Science.gov

Sample records for acute pyelonephritis apn

  1. Acute pyelonephritis in children.

    PubMed

    Morello, William; La Scola, Claudio; Alberici, Irene; Montini, Giovanni

    2016-08-01

    Acute pyelonephritis is one of the most serious bacterial illnesses during childhood. Escherichia coli is responsible in most cases, however other organisms including Klebsiella, Enterococcus, Enterobacter, Proteus, and Pseudomonas species are being more frequently isolated. In infants, who are at major risk of complications such as sepsis and meningitis, symptoms are ambiguous and fever is not always useful in identifying those at high risk. A diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis is initially made on the basis of urinalysis; dipstick tests for nitrites and/or leukocyte esterase are the most accurate indicators of infection. Collecting a viable urine sample for urine culture using clean voided methods is feasible, even in young children. No gold standard antibiotic treatment exists. In children appearing well, oral therapy and outpatient care is possible. New guidelines suggest less aggressive imaging strategies after a first infection, reducing radiation exposure and costs. The efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis in preventing recurrence is still a matter of debate and the risk of antibiotic resistance is a warning against its widespread use. Well-performed randomized controlled trials are required in order to better define both the imaging strategies and medical options aimed at preserving long-term renal function. PMID:26238274

  2. [Radionuclide diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis].

    PubMed

    Mil'ko, V I; Moskalenko, N I; Tikhonenko, E P

    1986-01-01

    Nephroscintigraphy using a 67Ga-citrate complex and 99mTc-pyrophosphate was performed in 88 patients with acute pyelonephritis. Nuclide hyperfixation was revealed in 97.8% of the cases. Three groups of patients were singled out on the basis of the intensity of incorporation and nature of the distribution of the radiopharmaceuticals (RP) in the kidneys. In the 1st group the RP incorporation was insignificant but higher than normal values; the RP distribution in the affected kidney was diffuse-inhomogenous. These changes were considered to be typical of acute serous pyelonephritis. In the 2nd and 3rd groups a sharp rise of the RP accumulation was noted, being typical of acute purulent pyelonephritis. One could distinguish between diffuse and focal lesions by the picture of the RP distribution in the renal parenchyma. Diuresis stimulation made it possible to differentiate an actual nuclide fixation during inflammation from nuclide mechanical retention as a result of urine outflow disorder. According to the authors, both radiopharmaceuticals could be applied for the diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis as well as for differential diagnosis of various forms of the disease. PMID:3001474

  3. Acute pyelonephritis can have serious complications.

    PubMed

    Shields, Joanne; Maxwell, Alexander P

    2010-04-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) may predominantly involve the lower urinary tract, i.e. acute cystitis, or upper urinary tract consisting of the renal pelvis and kidney,, i.e. acute pyelonephritis The incidence of acute pyelonephritis is higher in young women than in men but the incidence in men over 65 is similar to that in older women. Women have up to a 10% risk of recurrent acute pyelonephritis in the year following a first acute episode. The equivalent risk in men is 6%. Acute pyelonephritis may be uncomplicated and resolve without serious sequelae. A minority of episodes may be complicated by acute kidney injury, papillary necrosis, renal or perinephric abscess or the development of emphysematous pyelonephritis. Acute pyelonephritis is generally caused by microorganisms ascending from the urethra via the bladder into the upper urinary tract. Rarely the kidney may be seeded by blood-borne infection. Ecoli is the most common uropathogen causing pyelonephritis accounting for 70-90% of infections. Species of Enterococci, Klebsiella, Pseudomonas, Proteus and Staphylococci are responsible for the remaining infections. There is a rising incidence in the community of UTI with bacteria that produce extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) enzymes. These ESBL bacteria have developed resistance to antibiotics such as penicillin, cephalosporins and increasingly to quinolones. Risk factors for uncomplicated acute pyelonephritis include recent sexual intercourse, acute cystitis, stress incontinence and diabetes and for complicated acute pyelonephritis include pregnancy, diabetes, anatomical abnormalities of the urinary tract and renal calculi. PMID:20486480

  4. [Bacteriostatic shock in acute purulent pyelonephritis].

    PubMed

    Arbuliev, M G; Arbuliev, K M; Gadzhiev, D P

    2002-01-01

    Fifty-seven patients with acute purulent pyelonephritis (APP) complicated by bacteriotoxic shock (BTS) were treated in Daghestan Medical Academy's urological clinic from 1982 to 1999. The condition was primarily caused by acute occlusion of the urinary tracts. The first step of the treatment was aimed at the recovery of normal hemodynamics. As early as the first hours of BTS, plasma- and hemosorption, hemodialysis, hemodialysis were made. If the patients got better, they were operated to remove the obstruction for urine flow (epicystostomy, nephrostomy). 28 recent cases received adjuvant laser therapy--irradiation of the cavitary renal system and blood. This was performed via light guide inserted into the renal pelvis through the nephrostomic drainage. The guide was connected with the He-Ne optic quantum generator AFL-1. Laser procedure lasted for 8-12 min, a course consisted of 7-8 procedures. Later, laser beam was also directed to the biologically active points corresponding to pyelonephritis. Normalization of renal function and T, B immunity was faster in patients exposed to laser radiation. Lethality in this group was lower. PMID:12180052

  5. Association between Elevated Alanine Aminotransferase and Urosepsis in Children with Acute Pyelonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dongwan; Lee, Sung Hyun; Ryoo, Eell; Cho, Hye Kyung; Kim, Yun Mi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to investigate the association between elevated alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and urosepsis in children with acute pyelonephritis (APN). Methods We retrospectively identified all children who were managed in our hospital with APN during a decade period. In our study a diagnosis of APN was defined as having a positive urine culture and a positive (99m)Tc-dimercaptosuccinic acid scintigraphy. We compared those with elevated ALT and those with normal ALT according to the following variables: age, gender, duration of fever prior to admission, presence of hypotension, C-reactive protein (CRP), creatinine, presence of anemia, white blood cells count, platelet count, blood culture result, and grades of vesicoureteral reflux. In addition, the correlation between elevated ALT and positive blood culture was analyzed in detail. Results A total of 996 children were diagnosed with APN, of which 883 were included in the study. ALT was elevated in 81 children (9.2%). In the analysis of demographic characteristics, the number of children with elevated ALT was higher in children between 0 to 3 months, boys, and in those with positive blood culture (p=0.002, 0.036, and 0.010, respectively). In multivariate analysis of variables associated with positive blood culture, age younger than 3 months, elevated ALT, elevated CRP, and elevated creatinine showed statistical significance (p=0.004, 0.030, 0.043, and 0.044, respectively). Conclusion Our study demonstrates the association between elevated ALT and increased prevalence of urosepsis in addition to elevated CRP, elevated creatinine, and age younger than 3 months in children with APN. PMID:27066449

  6. Segmentation of acute pyelonephritis area on kidney SPECT images using binary shape analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chia-Hsiang; Sun, Yung-Nien; Chiu, Nan-Tsing

    1999-05-01

    Acute pyelonephritis is a serious disease in children that may result in irreversible renal scarring. The ability to localize the site of urinary tract infection and the extent of acute pyelonephritis has considerable clinical importance. In this paper, we are devoted to segment the acute pyelonephritis area from kidney SPECT images. A two-step algorithm is proposed. First, the original images are translated into binary versions by automatic thresholding. Then the acute pyelonephritis areas are located by finding convex deficiencies in the obtained binary images. This work gives important diagnosis information for physicians and improves the quality of medical care for children acute pyelonephritis disease.

  7. Comparison of computed tomography findings between bacteremic and non-bacteremic acute pyelonephritis due to Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Seon Jung; Je, Bo-Kyung; Lee, Seung Hwa; Choi, Won Seok; Hong, Doran; Kim, Sung-Bum

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To identify computed tomography (CT) findings that are associated with the presence of bacteremia in patients with acute pyelonephritis (APN) due to Escherichia coli (E. coli). METHODS: The clinical data and contrast-enhanced CT findings of 128 patients who were diagnosed with APN due to E. coli and showed renal abnormality on contrast-enhanced CT between January 2003 and November 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. The patients were divided into two groups according to the presence of bacteremia: The bacteremia group and the non-bacteremia group. The abnormality on contrast-enhanced CT were categorized into 5 renal and 4 extrarenal CT findings and compared between the two groups using the χ2 test and multivariate logistic regression. RESULTS: Among the 128 patients, 34 patients (26.6%) were classified into the bacteremia group and 94 patients (73.4%) into the non-bacteremia group. There was no statistically significant difference in gender between the two groups (P = 0.09), but the age of the patients in the bacteremia group was higher than that of the patients in the non-bacteremia group (P < 0.01). Compared to the non-bacteremia group, 1 renal CT finding such as urothelial thickening and 3 extrarenal CT findings such as diffuse peritoneal thickening, cystitis and pulmonary congestion were more frequently observed in the bacteremia group with statistical significance. The logistic regression analysis revealed that CT findings, including urothelial thickening, diffuse peritoneal thickening, cystitis and pulmonary congestion were suggested as the predictive CT findings of bacteremic APN. CONCLUSION: On CT, urothelial thickening, diffuse peritoneal thickening, cystitis, and pulmonary congestion are more frequently observed in patients with bacteremic APN due to E. coli. PMID:27158427

  8. The combination of urinary IL - 6 and renal biometry as useful diagnostic tools to differentiate acute pyelonephritis from lower urinary tract infection

    PubMed Central

    Azab, Sherif; Zakaria, Mostafa; Raafat, Mona; Seief, Hadeel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the role of renal ultrasound (RUS) and urinary IL-6 in the differentiation between acute pyelonephritis (APN) and lower urinary tract infection (LUTI). Patients and methods: This prospective study was carried out at the Pediatric and urology outpatient and inpatient departments of Cairo University Children's Hospital as well as October 6 University Hospital and it included 155 children between one month and fourteen years old with positive culture UTI. Patients were categorized into APN and LUTI based on their clinical features and laboratory parameters. Thirty healthy children, age and sex matched constituted the control group. Children with positive urine cultures were treated with appropriate antibiotics. Before treatment, urinary IL-6 was measured by enzyme immunoassay technique (ELISA), and renal ultrasound (RUS) was done. CRP (C-reactive protein), IL-6 and RUS were repeated on the 14th day of antibiotic treatment to evaluate the changes in their levels in response to treatment. Results: UIL-6 levels were more significantly higher in patients with APN than in patients with LUTI (24.3±19.3pg/mL for APN vs. 7.3±2.7pg/mL in LUTI (95% CI: 2.6-27.4; p<0.01). Similarly, serum CRP was more significantly higher in patients with APN than in children with LUTI (19.7±9.1μg/mL vs. 5.5±2.3μg/mL (p<0.01). IL-6 levels >20pg/mL and serum CRP >20μg/mL were highly reliable markers of APN. Mean renal volume and mean volume difference between the two kidneys in the APN group were more than that of the LUTI and control groups (P<0.001). Renal volume between 120-130% of normal was the best for differentiating APN from LUTI. Conclusions: RUS and urinary IL-6 levels have a highly dependable role in the differentiation between APN and LUTI especially in places where other investigations are not available and/ or affordable. PMID:27564295

  9. [Ampicillin pharmacokinetics in pregnant women with acute pyelonephritis].

    PubMed

    Akhtamova, Z M; Kholodov, L E; Dorokhov, V V; Gurtovoĭ, B L

    1985-03-01

    The pharmacokinetics of ampicillin was studied in 38 patients with acute pyelonephritis in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy after the first and the last (28th-32nd) intramuscular injections of the antibiotic. The ampicillin levels in the blood and urine were determined with the agar diffusion method. The pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated in a one-compartmental model by computer The ampicillin levels in the blood and urine of the patients did not practically differ at all the investigation periods (0.5-6 hours after the antibiotic administration) in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. During the treatment, the rate of ampicillin elimination from the host increased and the period of half-elimination from the blood decreased. The antibiotic levels in the urine within 4-6 hours after the last injection were practically lower in the second trimester of pregnancy as compared with the second trimester. The therapy resulted in an increase in the antibiotic renal clearance, which returned to normal in the second trimester of pregnancy and remained under normal in the third trimester of pregnancy. The increase was due to an approximately 2-fold acceleration of the rate of ampicillin secretion by the renal tubules. The total clearance of ampicillin practically increased in the second trimester of pregnancy and remained decreased in the third trimester of pregnancy. The estimation performed in accordance with the Krueger-Timmer principles on the basis of the characteristic features of the pharmacokinetics of ampicillin shown in the study provides recommendation of the following scheme for pyelonephritis treatment in pregnant women: 500 mg of ampicillin injected intramuscularly every 6 hours followed by gradual decreasing of the intervals between the injections to 4 hours as the rate of ampicillin elimination increases. PMID:4015063

  10. [Etiology of acute and chronic pyelonephritis in children in Khabarovsk region].

    PubMed

    Kozlova, E A; Kholodok, G N; Alekseeva, I N; Kozlov, V K

    2008-01-01

    Microflora of urinary tract was studied in 419 children aged 1 - 17 years and hospitalized due to acute or chronic pyelonephritis. Etiology of inflammatory process was established in 57.8% of cases. According to our study, etiologic structure of causative agents of pyelonephritis did not differ from all-Russian data. The leading positions belonged to Gram-negative microorganisms from Enterobacteriaceae family: Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, and Klebsiella spp. Results of the study point to high susceptibility of main causative agents of pyelonephritis to cephalosporins, aminoglycosides, and fluoroquinolones. High resistance to aminopenicillines was noted. In several isolates from Enterobacteriaceae family significant resistance to nalidixic acid and furazidin was observed. PMID:18595469

  11. Reverse kinetics of angiopoietin-2 and endotoxins in acute pyelonephritis: Implications for anti-inflammatory treatment?

    PubMed

    Safioleas, Konstantinos; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J; Carrer, Dionyssia-Pinelopi; Pistiki, Aikaterini; Sabracos, Lambros; Deliveliotis, Charalambos; Chrisofos, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Based on former studies showing an antagonism between angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) and bacterial endotoxins (LPS), we investigated the role of Ang-2 as immunomodulatory treatment. At first, kinetics of circulating LPS in Gram-negative pyelonephritis developing after urinary obstruction was studied. Serum LPS, interleukin (IL)-6 and Ang-2 were measured in 25 patients with acute pyelonephritis and sepsis before and after removal of the obstruction performed either with insertion of a pigtail catheter (n=12) or percutaneous drainage (n=13). At a second stage, Ang-2 was given as anti-inflammatory treatment in 40 rabbits one hour after induction of acute pyelonephritis by ligation of the ureter at the level of pelvo-ureteral junction and upstream bacterial inoculation. Survival was recorded; blood mononuclear cells were isolated and stimulated for the production of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα). The decrease in circulating LPS was significantly greater among patients undergoing drainage than pigtail insertion. This was accompanied by reciprocal changes of Ang-2 and IL-6. Treatment with Ang-2 prolonged survival from Escherichia coli pyelonephritis despite high levels of circulating LPS. When Ang-2 was given as treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pyelonephritis, sepsis-induced decrease of TNFα production by circulating mononuclear cells was reversed without an effect on tissue bacterial overgrowth. It is concluded that Ang-2 and LPS follow reverse kinetics in acute pyelonephritis. When given as experimental treatment, Ang-2 prolongs survival through an effect on mononuclear cells. PMID:26844659

  12. [The effect of endovascular helium-neon laser therapy on the immune status of patients with acute calculous pyelonephritis].

    PubMed

    Siniukhin, V N; Ianenko, E K; Safanov, R M; Khamaganova, E G; Borisik, V I

    1996-01-01

    Cellular immunity was assessed in 48 patients with acute calculous pyelonephritis exposed to intravenous He-Ne laser therapy. It was found that endovascular He-Ne laser therapy in the study regimens corrects immunological abnormalities arising in acute calculous pyelonephritis. PMID:9036617

  13. Acute pyelonephritis and secondary bacteraemia caused by Veillonella during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Yagihashi, Yusuke; Arakaki, Yoshitaka

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of pyelonephritis and secondary bacteraemia caused by Veillonella species during pregnancy. Veillonella is part of the normal flora from the oral cavity, gut and vagina. However, because Veillonella is usually isolated from cultures of clinical specimens as part of commensal flora, it is frequently regarded as a contaminant. In the present case, Veillonella was isolated from the patient's urine and blood samples that showed evidence of pyelonephritis and secondary bacteraemia. We found that ureteral stenting is an extremely effective therapeutic option for pregnant woman with hydronephrosis and clear signs and symptoms of urosepsis. PMID:23125301

  14. Acute pyelonephritis and secondary bacteraemia caused by Veillonella during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Yagihashi, Yusuke; Arakaki, Yoshitaka

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of pyelonephritis and secondary bacteraemia caused by Veillonella species during pregnancy. Veillonella is part of the normal flora from the oral cavity, gut and vagina. However, because Veillonella is usually isolated from cultures of clinical specimens as part of commensal flora, it is frequently regarded as a contaminant. In the present case, Veillonella was isolated from the patient's urine and blood samples that showed evidence of pyelonephritis and secondary bacteraemia. We found that ureteral stenting is an extremely effective therapeutic option for pregnant woman with hydronephrosis and clear signs and symptoms of urosepsis. PMID:23125301

  15. Maternal serum soluble CD30 is increased in pregnancies complicated with acute Pyelonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Romero, Roberto; Espinoza, Jimmy; Gotsch, Francesca; Edwin, Samuel; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Mittal, Pooja; Soto, Eleazar; Erez, Offer; Mazaki-Tovi, Shali; Than, Nandor Gabor; Friel, Lara; Yoon, Bo Hyun; Mazor, Moshe; Hassan, Sonia

    2007-01-01

    Objectives Normal pregnancy is characterized by activation of the innate immunity and suppression of the adaptive limb of the immune response. However, pregnant women are more susceptible to the effects of infection and microbial products than non-pregnant women. CD30 is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily and is preferentially expressed by activated T cells producing Th2-type cytokines. Its soluble form (sCD30) is proposed to be an index of Th2 immune response. High serum concentrations of sCD30 have been found in the acute phase of viral infections, such as HIV-1 and hepatitis B. There is, however, conflicting evidence about serum sCD30 concentration in patients with bacterial infections. The objective of this study was to determine whether there are changes in the serum concentration of sCD30 in pregnant women with pyelonephritis. Methods This cross-sectional study included normal pregnant women (N=89) and pregnant women with pyelonephritis (N=41). Maternal serum concentration of sCD30 was measured by a specific and sensitive enzyme-linked immunoassay. Non-parametric tests were used for comparisons. A p value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results (1) Pregnant women with pyelonephritis had a significantly higher median serum concentration of sCD30 than those with a normal pregnancy (median: 44.3 U/ml, range: 16–352.5 vs. median: 29.7 U/ml, range: 12.2–313.2, respectively; p<0.001); and (2) No significant differences were found in the median maternal serum concentration of sCD30 between pregnant women with pyelonephritis who had a positive blood culture compared to those with a negative blood culture (median:47.7 U/mL, range: 17.1–118.8 vs. median: 42.6 U/mL, range: 16–352.5, respectively; p=0.86). Conclusions Acute pyelonephritis during pregnancy is associated with a higher maternal serum concentration of sCD30 than normal pregnancy. This finding is novel, and suggests that pregnant women with pyelonephritis may

  16. Pyelonephritis and obstructive uropathy: a case of acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Ashmore, Adam Edward; Thompson, Christopher James

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a man in his late 50s with a history of metastatic prostate carcinoma requiring bilateral ureteric stenting. He was admitted with increasing confusion and lethargy. He was diagnosed with sepsis and an acute kidney injury (AKI). Clinical suspicions of an obstructive component to his AKI were not confirmed by an ultrasound scan, which showed a unilateral hydronephrosis unchanged from a scan 1 month previously. A nephrostomy was performed, and frank pus aspirated. The patient's clinical state improved steadily thereafter. Patients who are dehydrated, or who have suffered from malignant or fibrotic processes affecting the retroperitoneum, may present with urinary obstruction without a corresponding increase in urinary tract dilation. Additionally, there must be a suspicion of pyonephrosis in a symptomatic patient with known hydronephrosis. Clinicians should be aware that clinical suspicions of urinary obstruction not demonstrated on ultrasound scanning require further investigation. PMID:26733429

  17. Procalcitonin implication in renal cell apoptosis induced by acute pyelonephritis in children

    PubMed Central

    Belhadj-Tahar, Hafid; Coulais, Yvon; Tafani, Mathieu; Bouissou, François

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this biomedical trial was to clarify the physiological role of procalcitonin (PCT) in renal parenchyma apoptosis and fibrosis caused by acute childhood pyelonephritis. This prospective study enrolled 183 children. All children were treated with bi-therapy according to the French consensus on acute pyelonephritis treatment dated November 16, 1990: intra-vascular administration of ceftriaxone 50 mg/kg/day and netromicine 7 mg/kg/day during the first 48 hours, followed by specific antibiotherapy suited to antibiogram. On admission, PCT, C-reactive protein, and phospholipase A2 were quantified in serum. Scintigraphy monitoring with 99mTc-DMSA was performed on day 4 and 9 months later, in the presence of persistent abnormalities. On day 4, 78% presented renal parenchyma alterations and 30% renal fibrosis 9 months after admission. Paradoxically, PCT level was significantly lower in the presence of renal fibrosis due to cell apoptosis (4.19 vs 7.59 μgL−1). A significant increase in PCT indicated favorable progress (recovery 7.55 vs aggravation 3.34) and no difference between recovery and improvement. This result suggests the protective effect of PCT against apoptosis by nitric oxide down-regulation. PMID:21694876

  18. Vitamin E administration at the onset of fever prevents renal scarring in acute pyelonephritis.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Zhina; Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad; Tajik, Parvin; Monajemzadeh, Maryam; Payabvash, Seyedmehdi; Elmi, Azadeh

    2008-09-01

    We evaluated the protective effects of antioxidant at the onset of fever on renal damage in a rat model of acute pyelonephritis. Twenty rats were allocated to four groups. In groups 1 to 3, the animals were given direct inoculation of Escherichia coli into the right kidney, and group four served as control. All rats in groups 1 to 3 were given once-daily intraperitoneal injections of ceftriaxon for five consecutive days, beginning on the third day after inoculation. The animals' body temperatures were monitored; as soon as body temperature reaches 38 degrees C, the rats in group 2 were given allopurinol co-treatment, whereas, in group 3, vitamin E co-treatment was started at fever onset. Both kidneys were excised 6 weeks later, for the evaluation of histopathologic changes, apoptotic damage, and concentrations of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). Only minimal changes were found in control samples. Pathologic scores of inflammation and fibrosis in group 1 were higher than in the vitamin E and allopurinol groups (P < 0.05). Apoptosis index was also decreased in groups 2 and 3, compared to group 1 (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in average TGF-beta levels between study groups. These findings suggest that administration of vitamin E or allopurinol following the onset of fever can reduce renal damage in pyelonephritis. PMID:18523811

  19. Contribution of Proteus mirabilis urease to persistence, urolithiasis, and acute pyelonephritis in a mouse model of ascending urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D E; Russell, R G; Lockatell, C V; Zulty, J C; Warren, J W; Mobley, H L

    1993-07-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a significant cause of bacteriuria and acute pyelonephritis in humans, produces urease. This high-molecular-weight, multimeric, cytoplasmic enzyme hydrolyzes urea to ammonia and carbon dioxide. To assess the role of urease in colonization, urolithiasis, and acute pyelonephritis in an animal model of ascending urinary tract infection, we compared a uropathogenic strain of P. mirabilis with its isogenic urease-negative mutant, containing an insertion mutation within ureC, the gene encoding the large subunit of the enzyme. Mice challenged transurethrally with the parent strain developed significant bacteriuria and urinary stones. The urease-negative mutant had a 50% infective dose of 2.7 x 10(9) CFU, a value more than 1,000-fold greater than that of the parent strain (2.2 x 10(6) CFU). The urease-positive parent strain reached significantly higher concentrations and persisted significantly longer in the bladder and kidney than did the mutant. Indeed, in the kidney, the parent strain increased in concentration while the mutant concentration fell so that, by 1 week, the parent strain concentration was 10(6) times that of the mutant. Similarly, the urease-positive parent produced significantly more severe renal pathology than the mutant. The initial abnormalities were in and around the pelvis and consisted of acute inflammation and epithelial necrosis. By 1 week, pyelitis was more severe, crystals were seen in the pelvis, and acute pyelonephritis, with acute interstitial inflammation, tubular epithelial cell necrosis, and in some cases abscesses, had developed. By 2 weeks, more animals had renal abscesses and radial bands of fibrosis. We conclude that the urease of P. mirabilis is a critical virulence determinant for colonization, urolithiasis, and severe acute pyelonephritis. PMID:8514376

  20. Activation of Endogenous Anti-Inflammatory Mediator Cyclic AMP Attenuates Acute Pyelonephritis in Mice Induced by Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yang; Li, Ke; Wang, Na; Cai, Gui-Dong; Zhang, Ting; Lin, Yan; Gui, Bao-Song; Liu, En-Qi; Li, Zong-Fang; Zhou, Wuding

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of pyelonephritis caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is not well understood. Here, we show that besides UPEC virulence, the severity of the host innate immune response and invasion of renal epithelial cells are important pathogenic factors. Activation of endogenous anti-inflammatory mediator cAMP significantly attenuated acute pyelonephritis in mice induced by UPEC. Administration of forskolin (a potent elevator of intracellular cAMP) reduced kidney infection (ie, bacterial load, tissue destruction); this was associated with attenuated local inflammation, as evidenced by the reduction of renal production of proinflammatory mediators, renal infiltration of inflammatory cells, and renal myeloperoxidase activity. In primary cell culture systems, forskolin not only down-regulated UPEC-stimulated production of proinflammatory mediators by renal tubular epithelial cells and inflammatory cells (eg, monocyte/macrophages) but also reduced bacterial internalization by renal tubular epithelial cells. Our findings clearly indicate that activation of endogenous anti-inflammatory mediator cAMP is beneficial for controlling UPEC-mediated acute pyelonephritis in mice. The beneficial effect can be explained at least in part by limiting excessive inflammatory responses through acting on both renal tubular epithelial cells and inflammatory cells and by inhibiting bacteria invasion of renal tubular epithelial cells. PMID:25478807

  1. Activation of endogenous anti-inflammatory mediator cyclic AMP attenuates acute pyelonephritis in mice induced by uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yang; Li, Ke; Wang, Na; Cai, Gui-Dong; Zhang, Ting; Lin, Yan; Gui, Bao-Song; Liu, En-Qi; Li, Zong-Fang; Zhou, Wuding

    2015-02-01

    The pathogenesis of pyelonephritis caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is not well understood. Here, we show that besides UPEC virulence, the severity of the host innate immune response and invasion of renal epithelial cells are important pathogenic factors. Activation of endogenous anti-inflammatory mediator cAMP significantly attenuated acute pyelonephritis in mice induced by UPEC. Administration of forskolin (a potent elevator of intracellular cAMP) reduced kidney infection (ie, bacterial load, tissue destruction); this was associated with attenuated local inflammation, as evidenced by the reduction of renal production of proinflammatory mediators, renal infiltration of inflammatory cells, and renal myeloperoxidase activity. In primary cell culture systems, forskolin not only down-regulated UPEC-stimulated production of proinflammatory mediators by renal tubular epithelial cells and inflammatory cells (eg, monocyte/macrophages) but also reduced bacterial internalization by renal tubular epithelial cells. Our findings clearly indicate that activation of endogenous anti-inflammatory mediator cAMP is beneficial for controlling UPEC-mediated acute pyelonephritis in mice. The beneficial effect can be explained at least in part by limiting excessive inflammatory responses through acting on both renal tubular epithelial cells and inflammatory cells and by inhibiting bacteria invasion of renal tubular epithelial cells. PMID:25478807

  2. Acute Pyelonephritis with Bacteremia Caused by Enterococcus hirae: A Rare Infection in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Pãosinho, Ana; Azevedo, Telma; Alves, João V.; Costa, Isabel A.; Carvalho, Gustavo; Peres, Susana R.; Baptista, Teresa; Borges, Fernando; Mansinho, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Enterococci are one of the usual residents of the microflora in humans. In the last decade this genus has been reported as the third most common cause of bacteremia. We present the case of a 78-year-old female who was admitted to the emergency room because of nausea, lipothymia, and weakness. She was diagnosed with a pyelonephritis with bacteremia, with the isolation in blood and urine cultures of Escherichia coli and Enterococcus hirae. This last microorganism is a rarely isolated pathogen in humans. Currently it is estimated to represent 1–3% of all enterococcal species isolated in clinical practice. PMID:27127665

  3. [The dynamic level of beta 2-microglobulin, the basic lipid peroxidation indices and middle molecules in the blood and urine in patients with acute calculous pyelonephritis against a background of endovascular helium-neon laser therapy].

    PubMed

    Safafov, R M; Ianenko, E K; Nikitinskaia, L P; Golovanov, S A; Drozhzheva, V V; Kon'kova, T A; Danilkov, A P

    1997-01-01

    The authors present the effect of intravenous He-Ne laser therapy on the changes in beta 2-microglobulin, lipid peroxidation, middle-size molecules in the blood and urine of patients with acute calculous pyelonephritis. Endovascular He-Ne laser therapy was found an effective treatment of acute calculous pyelonephritis. The authors propose to combine hemosorption with endovascular He-Ne laser radiation. PMID:9123656

  4. Xanthogranulomatous Pyelonephritis with Staghorn Calculus, Acute Gangrenous Appendicitis and Enterocolitis: A Multidisciplinary Challenge of Kidney-Preserving Conservative Therapy.

    PubMed

    Friedl, Alexander; Tuerk, Christian; Schima, Wolfgang; Broessner, Clemens

    2015-09-01

    Xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis (XP) is a rare form of pyelonephritis and without treatment destructive to the kidney. We describe a 74-year-old Caucasian immunocompetent female patient with XP and multiple abscesses on the upper pole of the right kidney and several impacted obstructing renal calculi in the middle calyx that developed severe colitis and gangrenous appendicitis during therapy. Proteus mirabilis was detected as the major pathogen in the urine culture. Kidney preserving therapy was carried out by intensive parenteral bacterial eradication, CT-guided abscess drainage and stone destruction by 3 sessions of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy under ureteral stenting. Large tumor masses in XP are often daunting and may lead to a nephrectomy. However, kidney-preserving therapy is possible and should be considered in non-septic patients or in case of a solitary kidney. PMID:26889137

  5. Xanthogranulomatous Pyelonephritis with Staghorn Calculus, Acute Gangrenous Appendicitis and Enterocolitis: A Multidisciplinary Challenge of Kidney-Preserving Conservative Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Friedl, Alexander; Tuerk, Christian; Schima, Wolfgang; Broessner, Clemens

    2015-01-01

    Xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis (XP) is a rare form of pyelonephritis and without treatment destructive to the kidney. We describe a 74-year-old Caucasian immunocompetent female patient with XP and multiple abscesses on the upper pole of the right kidney and several impacted obstructing renal calculi in the middle calyx that developed severe colitis and gangrenous appendicitis during therapy. Proteus mirabilis was detected as the major pathogen in the urine culture. Kidney preserving therapy was carried out by intensive parenteral bacterial eradication, CT-guided abscess drainage and stone destruction by 3 sessions of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy under ureteral stenting. Large tumor masses in XP are often daunting and may lead to a nephrectomy. However, kidney-preserving therapy is possible and should be considered in non-septic patients or in case of a solitary kidney. PMID:26889137

  6. Novel immunotherapeutic strategies for pyelonephritis.

    PubMed

    Tsaganos, Thomas; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J

    2016-01-01

    Acute pyelonephritis is an infection of the renal parenchyma and renal pelvis. When it is caused by a typical pathogen in an immunocompetent female patient with normal urinary tract, it is considered uncomplicated. In all other cases, sepsis is the most worrisome complication. In the event of sepsis, patients should be hospitalized and treated aggressively with antibiotics, intravenous fluids and agents that enhance the immune response of the host. In this review, we summarize findings from immunomodulatory interventions in experimental studies of acute pyelonephritis and the application of these interventions into clinical practice. Vaccine against bacterial virulence factors and agents aiming to modulate the immune response of the host belong to these interventions and they are discussed. PMID:26641200

  7. Ceftazidime-avibactam Versus Doripenem for the Treatment of Complicated Urinary Tract Infections, Including Acute Pyelonephritis: RECAPTURE, a Phase 3 Randomized Trial Program

    PubMed Central

    Wagenlehner, Florian M.; Sobel, Jack D.; Newell, Paul; Armstrong, Jon; Huang, Xiangning; Stone, Gregory G.; Yates, Katrina; Gasink, Leanne B.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The global emergence of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae highlights the urgent need to reduce carbapenem dependence. The phase 3 RECAPTURE program compared the efficacy and safety of ceftazidime-avibactam and doripenem in patients with complicated urinary tract infection (cUTI), including acute pyelonephritis. Methods. Hospitalized adults with suspected or microbiologically confirmed cUTI/acute pyelonephritis were randomized 1:1 to ceftazidime-avibactam 2000 mg/500 mg every 8 hours or doripenem 500 mg every 8 hours (doses adjusted for renal function), with possible oral antibiotic switch after ≥5 days (total treatment duration up to 10 days or 14 days for patients with bacteremia). Results. Of 1033 randomized patients, 393 and 417 treated with ceftazidime-avibactam and doripenem, respectively, were eligible for the primary efficacy analyses; 19.6% had ceftazidime-nonsusceptible baseline pathogens. Noninferiority of ceftazidime-avibactam vs doripenem was demonstrated for the US Food and Drug Administration co-primary endpoints of (1) patient-reported symptomatic resolution at day 5: 276 of 393 (70.2%) vs 276 of 417 (66.2%) patients (difference, 4.0% [95% confidence interval {CI}, −2.39% to 10.42%]); and (2) combined symptomatic resolution/microbiological eradication at test of cure (TOC): 280 of 393 (71.2%) vs 269 of 417 (64.5%) patients (difference, 6.7% [95% CI, .30% to 13.12%]). Microbiological eradication at TOC (European Medicines Agency primary endpoint) occurred in 304 of 393 (77.4%) ceftazidime-avibactam vs 296 of 417 (71.0%) doripenem patients (difference, 6.4% [95% CI, .33% to 12.36%]), demonstrating superiority at the 5% significance level. Both treatments showed similar efficacy against ceftazidime-nonsusceptible pathogens. Ceftazidime-avibactam had a safety profile consistent with that of ceftazidime alone. Conclusions. Ceftazidime-avibactam was highly effective for the empiric treatment of cUTI (including acute

  8. [Empiric treatment of pyelonephritis].

    PubMed

    Iarovoĭ, S K; Shimanovskiĭ, N L; Kareva, E N

    2011-01-01

    The article analyses the most typical clinical situations in empirical treatment of pyelonephritis including situations with comorbid severe diseases: decompensated diabetes mellitus, chronic renal failure, HIV-infection. Choice of antibacterial medicines for empiric treatment of pyelonephritis is based on the results of the latest studies of antibioticoresistance of pyelonephritis pathogens as well as on specific features of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of antibacterial drugs. PMID:21815461

  9. Incidentally detected emphysematous pyelonephritis.

    PubMed

    Swami, Yogesh Kumar; Singh, Dharam Vir; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar; Pradhan, Aditya; Rana, Yajvender P S; Harkar, Sandeep; Wani, M Shafi

    2012-01-01

    Emphysematous pyelonephritis (EP) is a rare, severe gas forming infection of renal parenchyma and its surrounding areas and potentially life threatening condition that requires prompt evaluation and treatment. Although it commonly present with a fulminant clinical picture of sepsis, relatively mild symptoms can also be encountered. To our knowledge, incidentally detected emphysematous pyelonephritis has not been reported so far. We report a case of EP that was incidentally detected during evaluation for diabetes. PMID:24578929

  10. Bilateral Emphysematous Pyelonephritis with Hepatic Portal Venous Gas: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Mao Li; Nording, Hasnizal; Lim, Chen Hong

    2015-01-01

    Emphysematous pyelonephritis is a rare life-threatening condition caused by a severe acute necrotising infection of the renal parenchyma and its perinephric tissues, and it is commonly seen in diabetic patients. There is a rare association between emphysematous pyelonephritis and hepatic portal venous gas. Hepatic portal venous gas is an uncommon radiological finding, which implies a significant underlying abdominal disease. The management of emphysematous pyelonephritis has evolved from prompt nephrectomy to medical therapy. In the present report, we present a case of a diabetic woman diagnosed with bilateral emphysematous pyelonephritis with hepatic portal venous gas that was successfully managed medically despite the presence of poor prognostic factors, such as acute renal failure and thrombocytopenia. PMID:26715900

  11. Structural, evolutionary and functional analysis of APN genes in the Lepidoptera Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ping; Cheng, Tingcai; Jin, Shengkai; Jiang, Liang; Wang, Chen; Xia, Qingyou

    2014-02-10

    Aminopeptidases N (APNs), the receptors of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxin in the lepidopteran midgut, are involved in the Bt pathogen infection mechanism. In the present work, we screened 102 APNs from SilkDB, ButterflyBase and MonarchBase; 16 APNs were identified from the silkworm (Bombyx mori) and 24 from the monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus). Syntenic and phylogenetic tree analysis showed that APN genes have developed multi-family genes before evolutionary divergence of the Lepidoptera. The tissue-expression pattern shows some BmAPNs are specifically or highly expressed in the midgut. Bacillus bombysepticus (Bb) is a specific pathogen of B. mori, leading to acute fuliginosa septicemia of the larva. BmAPNs were modulated by real time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis after Bb or Bt oral infection. There were different patterns of induced expression between Bb and Bt challenges, suggesting that B. mori has different responses to infection by the specific pathogen Bb and the nonspecific pathogen Bt. Research on BmAPNs will help us to better understand the evolutionary conservation and functions in Bb or Bt pathogen interaction with the host and to apply this knowledge in agricultural and forestry pest control. PMID:24286860

  12. [Diffuse xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis in childhood].

    PubMed

    Wagner, V U; Zwiauer, K; Balzar, E; Khoss, A; Ponhold, W; Latal, D; Ulrich, W

    1988-02-01

    Xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis is a rare disease and rare cause of suppurative proliferative pseudotumor in children. An accurate diagnosis is difficult because of its clinical, radiological, sonographical and pathologic-anatomical similarities to renal tuberculosis. After removing the diseased kidney the prognosis is excellent. A 6-year old boy with xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis is reported. PMID:3130731

  13. A Rare Case of Pneumoureter: Emphysematous Pyelitis versus Emphysematous Pyelonephritis.

    PubMed

    Hiremath, Rudresh; Mahesh; Padala, Krishna Prasanthi; Swamy, Kumar; Pailoor, Aruna

    2015-11-01

    Emphysematous pyelitis is a rare benign entity which is defined as isolated gas production in the pelvicalyceal system, ureters or in the urinary bladder as a consequence of acute bacterial renal infection. In this case report we present a case with no prior medical history of diabetes or urinary obstruction who presented with uncontrolled hyperglycaemia for the first time associated with emphysematous pyelonephritis. Further, the imaging differences between emphysematous pyelonephritis (EPN) and emphysematous pyelitis (EP) has been discussed along with the approach and their management. PMID:26676155

  14. Immunopathological and antimicrobial effect of black pepper, ginger and thyme extracts on experimental model of acute hematogenous pyelonephritis in albino rats.

    PubMed

    Nassan, M A; Mohamed, E H

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies showed prominent antimicrobial activity of various plant extracts on certain pathogenic microorganisms, therefore we prepared crude aqueous extracts of black pepper, ginger and thyme and carried out an in vitro study by measuring antimicrobial activity of these extracts using the agar well diffusion method. An in vivo study was carried out on 50 adult healthy male albino rats which were divided into 5 groups, 10 rats each. Group 1: negative control group which received saline solution intragastrically daily; Group 2: Positive control group, injected with mixed bacterial suspension of S.aureus and E.coli as a model of pyelonephritis, then received saline solution intragastrically daily; Group 3: injected with the same dose of mixed bacterial suspension, then received 100 mg/kg/day black pepper extract intragastrically; Group 4: injected with mixed bacterial suspension then received 500 mg/kg/day ginger extract intragastrically. Group 5: injected with mixed bacterial suspension then received 500 mg/kg/day thyme extract intragastrically. All groups were sacrificed after either 1 or 4 weeks. Serum and blood samples were collected for lysozyme activity estimation using agarose lysoplate, measurement of nitric oxide production, and lymphocyte transformation test as well as for counting both total and differential leukocytes and erythrocytes. Kidney samples were tested histopathologically. Both in vivo and in vitro results confirm the efficacy of these extracts as natural antimicrobials and suggest the possibility of using them in treatment procedures. PMID:25572733

  15. Pyelonephritis (Kidney Infection) in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... F For More Information Urology Care Foundation MedlinePlus Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... Organizations​​ . (PDF, 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Pyelonephritis: Kidney Infection Page Content On this page: What is ...

  16. Measuring appropriate use of antibiotics in pyelonephritis in Belgian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Camberlin, Cécile; Ramaekers, Dirk

    2009-05-01

    Inappropriate use of antibiotics can induce antibiotic resistance, treatment failure, increased costs and even mortality. We developed a methodology for measuring guideline compliance of hospital antibiotic prescriptions in community-acquired acute pyelonephritis in Belgium. The claims and clinical data of all Belgian hospitalizations for community-acquired acute pyelonephritis were extracted from a nationwide administrative database. In a clinically homogeneous subset of patients, the percentage of patients who received a guideline-compliant prescription was calculated according to prescription guidelines disseminated in Belgium. In the group of non-pregnant adult female patients, 31% of the prescriptions were not in strict compliance with the guideline. Interhospital variability ranged from 0% to 100% compliance. We conclude that administrative databases can be used to analyze antibiotic prescription behavior in hospitals for homogeneous and clinically relevant patient groups. The interhospital variability observed in Belgian hospitals indicate that there is a clear room for improvement. PMID:19157631

  17. Cellular basis of host defence in pyelonephritis. III. Deletion of individual components.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, T. E.; Findon, G.; Cawley, S.

    1987-01-01

    Hosts were depleted of individual cellular components to determine the effects of these manipulations on cellular defence mechanisms in acute and chronic pyelonephritis. T-lymphocytes were found to have little or no involvement in host protection but cyclosporin A administration had a dramatic effect on the gross pathology and bacteriological status of experimentally induced pyelonephritis. This change represented a major depression of host defence status. Cyclosporin A also activated resolved lesions in chronic pyelonephritis, associated with an increase in bacterial numbers. Administration of antineutrophil serum also led to a 1000-fold increase in bacterial numbers in the acute phase but had little effect on the host-parasite balance in chronic pyelonephritis. Macrophage blockade, on the other hand, did not affect the course of either acute or chronic infection. These studies have provided additional information on the immunobiology of experimental pyelonephritis and have focussed attention on the role of neutrophils, and an unidentified mechanism, affected by cyclosporin A, in host defence to renal infection. PMID:3040066

  18. LOW CIRCULATING MATERNAL ADIPONECTIN IN PATIENTS WITH PYELONEPHRITIS: ADIPONECTIN AT THE CROSSROADS OF PREGNANCY AND INFECTION

    PubMed Central

    Mazaki-Tovi, Shali; Romero, Roberto; Vaisbuch, Edi; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Erez, Offer; Mittal, Pooja; Kim, Sun Kwon; Gotsch, Francesca; Lamont, Ronald; Ogge, Giovanna; Pacora, Percy; Goncalves, Luis; Kim, Chong Jai; Gomez, Ricardo; Espinoza, Jimmy; Hassan, Sonia S.; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro

    2009-01-01

    Objective An emerging theme in modern biology is that adipose tissue can respond to metabolic stress, and to inflammatory stimuli, by regulating the secretion of a complex network of soluble mediators, termed adipokines. Adiponectin, the most prevalent circulating adipokine in human, has profound insulin-sensitizing and anti-inflammatory properties. Indeed, the notion that adiponectin plays an important role in the interactions between the metabolic and the immune systems has been strongly suggested. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine if pyelonephritis during pregnancy is associated with changes in maternal serum adiponectin concentrations. Study design This cross-sectional study included women in the following groups: 1) normal pregnant women (n=200); and 2) pregnant women with pyelonephritis (n=50). Maternal plasma adiponectin concentrations were determined by ELISA. Non-parametric statistics were used for analyses. Results 1) The median maternal plasma adiponectin concentration was lower in patients with pyelonephritis than in those with a normal pregnancy (p<0.001); 2) among pregnant women with a normal weight, patients with pyelonephritis had a lower median plasma adiponectin concentration than those with a normal pregnancy (p<0.001); 3) similarly, among overweight/obese patients, those with pyelonephritis had a lower median plasma adiponectin concentration than those with a normal pregnancy (p<0.001); and 4) the presence of pyelonephritis was independently associated with maternal plasma adiponectin concentrations after adjustment for maternal age, smoking, gestational age at sampling, and pre-gestational BMI. Conclusion 1) The findings that acute pyelonephritis in pregnancy is characterized by low maternal plasma concentrations of adiponectin in both lean and overweight/obese patients are novel and concur with the anti-inflammatory properties of adiponectin; and 2) the results of this study support the notion that adiponectin may play a role in the

  19. Xanthogranulomatous Pyelonephritis Associated with Hepatic Dysfunction in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, L.; Oliveira, C.; Cruz, C.; Pacheco, A.

    2015-01-01

    Xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis is a rare disease characterised by the replacement of normal renal parenchyma by foamy macrophages. The only treatment for this type of pyelonephritis is of a surgical nature with partial or total nephrectomy. The occurrence of xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis during pregnancy is a rare event (with only 6 cases described in the literature). We report a case of xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis in a 32-week pregnant woman associated with hepatic dysfunction. PMID:26078894

  20. Pyelonephritis and Bacteremia from Lactobacillus delbrueckii

    PubMed Central

    DuPrey, Kevin M.; McCrea, Leon; Rabinowitch, Bonnie L.; Azad, Kamran N.

    2012-01-01

    Lactobacilli are normal colonizers of the oropharynx, gastrointestinal tract, and vagina. Infection is rare, but has been reported in individuals with predisposing conditions. Here we describe the case of a woman with pyelonephritis and bacteremia in which Lactobacillus delbrueckii was determined to be the causative agent. PMID:23056967

  1. Case of emphysematous pyelonephritis in kidney allograft: Conservative treatment

    PubMed Central

    Tienza, Antonio; Hevia, Mateo; Merino, Imanol; Velis, Jose Maria; Algarra, Ruben; Pascual, Juan Ignacio; Zudaire, Juan Javier; Robles, Jose Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Emphysematous pyelonephritis is an acute necrotizing infection with gas in the kidney and perinephric space that carries a bad prognosis. Apart from its predisposing clinical entities, diabetes mellitus and immune-incompetence are quite common in patients with this infection. We report a case of a 53-year-old kidney transplant recipient diabetic male, suffering from recurrent fever, abdominal pain and nausea episodes. Immediate broad-spectrum antibiotics were administered and percutaneous drainage was performed after the diagnosis. The bacteria involved were Stahpylococcus epidermidis and Escherichia coli. After 4 weeks of antibiotic treatment and abscesses drainage, the case was resolved. Consecutives urine cultures and ultrasonographies confirm the complete resolution of the disease. We discuss the predisposing factors, clinical presentation and management. PMID:24839494

  2. Pyelonephritis Caused Solely by Escherichia hermanii

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Yan Qing; Xin, Bing; Sun, Shu Qing

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In contrast with Escherichia coli, the association of E. hermanii with urinary tract infections has not been described. Case Presentation: In this case, E. hermanii was the sole isolate recovered from urine specimens of a pyelonephritis patient. The organism was found to be susceptible to piperacillin-tazobactam, ceftazidime, cefazolin, cefixime, aztreonam, gentamicin, tobramycin, imipenem, meropenem and amikacin, and resistant to amoxicillin. Antibiotic treatment was initiated with oral cefixime (400 mg every 24 hours). The symptoms were relieved within 72 hours after therapy. A urine sample was taken seven days after antibiotic therapy. E. hermanii was no longer isolated. Discussion: The present case demonstrates that the uropathogenic E. hermanii clone can cause destruction of the kidneys. During asymptomatic bacteriuria or cystitis, the bacteria remain in the urinary tract. Even when pyelonephritis develops, inflammatory response of the host is still restricted to the urinary tract. These signs mean that uropathogenic E. hermanii may be not very virulent. PMID:25147714

  3. Emphysematous Pyelonephritis in a Transplant Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Salehipour, M.; Roozbeh, J.; Rasekhi, A. R.; Afrasiabi, M. A.; Rezaee, H.; Izadpanah, K.; Malek-Hosseini, S. A.

    2010-01-01

    Emphysematous pyelonephritis (EPN) is a severe necrotizing infection of the kidney and its surrounding tissues. It is characterized by the production of gas within the kidney and perinephric structures. EPN often affects diabetic women but can also occur in nondiabetic patients who have ureteral obstruction and in immunocompromised patients. Herein, we report EPN in a 23-year-old woman who had a renal transplantation. PMID:25013564

  4. Double J stenting: A rewarding option in the management of emphysematous pyelonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Das, Debiprasad; Pal, Dilip Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Context: Emphysematous pyelonephritis (EPN) is an acute necrotizing inflammation of renal parenchyma and peri-nephric tissue characterized by gas formation. In this study, we evaluated the outcome of EPN cases by medical management with or without renal decompression. Materials and Methods: We have observed prospectively 15 cases of EPN admitted in our institute in respect to age, sex, mode of presentation, presence of comorbidity, laboratory profile, urine-analysis, and outcome after medical management and drainage procedures. Results: All patients improved on medical management and drainage procedure such as JJ stenting and percutaneous nephrostomy. No mortality noted in our 15 cases of EPN. Conclusion: Emphysematous pyelonephritis can be managed conservatively by DJ stenting, wcich is a less morbid procedure or percutaneous nephrostomy with proper antibiotics and adequate glycemic control. PMID:27453644

  5. Molecular characterization and dietary regulation of aminopeptidase N (APN) in the grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    PubMed

    Tang, Jianzhou; Qu, Fufa; Tang, Xiangbei; Zhao, Qiong; Wang, Yonghong; Zhou, Yi; Feng, Junchang; Lu, Shuangqing; Hou, Dexing; Liu, Zhen

    2016-05-10

    Aminopeptidase N (APN) is a member of the peptidase M1 family and plays an important role in protein digestion. In the present study, an APN gene was cloned from the intestine of Ctenopharyngodon idellus. The full-length cDNA sequence of APN encodes an 892-amino-acid peptide that includes one helix trans-membrane region. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the APN sequence clustered with Danio rerio as its closest neighbor, sharing a sequence similarity of 81.5%. APN mRNA was differentially expressed in different tissues, with a gradient expression from high to low in the tissues of the fore-intestine, hind-intestine, liver, mid-intestine, kidney, muscle, spleen and heart. APN expression in grass carp had a circadian pattern, showing time-dependent higher expression between 06:00 and 18:00 and lower expression between 18:00 and 06:00. In addition, the protein levels and resource in the diet-regulated APN expression suggested that low crude protein (CP) level and fish meal stimulated APN gene expression. Furthermore, the mRNA expression of APN in the intestine was significantly suppressed by high concentrations of glutamine and glutamine dipeptides, respectively. This study may provide valuable knowledge on the regulation of APN expression in teleost, which has potential applications for improving fish dietary formulations. PMID:26828613

  6. Unusual Tc-99m MDP and I-123 MIBG images in focal pyelonephritis

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, A.; Lenoir, P.; Delree, M.; Ramet, J.; Piepsz, A. )

    1990-11-01

    A 6-year-old boy presented with an inflammatory syndrome. Because Tc-99m MDP bone scintigraphy revealed increased tracer uptake at the upper pole of the right kidney, further studies were oriented towards a diagnosis of renal or adrenal pathology. I-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) accumulated at the site of the abnormal MDP uptake. The diagnosis of neuroblastoma or allied disorder was excluded on the basis of other investigations and further evaluation, suggesting that the MIBG uptake was a false-positive. Findings on clinical imaging, laboratory findings, Tc-99m DMSA imaging, sonography, and CT scanning were highly suggestive of acute focal pyelonephritis.

  7. Escherichia coli 0157 enterohaemorrhagic colitis associated with pyelonephritis: CT findings.

    PubMed

    Heffernan, E; Chatur, N; Zwirewich, C

    2009-04-01

    Escherichia coli 0157:H7 is increasingly being recognized as a cause of infectious colitis, which typically results in bloody diarrhoea in an afebrile patient. The absence of fever often means that an infectious process is not considered in the differential diagnosis, particularly as this organism will not be detected in routine stool cultures. Inappropriate antibiotic therapy may increase the risk of development of haemolytic uraemic syndrome, a potentially fatal complication of this form of colitis, hence the importance of accurate diagnosis. On CT, it is characterized by severe diffuse colonic wall thickening, with little or no pericolic inflammatory changes. The radiologist may be the first to suspect the correct diagnosis and so should be aware of its imaging appearances. We report the case of a 19-year-old man who presented with typical radiological findings of enterohaemorrhagic colitis and whose CT also showed evidence of acute pyelonephritis; we suggest that this combination of abnormalities should further heighten radiologists' suspicions of infection due to E. coli 0157:H7, despite the absence of fever. PMID:19325040

  8. The Anopheles-midgut APN1 structure reveals a new malaria transmission-blocking vaccine epitope.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Sarah C; Armistead, Jennifer S; Mathias, Derrick K; Sandeu, Maurice M; Tao, Dingyin; Borhani-Dizaji, Nahid; Tarimo, Brian B; Morlais, Isabelle; Dinglasan, Rhoel R; Borg, Natalie A

    2015-07-01

    Mosquito-based malaria transmission-blocking vaccines (mTBVs) target midgut-surface antigens of the Plasmodium parasite's obligate vector, the Anopheles mosquito. The alanyl aminopeptidase N (AnAPN1) is the leading mTBV immunogen; however, AnAPN1's role in Plasmodium infection of the mosquito and how anti-AnAPN1 antibodies functionally block parasite transmission have remained elusive. Here we present the 2.65-Å crystal structure of AnAPN1 and the immunoreactivity and transmission-blocking profiles of three monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to AnAPN1, including mAb 4H5B7, which effectively blocks transmission of natural strains of Plasmodium falciparum. Using the AnAPN1 structure, we map the conformation-dependent 4H5B7 neoepitope to a previously uncharacterized region on domain 1 and further demonstrate that nonhuman-primate neoepitope-specific IgG also blocks parasite transmission. We discuss the prospect of a new biological function of AnAPN1 as a receptor for Plasmodium in the mosquito midgut and the implications for redesigning the AnAPN1 mTBV. PMID:26075520

  9. APN1 is a functional receptor of Cry1Ac but not Cry2Ab in Helicoverpa zea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lepidopteran midgut aminopeptidases N (APNs) are phylogenetically divided into eight clusters, designated as APN1-8. Although APN1 has been implicated as one of the receptors for Cry1Ac in several species, its potential role in the mode of action of Cry2Ab has not been functionally determined so fa...

  10. ApnI, a Transmembrane Protein Responsible for Subtilomycin Immunity, Unveils a Novel Model for Lantibiotic Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yun; Li, Cong-Zhi; Zhu, Yi-Guang; Wang, Peng-Xia; Qi, Qing-Dong; Fu, Jing-Jing; Peng, Dong-Hai; Ruan, Li-Fang

    2014-01-01

    Subtilomycin was detected from the plant endophytic strain Bacillus subtilis BSn5 and was first reported from B. subtilis strain MMA7. In this study, a gene cluster that has been proposed to be related to subtilomycin biosynthesis was isolated from the BSn5 genome and was experimentally validated by gene inactivation and heterologous expression. Comparison of the subtilomycin gene cluster with other verified related lantibiotic gene clusters revealed a particular organization of the genes apnI and apnT downstream of apnAPBC, which may be involved in subtilomycin immunity. Through analysis of expression of the apnI and/or apnT genes in the subtilomycin-sensitive strain CU1065 and inactivation of apnI and apnT in the producer strain BSn5, we showed that the single gene apnI, encoding a putative transmembrane protein, was responsible for subtilomycin immunity. To our knowledge, evidence for lantibiotic immunity that is solely dependent on a transmembrane protein is quite rare. Further bioinformatic analysis revealed the abundant presence of ApnI-like proteins that may be responsible for lantibiotic immunity in Bacillus and Paenibacillus. We cloned the paeI gene, encoding one such ApnI-like protein, into CU1065 and showed that it confers resistance to paenibacillin. However, no cross-resistance was detected between ApnI and PaeI, even though subtilomycin and paenibacillin share similar structures, suggesting that the protection provided by ApnI/ApnI-like proteins involves a specific-sequence recognition mechanism. Peptide release/binding assays indicated that the recombinant B. subtilis expressing apnI interacted with subtilomycin. Thus, ApnI represents a novel model for lantibiotic immunity that appears to be common. PMID:25085495

  11. NGR Tumor-Homing Peptides: Structural Requirements for Effective APN (CD13) Targeting.

    PubMed

    Graziadio, Alessandra; Zanda, Matteo; Frau, Simona; Fleming, Ian N; Musolino, Manuele; Dall'Angelo, Sergio; Baldassarre, Massimiliano; Piras, Monica

    2016-05-18

    Cyclic CNGRC (cCNGRC) peptides are very important targeting ligands for Aminopeptidase N (APN or CD13), which is overexpressed on the surface of many cancer cells. In this work we have (1) developed an efficient solid-phase synthesis and (2) tested on purified porcine APN and APN-expressing human cells two different classes of cCNGRC peptides: the first carrying a biotin affinity tag or a fluorescent tag attached to the carboxyl Arg-Cys-COOH terminus and the second with the tags attached to the amino H2N-Cys-Asn terminus. Carboxyl-terminus functionalized cCNGRC peptides 3, 6, and 8 showed good affinity for porcine APN and very good capacity to target and be internalized into APN-expressing cells. In contrast, amino-terminus functionalized cCNGRC peptides 4, 5, and 7 displayed significantly decreased affinity and targeting capacity. These results, which are in agreement with the recently reported X-ray structure of a cCNGRC peptide bound to APN showing important stabilizing interactions between the unprotected cCNGRC amino terminus and the APN active site, indicate that the carboxyl and not the amino-terminus of cCNGRC peptides should be used as a "handle" for the attachment of toxic payloads for therapy or isotopically labeled functions for imaging and nuclear medicine. PMID:27077642

  12. APN1 is a functional receptor of Cry1Ac but not Cry2Ab in Helicoverpa zea

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jizhen; Zhang, Min; Liang, Gemei; Wu, Kongming; Guo, Yuyuan; Ni, Xinzhi; Li, Xianchun

    2016-01-01

    Lepidopteran midgut aminopeptidases N (APNs) are phylogenetically divided into eight clusters, designated as APN1–8. Although APN1 has been implicated as one of the receptors for Cry1Ac in several species, its potential role in the mode of action of Cry2Ab has not been functionally determined so far. To test whether APN1 also acts as one of the receptors for Cry1Ac in Helicoverpa zea and even for Cry2Ab in this species, we conducted a gain of function analysis by heterologously expressing H. zea APN1 (HzAPN1) in the midgut and fat body cell lines of H. zea and the ovarian cell line of Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) and a loss of function analysis by RNAi (RNA interference) silencing of the endogenous APN1 in the three cell lines using the HzAPN1 double strand RNA (dsRNA). Heterologous expression of HzAPN1 significantly increased the susceptibility of the three cell lines to Cry1Ac, but had no effects on their susceptibility to Cry2Ab. Knocking down of the endogenous APN1 made the three cell lines resistant to Cry1Ac, but didn’t change cell lines susceptibility to Cry2Ab. The findings from this study demonstrate that HzAPN1 is a functional receptor of Cry1Ac, but not Cry2Ab. PMID:26755166

  13. Successful treatment of ctx-m ESBL producing Escherichia coli relapsing pyelonephritis with long term pivmecillinam.

    PubMed

    Nicolle, Lindsay E; Mulvey, Michael R

    2007-01-01

    Oral therapy options for pyelonephritis caused by ESBL producing E. coli are limited. We describe a woman with relapsing pyelonephritis due to a CTX-M ESBL E. coli who was cured with a prolonged course of pivmecillinam. This suggests pivmecillinam may be effective treatment for selected patients with pyelonephritis with these organisms. PMID:17654359

  14. [Obstructive pyelonephritis caused by ureteral orifice catheterization with a bladder catheter].

    PubMed

    Arnaud, P; Carpentier, X; Pedulla, F; Sandid, M; Pernin, F

    2014-12-01

    This article reports a rare case of acute pyelonephritis secondary to left ureteral obstruction by a bladder catheter. The patient was 93years old man hospitalized in the hospital emergency department with a 39°C fever and pyuria from an indwelling catheter. Blood test found hyperleukocytosis, inflammatory syndrome and acute renal failure. Diagnosis was confirmed by non-contrast abdominal CT scan showing distal part of the catheter inside left ureteral orifice with ureterohydronephrosis. Treatment consisted in replacing the catheter by a three-way catheter for irrigation and parenteral antibiotics therapy. Clinico-biological evolution was successful and a urinary tract CT scan could be realized at day 9. The left upper urinary tract function was recovered. With a short review of the literature we propose to describe the different procedures to manage those obstructions. PMID:25288585

  15. Recommended Initial Antimicrobial Therapy for Emphysematous Pyelonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yu-Chuan; Hong, Jian-Hua; Chiang, Bing-Juin; Pong, Yuan-Hung; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Huang, Chao-Yuan; Pu, Yeong-Shiau

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate the profiles of pathogens and patterns of antibiotic resistance of emphysematous pyelonephritis (EPN), offering recommendations for initial antibiotic treatment. Between January, 2001, and November, 2014, demographic data, presenting clinical features, management strategies, and treatment outcomes of 51 patients with EPN were retrospectively reviewed, analyzing microbiological characteristics of causative pathogens and patterns of antibiotic resistance. Overall survival rate was 90.2% (46/51). Pathogens isolated most frequently were Escherichia coli (49.0%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (19.6%), and Proteus mirabilis (17.7%). Approximately 24% of E coli isolates and 22% K pneumoniae isolates were resistant to fluoroquinolones. Improper empiric antibiotic use (P = 0.02) and third-generation cephalosporin-resistant pathogens (G3CRP) (P = 0.01) were significantly more common in cases of patient fatality. Prior hospitalization and antibiotic use within past year (P = 0.03), need for emergency hemodialysis (P = 0.03), and development of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) (P = 0.03) were factors correlating significantly with microbial resistance to third-generation cephalosporins. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.91. The cut-off point determined by the maximum Youden index for 2 of these 3 factors yielded a sensitivity of 0.8 and specificity of 0.93. Third-generation cephalosporins are recommended as initial treatment of EPN. In patients with histories of prior hospitalization and antibiotic use and in those needing emergency hemodialysis or developing DIC, carbapenem is the empiric antibiotic of choice. Patients presenting with 2 or more factors carry the highest risk of G3CRP involvement. Fluoroquinolone and gentamicin should be avoided. PMID:27227920

  16. The role of base excision repair genes OGG1, APN1 and APN2 in benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dione induced p53 mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Abedin, Zahidur; Louis-Juste, Melissa; Stangl, Melissa; Field, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is primarily caused by exposure to tobacco smoke. Tobacco smoke contains numerous carcinogens, including Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH). The most common PAH studied is benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P). B[a]P is metabolically activated through multiple routes, one of which is catalyzed by aldo-keto reductase (AKR) to B[a]P-7,8-dione (BPQ). BPQ undergoes a futile redox cycle in the presence of NADPH to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS, in turn, damages DNA. Studies with a yeast p53 mutagenesis system found that the generation of ROS by PAH o-quinones may contribute to lung carcinogenesis because of similarities between the patterns (types of mutations) and spectra (location of mutations) and those seen in lung cancer. The patterns were dominated by G to T transversions, and the spectra in the experimental system have mutations at lung cancer hotspots. To address repair mechanisms that are responsible for BPQ induced damage we observed the effect of mutating two DNA repair genes OGG1 and APE1 (APN1 in yeast) and tested them in a yeast reporter system for p53 mutagenesis. There was an increase in both the mutant frequency and the number of G:C/T:A transversions in p53 treated with BPQ in ogg1 yeast but not in apn1 yeast. Knocking out APN2 increased mutagenesis in the apn1 cells. In addition, we did not find a strand bias on p53 treated with BPQ in ogg1 yeast. These studies suggest that Ogg1 is involved in repairing the oxidative damage caused by BPQ, Apn1 and Apn2 have redundant functions and that the stand bias seen in lung cancer may not be due to impaired repair of oxidative lesions. PMID:23117049

  17. Xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis with nephrocutaneous fistula due to Providencia rettgeri infection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gilho; Hong, Jeong Hee

    2011-07-01

    We describe what is to our knowledge the first case of xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis combined with nephrocutaneous fistula caused by Providencia rettgeri. Surgical extirpation including nephrectomy and fistulectomy was successfully performed. The strain was identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing in both renal tissue and pus culture from the fistula. PMID:21459904

  18. [Emphysematous pyelonephritis: review of the literature concerning a case report].

    PubMed

    Sarf, I; Meziane, A; Dahami, Z; Dakir, M; Jaoual, A; Bennani, S; el Mrini, M; Benjelloun, S

    2003-04-01

    Emphysematous pyelonephritis is defined as the presence of gas-producing bacteria in the kidney and in peri-nephretic areas. Even if it is rare, the mortality rate of this affection is between 50% and 90%. The E. coli is responsible in 60% of the cases. We report a case of a 50 years old male patient, with under diagnosed diabetics, how is admitted with pains in the left flank, fever, troubled urine, hematuria and worsening of general state. The diagnostic of emphysematous pyelonephritis was confirmed by CT Scan. In spite of adapted antibiotherapy to the renal function, insulinotherapy and correction of hydro-electrolytic troubles, the patient died with septic shock associated to digestive bleeding. Based on this case and a review of the literature, the authors describe the different features of this disease. Only an urgent nephrectomy after a short reanimation can improve the prognostic. PMID:12741191

  19. [Renal stone ileus in xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis. A case report].

    PubMed

    Schieroni, R; Dogliani, M; Acanfora, F; Gandini, G; Poy, F; Borello, G; Sancipriano, G

    2002-10-01

    A peculiar case of intestinal occlusion caused by a renal stone in a patient with nephroduodenal fistula due to previous xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis is reported. Only few cases of nephroduodenal fistula are described in the literature, generally as a single case report or in small series. A nephroduodenal fistula as a result of chronic renal inflammatory disease such as xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis, is usually associated with renal stones, recurrent urinary tract infections or endocrine disorders. Finally, renal stone as a cause of ileus is an event rarely described in the literature. In the case described, a correct preoperative diagnosis was possible with computerized tomography. During the operation a big renal stone was found and removed from the small bowel, but a limited resection was necessary because of the vascular impairment of the tract. At 8-month follow-up from operation, the patient was in good health, and no symptoms of renal or intestinal diseases were found. PMID:12370672

  20. Integrating spirituality into critical care: an APN perspective using Roy's adaptation model.

    PubMed

    Weiland, Sandra A

    2010-01-01

    Integration of the spiritual domain into the nursing plan of care positively influences health and wellness. Applying nursing theory to practice reinforces the advanced practice nurse's (APN's) responsibility to integrate spiritual care into the critical care environment. Indeed, all nurses have an obligation to integrate spiritual care because the focus of nursing care is beneficence. Moreover, the focus of APN care is not curing, but healing. Healing can be assisted by entering into the patient's suffering to help reconstruct life plans and facilitate realizing meaning from the despair of illness even while facing extreme adversity and death. This article describes spiritual care of the critically ill adult patient and the role that the APN must, can, and should take to assimilate spiritual care into care of these patients and their families. PMID:20551743

  1. Functional interpretation of a non-gut hemocoelic tissue aminopeptidase N (APN) in a lepidopteran insect pest Achaea janata.

    PubMed

    Ningshen, Thuirei Jacob; Aparoy, Polamarasetty; Ventaku, Venkat Rao; Dutta-Gupta, Aparna

    2013-01-01

    Insect midgut membrane-anchored aminopeptidases N (APNs) are Zn(++) dependent metalloproteases. Their primary role in dietary protein digestion and also as receptors in Cry toxin-induced pathogenesis is well documented. APN expression in few non-gut hemocoelic tissues of lepidopteran insects has also been reported but their functions are widely unknown. In the present study, we observed specific in vitro interaction of Cry1Aa toxin with a 113 kDa AjAPN1 membrane protein of larval fat body, Malpighian tubule and salivary gland of Achaea janata. Analyses of 3D molecular structure of AjAPN1, the predominantly expressed APN isoform in these non-gut hemocoelic tissues of A. janata showed high structural similarity to the Cry1Aa toxin binding midgut APN of Bombyx mori, especially in the toxin binding region. Structural similarity was further substantiated by in vitro binding of Cry1Aa toxin. RNA interference (RNAi) resulted in significant down-regulation of AjAPN1 transcript and protein expression in fat body and Malpighian tubule but not in salivary gland. Consequently, reduced AjAPN1 expression resulted in larval mortality, larval growth arrest, development of lethal larval-pupal intermediates, development of smaller pupae and emergence of viable defective adults. In vitro Cry1Aa toxin binding analysis of non-gut hemocoelic tissues of AjAPN1 knockdown larvae showed reduced interaction of Cry1Aa toxin with the 113 kDa AjAPN1 protein, correlating well with the significant silencing of AjAPN1 expression. Thus, our observations suggest AjAPN1 expression in non-gut hemocoelic tissues to play important physiological role(s) during post-embryonic development of A. janata. Though specific interaction of Cry1Aa toxin with AjAPN1 of non-gut hemocoelic tissues of A. janata was demonstrated, evidences to prove its functional role as a Cry1Aa toxin receptor will require more in-depth investigation. PMID:24244508

  2. Functional Interpretation of a Non-Gut Hemocoelic Tissue Aminopeptidase N (APN) in a Lepidopteran Insect Pest Achaea janata

    PubMed Central

    Ningshen, Thuirei Jacob; Aparoy, Polamarasetty; Ventaku, Venkat Rao; Dutta-Gupta, Aparna

    2013-01-01

    Insect midgut membrane-anchored aminopeptidases N (APNs) are Zn++ dependent metalloproteases. Their primary role in dietary protein digestion and also as receptors in Cry toxin-induced pathogenesis is well documented. APN expression in few non-gut hemocoelic tissues of lepidopteran insects has also been reported but their functions are widely unknown. In the present study, we observed specific in vitro interaction of Cry1Aa toxin with a 113 kDa AjAPN1 membrane protein of larval fat body, Malpighian tubule and salivary gland of Achaea janata. Analyses of 3D molecular structure of AjAPN1, the predominantly expressed APN isoform in these non-gut hemocoelic tissues of A. janata showed high structural similarity to the Cry1Aa toxin binding midgut APN of Bombyx mori, especially in the toxin binding region. Structural similarity was further substantiated by in vitro binding of Cry1Aa toxin. RNA interference (RNAi) resulted in significant down-regulation of AjAPN1 transcript and protein expression in fat body and Malpighian tubule but not in salivary gland. Consequently, reduced AjAPN1 expression resulted in larval mortality, larval growth arrest, development of lethal larval-pupal intermediates, development of smaller pupae and emergence of viable defective adults. In vitro Cry1Aa toxin binding analysis of non-gut hemocoelic tissues of AjAPN1 knockdown larvae showed reduced interaction of Cry1Aa toxin with the 113 kDa AjAPN1 protein, correlating well with the significant silencing of AjAPN1 expression. Thus, our observations suggest AjAPN1 expression in non-gut hemocoelic tissues to play important physiological role(s) during post-embryonic development of A. janata. Though specific interaction of Cry1Aa toxin with AjAPN1 of non-gut hemocoelic tissues of A. janata was demonstrated, evidences to prove its functional role as a Cry1Aa toxin receptor will require more in-depth investigation. PMID:24244508

  3. Fluoroquinolone-Resistant and Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase–Producing Escherichia coli Infections in Patients with Pyelonephritis, United States1

    PubMed Central

    Takhar, Sukhjit S.; Krishnadasan, Anusha; Abrahamian, Fredrick M.; Mower, William R.; Moran, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    For 2013–2014, we prospectively identified US adults with flank pain, temperature >38.0°C, and a diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis, confirmed by culture. Cultures from 453 (86.9%) of 521 patients grew Escherichia coli. Among E. coli isolates from 272 patients with uncomplicated pyelonephritis and 181 with complicated pyelonephritis, prevalence of fluoroquinolone resistance across study sites was 6.3% (range by site 0.0%–23.1%) and 19.9% (0.0%–50.0%), respectively; prevalence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) production was 2.6% (0.0%–8.3%) and 12.2% (0.0%–17.2%), respectively. Ten (34.5%) of 29 patients with ESBL infection reported no exposure to antimicrobial drugs, healthcare, or travel. Of the 29 patients with ESBL infection and 53 with fluoroquinolone-resistant infection, 22 (75.9%) and 24 (45.3%), respectively, were initially treated with in vitro inactive antimicrobial drugs. Prevalence of fluoroquinolone resistance exceeds treatment guideline thresholds for alternative antimicrobial drug strategies, and community-acquired ESBL-producing E. coli infection has emerged in some US communities. PMID:27532362

  4. Fluoroquinolone-Resistant and Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli Infections in Patients with Pyelonephritis, United States(1).

    PubMed

    Talan, David A; Takhar, Sukhjit S; Krishnadasan, Anusha; Abrahamian, Fredrick M; Mower, William R; Moran, Gregory J

    2016-09-01

    For 2013-2014, we prospectively identified US adults with flank pain, temperature >38.0°C, and a diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis, confirmed by culture. Cultures from 453 (86.9%) of 521 patients grew Escherichia coli. Among E. coli isolates from 272 patients with uncomplicated pyelonephritis and 181 with complicated pyelonephritis, prevalence of fluoroquinolone resistance across study sites was 6.3% (range by site 0.0%-23.1%) and 19.9% (0.0%-50.0%), respectively; prevalence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) production was 2.6% (0.0%-8.3%) and 12.2% (0.0%-17.2%), respectively. Ten (34.5%) of 29 patients with ESBL infection reported no exposure to antimicrobial drugs, healthcare, or travel. Of the 29 patients with ESBL infection and 53 with fluoroquinolone-resistant infection, 22 (75.9%) and 24 (45.3%), respectively, were initially treated with in vitro inactive antimicrobial drugs. Prevalence of fluoroquinolone resistance exceeds treatment guideline thresholds for alternative antimicrobial drug strategies, and community-acquired ESBL-producing E. coli infection has emerged in some US communities. PMID:27532362

  5. Xanthogranulomatous Pyelonephritis Can Simulate a Complex Cyst: Case Description and Review of Literature☆

    PubMed Central

    Butticè, Salvatore; Antonino, Inferrera; Giorgio, Ascenti; Valeria, Barresi; Stefano, Pergolizzi; Giuseppe, Mucciardi; Carlo, Magno

    2014-01-01

    Xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis is a rare and peculiar form of chronic pyelonephritis and is generally associated with renal lithiasis. Its incidence is higher in females. The peculiarity of this disease is that it requires a differential diagnosis, because it can often simulate dramatic pathologic conditions. In fact, in the literature are also described cases in association with squamous cell carcinoma of the kidney The radiologic clinical findings simulate renal masses, sometimes in association with caval thrombus. We describe a case of xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis with radiologic aspects of a complex cyst of Bosniak class III in a man 40-year old. PMID:26955560

  6. Nephrectomy in an Asian small-clawed otter (Amblonyx cinereus) with pyelonephritis and hydronephrosis secondary to ureteral obstruction.

    PubMed

    Higbie, Christine T; Carpenter, James W; Armbrust, Laura J; Klocke, Emily; Almes, Kelli

    2014-09-01

    A 10-yr-old, captive, intact male Asian small-clawed otter (Amblonyx cinereus) with a history of bilateral nephrolithiasis was presented for acute-onset lethargy and inappetance of 5 days duration. On physical examination, the otter was about 8% dehydrated and a palpable fluid wave was present in the abdomen. An abdominal ultrasound revealed hydronephrosis of the left kidney and a hyperechoic structure present within the lumen of the left ureter, causing an obstruction. A urinalysis revealed struvite crystalluria, bacteriuria, and an elevated pH. Following 4 days of antibiotic therapy, a left ureteronephrectomy was performed. Upon opening the kidney to retrieve calculi, a large amount of purulent material was noted within the renal pelvis. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first documented case of a nephrectomy in an Asian small-clawed otter. Nephrectomy should be considered as a viable option for treatment of ureteral obstruction, hydronephrosis, or severe pyelonephritis. PMID:25314845

  7. [Emphysematous Pyelonephritis with Cardio-Pulmonary Arrest : A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Yamamichi, Gaku; Tsutahara, Koichi; Kuribayashi, Sohei; Kawamura, Masataka; Nakano, Kosuke; Kishimoto, Nozomu; Tanigawa, Go; Matsushima, Asako; Fujimi, Satoshi; Takao, Tetsuya; Yamaguchi, Seiji

    2016-08-01

    A 40-year-old woman withuntreated type II diabetes mellitus was discovered withcardiopulmonary arrest in her room. On admission, she had ventricular fibrillation. After cardiopulmonary resuscitation, her own pulse restarted. The plasma glucose was 722 mg/dl and venous PH was 6.704. Abdominal computed tomography revealed gas within the parenchyma of the left kidney. We diagnosed her with emphysematous pyelonephritis and conducted emergency nephrectomy. Urinary and blood cultures were positive for Escherichia coli. Antibiotic therapy was initiated with doripenem and she was restrictively treated with intravenous insulin to control her plasma glucose. On the 8th day of hospital stay, she underwent resection of the small intestine because of necrosis. After multidisciplinary therapy, she was discharged with complete resolution of the infection. PMID:27624108

  8. Successful conservative treatment of bilateral emphysematous pyelonephritis in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Jaisuresh, K.; Bavaharan, R.

    2013-01-01

    Emphysematous pyelonephritis is a rare, potentially lethal complication of polycystic kidney disease. Treatment mostly includes emergency nephrectomy of the affected kidney. We report a case of bilateral emphysematous pyelonephritis in a 57-year-old diabetic male with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, who recovered with conservative treatment. Escherichia coli was cultured from the cyst aspirate. He was treated with percutaneous needle aspiration of infected cysts and intravenous antibiotics (meropenem and pazufloxacin) for 3 weeks. PMID:23814427

  9. Antibodies to a single, conserved epitope in Anopheles APN1 inhibit universal transmission of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax malaria.

    PubMed

    Armistead, Jennifer S; Morlais, Isabelle; Mathias, Derrick K; Jardim, Juliette G; Joy, Jaimy; Fridman, Arthur; Finnefrock, Adam C; Bagchi, Ansu; Plebanski, Magdalena; Scorpio, Diana G; Churcher, Thomas S; Borg, Natalie A; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Dinglasan, Rhoel R

    2014-02-01

    Malaria transmission-blocking vaccines (TBVs) represent a promising approach for the elimination and eradication of this disease. AnAPN1 is a lead TBV candidate that targets a surface antigen on the midgut of the obligate vector of the Plasmodium parasite, the Anopheles mosquito. In this study, we demonstrated that antibodies targeting AnAPN1 block transmission of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax across distantly related anopheline species in countries to which malaria is endemic. Using a biochemical and immunological approach, we determined that the mechanism of action for this phenomenon stems from antibody recognition of a single protective epitope on AnAPN1, which we found to be immunogenic in murine and nonhuman primate models and highly conserved among anophelines. These data indicate that AnAPN1 meets the established target product profile for TBVs and suggest a potential key role for an AnAPN1-based panmalaria TBV in the effort to eradicate malaria. PMID:24478095

  10. The role of Schizosaccharomyces pombe DNA repair enzymes Apn1p and Uve1p in the base excision repair of apurinic/apyrimidinic sites

    SciTech Connect

    Tanihigashi, Haruna; Yamada, Ayako; Igawa, Emi; Ikeda, Shogo . E-mail: ikeda@dbc.ous.ac.jp

    2006-09-08

    In Schizosaccharomyces pombe the repair of apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites is mainly initiated by AP lyase activity of DNA glycosylase Nth1p. In contrast, the major AP endonuclease Apn2p functions by removing 3'-{alpha},{beta}-unsaturated aldehyde ends induced by Nth1p, rather than by incising the AP sites. S. pombe possesses other minor AP endonuclease activities derived from Apn1p and Uve1p. In this study, we investigated the function of these two enzymes in base excision repair (BER) for methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) damage using the nth1 and apn2 mutants. Deletion of apn1 or uve1 from nth1{delta} cells did not affect sensitivity to MMS. Exogenous expression of Apn1p failed to suppress the MMS sensitivity of nth1{delta} cells. Although Apn1p and Uve1p incised the oligonucleotide containing an AP site analogue, these enzymes could not initiate repair of the AP sites in vivo. Despite this, expression of Apn1p partially restored the MMS sensitivity of apn2{delta} cells, indicating that the enzyme functions as a 3'-phosphodiesterase to remove 3'-blocked ends. Localization of Apn1p in the nucleus and cytoplasm hints at an additional function of the enzyme other than nuclear DNA repair. Heterologous expression of Saccharomyces cerevisiae homologue of Apn1p completely restored the MMS resistance of the nth1{delta} and apn2{delta} cells. This result confirms a difference in the major pathway for processing the AP site between S. pombe and S. cerevisiae cells.

  11. Compounds from Epilobium angustifolium inhibit the specific metallopeptidases ACE, NEP and APN.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Anna; Kowalski, Józef; Melzig, Matthias F

    2004-10-01

    Willow herb (Epilobium angustifolium L.) extracts showed inhibitory activity against the metallopeptidases: neutral endopeptidase (NEP), angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), and aminopeptidase N (APN). A bioassay-guided fractionation led to the isolation of several flavonoids and phenolic acids and an ellagitannin. The dimeric macrocyclic ellagitannin oenothein B inhibited the neutral endopeptidases in a dose-dependent manner with IC50 = 20 microM. Other polyphenols showed weaker activity but their synergistic activity cannot be excluded. Taking into account the role of these peptidases in prostate diseases, the results may partly support and explain the use of Epilobium extracts in folk medicine. PMID:15490319

  12. The Osteogenesis Effect and Underlying Mechanisms of Local Delivery of gAPN in Extraction Sockets of Beagle Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hongcheng; Pu, Yinfei; Lu, Songhe; Zhang, Kuo; Guo, Yuan; Lu, Hui; Li, Deli; Li, Xuefen; Li, Zichen; Wu, Yuwei; Tang, Zhihui

    2015-01-01

    A plastic and biodegradable bone substitute consists of poly (l-lactic-co-glycolic) acid and 30 wt % β-tricalcium phosphate has been previously fabricated, but its osteogenic capability required further improvement. We investigated the use of globular adiponectin (gAPN) as an anabolic agent for tissue-engineered bone using this scaffold. A qualitative analysis of the bone regeneration process was carried out using μCT and histological analysis 12 weeks after implantation. CBCT (Cone Beam Computed Tomography) superimposition was used to characterise the effect of the different treatments on bone formation. In this study, we also explored adiponectin’s (APN) influence on primary cultured human jaw bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells gene expressions involved in the osteogenesis. We found that composite scaffolds loaded with gAPN or bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) exhibited significantly increased bone formation and mineralisation following 12 weeks in the extraction sockets of beagle dogs, as well as enhanced expression of osteogenic markers. In vitro investigation revealed that APN also promoted osteoblast differentiation of primary cultured human jaw bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (h-JBMMSCs), accompanied by increased activity of alkaline phosphatase, greater mineralisation, and production of the osteoblast-differentiated genes osteocalcin, bone sialoprotein and collagen type I, which was reversed by APPL1 siRNA. Therefore, the composite scaffold loaded with APN exhibited superior activity for guided bone regeneration compared with blank control or Bio-Oss® (a commercially available product). The composite scaffold with APN has significant potential for clinical applications in bone tissue engineering. PMID:26492241

  13. Successful medical treatment of emphysematous pyelonephritis in chronic hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Vlachopanos, Georgios; Kassimatis, Theodoros; Zerva, Adamantia; Kokkona, Anastasia; Stavroulaki, Eirini; Zacharogiannis, Charilaos; Agrafiotis, Athanasios

    2015-10-01

    Emphysematous pyelonephritis (EPN) is a life-threatening renal infection caused by gas-producing bacteria and fungi. It usually occurs in patients with diabetes and patients with urinary tract obstruction. A combination of systemic antibiotics, percutaneous catheter drainage, or open nephrectomy is typically required to achieve cure. Because of grim prognosis, resorting to interventional methods is frequently inevitable. We report the case of a 77-year-old woman with diabetes and end-stage renal disease on chronic hemodialysis that presented with fever and left flank pain. A bubbly gas pattern inside the left kidney was demonstrated on abdominal computed tomography scan and blood cultures grew Escherichia coli. She was successfully treated solely with systemic antibiotics. This highlights the fact that prompt recognition of imaging findings associated with benign prognosis is essential for a favorable outcome. It allows for an effective management avoiding high-risk interventions, especially in frail patients with multiple comorbidities. Finally, we review all published cases of EPN in chronic dialysis patients. PMID:25643771

  14. Synthesis and Evaluation of Novel Tc-99m Labeled Probestin Conjugates for Imaging APN/CD13 Expression In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Pathuri, Gopal; Hedrick, Andria F.; Disch, Bryan; Doan, John; Ihnat, Michael A.; Awasthi, Vibhudutta; Gali, Hariprasad

    2011-01-01

    The enzyme aminopeptidase N (APN, also known as CD13) is known to play an important role in tumor proliferation, attachment, angiogenesis, and tumor invasion. In this study, we hypothesized that a radiolabeled high affinity APN inhibitor could be potentially useful for imaging APN expression in vivo. Here we report synthesis, radiolabeling, and biological evaluation of new probestin conjugates containing a tripeptide, N,N-dimethylglycyl-L-lysinyl-L-cysteinylamide (N3S), chelator. New probestin conjugates were synthesized by solid-phase peptide synthesis method, purified by reversed-phase HPLC, and characterized by electrospray mass spectrometry. The conjugates were complexed with Re(V) and 99mTc(V) by transmetallation using corresponding Re(V) or 99mTc(V) gluconate synthon. The mass spectral analyses of ReO-N3S-Probestin conjugates were consistent with the formation of neutral Re(V)O-N3S complexes. Initial biological activity of ReO-N3S-Probestin conjugates determined by performing an in vitro APN enzyme assay using intact HT-1080 cells demonstrated higher inhibition of APN enzyme activity than bestatin. In vivo biodistribution and whole body planar imaging studies of 99mTcO-N3S-PEG2-Probestin performed in nude mice xenografted with human fibrosarcoma tumors derived from HT-1080 cells demonstrated a tumor uptake value of 2.88 ± 0.64 %ID/g with tumor-to-blood and tumor-to-muscle ratios of 4.8 and 5.3 respectively at 1 hr post-injection (p.i.). Tumors were clearly visible in whole-body planar image obtained at 1 hr p.i., but not when the APN was competitively blocked with a co-injection of excess non-radioactive ReO-N3S-PEG2-Probestin conjugate. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using high affinity APN inhibitor conjugates as targeting vectors for in vivo targeting of APN. PMID:22148582

  15. Emphysematous pyelonephritis: A 10-year experience with 26 cases

    PubMed Central

    Misgar, Raiz Ahmad; Mubarik, Idrees; Wani, Arshad Iqbal; Bashir, Mir Iftikhar; Ramzan, Mahroosa; Laway, Bashir Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Emphysematous pyelonephritis (EPN) is a necrotizing infection which results in gas within the renal parenchyma, collecting system, or perinephric tissue. A majority of cases occur in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). In EPN, early aggressive medical treatment may avoid nephrectomy. Aims: The aim of this study was to analyze the characteristics of patients with EPN with respect to patient demographics, clinical presentation, diagnostic investigations, microbiological findings, treatment modality and outcome, and the influence of prognostic factors on the outcome. Materials and Methods: We reviewed the hospital records of 26 patients with EPN for clinical, laboratory, radiological, and microbiological findings, treatments given, and outcome. The severity of EPN was graded as per the Huang classification. We applied the reported prognostic factors to our patients to find out whether these factors correlated with failure of conservative treatment. Results: All the study subjects had DM and all but two of them were females. The majority of our patients (61.5%) had extensive EPN (class 3 or 4) and majority (76.9%) had two or more bad prognostic factors. Escherichia coli was the most common causative organism involved in 50% of our cases. Twenty-three (88.5%) of our patients responded to conservative treatment, two required nephrectomy, and one expired on conservative treatment. Conclusions: In this series of patients with EPN, all had DM, nearly all were women, and E. coli was the most frequently isolated pathogen. Nearly a third of our patients had bilateral disease. Despite the presence of two or more bad prognostic factors and extensive EPN (class 3 or 4) in a majority of our patients, conservative treatment afforded a striking success rate of 88.5%. We recommend early aggressive medical treatment and suggest that nephrectomy should be considered only if patients deteriorate or do not improve on conservative treatment. PMID:27366713

  16. Laparoscopic versus open nephrectomy for xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis: An outcome analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Kartik J.; Ganpule, Arvind P.; Kurien, Abraham; Muthu, Veeramani; Sabnis, Ravindra B.; Desai, Mahesh R.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Current literature suggests that laparoscopic nephrectomy (LN) in patients with xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis (XGP) is associated with high conversion and complication rate. Aims: To report contemporary outcome of patients with XGP, managed with either open nephrectomy (ON) or LN. Settings and Design: In this retrospective study, medical records of 37 patients with histopathologically confirmed XGP from January 2001 to October 2009 were reviewed. Materials and Methods: The clinical presentation, preoperative course, intraoperative findings, postoperative recovery and complications in ON and LN were analyzed. Statistical Analysis: Student's t test was used to perform statistical comparison between the LN and ON groups. Values are expressed as mean ± standard deviation. Results: In 37 patients, 20 underwent ON and 17 underwent LN. One patient in the LN group required conversion. He had ectopic pelvic kidney, and the vascular pedicle could not be identified because of dense adhesions. There were no intraoperative complications. The mean blood loss was 257.5 ± 156.67 ml and 141.18 ± 92.26 ml in ON and LN groups, respectively. Mean hospital stay was 15.45 ± 7.35 days and 9.71 ± 4.55 days in ON and LN groups, respectively. Postoperative complications were classified according to Clavien grading for surgical complications. Grade 2 complications were seen in 40% and 29.4% of patients in ON and LN groups, respectively. One patient in LN required secondary suturing of specimen retrieval site. Conclusions: LN in patients with XGP is often challenging and requires considerable experience in laparoscopy. In properly selected patients, all benefits of minimally invasive surgery can be availed with LN. PMID:22279311

  17. Educating APNs for Implementing the Guidelines for Adolescents in "Bright Futures: Guidelines of Health Supervision of Infants, Children, and Adolescents."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Cornelia P.; Pender, Nola J.; Hayman, Laura L.; Armstrong, Myrna L.; Riesch, Susan K.; Lewis, Mary Ann

    1997-01-01

    Discusses recommendations for preparing advanced practice nurses (APNs) to implement guidelines of a health curriculum: (1) ensuring age-appropriate teaching; (2) emphasizing the complex relationships of race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and gender; (3) reinforcing the self-care and resilience of adolescents; and (4) examining transitions…

  18. Trans-complementation by human apurinic endonuclease (Ape) of hypersensitivity to DNA damage and spontaneous mutator phenotype in apn1-yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, D M; Bennett, R A; Marquis, J C; Ansari, P; Demple, B

    1995-01-01

    Abasic (AP) sites in DNA are potentially lethal and mutagenic. 'Class II' AP endonucleases initiate the repair of these and other DNA lesions. In yeast, the predominant enzyme of this type is Apn1, and its elimination sensitizes the cells to killing by simple alkylating agents or oxidants, and raises the rate of spontaneous mutation. We investigated the ability of the major human class II AP endonuclease, Ape, which is structurally unrelated to Apn1, to replace the yeast enzyme in vivo. Confocal immunomicroscopy studies indicate that approximately 25% of the Ape expressed in yeast is present in the nucleus. High-level Ape expression corresponding to approximately 7000 molecules per nucleus, equal to the normal Apn1 copy number, restored resistance to methyl methanesulfonate to near wild-type levels in Apn1-deficient (apn1-) yeast. Ape expression in apn1- yeast provided little protection against H2O2 challenges, consistent with the weak 3'-repair diesterase activity of the human enzyme. Ape expression at approximately 2000 molecules per nucleus reduced the spontaneous mutation rate of apn1- yeast to that seen for wild-type cells. Because Ape has a powerful AP endonuclease but weak 3'-diesterase activity, these findings indicate that endogenously generated AP sites can drive spontaneous mutagenesis. Images PMID:8559661

  19. Co-existing malakoplakia and xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis of kidney: Two different spectrum of same disease process

    PubMed Central

    Das, Debi Prasad; Pal, Dilip Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis (XGP) and malakoplakia (MKP) are chronic inflammatory condition of kidney characterized by infiltration of inflammatory cells. We are presenting a rare case of concomitant XGP and MKP in the same kidney. This signifies that the two are different spectrums of the same disease process. PMID:27141206

  20. Simple nephrectomy in a young woman for recurrent pyelonephritis utilizing laparoendoscopic single-site surgery (LESS).

    PubMed

    Preston, Mark A; Watterson, James D; Blew, Brian Dm

    2011-12-01

    Minimally invasive surgery is rapidly evolving due to new technology and techniques designed to improve patient outcomes. We report a case of a young woman with an atrophic kidney secondary to reflux nephropathy, suffering from recurrent episodes of pyelonephritis. She was treated successfully using laparoendoscopic single-site surgery (LESS). We also present a review of the literature. PMID:22154177

  1. Pyelonephritis can be a source of a life-threatening necrotizing myofasciitis

    PubMed Central

    Kamel, Haytham; Awed, Mohamed Soliman Edris; Kotb, Ahmed Fouad

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a progressive, rapidly spreading, inflammatory infection located in deep fascia. It may cause necrosis of skin and subcutaneous tissue and can even results in involvement of adjacent soft tissues such as muscles resulting in necrotizing myositis. We report the case of an adult male presenting with necrotizing myofasciitis secondary to left pyelonephritis. We also review the relevant literature. PMID:25024809

  2. Chronic pyelonephritis presenting as a renal sinus tumor with retroperitoneal extension: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Chronic pyelonephritis is associated with progressive renal scarring and occurs, most of the time, in patients with major anatomical anomalies, including urinary tract obstruction, calculi, renal dysplasia or vesicoureteric reflux. We report the computed tomography imaging findings of a patient with chronic pyelonephritis appearing as a renal sinus mass. To our knowledge, it is the first time that such a case has been published in the literature. Case presentation We present a case of a 68-year-old woman who underwent a computed tomography scan of the abdomen in the work-up for recently diagnosed hypertension. A non-enhancing left renal sinus mass was detected extending to the para-aortic space. The initial diagnosis was that of a tumor of the collecting system. Nephro-ureterectomy was performed and the pathology results revealed changes of chronic pyelonephritis. Conclusion Chronic pyelonephritis presenting as a renal sinus mass is reported for the first time in the literature. This may lead to the conclusion that diagnostic ureteropyeloscopy and biopsy should be performed prior to radical surgery for possible upper tract urothelial tumors. PMID:19918288

  3. Corynebacterium minutissimum pyelonephritis with associated bacteraemia: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Nasir M; Ahmad, Khalid M

    2005-12-01

    We report a case of Corynebacterium minutissimum pyelonephritis with associated bacteraemia in an immunocompetent adult. The patient was successfully treated with a 14-day course of intravenous vancomycin. We review the clinical features of all the reported cases of invasive C. minutissimum infections with bacteraemia. PMID:16321644

  4. Nuclear medicine in acute and chronic renal failure

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, R.A.; Byun, K.J.

    1982-07-01

    The diagnostic value of renal scintiscans in patients with acute or chronic renal failure has not been emphasized other than for the estimation of renal size. /sup 131/I OIH, /sup 67/gallium, /sup 99m/TcDTPA, glucoheptonate and DMSA all may be valuable in a variety of specific settings. Acute renal failure due to acute tubular necrosis, hepatorenal syndrome, acute interstitial nephritis, cortical necrosis, renal artery embolism, or acute pyelonephritis may be recognized. Data useful in the diagnosis and management of the patient with obstructive or reflux nephropathy may be obtained. Radionuclide studies in patients with chronic renal failure may help make apparent such causes as renal artery stenosis, chronic pyelonephritis or lymphomatous kidney infiltration. Future correlation of scanning results with renal pathology promises to further expand nuclear medicine's utility in the noninvasive diagnosis of renal disease.

  5. [Diffuse xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis: clinical, anatomopathologic, and therapeutic features. Report ot 9 cases and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Dahami, Z; Dakir, M; Aboutaieb, R; Sarf, I; Elattar, H; Azzouzi, S; Bennani, S; Elmrini, M; Benjelloun, S

    2001-11-01

    Diffuse xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis is a rare chronic pyelonephritis. This study permitted us to notice the various histological, clinical, radiological, and the different means diagnoses of this affection. Retrospectively series of nine patients is reported. The median age was 43 years. The commonest clinical presentation was urinary tract infection, and lumbar pain. Urine culture identified a bacteria in seven cases (77%). Intravenous urography recovers silent kidney (five cases), hydronephrosis (two cases), chronic pyelonephritis (one case) and renal stones in six cases (67%). Treatment consisted of nephrectomy. No specific biological or radiological signs of this affection can be identifying this lesion in preoperative. The diagnosis was revealed by the histological examination of the removed kidney. The outcome is favorable after a follow-up of six months to four years. The clinical features of the pyelonephritis xanthogranulomatous is not specific. Magnetic resonance imaging can give a specificity to this affection. Only histological examination is able to established the definitive diagnosis. PMID:11774761

  6. Plasma Adiponectin Levels in Acute Liver Failure Patients Treated with Plasma Filtration with Dialysis and Plasma Exchange.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Nakae, Hajime; Uji, Yoshitaka; Maeda, Kazuhisa; Tani, Tohru; Eguchi, Yutaka

    2015-08-01

    Plasma filtration with dialysis (PDF) is a blood purification therapy in which simple plasma exchange (PE) is performed using a selective membrane plasma separator while the dialysate flows outside of the hollow fibers. Improvement of hypoadiponectinemia is considered to be a useful therapeutic approach for ameliorating fatal conditions including cardio-metabolic and infectious disease. We investigated the effects of PDF in comparison to PE in terms of plasma adiponectin (APN) changes in patients with acute liver failure. Seventeen patients with liver failure were studied; PDF was performed 55 times and PE 14 times. Plasma APN levels increased significantly after PDF, while decreasing significantly after PE. PDF appears to be among the most useful blood purification therapies in acute liver failure cases in terms of increasing APN levels. PMID:26386223

  7. PC, a Novel Oral Insecticidal Toxin from Bacillus bombysepticus Involved in Host Lethality via APN and BtR-175.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ping; Cheng, Tingcai; Jin, Shengkai; Wu, Yuqian; Fu, Bohua; Long, Renwen; Zhao, Ping; Xia, Qingyou

    2015-01-01

    Insect pests have developed resistance to chemical insecticides, insecticidal toxins as bioinsecticides or genetic protection built into crops. Consequently, novel, orally active insecticidal toxins would be valuable biological alternatives for pest control. Here, we identified a novel insecticidal toxin, parasporal crystal toxin (PC), from Bacillus bombysepticus (Bb). PC shows oral pathogenic activity and lethality towards silkworms and Cry1Ac-resistant Helicoverpa armigera strains. In vitro assays, PC after activated by trypsin binds to BmAPN4 and BtR-175 by interacting with CR7 and CR12 fragments. Additionally, trypsin-activated PC demonstrates cytotoxicity against Sf9 cells expressing BmAPN4, revealing that BmAPN4 serves as a functional receptor that participates in Bb and PC pathogenicity. In vivo assay, knocking out BtR-175 increased the resistance of silkworms to PC. These data suggest that PC is the first protein with insecticidal activity identified in Bb that is capable of causing silkworm death via receptor interactions, representing an important advance in our understanding of the toxicity of Bb and the contributions of interactions between microbial pathogens and insects to disease pathology. Furthermore, the potency of PC as an insecticidal protein makes it a good candidate for inclusion in integrated agricultural pest management systems. PMID:26057951

  8. PC, a Novel Oral Insecticidal Toxin from Bacillus bombysepticus Involved in Host Lethality via APN and BtR-175

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ping; Cheng, Tingcai; Jin, Shengkai; Wu, Yuqian; Fu, Bohua; Long, Renwen; Zhao, Ping; Xia, Qingyou

    2015-01-01

    Insect pests have developed resistance to chemical insecticides, insecticidal toxins as bioinsecticides or genetic protection built into crops. Consequently, novel, orally active insecticidal toxins would be valuable biological alternatives for pest control. Here, we identified a novel insecticidal toxin, parasporal crystal toxin (PC), from Bacillus bombysepticus (Bb). PC shows oral pathogenic activity and lethality towards silkworms and Cry1Ac-resistant Helicoverpa armigera strains. In vitro assays, PC after activated by trypsin binds to BmAPN4 and BtR-175 by interacting with CR7 and CR12 fragments. Additionally, trypsin-activated PC demonstrates cytotoxicity against Sf9 cells expressing BmAPN4, revealing that BmAPN4 serves as a functional receptor that participates in Bb and PC pathogenicity. In vivo assay, knocking out BtR-175 increased the resistance of silkworms to PC. These data suggest that PC is the first protein with insecticidal activity identified in Bb that is capable of causing silkworm death via receptor interactions, representing an important advance in our understanding of the toxicity of Bb and the contributions of interactions between microbial pathogens and insects to disease pathology. Furthermore, the potency of PC as an insecticidal protein makes it a good candidate for inclusion in integrated agricultural pest management systems. PMID:26057951

  9. Rare Co-existence of Squamous Cell Carcinoma with Infiltration of Renal Vein and Xanthogranulomatous Pyelonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Vanikar, A.V.; Patel, R.D.; Nigam, L. K.; Trivedi, H. L.

    2015-01-01

    Primary renal squamous cell carcinoma is a very rare malignancy of the upper urinary tract. Most patients have history of chronic urolithiasis, analgesics abuse, radiotherapy or infection. Co-existence of SCC with xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis is exceedingly rare with only few reports in the literature. We report a case of a 60-year-old male presented with right flank pain and mild tenderness of abdomen. Computed tomography of the abdomen revealed gross hydronephrosis with parenchymal thinning and irregular thick enhancing wall of pelvicalyceal system with multiple calculi in right kidney. Right renal vein appeared distended, filled with hypo dense material. Right nephrectomy was performed and sent for pathological examination. Histological evaluation revealed keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma with infiltration of renal vein and xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis. PMID:26816904

  10. A 13-Month-Old With Xanthogranulomatous Pyelonephritis With Features of Renal Malakoplakia

    PubMed Central

    Appleson, Tova; Sharif, Asma; Setty, Suman; Liu, Dennis; Wang, Shihtien; Kanard, Robert; Czech, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    Xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis is an uncommon chronic inflammatory renal disorder caused by chronic infection with gram-negative bacteria leading to destruction of the renal parenchyma and replacement with foamy lipid-laden macrophages. Renal malakoplakia is another rare form of chronic inflammatory granulomatous disease in the kidney associated with infection usually occurring in adults with immunocompromised status or debilitating disease. It is hallmarked by the finding of foamy histiocytes with distinctive basophilic inclusions (Michaelis-Gutmann bodies). We present a case of a 13-month-old male with history of congenital hydronephrosis who presented with clinical and radiologic findings suggestive of xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis. However, further pathologic studies revealed the presence of Michaelis-Gutmann bodies, which are pathognomonic for renal malakoplakia. With this case we hope to bring further evidence to support that these two conditions are not mutually exclusive but rather represent two pathologic processes on the same disease spectrum. PMID:26894199

  11. An unusual presentation of xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis: psoas abscess with reno-colic fistula.

    PubMed

    Ghoz, Hassan M; Williams, Martin; Perepletchikov, Aleksandr; James, Nicholas; Babeir, Abdulrahman A

    2016-07-01

    Xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis (XGP) is a rare histological subset of pyelonephritis characterized by being a chronic destructive granulomatous inflammation of the renal parenchyma. XGP is classified according to the extent of disease into two entities: within the renal cortex (focal or segmental XGP) or diffuse spread with pelvic communication (diffuse XGP). Although rare, XGP can have fatal complications including perinephric, psoas abscess, nephro-cutaneous fistula and reno-colic fistula. Only few studies have reported XGP complicated with psaos abcess and reno-colic fistula. Our aim is to add to the literature and share our experience with a case of extensive XGP eroding into the psoas muscle and ascending colon leading to severe sepsis that was successfully managed. We report a 56-year-old woman who was found to have XGP complicated by psoas abscess and reno-colic fistula managed by antibiotics, nephrostomy, and subsequent nephrectomy and partial colectomy. PMID:27471599

  12. An unusual presentation of xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis: psoas abscess with reno-colic fistula

    PubMed Central

    Ghoz, Hassan M.; Williams, Martin; Perepletchikov, Aleksandr; James, Nicholas; Babeir, Abdulrahman A.

    2016-01-01

    Xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis (XGP) is a rare histological subset of pyelonephritis characterized by being a chronic destructive granulomatous inflammation of the renal parenchyma. XGP is classified according to the extent of disease into two entities: within the renal cortex (focal or segmental XGP) or diffuse spread with pelvic communication (diffuse XGP). Although rare, XGP can have fatal complications including perinephric, psoas abscess, nephro-cutaneous fistula and reno-colic fistula. Only few studies have reported XGP complicated with psaos abcess and reno-colic fistula. Our aim is to add to the literature and share our experience with a case of extensive XGP eroding into the psoas muscle and ascending colon leading to severe sepsis that was successfully managed. We report a 56-year-old woman who was found to have XGP complicated by psoas abscess and reno-colic fistula managed by antibiotics, nephrostomy, and subsequent nephrectomy and partial colectomy. PMID:27471599

  13. Rare Co-existence of Squamous Cell Carcinoma with Infiltration of Renal Vein and Xanthogranulomatous Pyelonephritis.

    PubMed

    Kanodia, K V; Vanikar, A V; Patel, R D; Nigam, L K; Trivedi, H L

    2015-12-01

    Primary renal squamous cell carcinoma is a very rare malignancy of the upper urinary tract. Most patients have history of chronic urolithiasis, analgesics abuse, radiotherapy or infection. Co-existence of SCC with xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis is exceedingly rare with only few reports in the literature. We report a case of a 60-year-old male presented with right flank pain and mild tenderness of abdomen. Computed tomography of the abdomen revealed gross hydronephrosis with parenchymal thinning and irregular thick enhancing wall of pelvicalyceal system with multiple calculi in right kidney. Right renal vein appeared distended, filled with hypo dense material. Right nephrectomy was performed and sent for pathological examination. Histological evaluation revealed keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma with infiltration of renal vein and xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis. PMID:26816904

  14. Nephrolithiasis and pyelonephritis in two West Indian manatees (Trichechus manatus spp.).

    PubMed

    Keller, Martha; Moliner, José L; Vásquez, Grettys; Cruz, Danilo; Bello, Orestes; Costidis, Alex M; Rommel, Sentiel A; Mays, Maron B Calderwood; Gearhart, Scott

    2008-07-01

    Two West Indian manatees (Trichechus manatus spp.) were reported with severe emaciation. One animal was a Florida manatee from the Everglades; the other was an Antillean manatee from Cuba. On necropsy, both animals had nephrolithiasis, pyelonephritis, and moderate to severe renomegaly. Histopathology revealed multifocal to diffuse pyelonephritis, interstitial nephritis, and nephrocalcinosis. The stones were analyzed and consisted primarily of calcium carbonate. Serum chemistry values for the Florida animal revealed no renal abnormalities. The mechanism of calculus formation remains unclear in manatees. In horses, another hindgut fermenter, the most common urolith is also calcium carbonate. Urinalyses performed on manatees are very similar to those of horses (i.e., alkaline urine, low specific gravity, and calcium carbonate crystals). Formation of uroliths in manatees may have a pathogenesis similar to equine urolithiasis. PMID:18689658

  15. Pheochromocytoma multisystem crisis in a patient with multiple endocrine neoplasia type IIB and pyelonephritis.

    PubMed

    Caputo, Christopher; Fishbane, Steven; Shapiro, Lawrence; Courgi, Robert G; Kostadinov, Stefan; Donovan, Virginia; Epstein, David

    2002-06-01

    A patient with pyelonephritis developed multiorgan failure resulting in death. Clinical findings were consistent with multiple endocrine neoplasia type II, with bilateral pheochromocytomas identified by computed tomography scan. We hypothesize that either the infection or the administration of radiocontrast media led to a massive release of catecholamines from the pheochromocytomas. As a result, tissue perfusion was severely compromised, and multiorgan failure developed. This exceedingly rare complication of pheochromocytoma has been termed pheochromocytoma multisystem crisis. PMID:12046054

  16. Aminopeptidase N1 (EtAPN1), an M1 Metalloprotease of the Apicomplexan Parasite Eimeria tenella, Participates in Parasite Development

    PubMed Central

    Gras, Simon; Byzia, Anna; Gilbert, Florence B.; McGowan, Sheena; Drag, Marcin; Niepceron, Alisson; Lecaille, Fabien; Lalmanach, Gilles; Brossier, Fabien

    2014-01-01

    Aminopeptidases N are metalloproteases of the M1 family that have been reported in numerous apicomplexan parasites, including Plasmodium, Toxoplasma, Cryptosporidium, and Eimeria. While investigating the potency of aminopeptidases as therapeutic targets against coccidiosis, one of the most important avian diseases caused by the genus Eimeria, we identified and characterized Eimeria tenella aminopeptidase N1 (EtAPN1). Its inhibition by bestatin and amastatin, as well as its reactivation by divalent ions, is typical of zinc-dependent metalloproteases. EtAPN1 shared a similar sequence, three-dimensional structure, and substrate specificity and similar kinetic parameters with A-M1 from Plasmodium falciparum (PfA-M1), a validated target in the treatment of malaria. EtAPN1 is synthesized as a 120-kDa precursor and cleaved into 96-, 68-, and 38-kDa forms during sporulation. Further, immunolocalization assays revealed that, similar to PfA-M1, EtAPN1 is present during the intracellular life cycle stages in both the parasite cytoplasm and the parasite nucleus. The present results support the hypothesis of a conserved role between the two aminopeptidases, and we suggest that EtAPN1 might be a valuable target for anticoccidiosis drugs. PMID:24839124

  17. Clinical Profile and Predictors of Outcomes in Older Inpatients with Pyelonephritis in a Tertiary Care Hospital in Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Benny Paul; Viggeswarpu, Surekha; Sathyendra, Sowmya; Iyyadurai, Ramya; Visvanathan, Renuka; Mathews, Kuruvilla Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Background Pyelonephritis is a serious infection associated with significant morbidity and mortality in the elderly with an estimated annual incidence rate of around 10% from previous studies. Older people are at a higher risk for pyelonephritis due to multiple factors including structural, functional and co-existent conditions. There is very little data on the incidence, clinical features and outcomes among elderly patients with pyelonephritis in India. Materials and Methods We performed a retrospective review of case records of 100 consecutive patients over the age of 60 years with pyelonephritis admitted to a tertiary care hospital. Results One fourth of our patients (26%) did not have fever, 49% had delirium and 52% had systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Sixty five percent of the patients were diabetic and 60% had infections caused by extended spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL) producing organisms. As in other studies, the commonest organism isolated was E.coli (49%). A low serum albumin level was a predictor of mortality (p<0.001) and increased length of hospital stay (p<0.005). Delirium was also associated with a poor outcome (p=0.009) in these patients. Patients with pyelonephritis secondary to ESBL producing organisms had a higher length of stay (p<0.005). Conclusion Hypoalbuminemia and delirium predicted poor outcomes in our patients. We found a high prevalence of ESBL infections in this study. Further research is required to assess the efficacy of aggressive management of delirium and low albumin in improving health and cost outcomes. PMID:26557554

  18. Fulminant course of unilateral emphysematous pyelonephritis revealing a renal actinomycosis caused by Actinomyces meyeri, an unknown cause of septic shock.

    PubMed

    Herbland, Alexandre; Leloup, Maxime; Levrat, Quentin; Guillaume, Frédéric; Verrier, Virginie; Bouillard, Philippe; Landois, Thierry; Ouaki, Charlie Frédéric; Lesieur, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this case report is to describe the first case of renal actinomycosis caused by Actinomyces meyeri presenting as severe emphysematous pyelonephritis and complicated by septic shock and multi-organ failure. Emphysematous pyelonephritis is a potentially life-threatening infection mostly described in diabetic patients and predominantly caused by uropathogenic bacteria. Actinomycosis is an uncommon chronic infection due to anaerobic gram-positive bacteria that unusually involves the urinary tract. We report the first case of emphysematous pyelonephritis caused by A. meyeri in a 75-year-old non-diabetic woman. The patient presented with an altered status, fever, nausea, and vomiting lasting for 2 days. A computed tomography scan revealed unilateral emphysematous pyelonephritis. She was rapidly admitted to intensive care unit for a septic shock with multiple organ dysfunctions. A conservative management consisting in renal percutaneous drainage, supportive measures, and prolonged adapted antibiotic therapy resulted in complete recovery. This case report illustrates that renal actinomycosis should be considered in case of emphysematous pyelonephritis given the good prognosis of this infection with conservative medical treatment. PMID:25878793

  19. Spontaneous perirenal hemorrhage in cauda equina syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Seok, Hyun; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Choi, Won Hyuck; Ko, Yong Jae

    2013-08-01

    Neurogenic bladder is a common cause of acute pyelonephritis (APN) in cauda equina syndrome (CES). Perirenal hemorrhage, a rare complication of APN, can be a life-threatening condition. To our knowledge, there is no previous report of perirenal hemorrhage as a complication of APN in CES. A 57-year-old male, diagnosed with CES, due to a L3 burst fracture 3 months earlier, was presented with fever and chills. His diagnosis was APN due to neurogenic bladder. After treatment for APN, he was transferred to the department of rehabilitation medicine for management of his CES. Because of large post-voiding residual urine volumes, he performed self-catheterization after voiding. However, he presented again with fever and chills, and recurrent APN was diagnosed. On the third day of antibiotic treatment, he had acute abdominal pains and hypovolemic shock. Abdominal computed tomography and angiography showed left APN and a perirenal hematoma with left renal capsular artery bleeding. After embolization of the left renal capsular artery, no further active bleeding occurred. Because APN due to neurogenic bladder can lead to critical complications, such as perirenal hemorrhage, the physician should pay attention to the early diagnosis and treatment of urinary tract infection and the management of neurogenic bladder after CES. PMID:24020045

  20. Flexible ureteroscopy versus laparoscopy for the treatment of patients who initially presented with obstructive pyelonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Selcuk; Resorlu, Berkan; Eksi, Mithat; Aras, Bekir; Atar, Arda; Tugcu, Volkan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the safety and effectiveness of flexible ureteroscopy (F-URS) with transperitoneal laparoscopic ureterolithotomy (TPLU) in cases of obstructive pyelonephritis secondary to large proximal ureteral stones. Methods: A series of 42 patients presenting with obstructive pyelonephritis due to proximal ureteral stones larger than 1.5 cm were included from April 2006 to February 2015 in this comparative study. After drainage of pyonephrosis and resolution of sepsis, 22 patients treated with TPLU (Group I), and 20 patients were treated with F-URS (Group II). Preoperative patient and stone characteristics, procedure-related parameters and clinical outcomes were assessed for each group. Results: It was seen that both methods were effective in the treatment of large proximal ureteral stones. However TPLU provided a higher stone- free rate (100% vs 80%. p=0.043) and lower retreatment rate. There was no difference between the groups for the operative time and complication rate. On the other hand, patients treated with F-URS had less postoperative pain (p=0.008), a shorter hospital stay (p<0.001) and a faster return to daily activities (p<0.001). Conclusions: The results of our study show that both F-URS and TPLU are safe and effective surgical procedures for treatment of large proximal ureteral stones after controlling obstructive pyelonephritis. However, TPLU has a higher stone-free rate with comparable operating time and complication rate as compared to F-URS. On the other hand F-URS has the advantages of less postoperative pain, shorter hospital stay and faster return to daily activities. PMID:27375691

  1. Sarcomatoid Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis Masquerading as Emphysematous Pyelonephritis with Staghorn Calculus

    PubMed Central

    Kivlin, Dana; Tong, Carmen; Friedlander, Justin; Perosio, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Staghorn calculi are well-established risk factors for recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) and subsequent renal deterioration. Less commonly, long-term urothelial irritation from a calculus may also pose a risk of malignant transformation. Case Presentation: A 77-year-old male with multiple medical comorbidities presented with a chronic right renal pelvic staghorn calculus and findings concerning for emphysematous pyelonephritis. He was subsequently taken to the operating room for a planned laparoscopic right nephrectomy. Final pathology analysis revealed sarcomatoid squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the renal pelvis with superimposed pyelonephritis and renal abscesses. Preoperative imaging was not suggestive of malignancy. Conclusion: Although SCC of the urothelium can be caused by chronic irritation, its presentation is usually isolated to the lower urinary tract and is rarely encountered in the renal pelvis. Our patient's presentation with sarcomatoid SCC is an even rarer entity. Chronic staghorn calculi must be considered as a potential risk factor for the development of both UTI and malignant urothelial transformation.

  2. The 5'-UTR intron of the midgut-specific BmAPN4 gene affects the level and location of expression in transgenic silkworms.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liang; Huang, Chunlin; Sun, Qiang; Guo, Huizhen; Cheng, Tingcai; Peng, Zhengwen; Dang, Yinghui; Liu, Weiqiang; Xu, Guowen; Xia, Qingyou

    2015-08-01

    Introns are important for regulating gene expression. BmAPN4, which has a 5'-UTR upstream intron (5 UI), is specifically expressed in the entire silkworm midgut. In our previous study, the promoter region upstream of the 5 UI of BmAPN4 was cloned and identified as the P3 promoter (P3P) with activity only in the anterior midgut. In this study, the sequence consisting of the P3P and the 5 UI was cloned and named as P3P+5 UI. A transgenic vector was constructed in which EGFP was controlled by P3P+5 UI. Transgenic P3+5 UI silkworms were generated by embryo microinjection. RT-PCR showed P3P+5 UI activity throughout the larval stage. Intense green fluorescence was seen only in the entire midgut of P3+5 UI silkworms and expression was confirmed by RT-PCR. qPCR revealed that expression of EGFP in the anterior midgut of P3+5 UI silkworms was 64% higher than in P3 silkworms, indicating the 5 UI sustained intron-mediated enhancement of gene expression. These results suggested that the BmAPN4 5 UI affected the level and site of expression. The 5 UI was cloned and added behind P2P, another specific promoter with activity only in the anterior midgut of silkworm, to construct the P2P+5 UI and transgenic P2+5 UI silkworms. Expression patterns were the same for P2P+5 UI and P2P, suggesting that the 5UI of BmAPN4 did not affect P2P. This study found that the BmAPN4 5 UI affected the amount and location of gene expression. Its influence appeared to be dependent on a specific promoter. PMID:25982022

  3. Apn1 AP-endonuclease is essential for the repair of oxidatively damaged DNA bases in yeast frataxin-deficient cells

    PubMed Central

    Lefevre, Sophie; Brossas, Caroline; Auchère, Françoise; Boggetto, Nicole; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Santos, Renata

    2012-01-01

    Frataxin deficiency results in mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress and it is the cause of the hereditary neurodegenerative disease Friedreich ataxia (FA). Here, we present evidence that one of the pleiotropic effects of oxidative stress in frataxin-deficient yeast cells (Δyfh1 mutant) is damage to nuclear DNA and that repair requires the Apn1 AP-endonuclease of the base excision repair pathway. Major phenotypes of Δyfh1 cells are respiratory deficit, disturbed iron homeostasis and sensitivity to oxidants. These phenotypes are weak or absent under anaerobiosis. We show here that exposure of anaerobically grown Δyfh1 cells to oxygen leads to down-regulation of antioxidant defenses, increase in reactive oxygen species, delay in G1- and S-phases of the cell cycle and damage to mitochondrial and nuclear DNA. Nuclear DNA lesions in Δyfh1 cells are primarily caused by oxidized bases and single-strand breaks that can be detected 15–30 min after oxygen exposition. The Apn1 enzyme is essential for the repair of the DNA lesions in Δyfh1 cells. Compared with Δyfh1, the double Δyfh1Δapn1 mutant shows growth impairment, increased mutagenesis and extreme sensitivity to H2O2. On the contrary, overexpression of the APN1 gene in Δyfh1 cells decreases spontaneous and induced mutagenesis. Our results show that frataxin deficiency in yeast cells leads to increased DNA base oxidation and requirement of Apn1 for repair, suggesting that DNA damage and repair could be important features in FA disease progression. PMID:22706278

  4. Giant hydronephrosis and secondary pyelonephritis induced by Salmonella dublin in a Holstein calf.

    PubMed

    Taghipur Bazargani, T; Khodakaram-Tafti, A; Ashrafi, I; Abbassi, A M

    2015-01-01

    Hydronephrosis occurs as a congenital or an acquired condition following obstruction of the urinary tract. In this study, a four month old male Holstein calf with emaciation, growth retardation and a poor dry scruffy hair coat was examined because of remarkable distention of right abdomen. At necropsy, right kidney was hydronephrotic as a very big fluid-filled round pelvis with the presence of multilocular cysts bulged from the cortical surface. With sectioning, more than 10 L of bloody fluid poured out from this sac. Microscopic examination showed severe atrophy of cortical tissue and fibrosis of the medulla. Also, the dilated pelvis was composed of fibrinous exudate and necrosis of epithelium associated with multifocal aggregations of neutrophils and bacterial microcolonies. In a culture and serotyping of isolated bacteria, Salmonella dublin was determined. In conclusion, S. dublin induced pyelonephritis secondary to congenital giant hydronephrosis is the first report in cattle in the world. PMID:27175163

  5. Diagnosis and treatment of presumptive pyelonephritis in an Asian elephant (Elephas maximus).

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Carlos R; Murray, Suzan; Montali, Richard J; Spelman, Lucy H

    2004-09-01

    A 37-yr-old female Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) presented with anorexia, restlessness, and dark-colored urine. Urinalyses showed hematuria, leukocyturia, isosthenuria, proteinuria, granular casts, and no calcium oxalate crystals. Bloodwork revealed azotemia. Urine culture revealed a pure growth of Streptococcus zooepidemicus resistant to sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim but susceptible to cephalosporins. A presumptive diagnosis of pyelonephritis was made based on bloodwork, urinalysis, and urine culture. The animal was treated with intravenous ceftiofur, and intravenous and per rectum fluids were given for hydration. The elephant's attitude and appetite returned to normal, the abnormal blood parameters resolved, and urinary calcium oxalate crystals reappeared after treatment, supporting presumptive diagnosis. Follow-up ultrasonography revealed an abnormal outline of both kidneys with parenchymal hyperechogenicity and multiple uterine leiomyomas. PMID:15526898

  6. A case of emphysematous pyelonephritis in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis taking corticosteroid and low-dose methotrexate.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Ryoma; Asano, Tomoyuki; Shio, Kiori; Iwadate, Haruyo; Kobayashi, Hiroko; Matsuoka, Toshimitsu; Aikawa, Ken; Ohira, Hiromasa

    2010-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease that is characterized by chronic synovial inflammation. Patients with RA have increased risk of infection; this is related to RA itself or the adverse effects of medication. In this report, we describe a case of emphysematous pyelonephritis in a patient with RA associated with AA amyloidosis and steroid-induced diabetes mellitus who was taking corticosteroid and low-dose methotrexate. PMID:20536605

  7. An experimental study of the mechanism of andrographis paniculata nees (APN) in alleviating the Ca(2+)-overloading in the process of myocardial ischemic reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Guo, Z L; Zhao, H Y; Zheng, X H

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this experiment is to study the mechanism of APN in alleviating the Ca(2+)-overloading in dog model during the process of ischemic reperfusion. In comparison with the sustained ischemic group, the parameters in the ischemic reperfusion group demonstrated: Ca(2+) of ischemic region of myocardial cell increased (P < 0.05), Na+ increased remarkably (P < 0.01), the activity of Ca(2+)-ATPase dropped remarkably (P < 0.01), and MDA increased significantly (P < 0.01). Whereas in the group pretreated with APN, the Ca(2+) in the relevant area reduced (P < 0.05), Na+ decreased significantly (P < 0.01), the activity of Ca(2+)-ATPase and Na+-K+ ATPase increased remarkably (P < 0.01), and MDA decreased significantly (P < 0.01). These findings indicate tha APN may improve the activity of sarcolemma ATPase in alleviating the Ca(2+) and Na+ -overloading by decreasing the harmful effect of oxygen free radicals. PMID:8731924

  8. Molecular cloning and characterization of Dr-II, a nonfimbrial adhesin-I-like adhesin isolated from gestational pyelonephritis-associated Escherichia coli that binds to decay-accelerating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Pham, T Q; Goluszko, P; Popov, V; Nowicki, S; Nowicki, B J

    1997-01-01

    Bacterial adhesins play an important role in the colonization of the human urogenital tract. Escherichia coli Dr family adhesins have been found to be frequently expressed in strains associated with pyelonephritis in pregnant females. The tissue receptor for known Dr adhesins has been localized to the short consensus repeat-3 (SCR-3) domain of decay accelerating factor (DAF), a complement regulatory protein. In this report, we identified and cloned draE2, a gene encoding a novel 17-kDa DAF-binding adhesin, Dr-II, from a strain of E. coli associated with acute gestational pyelonephritis. Despite the significant sequence diversity between Dr-II and Dr family adhesins, the receptor of Dr-II was found to be the SCR-3 domain of DAF. Sequence analysis of the 186-amino-acid Dr-II open reading frame revealed significant diversity from other members of the Dr adhesin family, including Dr, AFA-I, AFA-III, and F1845, but only an 8-amino-acid difference in sequence from that of the 17-kDa nonfimbrial adhesin NFA-I of unknown receptor specificity. N-terminal peptide sequencing of the purified adhesin confirmed the identity of the open reading frame and indicated cleavage of a 28-amino-acid signal peptide. Antibodies raised against purified Dr-II adhesin exhibited little or no cross-reactivity to Dr adhesin. Characterization of the biological properties demonstrated that like the Dr adhesins, Dr-II was associated with the ability of E. coli to bind to tubular basement membranes and Bowman's capsule and to be internalized into HeLa cells. PMID:9317041

  9. Silencing of CYP6 and APN Genes Affects the Growth and Development of Rice Yellow Stem Borer, Scirpophaga incertulas

    PubMed Central

    Kola, Vijaya Sudhakara Rao; Renuka, P.; Padmakumari, Ayyagari Phani; Mangrauthia, Satendra K.; Balachandran, Sena M.; Ravindra Babu, V.; Madhav, Maganti S.

    2016-01-01

    RNAi is a powerful tool to target the insect genes involved in host-pest interactions. Key insect genes are the choice for silencing to achieve pest derived resistance where resistance genes are not available in gene pool of host plant. In this study, an attempt was made to determine the effect of dsRNA designed from two genes Cytochrome P450 derivative (CYP6) and Aminopeptidase N (APN) of rice yellow stem borer (YSB) on growth and development of insect. The bioassays involved injection of chemically synthesized 5′ FAM labeled 21-nt dsRNA into rice cut stems and allowing the larvae to feed on these stems which resulted in increased mortality and observed growth and development changes in larval length and weight compared with its untreated control at 12–15 days after treatment. These results were further supported by observing the reduction in transcripts expression of these genes in treated larvae. Fluorescence detection in treated larvae also proved that dsRNA was readily taken by larvae when fed on dsRNA treated stems. These results from the present study clearly show that YSB larvae fed on dsRNA designed from Cytochrome P450 and Aminopeptidase N has detrimental effect on larval growth and development. These genes can be deployed to develop YSB resistance in rice using RNAi approach. PMID:26903874

  10. [Serum resistance of Escherichia coli in chronic pyelonephritis. 1. Serum resistance in the human serum pool].

    PubMed

    Falkenhagen, U; Handschuck, I; Ulisko, I N; Ratiner YuA; Nimmich, W; Zingler, G; Naumann, G

    1984-07-01

    123 patients of the kidney department of the Clinic for Inner Medicine of Rostock University suffering from chronic pyelonephritis were taken into microbiological observation for between one and four years. 170 E. coli strains were bred from 59 patients with significant bacteriuria in the course of the disease and their serum resistence was determined with pooled human serum using Taylor's method. 78.24% of the strains examined were serum-sensitive, 11.18% intermediate and 10.59% serum-resistent. All strains were O-, K- and H-typed. 57.06% were successfully O-typed and were distributed over 40 O-serogroups. 24.12% were not typable and 18.82% were rough colonies. 86.50% of the resistent and intermediate strains strains were O-typable, 13.50% could not be typed. The significance of E. coli antigens (O, K, H) and serum resistence for the maintenance of a chronic infection is discussed. PMID:6385542

  11. Ileal Neobladder With Mucous Plugs as a Cause of Obstructive Acute Kidney Injury Requiring Emergent Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Singla, Montish; Shikha, Deep; Lee, Sunggeun; Baumstein, Donald; Chaudhari, Ashok; Carbajal, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Ileal neobladder is the preferred technique in the management of urinary diversion postradical cystectomy for bladder malignancy. The common complications associated with this procedure are atrophied kidney, chronic pyelonephritis, decreased renal function, ureteroileal or urethral anastomotic site stricture, urinary tract stones, incontinence, and hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis. Mucous plugs are also seen in 2%-3% patients. We present a rare presentation of a patient who required hemodialysis for severe hyperkalemia and acute kidney injury caused by mucous plugging of ileal neobladder. PMID:25420078

  12. Imaging diagnosis-ultrasonographic and CT findings in a gray seal (Halichoerus grypus) with hepatic cirrhosis, pyelonephritis, and nephrolithiasis.

    PubMed

    de Swarte, Marie; Bryan, Jill; Zarelli, Micaela; Huuskonen, Vihelmiina; Schneeweiss, Wilfried; McAllister, Hester

    2013-01-01

    An immature gray seal was presented with lethargy, weight loss, vomiting and hematuria. Hepatic disease and urinary tract infection were suspected. Abdominal ultrasound showed hyperechoic structures with marked acoustic shadowing spread throughout both kidneys, but incomplete visualization of the liver. Abdominal CT showed mineral densities scattered throughout both kidneys and poor delineation of the liver. Due to the poor quality of life, the seal was euthanized. Postmortem examination showed ammonium urate nephroliths, pyelonephritis, and hepatic cirrhosis. This case report emphasizes the difficulty of characterizing liver disease with conventional 2D-ultrasound and CT in a deep-chested animal with minimal intra-abdominal fat. PMID:23578275

  13. Prediction of Cortical Defect Using C-Reactive Protein and Urine Sodium to Potassium Ratio in Infants with Febrile Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Su Jin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We investigated whether C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, urine protein-creatinine ratio (uProt/Cr), and urine electrolytes can be useful for discriminating acute pyelonephritis (APN) from other febrile illnesses or the presence of a cortical defect on 99mTc dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scanning (true APN) from its absence in infants with febrile urinary tract infection (UTI). Materials and Methods We examined 150 infants experiencing their first febrile UTI and 100 controls with other febrile illnesses consecutively admitted to our hospital from January 2010 to December 2012. Blood (CRP, electrolytes, Cr) and urine tests [uProt/Cr, electrolytes, and sodium-potassium ratio (uNa/K)] were performed upon admission. All infants with UTI underwent DMSA scans during admission. All data were compared between infants with UTI and controls and between infants with or without a cortical defect on DMSA scans. Using multiple logistic regression analysis, the ability of the parameters to predict true APN was analyzed. Results CRP levels and uProt/Cr were significantly higher in infants with true APN than in controls. uNa levels and uNa/K were significantly lower in infants with true APN than in controls. CRP levels and uNa/K were relevant factors for predicting true APN. The method using CRP levels, u-Prot/Cr, u-Na levels, and uNa/K had a sensitivity of 94%, specificity of 65%, positive predictive value of 60%, and negative predictive value of 95% for predicting true APN. Conclusion We conclude that these parameters are useful for discriminating APN from other febrile illnesses or discriminating true APN in infants with febrile UTI. PMID:26632389

  14. Flank pain and acute renal failure after binge drinking: a growing concern?

    PubMed

    Calviño, Jesús; Bravo, Juan; Millán, Beatriz; Gonzalez-Tabares, Lourdes

    2013-01-01

    We describe two cases of acute renal failure (ARF) after heavy alcohol intake. Remarkable features included a few days latency period after binge drinking, acute flank pain resembling pyelonephritis, lack of rhabdomyolysis or liver injury, and concomitant intake of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Renal function improved with conservative treatment, and despite NSAIDs use, hyperkalemia was not clinically significant. Since binge drinking is common in the Western population, early recognition of this syndrome may be helpful when examining a patient with flank pain and ARF of unclear etiology. PMID:23477481

  15. Test Administrator's Handbook and Student Instructions for Job-Task Performance Tests for Doppler Radar, AN/APN-147 and its Computer AN/ASN-35, and Associated Test Equipment and Hand Tools. Report for June-December 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matrix Research Co., Alexandria, VA.

    The handbook covers a comprehensive series of Job-Task Performance Tests for the Doppler Radar (AN/APN) and its Associated Computer (AN/ASN-35). The test series has been developed to measure job performance of the electronic technician. These tests encompass all phases of day-to-day preventative and corrective maintenance that technicians are…

  16. Extended virulence genotypes and phylogenetic background of Escherichia coli isolates from patients with cystitis, pyelonephritis, or prostatitis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, James R; Kuskowski, Michael A; Gajewski, Abby; Soto, Sara; Horcajada, Juan Pablo; Jimenez de Anta, M Teresa; Vila, Jordi

    2005-01-01

    Molecular analysis of 63 Escherichia coli urine isolates showed that pyelonephritis (n=23) and prostatitis (n=17) isolates exhibited more virulence factors (VFs) among the 35 sought than did cystitis isolates (n=23). Several nontraditional VFs--including bmaE (M fimbriae), gafD (G fimbriae), fyuA (yersiniabactin receptor), ireA and iroN (novel siderophore receptors), cvaC (colicin [microcin] V), traT (serum-resistance associated), ibeA (invasion of brain endothelium), ompT (outer membrane protease T), and malX (pathogenicity island marker)--either differentiated significantly between syndromes (despite small numbers of isolates and possible multiple-comparison artifacts) or were broadly prevalent. Thus, interventions that target conserved uro-VFs may be possible, despite the likely existence of syndrome-specific pathogenetic mechanisms and/or host defense systems. PMID:15593002

  17. Usefulness of neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio in young children with febrile urinary tract infection

    PubMed Central

    Han, Song Yi; Lee, I Re; Park, Se Jin; Kim, Ji Hong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Acute pyelonephritis (APN) is a serious bacterial infection that can cause renal scarring in children. Early identification of APN is critical to improve treatment outcomes. The neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) is a prognostic marker of many diseases, but it has not yet been established in urinary tract infection (UTI). The aim of this study was to determine whether NLR is a useful marker to predict APN or vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). Methods We retrospectively evaluated 298 pediatric patients (age≤36 months) with febrile UTI from January 2010 to December 2014. Conventional infection markers (white blood cell [WBC] count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate [ESR], C-reactive protein [CRP]), and NLR were measured. Results WBC, CRP, ESR, and NLR were higher in APN than in lower UTI (P<0.001). Multiple logistic regression analyses showed that NLR was a predictive factor for positive dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) defects (P<0.001). The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was high for NLR (P<0.001) as well as CRP (P<0.001) for prediction of DMSA defects. NLR showed the highest area under the ROC curve for diagnosis of VUR (P<0.001). Conclusion NLR can be used as a diagnostic marker of APN with DMSA defect, showing better results than those of conventional markers for VUR prediction. PMID:27186221

  18. Recommended Initial Antimicrobial Therapy for Emphysematous Pyelonephritis: 51 Cases and 14-Year-Experience of a Tertiary Referral Center.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yu-Chuan; Hong, Jian-Hua; Chiang, Bing-Juin; Pong, Yuan-Hung; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Huang, Chao-Yuan; Pu, Yeong-Shiau

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the profiles of pathogens and patterns of antibiotic resistance of emphysematous pyelonephritis (EPN), offering recommendations for initial antibiotic treatment.Between January, 2001, and November, 2014, demographic data, presenting clinical features, management strategies, and treatment outcomes of 51 patients with EPN were retrospectively reviewed, analyzing microbiological characteristics of causative pathogens and patterns of antibiotic resistance.Overall survival rate was 90.2% (46/51). Pathogens isolated most frequently were Escherichia coli (49.0%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (19.6%), and Proteus mirabilis (17.7%). Approximately 24% of E coli isolates and 22% K pneumoniae isolates were resistant to fluoroquinolones. Improper empiric antibiotic use (P = 0.02) and third-generation cephalosporin-resistant pathogens (G3CRP) (P = 0.01) were significantly more common in cases of patient fatality. Prior hospitalization and antibiotic use within past year (P = 0.03), need for emergency hemodialysis (P = 0.03), and development of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) (P = 0.03) were factors correlating significantly with microbial resistance to third-generation cephalosporins. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.91. The cut-off point determined by the maximum Youden index for 2 of these 3 factors yielded a sensitivity of 0.8 and specificity of 0.93.Third-generation cephalosporins are recommended as initial treatment of EPN. In patients with histories of prior hospitalization and antibiotic use and in those needing emergency hemodialysis or developing DIC, carbapenem is the empiric antibiotic of choice. Patients presenting with 2 or more factors carry the highest risk of G3CRP involvement. Fluoroquinolone and gentamicin should be avoided. PMID:27227920

  19. The Effect of Statins Use on the Risk and Outcome of Acute Bacterial Infections in Adult Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ghorbani, Raheb; Afshar, Reza Kiaee

    2015-01-01

    Background Beyond their lipid-lowering abilities, statins have anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties. In view of these effects, a growing interest has emerged in the possible role of statins, in preventing or decreasing morbidity and mortality from infection. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine whether previous statin use is associated with reduced risk of acute bacterial infections and better outcome of these infections. Materials and Methods In this historical cohort study, consecutive adult patients admitted with acute bacterial infection were enrolled. Control group were selected from adult outpatient and without history of acute bacterial infections. Acute bacterial infections included in this study were; pneumonia, acute pyelonephritis, cellulitis and sepsis with unknown origin. Data about baseline characteristics, co-morbidities and statins use of two groups was obtained. Results Finally 144 patients met inclusion criteria and were enrolled. Same numbers of controls were selected. Two groups were matched based on most baseline characteristics and co-morbidities. The patients’ categories were as follows: pneumonia 42.3%, acute pyelonephritis 23.6%, cellulitis 16% and sepsis 18%. From all participants 29.9% of patients and 45.8% controls were statin users. There was significant association between previous statin use and reduced risk of acute bacterial infections (Mantel Haenszel Weighted Odds Ratio=0.51, 95% CI: 0.30-0.85, p=0.009). Duration of hospitalization was significantly shorter in statin users (p=0.002). Hospital mortality rate was lower (14.6%) in statins users when compared with non-users (18.8%) with significant difference (p=0.028). Conclusion Prior therapy with statins is associated with considerably reduced onset of acute bacterial infections and better outcome in adult patients. PMID:26676277

  20. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... or though physical contact (for example, on unwashed hands). Being exposed to tobacco smoke, air pollution, dusts, vapors, and fumes can also cause acute bronchitis. Less often, bacteria can also cause acute bronchitis. To diagnose acute ...

  1. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... control. Menopause also increases the risk for a urinary tract infection. The following also increase your chances of having ...

  2. Ampicillin plus mecillinam vs. cefotaxime/cefadroxil treatment of patients with severe pneumonia or pyelonephritis: a double-blind multicentre study evaluated by intention-to-treat analysis.

    PubMed

    Cronberg, S; Banke, S; Bruno, A M; Carlsson, M; Elmrud, H; Elowsson, S; Josefsson, K; Lindholm, A C; Montelius, H; Neringer, R

    1995-01-01

    In this double-blind multicentre study, using the intention-to-treat approach, a total of 293 patients with fever (> or = 38.5 degrees C), symptoms of sepsis and signs of pneumonia or pyelonephritis were randomly assigned to treatment with ampicillin and mecillinam (A+M) or cefotaxime followed by cefadroxil. In the febrile phase, treatment was given intravenously twice daily, either with 1,200 mg ampicillin together with 600 mg mecillinam or with 2 g cefotaxime alone. When the patients stayed afebrile, the intravenous administration was replaced by oral treatment twice daily for 14 days, either with 500 mg pivampicillin and 400 mg pivmecillinam or 1 g cefadroxil. In the A+M group, 33% (48/144) of the patients did not complete the full course of treatment as compared with 32% (47/149) in the cephalosporin group, the reasons being treatment failure in 27 and 29, respectively, or adverse effects (n = 16 in both groups). The median duration of fever was 47 h in the A + M group and 50 h in the cephalosporin group. Of 135 patients with pneumonia, 68% were completely cured in the A + M group, and 65% in the cephalosporin group, the main reasons for treatment failure being Mycoplasma pneumonia or ornithosis. Of 136 patients with pyelonephritis, 63% were cured in each group. The main reason for failure was bacteriological relapse. Side-effects were reported by 32 patients (22%) of the A+M group, as compared with 41 (28%) of the cephalosporin group. Epigastric complaints were equally frequent in both groups, but there was a tendency for a higher frequency of exanthema in the A+M group, and for antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and fungal superinfections in the cephalosporin group. PMID:8588136

  3. Expanding acute care nurse practitioner and clinical nurse specialist education: invasive procedure training and human simulation in critical care.

    PubMed

    Hravnak, Marilyn; Tuite, Patricia; Baldisseri, Marie

    2005-01-01

    Programs educating advanced practice nurses (APNs), including acute care nurse practitioners (ACNPs) and clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) may struggle with the degree to which technical and cognitive skills necessary and unique to the care of critically ill patients should be incorporated within training programs, and the best ways these skills can be synthesized and retained for clinical practice. This article describes the critical care technical skills training mechanisms and use of a High-Fidelity Human Simulation (HFHS) Laboratory in the ACNP and CNS programs at the University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing. The mechanisms for teaching invasive procedures are reviewed including an abbreviated course syllabus and documentation tools. The use of HFHS is discussed as a measure to provide students with technical and cognitive preparation to manage critical incidents. The HFHS Laboratory, scenario development and implementation, and the debriefing process are discussed. Critical care technical skills training and the use of simulation in the curriculum have had a favorable response from students and preceptors at the University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, and have enhanced faculty's ability to prepare APNs. PMID:15714021

  4. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    Bronchitis is an inflammation of the bronchial tubes, the airways that carry air to your lungs. It ... chest tightness. There are two main types of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis ...

  5. SoxS Increases the Expression of the Zinc Uptake System ZnuACB in an Escherichia coli Murine Pyelonephritis Model

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Douglas M.

    2012-01-01

    Paralogous transcriptional regulators MarA, Rob, and SoxS act individually and together to control expression of more than 80 Escherichia coli genes. Deletion of marA, rob, and soxS from an E. coli clinical isolate prevents persistence beyond 2 days postinfection in a mouse model of pyelonephritis. We used microarray analysis to identify 242 genes differentially expressed between the triple deletion mutant and its parent strain at 2 days postinfection in the kidney. One of these, znuC of the zinc transport system ZnuACB, displayed decreased expression in the triple mutant compared to that in the parental strain, and deletion of znuC from the parental strain reduced persistence. The marA rob soxS triple deletion mutant was less viable in vitro under limited-Zn and Zn-depleted conditions, while disruption of znuC caused a reduction in the growth rates for the parental and triple mutant strains to equally low levels under limited-Zn or Zn-depleted conditions. Complementation of the triple mutant with soxS, but not marA or rob, restored the parental growth rate in Zn-depleted medium, while deletion of only soxS from the parental strain led to low growth in Zn-depleted medium. Both results suggested that SoxS is a major regulator responsible for growth under Zn-depleted conditions. Gel shift experiments failed to show direct binding of SoxS to the znuCB promoter, thus suggesting indirect control of znuCB expression by SoxS. While SoxS expression in the triple mutant fully restored persistence, increased expression of znuACB via a plasmid in this mutant only partially restored wild-type levels of persistence in the kidney. This work implicates SoxS control of znuCB expression as a key factor in persistence of E. coli in murine pyelonephritis. PMID:22210763

  6. Acute nephritic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Glomerulonephritis - acute; Acute glomerulonephritis; Nephritis syndrome - acute ... Acute nephritic syndrome is often caused by an immune response triggered by an infection or other disease. Common causes ...

  7. Acute lobar nephritis in children: Not so easy to recognize and manage

    PubMed Central

    Bibalo, Cristina; Apicella, Andrea; Guastalla, Veronica; Marzuillo, Pierluigi; Zennaro, Floriana; Tringali, Carmela; Taddio, Andrea; Germani, Claudio; Barbi, Egidio

    2016-01-01

    Acute lobar nephritis (ALN) is a localized non-liquefactive inflammatory renal bacterial infection, which typically involves one or more lobes. ALN is considered to be a midpoint in the spectrum of upper urinary tract infection, a spectrum ranging from uncomplicated pyelonephritis to intrarenal abscess. This condition may be difficult to recognize due to the lack of specific symptoms and laboratory findings. Therefore the disease is probably underdiagnosed. Computed tomography scanning represents the diagnostic gold standard for ALN, but magnetic resonance imagine could be considered in order to limit irradiation. The diagnosis is relevant since initial intravenous antibiotic therapy and overall length of treatment should not be shorter than 3 wk. We review the literature and analyze the ALN clinical presentation starting from four cases with the aim to give to the clinicians the elements to suspect and recognize the ALN in children. PMID:26862513

  8. Acute lobar nephritis in children: Not so easy to recognize and manage.

    PubMed

    Bibalo, Cristina; Apicella, Andrea; Guastalla, Veronica; Marzuillo, Pierluigi; Zennaro, Floriana; Tringali, Carmela; Taddio, Andrea; Germani, Claudio; Barbi, Egidio

    2016-02-01

    Acute lobar nephritis (ALN) is a localized non-liquefactive inflammatory renal bacterial infection, which typically involves one or more lobes. ALN is considered to be a midpoint in the spectrum of upper urinary tract infection, a spectrum ranging from uncomplicated pyelonephritis to intrarenal abscess. This condition may be difficult to recognize due to the lack of specific symptoms and laboratory findings. Therefore the disease is probably underdiagnosed. Computed tomography scanning represents the diagnostic gold standard for ALN, but magnetic resonance imagine could be considered in order to limit irradiation. The diagnosis is relevant since initial intravenous antibiotic therapy and overall length of treatment should not be shorter than 3 wk. We review the literature and analyze the ALN clinical presentation starting from four cases with the aim to give to the clinicians the elements to suspect and recognize the ALN in children. PMID:26862513

  9. Acute sacroiliitis.

    PubMed

    Slobodin, Gleb; Rimar, Doron; Boulman, Nina; Kaly, Lisa; Rozenbaum, Michael; Rosner, Itzhak; Odeh, Majed

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the data on the etiology, risk factors, clinical presentations, and diagnosis of acute sacroiliitis. A Pubmed search utilizing the indexing term "acute sacroiliitis" was conducted and the data pertinent to the aim of the review was extracted and organized in accordance with the preplanned structure of the manuscript. The diagnosis of acute sacroiliitis is often challenging because of both the relative rarity of this presentation and diverse character of acute sacroiliac pain, frequently mimicking other, more prevalent disorders. Technetium bone scintigraphy can localize the disease process to the sacroiliac joint, while computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging can be used for the detailed characterization and the extent of the disease as well as the diagnosis of complications. Pyogenic sacroiliitis is by far the most common cause of acute sacroiliitis. Brucellosis, acute sacroiliitis in the course of reactive arthritis, and crystalline-induced sacroiliitis frequently imitate pyogenic sacroiliitis. Acute sacroiliitis can rarely be also related to hematological malignancies or treatment with isotretinoin. Awareness to the possibility of acute sacroiliitis and a thorough physical examination are the necessary prerequisites to its timely diagnosis, while the appropriate laboratory and imaging studies should confirm the precise diagnosis and direct the appropriate treatment strategy. PMID:26847855

  10. Acute malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Dupont, John S

    2006-01-01

    Acute malocclusion can result from disturbances in the maxillary/mandibular tooth relationship. These alterations in the occlusal position can result from high fillings, sinus problems, abscesses, periodontal disease, and moving or erupting teeth. Conditions seen less frequently include acute malocclusions secondary to an event (such as trauma) that make a stable dental relationship an unstable one. Patients can demonstrate any of a number of clinical conditions that interfere with their comfort and ability to function. This article provides information on some of the less familiar causes of acute malocclusion. PMID:16689064

  11. Comparison of Intranasal Outer Membrane Vesicles with Cholera Toxin and Injected MF59C.1 as Adjuvants for Malaria Transmission Blocking Antigens AnAPN1 and Pfs48/45.

    PubMed

    Pritsch, Michael; Ben-Khaled, Najib; Chaloupka, Michael; Kobold, Sebastian; Berens-Riha, Nicole; Peter, Annabell; Liegl, Gabriele; Schubert, Sören; Hoelscher, Michael; Löscher, Thomas; Wieser, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Purified protein vaccines often require adjuvants for efficient stimulation of immune responses. There is no licensed mucosal adjuvant on the market to adequately boost the immune response to purified antigens for intranasal applications in humans. Bacterial outer membrane vesicles (OMV) are attractive candidates potentially combining antigenic and adjuvant properties in one substance. To more precisely characterize the potential of Escherichia coli OMV for intranasal vaccination with heterologous antigens, immune responses for AnAPN1 and Pfs48/45 as well as ovalbumin as a reference antigen were assessed in mice. The intranasal adjuvant cholera toxin (CT) and parenteral adjuvant MF59C.1 were used in comparison. Vaccinations were administered intranasally or subcutaneously. Antibodies (total IgG and IgM as well as subclasses IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgG3) were measured by ELISA. T cell responses (cytotoxic T cells, Th1, Th17, and regulatory T cells) were determined by flow cytometry. When OMV were used as adjuvant for intranasal immunization, antibody and cellular responses against all three antigens could be induced, comparable to cholera toxin and MF59C.1. Antigen-specific IgG titres above 1 : 10(5) could be detected in all groups. This study provides the rationale for further development of OMV as a vaccination strategy in malaria and other diseases. PMID:27239480

  12. Comparison of Intranasal Outer Membrane Vesicles with Cholera Toxin and Injected MF59C.1 as Adjuvants for Malaria Transmission Blocking Antigens AnAPN1 and Pfs48/45

    PubMed Central

    Pritsch, Michael; Ben-Khaled, Najib; Chaloupka, Michael; Kobold, Sebastian; Berens-Riha, Nicole; Peter, Annabell; Liegl, Gabriele; Schubert, Sören; Hoelscher, Michael; Löscher, Thomas; Wieser, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Purified protein vaccines often require adjuvants for efficient stimulation of immune responses. There is no licensed mucosal adjuvant on the market to adequately boost the immune response to purified antigens for intranasal applications in humans. Bacterial outer membrane vesicles (OMV) are attractive candidates potentially combining antigenic and adjuvant properties in one substance. To more precisely characterize the potential of Escherichia coli OMV for intranasal vaccination with heterologous antigens, immune responses for AnAPN1 and Pfs48/45 as well as ovalbumin as a reference antigen were assessed in mice. The intranasal adjuvant cholera toxin (CT) and parenteral adjuvant MF59C.1 were used in comparison. Vaccinations were administered intranasally or subcutaneously. Antibodies (total IgG and IgM as well as subclasses IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgG3) were measured by ELISA. T cell responses (cytotoxic T cells, Th1, Th17, and regulatory T cells) were determined by flow cytometry. When OMV were used as adjuvant for intranasal immunization, antibody and cellular responses against all three antigens could be induced, comparable to cholera toxin and MF59C.1. Antigen-specific IgG titres above 1 : 105 could be detected in all groups. This study provides the rationale for further development of OMV as a vaccination strategy in malaria and other diseases. PMID:27239480

  13. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... bronchitis? Acute bronchitis is almost always caused by viruses that attack the lining of the bronchial tree ... infection. As your body fights back against these viruses, more swelling occurs and more mucus is produced. ...

  14. Acute Pericarditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... large pericardial effusions). Acute pericarditis usually responds to colchicine or NSAIDs (such as aspirin and ibuprofen ) taken ... reduce pain but relieves it by reducing inflammation. Colchicine also decreases the chance of pericarditis returning later. ...

  15. Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) - children

    MedlinePlus

    Acute myelogenous leukemia - children; AML; Acute myeloid leukemia - children; Acute granulocytic leukemia - children; Acute myeloblastic leukemia - children; Acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) - children

  16. Acute Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Hammad; Fasanya, Adebayo; Cheema, Tariq; Singh, Anil C

    2016-01-01

    Acute pneumonia is an active infection of the lungs that results when an individual at risk gets exposed to a particular microbiological pathogen. Acute pneumonia is the leading cause of death in the United States that is attributable to an infection. The risk factors, pathogenesis, and microbiological organisms involved differ if the pneumonia develops in the community versus health care-associated environment. The development of concise and comprehensive guidelines has led to an improvement in the management of the problem. However, the emergence of multidrug-resistant organisms and the increase in the percentage of elderly population keep mortality risk very substantial. PMID:26919676

  17. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary α-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  18. Acute diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Barr, Wendy; Smith, Andrew

    2014-02-01

    Acute diarrhea in adults is a common problem encountered by family physicians. The most common etiology is viral gastroenteritis, a self-limited disease. Increases in travel, comorbidities, and foodborne illness lead to more bacteria-related cases of acute diarrhea. A history and physical examination evaluating for risk factors and signs of inflammatory diarrhea and/or severe dehydration can direct any needed testing and treatment. Most patients do not require laboratory workup, and routine stool cultures are not recommended. Treatment focuses on preventing and treating dehydration. Diagnostic investigation should be reserved for patients with severe dehydration or illness, persistent fever, bloody stool, or immunosuppression, and for cases of suspected nosocomial infection or outbreak. Oral rehydration therapy with early refeeding is the preferred treatment for dehydration. Antimotility agents should be avoided in patients with bloody diarrhea, but loperamide/simethicone may improve symptoms in patients with watery diarrhea. Probiotic use may shorten the duration of illness. When used appropriately, antibiotics are effective in the treatment of shigellosis, campylobacteriosis, Clostridium difficile, traveler's diarrhea, and protozoal infections. Prevention of acute diarrhea is promoted through adequate hand washing, safe food preparation, access to clean water, and vaccinations. PMID:24506120

  19. Sinusitis (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Acute sinusitis is defined pathologically, by transient inflammation of the mucosal lining of the paranasal sinuses lasting less than 4 weeks. Clinically, it is characterised by nasal congestion, rhinorrhoea, facial pain, hyposmia, sneezing, and, if more severe, additional malaise and fever. It affects 1−5% of the adult population each year in Europe. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments in people with clinically diagnosed acute sinusitis, and with radiologically or bacteriologically confirmed acute sinusitis? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to August 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 19 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics (amoxicillin, co-amoxiclav, doxycycline, cephalosporins, macrolides, different doses [amoxicillin, co-amoxiclav, doxycycline, cephalosporins, macrolides], long-course regimens), antihistamines, cephalosporins or macrolides, decongestants (xylometazoline, phenylephrine, pseudoephedrine), doxycycline, saline nasal washes, steam inhalation, and topical corticosteroids (intra-nasal). PMID:19450327

  20. Sinusitis (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Acute sinusitis is defined pathologically, by transient inflammation of the mucosal lining of the paranasal sinuses lasting less than 4 weeks. Clinically, it is characterised by nasal congestion, rhinorrhoea, facial pain, hyposmia, sneezing, and, if more severe, additional malaise and fever. It affects 1% to 5% of the adult population each year in Europe. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments in people with clinically diagnosed acute sinusitis, and in people with radiologically or bacteriologically confirmed acute sinusitis? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 19 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics (amoxicillin, amoxicillin–clavulanic acid [co-amoxiclav], doxycycline, cephalosporins, macrolides; different doses, long-course regimens), antihistamines, decongestants (xylometazoline, phenylephrine, pseudoephedrine), saline nasal washes, steam inhalation, and topical corticosteroids (intranasal). PMID:22189346

  1. Acute glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, N

    2000-09-01

    Acute glomerulonephritis (AGN) is a representative disease of acute nephritic syndrome characterized by the sudden appearance of edema, hematuria, proteinuria, and hypertension. The prototype of AGN is acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (APSGN). "Nephritogenic streptococci" are defined as organisms that are cultured from a patient who develops AGN. Although only a limited number of M-types of streptococci have been recognized as "nephritogenic streptococci", all M-types of streptococci may have nephritogenic potential because the genes for major putative nephritogenic antigens such as SPEB and NAPIr are found to be present in all group A streptococci thus far examined. Pathogenic mechanisms for APSGN involving both humoral and cell-mediated immunity have been recently proposed. The role of humoral immunity is presumed to be mediated by the in situ formation of nephritogenic streptococcal antigen-antibody complexes and circulating immune complexes. While in the cellular immune component a role for delayed-type hypersensitivity has been suggested to contribute to the pathogenesis of APSGN. PMID:10969898

  2. Pyelonephritis (Kidney Infection) in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Griffin Rodgers, Director of the NIDDK Clinical Trials Current research studies and how you can volunteer Community Outreach and Health Fairs Science-based information and tips for planning an outreach effort or community event For Health Care Professionals Patient and provider resources ...

  3. Rapid detection of amoxicillin-susceptible Escherichia coli in fresh uncultured urine: a new tool to limit the use of broad-spectrum empirical therapy of community-acquired pyelonephritis.

    PubMed

    Chapelet, Guillaume; Corvec, Stéphane; Montassier, Emmanuel; Herbreteau, Guillaume; Berrut, Gilles; Batard, Eric; de Decker, Laure

    2016-06-01

    Because of the high prevalence of amoxicillin resistance among uropathogens, amoxicillin is not recommended as an empirical treatment of urinary tract infections (UTIs). Quick detection of an amoxicillin-susceptible Escherichia coli (ASEC) would allow prescribing amoxicillin without preliminary broad-spectrum empirical treatment in uncomplicated pyelonephritis. To quickly diagnose UTIs due to ASEC, we developed a real-time PCR that detects in fresh uncultured urine the E. coli-specific gene yccT as well as the blaTEM and blaCTX-M genes. The ASEC rapid test was considered positive if the PCR was positive for the yccT gene but negative for blaTEM and blaCTX-M. The test was compared with culture and susceptibility testing. Among 200 patients with a suspected community-acquired UTI, 61 (30.5%) had a monobacterial UTI due to ASEC. The ASEC rapid test result was obtained in 3 h 13 [95% confidence interval (CI) 3 h 12-3 h 15] and was positive for 43 patients (21.5%). Specificity and sensitivity were 97.8% (95% CI 95.8-99.8%) and 65.6% (95% CI 59.0-72.1%), respectively. Positive and negative predictive values were 93.0% (95% CI 89.5-96.5%) and 86.6% (95% CI 81.9-91.3%), respectively. Owing to its high specificity and positive predictive value, the ASEC rapid test allows the diagnosis of UTI due to ASEC only 3 h after urine sampling. A positive ASEC rapid test may be used to treat uncomplicated pyelonephritis with amoxicillin from the start, without preliminary broad-spectrum empirical treatment. The ASEC rapid test is a promising tool to spare fluoroquinolones and third-generation cephalosporins in UTIs. PMID:27211827

  4. [Acute myocarditis].

    PubMed

    Combes, Alain

    2012-06-01

    Myocarditis is defined as inflammation of the myocardium accompanied by myocellular necrosis. Acute myocarditis must be considered in patients who present with recent-onset of cardiac failure or arrhythmia. Fulminant myocarditis is a distinct entity characterized by sudden onset of severe congestive heart failure or cardiogenic shock, usually following a flu-like illness, parvovirus B19, human herpesvirus 6, coxsackievirus and adenovirus being the most frequently viruses responsible for the disease. Treatment of myocarditis remains largely supportive, since immunosuppression has not been proven to be beneficial for acute lymphocytic myocarditis. Trials of antiviral therapies, or immunostimulants such as interferons, suggest a potential therapeutic role but require further investigation. Lastly, early recognition of patients rapidly progressing to refractory cardiac failure and their immediate transfer to a medical-surgical center experienced in mechanical circulatory support is warranted. In this setting, ECMO should be the first-line mechanical assistance. For highly unstable patients, a Mobile Cardiac Assistance Unit, that rapidly travels to primary care hospitals with a portable ECMO system and hooks it up before refractory multiorgan failure takes hold, is the preferred option. PMID:22515999

  5. [Acute myocarditis].

    PubMed

    Combes, Alain

    2013-05-01

    Myocarditis is defined as inflammation of the myocardium accompanied by myocellular necrosis. Acute myocarditis must be considered in patients who present with recent onset of cardiac failure or arrhythmia. Fulminant myocarditis is a distinct entity characterized by sudden onset of severe congestive heart failure or cardiogenic shock, usually following a flu-like illness, parvovirus B19, human herpesvirus 6, coxsackievirus and adenovirus being the most frequently viruses responsible for the disease. Treatment of myocarditis remains largely supportive, since immunosuppression has not been proven to be beneficial for acute lymphocytic myocarditis. Trials of antiviral therapies, or immunostimulants such as interferons, suggest a potential therapeutic role but require further investigation. Lastly, early recognition of patients rapidly progressing to refractory cardiac failure and their immediate transfer to a medical-surgical center experienced in mechanical circulatory support is warranted. In this setting, ECMO should be the first-line mechanical assistance. For highly unstable patients, a Mobile Cardiac Assistance Unit, that rapidly travels to primary care hospitals with a portable ECMO system and hooks it up before refractory multiorgan failure takes hold, is the preferred option. PMID:23789482

  6. Acute cerebellar ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    Cerebellar ataxia; Ataxia - acute cerebellar; Cerebellitis; Post-varicella acute cerebellar ataxia; PVACA ... Acute cerebellar ataxia in children, especially younger than age 3, may occur several weeks after an illness caused by a virus. ...

  7. Ear infection - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Otitis media - acute; Infection - inner ear; Middle ear infection - acute ... Casselbrandt ML, Mandel EM. Acute otitis media and otitis media with effusion. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund V, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 6th ed. ...

  8. Acute pain.

    PubMed

    Good, M

    1999-01-01

    The review of acute pain describes the problem of unresolved pain and its effects on the neural, autonomic, and immune systems. Conceptualizations and mechanisms of pain are reviewed as well as theories of pain management. Descriptive studies of patient and nurse factors that inhibit effective pain management are discussed, followed by studies of pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions. Critical analysis reveals that most studies were atheoretical, and therefore, this proliferation of information lacked conceptual coherence and organization. Furthermore, the nature and extent of barriers to pain management were described, but few intervention studies have been devised, as yet, to modify the knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes of nurses and patients that are barriers to pain management. Although some of the complementary therapies have sufficient research support to be used in clinical pain management, the physiological mechanisms and outcomes need to be studied. It is critical at this time to design studies of interventions to improve assessment, decision making, attentive care, and patient teaching. PMID:10418655

  9. Immune biomarker panel monitoring utilizing IDO enzyme activity and CD4 ATP levels: prediction of acute rejection versus viral replication events

    PubMed Central

    Dharnidharka, Vikas R.; Gupta, Sushil; Khasawneh, Eihab Al; Haafiz, Allah; Shuster, Jonathan J.; Theriaque, Douglas W.; Shahlaee, Amir H.; Garrett, Timothy J.

    2011-01-01

    Infections have become as important an event as acute rejection post-transplant for long-term allograft survival. Less invasive biomarkers tested so far predict risk for one event or the other, not both. We prospectively tested blood and urine monthly for twelve months post-transplant from children receiving a kidney transplant. The indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO) enzyme pathway was assessed by mass spectrometry assays using the ratio of product L-kynurenine (kyn) to substrate tryptophan (trp). Kyn/trp ratios and blood CD4 T-cell ATP levels were correlated with acute rejection or major infection events or stable group (no events) in the next 30 days. The 25 subjects experienced 6 discrete episodes of acute rejection in 5 subjects and 16 discrete events of major infection in 14 subjects (7 BK viruria, 6 cytomegaloviremia, 1 Epstein-Barr and cytomegaloviremia, 2 transplant pyelonephritis). Mean serum kyn/trp ratios were significantly elevated in the group that experienced acute rejection (p = 0.02).Within-subject analyses revealed that over time, urine kyn/trp ratios showed an increase (p = 0.01) and blood CD4-ATP levels showed a decrease (p = 0.007) prior to a major infection event. These pilot results suggest that a panel of biomarkers together can predict over- or under-immunosuppression, but need independent validation. PMID:21492353

  10. Genetic Polymorphisms in Inflammasome-Dependent Innate Immunity among Pediatric Patients with Severe Renal Parenchymal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chi-Hui; Lee, Yun-Shien; Chang, Chee-Jen; Lin, Jui-Che; Lin, Tzou-Yien

    2015-01-01

    Background Inflammasome innate immune response activation has been demonstrated in various inflammatory diseases and microbial infections. However, to our knowledge, no study has examined the inflammasome-dependent pathways in patients with urinary tract infection. Defective or variant genes associated with innate immunity are believed to alter the host’s susceptibility to microbial infection. This study investigated genetic polymorphisms in genes encoding inflammasomes and the subsequent released cytokines in pediatric patients with severe renal parenchymal infections. Methodology This study included patients diagnosed with acute pyelonephritis (APN) and acute lobar nephronia (ALN) who had no underlying disease or structural anomalies other than vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping was performed in the genes associated with inflammasome formation and activation (NLRP3, CARD8) and subsequent IL–1β cytokine generation (IL–1β). Principal Findings A total of 40 SNPs were selected for initial genotyping. Analysis of samples from 48 patients each and 96 controls revealed that only nine SNPs (five SNPs in NLRP3; three SNPs in CARD8; one SNP in IL–1β) had heterozygosity rates >0.01. Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium was satisfied for the observed genotype frequencies of these SNPs. Analysis excluding patients with VUR, a well-known risk factor for severe UTIs, revealed a lower frequency of the CC genotype in NLRP3 (rs4612666) in patients with APN and ALN than in controls. Correction for multiple-SNP testing showed that the non-VUR subgroup of the APN+ALN combined patient groups remained significantly different from the control group (P < 0.0055). Conclusions This study is the first to suggest that the inflammasome-dependent innate immunity pathway is associated with the pathogenesis of pediatric severe renal parenchymal infections. Further investigation is warranted to clarify its pathogenic mechanism. PMID:26444566

  11. Leptospirosis Presenting with Rapidly Progressing Acute Renal Failure and Conjugated Hyperbilirubinemia: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Pothuri, Pallavi; Ahuja, Keerat; Kumar, Viki; Lal, Sham; Tumarinson, Taisiya; Mahmood, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Unexplained renal insufficiency combined with hepatic failure is a common problem encountered by clinicians. As with many disease processes involving multi-organ systems, reversible causes are usually not readily identifiable, and for many patients their health deteriorates rapidly. We present a rare cause of acute renal failure and hyperbilirubinemia occurring simultaneously, with leptospirosis presenting as Weil's disease. CASE REPORT A 53-year-old male presented to our clinic with complaints of anuria over the past two days. His symptoms started with dark urine, severe cramps in the thighs, and chills. The patient was a visitor to the United States from Guyana. Positive physical examination findings included mild tachycardia and hypotension, scleral icterus, and tenderness over abdomen, costovertebral angles, and thighs. The patient had a high white blood cell count, thrombocytopenia, renal/hepatic insufficiency, and an urinary tract infection (UTI). The patient was initially treated under the suspicion of acute kidney injury secondary to rhabdomyolysis and pyelonephritis. The patient continued to deteriorate with decreasing platelet counts, worsening renal function, hyperbilirubinemia, and respiratory distress, with no improvement with hemodialysis. Broad-spectrum antibiotics were administered, including doxycycline, due to a high suspicion of leptospirosis. The patient's condition drastically improved after initiation of doxycycline. On subsequent days, the patient's Leptospira antibody results were available, showing titers of more than 1:3200. Hemodialysis was discontinued as the patient started producing urine with improved kidney function. CONCLUSIONS As world travel becomes more economically feasible, we will continue to encounter foreign endemic diseases. Leptospirosis presenting as Weil's disease is a common cause of renal and hyperbilirubinemia in endemic areas. Often, as was the case for our patient where the time from presentation to acute

  12. Acute kidney failure

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure; Renal failure; Renal failure - acute; ARF; Kidney injury - acute ... There are many possible causes of kidney damage. They include: ... cholesterol (cholesterol emboli) Decreased blood flow due to very ...

  13. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    Acute renal arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... kidneys need a good blood supply. The main artery to the kidney is called the renal artery. ...

  14. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    ... arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... often result in permanent kidney failure. Acute arterial occlusion of the renal artery can occur after injury ...

  15. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... hard for blood to do its work. In acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), also called acute lymphoblastic leukemia, there are too ... of white blood cells called lymphocytes or lymphoblasts. ALL is the most common type of cancer in ...

  16. Imaging of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Thoeni, Ruedi F

    2015-11-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammation of the pancreas. Several classification systems have been used in the past but were considered unsatisfactory. A revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis was published that assessed the clinical course and severity of disease; divided acute pancreatitis into interstitial edematous pancreatitis and necrotizing pancreatitis; discerned an early phase (first week) from a late phase (after the first week); and focused on systemic inflammatory response syndrome and organ failure. This article focuses on the revised classification of acute pancreatitis, with emphasis on imaging features, particularly on newly-termed fluid collections and implications for the radiologist. PMID:26526433

  17. Acute loss of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Tristán, Bekinschtein; Gleichgerrcht, Ezequiel; Manes, Facundo

    2015-01-01

    Acute loss of consciousness poses a fascinating scenario for theoretical and clinical research. This chapter introduces a simple yet powerful framework to investigate altered states of consciousness. We then explore the different disorders of consciousness that result from acute brain injury, and techniques used in the acute phase to predict clinical outcome in different patient populations in light of models of acute loss of consciousness. We further delve into post-traumatic amnesia as a model for predicting cognitive sequels following acute loss of consciousness. We approach the study of acute loss of consciousness from a theoretical and clinical perspective to conclude that clinicians in acute care centers must incorporate new measurements and techniques besides the classic coma scales in order to assess their patients with loss of consciousness. PMID:25702218

  18. Decitabine in Treating Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Georgios K; Harissis, Haralampos; Mitsis, Michalis; Batsis, Haralampos; Fatouros, Michalis

    2012-04-28

    We report a case of acute chylous ascites formation presenting as peritonitis (acute chylous peritonitis) in a patient suffering from acute pancreatitis due to hypertriglyceridemia and alcohol abuse. The development of chylous ascites is usually a chronic process mostly involving malignancy, trauma or surgery, and symptoms arise as a result of progressive abdominal distention. However, when accumulation of "chyle" occurs rapidly, the patient may present with signs of peritonitis. Preoperative diagnosis is difficult since the clinical picture usually suggests hollow organ perforation, appendicitis or visceral ischemia. Less than 100 cases of acute chylous peritonitis have been reported. Pancreatitis is a rare cause of chyloperitoneum and in almost all of the cases chylous ascites is discovered some days (or even weeks) after the onset of symptoms of pancreatitis. This is the second case in the literature where the patient presented with acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis, and the presence of chyle within the abdominal cavity was discovered simultaneously with the establishment of the diagnosis of pancreatitis. The patient underwent an exploratory laparotomy for suspected perforated duodenal ulcer, since, due to hypertriglyceridemia, serum amylase values appeared within the normal range. Moreover, abdominal computed tomography imaging was not diagnostic for pancreatitis. Following abdominal lavage and drainage, the patient was successfully treated with total parenteral nutrition and octreotide. PMID:22563182

  20. Acute Arterial Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Dagnone, L. E.; Brown, P. M.

    1983-01-01

    The response of the primary care physician in the initial assessment and management of acute arterial injuries will often be the deciding factor in survival of life, limb or organ system. Most arterial emergencies occur as a result of trauma, disruption of vessel wall and/or occlusion of flow. The common clinical syndromes of acute arterial emergencies are injuries to and beyond the aorta, acute aortic dissection, ruptured aortic aneurysm, and thromboembolic occlusive arterial disease. The role of arteriography and the urgency of definitive surgical repair in acute arterial emergencies is summarized. PMID:21283323

  1. Acute phase reaction and acute phase proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Gruys, E.; Toussaint, M.J.M.; Niewold, T.A.; Koopmans, S.J.

    2005-01-01

    A review of the systemic acute phase reaction with major cytokines involved, and the hepatic metabolic changes, negative and positive acute phase proteins (APPs) with function and associated pathology is given. It appears that APPs represent appropriate analytes for assessment of animal health. Whereas they represent non-specific markers as biological effect reactants, they can be used for assessing nutritional deficits and reactive processes, especially when positive and negative acute phase variables are combined in an index. When such acute phase index is applied to separate healthy animals from animals with some disease, much better results are obtained than with single analytes and statistically acceptable results for culling individual animals may be reached. Unfortunately at present no cheap, comprehensive and easy to use system is available for assessing various acute phase proteins in serum or blood samples at the same time. Protein microarray or fluid phase microchip technology may satisfy this need; and permit simultaneous analysis of numerous analytes in the same small volume sample and enable integration of information derived from systemic reactivity and nutrition with disease specific variables. Applying such technology may help to solve health problems in various countries not only in animal husbandry but also in human populations. PMID:16252337

  2. Acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Lang, Joanna; Zuber, Kim; Davis, Jane

    2016-04-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) complicates up to 20% of all hospital admissions. Responding to the increase in admissions, complications, mortality, morbidity, and cost of AKI, Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes convened an expert panel to study the issue, review the literature, and publish guidelines to evaluate and treat patients with AKI in the acute setting. This article reviews those guidelines. PMID:27023656

  3. Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Gray, Matthew Philip; Gorelick, Marc H

    2016-06-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is a primarily pediatric, immune-mediated disease characterized by demyelination and polyfocal neurologic symptoms that typically occur after a preceding viral infection or recent immunization. This article presents the pathophysiology, diagnostic criteria, and magnetic resonance imaging characteristics of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. We also present evaluation and management strategies. PMID:27253358

  4. Poznan acute Astronomical Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    This Poznan acute Astronomical Observatory is a unit of the Adam Mickiewicz University, located in Poznan acute, Poland. From its foundation in 1919, it has specialized in astrometry and celestial mechanics (reference frames, dynamics of satellites and small solar system bodies). Recently, research activities have also included planetary and stellar astrophysics (asteroid photometry, catalysmic b...

  5. Acute Hepatic Porphyria

    PubMed Central

    Bissell, D. Montgomery; Wang, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    The porphyrias comprise a set of diseases, each representing an individual defect in one of the eight enzymes mediating the pathway of heme synthesis. The diseases are genetically distinct but have in common the overproduction of heme precursors. In the case of the acute (neurologic) porphyrias, the cause of symptoms appears to be overproduction of a neurotoxic precursor. For the cutaneous porphyrias, it is photosensitizing porphyrins. Some types have both acute and cutaneous manifestations. The clinical presentation of acute porphyria consists of abdominal pain, nausea, and occasionally seizures. Only a small minority of those who carry a mutation for acute porphyria have pain attacks. The triggers for an acute attack encompass certain medications and severely decreased caloric intake. The propensity of females to acute attacks has been linked to internal changes in ovarian physiology. Symptoms are accompanied by large increases in delta-aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen in plasma and urine. Treatment of an acute attack centers initially on pain relief and elimination of inducing factors such as medications; glucose is administered to reverse the fasting state. The only specific treatment is administration of intravenous hemin. An important goal of treatment is preventing progression of the symptoms to a neurological crisis. Patients who progress despite hemin administration have undergone liver transplantation with complete resolution of symptoms. A current issue is the unavailability of a rapid test for urine porphobilinogen in the urgent-care setting. PMID:26357631

  6. Acute Lung Failure

    PubMed Central

    Mac Sweeney, Rob; McAuley, Daniel F.; Matthay, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Lung failure is the most common organ failure seen in the intensive care unit. The pathogenesis of acute respiratory failure (ARF) can be classified as (1) neuromuscular in origin, (2) secondary to acute and chronic obstructive airway diseases, (3) alveolar processes such as cardiogenic and noncardiogenic pulmonary edema and pneumonia, and (4) vascular diseases such as acute or chronic pulmonary embolism. This article reviews the more common causes of ARF from each group, including the pathological mechanisms and the principles of critical care management, focusing on the supportive, specific, and adjunctive therapies for each condition. PMID:21989697

  7. Acute porphyric disorders.

    PubMed

    Moore, A W; Coke, J M

    2000-09-01

    Acute porphyrias are classified into 3 distinct groups of rare genetic disorders of metabolic enzyme biosynthesis. Acute porphyrias can significantly impact multiple organ systems, which often provides a challenge to the dentist presented with such a patient. A case of hereditary coproporphyria is reported in a patient with many of the classical signs and symptoms. The patient also had complex dental needs that required special medical and pharmacotherapeutic modifications. The acute porphyrias are reviewed by the authors with presentation of this challenging case. Recommendations for other dental health care professionals encountering these patients are then presented. PMID:10982942

  8. Weight Loss & Acute Porphyria

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sale You are here Home Diet and Nutrition Weight loss & acute Porphyria Being overweight is a particular problem ... one of these diseases before they enter a weight-loss program. Also, they should not participate in a ...

  9. Acute mountain sickness

    MedlinePlus

    High altitude cerebral edema; Altitude anoxia; Altitude sickness; Mountain sickness; High altitude pulmonary edema ... Acute mountain sickness is caused by reduced air pressure and lower oxygen levels at high altitudes. The faster you ...

  10. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... chap 33. Lee WL, Slutsky AS. Acute hypoxemic respiratory failure and ARDS. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016: ...

  11. Acute coronary syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Heart attack-ACS; Myocardial infarction-ACS; MI-ACS; Acute MI-ACS; ST-elevation myocardial infarction-ACS; Non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction-ACS; Unstable angina-ACS; Accelerating angina-ACS; New- ...

  12. Ear infection - acute

    MedlinePlus

    ... Risk factors for acute ear infections include: Attending day care (especially centers with more than 6 children) Changes ... hands and toys often. If possible, choose a day care that has 6 or fewer children. This can ...

  13. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... sudden inflammation of the pancreas manifested clinically by abdominal pain, nausea and dehydration that is usually self-limiting ... room for evaluation should they develop any abnormal abdominal pain symptoms. Conclusions While a rare event, acute pancreatitis ...

  14. Acute Flaccid Myelitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) is a condition that affects the nervous system, ... from a variety of causes including viral infections. AFM is characterized by a sudden weakness in one ...

  15. Acute genital ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-García, Silvia; Palacios-Marqués, Ana; Martínez-Escoriza, Juan Carlos; Martín-Bayón, Tina-Aurora

    2014-01-01

    Acute genital ulcers, also known as acute vulvar ulcers, ulcus vulvae acutum or Lipschütz ulcers, refer to an ulceration of the vulva or lower vagina of non-venereal origin that usually presents in young women, predominantly virgins. Although its incidence is unknown, it seems a rare entity, with few cases reported in the literature. Their aetiology and pathogenesis are still unknown. The disease is characterised by an acute onset of flu-like symptoms with single or multiple painful ulcers on the vulva. Diagnosis is mainly clinical, after exclusion of other causes of vulvar ulcers. The treatment is mainly symptomatic, with spontaneous resolution in 2 weeks and without recurrences in most cases. We present a case report of a 13-year-old girl with two episodes of acute ulcers that fit the clinical criteria for Lipschütz ulcers. PMID:24473429

  16. Acute Radiation Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dictionary Radiation Emergencies & Your Health Possible Health Effects Contamination and Exposure Acute Radiation Syndrome (ARS) Cutaneous Radiation ... Decision Making in Radiation Emergencies Protective Actions Internal Contamination Clinical Reference (ICCR) Application Psychological First Aid in ...

  17. Feigning Acute Intermittent Porphyria

    PubMed Central

    Elkhatib, Rania; Idowu, Modupe; Brown, Gregory S.; Jaber, Yasmeen M.; Reid, Matthew B.; Person, Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is an autosomal dominant genetic defect in heme synthesis. Patients with this illness can have episodic life-threatening attacks characterized by abdominal pain, neurological deficits, and psychiatric symptoms. Feigning this illness has not been reported in the English language literature to date. Here, we report on a patient who presented to the hospital with an acute attack of porphyria requesting opiates. Diligent assessment of extensive prior treatment records revealed thirteen negative tests for AIP. PMID:25525547

  18. Differentiating Acute Otitis Media and Acute Mastoiditis in Hospitalized Children.

    PubMed

    Laulajainen-Hongisto, Anu; Aarnisalo, Antti A; Jero, Jussi

    2016-10-01

    Acute otitis media is a common infection in children. Most acute otitis media episodes can be treated at an outpatient setting with antimicrobials, or only expectant observation. Hospital treatment with parenteral medication, and myringotomy or tympanostomy, may be needed to treat those with severe, prolonged symptoms, or with complications. The most common intratemporal complication of acute otitis media is acute mastoiditis. If a child with acute mastoiditis does not respond to this treatment, or if complications develop, further examinations and other surgical procedures, including mastoidectomy, are considered. Since the treatment of complicated acute otitis media and complicated acute mastoiditis differs, it is important to differentiate these two conditions. This article focuses on the differential diagnostics of acute otitis media and acute mastoiditis in children. PMID:27613655

  19. Leptospirosis Presenting with Rapidly Progressing Acute Renal Failure and Conjugated Hyperbilirubinemia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Pothuri, Pallavi; Ahuja, Keerat; Kumar, Viki; Lal, Sham; Tumarinson, Taisiya; Mahmood, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 53 Final Diagnosis: Leptospirosis Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: None Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Rare disease Background: Unexplained renal insufficiency combined with hepatic failure is a common problem encountered by clinicians. As with many disease processes involving multi-organ systems, reversible causes are usually not readily identifiable, and for many patients their health deteriorates rapidly. We present a rare cause of acute renal failure and hyperbilirubinemia occurring simultaneously, with leptospirosis presenting as Weil’s disease. Case Report: A 53-year-old male presented to our clinic with complaints of anuria over the past two days. His symptoms started with dark urine, severe cramps in the thighs, and chills. The patient was a visitor to the United States from Guyana. Positive physical examination findings included mild tachycardia and hypotension, scleral icterus, and tenderness over abdomen, costovertebral angles, and thighs. The patient had a high white blood cell count, thrombocytopenia, renal/hepatic insufficiency, and an urinary tract infection (UTI). The patient was initially treated under the suspicion of acute kidney injury secondary to rhabdomyolysis and pyelonephritis. The patient continued to deteriorate with decreasing platelet counts, worsening renal function, hyperbilirubinemia, and respiratory distress, with no improvement with hemodialysis. Broad-spectrum antibiotics were administered, including doxycycline, due to a high suspicion of leptospirosis. The patient’s condition drastically improved after initiation of doxycycline. On subsequent days, the patient’s Leptospira antibody results were available, showing titers of more than 1:3200. Hemodialysis was discontinued as the patient started producing urine with improved kidney function. Conclusions: As world travel becomes more economically feasible, we will continue to encounter foreign endemic diseases. Leptospirosis

  20. Flavopiridol, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Acute bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    Grover, Sudhanshu; Jindal, Atul; Bansal, Arun; Singhi, Sunit C

    2011-11-01

    Acute asthma is the third commonest cause of pediatric emergency visits at PGIMER. Typically, it presents with acute onset respiratory distress and wheeze in a patient with past or family history of similar episodes. The severity of the acute episode of asthma is judged clinically and categorized as mild, moderate and severe. The initial therapy consists of oxygen, inhaled beta-2 agonists (salbutamol or terbutaline), inhaled budesonide (three doses over 1 h, at 20 min interval) in all and ipratropium bromide and systemic steroids (hydrocortisone or methylprednisolone) in acute severe asthma. Other causes of acute onset wheeze and breathing difficulty such as pneumonia, foreign body, cardiac failure etc. should be ruled out with help of chest radiography and appropriate laboratory investigations in first time wheezers and those not responding to 1 h of inhaled therapy. In case of inadequate response or worsening, intravenous infusion of magnesium sulphate, terbutaline or aminophylline may be used. Magnesium sulphate is the safest and most effective alternative among these. Severe cases may need ICU care and rarely, ventilatory support. PMID:21769523

  2. Acute Appendicitis Secondary to Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Eduardo A.; Lopez, Marvin A.; Valluri, Kartik; Wang, Danlu; Fischer, Andrew; Perdomo, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 43 Final Diagnosis: Myeloid sarcoma appendicitis Symptoms: Abdominal pain • chills • fever Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Laparoscopic appendectomy, bone marrow biopsy Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare disease Background: The gastrointestinal tract is a rare site for extramedullary involvement in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Case Report: A 43-year-old female with no past medical history presented complaining of mild abdominal pain, fever, and chills for the past day. On examination, she was tachycardic and febrile, with mild tenderness of her right lower quadrant and without signs of peritoneal irritation. Laboratory examination revealed pancytopenia and DIC, with a fibrinogen level of 290 mg/dL. CT of the abdomen showed a thickened and hyperemic appendix without perforation or abscess, compatible with acute appendicitis. The patient was given IV broad-spectrum antibiotics and was transfused with packed red blood cells and platelets. She underwent uncomplicated laparoscopic appendectomy and bone marrow biopsy, which revealed neo-plastic cells of 90% of the total bone marrow cellularity. Flow cytometry indicated presence of 92.4% of immature myeloid cells with t (15: 17) and q (22: 12) mutations, and FISH analysis for PML-RARA demonstrated a long-form fusion transcript, positive for APL. Appendix pathology described leukemic infiltration with co-expression of myeloperoxidase and CD68, consistent with myeloid sarcoma of the appendix. The patient completed a course of daunorubicin, cytarabine, and all trans-retinoic acid. Repeat bone marrow biopsy demonstrated complete remission. She will follow up with her primary care physician and hematologist/oncologist. Conclusions: Myeloid sarcoma of the appendix in the setting of APL is very rare and it might play a role in the development of acute appendicitis. Urgent management, including bone marrow biopsy for definitive diagnosis and urgent surgical intervention

  3. [Acute pancreatitis in children].

    PubMed

    Rottier, B L; Holl, R A; Draaisma, J M

    1998-02-21

    Acute pancreatitis is probably commoner in children than was previously thought. In children it is most commonly associated with trauma or viral infection. The presentation may be subtler than in adults, requiring a high index of suspicion in the clinician. In three children, two boys aged 4 and 10 and a girl of 15 years, acute pancreatitis was suspected because of the findings at ultrasonography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography performed when the disease recurred (the boy aged 4), apathy and immobility without dehydration or other obvious causes (the boy aged 10), and severe abdominal pain in combination with vomiting (the girl). All three patients had severely increased (urinary) amylase levels. Most often, acute pancreatitis in children tends to be a self-limiting disease which responds well to conservative treatment. PMID:9562770

  4. Acute acalculous cholecystitis.

    PubMed

    Barie, Philip S; Eachempati, Soumitra R

    2003-08-01

    Acute cholecystitis can develop without gallstones in critically ill or injured patients. However, the development of acute acalculous cholecystitis is not limited to surgical or injured patients, or even to the intensive care unit. Diabetes, malignant disease, abdominal vasculitis, congestive heart failure, cholesterol embolization, and shock or cardiac arrest have been associated with acute acalculous cholecystitis. Children may also be affected, especially after a viral illness. The pathogenesis of acute acalculous cholecystitis is a paradigm of complexity. Ischemia and reperfusion injury, or the effects of eicosanoid proinflammatory mediators, appear to be the central mechanisms, but bile stasis, opioid therapy, positive-pressure ventilation, and total parenteral nutrition have all been implicated. Ultrasound of the gallbladder is the most accurate diagnostic modality in the critically ill patient, with gallbladder wall thickness of 3.5 mm or greater and pericholecystic fluid being the two most reliable criteria. The historical treatment of choice for acute acalculous cholecystitis has been cholecystectomy, but percutaneous cholecystostomy is now the mainstay of therapy, controlling the disease in about 85% of patients. Rapid improvement can be expected when the procedure is performed properly. The mortality rates (historically about 30%) for percutaneous and open cholecystostomy appear to be similar, reflecting the severity of illness, but improved resuscitation and critical care may portend a decreased risk of death. Interval cholecystectomy is usually not indicated after acute acalculous cholecystitis in survivors; if the absence of gallstones is confirmed and the precipitating disorder has been controlled, the cholecystostomy tube can be pulled out after the patient has recovered. PMID:12864960

  5. Acute Prevertebral Calcific Tendinitis

    PubMed Central

    Tamm, Alexander; Jeffery, Caroline C; Ansari, Khalid; Naik, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of neck pain in a middle-aged woman, initially attributed to a retropharyngeal infection and treated with urgent intubation. With the help of computed tomography, the diagnosis was later revised to acute prevertebral calcific tendinitis, a self-limiting condition caused by abnormal calcium hydroxyapatite deposition in the longus colli muscles. It is critical to differentiate between these two disease entities due to dramatic differences in management. A discussion of acute prevertebral calcific tendinitis and its imaging findings is provided below. PMID:27252789

  6. The Acute Abdominal Aorta.

    PubMed

    Mellnick, Vincent M; Heiken, Jay P

    2015-11-01

    Acute disorders of the abdominal aorta are potentially lethal conditions that require prompt evaluation and treatment. Computed tomography (CT) is the primary imaging method for evaluating these conditions because of its availability and speed. Volumetric CT acquisition with multiplanar reconstruction and three-dimensional analysis is now the standard technique for evaluating the aorta. MR imaging may be useful for select applications in stable patients in whom rupture has been excluded. Imaging is indispensable for diagnosis and treatment planning, because management has shifted toward endoluminal repair. Acute abdominal aortic conditions most commonly are complications of aneurysms and atherosclerosis. PMID:26526434

  7. Acute acalculous cholecystitis

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, M.S.; Wilk, P.J.; Weissmann, H.S.; Freeman, L.M.; Gliedman, M.L.

    1984-07-01

    Sixty-eight patients with acute acalculous cholecystitis were reviewed. The results of history and physical examinations were usually nondiagnostic. IDA cholescintigraphy (93 per cent accuracy rate) was the only reliable diagnostic modality. The results of oral cholecystography, intravenous cholangiography and ultrasonography were considerably less reliable. One-half of the patients had gangrenous cholecystitis. Cholecystectomy was the preferred operation with an over-all mortality of 9 per cent. IDA cholescintigraphy is an important new modality for the diagnosis of acute acalculous cholecystitis which, in the past, has often been difficult to diagnose.

  8. Acute Gynecologic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Carolyn K

    2015-11-01

    Premenopausal women with acute pelvic pain comprise a significant percentage of patients who present to the emergency room. Etiologies can be gynecologic, urologic, gastrointestinal, or vascular. Signs and symptoms are often nonspecific and overlapping. The choice of imaging modality is determined by the clinically suspected differential diagnosis. Ultrasound (US) is the preferred imaging modality for suspected obstetric or gynecologic disorders. CT is more useful when gastrointestinal or urinary tract pathology is likely. MR imaging is rarely used in the emergent setting, except to exclude appendicitis in pregnant women. This article presents a comprehensive review of imaging of acute gynecologic disorders. PMID:26526439

  9. Acute oral ulcers.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Julia S; Rogers, Roy S

    2016-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of acute oral ulcers can be challenging. Important historic details include the pattern of recurrence, anatomic areas of involvement within the mouth and elsewhere on the mucocutaneous surface, associated medical symptoms or comorbidities, and symptomology. Careful mucocutaneous examination is essential. When necessary, biopsy at an active site without ulceration is generally optimal. Depending on the clinical scenario, supplemental studies that may be useful include cultures; perilesional biopsy for direct immunofluorescence testing; and evaluation for infectious diseases, gluten sensitivity, inflammatory bowel disease, human immunodeficiency virus infection, connective tissue diseases, or hematinic deficiencies. Clinicians should maintain a broad differential diagnosis when evaluating patients with acute oral ulcers. PMID:27343961

  10. What Is Acute Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... about acute myeloid leukemia? What is acute myeloid leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in a part of ... the body from doing their jobs. Types of leukemia Not all leukemias are the same. There are ...

  11. Nutrition, Inflammation, and Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Max

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is acute inflammatory disease of the pancreas. Nutrition has a number of anti-inflammatory effects that could affect outcomes of patients with pancreatitis. Further, it is the most promising nonspecific treatment modality in acute pancreatitis to date. This paper summarizes the best available evidence regarding the use of nutrition with a view of optimising clinical management of patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:24490104

  12. Acute Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shirtliff, Mark E.; Mader, Jon T.

    2002-01-01

    Acute septic arthritis may develop as a result of hematogenous seeding, direct introduction, or extension from a contiguous focus of infection. The pathogenesis of acute septic arthritis is multifactorial and depends on the interaction of the host immune response and the adherence factors, toxins, and immunoavoidance strategies of the invading pathogen. Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Staphylococcus aureus are used in discussing the host-pathogen interaction in the pathogenesis of acute septic arthritis. While diagnosis rests on isolation of the bacterial species from synovial fluid samples, patient history, clinical presentation, laboratory findings, and imaging studies are also important. Acute nongonococcal septic arthritis is a medical emergency that can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Therefore, prompt recognition, rapid and aggressive antimicrobial therapy, and surgical treatment are critical to ensuring a good prognosis. Even with prompt diagnosis and treatment, high mortality and morbidity rates still occur. In contrast, gonococcal arthritis is often successfully treated with antimicrobial therapy alone and demonstrates a very low rate of complications and an excellent prognosis for full return of normal joint function. In the case of prosthetic joint infections, the hardware must be eventually removed by a two-stage revision in order to cure the infection. PMID:12364368

  13. Acute coronary care 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Califf, R.M.; Wagner, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 22 chapters. Some of the titles are: The measurement of acute myocardial infarct size by CT; Magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of myocardial ischemia and infarction; Poistron imaging in the evaluation of ischemia and myocardial infarction; and New inotropic agents.

  14. Acute radiation risk models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, Olga

    Biologically motivated mathematical models, which describe the dynamics of the major hematopoietic lineages (the thrombocytopoietic, lymphocytopoietic, granulocytopoietic, and erythropoietic systems) in acutely/chronically irradiated humans are developed. These models are implemented as systems of nonlinear differential equations, which variables and constant parameters have clear biological meaning. It is shown that the developed models are capable of reproducing clinical data on the dynamics of these systems in humans exposed to acute radiation in the result of incidents and accidents, as well as in humans exposed to low-level chronic radiation. Moreover, the averaged value of the "lethal" dose rates of chronic irradiation evaluated within models of these four major hematopoietic lineages coincides with the real minimal dose rate of lethal chronic irradiation. The demonstrated ability of the models of the human thrombocytopoietic, lymphocytopoietic, granulocytopoietic, and erythropoietic systems to predict the dynamical response of these systems to acute/chronic irradiation in wide ranges of doses and dose rates implies that these mathematical models form an universal tool for the investigation and prediction of the dynamics of the major human hematopoietic lineages for a vast pattern of irradiation scenarios. In particular, these models could be applied for the radiation risk assessment for health of astronauts exposed to space radiation during long-term space missions, such as voyages to Mars or Lunar colonies, as well as for health of people exposed to acute/chronic irradiation due to environmental radiological events.

  15. [Acute pancreatitis and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Scollo, P; Licitra, G

    1993-12-01

    Aetiologic factors (gallstones, hyperlipidemia I-IV, hypertriglyceridaemia) make their occurrence, mainly, in the third trimester of gestation. Two cases of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy are described; in both cases patients referred healthy diet, no habit to smoke and no previous episode of pancreatitis. An obstructive pathology of biliary tract was the aetiologic factor. Vomiting, upper abdominal pain are aspecific symptoms that impose a differential diagnosis with acute appendicitis, cholecystitis and obstructive intestinal pathology. Laboratory data (elevated serum amylase and lipase levels) and ultrasonography carry out an accurate diagnosis. The management of acute pancreatitis is based on the use of symptomatic drugs, a low fat diet alternated to the parenteral nutrition when triglycerides levels are more than 28 mmol/L. Surgical therapy, used only in case of obstructive pathology of biliary tract, is optimally collected in the third trimester or immediately after postpartum. Our patients, treated only medically, delivered respectively at 38th and 40th week of gestation. Tempestivity of diagnosis and appropriate therapy permit to improve prognosis of a pathology that, although really associated with pregnancy, presents high maternal mortality (37%) cause of complications (shock, coagulopathy, acute respiratory insufficiency) and fetal (37.9%) by occurrence of preterm delivery. PMID:8139793

  16. [Acute blood pressure elevations].

    PubMed

    Chamontin, B; Amar, J; Chollet, F; Rouge, P; Bonetti-d'Esteve, L; Guittard, J; Salvador, M

    2000-11-01

    Blood pressure (BP) elevations may correspond to different clinical situations. Hypertensives emergencies are situations that require immediate reduction in BP because of acute or rapidly progressing target organ damage: accelerated malignant hypertension, hypertensive encephalopathy, acute myocardial infarction, acute aortic dissection, acute left ventricular failure, and eclampsia. Hypertensive urgencies are those with marked elevated BP in which it is desirable to reduce BP progressively within few hours, such as severe hypertension, progressive target organ damage, perioperative hypertension. Cerebrovascular accidents have to be individualized. In most patients in the immediate post-stroke period, BP should not be lowered. Caution is advised in lowering BP in these patients because excessive falls may precipitate cerebral ischemia. In situations without symptoms or progressive target organ it is necessary to exclude proximate causes of elevated BP such as pain and elevated BP alone rarely requires antihypertensive treatment. Among parenteral antihypertensive (AH) drugs labetalol, nicardipine, urapidil, and nitroprussiate are generally used, and the choice of AH drug depends on the clinical situation. It is not required to normalize BP immediately but to reduce mean BP no more than 25%, then toward 160/100 mmHg as recommended by JNC VI, in order to avoid an impairment of renal, cerebral or coronary ischemia. Oral long-acting dihydropyridines are often subsequently administrated, except in myocardial ischemia. Therapeutic attitudes vary considerably according to the clinical situation: abstention, immediate decrease or progressive decrease in BP have to be decided. PMID:11190294

  17. Gadolinium induced recurrent acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Blasco-Perrin, H; Glaser, B; Pienkowski, M; Peron, J M; Payen, J L

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a sudden swelling and inflammation of the pancreas. The two most common causes are alcohol use and biliary stones. Drug-induced acute pancreatitis are rare (1.4-2%). In this present study, we present a case of recurrent acute pancreatitis induced by a specific magnetic-resonance-imaging (MRI) contrast agent called gadobenate dimeglumine. PMID:23395575

  18. Acute hepatitis E complicated by acute pancreatitis and multiorgan dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Karanth, Suman S; Khan, Zohaib; Rau, Nileshwar Radhakrishna; Rao, Karthik

    2014-01-01

    We report this rare case of a 27-year-old man who presented with acute hepatitis E and went on to develop acute epigastric pain. He was diagnosed to have acute severe pancreatitis with shock and acute renal failure due to hepatitis E. Such a phenomenon has rarely been reported in the literature, with patients following a benign course and complete recovery after conservative management and analgesia. Awareness of this potentially life-threatening complication, especially in young men from endemic areas with acute hepatitis E presenting with abdomen pain has been highlighted. PMID:24899005

  19. Acute gangrenous cholecystitis: radionuclide diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Brachman, M.B.; Tanasescu, D.E.; Ramanna, L.; Waxman, A.D.

    1984-04-01

    Radionuclide hepatobiliary imaging with Tc-99m IDA is a useful procedure for the diagnosis of acute cholecystitis. Visualization of the gallbladder essentially rules out acute cholecystitis. Nonvisualization suggest acute cholecystitis but may also be associated with chronic gallbladder disease or other conditions. The authors recently observed five patients in whom a rim of increased parenchymal liver activity was seen adjacent to the gallbladder fossa. All five patients had acute gangrenous cholecystitis. The rim of increased activity appears to be a useful secondary sign of acute cholecystitis.

  20. Severe Acute Pancreatitis in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Bahiyah; Kathiresan Pillai, Thanikasalam; Cheen, Lim Huay; Ryan, Ray Joshua

    2015-01-01

    This is a case of a pregnant lady at 8 weeks of gestation, who presented with acute abdomen. She was initially diagnosed with ruptured ectopic pregnancy and ruptured corpus luteal cyst as the differential diagnosis. However she then, was finally diagnosed as acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis with spontaneous complete miscarriage. This is followed by review of literature on this topic. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is not uncommon. The emphasis on high index of suspicion of acute pancreatitis in women who presented with acute abdomen in pregnancy is highlighted. Early diagnosis and good supportive care by multidisciplinary team are crucial to ensure good maternal and fetal outcomes. PMID:25628906

  1. Acute chylous ascites mimicking acute appendicitis in a patient with pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Emily K; Ek, Edmund; Croagh, Daniel; Spain, Lavinia A; Farrell, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of acute chylous peritonitis mimicking acute appendicitis in a man with acute on chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatitis, both acute and chronic, causing the development of acute chylous ascites and peritonitis has rarely been reported in the English literature. This is the fourth published case of acute chylous ascites mimicking acute appendicitis in the literature. PMID:19824123

  2. Acute Heart Failure Treatment.

    PubMed

    Levy, Phillip D; Bellou, Abdel

    2013-06-01

    Dyspnea is the predominant symptom for patients with acute heart failure and initial treatment is largely directed towards the alleviation of this. Contrary to conventional belief, not all patients present with fluid overload and the approach to management is rapidly evolving from a solitary focus on diuresis to one that more accurately reflects the complex interplay of underlying cardiac dysfunction and acute precipitant. Effective treatment thus requires an understanding of divergent patient profiles and an appreciation of various therapeutic options for targeted patient stabilization. The key principle within this paradigm is directed management that aims to diminish the work of breathing through situation appropriate ventillatory support, volume reduction and hemodynamic improvement. With such an approach, clinicians can more efficiently address respiratory discomfort while reducing the likelihood of avoidable harm. PMID:24223323

  3. Acute Biliary Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Forty-seven cases of biliary tract infection with septic shock are presented. The sepsis was caused by empyema of the gallbladder in 23 cases and by cholangitis in the remainder. Gallstones were most frequently the cause of the sepsis. An appropriate diagnostic description of the syndrome of biliary tract infection and septic shock should therefore include a description of the underlying biliary disease as well as the term acute biliary shock. In this series, emergency surgical management by removal of gallstones and drainage of suppuration was felt to be the most appropriate treatment. There was a high incidence of gallbladder rupture (10.6%) and intrahepatic stones (53.2%). Of the 13 patients who died, 8 might have survived if early operation had been performed after the diagnosis of acute biliary septic shock was established. PMID:2278914

  4. Acute aortic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) is a term used to describe a constellation of life-threatening aortic diseases that have similar presentation, but appear to have distinct demographic, clinical, pathological and survival characteristics. Many believe that the three major entities that comprise AAS: aortic dissection (AD), intramural hematoma (IMH) and penetrating aortic ulcer (PAU), make up a spectrum of aortic disease in which one entity may evolve into or coexist with another. Much of the confusion in accurately classifying an AAS is that they present with similar symptoms: typically acute onset of severe chest or back pain, and may have similar radiographic features, since the disease entities all involve injury or disruption of the medial layer of the aortic wall. The accurate diagnosis of an AAS is often made at operation. This manuscript will attempt to clarify the similarities and differences between AD, IMH and PAU of the ascending aorta and describe the challenges in distinguishing them from one another. PMID:27386405

  5. [Acute aortic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Nienaber, Christoph A

    2016-06-01

    Acute aortic syndrome is the common denominator for acute events to the aortic wall and encompasses dissection of the aorta, intramural hematoma, formation of aortic ulcers and trauma to the aorta with an annual incidence of up to 35 cases/100.000 between 65 and 75 years of age. Both, inflammation and/or microtrauma at the level of the aortic media layer, and a genetic disposition are promoting elements of AAS, while the extent and anatomic involvement of the ascending aorta call for either surgical resection/repair in the proximal part of the aorta, or an endovascular solution for pathologies in the distal aorta; in all cases of dissection (regardless of location) reconstruction/realignment has been proven to portend better long-term outcomes (in addition to medical management of blood pressure). PMID:27254622

  6. Acute aortic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Corvera, Joel S

    2016-05-01

    Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) is a term used to describe a constellation of life-threatening aortic diseases that have similar presentation, but appear to have distinct demographic, clinical, pathological and survival characteristics. Many believe that the three major entities that comprise AAS: aortic dissection (AD), intramural hematoma (IMH) and penetrating aortic ulcer (PAU), make up a spectrum of aortic disease in which one entity may evolve into or coexist with another. Much of the confusion in accurately classifying an AAS is that they present with similar symptoms: typically acute onset of severe chest or back pain, and may have similar radiographic features, since the disease entities all involve injury or disruption of the medial layer of the aortic wall. The accurate diagnosis of an AAS is often made at operation. This manuscript will attempt to clarify the similarities and differences between AD, IMH and PAU of the ascending aorta and describe the challenges in distinguishing them from one another. PMID:27386405

  7. Acute Ischemic Stroke Intervention.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Priyank; Yavagal, Dileep R; Sacco, Ralph L

    2016-06-01

    Acute ischemic stroke (AIS) is the leading cause of disability worldwide and among the leading causes of mortality. Although intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV-rtPA) was approved nearly 2 decades ago for treatment of AIS, only a minority of patients receive it due to a narrow time window for administration and several contraindications to its use. Endovascular approaches to recanalization in AIS developed in the 1980s, and recently, 5 major randomized trials showed an overwhelming superior benefit of combining endovascular mechanical thrombectomy with IV-rtPA over IV-rtPA alone. In this paper, we discuss the evolution of catheter-based treatment from first-generation thrombectomy devices to the game-changing stent retrievers, results from recent trials, and the evolving stroke systems of care to provide timely access to acute stroke intervention to patients in the United States. PMID:27256835

  8. [Acute Chest Pain].

    PubMed

    Gmür, Christian

    2016-02-17

    Acute chest pain is a frequent consultation reason in general practice as well as in emergency departments. With the help of history, physical examination, ECG, laboratory and newly developed risk scores, potentially life-threatening diseases and high-risk patients may be detected and treated early, quickly and cost-effectively. New biomarkers and their combination with risk scores can increase the negative predictive value to exclude certain diseases. PMID:26886697

  9. Diarrhoea in adults (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction An estimated 4000 million cases of diarrhoea occurred worldwide in 1996, resulting in 2.5 million deaths. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for acute diarrhoea in adults living in resource-rich countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute mild-to-moderate diarrhoea in adults from resource-rich countries traveling to resource-poor countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute mild-to-moderate diarrhoea in adults living in resource-poor countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute severe diarrhoea in adults living in resource-poor countries? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to January 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 71 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics, antimotility agents, antisecretory agents, bismuth subsalicylate, diet, intravenous rehydration, nasogastric tube rehydration, and oral rehydration solutions (amino acid oral rehydration solution, bicarbonate oral rehydration solution, reduced osmolarity oral rehydration solution, rice-based oral rehydration solution, standard oral rehydration solution). PMID:19450323

  10. Diarrhoea in adults (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction An estimated 4.6 billion cases of diarrhoea occurred worldwide in 2004, resulting in 2.2 million deaths. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for acute diarrhoea in adults living in resource-rich countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute mild-to-moderate diarrhoea in adults from resource-rich countries travelling to resource-poor countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute mild-to-moderate diarrhoea in adults living in resource-poor countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute severe diarrhoea in adults living in resource-poor countries? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to January 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 72 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics, antimotility agents, antisecretory agents, bismuth subsalicylate, diet, intravenous rehydration, nasogastric tube rehydration, oral rehydration solutions (amino acid oral rehydration solution, bicarbonate oral rehydration solution, reduced osmolarity oral rehydration solution, rice-based oral rehydration solution, standard oral rehydration solution), vitamin A supplementation, and zinc supplementation. PMID:21718555

  11. Acupuncture for acute hordeolum

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ke; Wang, Xue; Guo, Menghu; Wieland, L. Susan; Shen, Xueyong; Lao, Lixing

    2014-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: The objective of this review is to determine the effects and, when possible, the safety of acupuncture for the treatment of acute hordeola, in comparison to no specific treatment (e.g., observation), sham acupuncture, or other active treatments. Acupuncture as an adjuvant to another treatment also will be compared to that treatment alone. PMID:25214814

  12. IMMUNOTHERAPY IN ACUTE LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Wing

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in immunotherapy of cancer may represent a successful example in translational research, in which progress in knowledge and technology in immunology has lead to new strategies of immunotherapy, and even past failure in many clinical trials have led to a better understanding of basic cancer immunobiology. This article reviews the latest concepts in antitumor immunology and its application in the treatment of cancer, with particular focus on acute leukemia. PMID:19100371

  13. Streptococcal acute pharyngitis.

    PubMed

    Anjos, Lais Martins Moreira; Marcondes, Mariana Barros; Lima, Mariana Ferreira; Mondelli, Alessandro Lia; Okoshi, Marina Politi

    2014-07-01

    Acute pharyngitis/tonsillitis, which is characterized by inflammation of the posterior pharynx and tonsils, is a common disease. Several viruses and bacteria can cause acute pharyngitis; however, Streptococcus pyogenes (also known as Lancefield group A β-hemolytic streptococci) is the only agent that requires an etiologic diagnosis and specific treatment. S. pyogenes is of major clinical importance because it can trigger post-infection systemic complications, acute rheumatic fever, and post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis. Symptom onset in streptococcal infection is usually abrupt and includes intense sore throat, fever, chills, malaise, headache, tender enlarged anterior cervical lymph nodes, and pharyngeal or tonsillar exudate. Cough, coryza, conjunctivitis, and diarrhea are uncommon, and their presence suggests a viral cause. A diagnosis of pharyngitis is supported by the patient's history and by the physical examination. Throat culture is the gold standard for diagnosing streptococcus pharyngitis. However, it has been underused in public health services because of its low availability and because of the 1- to 2-day delay in obtaining results. Rapid antigen detection tests have been used to detect S. pyogenes directly from throat swabs within minutes. Clinical scoring systems have been developed to predict the risk of S. pyogenes infection. The most commonly used scoring system is the modified Centor score. Acute S. pyogenes pharyngitis is often a self-limiting disease. Penicillins are the first-choice treatment. For patients with penicillin allergy, cephalosporins can be an acceptable alternative, although primary hypersensitivity to cephalosporins can occur. Another drug option is the macrolides. Future perspectives to prevent streptococcal pharyngitis and post-infection systemic complications include the development of an anti-Streptococcus pyogenes vaccine. PMID:25229278

  14. [Acute coronary syndromes: epidemiology].

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Alev Arat

    2013-04-01

    Coronary heart disease is the main cause of death in the world as well as in Turkey. It's not only a health issue but also a social problem with a high economic burden and negative impact on quality of life. The majority of deaths are attributable to acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and their complications.This review summarizes some important facts regarding ACS epidemiology in the world and in Turkey. PMID:27323430

  15. Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis.

    PubMed

    Ulinski, Tim; Sellier-Leclerc, Anne-Laure; Tudorache, Elena; Bensman, Albert; Aoun, Bilal

    2012-07-01

    Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN) is a frequent cause of acute renal failure, characterised by the presence of inflammatory cell infiltrate in the interstitium of the kidney. Immuno-allergic reaction to certain medications, mainly non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and antibiotics are by far the most important etiology for TIN today, but other situations such as infections, toxins, and vasculitis are known to induce TIN. Incidence of TIN is increasing, probably due to prescription habits and NSAID overuse, representing 3-7% of acute kidney injury in biopsies in children. Avoidance of the causal substance and rapid steroid therapy are hallmarks for patient care, but spontaneous initial recovery is very frequent and the general prognosis seems satisfactory. However, development of chronic TIN, without response to steroid or other immunosuppressive treatment, is possible. As the largest part of TIN is secondary to certain drugs, clear indications in particular for NSAID or antibiotics should be respected to reduce the number of TIN cases. PMID:21638156

  16. Acute lung injury review.

    PubMed

    Tsushima, Kenji; King, Landon S; Aggarwal, Neil R; De Gorordo, Antonio; D'Alessio, Franco R; Kubo, Keishi

    2009-01-01

    The first report of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was published in 1967, and even now acute lung injury (ALI) and ARDS are severe forms of diffuse lung disease that impose a substantial health burden all over the world. Recent estimates indicate approximately 190,000 cases per year of ALI in the United States each year, with an associated 74,500 deaths per year. Common causes of ALI/ARDS are sepsis, pneumonia, trauma, aspiration pneumonia, pancreatitis, and so on. Several pathologic stages of ALI/ARDS have been described: acute inflammation with neutrophil infiltration, fibroproliferative phase with hyaline membranes, with varying degrees of interstitial fibrosis, and resolution phase. There has been intense investigation into the pathophysiologic events relevant to each stage of ALI/ARDS, and much has been learned in the alveolar epithelial, endobronchial homeostasis, and alveolar cell immune responses, especially neutrophils and alveolar macrophages in an animal model. However, these effective results in the animal models are not equally adoptive to those in randomized, controlled trials. The clinical course of ALI/ARDS is variable with the likely pathophysiologic complexity of human ALI/ARDS. In 1994, the definition was recommended by the American-European Consensus Conference Committee, which facilitated easy nomination of patients with ALI/ARDS for a randomized, clinical trial. Here, we review the recent randomized, clinical trials of ALI/ARDS. PMID:19420806

  17. Procalcitonin determined at emergency department as an early indicator of progression to septic shock in patient with sepsis associated with ureteral calculi

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Young Hwii; Ji, Yoon Seob; Park, Sin-Youl; Kim, Su Jin; Song, Phil Hyun

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: To investigate the role of initial procalcitonin (PCT) level as an early predictor of septic shock for the patient with sepsis induced by acute pyelonephritis (APN) secondary to ureteral calculi. Materials and Methods: The data from 49 consecutive patients who met criteria of sepsis due to APN following ureteral stone were collected and divided into two groups: with (n=15) or without (n=34) septic shock. The clinical variables including PCT level for this outcome were retrospectively compared by univariate analysis, followed by multivariable logistic regression model. Results: All subjects had hydronephrosis, and were hospitalized with the mean of 11.8 days (3–42 days). The mean size of the ureteral stones was 7.5mm (3–30mm), and 57% were located in upper ureter. At univariate analysis, patients with septic shock were significantly older, a higher proportion had hypertension, lower platelet count and serum albumin level, higher CRP and PCT level, and higher positive blood culture rate. Multivariate models indicated that lower platelet count and higher PCT level are independent risk factors (p=0.043 and 0.046, respectively). In ROC curve, the AUC was significantly wider in PCT (0.929), compared with the platelet count (0.822, p=0.004). At the cut-off of 0.52ng/mL, the sensitivity and specificity were 86.7% and 85.3%. Conclusion: Our study demonstrated elevated initial PCT levels as an early independent predictor to progress into septic shock in patients with sepsis associated with ureteral calculi. PMID:27256181

  18. Acute Cardiac Tamponade: An Unusual Cause of Acute Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Phadke, Gautam; Whaley-Connell, Adam; Dalal, Pranavkumar; Markley, John; Rich, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    We are reporting a case of acute renal failure after cardiac surgery due to acute pericardial effusion. The patient had normal baseline renal function but developed acute oliguric renal failure with a significant increase in serum creatinine postoperatively. Pericardiotomy led to an improvement in blood pressure, immediate diuresis and quick recovery of renal function back to baseline. Pericardial tamponade should be included in the consideration of causes of the cardiorenal syndrome. PMID:22619656

  19. Targeted Therapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-28

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Myelodysplasia-Related Changes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  20. Cholescintigraphy in acute acalculous cholecystitis

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanna, L.; Brachman, M.B.; Tanasescu, D.E.; Berman, D.S.; Waxman, A.D.

    1984-08-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis is a relatively rare but potentially lethal condition if not treated promptly. Since stones are not present, diagnostic procedures such as ultrasound or other radiological procedures are frequently not helpful. Tc-99m iminodiacetic acid scan results were analyzed in 11 proven cases of acute acalculous cholecystitis. All had positive tests with nonvisualization of the gallbladder giving a sensitivity of 100%. Tc-99m iminodiacetic acid cholescintigraphy is a highly reliable test and is easily performed even in acutely ill patients and should be the test of choice in all patients predisposed to and suspected of acute acalculous cholecystitis.

  1. [Acute abdomen in gynecology].

    PubMed

    von Hugo, R; Meyer, B; Loos, W; Dirmeier, H

    1988-09-01

    The aim of the present study is, to describe the morbidity and mortality of 196 patients with an acute abdominal condition who underwent surgery at the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics of the TU Munich between 1982 and 1986. This is a percentage of 2.7 of all 7,167 operations carried out during this period. 118 of these patients had an extrauterine pregnancy and were therefore excluded from the study. The second group of 79 patients, mostly with inflammatory diseases, were analyzed. In most of these cases the acute abdominal condition was caused by a tuboovarian abscess (48.1%), followed by peritonitis because of a bowel-disease (11.4%). 6 patients suffered from an abscessing endometritis due to a caesarean section with sepsis in 5 cases. A generalized peritonitis occurred in 5 cases and was treated with a planned relaparatomy with lavage. 63% of the patients had no complications within 28 days after operation, 13% developed a subileus; in 7% a relaparatomy was necessary. 6% of the patients had problems of wound-healing. One patient with stomach-cancer died 3 weeks after the operation because of a fulminant lung-embolism. Thus the mortality rate was 1.5%. A further 27% were treated at the intensive care-unit and 18% needed artificial respiration. The average postoperative period of hospitalisation was 15 days. In comparison, patients with elective operations remained 13 days. The morbidity and mortality of patients due to surgery of an acute abdominal condition was relatively small; postoperative complications could be well treated in all cases and is probably the result of a positive and early indication for surgical intervention. PMID:3181709

  2. [Acute toxic pneumopathies].

    PubMed

    Garnier, R

    1998-06-15

    The nature and extent of the acute injury due to toxic inhalants depend on the inhalant's solubility in water pH and chemical reactivity, on the aerodynamic diameter of particles (when the inhalant is an aerosol), and on the degree of exposure. Initial signs and symptoms indicate upper airways and bronchial irritation. Laryngeal oedema and (or) severe bronchospasm may be rapidly lethal. After cessation of exposure a transient improvement is generally observed; however a delayed pulmonary oedema may occur within the first 48 hours. On the following days, bacterial surinfection is a common complication. Possible long-term sequelae are reactive airways dysfunction syndrome and bronchiolitis obliterans. PMID:9781191

  3. Acute Compartment Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Andrew H

    2016-07-01

    Acute compartment syndrome (ACS) is a well-known pathophysiologic complication of trauma or tissue ischemia. ACS affects the appearance, function, and even the viability of the involved limb, and demands immediate diagnosis and treatment. However, ACS is difficult to diagnose and the only effective treatment is decompressive surgical fasciotomy. The clinical signs and symptoms may easily be attributed to other aspects of the injury, which further complicates the diagnosis. This article highlights the latest information regarding the diagnosis of ACS, how to perform fasciotomies, how to manage fasciotomy wounds, and also reviews complications and outcomes of ACS. PMID:27241376

  4. Feedlot Acute Interstitial Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Woolums, Amelia R

    2015-11-01

    Acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) of feedlot cattle is a sporadically occurring respiratory condition that is often fatal. Affected cattle have a sudden onset of labored breathing. There is no confirmed effective treatment of feedlot AIP; however, administration of antibiotics effective against common bacterial respiratory pathogens and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, especially aspirin, has been recommended. Protective strategies are not well defined, but efforts to limit dust exposure and heat stress; to ensure consistent formulation, mixing, and delivery of feed; and to identify and treat infectious respiratory disease in a timely manner may decrease rates of feedlot AIP. PMID:26253266

  5. Acute Alcoholic Hepatitis: Therapy.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Paulina K; Lucey, Michael R

    2016-08-01

    Alcoholic hepatitis (AH) causes great morbidity and mortality in the United States and throughout the world. Advances in therapy have proven difficult. In part, this reflects challenges in diagnosis, including the distinction between AH and acute-on-chronic liver failure. Liver biopsy is the best method to clarify the cause in circumstances whereby conflicting clinical data confound the diagnosis. All treatment of AH begins with abstinence from alcohol. All patients with AH should be given sufficient nutrition. Prednisolone has become the principal agent for treating patients with severe AH. PMID:27373613

  6. Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Zuk, Anna; Bonventre, Joseph V

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a global public health concern associated with high morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs. Other than dialysis, no therapeutic interventions reliably improve survival, limit injury, or speed recovery. Despite recognized shortcomings of in vivo animal models, the underlying pathophysiology of AKI and its consequence, chronic kidney disease (CKD), is rich with biological targets. We review recent findings relating to the renal vasculature and cellular stress responses, primarily the intersection of the unfolded protein response, mitochondrial dysfunction, autophagy, and the innate immune response. Maladaptive repair mechanisms that persist following the acute phase promote inflammation and fibrosis in the chronic phase. Here macrophages, growth-arrested tubular epithelial cells, the endothelium, and surrounding pericytes are key players in the progression to chronic disease. Better understanding of these complex interacting pathophysiological mechanisms, their relative importance in humans, and the utility of biomarkers will lead to therapeutic strategies to prevent and treat AKI or impede progression to CKD or end-stage renal disease (ESRD). PMID:26768243

  7. Acute traumatic patellar dislocation.

    PubMed

    Duthon, V B

    2015-02-01

    Inaugural traumatic patellar dislocation is most often due to trauma sustained during physical or sports activity. Two-thirds of acute patellar dislocations occur in young active patients (less than 20 years old). Non-contact knee sprain in flexion and valgus is the leading mechanism in patellar dislocation, accounting for as many as 93% of all cases. The strong displacement of the patella tears the medial stabilizing structures, and notably the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL), which is almost always injured in acute patellar dislocation, most frequently at its femoral attachment. Lateral patellar glide can be assessed with the knee in extension or 20° flexion. Displacement by more than 50% of the patellar width is considered abnormal and may induce apprehension. Plain X-ray and CT are mandatory to diagnose bony risk factors for patellar dislocation, such as trochlear dysplasia or increased tibial tubercle-trochlear groove distance (TT-TG), and plan correction. MRI gives information on cartilage and capsulo-ligamentous status for treatment planning: free bodies or osteochondral fracture have to be treated surgically. If patellar dislocation occurs in an anatomically normal knee and osteochondral fracture is ruled out on MRI, non-operative treatment is usually recommended. PMID:25592052

  8. Acute Bacterial Cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Vincent; Lammert, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute bacterial cholangitis for the most part owing to common bile duct stones is common in gastroenterology practice and represents a potentially life-threatening condition often characterized by fever, abdominal pain, and jaundice (Charcot's triad) as well as confusion and septic shock (Reynolds' pentad). Methods This review is based on a systematic literature review in PubMed with the search items ‘cholangitis’, ‘choledocholithiasis’, ‘gallstone disease’, ‘biliary infection’, and ‘biliary sepsis’. Results Although most patients respond to empiric broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment, timely endoscopic biliary drainage depending on the severity of the disease is required to eliminate the underlying obstruction. Specific recommendations have been derived from the Tokyo guideline working group consensus 2006 and its update in 2013, albeit poorly evidence-based, providing a comprehensive overview of diagnosis, classification, risk stratification, and treatment algorithms in acute bacterial cholangitis. Conclusion Prompt clinical recognition and accurate diagnostic workup including adequate laboratory assessment and (aetiology-oriented) imaging are critical steps in the management of cholangitis. Treatment is directed at the two major interrelated pathophysiologic components, i.e. bacterial infection (immediate antimicrobial therapy) and bile duct obstruction (biliary drainage). As for the latter, transpapillary endoscopic drainage by stent or nasobiliary drain and/or same-session bile duct clearance, depending on individual disease severity, represent first-line treatment approaches. PMID:26468310

  9. Imaging acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    González, R Gilberto; Schwamm, Lee H

    2016-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is common and often treatable, but treatment requires reliable information on the state of the brain that may be provided by modern neuroimaging. Critical information includes: the presence of hemorrhage; the site of arterial occlusion; the size of the early infarct "core"; and the size of underperfused, potentially threatened brain parenchyma, commonly referred to as the "penumbra." In this chapter we review the major determinants of outcomes in ischemic stroke patients, and the clinical value of various advanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging methods that may provide key physiologic information in these patients. The focus is on major strokes due to occlusions of large arteries of the anterior circulation, the most common cause of a severe stroke syndrome. The current evidence-based approach to imaging the acute stroke patient at the Massachusetts General Hospital is presented, which is applicable for all stroke types. We conclude with new information on time and stroke evolution that imaging has revealed, and how it may open the possibilities of treating many more patients. PMID:27432672

  10. Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kingsley, Edwin C.; Durie, Brian G. M.; Garewal, Harinder S.

    1987-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a subtype of acute myelogenous leukemia frequently associated with disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Data on 11 patients with APL treated at our institution were analyzed and compared with those of 147 published cases. Most had a bleeding diathesis at presentation and evidence of DIC eventually developed in all. Seven patients (64%) showed the t(15;17)(q22;q21) karyotype or a similar translocation. Using a chemotherapy induction regimen containing an anthracycline, complete remission, requiring a total of 14 courses of treatment, was achieved in six patients (55%). The median duration of response and median survival for complete responders were 10 and 15 months, respectively. Three patients (27%) died of bleeding complications during induction therapy. The tritiated-thymidine labeling index of leukemia cells predicted which patients would achieve a complete remission. Review of six studies of 147 patients with APL from the past 12 years supports the use of a chemotherapy induction regimen containing anthracycline or amsacrine and heparin for the treatment of DIC. PMID:3472414

  11. What Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... key statistics about acute lymphocytic leukemia? What is acute lymphocytic leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... leukemias). The rest of this document focuses on acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) in adults. For information on ALL in ...

  12. Acute diabetic abdomen in childhood.

    PubMed

    Valerio, D

    1976-01-10

    Three children presented as acute surgical emergencies due to undiagnosed diabetes mellitus. Where diabetic ketoacidosis mimicks the acute abdomen three clinical features are important in reaching the right diagnosis-namely, a history of polydipsia, polyuria, and anorexia preceding the abdominal pain, the deep sighing and rapid respirations, and severe dehydration. PMID:54584

  13. Acute recurrent appendicitis with appendicolith.

    PubMed

    Hollerman, J J; Bernstein, M A; Kottamasu, S R; Sirr, S A

    1988-11-01

    Appendiceal disease can be acute, acute recurrent, or chronic. Acute appendicitis is the most common form. Acute recurrent appendicitis is more common than chronic appendicitis. In children the clinical manifestations of appendicitis are variable. Patients who have an appendicolith usually develop appendicitis, often with perforation. A case is presented of 3-year follow-up of a patient with an appendicolith and acute recurrent appendicitis. The literature about appendicoliths is reviewed. In the appropriate clinical setting, a history of prior episodes of similar right lower quadrant pain does not preclude the diagnosis of appendiceal disease. Awareness of the less common forms of appendicitis is important so that appropriate treatment is not delayed. PMID:3052484

  14. Cytokines in Acute Chikungunya

    PubMed Central

    Venugopalan, Anuradha; Ghorpade, Ravi P.; Chopra, Arvind

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Acute chikungunya (CHIKV) is predominantly an acute onset of excruciatingly painful, self-limiting musculoskeletal (MSK) arbovirus illness and this was further reported by us during the 2006 Indian epidemic [Chopra et al. Epidemiol Infect 2012]. Selected serum cytokines profile in subjects within one month of onset of illness is being presented. Methods Out of 509 clinical CHIKV cases (43% population) identified during a rural population survey, 225 subjects consented blood investigations. 132 examined within 30 days of febrile onset are the study cohort. Anti-CHIKV IgM and IgG antibodies tested by immunochromatography and indirect immunofluorescence respectively. Interferons (IFN)-α, -β and -γ, Interferon Gamma-Induced Protein-10 (CXCL-10/IP-10), Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α), Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), Interleukin-6 (IL-6), Interleukin-13 (IL-13), Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 (MCP-1), Interleukin–4 (IL-4) and Interleukin–10 (IL-10) performed by ELISA. Samples collected from neighboring community a year prior to the epidemic used as healthy controls. Results Seropositivity for anti-CHIKV IgM and IgG was 65% and 52% respectively. IFN-α, IFN-β, IFN-γ, CXCL10/IP-10 and IL-1β showed intense response in early acute phase. Cytokines (particularly TNF-α, MCP-1, IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10) was maximum in extended symptomatic phase and remained elevated in recovered subjects. Higher (p<0.05) IFN and IL-4 seen in patients seropositive for anti-CHIKV IgG. Elderly cases (≥65 years) showed elevated cytokines (except IFN) and anti-CHIKV antibodies near similar to younger subjects. Significant correlations (p<0.05) found between cytokines and clinical features (fatigue, low back ache, myalgia) and anti-CHIKV antibodies. Conclusion An intense cytokine milieu was evident in the early and immediate persistent symptomatic phase and in recovered subjects. Early persistent IgM and lower IgG to anti-CHKV and intense Th2 cytokine phenotype seem to be

  15. Acute epiploic appendagitis and its mimics.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajay K; Gervais, Debra A; Hahn, Peter F; Sagar, Pallavi; Mueller, Peter R; Novelline, Robert A

    2005-01-01

    Acute epiploic appendagitis most commonly manifests with acute lower quadrant pain. Its clinical features are similar to those of acute diverticulitis or, less commonly, acute appendicitis. The conditions that may mimic acute epiploic appendagitis at computed tomography (CT) include acute omental infarction, mesenteric panniculitis, fat-containing tumor, and primary and secondary acute inflammatory processes in the large bowel (eg, diverticulitis and appendicitis). Whereas the location of acute epiploic appendagitis is most commonly adjacent to the sigmoid colon, acute omental infarction is typically located in the right lower quadrant and often is mistaken for acute appendicitis. It is important to correctly diagnose acute epiploic appendagitis and acute omental infarction on CT images because these conditions may be mistaken for acute abdomen, and the mistake may lead to unnecessary surgery. The CT features of acute epiploic appendagitis include an oval lesion 1.5-3.5 cm in diameter, with attenuation similar to that of fat and with surrounding inflammatory changes, that abuts the anterior sigmoid colon wall. The CT features of acute omental infarction include a well-circumscribed triangular or oval heterogeneous fatty mass with a whorled pattern of concentric linear fat stranding between the anterior abdominal wall and the transverse or ascending colon. As CT increasingly is used for the evaluation of acute abdomen, radiologists are likely to see acute epiploic appendagitis and its mimics more often. Recognition of these conditions on CT images will allow appropriate management of acute abdominal pain and may help to prevent unnecessary surgery. PMID:16284132

  16. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Acute and persistent diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Grimwood, Keith; Forbes, David A

    2009-12-01

    Socially disadvantaged Indigenous infants and children living in western industrialized countries experience high rates of infectious diarrhea, no more so than Aboriginal children from remote and rural regions of Northern Australia. Diarrheal disease, poor nutrition, and intestinal enteropathy reflect household crowding, inadequate water and poor sanitation and hygiene. Acute episodes of watery diarrhea are often best managed by oral glucose-electrolyte solutions with continuation of breastfeeding and early reintroduction of feeding. Selective use of lactose-free milk formula, short-term zinc supplementation and antibiotics may be necessary for ill children with poor nutrition, persistent symptoms, or dysentery. Education, high standards of environmental hygiene, breastfeeding, and immunization with newly licensed rotavirus vaccines are all needed to reduce the unacceptably high burden of diarrheal disease encountered in young children from Indigenous communities. PMID:19962025

  18. [Acute intermittent porphyria].

    PubMed

    Catania, A; Caimi, G

    1983-11-10

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is a congenital disease which as its name suggests, runs intermittently. Biochemically it is characterised by over-production of hepatic ALA synthetase (ALA-s), inducible mitochondrial enzyme and an increase in prophyrinic precursors (PBG, ac S-ALA). Clinically it is characterised by an abdominal nervous symptomatology. The primary metabolic error has been identified as a deficiency in enzyme activity which partially blocks haem biosynthesis. During the appearance of clinical manifestations, certain factors are present which have the capacity of inducing hepatic ALA-s production in vitro. Apart from some preventive measures treatment is mainly of symptomatology and complications. More recently the use of ALA-s inhibitors has been introduced. PMID:6657112

  19. Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Inaba, Hiroto; Greaves, Mel; Mullighan, Charles G.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is seen in both children and adults, but its incidence peaks between ages 2 and 5 years. The causation of ALL is considered to be multi-factorial, including exogenous or endogenous exposures, genetic susceptibility, and chance. The survival rate of paediatric ALL has improved to approximately 90% in recent trials with risk stratification by biologic features of leukaemic cells and response to therapy, therapy modification based on patient pharmacodynamics and pharmacogenomics, and improved supportive care. However, innovative approaches are needed to further improve survival while reducing adverse effects. While most children can be cured, the prognosis of infants and adults with ALL remains poor. Recent genome-wide profiling of germline and leukaemic cell DNA has identified novel submicroscopic structural genetic alterations and sequence mutations that contribute to leukaemogenesis, define new ALL subtypes, influence responsiveness to treatment, and may provide novel prognostic markers and therapeutic targets for personalized medicine. PMID:23523389

  20. Acute Inhalation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gorguner, Metin; Akgun, Metin

    2010-01-01

    Inhaled substances may cause injury in pulmonary epithelium at various levels of respiratory tract, leading from simple symptoms to severe disease. Acute inhalation injury (AII) is not uncommon condition. There are certain high risk groups but AII may occur at various places including home or workplace. Environmental exposure is also possible. In addition to individual susceptibility, the characteristics of inhaled substances such as water solubility, size of substances and chemical properties may affect disease severity as well as its location. Although AII cases may recover in a few days but AII may cause long-term complications, even death. We aimed to discuss the effects of short-term exposures (minutes to hours) to toxic substances on the lungs. PMID:25610115

  1. Massive acute arsenic poisonings.

    PubMed

    Lech, Teresa; Trela, Franciszek

    2005-07-16

    Arsenic poisonings are still important in the field of toxicology, though they are not as frequent as about 20-30 years ago. In this paper, the arsenic concentrations in ante- and post-mortem materials, and also forensic and anatomo-pathological aspects in three cases of massive acute poisoning with arsenic(III) oxide (two of them with unexplained criminalistic background, in which arsenic was taken for amphetamine and one suicide), are presented. Ante-mortem blood and urine arsenic concentrations ranged from 2.3 to 6.7 microg/ml, respectively. Post-mortem tissue total arsenic concentrations were also detected in large concentrations. In case 3, the contents of the duodenum contained as much as 30.1% arsenic(III) oxide. The high concentrations of arsenic detected in blood and tissues in all presented cases are particularly noteworthy in that they are very rarely detected at these concentrations in fatal arsenic poisonings. PMID:15939162

  2. Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kurien, Matthew; Lobo, Alan J

    2015-10-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB) is a frequently encountered medical emergency with an incidence of 84-160/100000 and associated with mortality of approximately 10%. Guidelines from the National Institute for Care and Care Excellence outline key features in the management of AUGIB. Patients require prompt resuscitation and risk assessment using validated tools. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy provides accurate diagnosis, aids in estimating prognosis and allows therapeutic intervention. Endoscopy should be undertaken immediately after resuscitation in unstable patients and within 24 hours in all other patients. Interventional radiology may be required for bleeding unresponsive to endoscopic intervention. Drug therapy depends on the cause of bleeding. Intravenous proton pump inhibitors should be used in patients with high-risk ulcers. Terlipressin and broad-spectrum antibiotics should be used following variceal haemorrhage. Hospitals admitting patients with AUGIB need to provide well organised services and ensure access to relevant services for all patients, and particularly to out of hours endoscopy. PMID:26430191

  3. [Acute retinal necrosis].

    PubMed

    Lucke, K; Reinking, U; el-Hifnawi, E; Dennin, R H; Laqua, H

    1988-12-01

    The authors report on three patients with acute retinal necrosis who were treated with the virostatic agent Acyclovir and who underwent vitreoretinal surgery with silicone oil filling for total retinal detachment. In two eyes the retina was reattached, but useful vision was only preserved in one patient. Titers from blood and the vitreous, as well as microscopic findings in retinal biopsies, support the view that the necrosis is caused by a herpes simplex virus infection. After therapy with Acyclovir was instituted no further progression on the necrosis was observed. However, the development of retinal detachment could not be prevented. Early diagnosis and antiviral therapy are essential to improve the otherwise poor prognosis in this rare syndrome. PMID:3221657

  4. [Acute epiglottitis in adults].

    PubMed

    Castillo, A

    1992-09-01

    The author presents the clinical history of 14 patients, from 21 to 48 years of age, 10 men and 4 women, with a final diagnosis of acute epiglottitis who were hospitalized at Gorgas Army Hospital or at the San Fernando Clinic. All the patients had pharyngitis and dysphagia, a few with nasal voice, stridor and difficulty breathing, as the chief complaint. All the patients were initially intubated orally for diagnostic purposes and immediately after nasotracheal intubation was done until the patient improved in 2 or 3 days (one patient remained intubated for 5 days). All patients were kept in the Intensive Care Unit and were treated with Ampicillin and Chloramphenicol IV and lately with a second generation cephalosporin (Cefamandole). The patients allergic to Penicillin were treated with Clindamycin and Chloramphenicol. Corticosteroids were not used in any of the patients. There were no sequelae and none of the patients expired. PMID:1439005

  5. Acute Methylenedioxypyrovalerone Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Froberg, Blake A; Levine, Michael; Beuhler, Michael C; Judge, Bryan S; Moore, Philip W; Engebretsen, Kristin M; Mckeown, Nathanael J; Rosenbaum, Christopher D; Young, Amy C; Rusyniak, Daniel E

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the acute clinical effects, laboratory findings, complications, and disposition of patients presenting to the hospital after abusing synthetic cathinone. We conducted a retrospective multicenter case series of patients with synthetic cathinone abuse by searching for the terms bath salts, MDPV, methylenedioxypyrovalerone, mephedrone, methcathinone, methylone, methedrone, and cathinone within the "agent" field of a national clinical toxicology database (ToxIC). The medical records of these patients were obtained and abstracted by investigators at each study site. Patients with confirmatory testing that identified a synthetic cathinone in either blood or urine were included in the series. Patients who had either an undetectable synthetic cathinone test or no confirmatory testing were excluded. A data abstraction sheet was used to obtain information on each patient. We entered data into an Excel spreadsheet and calculated descriptive statistics. We identified 23 patients with confirmed synthetic cathinone exposure--all were positive for methylenedioxyprovalerone (MDPV). Eighty-three percent were male and 74 % had recreational intent. The most common reported clinical effects were tachycardia (74 %), agitation (65 %), and sympathomimetic syndrome (65 %). Acidosis was the most common laboratory abnormality (43 %). Seventy-eight percent of patients were treated with benzodiazepines and 30 % were intubated. Ninety-six percent of patients were hospitalized and 87 % were admitted to the ICU. The majority (61 %) of patients was discharged home but 30 % required inpatient psychiatric care. There was one death in our series. The majority of patients presenting to the hospital after abusing MDPV have severe sympathomimetic findings requiring hospitalization. A number of these patients require inpatient psychiatric care after their acute presentation. PMID:25468313

  6. Asthma in adults (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction About 10% of adults have suffered an attack of asthma, and up to 5% of these have severe disease that responds poorly to treatment. Patients with severe disease have an increased risk of death, but patients with mild to moderate disease are also at risk of exacerbations. Most guidelines about the management of asthma follow stepwise protocols. This review does not endorse or follow any particular protocol, but presents the evidence about specific interventions. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for acute asthma? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to April 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 100 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: beta2 agonists (plus ipratropium bromide, pressured metered-dose inhalers, short-acting continuous nebulised, short-acting intermittent nebulised, short-acting iv, and inhaled formoterol); corticosteroids (inhaled); corticosteroids (single oral, combined inhaled, and short courses); education about acute asthma; generalist care; helium–oxygen mixture (heliox); magnesium sulphate (iv and adding isotonic nebulised magnesium to inhaled beta2 agonists); mechanical ventilation; oxygen supplementation (controlled 28% oxygen and controlled 100% oxygen); and specialist care. PMID:21463536

  7. [Acute acromioclavicular dislocations].

    PubMed

    Riand, N; Sadowski, C; Hoffmeyer, P

    1999-12-01

    Acromioclavicular dislocations represent over 10% of acute traumatic injuries to the shoulder girdle. The mechanism is usually a direct impact on the shoulder with the arm in adduction, producing rupture of the acromioclavicular (AC) ligaments, then of the coracoclavicular (CC) ligament, with displacement of the lateral end of the clavicle. Rockwood described 6 grades of injury. Physical examination usually provides the diagnosis, which is confirmed by radiological examination. X-rays centered on the AC joint, if necessary with forceful adduction of both shoulders or under traction, are useful to evaluate the severity of the lesion. Grade I and II lesions are usually treated conservatively by simply immobilizing the arm for 3 to 4 weeks. Surgical treatment is usually advocated for grade IV, V and VI lesions: AC or CC fixation, sometimes associated with ligament repair, depending on the surgeons. AC pinning or C-C screw fixation are the techniques most often used. Management of grade III lesions remains controversial. Some authors advocate immediate surgical treatment in young, active patients, in heavy laborers and even in slender individuals. The choice of the operative technique is controversial, as no single technique has clearly proved to be superior to others. Other authors advocate conservative treatment, which gives functional results which patients consider quite acceptable, with faster recovery; patients should be informed that results are essentially similar, whatever the treatment. The possibility of performing secondary operations with good results in cases with failure of conservative management is a further argument in favor of applying conservative therapy first in acute injuries. PMID:10675933

  8. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Estenssoro, Elisa; Dubin, Arnaldo

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is an acute respiratory failure produced by an inflammatory edema secondary to increased lung capillary permeability. This causes alveolar flooding and subsequently deep hypoxemia, with intrapulmonary shunt as its most important underlying mechanism. Characteristically, this alteration is unresponsive to high FIO2 and only reverses with end-expiratory positive pressure (PEEP). Pulmonary infiltrates on CXR and CT are the hallmark, together with decreased lung compliance. ARDS always occurs within a week of exposition to a precipitating factor; most frequently pneumonia, shock, aspiration of gastric contents, sepsis, and trauma. In CT scan, the disease is frequently inhomogeneous, with gravitational infiltrates coexisting with normal-density areas and also with hyperaerated parenchyma. Mortality is high (30-60%) especially in ARDS associated with septic shock and neurocritical diseases. The cornerstone of therapy lies in the treatment of the underlying cause and in the use mechanical ventilation which, if inappropriately administered, can lead to ventilator-induced lung injury. Tidal volume = 6 ml/kg of ideal body weight to maintain an end-inspiratory (plateau) pressure = 30 cm H2O ("protective ventilation") is the only variable consistently associated with decreased mortality. Moderate-to-high PEEP levels are frequently required to treat hypoxemia, yet no specific level or titration strategy has improved outcomes. Recently, the use of early prone positioning in patients with PaO2/FIO2 = 150 was associated with increased survival. In severely hypoxemic patients, it may be necessary to use adjuvants of mechanical ventilation as recruitment maneuvers, pressure-controlled modes, neuromuscular blocking agents, and extracorporeal-membrane oxygenation. Fluid restriction appears beneficial. PMID:27576283

  9. Acute management of migraine.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Debashish

    2010-04-01

    Migraine is a brain disease whose principal symptom is episodic intense throbbing pain in the head which is often accompanied by photophobia, phonophobia, nausea and vomiting. Primary objectives of migraine treatment are to abort the acute attacks, treat associated symptoms and prevent future attacks. With a majority of migraine patients being young, they will need a treatment plan to suit their professional work, leisure and reproductive concerns. Non specific anti-migraine drugs like non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, anti-emetics, narcotics, and sympathomimetics are usually helpful in mild to moderate attacks. Specific drugs like triptans and ergots are useful for moderate to severe attacks. In step care approach, the patients are started with the simplest options like simple analgesics first followed by non-steroidal agents, then ergot preparations and eventually triptans if they do not respond. In stratified care approach, the attacks and the patients are stratified according to the severity and therapeutic response. Those with severe disabling episodes are given specific anti-migraine medications like triptans whereas patients with mild or low disability are treated with simple analgesics. Currently, the most favored acute anti-migraine medication is a triptan. At marketed doses all triptans are effective as compared to placebos and generally well tolerated. Amongst them however, rizatriptan 10 mg, eletriptan 80 mg and almotriptan 12.5 mg provide the highest likelihood of consistent success. Triptan related adverse events are usually short lived, mild and clinically insignificant. Ergots are slowly being replaced by triptans. This is because of their adverse side-effects, low bioavailability and high potential for abuse that can lead to overuse headache. PMID:21049703

  10. Acute pancreatitis and acute renal failure complicating doxylamine succinate intoxication.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yang Deok; Lee, Soo Teik

    2002-06-01

    Doxylamine succinate is an antihistaminic drugwith additional hypnotic, anticholinergic and local anesthetic effects first described in 1948. In Korea and many other countries, it is a common-over-the counter medication frequently involved in overdoses. Clinical symtomatology of doxylamine succinate overdose includes somnolence, coma, seizures, mydriasis, tachycardia, psychosis, and rhabdomyolysis. A serious complication may be rhabdomyolysis with subsequent impairment of renal function and acute renal failure. We report a case of acute renal failure and acute pancreatitis complicating a doxylamine succinate intoxication. PMID:12046971

  11. [Latest advances in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    The present article analyses the main presentations on acute pancreatitis at Digestive Disease Week 2015. Arterial pseudoaneurysm is an uncommon complication of acute pancreatitis (incidence 0.7%) and mortality from this cause is currently anecdotal. Diabetes mellitus has little impact on the clinical course of acute pancreatitis, unlike cirrhosis, which doubles the risk of mortality. Intake of unsaturated fat could be associated with an increased severity of acute pancreatitis and is a confounding factor in studies evaluating the relationship between obesity and morbidity and mortality. PET-CT (positron emission tomography-computed tomography) could be a non-invasive tool to detect infection of collections in acute pancreatitis. Peripancreatic fat necrosis is less frequent than pancreatic fat necrosis and is associated with a better clinical course. If the clinical course is poor, increasing the calibre of the percutaneous drains used in the treatment of infected necrosis can avoid surgery in 20% of patients. The use of low molecular-weight heparin in moderate or severe pancreatitis could be associated with a better clinical course, specifically with a lower incidence of necrosis. In acute recurrent pancreatitis, simvastatin is a promising drug for prophylaxis of new episodes of acute pancreatitis. Nutritional support through a nasogastric tube does not improve clinical course compared with oral nutrition. PMID:26520203

  12. Biomarkers in acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Aditi; Januzzi, James L

    2015-06-01

    The care of patients with acutely decompensated heart failure is being reshaped by the availability and understanding of several novel and emerging heart failure biomarkers. The gold standard biomarkers in heart failure are B-type natriuretic peptide and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, which play an important role in the diagnosis, prognosis, and management of acute decompensated heart failure. Novel biomarkers that are increasingly involved in the processes of myocardial injury, neurohormonal activation, and ventricular remodeling are showing promise in improving diagnosis and prognosis among patients with acute decompensated heart failure. These include midregional proatrial natriuretic peptide, soluble ST2, galectin-3, highly-sensitive troponin, and midregional proadrenomedullin. There has also been an emergence of biomarkers for evaluation of acute decompensated heart failure that assist in the differential diagnosis of dyspnea, such as procalcitonin (for identification of acute pneumonia), as well as markers that predict complications of acute decompensated heart failure, such as renal injury markers. In this article, we will review the pathophysiology and usefulness of established and emerging biomarkers for the clinical diagnosis, prognosis, and management of acute decompensated heart failure. PMID:25911167

  13. [Cerebrolysin for acute ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    iganshina, L E; Abakumova, T R

    2013-01-01

    The review discusses existing evidence of benefits and risks of cerebrolysin--a mixture of low-molecular-weight peptides and amino acids derived from pigs' brain tissue with proposed neuroprotective and neurotrophic properties, for acute ischemic stroke. The review presents results of systematic search and analysis of randomised clinical trials comparing cerebrolysin with placebo in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Only one trial was selected as meeting quality criteria. No difference in death and adverse events between cerebrolysin and placebo was established. The authors conclude about insufficiency of evidence to evaluate the effect of cerebrolysin on survival and dependency in people with acute ischemic stroke. PMID:23805635

  14. Acute Legionella pneumophila infection masquerading as acute alcoholic hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Jonathan Michael; Chan, Julian; Reid, Angeline Louise; Tan, Chistopher

    2013-01-01

    A middle-aged man had deteriorated rapidly in hospital after being misdiagnosed with acute alcoholic hepatitis. Acute Legionnaires disease (Legionellosis) was subsequently diagnosed on rapid antigen urinary testing and further confirmed serologically. This led to appropriate antibiotic treatment and complete clinical resolution. Physicians caring for patients with alcohol-related liver disease should consider Legionella pneumophila in their differential diagnosis even with a paucity of respiratory symptoms. PMID:23355576

  15. [Acute heart failure: acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Marteles, Marta; Urrutia, Agustín

    2014-03-01

    Acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock are two of the main forms of presentation of acute heart failure. Both entities are serious, with high mortality, and require early diagnosis and prompt and aggressive management. Acute pulmonary edema is due to the passage of fluid through the alveolarcapillary membrane and is usually the result of an acute cardiac episode. Correct evaluation and clinical identification of the process is essential in the management of acute pulmonary edema. The initial aim of treatment is to ensure hemodynamic stability and to correct hypoxemia. Other measures that can be used are vasodilators such as nitroglycerin, loop diuretics and, in specific instances, opioids. Cardiogenic shock is characterized by sustained hypoperfusion, pulmonary wedge pressure > 18 mmHg and a cardiac index < 2.2l/min/m(2). The process typically presents with hypotension (systolic blood pressure < 90 mmHg or a decrease in mean arterial pressure > 30 mmHg) and absent or reduced diuresis (< 0.5 ml/kg/h). The most common cause is left ventricular failure due to acute myocardial infarction. Treatment consists of general measures to reverse acidosis and hypoxemia, as well as the use of vasopressors and inotropic drugs. Early coronary revascularization has been demonstrated to improve survival in shock associated with ischaemic heart disease. PMID:24930078

  16. Acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Domes, Trustin; Szafran, Olga; Bilous, Cheryl; Olson, Odell; Spooner, G. Richard

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the quality of care of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in a rural health region. DESIGN Clinical audit employing multiple explicit criteria of care elements for emergency department and in-hospital AMI management. The audit was conducted using retrospective chart review. SETTING Twelve acute care health centres and hospitals in the East Central Health Region, a rural health region in Alberta, where medical and surgical services are provided almost entirely by family physicians. PARTICIPANTS Hospital inpatients with a confirmed discharge diagnosis of AMI (ICD-9-CM codes 410.xx) during the period April 1, 2001, to March 31, 2002, were included (177 confirmed cases). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Quality of AMI care was assessed using guidelines from the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association and the Canadian Cardiovascular Outcomes Research Team and Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Quality of care indicators at three stages of patient care were assessed: at initial recognition and AMI management in the emergency department, during in-hospital AMI management, and at preparation for discharge from hospital. RESULTS In the emergency department, the quality of care was high for most procedural and therapeutic audit elements, with the exception of rapid electrocardiography, urinalysis, and provision of nitroglycerin and morphine. Average door-to-needle time for thrombolysis was 102.5 minutes. The quality of in-hospital care was high for most elements, but low for nitroglycerin and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, daily electrocardiography, and counseling regarding smoking cessation and diet. Few patients received counseling for lifestyle changes at hospital discharge. Male and younger patients were treated more aggressively than female and older patients. Sites that used care protocols achieved better results in initial AMI management than sites that did not. Stress testing was not readily available in the rural

  17. Pipazethate--acute childhood poisoning.

    PubMed

    da Silva, O A; Lopez, M

    1977-01-01

    A previously healthy child who who had accidentally ingested an unknown quantity of 20-mg tablets of pipazethate developed severe acute poisoning with neurologic, metabolic, and cardiovascular disturbances. She recovered with symptomatic and supportive therapy. PMID:589958

  18. Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) -- children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Leung WH, Pounds S, Cao X, e t al. Definition of cure in childhood acute myeloid leukemia. Cancer . 2014 Aug ... MD, Medical Oncologist, Fresno, CA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by ...

  19. Ultrasonography in acute gallbladder perforation.

    PubMed

    Soiva, M; Pamilo, M; Päivänsalo, M; Taavitsainen, M; Suramo, I

    1988-01-01

    The files of patients with acute cholecystitis from two large university hospitals from the years 1978-1985 were employed to find the cases with acute gallbladder perforation for this study. Only those patients (n = 9) were selected for the analysis of sonographic signs of acute gallbladder perforation who had less than 48 hours of symptoms before sonography, and were operated upon within 24 hours of the sonography. Patients (n = 10) with non-complicated acute cholecystitis and identical in regard to the duration of the symptoms and the timing of the sonography and the operation formed a control group. The sonographic findings in patients with gallbladder perforation were pericholecystic fluid collections, free peritoneal fluid, disappearance of the gallbladder wall echoes, focal highly echogenic areas with acoustic shadows in the gallbladder, and an inhomogeneous, generally echo-poor gallbladder wall. PMID:2964842

  20. Causes of acute bronchitis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the bronchial tubes, the part of the respiratory system that leads into the lungs. Acute bronchitis has a sudden onset and usually appears after a respiratory infection, such as a cold, and can be ...

  1. Commonly Used Acute Migraine Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... that make headaches worse (or lead to decreased responsiveness to other drug therapies) Patient preference Goals of ... Reduce frequency, severity, and duration of attacks Improve responsiveness to treatment of acute attacks Reduce level of ...

  2. [Ascites and acute kidney injury].

    PubMed

    Piano, Salvatore; Tonon, Marta; Angeli, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    Ascites is the most common complication of cirrhosis. Ascites develops as a consequence of an abnormal splanchnic vasodilation with reduction of effecting circulating volume and activation of endogenous vasoconstrictors system causing salt and water retention. Patients with ascites have a high risk to develop further complications of cirrhosis such as hyponatremia, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and acute kidney injury resulting in a poor survival. In recent years, new studies helped a better understanding of the pathophysiology of ascites and acute kidney injury in cirrhosis. Furthermore, new diagnostic criteria have been proposed for acute kidney injury and hepatorenal syndrome and a new algorithm for their management has been recommended with the aim of an early diagnosis and treatment. Herein we will review the current knowledge on the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of ascites and acute kidney injury in patients with cirrhosis and we will identify the unmet needs that should be clarified in the next years. PMID:27571467

  3. ARDS (Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter. What Is ARDS? ARDS, or acute respiratory distress syndrome, is a lung condition that leads to low oxygen levels in the blood. ARDS can be life threatening because your body's organs need oxygen-rich ...

  4. A survey of oncology advanced practice nurses in Ontario: profile and predictors of job satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Green, Esther; Fitch, Margaret; Macartney, Gail; Robb-Blenderman, Linda; McFarlane, Sandra; Bosompra, Kwadwo; DiCenso, Alba; Matthews, Susan; Milne, Harry

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine role structures and processes and their impact on job satisfaction for oncology advanced practice nurses (APNs) in Ontario. APNs caring for adult, paediatric or palliative patients in integrated regional cancer programs, tertiary care hospitals or community hospitals and agencies were invited to complete a mailed self-report questionnaire. A total of 73 of 77 APNs participated in the study. Most APNs (55%) were acute care nurse practitioners employed by regional cancer programs or tertiary care hospitals. Adult patients with breast or haematological cancers and those receiving initial treatment or palliative care were the primary focus of APN roles. APN education needs related to specialization in oncology, leadership and research were identified. Overall, APNs were minimally satisfied with their roles. Role confidence (beta = .404, p = .001) and the number of overtime hours (beta = -.313, p = .008) were respective positive and negative predictors of APN job satisfaction. Progress in role development is described, and recommendations for improving role development and expanding the delivery of oncology APN services are provided. PMID:17619596

  5. [Acute gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Baumbach, Robert; Faiss, Siegbert; Cordruwisch, Wolfgang; Schrader, Carsten

    2016-04-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding is a common major emergency (Internal medical or gastroenterological or medical), approximately 85 % of which occur in the upper GI tract. It is estimated that about a half of upper GI bleeds are caused by peptic ulcers. Upper GI bleeds are associated with more severe bleeding and poorer outcomes when compared to middle or lower GI bleeds. Prognostic determinants include bleeding intensity, patient age, comorbid conditions and the concomitant use of anticoagulants. A focused medical history can offer insight into the bleeding intensity, location and potential cause (along with early risk stratification). Initial measures should focus on rapid assessment and resuscitation of unstable patients. The oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (OGD) is the gold standard method for localizing the source of bleeding and for interventional therapy. Bleeding as a result of peptic ulcers is treated endoscopically with mechanical and / or thermal techniques in combination with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. When variceal bleeding is suspected, pre-interventional use of vasopressin analogues and antibiotic therapies are recommended. Endoscopically, the first line treatment of esophageal varices is endoscopic ligature therapy, whereas that for gastric varices is the use of Histoacryl injection sclerotherapy. When persistent and continued massive hemorrhage occurs in a patient with known or suspected aortic disease the possibility of an aorto-enteric fistula must be considered. PMID:27078246

  6. Acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Khwaja, Asim; Bjorkholm, Magnus; Gale, Rosemary E; Levine, Ross L; Jordan, Craig T; Ehninger, Gerhard; Bloomfield, Clara D; Estey, Eli; Burnett, Alan; Cornelissen, Jan J; Scheinberg, David A; Bouscary, Didier; Linch, David C

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is a disorder characterized by a clonal proliferation derived from primitive haematopoietic stem cells or progenitor cells. Abnormal differentiation of myeloid cells results in a high level of immature malignant cells and fewer differentiated red blood cells, platelets and white blood cells. The disease occurs at all ages, but predominantly occurs in older people (>60 years of age). AML typically presents with a rapid onset of symptoms that are attributable to bone marrow failure and may be fatal within weeks or months when left untreated. The genomic landscape of AML has been determined and genetic instability is infrequent with a relatively small number of driver mutations. Mutations in genes involved in epigenetic regulation are common and are early events in leukaemogenesis. The subclassification of AML has been dependent on the morphology and cytogenetics of blood and bone marrow cells, but specific mutational analysis is now being incorporated. Improvements in treatment in younger patients over the past 35 years has largely been due to dose escalation and better supportive care. Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation may be used to consolidate remission in those patients who are deemed to be at high risk of relapse. A plethora of new agents - including those targeted at specific biochemical pathways and immunotherapeutic approaches - are now in trial based on improved understanding of disease pathophysiology. These advances provide good grounds for optimism, although mortality remains high especially in older patients. PMID:27159408

  7. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yadam, Suman; Bihler, Eric; Balaan, Marvin

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a serious inflammatory disorder with high mortality. Its main pathologic mechanism seems to result from increased alveolar permeability. Its definition has also changed since first being described according to the Berlin definition, which now classifies ARDS on a severity scale based on PaO2 (partial pressure of oxygen, arterial)/FIO2 (fraction of inspired oxygen) ratio. The cornerstone of therapy was found to be a low tidal volume strategy featuring volumes of 6 to 8 mL per kg of ideal body weight that has been shown to have decreased mortality as proven by the ARDSnet trials. There are other areas of treatment right now that include extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, as well for severe refractory hypoxemia. Other methods that include prone positioning for ventilation have also shown improvements in oxygenation. Positive end-expiratory pressure with lung recruitment maneuvers has also been found to be helpful. Other therapies that include vasodilators and neuromuscular agents are still being explored and need further studies to define their role in ARDS. PMID:26919679

  8. Acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Patschan, Daniel; Müller, Gerhard Anton

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is a frequent and serious complication in hospitalized patients. Mortality rates have not substantially been decreased during the last 20 years. In most patients AKI results from transient renal hypoperfusion or ischemia. The consequences include tubular cell dysfunction/damage, inflammation of the organ, and post-ischemic microvasculopathy. The two latter events perpetuate kidney damage in AKI. Clinical manifestations result from diminished excretion of water, electrolytes, and endogenous / exogenous waste products. Patients are endangered by cardiovascular complications such as hypertension, heart failure, and arrhythmia. In addition, the whole organism may be affected by systemic toxification (uremia). The diagnostic approach in AKI involves several steps with renal biopsy inevitable in some patients. The current therapy focuses on preventing further kidney damage and on treatment of complications. Different pharmacological strategies have failed to significantly improve prognosis in AKI. If dialysis treatment becomes mandatory, intermittent and continuous renal replacement therapies are equally effective. Thus, new therapies are urgently needed in order to reduce short- and long-term outcome in AKI. In this respect, stem cell-based regimens may offer promising perspectives. PMID:25618438

  9. Acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Gerhard Anton

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Acute kidney injury is a frequent and serious complication in hospitalized patients. Mortality rates have not substantially been decreased during the last 20 years. In most patients AKI results from transient renal hypoperfusion or ischemia. The consequences include tubular cell dysfunction/damage, inflammation of the organ, and post-ischemic microvasculopathy. The two latter events perpetuate kidney damage in AKI. Clinical manifestations result from diminished excretion of water, electrolytes, and endogenous / exogenous waste products. Patients are endangered by cardiovascular complications such as hypertension, heart failure, and arrhythmia. In addition, the whole organism may be affected by systemic toxification (uremia). The diagnostic approach in AKI involves several steps with renal biopsy inevitable in some patients. The current therapy focuses on preventing further kidney damage and on treatment of complications. Different pharmacological strategies have failed to significantly improve prognosis in AKI. If dialysis treatment becomes mandatory, intermittent and continuous renal replacement therapies are equally effective. Thus, new therapies are urgently needed in order to reduce short- and long-term outcome in AKI. In this respect, stem cell-based regimens may offer promising perspectives. PMID:25618438

  10. Acute pain transfusion reaction.

    PubMed

    Hardwick, Jody; Osswald, Michael; Walker, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    A 34-year-old woman with a diagnosis of hemophagocytic lymphohistocytosis (HLH) received a double umbilical cord blood transplantation following a myeloablative chemotherapy preparative regimen with busulfan and cyclophosphamide. HLH is a rare, potentially fatal hematologic disorder characterized by the overactivation of histocytes and T lymphocytes, leading to organ infiltration and acute illness. On day 25 post-transplantation, the patient required a platelet transfusion for a platelet count of 6,000 per ml (normal range = 150,000-450,000 per ml). The patient's blood type prior to the cord blood transplantation was B positive and, although both umbilical cord blood donors were O positive, the patient was still B positive per blood bank testing on that day. Although the recipient of an allogenic stem cell transplantation will eventually become the blood type of the donor, the time for this process to occur varies for each person. That process must be monitored by the blood bank for the purpose of cross-matching blood products to decrease hemolysis as much as possible. The patient was premedicated with the facility's standard for platelet transfusions: acetaminophen 650 mg and diphenhydramine 25 mg about 30 minutes prior to the platelet transfusion. PMID:24161631

  11. Acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jawaid, Saad; Chaudary, Adeel

    2014-01-01

    The paramedics brought a 60-year-old man to the emergency department after a sudden onset of shortness of breath with a subsequent drop in the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). On arrival the patient looked peri-arrest. His O2 saturations were 84% on 15 L of oxygen. He had gasping breathing with a completely silent chest and the GCS was 6/15 (E=1, V=1, M=4). The blood gas revealed type-2 respiratory failure. The chest X-ray was unremarkable and ECG was not indicative for cardiac catheterisation lab activation. Bedside shock scan was done which showed global hypokinesia of the left ventricle. In spite of unconvincing ECG and chest X-ray, an acute cardiac event was diagnosed in view of an abnormal bedside echo. The patient was transferred to the cardiac catheterisation lab for urgent percutaneous coronary intervention which revealed critical stenosis of the left main stem coronary artery, which was successfully stented. The patient had a good recovery from the life-threatening event. PMID:24913081

  12. Acute Diarrhea in Children.

    PubMed

    Radlović, Nedeljko; Leković, Zoran; Vuletić, Biljana; Radlović, Vladimir; Simić, Dušica

    2015-01-01

    Acute diarrhea (AD) is the most frequent gastroenterological disorder, and the main cause of dehydration in childhood. It is manifested by a sudden occurrence of three or more watery or loose stools per day lasting for seven to 10 days, 14 days at most. It mainly occurs in children until five years of age and particularly in neonates in the second half-year and children until the age of three years. Its primary causes are gastrointestinal infections, viral and bacterial, and more rarely alimentary intoxications and other factors. As dehydration and negative nutritive balance are the main complications of AD, it is clear that the compensation of lost body fluids and adequate diet form the basis of the child's treatment. Other therapeutic measures, except antipyretics in high febrility, antiparasitic drugs for intestinal lambliasis, anti-amebiasis and probiotics are rarely necessary. This primarily regards uncritical use of antibiotics and intestinal antiseptics in the therapy of bacterial diarrhea.The use of antiemetics, antidiarrhetics and spasmolytics is unnecessary and potentially risky, so that it is not recommended for children with AD. PMID:26946776

  13. Uveitis (acute anterior)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Anterior uveitis is rare, with an annual incidence of 12/100,000 population, although it is more common in Finland (annual incidence of 23/100,000), probably because of genetic factors, such as high frequency of HLA–B27 in the population. It is often self-limiting, but can, in some cases, lead to complications such as posterior synechiae, cataract, glaucoma, and chronic uveitis. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of anti-inflammatory eye drops on acute anterior uveitis? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to November 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found six systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: corticosteroids, mydriatics, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug eye drops. PMID:21736765

  14. Acute optic neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Galetta, Steven L.; Villoslada, Pablo; Levin, Netta; Shindler, Kenneth; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Parr, Edward; Cadavid, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic demyelinating optic neuritis (ON) most commonly presents as acute unilateral vision loss and eye pain and is frequently associated with multiple sclerosis. Although emphasis is often placed on the good recovery of high-contrast visual acuity, persistent deficits are frequently observed in other aspects of vision, including contrast sensitivity, visual field testing, color vision, motion perception, and vision-related quality of life. Persistent and profound structural and functional changes are often revealed by imaging and electrophysiologic techniques, including optical coherence tomography, visual-evoked potentials, and nonconventional MRI. These abnormalities can impair patients' abilities to perform daily activities (e.g., driving, working) so they have important implications for patients' quality of life. In this article, we review the sequelae from ON, including clinical, structural, and functional changes and their interrelationships. The unmet needs in each of these areas are considered and the progress made toward meeting those needs is examined. Finally, we provide an overview of past and present investigational approaches for disease modification in ON. PMID:26236761

  15. Canagliflozin-Associated Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rajanshu

    2016-01-01

    Canagliflozin is a new drug in class of sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors used for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We describe a patient who developed moderately severe acute pancreatitis as an untoward consequence after being initiated on this drug. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of canagliflozin-associated acute pancreatitis in clinical literature. PMID:25187092

  16. Acute Scorpion Pancreatitis in Trinidad

    PubMed Central

    Bartholomew, Courtenay

    1970-01-01

    Over a two-month period 30 patients were admitted to hospital following stings of the scorpion of Trinidad, the Tityus trinitatis. In 24 cases acute pancreatitis developed soon after the sting, but in nine of these no abdominal pain occurred. All the patients made an uneventful recovery. Although such complications have been reported no pseudocyst formations or acute haemorrhagic pancreatitis occurred in this series. PMID:5443968

  17. Amebiasis presenting as acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Javier E; Mederos, Raul; Rivero, Haidy; Sendzischew, Morgan A; Soaita, Mauela; Robinson, Morton J; Sendzischew, Harry; Danielpour, Payman

    2007-11-01

    Amebiasis presenting as acute appendicitis is extremely rare. The case of a 38-year-old Hispanic man who presented to the hospital with symptoms and signs suggestive of acute appendicitis is reported. He underwent laparoscopic appendectomy and the pathologic examination of the appendix revealed multiple trophozoites of Entamoeba histolytica. The patient was treated postoperatively with metronidazole for amebiasis, and follow-up stool studies showed no sign of residual infection. The patient has remained asymptomatic. PMID:17984748

  18. Acute Acquired Concomitant Esotropia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingchang; Deng, Daming; Sun, Yuan; Shen, Tao; Cao, Guobin; Yan, Jianhua; Chen, Qiwen; Ye, Xuelian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Acute acquired concomitant esotropia (AACE) is a rare, distinct subtype of esotropia. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe the clinical characteristics and discuss the classification and etiology of AACE. Charts from 47 patients with AACE referred to our institute between October 2010 and November 2014 were reviewed. All participants underwent a complete medical history, ophthalmologic and orthoptic examinations, and brain and orbital imaging. Mean age at onset was 26.6 ± 12.2 years. Of the 18 cases with deviations ≤ 20 PD, 16 presented with diplopia at distance and fusion at near vision at the onset of deviation; differences between distance and near deviations were < 8 PD; all cases except one were treated with prism and diplopia resolved. Of the 29 cases with deviations > 20 PD, 5 were mild hypermetropic with age at onset between 5 and 19 years, 16 were myopic, and 8 were emmetropic with age at onset > 12 years; 24 were surgically treated and 5 cases remained under observation; all 24 cases achieved normal retinal correspondence or fusion or stereopsis on postoperative day 1 in synoptophore; in 23 cases diplopia or visual confusion resolved postoperatively. Of the 47 cases, brain and orbital imaging in 2 cases revealed a tumor in the cerebellopontine angle and 1 case involved spinocerebellar ataxia as revealed by genetic testing. AACE in this study was characterized by a sudden onset of concomitant nonaccommodative esotropia with diplopia or visual confusion at 5 years of age or older and the potential for normal binocular vision. We suggest that AACE can be divided into 2 subgroups consisting of patients with relatively small versus large angle deviations. Coexisting or underlying neurological diseases were infrequent in AACE. PMID:26705210

  19. Hyperoxic Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kallet, Richard H; Matthay, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged breathing of very high FIO2 (FIO2 ≥ 0.9) uniformly causes severe hyperoxic acute lung injury (HALI) and, without a reduction of FIO2, is usually fatal. The severity of HALI is directly proportional to PO2 (particularly above 450 mm Hg, or an FIO2 of 0.6) and exposure duration. Hyperoxia produces extraordinary amounts of reactive O2 species that overwhelms natural antioxidant defenses and destroys cellular structures through several pathways. Genetic predisposition has been shown to play an important role in HALI among animals, and some genetics-based epidemiologic research suggests that this may be true for humans as well. Clinically, the risk of HALI likely occurs when FIO2exceeds 0.7, and may become problematic when FIO2 exceeds 0.8 for an extended period of time. Both high-stretch mechanical ventilation and hyperoxia potentiate lung injury and may promote pulmonary infection. During the 1960s, confusion regarding the incidence and relevance of HALI largely reflected such issues as the primitive control of FIO2, the absence of PEEP, and the fact that at the time both ALI and ventilator-induced lung injury were unknown. The advent of PEEP and precise control over FIO2, as well as lung-protective ventilation, and other adjunctive therapies for severe hypoxemia, has greatly reduced the risk of HALI for the vast majority of patients requiring mechanical ventilation in the 21st century. However, a subset of patients with very severe ARDS requiring hyperoxic therapy is at substantial risk for developing HALI, therefore justifying the use of such adjunctive therapies. PMID:23271823

  20. Acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Appelbaum, F R; Rowe, J M; Radich, J; Dick, J E

    2001-01-01

    Through the hard work of a large number of investigators, the biology of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is becoming increasingly well understood, and as a consequence, new therapeutic targets have been identified and new model systems have been developed for testing novel therapies. How these new therapies can be most effectively studied in the clinic and whether they will ultimately improve cure rates are questions of enormous importance. In this article, Dr. Jacob Rowe presents a summary of the current state-of-the-art therapy for adult AML. His contribution emphasizes the fact that AML is not a single disease, but a number of related diseases each distinguished by unique cytogenetic markers which in turn help determine the most appropriate treatment. Dr. Jerald Radich continues on this theme, emphasizing how these cytogenetic abnormalities, as well as other mutations, give rise to abnormal signal transduction and how these abnormal pathways may represent ideal targets for the development of new therapeutics. A third contribution by Dr. Frederick Appelbaum describes how AML might be made the target of immunologic attack. Specifically, strategies using antibody-based or cell-based immunotherapies are described including the use of unmodified antibodies, drug conjugates, radioimmunoconjugates, non-ablative allogeneic transplantation, T cell adoptive immunotherapy and AML vaccines. Finally, Dr. John Dick provides a review of the development of the NOD/SCID mouse model of human AML emphasizing both what it has taught us about the biology of the disease as well as how it can be used to test new therapies. Taken together, these reviews are meant to help us understand more about where we are in the treatment of AML, where we can go and how we might get there. PMID:11722979

  1. Acute Migraine Treatment in Adults.

    PubMed

    Becker, Werner J

    2015-06-01

    There are many options for acute migraine attack treatment, but none is ideal for all patients. This study aims to review current medical office-based acute migraine therapy in adults and provides readers with an organized approach to this important facet of migraine treatment. A general literature review includes a review of several recent published guidelines. Acetaminophen, 4 nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (ibuprofen, acetylsalicylic acid [ASA], naproxen sodium, and diclofenac potassium), and 7 triptans (almotriptan, eletriptan, frovatriptan, naratriptan, rizatriptan, sumatriptan, and zolmitriptan) have good evidence for efficacy and form the core of acute migraine treatment. NSAID-triptan combinations, dihydroergotamine, non-opioid combination analgesics (acetaminophen, ASA, and caffeine), and several anti-emetics (metoclopramide, domperidone, and prochlorperazine) are additional evidence-based options. Opioid containing combination analgesics may be helpful in specific patients, but should not be used routinely. Clinical features to be considered when choosing an acute migraine medication include usual headache intensity, usual rapidity of pain intensity increase, nausea, vomiting, degree of disability, patient response to previously used medications, history of headache recurrence with previous attacks, and the presence of contraindications to specific acute medications. Available acute medications can be organized into 4 treatment strategies, including a strategy for attacks of mild to moderate severity (strategy one: acetaminophen and/or NSAIDs), a triptan strategy for patients with severe attacks and for attacks not responding to strategy one, a refractory attack strategy, and a strategy for patients with contraindications to vasoconstricting drugs. Acute treatment of migraine attacks during pregnancy, lactation, and for patients with chronic migraine is also discussed. In chronic migraine, it is particularly important that medication

  2. Genetically Modified T-cell Immunotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-10

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Donor; Early Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Late Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. [Acute and subacute chemical pneumonitis].

    PubMed

    Andujar, P; Nemery, B

    2009-10-01

    Acute or subacute chemical-induced lung injury is rarely compound specific and is most often caused by an accidental occupational, domestic or environmental exposure to an inhaled chemical agent. The industrial disaster that happened in Bhopal in 1984, accidental poisoning with chlorine and petroleum hydrocarbons and also vesicant gases used during conflicts, are specific examples. Rarely, a chemical agent can cause lung damage by being ingested and reaching the lung through the systemic circulation (for example accidental or deliberate paraquat ingestion). Household accidents should not be underestimated. An important cause of household accidents is chlorine inhalation resulting from mixing bleach with acids such as the scale removers used to clean toilets. Chemical agents can provoke direct and/or indirect damage to the respiratory tract. The acute or subacute clinical manifestations resulting from inhalation of chemical agents are very varied and include inhalation fevers, acute non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema, adult respiratory distress syndrome, reactive airways dysfunction syndrome and acute or subacute pneumonitis. The site and the severity of chemical-induced respiratory damage caused by inhaled chemical agents depend mainly on the nature and the amount of the agent inhaled. The immediate and long-term prognosis and possible sequelae are also variable. This review excludes infectious or immunologically induced acute respiratory diseases. PMID:19953031

  4. Decitabine, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-30

    Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Unilateral acute idiopathic maculopathy. 1991.

    PubMed

    Yannuzzi, Lawrence A; Jampol, Lee M; Rabb, Maurice F; Sorenson, John A; Beyrer, Charles; Wilcox, Lloyd M

    2012-02-01

    This is a report of nine patients who experienced sudden, severe, unilateral central vision loss following a flulike illness. Each patient had an exudative detachment of the macula. All patients experienced a spontaneous resolution of the acute macular manifestations with near-complete recovery of vision. A characteristic "bull's-eye" appearance in the macula persisted. The acute manifestations of the disorder did not recur in any of the patients during the period of follow-up. The constellation of findings was suggestive of an inflammatory disease of the retinal pigment epithelium, but a specific causative agent could not be identified. The acute clinical and angiographic features, the natural course, and the residual pigment epithelial derangement were not consistent with any previously described disorder. PMID:22451959

  7. Autophagy in acute brain injury.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Blomgren, Klas; Kroemer, Guido

    2016-08-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily ancient mechanism that ensures the lysosomal degradation of old, supernumerary or ectopic cytoplasmic entities. Most eukaryotic cells, including neurons, rely on proficient autophagic responses for the maintenance of homeostasis in response to stress. Accordingly, autophagy mediates neuroprotective effects following some forms of acute brain damage, including methamphetamine intoxication, spinal cord injury and subarachnoid haemorrhage. In some other circumstances, however, the autophagic machinery precipitates a peculiar form of cell death (known as autosis) that contributes to the aetiology of other types of acute brain damage, such as neonatal asphyxia. Here, we dissect the context-specific impact of autophagy on non-infectious acute brain injury, emphasizing the possible therapeutic application of pharmacological activators and inhibitors of this catabolic process for neuroprotection. PMID:27256553

  8. Acute hepatitis after amiodarone infusion

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Paulo; Dias, Adelaide; Gonçalves, Helena; Albuquerque, Aníbal; Gama, Vasco

    2015-01-01

    Acute hepatitis is a very rare, but potentially fatal, adverse effect of intravenous amiodarone. We present a case of an 88-year-old man with history of ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy and severely depressed left ventricular function that was admitted to our coronary care unit with diagnosis of decompensated heart failure and non-sustained ventricular tachycardia. A few hours after the beginning of intravenous amiodarone he developed an acute hepatitis. There was a completely recovery within the next days after amiodarone withdrawn and other causes of acute hepatitis have been ruled out. This case highlights the need for close monitoring of hepatic function during amiodarone infusion in order to identify any potential hepatotoxicity and prevent a fatal outcome. Oral amiodarone is, apparently, a safe option in these patients. PMID:26488027

  9. Acute silicosis with bilateral pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, G N; Prasad, Rajniti; Meena, Manoj; Hussain, Moosa

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of acute silicosis with bilateral pneumothorax of a 28-year-old man working at a stone crusher factory for 1 year. He presented to the emergency department with cough, respiratory distress and diffuse chest pain. The patient was managed with bilateral intercostal tube drainage under water seal, oxygen inhalation and conservative therapy. On follow-up he showed improvement of resting dyspnoea and was doing well. This case is being reported because of the rare complications of acute silicosis as bilateral pneumothorax. PMID:24862410

  10. The acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Pooja

    2015-01-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a major cause of acute respiratory failure. Its development leads to high rates of mortality, as well as short- and long-term complications, such as physical and cognitive impairment. Therefore, early recognition of this syndrome and application of demonstrated therapeutic interventions are essential to change the natural course of this devastating entity. In this review article, we describe updated concepts in ARDS. Specifically, we discuss the new definition of ARDS, its risk factors and pathophysiology, and current evidence regarding ventilation management, adjunctive therapies, and intervention required in refractory hypoxemia. PMID:25829644

  11. Acute Kidney Injury in Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Karvellas, Constantine J; Durand, Francois; Nadim, Mitra K

    2015-10-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent complication of end-stage liver disease, especially in those with acute-on-chronic liver failure, occurring in up to 50% of hospitalized patients with cirrhosis. There is no specific blood or urine biomarker that can reliably identify the cause of AKI in cirrhotic patients. This review examines studies used to assess renal dysfunction in cirrhotic patients including new diagnostic criteria and potential novel biomarkers. Although biomarker development to differentiate the cause of AKI in cirrhosis has promise, the utility of biomarkers to determine irreversible renal dysfunction with liver transplant remains lacking, warranting further investigation. PMID:26410141

  12. Acute silicosis with bilateral pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, G N; Prasad, Rajniti; Meena, Manoj; Hussain, Moosa

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of acute silicosis with bilateral pneumothorax of a 28-year-old man working at a stone crusher factory for 1 year. He presented to the emergency department with cough, respiratory distress and diffuse chest pain. The patient was managed with bilateral intercostal tube drainage under water seal, oxygen inhalation and conservative therapy. On follow-up he showed improvement of resting dyspnoea and was doing well. This case is being reported because of the rare complications of acute silicosis as bilateral pneumothorax. PMID:24862410

  13. Acute kidney injury in children.

    PubMed

    Merouani, A; Flechelles, O; Jouvet, P

    2012-04-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) affects 5% of critically ill hospitalized children and is a risk factor for increased morbidity and mortality. The current review focuses on new definitions of acute kidney injury, standardized to reflect the entire spectrum of the disease, as well as on ongoing research to identify early biomarkers of kidney injury. Its also provides an overview of current practice and available therapies, with emphasis on new strategies for the prevention and pharmacological treatment of diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome. Furthermore, a decision-making algorithm is presented for the use of renal replacement therapies in critically ill children with AKI. PMID:22495187

  14. Acute kidney injury after pediatric cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sarvesh Pal

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is a common complication after pediatric cardiac surgery. The definition, staging, risk factors, biomarkers and management of acute kidney injury in children is detailed in the following review article. PMID:27052074

  15. How Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Classified?

    MedlinePlus

    ... How is acute lymphocytic leukemia treated? How is acute lymphocytic leukemia classified? Most types of cancers are assigned numbered ... ALL are now named as follows: B-cell ALL Early pre-B ALL (also called pro-B ...

  16. Glucose Effect in the Acute Porphyrias

    MedlinePlus

    ... You are here Home Diet and Nutrition The glucose effect in acute porphyrias The disorders Acute Intermittent ... are treated initially with the administration of carbohydrate/glucose. This therapy has its basis in the ability ...

  17. General Information about Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  18. General Information about Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  19. General Information about Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health ... the PDQ Pediatric Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: acute promyelocytic leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... acute myeloid leukemia, a cancer of the blood-forming tissue ( bone marrow ). In normal bone marrow, hematopoietic ... 7186-203. Review. Citation on PubMed de Thé H, Chen Z. Acute promyelocytic leukaemia: novel insights into ...

  1. Targeted Therapy for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Monoclonal antibodies to treat acute lymphocytic leukemia Targeted therapy for acute lymphocytic leukemia In recent years, new ... These drugs are often referred to as targeted therapy. Some of these drugs can be useful in ...

  2. Altitude, Acute Mountain Sickness and Headache

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mountain Sickness, and Headache Print Email Altitude, Acute Mountain Sickness, and Headache ACHE Newsletter Sign up for ... entering your e-mail address below. Altitude, Acute Mountain Sickness, and Headache David W. Dodick, MD, FAHS, ...

  3. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  4. Stages of Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  5. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  6. Optical diagnosis of acute scrotum in children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadgan, Babak; Macnab, Andrew; Stothers, Lynn; Nigro, Mark; Afshar, Kourosh; Kajbafzadeh, A. M.

    2015-03-01

    Acute scrotum is a urologic condition defined by scrotal pain, swelling, and redness of acute onset. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are necessary to preserve testicular viability. The history and clinical symptoms reported are key to diagnosis and proper treatment, but are not always readily obtained in children, in whom common causes of acute scrotum include testicular torsion, torsion of the appendix testis, and epididymitis. These acute conditions have different causal pathology that mandate specific treatment, hence the importance of early and accurate diagnosis.

  7. Acute treatment of migraine headaches.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Frederick R

    2010-04-01

    Optimum acute treatment of migraine requires prevention of headache as a top priority. Recognition of the multitude of migraine presentations, the frequency of total headache attacks, and number of days of headache disability are critical. Successful treatment requires excellent patient-clinician communication enhancing confidence and mutual trust based on patient needs and preferences. Optimum management of acute migraine nearly always requires pharmacologic treatment for rapid resolution. Migraine-specific triptans, dihydroergotamine, and several antiinflammatories have substantial empirical clinical efficacy. Older nonspecific drugs, particularly butalbital and opioids, contribute to medication overuse headache and are to be avoided. Clinicians should utilize evidence-based acute migraine-specific therapy stressing the imperative acute treatment goal of early intervention, but not too often with the correct drug, formulation, and dose. This therapy needs to provide cost-effective fast results, meaningful to the patient while minimizing the need for additional drugs. Migraine-ACT evaluates 2-hour pain freedom with return to normal function, comfort with treatment, and consistency of response. Employ a thoroughly educated patient, formulary, testimonials, stratification, and rational cotherapy against the race to central sensitization for optimum outcomes. PMID:20352584

  8. Pharmacologic therapy for acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kambhampati, Swetha; Park, Walter; Habtezion, Aida

    2014-01-01

    While conservative management such as fluid, bowel rest, and antibiotics is the mainstay of current acute pancreatitis management, there is a lot of promise in pharmacologic therapies that target various aspects of the pathogenesis of pancreatitis. Extensive review of preclinical studies, which include assessment of therapies such as anti-secretory agents, protease inhibitors, anti-inflammatory agents, and anti-oxidants are discussed. Many of these studies have shown therapeutic benefit and improved survival in experimental models. Based on available preclinical studies, we discuss potential novel targeted pharmacologic approaches that may offer promise in the treatment of acute pancreatitis. To date a variety of clinical studies have assessed the translational potential of animal model effective experimental therapies and have shown either failure or mixed results in human studies. Despite these discouraging clinical studies, there is a great clinical need and there exist several preclinical effective therapies that await investigation in patients. Better understanding of acute pancreatitis pathophysiology and lessons learned from past clinical studies are likely to offer a great foundation upon which to expand future therapies in acute pancreatitis. PMID:25493000

  9. [Acute and transient psychotic disorders].

    PubMed

    Marneros, A; Pillmann, F; Haring, A; Balzuweit, S

    2000-04-01

    Psychotic disorders with acute onset, a dramatic and polymorphous symptomatology and rapid resolution have been described in different countries and by different psychiatric schools. They have been called cycloid psychosis, bouffée délirante, psychogenic psychosis or good prognosis schizophrenia. ICD-10 has given an operational definition under the name "acute and transient psychotic disorders" (F23). Their nosological status is unclear. The Halle-Study of acute and transient psychotic disorders (ATPD) has investigated in a prospective manner clinical, para-clinical features and course of illness in 42 patients with ATPD and matched controls with positive schizophrenia, bipolar schizoaffective disorders as well as mentally healthy patients with acute surgical conditions. First results of our study show that ATPD amount to 4% of psychotic in-patients, prefer female sex, show short prodromi, marked affective disturbances within the episode and much better outcome as schizophrenic psychoses according to psychopathological, social, psychological and biographical criteria. Though ATPD may still be an inhomogeneous group, their clinical delineation from schizophrenia seems justified. PMID:10907609

  10. Hypocalcemia in acute pancreatitis revisited

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Armin; Azim, Afzal; Gurjar, Mohan; Baronia, Arvind Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Hypocalcemia is a frequent finding in acute pancreatitis. Severe hypocalcemia can present with neurological as well as cardiovascular manifestations. Correction of hypocalcemia by parenteral calcium infusion remains a controversial topic as intracellular calcium overload is the central mechanism of acinar cell injury in pancreatitis. The current article deals with the art and science of calcium correction in pancreatitis patients. PMID:27076730

  11. Sildenafil Induced Acute Interstitial Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Burkhart, Ryan; Shah, Nina; Lewin, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) is characterized by inflammation of the renal interstitium and usually occurs in a temporal relationship with the medication. We present a case of an Asian male who had nephrotic range proteinuria and presented with acute kidney injury. The patient reported an acute change in physical appearance and symptomatology after the ingestion of a single dose of sildenafil. Renal biopsy was notable for minimal change disease (MCD) with acute and chronic interstitial nephritis. Renal replacement and glucocorticoid therapy were initiated. Renal recovery within six weeks permitted discontinuation of dialysis. AIN superimposed on MCD is a known association of NSAID induced nephropathy. The temporal association and the absence of any new drugs suggest that the AIN was most likely due to the sildenafil. NSAIDs are less likely to have caused the AIN given their remote use. The ease of steroid responsiveness would also suggest another cause as NSAID induced AIN is often steroid resistant. The MCD was most likely idiopathic given the lack of temporal association with a secondary cause. As the number of sildenafil prescriptions increases, more cases of AIN may be identified and physician awareness for this potential drug disease association is necessary. PMID:26491581

  12. Chest physiotherapy in acute bronchiolitis.

    PubMed Central

    Webb, M S; Martin, J A; Cartlidge, P H; Ng, Y K; Wright, N A

    1985-01-01

    Forty four children with acute bronchiolitis were given twice daily chest physiotherapy in addition to standard supportive measures and were compared with 46 controls who were not given physiotherapy. There was no clinically discernable benefit on the course of their illness. PMID:3907510

  13. Acute and dramatic saxophone penis.

    PubMed

    García-Rodrigo, Carlota Gutiérrez; Maroñas-Jiménez, Lidia; Menis, Diana; Larráin, Hugo; Martínez, Lara Angulo

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of intense genital swelling because of a hereditary angioedema. This rare disease should be included in the differential diagnosis of acute and asymptomatic genital edema, because it may prevent future potentially life-threatening episodes of visceral angioedema. PMID:26752411

  14. Acute calcium pyrophosphate deposition arthropathy.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Thomas; Furman, Janet

    2016-06-01

    Acute calcium pyrophosphate deposition (CPPD) arthropathy, also called pseudogout, is common, and becomes more prevalent as patients age. The presenting symptoms are similar to both gout and septic arthritis but may be treated differently. This article describes a typical patient presentation and management from an emergency medicine and orthopedic surgery standpoint. PMID:27228038

  15. Acute calcific tendinitis in children.

    PubMed

    Lassoued, S; Billey, T; Millet, J P; Henia, A O

    1999-01-01

    Acute calcific tendinitis is uncommon in children. Clinical manifestations are similar to those in adults. The abrupt onset, functional impairment, and frequent presence of fever suggest an infection. Radiographic findings establish the diagnosis, obviating the need for further investigations. PMID:10526384

  16. Redox signaling in acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Salvador; Pereda, Javier; Sabater, Luis; Sastre, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreatic gland that eventually may lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response. A key event in pancreatic damage is the intracellular activation of NF-κB and zymogens, involving also calcium, cathepsins, pH disorders, autophagy, and cell death, particularly necrosis. This review focuses on the new role of redox signaling in acute pancreatitis. Oxidative stress and redox status are involved in the onset of acute pancreatitis and also in the development of the systemic inflammatory response, being glutathione depletion, xanthine oxidase activation, and thiol oxidation in proteins critical features of the disease in the pancreas. On the other hand, the release of extracellular hemoglobin into the circulation from the ascitic fluid in severe necrotizing pancreatitis enhances lipid peroxidation in plasma and the inflammatory infiltrate into the lung and up-regulates the HIF–VEGF pathway, contributing to the systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, redox signaling and oxidative stress contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis. PMID:25778551

  17. Acute treatment of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Kowey, P R; Marinchak, R A; Rials, S J; Filart, R A

    1998-03-12

    Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is a common clinical entity, responsible for significant morbidity and mortality, but it also accounts for a large percentage of healthcare dollar expenditures. Efforts to treat this arrhythmia in the past have focused on subacute antithrombotic therapy and eventually use of antiarrhythmic drugs for maintenance of sinus rhythm. However, there has been a growing interest in the concept of acute electrical and pharmacologic conversion. This treatment strategy has a number of benefits, including immediate alleviation of patient symptoms, avoidance of antithrombotic therapy, and prevention of electrophysiologic remodeling, which is thought to contribute to the perpetuation of the arrhythmia. There is also increasing evidence that this is a cost-effective strategy in that it may obviate admission to the hospital and the cost of long-term therapy. This article represents a summary of the treatments that may be used acutely to control the ventricular response to AFib, prevent thromboembolic events, and provide for acute conversion either pharmacologically or electrically. It includes information on modalities that are currently available and those that are under active development. We anticipate that an active, acute treatment approach to AFib and atrial flutter will become the therapeutic norm in the next few years, especially as the benefits of these interventions are demonstrated in clinical trials. PMID:9525568

  18. ACUTE HYDRONEPHROSIS MIMICKING RENAL COLIC

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Donald C.; Kaufman, Joseph J.

    1964-01-01

    Hydronephrosis may be acute, recurrent and related to ingestion of fluid. Frequently a lower polar vessel is an etiological factor. The condition is amenable to corrective operation by a variety of surgical techniques, as in the six cases here reported. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7. PMID:14154288

  19. Olanzapine use in acute porphyria.

    PubMed

    Horgan, Patrick; Jones, Hugh

    2003-01-01

    This report describes the use of olanzapine in the treatment of a patient with hereditary coproporphyria. This patient suffered from paranoid delusions, poor self-care and anxiety symptoms. The patient was commenced on olanzapine with a good clinical response, and without significant adverse effects. This suggests that olanzapine is a safe and effective treatment of psychotic symptoms in acute porphyrias. PMID:24937245

  20. Thrombolysis for Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Webb, John; Thompson, Christopher

    1992-01-01

    Thrombolysis has an important role in the management of acute myocardial infarction. Early treatment can markedly reduce mortality and morbidity. This new standard of care requires knowledge of accepted indications and contraindications for thrombolysis as well as familiarity with available agents and regimens. ImagesFigure 3 PMID:21221398

  1. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-23

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Acute coronary care: Principles and practice

    SciTech Connect

    Califf, R.M.; Wagner, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 58 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Radionuclide Techniques for Diagnosing and Sizing of Myocardial Infarction; The Use of Serial Radionuclide Angiography for Monitoring Function during Acute Myocardial Infarction; Hemodynamic Monitoring in Acute Myocardial Infarction; and The Valve of Radionuclide Angiography for Risk Assessment of Patients following Acute Myocardial Infarction.

  4. Cannabis-induced recurrent acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Howaizi, Mehran; Chahine, Mouhamad; Haydar, Fadi; Jemaa, Yassine; Lapoile, Emmanuel

    2012-12-01

    Acute pancreatitis has a large number of causes. Major causes are alcohol and gallstones. Toxic causes, mainly represented by medication-induced pancreatitis account for less than 2% of the cases. Cannabis is an anecdotally reported cause of acute pancreatitis. Six cases have previously been reported. Herein we report a new case of cannabis-induced recurrent acute pancreatitis. PMID:23402090

  5. Towards Prevention of Acute Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, A.; Thongprayoon, C.; Pickering, B.W.; Akhoundi, A.; Wilson, G.; Pieczkiewicz, D.; Herasevich, V.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Identifying patients at risk for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) before their admission to intensive care is crucial to prevention and treatment. The objective of this study is to determine the performance of an automated algorithm for identifying selected ARDS predisposing conditions at the time of hospital admission. Methods This secondary analysis of a prospective cohort study included 3,005 patients admitted to hospital between January 1 and December 31, 2010. The automated algorithm for five ARDS predisposing conditions (sepsis, pneumonia, aspiration, acute pancreatitis, and shock) was developed through a series of queries applied to institutional electronic medical record databases. The automated algorithm was derived and refined in a derivation cohort of 1,562 patients and subsequently validated in an independent cohort of 1,443 patients. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of an automated algorithm to identify ARDS risk factors were compared with another two independent data extraction strategies, including manual data extraction and ICD-9 code search. The reference standard was defined as the agreement between the ICD-9 code, automated and manual data extraction. Results Compared to the reference standard, the automated algorithm had higher sensitivity than manual data extraction for identifying a case of sepsis (95% vs. 56%), aspiration (63% vs. 42%), acute pancreatitis (100% vs. 70%), pneumonia (93% vs. 62%) and shock (77% vs. 41%) with similar specificity except for sepsis and pneumonia (90% vs. 98% for sepsis and 95% vs. 99% for pneumonia). The PPV for identifying these five acute conditions using the automated algorithm ranged from 65% for pneumonia to 91 % for acute pancreatitis, whereas the NPV for the automated algorithm ranged from 99% to 100%. Conclusion A rule-based electronic data extraction can reliably and accurately identify patients at risk of ARDS at the time of hospital

  6. Lenalidomide in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-25

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. [Acute respiratory failure in neuromuscular disease].

    PubMed

    Damak, H; Décosterd, D

    2015-09-30

    Neuromuscular diseases can affect all respiratory muscles, leading to acute respiratory failure, which is the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in those patients. Two situations must be distinguished. 1) Acute respiratory failure as part of a neuromuscular disorder of acute onset and possibly reversible (Guillain-Barre syndrome, myasthenic crisis...). 2) Acute respiratory failure occurring in a patient with an already advanced neuromuscular disease (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Duchenne muscular dystrophy...). This article describes the neuromuscular acute respiratory failure in these different aspects, discusses its initial management in the emergency department and identifies the parameters that have to be monitored. PMID:26619704

  8. Acute kidney injury in patients with acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Marenzi, Giancarlo; Cosentino, Nicola; Bartorelli, Antonio L

    2015-11-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is increasingly being seen in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACSs). This condition has a complex pathogenesis, an incidence that can reach 30% and it is associated with higher short-term and long-term morbidity and mortality. Nevertheless, AKI is still characterised by lack of a single accepted definition, unclear pathophysiology understanding and insensitive diagnostic tools that make its detection difficult, particularly in the setting of ACS. Recent data suggested that patients with AKI during ACS, even those in whom renal function seems to fully recover, face an increased, persisting risk of future AKI and may develop chronic kidney disease. Thus, in these patients, nephrology follow-up, after hospital discharge, and secondary preventive measures should possibly be implemented. In this review, we aim at providing a framework of knowledge to increase cardiologists' awareness of AKI, with the goal of improving the outcome of patients with ACS. PMID:26243789

  9. Tsutsugamushi infection-associated acute rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Young, Park Chi; Hae, Chung Choon; Lee, Kim Hyun; Hoon, Chung Jong

    2003-12-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a rare complication that emerges in a variety of infectious diseases, such as tsutsugamushi infection. In this study, we report a 71-year-old female patient with tsutsugamushi infection who exhibiting rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure. On admission, an eschar, which is characteristic of tsutsugamushi infection, was found on her right flank area. Moreover, her tsutsugamushi antibody titer was 1:40960. The elevated values of serum creatinine phosphokinase (CPK), aldolase, creatinine and dark brown urine secondary to myoglobinuria are consistent with indications of rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure due to tsutsugamushi infection. Her health improved without any residual effects after treatment with doxycyclin and hydration with normal saline. PMID:14717236

  10. Glucocorticoids improve acute dizziness symptoms following acute unilateral vestibulopathy.

    PubMed

    Batuecas-Caletrío, Angel; Yañez-Gonzalez, Raquel; Sanchez-Blanco, Carmen; Pérez, Pedro Blanco; González-Sanchez, Enrique; Sanchez, Luis Alberto Guardado; Kaski, Diego

    2015-11-01

    Acute unilateral vestibulopathy (AUV) is characterized by acute vertigo, nausea, and imbalance without neurological deficits or auditory symptomatology. Here, we explore the effect of glucocorticoid treatment on the degree of canal paresis in patients with AUV, and critically, establish its relationship with dizziness symptom recovery. We recruited consecutive patients who were retrospectively assigned to one of the two groups according to whether they received glucocorticoid treatment (n = 32) or not (n = 44). All patients underwent pure-tone audiometry, bithermal caloric testing, MRI brain imaging, and were asked to complete a dizziness handicap inventory on admission to hospital and just prior to hospital discharge. In the treatment group, the canal paresis at discharge was significantly lower than in the control group (mean ± SD % 38.04 ± 21.57 versus 82.79 ± 21.51, p < 0.001). We also observed a significant reduction in the intensity of nystagmus in patients receiving glucocorticoid treatment compared to the non-treatment group (p = 0.03). DHI test score was significantly lower at discharge in the treatment group (mean ± SD % 23.15 ± 12.40 versus 64.07 ± 12.87, p < 0.001), as was the length of hospital stay (2.18 ± 1.5 days versus 3.6 ± 1.7 days, p = 0.002). Glucocorticoid treatment leads to acute symptomatic improvement, with a reduced hospital stay and reduction in the intensity of acute nystagmus. Our findings suggest that glucocorticoids may accelerate vestibular compensation via a restoration of peripheral vestibular function, and therefore has important clinical implications for the treatment of AUV. PMID:26459091

  11. Acute Respiratory Distress in Children: Croup and Acute Asthma.

    PubMed

    Sharma, B S; Shekhawat, Dhananjay S; Sharma, Prity; Meena, Chetan; Mohan, Hari

    2015-07-01

    Acute respiratory distress is one of the most common reason for emergency visits in children under 5 y of age. An accurate understanding of the epidemiology of these diseases, identification of risk factors and etiology is critical for successful treatment and prevention of related mortality. The cause of acute respiratory distress varies in etiology, and hence is amenable to different treatment modalities. Depending on the predominant symptoms and signs, a child presenting to the clinician can be divided into six groups, viz., stridor; cough, fever and difficulty in breathing or fast breathing; wheezing; mediastinal shift with severe respiratory distress; slow or irregular breathing in absence of any pulmonary sign; and respiratory distress with cardiac findings. A detailed history followed by a thorough clinical examination and laboratory evaluation assisted by imaging modalities if indicated, helps to establish the exact cause of respiratory distress in the child. Early recognition and prompt institution of appropriate management or referral can significantly improve the outcome of this illness. This article offers clinicians a brief update on the general management guidelines of respiratory distress in pediatric patients. Specific treatment depends on the exact cause, however croup and acute severe asthma have been discussed in this article. PMID:25257964

  12. Acute reference doses: theory and practical approaches.

    PubMed

    Moretto, A

    2000-07-01

    The approach of the Joint Meeting on Pesticide Residues to the establishment of the acute reference dose for pesticides is presented and related issues are discussed. Three main points seem relevant when discussing the acute reference dose: (1) what compounds should have an acute reference dose, (2) what toxicological database is required for the establishment of an acute reference dose; (3) what safety factors are to be used. It is concluded that (1) groups of compounds that need an acute reference dose can be identified, whereas general rules for identifying groups not requiring an acute reference dose cannot be easily given; (2) studies from the standard toxicological database can often be used to allocate an acute reference dose and the usefulness of refinements (by requesting specific studies) should be evaluated after intake assessment; general rules on study requirements cannot be easily given; (3) more thought should be given to what safety factors apply in certain circumstances. PMID:10983586

  13. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-08

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Advances in predicting acute GVHD

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Andrew C.; Ferrara, James L.M.; Levine, John E.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a leading cause of non-relapse mortality following allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation. Attempts to improve treatment response in clinically-established GVHD have not improved overall survival, often due to the increased risk of infectious complications. Alternative approaches to decrease GVHD-related morbidity and mortality have focused on the ability to predict GVHD prior to clinical manifestation in an effort to provide an opportunity to abort GVHD development, and to gain new insights into GVHD pathophysiology. This review outlines the research efforts to date that have identified clinical and laboratory-based factors that are predictive of acute GVHD and describes future directions in developing algorithms that will improve the ability to predict the development of clinically relevant GVHD. PMID:23205489

  15. Exenatide induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Aijazi, Ishma; Abdulla, Fadhil M; Zuberi, Beyla J; Elhassan, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Exenatide is an incretin mimetic. It was approved by the federal drug authority in 2005 for the treatment of type-2 diabetes. Since it is a relatively new medicine clinicians have limited experience with regards to its side effects and safety profile. We report a 47 year old lady who presented with exenatide associated acute kidney injury. She had type-2 diabetes for 10 years with mild micro albuminuria and normal renal functions. She was also taking a stable dose of metformin, gliclazide, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor and diuretic for over a year and there was no history of any recent use of non-steroid anti-inflammatory medications. One week after starting exenatide, she developed severe vomiting, followed by hypotension. She presented with acute renal insufficiency and severe lactic acidosis and had to be dialyzed on emergency basis. To our knowledge this is probably the first case reported in the local United Arab Emirate (U.A.E) population. PMID:25672206

  16. Acute exposure to rhodamine B.

    PubMed

    Dire, D J; Wilkinson, J A

    1987-01-01

    Rhodamine B is a red colored dye that is used in cosmetic products. We report a case of 17 patients who were exposed to aerosolized Rhodamine B inside a maintenance shop. The mean duration of exposure was 26 minutes (range 2-65). Sixteen of the patients (94%) complained of acute symptoms including: burning of the eyes (82%), excessive tearing (47%), nasal burning (41%), nasal itching (35%), chest pain/tightness (35%), rhinorhea (29%), cough (29%), dyspnea (29%), burning of the throat (24%), burning/pruritic skin (24%), chest burning (12%), headache (6%), and nausea (6%). All of the patients had resolution of their symptoms within 24 hours (less than 4 hours in 63%). Acute exposure to Rhodamine B resulted in transient mucous membrane and skin irritation without evidence of serious sequellae. PMID:3446824

  17. Acute Werdnig-Hoffmann disease

    PubMed Central

    Pearn, J. H.; Wilson, J.

    1973-01-01

    76 cases of acute Werdnig-Hoffmann disease (acute infantile spinal muscular atrophy) have been reviewed. The cases comprise an unselected consecutive series in which rigid diagnostic criteria have been applied. The natural history of the disease has been investigated. In at least one-third of cases the disease is manifest before or at delivery. All cases have shown delayed milestones by 5 months of age: 95% are dead by 18 months. Cumulative frequency curves for age at onset and age at death figures are presented for use both as prognostic guidelines and as aids in the management of sibs of index cases. Diagnosis, management, and genetic implications are discussed. ImagesFIG. 1 PMID:4712772

  18. Acute onset of postoperative syringohydromyelia.

    PubMed

    Rao, K Santosh Mohan; Balasubramaniam, Chidambaram; Subramaniam, K

    2015-01-01

    Syringohydromyelia is a frequent finding in cases of tethered cord syndrome. The classical teaching is that the development and progression of a syrinx is a chronic process. We present a case report of an acute onset syringomyelia in an infant, who underwent an excision of a lumbosacral transitional lipoma and detethering of the cord. Immediately after recovery, the infant was found to have flaccid paraplegia. An emergency magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large acute onset syringomyelia for which he underwent an emergency midline myelotomy and release of fluid from the syrinx. Though the eventual recovery was good, this made us re-visit our understanding of the concept of syringohydromyelia. The case details and a plausible hypothesis for the rapid development of the syrinx are presented. PMID:26557165

  19. Clinical cases in acute intoxication.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sean B; Maguire, Jennifer; Mauck, Karen F

    2009-12-01

    Over 2.5 million accidental and intentional drug-related poisonings are reported annually in the United States. Early diagnosis and management of patients who present with acute intoxication can significantly reduce both morbidity and mortality. The initial evaluation of patients with suspected or proven intoxications should focus on hemodynamic stability, mental status, and respiratory function. However, early recognition of toxic ingestion is paramount to implementing life-saving treatments. Important historical clues are often found in a social history that considers intravenous drug use, alcohol use, and any access or exposure to illicit substances. A patient's medication list should also be scrutinized for psychoactive or sedative medications, such as tricyclic antidepressants or opioids. In this article we present case-based discussions of the specific diagnosis and management of 5 commonly occurring acute intoxication syndromes. PMID:20877175

  20. Recognising and managing acute hyponatraemia.

    PubMed

    Keane, Matthew

    2014-02-01

    A significant amount of clinicians' time is spent managing patients with complications arising from the use of sympatheticomimetic drugs such as cocaine and ecstasy, or MDMA. This article examines one of these complications, namely acute hyponatraemia, which can have life-threatening neurological consequences. Although there are few signs or symptoms of this condition, emergency clinicians should be able to recognise when it may have occurred, and should have a basic understanding of the role of sodium in autoregulation of cellular function, the different fluid compartments in the human body and the pathology of cerebral oedema. The article describes the importance of early recognition and swift treatment of acute hyponatraemia, as well as the methods for calculating fluid replacement to optimise chances of full recovery. PMID:24494770

  1. Acute onset of postoperative syringohydromyelia

    PubMed Central

    Rao, K. Santosh Mohan; Balasubramaniam, Chidambaram; Subramaniam, K.

    2015-01-01

    Syringohydromyelia is a frequent finding in cases of tethered cord syndrome. The classical teaching is that the development and progression of a syrinx is a chronic process. We present a case report of an acute onset syringomyelia in an infant, who underwent an excision of a lumbosacral transitional lipoma and detethering of the cord. Immediately after recovery, the infant was found to have flaccid paraplegia. An emergency magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large acute onset syringomyelia for which he underwent an emergency midline myelotomy and release of fluid from the syrinx. Though the eventual recovery was good, this made us re-visit our understanding of the concept of syringohydromyelia. The case details and a plausible hypothesis for the rapid development of the syrinx are presented. PMID:26557165

  2. Acute oesophageal necrosis (black oesophagus).

    PubMed

    Galtés, Ignasi; Gallego, María Ángeles; Esgueva, Raquel; Martin-Fumadó, Carles

    2016-03-01

    A 54-year-old man was admitted to hospital after being found unconscious in his home. He had a history of alcoholism, multiple drug addictions, and type I diabetes mellitus. At admission, he had hyperglycaemia (550 mg/dL) with glucosuria and ketone bodies in the urine, along with septic shock refractory to bilateral alveolar infiltrates and severe respiratory failure. The patient died 24 hours post admission due to multiple organ failure, with diabetic ketoacidosis decompensated by possible respiratory infection in a patient with polytoxicomania. The autopsy confirmed the presence of acute bilateral bronchopneumonia, chronic pancreatitis, severe hepatic steatosis, and generalized congestive changes. At the oesophagus, acute oesophageal necrosis was evident. PMID:26949146

  3. Acute care of myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Gutman, M. B.; Lee, T. F.; Gin, K.; Ho, K.

    1996-01-01

    Patients with acute myocardial infarct (AMI) need rapid diagnosis and prompt initiation of thrombolytic therapy. Patients with suspected cardiac ischemia must receive a coordinated team response by the emergency room staff including rapid electrocardiographic analysis and a quick but thorough history and physical examination to diagnose AMI. Thrombolysis and adjunct therapies should be administered promptly when indicated. The choice of thrombolytics is predicated by the location of the infarct. PMID:8754702

  4. Acute Esophageal Necrosis: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Inayat, Faisal; Hurairah, Abu; Virk, Hafeez Ul Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Acute esophageal necrosis (AEN) or “black esophagus” is a rare clinical entity with an unclear etiology. It is diagnosed at upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with the presence of strikingly black necrotic esophagus. The treatment is primarily medical, but the prognosis is generally poor due to advanced age and comorbid illnesses in patients who develop AEN. Herein, we discussed the implications of poor glycemic control in regards with AEN and undertook a literature review of this rare diagnosis. PMID:27583242

  5. Management of acute renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Fry, A C; Farrington, K

    2006-01-01

    Acute renal failure is a common condition, frequently encountered in both community practice and hospital inpatients. While it remains a heterologous condition, following basic principles makes investigation straightforward, and initial management follows a standard pathway in most patients. This article shows this, advises on therapeutic strategies, including those in special situations, and should help the clinician in deciding when to refer to a nephrologist, and when to consider renal replacement therapy. PMID:16461473

  6. Acute hepatic failure in children.

    PubMed Central

    Riely, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Many diseases may present as acute hepatic failure in the pediatric age group, including viral hepatitis A and B, adverse drug reactions, both toxic and "hepatitic," and inherited metabolic disorders such as tyrosinemia, alpha 1 antitrypsin deficiency, and Wilson's disease. Management is primarily supportive, with care taken to anticipate the known complications of hepatic failure. Few "curative" therapies are known, although attempts at stimulating hepatic regeneration may be helpful. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 PMID:6433587

  7. Acute suprachoroidal hemorrhage during phacoemulsification.

    PubMed

    Nambiar, A K; Fox, P D

    2000-06-01

    We present a case of acute suprachoroidal hemorrhage that developed during routine phacoemulsification in an 85-year-old patient after uneventful administration of periocular anesthesia. Pre-existing risk factors included advanced age, glaucoma, myopia, and hypertension. The scleral tunnel prevented major expulsion of intraocular contents; however, raised intraocular pressure prevented intraocular lens implantation. The rarity of this condition raises questions regarding the further management and precautions related to it. PMID:10889443

  8. [Imaging in acute toxic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Dietemann, J-L; Botelho, C; Nogueira, T; Vargas, M I; Audibert, C; Abu Eid, M; Bogorin, A; Bernardo, R; Jacques, C; Kremer, S; Zöllner, G

    2004-09-01

    Neuroimaging, particularly MR imaging, plays a major role for the diagnosis of many acute toxic encephalopathies. Toxic disorders are related to drugs (immunosuppressive agents, chemotherapeutic agents, anti-epileptic drugs, heroin...), to metals (lead, manganese, mercury...), and to industrial and environmental chemicals (solvent, carbon monoxide...). MR imaging with diffusion and perfusion imaging provides information regarding brain lesions induced by the toxic agents (vasogenic edema, cytotoxic edema, infarction, hemorrhage, demyelination...). PMID:15545943

  9. Acute poisoning with Tricholoma equestre.

    PubMed

    Anand, Jacek Sein; Chwaluk, Paweł; Sut, Michał

    2009-01-01

    Four cases, including three adults and one child, suffering from acute poisoning with Tricholoma equestre were described. The patients had eaten from 100 to 400 grams of the mushroom within a few consecutive meals. After consuming about 1000 grams of Tricholoma equestre for 3-4 days, the subjects developed fatigue, muscle weakness, myalgia, and in two cases acute respiratory failure with the need of respiratorotherapy. Maximal serum CK was 48136 U/L in the adults and 306 U/L in children. Maximal serum levels of AST and ALT were 802 U/L and 446 U/L in adults and 39 U/L, and 56 U/L in a child. All routine biochemical tests were within normal range. No other causes of rhabdomyolysis such as parasitic or viral infections, immune diseases, trauma or exposure to medications were found. Patient, aged 72 yrs., who developed acute respiratory failure, died in the second day of hospitalization. In other patients all the above mentioned symptoms and biochemical abnormalities disappeared from 2 to 3 weeks of hospitalization. Physicians should be aware of the possibility of appearance of rhabdo-myolysis after repeated consumption of large quantities of Tricholoma equestre. PMID:19788144

  10. Management of Acute Variceal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Acute variceal bleeding could be a fatal complication in patients with liver cirrhosis. In patients with decompensated liver cirrhosis accompanied by ascites or hepatic encephalopathy, acute variceal bleeding is associated with a high mortality rate. Therefore, timely endoscopic hemostasis and prevention of relapse of bleeding are most important. The treatment goals for acute variceal bleeding are to correct hypovolemia; achieve rapid hemostasis; and prevent early rebleeding, complications related to bleeding, and deterioration of liver function. If variceal bleeding is suspected, treatment with vasopressors and antibiotics should be initiated immediately on arrival to the hospital. Furthermore, to obtain hemodynamic stability, the hemoglobin level should be maintained at >8 g/dL, systolic blood pressure >90 to 100 mm Hg, heart rate <100/min, and the central venous pressure from 1 to 5 mm Hg. When the patient becomes hemodynamically stable, hemostasis should be achieved by performing endoscopy as soon as possible. For esophageal variceal bleeding, endoscopic variceal ligation is usually performed, and for gastric variceal bleeding, endoscopic variceal obturation is performed primarily. If it is considered difficult to achieve hemostasis through endoscopy, salvage therapy may be carried out while keeping the patient hemodynamically stable. PMID:25133116

  11. Nutrition support in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Ioannidis, Orestis; Lavrentieva, Athina; Botsios, Dimitrios

    2008-01-01

    In the majority (80%) of patients with acute pancreatitis, the disease is self limiting and, after a few days of withholding feeding and intravenous administration of fluids, patients can again be normally fed orally. In a small percentage of patients, the disease progresses to severe necrotic pancreatitis, with an intense systemic inflammatory response and often with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. As mortality is high in patients with severe disease and as mortality and morbidity rates are directly related to the failure of establishing a positive nitrogen balance, it is assumed that feeding will improve survival in patients with severe disease. The aim of nutritional support is to cover the elevated metabolic demands as much as possible, without stimulating pancreatic secretion and maximizing self-digestion. The administration of either total parenteral nutrition or jejunal nutrition does not stimulate pancreatic secretion. Recently, a series of controlled clinical studies has been conducted in order to evaluate the effectiveness of enteral nutrition with jejunal administration of the nutritional solution. The results have shown that enteral nutrition, as compared to total parenteral nutrition, was cheaper, safer and more effective as regards the suppression of the immunoinflammatory response, the decrease of septic complications, the need for surgery for the management of the complications of acute pancreatitis and the reduction of the total hospitalization period. It did not seem to affect mortality or the rate of non-septic complications. In conclusion, enteral nutrition should be the preferred route of nutritional support in patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:18648127

  12. Ecallantide: in acute hereditary angioedema.

    PubMed

    Garnock-Jones, Karly P

    2010-07-30

    Ecallantide, a recombinant protein that is a selective, highly potent and reversible inhibitor of human plasma kallikrein, is indicated for the treatment of acute attacks of hereditary angioedema (HAE) in patients aged >or=16 years. In the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicentre, phase III trial EDEMA3, mean symptom response to treatment at 4 hours (assessed using the Treatment Outcome Score [TOS]; primary endpoint) was significantly greater with a single subcutaneous dose of ecallantide 30 mg than with placebo in patients with acute, moderate to severe attacks of HAE. In addition, the mean change from baseline in symptom severity at 4 hours (assessed using the Mean Symptom Complex Severity [MSCS] scale) was significantly greater with ecallantide than with placebo. At 4 hours in the similarly designed EDEMA4 trial, the mean change from baseline in MSCS score (primary endpoint) and mean TOS were both significantly greater in recipients of a single subcutaneous dose of ecallantide 30 mg than in placebo recipients. Subcutaneous ecallantide 30 mg was generally well tolerated in patients with acute attacks of HAE in the EDEMA3 and EDEMA4 trials. Adverse events were mostly of mild to moderate severity, and no event that was more common in ecallantide than placebo recipients occurred in >10% of patients. PMID:20614949

  13. Imaging following acute knee trauma.

    PubMed

    Kijowski, R; Roemer, F; Englund, M; Tiderius, C J; Swärd, P; Frobell, R B

    2014-10-01

    Joint injury has been recognized as a potent risk factor for the onset of osteoarthritis. The vast majority of studies using imaging technology for longitudinal assessment of patients following joint injury have focused on the injured knee joint, specifically in patients with anterior cruciate ligament injury and meniscus tears where a high risk for rapid onset of post-traumatic osteoarthritis is well known. Although there are many imaging modalities under constant development, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is the most important instrument for longitudinal monitoring after joint injury. MR imaging is sensitive for detecting early cartilage degeneration and can evaluate other joint structures including the menisci, bone marrow, tendons, and ligaments which can be sources of pain following acute injury. In this review, focusing on imaging following acute knee trauma, several studies were identified with promising short-term results of osseous and soft tissue changes after joint injury. However, studies connecting these promising short-term results to the development of osteoarthritis were limited which is likely due to the long follow-up periods needed to document the radiographic and clinical onset of the disease. Thus, it is recommended that additional high quality longitudinal studies with extended follow-up periods be performed to further investigate the long-term consequences of the early osseous and soft tissue changes identified on MR imaging after acute knee trauma. PMID:25278054

  14. Management of severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Doctor, Nilesh; Agarwal, Pravin; Gandhi, Vidhyachandra

    2012-02-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) develops in about 25% of patients with acute pancreatitis. Severity of acute pancreatitis is linked to the presence of systemic organ dysfunctions and/or necrotizing pancreatitis. Risk factors independently determining the outcome of SAP are early multiorgan failure (MOF), infection of necrosis, and extended necrosis (>50%). Morbidity of SAP is biphasic, in the first week it is strongly related to systemic inflammatory response syndrome while, sepsis due to infected pancreatic necrosis leading to MOF syndrome occurs in the later course after the first week. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography provides the highest diagnostic accuracy for necrotizing pancreatitis when performed after the first week of disease. Patients who suffer early organ dysfunctions or are at risk for developing a severe disease require early intensive care treatment. Antibiotic prophylaxis has not been shown as an effective preventive treatment. Early enteral feeding is based on a high level of evidence, resulting in a reduction of local and systemic infection. Patients suffering infected necrosis causing clinical sepsis are candidates for intervention. Hospital mortality of SAP after interventional or surgical debridement has decreased to below 20% in high-volume centers. PMID:23372306

  15. [Acute myocardial infarction during sport].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, M; Asakuma, S; Nakamura, K; Nakamura, T; Yasutomi, N; Iwasaki, T

    1995-10-01

    Thirty patients with acute myocardial infarction which occurred during sport were investigated to identify the type of sport, prodromata, situations at the onset of disease, habit of exercise, preceding medical evaluation, coronary risk factors, and coronary angiographic findings. Infarction occurred during golf in 12 patients, bowling in 4, gateball in 4, jogging or running in 5, baseball in 2, and tennis or table tennis in 3. The majority of the patients were playing ball games. Twenty-seven patients were men (90%) and 3 were women (10%). All patients had played the same kind of sport for several years. Twenty-four patients had one or more coronary risk factors, and especially 18 patients smoked cigarettes. Nine patients had experienced anterior chest pain but only two patients had received medical evaluation. Coronary angiography was performed in 25 patients (83.3%), revealing single-vessel disease in 14, two-vessel disease in 6, three-vessel disease in 4, and disease of all left main coronary trunks in 1. The acute episode of infarction occurred mainly in spring or fall. Many patients with acute myocardial infarction occurring during sport participate in sports of low or moderate dynamic and low static exercises which are generally regarded safe. Many patients had enjoyed their sports regularly for a long time. Though many patients had coronary risk factors, only a few had received a medical check before their heart attack. PMID:7500263

  16. Tipifarnib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-19

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Risk-Based Classification System of Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-07

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  18. [Perioperative acute kidney injury and failure].

    PubMed

    Chhor, Vibol; Journois, Didier

    2014-04-01

    Perioperative period is very likely to lead to acute renal failure because of anesthesia (general or perimedullary) and/or surgery which can cause acute kidney injury. Characterization of acute renal failure is based on serum creatinine level which is imprecise during and following surgery. Studies are based on various definitions of acute renal failure with different thresholds which skewed their comparisons. The RIFLE classification (risk, injury, failure, loss, end stage kidney disease) allows clinicians to distinguish in a similar manner between different stages of acute kidney injury rather than using a unique definition of acute renal failure. Acute renal failure during the perioperative period can mainly be explained by iatrogenic, hemodynamic or surgical causes and can result in an increased morbi-mortality. Prevention of this complication requires hemodynamic optimization (venous return, cardiac output, vascular resistance), discontinuation of nephrotoxic drugs but also knowledge of the different steps of the surgery to avoid further degradation of renal perfusion. Diuretics do not prevent acute renal failure and may even push it forward especially during the perioperative period when venous retourn is already reduced. Edema or weight gain following surgery are not correlated with the vascular compartment volume, much less with renal perfusion. Treatment of perioperative acute renal failure is similar to other acute renal failure. Renal replacement therapy must be mastered to prevent any additional risk of hemodynamic instability or hydro-electrolytic imbalance. PMID:24656890

  19. Interventions for acute internal hordeolum

    PubMed Central

    Lindsley, Kristina; Nichols, Jason J; Dickersin, Kay

    2014-01-01

    Background Hordeolum is a common, painful inflammation of the eyelid margin that is usually caused by bacterial infection. The infection affects oil glands of the eyelid and can be internal or external. In many cases, the lesion drains spontaneously and resolves untreated; however, the inflammation can spread to other ocular glands or tissues, and recurrences are common. If unresolved, acute internal hordeolum can become chronic or can develop into a chalazion. External hordeola, also known as styes, were not included in the scope of this review. Objectives The objective of this review was to investigate the effectiveness and safety of nonsurgical treatments for acute internal hordeolum compared with observation or placebo. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 7), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE, (January 1950 to July 2012), EMBASE (January 1980 to July 2012), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to July 2012), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 26 July 2012. Selection criteria The selection criteria for this review included randomized or quasi-randomized clinical trials of participants diagnosed with acute internal hordeolum. Studies of participants with external hordeolum (stye), chronic hordeolum, or chalazion were excluded. Nonsurgical interventions of interest included the use of hot or warm compresses, lid scrubs, antibiotics, or steroids compared with observation, placebo, or other active interventions. Data collection and analysis

  20. Biomarkers in Bone Marrow Samples From Pediatric Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-17

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  1. Acute Exacerbations of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Collard, Harold R.; Moore, Bethany B.; Flaherty, Kevin R.; Brown, Kevin K.; Kaner, Robert J.; King, Talmadge E.; Lasky, Joseph A.; Loyd, James E.; Noth, Imre; Olman, Mitchell A.; Raghu, Ganesh; Roman, Jesse; Ryu, Jay H.; Zisman, David A.; Hunninghake, Gary W.; Colby, Thomas V.; Egan, Jim J.; Hansell, David M.; Johkoh, Takeshi; Kaminski, Naftali; Kim, Dong Soon; Kondoh, Yasuhiro; Lynch, David A.; Müller-Quernheim, Joachim; Myers, Jeffrey L.; Nicholson, Andrew G.; Selman, Moisés; Toews, Galen B.; Wells, Athol U.; Martinez, Fernando J.

    2007-01-01

    The natural history of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) has been characterized as a steady, predictable decline in lung function over time. Recent evidence suggests that some patients may experience a more precipitous course, with periods of relative stability followed by acute deteriorations in respiratory status. Many of these acute deteriorations are of unknown etiology and have been termed acute exacerbations of IPF. This perspective is the result of an international effort to summarize the current state of knowledge regarding acute exacerbations of IPF. Acute exacerbations of IPF are defined as acute, clinically significant deteriorations of unidentifiable cause in patients with underlying IPF. Proposed diagnostic criteria include subjective worsening over 30 days or less, new bilateral radiographic opacities, and the absence of infection or another identifiable etiology. The potential pathobiological roles of infection, disordered cell biology, coagulation, and genetics are discussed, and future research directions are proposed. PMID:17585107

  2. Rim sign: association with acute cholecystitis

    SciTech Connect

    Bushnell, D.L.; Perlman, S.B.; Wilson, M.A.; Polcyn, R.E.

    1986-03-01

    In a retrospective analysis of 218 hepatobiliary studies in patients clinically suspected of acute cholecystitis, a rim of increased hepatic activity adjacent to the gallbladder fossa (the rim sign) has been evaluated as a scintigraphic predictor of confirmed acute cholecystitis. Of 28 cases with pathologic confirmation of acute cholecystitis in this series, 17 (60%) demonstrated this sign. When associated with nonvisualization of the gallbladder at 1 hr, the positive predictive value of this photon-intense rim for acute cholecystitis was 94%. When the rim sign was absent, the positive predictive value of nonvisualization of the gallbladder at 1 hr for acute cholecystitis was only 36%. As this sign was always seen during the first hour postinjection, it can, when associated with nonvisualization, reduce the time required for completion of an hepatobiliary examination in suspected acute cholecystitis.

  3. Acute pancreatitis: clinical vs. CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, M.C.; Barkin, J.; Isikoff, M.B.; Silver stein, W.; Kalser, M.

    1982-08-01

    In a prospective study of 91 patients with acute pancreatitis, computed tomographic (CT) findings were correlated with the clinical type of acute pancreatitis. In acute edematous pancreatitis (63 patients; 16 with repeat CT), CT was normal (28%) or showed inflammation limited to the pancreas (61%). Phlegmonous changes were present in 11%, including one patient with focal pancreatic hemorrhage, indicating that clinically unsuspected hemorrhagic pancreatitis can occur. In acute necrotizing (hemorrhagic, suppurative) pancreatitis (nine patients; eight with repeat CT), no patient had a normal CT scan and 89% had phlegmonous changes. One patient had hemorrhagic pancreatitis and three had abscesses. In acute exacerbation of chronic pancreatitis (10 patients; three with repeat CT), there were pancreatic calcifications (70%), a focal mass (40%), and pancreatic ductal dilation (30%). On follow-up CT, the findings of acute pancreatitis did not always disappear with resolution of the clinical symptons. This was especialy true of phlegmonous pancreatitis, where the CT findings could persist for months.

  4. [Ultrasonography in acute pelvic pain].

    PubMed

    Kupesić, Sanja; Aksamija, Alenka; Vucić, Niksa; Tripalo, Ana; Kurjak, Asim

    2002-01-01

    Acute pelvic pain may be the manifestation of various gynecologic and non-gynecologic disorders from less alarming rupture of the follicular cyst to life threatening conditions such as rupture of ectopic pregnancy or perforation of inflamed appendix. In order to construct an algorithm for differential diagnosis we divide acute pelvic pain into gynecologic and non-gynecologic etiology, which is than subdivided into gastrointestinal and urinary causes. Appendicitis is the most common surgical emergency and should always be considered in differential diagnosis if appendix has not been removed. Apart of clinical examination and laboratory tests, an ultrasound examination is sensitive up to 90% and specific up to 95% if graded compression technique is used. Still it is user-depended and requires considerable experience in order to perform it reliably. Meckel's diverticulitis, acute terminal ileitis, mesenteric lymphadenitis and functional bowel disease are conditions that should be differentiated from other causes of low abdominal pain by clinical presentation, laboratory and imaging tests. Dilatation of renal pelvis and ureter are typical signs of obstructive uropathy and may be efficiently detected by ultrasound. Additional thinning of renal parenchyma suggests long-term obstructive uropathy. Ruptured ectopic pregnancy, salpingitis and hemorrhagic ovarian cysts are three most commonly diagnosed gynecologic conditions presenting as an acute abdomen. Degenerating leiomyomas and adnexal torsion occur less frequently. For better systematization, gynecologic causes of acute pelvic pain could be divided into conditions with negative pregnancy test and conditions with positive pregnancy test. Pelvic inflammatory disease may be ultrasonically presented with numerous signs such as thickening of the tubal wall, incomplete septa within the dilated tube, demonstration of hyperechoic mural nodules, free fluid in the "cul-de-sac" etc. Color Doppler ultrasound contributes to more

  5. 8-Chloro-Adenosine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-11

    Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsed Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myeloproliferative Disorder

  6. Stenting in Acute Lower Limb Arterial Occlusions

    SciTech Connect

    Raja, Jowad; Munneke, Graham; Morgan, Robert; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2008-07-15

    Management of critical limb ischemia of acute onset includes surgical embolectomy, bypass grafting, aspiration thrombectomy, thrombolysis, and mechanical thrombectomy followed by treatment of the underlying cause. We present our experience with the use of stents to treat acute embolic/thrombotic occlusions in one iliac and three femoropopliteal arteries. Although this is a small case series, excellent immediate and midterm results suggest that stenting of acute occlusions of the iliac, superficial femoral, and popliteal arteries is a safe and effective treatment option.

  7. Normal gallbladder scintigraphy in acute cholecystitis

    SciTech Connect

    Ohrt, H.J.; Posalaky, I.P.; Shafer, R.B.

    1983-03-01

    Normal gallbladder scintigraphy occurs in 2 to 5% of reported patients with acute cholecystitis. Gallbladder visualization is found in patients with acalculous cholecystitis and in those with recent relief of cystic duct obstruction but persistence of inflammation. A patient is reported who had clinical and pathologic findings of acute cholecystitis but normal gallbladder visualization. This reemphasizes that the diagnosis of acute cholecystitis cannot be excluded by normal gallbladder scintigraphy.

  8. Imaging of acute pancreatitis and its complications. Part 2: complications of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Türkvatan, A; Erden, A; Türkoğlu, M A; Seçil, M; Yüce, G

    2015-02-01

    The Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis was introduced in 1992 and divides patients into mild and severe groups based on clinical and biochemical criteria. Recently, the terminology and classification scheme proposed at the initial Atlanta Symposium have been reviewed and a new consensus statement has been proposed by the Acute Pancreatitis Classification Working Group. Major changes include subdividing acute fluid collections into "acute peripancreatic fluid collection" and "acute post-necrotic pancreatic/peripancreatic fluid collection (acute necrotic collection)" based on the presence of necrotic debris. Delayed fluid collections have been similarly subdivided into "pseudocyst" and "walled of pancreatic necrosis". Appropriate use of the new terms describing the fluid collections is important for management decision-making in patients with acute pancreatitis. The purpose of this review article is to present an overview of complications of the acute pancreatitis with emphasis on their prognostic significance and impact on clinical management and to clarify confusing terminology for pancreatic fluid collections. PMID:24703377

  9. A Case Report of Acute Acalculous Cholecystitis and Acute Hemorrhagic Cystitis due to Salmonella Typhi

    PubMed Central

    Beyazal Polat, Hatice; Beyazal Çeliker, Fatma

    2014-01-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis and acute hemorrhagic cystitis due to Salmonella Typhi are a rare condition. A 24-year-old female patient was admitted to our clinic with abdominal pain, nausea, fever, headache, urinary burning, and bloody urine. Based on clinical, laboratory, and radiological evaluations, the patient was diagnosed with acute acalculous cholecystitis and acute hemorrhagic cystitis due to Salmonella Typhi. The patient was treated with intravenous ceftriaxone for two weeks. After the treatment, the patient's clinical and laboratory findings improved. Acute acalculous cholecystitis due to Salmonella Typhi concomitant with acute hemorrhagic cystitis is very rare and might be difficult to diagnose. Infectious agents such as Salmonella Typhi should be considered when acute acalculous cholecystitis and acute hemorrhagic cystitis are detected in adult patients with no underlying diseases. PMID:25161668

  10. U.S. EPA'S ACUTE REFERENCE EXPOSURE METHODOLOGY FOR ACUTE INHALATION EXPOSURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA National Center for Environmental Assessment has developed a methodology to derive acute inhalation toxicity benchmarks, called acute reference exposures (AREs), for noncancer effects. The methodology provides guidance for the derivation of chemical-specific benchmark...

  11. Drug induced acute pancreatitis: does it exist?

    PubMed

    Tenner, Scott

    2014-11-28

    As the incidence of acute pancreatitis continues to rise, establishing the etiology in order to prevent recurrence is important. Although the etiology of acute pancreatitis is not difficult in the majority of patients, almost a quarter of patients are initially labeled as having idiopathic acute pancreatitis. When confronted with a patient with acute pancreatitis and no clear etiology defined as an absence alcoholism, gallstones (ultrasound and/or MRI), a normal triglyceride level, and absence of tumor, it often appears reasonable to consider a drug as the cause of acute pancreatitis. Over 100 drugs have been implicated by case reports as causing acute pancreatitis. While some of these case reports are well written, many case reports represent poorly written experiences of the clinician simply implicating a drug without a careful evaluation. Over-reliance on case reports while ignoring randomized clinical trials and large pharmacoepidemiologic surveys has led to confusion about drug induced acute pancreatitis. This review will explain that drug induced acute pancreatitis does occur, but it is rare, and over diagnosis leads to misconceptions about the disease resulting in inappropriate patient care, increased litigation and a failure to address the true entity: idiopathic acute pancreatitis. PMID:25469020

  12. Acute Cholecystitis in Patients with Scrub Typhus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun; Ji, Misuk; Hwang, Jeong-Hwan; Lee, Ja-Yeon; Lee, Ju-Hyung; Chung, Kyung Min; Lee, Chang-Seop

    2015-11-01

    Acute cholecystitis is a rare complication of scrub typhus. Although a few such cases have been reported in patients with scrub typhus, the clinical course is not well described. Of 12 patients, acute cholecystitis developed in 66.7% (8/12) of patients older than 60 yr. The scrub typhus group with acute cholecystitis had marginal significant longer hospital stay and higher cost than the group without cholecystitis according to propensity score matching. Scrub typhus should be kept in mind as a rare etiology of acute cholecystitis in endemic areas because the typical signs of scrub typhus such as skin rash and eschar can present after the abdominal pain. PMID:26539017

  13. Drug induced acute pancreatitis: Does it exist?

    PubMed Central

    Tenner, Scott

    2014-01-01

    As the incidence of acute pancreatitis continues to rise, establishing the etiology in order to prevent recurrence is important. Although the etiology of acute pancreatitis is not difficult in the majority of patients, almost a quarter of patients are initially labeled as having idiopathic acute pancreatitis. When confronted with a patient with acute pancreatitis and no clear etiology defined as an absence alcoholism, gallstones (ultrasound and/or MRI), a normal triglyceride level, and absence of tumor, it often appears reasonable to consider a drug as the cause of acute pancreatitis. Over 100 drugs have been implicated by case reports as causing acute pancreatitis. While some of these case reports are well written, many case reports represent poorly written experiences of the clinician simply implicating a drug without a careful evaluation. Over-reliance on case reports while ignoring randomized clinical trials and large pharmacoepidemiologic surveys has led to confusion about drug induced acute pancreatitis. This review will explain that drug induced acute pancreatitis does occur, but it is rare, and over diagnosis leads to misconceptions about the disease resulting in inappropriate patient care, increased litigation and a failure to address the true entity: idiopathic acute pancreatitis. PMID:25469020

  14. Acute and subacute idiopathic interstitial pneumonias.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Hiroyuki; Kondoh, Yasuhiro

    2016-07-01

    Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) may have an acute or subacute presentation, or acute exacerbation may occur in a previously subclinical or unrecognized chronic IIP. Acute or subacute IIPs include acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP), cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP), nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (AE-IPF) and AE-NSIP. Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) including connective tissue disease (CTD) associated ILD, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, acute eosinophilic pneumonia, drug-induced lung disease and diffuse alveolar haemorrhage need to be differentiated from acute and subacute IIPs. Despite the severe lack of randomized controlled trials for the treatment of acute and subacute IIPs, the mainstream treatment remains corticosteroid therapy. Other potential therapies reported in the literature include corticosteroids and immunosuppression, antibiotics, anticoagulants, neutrophil elastase inhibitor, autoantibody-targeted treatment, antifibrotics and hemoperfusion therapy. With regard to mechanical ventilation, patients in recent studies with acute and subacute IIPs have shown better survival than those in previous studies. Therefore, a careful value-laden decision about the indications for endotracheal intubation should be made for each patient. Noninvasive ventilation may be beneficial to reduce ventilator associated pneumonia. PMID:27123874

  15. Acute Type A Aortic Dissection Missed as Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ansari-Ramandi, Mohammad Mostafa; Firoozi, Ata

    2016-01-01

    Although the aortic dissection is not common, its outcome is frequently fatal, and many patients with aortic dissection die before referral to the hospital or any diagnostic testing. The symptoms of aortic dissection can be similar to myocardial ischemia. A 66-year-old male was referred to our hospital with suspicion of aortic dissection after echocardiography done for evaluating his high blood pressure. He had symptoms of acute coronary syndrome two years before and had done coronary angiography. On presentation to our hospital he had a high blood pressure. On reviewing his past medical history and examining, in the film of coronary angiography, the dissection flap in ascending aorta was identified. Although type A aortic dissection is a catastrophic condition with high mortality and requires prompt surgical treatment but in some cases it may be misdiagnosed as acute coronary syndrome. Sometimes against its high mortality when left untreated, patients survive and are diagnosed later in life incidentally. So it is of great importance to have great clinical suspicion for aortic dissection in patients referring to the hospital with chest pain and the predisposing factors. PMID:27437290

  16. Focus on acute diarrhoeal disease

    PubMed Central

    Baldi, Fabio; Bianco, Maria Antonia; Nardone, Gerardo; Pilotto, Alberto; Zamparo, Emanuela

    2009-01-01

    Diarrhoea is an alteration of normal bowel movement characterized by an increase in the water content, volume, or frequency of stools. Diarrhoea needs to be classified according to the trends over time (acute or chronic) and to the characteristics of the stools (watery, fatty, inflammatory). Secretory diarrhoeas, mostly acute and of viral aetiology in more than 70% of cases, are by far the most important subtype of diarrhoeas in terms of frequency, incidence and mortality (over 2.5 million deaths/year in developing countries). Natural and synthetic opiates such as morphine, codeine, and loperamide which react with endogenous opiates (enkephalins, beta-endorphins, dynorphins) mainly act on intestinal motility and slow down transit. An antidiarrhoeal drug developed in recent years, racecadotril, acts as an enkephalinase inhibitor. Clinical studies have shown that it is just as effective as loperamide in resolving acute diarrhoea but with greater reduction in pain and abdominal distension. Some studies have explored the prevalence of diarrhoea in old age. An epidemiological study carried out in Italy by 133 General Practitioners on 5515 elderly outpatients reported a prevalence of diarrhoea, defined according to the Rome criteria, of 9.1%. Infectious diseases (19%) and drug use (16%) were the most common causes of diarrhoea in old age. Regardless of the cause, the treatment of elderly patients with diarrhoea must include rehydration and nutritional support. Every year, more than 50 million tourists travel from industrialized countries to places where hygiene levels are poor. At least 75% of those travelling for short periods mention health problems, and in particular traveller’s diarrhoea. PMID:19610134

  17. [Acute kidney injury in children].

    PubMed

    Amira-Peco-Antić; Paripović, Dusan

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a clinical condition considered to be the consequence of a sudden decrease (> 25%) or discontinuation of renal function. The term AKI is used instead of the previous term acute renal failure, because it has been demonstrated that even minor renal lesions may cause far-reaching consequences on human health. Contemporary classifications of AKI (RIFLE and AKIN) are based on the change of serum creatinine and urinary output. In the developed countries, AKI is most often caused by renal ischemia, nephrotoxins and sepsis, rather than a (primary) diffuse renal disease, such as glomerulonephritis, interstitial nephritis, renovascular disorder and thrombotic microangiopathy. The main risk factors for hospital AKI are mechanical ventilation, use of vasoactive drugs, stem cell transplantation and diuretic-resistant hypervolemia. Prerenal and parenchymal AKI (previously known as acute tubular necrosis) jointly account for 2/3 of all AKI causes. Diuresis and serum creatinine concentration are not early diagnostic markers of AKI. Potential early biomarkers of AKI are neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), cystatin C, kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), interleukins 6, 8 and 18, and liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP). Early detection of kidney impairment, before the increase of serum creatinine, is important for timely initiated therapy and recovery. The goal of AKI treatment is to normalize the fluid and electrolyte status, as well as the correction of acidosis and blood pressure. Since a severe fluid overload resistant to diuretics and inotropic agents is associated with a poor outcome, the initiation of dialysis should not be delayed. The mortality rate of AKI is highest in critically ill children with multiple organ failure and hemodynamically unstable patients. PMID:25033598

  18. Acute Shoulder Injuries in Adults.

    PubMed

    Monica, James; Vredenburgh, Zachary; Korsh, Jeremy; Gatt, Charles

    2016-07-15

    Acute shoulder injuries in adults are often initially managed by family physicians. Common acute shoulder injuries include acromioclavicular joint injuries, clavicle fractures, glenohumeral dislocations, proximal humerus fractures, and rotator cuff tears. Acromioclavicular joint injuries and clavicle fractures mostly occur in young adults as the result of a sports injury or direct trauma. Most nondisplaced or minimally displaced injuries can be treated conservatively. Treatment includes pain management, short-term use of a sling for comfort, and physical therapy as needed. Glenohumeral dislocations can result from contact sports, falls, bicycle accidents, and similar high-impact trauma. Patients will usually hold the affected arm in their contralateral hand and have pain with motion and decreased motion at the shoulder. Physical findings may include a palpable humeral head in the axilla or a dimple inferior to the acromion laterally. Reduction maneuvers usually require intra-articular lidocaine or intravenous analgesia. Proximal humerus fractures often occur in older patients after a low-energy fall. Radiography of the shoulder should include a true anteroposterior view of the glenoid, scapular Y view, and axillary view. Most of these fractures can be managed nonoperatively, using a sling, early range-of-motion exercises, and strength training. Rotator cuff tears can cause difficulty with overhead activities or pain that awakens the patient from sleep. On physical examination, patients may be unable to hold the affected arm in an elevated position. It is important to recognize the sometimes subtle signs and symptoms of acute shoulder injuries to ensure proper management and timely referral if necessary. PMID:27419328

  19. A Study of Plazomicin Compared With Colistin in Patients With Infection Due to Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-01

    Bloodstream Infections (BSI) Due to CRE; Hospital-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia (HABP) Due to CRE; Ventilator-Associated Bacterial Pneumonia (VABP) Due to CRE; Complicated Urinary Tract Infection (cUTI) Due to CRE; Acute Pyelonephritis (AP) Due to CRE

  20. Renal scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... reduced kidney function. This may be due to: Acute or chronic kidney failure Chronic kidney infection (pyelonephritis) Complications of a kidney transplant Glomerulonephritis Hydronephrosis Injury of the kidney and ureter Narrowing or blockage ...

  1. Black Anal Canal: Acute Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Catarina; Gonçalves, Cláudia; Alves, Paulo; Gil, Inês; Canhoto, Manuela; Silva, Filipe; Cotrim, Isabel; Amado, Cristina; Eliseu, Liliana; Vasconcelos, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Acute ischemia of the rectum or anal canal resulting in necrosis is extremely uncommon because both the rectum and the anal canal have excellent blood supplies. We present a case with spontaneous necrosis of the anal canal without rectal involvement. Surgical debridement was accomplished, and the recovery was uneventful. The patient was elderly, with probable atherosclerotic arterial disease, and presented with hypotension. Due to the lack of other precipitating factors, the hypoperfusion hypothesis seems to be the most suitable in this case. To the best of our knowledge, no similar cases have been reported in the literature on this subject.

  2. [Etiological factors of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Spicák, J

    2002-09-01

    Acute pancreatitis develops immediately after the causative impulse, while chronic pancreatitis develops after the long-term action of the noxious agent. A typical representative of acute pancreatitis is biliary pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis develops in alcoholism and has a long latency. As alcoholic pancreatitis is manifested at first as a rule by a potent attack, it is classified in this stage as acute pancreatitis. The most frequent etiological factors in our civilization are thus cholelithiasis and alcoholism (both account for 20-50% in different studies). The assumed pathogenetic principles in acute biliary pancreatitis are the common canal of both efferent ducts above the obturated papilla, duodenopancreatic reflux and intrapancreatic hypertension. A detailed interpretation is however lacking. The pathogenesis of alcoholic pancreatitis is more complicated. Among others some part is played by changes in the calcium concentration and fusion of cellular membranes. Idiopathic pancreatitis occurs in up to 10%, part of the are due to undiagnosed alcoholism and cholelithiasis. Other etiologies are exceptional. Similarly as in cholelithiasis pancreatitis develops also during other pathological processes in the area of the papilla of Vater such as dysfunction of the sphincter of Oddi, ampulloma and juxtapapillary diverticulum, it is however usually mild. The incidence of postoperative pancreatitis is declining. Its lethality is 30% and the diagnosis is difficult. In the pathogenesis changes of the ion concentration are involved, hypoxia and mechanical disorders of the integrity of the gland. Pancreatitis develops in association with other infections--frequently in mumps, rarely in hepatitis, tuberculosis, typhoid and mycoses. Viral pancreatitis is usually mild. In parasitoses pancreatitis develops due to a block of the papilla Vateri. In hyperparathyroidism chronic pancreatitis is more likely to develop, recent data are lacking. As to dyslipoproteinaemias

  3. Management of acute intestinal ischaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Windsor, C. W.

    1977-01-01

    The acute abdomen due to a vascular catastrophe affecting the major splanchnic vessels is often a life-threatening condition that can be very difficult to diagnose. In this article the pathological and physiological changes found in large- and small-intestinal ischaemia are related to the clinical features of the illness. Radiological, biochemical, and haematological aids to diagnosis are discussed. The treatment of large- and small-bowel ischaemia and of their specific complications, such as malabsorption and gastric hypersecretion, is outlined. PMID:835982

  4. Managing acute decompensated heart failure.

    PubMed

    Pauly, Daniel F

    2014-02-01

    Acute decompensated heart failure may occur de novo, but it most often occurs as an exacerbation of underlying chronic heart failure. Hospitalization for heart failure is usually a harbinger of a chronic disease that will require long-term, ongoing medical management. Leaders in the field generally agree that repeated inpatient admissions for treatment reflect a failure of the health care delivery system to manage the disease optimally. Newer management strategies focus on ameliorating symptoms by optimizing the hemodynamics, restoring neurohormonal balance, and making frequent outpatient adjustments when needed. PMID:24286585

  5. Acute Hematogenous Osteomyelitis in Children.

    PubMed

    Whyte, Noelle S B; Bielski, Robert J

    2016-06-01

    This article discusses the most common organisms associated with acute hematogenous osteomyelitis in children. Magnetic resonance imaging is extremely important in evaluating the extent of the disease process. Osteomyelitis due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus can be extremely difficult to treat and eradicate. It spreads quickly and causes local tissue necrosis. It is also associated with other serious sequelae such as deep venous thrombosis and septic pulmonary emboli. A multidisciplinary approach is needed to treat these infections. Hospital stays are often lengthy, complications are frequent, and patients are often critically ill. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(6):e204-e208.]. PMID:27294494

  6. Liraglutide-induced acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Jeyaraj, Santhosh; Shetty, Ananth Samith; Kumar, Champat Raj Roopesh; Nanditha, Arun; Krishnamoorthy, Satheesh; Raghavan, Arun; Raghavan, K; Ramachandran, Ambady

    2014-01-01

    An obese lady of 51 year with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus for 13 years was prescribed Liraglutide, a glucagon like peptide (GLP-1) analogue (Victoza) for glycaemic control and reduction of weight. She was on gliclazide and Insulin prior to initiation of Liraglutide. Eight weeks after initiation of GLP -1 analogue, she developed severe abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. She was admitted to a private hospital and evaluated. Biochemical tests and CT scan revealed presence of pancreatitis and she was treated for acute pancreatitis. Liraglutide was withdrawn and symptoms subsided. Subsequent follow-up showed that pancreatic enzyme levels were normal. PMID:25327099

  7. Sertraline induced acute mandibular dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Raveendranathan, Dhanya; Rao, Swaminath Gopala

    2015-01-01

    Specific serotonin reuptake inhibitors have been linked with the occurrence of drug-induced parkinsonism, dystonia, dyskinesia, and akathisia. Here, we describe a patient with a diagnosis of emotionally unstable personality disorder and depression who developed severe mandibular dystonia with sertraline in the absence of concurrent prescription of medications, which have potential action on the dopaminergic system. This case highlights the need for clinicians to be aware of this alarming acute adverse effect with sertraline, which is conventionally considered to be well-tolerated and safe. PMID:26752908

  8. Acute pancreatitis caused by bortezomib.

    PubMed

    Solakoglu, Tevfik; Akyol, Pinar; Guney, Tekin; Dilek, Imdat; Atalay, Roni; Koseoglu, Huseyin; Akin, Ebru; Demirezer Bolat, Aylin; Buyukasik, Naciye Semnur; Ersoy, Osman

    2013-01-01

    Drug-induced pancreatitis has been reported rarely. Bortezomib is a selective and reversible proteasome inhibitor used for the treatment of patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Recently, one case report about acute pancreatitis (AP) caused by bortezomib was published in the international literature. Herein we report a case of AP in a 67-year-old male on bortezomib therapy. On the fourth day after the first administration of bortezomib, the patient admitted to the hospital with symptoms of AP. The common etiological factors for AP were all excluded. Than the patient was diagnosed as bortezomib-induced pancreatitis. PMID:23561979

  9. Colloids in Acute Burn Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Cartotto, Robert; Greenhalgh, David

    2016-10-01

    Colloids have been used in varying capacities throughout the history of formula-based burn resuscitation. There is sound experimental evidence that demonstrates colloids' ability to improve intravascular colloid osmotic pressure, expand intravascular volume, reduce resuscitation requirements, and limit edema in unburned tissue following a major burn. Fresh frozen plasma appears to be a useful and effective immediate burn resuscitation fluid but its benefits must be weighed against its costs, and risks of viral transmission and acute lung injury. Albumin, in contrast, is less expensive and safer and has demonstrated ability to reduce resuscitation requirements and possibly limit edema-related morbidity. PMID:27600123

  10. [New model of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Cherkezova-Kinova, E; Lateva, E

    1981-01-01

    The authors propose a new model of acute pancreatitis by infusing duodenal content, obtained both from animals with experimental pancreatitis and from patients with pancreatitis, hepatitis and cholecystitis, into the duodenum of experimental animals without pressure for a period of several days. Pancreatitis was established functionally and histomorphologically. The control group of animals did not reveal deviations from the norm after infusion of duodenal content. The authors suggested the presence of pathogenic substances in the duodenal content of animals and sick persons, and these components damaged the pancreas, liver and kidneys by means of blood and lymph ways. PMID:7227280

  11. Acute incarcerated external abdominal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue-Fei

    2014-01-01

    External abdominal hernia occurs when abdominal organs or tissues leave their normal anatomic site and protrude outside the skin through the congenital or acquired weakness, defects or holes on the abdominal wall, including inguinal hernia, umbilical hernia, femoral hernia and so on. Acute incarcerated hernia is a common surgical emergency. With advances in minimally invasive devices and techniques, the diagnosis and treatment have witnessed major changes, such as the use of laparoscopic surgery in some cases to achieve minimally invasive treatment. However, strict adherence to the indications and contraindications is still required. PMID:25489584

  12. Acute spontaneous tumor lysis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jasek, A M; Day, H J

    1994-10-01

    An 83-year-old woman with no previous history of malignancy was admitted to our institution with weakness and anemia and subsequently developed acute tumor lysis syndrome secondary to newly diagnosed Burkitt's leukemia/lymphoma. This syndrome has been previously described in patients with hematologic malignancies; however, its development has been related to the administration of chemotherapy, steroids, or radiotherapy. The spontaneous occurrence of tumor lysis syndrome has not been previously reported; however, Cohen et al. [Am J Med 58:486-491, 1980] report 8 of 37 patients with "clinically insignificant pretreatment derangements" of serum potassium, phosphate, and calcium. PMID:8092128

  13. Pharmacological management of acute bronchiolitis

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Melvin; Mullett, Charles J; Piedimonte, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews the current knowledge base related to the pharmacological treatments for acute bronchiolitis. Bronchiolitis is a common lower respiratory illness affecting infants worldwide. The mainstays of therapy include airway support, supplemental oxygen, and support of fluids and nutrition. Frequently tried pharmacological interventions, such as ribavirin, nebulized bronchodilators, and systemic corticosteroids, have not been proven to benefit patients with bronchiolitis. Antibiotics do not improve the clinical course of patients with bronchiolitis, and should be used only in those patients with proven concurrent bacterial infection. Exogenous surfactant and heliox therapy also cannot be recommended for routine use, but surfactant replacement holds promise and should be further studied. PMID:19209271

  14. Nutritional support for acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Pisters, P W; Ranson, J H

    1992-09-01

    The current review has summarized current data relevant to the nutritional support of patients with acute pancreatitis. Selection of the most appropriate form of nutritional support for patients with acute pancreatitis is intimately linked to a thorough understanding of the effects of various forms of enteral and parenteral nutrition on physiologic exocrine secretory mechanisms. Two basic concepts have emerged from the multiple studies that have addressed these issues to date: 1, enteral feeds should have low fat composition and be delivered distal to the ligament of Treitz to minimize exocrine pancreatic secretion and 2, parenteral substrate infusions, alone or in combinations similar to those administered during TPN, do not stimulate exocrine pancreatic secretion. From a practical standpoint, most patients with acute pancreatitis are diagnosed by nonoperative means and will manifest some degree of paralytic ileus during the early phase of the disease. Therefore, jejunal feeds are usually not a therapeutic option early in the course of this disease. On the basis of the clinical studies reviewed herein we propose general guidelines for the nutritional support of patients with acute pancreatitis: 1, most patients with mild uncomplicated pancreatitis (one to two prognostic signs) do not benefit from nutritional support; 2, nutritional support should begin early in the course of patients with moderate to severe disease (as soon as hemodynamic and cardiorespiratory stability permit); 3, initial nutritional support should be through the parenteral route and include fat emulsion in amounts sufficient to prevent essential fatty acid deficiency (no objective data exist to recommend specific amino acid formulations); 4, patients requiring operation for diagnosis or complications of the disease should have a feeding jejunostomy placed at the time of operation for subsequent enteral nutrition using a low fat formula, such as Precision HN (Sandoz, 1.3 percent calories as fat

  15. Ultrasound in Acute Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Nalesso, Federico; Petrucci, Ilaria; Samoni, Sara; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Kidneys' imaging provides useful information in acute kidney injury (AKI) diagnosis and management. Today, several imaging techniques give information on kidneys anatomy, urinary obstruction, differential diagnosis between AKI and chronic kidney disease (CKD), renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate. Ultrasound is a safe, non-invasive and repeatable imaging technique so it is widely used in the first level work-up of AKI. The utility of contrast-enhanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in AKI or in AKI during CKD is limited because of renal toxicity associated with contrast agents used. PMID:27169556

  16. Acute lower motor neuron tetraparesis.

    PubMed

    Añor, Sònia

    2014-11-01

    Flaccid nonambulatory tetraparesis or tetraplegia is an infrequent neurologic presentation; it is characteristic of neuromuscular disease (lower motor neuron [LMN] disease) rather than spinal cord disease. Paresis beginning in the pelvic limbs and progressing to the thoracic limbs resulting in flaccid tetraparesis or tetraplegia within 24 to 72 hours is a common presentation of peripheral nerve or neuromuscular junction disease. Complete body flaccidity develops with severe decrease or complete loss of spinal reflexes in pelvic and thoracic limbs. Animals with acute generalized LMN tetraparesis commonly show severe motor dysfunction in all limbs and severe generalized weakness in all muscles. PMID:25441630

  17. High Throughput Drug Sensitivity Assay and Genomics- Guided Treatment of Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-19

    Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  18. Bortezomib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent, Refractory, or Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-13

    Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Idarubicin and Cytarabine With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  20. Atorvastatin Use Associated With Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Shih-Wei; Lin, Cheng-Li; Liao, Kuan-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Few data are present in the literature on the relationship between atorvastatin use and acute pancreatitis. The aim of this study was to explore this issue in Taiwan. Using representative claims data established from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program, this case–control study consisted of 5810 cases aged 20 to 84 years with a first-time diagnosis of acute pancreatitis during the period 1998 to 2011and 5733 randomly selected controls without acute pancreatitis. Both cases and controls were matched by sex, age, comorbidities, and index year of diagnosing acute pancreatitis. Subjects who at least received 1 prescription for other statins or nonstatin lipid-lowering drugs were excluded from the study. If subjects never had 1 prescription for atorvastatin, they were defined as never use of atorvastatin. Current use of atorvastatin was defined as subjects whose last remaining 1 tablet of atorvastatin was noted ≤7 days before the date of diagnosing acute pancreatitis. Late use of atorvastatin was defined as subjects whose last remaining 1 tablet of atorvastatin was noted >7 days before the date of diagnosing acute pancreatitis. The odds ratio with 95% confidence interval of acute pancreatitis associated with atorvastatin use was calculated by using the logistic regression analysis. The logistic regression analysis revealed that the odds ratio of acute pancreatitis was 1.67 for subjects with current use of atorvastatin (95% confidence interval 1.18, 2.38), when compared with subjects with never use of atorvastatin. The odds ratio decreased to 1.15 for those with late use of atorvastatin (95% confidence interval 0.87, 1.52), but without statistical significance. Current use of atorvastatin is associated with the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. Clinically, clinicians should consider the possibility of atorvastatin-associated acute pancreatitis when patients present with a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis without a definite etiology but are taking

  1. Plasmablastic Lymphoma Mimicking Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Virk, Hafeez Ul Hassan; Cheema, Ahmad R.; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2016-01-01

    Background. Plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL) is a rare B-cell neoplasm. It predominantly occurs in the oral cavity of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients and exhibits a highly aggressive clinical behavior. Case Presentation. We describe an unusual case of a 37-year-old HIV-positive male who presented with acute pancreatitis secondary to multiple peripancreatic masses compressing the pancreas. Histopathological examination of the lesions showed diffuse and cohesive pattern of large B-cells resembling immunoblasts or plasmablasts. The neoplastic cells were positive for BOB1 and MUM1, partially positive for CD79a, and negative for CD20, CD56, CD138, CD3, CD5, AE1/AE3, and HHV8. Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNA in situ hybridization was positive. These features were consistent with PBL. The patient was initiated on cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP) chemotherapy, demonstrating a striking response. Conclusion. To our research, this is the first report of PBL with the initial presentation of acute pancreatitis. The findings in this case suggest that PBL should be included in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic and peripancreatic tumors. PMID:27034868

  2. Acute pain management in children

    PubMed Central

    Verghese, Susan T; Hannallah, Raafat S

    2010-01-01

    The greatest advance in pediatric pain medicine is the recognition that untreated pain is a significant cause of morbidity and even mortality after surgical trauma. Accurate assessment of pain in different age groups and the effective treatment of postoperative pain is constantly being refined; with newer drugs being used alone or in combination with other drugs continues to be explored. Several advances in developmental neurobiology and pharmacology, knowledge of new analgesics and newer applications of old analgesics in the last two decades have helped the pediatric anesthesiologist in managing pain in children more efficiently. The latter include administering opioids via the skin and nasal mucosa and their addition into the neuraxial local anesthetics. Systemic opioids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents and regional analgesics alone or combined with additives are currently used to provide effective postoperative analgesia. These modalities are best utilized when combined as a multimodal approach to treat acute pain in the perioperative setting. The development of receptor specific drugs that can produce pain relief without the untoward side effects of respiratory depression will hasten the recovery and discharge of children after surgery. This review focuses on the overview of acute pain management in children, with an emphasis on pharmacological and regional anesthesia in achieving this goal. PMID:21197314

  3. Epidemiology of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Pendergrass, T.W.

    1985-06-01

    Although the etiology of acute leukemia is largely unknown, some facets of the puzzle are becoming clarified. Recognition of important patterns in age-specific mortality rates has suggested that events early in life, perhaps even prenatally, may have an influence on developing leukemia in childhood. The racial differences evident in mortality, incidence, and immunologic subtype of ALL suggest either differences in exposures to certain factors or differences in responses to those factors by white children. Hereditary factors appear to play a role. Familial and hereditary conditions exist that have high incidences of acute leukemia. Chromosomal anomalies are common in these conditions. Viral infections may play a role by contributing to alteration in genetic material through incorporation of the viral genome. How that virus is dealt with after primary infection seems important. The presence of immunodeficiency may allow wider dissemination or enhanced replication of such viruses, thereby increasing the likelihood of cellular transformation to an abnormal cell. Proliferation of that malignant cell to a clone may depend on other cofactors. Perhaps prolonged exposure to substances like benzene or alkylating agents may enhance these interactions between virus and genetic material. Does this change DNA repair mechanisms. Are viral infections handled differently. Is viral genomic information more easily integrated into host cells. Ionizing radiation has multiple effects. Alteration in genetic material occurs both at the molecular and chromosomal levels. DNA may be altered, lost, or added in the cell's attempt to recover from the injury.

  4. Acute Abdominal Pain in Children.

    PubMed

    Reust, Carin E; Williams, Amy

    2016-05-15

    Acute abdominal pain accounts for approximately 9% of childhood primary care office visits. Symptoms and signs that increase the likelihood of a surgical cause for pain include fever, bilious vomiting, bloody diarrhea, absent bowel sounds, voluntary guarding, rigidity, and rebound tenderness. The age of the child can help focus the differential diagnosis. In infants and toddlers, clinicians should consider congenital anomalies and other causes, including malrotation, hernias, Meckel diverticulum, or intussusception. In school-aged children, constipation and infectious causes of pain, such as gastroenteritis, colitis, respiratory infections, and urinary tract infections, are more common. In female adolescents, clinicians should consider pelvic inflammatory disease, pregnancy, ruptured ovarian cysts, or ovarian torsion. Initial laboratory tests include complete blood count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate or C-reactive protein, urinalysis, and a pregnancy test. Abdominal radiography can be used to diagnose constipation or obstruction. Ultrasonography is the initial choice in children for the diagnosis of cholecystitis, pancreatitis, ovarian cyst, ovarian or testicular torsion, pelvic inflammatory disease, pregnancy-related pathology, and appendicitis. Appendicitis is the most common cause of acute abdominal pain requiring surgery, with a peak incidence during adolescence. When the appendix is not clearly visible on ultrasonography, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging can be used to confirm the diagnosis. PMID:27175718

  5. Immunotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jurcic, Joseph G

    2005-09-01

    Immunotherapeutic strategies have become part of standard cancer treatment. Chimeric and humanized antibodies have demonstrated activity against a variety of tumors. Although the humanized anti-CD33 antibody HuM195 has only modest activity against overt acute myeloid leukemia (AML), it can eliminate minimal residual disease in acute promyelocytic leukemia. High-dose radioimmunotherapy with b-particle-emitting isotopes targeting CD33, CD45, and CD66 can potentially allow intensification of antileukemic therapy before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Conversely, a-particle immunotherapy with isotopes such as bismuth-213 or actinium-225 offers the possibility of selective tumor cell kill while sparing surrounding normal tissues. Targeted chemotherapy with the anti-CD33- calicheamicin construct gemtuzumab ozogamicin has produced remissions in relapsed AML and appears promising when used in combination with standard chemotherapy for newly diagnosed AML. T-cell recognition of peptide antigens presented on the cell surface in combination with major histocompatibility complex antigen provides another potentially promising approach for the treatment of AML. PMID:16091194

  6. Acute ankle sprain: an update.

    PubMed

    Ivins, Douglas

    2006-11-15

    Acute ankle injury, a common musculoskeletal injury, can cause ankle sprains. Some evidence suggests that previous injuries or limited joint flexibility may contribute to ankle sprains. The initial assessment of an acute ankle injury should include questions about the timing and mechanism of the injury. The Ottawa Ankle and Foot Rules provide clinical guidelines for excluding a fracture in adults and children and determining if radiography is indicated at the time of injury. Reexamination three to five days after injury, when pain and swelling have improved, may help with the diagnosis. Therapy for ankle sprains focuses on controlling pain and swelling. PRICE (Protection, Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation) is a well-established protocol for the treatment of ankle injury. There is some evidence that applying ice and using nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs improves healing and speeds recovery. Functional rehabilitation (e.g., motion restoration and strengthening exercises) is preferred over immobilization. Superiority of surgical repair versus functional rehabilitation for severe lateral ligament rupture is controversial. Treatment using semirigid supports is superior to using elastic bandages. Support devices provide some protection against future ankle sprains, particularly in persons with a history of recurrent sprains. Ankle disk or proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation exercise regimens also may be helpful, although the literature supporting this is limited. PMID:17137000

  7. Acute hypertensive crisis in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Silver, H M

    1989-05-01

    Severe pre-eclampsia is a state of acute afterload increase where compensation may be total by use of the Frank-Starling mechanism and/or increased adrenergic drive, or may be uncompensated in a patient with limited or exhausted preload reserve. As such, we are presented with a diverse group of patients and antihypertensive therapy ideally should be individualized. In reality we are dealing with a complex situation because of the presence of the fetus raising concerns about direct effects on the fetus as well as on uteroplacental blood flow. This limits our choice of agents to those with extensive use in pregnancy except in complicated or resistant cases. For these reasons, hydralazine is the antihypertensive agent of choice for treatment of acute hypertensive emergencies in pregnancy. In the complicated case other agents such as sodium nitroprusside or nitroglycerin may be more appropriate and, in these cases, hemodynamic monitoring should be performed to allow not only greater safety, but also to tailor therapy to the individual hemodynamic profile. PMID:2649760

  8. Nephrology Update: Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Sarabu, Nagaraju; Rahman, Mahboob

    2016-05-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) refers to any acute decrease in glomerular filtration rate, regardless of etiology. Staging of AKI has been recommended to stratify AKI patients according to severity of the condition, based on serum creatinine level and urine output. Classification of AKI into prerenal, intrinsic renal, and postrenal etiologies is helpful in differential diagnosis and management. AKI in hospitalized patients typically occurs due to decreased renal perfusion. Drug-induced, contrast-associated, postoperative, and sepsis-associated AKI also can occur. Clinical assessment of a patient with AKI involves a medical record review, thorough history and physical examination, urinary and blood tests, renal imaging, and, in some instances, renal biopsy. Contrast-induced nephropathy is a common iatrogenic etiology of AKI associated with administration of intravenous iodinated contrast media. Measures to prevent AKI should be taken before administration of intravenous iodinated contrast. AKI can result in many short- and long-term complications, including chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. Appropriate treatment of AKI patients involves management of the underlying etiology, when possible, and use of nondialytic and dialytic therapies. PMID:27163760

  9. Plasmablastic Lymphoma Mimicking Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Inayat, Faisal; Virk, Hafeez Ul Hassan; Cheema, Ahmad R; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2016-01-01

    Background. Plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL) is a rare B-cell neoplasm. It predominantly occurs in the oral cavity of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients and exhibits a highly aggressive clinical behavior. Case Presentation. We describe an unusual case of a 37-year-old HIV-positive male who presented with acute pancreatitis secondary to multiple peripancreatic masses compressing the pancreas. Histopathological examination of the lesions showed diffuse and cohesive pattern of large B-cells resembling immunoblasts or plasmablasts. The neoplastic cells were positive for BOB1 and MUM1, partially positive for CD79a, and negative for CD20, CD56, CD138, CD3, CD5, AE1/AE3, and HHV8. Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNA in situ hybridization was positive. These features were consistent with PBL. The patient was initiated on cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP) chemotherapy, demonstrating a striking response. Conclusion. To our research, this is the first report of PBL with the initial presentation of acute pancreatitis. The findings in this case suggest that PBL should be included in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic and peripancreatic tumors. PMID:27034868

  10. Liesegang rings in xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Pegas, Karla Laís; Edelweiss, Maria Isabel; Cambruzzi, Eduardo; Zettler, Cláudio Galleano

    2010-01-01

    Liesegang rings are concentric noncellular lamellar structures, rarely seen in vivo, occurring as a consequence of the accumulation of insoluble products in a colloidal matrix. These characteristic structures are a rare phenomenon usually found in association with cystic or inflammatory lesions and may be mistaken for parasites. The authors examined Liesegang rings from an inflammatory kidney lesion identified previously as a tumoral lesion on computerized tomography. On microscopic evaluation, Liesegang rings can be mistaken for eggs and larvae of parasites, psammoma bodies and calcification. Special stains like PAS, Grocott, von Kossa and Masson's trichrome facilitate the diagnosis. PMID:21151725

  11. Genetics Home Reference: core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... acute myeloid leukemia core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Close All Description Core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia (CBF-AML) is one form of a cancer ...

  12. Dysphagia Management in Acute and Sub-acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Vose, Alicia; Nonnenmacher, Jodi; Singer, Michele L.; González-Fernández, Marlís

    2014-01-01

    Swallowing dysfunction is common after stroke. More than 50% of the 665 thousand stroke survivors will experience dysphagia acutely of which approximately 80 thousand will experience persistent dysphagia at 6 months. The physiologic impairments that result in post-stroke dysphagia are varied. This review focuses primarily on well-established dysphagia treatments in the context of the physiologic impairments they treat. Traditional dysphagia therapies including volume and texture modifications, strategies such as chin tuck, head tilt, head turn, effortful swallow, supraglottic swallow, super-supraglottic swallow, Mendelsohn maneuver and exercises such as the Shaker exercise and Masako (tongue hold) maneuver are discussed. Other more recent treatment interventions are discussed in the context of the evidence available. PMID:26484001

  13. Haemophagocytic syndrome complicating acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Stark, R.; Manoharan, A.

    1989-01-01

    A 41 year old female developed reactive haemophagocytic histiocytosis secondary to herpes simplex infection, during remission induction for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. She recovered fully with acyclovir and supportive treatment. Previous publications on the association between acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and haemophagocytic syndrome are reviewed, and the nature of the haemophagocytic disorder is discussed. Images Figure 1 PMID:2687829

  14. Acute pancreatitis induced by anticancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ben Kridis, W; Khanfir, A; Frikha, M

    2013-01-01

    Drug-induced pancreatitis is rare (1.4-2%). This report describes a 20-year-old female patient who developed acute pancreatitis while being treated for neurosarcoma of abdominal wall with the ifosfamide and doxorubicin regimen. Although it is unusual, it is important to consider chemotherapeutic agents as a possible etiology for acute pancreatitis in patients presenting with gastrointestinal symptoms. PMID:24455804

  15. Acute surgical management in idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, Zaitun; Fenton, Eoin; Sattar, Muhammad Taufiq

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a headache syndrome with progressive symptoms of raised intracranial pressure. Most commonly, it is a slow process where surveillance and medical management are the main treatment modalities. We describe herein an acute presentation with bilateral sixth nerve palsies, papilloedema and visual deterioration, where acute surgical intervention was a vision-saving operation. PMID:23239783

  16. Acute Pancreatitis Due to a Duodenal Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Pyeon, Sung Ik; Kim, Yong Tae; Lee, Ban Seok; Lee, Sang Ho; Lee, Jae Nam; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Oh, Kong Jin

    2014-01-01

    Duodenal ulcers and acute pancreatitis are two of the most commonly encountered gastrointestinal diseases among the general population. However, duodenal ulcer-induced pancreatitis is very rarely reported worldwide. This report elaborates on a distinct medical treatment that contributes to partial or complete treatment of acute pancreatitis induced by a duodenal ulcer scar. PMID:25505728

  17. Acute pancreatitis in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Mitsuyoshi; Sai, Jin Kan; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    In this Topic Highlight, the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of acute pancreatitis in children are discussed. Acute pancreatitis should be considered during the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain in children and requires prompt treatment because it may become life-threatening. The etiology, clinical manifestations, and course of acute pancreatitis in children are often different than in adults. Therefore, the specific features of acute pancreatitis in children must be considered. The etiology of acute pancreatitis in children is often drugs, infections, trauma, or anatomic abnormalities. Diagnosis is based on clinical symptoms (such as abdominal pain and vomiting), serum pancreatic enzyme levels, and imaging studies. Several scoring systems have been proposed for the assessment of severity, which is useful for selecting treatments and predicting prognosis. The basic pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis does not greatly differ between adults and children, and the treatments for adults and children are similar. In large part, our understanding of the pathology, optimal treatment, assessment of severity, and outcome of acute pancreatitis in children is taken from the adult literature. However, we often find that the common management of adult pancreatitis is difficult to apply to children. With advances in diagnostic techniques and treatment methods, severe acute pancreatitis in children is becoming better understood and more controllable. PMID:25400985

  18. Acute Chagas Disease in a Returning Traveler

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Yvonne L.; Juliano, Jonathan J.; Montgomery, Susan P.; Qvarnstrom, Yvonne

    2012-01-01

    Acute Chagas disease is rarely recognized, and the risk for acquiring the disease is undefined in travelers to Central America. We describe a case of acute Chagas disease in a traveler to Costa Rica and highlight the need for increased awareness of this infection in travelers to Chagas-endemic areas. PMID:23091192

  19. Liver transplantation in acute-on-chronic liver failure: lessons learnt from acute liver failure setting.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Mettu Srinivas; Rajalingam, Rajesh; Rela, Mohamed

    2015-10-01

    Acute-on-chronic liver failure is a clinical entity with high risk of mortality. These patients can have severe liver dysfunction complicated with multiple organ failure. Liver transplantation is the definitive treatment for these patients. Literature regarding management of acute liver failure with special emphasis on liver transplantation was reviewed. Lessons learnt from the management of patients with acute liver failure which could be extrapolated to the management of patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure are discussed. Significant improvement in outcomes of acute liver failure has been reported across the world. Several aspects in transplantation for acute liver failure were found to be relevant to the management of acute-on-chronic liver failure. These include defining criteria to identify patients needing early liver transplantation, prioritizing patients with acute liver failure on the waiting list, defining when to abandon transplantation in acute liver failure, emphasis on graft quality and the need for a multi-disciplinary approach to manage multiple organ dysfunction. Useful lessons can be learnt from the progress made in the management of acute liver failure and these can be extrapolated to the management of patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure. PMID:25788191

  20. Sonography of acute appendicitis and its mimics in children

    PubMed Central

    Sargar, Kiran M; Siegel, Marilyn J

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of acute right lower quadrant pain in a pediatric population is challenging. Acute appendicitis is the most common cause of an acute surgical abdomen. The common mimics of acute appendicitis are acute gastrointestinal and gynecologic diseases. This article reviews the sonographic findings of the spectrum of common acute abdominal emergencies in children with a focus on imaging clues to a specific diagnosis. This awareness can impact on diagnostic accuracy and impact patient management. PMID:25024527

  1. Acute Kidney Injury is More Common in Acute Haemorrhagic Stroke in Mymensingh Medical College Hospital.

    PubMed

    Ray, N C; Chowdhury, M A; Sarkar, S R

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication after acute stroke and is an independent predictor of both early and long-term mortality after acute stroke. Acute kidney injury is associated with increased mortality in haemorrhagic stroke patients. This cross sectional observational study was conducted in Nephrology, Neuromedicine and Medicine department of Mymensingh Medical College & Hospital, Mymensingh from July 2012 to June 2014. A total of 240 patients with newly detected acute stroke confirmed by CT scan of brain were included in this study. According to this study, 15.42% of acute stroke patients developed AKI. Among the patients with haemorrhagic stroke 21.87% developed AKI while only 13.07% patients with ischaemic stroke developed AKI. So, early diagnosis and management of AKI in patients with acute stroke especially in haemorrhagic stroke is very important to reduce the morbidity and mortality of these patients. PMID:26931240

  2. Acute bile nephropathy secondary to anabolic steroids.

    PubMed

    Alkhunaizi, Ahmed M; ElTigani, Mohamed A; Rabah, Rola S; Nasr, Samih H

    2016-02-01

    Renal dysfunction in cholestatic liver disease is multifactorial. Acute kidney injury may develop secondary to renal vasoconstriction in the setting of peripheral vasodilation and relative hypovolemia, tubular obstruction by bile casts, and direct tubular toxicity from bile. Anabolic steroids are frequently used by athletes to boost endurance and increase muscle mass. These agents are a recently recognized cause of hepatotoxicity and jaundice and may lead to acute kidney injury. To increase awareness about this growing problem and to characterize the pathology of acute kidney injury in this setting, we report on a young male who developed acute kidney injury in the setting of severe cholestatic jaundice related to ingestion of anabolic steroids used for bodybuilding. Kidney biopsy showed bile casts within distal tubular lumina, filamentous bile inclusions within tubular cells, and signs of acute tubular injury. This report supports the recently re-emerged concept of bile nephropathy cholemic nephrosis. PMID:26587777

  3. [Improvement of treatment results of acute cholecystitis].

    PubMed

    Sovtsov, S A; Prilepina, E V

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was investigation of treatment results of acute cholecystitis according to suggested forms of cholecystitis by international experts in the research (Tokyo-2007). It was analyzed the immediate treatment results of 1399 patients with acute cholecystitis for the last 4 years in the Chelyabinsk Regional Hospital No3. 912 patients had acute cholecystitis I degree (easy cholecystitis), 270 patients--II (moderate) degree and 217 patients--III degree (severe cholecystitis). It was operated 1281 patients. Operating activity was 91.5%. Postoperative mortality in whole patients group was 0.78%. The authors suggested the main principles such as early, differentiated by the volume operative interventions according to graduations of investigation "Tokyo-2007". Controlled trial of treatment results of patients randomized on three degrees of acute cholecystitis observed appropriateness of allocation of these groups. It is necessary for differentiated treatment and improvement of treatment results of patients with acute cholecystitis. PMID:26031820

  4. [Vesicoureteric reflux in children: many questions still unanswered].

    PubMed

    Zieg, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    Vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) is the most common congenital anomaly of the uropoetic system. The gold standard for its diagnosis is the voiding cystourethrogram. Sonographic cystourethrography is an alternative method for reflux detection, but it is still not used routinely. Static scintigraphy enables us to diagnose renal scarring reflux nephropathy (RN). While congenital RN is a result of prenatal kidney injury, acquired RN results from pyelonephritis-induced renal damage.Risk factors for RN include VUR, recurrent APN, lower urinary tract dysfunction and delay in treatment of febrile urinary tract infection. Management of children after APN with VUR consists of antibiotic prophylaxy, surgery or surveillance only. The conclusions of performed studies are controversial, thus unified guidelines for the management of patients with VUR are not available. PMID:27256146

  5. Post-acute integration strategies in an era of accountability

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, John P; Trivedi, Amal N; Zinn, Jacqueline S; Mor, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine, in its 2001 Crossing the Quality Chasm report, recommended greater integration and coordination as a component of a transformed health care system, yet relationships between acute and post-acute providers have remained weak. With payment reforms that hold hospitals and health systems accountable for the total costs of care and readmissions, the dynamic between acute and post-acute providers is changing. In this article, we outline the internal and market factors that will drive health systems’ decisions about whether and how they integrate with post-acute providers. Enhanced integration between acute and post-acute providers should reduce variation in post-acute spending. PMID:27148428

  6. Acute Decompensated Heart Failure Update

    PubMed Central

    Teerlink, John R; Alburikan, Khalid; Metra, Marco; Rodgers, Jo E

    2015-01-01

    Acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) continues to increase in prevalence and is associated with substantial mortality and morbidity including frequent hospitalizations. The American Heart Association is predicting that more than eight million Americans will have heart failure by 2030 and that the total direct costs associated with the disease will rise from $21 billion in 2012 to $70 billion in 2030. The increase in the prevalence and cost of HF is primarily the result of shifting demographics and a growing population. Although many large, randomized, controlled clinical trials have been conducted in patients with chronic heart failure, it was not until recently that a growing number of studies began to address the management of ADHF. It is the intent of this review to update the clinician regarding the evaluation and optimal management of ADHF. PMID:24251454

  7. Management of acute ventilatory failure

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, B; Calverley, P M A

    2006-01-01

    Acute ventilatory failure is a challenging yet increasingly common medical emergency reflecting the growing burden of respiratory disease. It is not a diagnosis in itself but the end result of a diversity of disease processes culminating in arterial hypoxaemia and hypercapnia. This review focuses on key management issues including giving appropriate oxygen therapy, treatment of the underlying aetiology as well as any precipitant factors and provision of assisted ventilation if required. Ventilatory assistance can be provided both invasively and non‐invasively and the indications for either or both forms of assisted ventilation are discussed. Further emphasis is needed regarding advanced directives of care and clinicians should be aware of ethical issues regarding assisted ventilation. PMID:16822920

  8. Alberta's Acute Care Funding Project.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, P; Hall, E M; Lave, J R; Glendining, M

    1992-01-01

    Alberta initiated the Acute Care Funding Project (ACFP) in 1988, a new hospital funding system that institutes case mix budgeting adjustments to the global budget so that hospitals can be treated more equitably. The initiative is a significant departure in principle from the former method of funding. The ACFP is summarized and critiqued, and focuses on the inpatient side of the picture. The various elements of the project are discussed, such as the hospital performance index, the hospital performance measure, the Refined Diagnostic Related Group, case weights, typical and outlier cases, and the costing mechanisms. Since its implementation, the ACFP has undergone substantial changes; these are discussed, as well as some of the problems that still need to be addressed. Overall, the system offers incentives to reduce length of stay and to increase the efficiency with which inpatient care is provided. PMID:10121446

  9. Recovery Potential After Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Seitz, Rüdiger J.; Donnan, Geoffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    In acute stroke, the major factor for recovery is the early use of thrombolysis aimed at arterial recanalization and reperfusion of ischemic brain tissue. Subsequently, neurorehabilitative training critically improves clinical recovery due to augmention of postlesional plasticity. Neuroimaging and electrophysiology studies have revealed that the location and volume of the stroke lesion, the affection of nerve fiber tracts, as well as functional and structural changes in the perilesional tissue and in large-scale bihemispheric networks are relevant biomarkers of post-stroke recovery. However, associated disorders, such as mood disorders, epilepsy, and neurodegenerative diseases, may induce secondary cerebral changes or aggravate the functional deficits and, thereby, compromise the potential for recovery. PMID:26617568

  10. Acute transfusion reactions: an update.

    PubMed

    Scorer, T; Doughty, H

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade the use of blood products by the United Kingdom (UK) military has increased significantly; with the increase in transfusion comes an increased incidence of transfusion-related incidents. Acute transfusion reactions (ATRs) are a common consequence of transfusion, which vary widely in their severity and are likely to be under-reported, although reporting is a regulatory requirement. This paper discusses the importance of identifying ATRs and managing them appropriately. It introduces a flowchart (due to be incorporated in the next version of Joint Service Publication (JSP) 999, Clinical Guidelines for Operations (CGOs)), which is designed to assist the military multi-disciplinary team caring for patients in the operational environment. PMID:25895413

  11. Acute psychosis induced by isotretinoin

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopal, Sundararajan

    2014-01-01

    Isotretinoin is used for the treatment of severe acne. Psychiatric side-effects, particularly depression, have been well-documented. This dramatic case report is about a young male patient who developed acute psychosis within a few days of starting isotretinoin. Due to his persecutory delusions, the patient, who was an Indian engineer working in Germany, decided to immediately return to India fearing for his life in Germany. Careful history taking established the cause of the psychosis. Isotretinoin was stopped; patient showed rapid improvement, within a week, on a low dose of risperidone. Risperidone was continued as a precaution for 3 months. After a further 8 months, the patient remains well without any psychotropic medication. PMID:25316943

  12. Acute epiphyseal osteomyelitis in children

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenbaum, D.M.; Blumhagen, J.D.

    1985-07-01

    Nine children over 20 months of age had acute osteomyelitis of the epiphysis of a long bone. The clinical features varied, but all of the patients had pain at the infected site and an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate. The distal femur was involved in seven cases, the proximal tibian in two, and the proximal humerus in one. In two patients there was a contiguous metaphyseal lesion, while the other seven patients (eight sites) had lesions limited to the epiphysis. Bone scintigraphy clearly identified the infected sites in all seven patients in whom it was performed, and allowed an early diagnosis in four cases. Radiographs showed a lytic lesion of the epiphysis that corresponded to the scintigraphic findings in all cases. The epiphysis of the child should be recognized as another site of hematogenous osteomyelitis.

  13. [Therapy of acute ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Sobesky, J

    2009-11-01

    New diagnostic and therapeutic developments have led to an innovative approach to stroke therapy. The slogan "time is brain" emphasizes that stroke is a medical emergency comparable to myocardial infarction. The stroke unit conception is an evidence based therapy for all stroke patients and improves outcome significantly. The monitoring of vital signs and the management of stroke specific complications are highly effective. Early secondary prophylaxis reduces the risk of recurrence. The effect of CT based thrombolysis within the time window of 4,5 h has been substantiated by current data. Stroke MRI holds the promise for an improved therapy by patient stratification and by opening the time window. Interventional recanalisation, vascular interventions and hemicraniectomy complement the therapeutic options in the acute phase of stroke. PMID:19838656

  14. Blood tests for acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Basnayake, Chamara; Ratnam, Dilip

    2015-01-01

    Summary The diagnosis of acute pancreatitis requires the presence of at least two of the three diagnostic criteria – characteristic abdominal pain, elevated serum amylase or lipase, and radiological evidence of pancreatitis. Serum concentrations of amylase and lipase rise within hours of the pancreatic injury. A threshold concentration 2–4 times the upper limit of normal is recommended for diagnosis. Serum lipase is now the preferred test due to its improved sensitivity, particularly in alcohol-induced pancreatitis. Its prolonged elevation creates a wider diagnostic window than amylase. Neither enzyme is useful in monitoring or predicting the severity of an episode of pancreatitis in adults. New biomarkers including trypsinogen and elastase have no significant advantage over amylase or lipase. PMID:26648641

  15. Acute Management of Propionic Acidemia

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Kimberly A; Gropman, Andrea; MacLeod, Erin; Stagni, Kathy; Summar, Marshall L.; Ueda, Keiko; Mew, Nicholas Ah; Franks, Jill; Island, Eddie; Matern, Dietrich; Pena, Loren; Smith, Brittany; Sutton, V. Reid; Urv, Tiina; Venditti, Charles; Chakrapani, Anupam

    2014-01-01

    Propionic Acidemia or aciduria is an intoxication-type disorder of organic metabolism. Patients deteriorate in times of increased metabolic demand and subsequent catabolism. Metabolic decompensation can manifest with lethargy, vomiting, coma and death if not appropriately treated. On January 28-30, 2011 in Washington, D.C., Children's National Medical Center hosted a group of clinicians, scientists and parental group representatives to design recommendations for acute management of individuals with Propionic Acidemia. Although many of the recommendations are geared towards the previously undiagnosed neonate, the recommendations for a severely metabolically decompensated individual are applicable to any known patient as well. Initial management is critical for prevention of morbidity and mortality. The following manuscript provides recommendations for initial treatment and evaluation, a discussion of issues concerning transport to a metabolic center (if patient presents to a non-metabolic center), acceleration of management and preparation for discharge. PMID:22000903

  16. Epigenetics in acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jinhua; Zhuang, Shougang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Recent advances in epigenetics indicate the involvement of several epigenetic modifications in the pathogenesis of acute kidney injury (AKI). The purpose of this review is to summarize our understanding of recent advances in epigenetic regulation of AKI and provide mechanistic insight into the role of acetylation, methylation, and microRNA expression in the pathological processes of AKI. Recent findings Enhancement of protein acetylation by pharmacological inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACs) leads to more severe tubular injury and impairment of renal structural and functional recovery. The changes in promoter DNA methylation occur in the kidney with ischemia/reperfusion. microRNA expression is associated with regulation of both renal injury and regeneration after AKI. Summary Recent studies on epigenetic regulation indicate that acetylation, methylation, and microRNA expression are critically implicated in the pathogenesis of AKI. Strategies targeting epigenetic processes may hold a therapeutic potential for patients with AKI. PMID:26050122

  17. Biomarkers of Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Vishal S.; Ferguson, Michael A.; Bonventre, Joseph V.

    2009-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common condition with a high risk of death. The standard metrics used to define and monitor the progression of AKI, such as serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen levels, are insensitive, nonspecific, and change significantly only after significant kidney injury and then with a substantial time delay. This delay in diagnosis not only prevents timely patient management decisions, including administration of putative therapeutic agents, but also significantly affects the preclinical evaluation of toxicity thereby allowing potentially nephrotoxic drug candidates to pass the preclinical safety criteria only to be found to be clinically nephrotoxic with great human costs. Studies to establish effective therapies for AKI will be greatly facilitated by two factors: (a) development of sensitive, specific, and reliable biomarkers for early diagnosis/prognosis of AKI in preclinical and clinical studies, and (b) development and validation of high-throughput innovative technologies that allow rapid multiplexed detection of multiple markers at the bedside. PMID:17937594

  18. Severe acute malnutrition and infection

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kelsey D J; Berkley, James A

    2014-01-01

    Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) is associated with increased severity of common infectious diseases, and death amongst children with SAM is almost always as a result of infection. The diagnosis and management of infection are often different in malnourished versus well-nourished children. The objectives of this brief are to outline the evidence underpinning important practical questions relating to the management of infectious diseases in children with SAM and to highlight research gaps. Overall, the evidence base for many aspects covered in this brief is very poor. The brief addresses antimicrobials; antipyretics; tuberculosis; HIV; malaria; pneumonia; diarrhoea; sepsis; measles; urinary tract infection; nosocomial Infections; soil transmitted helminths; skin infections and pharmacology in the context of SAM. The brief is structured into sets of clinical questions, which we hope will maximise the relevance to contemporary practice. PMID:25475887

  19. UNDESCENDED TESTICLE COMPLICATING ACUTE APPENDICITIS*

    PubMed Central

    Herzig, Maximilian L.

    1924-01-01

    1. Symptoms referable to compression of the spermatic cord and incarceration of right testicle, obscure the underlying pathologic changes occurring in the vermiform appendix. 2. Testicular underdevelopment and resulting subnormal cerebration. 3. Operative technique: (a) Pre-operative diagnosis: Incarceration of right testicle and possible perforative appendicitis. (b) Descent of right incarcerated testicle. Bassini closure. (c) Exploratory laparotomy: Intramuscular gridiron incision. 4. Operative findings: (a) Strangulation and incarceration of undescended right testicle and spermatic cord in inguinal canal. (b) Copious pus, free in peritoneal cavity. An adherent, sloughing, perforative, retrocecal appendix identified, left undisturbed and free drainage established. 5. Progress: (a) Eventful recovery from acute suppurative appendicitis following drainage of appendical focus. (b) Marked development following the operative descent of an incarcerated testicle in a backward boy, age twelve, who had a bilateral cryptorchism. PMID:18739377

  20. [Intranasal opioids for acute pain].

    PubMed

    Añez Simón, C; Rull Bartomeu, M; Rodríguez Pérez, A; Fuentes Baena, A

    2006-12-01

    Intranasal drug administration is an easy, well-tolerated, noninvasive transmucosal route that avoids first-pass metabolism in the liver. The nasal mucosa provides an extensive, highly vascularized surface of pseudostratified ciliated epithelium. It secretes mucus that is subjected to mucociliary movement that can affect the time of contact between the drug and the surface. Absorption is influenced by anatomical and physiological factors as well as by properties of the drug and the delivery system. We review the literature on intranasal administration of fentanyl, meperidine, diamorphine, and butorphanol to treat acute pain. The adverse systemic effects are similar to those described for intravenous administration, the most common being drowsiness, nausea, and vomiting. Local effects reported are a burning sensation with meperidine and a bad taste. PMID:17302079

  1. Acute unilateral facial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Yeong, Siew Swan; Tassone, Peter

    2011-05-01

    Mrs PS, 78 years of age, presented with acute left-sided otalgia, ear swelling and subsequent unilateral facial paralysis (Figure 1). She denied any otorrhoea or hearing loss. Past medical history relevant to the presenting complaint included: * Bell palsy diagnosed 20 years ago with no residual effect * biopsy confirmed benign parotid lump (diagnosed 3 years previously). Histopathology revealed a pleomorphic adenoma. Mrs PS declined surgical intervention at the time * chicken pox as a child * normal fasting blood glucose 1 month previously and no known immune compromise. Examination revealed yellow crusts and small vesicles on the external acoustic meatus (Figure 2). A 10 mm well defined firm and nontender nodule was palpable at the ramus of the mandible. PMID:21597548

  2. ACUTE RETINAL ARTERIAL OCCLUSIVE DISORDERS

    PubMed Central

    Hayreh, Sohan Singh

    2011-01-01

    The initial section deals with basic sciences; among the various topics briefly discussed are the anatomical features of ophthalmic, central retinal and cilioretinal arteries which may play a role in acute retinal arterial ischemic disorders. Crucial information required in the management of central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) is the length of time the retina can survive following that. An experimental study shows that CRAO for 97 minutes produces no detectable permanent retinal damage but there is a progressive ischemic damage thereafter, and by 4 hours the retina has suffered irreversible damage. In the clinical section, I discuss at length various controversies on acute retinal arterial ischemic disorders. Classification of acute retinal arterial ischemic disorders These are of 4 types: CRAO, branch retinal artery occlusion (BRAO), cotton wools spots and amaurosis fugax. Both CRAO and BRAO further comprise multiple clinical entities. Contrary to the universal belief, pathogenetically, clinically and for management, CRAO is not one clinical entity but 4 distinct clinical entities – non-arteritic CRAO, non-arteritic CRAO with cilioretinal artery sparing, arteritic CRAO associated with giant cell arteritis (GCA) and transient non-arteritic CRAO. Similarly, BRAO comprises permanent BRAO, transient BRAO and cilioretinal artery occlusion (CLRAO), and the latter further consists of 3 distinct clinical entities - non-arteritic CLRAO alone, non-arteritic CLRAO associated with central retinal vein occlusion and arteritic CLRAO associated with GCA. Understanding these classifications is essential to comprehend fully various aspects of these disorders. Central retinal artery occlusion The pathogeneses, clinical features and management of the various types of CRAO are discussed in detail. Contrary to the prevalent belief, spontaneous improvement in both visual acuity and visual fields does occur, mainly during the first 7 days. The incidence of spontaneous visual

  3. Acute use of oxygen therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pilcher, Janine; Beasley, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Summary A major change is needed in the entrenched culture of routinely administering high-concentration oxygen to acutely ill patients regardless of need. Oxygen is a drug that should be prescribed for specific indications. There should be a documented target range for oxygen saturation, and regular monitoring of the patient’s response. There are risks from unrelieved hypoxaemia due to insufficient oxygen therapy, and from provoked hyperoxaemia due to excessive oxygen therapy. Oxygen therapy should therefore be titrated so that the saturation is within a range that avoids these risks. If oxygen requirements are increasing, the clinician should review the patient and consider transfer to a higher level of care. If oxygen requirements are decreasing, consider reducing or discontinuing oxygen therapy. PMID:26648631

  4. [Surgical treatment of acute mediastinitis].

    PubMed

    Krüger, M; Decker, S; Schneider, J P; Haverich, A; Schega, O

    2016-06-01

    Despite modern intensive care management, acute mediastinitis is still associated with a high morbidity and mortality (up to approximately 40 %). Effective antibiotic therapy, intensive care management, elimination of the causative sources of infection and drainage of the affected mediastinal compartments are the cornerstones of therapy in a multidisciplinary treatment concept. Early diagnosis, prompt and uncompromising initial therapy and planned computed tomography (CT) control after the first stages of therapy in order to decide on the necessity for surgical re-interventions are essential for achieving optimal results. Knowledge of the specific anatomical characteristics is crucial for the understanding of this disease and its treatment; therefore, the current knowledge on fascial layers and interstitial spaces from the neck to the mediastinum is described and discussed. A possible foudroyant spread of the infection, especially within the posterior mediastinum, has to be anticipated. The approach to the mediastinum depends on the mediastinal compartments affected, on the causative disease and on the patient's clinical situation. The surgical approach should be adapted to the particular clinical situation of the individual patient and to the surgical experience of the surgeon. When in doubt, the more invasive approach to the mediastinum, such as bilateral thoracotomy, is recommended. An ascending mediastinitis due to pancreatitis is a very rare condition; however, as chest pains are often the main clinical sign surgeons should be aware of this differential diagnosis. An intraoperative brown-black serous fluid in the mediastinal tissue is virtually pathognomonic. The treatment results of esophageal perforation as the most frequent cause of mediastinitis have been improved by integration of various interventional procedures. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy or immunoglobulin treatment can play an auxiliary role in selected patients with acute mediastinitis. PMID

  5. [Fibrinolysis in acute myocardial infarct].

    PubMed

    Bleifeld, W

    1987-10-24

    Fibrinolysis has opened up a new avenue in the treatment of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). In principle, the rate of reperfusion depends on the type of compound used, the mode of administration and the time between onset of symptoms and the beginning of treatment. With intracoronary streptokinase the reperfusion rate is of the order of 85%. Intravenous urokinase administered as a bolus results in a reopening rate of 50-60%; a similar rate of reperfusion is achieved with rt-PA as infusion, while i.v. streptokinase produces about 50% reopened coronary vessels. The final infarct size is decreased in 70% of patients if fibrinolysis is initiated within 2.5 hours after the onset of symptoms and followed by reopening of the occluded vessel. This results in a lowering of in-hospital mortality, which in various studies is of the order of 45-60%.- Bearing in mind the contraindications, fibrinolysis should be initiated within 3 hours. Hemodynamic improvement by a decrease of infarct size may also be achieved beyond 3 hours in large anterior myocardial infarctions and in posterior infarctions with cardiogenic shock. Early initiation of thrombolysis is of major importance in improving left ventricular function and lowering mortality following acute myocardial infarction. Therefore, prehospital thrombolytic therapy should be considered. - In the postinfarction phase coronary angiography is indicated in patients with angina at rest, stable angina of ECG signs of ischemia. In this situation transfer to a specialized cardiology division for possible percutaneous transluminal angioplasty is indicated. - Reocclusion after successful thrombolysis occurs in 20-30%, and it is therefore important to avoid reinfarction to improve the long term prognosis after AMI.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3321420

  6. The dynamics of acute inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rukmini

    The acute inflammatory response is the non-specific and immediate reaction of the body to pathogenic organisms, tissue trauma and unregulated cell growth. An imbalance in this response could lead to a condition commonly known as "shock" or "sepsis". This thesis is an attempt to elucidate the dynamics of acute inflammatory response to infection and contribute to its systemic understanding through mathematical modeling and analysis. The models of immunity discussed use Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs) to model the variation of concentration in time of the various interacting species. Chapter 2 discusses three such models of increasing complexity. Sections 2.1 and 2.2 discuss smaller models that capture the core features of inflammation and offer general predictions concerning the design of the system. Phase-space and bifurcation analyses have been used to examine the behavior at various parameter regimes. Section 2.3 discusses a global physiological model that includes several equations modeling the concentration (or numbers) of cells, cytokines and other mediators. The conclusions drawn from the reduced and detailed models about the qualitative effects of the parameters are very similar and these similarities have also been discussed. In Chapter 3, the specific applications of the biologically detailed model are discussed in greater detail. These include a simulation of anthrax infection and an in silico simulation of a clinical trial. Such simulations are very useful to biologists and could prove to be invaluable tools in drug design. Finally, Chapter 4 discusses the general problem of extinction of populations modeled as continuous variables in ODES is discussed. The average time to extinction and threshold are estimated based on analyzing the equivalent stochastic processes.

  7. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-09

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Adult L1 Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult L2 Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  8. Alemtuzumab and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Untreated Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-20

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L1 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  9. Race and mortality after acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Waikar, Sushrut S; Curhan, Gary C; Ayanian, John Z; Chertow, Glenn M

    2007-10-01

    Black patients receiving dialysis for end-stage renal disease in the United States have lower mortality rates than white patients. Whether racial differences exist in mortality after acute renal failure is not known. We studied acute renal failure in patients hospitalized between 2000 and 2003 using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample and found that black patients had an 18% (95% confidence interval [CI] 16 to 21%) lower odds of death than white patients after adjusting for age, sex, comorbidity, and the need for mechanical ventilation. Similarly, among those with acute renal failure requiring dialysis, black patients had a 16% (95% CI 10 to 22%) lower odds of death than white patients. In stratified analyses of patients with acute renal failure, black patients had significantly lower adjusted odds of death than white patients in settings of coronary artery bypass grafting, cardiac catheterization, acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, pneumonia, sepsis, and gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Black patients were more likely than white patients to be treated in hospitals that care for a larger number of patients with acute renal failure, and black patients had lower in-hospital mortality than white patients in all four quartiles of hospital volume. In conclusion, in-hospital mortality is lower for black patients with acute renal failure than white patients. Future studies should assess the reasons for this difference. PMID:17855647

  10. Cholescintigraphy in acute and chronic cholecystitis

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    Since the introduction of /sup 99m/Tc-labeled cholescintigraphic agents in the mid-1970s, there has been extensive investigation of their role in the evaluation of biliary tract disorders. These agents accurately assess the patency of the cystic and common bile ducts, and to date, their greatest impact has been on the diagnostic evaluation of suspected acute cholecystitis. This article reviews the use of /sup 99m/Tc-iminodiacetic acid (IDA) derivatives in acute and chronic cholecystitis. Since acute cholecystitis is characterized by cystic duct obstruction, failure of the gallbladder to visualize following /sup 99m/Tc-IDA administration is indicative of cystic duct obstruction and acute cholecystitis. Using this approach, cholescintigraphy has been shown to be highly sensitive, specific, and efficacious in the diagnosis of acute cholecystitis. Cholescintigraphy is now the procedure of choice for the detection of acute cholecystitis. Unlike its successful applications in acute cholecystitis, cholescintigraphy appears of limited value in chronic cholecystitis. Certain circumstances where cholescintigraphy is of value in chronic cholecystitis are discussed. Whether or not cholescintigraphy may play a greater role in the future in elucidating the pathogenesis of chronic cholecystitis by assessment of biliary kinetics remains unanswered.

  11. Combination Chemotherapy and Imatinib Mesylate in Treating Children With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Non-T, Non-B Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  12. Nivolumab and Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-28

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  13. Studying Biomarkers in Samples From Younger Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-17

    Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Other Myeloid Malignancies; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4)

  14. Vosaroxin and Infusional Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-10

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Myeloid Sarcoma; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Therapy-Related Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  15. The cell cycle and acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Price, Peter M.; Safirstein, Robert L.; Megyesi, Judit

    2009-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) activates pathways of cell death and cell proliferation. Although seemingly discrete and unrelated mechanisms, these pathways can now be shown to be connected and even to be controlled by similar pathways. The dependence of the severity of renal-cell injury on cell cycle pathways can be used to control and perhaps to prevent acute kidney injury. This review is written to address the correlation between cellular life and death in kidney tubules, especially in acute kidney injury. PMID:19536080

  16. Open Treatment of Acute Scapholunate Instability.

    PubMed

    Swanstrom, Morgan M; Lee, Steve K

    2015-08-01

    Acute treatment of scapholunate instability is important to prevent future complications of dorsal intercalated segment instability and scapholunate advanced collapse. An understanding of the fundamental normal and abnormal mechanics of this problem is vital. Diagnosis in the acute phase is based on clinical and radiographic findings and treatment focuses on primary scapholunate interosseous ligament repair with a reinforcing dorsal capsulodesis. Suture anchor repair with a modified "double-dorsal" capsulodesis is described. Current data show that open repair is a viable option in the acute setting with most patients demonstrating good to excellent functional, clinical, and radiographic results. PMID:26205704

  17. Dengue infection presenting as acute hypokalemic quadriparesis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, N; Garg, A; Chhabra, P

    2014-01-01

    Dengue infection is one of the most common viral hemorrhagic fevers seen in the tropical countries, including India. Its presentation varies from an acute self-resolving febrile illness to life-threatening hemorrhagic shock and multiorgan dysfunction leading to death. Neurological presentations are uncommon and limited to case reports only. Most common neurological manifestations being encephalitis, acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, transverse myelitis, and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis.Hypokalemic quadriparesis as a presenting feature of dengue is extremely rare. Here, we report this case of a 33-year-old female, who presented with hypokalemic quadriparesis and was subsequently diagnosed as dengue infection. PMID:25121379

  18. [Bilateral acute depigmentation of the iris syndrome].

    PubMed

    Portmann, A; Gueudry, J; Siahmed, K; Muraine, M

    2011-05-01

    Bilateral acute depigmentation of the iris syndrome (BADI syndrome) is a new clinical entity. Young females from 20 to 45 years of age are most commonly affected. It is characterized by bilateral nontransilluminating depigmentation of the iris stroma. During the acute phase, this clinical entity also combines with red painful eye, pigmentation of the trabecular meshwork, anterior chamber flare, circulating pigment, and pigmented deposit on the endothelium cornea. At the acute stage, the symptoms are controlled with topical corticosteroid treatment. The prognosis is good. We report a 41-year-old woman presenting with BADI syndrome. PMID:21531477

  19. Advances in Management of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Janisch, Nigeen H; Gardner, Timothy B

    2016-03-01

    This article reviews advances in the management of acute pancreatitis. Medical treatment has been primarily supportive for this diagnosis, and despite extensive research efforts, there are no pharmacologic therapies that improve prognosis. The current mainstay of management, notwithstanding the ongoing debate regarding the volume, fluid type, and rate of administration, is aggressive intravenous fluid resuscitation. Although antibiotics were used consistently for prophylaxis in severe acute pancreatitis to prevent infection, they are no longer used unless infection is documented. Enteral nutrition, especially in patients with severe acute pancreatitis, is considered a cornerstone in management of this disease. PMID:26895677

  20. Targeting Iron Homeostasis in Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Walker, Vyvyca J; Agarwal, Anupam

    2016-01-01

    Iron is an essential metal involved in several major cellular processes required to maintain life. Because of iron's ability to cause oxidative damage, its transport, metabolism, and storage is strictly controlled in the body, especially in the small intestine, liver, and kidney. Iron plays a major role in acute kidney injury and has been a target for therapeutic intervention. However, the therapies that have been effective in animal models of acute kidney injury have not been successful in human beings. Targeting iron trafficking via ferritin, ferroportin, or hepcidin may offer new insights. This review focuses on the biology of iron, particularly in the kidney, and its implications in acute kidney injury. PMID:27085736

  1. Acute care hospitals' accountability to provincial funders.

    PubMed

    Kromm, Seija K; Ross Baker, G; Wodchis, Walter P; Deber, Raisa B

    2014-09-01

    Ontario's acute care hospitals are subject to a number of tools, including legislation and performance measurement for fiscal accountability and accountability for quality. Examination of accountability documents used in Ontario at the government, regional and acute care hospital levels reveals three trends: (a) the number of performance measures being used in the acute care hospital sector has increased significantly; (b) the focus of the health system has expanded from accountability for funding and service volumes to include accountability for quality and patient safety; and (c) the accountability requirements are misaligned at the different levels. These trends may affect the success of the accountability approach currently being used. PMID:25305386

  2. Acute Care Hospitals' Accountability to Provincial Funders

    PubMed Central

    Kromm, Seija K.; Ross Baker, G.; Wodchis, Walter P.; Deber, Raisa B.

    2014-01-01

    Ontario's acute care hospitals are subject to a number of tools, including legislation and performance measurement for fiscal accountability and accountability for quality. Examination of accountability documents used in Ontario at the government, regional and acute care hospital levels reveals three trends: (a) the number of performance measures being used in the acute care hospital sector has increased significantly; (b) the focus of the health system has expanded from accountability for funding and service volumes to include accountability for quality and patient safety; and (c) the accountability requirements are misaligned at the different levels. These trends may affect the success of the accountability approach currently being used. PMID:25305386

  3. Acute Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation in Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Teh, Ru-Wen; Tsoi, Daphne T.

    2012-01-01

    Malignancy is a common cause of disseminated intravascular coagulation and usually presents as a chronic disorder in solid organ tumours. We present a rare case of recurrent acute disseminated intravascular coagulation in neuroendocrine carcinoma after manipulation, firstly, by core biopsy and, later, by cytotoxic therapy causing a release of procoagulants and cytokines from lysed tumour cells. This is reminiscent of tumour lysis syndrome where massive quantities of intracellular electrolytes and nucleic acid are released, causing acute metabolic imbalance and renal failure. This case highlights the potential complication of acute disseminated intravascular coagulation after trauma to malignant cells. PMID:23139666

  4. Acute arsenic intoxication from environmental arsenic exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Franzblau, A.; Lilis, R. )

    1989-11-01

    Reports of acute arsenic poisoning arising from environmental exposure are rare. Two cases of acute arsenic intoxication resulting from ingestion of contaminated well water are described. These patients experienced a variety of problems: acute gastrointestinal symptoms, central and peripheral neurotoxicity, bone marrow suppression, hepatic toxicity, and mild mucous membrane and cutaneous changes. Although located adjacent to an abandoned mine, the well water had been tested for microorganisms only and was found to be safe. Regulations for testing of water from private wells for fitness to drink are frequently nonexistent, or only mandate biologic tests for microorganisms. Well water, particularly in areas near mining activity, should be tested for metals.

  5. Decitabine With or Without Bortezomib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-14

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Advanced Nurse Practitioner Educational Needs for Safe and Efficient Radiological Imaging.

    PubMed

    Logsdon, Roberta; Gleason, Robyn

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated perceived knowledge and educational preparedness of advanced practice nurses (APNs) in the area of radiological imaging, including awareness and utilization of the American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria (ACR-AC). Previous studies have found a need for further education in radiological imaging for medical students, residents, and hospitalists; however, little to no research has been done to assess such knowledge and educational preparedness among APNs. An e-mail link to a researcher-developed questionnaire was sent to Florida licensed APNs. Statistical analysis used descriptive, parametric, and nonparametric methods including frequencies, percentages, and Mann-Whitney U statistics. Florida licensed APNs (n = 905) from 175 educational programs and 10 specialty areas responded to the questionnaire; 75.9% (n = 681) had never heard of the ACR-AC. Years of experience and training in acute care specialties increased perceived competency in ordering radiological tests. Results among APNs were similar to those reported from physician studies, and 92.3% of respondents (n = 829) stated that additional APN imaging education would be beneficial. These findings highlight the importance of incorporating more radiological imaging information into APN education, which could lead to a reduction in overall costs and improvement in perceived competence and knowledge of appropriate imaging utilization. PMID:26218489

  7. Acute tubular nephropathy in a patient with acute HIV infection: review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ananworanich, Jintanat; Datta, Anandita A; Fletcher, James Lk; Townamchai, Natavudh; Chomchey, Nitiya; Kroon, Eugene; Sereti, Irini; Valcour, Victor; Kim, Jerome H

    2014-01-01

    We report a 57-year old man with diabetes mellitus and hypertension who presented with acute HIV infection. Routine blood tests showed an elevated blood urea nitrogen and creatinine. Renal biopsy showed acute tubular nephropathy, which has not been reported to occur during acute HIV infection, in the absence of rhabdomyolysis or multiple organ system failure. Antiretroviral therapy was initiated. His renal failure gradually resolved without further intervention. At one year of follow-up his HIV RNA was undetectable, and his renal function was normal. The case illustrates a rare manifestation of acute HIV infection - acute renal failure - in an older man with diabetes and hypertension. In this setting acute kidney injury might mistakenly have been attributed to his chronic comorbidities, and this case supports early HIV-1 testing in the setting of a high index of suspicion. PMID:25745498

  8. Liver transplantation for acute liver failure accompanied by severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Kirino, Izumi; Fujimoto, Yasuhiro; Hata, Koichiro; Uemoto, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    The role of liver transplantation (LT) in acute liver failure (ALF) complicated by severe acute pancreatitis is still unclear. We here report a case of deceased-donor LT for idiopathic ALF accompanied by severe acute pancreatitis. A 58-year-old man with no history of liver disease presented with idiopathic ALF and acute pancreatitis. After careful consideration, he received a liver from a deceased donor. Following surgery, the patient's liver function rapidly reverted to normal level and the acute pancreatitis simultaneously subsided. The patient later developed a pancreatic pseudocyst, which was treated successfully with combination interventional radiology. LT can be considered for ALF associated with severe acute pancreatitis if there is no clinical evidence of an absolute contraindication for organ transplantation, such as systemic or local infection. Moreover, we recommend a close follow-up by ultrasonography to allow early detection and treatment of pancreatic pseudocysts following surgery. PMID:27600056

  9. Acute parotitis during induction therapy including L-asparaginase in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sica, S; Pagano, L; Salutari, P; Di Mario, A; Rutella, S; Leone, G

    1994-02-01

    In a patient affected by acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and subjected to therapy with Erwinia L-asparaginase, acute parotitis was observed. Microbiological studies excluded any infectious etiology. Regression of parotitis was spontaneous. This complication has not been previously reported and could be due to the same mechanism of pancreatic injury. The occurrence of acute parotitis needs to be promptly recognized in order to avoid the continuation of L-asparaginase. PMID:8148421

  10. Update: Acute Heart Failure (VII): Nonpharmacological Management of Acute Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Plácido, Rui; Mebazaa, Alexandre

    2015-09-01

    Acute heart failure is a major and growing public health problem worldwide with high morbidity, mortality, and cost. Despite recent advances in pharmacological management, the prognosis of patients with acute decompensated heart failure remains poor. Consequently, nonpharmacological approaches are being developed and increasingly used. Such techniques may include several modalities of ventilation, ultrafiltration, mechanical circulatory support, myocardial revascularization, and surgical treatment, among others. This document reviews the nonpharmacological approach in acute heart failure, indications, and prognostic implications. PMID:26169327

  11. Management of acute myeloid leukemia during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Avivi, Irit; Brenner, Benjamin

    2014-06-01

    Diagnosis of acute leukemia during pregnancy presents significant medical challenges. Pancytopenia, caused by bone marrow substitution with leukemic cells, impairs maternal and fetal health. Chemotherapeutic agents required to be immediately used to save the mother's life are likely to adversely affect fetal development and outcome, especially if administered at an early gestational stage. Patients diagnosed with acute leukemia during the first trimester are, therefore, recommended to undergo pregnancy termination. At later gestational stages, antileukemic therapy can be administered, although in this case, fetal outcome is still associated with increased incidence of growth restriction and loss. Special attention to the issue of future reproduction, adopting a personalized fertility preservation approach, is required. This article addresses these subjects, presenting women diagnosed with acute myeloid and acute promyelocytic leukemia in pregnancy. The rarity of this event, resulting in insufficient data, emphasizes the need for collaborative efforts to optimize management of this complicated clinical condition. PMID:25052751

  12. [Thrombolytic treatment of acute myocardial infarct. 1].

    PubMed

    Soares-Costa, J T; Soares-Costa, T J; Gabriel, H M

    1998-05-01

    I-Rationale of thrombolytic therapy in acute myocardial infarction (AMI). II-Thrombolytic drugs. III-Effects of thrombolytic therapy on mortality. IV-Studies comparing the effects of various thrombolytic agents on mortality. PMID:9951051

  13. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... genetic conditions affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  14. Stages of Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  15. Risk Groups for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... genetic conditions affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  16. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  17. Treatment Options for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... genetic conditions affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  18. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  19. Early features in acute macular neuroretinopathy.

    PubMed

    Garg, Anurag; Shah, Anish N; Richardson, Theresa; O'Sullivan, Eoin; Eleftheriadis, Haralabos

    2014-06-01

    Acute macular neuroretinopathy (AMNR) is a rare disorder characterised by acute onset of unilateral or bilateral visual impairment associated with reddish-brown wedge-shaped outer macular lesions. It is more frequently reported in young females and though the pathophysiology remains unclear, factors reported in association with its onset include post-viral illness and vasoconstrictor use. We report a case of AMNR in an 18-year old female patient presenting with a 2-day history of acute painless blurring of central vision bilaterally, following 1 month of preceding flu-like illness. For 1 week prior to presentation, the patient had taken large doses of oral preparations containing phenylephrine hydrochloride. In addition to demonstrating characteristic optical coherence tomography findings seen in AMNR, we illustrate some rarely seen acute ophthalmoscopic features. Based on associations from this case, we add further insight into the pathophysiology of this condition which remains poorly understood. PMID:24037593

  20. Imipenem/cilastatin-induced acute eosinophilic pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Foong, Kap Sum; Lee, Ashley; Pekez, Marijeta; Bin, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Drugs, toxins, and infections are known to cause acute eosinophilic pneumonia. Daptomycin and minocycline are the commonly reported antibiotics associated with acute eosinophilic pneumonia. In this study, we present a case of imipenem/cilastatin-induced acute eosinophilic pneumonia. The patient presented with fever, acute hypoxic respiratory distress, and diffuse ground-glass opacities on the chest CT a day after the initiation of imipenem/cilastatin. Patient also developed peripheral eosinophilia. A reinstitution of imipenem/cilastatin resulted in recurrence of the signs and symptoms. A bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage showed 780 nucleated cells/mm(3) with 15% eosinophil. The patient's clinical condition improved significantly after the discontinuation of imipenem/cilastatin therapy and the treatment with corticosteroid. PMID:26944380

  1. AIR SCORE ASSESSMENT FOR ACUTE APPENDICITIS

    PubMed Central

    VON-MÜHLEN, Bruno; FRANZON, Orli; BEDUSCHI, Murilo Gamba; KRUEL, Nicolau; LUPSELO, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute appendicitis is the most common cause of acute abdomen. Approximately 7% of the population will be affected by this condition during full life. The development of AIR score may contribute to diagnosis associating easy clinical criteria and two simple laboratory tests. Aim: To evaluate the score AIR (Appendicitis Inflammatory Response score) as a tool for the diagnosis and prediction of severity of acute appendicitis. Method: Were evaluated all patients undergoing surgical appendectomy. From 273 patients, 126 were excluded due to exclusion criteria. All patients were submitted o AIR score. Results: The value of the C-reactive protein and the percentage of leukocytes segmented blood count showed a direct relationship with the phase of acute appendicitis. Conclusion: As for the laboratory criteria, serum C-reactive protein and assessment of the percentage of the polymorphonuclear leukocytes count were important to diagnosis and disease stratification. PMID:26537139

  2. Acute myelogenous leukaemia in Hurler's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chen, K T; McKenna, R W; Desnick, R J

    1978-06-01

    The occurrence of the Hurler syndrome and acute myelogenous leukaemia in a 2 1/2-year-old girl is described. This represents the first published report of the concurrence of these two diseases. PMID:97385

  3. MR Perfusion Imaging in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Copen, William A.; Schaefer, Pamela W.; Wu, Ona

    2011-01-01

    MR perfusion imaging offers the potential for measuring brain perfusion in acute stroke patients, at a time when treatment decisions based upon these measurements may affect outcomes dramatically. Rapid advancements in both acute stroke therapy and perfusion imaging techniques have resulted in continuing redefinition of the role that perfusion imaging should play in patient management. This review first discusses the basic pathophysiology of acute stroke, with specific attention to alterations in the various perfusion-related parameters that can be studied by MR perfusion imaging. Although these parameters are sometimes treated as somewhat interchangeable, they reveal greatly different information about brain perfusion. Therefore, subsequent discussion of the utility of different kinds of perfusion images focuses on the differences between them, as well as important artifacts that can complicate their interpretation. Finally, research on the continually evolving role of MR perfusion imaging in acute stroke care is summarized. PMID:21640299

  4. Physiologic imaging in acute stroke: Patient selection

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Clinton D; Stephens, Marcus; Zuckerman, Scott L; Waitara, Magarya S; Morone, Peter J; Dewan, Michael C

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of acute stroke is changing, as endovascular intervention becomes an important adjunct to tissue plasminogen activator. An increasing number of sophisticated physiologic imaging techniques have unique advantages and applications in the evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment-decision making of acute ischemic stroke. In this review, we first highlight the strengths, weaknesses, and possible indications for various stroke imaging techniques. How acute imaging findings in each modality have been used to predict functional outcome is discussed. Furthermore, there is an increasing emphasis on using these state-of-the-art imaging modalities to offer maximal patient benefit through IV therapy, endovascular thrombolytics, and clot retrieval. We review the burgeoning literature in the determination of stroke treatment based on acute, physiologic imaging findings. PMID:26063695

  5. Acute Bronchitis - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Acute Bronchitis URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/acutebronchitis.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  6. Acute Salpingitis in a Nonsexually Active Adolescent.

    PubMed

    Fein, Daniel M; Sellinger, Catherine; Fagan, Michele J

    2015-12-01

    Acute salpingitis is an uncommon cause of an acute surgical abdomen, especially in an adolescent who is not sexually active. The following is a case of a 12-year-old girl who denied sexual activity, had a remote history of an appendectomy, and a recent diagnosis of a large, right-sided ovarian cyst, who presented with acute abdominal pain, urinary symptoms, and fever. The patient was ill-appearing and progressed to uncompensated septic shock in the emergency department despite aggressive fluid resuscitation and empiric antibiotics. She ultimately underwent an exploratory laparotomy and was diagnosed with acute bilateral salpingitis. This case highlights the diagnostic dilemmas facing those caring for an adolescent girl with abdominal pain and presents an extremely rare etiology for abdominal pain in a nonsexually active adolescent. PMID:26626893

  7. Acute pseudoseptic arthritis and palmoplantar pustulosis.

    PubMed

    Chamot, A M; Vion, B; Gerster, J C

    1986-01-01

    The case of a 60-year-old woman who developed acute peripheral arthritis of a pseudoseptic character (high synovial leucocytosis and fever) associated to a palmoplantar pustulosis is reported. PMID:3514079

  8. Drug Therapy for Acute Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Di Somma, Salvatore; Magrini, Laura

    2015-08-01

    Acute heart failure is globally one of most frequent reasons for hospitalization and still represents a challenge for the choice of the best treatment to improve patient outcome. According to current international guidelines, as soon as patients with acute heart failure arrive at the emergency department, the common therapeutic approach aims to improve their signs and symptoms, correct volume overload, and ameliorate cardiac hemodynamics by increasing vital organ perfusion. Recommended treatment for the early management of acute heart failure is characterized by the use of intravenous diuretics, oxygen, and vasodilators. Although these measures ameliorate the patient's symptoms, they do not favorably impact on short- and long-term mortality. Consequently, there is a pressing need for novel agents in acute heart failure treatment with the result that research in this field is increasing worldwide. PMID:26088867

  9. Imaging for acute pelvic pain in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Masselli, Gabriele; Brunelli, Roberto; Monti, Riccardo; Guida, Marianna; Laghi, Francesca; Casciani, Emanuele; Polettini, Elisabetta; Gualdi, Gianfranco

    2014-04-01

    Acute pelvic pain in pregnancy presents diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Standard imaging techniques need to be adapted to reduce harm to the foetus from X-rays because of their teratogenic and carcinogenic potential. Ultrasound remains the primary imaging investigation of the pregnant abdomen. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be useful in the diagnosis of gynaecological and obstetric problems during pregnancy and in the setting of acute abdomen during pregnancy. MRI overcomes some of the limitations of ultrasound, mainly the size of the gravid uterus. MRI poses theoretical risks to the foetus and care must be taken to minimise these with the avoidance of contrast agents. Teaching Points • Ultrasound and MRI are the preferred investigations for acute pelvic pain during pregnancy. • Ultrasound remains the primary imaging investigation because of availability and portability. • MRI helps differentiate causes of acute pelvic pain when ultrasound is inconclusive. PMID:24535757

  10. Acute Aortic Occlusion Presenting as Flaccid Paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Kilany, Ayman; Al-Hashel, Jasem Y.; Rady, Azza

    2015-01-01

    A 67-year-old male known to be hypertensive and diabetic had a sudden onset of severe low back pain and flaccid paraplegia with no sensory level or bladder affection and the distal pulsations were felt. Acute compressive myelopathy was excluded by MRI of the dorsal and lumbar spines. The nerve conduction study and CSF analysis was suggestive of acute demyelinating polyneuropathy. The patient developed ischemic changes of the lower limb and CT angiography revealed severe stenosis of the abdominal aorta and both common iliac arteries. We emphasize the importance of including acute aortic occlusion in the differential diagnosis of acute flaccid paraplegia especially in the presence of severe back pain even if the distal pulsations were felt. PMID:25866688

  11. The pathophysiology of hypertensive acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Viau, David M; Sala-Mercado, Javier A; Spranger, Marty D; O'Leary, Donal S; Levy, Phillip D

    2015-12-01

    While acute heart failure (AHF) is often regarded as a single disorder, an evolving understanding recognises the existence of multiple phenotypes with varied pathophysiological alterations. Herein we discuss hypertensive AHF and provide insight into a mechanism where acute fluid redistribution is caused by a disturbance in the ventricular-vascular coupling relationship. In this relationship, acute alterations in vascular elasticity, vasoconstriction and reflected pulse waves lead to increases in cardiac work and contribute to decompensated LV function with associated subendocardial ischaemia and end-organ damage. Chronic predisposing factors (neurohormonal activity, nitric oxide insensitivity, arterial stiffening) and physiological stressors (sympathetic surge, volume overload, physical exertion) that are causally linked to acute symptom onset are discussed. Lastly, we review treatment options including both nitrovasodilators and promising novel therapeutics, and discuss future directions in the management of this phenotypic variant. PMID:26123135

  12. Acute Bronchitis - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Acute Bronchitis URL of this page: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/languages/acutebronchitis.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  13. Acute pancreatitis, ascites, and acute renal failure in Plasmodium vivax malaria infection, a rare complication.

    PubMed

    Lakhotia, Manoj; Pahadiya, Hans Raj; Kumar, Harish; Singh, Jagdish; Sangappa, Jainapur Ravi; Choudhary, Prakash Kumar

    2015-01-01

    A 22-year-old male presented with 6 days history of intermittent fever with chills, 2 days history of upper abdomen pain, distension of abdomen, and decreased urine output. He was diagnosed to have Plasmodium vivax malaria, acute pancreatitis, ascites, and acute renal failure. These constellations of complications in P. vivax infection have never been reported in the past. The patient responded to intravenous chloroquine and supportive treatment. For renal failure, he required hemodialysis. Acute pancreatitis, ascites, and acute renal failure form an unusual combination in P. vivax infection. PMID:26629455

  14. Azacitidine, Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride, and Etoposide in Treating Older Patients With Poor-Prognosis Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-18

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. [Thrombolytic treatment of acute stroke].

    PubMed

    Amiri, H; Hacke, W; Bösel, J

    2011-11-01

    Ischemic stroke is a medical emergency and must be treated as quickly as possible according to the "time-is-brain" concept. At present, intravenous administration of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) within the first 4.5 h from stroke onset is the only effective treatment but is currently still only approved within the first 3 h from onset of symptoms (0.9 mg/kg body weight, maximum dose 90 mg, 10% of the cumulative dose as bolus, remaining 90% subsequently infused within 60 min). The therapeutic effect of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based thrombolytic therapy beyond the 4.5 h time window remains to be proven. Proximal occlusions of the middle cerebral artery can be treated successfully within the first 6 h from stroke onset by catheter-based intra-arterial administration of plasminogen activator leading to a significant improvement of outcome. Acute basilar artery occlusion should be treated in specialized centres using intra-arterial application of urokinase, rt-PA or mechanical recanalization but intravenous thrombolysis beyond the 3 h window is an acceptable alternative. PMID:21922224

  16. The Coagulopathy of Acute Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Jeff; Pittet, Jean-Francois

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review Sepsis, defined by the presence of infection and host inflammation, is a lethal clinical syndrome with an increasing mortality rate worldwide. In severe disease, the coagulation system becomes diffusely activated, with consumption of multiple clotting factors resulting in Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation (DIC). When present, DIC portends a higher mortality rate. Understanding the mechanisms that tie inflammation and diffuse thrombosis will allow therapeutic interventions to be developed. The Coagulopathy of Acute Sepsis is a dynamic process that is time and disease burden specific. Whole blood testing of coagulation may provide more clinically useful information than classical tests. Natural anticoagulants that regulate thrombosis are down regulated in sepsis. Patients may benefit from modulation of the coagulation system when systemic inflammation and hypercoagulopathy exist. Proper timing of anticoagulant therapy may ultimately lead to decreased incidence of multisystem organ dysfunction (MODS). Recent Findings The pathogenesis of coagulopathy in sepsis is driven by an up-regulation of procoagulant mechanisms and simultaneous down-regulation of natural anticoagulants. Inflammation caused by the invading organism is a natural host defense than cannot be eliminated during treatment. Successful strategies to prevent MODS center on stratifying patients at high risk for DIC and restoring the balance of inflammation and coagulation. Summary The prevention of DIC in septic patients is a key therapeutic target in preventing death from multisystem organ failure. Stratifying patients for therapy using thromboelastometry, specific markers for DIC, and composite scoring systems is an area of growing research. PMID:25590467

  17. Management in Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Shalimar; Acharya, Subrat K.

    2015-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) is a rare, potentially fatal complication of severe hepatic illness resulting from various causes. In a clinical setting, severe hepatic injury is usually recognised by the appearance of jaundice, encephalopathy and coagulopathy. The central and most important clinical event in ALF is occurrence of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) and cerebral edema which is responsible for most of the fatalities in this serious clinical syndrome. The pathogenesis of encephalopathy and cerebral edema in ALF is unique and multifactorial. Ammonia plays a central role in the pathogenesis. The role of newer ammonia lowering agents is still evolving. Liver transplant is the only effective therapy that has been identified to be of promise in those with poor prognostic factors, whereas in the others, aggressive intensive medical management has been documented to salvage a substantial proportion of patients. A small fraction of patients undergo liver transplant and the remaining are usually treated with medical therapy. Therefore, identification of the complications and causes of death in such patients, and use of appropriate prognostic models to identify those who need liver transplant and those who can be managed with medical treatment is a vital component of therapeutic strategy. In this review, we discuss the various pathogenetic mechanisms and treatment options available. PMID:26041950

  18. Pathophysiology of Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Basile, David P.; Anderson, Melissa D.; Sutton, Timothy A.

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is the leading cause of nephrology consultation and is associated with high mortality rates. The primary causes of AKI include ischemia, hypoxia or nephrotoxicity. An underlying feature is a rapid decline in GFR usually associated with decreases in renal blood flow. Inflammation represents an important additional component of AKI leading to the extension phase of injury, which may be associated with insensitivity to vasodilator therapy. It is suggested that targeting the extension phase represents an area potential of treatment with the greatest possible impact. The underlying basis of renal injury appears to be impaired energetics of the highly metabolically active nephron segments (i.e., proximal tubules and thick ascending limb) in the renal outer medulla, which can trigger conversion from transient hypoxia to intrinsic renal failure. Injury to kidney cells can be lethal or sublethal. Sublethal injury represents an important component in AKI, as it may profoundly influence GFR and renal blood flow. The nature of the recovery response is mediated by the degree to which sublethal cells can restore normal function and promote regeneration. The successful recovery from AKI depends on the degree to which these repair processes ensue and these may be compromised in elderly or CKD patients. Recent data suggest that AKI represents a potential link to CKD in surviving patients. Finally, earlier diagnosis of AKI represents an important area in treating patients with AKI that has spawned increased awareness of the potential that biomarkers of AKI may play in the future. PMID:23798302

  19. Acute selenium toxicosis in sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Blodgett, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    The toxicity, toxicokinetics, and progressive pathological changes produced by sodium selenite in sheep following parenteral administration were evaluated. In the intramuscular study, the LD/sub 50/ for sodium selenite was 0.7 mg selenium/kg body weight. In the continuous intravenous infusion study, a gradient of tissue selenium/kg body weight with a standard error of 0.035 over a 192 hour observation period. The most evident clinical signs were dyspnea and depression . At necropsy, the most consistent lesions were edematous lungs and pale mottled hearts. Highest tissue selenium concentrations in declining order were found in the liver, kidney, and heart. Four sheep injected intravenously with 0.7 mg selenium/kg body weight survived the 192 hour post-injection observation period. Semilogarithmic plots of blood selenium concentration versus time were triphasic. The ..cap alpha.. and ..gamma.. rate constants of sheep administered a single dose of selenium intravenously were significantly greater than those obtained when sheep were injected intramuscularly with 0.7 mg selenium concentrations was attained with 4, 8, and 12 hour infusions at steady state concentrations of 2500, 3000, and 3500 ppb selenium in the blood. The heart was the target organ of acute selenium toxicosis. A dose-response relationship was observed in the heart with degeneration evident in all hearts and necrosis present in the 2 hearts with the highest concentrations of selenium.

  20. [Acute diverticulitis of the cecum].

    PubMed

    Mandarano, R; Ciccone, A; Sereni, P; Venturini, N

    1994-06-01

    Following a brief introduction regarding the epidemiology of diverticular disease, the authors report a rare case of diverticulitis of the cecum which had developed into an abscess. The patient was a 37-year-old man who was referred to the authors' attention with classic symptoms of acute appendicitis and it was therefore decided to operate. During laparotomy a small paracecal abscess involving a diverticulum with suppurating infection was found on the anterior wall of the cecum, whereas the appendix appeared to be completely unaffected. The diverticulum was removed together with a small area of the surrounding healthy tissue using a double-layer suture of the cecal wall. In the discussion the authors analyse the similarities and rarities of the case and compare it with national and international findings. Special attention is drawn to the problems of differential diagnosis raised by this rare pathology. In conclusion, the authors state that it is difficult to make a preoperative diagnosis and that therefore the decision to operate must be extemporary. PMID:7970067