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Sample records for acute quadriplegic myopathy

  1. Myopathies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Different types of ion channels allow specific ions — sodium, calcium, potassium or chloride — to pass into and out of the muscle ... become more negative (“repolarized”). 4 13 sodium ... channel Myopathies • ©2011 MDA Inheritable myopathies ...

  2. Myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find People About NINDS NINDS Myopathy Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump to sections) What ... characterized by bone growing in muscle tissue familial periodic paralysis : characterized by episodes of weakness in the ...

  3. Update on toxic myopathies.

    PubMed

    Mastaglia, F L; Needham, M

    2012-02-01

    The toxic myopathies are a clinically and pathologically diverse group of disorders that can be caused by a variety of therapeutic agents used in clinical practice, as well as various venoms and other biological toxins. The most important iatrogenic causes are the statin and fibrate cholesterol-lowering agents that can cause a severe necrotizing myopathy and acute rhabdomyolysis and myoglobinuria. The current update focuses on the mechanisms of statin myotoxicity and the importance of genetic predisposing factors for statin myopathy, as well as the recently described form of necrotizing autoimmune myopathy, which is associated with antibodies to the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase enzyme and is responsive to aggressive immunotherapy. Mitochondrial myopathies associated with antiretroviral agents and the pyrimidine nucleoside analogue clevudine, and recent reports of myopathies caused by ingestion of red yeast rice and toxic species of mushrooms are also discussed. PMID:21968786

  4. Thyrotoxic Myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... NINDS Thyrotoxic Myopathy Information Page Synonym(s): Myopathy - Thyrotoxic Table of Contents (click to jump to sections) What ... associated with low blood potassium levels (known as periodic paralysis). Is there any treatment? Treatment involves restoring ...

  5. Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Dimachkie, Mazen M.; Barohn, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies are a group of rare disorders including polymyositis (PM), dermatomyositis (DM), and autoimmune necrotizing myopathies (NMs). The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies share many similarities. They present acutely, subacutely, or chronically with marked proximal and symmetric muscle weakness, except for associated distal and asymmetric weakness in inclusion body myositis. The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies also share a variable degree of creatine kinase (CK) elevation and a nonspecifically abnormal electromyogram demonstrating an irritative myopathy. The muscle pathology demonstrates inflammatory exudates of variable distribution within the muscle fascicle. Despite these similarities, the idiopathic inflammatory myopathies are a heterogeneous group. The overlap syndrome (OS) refers to the association of PM, DM, or NM with connective tissue disease, such as scleroderma or systemic lupus erythematosus. In addition to elevated antinuclear antibodies (ANA), patients with OS may be weaker in the proximal arms than the legs mimicking the pattern seen in some muscular dystrophies. In this review, we focus on DM, PM, and NM and examine current and promising therapies. PMID:23117947

  6. DISTAL MYOPATHIES

    PubMed Central

    Dimachkie, Mazen M.; Barohn, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Over a century ago, Gowers described two young patients in whom distal muscles weakness involved the hand, foot, sternocleidomastoid, and facial muscles in the other case the shoulder and distal leg musculature. Soon after, , similar distal myopathy cases were reported whereby the absence of sensory symptoms and of pathologic changes in the peripheral nerves and spinal cord at postmortem examination allowed differentiation from Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. In 1951, Welander described autosomal dominant (AD) distal arm myopathy in a large Scandanavian cohort. Since then the number of well-characterized distal myopathies has continued to grow such that the distal myopathies have formed a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders. Affected kindred commonly manifest weakness that is limited to foot and toe muscles even in advanced stages of the disease, with variable mild proximal leg, distal arm, neck and laryngeal muscle involvement in selected individuals. An interesting consequence of the molecular characterization of the distal myopathies has been the recognition that mutation in a single gene can lead to more than one clinical disorder. For example, Myoshi myopathy (MM) and limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) type 2B are allelic disorders due to defects in the gene that encodes dysferlin. The six well described distal myopathy syndromes are shown in Table 1. Table 2 lists advances in our understanding of the myofibrillar myopathy group and Table 3 includes more recently delineated and less common distal myopathies. In the same manner, the first section of this review pertains to the more traditional six distal myopathies followed by discussion of the myofibrillar myopathies. In the third section, we review other clinically and genetically distinctive distal myopathy syndromes usually based upon single or smaller family cohorts. The fourth section considers other neuromuscular disorders that are important to recognize as they display prominent

  7. Autonomic cardiovascular control recovery in quadriplegics after handcycle training.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Elizângela Márcia de Carvalho; Alves, Rani de Souza; Borges, Ana Carolina Lacerda; Lima, Fernanda Pupio Silva; Júnior, Alderico Rodrigues de Paula; Lima, Mário Oliveira

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the cardiovascular autonomic acute response, during recovery after handcycle training, in quadriplegics with spinal cord injury (SCI). [Subjects and Methods] Seven quadriplegics (SCIG -level C6-C7, male, age 28.00 ± 6.97 years) and eight healthy subjects (CG -male, age 25.00 ± 7.38 years) were studied. Their heart rate variability (HRV) was assessed before and after one handcycle training. [Results] After the training, the SCIG showed significantly reduced: intervals between R waves of the electrocardiogram (RR), standard deviation of the NN intervals (SDNN), square root of the mean squares differences of sucessive NN intervals (rMSSD), low frequency power (LF), high frequency power (HF), and Poincaré plot (standard deviation of short-term HRV -SD1 and standard deviation of long-term HRV -SD2). The SDNN, LF, and SD2 remained decreased during the recovery time. The CG showed significantly reduced: RR, rMSSD, number of pairs of adjacent NN intervals differing by more than 50 ms (pNN50), LF, HF, SD1, and sample entropy (SampEn). Among these parameters, only RR remained decreased during recovery time. Comparisons of the means of HRV parameters evaluated between the CG and SCIG showed that the SCIG had significantly lower pNN50, LF, HF, and SampEn before training, while immediately after training, the SCIG had significantly lower SDNN, LF, HF, and SD2. The rMSSD30s of the SCIG significantly reduced in the windows 180 and 330 seconds and between the windows 300 seconds in the CG. [Conclusion] There was a reduction of sympathetic and parasympathetic activity in the recovery period after the training in both groups; however, the CG showed a higher HRV. The parasympathetic activity also gradually increased after training, and in the SCIG, this activity remained reduced even at three minutes after the end of training, which suggests a deficiency in parasympathetic reactivation in quadriplegics after SCI. PMID:27512265

  8. Autonomic cardiovascular control recovery in quadriplegics after handcycle training

    PubMed Central

    Abreu, Elizângela Márcia de Carvalho; Alves, Rani de Souza; Borges, Ana Carolina Lacerda; Lima, Fernanda Pupio Silva; Júnior, Alderico Rodrigues de Paula; Lima, Mário Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the cardiovascular autonomic acute response, during recovery after handcycle training, in quadriplegics with spinal cord injury (SCI). [Subjects and Methods] Seven quadriplegics (SCIG −level C6–C7, male, age 28.00 ± 6.97 years) and eight healthy subjects (CG −male, age 25.00 ± 7.38 years) were studied. Their heart rate variability (HRV) was assessed before and after one handcycle training. [Results] After the training, the SCIG showed significantly reduced: intervals between R waves of the electrocardiogram (RR), standard deviation of the NN intervals (SDNN), square root of the mean squares differences of sucessive NN intervals (rMSSD), low frequency power (LF), high frequency power (HF), and Poincaré plot (standard deviation of short-term HRV −SD1 and standard deviation of long-term HRV −SD2). The SDNN, LF, and SD2 remained decreased during the recovery time. The CG showed significantly reduced: RR, rMSSD, number of pairs of adjacent NN intervals differing by more than 50 ms (pNN50), LF, HF, SD1, and sample entropy (SampEn). Among these parameters, only RR remained decreased during recovery time. Comparisons of the means of HRV parameters evaluated between the CG and SCIG showed that the SCIG had significantly lower pNN50, LF, HF, and SampEn before training, while immediately after training, the SCIG had significantly lower SDNN, LF, HF, and SD2. The rMSSD30s of the SCIG significantly reduced in the windows 180 and 330 seconds and between the windows 300 seconds in the CG. [Conclusion] There was a reduction of sympathetic and parasympathetic activity in the recovery period after the training in both groups; however, the CG showed a higher HRV. The parasympathetic activity also gradually increased after training, and in the SCIG, this activity remained reduced even at three minutes after the end of training, which suggests a deficiency in parasympathetic reactivation in quadriplegics after SCI. PMID

  9. Diabetes insipidus in a quadriplegic patient.

    PubMed

    Farrell, C A; Staas, W E

    1986-02-01

    An incomplete quadriplegic patient underwent investigation for production of copious amounts of dilute urine. Serum osmolality, electrolytes, BUN, glucose, and serum antidiuretic hormone (ADH) were recorded, as well as urinary osmolality, electrolytes, glucose, and pH. In response to subcutaneous vasopressin during the dehydration test, the patient's urinary osmolality increased by 12%, from 620 mOsm/l to 695 mOsm/l. A definitive diagnosis of partial central diabetes insipidus was made. Physicians involved in the care of patients with spinal cord injuries should be aware of the method of evaluating polyuric conditions, particularly while the patient is undergoing catheterization. PMID:3954565

  10. Statin-induced myopathies.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewski, Michał; Stępień, Karolina M; Tomaszewska, Joanna; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2011-01-01

    Statins are considered to be safe, well tolerated and the most efficient drugs for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia, one of the main risk factor for atherosclerosis, and therefore they are frequently prescribed medications. The most severe adverse effect of statins is myotoxicity, in the form of myopathy, myalgia, myositis or rhabdomyolysis. Clinical trials commonly define statin toxicity as myalgia or muscle weakness with creatine kinase (CK) levels greater than 10 times the normal upper limit. Rhabdomyolysis is the most severe adverse effect of statins, which may result in acute renal failure, disseminated intravascular coagulation and death. The exact pathophysiology of statin-induced myopathy is not fully known. Multiple pathophysiological mechanisms may contribute to statin myotoxicity. This review focuses on a number of them. The prevention of statin-related myopathy involves using the lowest statin dose required to achieve therapeutic goals and avoiding polytherapy with drugs known to increase systemic exposure and myopathy risk. Currently, the only effective treatment of statin-induced myopathy is the discontinuation of statin use in patients affected by muscle aches, pains and elevated CK levels. PMID:22001973

  11. Myalgias and Myopathies: Drug-Induced Myalgias and Myopathies.

    PubMed

    Holder, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    Drugs can cause myalgias and myopathies through a variety of mechanisms. Most drug-induced myopathies are potentially reversible if recognized early. Prescribers should be familiar with common drug-induced myopathies and drug-drug interactions. Clinical presentations can be subacute or acute, ranging from benign muscle pain with mild elevations of serum creatine kinase to fulminant rhabdomyolysis with high creatine kinase levels and potentially life-threatening acute kidney injury. Myalgias and proximal muscle weakness are typical symptoms; onset can be weeks to months after drug exposure. Endocrine disorders and inflammatory etiologies should be excluded because their management may differ from that of drug-induced myopathies. Statin drugs are prescribed widely, and statin-induced myopathy is one of the most commonly recognized and studied myopathies. Risk factors include dose and type of statin prescribed, older age, female sex, genetic predisposition, and concomitant use of other drugs metabolized by the cytochrome P450 system. Glucocorticoids, immunologic drugs, and antimicrobials, as well as other drugs and alcohol, can cause myopathies. Management typically involves discontinuing the drug and switching to an alternative drug or considering an alternative dosing schedule. Referral to a neuromuscular subspecialist is warranted if symptoms persist. PMID:26734833

  12. Congenital Myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... arms and legs, droopy eyelids, and problems with eye movements. Weakness often gets worse with time. Central core ... difficulties occur as well. Some children have weakened eye movements. Congenital fiber-type disproportion myopathy is a rare ...

  13. Stepwise Approach to Myopathy in Systemic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Jasvinder

    2011-01-01

    Muscle diseases can constitute a large variety of both acquired and hereditary disorders. Myopathies in systemic disease results from several different disease processes including endocrine, inflammatory, paraneoplastic, infectious, drug- and toxin-induced, critical illness myopathy, metabolic, and myopathies with other systemic disorders. Patients with systemic myopathies often present acutely or sub acutely. On the other hand, familial myopathies or dystrophies generally present in a chronic fashion with exceptions of metabolic myopathies where symptoms on occasion can be precipitated acutely. Most of the inflammatory myopathies can have a chance association with malignant lesions; the incidence appears to be specifically increased only in patients with dermatomyositis. In dealing with myopathies associated with systemic illnesses, the focus will be on the acquired causes. Management is beyond the scope of this chapter. Prognosis is based upon the underlying cause and, most of the time, carries a good prognosis. In order to approach a patient with suspected myopathy from systemic disease, a stepwise approach is utilized. PMID:21886637

  14. Statin myopathy.

    PubMed

    Radcliffe, Kristofer A; Campbell, William W

    2008-01-01

    Many different classes of medications can cause toxic myopathy. One of the most frequently implicated classes is the statins. Statin myotoxicity ranges from asymptomatic creatine kinase elevations or myalgias to muscle necrosis and fatal rhabdomyolysis. Statins may also cause an autoimmune myopathy requiring immunosuppressive treatment. The mechanisms of statin myotoxicity are unclear. If unrecognized in its early manifestations, complications from continued statin therapy may lead to rhabdomyolysis and death. Risk factors for myotoxicity include concomitant medication use and medical conditions, and the patient's underlying genetic constitution. We review these considerations along with the recommended evaluation and treatment for patients presenting with statin myotoxicity. PMID:18367041

  15. Toxic Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Pasnoor, Mamatha; Barohn, Richard J.; Dimachkie, Mazen M.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle tissue is highly sensitive to many substances. Early recognition of toxic myopathies is important, as they potentially are reversible on removal of the offending drug or toxin, with greater likelihood of complete resolution the sooner this is achieved. Clinical features range from mild muscle pain and cramps to severe weakness with rhabdomyolysis, renal failure, and even death. The pathogenic bases can be multifactorial. This article reviews some of the common toxic myopathies and their clinical presentation, histopathologic features and possible underlying cellular mechanisms. PMID:25037083

  16. Metabolic myopathies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, A.; Haller, R. G.; Barohn, R.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Metabolic myopathies are disorders of muscle energy production that result in skeletal muscle dysfunction. Cardiac and systemic metabolic dysfunction may coexist. Symptoms are often intermittent and provoked by exercise or changes in supply of lipid and carbohydrate fuels. Specific disorders of lipid and carbohydrate metabolism in muscle are reviewed. Evaluation often requires provocative exercise testing. These tests may include ischemic forearm exercise, aerobic cycle exercise, and 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy with exercise.

  17. Typewriter Modifications for Persons Who Are High-Level Quadriplegics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Reagan, James R.; And Others

    Standard, common electric typewriters are not completely suited to the needs of a high-level quadriplegic typing with a mouthstick. Experiences show that for complete control of a typewriter a mouthstick user needs the combined features of one-button correction, electric forward and reverse indexing, and easy character viewing. To modify a…

  18. Molecular and Genetic Studies of Congenital Myopathies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-26

    Central Core Disease; Centronuclear Myopathy; Congenital Fiber Type Disproportion; Multiminicore Disease; Myotubular Myopathy; Nemaline Myopathy; Rigid Spine Muscular Dystrophy; Undefined Congenital Myopathy

  19. Metabolic neuropathies and myopathies.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, Adele; Bertini, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Inborn errors of metabolism may impact on muscle and peripheral nerve. Abnormalities involve mitochondria and other subcellular organelles such as peroxisomes and lysosomes related to the turnover and recycling of cellular compartments. Treatable causes are β-oxidation defects producing progressive neuropathy; pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency, porphyria, or vitamin B12 deficiency causing recurrent episodes of neuropathy or acute motor deficit mimicking Guillain-Barré syndrome. On the other hand, lysosomal (mucopolysaccharidosis, Gaucher and Fabry diseases), mitochondriopathic (mitochondrial or nuclear mutations or mDNA depletion), peroxisomal (adrenomyeloneuropathy, Refsum disease, sterol carrier protein-2 deficiency, cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis, α-methylacyl racemase deficiency) diseases are multisystemic disorders involving also the heart, liver, brain, retina, and kidney. Pathophysiology of most metabolic myopathies is related to the impairment of energy production or to abnormal production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Main symptoms are exercise intolerance with myalgias, cramps and recurrent myoglobinuria or limb weakness associated with elevation of serum creatine kinase. Carnitine palmitoyl transferase deficiency, followed by acid maltase deficiency, and lipin deficiency, are the most common cause of isolated rhabdomyolysis. Metabolic myopathies are frequently associated to extra-neuromuscular disorders particularly involving the heart, liver, brain, retina, skin, and kidney. PMID:23622366

  20. Congenital myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Irene; Scoto, Mariacristina; Manzur, Adnan Y.; Robb, Stephanie A.; Maggi, Lorenzo; Gowda, Vasantha; Cullup, Thomas; Yau, Michael; Phadke, Rahul; Sewry, Caroline; Jungbluth, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the natural history of congenital myopathies (CMs) due to different genotypes. Methods: Retrospective cross-sectional study based on case-note review of 125 patients affected by CM, followed at a single pediatric neuromuscular center, between 1984 and 2012. Results: Genetic characterization was achieved in 99 of 125 cases (79.2%), with RYR1 most frequently implicated (44/125). Neonatal/infantile onset was observed in 76%. At birth, 30.4% required respiratory support, and 25.2% nasogastric feeding. Twelve percent died, mainly within the first year, associated with mutations in ACTA1, MTM1, or KLHL40. All RYR1-mutated cases survived and did not require long-term ventilator support including those with severe neonatal onset; however, recessive cases were more likely to require gastrostomy insertion (p = 0.0028) compared with dominant cases. Independent ambulation was achieved in 74.1% of all patients; 62.9% were late walkers. Among ambulant patients, 9% eventually became wheelchair-dependent. Scoliosis of variable severity was reported in 40%, with 1/3 of (both ambulant and nonambulant) patients requiring surgery. Bulbar involvement was present in 46.4% and required gastrostomy placement in 28.8% (at a mean age of 2.7 years). Respiratory impairment of variable severity was a feature in 64.1%; approximately half of these patients required nocturnal noninvasive ventilation due to respiratory failure (at a mean age of 8.5 years). Conclusions: We describe the long-term outcome of a large cohort of patients with CMs. While overall course is stable, we demonstrate a wide clinical spectrum with motor deterioration in a subset of cases. Severity in the neonatal/infantile period is critical for survival, with clear genotype-phenotype correlations that may inform future counseling. PMID:25428687

  1. [Inflammatory myopathies. New concepts].

    PubMed

    López Longo, Francisco Javier

    2008-03-01

    Myopathies are diseases characterized by the primary affection of skeletal muscle. In general they present with muscle weakness, pain, contracture, paresthesias, rigidity, or fatigue. They can be hereditary, such as muscle dystrophies, congenital, myotonic, metabolic, and myasthenic, or acquired. Among the latter ones we include idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM), toxic, endocrine, or infectious myopathies and myasthenia gravis. There is a current acceptance of considerable clinical and histopathological overlap among some muscle dystrophies and some IIM. However, the molecular profile is different and characteristic in each myopathy and the study into the patterns of expression of genes in the muscle can be useful in their differential diagnosis, including that of IIM. PMID:21794553

  2. Distal Myopathies: Case Studies.

    PubMed

    Shaibani, Aziz

    2016-08-01

    About 15% of myopathies present with distal weakness. Lack of sensory deficit, and preservation of sensory responses and deep tendon reflexes, favors a myopathic cause for distal weakness. Electromyogram confirms this diagnosis. Profuse spontaneous discharges are common in inflammatory, metabolic, and myofibrillar myopathy (MFM). If the clinical picture indicates a specific disease such as facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), genetic testing provides the quickest diagnosis. Otherwise, muscle biopsy can distinguish specific features. The common causes of myopathic distal weakness are FSHD, myotonic dystrophy, and inclusion body myositis. Other causes include MFM, distal muscular dystrophies, metabolic myopathies, and congenital myopathies. PMID:27445241

  3. Transdiaphragmatic pressure in quadriplegic individuals ventilated by diaphragmatic pacemaker.

    PubMed Central

    Garrido-García, H.; Martín-Escribano, P.; Palomera-Frade, J.; Arroyo, O.; Alonso-Calderón, J. L.; Mazaira-Alvarez, J.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Electrophrenic pacing can be used in the management of ventilatory failure in quadriplegic patients. A study was undertaken to determine the pattern of transdiaphragmatic pressure (PDI) during the conditioning phase of electrophrenic pacing to see if it had a possible role in optimising the process of conditioning. METHODS: The tidal volume (TV) and PDI were measured in a group of six quadriplegic patients commencing ventilation by low frequency pulse stimulation (7-10 Hz) and low respiratory rate stimulation (< 10 breaths/min). RESULTS: Tidal volume increased between baseline and month 1 (4.33 ml/kg, p < 0.001) and between months 1 and 2 (3.00 ml/kg, p < 0.05) and then stabilised. PDI was higher during bilateral diaphragmatic pacing (mean (SD) 1.73 (0.30) kPa) than with either left (1.15 (0.34) kPa) or right (0.86 (0.37) kPa) unilateral pacing. PDI varied throughout the observation period, probably by interaction between recovery of the diaphragmatic fibres and the pacing regimen. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with quadriplegia due to high spinal injury can be maintained with ventilation by continuous electrophrenic pacing. The control criteria used in this study for pacing were tidal volume and the patient's tolerance, and the PDI measurement did not contribute any additional information to help with managing the conditioning process. PMID:8733497

  4. Testosterone deficiency myopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Orrell, R W; Woodrow, D F; Barrett, M C; Press, M; Dick, D J; Rowe, R C; Lane, R J

    1995-01-01

    Testosterone is recognized to have a positive effect on nitrogen balance and muscle development in hypogonadal men, but significantly myopathy secondary to testosterone deficiency has been reported only rarely. We describe a patient who presented with a myopathy associated with testosterone deficiency, and who demonstrated a significant functional and myometric response to treatment. PMID:7562829

  5. An Electrical Communication System for a Nonverbal, Profoundly Retarded Spastic Quadriplegic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kucherawy, David A.; Kucherawy, Jenny M.

    1978-01-01

    The article describes the use of an electrical communication system (the Cocom Center Model 25) to establish communication with and more accurately assess an apparently profoundly retarded, nonverbal, 28-year-old spastic quadriplegic female. (Author/PHR)

  6. AIDS-related myopathy.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Rafiq A.; Yasmeen, Shagufta; Munn, Robert; Ruebner, Boris H.; Ellis, William G.

    1999-09-01

    Infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is often associated with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), and wasting is one of the defining clinical features of AIDS. Muscular weakness due to myopathy may develop at any stage of HIV infection. We report two illustrative cases of HIV-associated myopathies. One was due to inflammatory myosits most likely directly related to the HIV infection, and the other was most likely the result of mitochondrial damage due to zidovudine, a nucleoside analogue commonly used in treating HIV infection. Biopsies from both patients showed alterations of myofiber structures, of varying severity, culminating in necrosis, lipid droplets, and lymphoplasmocytic inflammatory response. The zidovudine-treated patient also showed distinctive mitochondrial changes, predominantly enlargement, variation in shape and size, and disorganization of the cristae. These two types of HIV-associated inflammatory myopathies are reviewed, along with other HIV-associated myopathies, including HIV wasting syndrome, nemaline rod myopathy, pyomyositis, rhabdomyolysis, cardiomyopathy, and other miscellaneous myopathies associated with HIV infection. PMID:11810429

  7. Phrenic Nerve Stimulation for Diaphragm Pacing in a Quadriplegic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Deog-ryung; Kim, Il-sup; Hong, Jae Taek

    2013-01-01

    Chronic hypoventilation due to injury to the brain stem respiratory center or high cervical cord (above the C3 level) can result in dependence to prolonged mechanical ventilation with tracheostomy, frequent nosocomial pneumonia, and prolonged hospitalization. Diaphragm pacing through electrical stimulation of the phrenic nerve is an established treatment for central hypoventilation syndrome. We performed chronic phrenic nerve stimulation for diaphragm pacing with the spinal cord stimulator for pain control in a quadriplegic patient with central apnea due to complete spinal cord injury at the level of C2 from cervical epidural hematoma. After diaphragmatic pacing, the patient who was completely dependent on the mechanical ventilator could ambulate up to three hours every day without aid of mechanical ventilation during the 12 months of follow-up. Diaphragm pacing through unilateral phrenic nerve stimulation with spinal cord stimulator was feasible in an apneic patient with complete quadriplegia who was completely dependent on mechanical ventilation. Diaphragm pacing with the spinal cord stimulator is feasible and effective for the treatment of the central hypoventilation syndrome. PMID:24294464

  8. Cardiorespiratory fitness and training in quadriplegics and paraplegics.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, M D

    1986-01-01

    With the growing interest in exercise and sport and the significance of cardiovascular disease in the spinal cord injured population, the role of endurance training in improving cardiovascular health is of particular interest. Ordinary daily activities of those with spinal cord injury are usually not adequate to maintain cardiovascular fitness, and lack of participation in a regular activity programme may result in a debilitative cycle. As this occurs, there is a reduction in functional work capacity which may limit independence, and the reduction in cardiovascular fitness may increase the risk for cardiovascular disease. Work capacity in those with spinal cord injury is limited by loss of functional muscle mass and sympathetic control. Sympathetic nervous system impairment limits control of regional blood flow and cardiac output, and maximum heart rate following cervical lesions may be reduced to 110 to 130 beats/min. However, endurance training in quadriplegics and paraplegics can elicit improvements in exercise performance similar to those observed in able-bodied individuals. Review of 13 cardiorespiratory training studies involving spinal cord injured subjects revealed average improvements of 20% in VO2max and 40% in physical work capacity after 4 to 20 weeks of training. Based upon the positive results of these studies, the general endurance training guidelines for the normal population appear to also be appropriate for the spinal cord injured population. These guidelines can be followed during participation in a number of different activities and sports including wheelchair pushing, arm crank ergometry, aerobic swimming, ambulation training, canoeing and wheelchair basketball. There is no evidence that intense training and competition is harmful, but special areas of risk as a result of impairments in sensation, cardiovascular function, autonomic function and temperature regulation must be considered. The long term benefits of endurance training in those with

  9. [Myopathy caused by hypothyroidism].

    PubMed

    Paiva, C; Mouro, A M; Luís, M L; Fonseca, F; Quina, M

    1991-01-01

    The authors report a case of primary hypothyroidism where the main symptoms were caused by muscular lesions and disappeared after treatment with L-thyroxine. Based on this case study the authors then review both the clinical aspects and the diagnostical methods of hypothyroidism myopathy, noting its frequency, be it in terms of isolated laboratory changes or in terms of functional changes. PMID:1807095

  10. Genetics Home Reference: inclusion body myopathy 2

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions inclusion body myopathy 2 inclusion body myopathy 2 Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Open All Close All Description Inclusion body myopathy 2 is a condition that primarily affects skeletal muscles , ...

  11. Central Cardiovascular Responses of Quadriplegic Subjects to Arm Exercise at Varying Levels of Oxygen Uptake.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Figoni, Stephen F.

    The purpose of this study was to assess selected central cardiovascular functions of spinal cord injured, quadriplegic subjects at varying levels of oxygen uptake (VO sub 2). Subjects included 11 untrained, male college students with C5, C6, or C7 complete quadriplegia and 11 able-bodied reference subjects. Exercise was performed on a Monark cycle…

  12. Collagen type VI myopathies.

    PubMed

    Bushby, Kate M D; Collins, James; Hicks, Debbie

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in each of the three collagen VI genes COL6A1, COL6A2 and COL6A3 cause two main types of muscle disorders: Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy, a severe phenotype, and a mild to moderate phenotype Bethlem myopathy. Recently, two additional phenotypes, including a limb-girdle muscular dystrophy phenotype and an autosomal recessive myosclerosis reported in one family with mutations in COL6A2 have been reported. Collagen VI is an important component of the extracellular matrix which forms a microfibrillar network that is found in close association with the cell and surrounding basement membrane. Collagen VI is also found in the interstitial space of many tissues including muscle, tendon, skin, cartilage, and intervertebral discs. Thus, collagen VI mutations result in disorders with combined muscle and connective tissue involvement, including weakness, joint laxity and contractures, and abnormal skin findings.In this review we highlight the four recognized clinical phenotypes of collagen VI related - myopathies; Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD), Bethlem myopathy (BM), autosomal dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy phenotype and autosomal recessive myosclerosis. We discuss the diagnostic criteria of these disorders, the molecular pathogenesis, genetics, treatment, and related disorders. PMID:24443028

  13. Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Barohn, Richard J.; Amato, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) consist of rare heterogenous autoimmune disorders that present with marked proximal and symmetric muscle weakness, except for distal and asymmetric weakness in inclusion body myositis (IBM). Besides frequent creatine kinase (CK) elevation, the electromyogram confirms the presence of an irritative myopathy. Extramuscular involvement affects a significant number of cases with interstitial lung disease (ILD), cutaneous in dermatomyositis (DM), systemic or joint manifestations and increased risk of malignancy especially in DM. Myositis specific autoantibodies influence phenotype of the IIM. Jo-1 antibodies are frequently associated with ILD and the newly described HMG-CoA reductase antibodies are characteristic of autoimmune necrotizing myopathy (NM). Muscle pathology ranges from inflammatory exudates of variable distribution, to intact muscle fiber invasion, necrosis, phagocytosis and in the case of IBM rimmed vacuoles and protein deposits. Despite many similarities, the IIM are a quite heterogeneous from the histopathological and pathogenetic standpoints in addition to some clinical and treatment-response difference. The field has witnessed significant advances in our understanding of pathophysiology and treatment of these rare disorders. In this review, we focus on DM, polymyositis (PM) and NM and examine current and promising therapies. The reader interested in more details on IBM is referred to the corresponding chapter in this issue. PMID:25037081

  14. Case report: electrophrenic respiration and discharge planning with a C1 quadriplegic.

    PubMed

    MacKechnie, J; Wade, P A

    1984-12-01

    The neuroscience aspects of care associated with a 365-day hospitalization of a 25-year-old, C1 quadriplegic are presented in the following article. The patient and his family have given permission to present specifics of his case and to use his name and photograph. This report does not consider all of the technical aspects of this patient's care. Our focus is on procedures and problems concomitant with phrenic stimulation and with discharge planning. PMID:6568261

  15. Genetics Home Reference: nemaline myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bushby K, Van den Bergh P, Iannaccone S, Laing NG, Wallgren-Pettersson C. Identification of 45 novel mutations ... Clement S, Barois A, Muntoni F, Romero NB, Laing NG. Nemaline myopathy caused by absence of alpha-skeletal ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Salih myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... myopathy with fatal cardiomyopathy Salih CMD Salih congenital muscular dystrophy Related Information How are genetic conditions and genes ... Children's Cardiomyopathy Foundation Congenital Muscle Disease International Registry Muscular Dystrophy ... Dystrophy Canada Muscular Dystrophy UK Resource ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: centronuclear myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... abnormal side-to-side curvature of the spine ( scoliosis ). Rarely, individuals with centronuclear myopathy have a weakened ... health conditions: Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Surgery and Rehabilitation Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Related Information How are ...

  18. Anaesthesia in myotubular (centronuclear) myopathy.

    PubMed

    Breslin, D; Reid, J; Hayes, A; Mirakhur, R K

    2000-05-01

    A patient with a known history of myotubular myopathy presented for surgery for insertion of a tibial nail. Anasthesia was induced and maintained using an intravenous anasthetic technique. Neuromuscular function was assessed using mechanomyography, which showed a profound reduction in muscle contractility. In view of this, the use of muscle relaxants was avoided altogether. Nerve conduction was normal but electromyography showed small motor units, with generalised distribution, suggesting mild to moderately severe myopathy. The patient made a slow but uneventful recovery. PMID:10792141

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Laing distal myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... for This Page GeneReview: Laing Distal Myopathy Laing NG, Laing BA, Meredith C, Wilton SD, Robbins P, ... T, Bridges LR, Fabian V, Rozemuller A, Laing NG. Laing early onset distal myopathy: slow myosin defect ...

  20. Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies: Clinical Approach and Management

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Asma; Hayat, Ghazala; Kalia, Junaid S.; Guzman, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) are a group of chronic, autoimmune conditions affecting primarily the proximal muscles. The most common types are dermatomyositis (DM), polymyositis (PM), necrotizing autoimmune myopathy (NAM), and sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM). Patients typically present with sub-acute to chronic onset of proximal weakness manifested by difficulty with rising from a chair, climbing stairs, lifting objects, and combing hair. They are uniquely identified by their clinical presentation consisting of muscular and extramuscular manifestations. Laboratory investigations, including increased serum creatine kinase (CK) and myositis specific antibodies (MSA) may help in differentiating clinical phenotype and to confirm the diagnosis. However, muscle biopsy remains the gold standard for diagnosis. These disorders are potentially treatable with proper diagnosis and initiation of therapy. Goals of treatment are to eliminate inflammation, restore muscle performance, reduce morbidity, and improve quality of life. This review aims to provide a basic diagnostic approach to patients with suspected IIM, summarize current therapeutic strategies, and provide an insight into future prospective therapies. PMID:27242652

  1. Electrical stimulation of the lumbrical muscles in an incomplete quadriplegic patient: case report.

    PubMed

    Carroll, S G; Bird, S F; Brown, D J

    1992-03-01

    The increasing number of incomplete cervical spinal cord injuries means that more attention needs to be focused on the rehabilitation of the incomplete quadriplegic hand. A case study, describing the application of electrical stimulation for strengthening the paretic lumbrical muscles, is presented. A 2 week strengthening program resulted in a 33% increase in the force produced by the lumbrical muscles. No loss of strength had occurred 4 weeks after cessation of the treatment. The magnitude and speed of this result should be of interest to those clinicians who seek to maximise patient independence in minimal time. PMID:1630853

  2. Resveratrol and Myopathy.

    PubMed

    Bastin, Jean; Djouadi, Fatima

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol is a natural polyphenolic compound produced by plants under various stress conditions. Resveratrol has been reported to exhibit antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-proliferative properties in mammalian cells and animal models, and might therefore exert pleiotropic beneficial effects in different pathophysiological states. More recently, resveratrol has also been shown to potentially target many mitochondrial metabolic pathways, including fatty acid β-oxidation or oxidative phosphorylation, leading to the up-regulation of the energy metabolism via signaling pathways involving PGC-1α, SIRT1, and/or AMP-kinase, which are not yet fully delineated. Some of resveratrol beneficial effects likely arise from its cellular effects in the skeletal muscle, which, surprisingly, has been given relatively little attention, compared to other target tissues. Here, we review the potential for resveratrol to ameliorate or correct mitochondrial metabolic deficiencies responsible for myopathies, due to inherited fatty acid β-oxidation or to respiratory chain defects, for which no treatment exists to date. We also review recent data supporting therapeutic effects of resveratrol in the Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, a fatal genetic disease affecting the production of muscle dystrophin, associated to a variety of mitochondrial dysfunctions, which likely contribute to disease pathogenesis. PMID:27136581

  3. Resveratrol and Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bastin, Jean; Djouadi, Fatima

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol is a natural polyphenolic compound produced by plants under various stress conditions. Resveratrol has been reported to exhibit antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-proliferative properties in mammalian cells and animal models, and might therefore exert pleiotropic beneficial effects in different pathophysiological states. More recently, resveratrol has also been shown to potentially target many mitochondrial metabolic pathways, including fatty acid β-oxidation or oxidative phosphorylation, leading to the up-regulation of the energy metabolism via signaling pathways involving PGC-1α, SIRT1, and/or AMP-kinase, which are not yet fully delineated. Some of resveratrol beneficial effects likely arise from its cellular effects in the skeletal muscle, which, surprisingly, has been given relatively little attention, compared to other target tissues. Here, we review the potential for resveratrol to ameliorate or correct mitochondrial metabolic deficiencies responsible for myopathies, due to inherited fatty acid β-oxidation or to respiratory chain defects, for which no treatment exists to date. We also review recent data supporting therapeutic effects of resveratrol in the Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, a fatal genetic disease affecting the production of muscle dystrophin, associated to a variety of mitochondrial dysfunctions, which likely contribute to disease pathogenesis. PMID:27136581

  4. Speech-Associated Labiomandibular Movement in Mandarin-Speaking Children with Quadriplegic Cerebral Palsy: A Kinematic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Wei-Hsien; Chen, Hsieh-Ching; Yang, Fan-pei Gloria; Wu, Ching-Yi; Chen, Chia-Ling; Wong, Alice May-kuen

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the speech-associated labiomandibular movement during articulation production in Mandarin-speaking children with spastic quadriplegic (SQ) cerebral palsy (CP). Twelve children with SQ CP (aged 7-11 years) and 12 age-matched healthy children as controls were enrolled for the study. All children underwent…

  5. Nemaline myopathy caused by mutations in the nebulin gene may present as a distal myopathy.

    PubMed

    Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Pelin, Katarina; Herczegfalvi, Agnes; Karcagi, Veronika; Pouget, Jean; Franques, Jerôme; Pellissier, Jean François; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; von der Hagen, Maja; Huebner, Angela; Schoser, Benedikt; Lochmüller, Hanns; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina

    2011-08-01

    Mutations in the nebulin gene are the main cause of autosomal recessive nemaline myopathy, with clinical presentations ranging from mild to severe disease. We have previously reported a nonspecific distal myopathy caused by homozygous missense mutations in the nebulin gene in six Finnish patients from four different families. Here we describe three non-Finnish patients in two unrelated families with distal nemaline myopathy caused by four different compound heterozygous nebulin mutations, only one of which is a missense mutation. One of the mutations has previously been identified in one family with the severe form of nemaline myopathy. We conclude that nemaline myopathy and distal myopathy caused by nebulin mutations form a clinical and histological continuum. Nemaline myopathy should be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients presenting with an early-onset predominantly distal myopathy. PMID:21724397

  6. Genetics Home Reference: collagen VI-related myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions collagen VI-related myopathy collagen VI-related myopathy Enable Javascript to view the ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Collagen VI-related myopathy is a group of disorders ...

  7. Resistin in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the serum levels and local expression of resistin in patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies to controls, and to determine the relationship between resistin levels, inflammation and disease activity. Methods Serum resistin levels were determined in 42 patients with inflammatory myopathies and 27 healthy controls. The association among resistin levels, inflammation, global disease activity and muscle strength was examined. The expression of resistin in muscle tissues from patients with inflammatory myopathies and healthy controls was evaluated. Gene expression and protein release from resistin-stimulated muscle and mononuclear cells were assessed. Results In patients with inflammatory myopathies, the serum levels of resistin were significantly higher than those observed in controls (8.53 ± 6.84 vs. 4.54 ± 1.08 ng/ml, P < 0.0001) and correlated with C-reactive protein (CRP) levels (r = 0.328, P = 0.044) and myositis disease activity assessment visual analogue scales (MYOACT) (r = 0.382, P = 0.026). Stronger association was observed between the levels of serum resistin and CRP levels (r = 0.717, P = 0.037) as well as MYOACT (r = 0.798, P = 0.007), and there was a trend towards correlation between serum resistin and myoglobin levels (r = 0.650, P = 0.067) in anti-Jo-1 positive patients. Furthermore, in patients with dermatomyositis, serum resistin levels significantly correlated with MYOACT (r = 0.667, P = 0.001), creatine kinase (r = 0.739, P = 0.001) and myoglobin levels (r = 0.791, P = 0.0003) and showed a trend towards correlation with CRP levels (r = 0.447, P = 0.067). Resistin expression in muscle tissue was significantly higher in patients with inflammatory myopathies compared to controls, and resistin induced the expression of interleukins (IL)-1β and IL-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 in mononuclear cells but not in myocytes. Conclusions The results of this study

  8. A Diagnostic Algorithm for Metabolic Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Berardo, Andres; DiMauro, Salvatore

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic myopathies comprise a clinically and etiologically diverse group of disorders caused by defects in cellular energy metabolism, including the breakdown of carbohydrates and fatty acids to generate adenosine triphosphate, predominantly through mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Accordingly, the three main categories of metabolic myopathies are glycogen storage diseases, fatty acid oxidation defects, and mitochondrial disorders due to respiratory chain impairment. The wide clinical spectrum of metabolic myopathies ranges from severe infantile-onset multisystemic diseases to adult-onset isolated myopathies with exertional cramps. Diagnosing these diverse disorders often is challenging because clinical features such as recurrent myoglobinuria and exercise intolerance are common to all three types of metabolic myopathy. Nevertheless, distinct clinical manifestations are important to recognize as they can guide diagnostic testing and lead to the correct diagnosis. This article briefly reviews general clinical aspects of metabolic myopathies and highlights approaches to diagnosing the relatively more frequent subtypes (Fig. 1). PMID:20425236

  9. Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism in a Boy with Myopathy.

    PubMed

    Haq, T; Pathan, M F; Ikhtaire, S

    2016-01-01

    Hypogonadism is seldom seen together with myopathy, although testosterone contributes to muscle strength. We present here a rare case of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism with myopathy in a 20 year old male. He had flaccid quadriparesis with raised creatinine phosphokinase. Hormone assays revealed low testosterone as well as low luteinising hormone and follicle stimulating hormone levels. Tests to exclude androgen deficiency should be carried out in male patients with myopathy. PMID:26931274

  10. Dermal ultrastructure in collagen VI myopathy.

    PubMed

    Hermanns-Lê, Trinh; Piérard, Gérald E; Piérard-Franchimont, Claudine; Delvenne, Philippe

    2014-04-01

    The COL VI mutations are responsible for a spectrum of myopathies. The authors report cutaneous ultrastructural alterations in a patient with COL6A2 myopathy. The changes include variations in size of collagen fibrils, flower-like sections of collagen fibrils, as well as thickening of vessel and nerve basement membranes. Electron microscopy of a skin biopsy contributes to the diagnosis of COL VI myopathies. PMID:24134684

  11. Metabolic myopathies: clinical features and diagnostic approach.

    PubMed

    Smith, Edward C; El-Gharbawy, Areeg; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2011-05-01

    The rheumatologist is frequently called on to evaluate patients with complaints of myalgia, muscle cramps, and fatigue. The evaluation of these patients presents a diagnostic challenge given the nonspecific and intermittent nature of their complaints, often leading to inappropriate diagnostic testing. When these symptoms are associated with physical exertion, a metabolic myopathy should be suspected Although inflammatory myopathies may present with similar features, such a pattern should prompt a thorough evaluation for an underlying metabolic myopathy. This review discusses the most common causes of metabolic myopathies and reviews the current diagnostic options available to the clinician. PMID:21444020

  12. Respiratory assessment in centronuclear myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Barbara K; Goddard, Melissa; Childers, Martin K.

    2014-01-01

    The centronuclear myopathies (CNMs) are a group of inherited neuromuscular disorders classified as congenital myopathies. While several causative genes have been identified, some patients do not harbor any of the currently known mutations. These diverse disorders have common histological features, which include a high proportion of centrally-nucleated muscle fibers, and clinical attributes of muscle weakness and respiratory insufficiency. Respiratory problems in CNMs may manifest initially during sleep, but daytime symptoms, ineffective airway clearance, and hypoventilation predominate as more severe respiratory muscle dysfunction evolves. Respiratory muscle capacity can be evaluated using a variety of clinical tests selected with consideration for the age and baseline motor function of the patient. Similar clinical tests of respiratory function can also be incorporated into preclinical CNM canine models to offer insight for clinical trials. Since respiratory problems account for significant morbidity in patients, routine assessments of respiratory muscle function are discussed. PMID:24668768

  13. Congenital myopathies: clinical and immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Thaha, Fazil; Gayathri, N; Nalini, A

    2011-01-01

    Congenital myopathies (CMs), a group of relatively non-progressive disorders presents with weakness and hypotonia of varying severity, morphologically recognized by specific structural abnormalities within the myofiber. This report presents the clinical and Histopathological features of 40 patients with CMs. Centronuclear myopathy was the commonest (40%) followed by congenital fiber type disproportion (37.5%). Other less common CMs included: myotubular myopathy (5%), nemaline myopathy (5%), central core disease (5%), multicore disease (2.5%) and congenital myopathy with tubular aggregate (5%). Immunolabeling to desmin corresponded to morphological changes within the myofibers while vimentin was negative in all the patients. There is no combined role of these proteins in the disease process. PMID:22234203

  14. Unilateral symptomatic intracranial arterial stenosis and myopathy in an adolescent with Graves disease: a case report of an high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jia; Zhu, Jiajia; Huang, Dongling; Shi, Changzheng; Guan, Yuqing; Zhou, Liang; Pan, Suyue

    2015-01-01

    Vascular and muscular involvements in Graves disease (GD) are rare. Here, we report a case of a 17-year-old patient with unilateral symptomatic middle cerebral artery stenosis concurrent with GD and myopathy. He presented with a 1-day history of acute severe right-sided hemiparesis and aphasia and a 3-week history of high metabolic syndrome. The pathogenesis of the stenosis is most likely vasculitis rather than atherosclerosis, based on contrast-enhanced high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging showing concentric wall enhancement. We suggest that lipid storage myopathy is secondary to GD, and it is likely mitochondrial dysfunction or immune dysfunction induced by GD responsible for the myopathy and that magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is capable of establishing the diagnosis of myopathy. Thus, MRS can be used for follow-up evaluations of the myopathy along with the pathology biopsy. PMID:25444029

  15. A diagnostic algorithm for metabolic myopathies.

    PubMed

    Berardo, Andres; DiMauro, Salvatore; Hirano, Michio

    2010-03-01

    Metabolic myopathies comprise a clinically and etiologically diverse group of disorders caused by defects in cellular energy metabolism, including the breakdown of carbohydrates and fatty acids to generate adenosine triphosphate, predominantly through mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Accordingly, the three main categories of metabolic myopathies are glycogen storage diseases, fatty acid oxidation defects, and mitochondrial disorders due to respiratory chain impairment. The wide clinical spectrum of metabolic myopathies ranges from severe infantile-onset multisystemic diseases to adult-onset isolated myopathies with exertional cramps. Diagnosing these diverse disorders often is challenging because clinical features such as recurrent myoglobinuria and exercise intolerance are common to all three types of metabolic myopathy. Nevertheless, distinct clinical manifestations are important to recognize as they can guide diagnostic testing and lead to the correct diagnosis. This article briefly reviews general clinical aspects of metabolic myopathies and highlights approaches to diagnosing the relatively more frequent subtypes (Fig. 1). Fig. 1 Clinical algorithm for patients with exercise intolerance in whom a metabolic myopathy is suspected. CK-creatine kinase; COX-cytochrome c oxidase; CPT-carnitine palmitoyl transferase; cyt b-cytochrome b; mtDNA-mitochondrial DNA; nDNA-nuclear DNA; PFK-phosphofructokinase; PGAM-phosphoglycerate mutase; PGK-phosphoglycerate kinase; PPL-myophosphorylase; RRF-ragged red fibers; TFP-trifunctional protein deficiency; VLCAD-very long-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase. PMID:20425236

  16. Motor recovery mechanism in a quadriplegic patient with locked-in syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyeok Gyu; Jang, Sung Ho

    2012-01-01

    Locked-in syndrome (LIS) is a rare neurologic condition caused by bilateral pontine lesions. Quadriplegia is one of the most serious clinical manifestations in patients with LIS. However, little is known about the motor recovery mechanism of quadriplegia in patients with LIS. In the current study, we present with a quadriplegic patient with bilateral pontine infarcts, whose motor function appeared to be reorganized into the peri-infarct areas of the infarcted pons, as demonstrated by diffusion tensor tractography (DTT). A 60-year-old was diagnosed as LIS due to bilateral pontine infarcts 6 years ago. The patient presented with complete paralysis of all four extremities at onset. After slow motor recovery, the patient was able to move all joint muscles against gravity and demonstrated some fine motor activity at the time of DTT scanning (6 years after onset). Results of DTTs for the corticospinal tract (CST) in both hemispheres showed that the CSTs originated from the primary motor cortex, descended along the known CST pathway, and passed through lateral areas of infarcts in the pons. Therefore, motor function of the four extremities of this patient appears to have been recovered by the CST, which passed through the lateral areas to the pontine infarcts. PMID:22430576

  17. Pamidronate treatment and posttreatment bone density in children with spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Bachrach, Steven J; Kecskemethy, Heidi H; Harcke, H Theodore; Lark, Robert K; Miller, Freeman; Henderson, Richard C

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about the long-term effects of a course of pamidronate treatment on bone mineral density (BMD) of children with spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy (SQCP). Nine patients with SQCP who had low bone density and/or history of previous fracture(s) were studied during treatment and more than 1 yr after cyclic pamidronate treatment ended. Over the 12 mo of treatment, spine BMD increases raised average Z-score from -4.0 to -2.8. In the distal femoral metaphysis, BMD increase raised average Z-score from -3.6 to -1.7. Observations posttreatment ranged from 12 to 49 mo. Changes in BMD were variable among individuals. Group spine Z-score an average of 34 mo posttreatment approached pretreatment value. Six of eight patients had final distal femur posttreatment Z-scores the same or better than pretreatment baseline an average of 27.1 mo later. While most but not all gains in BMD were lost over the first 2 yr after treatment, no patient sustained fracture during or after treatment for a cumulative follow-up of more than 27 patient-yr. PMID:16785077

  18. A Markov computer simulation model of the economics of neuromuscular blockade in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Macario, Alex; Chow, John L; Dexter, Franklin

    2006-01-01

    Background Management of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in the intensive care unit (ICU) is clinically challenging and costly. Neuromuscular blocking agents may facilitate mechanical ventilation and improve oxygenation, but may result in prolonged recovery of neuromuscular function and acute quadriplegic myopathy syndrome (AQMS). The goal of this study was to address a hypothetical question via computer modeling: Would a reduction in intubation time of 6 hours and/or a reduction in the incidence of AQMS from 25% to 21%, provide enough benefit to justify a drug with an additional expenditure of $267 (the difference in acquisition cost between a generic and brand name neuromuscular blocker)? Methods The base case was a 55 year-old man in the ICU with ARDS who receives neuromuscular blockade for 3.5 days. A Markov model was designed with hypothetical patients in 1 of 6 mutually exclusive health states: ICU-intubated, ICU-extubated, hospital ward, long-term care, home, or death, over a period of 6 months. The net monetary benefit was computed. Results Our computer simulation modeling predicted the mean cost for ARDS patients receiving standard care for 6 months to be $62,238 (5% – 95% percentiles $42,259 – $83,766), with an overall 6-month mortality of 39%. Assuming a ceiling ratio of $35,000, even if a drug (that cost $267 more) hypothetically reduced AQMS from 25% to 21% and decreased intubation time by 6 hours, the net monetary benefit would only equal $137. Conclusion ARDS patients receiving a neuromuscular blocker have a high mortality, and unpredictable outcome, which results in large variability in costs per case. If a patient dies, there is no benefit to any drug that reduces ventilation time or AQMS incidence. A prospective, randomized pharmacoeconomic study of neuromuscular blockers in the ICU to asses AQMS or intubation times is impractical because of the highly variable clinical course of patients with ARDS. PMID:16539706

  19. Myopathy with anti-HMGCR antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Alshehri, Ali; Choksi, Rati; Bucelli, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To analyze clinical features and myopathology changes in muscle fibers, connective tissue, and vessels in 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) antibody–associated myopathies. Methods: Retrospective review of records and myopathologic features of 49 consecutive patients with myopathies and serum HMGCR antibodies. Results: Clinical features included onset age from 12 to 83 years, female predominance (67%), proximal, symmetric weakness (84%), muscle discomfort (78%), dysphagia (35%), systemic features, including skin rash and interstitial lung disease (37%), statin use (38%), and a high serum creatine kinase (83%). Myopathology included muscle fiber necrosis or regeneration (66%), myonuclear pathology (43%), perimysial connective tissue damage (61%), and lymphocytic foci (27%). Conclusions: Patients with HMGCR antibody–associated myopathies present with weakness and muscle discomfort and often have damage to both perimysial connective tissue and muscle fibers, with necrosis and myonuclear pathology. Only a minority of patients with HMGCR antibody–associated myopathies have a history of statin exposure. PMID:26090508

  20. Severe reversible myopathy due to typhoid.

    PubMed

    Mody, G M; Gathiram, V; Abdulla, E A

    1989-04-01

    An 18-year-old Black male presented to hospital with a fever and inability to walk due to severe proximal myopathy. He was found to have typhoid, and marked elevation of the creatine phosphokinase with myoglobinuria was recorded. After appropriate antibiotic therapy the creatine phosphokinase level returned to normal and the patient made a complete recovery. Although neuropsychiatric manifestations have been commonly recorded in typhoid, the complication of a myopathy has not been frequently noted. PMID:2709478

  1. Gene therapy in monogenic congenital myopathies.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xuan; Goddard, Melissa A; Mack, David L; Childers, Martin K

    2016-04-15

    Current treatment options for patients with monogenetic congenital myopathies (MCM) ameliorate the symptoms of the disorder without resolving the underlying cause. However, gene therapies are being developed where the mutated or deficient gene target is replaced. Preclinical findings in animal models appear promising, as illustrated by gene replacement for X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM) in canine and murine models. Prospective applications and approaches to gene replacement therapy, using these disorders as examples, are discussed in this review. PMID:26454198

  2. Approach to the diagnosis of congenital myopathies.

    PubMed

    North, Kathryn N; Wang, Ching H; Clarke, Nigel; Jungbluth, Heinz; Vainzof, Mariz; Dowling, James J; Amburgey, Kimberly; Quijano-Roy, Susana; Beggs, Alan H; Sewry, Caroline; Laing, Nigel G; Bönnemann, Carsten G

    2014-02-01

    Over the past decade there have been major advances in defining the genetic basis of the majority of congenital myopathy subtypes. However the relationship between each congenital myopathy, defined on histological grounds, and the genetic cause is complex. Many of the congenital myopathies are due to mutations in more than one gene, and mutations in the same gene can cause different muscle pathologies. The International Standard of Care Committee for Congenital Myopathies performed a literature review and consulted a group of experts in the field to develop a summary of (1) the key features common to all forms of congenital myopathy and (2) the specific features that help to discriminate between the different genetic subtypes. The consensus statement was refined by two rounds of on-line survey, and a three-day workshop. This consensus statement provides guidelines to the physician assessing the infant or child with hypotonia and weakness. We summarise the clinical features that are most suggestive of a congenital myopathy, the major differential diagnoses and the features on clinical examination, investigations, muscle pathology and muscle imaging that are suggestive of a specific genetic diagnosis to assist in prioritisation of genetic testing of known genes. As next generation sequencing becomes increasingly used as a diagnostic tool in clinical practise, these guidelines will assist in determining which sequence variations are likely to be pathogenic. PMID:24456932

  3. Pregnancy in a quadriplegic patient treated with continuous intrathecal baclofen infusion to manage her severe spasticity. Case report.

    PubMed

    Delhaas, E M; Verhagen, J

    1992-07-01

    A report on pregnancy in a quadriplegic patient treated with a high dose of 1000 mcg/24 h continuous intrathecal baclofen infusion using an implanted drug delivery system (Synchromed, Medtronic, USA). Spasticity could be managed up to the 35th week of gestation. However, uterine contractions evoke enormous spastic symptoms which we, even with maximum values of the spasticity scales, could not classify. The recurrence of spasticity was associated with autonomic dysregulation. With continuous epidurally infused bupivacaine (11.25 mg/h) adequate relaxation could be reached and gestation was terminated by a primary caesarean section. A healthy girl was born (2040 g, Apgar 9 and 10). PMID:1508570

  4. Statin-induced myopathy in the rat: relationship between systemic exposure, muscle exposure and myopathy.

    PubMed

    Sidaway, J; Wang, Y; Marsden, A M; Orton, T C; Westwood, F R; Azuma, C T; Scott, R C

    2009-01-01

    Rare instances of myopathy are associated with all statins, but cerivastatin was withdrawn from clinical use due to a greater incidence of myopathy. The mechanism of statin-induced myopathy with respect to tissue disposition was investigated by measuring the systemic, hepatic, and skeletal muscle exposure of cerivastatin, rosuvastatin, and simvastatin in rats before and after muscle damage. The development of myopathy was not associated with the accumulation of statins in skeletal muscle. For each statin exposure was equivalent in muscles irrespective of their fibre-type sensitivity to myopathy. The low amount of each statin in skeletal muscle relative to the liver does not support a significant role for transporters in the disposition of statins in skeletal muscle. Finally, the concentration of cerivastatin necessary to cause necrosis in skeletal muscle was considerably lower than rosuvastatin or simvastatin, supporting the concept cerivastatin is intrinsically more myotoxic than other statins. PMID:19219751

  5. Genetics Home Reference: myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions MEMSA myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia Enable Javascript to view the ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia , commonly called MEMSA , is part ...

  6. Familial myopathy with tubular aggregates associated with abnormal pupils.

    PubMed

    Shahrizaila, Nortina; Lowe, James; Wills, Adrian

    2004-09-28

    The authors describe familial tubular aggregate myopathy associated with abnormal pupils. Four family members from two generations had myopathy and pupillary abnormalities. The myopathologic findings consisted of tubular aggregates in many fibers but predominantly type I fibers. PMID:15452313

  7. Lack of β2-adrenoceptors aggravates heart failure-induced skeletal muscle myopathy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Voltarelli, Vanessa A; Bechara, Luiz RG; Bacurau, Aline VN; Mattos, Katt C; Dourado, Paulo MM; Bueno, Carlos R; Casarini, Dulce E; Negrao, Carlos E; Brum, Patricia C

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal myopathy is a hallmark of heart failure (HF) and has been associated with a poor prognosis. HF and other chronic degenerative diseases share a common feature of a stressed system: sympathetic hyperactivity. Although beneficial acutely, chronic sympathetic hyperactivity is one of the main triggers of skeletal myopathy in HF. Considering that β2-adrenoceptors mediate the activity of sympathetic nervous system in skeletal muscle, we presently evaluated the contribution of β2-adrenoceptors for the morphofunctional alterations in skeletal muscle and also for exercise intolerance induced by HF. Male WT and β2-adrenoceptor knockout mice on a FVB genetic background (β2KO) were submitted to myocardial infarction (MI) or SHAM surgery. Ninety days after MI both WT and β2KO mice presented to cardiac dysfunction and remodelling accompanied by significantly increased norepinephrine and epinephrine plasma levels, exercise intolerance, changes towards more glycolytic fibres and vascular rarefaction in plantaris muscle. However, β2KO MI mice displayed more pronounced exercise intolerance and skeletal myopathy when compared to WT MI mice. Skeletal muscle atrophy of infarcted β2KO mice was paralleled by reduced levels of phosphorylated Akt at Ser 473 while increased levels of proteins related with the ubiquitin-–proteasome system, and increased 26S proteasome activity. Taken together, our results suggest that lack of β2-adrenoceptors worsen and/or anticipate the skeletal myopathy observed in HF. PMID:24629015

  8. Myopathy associated with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    He, Dian; Li, Ya; Dai, Qingqing; Zhang, Yifan; Xu, Zhu; Li, Yuan; Cai, Gang; Chu, Lan

    2016-10-01

    Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD) were generally thought to affect only central nervous system and spare peripheral aquaporin-4 (AQP4)-expressing organs. In recent years, however, increasing evidence has shown that skeletal muscle is involved in NMOSD. We provided a comprehensive review of the relevant literature and summarized the clinical and pathological characteristics of myopathy associated with NMOSD. NMOSD-associated myopathy seems to be characterized by mild muscle symptoms with prominent hyperCKemia and minimal changes on conventional pathological staining. Loss of AQP4 and deposition of IgG and activated complement products on sarcolemma of type II fibers are diagnostic features on immunohistochemical examinations. Creatine kinase leakage as a result of AQP4-IgG-induced, complement-mediated sarcolemmal injury may be a potential mechanism for hyperCKemia. Myopathy should be considered a component of NMOSD unified by AQP4-IgG seropositivity. PMID:26514543

  9. Diagnosis and treatment of mitochondrial myopathies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are a heterogeneous group of disorders resulting from primary dysfunction of the respiratory chain. Muscle tissue is highly metabolically active, and therefore myopathy is a common element of the clinical presentation of these disorders, although this may be overshadowed by central neurological features. This review is aimed at a general medical and neurologist readership and provides a clinical approach to the recognition, investigation, and treatment of mitochondrial myopathies. Emphasis is placed on practical management considerations while including some recent updates in the field. PMID:21867371

  10. Muscle fibre type changes in hypothyroid myopathy.

    PubMed Central

    McKeran, R O; Slavin, G; Andrews, T M; Ward, P; Mair, W G

    1975-01-01

    Changes in muscle fibre type in hypothyroid myopathy were studied by serial percutaneous needle biopsy of vastus lateralis before and during treatment with L-thyroxine. A type II fibre atrophy and loss was found, which correlated with the clinical and biochemical evidence of a myopathy. The type II fibre atrophy was corrected by L-thyroxine but type II fibre loss was still apparent in severely myopathic patients up to two years after starting treatment. The pathogenesis and significance of type II fibre atrophy and loss are discussed in relation to prognosis. PMID:1184764

  11. Myopathies of endocrine disorders: A prospective clinical and biochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vikas; Borah, Papori; Basumatary, Lakshya J.; Das, Marami; Goswami, Munindra; Kayal, Ashok K.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Major categories of endocrine myopathy include those associated with: Adrenal dysfunction (as in Cushing's disease or steroid myopathy); thyroid dysfunction (as in myxedema coma or thyrotoxic myopathy); vitamin D deficiency; parathyroid dysfunction; and pituitary dysfunction. Steroid myopathy is the most common endocrine myopathy. Objective: To study the etiology, varied presentations, and outcome after therapy of patients with endocrine myopathies. Materials and Methods: Myopathy was evaluated by the standard clinical procedures: Detailed clinical history, manual muscle strength testing, and creatine phosphokinase (CPK). Endocrine disorders were diagnosed as per clinical features and biochemical parameters. The treatment was given to patients as per underlying endocrine disease. Myopathy was assessed before and after treatment. Results: Out of the 37 patients who were diagnosed with endocrine myopathies, thyroid dysfunction was the most common cause (17 cases), followed by vitamin D deficiency in nine, adrenal dysfunction in six, parathyroid dysfunction in three, and pituitary dysfunction in two. Some patients had atypical presentation (repeated falls in one, tongue fasciculations in one, neck weakness in five, one with ptosis and facial weakness, asymmetrical onset in one, and calf hypertrophy in one. The serum creatine kinase (CK) concentration did not correlate with muscle weakness. Following the treatment regimen which was specific for a given myopathy, 26 patients recovered fully. Conclusion: We found varied clinical presentations of endocrine myopathies. All the patients with neuromuscular complaints should be investigated for endocrine causes because significant number of them recovers fully with specific treatment. PMID:25221399

  12. Calf heads on a trophy sign: Miyoshi myopathy.

    PubMed

    Shyma, M Mundayadan; Roopchand, P Sreedharan; Ram, K Mohan; Shaji, C Velayudhan

    2015-01-01

    Miyoshi myopathy is an autosomal recessive distal myopathy with predominant involvement of the posterior calf muscles attributed to mutations in the dysferlin gene. We report a 26-year-old male, born of nonconsanginous parentage. He noticed weakness and atrophy of leg muscles with inability to walk on his heels. The creatine kinase concentration was high. The electromyography showed myopathic pattern and the muscle biopsy disclosed dystrophic changes with absence of dysferlin. Miyoshi myopathy may be distinct among the hereditary distal myopathies. There are only few reported cases of Miyoshi myopathy in the world literature. In India only 12 cases were reported who had classical features of Miyoshi myopathy. Our's is a typical case of Miyoshi myopathy, with an affected twin sister as well. He also had "calf heads on a trophy sign" on physical examination, which is considered to be pathognomonic of this disease. PMID:26167036

  13. Calf heads on a trophy sign: Miyoshi myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Shyma, M. Mundayadan; Roopchand, P. Sreedharan; Ram, K. Mohan; Shaji, C. Velayudhan

    2015-01-01

    Miyoshi myopathy is an autosomal recessive distal myopathy with predominant involvement of the posterior calf muscles attributed to mutations in the dysferlin gene. We report a 26-year-old male, born of nonconsanginous parentage. He noticed weakness and atrophy of leg muscles with inability to walk on his heels. The creatine kinase concentration was high. The electromyography showed myopathic pattern and the muscle biopsy disclosed dystrophic changes with absence of dysferlin. Miyoshi myopathy may be distinct among the hereditary distal myopathies. There are only few reported cases of Miyoshi myopathy in the world literature. In India only 12 cases were reported who had classical features of Miyoshi myopathy. Our's is a typical case of Miyoshi myopathy, with an affected twin sister as well. He also had “calf heads on a trophy sign” on physical examination, which is considered to be pathognomonic of this disease. PMID:26167036

  14. Clinicopathological Features of Telbivudine-Associated Myopathy.

    PubMed

    Ambang, Tomica; Tan, Joo-San; Ong, Sheila; Wong, Kum-Thong; Goh, Khean-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Telbivudine, a thymidine nucleoside analog, is a common therapeutic option for chronic hepatitis B infection. While raised serum creatine kinase is common, myopathy associated with telbivudine is rare. Reports on its myopathological features are few and immunohistochemical analyses of inflammatory cell infiltrates have not been previously described. We describe the clinical, myopathological and immunohistochemical features of four patients who developed myopathy after telbivudine therapy for chronic hepatitis B infection. All four patients presented with progressive proximal muscle weakness, elevation of serum creatine kinase and myopathic changes on electromyography. Muscle biopsies showed myofiber degeneration/necrosis, regeneration, and fibers with cytoplasmic bodies and cytochrome c oxidase deficiency. There was minimal inflammation associated with strong sarcolemmal overexpression of class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I). Upon withdrawal of telbivudine, muscle weakness improved in all patients and eventually completely resolved in three. In our series, telbivudine-associated myopathy is characterized by necrotizing myopathy which improved on drug withdrawal. Although the occasional loss of cytochrome c oxidase is consistent with mitochondrial toxicity, the overexpression of MHC class I in all patients could suggest an underlying immune-mediated mechanism which may warrant further investigation. PMID:27611456

  15. Eosinophils in hereditary and inflammatory myopathies.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Thomas; Fuchss, Johann; Schneider, Ilka; Stoltenburg-Didinger, Gisela; Hanisch, Frank

    2013-12-01

    It is not known whether eosinophilic myositis is a specific histopathological feature of limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2A (LGMD2A). Number and location of eosinophils in skeletal muscle biopsies (n=100) was analysed by Giemsa and modified hematoxylin/eosin staining in patients with genetically confirmed myopathies (LGMD2A, LGMD2B, LGMD2L, facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy, dystrophinopathy), histologically confirmed idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM), dermatomyositis (DM), polymyositis), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (neurogenic control), and normal controls. The number of eosinophils/mm² was significantly higher in LGMD2A, PM, DM, and sIBM compared to controls but not significantly higher than other myopathies. A large overlap in the number of eosinophils/mm2 between all groups was seen. In all disease groups eosinophils were mainly found endomysially (46- 88%) and intra- and perivascularly (4-37%). There was no correlation between the numbers of eosinophils/mm² and (i) age at biopsy and (ii) the duration of the disease. The extent of myopathic, fibrotic, and inflammatory changes did not differ in samples with high and low eosinophil count. Eosinophils seem to represent an unspecific histological finding in hereditary and inflammatory myopathies, but also amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. PMID:24803842

  16. Multidisciplinary Approach to the Management of Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    M. King, Wendy; Kissel, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of Review Aside from some inflammatory myopathies and very few genetic disorders, there are no therapies that make most patients with myopathies stronger. Consequently, the management of these patients can be frustrating for patients and their families as well as the clinicians taking care of them. Treatment of these patients must involve a comprehensive approach focused on limiting the secondary effects of skeletal muscle weakness, managing comorbidities associated with specific diseases, and, most importantly, optimizing patients’ functional abilities and quality of life in terms of their ability to accomplish activities of daily living. While the approach to each patient differs depending on their disease, certain common themes can be addressed in each patient. This review highlights an approach centered on four conceptual themes (“the Four S’s”): Strength therapies, Supportive care, Symptomatic therapies, and pSychological support. Recent Findings Although relatively few well-designed studies have been done that highlight conservative management of patients with various myopathies, an emerging literature helps guide the clinician in certain key areas, especially in relation to cardiac and pulmonary management of these patients. Summary While disease-altering therapies have proven elusive for many muscle diseases, a multimodal approach to the conservative and supportive care of these patients can markedly improve their quality of life. Pharmacologic treatment options for specific myopathies will not be addressed in this article but are covered elsewhere in this issue of CONTINUUM. PMID:24305452

  17. The change in upper tract urolithiasis composition, surgical treatments and outcomes of para and quadriplegic patients over time.

    PubMed

    Clifton, Marisa M; Gettman, Matthew T; Patterson, David E; Rangel, Laureano; Krambeck, Amy E

    2014-10-01

    Stone disease in patients with spinal cord injury is a source of morbidity and mortality. Previous studies have indicated a decrease in infection-based urolithiasis in recent decades. We aimed to identify changes in stone composition and surgical outcomes in patients with para and quadriplegia over time. A retrospective review of para and quadriplegic patients from 1986 to 2011 who underwent surgical intervention for urolithiasis was performed, identifying 95 patients. The Mantel-Haenszel Chi square test was used to compare change in stone composition over time. The mean patient age was 44.0 years (range 18-88) and treatment included percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) 40 (42.1 %), ureteroscopy 28 (29.5 %), shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) 26 (27.4 %), and nephrectomy 1 (1 %). Overall stone-free status was found in 47.4 % with 19.0 % requiring a repeat procedure. The median hospital stay for patients undergoing SWL was 2.5 days, ureteroscopy 5 days, and PCNL 6 days. Infection-based stone composition was identified in 23 patients (36.5 %). We evaluated the linear change in percent of each stone component over time and identified increasing components of calcium oxalate dihydrate (p = 0.002) and calcium carbonate (p = 0.009). However, over a period of 25 years, the incidence of infection-based stone did not change (p = 0.57). Para and quadriplegic patients with urolithiasis can be difficult to treat surgically with prolonged hospitalizations, low stone-free status, and often require additional procedures. Despite improvements in antibiotic agents and management of neurogenic bladders, infection-based calculi continue to be a significant source of morbidity to this patient population. PMID:25015593

  18. How to extend the elbow with a weak or paralyzed triceps: control of arm kinematics for aiming in C6-C7 quadriplegic patients.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, G; Laffont, I; Hanneton, S; Roby-Brami, A

    2006-05-12

    This study aims to investigate how quadriplegic patients with a C6-C7 spinal lesion coordinate their upper limb to extend the elbow despite the paralysis or weakness of the triceps brachii, and what is the effect of a surgical musculotendinous transfer. For this purpose, aiming movements in a wide workspace were recorded in seven healthy subjects and in patients with incomplete (five cases) or complete (eight cases) triceps paralysis and after musculotendinous transfer (eight cases). We used four electromagnetic field sensors to quantify hand trajectory and to compute the angles describing the rotations at the scapula, glenohumeral joint, elbow and wrist (10 degrees of freedom). Extent and smoothness of the hand trajectories and hand velocity profiles were surprisingly similar between healthy subjects and quadriplegic patients. The reduction of elbow extension observed in patients was compensated by rotations distributed across several degrees of freedom including the scapula. Principal components analysis showed that the joint rotations could be summarized by an additive combination of two synergies, respectively orientating and stretching out the limb, which explained similar amounts of variance in healthy subjects and in patients. The participations of degrees of freedom in the synergies were roughly similar in the different groups of subjects, the main difference concerning scapular medial-lateral rotation, which seems to be critical in patients with a complete triceps paralysis. This demonstrates that elbow extension in quadriplegic patients is due to anticipated mechanical interaction coupling between upper limb segments. We propose that the persisting (incomplete paralysis) or restored (musculotendinous transfer) elbow extensor strength may act by stabilizing the elbow. This counterintuitive preservation of limb kinematics for horizontal aiming movements in quadriplegic patients despite the drastic changes in muscle action provoked by paralysis and/or by

  19. Centronuclear myopathy in a Border collie dog.

    PubMed

    Eminaga, S; Cherubini, G B; Shelton, G D

    2012-10-01

    A two-year old, male entire Border collie was presented with a one-year history of exercise-induced collapsing on the pelvic limbs. Physical examination revealed generalised muscle atrophy. Neurological examination supported a generalised neuromuscular disorder. Electromyography revealed spontaneous electrical activity in almost all muscles. Unfixed and formaldehyde-fixed biopsy samples were collected from the triceps brachii, longissimus and vastus lateralis muscles. Histopathological, histochemical and ultrastructural examinations of biopsy specimens were consistent with either centronuclear or myotubular myopathy. The dog clinically improved with supportive treatment with L-carnitine, co-enzyme Q10 and vitamin B compound. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of centronuclear/myotubular myopathy in a Border collie. PMID:23013377

  20. Autoimmune Myopathies: Where Do We Stand?

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Jean-Philippe; Marie, Isabelle; Jouen, Fabienne; Boyer, Olivier; Martinet, Jérémie

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AIDs) as a whole represent a major health concern and remain a medical and scientific challenge. Some of them, such as multiple sclerosis or type 1 diabetes, have been actively investigated for many decades. Autoimmune myopathies (AIMs), also referred to as idiopathic inflammatory myopathies or myositis, represent a group of very severe AID for which we have a more limited pathophysiological knowledge. AIM encompass a group of, individually rare but collectively not so uncommon, diseases characterized by symmetrical proximal muscle weakness, increased serum muscle enzymes such as creatine kinase, myopathic changes on electromyography, and several typical histological patterns on muscle biopsy, including the presence of inflammatory cell infiltrates in muscle tissue. Importantly, some AIMs are strongly related to cancer. Here, we review the current knowledge on the most prevalent forms of AIM and, notably, the diagnostic contribution of autoantibodies. PMID:27379096

  1. Bethlem myopathy: An autosomal dominant myopathy with flexion contractures, keloids, and follicular hyperkeratosis.

    PubMed

    Saroja, Aralikatte Onkarappa; Naik, Karkal Ravishankar; Nalini, Atcharayam; Gayathri, Narayanappa

    2013-10-01

    Bethlem myopathy and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy form a spectrum of collagenopathies caused by genetic mutations encoding for any of the three subunits of collagen VI. Bethlem phenotype is relatively benign and is characterized by proximal dominant myopathy, keloids, contractures, distal hyperextensibility, and follicular hyperkeratosis. Three patients from a single family were diagnosed to have Bethlem myopathy based on European Neuromuscular Centre Bethlem Consortium criteria. Affected father and his both sons had slowly progressive proximal dominant weakness and recurrent falls from the first decade. Both children aged 18 and 20 years were ambulant at presentation. All had flexion contractures, keloids, and follicular hyperkeratosis without muscle hypertrophy. Creatinine kinase was mildly elevated and electromyography revealed myopathic features. Muscle imaging revealed severe involvement of glutei and vasti with "central shadow" in rectus femoris. Muscle biopsy in the father showed dystrophic changes with normal immmunostaining for collagen VI, sarcoglycans, and dysferlin. PMID:24339618

  2. Bethlem myopathy: An autosomal dominant myopathy with flexion contractures, keloids, and follicular hyperkeratosis

    PubMed Central

    Saroja, Aralikatte Onkarappa; Naik, Karkal Ravishankar; Nalini, Atcharayam; Gayathri, Narayanappa

    2013-01-01

    Bethlem myopathy and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy form a spectrum of collagenopathies caused by genetic mutations encoding for any of the three subunits of collagen VI. Bethlem phenotype is relatively benign and is characterized by proximal dominant myopathy, keloids, contractures, distal hyperextensibility, and follicular hyperkeratosis. Three patients from a single family were diagnosed to have Bethlem myopathy based on European Neuromuscular Centre Bethlem Consortium criteria. Affected father and his both sons had slowly progressive proximal dominant weakness and recurrent falls from the first decade. Both children aged 18 and 20 years were ambulant at presentation. All had flexion contractures, keloids, and follicular hyperkeratosis without muscle hypertrophy. Creatinine kinase was mildly elevated and electromyography revealed myopathic features. Muscle imaging revealed severe involvement of glutei and vasti with “central shadow” in rectus femoris. Muscle biopsy in the father showed dystrophic changes with normal immmunostaining for collagen VI, sarcoglycans, and dysferlin. PMID:24339618

  3. Diagnosis and classification of idiopathic inflammatory myopathies.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, I E; Miller, F W; Tjärnlund, A; Bottai, M

    2016-07-01

    The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIMs) are a heterogeneous group of diseases, collectively termed myositis, sharing symptoms of muscle weakness, fatigue and inflammation. Other organs are frequently involved, supporting the notion that these are systemic inflammatory diseases. The IIMs can be subgrouped into dermatomyositis, polymyositis and inclusion body myositis. The myositis-specific autoantibodies (MSAs) identify other and often more distinct clinical phenotypes, such as the antisynthetase syndrome with antisynthetase autoantibodies and frequent interstitial lung disease and anti-SRP and anti-HMGCR autoantibodies that identify necrotizing myopathy. The MSAs are important both to support myositis diagnosis and to identify subgroups with different patterns of extramuscular organ involvement such as interstitial lung disease. Another cornerstone in the diagnostic procedure is muscle biopsy to identify inflammation and to exclude noninflammatory myopathies. Treatment effect and prognosis vary by subgroup. To develop new and better therapies, validated classification criteria that identify distinct subgroups of myositis are critical. The lack of such criteria was the main rationale for the development of new classification criteria for IIMs, which are summarized in this review; the historical background regarding previous diagnostic and classification criteria is also reviewed. As the IIMs are rare diseases with a prevalence of 10 in 100 000 individuals, an international collaboration was essential, as was the interdisciplinary effort including experts in adult and paediatric rheumatology, neurology, dermatology and epidemiology. The new criteria have been developed based on data from more than 1500 patients from 47 centres worldwide and are based on clinically easily available variables. PMID:27320359

  4. Extraocular mitochondrial myopathies and their differential diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Schoser, Benedikt G H; Pongratz, Dieter

    2006-06-01

    The diagnosis of mitochondrial myopathy depends upon a constellation of findings, family history, type of muscle involvement, specific laboratory abnormalities, and the results of histological, pathobiochemical and genetic analysis. In the present paper, the authors describe the diagnostic approach to mitochondrial myopathies manifesting as extraocular muscle disease. The most common ocular manifestation of mitochondrial myopathy is progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO). To exclude myasthenia gravis, ocular myositis, thyroid associated orbitopathy, oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy, and congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles in patients with an early onset or long-lasting very slowly progressive ptosis and external ophthalmoplegia, almost without any diplopia, and normal to mildly elevated serum creatine kinase and lactate, electromyography, nerve conduction studies and MRI of the orbits should be performed. A PEO phenotype forces one to look comprehensively for other multisystemic mitochondrial features (e.g., exercise induced weakness, encephalopathy, polyneuropathy, diabetes, heart disease). Thereafter, and presently even in familiar PEO, a diagnostic muscle biopsy should be taken. Histological and ultrastructural hallmarks are mitochondrial proliferations and structural abnormalities, lipid storage, ragged-red fibers, or cytochrome-C negative myofibers. In addition, Southern blotting may reveal the common deletion, or molecular analysis may verify specific mutations of distinct mitochondrial or nuclear genes. PMID:16760117

  5. GNE Myopathy: current update and future therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nishino, Ichizo; Carrillo-Carrasco, Nuria; Argov, Zohar

    2015-01-01

    GNE myopathy is an autosomal recessive muscle disease due to biallelic mutations in GNE, a gene encoding for a single protein with key enzymatic activities in sialic acid biosynthetic pathway. The diagnosis should be considered primarily in patients presenting with distal weakness (foot drop) in early adulthood (other onset symptoms are possible too). The disease slowly progresses to involve other lower and upper extremities’ muscles, with marked sparing of the quadriceps. Characteristic findings found in biopsies of affected muscles include “rimmed” (autophagic) vacuoles, aggregation of various proteins, and fiber size variation. The diagnosis is confirmed by sequencing of the GNE gene. Note that we use a new mutation nomenclature based upon the longest transcript (GenBank: NM_001128227), which encodes a 31-amino-acid longer protein than the originally described one (GenBank: NM_005476), which has been used previously in most papers. Given the pathophysiology of the disease, recent clinical trials have evaluated the use of sialic acid or ManNAc (a precursor of sialic acid) in patients with GNE myopathy as well as early gene therapy trials. Now that therapies are under investigation, it is critical that a timely and accurate diagnosis is made in patients with GNE myopathy. PMID:25002140

  6. The Spectrum of Renal Involvement in Patients With Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Couvrat-Desvergnes, Grégoire; Masseau, Agathe; Benveniste, Olivier; Bruel, Alexandra; Hervier, Baptiste; Mussini, Jean-Marie; Buob, David; Hachulla, Eric; Rémy, Philippe; Azar, Raymond; Namara, Evelyne Mac; MacGregor, Brigitte; Daniel, Laurent; Lacraz, Adeline; Broucker, Thomas De; Rouvier, Philippe; Carli, Philippe; Laville, Maurice; Dantan, Etienne; Hamidou, Mohamed; Moreau, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Data regarding the incidence and outcome of renal involvement in patients with inflammatory myopathies (IM) remain scarce. We assessed the incidence and causes of acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) in 150 patients with dermatomyositis, polymyositis, and antisynthetase syndrome followed in 3 French referral centers. Renal involvement occurred in 35 (23.3%) patients: AKI in 16 (10.7%), and CKD in 31 (20.7%) patients. The main cause of AKI was drug or myoglobinuria-induced acute tubular necrosis. Male sex, cardiovascular risk factors, cardiac involvement, and initial proteinuria >0.3 g/d were associated with the occurrence of AKI. The outcome of patients with AKI was poor: 13 (81%) progressed to CKD and 2 (12.5%) reached end-stage renal disease. In multivariate survival analysis, age at IM onset, male sex, a history of cardiovascular events, and a previous episode of AKI were associated with the risk of CKD. We also identified 14 IM patients who underwent a kidney biopsy in 10 nephrology centers. Renal pathology disclosed a wide range of renal disorders, mainly immune-complex glomerulonephritis. We identified in 5 patients a peculiar pattern of severe acute renal vascular damage consisting mainly of edematous thickening of the intima of arterioles. We found that AKI and CKD are frequent in patients with IM. Prevention of AKI is crucial in these patients, as AKI is a major contributor to their relatively high risk of CKD. A peculiar pattern of acute vascular damage is part of the spectrum of renal diseases associated with IM. PMID:24378741

  7. Late-onset myopathy of the posterior calf muscles mimicking Miyoshi myopathy unrelated to dysferlin mutation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Miyoshi myopathy, a type of distal myopathy with predominant involvement of the posterior calf muscles, has been assigned to mutations in the dysferlin gene. However, many of the late-onset limb-girdle and distal myopathies that resemble dysferlinopathy or Miyoshi myopathy remain unclassified, even after extensive immunohistological and genetic analysis. Case presentation We report the case of a 59-year-old Caucasian man with distal myopathy and exercise-induced myalgia, preferentially of the leg muscles, closely resembling the Miyoshi phenotype. Magnetic resonance imaging of his calf muscles showed typical fatty replacement of the medial heads of the gastrocnemius muscles and soleus muscles, with progression to the adductor longus muscles over a time course of two years. However, genetic analysis revealed that the phenotype of our patient was not related to a mutation in the dysferlin gene but to a novel homozygous splice mutation in the anoctamin 5 gene. Mutations in the anoctamin 5 gene have so far been identified only in some cases of limb-girdle and distal myopathy. Mutations in the anoctamin 5 gene have been assigned to limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2L, while distal Miyoshi-like phenotypes have been classified as Miyoshi myopathy type 3. Conclusion The case presented in this report further strengthens the underlying genetic heterogeneity in Miyoshi myopathy-like phenotypes and adds another family to non-dysferlin, Miyoshi myopathy type 3 of late-onset. Furthermore, our case supports the recent observation that anoctamin 5 mutations are a primary cause of distal non-dysferlin myopathies. Therefore, given the increasing number of anoctamin 5 mutations in Miyoshi-like phenotypes, genetic analysis should include an anoctamin 5 screen in late-onset limb-girdle and distal myopathies. PMID:23050857

  8. [Iatrogeny. The importance of clinical diagnosis. Myopathies induced by clofibrate].

    PubMed

    Godoy, J M; Nicaretta, D H; Balassiano, S L; Skacel, M

    1992-03-01

    The authors describe the neurological manifestations of a female patient with hypercholesterolemia who developed myopathy in the course of her treatment with clofibrate. After the drug was tapered off, the neurological signs and symptoms disappeared. Therefore, attention is called for the importance of the differential diagnosis of iatrogenic myopathies with polymyositis. PMID:1307471

  9. [Functional (in)dependence in the dependent relationship of quadriplegic men with their (un)replaceable parents/caregivers].

    PubMed

    Machado, Wiliam César Alves; Scramin, Ana Paula

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this study was to identify elements of the international classification of functioning, disability and health, applicable to quadriplegic men's home care, to reduce the dependence on their parents' help for activities of daily living and self-care. Data were collected from June 2004 to March 2005. Semi-structured interviews were performed with eight adults with high spinal cord lesions who were being cared for at home. Content analysis was performed based on the categories of meaning extrapolated and the following themes were discovered: family support: safety for the corporal functions of the disabled; supporting technology: inventiveness to promote quality care; fears, uncertain future and parents' loss: thresholds and human fragilities; and functional gains: objective response of body functions. In conclusion, family support, and especially the presence of parents, is fundamental to facing limitations and to reacting in the search for balance with the deficiency, disability, disadvantage and health of that population, preparing them to achieve gradual functional gain and independence for daily activities and self-care. PMID:20394219

  10. An Unusual Case of Statin-Induced Myopathy: Anti-HMGCoA Necrotizing Autoimmune Myopathy.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Laura; Pfeifer, Kurt; Mammen, Andrew L; Shahnoor, Nazima; Konersman, Chamindra G

    2015-12-01

    Statins are some of the most widely prescribed medications, and though generally well tolerated, can lead to a self-limited myopathy in a minority of patients. Recently, these medications have been associated with a necrotizing autoimmune myopathy (NAM). Statin-associated NAM is characterized by irritable myopathy on electromyography (EMG) and muscle necrosis with minimal inflammation on muscle biopsy. The case presented is a 63-year-old woman who has continued elevation of creatine kinase (CK) after discontinuation of statin therapy. She has irritable myopathy on EMG and NAM is confirmed by muscle biopsy. She subsequently tests positive for an experimental anti-3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (anti-HMGCoA) antibody that is found to be present in patients with statin-associated NAM. Though statin-associated NAM is a relatively rare entity, it is an important consideration for the general internist in patients who continue to have CK elevation and weakness after discontinuation of statin therapy. Continued research is necessary to better define statin-specific and dose-dependent risk, as well as optimal treatment for this condition. PMID:25855481

  11. Exertional myopathy in whooping cranes (Grus americana) with prognostic guidlelines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanley, C.S.; Thomas, N.J.; Paul-Murphy, P.; Hartup, B.K.

    2005-01-01

    Exertional myopathy developed in three whooping cranes (Grus americana) secondary to routine capture, handling, and trauma. Presumptive diagnosis of exertional myopathy was based on history of recent capture or trauma, clinical signs, and elevation of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, and serum potassium. Treatments were attempted in each case, but ultimately were not successful. Gross and microscopic lesions at necropsy confirmed the diagnosis in each case, with the leg musculature most severely affected. Guidelines for determining prognosis of exertional myopathy in cranes have been included based on the analysis of these cases and others in the literature. As treatment is largely unrewarding, prevention remains the key in controlling exertional myopathy. Identification of predisposing factors and proper handling, immobilization, and transportation techniques can help prevent development of exertional myopathy in cranes.

  12. Diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory myopathy: issues and management

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Christine

    2012-01-01

    The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies include polymyositis (PM), dermatomyositis (DM) and inclusion body myositis (IBM). The specific etiologies of these muscle diseases are not well known and are thought to involve components of the humoral and cellular immune system as well as other nonimmune factors. Diagnosing these myopathies involves a laboratory evaluation, imaging studies, multidisciplinary consultations, histologic examination and potentially genetic studies. Despite all that we currently know about inflammatory muscle disease with these studies, we find that our current concept of muscle disease is changing. In the cases of immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy and inclusion body myositis, the concept of inflammation needs to be rethought. Moreover, the classification schemes for these idiopathic myopathies may need updating to include current research findings that relate to pathogenesis. With ongoing discoveries, classification and appropriate treatment is becoming increasingly challenging. This paper discusses the inflammatory myopathies, the challenges to diagnosis, classification controversies and potential treatment options. PMID:22870499

  13. Antisynthetase syndrome: not just an inflammatory myopathy.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Soumya; Prayson, Richard; Farver, Carol

    2013-10-01

    In recent years, antisynthetase syndrome has been recognized as an important cause of autoimmune inflammatory myopathy in a subset of patients with polymyositis and dermatomyositis. It is associated with serum antibodies to aminoacyl-transfer RNA synthetases and is characterized by a constellation of manifestations, including fever, myositis, interstitial lung disease, "mechanic's hands," Raynaud phenomenon, and polyarthritis. Physicians should be familiar with its variety of clinical presentations and should include it in the differential diagnosis in patients presenting with unexplained interstitial lung disease. PMID:24085811

  14. Myopathy and parkinsonism in phosphoglycerate kinase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sotiriou, Evangelia; Greene, Paul; Krishna, Sindu; Hirano, Michio; DiMauro, Salvatore

    2010-05-01

    A 25-year-old man with exertional myoglobinuria had no evidence of hemolytic anemia, but he had severe parkinsonism that was responsive to levodopa. Phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) activity was markedly decreased in muscle, and molecular analysis of the PGK1 gene identified the p.T378P mutation that was recently reported in a patient with isolated myopathy. This case reinforces the concept that PGK deficiency is a clinically heterogeneous disorder and raises the question of a relationship between PGK deficiency and idiopathic juvenile Parkinson disease. PMID:20151463

  15. Bethlem myopathy is not allelic to limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1A

    SciTech Connect

    Speer, M.C.; Yamaoka, L.H.; Stajich, J.; Lewis, K.

    1995-08-28

    The Bethlem myopathy, an autosomal-dominant myopathy, shows a distribution of proximal muscle weakness similar to that observed in dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD). Yet the Bethlem myopathy differs from most limb-girdle dystrophies in two important regards. First, the Bethlem myopathy presents with joint contractures most commonly observed at the elbows, ankles, and neck. Secondly, disease onset in the Bethlem myopathy is in early childhood, while most dominant LGMDs present with adult onset. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia with inflammatory myopathy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting; Pu, Chuanqiang; Shi, Qiang; Wang, Qian; Cong, Lu; Liu, Jiexiao; Luo, Hongyu; Fei, Lingna; Tang, Wei; Yu, Shanshan

    2014-01-01

    Chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia is one of mitochondrial disorders, characterized by ptosis, limitation of eye movement, variably severe bulbar muscle weakness and proximal limb weakness. Chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia complicated with acquired disease is extremely rare. We report a 44 years old male patient with more than 20 years of chronic progressive bilateral ptosis and limitation of eye movements manifested dysarthria, dysphagia and neck muscle weakness for 3 years. The first muscle biopsy showed red-ragged fibers and cytochrome c oxidase negative fibers as well as inflammatory cells infiltration. Electron microscopy revealed paracrystalline inclusions. Mitochondrial genetic analysis demonstrated a large-scale mtDNA deletion of m.8470_13446del4977. The patient was treated with prednisone. In a three-year follow-up study, the second biopsy was performed. Before the treatment, except bilateral ptosis and external ophthalmopelgia, this patient presented bulbar muscle weakness and neck muscle weakness. After treated with prednisone, the symptoms of dysphagia, dysarthria and neck muscle weakness were significantly improved, and the second biopsy showed only mitochondrial myopathy pathology but the inflammations disappeared. Here, we report a patient with chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia complicated with inflammatory myopathy and after treated with prednisone as myositis, he had a significant therapeutic effect. PMID:25674260

  17. Diaphragmatic dysfunction in Collagen VI myopathies.

    PubMed

    Quijano-Roy, S; Khirani, S; Colella, M; Ramirez, A; Aloui, S; Wehbi, S; de Becdelievre, A; Carlier, R Y; Allamand, V; Richard, P; Azzi, V; Estournet, B; Fauroux, B

    2014-02-01

    Collagen VI-related myopathies are hereditary disorders causing progressive restrictive respiratory insufficiency. Specific diaphragm involvement has been suggested by a drop in supine volumes. This pilot study aimed at characterizing the respiratory muscle phenotype in patients with COL6A1-3 genes mutations. Lung function, blood gases, muscle strength and respiratory mechanics were measured in 7 patients between 2002 and 2012. Patients were classified as Early-Severe (n = 3), Moderate-Progressive (n = 2) and Mild (n = 2) according to clinical disease presentation. Seven patients (aged 6-28) were evaluated. Forced vital capacity distinguished the Mild group (>60% predicted) from the two other groups (<50% predicted). This distinction was also possible using the motor function measure scale. Diaphragmatic dysfunction at rest was observed in all the Early-Severe and Moderate-Progressive patients. During a voluntary sniff maneuver diaphragmatic dysfunction was observed in all patients, as assessed by a negative gastric pressure. All patients had diaphragmatic fatigue assessed by a tension-time index over the threshold of 0.15. Diaphragmatic dysfunction during a maximal voluntary maneuver and diaphragmatic fatigue are constant features in Collagen VI myopathies. These observations can assist the diagnosis and should be taken in account for the clinical management, with the early detection of sleep-disordered breathing. PMID:24314752

  18. Altered sodium channel-protein associations in critical illness myopathy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background During the acute phase of critical illness myopathy (CIM) there is inexcitability of skeletal muscle. In a rat model of CIM, muscle inexcitability is due to inactivation of sodium channels. A major contributor to this sodium channel inactivation is a hyperpolarized shift in the voltage dependence of sodium channel inactivation. The goal of the current study was to find a biochemical correlate of the hyperpolarized shift in sodium channel inactivation. Methods The rat model of CIM was generated by cutting the sciatic nerve and subsequent injections of dexamethasone for 7 days. Skeletal muscle membranes were prepared from gastrocnemius muscles, and purification and biochemical analyses carried out. Immunoprecipitations were performed with a pan-sodium channel antibody, and the resulting complexes probed in Western blots with various antibodies. Results We carried out analyses of sodium channel glycosylation, phosphorylation, and association with other proteins. Although there was some loss of channel glycosylation in the disease, as assessed by size analysis of glycosylated and de-glycosylated protein in control and CIM samples, previous work by other investigators suggest that such loss would most likely shift channel inactivation gating in a depolarizing direction; thus such loss was viewed as compensatory rather than causative of the disease. A phosphorylation site at serine 487 was identified on the NaV 1.4 sodium channel α subunit, but there was no clear evidence of altered phosphorylation in the disease. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments carried out with a pan-sodium channel antibody confirmed that the sodium channel was associated with proteins of the dystrophin associated protein complex (DAPC). This complex differed between control and CIM samples. Syntrophin, dystrophin, and plectin associated strongly with sodium channels in both control and disease conditions, while β-dystroglycan and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) associated

  19. Atypical presentation of GNE myopathy with asymmetric hand weakness.

    PubMed

    de Dios, John Karl L; Shrader, Joseph A; Joe, Galen O; McClean, Jeffrey C; Williams, Kayla; Evers, Robert; Malicdan, May Christine V; Ciccone, Carla; Mankodi, Ami; Huizing, Marjan; McKew, John C; Bluemke, David A; Gahl, William A; Carrillo-Carrasco, Nuria

    2014-12-01

    GNE myopathy is a rare autosomal recessive muscle disease caused by mutations in GNE, the gene encoding the rate-limiting enzyme in sialic acid biosynthesis. GNE myopathy usually manifests in early adulthood with distal myopathy that progresses slowly and symmetrically, first involving distal muscles of the lower extremities, followed by proximal muscles with relative sparing of the quadriceps. Upper extremities are typically affected later in the disease. We report a patient with GNE myopathy who presented with asymmetric hand weakness. He had considerably decreased left grip strength, atrophy of the left anterior forearm and fibro-fatty tissue replacement of left forearm flexor muscles on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The patient was an endoscopist and thus the asymmetric hand involvement may be associated with left hand overuse in daily repetitive pinching and gripping movements, highlighting the possible impact of environmental factors on the progression of genetic muscle conditions. PMID:25182749

  20. Atypical presentation of GNE myopathy with asymmetric hand weakness

    PubMed Central

    de Dios, John Karl L.; Shrader, Joseph A.; Joe, Galen O.; McClean, Jeffrey C.; Williams, Kayla; Evers, Robert; Malicdan, May Christine V.; Ciccone, Carla; Mankodi, Ami; Huizing, Marjan; McKew, John C.; Bluemke, David A.; Gahl, William A.; Carrillo-Carrasco, Nuria

    2014-01-01

    GNE myopathy is a rare autosomal recessive muscle disease caused by mutations in GNE, the gene encoding the rate-limiting enzyme in sialic acid biosynthesis. GNE myopathy usually manifests in early adulthood with distal myopathy that progresses slowly and symmetrically, first involving distal muscles of the lower extremities, followed by proximal muscles with relative sparing of the quadriceps. Upper extremities are typically affected later in the disease. We report a patient with GNE myopathy who presented with asymmetric hand weakness. He had considerably decreased left grip strength, atrophy of the left anterior forearm and fibro-fatty tissue replacement of left forearm flexor muscles on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The patient was an endoscopist and thus the asymmetric hand involvement may be associated with left hand overuse in daily repetitive pinching and gripping movements, highlighting the possible impact of environmental factors on the progression of genetic muscle conditions. PMID:25182749

  1. Genetics Home Reference: neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis), reduced thyroid activity (hypothyroidism), and type 2 diabetes mellitus (the most common ... Neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Hypothyroidism MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Type 2 Diabetes These resources from ...

  2. [Sarcopenia or uremic myopathy in CKD patients].

    PubMed

    Chauveau, Philippe; Moreau, Karine; Lasseur, Catherine; Fouque, Denis; Combe, Christian; Aparicio, Michel

    2016-04-01

    Often underestimated or misunderstood in chronic renal failure (CRF), muscle wasting is nevertheless common and concerns about 50% of dialysis patients. The consequences of this myopathy on quality of life and outcomes of patients are unfavorable, identical to those observed in sarcopenia in elderly subjects with sarcopenia. The similarities between the two situations also concern the symptoms, the underlying muscle damages and the pathogenic mechanisms and may be partly explained by the frequently high age of ESRD patients. Skeletal muscle involvement should be systematically investigated in the IRC patient as in the elderly with sarcopenia to propose as early as possible a treatment of which physical activity and nutritional interventions are the mainstay. PMID:26598033

  3. Aerobic Training in Patients with Congenital Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hedermann, Gitte; Vissing, Christoffer Rasmus; Heje, Karen; Preisler, Nicolai; Witting, Nanna; Vissing, John

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Congenital myopathies (CM) often affect contractile proteins of the sarcomere, which could render patients susceptible to exercise-induced muscle damage. We investigated if exercise is safe and beneficial in patients with CM. Methods Patients exercised on a stationary bike for 30 minutes, three times weekly, for 10 weeks at 70% of their maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max). Creatine kinase (CK) was monitored as a marker of muscle damage. VO2max, functional tests, and questionnaires evaluated efficacy. Results Sixteen patients with CM were included in a controlled study. VO2max increased by 14% (range, 6–25%; 95% CI 7–20; p < 0.001) in the seven patients who completed training, and tended to decrease in a non-intervention group (n = 7; change -3.5%; range, -11–3%, p = 0.083). CK levels were normal and remained stable during training. Baseline Fatigue Severity Scale scores were high, 4.9 (SE 1.9), and tended to decrease (to 4.4 (SE 1.7); p = 0.08) with training. Nine patients dropped out of the training program. Fatigue was the major single reason. Conclusions Ten weeks of endurance training is safe and improves fitness in patients with congenital myopathies. The training did not cause sarcomeric injury, even though sarcomeric function is affected by the genetic abnormalities in most patients with CM. Severe fatigue, which characterizes patients with CM, is a limiting factor for initiating training in CM, but tends to improve in those who train. Trial Registration The Regional Committee on Health Research Ethics of the Capital Region of Denmark H-2-2013-066 and ClinicalTrials.gov H2-2013-066 PMID:26751952

  4. TREATMENT OF PARALYTIC HIP DISLOCATION AMONG SPASTIC QUADRIPLEGIC CEREBRAL PALSY PATIENTS BY MEANS OF FEMORAL AND PELVIC OSTEOTOMY, WITHOUT OPENING THE JOINT CAPSULE (CAPSULOPLASTY)

    PubMed Central

    Junior, Fernando Farcetta; Abreu, Fabio Peluzo; Neves, Daniella Lins; Kertzman, Paulo Facciola; Zuccon, Alexandre; De Oliveira Bittencourt, Simone; Lopes, Davi Moshe Leopold

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To show the preoperative planning and results from surgical treatment for paralytic hip dislocation among patients with cerebral palsy. The techniques used were proximal femoral varus derotation osteotomy in association with Dega iliac osteotomy, without opening the joint capsule. Methods: We performed a retrospective review of ten hips in eight patients with spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy who underwent surgical treatment between 2003 and 2005, with the same surgical technique. The pre and postoperative clinical and radiological parameters, and the preoperative planning using an image intensifier, were assessed. The clinical parameters analyzed were: pain, hygiene-related difficulties and positioning difficulties. The radiological parameters were Reimer's index, the acetabular index and the neck-shaft angle. These results were subjected to statistical analysis. Results: We obtained good results with this technique. After a mean follow-up of three years, all the hips were observed to be stable at the last assessment, and there was a high degree of satisfaction among the families in relation to the treatment. We also showed that preoperative planning using an image intensifier allowed us to reduce and stabilize these hips without the need for capsuloplasty. Conclusion: The authors conclude that in treating hip dislocation among spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy patients, capsuloplasty is unnecessary for stabilizing the coxofemoral joint. PMID:27022539

  5. Mitochondrial myopathy presenting as fibromyalgia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction To the best of our knowledge, we describe for the first time the case of a woman who met the diagnostic criteria for fibromyalgia, did not respond to therapy for that disorder, and was subsequently diagnosed by biochemical and genetic studies with a mitochondrial myopathy. Treatment of the mitochondrial myopathy resulted in resolution of symptoms. This case demonstrates that mitochondrial myopathy may present in an adult with a symptom complex consistent with fibromyalgia. Case presentation Our patient was a 41-year-old Caucasian woman with symptoms of fatigue, exercise intolerance, headache, and multiple trigger points. Treatment for fibromyalgia with a wide spectrum of medications including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antidepressants, gabapentin and pregabalin had no impact on her symptoms. A six-minute walk study demonstrated an elevated lactic acid level (5 mmol/L; normal < 2 mmol/L). Biochemical and genetic studies from a muscle biopsy revealed a mitochondrial myopathy. Our patient was started on a compound of coenzyme Q10 (ubiquinone) 200 mg, creatine 1000 mg, carnitine 200 mg and folic acid 1 mg to be taken four times a day. She gradually showed significant improvement in her symptoms over a course of several months. Conclusions This case demonstrates that adults diagnosed with fibromyalgia may have their symptom complex related to an adult onset mitochondrial myopathy. This is an important finding since treatment of mitochondrial myopathy resulted in resolution of symptoms. PMID:22325469

  6. Rapid diagnosis of hypoglycin A intoxication in atypical myopathy of horses.

    PubMed

    Sander, Johannes; Cavalleri, Jessika-M V; Terhardt, Michael; Bochnia, Mandy; Zeyner, Annette; Zuraw, Aleksandra; Sander, Stefanie; Peter, Michael; Janzen, Nils

    2016-03-01

    Hypoglycin A (2-amino-3-(2-methylidenecyclopropyl)propanoic acid) is the plant toxin shown to cause atypical myopathy in horses. It is converted in vivo to methylenecyclopropyl acetic acid, which is transformed to a coenzyme A ester that subsequently blocks beta oxidation of fatty acids. Methylenecyclopropyl acetic acid is also conjugated with carnitine and glycine. Acute atypical myopathy may be diagnosed by quantifying the conjugates of methylenecyclopropyl acetic acid plus a selection of acyl conjugates in urine and serum. We describe a new mass spectrometric method for sample volumes of <0.5 mL. Samples were extracted with methanol containing 5 different internal standards. Extracts were analyzed by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry focusing on 11 metabolites. The total preparation time for a series of 20 samples was 100 min. Instrument run time was 14 min per sample. For the quantification of carnitine and glycine conjugates of methylenecyclopropyl acetic acid in urine, the coefficients of variation for intraday quantification were 2.9% and 3.0%, respectively. The respective values for interday were 9.3% and 8.0%. Methylenecyclopropyl acetyl carnitine was detected as high as 1.18 µmol/L in serum (median: 0.46 µmol/L) and 1.98 mmol/mol creatinine in urine (median: 0.79 mmol/mol creatinine) of diseased horses, while the glycine derivative accumulated up to 1.97 mmol/mol creatinine in urine but was undetectable in most serum samples. In serum samples from horses with atypical myopathy, the intraday coefficients of variation for C4-C8 carnitines and glycines were ≤4.5%. Measured concentrations exceeded those in healthy horses by ~10 to 1,400 times. PMID:26965229

  7. Native American myopathy: congenital myopathy with cleft palate, skeletal anomalies, and susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Stamm, Demetra S; Aylsworth, Arthur S; Stajich, Jeffrey M; Kahler, Stephen G; Thorne, Leigh B; Speer, Marcy C; Powell, Cynthia M

    2008-07-15

    Native American myopathy (NAM) [OMIM 255995], a putative autosomal recessive disorder, was first reported in the Lumbee Indians of North Carolina. NAM features include congenital weakness and arthrogryposis, cleft palate, ptosis, short stature, kyphoscoliosis, talipes deformities, and susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia (MH) provoked by anesthesia. This report documents the phenotypic complexity and natural history of this rare congenital disorder in fourteen individuals with NAM. Findings include a previously unreported 36% mortality by age 18. Based on this study, our conservative estimate for prevalence of NAM within the Lumbee population is approximately 2:10,000; however, birth incidence remains unknown. PMID:18553514

  8. Genetics Home Reference: myopathy with deficiency of iron-sulfur cluster assembly enzyme

    MedlinePlus

    ... sulfur cluster assembly enzyme myopathy with deficiency of iron-sulfur cluster assembly enzyme Enable Javascript to view ... All Close All Description Myopathy with deficiency of iron-sulfur cluster assembly enzyme is an inherited disorder ...

  9. The Story of Equine Atypical Myopathy: A Review from the Beginning to a Possible End

    PubMed Central

    Votion, Dominique-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Atypical myopathy (AM) is a frequently fatal seasonal pasture myopathy that emerges in Europe. Outbreaks are of an acute and unexpected nature and practitioners should be prepared to handle these critically ill patients. This review retraces the history of AM and describes results of epidemiological investigations that were conducted to raise hypotheses concerning the etiology of this devastating disease as well as to be able to suggest potential preventive measures. Also, clinical studies have contributed to a better definition and recognition of the syndrome, whereas elucidation of the pathological process, identified as a multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD), was a great step forward improving medical management of AM and guiding the search for the etiological agent towards toxins that reproduce the identified defect. Treatment plans can be extrapolated from the described clinical signs and metabolic problems, but they remain limited to supportive care until the causative agent has been identified with certainty. Since treatment is still unsuccessful in the majority of cases, the main emphasis is currently still on prevention. This paper aims at being a practical support for equine clinicians dealing with AM and is based on discussion and comparison of the currently available scientific data. PMID:23762581

  10. Epigenetic changes as a common trigger of muscle weakness in congenital myopathies.

    PubMed

    Rokach, Ori; Sekulic-Jablanovic, Marijana; Voermans, Nicol; Wilmshurst, Jo; Pillay, Komala; Heytens, Luc; Zhou, Haiyan; Muntoni, Francesco; Gautel, Mathias; Nevo, Yoram; Mitrani-Rosenbaum, Stella; Attali, Ruben; Finotti, Alessia; Gambari, Roberto; Mosca, Barbara; Jungbluth, Heinz; Zorzato, Francesco; Treves, Susan

    2015-08-15

    Congenital myopathies are genetically and clinically heterogeneous conditions causing severe muscle weakness, and mutations in the ryanodine receptor gene (RYR1) represent the most frequent cause of these conditions. A common feature of diseases caused by recessive RYR1 mutations is a decrease of ryanodine receptor 1 protein content in muscle. The aim of the present investigation was to gain mechanistic insight into the causes of this reduced ryanodine receptor 1. We found that muscle biopsies of patients with recessive RYR1 mutations exhibit decreased expression of muscle-specific microRNAs, increased DNA methylation and increased expression of class II histone deacetylases. Transgenic mouse muscle fibres over-expressing HDAC-4/HDAC-5 exhibited decreased expression of RYR1 and of muscle-specific miRNAs, whereas acute knock-down of RYR1 in mouse muscle fibres by siRNA caused up-regulation of HDAC-4/HDAC-5. Intriguingly, increased class II HDAC expression and decreased ryanodine receptor protein and miRNAs expression were also observed in muscles of patients with nemaline myopathy, another congenital neuromuscular disorder. Our results indicate that a common pathophysiological pathway caused by epigenetic changes is activated in some forms of congenital neuromuscular disorders. PMID:26019235

  11. Mutation Update: The Spectra of Nebulin Variants and Associated Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Kiiski, Kirsi; Sandaradura, Sarah A.; Laporte, Jocelyn; Repo, Pauliina; Frey, Jennifer A.; Donner, Kati; Marttila, Minttu; Saunders, Carol; Barth, Peter G.; den Dunnen, Johan T.; Beggs, Alan H.; Clarke, Nigel F.; North, Kathryn N.; Laing, Nigel G.; Romero, Norma B.; Winder, Thomas L.; Pelin, Katarina; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina

    2015-01-01

    A mutation update on the nebulin gene (NEB) is necessary because of recent developments in analysis methodology, the identification of increasing numbers and novel types of variants, and a widening in the spectrum of clinical and histological phenotypes associated with this gigantic, 183 exons containing gene. Recessive pathogenic variants in NEB are the major cause of nemaline myopathy (NM), one of the most common congenital myopathies. Moreover, pathogenic NEB variants have been identified in core-rod myopathy and in distal myopathies. In this update, we present the disease-causing variants in NEB in 159 families, 143 families with NM, and 16 families with NM-related myopathies. Eighty-eight families are presented here for the first time. We summarize 86 previously published and 126 unpublished variants identified in NEB. Furthermore, we have analyzed the NEB variants deposited in the Exome Variant Server (http://evs.gs.washington.edu/EVS/), identifying that pathogenic variants are a minor fraction of all coding variants (~7%). This indicates that nebulin tolerates substantial changes in its amino acid sequence, providing an explanation as to why variants in such a large gene result in relatively rare disorders. Lastly, we discuss the difficulties of drawing reliable genotype–phenotype correlations in NEB-associated disease. PMID:25205138

  12. Mutation update: the spectra of nebulin variants and associated myopathies.

    PubMed

    Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Kiiski, Kirsi; Sandaradura, Sarah A; Laporte, Jocelyn; Repo, Pauliina; Frey, Jennifer A; Donner, Kati; Marttila, Minttu; Saunders, Carol; Barth, Peter G; den Dunnen, Johan T; Beggs, Alan H; Clarke, Nigel F; North, Kathryn N; Laing, Nigel G; Romero, Norma B; Winder, Thomas L; Pelin, Katarina; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina

    2014-12-01

    A mutation update on the nebulin gene (NEB) is necessary because of recent developments in analysis methodology, the identification of increasing numbers and novel types of variants, and a widening in the spectrum of clinical and histological phenotypes associated with this gigantic, 183 exons containing gene. Recessive pathogenic variants in NEB are the major cause of nemaline myopathy (NM), one of the most common congenital myopathies. Moreover, pathogenic NEB variants have been identified in core-rod myopathy and in distal myopathies. In this update, we present the disease-causing variants in NEB in 159 families, 143 families with NM, and 16 families with NM-related myopathies. Eighty-eight families are presented here for the first time. We summarize 86 previously published and 126 unpublished variants identified in NEB. Furthermore, we have analyzed the NEB variants deposited in the Exome Variant Server (http://evs.gs.washington.edu/EVS/), identifying that pathogenic variants are a minor fraction of all coding variants (∼7%). This indicates that nebulin tolerates substantial changes in its amino acid sequence, providing an explanation as to why variants in such a large gene result in relatively rare disorders. Lastly, we discuss the difficulties of drawing reliable genotype-phenotype correlations in NEB-associated disease. PMID:25205138

  13. Myofibrillar myopathies: State of the art, present and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Béhin, A; Salort-Campana, E; Wahbi, K; Richard, P; Carlier, R-Y; Carlier, P; Laforêt, P; Stojkovic, T; Maisonobe, T; Verschueren, A; Franques, J; Attarian, S; Maues de Paula, A; Figarella-Branger, D; Bécane, H-M; Nelson, I; Duboc, D; Bonne, G; Vicart, P; Udd, B; Romero, N; Pouget, J; Eymard, B

    2015-10-01

    Myofibrillar myopathies (MFM) have been described in the mid-1990s as a group of diseases sharing common histological features, including an abnormal accumulation of intrasarcoplasmic proteins, the presence of vacuoles and a disorganization of the intermyofibrillar network beginning at the Z-disk. The boundaries of this concept are still uncertain, and whereas six genes (DES, CRYAB, LDB3/ZASP, MYOT, FLNC and BAG3) are now classically considered as responsible for MFM, other entities such as FHL1 myopathy or Hereditary Myopathy with Early Respiratory Failure linked to mutations of titin can now as well be included in this group. The diagnosis of MFM is not always easy; as histological lesions can be focal, and muscle biopsy may be disappointing; this has led to a growing importance of muscle imaging, and the selectivity of muscle involvement has now been described in several disorders. Due to the rarity of these myopathies, if some clinical patterns (such as distal myopathy associated with cardiomyopathy due to desmin mutations) are now well known, surprises remain possible and should lead to systematic testing of the known genes in case of a typical histological presentation. In this paper, we aim at reviewing the data acquired on the six main genes listed above as well as presenting the experience from two French reference centres, Paris and Marseilles. PMID:26342832

  14. Mendelian bases of myopathies, cardiomyopathies, and neuromyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Piluso, G; Aurino, S; Cacciottolo, M; Del Vecchio Blanco, F; Lancioni, A; Rotundo, IL; Torella, A; Nigro, V

    2010-01-01

    Summary A second genetic revolution is approaching thanks to next-generation DNA sequencing technologies. In the next few years, the 1,000$-genome sequencing promises to reveal every individual variation of DNA. There is, however, a major problem: the identification of thousands of nucleotide changes per individual with uncertain pathological meaning. This is also an ethical issue. In the middle, there is today the possibility to address the sequencing analysis of genetically heterogeneous disorders to selected groups of genes with defined mutation types. This will be cost-effective and safer. We assembled an easy-to manage overview of most Mendelian genes involved in myopathies, cardiomyopathies, and neuromyopathies. This was entirely put together using a number of open access web resources that are listed below. During this effort we realized that there are unexpected countless sources of data, but the confusion is huge. In some cases, we got lost in the validation of disease genes and in the difficulty to discriminate between polymorphisms and disease-causing alleles. In the table are the annotated genes, their associated disorders, genomic, mRNA and coding sizes. We also counted the number of pathological alleles so far reported and the percentage of single nucleotide mutations. PMID:22029103

  15. Myopathy in patients with Hashimoto's disease.

    PubMed

    Villar, Jaqueline; Finol, Héctor J; Torres, Sonia H; Roschman-González, Antonio

    2015-03-01

    Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) is an autoimmune disease of the thyroid gland. Patients may present or not a hypothyroid state, and frequently have manifestations of myopathy. The present work was aimed to assess the clinical symptoms and signs of skeletal muscle alterations in HT, describe the muscular pathological changes and relate them to the functional thyroid status and to the autoimmune condition of the patient. Clinical and laboratory studies were performed in ten HT patients and three control subjects (hormonal levels and electromyography). Biopsies from their vastus lateralis of quadriceps femoris muscle were analyzed under light (histochemistry and immunofluorescense) and electron microscopy. All patients showed muscle focal alterations, ranging from moderate to severe atrophy, necrosis, activation of satellite cells, presence of autophagosomes, capillary alterations and macrophage and mast cell infiltration, common to autoimmune diseases. The intensity of clinical signs and symptoms was not related to the morphological muscle findings, the electromyography results, or to the state of the thyroid function. Reactions for immunoglobulin in muscle fibers were positive in 80% of the patients. Fiber type II proportion was increased in all patients, with the exception of those treated with L-thyroxine. In conclusion, autoimmune processes in several of the patients may be associated to the skeletal muscle alterations, independently of the functional state of the thyroid gland; however, fiber II type proportion could have been normalized by L-thyroxine treatment. PMID:25920184

  16. Antiangiogenic VEGF Isoform in Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Volpi, Nila; Pecorelli, Alessandra; Lorenzoni, Paola; Di Lazzaro, Francesco; Belmonte, Giuseppe; Aglianò, Margherita; Giannini, Fabio; Grasso, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To investigate expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antiangiogenic isoform A-165b on human muscle in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) and to compare distribution of angiogenic/antiangiogenic VEGFs, as isoforms shifts are described in other autoimmune disorders. Subjects and Methods. We analyzed VEGF-A165b and VEGF-A by western blot and immunohistochemistry on skeletal muscle biopsies from 21 patients affected with IIM (polymyositis, dermatomyositis, and inclusion body myositis) and 6 control muscle samples. TGF-β, a prominent VEGF inductor, was analogously evaluated. Intergroup differences of western blot bands density were statistically examined. Endomysial vascularization, inflammatory score, and muscle regeneration, as pathological parameters of IIM, were quantitatively determined and their levels were confronted with VEGF expression. Results. VEGF-A165b was significantly upregulated in IIM, as well as TGF-β. VEGF-A was diffusely expressed on unaffected myofibers, whereas regenerating/atrophic myofibres strongly reacted for both VEGF-A isoforms. Most inflammatory cells and endomysial vessels expressed both isoforms. VEGF-A165b levels were in positive correlation to inflammatory score, endomysial vascularization, and TGF-β. Conclusions. Our findings indicate skeletal muscle expression of antiangiogenic VEGF-A165b and preferential upregulation in IIM, suggesting that modulation of VEGF-A isoforms may occur in myositides. PMID:23840094

  17. Capture myopathy in live-stranded cetaceans.

    PubMed

    Herráez, P; Espinosa de los Monteros, A; Fernández, A; Edwards, J F; Sacchini, S; Sierra, E

    2013-05-01

    A group of 51 cetaceans that had been stranded alive on the coasts of the Canary Islands, experienced human capture/rescue interactions and then died, were necropsied over a 12-year period. Of these cetaceans, 25 had haemodynamic lesions indicative of multiorganic vascular shock, degenerative muscle lesions affecting both skeletal and cardiac muscles and myoglobinuric nephrosis typical of capture myopathy (CM). Because macroscopic lesions in muscles and kidneys were not always obvious, a standard protocol was developed where the longissimus dorsi muscle was examined histologically for segmental hypercontraction, contraction band necrosis and segmental muscular degeneration and cardiomyocytes studied for hypereosinophilic wavy fibres, sarcolemmal and perinuclear vacuolation and contraction band necrosis. Light microscopic skeletal and cardiac muscle lesions in all CM animals were confirmed as ante mortem by immunohistochemical assay for myoglobin loss from and fibrinogen entry into affected myofibres. All animals had tubular nephrosis with casts and tubular myoglobin. The oxidative stress-related marker HSP70 was demonstrated immunohistochemically in tubular epithelium. Although the syndrome related to death of live-stranded cetaceans is multifactorial, this study documents that a clinicopathological syndrome comparable to CM of terrestrial wildlife has a role in stranding outcomes. PMID:23146174

  18. An unusual case of glipizide-induced proximal myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Das, Saibal; Ramasamy, Anand; De, Soumyadip; Mondal, Somnath

    2016-01-01

    This case report outlines a very rare case of glipizide-induced severe proximal myopathy in a 61-year-old diabetic man. After taking 10 mg glipizide for 5 months, diabetes was well controlled but the patient presented with progressive proximal muscle weakness in all the four limbs. Clinical examination and relevant investigations suggested it to be a case of proximal myopathy and might be drug induced. De-challenge was done and was treated resulting in reversal of the diseased state. After 3 more months, controlled re-challenge was done and there was recurrence of proximal muscle weakness. There were no evidences of any other possible metabolic, infective, organic or other pathologic causes giving rise to that condition and Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale suggested that it was “probable” that glipizide was responsible for the development of myopathy in this patient. PMID:27440956

  19. An unusual case of glipizide-induced proximal myopathy.

    PubMed

    Das, Saibal; Ramasamy, Anand; De, Soumyadip; Mondal, Somnath

    2016-01-01

    This case report outlines a very rare case of glipizide-induced severe proximal myopathy in a 61-year-old diabetic man. After taking 10 mg glipizide for 5 months, diabetes was well controlled but the patient presented with progressive proximal muscle weakness in all the four limbs. Clinical examination and relevant investigations suggested it to be a case of proximal myopathy and might be drug induced. De-challenge was done and was treated resulting in reversal of the diseased state. After 3 more months, controlled re-challenge was done and there was recurrence of proximal muscle weakness. There were no evidences of any other possible metabolic, infective, organic or other pathologic causes giving rise to that condition and Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale suggested that it was "probable" that glipizide was responsible for the development of myopathy in this patient. PMID:27440956

  20. Sialyllactose ameliorates myopathic phenotypes in symptomatic GNE myopathy model mice.

    PubMed

    Yonekawa, Takahiro; Malicdan, May Christine V; Cho, Anna; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Nonaka, Ikuya; Mine, Toshiki; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Nishino, Ichizo; Noguchi, Satoru

    2014-10-01

    Patients with GNE myopathy, a progressive and debilitating disease caused by a genetic defect in sialic acid biosynthesis, rely on supportive care and eventually become wheelchair-bound. To elucidate whether GNE myopathy is treatable at a progressive stage of the disease, we examined the efficacy of sialic acid supplementation on symptomatic old GNE myopathy mice that have ongoing, active muscle degeneration. We examined the therapeutic effect of a less metabolized sialic acid compound (6'-sialyllactose) or free sialic acid (N-acetylneuraminic acid) by oral, continuous administration to 50-week-old GNE myopathy mice for 30 weeks. To evaluate effects on their motor performance in living mice, spontaneous locomotion activity on a running wheel was measured chronologically at 50, 65, 72 and 80 weeks of age. The size, force production, and pathology of isolated gastrocnemius muscle were analysed at the end point. Sialic acid level in skeletal muscle was also measured. Spontaneous locomotion activity was recovered in 6'-sialyllactose-treated mice, while NeuAc-treated mice slowed the disease progression. Treatment with 6'-sialyllactose led to marked restoration of hyposialylation in muscle and consequently to robust improvement in the muscle size, contractile parameters, and pathology as compared to NeuAc. This is due to the fact that 6'-sialyllactose is longer working as it is further metabolized to free sialic acid after initial absorption. 6'-sialyllactose ameliorated muscle atrophy and degeneration in symptomatic GNE myopathy mice. Our results provide evidence that GNE myopathy can be treated even at a progressive stage and 6'-sialyllactose has more remarkable advantage than free sialic acid, providing a conceptual proof for clinical use in patients. PMID:25062695

  1. Guillain-Barré syndrome mimics primary biliary cirrhosis-related myopathy.

    PubMed

    Munday, William R; DiCapua, Daniel; Vortmeyer, Alexander; Gomez, Jose Luis

    2015-04-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is an immune-mediated disorder characterized by acute polyneuropathy, ascending paralysis and post infectious polyneuritis. Two-thirds of patients present with a history of recent upper respiratory tract or gastrointestinal infection. The clinical history, neurologic examination and laboratory assessment allow for a straightforward diagnosis in the majority of cases. However, primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is known to cause clinically detectable muscular weakness. It is therefore critical to differentiate between PBC-associated muscular weakness and GBS-induced paralysis. Here, we report a patient with a longstanding history of PBC who developed progressive weakness and respiratory failure due to GBS, which clinically mimicked PBC myopathy. This is the first reported association between GBS and PBC. PMID:26634144

  2. Rosuvastatin: characterization of induced myopathy in the rat.

    PubMed

    Westwood, F Russell; Scott, Robert C; Marsden, Alan M; Bigley, Alison; Randall, Kevin

    2008-02-01

    Rosuvastatin is a relatively new member of the statin family (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors), with superior lipid-lowering effects and a pattern of clinical side effects, including a low incidence of myopathy, similar to other widely prescribed statins. This article describes investigations of myopathy in the rat following administration of very high doses of rosuvastatin. The nature of the changes were found to be entirely consistent with those seen with other statins, including a differential sensitivity of muscle fibers (with glycolytic fibers [type IIB] the most sensitive and oxidative fibers [type I] the least), a delay of approximately 10 days after the start of oral dosing before necrosis was apparent, and ultrastructural alterations appearing first in mitochondria. In addition, the development of myopathy was prevented by coadministration of mevalonate, the product of HMG-CoA reductase. The findings illustrate a pattern of induced myopathy in the rat directly attributable to inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase that is entirely consistent between the various statins, with the oral dose required to produce the changes being a differentiating feature (based on these new data and a previously reported study from the same laboratory): cerivastatin dose less than simvastatin, and simvastatin dose less than rosuvastatin. PMID:18362199

  3. Genetics Home Reference: CAV3-related distal myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... gene causes a peculiar form of distal myopathy. Neurology. 2002 Jan 22;58(2):323-5. Erratum in: Neurology 2002 Mar 12;58(5):839. Itoyoma Y [ ... 3 cause four distinct autosomal dominant muscle diseases. Neurology. 2004 Feb 24;62(4):538-43. Review. ...

  4. Anesthesia for sickle cell disease and congenital myopathy in combination.

    PubMed

    Fanning, Rebecca; O'Donnell, Brian; Lynch, Brian; Stephens, Michael; O'Donovan, Frances

    2006-08-01

    We report on the perioperative management of anesthesia and analgesia in a child with sickle cell disease and a congenital myopathy, presenting for corrective orthopedic surgery. The case illustrates two valuable points of interest: the many benefits of regional anesthesia in complex medical cases and the successful use of tourniquets in children with sickle cell disease. PMID:16884472

  5. GNE Myopathy in Turkish Sisters with a Novel Homozygous Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Diniz, Gulden; Secil, Yaprak; Ceylaner, Serdar; Tokucoglu, Figen; Türe, Sabiha; Celebisoy, Mehmet; İncesu, Tülay Kurt; Akhan, Galip

    2016-01-01

    Background. Hereditary inclusion body myopathy is caused by biallelic defects in the GNE gene located on chromosome 9p13. It generally affects adults older than 20 years of age. Methods and Results. In this study, we present two Turkish sisters with progressive myopathy and describe a novel mutation in the GNE gene. Both sisters had slightly higher levels of creatine kinase (CK) and muscle weakness. The older sister presented at 38 years of age with an inability to climb steps, weakness, and a steppage gait. Her younger sister was 36 years old and had similar symptoms. The first symptoms of the disorder were seen when the sisters were 30 and 34 years old, respectively. The muscle biopsy showed primary myopathic features and presence of rimmed vacuoles. DNA analysis demonstrated the presence of previously unknown homozygous mutations [c.2152 G>A (p.A718T)] in the GNE genes. Conclusion. Based on our literature survey, we believe that ours is the first confirmed case of primary GNE myopathy with a novel missense mutation in Turkey. These patients illustrate that the muscle biopsy is still an important method for the differential diagnosis of vacuolar myopathies in that the detection of inclusions is required for the definitive diagnosis. PMID:27298745

  6. GNE Myopathy in Turkish Sisters with a Novel Homozygous Mutation.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Gulden; Secil, Yaprak; Ceylaner, Serdar; Tokucoglu, Figen; Türe, Sabiha; Celebisoy, Mehmet; İncesu, Tülay Kurt; Akhan, Galip

    2016-01-01

    Background. Hereditary inclusion body myopathy is caused by biallelic defects in the GNE gene located on chromosome 9p13. It generally affects adults older than 20 years of age. Methods and Results. In this study, we present two Turkish sisters with progressive myopathy and describe a novel mutation in the GNE gene. Both sisters had slightly higher levels of creatine kinase (CK) and muscle weakness. The older sister presented at 38 years of age with an inability to climb steps, weakness, and a steppage gait. Her younger sister was 36 years old and had similar symptoms. The first symptoms of the disorder were seen when the sisters were 30 and 34 years old, respectively. The muscle biopsy showed primary myopathic features and presence of rimmed vacuoles. DNA analysis demonstrated the presence of previously unknown homozygous mutations [c.2152 G>A (p.A718T)] in the GNE genes. Conclusion. Based on our literature survey, we believe that ours is the first confirmed case of primary GNE myopathy with a novel missense mutation in Turkey. These patients illustrate that the muscle biopsy is still an important method for the differential diagnosis of vacuolar myopathies in that the detection of inclusions is required for the definitive diagnosis. PMID:27298745

  7. Nutritional Status and Body Composition in Korean Myopathy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seong-Woong; Choi, Won Ah; Lee, Jang Woo; Suh, Mi Ri; Lee, Song Mi

    2016-01-01

    In myopathy patients, fat mass increases as the disease progresses, while lean body mass decreases. The present study aimed to investigate the overall nutritional status of Korean myopathy patients through surveys of diet and dietary habits, bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), and biochemistry tests, as well as the examination of related factors, for the purpose of using such findings as a basis for improving the nutritional status in myopathy patients. The energy intake of all participants was found to be insufficient at only 44.5% of Dietary Reference Intakes for Koreans 2010 (KDRIs 2010), whereas protein intake was sufficient at 89.8% of KDRIs 2010. Dietary fiber intake was found to be 58.4% of sufficient dietary fiber intake for adults according to KDRIs 2010. Calcium intake was found to be 55.0% and magnesium was 14.9% of the recommended calcium and magnesium intake for adults according to KDRIs 2010. With respect to quality of life (QOL), overall increase in QOL domain score showed significant positive correlations with vegetable fat intake (p < 0.05), vegetable protein intake (p < 0.05), and dietary fiber intake (p < 0.05). With respect to BIA, the mean phage angle of all participants was found to be 2.49 ± 0.93°, which was below the cutoff value. As a study that examined nutrient analysis and dietary habits of myopathy patients in Korea, the present study is meaningful in providing the basic data for future studies that aim to present dietary guidelines for patients suffering from myopathy. PMID:26839876

  8. DNM2 mutations in Chinese Han patients with centronuclear myopathy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pengfei; Liu, Xinhong; Zhao, Dandan; Dai, Tingjun; Wu, Huamin; Gong, Yaoqin; Yan, Chuanzhu

    2016-06-01

    Centronuclear myopathy (CNM) is a congenital myopathy characterized by an abnormally high number of muscle fibers with centrally located nuclei. Autosomal-dominant centronuclear myopathy-1 (CNM1) results from mutations in the dynamin 2 gene (DNM2) and accounts for approximately 50 % of all CNM cases. Up to now, around 35 mutations of DNM2 gene have been identified in CNM; however, the underlying molecular mechanism of DNM2 mutation in the pathology of CNM remains elusive, and the standard clinical characteristics and the genotype-phenotype correlation of DNM2 gene mutation with CNM have not yet been defined. Here, we report the clinical characteristics, molecular diagnosis strategy, and DNM2 gene mutations of four Chinese Han patients with CNM. Congenital myopathy-targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) was applied to sequence the regions of the genome that contain all the coding regions of all known CNM genes and other congenital myopathy genes. We found potential DNM2 mutations in all four of the patients. Further targeted Sanger DNA sequencing of DNM2 found the 1106G>A (p.R369Q) mutation in patients 1 and 2, the c.1393C>T (p.R465W) mutation in patient 3, and the c.1565G>A (p.R522H) mutation in patient 4, all of which were reported previously to be causative mutations of DNM2-related CNM. Our results suggest that the combination of targeted NGS and Sanger sequencing is an effective, rapid, and reliable strategy for the molecular diagnosis of CNM and other genetically heterogeneous disorders. PMID:26908122

  9. Hypokalemic vacuolar myopathy of chronic alcoholism. A histological and histochemical study.

    PubMed

    Khurana, R; Kalyanaraman, K

    1977-04-01

    Recent reports have emphasized the occurrence of a myopathy in chronic alcoholism associated with hypokalemia. This report of hypokalemic myopathy in a chronic alcoholic, emphasizes the primary myopathic nature of the condition and attributes it to a possible non-specific effect of the hypokalemia on skeletal muscle. It is pointed out, that histological and histochemical changes of muscle in this type of myopathy are indistinguishable from other types of hypokalemic myopathies like periodic paralysis. It is conjectured that in alcoholic myopathy, the underlying disorder might be related to a primary disturbance of potassium metabolism, though in most cases, serum potassium is normal. It is likely that studies aimed at studying total body potassium content and turnover in alcoholic myopathy would help in understanding its pathogenesis and possible relationship to disturbed potassium metabolism. PMID:849704

  10. Autonomic responses to correct outcomes and interaction errors during single-switch scanning among children with severe spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The combination of single-switch access technology and scanning is the most promising means of augmentative and alternative communication for many children with severe physical disabilities. However, the physical impairment of the child and the technology’s limited ability to interpret the child’s intentions often lead to false positives and negatives (corresponding to accidental and missed selections, respectively) occurring at rates that frustrate the user and preclude functional communication. Multiple psychophysiological studies have associated cardiac deceleration and increased phasic electrodermal activity with self-realization of errors among able-bodied individuals. Thus, physiological measurements have potential utility at enhancing single-switch access, provided that such prototypical autonomic responses exist in persons with profound disabilities. Methods The present case series investigated the autonomic responses of three pediatric single-switch users with severe spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy, in the context of a single-switch letter matching activity. Each participant exhibited distinct autonomic responses to activity engagement. Results Our analysis confirmed the presence of the autonomic response pattern of cardiac deceleration and increased phasic electrodermal activity following true positives, false positives and false negatives errors, but not subsequent to true negative outcomes. Conclusions These findings suggest that there may be merit in complementing single-switch input with autonomic measurements to improve augmentative and alternative communications for pediatric access technology users. PMID:24607065

  11. Sialylation of Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen is a noninvasive blood-based biomarker for GNE myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Leoyklang, Petcharat; Malicdan, May Christine; Yardeni, Tal; Celeste, Frank; Ciccone, Carla; Li, Xueli; Jiang, Rong; Gahl, William A.; Carrillo-Carrasco, Nuria; He, Miao; Huizing, Marjan

    2014-01-01

    GNE myopathy is an adult-onset progressive myopathy, resulting from mutations in GNE, the key enzyme of sialic acid synthesis. The pathomechanism of GNE myopathy likely involves aberrant sialylation, since administration of sialic acid itself, or its precursor, N-acetylmannosamine (ManNAc), rescued hyposialylation of GNE myopathy mice. Recently, clinical trials for GNE myopathy patients were initiated. A robust, noninvasive biomarker is highly desirable for diagnosis of GNE myopathy and for evaluating response to therapy. Since muscle biopsies of patients with GNE myopathy demonstrated hyposialylation of predominantly O-linked glycans, we analyzed the O-linked glycome of patients’ plasma proteins using mass spectrometry. Most patients showed increased plasma levels of the core 1 O-linked glycan, Thomsen-Friedenreich (T)-antigen and/or decreased amounts of its sialylated form, ST-antigen. In addition, compared to unaffected individuals, all analyzed patients had a consistently increased ratio of T-antigen to ST-antigen. Importantly, the T/ST ratios were in the normal range in a GNE myopathy patient treated with intravenous immunoglobulins as a source of sialic acid, indicating response to therapy. Natural history and clinical trial data will reveal whether T/ST ratios can be correlated to muscle function. These findings not only highlight plasma T/ST ratios as a robust blood-based biomarker for GNE myopathy, but may also help explain the pathology and course of the disease. PMID:25123033

  12. [Novel autoantibodies in inflammatory myopathies and systemic sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Ribi, Camillo

    2015-01-14

    Acquired inflammatory myopathies and systemic sclerosis are chronic autoimmune conditions. These diseases arise from sustained activation of the innate and adaptive immune system, resulting in damage to blood vessels, muscles, connective tissues and internal organs. Auto-antibodies are found in a majority of cases, which makes the immune serology an important diagnostic tool. The immuno dot assays detect a variety of disease-specific-or-associated antibodies. A positive result should be correlated with the indirect immunofluorescence pattern of the antinuclear antibody screen. Some antibodies are associated with specific organ involvement, other may indicated an underlying neoplastic condition. The scope of this article is to review the diagnostic and prognostic value of antibodies in inflammatory myopathies and systemic sclerosis. PMID:25799647

  13. Statin therapy, myopathy and exercise--a case report.

    PubMed

    Semple, Stuart J

    2012-01-01

    In a bid to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with coronary artery disease, statin therapy has become a cornerstone treatment for patients with dyslipideamia. Statins, or HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, are effective in blocking hepatic synthesis of cholesterol and are generally regarded as safe. Although rare, severe adverse side effects such as rhabdomyolysis have been reported, however, the more common complaint from patients is that related to myopathy. There is also mounting evidence that exercise may exacerbate these side effects, however the mechanisms are yet to be fully defined and there is controversy regarding the role that inflammation may play in the myopathy. This paper reports a patients experience during 6 months of simvastatin therapy and provides some insight into the white cell count (inflammation) following two bouts of moderate intensity exercise before and during statin therapy. It also highlights the need for rehabilitation practitioners to be aware of the adverse effects of statins in exercising patients. PMID:22420409

  14. Restriction enzyme analysis of the mitochondrial genome in mitochondrial myopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Poulton, J; Turnbull, D M; Mehta, A B; Wilson, J; Gardiner, R M

    1988-01-01

    The mitochondrial myopathies are a heterogeneous group of disorders some of which may be caused by mutations in the mitochondrial genome. Mitochondrial DNA from 10 patients with mitochondrial myopathy and their mothers was analysed using five restriction enzymes and 11 mitochondrial probes in bacteriophage M13. No abnormalities were found in seven out of the 10 patients. Polymorphisms which have not previously been reported were detected in three patients and two of their mothers. These results exclude the presence of deletions or insertions of greater than 60 bp in the region of the mitochondrial genome examined. Any causative mitochondrial DNA mutations in these disorders are therefore likely to be point mutations or small structural rearrangements. Images PMID:2903249

  15. Chronic myopathy due to immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Manoli, Irini; Kwan, Justin Y.; Wang, Qian; Rushing, Elisabeth J.; Tsokos, Maria; Arai, Andrew E.; Burch, Warner M.; Dispenzieri, Angela; McPherron, Alexandra C.; Gahl, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid myopathy associated with a plasma cell dyscrasia is a rare cause of muscle hypertrophy. It can be a challenging diagnosis, since pathological findings are often elusive. In addition, the mechanism by which immunoglobulin light-chain deposition stimulates muscle overgrowth remains poorly understood. We present a 53–year old female with a 10-year history of progressive generalized muscle overgrowth. Congo-red staining and immunohistochemistry revealed perivascular lambda light chain amyloid deposits, apparent only in a second muscle biopsy. The numbers of central nuclei and satellite cells were increased, suggesting enhanced muscle progenitor cell formation. Despite the chronicity of the light chain disease, the patient showed complete resolution of hematologic findings and significant improvement of her muscle symptoms following autologous bone marrow transplantation. This case highlights the importance of early diagnosis and therapy for this treatable cause of a chronic myopathy with muscle hypertrophy. PMID:23465863

  16. Cysteine mutations cause defective tyrosine phosphorylation in MEGF10 myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Mitsuhashi, Satomi; Mitsuhashi, Hiroaki; Alexander, Matthew S; Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Kang, Peter B

    2013-01-01

    Recessive mutations in MEGF10 are known to cause a congenital myopathy in humans. Two mutations in the extracellular EGF-like domains of MEGF10, C326R and C774R, were associated with decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of MEGF10 in vitro. Y1030 was identified to be the major tyrosine phosphorylation site in MEGF10 and is phosphorylated at least in part by c-Src. Overexpression of wild-type MEGF10 enhanced C2C12 myoblast proliferation, while overexpression of Y1030F mutated MEGF10 did not. We conclude that MEGF10-mediated signaling via tyrosine phosphorylation helps to regulate myoblast proliferation. Defects in this signaling pathway may contribute to the disease mechanism of MEGF10 myopathy. PMID:23954233

  17. Laing distal myopathy pathologically resembling inclusion body myositis

    PubMed Central

    Roda, Ricardo H; Schindler, Alice B; Blackstone, Craig; Mammen, Andrew L; Corse, Andrea M; Lloyd, Thomas E

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in MYH7 cause autosomal dominant Laing distal myopathy. We present a family with a previously reported deletion (c.5186_5188delAGA, p.K1729del). Muscle pathology in one family member was characterized by an inflammatory myopathy with rimmed vacuoles, increased MHC Class I expression, and perivascular and endomysial muscle inflammation comprising CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, and CD68+ inflammatory cells. Interestingly, this biopsy specimen contained TDP-43, p62, and SMI-31-positive protein aggregates typical of inclusion body myositis. These findings should alert physicians to the possibility that patients with MYH7 mutations may have muscle biopsies showing pathologic findings similar to inclusion body myositis. PMID:25574480

  18. Immune-Mediated Necrotizing Myopathy: Update on Diagnosis and Management.

    PubMed

    Basharat, Pari; Christopher-Stine, Lisa

    2015-12-01

    The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIMs) comprise a group of autoimmune disorders that target skeletal muscle. They are characterized by typical laboratory and clinical features including muscle weakness, elevated muscle enzymes, characteristic histopathology of muscle biopsies, as well as electromyography abnormalities. The IIMs are divided into polymyositis, dermatomyositis, inclusion body myositis, nonspecific myositis, and immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy (IMNM). IMNM is distinguished by the absence of primary inflammation on muscle biopsy. IMNM may be associated with myositis-specific autoantibodies (i.e., anti-SRP and anti-HMGCR) and malignancy, in association with viral infections (HIV or hepatitis C), or in relation to other connective tissue diseases (i.e., scleroderma). Typical clinical findings such as severe muscle weakness, highly elevated creatine kinase (CK) levels, as well as resistance to conventional immunosuppressive therapy are associated with this subtype of IIM. This review provides an overview of this disease entity and focuses on its diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26515574

  19. Lipid storage myopathy in von Gierke's disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, K; Santa, T; Inoue, K; Omae, T

    1978-09-01

    An 18-year-old girl with von Gierke's disease associated with a lipid storage myopathy is reported. The diagnosis of von Gierke's disease was made from decreased activity in glucose-6-phosphatase in the jejunal biopsy specimen. Neurologically she showed generalized hypotonia of the muscles, atrophy of bilateral proximal muscles of the lower extremities, weakness in neck flexors, deltoid and lumbar girdle muscles, and a positive Gower's sign. Muscle biopsy from flexor femoris muscle revealed fatty deposition in type 1 fibers and atrophy of type 2 fibers and the diagnosis of an accompanying lipid storage myopathy was made. This case also had a ventricular septal defect confirmed by right cardiac catheterization. PMID:213538

  20. Case Report: Elevated CPK, an indicator of idiopathic inflammatory myopathy?

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Hina N.; Jilani, Usman; Arora, Shitij

    2016-01-01

    Polymyositis is a rare disease with incidence rates at about 1 per 100,000 people annually. In this case report we will review a case of proximal muscle weakness with an elevated creatine phosphokinase that was initially misdiagnosed twice as rhabdomyolysis. Therefore, emphasizing that idiopathic inflammatory myopathy is a potential cause of myasthenia that must be considered in the differential. The case will also describe the current treatment and treatment response in polymyositis.

  1. Sleep-disordered breathing in a patient with congenital myopathy.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Y; Shimizu, T; Takahashi, K; Saito, Y; Ogawa, Y; Kanbayashi, T; Hishikawa, Y

    1998-04-01

    A case of adult onset myopathy who showed a peculiar sleep-related respiratory disorder (SRRD) is reported. She recovered from respiratory failure after tracheostomy and/or with the aid of the respirator used only during the night. Sleep study without the use of respirator revealed that her sleep was highly fragmented by frequent arousal responses due to inspiratory effort but not by apnea or hypopnea. To our knowledge this type of SRRD has not been described. PMID:9628169

  2. Analysis of lipid profile in lipid storage myopathy.

    PubMed

    Aguennouz, M'hammed; Beccaria, Marco; Purcaro, Giorgia; Oteri, Marianna; Micalizzi, Giuseppe; Musumesci, Olimpia; Ciranni, Annmaria; Di Giorgio, Rosa Maria; Toscano, Antonio; Dugo, Paola; Mondello, Luigi

    2016-09-01

    Lipid dysmetabolism disease is a condition in which lipids are stored abnormally in organs and tissues throughout the body, causing muscle weakness (myopathy). Usually, the diagnosis of this disease and its characterization goes through dosage of Acyl CoA in plasma accompanied with evidence of droplets of intra-fibrils lipids in the patient muscle biopsy. However, to understand the pathophysiological mechanisms of lipid storage diseases, it is useful to identify the nature of lipids deposited in muscle fiber. In this work fatty acids and triglycerides profile of lipid accumulated in the muscle of people suffering from myopathies syndromes was characterized. In particular, the analyses were carried out on the muscle biopsy of people afflicted by lipid storage myopathy, such as multiple acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency, and neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy, and by the intramitochondrial lipid storage dysfunctions, such as deficiencies of carnitine palmitoyltransferase II enzyme. A single step extraction and derivatization procedure was applied to analyze fatty acids from muscle tissues by gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector and with an electronic impact mass spectrometer. Triglycerides, extracted by using n-hexane, were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometer equipped with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization interface. The most representative fatty acids in all samples were: C16:0 in the 13-24% range, C18:1n9 in the 20-52% range, and C18:2n6 in the 10-25% range. These fatty acids were part of the most representative triglycerides in all samples. The data obtained was statistically elaborated performing a principal component analysis. A satisfactory discrimination was obtained among the different diseases. Using component 1 vs component 3 a 43.3% of total variance was explained. Such results suggest the important role that lipid profile characterization can have in supporting a correct

  3. Case Report: Elevated CPK, an indicator of idiopathic inflammatory myopathy?

    PubMed

    Khan, Hina N; Jilani, Usman; Arora, Shitij

    2016-01-01

    Polymyositis is a rare disease with incidence rates at about 1 per 100,000 people annually. In this case report we will review a case of proximal muscle weakness with an elevated creatine phosphokinase that was initially misdiagnosed twice as rhabdomyolysis. Therefore, emphasizing that idiopathic inflammatory myopathy is a potential cause of myasthenia that must be considered in the differential. The case will also describe the current treatment and treatment response in polymyositis. PMID:27540467

  4. Integrative Data Mining Highlights Candidate Genes for Monogenic Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Neto, Osorio Abath; Tassy, Olivier; Biancalana, Valérie; Zanoteli, Edmar; Pourquié, Olivier; Laporte, Jocelyn

    2014-01-01

    Inherited myopathies are a heterogeneous group of disabling disorders with still barely understood pathological mechanisms. Around 40% of afflicted patients remain without a molecular diagnosis after exclusion of known genes. The advent of high-throughput sequencing has opened avenues to the discovery of new implicated genes, but a working list of prioritized candidate genes is necessary to deal with the complexity of analyzing large-scale sequencing data. Here we used an integrative data mining strategy to analyze the genetic network linked to myopathies, derive specific signatures for inherited myopathy and related disorders, and identify and rank candidate genes for these groups. Training sets of genes were selected after literature review and used in Manteia, a public web-based data mining system, to extract disease group signatures in the form of enriched descriptor terms, which include functional annotation, human and mouse phenotypes, as well as biological pathways and protein interactions. These specific signatures were then used as an input to mine and rank candidate genes, followed by filtration against skeletal muscle expression and association with known diseases. Signatures and identified candidate genes highlight both potential common pathological mechanisms and allelic disease groups. Recent discoveries of gene associations to diseases, like B3GALNT2, GMPPB and B3GNT1 to congenital muscular dystrophies, were prioritized in the ranked lists, suggesting a posteriori validation of our approach and predictions. We show an example of how the ranked lists can be used to help analyze high-throughput sequencing data to identify candidate genes, and highlight the best candidate genes matching genomic regions linked to myopathies without known causative genes. This strategy can be automatized to generate fresh candidate gene lists, which help cope with database annotation updates as new knowledge is incorporated. PMID:25353622

  5. Filamin C-related myopathies: pathology and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Fürst, Dieter O; Goldfarb, Lev G; Kley, Rudolf A; Vorgerd, Matthias; Olivé, Montse; van der Ven, Peter F M

    2013-01-01

    The term filaminopathy was introduced after a truncating mutation in the dimerization domain of filamin C (FLNc) was shown to be responsible for a devastating muscle disease. Subsequently, the same mutation was found in patients from diverse ethnical origins, indicating that this specific alteration is a mutational hot spot. Patients initially present with proximal muscle weakness, while distal and respiratory muscles become affected with disease progression. Muscle biopsies of these patients show typical signs of myofibrillar myopathy, including disintegration of myofibrils and aggregation of several proteins into distinct intracellular deposits. Highly similar phenotypes were observed in patients with other mutations in Ig-like domains of FLNc that result in expression of a noxious protein. Biochemical and biophysical studies showed that the mutated domains acquire an abnormal structure causing decreased stability and eventually becoming a seed for abnormal aggregation with other proteins. The disease usually presents only after the fourth decade of life possibly as a result of ageing-related impairments in the machinery that is responsible for disposal of damaged proteins. This is confirmed by mutations in components of this machinery that cause a highly similar phenotype. Transfection studies of cultured muscle cells reflect the events observed in patient muscles and, therefore, may provide a helpful model for testing future dedicated therapeutic strategies. More recently, FLNC mutations were also found in families with a distal myopathy phenotype, caused either by mutations in the actin-binding domain of FLNc that result in increased actin-binding and non-specific myopathic abnormalities without myofibrillar myopathy pathology, or a nonsense mutation in the rod domain that leads to RNA instability, haploinsufficiency with decreased expression levels of FLNc in the muscle fibers and myofibrillar abnormalities, but not to the formation of desmin-positive protein

  6. Novel recessive myotilin mutation causes severe myofibrillar myopathy.

    PubMed

    Schessl, Joachim; Bach, Elisa; Rost, Simone; Feldkirchner, Sarah; Kubny, Christiana; Müller, Stefan; Hanisch, Franz-Georg; Kress, Wolfram; Schoser, Benedikt

    2014-08-01

    We identified the first homozygous and hence recessive mutation in the myotilin gene (MYOT) in a family affected by a severe myofibrillar myopathy (MFM). MFM is a rare, progressive and devastating disease of human skeletal muscle with distinct histopathological pattern of protein aggregates and myofibrillar degeneration. So far, only heterozygous missense mutations in MYOT have been associated with autosomal dominant myofibrillar myopathy, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1A and distal myopathy. Myotilin itself is highly expressed in skeletal and cardiac muscle and is localized at the Z-disc and therefore interacts in sarcomere assembly. We performed whole-exome sequencing in a German family clinically diagnosed with MFM and identified a homozygous mutation in exon 2, c.16C > G (p.Arg6Gly). Using laser microdissection followed by quantitative mass spectrometry, we identified the myotilin protein as one component showing the highest increased abundance in the aggregates in the index patient. We suggest that the combined approach has a high potential as a new tool for the confirmation of unclassified variants which are found in whole-exome sequencing approaches. PMID:24928145

  7. Capture myopathy in an endangered sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pulla)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carpenter, J.W.; Thomas, N.J.; Reeves, S.

    1991-01-01

    Despite precautions to protect cranes, a 3-year-old endangered Mississippi sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pulla) was found caught in a leghold trap in Gautier, Mississippi, on 11 November 1987. The bird could have been in the trap for up to 16 hr and was standing and struggling to escape when it was discovered. Serum chemistries of the crane on 12 November revealed elevated lactic dehydrogenase (2,880 IU/L), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (152 IU/L), and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) (>1,000 IU/L) values. Following surgical amputation of a fractured toe, the bird never attempted to stand and was unable to stand even when manually supported. Radiographic and physical examination of both legs did not reveal any anatomical abnormalities. Despite medical care, including supportive therapy, no improvement was observed in the bird's ability to stand and to support itself, and the bird died on 19 November. Serum chemistries and the postmortem and histopathologic findings were compatible with capture myopathy described in other species. Because of the possible susceptibility of long-legged birds such as the Mississippi sandhill crane to capture myopathy, special care must be taken when trapping, handling, chemically immobilizing, and transporting these species. In addition, precautions must be taken when conducting a predator-control program to ensure that nontarget wildlife are unlikely to encounter traps. Capture myopathy has only rarely been observed in wild birds, and this case represents the first report in a Mississippi sandhill crane.

  8. [A case of X-linked myotubular myopathy with chylothorax].

    PubMed

    Oishi, Taku; Sato, Tetsuya; Matsushita, Kenshi; Takechi, Tomoki; Murakami, Nobuyuki; Fujieda, Mikiya

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of X-linked myotubular myopathy with chylothorax. A male infant weighing 2,114 g was born to a mother whose pregnancy was complicated with polyhydramnios from gestational week 32. At gestational week 37, emergent caesarian section was performed due to membrane rupture followed by fetal bradycardia. Ventilatory support was necessary because the neonate showed severe birth asphyxia accompanied by hypotonia and dyspnea. He also showed a respiratory complication of chylothorax at 10 days old; therefore, thoracic drainage was performed. Congenital chylothorax associated with congenital myotonic dystrophy (CMD) has been described in a number of past reports. Specific findings of congenital myotubular myopathy and partial CMD, such as peripheral halo of muscle fibers, were demonstrated in biopsied muscle, and mutation of the myotubularin (MTM1) gene was identified. Tracheostomy was performed at 5 months old because of prolonged ventilatory support and severe dysphagia. The infant was able to be discharged at 17 months old. Congenital chylothorax might be associated with congenital myotubular myopathies such as CMD. PMID:27012108

  9. Classification, diagnosis, and management of idiopathic inflammatory myopathies.

    PubMed

    Lazarou, Ilias N; Guerne, Pierre-André

    2013-05-01

    The detection and characterization of a large array of autoantibodies, including at least 8 different antisynthetase, anti-SRP, -200/100 (HMGCR), -Mi-2, -CADM-140 (MDA5), -SAE, -p155, -MJ (NXP-2), and -PMS1, frequently associated with distinct and well-defined clinicopathological features, allowed for significant improvement in the definition and diagnosis of idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM). Classification remains difficult, with lingering divergence between the different specialties involved in IIM care, but several categories clearly stand out, including dermatomyositis (DM), overlap myositis (OM), polymyositis, necrotizing myositis, and sporadic inclusion body myositis (s-IBM). Biopsy and histological analysis remain crucial, particularly in the absence of autoantibodies, to accurately specify the diagnosis and rule out mimics such as muscular dystrophies and metabolic myopathies. Numerous infectious agents (in particular human immunodeficiency virus and human T cell lymphotrophic virus-1) and drugs (statins, tumor necrosis factor inhibitors, and proton pump inhibitors) can cause mimic IIM that must also be excluded. Pharmacological treatment, in addition to glucocorticoids and immunoglobulins, now includes mycophenolate mofetil and rituximab, which proved helpful in resistant cases, particularly rituximab in DM and OM. Exercise, initially seen as potentially deleterious, recently was shown to be efficacious and safe. IIM can thus be reasonably well controlled in most cases, although aggressive disease remains refractory to treatment, including some cases of necrotizing myopathy. Sporadic IBM still seems resistant to all medications tested to date. PMID:23504386

  10. Insights into Muscle Degeneration from Heritable Inclusion Body Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Muscle mass and function are gradually lost in age-related, degenerative neuromuscular disorders, which also reflect the clinical hallmarks of sarcopenia. The consensus definition of sarcopenia includes a condition of age-related loss of muscle mass, quality, and strength. The most common acquired muscle disease affecting adults aged over 50 years is sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM). Besides inflammatory effects and immune-mediated muscle injury, degenerative myofiber changes are characteristic features of the disease. Although the earliest triggering events in sIBM remain elusive, a plethora of downstream mechanisms are implicated in the pathophysiology of muscle wasting. Although it remains controversial whether hereditary forms of inclusion body myopathy (IBM) may be considered as degenerative sIBM disease models, partial pathophysiological aspects can mimic the much more frequent sporadic condition, in particular the occurrence of inclusion bodies in skeletal muscle. Various clinical aspects in genetically determined skeletal muscle disorders reflect age-related alterations observed in sarcopenia. Several intriguing clues from monogenic defects in heritable IBMs contributing to the molecular basis of muscle loss will be discussed with special emphasis on inclusion body myopathy with Paget’s disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD) and GNE myopathy. Finally, also the recently identified dominant multisystem proteinopathy will be considered, which may rarely present as IBM. PMID:25729363

  11. Cell stress molecules in the skeletal muscle of GNE myopathy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mutations of the UDP-N-acetylglucosamine-2-epimerase/N-acetylmannosamine-kinase (GNE)-gene are causally related to GNE myopathy. Yet, underlying pathomechanisms of muscle fibre damage have remained elusive. In sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM), the pro-inflammatory cell-stress mediators αB-crystallin and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) are crucial markers of the disease pathology. Methods 10 muscle biopsies from GNE myopathy patients were analyzed for mRNA-expression of markers of cell-stress, inflammation and β-amyloid and compared to non-myopathic controls. Using double-labeling immunohistochemistry, serial sections of skeletal muscle biopsies were stained for amyloid precursor protein (APP), major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-I, αB-crystallin, neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), interleukin (IL)-1β, β-amyloid, iNOS, and phosphorylated neurofilament (P-neurofilament) as well as hematoxylin/eosin histochemistry. Corresponding areas of all biopsies with a total of 2,817 muscle fibres were quantitatively assessed for all markers. Results mRNA-expression of APP, NCAM, iNOS, TNF-α and TGF-β was higher in GNE myopathy compared to controls, yet this was not statistically significant. The mRNA-expression of APP and αB-crystallin significantly correlated with the expression of several pro-inflammatory and cell-stress-associated markers as NCAM, IL-1β, TGF-β, CCL-3, and CCL4. By immunohistochemistry, αB-crystallin and iNOS were co-upregulated and the number of fibres positive for αB-crystallin, NCAM, MHC-I and iNOS significantly correlated with each other. A large fraction of fibres positive for αB-crystallin were double positive for iNOS and vice-versa. Moreover, several fibres with structural abnormalities were positive for αB-crystallin and iNOS. Notably, particularly normal appearing fibres displayed an overexpression of these molecules. Conclusions The cell-stress molecules αB-crystallin and iNOS are overexpressed in GNE

  12. Nutritional degenerative myopathy in a population of captive bred Uroplatus phantasticus (satanic leaf-tailed geckoes).

    PubMed

    Les Gabor, J

    2005-01-01

    Severe generalized degenerative myopathy was diagnosed in a population of captive bred satanic leaf-tailed geckoes (Uroplatus phantasticus). The diagnosis was based on characteristic histological changes and response to dietary therapy. This is the first reported case of nutritional myopathy in the satanic leaf-tailed gecko. PMID:15690956

  13. Myopathy induced by statin-ezetimibe combination: Evaluation of potential risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Brahmachari, Ballari; Chatterjee, Suparna

    2015-01-01

    Although both atorvastatin and ezetimibe may cause myopathy, statin-induced myopathy is less likely at low doses, and ezetimibe is only rarely reported to induce myopathy. Also, ezetimibe is not usually known to potentiate statin-induced myopathy. We report a case of myalgia with elevated serum creatinine phosphokinase in a patient after 2 months of therapy with fixed dose combination of atorvastatin and ezetimibe (10 mg each). At the time of the event, patient was undertaking moderate physical exertion in the form of brisk walking for 30–40 min a day and was detected to have low serum Vitamin D levels. The adverse event resolved after stopping atorvastatin-ezetimibe combination therapy. Potential risk factors, such as physical exertion and Vitamin D deficiency, co-existent in dyslipidemic patients, may exacerbate myopathy potential of these drugs, and precipitate muscular symptoms even at a low-dose. PMID:26600650

  14. Myopathy induced by statin-ezetimibe combination: Evaluation of potential risk factors.

    PubMed

    Brahmachari, Ballari; Chatterjee, Suparna

    2015-01-01

    Although both atorvastatin and ezetimibe may cause myopathy, statin-induced myopathy is less likely at low doses, and ezetimibe is only rarely reported to induce myopathy. Also, ezetimibe is not usually known to potentiate statin-induced myopathy. We report a case of myalgia with elevated serum creatinine phosphokinase in a patient after 2 months of therapy with fixed dose combination of atorvastatin and ezetimibe (10 mg each). At the time of the event, patient was undertaking moderate physical exertion in the form of brisk walking for 30-40 min a day and was detected to have low serum Vitamin D levels. The adverse event resolved after stopping atorvastatin-ezetimibe combination therapy. Potential risk factors, such as physical exertion and Vitamin D deficiency, co-existent in dyslipidemic patients, may exacerbate myopathy potential of these drugs, and precipitate muscular symptoms even at a low-dose. PMID:26600650

  15. Limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2L presenting as necrotizing myopathy.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Ilka; Stoltenburg, Gisela; Deschauer, Marcus; Winterholler, Martin; Hanisch, Frank

    2014-05-01

    Recessive mutations in the ANO5 gene, encoding anoctamin 5, cause proximal limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD2L), Miyoshi-type distal myopathy (MM3) and asymptomatic hyper- CKemia. We report a woman with exertion-induced myalgia and weakness in the hip girdle manifesting at the age of 40. Creatine kinase (CK) was increased 20-fold. Histologically the dominating feature was necrotizing myopathy, but long-term immunosuppressive therapy did not change CK level or myopathic symptoms. Molecular genetic investigation led to the finding of the homozygous ANO5 c.191dupA mutation. This is a report of a muscular dystrophy due to ANO5 mutation presenting histologically as necrotizing myopathy. For this reason our finding extends the histological spectrum of myopathies due to ANO5 mutations as well as the possible differential diagnoses for necrotizing myopathy. PMID:24843231

  16. Genetic Risk for Malignant Hyperthermia in Non-Anesthesia-Induced Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Vladutiu, Georgirene D.; Isackson, Paul J.; Kaufman, Kenneth; Harley, John B.; Cobb, Beth; Christopher-Stine, Lisa; Wortmann, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is a pharmacogenetic, autosomal dominantly inherited disorder of skeletal muscle triggered by volatile anesthetics and infrequently by extreme exertion and heat exposure. MH has variable penetrance with an incidence ranging from 1 in 5,000 to 1 in 50,000–100,000 anesthesias. Mutations in the ryanodine receptor gene, RYR1, are found in 50–70% of cases. We hypothesized that a portion of patients with drug-induced muscle diseases, unrelated to anesthesia, such as severe statin myopathy, have underlying genetic liability that may include RYR1 gene mutations. DNA samples were collected from 885 patients in 4 groups: severe statin myopathy (n=197), mild statin myopathy (n=163), statin-tolerant controls (n=133), and non-drug-induced myopathies of unknown etiology characterized by exercise-induced muscle pain and weakness (n=392). Samples were screened for 105 mutations and variants in 26 genes associated with 7 categories of muscle disease including 34 mutations and variants in the RYR1 gene. Disease-causing mutations or variants in RYR1 were present in 3 severe statin myopathy cases, 1 mild statin myopathy case, 8 patients with non-drug-induced myopathy, and none in controls. These results suggest that disease-causing mutations and certain variants in the RYR1 gene may contribute to underlying genetic risk for non-anesthesia-induced myopathies and should be included in genetic susceptibility screening in patients with severe statin myopathy and in patients with non-statin-induced myopathies of unknown etiology. PMID:21795085

  17. GNE Myopathy and Cell Apoptosis: A Comparative Mutation Analysis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Reema; Arya, Ranjana

    2016-07-01

    In a number of genetic disorders such as GNE myopathy, it is not clear how mutations in target genes result in disease phenotype. GNE myopathy is a progressive neuro-degenerative disorder associated with homozygous or compound heterozygous missense mutations in either epimerase or kinase domain of UDP-GlcNAc 2-epimerase/ManNAc kinase (GNE). This bifunctional enzyme catalyses the rate limiting step in sialic acid biosynthesis. Many mechanisms have been suggested as possible cause of muscle degeneration. These include hyposialylation of critical proteins, defects in cytoskeletal network, sarcomere organization and apoptosis. In order to elucidate the role of GNE in cell apoptosis, we have used HEK cell-based model system overexpressing pathologically relevant GNE mutations. These cells display a reduction in the levels of sialic acid-bound glycoconjugates. These mutants GNE overexpressing cells have defect in cell proliferation as compared to vector or wild-type GNE (wtGNE) controls. Moreover, effect of different GNE mutations on cell apoptosis was also observed using staining with annexin V-FITC and TUNEL assay. The downstream apoptosis signalling pathway involving activation of caspases and increased PARP cleavage were observed in all GNE mutant cell lines. In addition, morpho-structural changes in mitochondria in cells overexpressing different GNE mutants were noticed by transmission electron microscopy, and mitochondrial transmembrane potential was found to be altered in absence of functional GNE. Our results clearly indicate role of GNE in mitochondria-dependent cell apoptosis and provide insights into the pathomechanism of GNE myopathy. PMID:25976366

  18. Extensive morphological and immunohistochemical characterization in myotubular myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Shichiji, Minobu; Biancalana, Valérie; Fardeau, Michel; Hogrel, Jean-Yves; Osawa, Makiko; Laporte, Jocelyn; Romero, Norma Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    The X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM) also called X-linked centronuclear myopathy is a rare congenital myopathy due to mutations in the MTM1 gene encoding myotubularin. The disease gives rise to a severe muscle weakness in males at birth. The main muscle morphological characteristics (significant number of small muscle fibers with centralized nuclei and type 1 fiber predominance) are usually documented, but the sequence of formation and maintenance of this particular morphological pattern has not been extensively characterized in humans. In this study, we perform a reevaluation of morphological changes in skeletal muscle biopsies in severe XLMTM. We correlate the pathologic features observed in the muscle biopsies of 15 newborns with MTM1-mutations according to the “adjusted-age” at the time of muscle biopsy, focusing on sequential analysis in the early period of the life (from 34 weeks of gestation to 3 months of age). We found a similar morphological pattern throughout the period analyzed; the proportion of myofibers with central nuclei was high in all muscle biopsies, independently of the muscle type, the age of the newborns at time of biopsy and the specific MTM1 mutation. We did not observe a period free of morphological abnormalities in human skeletal muscle as observed in myotubularin-deficient mouse models. In addition, this study demonstrated some features of delayed maturation of the muscle fibers without any increase in the number of satellite cells, associated with a marked disorganization of the muscle T-tubules and cytoskeletal network in the skeletal muscle fibers. PMID:24381816

  19. Treatment of inflammatory myopathy: emerging therapies and therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Moghadam-Kia, Siamak; Aggarwal, Rohit; Oddis, Chester V

    2016-01-01

    Despite the lack of placebo-controlled trials, glucocorticoids are considered the mainstay of initial treatment for idiopathic inflammatory myopathy and myositis-associated interstitial lung disease. Glucocorticoid-sparing agents are often given concomitantly with other immunosuppressive agents, particularly in patients with moderate or severe disease. First-line conventional immunosuppressive drugs include either methotrexate or azathioprine, and when they fail, more aggressive therapy includes mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus or cyclosporine, intravenous immunoglobulin, rituximab, or cyclophosphamide, used alone or in various combinations. Further investigations are required to assess the role of more novel therapies in the treatment of myositis and myositis-associated interstitial lung disease. PMID:26313852

  20. Distal myopathy caused by homozygous missense mutations in the nebulin gene.

    PubMed

    Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina; Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Kalimo, Hannu; Paetau, Anders; Nuutinen, Elina; Hackman, Peter; Sewry, Caroline; Pelin, Katarina; Udd, Bjarne

    2007-06-01

    We describe a novel, recessively inherited distal myopathy caused by homozygous missense mutations in the nebulin gene (NEB), in which other combinations of mutations are known to cause nemaline (rod) myopathy (NM). Two different missense mutations were identified in homozygous form in seven Finnish patients from four unrelated families with childhood or adult-onset foot drop. Both mutations, when combined in compound heterozygous form with more disruptive mutations in NEB, are known to cause NM. Hitherto, no patients with NM have been found to have two missense mutations in NEB. Muscle weakness predominantly affected ankle dorsiflexors, finger extensors and neck flexors, a distribution different both from the patterns of weakness seen in NM caused by NEB mutations, and those of the known recessively inherited distal myopathies. Singleton cases need to be distinguished from the Laing type of distal myopathy. Histologically, this myopathy differs from NM in that nemaline bodies were not detectable with routine light microscopy, and they were inconspicuous or absent even with electron microscopy. Rimmed vacuoles, commonly seen in other distal myopathies, were not a feature. We conclude that homozygous missense mutations in NEB cause a novel distal myopathy, predominantly involving lower leg extensor muscles, finger extensors and neck flexors. PMID:17525139

  1. High risk of cancer in autoimmune necrotizing myopathies: usefulness of myositis specific antibody.

    PubMed

    Allenbach, Yves; Keraen, Jeremy; Bouvier, Anne-Marie; Jooste, Valérie; Champtiaux, Nicolas; Hervier, Baptiste; Schoindre, Yoland; Rigolet, Aude; Gilardin, Laurent; Musset, Lucile; Charuel, Jean-Luc; Boyer, Olivier; Jouen, Fabienne; Drouot, Laurent; Martinet, Jeremie; Stojkovic, Tanya; Eymard, Bruno; Laforêt, Pascal; Behin, Antony; Salort-Campana, Emmanuelle; Fain, Olivier; Meyer, Alain; Schleinitz, Nicolas; Mariampillai, Kuberaka; Grados, Aurelie; Benveniste, Olivier

    2016-08-01

    Cancer can occur in patients with inflammatory myopathies. This association is mainly observed in dermatomyositis, and myositis-specific antibodies have allowed us to delineate patients at an increased risk. Malignancy is also reported in patients with necrotizing autoimmune myopathies, but the risk remains elusive. Anti-signal recognition particle or anti-HMGCR antibodies have been specifically associated with necrotizing autoimmune myopathies. We aimed at screening the incidence of cancer in necrotizing autoimmune myopathies. A group of patients (n = 115) with necrotizing autoimmune myopathies with or without myositis-specific antibodies was analysed. Malignancy occurred more frequently in seronegative necrotizing autoimmune myopathies patients and in HMGCR-positive patients compared to anti-signal recognition particle positive patients. Synchronous malignancy was diagnosed in 21.4% and 11.5% of cases, respectively, and incidence of cancer was higher compared to the general population in both groups. No specific type of cancer was predominant. Patients suffering from a synchronous cancer had a decreased median survival time. Cancer screening is necessary in seronegative necrotizing autoimmune myopathies and in HMGCR-positive patients but not in anti-signal recognition particle-positive patients. PMID:27086869

  2. Statin-associated myopathy: from genetic predisposition to clinical management.

    PubMed

    Vrablik, M; Zlatohlavek, L; Stulc, T; Adamkova, V; Prusikova, M; Schwarzova, L; Hubacek, J A; Ceska, R

    2014-01-01

    Statin-associated myopathy (SAM) represents a broad spectrum of disorders from insignificant myalgia to fatal rhabdomyolysis. Its frequency ranges from 1-5 % in clinical trials to 15-20 % in everyday clinical practice. To a large extent, these variations can be explained by the definition used. Thus, we propose a scoring system to classify statin-induced myopathy according to clinical and biochemical criteria as 1) possible, 2) probable or 3) definite. The etiology of this disorder remains poorly understood. Most probably, an underlying genetic cause is necessary for overt SAM to develop. Variants in a few gene groups that encode proteins involved in: i) statin metabolism and distribution (e.g. membrane transporters and enzymes; OATP1B1, ABCA1, MRP, CYP3A4), ii) coenzyme Q10 production (e.g. COQ10A and B), iii) energy metabolism of muscle tissue (e.g. PYGM, GAA, CPT2) and several others have been proposed as candidates which can predispose to SAM. Pharmacological properties of individual statin molecules (e.g. lipophilicity, excretion pathways) and patients´ characteristics influence the likelihood of SAM development. This review summarizes current data as well as our own results. PMID:25428737

  3. [Myopathy in the course of carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency].

    PubMed

    Durka-Kęsy, Marta; Stępień, Adam; Tomczykiewicz, Kazimierz; Fidziańska, Anna; Niebrój-Dobosz, Irena; Pastuszak, Zanna

    2012-01-01

    Congenital deficiency of carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) II is a disease with an autosomal recessive inheritance of phenotypic variability which depends on age at the onset of symptoms. Three entities associated with deficiency of CPT II are known: the perinatal, the infantile and the adult form. The perinatal disease is the most severe form and is invariably fatal. On the other hand, the adult CPT II clinical phenotype is benign and requires additional external triggers such as high-intensity exercise to provoke myopathic symptoms. We report a case of adult CPT II deficiency presenting with the subtle symptoms of myopathy. A 32-year-old man was admitted to the hospital complaining of muscle pain after exercise. Athletic appearance drew attention, because the patient denied practicing sport. Neurological examination revealed marked tiredness during the single-leg hop test without other abnormalities. Electromyography (EMG) and serum biochemistry were not typical for myopathy. Routine histopathological examination did not reveal any abnormalities of structure of muscle fibers. Diagnosis was established after ultrastructural and biochemical analysis which revealed changes typical for CPT II deficiency. PMID:23319229

  4. Mitochondrial myopathies: diagnosis, exercise intolerance, and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Tarnopolsky, Mark A; Raha, Sandeep

    2005-12-01

    Mitochondrial myopathies are caused by genetic mutations that directly influence the functioning of the electron transport chain (ETC). It is estimated that 1 of 8,000 people have pathology inducing mutations affecting mitochondrial function. Diagnosis often requires a multifaceted approach with measurements of serum lactate and pyruvate, urine organic acids, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), muscle histology and ultrastructure, enzymology, genetic analysis, and exercise testing. The ubiquitous distribution of the mitochondria in the human body explains the multiple organ involvement. Exercise intolerance is a common but often an overlooked hallmark of mitochondrial myopathies. The muscle consequences of ETC dysfunction include increased reliance on anaerobic metabolism (lactate generation, phosphocreatine degradation), enhanced free radical production, reduced oxygen extraction and electron flux through ETC, and mitochondrial proliferation or biogenesis (see article by Hood in current issue). Treatments have included antioxidants (vitamin E, alpha lipoic acid), electron donors and acceptors (coenzyme Q10, riboflavin), alternative energy sources (creatine monohydrate), lactate reduction strategies (dichloroacetate) and exercise training. Exercise is a particularly important modality in diagnosis as well as therapy (see article by Taivassalo in current issue). Increased awareness of these disorders by exercise physiologists and sports medicine practitioners should lead to more accurate and more rapid diagnosis and the opportunity for therapy and genetic counseling. PMID:16331134

  5. Progressive myopathy with circulating autoantibody against giantin in the Golgi apparatus.

    PubMed

    Sahashi, K; Ibi, T; Ohno, K; Sahashi, K; Nakao, N; Kondo, H

    2004-05-25

    A woman aged 59 years with adult-onset progressive myopathy had anti-Golgi (giantin) autoantibody in the serum. Limb-muscle biopsy revealed chronic myopathy with paucity of cellular reactions and reduced immunostaining for alpha-dystroglycan. The similarity of the current patient with cases of hereditary alpha-dystroglycanopathies (Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy, Walker-Warburg syndrome, muscle-eye-brain disease, congenital muscular dystrophy type 1C, and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2I) suggests that the Golgi apparatus is the target organelle in a subset of myopathies. PMID:15159505

  6. Vitamin D deficiency: a forgotten treatable cause of motor delay and proximal myopathy.

    PubMed

    Fluss, Joel; Kern, Ilse; de Coulon, Geraldo; Gonzalez, Elsa; Chehade, Hassib

    2014-01-01

    We report a four-year-old African boy referred for proximal muscle weakness, fatigability and episodic limb pain. Classical causes of structural and metabolic myopathy were initially considered before clinical and biological features of vitamin D deficiency rickets were identified. Prompt treatment with vitamin D and calcium supplementation led to a complete reversal of the muscle symptoms. Rickets-associated myopathy should be included in the differential diagnosis of proximal myopathy, especially in at-risk individuals. Vitamin D deficiency and its prevention remain important health issues in industrialized countries. PMID:23273989

  7. Fibrous myopathy as a complication of repeated intramuscular injections for chronic headache

    PubMed Central

    Burnham, R; McNeil, S; Hegedus, C; Gray, DS

    2006-01-01

    Two cases of fibrous myopathy associated with repeated, long-term intramuscular injections for treatment of chronic temporomandibular joint pain and chronic headache, respectively, are described. Both patients developed severe, function-limiting contractures in upper and lower extremity muscles used as injection sites. In one of the cases, the contractures were painful. Electrophysiological testing, magnetic resonance imaging and muscle biopsy results were all consistent with myopathy and replacement of skeletal muscle with noncontractile fibrous tissue. These cases are presented to increase awareness of fibrous myopathy and to promote surveillance for this serious potential complication of long-term intramuscular injections in chronic headache and other pain patients. PMID:17149458

  8. Hereditary inclusion body myopathy: A myopathy with unique topography of weakness, yet frequently misdiagnosed: Case series and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Das, Biplab; Goyal, Manoj Kumar; Bhatkar, Sanat Ramchandra; Vinny, Pulikottil Wilson; Modi, Manish; Lal, Vivek; Gayathri, N.; Mahadevan, Anitha; Radotra, Bishan Dass

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hereditary inclusion body myopathy (HIBM) continues to be underrecognized clinically despite a characteristic topography of weakness with total sparing of quadriceps muscles and patient being wheelchair bound. We report seven patients of HIBM from four families in North India. Methods and Results: Seven patients from four different families were diagnosed to have HIBM. There was no consanguinity in any of the families. While one patient had two affected siblings, another had one affected siblings and the family history was noncontributory in two patients. Two of the siblings were available for examination and confirmed clinically to be suffering from HIBM. Among the seven patients, only one was still ambulatory at the time of diagnosis. Discussion: This is the first case report of occurrence of HIBM in North Indian population. Despite its unique clinical presentation, HIBM is frequently misdiagnosed resulting in unnecessary diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. A high index of suspicion of this rare myopathy along with proper clinical examination may go a long way in accurate prognostication and management of these patients. PMID:27011643

  9. Genetics Home Reference: inclusion body myopathy with early-onset Paget disease and frontotemporal dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... progressively damages parts of the brain that control reasoning, personality, social skills, speech, and language. People with ... K, Mumm S, Whyte MP, Smith CD, Watts GD. Clinical studies in familial VCP myopathy associated with Paget ...

  10. MRI in DNM2-related centronuclear myopathy: evidence for highly selective muscle involvement.

    PubMed

    Schessl, Joachim; Medne, Livija; Hu, Ying; Zou, Yaqun; Brown, Mark J; Huse, Jason T; Torigian, Drew A; Jungbluth, Heinz; Goebel, Hans-Hilmar; Bönnemann, Carsten G

    2007-01-01

    Dynamin 2 has recently been recognized as a causative gene for the autosomal dominant form of centronuclear myopathy (dominant centronuclear myopathy). Here we report an affected father and daughter with dynamin 2 related AD CNM with predominantly distal onset of weakness. In addition to the diagnostic central location of myonuclei the muscle biopsy also showed core-like structures. Muscle MRI in the lower leg revealed prominent involvement of the soleus, but also of the gastrocnemius and the tibialis anterior whereas in the thigh there was a consistent pattern of selective involvement of adductor longus, semimembranosus, biceps femoris, rectus femoris, and vastus intermedius with relative sparing of vastus lateralis and medialis, sartorius, gracilis, and partly of the semitendinosus. These characteristic findings on muscle MRI confirm similar findings reported for CT imaging in dynamin 2 related dominant centronuclear myopathy and may help to differentiate this disorder from central core disease and other myopathies. PMID:17134899

  11. Natural history of pulmonary function in collagen VI-related myopathies.

    PubMed

    Foley, A Reghan; Quijano-Roy, Susana; Collins, James; Straub, Volker; McCallum, Michelle; Deconinck, Nicolas; Mercuri, Eugenio; Pane, Marika; D'Amico, Adele; Bertini, Enrico; North, Kathryn; Ryan, Monique M; Richard, Pascale; Allamand, Valérie; Hicks, Debbie; Lamandé, Shireen; Hu, Ying; Gualandi, Francesca; Auh, Sungyoung; Muntoni, Francesco; Bönnemann, Carsten G

    2013-12-01

    The spectrum of clinical phenotypes associated with a deficiency or dysfunction of collagen VI in the extracellular matrix of muscle are collectively termed 'collagen VI-related myopathies' and include Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy, Bethlem myopathy and intermediate phenotypes. To further define the clinical course of these variants, we studied the natural history of pulmonary function in correlation to motor abilities in the collagen VI-related myopathies by analysing longitudinal forced vital capacity data in a large international cohort. Retrospective chart reviews of genetically and/or pathologically confirmed collagen VI-related myopathy patients were performed at 10 neuromuscular centres: USA (n = 2), UK (n = 2), Australia (n = 2), Italy (n = 2), France (n = 1) and Belgium (n = 1). A total of 486 forced vital capacity measurements obtained in 145 patients were available for analysis. Patients at the severe end of the clinical spectrum, conforming to the original description of Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy were easily identified by severe muscle weakness either preventing ambulation or resulting in an early loss of ambulation, and demonstrated a cumulative decline in forced vital capacity of 2.6% per year (P < 0.0001). Patients with better functional abilities, in whom walking with/without assistance was achieved, were initially combined, containing both intermediate and Bethlem myopathy phenotypes in one group. However, one subset of patients demonstrated a continuous decline in pulmonary function whereas the other had stable pulmonary function. None of the patients with declining pulmonary function attained the ability to hop or run; these patients were categorized as intermediate collagen VI-related myopathy and the remaining patients as Bethlem myopathy. Intermediate patients had a cumulative decline in forced vital capacity of 2.3% per year (P < 0.0001) whereas the relationship between age and forced vital capacity in patients with

  12. The Spectrum of Mitochondrial Ultrastructural Defects in Mitochondrial Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Amy E.; Ng, Yi Shiau; White, Kathryn; Davey, Tracey; Mannella, Carmen; Falkous, Gavin; Feeney, Catherine; Schaefer, Andrew M.; McFarland, Robert; Gorman, Grainne S.; Taylor, Robert W.; Turnbull, Doug M.; Picard, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial functions are intrinsically linked to their morphology and membrane ultrastructure. Characterizing abnormal mitochondrial structural features may thus provide insight into the underlying pathogenesis of inherited and acquired mitochondrial diseases. Following a systematic literature review on ultrastructural defects in mitochondrial myopathy, we investigated skeletal muscle biopsies from seven subjects with genetically defined mtDNA mutations. Mitochondrial ultrastructure and morphology were characterized using two complimentary approaches: transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and serial block face scanning EM (SBF-SEM) with 3D reconstruction. Six ultrastructural abnormalities were identified including i) paracrystalline inclusions, ii) linearization of cristae and abnormal angular features, iii) concentric layering of cristae membranes, iv) matrix compartmentalization, v) nanotunelling, and vi) donut-shaped mitochondria. In light of recent molecular advances in mitochondrial biology, these findings reveal novel aspects of mitochondrial ultrastructure and morphology in human tissues with implications for understanding the mechanisms linking mitochondrial dysfunction to disease. PMID:27506553

  13. Inborn Errors of Energy Metabolism Associated with Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anibh M.; Steuerwald, Ulrike; Illsinger, Sabine

    2010-01-01

    Inherited neuromuscular disorders affect approximately one in 3,500 children. Structural muscular defects are most common; however functional impairment of skeletal and cardiac muscle in both children and adults may be caused by inborn errors of energy metabolism as well. Patients suffering from metabolic myopathies due to compromised energy metabolism may present with exercise intolerance, muscle pain, reversible or progressive muscle weakness, and myoglobinuria. In this review, the physiology of energy metabolism in muscle is described, followed by the presentation of distinct disorders affecting skeletal and cardiac muscle: glycogen storage diseases types III, V, VII, fatty acid oxidation defects, and respiratory chain defects (i.e., mitochondriopathies). The diagnostic work-up and therapeutic options in these disorders are discussed. PMID:20589068

  14. Molecular basis of infantile reversible cytochrome c oxidase deficiency myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, John P.; Tuppen, Helen A. L.; Hudson, Gavin; Oldfors, Anders; Marie, Suely K. N.; Moslemi, Ali-Reza; Servidei, Serenella; Holme, Elisabeth; Shanske, Sara; Kollberg, Gittan; Jayakar, Parul; Pyle, Angela; Marks, Harold M.; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Scavina, Mena; Walter, Maggie C.; Çoku, Jorida; Günther-Scholz, Andrea; Smith, Paul M.; McFarland, Robert; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia M. A.; Lightowlers, Robert N.; Hirano, Michio; Lochmüller, Hanns; Taylor, Robert W.; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Tulinius, Mar; DiMauro, Salvatore

    2009-01-01

    Childhood-onset mitochondrial encephalomyopathies are usually severe, relentlessly progressive conditions that have a fatal outcome. However, a puzzling infantile disorder, long known as ‘benign cytochrome c oxidase deficiency myopathy’ is an exception because it shows spontaneous recovery if infants survive the first months of life. Current investigations cannot distinguish those with a good prognosis from those with terminal disease, making it very difficult to decide when to continue intensive supportive care. Here we define the principal molecular basis of the disorder by identifying a maternally inherited, homoplasmic m.14674T>C mt-tRNAGlu mutation in 17 patients from 12 families. Our results provide functional evidence for the pathogenicity of the mutation and show that tissue-specific mechanisms downstream of tRNAGlu may explain the spontaneous recovery. This study provides the rationale for a simple genetic test to identify infants with mitochondrial myopathy and good prognosis. PMID:19720722

  15. [Sporadic Late-Onset Nemaline Myopathy Associated with MGUS].

    PubMed

    Nagai, Taiji; Sunada, Yoshihide

    2015-12-01

    Sporadic late-onset nemaline myopathy is an uncommon disease. Clinically, it is characterized by progressive muscle weakness that can develop in limbs or axial muscles. Asymmetrical distal weakness, facial weakness, dropped head, and dysphagia can also occur. Since the serum creatine kinase level usually remains within the normal range, patients can be misdiagnosed with motor neuron disease. Recognition of nemaline rods on muscle biopsy is crucial for accurate diagnosis. If it is associated with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, the outcome is known to be unfavorable. In spite of various immunotherapies such as corticosteroids, immunosuppressants, and plasmapheresis, most patients die of respiratory failure within 5 years. Since the efficacy of autologous stem cell transplantation following high-dose melphalan was first reported in 2008, there have been accumulating reports that showed the positive effect of this therapy for the disease. PMID:26618766

  16. The Spectrum of Mitochondrial Ultrastructural Defects in Mitochondrial Myopathy.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Amy E; Ng, Yi Shiau; White, Kathryn; Davey, Tracey; Mannella, Carmen; Falkous, Gavin; Feeney, Catherine; Schaefer, Andrew M; McFarland, Robert; Gorman, Grainne S; Taylor, Robert W; Turnbull, Doug M; Picard, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial functions are intrinsically linked to their morphology and membrane ultrastructure. Characterizing abnormal mitochondrial structural features may thus provide insight into the underlying pathogenesis of inherited and acquired mitochondrial diseases. Following a systematic literature review on ultrastructural defects in mitochondrial myopathy, we investigated skeletal muscle biopsies from seven subjects with genetically defined mtDNA mutations. Mitochondrial ultrastructure and morphology were characterized using two complimentary approaches: transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and serial block face scanning EM (SBF-SEM) with 3D reconstruction. Six ultrastructural abnormalities were identified including i) paracrystalline inclusions, ii) linearization of cristae and abnormal angular features, iii) concentric layering of cristae membranes, iv) matrix compartmentalization, v) nanotunelling, and vi) donut-shaped mitochondria. In light of recent molecular advances in mitochondrial biology, these findings reveal novel aspects of mitochondrial ultrastructure and morphology in human tissues with implications for understanding the mechanisms linking mitochondrial dysfunction to disease. PMID:27506553

  17. Toxic myopathy induced by industrial minerals oils: clinical and histopathological features.

    PubMed

    Rossi, B; Siciliano, G; Giraldi, C; Angelini, C; Marchetti, A; Paggiaro, P L

    1986-12-01

    We report a case of subacute myopathy in a 47 years old man engaged on boiler maintenance at an oil-fired thermoelectric power station. The occupational history highlighted heavy exposure to inhalation of ash derived from mineral oil combustion and containing several elements, metals and metalloids, including vanadium and nickel. The presenting symptoms, clinical course and muscle histopathology suggest that exposure to toxic agents probably played an important part in the causation of the myopathy. PMID:3804712

  18. Motor unit reorganization in progressive muscular dystrophies and congenital myopathies.

    PubMed

    Szmidt-Sałkowska, Elżbieta; Gaweł, Małgorzata; Lipowska, Marta

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze motor unit reorganization in different types of progressive muscular dystrophies and congenital myopathies. The study population consisted of patients with genetically verified progressive muscular dystrophies: Duchenne (DMD) (n=54), Becker (BMD) (n=30), facio-scapulo-humeral (FSHD) (n=37), and Emery-Dreifuss (E-DD) (n=26). Patients with probable limb-girdle dystrophy (L-GD) (n=58) and congenital myopathies (n=35) were also included in the study. Quantitative EMG recordings were obtained from 469 muscles. Muscle activity at rest and during slight voluntary and maximal muscle contraction was analyzed. The motor unit activity potential (MUAP) duration, amplitude, area, size index (SI), polyphasicity, and the presence of "outliers" were evaluated. Diminished values of MUAP parameters and decreased maximal amplitude of maximal muscle contraction were recorded most frequently in DMD and mainly in the biceps brachii muscles. SI was the most frequently changed EMG parameter. "Outliers" with amplitude below the normal range were recorded more frequently then a decreased mean MUAP amplitude (what could indicate a very high sensitivity of this EMG parameter). Pathological interference pattern was recorded in 34.7% of biceps brachii and in 21.2% of rectus femoris muscles. In FSHD, decreased MUAP duration and SI and pathological interference pattern with low amplitude were recorded most frequently in the tibial anterior and deltoid muscles. The presence of potentials with reduced parameters is a result of decreasing motor unit area (reduced number and size of muscle fibers), while high amplitude potentials recorded in BMD and E-DD could indicate a slow and mild course of disease and muscle regeneration. PMID:26188938

  19. Statin-induced Myopathy in Skeletal Muscle: the Role of Exercise.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Hyo-Bum

    2014-09-01

    Statins are widely used drugs to lower cholesterol levels and to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. However, it has been reported that statins are associated with adverse side effects of skeletal myopathy. Statin treatment can impair mitochondrial function and induce apoptosis in skeletal muscle in both human and animal models. Ubiquinone plays an essential role in transferring electrons in the mitochondrial electron transfer chain for oxidative phosphorylation. However, statin treatment reduces ubiquinone levels in the cholesterol synthesis pathway, which may be associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and apoptosis induced by statins may provide cellular and molecular mechanisms in skeletal myopathy. Exercise is the most effective therapy to prevent metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. However, whether exercise provides a benefit to or exacerbation of statin-induced myopathy in skeletal muscle remains poorly investigated. This review will briefly provide a comprehensive summary regarding the effects of statins on skeletal myopathy, and discuss the potential mechanisms of statin-induced myopathy and the role of exercise in statin-induced myopathy in skeletal muscle. PMID:26064857

  20. Statin-induced Myopathy in Skeletal Muscle: the Role of Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Hyo-Bum

    2014-01-01

    Statins are widely used drugs to lower cholesterol levels and to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. However, it has been reported that statins are associated with adverse side effects of skeletal myopathy. Statin treatment can impair mitochondrial function and induce apoptosis in skeletal muscle in both human and animal models. Ubiquinone plays an essential role in transferring electrons in the mitochondrial electron transfer chain for oxidative phosphorylation. However, statin treatment reduces ubiquinone levels in the cholesterol synthesis pathway, which may be associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and apoptosis induced by statins may provide cellular and molecular mechanisms in skeletal myopathy. Exercise is the most effective therapy to prevent metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. However, whether exercise provides a benefit to or exacerbation of statin-induced myopathy in skeletal muscle remains poorly investigated. This review will briefly provide a comprehensive summary regarding the effects of statins on skeletal myopathy, and discuss the potential mechanisms of statin-induced myopathy and the role of exercise in statin-induced myopathy in skeletal muscle. PMID:26064857

  1. Scapuloperoneal muscular dystrophy phenotype due to TRIM32-sarcotubular myopathy in South Dakota Hutterite.

    PubMed

    Liewluck, Teerin; Tracy, Jennifer A; Sorenson, Eric J; Engel, Andrew G

    2013-02-01

    Scapuloperoneal muscular dystrophy is a group of genetically heterogeneous disorders that share the phenotype of progressive weakness of scapular and anterior distal leg muscles. Recessive mutations in C-terminal domains of TRIM32 result in limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2H and sarcotubular myopathy, a rare congenital myopathy commonly seen in Hutterites. A scapuloperoneal phenotype has never been reported in sarcotubular myopathy. We here report a 23-year-old Hutterite man with a one-year history of progressive weakness predominantly involving the anterior tibial and left scapular muscles, and hyperCKemia. Biopsy of the anterior tibial muscle showed an active myopathy with non-rimmed vacuoles and mild denervation atrophy associated with reinnervation. The vacuoles are similar to those described in sarcotubular myopathy. TRIM32 sequencing revealed the common c.1459G>A mutation at homozygosity. A search for mutations in TRIM32 should be considered in patients with scapuloperoneal muscular dystrophy, and especially in patients of Hutterite origin or with an atypical vacuolar myopathy. PMID:23142638

  2. KLHL40-related nemaline myopathy with a sustained, positive response to treatment with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Natera-de Benito, D; Nascimento, A; Abicht, A; Ortez, C; Jou, C; Müller, J S; Evangelista, T; Töpf, A; Thompson, R; Jimenez-Mallebrera, C; Colomer, J; Lochmüller, H

    2016-03-01

    Congenital myopathies are a group of inherited muscle disorders characterized by hypotonia, weakness and a non-dystrophic muscle biopsy with the presence of one or more characteristic histological features. Neuromuscular transmission defects have recently been reported in several patients with congenital myopathies (CM). Mutations in KLHL40 are among the most common causes of severe forms of nemaline myopathy. Clinical features of affected individuals include fetal akinesia or hypokinesia, respiratory failure, and swallowing difficulties at birth. Muscle weakness is usually severe and nearly half of the individuals have no spontaneous antigravity movement. The average age of death has been reported to be 5 months in a recent case series. Herein we present a case of a patient with a nemaline myopathy due to KLHL40 mutations (c.604delG, p.Ala202Argfs*56 and c.1513G>C, p.Ala505Pro) with an impressive and prolonged beneficial response to treatment with high-dose pyridostigmine. Myasthenic features or response to ACEI have not previously been reported as a characteristic of nemaline myopathy or KLHL40-related myopathy. PMID:26754003

  3. Deep RNA profiling identified CLOCK and molecular clock genes as pathophysiological signatures in collagen VI myopathy.

    PubMed

    Scotton, Chiara; Bovolenta, Matteo; Schwartz, Elena; Falzarano, Maria Sofia; Martoni, Elena; Passarelli, Chiara; Armaroli, Annarita; Osman, Hana; Rodolico, Carmelo; Messina, Sonia; Pegoraro, Elena; D'Amico, Adele; Bertini, Enrico; Gualandi, Francesca; Neri, Marcella; Selvatici, Rita; Boffi, Patrizia; Maioli, Maria Antonietta; Lochmüller, Hanns; Straub, Volker; Bushby, Katherine; Castrignanò, Tiziana; Pesole, Graziano; Sabatelli, Patrizia; Merlini, Luciano; Braghetta, Paola; Bonaldo, Paolo; Bernardi, Paolo; Foley, Reghan; Cirak, Sebahattin; Zaharieva, Irina; Muntoni, Francesco; Capitanio, Daniele; Gelfi, Cecilia; Kotelnikova, Ekaterina; Yuryev, Anton; Lebowitz, Michael; Zhang, Xiping; Hodge, Brian A; Esser, Karyn A; Ferlini, Alessandra

    2016-04-15

    Collagen VI myopathies are genetic disorders caused by mutations in collagen 6 A1, A2 and A3 genes, ranging from the severe Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy to the milder Bethlem myopathy, which is recapitulated by collagen-VI-null (Col6a1(-/-)) mice. Abnormalities in mitochondria and autophagic pathway have been proposed as pathogenic causes of collagen VI myopathies, but the link between collagen VI defects and these metabolic circuits remains unknown. To unravel the expression profiling perturbation in muscles with collagen VI myopathies, we performed a deep RNA profiling in both Col6a1(-/-)mice and patients with collagen VI pathology. The interactome map identified common pathways suggesting a previously undetected connection between circadian genes and collagen VI pathology. Intriguingly, Bmal1(-/-)(also known as Arntl) mice, a well-characterized model displaying arrhythmic circadian rhythms, showed profound deregulation of the collagen VI pathway and of autophagy-related genes. The involvement of circadian rhythms in collagen VI myopathies is new and links autophagy and mitochondrial abnormalities. It also opens new avenues for therapies of hereditary myopathies to modulate the molecular clock or potential gene-environment interactions that might modify muscle damage pathogenesis. PMID:26945058

  4. Comparison of blood aminotransferase methods for assessment of myopathy and hepatopathy in Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris).

    PubMed

    Harr, Kendal E; Allison, Kathryn; Bonde, Robert K; Murphy, David; Harvey, John W

    2008-06-01

    Muscle injury is common in Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris). Plasma aspartate aminotransferase (AST) is frequently used to assess muscular damage in capture myopathy and traumatic injury. Therefore, accurate measurement of AST and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) is important in managed, free-ranging animals, as well as in those rehabilitating from injury. Activities of these enzymes, however, are usually not increased in manatees with either acute or chronic muscle damage, despite marked increases in plasma creatine kinase activity. It is hypothesized that this absence of response is due to apoenzymes in the blood not detected by commonly used veterinary assays. Addition of coenzyme pyridoxal-5-phosphate (P5P or vitamin B6) should, therefore, result in higher measured enzyme activities. The objective of this study was to determine the most accurate, precise, and diagnostically useful method for aminotransferase measurement in manatees that can be used in veterinary practices and diagnostic laboratories. Additionally, appropriate collection and storage techniques were assessed. The use of an optimized commercial wet chemical assay with 100 micromol P5P resulted in a positive bias of measured enzyme activities in a healthy population of animals. However, AST and ALT were still much lower than that typically observed in domestic animals and should not be used alone in the assessment of capture myopathy and muscular trauma. Additionally, the dry chemistry analyzer, typically used in clinics, reported significantly higher and less precise AST and ALT activities with poor correlation to those measured with wet chemical methods found in diagnostic laboratories. Therefore, these results cannot be clinically compared. Overall, the optimized wet chemical method was the most precise and diagnostically useful measurement of aminotransferase in samples. Additionally, there was a statistically significant difference between paired serum and plasma measurement

  5. Critical illness myopathy: sepsis-mediated failure of the peripheral nervous system.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, O

    2008-01-01

    With better survival of critically ill patients, 'de novo' arising neuromuscular complications like critical illness myopathy or polyneuropathy have been increasingly observed. Prolonged hospitalization not only imposes risks like pneumonia or thrombosis on patients but also represents a real budget threat to modern intensive-care medicine. Clinical symptoms like muscle weakness and weaning failure are common to critical illness myopathy and critical illness polyneuropathy and do not allow for distinction. Specific therapies are not yet available, and the quest for the pathomechanisms has proved more complicated than anticipated. Especially for critical illness myopathy, multiple sites of disturbances to the excitation-contraction coupling cascade are possible causes of muscle weakness. The present review summarizes the epidemiological, clinical and diagnostic features of critical illness myopathy and then focuses on current concepts of the presumed pathomechanisms of critical illness myopathy. Sepsis was shown to be a major cause of critical illness myopathy and special emphasis will be placed on how sepsis and inflammatory mediators influence (i) the membrane excitability at the level of voltage-gated ion channels and (ii) the intracellular protein signalling that results in selective loss of myosin protein content and muscle wasting. For (i), critical illness myopathy represents a new type of acquired channelopathy affecting the inactivation properties of Na+ channels. For (ii), both protein proteolysis and protein build up at the transcriptional level seem to be involved. Findings from different studies are put into a common context to propose a model for cytokine-mediated failure of muscle in severe sepsis. This can open a series of new possible trials to test specific therapeutic strategies in the future. PMID:18289421

  6. Hypokalemic myopathy associated with primary aldosteronism and glycyrrhizine-induced pseudoaldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, S; Saito, T; Okada, K; Atsumi, T; Kuzuya, T

    1985-12-01

    Enzymatic and histological features of muscular disorders associated with primary aldosteronism and glycyrrhizine-induced pseudoaldosteronism were studied. Among 10 patients with primary aldosteronism and 3 patients with pseudoaldosteronism, 5 patients were admitted to our hospital because of muscular weakness. The serum potassium (K) level was 1.86 +/- 0.21 mEq/l in a myopathy group on admission, a value significantly less than that of the 2.74 +/- 0.10 mEq/l in a non-myopathy group (p less than 0.01). Serum creatine phosphokinase (CPK), glutamate-oxyloacetate transaminase (GOT), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were increased in the myopathy group compared to the non-myopathy group; serum CPK was 1412.6 +/- 902.6 vs. 22.8 +/- 5.0 mU/ml, serum GOT was 186.4 +/- 75.3 vs. 24.2 +/- 5.4 mU/ml (p less than 0.05), and serum LDH was 1133.4 +/- 377.3 vs. 387.6 +/- 42.5 mU/ml (p less than 0.05) in the groups with and without myopathy. Analysis of CPK isozymes revealed that the MM type exceeded 95%. The elevated serum CPK, GOT and LDH rapidly decreased to the normal range and muscular strength completely improved within 6 to 13 days after hospitalization, when the serum K level remained below than normal. Light microscopic finding of damaged muscle showed the diffuse necrosis and vacuolization of muscle fibers. Electron microscopic study clearly demonstrated complete dissolution of myofilaments with disappearance of sarcoplasmic reticulum and T-tubules in the necrotic muscle fibers. These results indicate that muscular lesions may occur in primary aldosteronism and pseudoaldosteronism when the serum K level is decreased to below 2.0 mEq/l. This myopathy is not periodic paralysis but hypokalemic myopathy. The mechanism by which K deficiency causes muscular damage remains unknown. PMID:3914413

  7. The diagnostic value of biexponential apparent diffusion coefficients in myopathy.

    PubMed

    Ran, Jun; Liu, Yao; Sun, Dong; Morelli, John; Zhang, Ping; Wu, Gang; Sheng, Yuda; Xie, Ruyi; Zhang, Xiaoli; Li, Xiaoming

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the performance of a biexponential signal decay model using DWI in myopathies and to differentiate Polymyositis (PM)/Dermatomyositis (DM), Glycogen Storage Diseases (GSDs) and Muscular Dystrophies (MDs) utilizing diffusion-weighted imaging. 11 healthy volunteers (control group) and 46 patients with myopathy were enrolled in the retrospective study. 27 of 46 patients had PM/DM, 7 patients GSDs and 12 patients MDs. After conventional MR sequences, diffusion weighted imaging with a b-factor ranging from 0 to 1200 s/mm(2) was performed on both thighs. The intra-muscular signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) on multiple-b DWI images were measured for 7 different muscles and compared among the different groups. The median T2 signal intensity and biexponential apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC), including standard ADC, fast ADC, and slow ADC values, were compared among the different groups. The intra-muscular SNRs were statistically significantly different depending on the b value, and also found among the 4 groups (p < 0.05). The median T2 signal intensity of the normal muscles in control group was statistically significantly lower than that of edematous muscles in the PM/DM, GSDs and MDs groups (p = 0.000), while there were no statistically significant differences among the PM/DM, GSDs, and MDs groups (p > 0.05). The median standard ADC value of the edematous muscles in GSDs was statistically significantly lower than that of normal muscles in the control group (p = 0.000) and the median ADC value of the edematous muscles in PM/DM patients was statistically significantly greater than that of the GSDs (p = 0.000) and MDs groups (p = 0.005). The median slow ADC value of the edematous muscles in MDs patients and PM/DM patients was statistically significantly greater than that of GSDs patients (p < 0.05). Intra-muscular SNR decay curves and biexponential ADC parameters are useful in distinguishing among PM/DM, GSDs, and MDs. PMID:27142711

  8. Titin mutation segregates with hereditary myopathy with early respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Pfeffer, Gerald; Elliott, Hannah R.; Griffin, Helen; Barresi, Rita; Miller, James; Marsh, Julie; Evilä, Anni; Vihola, Anna; Hackman, Peter; Straub, Volker; Dick, David J.; Horvath, Rita; Santibanez-Koref, Mauro; Udd, Bjarne

    2012-01-01

    In 2001, we described an autosomal dominant myopathy characterized by neuromuscular ventilatory failure in ambulant patients. Here we describe the underlying genetic basis for the disorder, and we define the neuromuscular, respiratory and radiological phenotype in a study of 31 mutation carriers followed for up to 31 years. A combination of genome-wide linkage and whole exome sequencing revealed the likely causal genetic variant in the titin (TTN) gene (g.274375T>C; p.Cys30071Arg) within a shared haplotype of 2.93 Mbp on chromosome 2. This segregated with the phenotype in 21 individuals from the original family, nine subjects in a second family with the same highly selective pattern of muscle involvement on magnetic resonance imaging and a third familial case with a similar phenotype. Comparing the mutation carriers revealed novel features not apparent in our original report. The clinical presentation included predominant distal, proximal or respiratory muscle weakness. The age of onset was highly variable, from early adulthood, and including a mild phenotype in advanced age. Muscle weakness was earlier onset and more severe in the lower extremities in nearly all patients. Seven patients also had axial muscle weakness. Respiratory function studies demonstrated a gradual deterioration over time, reflecting the progressive nature of this condition. Cardiomyopathy was not present in any of our patients despite up to 31 years of follow-up. Magnetic resonance muscle imaging was performed in 21 affected patients and revealed characteristic abnormalities with semitendinosus involvement in 20 of 21 patients studied, including 3 patients who were presymptomatic. Diagnostic muscle histopathology most frequently revealed eosinophilic inclusions (inclusion bodies) and rimmed vacuoles, but was non-specific in a minority of patients. These findings have important clinical implications. This disease should be considered in patients with adult-onset proximal or distal myopathy and

  9. X-linked myopathy with excessive autophagy: a failure of self-eating.

    PubMed

    Dowling, James J; Moore, Steven A; Kalimo, Hannu; Minassian, Berge A

    2015-03-01

    Autophagic vacuolar myopathies (AVMs) are a group of disorders united by shared histopathological features on muscle biopsy that include the aberrant accumulation of autophagic vacuoles. The classic conditions that compose the AVMs include Pompe Disease, Danon Disease and X-linked myopathy with excessive autophagy (XMEA). Other disorders, including acquired myopathies like chloroquine toxicity, also have features of an autophagic myopathy. This review is focused on XMEA, a myopathy with onset of slowly progressive proximal weakness and elevated serum creatine kinase (2× to 20× normal) typically in the first decade of life. However, both late-adult onset and severe, sometimes lethal, neonatal cases also occur. Skeletal muscle pathology is characterized by numerous cytoplasmic autophagic vacuoles, complex muscle fiber splitting with internalization of capillaries, and complement C5b-9 deposition within vacuoles and along the sarcolemma. The autophagic vacuoles have sarcolemmal features. Mutations in the VMA21 gene at Xq28 cause XMEA by reducing the activity of lysosomal hydrolases. The VMA21 protein regulates the assembly of the V-ATPase required to acidify the lysosome. Increased lysosomal pH and poor degradation of cellular debris may secondarily induce autophagy, the net effect being accumulation of autophagolysosomes. The relationship of XMEA to other lysosomal disorders of muscle and potential therapeutic interventions for XMEA are discussed. PMID:25644398

  10. Potassium dependent rescue of a myopathy with core-like structures in mouse

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, M Gartz; Wilde, Jonathan J; Moreno, Rosa L; Minic, Angela D; Niswander, Lee

    2015-01-01

    Myopathies decrease muscle functionality. Mutations in ryanodine receptor 1 (RyR1) are often associated with myopathies with microscopic core-like structures in the muscle fiber. In this study, we identify a mouse RyR1 model in which heterozygous animals display clinical and pathological hallmarks of myopathy with core-like structures. The RyR1 mutation decreases sensitivity to activated calcium release and myoplasmic calcium levels, subsequently affecting mitochondrial calcium and ATP production. Mutant muscle shows a persistent potassium leak and disrupted expression of regulators of potassium homeostasis. Inhibition of KATP channels or increasing interstitial potassium by diet or FDA-approved drugs can reverse the muscle weakness, fatigue-like physiology and pathology. We identify regulators of potassium homeostasis as biomarkers of disease that may reveal therapeutic targets in human patients with myopathy of central core disease (CCD). Altogether, our results suggest that amelioration of potassium leaks through potassium homeostasis mechanisms may minimize muscle damage of myopathies due to certain RyR1 mutations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02923.001 PMID:25564733

  11. Distal myopathy with coexisting heterozygous TIA1 and MYH7 Variants.

    PubMed

    Brand, Patricio; Dyck, P James B; Liu, Jie; Berini, Sarah; Selcen, Duygu; Milone, Margherita

    2016-08-01

    TIA1 mutations cause Welander distal myopathy. MYH7 mutations result in various clinical phenotypes, including Laing distal myopathy and cardiomyopathy. We describe a family with coexisting TIA1 and MYH7 variants. The proband is a 67-year-old woman with easy tripping since childhood and progressive asymmetric distal limb weakness, but no cardiac involvement. Muscle biopsy showed rare rimmed vacuoles, minicore-like structures and congophilic inclusions. Her 66-year-old sister has a mild distal myopathy, supraventricular tachycardia and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Both sisters carry the only known pathogenic TIA1 mutation and a heterozygous MYH7 variant (c.5459G > A; p.Arg1820Gln). Another sibling with isolated distal myopathy carries only the TIA1 mutation. MYH7 p.Arg1820Gln involves a highly conserved residue and is predicted to be deleterious. Furthermore, the proband's childhood-onset distal leg weakness and sister's cardiomyopathy suggest that MYH7 p.Arg1820Gln likely affects function, favoring a digenic etiology of the myopathy. PMID:27282841

  12. Decreased oxidative phosphorylation and PGAM deficiency in horses suffering from atypical myopathy associated with acquired MADD.

    PubMed

    Westermann, C M; Dorland, L; van Diggelen, O P; Schoonderwoerd, K; Bierau, J; Waterham, H R; van der Kolk, J H

    2011-11-01

    Earlier research on ten horses suffering from the frequently fatal disorder atypical myopathy showed that MADD (multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency) is the biochemical derangement behind atypical myopathy. From five horses that died as a result of this disease and seven healthy control horses, urine and plasma were collected ante mortem and muscle biopsies were obtained immediately post-mortem (2 patients and 7 control horses), to analyse creatine, purine and carbohydrate metabolism as well as oxidative phosphorylation. In patients, the mean creatine concentration in urine was increased 17-fold and the concentration of uric acid approximately 4-fold, compared to controls. The highest degree of depletion of glycogen was observed in the patient with the most severe myopathy clinically. In this patient, glycolysis was more active than in the other patients and controls, which may explain this depletion. One patient demonstrated very low phosphoglycerate mutase (PGAM) activity, less than 10% of reference values. Most respiratory chain complex activity in patients was 20-30% lower than in control horses, complex II activity was 42% lower than normal, and one patient had severely decrease ATP-synthase activity, more than 60% lower than in control horses. General markers for myopathic damage are creatine kinase (CK) and lactic acid in plasma, and creatine and uric acid in urine. To obtain more information about the cause of the myopathy analysis of carbohydrate, lipid and protein metabolism as well as oxidative phosphorylation is advised. This study expands the diagnostic possibilities of equine myopathies. PMID:21843962

  13. Significant response to immune therapies in a case of subacute necrotizing myopathy and FKRP mutations.

    PubMed

    Svahn, J; Streichenberger, N; Benveniste, O; Menassa, R; Michel, L; Fayolle, H; Petiot, P

    2015-11-01

    Necrotizing myopathies can be encountered in various conditions as acquired myopathies (toxic or autoimmune) or muscular dystrophies. We report a twenty-year-old Caucasian woman who presented with clinical findings suggestive of an inflammatory myopathy: subacute onset of lower limb muscle weakness, myalgia, weight loss and absence of family history. The serum creatine kinase level was elevated at 4738 IU/L (normal range, 25-175 IU/L). Muscle biopsy was consistent with necrotizing myopathy. The patient showed significant clinical improvement following corticosteroid, azathioprine and intravenous immunoglobulin treatments. Biological tests revealed no specific autoantibodies associated with necrotizing autoimmune myopathies. Immunohistochemical staining for sarcolemmal proteins in muscle biopsy samples finally led to a diagnosis of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2I (fukutin-related protein gene mutations). The response to immune therapies suggested a possible inflammatory component associated with the muscular dystrophy and highlighted the potential benefit of corticosteroid treatment in patients with LGMD2I and subacute onset. PMID:26363967

  14. Elucidation of the mechanism of atorvastatin-induced myopathy in a rat model.

    PubMed

    El-Ganainy, Samar O; El-Mallah, Ahmed; Abdallah, Dina; Khattab, Mahmoud M; Mohy El-Din, Mahmoud M; El-Khatib, Aiman S

    2016-06-01

    Myopathy is among the well documented and the most disturbing adverse effects of statins. The underlying mechanism is still unknown. Mitochondrial dysfunction related to coenzyme Q10 decline is one of the proposed theories. The present study aimed to investigate the mechanism of atorvastatin-induced myopathy in rats. In addition, the mechanism of the coenzyme Q10 protection was investigated with special focus of mitochondrial alterations. Sprague-Dawely rats were treated orally either with atorvastatin (100mg/kg) or atorvastatin and coenzyme Q10 (100mg/kg). Myopathy was assessed by measuring serum creatine kinase (CK) and myoglobin levels together with examination of necrosis in type IIB fiber muscles. Mitochondrial dysfunction was evaluated by measuring muscle lactate/pyruvate ratio, ATP level, pAkt as well as mitochondrial ultrastructure examination. Atorvastatin treatment resulted in a rise in both CK (2X) and myoglobin (6X) level with graded degrees of muscle necrosis. Biochemical determinations showed prominent increase in lactate/pyruvate ratio and a decline in both ATP (>80%) and pAkt (>50%) levels. Ultrastructure examination showed mitochondrial swelling with disrupted organelle membrane. Co-treatment with coenzyme Q10 induced reduction in muscle necrosis as well as in CK and myoglobin levels. In addition, coenzyme Q10 improved all mitochondrial dysfunction parameters including mitochondrial swelling and disruption. These results presented a model for atorvastatin-induced myopathy in rats and proved that mitochondrial dysfunction is the main contributor in statin-myopathy pathophysiology. PMID:27345130

  15. Mechanical Signaling in the Pathophysiology of Critical Illness Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kalamgi, Rebeca C.; Larsson, Lars

    2016-01-01

    The complete loss of mechanical stimuli of skeletal muscles, i.e., the loss of external strain, related to weight bearing, and internal strain, related to the contraction of muscle cells, is uniquely observed in pharmacologically paralyzed or deeply sedated mechanically ventilated intensive care unit (ICU) patients. The preferential loss of myosin and myosin associated proteins in limb and trunk muscles is a significant characteristic of critical illness myopathy (CIM) which separates CIM from other types of acquired muscle weaknesses in ICU patients. Mechanical silencing is an important factor triggering CIM. Microgravity or ground based microgravity models form the basis of research on the effect of muscle unloading-reloading, but the mechanisms and effects may differ from the ICU conditions. In order to understand how mechanical tension regulates muscle mass, it is critical to know how muscles sense mechanical information and convert stimulus to intracellular biochemical actions and changes in gene expression, a process called cellular mechanotransduction. In adult skeletal muscles and muscle fibers, this process may differ, the same stimulus can cause divergent response and the same fiber type may undergo opposite changes in different muscles. Skeletal muscle contains multiple types of mechano-sensors and numerous structures that can be affected differently and hence respond differently in distinct muscles. PMID:26869939

  16. Episodic weakness and vacuolar myopathy in hypokalemic periodic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Basali, Diana; Prayson, Richard A

    2015-11-01

    We report a 50-year-old woman who presented with a 20 year history of gradually progressive lower extremity weakness, characterized by knee buckling with occasional falls and foot dragging. She also experienced difficulty in lifting her arms above her shoulders. The primary periodic paralyses are rare disorders caused by dysfunctional ion channels in skeletal muscle. The hypokalemic type is generally an autosomal dominant condition, due to missense mutations in the alpha subunits of the skeletal muscle L-type calcium channel genes, CACN1AS, or the skeletal muscle sodium channel gene, SCN4A. The affected patients typically present with episodic weakness. For our patient, the consumption of foods high in carbohydrates seemed to precipitate the episodes of weakness. Her family history was significant for six blood relatives, including three sons and three relatives on the paternal side, who had experienced similar symptoms. A biopsy of the left rectus femoralis muscle showed vacuolar myopathic changes in the scattered muscle fibers, accompanied by occasional degenerating and regenerating muscle fibers. There was no evidence of inflammation on the biopsy. The vacuoles were often associated with increased acid phosphatase staining. An electron microscopic examination showed that the vacuolar changes were due to T-tubule dilation, a characteristic of hypokalemic periodic paralysis. Other metabolic etiologies of vacuolar myopathy, such as acid phosphatase (lysosomal) associated acid maltase deficiency (a glycogen storage disease), need to be considered in the differential diagnosis. PMID:26190219

  17. Dysferlin overexpression in skeletal muscle produces a progressive myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Glover, Louise E.; Newton, Kimberly; Krishnan, Gomathi; Bronson, Roderick; Boyle, Alexandra; Krivickas, Lisa S.; Brown, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The dose-response effects of dysferlin transgenesis were analyzed to determine if the dysferlin-deficient myopathies are good candidates for gene replacement therapy. Methods We have generated three lines of transgenic mice, expressing low, mid and high levels of full-length human dysferlin from a muscle-specific promoter. Transgenic skeletal muscle was analyzed and scored for morphological and functional deficits. Results Overexpression of dysferlin in mice resulted in a striking phenotype of kyphosis, irregular gait and reduced muscle mass and strength. Moreover, protein dosage correlated with phenotype severity. In contrast to dysferlin-null skeletal muscle, no evidence of sarcolemmal impairment was revealed. Rather, increased levels of Ca2+-regulated, dysferlin-binding proteins and ER stress chaperone proteins were observed in muscle lysates from transgenic mice as compared to controls. Interpretation Expression levels of dysferlin are important for appropriate function without deleterious or cytotoxic effects. As a corollary, we propose that future endeavors in gene replacement for correction of dysferlinopathy should be tailored to take account of this. PMID:20373350

  18. Commonality of TRIM32 mutation in causing sarcotubular myopathy and LGMD2H.

    PubMed

    Schoser, Benedikt G H; Frosk, Patrick; Engel, Andrew G; Klutzny, Ursula; Lochmüller, Hanns; Wrogemann, Klaus

    2005-04-01

    Sarcotubular myopathy (OMIM 268950) is a rare autosomal recessive myopathy first described in two Hutterite brothers from South Dakota and in two non-Hutterite brothers from Germany. We report that sarcotubular myopathy (STM) is caused by mutation in TRIM32, the gene encoding the tripartite motif-containing protein 32. TRIM32 was found to be the gene mutated in limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2H (LGMD2H [OMIM 254110]), a disorder that has been confined to the Hutterite population. The TRIM32 mutation found in the STM patients is identical to the causative mutation for LGMD2H (D487N), Haplotype analysis shows that the disease chromosomes share common ancestry. PMID:15786463

  19. Endplate structure and parameters of neuromuscular transmission in sporadic centronuclear myopathy associated with myasthenia.

    PubMed

    Liewluck, Teerin; Shen, Xin-Ming; Milone, Margherita; Engel, Andrew G

    2011-06-01

    Centronuclear myopathy is a pathologically diagnosed congenital myopathy. The disease genes encode proteins with membrane modulating properties (MTM1, DNM2, and BIN1) or alter excitation-contraction coupling (RYR1). Some patients also have myasthenic symptoms but electrodiagnostic and endplate studies in these are limited. A sporadic patient had fatigable weakness and a decremental EMG response. Analysis of centronuclear myopathy disease- and candidate-genes identified no mutations. Quantitative endplate electron microscopy studies revealed simplified postsynaptic regions, endplate remodeling with normal nerve terminal size, normal synaptic vesicle density, and mild acetylcholine receptor deficiency. The amplitude of the miniature endplate potential was decreased to 60% of normal. Quantal release by nerve impulse was reduced to 40% of normal due to a decreased number of releasable quanta. The safety margin of neuromuscular transmission is compromised by decreased quantal release by nerve impulse and by a reduced postsynaptic response to the released quanta. PMID:21482111

  20. Autosomal recessive sudden unexpected death in children probably caused by a cardiomyopathy associated with myopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Fried, K; Beer, S; Vure, E; Algom, M; Shapira, Y

    1979-01-01

    The propositus, who died suddenly at the age of 22 months, was investigated because of an unusual myopathy. Family history revealed two sisters and four cousins who had also died suddenly and unexpectedly. The finding of asymmetric septal hypertrophy by echocardiography in the propositus suggested that the cause of the sudden death in the relatives was an undetected cardiomyopathy accompanying a mild and often subclinical myopathy. The affected children were in two sibships and both sets of parents were first cousins. The mother of one sibship was the sister of the father of the other. It is suggested that a gene causes a mild autosomal recessive myopathy with cardiomyopathy that is often undiagnosed and usually ends in sudden unexpected death in the second year of life. The same gene may manifest on echocardiogram in some heterozygotes as asymmetric septal hypertrophy. Images PMID:513079

  1. Ultrastructural changes in muscle cells of patients with collagen VI-related myopathies.

    PubMed

    Tagliavini, Francesca; Sardone, Francesca; Squarzoni, Stefano; Maraldi, Nadir Mario; Merlini, Luciano; Faldini, Cesare; Sabatelli, Patrizia

    2013-10-01

    Collagen VI is an extracellular matrix protein expressed in several tissues including skeletal muscle. Mutations in COL6A genes cause Bethlem Myopathy (BM), Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy (UCMD) and Myosclerosis Myopathy (MM). Collagen VI deficiency causes increased opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), leading to ultrastructural and functional alterations of mitochondria, amplified by impairment of autophagy. Here we report for the first time ultrastructural studies on muscle biopsies from BM and UCMD patients, showing swollen mitochondria with hypodense matrix, disorganized cristae and paracrystalline inclusions, associated with dilated sarcoplasmic reticulum and apoptotic changes. These data were supported by scanning electron microscopy analysis on BM and UCMD cultured cells, showing alterations of the mitochondrial network. Morphometric analysis also revealed a reduced short axis and depicted swelling in about 3% of mitochondria. These data demonstrate that mitochondrial defects underlie the pathogenetic mechanism in muscle tissue of patients affected by collagen VI myopathies. PMID:24596691

  2. A Novel Mutation in PNPLA2 Leading to Neutral Lipid Storage Disease With Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ash, Daniel B.; Papadimitriou, Dimitra; Hays, Arthur P.; DiMauro, Salvatore; Hirano, Michio

    2016-01-01

    Background Mutations in PNPLA2, a gene encoding adipose triglyceride lipase, lead to neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy. Objective To report the clinical and molecular features of a case of neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy resulting from a novel mutation in PNPLA2. Design Case report. Setting University hospital. Patient A 65-year-old man with progressive muscle weakness and high serum creatine kinase levels. Intervention Direct sequencing of the PNPLA2 gene. Results Identification of a novel homozygous mutation in the patient’s PNPLA2 gene confirmed the suspected diagnosis of neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy. Conclusion Screening of the PNPLA2 gene should be considered for patients presenting with high levels of creatine kinase, progressive muscle weakness, and systemic lipid accumulation. The presence of Jordans anomaly can be a strong diagnostic clue. PMID:22964912

  3. Pathophysiological concepts in the congenital myopathies: blurring the boundaries, sharpening the focus.

    PubMed

    Ravenscroft, Gianina; Laing, Nigel G; Bönnemann, Carsten G

    2015-02-01

    The congenital myopathies are a diverse group of genetic skeletal muscle diseases, which typically present at birth or in early infancy. There are multiple modes of inheritance and degrees of severity (ranging from foetal akinesia, through lethality in the newborn period to milder early and later onset cases). Classically, the congenital myopathies are defined by skeletal muscle dysfunction and a non-dystrophic muscle biopsy with the presence of one or more characteristic histological features. However, mutations in multiple different genes can cause the same pathology and mutations in the same gene can cause multiple different pathologies. This is becoming ever more apparent now that, with the increasing use of next generation sequencing, a genetic diagnosis is achieved for a greater number of patients. Thus, considerable genetic and pathological overlap is emerging, blurring the classically established boundaries. At the same time, some of the pathophysiological concepts underlying the congenital myopathies are moving into sharper focus. Here we explore whether our emerging understanding of disease pathogenesis and underlying pathophysiological mechanisms, rather than a strictly gene-centric approach, will provide grounds for a different and perhaps complementary grouping of the congenital myopathies, that at the same time could help instil the development of shared potential therapeutic approaches. Stemming from recent advances in the congenital myopathy field, five key pathophysiology themes have emerged: defects in (i) sarcolemmal and intracellular membrane remodelling and excitation-contraction coupling; (ii) mitochondrial distribution and function; (iii) myofibrillar force generation; (iv) atrophy; and (v) autophagy. Based on numerous emerging lines of evidence from recent studies in cell lines and patient tissues, mouse models and zebrafish highlighting these unifying pathophysiological themes, here we review the congenital myopathies in relation to these

  4. Pathophysiological concepts in the congenital myopathies: blurring the boundaries, sharpening the focus

    PubMed Central

    Ravenscroft, Gianina; Laing, Nigel G.

    2015-01-01

    The congenital myopathies are a diverse group of genetic skeletal muscle diseases, which typically present at birth or in early infancy. There are multiple modes of inheritance and degrees of severity (ranging from foetal akinesia, through lethality in the newborn period to milder early and later onset cases). Classically, the congenital myopathies are defined by skeletal muscle dysfunction and a non-dystrophic muscle biopsy with the presence of one or more characteristic histological features. However, mutations in multiple different genes can cause the same pathology and mutations in the same gene can cause multiple different pathologies. This is becoming ever more apparent now that, with the increasing use of next generation sequencing, a genetic diagnosis is achieved for a greater number of patients. Thus, considerable genetic and pathological overlap is emerging, blurring the classically established boundaries. At the same time, some of the pathophysiological concepts underlying the congenital myopathies are moving into sharper focus. Here we explore whether our emerging understanding of disease pathogenesis and underlying pathophysiological mechanisms, rather than a strictly gene-centric approach, will provide grounds for a different and perhaps complementary grouping of the congenital myopathies, that at the same time could help instil the development of shared potential therapeutic approaches. Stemming from recent advances in the congenital myopathy field, five key pathophysiology themes have emerged: defects in (i) sarcolemmal and intracellular membrane remodelling and excitation-contraction coupling; (ii) mitochondrial distribution and function; (iii) myofibrillar force generation; (iv) atrophy; and (v) autophagy. Based on numerous emerging lines of evidence from recent studies in cell lines and patient tissues, mouse models and zebrafish highlighting these unifying pathophysiological themes, here we review the congenital myopathies in relation to these

  5. Licorice-induced hypokalemic myopathy and hypokalemic renal tubular damage in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, S; Kato, M; Tokuda, T; Momoi, H; Sekijima, Y; Higuchi, M; Yanagisawa, N

    1999-07-01

    A patient with a history of anorexia nervosa developed licorice-induced hypokalemic myopathy. With potassium replacement, high CPK blood level and myopathic signs returned to normal. However, the patient manifested persistent hypokalemia and impaired renal function to concentrate and acidify the urine. Renal biopsy demonstrated intense degeneration and vacuolation of tubules with a normal glomerus which was consistent with hypokalemic nephropathy. Prolonged hypokalemia in anorexia nervosa is sometimes attributed to surreptitious purging or taking diuretics, but it is necessary to check the urine pH, the urine-specific gravity, and the urine potassium level in order to find underlying renal damage even after hypokalemic myopathy is treated successfully. PMID:10349593

  6. Familial visceral myopathy diagnosed by exome sequencing of a patient with chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction.

    PubMed

    Holla, Oystein L; Bock, Gunter; Busk, Oyvind L; Isfoss, Björn Logi

    2014-06-01

    A 55-year-old woman with a history of bowel dysmotility presented with abdominal distension and peritonitis. Family history included premature deaths with intestinal symptomatology, suggesting autosomal dominant inheritance. Computed tomography showed a distended small bowel. Symptoms were alleviated by enterocutaneous stomas. Initial ileal biopsy suggested neuropathy; however, exome sequencing revealed an Arg148Ser mutation in the enteric smooth muscle actin gamma 2 (ACTG2) gene. Histological reassessment showed abnormal muscularis propria and smooth muscle actin, with the same findings in sibling, confirming familial visceral myopathy. Thus, noninvasive genomic analysis can provide early and specific diagnosis of familial visceral myopathy, which may help to avoid inappropriate surgery. PMID:24777424

  7. Capture myopathy in a free-flying greater sandhill crane (Grus canadensis tabida) from Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Windingstad, R.M.; Hurley, S.S.; Sileo, L.

    1983-01-01

    Capture myopathy has been reported Frequently in wild mammals (Bartsch et al., 1977, Vet. Pathol. 14: 314-324). There are, however, fewer reports of this disease in wild birds (Young, 1967, mt. Zoo Yearb. 7: 226-227; Bartsch et al., 1977, op. cit. ; Henschel and Low, 1978, S. Afr. J. Sci. 74: 305-306; Wobeser, 1981, Diseases of Wild Waterfowl, Plenum Press, New York, 300 pp.). We are reporting a case of skeletal muscle necrosis in a greater sandhill crane found dead 5 days after its capture, radio-tagging, and release. We believe this is the first case of capture myopathy to be reported for this species.

  8. Long-term management of atrial myopathy in two dogs with single chamber permanent transvenous pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, K E; Lefbom, B K

    2016-06-01

    Two young Labrador retriever dogs with bradycardia-induced syncope resulting from atrial myopathy underwent permanent transvenous pacemaker implantation. Both dogs developed heart failure 3-5 years after pacemaker implantation. Both were managed medically for approximately 7 years after pacemaker implantation and, ultimately, were humanely euthanized due to refractory heart failure signs and quality of life concerns. Long-term management of dogs with atrial myopathy and secondary atrial standstill with pacemaker implantation and medical therapy for heart failure is feasible and prognosis may be better than previously reported or speculated. PMID:26923757

  9. Inflammatory myopathy with abundant macrophages (IMAM): a condition sharing similarities with cytophagic histiocytic panniculitis and distinct from macrophagic myofasciitis.

    PubMed

    Bassez, Guillaume; Authier, Francois-Jérôme; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuèle; Delfau-Larue, Marie Hélène; Plonquet, Anne; Coquet, Michelle; Illa, Isabel; Gherardi, Romain K

    2003-05-01

    We describe the unreported pattern of inflammatory myopathy with abundant macrophages (IMAM) as a main differential diagnosis of postimmunization aluminum hydroxide-induced macrophagic myofasciitis (MMF). IMAM was mainly detected among patients with a dermatomyositis (DM)-like disease. Among 113 muscle biopsies from DM patients collected from 1974 to 2000, intensity of macrophage infiltration was highly variable: 41.5% (-/+); 34.5% (+); 17% (++): and 7% (+++). The 27 patients from groups (++) and (+++) had a similar pattern of macrophagic infiltration and were considered to have IMAM. They were compared to 40 MMF patients. In IMAM, macrophage infiltrates were diffuse and correlated positively with both T cell infiltrates and acute muscle fiber damage, and showed pictures of hemophagocytosis (21/27). Connective tissue structures were infiltrated by noncohesive, ribbon-forming collections of large basophilic macrophages containing no crystalline inclusions. In MMF, macrophage infiltrates were focal and formed compact well-delineated aggregates of granular PAS+ cells, loaded with crystalline aluminum hydroxide particles, in the absence of either hemophagocytosis or conspicuous muscle damage. Review of the literature indicates similarities between IMAM and "cytophagic histiocytic panniculitis" (CHP), a condition characterized by T cell-triggered macrophage hyperactivation. Both IMAM and CHP, but not MMF, may be associated with a life-threatening hemophagocytic syndrome. PMID:12769186

  10. Cyclophilin D, a target for counteracting skeletal muscle dysfunction in mitochondrial myopathy.

    PubMed

    Gineste, Charlotte; Hernandez, Andres; Ivarsson, Niklas; Cheng, Arthur J; Naess, Karin; Wibom, Rolf; Lesko, Nicole; Bruhn, Helene; Wedell, Anna; Freyer, Christoph; Zhang, Shi-Jin; Carlström, Mattias; Lanner, Johanna T; Andersson, Daniel C; Bruton, Joseph D; Wredenberg, Anna; Westerblad, Håkan

    2015-12-01

    Muscle weakness and exercise intolerance are hallmark symptoms in mitochondrial disorders. Little is known about the mechanisms leading to impaired skeletal muscle function and ultimately muscle weakness in these patients. In a mouse model of lethal mitochondrial myopathy, the muscle-specific Tfam knock-out (KO) mouse, we previously demonstrated an excessive mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake in isolated muscle fibers that could be inhibited by the cyclophilin D (CypD) inhibitor, cyclosporine A (CsA). Here we show that the Tfam KO mice have increased CypD levels, and we demonstrate that this increase is a common feature in patients with mitochondrial myopathy. We tested the effect of CsA treatment on Tfam KO mice during the transition from a mild to terminal myopathy. CsA treatment counteracted the development of muscle weakness and improved muscle fiber Ca(2+) handling. Importantly, CsA treatment prolonged the lifespan of these muscle-specific Tfam KO mice. These results demonstrate that CsA treatment is an efficient therapeutic strategy to slow the development of severe mitochondrial myopathy. PMID:26374844

  11. Muscle imaging in patients with tubular aggregate myopathy caused by mutations in STIM1

    PubMed Central

    Tasca, Giorgio; D'Amico, Adele; Monforte, Mauro; Nadaj-Pakleza, Aleksandra; Vialle, Marc; Fattori, Fabiana; Vissing, John; Ricci, Enzo; Bertini, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Tubular aggregate myopathy is a genetically heterogeneous disease characterized by tubular aggregates as the hallmark on muscle biopsy. Mutations in STIM1 have recently been identified as one genetic cause in a number of tubular aggregate myopathy cases. To characterize the pattern of muscle involvement in this disease, upper and lower girdles and lower limbs were imaged in five patients with mutations in STIM1, and the scans were compared with two patients with tubular aggregate myopathy not caused by mutations in STIM1. A common pattern of involvement was found in STIM1-mutated patients, although with variable extent and severity of lesions. In the upper girdle, the subscapularis muscle was invariably affected. In the lower limbs, all the patients showed a consistent involvement of the flexor hallucis longus, which is very rarely affected in other muscle diseases, and a diffuse involvement of thigh and posterior leg with sparing of gracilis, tibialis anterior and, to a lesser extent, short head of biceps femoris. Mutations in STIM1 are associated with a homogeneous involvement on imaging despite variable clinical features. Muscle imaging can be useful in identifying STIM1-mutated patients especially among other forms of tubular aggregate myopathy. PMID:26255678

  12. Aberrant O-GlcNAcylation disrupts GNE enzyme activity in GNE myopathy.

    PubMed

    Bennmann, Dorit; Weidemann, Wenke; Thate, Annett; Kreuzmann, Denise; Horstkorte, Rüdiger

    2016-06-01

    UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 2-epimerase/N-acetylmannosamine kinase (GNE) is the key enzyme for the biosynthesis of sialic acids. Sialic acids are terminal monosaccharides of glycoconjugates and gangliosides, which have an essential influence on various cell interactions. The sialylation of proteins varies during development, aging, and pathogenesis of degenerative diseases such as Morbus Alzheimer, diabetes mellitus type II, or myopathies. Mutation of methionine 743 in the GNE leads to a 30% reduction of the enzyme activity and is responsible for an aggressive form of GNE myopathy. GNE myopathy or hereditary inclusion body myopathy (HIBM) is an age-dependent muscular dystrophy. Here, we analyzed the impact of the exchange of methionine to threonine at position 743 which introduces an additional potential phosphorylation/O-GlcNAcylation site. We found increased O-GlcNAcylation of the M743T variant compared to the wild-type GNE. In addition, removal of the O-GlcNAc of the M743T variant resulted in an increased activity comparable to activity of the wild-type GNE. Furthermore, the half-life of the M743T variant is two times longer than for the wild-type GNE protein. This study provides that the balance of phosphorylation and O-GlcNAcylation is decisive involved in efficiency and regulation of GNE. PMID:27037841

  13. Expression of anti-SRP19 antibody in muscle tissues from patients with autoimmune necrotizing myopathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Q; Duan, F; Liu, P; Wang, P F; Wang, M X

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the role of anti-SRP19 antibody in muscle tissues of patients with autoimmune necrotizing myopathy. Immunohistochemistry staining was used to determine the expression of anti-SRP19 antibodies in muscle tissues of autoimmune necrotizing myopathy patients. Results demonstrated that anti-SRP19 antibody was expressed in 71.4% (20/28) of muscle tissue specimens from patients with autoimmune necrotizing myopathy. Anti-SRP19 antibody expression was mainly localized in cytoplasm of necrotic muscle fibers surrounding the small blood vessels and interstitial cells. There were no significant differences in the age, course of disease, muscle, and creatine kinase levels between patients with positive or negative expression of anti-SRP19 antibodies. The expression levels of anti-SRP19, serum anti-nuclear antibodies, as well as anti-Ro-52, anti- SSA, anti-Sm, and anti-Jo-1 antibodies were not significantly different among groups. This study demonstrates that anti-SRP19 antibody is highly expressed in muscle tissues of patients with autoimmune necrotizing myopathy, and suggests that this protein may be involved in the origin and progression of the disease. PMID:27525944

  14. Muscle imaging in patients with tubular aggregate myopathy caused by mutations in STIM1.

    PubMed

    Tasca, Giorgio; D'Amico, Adele; Monforte, Mauro; Nadaj-Pakleza, Aleksandra; Vialle, Marc; Fattori, Fabiana; Vissing, John; Ricci, Enzo; Bertini, Enrico

    2015-11-01

    Tubular aggregate myopathy is a genetically heterogeneous disease characterized by tubular aggregates as the hallmark on muscle biopsy. Mutations in STIM1 have recently been identified as one genetic cause in a number of tubular aggregate myopathy cases. To characterize the pattern of muscle involvement in this disease, upper and lower girdles and lower limbs were imaged in five patients with mutations in STIM1, and the scans were compared with two patients with tubular aggregate myopathy not caused by mutations in STIM1. A common pattern of involvement was found in STIM1-mutated patients, although with variable extent and severity of lesions. In the upper girdle, the subscapularis muscle was invariably affected. In the lower limbs, all the patients showed a consistent involvement of the flexor hallucis longus, which is very rarely affected in other muscle diseases, and a diffuse involvement of thigh and posterior leg with sparing of gracilis, tibialis anterior and, to a lesser extent, short head of biceps femoris. Mutations in STIM1 are associated with a homogeneous involvement on imaging despite variable clinical features. Muscle imaging can be useful in identifying STIM1-mutated patients especially among other forms of tubular aggregate myopathy. PMID:26255678

  15. A case of anti-nuclear matrix protein 2 antibody positive myopathy associated with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Shin; Unoda, Ki-Ichi; Nakajima, Hideto; Ikeda, Soichiro; Hamaguchi, Yasuhito; Kimura, Fumiharu

    2016-08-31

    Myositis-specific autoantibodies (MSAs) are associated with myositis. Anti-nuclear matrix protein 2 (NXP-2) antibody was recently identified as a major MSA and was observed mostly in juvenile dermatomyositis. We report the case of a 44-year-old man who presented with myopathy with anti-NXP-2 antibody and large cell carcinoma of the lung. He was hospitalized because of myalgia and edema of limbs. Neurological examination revealed mild proximal-dominant weakness in all four extremities, and laboratory studies showed elevated creatine kinase level (6,432 IU/l). Needle electromyography showed myogenic patterns. MRI of the lower limbs demonstrated inflammatory lesions in the thighs. Biopsied specimen from the left quadriceps femoris muscle showed mild mononuclear inflammatory infiltrate surrounding muscle fibres but no fiber necrosis. He was diagnosed with myopathy based on neurological examinations and clinical symptoms. His chest X-ray and CT showed tumor shadow on the right upper lung field, but CT didn't indicate the findings of interstitial lung disease. This was surgically removed, and a histological diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer was suspected. He was also treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy before and after operation. His symptoms of myopathy promptly remitted with the preoperative chemotherapy. His serum analysis was positive for the anti-NXP-2. Further investigation and experience of MSAs are necessary to evaluate the therapeutic strategy against cancer-associated myopathy/myositis. PMID:27477574

  16. Quadriceps myopathy: a variant of the limb-girdle dystrophy syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Swash, M; Heathfield, Kwg

    1983-01-01

    The clinical and pathological features in a patient with quadriceps myopathy are presented. The pattern of progression of the disorder, during a period of 18 years observation, suggests that it represents an unusual and perhaps specific syndrome within the clinical spectrum of the limb-girdle muscular dystophies. Images PMID:6842250

  17. PNA HyBeacons for analysis of human mutations related to statin-induced myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gale, Nittaya; Kocalka, Petr; Mardle, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    Aminoalkyl and alkyne-tagged PNA HyBeacons have been synthesized, labeled with fluorescein via conventional amide bond or triazole formation (click chemistry) and used to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) implicated in statin-induced myopathy. The PNA HyBeacons gave much better mismatch/mutant discrimination than conventional DNA HyBeacons but smaller fluorescence changes on melting. PMID:22567191

  18. Ileocolonic transfer of solid chyme in small intestinal neuropathies and myopathies

    SciTech Connect

    Greydanus, M.P.; Camilleri, M.; Colemont, L.J.; Phillips, S.F.; Brown, M.L.; Thomforde, G.M. )

    1990-07-01

    The aims of this study were to assess gastric emptying, small bowel transit and colonic filling in patients with motility disorders, with particular attention to the patterns of colonic filling. Gastrointestinal transit was assessed using a previously validated radiolabeled mixed meal. Fourteen patients with clinical and manometric features of chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction classified as intestinal neuropathy and 6 as intestinal myopathy, were studied. The results were compared with those from 10 healthy controls studied similarly. Gastric emptying and small bowel transit of solids were significantly slower in both groups of patients than in healthy controls (P less than 0.05). In health, the ileocolonic transit of solid chyme was characterized by intermittent bolus transfers. The mean size of boluses transferred to the colon (expressed as a percentage of ingested radiolabel) was significantly less (P less than 0.05) in patients with intestinal myopathy (10% +/- 4% (SEM)) than in healthy controls (25% +/- 4%) or in patients with intestinal neuropathy (25% +/- 4%). The intervals between bolus transfer of solids (plateaus in the colonic filling curve) were longer (P less than 0.05) in myopathies (212 +/- 89 minutes) than in health (45 +/- 7 minutes) or neuropathies (53 +/- 11 minutes). Thus, gastric emptying and small bowel transit were delayed in small bowel neuropathies and myopathies. Bolus filling of the colon was less frequent and less effective in patients with myopathic intestinal pseudoobstruction, whereas bolus transfer was preserved in patients with neuropathic intestinal pseudoobstruction.

  19. Trichinella pseudospiralis infection is characterized by more continuous and diffuse myopathy than T. spiralis infection.

    PubMed

    Boonmars, T; Wu, Z; Nagano, I; Takahashi, Y

    2005-08-01

    A time course study was performed to reveal the sequence of histopathology after Trichinella spiralis or T. pseudospiralis infection in mice. A cyst was formed in the former case by about 18 days post infection and prominent myopathy was restricted within the cyst. In the latter case, however, no typical cyst was formed, and myopathy spread diffusely over the infected muscle tissues occupying half the area of muscle sections. An electron microscope observation revealed that the disintegration of muscle cells was delayed in T. pseudospiralis infection than in T. spiralis infection. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) showed that apoptosis-related genes were expressed for a longer term in muscles infected with T. pseudospiralis than in those with T. spiralis, although the same spectrum of genes are mobilized. Examined apoptosis-related genes included tumor suppressor genes p53, p53; mouse double minute 2, MDM2; cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 (WAF1), p21(waf) ; Bcl-2 associated protein X, BAX; apoptotic protease activating factor 1, Apaf-1; Caspase 9 and serine/ threonine protein kinase, PKB. Micro-dissection of the infected muscle tissue and subsequent RT-PCR confirmed that the expressions of these genes are restricted to tissue with myopathy. Thus, the expression of the apoptosis-related genes correlated with continuous and diffuse myopathy caused by T. pseudospiralis infection. PMID:15948011

  20. Mutation-Specific Effects on Thin Filament Length in Thin Filament Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    de Winter, Josine M.; Joureau, Barbara; Lee, Eun-Jeong; Kiss, Balázs; Yuen, Michaela; Gupta, Vandana A.; Pappas, Christopher T.; Gregorio, Carol C.; Stienen, Ger J. M.; Edvardson, Simon; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina; Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Pelin, Katarina; Malfatti, Edoardo; Romero, Norma B.; van Engelen, Baziel G.; Voermans, Nicol C.; Donkervoort, Sandra; Bönnemann, C. G.; Clarke, Nigel F.; Beggs, Alan H.; Granzier, Henk; Ottenheijm, Coen A. C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Thin filament myopathies are among the most common nondystrophic congenital muscular disorders, and are caused by mutations in genes encoding proteins that are associated with the skeletal muscle thin filament. Mechanisms underlying muscle weakness are poorly understood, but might involve the length of the thin filament, an important determinant of force generation. Methods We investigated the sarcomere length-dependence of force, a functional assay that provides insights into the contractile strength of muscle fibers as well as the length of the thin filaments, in muscle fibers from 51 patients with thin filament myopathy caused by mutations in NEB, ACTA1, TPM2, TPM3, TNNT1, KBTBD13, KLHL40, and KLHL41. Results Lower force generation was observed in muscle fibers from patients of all genotypes. In a subset of patients who harbor mutations in NEB and ACTA1, the lower force was associated with downward shifted force–sarcomere length relations, indicative of shorter thin filaments. Confocal microscopy confirmed shorter thin filaments in muscle fibers of these patients. A conditional Neb knockout mouse model, which recapitulates thin filament myopathy, revealed a compensatory mechanism; the lower force generation that was associated with shorter thin filaments was compensated for by increasing the number of sarcomeres in series. This allowed muscle fibers to operate at a shorter sarcomere length and maintain optimal thin–thick filament overlap. Interpretation These findings might provide a novel direction for the development of therapeutic strategies for thin filament myopathy patients with shortened thin filament lengths. PMID:27074222

  1. Aerobic Exercise and Pharmacological Therapies for Skeletal Myopathy in Heart Failure: Similarities and Differences

    PubMed Central

    Bacurau, Aline V.; Cunha, Telma F.; Souza, Rodrigo W.; Voltarelli, Vanessa A.; Gabriel-Costa, Daniele; Brum, Patricia C.

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal myopathy has been identified as a major comorbidity of heart failure (HF) affecting up to 20% of ambulatory patients leading to shortness of breath, early fatigue, and exercise intolerance. Neurohumoral blockade, through the inhibition of renin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAS) and β-adrenergic receptor blockade (β-blockers), is a mandatory pharmacological therapy of HF since it reduces symptoms, mortality, and sudden death. However, the effect of these drugs on skeletal myopathy needs to be clarified, since exercise intolerance remains in HF patients optimized with β-blockers and inhibitors of RAS. Aerobic exercise training (AET) is efficient in counteracting skeletal myopathy and in improving functional capacity and quality of life. Indeed, AET has beneficial effects on failing heart itself despite being of less magnitude compared with neurohumoral blockade. In this way, AET should be implemented in the care standards, together with pharmacological therapies. Since both neurohumoral inhibition and AET have a direct and/or indirect impact on skeletal muscle, this review aims to provide an overview of the isolated effects of these therapeutic approaches in counteracting skeletal myopathy in HF. The similarities and dissimilarities of neurohumoral inhibition and AET therapies are also discussed to identify potential advantageous effects of these combined therapies for treating HF. PMID:26904163

  2. Rod distribution and muscle fiber type modification in the progression of nemaline myopathy.

    PubMed

    Gurgel-Giannetti, Juliana; Reed, Umbertina C; Marie, Sueli K; Zanoteli, Edmar; Fireman, Moacir A T; Oliveira, Acary S B; Werneck, Lineu C; Beggs, Alan H; Zatz, Mayana; Vainzof, Mariz

    2003-03-01

    Nemaline myopathy is a structural congenital myopathy associated with the presence of rodlike structures inside the muscle fibers and type I predominance. It may be caused by mutations in at least five genes: slow alpha-tropomyosin 3 (chromosome 1q22-23), nebulin (chromosome 2q21.1-q22), actin (chromosome 1q42), tropomyosin 2 (chromosome 9p13), and troponin T1 (chromosome 19q13.4). The effect of these mutations in the expression of the protein and the mechanism of rod formation is still under investigation. We analyzed the possibility of progressive alterations with time and/or disease evolution, such as transformation of type I to type II fiber and rod pattern and distribution in muscle fibers from patients with nemaline myopathy, through a morphometric and immunohistochemical analysis of different muscle protein isoforms. A tendency of diffuse rods to be organized in the subsarcolemmal region was observed in two patients who were submitted to subsequent biopsies after 10 and 13 years. Additionally, we observed the expression of type II protein isoforms in type I fibers and a higher proportion of type II fibers in the younger patient of a pair of affected sibs, giving further support to the hypothesis of progressive conversion of type II to type I fibers in nemaline myopathy. PMID:12731651

  3. Clinical Manifestation and a New "ISCU" Mutation in Iron-Sulphur Cluster Deficiency Myopathy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kollberg, Gittan; Tulinius, Mar; Melberg, Atle; Darin, Niklas; Andersen, Oluf; Holmgren, Daniel; Oldfors, Anders; Holme, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    Myopathy with deficiency of succinate dehydrogenase and aconitase is a recessively inherited disorder characterized by childhood-onset early fatigue, dyspnoea and palpitations on trivial exercise. The disease is non-progressive, but life-threatening episodes of widespread weakness, severe metabolic acidosis and rhabdomyolysis may occur. The…

  4. Metabolic Myopathies and Physical Activity: When Fatigue Is More Than Simple Exertion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarnopolsky, Mark A.

    2002-01-01

    When patients experience fatigue and muscle cramps beyond exercise adaptation, physicians should consider metabolic myopathies. The most common conditions seen in active patients are myoadenylate deaminase deficiency and disorders such as McArdle's disease. Targeted family histories and basic laboratory studies help rule out conditions mimicking…

  5. Rehabilitation of Critical Illness Polyneuropathy and Myopathy Patients: An Observational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Primoz; Vidmar, Gaj; Kuret, Zala; Bizovicar, Natasa

    2011-01-01

    Critical illness polyneuropathy and myopathy (CIPNM) frequently develops in patients hospitalized in intensive care units. The number of patients with CIPNM admitted to inpatient rehabilitation is increasing. The aim of this study was to comprehensively evaluate the outcome of their rehabilitation. Twenty-seven patients with CIPNM were included in…

  6. Comparison of blood aminotransferase methods for assessment of myopathy and hepatopathy in Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harr, K.E.; Allison, K.; Bonde, R.K.; Murphy, D.; Harvey, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    Muscle injury is common in Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris). Plasma aspartate amino-transferase (AST) is frequently used to assess muscular damage in capture myopathy and traumatic injury. Therefore, accurate measurement of AST and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) is important in managed, free-ranging animals, as well as in those rehabilitating from injury. Activities of these enzymes, however, are usually not increased in manatees with either acute or chronic muscle damage, despite marked increases in plasma creatine kinase activity. It is hypothesized that this absence of response is due to apoenzymes in the blood not detected by commonly used veterinary assays. Addition of coenzyme pyridoxal-5-phosphate (P5P or vitamin B6) should, therefore, result in higher measured enzyme activities. The objective of this study was to determine the most accurate, precise, and diagnostically useful method for aminotransferase measurement in manatees that can be used in veterinary practices and diagnostic laboratories. Additionally, appropriate collection and storage techniques were assessed. The use of an optimized commercial wet chemical assay with 100 ??mol P5P resulted in a positive bias of measured enzyme activities in a healthy population of animals. However, AST and ALT were still much lower than that typically observed in domestic animals and should not be used alone in the assessment of capture myopathy and muscular trauma. Additionally, the dry chemistry analyzer, typically used in clinics, reported significantly higher and less precise AST and ALT activities with poor correlation to those measured with wet chemical methods found in diagnostic laboratories. Therefore, these results cannot be clinically compared. Overall, the optimized wet chemical method was the most precise and diagnostically useful measurement of aminotransferase in samples. Additionally, there was a statistically significant difference between paired serum and plasma measurement

  7. Evaluation of ubiquinone concentration and mitochondrial function relative to cerivastatin-induced skeletal myopathy in rats.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, William H; Lawrence, Jeffery W; Loughlin, Amy F; Stoffregen, Dana A; Mixson, Lori A; Dean, Dennis C; Raab, Conrad E; Yu, Nathan X; Lankas, George R; Frederick, Clay B

    2004-01-01

    As a class, hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors can potentially cause skeletal myopathy. One statin, cerivastatin, has recently been withdrawn from the market due to an unacceptably high incidence of rhabdomyolysis. The mechanism underlying statin-induced myopathy is unknown. This paper sought to investigate the relationship among statin-induced myopathy, mitochondrial function, and muscle ubiquinone levels. Rats were administered cerivastatin at 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 (mg/kg)/day or dose vehicle (controls) by oral gavage for 15 days. Samples of type I-predominant skeletal muscle (soleus) and type II-predominant skeletal muscle [quadriceps and extensor digitorum longus (EDL)], and blood were collected on study days 5, 10, and 15 for morphological evaluation, clinical chemistry, mitochondrial function tests, and analysis of ubiquinone levels. No histological changes were observed in any of the animals on study days 5 or 10, but on study day 15, mid- and high-dose animals had necrosis and inflammation in type II skeletal muscle. Elevated creatine kinase (CK) levels in blood (a clinical marker of myopathy) correlated with the histopathological diagnosis of myopathy. Ultrastructural characterization of skeletal muscle revealed disruption of the sarcomere and altered mitochondria only in myofibers with degeneration, while adjacent myofibers were unaffected and had normal mitochondria. Thus, mitochondrial effects appeared not to precede myofiber degeneration. Mean coenzyme Q9 (CoQ9) levels in all dose groups were slightly decreased relative to controls in type II skeletal muscle, although the difference was not significantly different in most cases. Mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle was not affected by the changes in ubiquinone levels. The ubiquinone levels in high-dose-treated animals exhibiting myopathy were not significantly different from low-dose animals with no observable toxic effects. Furthermore, ubiquinone levels did not correlate

  8. Laing early onset distal myopathy: slow myosin defect with variable abnormalities on muscle biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Lamont, P J; Udd, B; Mastaglia, F L; de Visser, M; Hedera, P; Voit, T; Bridges, L R; Fabian, V; Rozemuller, A; Laing, N G

    2006-01-01

    Background Laing early onset distal myopathy (MPD1) is an autosomal dominant myopathy caused by mutations within the slow skeletal muscle fibre myosin heavy chain gene, MYH7. It is allelic with myosin storage myopathy, with the commonest form of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and with one form of dilated cardiomyopathy. However, the clinical picture of MPD1 is distinct from these three conditions. Objective To collate and discuss the histological features reported in the muscle biopsies of MPD1 patients and to outline the clinical features. Results The phenotype of MPD1 was consistent, with initial weakness of great toe/ankle dorsiflexion, and later development of weakness of finger extension and neck flexion. Age of onset was the only variable, being from birth up to the 20s, but progression was always very slow. The pathological features were variable. In this retrospective series, there were no pathognomonic diagnostic features, although atrophic type I fibres were found in half the families. Rimmed vacuoles are consistently seen in all other distal myopathies with the exception of Myoshi distal myopathy. However, they were found in a minority of patients with MPD1, and were not prominent when present. Immunohistochemical staining for slow and fast myosin showed co‐expression of slow and fast myosin in some type I fibres, possibly indicating a switch to type II status. This may be a useful aid to diagnosis. Conclusions The pathological findings in MPD1 are variable and appear to be affected by factors such as the specific muscle biopsied, the age of the patient at biopsy, and the duration of disease manifestations. PMID:16103042

  9. Investigation into the cause of mortality in 49 cases of idiopathic inflammatory myopathy: A single center study

    PubMed Central

    XIAO, YIZHI; ZUO, XIAOXIA; YOU, YUNHUI; LUO, HUI; DUAN, LIPING; ZHANG, WEIRU; LI, YISHA; XIE, YANLI; ZHOU, YAOU; NING, WANGBIN; LI, TONG; LIU, SIJIA; ZHU, HONGLIN; JIANG, YING; WU, SIYAO; ZHAO, HONGJUN

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic inflammatory myopathy (IIM) is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic muscle weakness and myositis with unknown etiology. IIM may affect the function of multiple organs and has a poor prognosis. In the present study, the causes of mortality in patients with IIM admitted to the Xiangya Hospital during the last 14 years were investigated. The investigation included an analysis of frequent causes of IIM, and of infections and associated complications. A cohort study was conducted on 676 patients with IIM that were admitted to Xiangya Hospital from January, 2001 to January, 2015. There were 49 patient mortalities (7.2% of the total cases), of which 34 mortalities were infection-associated and 15 were not infection-associated. The proportion of infection-associated IIM mortalities had increased since 2001. Of the 34 infection-associated mortalities, 31 cases (63.3%) were of fungal and bacterial infections, most frequently infecting the lungs and the blood. Klebsiella pneumoniae and Acinetobacter baumannii were the most commonly isolated pathogens, and co-infection with the two pathogens was observed in the majority of cases. In the IIM mortalities not associated with infection, there were 2 acute myocardial infarction cases, 2 acute interstitial lung disease cases, 4 malignancies and 1 case of each of the following: Arrhythmia, pneumothorax, ventilator weakness, pulmonary artery hypertension, gastrointestinal bleeding, liver failure and renal failure. Three mortalities were secondary to viral hepatitis in the present study. Pathogenic infection was the most frequent cause of mortality in patients with IIM. The remaining causes of mortality included secondary to heart failure, lung dysfunction and malignancy. Following the ubiquitous application of glucocorticoids and immunosuppressants, the proportion of infection-associated mortalities increased in patients with IIM. Thus, in addition to focusing on the primary disease, infection should receive

  10. [Anesthesia and intensive therapy for a patient with mitochondrial myopathy].

    PubMed

    Breucking, E; Mortier, W; Lampert, R; Brandt, L

    1993-10-01

    Since 1983 we have been involved in the diagnostic work-up and emergency treatment of a female patient now 48 years old who has a mitochondrial myopathy resembling Luft's disease. The syndrome was first described in 1959, and in more detail in 1962, by Luft and et al., who reported a picture of hypermetabolism with high temperature, extreme sweating, tachycardia, dyspnoea at rest, polydipsia, polyphagia and irritability but normal thyroid function. In 1971 and 1976 Haydar and Di Mauro presented a second case and proposed treatment with chloramphenicol. Our patient has the third case of the syndrome reported so far: her case was initially published in 1987. CASE REPORT. Since her 17th year of life the patient had suffered from episodes of fever, tachycardia and sweating. At the age of 32 these attacks worsened, leading to unconsciousness and apnoea. The patient then had to be intubated, ventilated and sometimes resuscitated. The diagnosis of MH susceptibility and Luft's disease was made on biochemical grounds after the first muscle biopsy in 1983. Therapy with chloramphenicol failed. Therapy with beta blockers, vitamin C and K or E, coenzyme Q10 and a high-caloric diet was started in 1985. The patient was registered with an emergency service, which flew her to our ICU whenever she had a severe crisis. For milder episodes she was supplied with an oxygen breathing mask at home. Myalgia increased with the episodes starting in 1988, and the patient needed dantrolene infusions and analgesics at home. To facilitate venepuncture a Port-A-Cath system was implanted in 1987, which had to be removed four times due to infection and sepsis. A muscle biopsy was taken in Rotterdam, which revealed differences in mitochondrial function from the biochemical findings recorded in 1983 and not in keeping with Luft's disease. Unfortunately, the patient was not able to undergo further metabolic investigations or therapeutic trials. ANAESTHESIA. The patient received three local and six

  11. Clinical, histological and genetic characterization of reducing body myopathy caused by mutations in FHL1

    PubMed Central

    Schessl, Joachim; Taratuto, Ana L.; Sewry, Caroline; Battini, Roberta; Chin, Steven S.; Maiti, Baijayanta; Dubrovsky, Alberto L.; Erro, Marcela G.; Espada, Graciela; Robertella, Monica; Saccoliti, Maria; Olmos, Patricia; Bridges, Leslie R.; Standring, Peter; Hu, Ying; Zou, Yaqun; Swoboda, Kathryn J.; Scavina, Mena; Goebel, Hans-Hilmar; Mitchell, Christina A.; Flanigan, Kevin M.; Muntoni, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    We recently identified the X-chromosomal four and a half LIM domain gene FHL1 as the causative gene for reducing body myopathy, a disorder characterized by progressive weakness and intracytoplasmic aggregates in muscle that exert reducing activity on menadione nitro-blue-tetrazolium (NBT). The mutations detected in FHL1 affected highly conserved zinc coordinating residues within the second LIM domain and lead to the formation of aggregates when transfected into cells. Our aim was to define the clinical and morphological phenotype of this myopathy and to assess the mutational spectrum of FHL1 mutations in reducing body myopathy in a larger cohort of patients. Patients were ascertained via the detection of reducing bodies in muscle biopsy sections stained with menadione-NBT followed by clinical, histological, ultrastructural and molecular genetic analysis. A total of 11 patients from nine families were included in this study, including seven sporadic patients with early childhood onset disease and four familial cases with later onset. Weakness in all patients was progressive, sometimes rapidly so. Respiratory failure was common and scoliosis and spinal rigidity were significant in some of the patients. Analysis of muscle biopsies confirmed the presence of aggregates of FHL1 positive material in all biopsies. In two patients in whom sequential biopsies were available the aggregate load in muscle sections appeared to increase over time. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that cytoplasmic bodies were regularly seen in conjunction with the reducing bodies. The mutations detected were exclusive to the second LIM domain of FHL1 and were found in both sporadic as well as familial cases of reducing body myopathy. Six of the nine mutations affected the crucial zinc coordinating residue histidine 123. All mutations in this residue were de novo and were associated with a severe clinical course, in particular in one male patient (H123Q). Mutations in the zinc coordinating residue

  12. Myopathy-inducing mutation H40Y in ACTA1 hampers actin filament structure and function.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chun; Fan, Jun; Messer, Andrew E; Marston, Steve B; Iwamoto, Hiroyuki; Ochala, Julien

    2016-08-01

    In humans, more than 200 missense mutations have been identified in the ACTA1 gene. The exact molecular mechanisms by which, these particular mutations become toxic and lead to muscle weakness and myopathies remain obscure. To address this, here, we performed a molecular dynamics simulation, and we used a broad range of biophysical assays to determine how the lethal and myopathy-related H40Y amino acid substitution in actin affects the structure, stability, and function of this protein. Interestingly, our results showed that H40Y severely disrupts the DNase I-binding-loop structure and actin filaments. In addition, we observed that normal and mutant actin monomers are likely to form distinctive homopolymers, with mutant filaments being very stiff, and not supporting proper myosin binding. These phenomena underlie the toxicity of H40Y and may be considered as important triggering factors for the contractile dysfunction, muscle weakness and disease phenotype seen in patients. PMID:27112274

  13. Respiratory muscle and pulmonary function in polymyositis and other proximal myopathies.

    PubMed Central

    Braun, N M; Arora, N S; Rochester, D F

    1983-01-01

    We studied 53 patients with proximal myopathy to determine at what level of muscle weakness hypercapnic respiratory failure is likely, and which tests of pulmonary function or respiratory muscle strength would best suggest this development. Respiratory muscle strength was determined from maximal static efforts and in half the patients, both inspiratory and expiratory muscle strengths were less than 50% of normal. In the 37 patients without lung disease respiratory muscle weakness was accompanied by significant decreases in vital capacity, total lung capacity, and maximum voluntary ventilation; by significant increases in residual volume and arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2); and greater likelihood of dependence on ventilators, atelectasis, and pneumonia. Hypercapnia was particularly likely when respiratory muscle strength was less than 30% of normal in uncomplicated myopathy, and when vital capacity was less than 55% of the predicted value in any patient. PMID:6412385

  14. Relationship of Skeletal Muscle Development and Growth to Breast Muscle Myopathies: A Review.

    PubMed

    Velleman, Sandra G

    2015-12-01

    Selection in meat-type birds has focused on growth rate, muscling, and feed conversion. These strategies have made substantial improvements but have affected muscle structure, repair mechanisms, and meat quality, especially in the breast muscle. The increase in muscle fiber diameters has reduced available connective tissue spacing, reduced blood supply, and altered muscle metabolism in the breast muscle. These changes have increased muscle fiber degeneration and necrosis but have limited muscle repair mechanisms mediated by the adult myoblast (satellite cell) population of cells, likely resulting in the onset of myopathies. This review focuses on muscle growth mechanisms and how changes in the cellular development of the breast muscle may be associated with breast muscle myopathies occurring in meat-type birds. PMID:26629627

  15. Inheritance patterns and phenotypic features of myofibrillar myopathy associated with a BAG3 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Odgerel, Zagaa; Sarkozy, Anna; Lee, Hee-Suk; McKenna, Caoimhe; Rankin, Julia; Straub, Volker; Lochmüller, Hanns; Paola, Francalanci; D’Amico, Adele; Bertini, Enrico; Bushby, Kate; Goldfarb, Lev G

    2010-01-01

    Myofibrillar myopathies (MFMs) are a heterogeneous group of neuromuscular disorders characterized by disintegration of myofibrils. The inheritance pattern in MFMs is commonly autosomal dominant, but there has been a striking absence of secondary cases noted in a BAG3-associated subtype. We studied three families with BAG3 p.Pro209Leu mutation showing a severe phenotype of myofibrillar myopathy and axonal neuropathy with giant axons. In one family, transmission to a pair of siblings has occurred from their asymptomatic father who showed somatic mosaicism. In two other families, neither of the parents was affected or showed detectable level of somatic mosaicism. These observations suggest that the BAG3 variant of MFM may result from a spontaneous mutation at an early point of embryonic development and that transmission from a mosaic parent may occur more than once. The study underlines the importance of parental evaluation as it may have implications for genetic counseling. PMID:20605452

  16. Outcomes and disease activity measures for assessing treatments in the idiopathic inflammatory myopathies.

    PubMed

    Oddis, Chester V

    2005-04-01

    The assessment and treatment of patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathy has taken a major step forward over the past few years. Through the efforts of multi-disciplinary international groups of experts interested in the management of patients with myositis, initiatives have led to the development of a core set of outcome measures critical to their assessment. Similarly, the lack of consensus on several issues of clinical trial design has been addressed resulting in the development of a definition of clinical improvement for adult and juvenile patients with inflammatory myopathy using the core set outcomes. The final step in the puzzle of well-designed therapeutic trials in myositis is the determination of consensus guidelines to conduct such trials in adult and pediatric populations of myositis patients. PMID:15760586

  17. Therapeutic advances in the management of Pompe disease and other metabolic myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Nascimbeni, Anna Chiara; Semplicini, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    The world of metabolic myopathies has been dramatically modified by the advent of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), the first causative treatment for glycogenosis type II (GSDII) or Pompe disease, which has given new impetus to research into that disease and also other pathologies. This article reviews new advances in the treatment of GSDII, the consensus about ERT, and its limitations. In addition, the most recent knowledge regarding the pathophysiology, phenotype, and genotype of the disease is discussed. Pharmacological, immunotherapy, nutritional, and physical/rehabilitative treatments for late-onset Pompe disease and other metabolic myopathies are covered, including treatments for defects in glycogen metabolism, such as glycogenosis type V (McArdle disease), and glycogenosis type III (debrancher enzyme deficiency), and defects in lipid metabolism, such as carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency and electron transferring flavoprotein dehydrogenase deficiency, or riboflavin-responsive multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency. PMID:23997816

  18. A PATTERN RECOGNITION APPROACH TO THE PATIENT WITH A SUSPECTED MYOPATHY

    PubMed Central

    Barohn, Richard J.; Dimachkie, Mazen M.; Jackson, Carlayne E.

    2014-01-01

    Myopathies are a heterogeneous group of disorders that can be challenging to diagnose. The purpose of this review is to provide a diagnostic approach based predominantly upon the clinical history and neurologic examination. Laboratory testing that can be subsequently used to confirm the suspected diagnosis based upon this pattern recognition approach will also be discussed. Over the past decade, there have been numerous discoveries allowing clinicians to diagnose myopathies with genetic testing. Unfortunately, some of the testing, particularly molecular genetics, is extremely expensive and frequently not covered by insurance. Careful consideration of the distribution of muscle weakness and attention to common patterns of involvement in the context of other aspects of the neurologic examination and laboratory evaluation should assist the clinician in making a timely and accurate diagnosis, and sometimes can minimize the expense of further testing PMID:25037080

  19. Development of autoantibodies against muscle-specific FHL1 in severe inflammatory myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Inka; Wick, Cecilia; Hallgren, Åsa; Tjärnlund, Anna; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Andrade, Felipe; Thompson, Kathryn; Coley, William; Phadke, Aditi; Diaz-Gallo, Lina-Marcela; Bottai, Matteo; Nennesmo, Inger; Chemin, Karine; Herrath, Jessica; Johansson, Karin; Wikberg, Anders; Ytterberg, A. Jimmy; Zubarev, Roman A.; Danielsson, Olof; Krystufkova, Olga; Vencovsky, Jiri; Landegren, Nils; Wahren-Herlenius, Marie; Padyukov, Leonid; Kämpe, Olle; Lundberg, Ingrid E.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations of the gene encoding four-and-a-half LIM domain 1 (FHL1) are the causative factor of several X-linked hereditary myopathies that are collectively termed FHL1-related myopathies. These disorders are characterized by severe muscle dysfunction and damage. Here, we have shown that patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIMs) develop autoimmunity to FHL1, which is a muscle-specific protein. Anti-FHL1 autoantibodies were detected in 25% of IIM patients, while patients with other autoimmune diseases or muscular dystrophies were largely anti-FHL1 negative. Anti-FHL1 reactivity was predictive for muscle atrophy, dysphagia, pronounced muscle fiber damage, and vasculitis. FHL1 showed an altered expression pattern, with focal accumulation in the muscle fibers of autoantibody-positive patients compared with a homogeneous expression in anti-FHL1–negative patients and healthy controls. We determined that FHL1 is a target of the cytotoxic protease granzyme B, indicating that the generation of FHL1 fragments may initiate FHL1 autoimmunity. Moreover, immunization of myositis-prone mice with FHL1 aggravated muscle weakness and increased mortality, suggesting a direct link between anti-FHL1 responses and muscle damage. Together, our findings provide evidence that FHL1 may be involved in the pathogenesis not only of genetic FHL1-related myopathies but also of autoimmune IIM. Importantly, these results indicate that anti-FHL1 autoantibodies in peripheral blood have promising potential as a biomarker to identify a subset of severe IIM. PMID:26551678

  20. Salvaging hope: Is increasing NAD(+) a key to treating mitochondrial myopathy?

    PubMed

    Lightowlers, Robert N; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia M A

    2014-06-01

    Mitochondrial diseases can arise from mutations either in mitochondrial DNA or in nuclear DNA encoding mitochondrially destined proteins. Currently, there is no cure for these diseases although treatments to ameliorate a subset of the symptoms are being developed. In this issue of EMBO Molecular Medicine, Khan et al (2014) use a mouse model to test the efficacy of a simple dietary supplement of nicotinamide riboside to treat and prevent mitochondrial myopathies. PMID:24838280

  1. Unfolded Protein Response and Activated Degradative Pathways Regulation in GNE Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Honghao; Chen, Qi; Liu, Fuchen; Zhang, Xuemei; Li, Wei; Liu, Shuping; Zhao, Yuying; Gong, Yaoqin; Yan, Chuanzhu

    2013-01-01

    Although intracellular beta amyloid (Aβ) accumulation is known as an early upstream event in the degenerative course of UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 2-epimerase/N-acetylmannosamine kinase (GNE) myopathy, the process by which Aβdeposits initiate various degradative pathways, and their relationship have not been fully clarified. We studied the possible secondary responses after amyloid beta precursor protein (AβPP) deposition including unfolded protein response (UPR), ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) activation and its correlation with autophagy system. Eight GNE myopathy patients and five individuals with normal muscle morphology were included in this study. We performed immunofluorescence and immunoblotting to investigate the expression of AβPP, phosphorylated tau (p-tau) and endoplasmic reticulum molecular chaperones. Proteasome activities were measured by cleavage of fluorogenic substrates. The expression of proteasome subunits and linkers between proteasomal and autophagy systems were also evaluated by immunoblotting and relative quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Four molecular chaperones, glucose-regulated protein 94 (GRP94), glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), calreticulin and calnexin and valosin containing protein (VCP) were highly expressed in GNE myopathy. 20S proteasome subunits, three main proteasome proteolytic activities, and the factors linking UPS and autophagy system were also increased. Our study suggests that AβPP deposition results in endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) and highly expressed VCP deliver unfolded proteins from endoplasmic reticulum to proteosomal system which is activated in endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation (ERAD) in GNE myopathy. Excessive ubiquitinated unfolded proteins are exported by proteins that connect UPS and autophagy to autophagy system, which is activated as an alternative pathway for degradation. PMID:23472144

  2. Congenital adrenal hypoplasia, myopathy, and glycerol kinase deficiency: Molecular genetic evidence for deletions

    PubMed Central

    Francke, Uta; Harper, John F.; Darras, Basil T.; Cowan, Janet M.; McCabe, Edward R. B.; Kohlschütter, Alfried; Seltzer, William K.; Saito, Fumiko; Goto, Jun; Harpey, Jean-Paul; Wise, Joyce E.

    1987-01-01

    Glycerol kinase deficiency (GKD) is an X-linked recessive trait that occurs in association with congenital adrenal hypoplasia (AH) and developmental delay with or without congenital dystrophic myopathy. Several such patients have recently been reported to have cytological deletions of chromosome region Xp21 and/or of DNA markers that map near the locus for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) in band Xp21. We have examined the initial family reported in the literature and, using prometaphase chromosome studies and Southern blot analysis with 13 different DNA probes derived from band Xp21, have found no deletions within this region of the X chromosome. When DNA samples from six other unrelated affected males were analyzed, four of them were found to have different-size deletions within Xp21. Thus, the form of GKD associated with AH and dystrophic myopathy exhibits significant genetic heterogeneity at the DNA level. No deletions were detected in two patients with isolated GK deficiency. Comparison of our molecular studies of unrelated patients with deletions of DNA segments allows us to define the region of Xp21 (between probes J-Bir and L1.4) that most likely contains the genes for GKD and AH. This location is distal to the DMD locus. The patients with progressive muscular dystrophy tended to have larger deletions that include markers known to derive from the DMD locus, while GKD/AH/dystrophic-myopathy patients without current evidence of deletion seemed to have a milder, nonprogressive form of congenital myopathy. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:2883886

  3. GNE myopathy associated with congenital thrombocytopenia: a report of two siblings.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Rumiko; Niihori, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Naoki; Sasahara, Yoji; Rikiishi, Takeshi; Nishiyama, Ayumi; Nishiyama, Shuhei; Endo, Kaoru; Kato, Masaaki; Warita, Hitoshi; Konno, Hidehiko; Takahashi, Toshiaki; Tateyama, Maki; Nagashima, Takeshi; Funayama, Ryo; Nakayama, Keiko; Kure, Shigeo; Matsubara, Yoichi; Aoki, Yoko; Aoki, Masashi

    2014-12-01

    GNE myopathy is an autosomal recessive muscular disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding the key enzyme in sialic acid biosynthesis, UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 2-epimerase/N-acetylmannosamine kinase (GNE/MNK). Here, we report two siblings with myopathy with rimmed vacuoles and congenital thrombocytopenia who harbored two compound heterozygous GNE mutations, p.V603L and p.G739S. Thrombocytopenia, which is characterized by shortened platelet lifetime rather than ineffective thrombopoiesis, has been observed since infancy. We performed exome sequencing and array CGH to identify the underlying genetic etiology of thrombocytopenia. No pathogenic variants were detected among the known causative genes of recessively inherited thrombocytopenia; yet, candidate variants in two genes that followed an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance, including previously identified GNE mutations, were detected. Alternatively, it is possible that the decreased activity of GNE/MNK itself, which would lead to decreased sialic content in platelets, is associated with thrombocytopenia in these patients. Further investigations are required to clarify the association between GNE myopathy and the pathogenesis of thrombocytopenia. PMID:25257349

  4. Oculopharyngeal Weakness, Hypophrenia, Deafness, and Impaired Vision: A Novel Autosomal Dominant Myopathy with Rimmed Vacuoles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ting; Lu, Xiang-Hui; Wang, Hui-Fang; Ban, Rui; Liu, Hua-Xu; Shi, Qiang; Wang, Qian; Yin, Xi; Pu, Chuan-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Myopathies with rimmed vacuoles are a heterogeneous group of muscle disorders with progressive muscle weakness and varied clinical manifestations but similar features in muscle biopsies. Here, we describe a novel autosomal dominant myopathy with rimmed vacuoles in a large family with 11 patients of three generations affected. Methods: A clinical study including family history, obstetric, pediatric, and development history was recorded. Clinical examinations including physical examination, electromyography (EMG), serum creatine kinase (CK), bone X-rays, and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed in this family. Open muscle biopsies were performed on the proband and his mother. To find the causative gene, the whole-exome sequencing was carried out. Results: Disease onset was from adolescence to adulthood, but the affected patients of the third generation presented an earlier onset and more severe clinical manifestations than the older generations. Clinical features were characterized as dysarthria, dysphagia, external ophthalmoplegia, limb weakness, hypophrenia, deafness, and impaired vision. However, not every patient manifested all symptoms. Serum CK was mildly elevated and EMG indicated a myopathic pattern. Brain MRI showed cerebellum and brain stem mildly atrophy. Rimmed vacuoles and inclusion bodies were observed in muscle biopsy. The whole-exome sequencing was performed, but the causative gene has not been found. Conclusions: We reported a novel autosomal dominant myopathy with rimmed vacuoles characterized by dysarthria, dysphagia, external ophthalmoplegia, limb weakness, hypophrenia, deafness, and impaired vision, but the causative gene has not been found and needs further study. PMID:27453229

  5. Subcellular Localization of Matrin 3 Containing Mutations Associated with ALS and Distal Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gallego-Iradi, M. Carolina; Clare, Alexis M.; Brown, Hilda H.; Janus, Christopher; Lewis, Jada; Borchelt, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mutations in Matrin 3 [MATR3], an RNA- and DNA-binding protein normally localized to the nucleus, have been linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and distal myopathies. In the present study, we have used transient transfection of cultured cell lines to examine the impact of different disease-causing mutations on the localization of Matrin 3 within cells. Results Using CHO and human H4 neuroglioma cell models, we find that ALS/myopathy mutations do not produce profound changes in the localization of the protein. Although we did observe variable levels of Matrin 3 in the cytoplasm either by immunostaining or visualization of fluorescently-tagged protein, the majority of cells expressing either wild-type (WT) or mutant Matrin 3 showed nuclear localization of the protein. When cytoplasmic immunostaining, or fusion protein fluorescence, was seen in the cytoplasm, the stronger intensity of staining or fluorescence was usually evident in the nucleus. In ~80% of cells treated with sodium arsenite (Ars) to induce cytoplasmic stress granules, the nuclear localization of WT and F115C mutant Matrin 3 was not disturbed. Notably, over-expression of mutant Matrin 3 did not induce the formation of obvious large inclusion-like structures in either the cytoplasm or nucleus. Conclusions Our findings indicate that mutations in Matrin 3 that are associated with ALS and myopathy do not dramatically alter the normal localization of the protein or readily induce inclusion formation. PMID:26528920

  6. Novel pathogenic variants and genes for myopathies identified by whole exome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Jesse M; Ahearn, Mary Ellen; Balak, Christopher D; Liang, Winnie S; Kurdoglu, Ahmet; Corneveaux, Jason J; Russell, Megan; Huentelman, Matthew J; Craig, David W; Carpten, John; Coons, Stephen W; DeMello, Daphne E; Hall, Judith G; Bernes, Saunder M; Baumbach-Reardon, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Neuromuscular diseases (NMD) account for a significant proportion of infant and childhood mortality and devastating chronic disease. Determining the specific diagnosis of NMD is challenging due to thousands of unique or rare genetic variants that result in overlapping phenotypes. We present four unique childhood myopathy cases characterized by relatively mild muscle weakness, slowly progressing course, mildly elevated creatine phosphokinase (CPK), and contractures. We also present two additional cases characterized by severe prenatal/neonatal myopathy. Prior extensive genetic testing and histology of these cases did not reveal the genetic etiology of disease. Here, we applied whole exome sequencing (WES) and bioinformatics to identify likely causal pathogenic variants in each pedigree. In two cases, we identified novel pathogenic variants in COL6A3. In a third case, we identified novel likely pathogenic variants in COL6A6 and COL6A3. We identified a novel splice variant in EMD in a fourth case. Finally, we classify two cases as calcium channelopathies with identification of novel pathogenic variants in RYR1 and CACNA1S. These are the first cases of myopathies reported to be caused by variants in COL6A6 and CACNA1S. Our results demonstrate the utility and genetic diagnostic value of WES in the broad class of NMD phenotypes. PMID:26247046

  7. A novel perspective for burn-induced myopathy: Membrane repair defect

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Wang, Hongyu; Wu, Dan; Hu, Jianhong; Wu, Wei; Zhang, Yong; Peng, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Myopathy is a common complication of severe burn patients. One potential cause of this myopathy could be failure of the plasma membrane to undergo repair following injuries generated from toxin or exercise. The aim of this study is to assess systemic effect on muscle membrane repair deficiency in burn injury. Skeletal muscle fibers isolated from burn-injured mice were damaged with a UV laser and dye influx imaged confocally to evaluate membrane repair capacity. Membrane repair failure was also tested in burn-injured mice subjected to myotoxin or treadmill exercise. We further used C2C12 myotubules and animal models to investigate the role of MG53 in development of burn-induced membrane repair defect. We demonstrated that skeletal muscle myofibers in burn-injured mice showed significantly more dye uptake after laser damage than controls, indicating a membrane repair deficiency. Myotoxin or treadmill exercise also resulted in a higher-grade repair defect in burn-injured mice. Furthermore, we observed that burn injury induced a significant decrease in MG53 levels and its dimerization in skeletal muscles. Our findings highlight a new mechanism that implicates membrane repair failure as an underlying cause of burn-induced myopathy. And, the disorders in MG53 expression and MG53 dimerization are involved in this cellular pathology. PMID:27545095

  8. Novel pathogenic variants and genes for myopathies identified by whole exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Jesse M; Ahearn, Mary Ellen; Balak, Christopher D; Liang, Winnie S; Kurdoglu, Ahmet; Corneveaux, Jason J; Russell, Megan; Huentelman, Matthew J; Craig, David W; Carpten, John; Coons, Stephen W; DeMello, Daphne E; Hall, Judith G; Bernes, Saunder M; Baumbach-Reardon, Lisa

    2015-07-01

    Neuromuscular diseases (NMD) account for a significant proportion of infant and childhood mortality and devastating chronic disease. Determining the specific diagnosis of NMD is challenging due to thousands of unique or rare genetic variants that result in overlapping phenotypes. We present four unique childhood myopathy cases characterized by relatively mild muscle weakness, slowly progressing course, mildly elevated creatine phosphokinase (CPK), and contractures. We also present two additional cases characterized by severe prenatal/neonatal myopathy. Prior extensive genetic testing and histology of these cases did not reveal the genetic etiology of disease. Here, we applied whole exome sequencing (WES) and bioinformatics to identify likely causal pathogenic variants in each pedigree. In two cases, we identified novel pathogenic variants in COL6A3. In a third case, we identified novel likely pathogenic variants in COL6A6 and COL6A3. We identified a novel splice variant in EMD in a fourth case. Finally, we classify two cases as calcium channelopathies with identification of novel pathogenic variants in RYR1 and CACNA1S. These are the first cases of myopathies reported to be caused by variants in COL6A6 and CACNA1S. Our results demonstrate the utility and genetic diagnostic value of WES in the broad class of NMD phenotypes. PMID:26247046

  9. Paraneoplastic necrotizing myopathy associated with adenocarcinoma of the lung – a rare entity with atypical onset: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Inflammatory myopathies (such as dermatomyositis and polymyositis) are well-recognized paraneoplastic syndromes. However, paraneoplastic necrotizing myopathy is a more recently defined clinical entity, characterized by rapidly progressive, symmetrical, predominantly proximal muscle weakness with severe disability, and associated with a marked increase in serum muscle enzyme levels. Paraneoplastic necrotizing myopathy requires muscle biopsy for diagnosis, which typically shows massive necrosis of muscle fibers with limited or absent inflammatory infiltrates. Case presentation We report the case of an 82-year-old Italian-born Caucasian man who was admitted to hospital because of heart failure and two drop attacks. Over the following days, he developed progressive severe weakness, dysphagia, and dysphonia. Testing showed increasing serum muscle enzyme levels. Electromyography showed irritative myopathy of the proximal muscles and sensorimotor polyneuropathy. Muscle biopsy (left vastus lateralis) showed massive necrosis of muscle fibers with negligible inflammatory infiltrates, complement membrane attack complex deposition on endomysial capillaries, and moderate upregulation of major histocompatibility complex-I. Computed tomography of the thorax showed a nodular mass in the apex of the right lung. The patient was diagnosed with paraneoplastic necrotizing myopathy. In spite of high-dose corticoid therapy, he died 1 month later because of his aggressive cancer. Subsequent electron microscopic examination of a muscle biopsy specimen showed thickened walls and typical pipestem changes of the endomysial capillaries, with swollen endothelial cells. Poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma of the lung was confirmed on post-mortem histological examination. Conclusions Paraneoplastic necrotizing myopathy is a rare syndrome with outcomes ranging from fast progression to complete recovery. Treatment with corticosteroids is often ineffective, and prognosis depends mainly

  10. Diagnosis of myocardial involvement in patients with systemic myopathies with 15-(p-(I-123)iodophenyl) pentadecanoic acid (IPPA) SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Kropp, J.; Briele, B.; Smekal, A.V.; Hotze, A.L.; Biersack, H.J.; Koehler, U.; Zierz, St. ); Knapp, F.F. )

    1992-01-01

    Involvement of the myocardium in non-infectious myopathies presents in most cases as systolic dysfunction or a disturbed cardiac rhythm. We are interested in exploring how often cardiac involvement can be evaluated with various diagnostic techniques in patients with proven myopathy. We investigated 41 patients with myopathies of various etiology, including mitochondrial and congenital myopathies, Curshmann-Steinert disease, muscular dystrophy, and others. Myopathy was proven by muscular biopsy usually from the bicep. Fatty acid imaging was performed with 15-(p-(I-123)iodophenyl)pentadecanoic acid (IP-PA) and sequential SPECT-scintigraphy with a 180 deg. rotation starting at the 45 deg. RAO position. 190 MBq were injected at the maximal stage of a submaximal exercise. Filtered backprojection and reorientation of the slices were achieved by standard techniques. The quantitative comparison of the oblique slices (bulls-eye technique) of the SPECT-studies revealed turnover-rates as a qualitative measure of {beta}-oxidation. Serum levels of lactate (L), pyruvate (P), glucose (G) and triglycerides (TG) were measured at rest and stress. Ventricular function was investigated by radionuclide ventriculography (MUGA) at rest and under stress with Tc-99m labeled red blood cells. In addition, ECG, 24 hour-ECG, and echocardiography were also performed with standard techniques.

  11. Diagnosis of myocardial involvement in patients with systemic myopathies with 15-(p-[I-123]iodophenyl) pentadecanoic acid (IPPA) SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Kropp, J.; Briele, B.; Smekal, A.V.; Hotze, A.L.; Biersack, H.J.; Koehler, U.; Zierz, St.; Knapp, F.F.

    1992-03-01

    Involvement of the myocardium in non-infectious myopathies presents in most cases as systolic dysfunction or a disturbed cardiac rhythm. We are interested in exploring how often cardiac involvement can be evaluated with various diagnostic techniques in patients with proven myopathy. We investigated 41 patients with myopathies of various etiology, including mitochondrial and congenital myopathies, Curshmann-Steinert disease, muscular dystrophy, and others. Myopathy was proven by muscular biopsy usually from the bicep. Fatty acid imaging was performed with 15-(p-[I-123]iodophenyl)pentadecanoic acid (IP-PA) and sequential SPECT-scintigraphy with a 180 deg. rotation starting at the 45 deg. RAO position. 190 MBq were injected at the maximal stage of a submaximal exercise. Filtered backprojection and reorientation of the slices were achieved by standard techniques. The quantitative comparison of the oblique slices (bulls-eye technique) of the SPECT-studies revealed turnover-rates as a qualitative measure of {beta}-oxidation. Serum levels of lactate (L), pyruvate (P), glucose (G) and triglycerides (TG) were measured at rest and stress. Ventricular function was investigated by radionuclide ventriculography (MUGA) at rest and under stress with Tc-99m labeled red blood cells. In addition, ECG, 24 hour-ECG, and echocardiography were also performed with standard techniques.

  12. A novel dynamin-2 gene mutation associated with a late-onset centronuclear myopathy with necklace fibres.

    PubMed

    Casar-Borota, Olivera; Jacobsson, Johan; Libelius, Rolf; Oldfors, Carola Hedberg; Malfatti, Edoardo; Romero, Norma Beatriz; Oldfors, Anders

    2015-04-01

    Nuclear centralisation and internalisation, sarcoplasmic radiating strands and type 1 muscle fibre predominance and hypotrophy characterise dynamin-2 (DNM2) associated centronuclear myopathy, whereas necklace fibres are typically seen in late onset myotubularin-1 (MTM1)-related myopathy. We report a woman with unilateral symptoms probably related to brachial plexus neuritis. Electromyography revealed localised neuropathic and generalised myopathic abnormalities. The typical features of DNM2 centronuclear myopathy with additional necklace fibres were found in the muscle biopsy. Sequencing of the DNM2 and MTM1 genes revealed a novel heterozygous missense mutation in exon 18 of the DNM2, leading to replacement of highly conserved proline at position 647 by arginine. The muscle symptoms have not progressed during the 3-year follow-up. However, the patient has developed bilateral subtle lens opacities. Our findings support the concept that necklace fibres may occasionally be found in DNM2-related myopathy, possibly indicating a common pathogenic mechanism in DNM2 and MTM1 associated centronuclear myopathy. PMID:25633151

  13. Skeletal muscle-specific HMG-CoA reductase knockout mice exhibit rhabdomyolysis: A model for statin-induced myopathy.

    PubMed

    Osaki, Yoshinori; Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Miyahara, Shoko; Iwasaki, Hitoshi; Ishii, Akiko; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yatoh, Shigeru; Takahashi, Akimitsu; Yahagi, Naoya; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Sone, Hirohito; Ohashi, Ken; Ishibashi, Shun; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2015-10-23

    HMG-CoA reductase (HMGCR) catalyzes the conversion of HMG-CoA to mevalonic acid (MVA); this is the rate-limiting enzyme of the mevalonate pathway that synthesizes cholesterol. Statins, HMGCR inhibitors, are widely used as cholesterol-reducing drugs. However, statin-induced myopathy is the most adverse side effect of statins. To eludicate the mechanisms underlying statin the myotoxicity and HMGCR function in the skeletal muscle, we developed the skeletal muscle-specific HMGCR knockout mice. Knockout mice exhibited postnatal myopathy with elevated serum creatine kinase levels and necrosis. Myopathy in knockout mice was completely rescued by the oral administration of MVA. These results suggest that skeletal muscle toxicity caused by statins is dependent on the deficiencies of HMGCR enzyme activity and downstream metabolites of the mevalonate pathway in skeletal muscles rather than the liver or other organs. PMID:26381177

  14. Mutation of the mitochondrial carrier SLC25A42 causes a novel form of mitochondrial myopathy in humans

    PubMed Central

    Kentab, Amal; Alkhalidi, Hisham; Summers, Brady; Alsedairy, Haifa; Xiong, Yong; Gupta, Vandana A.; Alkuraya, Fowzan S.

    2016-01-01

    Myopathies are heterogeneous disorders characterized clinically by weakness and hypotonia, usually in the absence of gross dystrophic changes. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a frequent cause of myopathy. We report a simplex case born to consanguineous parents who presented with muscle weakness, lactic acidosis, and muscle changes suggestive of mitochondrial dysfunction. Combined autozygome and exome analysis revealed a missense variant in the SLC25A42 gene, which encodes an inner mitochondrial membrane protein that imports co-enzyme A into the mitochondrial matrix. Zebrafish slc25a42 knockdown morphants display severe muscle disorganization and weakness. Importantly, these features are rescued by normal human SLC25A42 RNA, but not by RNA harboring the patient’s variant. Our data support a potentially causal link between SLC25A42 mutation and mitochondrial myopathy in humans. PMID:26541337

  15. Autism in the Son of a Woman with Mitochondrial Myopathy and Dysautonomia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Rais, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between autism spectrum disorders and mitochondrial dysfunction, including mitochondrial myopathies and other mitochondrial diseases, is an area of ongoing research. All autism spectrum disorders are known to be heritable, via genetic and/or epigenetic mechanisms, but specific modes of inheritance are not well characterized. Nevertheless, autism spectrum disorders have been linked to many specific genes associated with mitochondrial function, especially to genes involved in mitochondrial tRNA and the electron transport chain, both particularly vulnerable to point mutations, and clinical research also supports a relationship between the two pathologies. Although only a small minority of patients with autism have a mitochondrial disease, many patients with mitochondrial myopathies have autism spectrum disorder symptoms, and these symptoms may be the presenting symptoms, which presents a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. The authors report the case of a 15-year-old boy with a history of autism spectrum disorder and neurocardiogenic syncope, admitted to the inpatient unit for self-injury, whose young mother, age 35, was discovered to suffer from mitochondrial myopathy, dysautonomia, neurocardiogenic syncope, Ehler-Danlos syndrome, and other uncommon multisystem pathologies likely related to mitochondrial dysfunction. This case illustrates the need for a high index of suspicion for mitochondrial disease in patients with autism, as they have two orders of magnitude greater risk for such diseases than the general population. The literature shows that mitochondrial disease is underdiagnosed in autism spectrum disorder patients and should not be viewed as a “zebra” (i.e., an obscure diagnosis that is made when a more common explanation is more likely). PMID:26634179

  16. Bethlem myopathy and engineered collagen VI triple helical deletions prevent intracellular multimer assembly and protein secretion.

    PubMed

    Lamandé, S R; Shields, K A; Kornberg, A J; Shield, L K; Bateman, J F

    1999-07-30

    Mutations in the genes that code for collagen VI subunits, COL6A1, COL6A2, and COL6A3, are the cause of the autosomal dominant disorder, Bethlem myopathy. Although three different collagen VI structural mutations have previously been reported, the effect of these mutations on collagen VI assembly, structure, and function is currently unknown. We have characterized a new Bethlem myopathy mutation that results in skipping of COL6A1 exon 14 during pre-mRNA splicing and the deletion of 18 amino acids from the triple helical domain of the alpha1(VI) chain. Sequencing of genomic DNA identified a G to A transition in the +1 position of the splice donor site of intron 14 in one allele. The mutant alpha1(VI) chains associated intracellularly with alpha2(VI) and alpha3(VI) to form disulfide-bonded monomers, but further assembly into dimers and tetramers was prevented, and molecules containing the mutant chain were not secreted. This triple helical deletion thus resulted in production of half the normal amount of collagen VI. To further explore the biosynthetic consequences of collagen VI triple helical deletions, an alpha3(VI) cDNA expression construct containing a 202-amino acid deletion within the triple helix was produced and stably expressed in SaOS-2 cells. The transfected mutant alpha3(VI) chains associated with endogenous alpha1(VI) and alpha2(VI) to form collagen VI monomers, but dimers and tetramers did not form and the mutant-containing molecules were not secreted. Thus, deletions within the triple helical region of both the alpha1(VI) and alpha3(VI) chains can prevent intracellular dimer and tetramer assembly and secretion. These results provide the first evidence of the biosynthetic consequences of structural collagen VI mutations and suggest that functional protein haploinsufficiency may be a common pathogenic mechanism in Bethlem myopathy. PMID:10419498

  17. Complex sarcolemmal invaginations mimicking myotendinous junctions in a case of Laing early-onset distal myopathy.

    PubMed

    Reis, Gerald F; de la Motte, Grant; Gooding, Rebecca; Laing, Nigel G; Margeta, Marta

    2015-12-01

    Distal myopathies are a group of clinically and pathologically overlapping muscle diseases that are genetically complex and can represent a diagnostic challenge. Laing early-onset distal myopathy (MPD1) is a form of distal myopathy caused by mutations in the MYH7 gene, which encodes the beta myosin heavy chain protein expressed in type 1 skeletal muscle fibers and cardiac myocytes. Here, we present a case of genetically confirmed MPD1 with a typical clinical presentation but distinctive light microscopic and ultrastructural findings on muscle biopsy. A 39-year-old professional male cellist presented with a bilateral foot drop that developed by age 8; analysis of the family pedigree showed an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. The physical exam demonstrated bilateral weakness of ankle dorsiflexors, toe extensors and finger extensors; creatine kinase level was normal. Biopsy of the quadriceps femoris muscle showed predominance and hypotrophy of type 1 fibers, hybrid fibers with co-expression of slow and fast myosin proteins (both in highly atrophic and normal size range), moth-eaten fibers and mini-cores, lack of rimmed vacuoles and rare desmin-positive eosinophilic sarcoplasmic inclusions. In addition to these abnormalities often observed in MPD1, the biopsy demonstrated frequent clefted fibers with complex sarcolemmal invaginations; on ultrastructural examination, these structures closely mimicked myotendinous junctions but were present away from the tendon and were almost exclusively found in type 1 fibers. Sequencing analysis of the MYH7 gene in the index patient and other affected family members demonstrated a previously described heterozygous c.4522_4524delGAG (p.Glu1508del) mutation. This case widens the pathologic spectrum of MPD1 and highlights the pathologic and clinical variability that can accompany the same genetic mutation, suggesting a significant role for modifier genes in MPD1 pathogenesis. PMID:26094647

  18. Modulating myosin restores muscle function in a mouse model of nemaline myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Lindqvist, Johan; Levy, Yotam; Pati‐Alam, Alisha; Hardeman, Edna C.; Gregorevic, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objective Nemaline myopathy, one of the most common congenital myopathies, is associated with mutations in various genes including ACTA1. This disease is also characterized by various forms/degrees of muscle weakness, with most cases being severe and resulting in death in infancy. Recent findings have provided valuable insight into the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. Mutations in ACTA1 directly disrupt binding interactions between actin and myosin, and consequently the intrinsic force‐generating capacity of muscle fibers. ACTA1 mutations are also associated with variations in myofiber size, the mechanisms of which have been unclear. In the present study, we sought to test the hypotheses that the compromised functional and morphological attributes of skeletal muscles bearing ACTA1 mutations (1) would be directly due to the inefficient actomyosin complex and (2) could be restored by manipulating myosin expression. Methods We used a knockin mouse model expressing the ACTA1 His40Tyr actin mutation found in human patients. We then performed in vivo intramuscular injections of recombinant adeno‐associated viral vectors harboring a myosin transgene known to facilitate muscle contraction. Results We observed that in the presence of the transgene, the intrinsic force‐generating capacity was restored and myofiber size was normal. Interpretation This demonstrates a direct link between disrupted attachment of myosin molecules to actin monomers and muscle fiber atrophy. These data also suggest that further therapeutic interventions should primarily target myosin dysfunction to alleviate the pathology of ACTA1‐related nemaline myopathy. Ann Neurol 2016;79:717–725 PMID:26891371

  19. Autism in the Son of a Woman with Mitochondrial Myopathy and Dysautonomia: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Brown, Bradley D; Rais, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between autism spectrum disorders and mitochondrial dysfunction, including mitochondrial myopathies and other mitochondrial diseases, is an area of ongoing research. All autism spectrum disorders are known to be heritable, via genetic and/or epigenetic mechanisms, but specific modes of inheritance are not well characterized. Nevertheless, autism spectrum disorders have been linked to many specific genes associated with mitochondrial function, especially to genes involved in mitochondrial tRNA and the electron transport chain, both particularly vulnerable to point mutations, and clinical research also supports a relationship between the two pathologies. Although only a small minority of patients with autism have a mitochondrial disease, many patients with mitochondrial myopathies have autism spectrum disorder symptoms, and these symptoms may be the presenting symptoms, which presents a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. The authors report the case of a 15-year-old boy with a history of autism spectrum disorder and neurocardiogenic syncope, admitted to the inpatient unit for self-injury, whose young mother, age 35, was discovered to suffer from mitochondrial myopathy, dysautonomia, neurocardiogenic syncope, Ehler-Danlos syndrome, and other uncommon multisystem pathologies likely related to mitochondrial dysfunction. This case illustrates the need for a high index of suspicion for mitochondrial disease in patients with autism, as they have two orders of magnitude greater risk for such diseases than the general population. The literature shows that mitochondrial disease is underdiagnosed in autism spectrum disorder patients and should not be viewed as a "zebra" (i.e., an obscure diagnosis that is made when a more common explanation is more likely). PMID:26634179

  20. Clinical and Muscle Imaging Findings in 14 Mainland Chinese Patients with Oculopharyngodistal Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Juan; Liu, Jing; Xiao, Jiangxi; Du, Jing; Que, Chengli; Shi, Xin; Liang, Wei; Sun, Weiping; Zhang, Wei; Lv, He; Yuan, Yun; Wang, Zhaoxia

    2015-01-01

    Oculopharyngodistal myopathy (OPDM) is an extremely rare, adult-onset hereditary muscular disease characterized by progressive external ocular, pharyngeal, and distal muscle weakness and myopathological rimmed vacuole changes. The causative gene is currently unknown; therefore, diagnosis of OPDM is based on clinical and histopathological features and genetic exclusion of similar conditions. Moreover, variable manifestations of this disorder are reported in terms of muscle involvement and severity. We present the clinical profile and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes of lower limb muscles in 14 mainland Chinese patients with OPDM, emphasizing the role of muscle MRI in disease identification and differential diagnosis. The patients came from 10 unrelated families and presented with progressive external ocular, laryngopharyngeal, facial, distal limb muscle weakness that had been present since early adulthood. Serum creatine kinase was mildly to moderately elevated. Electromyography revealed myogenic changes with inconsistent myotonic discharge. The respiratory function test revealed subclinical respiratory muscle involvement. Myopathological findings showed rimmed vacuoles with varying degrees of muscular dystrophic changes. All known genes responsible for distal and myofibrillar myopathies, vacuolar myopathies, and muscular dystrophies were excluded by PCR or targeted next-generation sequencing. Muscle MRI revealed that the distal lower legs had more severe fatty replacement than the thigh muscles. Serious involvement of the soleus and long head of the biceps femoris was observed in all patients, whereas the popliteus, gracilis and short head of biceps femoris were almost completely spared, even in advanced stages. Not only does our study widen the spectrum of OPDM in China, but it also demonstrates that OPDM has a specific pattern of muscle involvement that may provide valuable information for its differential diagnosis and show further evidence supporting

  1. The genetic basis of pectoralis major myopathies in modern broiler chicken lines

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Richard A.; Watson, Kellie A.; Bilgili, S. F.; Avendano, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    This is the first report providing estimates of the genetic basis of breast muscle myopathies (BMM) and their relationship with growth and yield in broiler chickens. In addition, this paper addresses the hypothesis that genetic selection for increase breast yield has contributed to the onset of BMM. Data were analyzed from ongoing recording of BMM within the Aviagen breeding program. This study focused on three BMM: deep pectoral myopathy (DPM; binary trait), white striping (WS; 4 categories) and wooden breast (WB; 3 categories). Data from two purebred commercial broiler lines (A and B) were utilized providing greater than 40,000 meat quality records per line. The difference in selection history between these two lines has resulted in contrasting breast yield (BY): 29% for Line A and 21% for Line B. Data were analyzed to estimate genetic parameters using a multivariate animal model including six traits: body weight (BW), processing body weight (PW), BY, DPM, WB, and WS, in addition to the appropriate fixed effects and permanent environmental effect of the dam. Results indicate similar patterns of heritability and genetic correlations for the two lines. Heritabilities (h2) of BW, PW and BY ranged from 0.271–0.418; for DPM and WB h2 <0.1; and for WS h2 ≤0.338. Genetic correlations between the BMM and BW, PW, or BY were ≤0.132 in Line A and ≤0.248 in Line B. This paper demonstrates the polygenic nature of these traits and the low genetic relationships with BW, PW, and BY, which facilitates genetic improvement across all traits in a balanced breeding program. It also highlights the importance of understanding the environmental and/or management factors that contribute greater than 65% of the variance in the incidence of white striping of breast muscle and more than 90% of the variance of the incidence of wooden breast and deep pectoral myopathy in broiler chickens. PMID:26476091

  2. Phospholamban overexpression in mice causes a centronuclear myopathy-like phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Fajardo, Val A.; Bombardier, Eric; McMillan, Elliott; Tran, Khanh; Wadsworth, Brennan J.; Gamu, Daniel; Hopf, Andrew; Vigna, Chris; Smith, Ian C.; Bellissimo, Catherine; Michel, Robin N.; Tarnopolsky, Mark A.; Quadrilatero, Joe; Tupling, A. Russell

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Centronuclear myopathy (CNM) is a congenital myopathy that is histopathologically characterized by centrally located nuclei, central aggregation of oxidative activity, and type I fiber predominance and hypotrophy. Here, we obtained commercially available mice overexpressing phospholamban (PlnOE), a well-known inhibitor of sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPases (SERCAs), in their slow-twitch type I skeletal muscle fibers to determine the effects on SERCA function. As expected with a 6- to 7-fold overexpression of phospholamban, SERCA dysfunction was evident in PlnOE muscles, with marked reductions in rates of Ca2+ uptake, maximal ATPase activity and the apparent affinity of SERCA for Ca2+. However, our most significant discovery was that the soleus and gluteus minimus muscles from the PlnOE mice displayed overt signs of myopathy: they histopathologically resembled human CNM, with centrally located nuclei, central aggregation of oxidative activity, type I fiber predominance and hypotrophy, progressive fibrosis and muscle weakness. This phenotype is associated with significant upregulation of muscle sarcolipin and dynamin 2, increased Ca2+-activated proteolysis, oxidative stress and protein nitrosylation. Moreover, in our assessment of muscle biopsies from three human CNM patients, we found a significant 53% reduction in SERCA activity and increases in both total and monomeric PLN content compared with five healthy subjects, thereby justifying future studies with more CNM patients. Altogether, our results suggest that the commercially available PlnOE mouse phenotypically resembles human CNM and could be used as a model to test potential mechanisms and therapeutic strategies. To date, there is no cure for CNM and our results suggest that targeting SERCA function, which has already been shown to be an effective therapeutic target for murine muscular dystrophy and human cardiomyopathy, might represent a novel therapeutic strategy to combat CNM. PMID:26035394

  3. Exome sequencing reveals DNAJB6 mutations in dominantly-inherited myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Harms, Matthew B.; Sommerville, R. Brian; Allred, Peggy; Bell, Shaughn; Ma, Duanduan; Cooper, Paul; Lopate, Glenn; Pestronk, Alan; Weihl, Conrad C.; Baloh, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To identify the causative gene in an autosomal dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) with skeletal muscle vacuoles. Methods Exome sequencing was used to identify candidate mutations in the studied pedigree. Genome-wide linkage was then used to narrow the list of candidates to a single disease-associated mutation. Additional pedigrees with dominant or sporadic myopathy were screened for mutations in the same gene (DNAJB6) using exome sequencing. Skeletal muscle from affected patients was evaluated with histochemistry and immunohistochemical stains for dystrophy-related proteins, SMI-31, TDP43, and DNAJB6. Results Exome analysis in three affected individuals from a family with dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy and vacuolar pathology identified novel candidate mutations in 22 genes. Linkage analysis excluded all variants except a Phe93Leu mutation in the G/F domain of the DNAJB6 gene, which resides within the LGMD 1E locus at 7q36. Analysis of exome sequencing data from other pedigrees with dominant myopathy identified a second G/F domain mutation (Pro96Arg) in DNAJB6. Affected muscle showed mild dystrophic changes, vacuoles, and abnormal aggregation of proteins, including TDP-43 and DNAJB6 itself. Interpretation Mutations within the G/F domain of DNAJB6 are a novel cause of dominantly-inherited myopathy. DNAJB6 is a member of the HSP40/DNAJ family of molecular co-chaperones tasked with protecting client proteins from irreversible aggregation during protein synthesis or during times of cellular stress. The abnormal accumulation of several proteins in patient muscle, including DNAJB6 itself, suggest that DNAJB6 function is compromised by the identified G/F domain mutations. PMID:22334415

  4. The Sick and the Weak: Neuropathies/Myopathies in the Critically Ill

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, O.; Reid, M. B.; Van den Berghe, G.; Vanhorebeek, I.; Hermans, G.; Rich, M. M.; Larsson, L.

    2015-01-01

    Critical illness polyneuropathies (CIP) and myopathies (CIM) are common complications of critical illness. Several weakness syndromes are summarized under the term intensive care unit-acquired weakness (ICUAW). We propose a classification of different ICUAW forms (CIM, CIP, sepsis-induced, steroid-denervation myopathy) and pathophysiological mechanisms from clinical and animal model data. Triggers include sepsis, mechanical ventilation, muscle unloading, steroid treatment, or denervation. Some ICUAW forms require stringent diagnostic features; CIM is marked by membrane hypoexcitability, severe atrophy, preferential myosin loss, ultrastructural alterations, and inadequate autophagy activation while myopathies in pure sepsis do not reproduce marked myosin loss. Reduced membrane excitability results from depolarization and ion channel dysfunction. Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to energy-dependent processes. Ubiquitin proteasome and calpain activation trigger muscle proteolysis and atrophy while protein synthesis is impaired. Myosin loss is more pronounced than actin loss in CIM. Protein quality control is altered by inadequate autophagy. Ca2+ dysregulation is present through altered Ca2+ homeostasis. We highlight clinical hallmarks, trigger factors, and potential mechanisms from human studies and animal models that allow separation of risk factors that may trigger distinct mechanisms contributing to weakness. During critical illness, altered inflammatory (cytokines) and metabolic pathways deteriorate muscle function. ICUAW prevention/treatment is limited, e.g., tight glycemic control, delaying nutrition, and early mobilization. Future challenges include identification of primary/secondary events during the time course of critical illness, the interplay between membrane excitability, bioenergetic failure and differential proteolysis, and finding new therapeutic targets by help of tailored animal models. PMID:26133937

  5. Congenital Generalized Lipodystrophy, Type 4 (CGL4) Associated with Myopathy due to Novel PTRF Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Shastry, Savitha; Delgado, Mauricio R.; Dirik, Eray; Turkmen, Mehmet; Agarwal, Anil K.; Garg, Abhimanyu

    2010-01-01

    Congenital generalized lipodystrophy (CGL) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by near total absence of body fat since birth with predisposition to insulin resistance, diabetes, hypertriglyceridemia and hepatic steatosis. Three CGL loci, AGPAT2, BSCL2 and CAV1 have been identified previously. Recently, mutations in polymerase I and transcript release factor (PTRF) were reported in five Japanese patients presenting with myopathy and CGL (CGL4). We report on novel PTRF mutations and detailed phenotype of two male and three female patients with CGL4 belonging to two pedigrees of Mexican origin (CGL7100 and CGL178) and one pedigree of Turkish origin (CGL180). All patients had near total loss of body fat and congenital myopathy manifesting as weakness, percussion-induced muscle mounding and high serum creatine kinase levels. Four of them had hypertriglyceridemia. Three of them had atlantoaxial instability. Two patients belonging to CGL178 pedigree required surgery for pyloric stenosis in the first month of life. None of them had prolonged QT interval on electrocardiography but both siblings belonging to CGL7100 had exercise-induced arrhythmias. Three of them had mild acanthosis nigricans but had normal glucose tolerance. Two of them had hepatic steatosis. All patients had novel null mutations in PTRF gene. In conclusion, mutations in PTRF result in a novel phenotype that includes generalized lipodystrophy with mild metabolic derangements, myopathy, cardiac arrhythmias, atlantoaxial instability and pyloric stenosis. It is unclear how mutations in PTRF, which plays an essential role in formation of caveolae, affect a wide variety of tissues resulting in a variable phenotype. PMID:20684003

  6. Juvenile Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathy in a Patient With Dyskeratosis Congenita Due to C16orf57 Mutation.

    PubMed

    Kilic, Sara S; Cekic, Sukru

    2016-03-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita (DC) is a rare inherited disorder characterized by reticular skin pigmentation, oral cavity leukoplakia, and nail dystrophy. A variety of noncutaneous (dental, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, neurological, genitourinary, ophthalmic, and skeletal) abnormalities also have been reported. An 8-year-old boy with DC developed juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathy. C16orf57 mutation was identified as a genetic cause of DC. Treatment with methylprednisolone was initiated, followed with methotrexate, prednisolone, and high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin treatment. This is the first report on a patient with juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathy and DC. PMID:26535771

  7. Myasthenic decrement and myasthenic myopathy. A study on the effects of thymectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Pinelli, P; Arrigo, A; Moglia, A

    1975-01-01

    Motor unit action potentials, M responses to repetitive nerve stimulation, and anticholinesterase tests were investigated in 12 myasthenic patients before and after thymectomy. In six of them the endarterial acetylcholine test was also carried out. Responsiveness to ACTH or to prednisone treatment was evaluated before and after thymectomy. The typical myasthenic presynaptic disorders were improved by thymectomy, while signs of myasthenic myopathy (according to Rowland's definition) were apparently increased. This process of 'functional myopathophanerosis' is discussed and explained in terms of a previous presynaptic disorder blocking the voluntary recruitment threshold of those motor units which are most affected at both presynaptic and postsynaptic level. Images PMID:168321

  8. Myasthenic decrement and myasthenic myopathy. A study on the effects of thymectomy.

    PubMed

    Pinelli, P; Arrigo, A; Moglia, A

    1975-06-01

    Motor unit action potentials, M responses to repetitive nerve stimulation, and anticholinesterase tests were investigated in 12 myasthenic patients before and after thymectomy. In six of them the endarterial acetylcholine test was also carried out. Responsiveness to ACTH or to prednisone treatment was evaluated before and after thymectomy. The typical myasthenic presynaptic disorders were improved by thymectomy, while signs of myasthenic myopathy (according to Rowland's definition) were apparently increased. This process of 'functional myopathophanerosis' is discussed and explained in terms of a previous presynaptic disorder blocking the voluntary recruitment threshold of those motor units which are most affected at both presynaptic and postsynaptic level. PMID:168321

  9. Suspected myofibrillar myopathy in Arabian horses with a history of exertional rhabdomyolysis

    PubMed Central

    VALBERG, S. J.; McKENZIE, E. C.; EYRICH, L. V.; SHIVERS, J.; BARNES, N. E.; FINNO, C. J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Reasons for performing study Although exertional rhabdomyolysis (ER) is common in Arabian horses, there are no dedicated studies describing histopathological characteristics of muscle from Arabian horses with ER. Objectives To prospectively identify distinctive histopathological features of muscle from Arabian endurance horses with a history of ER (pro-ER) and to retrospectively determine their prevalence in archived samples from Arabian horses with exertional myopathies (retro-ER). Study design Prospective and retrospective histopathological description. Methods Middle gluteal muscle biopsies obtained from Arabian controls (n = 14), pro-ER (n = 13) as well as archived retro-ER (n = 25) muscle samples previously classified with type 2 polysaccharide storage myopathy (15/25), recurrent exertional rhabdomyolysis (7/25) and no pathology (3/25) were scored for histopathology and immunohistochemical staining of cytoskeletal proteins. Glutaraldehyde-fixed samples (2 pro-ER, one control) were processed for electron microscopy. Pro-ER and retro-ER groups were compared with controls using Mann–Whitney U and Fisher's exact tests. Results Centrally located myonuclei in mature myofibres were found in significantly more (P<0.05) pro-ER (12/13) and retro-ER (21/25) horses than controls (4/14). Degenerating myofibres were not evident in any biopsies. Retro-ER horses had amylase-resistant polysaccharide (6/25, P<0.05) and higher scores for cytoplasmic glycogen, rimmed vacuoles and rod-like bodies. A few control horses (3/14) and significantly (P<0.05) more pro-ER (12/13) and retro-ER (18/25) horses had disrupted myofibrillar alignment and large desmin and αβ-crystallin positive cytoplasmic aggregates. Prominent Z-disc degeneration and focal myofibrillar disruption with regional accumulation of β-glycogen particles were identified on electron microscopy of the 2 pro-ER samples. Conclusions In a subset of Arabian horses with intermittent episodes of exertional

  10. Mitochondrial myopathy, cardiomyopathy, and pontine signal changes in an adult patient with isolated complex II deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sonam, Kothari; Bindu, Parayil Sankaran; Taly, Arun B; Nalini, Atchayaram; Govindaraju, Chikkanna; Aravinda, Hanumanthapura R; Khan, Nahid Akthar; Thangaraj, Kumaraswamy; Gayathri, Narayanappa

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondrial disorders resulting from an isolated deficiency of complex II of the respiratory chain is rarely reported. The phenotypic spectrum associated with these disorders is heterogeneous and still expanding. This report describes a patient who presented with myopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, and pontine signal changes on magnetic resonance imaging. Muscle biopsy showed total absence of succinate dehydrogenase on enzyme histochemistry, negative succinate dehydrogenase subunit A (SDHA) activity on immunohistochemistry, and ultrastructural evidence of mitochondrial aggregates of varying sizes confirming the diagnosis of complex II deficiency. A unique phenotype with complex II deficiency is reported. PMID:25415517

  11. Extensive germinal mosaicism in a family with X linked myotubular myopathy simulates genetic heterogeneity.

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, M C; Guiraud-Chaumeil, C; Laporte, J; Manouvrier-Hanu, S; Mandel, J L

    1998-01-01

    A family with two male cousins affected with myotubular myopathy (MTM) was referred to us for genetic counselling. Linkage analysis appeared to exclude the Xq28 region. As a gene for X linked MTM was recently identified in Xq28, we screened the obligatory carrier mothers for mutation. We found a 4 bp deletion in exon 4 of the MTM1 gene, which originated from the grandfather of the affected children and which was transmitted to three daughters. This illustrates the importance of mutation detection to avoid pitfalls in linkage analysis that may be caused by such cases of germinal mosaicism. Images PMID:9541111

  12. Hyperpigmentation and atrophy in folds as cutaneous manifestation in a case of mitochondrial myopathy.

    PubMed

    Campuzano-García, Andrés Eduardo; Rodríguez-Arámbula, Adriana; Torres-Alvarez, Bertha; Castanedo-Cázares, Juan Pablo

    2015-05-01

    Mitochondrial myopathies are inborn metabolism defect diseases manifested by symptoms reflecting failure of the final step in the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Clinical expression of these conditions can vary widely, but typically includes organ systems with a high energy demand, such as striated muscle, myocardium, and nervous and liver tissues. In contrast, cutaneous manifestations are rare and are non-specific, most commonly presenting as pigmentation disorders. In this case report, we present a case of Alpers syndrome accompanied by hyperpigmentation and atrophy in skin folds. PMID:26295861

  13. Muscle spindles exhibit core lesions and extensive degeneration of intrafusal fibers in the Ryr1{sup I4895T/wt} mouse model of core myopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Zvaritch, Elena; MacLennan, David H.

    2015-04-24

    Muscle spindles from the hind limb muscles of adult Ryr1{sup I4895T/wt} (IT/+) mice exhibit severe structural abnormalities. Up to 85% of the spindles are separated from skeletal muscle fascicles by a thick layer of connective tissue. Many intrafusal fibers exhibit degeneration, with Z-line streaming, compaction and collapse of myofibrillar bundles, mitochondrial clumping, nuclear shrinkage and pyknosis. The lesions resemble cores observed in the extrafusal myofibers of this animal model and of core myopathy patients. Spindle abnormalities precede those in extrafusal fibers, indicating that they are a primary pathological feature in this murine Ryr1-related core myopathy. Muscle spindle involvement, if confirmed for human core myopathy patients, would provide an explanation for an array of devastating clinical features characteristic of these diseases and provide novel insights into the pathology of RYR1-related myopathies. - Highlights: • Muscle spindles exhibit structural abnormalities in a mouse model of core myopathy. • Myofibrillar collapse and mitochondrial clumping is observed in intrafusal fibers. • Myofibrillar degeneration follows a pattern similar to core formation in extrafusal myofibers. • Muscle spindle abnormalities are a part of the pathological phenotype in the mouse model of core myopathy. • Direct involvement of muscle spindles in the pathology of human RYR1-related myopathies is proposed.

  14. Intensive care unit acquired weakness in children: Critical illness polyneuropathy and myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kukreti, Vinay; Shamim, Mosharraf; Khilnani, Praveen

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: Intensive care unit acquired weakness (ICUAW) is a common occurrence in patients who are critically ill. It is most often due to critical illness polyneuropathy (CIP) or to critical illness myopathy (CIM). ICUAW is increasingly being recognized partly as a consequence of improved survival in patients with severe sepsis and multi-organ failure, partly related to commonly used agents such as steroids and muscle relaxants. There have been occasional reports of CIP and CIM in children, but little is known about their prevalence or clinical impact in the pediatric population. This review summarizes the current understanding of pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment of CIP and CIM in general with special reference to published literature in the pediatric age group. Subjects and Methods: Studies were identified through MedLine and Embase using relevant MeSH and Key words. Both adult and pediatric studies were included. Results: ICUAW in children is a poorly described entity with unknown incidence, etiology and unclear long-term prognosis. Conclusions: Critical illness polyneuropathy and myopathy is relatively rare, but clinically significant sequelae of multifactorial origin affecting morbidity, length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay and possibly mortality in critically ill children admitted to pediatric ICU. PMID:24678152

  15. Exome sequencing reveals a nebulin nonsense mutation in a dog model of nemaline myopathy.

    PubMed

    Evans, Jacquelyn M; Cox, Melissa L; Huska, Jonathan; Li, Frank; Gaitero, Luis; Guo, Ling T; Casal, Margaret L; Granzier, Henk L; Shelton, G Diane; Clark, Leigh Anne

    2016-10-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) is a congenital muscle disorder associated with muscle weakness, hypotonia, and rod bodies in the skeletal muscle fibers. Mutations in 10 genes have been implicated in human NM, but spontaneous cases in dogs have not been genetically characterized. We identified a novel recessive myopathy in a family of line-bred American bulldogs (ABDs); rod bodies in muscle biopsies established this as NM. Using SNP profiles from the nuclear family, we evaluated inheritance patterns at candidate loci and prioritized TNNT1 and NEB for further investigation. Whole exome sequencing of the dam, two affected littermates, and an unaffected littermate revealed a nonsense mutation in NEB (g.52734272 C>A, S8042X). Whole tissue gel electrophoresis and western blots confirmed a lack of full-length NEB in affected tissues, suggesting nonsense-mediated decay. The pathogenic variant was absent from 120 dogs of 24 other breeds and 100 unrelated ABDs, suggesting that it occurred recently and may be private to the family. This study presents the first molecularly characterized large animal model of NM, which could provide new opportunities for therapeutic approaches. PMID:27215641

  16. Identification and Mechanistic Investigation of Drug-Drug Interactions Associated with Myopathy – A Translational Approach

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xu; Quinney, Sara K.; Wang, Zhiping; Zhang, Pengyue; Duke, Jon; Desta, Zeruesenay; Elmendorf, Jeffrey S.; Flockhart, David A.; Li, L

    2015-01-01

    Myopathy is a group of muscle diseases that can be induced or exacerbated by drug-drug interactions (DDIs). We sought to identify clinically important myopathic DDIs and elucidate their underlying mechanisms. Five DDIs were found to increase the risk of myopathy based on analysis of observational data from the Indiana Network of Patient Care. Loratadine interacted with simvastatin (relative risk 95% CI = [1.39, 2.06]), alprazolam (1.50, 2.31), ropinirole (2.06, 5.00) and omeprazole (1.15, 1.38). Promethazine interacted with tegaserod (1.94, 4.64). In vitro investigation showed that these DDIs were unlikely to result from inhibition of drug metabolism by CYP450 enzymes or from inhibition of hepatic uptake via the membrane transporter OATP1B1/1B3. However, we did observe in vitro synergistic myotoxicity of simvastatin and desloratadine, suggesting a role in loratadine-simvastatin interaction. This interaction was epidemiologically confirmed (odds ratio 95% CI = [2.02, 3.65]) using the data from the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System. PMID:25975815

  17. A statin-dependent QTL for GATM expression is associated with statin-induced myopathy.

    PubMed

    Mangravite, Lara M; Engelhardt, Barbara E; Medina, Marisa W; Smith, Joshua D; Brown, Christopher D; Chasman, Daniel I; Mecham, Brigham H; Howie, Bryan; Shim, Heejung; Naidoo, Devesh; Feng, QiPing; Rieder, Mark J; Chen, Yii-Der I; Rotter, Jerome I; Ridker, Paul M; Hopewell, Jemma C; Parish, Sarah; Armitage, Jane; Collins, Rory; Wilke, Russell A; Nickerson, Deborah A; Stephens, Matthew; Krauss, Ronald M

    2013-10-17

    Statins are prescribed widely to lower plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL) concentrations and cardiovascular disease risk and have been shown to have beneficial effects in a broad range of patients. However, statins are associated with an increased risk, albeit small, of clinical myopathy and type 2 diabetes. Despite evidence for substantial genetic influence on LDL concentrations, pharmacogenomic trials have failed to identify genetic variations with large effects on either statin efficacy or toxicity, and have produced little information regarding mechanisms that modulate statin response. Here we identify a downstream target of statin treatment by screening for the effects of in vitro statin exposure on genetic associations with gene expression levels in lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from 480 participants of a clinical trial of simvastatin treatment. This analysis identified six expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) that interacted with simvastatin exposure, including rs9806699, a cis-eQTL for the gene glycine amidinotransferase (GATM) that encodes the rate-limiting enzyme in creatine synthesis. We found this locus to be associated with incidence of statin-induced myotoxicity in two separate populations (meta-analysis odds ratio = 0.60). Furthermore, we found that GATM knockdown in hepatocyte-derived cell lines attenuated transcriptional response to sterol depletion, demonstrating that GATM may act as a functional link between statin-mediated lowering of cholesterol and susceptibility to statin-induced myopathy. PMID:23995691

  18. Identification and Mechanistic Investigation of Drug-Drug Interactions Associated With Myopathy: A Translational Approach.

    PubMed

    Han, X; Quinney, S K; Wang, Z; Zhang, P; Duke, J; Desta, Z; Elmendorf, J S; Flockhart, D A; Li, L

    2015-09-01

    Myopathy is a group of muscle diseases that can be induced or exacerbated by drug-drug interactions (DDIs). We sought to identify clinically important myopathic DDIs and elucidate their underlying mechanisms. Five DDIs were found to increase the risk of myopathy based on analysis of observational data from the Indiana Network of Patient Care. Loratadine interacted with simvastatin (relative risk 95% confidence interval [CI] = [1.39, 2.06]), alprazolam (1.50, 2.31), ropinirole (2.06, 5.00), and omeprazole (1.15, 1.38). Promethazine interacted with tegaserod (1.94, 4.64). In vitro investigation showed that these DDIs were unlikely to result from inhibition of drug metabolism by CYP450 enzymes or from inhibition of hepatic uptake via the membrane transporter OATP1B1/1B3. However, we did observe in vitro synergistic myotoxicity of simvastatin and desloratadine, suggesting a role in loratadine-simvastatin interaction. This interaction was epidemiologically confirmed (odds ratio 95% CI = [2.02, 3.65]) using the data from the US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System. PMID:25975815

  19. Intragenic deletion of TRIM32 in compound heterozygotes with sarcotubular myopathy/LGMD2H.

    PubMed

    Borg, Kristian; Stucka, Rolf; Locke, Matthew; Melin, Eva; Ahlberg, Gabrielle; Klutzny, Ursula; Hagen, Maja von der; Huebner, Angela; Lochmüller, Hanns; Wrogemann, Klaus; Thornell, Lars-Eric; Blake, Derek J; Schoser, Benedikt

    2009-09-01

    In 2005 the commonality of sarcotubular myopathy (STM) and limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2H (LGMD2H) was demonstrated, as both are caused by the p D487N missense mutation in TRIM32 originally found in the Manitoba Hutterite population. Recently, three novel homozygous TRIM32 mutations have been described in LGMD patients. Here we describe a three generation Swedish family clinically presenting with limb girdle muscular weakness and histological features of a microvacuolar myopathy. The two index patients were compound heterozygotes for a frameshift mutation in TRIM32 (c.1560delC ) and a 30 kb intragenic deletion, encompassing parts of intron 1 and the entire exon 2 of TRIM32. In these patients, no full-length or truncated TRIM32 could be detected. Interestingly, heterozygous family members carrying only one mutation showed mild clinical symptoms and vacuolar changes in muscle. In our family, the phenotype encompasses additionally a mild demyelinating polyneuropathic syndrome. Thus STM and LGMD2H are the result of loss of function mutations that can be either deletions or missense mutations. PMID:19492423

  20. Validity of a Neurological Scoring System for Canine X-Linked Myotubular Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Meisner, Allison; Mack, David; Goddard, Melissa; Coulter, Ian T.; Grange, Robert; Childers, Martin K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A simple clinical neurological test was developed to evaluate response to gene therapy in a preclinical canine model of X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM). This devastating congenital myopathy is caused by mutation in the myotubularin (MTM1) gene. Clinical signs include muscle weakness, early respiratory failure, and ventilator dependence. A spontaneously occurring canine model has a similar clinical picture and histological abnormalities on muscle biopsy compared with patients. We developed a neuromuscular assessment score, graded on a scale from 10 (normal) to 1 (unable to maintain sternal recumbency). We hypothesize that this neurological assessment score correlates with genotype and established measures of disease severity and is reliable when performed by an independent observer. At 17 weeks of age, there was strong correlation between neurological assessment scores and established methods of severity testing. The neurological severity score correctly differentiated between XLMTM and wild-type dogs with good interobserver reliability, on the basis of strong agreement between neurological scores assigned by independent observers. Together, these data indicate that the neurological scoring system developed for this canine congenital neuromuscular disorder is reliable and valid. This scoring system may be helpful in evaluating response to therapy in preclinical testing in this disease model, such as response to gene therapy. PMID:26086764

  1. Scanning for Therapeutic Targets within the Cytokine Network of Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    De Paepe, Boel; Zschüntzsch, Jana

    2015-01-01

    The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) constitute a heterogeneous group of chronic disorders that include dermatomyositis (DM), polymyositis (PM), sporadic inclusion body myositis (IBM) and necrotizing autoimmune myopathy (NAM). They represent distinct pathological entities that, most often, share predominant inflammation in muscle tissue. Many of the immunopathogenic processes behind the IIM remain poorly understood, but the crucial role of cytokines as essential regulators of the intramuscular build-up of inflammation is undisputed. This review describes the extensive cytokine network within IIM muscle, characterized by strong expression of Tumor Necrosis Factors (TNFα, LTβ, BAFF), Interferons (IFNα/β/γ), Interleukins (IL-1/6/12/15/18/23) and Chemokines (CXCL9/10/11/13, CCL2/3/4/8/19/21). Current therapeutic strategies and the exploration of potential disease modifying agents based on manipulation of the cytokine network are provided. Reported responses to anti-TNFα treatment in IIM are conflicting and new onset DM/PM has been described after administration of anti-TNFα agents to treat other diseases, pointing to the complex effects of TNFα neutralization. Treatment with anti-IFNα has been shown to suppress the IFN type 1 gene signature in DM/PM patients and improve muscle strength. Beneficial effects of anti-IL-1 and anti-IL-6 therapy have also been reported. Cytokine profiling in IIM aids the development of therapeutic strategies and provides approaches to subtype patients for treatment outcome prediction. PMID:26270565

  2. Leiomodin-3 dysfunction results in thin filament disorganization and nemaline myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Michaela; Sandaradura, Sarah A.; Dowling, James J.; Kostyukova, Alla S.; Moroz, Natalia; Quinlan, Kate G.; Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Ravenscroft, Gianina; Todd, Emily J.; Ceyhan-Birsoy, Ozge; Gokhin, David S.; Maluenda, Jérome; Lek, Monkol; Nolent, Flora; Pappas, Christopher T.; Novak, Stefanie M.; D’Amico, Adele; Malfatti, Edoardo; Thomas, Brett P.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Gupta, Namrata; Daly, Mark J.; Ilkovski, Biljana; Houweling, Peter J.; Davidson, Ann E.; Swanson, Lindsay C.; Brownstein, Catherine A.; Gupta, Vandana A.; Medne, Livija; Shannon, Patrick; Martin, Nicole; Bick, David P.; Flisberg, Anders; Holmberg, Eva; Van den Bergh, Peter; Lapunzina, Pablo; Waddell, Leigh B.; Sloboda, Darcée D.; Bertini, Enrico; Chitayat, David; Telfer, William R.; Laquerrière, Annie; Gregorio, Carol C.; Ottenheijm, Coen A.C.; Bönnemann, Carsten G.; Pelin, Katarina; Beggs, Alan H.; Hayashi, Yukiko K.; Romero, Norma B.; Laing, Nigel G.; Nishino, Ichizo; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina; Melki, Judith; Fowler, Velia M.; MacArthur, Daniel G.; North, Kathryn N.; Clarke, Nigel F.

    2014-01-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) is a genetic muscle disorder characterized by muscle dysfunction and electron-dense protein accumulations (nemaline bodies) in myofibers. Pathogenic mutations have been described in 9 genes to date, but the genetic basis remains unknown in many cases. Here, using an approach that combined whole-exome sequencing (WES) and Sanger sequencing, we identified homozygous or compound heterozygous variants in LMOD3 in 21 patients from 14 families with severe, usually lethal, NM. LMOD3 encodes leiomodin-3 (LMOD3), a 65-kDa protein expressed in skeletal and cardiac muscle. LMOD3 was expressed from early stages of muscle differentiation; localized to actin thin filaments, with enrichment near the pointed ends; and had strong actin filament-nucleating activity. Loss of LMOD3 in patient muscle resulted in shortening and disorganization of thin filaments. Knockdown of lmod3 in zebrafish replicated NM-associated functional and pathological phenotypes. Together, these findings indicate that mutations in the gene encoding LMOD3 underlie congenital myopathy and demonstrate that LMOD3 is essential for the organization of sarcomeric thin filaments in skeletal muscle. PMID:25250574

  3. Validity of a Neurological Scoring System for Canine X-Linked Myotubular Myopathy.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Jessica M; Meisner, Allison; Mack, David; Goddard, Melissa; Coulter, Ian T; Grange, Robert; Childers, Martin K

    2015-06-01

    A simple clinical neurological test was developed to evaluate response to gene therapy in a preclinical canine model of X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM). This devastating congenital myopathy is caused by mutation in the myotubularin (MTM1) gene. Clinical signs include muscle weakness, early respiratory failure, and ventilator dependence. A spontaneously occurring canine model has a similar clinical picture and histological abnormalities on muscle biopsy compared with patients. We developed a neuromuscular assessment score, graded on a scale from 10 (normal) to 1 (unable to maintain sternal recumbency). We hypothesize that this neurological assessment score correlates with genotype and established measures of disease severity and is reliable when performed by an independent observer. At 17 weeks of age, there was strong correlation between neurological assessment scores and established methods of severity testing. The neurological severity score correctly differentiated between XLMTM and wild-type dogs with good interobserver reliability, on the basis of strong agreement between neurological scores assigned by independent observers. Together, these data indicate that the neurological scoring system developed for this canine congenital neuromuscular disorder is reliable and valid. This scoring system may be helpful in evaluating response to therapy in preclinical testing in this disease model, such as response to gene therapy. PMID:26086764

  4. A distinct mitochondrial myopathy, lactic acidosis and sideroblastic anemia (MLASA) phenotype associates with YARS2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Shahni, Rojeen; Wedatilake, Yehani; Cleary, Maureen A; Lindley, Keith J; Sibson, Keith R; Rahman, Shamima

    2013-09-01

    Nuclear-encoded disorders of mitochondrial translation are clinically and genetically heterogeneous. Genetic causes include defects of mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and factors required for initiation, elongation and termination of protein synthesis as well as ribosome recycling. We report on a new case of myopathy, lactic acidosis and sideroblastic anemia (MLASA) syndrome caused by defective mitochondrial tyrosyl aminoacylation. The patient presented at 1 year with anemia initially attributed to iron deficiency. Bone marrow aspirate at 5 years revealed ringed sideroblasts but transfusion dependency did not occur until 11 years. Other clinical features included lactic acidosis, poor weight gain, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and severe myopathy leading to respiratory failure necessitating ventilatory support. Long-range PCR excluded mitochondrial DNA rearrangements. Clinical diagnosis of MLASA prompted direct sequence analysis of the YARS2 gene encoding the mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase, which revealed homozygosity for a known pathogenic mutation, c.156C>G;p.F52L. Comparison with four previously reported cases demonstrated remarkable clinical homogeneity. First line investigation of MLASA should include direct sequence analysis of YARS2 and PUS1 (encoding a tRNA modification factor) rather than muscle biopsy. Early genetic diagnosis is essential for counseling and to facilitate appropriate supportive therapy. Reasons for segregation of specific clinical phenotypes with particular mitochondrial aminoacyl tRNA-synthetase defects remain unknown. PMID:23918765

  5. A distinct mitochondrial myopathy, lactic acidosis and sideroblastic anemia (MLASA) phenotype associates with YARS2 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Shahni, Rojeen; Wedatilake, Yehani; Cleary, Maureen A; Lindley, Keith J; Sibson, Keith R; Rahman, Shamima

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear-encoded disorders of mitochondrial translation are clinically and genetically heterogeneous. Genetic causes include defects of mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and factors required for initiation, elongation and termination of protein synthesis as well as ribosome recycling. We report on a new case of myopathy, lactic acidosis and sideroblastic anemia (MLASA) syndrome caused by defective mitochondrial tyrosyl aminoacylation. The patient presented at 1 year with anemia initially attributed to iron deficiency. Bone marrow aspirate at 5 years revealed ringed sideroblasts but transfusion dependency did not occur until 11 years. Other clinical features included lactic acidosis, poor weight gain, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and severe myopathy leading to respiratory failure necessitating ventilatory support. Long-range PCR excluded mitochondrial DNA rearrangements. Clinical diagnosis of MLASA prompted direct sequence analysis of the YARS2 gene encoding the mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase, which revealed homozygosity for a known pathogenic mutation, c.156C>G;p.F52L. Comparison with four previously reported cases demonstrated remarkable clinical homogeneity. First line investigation of MLASA should include direct sequence analysis of YARS2 and PUS1 (encoding a tRNA modification factor) rather than muscle biopsy. Early genetic diagnosis is essential for counseling and to facilitate appropriate supportive therapy. Reasons for segregation of specific clinical phenotypes with particular mitochondrial aminoacyl tRNA-synthetase defects remain unknown. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23918765

  6. HSPB7 interacts with dimerized FLNC and its absence results in progressive myopathy in skeletal muscles

    PubMed Central

    Juo, Liang-Yi; Liao, Wern-Chir; Shih, Yen-Ling; Yang, Bih-Ying; Liu, An-Bang

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT HSPB7 belongs to the small heat-shock protein (sHSP) family, and its expression is restricted to cardiac and skeletal muscles from embryonic stages to adulthood. Here, we found that skeletal-muscle-specific ablation of the HspB7 does not affect myogenesis during embryonic stages to postnatal day 1 (P1), but causes subsequent postnatal death owing to a respiration defect, with progressive myopathy phenotypes in the diaphragm. Deficiency of HSPB7 in the diaphragm muscle resulted in muscle fibrosis, sarcomere disarray and sarcolemma integrity loss. We identified dimerized filamin C (FLNC) as an interacting partner of HSPB7. Immunofluorescence studies demonstrated that the aggregation and mislocalization of FLNC occurred in the muscle of HspB7 mutant adult mice. Furthermore, the components of dystrophin glycoprotein complex, γ- and δ-sarcoglycan, but not dystrophin, were abnormally upregulated and mislocalized in HSPB7 mutant muscle. Collectively, our findings suggest that HSPB7 is essential for maintaining muscle integrity, which is achieved through its interaction with FLNC, in order to prevent the occurrence and progression of myopathy. PMID:26929074

  7. Leiomodin-3 dysfunction results in thin filament disorganization and nemaline myopathy.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Michaela; Sandaradura, Sarah A; Dowling, James J; Kostyukova, Alla S; Moroz, Natalia; Quinlan, Kate G; Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Ravenscroft, Gianina; Todd, Emily J; Ceyhan-Birsoy, Ozge; Gokhin, David S; Maluenda, Jérome; Lek, Monkol; Nolent, Flora; Pappas, Christopher T; Novak, Stefanie M; D'Amico, Adele; Malfatti, Edoardo; Thomas, Brett P; Gabriel, Stacey B; Gupta, Namrata; Daly, Mark J; Ilkovski, Biljana; Houweling, Peter J; Davidson, Ann E; Swanson, Lindsay C; Brownstein, Catherine A; Gupta, Vandana A; Medne, Livija; Shannon, Patrick; Martin, Nicole; Bick, David P; Flisberg, Anders; Holmberg, Eva; Van den Bergh, Peter; Lapunzina, Pablo; Waddell, Leigh B; Sloboda, Darcée D; Bertini, Enrico; Chitayat, David; Telfer, William R; Laquerrière, Annie; Gregorio, Carol C; Ottenheijm, Coen A C; Bönnemann, Carsten G; Pelin, Katarina; Beggs, Alan H; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Romero, Norma B; Laing, Nigel G; Nishino, Ichizo; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina; Melki, Judith; Fowler, Velia M; MacArthur, Daniel G; North, Kathryn N; Clarke, Nigel F

    2014-11-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) is a genetic muscle disorder characterized by muscle dysfunction and electron-dense protein accumulations (nemaline bodies) in myofibers. Pathogenic mutations have been described in 9 genes to date, but the genetic basis remains unknown in many cases. Here, using an approach that combined whole-exome sequencing (WES) and Sanger sequencing, we identified homozygous or compound heterozygous variants in LMOD3 in 21 patients from 14 families with severe, usually lethal, NM. LMOD3 encodes leiomodin-3 (LMOD3), a 65-kDa protein expressed in skeletal and cardiac muscle. LMOD3 was expressed from early stages of muscle differentiation; localized to actin thin filaments, with enrichment near the pointed ends; and had strong actin filament-nucleating activity. Loss of LMOD3 in patient muscle resulted in shortening and disorganization of thin filaments. Knockdown of lmod3 in zebrafish replicated NM-associated functional and pathological phenotypes. Together, these findings indicate that mutations in the gene encoding LMOD3 underlie congenital myopathy and demonstrate that LMOD3 is essential for the organization of sarcomeric thin filaments in skeletal muscle. PMID:25250574

  8. Effective treatment of mitochondrial myopathy by nicotinamide riboside, a vitamin B3.

    PubMed

    Khan, Nahid A; Auranen, Mari; Paetau, Ilse; Pirinen, Eija; Euro, Liliya; Forsström, Saara; Pasila, Lotta; Velagapudi, Vidya; Carroll, Christopher J; Auwerx, Johan; Suomalainen, Anu

    2014-06-01

    Nutrient availability is the major regulator of life and reproduction, and a complex cellular signaling network has evolved to adapt organisms to fasting. These sensor pathways monitor cellular energy metabolism, especially mitochondrial ATP production and NAD(+)/NADH ratio, as major signals for nutritional state. We hypothesized that these signals would be modified by mitochondrial respiratory chain disease, because of inefficient NADH utilization and ATP production. Oral administration of nicotinamide riboside (NR), a vitamin B3 and NAD(+) precursor, was previously shown to boost NAD(+) levels in mice and to induce mitochondrial biogenesis. Here, we treated mitochondrial myopathy mice with NR. This vitamin effectively delayed early- and late-stage disease progression, by robustly inducing mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle and brown adipose tissue, preventing mitochondrial ultrastructure abnormalities and mtDNA deletion formation. NR further stimulated mitochondrial unfolded protein response, suggesting its protective role in mitochondrial disease. These results indicate that NR and strategies boosting NAD(+) levels are a promising treatment strategy for mitochondrial myopathy. PMID:24711540

  9. A statin-dependent QTL for GATM expression is associated with statin-induced myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Mangravite, Lara M.; Engelhardt, Barbara E.; Medina, Marisa W.; Smith, Joshua D.; Brown, Christopher D.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Mecham, Brigham H.; Howie, Bryan; Shim, Heejung; Naidoo, Devesh; Feng, QiPing; Rieder, Mark J.; Chen, Y-D I.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Ridker, Paul M.; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Parish, Sarah; Armitage, Jane; Collins, Rory; Wilke, Russell A.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Stephens, Matthew; Krauss, Ronald M.

    2013-01-01

    Statins are widely prescribed for lowering plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL) concentrations and cardiovascular disease risk1, but there is considerable interindividual variation in treatment response2,3 and increasing concern regarding the potential for adverse effects, including myopathy4 and type 2 diabetes5. Despite evidence for substantial genetic influence on LDL concentrations6, pharmacogenomic trials have failed to identify genetic variations with large effects on either statin efficacy7-9 or toxicity10, and have yielded little information regarding mechanisms that modulate statin response. Here we identify a downstream target of statin treatment by screening for the effects of in vitro statin exposure on genetic associations with gene expression levels in lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from 480 participants of a clinical trial of simvastatin treatment7. This analysis identified six expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) that interacted with simvastatin exposure including rs9806699, a cis-eQTL for the gene GATM that encodes glycine amidinotransferase, a rate-limiting enzyme in creatine synthesis. We found this locus to be associated with incidence of statin-induced myotoxicity in two separate populations (meta-analysis odds ratio = 0.60, 95% confidence interval = 0.45-0.81, P=6.0×10-4). Furthermore, we found that GATM knockdown in hepatocyte-derived cell lines attenuated transcriptional response to sterol depletion, demonstrating that GATM may act as a functional link between statin-mediated cholesterol lowering and susceptibility to statin-induced myopathy. PMID:23995691

  10. Monoamine oxidase inhibition prevents mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis in myoblasts from patients with collagen VI myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Sorato, E.; Menazza, S.; Zulian, A.; Sabatelli, P.; Gualandi, F.; Merlini, L.; Bonaldo, P.; Canton, M.; Bernardi, P.; Di Lisa, F.

    2014-01-01

    Although mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress have been proposed to play a crucial role in several types of muscular dystrophy (MD), whether a causal link between these two alterations exists remains an open question. We have documented that mitochondrial dysfunction through opening of the permeability transition pore plays a key role in myoblasts from patients as well as in mouse models of MD, and that oxidative stress caused by monoamine oxidases (MAO) is involved in myofiber damage. In the present study we have tested whether MAO-dependent oxidative stress is a causal determinant of mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis in myoblasts from patients affected by collagen VI myopathies. We find that upon incubation with hydrogen peroxide or the MAO substrate tyramine myoblasts from patients upregulate MAO-B expression and display a significant rise in reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, with concomitant mitochondrial depolarization. MAO inhibition by pargyline significantly reduced both ROS accumulation and mitochondrial dysfunction, and normalized the increased incidence of apoptosis in myoblasts from patients. Thus, MAO-dependent oxidative stress is causally related to mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in myoblasts from patients affected by collagen VI myopathies, and inhibition of MAO should be explored as a potential treatment for these diseases. PMID:25017965

  11. Next generation sequencing on patients with LGMD and nonspecific myopathies: Findings associated with ANO5 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Savarese, Marco; Di Fruscio, Giuseppina; Tasca, Giorgio; Ruggiero, Lucia; Janssens, Sandra; De Bleecker, Jan; Delpech, Marc; Musumeci, Olimpia; Toscano, Antonio; Angelini, Corrado; Sacconi, Sabrina; Santoro, Lucio; Ricci, Enzo; Claes, Kathleen; Politano, Luisa; Nigro, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    We studied 786 undiagnosed patients with LGMD or nonspecific myopathic features to investigate the role of ANO5 mutations in limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs) and in nonspecific myopathies using the next generation sequencing (NGS) approach. In 160 LGMD patients, we first sequenced hotspot exons 5 and 20 and then sequenced the remaining part of the coding region. Another 626 patients, recruited using broader inclusion criteria, were directly analyzed by targeted NGS. By combining NGS and Sanger sequencing, we identified 33/786 (4%) patients carrying putative pathogenic changes in both alleles and 23 ANO5 heterozygotes (3%). The phenotypic spectrum is broader than expected, from hyperCKemia to myopathies, with lack of genotype/phenotype correlations. In particular, this is currently the largest screening of the ANO5 gene. The large number of heterozygotes for damaging mutations suggests that anoctaminopathies should be frequent and often nonpenetrant. We propose the multiple genetic testing by targeted NGS as a first step to analyze patients with nonspecific myopathic presentations. This represents a straightforward approach to overcome the difficulties of clinical heterogeneity of ANO5 patients, and to test, at the same time, many other genes involved in neuromuscular disorders. PMID:25891276

  12. Next generation sequencing on patients with LGMD and nonspecific myopathies: Findings associated with ANO5 mutations.

    PubMed

    Savarese, Marco; Di Fruscio, Giuseppina; Tasca, Giorgio; Ruggiero, Lucia; Janssens, Sandra; De Bleecker, Jan; Delpech, Marc; Musumeci, Olimpia; Toscano, Antonio; Angelini, Corrado; Sacconi, Sabrina; Santoro, Lucio; Ricci, Enzo; Claes, Kathleen; Politano, Luisa; Nigro, Vincenzo

    2015-07-01

    We studied 786 undiagnosed patients with LGMD or nonspecific myopathic features to investigate the role of ANO5 mutations in limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs) and in nonspecific myopathies using the next generation sequencing (NGS) approach. In 160 LGMD patients, we first sequenced hotspot exons 5 and 20 and then sequenced the remaining part of the coding region. Another 626 patients, recruited using broader inclusion criteria, were directly analyzed by targeted NGS. By combining NGS and Sanger sequencing, we identified 33/786 (4%) patients carrying putative pathogenic changes in both alleles and 23 ANO5 heterozygotes (3%). The phenotypic spectrum is broader than expected, from hyperCKemia to myopathies, with lack of genotype/phenotype correlations. In particular, this is currently the largest screening of the ANO5 gene. The large number of heterozygotes for damaging mutations suggests that anoctaminopathies should be frequent and often nonpenetrant. We propose the multiple genetic testing by targeted NGS as a first step to analyze patients with nonspecific myopathic presentations. This represents a straightforward approach to overcome the difficulties of clinical heterogeneity of ANO5 patients, and to test, at the same time, many other genes involved in neuromuscular disorders. PMID:25891276

  13. Phenotypes of Myopathy-Related Beta-Tropomyosin Mutants in Human and Mouse Tissue Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Abdul-Hussein, Saba; Rahl, Karin; Moslemi, Ali-Reza; Tajsharghi, Homa

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in TPM2 result in a variety of myopathies characterised by variable clinical and morphological features. We used human and mouse cultured cells to study the effects of β-TM mutants. The mutants induced a range of phenotypes in human myoblasts, which generally changed upon differentiation to myotubes. Human myotubes transfected with the E41K-β-TMEGFP mutant showed perinuclear aggregates. The G53ins-β-TMEGFP mutant tended to accumulate in myoblasts but was incorporated into filamentous structures of myotubes. The K49del-β-TMEGFP and E122K-β-TMEGFP mutants induced the formation of rod-like structures in human cells. The N202K-β-TMEGFP mutant failed to integrate into thin filaments and formed accumulations in myotubes. The accumulation of mutant β-TMEGFP in the perinuclear and peripheral areas of the cells was the striking feature in C2C12. We demonstrated that human tissue culture is a suitable system for studying the early stages of altered myofibrilogenesis and morphological changes linked to myopathy-related β-TM mutants. In addition, the histopathological phenotype associated with expression of the various mutant proteins depends on the cell type and varies with the maturation of the muscle cell. Further, the phenotype is a combinatorial effect of the specific amino acid change and the temporal expression of the mutant protein. PMID:24039757

  14. Transthyretin V122I amyloidosis with clinical and histological evidence of amyloid neuropathy and myopathy.

    PubMed

    Carr, A S; Pelayo-Negro, A L; Jaunmuktane, Z; Scalco, R S; Hutt, D; Evans, M R B; Heally, E; Brandner, S; Holton, J; Blake, J; Whelan, C J; Wechalekar, A D; Gillmore, J D; Hawkins, P N; Reilly, M M

    2015-06-01

    Hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis (ATTR) is a genetically and clinically heterogeneous disease manifesting with predominant peripheral and autonomic neuropathy; cardiomyopathy, or both. ATTR V122I is the most common variant associated with non-neuropathic familial amyloid cardiomyopathy. We present an unusual case of V122I amyloidosis with features of amyloid neuropathy and myopathy, supported by histological confirmation in both sites and diffuse tracer uptake on (99m)Tc-3,3-Diphosphono-1,2-Propanodicarboxylic acid (DPD) scintigraphy throughout skeletal and cardiac muscle. A 64 year old Jamaican man presented with cardiac failure. Cardiac MR revealed infiltrative cardiomyopathy; abdominal fat aspirate confirmed the presence of amyloid, and he was homozygous for the V122I variant of transthyretin. He also described general weakness and EMG demonstrated myopathic features. Sural nerve and vastus lateralis biopsy showed TTR amyloid. The patient is being treated with diflunisal, an oral TTR stabilising agent. Symptomatic myopathy and neuropathy with confirmation of tissue amyloid deposition has not previously been described. Extracardiac amyloidosis has implications for diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25819286

  15. Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in a case of intranuclear rod myopathy without any prenatal sentinel event.

    PubMed

    Kawase, Koya; Nishino, Ichizo; Sugimoto, Mari; Kouwaki, Masanori; Koyama, Norihisa; Yokochi, Kenji

    2015-02-01

    Intranuclear rod myopathy (IRM), a variant of nemaline myopathy, is characterized by the presence of nemaline bodies in myonuclei. We report a case of IRM presenting with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). There were no prenatal complications caused by fetal brain injury. Although no nemaline bodies were observed in the cytoplasm, intranuclear rods were observed in some fibers under light and electron microscopy. Molecular analysis identified a heterozygous variant, c.449C>T (p.Thr150Ile), in ACTA1. On magnetic resonance imaging at 9days of age, injuries to the basal ganglia, thalamus, and brainstem consistent with perinatal HIE were seen. Respiratory insufficiency at birth was strongly suspected to be the cause of HIE. Our case highlights that a patient with a congenital neuromuscular disorder who presents with severe respiratory dysfunction requiring substantial resuscitative efforts at birth can be complicated by HIE without any prenatal sentinel event. Prenatal detection of neuromuscular disorders, careful management of delivery, and neonatal resuscitation and adequate respiratory management are important in preventing irreversible brain injury in these patients. PMID:24787270

  16. Microneedle Electrode Array for Electrical Impedance Myography to Characterize Neurogenic Myopathy.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao; Li, Yi; Liu, Mingsheng; Cui, Liying; Yu, Yude

    2016-05-01

    Electrical impedance myography (EIM) is a noninvasive technique for neuromuscular assessment, wherein a low-intensity alternating current is applied to a muscle, and the consequent surface voltage patterns are evaluated. Commercial wet electrodes are most commonly used for EIM. However, these electrodes are not suitable for use on small muscles, as they do not effectively solve the problem of high electrode-skin contact impedance (ESCI) that negatively influences the quality of recorded biopotentials. To address this problem, we fabricated a novel microneedle electrode array (MEA) that consists of 124-µm-long microneedles. Compared to wet electrodes, the MEA could pierce through the outer skin surface in a painless and micro-invasive manner, and could thus effectively reduce ESCI. The MEA has excellent test-retest reproducibility, with intraclass correlation coefficients exceeding 0.920. When used in combination with EIM, the MEA differentiated the affected muscles from the unaffected muscles in patients with neurogenic myopathy, by using EIM parameters of reactance and phase (p = 0.023 and 0.008, respectively). Thus, the novel MEA is a practical and reusable device for EIM assessment in cases of neurogenic myopathy. However, further refinement of the electrode is needed to enhance the clinical application of the system. PMID:26407702

  17. Elevated risk of venous thromboembolic events in patients with inflammatory myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Michał; Królak-Nowak, Katarzyna; Sobolewska-Włodarczyk, Aleksandra; Fichna, Jakub; Włodarczyk, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a multifactorial disease manifesting as either deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism. Its prevalence makes VTE a significant issue for both the individual – as a negative factor influencing the quality of life and prognosis – and the society due to economic burden. VTE is the third most common vascular disorder in Western countries, after myocardial infarction and stroke, making it a major cause of in-hospital mortality, responsible for 5%–10% of hospital deaths. Despite many studies conducted, only 50%–60% provoking factors have been identified, while the remaining 40%–50% have been classified as idiopathic or unprovoked. Chronic inflammatory disorders, with their underlying prothrombotic state, reveal an increased risk of VTE (six to eight times) compared with the general population. Among the inflammatory disorders, we can identify inflammatory myopathies – a group of rare, chronic diseases featuring weakness and inflammation of muscles with periods of exacerbation and remission; their main classes are polymyositis and dermatomyositis. The objective of this review is to emphasize the need of VTE prophylaxis in individuals with inflammatory myopathies in order to reduce morbidity and mortality rates among those patients and improve their quality of life and prognosis. PMID:27350751

  18. Skeletal Muscle Pathology in X-Linked Myotubular Myopathy: Review With Cross-Species Comparisons

    PubMed Central

    Lawlor, Michael W.; Beggs, Alan H.; Buj-Bello, Ana; Childers, Martin K.; Dowling, James J.; James, Emma S.; Meng, Hui; Moore, Steven A.; Prasad, Suyash; Schoser, Benedikt; Sewry, Caroline A.

    2016-01-01

    X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM) is a devastating, rare, congenital myopathy caused by mutations in the MTM1 gene, resulting in a lack of or dysfunction of the enzyme myotubularin. This leads to severe perinatal weakness and distinctive muscle pathology. It was originally thought that XLMTM was related to developmental arrest in myotube maturation; however, the generation and characterization of several animal models have significantly improved our understanding of clinical and pathological aspects of this disorder. Myotubularin is now known to participate in numerous cellular processes including endosomal trafficking, excitation-contraction coupling, cytoskeletal organization, neuromuscular junction structure, autophagy, and satellite cell proliferation and survival. The available vertebrate models of XLMTM, which vary in severity from complete absence to reduced functional levels of myotubularin, recapitulate features of the human disease to a variable extent. Understanding how pathological endpoints in animals with XLMTM translate to human patients will be essential to interpret preclinical treatment trials and translate therapies into human clinical studies. This review summarizes the published animal models of XLMTM, including those of zebrafish, mice, and dogs, with a focus on their pathological features as compared to those seen in human XLMTM patients. PMID:26823526

  19. Fever, Myositis, and Paralysis: Is This Inflammatory Myopathy or Neuroinvasive Disease?

    PubMed

    Kiran, Aneeta R; Lau, Richard A; Wu, Kim M; Wong, Andrew L; Clements, Philip J; Heinze, Emil R

    2016-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a mosquito-borne RNA Flavivirus which emerged in North America in 1999. Most patients present with a febrile illness but a few develop WNV neuroinvasive disease. Myopathy is an uncommon manifestation. We describe a case of a 42-year-old male from Los Angeles who presented with 8 days of fever and muscle pain. Initial physical exam was normal except for 4/5 muscle strength testing in his extremity proximal muscles. Laboratory revealed a creatine kinase of 45,000 and a urinalysis with large blood but no red blood cells, suggesting rhabdomyolysis. The patient's condition declined despite aggressive supportive care and hydration, and on hospital day #6 he developed severe altered mental status and progressed to complete right arm paralysis and 2/5 muscle strength in bilateral legs. EMG/NCS showed sensorimotor axonal polyneuropathy and the cerebrospinal fluid was positive for IgM and IgG WNV antibodies. The patient was diagnosed with WNV neuroinvasive disease, poliomyelitis (and encephalitis) type with myopathy/muscle involvement. He was treated supportively and his muscle and neurologic disease gradually improved. At 12-month follow-up his muscle enzymes had normalized and his weakness had improved to 5/5 strength in bilateral legs and 3/5 strength in the right arm. PMID:27119037

  20. Effective treatment of mitochondrial myopathy by nicotinamide riboside, a vitamin B3

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Nahid A; Auranen, Mari; Paetau, Ilse; Pirinen, Eija; Euro, Liliya; Forsström, Saara; Pasila, Lotta; Velagapudi, Vidya; Carroll, Christopher J; Auwerx, Johan; Suomalainen, Anu

    2014-01-01

    Nutrient availability is the major regulator of life and reproduction, and a complex cellular signaling network has evolved to adapt organisms to fasting. These sensor pathways monitor cellular energy metabolism, especially mitochondrial ATP production and NAD+/NADH ratio, as major signals for nutritional state. We hypothesized that these signals would be modified by mitochondrial respiratory chain disease, because of inefficient NADH utilization and ATP production. Oral administration of nicotinamide riboside (NR), a vitamin B3 and NAD+ precursor, was previously shown to boost NAD+ levels in mice and to induce mitochondrial biogenesis. Here, we treated mitochondrial myopathy mice with NR. This vitamin effectively delayed early- and late-stage disease progression, by robustly inducing mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle and brown adipose tissue, preventing mitochondrial ultrastructure abnormalities and mtDNA deletion formation. NR further stimulated mitochondrial unfolded protein response, suggesting its protective role in mitochondrial disease. These results indicate that NR and strategies boosting NAD+ levels are a promising treatment strategy for mitochondrial myopathy. PMID:24711540

  1. Effects of exercise training on neurovascular control and skeletal myopathy in systolic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Middlekauff, Holly R.; Gomes-Santos, Igor L.; Antunes-Correa, Ligia M.

    2015-01-01

    Neurohormonal excitation and dyspnea are the hallmarks of heart failure (HF) and have long been associated with poor prognosis in HF patients. Sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) and ventilatory equivalent of carbon dioxide (VE/VO2) are elevated in moderate HF patients and increased even further in severe HF patients. The increase in SNA in HF patients is present regardless of age, sex, and etiology of systolic dysfunction. Neurohormonal activation is the major mediator of the peripheral vasoconstriction characteristic of HF patients. In addition, reduction in peripheral blood flow increases muscle inflammation, oxidative stress, and protein degradation, which is the essence of the skeletal myopathy and exercise intolerance in HF. Here we discuss the beneficial effects of exercise training on resting SNA in patients with systolic HF and its central and peripheral mechanisms of control. Furthermore, we discuss the exercise-mediated improvement in peripheral vasoconstriction in patients with HF. We will also focus on the effects of exercise training on ventilatory responses. Finally, we review the effects of exercise training on features of the skeletal myopathy in HF. In summary, exercise training plays an important role in HF, working synergistically with pharmacological therapies to ameliorate these abnormalities in clinical practice. PMID:25681428

  2. [A female infant of mitochondrial myopathy with findings of active necrosis and regeneration of muscle fibers].

    PubMed

    Nagaura, T; Sumi, K; Nonaka, I

    1990-04-01

    An 8 year-old female infant with the clinical and pathological characteristics of both progressive muscular dystrophy and mitochondrial myopathy was described. Her maternal cousin had clinical and pathological findings of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Since the patient had markedly elevated serum CK and calf muscle hypertrophy, her muscle was biopsied and she was diagnosed as having female DMD at the age of 5 years. She had generalized tonic-clonic convulsions and alternate hemiconvulsions for recent 4 years which brought her our hospital. On admission, she had mild generalized muscle atrophy and weakness predominantly in the proximal limbs. The lactate and pyruvate levels in both serum and cerebrospinal fluid were elevated, but with no metabolic acidosis. Serum CK was elevated to 4464 IU/L. Brain CT and MRI showed the expanding arachnoid cyst in the left middle fossa of cranium. In the biopsied left biceps crachii muscle, in addition to numerous ragged-red fibers, there were active muscular fiber necrosis and regeneration and interstitial fibrosis similar to those seen in progressive muscular dystrophy. Biochemically, no decrease or defect in the respiratory chain enzymes was detected. On electron microscopy, a large number of fibers contained aggregates of giant mitochondria with proliferated complicated cristae. Scattered throughout were necrotic muscle fibers filled with phagocytes and regenerating fibers. This patient had the diagnostic features of mitochondrial encephalomyopathy and progressive muscular dystrophy. We supposed that the patient provided very interesting evidences to study the relationship between mitochondrial myopathy and progressive muscular dystrophy. PMID:2387114

  3. Hypokalemic periodic paralysis in primary hyperaldosteronism. Subclinical myopathy with atrophy of the type 2A muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Bautista, J; Gil-Neciga, E; Gil-Peralta, A

    1979-01-01

    A case of a patient suffering from primary hyperaldosteronism is reported. In this case the disease is manifested clinically by periodic paralysis and hypopotasemia without permanent myopathy. The morphological study of the muscle demonstrates selective atrophy of the type 2A fibers as the most pronounced alteration. These findings suggest a chronic myopathic process. PMID:546663

  4. Defective collagen VI α6 chain expression in the skeletal muscle of patients with collagen VI-related myopathies.

    PubMed

    Tagliavini, F; Pellegrini, C; Sardone, F; Squarzoni, S; Paulsson, M; Wagener, R; Gualandi, F; Trabanelli, C; Ferlini, A; Merlini, L; Santi, S; Maraldi, N M; Faldini, C; Sabatelli, P

    2014-09-01

    Collagen VI is a non-fibrillar collagen present in the extracellular matrix (ECM) as a complex polymer; the mainly expressed form is composed of α1, α2 and α3 chains; mutations in genes encoding these chains cause myopathies known as Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD), Bethlem myopathy (BM) and myosclerosis myopathy (MM). The collagen VI α6 chain is a recently identified component of the ECM of the human skeletal muscle. Here we report that the α6 chain was dramatically reduced in skeletal muscle and muscle cell cultures of genetically characterized UCMD, BM and MM patients, independently of the clinical phenotype, the gene involved and the effect of the mutation on the expression of the "classical" α1α2α3 heterotrimer. By contrast, the collagen VI α6 chain was normally expressed or increased in the muscle of patients affected by other forms of muscular dystrophy, the overexpression matching with areas of increased fibrosis. In vitro treatment with TGF-β1, a potent collagen inducer, promoted the collagen VI α6 chain deposition in the ECM of normal muscle cells, whereas, in cultures derived from collagen VI-related myopathy patients, the collagen VI α6 chain failed to develop a network outside the cells and accumulated in the endoplasmic reticulum. The defect of the α6 chain points to a contribution to the pathogenesis of collagen VI-related disorders. PMID:24907562

  5. Defective collagen VI α6 chain expression in the skeletal muscle of patients with collagen VI-related myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Tagliavini, F.; Pellegrini, C.; Sardone, F.; Squarzoni, S.; Paulsson, M.; Wagener, R.; Gualandi, F.; Trabanelli, C.; Ferlini, A.; Merlini, L.; Santi, S.; Maraldi, N.M.; Faldini, C.; Sabatelli, P.

    2014-01-01

    Collagen VI is a non-fibrillar collagen present in the extracellular matrix (ECM) as a complex polymer; the mainly expressed form is composed of α1, α2 and α3 chains; mutations in genes encoding these chains cause myopathies known as Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD), Bethlem myopathy (BM) and myosclerosis myopathy (MM). The collagen VI α6 chain is a recently identified component of the ECM of the human skeletal muscle. Here we report that the α6 chain was dramatically reduced in skeletal muscle and muscle cell cultures of genetically characterized UCMD, BM and MM patients, independently of the clinical phenotype, the gene involved and the effect of the mutation on the expression of the “classical” α1α2α3 heterotrimer. By contrast, the collagen VI α6 chain was normally expressed or increased in the muscle of patients affected by other forms of muscular dystrophy, the overexpression matching with areas of increased fibrosis. In vitro treatment with TGF-β1, a potent collagen inducer, promoted the collagen VI α6 chain deposition in the ECM of normal muscle cells, whereas, in cultures derived from collagen VI-related myopathy patients, the collagen VI α6 chain failed to develop a network outside the cells and accumulated in the endoplasmic reticulum. The defect of the α6 chain points to a contribution to the pathogenesis of collagen VI-related disorders. PMID:24907562

  6. Loss of FHL1 induces an age-dependent skeletal muscle myopathy associated with myofibrillar and intermyofibrillar disorganization in mice

    PubMed Central

    Domenighetti, Andrea A.; Chu, Pao-Hsien; Wu, Tongbin; Sheikh, Farah; Gokhin, David S.; Guo, Ling T.; Cui, Ziyou; Peter, Angela K.; Christodoulou, Danos C.; Parfenov, Michael G.; Gorham, Joshua M.; Li, Daniel Y.; Banerjee, Indroneal; Lai, Xianyin; Witzmann, Frank A.; Seidman, Christine E.; Seidman, Jonathan G.; Gomes, Aldrin V.; Shelton, G. Diane; Lieber, Richard L.; Chen, Ju

    2014-01-01

    Recent human genetic studies have provided evidences that sporadic or inherited missense mutations in four-and-a-half LIM domain protein 1 (FHL1), resulting in alterations in FHL1 protein expression, are associated with rare congenital myopathies, including reducing body myopathy and Emery–Dreifuss muscular dystrophy. However, it remains to be clarified whether mutations in FHL1 cause skeletal muscle remodeling owing to gain- or loss of FHL1 function. In this study, we used FHL1-null mice lacking global FHL1 expression to evaluate loss-of-function effects on skeletal muscle homeostasis. Histological and functional analyses of soleus, tibialis anterior and sternohyoideus muscles demonstrated that FHL1-null mice develop an age-dependent myopathy associated with myofibrillar and intermyofibrillar (mitochondrial and sarcoplasmic reticulum) disorganization, impaired muscle oxidative capacity and increased autophagic activity. A longitudinal study established decreased survival rates in FHL1-null mice, associated with age-dependent impairment of muscle contractile function and a significantly lower exercise capacity. Analysis of primary myoblasts isolated from FHL1-null muscles demonstrated early muscle fiber differentiation and maturation defects, which could be rescued by re-expression of the FHL1A isoform, highlighting that FHL1A is necessary for proper muscle fiber differentiation and maturation in vitro. Overall, our data show that loss of FHL1 function leads to myopathy in vivo and suggest that loss of function of FHL1 may be one of the mechanisms underlying muscle dystrophy in patients with FHL1 mutations. PMID:23975679

  7. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... or though physical contact (for example, on unwashed hands). Being exposed to tobacco smoke, air pollution, dusts, vapors, and fumes can also cause acute bronchitis. Less often, bacteria can also cause acute bronchitis. To diagnose acute ...

  8. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... control. Menopause also increases the risk for a urinary tract infection. The following also increase your chances of having ...

  9. Mutations in the N-terminal actin-binding domain of filamin C cause a distal myopathy.

    PubMed

    Duff, Rachael M; Tay, Valerie; Hackman, Peter; Ravenscroft, Gianina; McLean, Catriona; Kennedy, Paul; Steinbach, Alina; Schöffler, Wiebke; van der Ven, Peter F M; Fürst, Dieter O; Song, Jaeguen; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina; Penttilä, Sini; Raheem, Olayinka; Reardon, Katrina; Malandrini, Alessandro; Gambelli, Simona; Villanova, Marcello; Nowak, Kristen J; Williams, David R; Landers, John E; Brown, Robert H; Udd, Bjarne; Laing, Nigel G

    2011-06-10

    Linkage analysis of the dominant distal myopathy we previously identified in a large Australian family demonstrated one significant linkage region located on chromosome 7 and encompassing 18.6 Mbp and 151 genes. The strongest candidate gene was FLNC because filamin C, the encoded protein, is muscle-specific and associated with myofibrillar myopathy. Sequencing of FLNC cDNA identified a c.752T>C (p.Met251Thr) mutation in the N-terminal actin-binding domain (ABD); this mutation segregated with the disease and was absent in 200 controls. We identified an Italian family with the same phenotype and found a c.577G>A (p.Ala193Thr) filamin C ABD mutation that segregated with the disease. Filamin C ABD mutations have not been described, although filamin A and filamin B ABD mutations cause multiple musculoskeletal disorders. The distal myopathy phenotype and muscle pathology in the two families differ from myofibrillar myopathies caused by filamin C rod and dimerization domain mutations because of the distinct involvement of hand muscles and lack of pathological protein aggregation. Thus, like the position of FLNA and B mutations, the position of the FLNC mutation determines disease phenotype. The two filamin C ABD mutations increase actin-binding affinity in a manner similar to filamin A and filamin B ABD mutations. Cell-culture expression of the c.752T>C (p.Met251)Thr mutant filamin C ABD demonstrated reduced nuclear localization as did mutant filamin A and filamin B ABDs. Expression of both filamin C ABD mutants as full-length proteins induced increased aggregation of filamin. We conclude filamin C ABD mutations cause a recognizable distal myopathy, most likely through increased actin affinity, similar to the pathological mechanism of filamin A and filamin B ABD mutations. PMID:21620354

  10. Mutations in the N-terminal Actin-Binding Domain of Filamin C Cause a Distal Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Duff, Rachael M.; Tay, Valerie; Hackman, Peter; Ravenscroft, Gianina; McLean, Catriona; Kennedy, Paul; Steinbach, Alina; Schöffler, Wiebke; van der Ven, Peter F.M.; Fürst, Dieter O.; Song, Jaeguen; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina; Penttilä, Sini; Raheem, Olayinka; Reardon, Katrina; Malandrini, Alessandro; Gambelli, Simona; Villanova, Marcello; Nowak, Kristen J.; Williams, David R.; Landers, John E.; Brown, Robert H.; Udd, Bjarne; Laing, Nigel G.

    2011-01-01

    Linkage analysis of the dominant distal myopathy we previously identified in a large Australian family demonstrated one significant linkage region located on chromosome 7 and encompassing 18.6 Mbp and 151 genes. The strongest candidate gene was FLNC because filamin C, the encoded protein, is muscle-specific and associated with myofibrillar myopathy. Sequencing of FLNC cDNA identified a c.752T>C (p.Met251Thr) mutation in the N-terminal actin-binding domain (ABD); this mutation segregated with the disease and was absent in 200 controls. We identified an Italian family with the same phenotype and found a c.577G>A (p.Ala193Thr) filamin C ABD mutation that segregated with the disease. Filamin C ABD mutations have not been described, although filamin A and filamin B ABD mutations cause multiple musculoskeletal disorders. The distal myopathy phenotype and muscle pathology in the two families differ from myofibrillar myopathies caused by filamin C rod and dimerization domain mutations because of the distinct involvement of hand muscles and lack of pathological protein aggregation. Thus, like the position of FLNA and B mutations, the position of the FLNC mutation determines disease phenotype. The two filamin C ABD mutations increase actin-binding affinity in a manner similar to filamin A and filamin B ABD mutations. Cell-culture expression of the c.752T>C (p.Met251)Thr mutant filamin C ABD demonstrated reduced nuclear localization as did mutant filamin A and filamin B ABDs. Expression of both filamin C ABD mutants as full-length proteins induced increased aggregation of filamin. We conclude filamin C ABD mutations cause a recognizable distal myopathy, most likely through increased actin affinity, similar to the pathological mechanism of filamin A and filamin B ABD mutations. PMID:21620354

  11. Muscular myopathies other than myotonic dystrophy also associated with (CTG)n expansion at the DMPK locus

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Vasavi; Ahuja, Y. R.; Hasan, Qurratulain

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Assess triplet repeat expansion (CTG)n at the ‘dystrophia-myotonica protein kinase’ (DMPK) locus in muscular myopathies to elucidate its role in myopathic symptoms and enable genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis in families. Methods and Results: Individuals with symptoms of myopathy, hypotonia and controls selected randomly from the population were evaluated for triplet repeat expansion of (CTG)n repeats in the 3’untranslated region (UTR) of DMPK gene, the causative mutation in myotonic dystrophy (DM). DNA was isolated from peripheral blood of 40 individuals; they presented symptoms of muscle myopathy (n = 11), muscle hypotonia (n = 4), members of their families (n = 5) and control individuals from random population (n = 20). Molecular analysis of genomic DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers specific for the DMPK gene encompassing the triplet repeat expansion, showed that all controls (n = 20) gave a 2.1 kb band indicating normal triplet repeat number. Three out of 11 cases (two clinically diagnosed DM and one muscular dystrophy) had an expansion of the (CTG)n repeat in the range of 1000-2100 repeats corresponding to the repeat number in cases of severe DM. Other two of these 11 cases, showed a mild expansion of ~ 66 repeats. Three samples, which included two cases of hypotonia and the father of a subject with muscular dystrophy, also gave a similar repeat expansion (~66 repeats). Conclusion: Results suggest a role of (CTG)n expansion at the DMPK locus in unexplained hypotonias and muscular myopathies other than DM. This calls for screening of the triplet repeat expansion at the DMPK locus in cases of idiopathic myopathies and hypotonia. PMID:23560000

  12. Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy: a distinct regional myopathy with a novel molecular pathogenesis. FSH Consortium.

    PubMed

    Tawil, R; Figlewicz, D A; Griggs, R C; Weiffenbach, B

    1998-03-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is one of the most common inherited diseases of muscle. Until recently, FSHD had received little attention because of its relatively benign course and the perception that it represented a syndrome rather than a distinct myopathy. Research interest into this disease was reignited with the demonstration of linkage of FSHD to chromosome 4q35 in 1990. Clinical and molecular genetic research in FSHD has since helped define it as a distinct clinical entity, outlined its natural history, and defined the primary molecular defect associated with the condition. FSHD is now known to be associated with large deletions of variable size on chromosome 4q35. These deletions, however, do not appear to disrupt a transcribed gene but are thought to interfere with the expression of a gene or genes located proximal to the deletions. These observations complicate the search for the FSHD gene but also imply the presence of a potentially novel molecular pathogenesis. PMID:9506542

  13. Late Na+ current and protracted electrical recovery are critical determinants of the aging myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Signore, Sergio; Sorrentino, Andrea; Borghetti, Giulia; Cannata, Antonio; Meo, Marianna; Zhou, Yu; Kannappan, Ramaswamy; Pasqualini, Francesco; O'Malley, Heather; Sundman, Mark; Tsigkas, Nikolaos; Zhang, Eric; Arranto, Christian; Mangiaracina, Chiara; Isobe, Kazuya; Sena, Brena F.; Kim, Junghyun; Goichberg, Polina; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Isom, Lori L.; Leri, Annarosa; Anversa, Piero; Rota, Marcello

    2015-01-01

    The aging myopathy manifests itself with diastolic dysfunction and preserved ejection fraction. We raised the possibility that, in a mouse model of physiological aging, defects in electromechanical properties of cardiomyocytes are important determinants of the diastolic characteristics of the myocardium, independently from changes in structural composition of the muscle and collagen framework. Here we show that an increase in the late Na+ current (INaL) in aging cardiomyocytes prolongs the action potential (AP) and influences temporal kinetics of Ca2+ cycling and contractility. These alterations increase force development and passive tension. Inhibition of INaL shortens the AP and corrects dynamics of Ca2+ transient, cell contraction and relaxation. Similarly, repolarization and diastolic tension of the senescent myocardium are partly restored. Thus, INaL offers inotropic support, but negatively interferes with cellular and ventricular compliance, providing a new perspective of the biology of myocardial aging and the aetiology of the defective cardiac performance in the elderly. PMID:26541940

  14. Exertional myopathy in a grizzly bear (Ursus arctos) captured by leghold snare.

    PubMed

    Cattet, Marc; Stenhouse, Gordon; Bollinger, Trent

    2008-10-01

    We diagnosed exertional myopathy (EM) in a grizzly bear (Ursus arctos) that died approximately 10 days after capture by leghold snare in west-central Alberta, Canada, in June 2003. The diagnosis was based on history, post-capture movement data, gross necropsy, histopathology, and serum enzyme levels. We were unable to determine whether EM was the primary cause of death because autolysis precluded accurate evaluation of all tissues. Nevertheless, comparison of serum aspartate aminotransferase and creatine kinase concentrations and survival between the affected bear and other grizzly bears captured by leghold snare in the same research project suggests EM also occurred in other bears, but that it is not generally a cause of mortality. We propose, however, occurrence of nonfatal EM in grizzly bears after capture by leghold snare has potential implications for use of this capture method, including negative effects on wildlife welfare and research data. PMID:18957653

  15. Progressive chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy in a child with central nervous system involvement and myopathy.

    PubMed

    Barisić, Nina; Horvath, Rita; Grković, Lana; Mihelcić, Dina; Luetić, Tomislav

    2006-12-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is a chronic disorder, manifesting with monophasic or relapsing course. Progressive course is rare in children. The article presents a boy with progressive generalized muscle weakness and areflexia since the age of two, developed after viral infection. Electromyoneurography showed severe neurogenic lesion, with myopathic pattern in proximal muscles. Increased serum ganglioside antibody titers (anti-GM1 and anti-GD1b) were registered. Sural nerve biopsy revealed demyelination and onion bulbs. Inflammatory perivascular CD3 positive infiltrates were present in muscle and nerve biopsies. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed cortical atrophy, hyperintensities of the white matter and gray matter hypointensities. Improvement occurred on intravenous immune globulins and methylprednisolone treatment. Demyelination might develop in central and peripheral nervous system associated with inflammatory myopathy in patients with progressive course of CIDP. PMID:17243577

  16. Aborted Sudden Cardiac Death and a Mother with Suspected Metabolic Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Finsterer, Josef; Stöllberger, Claudia; Keller, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Aborted sudden cardiac death (SCD) has not been reported as initial manifestation of cardiac involvement in metabolic myopathy (MM). A 20-year-old female with a previous history of three syncopes, hyperhidrosis, and recurrent tick bites experienced aborted SCD. Her mother presented with MM, and a history of pituitary adenoma, nephroptosis, arterial hypertension, depression, migraine, goiter, pancreatitis, osteoporosis, hyperhidrosis, multiple muscle ruptures, and hyperlipidemia. After a few days of disorientation and amnesia, the young female recovered completely. Clinical neurological examination was noticeable for partial ophthalmoparesis and mild hyperprolactinemia. She received an implantable cardioverter defibrillator, which did not discharge so far. Recurrent syncopes and aborted SCD may be the initial manifestation of MM with multiple organ involvement. The family history is important in cases with aborted SCD to guide the diagnostic work-up. Phenotypic heterogeneity between the family members may be an indicator of MM. PMID:25187745

  17. Autosomal dominant nemaline myopathy caused by a novel alpha-tropomyosin 3 mutation.

    PubMed

    Kiphuth, I C; Krause, S; Huttner, H B; Dekomien, G; Struffert, T; Schröder, R

    2010-04-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) is a genetically and clinically heterogenous muscle disorder, which is myopathologically characterized by nemaline bodies. Mutations in six genes have been reported to cause NM: Nebulin (NEB Pelin 1999), alpha-skeletal muscle actin (ACTA1 Nowak 1999), alpha-slow tropomyosin (TPM3 Laing 1995), beta-tropomyosin (TPM2 Donner 2002), slow troponin T (TNNT1 Johnston 2000) and cofilin 2 (CFL2 Agrawal 2007). The majority of cases are due to mutation in NEB and ACTA1. We report on the clinical, myopathological and muscle MRI findings in a German family with autosomal dominant NM due to a novel pathogenic TPM3 mutation (p.Ala156Thr). PMID:20012312

  18. Biomarkers and Autoantibodies of Interstitial Lung Disease with Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Yoshifuji, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    Various autoantibodies are seen in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies. Among myositis-specific antibodies, anti-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase and anti-melanoma differentiation-associated protein 5 (MDA5) antibodies are associated with interstitial lung disease (ILD). Anti-MDA5 antibodies are associated with dermatomyositis (DM) or clinically amyopathic DM complicated with rapidly progressive ILD. In anti-MDA5-positive patients, a random ground-glass attenuation pattern is a characteristic finding of ILD in chest high-resolution computed tomography. Conversely, anti-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase antibodies are not associated with rapidly progressive ILD but with chronic ILD. DM or clinically amyopathic DM patients with anti-MDA5, and characteristic high-resolution computed tomography findings are highly likely to have devastating ILD and need aggressive treatment. PMID:27081322

  19. Mitochondrial Myopathy in Follow-up of a Patient With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Galán, Fernando; de Lavera, Isabel; Cotán, David; Sánchez-Alcázar, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Symptoms of mitochondrial diseases and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) frequently overlap and can easily be mistaken. Methods. We report the case of a patient diagnosed with CFS and during follow-up was finally diagnosed with mitochondrial myopathy by histochemical study of muscle biopsy, spectrophotometric analysis of the complexes of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, and genetic studies. Results. The results revealed 3% fiber-ragged blue and a severe deficiency of complexes I and IV and several mtDNA variants. Mother, sisters, and nephews showed similar symptoms, which strongly suggests a possible maternal inheritance. The patient and his family responded to treatment with high doses of riboflavin and thiamine with a remarkable and sustained fatigue and muscle symptoms improvement. Conclusions. This case illustrates that initial symptoms of mitochondrial disease in adults can easily be mistaken with CFS, and in these patients a regular reassessment and monitoring of symptoms is recommended to reconfirm or change the diagnosis. PMID:26904705

  20. Ascending paresis as presentation of an unusual association between necrotizing autoimmune myopathy and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    García-Reynoso, Marco Julio; Veramendi-Espinoza, Liz Eliana; Ruiz-Garcia, Henry Jeison

    2014-01-01

    A 45 year-old man went to the emergency room due to disease duration of 15 days of insidious onset and progressive course. It began with symmetrical weakness and pain in feet and ankles that extends upward to the knees. Later, this progressed to paraparesis with Creatine phosphokinase levels of 44,270 U/L and respiratory failure that required mechanical ventilation. Electromyography and muscle biopsy of quadriceps were made. The patient responded to corticotherapy in pulses and supporting management. The presentation of ascending paresis suggested the diagnosis of Guillain-Barré syndrome. However, the degree of muscle involvement with rhabdomyolysis explains the neurological damage by itself. The biopsy revealed pathological criteria for necrotizing autoimmune myopathy (NAM), as well as other clinical and laboratory evidence. Patient disease continued and reached criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). To our best knowledge, this is the first report of the NAM and SLE association. PMID:23906548

  1. Mitochondrial Myopathy in Follow-up of a Patient With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Galán, Fernando; de Lavera, Isabel; Cotán, David; Sánchez-Alcázar, José A

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Symptoms of mitochondrial diseases and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) frequently overlap and can easily be mistaken. Methods. We report the case of a patient diagnosed with CFS and during follow-up was finally diagnosed with mitochondrial myopathy by histochemical study of muscle biopsy, spectrophotometric analysis of the complexes of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, and genetic studies. Results. The results revealed 3% fiber-ragged blue and a severe deficiency of complexes I and IV and several mtDNA variants. Mother, sisters, and nephews showed similar symptoms, which strongly suggests a possible maternal inheritance. The patient and his family responded to treatment with high doses of riboflavin and thiamine with a remarkable and sustained fatigue and muscle symptoms improvement. Conclusions. This case illustrates that initial symptoms of mitochondrial disease in adults can easily be mistaken with CFS, and in these patients a regular reassessment and monitoring of symptoms is recommended to reconfirm or change the diagnosis. PMID:26904705

  2. VMA21 deficiency prevents vacuolar ATPase assembly and causes autophagic vacuolar myopathy.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Nivetha; Munteanu, Iulia; Wang, Peixiang; Ruggieri, Alessandra; Rilstone, Jennifer J; Israelian, Nyrie; Naranian, Taline; Paroutis, Paul; Guo, Ray; Ren, Zhi-Ping; Nishino, Ichizo; Chabrol, Brigitte; Pellissier, Jean-Francois; Minetti, Carlo; Udd, Bjarne; Fardeau, Michel; Tailor, Chetankumar S; Mahuran, Don J; Kissel, John T; Kalimo, Hannu; Levy, Nicolas; Manolson, Morris F; Ackerley, Cameron A; Minassian, Berge A

    2013-03-01

    X-linked Myopathy with Excessive Autophagy (XMEA) is a childhood onset disease characterized by progressive vacuolation and atrophy of skeletal muscle. We show that XMEA is caused by hypomorphic alleles of the VMA21 gene, that VMA21 is the diverged human ortholog of the yeast Vma21p protein, and that like Vma21p, VMA21 is an essential assembly chaperone of the vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase), the principal mammalian proton pump complex. Decreased VMA21 raises lysosomal pH which reduces lysosomal degradative ability and blocks autophagy. This reduces cellular free amino acids which leads to downregulation of the mTORC1 pathway, and consequent increased macroautophagy resulting in proliferation of large and ineffective autolysosomes that engulf sections of cytoplasm, merge, and vacuolate the cell. Our results uncover a novel mechanism of disease, namely macroautophagic overcompensation leading to cell vacuolation and tissue atrophy. PMID:23315026

  3. [Retracted] Clinical, pathological and genetic characteristics of autosomal dominant inherited dynamin 2 centronuclear myopathy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinhong; Wu, Huamin; Gong, Jian; Wang, Tao; Yan, Chuanzhu

    2016-07-01

    We wish to retract our article entitled 'Clinical, pathological and genetic characteristics of autosomal dominant inherited dynamin 2 centronuclear myopathy' published in Molecular Medicine Reports 13: 4273-4278, 2016. The article was submitted by the first author, Xinhong Liu, without the prior knowledge of the corresponding author, Chuanzhu Yan, or the other authors included on the paper. Furthermore, the details of the paper were not discussed by the authors prior to the submission, and all are in agreement that the paper contains data therein (and interpretations thereof) which are either inaccurate or inappropriate. All the authors agree to this retraction, and we apologize for the inconvenience caused in this regard.[the original article was published in the Molecular Medicine Reports 13: 4273-4278, 2016; DOI: 10.3892/mmr.2016.5047]. PMID:27176730

  4. Role of Myofibrillar Protein Catabolism in Development of Glucocorticoid Myopathy: Aging and Functional Activity Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Seene, Teet; Kaasik, Priit

    2016-01-01

    Muscle weakness in corticosteroid myopathy is mainly the result of the destruction and atrophy of the myofibrillar compartment of fast-twitch muscle fibers. Decrease of titin and myosin, and the ratio of nebulin and MyHC in myopathic muscle, shows that these changes of contractile and elastic proteins are the result of increased catabolism of the abovementioned proteins in skeletal muscle. Slow regeneration of skeletal muscle is in good correlation with a decreased number of satellite cells under the basal lamina of muscle fibers. Aging causes a reduction of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity as the result of the reduced function of the mitochondrial compartment. AMPK activity increases as a result of increased functional activity. Resistance exercise causes anabolic and anticatabolic effects in skeletal muscle: muscle fibers experience hypertrophy while higher myofibrillar proteins turn over. These changes are leading to the qualitative remodeling of muscle fibers. As a result of these changes, possible maximal muscle strength is increasing. Endurance exercise improves capillary blood supply, increases mitochondrial biogenesis and muscle oxidative capacity, and causes a faster turnover rate of sarcoplasmic proteins as well as qualitative remodeling of type I and IIA muscle fibers. The combination of resistance and endurance exercise may be the fastest way to prevent or decelerate muscle atrophy due to the anabolic and anticatabolic effects of exercise combined with an increase in oxidative capacity. The aim of the present short review is to assess the role of myofibrillar protein catabolism in the development of glucocorticoid-caused myopathy from aging and physical activity aspects. PMID:27187487

  5. The Effect of Nutritional Status in the Pathogenesis of Critical Illness Myopathy (CIM)

    PubMed Central

    Ogilvie, Hannah; Larsson, Lars

    2014-01-01

    The muscle wasting and loss of specific force associated with Critical Illness Myopathy (CIM) is, at least in part, due to a preferential loss of the molecular motor protein myosin. This acquired myopathy is common in critically ill immobilized and mechanically ventilated intensive care patients (ICU). There is a growing understanding of the mechanisms underlying CIM, but the role of nutritional factors triggering this serious complication of modern intensive care remains unknown. This study aims at establishing the effect of nutritional status in the pathogenesis of CIM. An experimental ICU model was used where animals are mechanically ventilated, pharmacologically paralysed post-synaptically and extensively monitored for up to 14 days. Due to the complexity of the experimental model, the number of animals included is small. After exposure to this ICU condition, animals develop a phenotype similar to patients with CIM. The results from this study show that the preferential myosin loss, decline in specific force and muscle fiber atrophy did not differ between low vs. eucaloric animals. In both experimental groups, passive mechanical loading had a sparing effect of muscle weight independent on nutritional status. Thus, this study confirms the strong impact of the mechanical silencing associated with the ICU condition in triggering CIM, overriding any potential effects of caloric intake in triggering CIM. In addition, the positive effects of passive mechanical loading on muscle fiber size and force generating capacity was not affected by the nutritional status in this study. However, due to the small sample size these pilot results need to be validated in a larger cohort. PMID:24887774

  6. Role of multi-drug resistance-associated protein-1 transporter in statin-induced myopathy.

    PubMed

    Dorajoo, Rajkumar s o; Pereira, Barry P; Yu, Zou; Gopalakrishnakone, P; Leong, Cheng Chee; Wee, Aileen; Lee, Edmund

    2008-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of probenecid to inhibit the multi-drug resistance-associated protein-1 (MRP-1) in mediating the efflux and myotoxicity in rat skeletal muscles, with administration of rosuvastatin. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered daily, for 15 days, with either rosuvastatin (50, 100 or 200 mg/kg) or probenecid (100 mg/kg) alone, or with a combination of rosuvastatin (50, 100 or 200 mg/kg) and probenecid (100 mg/kg). Skeletal muscle toxicity was elevated with probenecid administered with 200 mg/kg/day of rosuvastatin, with the elevation of creatine kinase by 12-fold, alanine aminotrasferase by 10-fold and creatinine by 9-fold at day 15, with no adverse effects observed when probenecid was given alone. Mitochondria ultrastructural damage with enlargement, disruption, cristolysis and vaculation was seen in the soleus and plantaris of animals administered with probenecid and high dosages of statin. These muscles were also expressing more succinic dehydrogenase (SDH)-positive and cytochrome oxidase (CyOX)-positive fibers. Although generally well-tolerated, statins produce a variety of adverse skeletal muscle events. Hydrophilic statins, with reduced levels of non-specific passive diffusion rates into extra-hepatic tissues, are still seen to produce myopathy. This highlights the important roles of transport mechanisms in statin transport at the skeletal muscles. Excessive influx, reduced efflux or the combination of the two could result in elevated cellular levels of statins at the skeletal muscles, resulting in toxicity. This study provides preliminary evidence that the MRP-1 transporter and efflux at skeletal muscles possibly play significant roles in statin-induced myopathy. PMID:18509883

  7. Recessive TTN truncating mutations define novel forms of core myopathy with heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Chauveau, Claire; Bonnemann, Carsten G.; Julien, Cedric; Kho, Ay Lin; Marks, Harold; Talim, Beril; Maury, Philippe; Arne-Bes, Marie Christine; Uro-Coste, Emmanuelle; Alexandrovich, Alexander; Vihola, Anna; Schafer, Sebastian; Kaufmann, Beth; Medne, Livija; Hübner, Norbert; Foley, A. Reghan; Santi, Mariarita; Udd, Bjarne; Topaloglu, Haluk; Moore, Steven A.; Gotthardt, Michael; Samuels, Mark E.; Gautel, Mathias; Ferreiro, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Core myopathies (CM), the main non-dystrophic myopathies in childhood, remain genetically unexplained in many cases. Heart disease is not considered part of the typical CM spectrum. No congenital heart defect has been reported, and childhood-onset cardiomyopathy has been documented in only two CM families with homozygous mutations of the TTN gene. TTN encodes titin, a giant protein of striated muscles. Recently, heterozygous TTN truncating mutations have also been reported as a major cause of dominant dilated cardiomyopathy. However, relatively few TTN mutations and phenotypes are known, and titin pathophysiological role in cardiac and skeletal muscle conditions is incompletely understood. We analyzed a series of 23 families with congenital CM and primary heart disease using TTN M-line-targeted sequencing followed in selected patients by whole-exome sequencing and functional studies. We identified seven novel homozygous or compound heterozygous TTN mutations (five in the M-line, five truncating) in 17% patients. Heterozygous parents were healthy. Phenotype analysis identified four novel titinopathies, including cardiac septal defects, left ventricular non-compaction, Emery–Dreifuss muscular dystrophy or arthrogryposis. Additionally, in vitro studies documented the first-reported absence of a functional titin kinase domain in humans, leading to a severe antenatal phenotype. We establish that CM are associated with a large range of heart conditions of which TTN mutations are a major cause, thereby expanding the TTN mutational and phenotypic spectrum. Additionally, our results suggest titin kinase implication in cardiac morphogenesis and demonstrate that heterozygous TTN truncating mutations may not manifest unless associated with a second mutation, reassessing the paradigm of their dominant expression. PMID:24105469

  8. Recessive TTN truncating mutations define novel forms of core myopathy with heart disease.

    PubMed

    Chauveau, Claire; Bonnemann, Carsten G; Julien, Cedric; Kho, Ay Lin; Marks, Harold; Talim, Beril; Maury, Philippe; Arne-Bes, Marie Christine; Uro-Coste, Emmanuelle; Alexandrovich, Alexander; Vihola, Anna; Schafer, Sebastian; Kaufmann, Beth; Medne, Livija; Hübner, Norbert; Foley, A Reghan; Santi, Mariarita; Udd, Bjarne; Topaloglu, Haluk; Moore, Steven A; Gotthardt, Michael; Samuels, Mark E; Gautel, Mathias; Ferreiro, Ana

    2014-02-15

    Core myopathies (CM), the main non-dystrophic myopathies in childhood, remain genetically unexplained in many cases. Heart disease is not considered part of the typical CM spectrum. No congenital heart defect has been reported, and childhood-onset cardiomyopathy has been documented in only two CM families with homozygous mutations of the TTN gene. TTN encodes titin, a giant protein of striated muscles. Recently, heterozygous TTN truncating mutations have also been reported as a major cause of dominant dilated cardiomyopathy. However, relatively few TTN mutations and phenotypes are known, and titin pathophysiological role in cardiac and skeletal muscle conditions is incompletely understood. We analyzed a series of 23 families with congenital CM and primary heart disease using TTN M-line-targeted sequencing followed in selected patients by whole-exome sequencing and functional studies. We identified seven novel homozygous or compound heterozygous TTN mutations (five in the M-line, five truncating) in 17% patients. Heterozygous parents were healthy. Phenotype analysis identified four novel titinopathies, including cardiac septal defects, left ventricular non-compaction, Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy or arthrogryposis. Additionally, in vitro studies documented the first-reported absence of a functional titin kinase domain in humans, leading to a severe antenatal phenotype. We establish that CM are associated with a large range of heart conditions of which TTN mutations are a major cause, thereby expanding the TTN mutational and phenotypic spectrum. Additionally, our results suggest titin kinase implication in cardiac morphogenesis and demonstrate that heterozygous TTN truncating mutations may not manifest unless associated with a second mutation, reassessing the paradigm of their dominant expression. PMID:24105469

  9. Nemaline myopathy caused by mutations in the muscle alpha-skeletal-actin gene.

    PubMed

    Ilkovski, B; Cooper, S T; Nowak, K; Ryan, M M; Yang, N; Schnell, C; Durling, H J; Roddick, L G; Wilkinson, I; Kornberg, A J; Collins, K J; Wallace, G; Gunning, P; Hardeman, E C; Laing, N G; North, K N

    2001-06-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by muscle weakness and the presence of nemaline bodies (rods) in skeletal muscle. Disease-causing mutations have been reported in five genes, each encoding a protein component of the sarcomeric thin filament. Recently, we identified mutations in the muscle alpha-skeletal-actin gene (ACTA1) in a subset of patients with NM. In the present study, we evaluated a new series of 35 patients with NM. We identified five novel missense mutations in ACTA1, which suggested that mutations in muscle alpha-skeletal actin account for the disease in approximately 15% of patients with NM. The mutations appeared de novo and represent new dominant mutations. One proband subsequently had two affected children, a result consistent with autosomal dominant transmission. The seven patients exhibited marked clinical variability, ranging from severe congenital-onset weakness, with death from respiratory failure during the 1st year of life, to a mild childhood-onset myopathy, with survival into adulthood. There was marked variation in both age at onset and clinical severity in the three affected members of one family. Common pathological features included abnormal fiber type differentiation, glycogen accumulation, myofibrillar disruption, and "whorling" of actin thin filaments. The percentage of fibers with rods did not correlate with clinical severity; however, the severe, lethal phenotype was associated with both severe, generalized disorganization of sarcomeric structure and abnormal localization of sarcomeric actin. The marked variability, in clinical phenotype, among patients with different mutations in ACTA1 suggests that both the site of the mutation and the nature of the amino acid change have differential effects on thin-filament formation and protein-protein interactions. The intrafamilial variability suggests that alpha-actin genotype is not the sole determinant of phenotype. PMID:11333380

  10. Role of Myofibrillar Protein Catabolism in Development of Glucocorticoid Myopathy: Aging and Functional Activity Aspects.

    PubMed

    Seene, Teet; Kaasik, Priit

    2016-01-01

    Muscle weakness in corticosteroid myopathy is mainly the result of the destruction and atrophy of the myofibrillar compartment of fast-twitch muscle fibers. Decrease of titin and myosin, and the ratio of nebulin and MyHC in myopathic muscle, shows that these changes of contractile and elastic proteins are the result of increased catabolism of the abovementioned proteins in skeletal muscle. Slow regeneration of skeletal muscle is in good correlation with a decreased number of satellite cells under the basal lamina of muscle fibers. Aging causes a reduction of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity as the result of the reduced function of the mitochondrial compartment. AMPK activity increases as a result of increased functional activity. Resistance exercise causes anabolic and anticatabolic effects in skeletal muscle: muscle fibers experience hypertrophy while higher myofibrillar proteins turn over. These changes are leading to the qualitative remodeling of muscle fibers. As a result of these changes, possible maximal muscle strength is increasing. Endurance exercise improves capillary blood supply, increases mitochondrial biogenesis and muscle oxidative capacity, and causes a faster turnover rate of sarcoplasmic proteins as well as qualitative remodeling of type I and IIA muscle fibers. The combination of resistance and endurance exercise may be the fastest way to prevent or decelerate muscle atrophy due to the anabolic and anticatabolic effects of exercise combined with an increase in oxidative capacity. The aim of the present short review is to assess the role of myofibrillar protein catabolism in the development of glucocorticoid-caused myopathy from aging and physical activity aspects. PMID:27187487

  11. Mutations in the collagen XII gene define a new form of extracellular matrix-related myopathy.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Debbie; Farsani, Golara Torabi; Laval, Steven; Collins, James; Sarkozy, Anna; Martoni, Elena; Shah, Ashoke; Zou, Yaqun; Koch, Manuel; Bönnemann, Carsten G; Roberts, Mark; Lochmüller, Hanns; Bushby, Kate; Straub, Volker

    2014-05-01

    Bethlem myopathy (BM) [MIM 158810] is a slowly progressive muscle disease characterized by contractures and proximal weakness, which can be caused by mutations in one of the collagen VI genes (COL6A1, COL6A2 and COL6A3). However, there may be additional causal genes to identify as in ∼50% of BM cases no mutations in the COL6 genes are identified. In a cohort of -24 patients with a BM-like phenotype, we first sequenced 12 candidate genes based on their function, including genes for known binding partners of collagen VI, and those enzymes involved in its correct post-translational modification, assembly and secretion. Proceeding to whole-exome sequencing (WES), we identified mutations in the COL12A1 gene, a member of the FACIT collagens (fibril-associated collagens with interrupted triple helices) in five individuals from two families. Both families showed dominant inheritance with a clinical phenotype resembling classical BM. Family 1 had a single-base substitution that led to the replacement of one glycine residue in the triple-helical domain, breaking the Gly-X-Y repeating pattern, and Family 2 had a missense mutation, which created a mutant protein with an unpaired cysteine residue. Abnormality at the protein level was confirmed in both families by the intracellular retention of collagen XII in patient dermal fibroblasts. The mutation in Family 2 leads to the up-regulation of genes associated with the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway and swollen, dysmorphic rough-ER. We conclude that the spectrum of causative genes in extracellular matrix (ECM)-related myopathies be extended to include COL12A1. PMID:24334769

  12. Nutritional status evaluation in patients affected by bethlem myopathy and ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Toni, Silvia; Morandi, Riccardo; Busacchi, Marcello; Tardini, Lucia; Merlini, Luciano; Battistini, Nino Carlo; Pellegrini, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Collagen VI mutations lead to disabling myopathies like Bethlem myopathy (BM) and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD). We have investigated the nutritional and metabolic status of one UCMD and seven BM patients (five female, three male, mean age 31 ± 9 years) in order to find a potential metabolic target for nutritional intervention. For this study, we used standard anthropometric tools, such as BMI evaluation and body circumference measurements. All results were compared to dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), considered the "gold standard" method. Energy intake of each patient was evaluated through longitudinal methods (7-day food diary) while resting energy expenditure (REE) was predicted using specific equations and measured by indirect calorimetry. Clinical evaluation included general and nutritional blood and urine laboratory analyses and quantitative muscle strength measurement by hand-held dynamometry. BM and UCMD patients showed an altered body composition, characterized by low free fat mass (FFM) and high fat mass (FM), allowing us to classify them as sarcopenic, and all but one as sarcopenic-obese. Another main result was the negative correlation between REE/FFM ratio (basal energy expenditure per kilograms of fat-free mass) and the severity of the disease, as defined by the muscle megascore (correlation coefficient -0.955, P-value <0.001). We postulate that the increase of the REE/FFM ratio in relation to the severity of the disease may be due to an altered and pathophysiological loss of energetic efficiency at the expense of skeletal muscle. We show that a specific metabolic disequilibrium is related to the severity of the disease, which may represent a target for a nutritional intervention in these patients. PMID:25477818

  13. Nutritional Status Evaluation in Patients Affected by Bethlem Myopathy and Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Toni, Silvia; Morandi, Riccardo; Busacchi, Marcello; Tardini, Lucia; Merlini, Luciano; Battistini, Nino Carlo; Pellegrini, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Collagen VI mutations lead to disabling myopathies like Bethlem myopathy (BM) and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD). We have investigated the nutritional and metabolic status of one UCMD and seven BM patients (five female, three male, mean age 31 ± 9 years) in order to find a potential metabolic target for nutritional intervention. For this study, we used standard anthropometric tools, such as BMI evaluation and body circumference measurements. All results were compared to dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), considered the “gold standard” method. Energy intake of each patient was evaluated through longitudinal methods (7-day food diary) while resting energy expenditure (REE) was predicted using specific equations and measured by indirect calorimetry. Clinical evaluation included general and nutritional blood and urine laboratory analyses and quantitative muscle strength measurement by hand-held dynamometry. BM and UCMD patients showed an altered body composition, characterized by low free fat mass (FFM) and high fat mass (FM), allowing us to classify them as sarcopenic, and all but one as sarcopenic-obese. Another main result was the negative correlation between REE/FFM ratio (basal energy expenditure per kilograms of fat-free mass) and the severity of the disease, as defined by the muscle megascore (correlation coefficient −0.955, P-value <0.001). We postulate that the increase of the REE/FFM ratio in relation to the severity of the disease may be due to an altered and pathophysiological loss of energetic efficiency at the expense of skeletal muscle. We show that a specific metabolic disequilibrium is related to the severity of the disease, which may represent a target for a nutritional intervention in these patients. PMID:25477818

  14. Expression of myotubularins in blood platelets: Characterization and potential diagnostic of X-linked myotubular myopathy.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Rana; Severin, Sonia; Xuereb, Jean-Marie; Gratacap, Marie-Pierre; Laporte, Jocelyn; Buj-Bello, Ana; Tronchère, Hélène; Payrastre, Bernard

    2016-07-29

    Phosphoinositides play a key role in the spatiotemporal control of central intracellular processes and several specific kinases and phosphatases regulating the level of these lipids are implicated in human diseases. Myotubularins are a family of 3-phosphatases acting specifically on phosphatidylinositol 3-monophosphate and phosphatidylinositol 3,5 bisphosphate. Members of this family are mutated in genetic diseases including myotubularin 1 (MTM1) and myotubularin-related protein 2 (MTMR2) which mutations are responsible of X-linked centronuclear myopathy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy, respectively. Here we show that MTM1 is expressed in blood platelets and that hundred microliters of blood is sufficient to detect the protein by western blotting. Since the most severe cases of pathogenic mutations of MTM1 lead to loss of expression of the protein, we propose that a minimal amount of blood can allow a rapid diagnostic test of X-linked myotubular myopathy, which is currently based on histopathology of muscle biopsy and molecular genetic testing. In platelets, MTM1 is a highly active 3-phosphatase mainly associated to membranes and found on the dense granules and to a lesser extent on alpha-granules. However, deletion of MTM1 in mouse had no significant effect on platelet count and on platelet secretion and aggregation induced by thrombin or collagen stimulation. Potential compensation by other members of the myotubularin family is conceivable since MTMR2 was easily detectable by western blotting and the mRNA of several members of the family increased during in vitro differentiation of human megakaryocytes and MEG-01 cells. In conclusion, we show the presence of several myotubularins in platelets and propose that minimal amounts of blood can be used to develop a rapid diagnostic test for genetic pathologies linked to loss of expression of these phosphatases. PMID:27155155

  15. Mitochondrial Myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... ATP. This highly efficient part of the ATP manufacturing process requires oxygen, and is called the respiratory ... based on three natural substances involved in ATP production in our cells. One substance, creatine , normally acts ...

  16. Inflammatory Myopathies

    MedlinePlus

    ... the symptoms can be treated. Options include medication, physical therapy, exercise, heat therapy (including microwave and ultrasound), orthotics ... and polymyositis include cyclosporine A, cyclophosphamide, and tacrolimus. Physical therapy is usually recommended to prevent muscle atrophy and ...

  17. Metabolic Myopathies

    MedlinePlus

    ... muscles. Metabolic refers to chemical reactions that provide energy, nutrients and substances necessary for health and growth. ... occur when muscle cells don’t get enough energy. Without enough energy, the muscle lacks enough fuel ...

  18. Mitochondrial Myopathies

    MedlinePlus

    ... line and are therefore called the electron transport chain, and complex V actually churns out ATP, so ... coQ10 , is a component of the electron transport chain, which uses oxygen to manufacture ATP. Some mitochondrial ...

  19. Mitochondrial Myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... with ragged-red fibers, and mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes. The symptoms of ... riboflavin, coenzyme Q, and carnitine (a specialized amino acid) may provide subjective improvement in fatigue and energy ...

  20. Stac3 is a component of the excitation-contraction coupling machinery and mutated in Native American myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Horstick, Eric J.; Linsley, Jeremy W.; Dowling, James J.; Hauser, Michael A.; McDonald, Kristin K.; Ashley-Koch, Allison; Saint-Amant, Louis; Satish, Akhila; Cui, Wilson W.; Zhou, Weibin; Sprague, Shawn M.; Stamm, Demetra S.; Powell, Cynthia M.; Speer, Marcy C.; Franzini-Armstrong, Clara; Hirata, Hiromi; Kuwada, John Y.

    2013-01-01

    Excitation-contraction coupling, the process that regulates contractions by skeletal muscles, transduces changes in membrane voltage by activating release of Ca2+ from internal stores to initiate muscle contraction. Defects in EC coupling are associated with muscle diseases. Here we identify Stac3 as a novel component of the EC coupling machinery. Using a zebrafish genetic screen, we generate a locomotor mutation that is mapped to stac3. We provide electrophysiological, Ca2+ imaging, immunocytochemical and biochemical evidence that Stac3 participates in excitation-contraction coupling in muscles. Furthermore, we reveal that a mutation in human STAC3 as the genetic basis of the debilitating Native American myopathy (NAM). Analysis of NAM stac3 in zebrafish shows that the NAM mutation decreases excitation-contraction coupling. These findings enhance our understanding of both excitation-contraction coupling and the pathology of myopathies. PMID:23736855

  1. Mapping of the locus for X-linked cardioskeletal myopathy with neutropenia and abnormal mitochondria (Barth syndrome) to Xq28.

    PubMed Central

    Bolhuis, P A; Hensels, G W; Hulsebos, T J; Baas, F; Barth, P G

    1991-01-01

    X-linked cardioskeletal myopathy with neutropenia and abnormal mitochondria is clinically characterized by congenital dilated cardiomyopathy, skeletal myopathy, recurrent bacterial infections, and growth retardation. We analyzed linkage between the disease locus and X-chromosomal markers in a family with seven carriers, four patients, and eight unaffected sons of carriers. Highest lod scores obtained by two-point linkage analysis were 2.70 for St14.1 (DXS52, TaqI) at a recombination fraction of zero and 2.53 for cpX67 (DXS134) at a recombination fraction of zero. Multipoint linkage analysis resulted in a maximum lod score of 5.24 at the position of St35.691 (DXS305). The most distal recombination detected in this family was located between the markers II-10 (DXS466) and DX13 (DXS15). These data indicate the location of the mutated gene at Xq28. PMID:1998334

  2. Specific binding of Ulex europaeus agglutinin I lectin to sarcolemma of distal myopathy with rimmed vacuole formation.

    PubMed

    Yatabe, K; Kawai, M

    1997-08-01

    Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA I) binding was studied in 83 patients with various neuromuscular disorders. UEA I labelled endomysial capillaries and endothelial cells of perimysial blood vessels in all the examined muscles. There was no UEA I binding to muscle fibres except for all (9) cases of distal myopathy with rimmed vacuole formation (DMRV), 1 of 5 cases of inclusion body myositis and 1 of 36 cases of inflammatory myopathies. The UEA I binding was completely eliminated by preincubation of UEA I solution with L-fucose. Using electron microscopy, the UEA I binding was localized to sarcolemma and intrasarco-plasmic membranous organelles other than mitochondria. Myosatellite cells were not labelled. These findings revealed the existence of fucosylated proteins or lipids in a subset of skeletal muscles suffering from DMRV. Biochemical identification of the fucosylated substance and further detailed study on subcellular localization of UEA I binding may yield important clues to the unknown pathogenesis of DMRV. PMID:9309554

  3. “Target” and “Sandwich” Signs in Thigh Muscles have High Diagnostic Values for Collagen VI-related Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jun; Zheng, Yi-Ming; Jin, Su-Qin; Yi, Jun-Fei; Liu, Xiu-Juan; Lyn, He; Wang, Zhao-Xia; Zhang, Wei; Xiao, Jiang-Xi; Yuan, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Collagen VI-related myopathies are autosomal dominant and recessive hereditary myopathies, mainly including Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD) and Bethlem myopathy (BM). Muscle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been widely used to diagnosis muscular disorders. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of thigh muscles MRI for collagen VI-related myopathies. Methods: Eleven patients with collagen VI gene mutation-related myopathies were enrolled in this study. MRI of the thigh muscles was performed in all patients with collagen VI gene mutation-related myopathies and in 361 patients with other neuromuscular disorders (disease controls). T1-weighted images were used to assess fatty infiltration of the muscles using a modified Mercuri's scale. We assessed the sensitivity and specificity of the MRI features of collagen VI-related myopathies. The relationship between fatty infiltration of muscles and specific collagen VI gene mutations was also investigated. Results: Eleven patients with collagen VI gene mutation-related myopathies included six UCMD patients and five BM patients. There was no significant difference between UCMD and BM patients in the fatty infiltration of each thigh muscle except sartorius (P = 0.033); therefore, we combined the UCMD and BM data. Mean fatty infiltration scores were 3.1 and 3.0 in adductor magnus and gluteus maximus, while the scores were 1.3, 1.3, and 1.5 in gracilis, adductor longus, and sartorius, respectively. A “target” sign in rectus femoris (RF) was present in seven cases, and a “sandwich” sign in vastus lateralis (VL) was present in ten cases. The “target” and “sandwich” signs had sensitivities of 63.6% and 90.9% and specificities of 97.3% and 96.9% for the diagnosis of collagen VI-related myopathies, respectively. Fatty infiltration scores were 2.0–3.0 in seven patients with mutations in the triple-helical domain, and 1.0–1.5 in three of four patients with

  4. Deleting exon 55 from the nebulin gene induces severe muscle weakness in a mouse model for nemaline myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ottenheijm, Coen A. C.; Buck, Danielle; de Winter, Josine M.; Ferrara, Claudia; Piroddi, Nicoletta; Tesi, Chiara; Jasper, Jeffrey R.; Malik, Fady I.; Meng, Hui; Stienen, Ger J. M.; Beggs, Alan H.; Labeit, Siegfried; Poggesi, Corrado; Lawlor, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    Nebulin—a giant sarcomeric protein—plays a pivotal role in skeletal muscle contractility by specifying thin filament length and function. Although mutations in the gene encoding nebulin (NEB) are a frequent cause of nemaline myopathy, the most common non-dystrophic congenital myopathy, the mechanisms by which mutations in NEB cause muscle weakness remain largely unknown. To better understand these mechanisms, we have generated a mouse model in which Neb exon 55 is deleted (NebΔExon55) to replicate a founder mutation seen frequently in patients with nemaline myopathy with Ashkenazi Jewish heritage. NebΔExon55 mice are born close to Mendelian ratios, but show growth retardation after birth. Electron microscopy studies show nemaline bodies—a hallmark feature of nemaline myopathy—in muscle fibres from NebΔExon55 mice. Western blotting studies with nebulin-specific antibodies reveal reduced nebulin levels in muscle from NebΔExon55 mice, and immunofluorescence confocal microscopy studies with tropomodulin antibodies and phalloidin reveal that thin filament length is significantly reduced. In line with reduced thin filament length, the maximal force generating capacity of permeabilized muscle fibres and single myofibrils is reduced in NebΔExon55 mice with a more pronounced reduction at longer sarcomere lengths. Finally, in NebΔExon55 mice the regulation of contraction is impaired, as evidenced by marked changes in crossbridge cycling kinetics and by a reduction of the calcium sensitivity of force generation. A novel drug that facilitates calcium binding to the thin filament significantly augmented the calcium sensitivity of submaximal force to levels that exceed those observed in untreated control muscle. In conclusion, we have characterized the first nebulin-based nemaline myopathy model, which recapitulates important features of the phenotype observed in patients harbouring this particular mutation, and which has severe muscle weakness caused by thin

  5. Mutation in the Novel Nuclear-Encoded Mitochondrial Protein CHCHD10 in a Family with Autosomal Dominant Mitochondrial Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ajroud-Driss, Senda; Fecto, Faisal; Ajroud, Kaouther; Lalani, Irfan; Calvo, Sarah E.; Mootha, Vamsi K.; Deng, Han-Xiang; Siddique, Nailah; Tahmoush, Albert J.; Heiman-Patterson, Terry D.; Siddique, Teepu

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial myopathies belong to a larger group of systemic diseases caused by morphological or biochemical abnormalities of mitochondria. Mitochondrial disorders can be caused by mutations in either the mitochondrial or the nuclear genome. Only 5% of all mitochondrial disorders are autosomal dominant. We analyzed DNA from members of a previously reported Puerto Rican kindred with an autosomal dominant mitochondrial myopathy (Heimann-Patterson et al. 1997). Linkage analysis suggested a putative locus on the pericentric region of the long arm of chromosome 22 (22q11). Using the tools of integrative genomics, we established C22orf16 (later designated as CHCHD10) as the only high scoring mitochondrial candidate gene in our minimal candidate region. Sequence analysis revealed a double missense mutation (R15S; G58R) in cis in CHCHD10 which encodes a coiled-coil helix coiled-coil helix protein of unknown function. These two mutations completely co-segregated with the disease phenotype and were absent in 1481 Caucasian and 80 Hispanic (including 32 Puerto Rican) controls. Expression profiling showed that CHCHD10 is enriched in skeletal muscle. Mitochondrial localization of the CHCHD10 protein was confirmed using immunofluorescence in cells expressing either wild-type or mutant CHCHD10. We found that expression of the G58R, but not the R15S, mutation induced mitochondrial fragmentation. Our findings identify a novel gene causing mitochondrial myopathy, thereby expanding the spectrum of mitochondrial myopathies caused by nuclear genes. Our findings also suggest a role for CHCHD10 in the morphologic remodeling of the mitochondria. PMID:25193783

  6. Critical evaluation of the use of cell cultures for inclusion in clinical trials of patients affected by collagen VI myopathies.

    PubMed

    Sabatelli, P; Palma, E; Angelin, A; Squarzoni, S; Urciuolo, A; Pellegrini, C; Tiepolo, T; Bonaldo, P; Gualandi, F; Merlini, L; Bernardi, P; Maraldi, N M

    2012-07-01

    Collagen VI myopathies (Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD), Bethlem myopathy (BM), and myosclerosis myopathy) share a common pathogenesis, that is, mitochondrial dysfunction due to deregulation of the permeability transition pore (PTP). This effect was first identified in the Col6a1(-/-) mouse model and then in muscle cell cultures from UCMD and BM patients; the normalizing effect of cyclosporin A (CsA) confirmed the pathogenic role of PTP opening. In order to determine whether mitochondrial performance can be used as a criterion for inclusion in clinical trials and as an outcome measure of the patient response to therapy, it is mandatory to establish whether mitochondrial dysfunction is conserved in primary cell cultures from UCMD and BM patients. In this study we report evidence that mitochondrial dysfunction and the consequent increase of apoptotic rate can be detected not only, as previously reported, in muscle, but also in fibroblast cell cultures established from muscle biopsies of collagen VI-related myopathic patients. However, the mitochondrial phenotype is no longer maintained after nine passages in culture. These data demonstrate that the dire consequences of mitochondrial dysfunction are not limited to myogenic cells, and that this parameter can be used as a suitable diagnostic criterion, provided that the cell culture conditions are carefully established. PMID:21953374

  7. Whole-Body muscle MRI in a series of patients with congenital myopathy related to TPM2 gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Jarraya, Mohamed; Quijano-Roy, Susana; Monnier, Nicole; Béhin, Anthony; Avila-Smirnov, Daniela; Romero, Norma Beatriz; Allamand, Valérie; Richard, Pascale; Barois, Annie; May, Adrien; Estournet, Brigitte; Mercuri, Eugenio; Carlier, Pierre G; Carlier, Robert-Yves

    2012-10-01

    Beta-tropomyosin 2 (TPM2) gene mutations are a rare cause of congenital myopathy with variable clinical and histological features. We describe muscle involvement using Whole-Body muscle Magnetic Resonance Imaging (WBMRI) in 8 individuals with genetically proven TPM2 mutations and different clinical and histological features (nemaline myopathy, 'cap disease', Bethlem-like phenotype, arthrogryposis). Most patients shared a recognizable MRI pattern with the involvement of masticatory and distal lower leg muscles. The lower leg showed constant soleus muscle involvement, and often also involvement of peroneus, tibialis anterior, and toe flexor muscles. Pelvic and shoulder girdles, and upper limbs muscles were quite spared. Two adult subjects (a patient and a paucisymptomatic parent) had a more diffuse involvement with striking fat infiltration of the rectus femoris muscle. Two children showed variant findings: one presented with masseter involvement associated with severe axial fat infiltration, the second had masticatory and distal leg muscle involvement (soleus and gastrocnemius muscles). Our study suggests that, independently of the clinical and histological presentation, most patients with TPM2 mutations show a predominant involvement of masticatory and distal leg muscles with the other regions relatively spared. More spread involvement may be observed. This cephalic-distal MRI pattern is not frequent in other known myopathies. PMID:22980765

  8. [Diagnosis of inflammatory myopathy; usefulness of 99mTc MDP scintigraphy and muscle MRI for determination of affected sites].

    PubMed

    Nakayama, T; Saitoh, Y; Yatabe, K; Sueishi, M; Kawai, M

    1999-11-01

    We studied the effectiveness of 99mTc-MDP (methylendiphosphate) scintigraphy in imaging inflammatory myopathy. The three subjects including 1 male and 2 female patients had high creatine kinase (CK) levels and proximal dominant muscle weakness. In whole body muscle surveillance by 99mTc-MDP scintigraphy, abnormal 99mTc-MDP accumulation was found in the extremities of all patients. The sites with high 99mTc-MDP accumulation showed high intensity on T2 weighted MR imaging, suggesting an inflammatory process. Muscle biopsy was performed on two patients from the muscles with the abnormal MRI findings, which showed the diagnostic finding of inflammatory changes. Because muscle involvement in inflammatory myopathy differs from muscle to muscle, it is sometimes difficult to choose appropriate muscle biopsy sites for diagnostic purposes. Affected muscles are more easily identified by using 99mTc-MDP muscle scintigraphy and muscle MRI, therefore, a correct diagnosis and choice of biopsy site can be made. 99mTc-PYP scintigraphy is permitted for use in myocardial infarction alone and 111In-antimyosin scintigraphy is not available in Japan. Therefore, we recommend 99mTc-MDP scintigraphy for diagnosis of inflammatory myopathy and for determination of muscle biopsy sites. PMID:10689932

  9. A de novo mutation of the MYH7 gene in a large Chinese family with autosomal dominant myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Tetsuya; Xiong, Hui; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Wang, Shuo; Satake, Wataru; Jiao, Hui; Yang, Yanling; Cha, Pei-Chieng; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Nishino, Ichizo; Suzuki, Yutaka; Sugano, Sumio; Wu, Xiru; Toda, Tatsushi

    2015-01-01

    Laing distal myopathy (LDM) is an autosomal dominant myopathy that is caused by mutations in the slow/beta cardiac myosin heavy-chain (MYH7) gene. It has been recently reported that LDM presents with a wide range of clinical manifestations. We herein report a large Chinese family with autosomal dominant myopathy. The affected individuals in the family presented with foot drop in early childhood, along with progressive distal and proximal limb weakness. Their characteristic symptoms include scapular winging and scoliosis in the early disease phase and impairment of ambulation in the advanced phase. Although limb-girdle muscle dystrophy (LGMD) was suspected initially, a definite diagnosis could not be reached. As such, we performed linkage analysis and detected four linkage regions, namely 1q23.2-24.1, 14q11.2-12, 15q26.2-26.3 and 17q24.3. Through subsequent whole exome sequencing, we found a de novo p.K1617del causative mutation in the MYH7 gene and diagnosed the disease as LDM. This is the first LDM case in China. Our patients have severe clinical manifestations that mimic LGMD in comparison with the patients with the same mutation reported elsewhere. PMID:27081534

  10. A de novo mutation of the MYH7 gene in a large Chinese family with autosomal dominant myopathy.

    PubMed

    Oda, Tetsuya; Xiong, Hui; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Wang, Shuo; Satake, Wataru; Jiao, Hui; Yang, Yanling; Cha, Pei-Chieng; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Nishino, Ichizo; Suzuki, Yutaka; Sugano, Sumio; Wu, Xiru; Toda, Tatsushi

    2015-01-01

    Laing distal myopathy (LDM) is an autosomal dominant myopathy that is caused by mutations in the slow/beta cardiac myosin heavy-chain (MYH7) gene. It has been recently reported that LDM presents with a wide range of clinical manifestations. We herein report a large Chinese family with autosomal dominant myopathy. The affected individuals in the family presented with foot drop in early childhood, along with progressive distal and proximal limb weakness. Their characteristic symptoms include scapular winging and scoliosis in the early disease phase and impairment of ambulation in the advanced phase. Although limb-girdle muscle dystrophy (LGMD) was suspected initially, a definite diagnosis could not be reached. As such, we performed linkage analysis and detected four linkage regions, namely 1q23.2-24.1, 14q11.2-12, 15q26.2-26.3 and 17q24.3. Through subsequent whole exome sequencing, we found a de novo p.K1617del causative mutation in the MYH7 gene and diagnosed the disease as LDM. This is the first LDM case in China. Our patients have severe clinical manifestations that mimic LGMD in comparison with the patients with the same mutation reported elsewhere. PMID:27081534

  11. A Brazilian family with hereditary inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Fanganiello, R D; Kimonis, V E; Côrte, C C; Nitrini, R; Passos-Bueno, M R

    2011-04-01

    Inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget disease and frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD) is a progressive and usually misdiagnosed autosomal dominant disorder. It is clinically characterized by a triad of features: proximal and distal myopathy, early onset Paget disease of bone (PDB), and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). It is caused by missense mutations in the valosin-containing protein (VCP) gene. We describe here the clinical and molecular findings of the first Brazilian family identified with IBMPFD. Progressive myopathy affecting the limb girdles was detected by clinical examination followed by muscle biopsy and creatine kinase measurement. PDB was suggested after anatomopathological bone examination and FTD was diagnosed by clinical, neuropsychological and language evaluations. Brain magnetic resonance revealed severe atrophy of the anterior temporal lobes, including the hippocampi. A R93C mutation in VCP was detected by direct sequencing screening in subject W (age 62) and in his mother. Four more individuals diagnosed with "dementia" were reported in this family. We also present a comprehensive genotype-phenotype correlation analysis of mutations in VCP in 182 patients from 29 families described in the literature and show that while IBM is a conspicuously penetrant symptom, PDB has a lower penetrance when associated with mutations in the AAAD1 domain and FTD has a lower penetrance when associated with mutations in the Junction (L1-D1) domain. Furthermore, the R93C mutation is likely to be associated with the penetrance of all the clinical symptoms of the triad. PMID:21412659

  12. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    Bronchitis is an inflammation of the bronchial tubes, the airways that carry air to your lungs. It ... chest tightness. There are two main types of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis ...

  13. Statin Intolerance Because of Myalgia, Myositis, Myopathy, or Myonecrosis Can in Most Cases be Safely Resolved by Vitamin D Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Khayznikov, Maksim; Hemachrandra, Kallish; Pandit, Ramesh; Kumar, Ashwin; Wang, Ping; Glueck, Charles J

    2015-01-01

    Background: Low serum vitamin D can cause myalgia, myositis, myopathy, and myonecrosis. Statin-induced myalgia is a major and common cause of statin intolerance. Low serum vitamin D and statins, additively or synergistically, cause myalgia, myositis, myopathy, and/or myonecrosis. Statin-induced myalgia in vitamin D deficient patients can often be resolved by vitamin D supplementation, normalizing serum vitamin D levels. Aims: In 74 men and 72 women (age 59 ± 14 years) intolerant to ≥2 statins because of myalgia, myositis, myopathy, or myonecrosis and found to have low (<32 ng/mL) serum vitamin D, we prospectively assessed whether vitamin D supplementation (vitamin D2: 50,000-100,000 units/week) to normalize serum vitamin D would allow successful rechallenge therapy with statins. Materials and Methods: Follow-up evaluation on vitamin D supplementation was done on 134 patients at 6 months (median 5.3), 103 patients at 12 months (median 12.2), and 82 patients at 24 months (median 24). Results: Median entry serum vitamin D (22 ng/mL, 23 ng/mL, and 23 ng/mL) rose at 6 months, 12 months, and 24 months follow-up to 53 ng/mL, 53 ng/mL, and 55 ng/mL, respectively, (P < .0001 for all) on vitamin D therapy (50,000-100,000 units/week). On vitamin D supplementation, serum vitamin D normalized at 6 months, 12 months, and 24 months follow-up in 90%, 86%, and 91% of the patients, respectively. On rechallenge with statins while on vitamin D supplementation, median low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLC) fell from the study entry (167 mg/dL, 164 mg/dL, and 158 mg/dL) to 90 mg/dL, 91 mg/dL, and 84 mg/dL, respectively, (P < .0001 for all). On follow-up at median 6 months, 12 months, and 24 months on statins and vitamin D, 88%, 91%, and 95% of the previously statin-intolerant patients, respectively, were free of myalgia, myositis, myopathy, and/or myonecrosis. Conclusions: Statin intolerance because of myalgia, myositis, myopathy, or myonecrosis associated with low serum vitamin

  14. Muscle histopathology in nebulin-related nemaline myopathy: ultrastrastructural findings correlated to disease severity and genotype.

    PubMed

    Malfatti, Edoardo; Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Böhm, Johann; De Winter, Josine M; Schäffer, Ursula; Estournet, Brigitte; Quijano-Roy, Susana; Monges, Soledad; Lubieniecki, Fabiana; Bellance, Remi; Viou, Mai Thao; Madelaine, Angéline; Wu, Bin; Taratuto, Ana Lía; Eymard, Bruno; Pelin, Katarina; Fardeau, Michel; Ottenheijm, Coen A C; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina; Laporte, Jocelyn; Romero, Norma B

    2014-01-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) is a rare congenital myopathy characterised by hypotonia, muscle weakness, and often skeletal muscle deformities with the presence of nemaline bodies (rods) in the muscle biopsy. The nebulin (NEB) gene is the most commonly mutated and is thought to account for approximately 50% of genetically diagnosed cases of NM. We undertook a detailed muscle morphological analysis of 14 NEB-mutated NM patients with different clinical forms to define muscle pathological patterns and correlate them with clinical course and genotype. Three groups were identified according to clinical severity. Group 1 (n = 5) comprises severe/lethal NM and biopsy in the first days of life. Group 2 (n = 4) includes intermediate NM and biopsy in infancy. Group 3 (n = 5) comprises typical/mild NM and biopsy in childhood or early adult life. Biopsies underwent histoenzymological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural analysis. Fibre type distribution patterns, rod characteristics, distribution and localization were investigated. Contractile performance was studied in muscle fibre preparations isolated from seven muscle biopsies from each of the three groups. G1 showed significant myofibrillar dissociation and smallness with scattered globular rods in one third of fibres; there was no type 1 predominance. G2 presented milder sarcomeric dissociation, dispersed or clustered nemaline bodies, and type 1 predominance/uniformity. In contrast, G3 had well-delimited clusters of subsarcolemmal elongated rods and type 1 uniformity without sarcomeric alterations. In accordance with the clinical and morphological data, functional studies revealed markedly low forces in muscle bundles from G1 and a better contractile performance in muscle bundles from biopsies of patients from G2, and G3.In conclusion NEB-mutated NM patients present a wide spectrum of morphological features. It is difficult to establish firm genotype phenotype correlation. Interestingly, there was a correlation

  15. Anti-HMGCR autoantibodies in European patients with autoimmune necrotizing myopathies: inconstant exposure to statin.

    PubMed

    Allenbach, Yves; Drouot, Laurent; Rigolet, Aude; Charuel, Jean Luc; Jouen, Fabienne; Romero, Norma B; Maisonobe, Thierry; Dubourg, Odile; Behin, Anthony; Laforet, Pascal; Stojkovic, Tania; Eymard, Bruno; Costedoat-Chalumeau, Nathalie; Campana-Salort, Emmanuelle; Tournadre, Anne; Musset, Lucile; Bader-Meunier, Brigitte; Kone-Paut, Isabelle; Sibilia, Jean; Servais, Laurent; Fain, Olivier; Larroche, Claire; Diot, Elisabeth; Terrier, Benjamin; De Paz, Raphael; Dossier, Antoine; Menard, Dominique; Morati, Chafika; Roux, Marielle; Ferrer, Xavier; Martinet, Jeremie; Besnard, Sophie; Bellance, Remi; Cacoub, Patrice; Arnaud, Laurent; Grosbois, Bernard; Herson, Serge; Boyer, Olivier; Benveniste, Olivier

    2014-05-01

    Necrotizing autoimmune myopathy (NAM) is a group of acquired myopathies characterized by prominent myofiber necrosis with little or no muscle inflammation. Recently, researchers identified autoantibodies (aAb) against 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) in patients with NAM, especially in statin-exposed patients. Here we report what is to our knowledge the first European cohort of patients with NAM.The serum of 206 patients with suspicion of NAM was tested for detection of anti-HMGCR aAb using an addressable laser bead immunoassay. Forty-five patients were found to be anti-HMGCR positive. Their mean age was 48.9 ± 21.9 years and the group was predominantly female (73.3%). Statin exposure was recorded in 44.4% of patients. Almost all patients had a muscular deficit (97.7%), frequently severe (Medical Research Council [MRC] 5 ≤3 in 75.5%). Subacute onset (<6 mo) was noted for most of them (64.4%). Nevertheless, 3 patients (6.6%) had a slowly progressive course over more than 10 years. Except for weight loss (20%), no extramuscular sign was observed. The mean CK level was high (6941 ± 8802 IU/L) and correlated with muscle strength evaluated by manual muscle testing (r = -0.37, p = 0.03). Similarly, anti-HMGCR aAb titers were correlated with muscular strength (r = -0.31; p = 0.03) and CK level (r = 0.45; p = 0.01). Mean duration of treatment was 34.1 ± 40.8 months, and by the end of the study no patient had been able to stop treatment.This study confirms the observation and description of anti-HMGCR aAb associated with NAM. The majority of patients were statin naive and needed prolonged treatments. Some patients had a dystrophic-like presentation. Anti-HMGR aAb titers correlated with CK levels and muscle strength, suggesting their pathogenic role. PMID:24797170

  16. Increased mitochondrial emission of reactive oxygen species and calpain activation are required for doxorubicin-induced cardiac and skeletal muscle myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Min, Kisuk; Kwon, Oh-Sung; Smuder, Ashley J; Wiggs, Michael P; Sollanek, Kurt J; Christou, Demetra D; Yoo, Jeung-Ki; Hwang, Moon-Hyon; Szeto, Hazel H; Kavazis, Andreas N; Powers, Scott K

    2015-01-01

    Although doxorubicin (DOX) is a highly effective anti-tumour agent used to treat a variety of cancers, DOX administration is associated with significant side effects, including myopathy of both cardiac and skeletal muscles. The mechanisms responsible for DOX-mediated myopathy remain a topic of debate. We tested the hypothesis that both increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) emission and activation of the cysteine protease calpain are required for DOX-induced myopathy in rat cardiac and skeletal muscle. Cause and effect was determined by administering a novel mitochondrial-targeted anti-oxidant to prevent DOX-induced increases in mitochondrial ROS emission, whereas a highly-selective pharmacological inhibitor was exploited to inhibit calpain activity. Our findings reveal that mitochondria are a major site of DOX-mediated ROS production in both cardiac and skeletal muscle fibres and the prevention of DOX-induced increases in mitochondrial ROS emission protects against fibre atrophy and contractile dysfunction in both cardiac and skeletal muscles. Furthermore, our results indicate that DOX-induced increases in mitochondrial ROS emission are required to activate calpain in heart and skeletal muscles and, importantly, calpain activation is a major contributor to DOX-induced myopathy. Taken together, these findings show that increased mitochondrial ROS production and calpain activation are significant contributors to the development of DOX-induced myopathy in both cardiac and skeletal muscle fibres. PMID:25643692

  17. Molecular Genetic Diagnosis of a Bethlem Myopathy Family with an Autosomal-Dominant COL6A1 Mutation, as Evidenced by Exome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyung Jun; Choi, Young-Chul; Kim, Seung Min; Kim, Se Hoon; Hong, Young Bin; Yoon, Bo Ram

    2015-01-01

    Background We describe herein the application of whole exome sequencing (WES) for the molecular genetic diagnosis of a large Korean family with dominantly inherited myopathy. Case Report The affected individuals presented with slowly progressive proximal weakness and ankle contracture. They were initially diagnosed with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) based on clinical and pathologic features. However, WES and subsequent capillary sequencing identified a pathogenic splicing-site mutation (c.1056+1G>A) in COL6A1, which was previously reported to be an underlying cause of Bethlem myopathy. After identification of the genetic cause of the disease, careful neurologic examination revealed subtle contracture of the interphalangeal joint in the affected members, which is a characteristic sign of Bethlem myopathy. Therefore, we revised the original diagnosis from LGMD to Bethlem myopathy. Conclusions This is the first report of identification of COL6A1-mediated Bethlem myopathy in Korea, and indicates the utility of WES for the diagnosis of muscular dystrophy. PMID:25749816

  18. Melanocytes from Patients Affected by Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy and Bethlem Myopathy have Dysfunctional Mitochondria That Can be Rescued with Cyclophilin Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zulian, Alessandra; Tagliavini, Francesca; Rizzo, Erika; Pellegrini, Camilla; Sardone, Francesca; Zini, Nicoletta; Maraldi, Nadir Mario; Santi, Spartaco; Faldini, Cesare; Merlini, Luciano; Petronilli, Valeria; Bernardi, Paolo; Sabatelli, Patrizia

    2014-01-01

    Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy and Bethlem myopathy are caused by mutations in collagen VI (ColVI) genes, which encode an extracellular matrix protein; yet, mitochondria play a major role in disease pathogenesis through a short circuit caused by inappropriate opening of the permeability transition pore, a high-conductance channel, which causes a shortage in ATP production. We find that melanocytes do not produce ColVI yet they bind it at the cell surface, suggesting that this protein may play a trophic role and that its absence may cause lesions similar to those seen in skeletal muscle. We show that mitochondria in melanocytes of Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy and Bethlem myopathy patients display increased size, reduced matrix density, and disrupted cristae, findings that suggest a functional impairment. In keeping with this hypothesis, mitochondria (i) underwent anomalous depolarization after inhibition of the F-ATP synthase with oligomycin, and (ii) displayed decreased respiratory reserve capacity. The non-immunosuppressive cyclophilin inhibitor NIM811 prevented mitochondrial depolarization in response to oligomycin in melanocytes from both Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy and Bethlem myopathy patients, and partially restored the respiratory reserve of melanocytes from one Bethlem myopathy patient. These results match our recent findings on melanocytes from patients affected by Duchenne muscular dystrophy (Pellegrini et al., 2013), and suggest that skin biopsies may represent a minimally invasive tool to investigate mitochondrial dysfunction and to evaluate drug efficacy in ColVI-related myopathies and possibly in other muscle wasting conditions like aging sarcopenia. PMID:25477819

  19. Melanocytes from Patients Affected by Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy and Bethlem Myopathy have Dysfunctional Mitochondria That Can be Rescued with Cyclophilin Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zulian, Alessandra; Tagliavini, Francesca; Rizzo, Erika; Pellegrini, Camilla; Sardone, Francesca; Zini, Nicoletta; Maraldi, Nadir Mario; Santi, Spartaco; Faldini, Cesare; Merlini, Luciano; Petronilli, Valeria; Bernardi, Paolo; Sabatelli, Patrizia

    2014-01-01

    Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy and Bethlem myopathy are caused by mutations in collagen VI (ColVI) genes, which encode an extracellular matrix protein; yet, mitochondria play a major role in disease pathogenesis through a short circuit caused by inappropriate opening of the permeability transition pore, a high-conductance channel, which causes a shortage in ATP production. We find that melanocytes do not produce ColVI yet they bind it at the cell surface, suggesting that this protein may play a trophic role and that its absence may cause lesions similar to those seen in skeletal muscle. We show that mitochondria in melanocytes of Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy and Bethlem myopathy patients display increased size, reduced matrix density, and disrupted cristae, findings that suggest a functional impairment. In keeping with this hypothesis, mitochondria (i) underwent anomalous depolarization after inhibition of the F-ATP synthase with oligomycin, and (ii) displayed decreased respiratory reserve capacity. The non-immunosuppressive cyclophilin inhibitor NIM811 prevented mitochondrial depolarization in response to oligomycin in melanocytes from both Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy and Bethlem myopathy patients, and partially restored the respiratory reserve of melanocytes from one Bethlem myopathy patient. These results match our recent findings on melanocytes from patients affected by Duchenne muscular dystrophy (Pellegrini et al., 2013), and suggest that skin biopsies may represent a minimally invasive tool to investigate mitochondrial dysfunction and to evaluate drug efficacy in ColVI-related myopathies and possibly in other muscle wasting conditions like aging sarcopenia. PMID:25477819

  20. Association between risk of myopathy and cholesterol-lowering effect: a comparison of all statins.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masaki; Chisaki, Ikumi; Narumi, Katsuya; Hidaka, Kazuhiro; Kagawa, Toshiki; Itagaki, Shirou; Hirano, Takeshi; Iseki, Ken

    2008-04-23

    In the present study, we examined the mechanisms underlying the cytotoxicity of pitavastatin, a new statin, and we compared the in vitro potencies of muscle cytotoxicity using a prototypic embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma cell line (RD cells), a typical side effect of statins and compared the cholesterol-lowering effects of statins using Hep G2 hepatoma cells. Pitavastatin reduced the number of viable cells and caused caspase-9 and -3/7 activation in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The comparison of cytotoxities of statins showed that statins significantly reduced cell viability and markedly enhanced activity of caspase-3/7 in concentration-dependent manner. On the other hand, the effects of hydrophilic statins, pravastatin, rosuvastatin were very weak. The rank order of cytotoxicity was cerivastatin > simvastatin acid> fluvastatin > atorvastatin > lovastatin acid > pitavastatin > rosuvastatin, pravastatin. Statin-induced cytotoxicity is associated with these partition coefficients. On the other hand, the cholesterol-lowering effect of statins did not correlate with these partition coefficients and cytotoxicity. Thus, it is necessary to consider the association between risk of myopathy and cholesterol-lowering effect of a statin for precise use of statins. PMID:18402982

  1. Blockade of ActRIIB signaling triggers muscle fatigability and metabolic myopathy.

    PubMed

    Relizani, Karima; Mouisel, Etienne; Giannesini, Benoit; Hourdé, Christophe; Patel, Ketan; Morales Gonzalez, Susanne; Jülich, Kristina; Vignaud, Alban; Piétri-Rouxel, France; Fortin, Dominique; Garcia, Luis; Blot, Stéphane; Ritvos, Olli; Bendahan, David; Ferry, Arnaud; Ventura-Clapier, Renée; Schuelke, Markus; Amthor, Helge

    2014-08-01

    Myostatin regulates skeletal muscle size via the activin receptor IIB (ActRIIB). However, its effect on muscle energy metabolism and energy-dependent muscle function remains largely unexplored. This question needs to be solved urgently since various therapies for neuromuscular diseases based on blockade of ActRIIB signaling are being developed. Here, we show in mice, that 4-month pharmacological abrogation of ActRIIB signaling by treatment with soluble ActRIIB-Fc triggers extreme muscle fatigability. This is associated with elevated serum lactate levels and a severe metabolic myopathy in the mdx mouse, an animal model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Blockade of ActRIIB signaling downregulates porin, a crucial ADP/ATP shuttle between cytosol and mitochondrial matrix leading to a consecutive deficiency of oxidative phosphorylation as measured by in vivo Phosphorus Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy ((31)P-MRS). Further, ActRIIB blockade reduces muscle capillarization, which further compounds the metabolic stress. We show that ActRIIB regulates key determinants of muscle metabolism, such as Pparβ, Pgc1α, and Pdk4 thereby optimizing different components of muscle energy metabolism. In conclusion, ActRIIB signaling endows skeletal muscle with high oxidative capacity and low fatigability. The severe metabolic side effects following ActRIIB blockade caution against deploying this strategy, at least in isolation, for treatment of neuromuscular disorders. PMID:24861054

  2. Role of TGF-β signaling in inherited and acquired myopathies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) superfamily consists of a variety of cytokines expressed in many different cell types including skeletal muscle. Members of this superfamily that are of particular importance in skeletal muscle are TGF-β1, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and myostatin. These signaling molecules play important roles in skeletal muscle homeostasis and in a variety of inherited and acquired neuromuscular disorders. Expression of these molecules is linked to normal processes in skeletal muscle such as growth, differentiation, regeneration, and stress response. However, chronic elevation of TGF-β1, MAPKs, and myostatin is linked to various features of muscle pathology, including impaired regeneration and atrophy. In this review, we focus on the aberrant signaling of TGF-β in various disorders such as Marfan syndrome, muscular dystrophies, sarcopenia, and critical illness myopathy. We also discuss how the inhibition of several members of the TGF-β signaling pathway has been implicated in ameliorating disease phenotypes, opening up novel therapeutic avenues for a large group of neuromuscular disorders. PMID:21798096

  3. The evolution of capture myopathy in hooved mammals: a model for human stress cardiomyopathy?

    PubMed Central

    Blumstein, Daniel T.; Buckner, Janet; Shah, Sajan; Patel, Shane; Alfaro, Michael E.; Natterson-Horowitz, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives: Capture myopathy (CM) syndromes in wildlife may be a model for human stress cardiomyopathy, including Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Emotional stress or grief may trigger heart attack-like symptoms, and occasionally, sudden death in some humans. Similarly, wildlife exposed to predatory stresses, chase, or capture occasionally results in sudden death. To better understand the nature of vulnerability to stress-induced sudden death, we studied cases of CM in hooved mammals—ungulates—and hypothesized that CM would be associated with a syndrome of longevity-related traits. Methodology: We reconstructed the evolution of CM in ungulates then determined how a set of life history traits explained variation in the likelihood that CM was reported. Results: CM is broadly reported, but not in all genera, and phylogenetic analyses suggest that it is an evolutionarily labile trait. We found that the following traits were significantly associated with reports of CM: greater brain mass, faster maximum running speed, greater minimum group size and greater maximum longevity. Conclusions and implications: CM may be an unavoidable consequence of adaptations to reduce predation risk that include increased running speed, sociality and having larger brains. Moreover, longer-lived species seem to be more likely to be susceptible to CM. Exploring variable susceptibility to CM highlights the evolutionary origins of the disorder, potential basic mechanisms that underlie vulnerability to the phenomenon, and the potential for reduction of risk through modification of life history trajectory. PMID:26198189

  4. Inflammatory myopathy with severe tongue atrophy in Pembroke Welsh Corgi dogs.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Kaoru; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Matsuki, Naoaki; Sakai, Hideo; Kitagawa, Masato; Saito, Miyoko; Sasaki, Jun; Nakayama, Hiroyuki

    2010-11-01

    A disease characterized by tongue and facial muscle atrophy has been recognized sporadically among Pembroke Welsh Corgi (PWC) dogs in Japan. The present study describes the pathologic findings of this canine syndrome. Histopathologic examinations were performed in 2 dogs, including a case of muscular biopsy. Identification and characterization of autoantibodies were attempted by fluorescent antibody test (FAT) and Western blot (WB) by using sera from 7 PWC dogs with typical clinical features, 6 PWC dogs with other clinical signs, and 2 from other breeds with polymyositis. Clinically, the 7 affected PWC dogs exhibited dysphagia with severe tongue atrophy, facial muscular atrophy, and occasional walking difficulty. Histopathologic examinations of the 2 dogs with clinical symptoms revealed moderate to severe inflammatory lesions characterized by lymphohistiocytic infiltration and muscular atrophy in the tongue and/or femoral muscles. The tongue lesions were very severe and accompanied by diffuse fatty infiltration. There were no major lesions in the nervous tissues examined. By FAT, an autoantibody against the cross striation of skeletal muscle was detected in sera from 5 affected PWC dogs. By using WB analysis, the autoantibodies recognized a 42-kDa molecule in striated muscle but not in the nervous tissues. All of the findings indicated that the unique disease of PWC dogs might be generalized inflammatory myopathy, whereas the detailed etiology concerning the dominant involvement of tongue muscles and the role of the autoantibody in the canine disease remain to be clarified. PMID:21088170

  5. Diabetes in the young - a case of Alström syndrome with myopathy.

    PubMed

    Bronson, S C; Anand Moses, C R; Periyandavar, I; Dharmarajan, P; Suresh, E; Shanmugam, A; Vasuki, R; Venkatesh, D; Amudha, J

    2015-03-01

    Alström syndrome is a rare ciliopathy affecting about 1 in 1,000,000 individuals. It is characterised by cone-rod dystrophy, insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus, cardiomyopathy, renal failure and hypogonadism. Progressive multi-organ dysfunction eventually leads to death. Only about 800 patients with this disorder have been identified so far. The diagnosis of Alström syndrome is critical as it can easily be overlooked because of the many features it shares with metabolic syndrome. The gene affected in this autosomal recessive disease is ALMS1, the protein product of which is involved in intracellular trafficking and ciliary function. Alström syndrome is being studied as a model which would potentially shed light on the pathophysiology of diabetes mellitus. In this report, we describe a patient with features of Alström syndrome and a clinical picture suggestive of a recurrent, severe, steroid responsive myopathy which, to the best of our knowledge, has not been reported so far. PMID:25874828

  6. Exercise myopathy: changes in myofibrils of fast-twitch muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Kaasik, P; Umnova, M; Seene, T

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the relationships between the changes of myofibrils in fast-twitch oxidative-glycolytic (type IIA) fibres and fast-twitch glycolytic (type IIB) muscle fibres, protein synthesis and degradation rate in exercise-induced myopathic skeletal muscle. Exhaustive exercise was used to induce myopathy in Wistar rats. Intensity of glycogenolysis in muscle fibres during exercise, protein synthesis rate, degradation rate and structural changes of myofibrils were measured using morphological and biochemical methods. Myofibril cross sectional area (CSA) in type IIA fibres decreased 33% and type IIB fibres 44%. Protein degradation rate increased in both type IIA and IIB fibres, 63% and 69% respectively in comparison with the control group. According to the intensity of glycogenolysis, fast oxidative-glycolytic fibres are recruited more frequently during overtraining. Myofibrils in both types of fast-twitch myopathic muscle fibres are significantly thinner as the result of more intensive protein degradation. Regeneration capacity according to the presence of satellite cells is higher in type IIA fibres than in type IIB fibres in myopathic muscle. PMID:25177093

  7. [Pulmonary thromboembolism as a late complication of mitochondrial myopathy (Kearns-Sayer syndrome ].

    PubMed

    Fijołek, Justyna; Wiatr, Elzbieta; Wiechecka, Anna; Torbicki, Adam; Biederman, Andrzej; Mickielewicz, Anatol; Roszkowski-Sliz, Kazimierz

    2003-01-01

    A case of pulmonary thromboembolism with transient pulmonary hypertension of a rare cause is presented. In 24-year-old woman myasthenia was recognised on the ground of ptosis and fixation of eyes muscles from the 14th year of age. The treatment with mestinon was ineffective. Before planned thymectomy serious disturbances of heart rhythm and conduction were confirmed. Stimulator was implanted and thymectomy was done. No improvement of neurological state was observed despite the treatment with mestinone and prednisone. When she was 30 years old disease of lung appeared with fever, cough and parenchymal and pleural lesions of right lung. Antibiotic therapy was ineffective. CT scan and US examination revealed large thrombus inside the right auricle connected with stimulator electrodes. Embolisation of right pulmonary arteria was confirmed also. Treatment with heparin was ineffective and thrombectomy was performed. Exact neurological examination stated that the patient had no typical symptoms of myasthenia and that symptoms related with eyes and heart could be result of mitochondrial myopathy. Diagnosis was confirmed by EMG examination and muscle biopsy. PMID:15052981

  8. Two Desmin Gene Mutations Associated with Myofibrillar Myopathies in Polish Families

    PubMed Central

    Berdynski, Mariusz; Sikorska, Agata; Filipek, Slawomir; Redowicz, Maria Jolanta; Kaminska, Anna; Zekanowski, Cezary

    2014-01-01

    Desmin is a muscle-specific intermediate filament protein which forms a network connecting the sarcomere, T tubules, sarcolemma, nuclear membrane, mitochondria and other organelles. Mutations in the gene coding for desmin (DES) cause skeletal myopathies often combined with cardiomyopathy, or isolated cardiomyopathies. The molecular pathomechanisms of the disease remain ambiguous. Here, we describe and comprehensively characterize two DES mutations found in Polish patients with a clinical diagnosis of desminopathy. The study group comprised 16 individuals representing three families. Two mutations were identified: a novel missense mutation (Q348P) and a small deletion of nine nucleotides (A357_E359del), previously described by us in the Polish population. A common ancestry of all the families bearing the A357_E359del mutation was confirmed. Both mutations were predicted to be pathogenic using a bioinformatics approach, including molecular dynamics simulations which helped to rationalize abnormal behavior at molecular level. To test the impact of the mutations on DES expression and the intracellular distribution of desmin muscle biopsies were investigated. Elevated desmin levels as well as its atypical localization in muscle fibers were observed. Additional staining for M-cadherin, α-actinin, and myosin heavy chains confirmed severe disruption of myofibrill organization. The abnormalities were more prominent in the Q348P muscle, where both small atrophic fibers as well large fibers with centrally localized nuclei were observed. We propose that the mutations affect desmin structure and cause its aberrant folding and subsequent aggregation, triggering disruption of myofibrils organization. PMID:25541946

  9. Phenotypic expansion of visceral myopathy associated with ACTG2 tandem base substitution.

    PubMed

    Klar, Joakim; Raykova, Doroteya; Gustafson, Elisabet; Tóthová, Iveta; Ameur, Adam; Wanders, Alkwin; Dahl, Niklas

    2015-12-01

    Familial visceral myopathy (FVM) is a rare heritable and heterogeneous condition due to impaired smooth muscle function. We identified a family segregating 11 individuals with a spectrum of visceral symptoms involving the small intestine, colon, biliary tract, urinary tract and uterus. Whole-exome sequencing revealed a novel heterozygous tandem base substitution c.806_807delinsAA (p.(Gly269Glu)) in ACTG2, encoding smooth muscle actin γ-2, in affected family members. Variants in ACTG2 were recently identified in FVM with intestinal pseudo-obstruction as well as with the congenital megacystics-microcolon-intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome. In our family, eight affected members presented with severe complications from the biliary and/or the urinary tracts in addition to gastrointestinal pseudo-obstructions. Furthermore, all affected mothers had a history of assisted deliveries owing to poor progress during labor and weak uterine contractions. The variable involvement of multiple smooth muscle-dependent organs in our family, including the biliary tract and the uterus, add to the phenotypic spectrum associated with ACTG2 missense variants. PMID:25782675

  10. Critical illness myopathy and polyneuropathy - A challenge for physiotherapists in the intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Pattanshetty, Renu B; Gaude, Gajanan S

    2011-04-01

    The development of critical patient related generalized neuromuscular weakness, referred to as critical illness polyneuropathy (CIP) and critical illness myopathy (CIM), is a major complication in patients admitted to intensive care units (ICU). Both CIP and CIM cause muscle weakness and paresis in critically ill patients during their ICU stay. Early mobilization or kinesiotherapy have shown muscle weakness reversion in critically ill patients providing faster return to function, reducing weaning time, and length of hospitalization. Exercises in the form of passive, active, and resisted forms have proved to improve strength and psychological well being. Clinical trials using neuromuscular electrical stimulation to increase muscle mass, muscle strength and improve blood circulation to the surrounding tissue have proved beneficial. The role of electrical stimulation is unproven as yet. Recent evidence indicates no difference between treated and untreated muscles. Future research is recommended to conduct clinical trials using neuromuscular electrical stimulation, exercises, and early mobilization as a treatment protocol in larger populations of patients in ICU. PMID:21814370

  11. [Higher Brain Dysfunction in Mitochondrial Myopathy, Encephalopathy, Lactic Acidosis and Stroke-Like Episodes (MELAS)].

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Hiroo

    2016-02-01

    Stroke-like episodes are one of the cardinal features of mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), and occur in 84-99% of the patients. The affected areas detected on neuroimaging do not have classical vascular distribution, and involve predominantly the temporal, parietal and occipital lobes. Thus, the neurological symptoms including higher brain dysfunction correlate with this topographical distribution. In association with the occipital lobe involvement, the most frequent symptom is cortical blindness. Other symptoms have been occasionally reported in case reports: visual agnosia, prosopagnosia, cortical deafness, auditory agnosia, topographical disorientation, various types of aphasia, hemispatial neglect, and so on. On the other hand, cognitive decline associated with more diffuse brain impairment rather than with focal stroke-like lesions has been postulated. This condition is also known as mitochondrial dementia. Domains of cognitive dysfunction include abstract reasoning, verbal memory, visual memory, language (naming and fluency), executive or constructive functions, attention, and visuospatial function. Cognitive functions and intellectual abilities may decline from initially minimal cognitive impairment to dementia. To date, the neuropsychological and neurologic impairment has been reported to be associated with cerebral lactic acidosis as estimated by ventricular spectroscopic lactate levels. PMID:26873235

  12. Mutations in FAM111B Cause Hereditary Fibrosing Poikiloderma with Tendon Contracture, Myopathy, and Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Mercier, Sandra; Küry, Sébastien; Shaboodien, Gasnat; Houniet, Darren T.; Khumalo, Nonhlanhla P.; Bou-Hanna, Chantal; Bodak, Nathalie; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; David, Albert; Faivre, Laurence; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Gherardi, Romain K.; Glen, Elise; Hamel, Antoine; Laboisse, Christian; Le Caignec, Cédric; Lindenbaum, Pierre; Magot, Armelle; Munnich, Arnold; Mussini, Jean-Marie; Pillay, Komala; Rahman, Thahira; Redon, Richard; Salort-Campana, Emmanuelle; Santibanez-Koref, Mauro; Thauvin, Christel; Barbarot, Sébastien; Keavney, Bernard; Bézieau, Stéphane; Mayosi, Bongani M.

    2013-01-01

    Congenital poikiloderma is characterized by a combination of mottled pigmentation, telangiectasia, and epidermal atrophy in the first few months of life. We have previously described a South African European-descent family affected by a rare autosomal-dominant form of hereditary fibrosing poikiloderma accompanied by tendon contracture, myopathy, and pulmonary fibrosis. Here, we report the identification of causative mutations in FAM111B by whole-exome sequencing. In total, three FAM111B missense mutations were identified in five kindreds of different ethnic backgrounds. The mutation segregated with the disease in one large pedigree, and mutations were de novo in two other pedigrees. All three mutations were absent from public databases and were not observed on Sanger sequencing of 388 ethnically matched control subjects. The three single-nucleotide mutations code for amino acid changes that are clustered within a putative trypsin-like cysteine/serine peptidase domain of FAM111B. These findings provide evidence of the involvement of FAM111B in congenital poikiloderma and multisystem fibrosis. PMID:24268661

  13. A Tropomyosin-2 Mutation Suppresses a Troponin I Myopathy in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Naimi, Benyoussef; Harrison, Andrew; Cummins, Mark; Nongthomba, Upendra; Clark, Samantha; Canal, Inmaculada; Ferrus, Alberto; Sparrow, John C.

    2001-01-01

    A suppressor mutation, D53, of the held-up2 allele of the Drosophila melanogaster Troponin I (wupA) gene is described. D53, a missense mutation, S185F, of the tropomyosin-2, Tm2, gene fully suppresses all the phenotypic effects of held-up2, including the destructive hypercontraction of the indirect flight muscles (IFMs), a lack of jumping, the progressive myopathy of the walking muscles, and reductions in larval crawling and feeding behavior. The suppressor restores normal function of the IFMs, but flight ability decreases with age and correlates with an unusual, progressive structural collapse of the myofibrillar lattice starting at the center. The S185F substitution in Tm2 is close to a troponin T binding site on tropomyosin. Models to explain suppression by D53, derived from current knowledge of the vertebrate troponin-tropomyosin complex structure and functions, are discussed. The effects of S185F are compared with those of two mutations in residues 175 and 180 of human α-tropomyosin 1 which cause familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). PMID:11359941

  14. Differential involvement of sarcomeric proteins in myofibrillar myopathies: a morphological and immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Claeys, Kristl G; van der Ven, Peter F M; Behin, Anthony; Stojkovic, Tanya; Eymard, Bruno; Dubourg, Odile; Laforêt, Pascal; Faulkner, Georgine; Richard, Pascale; Vicart, Patrick; Romero, Norma B; Stoltenburg, Gisela; Udd, Bjarne; Fardeau, Michel; Voit, Thomas; Fürst, Dieter O

    2009-03-01

    Myofibrillar myopathies (MFMs) are rare inherited or sporadic progressive neuromuscular disorders with considerable clinical and genetic heterogeneity. In the current study, we have analyzed histopathological and immunohistochemical characteristics in genetically identified MFMs. We performed a morphological and morphometrical study in a cohort of 24 genetically identified MFM patients (12 desmin, 6 alphaB-crystallin, 4 ZASP, 2 myotilin), and an extensive immunohistochemical study in 15 of these patients, using both well-known and novel antibodies directed against distinct compartments of the muscle fibers, including Z-disc and M-band proteins. Our morphological data revealed some significant differences between the distinct MFM subgroups: the consistent presence of 'rubbed-out' fibers in desminopathies and alphaB-crystallinopathies, an elevated frequency of vacuoles in ZASPopathies and myotilinopathies, and the presence of a few necrotic fibers in the two myotilinopathy patients. Immunohistochemistry showed that in MFM only a subset of Z-disc proteins, such as filamin C and its ligands myotilin and Xin, exhibited significant alterations in their localization, whereas other Z-disc proteins like alpha-actinin, myopodin and tritopodin, did not. In contrast, M-band proteins revealed no abnormalities in MFM. We conclude that the presence of 'rubbed-out' fibers are a suggestive feature for desminopathy or alphaB-crystallinopathy, and that MFM is not a general disease of the myofibril, but primarily affects a subgroup of stress-responsive Z-disc proteins. PMID:19151983

  15. Vitamin D Receptor Gene Polymorphisms and Haplotypes in Hungarian Patients with Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Griger, Zoltán; Dankó, Katalin

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies are autoimmune diseases characterized by symmetrical proximal muscle weakness. Our aim was to identify a correlation between VDR polymorphisms or haplotypes and myositis. We studied VDR-BsmI, VDR-ApaI, VDR-TaqI, and VDR-FokI polymorphisms and haplotypes in 89 Hungarian poly-/dermatomyositis patients (69 females) and 93 controls (52 females). We did not obtain any significant differences for VDR-FokI, BsmI, ApaI, and TaqI genotypes and allele frequencies between patients with myositis and healthy individuals. There was no association of VDR polymorphisms with clinical manifestations and laboratory profiles in myositis patients. Men with myositis had a significantly different distribution of BB, Bb, and bb genotypes than female patients, control male individuals, and the entire control group. Distribution of TT, Tt, and tt genotypes was significantly different in males than in females in patient group. According to four-marker haplotype prevalence, frequencies of sixteen possible haplotypes showed significant differences between patient and control groups. The three most frequent haplotypes in patients were the fbAt, FBaT, and fbAT. Our findings may reveal that there is a significant association: Bb and Tt genotypes can be associated with myositis in the Hungarian population we studied. We underline the importance of our result in the estimated prevalence of four-marker haplotypes. PMID:25649962

  16. Dynamin GTPase Regulation is Altered by PH Domain Mutations Found in Centronuclear Myopathy Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Kenniston, J.; Lemmon, M

    2010-01-01

    The large GTPase dynamin has an important membrane scission function in receptor-mediated endocytosis and other cellular processes. Self-assembly on phosphoinositide-containing membranes stimulates dynamin GTPase activity, which is crucial for its function. Although the pleckstrin-homology (PH) domain is known to mediate phosphoinositide binding by dynamin, it remains unclear how this promotes activation. Here, we describe studies of dynamin PH domain mutations found in centronuclear myopathy (CNM) that increase dynamin's GTPase activity without altering phosphoinositide binding. CNM mutations in the PH domain C-terminal {alpha}-helix appear to cause conformational changes in dynamin that alter control of the GTP hydrolysis cycle. These mutations either 'sensitize' dynamin to lipid stimulation or elevate basal GTPase rates by promoting self-assembly and thus rendering dynamin no longer lipid responsive. We also describe a low-resolution structure of dimeric dynamin from small-angle X-ray scattering that reveals conformational changes induced by CNM mutations, and defines requirements for domain rearrangement upon dynamin self-assembly at membrane surfaces. Our data suggest that changes in the PH domain may couple lipid binding to dynamin GTPase activation at sites of vesicle invagination.

  17. Muscle proteomics reveals novel insights into the pathophysiological mechanisms of collagen VI myopathies.

    PubMed

    De Palma, Sara; Capitanio, Daniele; Vasso, Michele; Braghetta, Paola; Scotton, Chiara; Bonaldo, Paolo; Lochmüller, Hanns; Muntoni, Francesco; Ferlini, Alessandra; Gelfi, Cecilia

    2014-11-01

    Mutations in the collagen VI genes cause the Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD), with severe phenotype, and Bethlem myopathy (BM) with mild to moderate phenotype. Both, UCMD and BM patients show dystrophic features with degeneration/regeneration and replacement of muscle with fat and fibrous connective tissue. At molecular level, UCMD patients show autophagic impairment and increased PTP opening; these features are less severe in BM. To elucidate the biochemical mechanisms adopted by the muscle to adapt to collagen VI deficiency in BM and UCMD patients, a proteome analysis was carried out on human muscle biopsies. Qualitative and quantitative differences were assessed by 2D-DIGE coupled to MALDI-ToF/ToF MS. Proteomics results, coupled with immunoblotting, indicate changes in UPR, hexosamine pathway, and amino acid and fatty acid metabolism, suggesting an association of ER stress, metabolic dysregulation, autophagic impairment, and alteration in mechanotransduction signaling. Overall, these results indicate that despite the common downregulation of hexosamine pathway in UCMD and BM, in BM the protein quality control system is sustained by a metabolic adaptation supporting energy requirements for the maintenance of autophagy, counteracting ER misfolded protein overload. In UCMD, this multilayered system may be disrupted and worsened by the metabolic rewiring, which leads to lipotoxicity. PMID:25211533

  18. DNM2 mutations in a cohort of sporadic patients with centronuclear myopathy.

    PubMed

    Abath, Osorio; Martins, Cristiane de Araújo; Carvalho, Mary; Chadi, Gerson; Seitz, Katia Werneck; Oliveira, Acary Souza Bulle; Reed, Umbertina Conti; Laporte, Jocelyn; Zanoteli, Edmar

    2015-05-01

    Centronuclear myopathy (CNM) is a rare congenital muscle disease characterized by fibers with prominent centralized nuclei in muscle biopsies. The disease is clinically heterogeneous, ranging from severe neonatal hypotonic phenotypes to adult-onset mild muscle weakness, and can have multiple modes of inheritance in association with various genes, including MTM1, DNM2, BIN1 and RYR1. Here we analyzed 18 sporadic patients with clinical and histological diagnosis of CNM and sequenced the DNM2 gene, which codes for the dynamin 2 protein. We found DNM2 missense mutations in two patients, both in exon 8, one known (p.E368K) and one novel (p.F372C), which is found in a position of presumed pathogenicity and appeared de novo. The patients had similar phenotypes characterized by neonatal signs followed by improvement and late childhood reemergence of slowly progressive generalized muscle weakness, elongated face with ptosis and ophthalmoparesis, and histology showing fibers with radiating sarcoplasmic strands (RSS). These patients were the only ones in the series to present this histological marker, which together with previous reports in the literature suggest that, when RSS are present, direct sequencing of DNM2 mutation hot spot regions should be the first step in the molecular diagnosis of CNM, even in sporadic cases. PMID:26273216

  19. Vitamin D Receptor Agonists: Suitable Candidates as Novel Therapeutic Options in Autoimmune Inflammatory Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Crescioli, Clara

    2014-01-01

    The primary aim in the treatment of autoimmune inflammatory myopathies (IMs) is to recover muscle function. The presence of immune/inflammatory cell infiltrates within muscle tissues represents the common feature of different IM subtypes, albeit a correlation between muscular damage extent and inflammation degree is often lacking. Treatments for IMs are based on life-long immunosuppressive therapy, with the well known adverse effects; recovery is incomplete for many patients. More effective therapies, with reduced side-effects, are highly desirable. Vitamin D receptor (VDR) agonists emerge to retain pleiotropic anti-inflammatory properties, since they regulate innate and adaptive immunity by switching the immune response from proinflammatory T helper 1 (Th1) type to tolerogenic T helper 2 (Th2) type dominance. In skeletal muscle cells less hypercalcemic VDR ligands target powerful mediators of inflammation, such as TNFα and TNFα driven paths, without affecting immune or muscle cells viability, retaining the potentiality to counteract Th1 driven overreactivity established by the self-enhancing inflammatory loop between immune and skeletal muscle cells. This review summarizes those features of VDR agonists as candidates in future treatment of IM. PMID:24895631

  20. Cardiac and skeletal myopathy in Fabry disease: a clinicopathologic correlative study.

    PubMed

    Chimenti, Cristina; Padua, Luca; Pazzaglia, Costanza; Morgante, Emanuela; Centurion, Carlos; Antuzzi, Daniela; Russo, Matteo A; Frustaci, Andrea

    2012-09-01

    Skeletal muscle disturbances are commonly reported in patients with Fabry disease. Whether they derive from cardiac dysfunction or direct muscle involvement is still unclear. Clinical, noninvasive, and invasive cardiac and muscle studies, including an endomyocardial and muscle biopsy, were obtained in 12 patients (mean age, 42.1 ± 12.6 years; range, 24-58 years) with Fabry disease. In the youngest patients (group A, 4 men aged <35 years), results of cardiac and skeletal noninvasive studies were normal, except for reduced velocities in tissue Doppler imaging. Histologic examination indicated that muscle myocytes were unaffected, whereas muscle vessels showed the presence of mild glycosphingolipid accumulation in endothelial and smooth muscle cells. In the heart, cardiomyocytes and endothelial and smooth muscle cells of intramural cardiac vessels were involved by the disease. The oldest patients (group B, 6 men and 2 women aged >35 years) showed ultrasound muscle disarray and electromyography signs of myopathy, increased left ventricular mass, and normal cardiac function. Histologic examination showed that muscle myocytes contained mild glycosphingolipid accumulation compared with severe engulfment of cardiomyocytes. Moreover, similar infiltration of myocardial and muscle intramural vessels, causing lumen narrowing and fibrofatty tissue replacement, was observed. Direct muscle involvement occurs in patients with Fabry disease. It is milder and delayed compared with that in the heart. The difference in organ function and the need of residual α-galactosidase A activity are the likely causes. PMID:22406371

  1. Muscle inactivation of mTOR causes metabolic and dystrophin defects leading to severe myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Risson, Valérie; Mazelin, Laetitia; Roceri, Mila; Sanchez, Hervé; Moncollin, Vincent; Corneloup, Claudine; Richard-Bulteau, Hélène; Vignaud, Alban; Baas, Dominique; Defour, Aurélia; Freyssenet, Damien; Tanti, Jean-François; Le-Marchand-Brustel, Yannick; Ferrier, Bernard; Conjard-Duplany, Agnès; Romanino, Klaas; Bauché, Stéphanie; Hantaï, Daniel; Mueller, Matthias; Kozma, Sara C.; Thomas, George; Rüegg, Markus A.; Ferry, Arnaud; Pende, Mario; Bigard, Xavier; Koulmann, Nathalie

    2009-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a key regulator of cell growth that associates with raptor and rictor to form the mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTORC2, respectively. Raptor is required for oxidative muscle integrity, whereas rictor is dispensable. In this study, we show that muscle-specific inactivation of mTOR leads to severe myopathy, resulting in premature death. mTOR-deficient muscles display metabolic changes similar to those observed in muscles lacking raptor, including impaired oxidative metabolism, altered mitochondrial regulation, and glycogen accumulation associated with protein kinase B/Akt hyperactivation. In addition, mTOR-deficient muscles exhibit increased basal glucose uptake, whereas whole body glucose homeostasis is essentially maintained. Importantly, loss of mTOR exacerbates the myopathic features in both slow oxidative and fast glycolytic muscles. Moreover, mTOR but not raptor and rictor deficiency leads to reduced muscle dystrophin content. We provide evidence that mTOR controls dystrophin transcription in a cell-autonomous, rapamycin-resistant, and kinase-independent manner. Collectively, our results demonstrate that mTOR acts mainly via mTORC1, whereas regulation of dystrophin is raptor and rictor independent. PMID:20008564

  2. Immunocytochemical study of CD45 T cell isoforms in inflammatory myopathies.

    PubMed Central

    De Bleecker, J. L.; Engel, A. G.

    1995-01-01

    The CD45RO and CD45RA antigens subdivide the CD8+ and the CD4+ T cells into primed memory cells and unprimed virgin T cells, respectively. To assess the relative abundance of the CD8+ and the CD4+ T cells expressing the two CD45 isoforms in the major inflammatory myopathies, we immunophenotyped T cells in muscle specimens from patients with inclusion body myositis, polymyositis (PM), and dermatomyositis. The analysis was according to diagnosis and sites of cell accumulation: endomysial inflammatory cells focally surrounding and invading nonnecrotic fibers were analyzed in inclusion body myositis and PM and perivascular infiltrates in PM and dermatomyositis. In all diseases and at all sites of accumulation, the CD45RO+ memory T cells were predominant and the CD45RO/CD45RA ratio exceeded that in normal blood. In PM and inclusion body myositis, the marked enrichment of endomysial T cells in memory cells implicates these cells in the pathogenesis. The enrichment of perivascular T cells in dermatomyositis and PM in memory cells may be a result of enhanced transendothelial migratory capacity of these cells; alternatively, the virgin-to-memory cell conversion may occur after diapedesis. Images Figure 11 Figure 2 PMID:7747812

  3. Developments in the Classification and Treatment of the Juvenile Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Rider, Lisa G.; Katz, James D.; Jones, Olcay Y.

    2013-01-01

    The juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (JIIM) are rare, heterogeneous autoimmune diseases that share chronic muscle inflammation and weakness. JIIM broadly includes three major clinicopathologic groups: juvenile dermatomyositis, juvenile polymyositis, and overlap myositis. A growing spectrum of clinicopathologic groups and serologic phenotypes defined by the presence of myositis-specific or myositis-associated autoantibodies are now recognized, each with differing demographics, clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, and prognoses. With the first multi-center collaborative studies and controlled trials using standardized preliminarily validated outcome measures, the therapy of juvenile myositis has advanced. Although daily oral corticosteroids remain the backbone of treatment, disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are almost always used as adjunctive therapy. Methotrexate is the conventional DMARD for the initial therapy, either alone or combined with intravenous pulse methylprednisolone, and/or intravenous immunoglobulin for patients with moderate to severe disease. Cyclosporine may be added to these or serve as an alternative to methotrexate. Other drugs and biologic therapies, including mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus, cyclophosphamide, rituximab, and infliximab, might benefit selected patients with recalcitrant disease, unacceptable steroid toxicity, or patients with risk factors for poor prognosis. The treatment of cutaneous disease, calcinosis, and the role for rehabilitation are also discussed. PMID:24182859

  4. Limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B masquerading as inflammatory myopathy: case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B is a rare subtype of muscular dystrophy, the predominant feature of which is muscle weakness. The disease is caused by an autosomal recessively inherited reduction/absence of muscle dysferlin due to a mutation in dysferlin gene at 2p12-14. We report a 10 year old boy who presented with severe non-transient right knee pain and swelling, which later became bilateral. His pain was worst in the morning and during rest. Blood tests revealed markedly raised creatine kinase values (highest 22, 297 U/l), raising the possibility of an inflammatory myositis. MRI showed bilateral asymmetrical muscle involvement of thighs and calves with oedematous changes mimicking the imaging appearances of inflammatory myositis. CRP and ESR levels were consistently within normal limits. Over several months his knee pain worsened and limited walking. Muscle biopsy revealed a severe reduction of dysferlin immunostaining, indicating the diagnosis, which was confirmed by 2 compound heterozygous pathogenic mutations in the dysferlin gene. It is not unusual for this subtype of the disease to mimic myositis: however, significant pain is a rare presenting symptom. Given the significant overlap between this form of muscular dystrophy and inflammatory myopathies, a high index of suspicion is needed to ensure an accurate and timely diagnosis. Furthermore, characteristic inflammatory-related morning pain should not rule out consideration of non-inflammatory causes. PMID:23641709

  5. Blockade of ActRIIB Signaling Triggers Muscle Fatigability and Metabolic Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Relizani, Karima; Mouisel, Etienne; Giannesini, Benoit; Hourdé, Christophe; Patel, Ketan; Morales Gonzalez, Susanne; Jülich, Kristina; Vignaud, Alban; Piétri-Rouxel, France; Fortin, Dominique; Garcia, Luis; Blot, Stéphane; Ritvos, Olli; Bendahan, David; Ferry, Arnaud; Ventura-Clapier, Renée; Schuelke, Markus; Amthor, Helge

    2014-01-01

    Myostatin regulates skeletal muscle size via the activin receptor IIB (ActRIIB). However, its effect on muscle energy metabolism and energy-dependent muscle function remains largely unexplored. This question needs to be solved urgently since various therapies for neuromuscular diseases based on blockade of ActRIIB signaling are being developed. Here, we show in mice, that 4-month pharmacological abrogation of ActRIIB signaling by treatment with soluble ActRIIB-Fc triggers extreme muscle fatigability. This is associated with elevated serum lactate levels and a severe metabolic myopathy in the mdx mouse, an animal model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Blockade of ActRIIB signaling downregulates porin, a crucial ADP/ATP shuttle between cytosol and mitochondrial matrix leading to a consecutive deficiency of oxidative phosphorylation as measured by in vivo Phophorus Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (31P-MRS). Further, ActRIIB blockade reduces muscle capillarization, which further compounds the metabolic stress. We show that ActRIIB regulates key determinants of muscle metabolism, such as Pparβ, Pgc1α, and Pdk4 thereby optimizing different components of muscle energy metabolism. In conclusion, ActRIIB signaling endows skeletal muscle with high oxidative capacity and low fatigability. The severe metabolic side effects following ActRIIB blockade caution against deploying this strategy, at least in isolation, for treatment of neuromuscular disorders. PMID:24861054

  6. X-linked myotubular myopathy: clinical observations in ten additional cases.

    PubMed

    Joseph, M; Pai, G S; Holden, K R; Herman, G

    1995-11-01

    X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM) is a recessively inherited disorder, lethal to males in the first months of life. Since the first report in 1969, at least 90 cases have been described in the literature. Diagnosis is confirmed by muscle biopsy. Linkage studies have localized the disorder to the Xq28 region, close to the loci for X-linked hydrocephalus and MASA syndrome. We report on 10 additional cases of XLMTM from six different families. In addition to classic clinical features of XLMTM, our patients showed interesting associated findings which included birth length > 90th centile and large head circumference with or without hydrocephalus in 70%, narrow, elongated face in 80%, and slender, long digits in 60% of cases. There was concordance in the occurrence and severity of hydrocephalus in most sib pairs. These features in a "floppy" male infant serve as clues for early clinical diagnosis of XLMTM, which can then be confirmed by muscle biopsy. Development of polyhydramnios was observed in the third trimester of an at-risk dizygotic twin gestation monitored by serial sonography with confirmation of XLMTM at birth. PMID:8588581

  7. Clinical, pathological and genetic characteristics of autosomal dominant inherited dynamin 2 centronuclear myopathy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinhong; Wu, Huamin; Gong, Jian; Wang, Tao; Yan, Chuanzhu

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to report on a family with pathologically and genetically diagnosed autosomal dominant inherited centronuclear myopathy (CNM). In addition, this study aimed to investigate the clinical, pathological and molecular genetic characteristics of the disease. This pedigree was traced back three generations, four patients underwent neurological examination, two patients underwent muscle biopsy, and eight family members were subjected to dynamin 2 (DNM2) gene mutation analysis. DNM2 mutations were detected in seven family members, of which four patients exhibited DNM2 mutation‑specific clinical and pathological features. Lower extremity weakness was the predominant symptom of these patients, however, proximal and distal lower extremity involvement was inconsistent. All patients exhibited marked systematic muscle atrophy and various degrees of facial muscle involvement. The patients presented the typical pathological changes of CNM, and their muscle tissues were heavily replaced by adipose tissue, with clustered distribution of muscle fibers as another notable feature. DNM2‑CNM patients of this pedigree exhibited heterogeneous clinical and pathological features, providing a basis for further molecular genetic analysis. PMID:27035234

  8. Hemolysis, myopathy, and cardiac disease associated with hereditary phosphofructokinase deficiency in two Whippets

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Karen; Harvey, John W.; D'Agorne, Sara; Wood, Jonathan; Giger, Urs

    2009-01-01

    Two male castrated Whippet littermates were presented at 1 year of age for pallor, tachycardia, systolic heart murmur, dark yellow to orange feces, intermittent lethargy, pigmenturia, and muscle shivering or cramping after exercise. Persistent macrocytic hypochromic anemia with marked reticulocytosis and metarubricytosis was found when CBC results were compared with reference values for Whippets. Increased serum creatine kinase activity and hyperkalemia also were sometimes present over the 4-year period of evaluation. Progressively increasing serum concentrations of N-terminal prohormone brain natriuretic peptide suggested cardiac disease. Erythrocytes from the whippets were less osmotically fragile but more alkaline fragile than those from control dogs. Erythrocyte phosphofructokinase (PFK) activities and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate concentrations were decreased. Restriction enzyme-based DNA test screening and DNA sequencing revealed the same mutation in the muscle-PFK gene of the Whippets as seen in English Springer Spaniel dogs with PFK deficiency. This is the first report of PFK deficiency in Whippet dogs. In addition to causing hemolysis and exertional myopathy, heart disease may be a prominent clinical component of PFK deficiency in this breed and has not been previously recognized in PFK-deficient English Springer Spaniels. PMID:19228357

  9. Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) in Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathy: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Regardt, Malin; Wojcik, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is a research priority in chronic diseases. We undertook a systematic review (registration #CRD42015024939) to identify, appraise and synthesize the evidence relating to HRQoL in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM). A comprehensive search was conducted in August 2015 using CINAHL, EMBase and Pubmed to identify studies reporting original data on HRQoL in IIM using generic HRQoL instruments. Characteristics of samples and results from selected studies were extracted and appraised using a standardized approach. Qualitative synthesis of the results was performed. Ten studies including a total of 654 IIM subjects were included in this systematic review. HRQoL was significantly impaired in all subsets of IIM compared with the general population. Disease activity, disease damage and chronic disease course were associated with poorer HRQoL. Insufficient or conflicting results were found in associations between clinical features, treatment, disease duration and mood or illness perception, and HRQoL in IIM. This study suggests that HRQoL is impaired in IIM. However, due to the paucity and heterogeneity of the evidence to date, robust estimates are lacking and significant knowledge gaps persist. There is a need for studies that systematically investigate the correlates and trajectory of HRQoL in IIM. PMID:27504827

  10. Orai1 deficiency leads to heart failure and skeletal myopathy in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Völkers, Mirko; Dolatabadi, Nima; Gude, Natalie; Most, Patrick; Sussman, Mark A; Hassel, David

    2012-01-15

    Mutations in the store-operated Ca²⁺ entry pore protein ORAI1 have been reported to cause myopathies in human patients but the mechanism involved is not known. Cardiomyocytes express ORAI1 but its role in heart function is also unknown. Using reverse genetics in zebrafish, we demonstrated that inactivation of the highly conserved zebrafish orthologue of ORAI1 resulted in severe heart failure, reduced ventricular systolic function, bradycardia and skeletal muscle weakness. Electron microscopy of Orai1-deficient myocytes revealed progressive skeletal muscle instability with loss of myofiber integrity and ultrastructural abnormalities of the z-disc in both skeletal and cardiac muscle. Isolated Orai1-deficient cardiomyocytes showed loss of the calcineurin-associated protein calsarcin from the z-discs. Furthermore, we found mechanosignal transduction was affected in Orai1-depleted hearts, indicating an essential role for ORAI1 in establishing the cardiac signaling transduction machinery at the z-disc. Our findings identify ORAI1 as an important regulator of cardiac and skeletal muscle function and provide evidence linking ORAI1-mediated calcium signaling to sarcomere integrity and cardiomyocyte function. PMID:22302996

  11. Acute nephritic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Glomerulonephritis - acute; Acute glomerulonephritis; Nephritis syndrome - acute ... Acute nephritic syndrome is often caused by an immune response triggered by an infection or other disease. Common causes ...

  12. Association Between SLCO1B1 Gene T521C Polymorphism and Statin-Related Myopathy Risk

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Qingtao; Li, Sheyu; Li, Ling; Li, Yun; Sun, Xin; Tian, Haoming

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Statin-related myopathy is an important adverse effect of statin which is classically unpredictable. The evidence of association between solute carrier organic anion transporter 1B1 (SLCO1B1) gene T521C polymorphism and statin-related myopathy risk remained controversial. This study aimed to investigate this genetic association. Databases of PubMed, EMBASE, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Chinese Scientific Journals Database, and Wanfang Data were searched till June 17, 2015. Case-control studies investigating the association between SLCO1B1 gene T521C polymorphism and statin-related myopathy risk were included. The Newcastle–Ottawa Scale (NOS) was used for assessing the quality of included studies. Data were pooled by odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Nine studies with 1360 cases and 3082 controls were included. Cases of statin-related myopathy were found to be significantly associated with the variant C allele (TC + CC vs TT: OR = 2.09, 95% CI = 1.27–3.43, P = 0.003; C vs T: OR = 2.10, 95% CI = 1.43–3.09, P < 0.001), especially when statin-related myopathy was defined as an elevation of creatine kinase (CK) >10 times the upper limit of normal (ULN) or rhabdomyolysis (TC + CC vs TT: OR = 3.83, 95% CI = 1.41–10.39, P = 0.008; C vs T: OR = 2.94, 95% CI = 1.47–5.89, P = 0.002). When stratified by statin type, the association was significant in individuals receiving simvastatin (TC + CC vs TT: OR = 3.09, 95% CI = 1.64–5.85, P = 0.001; C vs T: OR = 3.00, 95% CI = 1.38–6.49, P = 0.005), but not in those receiving atorvastatin (TC + CC vs TT: OR = 1.31, 95% CI = 0.74–2.30, P = 0.35; C vs T: OR = 1.33, 95% CI = 0.57–3.12, P = 0.52). The available evidence suggests that SLCO1B1 gene T521C polymorphism is associated with an increased risk of

  13. An X-Linked Myopathy with Postural Muscle Atrophy and Generalized Hypertrophy, Termed XMPMA, Is Caused by Mutations in FHL1

    PubMed Central

    Windpassinger, Christian; Schoser, Benedikt; Straub, Volker; Hochmeister, Sonja; Noor, Abdul; Lohberger, Birgit; Farra, Natalie; Petek, Erwin; Schwarzbraun, Thomas; Ofner, Lisa; Löscher, Wolfgang N.; Wagner, Klaus; Lochmüller, Hanns; Vincent, John B.; Quasthoff, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Summary We have identified a large multigenerational Austrian family displaying a novel form of X-linked recessive myopathy. Affected individuals develop an adult-onset scapulo-axio-peroneal myopathy with bent-spine syndrome characterized by specific atrophy of postural muscles along with pseudoathleticism or hypertrophy and cardiac involvement. Known X-linked myopathies were excluded by simple-tandem-repeat polymorphism (STRP) and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis, direct gene sequencing, and immunohistochemical analysis. STRP analysis revealed significant linkage at Xq25–q27.1. Haplotype analysis based on SNP microarray data from selected family members confirmed this linkage region on the distal arm of the X chromosome, thereby narrowing down the critical interval to 12 Mb. Sequencing of functional candidate genes led to the identification of a missense mutation within the four and a half LIM domain 1 gene (FHL1), which putatively disrupts the fourth LIM domain of the protein. Mutation screening of FHL1 in a myopathy family from the UK exhibiting an almost identical phenotype revealed a 3 bp insertion mutation within the second LIM domain. FHL1 on Xq26.3 is highly expressed in skeletal and cardiac muscles. Western-blot analysis of muscle biopsies showed a marked decrease in protein expression of FHL1 in patients, in concordance with the genetic data. In summary, we have to our knowledge characterized a new disorder, X-linked myopathy with postural muscle atrophy (XMPMA), and identified FHL1 as the causative gene. This is the first FHL protein to be identified in conjunction with a human genetic disorder and further supports the role of FHL proteins in the development and maintenance of muscle tissue. Mutation screening of FHL1 should be considered for patients with uncharacterized myopathies and cardiomyopathies. PMID:18179888

  14. Literature Based Drug Interaction Prediction with Clinical Assessment Using Electronic Medical Records: Novel Myopathy Associated Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Subhadarshini, Abhinita; Karnik, Shreyas D.; Li, Xiaochun; Hall, Stephen D.; Jin, Yan; Callaghan, J. Thomas; Overhage, Marcus J.; Flockhart, David A.; Strother, R. Matthew; Quinney, Sara K.; Li, Lang

    2012-01-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are a common cause of adverse drug events. In this paper, we combined a literature discovery approach with analysis of a large electronic medical record database method to predict and evaluate novel DDIs. We predicted an initial set of 13197 potential DDIs based on substrates and inhibitors of cytochrome P450 (CYP) metabolism enzymes identified from published in vitro pharmacology experiments. Using a clinical repository of over 800,000 patients, we narrowed this theoretical set of DDIs to 3670 drug pairs actually taken by patients. Finally, we sought to identify novel combinations that synergistically increased the risk of myopathy. Five pairs were identified with their p-values less than 1E-06: loratadine and simvastatin (relative risk or RR = 1.69); loratadine and alprazolam (RR = 1.86); loratadine and duloxetine (RR = 1.94); loratadine and ropinirole (RR = 3.21); and promethazine and tegaserod (RR = 3.00). When taken together, each drug pair showed a significantly increased risk of myopathy when compared to the expected additive myopathy risk from taking either of the drugs alone. Based on additional literature data on in vitro drug metabolism and inhibition potency, loratadine and simvastatin and tegaserod and promethazine were predicted to have a strong DDI through the CYP3A4 and CYP2D6 enzymes, respectively. This new translational biomedical informatics approach supports not only detection of new clinically significant DDI signals, but also evaluation of their potential molecular mechanisms. PMID:22912565

  15. Pharmacogenetics of Statin-Induced Myopathy: A Focused Review of the Clinical Translation of Pharmacokinetic Genetic Variants

    PubMed Central

    Talameh, Jasmine A; Kitzmiller, Joseph P

    2014-01-01

    Statins are the most commonly prescribed drugs in the United States and are extremely effective in reducing major cardiovascular events in the millions of Americans with hyperlipidemia. However, many patients (up to 25%) cannot tolerate or discontinue statin therapy due to statin-induced myopathy (SIM). Patients will continue to experience SIM at unacceptably high rates or experience unnecessary cardiovascular events (as a result of discontinuing or decreasing their statin therapy) until strategies for predicting or mitigating SIM are identified. A promising strategy for predicting or mitigating SIM is pharmacogenetic testing, particularly of pharmacokinetic genetic variants as SIM is related to statin exposure. Data is emerging on the association between pharmacokinetic genetic variants and SIM. A current, critical evaluation of the literature on pharmacokinetic genetic variants and SIM for potential translation to clinical practice is lacking. This review focuses specifically on pharmacokinetic genetic variants and their association with SIM clinical outcomes. We also discuss future directions, specific to the research on pharmacokinetic genetic variants, which could speed the translation into clinical practice. For simvastatin, we did not find sufficient evidence to support the clinical translation of pharmacokinetic genetic variants other than SLCO1B1. However, SLCO1B1 may also be clinically relevant for pravastatin- and pitavastatin-induced myopathy, but additional studies assessing SIM clinical outcome are needed. CYP2D6*4 may be clinically relevant for atorvastatin-induced myopathy, but mechanistic studies are needed. Future research efforts need to incorporate statin-specific analyses, multi-variant analyses, and a standard definition of SIM. As the use of statins is extremely common and SIM continues to occur in a significant number of patients, future research investments in pharmacokinetic genetic variants have the potential to make a profound impact on

  16. Deficiency of the E3 ubiquitin ligase TRIM32 in mice leads to a myopathy with a neurogenic component.

    PubMed

    Kudryashova, Elena; Wu, Jun; Havton, Leif A; Spencer, Melissa J

    2009-04-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2H (LGMD2H) and sarcotubular myopathy are hereditary skeletal muscle disorders caused by mutations in TRIM32. We previously identified TRIM32 as an E3 ubiquitin ligase that binds to myosin and ubiquitinates actin. To date four TRIM32 mutations have been linked to LGMD2H, all of which occur in the C-terminal NHL domains. Unexpectedly, a fifth mutation in the B-box of TRIM32 causes a completely different, multisystemic disorder, Bardet-Biedl syndrome type 11. It is not understood how allelic mutations in TRIM32 can create such diverse phenotypic outcomes. To generate a tool for elucidating the complex in vivo functions of TRIM32, we created the first murine Trim32 knock-out model (T32KO). Histological analysis of T32KO skeletal muscles revealed mild myopathic changes. Electron microscopy showed areas with Z-line streaming and a dilated sarcotubular system with vacuoles -- the latter being a prominent feature of sarcotubular myopathy. Therefore, our model replicates phenotypes of LGMD2H and sarcotubular myopathy. The level of Trim32 expression in normal mouse brain exceeds that observed in skeletal muscle by more than 100 times, as we demonstrated by real-time PCR. Intriguingly, analysis of T32KO neural tissue revealed a decreased concentration of neurofilaments and a reduction in myelinated motoraxon diameters. The axonal changes suggest a shift toward a slower motor unit type. Not surprisingly, T32KO soleus muscle expressed an elevated type I slow myosin isotype with a concomitant reduction in the type II fast myosin. These data suggest that muscular dystrophy due to TRIM32 mutations involves both neurogenic and myogenic characteristics. PMID:19155210

  17. Loss of Catalytically Inactive Lipid Phosphatase Myotubularin-related Protein 12 Impairs Myotubularin Stability and Promotes Centronuclear Myopathy in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vandana A.; Hnia, Karim; Smith, Laura L.; Gundry, Stacey R.; McIntire, Jessica E.; Shimazu, Junko; Bass, Jessica R.; Talbot, Ethan A.; Amoasii, Leonela; Goldman, Nathaniel E.; Laporte, Jocelyn; Beggs, Alan H.

    2013-01-01

    X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM) is a congenital disorder caused by mutations of the myotubularin gene, MTM1. Myotubularin belongs to a large family of conserved lipid phosphatases that include both catalytically active and inactive myotubularin-related proteins (i.e., “MTMRs”). Biochemically, catalytically inactive MTMRs have been shown to form heteroligomers with active members within the myotubularin family through protein-protein interactions. However, the pathophysiological significance of catalytically inactive MTMRs remains unknown in muscle. By in vitro as well as in vivo studies, we have identified that catalytically inactive myotubularin-related protein 12 (MTMR12) binds to myotubularin in skeletal muscle. Knockdown of the mtmr12 gene in zebrafish resulted in skeletal muscle defects and impaired motor function. Analysis of mtmr12 morphant fish showed pathological changes with central nucleation, disorganized Triads, myofiber hypotrophy and whorled membrane structures similar to those seen in X-linked myotubular myopathy. Biochemical studies showed that deficiency of MTMR12 results in reduced levels of myotubularin protein in zebrafish and mammalian C2C12 cells. Loss of myotubularin also resulted in reduction of MTMR12 protein in C2C12 cells, mice and humans. Moreover, XLMTM mutations within the myotubularin interaction domain disrupted binding to MTMR12 in cell culture. Analysis of human XLMTM patient myotubes showed that mutations that disrupt the interaction between myotubularin and MTMR12 proteins result in reduction of both myotubularin and MTMR12. These studies strongly support the concept that interactions between myotubularin and MTMR12 are required for the stability of their functional protein complex in normal skeletal muscles. This work highlights an important physiological function of catalytically inactive phosphatases in the pathophysiology of myotubular myopathy and suggests a novel therapeutic approach through identification of

  18. Loss-of-function mutations in SCN4A cause severe foetal hypokinesia or 'classical' congenital myopathy.

    PubMed

    Zaharieva, Irina T; Thor, Michael G; Oates, Emily C; van Karnebeek, Clara; Hendson, Glenda; Blom, Eveline; Witting, Nanna; Rasmussen, Magnhild; Gabbett, Michael T; Ravenscroft, Gianina; Sframeli, Maria; Suetterlin, Karen; Sarkozy, Anna; D'Argenzio, Luigi; Hartley, Louise; Matthews, Emma; Pitt, Matthew; Vissing, John; Ballegaard, Martin; Krarup, Christian; Slørdahl, Andreas; Halvorsen, Hanne; Ye, Xin Cynthia; Zhang, Lin-Hua; Løkken, Nicoline; Werlauff, Ulla; Abdelsayed, Mena; Davis, Mark R; Feng, Lucy; Phadke, Rahul; Sewry, Caroline A; Morgan, Jennifer E; Laing, Nigel G; Vallance, Hilary; Ruben, Peter; Hanna, Michael G; Lewis, Suzanne; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; Männikkö, Roope; Muntoni, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    Congenital myopathies are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of muscle disorders characterized by congenital or early-onset hypotonia and muscle weakness, and specific pathological features on muscle biopsy. The phenotype ranges from foetal akinesia resulting in in utero or neonatal mortality, to milder disorders that are not life-limiting. Over the past decade, more than 20 new congenital myopathy genes have been identified. Most encode proteins involved in muscle contraction; however, mutations in ion channel-encoding genes are increasingly being recognized as a cause of this group of disorders. SCN4A encodes the α-subunit of the skeletal muscle voltage-gated sodium channel (Nav1.4). This channel is essential for the generation and propagation of the muscle action potential crucial to muscle contraction. Dominant SCN4A gain-of-function mutations are a well-established cause of myotonia and periodic paralysis. Using whole exome sequencing, we identified homozygous or compound heterozygous SCN4A mutations in a cohort of 11 individuals from six unrelated kindreds with congenital myopathy. Affected members developed in utero- or neonatal-onset muscle weakness of variable severity. In seven cases, severe muscle weakness resulted in death during the third trimester or shortly after birth. The remaining four cases had marked congenital or neonatal-onset hypotonia and weakness associated with mild-to-moderate facial and neck weakness, significant neonatal-onset respiratory and swallowing difficulties and childhood-onset spinal deformities. All four surviving cohort members experienced clinical improvement in the first decade of life. Muscle biopsies showed myopathic features including fibre size variability, presence of fibrofatty tissue of varying severity, without specific structural abnormalities. Electrophysiology suggested a myopathic process, without myotonia. In vitro functional assessment in HEK293 cells of the impact of the identified SCN4A

  19. The clinical pharmacogenetics implementation consortium guideline for SLCO1B1 and simvastatin-induced myopathy: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, L B; Johnson, S G; Caudle, K E; Haidar, C E; Voora, D; Wilke, R A; Maxwell, W D; McLeod, H L; Krauss, R M; Roden, D M; Feng, Q; Cooper-DeHoff, R M; Gong, L; Klein, T E; Wadelius, M; Niemi, M

    2014-10-01

    Simvastatin is among the most commonly used prescription medications for cholesterol reduction. A single coding single-nucleotide polymorphism, rs4149056T>C, in SLCO1B1 increases systemic exposure to simvastatin and the risk of muscle toxicity. We summarize evidence from the literature supporting this association and provide therapeutic recommendations for simvastatin based on SLCO1B1 genotype. This article is an update to the 2012 Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium guideline for SLCO1B1 and simvastatin-induced myopathy. PMID:24918167

  20. Progress in Diagnosing Mitochondrial Myopathy, Encephalopathy, Lactic Acidosis, and Stroke-like Episodes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying-Xin; Le, Wei-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) is a progressive, multisystem affected mitochondrial disease associated with a number of disease-related defective genes. MELAS has unpredictable presentations and clinical course, and it can be commonly misdiagnosed as encephalitis, cerebral infarction, or brain neoplasms. This review aimed to update the diagnosis progress in MELAS, which may provide better understanding of the disease nature and help make the right diagnosis as well. Data Sources: The data used in this review came from published peer review articles from October 1984 to October 2014, which were obtained from PubMed. The search term is “MELAS”. Study Selection: Information selected from those reported studies is mainly based on the progress on clinical features, blood biochemistry, neuroimaging, muscle biopsy, and genetics in diagnosing MELAS. Results: MELAS has a wide heterogeneity in genetics and clinical manifestations. The relationship between mutations and phenotypes remains unclear. Advanced serial functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide directional information on this disease. Muscle biopsy has meaningful value in diagnosing MELAS, which shows the presence of ragged red fibers and mosaic appearance of cytochrome oxidase negative fibers. Genetic studies have reported that approximately 80% of MELAS cases are caused by the mutation m.3243A>G of the mitochondrial transfer RNA (Leu (UUR)) gene (MT-TL1). Conclusions: MELAS involves multiple systems with variable clinical symptoms and recurrent episodes. The prognosis of MELAS patients depends on timely diagnosis. Therefore, overall diagnosis of MELAS should be based on the maternal inheritance family history, clinical manifestation, and findings from serial MRI, muscle biopsy, and genetics. PMID:26112726

  1. The phenotypic spectrum of neutral lipid storage myopathy due to mutations in the PNPLA2 gene.

    PubMed

    Reilich, Peter; Horvath, Rita; Krause, Sabine; Schramm, Nicolai; Turnbull, Doug M; Trenell, Michael; Hollingsworth, Kieren G; Gorman, Grainne S; Hans, Volkmar H; Reimann, Jens; MacMillan, Andrée; Turner, Lesley; Schollen, Annette; Witte, Gregor; Czermin, Birgit; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Walter, Maggie C; Schoser, Benedikt; Lochmüller, Hanns

    2011-11-01

    Neutral lipid storage disease is caused by mutations in the CGI-58 or the PNPLA2 genes. Lipid storage can be detected in various cell types including blood granulocytes. While CGI-58 mutations are associated with Chanarin-Dorfman syndrome, a condition characterized by lipid storage and skin involvement (ichthyosis), mutations in the patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing protein 2 gene (PNPLA2) were reported with skeletal and cardiac muscle disease only. We describe clinical, myopathological, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and genetic findings of six patients carrying different recessive PNPLA2 mutations. Pulse-chase labeling of control and patient cells with supplementation of clenbuterol, salmeterol, and dexamethasone was performed in vitro. The patients share a recognizable phenotype with prominent shoulder girdle weakness and mild pelvic girdle and distal muscle weakness, with highly elevated creatine kinase (CK) and cardiomyopathy developing at later stages. Muscle histology invariably reveals massive accumulation of lipid droplets. New muscle or whole-body MRI techniques may assist diagnosis and may become a useful tool to quantify intramuscular lipid storage. Four novel and two previously reported mutations were detected, affecting different parts of the PNPLA2 gene. Activation of hormone-sensitive lipase by beta-adrenergic substances such as clenbuterol appears to bypass the enzymatic block in PNPLA2-deficient patient cells in vitro. PNPLA2 deficiency is a slowly progressive myopathy with onset around the third decade. Cardiac involvement is relatively common at a later stage. Muscle MRI may detect increased lipid in a characteristic distribution, which could be used for monitoring disease progression. Beta-adrenergic agents may be beneficial in improving triacylglycerol breakdown in patients with PNPLA2 mutations. PMID:21544567

  2. Effect of L-carnitine on exercise performance in patients with mitochondrial myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gimenes, A.C.; Bravo, D.M.; Nápolis, L.M.; Mello, M.T.; Oliveira, A.S.B.; Neder, J.A.; Nery, L.E.

    2015-01-01

    Exercise intolerance due to impaired oxidative metabolism is a prominent symptom in patients with mitochondrial myopathy (MM), but it is still uncertain whether L-carnitine supplementation is beneficial for patients with MM. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of L-carnitine on exercise performance in MM. Twelve MM subjects (mean age±SD=35.4±10.8 years) with chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) were first compared to 10 healthy controls (mean age±SD=29±7.8 years) before they were randomly assigned to receive L-carnitine supplementation (3 g/daily) or placebo in a double-blind crossover design. Clinical status, body composition, respiratory function tests, peripheral muscle strength (isokinetic and isometric torque) and cardiopulmonary exercise tests (incremental to peak exercise and at 70% of maximal), constant work rate (CWR) exercise test, to the limit of tolerance [Tlim]) were assessed after 2 months of L-carnitine/placebo administration. Patients with MM presented with lower mean height, total body weight, fat-free mass, and peripheral muscle strength compared to controls in the pre-test evaluation. After L-carnitine supplementation, the patients with MM significantly improved their Tlim (14±1.9 vs 11±1.4 min) and oxygen consumption (V˙O2) at CWR exercise, both at isotime (1151±115 vs 1049±104 mL/min) and at Tlim (1223±114 vs 1060±108 mL/min). These results indicate that L-carnitine supplementation may improve aerobic capacity and exercise tolerance during high-intensity CWRs in MM patients with CPEO. PMID:25714882

  3. Reliability of the Adult Myopathy Assessment Tool in Individuals with Myositis

    PubMed Central

    Harris-Love, Michael O.; Joe, Galen; Davenport, Todd E.; Koziol, Deloris; Rose, Kristen Abbett; Shrader, Joseph A.; Vasconcelos, Olavo M.; McElroy, Beverly; Dalakas, Marinos C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The Adult Myopathy Assessment Tool (AMAT) is a 13-item performance-based battery developed to assess functional status and muscle endurance. The purpose of this study was to determine the intrarater and interrater reliability of the AMAT in adults with myosits. Methods Nineteen raters (13 physical therapists and 6 physicians) scored videotaped recordings of patients with myositis performing the AMAT for a total of 114 tests and 1,482 item observations per session. Raters rescored the AMAT test and item observations during a follow up session (19 ±6 days between scoring sessions). All raters completed a single, self-directed, electronic training module prior to the initial scoring session. Results Intrarater and interrater reliability correlation coefficients were .94 or greater for the AMAT Functional Subscale, Endurance Subscale, and Total score (all p < 0.02 for Ho:ρ ≤ 0.75). All AMAT items had satisfactory intrarater agreement (Kappa statistics with Fleiss-Cohen weights, Kw = .57-1.00). Interrater agreement was acceptable for each AMAT item (K = .56-.89) except the sit up (K = .16). The standard error of measurement and 95% confidence interval range for the AMAT Total scores did not exceed 2 points across all observations (AMAT Total score range = 0-45). Conclusions The AMAT is a reliable, domain-specific assessment of functional status and muscle endurance for adult subjects with myositis. Results of this study suggest that physicians and physical therapists may reliably score the AMAT following a single training session. The AMAT Functional Subscale, Endurance Subscale, and Total score exhibit interrater and intrarater reliability suitable for clinical and research use. PMID:25201624

  4. Novel myopathy in a newborn with Shwachman-Diamond syndrome and review of neonatal presentation.

    PubMed

    Topa, Alexandra; Tulinius, Mar; Oldfors, Anders; Hedberg-Oldfors, Carola

    2016-05-01

    Shwachman-Diamond-Bodian syndrome (SDS) is a pleiotropic disorder in which the main features are bone marrow dysfunction and pancreatic insufficiency. Skeletal changes can occur, and in rare cases manifest as severe congenital thoracic dystrophy. We report a newborn boy with asphyxia, narrow thorax, and severe hypotonia initially suggesting a neuromuscular disease. The muscle biopsy showed myopathic changes with prominent variability in muscle fiber size and abnormal expression of developmental isoforms of myosin. The myofibrils showed focal loss and disorganization of myofilaments, and thickening of the Z-discs including some abortive nemaline rods. The boy became permanently dependent on assisted ventilation. Pancreatic insufficiency was subsequently diagnosed, explaining the malabsorption and failure to thrive. Except transitory thrombocytopenia and leukopenia, no major hematological abnormalities were noted. He had bilateral nephrocalcinosis with preserved renal function. Transitory liver dysfunction with elevated transaminase levels and parenchymal changes on ultrasound were registered. The clinical diagnosis was confirmed by detection of compound heterozygous mutations in SBDS using whole-exome sequencing: a recurrent intronic mutation causing aberrant splicing (c.258+2T>C) and a novel missense variant in a highly conserved codon (c.41A>G, p.Asn14Ser), considered to be damaging for the protein structure by in silico prediction programs. The carrier status of the parents has been confirmed. This case illustrates the challenges in differential diagnosis of pronounced neonatal hypotonia with asphyxia and highlights the muscular involvement in SDS. To our knowledge, this is the first report of myopathy evidenced in a patient with clinically and molecularly confirmed SDS. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26866830

  5. Isolated inclusion body myopathy caused by a multisystem proteinopathy–linked hnRNPA1 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Rumiko; Warita, Hitoshi; Niihori, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Toshiaki; Tateyama, Maki; Suzuki, Naoki; Nishiyama, Ayumi; Shirota, Matsuyuki; Funayama, Ryo; Nakayama, Keiko; Mitsuhashi, Satomi; Nishino, Ichizo; Aoki, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify the genetic cause of isolated inclusion body myopathy (IBM) with autosomal dominant inheritance in 2 families. Methods: Genetic investigations were performed using whole-exome and Sanger sequencing of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 gene (hnRNPA1). The clinical and pathologic features of patients in the 2 families were evaluated with neurologic examinations, muscle imaging, and muscle biopsy. Results: We identified a missense p.D314N mutation in hnRNPA1, which is also known to cause familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, in 2 families with IBM. The affected individuals developed muscle weakness in their 40s, which slowly progressed toward a limb-girdle pattern. Further evaluation of the affected individuals revealed no apparent motor neuron dysfunction, cognitive impairment, or bone abnormality. The muscle pathology was compatible with IBM, lacking apparent neurogenic change and inflammation. Multiple immunohistochemical analyses revealed the cytoplasmic aggregation of hnRNPA1 in close association with autophagosomes and myonuclei. Furthermore, the aberrant accumulation was characterized by coaggregation with ubiquitin, sequestome-1/p62, valosin-containing protein/p97, and a variety of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Conclusions: The present study expands the clinical phenotype of hnRNPA1-linked multisystem proteinopathy. Mutations in hnRNPA1, and possibly hnRNPA2B1, will be responsible for isolated IBM with a pure muscular phenotype. Although the mechanisms underlying the selective skeletal muscle involvement remain to be elucidated, the immunohistochemical results suggest a broad sequestration of RBPs by the mutated hnRNPA1. PMID:27066560

  6. Identification of 45 novel mutations in the nebulin gene associated with autosomal recessive nemaline myopathy.

    PubMed

    Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Pelin, Katarina; Sandbacka, Maria; Ranta, Salla; Donner, Kati; Muntoni, Francesco; Sewry, Caroline; Angelini, Corrado; Bushby, Kate; Van den Bergh, Peter; Iannaccone, Susan; Laing, Nigel G; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina

    2006-09-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder of skeletal muscle caused by mutations in at least five different genes encoding thin filament proteins of the striated muscle sarcomere. We have previously described 18 different mutations in the last 42 exons of the nebulin gene (NEB) in 18 families with NM. Here we report 45 novel NEB mutations detected by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (dHPLC) and sequence analysis of all 183 NEB exons in NM patients from 44 families. Altogether we have identified, including the deletion of exon 55 identified in the Ashkenazi Jewish population, 64 different mutations in NEB segregating with autosomal recessive NM in 55 families. The majority (55%) of the mutations in NEB are frameshift or nonsense mutations predicted to cause premature truncation of nebulin. Point mutations (25%) or deletions (3%) affecting conserved splice signals are predicted in the majority of cases to cause in-frame exon skipping, possibly leading to impaired nebulin-tropomyosin interaction along the thin filament. Patients in 18 families had one of nine missense mutations (14%) affecting conserved amino acids at or in the vicinity of actin or tropomyosin binding sites. In addition, we found the exon 55 deletion in four families. The majority of the patients (in 49/55 families) were shown to be compound heterozygous for two different mutations. The mutations were found in both constitutively and alternatively expressed exons throughout the NEB gene, and there were no obvious mutational hotspots. Patients with more severe clinical pictures tended to have mutations predicted to be more disruptive than patients with milder forms. PMID:16917880

  7. Identification of a founder mutation in TPM3 in nemaline myopathy patients of Turkish origin.

    PubMed

    Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Pelin, Katarina; Donner, Kati; Voit, Thomas; Rudnik-Schöneborn, Sabine; Stoetter, Mechthild; Talim, Beril; Topaloglu, Haluk; Laing, Nigel G; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina

    2008-09-01

    To date, six genes are known to cause nemaline (rod) myopathy (NM), a rare congenital neuromuscular disorder. In an attempt to find a seventh gene, we performed linkage and subsequent sequence analyses in 12 Turkish families with recessive NM. We found homozygosity in two of the families at 1q12-21.2, a region encompassing the gamma-tropomyosin gene (TPM3) encoding slow skeletal muscle alpha-tropomyosin, a known NM gene. Sequencing revealed homozygous deletion of the first nucleotide of the last exon, c.913delA of TPM3 in both families. The mutation removes the last nucleotide before the stop codon, causing a frameshift and readthrough across the termination signal. The encoded alphaTm(slow) protein is predicted to be 73 amino acids longer than normal, and the extension to the protein is hypothesised to be unable to form a coiled coil. The resulting tropomyosin protein may therefore be non-functional. The affected children in both families were homozygous for the mutation, while the healthy parents were mutation carriers. Both of the patients in Family 1 had the severe form of NM, and also an unusual chest deformity. The affected children in Family 2 had the intermediate form of NM. Muscle biopsies showed type 1 (slow) fibres to be markedly smaller than type 2 (fast) fibres. Previously, there had been five reports, only, of NM caused by mutations in TPM3. The mutation reported here is the first deletion to be identified in TPM3, and it is likely to be a founder mutation in the Turkish population. PMID:18382475

  8. COLQ variant associated with Devon Rex and Sphynx feline hereditary myopathy.

    PubMed

    Gandolfi, Barbara; Grahn, Robert A; Creighton, Erica K; Williams, D Colette; Dickinson, Peter J; Sturges, Beverly K; Guo, Ling T; Shelton, G Diane; Leegwater, Peter A J; Longeri, Maria; Malik, Richard; Lyons, Leslie A

    2015-12-01

    Some Devon Rex and Sphynx cats have a variably progressive myopathy characterized by appendicular and axial muscle weakness, megaesophagus, pharyngeal weakness and fatigability with exercise. Muscle biopsies from affected cats demonstrated variable pathological changes ranging from dystrophic features to minimal abnormalities. Affected cats have exacerbation of weakness following anticholinesterase dosing, a clue that there is an underlying congenital myasthenic syndrome (CMS). A genome-wide association study and whole-genome sequencing suggested a causal variant for this entity was a c.1190G>A variant causing a cysteine to tyrosine substitution (p.Cys397Tyr) within the C-terminal domain of collagen-like tail subunit (single strand of homotrimer) of asymmetric acetylcholinesterase (COLQ). Alpha-dystroglycan expression, which is associated with COLQ anchorage at the motor end-plate, has been shown to be deficient in affected cats. Eighteen affected cats were identified by genotyping, including cats from the original clinical descriptions in 1993 and subsequent publications. Eight Devon Rex and one Sphynx not associated with the study were identified as carriers, suggesting an allele frequency of ~2.0% in Devon Rex. Over 350 tested cats from other breeds did not have the variant. Characteristic clinical features and variant presence in all affected cats suggest a model for COLQ CMS. The association between the COLQ variant and this CMS affords clinicians the opportunity to confirm diagnosis via genetic testing and permits owners and breeders to identify carriers in the population. Moreover, accurate diagnosis increases available therapeutic options for affected cats based on an understanding of the pathophysiology and experience from human CMS associated with COLQ variants. PMID:26374066

  9. A TALEN-Exon Skipping Design for a Bethlem Myopathy Model in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Radev, Zlatko; Hermel, Jean-Michel; Elipot, Yannick; Bretaud, Sandrine; Arnould, Sylvain; Duchateau, Philippe; Ruggiero, Florence; Joly, Jean-Stéphane; Sohm, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Presently, human collagen VI-related diseases such as Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD) and Bethlem myopathy (BM) remain incurable, emphasizing the need to unravel their etiology and improve their treatments. In UCMD, symptom onset occurs early, and both diseases aggravate with ageing. In zebrafish fry, morpholinos reproduced early UCMD and BM symptoms but did not allow to study the late phenotype. Here, we produced the first zebrafish line with the human mutation frequently found in collagen VI-related disorders such as UCMD and BM. We used a transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) to design the col6a1ama605003-line with a mutation within an essential splice donor site, in intron 14 of the col6a1 gene, which provoke an in-frame skipping of exon 14 in the processed mRNA. This mutation at a splice donor site is the first example of a template-independent modification of splicing induced in zebrafish using a targetable nuclease. This technique is readily expandable to other organisms and can be instrumental in other disease studies. Histological and ultrastructural analyzes of homozygous and heterozygous mutant fry and 3 months post-fertilization (mpf) fish revealed co-dominantly inherited abnormal myofibers with disorganized myofibrils, enlarged sarcoplasmic reticulum, altered mitochondria and misaligned sarcomeres. Locomotion analyzes showed hypoxia-response behavior in 9 mpf col6a1 mutant unseen in 3 mpf fish. These symptoms worsened with ageing as described in patients with collagen VI deficiency. Thus, the col6a1ama605003-line is the first adult zebrafish model of collagen VI-related diseases; it will be instrumental both for basic research and drug discovery assays focusing on this type of disorders. PMID:26221953

  10. A TALEN-Exon Skipping Design for a Bethlem Myopathy Model in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Elipot, Yannick; Bretaud, Sandrine; Arnould, Sylvain; Duchateau, Philippe; Ruggiero, Florence; Joly, Jean-Stéphane; Sohm, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Presently, human collagen VI-related diseases such as Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD) and Bethlem myopathy (BM) remain incurable, emphasizing the need to unravel their etiology and improve their treatments. In UCMD, symptom onset occurs early, and both diseases aggravate with ageing. In zebrafish fry, morpholinos reproduced early UCMD and BM symptoms but did not allow to study the late phenotype. Here, we produced the first zebrafish line with the human mutation frequently found in collagen VI-related disorders such as UCMD and BM. We used a transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) to design the col6a1ama605003-line with a mutation within an essential splice donor site, in intron 14 of the col6a1 gene, which provoke an in-frame skipping of exon 14 in the processed mRNA. This mutation at a splice donor site is the first example of a template-independent modification of splicing induced in zebrafish using a targetable nuclease. This technique is readily expandable to other organisms and can be instrumental in other disease studies. Histological and ultrastructural analyzes of homozygous and heterozygous mutant fry and 3 months post-fertilization (mpf) fish revealed co-dominantly inherited abnormal myofibers with disorganized myofibrils, enlarged sarcoplasmic reticulum, altered mitochondria and misaligned sarcomeres. Locomotion analyzes showed hypoxia-response behavior in 9 mpf col6a1 mutant unseen in 3 mpf fish. These symptoms worsened with ageing as described in patients with collagen VI deficiency. Thus, the col6a1ama605003-line is the first adult zebrafish model of collagen VI-related diseases; it will be instrumental both for basic research and drug discovery assays focusing on this type of disorders. PMID:26221953

  11. Tubular aggregate myopathy caused by a novel mutation in the cytoplasmic domain of STIM1

    PubMed Central

    Okuma, Hidehiko; Mitsui, Jun; Hara, Yuji; Hatanaka, Yuki; Ikeda, Miki; Shimizu, Teruo; Matsumura, Kiichiro; Shimizu, Jun; Tsuji, Shoji; Sonoo, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify the gene mutation of tubular aggregate myopathy (TAM) and gain mechanistic insight into the pathogenesis of the disorder. Methods: We described a family affected by autosomal dominant TAM and performed exome and Sanger sequencing to identify mutations. We further analyzed the functional significance of the identified mutation by expression studies and intracellular Ca2+ measurements. Results: A 42-year-old man presented with slowly progressive muscle weakness and atrophy in all 4 limbs and the trunk. Muscle biopsy and microscopic examination revealed tubular aggregates in his skeletal muscle. Genetic analysis of this family identified a novel heterozygous mutation, c.1450_1451insGA (p.Ile484ArgfsX21), in stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1), a Ca2+ sensor in sarcoplasmic reticulum. We transfected cultured cells with STIM1 and demonstrated that the mutant STIM1 exhibited aggregation-like appearance in shrunk cytoplasm. Furthermore, we revealed that the intracellular Ca2+ influx is decreased by the mutant STIM1. Conclusions: The novel mutation p.Ile484ArgfsX21 is located in the cytoplasmic C-terminal inhibitory domain (CTID) of STIM1. However, all mutations reported so far in TAM reside in the luminal N-terminal EF hand region. The aggregation-like appearance of STIM1 and the decreased intracellular Ca2+ influx in cells transfected with CTID mutant are in sharp contrast to these previous reports. Taken together, these findings indicate that mutations of STIM1 cause TAM through the dysregulation of Ca2+ homeostasis. PMID:27066587

  12. Health-related quality of life and well-being in adults with idiopathic inflammatory myopathy.

    PubMed

    Armadans-Tremolosa, Imma; Selva-O'Callaghan, Albert; Visauta-Vinacua, Bienvenido; Guilera, Georgina; Pinal-Fernández, Iago; Vilardell-Tarrés, Miquel

    2014-08-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and well-being are concepts that attempt to objectively capture a person's subjective perceptions of vitality and energy. Our objectives were to determine HRQoL and well-being in adult patients diagnosed with inflammatory myopathy who attended at our outpatient clinic and to investigate clinical and biological correlations with these concepts. Sixty-two patients (52 women), with a mean age of 50.7 years, were evaluated in this cross-sectional study-47 with dermatomyositis and 15 with polymyositis. Disease damage and activity were assessed with the International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies-validated instruments. Manual muscle testing was used to evaluate muscle strength. Quality of life was evaluated with the WHO instrument (WHO Quality of Life Measure (WHOQOL-BREF)), adapted for use in the Spanish population, and well-being with the WHO-Five Well-Being Index (WHO-5). t tests were conducted to examine differences in HRQoL and well-being outcomes in relation to several disease- and patient-related variables. Correlation analyses were performed with the Pearson correlation coefficient. None of the clinical or biological variables analyzed was significantly associated with a poorer HRQoL or well-being. No differences in HRQoL or WHO-5 well-being score were found between the two myositis subgroups (dermatomyositis vs. polymyositis). Disease activity and muscle weakness were negatively associated with the physical and environmental domains of the HRQoL, respectively (p < 0.002), but not with well-being. Disease duration did not have a significant impact on HRQoL or well-being. In adult patients with myositis, disease activity and muscle weakness are associated with poorer HRQoL in the physical health and environmental domains, respectively. PMID:24894104

  13. Differential Effects of Myopathy-Associated Caveolin-3 Mutants on Growth Factor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Brauers, Eva; Dreier, Agnes; Roos, Andreas; Wormland, Berthold; Weis, Joachim; Krüttgen, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Caveolin-3 is an important scaffold protein of cholesterol-rich caveolae. Mutations of caveolin-3 cause hereditary myopathies that comprise remarkably different pathologies. Growth factor signaling plays an important role in muscle physiology; it is influenced by caveolins and cholesterol-rich rafts and might thus be affected by caveolin-3 dysfunction. Prompted by the observation of a marked chronic peripheral neuropathy in a patient suffering from rippling muscle disease due to the R26Q caveolin-3 mutation and because TrkA is expressed by neuronal cells and skeletal muscle fibers, we performed a detailed comparative study on the effect of pathogenic caveolin-3 mutants on the signaling and trafficking of the TrkA nerve growth factor receptor and, for comparison, of the epidermal growth factor receptor. We found that the R26Q mutant slightly and the P28L strongly reduced nerve growth factor signaling in TrkA-transfected cells. Surface biotinylation experiments revealed that the R26Q caveolin-3 mutation markedly reduced the internalization of TrkA, whereas the P28L did not. Moreover, P28L expression led to increased, whereas R26Q expression decreased, epidermal growth factor signaling. Taken together, we found differential effects of the R26Q and P28L caveolin-3 mutants on growth factor signaling. Our findings are of clinical interest because they might help explain the remarkable differences in the degree of muscle lesions caused by caveolin-3 mutations and also the co-occurrence of peripheral neuropathy in the R26Q caveolinopathy case presented. PMID:20472890

  14. Intravenous immune globulin in hereditary inclusion body myopathy: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Sparks, Susan; Rakocevic, Goran; Joe, Galen; Manoli, Irini; Shrader, Joseph; Harris-Love, Michael; Sonies, Barbara; Ciccone, Carla; Dorward, Heidi; Krasnewich, Donna; Huizing, Marjan; Dalakas, Marinos C; Gahl, William A

    2007-01-01

    Background Hereditary Inclusion Body Myopathy (HIBM) is an autosomal recessive, adult onset, non-inflammatory neuromuscular disorder with no effective treatment. The causative gene, GNE, codes for UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 2-epimerase/N-acetylmannosamine kinase, which catalyzes the first two reactions in the synthesis of sialic acid. Reduced sialylation of muscle glycoproteins, such as α-dystroglycan and neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), has been reported in HIBM. Methods We treated 4 HIBM patients with intravenous immune globulin (IVIG), in order to provide sialic acid, because IgG contains 8 μmol of sialic acid/g. IVIG was infused as a loading dose of 1 g/kg on two consecutive days followed by 3 doses of 400 mg/kg at weekly intervals. Results For all four patients, mean quadriceps strength improved from 19.0 kg at baseline to 23.2 kg (+22%) directly after IVIG loading to 25.6 kg (+35%) at the end of the study. Mean shoulder strength improved from 4.1 kg at baseline to 5.9 kg (+44%) directly after IVIG loading to 6.0 kg (+46%) at the end of the study. The composite improvement for 8 other muscle groups was 5% after the initial loading and 19% by the end of the study. Esophageal motility and lingual strength improved in the patients with abnormal barium swallows. Objective measures of functional improvement gave variable results, but the patients experienced improvements in daily activities that they considered clinically significant. Immunohistochemical staining and immunoblotting of muscle biopsies for α-dystroglycan and NCAM did not provide consistent evidence for increased sialylation after IVIG treatment. Side effects were limited to transient headaches and vomiting. Conclusion The mild benefits in muscle strength experienced by HIBM patients after IVIG treatment may be related to the provision of sialic acid supplied by IVIG. Other sources of sialic acid are being explored as treatment options for HIBM. PMID:17261181

  15. Acute sacroiliitis.

    PubMed

    Slobodin, Gleb; Rimar, Doron; Boulman, Nina; Kaly, Lisa; Rozenbaum, Michael; Rosner, Itzhak; Odeh, Majed

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the data on the etiology, risk factors, clinical presentations, and diagnosis of acute sacroiliitis. A Pubmed search utilizing the indexing term "acute sacroiliitis" was conducted and the data pertinent to the aim of the review was extracted and organized in accordance with the preplanned structure of the manuscript. The diagnosis of acute sacroiliitis is often challenging because of both the relative rarity of this presentation and diverse character of acute sacroiliac pain, frequently mimicking other, more prevalent disorders. Technetium bone scintigraphy can localize the disease process to the sacroiliac joint, while computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging can be used for the detailed characterization and the extent of the disease as well as the diagnosis of complications. Pyogenic sacroiliitis is by far the most common cause of acute sacroiliitis. Brucellosis, acute sacroiliitis in the course of reactive arthritis, and crystalline-induced sacroiliitis frequently imitate pyogenic sacroiliitis. Acute sacroiliitis can rarely be also related to hematological malignancies or treatment with isotretinoin. Awareness to the possibility of acute sacroiliitis and a thorough physical examination are the necessary prerequisites to its timely diagnosis, while the appropriate laboratory and imaging studies should confirm the precise diagnosis and direct the appropriate treatment strategy. PMID:26847855

  16. Comparison of Dysferlin Expression in Human Skeletal Muscle with That in Monocytes for the Diagnosis of Dysferlin Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Manera, Jordi; Rojas-García, Ricardo; Gonzalez-Quereda, Lidia; Flix, Bàrbara; de Morrée, Antoine; van der Maarel, Silvère; Illa, Isabel

    2011-01-01

    Background Dysferlinopathies are caused by mutations in the dysferlin gene (DYSF). Diagnosis is complex due to the high clinical variability of the disease and because dysferlin expression in the muscle biopsy may be secondarily reduced due to a primary defect in some other gene. Dysferlin is also expressed in peripheral blood monocytes (PBM). Studying dysferlin in monocytes is used for the diagnosis of dysferlin myopathies. The aim of the study was to determine whether dysferlin expression in PBM correlates with that in skeletal muscle. Methodology/Principal Findings Using western-blot (WB) we quantified dysferlin expression in PBM from 21 pathological controls with other myopathies in whom mutations in DYSF were excluded and from 17 patients who had dysferlinopathy and two mutations in DYSF. Results were compared with protein expression in muscle by WB and immunohistochemistry (IH). We found a good correlation between skeletal muscle and monocytes using WB. However, IH results were misleading because abnormal expression of dysferlin was also observed in 13/21 pathological controls. Conclusions/Significance The analysis of dysferlin protein expression in PBM is helpful when: 1) the skeletal muscle IH pattern is abnormal or 2) when muscle WB can not be performed either because muscle sample is lacking or insufficient or because the muscle biopsy is taken from a muscle at an end-stage and it mainly consists of fat and fibrotic tissue. PMID:22194990

  17. NOVEL MUTATIONS WIDEN THE PHENOTYPIC SPECTRUM OF SLOW SKELETAL/β-CARDIAC MYOSIN (MYH7) DISTAL MYOPATHY

    PubMed Central

    Lamont, Phillipa J.; Wallefeld, William; Hilton-Jones, David; Udd, Bjarne; Argov, Zohar; Barboi, Alexandru C.; Bonneman, Carsten; Boycott, Kym M.; Bushby, Kate; Connolly, Anne M.; Davies, Nicholas; Beggs, Alan H.; Cox, Gerald F.; Dastgir, Jahannaz; DeChene, Elizabeth T.; Gooding, Rebecca; Jungbluth, Heinz; Muelas, Nuria; Palmio, Johanna; Penttilä, Sini; Schmedding, Eric; Suominen, Tiina; Straub, Volker; Staples, Christopher; Van den Bergh, Peter Y.K.; Vilchez, Juan J.; Wagner, Kathryn R.; Wheeler, Patricia G.; Wraige, Elizabeth; Laing, Nigel G.

    2014-01-01

    Laing early onset distal myopathy and myosin storage myopathy are caused by mutations of slow skeletal/β-cardiac myosin heavy chain encoded by the gene MYH7, as is a common form of familial hypertrophic/dilated cardiomyopathy. The mechanisms by which different phenotypes are produced by mutations in MYH7, even in the same region of the gene, are not known. To explore the clinical spectrum and pathobiology we screened the MYH7 gene in 88 patients from 21 previously unpublished families presenting with distal or generalised skeletal muscle weakness, with or without cardiac involvement. Twelve novel mutations have been identified in thirteen families. In one of these families the grandfather of the proband was found to be a mosaic for the MYH7 mutation. In eight cases de novo mutation appeared to have occurred, which was proven in three. The presenting complaint was footdrop, sometimes leading to delayed walking or tripping, in members of 17 families (81%), with other presentations including cardiomyopathy in infancy, generalised floppiness and scoliosis. Cardiac involvement as well as skeletal muscle weakness was identified in 9 of 21 families. Spinal involvement such as scoliosis or rigidity was identified in 12 (57%). This report widens the clinical and pathological phenotypes, and the genetics of MYH7 mutations leading to skeletal muscle diseases. PMID:24664454

  18. Dominant Mutations in KBTBD13, a Member of the BTB/Kelch Family, Cause Nemaline Myopathy with Cores

    PubMed Central

    Sambuughin, Nyamkhishig; Yau, Kyle S.; Olivé, Montse; Duff, Rachael M.; Bayarsaikhan, Munkhuu; Lu, Shajia; Gonzalez-Mera, Laura; Sivadorai, Padma; Nowak, Kristen J.; Ravenscroft, Gianina; Mastaglia, Frank L.; North, Kathryn N.; Ilkovski, Biljana; Kremer, Hannie; Lammens, Martin; van Engelen, Baziel G.M.; Fabian, Vicki; Lamont, Phillipa; Davis, Mark R.; Laing, Nigel G.; Goldfarb, Lev G.

    2010-01-01

    We identified a member of the BTB/Kelch protein family that is mutated in nemaline myopathy type 6 (NEM6), an autosomal-dominant neuromuscular disorder characterized by the presence of nemaline rods and core lesions in the skeletal myofibers. Analysis of affected families allowed narrowing of the candidate region on chromosome 15q22.31, and mutation screening led to the identification of a previously uncharacterized gene, KBTBD13, coding for a hypothetical protein and containing missense mutations that perfectly cosegregate with nemaline myopathy in the studied families. KBTBD13 contains a BTB/POZ domain and five Kelch repeats and is expressed primarily in skeletal and cardiac muscle. The identified disease-associated mutations, C.742C>A (p.Arg248Ser), c.1170G>C (p.Lys390Asn), and c.1222C>T (p.Arg408Cys), located in conserved domains of Kelch repeats, are predicted to disrupt the molecule's beta-propeller blades. Previously identified BTB/POZ/Kelch-domain-containing proteins have been implicated in a broad variety of biological processes, including cytoskeleton modulation, regulation of gene transcription, ubiquitination, and myofibril assembly. The functional role of KBTBD13 in skeletal muscle and the pathogenesis of NEM6 are subjects for further studies. PMID:21109227

  19. Oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum with myopathy and velopharyngeal insufficiency. A case report with a non-branchiomeric muscle biopsy.

    PubMed

    Murialdo, Giovanni; Piazzi, Attilia; Badolati, Giuseppe; Calcagno, Enrico; Berio, Agostino

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper we report on a case of oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum presenting fluorescence in situ hybridization and comparative genomic hybridization tests negative, hypotonia of some branchiomeric muscles (with velo-pharyngeal insufficiency, dysphagia and nasal voice) and non-branchiomeric muscles (with strabismus and limb hypotrophy). On the basis of the left quadriceps muscle biopsy, showing anisometry and prevalence of type 1 fibers, and on literature data, we underline the relevance of TBX1 gene (regulator of neural crest cells and activator of myogenic factors in branchiomeric muscles development) and of PAX3 gene (present in neural crest, inducing migration of these cells and reported in non-branchiomeric muscles). We conclude that the case of OAVS presented a generalized myopathy and we hypothesize that a cluster of genes strictly neural crest cells related, including TBX1 and PAX3, may be responsible of the branchiomeric and non-branchiomeric myopathy; alternatively, a regulatory mechanism abnormally common to OAVS and velo-cardio-facial syndrome could be present. PMID:27345603

  20. Activation of the Unfolded Protein Response in Sporadic Inclusion Body Myositis But Not in Hereditary GNE Inclusion Body Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Nogalska, Anna; D’Agostino, Carla; Engel, W. King; Cacciottolo, Mafalda; Asada, Shinichi; Mori, Kazutoshi; Askanas, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    Muscle fibers in patients with sporadic inclusion-body myositis (s-IBM), the most common age-associated myopathy, are characterized by autophagic vacuoles and accumulation of ubiquitinated and congophilic multiprotein aggregates that contain amyloid-β and phosphorylated tau. Muscle fibers of autosomal-recessive hereditary inclusion-body myopathy due to the GNE mutation (GNE-h-IBM) display similar pathologic features, except with less pronounced congophilia. Accumulation of unfolded/misfolded proteins inside the ER lumen leads to ER stress, which elicits the unfolded protein response (UPR) as a protective mechanism. Here we demonstrate for the first time that UPR is activated in s-IBM muscle biopsies, since there was a) increased ATF4 protein and increased mRNA of its target CHOP, b) cleavage of the ATF6 and increased mRNA of its target GRP78, and c) an increase of the spliced form of XBP-1 and increased mRNA of EDEM, target of heterodimer of cleaved ATF6 and spliced XBP-1. In contrast, we did not find similar evidence of the UPR induction in GNE-h-IBM patient muscle, suggesting that different intracellular mechanisms might lead to the similar pathological phenotypes. Interestingly, cultured GNE-h-IBM muscle fibers had a robust UPR response to experimental ER stress stimuli, suggesting that the GNE mutation per se is not responsible for the lack of UPR in GNE-h-IBM biopsied muscle. PMID:25978849

  1. Targeted Expression of Catalase to Mitochondria Protects Against Ischemic Myopathy in High-Fat Diet-Fed Mice.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Terence E; Schmidt, Cameron A; Green, Thomas D; Spangenburg, Espen E; Neufer, P Darrell; McClung, Joseph M

    2016-09-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes respond poorly to treatments for peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and are more likely to present with the most severe manifestation of the disease, critical limb ischemia. The underlying mechanisms linking type 2 diabetes and the severity of PAD manifestation are not well understood. We sought to test whether diet-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress would increase the susceptibility of the peripheral limb to hindlimb ischemia (HLI). Six weeks of high-fat diet (HFD) in C57BL/6 mice was insufficient to alter skeletal muscle mitochondrial content and respiratory function or the size of ischemic lesion after HLI, despite reducing blood flow. However, 16 weeks of HFD similarly decreased ischemic limb blood flow, but also exacerbated limb tissue necrosis, increased the myopathic lesion size, reduced muscle regeneration, attenuated muscle function, and exacerbated ischemic mitochondrial dysfunction. Mechanistically, mitochondrial-targeted overexpression of catalase prevented the HFD-induced ischemic limb necrosis, myopathy, and mitochondrial dysfunction, despite no improvement in limb blood flow. These findings demonstrate that skeletal muscle mitochondria are a critical pathological link between type 2 diabetes and PAD. Furthermore, therapeutically targeting mitochondria and oxidant burden is an effective strategy to alleviate tissue loss and ischemic myopathy during PAD. PMID:27284110

  2. T-Cell-Mediated Inflammatory Myopathies in HIV-Positive Individuals: A Histologic Study of 19 Cases.

    PubMed

    Hiniker, Annie; Daniels, Brianne H; Margeta, Marta

    2016-03-01

    T cell-mediated inflammatory myopathies (polymyositis [PM] and inclusion body myositis [IBM]) sometimes arise in conjunction with HIV infection; however, it is not understood whether PM and IBM arising in the context of HIV (HIV-PM and HV-IBM) differ from PM and IBM arising sporadically in HIV-negative individuals (sPM and sIBM). Here, we report the largest series of T cell-mediated inflammatory myopathies from HIV-infected patients (19 biopsies from 15 subjects); 5 cases were pathologically classified as PM (HIV-PM) and 14 as IBM (HIV-IBM). As with sporadic cases, quantitative immunohistochemistry for LC3, p62, and TDP-43 showed significantly greater percentage of stained fibers (% FS) in HIV-IBM compared to HIV-PM samples; however, there was no significant difference in % FS for any of the three markers between HIV-associated and sporadic cases. Despite histologic similarities between HIV-IBM and sIBM but in concordance with prior case reports, patients with HIV-IBM were significantly younger at diagnosis than patients with sIBM; in contrast, the mean age of HIV-PM and sPM patients was not significantly different. In summary, HIV-PM and HIV-IBM are morphologically similar to sPM and sIBM; thus, it remains unclear why patients with HIV-IBM, in contrast to patients with sIBM, sometimes show clinical improvement in response to immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:26843609

  3. Acute malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Dupont, John S

    2006-01-01

    Acute malocclusion can result from disturbances in the maxillary/mandibular tooth relationship. These alterations in the occlusal position can result from high fillings, sinus problems, abscesses, periodontal disease, and moving or erupting teeth. Conditions seen less frequently include acute malocclusions secondary to an event (such as trauma) that make a stable dental relationship an unstable one. Patients can demonstrate any of a number of clinical conditions that interfere with their comfort and ability to function. This article provides information on some of the less familiar causes of acute malocclusion. PMID:16689064

  4. The coexistence of dynamin 2 mutation and multiple mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions in the background of severe cardiomyopathy and centronuclear myopathy.

    PubMed

    Gal, Aniko; Inczedy-Farkas, Gabriella; Pal, Endre; Remenyi, Viktoria; Bereznai, Benjamin; Geller, Laszlo; Szelid, Zsolt; Merkely, Bela; Molnar, Maria Judit

    2015-01-01

    Dynamin2 (DNM2) gene mutations may result in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease and centronuclear myopathy. Here, we present a patient suffering from cardiomyopathy and centronuclear myopathy with repetitive discharges and mild axonal neuropathy due to DNM2 mutation. Detailed cardiological and neurological examinations, electrophysiological tests, muscle biopsy, and molecular genetic analysis were performed. The patient developed left bundle branch block at age 40 and was fitted with a pacemaker at the age of 43. The patient has severe heart failure, ptosis, strabism, facial and proximal muscle weakness. Electrophysiological investigations found myopathy, complex repetitive discharges, and axonal neuropathy. Skeletal muscle biopsy detected centronuclear myopathy and cytochrome C oxidase (COX) negative fibers. Genetic analysis detected a pathogenic c.1105C>T (p.R369W) DNM2 gene mutation and heteroplasmic multiple mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion. Our data broadens the phenotypic spectrum of DNM2 mutations. The presence of the multiple mtDNA deletions may provide new aspects to understanding the pathogenesis of multisystemic symptoms in patients with DNM2 mutations. PMID:25492887

  5. Increased amyloid β-peptide uptake in skeletal muscle is induced by hyposialylation and may account for apoptosis in GNE myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bosch-Morató, Mònica; Iriondo, Cinta; Guivernau, Biuse; Valls-Comamala, Victòria; Vidal, Noemí; Olivé, Montse; Querfurth, Henry; Muñoz, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    GNE myopathy is an autosomal recessive muscular disorder of young adults characterized by progressive skeletal muscle weakness and wasting. It is caused by a mutation in the UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 2-epimerase/N-acetylmannosamine kinase (GNE) gene, which encodes a key enzyme in sialic acid biosynthesis. The mutated hypofunctional GNE is associated with intracellular accumulation of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) in patient muscles through as yet unknown mechanisms. We found here for the first time that an experimental reduction in sialic acid favors Aβ1-42 endocytosis in C2C12 myotubes, which is dependent on clathrin and heparan sulfate proteoglycan. Accordingly, Aβ1-42 internalization in myoblasts from a GNE myopathy patient was enhanced. Next, we investigated signal changes triggered by Aβ1-42 that may underlie toxicity. We observed that p-Akt levels are reduced in step with an increase in apoptotic markers in GNE myopathy myoblasts compared to control myoblasts. The same results were experimentally obtained when Aβ1-42 was overexpressed in myotubes. Hence, we propose a novel disease mechanism whereby hyposialylation favors Aβ1-42 internalization and the subsequent apoptosis in myotubes and in skeletal muscle from GNE myopathy patients. PMID:26968811

  6. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... bronchitis? Acute bronchitis is almost always caused by viruses that attack the lining of the bronchial tree ... infection. As your body fights back against these viruses, more swelling occurs and more mucus is produced. ...

  7. Acute Pericarditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... large pericardial effusions). Acute pericarditis usually responds to colchicine or NSAIDs (such as aspirin and ibuprofen ) taken ... reduce pain but relieves it by reducing inflammation. Colchicine also decreases the chance of pericarditis returning later. ...

  8. Conspicuous involvement of desmin tail mutations in diverse cardiac and skeletal myopathies.

    PubMed

    Bär, Harald; Goudeau, Bertrand; Wälde, Sarah; Casteras-Simon, Monique; Mücke, Norbert; Shatunov, Alexey; Goldberg, Y Paul; Clarke, Charles; Holton, Janice L; Eymard, Bruno; Katus, Hugo A; Fardeau, Michel; Goldfarb, Lev; Vicart, Patrick; Herrmann, Harald

    2007-04-01

    Myofibrillar myopathy (MFM) encompasses a genetically heterogeneous group of human diseases caused by mutations in genes coding for structural proteins of muscle. Mutations in the intermediate filament (IF) protein desmin (DES), a major cytoskeletal component of myocytes, lead to severe forms of "desminopathy," which affects cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscle. Most mutations described reside in the central alpha-helical rod domain of desmin. Here we report three novel mutations--c.1325C>T (p.T442I), c.1360C>T (p.R454W), and c.1379G>T (p.S460I)--located in desmin's non-alpha-helical carboxy-terminal "tail" domain. We have investigated the impact of these and four--c.1237G>A (p.E413K), c.1346A>C (p.K449T), c.1353C>G (p.I451M), and c.1405G>A (p.V469M)--previously described "tail" mutations on in vitro filament formation and on the generation of ordered cytoskeletal arrays in transfected myoblasts. Although all but two mutants (p.E413K, p.R454W) assembled into IFs in vitro and all except p.E413K were incorporated into IF arrays in transfected C2C12 cells, filament properties differed significantly from wild-type desmin as revealed by viscometric assembly assays. Most notably, when coassembled with wild-type desmin, these mutants revealed a severe disturbance of filament-formation competence and filament-filament interactions, indicating an inherent incompatibility of mutant and wild-type protein to form mixed filaments. The various clinical phenotypes observed may reflect altered interactions of desmin's tail domain with different components of the myoblast cytoskeleton leading to diminished biomechanical properties and/or altered metabolism of the individual myocyte. Our in vitro assembly regimen proved to be a very sensible tool to detect if a particular desmin mutation is able to cause filament abnormalities. PMID:17221859

  9. Muscle weakness in TPM3-myopathy is due to reduced Ca2+-sensitivity and impaired acto-myosin cross-bridge cycling in slow fibres.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Michaela; Cooper, Sandra T; Marston, Steve B; Nowak, Kristen J; McNamara, Elyshia; Mokbel, Nancy; Ilkovski, Biljana; Ravenscroft, Gianina; Rendu, John; de Winter, Josine M; Klinge, Lars; Beggs, Alan H; North, Kathryn N; Ottenheijm, Coen A C; Clarke, Nigel F

    2015-11-15

    Dominant mutations in TPM3, encoding α-tropomyosinslow, cause a congenital myopathy characterized by generalized muscle weakness. Here, we used a multidisciplinary approach to investigate the mechanism of muscle dysfunction in 12 TPM3-myopathy patients. We confirm that slow myofibre hypotrophy is a diagnostic hallmark of TPM3-myopathy, and is commonly accompanied by skewing of fibre-type ratios (either slow or fast fibre predominance). Patient muscle contained normal ratios of the three tropomyosin isoforms and normal fibre-type expression of myosins and troponins. Using 2D-PAGE, we demonstrate that mutant α-tropomyosinslow was expressed, suggesting muscle dysfunction is due to a dominant-negative effect of mutant protein on muscle contraction. Molecular modelling suggested mutant α-tropomyosinslow likely impacts actin-tropomyosin interactions and, indeed, co-sedimentation assays showed reduced binding of mutant α-tropomyosinslow (R168C) to filamentous actin. Single fibre contractility studies of patient myofibres revealed marked slow myofibre specific abnormalities. At saturating [Ca(2+)] (pCa 4.5), patient slow fibres produced only 63% of the contractile force produced in control slow fibres and had reduced acto-myosin cross-bridge cycling kinetics. Importantly, due to reduced Ca(2+)-sensitivity, at sub-saturating [Ca(2+)] (pCa 6, levels typically released during in vivo contraction) patient slow fibres produced only 26% of the force generated by control slow fibres. Thus, weakness in TPM3-myopathy patients can be directly attributed to reduced slow fibre force at physiological [Ca(2+)], and impaired acto-myosin cross-bridge cycling kinetics. Fast myofibres are spared; however, they appear to be unable to compensate for slow fibre dysfunction. Abnormal Ca(2+)-sensitivity in TPM3-myopathy patients suggests Ca(2+)-sensitizing drugs may represent a useful treatment for this condition. PMID:26307083

  10. Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) - children

    MedlinePlus

    Acute myelogenous leukemia - children; AML; Acute myeloid leukemia - children; Acute granulocytic leukemia - children; Acute myeloblastic leukemia - children; Acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) - children

  11. Association of a Novel ACTA1 Mutation With a Dominant Progressive Scapuloperoneal Myopathy in an Extended Family

    PubMed Central

    Zukosky, Kristen; Meilleur, Katherine; Traynor, Bryan J.; Dastgir, Jahannaz; Medne, Livija; Devoto, Marcella; Collins, James; Rooney, Jachinta; Zou, Yaqun; Yang, Michele L.; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Meier, Markus; Stetefeld, Joerg; Finkel, Richard S.; Schessl, Joachim; Elman, Lauren; Felice, Kevin; Ferguson, Toby A.; Ceyhan-Birsoy, Ozge; Beggs, Alan H.; Tennekoon, Gihan; Johnson, Janel O.; Bönnemann, Carsten G.

    2015-01-01

    diseases, including nemaline myopathy, actin aggregate myopathy, fiber-type disproportion, and rod-core myopathy. To our knowledge, mutations in Glu197 have not been reported previously. This residue is highly conserved and located in an exposed position in the protein; the mutation affects the intermolecular and intramolecular electrostatic interactions as shown by structural modeling. The mutation in this residue does not appear to lead to rod formation or actin accumulation in vitro or in vivo, suggesting a different molecular mechanism from that of other ACTA1 diseases. PMID:25938801

  12. Acute Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Hammad; Fasanya, Adebayo; Cheema, Tariq; Singh, Anil C

    2016-01-01

    Acute pneumonia is an active infection of the lungs that results when an individual at risk gets exposed to a particular microbiological pathogen. Acute pneumonia is the leading cause of death in the United States that is attributable to an infection. The risk factors, pathogenesis, and microbiological organisms involved differ if the pneumonia develops in the community versus health care-associated environment. The development of concise and comprehensive guidelines has led to an improvement in the management of the problem. However, the emergence of multidrug-resistant organisms and the increase in the percentage of elderly population keep mortality risk very substantial. PMID:26919676

  13. Nocturnal respiratory failure in a child with congenital myopathy – management using average volume-assured pressure support (AVAPS)

    PubMed Central

    Gentin, Natalie; Williamson, Bruce; Thambipillay, Ganesh; Teng, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    This is a case report of the effective use of bi-level positive airway pressure support (BPAP) using the volume-assured pressure support feature in a pediatric patient with a congenital myopathy and significant nocturnal hypoventilation. Our patient was started on nocturnal nasal mask BPAP but required high pressures to improve her oxygen saturations and CO2 baseline. She was then trialed on a BPAP machine with the volume-assured pressure support feature on. The ability of this machine to adjust inspiratory pressures to give a targeted tidal volume allowed the patient to be on lower pressure settings for periods of the night, with the higher pressures only when required. She tolerated the ventilation well and her saturations, CO2 profiles, and clinical condition improved. This case report highlights the benefits of the volume-assured pressure support feature on a BPAP machine in a child with a neuromuscular disorder. PMID:26392861

  14. Cardiac and skeletal myopathy in beta myosin heavy-chain simian virus 40 tsA58 transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    De Leon, J R; Federoff, H J; Dickson, D W; Vikstrom, K L; Fishman, G I

    1994-01-01

    The mechanisms regulating cardiac muscle differentiation and development are incompletely understood. To examine the relationships between cardiocyte proliferation and differentiation, we tested the ability of a fragment from the rat beta myosin heavy-chain (MHC beta) gene to correctly target expression of a thermolabile simian virus 40 large tumor antigen allele (tsA58) in the developing mouse. Transgene expression in the heart was observed as early as 10 days postconception and was developmentally regulated in parallel with the endogenous MHC beta gene. Expression was also detected in developing skeletal muscle, although at low levels. Despite the temperature sensitivity of the mutant large tumor antigen protein, a subset of transgenic mice in several lineages developed marked cardiac and skeletal myopathies. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8290557

  15. Mutation of mouse Samd4 causes leanness, myopathy, uncoupled mitochondrial respiration, and dysregulated mTORC1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhe; Holland, William; Shelton, John M; Ali, Aktar; Zhan, Xiaoming; Won, Sungyong; Tomisato, Wataru; Liu, Chen; Li, Xiaohong; Moresco, Eva Marie Y; Beutler, Bruce

    2014-05-20

    Sterile alpha motif domain containing protein 4 (Samd4) is an RNA binding protein that mediates translational repression. We identified a Samd4 missense mutation, designated supermodel, that caused leanness and kyphosis associated with myopathy and adipocyte defects in C57BL/6J mice. The supermodel mutation protected homozygous mice from high fat diet-induced obesity, likely by promoting enhanced energy expenditure through uncoupled mitochondrial respiration. Glucose tolerance was impaired due to diminished insulin release in homozygous mutant mice. The defects of metabolism in supermodel mice may be explained by dysregulated mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling, evidenced by hypophosphorylation of 4E-BP1 and S6 in muscle and adipose tissues of homozygous mice. Samd4 may interface with mTORC1 signaling through an interaction with 14-3-3 proteins and with Akt, which phosphorylates Samd4 in vitro. PMID:24799716

  16. Loss-of-function mutations in SCN4A cause severe foetal hypokinesia or ‘classical’ congenital myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zaharieva, Irina T.; Thor, Michael G.; Oates, Emily C.; van Karnebeek, Clara; Hendson, Glenda; Blom, Eveline; Witting, Nanna; Rasmussen, Magnhild; Gabbett, Michael T.; Ravenscroft, Gianina; Sframeli, Maria; Suetterlin, Karen; Sarkozy, Anna; D’Argenzio, Luigi; Hartley, Louise; Matthews, Emma; Pitt, Matthew; Vissing, John; Ballegaard, Martin; Krarup, Christian; Slørdahl, Andreas; Halvorsen, Hanne; Ye, Xin Cynthia; Zhang, Lin-Hua; Løkken, Nicoline; Werlauff, Ulla; Abdelsayed, Mena; Davis, Mark R.; Feng, Lucy; Phadke, Rahul; Sewry, Caroline A.; Morgan, Jennifer E.; Laing, Nigel G.; Vallance, Hilary; Ruben, Peter; Hanna, Michael G.; Lewis, Suzanne; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; Männikkö, Roope

    2016-01-01

    See Cannon (doi:10.1093/brain/awv400) for a scientific commentary on this article. Congenital myopathies are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of muscle disorders characterized by congenital or early-onset hypotonia and muscle weakness, and specific pathological features on muscle biopsy. The phenotype ranges from foetal akinesia resulting in in utero or neonatal mortality, to milder disorders that are not life-limiting. Over the past decade, more than 20 new congenital myopathy genes have been identified. Most encode proteins involved in muscle contraction; however, mutations in ion channel-encoding genes are increasingly being recognized as a cause of this group of disorders. SCN4A encodes the α-subunit of the skeletal muscle voltage-gated sodium channel (Nav1.4). This channel is essential for the generation and propagation of the muscle action potential crucial to muscle contraction. Dominant SCN4A gain-of-function mutations are a well-established cause of myotonia and periodic paralysis. Using whole exome sequencing, we identified homozygous or compound heterozygous SCN4A mutations in a cohort of 11 individuals from six unrelated kindreds with congenital myopathy. Affected members developed in utero- or neonatal-onset muscle weakness of variable severity. In seven cases, severe muscle weakness resulted in death during the third trimester or shortly after birth. The remaining four cases had marked congenital or neonatal-onset hypotonia and weakness associated with mild-to-moderate facial and neck weakness, significant neonatal-onset respiratory and swallowing difficulties and childhood-onset spinal deformities. All four surviving cohort members experienced clinical improvement in the first decade of life. Muscle biopsies showed myopathic features including fibre size variability, presence of fibrofatty tissue of varying severity, without specific structural abnormalities. Electrophysiology suggested a myopathic process, without myotonia. In vitro

  17. Progressive mitochondrial myopathy, deafness, and sporadic seizures associated with a novel mutation in the mitochondrial tRNASer(AGY) gene.

    PubMed

    Cardaioli, Elena; Malfatti, Edoardo; Da Pozzo, Paola; Gallus, Gian Nicola; Carluccio, Maria Alessandra; Rufa, Alessandra; Volpi, Nila; Dotti, Maria Teresa; Federico, Antonio

    2011-04-15

    We sequenced the mitochondrial genome from a patient with progressive mitochondrial myopathy associated with deafness, sporadic seizures, and histological and biochemical features of mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction. Direct sequencing showed a heteroplasmic mutation at nucleotide 12262 in the tRNASer(AGY) gene. RFLP analysis confirmed that 63% of muscle mtDNA harboured the mutation, while it was absent in all the other tissues. The mutation is predicted to influence the functional behaviour of the aminoacyl acceptor stem of the tRNA. Several point mutations on mitochondrial tRNA genes have been reported in patients affected by encephalomyopathies, but between them only four were reported for tRNASer(AGY). PMID:21257182

  18. Mitochondria DNA depletion syndrome in a infant with multiple congenital malformations, severe myopathy, and prolonged postoperative paralysis.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Mark; Salpietro, Vincenzo; Canham, Natalie; Ruggieri, Martino; Phadke, Rahul; Kinali, Maria

    2015-04-01

    Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndromes are an important cause of mitochondrial cytopathies in both children and adults. We describe a newborn with multiple congenital malformations including a right aberrant subclavian artery and a trachea-oesophageal fistula in whom mitochondrial depletion syndrome was unmasked by perioperative muscle relaxation. After vecuronium infusion, the infant developed an irreversible postoperative paralysis, leading to death 32 days after surgery. The present case highlights (a) the clinical heterogeneity of mitochondrial depletion syndrome; (b) the importance of rigorous antemortem and postmortem investigations when the cause of a severe myopathy is uncertain; (c) the possible coexistence of mitochondrial depletion syndrome and congenital malformations as a result of a likely abnormal antenatal embryofetal development and (d) the importance of a careful anaesthetic management of children with mitochondrial depletion syndrome, which could be prone to complications related to the possible depressive effects on mitochondrial electron transport chain mediated by some anaesthetic agents. PMID:24789116

  19. Graphic Mining of High-Order Drug Interactions and Their Directional Effects on Myopathy Using Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Du, L; Chakraborty, A; Chiang, C-W; Cheng, L; Quinney, SK; Wu, H; Zhang, P; Li, L; Shen, L

    2015-01-01

    We propose to study a novel pharmacovigilance problem for mining directional effects of high-order drug interactions on an adverse drug event (ADE). Our goal is to estimate each individual risk of adding a new drug to an existing drug combination. In this proof-of-concept study, we analyzed a large electronic medical records database and extracted myopathy-relevant case control drug co-occurrence data. We applied frequent itemset mining to discover frequent drug combinations within the extracted data, evaluated directional drug interactions related to these combinations, and identified directional drug interactions with large effect sizes. Furthermore, we developed a novel visualization method to organize multiple directional drug interaction effects depicted as a tree, to generate an intuitive graphical and visual representation of our data-mining results. This translational bioinformatics approach yields promising results, adds valuable and complementary information to the existing pharmacovigilance literature, and has the potential to impact clinical practice. PMID:26380157

  20. A recurrent copy number variation of the NEB triplicate region: only revealed by the targeted nemaline myopathy CGH array.

    PubMed

    Kiiski, Kirsi; Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Löytynoja, Ari; Ahlstén, Liina; Laitila, Jenni; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina; Pelin, Katarina

    2016-04-01

    Recently, new large variants have been identified in the nebulin gene (NEB) causing nemaline myopathy (NM). NM constitutes a heterogeneous group of disorders among the congenital myopathies, and disease-causing variants in NEB are a main cause of the recessively inherited form of NM. NEB consists of 183 exons and it includes homologous sequences such as a 32-kb triplicate region (TRI), where eight exons are repeated three times (exons 82-89, 90-97, 98-105). In human, the normal copy number of NEB TRI is six (three copies in each allele). Recently, we described a custom NM-CGH microarray designed to detect copy number variations (CNVs) in the known NM genes. The array has now been updated to include all the currently known 10 NM genes. The NM-CGH array is superior in detecting CNVs, especially of the NEB TRI, that is not included in the exome capture kits. To date, we have studied 266 samples from 196 NM families using the NM-CGH microarray, and identified a novel recurrent NEB TRI variation in 13% (26/196) of the families and in 10% of the controls (6/60). An analysis of the breakpoints revealed adjacent repeat elements, which are known to predispose for rearrangements such as CNVs. The control CNV samples deviate only one copy from the normal six copies, whereas the NM samples include CNVs of up to four additional copies. Based on this study, NEB seems to tolerate deviations of one TRI copy, whereas addition of two or more copies might be pathogenic. PMID:26197980

  1. Myofibrillar myopathy with abnormal foci of desmin positivity. II. Immunocytochemical analysis reveals accumulation of multiple other proteins.

    PubMed

    De Bleecker, J L; Engel, A G; Ertl, B B

    1996-05-01

    The two major types of lesions in myofibrillar myopathy consist of hyaline spheroidal structures composed of compacted myofibrillar residues, and nonhyaline lesions that comprise foci of myofibrillar destruction. We employed immunocytochemical analysis to further characterize these abnormalities. The nonhyaline lesions are depleted of actin, alpha-actinin, myosin, and, less consistently, of titin and nebulin. Thus, each major component of the myofibrils is lost or decreased. These lesions also react strongly for both NCAM and desmin. By contrast, the hyaline structures are highly enriched in actin, are immunoreactive for fast and slow myosin, and show increased expression of titin, nebulin, and alpha-actinin. They fail to react for NCAM and react variably for desmin. Both types of lesion react, but with differing intensities, for gelsolin, dystrophin, beta-amyloid precursor protein (beta APP) epitopes amino-terminal to the alpha-secretase site, alpha 1-antichymotrypsin, and ubiquitin, and both can be congophilic. The increased expressions of desmin, dystrophin and gelsolin in muscle are also confirmed by immunoblot studies. The results, in harmony with the ultrastructural findings described in the companion paper, suggest that myofibrillar myopathy is conditioned by abnormal activation of a degradative process that primarily affects the myofibrils. A structural abnormality of desmin alone may not be sufficient to disrupt the myofibrillar architecture, but abnormal activation of a phosphorylating process could account for dissolution of the myofibrils. The cause and significance of the ectopic overexpression of desmin, dystrophin, NCAM, and beta APP components, and the chemical basis of the congophilia remain unknown. PMID:8627347

  2. Distinct muscle apoptotic pathways are activated in muscles with different fiber types a rat model of critical illness myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Benjamin T.; Confides, Amy L.; Rich, Mark M.; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E.

    2015-01-01

    Critical illness myopathy (CIM) is associated with severe muscle atrophy and fatigue in affected patients. Apoptotic signaling is involved in atrophy and is elevated in muscles from patients with CIM. In this study we investigated underlying mechanisms of apoptosis-related pathways in muscles with different fiber type composition in a rat model of CIM using denervation and glucocorticoid administration (denervation and steroid-induced myopathy, DSIM). Soleus and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles showed severe muscle atrophy (40–60% of control muscle weight) and significant apoptosis in interstitial as well as myofiber nuclei that was similar between the two muscles with DSIM. Caspase-3 and −8 activities, but not caspase-9 and −12, were elevated in TA and not in soleus muscle, while the caspase-independent proteins endonuclease G (EndoG) and apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) were not changed in abundance nor differentially localized in either muscle. Anti-apoptotic proteins HSP70, −27, and apoptosis repressor with a caspase recruitment domain (ARC) were elevated in soleus compared to TA muscle and ARC was significantly decreased with induction of DSIM in soleus. Results indicate that apoptosis is a significant process associated with DSIM in both soleus and TA muscles, and that apoptosis-associated processes are differentially regulated in muscles of different function and fiber type undergoing atrophy due to DSIM. We conclude that interventions combating apoptosis with CIM may need to be directed towards inhibiting caspase-dependent as well as -independent mechanisms to be able to affect muscles of all fiber types. PMID:25740800

  3. Antibody Levels Correlate with Creatine Kinase Levels and Strength in Anti-HMG-CoA Reductase-Associated Autoimmune Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Jessie L.; Christopher-Stine, Lisa; Ghazarian, Sharon R.; Pak, Katherine S.; Kus, Jordan E.; Daya, Natalie R.; Lloyd, Thomas E.; Mammen, Andrew L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Anti-HMGCR antibodies are found in patients with statin-associated immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy and, less commonly, in statin-unexposed subjects with autoimmune myopathy. The main objective of this study is to define the association of anti-HMGCR antibody levels with disease activity. Methods Anti-HMGCR levels, creatine kinase (CK) levels, and strength were assessed in anti-HMGCR positive subjects. Associations of antibody level with CK and strength at visit 1 were analyzed in 55 subjects, 40 of whom were statin-exposed. In 12 statin-exposed and 5 statin-unexposed subjects with serum from 5 serial visits, the evolution of antibody levels, CK levels, and strength was investigated. Results Antibody levels were associated with CK levels (p < 0.001), arm strength (p < 0.05), and leg strength (p < 0.05) at visit 1 but these associations were only significant amongst statin-exposed patients in stratified analyses. With treatment over 26.2 +/− 12.6 months, antibody levels declined (p < 0.05) and arm abduction strength improved (p < 0.05) in 17 subjects followed longitudinally. When analyzed separately, statin-exposed subjects developed decreased antibody levels (p < 0.01), decreased CK levels (p < 0.001), improved arm strength (p < 0.05), and improved hip flexion strength (p < 0.05) with treatment. Anti-HMGCR antibody levels did not normalize in any subject. Conclusion In the entire cohort, initial anti-HMGCR levels correlated with indicators of disease activity; with treatment, antibody levels declined and arm strength improved. Statin-exposed but not statin-unexposed subjects had significant improvements in CK and strength, suggesting a phenotypic difference between statin-exposed and -unexposed anti-HMGCR patients. PMID:22933019

  4. Sympathetic activation in exercise is not dependent on muscle acidosis. Direct evidence from studies in metabolic myopathies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vissing, J.; Vissing, S. F.; MacLean, D. A.; Saltin, B.; Quistorff, B.; Haller, R. G.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Muscle acidosis has been implicated as a major determinant of reflex sympathetic activation during exercise. To test this hypothesis we studied sympathetic exercise responses in metabolic myopathies in which muscle acidosis is impaired or augmented during exercise. As an index of reflex sympathetic activation to muscle, microneurographic measurements of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) were obtained from the peroneal nerve. MSNA was measured during static handgrip exercise at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction force to exhaustion in patients in whom exercise-induced muscle acidosis is absent (seven myophosphorylase deficient patients; MD [McArdle's disease], and one patient with muscle phosphofructokinase deficiency [PFKD]), augmented (one patient with mitochondrial myopathy [MM]), or normal (five healthy controls). Muscle pH was monitored by 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy during handgrip exercise in the five control subjects, four MD patients, and the MM and PFKD patients. With handgrip to exhaustion, the increase in MSNA over baseline (bursts per minute [bpm] and total activity [%]) was not impaired in patients with MD (17+/-2 bpm, 124+/-42%) or PFKD (65 bpm, 307%), and was not enhanced in the MM patient (24 bpm, 131%) compared with controls (17+/-4 bpm, 115+/-17%). Post-handgrip ischemia studied in one McArdle patient, caused sustained elevation of MSNA above basal suggesting a chemoreflex activation of MSNA. Handgrip exercise elicited an enhanced drop in muscle pH of 0.51 U in the MM patient compared with the decrease in controls of 0.13+/-0.02 U. In contrast, muscle pH increased with exercise in MD by 0.12+/-0.05 U and in PFKD by 0.01 U. In conclusion, patients with glycogenolytic, glycolytic, and oxidative phosphorylation defects show normal muscle sympathetic nerve responses to static exercise. These findings indicate that muscle acidosis is not a prerequisite for sympathetic activation in exercise.

  5. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary α-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  6. The myotubular myopathies: differential diagnosis of the X linked recessive, autosomal dominant, and autosomal recessive forms and present state of DNA studies.

    PubMed Central

    Wallgren-Pettersson, C; Clarke, A; Samson, F; Fardeau, M; Dubowitz, V; Moser, H; Grimm, T; Barohn, R J; Barth, P G

    1995-01-01

    Clinical differences exist between the three forms of myotubular myopathy. They differ regarding age at onset, severity of the disease, and prognosis, and also regarding some of the clinical characteristics. The autosomal dominant form mostly has a later onset and milder course than the X linked form, and the autosomal recessive form is intermediate in both respects. These differences are, however, quantitative rather than qualitative. Muscle biopsy studies of family members are useful in some cases, and immunohistochemical staining of desmin and vimentin may help distinguish between the X linked and autosomal forms. Determining the mode of inheritance and prognosis in individual families, especially those with a single male patient, still poses a problem. Current molecular genetic results indicate that the gene for the X linked form is located in the proximal Xq28 region. Further molecular genetic studies are needed to examine the existence of genetic heterogeneity in myotubular myopathy and to facilitate diagnosis. Images PMID:8544184

  7. Loss of Tropomodulin4 in the zebrafish mutant träge causes cytoplasmic rod formation and muscle weakness reminiscent of nemaline myopathy.

    PubMed

    Berger, Joachim; Tarakci, Hakan; Berger, Silke; Li, Mei; Hall, Thomas E; Arner, Anders; Currie, Peter D

    2014-12-01

    Nemaline myopathy is an inherited muscle disease that is mainly diagnosed by the presence of nemaline rods in muscle biopsies. Of the nine genes associated with the disease, five encode components of striated muscle sarcomeres. In a genetic zebrafish screen, the mutant träge (trg) was isolated based on its reduction in muscle birefringence, indicating muscle damage. Myofibres in trg appeared disorganised and showed inhomogeneous cytoplasmic eosin staining alongside malformed nuclei. Linkage analysis of trg combined with sequencing identified a nonsense mutation in tropomodulin4 (tmod4), a regulator of thin filament length and stability. Accordingly, although actin monomers polymerize to form thin filaments in the skeletal muscle of tmod4(trg) mutants, thin filaments often appeared to be dispersed throughout myofibres. Organised myofibrils with the typical striation rarely assemble, leading to severe muscle weakness, impaired locomotion and early death. Myofibrils of tmod4(trg) mutants often featured thin filaments of various lengths, widened Z-disks, undefined H-zones and electron-dense aggregations of various shapes and sizes. Importantly, Gomori trichrome staining and the lattice pattern of the detected cytoplasmic rods, together with the reactivity of rods with phalloidin and an antibody against actinin, is reminiscent of nemaline rods found in nemaline myopathy, suggesting that misregulation of thin filament length causes cytoplasmic rod formation in tmod4(trg) mutants. Although Tropomodulin4 has not been associated with myopathy, the results presented here implicateTMOD4 as a novel candidate for unresolved nemaline myopathies and suggest that the tmod4(trg) mutant will be a valuable tool to study human muscle disorders. PMID:25288681

  8. Aberrant mitochondria in a Bethlem myopathy patient with a homozygous amino acid substitution that destabilizes the collagen VI α2(VI) chain.

    PubMed

    Zamurs, Laura K; Idoate, Miguel A; Hanssen, Eric; Gomez-Ibañez, Asier; Pastor, Pau; Lamandé, Shireen R

    2015-02-13

    Bethlem myopathy and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD) sit at opposite ends of a clinical spectrum caused by mutations in the extracellular matrix protein collagen VI. Bethlem myopathy is relatively mild, and patients remain ambulant in adulthood while many UCMD patients lose ambulation by their teenage years and require respiratory interventions. Dominant and recessive mutations are found across the entire clinical spectrum; however, recessive Bethlem myopathy is rare, and our understanding of the molecular pathology is limited. We studied a patient with Bethlem myopathy. Electron microscopy of his muscle biopsy revealed abnormal mitochondria. We identified a homozygous COL6A2 p.D871N amino acid substitution in the C-terminal C2 A-domain. Mutant α2(VI) chains are unable to associate with α1(VI) and α3(VI) and are degraded by the proteasomal pathway. Some collagen VI is assembled, albeit more slowly than normal, and is secreted. These molecules contain the minor α2(VI) C2a splice form that has an alternative C terminus that does include the mutation. Collagen VI tetramers containing the α2(VI) C2a chain do not assemble efficiently into microfibrils and there is a severe collagen VI deficiency in the extracellular matrix. We expressed wild-type and mutant α2(VI) C2 domains in mammalian cells and showed that while wild-type C2 domains are efficiently secreted, the mutant p.D871N domain is retained in the cell. These studies shed new light on the protein domains important for intracellular and extracellular collagen VI assembly and emphasize the importance of molecular investigations for families with collagen VI disorders to ensure accurate diagnosis and genetic counseling. PMID:25533456

  9. Aberrant Mitochondria in a Bethlem Myopathy Patient with a Homozygous Amino Acid Substitution That Destabilizes the Collagen VI α2(VI) Chain*

    PubMed Central

    Zamurs, Laura K.; Idoate, Miguel A.; Hanssen, Eric; Gomez-Ibañez, Asier; Pastor, Pau; Lamandé, Shireen R.

    2015-01-01

    Bethlem myopathy and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD) sit at opposite ends of a clinical spectrum caused by mutations in the extracellular matrix protein collagen VI. Bethlem myopathy is relatively mild, and patients remain ambulant in adulthood while many UCMD patients lose ambulation by their teenage years and require respiratory interventions. Dominant and recessive mutations are found across the entire clinical spectrum; however, recessive Bethlem myopathy is rare, and our understanding of the molecular pathology is limited. We studied a patient with Bethlem myopathy. Electron microscopy of his muscle biopsy revealed abnormal mitochondria. We identified a homozygous COL6A2 p.D871N amino acid substitution in the C-terminal C2 A-domain. Mutant α2(VI) chains are unable to associate with α1(VI) and α3(VI) and are degraded by the proteasomal pathway. Some collagen VI is assembled, albeit more slowly than normal, and is secreted. These molecules contain the minor α2(VI) C2a splice form that has an alternative C terminus that does include the mutation. Collagen VI tetramers containing the α2(VI) C2a chain do not assemble efficiently into microfibrils and there is a severe collagen VI deficiency in the extracellular matrix. We expressed wild-type and mutant α2(VI) C2 domains in mammalian cells and showed that while wild-type C2 domains are efficiently secreted, the mutant p.D871N domain is retained in the cell. These studies shed new light on the protein domains important for intracellular and extracellular collagen VI assembly and emphasize the importance of molecular investigations for families with collagen VI disorders to ensure accurate diagnosis and genetic counseling. PMID:25533456

  10. Acute diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Barr, Wendy; Smith, Andrew

    2014-02-01

    Acute diarrhea in adults is a common problem encountered by family physicians. The most common etiology is viral gastroenteritis, a self-limited disease. Increases in travel, comorbidities, and foodborne illness lead to more bacteria-related cases of acute diarrhea. A history and physical examination evaluating for risk factors and signs of inflammatory diarrhea and/or severe dehydration can direct any needed testing and treatment. Most patients do not require laboratory workup, and routine stool cultures are not recommended. Treatment focuses on preventing and treating dehydration. Diagnostic investigation should be reserved for patients with severe dehydration or illness, persistent fever, bloody stool, or immunosuppression, and for cases of suspected nosocomial infection or outbreak. Oral rehydration therapy with early refeeding is the preferred treatment for dehydration. Antimotility agents should be avoided in patients with bloody diarrhea, but loperamide/simethicone may improve symptoms in patients with watery diarrhea. Probiotic use may shorten the duration of illness. When used appropriately, antibiotics are effective in the treatment of shigellosis, campylobacteriosis, Clostridium difficile, traveler's diarrhea, and protozoal infections. Prevention of acute diarrhea is promoted through adequate hand washing, safe food preparation, access to clean water, and vaccinations. PMID:24506120

  11. Sinusitis (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Acute sinusitis is defined pathologically, by transient inflammation of the mucosal lining of the paranasal sinuses lasting less than 4 weeks. Clinically, it is characterised by nasal congestion, rhinorrhoea, facial pain, hyposmia, sneezing, and, if more severe, additional malaise and fever. It affects 1−5% of the adult population each year in Europe. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments in people with clinically diagnosed acute sinusitis, and with radiologically or bacteriologically confirmed acute sinusitis? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to August 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 19 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics (amoxicillin, co-amoxiclav, doxycycline, cephalosporins, macrolides, different doses [amoxicillin, co-amoxiclav, doxycycline, cephalosporins, macrolides], long-course regimens), antihistamines, cephalosporins or macrolides, decongestants (xylometazoline, phenylephrine, pseudoephedrine), doxycycline, saline nasal washes, steam inhalation, and topical corticosteroids (intra-nasal). PMID:19450327

  12. Sinusitis (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Acute sinusitis is defined pathologically, by transient inflammation of the mucosal lining of the paranasal sinuses lasting less than 4 weeks. Clinically, it is characterised by nasal congestion, rhinorrhoea, facial pain, hyposmia, sneezing, and, if more severe, additional malaise and fever. It affects 1% to 5% of the adult population each year in Europe. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments in people with clinically diagnosed acute sinusitis, and in people with radiologically or bacteriologically confirmed acute sinusitis? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 19 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics (amoxicillin, amoxicillin–clavulanic acid [co-amoxiclav], doxycycline, cephalosporins, macrolides; different doses, long-course regimens), antihistamines, decongestants (xylometazoline, phenylephrine, pseudoephedrine), saline nasal washes, steam inhalation, and topical corticosteroids (intranasal). PMID:22189346

  13. Acute glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, N

    2000-09-01

    Acute glomerulonephritis (AGN) is a representative disease of acute nephritic syndrome characterized by the sudden appearance of edema, hematuria, proteinuria, and hypertension. The prototype of AGN is acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (APSGN). "Nephritogenic streptococci" are defined as organisms that are cultured from a patient who develops AGN. Although only a limited number of M-types of streptococci have been recognized as "nephritogenic streptococci", all M-types of streptococci may have nephritogenic potential because the genes for major putative nephritogenic antigens such as SPEB and NAPIr are found to be present in all group A streptococci thus far examined. Pathogenic mechanisms for APSGN involving both humoral and cell-mediated immunity have been recently proposed. The role of humoral immunity is presumed to be mediated by the in situ formation of nephritogenic streptococcal antigen-antibody complexes and circulating immune complexes. While in the cellular immune component a role for delayed-type hypersensitivity has been suggested to contribute to the pathogenesis of APSGN. PMID:10969898

  14. Association of Common Variants in the Human Eyes Shut Ortholog, EYS, with Statin-Induced Myopathy: Evidence for Additional Functions of EYS

    PubMed Central

    Isackson, Paul J.; Ochs-Balcom, Heather M.; Ma, Changxing; Harley, John B.; Peltier, Wendy; Tarnopolsky, Mark; Sripathi, Naganand; Wortmann, Robert L.; Simmons, Zachary; Wilson, Jon D.; Smith, Stephen A.; Barboi, Alexandru; Fine, Edward; Baer, Alan; Baker, Steven; Kaufman, Kenneth; Cobb, Beth; Kilpatrick, Jeffrey R.; Vladutiu, Georgirene D.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Of nearly 38 million people in the U.S. receiving statin therapy, 0.1–0.5% experience severe or life-threatening myopathic side effects. Methods We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in patients with severe statin myopathy versus a statin-tolerant group to identify genetic susceptibility loci. Results Replication studies in independent groups of severe statin myopathy (n=190) and statintolerant controls (n=130) resulted in the identification of three SNPs, rs9342288, rs1337512 and rs3857532, in the eyes shut homolog (EYS) on chromosome 6 suggestive of an association with risk for severe statin myopathy (p=0.0003–0.0008). Analysis of EYS cDNA demonstrated that EYS gene products are complex and expressed with relative abundance in the spinal cord as well as in the retina. Discussion Structural similarities of these EYS gene products to members of the Notch signaling pathway and to agrin suggest a possible functional role in the maintenance and regeneration of the structural integrity of skeletal muscle. PMID:21826682

  15. Myopathy caused by mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) inactivation is not reversed by restoring mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Romanino, Klaas; Mazelin, Laetitia; Albert, Verena; Conjard-Duplany, Agnès; Lin, Shuo; Bentzinger, C. Florian; Handschin, Christoph; Puigserver, Pere; Zorzato, Francesco; Schaeffer, Laurent; Gangloff, Yann-Gaël; Rüegg, Markus A.

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is central to the control of cell, organ, and body size. Skeletal muscle-specific inactivation of mTORC1 in mice results in smaller muscle fibers, fewer mitochondria, increased glycogen stores, and a progressive myopathy that causes premature death. In mTORC1-deficient muscles, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-α (PGC-1α), which regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and glucose homeostasis, is strongly down-regulated. Here we tested whether induction of mitochondrial biogenesis pharmacologically or by the overexpression of PGC-1α is sufficient to reverse the phenotype of mice deficient for mTORC1. We show that both approaches normalize mitochondrial function, such as oxidative capacity and expression of mitochondrial genes. However, they do not prevent or delay the progressive myopathy. In addition, we find that mTORC1 has a much stronger effect than PGC-1α on the glycogen content in muscle. This effect is based on the strong activation of PKB/Akt in mTORC1-deficient mice. We also show that activation of PKB/Akt not only affects glycogen synthesis but also diminishes glycogen degradation. Thus, our work provides strong functional evidence that mitochondrial dysfunction in mice with inactivated mTORC1 signaling is caused by the down-regulation of PGC-1α. However, our data also show that the impairment of mitochondria does not lead directly to the lethal myopathy. PMID:22143799

  16. Myopathy caused by mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) inactivation is not reversed by restoring mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Romanino, Klaas; Mazelin, Laetitia; Albert, Verena; Conjard-Duplany, Agnès; Lin, Shuo; Bentzinger, C Florian; Handschin, Christoph; Puigserver, Pere; Zorzato, Francesco; Schaeffer, Laurent; Gangloff, Yann-Gaël; Rüegg, Markus A

    2011-12-20

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is central to the control of cell, organ, and body size. Skeletal muscle-specific inactivation of mTORC1 in mice results in smaller muscle fibers, fewer mitochondria, increased glycogen stores, and a progressive myopathy that causes premature death. In mTORC1-deficient muscles, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-α (PGC-1α), which regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and glucose homeostasis, is strongly down-regulated. Here we tested whether induction of mitochondrial biogenesis pharmacologically or by the overexpression of PGC-1α is sufficient to reverse the phenotype of mice deficient for mTORC1. We show that both approaches normalize mitochondrial function, such as oxidative capacity and expression of mitochondrial genes. However, they do not prevent or delay the progressive myopathy. In addition, we find that mTORC1 has a much stronger effect than PGC-1α on the glycogen content in muscle. This effect is based on the strong activation of PKB/Akt in mTORC1-deficient mice. We also show that activation of PKB/Akt not only affects glycogen synthesis but also diminishes glycogen degradation. Thus, our work provides strong functional evidence that mitochondrial dysfunction in mice with inactivated mTORC1 signaling is caused by the down-regulation of PGC-1α. However, our data also show that the impairment of mitochondria does not lead directly to the lethal myopathy. PMID:22143799

  17. Mutation update and genotype-phenotype correlations of novel and previously described mutations in TPM2 and TPM3 causing congenital myopathies.

    PubMed

    Marttila, Minttu; Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Marston, Steven; Nyman, Tuula A; Barnerias, Christine; Beggs, Alan H; Bertini, Enrico; Ceyhan-Birsoy, Ozge; Cintas, Pascal; Gerard, Marion; Gilbert-Dussardier, Brigitte; Hogue, Jacob S; Longman, Cheryl; Eymard, Bruno; Frydman, Moshe; Kang, Peter B; Klinge, Lars; Kolski, Hanna; Lochmüller, Hans; Magy, Laurent; Manel, Véronique; Mayer, Michèle; Mercuri, Eugenio; North, Kathryn N; Peudenier-Robert, Sylviane; Pihko, Helena; Probst, Frank J; Reisin, Ricardo; Stewart, Willie; Taratuto, Ana Lia; de Visser, Marianne; Wilichowski, Ekkehard; Winer, John; Nowak, Kristen; Laing, Nigel G; Winder, Tom L; Monnier, Nicole; Clarke, Nigel F; Pelin, Katarina; Grönholm, Mikaela; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina

    2014-07-01

    Mutations affecting skeletal muscle isoforms of the tropomyosin genes may cause nemaline myopathy, cap myopathy, core-rod myopathy, congenital fiber-type disproportion, distal arthrogryposes, and Escobar syndrome. We correlate the clinical picture of these diseases with novel (19) and previously reported (31) mutations of the TPM2 and TPM3 genes. Included are altogether 93 families: 53 with TPM2 mutations and 40 with TPM3 mutations. Thirty distinct pathogenic variants of TPM2 and 20 of TPM3 have been published or listed in the Leiden Open Variant Database (http://www.dmd.nl/). Most are heterozygous changes associated with autosomal-dominant disease. Patients with TPM2 mutations tended to present with milder symptoms than those with TPM3 mutations, DA being present only in the TPM2 group. Previous studies have shown that five of the mutations in TPM2 and one in TPM3 cause increased Ca(2+) sensitivity resulting in a hypercontractile molecular phenotype. Patients with hypercontractile phenotype more often had contractures of the limb joints (18/19) and jaw (6/19) than those with nonhypercontractile ones (2/22 and 1/22), whereas patients with the non-hypercontractile molecular phenotype more often (19/22) had axial contractures than the hypercontractile group (7/19). Our in silico predictions show that most mutations affect tropomyosin-actin association or tropomyosin head-to-tail binding. PMID:24692096

  18. Mutation Update and Genotype–Phenotype Correlations of Novel and Previously Described Mutations in TPM2 and TPM3 Causing Congenital Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Marttila, Minttu; Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Marston, Steven; Nyman, Tuula A.; Barnerias, Christine; Beggs, Alan H.; Bertini, Enrico; Ceyhan-Birsoy, OÖzge; Cintas, Pascal; Gerard, Marion; Gilbert-Dussardier, Brigitte; Hogue, Jacob S.; Longman, Cheryl; Eymard, Bruno; Frydman, Moshe; Kang, Peter B.; Klinge, Lars; Kolski, Hanna; Lochmüller, Hans; Magy, Laurent; Manel, Véronique; Mayer, Michèle; Mercuri, Eugenio; North, Kathryn N.; Peudenier-Robert, Sylviane; Pihko, Helena; Probst, Frank J.; Reisin, Ricardo; Stewart, Willie; Taratuto, Ana Lia; de Visser, Marianne; Wilichowski, Ekkehard; Winer, John; Nowak, Kristen; Laing, Nigel G.; Winder, Tom L.; Monnier, Nicole; Clarke, Nigel F.; Pelin, Katarina; Grönholm, Mikaela; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina

    2014-01-01

    Mutations affecting skeletal muscle isoforms of the tropomyosin genes may cause nemaline myopathy, cap myopathy, core-rod myopathy, congenital fiber-type disproportion, distal arthrogryposes, and Escobar syndrome. We correlate the clinical picture of these diseases with novel (19) and previously reported (31) mutations of the TPM2 and TPM3 genes. Included are altogether 93 families: 53 with TPM2 mutations and 40 with TPM3 mutations. Thirty distinct pathogenic variants of TPM2 and 20 of TPM3 have been published or listed in the Leiden Open Variant Database (http://www.dmd.nl/). Most are heterozygous changes associated with autosomal-dominant disease. Patients with TPM2 mutations tended to present with milder symptoms than those with TPM3 mutations, DA being present only in the TPM2 group. Previous studies have shown that five of the mutations in TPM2 and one in TPM3 cause increased Ca2+ sensitivity resulting in a hypercontractile molecular phenotype. Patients with hypercontractile phenotype more often had contractures of the limb joints (18/19) and jaw (6/19) than those with nonhypercontractile ones (2/22 and 1/22), whereas patients with the non-hypercontractile molecular phenotype more often (19/22) had axial contractures than the hypercontractile group (7/19). Our in silico predictions show that most mutations affect tropomyosin–actin association or tropomyosin head-to-tail binding. PMID:24692096

  19. Muscle-specific overexpression of lipoprotein lipase causes a severe myopathy characterized by proliferation of mitochondria and peroxisomes in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Levak-Frank, S; Radner, H; Walsh, A; Stollberger, R; Knipping, G; Hoefler, G; Sattler, W; Weinstock, P H; Breslow, J L; Zechner, R

    1995-01-01

    In extrahepatic tissues lipoprotein lipase (LPL) hydrolyzes triglycerides thereby generating FFA for tissue uptake and metabolism. To study the effects of increased FFA uptake in muscle tissue, transgenic mouse lines were generated with a human LPL minigene driven by the promoter of the muscle creatine kinase gene. In these mice human LPL was expressed in skeletal muscle and cardiac muscle, but not in other tissues. In proportion to the level of LPL overexpression, decreased plasma triglyceride levels, elevated FFA uptake by muscle tissue, weight loss, and premature death were observed in three independent transgenic mouse lines. The animals developed a severe myopathy characterized by muscle fiber degeneration, fiber atrophy, glycogen storage, and extensive proliferation of mitochondria and peroxisomes. This degree of proliferation suggests that FFA play an important role in the biogenesis of these organelles. Our experiments indicate that LPL is rate limiting for the supply of muscle tissue with triglyceride-derived FFA. Improper regulation of muscle LPL can lead to major pathological changes and may be important in the pathogenesis of some human myopathies. Muscle-specific LPL transgenic mouse lines will serve as a useful animal model for the investigation of myopathies and the biogenesis of mitochondria and peroxisomes. Images PMID:7635990

  20. Genotype-Phenotype studies of VCP-associated Inclusion Body Myopathy with Paget Disease of Bone and/or Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Sarju G.; Khare, Manaswitha; Ramani, Rupal; Watts, Giles D. J.; Simon, Mariella; Osann, Kathryn E.; Donkervoort, Sandra; Dec, Eric; Nalbandian, Angele; Platt, Julia; Pasquali, Marzia; Wang, Annabel; Mozaffar, Tahseen; Smith, Charles D.; Kimonis, Virginia E.

    2012-01-01

    VCP disease associated with Inclusion body myopathy, Paget disease of the bone and frontotemporal dementia is a progressive autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations in Valosin containing protein gene. To establish genotype-phenotype correlations we analyzed clinical and biochemical markers from a database of 190 members in 27 families harboring ten missense mutations. Individuals were grouped into three categories: symptomatic, presymptomatic carriers and non-carriers. The symptomatic families were further divided into ten groups based on their VCP mutations. There was marked intra and inter-familial variation; and significant genotype-phenotype correlations were difficult because of small numbers. Nevertheless when comparing the two most common mutations, R155C mutation was found to be more severe, with earlier onset of myopathy and Paget (p=0.03). Survival analysis of all subjects revealed an average life span after diagnosis of myopathy and Paget of 18 and 19 years respectively, and after dementia only 6 years. R155C had a reduced survival compared to the R155H mutation (p=0.03). We identified amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in thirteen individuals (8.9%) and Parkinson’s disease in five individuals (3%); however there was no genotypic correlation. This study represents the largest dataset of patients with VCP disease and expands our understanding of natural history and provides genotype-phenotype correlations in this unique disease. PMID:22909335

  1. [Acute myocarditis].

    PubMed

    Combes, Alain

    2012-06-01

    Myocarditis is defined as inflammation of the myocardium accompanied by myocellular necrosis. Acute myocarditis must be considered in patients who present with recent-onset of cardiac failure or arrhythmia. Fulminant myocarditis is a distinct entity characterized by sudden onset of severe congestive heart failure or cardiogenic shock, usually following a flu-like illness, parvovirus B19, human herpesvirus 6, coxsackievirus and adenovirus being the most frequently viruses responsible for the disease. Treatment of myocarditis remains largely supportive, since immunosuppression has not been proven to be beneficial for acute lymphocytic myocarditis. Trials of antiviral therapies, or immunostimulants such as interferons, suggest a potential therapeutic role but require further investigation. Lastly, early recognition of patients rapidly progressing to refractory cardiac failure and their immediate transfer to a medical-surgical center experienced in mechanical circulatory support is warranted. In this setting, ECMO should be the first-line mechanical assistance. For highly unstable patients, a Mobile Cardiac Assistance Unit, that rapidly travels to primary care hospitals with a portable ECMO system and hooks it up before refractory multiorgan failure takes hold, is the preferred option. PMID:22515999

  2. [Acute myocarditis].

    PubMed

    Combes, Alain

    2013-05-01

    Myocarditis is defined as inflammation of the myocardium accompanied by myocellular necrosis. Acute myocarditis must be considered in patients who present with recent onset of cardiac failure or arrhythmia. Fulminant myocarditis is a distinct entity characterized by sudden onset of severe congestive heart failure or cardiogenic shock, usually following a flu-like illness, parvovirus B19, human herpesvirus 6, coxsackievirus and adenovirus being the most frequently viruses responsible for the disease. Treatment of myocarditis remains largely supportive, since immunosuppression has not been proven to be beneficial for acute lymphocytic myocarditis. Trials of antiviral therapies, or immunostimulants such as interferons, suggest a potential therapeutic role but require further investigation. Lastly, early recognition of patients rapidly progressing to refractory cardiac failure and their immediate transfer to a medical-surgical center experienced in mechanical circulatory support is warranted. In this setting, ECMO should be the first-line mechanical assistance. For highly unstable patients, a Mobile Cardiac Assistance Unit, that rapidly travels to primary care hospitals with a portable ECMO system and hooks it up before refractory multiorgan failure takes hold, is the preferred option. PMID:23789482

  3. The respiratory system.

    PubMed

    Zifko, U; Chen, R

    1996-10-01

    Neurological disorders frequently contribute to respiratory failure in critically ill patients. They may be the primary reason for the initiation of mechanical ventilation, or may develop later as a secondary complication. Disorders of the central nervous system leading to respiratory failure include metabolic encephalopathies, acute stroke, lesions of the motor cortex and brain-stem respiratory centres, and their descending pathways. Guillan-Barré syndrome, critical illness polyneuropathy and acute quadriplegic myopathy are the more common neuromuscular causes of respiratory failure. Clinical observations and pulmonary function tests are important in monitoring respiratory function. Respiratory electrophysiological studies are useful in the investigation and monitoring of respiratory failure. Transcortical and cervical magnetic stimulation can assess the central respiratory drive, and may be useful in determining the prognosis in ventilated patients, with cervical cord dysfunction. It is also helpful in the assessment of failure to wean, which is often caused by a combination of central and peripheral nervous system disorders. Phrenic nerve conduction studies and needle electromyography of the diaphragm and chest wall muscles are useful to characterize neuropathies and myopathies affecting the diaphragm. Repetitive phrenic nerve stimulation can assess neuromuscular transmission defects. It is important to identify patients at risk of respiratory failure. They should be carefully monitored and mechanical ventilation should be initiated before the development of severe hypoxaemia. PMID:9117072

  4. Acute cerebellar ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    Cerebellar ataxia; Ataxia - acute cerebellar; Cerebellitis; Post-varicella acute cerebellar ataxia; PVACA ... Acute cerebellar ataxia in children, especially younger than age 3, may occur several weeks after an illness caused by a virus. ...

  5. Ear infection - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Otitis media - acute; Infection - inner ear; Middle ear infection - acute ... Casselbrandt ML, Mandel EM. Acute otitis media and otitis media with effusion. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund V, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 6th ed. ...

  6. Seasonality of birth patterns in an Australian cohort of patients with biopsy-confirmed idiopathic inflammatory myopathy.

    PubMed

    Woodman, R; Hakendorf, P; Limaye, V

    2016-05-01

    Environmental exposures in the foetal period may predispose to autoimmunity. Aim of this study is to investigate whether seasonality in birth patterns exists in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM). We used Stata (StataCorp USA, version 13.0) and the user-written routine command 'circsummarise' to assess birth seasonality among South Australian patients with histologically confirmed IIM subsequent to 1980 using their date of birth. There was no evidence for a seasonal birth pattern among IIM patients overall (n = 568), however there were some ethnic variances in birth patterns among non-Caucasian patients. There was evidence for birth seasonality among both Aboriginal (mean = 7 July, Rayleigh P = 0.04) and Asian patients (mean = 12 August, Rayleigh P-value = 0.038). Non-Caucasians born in the third quarter of the calendar year may have an increased risk of developing IIM. Large international studies of IIM patients of diverse ethnicity are required to clarify the role of perinatal exposures in disease susceptibility. PMID:27170240

  7. [A case of primary aldosteronism presenting hypokalemic myopathy induced by benidipine hydrochloride; a dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker].

    PubMed

    Sugawara, H; Shiraiwa, H; Otsuka, M; Ueki, A

    2000-05-01

    We report a 46-year-old man with primary aldosteronism presenting hypokalemia, periodic paralysis and hypokalemic myopathy whose clinical course paralleled with the dosage of benidipine hydrochloride, a dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker (DHP-CCB), administered for the treatment of hypertension. To see relations between DHP-CCB and episodes of motor weakness in patients with primary aldosteronism, we surveyed retrospectively the history of motor weakness and anti-hypertensive drugs in 14 consecutive cases with primary aldosteronism in our institute. Five patients out of 11 cases (45.5%) who had received DHP-CCB experienced muscle weakness, however, the rest of three patients receiving other anti-hypertensive drug had not experienced weakness. Though, less attention has been paid as thiazide diuretics, it is reported that DHP-CCB also induces hypokalemia through several mechanisms. However, the occurrence of motor weakness by DHP-CCB is very rare. Our results show that primary aldosteronism should be taken into account when we encounter patients manifesting episodic motor weakness by the use of DHP-CCB. PMID:11002726

  8. Pseudouridine synthase 1 deficient mice, a model for Mitochondrial Myopathy with Sideroblastic Anemia, exhibit muscle morphology and physiology alterations

    PubMed Central

    Mangum, Joshua E.; Hardee, Justin P.; Fix, Dennis K.; Puppa, Melissa J.; Elkes, Johnathon; Altomare, Diego; Bykhovskaya, Yelena; Campagna, Dean R.; Schmidt, Paul J.; Sendamarai, Anoop K.; Lidov, Hart G. W.; Barlow, Shayne C.; Fischel-Ghodsian, Nathan; Fleming, Mark D.; Carson, James A.; Patton, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial myopathy with lactic acidosis and sideroblastic anemia (MLASA) is an oxidative phosphorylation disorder, with primary clinical manifestations of myopathic exercise intolerance and a macrocytic sideroblastic anemia. One cause of MLASA is recessive mutations in PUS1, which encodes pseudouridine (Ψ) synthase 1 (Pus1p). Here we describe a mouse model of MLASA due to mutations in PUS1. As expected, certain Ψ modifications were missing in cytoplasmic and mitochondrial tRNAs from Pus1−/− animals. Pus1−/− mice were born at the expected Mendelian frequency and were non-dysmorphic. At 14 weeks the mutants displayed reduced exercise capacity. Examination of tibialis anterior (TA) muscle morphology and histochemistry demonstrated an increase in the cross sectional area and proportion of myosin heavy chain (MHC) IIB and low succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) expressing myofibers, without a change in the size of MHC IIA positive or high SDH myofibers. Cytochrome c oxidase activity was significantly reduced in extracts from red gastrocnemius muscle from Pus1−/− mice. Transmission electron microscopy on red gastrocnemius muscle demonstrated that Pus1−/− mice also had lower intermyofibrillar mitochondrial density and smaller mitochondria. Collectively, these results suggest that alterations in muscle metabolism related to mitochondrial content and oxidative capacity may account for the reduced exercise capacity in Pus1−/− mice. PMID:27197761

  9. Increased Muscle Stress-Sensitivity Induced by Selenoprotein N Inactivation in Mouse: A Mammalian Model for SEPN1-Related Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Arbogast, Sandrine; Lainé, Jeanne; Vassilopoulos, Stéphane; Beuvin, Maud; Dubourg, Odile; Vignaud, Alban; Ferry, Arnaud; Krol, Alain; Allamand, Valérie; Guicheney, Pascale; Ferreiro, Ana; Lescure, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Selenium is an essential trace element and selenoprotein N (SelN) was the first selenium-containing protein shown to be directly involved in human inherited diseases. Mutations in the SEPN1 gene, encoding SelN, cause a group of muscular disorders characterized by predominant affection of axial muscles. SelN has been shown to participate in calcium and redox homeostasis, but its pathophysiological role in skeletal muscle remains largely unknown. To address SelN function in vivo, we generated a Sepn1-null mouse model by gene targeting. The Sepn1−/− mice had normal growth and lifespan, and were macroscopically indistinguishable from wild-type littermates. Only minor defects were observed in muscle morphology and contractile properties in SelN-deficient mice in basal conditions. However, when subjected to challenging physical exercise and stress conditions (forced swimming test), Sepn1−/− mice developed an obvious phenotype, characterized by limited motility and body rigidity during the swimming session, as well as a progressive curvature of the spine and predominant alteration of paravertebral muscles. This induced phenotype recapitulates the distribution of muscle involvement in patients with SEPN1-Related Myopathy, hence positioning this new animal model as a valuable tool to dissect the role of SelN in muscle function and to characterize the pathophysiological process. PMID:21858002

  10. Hereditary dilated cardiomyopathy in Holstein-Friesian cattle in Japan: association with hereditary myopathy of the diaphragmatic muscles.

    PubMed

    Furuoka, H; Yagi, S; Murakami, A; Honma, A; Kobayashi, Y; Matsui, T; Miyahara, K; Taniyama, H

    2001-01-01

    This report deals with the pathology and genetic basis of dilated cardiomyopathy in 10 Holstein-Friesian cows aged 3-6 years, a disease similar to that reported in Simmental-Red Holstein and Holstein-Friesian cattle in several other countries. The main clinical signs were associated with systemic circulatory failure, and at necropsy the animals showed cardiomegaly, severe congestion and fibrosis of the liver, and systemic cardiac oedema. Histologically, hypertrophy and vacuolation of the cardiac muscle fibres and severe fibrosis were noted. Electron microscopically, the sarcoplasm of the hypertrophic fibres was seen to be filled with fine structures of low electron-density, together with thin filamentous material, suggesting myofibrillar lysis. The mitochondria showed increased size, an abnormal cristae pattern and vacuolation due to partial loss of cristae. Pedigree analysis of the affected cattle indicated an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. The family line of this cardiomyopathy overlapped with that of hereditary myopathy of the diaphragmatic muscles in Holstein-Friesian cattle, the pathological aspects and inheritance mode of which were reported previously. The available evidence suggested a genetic association between these two pathologically distinct diseases. PMID:11578132

  11. Pseudouridine synthase 1 deficient mice, a model for Mitochondrial Myopathy with Sideroblastic Anemia, exhibit muscle morphology and physiology alterations.

    PubMed

    Mangum, Joshua E; Hardee, Justin P; Fix, Dennis K; Puppa, Melissa J; Elkes, Johnathon; Altomare, Diego; Bykhovskaya, Yelena; Campagna, Dean R; Schmidt, Paul J; Sendamarai, Anoop K; Lidov, Hart G W; Barlow, Shayne C; Fischel-Ghodsian, Nathan; Fleming, Mark D; Carson, James A; Patton, Jeffrey R

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial myopathy with lactic acidosis and sideroblastic anemia (MLASA) is an oxidative phosphorylation disorder, with primary clinical manifestations of myopathic exercise intolerance and a macrocytic sideroblastic anemia. One cause of MLASA is recessive mutations in PUS1, which encodes pseudouridine (Ψ) synthase 1 (Pus1p). Here we describe a mouse model of MLASA due to mutations in PUS1. As expected, certain Ψ modifications were missing in cytoplasmic and mitochondrial tRNAs from Pus1(-/-) animals. Pus1(-/-) mice were born at the expected Mendelian frequency and were non-dysmorphic. At 14 weeks the mutants displayed reduced exercise capacity. Examination of tibialis anterior (TA) muscle morphology and histochemistry demonstrated an increase in the cross sectional area and proportion of myosin heavy chain (MHC) IIB and low succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) expressing myofibers, without a change in the size of MHC IIA positive or high SDH myofibers. Cytochrome c oxidase activity was significantly reduced in extracts from red gastrocnemius muscle from Pus1(-/-) mice. Transmission electron microscopy on red gastrocnemius muscle demonstrated that Pus1(-/-) mice also had lower intermyofibrillar mitochondrial density and smaller mitochondria. Collectively, these results suggest that alterations in muscle metabolism related to mitochondrial content and oxidative capacity may account for the reduced exercise capacity in Pus1(-/-) mice. PMID:27197761

  12. Enzyme replacement therapy rescues weakness and improves muscle pathology in mice with X-linked myotubular myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Lawlor, Michael W.; Armstrong, Dustin; Viola, Marissa G.; Widrick, Jeffrey J.; Meng, Hui; Grange, Robert W.; Childers, Martin K.; Hsu, Cynthia P.; O'Callaghan, Michael; Pierson, Christopher R.; Buj-Bello, Anna; Beggs, Alan H.

    2013-01-01

    No effective treatment exists for patients with X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM), a fatal congenital muscle disease caused by deficiency of the lipid phosphatase, myotubularin. The Mtm1δ4 and Mtm1 p.R69C mice model severely and moderately symptomatic XLMTM, respectively, due to differences in the degree of myotubularin deficiency. Contractile function of intact extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus muscles from Mtm1δ4 mice, which produce no myotubularin, is markedly impaired. Contractile forces generated by chemically skinned single fiber preparations from Mtm1δ4 muscle were largely preserved, indicating that weakness was largely due to impaired excitation contraction coupling. Mtm1 p.R69C mice, which produce small amounts of myotubularin, showed impaired contractile function only in EDL muscles. Short-term replacement of myotubularin with a prototypical targeted protein replacement agent (3E10Fv-MTM1) in Mtm1δ4 mice improved contractile function and muscle pathology. These promising findings suggest that even low levels of myotubularin protein replacement can improve the muscle weakness and reverse the pathology that characterizes XLMTM. PMID:23307925

  13. Assessing Function and Endurance in Adults with Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy: Validity of the Adult Myopathy Assessment Tool

    PubMed Central

    Harris-Love, Michael O.; Fernandez-Rhodes, Lindsay; Joe, Galen; Shrader, Joseph A.; Kokkinis, Angela; La Pean Kirschner, Alison; Auh, Sungyoung; Chen, Cheunju; Li, Li; Levy, Ellen; Davenport, Todd E.; Di Prospero, Nicholas A.; Fischbeck, Kenneth H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The adult myopathy assessment tool (AMAT) is a performance-based battery comprised of functional and endurance subscales that can be completed in approximately 30 minutes without the use of specialized equipment. The purpose of this study was to determine the construct validity and internal consistency of the AMAT with a sample of adults with spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA). Methods. AMAT validity was assessed in 56-male participants with genetically confirmed SBMA (mean age, 53 ± 10 years). The participants completed the AMAT and assessments for disease status, strength, and functional status. Results. Lower AMAT scores were associated with longer disease duration (r = −0.29; P < 0.03) and lower serum androgen levels (r = 0.49–0.59; P < 0.001). The AMAT was significantly correlated with strength and functional status (r = 0.82–0.88; P < 0.001). The domains of the AMAT exhibited good internal consistency (Cronbach's α = 0.77–0.89; P < 0.001). Conclusions. The AMAT is a standardized, performance-based tool that may be used to assess functional limitations and muscle endurance. The AMAT has good internal consistency, and the construct validity of the AMAT is supported by its significant associations with hormonal, strength, and functional characteristics of adults with SBMA. This trial is registered with Clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00303446. PMID:24876969

  14. Metabolic Encephalopathy and Lipid Storage Myopathy Associated with a Presumptive Mitochondrial Fatty Acid Oxidation Defect in a Dog

    PubMed Central

    Biegen, Vanessa R.; McCue, John P.; Donovan, Taryn A.; Shelton, G. Diane

    2015-01-01

    A 1-year-old spayed female Shih Tzu presented for episodic abnormalities of posture and mentation. Neurological examination was consistent with a bilaterally symmetric multifocal encephalopathy. The dog had a waxing-and-waning hyperlactemia and hypoglycemia. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed bilaterally symmetric cavitated lesions of the caudate nuclei with less severe abnormalities in the cerebellar nuclei. Empirical therapy was unsuccessful, and the patient was euthanized. Post-mortem histopathology revealed bilaterally symmetric necrotic lesions of the caudate and cerebellar nuclei and multi-organ lipid accumulation, including a lipid storage myopathy. Malonic aciduria and ketonuria were found on urinary organic acid screen. Plasma acylcarnitine analysis suggested a fatty acid oxidation defect. Fatty acid oxidation disorders are inborn errors of metabolism documented in humans, but poorly described in dogs. Although neurological signs have been described in humans with this group of diseases, descriptions of advanced imaging, and histopathology are severely lacking. This report suggests that abnormalities of fatty acid metabolism may cause severe, bilateral gray matter necrosis, and lipid accumulation in multiple organs including the skeletal muscles, liver, and kidneys. Veterinarians should be aware that fatty acid oxidation disorders, although potentially fatal, may be treatable. A timely definitive diagnosis is essential in guiding therapy. PMID:26664991

  15. Acute pain.

    PubMed

    Good, M

    1999-01-01

    The review of acute pain describes the problem of unresolved pain and its effects on the neural, autonomic, and immune systems. Conceptualizations and mechanisms of pain are reviewed as well as theories of pain management. Descriptive studies of patient and nurse factors that inhibit effective pain management are discussed, followed by studies of pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions. Critical analysis reveals that most studies were atheoretical, and therefore, this proliferation of information lacked conceptual coherence and organization. Furthermore, the nature and extent of barriers to pain management were described, but few intervention studies have been devised, as yet, to modify the knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes of nurses and patients that are barriers to pain management. Although some of the complementary therapies have sufficient research support to be used in clinical pain management, the physiological mechanisms and outcomes need to be studied. It is critical at this time to design studies of interventions to improve assessment, decision making, attentive care, and patient teaching. PMID:10418655

  16. Guillain-Barre syndrome masquerading as acute respiratory failure in an infant

    PubMed Central

    Kishore, Praveen; Sharma, Pradeep Kumar; Saikia, Bhaskar; Khilnani, Praveen

    2015-01-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is a rare entity in infants. We report a case of GBS in a 5-month-old girl. The child presented with cough, loose stools, breathing difficulty, and listlessness. The child was treated as pneumonia with respiratory failure. Due to difficulty in weaning from ventilation with areflexia, marked hypotonia, and reduced power in all four limbs; possibilities of spinal muscular atrophy, poliomyelitis, and myopathies were kept. Nerve conduction velocity study was suggestive of mixed sensory-motor, severe axonal, and demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. Cerebrospinal fluid study revealed albuminocytological dissociation. Child was diagnosed as GBS and treated with intravenous immunoglobulin. Child recovered completely on follow-up. GBS should be considered as a differential diagnosis in acute onset respiratory failure with neuromuscular weakness in infants. PMID:26962356

  17. A Curious Case of Acute Respiratory Failure: Is It Antisynthetase Syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Serafin; Iliescu, Mira

    2016-01-01

    Antisynthetase (AS) syndrome is a major subgroup of inflammatory myopathies seen in a minority of patients with dermatomyositis and polymyositis. Although it is usually associated with elevated creatine phosphokinase level, some patients may have amyopathic dermatomyositis (ADM) like presentation with predominant skin involvement. Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is the main pulmonary manifestation and may be severe thereby determining the prognosis. It may rarely present with a very aggressive course resulting in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We report a case of a 43-year-old male who presented with nonresolving pneumonia who was eventually diagnosed to have ADM through a skin biopsy without any muscle weakness. ADM may be associated with rapidly progressive course of interstitial lung disease (ADM-ILD) which is associated with high mortality. Differentiation between ADM-ILD and AS syndrome may be difficult in the absence of positive serology and clinical presentation may help in clinching the diagnosis. PMID:27433359

  18. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as the Initial Clinical Manifestation of an Antisynthetase Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seo-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Antisynthetase syndrome has been recognized as an important cause of autoimmune inflammatory myopathy in a subset of patients with polymyositis and dermatomyositis. It is associated with serum antibody to aminoacyl-transfer RNA synthetases and is characterized by a constellation of manifestations, including fever, myositis, interstitial lung disease, mechanic's hand-like cutaneous involvement, Raynaud phenomenon, and polyarthritis. Lung disease is the presenting feature in 50% of the cases. We report a case of a 60-year-old female with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which later proved to be an unexpected and initial manifestation of anti-Jo-1 antibody–positive antisynthetase syndrome. The present case showed resolution of ARDS after treatment with high-dose corticosteroids. Given that steroids are not greatly beneficial in the treatment of ARDS, it is likely that the improvement of the respiratory symptoms in this patient also resulted from the prompt suppression of the inflammatory systemic response by corticosteroids. PMID:27433180

  19. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as the Initial Clinical Manifestation of an Antisynthetase Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seo-Hyun; Park, I-Nae

    2016-07-01

    Antisynthetase syndrome has been recognized as an important cause of autoimmune inflammatory myopathy in a subset of patients with polymyositis and dermatomyositis. It is associated with serum antibody to aminoacyl-transfer RNA synthetases and is characterized by a constellation of manifestations, including fever, myositis, interstitial lung disease, mechanic's hand-like cutaneous involvement, Raynaud phenomenon, and polyarthritis. Lung disease is the presenting feature in 50% of the cases. We report a case of a 60-year-old female with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which later proved to be an unexpected and initial manifestation of anti-Jo-1 antibody-positive antisynthetase syndrome. The present case showed resolution of ARDS after treatment with high-dose corticosteroids. Given that steroids are not greatly beneficial in the treatment of ARDS, it is likely that the improvement of the respiratory symptoms in this patient also resulted from the prompt suppression of the inflammatory systemic response by corticosteroids. PMID:27433180

  20. Guillain-Barre syndrome masquerading as acute respiratory failure in an infant.

    PubMed

    Kishore, Praveen; Sharma, Pradeep Kumar; Saikia, Bhaskar; Khilnani, Praveen

    2015-01-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is a rare entity in infants. We report a case of GBS in a 5-month-old girl. The child presented with cough, loose stools, breathing difficulty, and listlessness. The child was treated as pneumonia with respiratory failure. Due to difficulty in weaning from ventilation with areflexia, marked hypotonia, and reduced power in all four limbs; possibilities of spinal muscular atrophy, poliomyelitis, and myopathies were kept. Nerve conduction velocity study was suggestive of mixed sensory-motor, severe axonal, and demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. Cerebrospinal fluid study revealed albuminocytological dissociation. Child was diagnosed as GBS and treated with intravenous immunoglobulin. Child recovered completely on follow-up. GBS should be considered as a differential diagnosis in acute onset respiratory failure with neuromuscular weakness in infants. PMID:26962356

  1. Evaluation of a vocational robot with a quadriplegic employee.

    PubMed

    Hammel, J M; Van der Loos, H F; Perkash, I

    1992-07-01

    A vocational robotic workstation capable of performing activities of daily living (ADL) and vocational tasks was placed for 18 months in the work site of an employee with C4 to C5 quadriplegia. A single-subject study was conducted to evaluate the performance of the robot vs that of a human attendant. The employee preferred the robot over the attendant for performance of all vocational tasks and ADLs, with the exception of feeding. Results indicated that the robot was capable of safely replacing the attendant for two five-hour periods during the workday, thus proving to be a cost-effective alternative to full-time, on-the-job attendant care. The study demonstrated the potential of robotics technology for returning independence and control to disabled employees and for offering corporate employers a solution to the problem of reasonable accommodation in the workplace. PMID:1622327

  2. Implanted Brain Chip Restores Hand Movement to Quadriplegic Man

    MedlinePlus

    ... usable in a home setting, including robust computer software and hardware, and smaller devices, Sharma said. The current trial permits up to four additional patients, he said. "We are currently recruiting a second participant for our clinical study and hope to begin that work this ...

  3. Myotubular Myopathy in a girl with a deletion of Xq27-q28 and unbalanced X inactivation assigns the MTM1 gene to a 600-kb region

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, N.; Mandel, J.L.; Chery, M.; Gilgenkrantz, S.; Fardeau, M.; Nivelon-Chevallier, A.; Sidaner-Noisette, I.; Mugneret, F.; Gouyon, J.B.; Gal, A.

    1995-05-01

    A young girl with a clinically moderate form of myotubular myopathy was found to carry a cytogenetically detectable deletion in Xq27-q28. The deletion had occurred de novo on the paternal X chromosome. It encompasses the fragile X (FRAXA) and Hunter syndrome (IDS) loci, and the DXS304 and DXS455 markers, in Xq27.3 and proximal Xq28. Other loci from the proximal half of Xq28 (DXS49, DXS256, DXS258, DXS305, and DXS497) were found intact. As the X-linked myotubular myopathy locus (MTM1) was previously mapped to Xq28 by linkage analysis, the present observation suggested that MTM1 is included in the deletion. However, a significant clinical phenotype is unexpected in a female MTM1 carrier. Analysis of inactive X-specific methylation at the androgen receptor gene showed that the deleted X chromosome was active in {approximately}80% of leukocytes. Such unbalanced inactivation may account for the moderate MTM1 phenotype and for the mental retardation that later developed in the patient. This observation is discussed in relation to the hypothesis that a locus modulating X inactivation may lie in the region. Comparison of this deletion with that carried by a male patient with a severe Hunter syndrome phenotype but no myotubular myopathy, in light of recent linkage data on recombinant MTM1 families, led to a considerable refinement of the position of the MTM1 locus, to a region of {approximately}600 kb, between DXS304 and DXS497. 46 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Activation of osmolyte pathways in inflammatory myopathy and Duchenne muscular dystrophy points to osmoregulation as a contributing pathogenic mechanism.

    PubMed

    De Paepe, Boel; Martin, Jean-Jacques; Herbelet, Sandrine; Jimenez-Mallebrera, Cecilia; Iglesias, Estibaliz; Jou, Cristina; Weis, Joachim; De Bleecker, Jan L

    2016-08-01

    Alongside well-known nuclear factor κB (NFκB) and its associated cytokine networks, nuclear factor of activated T cells 5 (NFAT5), the master regulator of cellular osmoprotective programs, comes forward as an inflammatory regulator. To gain insight into its yet unexplored role in muscle disease, we studied the expression of NFAT5 target proteins involved in osmolyte accumulation: aldose reductase (AR), taurine transporter (TauT), and sodium myo-inositol co-transporter (SMIT). We analyzed idiopathic inflammatory myopathy and Duchenne muscular dystrophy muscle biopsies and myotubes in culture, using immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and western blotting. We report that the level of constitutive AR was upregulated in patients, most strongly so in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. TauT and SMIT expression levels were induced in patients' muscle fibers, mostly representing regenerating and atrophic fibers. In dermatomyositis, strong staining for AR, TauT, and SMIT in atrophic perifascicular fibers was accompanied by staining for other molecular NFAT5 targets, including chaperones, chemokines, and inducible nitric oxide synthase. In these fibers, NFAT5 and NFκB p65 staining coincided, linking both transcription factors with this important pathogenic hallmark. In sporadic inclusion body myositis, SMIT localized to inclusions inside muscle fibers. In addition, SMIT was expressed by a substantial subset of muscle-infiltrating macrophages and T cells in patient biopsies. Our results indicate that osmolyte pathways may contribute to normal muscle functioning, and that activation of AR, TauT, and SMIT in muscle inflammation possibly contributes to the tissue's failing program of damage control. PMID:27322952

  5. Mutations in BIN1 Associated with Centronuclear Myopathy Disrupt Membrane Remodeling by Affecting Protein Density and Oligomerization

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tingting; Shi, Zheng; Baumgart, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of membrane shapes is central to many cellular phenomena. Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domain-containing proteins are key players for membrane remodeling during endocytosis, cell migration, and endosomal sorting. BIN1, which contains an N-BAR domain, is assumed to be essential for biogenesis of plasma membrane invaginations (T-tubules) in muscle tissues. Three mutations, K35N, D151N and R154Q, have been discovered so far in the BAR domain of BIN1 in patients with centronuclear myopathy (CNM), where impaired organization of T-tubules has been reported. However, molecular mechanisms behind this malfunction have remained elusive. None of the BIN1 disease mutants displayed a significantly compromised curvature sensing ability. However, two mutants showed impaired membrane tubulation both in vivo and in vitro, and displayed characteristically different behaviors. R154Q generated smaller membrane curvature compared to WT N-BAR. Quantification of protein density on membranes revealed a lower membrane-bound density for R154Q compared to WT and the other mutants, which appeared to be the primary reason for the observation of impaired deformation capacity. The D151N mutant was unable to tubulate liposomes under certain experimental conditions. At medium protein concentrations we found ‘budding’ structures on liposomes that we hypothesized to be intermediates during the tubulation process except for the D151N mutant. Chemical crosslinking assays suggested that the D151N mutation impaired protein oligomerization upon membrane binding. Although we found an insignificant difference between WT and K35N N-BAR in in vitro assays, depolymerizing actin in live cells allowed tubulation of plasma membranes through the K35N mutant. Our results provide insights into the membrane-involved pathophysiological mechanisms leading to human disease. PMID:24755653

  6. Constitutive Expression of Yes-Associated Protein (Yap) in Adult Skeletal Muscle Fibres Induces Muscle Atrophy and Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Judson, Robert N.; Gray, Stuart R.; Walker, Claire; Carroll, Andrew M.; Itzstein, Cecile; Lionikas, Arimantas; Zammit, Peter S.; De Bari, Cosimo; Wackerhage, Henning

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the function of the Hippo pathway member Yes-associated protein (Yap, gene name Yap1) in skeletal muscle fibres in vivo. Specifically we bred an inducible, skeletal muscle fibre-specific knock-in mouse model (MCK-tTA-hYAP1 S127A) to test whether the over expression of constitutively active Yap (hYAP1 S127A) is sufficient to drive muscle hypertrophy or stimulate changes in fibre type composition. Unexpectedly, after 5–7 weeks of constitutive hYAP1 S127A over expression, mice suddenly and rapidly lost 20–25% body weight and suffered from gait impairments and kyphosis. Skeletal muscles atrophied by 34–40% and the muscle fibre cross sectional area decreased by ≈40% when compared to control mice. Histological analysis revealed evidence of skeletal muscle degeneration and regeneration, necrotic fibres and a NADH-TR staining resembling centronuclear myopathy. In agreement with the histology, mRNA expression of markers of regenerative myogenesis (embryonic myosin heavy chain, Myf5, myogenin, Pax7) and muscle protein degradation (atrogin-1, MuRF1) were significantly elevated in muscles from transgenic mice versus control. No significant changes in fibre type composition were detected using ATPase staining. The phenotype was largely reversible, as a cessation of hYAP1 S127A expression rescued body and muscle weight, restored muscle morphology and prevented further pathological progression. To conclude, high Yap activity in muscle fibres does not induce fibre hypertrophy nor fibre type changes but instead results in a reversible atrophy and deterioration. PMID:23544078

  7. The NKG2D-IL-15 signaling pathway contributes to T-cell mediated pathology in inflammatory myopathies.

    PubMed

    Ruck, Tobias; Bittner, Stefan; Afzali, Ali Maisam; Göbel, Kerstin; Glumm, Sarah; Kraft, Peter; Sommer, Claudia; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Preuße, Corinna; Stenzel, Werner; Wiendl, Heinz; Meuth, Sven G

    2015-12-22

    NKG2D is an activating receptor on T cells, which has been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. T cells are critically involved in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) and have been proposed as specific therapeutic targets. However, the mechanisms underlying T cell-mediated progressive muscle destruction in IIM remain to be elucidated. We here determined the involvement of the NKG2D - IL-15 signaling pathway. Primary human myoblasts expressed NKG2D ligands, which were further upregulated upon inflammatory stimuli. In parallel, shedding of the soluble NKG2D ligand MICA (sMICA) decreased upon inflammation potentially diminishing inhibition of NKG2D signaling. Membrane-related expression of IL-15 by myoblasts induced differentiation of naïve CD8+ T cells into highly activated, cytotoxic CD8+NKG2Dhigh T cells demonstrating NKG2D-dependent lysis of myoblasts in vitro. CD8+NKG2Dhigh T cell frequencies were increased in the peripheral blood of polymyositis (PM) patients and correlated with serum creatinine kinase concentrations, while serum sMICA levels were not significantly changed. In muscle biopsy specimens from PM patients expression of the NKG2D ligand MICA/B was upregulated, IL-15 was expressed by muscle cells, CD68+ macrophages as well as CD4+ T cells, and CD8+NKG2D+ cells were frequently detected within inflammatory infiltrates arguing for a local signaling circuit in the inflammatory muscle milieu. In conclusion, the NKG2D - IL-15 signaling pathway contributes to progressive muscle destruction in IIM potentially opening new therapeutic avenues. PMID:26646698

  8. Gamma delta T cell receptor gene expression by muscle-infiltrating lymphocytes in the idiopathic inflammatory myopathies.

    PubMed Central

    O'Hanlon, T P; Messersmith, W A; Dalakas, M C; Plotz, P H; Miller, F W

    1995-01-01

    Autoreactive alpha beta T cells have been implicated as playing a primary pathogenic role in a group of diseases characterized by chronic muscle inflammation known as the idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM). gamma delta T cells, a distinct and enigmatic class of T cells, play a less certain role in a variety of human autoimmune diseases including the IIM. In an attempt to understand the significance of gamma delta T cells in the IIM, we utilized a sensitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique to evaluate gamma delta T cell receptor (TCR) gene expression in 45 muscle biopsies obtained from 42 IIM patients (17 polymyositis, 12 dermatomyositis, and 13 inclusion body myositis). gamma delta TCR gene expression was not detected in 36 specimens, the majority of muscle biopsies surveyed. gamma delta TCR gene expression by muscle-infiltrating lymphocytes was detected among nine clinically heterogeneous patients. We further analysed the junctional sequence composition of the V gamma 3 and V delta 1 transcripts, whose expression was prominent among gamma delta positive patients. DNA sequence analysis of V gamma 3 amplification products from two patients revealed the presence of several productively rearranged transcripts with amino acid sequence similarities within the V gamma 3-N-J gamma junctional domain. No amino acid sequence similarities were evident within the V delta-N-D delta-N-J delta region of V delta 1 transcripts amplified from four patients, although a distinct and dominant clonotype was detected from each patient. Our cumulative data suggest that unlike alpha beta T cells, gamma delta T cells do not play a prominent pathologic role in the IIM. In fact, the sporadic nature of gamma delta TCR gene expression detected among these patients implies that gamma delta T cell infiltration, when it occurs, is a secondary event perhaps resulting from non-specific inflammatory processes. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7774065

  9. Mutations in FKBP14 cause a variant of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome with progressive kyphoscoliosis, myopathy, and hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Matthias; Giunta, Cecilia; Krabichler, Birgit; Rüschendorf, Franz; Zoppi, Nicoletta; Colombi, Marina; Bittner, Reginald E; Quijano-Roy, Susana; Muntoni, Francesco; Cirak, Sebahattin; Schreiber, Gudrun; Zou, Yaqun; Hu, Ying; Romero, Norma Beatriz; Carlier, Robert Yves; Amberger, Albert; Deutschmann, Andrea; Straub, Volker; Rohrbach, Marianne; Steinmann, Beat; Rostásy, Kevin; Karall, Daniela; Bönnemann, Carsten G; Zschocke, Johannes; Fauth, Christine

    2012-02-10

    We report on an autosomal-recessive variant of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) characterized by severe muscle hypotonia at birth, progressive scoliosis, joint hypermobility, hyperelastic skin, myopathy, sensorineural hearing impairment, and normal pyridinoline excretion in urine. Clinically, the disorder shares many features with the kyphoscoliotic type of EDS (EDS VIA) and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy. Linkage analysis in a large Tyrolean kindred identified a homozygous frameshift mutation in FKBP14 in two affected individuals. Based on the cardinal clinical characteristics of the disorder, four additional individuals originating from different European countries were identified who carried either homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in FKBP14. FKBP14 belongs to the family of FK506-binding peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerases (PPIases). ER-resident FKBPs have been suggested to act as folding catalysts by accelerating cis-trans isomerization of peptidyl-prolyl bonds and to act occasionally also as chaperones. We demonstrate that FKBP14 is localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and that deficiency of FKBP14 leads to enlarged ER cisterns in dermal fibroblasts in vivo. Furthermore, indirect immunofluorescence of FKBP14-deficient fibroblasts indicated an altered assembly of the extracellular matrix in vitro. These findings suggest that a disturbance of protein folding in the ER affecting one or more components of the extracellular matrix might cause the generalized connective tissue involvement in this disorder. FKBP14 mutation analysis should be considered in all individuals with apparent kyphoscoliotic type of EDS and normal urinary pyridinoline excretion, in particular in conjunction with sensorineural hearing impairment. PMID:22265013

  10. VCP Associated Inclusion Body Myopathy and Paget Disease of Bone Knock-In Mouse Model Exhibits Tissue Pathology Typical of Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kitazawa, Masashi; Su, Hailing; Tanaja, Jasmin; Dec, Eric; Wallace, Douglas C.; Mukherjee, Jogeshwar; Caiozzo, Vincent; Warman, Matthew; Kimonis, Virginia E.

    2010-01-01

    Dominant mutations in the valosin containing protein (VCP) gene cause inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget's disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD). We have generated a knock-in mouse model with the common R155H mutation. Mice demonstrate progressive muscle weakness starting approximately at the age of 6 months. Histology of mutant muscle showed progressive vacuolization of myofibrils and centrally located nuclei, and immunostaining shows progressive cytoplasmic accumulation of TDP-43 and ubiquitin-positive inclusion bodies in quadriceps myofibrils and brain. Increased LC3-II staining of muscle sections representing increased number of autophagosomes suggested impaired autophagy. Increased apoptosis was demonstrated by elevated caspase-3 activity and increased TUNEL-positive nuclei. X-ray microtomography (uCT) images show radiolucency of distal femurs and proximal tibiae in knock-in mice and uCT morphometrics shows decreased trabecular pattern and increased cortical wall thickness. Bone histology and bone marrow derived macrophage cultures in these mice revealed increased osteoclastogenesis observed by TRAP staining suggestive of Paget bone disease. The VCPR155H/+ knock-in mice replicate the muscle, bone and brain pathology of inclusion body myopathy, thus representing a useful model for preclinical studies. PMID:20957154

  11. c-kit-Positive Cardiac Stem Cells Nested in Hypoxic Niches are Activated by Stem Cell Factor Reversing the Aging Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Sanada, Fumihiro; Kim, Junghyun; Czarna, Anna; Chan, Noel Yan-Ki; Signore, Sergio; Ogórek, Barbara; Isobe, Kazuya; Wybieralska, Ewa; Borghetti, Giulia; Pesapane, Ada; Sorrentino, Andrea; Mangano, Emily; Cappetta, Donato; Mangiaracina, Chiara; Ricciardi, Mario; Cimini, Maria; Ifedigbo, Emeka; Perrella, Mark A.; Goichberg, Polina; Choi, Augustine; Kajstura, Jan; Hosoda, Toru; Rota, Marcello; Anversa, Piero; Leri, Annarosa

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Hypoxia favors stem cell quiescence, while normoxia is required for their activation; but whether cardiac stem cell (CSC) function is regulated by the hypoxic/normoxic state of the cell is currently unknown. Objective A balance between hypoxic and normoxic CSCs may be present in the young heart, although this homeostatic control may be disrupted with aging. Defects in tissue oxygenation occur in the old myocardium, and this phenomenon may expand the pool of hypoxic CSCs, which are no longer involved in myocyte renewal. Methods and Results Here we show that the senescent heart is characterized by an increased number of quiescent CSCs with intact telomeres that cannot reenter the cell cycle and form a differentiated progeny. Conversely, myocyte replacement is controlled only by frequently dividing CSCs with shortened telomeres; these CSCs generate a myocyte population that is chronologically young but phenotypically old. Telomere dysfunction dictates their actual age and mechanical behavior. However, the residual subset of quiescent young CSCs can be stimulated in situ by stem cell factor reversing the aging myopathy. Conclusions Our findings support the notion that strategies targeting CSC activation and growth interfere with the manifestations of myocardial aging in an animal model. Although caution has to be exercised in the translation of animal studies to human beings, our data strongly suggests that a pool of functionally-competent CSCs persists in the senescent heart and this stem cell compartment can promote myocyte regeneration effectively, correcting partly the aging myopathy. PMID:24170267

  12. A novel mutation in FHL1 in a family with X-linked scapuloperoneal myopathy: phenotypic spectrum and structural study of FHL1 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dong-Hui; Raskind, Wendy H.; Parson, William W.; Sonnen, Joshua A.; Vu, Tiffany; Zheng, YunLin; Matsushita, Mark; Wolff, John; Lipe, Hillary; Bird, Thomas D.

    2010-01-01

    An X-linked myopathy was recently associated with mutations in the four-and-a-half-LIM domains 1 (FHL1) gene. We identified a family with late onset, slowly progressive weakness of scapuloperoneal muscles in three brothers and their mother. A novel missense mutation in the LIM2 domain of FHL1 (W122C) co-segregated with disease in the family. The phenotype was less severe than that in other reported families. Muscle biopsy revealed myopathic changes with FHL1 inclusions that were ubiquitin- and desmin-positive. This mutation provides additional evidence for X-linked myopathy caused by a narrow spectrum of mutations in FHL1, mostly in the LIM2 domain. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the newly identified mutation and five previously published missense mutations in the LIM2 domain revealed no major distortions of the protein structure or disruption of zinc binding. There were, however, increases in the nonpolar, solvent-accessible surface area in one or both of two clusters of residues, suggesting that the mutant proteins have a variably increased propensity to aggregate. Review of the literature shows a wide range of phenotypes associated with mutations in FHL1. However, recognizing the typical scapuloperoneal phenotype and X-linked inheritance pattern will help clinicians arrive at the correct diagnosis. PMID:20633900

  13. AAV-mediated intramuscular delivery of myotubularin corrects the myotubular myopathy phenotype in targeted murine muscle and suggests a function in plasma membrane homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Buj-Bello, Anna; Fougerousse, Françoise; Schwab, Yannick; Messaddeq, Nadia; Spehner, Danièle; Pierson, Christopher R; Durand, Muriel; Kretz, Christine; Danos, Olivier; Douar, Anne-Marie; Beggs, Alan H; Schultz, Patrick; Montus, Marie; Denèfle, Patrice; Mandel, Jean-Louis

    2008-07-15

    Myotubular myopathy (XLMTM, OMIM 310400) is a severe congenital muscular disease due to mutations in the myotubularin gene (MTM1) and characterized by the presence of small myofibers with frequent occurrence of central nuclei. Myotubularin is a ubiquitously expressed phosphoinositide phosphatase with a muscle-specific role in man and mouse that is poorly understood. No specific treatment exists to date for patients with myotubular myopathy. We have constructed an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector expressing myotubularin in order to test its therapeutic potential in a XLMTM mouse model. We show that a single intramuscular injection of this vector in symptomatic Mtm1-deficient mice ameliorates the pathological phenotype in the targeted muscle. Myotubularin replacement in mice largely corrects nuclei and mitochondria positioning in myofibers and leads to a strong increase in muscle volume and recovery of the contractile force. In addition, we used this AAV vector to overexpress myotubularin in wild-type skeletal muscle and get insight into its localization and function. We show that a substantial proportion of myotubularin associates with the sarcolemma and I band, including triads. Myotubularin overexpression in muscle induces the accumulation of packed membrane saccules and presence of vacuoles that contain markers of sarcolemma and T-tubules, suggesting that myotubularin is involved in plasma membrane homeostasis of myofibers. This study provides a proof-of-principle that local delivery of an AAV vector expressing myotubularin can improve the motor capacities of XLMTM muscle and represents a novel approach to study myotubularin function in skeletal muscle. PMID:18434328

  14. Targeted array comparative genomic hybridization--a new diagnostic tool for the detection of large copy number variations in nemaline myopathy-causing genes.

    PubMed

    Kiiski, K; Laari, L; Lehtokari, V-L; Lunkka-Hytönen, M; Angelini, C; Petty, R; Hackman, P; Wallgren-Pettersson, C; Pelin, K

    2013-01-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) constitutes a heterogeneous group of congenital myopathies. Mutations in the nebulin gene (NEB) are the main cause of recessively inherited NM. NEB is one of the most largest genes in human. To date, 68 NEB mutations, mainly small deletions or point mutations have been published. The only large mutation characterized is the 2.5 kb deletion of exon 55 in the Ashkenazi Jewish population. To investigate any copy number variations in this enormous gene, we designed a novel custom comparative genomic hybridization microarray, NM-CGH, targeted towards the seven known genes causative for NM. During the validation of the NM-CGH array we identified two novel deletions in two different families. The first is the largest deletion characterized in NEB to date, (∼53 kb) encompassing 24 exons. The second deletion (1 kb) covers two exons. In both families, the copy number change was the second mutation to be characterized and shown to have been inherited from one of the healthy carrier parents. In addition to these novel mutations, copy number variation was identified in four samples in three families in the triplicate region of NEB. We conclude that this method appears promising for the detection of copy number variations in NEB. PMID:23010307

  15. Congenital encephalomyopathy and adult-onset myopathy and diabetes mellitus: different phenotypic associations of a new heteroplasmic mtDNA tRNA glutamic acid mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, M G; Nelson, I; Sweeney, M G; Cooper, J M; Watkins, P J; Morgan-Hughes, J A; Harding, A E

    1995-01-01

    We report the clinical, biochemical, and molecular genetic findings in a family with an unusual mitochondrial disease phenotype harboring a novel mtDNA tRNA glutamic acid mutation at position 14709. The proband and his sister presented with congenital myopathy and mental retardation and subsequently developed cerebellar ataxia. Other family members had either adult-onset diabetes mellitus with muscle weakness or adult-onset diabetes mellitus alone. Ragged-red and cytochrome c oxidase (COX)-negative fibers were present in muscle biopsies. Biochemical studies of muscle mitochondria showed reduced complex I and IV activities. The mtDNA mutation was heteroplasmic in blood and muscle in all matrilineal relatives analyzed. Primary myoblast, but not fibroblast, cultures containing high proportions of mutant mtDNA exhibited impaired mitochondrial translation. These observations indicate that mtDNA tRNA point mutations should be considered in the differential diagnosis of congenital myopathy. In addition they illustrate the diversity of phenotypes associated with this mutation in the same family and further highlight the association between mtDNA mutations and diabetes mellitus. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7726155

  16. Mechanical-Stretch of C2C12 Myoblasts Inhibits Expression of Toll-Like Receptor 3 (TLR3) and of Autoantigens Associated with Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinghui; Adriouch, Sahil; Liao, Hua

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies in patients suffering from inflammatory autoimmune myopathies suggested that moderate exercise training improves or at least stabilizes muscle strength and function without inducing disease flares. However, the precise mechanisms involved in this beneficial effect have not been extensively studied. Here we used a model of in vitro stretched C2C12 myoblasts to investigate whether mechanical stretch could influence myoblast proliferation or the expression of proinflammatory genes. Our results demonstrated that cyclic mechanical stretch stimulated C2C12 cell cycling and early up-regulation of the molecules related to mechanical-stretch pathway in muscle (calmodulin, nNOS, MMP-2, HGF and c-Met). Unexpectedly, mechanical stretch also reduced the expression of TLR3 and of proteins known to represent autoantigens in inflammatory autoimmune myopathies (Mi-2, HRS, DNA-PKcs, U1-70). Interestingly, stimulation or inhibition of calmodulin, NOS, HGF or c-Met molecules in vitro affected the expression of autoantigens and TLR3 proteins confirming their role in the inhibition of autoantigens and TLR3 during mechanical stretch. Overall, this study demonstrates for the first time that mechanical stretch could be beneficial by reducing expression of muscle autoantigens and of pro-inflammatory TLR3 and may provide new insight to understand how resistance training can reduce the symptoms associated with myositis. PMID:24224022

  17. Congenital encephalomyopathy and adult-onset myopathy and diabetes mellitus: Different phenotypic associations of a new heteroplasmic mtDNA tRNA glutamic acid mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, M.G.; Nelson, I.; Sweeney, M.G.; Cooper, J.M.; Watkins, P.J.; Morgan-Hughes, J.A.; Harding, A.E.

    1995-05-01

    We report the clinical, biochemical, and molecular genetic findings in a family with an unusual mitochondrial disease phenotype harboring a novel mtDNA tRNA glutamic acid mutation at position 14709. The proband and his sister presented with congenital myopathy and mental retardation and subsequently developed cerebellar ataxia. Other family members had either adult-onset diabetes mellitus with muscle weakness or adult-onset diabetes mellitus alone. Ragged-red and cytochrome c oxidase (COX)-negative fibers were present in muscle biopsies. Biochemical studies of muscle mitochondria showed reduced complex I and IV activities. The mtDNA mutation was heteroplasmic in blood and muscle in all matrilineal relatives analyzed. Primary myoblast, but not fibroblast, cultures containing high proportions of mutant mtDNA exhibited impaired mitochondrial translation. These observations indicate that mtDNA tRNA point mutations should be considered in the differential diagnosis of congenital myopathy. In addition they illustrate the diversity of phenotypes associated with this mutation in the same family and further highlight the association between mtDNA mutations and diabetes mellitus. 43 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Expression of the inclusion body myopathy 3 mutation in Drosophila depresses myosin function and stability and recapitulates muscle inclusions and weakness.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Melkani, Girish C; Suggs, Jennifer A; Melkani, Anju; Kronert, William A; Cammarato, Anthony; Bernstein, Sanford I

    2012-06-01

    Hereditary myosin myopathies are characterized by variable clinical features. Inclusion body myopathy 3 (IBM-3) is an autosomal dominant disease associated with a missense mutation (E706K) in the myosin heavy chain IIa gene. Adult patients experience progressive muscle weakness. Biopsies reveal dystrophic changes, rimmed vacuoles with cytoplasmic inclusions, and focal disorganization of myofilaments. We constructed a transgene encoding E706K myosin and expressed it in Drosophila (E701K) indirect flight and jump muscles to establish a novel homozygous organism with homogeneous populations of fast IBM-3 myosin and muscle fibers. Flight and jump abilities were severely reduced in homozygotes. ATPase and actin sliding velocity of the mutant myosin were depressed >80% compared with wild-type myosin. Light scattering experiments and electron microscopy revealed that mutant myosin heads bear a dramatic propensity to collapse and aggregate. Thus E706K (E701K) myosin appears far more labile than wild-type myosin. Furthermore, mutant fly fibers exhibit ultrastructural hallmarks seen in patients, including cytoplasmic inclusions containing aberrant proteinaceous structures and disorganized muscle filaments. Our Drosophila model reveals the unambiguous consequences of the IBM-3 lesion on fast muscle myosin and fibers. The abnormalities observed in myosin function and muscle ultrastructure likely contribute to muscle weakness observed in our flies and patients. PMID:22496423

  19. Removal of immunoglobulin-like domains from titin’s spring segment alters titin splicing in mouse skeletal muscle and causes myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Danielle; Smith, John E.; Chung, Charles S.; Ono, Yasuko; Sorimachi, Hiroyuki; Labeit, Siegfried

    2014-01-01

    Titin is a molecular spring that determines the passive stiffness of muscle cells. Changes in titin’s stiffness occur in various myopathies, but whether these are a cause or an effect of the disease is unknown. We studied a novel mouse model in which titin’s stiffness was slightly increased by deleting nine immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains from titin’s constitutively expressed proximal tandem Ig segment (IG KO). KO mice displayed mild kyphosis, a phenotype commonly associated with skeletal muscle myopathy. Slow muscles were atrophic with alterations in myosin isoform expression; functional studies in soleus muscle revealed a reduced specific twitch force. Exon expression analysis showed that KO mice underwent additional changes in titin splicing to yield smaller than expected titin isoforms that were much stiffer than expected. Additionally, splicing occurred in the PEVK region of titin, a finding confirmed at the protein level. The titin-binding protein Ankrd1 was highly increased in the IG KO, but this did not play a role in generating small titin isoforms because titin expression was unaltered in IG KO mice crossed with Ankrd1-deficient mice. In contrast, the splicing factor RBM20 (RNA-binding motif 20) was also significantly increased in IG KO mice, and additional differential splicing was reversed in IG KO mice crossed with a mouse with reduced RBM20 activity. Thus, increasing titin’s stiffness triggers pathological changes in skeletal muscle, with an important role played by RBM20. PMID:24470489

  20. UNUSUAL CLINICAL CASES THAT MIMIC ACUTE DISSEMINATED ENCEPHALOMYELITIS.

    PubMed

    Duman, Özgür; Yürekli, Vedat Ali; Gencpinar, Pinar; Karaali, Kamil; Gümüş, Hakan; Okuyaz, Çetin; Hazar, Volkan; Haspolat, Şenay

    2015-09-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is an immune-mediated monophasic inflammatory demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system which poses a diagnostic challenge. We report on six cases of different etiologies that mimicked the clinical and radiologic findings of ADEM. The cases were collected from four different reference hospitals in Turkey. The same radiologist from the Akdeniz University Faculty of Medicine examined the magnetic resonance images of all patients. Three (50%) patients had antecedent infections. Initial symptoms of the patients were as follows: fever in 50%, altered consciousness in 33.3% and convulsions in 16.7% of patients. Neurologic examination showed long tract signs in 83.3%, ataxia in 50% and altered consciousness in 50% of patients. Cerebrospinal fluid examination revealed lymphocytic pleocytosis only in case 6. Four patients received steroid pulse therapy and one of these initially underwent intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. The patients' definitive diagnoses were as follows: paraspinal neuroblastoma-associated paraneoplastic syndrome; histiocytic sarcoma; mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes; and cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy in one patient each, while two patients had hemophagocytic syndrome. The present case series demonstrated difficulties in diagnosing ADEM while revealing extremely rare disorders that mimic ADEM radiologically and clinically. PMID:26666111