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Sample records for acute rat brain

  1. Brain perfusion in acute and chronic hyperglycemia in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kikano, G.E.; LaManna, J.C.; Harik, S.I. )

    1989-08-01

    Recent studies show that acute and chronic hyperglycemia cause a diffuse decrease in regional cerebral blood flow and that chronic hyperglycemia decreases the brain L-glucose space. Since these changes can be caused by a decreased density of perfused brain capillaries, we used 30 adult male Wistar rats to study the effect of acute and chronic hyperglycemia on (1) the brain intravascular space using radioiodinated albumin, (2) the anatomic density of brain capillaries using alkaline phosphatase histochemistry, and (3) the fraction of brain capillaries that are perfused using the fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran method. Our results indicate that acute and chronic hyperglycemia do not affect the brain intravascular space nor the anatomic density of brain capillaries. Also, there were no differences in capillary recruitment among normoglycemic, acutely hyperglycemic, and chronically hyperglycemic rats. These results suggest that the shrinkage of the brain L-glucose space in chronic hyperglycemia is more likely due to changes in the blood-brain barrier permeability to L-glucose.

  2. Deferoxamine attenuates acute hydrocephalus after traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jinbing; Chen, Zhi; Xi, Guohua; Keep, Richard F; Hua, Ya

    2014-10-01

    Acute post-traumatic ventricular dilation and hydrocephalus are relatively frequent consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Several recent studies have indicated that high iron levels in brain may relate to hydrocephalus development after intracranial hemorrhage. However, the role of iron in the development of post-traumatic hydrocephalus is still unclear. This study was to determine whether or not iron has a role in hydrocephalus development after TBI. TBI was induced by lateral fluid-percussion in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Some rats had intraventricular injection of iron. Acute hydrocephalus was measured by magnetic resonance T2-weighted imaging and brain hemorrhage was determined by T2* gradient-echo sequence imaging and brain hemoglobin levels. The effect of deferoxamine on TBI-induced hydrocephalus was examined. TBI resulted in acute hydrocephalus at 24 h (lateral ventricle volume: 24.1 ± 3.0 vs. 9.9 ± 0.2 mm(3) in sham group). Intraventricular injection of iron also caused hydrocephalus (25.7 ± 3.4 vs. 9.0 ± 0.6 mm(3) in saline group). Deferoxamine treatment attenuated TBI-induced hydrocephalus and heme oxygenase-1 upregulation. In conclusion, iron may contribute to acute hydrocephalus after TBI.

  3. Effect of acute and chronic hypernatremia on myoinositol and sorbitol concentration in rat brain and kidney.

    PubMed

    Lohr, J W; McReynolds, J; Grimaldi, T; Acara, M

    1988-01-01

    In animal models of hypernatremia, increases in brain electrolyte content account for the entire increase in osmolality in acute but not chronic hypernatremia, suggesting that there is generation of additional intracellular solutes ("idiogenic osmoles") in chronic hypernatremic states. In the present study, the concentration of the polyols myoinositol and sorbitol and water content were determined in the brain and kidneys of rats made acutely (2 hours) and chronically (72 hours) hypernatremic by intraperitoneal injection of NaCl and water restriction. Both the brain and the kidney responded to chronic hypernatremia with increased levels of myoinositol. Sorbitol levels increased in the kidney in response to both acute and chronic hypernatremia. Water content dropped in acute hypernatremia, but remained unchanged during chronic hyperosmolar challenge. We conclude that the polyols, myoinositol and sorbitol, may play a significant role in cellular osmoregulation in brain and kidney during chronic hypernatremia in the rat.

  4. A Brain Signature to Differentiate Acute and Chronic Pain in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yifei; Wang, Yuzheng; Sun, Yabin; Wang, Jin-Yan

    2016-01-01

    The transition from acute pain to chronic pain entails considerable changes of patients at multiple levels of the nervous system and in psychological states. An accurate differentiation between acute and chronic pain is essential in pain management as it may help optimize analgesic treatments according to the pain state of patients. Given that acute and chronic pain could modulate brain states in different ways and that brain states could greatly shape the neural processing of external inputs, we hypothesized that acute and chronic pain would show differential effects on cortical responses to non-nociceptive sensory information. Here by analyzing auditory-evoked potentials (AEPs) to pure tones in rats with acute or chronic pain, we found opposite influences of acute and chronic pain on cortical responses to auditory inputs. In particular, compared to no-pain controls, the N100 wave of rat AEPs was significantly enhanced in rats with acute pain but significantly reduced in rats with chronic pain, indicating that acute pain facilitated cortical processing of auditory information while chronic pain exerted an inhibitory effect. These findings could be justified by the fact that individuals suffering from acute or chronic pain would have different vigilance states, i.e., the vigilance level to external sensory stimuli would be increased with acute pain, but decreased with chronic pain. Therefore, this auditory response holds promise of being a brain signature to differentiate acute and chronic pain. Instead of investigating the pain system per se, the study of pain-induced influences on cortical processing of non-nocicpetive sensory information might represent a potential strategy to monitor the progress of pain chronification in clinical applications. PMID:27199727

  5. Methylprednisolone exacerbates acute critical illness-related corticosteroid insufficiency associated with traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Zhang, Bin; Chai, Yan; Dong, Bo; Lei, Ping; Jiang, Rongcai; Zhang, Jianning

    2011-03-25

    Emerging evidence demonstrates that severe illness could induce critical illness-related corticosteroid insufficiency (CIRCI) and cause poor prognosis. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that methylprednisolone (MP), a synthetic glucocorticoid, promotes post-traumatic apoptosis in both the hypothalamus and pituitary, resulting in acute CIRCI and increased mortality in the acute phase of traumatic brain injury (TBI). We tested this hypothesis by measuring acute CIRCI in rats subjected to fluid percussion injury (FPI) and treated with MP (5-30mg/kg). The corticosteroid response to TBI was evaluated using the corticosterone increase index (CII), where values less than 2.5 were considered indicative of acute CIRCI. The CII of MP treated rats was comparable to that of saline treated control rats before injury but was significantly decreased in injured rats receiving high-dose MP on post-injury day 7. Similarly, the incidence of acute CIRCI was significantly higher in the high-dose MP group on post-injury day 7. Furthermore, the CII of rats that did not survive post-injury was significantly lower compared to that of survival and was indicative of acute CIRCI. We also examined apoptosis in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus and the adenohypophysis of the pituitary, using a TUNEL assay and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The number of TUNEL-positive cells was significantly higher in injured rats treated with high-dose MP. No TUNEL-positive cells were detected in the adenohypophysis across experimental groups at either 7 or 14days after TBI. However, autopsies performed on rats that did not survive post-injury revealed obvious apoptotic cells in the adenohypophysis. Moreover, TEM revealed morphological changes characteristic of apoptosis in both the PVN and adenohypophysis of high-dose MP treated rats. These data suggest that MP therapy for TBI could increase neuronal apoptosis in both the hypothalamus and pituitary and

  6. The effects of acute ethanol exposure and ageing on rat brain glutathione metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sommavilla, Michela; Sánchez-Villarejo, M Victoria; Almansa, Inmaculada; Sánchez-Vallejo, Violeta; Barcia, Jorge M; Romero, Francisco Javier; Miranda, María

    2012-09-01

    Binge alcohol consumption in adolescents is increasing, and it has been proposed that immature brain deals poorly with oxidative stress. The aim of our work was to study the effect of an acute dose of ethanol on glutathione (GSH) metabolism in frontal cortex, hippocampus and striatum of juvenile and adult rats. We have observed no change in levels of glutathione produced by acute alcohol in the three brain areas studied of juvenile and adult rats. Only in the frontal cortex the ratio of GSH/GSSG was increased in the ethanol-treated adult rats. GSH levels in the hippocampus and striatum were significantly higher in adult animals compared to young ones. Higher glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity in adult rats was observed in frontal cortex and in striatum. Our data show an increased GSH concentration and GPx activity in different cerebral regions of the adult rat, compared to the young ones, suggesting that age-related variations of total antioxidant defences in brain may predispose young brain structures to ethanol-induced, oxidative stress-mediated tissue damage.

  7. Effect of acute and chronic cholinesterase inhibition on biogenic amines in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Soininen, H; Unni, L; Shillcutt, S

    1990-12-01

    The effects of five cholinesterase inhibitors on forebrain monoamine and their metabolite levels, and on forebrain and plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activity in rat were studied in acute and chronic conditions. Acute tetrahydroaminoacridine (THA) dosing caused lower brain (68%) and higher plasma (90%) ChE inhibition than the other drugs studied and increased levels of brain dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) (236%), homovanillic acid (HVA) (197%) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) (130%). Acute physostigmine (PHY) administration caused a 215% increase in brain DOPAC content. Despite high brain ChE inhibition induced by metrifonate (MTF), dichlorvos (DDVP) or naled no changes in brain noradrenaline (NA), dopamine (DA) or serotonin (5-HT) occurred due to treatment with the study drugs in the acute study. In the chronic 10-day study THA or PHY caused no substantial ChE inhibition in brain when measured 18 hours after the last dose, whereas MTF induced 74% ChE inhibition. Long-term treatment with THA or MTF caused no changes in monoamine levels, but PHY treatment resulted in slightly increased 5-HT values. These results suggest that MTF, DDVP and naled seem to act solely by cholinergic mechanisms. However, the central neuropharmacological mechanism of action of THA and PHY may involve changes in cholinergic as well as dopaminergic and serotoninergic systems. PMID:1711162

  8. Acute effect of aspartame-induced oxidative stress in Wistar albino rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ashok, Iyaswamy; Sheeladevi, Rathinasamy; Wankhar, Dapkupar

    2015-09-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the acute effect of aspartame on oxidative stress in the Wistar albino rat brain. We sought to investigate whether acute administration of aspartame (75 mg/kg) could release methanol and induce oxidative stress in the rat brain 24 hours after administration. To mimic human methanol metabolism, methotrexate treated rats were used to study aspartame effects. Wistar strain male albino rats were administered with aspartame orally as a single dose and studied along with controls and methotrexate treated controls. Blood methanol and formate level were estimated after 24 hours and rats were sacrificed and free radical changes were observed in discrete regions by assessing the scavenging enzymes, reduce dglutathione (GSH), lipid peroxidation and protein thiol levels. There was a significant increase in lipid peroxidation levels, superoxide dismutase activity (SOD), glutathione peroxidase levels (GPx), and catalase activity (CAT) with a significant decrease in GSH and protein thiol. Aspartame exposure resulted in detectable methanol even after 24 hours. Methanol and its metabolites may be responsible for the generation of oxidative stress in brain regions. The observed alteration in aspartame fed animals may be due to its metabolite methanol and elevated formate. The elevated free radicals due to methanol induced oxidative stress. PMID:26445572

  9. Acute effect of aspartame-induced oxidative stress in Wistar albino rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ashok, Iyaswamy; Sheeladevi, Rathinasamy; Wankhar, Dapkupar

    2015-09-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the acute effect of aspartame on oxidative stress in the Wistar albino rat brain. We sought to investigate whether acute administration of aspartame (75 mg/kg) could release methanol and induce oxidative stress in the rat brain 24 hours after administration. To mimic human methanol metabolism, methotrexate treated rats were used to study aspartame effects. Wistar strain male albino rats were administered with aspartame orally as a single dose and studied along with controls and methotrexate treated controls. Blood methanol and formate level were estimated after 24 hours and rats were sacrificed and free radical changes were observed in discrete regions by assessing the scavenging enzymes, reduce dglutathione (GSH), lipid peroxidation and protein thiol levels. There was a significant increase in lipid peroxidation levels, superoxide dismutase activity (SOD), glutathione peroxidase levels (GPx), and catalase activity (CAT) with a significant decrease in GSH and protein thiol. Aspartame exposure resulted in detectable methanol even after 24 hours. Methanol and its metabolites may be responsible for the generation of oxidative stress in brain regions. The observed alteration in aspartame fed animals may be due to its metabolite methanol and elevated formate. The elevated free radicals due to methanol induced oxidative stress.

  10. Catalase-independent early-gene expression in rat brain following acute ethanol exposure.

    PubMed

    Canales, Juan J

    2004-07-30

    Early-gene expression evoked by acute ethanol treatment was studied in rat brain by quantitative immunocytochemistry, with reference to ethanol metabolism by the enzyme catalase. Colocalization with mu-opioid receptor (MOR) sites was also examined. Ethanol challenges [1, 2.5, and 4 g/kg intraperitoneally (i.p.)] evoked dose-dependent increases in c-Fos expression in several brain regions, but overlap with MOR-rich sites was only partial. Strong inhibition of brain catalase activity (ca. 60%) with 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (AT, 1 g/kg i.p.) did not alter ethanol-induced c-Fos nor Krox-24 expression in any of the brain regions analyzed. This evidence demonstrates that catalase-mediated metabolism is not a requisite for c-Fos nor Krox-24 induction in rat brain following acute ethanol treatment, and suggests that ethanol is by itself capable of eliciting strong neuronal and circuit-level adaptations in the nervous system.

  11. Effects of Acute Lithium Treatment on Brain Levels of Inflammatory Mediators in Poststroke Rats.

    PubMed

    Boyko, Matthew; Nassar, Ahmad; Kaplanski, Jacob; Zlotnik, Alexander; Sharon-Granit, Yael; Azab, Abed N

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Few therapeutic options with proven efficacy are available for the treatment of this disabling disease. Lithium is the gold standard treatment for bipolar disorder. Moreover, lithium has been shown to exhibit neuroprotective effects and therapeutic efficacy as a treatment of other neurological disorders. This study was undertaken to examine the effects of lithium on brain inflammatory mediators levels, fever, and mortality in postischemic stroke rats. Ischemic stroke was induced by occlusion of the mid cerebral artery (MCAO). Pretreatment with a single dose of lithium at 2 hours before MCAO induction significantly reduced the elevation in interleukin- (IL-) 6 and prostaglandin E2 levels in brain of post-MCAO rats, as compared to vehicle-treated animals. On the other hand, lithium did not affect the elevation in IL-1α, IL-10, IL-12, and tumor necrosis factor-α levels in brain of post-MCAO rats. Moreover, pretreatment with lithium did not alter post-MCAO fever and mortality. These results suggest that acute pretreatment with a single dose of lithium did not markedly affect post-MCAO morbidity and mortality in rats.

  12. Volume regulatory loss of Na, Cl, and K from rat brain during acute hyponatremia

    SciTech Connect

    Melton, J.E.; Patlak, C.S.; Pettigrew, K.D.; Cserr, H.F.

    1987-04-01

    This study quantitatively evaluates the contribution of tissue Na, Cl, and K loss to brain volume regulation during acute dilutional hyponatremia (DH) and examines the mechanism of Na loss. DH was produced in pentobarbital sodium-anesthetized rats by intraperitoneal infusion of distilled water and brain water and electrolytes analyzed 30 min, 1 h, 3 h, 4 h, or 6 h later. The rate of Na and Cl loss was greatest during the first 30 min of DH. Net loss of Na and Cl was maximal after 3 h of DH. K loss was slower, achieving significance after 3 h. Electrolyte loss was sufficient to account for observed brain volume regulation after three or more hours of DH. Measurements of /sup 22/Na influx and efflux across the blood brain barrier showed that barrier permeability to Na is unchanged during DH. Analysis of results using a two-compartment model of plasma-brain exchange suggests that loss of brain Na during DH does not result solely from a shift of electrolyte across the blood-brain barrier to plasma, and thus provides indirect evidence for an additional pathway for Na loss, presumably via cerebrospinal fluid.

  13. Acute renal failure potentiates methylmalonate-induced oxidative stress in brain and kidney of rats.

    PubMed

    Schuck, P F; Alves, L; Pettenuzzo, L F; Felisberto, F; Rodrigues, L B; Freitas, B W; Petronilho, F; Dal-Pizzol, F; Streck, E L; Ferreira, G C

    2013-03-01

    Tissue methylmalonic acid (MMA) accumulation is the biochemical hallmark of methylmalonic acidemia. The disease is clinically characterized by progressive neurological deterioration and kidney failure, whose pathophysiology is still unclear. In the present work we investigated the effects of acute MMA administration on various parameters of oxidative stress in cerebral cortex and kidney of young rats, as well as the influence of acute renal failure on MMA-elicited effects on these parameters. Acute renal failure was induced by gentamicin, an aminoglycoside antibiotic whose utilization over prolonged periods causes nephrotoxicity. The administration of gentamicin alone increased carbonyl content and inhibited superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in cerebral cortex, as well as increased thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBA-RS) and sulfhydryl levels and diminished glutathione peroxidase activity in kidney. On the other hand, MMA administration increased TBA-RS levels in cerebral cortex and decreased SOD activity in kidney. Furthermore, the simultaneous administration of MMA and gentamicin to the rats provoked an augment in TBA-RS levels and superoxide generation in cerebral cortex and in TBA-RS, carbonyl and sulfhydryl levels in kidney, while diminished SOD activity in both studied tissues. Finally, nitrate/nitrite content, reduced glutathione levels, 2',7'-dihydrodichlorofluorescein oxidation and catalase activity were not affected by this animal treatment in either tissue. In conclusion, our present data are in line with the hypothesis that MMA acts as a toxin in brain and kidney of rats and suggest that renal injury potentiates the toxicity of MMA on oxidative stress parameters in brain and peripheral tissues.

  14. Acute exposure of uranyl nitrate causes lipid peroxidation and histopathological damage in brain and bone of Wistar rat.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Somnath; Kumar, Amit; Pandey, Badri Narain; Mishra, Kaushala Prasad

    2007-01-01

    Although the kidneys are the main target organs for uranium (U) toxicity, recent studies have shown that U can cross the blood-brain barrier to accumulate in the brain. Uranyl nitrate (U-238)induced oxidative damage was investigated in brain and bone of Wistar rats after intraperitoneal injection of uranyl nitrate at acute doses either nephrotoxic (576 microg of U/kg body weight) or subnephrotoxic (144 microg U/kg body weight). The health effects of U administration at 576 microg of U/kg body weight were seen in terms of decrease in food intake and no gain in body weight compared to respective controls. These alterations were correlated with increased lipid peroxidation as measured by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances in rat brain and bone. However, at lower dosage of U (144 microg U/kg body weight), no significant lipid peroxidation was observed in brain and bone. Histological examination of U-treated (576 microg of U/kg body weight) rat brain tissues showed marked and diffuse cystic degeneration and a similar pattern in histological alterations was observed in kidneys in treated animals; whereas no significant histological change was observed in rat brains and kidney treated with a lower dose of U (144 microg U/kg body weight). It is concluded that administration of U at an acute nephrotoxic dose caused oxidative stress in brain and bone manifested as lipid peroxidation and histopathological damage.

  15. High-strain-rate brain injury model using submerged acute rat brain tissue slices.

    PubMed

    Sarntinoranont, Malisa; Lee, Sung J; Hong, Yu; King, Michael A; Subhash, Ghatu; Kwon, Jiwoon; Moore, David F

    2012-01-20

    Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) has received increasing attention in recent years due to ongoing military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. Sudden impacts or explosive blasts generate stress and pressure waves that propagate at high velocities and affect sensitive neurological tissues. The immediate soft tissue response to these stress waves is difficult to assess using current in vivo imaging technologies. However, these stress waves and resultant stretching and shearing of tissue within the nano- to microsecond time scale of blast and impact are likely to cause initial injury. To visualize the effects of stress wave loading, we have developed a new ex vivo model in which living tissue slices from rat brain, attached to a ballistic gelatin substrate, were subjected to high-strain-rate loads using a polymer split Hopkinson pressure bar (PSHPB) with real-time high-speed imaging. In this study, average peak fluid pressure within the test chamber reached a value of 1584±63.3 psi. Cavitation due to a trailing underpressure wave was also observed. Time-resolved images of tissue deformation were collected and large maximum eigenstrains (0.03-0.42), minimum eigenstrains (-0.33 to -0.03), maximum shear strains (0.09-0.45), and strain rates (8.4×10³/sec) were estimated using digital image correlation (DIC). Injury at 4 and 6 h was quantified using Fluoro-Jade C. Neuronal injury due to PSHPB testing was found to be significantly greater than injury associated with the tissue slice paradigm alone. While large pressures and strains were encountered for these tests, this system provides a controllable test environment to study injury to submerged brain slices over a range of strain rate, pressure, and strain loads. PMID:21970544

  16. Optically based-indentation technique for acute rat brain tissue slices and thin biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S. J.; Sun, J.; Flint, J. J.; Guo, S.; Xie, H. K.; King, M. A.; Sarntinoranont, M.

    2011-01-01

    Currently, micro-indentation testing of soft biological materials is limited in its capability to test over long time scales due to accumulated instrumental drift errors. As a result, there is a paucity of measures for mechanical properties such as the equilibrium modulus. In this study, indentation combined with optical coherence tomography (OCT) was used for mechanical testing of thin tissue slices. OCT was used to measure the surface deformation profiles by placing spherical beads onto submerged test samples. Agarose-based hydrogels at low-concentrations (w/v, 0.3–0.6 %) and acute rat brain tissue slices were tested using this technique over a 30 min time window. To establish that tissue slices maintained cell viability, allowable testing times were determined by measuring neuronal death or degeneration as a function of incubation time with Fluor-Jade C (FJC) staining. Since large deformations at equilibrium were measured, displacements of surface beads were compared with finite element elastic contact simulations to predict the equilibrium modulus, μ∞. Values of μ∞ for the low- concentration hydrogels ranged from 0.07–1.8 kPa, and μ∞ for acute rat brain tissue slices was 0.13 ± 0.04 kPa for the cortex and 0.09 ± 0.015 kPa for the hippocampus (for Poisson ratio=0.35). This indentation technique offers a localized, real-time, and high resolution method for long-time scale mechanical testing of very soft materials. This test method may also be adapted for viscoelasticity, for testing of different tissues and biomaterials, and for analyzing changes in internal structures with loading. PMID:21290586

  17. Acute stress affects the global DNA methylation profile in rat brain: modulation by physical exercise.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Gelson M; Toffoli, Leandro V; Manfredo, Marcelo H; Francis-Oliveira, José; Silva, Andrey S; Raquel, Hiviny A; Martins-Pinge, Marli C; Moreira, Estefânia G; Fernandes, Karen B; Pelosi, Gislaine G; Gomes, Marcus V

    2015-02-15

    The vulnerability of epigenetic marks of brain cells to environmental stimuli and its implication for health have been recently debated. Thus, we used the rat model of acute restraint stress (ARS) to evaluate the impact of stress on the global DNA methylation and on the expression of the Dnmt1 and Bdnf genes of hippocampus, cortex, hypothalamus and periaqueductal gray (PAG). Furthermore, we verified the potential of physical exercise to modulate epigenetic responses evoked by ARS. Sedentary male Wistar rats were submitted to ARS at the 75th postnatal day (PND), whereas animals from a physically active group were previously submitted to swimming sessions (35-74th PND) and to ARS at the 75th PND. Global DNA methylation profile was quantified using an ELISA-based method and the quantitative expression of the Dnmt1 and Bdnf genes was evaluated by real-time PCR. ARS induced a decrease in global DNA methylation in hippocampus, cortex and PAG of sedentary animals and an increased expression of Bdnf in PAG. No change in DNA methylation was associated with ARS in the exercised animals, although it was associated with abnormal expression of Dnmt1 and Bdnf in cortex, hypothalamus and PAG. Our data reveal that ARS evokes adaptive changes in global DNA methylation of rat brain that are independent of the expression of the Dnmt1 gene but might be linked to abnormal expression of the Bdnf gene in the PAG. Furthermore, our evidence indicates that physical exercise has the potential to modulate changes in DNA methylation and gene expression consequent to ARS.

  18. Effects of different kinds of acute stress on nerve growth factor content in rat brain.

    PubMed

    von Richthofen, Sita; Lang, Undine E; Hellweg, Rainer

    2003-10-17

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) has several effects on the central nervous system; on the one hand NGF fosters survival and function of cholinergic neurons of the basal forebrain, on the other hand this protein is implicated in the stress response of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis (HPAA). In this study we tested the influence of threatening and painful stress treatments in three different intensities as well as forced motoric activity on NGF content in different brain areas in adult rats. We found that threatening treatment with or without painful stimuli was followed by a significant decrease of NGF concentration in the amygdala (44.5%; P=0.03) and the frontal cortex (-45.5%; P=0.02). We also observed that after stress of forced motoric activity NGF content in the frontal cortex (-32%; P=0.01) and the hippocampus (-32%; P=0.006) was significantly reduced. Thus, NGF content in distinct brain regions is decreased, following different forms of acute stress. This might be relevant for the pathophysiological understanding of psychiatric diseases, such as depression, which are associated with stress.

  19. Early coagulation events induce acute lung injury in a rat model of blunt traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Hideki; Donahue, Deborah L; Walsh, Mark; Castellino, Francis J; Ploplis, Victoria A

    2016-07-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and systemic coagulopathy are serious complications of traumatic brain injury (TBI) that frequently lead to poor clinical outcomes. Although the release of tissue factor (TF), a potent initiator of the extrinsic pathway of coagulation, from the injured brain is thought to play a key role in coagulopathy after TBI, its function in ALI following TBI remains unclear. In this study, we investigated whether the systemic appearance of TF correlated with the ensuing coagulopathy that follows TBI in ALI using an anesthetized rat blunt trauma TBI model. Blood and lung samples were obtained after TBI. Compared with controls, pulmonary edema and increased pulmonary permeability were observed as early as 5 min after TBI without evidence of norepinephrine involvement. Systemic TF increased at 5 min and then diminished 60 min after TBI. Lung injury and alveolar hemorrhaging were also observed as early as 5 min after TBI. A biphasic elevation of TF was observed in the lungs after TBI, and TF-positive microparticles (MPs) were detected in the alveolar spaces. Fibrin(ogen) deposition was also observed in the lungs within 60 min after TBI. Additionally, preadministration of a direct thrombin inhibitor, Refludan, attenuated lung injuries, thus implicating thrombin as a direct participant in ALI after TBI. The results from this study demonstrated that enhanced systemic TF may be an initiator of coagulation activation that contributes to ALI after TBI. PMID:27190065

  20. Alterations in catecholamine turnover in specific regions of the rat brain following acute exposure to nitrous oxide.

    PubMed

    Karuri, A R; Kugel, G; Engelking, L R; Kumar, M S

    1998-04-01

    The effects of nitrous oxide (N2O) on steady-state concentrations and turnover rates of catecholamines in the olfactory bulb, hypothalamus, brain stem, hippocampus, striatum, thalamus, cerebral cortex, and spinal cord were determined in rats. Animals were exposed for 2 h to either 60% N2O or air. Immediately following exposure, all animals were injected intraperitoneally with alpha-methylparatyrosine (alphaMPT), a competitive inhibitor of tyrosine hydroxylase, and sacrificed at 0, 30, or 90 min postinjection. Brain catecholamine concentrations were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrochemical detection (HPLC-EC). Results indicate that N2O exposure significantly elevates steady-state concentrations of norepinephrine (NE) in the hypothalamus and striatum yet decreases amine levels in the brain stem region. Steady-state levels of dopamine (DA) were not significantly altered in any region of the CNS by N2O exposure. Acute exposure to N2O also resulted in significant decreases in the turnover rate of NE in the brain stem, yet it increased turnover of this amine in the olfactory bulb, hypothalamus, and striatum. Acute exposure to N2O resulted in a decreased turnover rate of DA in the hippocampus and striatum. In contrast, N2O appears to increase DA turnover in the olfactory bulb. These results indicate that acute exposure to N2O in rats causes region-specific alterations in steady-state levels and turnover rates of DA and NE within the central nervous system.

  1. The relationship between decorrelation time and sample thickness in acute rat brain tissue slices (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brake, Joshua; Jang, Mooseok; Yang, Changhuei

    2016-03-01

    The optical opacity of biological tissue has long been a challenge in biomedical optics due to the strong scattering nature of tissue in the optical regime. While most conventional optical techniques attempt to gate out multiply scattered light and use only unscattered light, new approaches in the field of wavefront shaping exploit the time reversible symmetry of optical scattering in order to focus light inside or through scattering media. While these approaches have been demonstrated effectively on static samples, it has proven difficult to apply them to dynamic biological samples since even small changes in the relative positions of the scatterers within will cause the time symmetry that wavefront shaping relies upon to decorrelate. In this paper we investigate the decorrelation curves of acute rat brain slices for thicknesses in the range 1-3 mm (1/e decorrelation time on the order of seconds) using multi-speckle diffusing wave spectroscopy (MSDWS) and compare the results with theoretical predictions. The results of this study demonstrate that the 1/L^2 relationship between decorrelation time and thickness predicted by diffusing wave spectroscopy provides a good rule of thumb for estimating how the decorrelation of a sample will change with increasing thickness. Understanding this relationship will provide insight to guide the future development of biophotonic wavefront shaping tools by giving an estimate of how fast wavefront shaping systems need to operate to overcome the dynamic nature of biological samples.

  2. Acute neuroprotective effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields after traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Li, Ling; Wang, Yan-Gang; Fei, Zhou; Zhong, Jun; Wei, Li-Zhou; Long, Qian-Fa; Liu, Wei-Ping

    2012-05-10

    Traumatic brain injury commonly has a result of a short window of opportunity between the period of initial brain injury and secondary brain injury, which provides protective strategies and can reduce damages of brain due to secondary brain injury. Previous studies have reported neuroprotective effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields. However, the effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields on neural damage after traumatic brain injury have not been reported yet. The present study aims to investigate effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields on neuroprotection after traumatic brain injury. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used for the model of lateral fluid percussion injury, which were placed in non-electromagnetic fields and 15 Hz (Hertz) electromagnetic fields with intensities of 1 G (Gauss), 3 G and 5 G. At various time points (ranging from 0.5 to 30 h) after lateral fluid percussion injury, rats were treated with kainic acid (administered by intraperitoneal injection) to induce apoptosis in hippocampal cells. The results were as follows: (1) the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α was dramatically decreased during the neuroprotective time window. (2) The kainic acid-induced apoptosis in the hippocampus was significantly decreased in rats exposed to electromagnetic fields. (3) Electromagnetic fields exposure shortened the escape time in water maze test. (4) Electromagnetic fields exposure accelerated the recovery of the blood-brain barrier after brain injury. These findings revealed that extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields significantly prolong the window of opportunity for brain protection and enhance the intensity of neuroprotection after traumatic brain injury.

  3. Blocking NMDA receptors delays death in rats with acute liver failure by dual protective mechanisms in kidney and brain.

    PubMed

    Cauli, Omar; González-Usano, Alba; Cabrera-Pastor, Andrea; Gimenez-Garzó, Carla; López-Larrubia, Pilar; Ruiz-Sauri, Amparo; Hernández-Rabaza, Vicente; Duszczyk, Malgorzata; Malek, Michal; Lazarewicz, Jerzy W; Carratalá, Arturo; Urios, Amparo; Miguel, Alfonso; Torregrosa, Isidro; Carda, Carmen; Montoliu, Carmina; Felipo, Vicente

    2014-06-01

    Treatment of patients with acute liver failure (ALF) is unsatisfactory and mortality remains unacceptably high. Blocking NMDA receptors delays or prevents death of rats with ALF. The underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Clarifying these mechanisms will help to design more efficient treatments to increase patient's survival. The aim of this work was to shed light on the mechanisms by which blocking NMDA receptors delays rat's death in ALF. ALF was induced by galactosamine injection. NMDA receptors were blocked by continuous MK-801 administration. Edema and cerebral blood flow were assessed by magnetic resonance. The time course of ammonia levels in brain, muscle, blood, and urine; of glutamine, lactate, and water content in brain; of glomerular filtration rate and kidney damage; and of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) and intracranial pressure was assessed. ALF reduces kidney glomerular filtration rate (GFR) as reflected by reduced inulin clearance. GFR reduction is due to both reduced renal perfusion and kidney tubular damage as reflected by increased Kim-1 in urine and histological analysis. Blocking NMDA receptors delays kidney damage, allowing transient increased GFR and ammonia elimination which delays hyperammonemia and associated changes in brain. Blocking NMDA receptors does not prevent cerebral edema or blood-brain barrier permeability but reduces or prevents changes in cerebral blood flow and brain lactate. The data show that dual protective effects of MK-801 in kidney and brain delay cerebral alterations, HE, intracranial pressure increase and death. NMDA receptors antagonists may increase survival of patients with ALF by providing additional time for liver transplantation or regeneration.

  4. Acute effects of oral or parenteral aspartame on catecholamine metabolism in various regions of rat brain.

    PubMed

    Yokogoshi, H; Wurtman, R J

    1986-03-01

    Hypertensive (SHR) and nonhypertensive [Wistar-Kyoto (WKY); Sprague-Dawley (SD)] strains of rats received the dipeptide sweetener aspartame (200 mg/kg) or, as a positive control, tyrosine (200 mg/kg) by gavage or parenterally, after a brief (2-h) fast. Two hours later, compared with those of saline controls brain levels of the norepinephrine metabolite 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylethylethyleneglycol (MHPG) sulfate were significantly higher in the hypothalamus (WKY), locus coeruleus (SD and SHR) and brain stem (SHR) in tyrosine-treated animals, and in the locus coeruleus (SD) of those given aspartame. Brain norepinephrine levels were also higher, compared with those of saline-treated control rats, in the cerebral cortex (SD and SHR), amygdala (SD) and locus coeruleus (WKY) after tyrosine administration, and in the amygdala (SD) and cerebral cortex (SHR) after aspartame administration. In another study, oral aspartame was found to be at least as effective as the parenterally administered sweetener in raising regional brain levels of tyrosine or MHPG sulfate (i.e., compared with corresponding levels in saline-treated rats). Animals receiving oral aspartame also exhibited higher plasma tyrosine and phenylalanine ratios (i.e., the ratios of their plasma concentrations to the summed concentrations of other large neutral amino acids that compete with them for uptake into the brain), than animals receiving saline.

  5. Neuropeptide Y administration acutely increases hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing factor immunoreactivity: lack of effect in other rat brain regions

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, D.A.; George, S.R.

    1987-12-21

    The effect of acute central administration of Neuropeptide Y (NPY) to adult male rats on the brain content of corticotropin-releasing factor immunoreactivity (CRF-ir) was investigated. The brain regions studied included frontal cortex, hippocampus, medulla-pons, midbrain-thalamus, cerebellum, neurointermediate lobe of pituitary, median eminence and the remaining hypothalamus. CRF-ir was determined in each of these regions using radioimmunoassay specific for rat CRF. CRF-ir was found to be significantly increased in the major site of CRF localization in the brain, the hypothalamus, in NPY-treated rats as compared to vehicle-treated controls either 15 minutes (p<0.025) or 45 minutes (p<0.005) post-injection. This increase was localized to the median eminence (p<0.05 after 15 minutes, p<0.01 after 45 minutes). No statistically significant differences were noted in any of the other brain regions assessed. Plasma adrenocorticotropin levels were also found to increase following NPY treatment, an effect which became significant after 45 minutes (p<0.05). These data show that NPY can alter the content of hypothalamic CRF and may play a role in its regulation. 33 references, 4 figures.

  6. [Characteristics of antiischemic and nootropic properties of ademol in a rat model of acute brain ischemia].

    PubMed

    Khodakivs'kyĭ, O A

    2013-01-01

    In experiments with the rat model of acute disorder of encephalic circulation (bilateral carotid occlusion) it was found that introduction of derivate of adamantan 1-adamantiloxy-3-morfolino-2 propanol (under conventional name ademol) in the dose 2 mg/kg intraabdominal in treatment regimen (in an hour after reconstruction of insult and further 1 time every 24 hours during 21 days) was accompanied by a recovery of mnemotropic properties and is more effective than cytikolin, resulting in a decreased lethality and neurological deficiency in acute and recovery periods of insults. The data received proved the usefulness of development of ademol based cerebroprotective remedy.

  7. Blood-brain barrier permeability is increased after acute adult stroke but not neonatal stroke in the rat.

    PubMed

    Fernández-López, David; Faustino, Joel; Daneman, Richard; Zhou, Lu; Lee, Sarah Y; Derugin, Nikita; Wendland, Michael F; Vexler, Zinaida S

    2012-07-11

    The immaturity of the CNS at birth greatly affects injury after stroke but the contribution of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to the differential response to stroke in adults and neonates is poorly understood. We asked whether the structure and function of the BBB is disrupted differently in neonatal and adult rats by transient middle cerebral artery occlusion. In adult rats, albumin leakage into injured regions was markedly increased during 2-24 h reperfusion but leakage remained low in the neonates. Functional assays employing intravascular tracers in the neonates showed that BBB permeability to both large (70 kDa dextran) and small (3 kDa dextran), gadolinium (III)-diethyltriaminepentaacetic acid tracers remained largely undisturbed 24 h after reperfusion. The profoundly different functional integrity of the BBB was associated with the largely nonoverlapping patterns of regulated genes in endothelial cells purified from injured and uninjured adult and neonatal brain at 24 h (endothelial transcriptome, 31,042 total probe sets). Within significantly regulated 1266 probe sets in injured adults and 361 probe sets in neonates, changes in the gene expression of the basal lamina components, adhesion molecules, the tight junction protein occludin, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 were among the key differences. The protein expression of collagen-IV, laminin, claudin-5, occludin, and zonula occludens protein 1 was also better preserved in neonatal rats. Neutrophil infiltration remained low in acutely injured neonates but neutralization of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1 in the systemic circulation enhanced neutrophil infiltration, BBB permeability, and injury. The markedly more integrant BBB in neonatal brain than in adult brain after acute stroke may have major implications for the treatment of neonatal stroke. PMID:22787045

  8. Attenuation of Acute Phase Injury in Rat Intracranial Hemorrhage by Cerebrolysin that Inhibits Brain Edema and Inflammatory Response.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Zhaotao; Wang, Shanshan; Gao, Mou; Xu, Ruxiang; Liang, Chunyang; Zhang, Hongtian

    2016-04-01

    The outcome of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is mainly determined by the volume of the hemorrhage core and the secondary brain damage to penumbral tissues due to brain swelling, microcirculation disturbance and inflammation. The present study aims to investigate the protective effects of cerebrolysin on brain edema and inhibition of the inflammation response surrounding the hematoma core in the acute stage after ICH. The ICH model was induced by administration of type VII bacterial collagenase into the stratum of adult rats, which were then randomly divided into three groups: ICH + saline; ICH + Cerebrolysin (5 ml/kg) and sham. Cerebrolysin or saline was administered intraperitoneally 1 h post surgery. Neurological scores, extent of brain edema content and Evans blue dye extravasation were recorded. The levels of pro-inflammatory factors (IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6) were assayed by Real-time PCR and Elisa kits. Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and tight junction proteins (TJPs; claudin-5, occludin and zonula occluden-1) expression were measured at multiple time points. The morphological and intercellular changes were characterized by Electron microscopy. It is found that cerebrolysin (5 ml/kg) improved the neurological behavior and reduced the ipsilateral brain water content and Evans blue dye extravasation. After cerebrolysin treated, the levels of pro-inflammatory factors and AQP4 in the peri-hematomal areas were markedly reduced and were accompanied with higher expression of TJPs. Electron microscopy showed the astrocytic swelling and concentrated chromatin in the ICH group and confirmed the cell junction changes. Thus, early cerebrolysin treatment ameliorates secondary injury after ICH and promotes behavioral performance during the acute phase by reducing brain edema, inflammatory response, and blood-brain barrier permeability.

  9. Attenuation of Acute Phase Injury in Rat Intracranial Hemorrhage by Cerebrolysin that Inhibits Brain Edema and Inflammatory Response.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Zhaotao; Wang, Shanshan; Gao, Mou; Xu, Ruxiang; Liang, Chunyang; Zhang, Hongtian

    2016-04-01

    The outcome of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is mainly determined by the volume of the hemorrhage core and the secondary brain damage to penumbral tissues due to brain swelling, microcirculation disturbance and inflammation. The present study aims to investigate the protective effects of cerebrolysin on brain edema and inhibition of the inflammation response surrounding the hematoma core in the acute stage after ICH. The ICH model was induced by administration of type VII bacterial collagenase into the stratum of adult rats, which were then randomly divided into three groups: ICH + saline; ICH + Cerebrolysin (5 ml/kg) and sham. Cerebrolysin or saline was administered intraperitoneally 1 h post surgery. Neurological scores, extent of brain edema content and Evans blue dye extravasation were recorded. The levels of pro-inflammatory factors (IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6) were assayed by Real-time PCR and Elisa kits. Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and tight junction proteins (TJPs; claudin-5, occludin and zonula occluden-1) expression were measured at multiple time points. The morphological and intercellular changes were characterized by Electron microscopy. It is found that cerebrolysin (5 ml/kg) improved the neurological behavior and reduced the ipsilateral brain water content and Evans blue dye extravasation. After cerebrolysin treated, the levels of pro-inflammatory factors and AQP4 in the peri-hematomal areas were markedly reduced and were accompanied with higher expression of TJPs. Electron microscopy showed the astrocytic swelling and concentrated chromatin in the ICH group and confirmed the cell junction changes. Thus, early cerebrolysin treatment ameliorates secondary injury after ICH and promotes behavioral performance during the acute phase by reducing brain edema, inflammatory response, and blood-brain barrier permeability. PMID:26498936

  10. Rat brain and serum lithium concentrations after acute injections of lithium carbonate and orotate.

    PubMed

    Kling, M A; Manowitz, P; Pollack, I W

    1978-06-01

    Eight hours after intraperitoneal injections of 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0m equiv Li kg-1, the serum and brain lithium concentrations of rats were significantly greater after lithium orotate than after lithium carbonate. While little serum lithium remained at 24 h after injection of 2.0 m equiv kg-1 lithium carbonate, two-thirds of the 2 h serum lithium concentration was present 24h after lithium orotate. Furthermore, the 24 h brain concentration of lithium after lithium orotate was approximately three times greater than that after lithium carbonate. These data suggest the possibility that lower doses of lithium orotate than lithium carbonate may achieve therapeutic brain lithium concentrations and relatively stable serum concentrations. PMID:26768

  11. Similarities and differences of acute nonconvulsive seizures and other epileptic activities following penetrating and ischemic brain injuries in rats.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xi-Chun May; Mountney, Andrea; Chen, Zhiyong; Wei, Guo; Cao, Ying; Leung, Lai Yee; Khatri, Vivek; Cunningham, Tracy; Tortella, Frank C

    2013-04-01

    The similarities and differences between acute nonconvulsive seizures (NCS) and other epileptic events, for example, periodic epileptiform discharges (PED) and intermittent rhythmic delta activities (IRDA), were characterized in rat models of penetrating and ischemic brain injuries. The NCS were spontaneously induced by either unilateral frontal penetrating ballistic-like brain injury (PBBI) or permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO), and were detected by continuous electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring begun immediately after the injury and continued for 72 h or 24 h, respectively. Analysis of NCS profiles (incidence, frequency, duration, and time distribution) revealed a high NCS incidence in both injury models. The EEG waveform expressions of NCS and PED exhibited intrinsic variations that resembled human electrographic manifestations of post-traumatic and post-ischemic ictal and inter-ictal events, but these waveform variations were not distinguishable between the two types of brain injury. However, the NCS after pMCAO occurred more acutely and intensely (latency=0.6 h, frequency=25 episodes/rat) compared with the PBBI-induced NCS (latency=24 h, frequency=10 episodes/rat), such that the most salient features differentiating post-traumatic and post-ischemic NCS were the intensity and time distribution of the NCS profiles. After pMCAO, nearly 50% of the seizures occurred within the first 2 h of injury, whereas after PBBI, NCS occurred sporadically (0-5%/h) throughout the 72 h recording period. The PED were episodically associated with NCS. By contrast, the IRDA appeared to be independent of other epileptic events. This study provided comprehensive comparisons of post-traumatic and post-ischemic epileptic profiles. The identification of the similarities and differences across a broad spectrum of epileptic events may lead to differential strategies for post-traumatic and post-stroke seizure interventions.

  12. Acute effects of aspartame on concentrations of brain amines and their metabolites in selected brain regions of Fischer 344 and Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Freeman, G; Sobotka, T; Hattan, D

    1990-01-01

    This study is the first in a series to define a rodent model to document the effects of amino acid-modulating compounds on central neurotransmitter function. A time-response curve for a single dose of orally intubated aspartame was determined in male Fischer 344 and Sprague-Dawley rats. Regional brain concentrations of norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT) and their metabolites were analyzed in the hypothalamus, cerebellum, pons/medulla, hippocampus, striatum, cortex, and midbrain/thalamus at 30, 60, 120, or 240 min after oral aspartame (1000 mg/kg) administration. Without consideration for time and group variables, levels of most compounds were higher in the brain regions of Fischer than Sprague-Dawley rats. Aspartame in Fischer 344 or Sprague-Dawley rats had no significant effect on levels of the catecholamines or indoleamines at any of the time points monitored following its acute administration. From the results of this study, large oral loads of aspartame do not appear to lead to regional alterations in brain biogenic amine levels.

  13. [Brain histaminergic neurons in rats subjected to the acute effect of alcohol].

    PubMed

    Zimatkin, S M; Fedina, E M; Kuznetsova, V B

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to examine the effect of single injection of alcohol on histaminergic neurons of rat brain. The study included 41 male albino rats, histological, histochemical, electron microscopic and morphometric methods were used. It was found that 1 hour after the intraperitoneal administration of ethanol in a dose of 4 g/kg the neurons become more spherical, the activity of NADH and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenases in their cytoplasm decreased, but the activity of lactate dehydrogenase, type B monoaminooxidase and acid phosphatase increased, at the same time significant ultrastructural disturbances were observed. Six hours following alcohol administration, the signs of histaminergic neuronal damage were reduced while the features of structural and metabolic adaptation became more expressed.

  14. Effect of Coenzyme Q10 on Proteomic Profile of Rat Brain Amygdala during Acute Metabolic Stress.

    PubMed

    Kirbaeva, N V; Sharanova, N E; Zhminchenko, V M; Toropygin, I Yu; Koplik, E V; Pertsov, S S; Vasil'ev, A V

    2016-08-01

    Differences in the proteomic profiles of the brain amygdala in rats with different prognostic resistance to stress were found on the model of metabolic stress. Differential expression of tropomodulin-2, GTP-binding protein SAR1, peroxiredoxin-2, calcineurin B homologous protein 1, Ras-related protein Rab-14, glutathione S-transferase omega-1, Tcrb protein, and NADH dehydrogenase [ubiquinone] iron-sulfur protein 8 (mitochondrial) was shown to depend on the behavioral pattern of animals and stage of the study. Specific features were observed in the involvement of the amygdala in the stress response of specimens with various behavioral characteristics. PMID:27590759

  15. Acute Administration of Branched-Chain Amino Acids Increases the Pro-BDNF/Total-BDNF Ratio in the Rat Brain.

    PubMed

    Scaini, Giselli; Morais, Meline O S; Furlanetto, Camila B; Kist, Luiza W; Pereira, Talita C B; Schuck, Patrícia F; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Pasquali, Matheus A B; Gelain, Daniel P; Moreira, José Cláudio F; Bogo, Maurício R; Streck, Emilio L

    2015-05-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is caused by an inborn error in metabolism resulting from a deficiency in the branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase complex activity. This blockage leads to accumulation of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) leucine, isoleucine and valine, as well as their corresponding α-keto acids and α-hydroxy acids. High levels of BCAAs are associated with neurological dysfunction and the role of pro- and mature brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the neurological dysfunction of MSUD is still unclear. Thus, in the present study we investigated the effect of an acute BCAA pool administration on BDNF levels and on the pro-BDNF cleavage-related proteins S100A10 and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in rat brains. Our results demonstrated that acute Hyper-BCAA (H-BCAA) exposure during the early postnatal period increases pro-BDNF and total-BDNF levels in the hippocampus and striatum. Moreover, tPA levels were significantly decreased, without modifications in the tPA transcript levels in the hippocampus and striatum. On the other hand, the S100A10 mRNA and S100A10 protein levels were not changed in the hippocampus and striatum. In the 30-day-old rats, we observed increased pro-BDNF, total-BDNF and tPA levels only in the striatum, whereas the tPA and S100A10 mRNA expression and the immunocontent of S100A10 were not altered. In conclusion, we demonstrated that acute H-BCAA administration increases the pro-BDNF/total-BDNF ratio and decreases the tPA levels in animals, suggesting that the BCAA effect may depend, at least in part, on changes in BDNF post-translational processing. PMID:25681161

  16. Analyzing the relationship between decorrelation time and tissue thickness in acute rat brain slices using multispeckle diffusing wave spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Brake, Joshua; Jang, Mooseok; Yang, Changhuei

    2016-02-01

    Novel techniques in the field of wavefront shaping have enabled light to be focused deep inside or through scattering media such as biological tissue. However, most of these demonstrations have been limited to thin, static samples since these techniques are very sensitive to changes in the arrangement of the scatterers within. As the samples of interest get thicker, the influence of the dynamic nature of the sample becomes even more pronounced and the window of time in which the wavefront solutions remain valid shrinks further. In this paper, we examine the time scales upon which this decorrelation happens in acute rat brain slices via multispeckle diffusing wave spectroscopy and investigate the relationship between this decorrelation time and the thickness of the sample using diffusing wave spectroscopy theory and Monte Carlo photon transport simulation.

  17. Protective Role of Oleuropein against Acute Deltamethrin-Induced Neurotoxicity in Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Khalatbary, Ali Reza; Ghaffari, Elmira; Mohammadnegad, Behrooz

    2015-01-01

    Background: Deltamethrin (DM) is a synthetic pyrethroid insecticide that can elicit neurotoxicity, leading to apoptosis. There is accumulating evidence that oleuropein (OE) has anti-apoptotic effect. The purpose of this study was to determine the anti-apoptotic effect of OE pretreatment in the neuronal cells of cerebral cortex. Methods: Rats were randomly divided into four groups each containing five rats: DM-treated group (12.5 mg/kg, a single dose), OE-treated group (20 mg/kg per day), DM + OE-treated group, and vehicle group. Sections of the brain were obtained 24 hours after DM injection and studied for histopathological and immunohistochemistry assessment. Results: The histopathological assessments showed lesser characteristics of neural degeneration in DM + OE group compared with DM group. Greater Bcl-2 and attenuated Bax expression could be detected in the DM + OE treated-mice compared with DM group. Conclusion: The results suggested that DM-induced neurotoxicity can be subsided by OE. PMID:26216399

  18. Behavioral deficits in rats following acute administration of glimepiride: Relationship with brain serotonin and dopamine.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Shehnaz Abdul; Ikram, Huma; Haleem, Darakhshan Jabeen

    2015-07-01

    A considerable body of literature suggests that depression and diabetes mellitus are co-morbid. The present study was designed to test any possible behavioral deficits and/or neurochemical changes in the brain as induced by the anti-diabetic drugs. Twenty-four rats were divided into four groups: (i) saline (ii) glimepiride (2.5mg/kg)- (iii) glimepiride (5.0mg/kg)- and (iv) glimepiride (10 mg/kg) injected animals. Behavioral activities in Skinner's box, open field and elevated plus maze were monitored 20, 35 and 45 minutes post injection respectively. Animals were decapitated 60 minutes post injection to collect brain samples. Samples were kept at -70°C until neurochemical analysis by HPLC-EC. Results from the present study show decreased time spent in the open arm of the elevated plus maze (p<0.05) at all the three doses. A decrease in the HVA (Homovanillic acid) levels at all three doses (p<0.01) was also observed along with decreased 5-HT (5-Hydroxytryptamine) (p<0.05 at 5.0 and 10mg/kg) and 5-HIAA (5-Hydroxyindoleacetic acid) (p<0.05 at all three doses) levels. Since a decrease in 5-HT metabolism can induce depression-like effects, the present study therefore suggests that the occurrence of depression in diabetic patients is due to the use of glimipride. Effects of long-term administration of smaller doses of glimipride are to be explored further to monitor tolerance in glimipride-induced deficits of serotonin. The finding may help to explore the cause of depression in diabetics for improving pharmacotherapy in diabetes. PMID:26142509

  19. Acute brain trauma.

    PubMed

    Martin, G T

    2016-01-01

    In the 20th century, the complications of head injuries were controlled but not eliminated. The wars of the 21st century turned attention to blast, the instant of impact and the primary injury of concussion. Computer calculations have established that in the first 5 milliseconds after the impact, four independent injuries on the brain are inflicted: 1) impact and its shockwave, 2) deceleration, 3) rotation and 4) skull deformity with vibration (or resonance). The recovery, pathology and symptoms after acute brain trauma have always been something of a puzzle. The variability of these four modes of injury, along with a variable reserve of neurones, explains some of this problem.

  20. Influence of perinatal trans fat on behavioral responses and brain oxidative status of adolescent rats acutely exposed to stress.

    PubMed

    Pase, C S; Roversi, Kr; Trevizol, F; Roversi, K; Kuhn, F T; Schuster, A J; Vey, L T; Dias, V T; Barcelos, R C S; Piccolo, J; Emanuelli, T; Bürger, M E

    2013-09-01

    Because consumption of processed foods has increased in the last decades and so far its potential influence on emotionality and susceptibility to stress is unknown, we studied the influence of different fatty acids (FA) on behavioral and biochemical parameters after acute restrain stress (AS) exposure. Two sequential generations of female rats were supplemented with soybean oil (control group; C-SO), fish oil (FO) and hydrogenated vegetable fat (HVF) from pregnancy and during lactation. At 41days of age, half the animals of each supplemented group were exposed to AS and observed in open field and elevated plus maze task, followed by euthanasia for biochemical assessments. The HVF-supplemented group showed higher anxiety-like symptoms per se, while the C-SO and FO groups did not show these behaviors. Among groups exposed to AS, HVF showed locomotor restlessness in the open field, while both C-SO and HVF groups showed anxiety-like symptoms in the elevated plus maze, but this was not observed in the FO group. Biochemical evaluations showed higher lipoperoxidation levels and lower cell viability in cortex in the HVF group. In addition, HVF-treated rats showed reduced catalase activity in striatum and hippocampus, as well as increased generation of reactive species in striatum, while FO was associated with increased cell viability in the hippocampus. Among groups exposed to AS, HVF increased reactive species generation in the brain, decreased cell viability in the cortex and striatum, and decreased catalase activity in the striatum and hippocampus. Taken together, our findings show that the type of FA provided during development and growth over two generations is able to modify the brain oxidative status, which was particularly adversely affected by trans fat. In addition, the harmful influence of chronic consumption of trans fats as observed in this study can enhance emotionality and anxiety parameters resulting from stressful situations of everyday life, which can

  1. Brain vasopressin V(1) receptors contribute to enhanced cardiovascular responses to acute stress in chronically stressed rats and rats with myocardial infarcton.

    PubMed

    Cudnoch-Jedrzejewska, Agnieszka; Szczepanska-Sadowska, Ewa; Dobruch, Jakub; Gomolka, Ryszard; Puchalska, Liana

    2010-03-01

    The present study was designed to determine the role of central vasopressin 1 receptors (V(1)R) in the regulation of cardiovascular parameters in chronically stressed infarcted rats and sham-operated rats under resting conditions and during exposure to acute alarming stress. The experiments were performed on four groups of conscious sham-operated and four groups of infarcted rats subjected to intraventricular infusion of either vehicle or a V(1)R antagonist (V(1)RANT). Two groups of infarcted and two groups of sham-operated rats were subjected to mild chronic stressing. Mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) and heart rate (HR) were determined under resting conditions and after exposure to acute stress (air jet). During vehicle infusion, MABP and HR increases in response to acute stress in the infarcted rats not subjected to chronic stress, and in the infarcted and sham-operated chronically stressed rats, were significantly greater than in the sham-operated rats not exposed to chronic stress. However, MABP and HR responses to acute stress in the chronically stressed infarcted rats and chronically stressed sham-operated rats did not differ. V(1)RANT abolished differences in cardiovascular responses to acute stress between the experimental groups. Resting cardiovascular parameters were not affected by any of the experimental treatments. It is concluded that chronic stressing enhances the pressor and tachycardic responses to acute stress in the sham-operated rats but does not further intensify these responses in infarcted rats.The results provide evidence that central V(1)Rs are involved in potentiation of cardiovascular responses to acute stress in chronically stressed rats, infarcted rats, and chronically stressed infarcted rats.

  2. Pyrroloquinoline quinine protects rat brain cortex against acute glutamate-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Ding, Mei; Cao, Zheng; Zhang, Jingjing; Ding, Fei; Ke, Kaifu

    2013-08-01

    To investigate possible protective effects of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) on the rat cortex with glutamate injection and to understand the mechanisms linking the in vivo neuroprotection of PQQ. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats received glutamate injection into the rat cortex. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase biotin-dUTP nick end labeling assay was performed to observe influences of co-treatment with PQQ (simultaneous injection with PQQ and glutamate) on neural cell apoptosis in the rat cortex. The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the rat cortex was detected by flow cytometry using 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate labeling, and the activity of superoxide dismutase, glutathione and malondialdehyde was respectively determined. Real time quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot were applied to measure the mRNA and protein expressions of Nrf1, Nrf2, HO-1 and GCLC in the rat cortex. Western blot was used to detect the phosphorylation of Akt and GSK3β in the rat cortex. Co-treatment with PQQ protected neural cells in the rat cortex from glutamate-induced apoptosis. PQQ decreased the ROS production induced by glutamate injection. PQQ increased the mRNA and protein expressions of Nrf2, HO-1 and GCLC and the phosphorylation of Akt and GSK3β in the cortex of glutamate-injected rats. PQQ could produce neuroprotective effects on the rat cortex. The antioxidant properties of PQQ and PQQ-induced activation of Akt/GSK3β signal pathway might be responsible for the in vivo neuroprotection of PQQ.

  3. Acute effects of aspartame on large neutral amino acids and monoamines in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Fernstrom, J D; Fernstrom, M H; Gillis, M A

    1983-04-01

    The dipeptide aspartame (APM; aspartylphenylalanine methylester), an artificial sweetener, was studied in vivo for its ability to influence brain levels of the large neutral amino acids and the rates of hydroxylation of the aromatic amino acids. The administration by gavage of APM (200 mg/kg) caused large increments in blood and brain levels of phenylalanine and tyrosine by 60 minutes. Brain tryptophan level was occasionally reduced significantly, but the brain levels of the branched-chain amino acids were always unaffected. Smaller doses (50, 100 mg/kg) also raised blood and brain tyrosine and phenylalanine, but did not reduce brain tryptophan levels. At the highest dose (200 mg/kg), APM gavage caused an insignificant increase in dopa accumulation (after NSD-1015), and a modest reduction in 5-hydroxytryptophan accumulation. No changes in the brain levels of serotonin, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, dopamine, dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, homovanillic acid, or norepinephrine were produced by APM administration (200 mg/kg). These results thus indicate that APM, even when administered in amounts that cause large increments in brain tyrosine and phenylalanine, produce minimal effects on the rates of formation of monoamine transmitters.

  4. Acute Exposure to Perchlorethylene alters Rat Visual Evoked Potentials in Relation to Brain Concentration

    EPA Science Inventory

    These experiments sought to establish a dose-effect relationship between the concentration of perchloroethylene (PCE) in brain tissue and concurrent changes in visual function. A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was implemented to predict concentrations of PCE ...

  5. AGE-RELATED TOXICITY PATHWAY ANALYSIS IN BROWN NORWAY RAT BRAIN FOLLOWING ACUTE TOLUENE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The influence of aging on susceptibility to environmental exposures is poorly understood. To investigate-the contribution of different life stages on response to toxicants, we examined the effects of an acute exposure to the volatile organic compound, toluene (0.0 or 1.0 g/kg), i...

  6. TOXICITY PATHWAY ANALYSIS IN AGING BROWN NORWAY RAT BRAIN FOLLOWING ACUTE TOLUENE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The influence of aging on susceptibility to environmental stressors is poorly understood. To investigate the contribution of different life stages on response to toxicants, we examined the effects of acute exposure by oral gavage of the volatile organic solvent toluene (0.00, 0.3...

  7. An evaluation of the effects of acute and chronic L-tyrosine administration on BDNF levels and BDNF mRNA expression in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Gabriela K; Scaini, Giselli; Jeremias, Isabela C; Carvalho-Silva, Milena; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Pereira, Talita C B; Oliveira, Giovanna M T; Kist, Luiza W; Bogo, Maurício R; Schuck, Patrícia F; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Streck, Emilio L

    2014-04-01

    Tyrosinemia type II, which is also known as Richner-Hanhart syndrome, is an inborn error of metabolism that is due to a block in the transamination reaction that converts tyrosine to p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate. Because the mechanisms of neurological dysfunction in hypertyrosinemic patients are poorly known and the symptoms of these patients are related to the central nervous system, the present study evaluated brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels and bdnf mRNA expression in young rats and during growth. In our acute protocol, Wistar rats (10 and 30 days old) were killed 1 h after a single intraperitoneal L-tyrosine injection (500 mg/kg) or saline. Chronic administration consisted of L-tyrosine (500 mg/kg) or saline injections 12 h apart for 24 days in Wistar rats (7 days old), and the rats were killed 12 h after the last injection. The brains were rapidly removed, and we evaluated the BDNF levels and bdnf mRNA expression. The present results showed that the acute administration of L-tyrosine decreased both BDNF and bdnf mRNA levels in the striatum of 10-day-old rats. In the 30-day-old rats, we observed decreased BDNF levels without modifications in bdnf transcript level in the hippocampus and striatum. Chronic administration of L-tyrosine increased the BDNF levels in the striatum of rats during their growth, whereas bdnf mRNA expression was not altered. We hypothesize that oxidative stress can interact with the BDNF system to modulate synaptic plasticity and cognitive function. The present results enhance our knowledge of the pathophysiology of hypertyrosinemia. PMID:24091827

  8. An evaluation of the effects of acute and chronic L-tyrosine administration on BDNF levels and BDNF mRNA expression in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Gabriela K; Scaini, Giselli; Jeremias, Isabela C; Carvalho-Silva, Milena; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Pereira, Talita C B; Oliveira, Giovanna M T; Kist, Luiza W; Bogo, Maurício R; Schuck, Patrícia F; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Streck, Emilio L

    2014-04-01

    Tyrosinemia type II, which is also known as Richner-Hanhart syndrome, is an inborn error of metabolism that is due to a block in the transamination reaction that converts tyrosine to p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate. Because the mechanisms of neurological dysfunction in hypertyrosinemic patients are poorly known and the symptoms of these patients are related to the central nervous system, the present study evaluated brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels and bdnf mRNA expression in young rats and during growth. In our acute protocol, Wistar rats (10 and 30 days old) were killed 1 h after a single intraperitoneal L-tyrosine injection (500 mg/kg) or saline. Chronic administration consisted of L-tyrosine (500 mg/kg) or saline injections 12 h apart for 24 days in Wistar rats (7 days old), and the rats were killed 12 h after the last injection. The brains were rapidly removed, and we evaluated the BDNF levels and bdnf mRNA expression. The present results showed that the acute administration of L-tyrosine decreased both BDNF and bdnf mRNA levels in the striatum of 10-day-old rats. In the 30-day-old rats, we observed decreased BDNF levels without modifications in bdnf transcript level in the hippocampus and striatum. Chronic administration of L-tyrosine increased the BDNF levels in the striatum of rats during their growth, whereas bdnf mRNA expression was not altered. We hypothesize that oxidative stress can interact with the BDNF system to modulate synaptic plasticity and cognitive function. The present results enhance our knowledge of the pathophysiology of hypertyrosinemia.

  9. Effect of acute and chronic administration of L-tyrosine on nerve growth factor levels in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Gabriela K; Jeremias, Isabela C; Scaini, Giselli; Carvalho-Silva, Milena; Gomes, Lara M; Furlanetto, Camila B; Morais, Meline O; Schuck, Patrícia F; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Streck, Emilio L

    2013-08-01

    Most inborn errors of tyrosine catabolism produce hypertyrosinemia. Neurological manifestations are variable and some patients are developmentally normal, while others show different degrees of developmental retardation. Considering that current data do not eliminate the possibility that elevated levels of tyrosine and/or its derivatives may have noxious effects on central nervous system development in some patients, the present study evaluated nerve growth factor (NGF) levels in hippocampus, striatum and posterior cortex of young rats. In our acute protocol, Wistar rats (10 and 30 days old) were killed 1 h after a single intraperitoneal administration of L-tyrosine (500 mg/kg) or saline. Chronic administration consisted of L-tyrosine (500 mg/kg) or saline injections 12 h apart for 24 days in Wistar rats (7 days old); the rats were killed 12 h after the last injection. NGF levels were then evaluated. Our findings showed that acute administration of L-tyrosine decreased NGF levels in striatum of 10-day-old rats. In the 30-day-old rats, NGF levels were decreased in hippocampus and posterior cortex. On the other hand, chronic administration of L-tyrosine increased NGF levels in posterior cortex. Decreased NGF may impair growth, differentiation, survival and maintenance of neurons. PMID:23690230

  10. The Effect of Intravenous Lidocaine on Brain Activation During Non-Noxious and Acute Noxious Stimulation of the Forepaw: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Zhongchi; Yu, Mei; Smith, S. David; Kritzer, Mary; Du, Congwu; Ma, Yu; Volkow, Nora D.; Glass, Peter S.; Benveniste, Helene

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Lidocaine can alleviate acute as well as chronic neuropathic pain at very low plasma concentrations in humans and laboratory animals. The mechanism(s) underlying lidocaine’s analgesic effect when administered systemically is poorly understood but clearly not related to interruption of peripheral nerve conduction. Other targets for lidocaine’s analgesic action(s) have been suggested, including sodium channels and other receptor sites in the central rather than peripheral nervous system. To our knowledge, the effect of lidocaine on the brain’s functional response to pain has never been investigated. Here, we therefore characterized the effect of systemic lidocaine on the brain’s response to innocuous and acute noxious stimulation in the rat using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). METHODS Alpha-chloralose anesthetized rats underwent fMRI to quantify brain activation patterns in response to innocuous and noxious forepaw stimulation before and after IV administration of lidocaine. RESULTS Innocuous forepaw stimulation elicited brain activation only in the contralateral primary somatosensory (S1) cortex. Acute noxious forepaw stimulation induced activation in additional brain areas associated with pain perception, including the secondary somatosensory cortex (S2), thalamus, insula and limbic regions. Lidocaine administered at IV doses of either 1 mg/kg, 4 mg/kg or 10 mg/kg did not abolish or diminish brain activation in response to innocuous or noxious stimulation. In fact, IV doses of 4 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg lidocaine enhanced S1 and S2 responses to acute nociceptive stimulation, increasing the activated cortical volume by 50%–60%. CONCLUSION The analgesic action of systemic lidocaine in acute pain is not reflected in a straightforward interruption of pain-induced fMRI brain activation as has been observed with opioids. The enhancement of cortical fMRI responses to acute pain by lidocaine observed here has also been reported for cocaine. We

  11. Mechanisms of acute uremic encephalopathy: early activation of Fos and Fra-2 gene products in different nuclei/areas of the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Heidland, August; Sebekova, Katarina; Klassen, André; Palkovits, Miklós

    2010-09-01

    High levels of various uremic toxins such as guanidino compounds and advanced glycation endproducts, as well as an excess of parathyroid hormones, are involved in the pathogenesis of acute uremic encephalopathy. Moreover, distant effects of the damaged kidney with enhanced production of inflammatory mediators are implicated. Data on the pump activity of an abnormal Na-K-ATPase and inhibition of the organic anion transporter system in the brain have been published previously. Recently, the effect of an experimentally induced acute renal failure (ARF) on the neuronal cell activation of Fos and Fra-2 in the rat brain was investigated by immunohistochemistry. ARF was induced by using the following 3 rat models: bilateral nephrectomy, bilateral ureter ligation, and uranyl acetate injection with corresponding controls. The Fos and the Fra-2 immunoreactive neurons of the brain were determined in a total of 120 brain areas over a period of 3 days post bilateral nephrectomy and bilateral ureter ligation and 12 days after uranyl acetate. An activation response was observed in 73 of 120 areas of the brain. The responses were classified into 4 groups: (1) biogenic amines (noradrenaline, adrenaline, histamine, and 5-hydroxytryptamine), (2) stress-sensitive forebrain areas, (3) neuronal cell groups involved in the regulation of water and electrolyte homeostasis, and (4) central autonomic cell groups. In the uranyl acetate-induced ARF, activation of Fos and Fra-2 immunoreactivity took place at the earliest time-point (3 hours) which persisted even after improvement of ARF. This suggests the involvement of the toxic effects of uranium as a result of its accumulation in the brain.

  12. Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI) reveals brain circuitry involved in responding to an acute novel stress in rats with a history of repeated social stress

    PubMed Central

    Bangasser, Debra A.; Lee, Catherine S.; Cook, Philip A.; Gee, James C.; Bhatnagar, Seema; Valentino, Rita J.

    2013-01-01

    Responses to acute stressors are determined in part by stress history. For example, a history of chronic stress results in facilitated responses to a novel stressor and this facilitation is considered to be adaptive. We previously demonstrated that repeated exposure of rats to the resident-intruder model of social stress results in the emergence of two subpopulations that are characterized by different coping responses to stress. The submissive subpopulation failed to show facilitation to a novel stressor and developed a passive strategy in the Porsolt forced swim test. Because a passive stress coping response has been implicated in the propensity to develop certain psychiatric disorders, understanding the unique circuitry engaged by exposure to a novel stressor in these subpopulations would advance our understanding of the etiology of stress-related pathology. An ex vivo functional imaging technique, manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI), was used to identify and distinguish brain regions that are differentially activated by an acute swim stress (15 min) in rats with a history of social stress compared to controls. Specifically, Mn2+ was administered intracerebroventricularly prior to swim stress and brains were later imaged ex vivo to reveal activated structures. When compared to controls, all rats with a history of social stress showed greater activation in specific striatal, hippocampal, hypothalamic, and midbrain regions. The submissive subpopulation of rats was further distinguished by significantly greater activation in amygdala, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, and septum, suggesting that these regions may form a circuit mediating responses to novel stress in individuals that adopt passive coping strategies. The finding that different circuits are engaged by a novel stressor in the two subpopulations of rats exposed to social stress implicates a role for these circuits in determining individual strategies for responding to stressors

  13. Acute Nicotine Administration Increases BOLD fMRI Signal in Brain Regions Involved in Reward Signaling and Compulsive Drug Intake in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Jon C.; Perez, Pablo D.; Bauzo-Rodriguez, Rayna; Hall, Gabrielle; Klausner, Rachel; Guerra, Valerie; Zeng, Huadong; Igari, Moe; Febo, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute nicotine administration potentiates brain reward function and enhances motor and cognitive function. These studies investigated which brain areas are being activated by a wide range of doses of nicotine, and if this is diminished by pretreatment with the nonselective nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine. Methods: Drug-induced changes in brain activity were assessed by measuring changes in the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal using an 11.1-Tesla magnetic resonance scanner. In the first experiment, nicotine naïve rats were mildly anesthetized and the effect of nicotine (0.03–0.6mg/kg) on the BOLD signal was investigated for 10min. In the second experiment, the effect of mecamylamine on nicotine-induced brain activity was investigated. Results: A high dose of nicotine increased the BOLD signal in brain areas implicated in reward signaling, such as the nucleus accumbens shell and the prelimbic area. Nicotine also induced a dose-dependent increase in the BOLD signal in the striato-thalamo-orbitofrontal circuit, which plays a role in compulsive drug intake, and in the insular cortex, which contributes to nicotine craving and relapse. In addition, nicotine induced a large increase in the BOLD signal in motor and somatosensory cortices. Mecamylamine alone did not affect the BOLD signal in most brain areas, but induced a negative BOLD response in cortical areas, including insular, motor, and somatosensory cortices. Pretreatment with mecamylamine completely blocked the nicotine-induced increase in the BOLD signal. Conclusions: These studies demonstrate that acute nicotine administration activates brain areas that play a role in reward signaling, compulsive behavior, and motor and cognitive function. PMID:25552431

  14. Effect of acute administration of L-tyrosine on oxidative stress parameters in brain of young rats.

    PubMed

    Macêdo, Livia G R P; Carvalho-Silva, Milena; Ferreira, Gabriela K; Vieira, Júlia S; Olegário, Natália; Gonçalves, Renata C; Vuolo, Francieli S; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Schuck, Patrícia F; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Streck, Emilio L

    2013-12-01

    Tyrosinemia type II, also known as Richner-Hanhart syndrome, is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism caused by a deficiency of hepatic cytosolic tyrosine aminotransferase, and is associated with neurologic and development difficulties in numerous patients. Considering that the mechanisms underlying the neurological dysfunction in hypertyrosinemic patients are poorly known and that studies demonstrated that high concentrations of tyrosine provoke oxidative stress in vitro and in vivo in the cerebral cortex of rats, in the present study we investigate the oxidative stress parameters (enzymatic antioxidant defenses, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances and protein carbonyl content) in cerebellum, hippocampus and striatum of 30-old-day rats after acute administration of L-tyrosine. Our results demonstrated that the acute administration of L-tyrosine increased the thiobarbituric acid reactive species levels in hippocampus and the carbonyl levels in cerebellum, hippocampus and striatum. In addition, acute administration of L-tyrosine significantly decreased superoxide dismutase activity in cerebellum, hippocampus and striatum, while catalase was increased in striatum. In conclusion, the oxidative stress may contribute, along with other mechanisms, to the neurological dysfunction characteristic of hypertyrosinemia and the administration of antioxidants may be considered as a potential adjuvant therapy for tyrosinemia, especially type II. PMID:24135880

  15. Effect of acute administration of L-tyrosine on oxidative stress parameters in brain of young rats.

    PubMed

    Macêdo, Livia G R P; Carvalho-Silva, Milena; Ferreira, Gabriela K; Vieira, Júlia S; Olegário, Natália; Gonçalves, Renata C; Vuolo, Francieli S; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Schuck, Patrícia F; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Streck, Emilio L

    2013-12-01

    Tyrosinemia type II, also known as Richner-Hanhart syndrome, is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism caused by a deficiency of hepatic cytosolic tyrosine aminotransferase, and is associated with neurologic and development difficulties in numerous patients. Considering that the mechanisms underlying the neurological dysfunction in hypertyrosinemic patients are poorly known and that studies demonstrated that high concentrations of tyrosine provoke oxidative stress in vitro and in vivo in the cerebral cortex of rats, in the present study we investigate the oxidative stress parameters (enzymatic antioxidant defenses, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances and protein carbonyl content) in cerebellum, hippocampus and striatum of 30-old-day rats after acute administration of L-tyrosine. Our results demonstrated that the acute administration of L-tyrosine increased the thiobarbituric acid reactive species levels in hippocampus and the carbonyl levels in cerebellum, hippocampus and striatum. In addition, acute administration of L-tyrosine significantly decreased superoxide dismutase activity in cerebellum, hippocampus and striatum, while catalase was increased in striatum. In conclusion, the oxidative stress may contribute, along with other mechanisms, to the neurological dysfunction characteristic of hypertyrosinemia and the administration of antioxidants may be considered as a potential adjuvant therapy for tyrosinemia, especially type II.

  16. Autophagy in acute brain injury.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Blomgren, Klas; Kroemer, Guido

    2016-08-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily ancient mechanism that ensures the lysosomal degradation of old, supernumerary or ectopic cytoplasmic entities. Most eukaryotic cells, including neurons, rely on proficient autophagic responses for the maintenance of homeostasis in response to stress. Accordingly, autophagy mediates neuroprotective effects following some forms of acute brain damage, including methamphetamine intoxication, spinal cord injury and subarachnoid haemorrhage. In some other circumstances, however, the autophagic machinery precipitates a peculiar form of cell death (known as autosis) that contributes to the aetiology of other types of acute brain damage, such as neonatal asphyxia. Here, we dissect the context-specific impact of autophagy on non-infectious acute brain injury, emphasizing the possible therapeutic application of pharmacological activators and inhibitors of this catabolic process for neuroprotection. PMID:27256553

  17. Neuroprotective effect of suppression of astrocytic activation by arundic acid on brain injuries in rats with acute subdural hematomas.

    PubMed

    Wajima, Daisuke; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Nakase, Hiroyuki; Yonezawa, Taiji

    2013-06-26

    Acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) can cause massive ischemic cerebral blood flow (CBF) underneath the hematoma, but early surgical evacuation of the mass reduces mortality. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether arundic acid improves the secondary ischemic damage induced by ASDH. Our results confirmed that arundic acid decreases the expression of S100 protein produced by activated astrocytes around ischemic lesions due to cytotoxic edema after ASDH as well as reducing infarction volumes and numbers of apoptotic cells around the ischemic lesions. In this study, we also evaluate the relationship of brain edema and the expression of Aquaporin 4 (AQP4) in an ASDH model. The expression of AQP4 was decreased in the acute phase after ASDH. Cytotoxic edema, assumed to be the main cause of ASDH, could also cause ischemic lesions around the edema area. Arundic acid decreased the infarction volume and number of apoptotic cells via suppression of S100 protein expression in ischemic lesions without changing the expression of AQP4.

  18. Effect of Acute Emotional Stress on Proteomic Profile of Selected Brain Areas and Lysosomal Proteolysis in Rats with Different Behavioral Activity.

    PubMed

    Sharanova, N E; Kirbaeva, N V; Toropygin, I Yu; Khryapova, E V; Koplik, E V; Soto, C Kh; Pertsov, S S; Vasiliev, A V

    2016-07-01

    We compared proteome profiles of selected brain areas (cortex, amygdala, hippocampus, and reticular formation) and measured cathepsins B and D activity in liver lysosomal fraction in rats with different behavioral activity under conditions of emotional stress. In passive rats, the expression of some proteins in various brain regions was changed and baseline cathepsin B activity was higher than in active animals. Taken together, the results attest to differences in the adaptive response formation in rats, depending on behavioral features. PMID:27502534

  19. Repeated aripiprazole treatment regulates Bdnf, Arc and Npas4 expression under basal condition as well as after an acute swim stress in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Luoni, Alessia; Fumagalli, Fabio; Racagni, Giorgio; Riva, Marco A

    2014-02-01

    Despite the rapid control of schizophrenic symptoms is due to the ability of antipsychotic drugs (APDs) to block D2 receptors in the mesolimbic pathway, it is now well-established that the therapeutic effects rely on adaptive mechanisms set in motion by their long-term administration. Such neuroplastic mechanisms depend on the pharmacological profile of the drug employed, with marked differences existing between first and second generation APDs. On these bases, the major accomplishment of this work was to investigate neuroadaptive changes set in motion by repeated treatment with aripiprazole, a novel APD that is unique for being a partial agonist at dopamine D2 receptors. Moreover, given that stress plays a critical role in the exacerbation of disease symptoms, we also investigated whether aripiprazole could influence the dynamic response of the brain to an acute challenge. We found that repeated aripiprazole treatment in rats regulates the expression of different markers of neuroplasticity such as Bdnf, Arc and Npas4 in a brain-region specific fashion; more importantly, the expression of these molecules was significantly up-regulated by an acute swim stress only in aripiprazole-treated animals, which is suggestive of increased ability to cope with the adverse event. We indeed found an overall facilitation of Bdnf expression, an effect that is mainly evident in the prefrontal cortex on the pool of transcripts undergoing dendritic localization. Overall, our results provide novel information regarding the mechanisms through which aripiprazole may regulate brain function and could contribute to improve neuroplastic defects that are associated with schizophrenia symptomatology.

  20. Acute repeated intracerebroventricular injections of angiotensin II reduce agonist and antagonist radioligand binding in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and median preoptic nucleus in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Speth, Robert C; Vento, Peter J; Carrera, Eduardo J; Gonzalez-Reily, Luz; Linares, Andrea; Santos, Kira; Swindle, Jamala D; Daniels, Derek

    2014-10-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) stimulates water and saline intakes when injected into the brain of rats. This arises from activation of the AT1 Ang II receptor subtype. Acute repeated injections, however, decrease the water intake response to Ang II without affecting saline intake. Previous studies provide evidence that Ang II-induced water intake is mediated via the classical G protein coupling pathway, whereas the saline intake caused by Ang II is mediated by an ERK 1/2 MAP kinase signaling pathway. Accordingly, the different behavioral response to repeated injections of Ang II may reflect a selective effect on G protein coupling. To test this hypothesis, we examined the binding of a radiolabeled agonist ((125)I-sarcosine(1) Ang II) and a radiolabeled antagonist ((125)I-sarcosine(1), isoleucine(8) Ang II) in brain homogenates and tissue sections prepared from rats given repeated injections of Ang II or vehicle. Although no treatment-related differences were found in hypothalamic homogenates, a focus on specific brain structures using receptor autoradiography, found that the desensitization treatment reduced binding of both radioligands in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) and median preoptic nucleus (MnPO), but not in the subfornical organ (SFO). Because G protein coupling is reported to have a selective effect on agonist binding without affecting antagonist binding, these findings do not support a G protein uncoupling treatment effect. This suggests that receptor number is more critical to the water intake response than the saline intake response, or that pathways downstream from the G protein mediate desensitization of the water intake response.

  1. Acute Response of the Hippocampal Transcriptome Following Mild Traumatic Brain Injury After Controlled Cortical Impact in the Rat.

    PubMed

    Samal, Babru B; Waites, Cameron K; Almeida-Suhett, Camila; Li, Zheng; Marini, Ann M; Samal, Nihar R; Elkahloun, Abdel; Braga, Maria F M; Eiden, Lee E

    2015-10-01

    We have previously demonstrated that mild controlled cortical impact (mCCI) injury to rat cortex causes indirect, concussive injury to underlying hippocampus and other brain regions, providing a reproducible model for mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and its neurochemical, synaptic, and behavioral sequelae. Here, we extend a preliminary gene expression study of the hippocampus-specific events occurring after mCCI and identify 193 transcripts significantly upregulated, and 21 transcripts significantly downregulated, 24 h after mCCI. Fifty-three percent of genes altered by mCCI within 24 h of injury are predicted to be expressed only in the non-neuronal/glial cellular compartment, with only 13% predicted to be expressed only in neurons. The set of upregulated genes following mCCI was interrogated using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) augmented with manual curation of the literature (190 transcripts accepted for analysis), revealing a core group of 15 first messengers, mostly inflammatory cytokines, predicted to account for >99% of the transcript upregulation occurring 24 h after mCCI. Convergent analysis of predicted transcription factors (TFs) regulating the mCCI target genes, carried out in IPA relative to the entire Affymetrix-curated transcriptome, revealed a high concordance with TFs regulated by the cohort of 15 cytokines/cytokine-like messengers independently accounting for upregulation of the mCCI transcript cohort. TFs predicted to regulate transcription of the 193-gene mCCI cohort also displayed a high degree of overlap with TFs predicted to regulate glia-, rather than neuron-specific genes in cortical tissue. We conclude that mCCI predominantly affects transcription of non-neuronal genes within the first 24 h after insult. This finding suggests that early non-neuronal events trigger later permanent neuronal changes after mTBI, and that early intervention after mTBI could potentially affect the neurochemical cascade leading to later reported synaptic and

  2. 1H-MRS in spinal cord injury: acute and chronic metabolite alterations in rat brain and lumbar spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Erschbamer, Matthias; Öberg, Johanna; Westman, Eric; Sitnikov, Rouslan; Olson, Lars; Spenger, Christian

    2011-01-01

    A variety of tests of sensorimotor function are used to characterize outcome after experimental spinal cord injury (SCI). These tests typically do not provide information about chemical and metabolic processes in the injured CNS. Here, we used 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to monitor long-term and short-term chemical changes in the CNS in vivo following SCI. The investigated areas were cortex, thalamus/striatum and the spinal cord distal to injury. In cortex, glutamate (Glu) decreased 1 day after SCI and slowly returned towards normal levels. The combined glutamine (Gln) and Glu signal was similarly decreased in cortex, but increased in the distal spinal cord, suggesting opposite changes of the Glu/Gln metabolites in cortex and distal spinal cord. In lumbar spinal cord, a marked increase of myo-inositol was found 3 days, 14 days and 4 months after SCI. Changes in metabolite concentrations in the spinal cord were also found for choline and N-acetylaspartate. No significant changes in metabolite concentrations were found in thalamus/striatum. Multivariate data analysis allowed separation between rats with SCI and controls for spectra acquired in cortex and spinal cord, but not in thalamus/striatum. Our findings suggest MRS could become a helpful tool to monitor spatial and temporal alterations of metabolic conditions in vivo in the brain and spinal cord after SCI. We provide evidence for dynamic temporal changes at both ends of the neuraxis, cortex cerebri and distal spinal cord, while deep brain areas appear less affected. PMID:21251091

  3. Acute up-regulation of the rat brain somatostatin receptor-effector system by leptin is related to activation of insulin signaling and may counteract central leptin actions.

    PubMed

    Perianes-Cachero, A; Burgos-Ramos, E; Puebla-Jiménez, L; Canelles, S; Frago, L M; Hervás-Aguilar, A; de Frutos, S; Toledo-Lobo, M V; Mela, V; Viveros, M P; Argente, J; Chowen, J A; Arilla-Ferreiro, E; Barrios, V

    2013-11-12

    Leptin and somatostatin (SRIF) have opposite effects on food seeking and ingestive behaviors, functions partially regulated by the frontoparietal cortex and hippocampus. Although it is known that the acute suppression of food intake mediated by leptin decreases with time, the counter-regulatory mechanisms remain unclear. Our aims were to analyze the effect of acute central leptin infusion on the SRIF receptor-effector system in these areas and the implication of related intracellular signaling mechanisms in this response. We studied 20 adult male Wister rats including controls and those treated intracerebroventricularly with a single dose of 5 μg of leptin and sacrificed 1 or 6h later. Density of SRIF receptors was unchanged at 1h, whereas leptin increased the density of SRIF receptors at 6h, which was correlated with an elevated capacity of SRIF to inhibit forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity in both areas. The functional capacity of SRIF receptors was unaltered as cell membrane levels of αi1 and αi2 subunits of G inhibitory proteins were unaffected in both brain areas. The increased density of SRIF receptors was due to enhanced SRIF receptor subtype 2 (sst2) protein levels that correlated with higher mRNA levels for this receptor. These changes in sst2 mRNA levels were concomitant with increased activation of the insulin signaling, c-Jun and cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB); however, activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 was reduced in the cortex and unchanged in the hippocampus and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 remained unchanged in these areas. In addition, the leptin antagonist L39A/D40A/F41A blocked the leptin-induced changes in SRIF receptors, leptin signaling and CREB activation. In conclusion, increased activation of insulin signaling after leptin infusion is related to acute up-regulation of the SRIF receptor-effector system that may antagonize short-term leptin actions in the rat brain.

  4. Patch-clamp recordings of rat neurons from acute brain slices of the somatosensory cortex during magnetic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Pashut, Tamar; Magidov, Dafna; Ben-Porat, Hana; Wolfus, Shuki; Friedman, Alex; Perel, Eli; Lavidor, Michal; Bar-Gad, Izhar; Yeshurun, Yosef; Korngreen, Alon

    2014-01-01

    Although transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a popular tool for both basic research and clinical applications, its actions on nerve cells are only partially understood. We have previously predicted, using compartmental modeling, that magnetic stimulation of central nervous system neurons depolarized the soma followed by initiation of an action potential in the initial segment of the axon. The simulations also predict that neurons with low current threshold are more susceptible to magnetic stimulation. Here we tested these theoretical predictions by combining in vitro patch-clamp recordings from rat brain slices with magnetic stimulation and compartmental modeling. In agreement with the modeling, our recordings demonstrate the dependence of magnetic stimulation-triggered action potentials on the type and state of the neuron and its orientation within the magnetic field. Our results suggest that the observed effects of TMS are deeply rooted in the biophysical properties of single neurons in the central nervous system and provide a framework both for interpreting existing TMS data and developing new simulation-based tools and therapies. PMID:24917788

  5. Effect of acute ether stress on monoamine metabolism in median eminence and discrete hypothalamic nuclei of the rat brain and on anterior pituitary hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Johnston, C A; Spinedi, E J; Negro-Vilar, A

    1985-07-01

    This study was designed to correlate the endocrine responses elicited by acute ether stress with the changes in metabolism of several monoamines in discrete nuclei of the rat brain. Concentrations of norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA), and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and also of the specific metabolites of NE, DA, and 5-HT, 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylethylene glycol, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, and 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid, respectively, were concurrently measured in microdissected nuclei using high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. The ratio of the metabolites to their respective amines was used as an estimate of the metabolism of NE, DA, and 5-HT. Acute exposure to ether vapors induced, within 5-15 min, large increments in plasma levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), beta-endorphin, and prolactin (PRL), and decrements in the levels of plasma growth hormone (GH). Significant increases in NE metabolism were observed in the rostral (ANr) and caudal (ANc) divisions of the arcuate nucleus, as well as in the paraventricular (PVN) and dorsomedial nuclei, 15 min after ether stress. A significant decrease in 5-HT metabolism was observed in the PVN, supraoptic nucleus, and ANc, whereas significant increases in 5-HT metabolism were detected in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and ANr. DA metabolism selectively increased in the ANr. The present results indicate that the acute changes in ACTH, beta-endorphin, PRL, and GH release induced by ether exposure are temporally correlated with increases in NE metabolism in many hypothalamic nuclei; a selective increase in DA metabolism restricted to the ANr, and differential effects on 5-HT metabolism, probably reflecting selective activation or inhibition of different populations of 5-HT neurons.

  6. Brain and plasma levels of cocaine and benzoylecgonine in lead-expose and cadmium-exposed rats following acute or chronic intraperitoneal administration of cocaine.

    PubMed

    Nation, J R; Wellman, P J; Livermore, C L; Miller, D K; Bratton, G R

    1997-06-16

    Previous investigations of metal/cocaine interactions have shown that chronic oral exposure to inorganic lead or cadmium attenuates the psychoactive effects of acute or repeated administration of cocaine. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the possibility that such interactive effects may derive from metal-induced disturbances in cocaine pharmacokinetics, i.e., delivery of cocaine to critical biologic sites may be disrupted by metal contamination. In this study, adult male rats were exposed to purified diets containing 250 ppm lead acetate (Group Lead), 100 ppm cadmium chloride (Group Cadmium), or unadulterated laboratory chow (Group Control); n = 48/exposure condition. Following ad libitum access to their respective diets in the home cage for 45 days, half the animals from each exposure regimen received single daily IP injections of 5, 10, or 20 mg/kg cocaine HCl for a period of 7 days (n = 8/group). The remaining half the animals received repeated daily injections of saline during this pretreatment phase. On the day following pretreatment, animals previously receiving cocaine injections were administered a single cocaine test challenge at a dose equal to that received in pretreatment. Similarly, saline pretreatment animals received either 5, 10, or 20 mg/kg cocaine. The results of this investigation did not reveal reliable evidence of metal-related differences in brain levels of cocaine. Plasma cocaine and benzoylecgonine (BE) levels also were essentially the same for control and metal-exposed animals. The failure to show that lead or cadmium alters the disposition of cocaine in brain or plasma underscores the need to pursue alternative accounts of metal/cocaine interactions.

  7. Acute liver failure impairs function and expression of breast cancer-resistant protein (BCRP) at rat blood-brain barrier partly via ammonia-ROS-ERK1/2 activation.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Zhang, Ji; Xu, Ping; Sun, Binbin; Zhong, Zeyu; Liu, Can; Ling, Zhaoli; Chen, Yang; Shu, Nan; Zhao, Kaijing; Liu, Li; Liu, Xiaodong

    2016-07-01

    We once reported that P-glycoprotein (P-GP) and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) were oppositely regulated at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) of thioacetamide-induced acute liver failure (ALF) rats. This study aimed to investigate whether ALF affected function and expression of breast cancer-resistant protein (BCRP) at the BBB of rats and the role of ammonia in the regulation. ALF rats were developed by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of thioacetamide (300 mg/kg) for 2 days. Hyperammonemic rats were developed by NH4 Ac (i.p. 4.5 mmol/kg). BCRP function and expression were measured by brain distribution of specific substrates (prazosin and methotrexate) and western blot, respectively. MDCK-BCRP cells and primarily cultured rat brain microvessel endothelial cells (rBMECs) were employed to investigate possible mechanisms through which ammonia regulated BCRP function and expression. The results showed that both ALF and hyperammonemia significantly weakened function and expression of BCRP in the brain of rats. The function and expression of BCRP in MDCK-BCRP cells and rBMECs were strikingly decreased after exposure to NH4 Cl and H2 O2 , accompanied by remarkable increases in the levels of phosphorylated ERK1/2 and reactive oxygen species (ROS). The altered BCRP expression and function by ammonia and H2 O2 were restored by ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine and ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126. Markedly increased levels of ERK1/2 phosphorylation and ROS were found in the brains of ALF rats and hyperammonemic rats. All above results indicated ALF down-regulated expression and function of BCRP at BBB of rats partly via hyperammonemia. Activation of ROS-mediated ERK1/2 phosphorylation may be one of the reasons that ammonia impaired BCRP expression and function at the BBB. The present study showed that the expression and function of breast cancer resistant protein (BCRP) at blood-brain barrier (BBB) of thioacetamide-induced ALF rats were down-regulated which partly

  8. Acute liver failure impairs function and expression of breast cancer-resistant protein (BCRP) at rat blood-brain barrier partly via ammonia-ROS-ERK1/2 activation.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Zhang, Ji; Xu, Ping; Sun, Binbin; Zhong, Zeyu; Liu, Can; Ling, Zhaoli; Chen, Yang; Shu, Nan; Zhao, Kaijing; Liu, Li; Liu, Xiaodong

    2016-07-01

    We once reported that P-glycoprotein (P-GP) and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) were oppositely regulated at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) of thioacetamide-induced acute liver failure (ALF) rats. This study aimed to investigate whether ALF affected function and expression of breast cancer-resistant protein (BCRP) at the BBB of rats and the role of ammonia in the regulation. ALF rats were developed by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of thioacetamide (300 mg/kg) for 2 days. Hyperammonemic rats were developed by NH4 Ac (i.p. 4.5 mmol/kg). BCRP function and expression were measured by brain distribution of specific substrates (prazosin and methotrexate) and western blot, respectively. MDCK-BCRP cells and primarily cultured rat brain microvessel endothelial cells (rBMECs) were employed to investigate possible mechanisms through which ammonia regulated BCRP function and expression. The results showed that both ALF and hyperammonemia significantly weakened function and expression of BCRP in the brain of rats. The function and expression of BCRP in MDCK-BCRP cells and rBMECs were strikingly decreased after exposure to NH4 Cl and H2 O2 , accompanied by remarkable increases in the levels of phosphorylated ERK1/2 and reactive oxygen species (ROS). The altered BCRP expression and function by ammonia and H2 O2 were restored by ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine and ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126. Markedly increased levels of ERK1/2 phosphorylation and ROS were found in the brains of ALF rats and hyperammonemic rats. All above results indicated ALF down-regulated expression and function of BCRP at BBB of rats partly via hyperammonemia. Activation of ROS-mediated ERK1/2 phosphorylation may be one of the reasons that ammonia impaired BCRP expression and function at the BBB. The present study showed that the expression and function of breast cancer resistant protein (BCRP) at blood-brain barrier (BBB) of thioacetamide-induced ALF rats were down-regulated which partly

  9. Acute and Subchronic Toxicity of Inhaled Toluene in Male Long-Evans Rats: Oxidative Stress Markers in Brain

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which are of concern to the EPA, are poorly understood, in part because of insufficient characterization of how human exposure duration impacts VOC effects. Two inhalation studies with multiple endpoints, one acute an...

  10. [Effect of acute hypoxia on the intensity of free radical processes in the basal nuclei of the brain, and the rat behaviour in the open field test under conditions of altered photoperiod].

    PubMed

    Sopova, I Iu; Zamorskiĭ, I I

    2011-03-01

    The effect of acute hypoxia on the intensity of free radical processes in the basal nuclei (the nucleus caudatus, globus pallidus. nucleus accumbens. amygdaloid complex) of the brain, and the rat behaviour in the open field test has been studied under conditions of altered photoperiod. It has been shown that constant darkness levels the effect of acute hypoxia on the intensity of lipid peroxidation, preserves the activity of superoxide dismutase and catalase at a higher level, lowers the activity of glutathione peroxidase. Under light, the sensitivity of basal nuclei neurons to acute hypoxia is enhanced, the latter being reflected in intensification of lipid peroxidation at the expense of increased formation of dien conjugates. The activity of catalase at that considerably exceeds the level of even intact rats in all the structures. It has been established that an altered photoperiod modulates the effect of acute hypoxia on the parameters of rat's activity in the open field, the character of their change depending on the nature of a photophase change.

  11. Use of a custom RT-PCR array to analyze toxicity pathways at different life stages in Brown Norway Rat Brain following acute Toluene exposure.

    EPA Science Inventory

    To investigate the contribution of different life stages on response to toxicants, we utilized a custom designed RT-PCR array to examine the effects of acute exposure by oral gavage of the volatile organic solvent toluene (0.00, 0.65 or 1.0 glkg) in the brains of ma1e Brown Norwa...

  12. Paliperidone Prevents Brain Toll-Like Receptor 4 Pathway Activation and Neuroinflammation in Rat Models of Acute and Chronic Restraint Stress

    PubMed Central

    MacDowell, KS; Caso, JR; Martín-Hernández, D; Madrigal, JL; Leza, JC

    2015-01-01

    Background: Alterations in the innate immune/inflammatory system have been proposed to underlie the pathophysiology of psychotic disease, but the mechanisms implicated remain elusive. The main agents of the innate immunity are the family of toll-like receptors (TLRs), which detect circulating pathogen-associated molecular patterns and endogenous damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPS). Current antipsychotics are able to modulate pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways, but their actions on TLRs remain unexplored. Methods: This study was conducted to elucidate the effects of paliperidone (1mg/Kg i.p.) on acute (6 hours) and chronic (6 hours/day during 21 consecutive days) restraint stress–induced TLR-4 pathway activation and neuroinflammation, and the possible mechanism(s) related (bacterial translocation and/or DAMPs activation). The expression of the elements of a TLR-4-dependent proinflammatory pathway was analyzed at the mRNA and protein levels in prefrontal cortex samples. Results: Paliperidone pre-treatment prevented TLR-4 activation and neuroinflammation in the prefrontal cortices of stressed rats. Regarding the possible mechanisms implicated, paliperidone regulated stress-induced increased intestinal inflammation and plasma lipopolysaccharide levels. In addition, paliperidone also prevented the activation of the endogenous activators of TLR-4 HSP70 and HGMB-1. Conclusions: Our results showed a regulatory role of paliperidone on brain TLR-4, which could explain the therapeutic benefits of its use for the treatment of psychotic diseases beyond its effects on dopamine and serotonin neurotransmission. The study of the mechanisms implicated suggests that gut-increased permeability, inflammation, and bacterial translocation of Gram-negative microflora and HSP70 and HGMB1 expression could be potential adjuvant therapeutic targets for the treatment of psychotic and other stress-related psychiatric pathologies. PMID:25522409

  13. Effect of acute treatment with cadmium on ethanol anesthesia, body termperature, and synaptosomal Na/sup +/-K/sup +/-ATPase of rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Magour, S.; Kristof, V.; Baumann, M.; Assmann, G.

    1981-12-01

    The effect of a single intraperitoneal dose of 0.56, 1.12, and 1.68 mg cadmium/kg on the duration of ethanol-induced sleep was investigated in male rats. Cadmium potentiated ethanol sleeping time in a dose dependent manner up to 300% over controls. No significant difference in the elimination rate of ethanol from blood and brain and observed between control and cadmium-pretreated rats. Cadmium slightly inhibited the hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase in vivo and also potentiated ethanol hypothermia but these changes did not play a significant role in the observed prolongation of ethanol sleeping time. However, cadmium and ethanol additively inhibited brain synaptosomal Na/sup +/-K/sup +/-ATPase in a noncompetitive manner. The results so far indicate that cadmium may increase brain responsiveness toward ethanol partly through inhibition of snaptosomal Na/sup +/-K/sup +/-ATPase.

  14. Acute myocardial infarction in rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yewen; Yin, Xing; Wijaya, Cori; Huang, Ming-He; McConnell, Bradley K

    2011-01-01

    With heart failure leading the cause of death in the USA (Hunt), biomedical research is fundamental to advance medical treatments for cardiovascular diseases. Animal models that mimic human cardiac disease, such as myocardial infarction (MI) and ischemia-reperfusion (IR) that induces heart failure as well as pressure-overload (transverse aortic constriction) that induces cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure (Goldman and Tarnavski), are useful models to study cardiovascular disease. In particular, myocardial ischemia (MI) is a leading cause for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality despite controlling certain risk factors such as arteriosclerosis and treatments via surgical intervention (Thygesen). Furthermore, an acute loss of the myocardium following myocardial ischemia (MI) results in increased loading conditions that induces ventricular remodeling of the infarcted border zone and the remote non-infarcted myocardium. Myocyte apoptosis, necrosis and the resultant increased hemodynamic load activate multiple biochemical intracellular signaling that initiates LV dilatation, hypertrophy, ventricular shape distortion, and collagen scar formation. This pathological remodeling and failure to normalize the increased wall stresses results in progressive dilatation, recruitment of the border zone myocardium into the scar, and eventually deterioration in myocardial contractile function (i.e. heart failure). The progression of LV dysfunction and heart failure in rats is similar to that observed in patients who sustain a large myocardial infarction, survive and subsequently develops heart failure (Goldman). The acute myocardial infarction (AMI) model in rats has been used to mimic human cardiovascular disease; specifically used to study cardiac signaling mechanisms associated with heart failure as well as to assess the contribution of therapeutic strategies for the treatment of heart failure. The method described in this report is the rat model of acute myocardial

  15. Targeted Lipid Profiling Discovers Plasma Biomarkers of Acute Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sheth, Sunil A.; Iavarone, Anthony T.; Liebeskind, David S.; Won, Seok Joon; Swanson, Raymond A.

    2015-01-01

    Prior efforts to identify a blood biomarker of brain injury have relied almost exclusively on proteins; however their low levels at early time points and poor correlation with injury severity have been limiting. Lipids, on the other hand, are the most abundant molecules in the brain and readily cross the blood-brain barrier. We previously showed that certain sphingolipid (SL) species are highly specific to the brain. Here we examined the feasibility of using SLs as biomarkers for acute brain injury. A rat model of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and a mouse model of stroke were used to identify candidate SL species though our mass-spectrometry based lipid profiling approach. Plasma samples collected after TBI in the rat showed large increases in many circulating SLs following injury, and larger lesions produced proportionately larger increases. Plasma samples collected 24 hours after stroke in mice similarly revealed a large increase in many SLs. We constructed an SL score (sum of the two SL species showing the largest relative increases in the mouse stroke model) and then evaluated the diagnostic value of this score on a small sample of patients (n = 14) who presented with acute stroke symptoms. Patients with true stroke had significantly higher SL scores than patients found to have non-stroke causes of their symptoms. The SL score correlated with the volume of ischemic brain tissue. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using lipid biomarkers to diagnose brain injury. Future studies will be needed to further characterize the diagnostic utility of this approach and to transition to an assay method applicable to clinical settings. PMID:26076478

  16. Pharmacological modulation of blood-brain barrier increases permeability of doxorubicin into the rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Sardi, Iacopo; la Marca, Giancarlo; Cardellicchio, Stefania; Giunti, Laura; Malvagia, Sabrina; Genitori, Lorenzo; Massimino, Maura; de Martino, Maurizio; Giovannini, Maria G

    2013-01-01

    Our group recently demonstrated in a rat model that pretreatment with morphine facilitates doxorubicin delivery to the brain in the absence of signs of increased acute systemic toxicity. Morphine and other drugs such as dexamethasone or ondansetron seem to inhibit MDR proteins localized on blood-brain barrier, neurons and glial cells increasing the access of doxorubicin to the brain by efflux transporters competition. We explored the feasibility of active modification of the blood-brain barrier protection, by using morphine dexamethasone or ondansetron pretreatment, to allow doxorubicin accumulation into the brain in a rodent model. Rats were pretreated with morphine (10 mg/kg, i.p.), dexamethasone (2 mg/kg, i.p.) or ondansetron (2 mg/kg, i.p.) before injection of doxorubicin (12 mg/kg, i.p.). Quantitative analysis of doxorubicin was performed by mass spectrometry. Acute hearth and kidney damage was analyzed by measuring doxorubicin accumulation, LDH activity and malondialdehyde plasma levels. The concentration of doxorubicin was significantly higher in all brain areas of rats pretreated with morphine (P < 0.001) or ondansetron (P < 0.05) than in control tissues. The concentration of doxorubicin was significantly higher in cerebral hemispheres and brainstem (P < 0.05) but not in cerebellum of rats pretreated with dexamethasone than in control tissues. Pretreatment with any of these drugs did not increase LDH activity or lipid peroxidation compared to controls. Our data suggest that morphine, dexamethasone or ondansetron pretreatment is able to allow doxorubicin penetration inside the brain by modulating the BBB. This effect is not associated with acute cardiac or renal toxicity. This finding might provide the rationale for clinical applications in the treatment of refractory brain tumors and pave the way to novel applications of active but currently inapplicable chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:23977451

  17. Protection of the blood-brain barrier by hypercapnia during acute hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Baumbach, G.L.; Mayhan, W.G.; Heistad, D.D.

    1986-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine effects of hypercapnia on susceptibility of the blood-brain barrier to disruption during acute hypertension. Two methods were used to test the hypothesis that cerebral vasodilation during hypercapnia increases disruption of the blood-brain barrier. First, permeability of the blood-brain barrier was measured in anesthetized cats with SVI-labeled serum albumin. Severe hypertension markedly increased permeability of the blood-brain barrier during normocapnia, but not during hypercapnia. The protective effect of hypercapnia was not dependent on sympathetic nerves. Second, in anesthetized rats, permeability of the barrier was quantitated by clearance of fluorescent dextran. Disruption of the blood-brain barrier during hypertension was decreased by hypercapnia. Because disruption of the blood-brain barrier occurred primarily in pial venules, the authors also measured pial venular diameter and pressure. Acute hypertension increased pial venular pressure and diameter in normocapnic rats. Hypercapnia alone increased pial venular pressure and pial venular diameter, and acute hypertension during hypercapnia further increased venular pressure. The magnitude of increase in pial venular pressure during acute hypertension was significantly less in hypercapnic than in normocapnic rats. They conclude that hypercapnia protects the blood-brain barrier. Possible mechanisms of this effect include attenuation of the incremental increase in pial venular pressure by hypercapnia or a direct effect on the blood-brain barrier not related to venous pressure.

  18. Effect of acute and prolonged tianeptine administration on the 5-HT transporter: electrophysiological, biochemical and radioligand binding studies in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Piñeyro, G; Deveault, L; Blier, P; Dennis, T; de Montigny, C

    1995-02-01

    In the present study, in vivo extracellular unitary recordings, in vitro [3H]5-HT uptake and [3H]cyanoimipramine binding assays were used to assess the effect of acute and prolonged administration of the putative antidepressant tianeptine, on the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) transporter. Microiontophoretic application of tianeptine onto dorsal hippocampus CA3 pyramidal neurons, as well as its intravenous administration (2 mg/kg), increased their firing frequency. Following intracerebroventricular administration of 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine, the activation induced by the microiontophoretic application of tianeptine remained unchanged, thus suggesting that the 5-HT carrier is not involved in this effect. Furthermore, in spite of its activating effect on CA3 pyramidal neuron firing frequency, the intravenous administration of tianeptine did not alter the time of recovery of these neurons from microiontophoretic applications of 5-HT, an index of 5-HT uptake activity. In keeping with this observation, the acute administration of tianeptine did not change the effectiveness of the 5-HT reuptake blocker paroxetine (1 mg/kg, i.v.) in prolonging the suppressant effect of microiontophoretically-applied 5-HT. However, in rats that had received tianeptine for 14 days (20 mg/kg/day, s.c.), the recovery time from the suppressant effect of microiontophoretic applications of 5-HT was reduced by 40% and the effectiveness of paroxetine (1 mg/kg, i.v.) was decreased. These effects were no longer observed following a 48 h washout period. In a second series of experiments, the ability of tianeptine to interfere with the uptake blocking capacity of paroxetine was assessed in vitro, using hippocampal slices obtained from rats that had been treated with tianeptine for 14 days (20 mg/kg/day, s.c.; by minipump).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Effects of acute and chronic hyperglycemia on the neurochemical profiles in the rat brain with streptozotocin-induced diabetes detected using in vivo 1H MR spectroscopy at 9.4 T

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen-Tung; Lee, Phil; Yeh, Hung-Wen; Smirnova, Irina V.; Choi, In-Young

    2012-01-01

    Chronic hyperglycemia could lead to cerebral metabolic alterations and CNS injury. However, findings of metabolic alterations in poorly managed diabetes in humans and animal models are rather inconsistent. We have characterized the cerebral metabolic consequences of untreated hyperglycemia from the onset to the chronic stage in a streptozotocin-induced rat model of diabetes. In vivo 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was used to measure over 20 neurochemicals longitudinally. Upon the onset of hyperglycemia (acute state), increases in brain glucose levels were accompanied by increases in osmolytes and ketone bodies, all of which remained consistently high through the chronic state of over 10 weeks of hyperglycemia. Only after over 4 weeks of hyperglycemia, the levels of other neurochemicals including N-acetylaspartate and glutathione were significantly reduced and these alterations persisted into the chronic stage. However, glucose transport was not altered in chronic hyperglycemia of over 10 weeks. When glucose levels were acutely restored to euglycemia, some neurochemical changes were irreversible, indicating the impact of prolonged uncontrolled hyperglycemia on the CNS. Furthermore, progressive changes in neurochemical levels from control to acute and chronic conditions demonstrated the utility of 1H MRS as a noninvasive tool in monitoring the disease progression in diabetes. PMID:22353009

  20. Both acute and chronic buspirone treatments have different effects on regional 5-HT synthesis in Flinders Sensitive Line rats (a rat model of depression) than in control rats

    PubMed Central

    Nishi, Kyoko; Kanemaru, Kazuya; Hasegawa, Shu; Watanabe, Arata; Diksic, Mirko

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of this investigation was to evaluate the effects of buspirone, a 5-HT1A agonist with some partial agonist properties and also an antidepressant, on regional 5-HT synthesis in Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rats (“depressed”), and to compare the effects to the Flinders Resistant Line (FRL) control rats (not “depressed”). In addition results were compared to those previously reported in normal Sprague-Dawley (SPD) rats (normal control). Serotonin synthesis in both FSL and FRL rats was measured following acute and chronic treatments with buspirone. Both of these strains were derived from the SPD rats. No direct comparison was done between the FSL saline and FRL saline groups, or the FSL buspirone and FRL buspirone groups, because the objective of the studies was to evaluate effects of buspirone in these two strains. The results show that acute treatment with buspirone elevates 5-HT synthesis throughout the brain in the FRL rats. In the FSL rats, there were reductions in some brain regions (e.g., dorsal and median raphe, amygdala, anterior olfactory nucleus, substantia nigra reticulate), while in other regions, there were increases in the synthesis observed (e.g., frontal, parietal, visual and somatosensory cortices, ventral hippocampus). In twenty out of the thirty brain regions investigated in the FSL rats, there was no significant change in the synthesis following acute buspirone treatment. During the chronic treatment, buspirone produced a significant reduction of 5-HT synthesis in fifteen out of thirty brain regions in the FRL rats. In the FSL rats, buspirone produced a significant elevation of the synthesis in ten out of thirty brain regions. In both the FSL and FRL rats, buspirone produced rather different effects than those reported previously for SPD (normal) rats. The acute effect in the FSL rats was somewhat similar to the effect reported previously for the SPD rats, while in the FRL rats, the acute buspirone treatment produced an

  1. Extending the viability of acute brain slices

    PubMed Central

    Buskila, Yossi; Breen, Paul P.; Tapson, Jonathan; van Schaik, André; Barton, Matthew; Morley, John W.

    2014-01-01

    The lifespan of an acute brain slice is approximately 6–12 hours, limiting potential experimentation time. We have designed a new recovery incubation system capable of extending their lifespan to more than 36 hours. This system controls the temperature of the incubated artificial cerebral spinal fluid (aCSF) while continuously passing the fluid through a UVC filtration system and simultaneously monitoring temperature and pH. The combination of controlled temperature and UVC filtering maintains bacteria levels in the lag phase and leads to the dramatic extension of the brain slice lifespan. Brain slice viability was validated through electrophysiological recordings as well as live/dead cell assays. This system benefits researchers by monitoring incubation conditions and standardizing this artificial environment. It further provides viable tissue for two experimental days, reducing the time spent preparing brain slices and the number of animals required for research. PMID:24930889

  2. WHY DO THE ACUTE BEHAVIORAL EFFECTS OT TOLUENE IN RATS DEPEND ON THE ROUTE OF EXPOSURE?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Despite evidence suggesting that the acute effects of organic solvents are related to their concentration in the brain, we have observed route-dependent differences in the acute behavioral effects of toluene. Whereas inhaled toluene disrupts the performance of rats on a visual si...

  3. Therapeutic hypothermia for acute brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Andresen, Max; Gazmuri, Jose Tomás; Marín, Arnaldo; Regueira, Tomas; Rovegno, Maximiliano

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia, recently termed target temperature management (TTM), is the cornerstone of neuroprotective strategy. Dating to the pioneer works of Fay, nearly 75 years of basic and clinical evidence support its therapeutic value. Although hypothermia decreases the metabolic rate to restore the supply and demand of O₂, it has other tissue-specific effects, such as decreasing excitotoxicity, limiting inflammation, preventing ATP depletion, reducing free radical production and also intracellular calcium overload to avoid apoptosis. Currently, mild hypothermia (33°C) has become a standard in post-resuscitative care and perinatal asphyxia. However, evidence indicates that hypothermia could be useful in neurologic injuries, such as stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage and traumatic brain injury. In this review, we discuss the basic and clinical evidence supporting the use of TTM in critical care for acute brain injury that extends beyond care after cardiac arrest, such as for ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and traumatic brain injury. We review the historical perspectives of TTM, provide an overview of the techniques and protocols and the pathophysiologic consequences of hypothermia. In addition, we include our experience of managing patients with acute brain injuries treated using endovascular hypothermia. PMID:26043908

  4. Therapeutic hypothermia for acute brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Andresen, Max; Gazmuri, Jose Tomás; Marín, Arnaldo; Regueira, Tomas; Rovegno, Maximiliano

    2015-06-05

    Therapeutic hypothermia, recently termed target temperature management (TTM), is the cornerstone of neuroprotective strategy. Dating to the pioneer works of Fay, nearly 75 years of basic and clinical evidence support its therapeutic value. Although hypothermia decreases the metabolic rate to restore the supply and demand of O₂, it has other tissue-specific effects, such as decreasing excitotoxicity, limiting inflammation, preventing ATP depletion, reducing free radical production and also intracellular calcium overload to avoid apoptosis. Currently, mild hypothermia (33°C) has become a standard in post-resuscitative care and perinatal asphyxia. However, evidence indicates that hypothermia could be useful in neurologic injuries, such as stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage and traumatic brain injury. In this review, we discuss the basic and clinical evidence supporting the use of TTM in critical care for acute brain injury that extends beyond care after cardiac arrest, such as for ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and traumatic brain injury. We review the historical perspectives of TTM, provide an overview of the techniques and protocols and the pathophysiologic consequences of hypothermia. In addition, we include our experience of managing patients with acute brain injuries treated using endovascular hypothermia.

  5. Determination of cefuroxime lysine in rat brain microdialysates by ultra-fast liquid chromatography with UV and tandem mass spectrometry: application to an acute toxicokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Longshan; Li, Qing; Zhu, Heyun; Chen, Xiaohui; Bi, Kaishun

    2014-09-01

    Cefuroxime lysine is a new second-generation cephalosporins, which can penetrate the blood-brain barrier to cure the meningitis. In order to investigate its acute toxicokinetic study after intraperitoneal injection of 675 mg/kg cefuroxime lysine, a sensitive and clean ultra-fast liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UFLC-MS/MS) method for the determination of cefuroxime lysine in microdialysate samples was developed and validated, which was compared with UFLC-UV as a reference method. Chromatographic separation was performed on a Shim-pack XR-ODS C18 column (75 × 3.0 mm, 2.2 µm), with an isocratic elution of 0.1% formic acid in acetonitrile-0.1% formic acid in water (45:55, v/v) for LC-MS and acetonitrile-20 mm potassium dihydrogen phosphate (pH 3.0,20:80, v/v) for LC-UV. The lower limit of detection was 0.01 µg/mL for LC-MS and 0.1 µg/mL for LC-UV method, with the same corresponding linearity range of 0.1-50 µg/mL. The intra- and inter-day precisions (relative standard deviation) for both methods were from 1.1 to 8.9%, while the accuracy was all within ±10.9%. The results of both methods were finally compared using paired t-test; the results indicated that the concentrations measured by the two methods correlated significantly (p < 0.05), which suggested that the two methods based on LC-MS and LC-UV were suitable for the acute toxicokinetic study.

  6. Neuroprotection of Selective Brain Cooling After Penetrating Ballistic-like Brain Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Wei, Guo; Lu, Xi-Chun M; Shear, Deborah A; Yang, Xiaofang; Tortella, Frank C

    2011-01-01

    Induced hypothermia has been reported to provide neuroprotection against traumatic brain injury. We recently developed a novel method of selective brain cooling (SBC) and demonstrated its safety and neuroprotection efficacy in a rat model of ischemic brain injury. The primary focus of the current study was to evaluate the potential neuroprotective efficacy of SBC in a rat model of penetrating ballistic-like brain injury (PBBI) with a particular focus on the acute cerebral pathophysiology, neurofunction, and cognition. SBC (34°C) was induced immediately after PBBI, and maintained for 2 hours, followed by a spontaneous re-warming. Intracranial pressure (ICP) and regional cerebral blood flow were monitored continuously for 3 hours, and the ICP was measured again at 24 hours postinjury. Brain swelling, blood-brain barrier permeability, intracerebral hemorrhage, lesion size, and neurological status were assessed at 24 hours postinjury. Cognitive abilities were evaluated in a Morris water maze task at 12-16 days postinjury. Results showed that SBC significantly attenuated PBBI-induced elevation of ICP (PBBI = 33.2 ± 10.4; PBBI + SBC = 18.8 ± 6.7 mmHg) and reduced brain swelling, blood-brain barrier leakage, intracerebral hemorrhage, and lesion volume by 40%-45% for each matrix, and significantly improved neurologic function. However, these acute neuroprotective benefits of SBC did not translate into improved cognitive performance in the Morris water maze task. These results indicate that 34°C SBC is effective in protecting against acute brain damage and related neurological dysfunction. Further studies are required to establish the optimal treatment conditions (i.e., duration of cooling and/or combined therapeutic approaches) needed to achieve significant neurocognitive benefits.

  7. Time-dependent co-relation of BDNF and CREB mRNAs in adult rat brains following acute psychological stress in the communication box paradigm.

    PubMed

    Li, Gongying; Wang, Yanmei; Yan, Min; Ma, Hongxia; Gao, Yanjie; Li, Zexuan; Li, Changqi; Tian, Hongjun; Zhuo, Chuanjun

    2016-06-15

    Psychological stress affects human health, and chronic stress leads to life-threatening diseases, such as depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. Psychological stress coping mechanisms involve the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and downstream cAMP response element binding protein (CREB), which are targets of the adverse effects of stress paradigms. Fourty-seven adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into control, physical stress and six psychological stress groups which were assayed at 0h, 0.5h, 1h, 2h, 6h and 24h after communication box (CB) stress induction. Behavioral assessment using open field and elevated plus maze tests determined that CB stress significantly increased anxiety. After CB stress, the alternation of mRNA levels of BDNF and CREB were assessed at different time points by in situ hybridization. The mRNA levels of BDNF and CREB were significantly decreased, then gradually recovered over 24h to maximum levels in the hippocampus (CA1 region), prefrontal cortex (PFC), central amygdaloid nuclei (AG), shell of accumbens nucleus (NAC), periaqueductal gray (PAG) and ventral tegmental area, except for the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Moreover, mRNA levels of BDNF and CREB were positively correlated in all examined brain regions, except for the VTA region at 0 and 24h after CB stress induction. These findings suggest that BDNF and CREB may belong to the same pathway and be involved in psychological stress response mechanisms, and protect the organism from stress induced, aversive processes leading to disease. PMID:27132084

  8. Time-dependent co-relation of BDNF and CREB mRNAs in adult rat brains following acute psychological stress in the communication box paradigm.

    PubMed

    Li, Gongying; Wang, Yanmei; Yan, Min; Ma, Hongxia; Gao, Yanjie; Li, Zexuan; Li, Changqi; Tian, Hongjun; Zhuo, Chuanjun

    2016-06-15

    Psychological stress affects human health, and chronic stress leads to life-threatening diseases, such as depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. Psychological stress coping mechanisms involve the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and downstream cAMP response element binding protein (CREB), which are targets of the adverse effects of stress paradigms. Fourty-seven adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into control, physical stress and six psychological stress groups which were assayed at 0h, 0.5h, 1h, 2h, 6h and 24h after communication box (CB) stress induction. Behavioral assessment using open field and elevated plus maze tests determined that CB stress significantly increased anxiety. After CB stress, the alternation of mRNA levels of BDNF and CREB were assessed at different time points by in situ hybridization. The mRNA levels of BDNF and CREB were significantly decreased, then gradually recovered over 24h to maximum levels in the hippocampus (CA1 region), prefrontal cortex (PFC), central amygdaloid nuclei (AG), shell of accumbens nucleus (NAC), periaqueductal gray (PAG) and ventral tegmental area, except for the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Moreover, mRNA levels of BDNF and CREB were positively correlated in all examined brain regions, except for the VTA region at 0 and 24h after CB stress induction. These findings suggest that BDNF and CREB may belong to the same pathway and be involved in psychological stress response mechanisms, and protect the organism from stress induced, aversive processes leading to disease.

  9. Effect of acute renal failure on neurotoxicity of enoxacin in rats.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, J; Ohashi, K; Yamamoto, K; Sawada, Y; Iga, T

    1997-08-01

    We investigated the effect of acute renal failure on the neurotoxicity of enoxacin (ENX) in rats. Experimental acute renal failure was produced by bilateral ureteral ligation. ENX was intravenously infused to ureter ligated (UL) and control rats, and its concentration in plasma, brain and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was compared. Plasma concentration of ENX increased rapidly in UL rats as compared with control rats. Brain/plasma concentration ratio (Kp)-time profile of ENX was similar in UL and control rats. Brain concentration of ENX at the occurrence of convulsion did not depend on the infusion rate, suggesting that in the brain tissue it equilibrates rapidly with the site of action for clonic convulsion. Brain concentration of ENX in UL rats at the occurrence of clonic convulsion was lower than that in control rats. A similar tendency was also observed with CSF concentration. In conclusion, the potentiation of neurotoxicity of ENX with acute renal failure may be caused by not only decreased capability for renal elimination of ENX but also increased sensitivity to convulsant activity of ENX in the central nervous system.

  10. Interleukin-1 and acute brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Katie N.; Parry-Jones, Adrian R.; Allan, Stuart M.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is the key host-defense response to infection and injury, yet also a major contributor to a diverse range of diseases, both peripheral and central in origin. Brain injury as a result of stroke or trauma is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide, yet there are no effective treatments, resulting in enormous social and economic costs. Increasing evidence, both preclinical and clinical, highlights inflammation as an important factor in stroke, both in determining outcome and as a contributor to risk. A number of inflammatory mediators have been proposed as key targets for intervention to reduce the burden of stroke, several reaching clinical trial, but as yet yielding no success. Many factors could explain these failures, including the lack of robust preclinical evidence and poorly designed clinical trials, in addition to the complex nature of the clinical condition. Lack of consideration in preclinical studies of associated co-morbidities prevalent in the clinical stroke population is now seen as an important omission in previous work. These co-morbidities (atherosclerosis, hypertension, diabetes, infection) have a strong inflammatory component, supporting the need for greater understanding of how inflammation contributes to acute brain injury. Interleukin (IL)-1 is the prototypical pro-inflammatory cytokine, first identified many years ago as the endogenous pyrogen. Research over the last 20 years or so reveals that IL-1 is an important mediator of neuronal injury and blocking the actions of IL-1 is beneficial in a number of experimental models of brain damage. Mechanisms underlying the actions of IL-1 in brain injury remain unclear, though increasing evidence indicates the cerebrovasculature as a key target. Recent literature supporting this and other aspects of how IL-1 and systemic inflammation in general contribute to acute brain injury are discussed in this review. PMID:25705177

  11. [Differentiated treatment of acute diffuse brain injuries].

    PubMed

    Pedachenko, E G; Dziak, L A; Sirko, A G

    2012-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment results of 57 patients with acute diffuse brain injury have been analyzed. Patients were divided into two groups: first study period 2000-2005; second study period 2006-2010. The main differences between the first and the second study periods were in health condition and brain functions monitoring parameters, therapy approaches and goals. Increasing of axial and lateral dislocation symptoms during progression from the first type of diffuse injury to the fourth one is related to intracranial hypertension (ICH) occurrence rate and significance it's significance. During the second study period, ICH was found in 25% patients with the second type of injury, 57% patients with the third type of injury, and 80%, with the fourth type of injury. Mean ICP in the group of patients with the second type of diffuse injury comprised 14.4 +/- 6.6 mmHg; with the third type of injury, 30 +/- 20.6 mmHg; with the fourth type of injuty, 37.6 +/- 14.1 mmHg. Introduction of differentiated approach to conservative or surgical treatment method application to acute diffuse brain injuries patients based on ICP monitoring data led to 13.8% reduction in mortality in the second study period compared with the first study period.

  12. Regulation of atrial natriuretic peptide receptors in the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Saavedra, J.M.

    1987-06-01

    We have studied the localization, kinetics, and regulation of receptors for the circulating form of the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP; 99-126) in the rat brain. Quantitative autoradiographic techniques and a /sup 125/I-labeled ligand, /sup 125/I-ANP (99-126), were employed. After in vitro autoradiography, quantification was achieved by computerized microdensitometry followed by comparison with /sup 125/I-standards. ANP receptors were discretely localized in the rat brain, with the highest concentrations in circumventricular organs, the choroid plexus, and selected hypothalamic nuclei involved in the production of the antidiuretic hormone vasopressin and in blood-pressure control. Spontaneously (genetic) hypertensive rats showed much lower numbers of ANP receptors than normotensive controls in the subfornical organ, the area postrema, the nucleus of the solitary tract, and the choroid plexus. These changes are in contrast to those observed for receptors of angiotensin II, another circulating peptide with actions opposite to those of ANP. Under conditions of acute dehydration after water deprivation, as well as under conditions of chronic dehydration such as those present in homozygous Brattleboro rats, there was an up-regulation of ANP receptors in the subfornical organ. Our results indicate that in the brain, circumventricular organs contain ANP receptors which could respond to variations in the concentration of circulating ANP. In addition, brain areas inside the blood-brain barrier contain ANP receptors probably related to the endogenous, central ANP system. The localization of ANP receptors and the alterations in their regulation present in genetically hypertensive rats and after dehydration indicate that brain ANP receptors are probably related to fluid regulation, including the secretion of vasopressin, and to cardiovascular function.

  13. Consensus Modeling of Oral Rat Acute Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    An acute toxicity dataset (oral rat LD50) with about 7400 compounds was compiled from the ChemIDplus database. This dataset was divided into a modeling set and a prediction set. The compounds in the prediction set were selected so that they were present in the modeling set used...

  14. CHLORPYRIFOS AND 3,5,6 TRICHLORO-2-PYRIDINOL DISTRIBUTION IN RAT BLOOD AND BRAIN DURING CHRONIC DIETARY AND REPEATED HIGH LEVEL ACUTE EXPOSURE TO CHLORPYRIFOS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The aim of this study was to determine the concentrations of an organophosphorus pesticide, chlorpyrifos (CPF), and the metabolite 3,5,6 trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP) in tissues from rats exposed to long-term, low-dose CPF. Adult, Long-Evans male rats received CPF for one year at ...

  15. Acute parotitis and hyperamylasemia following whole-brain radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Cairncross, J.G.; Salmon, J.; Kim, J.H.; Posner, J.B.

    1980-04-01

    Parotitis, an infrequent, previously unreported complication of whole-brain radiation therapy, was observed in 4 patients. The acute symptoms, which include fever, dry mouth, pain, swelling, and tenderness, are accompanied by hyperamylasemia. Among 10 patients receiving whole-brain irradiation, 8 had serum amylase elevations without symptoms. Both acute parotitis and asymptomatic hyperamylasemia result from irradiation of the parotid glands.

  16. Assessing the Effects of Acute Amyloid β Oligomer Exposure in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ryan S.; Cechetto, David F.; Whitehead, Shawn N.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia, yet there are no therapeutic treatments that can either cure or delay its onset. Currently, the pathogenesis of AD is still uncertain, especially with respect to how the disease develops from a normal healthy brain. Amyloid β oligomers (AβO) are highly neurotoxic proteins and are considered potential initiators to the pathogenesis of AD. Rat brains were exposed to AβO via bilateral intracerebroventricular injections. Rats were then euthanized at either 1, 3, 7 or 21-days post surgery. Rat behavioural testing was performed using the Morris water maze and open field tests. Post-mortem brain tissue was immunolabelled for Aβ, microglia, and cholinergic neurons. Rats exposed to AβO showed deficits in spatial learning and anxiety-like behaviour. Acute positive staining for Aβ was only observed in the corpus callosum surrounding the lateral ventricles. AβO exposed rat brains also showed a delayed increase in activated microglia within the corpus callosum and a decreased number of cholinergic neurons within the basal forebrain. Acute exposure to AβO resulted in mild learning and memory impairments with co-concomitant white matter pathology within the corpus callosum and cholinergic cell loss within the basal forebrain. Results suggest that acute exposure to AβO in the rat may be a useful tool in assessing the early phases for the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:27563885

  17. Assessing the Effects of Acute Amyloid β Oligomer Exposure in the Rat.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ryan S; Cechetto, David F; Whitehead, Shawn N

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia, yet there are no therapeutic treatments that can either cure or delay its onset. Currently, the pathogenesis of AD is still uncertain, especially with respect to how the disease develops from a normal healthy brain. Amyloid β oligomers (AβO) are highly neurotoxic proteins and are considered potential initiators to the pathogenesis of AD. Rat brains were exposed to AβO via bilateral intracerebroventricular injections. Rats were then euthanized at either 1, 3, 7 or 21-days post surgery. Rat behavioural testing was performed using the Morris water maze and open field tests. Post-mortem brain tissue was immunolabelled for Aβ, microglia, and cholinergic neurons. Rats exposed to AβO showed deficits in spatial learning and anxiety-like behaviour. Acute positive staining for Aβ was only observed in the corpus callosum surrounding the lateral ventricles. AβO exposed rat brains also showed a delayed increase in activated microglia within the corpus callosum and a decreased number of cholinergic neurons within the basal forebrain. Acute exposure to AβO resulted in mild learning and memory impairments with co-concomitant white matter pathology within the corpus callosum and cholinergic cell loss within the basal forebrain. Results suggest that acute exposure to AβO in the rat may be a useful tool in assessing the early phases for the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:27563885

  18. Brain energy consumption in ethanol-treated, Long-Evans rats.

    PubMed

    Viña, J R; Salus, J E; DeJoseph, M R; Pallardo, F; Towfighi, J; Hawkins, R A

    1991-06-01

    The cerebral metabolic rate of glucose utilization (CMRGlc) was measured in rats fed liquid diets containing ethanol for 8 wk, after removal of ethanol from the diet and after acute ethanol intoxication. Control rats were pair fed the liquid diets containing isoenergetic amounts of dextrin-maltose. Quantitative autogradiography using [6-14C]glucose measured CMRGlc at the level of individual structures. Digital image techniques created stereograms of brain energy consumption from the autoradiographs. These techniques provided information about CMRGlc throughout the brain. Rats given the ethanol liquid diet drank constantly throughout the day and night. Neuropathological examination of brain revealed no abnormalities from ethanol consumption. Acute ethanol administration to control rats produced a decrease in CMRGlc throughout the brain that was most prominent in structures concerning auditory, visual, memory and motor functions. Chronic ethanol consumption did not reduce CMRGlc to the same degree as acute ethanol intoxication; in fact, it affected only a few structures. The removal of ethanol from chronic ethanol-treated rats for a period of 18 h caused CMRGlc to rise above control values throughout the brain. However, there were no seizures or other evidence of brain dysfunction.

  19. Aspartame and the rat brain monoaminergic system.

    PubMed

    Perego, C; De Simoni, M G; Fodritto, F; Raimondi, L; Diomede, L; Salmona, M; Algeri, S; Garattini, S

    1988-12-01

    A high dose of aspartame (APM) was administered to rats to study possible effects on brain monoaminergic systems. APM and its metabolite phenylalanine (Phe) were given orally at doses of 1000 and 500 mg/kg, respectively. Significant increases were seen in brain Phe and tyrosine (Tyr) levels. Two different approaches were used to study monoaminergic systems: whole tissue measurements by HPLC-ED and in vivo voltammetry in freely moving rats. Dopamine, serotonin and their metabolites were taken as indexes of neuronal activity. In spite of the high dose used, no modification was found in monoamines or their metabolites in striatum, hippocampus and nucleus accumbens.

  20. Characterization of acute rat parvovirus infection by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Gaertner, D J; Jacoby, R O; Johnson, E A; Paturzo, F X; Smith, A L; Brandsma, J L

    1993-04-01

    In situ hybridization and virus titration were used to characterize early stages of rat virus (RV) infection of rat pups after oronasal inoculation. Results suggest that virus enters through the lung and that early viremia leads rapidly to pantropic infection. Cells derived from all three germ layers were infected with RV, but those of endodermal and mesodermal origin were the predominant targets. Infection of vascular endothelium was widespread and was associated with hemorrhage and infarction in the brain. Convalescence from acute infection was accompanied by mononuclear cell infiltrates at sites containing RV DNA. Viral DNA was also detected in endothelium, fibroblasts and smooth muscle myofibers four weeks after inoculation. Further examination of these cells as potential sites of persistent infection is warranted.

  1. Genetic influence on brain catecholamines: high brain norepinephrine in salt-sensitive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Iwai, J; Friedman, R; Tassinari, L

    1980-01-01

    Rats genetically sensitive to salt-induced hypertension evinced higher levels of plasma norepinephrine and epinephrine than rats genetically resistant to hypertension. The hypertension-sensitive rats showed higher hypothalamic norepinephrine and lower epinephrine than resistant rats. In response to a high salt diet, brain stem norepinephrine increased in sensitive rats while resistant rats exhibited a decrease on the same diet.

  2. Laser scattering by transcranial rat brain illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Marcelo V. P.; Prates, Renato; Kato, Ilka T.; Sabino, Caetano P.; Suzuki, Luis C.; Ribeiro, Martha S.; Yoshimura, Elisabeth M.

    2012-06-01

    Due to the great number of applications of Low-Level-Laser-Therapy (LLLT) in Central Nervous System (CNS), the study of light penetration through skull and distribution in the brain becomes extremely important. The aim is to analyze the possibility of precise illumination of deep regions of the rat brain, measure the penetration and distribution of red (λ = 660 nm) and Near Infra-Red (NIR) (λ = 808 nm) diode laser light and compare optical properties of brain structures. The head of the animal (Rattus Novergicus) was epilated and divided by a sagittal cut, 2.3 mm away from mid plane. This section of rat's head was illuminated with red and NIR lasers in points above three anatomical structures: hippocampus, cerebellum and frontal cortex. A high resolution camera, perpendicularly positioned, was used to obtain images of the brain structures. Profiles of scattered intensities in the laser direction were obtained from the images. There is a peak in the scattered light profile corresponding to the skin layer. The bone layer gives rise to a valley in the profile indicating low scattering coefficient, or frontal scattering. Another peak in the region related to the brain is an indication of high scattering coefficient (μs) for this tissue. This work corroborates the use of transcranial LLLT in studies with rats which are subjected to models of CNS diseases. The outcomes of this study point to the possibility of transcranial LLLT in humans for a large number of diseases.

  3. Dietary aspartame with protein on plasma and brain amino acids, brain monoamines and behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Torii, K; Mimura, T; Takasaki, Y; Ichimura, M

    1986-01-01

    Aspartame (APM; L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester), was investigated for its ability to alter levels of the large neutral amino acids and monoamines in overnight fasted rats allowed to consume meals with or without protein for two hours. Additionally, the possible long term behavioral consequences of APM in 25% casein diets with or without 10% sucrose were determined. Acute APM ingestion increased both plasma and brain phenylalanine and tyrosine levels, but brain tryptophan levels were not altered regardless of dietary protein. Brain norepinephrine and dopamine levels were unaltered by any of the diet while serotonin levels were slightly increased when a protein-free diet was consumed. But APM and/or protein ingestion minimized this increase of brain serotonin levels as much as controls. Chronic APM ingestion failed to influence diurnal feeding patterns, meal size distributions, or diurnal patterns of spontaneous motor activity. The chronic ingestion of abuse doses of APM produced no significant chemical changes in brain capable of altering behavioral parameters believed to be controlled by monoamines in rats.

  4. Stimulation of brain muscarinic acetylcholine receptors acutely reverses radiogenic hypodipsia

    SciTech Connect

    Mickley, G.A.; Stevens, K.E.

    1986-03-01

    A sufficiently large dose of ionizing radiation produces changes in water consumption. However, the direction, durations, and physiological substrates of these alterations remain in question. Here we report a 5-d hypodipsia in rats exposed to 600 rads /sup 60/Co but a more transient, albeit larger, reduction in drinking after 1000 /sup 60/Co. Brain cholinergic neurons have been implicated as mediators of thirst. Therefore, we explored the role of hypothalamic muscarinic receptors in the production of radiation-induced hypodipsia. This was accomplished through the intrahypothalamic injection of carbachol (a muscarinic agonist) or atropine (a muscarinic antagonist) in irradiated rats. Intracranial carbachol produced acute reversal of radiogenic hypodipsia while atropine potentiated the hypodipsia. These post-irradiation drug-induced behaviors were similar to those observed after the same drug treatments before irradiation. Since cholinergic neuronal functions persist and are labile (can be pharmacologically stimulated and blocked) after irradiation, this suggests that other neuronal systems and/or neurochemicals may be more prominently involved in radiogenic hypodipsia.

  5. Acute administration of l-tyrosine alters energetic metabolism of hippocampus and striatum of infant rats.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Andrea C; Ferreira, Gabriela K; Carvalho-Silva, Milena; Furlanetto, Camila B; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Schuck, Patrícia F; Streck, Emilio L

    2013-08-01

    Tyrosinemia type II is an inborn error of metabolism caused by mutations in the gene that encodes tyrosine aminotransferase, which leads to increased blood tyrosine levels. Considering that tyrosine levels are highly elevated in fluids of patients with tyrosinemia type II, and that previous studies demonstrated significant alterations in brain energy metabolism of young rats caused by l-tyrosine, the present study aimed to evaluate the effect of acute administration of l-tyrosine on the activities of citrate synthase, malate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, and mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes I, II, II-III, and IV in posterior cortex, hippocampus, and striatum of infant rats. Wistar rats (10 days old) were killed 1h after a single intraperitoneal injection of tyrosine (500 mg/kg) or saline. The activities of energy metabolism enzymes were evaluated in brain of rats. Our results demonstrated that acute administration of l-tyrosine inhibited the activity of citrate synthase activity in striatum and increased the activities of malate dehydrogenase and succinate dehydrogenase in hippocampus. On the other hand, these enzymes were not affected in posterior cortex. The activities of complex I and complex II were inhibited by acute administration of l-tyrosine in striatum. On the other hand, the acute administration of l-tyrosine increased the activity of activity of complex II-III in hippocampus. Complex IV was not affected by acute administration of l-tyrosine in infant rats. Our results indicate an alteration in the energy metabolism in hippocampus and striatum of infant rats after acute administration of l-tyrosine. If the same effects occur in the brain of the patients, it is possible that energy metabolism impairment may be contribute to possible damage in memory and cognitive processes in patients with tyrosinemia type II. PMID:23602810

  6. Acute administration of l-tyrosine alters energetic metabolism of hippocampus and striatum of infant rats.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Andrea C; Ferreira, Gabriela K; Carvalho-Silva, Milena; Furlanetto, Camila B; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Schuck, Patrícia F; Streck, Emilio L

    2013-08-01

    Tyrosinemia type II is an inborn error of metabolism caused by mutations in the gene that encodes tyrosine aminotransferase, which leads to increased blood tyrosine levels. Considering that tyrosine levels are highly elevated in fluids of patients with tyrosinemia type II, and that previous studies demonstrated significant alterations in brain energy metabolism of young rats caused by l-tyrosine, the present study aimed to evaluate the effect of acute administration of l-tyrosine on the activities of citrate synthase, malate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, and mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes I, II, II-III, and IV in posterior cortex, hippocampus, and striatum of infant rats. Wistar rats (10 days old) were killed 1h after a single intraperitoneal injection of tyrosine (500 mg/kg) or saline. The activities of energy metabolism enzymes were evaluated in brain of rats. Our results demonstrated that acute administration of l-tyrosine inhibited the activity of citrate synthase activity in striatum and increased the activities of malate dehydrogenase and succinate dehydrogenase in hippocampus. On the other hand, these enzymes were not affected in posterior cortex. The activities of complex I and complex II were inhibited by acute administration of l-tyrosine in striatum. On the other hand, the acute administration of l-tyrosine increased the activity of activity of complex II-III in hippocampus. Complex IV was not affected by acute administration of l-tyrosine in infant rats. Our results indicate an alteration in the energy metabolism in hippocampus and striatum of infant rats after acute administration of l-tyrosine. If the same effects occur in the brain of the patients, it is possible that energy metabolism impairment may be contribute to possible damage in memory and cognitive processes in patients with tyrosinemia type II.

  7. Distribution of methamphetamine and its metabolite amphetamine in acute and subacute ethanol-methamphetamine combination abuse model rats.

    PubMed

    Liang, Man; Liu, Yan; Zheng, Na; Ananda, Sunnassee; Liu, Liang

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the distribution of methamphetamine (MA) and its metabolite amphetamine (AP) in rat models of acute and subacute MA-ethanol combination abuse. Rats were fed with 20% ethanol for 4 weeks (chronic active-drinking group), and MA was injected intraperitoneally into chronically drinking and normal rats over 5 and 14 days, respectively. Then the rats from the acute and subacute combination abuse groups were euthanized, and ethanol, MA, and AP concentrations in samples were quantified. Except for the similar ethanol concentrations among acute and subacute groups, the MA and AP levels between groups were quite different. The concentrations of MA and AP in rats' liver, lung, kidney, and brain were much higher than other tissues, regardless of combination with ethanol. Also, MA and AP levels in subacute rats groups were higher than those in acute groups, and the levels of MA and the formation of AP in rats subjected to the combination abuse with ethanol were higher than in MA-only intoxicated rats. We conclude that ethanol has no bearing on the MA and AP distribution in body fluids and tissues, yet it can increase MA levels and markedly accelerate the formation of AP in combination-abuse rats. Comparing the acute and subacute combination-abuse rats' samples, it can be deduced that various accumulated amounts of MA and AP were unaffected by ethanol, even after multi-dose injection, regardless of acute or subacute use.

  8. Impact of prenatal and acute methamphetamine exposure on behaviour of adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Schutová, B; Hrubá, L; Pometlová, M; Slamberová, R

    2009-01-01

    Psychostimulants have been shown to alter behaviour in both rats and humans. The aim of the present study was: (1) to assess the effect of prenatal and acute methamphetamine (MA) administration on behaviour in adult male rats and (2) to find out if the prenatal exposure to MA increases sensitivity to acute MA application in adulthood. Behaviour of adult male rats prenatally exposed to MA (5 mg/kg) or no drug was tested in Open field (OF) and Elevated plus maze (EPM). Half of the animals were injected with MA (1 mg/kg) subcutaneously 30 minutes prior to testing. Locomotion, exploration, comforting behaviour and anxiety were evaluated in the OF, while anxiety and exploratory behaviour were assessed in the EPM. Our results showed that prenatal MA did not have an effect on baseline behaviour in either of the tests. By contrast, acute MA increased overall psychomotor activity by increasing locomotion and exploratory behaviour and decreasing comforting behaviour. Moreover, adult rats prenatally exposed to MA were more sensitive to the effects of acute MA on exploration. In addition, acute MA application decreased anxiety in the OF as well as in the EPM. Our present study, thus, demonstrates that acute MA increases overall psychomotor activity and decreases anxiety to novel environment. To further support our hypothesis that prenatal MA exposure increases sensitivity to drugs in adulthood, studies investigating the levels of dopamine in the rat brain after prenatal MA exposure are planned.

  9. Cocaine induces DNA damage in distinct brain areas of female rats under different hormonal conditions.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Marilise F; Gonçales, Tierre A; Steinmetz, Aline; Moura, Dinara J; Saffi, Jenifer; Gomez, Rosane; Barros, Helena M T

    2014-04-01

    We evaluated levels of neuronal DNA damage after acute or repeated cocaine treatment in different brain areas of female rats after ovariectomy or sham surgery. Rats in the control and acute groups were given saline i.p., whereas in the repeated group were given 15 mg/kg, i.p., cocaine for 8 days. After a 10 day washout period, the control group was given saline i.p., whereas rats in the acute and repeated groups were given a challenge dose of 15 mg/kg, i.p., cocaine. After behavioural assessment, rats were killed and the cerebellum, hippocampus, hypothalamus, prefrontal cortex and striatum were dissected for the Comet assay. Acute cocaine exposure induced DNA damage in all brain areas. This effect persisted after repeated administration, except in the hypothalamus, where repeated treatment did not cause increased DNA damage. Sexual hormones exhibited a neuroprotective effect, decreasing cocaine-induced DNA damage in cycling rats in all brain areas. PMID:24552452

  10. Biotransformation of norcocaine to norcocaine nitroxide by rat brain microsomes.

    PubMed

    Kloss, M W; Rosen, G M; Rauckman, E J

    1984-01-01

    In the mid 1970's, norcocaine was identified as a metabolite of cocaine in rat brain tissue. We extend these studies by demonstrating that rat brain FAD-containing monooxygenase metabolizes norcocaine to N-hydroxynorcocaine. This hydroxylamine is then further oxidized to the nitroxyl free radical norcocaine nitroxide by rat brain cytochrome P-450. Brain microsomal reduction of norcocaine nitroxide leads to the generation of superoxide. Finally, incubation of rat brain microsomes with either N-hydroxynorcocaine or norcocaine nitroxide leads to significant lipid peroxidation as monitored by spin-trapping techniques.

  11. EVALUATION OF PERFLUOROOCTANE SULFONATE (PFOS) IN THE RAT BRAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examined whether there is a differential distribution of PFOS within the brain, and compares adult rats with neonatal rats at an age when formation of the blood-brain barrier is not yet complete (postnatal day 7). Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats (60-70 day old, 4/...

  12. Secretin: specific binding to rat brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Fremeau, R.T. Jr.; Jensen, R.T.; Charlton, C.G.; Miller, R.L.; O'Donohue, T.L.; Moody, T.W.

    1983-08-01

    The binding of (/sup 125/I)secretin to rat brain membranes was investigated. Radiolabeled secretin bound with high affinity (KD . 0.2 nM) to a single class of noninteracting sites. Binding was specific, saturable, and reversible. Regional distribution studies indicated that the specific binding was greatest in the cerebellum, intermediate in the cortex, thalamus, striatum, hippocampus, and hypothalamus, and lowest in the midbrain and medulla/pons. Pharmacological studies indicated that only secretin, but not other peptides, inhibits binding of (/sup 125/I)secretin with high affinity. Also, certain guanine nucleotides inhibited high affinity binding. These data indicate that rat brain membranes possess high affinity binding sites specific for secretin and that with the use of (/sup 125/I) secretin the kinetics, stoichiometry, specificity, and distribution of secretin receptors can be directly investigated.

  13. Central effect of histamine in a rat model of acute trigeminal pain.

    PubMed

    Tamaddonfard, Esmaeal; Khalilzadeh, Emad; Hamzeh-Gooshchi, Nasrin; Seiednejhad-Yamchi, Sona

    2008-01-01

    In conscious rats implanted with an intracerebroventricular (icv) cannula, effect of icv injections of histamine, chlorpheniramine (H(1)-receptor antagonist) and ranitidine (H(2)-receptor blocker) was investigated in a rat model of acute trigeminal pain. Acute trigeminal pain was induced by putting a drop of 5 M NaCl solution on the corneal surface of the eye and the numbers of eye wipes were counted during the first 30 s. Histamine (20, 40 microg) and chlorpheniramine (80 microg) significantly decreased the numbers of eye wipes. Ranitidine alone had no effect. Pretreatment with chlorpheniramine did not change the histamine-induced analgesia, whereas the histamine effect on pain was inhibited with ranitidine pretreatment. These results indicate that the brain histamine, through central H(2) receptors, may be involved in the modulation of the acute trigeminal pain in rats.

  14. Acute behavioral toxicity of carbaryl and propoxur in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Ruppert, P H; Cook, L L; Dean, K F; Reiter, L W

    1983-04-01

    Motor activity and neuromotor function were examined in adult CD rats exposed to either carbaryl or propoxur, and behavioral effects were compared with the time course of cholinesterase inhibition. Rats received an IP injection of either 0, 2, 4, 6 or 8 mg/kg propoxur or 0, 4, 8, 16 or 28 mg/kg carbaryl in corn oil 20 min before testing. All doses of propoxur reduced 2 hr activity in a figure-eight maze, and crossovers and rears in an open field. For carbaryl, dosages of 8, 16 and 28 mg/kg decreased maze activity whereas 16 and 28 mg/kg reduced open field activity. In order to determine the time course of effects, rats received a single IP injection of either corn oil, 2 mg/kg propoxur or 16 mg/kg carbaryl, and were tested for 5 min in a figure-eight maze either 15, 30, 60, 120 or 240 min post-injection. Immediately after testing, animals were sacrificed and total cholinesterase was measured. Maximum effects of propoxur and carbaryl on blood and brain cholinesterase and motor activity were seen within 15 min. Maze activity had returned to control levels within 30 and 60 min whereas cholinesterase levels remained depressed for 120 and 240 min for propoxur and carbaryl, respectively. These results indicate that both carbamates decrease motor activity, but behavioral recovery occurs prior to that of cholinesterase following acute exposure.

  15. Factors that limit brain volume changes in response to acute and sustained hyper- and hyponatremia

    PubMed Central

    Holliday, Malcolm A.; Kalayci, M. N.; Harrah, Jean

    1968-01-01

    Rats were made acutely hyper- or hyponatremic by infusion of hypertonic saline or water, respectively. Other rats were maintained in these states from 1 to 7 days to observe the effects of time. Brain tissue water, Na, Cl, and K were compared with serum Na and Cl concentration (NaE and ClE). The following observations are noted: Brain Cl content varies directly with ClE and brain Na content in the Cl space (Nae) varies directly with NaE, indicating little or no restraint on the inward or outward movement of Na or Cl from the Cl space of brain. The intracellular volume of brain fluid (Vi) derived as the difference between total water and Cl space, decreases with hypernatremia and increases with hyponatremia. The changes in Vi in the acute studies are not accompanied by any change in brain K content, or calculated intracellular Na content, and are approximately 0.6 the changes predicted from osmotic behavior of cells, which apply four assumptions: (a) NaE is proportional to osmolality; (b) brain osmolality remains equal to plasma osmolality; (c) Vi is osmotically active; and (d) there is no net gain or loss of solute from Vi. The validity of these assumptions is considered. When changes in osmolality are sustained, Vi is much closer to control values than when in the acute phase. K content increases in hypernatremia and decreases in hyponatremia. The changes in K content can account for some of the adjustment in Vi observed over the extended period of hyper- or hyponatremia. The regression of (Na + K)/v upon NaE describes a slope less than 1.0 and an intercept of (Na + K)/v equal to 40% of the control (Na + K)/v. These characteristics are interpreted to mean that significant quantities of Na and K in brain are osmotically inactive. The brain protects itself from acute volume changes in response to change in NaE by the freedom for Na and Cl to move from the Cl space, by Vi not changing acutely to the degree predicted from osmotic properties of cells in general, and by

  16. Ethanol effects on rat brain phosphoinositide metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.M.

    1987-01-01

    An increase in acidic phospholipids in brain plasma and synaptic plasma membranes upon chronic ethanol administration was observed. Chronic ethanol administration resulted in an increase in {sup 32}P{sub i} incorporation into the acidic phospholipids in synaptosomes. Postdecapitative ischemic treatment resulted rapid degradation of poly-PI in rat brain. However, there was a rapid appearance of IP{sub 2} in ethanol group which indicated a more rapid turnover of IP{sub 3} in the ethanol-treated rats. Carbachol stimulated accumulation of labeled inositol phosphates in brain slices and synaptosomes. Carbachol-stimulated release of IP and IP{sub 2} was calcium dependent and was inhibited by EGTA and atropine. Adenosine triphosphates and 1 mM further enhanced carbachol-induced formation of IP and IP{sub 2}, but showed an increase and a decrease in IP{sub 3} at 1 mM and 0.01 mM, respectively. Guanosine triphosphate at 0.1 mM did not change in labeled IP, but there was a significant increase in labeled IP{sub 2} and decrease in IP{sub 3}. Mn and CMP greatly enhanced incorporation of ({sup 3}H)-inositol into PI, but not into poly-PI labeling in brain synaptosomes. Incubation of brain synaptosomes resulted in a Ca{sup 2+}, time-dependent release of labeled IP. However, the pool of PI labeled through this pathway is not susceptible to carbachol stimulation. When saponin permeabilized synaptosomal preparations were incubated with ({sup 3}H)-inositol-PI or ({sup 14}C)-arachidonoyl-PI, ATP enhanced the formation of labeled IP and DG.

  17. Pharmacologically induced hypothermia attenuates traumatic brain injury in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiaohuan; Wei, Zheng Zachory; Espinera, Alyssa; Lee, Jin Hwan; Ji, Xiaoya; Wei, Ling; Dix, Thomas A; Yu, Shan Ping

    2015-05-01

    Neonatal brain trauma is linked to higher risks of mortality and neurological disability. The use of mild to moderate hypothermia has shown promising potential against brain injuries induced by stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI) in various experimental models and in clinical trials. Conventional methods of physical cooling, however, are difficult to use in acute treatments and in induction of regulated hypothermia. In addition, general anesthesia is usually required to mitigate the negative effects of shivering during physical cooling. Our recent investigations demonstrate the potential therapeutic benefits of pharmacologically induced hypothermia (PIH) using the neurotensin receptor (NTR) agonist HPI201 (formerly known as ABS201) in stroke and TBI models of adult rodents. The present investigation explored the brain protective effects of HPI201 in a P14 rat pediatric model of TBI induced by controlled cortical impact. When administered via intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection, HPI201 induced dose-dependent reduction of body and brain temperature. A 6-h hypothermic treatment, providing an overall 2-3°C reduction of brain and body temperature, showed significant effect of attenuating the contusion volume versus TBI controls. Attenuation occurs whether hypothermia is initiated 15min or 2h after TBI. No shivering response was seen in HPI201-treated animals. HPI201 treatment also reduced TUNEL-positive and TUNEL/NeuN-colabeled cells in the contusion area and peri-injury regions. TBI-induced blood-brain barrier damage was attenuated by HPI201 treatment, evaluated using the Evans Blue assay. HPI201 significantly decreased MMP-9 levels and caspase-3 activation, both of which are pro-apototic, while it increased anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 gene expression in the peri-contusion region. In addition, HPI201 prevented the up-regulation of pro-inflammatory tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-6. In sensorimotor activity assessments, rats in the HPI201

  18. Pharmacologically Induced Hypothermia Attenuates Traumatic Brain Injury in Neonatal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Espinera, Alyssa; Lee, Jin Hwan; Ji, Xiaoya; Wei, Ling; Dix, Thomas A.; Yu, Shan Ping

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal brain trauma is linked to higher risks of mortality and neurological disability. The use of mild to moderate hypothermia has shown promising potential against brain injuries induced by stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI) in various experimental models and in clinical trials. Conventional methods of physical cooling, however, are difficult to use in acute treatments and in induction of regulated hypothermia. In addition, general anesthesia is usually required to mitigate the negative effects of shivering during physical cooling. Our recent investigations demonstrate the potential therapeutic benefits of pharmacologically induced hypothermia (PIH) using the neurotensin receptor (NTR) agonist HPI201 (formerly known as ABS201) in stroke and TBI models of adult rodents. The present investigation explored the brain protective effects of HPI201 in a P14 rat pediatric model of TBI induced by controlled cortical impact. When administered via intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection, HPI201 induced dose-dependent reduction of body and brain temperature. A six-hour hypothermic treatment, providing an overall 2-3°C reduction of brain and body temperature, showed significant effect of attenuating the contusion volume versus TBI controls. Attenuation occurs whether hypothermia is initiated 15 min or 2 hr after TBI. No shivering response was seen in HPI201-treated animals. HPI201 treatment also reduced TUNEL-positive and TUNEL/NeuN-colabeled cells in the contusion area and peri-injury regions. TBI-induced blood brain barrier damage was attenuated by HPI201 treatment, evaluated using the Evans Blue assay. HPI201 significantly decreased MMP-9 levels and Caspase-3 activation, both of which are pro-apototic, while it increased anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 gene expression in the peri-contusion region. In addition, HPI201 prevented the up-regulation of pro-inflammatory tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-6. In sensorimotor activity assessments, rats in the

  19. Studies of aluminum in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lipman, J.J.; Brill, A.B.; Som, P.; Jones, K.W.; Colowick, S.; Cholewa, M.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of high aluminum concentrations in rat brains were studied using /sup 14/C autoradiography to measure the uptake of /sup 14/C 2-deoxy-D-glucose (/sup 14/C-2DG) and microbeam proton-induced x-ray emission (microPIXE) with a 20-..mu..m resolution to measure concentrations of magnesium, aluminum, potassium, and calcium. The aluminum was introduced intracisternally in the form of aluminum tartrate (Al-T) while control animals were given sodium tartrate (Na-T). The /sup 14/C was administered intravenously. The animals receiving Al-T developed seizure disorders and had pathological changes that included cerebral cortical atrophy. The results showed that there was a decreased uptake of /sup 14/C-2DG in cortical regions in which increased aluminum levels were measured, i.e., there is a correlation between the aluminum in the rat brain and decreased brain glucose metabolism. A minimum detection limit of about 16 ppM (mass fraction) or 3 x 10/sup 9/ Al atoms was obtained for Al under the conditions employed. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Effects of nanoparticle zinc oxide on emotional behavior and trace elements homeostasis in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Amara, Salem; Slama, Imen Ben; Omri, Karim; El Ghoul, Jaber; El Mir, Lassaad; Rhouma, Khemais Ben; Abdelmelek, Hafedh; Sakly, Mohsen

    2015-12-01

    Over recent years, nanotoxicology and the potential effects on human body have grown in significance, the potential influences of nanosized materials on the central nervous system have received more attention. The aim of this study was to determine whether zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) exposure cause alterations in emotional behavior and trace elements homeostasis in rat brain. Rats were treated by intraperitoneal injection of ZnO NPs (20-30 nm) at a dose of 25 mg/kg body weight. Sub -: acute ZnO NPs treatment induced no significant increase in the zinc content in the homogenate brain. Statistically significant decreases in iron and calcium concentrations were found in rat brain tissue compared to control. However, sodium and potassium contents remained unchanged. Also, there were no significant changes in the body weight and the coefficient of brain. In the present study, the anxiety-related behavior was evaluated using the plus-maze test. ZnO NPs treatment modulates slightly the exploratory behaviors of rats. However, no significant differences were observed in the anxious index between ZnO NP-treated rats and the control group (p > 0.05). Interestingly, our results demonstrated minimal effects of ZnO NPs on emotional behavior of animals, but there was a possible alteration in trace elements homeostasis in rat brain.

  1. Protein purification and cloning of diacylglycerol lipase from rat brain.

    PubMed

    Aso, Chizu; Araki, Mari; Ohshima, Noriyasu; Tatei, Kazuaki; Hirano, Tohko; Obinata, Hideru; Kishi, Mikiko; Kishimoto, Koji; Konishi, Akimitsu; Goto, Fumio; Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Izumi, Takashi

    2016-06-01

    Diacylglycerol (DG) lipase, which hydrolyses 1-stearoyl-2-arachidonyl-sn-glycerol to produce an endocannabinoid, 2-arachidonoylglycerol, was purified from the soluble fraction of rat brain lysates. DG lipase was purified about 1,200-fold by a sequential column chromatographic procedure. Among proteins identified by mass spectrometry analysis in the partially purified DG lipase sample, only DDHD domain containing two (DDHD2), which was formerly regarded as a phospholipase A1, exhibited significant DG lipase activity. Rat DDHD2 expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells showed similar enzymatic properties to partially purified DG lipase from rat brain. The source of DG lipase activity in rat brain was immunoprecipitated using anti-DDHD2 antibody. Thus, we concluded that the DG lipase activity in the soluble fraction of rat brain is derived from DDHD2. DDHD2 is distributed widely in the rat brain. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that DDHD2 is expressed in hippocampal neurons, but not in glia.

  2. Targeting neurotransmitter receptors with nanoparticles in vivo allows single-molecule tracking in acute brain slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, Juan A.; Dupuis, Julien P.; Etchepare, Laetitia; Espana, Agnès; Cognet, Laurent; Groc, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    Single-molecule imaging has changed the way we understand many biological mechanisms, particularly in neurobiology, by shedding light on intricate molecular events down to the nanoscale. However, current single-molecule studies in neuroscience have been limited to cultured neurons or organotypic slices, leaving as an open question the existence of fast receptor diffusion in intact brain tissue. Here, for the first time, we targeted dopamine receptors in vivo with functionalized quantum dots and were able to perform single-molecule tracking in acute rat brain slices. We propose a novel delocalized and non-inflammatory way of delivering nanoparticles (NPs) in vivo to the brain, which allowed us to label and track genetically engineered surface dopamine receptors in neocortical neurons, revealing inherent behaviour and receptor activity regulations. We thus propose a NP-based platform for single-molecule studies in the living brain, opening new avenues of research in physiological and pathological animal models.

  3. Targeting neurotransmitter receptors with nanoparticles in vivo allows single-molecule tracking in acute brain slices

    PubMed Central

    Varela, Juan A.; Dupuis, Julien P.; Etchepare, Laetitia; Espana, Agnès; Cognet, Laurent; Groc, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Single-molecule imaging has changed the way we understand many biological mechanisms, particularly in neurobiology, by shedding light on intricate molecular events down to the nanoscale. However, current single-molecule studies in neuroscience have been limited to cultured neurons or organotypic slices, leaving as an open question the existence of fast receptor diffusion in intact brain tissue. Here, for the first time, we targeted dopamine receptors in vivo with functionalized quantum dots and were able to perform single-molecule tracking in acute rat brain slices. We propose a novel delocalized and non-inflammatory way of delivering nanoparticles (NPs) in vivo to the brain, which allowed us to label and track genetically engineered surface dopamine receptors in neocortical neurons, revealing inherent behaviour and receptor activity regulations. We thus propose a NP-based platform for single-molecule studies in the living brain, opening new avenues of research in physiological and pathological animal models. PMID:26971573

  4. Brain and muscle redox imbalance elicited by acute ethylmalonic acid administration.

    PubMed

    Schuck, Patrícia Fernanda; Milanez, Ana Paula; Felisberto, Francine; Galant, Leticia Selinger; Machado, Jéssica Luca; Furlanetto, Camila Brulezi; Petronilho, Fabricia; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Streck, Emilio Luiz; Ferreira, Gustavo Costa

    2015-01-01

    Ethylmalonic acid (EMA) accumulates in tissues and biological fluids of patients affected by short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (SCADD) and ethylmalonic encephalopathy, illnesses characterized by neurological and muscular symptoms. Considering that the mechanisms responsible for the brain and skeletal muscle damage in these diseases are poorly known, in the present work we investigated the effects of acute EMA administration on redox status parameters in cerebral cortex and skeletal muscle from 30-day-old rats. Animals received three subcutaneous injections of EMA (6 μmol/g; 90 min interval between injections) and were killed 1 h after the last administration. Control animals received saline in the same volumes. EMA administration significantly increased thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances levels in cerebral cortex and skeletal muscle, indicating increased lipid peroxidation. In addition, carbonyl content was increased in EMA-treated animal skeletal muscle when compared to the saline group. EMA administration also significantly increased 2',7'-dihydrodichlorofluorescein oxidation and superoxide production (reactive species markers), and decreased glutathione peroxidase activity in cerebral cortex, while glutathione levels were decreased only in skeletal muscle. On the other hand, respiratory chain complex I-III activity was altered by acute EMA administration neither in cerebral cortex nor in skeletal muscle. The present results show that acute EMA administration elicits oxidative stress in rat brain and skeletal muscle, suggesting that oxidative damage may be involved in the pathophysiology of the brain and muscle symptoms found in patients affected by SCADD and ethylmalonic encephalopathy.

  5. Brain and muscle redox imbalance elicited by acute ethylmalonic acid administration.

    PubMed

    Schuck, Patrícia Fernanda; Milanez, Ana Paula; Felisberto, Francine; Galant, Leticia Selinger; Machado, Jéssica Luca; Furlanetto, Camila Brulezi; Petronilho, Fabricia; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Streck, Emilio Luiz; Ferreira, Gustavo Costa

    2015-01-01

    Ethylmalonic acid (EMA) accumulates in tissues and biological fluids of patients affected by short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (SCADD) and ethylmalonic encephalopathy, illnesses characterized by neurological and muscular symptoms. Considering that the mechanisms responsible for the brain and skeletal muscle damage in these diseases are poorly known, in the present work we investigated the effects of acute EMA administration on redox status parameters in cerebral cortex and skeletal muscle from 30-day-old rats. Animals received three subcutaneous injections of EMA (6 μmol/g; 90 min interval between injections) and were killed 1 h after the last administration. Control animals received saline in the same volumes. EMA administration significantly increased thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances levels in cerebral cortex and skeletal muscle, indicating increased lipid peroxidation. In addition, carbonyl content was increased in EMA-treated animal skeletal muscle when compared to the saline group. EMA administration also significantly increased 2',7'-dihydrodichlorofluorescein oxidation and superoxide production (reactive species markers), and decreased glutathione peroxidase activity in cerebral cortex, while glutathione levels were decreased only in skeletal muscle. On the other hand, respiratory chain complex I-III activity was altered by acute EMA administration neither in cerebral cortex nor in skeletal muscle. The present results show that acute EMA administration elicits oxidative stress in rat brain and skeletal muscle, suggesting that oxidative damage may be involved in the pathophysiology of the brain and muscle symptoms found in patients affected by SCADD and ethylmalonic encephalopathy. PMID:26010931

  6. Brain and Muscle Redox Imbalance Elicited by Acute Ethylmalonic Acid Administration

    PubMed Central

    Schuck, Patrícia Fernanda; Milanez, Ana Paula; Felisberto, Francine; Galant, Leticia Selinger; Machado, Jéssica Luca; Furlanetto, Camila Brulezi; Petronilho, Fabricia; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Streck, Emilio Luiz; Ferreira, Gustavo Costa

    2015-01-01

    Ethylmalonic acid (EMA) accumulates in tissues and biological fluids of patients affected by short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (SCADD) and ethylmalonic encephalopathy, illnesses characterized by neurological and muscular symptoms. Considering that the mechanisms responsible for the brain and skeletal muscle damage in these diseases are poorly known, in the present work we investigated the effects of acute EMA administration on redox status parameters in cerebral cortex and skeletal muscle from 30-day-old rats. Animals received three subcutaneous injections of EMA (6 μmol/g; 90 min interval between injections) and were killed 1 h after the last administration. Control animals received saline in the same volumes. EMA administration significantly increased thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances levels in cerebral cortex and skeletal muscle, indicating increased lipid peroxidation. In addition, carbonyl content was increased in EMA-treated animal skeletal muscle when compared to the saline group. EMA administration also significantly increased 2’,7’-dihydrodichlorofluorescein oxidation and superoxide production (reactive species markers), and decreased glutathione peroxidase activity in cerebral cortex, while glutathione levels were decreased only in skeletal muscle. On the other hand, respiratory chain complex I-III activity was altered by acute EMA administration neither in cerebral cortex nor in skeletal muscle. The present results show that acute EMA administration elicits oxidative stress in rat brain and skeletal muscle, suggesting that oxidative damage may be involved in the pathophysiology of the brain and muscle symptoms found in patients affected by SCADD and ethylmalonic encephalopathy. PMID:26010931

  7. Simvastatin reduces VEGF and NO levels in acute stages of experimental traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Yüksel, Hatice; Yavuz, Özlem; Iş, Merih; Çomunoğlu, Nil; Üzüm, Gülay; Akyüz, Feyzullah; Yıldırım, Hayriye Ak

    2013-11-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of simvastatin, a cholesterol-lowering agent, on vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs), nitric oxide (NO) levels and neuroprotection, in rats with experimentally induced traumatic brain injury (TBI). Forty Wistar albino rats were categorized into four groups: sham operated (S), trauma (T), trauma + vehicle (T + V) and trauma + simvastatin (T + S). The T, T + V and T + S groups were subjected to TBI. The T + V group was administered vehicle [ethanol:saline (1/2)] and the T + S group was administered 1 mg/kg of simvastatin 3 h after the injury insult. Blood and brain tissue specimens were obtained 24 h after the trauma to measure VEGFs and NO levels and perform histopathological examinations. The histopathological injury scores of brain tissues were significantly higher in the T group, and simvastatin significantly prevented brain injury in the T + S group. In the T group, significant increases of VEGF levels in serum and brain tissues were noted, which were prevented with simvastatin treatment in the T + S group. The markedly high levels of NO in brain tissues of the T group were decreased by simvastatin treatment in the T + S group. It can be concluded that, as evidenced by histopathological findings, simvastatin treatment improves neuropathology in acute stages of TBI.

  8. Sulfonylurea Receptor 1 Contributes to the Astrocyte Swelling and Brain Edema in Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Jayakumar, A.R.; Valdes, V.; Tong, X.Y.; Shamaladevi, N.; Gonzalez, W.; Norenberg, M.D.

    2014-01-01

    Astrocyte swelling (cytotoxic brain edema) is the major neurological complication of acute liver failure (ALF), a condition in which ammonia has been strongly implicated in its etiology. Ion channels and transporters are known to be involved in cell volume regulation and a disturbance in these systems may result in cell swelling. One ion channel known to contribute to astrocyte swelling/brain edema in other neurological disorders is the ATP-dependent, non-selective cation channel (NCCa-ATP channel). We therefore examined its potential role in the astrocyte swelling/brain edema associated with ALF. Cultured astrocytes treated with 5 mM ammonia showed a 3-fold increase in the sulfonylurea receptor type 1 (SUR1) protein expression, a marker of NCCa-ATP channel activity. Blocking SUR1 with glibenclamide significantly reduced the ammonia-induced cell swelling in cultured astrocytes. Additionally, overexpression of SUR1 in ammonia-treated cultured astrocytes was significantly reduced by co-treatment of cells with BAY 11-7082, an inhibitor of NF-κB, indicating the involvement of an NF-κB-mediated SUR1 upregulation in the mechanism of ammonia-induced astrocyte swelling. Brain SUR1 mRNA level was also found to be increased in the thioacetamide (TAA) rat model of ALF. Additionally, we found a significant increase in SUR1 protein expression in rat brain cortical astrocytes in TAA-treated rats. Treatment with glibenclamide significantly reduced the brain edema in this model of ALF. These findings strongly suggest the involvement of NCCa-ATP channel in the astrocyte swelling/brain edema in ALF, and that targeting this channel may represent a useful approach for the treatment of the brain edema associated with ALF. PMID:24443056

  9. Blood-brain barrier in acute liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Justin H.

    2011-01-01

    Brain edema remains a challenging obstacle in the management of acute liver failure (ALF). Cytotoxic mechanisms associated with brain edema have been well recognized, but evidence for vasogenic mechanisms in the pathogenesis of brain edema in ALF has been lacking. Recent reports have not only shown a role of matrix metalloproteinase-9 in the pathogenesis of brain edema in experimental ALF but have also found significant alterations in the tight junction elements including occludin and claudin-5, suggesting a vasogenic injury in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity. This article reviews and explores the role of the paracellular tight junction proteins in the increased selective BBB permeability that leads to brain edema in ALF. PMID:22100566

  10. Acute ethanol effects on focal cerebral ischemia in fasted rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y J; Yang, G Y; Ben-Joseph, O; Ross, B D; Chenevert, T L; Domino, E F

    1998-05-01

    The effects of acute ethanol intoxication were investigated in a rat model of unilateral middle cerebral artery occlusion. Groups of 5 to 8 male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 4 hr of left middle cerebral artery occlusion. All groups were deprived of food overnight and were pretreated intraperitoneally with 5% dextrose solution (10 ml/kg), 20% ethyl alcohol in 5% dextrose solution (2 g/kg), or 30% ethyl alcohol in a 5% dextrose solution (3 g/kg) 1 hr before middle cerebral artery occlusion. Regional cerebral blood flow during ipsilateral occlusion was approximately 9.1 to 10% of baseline in all groups. The mean % brain water content in control, 2 g/kg ethanol-treated groups, and 3 g/kg ethanol-treated groups were: in the ischemic core--81.6, 81.2, and 82.4; intermediate zone--80.5, 80.6, and 81.7; and outer zone--79.7, 79.7, and 80.8, respectively. Brain Na+ and K+ content in the three groups was related to water content, but much greater with ethanol pretreatment. The water content of the intermediate zones in the 3 g/kg ethanol-treated animals was significantly greater than in the control (p < 0.01 and 0.001) and the 2 g/kg ethanol-treated groups. One-way analysis of variance indicated a significant dose-effect relationship in which the lower dose of ethanol tended to reduce ischemic core water content, and the larger dose increased ischemic core water, compared with the control. None of the overnight fasted groups had any significant hyperglycemia. The group given 3 g/kg i.p. ethanol 1 hr before had exacerbated edema formation with a mean whole blood level of ethanol of approximately 230 mg/dl. The neurotoxic effects of high concentrations of ethanol were unrelated to any change in plasma glucose concentrations.

  11. Acute and chronic tramadol administration impair spatial memory in rat

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini-Sharifabad, Ali; Rabbani, Mohammad; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad; Bagheri, Narges

    2016-01-01

    Tramadol hydrochloride, a synthetic opioid, acts via a multiple mechanism of action. Tramadol can potentially change the behavioral phenomena. The present study evaluates the effect of tramadol after single or multiple dose/s on the spatial memory of rat using object recognition task (ORT). Tramadol, 20 mg/kg, was injected intraperitoneally (i.p) as a single dose or once a day for 21 successive days considered as acute or chronic treatment respectively. After treatment, animals underwent two trials in the ORT. In the first trial (T1), animals encountered with two identical objects for exploration in a five-minute period. After 1 h, in the T2 trial, the animals were exposed to a familiar and a nonfamiliar object. The exploration times and frequency of the exploration for any objects were recorded. The results showed that tramadol decreased the exploration times for the nonfamiliar object in the T2 trial when administered either as a single dose (P<0.001) or as the multiple dose (P<0.05) compared to the respective control groups. Both acute and chronic tramadol administration eliminated the different frequency of exploration between the familiar and nonfamiliar objects. Our findings revealed that tramadol impaired memory when administered acutely or chronically. Single dose administration of tramadol showed more destructive effect than multiple doses of tramadol on the memory. The observed data can be explained by the inhibitory effects of tramadol on the wide range of neurotransmitters and receptors including muscarinic, N-methyl D-aspartate, AMPA as well as some second messenger like cAMP and cGMP or its stimulatory effect on the opioid, gama amino butyric acid, dopamine or serotonin in the brain. PMID:27051432

  12. Acute and chronic tramadol administration impair spatial memory in rat.

    PubMed

    Hosseini-Sharifabad, Ali; Rabbani, Mohammad; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad; Bagheri, Narges

    2016-01-01

    Tramadol hydrochloride, a synthetic opioid, acts via a multiple mechanism of action. Tramadol can potentially change the behavioral phenomena. The present study evaluates the effect of tramadol after single or multiple dose/s on the spatial memory of rat using object recognition task (ORT). Tramadol, 20 mg/kg, was injected intraperitoneally (i.p) as a single dose or once a day for 21 successive days considered as acute or chronic treatment respectively. After treatment, animals underwent two trials in the ORT. In the first trial (T1), animals encountered with two identical objects for exploration in a five-minute period. After 1 h, in the T2 trial, the animals were exposed to a familiar and a nonfamiliar object. The exploration times and frequency of the exploration for any objects were recorded. The results showed that tramadol decreased the exploration times for the nonfamiliar object in the T2 trial when administered either as a single dose (P<0.001) or as the multiple dose (P<0.05) compared to the respective control groups. Both acute and chronic tramadol administration eliminated the different frequency of exploration between the familiar and nonfamiliar objects. Our findings revealed that tramadol impaired memory when administered acutely or chronically. Single dose administration of tramadol showed more destructive effect than multiple doses of tramadol on the memory. The observed data can be explained by the inhibitory effects of tramadol on the wide range of neurotransmitters and receptors including muscarinic, N-methyl D-aspartate, AMPA as well as some second messenger like cAMP and cGMP or its stimulatory effect on the opioid, gama amino butyric acid, dopamine or serotonin in the brain. PMID:27051432

  13. Propofol Attenuates Early Brain Injury After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Song-sheng; Zhang, Hua-bin; Wang, Chun-hua; Yang, Wei-zhong; Liang, Ri-sheng; Chen, Ye; Tu, Xian-kun

    2015-12-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that propofol protects rat brain against focal cerebral ischemia. However, whether propofol attenuates early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats remains unknown until now. The present study was performed to evaluate the effect of propofol on early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats and further explore the potential mechanisms. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) by endovascular perforation then received treatment with propofol (10 or 50 mg/kg) or vehicle after 2 and 12 h of SAH. SAH grading, neurological scores, brain water content, Evans blue extravasation, the myeloperoxidase activity, and malondialdehyde (MDA) content were measured 24 h after SAH. Expression of nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2 (Nrf2), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65, and aquaporin 4 (AQP4) expression in rat brain were detected by Western blot. Expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Expressions of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) were assessed by ELISA. Neurological scores, brain water content, Evans blue extravasation, the myeloperoxidase activity, and MDA content were significantly reduced by propofol. Furthermore, expression of Nrf2 in rat brain was upregulated by propofol, and expression of NF-κB p65, AQP4, COX-2, MMP-9, TNF-α, and IL-1β in rat brain were attenuated by propofol. Our results demonstrated that propofol improves neurological scores, reduces brain edema, blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, inflammatory reaction, and lipid peroxidation in rats of SAH. Propofol exerts neuroprotection against SAH-induced early brain injury, which might be associated with the inhibition of inflammation and lipid peroxidation. PMID:26342279

  14. Propofol Attenuates Early Brain Injury After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Song-sheng; Zhang, Hua-bin; Wang, Chun-hua; Yang, Wei-zhong; Liang, Ri-sheng; Chen, Ye; Tu, Xian-kun

    2015-12-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that propofol protects rat brain against focal cerebral ischemia. However, whether propofol attenuates early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats remains unknown until now. The present study was performed to evaluate the effect of propofol on early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats and further explore the potential mechanisms. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) by endovascular perforation then received treatment with propofol (10 or 50 mg/kg) or vehicle after 2 and 12 h of SAH. SAH grading, neurological scores, brain water content, Evans blue extravasation, the myeloperoxidase activity, and malondialdehyde (MDA) content were measured 24 h after SAH. Expression of nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2 (Nrf2), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65, and aquaporin 4 (AQP4) expression in rat brain were detected by Western blot. Expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Expressions of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) were assessed by ELISA. Neurological scores, brain water content, Evans blue extravasation, the myeloperoxidase activity, and MDA content were significantly reduced by propofol. Furthermore, expression of Nrf2 in rat brain was upregulated by propofol, and expression of NF-κB p65, AQP4, COX-2, MMP-9, TNF-α, and IL-1β in rat brain were attenuated by propofol. Our results demonstrated that propofol improves neurological scores, reduces brain edema, blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, inflammatory reaction, and lipid peroxidation in rats of SAH. Propofol exerts neuroprotection against SAH-induced early brain injury, which might be associated with the inhibition of inflammation and lipid peroxidation.

  15. Standardized environmental enrichment supports enhanced brain plasticity in healthy rats and prevents cognitive impairment in epileptic rats.

    PubMed

    Fares, Raafat P; Belmeguenai, Amor; Sanchez, Pascal E; Kouchi, Hayet Y; Bodennec, Jacques; Morales, Anne; Georges, Béatrice; Bonnet, Chantal; Bouvard, Sandrine; Sloviter, Robert S; Bezin, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Environmental enrichment of laboratory animals influences brain plasticity, stimulates neurogenesis, increases neurotrophic factor expression, and protects against the effects of brain insult. However, these positive effects are not constantly observed, probably because standardized procedures of environmental enrichment are lacking. Therefore, we engineered an enriched cage (the Marlau™ cage), which offers: (1) minimally stressful social interactions; (2) increased voluntary exercise; (3) multiple entertaining activities; (4) cognitive stimulation (maze exploration), and (5) novelty (maze configuration changed three times a week). The maze, which separates food pellet and water bottle compartments, guarantees cognitive stimulation for all animals. Compared to rats raised in groups in conventional cages, rats housed in Marlau™ cages exhibited increased cortical thickness, hippocampal neurogenesis and hippocampal levels of transcripts encoding various genes involved in tissue plasticity and remodeling. In addition, rats housed in Marlau™ cages exhibited better performances in learning and memory, decreased anxiety-associated behaviors, and better recovery of basal plasma corticosterone level after acute restraint stress. Marlau™ cages also insure inter-experiment reproducibility in spatial learning and brain gene expression assays. Finally, housing rats in Marlau™ cages after severe status epilepticus at weaning prevents the cognitive impairment observed in rats subjected to the same insult and then housed in conventional cages. By providing a standardized enriched environment for rodents during housing, the Marlau™ cage should facilitate the uniformity of environmental enrichment across laboratories.

  16. Intraperitoneal N-acetylcysteine for acute iron intoxication in rats.

    PubMed

    Breitbart, Rachelle; Abu-Kishk, Ibrahim; Kozer, Eran; Ben-Assa, Eyal; Goldstein, Lee H; Youngster, Ilan; Berkovitch, Matitiahu

    2011-10-01

    Free radical formation and release of oxidant agents have been suggested as possible mechanisms for tissue damage in acute iron intoxication. N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a glutathione substitute and an antioxidant, is widely used as an antidote for various intoxications. Our aim was to determine whether intraperitoneal (i.p.) NAC would reduce the mortality of rats after acute, toxic oral doses of iron. Male Wistar rats were studied in three phases. In the first phase, animals were assigned to groups 1 (distilled water by gavage) and 2 (i.p. NAC) and observed for survival. In the second phase, rats were assigned to groups 3 (400 mg/kg elemental iron orally) and 4 (400 mg/kg elemental iron, followed by 150 mg/kg i.p. NAC). Survival was observed. Because most rats in Group 3 died within 90 minutes after iron administration, a third phase was conducted in order to allow for comparison of iron and transaminase serum levels after the administration of iron and NAC (group 5: n = 10). Mortality was significantly lower in rats treated with iron and NAC, compared to those treated with iron (P = 0.016). Median serum iron level was significantly lower among rats treated with iron and NAC, compared with rats treated with iron alone (P = 0.002). In a rat model of acute iron intoxication, i.p. administration of NAC may decrease serum iron levels and mortality. PMID:21740343

  17. Nanowire-Based Electrode for Acute In Vivo Neural Recordings in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Suyatin, Dmitry B.; Wallman, Lars; Thelin, Jonas; Prinz, Christelle N.; Jörntell, Henrik; Samuelson, Lars; Montelius, Lars; Schouenborg, Jens

    2013-01-01

    We present an electrode, based on structurally controlled nanowires, as a first step towards developing a useful nanostructured device for neurophysiological measurements in vivo. The sensing part of the electrode is made of a metal film deposited on top of an array of epitaxially grown gallium phosphide nanowires. We achieved the first functional testing of the nanowire-based electrode by performing acute in vivo recordings in the rat cerebral cortex and withstanding multiple brain implantations. Due to the controllable geometry of the nanowires, this type of electrode can be used as a model system for further analysis of the functional properties of nanostructured neuronal interfaces in vivo. PMID:23431387

  18. Regulation of Mct1 by cAMP-dependent internalization in rat brain endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jeffrey P; Uhernik, Amy L; Li, Lun; Liu, Zejian; Drewes, Lester R

    2012-10-22

    In the cerebrovascular endothelium, monocarboxylic acid transporter 1 (Mct1) controls blood-brain transport of short chain monocarboxylic and keto acids, including pyruvate and lactate, to support brain energy metabolism. Mct1 function is acutely decreased in rat brain cerebrovascular endothelial cells by β-adrenergic signaling through cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP); however, the mechanism for this acute reduction in transport capacity is unknown. In this report, we demonstrate that cAMP induces the dephosphorylation and internalization of Mct1 from the plasma membrane into caveolae and early endosomes in the RBE4 rat brain cerebrovascular endothelial cell line. Additionally, we provide evidence that Mct1 constitutively cycles through clathrin vesicles and recycling endosomes in a pathway that is not dependent upon cAMP signaling in these cells. Our results are important because they show for the first time the regulated and unregulated vesicular trafficking of Mct1 in cerebrovascular endothelial cells; processes which have significance for better understanding normal brain energy metabolism, and the etiology and potential therapeutic approaches to treating brain diseases, such as stroke, in which lactic acidosis is a key component.

  19. Incidence of brain tumors in rats fed aspartame.

    PubMed

    Ishii, H

    1981-03-01

    The brain tumorigenicity of aspartame (APM) and of its diketopiperazine (DKP) was studied in 860 SCL Wistar rats. APM at dietary levels of 1 g/kg, 2 gK/, 4 g/kg or APM + DKP (3:1) 4 g/kg was fed for 104 weeks. One atypical astrocytoma was found in a control rat and 2 astrocytomas, 2 oligodendrogliomas and 1 ependymoma were scattered among the 4 test groups. There was no significant difference in the incidence of brain tumors between control and test groups. It is concluded that neither AMP nor DKP caused brain tumors in rats in this study.

  20. Neuroprotective effects of bloodletting at Jing points combined with mild induced hypothermia in acute severe traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Yue; Miao, Xiao-mei; Yi, Tai-long; Chen, Xu-yi; Sun, Hong-tao; Cheng, Shi-xiang; Zhang, Sai

    2016-01-01

    Bloodletting at Jing points has been used to treat coma in traditional Chinese medicine. Mild induced hypothermia has also been shown to have neuroprotective effects. However, the therapeutic effects of bloodletting at Jing points and mild induced hypothermia alone are limited. Therefore, we investigated whether combined treatment might have clinical effectiveness for the treatment of acute severe traumatic brain injury. Using a rat model of traumatic brain injury, combined treatment substantially alleviated cerebral edema and blood-brain barrier dysfunction. Furthermore, neurological function was ameliorated, and cellular necrosis and the inflammatory response were lessened. These findings suggest that the combined effects of bloodletting at Jing points (20 μL, twice a day, for 2 days) and mild induced hypothermia (6 hours) are better than their individual effects alone. Their combined application may have marked neuroprotective effects in the clinical treatment of acute severe traumatic brain injury. PMID:27482221

  1. Creatine kinase reaction rates in rat brain during chronic ischemia.

    PubMed

    Mlynárik, V; Kasparová, S; Liptaj, T; Dobrota, D; Horecký, J; Belan, V

    1998-12-01

    Creatine kinase reaction rates were measured by magnetisation transfer technique in the brain of healthy adult and aged rats and in the rats with mild or severe chronic cerebral ischemia. These measurements indicated that the rate constant of the creatine kinase reaction is significantly reduced in the case of chronic brain ischemia in aged rats. In contrast, occlusion of both carotid arteries in adult rats produced a slight increase in the reaction rate 4 weeks after occlusion. At the same time, corresponding conventional phosphorus magnetic resonance spectra showed negligible changes in signal intensities. PMID:10050942

  2. Celecoxib attenuates systemic lipopolysaccharide-induced brain inflammation and white matter injury in the neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Fan, L-W; Kaizaki, A; Tien, L-T; Pang, Y; Tanaka, S; Numazawa, S; Bhatt, A J; Cai, Z

    2013-06-14

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced white matter injury in the neonatal rat brain is associated with inflammatory processes. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) can be induced by inflammatory stimuli, such as cytokines and pro-inflammatory molecules, suggesting that COX-2 may be considered as the target for anti-inflammation. The objective of the present study was to examine whether celecoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, can reduce systemic LPS-induced brain inflammation and brain damage. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of LPS (2mg/kg) was performed in postnatal day 5 (P5) of Sprague-Dawley rat pups and celecoxib (20mg/kg) or vehicle was administered i.p. 5 min after LPS injection. The body weight and wire-hanging maneuver test was performed 24h after the LPS exposure, and brain injury was examined after these tests. Systemic LPS exposure resulted in an impairment of behavioral performance and acute brain injury, as indicated by apoptotic death of oligodendrocytes (OLs) and loss of OL immunoreactivity in the neonatal rat brain. Treatments with celecoxib significantly reduced systemic LPS-induced neurobehavioral disturbance and brain damage. Celecoxib administration significantly attenuated systemic LPS-induced increments in the number of activated microglia and astrocytes, concentrations of IL-1β and TNFα, and protein levels of phosphorylated-p38 MAPK in the neonatal rat brain. The protection of celecoxib was also associated with a reduction of systemic LPS-induced COX-2+ cells which were double labeled with GFAP+ (astrocyte) cells. The overall results suggest that celecoxib was capable of attenuating the brain injury and neurobehavioral disturbance induced by systemic LPS exposure, and the protective effects are associated with its anti-inflammatory properties.

  3. Imaging Evaluation of Acute Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Mutch, Christopher A; Talbott, Jason F; Gean, Alisa

    2016-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Imaging plays an important role in the evaluation, diagnosis, and triage of patients with TBI. Recent studies suggest that it also helps predict patient outcomes. TBI consists of multiple pathoanatomic entities. This article reviews the current state of TBI imaging including its indications, benefits and limitations of the modalities, imaging protocols, and imaging findings for each of these pathoanatomic entities. Also briefly surveyed are advanced imaging techniques, which include several promising areas of TBI research. PMID:27637393

  4. Acute Oral Toxicity and Histopathological Study of Combination of Endosulfan and Cypermethrin in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Jaya; Mohineesh; Ray, Ruma; Dogra, T. D.; Raina, Anupuma

    2013-01-01

    Background: Endosulfan, a neurotoxic organochlorine insecticide and cypermethrin, a synthetic pyrethroid insecticide used to control pests in domestic, industrial, and agricultural situations. Materials and Methods: The present study was carried out to investigate the acute oral toxicity, behavioral and histopathological changes of combination of endosulfan and cypermethrin in albino rats. According to Miller and Tainter analysis method, at 48 h, LD50 value of combination of endosulfan and cypermethrin (ratio 1:1) in rats was found to be 691.83 mg/kg bw by oral gavage. Results: When combination of both these pesticides was administered orally at concentration of 103.72 mg/kg bw, 172.95 mg/kg bw and 207.50 mg/kg bw, respectively, as a single dose, no significant changes in behavior of rats was observed, neither in dosed nor in control group of rats. Combination of endosulfan- and cypermethrin-treated rats showed mild histopathological changes in liver and kidney in group IV (207.50 mg/kg BW) as compared to the control. However, no significant changes were observed in brain and small intestine at either dose of combination of endosulfan and cypermethrin with respect to control. Conclusion: Thus, the present study, first of its kind in India, demonstrated the oral toxicity, behavioral, and histo-architectual alterations after induction of combination of endosulfan and cypermethrin at acute doses in Wistar rats. PMID:23833440

  5. Autophagy in acute brain injury: feast, famine, or folly?

    PubMed

    Smith, Craig M; Chen, Yaming; Sullivan, Mara L; Kochanek, Patrick M; Clark, Robert S B

    2011-07-01

    In the central nervous system, increased autophagy has now been reported after traumatic brain and spinal cord injury, cerebral ischemia, intracerebral hemorrhage, and seizures. This increase in autophagy could be physiologic, converting damaged or dysfunctional proteins, lipids, and/or organelles to their amino acid and fatty acid components for recycling. On the other hand, this increase in autophagy could be supraphysiologic, perhaps consuming and eliminating functional proteins, lipids, and/or organelles as well. Whether an increase in autophagy is beneficial (feast) or detrimental (famine) in brain likely depends on both the burden of intracellular substrate targeted for autophagy and the capacity of the cell's autophagic machinery. Of course, increased autophagy observed after brain injury could also simply be an epiphenomenon (folly). These divergent possibilities have clear ramifications for designing therapeutic strategies targeting autophagy after acute brain injury and are the subject of this review. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Autophagy and protein degradation in neurological diseases."

  6. [Alteration of white rats brain tissue inducted by assessment of silver nanocomposite incapsulated in polymer matrix].

    PubMed

    Titov, E A; Sosedova, L M; Novikov, M A

    2015-01-01

    The paper present experimental materials of intragastric administration of silver nanoparticles encapsulated in polymer matrix of arabinogalactan by white outbred male rats. Animals were injected "pure" arabinogalactan and colloid silver solution containing silver macroform separately for comparison. Research provided data about status of brain tissue at the impact of these substances on organism. Histological analysis revealed the presence of a pathological process, character and intensity of which varied depending on the type of injected material. Pathological process under the influence of silver-arabinogalactan characterized by appearance in brain tissue of perivascular edema and development of acute inflammation in formation of glial scars, swelling of vascular bundles in sum. PMID:27116877

  7. [Alteration of white rats brain tissue inducted by assessment of silver nanocomposite incapsulated in polymer matrix].

    PubMed

    Titov, E A; Sosedova, L M; Novikov, M A

    2015-01-01

    The paper present experimental materials of intragastric administration of silver nanoparticles encapsulated in polymer matrix of arabinogalactan by white outbred male rats. Animals were injected "pure" arabinogalactan and colloid silver solution containing silver macroform separately for comparison. Research provided data about status of brain tissue at the impact of these substances on organism. Histological analysis revealed the presence of a pathological process, character and intensity of which varied depending on the type of injected material. Pathological process under the influence of silver-arabinogalactan characterized by appearance in brain tissue of perivascular edema and development of acute inflammation in formation of glial scars, swelling of vascular bundles in sum.

  8. 26Al uptake and accumulation in the rat brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumoto, S.; Nagai, H.; Imamura, M.; Matsuzaki, H.; Hayashi, K.; Masuda, A.; Kumazawa, H.; Ohashi, H.; Kobayashi, K.

    1997-03-01

    To investigate the cause of Alzheimer's disease (senile dementia), 26Al incorporation in the rat brain was studied by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). When 26Al was injected into healthy rats, a considerable amount of 26Al entered the brain (cerebrum) through the blood-brain barrier 5 days after a single injection, and the brain 26Al level remained almost constant from 5 to 270 days. On the other hand, the level of 26Al in the blood decreased remarkably 75 days after injection. Approximately 89% of the 26Al taken in by the brain cell nuclei bound to chromatin. This study supports the theory that Alzheimer's disease is caused by irreversible accumulation of aluminium (Al) in the brain, and brain cell nuclei.

  9. Combined administration of hyperbaric oxygen and hydroxocobalamin improves cerebral metabolism after acute cyanide poisoning in rats.

    PubMed

    Hansen, M B; Olsen, N V; Hyldegaard, O

    2013-11-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) or intravenous hydroxocobalamin (OHCob) both abolish cyanide (CN)-induced surges in interstitial brain lactate and glucose concentrations. HBOT has been shown to induce a delayed increase in whole blood CN concentrations, whereas OHCob may act as an intravascular CN scavenger. Additionally, HBOT may prevent respiratory distress and restore blood pressure during CN intoxication, an effect not seen with OHCob administration. In this report, we evaluated the combined effects of HBOT and OHCob on interstitial lactate, glucose, and glycerol concentrations as well as lactate-to-pyruvate ratio in rat brain by means of microdialysis during acute CN poisoning. Anesthetized rats were allocated to three groups: 1) vehicle (1.2 ml isotonic NaCl intra-arterially); 2) potassium CN (5.4 mg/kg intra-arterially); 3) potassium CN, OHCob (100 mg/kg intra-arterially) and subsequent HBOT (284 kPa in 90 min). OHCob and HBOT significantly attenuated the acute surges in interstitial cerebral lactate, glucose, and glycerol concentrations compared with the intoxicated rats given no treatment. Furthermore, the combined treatment resulted in consistent low lactate, glucose, and glycerol concentrations, as well as in low lactate-to-pyruvate ratios compared with CN intoxicated controls. In rats receiving OHCob and HBOT, respiration improved and cyanosis disappeared, with subsequent stabilization of mean arterial blood pressure. The present findings indicate that a combined administration of OHCob and HBOT has a beneficial and persistent effect on the cerebral metabolism during CN intoxication.

  10. Acute and oral subchronic toxicity of D-003 in rats.

    PubMed

    Gámez, R; Mas, R; Noa, M; Menéndez, R; Alemán, C; Acosta, P; García, H; Hernández, C; Amor, A; Pérez, J; Goicochea, E

    2000-12-20

    D-003 is a mixture of higher aliphatic primary acids purified from sugar cane wax (Saccharum officinarum) with cholesterol-lowering and antiplatelet effects experimentally proven. The present work reports the results of two studies investigating the acute and subchronic oral toxicity of D-003 in rats. Oral acute toxicity of D-003 (2000 mg/kg) was investigated according to the Acute Toxic Class (ATC) method (an alternative for the classical LD(50) test), which was performed in Wistar rats. The results obtained in this study defined D-003 oral acute toxicity as unclassified. In the subchronic study, rats of both sexes were orally treated with D-003 at 50, 200 and 1250 mg/kg for 90 days. At this time, animals were sacrificed. No evidence of treatment-related toxicity was detected during the study. Thus, data analysis of body weight gain, food consumption, clinical observations, blood biochemical, haematology, organ weight ratios and histopathological findings did not show significant differences between control and treated groups. It is concluded that D-003 orally administered to rats was safe and that no drug-related toxicity was detected even at the highest doses investigated in both acute (2000 mg/kg) and subchronic (1250 mg/kg) studies.

  11. Role of ethanolamine phosphate in the hippocampus of rats with acute experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Aguado-Llera, D; Puebla-Jiménez, L; Barrios, V; Hernández-Pinto, A; Arilla-Ferreiro, E

    2011-01-01

    Here, we assessed the effects of acute experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) on the rat hippocampal somatostatinergic system and whether administration of an ethanolamine phosphate salt could prevent the appearance of the clinical signs and the impairment of the somatostatinergic system in this pathological condition. Female Lewis rats were injected in both hindlimb footpads with myelin basic protein from guinea pig brain and complete Freund's adjuvant and were sacrificed when limp tail (grade 1 EAE) or severe hindlimb paralysis (grade 3 EAE) were observed. One group was injected daily with ethanolamine phosphate, starting two days prior to immunization and for 15 days thereafter. The animals were sacrificed 15 days post-immunization. Acute EAE in grade 3 increased anti-myelin basic protein antibodies in rat serum as well as tumor necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ levels in hippocampal extracts. In addition, it decreased the somatostatin receptor density, somatostatin receptor subtype 2 mRNA and protein content, and the inhibitory effect of somatostatin on adenylyl cyclase activity in the hippocampus. The protein levels of the inhibitory G protein subunits αi(1-3), the G protein-coupled receptor kinase isoforms 2, 5 and 6, the phosphorylated cyclic AMP-binding protein and the somatostatin-like immunoreactivity content were unaltered in this brain area. Acute EAE in grade 1 did not modify any of these parameters. Ethanolamine phosphate administration prevented the clinical expression of acute EAE as well as the decrease in the somatostatin receptor density, somatostatin receptor subtype 2 expression and the capacity of somatostatin to inhibit adenylyl cyclase activity at the time-period studied. Furthermore, it blunted the rise in serum anti-myelin basic protein antibodies and hippocampal interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α levels. Altogether, these data suggest that ethanolamine phosphate might provide protection against acute EAE.

  12. Nonlinear Dynamic Theory of Acute Cell Injuries and Brain Ischemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taha, Doaa; Anggraini, Fika; Degracia, Donald; Huang, Zhi-Feng

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral ischemia in the form of stroke and cardiac arrest brain damage affect over 1 million people per year in the USA alone. In spite of close to 200 clinical trials and decades of research, there are no treatments to stop post-ischemic neuron death. We have argued that a major weakness of current brain ischemia research is lack of a deductive theoretical framework of acute cell injury to guide empirical studies. A previously published autonomous model based on the concept of nonlinear dynamic network was shown to capture important facets of cell injury, linking the concept of therapeutic to bistable dynamics. Here we present an improved, non-autonomous formulation of the nonlinear dynamic model of cell injury that allows multiple acute injuries over time, thereby allowing simulations of both therapeutic treatment and preconditioning. Our results are connected to the experimental data of gene expression and proteomics of neuron cells. Importantly, this new model may be construed as a novel approach to pharmacodynamics of acute cell injury. The model makes explicit that any pro-survival therapy is always a form of sub-lethal injury. This insight is expected to widely influence treatment of acute injury conditions that have defied successful treatment to date. This work is supported by NIH NINDS (NS081347) and Wayne State University President's Research Enhancement Award.

  13. Effects of preshock experience on enhancement of rat brain noradrenaline turnover induced by psychological stress.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, A; Tanaka, M; Ida, Y; Tsujimaru, S; Ushijima, I; Nagasaki, N

    1986-01-01

    The present study examined alterations of brain noradrenaline (NA) turnover as a function of preshock and psychological stress treatments, by measuring contents of NA metabolite, 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylethyleneglycol sulfate (MHPG-SO4), in discrete brain regions of male Wistar rats. Psychological stress induced by exposing to the sight, sound and odor of other rats being shocked produced higher levels of MHPG-SO4 in the hypothalamus, amygdala and locus coeruleus (LC) region, as well as higher levels of plasma corticosterone. Preshock experienced rats also showed marked increases of MHPG-SO4 levels in the same regions described above and elevated plasma corticosterone levels when placed but not shocked in the same environment in which the rats had previously received shocks. The effects of psychological stress on brain NA turnover were affected by the animal's shock history preferentially in the hypothalamus and amygdala. These results suggest that: a purely psychological stressor caused acutely enhanced NA turnover in specific brain regions; regional NA activity appeared to be reinstated simply by reexposure to the environment previously associated with shock; preshock experience further intensified the enhancement of amygdaloid NA turnover evoked by psychological stress. An additional experiment, studying the aftereffects of preshock experience, clearly showed that these findings result from sensitization or conditioning to the environment previously paired with shock, and not merely from the aftereffects of the shock per se. PMID:3945655

  14. A new NOE-mediated MT signal at around -1.6ppm for detecting ischemic stroke in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Yong; Wang, Feng; Afzal, Aqeela; Xu, Junzhong; Gore, John C; Gochberg, Daniel F; Zu, Zhongliang

    2016-10-01

    In the present work, we reported a new nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE)-mediated magnetization transfer (MT) signal at around -1.6ppm (NOE(-1.6)) in rat brain and investigated its application in the detection of acute ischemic stroke in rodent model. Using continuous wave (CW) MT sequence, the NOE(-1.6) is reliably detected in rat brain. The amplitude of this new NOE signal in rat brain was quantified using a 5-pool Lorentzian Z-spectral fitting method. Amplitudes of amide, amine, NOE at -3.5ppm (NOE(-3.5)), as well as NOE(-1.6) were mapped using this fitting method in rat brain. Several other conventional imaging parameters (R1, R2, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and semi-solid pool size ratio (PSR)) were also measured. Our results show that NOE(-1.6), R1, R2, ADC, and APT signals from stroke lesion have significant changes at 0.5-1h after stroke. Compared with several other imaging parameters, NOE(-1.6) shows the strongest contrast differences between stroke and contralateral normal tissues and stays consistent over time until 2h after onset of stroke. Our results demonstrate that this new NOE(-1.6) signal in rat brain is a new potential contrast for assessment of acute stroke in vivo and might provide broad applications in the detection of other abnormal tissues. PMID:27211260

  15. A new NOE-mediated MT signal at around -1.6ppm for detecting ischemic stroke in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Yong; Wang, Feng; Afzal, Aqeela; Xu, Junzhong; Gore, John C; Gochberg, Daniel F; Zu, Zhongliang

    2016-10-01

    In the present work, we reported a new nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE)-mediated magnetization transfer (MT) signal at around -1.6ppm (NOE(-1.6)) in rat brain and investigated its application in the detection of acute ischemic stroke in rodent model. Using continuous wave (CW) MT sequence, the NOE(-1.6) is reliably detected in rat brain. The amplitude of this new NOE signal in rat brain was quantified using a 5-pool Lorentzian Z-spectral fitting method. Amplitudes of amide, amine, NOE at -3.5ppm (NOE(-3.5)), as well as NOE(-1.6) were mapped using this fitting method in rat brain. Several other conventional imaging parameters (R1, R2, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and semi-solid pool size ratio (PSR)) were also measured. Our results show that NOE(-1.6), R1, R2, ADC, and APT signals from stroke lesion have significant changes at 0.5-1h after stroke. Compared with several other imaging parameters, NOE(-1.6) shows the strongest contrast differences between stroke and contralateral normal tissues and stays consistent over time until 2h after onset of stroke. Our results demonstrate that this new NOE(-1.6) signal in rat brain is a new potential contrast for assessment of acute stroke in vivo and might provide broad applications in the detection of other abnormal tissues.

  16. Citrus peel extract attenuates acute cyanide poisoning-induced seizures and oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Abdel Moneim, Ahmed E

    2014-01-01

    The primary aimed of this study was to investigate the potential protective effects of methanolic extract of citrus peel (MECP) on acute cyanide (KCN) poisoning-induced seizures and oxidative stress in rats. The intraperitoneal LD50 value of KCN (6.3 mg/Kg bwt), based on 24 hrs mortality, was significantly increased by 9, 52 or 113% by oral administration of MECP (500 mg/Kg bwt) pre-administered for 1, 2 and 3 days, respectively, in rats in a time-dependent manner. Intraperitoneal injection of the sublethal dose of KCN (3 mg/Kg bwt) into rats increased, 24 hrs later, lipid peroxidation (LPO), nitric oxide (NO), glutamate levels and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in hippocampus, striatum and cerebral cortex. KCN also decreased brain glutathione (GSH) level and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities in these animals. Pre-treatment of rats with MECP inhibited KCN-induced increases in LPO, NO, and glutamate levels and AChE activity as well as decreases in brain GSH level and SOD and CAT activities. In addition, KCN significantly decreased norepinephrine, dopamine and serotonin levels in different brain regions which were resolved by MECP. From the present results, it can be concluded that the neuroprotective effects of MECP against KCN-induced seizures and oxidative stress may be due to the inhibition of oxidative stress overproduction and maintenance of antioxidant defense mechanisms.

  17. [Arterial and venous brain reactivity in the acute period of brain concussion].

    PubMed

    Dicheskul, M L; Kulikov, V P

    2009-01-01

    Arterial and venous brain reactivity has been studied in 38 patients in the acute period of brain concussion (BC) and 32 healthy volunteers using transcranial color duplex scanning of brain vessels. The assessment of arterial inflow was conducted for the medial brain artery (MBA) and that of venous outflow - for the basal vein (BV) of Rosenthal. Hyperkinetic and orthostatic probes were used for assessment of cerebrovascular reactivity. BC was not accompanied by marked changes of cerebral resting hemodynamic parameters. The increase of peak blood flow velocity in MBA in the acute period which is characteristic of the brain hyperinfusion was found in 20% of patients and that in BA compensating the disturbed outflow along the surface brain system - in 25% of patients. In normalcy, the brain venous reactivity to hypercapnia was higher than arterial one and that to orthostasis corresponded to the intensity of arterial changes. The lack of quantitative differences in the reaction of arterial and venous blood flow to hypercapnia and the predominance of venous reactivity value in orthostasis in patients with BC suggest the disturbance of venous tone regulation in these patients.

  18. Biomarkers and acute brain injuries: interest and limits.

    PubMed

    Mrozek, Ségolène; Dumurgier, Julien; Citerio, Giuseppe; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Geeraerts, Thomas

    2014-04-24

    For patients presenting with acute brain injury (such as traumatic brain injury, subarachnoid haemorrhage and stroke), the diagnosis and identification of intracerebral lesions and evaluation of the severity, prognosis and treatment efficacy can be challenging. The complexity and heterogeneity of lesions after brain injury are most probably responsible for this difficulty. Patients with apparently comparable brain lesions on imaging may have different neurological outcomes or responses to therapy. In recent years, plasmatic and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers have emerged as possible tools to distinguish between the different pathophysiological processes. This review aims to summarise the plasmatic and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers evaluated in subarachnoid haemorrhage, traumatic brain injury and stroke, and to clarify their related interests and limits for diagnosis and prognosis. For subarachnoid haemorrhage, particular interest has been focused on the biomarkers used to predict vasospasm and cerebral ischaemia. The efficacy of biomarkers in predicting the severity and outcome of traumatic brain injury has been stressed. The very early diagnostic performance of biomarkers and their ability to discriminate ischaemic from haemorrhagic stroke were studied.

  19. Biomarkers and acute brain injuries: interest and limits

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    For patients presenting with acute brain injury (such as traumatic brain injury, subarachnoid haemorrhage and stroke), the diagnosis and identification of intracerebral lesions and evaluation of the severity, prognosis and treatment efficacy can be challenging. The complexity and heterogeneity of lesions after brain injury are most probably responsible for this difficulty. Patients with apparently comparable brain lesions on imaging may have different neurological outcomes or responses to therapy. In recent years, plasmatic and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers have emerged as possible tools to distinguish between the different pathophysiological processes. This review aims to summarise the plasmatic and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers evaluated in subarachnoid haemorrhage, traumatic brain injury and stroke, and to clarify their related interests and limits for diagnosis and prognosis. For subarachnoid haemorrhage, particular interest has been focused on the biomarkers used to predict vasospasm and cerebral ischaemia. The efficacy of biomarkers in predicting the severity and outcome of traumatic brain injury has been stressed. The very early diagnostic performance of biomarkers and their ability to discriminate ischaemic from haemorrhagic stroke were studied. PMID:25029344

  20. Salvianolic Acids Attenuate Rat Hippocampal Injury after Acute CO Poisoning by Improving Blood Flow Properties

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Li; Zhang, Yan-Lin; Li, Zong-Yang; Zhu, Ming-Xia; Yao, Wei-Juan; Zhao, Jin-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning causes the major injury and death due to poisoning worldwide. The most severe damage via CO poisoning is brain injury and mortality. Delayed encephalopathy after acute CO poisoning (DEACMP) occurs in forty percent of the survivors of acute CO exposure. But the pathological cause for DEACMP is not well understood. And the corresponding therapy is not well developed. In order to investigate the effects of salvianolic acid (SA) on brain injury caused by CO exposure from the view point of hemorheology, we employed a rat model and studied the dynamic of blood changes in the hemorheological and coagulative properties over acute CO exposure. Compared with the groups of CO and 20% mannitol + CO treatments, the severe hippocampal injury caused by acute CO exposure was prevented by SA treatment. These protective effects were associated with the retaining level of hematocrit (Hct), plasma viscosity, fibrinogen, whole blood viscosities and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in red blood cells (RBCs). These results indicated that SA treatment could significantly improve the deformation of erythrocytes and prevent the damage caused by CO poisoning. Meanwhile, hemorheological indexes are good indicators for monitoring the pathological dynamic after acute CO poisoning. PMID:25705671

  1. Actin purification from a gel of rat brain extracts.

    PubMed

    Levilliers, N; Peron-Renner, M; Coffe, G; Pudles, J

    1984-01-01

    Actin, 99% pure, has been recovered from rat brain with a high yield (greater than 15 mg/100 g brain). We have shown that: 1. a low ionic strength extract from rat brain tissue is capable of giving rise to a gel; 2. actin is the main gel component and its proportion is one order of magnitude higher than in the original extract; 3. actin can be isolated from this extract by a three-step procedure involving gelation, dissociation of the gel in 0.6 M KCl, followed by one or two depolymerization-polymerization cycles. PMID:6529588

  2. Effects of photoradiation therapy on normal rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, M.K.; McKean, J.; Boisvert, D.; Tulip, J.; Mielke, B.W.

    1984-12-01

    Laser photoradiation of the brain via an optical fiber positioned 5 mm above a burr hole was performed after the injection of hematoporphyrin derivative (HpD) in 33 normal rats and 6 rats with an intracerebral glioma. Normal rats received HpD, 5 or 10 mg/kg of body weight, followed by laser exposure at various doses or were exposed to a fixed laser dose after the administration of HpD, 2.5 to 20 mg/kg. One control group received neither HpD nor laser energy, and another was exposed to laser energy only. The 6 rats bearing an intracranial 9L glioma were treated with HpD, 5 mg/kg, followed by laser exposure at various high doses. The temperature in the cortex or tumor was measured with a probe during laser exposure. The rats were killed 72 hours after photoradiation, and the extent of necrosis of cerebral tissue was measured microscopically. In the normal rats, the extent of brain damage correlated with increases in the dose of both the laser and the HpD. In all 6 glioma-bearing rats, the high laser doses produced some focal necrosis in the tumors but also damaged adjacent normal brain tissue. The authors conclude that damage to normal brain tissue may be a significant complication of high dose photoradiation therapy for intracranial tumors.

  3. Danaparoid sodium prevents cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Satoshi; Iwasaka, Hideo; Uchida, Tomohisa; Hasegawa, Akira; Asai, Nobuhiko; Noguchi, Takayuki

    2009-07-01

    Systemic inflammatory mediators, including the protein high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), play an important role in the development of acute pancreatitis. Anticoagulants such as danaparoid sodium (DA) may be able to inhibit sepsis-induced inflammation, but the mechanism of action is not well understood. We hypothesized that DA would act as an inhibitor of inflammation and prevent cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. Male Wistar rats were used as subjects in this study. Each received a bolus of 50 U/kg of DA or saline-injected into the tail vein, followed by 4 injections of 50 mg/kg cerulean (i.p.) at 1-h intervals. Cytokine (IL-6), NO, and HMGB1 levels in serum and pancreatic tissue were measured after the cerulein injection. Pancreas histopathology and wet-dry ratio significantly improved in the DA-injected (50 U/kg) animals compared with saline-injected rats. Serum and pancreatic HMGB1 levels decreased over time in DA-treated animals. Danaparoid sodium also decreased cytokine, NO, and HMGB1 levels during cerulein-induced inflammation. As a result, DA ameliorated pancreas pathology in the rat model of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. This study demonstrates that DA treatment prevents cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in a rat model. This effect may be mediated through inhibition of cytokines, NO, and HMGB1. PMID:18948846

  4. Brain uptake of ketoprofen-lysine prodrug in rats.

    PubMed

    Gynther, Mikko; Jalkanen, Aaro; Lehtonen, Marko; Forsberg, Markus; Laine, Krista; Ropponen, Jarmo; Leppänen, Jukka; Knuuti, Johanna; Rautio, Jarkko

    2010-10-31

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) controls the entry of xenobiotics into the brain. Often the development of central nervous system drugs needs to be terminated because of their poor brain uptake. We describe a way to achieve large neutral amino acid transporter (LAT1)-mediated drug transport into the rat brain. We conjugated ketoprofen to an amino acid l-lysine so that the prodrug could access LAT1. The LAT1-mediated brain uptake of the prodrug was demonstrated with in situ rat brain perfusion technique. The ability of the prodrug to deliver ketoprofen into the site of action, the brain intracellular fluid, was determined combining in vivo and in vitro experiments. A rapid brain uptake from blood and cell uptake was seen both in in situ and in vivo experiments. Therefore, our results show that a prodrug approach can achieve uptake of drugs via LAT1 into the brain intracellular fluid. The distribution of the prodrug in the brain parenchyma and the site of parent drug release in the brain were shown with in vivo and in vitro studies. In addition, our results show that although lysine or ketoprofen are not LAT1-substrates themselves, by combining these molecules, the formed prodrug has affinity for LAT1. PMID:20727958

  5. In vitro comparison of rat and chicken brain neurotoxic esterase

    SciTech Connect

    Novak, R.; Padilla, S.

    1986-04-01

    A systematic comparison was undertaken to characterize neurotoxic esterase (NTE) from rat and chicken brain in terms of inhibitor sensitivities, pH optima, and molecular weights. Paraoxon titration of phenyl valerate (PV)-hydrolyzing carboxylesterases showed that rat esterases were more sensitive than chicken to paraoxon inhibition at concentrations less than or equal to microM and superimposable with chicken esterases at concentrations of 2.5-1000 microM. Mipafox titration of the paraoxon-resistant esterases at a fixed paraoxon concentration of 100 microM (mipafox concentration: 0-1000 microM) resulted in a mipafox I50 of 7.3 microM for chicken brain NTE and 11.6 microM for rat brain NTE. NTE (i.e., paraoxon-resistant, mipafox-sensitive esterase activity) comprised 80% of chicken and 60% of rat brain paraoxon-resistant activity with the specific activity of chicken brain NTE approximately twice that of rat brain NTE. The pH maxima for NTE from both species was similar showing broad, slightly alkaline optima from pH 7.9 to 8.6. (/sup 3/H)Diisopropyl phosphorofluoridate (DFP)-labeled NTE from the brains of both species had an apparent mol wt of 160,000 measured by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In conclusion, NTE from both species was very similar, with the mipafox I50 for rat NTE within the range of reported values for chicken and human NTE, and the inhibitor parameters of the chicken NTE assay were applicable for the rat NTE assay.

  6. Effects of hyperbaric oxygenation on oxidative stress in acute transient focal cerebral ischemic rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ray-Yau; Chang, Heng-Chih; Chen, Chun-Hao; Tsai, Yi-Wei; Yang, Yea-Ru

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO) after brain ischemia. Middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) procedure was used to induce the brain ischemia. Rats were assigned to control or HBO group after brain ischemia. In order to examine the role of glutathione after HBO treatment, another group of brain ischemic rats were included to receive the glutathione synthesis inhibitor and HBO treatment. HBO was administered at a pressure of 3 atmospheres absolute for 1 h with 100% oxygen, starting at 3 h post brain ischemia in HBO groups. Animals in control group were placed in their home cage and exposed to normobaric room air. The infarct volume (IV), activation of astrocyte, and level of total glutathione and lipid peroxidation (LP) were assessed 24 h post-reperfusion. Significant reduction in IV was noted in HBO group when compared with control group. The activation of astrocyte was significantly increased in the right cerebral cortex and right striatum in the HBO group when compared with those of the control group. The glutathione level was higher with lower LP level in right cortex and right striatum after HBO as compared with those of the control. However, such effects of HBO treatment were markedly reduced by glutathione synthesis inhibitor administration. These results show that inhibiting glutathione synthesis dramatically reduces the effectiveness of HBO in acute transient focal cerebral ischemia.

  7. Regional Metabolite Levels and Turnover in the Awake Rat Brain under the Influence of Nicotine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie; Jiang, Lihong; Jiang, Yifeng; Ma, Xiaoxian; Graeme, F. Mason

    2010-01-01

    As one of the most widespread drugs of abuse, nicotine has long been known to impact the brain, particularly with respect to addiction. However, the regional effects of nicotine on the concentrations and kinetics of amino acid neurotransmitters and some energetically related neurochemicals have been little studied. In this investigation, acute effects of nicotine were measured by 1H-observed/13C-edited nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy method in extracts obtained from nicotine-naïve, freely moving rats given 0.7 mg/kg nicotine or saline, with [1-13C] glucose to track metabolism. Nicotine was observed to exert significant effects on the concentrations of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), particularly in the striatum. Nicotine decreased brain glucose oxidation, glutamate-glutamine neurotransmitter cycling, and GABA synthesis regionally, including in the parietal and occipital cortices and the striatum. The olfactory bulb showed kinetics that differed markedly from those observed in the rest of the brain. Independently of nicotine, the concentration of glutamate was found to be correlated significantly with levels of NAA and GABA, suggesting a potential interplay of energetics and excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission. In summary, the study revealed that the neurochemicals were most affected in the cortex and striatum of the rat brain after acute nicotine treatment. PMID:20345764

  8. Central diabetes insipidus in children with acute brain insult.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yun-Hsuan; Lin, Jainn-Jim; Hsia, Shao-Hsuan; Wu, Chang-Teng; Wang, Huei-Shyong; Hung, Po-Cheng; Chou, Min-Liang; Hsieh, Meng-Ying; Lin, Kuang-Lin

    2011-12-01

    Central diabetes insipidus occurs in patients with overwhelming central nervous system injuries, and may be associated with brain death. The clinical picture of children with acquired central diabetes insipidus after acute brain insult is seldom reported. We retrospectively reviewed cases dating from January 2000-February 2008 at a tertiary pediatric intensive care unit. Fifty-four patients (28 girls, 26 boys), aged 3 months to 18 years, were enrolled. Etiologies included severe central nervous system infection (35.2%), hypoxic-ischemic events (31.5%), head injury (18.5%), and vascular lesions (14.8%). In 39 (72.2%) patients, diabetes insipidus was diagnosed during the first 2 days after acute central nervous system injury, and 40 (74.0%) developed maximum serum sodium concentrations of >160 mEq/L. In 16, sequential cerebral salt wasting syndrome developed after their initial diabetes insipidus presentation. Overall mortality at 2 months after admission was 77.8%. Our results demonstrate that patients who develop central diabetes insipidus after acute central nervous system injury manifest high mortality. Development of central diabetes insipidus within the first 2 days and a maximum plasma sodium >160 mEq/L were significant predictors of outcomes.

  9. Impaired mitochondrial respiration and protein nitration in the rat hippocampus after acute inhalation of combustion smoke

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Heung M.; Reed, Jason; Greeley, George H.; Englander, Ella W.

    2009-03-01

    Survivors of massive inhalation of combustion smoke endure critical injuries, including lasting neurological complications. We have previously reported that acute inhalation of combustion smoke disrupts the nitric oxide homeostasis in the rat brain. In this study, we extend our findings and report that a 30-minute exposure of awake rats to ambient wood combustion smoke induces protein nitration in the rat hippocampus and that mitochondrial proteins are a sensitive nitration target in this setting. Mitochondria are central to energy metabolism and cellular signaling and are critical to proper cell function. Here, analyses of the mitochondrial proteome showed elevated protein nitration in the course of a 24-hour recovery following exposure to smoke. Mass spectrometry identification of several significantly nitrated mitochondrial proteins revealed diverse functions and involvement in central aspects of mitochondrial physiology. The nitrated proteins include the ubiquitous mitochondrial creatine kinase, F1-ATP synthase {alpha} subunit, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3), succinate dehydrogenase Fp subunit, and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC1) protein. Furthermore, acute exposure to combustion smoke significantly compromised the respiratory capacity of hippocampal mitochondria. Importantly, elevated protein nitration and reduced mitochondrial respiration in the hippocampus persisted beyond the time required for restoration of normal oxygen and carboxyhemoglobin blood levels after the cessation of exposure to smoke. Thus, the time frame for intensification of the various smoke-induced effects differs between blood and brain tissues. Taken together, our findings suggest that nitration of essential mitochondrial proteins may contribute to the reduction in mitochondrial respiratory capacity and underlie, in part, the brain pathophysiology after acute inhalation of combustion smoke.

  10. Brain glucose content in fetuses of ethanol-fed rats

    SciTech Connect

    Pullen, G.; Singh, S.P.; Snyder, A.K.; Hoffen, B.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have previously demonstrated impaired placental glucose transfer and fetal hypoglycemia in association with ethanol ingestion by pregnant rats. The present study examines the relationship between glucose availability and fetal brain growth under the same conditions. Rats (EF) were fed ethanol (30% of caloric intake) in liquid diet throughout gestation. Controls received isocaloric diet without ethanol by pair-feeding (PF) or ad libitum (AF). On the 22nd day of gestation fetuses were obtained by cesarean section. Fetal brains were removed and freeze-clamped. Brain weight was significantly reduced (p < 0.001) by maternal ethanol ingestion (206 +/- 2, 212 +/- 4 and 194 +/- 2 mg in AF, FP and EF fetuses respectively). Similarly, fetal brain glucose content was lower (p < 0.05) in the EF group (14.3 +/- 0.9 mmoles/g dry weight) than in the PF (18.6 +/- 1.0) or the AF (16.2 +/- 0.9) groups. The protein: DNA ratio, an indicator of cell size, correlated positively (r = 0.371, p < 0.005) with brain glucose content. In conclusion, maternal ethanol ingestion resulted in lower brain weight and reduced brain glucose content. Glucose availability may be a significant factor in the determination of cell size in the fetal rat brain.

  11. Ketamine coadministration attenuates morphine tolerance and leads to increased brain concentrations of both drugs in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Lilius, T O; Jokinen, V; Neuvonen, M S; Niemi, M; Kalso, E A; Rauhala, P V

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The effects of ketamine in attenuating morphine tolerance have been suggested to result from a pharmacodynamic interaction. We studied whether ketamine might increase brain morphine concentrations in acute coadministration, in morphine tolerance and morphine withdrawal. Experimental Approach Morphine minipumps (6 mg·day–1) induced tolerance during 5 days in Sprague–Dawley rats, after which s.c. ketamine (10 mg·kg–1) was administered. Tail flick, hot plate and rotarod tests were used for behavioural testing. Serum levels and whole tissue brain and liver concentrations of morphine, morphine-3-glucuronide, ketamine and norketamine were measured using HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry. Key Results In morphine-naïve rats, ketamine caused no antinociception whereas in morphine-tolerant rats there was significant antinociception (57% maximum possible effect in the tail flick test 90 min after administration) lasting up to 150 min. In the brain of morphine-tolerant ketamine-treated rats, the morphine, ketamine and norketamine concentrations were 2.1-, 1.4- and 3.4-fold, respectively, compared with the rats treated with morphine or ketamine only. In the liver of morphine-tolerant ketamine-treated rats, ketamine concentration was sixfold compared with morphine-naïve rats. After a 2 day morphine withdrawal period, smaller but parallel concentration changes were observed. In acute coadministration, ketamine increased the brain morphine concentration by 20%, but no increase in ketamine concentrations or increased antinociception was observed. Conclusions and Implications The ability of ketamine to induce antinociception in rats made tolerant to morphine may also be due to increased brain concentrations of morphine, ketamine and norketamine. The relevance of these findings needs to be assessed in humans. PMID:25297798

  12. Acute deep brain stimulation in the thalamic reticular nucleus protects against acute stress and modulates initial events of adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Magdaleno-Madrigal, Víctor Manuel; Pantoja-Jiménez, Christopher Rodrigo; Bazaldúa, Adrián; Fernández-Mas, Rodrigo; Almazán-Alvarado, Salvador; Bolaños-Alejos, Fernanda; Ortíz-López, Leonardo; Ramírez-Rodriguez, Gerardo Bernabé

    2016-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is used as an alternative therapeutic procedure for pharmacoresistant psychiatric disorders. Recently the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) gained attention due to the description of a novel pathway from the amygdala to this nucleus suggesting that may be differentially disrupted in mood disorders. The limbic system is implicated in the regulation of these disorders that are accompanied by neuroplastic changes. The hippocampus is highly plastic and shows the generation of new neurons, process affected by stress but positively regulated by antidepressant drugs. We explored the impact of applying acute DBS to the TRN (DBS-TRN) in male Wistar rats exposed to acute stress caused by the forced-swim Porsolt's test (FST) and on initial events of hippocampal neurogenesis. After the first session of forced-swim, rats were randomly subdivided in a DBS-TRN and a Sham group. Stimulated rats received 10min of DBS, thus the depressant-like behavior reflected as immobility was evaluated in the second session of forced-swim. Locomotricity was evaluated in the open field test. Cell proliferation and doublecortin-associated cells were quantified in the hippocampus of other cohorts of rats. No effects of electrode implantation were found in locomotricity. Acute DBS-TRN reduced immobility in comparison to the Sham group (p<0.001). DBS-TRN increased cell proliferation (Ki67 or BrdU-positive cells; p=0.02, p=0.02) and the number of doublecortin-cells compared to the Sham group (p<0.02). Similar effects were found in rats previously exposed to the first session of forced-swim. Our data could suggest that TRN brain region may be a promising target for DBS to treat intractable depression.

  13. Acute deep brain stimulation in the thalamic reticular nucleus protects against acute stress and modulates initial events of adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Magdaleno-Madrigal, Víctor Manuel; Pantoja-Jiménez, Christopher Rodrigo; Bazaldúa, Adrián; Fernández-Mas, Rodrigo; Almazán-Alvarado, Salvador; Bolaños-Alejos, Fernanda; Ortíz-López, Leonardo; Ramírez-Rodriguez, Gerardo Bernabé

    2016-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is used as an alternative therapeutic procedure for pharmacoresistant psychiatric disorders. Recently the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) gained attention due to the description of a novel pathway from the amygdala to this nucleus suggesting that may be differentially disrupted in mood disorders. The limbic system is implicated in the regulation of these disorders that are accompanied by neuroplastic changes. The hippocampus is highly plastic and shows the generation of new neurons, process affected by stress but positively regulated by antidepressant drugs. We explored the impact of applying acute DBS to the TRN (DBS-TRN) in male Wistar rats exposed to acute stress caused by the forced-swim Porsolt's test (FST) and on initial events of hippocampal neurogenesis. After the first session of forced-swim, rats were randomly subdivided in a DBS-TRN and a Sham group. Stimulated rats received 10min of DBS, thus the depressant-like behavior reflected as immobility was evaluated in the second session of forced-swim. Locomotricity was evaluated in the open field test. Cell proliferation and doublecortin-associated cells were quantified in the hippocampus of other cohorts of rats. No effects of electrode implantation were found in locomotricity. Acute DBS-TRN reduced immobility in comparison to the Sham group (p<0.001). DBS-TRN increased cell proliferation (Ki67 or BrdU-positive cells; p=0.02, p=0.02) and the number of doublecortin-cells compared to the Sham group (p<0.02). Similar effects were found in rats previously exposed to the first session of forced-swim. Our data could suggest that TRN brain region may be a promising target for DBS to treat intractable depression. PMID:27435420

  14. Acute moderate exercise enhances compensatory brain activation in older adults.

    PubMed

    Hyodo, Kazuki; Dan, Ippeita; Suwabe, Kazuya; Kyutoku, Yasushi; Yamada, Yuhki; Akahori, Mitsuya; Byun, Kyeongho; Kato, Morimasa; Soya, Hideaki

    2012-11-01

    A growing number of reports state that regular exercise enhances brain function in older adults. Recently a functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) study revealed that an acute bout of moderate exercise enhanced activation of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (L-DLPFC) associated with Stroop interference in young adults. Whether this acute effect is also applicable to older adults was examined. Sixteen older adults performed a color-word matching Stroop task before and after 10 minutes of exercise on a cycle ergometer at a moderate intensity. Cortical hemodynamics of the prefrontal area was monitored with a fNIRS during the Stroop task. We analyzed Stroop interference (incongruent-neutral) as Stroop performance. Though activation for Stroop interference was found in the bilateral prefrontal area before the acute bout of exercise, activation of the right frontopolar area (R-FPA) was enhanced after exercise. In the majority of participants, this coincided with improved performance reflected in Stroop interference results. Thus, an acute bout of moderate exercise improved Stroop performance in older adults, and this was associated with contralateral compensatory activation. PMID:22300952

  15. Acute moderate exercise enhances compensatory brain activation in older adults.

    PubMed

    Hyodo, Kazuki; Dan, Ippeita; Suwabe, Kazuya; Kyutoku, Yasushi; Yamada, Yuhki; Akahori, Mitsuya; Byun, Kyeongho; Kato, Morimasa; Soya, Hideaki

    2012-11-01

    A growing number of reports state that regular exercise enhances brain function in older adults. Recently a functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) study revealed that an acute bout of moderate exercise enhanced activation of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (L-DLPFC) associated with Stroop interference in young adults. Whether this acute effect is also applicable to older adults was examined. Sixteen older adults performed a color-word matching Stroop task before and after 10 minutes of exercise on a cycle ergometer at a moderate intensity. Cortical hemodynamics of the prefrontal area was monitored with a fNIRS during the Stroop task. We analyzed Stroop interference (incongruent-neutral) as Stroop performance. Though activation for Stroop interference was found in the bilateral prefrontal area before the acute bout of exercise, activation of the right frontopolar area (R-FPA) was enhanced after exercise. In the majority of participants, this coincided with improved performance reflected in Stroop interference results. Thus, an acute bout of moderate exercise improved Stroop performance in older adults, and this was associated with contralateral compensatory activation.

  16. Acute decrease in alkaline phosphatase after brain injury: A potential mechanism for tauopathy.

    PubMed

    Arun, Peethambaran; Oguntayo, Samuel; Albert, Stephen Van; Gist, Irene; Wang, Ying; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P; Long, Joseph B

    2015-11-16

    Dephosphorylation of phosphorylated Tau (pTau) protein, which is essential for the preservation of neuronal microtubule assemblies and for protection against trauma-induced tauopathy and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), is primarily achieved in brain by tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP). Paired helical filaments (PHFs) and Tau isolated from Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients' brains have been shown to form microtubule assemblies with tubulin only after treatment with TNAP or protein phosphatase-2A, 2B and -1, suggesting that Tau protein in the PHFs of neurons in AD brain is hyperphosphorylated, which prevents microtubule assembly. Using blast or weight drop models of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in rats, we observed pTau accumulation in the brain as early as 6h post-injury and further accumulation which varied regionally by 24h post-injury. The pTau accumulation was accompanied by reduced TNAP expression and activity in these brain regions and a significantly decreased plasma total alkaline phosphatase activity after the weight drop. These results reveal that both blast- and impact acceleration-induced head injuries cause an acute decrease in the level/activity of TNAP in the brain, which potentially contributes to trauma-induced accumulation of pTau and the resultant tauopathy. The regional changes in the level/activity of TNAP or accumulation of pTau after these injuries did not correlate with the accumulation of amyloid precursor protein, suggesting that the basic mechanism underlying tauopathy in TBI might be distinct from that associated with AD.

  17. Serum Metabolomics in Rats after Acute Paraquat Poisoning.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiyi; Ma, Jianshe; Zhang, Meiling; Wen, Congcong; Huang, Xueli; Sun, Fa; Wang, Shuanghu; Hu, Lufeng; Lin, Guanyang; Wang, Xianqin

    2015-01-01

    Paraquat is one of the most widely used herbicides in the world and is highly toxic to humans and animals. In this study, we developed a serum metabolomic method based on GC/MS to evaluate the effects of acute paraquat poisoning on rats. Pattern recognition analysis, including both principal component analysis and partial least squares-discriminate analysis revealed that acute paraquat poisoning induced metabolic perturbations. Compared with the control group, the level of octadecanoic acid, L-serine, L-threonine, L-valine, and glycerol in the acute paraquat poisoning group (36 mg/kg) increased, while the levels of hexadecanoic acid, D-galactose, and decanoic acid decreased. These findings provide an overview of systematic responses to paraquat exposure and metabolomic insight into the toxicological mechanism of paraquat. Our results indicate that metabolomic methods based on GC/MS may be useful to elucidate the mechanism of acute paraquat poisoning through the exploration of biomarkers. PMID:26133715

  18. Ulinastatin attenuates brain edema after traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Cui, Tao; Zhu, Gangyi

    2015-03-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains the leading cause of injury-related death and disability. Brain edema, one of the most major complications of TBI, contributes to elevated intracranial pressure, and poor prognosis following TBI. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether Ulinastatin (UTI), a serine protease inhibitor, attenuates brain edema following TBI. Our results showed that treatment with UTI at a dose of 50,000 U/kg attenuated the brain edema, as assayed by water content 24 h after TBI induction. This attenuation was associated with a significant decrease of the expression level of aquaporin-4. In addition, we showed that UTI treatment also markedly inhibited the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-1β and TNF-α as well as activity of NF-κB. Collectively, our findings suggested that UTI may be a promising strategy to treat brain edema following TBI.

  19. Hyponatremia in acute brain disease: the cerebral salt wasting syndrome.

    PubMed

    Betjes, Michiel G.H.

    2002-02-01

    Hyponatremia in acute brain disease is a common occurrence, especially after an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Originally, excessive natriuresis, called cerebral salt wasting, and later the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH), were considered to be the causes of hyponatremia. In recent years, it has become clear that most of these patients are volume-depleted and have a negative sodium balance, consistent with the original description of cerebral salt wasting. Elevated plasma concentrations of atrial or brain natriuretic peptide have been identified as the putative natriuretic factor. Hyponatremia and volume depletion may aggravate neurological symptoms, and timely treatment with adequate replacement of water and NaCl is essential. The use of fludrocortisone to increase sodium reabsorption by the renal tubules may be an alternative approach.

  20. In vivo and in vitro effects of fructose on rat brain acetylcholinesterase activity: an ontogenetic study.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Carine A; Biella, Mairis S; Lopes, Abigail; Deroza, Pedro F; Oliveira, Mariana B; Macan, Tamires P; Streck, Emilio L; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Zugno, Alexandra I; Schuck, Patrícia F

    2014-12-01

    Increased fructose concentrations are the biochemical hallmark of fructosemia, a group of inherited disorders on the metabolic pathway of this sugar. The main clinical findings observed in patients affected by fructosemia include neurological abnormalities with developmental delay, whose pathophysiology is still undefined. In the present work we investigated the in vitro and in vivo effects of fructose on acetylcholinesterase (AchE) activity in brain structures of developing rats. For the in vitro experiments, fructose was added at increasing concentrations to the incubation medium. It was observed that fructose provoked an inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity in cerebral cortex of 30-day-old-rats, even at low concentrations (0.1 mM). For the in vivo experiments, rats were killed 1 h after a single fructose administration (5 µmol/g). Control group received the same volume of saline solution. We found that AchE activity was increased in cerebral cortex of 30- and 60-day-old rats receiving fructose administration. Finally, we observed that AchE activity was unaffected by acute fructose administration in cerebral cortex, striatum or hippocampus of 15- and 90-day-old rats. The present data suggest that a disruption in cholinergic homeostasis may be involved in the pathophysiology of brain damage observed in young patients affected by fructosemia. PMID:25590728

  1. Hydrogen-rich water attenuates brain damage and inflammation after traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Tian, Runfa; Hou, Zonggang; Hao, Shuyu; Wu, Weichuan; Mao, Xiang; Tao, Xiaogang; Lu, Te; Liu, Baiyun

    2016-04-15

    Inflammation and oxidative stress are the two major causes of apoptosis after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Most previous studies of the neuroprotective effects of hydrogen-rich water on TBI primarily focused on antioxidant effects. The present study investigated whether hydrogen-rich water (HRW) could attenuate brain damage and inflammation after traumatic brain injury in rats. A TBI model was induced using a controlled cortical impact injury. HRW or distilled water was injected intraperitoneally daily following surgery. We measured survival rate, brain edema, blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown and neurological dysfunction in all animals. Changes in inflammatory cytokines, inflammatory cells and Cho/Cr metabolites in brain tissues were also detected. Our results demonstrated that TBI-challenged rats exhibited significant brain injuries that were characterized by decreased survival rate and increased BBB permeability, brain edema, and neurological dysfunction, while HRW treatment ameliorated the consequences of TBI. HRW treatment also decreased the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and HMGB1), inflammatory cell number (Iba1) and inflammatory metabolites (Cho) and increased the levels of an anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10) in the brain tissues of TBI-challenged rats. In conclusion, HRW could exert a neuroprotective effect against TBI and attenuate inflammation, which suggests HRW as an effective therapeutic strategy for TBI patients. PMID:26826009

  2. Effect of sinusoidal modulated currents and acute hypoxia on corticosterone content and activity of certain dehydrogenases in tissues of different rat organs during hypokinesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melik-Aslanova, L. L.; Frenkel, I. D.

    1980-01-01

    The state of hypokinesia in rats was reproduced by keeping them for 30 days in special box cages that restricted their mobility in all directions. Results show the resistance to acute hypoxic hypoxia is increased. This is linked to the considerable rise in the reduced level of corticosterone in different organs and the succinate dehydrogenase activity in the liver and brain. The letter indicated the primary oxidation of succinate, which has great importance in the adaptation of the oxidative metabolism to acute oxygen insufficiency. The use of sinusoidal modulated currents in the period of hypokinesia promotes normalization of the indices for resistance of the rats to acute hypoxia.

  3. Leptin acts in the brain to influence hypoglycemic counterregulation: disparate effects of acute and recurrent hypoglycemia on glucagon release.

    PubMed

    Reno, Candace M; Ding, Yuyan; Sherwin, Robert

    2015-12-15

    Leptin has been shown to diminish hyperglycemia via reduced glucagon secretion, although it can also enhance sympathoadrenal responses. However, whether leptin can also inhibit glucagon secretion during insulin-induced hypoglycemia or increase epinephrine during acute or recurrent hypoglycemia has not been examined. To test whether leptin acts in the brain to influence counterregulation, hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemic (∼45 mg/dl) clamps were performed on rats exposed to or not exposed to recurrent hypoglycemia (3 days, ∼40 mg/dl). Intracerebroventricular artificial cerebral spinal fluid or leptin was infused during the clamp. During acute hypoglycemia, leptin decreased glucagon responses by 51% but increased epinephrine and norepinephrine by 24 and 48%, respectively. After recurrent hypoglycemia, basal plasma leptin levels were undetectable. Subsequent brain leptin infusion during hypoglycemia paradoxically increased glucagon by 45% as well as epinephrine by 19%. In conclusion, leptin acts within the brain to diminish glucagon secretion during acute hypoglycemia but increases epinephrine, potentially limiting its detrimental effects during hypoglycemia. Exposure to recurrent hypoglycemia markedly suppresses plasma leptin, whereas exogenous brain leptin delivery enhances both glucagon and epinephrine release to subsequent hypoglycemia. These data suggest that recurrent hypoglycemia may diminish counterregulatory responses in part by reducing brain leptin action.

  4. Response of rat brain protein synthesis to ethanol and sodium barbital

    SciTech Connect

    Tewari, S.; Greenberg, S.A.; Do, K.; Grey, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) depressants such as ethanol and barbiturates under acute or chronic conditions can induce changes in rat brain protein synthesis. While these data demonstrate the individual effects of drugs on protein synthesis, the response of brain protein synthesis to alcohol-drug interactions is not known. The goal of the present study was to determine the individual and combined effects of ethanol and sodium barbital on brain protein synthesis and gain an understanding of the mechanisms by which these alterations in protein synthesis are produced. Specifically, the in vivo and in vitro effects of sodium barbital (one class of barbiturates which is not metabolized by the hepatic tissue) were examined on brain protein synthesis in rats made physically dependent upon ethanol. Using cell free brain polysomal systems isolated from Control, Ethanol and 24 h Ethanol Withdrawn rats, data show that sodium barbital, when intubated intragastrically, inhibited the time dependent incorporation of /sup 14/C) leucine into protein by all three groups of ribosomes. Under these conditions, the Ethanol Withdrawn group displayed the largest inhibition of the /sup 14/C) leucine incorporation into protein when compared to the Control and Ethanol groups. In addition, sodium barbital when added at various concentrations in vitro to the incubation medium inhibited the incorporation of /sup 14/C) leucine into protein by Control and Ethanol polysomes. The inhibitory effects were also obtained following preincubation of ribosomes in the presence of barbital but not cycloheximide. Data suggest that brain protein synthesis, specifically brain polysomes, through interaction with ethanol or barbital are involved in the functional development of tolerance. These interactions may occur through proteins or polypeptide chains or alterations in messenger RNA components associated with the ribosomal units.

  5. The effect of opioid antagonists in local regulation of testicular response to acute stress in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Kostić, T; Andrić, S; Kovacević, R; Marić, D

    1997-11-01

    The present study examined the effects of naloxone (N) and naltrexone-methobromide (NMB; an opioid receptor antagonist that does not cross the blood-brain barrier) on testicular steroidogenesis during acute immobilization stress (IMO; 2 h) in adult rats. Unstressed rats as well as IMO rats were treated by unilateral intratesticular injection of N (20 micrograms/testis), NMB (36 micrograms/testis), or vehicle at the beginning of and at 1 h of the IMO period. In IMO rats serum T levels were significantly reduced, while serum luteinizing hormone levels were not affected. N and NMB normalized serum T levels in IMO rats and had no effects in controls. In IMO rats the activities of 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD) and P450(17 alpha, lyase) were significantly reduced, while the activity of 17 beta-HSD was not affected. N and NMB antagonized the inhibitory effect of IMO on 3 beta-HSD and P450(17 alpha, lyase) but did not alter enzyme activity in freely moving rats. Acute IMO decreased basal and human chorionic gonadotropin-stimulated androgen production by hemitestis preparation, but N (10(-4) M) added directly to the incubation medium blocked the decrease and had no effect on testes from freely moving control rats. These results support the conclusion that endogenous opioid peptides are potentially important paracrine regulators of testicular steroidogenesis under stress conditions. PMID:9366009

  6. Acute and chronic head-down tail suspension diminishes cerebral perfusion in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkerson, M. Keith; Colleran, Patrick N.; Delp, Michael D.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that regional brain blood flow and vascular resistance are altered by acute and chronic head-down tail suspension (HDT). Regional cerebral blood flow, arterial pressure, heart rate, and vascular resistance were measured in a group of control rats during normal standing and following 10 min of HDT and in two other groups of rats after 7 and 28 days of HDT. Heart rate was not different among conditions, whereas mean arterial pressure was elevated at 10 min of HDT relative to the other conditions. Total brain blood flow was reduced from that during standing by 48, 24, and 27% following 10 min and 7 and 28 days of HDT, respectively. Regional blood flows to all cerebral tissues and the eyes were reduced with 10 min of HDT and remained lower in the eye, olfactory bulbs, left and right cerebrum, thalamic region, and the midbrain with 7 and 28 days of HDT. Total brain vascular resistance was 116, 44, and 38% greater following 10 min and 7 and 28 days of HDT, respectively, relative to that during control standing. Vascular resistance was elevated in all cerebral regions with 10 min of HDT and remained higher than control levels in most brain regions. These results demonstrate that HDT results in chronic elevations in total and regional cerebral vascular resistance, and this may be the underlying stimulus for the HDT-induced smooth muscle hypertrophy of cerebral resistance arteries.

  7. Hydrophilic solute transport across the rat blood-brain barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Lucchesi, K.J.

    1987-01-01

    Brain capillary permeability-surface area products (PS) of hydrophilic solutes ranging in size from 180 to 5,500 Daltons were measured in rats according to the method of Ohno, Pettigrew and Rapoport. The distribution volume of 70 KD dextran at 10 minutes after i.v. injection was also measured to determine the residual volume of blood in brain tissue at the time of sacrifice. Small test solutes were injected in pairs in order to elucidate whether their transfer into the brain proceeds by diffusion through water- or lipid-filled channels or by vesicular transport. This issue was examined in rats whose blood-brain barrier (BBB) was presumed to be intact (untreated) and in rats that received intracarotid infusions to open the BBB (isosmotic salt (ISS) and hyperosmolar arabinose). Ohno PS values of {sup 3}H-inulin and {sup 14}C-L-glucose in untreated rats were found to decrease as the labelling time was lengthened. This was evidence that a rapidly equilibrating compartment exists between blood and brain that renders the Ohno two-compartment model inadequate for computing true transfer rate constants. When the data were reanalyzed using a multi-compartment graphical analysis, solutes with different molecular radii were found to enter the brain at approximately equal rates. Furthermore, unidirectional transport is likely to be initiated by solute adsorption to a glycocalyx coat on the luminal surface of brain capillary endothelium. Apparently, more inulin than L-glucose was adsorbed, which may account for its slightly faster transfer across the BBB. After rats were treated with intracarotid infusions of ISS or hyperosmolar arabinose, solute PS values were significantly increased, but the ratio of PS for each of the solute pairs approached that of their free-diffusion coefficients.

  8. Differential effects of exercise on brain opioid receptor binding and activation in rats.

    PubMed

    Arida, Ricardo Mario; Gomes da Silva, Sérgio; de Almeida, Alexandre Aparecido; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Zavala-Tecuapetla, Cecilia; Brand, Serge; Rocha, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Physical exercise stimulates the release of endogenous opioid peptides supposed to be responsible for changes in mood, anxiety, and performance. Exercise alters sensitivity to these effects that modify the efficacy at the opioid receptor. Although there is evidence that relates exercise to neuropeptide expression in the brain, the effects of exercise on opioid receptor binding and signal transduction mechanisms downstream of these receptors have not been explored. Here, we characterized the binding and G protein activation of mu opioid receptor, kappa opioid receptor or delta opioid receptor in several brain regions following acute (7 days) and chronic (30 days) exercise. As regards short- (acute) or long-term effects (chronic) of exercise, overall, higher opioid receptor binding was observed in acute-exercise animals and the opposite was found in the chronic-exercise animals. The binding of [(35) S]GTPγS under basal conditions (absence of agonists) was elevated in sensorimotor cortex and hippocampus, an effect more evident after chronic exercise. Divergence of findings was observed for mu opioid receptor, kappa opioid receptor, and delta opioid receptor receptor activation in our study. Our results support existing evidence of opioid receptor binding and G protein activation occurring differentially in brain regions in response to diverse exercise stimuli. We characterized the binding and G protein activation of mu, kappa, and delta opioid receptors in several brain regions following acute (7 days) and chronic (30 days) exercise. Higher opioid receptor binding was observed in the acute exercise animal group and opposite findings in the chronic exercise group. Higher G protein activation under basal conditions was noted in rats submitted to chronic exercise, as visible in the depicted pseudo-color autoradiograms. PMID:25330347

  9. Differential effects of exercise on brain opioid receptor binding and activation in rats.

    PubMed

    Arida, Ricardo Mario; Gomes da Silva, Sérgio; de Almeida, Alexandre Aparecido; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Zavala-Tecuapetla, Cecilia; Brand, Serge; Rocha, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Physical exercise stimulates the release of endogenous opioid peptides supposed to be responsible for changes in mood, anxiety, and performance. Exercise alters sensitivity to these effects that modify the efficacy at the opioid receptor. Although there is evidence that relates exercise to neuropeptide expression in the brain, the effects of exercise on opioid receptor binding and signal transduction mechanisms downstream of these receptors have not been explored. Here, we characterized the binding and G protein activation of mu opioid receptor, kappa opioid receptor or delta opioid receptor in several brain regions following acute (7 days) and chronic (30 days) exercise. As regards short- (acute) or long-term effects (chronic) of exercise, overall, higher opioid receptor binding was observed in acute-exercise animals and the opposite was found in the chronic-exercise animals. The binding of [(35) S]GTPγS under basal conditions (absence of agonists) was elevated in sensorimotor cortex and hippocampus, an effect more evident after chronic exercise. Divergence of findings was observed for mu opioid receptor, kappa opioid receptor, and delta opioid receptor receptor activation in our study. Our results support existing evidence of opioid receptor binding and G protein activation occurring differentially in brain regions in response to diverse exercise stimuli. We characterized the binding and G protein activation of mu, kappa, and delta opioid receptors in several brain regions following acute (7 days) and chronic (30 days) exercise. Higher opioid receptor binding was observed in the acute exercise animal group and opposite findings in the chronic exercise group. Higher G protein activation under basal conditions was noted in rats submitted to chronic exercise, as visible in the depicted pseudo-color autoradiograms.

  10. Maternal Oxytocin Administration Before Birth Influences the Effects of Birth Anoxia on the Neonatal Rat Brain.

    PubMed

    Boksa, Patricia; Zhang, Ying; Nouel, Dominique

    2015-08-01

    Ineffective contractions and prolonged labor are common birth complications in primiparous women, and oxytocin is the most common agent given for induction or augmentation of labor. Clinical studies in humans suggest oxytocin might adversely affect the CNS response to hypoxia at birth. In this study, we used a rat model of global anoxia during Cesarean section birth to test if administering oxytocin to pregnant dams prior to birth affects the acute neonatal CNS response to birth anoxia. Anoxic pups born from dams pre-treated with intravenous injections or infusions of oxytocin before birth showed significantly increased brain lactate, a metabolic indicator of CNS hypoxia, compared to anoxic pups from dams pre-treated with saline. Anoxic pups born from dams given oxytocin before birth also showed decreased brain ATP compared to anoxic pups from saline dams. Direct injection of oxytocin to postnatal day 2 rat pups followed by exposure to anoxia also resulted in increased brain lactate and decreased brain ATP, compared to anoxia exposure alone. Oxytocin pre-treatment of the dam decreased brain malondialdehyde, a marker of lipid peroxidation, as well as protein kinase C activity, both in anoxic pups and controls, suggesting oxytocin may reduce aspects of oxidative stress. Finally, when dams were pretreated with indomethacin, a cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor, maternal oxytocin no longer potentiated effects of anoxia on neonatal brain lactate, suggesting this effect of oxytocin may be mediated via prostaglandin production or other COX-derived products. The results indicate that maternal oxytocin administration may have multiple acute effects on CNS metabolic responses to anoxia at birth.

  11. Neuroprotective mechanism of HIF-1α overexpression in the early stage of acute cerebral infarction in rats

    PubMed Central

    SUN, YUHUA; HE, WEIYA; GENG, LIJIAO

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to explore the expression and neuroprotective mechanism of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF-1α) in the brain tissue of a rat model of early acute cerebral infarction. A total of 64 Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into surgery and sham groups and the model of focal cerebral infarction was established by the suture-occluded method. In the sham group, blood vessels were separated but not occluded. Rats in the surgery and sham groups were subdivided into eight groups (n=4/group). Blood samples was collected at 8 time points including 30 min and 1, 3, 6, 12, 48, 24 and 72 h, respectively, and HIF-1α content was detected using ELISA. Brain tissues of rats in all groups were harvested following blood collection. HIF-1α protein expression was detected by immunohistochemistry and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) dUTP nick-end labeling was used to analyze the brain cell apoptosis index. ELISA results demonstrated that rats in the surgery group began to express HIF-1α within 30 min, and HIF-1α expression levels gradually increased, peaking at 12 h. HIF-1α expression levels were significantly increased in the surgery group at all time points, as compared with the sham group (P<0.05). The concentration of HIF-1α decreased rapidly in 12 h. At various time points, HIF-1α protein expression in the brain tissue of rats in the sham group was negative. HIF-1α protein expression was significantly increased in the surgery group (P<0.05), peaking at 12 h, and decreasing after this point. As compared with the sham group, the apoptosis indices of the brain tissue of rats in the surgery group exhibited a gradual increasing trend with significant decreases observed after 12 h (P<0.05). Intra-group comparison of all indices in the surgery group, indicated that there was a statistically significant difference between postoperative 12 h and other time points (P<0.05). In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that HIF-1α was highly

  12. Effects of single-dose and fractionated cranial irradiation on rat brain accumulation of methotrexate

    SciTech Connect

    Kamen, B.A.; Moulder, J.E.; Kun, L.E.; Ring, B.J.; Adams, S.M.; Fish, B.L.; Holcenberg, J.S.

    1984-11-01

    The effects of single-dose and fractionated whole-brain irradiation on brain methotrexate (MTX) has been studied in a rat model. The amount of MTX present in the brain 24 hr after a single i.p. dose (100 mg/kg) was the same whether animals were sham irradiated or given a single dose of 2000 rads 6 or 48 hr prior to the drug (6.9, 8.3, and 6.8 pmol MTX/g, wet weight, respectively). Animals sham irradiated or given 2000 rads in 10 fractions over 11 days and treated with an average dose of 1.2 mg MTX/kg i.p. twice a week for 24 weeks did not differ significantly in their brain MTX concentration (7.9 and 8.3 pmol MTX/g, wet weight, respectively). Chronically MTX-treated animals became folate deficient whether they were irradiated or not (450 and 670 pmol folate/g, wet weight, brain in MTX-treated and control animals). Thus, MTX accumulates in the brain with acute or chronic administration, and this accumulation is not altered by this amount of brain irradiation.

  13. Angiotensin-(1-7) attenuates the anxiety and depression-like behaviors in transgenic rats with low brain angiotensinogen.

    PubMed

    Kangussu, Lucas M; Almeida-Santos, Ana F; Bader, Michael; Alenina, Natalia; Fontes, Marco Antônio P; Santos, Robson A S; Aguiar, Daniele C; Campagnole-Santos, Maria José

    2013-11-15

    Transgenic rats with low brain angiotensinogen, TGR(ASrAOGEN)680, expressing an antisense RNA against angiotensinogen in glial cells, provide an interesting tool to evaluate the role of brain angiotensins in different behavior responses. The present study was conducted to test the hypothesis that angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] and serotonin can modulate anxiety and depression-related behaviors in the TGR(ASrAOGEN)680 rats. Therefore, the effect of acute intracerebroventricular administration of Ang-(1-7) and intraperitoneal administration of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine was evaluated in TGR(ASrAOGEN) rats subjected to the elevated plus maze (EPM) and forced swimming (FST) tests. Transgenic rats spent a lower percentage of time in the open arms of EPM and showed a significant increase in the immobility time in FST, indicating that a low angiotensinogen level in the brain leads to anxiety-like behavior accompanied by a depression-like state. Administration of both, Ang-(1-7) and fluoxetine reversed the anxiety- and depressive-like behavior of transgenic rats with low brain angiotensinogen, suggesting that this may be, at least in part, related to a decreased level of Ang-(1-7) and serotonin in the brain of these animals.

  14. C-Phycocyanin protects against acute tributyltin chloride neurotoxicity by modulating glial cell activity along with its anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory property: A comparative efficacy evaluation with N-acetyl cysteine in adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Sumonto; Siddiqui, Waseem A; Khandelwal, Shashi

    2015-08-01

    Spirulina is a widely used health supplement and is a dietary source of C-Phycocyanin (CPC), a potent anti-oxidant. We have previously reported the neurotoxic potential of tributyltin chloride (TBTC), an environmental pollutant and potent biocide. In this study, we have evaluated the protective efficacy of CPC against TBTC induced neurotoxicity. To evaluate the extent of neuroprotection offered by CPC, its efficacy was compared with the degree of protection offered by N-acetylcysteine (NAC) (a well known neuroprotective drug, taken as a positive control). Male Wistar rats (28 day old) were administered with 20mg/kg TBTC (oral) and 50mg/kg CPC or 50mg/kg NAC (i.p.), alone or in combination, and various parameters were evaluated. These include blood-brain barrier (BBB) damage; redox parameters (ROS, GSH, redox pathway associated enzymes, oxidative stress markers); inflammatory, cellular, and stress markers; apoptotic proteins and in situ cell death assay (TUNEL). We observed increased CPC availability in cortical tissue following its administration. Although BBB associated proteins like claudin-5, p-glycoprotein and ZO-1 were restored, CPC/NAC failed to protect against TBTC induced overall BBB permeability (Evans blue extravasation). Both CPC and NAC remarkably reduced oxidative stress and inflammation. NAC effectively modulated redox pathway associated enzymes whereas CPC countered ROS levels efficiently. Interestingly, CPC and NAC were equivalently capable of reducing apoptotic markers, astroglial activation and cell death. This study illustrates the various pathways involved in CPC mediated neuroprotection against this environmental neurotoxicant and highlights its capability to modulate glial cell activity. PMID:26079211

  15. Aged rats are hypo-responsive to acute restraint: implications for psychosocial stress in aging.

    PubMed

    Buechel, Heather M; Popovic, Jelena; Staggs, Kendra; Anderson, Katie L; Thibault, Olivier; Blalock, Eric M

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive processes associated with prefrontal cortex and hippocampus decline with age and are vulnerable to disruption by stress. The stress/stress hormone/allostatic load hypotheses of brain aging posit that brain aging, at least in part, is the manifestation of life-long stress exposure. In addition, as humans age, there is a profound increase in the incidence of new onset stressors, many of which are psychosocial (e.g., loss of job, death of spouse, social isolation), and aged humans are well-understood to be more vulnerable to the negative consequences of such new-onset chronic psychosocial stress events. However, the mechanistic underpinnings of this age-related shift in chronic psychosocial stress response, or the initial acute phase of that chronic response, have been less well-studied. Here, we separated young (3 month) and aged (21 month) male F344 rats into control and acute restraint (an animal model of psychosocial stress) groups (n = 9-12/group). We then assessed hippocampus-associated behavioral, electrophysiological, and transcriptional outcomes, as well as blood glucocorticoid and sleep architecture changes. Aged rats showed characteristic water maze, deep sleep, transcriptome, and synaptic sensitivity changes compared to young. Young and aged rats showed similar levels of distress during the 3 h restraint, as well as highly significant increases in blood glucocorticoid levels 21 h after restraint. However, young, but not aged, animals responded to stress exposure with water maze deficits, loss of deep sleep and hyperthermia. These results demonstrate that aged subjects are hypo-responsive to new-onset acute psychosocial stress, which may have negative consequences for long-term stress adaptation and suggest that age itself may act as a stressor occluding the influence of new onset stressors.

  16. Aged rats are hypo-responsive to acute restraint: implications for psychosocial stress in aging

    PubMed Central

    Buechel, Heather M.; Popovic, Jelena; Staggs, Kendra; Anderson, Katie L.; Thibault, Olivier; Blalock, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive processes associated with prefrontal cortex and hippocampus decline with age and are vulnerable to disruption by stress. The stress/stress hormone/allostatic load hypotheses of brain aging posit that brain aging, at least in part, is the manifestation of life-long stress exposure. In addition, as humans age, there is a profound increase in the incidence of new onset stressors, many of which are psychosocial (e.g., loss of job, death of spouse, social isolation), and aged humans are well-understood to be more vulnerable to the negative consequences of such new-onset chronic psychosocial stress events. However, the mechanistic underpinnings of this age-related shift in chronic psychosocial stress response, or the initial acute phase of that chronic response, have been less well-studied. Here, we separated young (3 month) and aged (21 month) male F344 rats into control and acute restraint (an animal model of psychosocial stress) groups (n = 9–12/group). We then assessed hippocampus-associated behavioral, electrophysiological, and transcriptional outcomes, as well as blood glucocorticoid and sleep architecture changes. Aged rats showed characteristic water maze, deep sleep, transcriptome, and synaptic sensitivity changes compared to young. Young and aged rats showed similar levels of distress during the 3 h restraint, as well as highly significant increases in blood glucocorticoid levels 21 h after restraint. However, young, but not aged, animals responded to stress exposure with water maze deficits, loss of deep sleep and hyperthermia. These results demonstrate that aged subjects are hypo-responsive to new-onset acute psychosocial stress, which may have negative consequences for long-term stress adaptation and suggest that age itself may act as a stressor occluding the influence of new onset stressors. PMID:24575039

  17. Cinnamon intake alleviates the combined effects of dietary-induced insulin resistance and acute stress on brain mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Couturier, Karine; Hininger, Isabelle; Poulet, Laurent; Anderson, Richard A; Roussel, Anne-Marie; Canini, Frédéric; Batandier, Cécile

    2016-02-01

    Insulin resistance (IR), which is a leading cause of the metabolic syndrome, results in early brain function alterations which may alter brain mitochondrial functioning. Previously, we demonstrated that rats fed a control diet and submitted to an acute restraint stress exhibited a delayed mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening. In this study, we evaluated the combined effects of dietary and emotional stressors as found in western way of life. We studied, in rats submitted or not to an acute stress, the effects of diet-induced IR on brain mitochondria, using a high fat/high fructose diet (HF(2)), as an IR inducer, with addition or not of cinnamon as an insulin sensitizer. We measured Ca(2+) retention capacity, respiration, ROS production, enzymatic activities and cell signaling activation. Under stress, HF(2) diet dramatically decreased the amount of Ca(2+) required to open the mPTP (13%) suggesting an adverse effect on mitochondrial survival. Cinnamon added to the diet corrected this negative effect and resulted in a partial recovery (30%). The effects related to cinnamon addition to the diet could be due to its antioxidant properties or to the observed modulation of PI3K-AKT-GSK3β and MAPK-P38 pathways or to a combination of both. These data suggest a protective effect of cinnamon on brain mitochondria against the negative impact of an HF(2) diet. Cinnamon could be beneficial to counteract deleterious dietary effects in stressed conditions. PMID:26878796

  18. [Uncaria tomentosa and acute ischemic kidney injury in rats].

    PubMed

    de Fátima Fernandes Vattimo, Maria; da Silva, Natalia Oliveira

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the renoprotective effects of Uncaria Tomentosa (cat's claw) on ischemic acute kidney injury induced by renal clamping in rats. The hypoxia and hypoperfusion increase the production of reactive species already present in the inflammatory process. Results showed that the renal function evaluated by creatinine clearance, the urinary excretion of peroxides and malondealdehyde indexes demonstrated that UT induced renoprotection, probably related to its antioxidant activities.

  19. Protective mechanism of quercetin on acute myocardial infarction in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, B; Yang, M; Liu, J W; Yin, G T

    2016-03-11

    To investigate the protective mechanism of quercetin on acute myocardial infarction (AMI) rats, an AMI rat model was established by ligating the left coronary anterior descending branch. The rats were randomly divided into the model group and low- and high-dose quercetin groups. The control group comprised sham-operated rats. The rats in the low- and high-dose quercetin groups were administered 100 and 400 mg/kg quercetin, respectively, by gavage. The rats in the control and model groups were administered isometric normal saline once daily for one week. The mRNA and protein levels of TNF-α and IL-1β in the myocardial tissue of rats were detected in each group by real time polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Malondialdehyde (MDA) content in the myocardial tissue and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities were detected using a colorimetric method. The level of apoptosis was detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling. Compared with those in the control group, the mRNA and protein levels of TNF-α, IL-1β and MDA content in the model, low-, and high-dose groups significantly increased. SOD and CAT activities decreased significantly. The cell apoptosis index increased significantly  (P < 0.05). Compared with those in the model group, the mRNA and protein levels of TNF-α and IL-1β and MDA content in myocardial tissue of rats in the low-dose and high-dose groups decreased significantly. SOD and CAT activities increased significantly. The cell apoptosis index significantly reduced (P < 0.05). In conclusion, quercetin has significant anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anti-apoptotic effects on AMI rats and can effectively protect against myocardium damage.

  20. Attenuation of acute morphine withdrawal in the neonatal rat by the competitive NMDA receptor antagonist LY235959.

    PubMed

    Jones, Kathy L; Zhu, Hongbo; Jenab, Shirzad; Du, Ted; Inturrisi, Charles E; Barr, Gordon A

    2002-03-01

    The present study examined the ability of LY235959, a competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, to attenuate behaviors and c-fos mRNA expression associated with acute morphine withdrawal in the infant rat. Rat pups were given a single dose of morphine (10.0 mg/kg, s.c.) or saline. Two hours later, pups were removed from the dam and injected with either LY235959 (10.0 mg/kg, s.c.) or saline. Fifteen minutes later acute morphine withdrawal was precipitated with naltrexone (10.0 mg/kg, s.c.) and behaviors were recorded every 15 s for the next 60 min. Immediately after behavioral testing, brain and spinal cord were assayed for c-fos mRNA analysis by solution hybridization. The intensity of the morphine withdrawal syndrome was reduced in pups pre-treated with LY235959. Withdrawal behaviors such as head moves, moving paws, rolling, and walking were decreased, and vocalizations were completely eliminated in pups pre-treated with LY2359559. Acute morphine withdrawal increased c-fos mRNA expression in the brain and the spinal cord, which was attenuated by pre-treatment of LY235959. Thus, in the 7-day-old rat, as in the adult, NMDA receptors play a role in the behavioral and molecular manifestations of acute morphine withdrawal. PMID:11850145

  1. The Brain Metabolome of Male Rats across the Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiaojiao; Chen, Tianlu; Zhao, Aihua; Wang, Xiaoyan; Xie, Guoxiang; Huang, Fengjie; Liu, Jiajian; Zhao, Qing; Wang, Shouli; Wang, Chongchong; Zhou, Mingmei; Panee, Jun; He, Zhigang; Jia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive and accurate characterization of brain metabolome is fundamental to brain science, but has been hindered by technical limitations. We profiled the brain metabolome in male Wistar rats at different ages (day 1 to week 111) using high-sensitivity and high-resolution mass spectrometry. Totally 380 metabolites were identified and 232 of them were quantitated. Compared with anatomical regions, age had a greater effect on variations in the brain metabolome. Lipids, fatty acids and amino acids accounted for the largest proportions of the brain metabolome, and their concentrations varied across the lifespan. The levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids were higher in infancy (week 1 to week 3) compared with later ages, and the ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids increased in the aged brain (week 56 to week 111). Importantly, a panel of 20 bile acids were quantitatively measured, most of which have not previously been documented in the brain metabolome. This study extends the breadth of the mammalian brain metabolome as well as our knowledge of functional brain development, both of which are critically important to move the brain science forward. PMID:27063670

  2. Demonstration of endogenous imipramine like material in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Rehavi, M.; Ventura, I.; Sarne, Y.

    1985-02-18

    The extraction and partial purification of an endogenous imipramine-like material from rat brain is described. The endogenous factor obtained after gel filtration and silica chromatography inhibits (/sup 3/H) imipramine specific binding and mimics the inhibitory effect of imipramine on (/sup 3/H) serotonin uptake in both brain and platelet preparations. The effects of the endogenous material are dose-dependent and it inhibits (/sup 3/H) imipramine binding in a competitive fashion. The factor is unevenly distributed in the brain with high concentration in the hypothalamus and low concentration in the cerebellum.

  3. A new stress model, a scream sound, alters learning and monoamine levels in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lili; Yang, Juan; Song, Tusheng; Hou, Ni; Liu, Yong; Zhao, Xiaoge; Zhang, Dianzeng; Wang, Lumin; Wang, Tao; Huang, Chen

    2014-01-17

    Most existing animal models for stress involve the simultaneous application of physical and psychological stress factors. In the current study, we described and used a novel psychological stress model (scream sound stress). To study the validity of it, we carried out acute and chronic scream sound stress. First, adult Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into white noise, stress and background groups. The white noise group and stress group were treated with white noise and scream sound for 4h in the morning respectively. Compared with white noise and background groups, exposure to acute scream sound increased corticosterone (CORT) level and decreased latency in Morris water maze (MWM) test. The levels of noradrenaline (NE), dopamine (DA), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) were altered in the striatum, hypothalamus and hippocampus of stress rats. Second, adult SD rats were randomly divided into background and stress groups, which were treated with scream sound for three weeks. Exposure to chronic scream sound suppressed body weight gain, increased corticosterone (CORT) level, influenced the morphology of adrenal gland, improved spleen and thymus indices, and decreased latency in MWM test. NE, DA, DOPAC, HVA and 5-HIAA levels were also altered in the brain of stress rats. Our results suggested that scream sound, as a novel stressor, facilitated learning ability, as well as altered monoamine levels in the rat brain. Moreover, scream sound is easy to apply and can be applied in more animals at the same time.

  4. Caspase-1 inhibition alleviates acute renal injury in rats with severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Hua; Li, Min-Li; Wang, Bin; Guo, Mei-Xia; Zhu, Ren-Min

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the effect of inhibition of caspase-1 on acute renal injury in rats with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). METHODS: Forty-two Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: healthy controls (HC, n = 6), SAP rats treated with saline (SAP-S, n = 18), or SAP rats treated with a caspase-1/interleukin (IL)-1β-converting-enzyme (ICE) inhibitor (SAP-I-ICE, n = 18). SAP was induced by retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the bile-pancreatic duct. HC rats were subjected to identical treatment and surgical procedures without sodium taurocholate. Rats received an intraperitoneal injection of isotonic saline (SAP-S) or the inhibitor (SAP-ICE-I) at 2 and 12 h after induction of acute pancreatitis. Surviving rats were sacrificed at different time points after SAP induction; all samples were obtained and stored for subsequent analyses. The levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine (Cr) were measured using automatic methods, and serum IL-1β concentrations were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Intrarenal expression of IL-1β, IL-18 and caspase-1 mRNAs was detected by RT-PCR. IL-1β protein expression and the pathologic changes in kidney tissues were observed by microscopy after immunohistochemical or hematoxylin and eosin staining, respectively. RESULTS: The serum levels of BUN and Cr in the SAP-S group were 12.48 ± 2.30 mmol/L and 82.83 ± 13.89 μmol/L at 6 h, 23.53 ± 2.58 mmol/L and 123.67 ± 17.67 μmol/L at 12 h, and 23.60 ± 3.33 mmol/L and 125.33 ± 21.09 μmol/L at 18 h, respectively. All were significantly increased compared to HC rats (P < 0.01 for all). Levels in SAP-ICE-I rats were significantly decreased compared to SAP-S rats both at 12 and 18 h (P < 0.01 for all). Serum IL-1β levels in the SAP-S group were 276.77 ± 44.92 pg/mL at 6 h, 308.99 ± 34.95 pg/mL at 12 h, and 311.60 ± 46.51 pg/mL at 18 h; all significantly higher than those in the HC and SAP-ICE-I groups (P < 0.01 for all

  5. Acute effects of ethanol on renal folate clearance in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenga, B.H.; McMartin, K.E.

    1986-03-05

    Studies of the renal clearance of folic acid in primates demonstrate net reabsorption of folate by a saturable system. The acute administration of ethanol to rats causes a significant increase in urinary folate excretion. The mechanism for this effect is unknown and thus the effect of acute administration of ethanol on the renal absorption and urinary clearance of folate was studied in rats. Folic acid was administered to male Sprague-Dawley rats via continuous intravenous infusion in doses ranging from 3-75 micromoles/kg and renal clearance relative to inulin was determined. The effects of various dose levels of ethanol on these parameters were then determined. At a dose of 15 micromoles/kg, the renal clearance of folate relative to that of inulin was about 0.65 mg/min. At a plasma ethanol level about 100 mg/dl, the renal clearance of folate was not markedly altered. These results suggests that there is net reabsorption of folate in the rat kidney and that moderate doses of ethanol have little effect on renal effect on renal folate reabsorption.

  6. Sleep restriction acutely impairs glucose tolerance in rats.

    PubMed

    Jha, Pawan K; Foppen, Ewout; Kalsbeek, Andries; Challet, Etienne

    2016-06-01

    Chronic sleep curtailment in humans has been related to impairment of glucose metabolism. To better understand the underlying mechanisms, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of acute sleep deprivation on glucose tolerance in rats. A group of rats was challenged by 4-h sleep deprivation in the early rest period, leading to prolonged (16 h) wakefulness. Another group of rats was allowed to sleep during the first 4 h of the light period and sleep deprived in the next 4 h. During treatment, food was withdrawn to avoid a postmeal rise in plasma glucose. An intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) was performed immediately after the sleep deprivation period. Sleep deprivation at both times of the day similarly impaired glucose tolerance and reduced the early-phase insulin responses to a glucose challenge. Basal concentrations of plasma glucose, insulin, and corticosterone remained unchanged after sleep deprivation. Throughout IVGTTs, plasma corticosterone concentrations were not different between the control and sleep-deprived group. Together, these results demonstrate that independent of time of day and sleep pressure, short sleep deprivation during the resting phase favors glucose intolerance in rats by attenuating the first-phase insulin response to a glucose load. In conclusion, this study highlights the acute adverse effects of only a short sleep restriction on glucose homeostasis. PMID:27354542

  7. Mechanisms of blast induced brain injuries, experimental studies in rats.

    PubMed

    Risling, M; Plantman, S; Angeria, M; Rostami, E; Bellander, B-M; Kirkegaard, M; Arborelius, U; Davidsson, J

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) potentially induced by blast waves from detonations result in significant diagnostic problems. It may be assumed that several mechanisms contribute to the injury. This study is an attempt to characterize the presumed components of the blast induced TBI. Our experimental models include a blast tube in which an anesthetized rat can be exposed to controlled detonations of explosives that result in a pressure wave with a magnitude between 130 and 260 kPa. In this model, the animal is fixed with a metal net to avoid head acceleration forces. The second model is a controlled penetration of a 2mm thick needle. In the third model the animal is subjected to a high-speed sagittal rotation angular acceleration. Immunohistochemical labeling for amyloid precursor protein revealed signs of diffuse axonal injury (DAI) in the penetration and rotation models. Signs of punctuate inflammation were observed after focal and rotation injury. Exposure in the blast tube did not induce DAI or detectable cell death, but functional changes. Affymetrix Gene arrays showed changes in the expression in a large number of gene families including cell death, inflammation and neurotransmitters in the hippocampus after both acceleration and penetration injuries. Exposure to the primary blast wave induced limited shifts in gene expression in the hippocampus. The most interesting findings were a downregulation of genes involved in neurogenesis and synaptic transmission. These experiments indicate that rotational acceleration may be a critical factor for DAI and other acute changes after blast TBI. The further exploration of the mechanisms of blast TBI will have to include a search for long-term effects. PMID:20493951

  8. Thyroid insufficiency in developing rat brain: A genomic analysis.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid Insufficiency in the Developing Rat Brain: A Genomic Analysis. JE Royland and ME Gilbert, Neurotox. Div., U.S. EPA, RTP, NC, USA. Endocrine disruption (ED) is an area of major concern in environmental neurotoxicity. Severe deficits in thyroid hormone (TH) levels have bee...

  9. EVALUATION OF PERFLUOROOCTANE SULFONATE IN THE RAT BRAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctane Sulfonate (PFOS) is an environmentally persistent chemical that has been detected in humans and wildlife. PFOS is primarily distributed in liver and blood. The current study evaluated the level of PFOS in the adult and neonatal rat brain and determined whether t...

  10. Autoradiographic localization of relaxin binding sites in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Osheroff, P.L.; Phillips, H.S. )

    1991-08-01

    Relaxin is a member of the insulin family of polypeptide hormones and exerts its best understood actions in the mammalian reproductive system. Using a biologically active 32P-labeled human relaxin, the authors have previously shown by in vitro autoradiography specific relaxin binding sites in rat uterus, cervix, and brain tissues. Using the same approach, they describe here a detailed localization of human relaxin binding sites in the rat brain. Displaceable relaxin binding sites are distributed in discrete regions of the olfactory system, neocortex, hypothalamus, hippocampus, thalamus, amygdala, midbrain, and medulla of the male and female rat brain. Characterization of the relaxin binding sites in the subfornical organ and neocortex reveals a single class of high-affinity sites (Kd = 1.4 nM) in both regions. The binding of relaxin to two of the circumventricular organs (subfornical organ and organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis) and the neurosecretory magnocellular hypothalamic nuclei (i.e., paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei) provides the anatomical and biochemical basis for emerging physiological evidence suggesting a central role for relaxin in the control of blood pressure and hormone release. They conclude that specific, high-affinity relaxin binding sites are present in discrete regions of the rat brain and that the distribution of some of these sites may be consistent with a role for relaxin in control of vascular volume and blood pressure.

  11. Impairment of Electron Transfer Chain Induced by Acute Carnosine Administration in Skeletal Muscle of Young Rats

    PubMed Central

    Macarini, José Roberto; Maravai, Soliany Grassi; Cararo, José Henrique; Dimer, Nádia Webber; Gonçalves, Cinara Ludvig; Kist, Luiza Wilges; Bogo, Mauricio Reis; Schuck, Patrícia Fernanda; Streck, Emilio Luiz; Ferreira, Gustavo Costa

    2014-01-01

    Serum carnosinase deficiency is an inherited disorder that leads to an accumulation of carnosine in the brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid, skeletal muscle, and other tissues of affected patients. Considering that high levels of carnosine are associated with neurological dysfunction and that the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in serum carnosinase deficiency remain poorly understood, we investigated the in vivo effects of carnosine on bioenergetics parameters, namely, respiratory chain complexes (I–III, II, and II-III), malate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, and creatine kinase activities and the expression of mitochondrial-specific transcription factors (NRF-1, PGC-1α, and TFAM) in skeletal muscle of young Wistar rats. We observed a significant decrease of complexes I–III and II activities in animals receiving carnosine acutely, as compared to control group. However, no significant alterations in respiratory chain complexes, citric acid cycle enzymes, and creatine kinase activities were found between rats receiving carnosine chronically and control group animals. As compared to control group, mRNA levels of NRF-1, PGC-1α, and TFAM were unchanged. The present findings indicate that electron transfer through the respiratory chain is impaired in skeletal muscle of rats receiving carnosine acutely. In case these findings are confirmed by further studies and ATP depletion is also observed, impairment of bioenergetics could be considered a putative mechanism responsible for the muscle damage observed in serum carnosinase-deficient patients. PMID:24877122

  12. Impairment of electron transfer chain induced by acute carnosine administration in skeletal muscle of young rats.

    PubMed

    Macarini, José Roberto; Maravai, Soliany Grassi; Cararo, José Henrique; Dimer, Nádia Webber; Gonçalves, Cinara Ludvig; Kist, Luiza Wilges; Bogo, Mauricio Reis; Schuck, Patrícia Fernanda; Streck, Emilio Luiz; Ferreira, Gustavo Costa

    2014-01-01

    Serum carnosinase deficiency is an inherited disorder that leads to an accumulation of carnosine in the brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid, skeletal muscle, and other tissues of affected patients. Considering that high levels of carnosine are associated with neurological dysfunction and that the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in serum carnosinase deficiency remain poorly understood, we investigated the in vivo effects of carnosine on bioenergetics parameters, namely, respiratory chain complexes (I-III, II, and II-III), malate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, and creatine kinase activities and the expression of mitochondrial-specific transcription factors (NRF-1, PGC-1α , and TFAM) in skeletal muscle of young Wistar rats. We observed a significant decrease of complexes I-III and II activities in animals receiving carnosine acutely, as compared to control group. However, no significant alterations in respiratory chain complexes, citric acid cycle enzymes, and creatine kinase activities were found between rats receiving carnosine chronically and control group animals. As compared to control group, mRNA levels of NRF-1, PGC-1α , and TFAM were unchanged. The present findings indicate that electron transfer through the respiratory chain is impaired in skeletal muscle of rats receiving carnosine acutely. In case these findings are confirmed by further studies and ATP depletion is also observed, impairment of bioenergetics could be considered a putative mechanism responsible for the muscle damage observed in serum carnosinase-deficient patients. PMID:24877122

  13. Maternal metallothionein and zinc after acute ethanol exposure during gestation in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.E. )

    1992-02-26

    Acute exposure of the rat fetus to ethanol at critical periods can cause growth retardation and brain damage; the mechanism(s) is not known. Ethanol may cause redistribution of maternal zinc which results in fetal zinc deficiency and subsequent interruption of growth and development. The purpose was to determine if acute ethanol administration to the pregnant rat alters Zn and the Zn binding protein metallothionein (MT) in selected tissues. On gestational day (gd) 14, eighteen pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into groups. By intragastric tube, ethanol treated dams were given ethanol and pairfed controls were given a 0.85% NaCl solution. On gd 15, intragastric feedings were repeated. Throughout, the Lieber-DeCarli control diet was fed (adlibitum to untreated controls and ethanol treated dams and in appropriate quantities to pair fed controls). Blood ethanol concentrations at 90 minutes after the ethanol dose were 154 {plus minus} 46 and 265 {plus minus} 110 mg% on gd 14 and 15, respectively.

  14. Protein-energy malnutrition developing after global brain ischemia induces an atypical acute-phase response and hinders expression of GAP-43.

    PubMed

    Smith, Shari E; Figley, Sarah A; Schreyer, David J; Paterson, Phyllis G

    2014-01-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) is a common post-stroke problem. PEM can independently induce a systemic acute-phase response, and pre-existing malnutrition can exacerbate neuroinflammation induced by brain ischemia. In contrast, the effects of PEM developing in the post-ischemic period have not been studied. Since excessive inflammation can impede brain remodeling, we investigated the effects of post-ischemic malnutrition on neuroinflammation, the acute-phase reaction, and neuroplasticity-related proteins. Male, Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to global forebrain ischemia using the 2-vessel occlusion model or sham surgery. The sham rats were assigned to control diet (18% protein) on day 3 after surgery, whereas the rats exposed to global ischemia were assigned to either control diet or a low protein (PEM, 2% protein) diet. Post-ischemic PEM decreased growth associated protein-43, synaptophysin and synaptosomal-associated protein-25 immunofluorescence within the hippocampal CA3 mossy fiber terminals on day 21, whereas the glial response in the hippocampal CA1 and CA3 subregions was unaltered by PEM. No systemic acute-phase reaction attributable to global ischemia was detected in control diet-fed rats, as reflected by serum concentrations of alpha-2-macroglobulin, alpha-1-acid glycoprotein, haptoglobin, and albumin. Acute exposure to the PEM regimen after global brain ischemia caused an atypical acute-phase response. PEM decreased the serum concentrations of albumin and haptoglobin on day 5, with the decreases sustained to day 21. Serum alpha-2-macroglobulin concentrations were significantly higher in malnourished rats on day 21. This provides the first direct evidence that PEM developing after brain ischemia exerts wide-ranging effects on mechanisms important to stroke recovery.

  15. Induction of acute phase gene expression by brain irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Ji-Hong |; Sun, Ji-Rong; Withers, H.R.

    1995-10-15

    To investigate the in vivo acute phase molecular response of the brain to ionizing radiation, C3Hf/Sed/Kam mice were given midbrain or whole-body irradiation. Cerebral expression of interleukins (IL-1{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, IL-2, IL-3, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6), interferon (IFN-{gamma}), tumor necrosis factors (TNF-{alpha} and TNF-{beta}), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), inducible nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS), von Willebrand factor (vWF), {alpha}1-antichymotrypsin (EB22/5.3), and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) was measured at various times after various radiation doses by ribonuclease (RNase) protection assay. The effects of dexamethasone or pentoxifylline treatment of mice on radiation-induced gene expression were also examined. Levels of TNF-{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, ICAM-1, EB22/5.3, and to a lesser extent IL-1{alpha} and GFAP, messenger RNA were increased in the brain after irradiation, whether the dose was delivered to the whole body or only to the midbrain. Responses were radiation dose dependent, but were not found below 7 Gy; the exception being ICAM-1, which was increased by doses as low as 2 Gy. Most responses were rapid, peaking within 4-8 h, but antichymotrypsin and GFAP responses were delayed and still elevated at 24 h, by which time the others had subsided. Pretreatment of mice with dexamethasone or pentoxifylline suppressed radiation-induced gene expression, either partially or completely. Dexamethasone was more inhibitory than pentoxifylline at the doses chosen. The initial response of the brain to irradiation involves expression of inflammatory gene products, which are probably responsible for clinically observed early symptoms of brain radiotherapy. This mechanism explains the beneficial effects of the clinical use of steroids in such circumstances. 64 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Restraint Stress-Induced Morphological Changes at the Blood-Brain Barrier in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sántha, Petra; Veszelka, Szilvia; Hoyk, Zsófia; Mészáros, Mária; Walter, Fruzsina R.; Tóth, Andrea E.; Kiss, Lóránd; Kincses, András; Oláh, Zita; Seprényi, György; Rákhely, Gábor; Dér, András; Pákáski, Magdolna; Kálmán, János; Kittel, Ágnes; Deli, Mária A.

    2016-01-01

    Stress is well-known to contribute to the development of both neurological and psychiatric diseases. While the role of the blood-brain barrier is increasingly recognized in the development of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier has been linked to stress-related psychiatric diseases only recently. In the present study the effects of restraint stress with different duration (1, 3, and 21 days) were investigated on the morphology of the blood-brain barrier in male adult Wistar rats. Frontal cortex and hippocampus sections were immunostained for markers of brain endothelial cells (claudin-5, occluding, and glucose transporter-1) and astroglia (GFAP). Staining pattern and intensity were visualized by confocal microscopy and evaluated by several types of image analysis. The ultrastructure of brain capillaries was investigated by electron microscopy. Morphological changes and intensity alterations in brain endothelial tight junction proteins claudin-5 and occludin were induced by stress. Following restraint stress significant increases in the fluorescence intensity of glucose transporter-1 were detected in brain endothelial cells in the frontal cortex and hippocampus. Significant reductions in GFAP fluorescence intensity were observed in the frontal cortex in all stress groups. As observed by electron microscopy, 1-day acute stress induced morphological changes indicating damage in capillary endothelial cells in both brain regions. After 21 days of stress thicker and irregular capillary basal membranes in the hippocampus and edema in astrocytes in both regions were seen. These findings indicate that stress exerts time-dependent changes in the staining pattern of tight junction proteins occludin, claudin-5, and glucose transporter-1 at the level of brain capillaries and in the ultrastructure of brain endothelial cells and astroglial endfeet, which may contribute to neurodegenerative processes, cognitive and

  17. Restraint Stress-Induced Morphological Changes at the Blood-Brain Barrier in Adult Rats.

    PubMed

    Sántha, Petra; Veszelka, Szilvia; Hoyk, Zsófia; Mészáros, Mária; Walter, Fruzsina R; Tóth, Andrea E; Kiss, Lóránd; Kincses, András; Oláh, Zita; Seprényi, György; Rákhely, Gábor; Dér, András; Pákáski, Magdolna; Kálmán, János; Kittel, Ágnes; Deli, Mária A

    2015-01-01

    Stress is well-known to contribute to the development of both neurological and psychiatric diseases. While the role of the blood-brain barrier is increasingly recognized in the development of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier has been linked to stress-related psychiatric diseases only recently. In the present study the effects of restraint stress with different duration (1, 3, and 21 days) were investigated on the morphology of the blood-brain barrier in male adult Wistar rats. Frontal cortex and hippocampus sections were immunostained for markers of brain endothelial cells (claudin-5, occluding, and glucose transporter-1) and astroglia (GFAP). Staining pattern and intensity were visualized by confocal microscopy and evaluated by several types of image analysis. The ultrastructure of brain capillaries was investigated by electron microscopy. Morphological changes and intensity alterations in brain endothelial tight junction proteins claudin-5 and occludin were induced by stress. Following restraint stress significant increases in the fluorescence intensity of glucose transporter-1 were detected in brain endothelial cells in the frontal cortex and hippocampus. Significant reductions in GFAP fluorescence intensity were observed in the frontal cortex in all stress groups. As observed by electron microscopy, 1-day acute stress induced morphological changes indicating damage in capillary endothelial cells in both brain regions. After 21 days of stress thicker and irregular capillary basal membranes in the hippocampus and edema in astrocytes in both regions were seen. These findings indicate that stress exerts time-dependent changes in the staining pattern of tight junction proteins occludin, claudin-5, and glucose transporter-1 at the level of brain capillaries and in the ultrastructure of brain endothelial cells and astroglial endfeet, which may contribute to neurodegenerative processes, cognitive and

  18. Prenatal Ethanol Exposure Increases Brain Cholesterol Content in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Barceló-Coblijn, Gwendolyn; Wold, Loren E.; Ren, Jun; Murphy, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome is the most severe expression of the fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Although alterations in fetal and neonate brain fatty acid composition and cholesterol content is known to change in animal models of FASD, the persistence of these alterations into adulthood is unknown. To address this question, we determined the effect of prenatal ethanol exposure on individual phospholipid class fatty acid composition, individual phospholipid class mass, and cholesterol mass in brains from 25-week-old rats that were exposed to ethanol during gestation beginning at gestational day 2. While total phospholipid mass was unaffected, phosphatidylinositol and cardiolipin mass was decreased 14 and 43%, respectively. Exposure to prenatal ethanol modestly altered brain phospholipid fatty acid composition, and the most consistent change was a significant 1.1-fold increase in total PUFA, in the n-3/n-6 ratio, and in the 22:6 n-3 content in ethanolamine glycerophospholipids and in phosphatidylserine. In contrast, prenatal ethanol consumption significantly increased brain cholesterol mass 1.4-fold and the phospholipid to cholesterol ratio was significantly increased 1.3-fold. These results indicate that brain cholesterol mass was significantly increased in adult rats exposed prenatally to ethanol, but changes in phospholipid mass and phospholipid fatty acid composition were extremely limited. Importantly, suppression of post-natal ethanol consumption was not sufficient to reverse the large increase in cholesterol observed in the adult rats. PMID:23996454

  19. Acute Resistance Exercise Induces Antinociception by Activation of the Endocannabinoid System in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Galdino, Giovane; Romero, Thiago; da Silva, José Felippe Pinho; Aguiar, Daniele; de Paula, Ana Maria; Cruz, Jader; Parrella, Cosimo; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Duarte, Igor; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Perez, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Background Resistance exercise (RE) is also known as strength training, and it is performed to increase the strength and mass of muscles, bone strength and metabolism. RE has been increasingly prescribed for pain relief. However, the endogenous mechanisms underlying this antinociceptive effect are still largely unexplored. Thus, we investigated the involvement of the endocannabinoid system in RE-induced antinociception. Methods Male Wistar rats were submitted to acute RE in a weight-lifting model. The nociceptive threshold was measured by a mechanical nociceptive test (paw pressure) before and after exercise. To investigate the involvement of cannabinoid receptors and endocannabinoids in RE-induced antinociception, cannabinoid receptor inverse agonists, endocannabinoid metabolizing enzyme inhibitors and an anandamide reuptake inhibitor were injected before RE. After RE, CB1 cannabinoid receptors were quantified in rat brain tissue by Western blot and immunofluorescence. In addition, endocannabinoid plasma levels were measured by isotope dilution-liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Results RE-induced antinociception was prevented by preinjection with CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptor inverse agonists. By contrast, preadministration of metabolizing enzyme inhibitors and the anandamide reuptake inhibitor prolonged and enhanced this effect. RE also produced an increase in the expression and activation of CB1 cannabinoid receptors in rat brain tissue and in the dorsolateral and ventrolateral periaqueductal regions and an increase of endocannabinoid plasma levels. Conclusion The present study suggests that a single session of RE activates the endocannabinoid system to induce antinociception. PMID:24977916

  20. Inducible Gene Manipulations in Brain Serotonergic Neurons of Transgenic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tews, Björn; Bartsch, Dusan

    2011-01-01

    The serotonergic (5-HT) system has been implicated in various physiological processes and neuropsychiatric disorders, but in many aspects its role in normal and pathologic brain function is still unclear. One reason for this might be the lack of appropriate animal models which can address the complexity of physiological and pathophysiological 5-HT functioning. In this respect, rats offer many advantages over mice as they have been the animal of choice for sophisticated neurophysiological and behavioral studies. However, only recently technologies for the targeted and tissue specific modification of rat genes - a prerequisite for a detailed study of the 5-HT system - have been successfully developed. Here, we describe a rat transgenic system for inducible gene manipulations in 5-HT neurons. We generated a Cre driver line consisting of a tamoxifen-inducible CreERT2 recombinase under the control of mouse Tph2 regulatory sequences. Tissue-specific serotonergic Cre recombinase expression was detected in four transgenic TPH2-CreERT2 rat founder lines. For functional analysis of Cre-mediated recombination, we used a rat Cre reporter line (CAG-loxP.EGFP), in which EGFP is expressed after Cre-mediated removal of a loxP-flanked lacZ STOP cassette. We show an in-depth characterisation of this rat Cre reporter line and demonstrate its applicability for monitoring Cre-mediated recombination in all major neuronal subpopulations of the rat brain. Upon tamoxifen induction, double transgenic TPH2-CreERT2/CAG-loxP.EGFP rats show selective and efficient EGFP expression in 5-HT neurons. Without tamoxifen administration, EGFP is only expressed in few 5-HT neurons which confirms minimal background recombination. This 5-HT neuron specific CreERT2 line allows Cre-mediated, inducible gene deletion or gene overexpression in transgenic rats which provides new opportunities to decipher the complex functions of the mammalian serotonergic system. PMID:22140568

  1. Not just the brain: methamphetamine disrupts blood-spinal cord barrier and induces acute glial activation and structural damage of spinal cord cells.

    PubMed

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Sharma, Hari S

    2015-01-01

    Acute methamphetamine (METH) intoxication induces metabolic brain activation as well as multiple physiological and behavioral responses that could result in life-threatening health complications. Previously, we showed that METH (9 mg/kg) used in freely moving rats induces robust leakage of blood-brain barrier, acute glial activation, vasogenic edema, and structural abnormalities of brain cells. These changes were tightly correlated with drug-induced brain hyperthermia and were greatly potentiated when METH was used at warm ambient temperatures (29°C), inducing more robust and prolonged hyperthermia. Extending this line of research, here we show that METH also strongly increases the permeability of the blood-spinal cord barrier as evidenced by entry of Evans blue and albumin immunoreactivity in T9-12 segments of the spinal cord. Similar to the blood-brain barrier, leakage of bloodspinal cord barrier was associated with acute glial activation, alterations of ionic homeostasis, water tissue accumulation (edema), and structural abnormalities of spinal cord cells. Similar to that in the brain, all neurochemical alterations correlated tightly with drug-induced elevations in brain temperature and they were enhanced when the drug was used at 29°C and brain hyperthermia reached pathological levels (>40°C). We discuss common features and differences in neural responses between the brain and spinal cord, two inseparable parts of the central nervous system affected by METH exposure. PMID:25687701

  2. Not just the brain: methamphetamine disrupts blood-spinal cord barrier and induces acute glial activation and structural damage of spinal cord cells.

    PubMed

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Sharma, Hari S

    2015-01-01

    Acute methamphetamine (METH) intoxication induces metabolic brain activation as well as multiple physiological and behavioral responses that could result in life-threatening health complications. Previously, we showed that METH (9 mg/kg) used in freely moving rats induces robust leakage of blood-brain barrier, acute glial activation, vasogenic edema, and structural abnormalities of brain cells. These changes were tightly correlated with drug-induced brain hyperthermia and were greatly potentiated when METH was used at warm ambient temperatures (29°C), inducing more robust and prolonged hyperthermia. Extending this line of research, here we show that METH also strongly increases the permeability of the blood-spinal cord barrier as evidenced by entry of Evans blue and albumin immunoreactivity in T9-12 segments of the spinal cord. Similar to the blood-brain barrier, leakage of bloodspinal cord barrier was associated with acute glial activation, alterations of ionic homeostasis, water tissue accumulation (edema), and structural abnormalities of spinal cord cells. Similar to that in the brain, all neurochemical alterations correlated tightly with drug-induced elevations in brain temperature and they were enhanced when the drug was used at 29°C and brain hyperthermia reached pathological levels (>40°C). We discuss common features and differences in neural responses between the brain and spinal cord, two inseparable parts of the central nervous system affected by METH exposure.

  3. Autoradiographic localization of (3H) gepirone in the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, J.E.; Matheson, G.K. )

    1990-02-26

    Gepirone is an anxiolytic compound active at the 5-HT{sub 1A} receptor site. The purpose of this study was to locate the ({sup 3}H)gepirone in the rat brain and to determine the quantity of gepirone in these locations. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with (3H)gepirone (200 {mu}Ci/kg, i.v.) and decapitated 10 minutes later. To determine specific binding some animals were pretreated with cold gepirone (1 mg/kg) 15 minutes before the (3H)gepirone treatment. The brains were removed, frozen, sectioned, and fixed in formaldehyde vapors. Tritium sensitive film was exposed to the sections for 106 days. Using computerized imaging technology data were obtained from 104 brain sites. Overall, the quantity of (3H)gepirone in each site correlated proportionally with known 5-HT{sub 1A} (in vitro) receptor binding.

  4. Enzyme markers of maternal malnutrition in fetal rat brain.

    PubMed

    Shambaugh, G E; Mankad, B; Derecho, M L; Koehler, R R

    1987-01-01

    The impact of maternal starvation in late gestation on development of some enzymatic mechanisms concerned with neurotransmission and polyamine synthesis was studied in fetal rat brain. Between 17 and 20 d, acetylcholinesterase and choline acetyltransferase activity increased in fetal brains of fed dams, whereas maternal starvation from day 17 to day 20 resulted in heightened acetylcholinesterase but not choline acetyltransferase activity. Ornithine decarboxylase activity on a per-gram wet-weight basis fell between 17 and 20 d in fetal brain from fed dams. Increasing the duration of maternal starvation resulted in a progressive increase in fetal brain ornithine decarboxylase. Arginine and putrescine levels in the brain were lower in fetuses of starved mothers while spermidine and spermine concentrations were unchanged. Since the Km of ornithine decarboxylase for ornithine was found to vary directly with levels of putrescine in fetal brain, lower concentrations of putrescine and greater ornithine decarboxylase activity in fetal brains from starved mothers suggested that levels of this enzyme may be controlled in part by putrescine. Changes in the maternal nutritional state had no effect on the activity of glutamate decarboxylase in fetal brain, and tissue levels of the product, gamma-aminobutyric acid, were unchanged. Thus changes in ornithine decarboxylase and acetylcholinesterase activity in fetal brain may uniquely reflect biochemical alterations consequent to maternal starvation.

  5. DNA microarray unravels rapid changes in transcriptome of MK-801 treated rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Yuka; Kulikova, Sofya P; Shibato, Junko; Rakwal, Randeep; Satoh, Hiroyuki; Pinault, Didier; Masuo, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the impact of MK-801 on gene expression patterns genome wide in rat brain regions. METHODS: Rats were treated with an intraperitoneal injection of MK-801 [0.08 (low-dose) and 0.16 (high-dose) mg/kg] or NaCl (vehicle control). In a first series of experiment, the frontoparietal electrocorticogram was recorded 15 min before and 60 min after injection. In a second series of experiments, the whole brain of each animal was rapidly removed at 40 min post-injection, and different regions were separated: amygdala, cerebral cortex, hippocampus, hypothalamus, midbrain and ventral striatum on ice followed by DNA microarray (4 × 44 K whole rat genome chip) analysis. RESULTS: Spectral analysis revealed that a single systemic injection of MK-801 significantly and selectively augmented the power of baseline gamma frequency (30-80 Hz) oscillations in the frontoparietal electroencephalogram. DNA microarray analysis showed the largest number (up- and down- regulations) of gene expressions in the cerebral cortex (378), midbrain (376), hippocampus (375), ventral striatum (353), amygdala (301), and hypothalamus (201) under low-dose (0.08 mg/kg) of MK-801. Under high-dose (0.16 mg/kg), ventral striatum (811) showed the largest number of gene expression changes. Gene expression changes were functionally categorized to reveal expression of genes and function varies with each brain region. CONCLUSION: Acute MK-801 treatment increases synchrony of baseline gamma oscillations, and causes very early changes in gene expressions in six individual rat brain regions, a first report. PMID:26629322

  6. Waiver of consent in studies of acute brain injury.

    PubMed

    Clifton, Guy L; Knudson, Paula; McDonald, Marilyn

    2002-10-01

    A multicenter trial of hypothermia in patients with acute brain injury, designed to accrue 140 patients per year and randomizing in less than 6 h from injury, enrolled 392 patients. The design was to achieve 33 degrees C within 8 h after injury. For the first 9 months of the trial, the only consent mechanism permitted by federal regulations was prospective, informed consent. In the subsequent 33 months, after a change in federal regulations, waiver of consent could be used when family could not be located. Waiver of consent was used in 62% of patients enrolled. In the first 9 months of the trial, accrual was 65 patients. In the subsequent 3 years, an average yearly accrual was 127 patients. In the first 9 months, time from injury to randomization was 4.5 +/- 1.2 h; time to achievement of target temperature was 11.7 +/- 2.6 h. In years when waiver of consent was permitted, randomization time was 4.1 +/- 1.1 h, and time to target temperature was 7.9 +/- 2.7 h. For all years of the study, waiver of consent was used for 53% of minorities, 47% of unskilled workers, 33% of nonminorities, and 29% of skilled or professional workers. Minorities were underrepresented by 30% in the first 9 months of the study. We conclude that it is impracticable and unjust to perform studies of acute brain injury without use of waiver of consent when the treatment window is less than 6 h. PMID:12427322

  7. Effects of acute administration of ethanol on cerebral glucose utilization in adult alcohol-preferring and alcohol-nonpreferring rats.

    PubMed

    Strother, Wendy N; McBride, William J; Lumeng, Lawrence; Li, Ting-Kai

    2005-02-01

    Local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU) rates, as determined by the [(14)C]-2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) technique, were examined after acute ethanol administration within selected brain regions of alcohol-preferring (P) and alcohol-nonpreferring (NP) rats. Adult male P and NP rats were injected with saline, 0.25 g/kg, or 1.0 g/kg ethanol, intraperitoneally (ip), 10 min before an intravenous bolus of [(14)C]2-DG (125 microCi/kg). Timed arterial blood samples were collected over 45 min and assayed for plasma glucose, ethanol, and [(14)C]2-DG levels. Image densities were determined using quantitative autoradiography and LCGU values calculated. Data were collected from several key limbic, basal ganglionic, cortical, and subcortical structures. Low-dose ethanol (0.25 g/kg) significantly decreased LCGU rates in several brain regions including the medial prefrontal cortex, olfactory tubercles, and the CA1 subregion of the hippocampus of P rats. Low-dose ethanol had no significant effects on LCGU rates in the NP rats. Moderate-dose ethanol (1.0 g/kg) also significantly lowered LCGU rates in many brain regions of P rats, including key limbic structures, such as the medial prefrontal cortex, olfactory tubercles, ventral tegmental area, basolateral nucleus of the amygdala, lateral septum, and ventral pallidum. Moderate-dose ethanol also significantly lowered LCGU rates in the medial prefrontal cortex as well as in the habenula of NP rats. All other regions were unaffected in the NP rats. These findings support the suggestion that certain central nervous system regions of P rats may be more sensitive than those of NP rats to the effects of low to intermediate doses of ethanol.

  8. Norepinephrine content in discrete brain areas and neurohypophysial vasopressin in rats after a 9-d spaceflight (SLS-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fareh, Jeannette; Cottet-Emard, Jean-Marie; Pequignot, Jean-Marc; Jahns, Gary; Meylor, John; Viso, Michel; Vassaux, Didier; Gauquelin, Guillemette; Gharib, Claude

    1993-01-01

    The norepinephrine (NE) content in discrete brain areas and the vasopressin content in the neurohypophysial system were assessed in rats after a 9-d spaceflight and after a recovery period. The NE content in the locus coeruleus decreased significantly in spaceflight rats, but showed no difference between control and flight animals after a 9-d recovery. These findings were probably due to an acute stress undergone during landing. The NE content was unchanged in the A2 and A5 cell groups. In rats flown aboard SLS-1, the vasopressin content was increased in the posterior pituitary, and was significantly decreased in the hypothalamus. We conclude that the NE depletion in the locus coeruleus and the alteration in vasopressin release were consistent with an acute stress, likely occurring during and/or after landing. These changes tend to mask the actual neuroendocrine modifications caused by microgravity.

  9. Male adolescent rats display blunted cytokine responses in the CNS after acute ethanol or lipopolysaccharide exposure.

    PubMed

    Doremus-Fitzwater, Tamara L; Gano, Anny; Paniccia, Jacqueline E; Deak, Terrence

    2015-09-01

    Alcohol induces widespread changes in cytokine expression, with recent data from our laboratory having demonstrated that, during acute ethanol intoxication, adult rats exhibit consistent increases in interleukin (IL)-6 mRNA expression in several brain regions, while showing reductions in IL-1 and TNFα expression. Given evidence indicating that adolescence may be an ontogenetic period in which some neuroimmune processes and cells may not yet have fully matured, the purpose of the current experiments was to examine potential age differences in the central cytokine response of adolescent (P31-33days of age) and adult (69-71days of age) rats to either an acute immune (lipopolysaccharide; LPS) or non-immune challenge (ethanol). In Experiment 1, male Sprague-Dawley rats were given an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of either sterile saline, LPS (250μg/kg), or ethanol (4-g/kg), and then trunk blood and brain tissue were collected 3h later for measurement of blood ethanol concentrations (BECs), plasma endotoxin, and central mRNA expression of several immune-related gene targets. In Experiment 2, the response to intragastrically (i.g.) administered ethanol was examined and compared to animals given tap water (i.g.). Results showed that LPS stimulated robust increases in expression of IL-1, IL-6, TNFα, and IκBα in the hippocampus, PVN, and amygdala, and that these increases were generally less pronounced in adolescents relative to adults. Following an i.p. ethanol challenge, IL-6 and IκBα expression was significantly increased in both ages in the PVN and amygdala, and adults exhibited even greater increases in IκBα than adolescents. I.g. administration of ethanol also increased IL-6 and IκBα expression in all three brain regions, with hippocampal IL-6 elevated even more so in adults compared to adolescents. Furthermore, assessment of plasma endotoxin concentrations revealed (i) whereas robust increases in plasma endotoxin were observed in adults injected with LPS

  10. Brain damage from sup 125 I brachytherapy evaluated by MR imaging, a blood-brain barrier tracer, and light and electron microscopy in a rat model

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, M.; Marotta, T.; Stewart, P.; Glen, J.; Resch, L.; Henkelman, M. )

    1990-10-01

    Changes in normal rat brain were studied acutely, and at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months following interstitial brachytherapy with high-activity {sup 125}I seeds. An 80-Gy radiation dose was administered to an area with a 5.5-mm radius. Effects were measured with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (with and without gadolinium enhancement), leakage of horseradish peroxidase (HRP), electron microscopy, and light microscopy. Significant histological damage was seen at radiation doses above 295 Gy, and breakdown of the blood-brain barrier was observed only in tissue receiving a dose of 165 Gy or greater. Blood-brain barrier breakdown increased up to the 6-month time point, and thereafter appeared to stabilize or decrease. The area of blood-brain barrier disruption indicated by gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging was greater than that indicated by leakage of HRP.

  11. Chronic Methamphetamine Effects on Brain Structure and Function in Rats.

    PubMed

    Thanos, Panayotis K; Kim, Ronald; Delis, Foteini; Ananth, Mala; Chachati, George; Rocco, Mark J; Masad, Ihssan; Muniz, Jose A; Grant, Samuel C; Gold, Mark S; Cadet, Jean Lud; Volkow, Nora D

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) addiction is a growing epidemic worldwide. Chronic MA use has been shown to lead to neurotoxicity in rodents and humans. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies in MA users have shown enlarged striatal volumes and positron emission tomography (PET) studies have shown decreased brain glucose metabolism (BGluM) in the striatum of detoxified MA users. The present study examines structural changes of the brain, observes microglial activation, and assesses changes in brain function, in response to chronic MA treatment. Rats were randomly split into three distinct treatment groups and treated daily for four months, via i.p. injection, with saline (controls), or low dose (LD) MA (4 mg/kg), or high dose (HD) MA (8 mg/kg). Sixteen weeks into the treatment period, rats were injected with a glucose analog, [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), and their brains were scanned with micro-PET to assess regional BGluM. At the end of MA treatment, magnetic resonance imaging at 21T was performed on perfused rats to determine regional brain volume and in vitro [3H]PK 11195 autoradiography was performed on fresh-frozen brain tissue to measure microglia activation. When compared with controls, chronic HD MA-treated rats had enlarged striatal volumes and increases in [3H]PK 11195 binding in striatum, the nucleus accumbens, frontal cortical areas, the rhinal cortices, and the cerebellar nuclei. FDG microPET imaging showed that LD MA-treated rats had higher BGluM in insular and somatosensory cortices, face sensory nucleus of the thalamus, and brainstem reticular formation, while HD MA-treated rats had higher BGluM in primary and higher order somatosensory and the retrosplenial cortices, compared with controls. HD and LD MA-treated rats had lower BGluM in the tail of the striatum, rhinal cortex, and subiculum and HD MA also had lower BGluM in hippocampus than controls. These results corroborate clinical findings and help further examine the mechanisms behind MA

  12. Chronic Methamphetamine Effects on Brain Structure and Function in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Thanos, Panayotis K.; Kim, Ronald; Delis, Foteini; Ananth, Mala; Chachati, George; Rocco, Mark J.; Masad, Ihssan; Muniz, Jose A.; Grant, Samuel C.; Gold, Mark S.; Cadet, Jean Lud; Volkow, Nora D.

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) addiction is a growing epidemic worldwide. Chronic MA use has been shown to lead to neurotoxicity in rodents and humans. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies in MA users have shown enlarged striatal volumes and positron emission tomography (PET) studies have shown decreased brain glucose metabolism (BGluM) in the striatum of detoxified MA users. The present study examines structural changes of the brain, observes microglial activation, and assesses changes in brain function, in response to chronic MA treatment. Rats were randomly split into three distinct treatment groups and treated daily for four months, via i.p. injection, with saline (controls), or low dose (LD) MA (4 mg/kg), or high dose (HD) MA (8 mg/kg). Sixteen weeks into the treatment period, rats were injected with a glucose analog, [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), and their brains were scanned with micro-PET to assess regional BGluM. At the end of MA treatment, magnetic resonance imaging at 21T was performed on perfused rats to determine regional brain volume and in vitro [3H]PK 11195 autoradiography was performed on fresh-frozen brain tissue to measure microglia activation. When compared with controls, chronic HD MA-treated rats had enlarged striatal volumes and increases in [3H]PK 11195 binding in striatum, the nucleus accumbens, frontal cortical areas, the rhinal cortices, and the cerebellar nuclei. FDG microPET imaging showed that LD MA-treated rats had higher BGluM in insular and somatosensory cortices, face sensory nucleus of the thalamus, and brainstem reticular formation, while HD MA-treated rats had higher BGluM in primary and higher order somatosensory and the retrosplenial cortices, compared with controls. HD and LD MA-treated rats had lower BGluM in the tail of the striatum, rhinal cortex, and subiculum and HD MA also had lower BGluM in hippocampus than controls. These results corroborate clinical findings and help further examine the mechanisms behind MA

  13. Elimination Half-Lives of Acute Phase Proteins in Rats and Beagle Dogs During Acute Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kuribayashi, Takashi; Seita, Tetsuro; Momotani, Eiichi; Yamazaki, Shunsuke; Hagimori, Kohei; Yamamoto, Shizuo

    2015-08-01

    The half-lives of typical acute phase proteins in rats and beagle dogs during acute inflammation were investigated. Acute inflammation was induced by injection of turpentine oil in rats and administration of indomethacin in beagle dogs. Serum concentrations of α2-macroglobulin (α2M) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and α1-acid glycoprotein (AAG) was measured by single radial immunodiffusion. Half-life was calculated as 0.693/elimination rate constant (K). The mean half-lives in the terminal elimination phase of α2M and AAG were 68.1 and 164.8 h, respectively. The half-life of AAG was significantly longer than that of α2M. Mean half-lives in the terminal elimination phase of CRP and AAG were 161.9 and 304.4 h, respectively. The half-life of AAG was significantly longer than that of CRP in beagle dogs. No significant differences in the half-life of AAG were observed between rats and beagle dogs. Furthermore, serum concentrations in the terminal elimination phase could be simulated with the K data acquired in this study.

  14. Decreased myeloperoxidase expressing cells in the aged rat brain after excitotoxic damage.

    PubMed

    Campuzano, Oscar; Castillo-Ruiz, Maria del Mar; Acarin, Laia; Gonzalez, Berta; Castellano, Bernardo

    2011-09-01

    Brain aging is associated to several morphological and functional alterations that influence the evolution and outcome of CNS damage. Acute brain injury such as an excitotoxic insult induces initial tissue damage followed by associated inflammation and oxidative stress, partly attributed to neutrophil recruitment and the expression of oxidative enzymes such as myeloperoxidase (MPO), among others. However, to date, very few studies have focused on how age can influence neutrophil infiltration after acute brain damage. Therefore, to evaluate the age-dependent pattern of neutrophil cell infiltration following an excitotoxic injury, intrastriatal injection of N-methyl-d-aspartate was performed in young and aged male Wistar rats. Animals were sacrificed at different times between 12h post-lesion (hpl) to 14 days post-lesion (dpl). Cryostat sections were processed for myeloperoxidase (MPO) immunohistochemistry, and double labeling for either neuronal cells (NeuN), astrocytes (GFAP), perivascular macrophages (ED-2), or microglia/macrophages (tomato lectin histochemistry). Our observations showed that MPO + cells were observed in the injured striatum from 12 hpl (when maximum values were found) until 7 dpl, when cell density was strongly diminished. However, at all survival times analyzed, the overall density of MPO + cells was lower in the aged versus the adult injured striatum. MPO + cells were mainly identified as neutrophils (especially at 12 hpl and 1 dpl), but it should be noted that MPO + neurons and microglia/macrophages were also found. MPO + neurons were most commonly observed at 12 hpl and reduced in the aged. MPO + microglia/macrophages were the main population expressing MPO from 3 dpl, when density was also reduced in aged subjects. These results point to neutrophil infiltration as another important factor contributing to the different responses of the adult and aged brain to damage, highlighting the need of using aged animals for the study of acute age

  15. Developmental Vitamin D3 deficiency alters the adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Féron, F; Burne, T H J; Brown, J; Smith, E; McGrath, J J; Mackay-Sim, A; Eyles, D W

    2005-03-15

    There is growing evidence that Vitamin D(3) (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3)) is involved in brain development. We have recently shown that the brains of newborn rats from Vitamin D(3) deficient dams were larger than controls, had increased cell proliferation, larger lateral ventricles, and reduced cortical thickness. Brains from these animals also had reduced expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor. The aim of the current study was to examine if there were any permanent outcomes into adulthood when the offspring of Vitamin D(3) deficient dams were restored to a normal diet. The brains of adult rats were examined at 10 weeks of age after Vitamin D(3) deficiency until birth or weaning. Compared to controls animals that were exposed to transient early Vitamin D(3) deficiency had larger lateral ventricles, reduced NGF protein content, and reduced expression of a number genes involved in neuronal structure, i.e. neurofilament or MAP-2 or neurotransmission, i.e. GABA-A(alpha4). We conclude that transient early life hypovitaminosis D(3) not only disrupts brain development but leads to persistent changes in the adult brain. In light of the high incidence of hypovitaminosis D(3) in women of child-bearing age, the public health implications of these findings warrant attention. PMID:15763180

  16. Alterations in blood-brain barrier function following acute hypertension: comparison of the blood-to-brain transfer of horseradish peroxidase with that of alpha-aminisobutyric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, M.D.B.

    1985-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) selectively restricts the blood-to-brain passage of many solutes owing to unique properties of cerebrovascular endothelial cell membranes. To date, experimental study of the BBB has been accomplished primarily through the use of two different methodological approaches. Morphological studies have mostly employed large molecular weight (MW) tracers to detect morphological alterations underlying increased permeability. Physiological studies, employing smaller, more physiologic tracers have successfully described, quantitatively, certain functional aspects of blood-to-brain transfer. The current work attempts to merge these two approaches and to consider barrier function/dysfunction from both a morphological and a functional perspective. Specifically, the study compares in rats, following acute hypertension, the cerebrovascular passage of /sup 14/C-alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) and that of horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The blood-to-brain passage of AIB and HRP were compared following acute hypertension, with regard to both the distributions of the tracer extravasation patterns and the magnitude of tracer extravasation. The results of this study suggest that traditional morphological barrier studies alone do not reveal all aspects of altered barrier status and that multiple mechanisms underlying increased BBB permeability may operate simultaneously during BBB dysfunction.

  17. Acute Gonadotroph and Somatotroph Hormonal Suppression after Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Justin; Dusick, Joshua R.; McArthur, David L.; Cohan, Pejman; Wang, Christina; Swerdloff, Ronald; Boscardin, W. John

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Hormonal dysfunction is a known consequence of moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). In this study we determined the incidence, time course, and clinical correlates of acute post-TBI gonadotroph and somatotroph dysfunction. Patients had daily measurement of serum luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), testosterone, estradiol, growth hormone, and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) for up to 10 days post-injury. Values below the fifth percentile of a healthy cohort were considered abnormal, as were non-measurable growth hormone (GH) values. Outcome measures were frequency and time course of hormonal suppression, injury characteristics, and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score. The cohort consisted of 101 patients (82% males; mean age 35 years; Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS] score ≤8 in 87%). In men, 100% had at least one low testosterone value, and 93% of all values were low; in premenopausal women, 43% had at least one low estradiol value, and 39% of all values were low. Non-measurable GH levels occurred in 38% of patients, while low IGF-1 levels were observed in 77% of patients, but tended to normalize within 10 days. Multivariate analysis revealed associations of younger age with low FSH and low IGF-1, acute anemia with low IGF-1, and older age and higher body mass index (BMI) with low GH. Hormonal suppression was not predictive of GOS score. These results indicate that within 10 days of complicated mild, moderate, and severe TBI, testosterone suppression occurs in all men and estrogen suppression occurs in over 40% of women. Transient somatotroph suppression occurs in over 75% of patients. Although this acute neuroendocrine dysfunction may not be TBI-specific, low gonadal steroids, IGF-1, and GH may be important given their putative neuroprotective functions. PMID:20214417

  18. A peptide for targeted, systemic delivery of imaging and therapeutic compounds into acute brain injuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Aman P.; Scodeller, Pablo; Hussain, Sazid; Joo, Jinmyoung; Kwon, Ester; Braun, Gary B.; Mölder, Tarmo; She, Zhi-Gang; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Ranscht, Barbara; Krajewski, Stan; Teesalu, Tambet; Bhatia, Sangeeta; Sailor, Michael J.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2016-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major health and socio-economic problem, but no pharmacological agent is currently approved for the treatment of acute TBI. Thus, there is a great need for advances in this field. Here, we describe a short peptide (sequence CAQK) identified by in vivo phage display screening in mice with acute brain injury. The CAQK peptide selectively binds to injured mouse and human brain, and systemically injected CAQK specifically homes to sites of brain injury in mouse models. The CAQK target is a proteoglycan complex upregulated in brain injuries. Coupling to CAQK increased injury site accumulation of systemically administered molecules ranging from a drug-sized molecule to nanoparticles. CAQK-coated nanoparticles containing silencing oligonucleotides provided the first evidence of gene silencing in injured brain parenchyma by systemically administered siRNA. These findings present an effective targeting strategy for the delivery of therapeutics in clinical management of acute brain injuries.

  19. A peptide for targeted, systemic delivery of imaging and therapeutic compounds into acute brain injuries

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Aman P.; Scodeller, Pablo; Hussain, Sazid; Joo, Jinmyoung; Kwon, Ester; Braun, Gary B.; Mölder, Tarmo; She, Zhi-Gang; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Ranscht, Barbara; Krajewski, Stan; Teesalu, Tambet; Bhatia, Sangeeta; Sailor, Michael J.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major health and socio-economic problem, but no pharmacological agent is currently approved for the treatment of acute TBI. Thus, there is a great need for advances in this field. Here, we describe a short peptide (sequence CAQK) identified by in vivo phage display screening in mice with acute brain injury. The CAQK peptide selectively binds to injured mouse and human brain, and systemically injected CAQK specifically homes to sites of brain injury in mouse models. The CAQK target is a proteoglycan complex upregulated in brain injuries. Coupling to CAQK increased injury site accumulation of systemically administered molecules ranging from a drug-sized molecule to nanoparticles. CAQK-coated nanoparticles containing silencing oligonucleotides provided the first evidence of gene silencing in injured brain parenchyma by systemically administered siRNA. These findings present an effective targeting strategy for the delivery of therapeutics in clinical management of acute brain injuries. PMID:27351915

  20. A peptide for targeted, systemic delivery of imaging and therapeutic compounds into acute brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Mann, Aman P; Scodeller, Pablo; Hussain, Sazid; Joo, Jinmyoung; Kwon, Ester; Braun, Gary B; Mölder, Tarmo; She, Zhi-Gang; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Ranscht, Barbara; Krajewski, Stan; Teesalu, Tambet; Bhatia, Sangeeta; Sailor, Michael J; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major health and socio-economic problem, but no pharmacological agent is currently approved for the treatment of acute TBI. Thus, there is a great need for advances in this field. Here, we describe a short peptide (sequence CAQK) identified by in vivo phage display screening in mice with acute brain injury. The CAQK peptide selectively binds to injured mouse and human brain, and systemically injected CAQK specifically homes to sites of brain injury in mouse models. The CAQK target is a proteoglycan complex upregulated in brain injuries. Coupling to CAQK increased injury site accumulation of systemically administered molecules ranging from a drug-sized molecule to nanoparticles. CAQK-coated nanoparticles containing silencing oligonucleotides provided the first evidence of gene silencing in injured brain parenchyma by systemically administered siRNA. These findings present an effective targeting strategy for the delivery of therapeutics in clinical management of acute brain injuries. PMID:27351915

  1. Nature of stress: differential effects on brain acetylcholinesterase activity and memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Das, Amitava; Rai, Deepak; Dikshit, Madhu; Palit, Gautam; Nath, Chandishwar

    2005-09-16

    Effect of acute, chronic-predictable and chronic-unpredictable stress on memory and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) was investigated in rats. The animals were subjected to 3 type of stressors--(1) acute immobilization stress, (2) chronic-predictable stress i.e., immobilization daily for 5 consecutive days and (3) chronic-unpredictable stress that included reversal of light/dark cycle, over-night fasting, forced-swimming, immobilization and forced exercise in random unpredictable manner daily for 5 consecutive days. Learning and memory function was studied by single trial Passive avoidance test. AChE activity was assayed spectrophotometrically in the detergent (DS) and salt (SS) soluble fractions in different brain regions. Learning was obtained in acute and chronic-predictable stress groups but not in chronic-unpredictable group. Acute, chronic-predictable and chronic-unpredictable stress caused significant decrease in AChE activity in the DS fraction of cortex, hippocampus and hypothalamus as compared to control. Results indicate that AChE in DS fraction is predominantly affected in stressed and stressed-trained group but cognition is affected only by chronic-unpredictable stress. In acute and chronic-predictable groups the decreased AChE activity in the hippocampal DS fraction during learning may be responsible to maintain cognitive function by enhancing the cholinergic activity.

  2. Vasopressin receptors in the brain, liver and kidney of rats following osmotic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Landgraf, R; Szot, P; Dorsa, D M

    1991-03-29

    The binding site concentration (Bmax) and equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) for [3H]-arginine vasopressin (AVP) binding sites were measured in limbic brain areas (septum, dorsal hippocampus, amygdala) and liver and kidney of control and osmotically stimulated male Wistar rats. Membrane binding was performed in these five areas 30, 60 and 180 min following intraperitoneal injection of hypertonic saline. This paradigm resulted in no significant change in binding characteristics in the septum, dorsal hippocampus, amygdala and liver from control treated rats. In contrast, the kidney Bmax was significantly reduced 60 min following osmotic stimulation, with no effect on affinity. These results also suggest that AVP receptors in the CNS are relatively resistant to regulatory effects of an acute AVP exposure. PMID:1828184

  3. Correlation between subacute sensorimotor deficits and brain water content after surgical brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    McBride, Devin W; Wang, Yuechun; Sherchan, Prativa; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2015-09-01

    Brain edema is a major contributor to poor outcome and reduced quality of life after surgical brain injury (SBI). Although SBI pathophysiology is well-known, the correlation between cerebral edema and neurological deficits has not been thoroughly examined in the rat model of SBI. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine the correlation between brain edema and deficits in standard sensorimotor neurobehavior tests for rats subjected to SBI. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to either sham surgery or surgical brain injury via partial frontal lobectomy. All animals were tested for neurological deficits 24 post-SBI and fourteen were also tested 72 h after surgery using seven common behavior tests: modified Garcia neuroscore (Neuroscore), beam walking, corner turn test, forelimb placement test, adhesive removal test, beam balance test, and foot fault test. After assessing the functional outcome, animals were euthanized for brain water content measurement. Surgical brain injury resulted in significantly elevated frontal lobe brain water content 24 and 72 h after surgery compared to that of sham animals. In all behavior tests, significance was observed between sham and SBI animals. However, a correlation between brain water content and functional outcome was observed for all tests except Neuroscore. The selection of behavior tests is critical to determine the effectiveness of therapeutics. Based on this study's results, we recommend using beam walking, the corner turn test, the beam balance test, and the foot fault test since correlations with brain water content were observed at both 24 and 72 h post-SBI. PMID:25975171

  4. Rapamycin suppresses brain aging in senescence-accelerated OXYS rats.

    PubMed

    Kolosova, Nataliya G; Vitovtov, Anton O; Muraleva, Natalia A; Akulov, Andrey E; Stefanova, Natalia A; Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2013-06-01

    Cellular and organismal aging are driven in part by the MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) pathway and rapamycin extends life span inC elegans, Drosophila and mice. Herein, we investigated effects of rapamycin on brain aging in OXYS rats. Previously we found, in OXYS rats, an early development of age-associated pathological phenotypes similar to several geriatric disorders in humans, including cerebral dysfunctions. Behavioral alterations as well as learning and memory deficits develop by 3 months. Here we show that rapamycin treatment (0.1 or 0.5 mg/kg as a food mixture daily from the age of 1.5 to 3.5 months) decreased anxiety and improved locomotor and exploratory behavior in OXYS rats. In untreated OXYS rats, MRI revealed an increase of the area of hippocampus, substantial hydrocephalus and 2-fold increased area of the lateral ventricles. Rapamycin treatment prevented these abnormalities, erasing the difference between OXYS and Wister rats (used as control). All untreated OXYS rats showed signs of neurodegeneration, manifested by loci of demyelination. Rapamycin decreased the percentage of animals with demyelination and the number of loci. Levels of Tau and phospho-Tau (T181) were increased in OXYS rats (compared with Wistar). Rapamycin significantly decreased Tau and inhibited its phosphorylation in the hippocampus of OXYS and Wistar rats. Importantly, rapamycin treatment caused a compensatory increase in levels of S6 and correspondingly levels of phospo-S6 in the frontal cortex, indicating that some downstream events were compensatory preserved, explaining the lack of toxicity. We conclude that rapamycin in low chronic doses can suppress brain aging.

  5. Oxidation of ethanol in the rat brain and effects associated with chronic ethanol exposure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Du, Hongying; Jiang, Lihong; Ma, Xiaoxian; de Graaf, Robin A; Behar, Kevin L; Mason, Graeme F

    2013-08-27

    It has been reported that chronic and acute alcohol exposure decreases cerebral glucose metabolism and increases acetate oxidation. However, it remains unknown how much ethanol the living brain can oxidize directly and whether such a process would be affected by alcohol exposure. The questions have implications for reward, oxidative damage, and long-term adaptation to drinking. One group of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats was treated with ethanol vapor and the other given room air. After 3 wk the rats received i.v. [2-(13)C]ethanol and [1, 2-(13)C2]acetate for 2 h, and then the brain was fixed, removed, and divided into neocortex and subcortical tissues for measurement of (13)C isotopic labeling of glutamate and glutamine by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Ethanol oxidation was seen to occur both in the cortex and the subcortex. In ethanol-naïve rats, cortical oxidation of ethanol occurred at rates of 0.017 ± 0.002 µmol/min/g in astroglia and 0.014 ± 0.003 µmol/min/g in neurons, and chronic alcohol exposure increased the astroglial ethanol oxidation to 0.028 ± 0.002 µmol/min/g (P = 0.001) with an insignificant effect on neuronal ethanol oxidation. Compared with published rates of overall oxidative metabolism in astroglia and neurons, ethanol provided 12.3 ± 1.4% of cortical astroglial oxidation in ethanol-naïve rats and 20.2 ± 1.5% in ethanol-treated rats. For cortical astroglia and neurons combined, the ethanol oxidation for naïve and treated rats was 3.2 ± 0.3% and 3.8 ± 0.2% of total oxidation, respectively. (13)C labeling from subcortical oxidation of ethanol was similar to that seen in cortex but was not affected by chronic ethanol exposure.

  6. BEHAVIORAL CHARACTERISTICS OF RATS ON VARIOUS HIERARCHICAL LEVEL CAUSED BY ACUTE INFORMATIONAL STRESS.

    PubMed

    Matitaishvili, T; Domianidze, T; Emukhvari, N; Khananashvili, M

    2016-03-01

    The aim of our research was to study behavioral indices of rats standing on various hierarchical level in the conditions of acute informational stress as well as their resistance to stress taking into account their social status. The Animal's behavior has been studied in conflict and agonist conditions against the background of high food and thirst motivation. After determination of hierarchical relations the stressing procedure of two active avoidance reactions was performed simultaneously during one trial (14 days). During the experiment, behavioral indices of rats induced by stressing procedure were registered. We used "open field" test in order to assess animals' emotional state. The studies performed by us demonstrated behavioral characteristics of animals standing on various hierarchical level. The obtained results showed that after stressing all the animals of the group under stressogenic influence of equal strength, behavior of rats did nor reliably differ in conflict situations. Dominants standing on high hierarchical level remained active in both conflict situations. The impact of stress on their behavior was less detected. Dominant animal maintained its hierarchical status. Submissive rats were more greatly influenced by stress. The obtained results confirmed that dominant animals were characterized with more comprehensively developed self-regulating mechanisms of brain. PMID:27119838

  7. Quantification of [11C]yohimbine binding to α2 adrenoceptors in rat brain in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Jenny-Ann; Landau, Anne M; Wong, Dean F; Jakobsen, Steen; Nahimi, Adjmal; Doudet, Doris J; Gjedde, Albert

    2015-01-01

    We quantified the binding potentials (BPND) of [11C]yohimbine binding in rat brain to alpha-2 adrenoceptors to evaluate [11C]yohimbine as an in vivo marker of noradrenergic neurotransmission and to examine its sensitivity to the level of noradrenaline. Dual [11C]yohimbine dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) recordings were applied to five Sprague Dawley rats at baseline, followed by acute amphetamine administration (2 mg/kg) to induce elevation of the endogenous level of noradrenaline. The volume of distribution (VT) of [11C]yohimbine was obtained using Logan plot with arterial plasma input. Because alpha-2 adrenoceptors are distributed throughout the brain, the estimation of the BPND is complicated by the absence of an anatomic region of no displaceable binding. We used the Inhibition plot to acquire the reference volume, VND, from which we calculated the BPND. Acute pharmacological challenge with amphetamine induced a significant decline of [11C]yohimbine BPND of ~38% in all volumes of interest. The BPND was greatest in the thalamus and striatum, followed in descending order by, frontal cortex, pons, and cerebellum. The experimental data demonstrate that [11C]yohimbine binding is sensitive to a challenge known to increase the extracellular level of noradrenaline, which can benefit future PET investigations of pathologic conditions related to disrupted noradrenergic neurotransmission. PMID:25564241

  8. Alterations of Amino Acid Level in Depressed Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Pei; Li, Xuechun; Tian, Jingchen; Jing, Fu; Qu, Changhai; Lin, Longfei; Zhang, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Amino-acid neurotransmitter system dysfunction plays a major role in the pathophysiology of depression. Several studies have demonstrated the potential of amino acids as a source of neuro-specific biomarkers could be used in future diagnosis of depression. Only partial amino acids such as glycine and asparagine were determined from certain parts of rats' brain included hippocampi and cerebral cortex in previous studies. However, according to systematic biology, amino acids in different area of brain are interacted and interrelated. Hence, the determination of 34 amino acids through entire rats' brain was conducted in this study in order to demonstrate more possibilities for biomarkers of depression by discovering other potential amino acids in more areas of rats' brain. As a result, 4 amino acids (L-aspartic acid, L-glutamine, taurine and γ-amino-n-butyric acid) among 34 were typically identified as potentially primary biomarkers of depression by data statistics. Meanwhile, an antidepressant called Fluoxetine was employed to verify other potential amino acids which were not identified by data statistics. Eventually, we found L-α-amino-adipic acid could also become a new potentially secondary biomarker of depression after drug validation. In conclusion, we suggested that L-aspartic acid, L-glutamine, taurine, γ-amino-n-butyric acid and L-α-amino-adipic acid might become potential biomarkers for future diagnosis of depression and development of antidepressant. PMID:25352755

  9. Rat brain acetylcholinesterase visualized with [11C]physostigmine.

    PubMed

    Planas, A M; Crouzel, C; Hinnen, F; Jobert, A; Né, F; DiGiamberardino, L; Tavitian, B

    1994-06-01

    Physostigmine, a powerful cholinesterase inhibitor, has recently been labelled with 11C in view of its potential application for in vivo imaging of cerebral acetylcholinesterase (AChE) using positron emission tomography. Here we carried out autoradiography of the rat brain using [11C]physostigmine in order to characterize the cerebral targets of this ligand. Autoradiograms were obtained using phosphor storage plates which, compared to autoradiographic films, greatly improved the quality of 11C images. Following autoradiography, brain sections were stained for AChE activity, allowing a direct comparison of autoradiographic and histoenzymatic localizations. The distributions of 11C label and of AChE activity were found to be essentially super-imposable, both after in vivo injection of and after in vitro incubation with [11C]physostigmine. Densitometric analysis showed that radioactivity and enzymatic activity distributions were regionally correlated. The fixation of [11C]physostigmine to cerebral tissue was abolished after incubation of the rat brain sections with BW 284C51, a specific AChE inhibitor, but not after incubation with iso-OMPA, a specific inhibitor of butyrylcholinesterase. Unilateral excitotoxic lesions of the striatum that eliminated local AChE expression concomitantly reduced the binding of the ligand in the lesioned area. These results indicate that autoradiographic images of the rat brain obtained with [11C]physostigmine reflect AChE distribution, thus supporting the use of this radioligand to trace cerebral AChE activity in humans with positron emission tomography.

  10. Alcohol induced changes in phosphoinositide signaling system in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, S.; Piano, M.; Schwertz, D.; Davis, J.; Pandey, G. )

    1991-03-11

    Agonist-induced phosphoinositide break down functions as a signal generating system in a manner similar to the C-AMP system. In order to examine if the changes produced by chronic ethanol treatment on membrane lipid composition and metabolism effect the cellular functions of the neuron, the authors have examined the effect of chronic ethanol exposure on norepinephrine (NE) serotonin (5HT) and calcium ionophore (CI) stimulated phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis in rat cortical slices. Rats were maintained on liber-decarli diet alcohol and control liquid diet containing isocaloric sucrose substitute for two months. They were then sacrificed and brain was removed for determination of PI turnover. 5HT stimulated {sup 3}H- inositol monophosphate ({sup 3}H-IPI) formation was significantly lower in the cortex of alcohol treated rats as compared to control rats. However, neither CI nor NE stimulated IP1 formation was significantly different from control rats. The results thus indicate that chronic exposure to ethanol decreases 5HT induced PI breakdown in rat cortex. In order to examine if this decrease is related to a decrease in 5HT2 receptors, or decreased in coupling of receptor to the effector pathway, the authors are currently determining the number and affinity of 5HT2 receptors in alcohol treated rats.

  11. Abdominal surgery activates nesfatin-1 immunoreactive brain nuclei in rats.

    PubMed

    Stengel, Andreas; Goebel, Miriam; Wang, Lixin; Taché, Yvette

    2010-02-01

    Abdominal surgery-induced postoperative gastric ileus is well established to induce Fos expression in specific brain nuclei in rats within 2-h after surgery. However, the phenotype of activated neurons has not been thoroughly characterized. Nesfatin-1 was recently discovered in the rat hypothalamus as a new anorexigenic peptide that also inhibits gastric emptying and is widely distributed in rat brain autonomic nuclei suggesting an involvement in stress responses. Therefore, we investigated whether abdominal surgery activates nesfatin-1-immunoreactive (ir) neurons in the rat brain. Two hours after abdominal surgery with cecal palpation under short isoflurane anesthesia or anesthesia alone, rats were transcardially perfused and brains processed for double immunohistochemical labeling of Fos and nesfatin-1. Abdominal surgery, compared to anesthesia alone, induced Fos expression in neurons of the supraoptic nucleus (SON), paraventricular nucleus (PVN), locus coeruleus (LC), Edinger-Westphal nucleus (EW), rostral raphe pallidus (rRPa), nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and ventrolateral medulla (VLM). Double Fos/nesfatin-1 labeling showed that of the activated cells, 99% were nesfatin-1-immunoreactive in the SON, 91% in the LC, 82% in the rRPa, 74% in the EW and VLM, 71% in the anterior parvicellular PVN, 47% in the lateral magnocellular PVN, 41% in the medial magnocellular PVN, 14% in the NTS and 9% in the medial parvicellular PVN. These data established nesfatin-1 immunoreactive neurons in specific nuclei of the hypothalamus and brainstem as part of the neuronal response to abdominal surgery and suggest a possible implication of nesfatin-1 in the alterations of food intake and gastric transit associated with such a stressor. PMID:19944727

  12. Human and rat brain lipofuscin proteome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The accumulation of an autofluorescent pigment called lipofuscin in neurons is an invariable hallmark of brain aging. So far, this material has been considered to be waste material without particular relevance for cellular pathology. However, two lines of evidence argue that lipofuscin may have yet ...

  13. Nerve growth factor receptor molecules in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Taniuchi, M.; Schweitzer, J.B.; Johnson, E.M. Jr.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have developed a method to immunoprecipitate rat nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor proteins and have applied the method to detect NGF receptor molecules in the rat brain. Crosslinking /sup 125/I-labeled NGF to either PC12 cells or cultured rat sympathetic neurons yielded two radiolabeled molecules (90 kDa and 220 kDa) that were immunoprecipitated by monoclonal antibody 192-IgG. Further, 192-IgG precipitated two radiolabeled proteins, with the expected sizes (80 kDa and 210 kDa) of noncrosslinked NGF receptor components, from among numerous surface-iodinated PC12 cell proteins. These results demonstrate the specific immunoprecipitation of NGF receptor molecules by 192-IgG. They applied the /sup 125/I-NGF crosslinking and 192-IgG-mediated immunoprecipitation procedures to plasma membrane preparations of rat brain: NGF receptor molecules of the same molecular masses as the peripheral receptor components were consistently detected in all regions and in preparations from whole brains. Removal of the peripheral sympathetic innervation of the brain did not eliminate these NGF receptor proteins, indicating that the receptor is endogenous to central nervous system tissues. They also observed retrograde transport of /sup 125/I-labeled 192-IgG from the parietal cortex to the nucleus basalis and from the hippocampus to the nucleus of the diagonal band of Broca and the medial septal nucleus. These findings demonstrate the presence in brain of NGF receptor molecules indistinguishable from those of the peripheral nervous system.

  14. Determination of boron distribution in rat's brain, kidney and liver.

    PubMed

    Pazirandeh, Ali; Jameie, Behnam; Zargar, Maysam

    2009-07-01

    To determine relative boron distribution in rat's brain, liver and kidney, a mixture of boric acid and borax, was used. After transcardial injection of the solution, the animals were sacrificed and the brain, kidney and liver were removed. The coronal sections of certain areas of the brain were prepared by freezing microtome. The slices were sandwiched within two pieces of CR-39. The samples were bombarded in a thermal neutron field of the TRR pneumatic facility. The alpha tracks are registered on CR-39 after being etched in NaOH. The boron distribution was determined by counting these alpha tracks CR-39 plastics. The distribution showed non-uniformity in brain, liver and kidney. PMID:19375929

  15. Correlation Between Subacute Sensorimotor Deficits and Brain Edema in Rats after Surgical Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    McBride, Devin W; Wang, Yuechun; Adam, Loic; Oudin, Guillaume; Louis, Jean-Sébastien; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2016-01-01

    No matter how carefully a neurosurgical procedure is performed, it is intrinsically linked to postoperative deficits resulting in delayed healing caused by direct trauma, hemorrhage, and brain edema, termed surgical brain injury (SBI). Cerebral edema occurs several hours after SBI and is a major contributor to patient morbidity, resulting in increased postoperative care. Currently, the correlation between functional recovery and brain edema after SBI remains unknown. Here we examine the correlation between neurological function and brain water content in rats 42 h after SBI. SBI was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats via frontal lobectomy. Twenty-four hours post-ictus animals were subjected to four neurobehavior tests: composite Garcia neuroscore, beam walking test, corner turn test, and beam balance test. Animals were then sacrificed for right-frontal brain water content measurement via the wet-dry method. Right-frontal lobe brain water content was found to significantly correlate with neurobehavioral deficits in the corner turn and beam balance tests: the number of left turns (percentage of total turns) for the corner turn test and distance traveled for the beam balance test were both inversely proportional with brain water content. No correlation was observed for the composite Garcia neuroscore or the beam walking test. PMID:26463968

  16. Chronic stress affects the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in rat salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Saruta, Juri; Lee, Taeki; Shirasu, Masayoshi; Takahashi, Takeshi; Sato, Chikatoshi; Sato, Sadao; Tsukinoki, Keiichi

    2010-01-01

    Plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels are associated with several neural disorders. Previously, we reported that BDNF is produced from salivary glands under acute immobilization stress. Additionally, salivary glands are the origin of plasma BDNF during stress; however, the association between the expression of BDNF by the salivary glands under chronic stress conditions is not known. In the present study, we investigated whether plasma BDNF levels in chronic stress depend on the salivary glands. Expression of BDNF mRNA and protein were identified in the submandibular glands when male rats were exposed to chronic restraint stress (12 h daily for 22 days). Chronic stress significantly increased plasma BDNF concentration, as well as adrenocorticotropic hormone and corticosterone levels, but was not altered under chronic stress in bilaterally sialoadenectomized rats. Since chronic stress increases plasma BDNF levels in the sialoadenectomized rat model, the plasma BDNF level was not dependent on BDNF from the salivary glands. Although the salivary glands were the source of plasma BDNF in acute stress conditions in our previous study, it seems that that the increased BDNF expression in the salivary glands in chronic stress does not contribute importantly to the increased circulating BDNF level. The increased plasma BDNF levels may play important roles in homeostasis under stress conditions.

  17. Evaluation of acute and sub-acute toxicity of Pinus eldarica bark extract in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Ghadirkhomi, Akram; Safaeian, Leila; Zolfaghari, Behzad; Agha Ghazvini, Mohammad Reza; Rezaei, Parisa

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Pinus eldarica (P. eldarica) is one of the most common pines in Iran which has various bioactive constituents and different uses in traditional medicine. Since there is no documented evidence for P. eldarica safety, the acute and sub-acute oral toxicities of hydroalcoholic extract of P. eldarica bark were investigated in male and female Wistar rats in this study. Materials and Methods: In the acute study, a single dose of extract (2000 mg/kg) was orally administered and animals were monitored for 7 days. In the sub-acute study, repeated doses (125, 250 and 500 mg/kg/day) of the extract were administered for 28 days and biochemical, hematological and histopathological parameters were evaluated. Results: Our results showed no sign of toxicity and no mortality after single or repeated administration of P. eldarica. The median lethal dose (LD50) of P. eldarica was determined to be higher than 2000 mg/kg. The mean body weight and most of the biochemical and hematological parameters showed normal levels. There were only significant decreases in serum triglyceride levels at the doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg of the extract in male rats (p<0.05 and p<0.01, respectively) and in monocyte counts at the highest dose of the extract in both male and female rats (p<0.05). Mild inflammation was also found in histological examination of kidney and liver tissues at the highest dose of extract. Conclusion: Oral administration of the hydroalcoholic extract of P. eldarica bark may be considered as relatively non-toxic particularly at the doses of 125 and 250 mg/kg. PMID:27761426

  18. Differential expression of sirtuins in the aging rat brain.

    PubMed

    Braidy, Nady; Poljak, Anne; Grant, Ross; Jayasena, Tharusha; Mansour, Hussein; Chan-Ling, Tailoi; Smythe, George; Sachdev, Perminder; Guillemin, Gilles J

    2015-01-01

    Although there are seven mammalian sirtuins (SIRT1-7), little is known about their expression in the aging brain. To characterize the change(s) in mRNA and protein expression of SIRT1-7 and their associated proteins in the brain of "physiologically" aged Wistar rats. We tested mRNA and protein expression levels of rat SIRT1-7, and the levels of associated proteins in the brain using RT-PCR and western blotting. Our data shows that SIRT1 expression increases with age, concurrently with increased acetylated p53 levels in all brain regions investigated. SIRT2 and FOXO3a protein levels increased only in the occipital lobe. SIRT3-5 expression declined significantly in the hippocampus and frontal lobe, associated with increases in superoxide and fatty acid oxidation levels, and acetylated CPS-1 protein expression, and a reduction in MnSOD level. While SIRT6 expression declines significantly with age acetylated H3K9 protein expression is increased throughout the brain. SIRT7 and Pol I protein expression increased in the frontal lobe. This study identifies previously unknown roles for sirtuins in regulating cellular homeostasis and healthy aging. PMID:26005404

  19. [Acute liver injury in rats by praseodymium nitrate (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Schriewer, H; Gebauer, B; Rauen, H M

    1976-01-01

    After acute intoxication with praseodymium nitrate (10 mg/kg body weight i.v.), time functions of enzyme activities of GOT, GPT, ChE, AP and of free fatty acids concentration in rat serum were analysed and the results subjected to significance and correlation analysis. Time functions of free fatty acids concentration corresponded with those of enzyme activities of GOT and GPT. In the early state of intoxication serum concentrations of palmitoleinic and oleic acid were more increased than those of stearinic acid. There seems to be an alteration in the correlations of analysed measures with regard to their temporal changes parallel to the progress of intoxication.

  20. Spectral and lifetime domain measurements of rat brain tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abi Haidar, D.; Leh, B.; Allaoua, K.; Genoux, A.; Siebert, R.; Steffenhagen, M.; Peyrot, D.; Sandeau, N.; Vever-Bizet, C.; Bourg-Heckly, G.; Chebbi, I.; Collado-Hilly, M.

    2012-02-01

    During glioblastoma surgery, delineation of the brain tumour margins remains difficult especially since infiltrated and normal tissues have the same visual appearance. This problematic constitutes our research interest. We developed a fibre-optical fluorescence probe for spectroscopic and time domain measurements. First measurements of endogenous tissue fluorescence were performed on fresh and fixed rat tumour brain slices. Spectral characteristics, fluorescence redox ratios and fluorescence lifetime measurements were analysed. Fluorescence information collected from both, lifetime and spectroscopic experiments, appeared promising for tumour tissue discrimination. Two photon measurements were performed on the same fixed tissue. Different wavelengths are used to acquire two-photon excitation-fluorescence of tumorous and healthy sites.

  1. Glycine inhibits ethanol-induced oxidative stress, neuroinflammation and apoptotic neurodegeneration in postnatal rat brain.

    PubMed

    Amin, Faiz Ul; Shah, Shahid Ali; Kim, Myeong Ok

    2016-06-01

    Here we investigated for the first time the inhibitory potential of Glycine (Gly) against ethanol-induced oxidative stress, neuroinflammation and apoptotic neurodegeneration in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells and in the developing rat brain. The Gly co-treatment significantly increased the cell viability, inhibited the expression of phospho-Nuclear Factor kappa B (p-NF-kB) and caspase-3 and reduced the oxidative stress in ethanol-treated SH-SY5Y cells in a PI3K-dependent manner. Seven days old male rat pups were injected with ethanol (5 g/kg subcutaneously, prepared in a 20% saline solution) and Gly (1 g/kg). Gly co-treatment stimulated the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway to limit the ethanol induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the developing rat brain. It lowered the ethanol-elevated levels of phospho-c Jun N terminal kinase (p-JNK) and its various downstream apoptotic markers, including Bax, cytochrome C, caspase-3 and PARP-1. Additionally, the Gly treatment upregulated antiapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins and prevented ethanol-induced neurodegeneration as assessed by Fluoro-Jade-B (FJB) and Nissl staining. Furthermore, the Gly administration caused significant reduction in the ethanol-induced neuroinflammation by inhibiting the expression of inflammatory markers such as p-NF-kB, cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and reversed the ethanol-induced synaptic protein markers expression. The results suggest that acute Gly treatment reduces ethanol-induced oxidative stress and neuronal cell loss in SH-SY5Y cells and in the developing rat brain. Therefore, Gly may be considered as potential treatment in ethanol-intoxicated newborns and infants. PMID:27058626

  2. Cloning and expression of a rat brain GABA transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Guastella, J.; Czyzyk, L.; Davidson, N.; Lester, H.A. ); Nelson, N.; Nelson, H.; Miedel, M.C. ); Keynan, S.; Kanner, B.I. )

    1990-09-14

    A complementary DNA clone (designated GAT-1) encoding a transporter for the neurotransmitter {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA) has been isolated from rat brain, and its functional properties have been examined in Xenopus oocytes. Oocytes injected with GAT-1 synthetic messenger RNA accumulated ({sup 3}H)GABA to levels above control values. The transporter encoded by GAT-1 has a high affinity for GABA, is sodium- and chloride-dependent, and is pharmacologically similar to neuronal GABA transporters. The GAT-1 protein shares antigenic determinants with a native rat brain GABA transporter. The nucleotide sequence of GAT-1 predicts a protein of 599 amino acids with a molecular weight of 67 kilodaltons. Hydropathy analysis of the deduced protein suggests multiple transmembrane regions, a feature shared by several cloned transporters; however, database searches indicate that GAT-1 is not homologous to any previously identified proteins. Therefore, GAT-1 appears to be a member of a previously uncharacterized family of transport molecules.

  3. Effects of exercise training on brain opioid peptides and serum LH in female rats.

    PubMed

    Blake, M J; Stein, E A; Vomachka, A J

    1984-01-01

    In order to investigate the effects of long-term exercise training on brain endorphin systems, and the latter's possible effects on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, female Wistar rats were subjected to daily treadmill running. A sedentary control group was also employed. After 8 weeks of training, and just prior to sacrifice, one-half of each group received a final fatiguing bout of exercise. Thus the final four groups consisted of a trained-fatigued (TF), trained-nonfatigued (TN), control-fatigued (CF), and control-nonfatigued (CN) group. Regional brain levels of beta-endorphin (beta E), methionine enkephalin and leucine enkephalin (LE) were assayed with independent RIAs from the nucleus accumbens, cortex, caudate-putamen, septum, amygdala, anterior and posterior hypothalamus, substantia nigra and ventral tegmentum. Diestrus serum levels of luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone and prolactin (PRL) were also determined. Fatiguing resulted in a decrease in serum LH levels as well as an increase in beta E content in the nucleus accumbens, and LE content in the ventral tegmentum. Finally, TF animals exhibited less LE in the amygdala than the TN rats. Taken together, these changes in brain endorphins may indicate an acute, fatigue-running modulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

  4. Ethyl Pyruvate Protects against Blood-Brain Barrier Damage and Improves Long-Term Neurological Outcomes in a Rat Model of Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Hong; Wang, Hailian; Pu, Hongjian; Shi, Yejie; Zhang, Jia; Zhang, Wenting; Wang, Guohua; Hu, Xiaoming; Leak, Rehana K.; Chen, Jun; Gao, Yanqin

    2015-01-01

    Aims Many traumatic brain injury (TBI) survivors sustain neurological disability and cognitive impairments due to the lack of defined therapies to reduce TBI-induced long-term brain damage. Ethyl pyruvate (EP) has shown neuroprotection in several models of acute brain injury. The present study therefore investigated the potential beneficial effect of EP on long-term outcomes after TBI and the underlying mechanisms. Methods Male adult rats were subjected to unilateral controlled cortical impact injury. EP was injected intraperitoneally 15 min after TBI and again at 12, 24, 36, 48, and 60 h after TBI. Neurological deficits, blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity and neuroinflammation were assessed. Results EP improved sensorimotor and cognitive functions and ameliorated brain tissue damage up to 28 d post-TBI. BBB breach and brain edema were attenuated by EP at 48 h after TBI. EP suppressed matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 production from peripheral neutrophils and reduced the number of MMP-9-overproducing neutrophils in the spleen, and therefore mitigated MMP-9-mediated BBB breakdown. Moreover, EP exerted potent anti-inflammatory effects in cultured microglia and inhibited the elevation of inflammatory mediators in the brain after TBI. Conclusion EP confers long-term neuroprotection against TBI, possibly through breaking the vicious cycle among MMP-9-mediated BBB disruption, neuroinflammation and long-lasting brain damage. PMID:25533312

  5. Expression of aquaporins 1 and 4 in the brain of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Tomassoni, Daniele; Bramanti, Vincenzo; Amenta, Francesco

    2010-04-14

    Aquaporins (AQP) 1 and 4 are water channel proteins localized respectively at the level of the blood-cerebrospinal fluids (CSF) and blood brain (BBB) barriers. These barriers represent the sites of exchange between blood and nervous tissue and between blood, choroid plexus and CSF in brain ventricles respectively. Damage of these barriers may alter transfer of substances between blood and nervous tissue. In spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) chronic hypertension may induce BBB dysfunction and pronounced defects in the integrity of the blood-CSF barrier. AQP1 is expressed in the apical membrane of choroid plexus epithelium. AQP4 is expressed by astrocyte foot processes near blood vessels. The present study has assessed the expression of AQP1 and AQP4 in the brain of SHR in pre-hypertensive (2 months of age), developing hypertension (4 months of age) and established hypertension (6 months of age) stages. Age-matched Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were used as normotensive reference group. AQP1 expression is increased in choroid plexus epithelium of 6-month-old SHR. An increased expression of AQP4 was found in frontal cortex, striatum, and hippocampus of 4- and 6-month-old SHR compared to younger cohorts and age-matched WKY rats. These findings suggest that the increase in AQP expression may alter fluid exchange in BBB and/or in blood-CSF barrier. This situation in case of an acute or excessively elevated rise of blood pressure can promote BBB changes causing the brain damage occurring in this animal model of hypertension.

  6. Microwave effects on energy metabolism of rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, A.P.; Schaefer, D.J.; Joines, W.T.

    1980-01-01

    Rat brain was exposed to 591-MHz, continuous-wave (CW) microwaves at 13.8 or 5.0 mW/cm2 to determine the effect on nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, reduced (NADH), adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and creatine phosphate (CP) levels. On initiation of the in vivo microwave exposures, fluorimetrically determined NADH rapidly increased to a maximum of 4.0%-12.5% above pre-exposure control levels at one-half minute, than decreased slowly to 2% above control at three minutes, finally increasing slowly to 5% above control level at five minutes. ATP and CP assays were performed on sham- and microwave-exposed brain at each exposure time. At 13.8 mW/cm2, brain CP level was decreased an average of 39.4%, 41.1%, 18.2%, 13.1%, and 36.4% of control at exposure points one-half, one, two three, and five minutes, respectively, and brain ATP concentration was decreased an average of 25.2%, 15.2%, 17.8%, 7.4%, and 11.2% of control at the corresponding exposure periods. ATP and CP levels of rat brain exposed to 591-MHz cw microwaves at 5mW/cm2 for one-half and one minute were decreased significantly below control levels at these exposure times, but were not significantly different from the 13.8 mW/cm2 exposures. For all exposures, rectal temperature remained constant. Heat loss through the skull aperture caused brain temperature to decrease during the five-minute exposures. This decrease was the same in magnitude for experimental and control subjects. Changes in NADH, ATP, and CP levels during microwave exposure cannot be attributed to general tissue hyperthermia. The data support the hypothesis that microwave exposure inhibits mitochondrial electron transport chain function, which results in decreased ATP and CP levels in brain.

  7. Identification of rat brain opioid (enkephalin) receptor by photoaffinity labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Yeung, C.W.

    1986-01-01

    A photoreactive, radioactive enkephalin derivative was prepared and purified by high performance liquid chromatography. Rat brain and spinal cord plasma membranes were incubated with this radioiodinated photoprobe and were subsequently photolysed. Autoradiography of the sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis of the solubilized and reduced membranes showed that a protein having an apparent molecular weight of 46,000 daltons was specifically labeled, suggesting that this protein may be the opioid (enkephalin) receptor.

  8. Oxidative changes in brain of aniline-exposed rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kakkar, P.; Awasthi, S.; Viswanathan, P.N. )

    1992-10-01

    Oxidative stress in rat cerebellum, cortex and brain stem after a short-term high-dose exposure to aniline vapors under conditions akin to those after major chemical accidents, was studied. Significant increases in superoxide dismutase isozyme activities and formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive material along with depletion of ascorbic acid and non-protein sulfhydryl content suggest impairment of antioxidant defenses 24 h after single exposure to 15,302 ppm aniline vapors for 10 min.

  9. Interactions between methaqualone and ethanol in rats and mice during acute and chronic states.

    PubMed

    Ho, C C; Ho, A K

    1978-01-01

    1. The effects of acute and chronic treatment of methaqualone on ethanol preference, the rate of disappearance of ethanol and on toxicity were studied in mice and rats. 2. Acute treatment with methaqualone showed a dose-dependent suppression in the voluntary intake of ethanol in C57Bl/6J mice in rats. No significant change in ethanol intake was observed during chronic methaqualone treatment and withdrawal. 3. Methaqualone pretreatment significantly (P less than 0.005) delayed the disappearance of ethanol in the blood and brain over a period of 50 and 200 min after a loading dose of 2.0 g/kg, i.p., of ethanol. 4. Methaqualone pretreatment at doses of 140 and 200 mg/kg significantly increased ethanol toxicity by 11% and 28%, respectively. Co-administration of ethanol using 6.0, 7.0 and 8.0 g/kg also reduced the LD50 of methaqualone by 19%, 24% and 40%, respectively. 5. Chronic administration with ethanol decreased the toxicity due to methaqualone. Potentiation of ethanol toxicity by methaqualone may be of clinical importance in view of the narrow range of safety margin of ethanol.

  10. Multiple opiate receptors in the brain of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Das, S.; Bhargava, H.N.

    1986-03-01

    The characteristics of ..mu.., delta and kappa -opiate receptors in the brain of spontaneously hypertensive (SH) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were determined using the receptor binding assays. The ligands used were /sup 3/H-naltrexone (..mu..), /sup 3/H-ethylketocyclazocine (EKC, kappa) and /sup 3/H-Tyr-D-Ser-Gly-Phe-Leu-Thr (DSTLE, delta). Since EKC binds to ..mu.. and delta receptors in addition to kappa, the binding was done in the presence of 100 nM each of DAGO and DADLE to suppress ..mu.. and delta sites, respectively. All three ligands bound to brain membranes of WKY rats at a single high affinity site with the following B/sub max/ (fmol/mg protein) and K/sub d/ (nM) values: /sup 3/H-naltrexone (130.5; 0.43) /sup 3/H-EKC (19.8, 1.7) and /sup 3/H-DSTLE (139, 2.5). The binding of /sup 3/H-naltrexone and /sup 3/H-DSTLE in the brain of WKY and SH did not differ. A consistent increase (22%) in B/sub max/ of /sup 3/H-EKC was found in SHR compared to WKY rats. However, the K/sub d/ values did not differ. The increase in B/sub max/ was due to increases in hypothalamus and cortex. It is concluded that SH rats have higher density of kappa-opiate receptors, particularly in hypothalamus and cortex, compared to WKY rats, and that kappa-opiate receptors may be involved in the pathophysiology of hypertension.

  11. Effects of acute and chronic administration of methylprednisolone on oxidative stress in rat lungs* **

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Ronaldo Lopes; Torres, Iraci Lucena da Silva; Laste, Gabriela; Ferreira, Maria Beatriz Cardoso; Cardoso, Paulo Francisco Guerreiro; Belló-Klein, Adriane

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effects of acute and chronic administration of methylprednisolone on oxidative stress, as quantified by measuring lipid peroxidation (LPO) and total reactive antioxidant potential (TRAP), in rat lungs. Methods: Forty Wistar rats were divided into four groups: acute treatment, comprising rats receiving a single injection of methylprednisolone (50 mg/kg i.p.); acute control, comprising rats i.p. injected with saline; chronic treatment, comprising rats receiving methylprednisolone in drinking water (6 mg/kg per day for 30 days); and chronic control, comprising rats receiving normal drinking water. Results: The levels of TRAP were significantly higher in the acute treatment group rats than in the acute control rats, suggesting an improvement in the pulmonary defenses of the former. The levels of lung LPO were significantly higher in the chronic treatment group rats than in the chronic control rats, indicating oxidative damage in the lung tissue of the former. Conclusions: Our results suggest that the acute use of corticosteroids is beneficial to lung tissue, whereas their chronic use is not. The chronic use of methylprednisolone appears to increase lung LPO levels. PMID:25029646

  12. Acute Ethanol Administration Rapidly Increases Phosphorylation of Conventional Protein Kinase C in Specific Mammalian Brain Regions in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wilkie, Mary Beth; Besheer, Joyce; Kelley, Stephen P.; Kumar, Sandeep; O’Buckley, Todd K.; Morrow, A. Leslie; Hodge, Clyde W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Protein kinase C (PKC) is a family of isoenzymes that regulate a variety of functions in the central nervous system including neurotransmitter release, ion channel activity, and cell differentiation. Growing evidence suggests that specific isoforms of PKC influence a variety of behavioral, biochemical, and physiological effects of ethanol in mammals. The purpose of this study was to determine whether acute ethanol exposure alters phosphorylation of conventional PKC isoforms at a threonine 674 (p-cPKC) site in the hydrophobic domain of the kinase, which is required for its catalytic activity. Methods Male rats were administered a dose range of ethanol (0, 0.5, 1, or 2 g/kg, intragastric) and brain tissue was removed 10 minutes later for evaluation of changes in p-cPKC expression using immunohistochemistry and Western blot methods. Results Immunohistochemical data show that the highest dose of ethanol (2 g/kg) rapidly increases p-cPKC immunoreactivity specifically in the nucleus accumbens (core and shell), lateral septum, and hippocampus (CA3 and dentate gyrus). Western blot analysis further showed that ethanol (2 g/kg) increased p-cPKC expression in the P2 membrane fraction of tissue from the nucleus accumbens and hippocampus. Although p-cPKC was expressed in numerous other brain regions, including the caudate nucleus, amygdala, and cortex, no changes were observed in response to acute ethanol. Total PKCγ immunoreactivity was surveyed throughout the brain and showed no change following acute ethanol injection. Conclusions These results suggest that ethanol rapidly promotes phosphorylation of cPKC in limbic brain regions, which may underlie effects of acute ethanol on the nervous system and behavior. PMID:17511744

  13. Cytosolic rat brain synapsin I is a diacylglycerol kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, D W; Besterman, J M

    1991-01-01

    The phosphorylation of diacylglycerol (DG), a reaction catalyzed by DG kinase, may be critical in the termination of effector-induced signals mediated by protein kinase C. Synapsin I is a principal target of intracellular protein kinases and is thought to be involved in the release of neurotransmitter from axon terminals. We present several lines of evidence which indicate that rat brain synapsin, in addition to this role, may function as a DG kinase. Purified rat brain DG kinase was digested with trypsin, which produced three major fragments whose sequence was identical to three regions in synapsin I. Using a rabbit anti-synapsin polyclonal antiserum, the elution profile of synapsin immunoreactivity coincided exactly with that of DG kinase activity in column fractions from the final step in the DG kinase purification procedure. As is the case with synapsin, the purified enzyme was a strongly basic protein with an isoelectric point greater than 10.0. Finally, incubating the DG kinase with highly purified bacterial collagenase, an enzyme that partially degrades the proline- and glycine-rich synapsin, resulted in the simultaneous loss of DG kinase activity and synapsin immunoreactivity. We conclude that cytosolic rat brain synapsin is capable of functioning as a DG kinase. Images PMID:1648730

  14. Methylphenidate alters NCS-1 expression in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Souza, Renan P; Soares, Eliane C; Rosa, Daniela V F; Souza, Bruno R; Réus, Gislaine Z; Barichello, Tatiana; Gomes, Karin M; Gomez, Marcus V; Quevedo, João; Romano-Silva, Marco A

    2008-07-01

    Methylphenidate has been used as an effective treatment for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Methylphenidate (MPH) blocks dopamine and norepinephrine transporters causing an increase in extracellular levels. The use of psychomotor stimulants continues to rise due to both the treatment of ADHD and illicit abuse. Methylphenidate sensitization mechanism has still poor knowledge. Neuronal calcium sensor 1 was identified as a dopaminergic receptor interacting protein. When expressed in mammalian cells, neuronal calcium sensor 1 attenuates dopamine-induced D2 receptor internalization by a mechanism that involves a reduction in D2 receptor phosphorylation. Neuronal calcium sensor 1 appears to play a pivotal role in regulating D2 receptor function, it will be important to determine if there are alterations in neuronal calcium sensor 1 in neuropathologies associated with deregulation in dopaminergic signaling. Then, we investigated if methylphenidate could alter neuronal calcium sensor 1 expression in five brain regions (striatum, hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, cortex and cerebellum) in young and adult rats. These regions were chosen because some are located in brain circuits related with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Our results showed changes in neuronal calcium sensor 1 expression in hippocampus, prefrontal cortex and cerebellum mainly in adult rats. The demonstration that methylphenidate induces changes in neuronal calcium sensor 1 levels in rat brain may help to understand sensitization mechanisms as well as methylphenidate therapeutic effects to improve attention deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms.

  15. Gelation and fodrin purification from rat brain extracts.

    PubMed

    Levilliers, N; Péron-Renner, M; Coffe, G; Pudles, J

    1986-06-01

    Extracts from rat brain tissue have been shown to give rise to a gel which exhibits the following features. It is mainly enriched in actin and in a high-molecular-weight protein with polypeptide chains of 235 and 240 kDa, which we identified as fodrin. Tubulin is also a major component of the gel but it appears to be trapped non-specifically during the gelation process. Gelation is pH-, ionic strength- and Ca2+-concentration-dependent, and is optimal under the conditions which promote the interaction between polymerized actin and fodrin. In a similar way to that described for the purification of rat brain actin (Levilliers, N., Péron-Renner, M., Coffe, G. and Pudles, J. (1984) Biochimie 66, 531-537), we used the gelation system as a selective means of recovering fodrin from the mixture of a low-ionic-strength extract from whole rat brain and a high-ionic-strength extract of the particulate fraction. From this gel, fodrin was purified with a good yield by a simple procedure involving gel dissociation in 0.5 M KCl and depolymerization in 0.7 M KI, Bio-Gel A-15m chromatography, followed by ammonium sulfate precipitation. PMID:3707993

  16. Ketone-body utilization by homogenates of adult rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes-Cardozo, M.; Klein, W.

    1982-06-01

    The regulation of ketone-body metabolism and the quantitative importance of ketone bodies as lipid precursors in adult rat brain has been studied in vitro. Utilization of ketone bodies and of pyruvate by homogenates of adult rat brain was measured and the distribution of /sup 14/C from (3-/sup 14/C)ketone bodies among the metabolic products was analysed. The rate of ketone-body utilization was maximal in the presence of added Krebs-cycle intermediates and uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation. The consumption of acetoacetate was faster than that of D-3-hydroxybutyrate, whereas, pyruvate produced twice as much acetyl-CoA as acetoacetate under optimal conditions. Millimolar concentrations of ATP in the presence of uncoupler lowered the consumption of ketone bodies but not of pyruvate. Indirect evidence is presented suggesting that ATP interferes specifically with the mitochondrial uptake of ketone bodies. Interconversion of ketone bodies and the accumulation of acid-soluble intermediates (mainly citrate and glutamate) accounted for the major part of ketone-body utilization, whereas only a small part was oxidized to CO/sub 2/. Ketone bodies were not incorporated into lipids or protein. We conclude that adult rat-brain homogenates use ketone bodies exclusively for oxidative purposes.

  17. Intracellular pathways regulating ciliary beating of rat brain ependymal cells

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thien; Chin, Wei-Chun; O’Brien, Jennifer A; Verdugo, Pedro; Berger, Albert J

    2001-01-01

    The mammalian brain ventricles are lined with ciliated ependymal cells. As yet little is known about the mechanisms by which neurotransmitters regulate cilia beat frequency (CBF). Application of 5-HT to ependymal cells in cultured rat brainstem slices caused CBF to increase. 5-HT had an EC50 of 30 μM and at 100 μM attained a near-maximal CBF increase of 52.7 ± 4.1 % (mean ± s.d.) (n= 8). Bathing slices in Ca2+-free solution markedly reduced the 5-HT-mediated increase in CBF. Fluorescence measurements revealed that 5-HT caused a marked transient elevation in cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]c) that then slowly decreased to a plateau level. Analysis showed that the [Ca2+]c transient was due to release of Ca2+ from inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-sensitive stores; the plateau was probably due to extracellular Ca2+ influx through Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels. Application of ATP caused a sustained decrease in CBF. ATP had an EC50 of about 50 μM and 100 μM ATP resulted in a maximal 57.5 ± 6.5 % (n= 12) decrease in CBF. The ATP-induced decrease in CBF was unaffected by lowering extracellular [Ca2+], and no changes in [Ca2+]c were observed. Exposure of ependymal cells to forskolin caused a decrease in CBF. Ciliated ependymal cells loaded with caged cAMP exhibited a 54.3 ± 7.5 % (n= 9) decrease in CBF following uncaging. These results suggest that ATP reduces CBF by a Ca2+-independent cAMP-mediated pathway. Application of 5-HT and adenosine-5′-O-3-thiotriphosphate (ATP-γ-S) to acutely isolated ciliated ependymal cells resulted in CBF responses similar to those of ependymal cells in cultured slices suggesting that these neurotransmitters act directly on these cells. The opposite response of ciliated ependymal cells to 5-HT and ATP provides a novel mechanism for their active involvement in central nervous system signalling. PMID:11179397

  18. Ulinastatin suppresses endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis in the hippocampus of rats with acute paraquat poisoning.

    PubMed

    Li, Hai-Feng; Zhao, Shi-Xing; Xing, Bao-Peng; Sun, Ming-Li

    2015-03-01

    Lung injury is the main manifestation of paraquat poisoning. Few studies have addressed brain damage after paraquat poisoning. Ulinastatin is a protease inhibitor that can effectively stabilize lysosomal membranes, prevent cell damage, and reduce the production of free radicals. This study assumed that ulinastatin would exert these effects on brain tissues that had been poisoned with paraquat. Rat models of paraquat poisoning were intraperitoneally injected with ulinastatin. Simultaneously, rats in the control group were administered normal saline. Hematoxylin-eosin staining showed that most hippocampal cells were contracted and nucleoli had disappeared in the paraquat group. Fewer cells in the hippocampus were concentrated and nucleoli had disappeared in the ulinastatin group. Western blot assay showed that expressions of GRP78 and cleaved-caspase-3 were significantly lower in the ulinastatin group than in the paraquat group. Immunohistochemical findings showed that CHOP immunoreactivity was significantly lower in the ulinastatin group than in the paraquat group. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling staining showed that the number of apoptotic cells was reduced in the paraquat and ulinastatin groups. These data confirmed that endoplasmic reticular stress can be induced by acute paraquat poisoning. Ulinastatin can effectively inhibit this stress as well as cell apoptosis, thereby exerting a neuroprotective effect.

  19. Intrinsic optical signals of brains in rats during loss of tissue viability: effect of brain temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawauchi, Satoko; Sato, Shunichi; Ooigawa, Hidetoshi; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Kikuchi, Makoto

    2007-07-01

    Noninvasive, real-time monitoring of brain tissue viability is crucial for the patients with stroke, traumatic brain injury, etc. For this purpose, measurement of intrinsic optical signal (IOS) is attractive because it can provide direct information about the viability of brain tissue noninvasively. We performed simultaneous measurements of IOSs that are related to morphological characteristics, i.e., light scattering, and energy metabolism for rat brains during saline infusion as a model with temporal loss of brain tissue viability. The results showed that the scattering signal was steady in an initial phase but showed a drastic, triphasic change in a certain range of infusion time, during which the reduction of CuA in cytochrome c oxidase started and proceeded rapidly. The start time of triphasic scattering change was delayed for about 100 s by lowering brain temperature from 29°C to 24°C, demonstrating the optical detection of cerebroprotection effect by brain cooling. Electron microscopic observation showed morphological changes of dendrite and mitochondria in the cortical surface tissue after the triphasic scattering change, which was thought to be associated with the change in light scattering we observed. These findings suggest that the simultaneous measurement of the intrinsic optical signals related to morphological characteristics and energy metabolism is useful for monitoring tissue viability in brain.

  20. Magnetic micelles for DNA delivery to rat brains after mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Das, Mahasweta; Wang, Chunyan; Bedi, Raminder; Mohapatra, Shyam S; Mohapatra, Subhra

    2014-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes significant mortality, long term disability and psychological symptoms. Gene therapy is a promising approach for treatment of different pathological conditions. Here we tested chitosan and polyethyleneimine (PEI)-coated magnetic micelles (CP-mag micelles or CPMMs), a potential MRI contrast agent, to deliver a reporter DNA to the brain after mild TBI (mTBI). CPMM-tomato plasmid (ptd) conjugate expressing a red-fluorescent protein (RFP) was administered intranasally immediately after mTBI or sham surgery in male SD rats. Evans blue extravasation following mTBI suggested CPMM-ptd entry into the brain via the compromised blood-brain barrier. Magnetofection increased the concentration of CPMMs in the brain. RFP expression was observed in the brain (cortex and hippocampus), lung and liver 48 h after mTBI. CPMM did not evoke any inflammatory response by themselves and were excreted from the body. These results indicate the possibility of using intranasally administered CPMM as a theranostic vehicle for mTBI. From the clinical editor: In this study, chitosan and PEI-coated magnetic micelles (CPMM) were demonstrated as potentially useful vehicles in traumatic brain injury in a rodent model. Magnetofection increased the concentration of CPMMs in the brain and, after intranasal delivery, CPMM did not evoke any inflammatory response and were excreted from the body. PMID:24486465

  1. Outer brain barriers in rat and human development.

    PubMed

    Brøchner, Christian B; Holst, Camilla B; Møllgård, Kjeld

    2015-01-01

    Complex barriers at the brain's surface, particularly in development, are poorly defined. In the adult, arachnoid blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier separates the fenestrated dural vessels from the CSF by means of a cell layer joined by tight junctions. Outer CSF-brain barrier provides diffusion restriction between brain and subarachnoid CSF through an initial radial glial end feet layer covered with a pial surface layer. To further characterize these interfaces we examined embryonic rat brains from E10 to P0 and forebrains from human embryos and fetuses (6-21st weeks post-conception) and adults using immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy. Antibodies against claudin-11, BLBP, collagen 1, SSEA-4, MAP2, YKL-40, and its receptor IL-13Rα2 and EAAT1 were used to describe morphological characteristics and functional aspects of the outer brain barriers. Claudin-11 was a reliable marker of the arachnoid blood-CSF barrier. Collagen 1 delineated the subarachnoid space and stained pial surface layer. BLBP defined radial glial end feet layer and SSEA-4 and YKL-40 were present in both leptomeningeal cells and end feet layer, which transformed into glial limitans. IL-13Rα2 and EAAT1 were present in the end feet layer illustrating transporter/receptor presence in the outer CSF-brain barrier. MAP2 immunostaining in adult brain outlined the lower border of glia limitans; remnants of end feet were YKL-40 positive in some areas. We propose that outer brain barriers are composed of at least 3 interfaces: blood-CSF barrier across arachnoid barrier cell layer, blood-CSF barrier across pial microvessels, and outer CSF-brain barrier comprising glial end feet layer/pial surface layer.

  2. Outer brain barriers in rat and human development

    PubMed Central

    Brøchner, Christian B.; Holst, Camilla B.; Møllgård, Kjeld

    2015-01-01

    Complex barriers at the brain's surface, particularly in development, are poorly defined. In the adult, arachnoid blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier separates the fenestrated dural vessels from the CSF by means of a cell layer joined by tight junctions. Outer CSF-brain barrier provides diffusion restriction between brain and subarachnoid CSF through an initial radial glial end feet layer covered with a pial surface layer. To further characterize these interfaces we examined embryonic rat brains from E10 to P0 and forebrains from human embryos and fetuses (6–21st weeks post-conception) and adults using immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy. Antibodies against claudin-11, BLBP, collagen 1, SSEA-4, MAP2, YKL-40, and its receptor IL-13Rα2 and EAAT1 were used to describe morphological characteristics and functional aspects of the outer brain barriers. Claudin-11 was a reliable marker of the arachnoid blood-CSF barrier. Collagen 1 delineated the subarachnoid space and stained pial surface layer. BLBP defined radial glial end feet layer and SSEA-4 and YKL-40 were present in both leptomeningeal cells and end feet layer, which transformed into glial limitans. IL-13Rα2 and EAAT1 were present in the end feet layer illustrating transporter/receptor presence in the outer CSF-brain barrier. MAP2 immunostaining in adult brain outlined the lower border of glia limitans; remnants of end feet were YKL-40 positive in some areas. We propose that outer brain barriers are composed of at least 3 interfaces: blood-CSF barrier across arachnoid barrier cell layer, blood-CSF barrier across pial microvessels, and outer CSF-brain barrier comprising glial end feet layer/pial surface layer. PMID:25852456

  3. Sleep deprivation does not affect neuronal susceptibility to mild traumatic brain injury in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Aimee M; Stephenson, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Mild and moderate traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) (and concussion) occur frequently as a result of falls, automobile accidents, and sporting activities, and are a major cause of acute and chronic disability. Fatigue and excessive sleepiness are associated with increased risk of accidents, but it is unknown whether prior sleep debt also affects the pathophysiological outcome of concussive injury. Using the “dark neuron” (DN) as a marker of reversible neuronal damage, we tested the hypothesis that acute (48 hours) total sleep deprivation (TSD) and chronic sleep restriction (CSR; 10 days, 6-hour sleep/day) affect DN formation following mild TBI in the rat. TSD and CSR were administered using a walking wheel apparatus. Mild TBI was administered under anesthesia using a weight-drop impact model, and the acute neuronal response was observed without recovery. DNs were detected using standard bright-field microscopy with toluidine blue stain following appropriate tissue fixation. DN density was low under home cage and sleep deprivation control conditions (respective median DN densities, 0.14% and 0.22% of neurons), and this was unaffected by TSD alone (0.1%). Mild TBI caused significantly higher DN densities (0.76%), and this was unchanged by preexisting acute or chronic sleep debt (TSD, 0.23%; CSR, 0.7%). Thus, although sleep debt may be predicted to increase the incidence of concussive injury, the present data suggest that sleep debt does not exacerbate the resulting neuronal damage. PMID:26124685

  4. Sleep deprivation does not affect neuronal susceptibility to mild traumatic brain injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Caron, Aimee M; Stephenson, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Mild and moderate traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) (and concussion) occur frequently as a result of falls, automobile accidents, and sporting activities, and are a major cause of acute and chronic disability. Fatigue and excessive sleepiness are associated with increased risk of accidents, but it is unknown whether prior sleep debt also affects the pathophysiological outcome of concussive injury. Using the "dark neuron" (DN) as a marker of reversible neuronal damage, we tested the hypothesis that acute (48 hours) total sleep deprivation (TSD) and chronic sleep restriction (CSR; 10 days, 6-hour sleep/day) affect DN formation following mild TBI in the rat. TSD and CSR were administered using a walking wheel apparatus. Mild TBI was administered under anesthesia using a weight-drop impact model, and the acute neuronal response was observed without recovery. DNs were detected using standard bright-field microscopy with toluidine blue stain following appropriate tissue fixation. DN density was low under home cage and sleep deprivation control conditions (respective median DN densities, 0.14% and 0.22% of neurons), and this was unaffected by TSD alone (0.1%). Mild TBI caused significantly higher DN densities (0.76%), and this was unchanged by preexisting acute or chronic sleep debt (TSD, 0.23%; CSR, 0.7%). Thus, although sleep debt may be predicted to increase the incidence of concussive injury, the present data suggest that sleep debt does not exacerbate the resulting neuronal damage. PMID:26124685

  5. Acute stress enhances adult rat hippocampal neurogenesis and activation of newborn neurons via secreted astrocytic FGF2.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Elizabeth D; Muroy, Sandra E; Sun, Wayne G; Covarrubias, David; Leong, Megan J; Barchas, Laurel A; Kaufer, Daniela

    2013-04-16

    Stress is a potent modulator of the mammalian brain. The highly conserved stress hormone response influences many brain regions, particularly the hippocampus, a region important for memory function. The effect of acute stress on the unique population of adult neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs) that resides in the adult hippocampus is unclear. We found that acute stress increased hippocampal cell proliferation and astrocytic fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) expression. The effect of acute stress occurred independent of basolateral amygdala neural input and was mimicked by treating isolated NPCs with conditioned media from corticosterone-treated primary astrocytes. Neutralization of FGF2 revealed that astrocyte-secreted FGF2 mediated stress-hormone-induced NPC proliferation. 2 weeks, but not 2 days, after acute stress, rats also showed enhanced fear extinction memory coincident with enhanced activation of newborn neurons. Our findings suggest a beneficial role for brief stress on the hippocampus and improve understanding of the adaptive capacity of the brain. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00362.001.

  6. Relationship between Morphofunctional Changes in Open Traumatic Brain Injury and the Severity of Brain Damage in Rats.

    PubMed

    Shakova, F M; Barskov, I V; Gulyaev, M V; Prokhorenko, S V; Romanova, G A; Grechko, A V

    2016-07-01

    A correlation between the severity of morphofunctional disturbances and the volume of brain tissue injury determined by MRT was demonstrated on the model of open traumatic brain injury in rats. A relationship between the studied parameters (limb placing and beam walking tests and histological changes) and impact force (the height of load fell onto exposed brain surface) was revealed.

  7. Relationship between Morphofunctional Changes in Open Traumatic Brain Injury and the Severity of Brain Damage in Rats.

    PubMed

    Shakova, F M; Barskov, I V; Gulyaev, M V; Prokhorenko, S V; Romanova, G A; Grechko, A V

    2016-07-01

    A correlation between the severity of morphofunctional disturbances and the volume of brain tissue injury determined by MRT was demonstrated on the model of open traumatic brain injury in rats. A relationship between the studied parameters (limb placing and beam walking tests and histological changes) and impact force (the height of load fell onto exposed brain surface) was revealed. PMID:27496035

  8. Astaxanthin reduces ischemic brain injury in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hui; Kuo, Chi-Chung; Chou, Jenny; Delvolve, Alice; Jackson, Shelley N; Post, Jeremy; Woods, Amina S; Hoffer, Barry J; Wang, Yun; Harvey, Brandon K

    2009-06-01

    Astaxanthin (ATX) is a dietary carotenoid of crustaceans and fish that contributes to their coloration. Dietary ATX is important for development and survival of salmonids and crustaceans and has been shown to reduce cardiac ischemic injury in rodents. The purpose of this study was to examine whether ATX can protect against ischemic injury in the mammalian brain. Adult rats were injected intracerebroventricularly with ATX or vehicle prior to a 60-min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). ATX was present in the infarction area at 70-75 min after onset of MCAo. Treatment with ATX, compared to vehicle, increased locomotor activity in stroke rats and reduced cerebral infarction at 2 d after MCAo. To evaluate the protective mechanisms of ATX against stroke, brain tissues were assayed for free radical damage, apoptosis, and excitoxicity. ATX antagonized ischemia-mediated loss of aconitase activity and reduced glutamate release, lipid peroxidation, translocation of cytochrome c, and TUNEL labeling in the ischemic cortex. ATX did not alter physiological parameters, such as body temperature, brain temperature, cerebral blood flow, blood gases, blood pressure, and pH. Collectively, our data suggest that ATX can reduce ischemia-related injury in brain tissue through the inhibition of oxidative stress, reduction of glutamate release, and antiapoptosis. ATX may be clinically useful for patients vulnerable or prone to ischemic events. PMID:19218497

  9. Astaxanthin reduces ischemic brain injury in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hui; Kuo, Chi-Chung; Chou, Jenny; Delvolve, Alice; Jackson, Shelley N; Post, Jeremy; Woods, Amina S; Hoffer, Barry J; Wang, Yun; Harvey, Brandon K

    2009-06-01

    Astaxanthin (ATX) is a dietary carotenoid of crustaceans and fish that contributes to their coloration. Dietary ATX is important for development and survival of salmonids and crustaceans and has been shown to reduce cardiac ischemic injury in rodents. The purpose of this study was to examine whether ATX can protect against ischemic injury in the mammalian brain. Adult rats were injected intracerebroventricularly with ATX or vehicle prior to a 60-min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). ATX was present in the infarction area at 70-75 min after onset of MCAo. Treatment with ATX, compared to vehicle, increased locomotor activity in stroke rats and reduced cerebral infarction at 2 d after MCAo. To evaluate the protective mechanisms of ATX against stroke, brain tissues were assayed for free radical damage, apoptosis, and excitoxicity. ATX antagonized ischemia-mediated loss of aconitase activity and reduced glutamate release, lipid peroxidation, translocation of cytochrome c, and TUNEL labeling in the ischemic cortex. ATX did not alter physiological parameters, such as body temperature, brain temperature, cerebral blood flow, blood gases, blood pressure, and pH. Collectively, our data suggest that ATX can reduce ischemia-related injury in brain tissue through the inhibition of oxidative stress, reduction of glutamate release, and antiapoptosis. ATX may be clinically useful for patients vulnerable or prone to ischemic events.

  10. Changes in brain volume in response to estradiol levels, amphetamine sensitization and haloperidol treatment in awake female rats.

    PubMed

    Madularu, Dan; Kulkarni, Praveen; Ferris, Craig F; Brake, Wayne G

    2015-08-27

    Estrogen has been shown to further ameliorate symptoms when administered in conjunction with antipsychotics in patients with schizophrenia. We have previously shown that chronic haloperidol (HAL) treatment reduces amphetamine (AMPH)-induced locomotor activity in AMPH-sensitized rats, but only when paired with high levels of the estrogen, 17-β estradiol. In addition, we reported estradiol-dependent responses to AMPH in AMPH-sensitized rats as measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging. It is thus clear that estradiol and antipsychotics both affect the rat brain, however the mechanism by which this occurs is unknown. The aim of the current study was to assess this interaction by investigating the effects of estradiol, AMPH and HAL on brain volume changes in awake female rats. Repeated exposure to AMPH resulted in an overall reduction in brain volume, regardless of hormonal status (i.e. no, low or high estradiol). Similarly, chronic HAL treatment further reduced brain volume compared to acute treatment. Hormonal status affected hippocampal volume with rats receiving low estradiol replacement showing larger volume; this difference was no longer significant after repeated exposure to AMPH. Finally, we found changes in volume in response to AMPH throughout hippocampal components (i.e. CA1-CA3 and dentate) as well as components of the mesocortical system. In conclusion, brain volume seems to be influenced by hormonal status, as well as exposure to AMPH and haloperidol treatment. These findings implicate areas where estradiol, amphetamine and antipsychotics may be producing volumetric changes in the brain, pointing the way to where future studies should focus. PMID:26032742

  11. Photoacoustic imaging for transvascular drug delivery to the rat brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Ryota; Sato, Shunichi; Tsunoi, Yasuyuki; Kawauchi, Satoko; Takemura, Toshiya; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro

    2015-03-01

    Transvascular drug delivery to the brain is difficult due to the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Thus, various methods for safely opening the BBB have been investigated, for which real-time imaging methods are desired both for the blood vessels and distribution of a drug. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging, which enables depth-resolved visualization of chromophores in tissue, would be useful for this purpose. In this study, we performed in vivo PA imaging of the blood vessels and distribution of a drug in the rat brain by using an originally developed compact PA imaging system with fiber-based illumination. As a test drug, Evans blue (EB) was injected to the tail vein, and a photomechanical wave was applied to the targeted brain tissue to increase the permeability of the blood vessel walls. For PA imaging of blood vessels and EB distribution, nanosecond pulses at 532 nm and 670 nm were used, respectively. We clearly visualized blood vessels with diameters larger than 50 μm and the distribution of EB in the brain, showing spatiotemporal characteristics of EB that was transvascularly delivered to the target tissue in the brain.

  12. Age and heat exposure-dependent changes in antioxidant enzymes activities in rat's liver and brain mitochondria: role of alpha-tocopherol.

    PubMed

    Stojkovski, V; Hadzi-Petrushev, N; Ilieski, V; Sopi, R; Gjorgoski, I; Mitrov, D; Jankulovski, N; Mladenov, M

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the role of mitochondrial antioxidant capacity during increased susceptibility to heat accompanied by the aging, young and aged Wistar rats were exposed on heat for 60 min. After heat exposure, hepatic and brain mitochondria were isolated. Our results revealed changes in antioxidant enzyme activities in liver and brain mitochondria from young and to a greater extent in aged rats. Our measurements of MnSOD, GPx and GR activity indicate greater reactive oxygen species production from the mitochondria of aged heat exposed in comparison to young heat exposed rats. Also in the aged rats, the effect of alpha-tocopherol treatment in the prevention of oxidative stress occurred as a result of heat exposure, is less pronounced. Taken together, our data suggest that mitochondria in aged rats are more vulnerable and less able to prevent oxidative changes that occur in response to acute heat exposure.

  13. In vivo cerebral incorporation of radiolabeled fatty acids after acute unilateral orbital enucleation in adult hooded Long-Evans rats

    SciTech Connect

    Wakabayashi, S.; Freed, L.M.; Bell, J.M.; Rapoport, S.I.

    1994-03-01

    We examined effects of acute unilateral enucleation on incorporation from blood of intravenously injected unsaturated [1-{sup 14}C]arachidonic acid ([{sup 14}C]AA) and [1-{sup 14}C]docosahexaenoic acid ([{sup 14}C]DHA), and of saturated [9,10-{sup 3}H]palmitic acid ([{sup 3}H]PA), into visual and nonvisual brain areas of awake adult Long-Evans hooded rats. Regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMR{sub glc}) values also were assessed with 2-deoxy-D-[1-{sup 14}C]glucose ([{sup 14}C]DG). One day after unilateral enucleation, an awake rat was placed in a brightly lit visual stimulation box with black and white striped walls, and a radiolabeled fatty acid was infused for 5 min or [{sup 14}C]DG was injected as a bolus. [{sup 14}C]DG also was injected in a group of rats kept in the dark for 4 h. Fifteen minutes after starting an infusion of a radiolabeled fatty acid, or 45 min after injecting [{sup 14}C]DG, the rat was killed and the brain was prepared for quantitative autoradiography. Incorporation coefficients k* of fatty acids, or rCMR{sub glc} values, were calculated in homologous brain regions contralateral and ipsilateral to enucleation. As compared with ipsilateral regions, rCMR{sub glc} was reduced significantly (by as much as -39%) in contralateral visual areas, including the superior colliculus, lateral geniculate body, and layers I, IV, and V of the primary (striate) and secondary (association, extrastriate) visual cortices. These results indicate that enucleation acutely reduces neuronal activity in contralateral visual areas of the awake rat and that the reductions are coupled to reduced incorporation of unsaturated fatty acids into sn-2 regions of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidylethanolamine. Reduced fatty acid incorporation likely reflects reduced activity of phospholipases A{sub 2} and/or phospholipase C. 65 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Maturation of metabolic connectivity of the adolescent rat brain.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hongyoon; Choi, Yoori; Kim, Kyu Wan; Kang, Hyejin; Hwang, Do Won; Kim, E Edmund; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Dong Soo

    2015-11-27

    Neuroimaging has been used to examine developmental changes of the brain. While PET studies revealed maturation-related changes, maturation of metabolic connectivity of the brain is not yet understood. Here, we show that rat brain metabolism is reconfigured to achieve long-distance connections with higher energy efficiency during maturation. Metabolism increased in anterior cerebrum and decreased in thalamus and cerebellum during maturation. When functional covariance patterns of PET images were examined, metabolic networks including default mode network (DMN) were extracted. Connectivity increased between the anterior and posterior parts of DMN and sensory-motor cortices during maturation. Energy efficiency, a ratio of connectivity strength to metabolism of a region, increased in medial prefrontal and retrosplenial cortices. Our data revealed that metabolic networks mature to increase metabolic connections and establish its efficiency between large-scale spatial components from childhood to early adulthood. Neurodevelopmental diseases might be understood by abnormal reconfiguration of metabolic connectivity and efficiency.

  15. Detecting Behavioral Deficits Post Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Awwad, Hibah O

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI), ranging from mild to severe, almost always elicits an array of behavioral deficits in injured subjects. Some of these TBI-induced behavioral deficits include cognitive and vestibulomotor deficits as well as anxiety and other consequences. Rodent models of TBI have been (and still are) fundamental in establishing many of the pathophysiological mechanisms of TBI. Animal models are also utilized in screening and testing pharmacological effects of potential therapeutic agents for brain injury treatment. This chapter details validated protocols for each of these behavioral deficits post traumatic brain injury in Sprague-Dawley male rats. The elevated plus maze (EPM) protocol is described for assessing anxiety-like behavior; the Morris water maze protocol for assessing cognitive deficits in learning memory and spatial working memory and the rotarod test for assessing vestibulomotor deficits. PMID:27604739

  16. Copolymer-1 Promotes Neurogenesis and Improves Functional Recovery after Acute Ischemic Stroke in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Yolanda; Lorea, Jonathan; Mestre, Humberto; Kim-Lee, Jennifer Hyuna; Herrera, Judith; Mellado, Raúl; Gálvez, Vanesa; Cuellar, Leopoldo; Musri, Carolina; Ibarra, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Stroke triggers a systemic inflammatory response that exacerbates the initial injury. Immunizing with peptides derived from CNS proteins can stimulate protective autoimmunity (PA). The most renowned of these peptides is copolymer-1 (Cop-1) also known as glatiramer acetate. This peptide has been approved for use in the treatment of multiple sclerosis. Cop-1-specific T cells cross the blood-brain barrier and secrete neurotrophins and anti-inflammatory cytokines that could stimulate proliferation of neural precursor cells and recruit them to the injury site; making it an ideal therapy for acute ischemic stroke. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of Cop-1 on neurogenesis and neurological recovery during the acute phase (7 days) and the chronic phase of stroke (60 days) in a rat model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAo). BDNF and NT-3 were quantified and infarct volumes were measured. We demonstrated that Cop-1 improves neurological deficit, enhances neurogenesis (at 7 and 60 days) in the SVZ, SGZ, and cerebral cortex through an increase in NT-3 production. It also decreased infarct volume even at the chronic phase of tMCAo. The present manuscript fortifies the support for the use of Cop-1 in acute ischemic stroke. PMID:25821957

  17. Exercise training improves renal excretory responses to acute volume expansion in rats with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hong; Li, Yi-Fan; Zucker, Irving H; Patel, Kaushik P

    2006-12-01

    Experiments were performed to test the postulate that exercise training (ExT) improves the blunted renal excretory response to acute volume expansion (VE), in part, by normalizing the neural component of the volume reflex typically observed in chronic heart failure (HF). Diuretic and natriuretic responses to acute VE were examined in sedentary and ExT groups of rats with either HF or sham-operated controls. Experiments were performed in anesthetized (Inactin) rats 6 wk after coronary ligation surgery. Histological data indicated that there was a 34.9 +/- 3.0% outer and 42.5 +/- 3.2% inner infarct of the myocardium in the HF group. Sham rats had no observable damage to the myocardium. In sedentary rats with HF, VE produced a blunted diuresis (46% of sham) and natriuresis (35% of sham) compared with sham-operated control rats. However, acute VE-induced diuresis and natriuresis in ExT rats with HF were comparable to sham rats and significantly higher than sedentary HF rats. Renal denervation abolished the salutary effects of ExT on renal excretory response to acute VE in HF. Since glomerular filtration rates were not significantly different between the groups, renal hemodynamic changes may not account for the blunted renal responses in rats with HF. Additional experiments confirmed that renal sympathetic nerve activity responses to acute VE were blunted in sedentary HF rats; however, ExT normalized the renal sympathoinhibition in HF rats. These results confirm an impairment of neurally mediated excretory responses to acute VE in rats with HF. ExT restored the blunted excretory responses as well as the renal sympathoinhibitory response to acute VE in HF rats. Thus the beneficial effects of ExT on cardiovascular regulation in HF may be partly due to improvement of the neural component of volume reflex.

  18. Modulation of gamma-irradiation and carbon tetrachloride induced oxidative stress in the brain of female rats by flaxseed oil.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Amel F M; Salem, Asmaa A M; Eassawy, Mamdouh M T

    2016-08-01

    The activity of flaxseed oil (FSO) on gamma-irradiation (7Gy) and/or carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) induced acute neurotoxicity in rats' brain was investigated. The results revealed a significant decrease (p<0.05) in superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione-peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities, reduced glutathione (GSH) and manganese (Mn) contents. Further, a significant elevation (p<0.05) in malondialdehyde, nitric oxide (NO), Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-α), Interleukin-1-beta (IL-1β), Interleukin-6 (IL-6), transforming growth factor-beta-1 (TGF-β1), iron (Fe), calcium (Ca), copper (Cu) and magnesium (Mg) levels were observed. Furthermore, the relative ratio of xanthine oxidase (XO) and inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) gene expression levels were elevated in the brain tissues of γ-irradiated and CCl4 intoxicated animals. Those effects were augmented due to the effect of CCl4-induced toxicity in γ-irradiated rats. The treatment of FSO displayed significant amendment of the studied parameters in the brain tissues of γ-irradiated and CCl4 intoxicated animals. FSO has a neuroprotective effect against CCl4-induced brain injury in gamma-irradiated rats. This effect is interrelated to the ability of FSO to scavenges the free radicals, enhances the antioxidant enzymes activity, increases GSH contents, down-regulates the inflammatory responses, ameliorates the iron, calcium, copper, magnesium, manganese levels and inhibiting the gene expression level of XO and iNOS in the brain tissues of intoxicated animals. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of FSO have the ability to improve the antioxidant status, suppress the inflammatory responses, and regulate the trace elements in the brain tissues of γ-irradiated, CCl4, and their combined effect in intoxicated animals. Consequently, FSO exhibited neuroprotective activity on γ-irradiated, CCl4, and their combined effect induced brain injury in

  19. Modulation of gamma-irradiation and carbon tetrachloride induced oxidative stress in the brain of female rats by flaxseed oil.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Amel F M; Salem, Asmaa A M; Eassawy, Mamdouh M T

    2016-08-01

    The activity of flaxseed oil (FSO) on gamma-irradiation (7Gy) and/or carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) induced acute neurotoxicity in rats' brain was investigated. The results revealed a significant decrease (p<0.05) in superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione-peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities, reduced glutathione (GSH) and manganese (Mn) contents. Further, a significant elevation (p<0.05) in malondialdehyde, nitric oxide (NO), Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-α), Interleukin-1-beta (IL-1β), Interleukin-6 (IL-6), transforming growth factor-beta-1 (TGF-β1), iron (Fe), calcium (Ca), copper (Cu) and magnesium (Mg) levels were observed. Furthermore, the relative ratio of xanthine oxidase (XO) and inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) gene expression levels were elevated in the brain tissues of γ-irradiated and CCl4 intoxicated animals. Those effects were augmented due to the effect of CCl4-induced toxicity in γ-irradiated rats. The treatment of FSO displayed significant amendment of the studied parameters in the brain tissues of γ-irradiated and CCl4 intoxicated animals. FSO has a neuroprotective effect against CCl4-induced brain injury in gamma-irradiated rats. This effect is interrelated to the ability of FSO to scavenges the free radicals, enhances the antioxidant enzymes activity, increases GSH contents, down-regulates the inflammatory responses, ameliorates the iron, calcium, copper, magnesium, manganese levels and inhibiting the gene expression level of XO and iNOS in the brain tissues of intoxicated animals. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of FSO have the ability to improve the antioxidant status, suppress the inflammatory responses, and regulate the trace elements in the brain tissues of γ-irradiated, CCl4, and their combined effect in intoxicated animals. Consequently, FSO exhibited neuroprotective activity on γ-irradiated, CCl4, and their combined effect induced brain injury in

  20. NCS-1 expression in rat brain after electroconvulsive stimulation.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Daniela V F; Souza, Renan P; Souza, Bruno R; Motta, Bernardo S; Caetano, Fernando; Jornada, Luciano K; Feier, Gustavo; Jeromin, Andreas; Gomez, Marcus V; Quevedo, João; Romano-Silva, Marco A

    2007-01-01

    Although electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has been used as a treatment for mental disorder since 1930s, little progress has been made towards understanding the mechanisms underlying its therapeutic and adverse effects. The aim of this work was to analyze the expression of NCS-1 (neuronal calcium sensor 1, a protein that was found to be altered in post-mortem prefrontal cortex of schizophrenic patients) in striatum, cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum of Wistar rats after acute or chronic electroconvulsive stimulation (ECS). Rats were submitted to a single stimulation (acute) or to a series of eight stimulations, applied one every 48 h (chronic). Animals were killed for collection of tissue samples at time zero, 30 min, 3, 12, 24 and 48 h after stimulation in the acute model and at the same time intervals after the last stimulation in the chronic model. Our results indicated that chronic ECS increased the expression of NCS-1 only in cerebellum. Such results on the expression of proteins involved in signaling pathways that are relevant for neuropsychiatric disorders and treatment, in particular ECT, can contribute to shed light on the mechanisms related to therapeutic and adverse effects.

  1. Global profiling of influence of intra-ischemic brain temperature on gene expression in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Megumi Sugahara; Asai, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Koichi; Nishida, Yayoi; Nagata, Toshihito; Takahashi, Yasuo

    2008-06-01

    Mild to moderate differences in brain temperature are known to greatly affect the outcome of cerebral ischemia. The impact of brain temperature on ischemic disorders has been mainly evaluated through pathological analysis. However, no comprehensive analyses have been conducted at the gene expression level. Using a high-density oligonucleotide microarray, we screened 24000 genes in the hippocampus under hypothermic (32 degrees C), normothermic (37 degrees C), and hyperthermic (39 degrees C) conditions in a rat ischemia-reperfusion model. When the ischemic group at each intra-ischemic brain temperature was compared to a sham-operated control group, genes whose expression levels changed more than three-fold with statistical significance could be detected. In our screening condition, thirty-three genes (some of them novel) were obtained after screening, and extensive functional surveys and literature reviews were subsequently performed. In the hypothermic condition, many neuroprotective factor genes were obtained, whereas cell death- and cell damage-associated genes were detected as the brain temperature increased. At all intra-ischemic brain temperatures, multiple molecular chaperone genes were obtained. The finding that intra-ischemic brain temperature affects the expression level of many genes related to neuroprotection or neurotoxicity coincides with the different pathological outcomes at different brain temperatures, demonstrating the utility of the genetic approach.

  2. Light-sheet microscopy imaging of a whole cleared rat brain with Thy1-GFP transgene

    PubMed Central

    Stefaniuk, Marzena; Gualda, Emilio J.; Pawlowska, Monika; Legutko, Diana; Matryba, Paweł; Koza, Paulina; Konopka, Witold; Owczarek, Dorota; Wawrzyniak, Marcin; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo; Kaczmarek, Leszek

    2016-01-01

    Whole-brain imaging with light-sheet fluorescence microscopy and optically cleared tissue is a new, rapidly developing research field. Whereas successful attempts to clear and image mouse brain have been reported, a similar result for rats has proven difficult to achieve. Herein, we report on creating novel transgenic rat harboring fluorescent reporter GFP under control of neuronal gene promoter. We then present data on clearing the rat brain, showing that FluoClearBABB was found superior over passive CLARITY and CUBIC methods. Finally, we demonstrate efficient imaging of the rat brain using light-sheet fluorescence microscopy. PMID:27312902

  3. Light-sheet microscopy imaging of a whole cleared rat brain with Thy1-GFP transgene.

    PubMed

    Stefaniuk, Marzena; Gualda, Emilio J; Pawlowska, Monika; Legutko, Diana; Matryba, Paweł; Koza, Paulina; Konopka, Witold; Owczarek, Dorota; Wawrzyniak, Marcin; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo; Kaczmarek, Leszek

    2016-01-01

    Whole-brain imaging with light-sheet fluorescence microscopy and optically cleared tissue is a new, rapidly developing research field. Whereas successful attempts to clear and image mouse brain have been reported, a similar result for rats has proven difficult to achieve. Herein, we report on creating novel transgenic rat harboring fluorescent reporter GFP under control of neuronal gene promoter. We then present data on clearing the rat brain, showing that FluoClearBABB was found superior over passive CLARITY and CUBIC methods. Finally, we demonstrate efficient imaging of the rat brain using light-sheet fluorescence microscopy. PMID:27312902

  4. Resveratrol ameliorates Serratia marcescens-induced acute pneumonia in rats.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chia-Chen; Lai, Hsin-Chih; Hsieh, Shang-Chen; Chen, Jan-Kan

    2008-04-01

    Serratia marcescens is an important nosocomial pathogen, which has been especially problematic as a cause of hospital-acquired pneumonia in the past two decades. Treatment of S. marcescens-related infections has been limited by emergence of multiple drug-resistant strains. Thus, the development of alternative agents for the prevention and treatment of Serratia infection is urgently needed. Resveratrol (RSV) is a compound with diverse biological effects including anti-cancer, anti-inflammation, anti-diabetes, and cancer chemoprevention. Whether RSV has in vivo prophylactic or therapeutic potential against infection remains uncharacterized. In the present study, we used a murine acute pneumonia model initiated by intratracheal application of S. marcescens to evaluate whether RSV possesses anti-infection properties. We showed that pretreatment with RSV for 3 days markedly increased alveolar macrophage infiltration, elevated NK cell activity, and decreased bacterial burden in the infected lung with a subsequent decrease in mortality. These effects were associated with significantly less-severe inflammatory phenotypes in lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, including reduced neutrophil infiltration of the lungs, reduced phagocytosis activity, and reduced secretion of cytokines such as TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-6. To further characterize the underlying mechanism responsible for these effects of RSV, LPS derived from S. marcescens was used to induce acute pneumonia in rats, with or without RSV pretreatment. RSV was shown to ameliorate acute pneumonia via inhibition of the NF-kappaB signaling pathway, including inhibition of IkappaBalpha phosphorylation and subsequent NF-kappaB activation. These findings suggest that RSV might be beneficial as a prophylactic treatment in patients at risk of an episode of S. marcescens-induced acute pneumonia.

  5. Very Early Administration of Progesterone for Acute Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wright, David W.; Yeatts, Sharon D.; Silbergleit, Robert; Palesch, Yuko Y.; Hertzberg, Vicki S.; Frankel, Michael; Goldstein, Felicia C.; Caveney, Angela F.; Howlett-Smith, Harriet; Bengelink, Erin M.; Manley, Geoffrey T.; Merck, Lisa H.; Janis, L. Scott; Barsan, William G.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability worldwide. Progesterone has been shown to improve neurologic outcome in multiple experimental models and two early-phase trials involving patients with TBI. METHODS We conducted a double-blind, multicenter clinical trial in which patients with severe, moderate-to-severe, or moderate acute TBI (Glasgow Coma Scale score of 4 to 12, on a scale from 3 to 15, with lower scores indicating a lower level of consciousness) were randomly assigned to intravenous progesterone or placebo, with the study treatment initiated within 4 hours after injury and administered for a total of 96 hours. Efficacy was defined as an increase of 10 percentage points in the proportion of patients with a favorable outcome, as determined with the use of the stratified dichotomy of the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale score at 6 months after injury. Secondary outcomes included mortality and the Disability Rating Scale score. RESULTS A total of 882 of the planned sample of 1140 patients underwent randomization before the trial was stopped for futility with respect to the primary outcome. The study groups were similar with regard to baseline characteristics; the median age of the patients was 35 years, 73.7% were men, 15.2% were black, and the mean Injury Severity Score was 24.4 (on a scale from 0 to 75, with higher scores indicating greater severity). The most frequent mechanism of injury was a motor vehicle accident. There was no significant difference between the progesterone group and the placebo group in the proportion of patients with a favorable outcome (relative benefit of progesterone, 0.95; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.85 to 1.06; P = 0.35). Phlebitis or thrombophlebitis was more frequent in the progesterone group than in the placebo group (relative risk, 3.03; CI, 1.96 to 4.66). There were no significant differences in the other prespecified safety outcomes. CONCLUSIONS This clinical trial did not show a

  6. Behavioral effects and CRF expression in brain structures of high- and low-anxiety rats after chronic restraint stress.

    PubMed

    Wisłowska-Stanek, Aleksandra; Lehner, Małgorzata; Skórzewska, Anna; Krząścik, Paweł; Płaźnik, Adam

    2016-09-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the influence of chronic restraint stress (5 weeks, 3h/day) on behavior and central corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) expression in rats selected for high (HR) and low anxiety (LR). The conditioned freezing response was used as a discriminating variable. Moreover, we assessed the influence of acute restraint on CRF expression in the brain in HR and LR rats. We found that chronic restraint induced symptoms of anhedonia (decreased consumption of 1% sucrose solution) in HR rats. In addition, HR restraint rats showed an increased learned helplessness behavior (immobility time in the Porsolt test) as well as neophobia in the open field test vs. LR restraint and HR control rats. These behavioral changes were accompanied by a decreased expression of CRF in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (pPVN) and the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus (DG) compared to the HR control and LR restraint rat groups, respectively. The acute restraint condition increased the expression of CRF in the pPVN of HR rats compared to the HR control group, and enhanced the expression of CRF in the CA1 area and DG of LR restraint animals compared to the HR restraint and LR control rats, respectively. The present results indicate that chronic restraint stress in high anxiety rats attenuated CRF expression in the pPVN and DG, which was probably due to detrimental actions on the hippocampus-hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal gland feedback mechanism, thus modulating the stress response and inducing anhedonia and depressive-like symptoms. PMID:27150225

  7. In utero exposure to microwave radiation and rat brain development

    SciTech Connect

    Merritt, J.H.; Hardy, K.A.; Chamness, A.F.

    1984-01-01

    Timed-pregnancy rats were exposed in a circular waveguide system starting on day 2 of gestation. The system operated at 2,450 MHz (pulsed waves; 8 microseconds PW; 830 pps). Specific absorption rate (SAR) was maintained at 0.4 W/kg by increasing the input power as the animals grew in size. On day 18 of gestation the dams were removed from the waveguide cages and euthanized; the fetuses were removed and weighed. Fetal brains were excised and weighed, and brain RNA, DNA and protein were determined. Values for measured parameters of the radiated fetuses did not differ significantly from those of sham-exposed fetuses. A regression of brain weight on body weight showed no micrencephalous fetuses in the radiation group when using as a criterion a regression line based on two standard errors of the estimate of the sham-exposed group. In addition, metrics derived from brain DNA (ie, cell number and cell size) showed no significant differences when radiation was compared to sham exposure. We conclude that 2,450-MHz microwave radiation, at an SAR of 0.4 W/kg, did not produce significant alterations in brain organogenesis.

  8. MRI measurement of angiogenesis and the therapeutic effect of acute marrow stromal cell administration on traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Lian; Chopp, Michael; Ding, Guang Liang; Qu, Chang Sheng; Li, Qing Jiang; Lu, Mei; Wang, Shiyang; Nejad-Davarani, Siamak P; Mahmood, Asim; Jiang, Quan

    2012-11-01

    Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the present study was undertaken to investigate the therapeutic effect of acute administration of human bone marrow stromal cells (hMSCs) on traumatic brain injury (TBI) and to measure the temporal profile of angiogenesis after the injury with or without cell intervention. Male Wistar rats (300 to 350 g, n=18) subjected to controlled cortical impact TBI were intravenously injected with 1 mL of saline (n=9) or hMSCs in suspension (n=9, 3 × 10(6) hMSCs) 6 hours after TBI. In-vivo MRI acquisitions of T2-weighted imaging, cerebral blood flow (CBF), three-dimensional (3D) gradient echo imaging, and blood-to-brain transfer constant (Ki) of contrast agent were performed on all animals 2 days after injury and weekly for 6 weeks. Sensorimotor function and spatial learning were evaluated. Volumetric changes in the trauma-induced brain lesion and the lateral ventricles were tracked and quantified using T2 maps, and hemodynamic alteration and blood-brain barrier permeability were monitored by CBF and Ki, respectively. Our data show that transplantation of hMSCs 6 hours after TBI leads to reduced cerebral atrophy, early and enhanced cerebral tissue perfusion and improved functional outcome compared with controls. The hMSC treatment increases angiogenesis in the injured brain, which may promote neurologic recovery after TBI.

  9. Sympathoadrenal responses to acute and chronic hypoxia in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, T S; Young, J B; Landsberg, L

    1983-01-01

    The sympathoadrenal responses to acute and chronic hypoxic exposure at 10.5 and 7.5% oxygen were determined in the rat. Cardiac norepinephrine (NE) turnover was used to assess sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity, and urinary excretion of epinephrine (E) was measured as an index of adrenal medullary activity. The responses of the adrenal medulla and SNS were distinct and dependent upon the degree and duration of hypoxic exposure. Chronic hypoxia at 10.5% oxygen increased cardiac NE turnover by 130% after 3, 7, and 14 d of hypoxic exposure. Urinary excretion of NE was similarly increased over this time interval, while urinary E excretion was marginally elevated. In contrast, acute exposure to moderate hypoxia at 10.5% oxygen was not associated with an increase in SNS activity; in fact, decreased SNS activity was suggested by diminished cardiac NE turnover and urinary NE excretion over the first 12 h of hypoxic exposure, and by a rebound increase in NE turnover after reexposure to normal oxygen tension. Adrenal medullary activity, on the other hand, increased substantially during acute exposure to moderate hypoxia (2-fold increase in urinary E excretion) and severe hypoxia (greater than 10-fold). In distinction to the lack of effect of acute hypoxic exposure (10.5% oxygen), the SNS was markedly stimulated during the first day of hypoxia exposure at 7.5% oxygen, an increase that was sustained throughout at least 7 d at 7.5% oxygen. These results demonstrate that chronic exposure to moderate and severe hypoxia increases the activity of the SNS and adrenal medulla, the effect being greater in severe hypoxic exposure. The response to acute hypoxic exposure is more complicated; during the first 12 h of exposure at 10.5% oxygen, the SNS is not stimulated and appears to be restrained, while adrenal medullary activity is enhanced. Acute exposure to a more severe degree of hypoxia (7.5% oxygen), however, is associated with stimulation of both the SNS and adrenal medulla

  10. CART peptide and opioid addiction: Expression changes in male rat brain.

    PubMed

    Bakhtazad, A; Vousooghi, N; Garmabi, B; Zarrindast, M R

    2016-06-14

    Previous studies have shown the prominence of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptide in rewarding and reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse specially psychostimulants. The data regarding the effects of different stages of opioid addiction on CART expression and the interconnection between CART and opioids are not much available. Here we have studied the changes in the expression level of CART mRNA and protein in various parts of the brain reward pathway in different stages of opioid addiction. Groups of male rats received acute low-dose (10mg/kg), acute high-dose (80mg/kg) and chronic escalating doses of morphine. In addition, withdrawal and abstinence states were evaluated after injection of naloxone (1mg/kg) and long-term maintenance of addicted animals, respectively. Expression of CART mRNA in the brain was measured by real-time PCR method. Western blotting was used to quantify the protein level. CART mRNA and protein were both up-regulated in high-dose morphine-administered animals and also in the withdrawal group in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), striatum and prefrontal cortex (PFC). In the addicted group, CART mRNA and protein were both down-regulated in NAc and striatum. In the abstinent group, CART mRNA was down-regulated in NAc. In the hippocampus, the only observed change was the up-regulation of CART mRNA in the withdrawal group. We suggest that the modulatory role of CART peptide in rewarding and reinforcing effects of opioids weakens when opioids are used for a long time and is stimulated when acute stress such as naloxone-induced withdrawal syndrome or acute high-dose administration of morphine occurs to the animal.

  11. Acute Carnosine Administration Increases Respiratory Chain Complexes and Citric Acid Cycle Enzyme Activities in Cerebral Cortex of Young Rats.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Levy W; Cararo, José H; Maravai, Soliany G; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Oliveira, Giovanna M T; Kist, Luiza W; Guerra Martinez, Camila; Kurtenbach, Eleonora; Bogo, Maurício R; Hipkiss, Alan R; Streck, Emilio L; Schuck, Patrícia F; Ferreira, Gustavo C

    2016-10-01

    Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) is an imidazole dipeptide synthesized in excitable tissues of many animals, whose biochemical properties include carbonyl scavenger, anti-oxidant, bivalent metal ion chelator, proton buffer, and immunomodulating agent, although its precise physiological role(s) in skeletal muscle and brain tissues in vivo remain unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vivo effects of acute carnosine administration on various aspects of brain bioenergetics of young Wistar rats. The activity of mitochondrial enzymes in cerebral cortex was assessed using a spectrophotometer, and it was found that there was an increase in the activities of complexes I-III and II-III and succinate dehydrogenase in carnosine-treated rats, as compared to vehicle-treated animals. However, quantitative real-time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) data on mRNA levels of mitochondrial biogenesis-related proteins (nuclear respiratory factor 1 (Nrf1), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1-α (Ppargc1α), and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam)) were not altered significantly and therefore suggest that short-term carnosine administration does not affect mitochondrial biogenesis. It was in agreement with the finding that immunocontent of respiratory chain complexes was not altered in animals receiving carnosine. These observations indicate that acute carnosine administration increases the respiratory chain and citric acid cycle enzyme activities in cerebral cortex of young rats, substantiating, at least in part, a neuroprotector effect assigned to carnosine against oxidative-driven disorders. PMID:26476839

  12. Acute Carnosine Administration Increases Respiratory Chain Complexes and Citric Acid Cycle Enzyme Activities in Cerebral Cortex of Young Rats.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Levy W; Cararo, José H; Maravai, Soliany G; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Oliveira, Giovanna M T; Kist, Luiza W; Guerra Martinez, Camila; Kurtenbach, Eleonora; Bogo, Maurício R; Hipkiss, Alan R; Streck, Emilio L; Schuck, Patrícia F; Ferreira, Gustavo C

    2016-10-01

    Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) is an imidazole dipeptide synthesized in excitable tissues of many animals, whose biochemical properties include carbonyl scavenger, anti-oxidant, bivalent metal ion chelator, proton buffer, and immunomodulating agent, although its precise physiological role(s) in skeletal muscle and brain tissues in vivo remain unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vivo effects of acute carnosine administration on various aspects of brain bioenergetics of young Wistar rats. The activity of mitochondrial enzymes in cerebral cortex was assessed using a spectrophotometer, and it was found that there was an increase in the activities of complexes I-III and II-III and succinate dehydrogenase in carnosine-treated rats, as compared to vehicle-treated animals. However, quantitative real-time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) data on mRNA levels of mitochondrial biogenesis-related proteins (nuclear respiratory factor 1 (Nrf1), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1-α (Ppargc1α), and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam)) were not altered significantly and therefore suggest that short-term carnosine administration does not affect mitochondrial biogenesis. It was in agreement with the finding that immunocontent of respiratory chain complexes was not altered in animals receiving carnosine. These observations indicate that acute carnosine administration increases the respiratory chain and citric acid cycle enzyme activities in cerebral cortex of young rats, substantiating, at least in part, a neuroprotector effect assigned to carnosine against oxidative-driven disorders.

  13. Effect of acute and chronic ethanol pre-treatment on the disposition of phencyclidine (PCP) in the rat.

    PubMed

    Vadlamani, N L; Pontani, R B; Misra, A L

    1982-05-01

    Disposition of [H] Phencyclidine in brain, plasma and adipose tissue of rats acutely and chronically-treated with ethanol was studied using a method possessing high sensitivity and specificity for PCP. In rats acutely-treated with ethanol (5 g/kg PO dose) and PCP (10 mg/kg IP dose), dispositional factors did not play a role in the intensifies pharmacological and behavioral effects of PCP. However in rats chronically-treated with 2.5 g/kg PO dose of ethanol twice a day for 19 days, the disposition of PCP (5 mg/kg IP dose) was significantly altered and the values of PCP in brain, plasma and adipose tissue were significantly higher than those in the control group. Although inhibition of PCP metabolism and a comparatively slower rate of its elimination appear to account for the potentiation of drug effects in animals chronically-treated with ethanol, interaction of drugs at the level of the central nervous system cannot be ruled out. PMID:7089042

  14. Acute and chronic tianeptine treatments attenuate ethanol withdrawal syndrome in rats.

    PubMed

    Uzbay, Tayfun; Kayir, Hakan; Celik, Turgay; Yüksel, Nevzat

    2006-05-01

    Effects of acute and chronic tianeptine treatments on ethanol withdrawal syndrome were investigated in rats. Ethanol (7.2% v/v) was given to adult male Wistar rats by a liquid diet for 30 days. Acute or chronic (twice daily) tianeptine (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg) and saline were administered to rats intraperitoneally. Acute and last chronic tianeptine injections and saline were done 30 min before ethanol withdrawal testing. After 2nd, 4th and 6th hours of ethanol withdrawal, rats were observed for 5 min, and withdrawal signs which included locomotor hyperactivity, agitation, tremor, wet dog shakes, stereotyped behavior and audiogenic seizures were recorded or rated. Locomotor activity in naive (no ethanol-dependent rats) was also tested after acute tianeptine treatments. Acute but not chronic tianeptine treatment attenuated locomotor hyperactivity and agitation in ethanol-dependent rats. Both acute and chronic tianeptine treatment produced some significant inhibitory effects on tremor, wet dog shakes, stereotyped behaviors and audiogenic seizures during the ethanol withdrawal. Our results suggest that acute or chronic tianeptine treatment attenuates ethanol withdrawal syndrome in ethanol-dependent rats and this drug may be useful for treatment of ethanol-type dependence.

  15. Investigating Metacognition, Cognition, and Behavioral Deficits of College Students with Acute Traumatic Brain Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Sarah; Davalos, Deana

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Executive dysfunction in college students who have had an acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) was investigated. The cognitive, behavioral, and metacognitive effects on college students who endorsed experiencing a brain injury were specifically explored. Participants: Participants were 121 college students who endorsed a mild TBI, and 121…

  16. Contrasting Acute and Slow-Growing Lesions: A New Door to Brain Plasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desmurget, Michel; Bonnetblanc, FranCois; Duffau, Hugues

    2007-01-01

    The concept of plasticity describes the mechanisms that rearrange cerebral organization following a brain injury. During the last century, plasticity has been mainly investigated in humans with acute strokes. It was then shown: (i) that the brain is organized into highly specialized functional areas, often designated "eloquent" areas and (ii) that…

  17. Corticotropin-releasing factor antagonist blocks microwave-induced decreases in high-affinity choline uptake in the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.; Carino, M.A.; Horita, A.; Guy, A.W. )

    1990-10-01

    Acute (45-min) irradiation with pulsed low-level microwaves (2450-MHz, 2 microseconds pulses at 500 pps, average power density of 1 mW/cm2, whole-body average specific absorption rate of 0.6 W/kg) decreased sodium-dependent high-affinity choline uptake (HACU) activity in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of the rat. These effects were blocked by pretreating the animals before exposure with intracerebroventricular injection of the specific corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptor antagonist, alpha-helical-CRF9-41 (25 micrograms). Similar injection of the antagonist had no significant effect on HACU in the brain of the sham-exposed rats. These data suggest that low-level microwave irradiation activates CRF in the brain, which in turn causes the changes in central HACU.

  18. [Behavior and functional state of the dopaminergic brain system in pups of depressive WAG/Rij rats].

    PubMed

    Malyshev, A V; Razumkina, E V; Rogozinskaia, É Ia; Sarkisova, K Iu; Dybynin, V A

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, it has been studied for the first time behavior and functional state of the dopaminergic brain system in pups of "depressive" WAG/Rij rats. Offspring of "depressive" WAG/Rij rats at age of 6-16 days compared with offspring of "normal" (non-depressed) outbred rats of the same age exhibited reduced rate of pshychomotor development, lower body weight, attenuation in integration of coordinated reflexes and vestibular function (greater latency of righting reflex, abnormal negative geotaxis), hyper-reactivity to tactile stimulation, reduced motivation to contact with mother (reduced infant-mother attachment). Differences in a nest seeking response induced by olfactory stimuli (olfactory discrimination test) and in locomotor activity (tests "gait reflex" and "small open field") have not been revealed. Acute injection of the antagonist of D2-like dopamine receptors clebopride 20 min before testing aggravated mother-oriented behavior in 15-days-old pups of both "depressive" and "non-depressive" rats. However this effect was greater in pups of "depressive" WAG/Rij rats compared with pups of "normal" rats that may indicate reduced functional activity of the dopaminergic brain system in offspring of "depressive" rats. It is proposed that reduced attachment behavior in pups of "depressive" WAG/Rij rats might be a consequence of maternal depression and associated with it reduced maternal care. Moreover, reduced attachment behavior in pups of "depressive" rats might be an early precursor (a marker) of depressive-like pathology which become apparent later in life (approximately at age of 3 months). PMID:25723020

  19. Autoradiographic localization of angiotensin II receptors in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, F.A.O.; Quirion, R.; Saavedra, J.M.; Aguilera, G.; Catt, K.J.

    1984-03-01

    The /sup 125/I-labeled agonist analog (1-sarcosine)-angiotensin II ((Sar/sup 1/)AII) bound with high specificity and affinity (K/sub a/ = 2 x 10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/) to a single class of receptor sites in rat brain. This ligand was used to analyze the distribution of AII receptors in rat brain by in vitro autoradiography followed by computerized densitometry and color coding. A very high density of AII receptors was found in the subfornical organ, paraventricular and periventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus, nucleus of the tractus solitarius, and area postrema. A high concentration of receptors was found in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, lateral olfactory tracts, nuclei of the accessory and lateral olfactory tracts, triangular septal nucleus, subthalamic nucleus, locus coeruleus, and inferior olivary nuclei. Moderate receptor concentrations were found in the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, median preoptic nucleus, medial habenular nucleus, lateral septum, ventroposterior thalamic nucleus, median eminence, medial geniculate nucleus, superior colliculus, subiculum, pre- and parasubiculum, and spinal trigeminal tract. Low concentrations of sites were seen in caudate-putamen, nucleus accumbens, amygdala, and gray matter of the spinal cord. These studies have demonstrated that AII receptors are distributed in a highly characteristic anatomical pattern in the brain. The high concentrations of AII receptors at numerous physiologically relevant sites are consistent with the emerging evidence for multiple roles of AII as a neuropeptide in the central nervous system. 75 references, 2 figures.

  20. Localization of histidine decarboxylase mRNA in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Bayliss, D A; Wang, Y M; Zahnow, C A; Joseph, D R; Millhorn, D E

    1990-08-01

    The recent cloning of a cDNA encoding fetal rat liver histidine decarboxylase (HDC), the synthesizing enzyme for histamine, allows the study of the central histaminergic system at the molecular level. To this end, Northern blot and in situ hybridization analyses were used to determine the regional and cellular distribution of neurons which express HDC mRNA in rat brain. Three hybridizing species which migrate as 1.6-, 2.6-, and 3.5-kb RNA were identified with Northern blots. The major (2.6 kb) and minor (3.5 kb) species, characteristic of HDC mRNA in fetal liver, were expressed at high levels in diencephalon and at just detectable levels in hippocampus, but not in other brain regions. In contrast, the 1.6-kb species was present in all brain regions examined except the olfactory bulb. Cells which contain HDC mRNA were found by in situ hybridization in the hypothalamus; HDC mRNA-containing cells were not detected in other areas, including the hippocampus. Hypothalamic neurons which express HDC mRNA were localized to all aspects of the tuberomammillary nucleus, a result consistent with previous immunohistochemical findings. PMID:19912749

  1. Role of aqueous extract of Cynodon dactylon in prevention of carbofuran- induced oxidative stress and acetylcholinesterase inhibition in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Rai, D K; Sharma, R K; Rai, P K; Watal, G; Sharma, B

    2011-02-12

    The present study was designed to investigate the ameliorating effect of aqueous extract of C. dactylon on carbofuran induced oxidative stress (OS) and alterations in the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in the brain of rats. Vitamin C was used as a positive control. Wistar rats were administered with single sub-acute oral dose (1.6 mgkg-1 b.wt.) of carbofuran for 24 h. The OS parameters such as lipid peroxidation (LPO) and the activities of antioxidant enzymes including super oxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST), and that of AChE were studied in brain. Carbofuran treatment significantly increased the activities of SOD and CAT by 75 and 60%, respectively. It also induced the level of LPO by 113%. In contrast, the activities of GST and AChE were recorded to be diminished by 25 and 33%, respectively. Pretreatment of the rats with aqueous extract of C. dactylon (oral; 500mgkg-1) restored SOD activity completely but CAT activity only partially (7%). Carbofuran induced LPO was moderated by 95% in the brain of C. dactylon treated rats. The observed changes in OS parameters in C. dactylon treated group were comparable to that observed in vitamin C (200 mg-kg-1 b. wt.) treated group. Surprisingly, C. dactylon treatment significantly recovered the activity of AChE to a similar level as observed in the brain of control group. In contrast vitamin C treatment did not cause significant change in the activity of AChE in carbofuran treated group. There were no noticeable changes in the aforementioned study parameters in the brain of rats receiving C. dactylon and vitamin C, only. The results suggest that the study is extremely important in the context of development of new anticholinestesterase and antioxidant antidotes against carbofuran from C. dactylon.

  2. Influence of brain catecholamines on the development of fatigue in exercising rats in the heat.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Piacentini, Maria Francesca; Sarre, Sophie; Michotte, Yvette; Ishiwata, Takayuki; Meeusen, Romain

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to identify the effects of an acute injection of a dual dopamine (DA)/noradrenaline (NA) reuptake inhibitor (bupropion) on exercise performance, thermoregulation and neurotransmitters in the preoptic area and anterior hypothalamus (PO/AH) of the rat during exercise in the heat. Body core temperature (T(core)), brain temperature (T(brain)) and tail skin temperature (T(tail)) were measured. A microdialysis probe was inserted in the PO/AH, and samples for measurement of extracellular DA, NA and serotonin (5-HT) levels were collected. Rats received either bupropion (17 mg kg(-1); hot-BUP) or saline (1 ml kg(-1); hot) 20 min before the start of exercise and ran at a speed of 26 m min(-1) until exhaustion in a warm environment (30 degrees C). Rats also ran until exhaustion in a cool environment (18 degrees C; cool). Running time to exhaustion was significantly influenced by the ambient temperature, and it was increased by bupropion in the heat (cool, 143.6 +/- 21 min; hot, 65.8 +/- 13 min; hot-BUP, 86.3 +/- 7.2 min). T(core) and T(brain) at exhaustion were significantly higher in the bupropion group compared to the cool and hot groups, respectively. T(tail) measured at exhaustion was not significantly different between the two hot conditions. Extracellular concentrations of DA and NA in the PO/AH increased during exercise, and was significantly higher in the bupropion than in cool and hot groups (P < 0.05). No differences were observed between groups for 5-HT levels. These results suggest that DA and NA in the PO/AH might be responsible for the increase in exercise performance and T(core) and T(brain) in the bupropion group in hyperthermia. Moreover, these results support previous findings in humans that acute bupropion ingestion increases T(core) during exercise in the heat, indicating the possibility of an important role for DA and NA in thermoregulation.

  3. Methylphenidate treatment leads to abnormalities on krebs cycle enzymes in the brain of young and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Réus, Gislaine Z; Scaini, Giselli; Furlanetto, Camila B; Morais, Meline O S; Jeremias, Isabela C; Mello-Santos, Lis Mairá; Freitas, Karolina V; Quevedo, João; Streck, Emilio L

    2013-08-01

    Studies have shown a relationship between energy metabolism and methylphenidate (MPH); however, there are no studies evaluating the effects of MPH in Krebs cycle. So, we investigated if MPH treatment could alter the activity of citrate synthase (CS), malate dehydrogenase (MD), and isocitrate dehydrogenase (ID) in the brain of young and adult Wistar rats. Our results showed that MPH (2 and 10 mg/kg) reduced CS in the striatum and prefrontal cortex (PF), with MPH at all doses in the cerebellum and hippocampus after chronic treatment in young rats. In adult rats the CS was reduced in the cerebellum after acute treatment with MPH at all doses, and after chronic treatment in the PF and cerebellum with MPH (10 mg/kg), and in the hippocampus with MPH (2 and 10 mg/kg). The ID decreased in the hippocampus and striatum with MPH (2 and 10 mg/kg), and in the cortex (10 mg/kg) after acute treatment in young rats. In adult rats acute treatment with MPH (2 and 10 mg/kg) reduced ID in the cerebellum, and with MPH (10 mg/kg) in the cortex; chronic treatment with MPH (10 mg/kg) decreased ID in the PF; with MPH (2 and 10 mg/kg) in the cerebellum, and with MPH at all doses in the hippocampus. The MD did not alter. In conclusion, our results suggest that MPH can alter enzymes of Krebs cycle in brain areas involved with circuits related with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder; however, such effects depend on age of animal and treatment regime.

  4. Quantitative Analysis of Long-Form Aromatase mRNA in the Male and Female Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Tabatadze, Nino; Sato, Satoru M.; Woolley, Catherine S.

    2014-01-01

    In vitro studies show that estrogens acutely modulate synaptic function in both sexes. These acute effects may be mediated in vivo by estrogens synthesized within the brain, which could fluctuate more rapidly than circulating estrogens. For this to be the case, brain regions that respond acutely to estrogens should be capable of synthesizing them. To investigate this question, we used quantitative real-time PCR to measure expression of mRNA for the estrogen-synthesizing enzyme, aromatase, in different brain regions of male and female rats. Importantly, because brain aromatase exists in two forms, a long form with aromatase activity and a short form with unknown function, we targeted a sequence found exclusively in long-form aromatase. With this approach, we found highest expression of aromatase mRNA in the amygdala followed closely by the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) and preoptic area (POA); we found moderate levels of aromatase mRNA in the dorsal hippocampus and cingulate cortex; and aromatase mRNA was detectable in brainstem and cerebellum, but levels were very low. In the amygdala, gonadal/hormonal status regulated aromatase expression in both sexes; in the BNST and POA, castration of males down-regulated aromatase, whereas there was no effect of estradiol in ovariectomized females. In the dorsal hippocampus and cingulate cortex, there were no differences in aromatase levels between males and females or effects of gonadal/hormonal status. These findings demonstrate that long-form aromatase is expressed in brain regions that respond acutely to estrogens, such as the dorsal hippocampus, and that gonadal/hormonal regulation of aromatase differs among different brain regions. PMID:25036039

  5. The Toxic Effect of Manganese on the Acetylcholinesterase Activity in Rat Brains

    PubMed Central

    Yousefi Babadi, Vahid; Sadeghi, Leila; Shirani, Kobra; Malekirad, Ali Akbar; Rezaei, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is a naturally occurring element and an essential nutrient for humans and animals. However, exposure to high levels of Mn may cause neurotoxic effects. Accumulation of manganese damages central nervous system and causes Parkinson's disease-like syndrome called manganism. Mn neurotoxicity has been suggested to involve an imbalance between the DAergic and cholinergic systems. The pathological mechanisms associated with Mn neurotoxicity are poorly understood, but several reports have established it is mediated by changing of AChE activity that resulted in oxidative stress. Therefore we focused the effect of Mn in AChE activity in the rat's brain by MnCl2 injection intraperitoneally and analyzed their brains after time intervals. This study used different acute doses in short time course and different chronic doses at different exposing time to investigate which of them (exposing dose or time) is more important in Mn toxic effect. Results showed toxic effect of Mn is highly dose dependent and AChE activity in presence of chronic dose in 8 weeks reaches acute dose in only 2 days. PMID:25246936

  6. The blood-brain barrier penetration and distribution of PEGylated fluorescein-doped magnetic silica nanoparticles in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, Shuting; Yan, Feng; Wang, Ying; Sun, Yilin; Yang, Nan; Ye, Ling

    2010-04-16

    PEGylated PAMAM conjugated fluorescein-doped magnetic silica nanoparticles (PEGylated PFMSNs) have been synthesized for evaluating their ability across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and distribution in rat brain. The obtained nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermal gravimetry analyses (TGA), zeta potential ({zeta}-potential) titration, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The BBB penetration and distribution of PEGylated PFMSNs and FMSNs in rat brain were investigated not only at the cellular level with Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), but also at the subcellular level with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results provide direct evidents that PEGylated PFMSNs could penetrate the BBB and spread into the brain parenchyma.

  7. Primary blast traumatic brain injury in the rat: relating diffusion tensor imaging and behavior.

    PubMed

    Budde, Matthew D; Shah, Alok; McCrea, Michael; Cullinan, William E; Pintar, Frank A; Stemper, Brian D

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of traumatic brain injury (TBI) among military personnel is at its highest point in U.S. history. Experimental animal models of blast have provided a wealth of insight into blast injury. The mechanisms of neurotrauma caused by blast, however, are still under debate. Specifically, it is unclear whether the blast shockwave in the absence of head motion is sufficient to induce brain trauma. In this study, the consequences of blast injury were investigated in a rat model of primary blast TBI. Animals were exposed to blast shockwaves with peak reflected overpressures of either 100 or 450 kPa (39 and 110 kPa incident pressure, respectively) and subsequently underwent a battery of behavioral tests. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), a promising method to detect blast injury in humans, was performed on fixed brains to detect and visualize the spatial dependence of blast injury. Blast TBI caused significant deficits in memory function as evidenced by the Morris Water Maze, but limited emotional deficits as evidenced by the Open Field Test and Elevated Plus Maze. Fractional anisotropy, a metric derived from DTI, revealed significant brain abnormalities in blast-exposed animals. A significant relationship between memory deficits and brain microstructure was evident in the hippocampus, consistent with its role in memory function. The results provide fundamental insight into the neurological consequences of blast TBI, including the evolution of injury during the sub-acute phase and the spatially dependent pattern of injury. The relationship between memory dysfunction and microstructural brain abnormalities may provide insight into the persistent cognitive difficulties experienced by soldiers exposed to blast neurotrauma and may be important to guide therapeutic and rehabilitative efforts.

  8. Cerebrolysin attenuates blood-brain barrier and brain pathology following whole body hyperthermia in the rat.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Hari Shanker; Zimmermann-Meinzingen, Sibilla; Sharma, Aruna; Johanson, Conrad E

    2010-01-01

    The possibility that Cerebrolysin, a mixture of several neurotrophic factors, has some neuroprotective effects on whole body hyperthermia (WBH) induced breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), blood-CSF barrier (BCSFB), brain edema formation and neuropathology were examined in a rat model. Rats subjected to a 4 h heat stress at 38 degrees C in a biological oxygen demand (BOD) incubator exhibited profound increases in BBB and BCSFB permeability to Evans blue and radioiodine tracers compared to controls. Hippocampus, caudate nucleus, thalamus and hypothalamus exhibited pronounced increase in water content and brain pathology following 4 h heat stress. Pretreatment with Cerebrolysin (1, 2 or 5 mL/kg i.v.) 24 h before WBH significantly attenuated breakdown of the BBB or BCSFB and brain edema formation. This effect was dose dependent. Interestingly, the cell and tissue injury following WBH in cerebrolysin-treated groups were also considerably reduced. These novel observations suggest that cerebrolysin can attenuate WBH induced BBB and BCSFB damage resulting in neuroprotection.

  9. Acute stress differentially affects aromatase activity in specific brain nuclei of adult male and female quail.

    PubMed

    Dickens, Molly J; Cornil, Charlotte A; Balthazart, Jacques

    2011-11-01

    The rapid and temporary suppression of reproductive behavior is often assumed to be an important feature of the adaptive acute stress response. However, how this suppression operates at the mechanistic level is poorly understood. The enzyme aromatase converts testosterone to estradiol in the brain to activate reproductive behavior in male Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica). The discovery of rapid and reversible modification of aromatase activity (AA) provides a potential mechanism for fast, stress-induced changes in behavior. We investigated the effects of acute stress on AA in both sexes by measuring enzyme activity in all aromatase-expressing brain nuclei before, during, and after 30 min of acute restraint stress. We show here that acute stress rapidly alters AA in the male and female brain and that these changes are specific to the brain nuclei and sex of the individual. Specifically, acute stress rapidly (5 min) increased AA in the male medial preoptic nucleus, a region controlling male reproductive behavior; in females, a similar increase was also observed, but it appeared delayed (15 min) and had smaller amplitude. In the ventromedial and tuberal hypothalamus, regions associated with female reproductive behavior, stress induced a quick and sustained decrease in AA in females, but in males, only a slight increase (ventromedial) or no change (tuberal) in AA was observed. Effects of acute stress on brain estrogen production, therefore, represent one potential way through which stress affects reproduction.

  10. Magnetic Micelles for DNA delivery to rat brains after mild traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Das, Mahasweta; Wang, Chunyan; Bedi, Raminder; Mohapatra, Shyam S.; Mohapatra, Subhra

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes significant mortality, long term disability and psychological symptoms. Gene therapy is a promising approach for treatment of different pathological conditions. Here we tested chitosan and polyethyleneimine (PEI)-coated magnetic micelles (CPmag micelles or CPMMs), a potential MRI contrast agent, to deliver a reporter DNA to the brain after mild TBI (mTBI). CPMM - tomato plasmid (ptd) conjugate expressing a red-fluorescent protein (RFP) was administered intranasally immediately after mTBI or sham surgery in male SD rats. Evans blue extravasation following mTBI suggested CPMM-ptd entry into the brain via the compromised blood-brain barrier. Magnetofection increased the concentration of CPMMs in the brain. RFP expression was observed in the brain (cortex and hippocampus), lung and liver 48 hours after mTBI. CPMM did not evoke any inflammatory response by themselves and were excreted from the body. These results indicate the possibility of using intranasally administered CPMM as a theranostic vehicle for mTBI. PMID:24486465

  11. Comprehensive Evaluation of Neuroprotection Achieved by Extended Selective Brain Cooling Therapy in a Rat Model of Penetrating Ballistic-Like Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xi-Chun May; Shear, Deborah A; Deng-Bryant, Ying; Leung, Lai Yee; Wei, Guo; Chen, Zhiyong; Tortella, Frank C

    2016-03-01

    Brain hypothermia has been considered as a promising alternative to whole-body hypothermia in treating acute neurological disease, for example, traumatic brain injury. Previously, we demonstrated that 2-hours selective brain cooling (SBC) effectively mitigated acute (≤24 hours postinjury) neurophysiological dysfunction induced by a penetrating ballistic-like brain injury (PBBI) in rats. This study evaluated neuroprotective effects of extended SBC (4 or 8 hours in duration) on sub-acute secondary injuries between 3 and 21 days postinjury (DPI). SBC (34°C) was achieved via extraluminal cooling of rats' bilateral common carotid arteries (CCA). Depending on the experimental design, SBC was introduced either immediately or with a 2- or 4-hour delay after PBBI and maintained for 4 or 8 hours. Neuroprotective effects of SBC were evaluated by measuring brain lesion volume, axonal injury, neuroinflammation, motor and cognitive functions, and post-traumatic seizures. Compared to untreated PBBI animals, 4 or 8 hours SBC treatment initiated immediately following PBBI produced comparable neuroprotective benefits against PBBI-induced early histopathology at 3 DPI as evidenced by significant reductions in brain lesion volume, axonal pathology (beta-amyloid precursor protein staining), neuroinflammation (glial fibrillary acetic protein stained-activated astrocytes and rat major histocompatibility complex class I stained activated microglial cell), and post-traumatic nonconvulsive seizures. In the later phase of the injury (7-21 DPI), significant improvement on motor function (rotarod test) was observed under most SBC protocols, including the 2-hour delay in SBC initiation. However, SBC treatment failed to improve cognitive performance (Morris water maze test) measured 13-17 DPI. The protective effects of SBC on delayed axonal injury (silver staining) were evident out to 14 DPI. In conclusion, the CCA cooling method of SBC produced neuroprotection measured across multiple

  12. Detection of cocaine induced rat brain activation by photoacoustic tomography

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Janggun; Yang, Xinmai

    2011-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) was used to detect the progressive changes on the cerebral cortex of Sprague Dawley rats after the administration of cocaine hydrochloride. Different concentrations (0, 2.5, and 5.0 mg per kg body) of cocaine hydrochloride in saline solution were injected into Sprague Dawley rats through tail veins. Cerebral cortex images of the animals were continuously acquired by PAT. For continuous observation, PAT system used multi-transducers to reduce the scanning time and maintain a good signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The obtained photoacoustic images were compared with each other and confirmed that changes in blood volume were induced by cocaine hydrochloride injection. The results demonstrate that PAT may be used to detect the effects of drug abuse-induced brain activation. PMID:21163301

  13. Acute predator stress impairs the consolidation and retrieval of hippocampus-dependent memory in male and female rats

    PubMed Central

    Park, Collin R.; Zoladz, Phillip R.; Conrad, Cheryl D.; Fleshner, Monika; Diamond, David M.

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the effects of an acute predator stress experience on spatial learning and memory in adult male and female Sprague-Dawley rats. All rats were trained to learn the location of a hidden escape platform in the radial-arm water maze (RAWM), a hippocampus-dependent spatial memory task. In the control (non-stress) condition, female rats were superior to the males in the accuracy and consistency of their spatial memory performance tested over multiple days of training. In the stress condition, rats were exposed to the cat for 30 min immediately before or after learning, or before the 24-h memory test. Predator stress dramatically increased corticosterone levels in males and females, with females exhibiting greater baseline and stress-evoked responses than males. Despite these sex differences in the overall magnitudes of corticosterone levels, there were significant sex-independent correlations involving basal and stress-evoked corticosterone levels, and memory performance. Most importantly, predator stress impaired short-term memory, as well as processes involved in memory consolidation and retrieval, in male and female rats. Overall, we have found that an intense, ethologically relevant stressor produced a largely equivalent impairment of memory in male and female rats, and sex-independent corticosterone-memory correlations. These findings may provide insight into commonalities in how traumatic stress affects the brain and memory in men and women. PMID:18391188

  14. Chronic marijuana smoke exposure in the rhesus monkey. IV: Neurochemical effects and comparison to acute and chronic exposure to delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in rats.

    PubMed

    Ali, S F; Newport, G D; Scallet, A C; Paule, M G; Bailey, J R; Slikker, W

    1991-11-01

    THC is the major psychoactive constituent of marijuana and is known to produce psychopharmacological effects in humans. These studies were designed to determine whether acute or chronic exposure to marijuana smoke or THC produces in vitro or in vivo neurochemical alterations in rat or monkey brain. For the in vitro study, THC was added (1-100 nM) to membranes prepared from different regions of the rat brain and muscarinic cholinergic (MCh) receptor binding was measured. For the acute in vivo study, rats were injected IP with vehicle, 1, 3, 10, or 30 mg THC/kg and sacrificed 2 h later. For the chronic study, rats were gavaged with vehicle or 10 or 20 mg THC/kg daily, 5 days/week for 90 days and sacrificed either 24 h or 2 months later. Rhesus monkeys were exposed to the smoke of a single 2.6% THC cigarette once a day, 2 or 7 days a week for 1 year. Approximately 7 months after the last exposure, animals were sacrificed by overdose with pentobarbital for neurochemical analyses. In vitro exposure to THC produced a dose-dependent inhibition of MCh receptor binding in several brain areas. This inhibition of MCh receptor binding, however, was also observed with two other nonpsychoactive derivatives of marijuana, cannabidiol and cannabinol. In the rat in vivo study, we found no significant changes in MCh or other neurotransmitter receptor binding in hippocampus, frontal cortex or caudate nucleus after acute or chronic exposure to THC. In the monkey brain, we found no alterations in the concentration of neurotransmitters in caudate nucleus, frontal cortex, hypothalamus or brain stem.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. The effects of acute alcohol administration on the human brain: insights from neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Bjork, James M; Gilman, Jodi M

    2014-09-01

    Over the last quarter century, researchers have peered into the living human brain to develop and refine mechanistic accounts of alcohol-induced behavior, as well as neurobiological mechanisms for development and maintenance of addiction. These in vivo neuroimaging studies generally show that acute alcohol administration affects brain structures implicated in motivation and behavior control, and that chronic intoxication is correlated with structural and functional abnormalities in these same structures, where some elements of these decrements normalize with extended sobriety. In this review, we will summarize recent findings about acute human brain responses to alcohol using neuroimaging techniques, and how they might explain behavioral effects of alcohol intoxication. We then briefly address how chronic alcohol intoxication (as inferred from cross-sectional differences between various drinking populations and controls) may yield individual brain differences between drinking subjects that may confound interpretation of acute alcohol administration effects. This article is part of the Special Issue Section entitled 'Neuroimaging in Neuropharmacology'.

  16. Long-term exposure to nicotine markedly reduces kynurenic acid in rat brain - In vitro and ex vivo evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Zielinska, Elzbieta; Kuc, Damian; Zgrajka, Wojciech; Turski, Waldemar A.; Dekundy, Andrzej

    2009-10-15

    Kynurenic acid (KYNA) is a recognized broad-spectrum antagonist of excitatory amino acid receptors with a particularly high affinity for the glycine co-agonist site of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor complex. KYNA is also a putative endogenous neuroprotectant. Recent studies show that KYNA strongly blocks {alpha}7 subtype of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). The present studies were aimed at assessing effects of acute and chronic nicotine exposure on KYNA production in rat brain slices in vitro and ex vivo. In brain slices, nicotine significantly increased KYNA formation at 10 mM but not at 1 or 5 mM. Different nAChR antagonists (dihydro-{beta}-erythroidine, methyllycaconitine and mecamylamine) failed to block the influence exerted by nicotine on KYNA synthesis in cortical slices in vitro. Effects of acute (1 mg/kg, i.p.), subchronic (10-day) and chronic (30-day) administration of nicotine in drinking water (100 {mu}g/ml) on KYNA brain content were evaluated ex vivo. Acute treatment with nicotine (1 mg/kg i.p.) did not affect KYNA level in rat brain. The subchronic exposure to nicotine in drinking water significantly increased KYNA by 43%, while chronic exposure to nicotine resulted in a reduction in KYNA by 47%. Co-administration of mecamylamine with nicotine in drinking water for 30 days reversed the effect exerted by nicotine on KYNA concentration in the cerebral cortex. The present results provide evidence for the hypothesis of reciprocal interaction between the nicotinic cholinergic system and the kynurenine pathway in the brain.

  17. Brain tumor imaging of rat fresh tissue using terahertz spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Sayuri; Fukushi, Yasuko; Kubota, Oichi; Itsuji, Takeaki; Ouchi, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Tumor imaging by terahertz spectroscopy of fresh tissue without dye is demonstrated using samples from a rat glioma model. The complex refractive index spectrum obtained by a reflection terahertz time-domain spectroscopy system can discriminate between normal and tumor tissues. Both the refractive index and absorption coefficient of tumor tissues are higher than those of normal tissues and can be attributed to the higher cell density and water content of the tumor region. The results of this study indicate that terahertz technology is useful for detecting brain tumor tissue. PMID:27456312

  18. Brain tumor imaging of rat fresh tissue using terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Sayuri; Fukushi, Yasuko; Kubota, Oichi; Itsuji, Takeaki; Ouchi, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Seiji

    2016-07-01

    Tumor imaging by terahertz spectroscopy of fresh tissue without dye is demonstrated using samples from a rat glioma model. The complex refractive index spectrum obtained by a reflection terahertz time-domain spectroscopy system can discriminate between normal and tumor tissues. Both the refractive index and absorption coefficient of tumor tissues are higher than those of normal tissues and can be attributed to the higher cell density and water content of the tumor region. The results of this study indicate that terahertz technology is useful for detecting brain tumor tissue.

  19. 2-hydroxyestradiol modifies serotonergic processes in the male rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalik, S.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of chronic (5 day) 2-hydroxyestradiol or estradiol on catecholaminergic and serotonergic neurons in the male rat brain were studied. The results indicate estrogen to be specific is inducing changes in dopaminergic systems; whereas its hydroxymetabolite appears to have a preference for serotonergic processes. In particular, in vitro 2-hydroxyestradiol appears to be a potent inhibitor of /sup 3/H-imipramine binding in brain; this inhibition is especially potent in the cortex, where it is equal in potency to serotonin. However, unlike serotonin, which is a competitive inhibitor of imipramine, 2-hydroxyestradiol is an uncompetitive inhibitor of /sup 3/H-imipramine binding in cortex and hypothalamus and a noncompetitive inhibitor in the striatum; this suggests that the inhibition of binding takes place at a point other than the site of serotonin uptake. In vitro 2-hydroxyestradiol also appears to increase the uptake of serotonin into these tissues, a change which would be expected if the imipramine binding is blocked.

  20. [Acute gastric lesions induced by drinking water, in rats].

    PubMed

    Laudano, O M

    1994-01-01

    The ability of certain beverages and drinking waters to induce acute gastric lesions was studied and the measurement of their pH was performed. 1) Saline; 2) tap water; 3) well-water; 4) well water plus puritabs; 5) saline plus 2 Cl drips; 6) saline plus 4 Cl drops; 7) saline plus 8 Cl drops; 8) boiled water after 30 min; 9) apartment deposit water; 10) WC bowl water; 11) ice water; 12) Paraná river water (Northern Rosario); 13) Paraná river water (Southern Rosario); 14) rain water (Rosario); 15) rain water) countryside); 16) carbonated mineral water; 17) non-carbonated mineral water; 18) soda; 19) flavored electrolytic water I; 20) flavored electrolytic water II; and 21) cola drink. We can conclude that: 1) a remarkable variance in saline and tap water pH is observed. 2) Rain water and Paraná river water were slightly acid, in contrast electrolytic carbonated beverages and cola drink were strongly acid (pH 2.5). 3) Saline, pH 6.68; saline plus 2 Cl drops; and non-carbonated mineral water were the only beverages that did not induce acute gastric lesions in rats.

  1. Studies on cerebral protection of digoxin against hypoxic-ischemic brain damage in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Peng, Kaiwei; Tan, Danfeng; He, Miao; Guo, Dandan; Huang, Juan; Wang, Xia; Liu, Chentao; Zheng, Xiangrong

    2016-08-17

    Hypoxic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD) is a major cause of neonatal acute deaths and chronic nervous system damage. Our present study was designed to investigate the possible neuroprotective effect of digoxin-induced pharmacological preconditioning after hypoxia-ischemia and underlying mechanisms. Neonatal rats were assigned randomly to control, HIBD, or HIBD+digoxin groups. Pharmacological preconditioning was induced by administration of digoxin 72 h before inducing HIBD by carotid occlusion+hypoxia. Behavioral assays, and neuropathological and apoptotic assessments were performed to examine the effects; the expression of Na/K ATPase was also assessed. Rats in the HIBD group showed deficiencies on the T-maze, radial water maze, and postural reflex tests, whereas the HIBD+digoxin group showed significant improvements on all behavioral tests. The rats treated with digoxin showed recovery of pathological conditions, increased number of neural cells and proliferative cells, and decreased number of apoptotic cells. Meanwhile, an increased expression level of Na/K ATPase was observed after digoxin preconditioning treatment. The preconditioning treatment of digoxin contributed toward an improved functional recovery and exerted a marked neuroprotective effect including promotion of cell proliferation and reduction of apoptosis after HIBD, and the neuroprotective action was likely associated with increased expression of Na/K ATPase. PMID:27362436

  2. Protective action of a hexane crude extract of Pterodon emarginatus fruits against oxidative and nitrosative stress induced by acute exercise in rats

    PubMed Central

    Paula, Fernanda BA; Gouvêa, Cibele MCP; Alfredo, Patrícia P; Salgado, Ione

    2005-01-01

    Background The aim of the present work was to evaluate the effect of a hexane crude extract (HCE) of Pterodon emarginatus on the oxidative and nitrosative stress induced in skeletal muscle, liver and brain of acutely exercised rats. Methods Adult male rats were subjected to acute exercise by standardized contractions of the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle (100 Hz, 15 min) and treated orally with the HCE (once or three times with a fixed dose of 498 mg/kg), before and after acute exercise. Serum creatine kinase activity was determined by a kinetic method and macrophage infiltration by histological analyses of TA muscle. Lipid peroxidation was measured as malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. Nitric oxide production was evaluated by measuring nitrite formation, using Griess reagent, and nitrotyrosine was assessed by western blotting. Results Serum creatine kinase activities in the controls (111 U/L) increased 1 h after acute exercise (443 U/L). Acute exercise also increased the infiltration of macrophages into TA muscle; lipid peroxidation levels in TA muscle (967%), liver (55.5%) and brain (108.9%), as well as the nitrite levels by 90.5%, 30.7% and 60%, respectively. The pattern of nitrotyrosine formation was also affected by acute exercise. Treatment with HCE decreased macrophage infiltration, lipid peroxidation, nitrite production and nitrotyrosine levels to control values. Conclusion Acute exercise induced by functional electrical stimulation in rats resulted in increase in lipid peroxidation, nitrite and nitrotyrosine levels in brain, liver and skeletal muscle. The exercise protocol, that involved eccentric muscle contraction, also caused some muscle trauma, associated with over-exertion, leading to inflammation. The extract of P. emarginatus abolished most of these oxidative processes, thus confirming the high antioxidant activity of this oil which infusions are used in folk medicine against inflammatory processes. PMID:16107219

  3. The impact of chronic stress on the rat brain lipidome.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, T G; Chan, R B; Bravo, F V; Miranda, A; Silva, R R; Zhou, B; Marques, F; Pinto, V; Cerqueira, J J; Di Paolo, G; Sousa, N

    2016-01-01

    Chronic stress is a major risk factor for several human disorders that affect modern societies. The brain is a key target of chronic stress. In fact, there is growing evidence indicating that exposure to stress affects learning and memory, decision making and emotional responses, and may even predispose for pathological processes, such as Alzheimer's disease and depression. Lipids are a major constituent of the brain and specifically signaling lipids have been shown to regulate brain function. Here, we used a mass spectrometry-based lipidomic approach to evaluate the impact of a chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) paradigm on the rat brain in a region-specific manner. We found that the prefrontal cortex (PFC) was the area with the highest degree of changes induced by chronic stress. Although the hippocampus presented relevant lipidomic changes, the amygdala and, to a greater extent, the cerebellum presented few lipid changes upon chronic stress exposure. The sphingolipid and phospholipid metabolism were profoundly affected, showing an increase in ceramide (Cer) and a decrease in sphingomyelin (SM) and dihydrosphingomyelin (dhSM) levels, and a decrease in phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and ether phosphatidylcholine (PCe) and increase in lysophosphatidylethanolamine (LPE) levels, respectively. Furthermore, the fatty-acyl profile of phospholipids and diacylglycerol revealed that chronic stressed rats had higher 38 carbon(38C)-lipid levels in the hippocampus and reduced 36C-lipid levels in the PFC. Finally, lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) levels in the PFC were found to be correlated with blood corticosterone (CORT) levels. In summary, lipidomic profiling of the effect of chronic stress allowed the identification of dysregulated lipid pathways, revealing putative targets for pharmacological intervention that may potentially be used to modulate stress-induced deficits.

  4. Data for mitochondrial proteomic alterations in the developing rat brain.

    PubMed

    Villeneuve, Lance M; Stauch, Kelly L; Fox, Howard S

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondria are a critical organelle involved in many cellular processes, and due to the nature of the brain, neuronal cells are almost completely reliant on these organelles for energy generation. Due to the fact that biomedical research tends to investigate disease state pathogenesis, one area of mitochondrial research commonly overlooked is homeostatic responses to energy demands. Therefore, to elucidate mitochondrial alterations occurring during the developmentally important phase of E18 to P7 in the brain, we quantified the proteins in the mitochondrial proteome as well as proteins interacting with the mitochondria. We identified a large number of significantly altered proteins involved in a variety of pathways including glycolysis, mitochondrial trafficking, mitophagy, and the unfolded protein response. These results are important because we identified alterations thought to be homeostatic in nature occurring within mitochondria, and these results may be used to identify any abnormal deviations in the mitochondrial proteome occurring during this period of brain development. A more comprehensive analysis of this data may be obtained from the article "Proteomic analysis of mitochondria from embryonic and postnatal rat brains reveals response to developmental changes in energy demands" in the Journal of Proteomics. PMID:26217684

  5. Gene Transfer into Rat Brain Using Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Puntel, Mariana; Kroeger, Kurt M.; Sanderson, Nicholas S.R.; Thomas, Clare E.; Castro, Maria G.; Lowenstein, Pedro R.

    2010-01-01

    Viral vector–mediated gene delivery is an attractive procedure for introducing genes into the brain, both for purposes of basic neuroscience research and to develop gene therapy for neurological diseases. Replication-defective adenoviruses possess many features which make them ideal vectors for this purpose—efficiently transducing terminally differentiated cells such as neurons and glial cells, resulting in high levels of transgene expression in vivo. Also, in the absence of anti-adenovirus immunity, these vectors can sustain very long-term transgene expression within the brain parenchyma. This unit provides protocols for the stereotactic injection of adenoviral vectors into the brain, followed by protocols to detect transgene expression or infiltrates of immune cells by immunocytochemistry or immunofluorescence. ELISPOT and neutralizing antibody assay methodologies are provided to quantitate the levels of cellular and humoral immune responses against adenoviruses. Quantitation of adenoviral vector genomes within the rat brain using qPCR is also described. Curr. Protoc. Neurosci. 50:4.24.1–4.24.49. © 2010 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:20066657

  6. Somatostatin receptors: identification and characterization in rat brain membranes.

    PubMed

    Srikant, C B; Patel, Y C

    1981-06-01

    We have identified and characterized specific receptors for tetradecapeptide somatostatin (SRIF; somatotropin release-inhibiting factor) in rat brain using [125I]Tyr11]SRIF as the radioligand. These receptors are present in membranes obtained from a subfraction of synaptosomes. Membranes derived from cerebral cortex bind SRIF with high affinity (Ka = 1.25 X 10(10) M-1) and have a maximum binding capacity (Bmax) of 0.155 X 10(-12) mol/mg. Neither opiates nor other neuropeptides appear to influence the binding of SRIF to brain membranes. Synthetic analogs with greater biological potency than SRIF--[D-Trp8]SRIF, [D-Cys14]SRIF, and [D-Trp8, D-Cys14]SRIF--bind to the receptors with greater avidity than SRIF, whereas inactive analogs [(2H)Ala3]SRIF and [Ala6]SRIF exhibit low binding. The ratio of receptor density to endogenous somatostatin is high in the cortex, thalamus, and striatum, low in the hypothalamus, and extremely low in the brain stem and cerebellum. Thus, SRIF receptors in the brain appear to be a distinct, new class of receptors with a regional distribution different from that of endogenous somatostatin.

  7. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Activates Specific Regions in Rat Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Ru-Rong; Schlaepfer, Thomas E.; Aizenman, Carlos D.; Epstein, Charles M.; Qiu, Dike; Huang, Justin C.; Rupp, Fabio

    1998-12-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a noninvasive technique to induce electric currents in the brain. Although rTMS is being evaluated as a possible alternative to electroconvulsive therapy for the treatment of refractory depression, little is known about the pattern of activation induced in the brain by rTMS. We have compared immediate early gene expression in rat brain after rTMS and electroconvulsive stimulation, a well-established animal model for electroconvulsive therapy. Our result shows that rTMS applied in conditions effective in animal models of depression induces different patterns of immediate-early gene expression than does electroconvulsive stimulation. In particular, rTMS evokes strong neural responses in the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus (PVT) and in other regions involved in the regulation of circadian rhythms. The response in PVT is independent of the orientation of the stimulation probe relative to the head. Part of this response is likely because of direct activation, as repetitive magnetic stimulation also activates PVT neurons in brain slices.

  8. Tianeptine increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in the rat amygdala.

    PubMed

    Reagan, Lawrence P; Hendry, Robert M; Reznikov, Leah R; Piroli, Gerardo G; Wood, Gwendolyn E; McEwen, Bruce S; Grillo, Claudia A

    2007-06-22

    Chronic restraint stress affects hippocampal and amygdalar synaptic plasticity as determined by electrophysiological, morphological and behavioral measures, changes that are inhibited by some but not all antidepressants. The efficacy of some classes of antidepressants is proposed to involve increased phosphorylation of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB), leading to increased expression of neurotrophic factors, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Conversely, some studies suggest that acute and chronic stress downregulate BDNF expression and activity. Accordingly, the aim of the current study was to examine total and phosphorylated CREB (pCREB), as well as BDNF mRNA and protein levels in the hippocampus and amygdala of rats subjected to chronic restraint stress in the presence and absence of the antidepressant tianeptine. In the hippocampus, chronic restraint stress increased pCREB levels without affecting BDNF mRNA or protein expression. Tianeptine administration had no effect upon these measures in the hippocampus. In the amygdala, BDNF mRNA expression was not modulated in chronic restraint stress rats given saline in spite of increased pCREB levels. Conversely, BDNF mRNA levels were increased in the amygdala of chronic restraint stress/tianeptine rats in the absence of changes in pCREB levels when compared to non-stressed controls. Amygdalar BDNF protein increased while pCREB levels decreased in tianeptine-treated rats irrespective of stress conditions. Collectively, these results demonstrate that tianeptine concomitantly decreases pCREB while increasing BDNF expression in the rat amygdala, increases in neurotrophic factor expression that may participate in the enhancement of amygdalar synaptic plasticity mediated by tianeptine.

  9. The effects of acute ethanol administration on ethanol withdrawal-induced anxiety-like syndrome in rats: A biochemical study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Jaya; Hapidin, Hermizi; Get Bee, Yvonne-Tee; Ismail, Zalina

    2016-02-01

    Withdrawal from long-term ethanol consumption results in overexcitation of glutamatergic neurotransmission in the amygdala, which induces an anxiety-like syndrome. Most alcoholics that suffer from such symptoms frequently depend on habitual drinking as self-medication to alleviate their symptoms. Metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu5) and protein kinase C (PKC) epsilon have been reported to mediate acute and chronic effects of ethanol. This study explores the changes in mGlu5 and PKC epsilon in the amygdala following acute administration of ethanol during ethanol withdrawal (EW) induced anxiety. Male Wistar rats were fed a modified liquid diet containing low-fat cow milk, sucrose, and maltodextrin, with a gradual introduction of 2.4%, 4.8% and 7.2% ethanol for 20 days. Six hours into EW, the rats were intraperitoneally injected with normal saline and ethanol (2.5 g/kg, 20% v/v), and exposed to open-field and elevated plus maze tests. Then, amygdala tissue was dissected from the rat brain for Western blot and gene expression studies. EW-induced anxiety was accompanied by a significant increase in mGlu5, total PKC epsilon, and phosphorylated PKC epsilon protein levels, and also of mRNA of mGlu5 (GRM5) in the amygdala. Acute administration of ethanol significantly attenuated EW-induced anxiety as well as an EW-induced increase in GRM5. The acute challenge of ethanol to EW rats had little effect on the phosphorylated and total protein levels of PKC epsilon in the amygdala. Our results demonstrate that amygdala PKC epsilon may not be directly involved in the development of anxiety following EW.

  10. The Acute Inflammatory Response in Trauma / Hemorrhage and Traumatic Brain Injury: Current State and Emerging Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Namas, R; Ghuma, A; Hermus, L; Zamora, R; Okonkwo, DO; Billiar, TR; Vodovotz, Y

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic injury/hemorrhagic shock (T/HS) elicits an acute inflammatory response that may result in death. Inflammation describes a coordinated series of molecular, cellular, tissue, organ, and systemic responses that drive the pathology of various diseases including T/HS and traumatic brain injury (TBI). Inflammation is a finely tuned, dynamic, highly-regulated process that is not inherently detrimental, but rather required for immune surveillance, optimal post-injury tissue repair, and regeneration. The inflammatory response is driven by cytokines and chemokines and is partially propagated by damaged tissue-derived products (Damage-associated Molecular Patterns; DAMP's). DAMPs perpetuate inflammation through the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, but may also inhibit anti-inflammatory cytokines. Various animal models of T/HS in mice, rats, pigs, dogs, and non-human primates have been utilized in an attempt to move from bench to bedside. Novel approaches, including those from the field of systems biology, may yield therapeutic breakthroughs in T/HS and TBI in the near future. PMID:21483522

  11. L-tyrosine induces DNA damage in brain and blood of rats.

    PubMed

    De Prá, Samira D T; Ferreira, Gabriela K; Carvalho-Silva, Milena; Vieira, Júlia S; Scaini, Giselli; Leffa, Daniela D; Fagundes, Gabriela E; Bristot, Bruno N; Borges, Gabriela D; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Schuck, Patrícia F; Andrade, Vanessa M; Streck, Emilio L

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the tyrosine aminotransferase gene have been identified to cause tyrosinemia type II which is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. Studies have demonstrated that an excessive production of ROS can lead to reactions with macromolecules, such as DNA, lipids, and proteins. Considering that the L-tyrosine may promote oxidative stress, the main objective of this study was to investigate the in vivo effects of L-tyrosine on DNA damage determined by the alkaline comet assay, in brain and blood of rats. In our acute protocol, Wistar rats (30 days old) were killed 1 h after a single intraperitoneal L-tyrosine injection (500 mg/kg) or saline. For chronic administration, the animals received two subcutaneous injections of L-tyrosine (500 mg/kg, 12-h intervals) or saline administered for 24 days starting at postnatal day (PD) 7 (last injection at PD 31), 12 h after the last injection, the animals were killed by decapitation. We observed that acute administration of L-tyrosine increased DNA damage frequency and damage index in cerebral cortex and blood when compared to control group. Moreover, we observed that chronic administration of L-tyrosine increased DNA damage frequency and damage index in hippocampus, striatum, cerebral cortex and blood when compared to control group. In conclusion, the present work demonstrated that DNA damage can be encountered in brain from animal models of hypertyrosinemia, DNA alterations may represent a further means to explain neurological dysfunction in this inherited metabolic disorder and to reinforce the role of oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of tyrosinemia type II. PMID:24297753

  12. L-tyrosine induces DNA damage in brain and blood of rats.

    PubMed

    De Prá, Samira D T; Ferreira, Gabriela K; Carvalho-Silva, Milena; Vieira, Júlia S; Scaini, Giselli; Leffa, Daniela D; Fagundes, Gabriela E; Bristot, Bruno N; Borges, Gabriela D; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Schuck, Patrícia F; Andrade, Vanessa M; Streck, Emilio L

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the tyrosine aminotransferase gene have been identified to cause tyrosinemia type II which is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. Studies have demonstrated that an excessive production of ROS can lead to reactions with macromolecules, such as DNA, lipids, and proteins. Considering that the L-tyrosine may promote oxidative stress, the main objective of this study was to investigate the in vivo effects of L-tyrosine on DNA damage determined by the alkaline comet assay, in brain and blood of rats. In our acute protocol, Wistar rats (30 days old) were killed 1 h after a single intraperitoneal L-tyrosine injection (500 mg/kg) or saline. For chronic administration, the animals received two subcutaneous injections of L-tyrosine (500 mg/kg, 12-h intervals) or saline administered for 24 days starting at postnatal day (PD) 7 (last injection at PD 31), 12 h after the last injection, the animals were killed by decapitation. We observed that acute administration of L-tyrosine increased DNA damage frequency and damage index in cerebral cortex and blood when compared to control group. Moreover, we observed that chronic administration of L-tyrosine increased DNA damage frequency and damage index in hippocampus, striatum, cerebral cortex and blood when compared to control group. In conclusion, the present work demonstrated that DNA damage can be encountered in brain from animal models of hypertyrosinemia, DNA alterations may represent a further means to explain neurological dysfunction in this inherited metabolic disorder and to reinforce the role of oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of tyrosinemia type II.

  13. Ghrelin Supresses Sympathetic Hyperexcitation in Acute Heart Failure in Male Rats: Assessing Centrally and Peripherally Mediated Pathways.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Mikiyasu; Joe, Natalie; Tsuchimochi, Hirotsugu; Sonobe, Takashi; Schwenke, Daryl O

    2015-09-01

    The hormone ghrelin prevents a dangerous increase in cardiac sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) after acute myocardial infarction (MI), although the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. This study aimed to determine whether ghrelin's sympathoinhibitory properties stem either from directly within the central nervous system, or via modulation of specific cardiac vagal inhibitory afferents. Cardiac SNA was recorded in urethane-anesthetized rats for 3 hours after the ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery (ie, MI). Rats received ghrelin either sc (150 μg/kg) or intracerebroventricularly (5 μg/kg) immediately after the MI. In another two groups, the cervical vagi were denervated prior to the MI, followed by sc injection of either ghrelin or placebo. Acute MI induced a 188% increase in cardiac SNA, which was significantly attenuated in ghrelin-treated rats for both sc or intracerebroventricularly administration (36% and 76% increase, respectively). Consequently, mortality (47%) and the incidence of arrhythmic episodes (12 per 2 h) were improved with both routes of ghrelin administration (<13% and less than five per 2 h, respectively). Bilateral vagotomy significantly attenuated the cardiac SNA response to acute MI (99% increase). Ghrelin further attenuated the sympathetic response to MI in vagotomized rats so that the SNA response was comparable between vagotomized and vagal-intact MI rats treated with ghrelin. These results suggest that ghrelin may act primarily via a central pathway within the brain to suppress SNA after MI, although peripheral vagal afferent pathways may also contribute in part. The exact region(s) within the central nervous system whereby ghrelin inhibits SNA remains to be fully elucidated.

  14. Correlation between light scattering signal and tissue reversibility in rat brain exposed to hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawauchi, Satoko; Sato, Shunichi; Uozumi, Yoichi; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Ishihara, Miya; Kikuchi, Makoto

    2010-02-01

    Light scattering signal is a potential indicator of tissue viability in brain because cellular and subcellular structural integrity should be associated with cell viability in brain tissue. We previously performed multiwavelength diffuse reflectance measurement for a rat global ischemic brain model and observed a unique triphasic change in light scattering at a certain time after oxygen and glucose deprivation. This triphasic scattering change (TSC) was shown to precede cerebral ATP exhaustion, suggesting that loss of brain tissue viability can be predicted by detecting scattering signal. In the present study, we examined correlation between light scattering signal and tissue reversibility in rat brain in vivo. We performed transcranial diffuse reflectance measurement for rat brain; under spontaneous respiration, hypoxia was induced for the rat by nitrogen gas inhalation and reoxygenation was started at various time points. We observed a TSC, which started at 140 +/- 15 s after starting nitrogen gas inhalation (mean +/- SD, n=8). When reoxygenation was started before the TSC, all rats survived (n=7), while no rats survived when reoxygenation was started after the TSC (n=8). When reoxygenation was started during the TSC, rats survived probabilistically (n=31). Disability of motor function was not observed for the survived rats. These results indicate that TSC can be used as an indicator of loss of tissue reversibility in brains, providing useful information on the critical time zone for treatment to rescue the brain.

  15. Remarkable increase in 14C-acetate uptake in an epilepsy model rat brain induced by lithium-pilocarpine.

    PubMed

    Hosoi, Rie; Kitano, Daisuke; Momosaki, Sotaro; Kuse, Kenji; Gee, Antony; Inoue, Osamu

    2010-01-22

    The present study demonstrates changes in rat brain glial metabolism during the acute phase of epilepsy. Status epilepticus (SE) was induced using the lithium-pilocarpine model. Glial metabolism was measured with (14)C-acetate. Local cerebral blood flow and glucose metabolism were also measured using (14)C-N-isopropyl-p-iodoamphetamine (IMP) and (14)C-2-deoxyglucose (2DG), respectively. At the initiation of the seizure, (14)C-acetate uptake did not change significantly. However, a marked increase was observed 2 h after the pilocarpine injection in all brain regions studied. The increase of brain uptake was transient, and the maximum enhancement was seen at 2 h after the pilocarpine injection. The increase of (14)C-acetate uptake was almost to the same degree in all regions, whereas (14)C-IMP and (14)C-2DG uptakes showed a heterogeneous increase. In the case of (14)C-IMP, the highest increase was observed in the thalamus (280%), and a moderate increase (120 to 150%) was seen in the orbital cortex, cingulate cortex and pyriform cortex. (14)C-2DG uptake increased by 130 to 240% in most regions of the brain, however, an increase of only 40 and 20% was observed in the cerebellum and pons-medulla, respectively. These results demonstrated that glial energy metabolism was markedly enhanced during a prolonged seizure. To our knowledge, this study is the first observation showing large and widespread glial metabolic increases in the rat brain during status epilepticus.

  16. Distribution of 14C-atrazine following an acute lactational exposure in the Wistar rat.

    PubMed

    Stoker, Tammy E; Cooper, Ralph L

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the distribution of atrazine in the lactating dam and suckling neonate following an acute exposure to either 2 or 4mg/kg 14C-atrazine (14C-ATR) by gavage. 14C-ATR was administered to the nursing dam on postnatal day 3 by oral gavage. Two and a half hours after exposure of the mother to 14C-ATR, the pups were allowed to nurse for 30min. At the end of the nursing period, radiolabelled residues of 14C-ATR [or 14C-chlorotriazines (14C-ClTRI)] were measured in the organs and tissues of the perfused dam and in the stomachs and brains of the rat pups. Both the 2 and the 4mg atrazine treatments resulted in a transfer of approximately 0.007% of 14C-ClTRI to the stomach (indicator of milk content) and 0.0002% to the brains of the offspring following the 30-min nursing period. Three hours following the dose of 14C-ATR, there was a distribution of 14C-ClTRI to the organs of the dam, with the highest amounts in the liver and kidney (1.1 and 0.3% of the administered dose, respectively). Approximately 0.003% of the administered dose was present in three different brain sections of the dam following both doses of 14C-ATR. The results of this study demonstrate that 14C-ClTRI are present in small concentrations in the brain and tissues of the dam (adult female) and provide evidence that atrazine or the metabolites can have direct effects on neuroendrocrine function. The results also provide information for postnatal distribution into the suckling neonate during early lactation.

  17. Fetal asphyctic preconditioning modulates the acute cytokine response thereby protecting against perinatal asphyxia in neonatal rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Perinatal asphyxia (PA) is a major cause of brain damage and neurodevelopmental impairment in infants. Recent investigations have shown that experimental sublethal fetal asphyxia (FA preconditioning) protects against a subsequent more severe asphyctic insult at birth. The molecular mechanisms of this protection have, however, not been elucidated. Evidence implicates that inflammatory cytokines play a protective role in the induction of ischemic tolerance in the adult brain. Accordingly, we hypothesize that FA preconditioning leads to changes in the fetal cytokine response, thereby protecting the newborn against a subsequent asphyctic insult. Methods In rats, FA preconditioning was induced at embryonic day 17 by clamping the uterine vasculature for 30 min. At term birth, global PA was induced by placing the uterine horns, containing the pups, in a saline bath for 19 min. We assessed, at different time points after FA and PA, mRNA and protein expression of several cytokines and related receptor mRNA levels in total hemispheres of fetal and neonatal brains. Additionally, we measured pSTAT3/STAT3 levels to investigate cellular responses to these cytokines. Results Prenatally, FA induced acute downregulation in IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-10 mRNA levels. At 96 h post FA, IL-6 mRNA and IL-10 protein expression were increased in FA brains compared with controls. Two hours after birth, all proinflammatory cytokines and pSTAT3/STAT3 levels decreased in pups that experienced FA and/or PA. Interestingly, IL-10 and IL-6 mRNA levels increased after PA. When pups were FA preconditioned, however, IL-10 and IL-6 mRNA levels were comparable to those in controls. Conclusions FA leads to prenatal changes in the neuroinflammatory response. This modulation of the cytokine response probably results in the protective inflammatory phenotype seen when combining FA and PA and may have significant implications for preventing post-asphyctic perinatal encephalopathy. PMID:23351591

  18. Gallic acid improved behavior, brain electrophysiology, and inflammation in a rat model of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Sarkaki, Alireza; Farbood, Yaghoub; Gharib-Naseri, Mohammad Kazem; Badavi, Mohammad; Mansouri, Mohammad Taghi; Haghparast, Abbas; Mirshekar, Mohammad Ali

    2015-08-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the main causes of intellectual and cognitive disabilities. In the clinic it is essential to limit the development of cognitive impairment after TBI. In this study, the effects of gallic acid (GA; 100 mg/kg, per oral, from 7 days before to 2 days after TBI induction) on neurological score, passive avoidance memory, long-term potentiation (LTP) deficits, and levels of proinflammatory cytokines including interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the brain have been evaluated. Brain injury was induced following Marmarou's method. Data were analyzed by one-way and repeated measures ANOVA followed by Tukey's post-hoc test. The results indicated that memory was significantly impaired (p < 0.001) in the group treated with TBI + vehicle, together with deterioration of the hippocampal LTP and increased brain tissue levels of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α. GA treatment significantly improved memory and LTP in the TBI rats. The brain tissue levels of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α were significantly reduced (p < 0.001) in the group treated with GA. The results suggest that GA has neuroprotective properties against TBI-induced behavioral, electrophysiological, and inflammatory disorders, probably via the decrease of cerebral proinflammatory cytokines.

  19. Effects of acute and chronic physical exercise and stress on different types of memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Mello, Pâmela Billig; Benetti, Fernando; Cammarota, Martín; Izquierdo, Iván

    2008-06-01

    Here we study the effect of acute and chronic physical exercise in a treadmill and of daily stress (because forced exercise involves a degree of stress) during 2 or 8 weeks on different types of memory in male Wistar rats. The memory tests employed were: habituation in an open field, object recognition and spatial learning in the Morris water maze. Daily foot-shock stress enhanced habituation learning after 2 but not after 8 weeks; it hindered both short- (STM) and long-term memory (LTM) of the recognition task at 2 weeks but only STM after 8 weeks and had no effect on spatial learning after either 2 or 8 weeks. Acute but not chronic exercise also enhanced habituation in the open field and hindered STM and LTM in the recognition task. Chronic exercise enhanced one important measure of spatial learning (latency to escape) but not others. Our findings indicate that some care must be taken when interpreting effects of forced exercise on brain parameters since at least part of them may be due to the stress inherent to the training procedure.

  20. Propagation and titration of Alkhumra hemorrhagic fever virus in the brains of newborn Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Madani, Tariq A; Kao, Moujahed; Abuelzein, El-Tayeb M E; Azhar, Esam I; Al-Bar, Hussein M S; Abu-Araki, Huda; Bokhary, Rana Y; Ksiazek, Thomas G

    2014-04-01

    Alkhumra hemorrhagic fever virus (AHFV) is a novel flavivirus identified first in Saudi Arabia. In this study, successful propagation of AHFV in the brains of newborn Wistar rats is described and the median rat lethal dose (RLD50) is determined. AHFV-RNA-positive human sera diluted 1:10 were injected intracerebrally into 16, ≤24h old rats. Post-inoculation, the rats were observed daily for 30 days. Brains of moribund rats were tested for AHFV-RNA using RT-PCR and cultured in LLC-MK2 cells. The titer of the isolated virus was determined and expressed in median tissue culture infectious dose (TCID50). To determine the RLD50, AHFV brain suspension was 10-fold diluted serially and each dilution was inoculated in the cerebral hemispheres of 10 rats for a total of 90 rats. Three days post-inoculation, the rats developed tremor, irritability, convulsion, opisthotonus, and spastic paresis starting in the hind limbs and ascending to involve the whole body. All infected rats died within 3-7 days with histopathologically confirmed meningoencephalitis. AHFV-RNA was detected in the brains of all infected rats and the virus titer was 10(9.4) RLD50/ml. The virus titer in LLC-MK2 was 10(8.2) TCID50/ml. In conclusion, AHFV was propagated successfully to high titers in the brains of newborn Wistar rats.

  1. Pleiotrophin gene transcription in the rat nucleus accumbens is stimulated by an acute dose of amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Le Grevès, Pierre

    2005-05-30

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a heparin-binding protein with diverse functions. For example, it stimulates neurite outgrowth, mitogenesis, repair and differentiation, effects that are similar to those of the neurotrophins. The neurotrophins have, in recent years, been implicated as mediators of structural plasticity, suggested to underlie the development of behavioural sensitisation to many drugs of abuse. Since NMDA receptor antagonists inhibit the underlying morphological changes, the mechanisms are thought to be highly dependent on the activation of the NMDA subtype of glutamate receptors. To investigate if PTN has a possible role in structural plasticity, its responsiveness to an acute dose of amphetamine was studied. Amphetamine is a well-characterised inducer of sensitisation. A group of rats was systemically treated with amphetamine (10 mg/kg) and the effect on the PTN gene transcription was studied 4 h later. A separate group of rats was pretreated with the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 (0.25 mg/kg) 30 min prior to the administration of amphetamine. Northern blot analysis revealed a significant increase of the PTN transcript after the administration of amphetamine. However, MK-801 pretreatment did not block this effect; in contrast, it further increased PTN mRNA levels. As the response to the two drugs resembles the one earlier reported on the gene expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), the present results suggest that PTN may be an attractive protein to study further in the field of synaptic plasticity.

  2. Influence of brain catecholamines on the development of fatigue in exercising rats in the heat

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Piacentini, Maria Francesca; Sarre, Sophie; Michotte, Yvette; Ishiwata, Takayuki; Meeusen, Romain

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to identify the effects of an acute injection of a dual dopamine (DA)/noradrenaline (NA) reuptake inhibitor (bupropion) on exercise performance, thermoregulation and neurotransmitters in the preoptic area and anterior hypothalamus (PO/AH) of the rat during exercise in the heat. Body core temperature (Tcore), brain temperature (Tbrain) and tail skin temperature (Ttail) were measured. A microdialysis probe was inserted in the PO/AH, and samples for measurement of extracellular DA, NA and serotonin (5-HT) levels were collected. Rats received either bupropion (17 mg kg−1; hot-BUP) or saline (1 ml kg−1; hot) 20 min before the start of exercise and ran at a speed of 26 m min−1 until exhaustion in a warm environment (30°C). Rats also ran until exhaustion in a cool environment (18°C; cool). Running time to exhaustion was significantly influenced by the ambient temperature, and it was increased by bupropion in the heat (cool, 143.6 ± 21 min; hot, 65.8 ± 13 min; hot-BUP, 86.3 ± 7.2 min). Tcore and Tbrain at exhaustion were significantly higher in the bupropion group compared to the cool and hot groups, respectively. Ttail measured at exhaustion was not significantly different between the two hot conditions. Extracellular concentrations of DA and NA in the PO/AH increased during exercise, and was significantly higher in the bupropion than in cool and hot groups (P < 0.05). No differences were observed between groups for 5-HT levels. These results suggest that DA and NA in the PO/AH might be responsible for the increase in exercise performance and Tcore and Tbrain in the bupropion group in hyperthermia. Moreover, these results support previous findings in humans that acute bupropion ingestion increases Tcore during exercise in the heat, indicating the possibility of an important role for DA and NA in thermoregulation. PMID:17947314

  3. Regional distribution of neuropeptide processing endopeptidases in adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Berman, Y L; Rattan, A K; Carr, K; Devi, L

    1994-01-01

    Many peptide hormone and neuropeptide precursors undergo post-translational processing at mono- and/or dibasic residues. An enzymatic activity capable of processing prodynorphin at a monobasic processing site designated 'dynorphin converting enzyme' has been previously reported in rat rain and bovine pituitary. In this study the distribution of dynorphin converting enzyme activity in ten regions of rat brain has been compared with the distribution of subtilisin-like processing enzymes and with the immuno-reactive dynorphin peptides. The distribution of dynorphin converting enzyme activity generally matches the distribution of immuno-reactive dynorphin B-13 in most but not all brain regions. The regions that are known to have a relatively large number of immuno-reactive dynorphin-neurons also contain high levels of dynorphin converting enzyme activity. The distribution of dynorphin converting enzyme activity does not match the distribution of subtilisin-like processing enzyme or carboxypeptidase E activities. Taken together the data support the possibility that the dynorphin converting enzyme is involved in the maturation of dynorphin, as well as other neuropeptides, and peptide hormones.

  4. Anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effects of Pimpinella anisum in rat brain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Essential oil of Pimpinella anisum L. Apiaceae (anise oil) has been widely used in traditional Persian medicine to treat a variety of diseases, including some neurological disorders. This study was aimed to test the possible anti-seizure and anti-hypoxia effects of anise oil. Methods The effects of different concentrations of anise oil were tested on seizure attacks induced by pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) injection and neuronal hypoxia induced by oxygen withdrawal as well as on production of dark neurons and induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) in in vivo and in vitro experimental models of rat brain. Results Anise oil significantly prolonged the latency of seizure attacks and reduced the amplitude and duration of epileptiform burst discharges induced by injection of intraperitoneal PTZ. In addition, anise oil significantly inhibited production of dark neurons in different regions of the brain in epileptic rats. Anise oil also significantly enhanced the duration of the appearance of anoxic terminal negativity induced by oxygen withdrawal and inhibited induction of LTP in hippocampal slices. Conclusions Our data indicate the anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effects of anise oil, likely via inhibition of synaptic plasticity. Further evaluation of anise oil to use in the treatment of neurological disorders is suggested. PMID:22709243

  5. Distribution of beacon immunoreactivity in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Tian, De-Run; Tian, Nan; Chen, Hui; Shi, Yu-Shun; Chang, Jaw-Kang; Yang, Jun; Yuan, Lan; Han, Ji-Sheng

    2006-01-01

    Beacon is a novel peptide isolated from the hypothalamus of Israeli sand rat. In the present study, we determined the distribution of beacon in the rat brain using immunohistochemical approach with a polyclonal antiserum directed against the synthetic C-terminal peptide fragment (47-73). The hypothalamus represented the major site of beacon-immunoreactive (IR) cell bodies that were concentrated in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and the supraoptic nucleus (SON). Additional immunostained cells were found in the septum, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, subfornical organ and subcommissural organ. Beacon-IR fibers were seen with high density in the internal layer of the median eminence and low to moderate density in the external layer. Significant beacon-IR fibers were also seen in the nucleus of the solitary tract and lateral reticular formation. The beacon neurons found in the PVN were further characterized by double label immunohistochemistry. Several beacon-IR neurons that resided in the medial PVN were shown to coexpress corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) and most labeled beacon fibers in the external layer of median eminence coexist with CRH. The topographical distribution of beacon-IR in the brain suggests multiple biological activities for beacon in addition to its proposed roles in modulating feeding behaviors and pituitary hormone release.

  6. Wearable scanning photoacoustic brain imaging in behaving rats.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jianbo; Dai, Xianjin; Jiang, Huabei

    2016-06-01

    A wearable scanning photoacoustic imaging (wPAI) system is presented for noninvasive brain study in behaving rats. This miniaturized wPAI system consists of four pico linear servos and a single transducer-based PAI probe. It has a dimension of 50 mm × 35 mm × 40 mm, and a weight of 26 g excluding cablings. Phantom evaluation shows that wPAI achieves a lateral resolution of ∼0.5 mm and an axial resolution of ∼0.1 mm at a depth of up to 11 mm. Its imaging ability is also tested in a behaving rat, and the results indicate that wPAI is able to image blood vessels at a depth of up to 5 mm with intact scalp and skull. With its noninvasive, deep penetration, and functional imaging ability in behaving animals, wPAI can be used for behavior, cognition, and preclinical brain disease studies. PMID:26777064

  7. Oral branched-chain amino acid supplements that reduce brain serotonin during exercise in rats also lower brain catecholamines.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sujean; Disilvio, Briana; Fernstrom, Madelyn H; Fernstrom, John D

    2013-11-01

    Exercise raises brain serotonin release and is postulated to cause fatigue in athletes; ingestion of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA), by competitively inhibiting tryptophan transport into brain, lowers brain tryptophan uptake and serotonin synthesis and release in rats, and reputedly in humans prevents exercise-induced increases in serotonin and fatigue. This latter effect in humans is disputed. But BCAA also competitively inhibit tyrosine uptake into brain, and thus catecholamine synthesis and release. Since increasing brain catecholamines enhances physical performance, BCAA ingestion could lower catecholamines, reduce performance and thus negate any serotonin-linked benefit. We therefore examined in rats whether BCAA would reduce both brain tryptophan and tyrosine concentrations and serotonin and catecholamine synthesis. Sedentary and exercising rats received BCAA or vehicle orally; tryptophan and tyrosine concentrations and serotonin and catecholamine synthesis rates were measured 1 h later in brain. BCAA reduced brain tryptophan and tyrosine concentrations, and serotonin and catecholamine synthesis. These reductions in tyrosine concentrations and catecholamine synthesis, but not tryptophan or serotonin synthesis, could be prevented by co-administering tyrosine with BCAA. Complete essential amino acid mixtures, used to maintain or build muscle mass, were also studied, and produced different effects on brain tryptophan and tyrosine concentrations and serotonin and catecholamine synthesis. Since pharmacologically increasing brain catecholamine function improves physical performance, the finding that BCAA reduce catecholamine synthesis may explain why this treatment does not enhance physical performance in humans, despite reducing serotonin synthesis. If so, adding tyrosine to BCAA supplements might allow a positive action on performance to emerge.

  8. NO-Tryptophan: A New Small Molecule Located in the Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Mangas, A.; Yajeya, J.; González, N.; Duleu, S.; Geffard, M.; Coveñas, R.

    2016-01-01

    A highly specific monoclonal antibody directed against nitric oxide-tryptophan (NO-W) with good affinity (10-9 M) and specificity was developed. In the rat brain, using an indirect immunoperoxidase technique, cell bodies containing NO-W were exclusively found in the intermediate and dorsal parts of the lateral septal nucleus. No immunoreactive fibres were found in the rat brain. This work reports the first visualization and the morphological characteristics of cell bodies containing NO-W in the mammalian brain. The restricted distribution of NO-W in the rat brain suggests that this molecule could be involved in specific physiological mechanisms. PMID:27734994

  9. Nilotinib ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats

    SciTech Connect

    El-Agamy, Dina S.

    2011-06-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of the new tyrosine kinase inhibitor, nilotinib on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in rats and explore its possible mechanisms. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given nilotinib (10 mg/kg) by oral gavage twice daily for 1 week prior to exposure to aerosolized LPS. At 24 h after LPS exposure, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) samples and lung tissue were collected. The lung wet/dry weight (W/D) ratio, protein level and the number of inflammatory cells in the BALF were determined. Optical microscopy was performed to examine the pathological changes in lungs. Malondialdehyde (MDA) content, superoxidase dismutase (SOD) and reduced glutathione (GSH) activities as well as nitrite/nitrate (NO{sub 2}{sup -}/NO{sub 3}{sup -}) levels were measured in lung tissues. The expression of inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}), transforming growth factor-{beta}{sub 1} (TGF-{beta}{sub 1}) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were determined in lung tissues. Treatment with nilotinib prior to LPS exposure significantly attenuated the LPS-induced pulmonary edema, as it significantly decreased lung W/D ratio, protein concentration and the accumulation of the inflammatory cells in the BALF. This was supported by the histopathological examination which revealed marked attenuation of LPS-induced ALI in nilotinib treated rats. In addition, nilotinib significantly increased SOD and GSH activities with significant decrease in MDA content in the lung. Nilotinib also reduced LPS mediated overproduction of pulmonary NO{sub 2}{sup -}/NO{sub 3}{sup -} levels. Importantly, nilotinib caused down-regulation of the inflammatory cytokines TNF-{alpha}, TGF-{beta}{sub 1} and iNOS levels in the lung. Taken together, these results demonstrate the protective effects of nilotinib against the LPS-induced ALI. This effect can be attributed to nilotinib ability to counteract the inflammatory cells

  10. Altered Cerebellar White Matter Integrity in Patients with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in the Acute Stage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhongqiu; Wu, Wenzhong; Liu, Yongkang; Wang, Tianyao; Chen, Xiao; Zhang, Jianhua; Zhou, Guoxing; Chen, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Imaging studies of traumatic brain injury demonstrate that the cerebellum is often affected. We aim to examine fractional anisotropy alteration in acute-phase mild traumatic brain injury patients in cerebellum-related white matter tracts. Materials and Methods This prospective study included 47 mild traumatic brain injury patients in the acute stage and 37 controls. MR imaging and neurocognitive tests were performed in patients within 7 days of injury. White matter integrity was examined by using diffusion tensor imaging. We used three approaches, tract-based spatial statistics, graphical-model-based multivariate analysis, and region-of-interest analysis, to detect altered cerebellar white matter integrity in mild traumatic brain injury patients. Results Results from three analysis methods were in accordance with each other, and suggested fractional anisotropy in the middle cerebellar peduncle and the pontine crossing tract was changed in the acute-phase mild traumatic brain injury patients, relative to controls (adjusted p-value < 0.05). Higher fractional anisotropy in the middle cerebellar peduncle was associated with worse performance in the fluid cognition composite (r = -0.289, p-value = 0.037). Conclusion Altered cerebellar fractional anisotropy in acute-phase mild traumatic brain injury patients is localized in specific regions and statistically associated with cognitive deficits detectable on neurocognitive testing. PMID:26967320

  11. [Effects of total saponins of semen ziziphi Spinosae on brain damages and brain biochemical parameters under cerebral ischemia of rats].

    PubMed

    Bai, X; Huang, Z; Mo, Z; Pan, H; Ding, H

    1996-02-01

    Total saponins of Semen Ziziphi Spinosae (ZS) can reduce the contents of water and MDA in ischemic rat's brain tissues, elevate the activity of SOD, CK and LDH, cut down the content of lactate and alleviate the damages of nerve cells in brain. The study shows that ZS possesses protective effects on cerebral ischemic injuries. PMID:8758767

  12. Longitudinal assessment of gait abnormalities following penetrating ballistic-like brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Mountney, Andrea; Leung, Lai Yee; Pedersen, Rebecca; Shear, Deborah; Tortella, Frank

    2013-01-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in enduring motor and cognitive dysfunction. Although gait disturbances have been documented among TBI patients, few studies have profiled gait abnormalities in animal models of TBI. We sought to obtain a comprehensive longitudinal analysis of gait function following severe penetrating ballistic-like brain injury (PBBI) in rats. Rats were subjected to either unilateral frontal PBBI, probe insertion alone, or sham surgery. Sensorimotor performance was assessed using the CatWalk automated gait analysis system. Baseline measurements were taken 3 days prior to injury and detailed analysis of gait was performed at 1, 3, 7, 14, and 28 days post-injury. Both PBBI and probe-inserted rats displayed altered static and dynamic gait parameters that were primarily evident during the early (<7 days) post-injury phase and were resolved by 1 month post-injury. PBBI produced more severe deficits compared to probe-alone which were reflected in the number, magnitude, and resolution time of abnormal gait parameters. While altered parameters were detected in all four paws, they were more apparent on the contralateral side. Gait parameters including paw pressure, print area, swing speed, and stride length were significantly decreased whereas stance, swing, and step cycle duration were increased compared to sham. Overall, altered gait patterns detected using the CatWalk system in the PBBI model were injury-severity dependent, resolved at later time points, and appeared similar to those reported in severe TBI patients. These results indicate that the CatWalk may be most useful for neuroprotection studies that focus on the acute/subacute recovery period after TBI.

  13. Brain polyphosphoinositide metabolism during focal ischemia in rat cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, T.N.; Liu, T.H.; Xu, J.; Hsu, C.Y.; Sun, G.Y. )

    1991-04-01

    Using a rat model of stroke, we examined the effects of focal cerebral ischemia on the metabolism of polyphosphoinositides by injecting {sup 32}Pi into both the left and right cortices. After equilibration of the label for 2-3 hours, ischemia induced a significant decrease (p less than 0.001) in the concentrations of labeled phosphatidyl 4,5-bisphosphates (66-78%) and phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (64-67%) in the right middle cerebral artery cortex of four rats. The phospholipid labeling pattern in the left middle cerebral artery cortex, which sustained only mild ischemia and no permanent tissue damage, was not different from that of two sham-operated controls. However, when {sup 32}Pi was injected 1 hour after the ischemic insult, there was a significant decrease (p less than 0.01) in the incorporation of label into the phospholipids in both cortices of four ischemic rats compared with four sham-operated controls. Furthermore, differences in the phospholipid labeling pattern were observed in the left cortex compared with the sham-operated controls. The change in labeling pattern was attributed to the partial reduction in blood flow following ligation of the common carotid arteries. We provide a sensitive procedure for probing the effects of focal cerebral ischemia on the polyphosphoinositide signaling pathway in the brain, which may play an important role in the pathogenesis of tissue injury.

  14. Effect of exposure to diazinon on adult rat's brain.

    PubMed

    Rashedinia, Marzieh; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein; Imenshahidi, Mohsen; Lari, Parisa; Razavi, Bibi Marjan; Abnous, Khalil

    2016-04-01

    Diazinon (DZN), a commonly used agricultural organophosphate insecticide, is one of the major concerns for human health. This study was planned to investigate neurotoxic effects of subacute exposure to DZN in adult male Wistar rats. Animals received corn oil as control and 15 and 30 mg/kg DZN orally by gastric gavage for 4 weeks. The cerebrum malondialdehyde and glutathione (GSH) contents were assessed as biomarkers of lipid peroxidation and nonenzyme antioxidants, respectively. Moreover, activated forms of caspase 3, -9, and Bax/Bcl-2 ratios were evaluated as key apoptotic proteins. Results of this study suggested that chronic administration of DZN did not change lipid peroxidation and GSH levels significantly in comparison with control. Also, the active forms of caspase 3 and caspase 9 were not significantly altered in DZN-treated rat groups. Moreover, no significant changes were observed in Bax and Bcl-2 ratios. This study indicated that generation of reactive oxygen species was probably modulated by intracellular antioxidant system. In conclusion, subacute oral administration of DZN did not alter lipid peroxidation. Moreover, apoptosis induction was not observed in rat brain.

  15. Effects of aspartame and carbohydrate administration on human and rat plasma large neutral amino acid levels and rat brain amino acid and monoamine levels.

    PubMed

    Romano, M; Casacci, F; De Marchi, F; Pacei, T; Esteve, A; Lomuscio, G; Mennini, T; Salmona, M

    1989-01-01

    Thirty fasted human volunteers were given 0.83 and 8.3 mg aspartame/kg body weight alone, as part of a basal low carbohydrate meal (648 kcal, 10% carbohydrate) or as part of a high energy carbohydrate-rich meal (1290 kcal, 34% carbohydrate). Amino acid concentrations in plasma were determined before and 30, 60 and 180 min after the consumption of aspartame. Under these conditions, which mimic realistic aspartame consumption, aspartame had no significant effect on plasma concentration of any amino acid. In addition, the effect of aspartame alone or with carbohydrates on plasma and brain amino acid levels was studied in rats after acute or subacute (14 d) oral treatment. In subacute dosing experiments aspartame was included in the diet. Brain monoamine concentrations were also measured in the same animals. Plasma concentrations of large neutral amino acids were modified under acute conditions. In contrast, after subacute treatment no significant differences in plasma or brain amino acid concentrations or in brain monoamine concentrations were observed.

  16. Coenzyme Q10 protects against acute consequences of experimental myocardial infarction in rats

    PubMed Central

    Eleawa, Samy M; Alkhateeb, Mahmoud; Ghosh, Sanjoy; Al-Hashem, Fahaid; Shatoor, Abdullah S; Alhejaily, Abdulmohsen; Khalil, Mohammad A

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Myocardial infarction (MI) due to sudden occlusion of a major coronary artery leads to a complex series of events that result in left ventricle (LV) impairment eventual heart failure. Therapeutic options are limited to reverse such trends post MI. The aim of this study was to compare the acute cardioprotective effects of the antioxidants, resveratrol (RES) and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), either individually or in combination, on infracts size, LV hemodynamics, inflammation and oxidative stress markers in rats with experimentally induced MI. Methods: Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into six groups: control without surgery, sham without occlusion, MI without antioxidants, RES pre-treated then MI (20 mg/kg, orally), CoQ10 then MI (20 mg/kg, intramuscular.), and combined RES and CoQ10 then MI with (each group n = 10). Pretreatment commenced 7 days prior to the permanent occlusion of the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery. Infarct area, hemodynamics, inflammation and oxidative stress markers were assessed 24 hours post-MI. Results: Compared to RES alone, CoQ10 pre-administration either by itself or in combination with RES, significantly reduced LV infarct area (57%), and normalized LV hemodynamic parameters like LVEDP (100%), LVSP (95.4%), LV +dp/dt and -dp/dt (102 and 73.1%, respectively). CoQ10 also decreased serum levels of brain natriuretic peptide (70%), and various circulating inflammatory markers like TNF-α (83.2%) and IL-6 (83.2%). Regarding oxidative stress, TBARS scores were lowered with a concurrent increase in both superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities with CoQ10 alone or in combination with RES. Conclusion: Coenzyme Q10 protects against the acute sequelae of myocardial infarction. It profoundly reduced infarct area, inflammation and oxidative stress while normalizing LV hemodynamics post MI. PMID:26069524

  17. Non-injurious neonatal hypoxia confers resistance to brain senescence in aged male rats.

    PubMed

    Martin, Nicolas; Bossenmeyer-Pourié, Carine; Koziel, Violette; Jazi, Rozat; Audonnet, Sandra; Vert, Paul; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Daval, Jean-Luc; Pourié, Grégory

    2012-01-01

    Whereas brief acute or intermittent episodes of hypoxia have been shown to exert a protective role in the central nervous system and to stimulate neurogenesis, other studies suggest that early hypoxia may constitute a risk factor that influences the future development of mental disorders. We therefore investigated the effects of a neonatal "conditioning-like" hypoxia (100% N₂, 5 min) on the brain and the cognitive outcomes of rats until 720 days of age (physiologic senescence). We confirmed that such a short hypoxia led to brain neurogenesis within the ensuing weeks, along with reduced apoptosis in the hippocampus involving activation of Erk1/2 and repression of p38 and death-associated protein (DAP) kinase. At 21 days of age, increased thicknesses and cell densities were recorded in various subregions, with strong synapsin activation. During aging, previous exposure to neonatal hypoxia was associated with enhanced memory retrieval scores specifically in males, better preservation of their brain integrity than controls, reduced age-related apoptosis, larger hippocampal cell layers, and higher expression of glutamatergic and GABAergic markers. These changes were accompanied with a marked expression of synapsin proteins, mainly of their phosphorylated active forms which constitute major players of synapse function and plasticity, and with increases of their key regulators, i.e. Erk1/2, the transcription factor EGR-1/Zif-268 and Src kinase. Moreover, the significantly higher interactions between PSD-95 scaffolding protein and NMDA receptors measured in the hippocampus of 720-day-old male animals strengthen the conclusion of increased synaptic functional activity and plasticity associated with neonatal hypoxia. Thus, early non-injurious hypoxia may trigger beneficial long term effects conferring higher resistance to senescence in aged male rats, with a better preservation of cognitive functions.

  18. Rat Injury Model under Controlled Field-Relevant Primary Blast Conditions: Acute Response to a Wide Range of Peak Overpressures

    PubMed Central

    Skotak, Maciej; Wang, Fang; Alai, Aaron; Holmberg, Aaron; Harris, Seth; Switzer, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We evaluated the acute (up to 24 h) pathophysiological response to primary blast using a rat model and helium driven shock tube. The shock tube generates animal loadings with controlled pure primary blast parameters over a wide range and field-relevant conditions. We studied the biomechanical loading with a set of pressure gauges mounted on the surface of the nose, in the cranial space, and in the thoracic cavity of cadaver rats. Anesthetized rats were exposed to a single blast at precisely controlled five peak overpressures over a wide range (130, 190, 230, 250, and 290 kPa). We observed 0% mortality rates in 130 and 230 kPa groups, and 30%, 24%, and 100% mortality rates in 190, 250, and 290 kPa groups, respectively. The body weight loss was statistically significant in 190 and 250 kPa groups 24 h after exposure. The data analysis showed the magnitude of peak-to-peak amplitude of intracranial pressure (ICP) fluctuations correlates well with mortality rates. The ICP oscillations recorded for 190, 250, and 290 kPa are characterized by higher frequency (10–20 kHz) than in other two groups (7–8 kHz). We noted acute bradycardia and lung hemorrhage in all groups of rats subjected to the blast. We established the onset of both corresponds to 110 kPa peak overpressure. The immunostaining against immunoglobulin G (IgG) of brain sections of rats sacrificed 24-h post-exposure indicated the diffuse blood-brain barrier breakdown in the brain parenchyma. At high blast intensities (peak overpressure of 190 kPa or more), the IgG uptake by neurons was evident, but there was no evidence of neurodegeneration after 24 h post-exposure, as indicated by cupric silver staining. We observed that the acute response as well as mortality is a non-linear function over the peak overpressure and impulse ranges explored in this work. PMID:23362798

  19. Acute stress and hippocampal output: exploring dorsal CA1 and subicular synaptic plasticity simultaneously in anesthetized rats

    PubMed Central

    MacDougall, Matthew J; Howland, John G

    2013-01-01

    The Cornu Ammonis-1 (CA1) subfield and subiculum (SUB) serve as major output structures of the hippocampal formation. Exploring forms of synaptic plasticity simultaneously within these two output regions may improve understanding of the dynamics of hippocampal circuitry and information transfer between hippocampal and cortical brain regions. Using a novel dual-channel electrophysiological preparation in urethane-anesthetized adult male Sprague-Dawley rats in vivo, we examined the effects of acute restraint stress (30 min) on short- and long-term forms of synaptic plasticity in both CA1 and SUB by stimulating the CA3 region. Paired-pulse facilitation was disrupted in SUB but not CA1 in the dual-channel experiments following exposure to acute stress. Disruptions in CA1 PPF were evident in subsequent single-channel experiments with a more anterior recording site. Acute stress disrupted long-term potentiation induced by high-frequency stimulation (10 bursts of 20 pulses at 200 Hz) in both CA1 and SUB. Low-frequency stimulation (900 pulses at 1 Hz) did not alter CA1 plasticity while a late-developing potentiation was evident in SUB that was disrupted following exposure to acute stress. These findings highlight differences in the sensitivity to acute stress for distinct forms of synaptic plasticity within synapses in hippocampal output regions. The findings are discussed in relation to normal and aberrant forms of hippocampal-cortical information processing. PMID:24303119

  20. Effects of acute chlorpyrifos exposure on in vivo acetylcholine accumulation in rat striatum

    SciTech Connect

    Karanth, Subramanya; Liu, Jing; Mirajkar, Nikita; Pope, Carey . E-mail: carey.pope@okstate.edu

    2006-10-01

    This study examined the acute effects of chlorpyrifos (CPF) on cholinesterase inhibition and acetylcholine levels in the striatum of freely moving rats using in vivo microdialysis. Adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with vehicle (peanut oil, 2 ml/kg) or CPF (84, 156 or 279 mg/kg, sc) and functional signs of toxicity, body weight and motor activity recorded. Microdialysis was conducted at 1, 4 and 7 days after CPF exposure for measurement of acetylcholine levels in striatum. Rats were then sacrificed and the contralateral striatum and diaphragm were collected for biochemical measurements. Few overt signs of cholinergic toxicity were noted in any rats. Body weight gain was significantly affected in the high-dose (279 mg/kg) group only, while motor activity (nocturnal rearing) was significantly reduced in all CPF-treated groups at one day (84 mg/kg) or from 1-4 days (156 and 279 mg/kg) after dosing. Cholinesterase activities in both diaphragm and striatum were markedly inhibited (50-92%) in a time-dependent manner, but there were relatively minimal dose-related changes. In contrast, time- and dose-dependent changes in striatal acetylcholine levels were noted, with significantly higher levels noted in the high-dose group compared to other groups. Maximal increases in striatal acetylcholine levels were observed at 4-7 days after dosing (84 mg/kg, 7-9-fold; 156 mg/kg, 10-13-fold; 279 mg/kg, 35-57-fold). Substantially higher acetylcholine levels were noted when an exogenous cholinesterase inhibitor was included in the perfusion buffer, but CPF treatment-related differences were substantially lower in magnitude under those conditions. The results suggest that marked differences in acetylcholine accumulation can occur with dosages of CPF eliciting relatively similar degrees of cholinesterase inhibition. Furthermore, the minimal expression of classic signs of cholinergic toxicity in the presence of extensive brain acetylcholine accumulation suggests that some

  1. Heatstroke Effect on Brain Heme Oxygenase-1 in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Ya-Ting; Liu, Tsung-Ta; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Chen, Chun-Chi; Kung, Woon-Man; Huang, Chi-Chang; Lin, Tien-Jen; Wang, Yuan-Hung; Wei, Li

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to high environmental temperature leading to increased core body temperature above 40°C and central nervous system abnormalities such as convulsions, delirium, or coma is defined as heat stroke. Studies in humans and animals indicate that the heat shock responses of the host contribute to multiple organ injury and death during heat stroke. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1)—a stress-responsive enzyme that catabolizes heme into iron, carbon monoxide, and biliverdin—has an important role in the neuroprotective mechanism against ischemic stroke. Here, we investigated the role of endogenous HO-1 in heat-induced brain damage in rats. RT-PCR results revealed that levels of HO-1 mRNA peaked at 0 h after heat exposure and immunoblot analysis revealed that the maximal protein expression occurred at 1 h post-heat exposure. Subsequently, we detected the HO-1 expression in the cortical brain cells and revealed the neuronal cell morphology. In conclusion, HO-1 is a potent protective molecule against heat-induced brain damage. Manipulation of HO-1 may provide a potential therapeutic approach for heat-related diseases. PMID:26392811

  2. Kappa opioid receptors stimulate phosphoinositide turnover in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Periyasamy, S.; Hoss, W. )

    1990-01-01

    The effects of various subtype-selective opioid agonists and antagonists on the phosphoinositide (PI) turnover response were investigated in the rat brain. The {kappa}-agonists U-50,488H and ketocyclazocine produced a concentration-dependent increase in the accumulation of IP's in hippocampal slices. The other {kappa}-agonists Dynorphin-A (1-13) amide, and its protected analog D(Ala){sup 2}-dynorphin-A (1-13) amide also produced a significant increase in the formation of ({sup 3}H)-IP's, whereas the {mu}-selective agonists (D-Ala{sup 2}-N-Me-Phe{sup 4}-Gly{sup 5}-ol)-enkephalin and morphine and the {delta}-selective agonist (D-Pen{sup 2,5})-enkephalin were ineffective. The increase in IP's formation elicited by U-50,488H was partially antagonized by naloxone and more completely antagonized by the {kappa}-selective antagonists nor-binaltorphimine and MR 2266. The formation of IP's induced by U-50,488H varies with the regions of the brain used, being highest in hippocampus and amygdala, and lowest in striatum and pons-medullar. The results indicate that brain {kappa}- but neither {mu}- nor {delta}- receptors are coupled to the PI turnover response.

  3. Heatstroke Effect on Brain Heme Oxygenase-1 in Rats.

    PubMed

    Wen, Ya-Ting; Liu, Tsung-Ta; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Chen, Chun-Chi; Kung, Woon-Man; Huang, Chi-Chang; Lin, Tien-Jen; Wang, Yuan-Hung; Wei, Li

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to high environmental temperature leading to increased core body temperature above 40°C and central nervous system abnormalities such as convulsions, delirium, or coma is defined as heat stroke. Studies in humans and animals indicate that the heat shock responses of the host contribute to multiple organ injury and death during heat stroke. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1)-a stress-responsive enzyme that catabolizes heme into iron, carbon monoxide, and biliverdin-has an important role in the neuroprotective mechanism against ischemic stroke. Here, we investigated the role of endogenous HO-1 in heat-induced brain damage in rats. RT-PCR results revealed that levels of HO-1 mRNA peaked at 0 h after heat exposure and immunoblot analysis revealed that the maximal protein expression occurred at 1 h post-heat exposure. Subsequently, we detected the HO-1 expression in the cortical brain cells and revealed the neuronal cell morphology. In conclusion, HO-1 is a potent protective molecule against heat-induced brain damage. Manipulation of HO-1 may provide a potential therapeutic approach for heat-related diseases. PMID:26392811

  4. Neurotoxicity of Silver Nanoparticles in Rat Brain After Intragastric Exposure.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liming; Shao, Anliang; Zhao, Yanhong; Wang, Zhijie; Zhang, Cuiping; Sun, Yilin; Deng, Jie; Chou, Laisheng Lee

    2015-06-01

    It is known that the biological half-life of silver in the central nervous system is longer than in other organs. However, the potential toxicity of silver nanoparticles (NPs) on brain tissue and the underlying mechanism(s) of action are not well understood. In this study, neurotoxicity of silver NPs was examined in rat after intragastric administration. After a two-week exposure to low-dose (1 mg/kg, body weight) or high-dose (10 mg/kg) silver NPs, the pathological and ultrastructural changes in brain tissue were evaluated with H&E staining and transmission electron microscopy. The mRNA expression levels of key tight junction proteins of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR, and several inflammatory factors were assessed in blood using ELISA assay. We observed neuron shrinkage, cytoplasmic or foot swelling of astrocytes, and extra-vascular lymphocytes in silver NP exposure groups. The cadherin 1 (2(-ΔΔCt): 1.45-fold/control) and Claudin-1 (2(-ΔΔCt): 2.77-fold/control) were slightly increase in mRNA expression levels, and IL-4 significantly increased after silver NP exposure. It was suggest that silver NP can induce neuronal degeneration and astrocyte swelling, even with a low-dose (1 mg/kg) oral exposure. One potential mechanism for the effects of silver NPs to the nervous cells is involved in inflammatory effects.

  5. Environmentally relevant pyrethroid mixtures: A study on the correlation of blood and brain concentrations of a mixture of pyrethroid insecticides to motor activity in the rat.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Michael F; Ross, David G; Starr, James M; Scollon, Edward J; Wolansky, Marcelo J; Crofton, Kevin M; DeVito, Michael J

    2016-06-01

    Human exposure to multiple pyrethroid insecticides may occur because of their broad use on crops and for residential pest control. To address the potential health risk from co-exposure to pyrethroids, it is important to understand their disposition and toxicity in target organs such as the brain, and surrogates such as the blood when administered as a mixture. The objective of this study was to assess the correlation between blood and brain concentrations of pyrethroids and neurobehavioral effects in the rat following an acute oral administration of the pyrethroids as a mixture. Male Long-Evans rats were administered a mixture of β-cyfluthrin, cypermethrin, deltamethrin, esfenvalerate and cis- and trans-permethrin in corn oil at seven dose levels. The pyrethroid with the highest percentage in the dosing solution was trans-permethrin (31% of total mixture dose) while deltamethrin and esfenvalerate had the lowest percentage (3%). Motor activity of the rats was then monitored for 1h. At 3.5h post-dosing, the animals were euthanized and blood and brain were collected. These tissues were extracted and analyzed for parent pyrethroid using HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry. Cypermethrin and cis-permethrin were the predominate pyrethroids detected in blood and brain, respectively, at all dosage levels. The relationship of total pyrethroid concentration between blood and brain was linear (r=0.93). The pyrethroids with the lowest fraction in blood were trans-permethrin and β-cyfluthrin and in brain were deltamethrin and esfenvalerate. The relationship between motor activity of the treated rats and summed pyrethroid blood and brain concentration was described using a sigmoidal Emax model with the Effective Concentration50 being more sensitive for brain than blood. The data suggests summed pyrethroid rat blood concentration could be used as a surrogate for brain concentration as an aid to study the neurotoxic effects of pyrethroids administered as a mixture under the conditions

  6. Environmentally relevant pyrethroid mixtures: A study on the correlation of blood and brain concentrations of a mixture of pyrethroid insecticides to motor activity in the rat.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Michael F; Ross, David G; Starr, James M; Scollon, Edward J; Wolansky, Marcelo J; Crofton, Kevin M; DeVito, Michael J

    2016-06-01

    Human exposure to multiple pyrethroid insecticides may occur because of their broad use on crops and for residential pest control. To address the potential health risk from co-exposure to pyrethroids, it is important to understand their disposition and toxicity in target organs such as the brain, and surrogates such as the blood when administered as a mixture. The objective of this study was to assess the correlation between blood and brain concentrations of pyrethroids and neurobehavioral effects in the rat following an acute oral administration of the pyrethroids as a mixture. Male Long-Evans rats were administered a mixture of β-cyfluthrin, cypermethrin, deltamethrin, esfenvalerate and cis- and trans-permethrin in corn oil at seven dose levels. The pyrethroid with the highest percentage in the dosing solution was trans-permethrin (31% of total mixture dose) while deltamethrin and esfenvalerate had the lowest percentage (3%). Motor activity of the rats was then monitored for 1h. At 3.5h post-dosing, the animals were euthanized and blood and brain were collected. These tissues were extracted and analyzed for parent pyrethroid using HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry. Cypermethrin and cis-permethrin were the predominate pyrethroids detected in blood and brain, respectively, at all dosage levels. The relationship of total pyrethroid concentration between blood and brain was linear (r=0.93). The pyrethroids with the lowest fraction in blood were trans-permethrin and β-cyfluthrin and in brain were deltamethrin and esfenvalerate. The relationship between motor activity of the treated rats and summed pyrethroid blood and brain concentration was described using a sigmoidal Emax model with the Effective Concentration50 being more sensitive for brain than blood. The data suggests summed pyrethroid rat blood concentration could be used as a surrogate for brain concentration as an aid to study the neurotoxic effects of pyrethroids administered as a mixture under the conditions

  7. Electroencephalographic inverse localization of brain activity in acute traumatic brain injury as a guide to surgery, monitoring and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Irimia, Andrei; Goh, S.-Y. Matthew; Torgerson, Carinna M.; Stein, Nathan R.; Chambers, Micah C.; Vespa, Paul M.; Van Horn, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To inverse-localize epileptiform cortical electrical activity recorded from severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients using electroencephalography (EEG). Methods Three acute TBI cases were imaged using computed tomography (CT) and multimodal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Semi-automatic segmentation was performed to partition the complete TBI head into 25 distinct tissue types, including 6 tissue types accounting for pathology. Segmentations were employed to generate a finite element method model of the head, and EEG activity generators were modeled as dipolar currents distributed over the cortical surface. Results We demonstrate anatomically faithful localization of EEG generators responsible for epileptiform discharges in severe TBI. By accounting for injury-related tissue conductivity changes, our work offers the most realistic implementation currently available for the inverse estimation of cortical activity in TBI. Conclusion Whereas standard localization techniques are available for electrical activity mapping in uninjured brains, they are rarely applied to acute TBI. Modern models of TBI-induced pathology can inform the localization of epileptogenic foci, improve surgical efficacy, contribute to the improvement of critical care monitoring and provide guidance for patient-tailored treatment. With approaches such as this, neurosurgeons and neurologists can study brain activity in acute TBI and obtain insights regarding injury effects upon brain metabolism and clinical outcome. PMID:24011495

  8. Effects of traumatic brain injury on regional cerebral blood flow in rats as measured with radiolabeled microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Yamakami, I.; McIntosh, T.K.

    1989-02-01

    To clarify the effect of experimental brain injury on regional CBF (rCBF), repeated rCBF measurements were performed using radiolabeled microspheres in rats subjected to fluid-percussion traumatic brain injury. Three consecutive microsphere injections in six uninjured control rats substantiated that the procedure induces no significant changes in hemodynamic variables or rCBF. Animals were subjected to left parietal fluid-percussion brain injury of moderate severity (2.1-2.4 atm) and rCBF values were determined (a) prior to injury and 15 min and 1 h following injury (n = 7); and (b) prior to injury and 30 min and 2 h following injury (n = 7). At 15 min post injury, there was a profound reduction of rCBF in all brain regions studied (p less than 0.01). Although rCBF in the hindbrain had recovered to near-normal by 30 min post injury, rCBF in both injured and contralateral (uninjured) forebrain areas remained significantly suppressed up to 1 h post injury. At 2 h post injury, recovery of rCBF to near-normal values was observed in all brain regions except the focal area of injury (left parietal cortex) where rCBF remained significantly depressed (p less than 0.01). This prolonged focal oligemia at the injury site was associated with the development of reproducible cystic necrosis in the left parietotemporal cortex at 4 weeks post injury. Our results demonstrate that acute changes in rCBF occur following experimental traumatic brain injury in rats and that rCBF remains significantly depressed up to 2 h post injury in the area circumscribing the trauma site.

  9. ACUTE EXPOSURE TO MOLINATE ALTERS NEUROENDOCRINE CONTROL OF OVULATION IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Molinate, a thiocarbamate herbicide, has been shown previously to impair reproductive capability in the male rat. In a two-generation study, molinate exposure to female rats resulted in altered pregnancy outcome. However, published data is lacking on the effects of acute exposure...

  10. Respiratory autoresuscitation following severe acute hypoxemia in anesthetized adult rats.

    PubMed

    Krause, A; Nowak, Z; Srbu, R; Bell, H J

    2016-10-01

    In the present study we investigated the pattern and efficacy of respiratory autoresuscitation in spontaneously breathing adult male rats across three separate anesthetic backgrounds. Each animal was administered one of three injectable anesthetics to achieve a surgical plane of anesthesia: ketamine-xylazine (KET, n=10), pentobarbital (PEN, n=10), or urethane (URE, n=10). Animals were tracheostomized and equipped with a femoral artery catheter to record airflow and arterial pressures. In response to a bout of breathing anoxic air, none of the 10 URE animals were able to mount a successful autoresuscitation response. In contrast, all KET and PEN animals survived all four consecutive anoxic exposures, restoring eupneic breathing in all cases. Moreover, only 4/10 URE animals expressed gasping breaths following the onset of respiratory arrest, and these were temporally delayed (p<0.001) and much smaller in volume (P≤0.012) compared to KET and PEN animals. URE animals showed no clear aberrations in their cardiovascular responses to anoxia, with the exception of lower arterial pulse pressures compared to either KET or PEN animals at specific points following RA. Ketamine-xylazine and pentobarbital anesthesia can be reliably and effectively used to create models for the study of autoresuscitation in adult rats. In contrast, urethane causes catastrophic failure of respiratory autoresuscitation, by delaying or outright preventing the elaboration of gasping breaths following anoxia-induced respiratory arrest. The neuronal and synaptic alterations accompanying urethane anesthesia may therefore provide a means of understanding potential pathological alterations in rhythm generation that can predispose the respiratory control system to failed autoresuscitation following an episode of acute severe hypoxemia. PMID:27378495

  11. Hyperhydrating effect of acute administration of angiotensin II in rats.

    PubMed

    Fregly, M J; Wilson, K M; Rowland, N E; Cade, J R

    1992-01-01

    Water intake, urine output, and fluid exchange (water intake less urine output) were measured in rats at hourly intervals for 7 hours and at 24 hours following acute administration of angiotensin II (AII, 200 micrograms/kg SC). AII induced the expected abrupt increase in water intake and a more gradual increase in urine output. The change in fluid exchange (fluid exchange of the AII-treated group less fluid exchange of controls) became positive within the first hour after treatment with AII, decreased linearly with time, and reached 0 at approximately 10 to 12 hours after treatment with AII. When AII was administered intracerebroventricularly (50 ng), similar results were observed. In this case, the change in fluid exchange (delta F) reached 0 in about 6 hours. Imposition of a water load (1% of body weight, IP) on the group receiving AII SC failed to affect the time required for delta F to reach 0 if the water load was disregarded. However, inclusion of the load as a part of intake extended the time the rats remained in positive fluid balance beyond that of the nonloaded, AII-treated control group. In the case of the larger water load (3% of body weight, IP), delta F returned to that of controls in about 4 to 5 hours if the water load was disregarded. However, inclusion of the load as part of intake extended the period of hyperhydration well beyond that of both the nonloaded, AII-treated group and the AII-treated group given the 1% load.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. In vivo deep brain imaging of rats using oral-cavity illuminated photoacoustic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li; Xia, Jun; Wong, Terence T. W.; Zhang, Ruiying; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate, by means of internal light delivery, photoacoustic imaging of the deep brain of rats in vivo. With fiber illumination via the oral cavity, we delivered light directly into the bottom of the brain, much more than can be delivered by external illumination. The study was performed using a photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) system equipped with a 512-element full-ring transducer array, providing a full two-dimensional view aperture. Using internal illumination, the PACT system provided clear cross sectional photoacoustic images from the palate to the middle brain of live rats, revealing deep brain structures such as the hypothalamus, brain stem, and cerebral medulla.

  13. [Regulation of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 5 mRNA and protein level in rat brain by addictive drugs].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Min; Fan, Xue-Liang; Yang, Wei-Lin; Jiang, Yan; Ma, Lan

    2004-10-25

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase 5 (GRK5) plays an important role in the regulation of GPCR-transduced signals. Our previous study showed that acute administration of morphine could significantly increase GRK5 mRNA level in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of the rat brain. The current study investigated the potential effects of acute administration of addictive drugs including morphine, heroine and cocaine on GRK5 mRNA level in the rat brain using in situ hybridization and analyzed the effects of acute and chronic morphine treatments on GRK5 protein level in the rat brain using Western blotting assay. Our results showed that 2 h after the initial morphine (10 mg/kg), cocaine (15 mg/kg) and heroine (1 mg/kg) treatment, the mRNA level of GRK5 in the parietal cortex increased about 110% (P<0.01), 70% (P<0.05) and 100% (P<0.01), respectively. In the temporal cortex, GRK5 mRNA level increased about 90% (P<0.01), 40% (P<0.05) and 80.0% (P<0.01), respectively . In the hippocampus, the mRNA level of GRK5 increased about 60% (P<0.01), 30% (P<0.05) and 80% (P<0.01). However, the mRNA level of GRK5 remained unchanged after acute morphine, cocaine or heroine treatment. In the cerebral cortex of the rat brain, the acute administration of morphine (NS-Mor) increased GRK5 protein level by about 60% while the chronic morphine treatment (Mor-Mor) increased GRK5 protein level even higher [about 130% compared with the control group (chronic saline treatment, NS-NS) group, P<0.01]. In the hippocampus, GRK5 protein level remained unchanged after acute administration of morphine (P>0.1),while the level of GRK5 protein tended to decrease after chronic morphine treatment (P=0.098). In the thalamus, acute morphine treatment caused no change in GRK5 protein level (P>0.1) while after chronic morphine treatment, GRK5 protein level decreased significantly (more than 90%, P<0.01), Taken together, our results indicate that addictive drugs can regulate GRK5 in the rat brain on protein level

  14. High Fat Diet and Inflammation – Modulation of Haptoglobin Level in Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Spagnuolo, Maria Stefania; Mollica, Maria Pina; Maresca, Bernardetta; Cavaliere, Gina; Cefaliello, Carolina; Trinchese, Giovanna; Scudiero, Rosaria; Crispino, Marianna; Cigliano, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and dietary fats are well known risk factors for the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. The analysis of specific markers, whose brain level can be affected by diet, might contribute to unveil the intersection between inflammation/obesity and neurodegeneration. Haptoglobin (Hpt) is an acute phase protein, which acts as antioxidant by binding free haemoglobin (Hb), thus neutralizing its pro-oxidative action. We previously demonstrated that Hpt plays critical functions in brain, modulating cholesterol trafficking in neuroblastoma cell lines, beta-amyloid (Aβ) uptake by astrocyte, and limiting Aβ toxicity on these cells. A major aim of this study was to evaluate whether a long term (12 or 24 weeks) high-fat diet (HFD) influences Hpt and Hb expression in rat hippocampus. We also assessed the development of obesity-induced inflammation by measuring hippocampal level of TNF-alpha, and the extent of protein oxidation by titrating nitro-tyrosine (N-Tyr). Hpt concentration was lower (p < 0.001) in hippocampus of HFD rats than in control animals, both in the 12 and in the 24 weeks fed groups. HFD was also associated in hippocampus with the increase of Hb level (p < 0.01), inflammation and protein oxidative modification, as evidenced by the increase in the concentration of TNF-alpha and nitro-tyrosine. In fact, TNF-alpha concentration was higher in rats receiving HFD for 12 (p < 0.01) or 24 weeks (p < 0.001) compared to those receiving the control diet. N-Tyr concentration was more elevated in hippocampus of HFD than in control rats in both 12 weeks (p = 0.04) and 24 weeks groups (p = 0.01), and a positive correlation between Hb and N-Tyr concentration was found in each group. Finally, we found that the treatment of the human glioblastoma-astrocytoma cell line U-87 MG with cholesterol and fatty acids, such as palmitic and linoleic acid, significantly impairs (p < 0.001) Hpt secretion in the extracellular compartment. We hypothesize that the HFD

  15. Acute and sub-acute oral toxicity assessment of the hydroalcoholic extract of Withania somnifera roots in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Prabu, P C; Panchapakesan, S; Raj, C David

    2013-08-01

    Withania somnifera is a widely used medicinal plant for several disorders. Toxicity studies on Withania somnifera are not available. Acute and sub-acute oral toxicities of Withania somnifera root extract in Wistar rats were evaluated in the present study. In the acute toxicity study, WSR extract was administered to five rats at 2000 mg/kg, once orally and were observed for 14 days. No toxic signs/mortality were observed. In the sub-acute study, WSR extract was administered once daily for 28 days to rats at 500, 1000 and 2000 mg/kg, orally. No toxic signs/mortality were observed. There were no significant changes (P < 0.05) in the body weights, organ weights and haemato-biochemical parameters in any of the dose levels. No treatment related gross/histopathological lesions were observed. The present investigation demonstrated that the no observed adverse effect level was 2000 mg/kg body weight per day of hydroalcoholic extract of W. somnifera in rats and hence may be considered as non-toxic.

  16. Psychological stress, cocaine and natural reward each induce endoplasmic reticulum stress genes in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Pavlovsky, A A; Boehning, D; Li, D; Zhang, Y; Fan, X; Green, T A

    2013-08-29

    Our prior research has shown that the transcription of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress transcription factors activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) and ATF4 are induced by amphetamine and restraint stress in rat striatum. However, presently the full extent of ER stress responses to psychological stress or cocaine, and which of the three ER stress pathways is activated is unknown. The current study examines transcriptional responses of key ER stress target genes subsequent to psychological stress or cocaine. Rats were subjected to acute or repeated restraint stress or cocaine treatment and mRNA was isolated from dorsal striatum, medial prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens brain tissue. ER stress gene mRNA expression was measured using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and RNA sequencing. Restraint stress and cocaine-induced transcription of the classic ER stress-induced genes (BIP, CHOP, ATF3 and GADD34) and of two other ER stress components x-box binding protein 1 (XBP1) and ATF6. In addition, rats living in an enriched environment (large group cage with novel toys changed daily) exhibited rapid induction of GADD34 and ATF3 after 30 min of exploring novel toys, suggesting these genes are also involved in normal non-pathological signaling. However, environmental enrichment, a paradigm that produces protective addiction and depression phenotypes in rats, attenuated the rapid induction of ATF3 and GADD34 after restraint stress. These experiments provide a sensitive measure of ER stress and, more importantly, these results offer good evidence of the activation of ER stress mechanisms from psychological stress, cocaine and natural reward. Thus, ER stress genes may be targets for novel therapeutic targets for depression and addiction. PMID:23644055

  17. Psychological Stress, Cocaine and Natural Reward Each Induce Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Genes in Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Pavlovsky, Ashly A.; Boehning, Darren; Li, Dingge; Zhang, Yafang; Fan, Xiuzhen; Green, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Our prior research has shown that the transcription of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress transcription factors Activating Transcription Factor 3 (ATF3) and ATF4 are induced by amphetamine and restraint stress in rat striatum. However, presently it is unknown the full extent of ER stress responses to psychological stress or cocaine, and which of the three ER stress pathways is activated. The current study examines transcriptional responses of key ER stress target genes subsequent to psychological stress or cocaine. Rats were subjected to acute or repeated restraint stress or cocaine treatment and mRNA was isolated from dorsal striatum, medial prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens brain tissue. ER stress gene mRNA expression was measured using quantitative PCR and RNA sequencing. Restraint stress and cocaine induced transcription of the classic ER stress-induced genes (BIP, CHOP, ATF3 and GADD34) and of two other ER stress components XBP1 and ATF6. In addition, rats living in an enriched environment (large group cage with novel toys changed daily) exhibited rapid induction of GADD34 and ATF3 after 30 min of exploring novel toys, suggesting these genes are also involved in normal non-pathological signaling. However, environmental enrichment, a paradigm that produces protective addiction and depression phenotypes in rats, attenuated the rapid induction of ATF3 and GADD34 after restraint stress. These experiments provide a sensitive measure of ER stress and, more importantly, these results offer good evidence of the activation of ER stress mechanisms from psychological stress, cocaine and natural reward. Thus, ER stress genes may be targets for novel therapeutic targets for depression and addiction. PMID:23644055

  18. Reduction in brain immunoreactive corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, K.; Hattori, T.; Murakami, K.; Suemaru, S.; Kawada, Y.; Kageyama, J.; Ota, Z.

    1985-02-18

    The brain CRF concentration of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and normotensive Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY) was examined by rat CRF radioimmunoassay. Anti-CRF serum was developed by immunizing rabbits with synthetic rat CRF. Synthetic rat CRF was also used as tracer and standard. The displacement of /sup 125/I-rat CRF by serially diluted extracts of male Wistar rats hypothalamus, thalamus, midbrain, pons, medulla oblongata, cerebral cortex, cerebellum and neurointermediate lobe was parallel to the displacement of synthetic rat CRF. In both WKY and SHR the highest levels of CRF immunoreactivity were shown by the hypothalamus and neurointermediate lobe, and considerable CRF immunoreactivity was also detected in other brain regions. The CRF immunoreactivity in the hypothalamus, neurointermediate lobe, midbrain, medulla oblongata and cerebral cortex was significantly reduced in SHR and it may suggest that CRF abnormality may be implicated in the reported abnormalities in the pituitary-adrenal axis, autonomic response and behavior of SHR.

  19. Systems biomarkers as acute diagnostics and chronic monitoring tools for traumatic brain injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kevin K. W.; Moghieb, Ahmed; Yang, Zhihui; Zhang, Zhiqun

    2013-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant biomedical problem among military personnel and civilians. There exists an urgent need to develop and refine biological measures of acute brain injury and chronic recovery after brain injury. Such measures "biomarkers" can assist clinicians in helping to define and refine the recovery process and developing treatment paradigms for the acutely injured to reduce secondary injury processes. Recent biomarker studies in the acute phase of TBI have highlighted the importance and feasibilities of identifying clinically useful biomarkers. However, much less is known about the subacute and chronic phases of TBI. We propose here that for a complex biological problem such as TBI, multiple biomarker types might be needed to harness the wide range of pathological and systemic perturbations following injuries, including acute neuronal death, neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration and neuroregeneration to systemic responses. In terms of biomarker types, they range from brain-specific proteins, microRNA, genetic polymorphism, inflammatory cytokines and autoimmune markers and neuro-endocrine hormones. Furthermore, systems biology-driven biomarkers integration can help present a holistic approach to understanding scenarios and complexity pathways involved in brain injury.

  20. Voltammetric detection of 5-hydroxytryptamine release in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Parastoo; Dankoski, Elyse C; Petrovic, Jelena; Keithley, Richard B; Wightman, R M

    2009-11-15

    5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) is an important molecule in the brain that is implicated in mood and emotional processes. In vivo, its dynamic release and uptake kinetics are poorly understood due to a lack of analytical techniques for its rapid measurement. Whereas fast-scan cyclic voltammetry with carbon fiber microelectrodes is used frequently to monitor subsecond dopamine release in freely moving and anesthetized rats, the electrooxidation of 5-HT forms products that quickly polymerize and irreversibly coat the carbon electrode surface. Previously described modifications of the electrochemical waveform allow stable and sensitive 5-HT measurements in mammalian tissue slice preparations and in the brain of fruit fly larvae. For in vivo applications in mammals, however, the problem of electrode deterioration persists. We identify the root of this problem to be fouling by extracellular metabolites such as 5-hydoxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA), which is present in 200-1000 times the concentration of 5-HT and displays similar electrochemical properties, including filming of the electrode surface. To impede access of the 5-HIAA to the electrode surface, a thin layer of Nafion, a cation exchange polymer, has been electrodeposited onto cylindrical carbon-fiber microelectrodes. The presence of the Nafion film was confirmed with environmental scanning electron microscopy and was demonstrated by the diminution of the voltammetric signals for 5-HIAA as well as other common anionic species. The modified microelectrodes also display increased sensitivity to 5-HT, yielding a characteristic cyclic voltammogram that is easily distinguishable from other common electroactive brain species. The thickness of the Nafion coating and a diffusion coefficient (D) in the film for 5-HT were evaluated by measuring permeation through Nafion. In vivo, we used physiological, anatomical, and pharmacological evidence to validate the signal as 5-HT. Using Nafion-modified microelectrodes, we present the

  1. A targeted multiplexed proteomic investigation identifies ketamine-induced changes in immune markers in rat serum and expression changes in protein kinases/phosphatases in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Wesseling, Hendrik; Rahmoune, Hassan; Tricklebank, Mark; Guest, Paul C; Bahn, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    There is substantial interest in the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist ketamine in psychiatric research because it exerts acute psychotomimetic and rapid antidepressant effects in rodents and humans. Here, we investigated proteomic changes in brain and serum after acute treatment of rats with ketamine using two targeted proteomic profiling methods. Multiplex immunoassay profiling of serum identified altered levels of interleukin 4, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and fibroblast growth factor 9, suggesting a link between ketamine exposure and peripheral inflammation and growth factor dysregulation. Selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry profiling of rat brain tissue found that proteomic changes occurred in the frontal cortex and to a greater extent in the hippocampus. This involved changes in signaling kinases and proteases such as protein kinase C beta, neurochondrin (NCDN), calcineurin, extracellular signal-regulated kinsase 1 (ERK1), and mammalian target of rapamycin (MTOR). Furthermore, altered levels were found for proteins associated with neurotransmitter metabolism (mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase, catechol O-methyl transferase, synaptic vesicle endo-/exocytosis (vesicle fusing ATPase (NSF), synapsin 1 (SYN1), syndapin-1 (PACN1)). Consistent with previous global proteomic studies, we confirmed known changes in mitochondrial complex I, prohibitin (PHB) and neurofilament proteins (neurofilament light chain and α-internexin (AINX)). Taken together, the proteomic changes parallel those described in human psychiatric pathology. The results will help to elucidate ketamine's mechanism of action, which will facilitate development of novel drugs for the treatment of schizophrenia and major depressive disorder. PMID:25363195

  2. Does acute caffeine ingestion alter brain metabolism in young adults?

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng; Liu, Peiying; Pekar, James J; Lu, Hanzhang

    2015-04-15

    Caffeine, as the most commonly used stimulant drug, improves vigilance and, in some cases, cognition. However, the exact effect of caffeine on brain activity has not been fully elucidated. Because caffeine has a pronounced vascular effect which is independent of any neural effects, many hemodynamics-based methods such as fMRI cannot be readily applied without a proper calibration. The scope of the present work is two-fold. In Study 1, we used a recently developed MRI technique to examine the time-dependent changes in whole-brain cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) following the ingestion of 200mg caffeine. It was found that, despite a pronounced decrease in CBF (p<0.001), global CMRO2 did not change significantly. Instead, the oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) was significantly elevated (p=0.002) to fully compensate for the reduced blood supply. Using the whole-brain finding as a reference, we aim to investigate whether there are any regional differences in the brain's response to caffeine. Therefore, in Study 2, we examined regional heterogeneities in CBF changes following the same amount of caffeine ingestion. We found that posterior brain regions such as posterior cingulate cortex and superior temporal regions manifested a slower CBF reduction, whereas anterior brain regions including dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and medial frontal cortex showed a faster rate of decline. These findings have a few possible explanations. One is that caffeine may result in a region-dependent increase or decrease in brain activity, resulting in an unaltered average brain metabolic rate. The other is that caffeine's effect on vasculature may be region-specific. Plausibility of these explanations is discussed in the context of spatial distribution of the adenosine receptors.

  3. Does acute caffeine ingestion alter brain metabolism in young adults?

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng; Liu, Peiying; Pekar, James J; Lu, Hanzhang

    2015-04-15

    Caffeine, as the most commonly used stimulant drug, improves vigilance and, in some cases, cognition. However, the exact effect of caffeine on brain activity has not been fully elucidated. Because caffeine has a pronounced vascular effect which is independent of any neural effects, many hemodynamics-based methods such as fMRI cannot be readily applied without a proper calibration. The scope of the present work is two-fold. In Study 1, we used a recently developed MRI technique to examine the time-dependent changes in whole-brain cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) following the ingestion of 200mg caffeine. It was found that, despite a pronounced decrease in CBF (p<0.001), global CMRO2 did not change significantly. Instead, the oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) was significantly elevated (p=0.002) to fully compensate for the reduced blood supply. Using the whole-brain finding as a reference, we aim to investigate whether there are any regional differences in the brain's response to caffeine. Therefore, in Study 2, we examined regional heterogeneities in CBF changes following the same amount of caffeine ingestion. We found that posterior brain regions such as posterior cingulate cortex and superior temporal regions manifested a slower CBF reduction, whereas anterior brain regions including dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and medial frontal cortex showed a faster rate of decline. These findings have a few possible explanations. One is that caffeine may result in a region-dependent increase or decrease in brain activity, resulting in an unaltered average brain metabolic rate. The other is that caffeine's effect on vasculature may be region-specific. Plausibility of these explanations is discussed in the context of spatial distribution of the adenosine receptors. PMID:25644657

  4. Inhibition of Neutrophil Exocytosis Ameliorates Acute Lung Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Uriarte, Silvia M.; Rane, Madhavi J.; Merchant, Michael L.; Jin, Shunying; Lentsch, Alex B.; Ward, Richard A.; McLeish, Kenneth R.

    2013-01-01

    Exocytosis of neutrophil granules contributes to acute lung injury (ALI) induced by infection or inflammation, suggesting that inhibition of neutrophil exocytosis in vivo could be a viable therapeutic strategy. This study was conducted to determine the effect of a cell-permeable fusion protein that inhibits neutrophil exocytosis (TAT-SNAP-23) on ALI using an immune complex deposition model in rats. The effect of inhibition of neutrophil exocytosis by intravenous administration of TAT-SNAP-23 on ALI was assessed by albumin leakage, neutrophil infiltration, lung histology, and proteomic analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALf). Administration of TAT-SNAP-23, but not TAT-Control, significantly reduced albumin leakage, total protein levels in the BALf, and intra-alveolar edema and hemorrhage. Evidence that TAT-SNAP-23 inhibits neutrophil exocytosis included a reduction in plasma membrane CD18 expression by BALf neutrophils and a decrease in neutrophil granule proteins in BALf. Similar degree of neutrophil accumulation in the lungs and/or BALf suggests that TAT-SNAP-23 did not alter vascular endothelial cell function. Proteomic analysis of BALf revealed that components of the complement and coagulation pathways were significantly reduced in BALf from TAT-SNAP-23-treated animals. Our results indicate that administration of a TAT-fusion protein that inhibits neutrophil exocytosis reduces in vivo ALI. Targeting neutrophil exocytosis is a potential therapeutic strategy to ameliorate ALI. PMID:23364427

  5. Changes in electrocortical arousal following acute trimethylbenzene administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Tomas, T; Lutz, P; Wiaderna, D

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare the neurotoxic potential of trimethylbenzene (TMB) isomers (the solvents) with that of benzene derivatives with a smaller number of methyl groups (toluene). The experiments were performed on WAG/Rij rats with EEG recording electrodes implanted in the fronto-parietal cortex. The solvents, toluene or TMB isomers: 1,3,5-TMB (mesitylene), 1,2,3-TMB (hemimellitene) or 1,2,4-TMB (pseudocumene), were diluted with olive oil and administered intragastrically via gavage at an acute dose of 0.002, 0.008, or 0.032 mol/kg. The electrocortical activity was recorded for 20 min before, and for 60 min after the solvent administration. The electrocorticograms were analysed with respect to the number and duration of the high-voltage spindles (HVS), a form of activity sensitive to the arousal level. In case of each solvent the observed effect--inhibition of the HVS activity--was dose-related. However, the effect produced by TMB isomers was in each case less pronounced than that of toluene. Among TMBs, pseudocumene displayed the least significant effect, and the efficacy of two other TMB isomers was similar. PMID:10846847

  6. Arctigenin attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xianbao; Sun, Hongzhi; Zhou, Dun; Xi, Huanjiu; Shan, Lina

    2015-04-01

    Arctigenin (ATG) has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties. However, the effects of ATG on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) remains not well understood. In the present study, our investigation was designed to reveal the effect of ATG on LPS-induced ALI in rats. We found that ATG pretreatment attenuated the LPS-induced ALI, as evidenced by the reduced histological scores, myeloperoxidase activity, and wet-to-dry weight ratio in the lung tissues. This was accompanied by the decreased levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interleukin-1 (IL-6) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Furthermore, ATG downregulated the expression of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65, promoted the phosphorylation of inhibitor of nuclear factor-κB-α (IκBα) and activated the adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPKα) in the lung tissues. Our results suggested that ATG attenuates the LPS-induced ALI via activation of AMPK and suppression of NF-κB signaling pathway.

  7. Arctigenin attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xianbao; Sun, Hongzhi; Zhou, Dun; Xi, Huanjiu; Shan, Lina

    2015-04-01

    Arctigenin (ATG) has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties. However, the effects of ATG on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) remains not well understood. In the present study, our investigation was designed to reveal the effect of ATG on LPS-induced ALI in rats. We found that ATG pretreatment attenuated the LPS-induced ALI, as evidenced by the reduced histological scores, myeloperoxidase activity, and wet-to-dry weight ratio in the lung tissues. This was accompanied by the decreased levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interleukin-1 (IL-6) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Furthermore, ATG downregulated the expression of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65, promoted the phosphorylation of inhibitor of nuclear factor-κB-α (IκBα) and activated the adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPKα) in the lung tissues. Our results suggested that ATG attenuates the LPS-induced ALI via activation of AMPK and suppression of NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:25008149

  8. Cognitive dysfunction and histological findings in adult rats one year after whole brain irradiation.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, K; Tanaka, R; Sato, M; Takeda, N

    2001-12-01

    Cognitive dysfunction and histological changes in the brain were investigated following irradiation in 20 Fischer 344 rats aged 6 months treated with whole brain irradiation (WBR) (25 Gy/single dose), and compared with the same number of sham-irradiated rats as controls. Performance of the Morris water maze task and the passive avoidance task were examined one year after WBR. Finally, histological and immunohistochemical examinations using antibodies to myelin basic protein (MBP), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and neurofilament (NF) were performed of the rat brains. The irradiated rats continued to gain weight 7 months after WBR whereas the control rats stopped gaining weight. Cognitive functions in both the water maze task and the passive avoidance task were lower in the irradiated rats than in the control rats. Brain damage consisting of demyelination only or with necrosis was found mainly in the body of the corpus callosum and the parietal white matter near the corpus callosum in the irradiated rats. Immunohistochemical examination of the brains without necrosis found MBP-positive fibers were markedly decreased in the affected areas by irradiation; NF-positive fibers were moderately decreased and irregularly dispersed in various shapes in the affected areas; and GFAP-positive fibers were increased, with gliosis in those areas. These findings are similar to those in clinically accelerated brain aging in conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, Binswanger's disease, and multiple sclerosis.

  9. Acute functional reactivation of the language network during awake intraoperative brain mapping.

    PubMed

    Spena, Giannantonio; Costi, Emanuele; Panciani, Pier Paolo; Roca, Elena; Migliorati, Karol; Fontanella, Marco Maria

    2015-01-01

    Acute brain plasticity during resection of central lesions has been recently described. In the cases reported, perilesional latent networks, useful to preserve the neurological functions, were detected in asymptomatic patients. In this paper, we presented a case of acute functional reactivation (AFR) of the language network in a symptomatic patient. Tumor resection allowed to acutely restore the neurological deficit. Intraoperative direct cortical stimulation (DCS) and functional neuroimaging showed new epicentres of activation of the language network after tumor excision. DCS in awake surgery is mandatory to reveal AFR needful to improve the extent of resection preserving the quality of life.

  10. [Clinical-diagnostic features of the acute period of brain concussion in military personnel].

    PubMed

    Tkachov, A V

    2008-01-01

    The comparative analysis of a complex examination of 78 patients aged 16-45 years in acute period of closed craniocereberal trauma (CCRCT) has been carried out. Physical examination was done on the first 10th and 30th day of the treatment. The author used specially developed multiple-aspect scales and questionnaires for objectification of patient complaints, magnetic resonance tomography, brain electroencephalography. A complex clinical and neuropsychological examination revealed that all cases of brain concussion were accompanied by various signs of asthenic disorders and in 81% of cases--by cognitive disorders. Patients in the acute period of brain concussion had significantly low indicators of cerebral neurodynamics in comparison with healthy individuals. It was shown by increase in signs of irritation, changes of bioelectric activity of the brain that was expressed by considerable blurriness of regional disjunctions and fading of an alpha rhythm. Specific changes of brain tissue in acute period of brain concussion were not registered when CT or MRT were used.

  11. Brain stem serotonin protects blood pressure in neonatal rats exposed to episodic anoxia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hsiao T; Cummings, Kevin J

    2013-12-01

    In neonatal rodents, a loss of brain stem serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] in utero or at birth compromises anoxia-induced gasping and the recovery of heart rate (HR) and breathing with reoxygenation (i.e., autoresuscitation). How mean arterial pressure (MAP) is influenced after an acute loss of brain stem 5-HT content is unknown. We hypothesized that a loss of 5-HT for ∼1 day would compromise MAP during episodic anoxia. We injected 6-fluorotryptophan (20 mg/kg ip) into rat pups (postnatal days 9-10 or 11-13, n = 22 treated, 24 control), causing a ∼70% loss of brain stem 5-HT. Pups were exposed to a maximum of 15 anoxic episodes, separated by 5 min of room air to allow autoresuscitation. In younger pups, we measured breathing frequency and tidal volume using "head-out" plethysmography and HR from the electrocardiogram. In older pups, we used whole body plethysmography to detect gasping, while monitoring MAP. Gasp latency and the time required for respiratory, HR, and MAP recovery following each episode were determined. Despite normal gasp latency, breathing frequency and a larger tidal volume (P < 0.001), 5-HT-deficient pups survived one-half the number of episodes as controls (P < 0.001). The anoxia-induced decrease in MAP experienced by 5-HT-deficient pups was double that of controls (P = 0.017), despite the same drop in HR (P = 0.48). MAP recovery was delayed ∼10 s by 5-HT deficiency (P = 0.001). Our data suggest a loss of brain stem 5-HT leads to a pronounced, premature loss of MAP in response to episodic anoxia. These data may help explain why some sudden infant death syndrome cases die from what appears to be cardiovascular collapse during apparent severe hypoxia. PMID:24136109

  12. Effect of Bacopa monniera on stress induced changes in plasma corticosterone and brain monoamines in rats.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Naila; Ahmad, Ausaf; Siripurapu, Kiran Babu; Kuchibhotla, Vijaya Kumar; Singh, Satyawan; Palit, Gautam

    2007-05-22

    Bacopa monniera (BM) is well known for its neuropharmacological effects. Our previous studies indicated the adaptogenic effect of standardized extract of BM in various stress models. In the present study, effect of BM was evaluated on acute stress (AS) and chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) induced changes in plasma corticosterone and monoamines-noradrenaline (NA), dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) in cortex and hippocampus regions of brain in rats. Panax root powder (Panax quinquefolium) was taken as standard. Subjecting animals to AS (immobilization for 150 min once only) and CUS (different stressors for 7 days) resulted in significant elevation in plasma corticosterone levels, which was significantly countered by treatment with BM at a dose of 40 and 80 mg/kg p.o. similar to the effects of Panax quinquefolium (PQ) at 100 mg/kg p.o. AS exposure significantly increased the levels of 5-HT and decreased NA content in both the brain regions while DA content was significantly increased in cortex and decreased in hippocampus regions. In CUS regimen, levels of NA, DA and 5-HT were significantly depleted in cortex and hippocampus regions of brain. Treatment with BM (40 and 80 mg/kg) attenuated the stress induced changes in levels of 5-HT and DA in cortex and hippocampus regions but was ineffective in normalizing the NA levels in AS model, whereas PQ treatment significantly reverted back the effects of stress. In CUS model, pretreatment with BM and PQ significantly elevated the levels of NA, DA and 5-HT levels in cortex and levels of NA and 5-HT in hippocampus regions. Hence, our study indicates that the adaptogenic activity of BM might be due to the normalization of stress induced alteration in plasma corticosterone and levels of monoamines like NA, 5-HT and DA in cortex and hippocampus regions of the brain, which are more vulnerable to stressful conditions analogous to the effects of PQ.

  13. Sex Differences in Serotonin 1 Receptor Binding in Rat Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischette, Christine T.; Biegon, Anat; McEwen, Bruce S.

    1983-10-01

    Male and female rats exhibit sex differences in binding by serotonin 1 receptors in discrete areas of the brain, some of which have been implicated in the control of ovulation and of gonadotropin release. The sex-specific changes in binding, which occur in response to the same hormonal (estrogenic) stimulus, are due to changes in the number of binding sites. Castration alone also affects the number of binding sites in certain areas. The results lead to the conclusion that peripheral hormones modulate binding by serotonin 1 receptors. The status of the serotonin receptor system may affect the reproductive capacity of an organism and may be related to sex-linked emotional disturbances in humans.

  14. Estimating The Sodium Ion Diffusion Coefficient in Rat Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, James A.; Bretthorst, G. Larry; Kroenke, Christopher D.; Ackerman, Joseph J. H.; Neil, Jeffrey J.

    2004-04-01

    Quantifying sodium ion diffusion in the extra- and intracellular compartments will provide mechanistic insight into the as yet unexplained marked decrease in water diffusion resulting from central nervous system injury. As a first step, the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of bulk brain Na+ has been determined in vivo in rat. A surface coil transmit/receive adiabatic-pulse scheme is used to provide two dimensions of volume localization, thus minimizing echo time. The third dimension is determined by slice selection gradients on the axis perpendicular to the coil plane. Signal decay in the presence of diffusion sensitizing pulsed field gradients was modeled by Bayesian Probability Theory. Preliminary findings indicate a bulk Na+ ADC of (1.16 ± .07) × 10-3 mm2/s.

  15. Label-free dopamine imaging in live rat brain slices.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Bidyut; Banerjee, Arkarup; Das, Anand Kant; Nag, Suman; Kaushalya, Sanjeev Kumar; Tripathy, Umakanta; Shameem, Mohammad; Shukla, Shubha; Maiti, Sudipta

    2014-05-21

    Dopaminergic neurotransmission has been investigated extensively, yet direct optical probing of dopamine has not been possible in live cells. Here we image intracellular dopamine with sub-micrometer three-dimensional resolution by harnessing its intrinsic mid-ultraviolet (UV) autofluorescence. Two-photon excitation with visible light (540 nm) in conjunction with a non-epifluorescent detection scheme is used to circumvent the UV toxicity and the UV transmission problems. The method is established by imaging dopamine in a dopaminergic cell line and in control cells (glia), and is validated by mass spectrometry. We further show that individual dopamine vesicles/vesicular clusters can be imaged in cultured rat brain slices, thereby providing a direct visualization of the intracellular events preceding dopamine release induced by depolarization or amphetamine exposure. Our technique opens up a previously inaccessible mid-ultraviolet spectral regime (excitation ~270 nm, emission < 320 nm) for label-free imaging of native molecules in live tissue.

  16. Label-Free Dopamine Imaging in Live Rat Brain Slices

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Dopaminergic neurotransmission has been investigated extensively, yet direct optical probing of dopamine has not been possible in live cells. Here we image intracellular dopamine with sub-micrometer three-dimensional resolution by harnessing its intrinsic mid-ultraviolet (UV) autofluorescence. Two-photon excitation with visible light (540 nm) in conjunction with a non-epifluorescent detection scheme is used to circumvent the UV toxicity and the UV transmission problems. The method is established by imaging dopamine in a dopaminergic cell line and in control cells (glia), and is validated by mass spectrometry. We further show that individual dopamine vesicles/vesicular clusters can be imaged in cultured rat brain slices, thereby providing a direct visualization of the intracellular events preceding dopamine release induced by depolarization or amphetamine exposure. Our technique opens up a previously inaccessible mid-ultraviolet spectral regime (excitation ∼ 270 nm, emission < 320 nm) for label-free imaging of native molecules in live tissue. PMID:24661118

  17. Cholecystokinin octapeptide-like immunoreactivity: histochemical localization in rat brain.

    PubMed Central

    Innis, R B; Corrêa, F M; Uhl, G R; Schneider, B; Snyder, S H

    1979-01-01

    Cholecystokinin octapeptide-like (CCK-OP-like) immunoreactivity was localized in the rat brain by using the indirect immunofluorescence method. Specificity in immunohistochemical studies was demonstrated by the virtual elimination of staining with either preimmune sera or sera preadsorbed with CCK-OP and by the achievement of similar fluorescent patterns with two different primary anti-CCK-OP sera. CCK-OP-like fluorescence was localized in neuronal cell bodies, fibers, and varicose terminals. The most dense collections of CCK-OP cells occurred in the periaqueductal gray and in the dorsomedial hypothalamus. Substantial numbers of cells and fibers also were present in the medial/dorsal and perirhinal cortex; more limited groups of cells were found in the pyramidal layer of the hippocampus and in the dorsal raphe. Images PMID:284371

  18. Does acute caffeine ingestion alter brain metabolism in young adults?

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feng; Liu, Peiying; Pekar, James J.; Lu, Hanzhang

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine, as the most commonly used stimulant drug, improves vigilance and, in some cases, cognition. However, the exact effect of caffeine on brain activity has not been fully elucidated. Because caffeine has a pronounced vascular effect which is independent of any neural effects, many hemodynamics-based methods such as fMRI cannot be readily applied without a proper calibration. The scope of the present work is two-fold. In Study 1, we used a recently developed MRI technique to examine the time-dependent changes in whole-brain cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) following the ingestion of 200mg caffeine. It was found that, despite a pronounced decrease in CBF (p<0.001), global CMRO2 did not change significantly. Instead, the oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) was significantly elevated (p=0.002) to fully compensate for the reduced blood supply. Using the whole-brain finding as a reference, we aim to investigate whether there are any regional differences in the brain’s response to caffeine. Therefore, in Study 2, we examined regional heterogeneities in CBF changes following the same amount of caffeine ingestion. We found that posterior brain regions such as posterior cingulate cortex and superior temporal regions manifested a slower CBF reduction, whereas anterior brain regions including dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and medial frontal cortex showed a faster rate of decline. These findings have a few possible explanations. One is that caffeine may result in a region-dependent increase or decrease in brain activity, resulting in an unaltered average brain metabolic rate. The other is that caffeine’s effect on vasculature may be region-specific. Plausibility of these explanations is discussed in the context of spatial distribution of the adenosine receptors. PMID:25644657

  19. Neutrotoxic effects of fructose administration in rat brain: implications for fructosemia.

    PubMed

    Macongonde, Ernesto A; Costa, Naithan L F; Ferreira, Bruna K; Biella, Mairis S; Frederico, Marisa J S; Oliveira, Marcos R de; Ávila Júnior, Silvio; Silva, Fátima R M B; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Streck, Emilio L; Schuck, Patrícia F

    2015-08-01

    Fructose accumulates in tissue and body fluids of patients affected by hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI), a disorder caused by the deficiency of aldolase B. We investigated the effect of acute fructose administration on the biochemical profile and on the activities of the Krebs cycle enzymes in the cerebral cortex of young rats. Rats received a subcutaneous injection of NaCl (0.9 %; control group) or fructose solution (5 μmol/g; treated group). Twelve or 24 h after the administration, the animals were euthanized and the cerebral cortices were isolated. Peripheral blood (to obtain the serum) and cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) from the animals were also collected. It was observed that albumin levels were decreased and cholesterol levels were increased in CSF of animals 12 h after the administration of fructose. In addition, serum lactate levels were increased 12 h after the administration, as compared to control group. Furthermore, malate dehydrogenase activity was increased in cerebral cortex from treated group 24 h after the administration of this carbohydrate. Herein we demonstrate that fructose administration alters biochemical parameters in CSF and serum and bioenergetics parameters in the cerebral cortex. These findings indicate a possible role of fructose on brain alterations found in HFI patients. PMID:26312423

  20. Neutrotoxic effects of fructose administration in rat brain: implications for fructosemia.

    PubMed

    Macongonde, Ernesto A; Costa, Naithan L F; Ferreira, Bruna K; Biella, Mairis S; Frederico, Marisa J S; Oliveira, Marcos R de; Ávila Júnior, Silvio; Silva, Fátima R M B; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Streck, Emilio L; Schuck, Patrícia F

    2015-08-01

    Fructose accumulates in tissue and body fluids of patients affected by hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI), a disorder caused by the deficiency of aldolase B. We investigated the effect of acute fructose administration on the biochemical profile and on the activities of the Krebs cycle enzymes in the cerebral cortex of young rats. Rats received a subcutaneous injection of NaCl (0.9 %; control group) or fructose solution (5 μmol/g; treated group). Twelve or 24 h after the administration, the animals were euthanized and the cerebral cortices were isolated. Peripheral blood (to obtain the serum) and cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) from the animals were also collected. It was observed that albumin levels were decreased and cholesterol levels were increased in CSF of animals 12 h after the administration of fructose. In addition, serum lactate levels were increased 12 h after the administration, as compared to control group. Furthermore, malate dehydrogenase activity was increased in cerebral cortex from treated group 24 h after the administration of this carbohydrate. Herein we demonstrate that fructose administration alters biochemical parameters in CSF and serum and bioenergetics parameters in the cerebral cortex. These findings indicate a possible role of fructose on brain alterations found in HFI patients.

  1. Methylglyoxal can mediate behavioral and neurochemical alterations in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Fernanda; Pandolfo, Pablo; Galland, Fabiana; Torres, Felipe Vasconcelos; Dutra, Márcio Ferreira; Batassini, Cristiane; Guerra, Maria Cristina; Leite, Marina Concli; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto

    2016-10-01

    Diabetes is associated with loss of cognitive function and increased risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are elevated in diabetes and AD and have been suggested to act as mediators of the cognitive decline observed in these pathologies. Methylglyoxal (MG) is an extremely reactive carbonyl compound that propagates glycation reactions and is, therefore, able to generate AGEs. Herein, we evaluated persistent behavioral and biochemical parameters to explore the hypothesis that elevated exogenous MG concentrations, induced by intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion, lead to cognitive decline in Wistar rats. A high and sustained administration of MG (3μmol/μL; subdivided into 6days) was found to decrease the recognition index of rats, as evaluated by the object-recognition test. However, MG was unable to impair learning-memory processes, as shown by the habituation in the open field (OF) and Y-maze tasks. Moreover, a single high dose of MG induced persistent alterations in anxiety-related behavior, diminishing the anxiety-like parameters evaluated in the OF test. Importantly, MG did not alter locomotion behavior in the different tasks performed. Our biochemical findings support the hypothesis that MG induces persistent alterations in the hippocampus, but not in the cortex, related to glyoxalase 1 activity, AGEs content and glutamate uptake. Glial fibrillary acidic protein and S100B content, as well as S100B secretion (astroglial-related parameters of brain injury), were not altered by ICV MG administration. Taken together, our data suggest that MG interferes directly in brain function and that the time and the levels of exogenous MG determine the different features that can be seen in diabetic patients.

  2. Methylglyoxal can mediate behavioral and neurochemical alterations in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Fernanda; Pandolfo, Pablo; Galland, Fabiana; Torres, Felipe Vasconcelos; Dutra, Márcio Ferreira; Batassini, Cristiane; Guerra, Maria Cristina; Leite, Marina Concli; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto

    2016-10-01

    Diabetes is associated with loss of cognitive function and increased risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are elevated in diabetes and AD and have been suggested to act as mediators of the cognitive decline observed in these pathologies. Methylglyoxal (MG) is an extremely reactive carbonyl compound that propagates glycation reactions and is, therefore, able to generate AGEs. Herein, we evaluated persistent behavioral and biochemical parameters to explore the hypothesis that elevated exogenous MG concentrations, induced by intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion, lead to cognitive decline in Wistar rats. A high and sustained administration of MG (3μmol/μL; subdivided into 6days) was found to decrease the recognition index of rats, as evaluated by the object-recognition test. However, MG was unable to impair learning-memory processes, as shown by the habituation in the open field (OF) and Y-maze tasks. Moreover, a single high dose of MG induced persistent alterations in anxiety-related behavior, diminishing the anxiety-like parameters evaluated in the OF test. Importantly, MG did not alter locomotion behavior in the different tasks performed. Our biochemical findings support the hypothesis that MG induces persistent alterations in the hippocampus, but not in the cortex, related to glyoxalase 1 activity, AGEs content and glutamate uptake. Glial fibrillary acidic protein and S100B content, as well as S100B secretion (astroglial-related parameters of brain injury), were not altered by ICV MG administration. Taken together, our data suggest that MG interferes directly in brain function and that the time and the levels of exogenous MG determine the different features that can be seen in diabetic patients. PMID:27235733

  3. Cognitive deficits and brain myo-Inositol are early biomarkers of epileptogenesis in a rat model of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Pascente, Rosaria; Frigerio, Federica; Rizzi, Massimo; Porcu, Luca; Boido, Marina; Davids, Joe; Zaben, Malik; Tolomeo, Daniele; Filibian, Marta; Gray, William P; Vezzani, Annamaria; Ravizza, Teresa

    2016-09-01

    One major unmet clinical need in epilepsy is the identification of therapies to prevent or arrest epilepsy development in patients exposed to a potential epileptogenic insult. The development of such treatments has been hampered by the lack of non-invasive biomarkers that could be used to identify the patients at-risk, thereby allowing to design affordable clinical studies. Our goal was to test the predictive value of cognitive deficits and brain astrocyte activation for the development of epilepsy following a potential epileptogenic injury. We used a model of epilepsy induced by pilocarpine-evoked status epilepticus (SE) in 21-day old rats where 60-70% of animals develop spontaneous seizures after around 70days, although SE is similar in all rats. Learning was evaluated in the Morris water-maze at days 15 and 65 post-SE, each time followed by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy for measuring hippocampal myo-Inositol levels, a marker of astrocyte activation. Rats were video-EEG monitored for two weeks at seven months post-SE to detect spontaneous seizures, then brain histology was done. Behavioral and imaging data were retrospectively analysed in epileptic rats and compared with non-epileptic and control animals. Rats displayed spatial learning deficits within three weeks from SE. However, only epilepsy-prone rats showed accelerated forgetting and reduced learning rate compared to both rats not developing epilepsy and controls. These deficits were associated with reduced hippocampal neurogenesis. myo-Inositol levels increased transiently in the hippocampus of SE-rats not developing epilepsy while this increase persisted until spontaneous seizures onset in epilepsy-prone rats, being associated with a local increase in S100β-positive astrocytes. Neuronal cell loss was similar in all SE-rats. Our data show that behavioral deficits, together with a non-invasive marker of astrocyte activation, predict which rats develop epilepsy after an acute injury. These measures

  4. Cognitive deficits and brain myo-Inositol are early biomarkers of epileptogenesis in a rat model of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Pascente, Rosaria; Frigerio, Federica; Rizzi, Massimo; Porcu, Luca; Boido, Marina; Davids, Joe; Zaben, Malik; Tolomeo, Daniele; Filibian, Marta; Gray, William P; Vezzani, Annamaria; Ravizza, Teresa

    2016-09-01

    One major unmet clinical need in epilepsy is the identification of therapies to prevent or arrest epilepsy development in patients exposed to a potential epileptogenic insult. The development of such treatments has been hampered by the lack of non-invasive biomarkers that could be used to identify the patients at-risk, thereby allowing to design affordable clinical studies. Our goal was to test the predictive value of cognitive deficits and brain astrocyte activation for the development of epilepsy following a potential epileptogenic injury. We used a model of epilepsy induced by pilocarpine-evoked status epilepticus (SE) in 21-day old rats where 60-70% of animals develop spontaneous seizures after around 70days, although SE is similar in all rats. Learning was evaluated in the Morris water-maze at days 15 and 65 post-SE, each time followed by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy for measuring hippocampal myo-Inositol levels, a marker of astrocyte activation. Rats were video-EEG monitored for two weeks at seven months post-SE to detect spontaneous seizures, then brain histology was done. Behavioral and imaging data were retrospectively analysed in epileptic rats and compared with non-epileptic and control animals. Rats displayed spatial learning deficits within three weeks from SE. However, only epilepsy-prone rats showed accelerated forgetting and reduced learning rate compared to both rats not developing epilepsy and controls. These deficits were associated with reduced hippocampal neurogenesis. myo-Inositol levels increased transiently in the hippocampus of SE-rats not developing epilepsy while this increase persisted until spontaneous seizures onset in epilepsy-prone rats, being associated with a local increase in S100β-positive astrocytes. Neuronal cell loss was similar in all SE-rats. Our data show that behavioral deficits, together with a non-invasive marker of astrocyte activation, predict which rats develop epilepsy after an acute injury. These measures

  5. Multiple parallel memory systems in the brain of the rat.

    PubMed

    White, Norman M; McDonald, Robert J

    2002-03-01

    A theory of multiple parallel memory systems in the brain of the rat is described. Each system consists of a series of interconnected neural structures. The "central structures" of the three systems described are the hippocampus, the matrix compartment of the dorsal striatum (caudate-putamen), and the amygdala. Information, coded as neural signals, flows independently through each system. All systems have access to the same information from situations in which learning occurs, but each system is specialized to represent a different kind of relationship among the elements (stimulus events, responses, reinforcers) of the information that flows through it. The speed and accuracy with which a system forms a coherent representation of a learning situation depend on the correspondence between the specialization of the system and the relationship among the elements of the situation. The coherence of these stored representations determines the degree of control exerted by each system on behavior in the situation. Although they process information independently the systems interact in at least two ways: by simultaneous parallel influence on behavioral output and by directly influencing each other. These interactions can be cooperative (leading to similar behaviors) or competitive (leading to different behaviors). Experimental findings consistent with these ideas, mostly from experiments with rats, are reviewed.

  6. Ethylene glycol ethers induce oxidative stress in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Pomierny, Bartosz; Krzyżanowska, Weronika; Smaga, Irena; Pomierny-Chamioło, Lucyna; Stankowicz, Piotr; Budziszewska, Bogusława

    2014-11-01

    Ethylene glycol ethers (EGEs) are components of many industrial and household products. Their hemolytic and gonadotoxic effects are relatively well known while their potential adverse effects on the central nervous system have not yet been clearly demonstrated. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of 4-week administration of 2-buthoxyethanol (BE), 2-phenoxyethanol (PHE) and 2-ethoxyethanol (EE) on the total antioxidant capacity, activity of some antioxidant enzymes, such as the superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and glutathione reductase and lipid peroxidation in the frontal cortex and hippocampus in the rat. These studies showed that BE and PHE decreased the total antioxidant activity, SOD and GPX activity, while increased lipid peroxidation in the frontal cortex. Like in the frontal cortex, also in the hippocampus BE and PHE attenuated the total antioxidant activity, however, lipid peroxidation was increased only in animals which received BE while reduction in GPX activity was present in rats administered PHE. The obtained data indicated that 4-week administration of BE and PHE, but not EE, reduced the total antioxidant activity and enhanced lipid peroxidation in the brain. In the frontal cortex, adverse effects of PHE and BE on lipid peroxidation probably depended on reduction in SOD and GPX activity, however, in the hippocampus the changes in the total antioxidant activity and lipid peroxidation were not connected with reduction of the investigated antioxidant enzyme activity.

  7. Biosynthesis and secretion of alpha 1 acute-phase globulin in primary cultures of rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Bauer, J; Kurdowska, A; Tran-Thi, T A; Budek, W; Koj, A; Decker, K; Heinrich, P C

    1985-01-15

    Experimental inflammation in rats led to a sevenfold increase in serum levels of alpha 1 acute-phase globulin. This increase is correlated with elevated levels of translatable mRNA for alpha 1 acute-phase globulin in the liver. Biosynthesis and secretion of alpha 1 acute-phase globulin were studied in rat hepatocyte primary cultures. An intracellular form of alpha 1 acute-phase globulin with an apparent relative molecular mass of 63 500 and a secreted form of 68 000 were found. The intracellular form of alpha 1 acute-phase globulin could be deglycosylated by endoglucosaminidase H treatment indicating that its oligosaccharide chains were of the high-mannose type. The secreted form of alpha 1 acute-phase globulin was not sensitive to endoglucosaminidase H, but was susceptible to the action of sialidase reflecting carbohydrate side-chains of the complex type. Pulse-chase experiments revealed a precursor-product relationship for the high-mannose and the complex type alpha 1 acute-phase globulin. In the hepatocyte medium newly synthesized alpha 1 acute-phase globulin was detected 30 min after the pulse. Unglycosylated alpha 1 acute-phase globulin was found in the cells as well as in the medium when the transfer of oligosaccharide chains onto the polypeptide chains was blocked by tunicamycin. Tunicamycin led to a marked delay in alpha 1 acute-phase globulin secretion. PMID:2578391

  8. Protective effects of methylxanthines on hypoxia-induced apoptotic neurodegeneration and long-term cognitive functions in the developing rat brain.

    PubMed

    Kumral, Abdullah; Yesilirmak, Didem Cemile; Aykan, Simge; Genc, Sermin; Tugyan, Kazim; Cilaker, Serap; Akhisaroglu, Mustafa; Aksu, Ilkay; Sutcuoglu, Sumer; Yilmaz, Osman; Duman, Nuray; Ozkan, Hasan

    2010-01-01

    Aminophylline is widely used in the management of premature apnea. The methylxanthines aminophylline, theophylline and caffeine are nonspecific inhibitors of adenosine receptors. There are no proven effects of methylxanthines on acute brain injury and long-term cognitive functions. This study is aimed at investigating the effects of methylxanthines on brain injury and cognitive functions. Newborn rats were allocated to form four groups, which contained at least 21 pups: two groups were exposed to room air and two groups were exposed to intermittent hypoxia. Intraperitoneal aminophylline was administered to treatment groups during postnatal day 1 through postnatal day 7. All rats were sacrificed on postnatal day 8 via intraperitoneal pentobarbital and the effects of the administered drug on brain injury and adenosine receptor expression were determined. Cognitive functions of rats were evaluated via water maze test. Histopathological evaluation demonstrated that aminophylline significantly diminished the number of 'apoptotic cells' in the hippocampal CA1, CA2, CA3 and gyrus dentatus regions in the brain. Aminophylline treatment immediately after hypoxic insult significantly improved long-term neurobehavioral achievements. In conclusion, aminophylline administration immediately after neonatal hypoxic insult provides benefit over a prolonged period in the developing rat brain.

  9. Effects of prostaglandin inhibition on intrarenal hemodynamics in acutely saline-loaded rats.

    PubMed

    Düsing, R; Melder, B; Kramer, H J

    1977-09-01

    We studied the effect of inhibition of the prostaglandin (PG)-synthesizing enzyme system in female Sprague-Dawley rats following acute expansion of the extracellular fluid volume (ECV). In 57 conscious rats expansion of the ECV with isotonic saline corresponding to an increase in body weight of 10% was induced. Prior to ECV expansion 31 rats received indomethacin (10 mg/kg of body wt) by stomach tube. In six non-ECV-expanded rats indomethacin had no effect on glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and renal plasma flow (RPF). In ECV-expanded rats pretreated with indomethacin, GFR was unaltered but 125I-hippuran clearance decreased, and filtration fraction significantly increased. Intrarenal 86Rb distribution was similar in control and ECV-expanded rats. Indomethacin caused a slight increase in relative cortical 86 RB activity in non-ECV-expanded rats, but had no effect on intrarenal 86Rb distribution in ECV-expanded rats. No difference in intracortical glomerular perfusion was noted between control and ECV-expanded rats. In indomethacin-treated ECV-expanded rats an increase in relative inner cortical perfusion was observed. Absolute perfusion remained unaltered. Thus the decrease in total RPF was entirely due to decreased perfusion of outer cortical nephrons. Renal prostaglandins therefore may play a permissive role for physical factors to promote renal sodium excretion in acute ECV expansion via changes in intrarenal hemodynamics. PMID:890884

  10. Are soluble and membrane-bound rat brain acetylcholinesterase different

    SciTech Connect

    Andres, C.; el Mourabit, M.; Stutz, C.; Mark, J.; Waksman, A. )

    1990-11-01

    Salt-soluble and detergent-soluble acetylcholinesterases (AChE) from adult rat brain were purified to homogeneity and studied with the aim to establish the differences existing between these two forms. It was found that the enzymatic activities of the purified salt-soluble AChE as well as the detergent-soluble AChE were dependent on the Triton X-100 concentration. Moreover, the interaction of salt-soluble AChE with liposomes suggests amphiphilic behaviour of this enzyme. Serum cholinesterase (ChE) did not bind to liposomes but its activity was also detergent-dependent. Detergent-soluble AChE remained in solution below critical micellar concentrations of Triton X-100. SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of purified, Biobeads-treated and iodinated detergent-soluble 11 S AChE showed, under non reducing conditions, bands of 69 kD, 130 kD and greater than 250 kD corresponding, respectively, to monomers, dimers and probably tetramers of the same polypeptide chain. Under reducing conditions, only a 69 kD band was detected. It is proposed that an amphiphilic environment stabilizes the salt-soluble forms of AChE in the brain in vivo and that detergent-soluble Biobeads-treated 11 S AChE possess hydrophobic domain(s) different from the 20 kD peptide already described.

  11. Brain Pathology in Adult Rats Treated With Domoic Acid.

    PubMed

    Vieira, A C; Alemañ, N; Cifuentes, J M; Bermúdez, R; Peña, M López; Botana, L M

    2015-11-01

    Domoic acid (DA) is a neurotoxin reported to produce damage to the hippocampus, which plays an important role in memory. The authors inoculated rats intraperitoneally with an effective toxic dose of DA to study the distribution of the toxin in major internal organs by using immunohistochemistry, as well as to evaluate the induced pathology by means of histopathologic and immunohistochemical methods at different time points after toxin administration (6, 10, and 24 hours; 5 and 54 days). DA was detected by immunohistochemistry exclusively in pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus at 6 and 10 hours after dosing. Lesions induced by DA were prominent at 5 days following treatment in selected regions of the brain: hippocampus, amygdala, piriform and perirhinal cortices, olfactory tubercle, septal nuclei, and thalamus. The authors found 2 types of lesions: delayed death of selective neurons and large areas of necrosis, both accompanied by astrocytosis and microgliosis. At 54 days after DA exposure, the pathology was characterized by still-distinguishable dying neurons, calcified lesions in the thalamus, persistent astrocytosis, and pronounced microgliosis. The expression of nitric oxide synthases suggests a role for nitric oxide in the pathogenesis of neuronal degeneration and chronic inflammation induced by DA in the brain.

  12. A better mild traumatic brain injury model in the rat.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Satoru; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Sato, Shunichi; Kawauchi, Satoko; Nagatani, Kimihiro; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Otani, Naoki; Osada, Hideo; Wada, Kojiro; Shima, Katsuji

    2013-01-01

    The primary pathology associated with mild -traumatic brain injury (TBI) is selective axonal injury, which may characterize the vast majority of blast-induced TBIs. Axonal injuries in cases of mild TBI have been considered to be the main factors responsible for the long-lasting memory or attentional impairment in affected subjects. Among these axonal injuries, recent attention has been focused on the cingulum bundle (CB). Furthermore, recent studies with diffusion tensor MR imaging have shown the presence of injuries of the CB in cases of mild TBI in humans. This study aimed to provide a better laboratory model of mild TBI.Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to mild TBI using laser-induced shock waves (LISW) (sham, 0.5 J/cm(2), or 1.0 J/cm(2); n = 4 per group). Bodian-stained brain sections 14 days after LISW at 0.5 J/cm(2) or 1.0 J/cm(2) showed a decrease in the CB axonal density compared with the sham group, whereas there were no differences in the axonal density of the corpus callosum.The present study shows that this model is capable of reproducing the histological changes associated with mild TBI. PMID:23564112

  13. Vitexin reduces hypoxia-ischemia neonatal brain injury by the inhibition of HIF-1alpha in a rat pup model.

    PubMed

    Min, Jia-Wei; Hu, Jiang-Jian; He, Miao; Sanchez, Russell M; Huang, Wen-Xian; Liu, Yu-Qiang; Bsoul, Najeeb Bassam; Han, Song; Yin, Jun; Liu, Wan-Hong; He, Xiao-Hua; Peng, Bi-Wen

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the early suppression of HIF-1α after hypoxia-ischemia (HI) injury provides neuroprotection. Vitexin (5, 7, 4-trihydroxyflavone-8-glucoside), an HIF-1α inhibitor, is a c-glycosylated flavone that has been identified in medicinal plants. Therefore, we hypothesized that treatment with vitexin would protect against HI brain injury. Newborn rat pups were subjected to unilateral carotid artery ligation followed by 2.5 h of hypoxia (8% O2 at 37 °C). Vitexin (30, 45 or 60 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally at 5 min or 3 h after HI. Vitexin, administered 5 min after HI, was neuroprotective as seen by decreased infarct volume evaluated at 48 h post-HI. This neuroprotection was removed when vitexin was administered 3 h after HI. Neuronal cell death, blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity, brain edema, HIF-1α and VEGF protein levels were evaluated using a combination of Nissl staining, IgG staining, brain water content, immunohistochemistry and Western blot at 24 and 48 h after HI. The long-term effects of vitexin were evaluated by brain atrophy measurement, Nissl staining and neurobehavioral tests. Vitexin (45 mg/kg) ameliorated brain edema, BBB disruption and neuronal cell death; Upregulation of HIF-1α by dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG) increased the BBB permeability and brain edema compared to HI alone. Vitexin attenuated the increase in HIF-1α and VEGF. Vitexin also had long-term effects of protecting against the loss of ipsilateral brain and improveing neurobehavioral outcomes. In conclusion, our data indicate early HIF-1α inhibition with vitexin provides both acute and long-term neuroprotection in the developing brain after neonatal HI injury. PMID:26187393

  14. Effects of acute ethanol exposure on hepatic metallothionein, zinc and glutathione in male and female rats

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.; Harrell, B. )

    1991-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine the simultaneous responses of hepatic metallothionein (MT), zinc (Zn) and glutathione (GSH) in male and female rats to an acute ethanol dose. In male rats, hepatic MT has been shown to be induced by an acute ethanol dose. The Sprague-Dawley rats were fed the Lieber-DeCarli control diet for a five day period and then divided into 6 groups: baseline females and males, ethanol-treated females and males, pair-fed females and males. At t=0, baseline rats were killed, ethanol-treated rats were given ethanol by intragastric tube, and pair-fed rats were given ethanol by intragastric tube, and pair-fed rats were given an isocaloric sucrose solution by intragastric tube. At t=24 h, the ethanol-treated and pair-fed rats were killed. Livers were assayed for MT. Zn and GSH. Concentrations of blood ethanol (BEC) were significantly greater for male than female rats. A two way ANOVA with the independent variables being time and sex was performed to analyze differences for hepatic MT, Zn and GSH. For rats dosed with ethanol and killed 24 h later compared with rats at baseline, hepatic MT was significantly greater and hepatic Zn and GSH were not significantly different. Hepatic MT, Zn and GSH were not significantly different by sex. A significant correlation existed between hepatic Zn/g and MT/g. In conclusion, 24 h after an acute dose of ethanol, female as well as male rats responded with the induction of hepatic MT; and enough cysteine was available for the induction of hepatic MT and the maintenance of hepatic GSH levels. The measurement of Zn bound to hepatic MT rather than total hepatic Zn would be desirable to discern if changes in Zn distribution occur.

  15. Cognitive Impairment and Whole Brain Diffusion in Patients with Neuromyelitis Optica after Acute Relapse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Diane; Wu, Qizhu; Chen, Xiuying; Zhao, Daidi; Gong, Qiyong; Zhou, Hongyu

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study investigated cognitive impairments and their correlations with fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) in patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO) without visible lesions on conventional brain MRI during acute relapse. Twenty one patients with NMO and 21 normal control subjects received several cognitive…

  16. Reversible acute bilateral blindness resulting from a frontal brain tumor: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Koji; Nakada, Mitsutoshi; Miyashita, Katsuyoshi; Hayashi, Yutaka; Hamada, Jun-ichiro

    2014-12-01

    We experienced an unusual case of a 15-year-old girl who suffered acute bilateral blindness caused by a frontal lobe tumour. She underwent emergent operation, after which her vision recovered. This case emphasizes that a brain mass can cause sudden onset blindness and an emergency intervention might save the patient's sight.

  17. Subcellular localization and compartmentation of thiamine derivatives in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Bettendorff, L; Wins, P; Lesourd, M

    1994-05-26

    The subcellular distribution of thiamine derivatives in rat brain was studied. Thiamine diphosphate content was highest in the mitochondrial and synaptosomal fractions, and lowest in microsomal, myelin and cytosolic fractions. Only 3-5% of total thiamine diphosphate was bound to transketolase, a cytosolic enzyme. Thiamine triphosphate was barely detectable in the microsomal and cytosolic fraction, but synaptosomes were slightly enriched in this compound compared to the crude homogenate. Both myelin and mitochondrial fractions contained significant amounts of thiamine triphosphate. In order to estimate the relative turnover rates of these compounds, the animals received an intraperitoneal injection of either [14C]thiamine or [14C]sulbutiamine (isobutyrylthiamine disulfide) 1 h before decapitation. The specific radioactivities of thiamine compounds found in the brain decreased in the order: thiamine > thiamine triphosphate > thiamine monophosphate > thiamine diphosphate. Incorporation of radioactivity into thiamine triphosphate was more marked with [14C]sulbutiamine than with [14C]thiamine. The highest specific radioactivity of thiamine diphosphate was found in the cytosolic fraction of the brain, though this pool represents less than 10% of total thiamine diphosphate. Cytosolic thiamine diphosphate had a twice higher specific radioactivity when [14C]sulbutiamine was used as precursor compared with thiamine though no significant differences were found in the other cellular compartments. Our results suggest the existence of two thiamine diphosphate pools: the bound cofactor pool is essentially mitochondrial and has a low turnover; a much smaller cytosolic pool (6-7% of total TDP) of high turnover is the likely precursor of thiamine triphosphate. PMID:8186256

  18. Garlic extract attenuates brain mitochondrial dysfunction and cognitive deficit in obese-insulin resistant rats.

    PubMed

    Pintana, Hiranya; Sripetchwandee, Jirapas; Supakul, Luerat; Apaijai, Nattayaporn; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn

    2014-12-01

    Oxidative stress in the obese-insulin resistant condition has been shown to affect cognitive as well as brain mitochondrial functions. Garlic extract has exerted a potent antioxidant effect. However, the effects of garlic extract on the brain of obese-insulin resistant rats have never been investigated. We hypothesized that garlic extract improves cognitive function and brain mitochondrial function in obese-insulin resistant rats induced by long-term high-fat diet (HFD) consumption. Male Wistar rats were fed either normal diet or HFD for 16 weeks (n = 24/group). At week 12, rats in each dietary group received either vehicle or garlic extract (250 and 500 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) for 28 days. Learning and memory behaviors, metabolic parameters, and brain mitochondrial function were determined at the end of treatment. HFD led to increased body weight, visceral fat, plasma insulin, cholesterol, and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, indicating the development of insulin resistance. Furthermore, HFD rats had cognitive deficit and brain mitochondrial dysfunction. HFD rats treated with both doses of garlic extract had decreased body weight, visceral fat, plasma cholesterol, and MDA levels. Garlic extract also improved cognitive function and brain mitochondrial function, which were impaired in obese-insulin resistant rats caused by HFD consumption.

  19. Tannic acid alleviates lead acetate-induced neurochemical perturbations in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ashafaq, Mohammad; Tabassum, Heena; Vishnoi, Shruti; Salman, Mohd; Raisuddin, Sheikh; Parvez, Suhel

    2016-03-23

    Oxidative stress has been projected as a promising mechanism involved in lead exposure. The lead predisposition catalyzes oxidative reactions and generates reactive oxygen species. The present study was carried out to investigate the effect of oral administration of tannic acid (TA) on behavioral deficit, antioxidative deterioration induced by lead acetate (LA) exposure on experimental rat brain. Male Wistar rats were treated with 50mg/kg body weight of LA and TA for three times a week for two weeks. Our data showed LA-induced profound elevation of ROS production and oxidative stress, as evidenced by increased levels of oxidative stress markers such as lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl observed in LA treated rats, whereas significant depletion in the activity of non-enzymatic antioxidants, enzymatic antioxidants, neurotoxicity biomarker and histological changes were observed in LA treated rat brain. However, TA administration restored antioxidant status of brain significantly when compared to control. Our results demonstrate that TA exhibits potent antioxidant properties and suppresses oxidative damages in rat brain induced by LA treatment. These findings were further supported by the neurotoxicity biomarker and histopathological findings in the brain tissue showed that TA protected tissue from deleterious effects of LA exposure. It is concluded, these data suggest that LA induces oxidative stress and supplementation of TA has a powerful antioxidant effect, and it protected rat brain from poisonous effect of LA exposure in experimental rat.

  20. Tannic acid alleviates lead acetate-induced neurochemical perturbations in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ashafaq, Mohammad; Tabassum, Heena; Vishnoi, Shruti; Salman, Mohd; Raisuddin, Sheikh; Parvez, Suhel

    2016-03-23

    Oxidative stress has been projected as a promising mechanism involved in lead exposure. The lead predisposition catalyzes oxidative reactions and generates reactive oxygen species. The present study was carried out to investigate the effect of oral administration of tannic acid (TA) on behavioral deficit, antioxidative deterioration induced by lead acetate (LA) exposure on experimental rat brain. Male Wistar rats were treated with 50mg/kg body weight of LA and TA for three times a week for two weeks. Our data showed LA-induced profound elevation of ROS production and oxidative stress, as evidenced by increased levels of oxidative stress markers such as lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl observed in LA treated rats, whereas significant depletion in the activity of non-enzymatic antioxidants, enzymatic antioxidants, neurotoxicity biomarker and histological changes were observed in LA treated rat brain. However, TA administration restored antioxidant status of brain significantly when compared to control. Our results demonstrate that TA exhibits potent antioxidant properties and suppresses oxidative damages in rat brain induced by LA treatment. These findings were further supported by the neurotoxicity biomarker and histopathological findings in the brain tissue showed that TA protected tissue from deleterious effects of LA exposure. It is concluded, these data suggest that LA induces oxidative stress and supplementation of TA has a powerful antioxidant effect, and it protected rat brain from poisonous effect of LA exposure in experimental rat. PMID:26851560

  1. Immediate and Long-Term Outcome of Acute H2S Intoxication Induced Coma in Unanesthetized Rats: Effects of Methylene Blue

    PubMed Central

    Sonobe, Takashi; Chenuel, Bruno; Cooper, Timothy K.; Haouzi, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute hydrogen sulfide (H2S) poisoning produces a coma, the outcome of which ranges from full recovery to severe neurological deficits. The aim of our study was to 1- describe the immediate and long-term neurological effects following H2S-induced coma in un-anesthetized rats, and 2- determine the potential benefit of methylene blue (MB), a compound we previously found to counteract acute sulfide cardiac toxicity. Methods NaHS was administered IP in un-sedated rats to produce a coma (n = 34). One minute into coma, the rats received MB (4 mg/kg IV) or saline. The surviving rats were followed clinically and assigned to Morris water maze (MWM) and open field testing then sacrificed at day 7. Results Sixty percent of the non-treated comatose rats died by pulseless electrical activity. Nine percent recovered with neurological deficits requiring euthanasia, their brain examination revealed major neuronal necrosis of the superficial and middle layers of the cerebral cortex and the posterior thalamus, with variable necrosis of the caudate putamen, but no lesions of the hippocampus or the cerebellum, in contrast to the typical distribution of post-ischemic lesions. The remaining animals displayed, on average, a significantly less effective search strategy than the control rats (n = 21) during MWM testing. Meanwhile, 75% of rats that received MB survived and could perform the MWM test (P<0.05 vs non-treated animals). The treated animals displayed a significantly higher occurrence of spatial search than the non-treated animals. However, a similar proportion of cortical necrosis was observed in both groups, with a milder clinical presentation following MB. Conclusion In conclusion, in rats surviving H2S induced coma, spatial search patterns were used less frequently than in control animals. A small percentage of rats presented necrotic neuronal lesions, which distribution differed from post-ischemic lesions. MB dramatically improved the immediate survival and spatial

  2. Acute and chronic administration of the branched-chain amino acids decreases nerve growth factor in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Scaini, Giselli; Mello-Santos, Lis Mairá; Furlanetto, Camila B; Jeremias, Isabela C; Mina, Francielle; Schuck, Patrícia F; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Kist, Luiza W; Pereira, Talita C B; Bogo, Maurício R; Streck, Emilio L

    2013-12-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is a neurometabolic disorder caused by deficiency of the activity of the mitochondrial enzyme complex branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase leading to accumulation of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) and their corresponding branched-chain α-keto acids. In this study, we examined the effects of acute and chronic administration of BCAA on protein levels and mRNA expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) considering that patients with MSUD present neurological dysfunction and cognitive impairment. Considering previous observations, it is suggested that oxidative stress may be involved in the pathophysiology of the neurological dysfunction of MSUD. We also investigated the influence of antioxidant treatment (N-acetylcysteine and deferoxamine) in order to verify the influence of oxidative stress in the modulation of NGF levels. Our results demonstrated decreased protein levels of NGF in the hippocampus after acute and chronic administration of BCAA. In addition, we showed a significant decrease in the expression of ngf in the hippocampus only following acute administration in 10-day-old rats. Interestingly, antioxidant treatment was able to prevent the decrease in NGF levels by increasing ngf expression. In conclusion, the results suggest that BCAA is involved in the regulation of NGF in the developing rat. Thus, it is possible that alteration of neurotrophin levels during brain maturation could be of pivotal importance in the impairment of cognition provoked by BCAA. Moreover, the decrease in NGF levels was prevented by antioxidant treatment, reinforcing that the hypothesis of oxidative stress can be an important pathophysiological mechanism underlying the brain damage observed in MSUD. PMID:23559405

  3. Hepatic metabolism of ibuprofen in rats under acute hypobaric hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Gola, Shefali; Keshri, Gaurav Km; Gupta, Asheesh

    2013-09-01

    Hypobaric hypoxia induced at high altitude causes a subnormal oxygen concentration in cells which affects the drug metabolic and pharmacokinetic (PK) capacity of the body. The metabolism and PK of drugs like ibuprofen may be impaired under hypoxia and may require a different than usual therapeutic dose regimen to ensure safe therapy. The present investigation was undertaken to evaluate the effect of acute hypobaric hypoxia (AHH) on hepatic metabolism and PK of ibuprofen in rats. Animals were exposed to simulated altitude of 7620 m (∼25,000 ft) for AHH exposure (6 and 24 h) in a decompression chamber and were administrated with single dose of ibuprofen (80 mg/kg body weight, p.o.). The results showed that GST activity was significantly reduced at 6 h (15%) and 24 h (23%) (p<0.05) in hypoxic group as compared to normoxic. A significant increase by 20-24% (p<0.05) in AST level was observed after AHH exposure. LDH activity also exhibited significant increase (p<0.05) after 24h of AHH. A significant down-regulated CYP2C9 level and mild histopathological changes were observed after 24h of AHH. Furthermore, PK variables viz. elimination half-life (T½) and mean residence time (MRT) of ibuprofen exhibited significant increase by 42% and 51% (p<0.05) respectively after 24h of AHH. Thus, results suggest that AHH exposure of 24h significantly affects phase II conjugation pathway, CYP2C9 level, AST level, liver histology and PK parameters. This asserts that AHH can impair disposition of ibuprofen however, it requires further investigation under chronic hypobaric hypoxic conditions.

  4. Pharmacological TLR4 Inhibition Protects against Acute and Chronic Fat-Induced Insulin Resistance in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ning; Liang, Hanyu; Farese, Robert V.; Li, Ji

    2015-01-01

    Aims To evaluate whether pharmacological TLR4 inhibition protects against acute and chronic fat-induced insulin resistance in rats. Materials and Methods For the acute experiment, rats received a TLR4 inhibitor [TAK-242 or E5564 (2x5 mg/kg i.v. bolus)] or vehicle, and an 8-h Intralipid (20%, 8.5 mg/kg/min) or saline infusion, followed by a two-step hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. For the chronic experiment, rats were subcutaneously implanted with a slow-release pellet of TAK-242 (1.5 mg/d) or placebo. Rats then received a high fat diet (HFD) or a low fat control diet (LFD) for 10 weeks, followed by a two-step insulin clamp. Results Acute experiment; the lipid-induced reduction (18%) in insulin-stimulated glucose disposal (Rd) was attenuated by TAK-242 and E5564 (the effect of E5564 was more robust), suggesting improved peripheral insulin action. Insulin was able to suppress hepatic glucose production (HGP) in saline- but not lipid-treated rats. TAK-242, but not E5564, partially restored this effect, suggesting improved HGP. Chronic experiment; insulin-stimulated Rd was reduced ~30% by the HFD, but completely restored by TAK-242. Insulin could not suppress HGP in rats fed a HFD and TAK-242 had no effect on HGP. Conclusions Pharmacological TLR4 inhibition provides partial protection against acute and chronic fat-induced insulin resistance in vivo. PMID:26196892

  5. Acute Ethanol Does Not Always Affect Delay Discounting in Rats Selected to Prefer or Avoid Ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, Clare J.; Mitchell, Suzanne H.

    2012-01-01

    Aims: The purpose of this study was to determine whether animals predisposed to prefer alcohol possess an altered acute response to alcohol on a delay discounting task relative to animals predisposed to avoid alcohol. Methods: We used rats selected to prefer or avoid alcohol to assess whether genotype moderates changes in delay discounting induced by acute ethanol exposure. Selectively bred rat lines of Sardinian alcohol-preferring (sP; n = 8) and non-preferring (sNP; n = 8) rats, and alko alcohol (AA, n = 8) and alko non-alcohol (ANA, n = 8) rats were trained in an adjusting amount task to assess delay discounting. Results: There were no significant effects of line on baseline discounting; however, both lines of alcohol-preferring rats exhibit slowed reaction times. Acute ethanol (0, 0.25, 0.5 g/kg) treatment also had no effect on delay discounting in any of the selectively bred rat lines. Conclusion: Our data indicate that in these lines of animals, alcohol preference or avoidance has no impact on delay discounting following acute ethanol exposure. It is possible that other genetic models or lines may be differentially affected by alcohol and exhibit qualitatively and quantitatively different responses in delay discounting tasks. PMID:22645038

  6. Evaluation of the effects of fructose on oxidative stress and inflammatory parameters in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Abigail; Vilela, Thais Ceresér; Taschetto, Luciane; Vuolo, Franciele; Petronilho, Fabricia; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Streck, Emilio Luiz; Ferreira, Gustavo Costa; Schuck, Patrícia Fernanda

    2014-12-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the accumulation of fructose in tissues and biological fluids of patients. The disease results from a deficiency of aldolase B, responsible for metabolizing fructose in the liver, kidney, and small intestine. We investigated the effect of acute fructose administration on oxidative stress and neuroinflammatory parameters in the cerebral cortex of 30-day-old Wistar rats. Animals received subcutaneous injection of sodium chloride (0.9 %) (control group) or fructose solution (5 μmol/g) (fructose group). One hour later, the animals were euthanized and the cerebral cortex was isolated. Oxidative stress (levels of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBA-RS), carbonyl content, nitrate and nitrite levels, 2',7'-dihydrodichlorofluorescein (DCFH) oxidation, glutathione (GSH) levels, as well as the activities of catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) and neuroinflammatory parameters (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 levels and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity) were investigated. Acute fructose administration increased levels of TBA-RS and carbonyl content, indicating lipid peroxidation and protein damage. Furthermore, SOD activity incr