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  1. Salvianolic Acids Attenuate Rat Hippocampal Injury after Acute CO Poisoning by Improving Blood Flow Properties

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Li; Zhang, Yan-Lin; Li, Zong-Yang; Zhu, Ming-Xia; Yao, Wei-Juan; Zhao, Jin-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning causes the major injury and death due to poisoning worldwide. The most severe damage via CO poisoning is brain injury and mortality. Delayed encephalopathy after acute CO poisoning (DEACMP) occurs in forty percent of the survivors of acute CO exposure. But the pathological cause for DEACMP is not well understood. And the corresponding therapy is not well developed. In order to investigate the effects of salvianolic acid (SA) on brain injury caused by CO exposure from the view point of hemorheology, we employed a rat model and studied the dynamic of blood changes in the hemorheological and coagulative properties over acute CO exposure. Compared with the groups of CO and 20% mannitol + CO treatments, the severe hippocampal injury caused by acute CO exposure was prevented by SA treatment. These protective effects were associated with the retaining level of hematocrit (Hct), plasma viscosity, fibrinogen, whole blood viscosities and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in red blood cells (RBCs). These results indicated that SA treatment could significantly improve the deformation of erythrocytes and prevent the damage caused by CO poisoning. Meanwhile, hemorheological indexes are good indicators for monitoring the pathological dynamic after acute CO poisoning. PMID:25705671

  2. Acute stress and hippocampal output: exploring dorsal CA1 and subicular synaptic plasticity simultaneously in anesthetized rats

    PubMed Central

    MacDougall, Matthew J; Howland, John G

    2013-01-01

    The Cornu Ammonis-1 (CA1) subfield and subiculum (SUB) serve as major output structures of the hippocampal formation. Exploring forms of synaptic plasticity simultaneously within these two output regions may improve understanding of the dynamics of hippocampal circuitry and information transfer between hippocampal and cortical brain regions. Using a novel dual-channel electrophysiological preparation in urethane-anesthetized adult male Sprague-Dawley rats in vivo, we examined the effects of acute restraint stress (30 min) on short- and long-term forms of synaptic plasticity in both CA1 and SUB by stimulating the CA3 region. Paired-pulse facilitation was disrupted in SUB but not CA1 in the dual-channel experiments following exposure to acute stress. Disruptions in CA1 PPF were evident in subsequent single-channel experiments with a more anterior recording site. Acute stress disrupted long-term potentiation induced by high-frequency stimulation (10 bursts of 20 pulses at 200 Hz) in both CA1 and SUB. Low-frequency stimulation (900 pulses at 1 Hz) did not alter CA1 plasticity while a late-developing potentiation was evident in SUB that was disrupted following exposure to acute stress. These findings highlight differences in the sensitivity to acute stress for distinct forms of synaptic plasticity within synapses in hippocampal output regions. The findings are discussed in relation to normal and aberrant forms of hippocampal-cortical information processing. PMID:24303119

  3. Acute running stimulates hippocampal dopaminergic neurotransmission in rats, but has no influence on brain-derived neurotrophic factor

    PubMed Central

    Goekint, Maaike; Bos, Inge; Heyman, Elsa; Michotte, Yvette; Sarre, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    Hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protein is increased with exercise in rats. Monoamines seem to play a role in the regulation of BDNF, and monoamine neurotransmission is known to increase with exercise. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of acute exercise on monoaminergic neurotransmission and BDNF protein concentrations. Hippocampal microdialysis was performed in rats that were subjected to 60 min of treadmill running at 20 m/min or rest. Two hours postexercise, the rats were killed, and the hippocampus was dissected. In experiments without microdialysis, hippocampus and serum samples were collected immediately after exercise. Exercise induced a twofold increase in hippocampal dopamine release. Noradrenaline and serotonin release were not affected. Hippocampal BDNF levels were not influenced, whether they were measured immediately or 2 h after the exercise protocol. Serum BDNF levels did not change either, but serum BDNF was negatively correlated to peripheral corticosterone concentrations, indicating a possible inhibitory reaction to the stress of running. Sixty minutes of exercise enhances dopamine release in the hippocampus of the rat in vivo. However, this increase is not associated with changes in BDNF protein levels immediately nor 2 h after the acute exercise bout. An increased corticosterone level might be the contributing factor for the absence of changes in BDNF. PMID:22134693

  4. ACUTE EXPOSURE TO TRIS (2-CHLOROETHYL) PHOSPHATE HIPPOCAMPAL NEURONAL LOSS AND IMPAIRS LEARNING IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adult female, Fischer 344 rats were exposed to 275 mg/kg of tris(2- chloroethyl)phosphate (TRCP) by gavage. RCP produced consistent signs of convulsive activity within 60-90 minutes after dosing and extensive loss of CA1 hippocampal pyramidal cells when examined 7 days after dosi...

  5. Effect of acute fentanyl treatment on synaptic plasticity in the hippocampal CA1 region in rats

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Hai; Xu, Yueming; Liu, Fucun; Wang, Guowei; Hu, Sanjue

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD), mainly characterized by short-term decline of learning and memory, occurs after operations under anesthesia. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The μ-opioid receptors (MOR) are highly expressed in interneurons of hippocampus, and is believed to be critical for the dysfunction of synaptic plasticity between hippocampal neurons. Therefore, we investigated the effect of fentanyl, a strong agonist of MOR and often used for anesthesia and analgesia in clinical settings, on hippocampal synaptic plasticity in the Schaffer-collateral CA1 pathway during acute exposure and washout in vitro. Our results revealed that acute fentanyl exposure (0.01, 0.1, 1 μM) dose-dependently increased the field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs), which was prevented by pre-administration of picrotoxin (50 μM) or MOR antagonist D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Orn-Thr-Phe-Thr-NH2 (CTOP, 10 μM). While fentanyl exposure-increased fEPSPs amplitude was prevented by picrotoxin [an inhibitor of γ-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABAR)] treatment or fentanyl washout, pretreatment of picrotoxin failed to prevent the fentanyl-impaired long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic strength as well as the fentanyl-enhanced long-term depression (LTD). These results demonstrated that fentanyl acute exposure and washout increases hippocampal excitability in the Schaffer-collateral CA1 pathway, depending on disinhibiting interneurons after MOR activation. In addition, fentanyl acute exposure and washout modulated synaptic plasticity, but the inhibitory activation was not critical. Elucidating the detailed mechanisms for synaptic dysfunction after fentanyl exposure and washout may provide insights into POCD generation after fentanyl anesthesia. PMID:26578961

  6. KCNQ/Kv7 channel activator flupirtine protects against acute stress-induced impairments of spatial memory retrieval and hippocampal LTP in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, C; Huang, P; Lu, Q; Zhou, M; Guo, L; Xu, X

    2014-11-01

    Spatial memory retrieval and hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) are impaired by stress. KCNQ/Kv7 channels are closely associated with memory and the KCNQ/Kv7 channel activator flupirtine represents neuroprotective effects. This study aims to test whether KCNQ/Kv7 channel activation prevents acute stress-induced impairments of spatial memory retrieval and hippocampal LTP. Rats were placed on an elevated platform in the middle of a bright room for 30 min to evoke acute stress. The expression of KCNQ/Kv7 subunits was analyzed at 1, 3 and 12 h after stress by Western blotting. Spatial memory was examined by the Morris water maze (MWM) and the field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP) in the hippocampal CA1 area was recorded in vivo. Acute stress transiently decreased the expression of KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 in the hippocampus. Acute stress impaired the spatial memory retrieval and hippocampal LTP, the KCNQ/Kv7 channel activator flupirtine prevented the impairments, and the protective effects of flupirtine were blocked by XE-991 (10,10-bis(4-Pyridinylmethyl)-9(10H)-anthracenone), a selective KCNQ channel blocker. Furthermore, acute stress decreased the phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) at Ser9 in the hippocampus, and flupirtine inhibited the reduction. These results suggest that the KCNQ/Kv7 channels may be a potential target for protecting both hippocampal synaptic plasticity and spatial memory retrieval from acute stress influences. PMID:25234320

  7. Altered Hippocampal Lipid Profile Following Acute Postnatal Exposure to Di(2-Ethylhexyl) Phthalate in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Catherine A.; Farmer, Kyle; Lee, Hyunmin; Holahan, Matthew R.; Smith, Jeffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    Slight changes in the abundance of certain lipid species in the brain may drastically alter normal neurodevelopment via membrane stability, cell signalling, and cell survival. Previous findings have demonstrated that postnatal exposure to di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) disrupts normal axonal and neural development in the hippocampus. The goal of the current study was to determine whether postnatal exposure to DEHP alters the lipid profile in the hippocampus during postnatal development. Systemic treatment with 10 mg/kg DEHP during postnatal development led to elevated levels of phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin in the hippocampus of female rats. There was no effect of DEHP exposure on the overall abundance of phosphatidylcholine or sphingomyelin in male rats or of lysophosphatidylcholine in male or female rats. Individual analyses of each identified lipid species revealed 10 phosphatidylcholine and six sphingomyelin lipids in DEHP-treated females and a single lysophosphatidylcholine in DEHP-treated males with a two-fold or higher increase in relative abundance. Our results are congruent with previous work that found that postnatal exposure to DEHP had a near-selective detrimental effect on hippocampal development in males but not females. Together, results suggest a neuroprotective effect of these elevated lipid species in females. PMID:26516880

  8. Altered Hippocampal Lipid Profile Following Acute Postnatal Exposure to Di(2-Ethylhexyl) Phthalate in Rats.

    PubMed

    Smith, Catherine A; Farmer, Kyle; Lee, Hyunmin; Holahan, Matthew R; Smith, Jeffrey C

    2015-10-01

    Slight changes in the abundance of certain lipid species in the brain may drastically alter normal neurodevelopment via membrane stability, cell signalling, and cell survival. Previous findings have demonstrated that postnatal exposure to di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) disrupts normal axonal and neural development in the hippocampus. The goal of the current study was to determine whether postnatal exposure to DEHP alters the lipid profile in the hippocampus during postnatal development. Systemic treatment with 10 mg/kg DEHP during postnatal development led to elevated levels of phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin in the hippocampus of female rats. There was no effect of DEHP exposure on the overall abundance of phosphatidylcholine or sphingomyelin in male rats or of lysophosphatidylcholine in male or female rats. Individual analyses of each identified lipid species revealed 10 phosphatidylcholine and six sphingomyelin lipids in DEHP-treated females and a single lysophosphatidylcholine in DEHP-treated males with a two-fold or higher increase in relative abundance. Our results are congruent with previous work that found that postnatal exposure to DEHP had a near-selective detrimental effect on hippocampal development in males but not females. Together, results suggest a neuroprotective effect of these elevated lipid species in females. PMID:26516880

  9. Acute stress enhances adult rat hippocampal neurogenesis and activation of newborn neurons via secreted astrocytic FGF2

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Elizabeth D; Muroy, Sandra E; Sun, Wayne G; Covarrubias, David; Leong, Megan J; Barchas, Laurel A; Kaufer, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Stress is a potent modulator of the mammalian brain. The highly conserved stress hormone response influences many brain regions, particularly the hippocampus, a region important for memory function. The effect of acute stress on the unique population of adult neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs) that resides in the adult hippocampus is unclear. We found that acute stress increased hippocampal cell proliferation and astrocytic fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) expression. The effect of acute stress occurred independent of basolateral amygdala neural input and was mimicked by treating isolated NPCs with conditioned media from corticosterone-treated primary astrocytes. Neutralization of FGF2 revealed that astrocyte-secreted FGF2 mediated stress-hormone-induced NPC proliferation. 2 weeks, but not 2 days, after acute stress, rats also showed enhanced fear extinction memory coincident with enhanced activation of newborn neurons. Our findings suggest a beneficial role for brief stress on the hippocampus and improve understanding of the adaptive capacity of the brain. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00362.001 PMID:23599891

  10. Acute caffeine treatment increases extracellular nucleotide hydrolysis from rat striatal and hippocampal synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Rosane Souza; Bruno, Alessandra Nejar; Battastini, Ana Maria Oliveira; Sarkis, João José Freitas; Lara, Diogo Rizzato; Bonan, Carla Denise

    2003-08-01

    The psychostimulant caffeine promotes behavioral effects such as hyperlocomotion, anxiety, and disruption of sleep by blockade of adenosine receptors. The availability of extracellular adenosine depends on its release by transporters or by the extracellular ATP catabolism performed by the ecto-nucleotidase pathway. This study verified the effect of caffeine on NTPDase 1 (ATP diphosphohydrolase) and 5'-nucleotidase of synaptosomes from hippocampus and striatum of rats. Caffeine and theophylline tested in vitro were unable to modify nucleotide hydrolysis. Caffeine chronically administered in the drinking water at 0.3 g/L or 1 g/L for 14 days failed to affect nucleotide hydrolysis. However, acute administration of caffeine (30 mg/kg, i.p.) produced an enhancement of ATP (50%) and ADP (32%) hydrolysis in synaptosomes of hippocampus and striatum, respectively. This activation of ATP and ADP hydrolysis after acute treatment suggests a compensatory effect to increase adenosine levels and counteract the antagonist action of caffeine. PMID:12834266

  11. Losing control under ketamine: suppressed cortico-hippocampal drive following acute ketamine in rats.

    PubMed

    Moran, Rosalyn J; Jones, Matthew W; Blockeel, Anthony J; Adams, Rick A; Stephan, Klaas E; Friston, Karl J

    2015-01-01

    Systemic doses of the psychotomimetic ketamine alter the spectral characteristics of hippocampal and prefrontal cortical network activity. Using dynamic causal modeling (DCM) of cross-spectral densities, we quantify the putative synaptic mechanisms underlying ketamine effects in terms of changes in directed, effective connectivity between dorsal hippocampus and medial prefrontal (dCA1-mPFC) cortex of freely moving rats. We parameterize dose-dependent changes in spectral signatures of dCA1-mPFC local field potential recordings, using neural mass models of glutamatergic and GABAergic circuits. Optimizing DCMs of theta and gamma frequency range responses, model comparisons suggest that both enhanced gamma and depressed theta power result from a reduction in top-down connectivity from mPFC to the hippocampus, mediated by postsynaptic NMDA receptors (NMDARs). This is accompanied by an alteration in the bottom-up pathway from dCA1 to mPFC, which exhibits a distinct asymmetry: here, feed-forward drive at AMPA receptors increases in the presence of decreased NMDAR-mediated inputs. Setting these findings in the context of predictive coding suggests that NMDAR antagonism by ketamine in recurrent hierarchical networks may result in the failure of top-down connections from higher cortical regions to signal predictions to lower regions in the hierarchy, which consequently fail to respond consistently to errors. Given that NMDAR dysfunction has a central role in pathophysiological theories of schizophrenia and that theta and gamma rhythm abnormalities are evident in schizophrenic patients, the approach followed here may furnish a framework for the study of aberrant hierarchical message passing (of prediction errors) in schizophrenia-and the false perceptual inferences that ensue. PMID:25053181

  12. Resveratrol protects against oxidative injury induced by H2O2 in acute hippocampal slice preparations from Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Lúcia Maria Vieira; Leite, Marina Concli; Thomazi, Ana Paula; Battu, Cíntia; Nardin, Patrícia; Tortorelli, Lucas Silva; Zanotto, Caroline; Posser, Thaís; Wofchuk, Susana Tchernin; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto; Gottfried, Carmem

    2008-12-01

    There is a current interest in dietary compounds (such as trans-resveratrol) that can inhibit or reverse oxidative stress, the common pathway for a variety of brain disorders, including Alzheimer's disease and stroke. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of resveratrol, under conditions of oxidative stress induced by H(2)O(2), on acute hippocampal slices from Wistar rats. Here, we evaluated cell viability, extracellular lactate, glutathione content, ERK(MAPK) activity, glutamate uptake and S100B secretion. Resveratrol did not change the decrease in lactate levels and in cell viability (by MTT assay) induced by 1mM H(2)O(2), but prevented the increase in cell permeability to Trypan blue induced by H(2)O(2). Moreover, resveratrol per se increased total glutathione levels and prevented the decrease in glutathione induced by 1mM H(2)O(2). The reduction of S100B secretion induced by H(2)O(2) was not changed by resveratrol. Glutamate uptake was decreased in the presence of 1mM H(2)O(2) and this effect was not prevented by resveratrol. There was also a significant activation of ERK1/2 by 1mM H(2)O(2) and resveratrol was able to completely prevent this activation, leading to activity values lower than control levels. The impairments in astrocyte activities, induced by H(2)O(2), confirmed the importance of these cells as targets for therapeutic strategy in brain disorders involving oxidative stress. This study reinforces the protective role of resveratrol and indicates some possible molecular sites of activity of this compound on glial cells, in the acute damage of brain tissue during oxidative stress. PMID:18835240

  13. HIPPOCAMPAL MOSSY FIBER LEU-ENKEPHALIN IMMUNOREACTIVITY IN FEMALE RATS IS SIGNIFICANTLY ALTERED FOLLOWING BOTH ACUTE AND CHRONIC STRESS

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Joseph P.; Kelter, David T.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Waters, Elizabeth M.; Milner, Teresa A.

    2013-01-01

    Research indicates that responses to stress are sexually dimorphic, particularly in regard to learning and memory processes: while males display impaired cognitive performance and hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cell dendritic remodeling following chronic stress, females exhibit enhanced performance and no remodeling. Leu-enkephalin, an endogenous opioid peptide found in the hippocampal mossy fiber pathway, plays a critical role in mediating synaptic plasticity at the mossy fiber-CA3 pyramidal cell synapse. Estrogen is known to influence the expression of leu-enkephalin in the mossy fibers of females, with leu-enkephalin levels being highest at proestrus and estrus, when estrogen levels are elevated. Since stress is also known to alter the expression of leu-enkephalin in various brain regions, this study was designed to determine whether acute or chronic stress had an effect on mossy fiber leu-enkephalin levels in females or males, through the application of correlated quantitative light and electron microscopic immunocytochemistry. Both acute and chronic stress eliminated the estrogen-dependence of leu-enkephalin levels across the estrous cycle in females, but had no effect on male levels. However, following acute stress leu-enkephalin levels in females were consistently lowered to values comparable to the lowest control values, while following chronic stress they were consistently elevated to values comparable to the highest control values. Ultrastructural changes in leu-enkephalin labeled dense core vesicles paralleled light microscopic observations, with acute stress inducing a decrease in leu-enkephalin labeled dense core vesicles, and chronic stress inducing an increase in leu-enkephalin labeled dense-core vesicles in females. These findings suggest that alterations in leu-enkephalin levels following stress could play an important role in the sex-specific responses that females display in learning processes, including those important in addiction. PMID:24275289

  14. Variations in elemental compositions of rat hippocampal formation between acute and latent phases of pilocarpine-induced epilepsy: an X-ray fluorescence microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Chwiej, J; Dulinska, J; Janeczko, K; Appel, K; Setkowicz, Z

    2012-06-01

    There is growing experimental evidence that tracing the elements involved in brain hyperexcitability, excitotoxicity, and/or subsequent neurodegeneration could be a valuable source of data on the molecular mechanisms triggering or promoting further development of epilepsy. The most frequently used experimental model of the temporal lobe epilepsy observed in clinical practice is the one based on pilocarpine-induced seizures. In the frame of this study, the elemental anomalies occurring for the rat hippocampal tissue in acute and silent periods after injection of pilocarpine in rats were compared. X-ray fluorescence microscopy was applied for the topographic and quantitative elemental analysis. The differences in the levels of elements such as P, S, K, Ca, Fe, Cu, and Zn between the rats 3 days (SE72) and 6 h (SE6) after pilocarpine injection as well as naive controls were examined. Comparison of SE72 and control groups showed, for specific areas of the hippocampal formation, lower levels of P, K, Cu, and Zn, and an increase in Ca accumulation. These results as well as further analysis of the differences between the SE72 and SE6 groups confirmed that seizure-induced excitotoxicity as well as mossy fiber sprouting are the mechanisms involved in the neurodegenerative processes which may finally lead to spontaneous seizures in the chronic period of the pilocarpine model. Moreover, in the light of the results obtained, Cu seems to play a very important role in the pathogenesis of epilepsy in this animal model. For all areas analyzed, the levels of this element recorded in the latent period were not only lower than those for controls but were even lower than the levels found in the acute period. The decreased hippocampal accumulation of Cu in the phase of behavior and EEG stabilization, a possible inhibitory effect of this element on excitatory amino acid receptors, and enhanced seizure susceptibility in Menkes disease (an inherited Cu transport disorder leading to Cu

  15. Dopamine Modulates Spike Timing-Dependent Plasticity and Action Potential Properties in CA1 Pyramidal Neurons of Acute Rat Hippocampal Slices

    PubMed Central

    Edelmann, Elke; Lessmann, Volkmar

    2011-01-01

    Spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) is a cellular model of Hebbian synaptic plasticity which is believed to underlie memory formation. In an attempt to establish a STDP paradigm in CA1 of acute hippocampal slices from juvenile rats (P15–20), we found that changes in excitability resulting from different slice preparation protocols correlate with the success of STDP induction. Slice preparation with sucrose containing ACSF prolonged rise time, reduced frequency adaptation, and decreased latency of action potentials in CA1 pyramidal neurons compared to preparation in conventional ASCF, while other basal electrophysiological parameters remained unaffected. Whereas we observed prominent timing-dependent long-term potentiation (t-LTP) to 171 ± 10% of controls in conventional ACSF, STDP was absent in sucrose prepared slices. This sucrose-induced STDP deficit could not be rescued by stronger STDP paradigms, applying either more pre- and/or postsynaptic stimuli, or by a higher stimulation frequency. Importantly, slice preparation with sucrose containing ACSF did not eliminate theta-burst stimulation induced LTP in CA1 in field potential recordings in our rat hippocampal slices. Application of dopamine (for 10–20 min) to sucrose prepared slices completely rescued t-LTP and recovered action potential properties back to levels observed in ACSF prepared slices. Conversely, acute inhibition of D1 receptor signaling impaired t-LTP in ACSF prepared slices. No similar restoring effect for STDP as seen with dopamine was observed in response to the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. ELISA measurements demonstrated a significant reduction of endogenous dopamine levels (to 61.9 ± 6.9% of ACSF values) in sucrose prepared slices. These results suggest that dopamine signaling is involved in regulating the efficiency to elicit STDP in CA1 pyramidal neurons. PMID:22065958

  16. Non-specific inhibitors of aquaporin-4 stimulate S100B secretion in acute hippocampal slices of rats.

    PubMed

    Zanotto, Caroline; Abib, Renata Torres; Batassini, Cristiane; Tortorelli, Lucas Silva; Biasibetti, Regina; Rodrigues, Letícia; Nardin, Patrícia; Hansen, Fernanda; Gottfried, Carmem; Leite, Marina Concli; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto

    2013-01-23

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP-4) is the principal brain water channel and is predominantly expressed in astrocytes suggesting its dynamic involvement in water homeostasis in brain tissue. Due to the co-localization of AQP-4 and inward rectifier K(+) channels Kir 4.1, a functional coupling between these proteins has been proposed. AQP-4 has a putative role in the physiopathology of brain disorders including epilepsy and trauma. S100B is a calcium-binding protein expressed and secreted by astrocytes, and commonly used as a parameter of astroglial activation. Here, we investigate a possible link between AQP-4 activity (and Kir 4.1) and S100B secretion in hippocampal slices of rats of different ages using non-specific inhibitors of AQP-4 (AZA, acetazolamide and TEA, tetraethylammonium) and Kir 4.1 (barium chloride). We found that blockade of AQP-4 with TEA and AZA produced an increase in S100B secretion in young rats, compatible with an astroglial activation observed in many conditions of brain injury. On the other hand, BaCl(2) induced Kir 4.1 inhibition caused a decrease in S100B secretion. Both channels, AQP-4 and Kir 4.1, exhibited a similar ontogenetic profile, in spite of the functional uncoupling, in relation to S100B secretion. Moreover, we found a significant increase in the S100B secretion basal levels with the increasing of animal age and the incubation with high levels of potassium resulted in a decrease of S100B secretion in 30 and 90-day old rats. These data, together with previous observations from gap junctions and glutamate transport of astrocytes, contribute to characterize the operational system involving astroglial activation, particularly on S100B secretion, in brain disorders. PMID:23142267

  17. Effects of aluminum chloride on sodium current, transient outward potassium current and delayed rectifier potassium current in acutely isolated rat hippocampal CA1 neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Nie, Aifang; Bai, Wei; Meng, Ziqiang

    2004-09-01

    The effects of aluminum chloride (AlCl3) on sodium current (INa), the transient outward potassium (IA) and delayed rectifier potassium currents (IK) in hippocampal CA1 neurons of rats were studied using the whole cell patch-clamp technique. AlCl3 decreased INa, IA, and IK in a partly reversible, dose and voltage-dependent manner. AlCl3 prolonged the time to peak of INa, and increased the inactivation time constants of INa and IA . In addition, 1000 microM AlCl3 shifted the voltage dependence of steady-state activation of INa, IA and IK toward positive potential, and the voltage dependence of steady-state inactivation of INa, IA toward negative potential. These results imply that AlCl3 could affect the activation and inactivation courses of sodium current and potassium current of rat hippocampal CA1 neurons, which may contribute to damage of the central nervous system by aluminum. PMID:15234075

  18. New Hippocampal Neurons Mature Rapidly in Response to Ketamine But Are Not Required for Its Acute Antidepressant Effects on Neophagia in Rats123

    PubMed Central

    Soumier, Amelie; Carter, Rayna M.; Schoenfeld, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Virtually all antidepressant agents increase the birth of granule neurons in the adult dentate gyrus in rodents, providing a key basis for the neurogenesis hypothesis of antidepressant action. The novel antidepressant ketamine, however, shows antidepressant activity in humans within hours, far too rapid for a mechanism involving neuronal birth. Ketamine could potentially act more rapidly by enhancing maturation of new neurons born weeks earlier. To test this possibility, we assessed the effects of S-ketamine (S-(+)-ketamine hydrochloride) injection on maturation, as well as birth and survival, of new dentate gyrus granule neurons in rats, using the immediate-early gene zif268, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and BrdU, respectively. We show that S-ketamine has rapid effects on new neurons, increasing the proportion of functionally mature young granule neurons within 2 h. A single injection of S-ketamine also increased cell proliferation and functional maturation, and decreased depressive-like behavior, for at least 4 weeks in rats treated with long-term corticosterone administration (a depression model) and controls. However, the behavioral effects of S-ketamine on neophagia were unaffected by elimination of adult neurogenesis. Together, these results indicate that ketamine has surprisingly rapid and long-lasting effects on the recruitment of young neurons into hippocampal networks, but that ketamine has antidepressant-like effects that are independent of adult neurogenesis. PMID:27066531

  19. The effect of acute swim stress and training in the water maze on hippocampal synaptic activity as well as plasticity in the dentate gyrus of freely moving rats: revisiting swim-induced LTP reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Tabassum, Heena; Frey, Julietta U

    2013-12-01

    Hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) is a cellular model of learning and memory. An early form of LTP (E-LTP) can be reinforced into its late form (L-LTP) by various behavioral interactions within a specific time window ("behavioral LTP-reinforcement"). Depending on the type and procedure used, various studies have shown that stress differentially affects synaptic plasticity. Under low stress, such as novelty detection or mild foot shocks, E-LTP can be transformed into L-LTP in the rat dentate gyrus (DG). A reinforcing effect of a 2-min swim, however, has only been shown in (Korz and Frey (2003) J Neurosci 23:7281-7287; Korz and Frey (2005) J Neurosci 25:7393-7400; Ahmed et al. (2006) J Neurosci 26:3951-3958; Sajikumar et al., (2007) J Physiol 584.2:389-400) so far. We have reinvestigated these studies using the same as well as an improved recording technique which allowed the recording of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSP) and the population spike amplitude (PSA) at their places of generation in freely moving rats. We show that acute swim stress led to a long-term depression (LTD) in baseline values of PSA and partially fEPSP. In contrast to earlier studies a LTP-reinforcement by swimming could never be reproduced. Our results indicate that 2-min swim stress influenced synaptic potentials as well as E-LTP negatively. PMID:23836535

  20. Acute restraint stress enhances hippocampal endocannabinoid function via glucocorticoid receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meina; Hill, Matthew N; Zhang, Longhua; Gorzalka, Boris B; Hillard, Cecilia J; Alger, Bradley E

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to behavioural stress normally triggers a complex, multilevel response of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis that helps maintain homeostatic balance. Although the endocannabinoid (eCB) system (ECS) is sensitive to chronic stress, few studies have directly addressed its response to acute stress. Here we show that acute restraint stress enhances eCB-dependent modulation of GABA release measured by whole-cell voltage clamp of inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) in rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells in vitro. Both Ca(2+)-dependent, eCB-mediated depolarization-induced suppression of inhibition (DSI), and muscarinic cholinergic receptor (mAChR)-mediated eCB mobilization are enhanced following acute stress exposure. DSI enhancement is dependent on the activation of glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) and is mimicked by both in vivo and in vitro corticosterone treatment. This effect does not appear to involve cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), an enzyme that can degrade eCBs; however, treatment of hippocampal slices with the L-type calcium (Ca(2+)) channel inhibitor, nifedipine, reverses while an agonist of these channels mimics the effect of in vivo stress. Finally, we find that acute stress produces a delayed (by 30 min) increase in the hippocampal content of 2-arachidonoylglycerol, the eCB responsible for DSI. These results support the hypothesis that the ECS is a biochemical effector of glucocorticoids in the brain, linking stress with changes in synaptic strength. PMID:21890595

  1. Intracellular sodium homeostasis in rat hippocampal astrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Rose, C R; Ransom, B R

    1996-01-01

    1. We determined the intracellular Na+ concentration ([Na+]i) and mechanisms of its regulation in cultured rat hippocampal astrocytes using fluorescence ratio imaging of the Na+ indicator SBFI-AM (acetoxymethylester of sodium-binding benzofuran isophthalate, 10 microM). Dye signal calibration within the astrocytes showed that the ratiometric dye signal changed monotonically with changes in [Na+]i from 0 to 140 nM. The K+ sensitivity of the dye was negligible; intracellular pH changes, however, slightly affected the 'Na+' signal. 2. Baseline [Na+]i was 14.6 +/- 4.9 mM (mean +/- S.D.) in CO2/HCO3(-)-containing saline with 3 mM K+. Removal of extracellular Na+ decreased [Na+]i in two phases: a rapid phase of [Na+]i reduction (0.58 +/- 0.32 mM min-1) followed by a slower phase (0.15 +/- 0.09 mM min-1). 3. Changing from CO2/HCO3(-)-free to CO2/HCO3(-)-buffered saline resulted in a transient increase in [Na+]i of approximately 5 mM, suggesting activation of inward Na(+)-HCO3- cotransport by CO2/HCO3-. During furosemide (frusemide, 1 mM) or bumetanide (50 microM) application, a slow decrease in [Na+]i of approximately 2 mM was observed, indicating a steady inward transport of Na+ via Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl- cotransport under control conditions. Tetrodotoxin (100 microM) did not influence [Na+]i in the majority of cells (85%), suggesting that influx of Na+ through voltage-gated Na+ channels contributed to baseline [Na+]i in only a small subpopulation of hippocampal astrocytes. 4. Blocking Na+, K(+)-ATPase activity with cardiac glycosides (ouabain or strophanthidin, 1 mM) or removal of extracellular K+ led to an increase in [Na+]i of about 2 and 4 mM min-1, respectively. This indicated that Na+, K(+)-ATPase activity was critical in maintaining low [Na+]i in the face of a steep electrochemical gradient, which would favour a much higher [Na+]i. 5. Elevation of extracellular K+ concentration ([K+]o) by as little as 1 mM (from 3 to 4 mM) resulted in a rapid and reversible decrease in

  2. Role of hippocampal H1 receptors in radial maze performance and hippocampal theta activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Masuoka, Takayoshi; Kamei, Chiaki

    2007-07-12

    Histamine H1 antagonists impaired the spatial memory performance. On the other hand, it is well recognized that the hippocampal theta rhythm plays a critical role in spatial memory. However, little work has been done the effect of H1 antagonists on the hippocampal theta rhythm which was associated with the memory performance. We investigated the effect of pyrilamine, a selective H1 receptor antagonist, on spatial memory performance as well as hippocampal theta rhythm during the memory task in rats. Effect of pyrilamine on spatial memory was measured using eight-arm radial maze with four arms baited. Hippocampal theta rhythm during the radial maze task was recorded with a polygraph system with a telemetric technique. Intraperitoneal injection of pyrilamine resulted in impairments of both reference and working memory on the radial maze task. The working memory deficit induced by pyrilamine was antagonized by the intrahippocampal injection of histamine and 6-[2-(4-imidazolyl)ethylamino]-N-(4-trifluoromethylphenyl)heptanecarboxamide (HTMT), a histamine H1 agonist. Intraperitoneal injection of pyrilamine decreased the hippocampal theta power at a dose that impaired reference and working memory. This effect was antagonized by the intrahippocampal injection of histamine and HTMT at a dose that ameliorated the working memory deficit. Intrahippocampal injection of pyrilamine impaired working memory and simultaneously decreased the hippocampal theta power. These results suggest that: (i) the hippocampal H1 receptors play an important role in the working memory processes on the radial maze performance and (ii) the decrease in the hippocampal theta power is associated with the working memory deficit induced by the blocking of H1 receptors. PMID:17562388

  3. Damage of hippocampal neurons in rats with chronic alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    Du, Ailin; Jiang, Hongbo; Xu, Lei; An, Na; Liu, Hui; Li, Yinsheng; Zhang, Ruiling

    2014-01-01

    Chronic alcoholism can damage the cytoskeleton and aggravate neurological deficits. However, the effect of chronic alcoholism on hippocampal neurons remains unclear. In this study, a model of chronic alcoholism was established in rats that were fed with 6% alcohol for 42 days. Endogenous hydrogen sulfide content and cystathionine-beta-synthase activity in the hippocampus of rats with chronic alcoholism were significantly increased, while F-actin expression was decreased. Hippocampal neurons in rats with chronic alcoholism appeared to have a fuzzy nuclear membrane, mitochondrial edema, and ruptured mitochondrial crista. These findings suggest that chronic alcoholism can cause learning and memory decline in rats, which may be associated with the hydrogen sulfide/cystathionine-beta-synthase system, mitochondrial damage and reduced expression of F-actin. PMID:25368648

  4. Rapid manifestation of reactive astrogliosis in acute hippocampal brain slices

    PubMed Central

    Takano, Takahiro; He, Wei; Han, Xiaoning; Wang, Fushun; Xu, Qiwu; Wang, Xiaohai; Oberheim Bush, Nancy Ann; Cruz, Nancy; Dienel, Gerald A.; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2014-01-01

    A flurry of studies over the past decade has shown that astrocytes play a more active role in neural function than previously recognized. Hippocampal slices prepared from young rodent pups have served as a popular model for studying the pathways by which astrocytes participate in synaptic transmission. It is, however, not known how well astrocytes tolerate traumatic injury and hypoxia, which are unavoidable when preparing acute slices. We here show that astrocytes exhibit striking changes in expression of several receptors and structural proteins, including re-expression of the developmental marker nestin within 90 min following preparation of live vibratome slices. Moreover, immunoelectron microscopy showed a 2.7-fold loss of astrocytic processes in acute hippocampal slices prepared from GFAP-GFP reporter mice. A sharp decrease in the number of mitochondria was also noted in acute slices, concurrently with an increase in mitochondrial size. Glycogen content decreased 3-fold upon slice preparation and did not recover despite stable recordings of field EPSC. Analysis of Ca2+ signaling showed that astrocytic responses to purine receptor and mGluR5 agonists differed in slice vs. in vivo. These observations suggest that the functional properties and the fine structure of astrocytes in slices may be reflective of early stages of reactive gliosis and should be confirmed in vivo when possible. PMID:24272704

  5. Rapid manifestation of reactive astrogliosis in acute hippocampal brain slices.

    PubMed

    Takano, Takahiro; He, Wei; Han, Xiaoning; Wang, Fushun; Xu, Qiwu; Wang, Xiaohai; Oberheim Bush, Nancy Ann; Cruz, Nancy; Dienel, Gerald A; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2014-01-01

    A flurry of studies over the past decade has shown that astrocytes play a more active role in neural function than previously recognized. Hippocampal slices prepared from young rodent pups have served as a popular model for studying the pathways by which astrocytes participate in synaptic transmission. It is, however, not known how well astrocytes tolerate traumatic injury and hypoxia, which are unavoidable when preparing acute slices. We here showed that astrocytes exhibit striking changes in expression of several receptors and structural proteins, including re-expression of the developmental marker nestin within 90 min following preparation of live vibratome slices. Moreover, immunoelectron microscopy showed a 2.7-fold loss of astrocytic processes in acute hippocampal slices prepared from glial fibrillary acidic protein-green fluorescent protein reporter mice. A sharp decrease in the number of mitochondria was also noted in acute slices, concurrently with an increase in mitochondrial size. Glycogen content decreased 3-fold upon slice preparation and did not recover despite stable recordings of field excitatory postsynaptic current. Analysis of Ca(2+) signaling showed that astrocytic responses to purine receptor and mGluR5 agonists differed in slice versus in vivo. These observations suggest that the functional properties and the fine structure of astrocytes in slices may be reflective of early stages of reactive gliosis and should be confirmed in vivo when possible. PMID:24272704

  6. The TNFα-Transgenic Rat: Hippocampal Synaptic Integrity, Cognition, Function, and Post-Ischemic Cell Loss

    PubMed Central

    Pettigrew, L. Creed; Kryscio, Richard J.; Norris, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    The cytokine, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), is a key regulator of neuroinflammation linked to numerous neurodegenerative conditions and diseases. The present study used transgenic rats that overexpress a murine TNFα gene, under the control of its own promoter, to investigate the impact of chronically elevated TNFα on hippocampal synaptic function. Neuronal viability and cognitive recovery in TNFα Tg rats were also determined following an ischemic insult arising from reversible middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Basal CA3-CA1 synaptic strength, recorded in acute brain slices, was not significantly different between eight-week-old TNFα Tg rats and non-Tg rats. In contrast, slices from TNFα Tg rats showed significantly greater levels of long-term potentiation (LTP) in response to 100 Hz stimulation, suggesting that synaptic networks may be hyperexcitable in the context of elevated TNFα. Cognitive and motor deficits (assessed on the Morris Water Maze and Rotarod task, respectively) were present in TNFα Tg rats in the absence of significant differences in the loss of cortical and hippocampal neurons. TNF overexpression exacerbated MCAO-dependent deficits on the rotarod, but ameliorated cortical neuron loss in response to MCAO. PMID:27144978

  7. Point application with Angong Niuhuang sticker protects hippocampal and cortical neurons in rats with cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dong-shu; Liu, Yuan-liang; Zhu, Dao-qi; Huang, Xiao-jing; Luo, Chao-hua

    2015-01-01

    Angong Niuhuang pill, a Chinese materia medica preparation, can improve neurological functions after acute ischemic stroke. Because of its inconvenient application and toxic components (Cinnabaris and Realgar), we used transdermal enhancers to deliver Angong Niuhuang pill by modern technology, which expanded the safe dose range and clinical indications. In this study, Angong Niuhuang stickers administered at different point application doses (1.35, 2.7, and 5.4 g/kg) were administered to the Dazhui (DU14), Qihai (RN6) and Mingmen (DU4) of rats with chronic cerebral ischemia, for 4 weeks. The Morris water maze was used to determine the learning and memory ability of rats. Hematoxylin-eosin staining and Nissl staining were used to observe neuronal damage of the cortex and hippocampal CA1 region in rats with chronic cerebral ischemia. The middle- and high-dose point application of Angong Niuhuang stickers attenuated neuronal damage in the cortex and hippocampal CA1 region, and improved the memory of rats with chronic cerebral ischemia with an efficacy similar to interventions by electroacupuncture at Dazhui (DU14), Qihai (RN6) and Mingmen (DU4). Our experimental findings indicate that point application with Angong Niuhuang stickers can improve cognitive function after chronic cerebral ischemia in rats and is neuroprotective with an equivalent efficacy to acupuncture. PMID:25883629

  8. ACUTE ETHANOL SUPPRESSES GLUTAMATERGIC NEUROTRANSMISSION THROUGH ENDOCANNABINOIDS IN HIPPOCAMPAL NEURONS

    PubMed Central

    Basavarajappa, Balapal S.; Ninan, Ipe; Arancio, Ottavio

    2008-01-01

    Ethanol exposure during fetal development is a leading cause of long-term cognitive impairments. Studies suggest that ethanol exposure have deleterious effects on the hippocampus, a brain region that is important for learning and memory. Ethanol exerts its effects, in part, via alterations in glutamatergic neurotransmission, which is critical for the maturation of neuronal circuits during development. The current literature strongly supports the growing evidence that ethanol inhibits glutamate release in the neonatal CA1 hippocampal region. However, the exact molecular mechanism responsible for this effect is not well understood. In this study, we show that ethanol enhances endocannabinoid (EC) levels in cultured hippocampal neurons, possibly through calcium pathways. Acute ethanol depresses miniature postsynaptic current (mEPSC) frequencies without affecting their amplitude. This suggests that ethanol inhibits glutamate release. The CB1 receptors (CB1Rs) present on presynaptic neurons are not altered by acute ethanol. The CB1R antagonist SR 141716A reverses ethanol-induced depression of mEPSC frequency. Drugs that are known to enhance the in vivo function of ECs occlude ethanol effects on mEPSC frequency. Chelation of postsynaptic calcium by EGTA antagonizes ethanol-induced depression of mEPSC frequency. The activation of CB1R with the selective agonist WIN55,212-2 also suppresses the mEPSC frequency. This WIN55,212-2 effect is similar to the ethanol effects and is reversed by SR141716A. In addition, tetani-induced excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) are depressed by acute ethanol. SR141716A significantly reverses ethanol effects on evoked EPSC amplitude in a dual recording preparation. These observations, taken together, suggest the participation of ECs as retrograde messengers in the ethanol-induced depression of synaptic activities. PMID:18796007

  9. Effects of hippocampal lesioning on experimental periodontitis in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Breivik, T; Thrane, P S; Gjermo, P; Cools, A; Myhrer, T

    2002-10-01

    The hippocampus, which is a brain structure involved in learning and memory processes, plays a key role in the feedback regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and autonomic sympathetic nervous system, and the subsequent secretion of immuno-modulatory hormones in response to pathogenic microorganisms. Dysregulation of these brain-neuroendocrine-immune regulatory networks, which act in concert to maintain homeostasis, is found to be of critical importance to the host defence against pathogens, as well as susceptibility to diseases, including periodontal disease. The present study was designed to determine the effects of hippocampal lesioning on the progression of periodontitis. Experimental ligature-induced periodontitis was induced in 16 Wistar rats, which were bilaterally lesioned in their hippocampal region with an aspiration technique that is well documented to impair learning and memory, as well as in 15 sham-operated control rats. The disease progression was evaluated radiographically and histometrically. The results revealed that the hippocampal lesioned rats developed significantly more destruction of the periodontium than did the sham-operated controls. This finding supports recent studies that indicate that inappropriate brain-neuroendocrine regulation of inflammatory responses to infectious agents may play an important role in disease susceptibility and progression. PMID:12366859

  10. DISC1-mediated dysregulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Heekyung; Kang, Eunchai; GoodSmith, Douglas; Yoon, Do Yeon; Song, Hongjun; Knierim, James J.; Ming, Guo-li; Christian, Kimberly M.

    2015-01-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis, the constitutive generation of new granule cells in the dentate gyrus of the mature brain, is a robust model of neural development and its dysregulation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of psychiatric and neurological disorders. Previous studies in mice have shown that altered expression of Disrupted-In-Schizophrenia 1 (Disc1), the mouse homolog of a risk gene for major psychiatric disorders, results in several distinct morphological phenotypes during neuronal development. Although there are advantages to using rats over mice for neurophysiological studies, genetic manipulations have not been widely utilized in rat models. Here, we used a retroviral-mediated approach to knockdown DISC1 expression in dividing cells in the rat dentate gyrus and characterized the morphological development of adult-born granule neurons. Consistent with earlier findings in mice, we show that DISC1 knockdown in adult-born dentate granule cells in rats resulted in accelerated dendritic growth, soma hypertrophy, ectopic dendrites, and mispositioning of new granule cells due to overextended migration. Our study thus demonstrates that the Disc1 genetic manipulation approach used in prior mouse studies is feasible in rats and that there is a conserved biological function of this gene across species. Extending gene-based studies of adult hippocampal neurogenesis from mice to rats will allow for the development of additional models that may be more amenable to behavioral and in vivo electrophysiological investigations. These models, in turn, can generate additional insight into the systems-level mechanisms of how risk genes for complex psychiatric disorders may impact adult neurogenesis and hippocampal function. PMID:26161071

  11. DISC1-mediated dysregulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heekyung; Kang, Eunchai; GoodSmith, Douglas; Yoon, Do Yeon; Song, Hongjun; Knierim, James J; Ming, Guo-Li; Christian, Kimberly M

    2015-01-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis, the constitutive generation of new granule cells in the dentate gyrus of the mature brain, is a robust model of neural development and its dysregulation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of psychiatric and neurological disorders. Previous studies in mice have shown that altered expression of Disrupted-In-Schizophrenia 1 (Disc1), the mouse homolog of a risk gene for major psychiatric disorders, results in several distinct morphological phenotypes during neuronal development. Although there are advantages to using rats over mice for neurophysiological studies, genetic manipulations have not been widely utilized in rat models. Here, we used a retroviral-mediated approach to knockdown DISC1 expression in dividing cells in the rat dentate gyrus and characterized the morphological development of adult-born granule neurons. Consistent with earlier findings in mice, we show that DISC1 knockdown in adult-born dentate granule cells in rats resulted in accelerated dendritic growth, soma hypertrophy, ectopic dendrites, and mispositioning of new granule cells due to overextended migration. Our study thus demonstrates that the Disc1 genetic manipulation approach used in prior mouse studies is feasible in rats and that there is a conserved biological function of this gene across species. Extending gene-based studies of adult hippocampal neurogenesis from mice to rats will allow for the development of additional models that may be more amenable to behavioral and in vivo electrophysiological investigations. These models, in turn, can generate additional insight into the systems-level mechanisms of how risk genes for complex psychiatric disorders may impact adult neurogenesis and hippocampal function. PMID:26161071

  12. Gonadal Hormones Rapidly Enhance Spatial Memory and Increase Hippocampal Spine Density in Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Jacome, Luis F; Barateli, Ketti; Buitrago, Dina; Lema, Franklin; Frankfurt, Maya; Luine, Victoria N

    2016-04-01

    17β-estradiol (E2) rapidly, within minutes, activates behaviors and cognition by binding to membrane estrogen receptors, activating cell signaling cascades and increasing dendritic spines. In female rodents, E2 enhances spatial memory within 2-4 hours, and spine density is increased in the CA1 area of the hippocampus within 30-60 minutes. Although chronic gonadal hormone treatments in male rats alter cognition and spines/spine synapses and acute hormone effects occur in hippocampal slices, effects of acute, in vivo hormone administration in males are unknown. Therefore, we assessed rapid effects of E2 (20 μg/kg) and testosterone (T) (750 μg/kg) on spatial memory using the object placement task and on hippocampal spine density using Golgi impregnation. Orchidectomized rats received hormones immediately after the training trial and were tested for retention 2 hours later. Vehicle-injected orchidectomized males spent equal time exploring objects in the old and new locations, but E2- or T-treated subjects spent more time exploring objects at the new location, suggesting enhanced memory. Both hormones also increased spine density in CA1, but not the dentate gyrus, by 20%-40% at 30 minutes and 2 hours after injections. This report is the first, to our knowledge, to show E2 and T enhancements of memory and spine density within such a short time frame in male rats. PMID:26844375

  13. Effects of hippocampal partial kindling on sensory and sensorimotor gating and methamphetamine-induced locomotion in kindling-prone and kindling-resistant rats.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jingyi; Leung, L Stan

    2016-05-01

    The effects of hippocampal partial kindling on gating of hippocampal auditory-evoked potentials (AEPs), prepulse inhibition (PPI) to an acoustic startle response, and methamphetamine-induced locomotion were examined in selectively bred kindling-prone (Fast) and kindling-resistant (Slow) rats. Ten electrographic seizures (afterdischarges, ADs) induced by high-frequency stimulation of the hippocampal CA1 region resulted in deficits in gating of hippocampal AEP and PPI in Fast, but not Slow, rats. The increase in AD duration with kindling was similar in Fast and Slow rats. Kindling-induced changes in hippocampal AEP and PPI in Fast rats were abolished by pretest injection of CGP7930 (1mg/kg i.p.), a positive allosteric modulator of GABAB receptors. Injection of haloperidol (0.1mg/kg i.p.) daily before kindling also prevented kindling-induced changes in PPI and hippocampal AEP in Fast rats. Interestingly, methamphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion was enhanced by kindling in Slow, but not Fast, rats. However, the methamphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion in Slow rats was not suppressed by daily injection of 0.1mg/kg i.p. haloperidol before kindling, as compared with kindling without haloperidol. It is concluded that genetic disposition affected the behavioral consequences of repeated seizures. Fast rats required fewer hippocampal ADs to induce sensory (AEP) and sensorimotor (PPI) deficits, while Slow kindled rats were more sensitive to methamphetamine-induced locomotion. Dopaminergic blockade by haloperidol during kindling, or acute injection of CGP7930 before testing, attenuated some of the behavioral deficits induced by repeated hippocampal seizures, suggesting possible therapeutic strategies to treat the schizophrenic-like symptoms associated with temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:27070861

  14. Classic hippocampal sclerosis and hippocampal-onset epilepsy produced by a single “cryptic” episode of focal hippocampal excitation in awake rats

    PubMed Central

    Norwood, Braxton A.; Bumanglag, Argyle V.; Osculati, Francesco; Sbarbati, Andrea; Marzola, Pasquina; Nicolato, Elena; Fabene, Paolo F.; Sloviter, Robert S.

    2010-01-01

    In refractory temporal lobe epilepsy, seizures often arise from a shrunken hippocampus exhibiting a pattern of selective neuron loss called “classic hippocampal sclerosis.” No single experimental injury has reproduced this specific pathology, suggesting that hippocampal atrophy might be a progressive “endstage” pathology resulting from years of spontaneous seizures. We posed the alternate hypothesis that classic hippocampal sclerosis results from a single excitatory event that has never been successfully modeled experimentally because convulsive status epilepticus, the insult most commonly used to produce epileptogenic brain injury, is too severe and necessarily terminated before the hippocampus receives the needed duration of excitation. We tested this hypothesis by producing prolonged hippocampal excitation in awake rats without causing convulsive status epilepticus. Two daily 30-minute episodes of perforant pathway stimulation in Sprague-Dawley rats increased granule cell paired-pulse inhibition, decreased epileptiform afterdischarge durations during 8 hours of subsequent stimulation, and prevented convulsive status epilepticus. Similarly, one 8-hour episode of reduced-intensity stimulation in Long-Evans rats, which are relatively resistant to developing status epilepticus, produced hippocampal discharges without causing status epilepticus. Both paradigms immediately produced the extensive neuronal injury that defines classic hippocampal sclerosis, without giving any clinical indication during the insult that an injury was being inflicted. Spontaneous hippocampal-onset seizures began 16–25 days post-injury, before hippocampal atrophy developed, as demonstrated by sequential magnetic resonance imaging. These results indicate that classic hippocampal sclerosis is uniquely produced by a single episode of clinically “cryptic” excitation. Epileptogenic insults may often involve prolonged excitation that goes undetected at the time of injury. PMID

  15. Measurement of Inositol Triphosphate Levels from Rat Hippocampal Slices

    PubMed Central

    Tabatadze, Nino; Woolley, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Inositol triphosphate (IP3) is an important second messenger that participates in signal transduction pathways in diverse cell types including hippocampal neurons. Stimulation of phospholipase C in response to various stimuli (hormones, growth factors, neurotransmitters, neurotrophins, neuromodulators, odorants, light, etc) results in hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4, 5-bisphosphate (PIP2), a phospholipid that is located in the plasma membrane, and leads to the production of IP3 and diacylglycerol. Binding of IP3 to the IP3 receptor (IP3R) induces Ca2+ release from intracellular stores and enables the initiation of intracellular Ca2+-dependent signaling. Here we describe a procedure for the measurement of cellular IP3 levels in tissue homogenates prepared from rat hippocampal slices.

  16. Developmental mercury exposure elicits acute hippocampal cell death, reductions in neurogenesis, and severe learning deficits during puberty.

    PubMed

    Falluel-Morel, Anthony; Sokolowski, Katie; Sisti, Helene M; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Shors, Tracey J; Dicicco-Bloom, Emanuel

    2007-12-01

    Normal brain development requires coordinated regulation of several processes including proliferation, differentiation, and cell death. Multiple factors from endogenous and exogenous sources interact to elicit positive as well as negative regulation of these processes. In particular, the perinatal rat brain is highly vulnerable to specific developmental insults that produce later cognitive abnormalities. We used this model to examine the developmental effects of an exogenous factor of great concern, methylmercury (MeHg). Seven-day-old rats received a single injection of MeHg (5 microg/gbw). MeHg inhibited DNA synthesis by 44% and reduced levels of cyclins D1, D3, and E at 24 h in the hippocampus, but not the cerebellum. Toxicity was associated acutely with caspase-dependent programmed cell death. MeHg exposure led to reductions in hippocampal size (21%) and cell numbers 2 weeks later, especially in the granule cell layer (16%) and hilus (50%) of the dentate gyrus defined stereologically, suggesting that neurons might be particularly vulnerable. Consistent with this, perinatal exposure led to profound deficits in juvenile hippocampal-dependent learning during training on a spatial navigation task. In aggregate, these studies indicate that exposure to one dose of MeHg during the perinatal period acutely induces apoptotic cell death, which results in later deficits in hippocampal structure and function. PMID:17760861

  17. Investigation of Synaptic Tagging/Capture and Cross-capture using Acute Hippocampal Slices from Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Mahesh Shivarama; Sharma, Mahima; Hui, Neo Sin; Dasgupta, Ananya; Gopinadhan, Suma; Sajikumar, Sreedharan

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic tagging and capture (STC) and cross-tagging are two important mechanisms at cellular level that explain how synapse-specificity and associativity is achieved in neurons within a specific time frame. These long-term plasticity-related processes are the leading candidate models to study the basis of memory formation and persistence at the cellular level. Both STC and cross-tagging involve two serial processes: (1) setting of the synaptic tag as triggered by a specific pattern of stimulation, and (2) synaptic capture, whereby the synaptic tag interacts with newly synthesized plasticity-related proteins (PRPs). Much of the understanding about the concepts of STC and cross-tagging arises from the studies done in CA1 region of the hippocampus and because of the technical complexity many of the laboratories are still unable to study these processes. Experimental conditions for the preparation of hippocampal slices and the recording of stable late-LTP/LTD are extremely important to study synaptic tagging/cross-tagging. This video article describes the experimental procedures to study long-term plasticity processes such as STC and cross-tagging in the CA1 pyramidal neurons using stable, long-term field-potential recordings from acute hippocampal slices of rats. PMID:26381286

  18. Investigation of Synaptic Tagging/Capture and Cross-capture using Acute Hippocampal Slices from Rodents.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Mahesh Shivarama; Sharma, Mahima; Hui, Neo Sin; Dasgupta, Ananya; Gopinadhan, Suma; Sajikumar, Sreedharan

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic tagging and capture (STC) and cross-tagging are two important mechanisms at cellular level that explain how synapse-specificity and associativity is achieved in neurons within a specific time frame. These long-term plasticity-related processes are the leading candidate models to study the basis of memory formation and persistence at the cellular level. Both STC and cross-tagging involve two serial processes: (1) setting of the synaptic tag as triggered by a specific pattern of stimulation, and (2) synaptic capture, whereby the synaptic tag interacts with newly synthesized plasticity-related proteins (PRPs). Much of the understanding about the concepts of STC and cross-tagging arises from the studies done in CA1 region of the hippocampus and because of the technical complexity many of the laboratories are still unable to study these processes. Experimental conditions for the preparation of hippocampal slices and the recording of stable late-LTP/LTD are extremely important to study synaptic tagging/cross-tagging. This video article describes the experimental procedures to study long-term plasticity processes such as STC and cross-tagging in the CA1 pyramidal neurons using stable, long-term field-potential recordings from acute hippocampal slices of rats. PMID:26381286

  19. Hippocampal phosphoproteomics of F344 rats exposed to 1-bromopropane

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhenlie; Ichihara, Sahoko; Oikawa, Shinji; Chang, Jie; Zhang, Lingyi; Hu, Shijie; Huang, Hanlin; Ichihara, Gaku

    2015-01-15

    1-Bromopropane (1-BP) is neurotoxic in both experimental animals and human. To identify phosphorylated modification on the unrecognized post-translational modifications of proteins and investigate their role in 1-BP-induced neurotoxicity, changes in hippocampal phosphoprotein expression levels were analyzed quantitatively in male F344 rats exposed to 1-BP inhalation at 0, 400, or 1000 ppm for 8 h/day for 1 or 4 weeks. Hippocampal protein extracts were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively by Pro-Q Diamond gel staining and SYPRO Ruby staining coupled with two-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), respectively, as well as by matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) to identify phosphoproteins. Changes in selected proteins were further confirmed by Manganese II (Mn{sup 2+})-Phos-tag SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Bax and cytochrome c protein levels were determined by western blotting. Pro-Q Diamond gel staining combined with 2D-DIGE identified 26 phosphoprotein spots (p < 0.05), and MALDI-TOF/MS identified 18 up-regulated proteins and 8 down-regulated proteins. These proteins are involved in the biological process of response to stimuli, metabolic processes, and apoptosis signaling. Changes in the expression of phosphorylated 14-3-3 θ were further confirmed by Mn{sup 2+}-Phos-tag SDS-PAGE. Western blotting showed overexpression of Bax protein in the mitochondria with down-regulation in the cytoplasm, whereas cytochrome c expression was high in the cytoplasm but low in the mitochondria after 1-BP exposure. Our results suggest that the pathogenesis of 1-BP-induced hippocampal damage involves inhibition of antiapoptosis process. Phosphoproteins identified in this study can potentially serve as biomarkers for 1-BP-induced neurotoxicity. - Highlights: • 1-BP modified hippocampal phosphoproteome in rat and 23 altered proteins were identified. • 1-BP changed phosphorylation

  20. TNF-α from hippocampal microglia induces working memory deficits by acute stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Ohgidani, Masahiro; Kato, Takahiro A; Sagata, Noriaki; Hayakawa, Kohei; Shimokawa, Norihiro; Sato-Kasai, Mina; Kanba, Shigenobu

    2016-07-01

    The role of microglia in stress responses has recently been highlighted, yet the underlying mechanisms of action remain unresolved. The present study examined disruption in working memory due to acute stress using the water-immersion resistant stress (WIRS) test in mice. Mice were subjected to acute WIRS, and biochemical, immunohistochemical, and behavioral assessments were conducted. Spontaneous alternations (working memory) significantly decreased after exposure to acute WIRS for 2h. We employed a 3D morphological analysis and site- and microglia-specific gene analysis techniques to detect microglial activity. Morphological changes in hippocampal microglia were not observed after acute stress, even when assessing ramification ratios and cell somata volumes. Interestingly, hippocampal tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels were significantly elevated after acute stress, and acute stress-induced TNF-α was produced by hippocampal-ramified microglia. Conversely, plasma concentrations of TNF-α were not elevated after acute stress. Etanercept (TNF-α inhibitor) recovered working memory deficits in accordance with hippocampal TNF-α reductions. Overall, results suggest that TNF-α from hippocampal microglia is a key contributor to early-stage stress-to-mental responses. PMID:26551431

  1. Administration of copper reduced the hyper-excitability of neurons in CA1 hippocampal slices from epileptic rats.

    PubMed

    Leiva, Juan; Infante, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    Copper as a trace metal is involved in several neurodegenerative illnesses, such as Menkes, Wilson's, Alzheimer's, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and Creutzfeldt-Jakob. Electrophysiological evidence indicates that acute perfusion of copper can inhibit long-term synaptic potentiation in hippocampal slices. The objective of this work is to determine whether Cu perfusion can perturb synaptic transmission in hippocampal slices derived from pilocarpine treated epileptic rats. Field potential (FP) recordings of the CA1 neurons of rats with chronic epilepsy showed voltage and response duration decrease following copper sulfate perfusion. However, voltage and response duration were higher after removing copper by washing. The discharge frequency of the CA1 neurons of hippocampal slices from non-epileptic control rats was increased after acute perfusion of 10 μM of pilocarpine. This increase was blocked by administering copper sulphate 10 μM. Krebs-Ringer solution washing re-established the discharges, with a higher frequency than that provoked by pilocarpine perfusion. We discuss the blocking effect of copper and the synaptic hyper-excitability generated by its removal. PMID:27548095

  2. Antidepressant behavior in thyroidectomized Wistar rats is induced by hippocampal hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    da Conceição, Rodrigo Rodrigues; Laureano-Melo, Roberto; Oliveira, Kelen Carneiro; de Carvalho Melo, Maria Clara; Kasamatsu, Tereza Sayoko; de Barros Maciel, Rui Monteiro; de Souza, Janaina Sena; Giannocco, Gisele

    2016-04-01

    Thyroidectomy is a surgical procedure indicated in cases of several maligned or benign thyroid diseases, thus, the aim of our study was to verify how the hypothyroidism induced by thyroidectomy influences behavioral parameters and its relation to thyroid hormones metabolism and neurogenesis at hippocampus. For this purpose, Adult male Wistar rats underwent to thyroidectomy to induce hypothyroidism. Behavioral tests, the thyroid profile and hippocampal gene expression were evaluated in control and in thyroidectomized animals. It was observed that thyroidectomized group had a significant increasing in serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and a decreasing in thyroxine (T4) levels as well as in triiodothyronine (T3) serum level. It was also observed reduction of the monocarboxylate transporter 8 (Mct8), thyroid hormone receptor alfa (Trα1), deiodinase type 2 (Dio2), ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 2 (Enpp2) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) mRNA expression in hippocampus of thyroidectomized animals. In the forced swimming test, it was verified that thyroidectomy promotes a decrease in time of immobility and climbing when compared with the control group. In summary, we demonstrated that antidepressant behavior in thyroidectomized Wistar rats is induced by hippocampal hypothyroidism. This effect could be associated to an impaired neuronal activity in acute stress response as it is observed in forced swimming paradigm. PMID:26861177

  3. Inhibitory control deficits in rats with ventral hippocampal lesions.

    PubMed

    Abela, Andrew R; Dougherty, Stephen D; Fagen, Erin D; Hill, Carolyn J R; Chudasama, Y

    2013-06-01

    Two experiments are reported in which rats with selective hippocampal lesions were tested on 2 prefrontal-dependent tasks. In Experiment 1, we compared the effects of lesions of the ventral hippocampus (vHC), dorsal hippocampus (dHC), and sham control surgery on the 5-choice reaction time task. Whereas rats with lesions of the dHC were indistinguishable from sham controls, those with vHC lesions showed increased premature responses and reduced accuracy throughout the experiment. The subsequent administration of systemic escitalopram (5 mg/kg), a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, reduced the number of premature responses in the vHC animals to control levels. In contrast, systemic injections of GBR 12909, a dopamine reuptake inhibitor, failed to ameliorate the impulsive deficit in the vHC group and, in addition, elevated perseverative responding in the vHC group only. In Experiment 2, we tested a separate group of rats with vHC lesions on a touchscreen visual discrimination and reversal learning task. Rats with vHC lesions acquired the visual discrimination as well as sham controls and showed normal inhibitory control of a previously reinforced response during reversal learning. These data support a role for the vHC in inhibitory control functions, especially in the inhibitory control of impulsive actions. PMID:22615141

  4. Treadmill exercise induces hippocampal astroglial alterations in rats.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Caren; Tramontina, Ana Carolina; Nardin, Patrícia; Biasibetti, Regina; Costa, Ana Paula; Vizueti, Adriana Fernanda; Batassini, Cristiane; Tortorelli, Lucas Silva; Wartchow, Krista Minéia; Dutra, Márcio Ferreira; Bobermin, Larissa; Sesterheim, Patrícia; Quincozes-Santos, André; de Souza, Jaqueline; Gonçalves, Carlos Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Physical exercise effects on brain health and cognitive performance have been described. Synaptic remodeling in hippocampus induced by physical exercise has been described in animal models, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Changes in astrocytes, the glial cells involved in synaptic remodeling, need more characterization. We investigated the effect of moderate treadmill exercise (20 min/day) for 4 weeks on some parameters of astrocytic activity in rat hippocampal slices, namely, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), glutamate uptake and glutamine synthetase (GS) activities, glutathione content, and S100B protein content and secretion, as well as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels and glucose uptake activity in this tissue. Results show that moderate treadmill exercise was able to induce a decrease in GFAP content (evaluated by ELISA and immunohistochemistry) and an increase in GS activity. These changes could be mediated by corticosterone, whose levels were elevated in serum. BDNF, another putative mediator, was not altered in hippocampal tissue. Moreover, treadmill exercise caused a decrease in NO content. Our data indicate specific changes in astrocyte markers induced by physical exercise, the importance of studying astrocytes for understanding brain plasticity, as well as reinforce the relevance of physical exercise as a neuroprotective strategy. PMID:23401802

  5. Treadmill Exercise Induces Hippocampal Astroglial Alterations in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, Caren; Tramontina, Ana Carolina; Nardin, Patrícia; Biasibetti, Regina; Costa, Ana Paula; Vizueti, Adriana Fernanda; Batassini, Cristiane; Tortorelli, Lucas Silva; Wartchow, Krista Minéia; Dutra, Márcio Ferreira; Bobermin, Larissa; Sesterheim, Patrícia; Quincozes-Santos, André; de Souza, Jaqueline; Gonçalves, Carlos Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Physical exercise effects on brain health and cognitive performance have been described. Synaptic remodeling in hippocampus induced by physical exercise has been described in animal models, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Changes in astrocytes, the glial cells involved in synaptic remodeling, need more characterization. We investigated the effect of moderate treadmill exercise (20 min/day) for 4 weeks on some parameters of astrocytic activity in rat hippocampal slices, namely, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), glutamate uptake and glutamine synthetase (GS) activities, glutathione content, and S100B protein content and secretion, as well as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels and glucose uptake activity in this tissue. Results show that moderate treadmill exercise was able to induce a decrease in GFAP content (evaluated by ELISA and immunohistochemistry) and an increase in GS activity. These changes could be mediated by corticosterone, whose levels were elevated in serum. BDNF, another putative mediator, was not altered in hippocampal tissue. Moreover, treadmill exercise caused a decrease in NO content. Our data indicate specific changes in astrocyte markers induced by physical exercise, the importance of studying astrocytes for understanding brain plasticity, as well as reinforce the relevance of physical exercise as a neuroprotective strategy. PMID:23401802

  6. Neural depolarization triggers Mg2+ influx in rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, R; Shindo, Y; Karube, T; Hotta, K; Suzuki, K; Oka, K

    2015-12-01

    Homeostasis of magnesium ion (Mg(2+)) plays key roles in healthy neuronal functions, and deficiency of Mg(2+) is involved in various neuronal diseases. In neurons, we have reported that excitotoxicity induced by excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate increases intracellular Mg(2+) concentration ([Mg(2+)]i). However, it has not been revealed whether neuronal activity under physiological condition modulates [Mg(2+)]i. The aim of this study is to explore the direct relationship between neural activity and [Mg(2+)]i dynamics. In rat primary-dissociated hippocampal neurons, the [Mg(2+)]i and [Ca(2+)]i dynamics were simultaneously visualized with a highly selective fluorescent Mg(2+) probe, KMG-104, and a fluorescent Ca(2+) probe, Fura Red, respectively. [Mg(2+)]i increase concomitant with neural activity by direct current stimulation was observed in neurons plated on an indium-tin oxide (ITO) glass electrode, which enables fluorescent imaging during neural stimulation. The neural activity-dependent [Mg(2+)]i increase was also detected in neurons whose excitability was enhanced by the treatment of a voltage-gated K(+) channel blocker, tetraethylammonium (TEA) at the timings of spontaneous Ca(2+) increase. Furthermore, the [Mg(2+)]i increase was abolished in Mg(2+)-free extracellular medium, indicating [Mg(2+)]i increase is due to Mg(2+) influx induced by neural activity. The direct neuronal depolarization by veratridine, a Na(+) channel opener, induced [Mg(2+)]i increase, and this [Mg(2+)]i increase was suppressed by the pretreatment of a non-specific Mg(2+) channel inhibitor, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB). Overall, activity-dependent [Mg(2+)]i increase results from Mg(2+) influx through 2-APB-sensitive channels in rat hippocampal neurons. PMID:26455951

  7. Hippocampal morphology in a rat model of depression: the effects of physical activity.

    PubMed

    Sierakowiak, Adam; Mattsson, Anna; Gómez-Galán, Marta; Feminía, Teresa; Graae, Lisette; Aski, Sahar Nikkhou; Damberg, Peter; Lindskog, Mia; Brené, Stefan; Åberg, Elin

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating in vivo and ex vivo evidences show that humans suffering from depression have decreased hippocampal volume and altered spine density. Moreover, physical activity has an antidepressant effect in humans and in animal models, but to what extent physical activity can affect hippocampal volume and spine numbers in a model for depression is not known. In this study we analyzed whether physical activity affects hippocampal volume and spine density by analyzing a rodent genetic model of depression, Flinders Sensitive Line Rats (FSL), with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and ex vivo Golgi staining. We found that physical activity in the form of voluntary wheel running during 5 weeks increased hippocampal volume. Moreover, runners also had larger numbers of thin spines in the dentate gyrus. Our findings support that voluntary wheel running, which is antidepressive in FSL rats, is associated with increased hippocampal volume and spine numbers. PMID:25674191

  8. Medium-intensity acute exhaustive exercise induces neural cell apoptosis in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Li, Shanni; Liu, Jin; Yan, Hengmei

    2013-01-15

    The present study assessed the influence of medium-intensity (treadmill at a speed of 19.3 m/min until exhaustion) and high-intensity (treadmill at a speed of 26.8 m/min until exhaustion) acute exhaustive exercise on rat hippocampal neural cell apoptosis. TUNEL staining showed significantly increased neural cell apoptosis in the hippocampal CA1 region of rats after medium- and high-intensity acute exhaustive exercise, particularly the medium-intensity acute exhaustive exercise, when compared with the control. Immunohistochemistry showed significantly increased expression of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 and the proapoptotic protein Bax in the hippocampal CA1 region of rats after medium- and high-intensity acute exhaustive exercise. Additionally, the ratio of Bax to Bcl-2 increased in both exercise groups. In particular, the medium-intensity acute exhaustive exercise group had significantly higher Bax and Bcl-2 protein expression and a higher Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. These findings indicate that acute exhaustive exercise of different intensities can induce neural cell apoptosis in the hippocampus, and that medium-intensity acute exhaustive exercise results in greater damage when compared with high-intensity exercise. PMID:25206482

  9. Ventromedial prefrontal cortex stimulation enhances memory and hippocampal neurogenesis in the middle-aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Albert; Jain, Neeraj; Vyas, Ajai; Lim, Lee Wei

    2015-01-01

    Memory dysfunction is a key symptom of age-related dementia. Although recent studies have suggested positive effects of electrical stimulation for memory enhancement, its potential targets remain largely unknown. In this study, we hypothesized that spatially targeted deep brain stimulation of ventromedial prefrontal cortex enhanced memory functions in a middle-aged rat model. Our results show that acute stimulation enhanced the short-, but not the long-term memory in the novel-object recognition task. Interestingly, after chronic high-frequency stimulation, both the short- and long-term memories were robustly improved in the novel-object recognition test and Morris water-maze spatial task compared to sham. Our results also demonstrated that chronic ventromedial prefrontal cortex high-frequency stimulation upregulated neurogenesis-associated genes along with enhanced hippocampal cell proliferation. Importantly, these memory behaviors were strongly correlated with the hippocampal neurogenesis. Overall, these findings suggest that chronic ventromedial prefrontal cortex high-frequency stimulation may serve as a novel effective therapeutic target for dementia-related disorders. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04803.001 PMID:25768425

  10. Wnt-5a Ligand Modulates Mitochondrial Fission-Fusion in Rat Hippocampal Neurons*

    PubMed Central

    Godoy, Juan A.; Arrázola, Macarena S.; Ordenes, Daniela; Silva-Alvarez, Carmen; Braidy, Nady; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2014-01-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway plays an important role in developmental processes, including embryonic patterning, cell specification, and cell polarity. Wnt components participate in the development of the central nervous system, and growing evidence indicates that this pathway also regulates the function of the adult nervous system. In this study, we report that Wnt-5a, a noncanonical Wnt ligand, is a potent activator of mitochondrial dynamics and induces acute fission and fusion events in the mitochondria of rat hippocampal neurons. The effect of Wnt-5a was inhibited in the presence of sFRP, a Wnt scavenger. Similarly, the canonical Wnt-3a ligand had no effect on mitochondrial fission-fusion events, suggesting that this effect is specific for Wnt-5a alone. We also show that the Wnt-5a effects on mitochondrial dynamics occur with an increase in both intracellular and mitochondrial calcium (Ca2+), which was correlated with an increased phosphorylation of Drp1(Ser-616) and a decrease of Ser-637 phosphorylation, both indicators of mitochondrial dynamics. Electron microscope analysis of hippocampal tissues in the CA1 region showed an increase in the number of mitochondria present in the postsynaptic region, and this finding correlated with a change in mitochondrial morphology. We conclude that Wnt-5a/Ca2+ signaling regulates the mitochondrial fission-fusion process in hippocampal neurons, a feature that might help to further understand the role of Wnt-related pathologies, including neurodegenerative diseases associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, and represents a potentially important link between impaired metabolic function and degenerative disorders. PMID:25336659

  11. Methylxanthine-evoked perturbation of spontaneous and evoked activities in isolated newborn rat hippocampal networks.

    PubMed

    Ruangkittisakul, A; Sharopov, S; Kantor, C; Kuribayashi, J; Mildenberger, E; Luhmann, H J; Kilb, W; Ballanyi, K

    2015-08-20

    Treatment of apnea of prematurity with methylxanthines like caffeine, aminophylline or theophylline can evoke hippocampal seizures. However, it is unknown at which interstitial brain concentrations methylxanthines promote such neonatal seizures or interfere with physiological 'early network oscillations' (ENOs) that are considered as pivotal for maturation of hippocampal neural networks. We studied theophylline and caffeine effects on ENOs in CA3 neurons (CA3-ENOs) and CA3 electrical stimulation-evoked monosynaptic CA1 field potentials (CA1-FPs) in sliced and intact hippocampi, respectively, from 8 to 10-days-old rats. Submillimolar doses of theophylline and caffeine, blocking adenosine receptors and phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4), did not affect CA3-ENOs, ENO-associated cytosolic Ca(2+) transients or CA1-FPs nor did they provoke seizure-like discharges. Low millimolar doses of theophylline (⩾1mM) or caffeine (⩾5mM), blocking GABAA and glycine receptors plus sarcoplasmic-endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase (SERCA)-type Ca(2+) ATPases, evoked seizure-like discharges with no indication of cytosolic Ca(2+) dysregulation. Inhibiting PDE4 with rolipram or glycine receptors with strychnine had no effect on CA3-ENOs and did not occlude seizure-like events as tested with theophylline. GABAA receptor blockade induced seizure-like discharges and occluded theophylline-evoked seizure-like discharges in the slices, but not in the intact hippocampi. In summary, submillimolar methylxanthine concentrations do not acutely affect spontaneous CA3-ENOs or electrically evoked synaptic activities and low millimolar doses are needed to evoke seizure-like discharges in isolated developing hippocampal neural networks. We conclude that mechanisms of methylxanthine-related seizure-like discharges do not involve SERCA inhibition-related neuronal Ca(2+) dysregulation, PDE4 blockade or adenosine and glycine receptor inhibition, whereas GABA(A) receptor blockade may contribute partially. PMID

  12. [Effects of coriaria lactone on the concentration of intracellular free calcium of rat hippocampal neurons].

    PubMed

    Lai, Xiaohui; Zhang, Qin; Zhou, Dong

    2008-08-01

    We instituted an investigation to elucidate the role of Ca2+ and calcium channels in epileptogenesis and to analyze the mechanism by which coriaria lactone (CL) regulates intracellular Ca2+ concentration. The hippocampal neurons of Sprague-Dawley rats (post natal days 7 to 14) were acutely isolated and loaded with calcium-sensitive fluorescent indicator Fluo-3/AM. Intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) changes were measured using laser scanning confocal microscopy. The study included five groups, namely the CL group, the NiCl2 plus CL group, the Nifedipine plus CL group, the NiCl2+ Nifedipine plus CL group, and the control group. The results indicated that 20 microl/ml CL induced a significant increase of [Ca2+]i in hippocampal neurons when compared to the control (P < 0.01), the mean fluorescent intensity of intracellular calcium displaying an increase from 5.46 +/- 2.37 to 34.03 +/- 3.45. Although the increase of relative intracellular fluorescent intensity was delayed by 3 or 4 minutes in the NiCl2 plus CL group, the Nifedipine plus CL group, and the NiCl2+ Nifedipine plus CL group, yet the use to 20 microl/ml CL in these 3 groups caused a significant ascending level of the fluorescent intensities (from 3.94 +/- 1.75 to 30.18 +/- 4.22; from 3.38 +/- 1.11 to 36.39 +/- 3.97; from 3.05 +/- 1.02 to 28.05 +/- 2.71), and the effect was comparable to that observed in the CL group (P > 0.05). So CL can increase [Ca2+]i in acutely isolated rat hippocampal neurons. This effect can be delayed but can not be completely blocked by NiCl2 and Nifedipine. These findings indicate that CL can increase [Ca2+]i by other means besides T- and L-type voltage-gated calcium channels, and that CL can increase the excitability of neurons and play a role in the epileptogenesis process. PMID:18788307

  13. Hippocampal protection in mice with an attenuated inflammatory monocyte response to acute CNS picornavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Charles L.; LaFrance-Corey, Reghann G.; Sundsbak, Rhianna S.; Sauer, Brian M.; LaFrance, Stephanie J.; Buenz, Eric J.; Schmalstieg, William F.

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal injury during acute viral infection of the brain is associated with the development of persistent cognitive deficits and seizures in humans. In C57BL/6 mice acutely infected with the Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus, hippocampal CA1 neurons are injured by a rapid innate immune response, resulting in profound memory deficits. In contrast, infected SJL and B6xSJL F1 hybrid mice exhibit essentially complete hippocampal and memory preservation. Analysis of brain-infiltrating leukocytes revealed that SJL mice mount a sharply attenuated inflammatory monocyte response as compared to B6 mice. Bone marrow transplantation experiments isolated the attenuation to the SJL immune system. Adoptive transfer of B6 inflammatory monocytes into acutely infected B6xSJL hosts converted these mice to a hippocampal damage phenotype and induced a cognitive deficit marked by failure to recognize a novel object. These findings show that inflammatory monocytes are the critical cellular mediator of hippocampal injury during acute picornavirus infection of the brain. PMID:22848791

  14. Spontaneous perseverative turning in rats with radiation-induced hippocampal damage

    SciTech Connect

    Mickley, G.A.; Ferguson, J.L.; Nemeth, T.J.; Mulvihill, M.A.; Alderks, C.E. )

    1989-08-01

    This study found a new behavioral correlate of lesions specific to the dentate granule cell layer of the hippocampus: spontaneous perseverative turning. Irradiation of a portion of the neonatal rat cerebral hemispheres produced hypoplasia of the granule cell layer of the hippocampal dentate gyrus while sparing the rest of the brain. Radiation-induced damage to the hippocampal formation caused rats placed in bowls to spontaneously turn in long, slow bouts without reversals. Irradiated subjects also exhibited other behaviors characteristic of hippocampal damage (e.g., perseveration in spontaneous exploration of the arms of a T-maze, retarded acquisition of a passive avoidance task, and increased horizontal locomotion). These data extend previously reported behavioral correlates of fascia dentata lesions and suggest the usefulness of a bout analysis of spontaneous bowl turning as a measure of nondiscrete-trial spontaneous alternation and a sensitive additional indicator of radiation-induced hippocampal damage.

  15. Exposure of rat hippocampal astrocytes to Ziram increases oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Matei, Ann-Marie; Trombetta, Louis D

    2016-04-01

    Pesticides have been shown in several studies to be the leading candidates of environmental toxins and may contribute to the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases. Ziram (zinc-bis(dimethyldithiocarbamate)) is an agricultural dithiocarbamate fungicide that is used to treat a variety of plant diseases. In spite of their generally acknowledged low toxicity, dithiocarbamates are known to cause a wide range of neurobehavioral effects as well as neuropathological changes in the brain. Astrocytes play a key role in normal brain physiology and in the pathology of the nervous system. This investigation studied the effects of 1.0 µM Ziram on rat hippocampal astrocytes. The thiobarbituric acid reactive substance assay performed showed a significant increase in malondialdehyde, a product of lipid peroxidation, in the Ziram-treated cells. Biochemical analysis also revealed a significant increase in the induction of 70 kDa heat shock and heme oxygenase 1 stress proteins. In addition, an increase of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and a significant increase in oxidized glutathione (GSSG) were observed in the Ziram-treated cells. The ratio GSH to GSSG calculated from the treated cells was also decreased. Light and transmission electron microscopy supported the biochemical findings in Ziram-treated astrocytes. This data suggest that the cytotoxic effects observed with Ziram treatments may be related to the increase of oxidative stress. PMID:24193059

  16. Ketamine Affects the Neurogenesis of the Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus in 7-Day-Old Rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, He; Liu, Cun-Ming; Sun, Jie; Hao, Ting; Xu, Chun-Mei; Wang, Dan; Wu, Yu-Qing

    2016-08-01

    Ketamine has been reported to cause neonatal neurotoxicity via a neuronal apoptosis mechanism; however, no in vivo research has reported whether ketamine could affect postnatal neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG). A growing number of experiments suggest that postnatal hippocampal neurogenesis is the foundation of maintaining normal hippocampus function into adulthood. Therefore, this study investigated the effect of ketamine on hippocampal neurogenesis. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two groups: the control group (equal volume of normal saline), and the ketamine-anesthesia group (40 mg/kg ketamine in four injections at 1 h intervals). The S-phase marker 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was administered after ketamine exposure to postnatal day 7 (PND-7) rats, and the neurogenesis in the hippocampal DG was assessed using single- or double-immunofluorescence staining. The expression of GFAP in the hippocampal DG was measured by western blot analysis. Spatial reference memory was tested by Morris water maze at 2 months after PND-7 rats exposed to ketamine treatment. The present results showed that neonatal ketamine exposure significantly inhibited neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation, decreased astrocytic differentiation, and markedly enhanced neuronal differentiation. The disruptive effect of ketamine on the proliferation and differentiation of NSCs lasted at least 1 week and disappeared by 2 weeks after ketamine exposure. Moreover, the migration of newborn neurons in the granule cell layer and the growth of astrocytes in the hippocampal DG were inhibited by ketamine on PND-37 and PND-44. Finally, ketamine caused a deficit in hippocampal-dependent spatial reference memory tasks at 2 months old. Our results suggested that ketamine may interfere with hippocampal neurogenesis and long-term neurocognitive function in PND-7 rats. These findings may provide a new perspective to explain the adult neurocognitive dysfunction induced by neonatal

  17. Different transfer of nociceptive sensitivity from rats with postnatal hippocampal lesions to control rats.

    PubMed

    Yamamotová, Anna; Franek, Miloslav; Vaculín, Simon; St'astný, Frantisek; Bubeníková-Valesová, Vera; Rokyta, Richard

    2007-07-01

    Hippocampal lesions in newborn rats alter the development of mechanisms involved in the processing of nociception. The hippocampal lesion was induced by the bilateral infusion, into the lateral cerebral ventricles, of 0.25 microL of saline containing either 0.25 micromol quinolinic acid (QUIN) and/or 0.25 micromol N-acetyl-L-aspartyl-L-glutamate (NAAG) on postnatal day 12. The same amount of sterile saline was injected into the sham-operated animals (group SHAM). It was expected that the QUIN- and NAAG-lesioned rats would exhibit some differences in thermal pain perception; however, we wanted to know if the control rats would exhibit, at least in part, similar changes in pain perception as their chemically lesioned siblings with which they were housed. Young adult NAAG-injured rats exhibited increased withdrawal latencies in the tail-flick and plantar tests, whereas young adult QUIN-injured animals exhibited only marginally decreased latencies. Nociceptive responses in the SHAM rats paralleled the littermates that had been neonatally treated with QUIN or NAAG, i.e. the responses in the SHAM(QUIN) group decreased, whereas the responses in the SHAM(NAAG) group increased. No significant changes in nociception were observed in intact animals, regardless of which group they were housed with. Our results show that social factors, which were originally demonstrated only for the pain behavior, may also influence basal nociceptive sensitivity in rats. We concluded that the "sham operation" may have had a long-term, nonspecific impact on nociceptive behavior by inducing behavioral mimicry of other animals. PMID:17623020

  18. Acute deep brain stimulation in the thalamic reticular nucleus protects against acute stress and modulates initial events of adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Magdaleno-Madrigal, Víctor Manuel; Pantoja-Jiménez, Christopher Rodrigo; Bazaldúa, Adrián; Fernández-Mas, Rodrigo; Almazán-Alvarado, Salvador; Bolaños-Alejos, Fernanda; Ortíz-López, Leonardo; Ramírez-Rodriguez, Gerardo Bernabé

    2016-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is used as an alternative therapeutic procedure for pharmacoresistant psychiatric disorders. Recently the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) gained attention due to the description of a novel pathway from the amygdala to this nucleus suggesting that may be differentially disrupted in mood disorders. The limbic system is implicated in the regulation of these disorders that are accompanied by neuroplastic changes. The hippocampus is highly plastic and shows the generation of new neurons, process affected by stress but positively regulated by antidepressant drugs. We explored the impact of applying acute DBS to the TRN (DBS-TRN) in male Wistar rats exposed to acute stress caused by the forced-swim Porsolt's test (FST) and on initial events of hippocampal neurogenesis. After the first session of forced-swim, rats were randomly subdivided in a DBS-TRN and a Sham group. Stimulated rats received 10min of DBS, thus the depressant-like behavior reflected as immobility was evaluated in the second session of forced-swim. Locomotricity was evaluated in the open field test. Cell proliferation and doublecortin-associated cells were quantified in the hippocampus of other cohorts of rats. No effects of electrode implantation were found in locomotricity. Acute DBS-TRN reduced immobility in comparison to the Sham group (p<0.001). DBS-TRN increased cell proliferation (Ki67 or BrdU-positive cells; p=0.02, p=0.02) and the number of doublecortin-cells compared to the Sham group (p<0.02). Similar effects were found in rats previously exposed to the first session of forced-swim. Our data could suggest that TRN brain region may be a promising target for DBS to treat intractable depression. PMID:27435420

  19. Contrasting effects on path integration after hippocampal damage in humans and rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soyun; Sapiurka, Maya; Clark, Robert E.; Squire, Larry R.

    2013-01-01

    The hippocampus and other medial temporal lobe structures have been linked to both memory and spatial cognition, but it has been unclear how these ideas are connected. We carried out parallel studies of path integration in patients with medial temporal lobe lesions and rats with hippocampal lesions. Subjects entered a circular arena without vision, searched for a target, and then attempted to return to the start location. Patients performed accurately, and as well as controls, so long as the outward path was relatively direct and the target was found within 20 s. In sharp contrast, rats with hippocampal lesions were impaired, even when the outward path was shorter than 1 m, involved no turns, and the target was found within 3 s. We suggest that patients succeeded because performance could be supported by working memory and that patients and rats differ after hippocampal lesions in their ability to construct a coherent working memory of spatial environments. PMID:23404706

  20. Dysregulation of neonatal hippocampal cell genesis in the androgen insensitive Tfm rat

    PubMed Central

    Waddell, Jaylyn; Bowers, J. Michael; Edwards, N. Shalon; Jordan, Cynthia L.; McCarthy, Margaret M.

    2013-01-01

    The first two weeks of life are a critical period for hippocampal development. At this time gonadal steroid exposure organizes sex differences in hippocampal sensitivity to activational effects of steroids, hippocampal cell morphology and hippocampus dependent behaviors. Our laboratory has characterized a robust sex difference in neonatal neurogenesis in the hippocampus that is mediated by estradiol. Here, we extend our knowledge of this sex difference by comparing the male and female hippocampus to the androgen insensitive testicular feminized mutant (Tfm) rat. In the neonatal Tfm rat hippocampus, fewer newly generated cells survive compared to males or females. This deficit in cell genesis is partially recovered with the potent androgen DHT, but is more completely recovered following estradiol administration. Tfm rats do not differ from males or females in the level of endogenous estradiol in the neonatal hippocampus, suggesting other mechanisms mediate a differential sensitivity to estradiol in male, female and Tfm hippocampus. We also demonstrate disrupted performance on a hippocampal-dependent contextual fear discrimination task. Tfm rats generalize fear across contexts, and do not exhibit significant loss of fear during extinction exposure. These results extend prior reports of exaggerated response to stress in Tfm rats, and following gonadectomy in normal male rats. PMID:23747829

  1. Correlation between hippocampal levels of neural, epithelial and inducible NOS and spatial learning skills in rats.

    PubMed

    Gökçek-Saraç, Çiğdem; Karakurt, Serdar; Adalı, Orhan; Jakubowska-Doğru, Ewa

    2012-12-01

    In the present study, to better understand the role of different nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoforms in hippocampus-dependent forms of learning, we examined the expression of neural, endothelial, and inducible NOS in the hippocampus of young-adult rats classified as "poor" and "good" learners on the basis of their performance in the partially baited 12-arm radial maze. Taking into consideration strain-dependent differences in learning skills and NOS expression, experiments were performed on two different lines of laboratory rats: the inbred Wistar (W) and the outcrossed Wistar/Spraque-Dawley (W/S) line. The hippocampal levels of NOS proteins were assessed by Western Blotting. In the present study, genetically more homogenous W rats showed a slower rate of learning compared to the genetically less homogenous outcrossed W/S rats. The deficient performance in the W rat group compared to outcrossed W/S rats, and in "poor" learners of both groups compared to "good" learners was due to a higher percentage of reference memory errors. The overall NOS levels were significantly higher in W group compared to outcrossed W/S rats. In both rat lines, the rate of learning positively correlated with hippocampal levels of nNOS and negatively correlated with iNOS levels. Hippocampal eNOS levels correlated negatively with animals' performance but only in the W rats. These results suggest that all 3 NOS isoforms are implemented but play different roles in neural signaling. PMID:22909987

  2. Loss of hippocampal theta rhythm results in spatial memory deficit in the rat.

    PubMed

    Winson, J

    1978-07-14

    Rats learned, using distal room cues, to run to a goal on an elevated, circular track starting from any position on the track. The goal was one of eight equidistant, recessed cups set around the track, the goal cup being distinguished from the others solely by its position in the room. After learning, electrolytic lesions were made in the medial septal nucleus eliminating hippocampal theta rhythm in some animals but not in others. Rats without theta rhythm were no longer able to perform the spatial task, whereas rats with undisturbed theta rhythm retrained normal performance. Although rats without theta rhythm could not find their way directly to the goal, they recognized its location when they came upon it by chance. This type of spatial deficit appears similar to that shown by hippocampally lesioned patient H.M. Subsequent tests demonstrated that rats deprived of theta rhythm before training could nevertheless learn the task. PMID:663646

  3. Existence of nitric oxide synthase in rat hippocampal pyramidal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Wendland, B; Schweizer, F E; Ryan, T A; Nakane, M; Murad, F; Scheller, R H; Tsien, R W

    1994-01-01

    It has been proposed that nitric oxide (NO) serves as a key retrograde messenger during long-term potentiation at hippocampal synapses, linking induction of long-term potentiation in postsynaptic CA1 pyramidal cells to expression of long-term potentiation in presynaptic nerve terminals. However, nitric oxide synthase (NOS), the proposed NO-generating enzyme, has not yet been detected in the appropriate postsynaptic cells. We here demonstrate specific NOS immunoreactivity in the CA1 region of hippocampal sections by using an antibody specific for NOS type I and relatively gentle methods of fixation. NOS immunoreactivity was found in dendrites and cell bodies of CA1 pyramidal neurons. Cultured hippocampal pyramidal cells also displayed specific immunostaining. Control experiments showed no staining with preimmune serum or immune serum that was blocked with purified NOS. These results demonstrate that CA1 pyramidal cells contain NOS, as required were NO involved in retrograde signaling during hippocampal synaptic plasticity. Images PMID:7510887

  4. Anterior Thalamic Lesions Alter Both Hippocampal-Dependent Behavior and Hippocampal Acetylcholine Release in the Rat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savage, Lisa M.; Hall, Joseph M.; Vetreno, Ryan P.

    2011-01-01

    The anterior thalamic nuclei (ATN) are important for learning and memory as damage to this region produces a persistent amnestic syndrome. Dense connections between the ATN and the hippocampus exist, and importantly, damage to the ATN can impair hippocampal functioning. Acetylcholine (ACh) is a key neurotransmitter in the hippocampus, and in vivo…

  5. Prenatal choline availability modulates hippocampal neurogenesis and neurogenic responses to enriching experiences in adult female rats

    PubMed Central

    Glenn, Melissa J.; Gibson, Erin M.; Kirby, Elizabeth D.; Mellott, Tiffany J.; Blusztajn, Jan K.; Williams, Christina L.

    2008-01-01

    Increased dietary intake of choline early in life improves performance of adult rats on memory tasks and prevents their age-related memory decline. Because neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus also declines with age, we investigated whether prenatal choline availability affects hippocampal neurogenesis in adult Sprague–Dawley rats and modifies their neurogenic response to environmental stimulation. On embryonic days (ED) 12−17, pregnant rats ate a choline-supplemented (SUP-5 g/kg), choline sufficient (SFF-1.1 g/kg), or choline-free (DEF) semisynthetic diet. Adult offspring either remained in standard housing or were given 21 daily visits to explore a maze. On the last ten exploration days, all rats received daily injections of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU, 100 mg/kg). The number of BrdU+ cells was significantly greater in the dentate gyrus in SUP rats compared to SFF or DEF rats. While maze experience increased the number of BrdU+ cells in SFF rats to the level seen in the SUP rats, this enriching experience did not alter cell proliferation in DEF rats. Similar patterns of cell proliferation were obtained with immunohistochemical staining for neuronal marker doublecortin, confirming that diet and exploration affected hippocampal neurogenesis. Moreover, hippocampal levels of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were increased in SUP rats as compared to SFF and DEF animals. We conclude that prenatal choline intake has enduring effects on adult hippocampal neurogenesis, possibly via up-regulation of BDNF levels, and suggest that these alterations of neurogenesis may contribute to the mechanism of life-long changes in cognitive function governed by the availability of choline during gestation. PMID:17445242

  6. Diurnal inhibition of NMDA-EPSCs at rat hippocampal mossy fibre synapses through orexin-2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Perin, Martina; Longordo, Fabio; Massonnet, Christine; Welker, Egbert; Lüthi, Anita

    2014-01-01

    Diurnal release of the orexin neuropeptides orexin-A (Ox-A, hypocretin-1) and orexin-B (Ox-B, hypocretin-2) stabilises arousal, regulates energy homeostasis and contributes to cognition and learning. However, whether cellular correlates of brain plasticity are regulated through orexins, and whether they do so in a time-of-day-dependent manner, has never been assessed. Immunohistochemically we found sparse but widespread innervation of hippocampal subfields through Ox-A- and Ox-B-containing fibres in young adult rats. The actions of Ox-A were studied on NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-mediated excitatory synaptic transmission in acute hippocampal slices prepared around the trough (Zeitgeber time (ZT) 4–8, corresponding to 4–8 h into the resting phase) and peak (ZT 23) of intracerebroventricular orexin levels. At ZT 4–8, exogenous Ox-A (100 nm in bath) inhibited NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (NMDA-EPSCs) at mossy fibre (MF)–CA3 (to 55.6 ± 6.8% of control, P = 0.0003) and at Schaffer collateral–CA1 synapses (70.8 ± 6.3%, P = 0.013), whereas it remained ineffective at non-MF excitatory synapses in CA3. Ox-A actions were mediated postsynaptically and blocked by the orexin-2 receptor (OX2R) antagonist JNJ10397049 (1 μm), but not by orexin-1 receptor inhibition (SB334867, 1 μm) or by adrenergic and cholinergic antagonists. At ZT 23, inhibitory effects of exogenous Ox-A were absent (97.6 ± 2.9%, P = 0.42), but reinstated (87.2 ± 3.3%, P = 0.002) when endogenous orexin signalling was attenuated for 5 h through i.p. injections of almorexant (100 mg kg−1), a dual orexin receptor antagonist. In conclusion, endogenous orexins modulate hippocampal NMDAR function in a time-of-day-dependent manner, suggesting that they may influence cellular plasticity and consequent variations in memory performance across the sleep–wake cycle. PMID:25085886

  7. High-frequency electroacupuncture evidently reinforces hippocampal synaptic transmission in Alzheimer's disease rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Kong, Li-hong; Wang, Hui; Shen, Feng; Wang, Ya-wen; Zhou, Hua; Sun, Guo-jie

    2016-01-01

    The frequency range of electroacupuncture in treatment of Alzheimer's disease in rats is commonly 2–5 Hz (low frequency) and 50–100 Hz (high frequency). We established a rat model of Alzheimer's disease by injecting β-amyloid 1–42 (Aβ1–42) into the bilateral hippocampal dentate gyrus to verify which frequency may be better suited in treatment. Electroacupuncture at 2 Hz or 50 Hz was used to stimulate Baihui (DU20) and Shenshu (BL23) acupoints. The water maze test and electrophysiological studies demonstrated that spatial memory ability was apparently improved, and the ranges of long-term potentiation and long-term depression were increased in Alzheimer's disease rats after electroacupuncture treatment. Moreover, the effects of electroacupuncture at 50 Hz were better than that at 2 Hz. These findings suggest that high-frequency electroacupuncture may enhance hippocampal synaptic transmission and potentially improve memory disorders in Alzheimer's disease rats. PMID:27335565

  8. Developmental hypothyroidism abolishes bilateral differences in sonic hedgehog gene control in the rat hippocampal dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takeshi; Wang, Liyun; Kimura, Masayuki; Abe, Hajime; Mizukami, Sayaka; Yoshida, Toshinori; Shibutani, Makoto

    2015-03-01

    Both developmental and adult-stage hypothyroidism disrupt rat hippocampal neurogenesis. We previously showed that exposing mouse offspring to manganese permanently disrupts hippocampal neurogenesis and abolishes the asymmetric distribution of cells expressing Mid1, a molecule regulated by sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling. The present study examined the involvement of Shh signaling on the disruption of hippocampal neurogenesis in rats with hypothyroidism. Pregnant rats were treated with methimazole (MMI) at 0 or 200 ppm in the drinking water from gestation day 10-21 days after delivery (developmental hypothyroidism). Adult male rats were treated with MMI in the same manner from postnatal day (PND) 46 to PND 77 (adult-stage hypothyroidism). Developmental hypothyroidism reduced the number of Mid1(+) cells within the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus of offspring on PND 21, and consequently abolished the normal asymmetric predominance of Mid1(+) cells on the right side through the adult stage. In control animals, Shh was expressed in a subpopulation of hilar neurons, showing asymmetric distribution with left side predominance on PND 21; however, this asymmetry did not continue through the adult stage. Developmental hypothyroidism increased Shh(+) neurons bilaterally and abolished the asymmetric distribution pattern on PND 21. Adult hypothyroidism also disrupted the asymmetric distribution of Mid1(+) cells but did not affect the distribution of Shh(+) hilar neurons. The results suggest that the hippocampal neurogenesis disruption seen in hypothyroidism involves changes in asymmetric Shh(+) neuron distribution in developmental hypothyroidism and altered Mid1 expression in both developmental and adult-stage hypothyroidism. PMID:25539664

  9. MODULATION OF HIPPOCAMPAL NEUROGENESIS AND COGNITIVE PERFORMANCE IN THE AGED RAT: THE BLUEBERRY EFFECT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The decline of memory with age is associated with a reduction in hippocampal neurogenesis, suggesting that this process may be an important factor in memory modulation. Thus, factors such as head injury, depression and stress that lead to decreases in neurogenesis are all associated with greater rat...

  10. Protein kinase C regulates mood-related behaviors and adult hippocampal cell proliferation in rats.

    PubMed

    Abrial, Erika; Etievant, Adeline; Bétry, Cécile; Scarna, Hélène; Lucas, Guillaume; Haddjeri, Nasser; Lambás-Señas, Laura

    2013-06-01

    The neurobiological mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology and therapeutics of bipolar disorder are still unknown. In recent years, protein kinase C (PKC) has emerged as a potential key player in mania. To further investigate the role of this signaling system in mood regulation, we examined the effects of PKC modulators in behavioral tests modeling several facets of bipolar disorder and in adult hippocampal cell proliferation in rats. Our results showed that a single injection of the PKC inhibitors tamoxifen (80 mg/kg, i.p.) and chelerythrine (3 mg/kg, s.c.) attenuated amphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion and decreased risk-taking behavior, supporting the efficacy of PKC blockade in acute mania. Moreover, chronic exposure to tamoxifen (10 mg/kg/day, i.p., for 14 days) or chelerythrine (0.3 mg/kg/day, s.c., for 14 days) caused depressive-like behavior in the forced swim test, and resulted in a reduction of cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Finally, we showed that, contrary to the PKC inhibitors, the PKC activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) enhanced risk-taking behavior and induced an antidepressant-like effect. Taken together, these findings support the involvement of PKC in regulating opposite facets of bipolar disorder, and emphasize a major role for PKC in this disease. PMID:23228462

  11. Prolonged hippocampal cell death following closed-head traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Shigeharu; Hou, Jiamei; Nelson, Rachel L; Wilkie, Zachary J; Mustafa, Golam; Sinharoy, Ankita; Watts, Joseph V; Thompson, Floyd J; Bose, Prodip K

    2016-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) leads to enduring cognitive disorders. Although recent evidence has shown that controlled cortical impact in a rodent may induce memory deficits with prolonged cell death in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus, few studies have reported long-term chronic hippocampal cell death following 'closed-head' TBI (cTBI), the predominant form of human TBI. Therefore, the aim of this study was to quantify terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)(+) apoptotic hippocampal cells as well as hippocampal cells with hallmark morphological features of degenerating cells in a chronic setting of cTBI in rats. TUNEL assays and Cresyl violet staining were performed using 6-month post-TBI fixed hippocampal sections. Evidence of prolonged hippocampal cell death was shown by the presence of a significantly increased number of TUNEL(+) cells in the cornu ammonis 1-3 (CA1-CA3) and DG of the hippocampus compared with intact controls. In addition, Cresyl violet staining indicated a significantly elevated number of cells with the degenerative morphological features in all hippocampal subregions (CA1-CA3, hilus, and DG). These results suggest that prolonged cell death may occur in multiple regions of the hippocampus following cTBI. PMID:27213933

  12. Hippocampal microglial activation and glucocorticoid receptor down-regulation precipitate visceral hypersensitivity induced by colorectal distension in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gongliang; Zhao, Bing-Xue; Hua, Rong; Kang, Jie; Shao, Bo-Ming; Carbonaro, Theresa M; Zhang, Yong-Mei

    2016-03-01

    Visceral hypersensitivity is a common characteristic in patients suffering from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and other disorders with visceral pain. Although the pathogenesis of visceral hypersensitivity remains speculative due to the absence of pathological changes, the long-lasting sensitization in neuronal circuitry induced by early life stress may play a critical role beyond the digestive system even after complete resolution of the initiating event. The hippocampus integrates multiple sources of afferent inputs and sculpts integrated autonomic outputs for pain and analgesia regulation. Here, we examined the hippocampal mechanism in the pathogenesis of visceral hypersensitivity with a rat model induced by neonatal and adult colorectal distensions (CRDs). Neither neonatal nor adult CRD evoked behavioral abnormalities in adulthood; however, adult re-exposure to CRD induced persistent visceral hypersensitivity, depression-like behaviors, and spatial learning impairment in rats that experienced neonatal CRD. Rats that experienced neonatal and adult CRDs presented a decrease in hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor (GR) immunofluorescence staining and protein expression, and increases in hippocampal microglial activation and cytokine (IL-1β and TNF-α) accumulation. The decrease in hippocampal GR expression and increase in hippocampal IL-1β and TNF-α accumulation could be prevented by hippocampal local infusion of minocycline, a microglial inhibitor. These results suggest that neonatal CRD can increase the vulnerability of hippocampal microglia, and adult CRD challenge facilitates the hippocampal cytokine release from the sensitized microglia, which down-regulates hippocampal GR protein expression and, subsequently, precipitates visceral hypersensitivity. PMID:26656865

  13. Reinforcement of Rat Hippocampal LTP by Holeboard Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frey, Julietta U.; Korz, Volker; Uzakov, Shukhrat

    2005-01-01

    Hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) can be dissociated in early-LTP lasting 4-5 h and late-LTP with a duration of more than 8 h, the latter of which requires protein synthesis and heterosynaptic activity during its induction. Previous studies in vivo have shown that early-LTP in the dentate gyrus can protein synthesis-dependently be…

  14. Genome-wide alterations in hippocampal 5-hydroxymethylcytosine links plasticity genes to acute stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Sisi; Papale, Ligia A; Zhang, Qi; Madrid, Andy; Chen, Li; Chopra, Pankaj; Keleş, Sündüz; Jin, Peng; Alisch, Reid S

    2016-02-01

    Environmental stress is among the most important contributors to increased susceptibility to develop psychiatric disorders, including anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder. While even acute stress alters gene expression, the molecular mechanisms underlying these changes remain largely unknown. 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) is a novel environmentally sensitive DNA modification that is highly enriched in post-mitotic neurons and is associated with active transcription of neuronal genes. Recently, we found a hippocampal increase of 5hmC in the glucocorticoid receptor gene (Nr3c1) following acute stress, warranting a deeper investigation of stress-related 5hmC levels. Here we used an established chemical labeling and affinity purification method coupled with high-throughput sequencing technology to generate the first genome-wide profile of hippocampal 5hmC following exposure to acute restraint stress and a one-hour recovery. This approach found a genome-wide disruption in 5hmC associated with acute stress response, primarily in genic regions, and identified known and potentially novel stress-related targets that have a significant enrichment for neuronal ontological functions. Integration of these data with hippocampal gene expression data from these same mice found stress-related hydroxymethylation correlated to altered transcript levels and sequence motif predictions indicated that 5hmC may function by mediating transcription factor binding to these transcripts. Together, these data reveal an environmental impact on this newly discovered epigenetic mark in the brain and represent a critical step toward understanding stress-related epigenetic mechanisms that alter gene expression and can lead to the development of psychiatric disorders. PMID:26598390

  15. 916 MHz electromagnetic field exposure affects rat behavior and hippocampal neuronal discharge☆

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Dongmei; Yang, Lei; Chen, Su; Tian, Yonghao; Wu, Shuicai

    2012-01-01

    Wistar rats were exposed to a 916 MHz, 10 W/m2 mobile phone electromagnetic field for 6 hours a day, 5 days a week. Average completion times in an eight-arm radial maze were longer in the exposed rats than control rats after 4–5 weeks of exposure. Error rates in the exposed rats were greater than the control rats at 6 weeks. Hippocampal neurons from the exposed rats showed irregular firing patterns during the experiment, and they exhibited decreased spiking activity 6–9 weeks compared with that after 2–5 weeks of exposure. These results indicate that 916 MHz electromagnetic fields influence learning and memory in rats during exposure, but long-term effects are not obvious. PMID:25657684

  16. Hippocampal BDNF treatment facilitates consolidation of spatial memory in spontaneous place recognition in rats.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Takaaki; Yamada, Kazuo; Ichitani, Yukio

    2014-04-15

    In order to investigate the role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the consolidation of spatial memory, we examined the relationship between the increase of hippocampal BDNF and the establishment of long-term spatial memory in spontaneous place recognition test in rats. The test consisted of a sample phase, delay interval, and a test phase, and preferred exploration of the object in a novel place compared with that in a familiar place was assessed in the test phase. In experiment 1, dorsal hippocampal administration of anisomycin, a protein synthesis inhibitor, before the sample phase (20 min) abolished the preference for the novel place object in the test phase conducted 24h later. This impairment was reversed by the dorsal hippocampal BDNF treatment immediately after the sample phase, although the BDNF treatment alone did not improve performance. In experiment 2, we used a shorter sample phase condition (5 min) in which control rats did not show any preference for the novel place object in the test phase after 24h delay, and found that BDNF treatment immediately after the sample phase caused rats' significant preference for it. Results suggest an important role of hippocampal BDNF as a product of protein synthesis that is required for the consolidation of spatial memory. PMID:24503120

  17. Wogonin Attenuates Hippocampal Neuronal Loss and Cognitive Dysfunction in Trimethyltin-Intoxicated Rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bombi; Sur, Bongjun; Cho, Seong-Guk; Yeom, Mijung; Shim, Insop; Lee, Hyejung; Hahm, Dae-Hyun

    2016-05-01

    We examined whether wogonin (WO) improved hippocampal neuronal activity, behavioral alterations and cognitive impairment, in rats induced by administration of trimethyltin (TMT), an organotin compound that is neurotoxic to these animals. The ability of WO to improve cognitive efficacy in the TMT-induced neurodegenerative rats was investigated using a passive avoidance test, and the Morris water maze test, and using immunohistochemistry to detect components of the acetylcholinergic system, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) expression. Rats injected with TMT showed impairments in learning and memory and daily administration of WO improved memory function, and reduced aggressive behavior. Administration of WO significantly alleviated the TMT-induced loss of cholinergic immunoreactivity and restored the hippocampal expression levels of BDNF and CREB proteins and their encoding mRNAs to normal levels. These findings suggest that WO might be useful as a new therapy for treatment of various neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27133262

  18. Wogonin Attenuates Hippocampal Neuronal Loss and Cognitive Dysfunction in Trimethyltin-Intoxicated Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bombi; Sur, Bongjun; Cho, Seong-Guk; Yeom, Mijung; Shim, Insop; Lee, Hyejung; Hahm, Dae-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    We examined whether wogonin (WO) improved hippocampal neuronal activity, behavioral alterations and cognitive impairment, in rats induced by administration of trimethyltin (TMT), an organotin compound that is neurotoxic to these animals. The ability of WO to improve cognitive efficacy in the TMT-induced neurodegenerative rats was investigated using a passive avoidance test, and the Morris water maze test, and using immunohistochemistry to detect components of the acetylcholinergic system, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) expression. Rats injected with TMT showed impairments in learning and memory and daily administration of WO improved memory function, and reduced aggressive behavior. Administration of WO significantly alleviated the TMT-induced loss of cholinergic immunoreactivity and restored the hippocampal expression levels of BDNF and CREB proteins and their encoding mRNAs to normal levels. These findings suggest that WO might be useful as a new therapy for treatment of various neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27133262

  19. Temperature effects on evoked potentials of hippocampal slices from euthermic chipmunks, hamsters and rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooper, D. C.; Martin, S. M.; Horowitz, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    1. Neural activity was recorded in hippocampal slices from euthermic chipmunks, hamsters and rats. 2. While recording the evoked potentials, the temperature of the Ringer's solution bathing the slice was varied by controlling the temperature of an outer chamber jacketing the recording chamber. 3. The temperature just below that at which a population spike could be evoked, Tt, was 10.4 +/- 0.3 degrees C (mean +/- SEM) for chipmunk slices, 14.1 +/- 0.4 degrees C for rat slices and 14.8 +/- 0.4 degrees C for hamster slices. Tt was significantly lower in the chipmunk slices (P<0.01) than in the rat and hamster slices. 4. Data were interpreted as consistent with the hypothesis that chipmunk hippocampal neurons are intrinsically cold resistant.

  20. Trading new neurons for status: Adult hippocampal neurogenesis in eusocial Damaraland mole-rats.

    PubMed

    Oosthuizen, M K; Amrein, I

    2016-06-01

    Diversity in social structures, from solitary to eusocial, is a prominent feature of subterranean African mole-rat species. Damaraland mole-rats are eusocial, they live in colonies that are characterized by a reproductive division of labor and a subdivision into castes based on physiology and behavior. Damaraland mole-rats are exceptionally long lived and reproductive animals show delayed aging compared to non-reproductive animals. In the present study, we described the hippocampal architecture and the rate of hippocampal neurogenesis of wild-derived, adult Damaraland mole-rats in relation to sex, relative age and social status or caste. Overall, Damaraland mole-rats were found to have a small hippocampus and low rates of neurogenesis. We found no correlation between neurogenesis and sex or relative age. Social status or caste was the most prominent modulator of neurogenesis. An inverse relationship between neurogenesis and social status was apparent, with queens displaying the lowest neurogenesis while the worker mole-rats had the most. As there is no natural progression from one caste to another, social status within a colony was relatively stable and is reflected in the level of neurogenesis. Our results correspond to those found in the naked mole-rat, and may reflect an evolutionary and environmentally conserved trait within social mole-rat species. PMID:26979050

  1. Modification of hippocampal markers of synaptic plasticity by memantine in animal models of acute and repeated restraint stress: implications for memory and behavior.

    PubMed

    Amin, Shaimaa Nasr; El-Aidi, Ahmed Amro; Ali, Mohamed Mostafa; Attia, Yasser Mahmoud; Rashed, Laila Ahmed

    2015-06-01

    Stress is any condition that impairs the balance of the organism physiologically or psychologically. The response to stress involves several neurohormonal consequences. Glutamate is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, and its release is increased by stress that predisposes to excitotoxicity in the brain. Memantine is an uncompetitive N-methyl D-aspartate glutamatergic receptors antagonist and has shown beneficial effect on cognitive function especially in Alzheimer's disease. The aim of the work was to investigate memantine effect on memory and behavior in animal models of acute and repeated restraint stress with the evaluation of serum markers of stress and the expression of hippocampal markers of synaptic plasticity. Forty-two male rats were divided into seven groups (six rats/group): control, acute restraint stress, acute restraint stress with Memantine, repeated restraint stress, repeated restraint stress with Memantine and Memantine groups (two subgroups as positive control). Spatial working memory and behavior were assessed by performance in Y-maze. We evaluated serum cortisol, tumor necrotic factor, interleukin-6 and hippocampal expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, synaptophysin and calcium-/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. Our results revealed that Memantine improved spatial working memory in repeated stress, decreased serum level of stress markers and modified the hippocampal synaptic plasticity markers in both patterns of stress exposure; in ARS, Memantine upregulated the expression of synaptophysin and brain-derived neurotrophic factor and downregulated the expression of calcium-/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, and in repeated restraint stress, it upregulated the expression of synaptophysin and downregulated calcium-/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II expression. PMID:25680935

  2. Attenuated inhibition by levofloxacin, l-isomer of ofloxacin, on GABA response in the dissociated rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Imanishi, T; Akahane, K; Akaike, N

    1995-06-30

    The effects of ofloxacin (OFLX) and its isomers, levofloxacin (LVFX) and DR-3354, on the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-induced Cl- current in acutely dissociated rat hippocampal CA1 neurons were investigated using nystatin perforated patch recording configuration under voltage-clamp conditions. At 10(-5) M these 3 compounds themselves did not affect the GABA response. Biphenylacetic acid (BPA) at 10(-5) M also had no effect on the GABA response, but BPA greatly suppressed the GABA response in combination with these 3 compounds without affecting the reversal potential of GABA response. The inhibitory effects of OFLX and DR-3354 on the GABA response were stronger than that of LVFX. LVFX inhibited the response in a competitive and voltage-independent manner. The results suggest that LVFX has lower CNS adverse effects, such as convulsions, compared to OFLX. PMID:7478164

  3. Enhanced acoustic startle responding in rats with radiation-induced hippocampal granule cell hypoplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Mickley, G.A.; Ferguson, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    Irradiation of the neonatal rat hippocampus reduces the proliferation of granule cells in the dentate gyrus and results in locomotor hyperactivity, behavioral preservation, and deficits on some learned tasks. In order to address the role of changes in stimulus salience and behavioral inhibition in animals with this type of brain damage, irradiated and normal rats were compared in their startle reactions to an acoustic stimulus. Irradiated rats startled with a consistently higher amplitude than control and were more likely to exhibit startle responses. These animals with hippocampal damage also failed to habituate to the startle stimulus and, under certain circumstances, showed potentiated startle responses after many tone presentations.

  4. Aged rats show dominant modulation of lower frequency hippocampal theta rhythm during running.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia-Yi; Kuo, Terry B J; Yang, Cheryl C H

    2016-10-01

    Aging causes considerable decline in both physiological and mental functions, particularly cognitive function. The hippocampal theta rhythm (4-12Hz) is related to both cognition and locomotion. Aging-related findings of the frequency and amplitude of hippocampal theta oscillations are inconsistent and occasionally contradictory. This inconsistency may be due to the effects of the sleep/wake state and different frequency subbands being overlooked. We assumed that aged rats have lower responses of the hippocampal theta rhythm during running, which is mainly due to the dominant modulation of theta frequency subbands related to cognition. By simultaneously recording electroencephalography, physical activity (PA), and the heart rate (HR), this experiment explored the theta oscillations before, during, and after treadmill running at a constant speed in 8-week-old (adult) and 60-week-old (middle-aged) rats. Compared with adult rats, the middle-aged rats exhibited lower theta activity in all frequency ranges before running. Running increased the theta frequency (Frq, 4-12Hz), total activity of the whole theta band (total power, TP), activity of the middle theta frequency (MT, 6.5-9.5Hz), and PA in both age groups. However, the middle-aged rats still showed fewer changes in these parameters during the whole running process. After the waking baseline values were substracted, middle-aged rats showed significantly fewer differences in ΔFrq, ΔTP, and ΔMT but significantly more differences in low-frequency theta activity (4.0-6.5Hz) and HR than the adult rats did. Therefore, the decreasing activity and response of the whole theta band in the middle-aged rats resulted in dominant modulation of the middle to lower frequency (4.0-9.5Hz) theta rhythm. The different alterations in the theta rhythm during treadmill running in the two groups may reflect that learning decline with age. PMID:27496645

  5. The Effect of Acute and Chronic Social Stress on the Hippocampal Transcriptome in Mice.

    PubMed

    Stankiewicz, Adrian M; Goscik, Joanna; Majewska, Alicja; Swiergiel, Artur H; Juszczak, Grzegorz R

    2015-01-01

    Psychogenic stress contributes to the formation of brain pathology. Using gene expression microarrays, we analyzed the hippocampal transcriptome of mice subjected to acute and chronic social stress of different duration. The longest period of social stress altered the expression of the highest number of genes and most of the stress-induced changes in transcription were reversible after 5 days of rest. Chronic stress affected genes involved in the functioning of the vascular system (Alas2, Hbb-b1, Hba-a2, Hba-a1), injury response (Vwf, Mgp, Cfh, Fbln5, Col3a1, Ctgf) and inflammation (S100a8, S100a9, Ctla2a, Ctla2b, Lcn2, Lrg1, Rsad2, Isg20). The results suggest that stress may affect brain functions through the stress-induced dysfunction of the vascular system. An important issue raised in our work is also the risk of the contamination of brain tissue samples with choroid plexus. Such contamination would result in a consistent up- or down-regulation of genes, such as Ttr, Igf2, Igfbp2, Prlr, Enpp2, Sostdc1, 1500015O10RIK (Ecrg4), Kl, Clic6, Kcne2, F5, Slc4a5, and Aqp1. Our study suggests that some of the previously reported, supposedly specific changes in hippocampal gene expression, may be a result of the inclusion of choroid plexus in the hippocampal samples. PMID:26556046

  6. The Effect of Acute and Chronic Social Stress on the Hippocampal Transcriptome in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Stankiewicz, Adrian M.; Goscik, Joanna; Majewska, Alicja; Swiergiel, Artur H.; Juszczak, Grzegorz R.

    2015-01-01

    Psychogenic stress contributes to the formation of brain pathology. Using gene expression microarrays, we analyzed the hippocampal transcriptome of mice subjected to acute and chronic social stress of different duration. The longest period of social stress altered the expression of the highest number of genes and most of the stress-induced changes in transcription were reversible after 5 days of rest. Chronic stress affected genes involved in the functioning of the vascular system (Alas2, Hbb-b1, Hba-a2, Hba-a1), injury response (Vwf, Mgp, Cfh, Fbln5, Col3a1, Ctgf) and inflammation (S100a8, S100a9, Ctla2a, Ctla2b, Lcn2, Lrg1, Rsad2, Isg20). The results suggest that stress may affect brain functions through the stress-induced dysfunction of the vascular system. An important issue raised in our work is also the risk of the contamination of brain tissue samples with choroid plexus. Such contamination would result in a consistent up- or down-regulation of genes, such as Ttr, Igf2, Igfbp2, Prlr, Enpp2, Sostdc1, 1500015O10RIK (Ecrg4), Kl, Clic6, Kcne2, F5, Slc4a5, and Aqp1. Our study suggests that some of the previously reported, supposedly specific changes in hippocampal gene expression, may be a result of the inclusion of choroid plexus in the hippocampal samples. PMID:26556046

  7. Tactile stimulation effects on hippocampal neurogenesis and spatial learning and memory in prenatally stressed rats.

    PubMed

    de Los Angeles, Guerrero Aguilera María; Del Carmen, Rubio Osornio María; Wendy, Portillo Martínez; Socorro, Retana-Márquez

    2016-06-01

    Neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus is increased by spatial learning and postnatal stimulation. Conversely, prenatal stress (PS) produces a decrease in the proliferation of hippocampal granular cells. This work evaluated the effect of postnatal tactile stimulation (PTS), when applied from birth to adulthood, on cognitive performance and hippocampal neurogenesis (survival and differentiation) in PS female and male rats. The response of the adrenal axis to training in the Morris water maze (MWM) was also analyzed. PS was provided during gestational days 15 through 21. Hippocampal neurogenesis and cognitive performance in the MWM were assessed at an age of three months. Results showed that escape latencies of both female and male PS rats were longer compared to those of their controls (CON). DG cell survival increased in the PS female rats. Corticosterone concentrations were significantly higher in the male and female PS rats after MWM training. PTS improved escape latencies and increased the number of new neurons in the DG of PS animals, and their corticosterone concentrations were similar to those in CON. In CON, PTS diminished DG cell survival but increased differentiation and reduces latency in the MWM. These results show that long-term PTS in PS animals might prevent learning deficits in adults through increase in the number of DG new cells and decrease of the reactivity of the adrenal axis to MWM training. PMID:26993794

  8. Short-Term Sleep Deprivation Stimulates Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Rats Following Global Cerebral Ischemia/Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Oumei; Li, Rong; Zhao, Lei; Yu, Lijuan; Yang, Bin; Wang, Jia; Chen, Beibei; Yang, Junqing

    2015-01-01

    Background Sleep deprivation (SD) plays a complex role in central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Recent studies indicate that short-term SD can affect the extent of ischemic damage. The aim of this study was to investigate whether short-term SD could stimulate hippocampal neurogenesis in a rat model of global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (GCIR). Methods One hundred Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into Sham, GCIR and short-term SD groups based on different durations of SD; the short-term SD group was randomly divided into three subgroups: the GCIR+6hSD*3d-treated, GCIR+12hSD-treated and GCIR+12hSD*3d-treated groups. The GCIR rat model was induced via the bilateral occlusion of the common carotid arteries and hemorrhagic hypotension. The rats were sleep-deprived starting at 48 h following GCIR. A Morris water maze test was used to assess learning and memory ability; cell proliferation and differentiation were analyzed via 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and neuron-specific enolase (NSE), respectively, at 14 and 28 d; the expression of hippocampal BDNF was measured after 7 d. Results The different durations of short-term SD designed in our experiment exhibited improvement in cognitive function as well as increased hippocampal BDNF expression. Additionally, the short-term SD groups also showed an increased number of BrdU- and BrdU/NSE-positive cells compared with the GCIR group. Of the three short-term SD groups, the GCIR+12hSD*3d-treated group experienced the most substantial beneficial effects. Conclusions Short-term SD, especially the GCIR+12hSD*3d-treated method, stimulates neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) of rats that undergo GCIR, and BDNF may be an underlying mechanism in this process. PMID:26039740

  9. Acute inflammation alters adult hippocampal neurogenesis in a multiple sclerosis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Giannakopoulou, A; Grigoriadis, N; Bekiari, C; Lourbopoulos, A; Dori, I; Tsingotjidou, A S; Michaloudi, H; Papadopoulos, G C

    2013-07-01

    Neural precursor cells (NPCs) located in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG) give rise to thousands of new cells every day, mainly hippocampal neurons, which are integrated into existing neuronal circuits. Aging and chronic degenerative disorders have been shown to impair hippocampal neurogenesis, but the consequence of inflammation is somewhat controversial. The present study demonstrates that the inflammatory environment prevailing in the brain of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice enhances the proliferation of NPCs in SGZ of the dorsal DG and alters the proportion between radial glial cells and newborn neuroblasts. The injection protocol of the cell cycle marker bromodeoxyuridine and the immunohistochemical techniques that were employed revealed that the proliferation of NPCs is increased approximately twofold in the SGZ of the dorsal DG of EAE mice, at the acute phase of the disease. However, although EAE animals exhibited significant higher percentage of newborn radial-glia-like NPCs, the mean percentage of newborn neuroblasts rather was decreased, indicating that the robust NPCs proliferation is not followed by a proportional production of newborn neurons. Significant positive correlations were detected between the number of proliferating cells in the SGZ and the clinical score or degree of brain inflammation of diseased animals. Finally, enhanced neuroproliferation in the acute phase of EAE was not found to trigger compensatory apoptotic mechanisms. The possible causes of altered neurogenesis observed in this study emphasize the need to understand more precisely the mechanisms regulating adult neurogenesis under both normal and pathological conditions. PMID:23606574

  10. Rat hippocampal muscarinic autoreceptors are similar to the M2 (cardiac) subtype: comparison with hippocampal M1, atrial M2 and ileal M3 receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Richards, M. H.

    1990-01-01

    1. Affinity constants for 15 non-selective or putatively selective muscarinic antagonists were determined at muscarinic autoreceptors and postsynaptic receptors (linked to phosphatidylinositol (PI) hydrolysis) in rat hippocampal slices, at muscarinic receptors mediating contractility in guinea-pig atria or ileal smooth muscle and at binding sites in rat cerebral cortical membranes labelled with [3H]-1-quinuclidinyl benzilate or [3H]-pirenzepine. 2. Comparison of the affinities of these antagonists at central M1 receptors (inositol-monophosphate formation in rat hippocampal slices) with their affinities at peripheral M1 receptors (inhibition by McN-A-343 of electrically stimulated twitches in rabbit vas deferens) provides support for the suggestion that these receptors may differ pharmacologically. 3. Comparison of affinity constants obtained by displacement of specifically bound [3H]-pirenzepine from rat cerebral cortical membranes with those obtained in functional tests showed poor correlations between affinities for binding sites and for functional atrial receptors or for hippocampal autoreceptors. A significant correlation was found between affinities for [3H]-pirenzepine binding and those determined at muscarinic receptors linked to PI turnover in rat hippocampus. A significant correlation was also obtained between the affinities for specific [3H]-pirenzepine binding sites in cortical membranes and the affinities at ileal receptors. 4. Comparison of the affinity values for muscarinic autoreceptors in rat hippocampus with affinity values obtained from in vitro models of muscarinic receptor subtypes showed no significant correlations between these autoreceptors and either M1 or M3 receptors. A significant correlation was found between antagonist affinities for hippocampal autoreceptors and muscarinic receptors in the heart. Therefore, muscarinic autoreceptors in rat hippocampus are pharmacologically similar to the M2 (cardiac) muscarinic receptor subtype. PMID

  11. Cariprazine delays ouabain-evoked epileptiform spikes and loss of activity in rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    El-Mallakh, Rif S; Payne, Ralphiel S; Schurr, Avital; Gao, Yonglin; Lei, Zhemin; Kiss, Béla; Gyertyán, István; Adham, Nika

    2015-09-30

    In the only bipolar cycling in vitro model, rat hippocampal slices are treated with the sodium pump inhibitor ouabain, which induces epileptiform activity, followed by refractory activity loss that recovers and cycles back to epileptiform activity. Thus, clinical cycling seen in patients with bipolar disorder is modeled on a cellular level as alternating hyperactivity and hypoactivity interspersed with normal activity. In this study, we tested the ability of cariprazine a new antipsychotic candidate to block ouabain-induced changes in rat hippocampal slices. Cycling of population spikes and epileptiform bursts was evoked using an extracellular stimulation electrode located in the Schaeffer collaterals of 400-µm-thick rat hippocampal slices treated with ouabain (3.3μM) alone or in combination with cariprazine (1, 5, 25, and 50µM). Responses were recorded using an extracellular electrode placed in the cell body layer of the CA1 region. Cariprazine 25 and 50µM delayed ouabain-induced epileptiform burst onset and subsequent activity loss. Lower cariprazine concentrations were ineffective. Cariprazine delays the onset of ouabain-induced epileptiform bursts and the loss of spiking activity similarly to that previously demonstrated with the mood stabilizer lithium. These results suggest that cariprazine may have therapeutic potential for treatment of bipolar disorder. PMID:26160196

  12. Regulation of GABA Equilibrium Potential by mGluRs in Rat Hippocampal CA1 Neurons.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Rajput, Padmesh S; Kumar, Ujendra; Sastry, Bhagavatula R

    2015-01-01

    The equilibrium potential for GABA-A receptor mediated currents (EGABA) in neonatal central neurons is set at a relatively depolarized level, which is suggested to be caused by a low expression of K+/Cl- co-transporter (KCC2) but a relatively high expression of Na+-K+-Cl- cotransporter (NKCC1). Theta-burst stimulation (TBS) in stratum radiatum induces a negative shift in EGABA in juvenile hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. In the current study, the effects of TBS on EGABA in neonatal and juvenile hippocampal CA1 neurons and the underlying mechanisms were examined. Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are suggested to modulate KCC2 and NKCC1 levels in cortical neurons. Therefore, the involvement of mGluRs in the regulation of KCC2 or NKCC1 activity, and thus EGABA, following TBS was also investigated. Whole-cell patch recordings were made from Wistar rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, in a slice preparation. In neonates, TBS induces a positive shift in EGABA, which was prevented by NKCC1 antisense but not NKCC1 sense mRNA. (RS)-a-Methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG), a group I and II mGluR antagonist, blocked TBS-induced shifts in both juvenile and neonatal hippocampal neurons. While blockade of mGluR1 or mGluR5 alone could interfere with TBS-induced shifts in EGABA in neonates, only a combined blockade could do the same in juveniles. These results indicate that TBS induces a negative shift in EGABA in juvenile hippocampal neurons but a positive shift in neonatal hippocampal neurons via corresponding changes in KCC2 and NKCC1 expressions, respectively. mGluR activation seems to be necessary for both shifts to occur while the specific receptor subtype involved seems to vary. PMID:26389591

  13. Regulation of GABA Equilibrium Potential by mGluRs in Rat Hippocampal CA1 Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bo; Rajput, Padmesh S.; Kumar, Ujendra; Sastry, Bhagavatula R.

    2015-01-01

    The equilibrium potential for GABA-A receptor mediated currents (EGABA) in neonatal central neurons is set at a relatively depolarized level, which is suggested to be caused by a low expression of K+/Cl- co-transporter (KCC2) but a relatively high expression of Na+-K+-Cl- cotransporter (NKCC1). Theta-burst stimulation (TBS) in stratum radiatum induces a negative shift in EGABA in juvenile hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. In the current study, the effects of TBS on EGABA in neonatal and juvenile hippocampal CA1 neurons and the underlying mechanisms were examined. Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are suggested to modulate KCC2 and NKCC1 levels in cortical neurons. Therefore, the involvement of mGluRs in the regulation of KCC2 or NKCC1 activity, and thus EGABA, following TBS was also investigated. Whole-cell patch recordings were made from Wistar rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, in a slice preparation. In neonates, TBS induces a positive shift in EGABA, which was prevented by NKCC1 antisense but not NKCC1 sense mRNA. (RS)-a-Methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG), a group I and II mGluR antagonist, blocked TBS-induced shifts in both juvenile and neonatal hippocampal neurons. While blockade of mGluR1 or mGluR5 alone could interfere with TBS-induced shifts in EGABA in neonates, only a combined blockade could do the same in juveniles. These results indicate that TBS induces a negative shift in EGABA in juvenile hippocampal neurons but a positive shift in neonatal hippocampal neurons via corresponding changes in KCC2 and NKCC1 expressions, respectively. mGluR activation seems to be necessary for both shifts to occur while the specific receptor subtype involved seems to vary. PMID:26389591

  14. Antidepressant-like effects of curcumin in WKY rat model of depression is associated with an increase in hippocampal BDNF

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Laura L.; Akinfiresoye, Luli; Nwulia, Evaristus; Kamiya, Atsushi; Kulkarni, Amol; Tizabi, Yousef

    2012-01-01

    Curcumin is the principal active ingredient found in turmeric (Curcuma longa), a plant used in traditional Asian diets and herbal medicines. It is known to have a wide range of biological actions including antidepressant-like effects which have been observed in stress-induced depression models. This study was designed to investigate the antidepressant potential of curcumin in a non-induced model of depression. Moreover, since brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been implicated in antidepressant effects of many drugs, we also evaluated the effects of curcumin on BDNF in the hippocampus. Adult male Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats, a putative model of depression, were injected acutely or chronically (10 d) with 50, 100, and 200mg/kg curcumin. Open field locomotor activity (OFLA) and forced swim test (FST), a measure of helplessness, were measured 1 hour after acute and 18–20 hours after last chronic injection. Results showed a dose-dependent reduction of immobility in the FST by curcumin in both acute and chronic studies, without any significant effect on OFLA. The effect of higher chronic curcumin dose in FST was still evident a week later. Chronic curcumin also resulted in a dose-dependent increase in hippocampal BDNF. This data provides evidence for an antidepressant-like effect of curcumin, possibly through increased neurotrophic activity, in the WKY model of depression, and support the notion that curcumin may prove an effective and lasting natural antidepressant. PMID:23142609

  15. Oseltamivir reduces hippocampal abnormal EEG activities after a virus infection (influenza) in isoflurane-anesthetized rats

    PubMed Central

    Cissé, Youssouf; Inoue, Isao; Kido, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Background Oseltamivir phosphate (OP, Tamiflu®) is a widely used drug in the treatment of influenza with fever. However, case reports have associated OP intake with sudden abnormal behaviors. In rats infected by the influenza A virus (IAV), the electroencephalogram (EEG) displayed abnormal high-voltage amplitudes with spikes and theta oscillations at a core temperature of 39.9°C to 41°C. Until now, there has been no information describing the effect of OP on intact brain hippocampal activity of IAV-infected animals during hyperthermia. Objective The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of OP on abnormal EEG activities in the hippocampus using the rat model of influenza-associated encephalopathy. Methods Male Wistar rats aged 3 to 4 weeks were used for the study. Influenza A/WSN/33 strain (1 × 105 plaque forming unit in PBS, 60 µL) was applied intranasally to the rats. To characterize OP effects on the IAV-infected rats, EEG activity was studied more particularly in isoflurane-anesthetized IAV-infected rats during hyperthermia. Results We found that the hippocampal EEG of the OP-administered (10 mg/kg) IAV-infected rats showed significant reduction of the high-voltage amplitudes and spikes, but the theta oscillations, which had been observed only at >40°C in OP non-administered rats, appeared at 38°C core temperature. Atropine (30 mg/kg) blocked the theta oscillations. Conclusion Our data suggest that OP efficiently reduces the abnormal EEG activities after IAV infection during hyperthermia. However, OP administration may stimulate ACh release in rats at normal core temperature.

  16. Responses of rat hippocampal slices in a high-K+ medium following in vivo global ischaemia.

    PubMed

    el-Sabban, F; Reid, K H; Edmonds, H L

    1998-01-01

    1. We hypothesized that burst activity induced in rat hippocampal tissue by a high-K+ medium in vitro would be increased by a previous episode of global ischaemia, severe enough to induce persistent neurological dysfunction. 2. Male Wistar rats that were subjected to 9 min of chest compression, sufficient to reduce blood pressure (BP) to zero, showed evidence of neurological damage attributed to a global ischaemic insult. Hindlimb function was impaired for 24-48 h and a susceptibility to sound-induced seizures was induced in 25 to 35 rats. The seizure susceptibility cleared spontaneously within 2 weeks in 10 of 25 rats. 3. Hippocampal slices from postischaemic rats were prepared, tested for viability and were then exposed to an 8.0 mmol/L K+ artificial cerebrospinal fluid in vitro. Spontaneous epileptiform bursting activity in the high-K+ medium was not increased. Instead, burst size decreased with time after ischaemia. 4. The decrement in bursting activity is attributed to loss of cellular activity or integrity. These changes correlate with functional changes described by others, but not necessarily to histologically verifiable cell death. The time course of these changes was remarkably long, continuing for almost 3 weeks. Thus, a less-than-lethal ischaemia appears to induce neuronal changes, possibly reversible, that continue for at least 20 days after the global ischaemic insult. PMID:9673437

  17. Effect of intermittent hypoxia on long-term potentiation in rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Payne, Ralphiel S; Goldbart, Aviv; Gozal, David; Schurr, Avital

    2004-12-17

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH) during sleep has been shown to induce apoptosis in a time-dependent manner and spatial learning deficits in adult rats. Recently, we have demonstrated that IH induced significant decreases in Ser-133-phosphorylated cAMP-response element-binding protein (pCREB) without changes in total CREB. The expression of cleaved caspase 3 in the hippocampal CA1, a marker of apoptosis, peaked at 3 days of IH and returned to normoxic values at 14 days of IH. In addition, biphasic changes in spatial task learning were correlated with the CREB phosphorylation time course. In the present study, the rat hippocampal slice preparation was used to evaluate the ability to induce and maintain a CA1 population spike long-term potentiation (PS-LTP) in room air (RA)-maintained and IH-exposed rats. A significant decrease in the ability to sustain PS-LTP for 15 min in slices prepared from IH-exposed rats for either 3 days (34% of total) or 7 days (51% of total) as compared to slices prepared from RA-maintained rats (76% of total) was observed. These results suggest that the diminishment in the ability of neuronal tissue to express and sustain PS-LTP is correlated with previously reported biphasic changes in CREB phosphorylation and programmed cell death. PMID:15542074

  18. Memory and hippocampal architecture following short-term midazolam in western diet-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Rosenberger, Dorothea S; Falangola, Maria F; Ledreux, Aurélie; Nie, Xingju; Suhre, Wendy M; Boger, Heather A; Granholm, Ann-Charlotte

    2016-05-16

    The impact of short-term benzodiazepine exposure on cognition in middle-aged or older patients is a highly debated topic among anesthesiologists, critical care physicians and public media. "Western diet" (WD) consumption is linked to impaired cognition as well. The combination of benzodiazepines with substantial exposure to WD might set the stage for increased hippocampal vulnerability for benzodiazepines leading to exaggerated cognitive impairment in the postoperative period. In this study, Fischer 344 rats were fed either WD or standard rodent diet from 5 to 10.5 months of age. Rats were exposed to midazolam or placebo two days prior to an MRI scan using Diffusional Kurtosis Imaging (DKI) to assess brain microstructural integrity, followed by behavioral testing using a water radial arm maze. Hippocampal tissue was collected to assess alterations in protein biochemistry in brain regions associated with learning and memory. Our results showed that rats exposed to the combination of midazolam and WD had significantly delayed time of learning and exhibited spatial memory impairment. Further, we observed an overall increase of kurtosis metrics in the hippocampus and increased expression of the mitochondrial protein VDAC2 in midazolam-treated rats. Our data suggest that both the short-acting benzodiazepine midazolam and WD contribute to negatively affect the brain in middle-aged rats. This study is the first application of DKI on the effects of midazolam and WD exposure, and the findings demonstrate that diffusion metrics are sensitive indicators of changes in the complexity of neurite architecture. PMID:27080429

  19. Dimethyl fumarate attenuates intracerebroventricular streptozotocin-induced spatial memory impairment and hippocampal neurodegeneration in rats.

    PubMed

    Majkutewicz, Irena; Kurowska, Ewelina; Podlacha, Magdalena; Myślińska, Dorota; Grembecka, Beata; Ruciński, Jan; Plucińska, Karolina; Jerzemowska, Grażyna; Wrona, Danuta

    2016-07-15

    Intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of streptozotocin (STZ) is a widely-accepted animal model of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (sAD). The present study evaluated the ability of dimethyl fumarate (DMF), an agent with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, to prevent spatial memory impairments and hippocampal neurodegeneration mediated by ICV injection of STZ in 4-month-old rats. Rodent chow containing DMF (0.4%) or standard rodent chow was made available on day 0. Rat body weight and food intake were measured daily for whole the experiment (21days). STZ or vehicle (SHAM) ICV injections were performed on days 2 and 4. Spatial reference and working memory were evaluated using the Morris water maze on days 14-21. Cells containing Fluoro-Jade B (neurodegeneration marker), IL-6, IL-10 were quantified in the hippocampus and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) in the basal forebrain. The disruption of spatial memory and a high density of hippocampal CA1-3 cells labeled with Fluoro-Jade B or containing IL-6 or IL-10 were observed in the STZ group but not in the STZ+DMF group, as compared to the SHAM or SHAM+DMF groups. STZ vs. STZ+DMF differences were found: worse reference memory acquisition, fewer ChAT-positive neurons in the medial septum (Ch1), more Fluoro-Jade-positive CA1 hippocampal cells in STZ rats. DMF therapy in a rodent model of sAD prevented the disruption of spatial reference and working memory, loss of Ch1 cholinergic cells and hippocampal neurodegeneration as well as the induction of IL-6 and IL-10 in CA1. These beneficial cognitive and molecular effects validate the anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective properties of DMF in the hippocampus. PMID:27083302

  20. Estrogen administration modulates hippocampal GABAergic subpopulations in the hippocampus of trimethyltin-treated rats

    PubMed Central

    Corvino, Valentina; Di Maria, Valentina; Marchese, Elisa; Lattanzi, Wanda; Biamonte, Filippo; Michetti, Fabrizio; Geloso, Maria Concetta

    2015-01-01

    Given the well-documented involvement of estrogens in the modulation of hippocampal functions in both physiological and pathological conditions, the present study investigates the effects of 17-beta estradiol (E2) administration in the rat model of hippocampal neurodegeneration induced by trimethyltin (TMT) administration (8 mg/kg), characterized by loss of pyramidal neurons in CA1, CA3/hilus hippocampal subfields, associated with astroglial and microglial activation, seizures and cognitive impairment. After TMT/saline treatment, ovariectomized animals received two doses of E2 (0.2 mg/kg intra-peritoneal) or vehicle, and were sacrificed 48 h or 7 days after TMT-treatment. Our results indicate that in TMT-treated animals E2 administration induces the early (48 h) upregulation of genes involved in neuroprotection and synaptogenesis, namely Bcl2, trkB, cadherin 2 and cyclin-dependent-kinase-5. Increased expression levels of glutamic acid decarboxylase (gad) 67, neuropeptide Y (Npy), parvalbumin, Pgc-1α and Sirtuin 1 genes, the latter involved in parvalbumin (PV) synthesis, were also evident. Unbiased stereology performed on rats sacrificed 7 days after TMT treatment showed that although E2 does not significantly influence the extent of TMT-induced neuronal death, significantly enhances the TMT-induced modulation of GABAergic interneuron population size in selected hippocampal subfields. In particular, E2 administration causes, in TMT-treated rats, a significant increase in the number of GAD67-expressing interneurons in CA1 stratum oriens, CA3 pyramidal layer, hilus and dentate gyrus, accompanied by a parallel increase in NPY-expressing cells, essentially in the same regions, and of PV-positive cells in CA1 pyramidal layer. The present results add information concerning the role of in vivo E2 administration on mechanisms involved in cellular plasticity in the adult brain. PMID:26594149

  1. Inhibition of Hippocampal Regeneration by Adjuvant Dexamethasone in Experimental Infant Rat Pneumococcal Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Bally, Lia; Grandgirard, Denis; Leib, Stephen L

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis (PM) causes neurological sequelae in up to half of surviving patients. Neuronal damage associated with poor outcome is largely mediated by the inflammatory host response. Dexamethasone (DXM) is used as an adjuvant therapy in adult PM, but its efficacy in the treatment of pneumococcal meningitis in children is controversially discussed. While DXM has previously been shown to enhance hippocampal apoptosis in experimental PM, its impact on hippocampal cell proliferation is not known. This study investigated the impact of DXM on hippocampal proliferation in infant rat PM. Eleven-day-old nursing Wistar rats (n = 90) were intracisternally infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae to induce experimental meningitis. Treatment with DXM or vehicle was started 18 h after infection, concomitantly with antibiotics (ceftriaxone 100 mg/kg of body weight twice a day [b.i.d.]). Clinical parameters were monitored, and the amount of cells with proliferating activity was assessed using in vivo incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and an in vitro neurosphere culture system at 3 and 4 d postinfection. DXM significantly worsened weight loss and survival. Density of BrdU-positive cells, as an index of cells with proliferating activity, was significantly lower in DXM-treated animals compared to vehicle controls (P < 0.0001). In parallel, DXM reduced neurosphere formation as an index for stem/progenitor cell density compared to vehicle treatment (P = 0.01). Our findings provide clear evidence that DXM exerts an antiproliferative effect on the hippocampus in infant rat PM. We conclude that an impairment of regenerative hippocampal capacity should be taken into account when considering adjuvant DXM in the therapeutic regimen for PM in children. PMID:26824948

  2. Electron tomographic structure and protein composition of isolated rat cerebellar, hippocampal and cortical postsynaptic densities.

    PubMed

    Farley, M M; Swulius, M T; Waxham, M N

    2015-09-24

    Electron tomography and immunogold labeling were used to analyze similarities and differences in the morphology and protein composition of postsynaptic densities (PSDs) isolated from adult rat cerebella, hippocampi, and cortices. There were similarities in physical dimensions and gross morphology between cortical, hippocampal and most cerebellar PSDs, although the morphology among cerebellar PSDs could be categorized into three distinct groups. The majority of cerebellar PSDs were composed of dense regions of protein, similar to cortical and hippocampal PSDs, while others were either composed of granular or lattice-like protein regions. Significant differences were found in protein composition and organization across PSDs from the different brain regions. The signaling protein, βCaMKII, was found to be a major component of each PSD type and was more abundant than αCaMKII in both hippocampal and cerebellar PSDs. The scaffold molecule PSD-95, a major component of cortical PSDs, was found absent in a fraction of cerebellar PSDs and when present was clustered in its distribution. In contrast, immunogold labeling for the proteasome was significantly more abundant in cerebellar and hippocampal PSDs than cortical PSDs. Together, these results indicate that PSDs exhibit remarkable diversity in their composition and morphology, presumably as a reflection of the unique functional demands placed on different synapses. PMID:26215919

  3. A three-plane architectonic atlas of the rat hippocampal region.

    PubMed

    Boccara, Charlotte N; Kjonigsen, Lisa J; Hammer, Ingvild M; Bjaalie, Jan G; Leergaard, Trygve B; Witter, Menno P

    2015-07-01

    The hippocampal region, comprising the hippocampal formation and the parahippocampal region, has been one of the most intensively studied parts of the brain for decades. Better understanding of its functional diversity and complexity has led to an increased demand for specificity in experimental procedures and manipulations. In view of the complex 3D structure of the hippocampal region, precisely positioned experimental approaches require a fine-grained architectural description that is available and readable to experimentalists lacking detailed anatomical experience. In this paper, we provide the first cyto- and chemoarchitectural description of the hippocampal formation and parahippocampal region in the rat at high resolution and in the three standard sectional planes: coronal, horizontal and sagittal. The atlas uses a series of adjacent sections stained for neurons and for a number of chemical marker substances, particularly parvalbumin and calbindin. All the borders defined in one plane have been cross-checked against their counterparts in the other two planes. The entire dataset will be made available as a web-based interactive application through the Rodent Brain WorkBench (http://www.rbwb.org) which, together with this paper, provides a unique atlas resource. PMID:25533645

  4. Long-Term Potentiation by Theta-Burst Stimulation Using Extracellular Field Potential Recordings in Acute Hippocampal Slices.

    PubMed

    Abrahamsson, Therese; Lalanne, Txomin; Watt, Alanna J; Sjöström, P Jesper

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes how to carry out theta-burst long-term potentiation (LTP) with extracellular field recordings in acute rodent hippocampal slices. This method is relatively simple and noninvasive and provides a way to sample many neurons simultaneously, making it suitable for applications requiring higher throughput than whole-cell recording. PMID:27250947

  5. Conserved hippocampal cellular pathophysiology but distinct behavioural deficits in a new rat model of FXS.

    PubMed

    Till, Sally M; Asiminas, Antonis; Jackson, Adam D; Katsanevaki, Danai; Barnes, Stephanie A; Osterweil, Emily K; Bear, Mark F; Chattarji, Sumantra; Wood, Emma R; Wyllie, David J A; Kind, Peter C

    2015-11-01

    Recent advances in techniques for manipulating genomes have allowed the generation of transgenic animals other than mice. These new models enable cross-mammalian comparison of neurological disease from core cellular pathophysiology to circuit and behavioural endophenotypes. Moreover they will enable us to directly test whether common cellular dysfunction or behavioural outcomes of a genetic mutation are more conserved across species. Using a new rat model of Fragile X Syndrome, we report that Fmr1 knockout (KO) rats exhibit elevated basal protein synthesis and an increase in mGluR-dependent long-term depression in CA1 of the hippocampus that is independent of new protein synthesis. These defects in plasticity are accompanied by an increase in dendritic spine density selectively in apical dendrites and subtle changes in dendritic spine morphology of CA1 pyramidal neurons. Behaviourally, Fmr1 KO rats show deficits in hippocampal-dependent, but not hippocampal-independent, forms of associative recognition memory indicating that the loss of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) causes defects in episodic-like memory. In contrast to previous reports from mice, Fmr1 KO rats show no deficits in spatial reference memory reversal learning. One-trial spatial learning in a delayed matching to place water maze task was also not affected by the loss of FMRP in rats. This is the first evidence for conservation across mammalian species of cellular and physiological hippocampal phenotypes associated with the loss of FMRP. Furthermore, while key cellular phenotypes are conserved they manifest in distinct behavioural dysfunction. Finally, our data reveal novel information about the selective role of FMRP in hippocampus-dependent associative memory. PMID:26243794

  6. Increased hippocampal NgR1 signaling machinery in aged rats with deficits of spatial cognition

    PubMed Central

    VanGuilder Starkey, Heather D.; Sonntag, William E.; Freeman, Willard M.

    2013-01-01

    Myelin-associated inhibitor/NgR1 signaling has important roles in modulation of synaptic plasticity, with demonstrated effects on cognitive function. We have previously demonstrated that NgR1 and its ligands are upregulated in the hippocampus of aged rats with impaired spatial learning and memory, but it is unknown whether increased expression of these proteins indicates a potential increase in pathway signaling because NgR1 requires co-receptors for signal transduction through RhoA. Two co-receptor complexes have been identified to date, comprised of NgR1 and LINGO-1, and either p75 or TROY. In this study, we assessed the expression of LINGO-1, p75 and TROY, and the downstream effector RhoA in mature adult (12 months) and aged (26 months) male Fischer 344/Brown Norway hybrid rats classified as cognitively impaired or cognitively intact by Morris water maze testing. The hippocampal distribution of NgR1 and its co-receptors was assessed to determine whether receptor/co-receptor interaction, and therefore signaling through this pathway, is possible. Protein expression of LINGO-1, p75, TROY, and RhoA was significantly elevated in cognitively impaired, but not intact, aged rats compared to mature adults, and expression levels correlated significantly with water maze performance. Co-localization of NgR1 with LINGO-1, p75 and TROY was observed in hippocampal neurons of aged, cognitively impaired rats. Further, expression profiles of NgR1 pathway components were demonstrated to classify rats as cognitively intact or cognitively impaired with high accuracy. Together, this suggests that hippocampal induction of this pathway is a conserved phenomenon in cognitive decline that may impair learning and memory by suppressing neuronal plasticity. PMID:23438185

  7. Differential regulation of hippocampal progenitor proliferation by opioid receptor antagonists in running and non-running spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Persson, Anders I; Naylor, Andrew S; Jonsdottir, Ingibjörg H; Nyberg, Fred; Eriksson, Peter S; Thorlin, Thorleif

    2004-04-01

    Voluntary running in mice and forced treadmill running in rats have been shown to increase the amount of proliferating cells in the hippocampus. Little is known as yet about the mechanisms involved in these processes. It is well known that the endogenous opioid system is affected during running and other forms of physical exercise. In this study, we evaluated the involvement of the endogenous opioids in the regulation of hippocampal proliferation in non-running and voluntary running rats. Nine days of wheel running was compared with non-running in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), a rat strain known to run voluntarily. On the last 2 days of the experimental period all rats received two daily injections of the opioid receptor antagonists naltrexone or naltrindole together with injections of bromodeoxyuridine to label dividing cells. Brain sections from the running rats showed approximately a five-fold increase in newly generated cells in the hippocampus, and this increase was partly reduced by naltrexone but not by naltrindole. By contrast, both naltrexone and naltrindole increased hippocampal proliferation in non-running rats. In non-running rats the administration of naltrexone decreased corticosterone levels and adrenal gland weights, whereas no significant effects on these parameters could be detected for naltrindole. However, adrenal gland weights were increased in naltrexone- but not in naltrindole-administered running rats. In addition, in voluntary running rats there was a three-fold increase in the hippocampal levels of Met-enkephalin-Arg-Phe compared with non-runners, indicating an increase in opioid activity in the hippocampus during running. These data suggest an involvement of endogenous opioids in the regulation of hippocampal proliferation in non-running rats, probably through hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis modulation. During voluntary running in SHR naltrexone altered hippocampal proliferation via as yet unknown mechanisms. PMID:15078558

  8. Fornical and nonfornical projections from the rat hippocampal formation to the anterior thalamic nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Dillingham, Christopher M.; Erichsen, Jonathan T.; O'Mara, Shane M.; Aggleton, John P.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The hippocampal formation and anterior thalamic nuclei form part of an interconnected network thought to support memory. A central pathway in this mnemonic network comprises the direct projections from the hippocampal formation to the anterior thalamic nuclei, projections that, in the primate brain, originate in the subicular cortices to reach the anterior thalamic nuclei by way of the fornix. In the rat brain, additional pathways involving the internal capsule have been described, linking the dorsal subiculum to the anteromedial thalamic nucleus, as well as the postsubiculum to the anterodorsal thalamic nucleus. Confirming such pathways is essential in order to appreciate how information is transferred from the hippocampal formation to the anterior thalamus and how it may be disrupted by fornix pathology. Accordingly, in the present study, pathway tracers were injected into the anterior thalamic nuclei and the dorsal subiculum of rats with fornix lesions. Contrary to previous descriptions, projections from the subiculum to the anteromedial thalamic nucleus overwhelmingly relied on the fornix. Dorsal subiculum projections to the majority of the anteroventral nucleus also predominantly relied on the fornix, although postsubicular inputs to the lateral dorsal part of the anteroventral nucleus, as well as to the anterodorsal and laterodorsal thalamic nuclei, largely involved a nonfornical pathway, via the internal capsule. © 2015 The Authors Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25616174

  9. Consensus Modeling of Oral Rat Acute Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    An acute toxicity dataset (oral rat LD50) with about 7400 compounds was compiled from the ChemIDplus database. This dataset was divided into a modeling set and a prediction set. The compounds in the prediction set were selected so that they were present in the modeling set used...

  10. Experimental diabetes in rats causes hippocampal dendritic and synaptic reorganization and increased glucocorticoid reactivity to stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    María Magariños, Ana; McEwen, Bruce S.

    2000-09-01

    We report that 9 d of uncontrolled experimental diabetes induced by streptozotocin (STZ) in rats is an endogenous chronic stressor that produces retraction and simplification of apical dendrites of hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons, an effect also observed in nondiabetic rats after 21 d of repeated restraint stress or chronic corticosterone (Cort) treatment. Diabetes also induces morphological changes in the presynaptic mossy fiber terminals (MFT) that form excitatory synaptic contacts with the proximal CA3 apical dendrites. One effect, synaptic vesicle depletion, occurs in diabetes as well as after repeated stress and Cort treatment. However, diabetes produced other MFT structural changes that differ qualitatively and quantitatively from other treatments. Furthermore, whereas 7 d of repeated stress was insufficient to produce dendritic or synaptic remodeling in nondiabetic rats, it potentiated both dendritic atrophy and MFT synaptic vesicle depletion in STZ rats. These changes occurred in concert with adrenal hypertrophy and elevated basal Cort release as well as hypersensitivity and defective shutoff of Cort secretion after stress. Thus, as an endogenous stressor, STZ diabetes not only accelerates the effects of exogenous stress to alter hippocampal morphology; it also produces structural changes that overlap only partially with those produced by stress and Cort in the nondiabetic state.

  11. Estrous Cycle-Dependent Phasic Changes in the Stoichiometry of Hippocampal Synaptic AMPA Receptors in Rats.

    PubMed

    Tada, Hirobumi; Koide, Mayu; Ara, Wakana; Shibata, Yusuke; Funabashi, Toshiya; Suyama, Kumiko; Goto, Takahisa; Takahashi, Takuya

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive function can be affected by the estrous cycle. However, the effect of the estrous cycle on synaptic functions is poorly understood. Here we show that in female rats, inhibitory-avoidance (IA) task (hippocampus-dependent contextual fear-learning task) drives GluA2-lacking Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs) into the hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses during all periods of the estrous cycle except the proestrous period, when estrogen levels are high. In addition, IA task failed to drive CP-AMPARs into the CA3-CA1 synapses of ovariectomized rats only when estrogen was present. Thus, changes in the stoichiometry of AMPA receptors during learning depend on estrogen levels. Furthermore, the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) after IA task was prevented during the proestrous period, while intact LTP is still expressed after IA task during other period of the estrous cycle. Consistent with this finding, rats conditioned by IA training failed to acquire hippocampus-dependent Y-maze task during the proestrous period. On the other hand, during other estrous period, rats were able to learn Y-maze task after IA conditioning. These results suggest that high estrogen levels prevent the IA learning-induced delivery of CP-AMPARs into hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses and limit synaptic plasticity after IA task, thus preventing the acquisition of additional learning. PMID:26121335

  12. Aluminium-maltolate-induced impairment of learning, memory and hippocampal long-term potentiation in rats.

    PubMed

    Liang, Rui-Feng; Li, Wei-Qing; Wang, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Hui-Fang; Wang, Hong; Wang, Jun-Xia; Zhang, Yu; Wan, Ming-Tao; Pan, Bao-Long; Niu, Qiao

    2012-01-01

    Recently, aluminium (Al) has been proposed to be one of the environmental factors responsible for cause Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the relationship between Al and AD is controversial. To investigate the effects of subchronic Aluminium-maltolate (Al (mal)(3)) exposure on the behavioral, electrophysiological functions. Forty Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly distributed into five groups. Over two months, rats in the saline group received daily intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections 0.9% saline, rats in the maltolate group received 7.56 mg/kg maltolate, and rats in the 0.27, 0.54, 1.08 mg/kg Al (mal)(3) groups received i.p. administrations of these three doses, respectively. Neural behavior was assessed in Morris water maze. Long-term potentiation (LTP) in hippocampus was recorded. Al content in the neocortex was determined using a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Our studies indicate that subchronic Al (mal)(3) exposure significantly impaired spatial learning and memory abilities, suppressed the LTP in the CA1 hippocampal area, and elevated Al levels in cerebral cortex in a dose-dependent fashion. In conclusion, low doses of Al (mal)(3) can still lead to dramatic Al accumulation in the brain, severely impair learning and memory capacities, and hippocampal LTP. PMID:22878356

  13. Long-lasting desynchronization in rat hippocampal slice induced by coordinated reset stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Tass, P. A.; Barnikol, U. B.; Silchenko, A. N.; Hauptmann, C.; Speckmann, E.-J.

    2009-07-15

    In computational models it has been shown that appropriate stimulation protocols may reshape the connectivity pattern of neural or oscillator networks with synaptic plasticity in a way that the network learns or unlearns strong synchronization. The underlying mechanism is that a network is shifted from one attractor to another, so that long-lasting stimulation effects are caused which persist after the cessation of stimulation. Here we study long-lasting effects of multisite electrical stimulation in a rat hippocampal slice rendered epileptic by magnesium withdrawal. We show that desynchronizing coordinated reset stimulation causes a long-lasting desynchronization between hippocampal neuronal populations together with a widespread decrease in the amplitude of the epileptiform activity. In contrast, periodic stimulation induces a long-lasting increase in both synchronization and amplitude.

  14. Paroxetine ameliorates changes in hippocampal energy metabolism in chronic mild stress-exposed rats

    PubMed Central

    Khedr, Lobna H; Nassar, Noha N; El-Denshary, Ezzeldin S; Abdel-tawab, Ahmed M

    2015-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying stress-induced depression have not been fully outlined. Hence, the current study aimed at testing the link between behavioral changes in chronic mild stress (CMS) model and changes in hippocampal energy metabolism and the role of paroxetine (PAROX) in ameliorating these changes. Male Wistar rats were divided into three groups: vehicle control, CMS-exposed rats, and CMS-exposed rats receiving PAROX (10 mg/kg/day intraperitoneally). Sucrose preference, open-field, and forced swimming tests were carried out. Corticosterone (CORT) was measured in serum, while adenosine triphosphate and its metabolites, cytosolic cytochrome-c (Cyt-c), caspase-3 (Casp-3), as well as nitric oxide metabolites (NOx) were measured in hippocampal tissue homogenates. CMS-exposed rats showed a decrease in sucrose preference as well as body weight compared to control, which was reversed by PAROX. The latter further ameliorated the CMS-induced elevation of CORT in serum (91.71±1.77 ng/mL vs 124.5±4.44 ng/mL, P<0.001) as well as the changes in adenos-ine triphosphate/adenosine diphosphate (3.76±0.02 nmol/mg protein vs 1.07±0.01 nmol/mg protein, P<0.001). Furthermore, PAROX reduced the expression of Cyt-c and Casp-3, as well as restoring NOx levels. This study highlights the role of PAROX in reversing depressive behavior associated with stress-induced apoptosis and changes in hippocampal energy metabolism in the CMS model of depression. PMID:26622178

  15. Androgens increase spine synapse density in the CA1 hippocampal subfield of ovariectomized female rats.

    PubMed

    Leranth, Csaba; Hajszan, Tibor; MacLusky, Neil J

    2004-01-14

    The effects of androgen on the density of spine synapses on pyramidal neurons in the CA1 area of the hippocampus were studied in ovariectomized (OVX) adult female rats. Treatment of OVX rats with testosterone propionate (TP; 500 microg/d, s.c., 2 d) significantly increased spine synapse density (from 0.661 +/- 0.016 spine synapse/microm3 in OVX rats to 1.081 +/- 0.018 spine synapse/microm3 after TP treatment). A smaller, but still statistically significant, increase in synapse density (0.955 +/- 0.029 spine synapse/microm3) was observed in OVX animals after treatment with the nonaromatizable androgen dihydrotestosterone (DHT; 500 microg/d, s.c., 2 d). Administration of 1 mg of letrozole, a powerful nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor, 1 hr before the steroid injections almost completely blocked the synaptic response to testosterone, resulting in a mean synapse density (0.723 +/- 0.003 spine synapse/microm3) only slightly higher than in OVX control rats. By contrast, the response to DHT was unaffected by letrozole pretreatment. These data suggest that androgen secretion during the female reproductive cycle may contribute to cyclical changes in hippocampal synaptic density. They also indicate that androgen treatment may be as effective as estrogen replacement in reversing the decline in hippocampal CA1 spine synapses that follows loss of ovarian function. Induction of hippocampal synapse formation by androgen is not mediated entirely via intracerebral estrogen biosynthesis, however, because aromatase-independent mechanisms also significantly affect CA1 spine synapse density. PMID:14724248

  16. Involvement of hippocampal NMDA receptors in retrieval of spontaneous object recognition memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Iwamura, Etsushi; Yamada, Kazuo; Ichitani, Yukio

    2016-07-01

    The involvement of hippocampal N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the retrieval process of spontaneous object recognition memory was investigated. The spontaneous object recognition test consisted of three phases. In the sample phase, rats were exposed to two identical objects several (2-5) times in the arena. After the sample phase, various lengths of delay intervals (24h-6 weeks) were inserted (delay phase). In the test phase in which both the familiar and the novel objects were placed in the arena, rats' novel object exploration behavior under the hippocampal treatment of NMDA receptor antagonist, AP5, or vehicle was observed. With 5 exposure sessions in the sample phase (experiment 1), AP5 treatment in the test phase significantly decreased discrimination ratio when the delay was 3 weeks but not when it was one week. On the other hand, with 2 exposure sessions in the sample phase (experiment 2) in which even vehicle-injected control animals could not discriminate the novel object from the familiar one with a 3 week delay, AP5 treatment significantly decreased discrimination ratio when the delay was one week, but not when it was 24h. Additional experiment (experiment 3) showed that the hippocampal treatment of an α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor antagonist, NBQX, decreased discrimination ratio with all delay intervals tested (24h-3 weeks). Results suggest that hippocampal NMDA receptors play an important role in the retrieval of spontaneous object recognition memory especially when the memory trace weakens. PMID:27036649

  17. Isoflurane induced cognitive impairment in aged rats through hippocampal calcineurin/NFAT signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, Cheng; Li, Zhengqian; Qian, Min; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Jun; Guo, Xiangyang

    2015-05-15

    Calcineurin (CaN) over-activation constrains synaptic plasticity and memory formation. Upon CaN activation, NFAT imports into the nucleus and guides its downstream genes, which also affect neuronal and synaptic function. Aberrant CaN/NFAT signaling involves in neurotoxicity and cognitive impairment in neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, but its role in postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) remains uninvestigated. Inhaled anesthetic isoflurane facilitates the development of POCD, and the present study investigated the role of CaN/NFAT signaling in isoflurane induced cognitive impairment of aged rats, and the therapeutic effects of CaN inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA). The results indicated that hippocampal CaN activity increased and peaked at 6 h after isoflurane exposure, and NFAT, especially NFATc4, imported into the nucleus following CaN activation. Furthermore, phamacological inhibition of CaN by CsA markedly attenuated isoflurane induced aberrant CaN/NFATc4 signaling in the hippocampus, and rescued relevant spatial learning and memory impairment of aged rats. Overall, the study suggests hippocampal CaN/NFAT signaling as the upstream mechanism of isoflurane induced cognitive impairment, and provides potential therapeutic target and possible treatment methods for POCD. - Highlights: • Isoflurane induces hippocampal calcineurin activation. • Isoflurane induces hippocampal NFAT, especially NFATc4, nuclear import. • Cyclosporine A attenuates isoflurane induced aberrant calcineurin/NFAT signaling. • Cyclosporine A rescues isoflurane induced cognitive impairment. • Calcineurin/NFAT signaling is the upstream mechanism of isoflurane induced synaptic dysfunction and cognitive impairment.

  18. Hypoxia induces an increase in intracellular magnesium via transient receptor potential melastatin 7 (TRPM7) channels in rat hippocampal neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Zhao, Fengbo; Zhao, Yin; Wang, Jing; Pei, Lei; Sun, Ning; Shi, Jing

    2011-06-10

    TRPM7, a divalent cation channel, plays an important role in neurons damaged from cerebral ischemia due to permitting intracellular calcium overload. This study aimed to explore whether magnesium was transported via a TRPM7 channel into the intracellular space of rat hippocampal neurons after 1 h of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and acute chemical ischemia (CI) by using methods of the Mg(2+) fluorescent probe Mag-Fura-2 to detect intracellular magnesium concentration ([Mg(2+)](i)) and flame atomic absorption spectrometry to measure extracellular magnesium concentration ([Mg(2+)](o)). The results showed that the neuronal [Mg(2+)](i) was 1.51-fold higher after 1 h of OGD at a basal level, and the increase of neuronal [Mg(2+)](i) reached a peak after 1 h of OGD and was kept for 60 min with re-oxygenation. Meanwhile, the [Mg(2+)](o) decreased after 1 h of OGD and recovered to the pre-ischemic level within 15 min after re-oxygenation. In the case of CI, the [Mg(2+)](i) peak immediately appeared in hippocampal neurons. This increase of [Mg(2+)](i) declined by removing extracellular magnesium in OGD or CI. Furthermore, by using Gd(3+) or 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate to inhibit TRPM7 channels, the [Mg(2+)](i) increase, which was induced by OGD or CI, was attenuated without altering the basal level of [Mg(2+)](i). By silencing TRPM7 with shRNA in hippocampal neurons, it was found that not only was the increase of [Mg(2+)](i) induced by OGD or CI but also the basal levels of [Mg(2+)](i) were attenuated. In contrast, overexpression of TRPM7 in HEK293 cells exaggerated both the basal levels and increased [Mg(2+)](i) after 1 h of OGD/CI. These results suggest that anoxia induced the increase of [Mg(2+)](i) via TRPM7 channels in rat hippocampal neurons. PMID:21487014

  19. Hypothyroxinemia induced by maternal mild iodine deficiency impairs hippocampal myelinated growth in lactational rats.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Wang, Yi; Dong, Jing; Wang, Yuan; Min, Hui; Song, Binbin; Shan, Zhongyan; Teng, Weiping; Xi, Qi; Chen, Jie

    2015-11-01

    Hypothyroxinemia induced by maternal mild iodine deficiency causes neurological deficits and impairments of brain function in offspring. Hypothyroxinemia is prevalent in developing and developed countries alike. However, the mechanism underlying these deficits remains less well known. Given that the myelin plays an important role in learning and memory function, we hypothesize that hippocampal myelinated growth may be impaired in rat offspring exposed to hypothyroxinemia induced by maternal mild iodine deficiency. To test this hypothesis, the female Wistar rats were used and four experimental groups were prepared: (1) control; (2) maternal mild iodine deficiency diet inducing hypothyroxinemia; (3) hypothyroidism induced by maternal severe iodine deficiency diet; (4) hypothyroidism induced by maternal methimazole water. The rats were fed the diet from 3 months before pregnancy to the end of lactation. Our results showed that the physiological changes occuring in the hippocampal myelin were altered in the mild iodine deficiency group as indicated by the results of immunofluorescence of myelin basic proteins on postnatal day 14 and postnatal day 21. Moreover, hypothyroxinemia reduced the expressions of oligodendrocyte lineage transcription factor 2 and myelin-related proteins in the treatments on postnatal day 14 and postnatal day 21. Our data suggested that hypothyroxinemia induced by maternal mild iodine deficiency may impair myelinated growth of the offspring. PMID:24753110

  20. Effects of Modafinil on Behavioral Learning and Hippocampal Synaptic Transmission in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chong; Wang, Hai-Xia; Li, Chu-Hua; Huang, Jun-Ni; Xiao, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Modafinil is a wake-promoting agent that has been proposed to improve cognitive performance at the preclinical and clinical levels. Since there is insufficient evidence for modafinil to be regarded as a cognitive enhancer, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of chronic modafinil administration on behavioral learning in healthy adult rats. Methods: Y-maze training was used to assess learning performance, and the whole-cell patch clamp technique was used to assess synaptic transmission in pyramidal neurons of the hippocampal CA1 region of rats. Results: Intraperitoneal administration of modafinil at 200 mg/kg or 300 mg/kg significantly improved learning performance. Furthermore, perfusion with 1mM modafinil enhanced the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous postsynaptic currents and spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents in CA1 pyramidal neurons in hippocampal slices. However, the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in CA1 pyramidal neurons were inhibited by treatment with 1mM modafinil. Conclusions: These results indicate that modafinil improves learning and memory in rats possibly by enhancing glutamatergic excitatory synaptic transmission and inhibiting GABAergic (gamma-aminobutyric acid-ergic) inhibitory synaptic transmission. PMID:26739176

  1. ToF-SIMS cluster ion imaging of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal rat neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, J. T.; Nie, H.-Y.; Taylor, A. R.; Walzak, M. J.; Chang, W. H.; MacFabe, D. F.; Lau, W. M.

    2008-12-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the power of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) cluster ion imaging to characterize biological structures, such as that of the rat central nervous system. A large number of the studies to date have been carried out on the "structural scale" imaging several mm 2 using mounted thin sections. In this work, we present our ToF-SIMS cluster ion imaging results on hippocampal rat brain neurons, at the cellular and sub-cellular levels. As a part of an ongoing investigation to examine gut linked metabolic factors in autism spectrum disorders using a novel rat model, we have observed a possible variation in hippocampal Cornu ammonis 1 (CA1) pyramidal neuron geometry in thin, paraformaldehyde fixed brain sections. However, the fixation process alters the tissue matrix such that much biochemical information appears to be lost. In an effort to preserve as much as possible this original information, we have established a protocol using unfixed thin brain sections, along with low dose, 500 eV Cs + pre-sputtering that allows imaging down to the sub-cellular scale with minimal sample preparation.

  2. The impacts of diabetes in pregnancy on hippocampal synaptogenesis in rat neonates.

    PubMed

    Vafaei-Nezhad, S; Hami, J; Sadeghi, A; Ghaemi, K; Hosseini, M; Abedini, M R; Haghir, H

    2016-03-24

    Diabetes during the pregnancy period impairs hippocampal development, and is associated with neurocognitive and neurobehavioral problems in the offspring. Synaptogenesis is one of the most important events in the development of the nervous system, and is known as a mechanism by which the memory process takes place. Synaptophysin (SYP) is an integral membrane protein of synaptic vesicles in the hippocampus involved also in learning and memory. The present study aimed to examine the effects of maternal diabetes on the expression and distribution pattern of SYP, as a marker of synaptogenesis, in the developing rat hippocampus using Immunofluorescence staining and real-time PCR. Wistar female rats were maintained as diabetic from a week before pregnancy through parturition and male offspring was euthanized at postnatal day (P) 0, 7, and 14. Our results showed a significant down-regulation in mRNA expression of SYP in the offspring born to diabetic animals at P7, and P14 (P ⩽ 0.05 each). Regarding to the density of SYP expressing hippocampal neurons, we found a marked decrease in the distribution pattern of SYP in all hippocampal subfields of Streptozotocin (STZ)-D group rat neonates, especially in one and two weeks of age (P ⩽ 0.05 each). Moreover, the results revealed no significant changes in either gene expression or distribution pattern of SYP--positive neurons in insulin-treated group compared with the controls. The present study demonstrated that diabetes in pregnancy has negative impacts on synaptogenesis in the offspring's hippocampus. Furthermore, the rigid maternal glycaemia control by insulin treatment in most cases normalized these effects. PMID:26794272

  3. Continuous recognition of spatial and nonspatial stimuli in hippocampal-lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Jackson-Smith, P; Kesner, R P; Chiba, A A

    1993-03-01

    The present experiments compared the performance of hippocampal-lesioned rats to control rats on a spatial continuous recognition task and an analogous nonspatial task with similar processing demands. Daily sessions for Experiment 1 involved sequential presentation of individual arms on a 12-arm radial maze. Each arm contained a Froot Loop reinforcement the first time it was presented, and latency to traverse the arm was measured. A subset of the arms were repeated, but did not contain reinforcement. Repeated arms were presented with lags ranging from 0 to 6 (0 to 6 different arm presentations occurred between the first and the repeated presentation). Difference scores were computed by subtracting the latency on first presentations from the latency on repeated presentations, and these scores were high in all rats prior to surgery, with a decreasing function across lag. There were no differences in performance following cortical control or sham surgery. However, there was a total deficit in performance following large electrolytic lesions of the hippocampus. The second experiment employed the same continuous recognition memory procedure, but used three-dimensional visual objects (toys, junk items, etc., in various shapes, sizes, and textures) as stimuli on a flat runway. As in Experiment 1, the stimuli were presented successively and latency to run to and move the object was measured. Objects were repeated with lags ranging from 0 to 4. Performance on this task following surgery did not differ from performance prior to surgery for either the control group or the hippocampal lesion group. These results provide support for Kesner's attribute model of hippocampal function in that the hippocampus is assumed to mediate data-based memory for spatial locations, but not three-dimensional visual objects. PMID:8476378

  4. Firing relations of medial entorhinal neurons to the hippocampal theta rhythm in urethane anesthetized and walking rats.

    PubMed

    Stewart, M; Quirk, G J; Barry, M; Fox, S E

    1992-01-01

    The firing of neurons from layers II and III of medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) was examined in relation to the hippocampal theta rhythm in urethane anesthetized and walking rats. 1) MEC neurons showed a significant phase relation to the hippocampal theta rhythm in both walking and urethane anesthetized rats, suggesting that this region contributes to the generation of both atropine-resistant and atropine-sensitive theta rhythm components. 2) The proportion of phase-locked cells was three times greater in walking rats (22/23 cells) as compared to anesthetized rats (8/23 cells), indicating that MEC cells made a greater contribution during walking theta rhythm. This difference was also manifest in the greater mean vector length for the group of phase-locked MEC cells during walking: 0.39 +/- 0.13 versus 0.21 +/- 0.08. Firing rate differences between walking and urethane conditions were not significant. 3) In walking rats, MEC cells fired on the positive peak of the dentate theta rhythm (group mean phase = 5 degrees; 0 degrees = positive peak at the hippocampal fissure). This is close to the reported phases for dentate granule and hippocampal pyramidal cells. The distribution of MEC cell phases in urethane anesthetized rats was broader (group mean phase = 90 degrees), consistent with the phase data reported for hippocampal projection cells. These findings suggest that medial entorhinal neurons are the principal determinant of theta-related firing of hippocampal neurons and that their robust rhythmicity in walking as compared to urethane anesthesia accounts for EEG differences across the two conditions. PMID:1521610

  5. Neonatal anoxia in rats: hippocampal cellular and subcellular changes related to cell death and spatial memory.

    PubMed

    Takada, S H; dos Santos Haemmerle, C A; Motta-Teixeira, L C; Machado-Nils, A V; Lee, V Y; Takase, L F; Cruz-Rizzolo, R J; Kihara, A H; Xavier, G F; Watanabe, I-S; Nogueira, M I

    2015-01-22

    Neonatal anoxia in rodents has been used to understand brain changes and cognitive dysfunction following asphyxia. This study investigated the time-course of cellular and subcellular changes and hippocampal cell death in a non-invasive model of anoxia in neonatal rats, using Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP Nick End Labeling (TUNEL) to reveal DNA fragmentation, Fluoro-Jade® B (FJB) to show degenerating neurons, cleaved caspase-3 immunohistochemistry (IHC) to detect cells undergoing apoptosis, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to reveal fine ultrastructural changes related to cell death. Anoxia was induced by exposing postnatal day 1 (P1) pups to a flow of 100% gaseous nitrogen for 25 min in a chamber maintained at 37 °C. Control rats were similarly exposed to this chamber but with air flow instead of nitrogen. Brain changes following anoxia were evaluated at postnatal days 2, 14, 21 and 60 (P2, P14, P21 and P60). In addition, spatial reference memory following anoxia and control treatments was evaluated in the Morris water maze, starting at P60. Compared to their respective controls, P2 anoxic rats exhibited (1) higher TUNEL labeling in cornus ammonis (CA) 1 and the dentate gyrus (DG), (2) higher FJB-positive cells in the CA2-3, and (3) somato-dendritic swelling, mitochondrial injury and chromatin condensation in irregular bodies, as well as other subcellular features indicating apoptosis, necrosis, autophagy and excitotoxicity in the CA1, CA2-3 and DG, as revealed by TEM. At P14, P21 and P60, both groups showed small numbers of TUNEL-positive and FJB-positive cells. Stereological analysis at P2, P14, P21 and P60 revealed a lack of significant differences in cleaved caspase-3 IHC between anoxic and control subjects. These results suggest that the type of hippocampal cell death following neonatal anoxia is likely independent of caspase-3 activation. Neonatal anoxia induced deficits in acquisition and performance of spatial reference

  6. Hippocampal State-Dependent Behavioral Reflex to an Identical Sensory Input in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tokuda, Keita; Nishikawa, Michimasa; Kawahara, Shigenori

    2014-01-01

    We examined the local field potential of the hippocampus to monitor brain states during a conditional discrimination task, in order to elucidate the relationship between ongoing brain states and a conditioned motor reflex. Five 10-week-old Wistar/ST male rats underwent a serial feature positive conditional discrimination task in eyeblink conditioning using a preceding light stimulus as a conditional cue for reinforced trials. In this task, a 2-s light stimulus signaled that the following 350-ms tone (conditioned stimulus) was reinforced with a co-terminating 100-ms periorbital electrical shock. The interval between the end of conditional cue and the onset of the conditioned stimulus was 4±1 s. The conditioned stimulus was not reinforced when the light was not presented. Animals successfully utilized the light stimulus as a conditional cue to drive differential responses to the identical conditioned stimulus. We found that presentation of the conditional cue elicited hippocampal theta oscillations, which persisted during the interval of conditional cue and the conditioned stimulus. Moreover, expression of the conditioned response to the tone (conditioned stimulus) was correlated with the appearance of theta oscillations immediately before the conditioned stimulus. These data support hippocampal involvement in the network underlying a conditional discrimination task in eyeblink conditioning. They also suggest that the preceding hippocampal activity can determine information processing of the tone stimulus in the cerebellum and its associated circuits. PMID:25397873

  7. Astroglial Plasticity Is Implicated in Hippocampal Remodelling in Adult Rats Exposed to Antenatal Dexamethasone

    PubMed Central

    Shende, Vishvesh H.; McArthur, Simon; Gillies, Glenda E.; Opacka-Juffry, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    The long-term effects of antenatal dexamethasone treatment on brain remodelling in 3-month-old male Sprague Dawley rats whose mothers had been treated with dexamethasone were investigated in the present study. Dorsal hippocampus, basolateral amygdala and nucleus accumbens volume, cell numbers, and GFAP-immunoreactive astroglial cell morphology were analysed using stereology. Total brain volume as assessed by micro-CT was not affected by the treatment. The relative volume of the dorsal hippocampus (% of total brain volume) showed a moderate, by 8%, but significant reduction in dexamethasone-treated versus control animals. Dexamethasone had no effect on the total and GFAP-positive cell numbers in the hippocampal subregions, basolateral amygdala, and nucleus accumbens. Morphological analysis indicated that numbers of astroglial primary processes were not affected in any of the hippocampal subregions analysed but significant reductions in the total primary process length were observed in CA1 by 32%, CA3 by 50%, and DG by 25%. Mean primary process length values were also significantly decreased in CA1 by 25%, CA3 by 45%, and DG by 25%. No significant astroglial morphological changes were found in basolateral amygdala and nucleus accumbens. We propose that the dexamethasone-dependent impoverishment of hippocampal astroglial morphology is the case of maladaptive glial plasticity induced prenatally. PMID:26345609

  8. Parkia biglobosa Improves Mitochondrial Functioning and Protects against Neurotoxic Agents in Rat Brain Hippocampal Slices

    PubMed Central

    Komolafe, Kayode; Olaleye, Tolulope M.; Seeger, Rodrigo L.; Carvalho, Fabiano B.; Boligon, Aline A.; Athayde, Margareth L.; Klimaczewski, Claudia V.; Akindahunsi, Akintunde A.; Rocha, Joao B. T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Methanolic leaf extracts of Parkia biglobosa, PBE, and one of its major polyphenolic constituents, catechin, were investigated for their protective effects against neurotoxicity induced by different agents on rat brain hippocampal slices and isolated mitochondria. Methods. Hippocampal slices were preincubated with PBE (25, 50, 100, or 200 µg/mL) or catechin (1, 5, or 10 µg/mL) for 30 min followed by further incubation with 300 µM H2O2, 300 µM SNP, or 200 µM PbCl2 for 1 h. Effects of PBE and catechin on SNP- or CaCl2-induced brain mitochondrial ROS formation and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) were also determined. Results. PBE and catechin decreased basal ROS generation in slices and blunted the prooxidant effects of neurotoxicants on membrane lipid peroxidation and nonprotein thiol contents. PBE rescued hippocampal cellular viability from SNP damage and caused a significant boost in hippocampus Na+, K+-ATPase activity but with no effect on the acetylcholinesterase activity. Both PBE and catechin also mitigated SNP- or CaCl2-dependent mitochondrial ROS generation. Measurement by safranine fluorescence however showed that the mild depolarization of the ΔΨm by PBE was independent of catechin. Conclusion. The results suggest that the neuroprotective effect of PBE is dependent on its constituent antioxidants and mild mitochondrial depolarization propensity. PMID:25177688

  9. Activities of visual cortical and hippocampal neurons co-fluctuate in freely moving rats during spatial behavior

    PubMed Central

    Haggerty, Daniel Christopher; Ji, Daoyun

    2015-01-01

    Visual cues exert a powerful control over hippocampal place cell activities that encode external spaces. The functional interaction of visual cortical neurons and hippocampal place cells during spatial navigation behavior has yet to be elucidated. Here we show that, like hippocampal place cells, many neurons in the primary visual cortex (V1) of freely moving rats selectively fire at specific locations as animals run repeatedly on a track. The V1 location-specific activity leads hippocampal place cell activity both spatially and temporally. The precise activities of individual V1 neurons fluctuate every time the animal travels through the track, in a correlated fashion with those of hippocampal place cells firing at overlapping locations. The results suggest the existence of visual cortical neurons that are functionally coupled with hippocampal place cells for spatial processing during natural behavior. These visual neurons may also participate in the formation and storage of hippocampal-dependent memories. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08902.001 PMID:26349031

  10. Effect of chronic stress on synaptic currents in rat hippocampal dentate gyrus neurons.

    PubMed

    Karst, Henk; Joëls, Marian

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the effect of chronic stress on synaptic responses of rat dentate granule cells to perforant path stimulation. Rats were subjected for 3 wk to unpredictable stressors twice daily or to control handling. One day after the last stressor, hippocampal slices were prepared and synaptic responses were determined with whole-cell recording. At that time, adrenal weight was found to be increased and thymus weight as well as gain in body weight were decreased in the stressed versus control animals, indicative of corticosterone hypersecretion during the stress period. In slices from rats with basal corticosteroid levels (at the circadian trough, under rest), no effect of prior stress exposure was observed on synaptic responses. However, synaptic responses of dentate granule cells from chronically stressed and control rats were differently affected by in vitro activation of glucocorticoid receptors, i.e., 1-4 h after administration of 100 nM corticosterone for 20 min. Thus the maximal response to synaptic activation of dentate cells at holding potential of -70 mV [when N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are blocked by magnesium] was significantly enhanced after corticosterone administration in chronically stressed but not in control animals. In accordance, the amplitude of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisolazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) but not of NMDA receptor-mediated currents was increased by corticosterone in stressed rats, over the entire voltage range. Corticosterone treatment also decreased the time to peak of AMPA currents, but this effect did not depend on prior stress exposure. The data indicate that following chronic stress exposure synaptic excitation of dentate granule cells may be enhanced when corticosterone levels rise. This enhanced synaptic flow could contribute to enhanced excitation of projection areas of the dentate gyrus, most notably the CA3 hippocampal region. PMID:12522207

  11. Epilepsy and hippocampal neurodegeneration induced by glutamate decarboxylase inhibitors in awake rats.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Patricia; Tapia, Ricardo

    2015-10-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), the enzyme responsible for GABA synthesis, requires pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) as a cofactor. Thiosemicarbazide (TSC) and γ-glutamyl-hydrazone (PLPGH) inhibit the free PLP-dependent isoform (GAD65) activity after systemic administration, leading to epilepsy in mice and in young, but not in adult rats. However, the competitive GAD inhibitor 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) induces convulsions in both immature and adult rats. In the present study we tested comparatively the epileptogenic and neurotoxic effects of PLPGH, TSC and MPA, administered by microdialysis in the hippocampus of adult awake rats. Cortical EEG and motor behavior were analyzed during the next 2h, and aspartate, glutamate and GABA were measured by HPLC in the microdialysis-collected fractions. Twenty-four hours after drug administration rats were fixed for histological analysis of the hippocampus. PLPGH or TSC did not affect the motor behavior, EEG or cellular morphology, although the extracellular concentration of GABA was decreased. In contrast, MPA produced intense wet-dog shakes, EEG epileptiform discharges, a >75% reduction of extracellular GABA levels and remarkable neurodegeneration of the CA1 region, with >80% neuronal loss. The systemic administration of the NMDA glutamate receptor antagonist MK-801 30 min before MPA did not prevent the MPA-induced epilepsy but significantly protected against its neurotoxic effect, reducing neuronal loss to <30%. We conclude that in adult awake rats, drugs acting on PLP availability have only a weak effect on GABA neurotransmission, whereas direct GAD inhibition produced by MPA induces hyperexcitation leading to epilepsy and hippocampal neurodegeneration. Because this degeneration was prevented by the blockade of NMDA receptors, we conclude that it is due to glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity consequent to disinhibition of the hippocampal excitatory circuits. PMID:26354164

  12. Hippocampal synaptic plasticity and spatial learning are impaired in a rat model of sleep fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Tartar, Jaime L; Ward, Christopher P; McKenna, James T; Thakkar, Mahesh; Arrigoni, Elda; McCarley, Robert W; Brown, Ritchie E; Strecker, Robert E

    2006-05-01

    Sleep fragmentation, a symptom in many clinical disorders, leads to cognitive impairments. To investigate the mechanisms by which sleep fragmentation results in memory impairments, rats were awakened once every 2 min via 30 s of slow movement on an automated treadmill. Within 1 h of this sleep interruption (SI) schedule, rats began to sleep in the 90-s periods without treadmill movement. Total non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREM) sleep time did not change over the 24 h of SI, although there was a significant decline in rapid eye movement sleep (REM) sleep and a corresponding increase in time spent awake. In the SI group, the mean duration of sleep episodes decreased and delta activity during periods of wake increased. Control rats either lived in the treadmill without movement (cage controls, CC), or had 10-min periods of movement followed by 30 min of non-movement allowing deep/continuous sleep (exercise controls, EC). EC did not differ from baseline in the total time spent in each vigilance state. Hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP), a long-lasting change in synaptic efficacy thought to underlie declarative memory formation, was absent in rats exposed to 24 and 72 h SI. In contrast, LTP was normal in EC rats. However, long-term depression and paired-pulse facilitation were unaltered by 24 h SI. Twenty-four hour SI also impaired acquisition of spatial learning in the hippocampus-dependent water maze test. Twenty-four hour SI elevated plasma corticosterone (CORT) to levels previously shown to enhance LTP (125 ng/mL). The results suggest that sleep fragmentation negatively impacts spatial learning. Loss of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependent LTP in the hippocampal CA1 region may be one mechanism involved in this deficit. PMID:16817877

  13. Impaired hippocampal synaptic plasticity and NR2A/2B expression ratio in remifentanil withdrawal rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Yi; Liu, Shichang; Zhang, Nan; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Yinguo

    2016-03-01

    Remifentanil is a kind of synthetic opioid which has gained wide clinical acceptance by anesthesiologists. In this study, we attempted to test whether withdrawal effects on learning mechanisms can be triggered by repeated low-dose remifentanil treatment. Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were subjected to remifentanil (50μg/kgs.c.) twice per day at 12h intervals for 15 days. When the animals of remifentanil group were withdrawn from remifentanil at 10h after the last injection, changes in open field test, Morris water maze test (MWM) and synaptic efficacy were examined in each group. We demonstrated that repeated exposure to 50μg/kg remifentanil produced enhanced locomotor activity indicating that a remifentanil addiction animal model in rats was established. MWM results showed that exposure to remifentanil had no influence on the spatial cognition. After withdrawal of remifentanil rats showed impaired spatial cognition. In electrophysiology test, remifentanil group rats showed a trend for a rightward shift of input/output relationship and significant deficits in maintenance of STP and LTP. Immunohistochemistry results demonstrated increased NR2A/NR2B ratio that should be included depression of LTP. In the whole-cell patch-clamp recording, after elimination from remifentanil incubation, mEPSC frequency was down regulated in hippocampal CA1 neurons, indicating that basal synaptic transmission were affected by remifentanil withdrawal. Taken together, the current findings demonstrate that the remifentanil withdrawn rats exhibit obvious impairment of hippocampus-dependent memory and synaptic plasticity. Increased hippocampal NR2A/NR2B expression ratio and the changes of basal synaptic transmission may participate in the impairment of LTP. PMID:26777139

  14. Neuroprotective Effects of Agmatine Against Cell Damage Caused by Glucocorticoids in Cultured Rat Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, M.-Y.; Wang, W.-P.; Bissette, G.

    2010-01-01

    In the present study the neuroprotective effects of agmatine against neuronal damage caused by glucocorticoids were examined in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Spectrophotometric measurements of lactate dehydrogenase activities, β-tubulin III immunocytochemical staining, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate (dUTP) nick-end-labeling assay (TUNEL) labeling and caspase-3 assays were carried out to detect cell damage or possible involved mechanisms. Our results show that dexamethasone and corticosterone produced a concentration-dependent increase of lactate dehydrogenase release in 12-day hippocampal cultures. Addition of 100 μM agmatine into media prevented the glucocorticoid-induced increase of lactate dehydrogenase release, an effect also shared with the specific N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist MK801 and glucocorticoid receptor antagonists mifepristone and spironolactone. Arcaine, an analog of agmatine with similar structure as agmatine, also blocked glucocorticoid-induced increase of lactate dehydrogenase release. Spermine and putrescine, the endogenous polyamine and metabolic products of agmatine without the guanidino moiety of agmatine, have no appreciable effect on glucocorticoid-induced injuries, indicating a structural relevance for this neuroprotection. Immunocytochemical staining with β-tubulin III confirmed the substantial neuronal injuries caused by glucocorticoids and the neuroprotective effects of agmatine against these neuronal injuries. TUNEL labeling demonstrated that agmatine significantly reduced TUNEL-positive cell numbers induced by exposure of cultured neurons to dexamethasone. Moreover, exposure of hippocampal neurons to dexamethasone significantly increased caspase-3 activity, which was inhibited by co-treatment with agmatine. Taken together, these results demonstrate that agmatine can protect cultured hippocampal neurons from glucocorticoid-induced neurotoxicity, through a possible blockade of

  15. Dendritic remodeling of hippocampal neurons is associated with altered NMDA receptor expression in alcohol dependent rats

    PubMed Central

    Staples, Miranda C.; Kim, Airee; Mandyam, Chitra D.

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged alcohol exposure has been previously shown to impair the structure and function of the hippocampus, although the underlying structural and biochemical alterations contributing to these deleterious effects are unclear. Also unclear is whether these changes persist into prolonged periods of abstinence. Previous work from our lab utilizing a clinically relevant rodent model of alcohol consumption demonstrated that alcohol dependence (induced by chronic intermittent ethanol vapor exposure or CIE) decreases proliferation and survival of neural stem cells in the hippocampal subgranular zone and hippocampal neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus, implicating this region of the cortex as particularly sensitive to the toxic effects of prolonged ethanol exposure. For this study, we investigated seven weeks of CIE-induced morphological changes (dendritic complexity and dendritic spine density) of dentate gyrus (DG) granule cell neurons, CA3, and CA1 pyramidal neurons and the associated alterations in biochemical markers of synaptic plasticity and toxicity (NMDA receptors and PSD-95) in the hippocampus in ethanol-experienced Wistar rats 3h (CIE) and 21 days (protracted abstinence) after the last ethanol vapor exposure. CIE reduced dendritic arborization of DG neurons and this effect persisted into protracted abstinence. CIE enhanced dendritic arborization of pyramidal neurons and this effect did not persist into protracted abstinence. The architectural changes in dendrites did not correlate with alterations in dendritic spine density, however, they were associated with increases in the expression of pNR2B, total NR2B, and total NR2A immediately following CIE with expression levels returning to control levels in prolonged abstinence. Overall, these data provide the evidence that CIE produces profound changes in hippocampal structural plasticity and in molecular tools that maintain hippocampal structural plasticity, and these alterations may underlie cognitive dysfunction

  16. Effect of the multimodal acting antidepressant vortioxetine on rat hippocampal plasticity and recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Bétry, Cécile; Etiévant, Adeline; Pehrson, Alan; Sánchez, Connie; Haddjeri, Nasser

    2015-04-01

    Depression is frequently associated with cognitive disturbances. Vortioxetine is a multimodal acting antidepressant that functions as a 5-HT3 and 5-HT7 and 5-HT1D receptor antagonist, 5-HT1B receptor partial agonist, 5-HT1A receptor agonist and inhibitor of the 5-HT transporter. Given its pharmacological profile, the present study was undertaken to determine whether vortioxetine could modulate several preclinical parameters known to be involved in cognitive processing. In the dorsal hippocampus of anaesthetized rats, the high-frequency stimulation of the Schaffer collaterals provoked a stable long-term potentiation (LTP) of ~25%. Interestingly, vortioxetine (10mg/kg, i.p.) counteracted the suppressant effect of elevated platform stress on hippocampal LTP induction. In the novel object recognition test, vortioxetine (10mg/kg, i.p.) increased the time spent exploring the novel object during the retention test and this pro-cognitive effect was prevented by the partial 5-HT3 receptor agonist SR57227 (1mg/kg, i.p.). Finally, compared to fluoxetine, sustained administration of vortioxetine (5mg/kg/day, s.c.) induced a rapid increase of cell proliferation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. In summary, vortioxetine prevented the effect of stress on hippocampal LTP, increased rapidly hippocampal cell proliferation and enhanced short-term episodic memory, via, at least in part, its 5-HT3 receptor antagonism. Taken together, these preclinical data suggest that the antidepressant vortioxetine may have a beneficial effect on human cognitive processes. PMID:25524057

  17. Osteopontin Expression in Acute Immune Response Mediates Hippocampal Synaptogenesis and Adaptive Outcome Following Cortical Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Julie L.; Reeves, Thomas M.; Phillips, Linda L.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) produces axotomy, deafferentation and reactive synaptogenesis. Inflammation influences synaptic repair, and the novel brain cytokine osteopontin (OPN) has potential to support axon regeneration through exposure of its integrin receptor binding sites. This study explored whether OPN secretion and proteolysis by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) mediate the initial degenerative phase of synaptogenesis, targeting reactive neuroglia to affect successful repair. Adult rats received unilateral entorhinal cortex lesion (UEC) modeling adaptive synaptic plasticity. Over the first week postinjury, hippocampal OPN protein and mRNA were assayed and histology performed. At 1–2d, OPN protein increased up to 51 fold, and was localized within activated, mobilized glia. OPN transcript also increased over 50 fold, predominantly within reactive microglia. OPN fragments known to be derived from MMP proteolysis were elevated at 1d, consistent with prior reports of UEC glial activation and enzyme production. Postinjury minocycline immunosuppression attenuated MMP-9 gelatinase activity, which was correlated with reduction of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (LCN2) expression, and reduced OPN fragment generation. The antibiotic also attenuated removal of synapsin-1 positive axons from the deafferented zone. OPN KO mice subjected to UEC had similar reduction of hippocampal MMP-9 activity, as well as lower synapsin-1 breakdown over the deafferented zone. MAP1B and N-cadherin, surrogates of cytoarchitecture and synaptic adhesion, were not affected. OPN KO mice with UEC exhibited time dependent cognitive deficits during the synaptogenic phase of recovery. This study demonstrates that OPN can mediate immune response during TBI synaptic repair, positively influencing synapse reorganization and functional recovery. PMID:25151457

  18. Chronic Trigeminal Nerve Stimulation Protects Against Seizures, Cognitive Impairments, Hippocampal Apoptosis, and Inflammatory Responses in Epileptic Rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian-Qian; Zhu, Li-Jun; Wang, Xian-Hong; Zuo, Jian; He, Hui-Yan; Tian, Miao-Miao; Wang, Lei; Liang, Gui-Ling; Wang, Yu

    2016-05-01

    Trigeminal nerve stimulation (TNS) has recently been demonstrated effective in the treatment of epilepsy and mood disorders. Here, we aim to determine the effects of TNS on epileptogenesis, cognitive function, and the associated hippocampal apoptosis and inflammatory responses. Rats were injected with pilocarpine to produce status epilepticus (SE) and the following chronic epilepsy. After SE induction, TNS treatment was conducted for 4 consecutive weeks. A pilocarpine re-injection was then used to induce a seizure in the epileptic rats. The hippocampal neuronal apoptosis induced by seizure was assessed by TUNEL staining and inflammatory responses by immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The spontaneous recurrent seizure (SRS) number was counted through video monitoring, and the cognitive function assessed through Morris Water Maze (MWM) test. TNS treatment attenuated the SRS attacks and improved the cognitive impairment in epileptic rats. A pilocarpine re-injection resulted in less hippocampal neuronal apoptosis and reduced level of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and microglial activation in epileptic rats with TNS treatment in comparison to the epileptic rats without TNS treatment. It is concluded that TNS treatment shortly after SE not only protected against the chronic spontaneous seizures but also improved cognitive impairments. These antiepileptic properties of TNS may be related to its attenuating effects on hippocampal apoptosis and pro-inflammatory responses. PMID:26973056

  19. Hippocampal long-term potentiation is reduced in mature compared to young male rats but not in female rats.

    PubMed

    Monfort, P; Felipo, V

    2007-05-11

    Aging is associated with a decline in cognitive function which could be due to reduced synaptic plasticity. Hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) is an activity-dependent form of increased transmission efficacy at synapses that is considered the basis for some forms of learning and memory. We studied the N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor-dependent LTP in the CA1 region of hippocampus in young (2 months) and mature (8 months) male and female rats. We have found that in young male rats the tetanus increased the magnitude of excitatory post-synaptic potentials to 204+/-10% of basal while in mature male rats the magnitude of the LTP was significantly lower reaching only 153+/-11% of basal. This decrease did not occur in female rats. Similar changes occurred in the content of the NMDA receptor subunits NR1 and NR2A in hippocampus. The amount of both subunits was reduced significantly (15-16%) in hippocampus of 8-month-old compared with 2-month-old male rats. This decrease was not observed in female rats. Moreover, there is a significant correlation between the content of NR1 subunit and the magnitude of the potentiation. These data suggest that some of the neurobiological changes induced in hippocampus by aging are different in males and females. PMID:17395392

  20. Developmental hypothyroxinaemia induced by maternal mild iodine deficiency delays hippocampal axonal growth in the rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Wei, W; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Dong, J; Min, H; Song, B; Teng, W; Xi, Q; Chen, J

    2013-09-01

    Iodine is essential for the biosynthesis of thyroid hormones, including triiodothyronine and thyroxine. Thyroid hormones are important for central nervous system development. Mild maternal iodine deficiency (ID)-induced hypothyroxinaemia causes neurological deficits and mental retardation of the foetus. However, the detailed mechanism underlying these deficits is still largely unknown. Given that the growth-associated protein of 43 kDa (GAP-43), semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) and the glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β)/collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP2) pathway are essential for axonal development, we hypothesise that hippocampal axonal growth-related proteins may be impaired, which may contribute to hippocampal axonal growth delay in rat offspring exposed to maternal hypothyroxinaemia. To test this hypothesis, maternal hypothyroxinaemia models were established in Wistar rats using a mild ID diet. Besides a negative control group, two maternal hypothyroidism models were created with either a severe ID diet or methimazole in the water. Our results showed that maternal hypothyroxinaemia exposure delayed offspring axonal growth on gestational day 19, postnatal day (PN) 7, PN14 and PN21. Consistent with this, the mean intensity of hippocampal CRMP2 and Tau1 immunofluorescence axonal protein was reduced in the mild ID group. Moreover, maternal hypothyroxinaemia disrupted expressions of GAP-43 and Sema3A. Furthermore, the phosphorylation of GSK3β and CRMP2 was also affected in the treated offspring, implying a potential mechanism by which hypothyroxinaemia-exposure affects neurodevelopment. Taken together, our data support the hypothesis that maternal hypothyroxinaemia may impair axonal growth of the offspring. PMID:23763342

  1. Tributyltin induces oxidative stress and neuronal injury by inhibiting glutathione S-transferase in rat organotypic hippocampal slice cultures.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Yasuhiro; Kawami, Tomohito; Ishida, Atsuhiko; Yamazaki, Takeshi

    2012-06-01

    Tributyltin (TBT) has been used as a heat stabilizer, agricultural pesticide and antifouling agents on ships, boats and fish-farming nets; however, the neurotoxicity of TBT has recently become a concern. TBT is suggested to stimulate the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) inside cells. The aim of this study was to determine the mechanism of neuronal oxidative injury induced by TBT using rat organotypic hippocampal slice cultures. The treatment of rat hippocampal slices with TBT induced ROS production, lipid peroxidation and cell death. Pretreatment with antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase, catalase or trolox, suppressed the above phenomena induced by TBT, indicating that TBT elicits oxidative stress in hippocampal slices, which causes neuronal cell death. TBT dose-dependently inhibited glutathione S-transferase (GST), but not glutathione peroxidase or glutathione reductase in the cytosol of rat hippocampus. The treatment of hippocampal slices with TBT decreased the GST activity. Pretreatment with reduced glutathione attenuated the reduction of GST activity and cell death induced by TBT, indicating that the decrease in GST activity by TBT is involved in hippocampal cell death. When hippocampal slices were treated with sulforaphane, the expression and activity of GST were increased. Notably, TBT-induced oxidative stress and cell death were significantly suppressed by pretreatment with sulforaphane. These results indicate that GST inhibition could contribute, at least in part, to the neuronal cell death induced by TBT in hippocampal slices. This study is the first report to show the link between neuronal oxidative injury and the GST inhibition elicited by TBT. PMID:22449404

  2. Glatiramer acetate reverses cognitive deficits from cranial-irradiated rat by inducing hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    He, Fen; Zou, Jun-Tao; Zhou, Qiong-Fang; Niu, Dao-Li; Jia, Wei-Hua

    2014-06-15

    Patients received cranial-irradiation can be affected with cognitive deficits and decreasing hippocampal neurogenesis. In this work, we characterized the cognitive ability and immune-induced neurogenesis of the pre- and post-treated cranial-irradiated rats with Glatiramer acetate (GA), known as a weak CNS auto-antigen. The GA-treated rats displayed better cognitive abilities in Morris water maze (MWM). The numbers of Iba-I-positive microglia, BrdU(+)/DCX(+) cells and BrdU(+)/NeuN(+) cells in hippocampus increased, which are accompanied with increased IFN-γ and decreased IL-6, IL-4. Furthermore, GA reverted the Th1/Th2 balance. GA treatment can reverse the cognitive deficits caused by cranial irradiation through a mechanism that likely involves immunomodulation. PMID:24713401

  3. Cytomorphometric Changes in Hippocampal CA1 Neurons Exposed to Simulated Microgravity Using Rats as Model

    PubMed Central

    Ranjan, Amit; Behari, Jitendra; Mallick, Birendra N.

    2014-01-01

    Microgravity and sleep loss lead to cognitive and learning deficits. These behavioral alterations are likely to be associated with cytomorphological changes and loss of neurons. To understand the phenomenon, we exposed rats (225–275 g) to 14 days simulated microgravity (SMg) and compared its effects on CA1 hippocampal neuronal plasticity, with that of normal cage control rats. We observed that the mean area, perimeter, synaptic cleft, and length of active zone of CA1 hippocampal neurons significantly decreased while dendritic arborization and number of spines significantly increased in SMg group as compared with controls. The mean thickness of the postsynaptic density and total dendritic length remained unaltered. The changes may be a compensatory effect induced by exposure to microgravity; however, the effects may be transient or permanent, which need further study. These findings may be useful for designing effective prevention for those, including the astronauts, exposed to microgravity. Further, subject to confirmation, we propose that SMg exposure might be useful for recovery of stroke patients. PMID:24904521

  4. Candidate Hippocampal Biomarkers of Susceptibility and Resilience to Stress in a Rat Model of Depression*

    PubMed Central

    Henningsen, Kim; Palmfeldt, Johan; Christiansen, Sofie; Baiges, Isabel; Bak, Steffen; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard; Gregersen, Niels; Wiborg, Ove

    2012-01-01

    Susceptibility to stress plays a crucial role in the development of psychiatric disorders such as unipolar depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. In the present study the chronic mild stress rat model of depression was used to reveal stress-susceptible and stress-resilient rats. Large-scale proteomics was used to map hippocampal protein alterations in different stress states. Membrane proteins were successfully captured by two-phase separation and peptide based proteomics. Using iTRAQ labeling coupled with mass spectrometry, more than 2000 proteins were quantified and 73 proteins were found to be differentially expressed. Stress susceptibility was associated with increased expression of a sodium-channel protein (SCN9A) currently investigated as a potential antidepressant target. Differential protein profiling also indicated stress susceptibility to be associated with deficits in synaptic vesicle release involving SNCA, SYN-1, and AP-3. Our results indicate that increased oxidative phosphorylation (COX5A, NDUFB7, NDUFS8, COX5B, and UQCRB) within the hippocampal CA regions is part of a stress-protection mechanism. PMID:22311638

  5. Reduced cell proliferation and increased apoptosis in the hippocampal formation in a rat model of Hirschsprung's disease.

    PubMed

    Xie, Dan; Croaker, G David H; Li, Jimei; Song, Zan-Min

    2016-07-01

    Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR) is a congenital malformation characterized by the absence of enteric ganglia in the distal intestine and gut obstruction. Some HSCR patients also have associated neurological symptoms. We studied a rat model of HSCR, also known as spotting lethal (sl/sl) rat, which carries a spontaneous deletion in the gene of endothelin receptor B (EDNRB) and a similar phenotype as humans with HSCR. We focused on the changes in cell proliferation and apoptosis in the hippocampal formation of the sl/sl rat. Proliferating cells in wildtype (+/+), heterozygous (+/sl) and homozygous (sl/sl) rats were labelled by intraperitoneal injection of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) at postnatal day 2. The density of proliferating cells in the CA1 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus and dentate gyrus of sl/sl rats was significantly reduced compared to +/+ rats. The effect of EDNRB mutation on cell apoptosis was examined by using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labelling assay. This showed that the density of apoptotic cells in the hippocampal formation, particularly in the CA1 region of sl/sl rats, was significantly increased compared to +/+ rats. The expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) was measured with ELISA in the hippocampal formation, but no difference was revealed between genotypes. These results suggest that EDNRB mutation reduces cell proliferation and increases apoptosis in the hippocampal formation of the sl/sl rat, but does not alter the levels of BDNF and GDNF. Our findings provide an insight into the cellular changes in the brains of HSCR patients caused by EDNRB mutation. PMID:27017960

  6. Effect of perinatal thyroid hormone deficiency on expression of rat hippocampal conventional protein kinase C isozymes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Mei; Lin, Ning; Dong, Yan; Su, Qing; Luo, Min

    2011-07-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is essential for the proper development of mammalian central nervous system. TH deficiency during critical period of brain development results in permanent cognitive and neurological impairments. Hippocampus is a structure involved in various memory processes that are essential for creating new memories, and lesions to hippocampus result in impaired learning and memory. Protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms play an important role in many types of learning and memory, and deletion of specific PKC genes results in deficits in learning. In the present study, we used real-time PCR and Western blot to investigate the conventional PKC expression in developing rat hippocampus with different thyroid status, trying to establish a correlation between TH deficiency and conventional PKC expression in developing rat hippocampus. We found that PKCβI and PKCγ expression decreased significantly both in mRNA and protein levels in hypothyroid group compared with the normal controls, and thyroxine replacement could restore it. As for PKCα, we did not find any difference between different thyroid status. Though the expression of PKCβII also decreased in the TH deficiency group, the change was not significant. Taken together, our data indicate TH deficiency can cause hippocampal PKCβ1 and PKCγ downregulation during rat brain development. Since there are other PKC isoforms in the rat brain, whether these change is related to impaired learning and memory of perinatal hypothyroid rats requires further researches. PMID:21424759

  7. Enduring Effects of Early Life Stress on Firing Patterns of Hippocampal and Thalamocortical Neurons in Rats: Implications for Limbic Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Idrish; O'Brien, Patrick; Kumar, Gaurav; Zheng, Thomas; Jones, Nigel C.; Pinault, Didier; French, Chris; Morris, Margaret J.; Salzberg, Michael R.; O'Brien, Terence J.

    2013-01-01

    Early life stress results in an enduring vulnerability to kindling-induced epileptogenesis in rats, but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Recent studies indicate the involvement of thalamocortical neuronal circuits in the progression of kindling epileptogenesis. Therefore, we sought to determine in vivo the effects of early life stress and amygdala kindling on the firing pattern of hippocampus as well as thalamic and cortical neurons. Eight week old male Wistar rats, previously exposed to maternal separation (MS) early life stress or early handling (EH), underwent amygdala kindling (or sham kindling). Once fully kindled, in vivo juxtacellular recordings in hippocampal, thalamic and cortical regions were performed under neuroleptic analgesia. In the thalamic reticular nucleus cells both kindling and MS independently lowered firing frequency and enhanced burst firing. Further, burst firing in the thalamic reticular nucleus was significantly increased in kindled MS rats compared to kindled EH rats (p<0.05). In addition, MS enhanced burst firing of hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Following a stimulation-induced seizure, somatosensory cortical neurons exhibited a more pronounced increase in burst firing in MS rats than in EH rats. These data demonstrate changes in firing patterns in thalamocortical and hippocampal regions resulting from both MS and amygdala kindling, which may reflect cellular changes underlying the enhanced vulnerability to kindling in rats that have been exposed to early life stress. PMID:23825595

  8. Acute effects of electro-acupuncture (EA) on hippocampal long term potentiation (LTP) of perforant path-dentate gyrus granule cells synapse related to memory.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaokuo; Yan, Tiebin; Chen, Rongfa; Ran, Dongzhi

    2012-01-01

    Acupuncture, a traditional Chinese therapeutic method, has been widely used in clinical practice to treat diseases such as stroke, Bell's palsy, Alzheimer disease, Parkinson diseases, dysmenorrhea and chronic pain. Mounting lab data had suggested that electro-acupuncture could alleviate dementia and restore long term potentiation of hippocampus in rat. Clinical data also indicated that electro-acupuncture could improve electrical activity of brain in vascular dementia patients. However, its biological basis and acute effects on hippocampal long term potentiation (LTP) remain not well understood. Therefore, we sought to investigate whether acute electro-acupuncture (acupoints: ST36 and SP6; continuous wave, 2 mV, 2Hz; lasted 20 min) could enhance LTP of perforant path-dentate gyrus granule cells in anesthetized rat and explore its underlying mechanisms. We found that electro-acupuncture could significantly increase PS2/PS 1 in pair pulse test (P <0.05, inter-pulse interval: 20ms and 90ms). When compared to control group, electro-acupuncture could significantly enhance LTP to about 234% which was about 143% of that in control group (P <0.05). It suggested that electro-acupuncture could modulate the function of interneurons in hippocampus hence increase LTP. PMID:23156202

  9. Elevation of naloxone-sensitive /sup 3/H-dihydromorphine binding in hippocampal formation of genetically epilepsy-prone rats

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, D.D.; Mills, S.A.; Jobe, P.C.; Reigel, C.E.

    1988-01-01

    /sup 3/H-Dihydromorphine (DHM) binding sites were measured in the brain of non-epileptic control and GEPR rats using in vitro autoradiographic techniques. The number of naloxone-sensitive /sup 3/H-DHM binding sites was increased 38-57% in the pyramidal cell layer of ventral hippocampal CA/sub 3/ and CA/sub 1/ of GEPR-3 and GEPR-9 rats compared to non-epileptic controls. No significant differences in /sup 3/H-DHM binding were observed in dorsal hippocampal formation, lateral entorhinal cortex, lateral geniculate or cerebellum. The results suggest that an increase in the number of opioid receptors in ventral hippocampus of GEPR rats may be one factor contributing to the enhanced sensitivity of GEPR-9 rats to the proconvulsant effects of morphine.

  10. Elevated dynorphin in the hippocampal formation of aged rats: Relation to cognitive impairment on a spatial learning task

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Hannkuang; Owyang, V.; Hong, Jaushyong; Gallagher, M. )

    1989-04-01

    Radioimmunoassay revealed increased dynorphin A(1-8)-like immunoreactivity (dynA(1-8)LI) in the aged rat brain. Among a number of brain regions examined, an age-related dynA(1-8)LI elevation was found only in the hippocampal formation and frontal cortex. Moreover, the increase in dynA(1-8)LI in the aged hippocampus was associated with a decline in spatial learning ability: dynA(1-8)LI distinguished aged rats that were behaviorally impaired from aged cohorts that learned the spatial task as rapidly as younger animals. Northern blot hybridization using a {sup 32}P-labeled complementary RNA probe encoding rat prodynorphin indicated that the abundance of prodynorphin mRNA was also significantly increased in the hippocampal formation of aged rats with identified spatial learning impairments.

  11. Chronic exercise training versus acute endurance exercise in reducing neurotoxicity in rats exposed to lead acetate.

    PubMed

    Shahandeh, Mohammad; Roshan, Valiollah Dabidi; Hosseinzadeh, Somayeh; Mahjoub, Soleiman; Sarkisian, Vaginak

    2013-03-15

    After intraperitoneal injection of 20 mg/kg lead acetate, rats received 8 weeks of treadmill exercise (15-22 m/min, 25-64 minutes) and/or treadmill exercise at 1.6 km/h until exhaustion. The markers related to neurotoxicity were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. 8 weeks of treadmill exercise significantly increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor level in the hippocampus (P = 0.04) and plasma level of total antioxidant capacity of rats exposed to lead acetate (P < 0.001), and significantly decreased plasma level of malondialdehyde (P < 0.001). Acute exercise only decreased the hippocampal malondialdehyde level (P = 0.09) and increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor level in the hippocampus (P = 0.66). Acute exercise also enhanced the total antioxidant capacity in rats exposed to lead acetate, insignificantly (P = 0.99). These findings suggest that chronic treadmill exercise can significantly decrease neurotoxicity and alleviate oxidative stress in rats exposed to lead acetate. However, acute endurance exercise was not associated with these beneficial effects. PMID:25206718

  12. Chronic exercise training versus acute endurance exercise in reducing neurotoxicity in rats exposed to lead acetate☆

    PubMed Central

    Shahandeh, Mohammad; Roshan, Valiollah Dabidi; Hosseinzadeh, Somayeh; Mahjoub, Soleiman; Sarkisian, Vaginak

    2013-01-01

    After intraperitoneal injection of 20 mg/kg lead acetate, rats received 8 weeks of treadmill exercise (15–22 m/min, 25–64 minutes) and/or treadmill exercise at 1.6 km/h until exhaustion. The markers related to neurotoxicity were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. 8 weeks of treadmill exercise significantly increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor level in the hippocampus (P = 0.04) and plasma level of total antioxidant capacity of rats exposed to lead acetate (P < 0.001), and significantly decreased plasma level of malondialdehyde (P < 0.001). Acute exercise only decreased the hippocampal malondialdehyde level (P = 0.09) and increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor level in the hippocampus (P = 0.66). Acute exercise also enhanced the total antioxidant capacity in rats exposed to lead acetate, insignificantly (P = 0.99). These findings suggest that chronic treadmill exercise can significantly decrease neurotoxicity and alleviate oxidative stress in rats exposed to lead acetate. However, acute endurance exercise was not associated with these beneficial effects. PMID:25206718

  13. ALUMINUM DECREASES MUSCARINIC, ADRENERGIC, AND METABOTROPIC RECEPTOR-STIMULATED PHOSPHOINOSITIDE HYDROLYSIS IN HIPPOCAMPAL AND CORTICAL SLICES FROM RAT BRAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of aluminum chloride (AlCl3) (0.1 to 1000 um) on inositol phosphate (IP) accumulation stimulated by carbachol (CARB), norepinephrine (NE) or quisqualate (QUIS) were examined in rat hippocampal and cortical slices. n the absence of agonist, only 1000 um AIC1 significantly ...

  14. Low-Dose Sevoflurane Promotes Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Facilitates the Development of Dentate Gyrus-Dependent Learning in Neonatal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chong; Shen, Feng-Yan; Zhao, Xuan; Zhou, Tao; Xu, Dao-Jie; Wang, Zhi-Ru

    2015-01-01

    Huge body of evidences demonstrated that volatile anesthetics affect the hippocampal neurogenesis and neurocognitive functions, and most of them showed impairment at anesthetic dose. Here, we investigated the effect of low dose (1.8%) sevoflurane on hippocampal neurogenesis and dentate gyrus-dependent learning. Neonatal rats at postnatal day 4 to 6 (P4–6) were treated with 1.8% sevoflurane for 6 hours. Neurogenesis was quantified by bromodeoxyuridine labeling and electrophysiology recording. Four and seven weeks after treatment, the Morris water maze and contextual-fear discrimination learning tests were performed to determine the influence on spatial learning and pattern separation. A 6-hour treatment with 1.8% sevoflurane promoted hippocampal neurogenesis and increased the survival of newborn cells and the proportion of immature granular cells in the dentate gyrus of neonatal rats. Sevoflurane-treated rats performed better during the training days of the Morris water maze test and in contextual-fear discrimination learning test. These results suggest that a subanesthetic dose of sevoflurane promotes hippocampal neurogenesis in neonatal rats and facilitates their performance in dentate gyrus-dependent learning tasks. PMID:25873307

  15. Effects of pharmacological treatments on hippocampal NCAM1 and ERK2 expression in epileptic rats with cognitive dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Qingxia; Min, Xia; Sun, Ran; Gao, Jianying; Liang, Ruqing; Li, Lei; Chu, Xu

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of various pharmacological agents on the hippocampal expression of neural cell adhesion molecule 1 (NCAM1) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) in epileptic rats with cognitive dysfunction. The experiments were conducted using 120 Wistar rats: 20 controls and 100 with pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE). The SE rats were randomly assigned to 5 groups (n=20/group) that received daily treatments for 1 month with one of the following: (i) saline (no effect on epilepsy); (ii) carbamazepine (an anticonvulsant); (iii) oxcarbazepine (an anticonvulsant); (iv) aniracetam (a nootropic); or (v) donepezil (an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor). Spatial learning and memory were assessed using a Morris Water Maze (MWM). Hippocampal tissue was assessed for NCAM1 and ERK2 messenger RNA (mRNA) expression by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and protein expression by immunochemistry. The results revealed that SE rats had significantly poorer MWM performances compared with controls (P<0.01). Performance in SE rats was improved with donepezil treatment (P<0.01), but declined with carbamazepine (P<0.01). Compared with controls, saline-treated SE rats exhibited increased hippocampal NCAM1 mRNA expression (P<0.01). Among SE rats, NCAM1 mRNA expression was highest in those treated with donepezil, followed by aniracetam-, saline-, oxcarbazepine- and carbamazepine-treated rats. Compared to controls, saline-treated SE rats exhibited decreased hippocampal ERK2 mRNA expression (P<0.01). Among SE rats, ERK2 mRNA expression was highest in those treated with donepezil, followed by aniracetam, saline, oxcarbazepine and carbamazepine. NCAM1 and ERK2 protein expression levels were parallel to those of the mRNA. In saline-treated SE rats, hippocampal ERK2 expression was decreased and NCAM1 expression was increased; thus, these two molecules may be involved in the impairment of spatial memory. Carbamazepine augmented

  16. Electroacupuncture upregulates ERK signaling pathways and promotes adult hippocampal neural progenitors proliferation in a rat model of depression

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In this study, we investigate the proliferation of adult neural stem cells (NSCs) in a chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) rat model of depression, the effects of electroacupunture (EA) on depressive-like symptoms and the corresponding signaling pathways. Methods SD rats were subjected to 4 weeks of CUS to induce depressive-like behaviors. EA was performed at the Du-20 (Bai-Hui) and GB-34 (Yang-Ling-Quan) acupoints. Rats were injected with BrdU and the brains were cut into sections. Double-labeling with BrdU/Sox2 and p-ERK/Nestin was performed to demonstrate the in vivo proliferation of adult NSCs in hippocampus and ERK activation in NSCs. Hippocampal microdialysates of different groups were collected to observe the in vitro effects on NSCs. Results After 8 treatments, EA generated a clear antidepressant effect on the stressed rats and promoted the NSC proliferation. ERK activation might be involved in the antidepressant-like effects of EA treatment. Hippocampal microdialysates from EA-treated stressed rats influenced NSCs to form larger neural spheres and exhibit higher p-ERK level in vitro, compared to the untreated stressed rats. Meanwhile, the antidepressant-like effects of EA involved contribution from both acupoint specificity and electrical stimulus. Conclusions EA might interfere with the hippocampal microenvironment and enhance the activation of ERK signaling pathways. This could mediate, at least in part, the beneficial effects of EA on NSC proliferation and depressive-like behaviors. PMID:24165147

  17. Peripherally restricted acute phase response to a viral mimic alters hippocampal gene expression.

    PubMed

    Michalovicz, Lindsay T; Konat, Gregory W

    2014-03-01

    We have previously shown that peripherally restricted acute phase response (APR) elicited by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of a viral mimic, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (PIC), renders the brain hypersusceptible to excitotoxic insult as seen from profoundly exacerbated kainic acid (KA)-induced seizures. In the present study, we found that this hypersusceptibility was protracted for up to 72 h. RT-PCR profiling of hippocampal gene expression revealed rapid upregulation of 23 genes encoding cytokines, chemokines and chemokine receptors generally within 6 h after PIC challenge. The expression of most of these genes decreased by 24 h. However, two chemokine genes, i.e., Ccl19 and Cxcl13 genes, as well as two chemokine receptor genes, Ccr1 and Ccr7, remained upregulated for 72 h suggesting their possible involvement in the induction and sustenance of seizure hypersusceptibility. Also, 12 genes encoding proteins related to glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission featured initial upregulation or downregulation followed by gradual normalization. The upregulation of the Gabrr3 gene remained upregulated at 72 h, congruent with its plausible role in the hypersusceptible phenotype. Moreover, the expression of ten microRNAs (miRs) was rapidly affected by PIC challenge, but their levels generally exhibited oscillating profiles over the time course of seizure hypersusceptibility. These results indicate that protracted seizure susceptibility following peripheral APR is associated with a robust polygenic response in the hippocampus. PMID:24363211

  18. Neuroprotective effect of acute melatonin treatment on hippocampal neurons against irradiation by inhibition of caspase-3

    PubMed Central

    LI, JIANGUO; ZHANG, GUOWEI; MENG, ZHUANGZHI; WANG, LINGZHAN; LIU, HAIYING; LIU, QIANG; BUREN, BATU

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal cell apoptosis is associated with various factors that induce neurological damage, including radiation exposure. When administered prior to exposure to radiation, a protective agent may prevent cellular and molecular injury. The present study aimed to investigate whether melatonin exerts a neuroprotective effect by inhibiting the caspase cell death pathway. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered melatonin (100 mg/kg body weight) 30 min prior to radiation exposure in red light during the evening. In order to elucidate whether melatonin has a neuroprotective role, immunohistochemistry, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling, Nissl staining, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, reactive oxygen species analysis and western blotting were performed. At 24 h post-melatonin treatment, caspase-3 mRNA and protein expression levels were significantly decreased. These results demonstrated that melatonin may protect hippocampal neurons via the inhibition of caspase-3 when exposed to irradiation. Therefore, caspase-3 inhibition serves a neuroprotective and antioxidant role in the interventional treatment of melatonin. The results of the present study suggested that melatonin may have a potential therapeutic effect against irradiation; however, further studies are required in order to elucidate the underlying antioxidant mechanisms. PMID:27313671

  19. Decoupling Actions from Consequences: Dorsal Hippocampal Lesions Facilitate Instrumental Performance, but Impair Behavioral Flexibility in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Busse, Sebastian; Schwarting, Rainer K. W.

    2016-01-01

    The present study is part of a series of experiments, where we analyze why and how damage of the rat’s dorsal hippocampus (dHC) can enhance performance in a sequential reaction time task (SRTT). In this task, sequences of distinct visual stimulus presentations are food-rewarded in a fixed-ratio-13-schedule. Our previous study (Busse and Schwarting, 2016) had shown that rats with lesions of the dHC show substantially shorter session times and post-reinforcement pauses (PRPs) than controls, which allows for more practice when daily training is kept constant. Since sequential behavior is based on instrumental performance, a sequential benefit might be secondary to that. In order to test this hypothesis in the present study, we performed two experiments, where pseudorandom rather than sequential stimulus presentation was used in rats with excitotoxic dorsal hippocampal lesions. Again, we found enhanced performance in the lesion-group in terms of shorter session times and PRPs. During the sessions we found that the lesion-group spent less time with non-instrumental behavior (i.e., grooming, sniffing, and rearing) after prolonged instrumental training. Also, such rats showed moderate evidence for an extinction impairment under devalued food reward conditions and significant deficits in a response-outcome (R-O)-discrimination task in comparison to a control-group. These findings suggest that facilitatory effects on instrumental performance after dorsal hippocampal lesions may be primarily a result of complex behavioral changes, i.e., reductions of behavioral flexibility and/or alterations in motivation, which then result in enhanced instrumental learning. PMID:27375453

  20. Effect of Cardiac Arrest on Cognitive Impairment and Hippocampal Plasticity in Middle-Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Kunjan R.; Alekseyenko, Aleksey; Binkert, Marc; Stransky, Kenneth; Lin, Hung Wen; Barnes, Carol A.; Wright, Clinton B.; Perez-Pinzon, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary arrest is a leading cause of death and disability in the United States that usually occurs in the aged population. Cardiac arrest (CA) induces global ischemia, disrupting global cerebral circulation that results in ischemic brain injury and leads to cognitive impairments in survivors. Ischemia-induced neuronal damage in the hippocampus following CA can result in the impairment of cognitive function including spatial memory. In the present study, we used a model of asphyxial CA (ACA) in nine month old male Fischer 344 rats to investigate cognitive and synaptic deficits following mild global cerebral ischemia. These experiments were performed with the goals of 1) establishing a model of CA in nine month old middle-aged rats; and 2) to test the hypothesis that learning and memory deficits develop following mild global cerebral ischemia in middle-aged rats. To test this hypothesis, spatial memory assays (Barnes circular platform maze and contextual fear conditioning) and field recordings (long-term potentiation and paired-pulse facilitation) were performed. We show that following ACA in nine month old middle-aged rats, there is significant impairment in spatial memory formation, paired-pulse facilitation n dysfunction, and a reduction in the number of non-compromised hippocampal Cornu Ammonis 1 and subiculum neurons. In conclusion, nine month old animals undergoing cardiac arrest have impaired survival, deficits in spatial memory formation, and synaptic dysfunction. PMID:25933411

  1. Neonatal exposure to benzo[a]pyrene induces oxidative stress causing altered hippocampal cytomorphometry and behavior during early adolescence period of male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Patel, Bhupesh; Das, Saroj Kumar; Das, Swagatika; Das, Lipsa; Patri, Manorama

    2016-05-01

    Environmental neurotoxicants like benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) have been well documented regarding their potential to induce oxidative stress. However, neonatal exposure to B[a]P and its subsequent effect on anti-oxidant defence system and hippocampal cytomorphometry leading to behavioral changes have not been fully elucidated. We investigated the effect of acute exposure of B[a]P on five days old male Wistar pups administered with single dose of B[a]P (0.2 μg/kg BW) through intracisternal mode. Control group was administered with vehicle i.e., DMSO and a separate group of rats without any treatment was taken as naive group. Behavioral analysis showed anxiolytic-like behavior with significant increase in time spent in open arm in elevated plus maze. Further, significant reduction in fall off time during rotarod test showing B[a]P induced locomotor hyperactivity and impaired motor co-ordination in adolescent rats. B[a]P induced behavioral changes were further associated with altered anti-oxidant defence system involving significant reduction in the total ATPase, Na(+) K(+) ATPase, Mg(2+) ATPase, GR and GPx activity with a significant elevation in the activity of catalase and GST as compared to naive and control groups. Cytomorphometry of hippocampus showed that the number of neurons and glia in B[a]P treated group were significantly reduced as compared to naive and control. Subsequent observation showed that the area and perimeter of hippocampus, hippocampal neurons and neuronal nucleus were significantly reduced in B[a]P treated group as compared to naive and control. The findings of the present study suggest that the alteration in hippocampal cytomorphometry and neuronal population associated with impaired antioxidant signaling and mood in B[a]P treated group could be an outcome of neuromorphological alteration leading to pyknotic cell death or impaired differential migration of neurons during early postnatal brain development. PMID:26946409

  2. Functional MRI during Hippocampal Deep Brain Stimulation in the Healthy Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Van Den Berge, Nathalie; Vanhove, Christian; Descamps, Benedicte; Dauwe, Ine; van Mierlo, Pieter; Vonck, Kristl; Keereman, Vincent; Raedt, Robrecht; Boon, Paul; Van Holen, Roel

    2015-01-01

    Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is a promising treatment for neurological and psychiatric disorders. The mechanism of action and the effects of electrical fields administered to the brain by means of an electrode remain to be elucidated. The effects of DBS have been investigated primarily by electrophysiological and neurochemical studies, which lack the ability to investigate DBS-related responses on a whole-brain scale. Visualization of whole-brain effects of DBS requires functional imaging techniques such as functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI), which reflects changes in blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) responses throughout the entire brain volume. In order to visualize BOLD responses induced by DBS, we have developed an MRI-compatible electrode and an acquisition protocol to perform DBS during BOLD fMRI. In this study, we investigate whether DBS during fMRI is valuable to study local and whole-brain effects of hippocampal DBS and to investigate the changes induced by different stimulation intensities. Seven rats were stereotactically implanted with a custom-made MRI-compatible DBS-electrode in the right hippocampus. High frequency Poisson distributed stimulation was applied using a block-design paradigm. Data were processed by means of Independent Component Analysis. Clusters were considered significant when p-values were <0.05 after correction for multiple comparisons. Our data indicate that real-time hippocampal DBS evokes a bilateral BOLD response in hippocampal and other mesolimbic structures, depending on the applied stimulation intensity. We conclude that simultaneous DBS and fMRI can be used to detect local and whole-brain responses to circuit activation with different stimulation intensities, making this technique potentially powerful for exploration of cerebral changes in response to DBS for both preclinical and clinical DBS. PMID:26193653

  3. Atorvastatin enhances kainate-induced gamma oscillations in rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengzhang; Wang, Jiangang; Zhao, Jianhua; Wang, Yali; Liu, Zhihua; Guo, Fang Li; Wang, Xiao Fang; Vreugdenhil, Martin; Lu, Cheng Biao

    2016-09-01

    Atorvastatin has been shown to affect cognitive functions in rodents and humans. However, the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. Because hippocampal gamma oscillations (γ, 20-80 Hz) are associated with cognitive functions, we studied the effect of atorvastatin on persistent kainate-induced γ oscillation in the CA3 area of rat hippocampal slices. The involvement of NMDA receptors and multiple kinases was tested before and after administration of atorvastatin. Whole-cell current-clamp and voltage-clamp recordings were made from CA3 pyramidal neurons and interneurons before and after atorvastatin application. Atorvastatin increased γ power by ~ 50% in a concentration-dependent manner, without affecting dominant frequency. Whereas atorvastatin did not affect intrinsic properties of both pyramidal neurons and interneurons, it increased the firing frequency of interneurons but not that of pyramidal neurons. Furthermore, whereas atorvastatin did not affect synaptic current amplitude, it increased the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory post-synaptic currents, but did not affect the frequency of spontaneous excitatory post-synaptic currents. The atorvastatin-induced enhancement of γ oscillations was prevented by pretreatment with the PKA inhibitor H89, the ERK inhibitor U0126, or the PI3K inhibitor wortmanin, but not by the NMDA receptor antagonist D-AP5. Taken together, these results demonstrate that atorvastatin enhanced the kainate-induced γ oscillation by increasing interneuron excitability, with an involvement of multiple intracellular kinase pathways. Our study suggests that the classical cholesterol-lowering agent atorvastatin may improve cognitive functions compromised in disease, via the enhancement of hippocampal γ oscillations. PMID:27336700

  4. ANTIDEPRESSANT-LIKE EFFECTS OF LOW KETAMINE DOSE IS ASSOCIATED WITH INCREASED HIPPOCAMPAL AMPA/NMDA RECEPTOR DENSITY RATIO IN FEMALE WISTAR-KYOTO RATS

    PubMed Central

    Tizabi, Yousef; Bhatti, Babur H; Manaye, Kebreten F; Das, Jharna R; Akinfiresoye, Luli

    2012-01-01

    Preclinical as well as limited clinical studies indicate that ketamine, a non-competitive glutamate NMDA receptor antagonist, may exert a quick and prolonged antidepressant effect. It has been postulated that ketamine action is due to inhibition of NMDA and stimulation of AMPA receptors. Here, we sought to determine whether ketamine would exert antidepressant effects in Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats, a putative animal model of depression and whether this effect would be associated with changes in AMPA/NMDA receptor densities in the hippocampus. Adult female WKY rats and their control Wistar rats were subjected to acute and chronic ketamine doses and their locomotor activity (LMA) and immobility in the forced swim test (FST) were evaluated. Hippocampal AMPA and NMDA receptor densities were also measured following a chronic ketamine dose. Ketamine, both acutely (0.5–5.0 mg/kg ip) and chronically (0.5–2.5 mg/kg daily for 10 days) resulted in a dose-dependent and prolonged decrease in immobility in the FST in WKY rats only, suggesting an antidepressant-like effect in this model. Chronic treatment with an effective dose of ketamine also resulted in an increase in AMPA/NMDA receptor density ratio in the hippocampus of WKY rats. LMA was not affected by any ketamine treatment in either strain. These results indicate a rapid and lasting antidepressant-like effect of a low ketamine dose in WKY rat model of depression. Moreover, the increase in AMPA/NMDA receptor density in hippocampus could be a contributory factor to behavioral effects of ketamine. These findings suggest potential therapeutic benefit in simultaneous reduction of central NMDA and elevation of AMPA receptor function in treatment of depression. PMID:22521815

  5. Postischemic Anhedonia Associated with Neurodegenerative Changes in the Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kasahara, Jiro; Uchida, Hiroto; Tezuka, Kenta; Oka, Nanae

    2016-01-01

    Poststroke depression is one of the major symptoms observed in the chronic stage of brain stroke such as cerebral ischemia. Its pathophysiological mechanisms, however, are not well understood. Using the transient right middle cerebral artery occlusion- (MCAO-, 90 min) operated rats as an ischemia model in this study, we first observed that aggravation of anhedonia spontaneously occurred especially after 20 weeks of MCAO, and it was prevented by chronic antidepressants treatment (imipramine or fluvoxamine). The anhedonia specifically associated with loss of the granular neurons in the ipsilateral side of hippocampal dentate gyrus and was also prevented by an antidepressant imipramine. Immunohistochemical analysis showed increased apoptosis inside the granular cell layer prior to and associated with the neuronal loss, and imipramine seemed to recover the survival signal rather than suppressing the death signal to prevent neurons from apoptosis. Proliferation and development of the neural stem cells were increased transiently in the subgranular zone of both ipsi- and contralateral hippocampus within one week after MCAO and then decreased and almost ceased after 6 weeks of MCAO, while chronic imipramine treatment prevented them partially. Overall, our study suggests new insights for the mechanistic correlation between poststroke depression and the delayed neurodegenerative changes in the hippocampal dentate gyrus with effective use of antidepressants on them. PMID:27057366

  6. Postischemic Anhedonia Associated with Neurodegenerative Changes in the Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus of Rats.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Jiro; Uchida, Hiroto; Tezuka, Kenta; Oka, Nanae

    2016-01-01

    Poststroke depression is one of the major symptoms observed in the chronic stage of brain stroke such as cerebral ischemia. Its pathophysiological mechanisms, however, are not well understood. Using the transient right middle cerebral artery occlusion- (MCAO-, 90 min) operated rats as an ischemia model in this study, we first observed that aggravation of anhedonia spontaneously occurred especially after 20 weeks of MCAO, and it was prevented by chronic antidepressants treatment (imipramine or fluvoxamine). The anhedonia specifically associated with loss of the granular neurons in the ipsilateral side of hippocampal dentate gyrus and was also prevented by an antidepressant imipramine. Immunohistochemical analysis showed increased apoptosis inside the granular cell layer prior to and associated with the neuronal loss, and imipramine seemed to recover the survival signal rather than suppressing the death signal to prevent neurons from apoptosis. Proliferation and development of the neural stem cells were increased transiently in the subgranular zone of both ipsi- and contralateral hippocampus within one week after MCAO and then decreased and almost ceased after 6 weeks of MCAO, while chronic imipramine treatment prevented them partially. Overall, our study suggests new insights for the mechanistic correlation between poststroke depression and the delayed neurodegenerative changes in the hippocampal dentate gyrus with effective use of antidepressants on them. PMID:27057366

  7. In Vitro Manganese Exposure Disrupts MAPK Signaling Pathways in Striatal and Hippocampal Slices from Immature Rats

    PubMed Central

    Peres, Tanara Vieira; Pedro, Daniela Zótico; de Cordova, Fabiano Mendes; Lopes, Mark William; Gonçalves, Filipe Marques; Mendes-de-Aguiar, Cláudia Beatriz Nedel; Walz, Roger; Farina, Marcelo; Aschner, Michael; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms mediating manganese (Mn)-induced neurotoxicity, particularly in the immature central nervous system, have yet to be completely understood. In this study, we investigated whether mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) could represent potential targets of Mn in striatal and hippocampal slices obtained from immature rats (14 days old). The aim of this study was to evaluate if the MAPK pathways are modulated after subtoxic Mn exposure, which do not significantly affect cell viability. The concentrations of manganese chloride (MnCl2; 10–1,000 μM) caused no change in cell viability in slices exposed for 3 or 6 hours. However, Mn exposure significantly increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, as well as c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) 1/2/3 phosphorylation at both 3 and 6 hours incubations, in both brain structures. Furthermore, Mn exposure did not change the total content or phosphorylation of TH at the serine 40 site in striatal slices. Thus, Mn at concentrations that do not disrupt cell viability causes activation of MAPKs (ERK1/2 and JNK1/2/3) in immature hippocampal and striatal slices. These findings suggest that altered intracellular MAPKs signaling pathways may represent an early event concerning the effects of Mn in the immature brain. PMID:24324973

  8. The effects of chronic treatment with mood stabilizers on the rat hippocampal postsynaptic density proteome

    PubMed Central

    Nanavati, Dhaval; Austin, Daniel R.; Catapano, Lisa A.; Luckenbaugh, David A.; Dosemeci, Ayse; Manji, Husseini K.; Chen, Guang; Markey, Sanford P.

    2011-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a devastating illness that is marked by recurrent episodes of mania and depression. There is growing evidence that the disease is correlated with disruptions in synaptic plasticity cascades involved in cognition and mood regulation. Alleviating the symptoms of bipolar disorder involves chronic treatment with mood stabilizers like lithium or valproate. These two structurally dissimilar drugs are known to alter prominent signaling cascades in the hippocampus, but their effects on the postsynaptic density complex remain undefined. In this work, we utilized mass spectrometry for quantitative profiling of the rat hippocampal postsynaptic proteome to investigate the effects of chronic mood stabilizer treatment. Our data shows that in response to chronic treatment of mood stabilizers there were not gross qualitative changes but rather subtle quantitative perturbations in PSD proteome linked to several key signaling pathways. Our data specifically support the changes in actin dynamics on valproate treatment. Using label free quantification methods, we report that lithium and valproate significantly altered the abundance of 21 and 43 proteins, respectively. Seven proteins were affected similarly by both lithium and valproate: Ank3, Grm3, Dyhc1, and four isoforms of the 14-3-3 family. Immunoblotting the same samples confirmed the changes in Ank3 and Grm3 abundance. Our findings support the hypotheses that BPD is a synaptic disorder and that mood stabilizers modulate the protein signaling complex in the hippocampal PSD. PMID:21838781

  9. The longitudinal study of rat hippocampus influenced by stress: early adverse experience enhances hippocampal vulnerability and working memory deficit in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Jin, Fengkui; Li, Lei; Shi, Mei; Li, Zhenzi; Zhou, Jinghua; Chen, Li

    2013-06-01

    Epidemiologic studies indicate that early adverse experience is related to learning disabilities in adults, but the neurobiological mechanisms have not yet been identified. We used longitudinal animal experiments to test the hypothesis that early life stress enhances hippocampal vulnerability and working memory deficit in adult rats. The expression of Synaptophysin (SYN) and apoptosis (Apo) in hippocampal CA3 and dentate gyrus (DG) regions were examined to evaluate the effects of environmental factors on the hippocampus. The working memory errors via radial 8-arm maze were studied to evaluate the long-term effect of early stress on rats' spatial learning ability. Our results indicated that chronic restraint stress in early life and forced cold water swimming stress in adulthood reduced SYN expression and increased Apo levels in rat hippocampus, but the hippocampal damage tended to recover when rats returned to a non-stress environment. In addition, when the rats were exposed to forced cold water swimming stress during adulthood, SYN expression (CA3 and DG regions) and Apo levels (CA3 region) in rat hippocampus showed statistical difference between early restraint stress group and non-early restraint stress group (rats exposed to stress in adulthood only). One month after the two groups of rats returned to non-stress environment, this difference of SYN expression (CA3 and DG regions) and working memory deficit between the two groups was still statistically significant. Our study findings suggested that early adverse experience enhances hippocampal vulnerability and working memory deficit in adult rats, and reduces structural plasticity of hippocampus. PMID:23500055

  10. Apoptosis of hippocampal pyramidal neurons is virus independent in a mouse model of acute neurovirulent picornavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Buenz, Eric J; Sauer, Brian M; Lafrance-Corey, Reghann G; Deb, Chandra; Denic, Aleksandar; German, Christopher L; Howe, Charles L

    2009-08-01

    Many viruses, including picornaviruses, have the potential to infect the central nervous system (CNS) and stimulate a neuroinflammatory immune response, especially in infants and young children. Cognitive deficits associated with CNS picornavirus infection result from injury and death of neurons that may occur due to direct viral infection or during the immune responses to virus in the brain. Previous studies have concluded that apoptosis of hippocampal neurons during picornavirus infection is a cell-autonomous event triggered by direct neuronal infection. However, these studies assessed neuron death at time points late in infection and during infections that lead to either death of the host or persistent viral infection. In contrast, many neurovirulent picornavirus infections are acute and transient, with rapid clearance of virus from the host. We provide evidence of hippocampal pathology in mice acutely infected with the Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis picornavirus. We found that CA1 pyramidal neurons exhibited several hallmarks of apoptotic death, including caspase-3 activation, DNA fragmentation, and chromatin condensation within 72 hours of infection. Critically, we also found that many of the CA1 pyramidal neurons undergoing apoptosis were not infected with virus, indicating that neuronal cell death during acute picornavirus infection of the CNS occurs in a non-cell-autonomous manner. These observations suggest that therapeutic strategies other than antiviral interventions may be useful for neuroprotection during acute CNS picornavirus infection. PMID:19608874

  11. Enriched Environment Altered Aberrant Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Improved Long-Term Consequences After Temporal Lobe Epilepsy in Adult Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoqian; Liu, Tingting; Zhou, Zhike; Mu, Xiaopeng; Song, Chengguang; Xiao, Ting; Zhao, Mei; Zhao, Chuansheng

    2015-06-01

    Abnormal hippocampal neurogenesis is thought to contribute to cognitive impairments in chronic temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) and its specific receptor CXCR4 play important roles in neurogenesis. We investigated whether enriched environment (EE) might be beneficial for TLE. Adult rats were randomly assigned as control rats, rats subjected to status epilepticus (SE), or post-SE rats treated with EE for 30 days. We used immunofluorescence staining to analyze the hippocampal neurogenesis and Nissl staining to evaluate hippocampal damage. Electroencephalography was used to measure the duration of spontaneous seizures. Cognitive function was evaluated by Morris water maze. Western blot was used to measure the expression of SDF-1 and CXCR4 in the hippocampus. In the present study, we found the TLE model resulted in aberrant neurogenesis such as reduced proliferation, intensified dendritic development of newborn neurons, as well as spontaneous seizures and cognitive impairments. More importantly, EE treatment significantly increased the cell proliferation and survival, extended the apical dendrites, and delayed the attenuation of the expression of SDF-1 and CXCR4, accompanied by decreased long-term seizure activity and improved cognitive impairments in adult rats after TLE. These results provided morphological evidence that EE might be beneficial for treating TLE. PMID:25946980

  12. Effect of Fluoxetine on Neurogenesis in Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus after Global Transient Cerebral Ischemia in Rats.

    PubMed

    Khodanovich, M Yu; Kisel', A A; Chernysheva, G A; Smol'yakova, V I; Savchenko, R R; Plotnikov, M B

    2016-07-01

    Changes in cerebral neurogenesis provoked by ischemia and the effect of fluoxetine on this process were studied using a three-vessel occlusion model of global transient cerebral ischemia. The global transient cerebral ischemia was modeled on male Wistar rats by transient occlusion of three major vessels originating from the aortic arch and supplying the brain (brachiocephalic trunk, left subclavian artery, and left common carotid artery). The cells expressing doublecortin (DCX, a marker of young neurons) were counted in the hippocampal dentate gyrus on day 31 after ischemia modeling. It was found that ischemia inhibited neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus in comparison with sham-operated controls (p<0.05), while fluoxetine (20 mg/kg/day) injected over 10 days after surgery restored neurogenesis to the control level (p<0.001). PMID:27496030

  13. Alterations of hippocampal place cells in foraging rats facing a "predatory" threat.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Joo; Park, Mijeong; Kong, Mi-Seon; Park, Sang Geon; Cho, Jeiwon; Kim, Jeansok J

    2015-05-18

    Fear is an adaptive mechanism evolved to influence the primal decisions of foragers in "approach resource-avoid predator" conflicts. To survive and reproduce, animals must attain the basic needs (food, water, shelter, and mate) while avoiding the ultimate cost of predation. Consistent with this view, ecological studies have found that predatory threats cause animals to limit foraging to fewer places in their habitat and/or to restricted times. However, the neurophysiological basis through which animals alter their foraging boundaries when confronted with danger remains largely unknown. Here, we investigated place cells in the hippocampus, implicated in processing spatial information and memory, in male Long-Evans rats foraging for food under risky situations that would be common in nature. Specifically, place cells from dorsal cornu ammonis field 1 (CA1) were recorded while rats searched for food in a semi-naturalistic apparatus (consisting of a nest and a relatively large open area) before, during, and after encountering a "predatory" robot situated remotely from the nest. The looming robot induced remapping of place fields and increased the theta rhythm as the animals advanced toward the vicinity of threat, but not when they were around the safety of the nest. These neurophysiological effects on the hippocampus were prevented by lesioning of the amygdala. Based on these findings, we suggest that the amygdalar signaling of fear influences the stability of hippocampal place cells as a function of threat distance in rats foraging for food. PMID:25891402

  14. Changes in the expression of hippocampal proteins in rats with recrudescence of morphine addiction

    PubMed Central

    QIU, HAITANG; GAO, YUFENG; FU, YIXIAO; DU, LIAN; QIU, TIAN; FENG, KUN; LUO, QINGHUA; MENG, HUAQING

    2013-01-01

    The high recrudescence rate of drug addiction has received attention worldwide and its mechanisms remain to be elucidated. This study aimed to analyse the disparate protein expression in the hippocampal tissue of rats with recrudescence of morphine addiction, as well as to provide clues for the exploration of the recrudescence mechanism. Sixteen male adult Sprague-Dawley rats were divided equally into the morphine and physiological saline groups. Effective nose pokes were determined as the main index. The proteins were separated using the immobilised pH gradient two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE). Disparate protein spots were analysed using the PDQuest 2-DE software. Peptide dactylograms were obtained using the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The effective nose poke counts of the morphine group significantly increased during addiction maturation compared with the saline group (P<0.001). The post-recrudescence nose poke counts of the morphine group significantly increased compared with those before recrudescence (P<0.001). Fifteen disparate proteins were identified according to the protein electrophoresis of the morphine and physiological saline groups, including three proteins associated with energy metabolism, two ionic channel regulatory proteins, one heat shock protein and one exogenous substance metabolic enzyme. The energy metabolism and expression of cell metabolism-related proteins decreased in the hippocampus of rats with morphine recrudescence. PMID:23408778

  15. Cellular mechanisms of 4-aminopyridine-induced synchronized after-discharges in the rat hippocampal slice.

    PubMed Central

    Traub, R D; Colling, S B; Jefferys, J G

    1995-01-01

    1. We constructed a model of the in vitro rodent CA3 region with 128 pyramidal neurones and twenty-four inhibitory neurones. The model was used to analyse synchronized firing induced in the rat hippocampal slice by 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), a problem simultaneously studied in experiments in rat hippocampal slices. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors were blocked. 2. Consistent with a known action of 4-AP, unitary EPSCs were assumed to be large and prolonged. With augmented EPSCs, spontaneous synchronized bursts occurred in the model if random ectopic axonal spikes were present. We observed probable antidromic spikes and miniature spikes experimentally. 3. Consistent with experiment, model synchronized bursts were preceded by a period of about 100 ms of increased unit activity and cell depolarization. In the model, this was caused in part by EPSPs consequent to ectopic axonal spikes. 4. After widespread firing had begun, full-blown synchrony in the model required orthodromic EPSPs. A single synchronized burst, once initiated, could proceed without further ectopic activity. 5. A depolarizing change in reversal potential for dendritic GABAA favoured the occurrence of synchronized after-discharges in the model. Consistent with this, bicuculline was found to block after-discharges in slices bathed in 4-AP (70 microM) during NMDA blockade. 6. These data indicate that, even with synaptic inhibition present, ectopic spikes can 'set the stage' for synchronized activity by depolarizing pyramidal cell dendrites, but that recurrent orthodromic EPSPs are required for expression of this synchrony. When synaptic inhibition is present, EPSCs may need to be larger than usual for synchrony to take place. Secondary bursts in 4-AP appear to be driven in part by a depolarizing GABAA-mediated current. PMID:8583397

  16. Caloric restriction in young rats disturbs hippocampal neurogenesis and spatial learning.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Armando; Marrana, Francisco; Andrade, José P

    2016-09-01

    It is widely known that caloric restriction (CR) has benefits on several organic systems, including the central nervous system. However, the majority of the CR studies was performed in adult animals and the information about the consequences on young populations is limited. In this study, we analyzed the effects of young-onset CR, started at 4weeks of age, in the number of neuropeptide Y (NPY)-containing neurons and in neurogenesis of the hippocampal formation, using doublecortin (DCX) and Ki67 as markers. Knowing that CR treatment could interfere with exploratory activity, anxiety, learning and memory we have analyzed the performance of the rats in the open-field, elevated plus-maze and Morris water maze tests. Animals aged 4weeks were randomly assigned to control or CR groups. Controls were maintained in the ad libitum regimen during 2months. The adolescent CR rats were fed, during 2months, with 60% of the amount of food consumed by controls. We have found that young-onset CR treatment did not affect the total number of NPY-immunopositive neurons in dentate hilus, CA3 and CA1 hippocampal subfields and did not change the exploratory activity and anxiety levels. Interestingly, we have found that young-onset CR might affect spatial learning process since those animals showed worse performance during the acquisition phase of Morris water maze. Furthermore, young-onset CR induced alterations of neurogenesis in the dentate subgranular layer that seems to underlie the impairment of spatial learning. Our data suggest that adolescent animals are vulnerable to CR treatment and that this diet is not suitable to be applied in this age phase. PMID:27432519

  17. Fetal iron deficiency alters the proteome of adult rat hippocampal synaptosomes

    PubMed Central

    Dakoji, Srikanth; Reise, Kathryn H.; Storey, Kathleen K.; Georgieff, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    Fetal and neonatal iron deficiency results in cognitive impairments in adulthood despite prompt postnatal iron replenishment. To systematically determine whether abnormal expression and localization of proteins that regulate adult synaptic efficacy are involved, we used a quantitative proteomic approach (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation, iTRAQ) and pathway analysis to identify dysregulated proteins in hippocampal synapses of fetal iron deficiency model. Rat pups were made iron deficient (ID) from gestational day 2 through postnatal day (P) 7 by providing pregnant and nursing dams an ID diet (4 ppm Fe) after which they were rescued with an iron-sufficient diet (200 ppm Fe). This paradigm resulted in a 40% loss of brain iron at P15 with complete recovery by P56. Synaptosomes were prepared from hippocampi of the formerly iron-deficient (FID) and always iron-sufficient controls rats at P65 using a sucrose gradient method. Six replicates per group that underwent iTRAQ labeling and LC-MS/MS analysis for protein identification and comparison elucidated 331 differentially expressed proteins. Western analysis was used to confirm findings for selected proteins in the glutamate receptor signaling pathway, which regulates hippocampal synaptic plasticity, a cellular process critical for learning and memory. Bioinformatics were performed using knowledge-based Interactive Pathway Analysis. FID synaptosomes show altered expression of synaptic proteins-mediated cellular signalings, supporting persistent impacts of fetal iron deficiency on synaptic efficacy, which likely cause the cognitive dysfunction and neurobehavioral abnormalities. Importantly, the findings uncover previously unsuspected pathways, including neuronal nitric oxide synthase signaling, identifying additional mechanisms that may contribute to the long-term biobehavioral deficits. PMID:24089371

  18. Serotonin Depletion Does not Modify the Short-Term Brain Hypometabolism and Hippocampal Neurodegeneration Induced by the Lithium-Pilocarpine Model of Status Epilepticus in Rats.

    PubMed

    García-García, Luis; Shiha, Ahmed Anis; Bascuñana, Pablo; de Cristóbal, Javier; Fernández de la Rosa, Rubén; Delgado, Mercedes; Pozo, Miguel A

    2016-05-01

    It has been reported that fluoxetine, a selective serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) reuptake inhibitor, has neuroprotective properties in the lithium-pilocarpine model of status epilepticus (SE) in rats. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of 5-HT depletion by short-term administration of p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA), a specific tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor, on the brain hypometabolism and neurodegeneration induced in the acute phase of this SE model. Our results show that 5-HT depletion did modify neither the brain basal metabolic activity nor the lithium-pilocarpine-induced hypometabolism when evaluated 3 days after the insult. In addition, hippocampal neurodegeneration and astrogliosis triggered by lithium-pilocarpine were not exacerbated by PCPA treatment. These findings point out that in the early latent phase of epileptogenesis, non-5-HT-mediated actions may contribute, at least in some extent, to the neuroprotective effects of fluoxetine in this model of SE. PMID:26208805

  19. Misoprostol Reverse Hippocampal Neuron Cyclooxygenase-2 Downstream Signaling Imbalance in Aluminum-Overload Rats.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuanxin; Lei, Wenjuan; Wang, Jianfeng; Hu, Xinyue; Wei, Yuling; Ji, Chaonan; Yang, Junqing

    2016-01-01

    Although COX-2 inhibition in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases has shown neuroprotection, recent studies have revealed some serious side effects (ulcers, bleeding, fatal cerebrovascular diseases etc.) and the limited benefits of COX-2 inhibitors. A more focused approach is necessary to explore the therapeutic effect of the COX downstream signaling pathway in neurological research. The aim of this study was to explore the alterations of the PGES-PGE2-EP signal pathway and the effect of misoprostol on neurodegeneration by chronic aluminum-overload in rats. Adult rats were treated by intragastric administration of aluminum gluconate. The PGE2 content and expression of PGES and EPs in the hippocampi of rats were detected using ELISA, q-PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. The content of malondialdehyde (MDA) and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the rat hippocampi were also detected. The misoprostol treatment dose-dependently improved spatial learning and memory function as well as healing after hippocampal neuron damage induced by chronic aluminum-overload in rats. Meanwhile, the administration of misoprostol resulted in a decrease in the PGE2 level and down-regulation of the mPGES-1, EP2 and EP4 expression levels, while there was a dosedependent up-regulation of EP3 expression. These results suggest that misoprostol possesses a neuroprotective property, and the mechanism involves affecting the EP3 level and reducing the endogenous production of PGE2 through a negative feedback mechanism, increasing the EP3 expression level, decreasing the EP2 and EP4 expression levels, and rebuilding the mPGES-1-PGE2-EP1-4 signal pathway balance. In this way, misoprostol has a counteractive effect on oxidant stress and inflammation in the central nervous system. The PGES-PGE2-EPs signaling pathway is a potential therapeutic strategy for treating neurodegeneration in patients. PMID:27033056

  20. Catalpol increases hippocampal neuroplasticity and up-regulates PKC and BDNF in the aged rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; He, Qiao-Jie; Zou, Wei; Wang, Hong-Xia; Bao, Yong-Ming; Liu, Yu-Xin; An, Li-Jia

    2006-12-01

    Rehmannia, a traditional Chinese medical herb, has a long history in age-related disease therapy. Previous work has indicated that catalpol is a main active ingredient performing neuroprotective effect in rehmannia, while the mechanism underlying the effect remains poorly understood. In this study, we attempt to investigate the effect of catalpol on presynaptic proteins and explore a potential mechanism. The hippocampal levels of GAP-43 and synaptophysin in 3 groups of 4 months (young group), 22-24 months (aged group) and catalpol-treated 22-24 months (catalpol-treated group) rats were evaluated by western blotting. Results clearly showed a significant decrease in synaptophysin (46.6%) and GAP-43 (61.4%) levels in the aged group against the young animals and an increase (45.0% and 31.8% respectively) in the catalpol-treated aged rats in comparison with the untreated aged group. In particular, synaptophysin immunoreactivity (OD) in the dentate granule layer of the hippocampus was increased 0.0251 in the catalpol-treated group as compared with the aged group. The study also revealed a catalpol-associated increase of PKC and BDNF in the hippocampus of the catalpol-treated group in comparison with the aged rats and highly correlated with synaptophysin and GAP-43. Such positive correlations between presynaptic proteins and signaling molecules also existed in the young group. These results suggested that catalpol could increase presynaptic proteins and up-regulate relative signaling molecules in the hippocampus of the aged rats. Consequently, it seemed to indicate that catalpol might ameliorate age-related neuroplasticity loss by "normalizing" presynaptic proteins and their relative signaling pathways in the aged rats. PMID:17078935

  1. Early and sustained exposure to high-sucrose diet triggers hippocampal ER stress in young rats.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Bruno Araújo Serra; Melo, Thamys Marinho; Flister, Karla Frida Torres; França, Lucas Martins; Kajihara, Daniela; Tanaka, Leonardo Yuji; Laurindo, Francisco Rafael Martins; Paes, Antonio Marcus de Andrade

    2016-08-01

    Early-life environmental insults have been shown to promote long-term development of chronic non-communicable diseases, including metabolic disturbances and mental illnesses. As such, premature consumption of high-sugar foods has been associated to early onset of detrimental outcomes, whereas underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. In the present study, we sought to investigate whether early and sustained exposure to high-sucrose diet promotes metabolic disturbances that ultimately might anticipate neurological injuries. At postnatal day 21, weaned male rats started to be fed a standard chow (10 % sucrose, CTR) or a high-sucrose diet (25 % sucrose, HSD) for 9 weeks prior to euthanasia at postnatal day 90. HSD did not alter weight gain and feed efficiency between groups, but increased visceral, non-visceral and brown adipose tissue accumulation. HSD rats demonstrated elevated blood glucose levels in both fasting and fed states, which were associated to impaired glucose tolerance. Peripheral insulin sensitivity did not change, whereas hepatic insulin resistance was supported by increased serum triglyceride levels, as well as higher TyG index values. Assessment of hippocampal gene expression showed endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress pathways were activated in HSD rats, as compared to CTR. HSD rats had overexpression of unfolded protein response sensors, PERK and ATF6; ER chaperone, PDIA2 and apoptosis-related genes, CHOP and Caspase 3; but decreased expression of chaperone GRP78. Finally, HSD rats demonstrated impaired neuromuscular function and anxious behavior, but preserved cognitive parameters. In conclusion, our data indicate that early exposure to HSD promote metabolic disturbances, which disrupt hippocampus homeostasis and might precociously affect its neurobehavioral functions. PMID:27154727

  2. Misoprostol Reverse Hippocampal Neuron Cyclooxygenase-2 Downstream Signaling Imbalance in Aluminum-Overload Rats

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yuanxin; Lei, Wenjuan; Wang, Jianfeng; Hu, Xinyue; Wei, Yuling; Ji, Chaonan; Yang, Junqing

    2016-01-01

    Although COX-2 inhibition in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases has shown neuroprotection, recent studies have revealed some serious side effects (ulcers, bleeding, fatal cerebrovascular diseases etc.) and the limited benefits of COX-2 inhibitors. A more focused approach is necessary to explore the therapeutic effect of the COX downstream signaling pathway in neurological research. The aim of this study was to explore the alterations of the PGES-PGE2-EP signal pathway and the effect of misoprostol on neurodegeneration by chronic aluminum-overload in rats. Adult rats were treated by intragastric administration of aluminum gluconate. The PGE2 content and expression of PGES and EPs in the hippocampi of rats were detected using ELISA, q-PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. The content of malondialdehyde (MDA) and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the rat hippocampi were also detected. The misoprostol treatment dose-dependently improved spatial learning and memory function as well as healing after hippocampal neuron damage induced by chronic aluminum-overload in rats. Meanwhile, the administration of misoprostol resulted in a decrease in the PGE2 level and down-regulation of the mPGES-1, EP2 and EP4 expression levels, while there was a dose-dependent up-regulation of EP3 expression. These results suggest that misoprostol possesses a neuroprotective property, and the mechanism involves affecting the EP3 level and reducing the endogenous production of PGE2 through a negative feedback mechanism, increasing the EP3 expression level, decreasing the EP2 and EP4 expression levels, and rebuilding the mPGES-1-PGE2-EP1-4 signal pathway balance. In this way, misoprostol has a counteractive effect on oxidant stress and inflammation in the central nervous system. The PGES-PGE2-EPs signaling pathway is a potential therapeutic strategy for treating neurodegeneration in patients. PMID:27033056

  3. GABA release by hippocampal astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Le Meur, Karim; Mendizabal-Zubiaga, Juan; Grandes, Pedro; Audinat, Etienne

    2012-01-01

    Astrocytes can directly influence neuronal activity through the release of various transmitters acting on membrane receptors expressed by neurons. However, in contrast to glutamate and ATP for instance, the release of GABA (γ-amino-butyric acid) by astrocytes is still poorly documented. Here, we used whole-cell recordings in rat acute brain slices and electron microscopy to test whether hippocampal astrocytes release the inhibitory transmitter GABA. We observed that slow transient inhibitory currents due to the activation of GABAA receptors occur spontaneously in principal neurons of the three main hippocampal fields (CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus). These currents share characteristics with the slow NMDA receptor-mediated currents previously shown to result from astrocytic glutamate release: they occur in the absence of synaptic transmission and have variable kinetics and amplitudes as well as low frequencies. Osmotic pressure reduction, known to enhance transmitter release from astrocytes, similarly increased the frequency of non-synaptic GABA and glutamate currents. Simultaneous occurrence of slow inhibitory and excitatory currents was extremely rare. Yet, electron microscopy examination of immunostained hippocampal sections shows that about 80% of hippocampal astrocytes [positive for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)] were immunostained for GABA. Our results provide quantitative characteristics of the astrocyte-to-neuron GABAergic signaling. They also suggest that all principal neurons of the hippocampal network are under a dual, excitatory and inhibitory, influence of astrocytes. The relevance of the astrocytic release of GABA, and glutamate, on the physiopathology of the hippocampus remains to be established. PMID:22912614

  4. The protective effects of insulin and natural honey against hippocampal cell death in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Jafari Anarkooli, Iraj; Barzegar Ganji, Hossein; Pourheidar, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effects of insulin and honey as antioxidants to prevent the hippocampal cell death in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. We selected sixty Wister rats (5 groups of 12 animals each), including the control group (C), and four diabetic groups (control (D) and 3 groups treated with insulin (I), honey (H), and insulin plus honey (I + H)). Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin injection (IP, 60 mg/kg). Six weeks after the induction of diabetes, the group I received insulin (3-4 U/kg/day, SC), group H received honey (5 mg/kg/day, IP), and group I + H received a combination of the above at the same dose. Groups C and D received normal saline. Two weeks after treatment, rats were sacrificed and the hippocampus was extracted. Neuronal cell death in the hippocampal region was examined using trypan blue assay, "H & E" staining, and TUNEL assay. Cell viability assessment showed significantly lower number of living cells in group D than in group C. Besides, the mean number of living cells was significantly higher in group I, H, and I + H compared to group D. Therefore, it can be concluded that the treatment of the diabetic rats with insulin, honey, and a combination of insulin and honey can prevent neuronal cell death in different hippocampal areas of the studied samples. PMID:24745031

  5. The Protective Effects of Insulin and Natural Honey against Hippocampal Cell Death in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jafari Anarkooli, Iraj; Barzegar Ganji, Hossein; Pourheidar, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effects of insulin and honey as antioxidants to prevent the hippocampal cell death in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. We selected sixty Wister rats (5 groups of 12 animals each), including the control group (C), and four diabetic groups (control (D) and 3 groups treated with insulin (I), honey (H), and insulin plus honey (I + H)). Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin injection (IP, 60 mg/kg). Six weeks after the induction of diabetes, the group I received insulin (3-4 U/kg/day, SC), group H received honey (5 mg/kg/day, IP), and group I + H received a combination of the above at the same dose. Groups C and D received normal saline. Two weeks after treatment, rats were sacrificed and the hippocampus was extracted. Neuronal cell death in the hippocampal region was examined using trypan blue assay, “H & E” staining, and TUNEL assay. Cell viability assessment showed significantly lower number of living cells in group D than in group C. Besides, the mean number of living cells was significantly higher in group I, H, and I + H compared to group D. Therefore, it can be concluded that the treatment of the diabetic rats with insulin, honey, and a combination of insulin and honey can prevent neuronal cell death in different hippocampal areas of the studied samples. PMID:24745031

  6. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 affects migration of hippocampal neural progenitors following status epilepticus in rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Epilepsy is a common brain disorder characterized by a chronic predisposition to generate spontaneous seizures. The mechanisms for epilepsy formation remain unknown. A growing body of evidence suggests the involvement of inflammatory processes in epileptogenesis. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in aberrant migration of hippocampal progenitors in rats after the insult of status epilepticus (SE). Methods SE was induced with pilocarpine in Sprague–Dawley rats. Transcriptional expression of MCP-1 in the dentate gyrus (DG) was measured using quantitative real-time PCR. From 1 to 28 days after SE, the temporal profiles of MCP-1 protein expression in DG were evaluated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 2 (CCR2) expression in doublecortin-positive neuronal progenitors was examined using double-labeling immunohistochemistry. The involvement of MCP-1/CCR2 signaling in aberrant neuronal progenitor migration in the epileptic hippocampus was assessed in the SE rats using a CCR2 antagonist, RS102895, and the ectopic migration of neuronal progenitors was determined using Prox1/doublecortin double immunostaining. Results After SE, MCP-1 gene was significantly upregulated and its corresponding protein expression in the DG was significantly increased on days 1 and 3. Some hilar ectopic progenitor cells of SE rats expressed the MCP-1 receptor, CCR2. Notably, the ectopic migration of neuronal progenitors into hilus was attenuated by a blockade of the MCP-1/CCR2 interaction with a selective CCR2 inhibitor, RS102895. Conclusions An increase in dentate MCP-1 is associated with seizure-induced aberrant migration of neuronal progenitors through the interaction with CCR2. The upregulation of MCP-1 after an insult of SE may play a role in the generation of epilepsy. PMID:23339567

  7. Fingolimod (FTY720) improves hippocampal synaptic plasticity and memory deficit in rats following focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Nazari, Maryam; Keshavarz, Somaye; Rafati, Ali; Namavar, Mohammad Reza; Haghani, Masoud

    2016-06-01

    Fingolimod (FTY720) is a known sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor agonist. Several studies have shown the therapeutic efficacy of FTY720 in neurodegenerative disorders. However, the neuroprotective mechanisms in brain ischemia have not been adequately studied. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the effects of FTY720 on the impairment of learning and memory and hippocampal synaptic plasticity induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in ischemic brain injury. Twenty eight male rats were randomly divided into four groups of control (n=7), sham (n=8), ischemic-reperfusion+vehicle (I/R+V; n=7), and I/R+FTY720 (n=6). After 1h of the occlusion of artery, the filament was gently withdrawn to allow reperfusion for the next 7 days. The animals first received a dose of FTY720 (0.5mg/Kg) or its vehicle (intra-peritoneal) twenty-four hours before surgery in I/R+FTY720 and I/R+V groups, respectively. The administration of FTY720 or its vehicle continued every other day. The passive avoidance test and field potential recording were used for evaluation of learning, memory and synaptic plasticity. The brain infarct volume was measured by triphenyltetrazolim hydrochloride (TTC) staining. MCAO caused infarct damage in the rat's brain tissue. The administration of FTY720 significantly reduced the size of the lesion, improved the memory impairment of MCAO rats, and increased the STL time. In addition, the field potential recording demonstrated a marked reduction in induction of long-term potentiation of MCAO animals. However, administration of FTY720 recovers the magnitude of the LTP without any effects on presynaptic plasticity and neurotransmitter release probability. The results of this study demonstrated that MCAO in rats impairs the retention of passive avoidance tasks and multiple injection of FTY720 improved the memory performance after MCAO by LTP induction via post-synaptic mechanisms. PMID:27066884

  8. Proteomic analysis of hippocampal proteins of F344 rats exposed to 1-bromopropane

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhenlie; Ichihara, Sahoko; Oikawa, Shinji; Chang, Jie; Zhang, Lingyi; Takahashi, Masahide; Subramanian, Kaviarasan; Mohideen, Sahabudeen Sheik; Wang, Yun; Ichihara, Gaku

    2011-11-15

    1-Bromopropane (1-BP) is a compound used as an alternative to ozone-depleting solvents and is neurotoxic both in experimental animals and human. However, the molecular mechanisms of the neurotoxic effects of 1-BP are not well known. To identify the molecular mechanisms of 1-BP-induced neurotoxicity, we analyzed quantitatively changes in protein expression in the hippocampus of rats exposed to 1-BP. Male F344 rats were exposed to 1-BP at 0, 400, or 1000 ppm for 8 h/day for 1 or 4 weeks by inhalation. Two-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) combined with matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) were conducted to detect and identify protein modification. Changes in selected proteins were further confirmed by western blot. 2D-DIGE identified 26 proteins with consistently altered model (increase or decrease after both 1- and 4-week 1-BP exposures) and significant changes in their levels (p < 0.05; fold change {>=} {+-} 1.2) at least at one exposure level or more compared with the corresponding controls. Of these proteins, 19 were identified by MALDI-TOF-TOF/MS. Linear regression analysis of 1-BP exposure level identified 8 differentially expressed proteins altered in a dose-dependent manner both in 1- and 4-week exposure experiments. The identified proteins could be categorized into diverse functional classes such as nucleocytoplasmic transport, immunity and defense, energy metabolism, ubiquitination-proteasome pathway, neurotransmitter and purine metabolism. Overall, the results suggest that 1-BP-induced hippocampal damage involves oxidative stress, loss of ATP production, neurotransmitter dysfunction and inhibition of ubiquitination-proteasome system. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 1-BP modified hippocampal proteome in rat and 19 altered proteins were identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of Ran, TPI, HSP60, PSMA1, ECH1, TPI, B-CK and DJ-1 was changed by 1-BP. Black

  9. Dysregulation of oxygen hemodynamic responses to synaptic train stimulation in a rat hippocampal model of subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Galeffi, Francesca; Degan, Simone; Britz, Gavin; Turner, Dennis A

    2016-04-01

    We investigated microvascular reactivity to synaptic train stimulation after induction of subarachnoid hemorrhage in adult rats, analyzing tissue oxygen levels [pO2] in intact hippocampus. In control rats, hippocampal pO2averaged 11.4 mm Hg whereas hemodynamic responses averaged 13.1 mm Hg (to a 25 s train). After subarachnoid hemorrhage (at 2 days), we recorded a dramatic elevation in baseline pO2in the hippocampus (to 68.4 mm Hg) accompanied by inverted pO2responses to synaptic train stimulation (-9.46 mm Hg). These significant changes in baseline hippocampal pO2and inverted pO2responses after subarachnoid hemorrhage indicate severe alterations of neurovascular coupling and neuronal viability. PMID:26721394

  10. The Effect of Chronic Methamphetamine Exposure on the Hippocampal and Olfactory Bulb Neuroproteomes of Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Rui; Yang, Tianjiao; Kobeissy, Firas; Mouhieddine, Tarek H; Raad, Mohamad; Nokkari, Amaly; Gold, Mark S; Wang, Kevin K; Mechref, Yehia

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, drug abuse and addiction are serious public health problems in the USA. Methamphetamine (METH) is one of the most abused drugs and is known to cause brain damage after repeated exposure. In this paper, we conducted a neuroproteomic study to evaluate METH-induced brain protein dynamics, following a two-week chronic regimen of an escalating dose of METH exposure. Proteins were extracted from rat brain hippocampal and olfactory bulb tissues and subjected to liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. Both shotgun and targeted proteomic analysis were performed. Protein quantification was initially based on comparing the spectral counts between METH exposed animals and their control counterparts. Quantitative differences were further confirmed through multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) LC-MS/MS experiments. According to the quantitative results, the expression of 18 proteins (11 in the hippocampus and 7 in the olfactory bulb) underwent a significant alteration as a result of exposing rats to METH. 13 of these proteins were up-regulated after METH exposure while 5 were down-regulated. The altered proteins belonging to different structural and functional families were involved in processes such as cell death, inflammation, oxidation, and apoptosis. PMID:27082425

  11. Effects of edible bird's nest on hippocampal and cortical neurodegeneration in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Zhiping, Hou; Imam, Mustapha Umar; Ismail, Maznah; Ismail, Norsharina; Yida, Zhang; Ideris, Aini; Sarega, Nadarajan; Mahmud, Rozi

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this research is to investigate whether edible bird's nest (EBN) attenuates cortical and hippocampal neurodegeneration in ovariectomized rats. Ovariectomized rats were randomly divided into seven experimental groups (n = 6): the ovariectomy (OVX) group had their ovaries surgically removed; the sham group underwent surgical procedure similar to OVX group, but ovaries were left intact; estrogen group had OVX and received estrogen therapy (0.2 mg kg(-1) per day); EBN treatment groups received 6%, 3%, and 1.5% EBN, respectively. Control group was not ovariectomized. After 12 weeks of intervention, biochemical assays were performed for markers of neurodegeneration, and messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) levels of oxidative stress-related genes in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of the brain were analysed. Caspase 3 (cysteine-aspartic proteases 3) protein levels in the hippocampus and frontal cortex were also determined using western blotting. The results show that EBNs significantly decreased estrogen deficiency-associated serum elevation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), and they changed redox status as evidenced by oxidative damage (malondialdehyde content) and enzymatic antioxidant defense (superoxide dismutase and catalase) markers. Furthermore, genes associated with neurodegeneration and apoptosis were downregulated in the hippocampus and frontal cortex by EBN supplementation. Taken together, the results suggest that EBN has potential for neuroprotection against estrogen deficiency-associated senescence, at least in part via modification of the redox system and attenuation of AGEs. PMID:25920003

  12. Short-term environmental enrichment enhances synaptic plasticity in hippocampal slices from aged rats.

    PubMed

    Stein, Liana R; O'Dell, Kazuko A; Funatsu, Michiyo; Zorumski, Charles F; Izumi, Yukitoshi

    2016-08-01

    Age-associated changes in cognition are mirrored by impairments in cellular models of memory and learning, such as long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD). In young rodents, environmental enrichment (EE) can enhance memory, alter LTP and LTD, as well as reverse cognitive deficits induced by aging. Whether short-term EE can benefit cognition and synaptic plasticity in aged rodents is unclear. Here, we tested if short-term EE could overcome age-associated impairments in induction of LTP and LTD. LTP and LTD could not be induced in the CA1 region of hippocampal slices in control, aged rats using standard stimuli that are highly effective in young rats. However, exposure of aged littermates to EE for three weeks enabled successful induction of LTP and LTD. EE-facilitated LTP was dependent upon N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs). These alterations in synaptic plasticity occurred with elevated levels of phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein and vascular endothelial growth factor, but in the absence of changes in several other synaptic and cellular markers. Importantly, our study suggests that even a relatively short period of EE is sufficient to alter synaptic plasticity and molecular markers linked to cognitive function in aged animals. PMID:27208617

  13. Involvement of cellular metabolism in age-related LTP modifications in rat hippocampal slices

    PubMed Central

    Drulis-Fajdasz, Dominika; Wójtowicz, Tomasz; Wawrzyniak, Marcin; Wlodarczyk, Jakub; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W.; Rakus, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies emphasized crucial role of astrocytic glycogen metabolism in regulation of synaptic transmission and plasticity in young animals. However, the interplay between age-related synaptic plasticity impairments and changes in energetic metabolism remains obscure. To address this issue, we investigated, in hippocampal slices of young (one month) and aged rats (20-22-months), the impact of glycogen degradation inhibition on LTP, mRNA expression for glycogen metabolism enzymes and morphology of dendritic spines. We show that, whereas in young hippocampi, inhibition of glycogen phosphorolysis disrupts the late phase of LTP in the Schaffer collateral-CA1 pathway, in aged rats, blockade of glycogen phosphorylase tends to enhance it. Gene expression for key energy metabolism enzymes, such as glycogen synthase and phosphorylase and glutamine synthetase showed marked differences between young and aged groups and changes in expression of these enzymes preceded plasticity phenomena. Interestingly, in the aged group, a prominent expression of these enzymes was found also in neurons. Concluding, we show that LTP in the considered pathway is differentially modulated by metabolic processes in young and aging animals, indicating a novel venue of studies aiming at preventing cognitive decline during aging. PMID:26101857

  14. The Effect of Chronic Methamphetamine Exposure on the Hippocampal and Olfactory Bulb Neuroproteomes of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Rui; Yang, Tianjiao; Kobeissy, Firas; Mouhieddine, Tarek H.; Raad, Mohamad; Nokkari, Amaly; Gold, Mark S.; Wang, Kevin K.; Mechref, Yehia

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, drug abuse and addiction are serious public health problems in the USA. Methamphetamine (METH) is one of the most abused drugs and is known to cause brain damage after repeated exposure. In this paper, we conducted a neuroproteomic study to evaluate METH-induced brain protein dynamics, following a two-week chronic regimen of an escalating dose of METH exposure. Proteins were extracted from rat brain hippocampal and olfactory bulb tissues and subjected to liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. Both shotgun and targeted proteomic analysis were performed. Protein quantification was initially based on comparing the spectral counts between METH exposed animals and their control counterparts. Quantitative differences were further confirmed through multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) LC-MS/MS experiments. According to the quantitative results, the expression of 18 proteins (11 in the hippocampus and 7 in the olfactory bulb) underwent a significant alteration as a result of exposing rats to METH. 13 of these proteins were up-regulated after METH exposure while 5 were down-regulated. The altered proteins belonging to different structural and functional families were involved in processes such as cell death, inflammation, oxidation, and apoptosis. PMID:27082425

  15. Effects of melatonin on cognitive impairment and hippocampal neuronal damage in a rat model of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion

    PubMed Central

    LEE, CHOONG HYUN; PARK, JOON HA; AHN, JI HYEON; WON, MOO-HO

    2016-01-01

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH), which induces oxidative stress and inflammation in the brain, has previously been associated with cognitive impairment and neuronal cell damage. Melatonin is a well-known free radical scavenger and antioxidant; therefore, the present study investigated the protective effects of melatonin against CCH-induced cognitive impairment and neuronal cell death in a CCH rat model, which was generated via permanent bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (2VO). The rats in the 2VO group exhibited markedly increased escape latencies in a Morris water maze test, as compared with the rats in the sham group. In addition, increased neuronal cell damage was detected in the hippocampal CA1 region of the 2VO rats, as compared with the rats in the sham group. Treatment of the 2VO rats with melatonin significantly reduced the escape latency and neuronal cell damage, and was associated with reduced levels of malondialdehyde, microglial activation, and tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β in the ischemic hippocampus. The results of the present study suggest that melatonin may attenuate CCH-induced cognitive impairment and hippocampal neuronal cell damage by decreasing oxidative stress, microglial activation and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the ischemic hippocampus. PMID:27284307

  16. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis Reveals Molecular Adaptations in the Hippocampal Synaptic Active Zone of Chronic Mild Stress-Unsusceptible Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jian; Liu, Zhao; Yu, Jia; Han, Xin; Fan, Songhua; Shao, Weihua; Chen, Jianjun; Qiao, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Background: While stressful events are recognized as an important cause of major depressive disorder, some individuals exposed to life stressors maintain normal psychological functioning. The molecular mechanism(s) underlying this phenomenon remain unclear. Abnormal transmission and plasticity of hippocampal synapses have been implied to play a key role in the pathoetiology of major depressive disorder. Methods: A chronic mild stress protocol was applied to separate susceptible and unsusceptible rat subpopulations. Proteomic analysis using an isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation coupled with tandem mass spectrometry was performed to identify differential proteins in enriched hippocampal synaptic junction preparations. Results: A total of 4318 proteins were quantified, and 89 membrane proteins were present in differential amounts. Of these, SynaptomeDB identified 81 (91%) having a synapse-specific localization. The unbiased profiles identified several candidate proteins within the synaptic junction that may be associated with stress vulnerability or insusceptibility. Subsequent functional categorization revealed that protein systems particularly involved in membrane trafficking at the synaptic active zone exhibited a positive strain as potential molecular adaptations in the unsusceptible rats. Moreover, through STRING and immunoblotting analysis, membrane-associated GTP-bound Rab3a and Munc18-1 appear to coregulate syntaxin-1/SNAP25/VAMP2 assembly at the hippocampal presynaptic active zone of unsusceptible rats, facilitating SNARE-mediated membrane fusion and neurotransmitter release, and may be part of a stress-protection mechanism in actively maintaining an emotional homeostasis. Conclusions: The present results support the concept that there is a range of potential protein adaptations in the hippocampal synaptic active zone of unsusceptible rats, revealing new investigative targets that may contribute to a better understanding of stress

  17. Intrinsic membrane properties determine hippocampal differential firing pattern in vivo in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Janina; Gan, Jian; Jonas, Peter; Pernía-Andrade, Alejandro J

    2016-05-01

    The hippocampus plays a key role in learning and memory. Previous studies suggested that the main types of principal neurons, dentate gyrus granule cells (GCs), CA3 pyramidal neurons, and CA1 pyramidal neurons, differ in their activity pattern, with sparse firing in GCs and more frequent firing in CA3 and CA1 pyramidal neurons. It has been assumed but never shown that such different activity may be caused by differential synaptic excitation. To test this hypothesis, we performed high-resolution whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in anesthetized rats in vivo. In contrast to previous in vitro data, both CA3 and CA1 pyramidal neurons fired action potentials spontaneously, with a frequency of ∼3-6 Hz, whereas GCs were silent. Furthermore, both CA3 and CA1 cells primarily fired in bursts. To determine the underlying mechanisms, we quantitatively assessed the frequency of spontaneous excitatory synaptic input, the passive membrane properties, and the active membrane characteristics. Surprisingly, GCs showed comparable synaptic excitation to CA3 and CA1 cells and the highest ratio of excitation versus hyperpolarizing inhibition. Thus, differential synaptic excitation is not responsible for differences in firing. Moreover, the three types of hippocampal neurons markedly differed in their passive properties. While GCs showed the most negative membrane potential, CA3 pyramidal neurons had the highest input resistance and the slowest membrane time constant. The three types of neurons also differed in the active membrane characteristics. GCs showed the highest action potential threshold, but displayed the largest gain of the input-output curves. In conclusion, our results reveal that differential firing of the three main types of hippocampal principal neurons in vivo is not primarily caused by differences in the characteristics of the synaptic input, but by the distinct properties of synaptic integration and input-output transformation. © 2015 The Authors Hippocampus

  18. Synchrotron FTIR micro-spectroscopy study of the rat hippocampal formation after pilocarpine-evoked seizures.

    PubMed

    Chwiej, J; Dulinska, J; Janeczko, K; Dumas, P; Eichert, D; Dudala, J; Setkowicz, Z

    2010-10-01

    In the present work, synchrotron radiation Fourier transform infrared (SRFTIR) micro-spectroscopy and imaging were used for topographic and semi-quantitative biochemical analysis of rat brain tissue in cases of pilocarpine-induced epilepsy. The tissue samples were analyzed with a beam defined by small apertures and spatial resolution steps of 10 microm which allowed us to probe the selected cellular layers of hippocampal formation. Raster scanning of the samples has generated 2D chemical cartographies revealing the distribution of proteins, lipids and nucleic acids. Spectral analysis has shown changes in the saturation level of phospholipids and relative secondary structure of proteins. Special interest was put in the analysis of two areas of the hippocampal formation (sector 3 of the Ammon's horn, CA3 and dentate gyrus, DG) in which elemental abnormalities were observed during our previous studies. Statistically significant increase in the saturation level of phospholipids (increased ratio of the absorption intensities at around 2921 and 2958 cm(-1)) as well as conformational changes of proteins (beta-type structure discrepancies as shown by the increased ratio of the absorbance intensities at around 1631 and 1657 cm(-1) as well as the ratio of the absorbance at 1548 and 1657 cm(-1)) were detected in pyramidal cells of CA3 area as well as in the multiform and molecular layers of DG. The findings presented here suggest that abnormalities in the protein secondary structure and increases in the level of phospholipid saturation could be involved in mechanisms of neurodegenerative changes following the oxidative stress evoked in brain areas affected by pilocarpine-induced seizures. PMID:20362662

  19. Bidirectional modulation of GABAergic transmission by cholecystokinin in hippocampal dentate gyrus granule cells of juvenile rats

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Pan-Yue; Lei, Saobo

    2006-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) interacts with two types of G protein-coupled receptors in the brain: CCK-A and CCK-B receptors. Both CCK and CCK-B receptors are widely distributed in the hippocampal formation, but the functions of CCK there have been poorly understood. In the present study, we initially examined the effects of CCK on GABAA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission in the hippocampal formation and then explored the underlying cellular mechanisms by focusing on the dentate gyrus region, where the highest levels of CCK-binding sites have been detected. Our results indicate that activation of CCK-B receptors initially and transiently increased spontaneous IPSC (sIPSC) frequency, followed by a persistent reduction. The effects of CCK were more evident in juvenile rats, suggesting that they are developmentally regulated. Cholecystokinin failed to modulate the miniature IPSCs recorded in the presence of TTX and the amplitude of the evoked IPSCs, but produced a transient increase followed by a reduction in action potential firing frequency recorded from GABAergic interneurons, suggesting that CCK acts by modulating the excitability of the interneurons to regulate GABA release. Cholecystokinin reduced the amplitude of the after-hyperpolarization of the action potentials, and application of paxilline or charybdotoxin considerably reduced CCK-mediated modulation of sIPSC frequency, suggesting that the effects of CCK are related to the inhibition of Ca2+-activated K+ currents (IK(Ca)). The effects of CCK were independent of the functions of phospholipase C, intracellular Ca2+ release, protein kinase C or phospholipase A2, suggesting a direct coupling between the G proteins of CCK-B receptors and IK(Ca). Our results provide a novel mechanism underlying CCK-mediated modulation of GABA release. PMID:16455686

  20. Mechanisms underlying H(2)O(2)-mediated inhibition of synaptic transmission in rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Avshalumov, M V; Chen, B T; Rice, M E

    2000-11-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) inhibits the population spike (PS) evoked by Schaffer collateral stimulation in hippocampal slices. Proposed mechanisms underlying this effect include generation of hydroxyl radicals (.OH) and inhibition of presynaptic Ca(2+) entry. We have examined these possible mechanisms in rat hippocampal slices. Inhibition of the evoked PS by H(2)O(2) was sharply concentration-dependent: 1.2 mM H(2)O(2) had no effect, whereas 1.5 and 2.0 mM H(2)O(2) reversibly depressed PS amplitude by roughly 80%. The iron chelator, deferoxamine (1 mM), and the endogenous.OH scavenger, ascorbate (400 microM), prevented PS inhibition, confirming.OH involvement. Isoascorbate (400 microM), which unlike ascorbate is not taken up by brain cells, also prevented PS inhibition, indicating an extracellular site of.OH generation or action. We then investigated whether H(2)O(2)-induced PS depression could be overcome by prolonged stimulation, which enhances Ca(2+) entry. During 5-s, 10-Hz trains under control conditions, PS amplitude increased to over 200% during the first three-four pulses, then stabilized. In the presence of H(2)O(2), PS amplitude was initially depressed, but began to recover after 2.5 s of stimulation, finally reaching 80% of the control maximum. In companion experiments, we assessed the effect of H(2)O(2) on presynaptic Ca(2+) entry by monitoring extracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](o)) during train stimulation in the presence of postsynaptic receptor blockers. Evoked [Ca(2+)](o) shifts were apparently unaltered by H(2)O(2), suggesting a lack of effect on Ca(2+) entry. Taken together, these findings suggest new ways in which reactive oxygen species (ROS) might act as signaling agents, specifically as modulators of synaptic transmission. PMID:11056187

  1. Development of a Prolonged Calcium Plateau in Hippocampal Neurons in Rats Surviving Status Epilepticus Induced by the Organophosphate Diisopropylfluorophosphate

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Laxmikant S.; Carter, Dawn S.; Blair, Robert E.; DeLorenzo, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Organophosphate (OP) compounds are among the most lethal chemical weapons ever developed and are irreversible inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase. Exposure to majority of OP produces status epilepticus (SE) and severe cholinergic symptoms that if left untreated are fatal. Survivors of OP intoxication often suffer from irreversible brain damage and chronic neurological disorders. Although pilocarpine has been used to model SE following OP exposure, there is a need to establish a SE model that uses an OP compound in order to realistically mimic both acute and long-term effects of nerve agent intoxication. Here we describe the development of a rat model of OP-induced SE using diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP). The mortality, behavioral manifestations, and electroencephalogram (EEG) profile for DFP-induced SE (4 mg/kg, sc) were identical to those reported for nerve agents. However, significantly higher survival rates were achieved with an improved dose regimen of DFP and treatment with pralidoxime chloride (25 mg/kg, im), atropine (2 mg/kg, ip), and diazepam (5 mg/kg, ip) making this model ideal to study chronic effects of OP exposure. Further, DFP treatment produced N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor–mediated significant elevation in hippocampal neuronal [Ca2+]i that lasted for weeks after the initial SE. These results provided direct evidence that DFP-induced SE altered Ca2+ dynamics that could underlie some of the long-term plasticity changes associated with OP toxicity. This model is ideally suited to test effective countermeasures for OP exposure and study molecular mechanisms underlying neurological disorders following OP intoxication. PMID:20498005

  2. Electrophysiological properties of hippocampal-cortical neural networks, role in the processes of learning and memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Chang-Jun; Lu, Yun; Zhou, Mei; Guo, Lian-Jun

    2014-06-01

    The recording of hippocampal and cortical long-term potentiation (LTP) in rats in vivo is an appropriate and commonly used method to describe changes in cellular mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity. Recently, we introduced a method for the simultaneous recording of LTP in bilateral CA1 regions and parietal association cortex (PtA), and observed differences between the Schaffer collateral-CA1 pathway (SC), Schaffer collateral/associational commissural pathway (SAC) and Schaffer collateral/associational commissural-cortex pathway (SACC). In this study, we found that (1) synaptic transmission of the SAC and SACC pathways depended on hippocampal commissural fibers [dorsal and ventral hippocampal commissural fibers, the medial septum (MS) and hippocampal CA3 commissural fibers], (2) nerve conduction velocity of the SACC pathway might be higher than that of the SAC pathway, (3) the input/output (I/O) curve of the SC pathway was shifted to the left side, compared to that of the SAC and SACC pathways, (4) all three pathways could induce stable LTP; however, LTP of the SAC and SACC pathways was much stronger than that of the SC pathway, (5) the degree of paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) was weaker in the SC pathway than that in the SAC and SACC pathways, (6) after cutting off the corpus callosum and commissural fibers, spatial learning and memory were impaired, and the ability to explore the novel environment and spontaneous locomotor activity were weakened. Taken together, our results suggested that hippocampal commissural fibers were very important for exchanging information between hemispheres, and basic differences in electrophysiological properties of hippocampal-cortical neural networks play a vital role in the processes of learning and memory. PMID:24504908

  3. The tricyclic antidepressant desipramine inhibited the neurotoxic, kainate-induced [Ca(2+)]i increases in CA1 pyramidal cells in acute hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Koncz, István; Szász, Bernadett K; Szabó, Szilárd I; Kiss, János P; Mike, Arpád; Lendvai, Balázs; Sylvester Vizi, E; Zelles, Tibor

    2014-05-01

    Kainate (KA), used for modelling neurodegenerative diseases, evokes excitotoxicity. However, the precise mechanism of KA-evoked [Ca(2+)]i increase is unexplored, especially in acute brain slice preparations. We used [Ca(2+)]i imaging and patch clamp electrophysiology to decipher the mechanism of KA-evoked [Ca(2+)]i rise and its inhibition by the tricyclic antidepressant desipramine (DMI) in CA1 pyramidal cells in rat hippocampal slices and in cultured hippocampal cells. The effect of KA was dose-dependent and relied totally on extracellular Ca(2+). The lack of effect of dl-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP-5) and abolishment of the response by 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) suggested the involvement of non-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (non-NMDARs). The predominant role of the Ca(2+)-impermeable α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate receptors (AMPARs) in the initiation of the Ca(2+) response was supported by the inhibitory effect of the selective AMPAR antagonist GYKI 53655 and the ineffectiveness of 1-naphthyl acetylspermine (NASPM), an inhibitor of the Ca(2+)-permeable AMPARs. The voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (VGCC), blocked by ω-Conotoxin MVIIC+nifedipine+NiCl2, contributed to the [Ca(2+)]i rise. VGCCs were also involved, similarly to AMPAR current, in the KA-evoked depolarisation. Inhibition of voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSCs; tetrodotoxin, TTX) did not affect the depolarisation of pyramidal cells but blocked the depolarisation-evoked action potential bursts and reduced the Ca(2+) response. The tricyclic antidepressant DMI inhibited the KA-evoked [Ca(2+)]i rise in a dose-dependent manner. It directly attenuated the AMPA-/KAR current, but its more potent inhibition on the Ca(2+) response supports additional effect on VGCCs, VGSCs and Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchangers. The multitarget action on decisive players of excitotoxicity holds out more promise in clinical therapy of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24742525

  4. Rats with hippocampal lesion show impaired learning and memory in the ziggurat task: a new task to evaluate spatial behavior.

    PubMed

    Faraji, Jamshid; Lehmann, Hugo; Metz, Gerlinde A; Sutherland, Robert J

    2008-05-16

    Spatial tasks are widely used to determine the function of limbic system structures in rats. The present study used a new task designed to evaluate spatial behavior, the ziggurat task (ZT), to examine the performance of rats with widespread hippocampal damage induced by N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA). The task consisted of an open field containing 16 identical ziggurats (pyramid shaped towers) arranged at equal distances. One of the ziggurats was baited with a food reward. The task required rats to navigate through the open field by using a combination of distal and/or proximal cues in order to locate the food reward. The ability to acquire and recall the location of the goal (baited) ziggurat was tested in consecutive training sessions of eight trials per day for 10 days. The location of the goal ziggurat was changed every second day, requiring the rats to learn a total of five different locations. Several parameters, including latency to find the target, distance traveled, the number of visits to non-baited ziggurats (errors), and the number of returns were used as indices of learning and memory. Control rats showed a significant decrease in distance traveled and reduced latency in locating the goal ziggurat across trials and days, suggesting that they learned and remembered the location of the goal ziggurat. Interestingly, the hippocampal-damaged group moved significantly faster, and traveled longer distances compared to the control group. Significant differences were observed between these groups with respect to the number of errors and returns on test days. Day 11 served as probe day, in which no food reward was given. The controls spent more time searching for the food in the previous training quadrant compared to the hippocampal group. The findings demonstrate that the ZT is a sensitive and efficient dry task for measuring hippocampus-dependent spatial performance in rats requiring little training and not associated with some of the disadvantages of water

  5. Evaluation of Mitochondrial Function in the CNS of Rodent Models of Alzheimer's Disease - High Resolution Respirometry Applied to Acute Hippocampal Slices.

    PubMed

    Dias, Candida; Barbosa, Rui M; Laranjinha, Joao; Ledo, Ana

    2014-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a multifactorial disease characterized by extracellular deposits of amyloid plaques and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles. These hallmark alterations are preceded by synaptic deterioration, changes in neuromolecular plasticity phenomena, mitochondrial dysfunction, increase in oxidative damage to cellular constituents and decreased energy metabolism. The hippocampus is a structure of the temporal medial lobe implicated in specific forms of memory processes. It is also one of the first and most affected regions of the CNS in AD. Here we present a novel approach to the study if mitochondrial function/disfunction in 2 rodent models of AD: an acute rat model obtained by intracerebroventricular injection of the toxin streptozotocin (STZ) and a progressive triple transgenic mouse model (3TgAD) harboring PS1M146V, APPSwe, and tauP301L transgenes. Mitochondrial dysfunction has classically been assessed in such models by isolating mitochondria, synaptossoms or working with cell cultures. Anyone of these approaches destroys the intricate intercellular connectivity and cytoarchitecture of neuronal tissue. We used acute hippocampal slices obtained from the 2 models of AD and evaluated changes in mitochondrial function as a function of disease and/or age. Mitochondrial stress test were performed on the high resolution respirometry (Oroboros 2K Oxymeter). Upon analysis of oxygen consumption rates (OCR) we observed significant decreases in basal OCR, maximal respiratory capacity, ATP turnover and a tendency for decrease in sparing capacity in the STZ rat model compared to shame injected animals. Regarding the 3TgAD model we observed an age-dependent decrease in all parameters evaluated in the mitochondrial stress test, in both 3TgAD and NTg animals. However, although a tendency towards decreased OCR was observed when comparing 3TgAD and age-matched NTg animals, no statistically significant difference was observed. PMID:26461355

  6. Intrinsic excitability changes induced by acute treatment of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons with exogenous amyloid β peptide.

    PubMed

    Tamagnini, Francesco; Scullion, Sarah; Brown, Jon T; Randall, Andrew D

    2015-07-01

    Accumulation of beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptides in the human brain is a canonical pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent work in Aβ-overexpressing transgenic mice indicates that increased brain Aβ levels can be associated with aberrant epileptiform activity. In line with this, such mice can also exhibit altered intrinsic excitability (IE) of cortical and hippocampal neurons: these observations may relate to the increased prevalence of seizures in AD patients. In this study, we examined what changes in IE are produced in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells after 2-5 h treatment with an oligomeric preparation of synthetic human Aβ 1-42 peptide. Whole cell current clamp recordings were compared between Aβ-(500 nM) and vehicle-(DMSO 0.05%) treated hippocampal slices obtained from mice. The soluble Aβ treatment did not produce alterations in sub-threshold intrinsic properties, including membrane potential, input resistance, and hyperpolarization activated "sag". Similarly, no changes were noted in the firing profile evoked by 500 ms square current supra-threshold stimuli. However, Aβ 500 nM treatment resulted in the hyperpolarization of the action potential (AP) threshold. In addition, treatment with Aβ at 500 nM depressed the after-hyperpolarization that followed both a single AP or 50 Hz trains of a number of APs between 5 and 25. These data suggest that acute exposure to soluble Aβ oligomers affects IE properties of CA1 pyramidal neurons differently from outcomes seen in transgenic models of amyloidopathy. However, in both chronic and acute models, the IE changes are toward hyperexcitability, reinforcing the idea that amyloidopathy and increased incidence in seizures might be causally related in AD patients. PMID:25515596

  7. Intrinsic excitability changes induced by acute treatment of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons with exogenous amyloid β peptide

    PubMed Central

    Scullion, Sarah; Brown, Jon T.; Randall, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Accumulation of beta‐amyloid (Aβ) peptides in the human brain is a canonical pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent work in Aβ‐overexpressing transgenic mice indicates that increased brain Aβ levels can be associated with aberrant epileptiform activity. In line with this, such mice can also exhibit altered intrinsic excitability (IE) of cortical and hippocampal neurons: these observations may relate to the increased prevalence of seizures in AD patients. In this study, we examined what changes in IE are produced in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells after 2–5 h treatment with an oligomeric preparation of synthetic human Aβ 1–42 peptide. Whole cell current clamp recordings were compared between Aβ‐(500 nM) and vehicle‐(DMSO 0.05%) treated hippocampal slices obtained from mice. The soluble Aβ treatment did not produce alterations in sub‐threshold intrinsic properties, including membrane potential, input resistance, and hyperpolarization activated “sag”. Similarly, no changes were noted in the firing profile evoked by 500 ms square current supra‐threshold stimuli. However, Aβ 500 nM treatment resulted in the hyperpolarization of the action potential (AP) threshold. In addition, treatment with Aβ at 500 nM depressed the after‐hyperpolarization that followed both a single AP or 50 Hz trains of a number of APs between 5 and 25. These data suggest that acute exposure to soluble Aβ oligomers affects IE properties of CA1 pyramidal neurons differently from outcomes seen in transgenic models of amyloidopathy. However, in both chronic and acute models, the IE changes are toward hyperexcitability, reinforcing the idea that amyloidopathy and increased incidence in seizures might be causally related in AD patients. © 2014 The Authors Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25515596

  8. Sex-dependent actions of amyloid beta peptides on hippocampal choline carriers of postnatal rats.

    PubMed

    Kristofiková, Z; Rícný, J; Kozmiková, I; Rípová, D; Zach, P; Klaschka, J

    2006-03-01

    It is suggested that amyloid beta peptides (Abeta) play a role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease but their physiological function is still unknown. However, low pM-nM concentrations mediate a hypofunction of a basal forebrain cholinergic system without marked signs of neurotoxicity. In this study, we compared in vitro effects of soluble nonaggregated human Abeta 1-40 and 1-42 either on synaptosomal hemicholinium-3 sensitive choline carriers or on membrane fluidity in hippocampi of male and female Wistar rats aged 7 and 14 days or 2-3 months. The results indicate age- and sex-dependent effects mediated by peptides at nM concentrations but no significant differences between both fragments. Namely, opposite actions were observed in 14-day (the increase in the choline uptake and membrane fluidity) when compared to 7-day old and adult males (the mild drops). Lineweaver-Burk plot analysis revealed that the enhancement of the high-affinity choline transport in 14-day old males occurs via alterations in K (M )and the change was accompanied by a mild increase in the specific binding of [3H]hemicholinium-3. On the other hand, no age-dependent differences were found in females. Rat Abeta 1-40 mediated similar effects on 14-day old rats as the corresponding human fragment. Moreover, higher levels of soluble peptides were detected in immature when compared to mature male brains by means of competitive ELISA. Our study indicates that Abeta could play a role in postnatal sexual differentiation of hippocampal cholinergic system. PMID:16733811

  9. Effects of cold exposure on behavioral and electrophysiological parameters related with hippocampal function in rats

    PubMed Central

    Elmarzouki, Hajar; Aboussaleh, Youssef; Bitiktas, Soner; Suer, Cem; Artis, A. Seda; Dolu, Nazan; Ahami, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Behavioral and mental changes may occur in people exposed to cold stress by decreasing their work efficiency and their mental capacity while increasing the number of accidents on the job site. The goal of this study was to explore the effect of cold stress in spatial learning performance excitability and LTP. Materials and Methods: Three to four month old rats were randomly divided into four groups to form a control group and a cold stress group for each sex. The groups of cold stressed animals were placed in a cold room ambient temperature of 4°C for 2 h day. Adrenal glands and body weight (g) were recorded in control and stressed rats during the cold exposure. Spatial learning (acquisition phase) and memory (probe trial) were tested in the Morris water maze (MWM) immediately after daily exposure. Latency to locate the hidden platform, distance moved (DM), mean distance to platform, swim speed (SS) and time spent in the platform quadrant were compared between genders and treatments. Field potential recordings were made, under urethane anesthesia, from the dentate gyrus (DG) granule-cell layer, with stimulation of the medial perforant pathway 2 h after the probe trial. This study examined spatial memory as measured by MWM performance and hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) in the DG after exposure to cold in a repeated stress condition for 2 h/day for 5 days. Results: The cold-exposed female rats needed less time to find the hidden platform on day 1 (43.0 ± 13.9 s vs. 63.2 ± 13.2 s), day 2 (18.2 ± 8.4 s vs. 40.9 ± 12.2 s) and on day 4 (8.0 ± 2.1 s vs. 17.2 ± 7.0 s) while cold-exposed male rats showed a decreased escape latency (EL) on day 1 only (37.3 ± 12.5 s vs. 75.4 ± 13.1 s). Cold-exposed male rats spent less time in the target quadrant (30.08 ± 6.11%) than the control male rats (37.33 ± 8.89%). Two hour cold exposure decreased population spike (PS) potentiation during both induction (218.3 ± 21.6 vs. 304.5 ± 18.8%) and maintenance

  10. Serotonin 5-HT3 receptors in rat CA1 hippocampal interneurons: functional and molecular characterization

    PubMed Central

    Sudweeks, Sterling N; van Hooft, Johannes A; Yakel, Jerrel L

    2002-01-01

    The molecular makeup of the serotonin 5-HT3 receptor (5-HT3R) channel was investigated in rat hippocampal CA1 interneurons in slices using single-cell RT-PCR and patch-clamp recording techniques. We tested for the expression of the 5-HT3A (both short and long splice variants) and 5-HT3B subunits, as well as the expression of the α4 subunit of the neuronal nicotinic ACh receptors (nAChRs), the latter of which has been shown to co-assemble with the 5-HT3A subunit in heterologous expression systems. Both the 5-HT3A-short and α4-nAChR subunits were expressed in these interneurons, but we could not detect any expression of either the 5-HT3B or the 5-HT3A-long subunits. Furthermore, there was a strong tendency for the 5-HT3A-short and α4-nAChR subunits to be co-expressed in individual interneurons. To assess whether there was any functional evidence for co-assembly between the 5-HT3A-short and α4-nAChR subunits, we used the sulphydryl agent 2-aminoethyl methanethiosulphonate (MTSEA), which has previously been shown to modulate expressed 5-HT3Rs that contain the α4-nAChR subunit. In half of the interneurons examined, MTSEA significantly enhanced the amplitude of the 5-HT3R-mediated responses, which is consistent with the notion that the α4-nAChR subunit co-assembles with the 5-HT3A subunit to form a native heteromeric 5-HT3R channel in rat CA1 hippocampal interneurons in vivo. In addition, the single-channel properties of the 5-HT3R were investigated in outside-out patches. No resolvable single-channel currents were observed. Using non-stationary fluctuation analysis, we obtained an estimate of the single-channel conductance of 4 pS, which is well below that expected for channels containing both the 5-HT3A and 5-HT3B subunits. PMID:12411518

  11. Effects of maternal hypothyroidism during pregnancy on learning, memory and hippocampal BDNF in rat pups: Beneficial effects of exercise.

    PubMed

    Shafiee, Seyed Morteza; Vafaei, Abbas Ali; Rashidy-Pour, Ali

    2016-08-01

    Hypothyroidism during early development leads to numerous morphological, biochemical and functional changes in developing brain. In this study, we investigated the effects of voluntary and treadmill exercise on learning, memory and hippocampal BDNF levels in both hypothyroid male and female rat pups. To induce hypothyroidism in the mothers, 6-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU) was added to their drinking water (100mg/L) from their embryonic day 6 to their postnatal day (PND) 21. For 14days, from PNDs 31 to 44, the rat pups were trained with one of the two different exercise protocols, namely the mild treadmill exercise and the voluntary wheel exercise. On PNDs 45-52, a water maze was used for testing their learning and memory ability. The rats were sacrificed one day later and their BDNF levels were then measured in the hippocampus. The findings of the present study indicate that hypothyroidism during the fetal period and the early postnatal period is associated with the impairment of spatial learning and memory and reduced hippocampal BDNF levels in both male and female rat offspring. Both the short-term treadmill exercise and the voluntary wheel exercise performed during the postnatal period reverse the behavioral and neurochemical deficits induced by developmental thyroid hormone insufficiency in both male and female rat offspring. The findings of this study thus demonstrate a marked reversibility of both behavioral and neurochemical disorders induced by developmental thyroid hormone insufficiency through the performance of exercise. PMID:27181637

  12. Hippocampal Synaptic Expansion Induced by Spatial Experience in Rats Correlates with Improved Information Processing in the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Carasatorre, Mariana; Ochoa-Alvarez, Adrian; Velázquez-Campos, Giovanna; Lozano-Flores, Carlos; Díaz-Cintra, Sofía Y.; Ramírez-Amaya, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    Spatial water maze (WM) overtraining induces hippocampal mossy fiber (MF) expansion, and it has been suggested that spatial pattern separation depends on the MF pathway. We hypothesized that WM experience inducing MF expansion in rats would improve spatial pattern separation in the hippocampal network. We first tested this by using the the delayed non-matching to place task (DNMP), in animals that had been previously trained on the water maze (WM) and found that these animals, as well as animals treated as swim controls (SC), performed better than home cage control animals the DNMP task. The “catFISH” imaging method provided neurophysiological evidence that hippocampal pattern separation improved in animals treated as SC, and this improvement was even clearer in animals that experienced the WM training. Moreover, these behavioral treatments also enhance network reliability and improve partial pattern separation in CA1 and pattern completion in CA3. By measuring the area occupied by synaptophysin staining in both the stratum oriens and the stratun lucidum of the distal CA3, we found evidence of structural synaptic plasticity that likely includes MF expansion. Finally, the measures of hippocampal network coding obtained with catFISH correlate significantly with the increased density of synaptophysin staining, strongly suggesting that structural synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus induced by the WM and SC experience is related to the improvement of spatial information processing in the hippocampus. PMID:26244549

  13. Maternal immune activation produces neonatal excitability defects in offspring hippocampal neurons from pregnant rats treated with poly I:C

    PubMed Central

    Patrich, Eti; Piontkewitz, Yael; Peretz, Asher; Weiner, Ina; Attali, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Maternal immune activation (MIA) resulting from prenatal exposure to infectious pathogens or inflammatory stimuli is increasingly recognized to play an important etiological role in neuropsychiatric disorders with neurodevelopmental features. MIA in pregnant rodents induced by injection of the synthetic double-stranded RNA, Poly I:C, a mimic of viral infection, leads to a wide spectrum of behavioral abnormalities as well as structural and functional defects in the brain. Previous MIA studies using poly I:C prenatal treatment suggested that neurophysiological alterations occur in the hippocampus. However, these investigations used only juvenile or adult animals. We postulated that MIA-induced alterations could occur earlier at neonatal/early postnatal stages. Here we examined the neurophysiological properties of cultured pyramidal-like hippocampal neurons prepared from neonatal (P0-P2) offspring of pregnant rats injected with poly I:C. Offspring neurons from poly I:C-treated mothers exhibited significantly lower intrinsic excitability and stronger spike frequency adaptation, compared to saline. A similar lower intrinsic excitability was observed in CA1 pyramidal neurons from hippocampal slices of two weeks-old poly I:C offspring. Cultured hippocampal neurons also displayed lower frequency of spontaneous firing, higher charge transfer of IPSCs and larger amplitude of miniature IPSCs. Thus, maternal immune activation leads to strikingly early neurophysiological abnormalities in hippocampal neurons. PMID:26742695

  14. Potential targets for protecting against hippocampal cell apoptosis after transient cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xiangyu; Zhang, Li’na; Liu, Ran; Liu, Yingzhi; Song, Jianfang; Dong, He; Jia, Yanfang; Zhou, Zangong

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria play an important role in neuronal apoptosis caused by cerebral ischemia, and the role is mediated by the expression of mitochondrial proteins. This study investigated the involvement of mitochondrial proteins in hippocampal cell apoptosis after transient cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in aged rats using a comparative proteomics strategy. Our experimental results show that the aged rat brain is sensitive to ischemia-reperfusion injury and that transient ischemia led to cell apoptosis in the hippocampus and changes in memory and cognition of aged rats. Differential proteomics analysis suggested that this phenomenon may be mediated by mitochondrial proteins associated with energy metabolism and apoptosis in aged rats. This study provides potential drug targets for the treatment of transient cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:25206771

  15. Effects of selected muscarinic cholinergic antagonists on [3H]acetylcholine release from rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Pohorecki, R; Head, R; Domino, E F

    1988-01-01

    A number of cholinergic muscarinic (M) agonists and antagonists were studied for their ability to enhance tritiated acetylcholine ([3H]ACh) release from electrically field-stimulated rat hippocampal slices. A Ca++-free medium and carbachol, but not nicotine, inhibited [3H]ACh release. Atropine, methylatropine and dexetimide produced concentration-dependent increases in [3H]ACh release to a maximum of about 50% above control. Aprophen and benactyzine produced a maximal response 25 to 35% above control. The selective M1 antagonist pirenzepine had the least effect on [3H]ACh release. Of the nonspecific M1-M2 antagonists studied, benactyzine produced the least amount of [3H]ACh release. The order of potency of the M antagonists in promoting a 15% increase in [3H]ACh release was aprophen greater than benactyzine greater than methylatropine greater than dexetimide greater than pirenzepine greater than atropine. However, the order of promoting maximal release of [3H]ACh was atropine greater than dexetimide greater than methylatropine greater than aprophen greater than benactyzine greater than pirenzepine. PMID:3335998

  16. Volatile anesthetics gate a chloride current in postnatal rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Yang, J; Isenberg, K E; Zorumski, C F

    1992-02-01

    A volatile anesthetic-gated current was characterized in patch-clamped cultured postnatal rat hippocampal neurons. In this preparation, the major volatile anesthetics, isoflurane, halothane, and enflurane, open an anion-selective conductance. This volatile anesthetic-gated current exhibits anion selectivity with a chloride-to-acetate permeability ratio of 15, shows outward rectification well described by the constant field equation, and is activated in a dose-dependent fashion with half-maximal response to isoflurane at 0.8 mM (0.032 atm). The current persists in the absence of external Ca2+ and is not blocked by strychnine, a glycine antagonist. However, the gamma-aminobutyric acidA (GABAA) antagonists, bicuculline and picrotoxinin, and the nonspecific anion channel blocker, 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS), completely block the response. These observations suggest that volatile anesthetics, like several other general anesthetics such as barbiturates, steroids, and etomidate, have a GABA-mimetic effect on vertebrate central neurons in culture. It is not clear whether this GABAA-gating property is a prerequisite for all general anesthetics. However, under normal physiological conditions of low intracellular Cl-, it is likely that drugs with both direct GABA agonist and GABA modulatory properties will produce overall depression of the central nervous system by increasing the normal inhibitory synaptic influence and by directly hyperpolarizing neurons. PMID:1740240

  17. Sevoflurane improves electrophysiological recovery of rat hippocampal slice CA1 pyramidal neurons after hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Matei, Gina; Pavlik, Rostislav; McCadden, Tai; Cottrell, James E; Kass, Ira S

    2002-10-01

    Sevoflurane is a volatile anesthetic agent that reduces cerebral metabolism and thereby may reduce neuronal damage during energy deprivation. We have examined the effect of sevoflurane on hypoxic neuronal damage in rat hippocampal slices. Slices were subjected to 0%, 2%, or 4% sevoflurane 10 minutes before, during, and 10 minutes after hypoxia. The Schaffer collateral pathway was stimulated every 10 seconds and the evoked population spike recorded in the CA1 pyramidal cell region throughout the experiment. During hypoxia, the postsynaptic evoked response was blocked. The time until the blockade of this response in the 0% sevoflurane group was 158 seconds. Sevoflurane (4%) significantly delayed the loss of the evoked response during hypoxia (242 seconds). The percent recovery of the postsynaptic population spike was calculated by dividing the size of the response 120 minutes after hypoxia by its prehypoxic, presevoflurane amplitude. There was no recovery of the population spike in the 0% sevoflurane group 120 minutes after the end of 5 minutes of hypoxia (6 +/- 6%); there was significantly better recovery after 5 minutes of hypoxia in the sevoflurane (4%) treated group (40 +/- 9%). A lower concentration of sevoflurane (2%) delayed the loss of evoked response during hypoxia (191 seconds), but it did not significantly affect recovery of the population spike after hypoxia (7 +/- 7%). Hypoxia irreversibly damages electrophysiologic activity. A high, but clinically usable, concentration of sevoflurane increases the time during hypoxia until the postsynaptic evoked response is blocked and improves recovery of this response after 5 minutes of hypoxia. PMID:12357086

  18. Effects of uniform extracellular DC electric fields on excitability in rat hippocampal slices in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bikson, Marom; Inoue, Masashi; Akiyama, Hiroki; Deans, Jackie K; Fox, John E; Miyakawa, Hiroyoshi; Jefferys, John G R

    2004-01-01

    The effects of uniform steady state (DC) extracellular electric fields on neuronal excitability were characterized in rat hippocampal slices using field, intracellular and voltage-sensitive dye recordings. Small electric fields (<|40| mV mm−1), applied parallel to the somato-dendritic axis, induced polarization of CA1 pyramidal cells; the relationship between applied field and induced polarization was linear (0.12 ± 0.05 mV per mV mm−1 average sensitivity at the soma). The peak amplitude and time constant (15–70 ms) of membrane polarization varied along the axis of neurons with the maximal polarization observed at the tips of basal and apical dendrites. The polarization was biphasic in the mid-apical dendrites; there was a time-dependent shift in the polarity reversal site. DC fields altered the thresholds of action potentials evoked by orthodromic stimulation, and shifted their initiation site along the apical dendrites. Large electric fields could trigger neuronal firing and epileptiform activity, and induce long-term (>1 s) changes in neuronal excitability. Electric fields perpendicular to the apical–dendritic axis did not induce somatic polarization, but did modulate orthodromic responses, indicating an effect on afferents. These results demonstrate that DC fields can modulate neuronal excitability in a time-dependent manner, with no clear threshold, as a result of interactions between neuronal compartments, the non-linear properties of the cell membrane, and effects on afferents. PMID:14978199

  19. Impaired structural hippocampal plasticity is associated with emotional and memory deficits in the olfactory bulbectomized rat.

    PubMed

    Morales-Medina, J C; Juarez, I; Venancio-García, E; Cabrera, S N; Menard, C; Yu, W; Flores, G; Mechawar, N; Quirion, R

    2013-04-16

    Disturbances in olfactory circuitry have been associated with depression in humans. The olfactory bulbectomized (OBX lesion) has been largely used as a model of depression-like behavior in the rat. However, quantitative neuronal rearrangements in key brain regions in this animal model have not been evaluated yet. Accordingly, we investigated changes in hippocampal plasticity as well as behavioral deficits in this animal model. OBX-induced behavioral deficits were studied in a battery of tests, namely the open field test (OFT), forced swim test (FST), and spatial memory disturbances in the Morris water maze (MWM). To characterize the neuronal remodeling, neuroanatomical rearrangements were investigated in the CA1 hippocampus and piriform cortex (PirC), brain regions receiving inputs from the olfactory bulbs and associated with emotional or olfactory processes. Additionally, cell proliferation and survival of newborn cells in the adult dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus were also determined. OBX induced hyperlocomotion and enhanced rearing and grooming in the OFT, increased immobility in the FST as well as required a longer time to find the hidden platform in the MWM. OBX also induced dendritic atrophy in the hippocampus and PirC. In addition, cell proliferation was decreased while the survival remained unchanged in the DG of these animals. These various features are also observed in depressed subjects, adding further support to the validity and usefulness of this model to evaluate potential novel antidepressants. PMID:23357118

  20. Developmental lead exposure alters gene expression of metabotropic glutamate receptors in rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian; Yan, Chong-Huai; Wu, Sheng-Hu; Yu, Xiao-Dan; Yu, Xiao-Gang; Shen, Xiao-Ming

    2007-02-21

    Exposure to lead in utero and in infancy is associated with a risk of impaired cognitive development. Increasing evidence suggests that the family of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) plays an important role in synaptic plasticity and memory formation. We determined whether mGluRs subtypes 1, 3, and 7 (mGluR1, mGluR3, and mGluR7) were involved in developmental neurotoxicity due to lead. Embryonic rat hippocampal neurons were cultured for 21 days and exposed to lead chloride beginning on the fourth day of incubation. We investigated levels of mGluR1, mGluR3, and mGluR7 mRNA expression by using quantitative real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with lead exposure at 10 nM, 1 microM, and 100 microM. Lead exposure in vitro downregulated the expression of mGluR1 mRNA and upregulated the expression of mGluR3 and mGluR7 mRNA in a dose-dependent manner. We speculate that mGluRs may be involved in lead neurotoxicity. Pathways that likely contribute to lead neurotoxicity by means of mGluRs are impairment of long-term potentiation, effects on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor functions, and depotentiation. PMID:17267122

  1. Intracellular Ca2+ stores modulate SOCCs and NMDA receptors via tyrosine kinases in rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Koss, David J; Riedel, Gernot; Platt, Bettina

    2009-07-01

    The regulation of intracellular Ca(2+) signalling by phosphorylation processes remains poorly defined, particularly with regards to tyrosine phosphorylation. Evidence from non-excitable cells implicates tyrosine phosphorylation in the activation of so-called store-operated Ca(2+) channels (SOCCs), but their involvement in neuronal Ca(2+) signalling is still elusive. In the present study, we determined the role of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) and tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) in the coupling between intracellular Ca(2+) stores and SOCCs in neonatal rat hippocampal neurons by Fura-2 Ca(2+) imaging. An early Ca(2+) response from intracellular stores was triggered with thapsigargin, and followed by a secondary plasma membrane Ca(2+) response. This phase was blocked by the non-specific Ca(2+) channel blocker NiCl and the SOCC blocker, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB). Interestingly, two structurally distinct PTK inhibitors, genistein and AG126, also inhibited this secondary response. Application of the PTP inhibitor sodium orthovanadate (OV) also activated a sustained and tyrosine kinase dependent Ca(2+) response, blocked by NiCl and 2-APB. In addition, OV resulted in a Ca(2+) store dependent enhancement of NMDA responses, corresponding to, and occluding the signalling pathway for group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs). This study provides first evidence for tyrosine based phospho-regulation of SOCCs and NMDA signalling in neurons. PMID:19423160

  2. Effects of adult dysthyroidism on the morphology of hippocampal granular cells in rats.

    PubMed

    Martí-Carbonell, Maria Assumpció; Garau, Adriana; Sala-Roca, Josefina; Balada, Ferran

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are essential for normal brain development and very important in the normal functioning of the brain. Thyroid hormones action in the adult brain has not been widely studied. The effects of adult hyperthyroidism are not as well understood as adult hypothyroidism, mainly in hippocampal granular cells. The purpose of the present study is to assess the consequences of adult hormone dysthyroidism (excess/deficiency of TH) on the morphology of dentate granule cells in the hippocampus by performing a quantitative study of dendritic arborizations and dendritic spines using Golgi impregnated material. Hypo-and hyperthyroidism were induced in rats by adding 0.02 percent methimazole and 1 percent L-thyroxine, respectively, to drinking water from 40 days of age. At 89 days, the animals' brains were removed and stained by a modified Golgi method and blood samples were collected in order to measure T4 serum levels. Neurons were selected and drawn using a camera lucida. Our results show that both methimazole and thyroxine treatment affect granule cell morphology. Treatments provoke alterations in the same direction, namely, reduction of certain dendritic-branching parameters that are more evident in the methimazole than in the thyroxine group. We also observe a decrease in spine density in both the methimazole and thyroxine groups. PMID:23093010

  3. The protective role of chelators and antioxidants on mancozeb-induced toxicity in rat hippocampal astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Tsang, M M; Trombetta, L D

    2007-09-01

    Mancozeb, manganese ethylene-bis-dithiocarbamate with zinc salts, is one of the most commonly used fungicides in the United States. Epidemiological and experimental data showed that mancozeb causes detrimental effects on various organ systems including the reproductive, endocrine, immune, and central nervous system. Increasing evidence has shown a strong association between pesticides and neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we examined the neurotoxic potential of mancozeb in rat hippocampal astrocytes. The cytotoxicity of mancozeb was found to be dose dependent and recovery studies showed that cells exposed to mancozeb for 1 h did not recover from mancozeb-induced insult. Atomic absorption data showed a significant accumulation of manganese in astrocytes after 1 h of treatment. This study further investigated whether various chelators and antioxidants could prevent mancozeb-induced cytotoxicity. Our data reported that butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) was the most effective agent in protecting against mancozeb insult. BHT also increased total cellular antioxidants of astrocytes after 1-h mancozeb exposure. In summary, this study reported for the first time that the manganese portion of mancozeb might be, at least in part, responsible for the toxicity. Mancozeb-induced cytotoxicity in astroyctes can be protected by BHT and that this antioxidant increased the total cellular antioxidant capacity. PMID:18669167

  4. Neurite formation by neurons derived from adult rat hippocampal progenitor cells is susceptible to myelin inhibition.

    PubMed

    Mellough, Carla B; Cho, Seongeun; Wood, Andrew; Przyborski, Stefan

    2011-09-01

    Myelin-associated inhibitors expressed following injury to the adult central nervous system (CNS) induce growth cone collapse and retraction of the axonal cytoskeleton. Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) is a bi-functional molecule that promotes neuritogenesis in some immature neurons during development then becomes inhibitory to neurite outgrowth as neurons mature. Progress is being made towards the elucidation of the downstream events that regulate myelin inhibition of regeneration in neuronal populations. However it is not known how adult-derived neural stem cells or progenitors respond to myelin during neuronal differentiation and neuritogenesis. Here we examine the effect of MAG on neurons derived from an adult rat hippocampal progenitor cell line (AHPCs). We show that, unlike their developmental counterparts, AHPC-derived neurons are susceptible to MAG inhibition of neuritogenesis during differentiation and display a 57% reduction in neurite outgrowth when compared with controls. We demonstrate that this effect can be overcome (by up to 69%) by activation of the neurotrophin, cyclic AMP and protein kinase A pathways or by Rho-kinase suppression. We also demonstrate that combination of these factors enhanced neurite outgrowth from differentiating neurons in the presence of MAG. This work provides important information for the successful generation of new neurons from adult neural stem cell populations within compromised adult circuitry and is thus directly relevant to endogenous repair and regeneration of the adult CNS. PMID:21256909

  5. Reorganization of supramammillary-hippocampal pathways in the rat pilocarpine model of temporal lobe epilepsy: evidence for axon terminal sprouting.

    PubMed

    Soussi, Rabia; Boulland, Jean-Luc; Bassot, Emilie; Bras, Hélène; Coulon, Patrice; Chaudhry, Farrukh Abbas; Storm-Mathisen, Jon; Ferhat, Lotfi; Esclapez, Monique

    2015-07-01

    In mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE), spontaneous seizures likely originate from a multi-structural epileptogenic zone, including several regions of the limbic system connected to the hippocampal formation. In this study, we investigate the structural connectivity between the supramammillary nucleus (SuM) and the dentate gyrus (DG) in the model of MTLE induced by pilocarpine in the rat. This hypothalamic nucleus, which provides major extracortical projections to the hippocampal formation, plays a key role in the regulation of several hippocampus-dependent activities, including theta rhythms, memory function and emotional behavior, such as stress and anxiety, functions that are known to be altered in MTLE. Our findings demonstrate a marked reorganization of DG afferents originating from the SuM in pilocarpine-treated rats. This reorganization, which starts during the latent period, is massive when animals become epileptic and continue to evolve during epilepsy. It is characterized by an aberrant distribution and an increased number of axon terminals from neurons of both lateral and medial regions of the SuM, invading the entire inner molecular layer of the DG. This reorganization, which reflects an axon terminal sprouting from SuM neurons, could contribute to trigger spontaneous seizures within an altered hippocampal intrinsic circuitry. PMID:24889162

  6. Detrimental effects of a high fat/high cholesterol diet on memory and hippocampal markers in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Ledreux, Aurélie; Wang, Xiuzhe; Schultzberg, Marianne; Granholm, Ann-Charlotte; Freeman, Linnea R

    2016-10-01

    High fat diets have detrimental effects on cognitive performance, and can increase oxidative stress and inflammation in the brain. The aging brain provides a vulnerable environment to which a high fat diet could cause more damage. We investigated the effects of a high fat/high cholesterol (HFHC) diet on cognitive performance, neuroinflammation markers, and phosphorylated Tau (p-Tau) pathological markers in the hippocampus of Young (4-month old) versus Aged (14-month old) male rats. Young and Aged male Fisher 344 rats were fed a HFHC diet or a normal control diet for 6 months. All animals underwent cognitive testing for 12days in a water radial arm maze to assess spatial and working reference memory. Hippocampal tissue was analyzed by immunohistochemistry for structural changes and inflammation, and Western blot analysis. Young and Aged rats fed the HFHC diet exhibited worse performance on a spatial working memory task. They also exhibited significant reduction of NeuN and calbindin-D28k immunoreactivity as well as an increased activation of microglial cells in the hippocampal formation. Western blot analysis of the hippocampus showed higher levels of p-Tau S202/T205 and T231 in Aged HFHC rats, suggesting abnormal phosphorylation of Tau protein following the HFHC diet exposure. This work demonstrates HFHC diet-induced cognitive impairment with aging and a link between high fat diet consumption and pathological markers of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27343935

  7. All-Trans Retinoic Acid Induces Expression of a Novel Intergenic Long Noncoding RNA in Adult rat Primary Hippocampal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Kour, Sukhleen; Rath, Pramod C

    2016-02-01

    Around 90% of the mammalian genome undergoes pervasive transcription into various types of small and long regulatory noncoding RNAs, whereas only ∼ 1.5% codes for proteins. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) constitute diverse classes of sense- and antisense transcripts that are abundantly expressed in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS) in cell type- and developmental stage-specific manners. They are implicated in brain development, differentiation, neuronal plasticity, and other cognitive functions. Mammalian brain requires the vitamin A metabolite all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) for its normal development, differentiation, and cell-fate determination. However, its role in adult brain function is less understood. Here, we report atRA-mediated transcriptional upregulation of endogenous expression of a novel long intergenic noncoding RNA-rat brain expressed (LINC-RBE) in cultured primary hippocampal neurons from adult rat. We have previously reported LINC-RBE as an intergenic, simple repeat sequence containing lncRNA highly expressed in the rat brain. This is a first-time report of involvement of atRA in transcriptional upregulation of lncRNA expression in rat hippocampal neurons. Therefore, it may be involved in regulation of brain function and disease. PMID:26572536

  8. Effects of long-term malnutrition and rehabilitation on the hippocampal formation of the adult rat. A morphometric study.

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, J P; Madeira, M D; Paula-Barbosa, M M

    1995-01-01

    We have previously shown that the numerical density of dentate granule and CA3 pyramidal cells of adult rats is reduced after lengthy periods of low-protein diet. In this study, the total number of these neurons was estimated, together with those for the hilar and CA1 pyramidal cells in order to obtain a complete and unbiased insight into the effects of malnutrition and rehabilitation from malnutrition on the structure of the hippocampal formation. Groups of 2-month-old rats were fed a low protein diet (8% casein) for 6, 12 and 18 months and compared with age-matched control and recovery rats. The recovery group was fed a low protein diet for 6 months and then switched to normal diet during the same period. Total numbers of neurons of each hippocampal region were calculated from their numerical density, estimated with the physical disector, and from the volume of the respective cell layers, after correction for the tissue shrinkage factor. The total number of granule, hilar, CA1 and CA3 pyramidal cells was reduced in all groups of malnourished rats including the recovery group. No differences were found between malnourished and recovery groups. These findings indicate that a prolonged low protein diet, started in adult life, leads to a deficit in neuronal numbers in the hippocampal formation, and that it may also disrupt the normal process of cell acquisition in the dentate gyrus. Moreover, our data support the view that the morphological alterations induced by a low protein intake are irreversible. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7592001

  9. Treadmill exercise alleviates prenatal noise stress-induced impairment of spatial learning ability through enhancing hippocampal neurogenesis in rat pups

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Woon; Shin, Mal-Soon; Park, Joon-Ki; Shin, Mi-Ai; Lee, Hee-Hyuk; Lee, Sam-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Stress alters brain cell properties and then disturbs cognitive processes, such as learning and memory. In this study, we investigated the effect of postnatal treadmill exercise on hippocampal neurogenesis and spatial learning ability of rat pups following prenatal noise stress. The impact of exercise intensity (mild-intensity exercise vs heavy-intensity exercise) was also compared. The pregnant rats in the stress-applied group were exposed to a 95 dB supersonic machine sound for 1 h once a day from the 15th day after mating until delivery. After birth, the rat pups in the exercise groups were made to run on a treadmill for 30 min once a day for 7 consecutive days, starting 4 weeks after birth. The spatial learning ability was tested using radial-arm maze task and hippocampal neurogenesis was determined by 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) immunohistochemistry. The rat pups born from the stress-applied maternal rats spent more time for the seeking of water and showed higher number of error in the radial-arm maze task compared to the control group. These rat pups showed suppressed neurogenesis in the hippocampus. In contrast, the rat pups performed postnatal treadmill exercise saved time for seeking of water and showed lower number of error compared to the stress-applied group. Postnatal treadmill exercise also enhanced neurogenesis in the hippocampus. The mild-intensity exercise showed more potent impact compared to the heavy-intensity exercise. The present results reveal that postnatal treadmill exercise lessens prenatal stress-induced deterioration of brain function in offspring. PMID:24282804

  10. Effects of genistein on cognitive dysfunction and hippocampal synaptic plasticity impairment in an ovariectomized rat kainic acid model of seizure.

    PubMed

    Khodamoradi, Mehdi; Asadi-Shekaari, Majid; Esmaeili-Mahani, Saeed; Esmaeilpour, Khadije; Sheibani, Vahid

    2016-09-01

    The major objective of this study was to investigate the probable effects of genistein (one of the most important soy phytoestrogens-SPEs) on seizure-induced cognitive dysfunction, hippocampal early long-term potentiation (E-LTP) impairment and morphological damage to CA1 neurons in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Three weeks after ovariectomy, cannulae were implanted over the left lateral ventricle. After a 7-day recovery period, animals were injected by genistein (0.5 or 5mg/kg) or vehicle during four consecutive days, each 24h. One h after the last treatment, kainic acid (KA) or vehicle was perfused into the left lateral ventricle to induce generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Finally, 7 days later, spatial learning and memory of animals were examined using the Morris water maze (MWM) task, hippocampal E-LTP was assessed using in-vivo field potential recordings and the morphology of hippocampal CA1 area was examined using Fluoro-Jade C staining. KA-induced generalized seizures resulted in spatial learning and memory impairment, E-LTP deficit and CA1 cell injury. Seizure-induced abnormalities improved partially only by the lower dose of genistein (0.5mg/kg). However, genistein at the higher dose (5mg/kg) did not have any beneficial effects. Also, genistein did not affect seizure activity. It is concluded that genistein may have partially preventive effects against seizure-induced cognitive impairment in OVX rats. Also, it seems that such effects of genistein are correlated with its beneficial effects on hippocampal synaptic plasticity and morphology. PMID:27235295

  11. The Effects of a High-Energy Diet on Hippocampal Function and Blood-Brain Barrier Integrity in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Kanoski, Scott E.; Zhang, Yanshu; Zheng, Wei; Davidson, Terry L.

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s Disease are linked with intake of a Western Diet, characterized by high levels of saturated fats and simple carbohydrates. In rats, these dietary components have been shown to disrupt hippocampal-dependent learning and memory processes, particularly those involving spatial memory. Using a rat model, the present research assessed the degree to which consumption of a high-energy (HE) diet, similar to those found in modern Western cultures, produces a selective impairment in hippocampal function as opposed to a more global cognitive disruption. Learning and memory performance was examined following 90-days consumption of an HE-diet in three nonspatial discrimination learning problems that differed with respect to their dependence on the integrity of the hippocampus. The results showed that consumption of the HE-diet impaired performance in a hippocampal-dependent feature negative discrimination problem relative to chow-fed controls, whereas performance was spared on two discrimination problems that do not rely on the hippocampus. To explore the mechanism whereby consuming HE-diets impairs cognitive function, we investigated the effect of HE-diets on the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). We found that HE-diet consumption produced a decrease in mRNA expression of tight junction proteins, particularly Claudin-5 and -12, in the choroid plexus and the BBB. Consequently, an increased blood-to-brain permeability of sodium fluorescein was observed in the hippocampus, but not in the striatum and prefrontal cortex following HE-diet access. There results indicate that hippocampal function may be particularly vulnerable to disruption by HE-diets, and this disruption may be related to impaired BBB integrity. PMID:20413889

  12. NAAG reduces NMDA receptor current in CA1 hippocampal pyramidal neurons of acute slices and dissociated neurons.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Richard; Coyle, Joseph T; Tsai, Guochan; Greene, Robert W

    2005-01-01

    N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) is an abundant neuropeptide in the nervous system, yet its functions are not well understood. Pyramidal neurons of the CA1 sector of acutely prepared hippocampal slices were recorded using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. At low concentrations (20 microM), NAAG reduced isolated N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-mediated synaptic currents or NMDA-induced currents. The NAAG-induced change in the NMDA concentration/response curve suggested that the antagonism was not competitive. However, the NAAG-induced change in the concentration/response curve for the NMDAR co-agonist, glycine, indicated that glycine can overcome the NAAG antagonism. The antagonism of the NMDAR induced by NAAG was still observed in the presence of LY-341495, a potent and selective mGluR3 antagonist. Moreover, in dissociated pyramidal neurons of the CA1 region, NAAG also reduced the NMDA current and this effect was reversed by glycine. These results suggest that NAAG reduces the NMDA currents in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. PMID:15354184

  13. Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA and NMDA receptor channels in basket cells of rat hippocampal dentate gyrus.

    PubMed Central

    Koh, D S; Geiger, J R; Jonas, P; Sakmann, B

    1995-01-01

    1. Glutamate receptor (GluR) channels were studied in basket cells in the dentate gyrus of rat hippocampal slices. Basket cells were identified by their location, dendritic morphology and high frequency of action potentials generated during sustained current injection. 2. Dual-component currents were activated by fast application of glutamate to outside-out membrane patches isolated from basket cell somata (10 microM glycine, no external Mg2+). The fast component was selectively blocked by 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), the slow component by D-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (D-AP5). This suggests that the two components were mediated by alpha-amino-3- hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate receptor (AMPAR)/kainate receptor and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) channels, respectively. The mean ratio of the peak current of the NMDAR component to that of the AMPAR/kainate receptor component was 0.22 (1 ms pulses of 10 mM glutamate). 3. The AMPAR/kainate receptor component, which was studied in isolation in the presence of D-AP5, was identified as AMPAR mediated on the basis of the preferential activation by AMPA as compared with kainate, the weak desensitization of kainate-activated currents, the cross-desensitization between AMPA and kainate, and the reduction of desensitization by cyclothiazide. 4. Deactivation of basket cell AMPARs following 1 ms pulses of glutamate occurred with a time constant (tau) of 1.2 +/- 0.1 ms (mean +/- S.E.M.). During 100 ms glutamate pulses AMPARs desensitized with a tau of 3.7 +/- 0.2ms. 5. The peak current-voltage (I-V) relation of AMPAR-mediated currents in Na(+)-rich extracellular solution showed a reversal potential of -4.0 +/- 2.6 mV and was characterized by a a doubly rectifying shape. The conductance of single AMPAR channels was estimated as 22.6 +/- 1.6 pS using non-stationary fluctuation analysis. AMPARs expressed in hippocampal basket cells were highly Ca2+ permeable (PCa/PK = 1.79). 6. NMDARs in

  14. Long-Term Estrogen Receptor Beta Agonist Treatment Modifies the Hippocampal Transcriptome in Middle-Aged Ovariectomized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sárvári, Miklós; Kalló, Imre; Hrabovszky, Erik; Solymosi, Norbert; Rodolosse, Annie; Liposits, Zsolt

    2016-01-01

    Estradiol (E2) robustly activates transcription of a broad array of genes in the hippocampal formation of middle-aged ovariectomized rats via estrogen receptors (ERα, ERβ, and G protein-coupled ER). Selective ERβ agonists also influence hippocampal functions, although their downstream molecular targets and mechanisms are not known. In this study, we explored the effects of long-term treatment with ERβ agonist diarylpropionitrile (DPN, 0.05 mg/kg/day, sc.) on the hippocampal transcriptome in ovariectomized, middle-aged (13 month) rats. Isolated hippocampal formations were analyzed by Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarray and quantitative real-time PCR. Four hundred ninety-seven genes fulfilled the absolute fold change higher than 2 (FC > 2) selection criterion. Among them 370 genes were activated. Pathway analysis identified terms including glutamatergic and cholinergic synapse, RNA transport, endocytosis, thyroid hormone signaling, RNA degradation, retrograde endocannabinoid signaling, and mRNA surveillance. PCR studies showed transcriptional regulation of 58 genes encoding growth factors (Igf2, Igfb2, Igf1r, Fgf1, Mdk, Ntf3, Bdnf), transcription factors (Otx2, Msx1), potassium channels (Kcne2), neuropeptides (Cck, Pdyn), peptide receptors (Crhr2, Oprm1, Gnrhr, Galr2, Sstr1, Sstr3), neurotransmitter receptors (Htr1a, Htr2c, Htr2a, Gria2, Gria3, Grm5, Gabra1, Chrm5, Adrb1), and vesicular neurotransmitter transporters (Slc32a1, Slc17a7). Protein-protein interaction analysis revealed networking of clusters associated with the regulation of growth/troph factor signaling, transcription, translation, neurotransmitter and neurohormone signaling mechanisms and potassium channels. Collectively, the results reveal the contribution of ERβ-mediated processes to the regulation of transcription, translation, neurogenesis, neuromodulation, and neuroprotection in the hippocampal formation of ovariectomized, middle-aged rats and elucidate regulatory channels responsible for

  15. Long-Term Estrogen Receptor Beta Agonist Treatment Modifies the Hippocampal Transcriptome in Middle-Aged Ovariectomized Rats.

    PubMed

    Sárvári, Miklós; Kalló, Imre; Hrabovszky, Erik; Solymosi, Norbert; Rodolosse, Annie; Liposits, Zsolt

    2016-01-01

    Estradiol (E2) robustly activates transcription of a broad array of genes in the hippocampal formation of middle-aged ovariectomized rats via estrogen receptors (ERα, ERβ, and G protein-coupled ER). Selective ERβ agonists also influence hippocampal functions, although their downstream molecular targets and mechanisms are not known. In this study, we explored the effects of long-term treatment with ERβ agonist diarylpropionitrile (DPN, 0.05 mg/kg/day, sc.) on the hippocampal transcriptome in ovariectomized, middle-aged (13 month) rats. Isolated hippocampal formations were analyzed by Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarray and quantitative real-time PCR. Four hundred ninety-seven genes fulfilled the absolute fold change higher than 2 (FC > 2) selection criterion. Among them 370 genes were activated. Pathway analysis identified terms including glutamatergic and cholinergic synapse, RNA transport, endocytosis, thyroid hormone signaling, RNA degradation, retrograde endocannabinoid signaling, and mRNA surveillance. PCR studies showed transcriptional regulation of 58 genes encoding growth factors (Igf2, Igfb2, Igf1r, Fgf1, Mdk, Ntf3, Bdnf), transcription factors (Otx2, Msx1), potassium channels (Kcne2), neuropeptides (Cck, Pdyn), peptide receptors (Crhr2, Oprm1, Gnrhr, Galr2, Sstr1, Sstr3), neurotransmitter receptors (Htr1a, Htr2c, Htr2a, Gria2, Gria3, Grm5, Gabra1, Chrm5, Adrb1), and vesicular neurotransmitter transporters (Slc32a1, Slc17a7). Protein-protein interaction analysis revealed networking of clusters associated with the regulation of growth/troph factor signaling, transcription, translation, neurotransmitter and neurohormone signaling mechanisms and potassium channels. Collectively, the results reveal the contribution of ERβ-mediated processes to the regulation of transcription, translation, neurogenesis, neuromodulation, and neuroprotection in the hippocampal formation of ovariectomized, middle-aged rats and elucidate regulatory channels responsible for

  16. Hippocampal gene expression in a rat model of depression after electroacupuncture at the Baihui and Yintang acupoints

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Dongmei; Yang, Xiuyan; Ya, Tu; Chen, Liping

    2014-01-01

    Preliminary basic research and clinical findings have demonstrated that electroacupuncture therapy exhibits positive effects in ameliorating depression. However, most studies of the underlying mechanism are at the single gene level; there are few reports regarding the mechanism at the whole-genome level. Using a rat genomic gene-chip, we profiled hippocampal gene expression changes in rats after electroacupuncture therapy. Electroacupuncture therapy alleviated depression-related manifestations in the model rats. Using gene-chip analysis, we demonstrated that electroacupuncture at Baihui (DU20) and Yintang (EX-HN3) regulates the expression of 21 genes. Real-time PCR showed that the genes Vgf, Igf2, Tmp32, Loc500373, Hif1a, Folr1, Nmb, and Rtn were upregulated or downregulated in depression and that their expression tended to normalize after electroacupuncture therapy. These results indicate that electroacupuncture at Baihui and Yintang modulates depression by regulating the expression of particular genes. PMID:25206746

  17. Acute oral administration of low doses of methylphenidate targets calretinin neurons in the rat septal area

    PubMed Central

    García-Avilés, Álvaro; Albert-Gascó, Héctor; Arnal-Vicente, Isabel; Elhajj, Ebtisam; Sanjuan-Arias, Julio; Sanchez-Perez, Ana María; Olucha-Bordonau, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Methylphenidate (MPD) is a commonly administered drug to treat children suffering from attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Alterations in septal driven hippocampal theta rhythm may underlie attention deficits observed in these patients. Amongst others, the septo-hippocampal connections have long been acknowledged to be important in preserving hippocampal function. Thus, we wanted to ascertain if MPD administration, which improves attention in patients, could affect septal areas connecting with hippocampus. We used low and orally administered MPD doses (1.3, 2.7 and 5 mg/Kg) to rats what mimics the dosage range in humans. In our model, we observed no effect when using 1.3 mg/Kg MPD; whereas 2.7 and 5 mg/Kg induced a significant increase in c-fos expression specifically in the medial septum (MS), an area intimately connected to the hippocampus. We analyzed dopaminergic areas such as nucleus accumbens and striatum, and found that only 5 mg/Kg induced c-fos levels increase. In these areas tyrosine hydroxylase correlated well with c-fos staining, whereas in the MS the sparse tyrosine hydroxylase fibers did not overlap with c-fos positive neurons. Double immunofluorescence of c-fos with neuronal markers in the septal area revealed that co-localization with choline acethyl transferase, parvalbumin, and calbindin with c-fos did not change with MPD treatment; whereas, calretinin and c-fos double labeled neurons increased after MPD administration. Altogether, these results suggest that low and acute doses of methylphenidate primary target specific populations of caltretinin medial septal neurons. PMID:25852493

  18. Subregional Expression of Hippocampal Glutamatergic and GABAergic Genes in F344 Rats with Social Isolation after Weaning

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Hisaya; Yamamuro, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have shown that postweaning social isolation (pwSI) alters various behavioral phenotypes, including hippocampus-dependent tasks. Here, we report the comprehensive analysis of the expression of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission-related genes in the distinct hippocampal subregions of pwSI rats. Male F344 rats (age, 4 wk) experienced either pwSI or group housing (controls). At 7 wk of age, the hippocampus of each rat was removed and laser-microdissected into the CA1 and CA3 layers of pyramidal cells and the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus. Subsequently, the expression of glutamatergic- and GABAergic-related genes was analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR. In the CA1 and CA3 pyramidal cell layers, 18 of 24 glutamate receptor subunit genes were at least 1.5-fold increased in expression after pwSI. In particular, the expression of several N-methyl-D-aspartate and kainate receptors (for example, Grin2a in CA1, Grik4 in CA3) was significantly increased after pwSI. In contrast, pwSI tended to decrease the expression of GABAA receptor subunit genes, and Gabra1, Gabra2, Gabra4, Gabra5, Gabrb2, Gabrg1, and Gabrg2 were all significantly decreased in expression compared with the levels in the group-housed rats. These results indicate a subregion-specific increase of glutamate receptors and reduction of GABAA receptors, suggesting that the hippocampal circuits of pwSI rats may be in more excitable states than those of group-housed rats. PMID:26884404

  19. Erythropoietin Ameliorates Neonatal Hypoxia-Ischemia-Induced Neurobehavioral Deficits, Neuroinflammation, and Hippocampal Injury in the Juvenile Rat

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Kuo-Mao; Tien, Lu-Tai; Cai, Zhengwei; Lin, Shuying; Pang, Yi; Tanaka, Sachiko; Rhodes, Philip G.; Bhatt, Abhay J.; Savich, Renate D.; Fan, Lir-Wan

    2016-01-01

    The hematopoietic growth factor erythropoietin (EPO) has been shown to be neuroprotective against hypoxia-ischemia (HI) in Postnatal Day 7 (P7)–P10 or adult animal models. The current study was aimed to determine whether EPO also provides long-lasting neuroprotection against HI in P5 rats, which is relevant to immature human infants. Sprague-Dawley rats at P5 were subjected to right common carotid artery ligation followed by an exposure to 6% oxygen with balanced nitrogen for 1.5 h. Human recombinant EPO (rEPO, at a dose of 5 units/g) was administered intraperitoneally one hour before or immediately after insult, followed by additional injections at 24 and 48 h post-insult. The control rats were injected with normal saline following HI. Neurobehavioral tests were performed on P8 and P20, and brain injury was examined on P21. HI insult significantly impaired neurobehavioral performance including sensorimotor, locomotor activity and cognitive ability on the P8 and P20 rats. HI insult also resulted in brain inflammation (as indicated by microglia activation) and neuronal death (as indicated by Jade B positive staining) in the white matter, striatum, cortex, and hippocampal areas of the P21 rat. Both pre- and post-treatment with rEPO significantly improved neurobehavioral performance and protected against the HI-induced neuronal death, microglia activation (OX42+) as well as loss of mature oligodendrocytes (APC-CC1+) and hippocampal neurons (Nissl+). The long-lasting protective effects of rEPO in the neonatal rat HI model suggest that to exert neurotrophic activity in the brain might be an effective approach for therapeutic treatment of neonatal brain injury induced by hypoxia-ischemia. PMID:26927081

  20. A mixed polyunsaturated fatty acid diet normalizes hippocampal neurogenesis and reduces anxiety in serotonin transporter knockout rats.

    PubMed

    Schipper, Pieter; Kiliaan, Amanda J; Homberg, Judith R

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a mixed dietary intervention on behavioral symptoms in serotonin transporter knockout (5-HTT⁻/⁻) rats modeling the human 5-HTT length polymorphic region short-allele. Twenty female 5-HTT⁻/⁻ and 19 wild-type (5-HTT⁺/⁺) rats were fed for 3 months on a mixed polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) diet comprising n-3 PUFAs, B vitamins and phospholipids, or an isocaloric control diet, and a subgroup was subsequently tested in an array of anxiety-related behavioral tests. All brains were harvested and immunostained for doublecortin, a neurogenesis marker. In addition, hippocampal volume was measured. 5-HTT⁻/⁻ rats on the control diet displayed increased anxiety-related behavioral responses, and impaired fear extinction. These effects were completely offset by the mixed PUFA diet, whereas this diet had no behavioral effect in 5-HTT⁺/⁺ rats. In parallel, dentate gyrus doublecortin immunoreactivity was increased in 5-HTT⁻/⁻ rats fed on the control diet, which was reversed by the mixed PUFA diet. Hippocampal volume was unaffected by the mixed PUFA diet in 5-HTT⁻/⁻ subjects, whereas it increased in 5-HTT⁺/⁺ rats. We conclude that a mixed n-3 PUFA diet ameliorates anxiety-related symptoms in a genotype-dependent manner, potentially by normalizing neurogenesis. We suggest that such a mixed diet may serve as an attractive adjuvant to treat anxiety in 5-HTT length polymorphic region short-allele carriers. PMID:21606840

  1. Erythropoietin Ameliorates Neonatal Hypoxia-Ischemia-Induced Neurobehavioral Deficits, Neuroinflammation, and Hippocampal Injury in the Juvenile Rat.

    PubMed

    Lan, Kuo-Mao; Tien, Lu-Tai; Cai, Zhengwei; Lin, Shuying; Pang, Yi; Tanaka, Sachiko; Rhodes, Philip G; Bhatt, Abhay J; Savich, Renate D; Fan, Lir-Wan

    2016-01-01

    The hematopoietic growth factor erythropoietin (EPO) has been shown to be neuroprotective against hypoxia-ischemia (HI) in Postnatal Day 7 (P7)-P10 or adult animal models. The current study was aimed to determine whether EPO also provides long-lasting neuroprotection against HI in P5 rats, which is relevant to immature human infants. Sprague-Dawley rats at P5 were subjected to right common carotid artery ligation followed by an exposure to 6% oxygen with balanced nitrogen for 1.5 h. Human recombinant EPO (rEPO, at a dose of 5 units/g) was administered intraperitoneally one hour before or immediately after insult, followed by additional injections at 24 and 48 h post-insult. The control rats were injected with normal saline following HI. Neurobehavioral tests were performed on P8 and P20, and brain injury was examined on P21. HI insult significantly impaired neurobehavioral performance including sensorimotor, locomotor activity and cognitive ability on the P8 and P20 rats. HI insult also resulted in brain inflammation (as indicated by microglia activation) and neuronal death (as indicated by Jade B positive staining) in the white matter, striatum, cortex, and hippocampal areas of the P21 rat. Both pre- and post-treatment with rEPO significantly improved neurobehavioral performance and protected against the HI-induced neuronal death, microglia activation (OX42+) as well as loss of mature oligodendrocytes (APC-CC1+) and hippocampal neurons (Nissl+). The long-lasting protective effects of rEPO in the neonatal rat HI model suggest that to exert neurotrophic activity in the brain might be an effective approach for therapeutic treatment of neonatal brain injury induced by hypoxia-ischemia. PMID:26927081

  2. Subregional Expression of Hippocampal Glutamatergic and GABAergic Genes in F344 Rats with Social Isolation after Weaning.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Hisaya; Yamamuro, Yutaka

    2016-02-01

    Many studies have shown that postweaning social isolation (pwSI) alters various behavioral phenotypes, including hippocampusdependent tasks. Here, we report the comprehensive analysis of the expression of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmissionrelated genes in the distinct hippocampal subregions of pwSI rats. Male F344 rats (age, 4 wk) experienced either pwSI or group housing (controls). At 7 wk of age, the hippocampus of each rat was removed and laser-microdissected into the CA1 and CA3 layers of pyramidal cells and the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus. Subsequently, the expression of glutamatergic- and GABAergic- related genes was analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR. In the CA1 and CA3 pyramidal cell layers, 18 of 24 glutamate receptor subunit genes were at least 1.5-fold increased in expression after pwSI. In particular, the expression of several N-methyl-D-aspartate and kainate receptors (for example, Grin2a in CA1, Grik4 in CA3) was significantly increased after pwSI. In contrast, pwSI tended to decrease the expression of GABAA receptor subunit genes, and Gabra1, Gabra2, Gabra4, Gabra5, Gabrb2, Gabrg1, and Gabrg2 were all significantly decreased in expression compared with the levels in the group-housed rats. These results indicate a subregion- specific increase of glutamate receptors and reduction of GABAA receptors, suggesting that the hippocampal circuits of pwSI rats may be in more excitable states than those of group-housed rats. PMID:26884404

  3. Impaired mitochondrial respiration and protein nitration in the rat hippocampus after acute inhalation of combustion smoke.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heung M; Reed, Jason; Greeley, George H; Englander, Ella W

    2009-03-01

    Survivors of massive inhalation of combustion smoke endure critical injuries, including lasting neurological complications. We have previously reported that acute inhalation of combustion smoke disrupts the nitric oxide homeostasis in the rat brain. In this study, we extend our findings and report that a 30-minute exposure of awake rats to ambient wood combustion smoke induces protein nitration in the rat hippocampus and that mitochondrial proteins are a sensitive nitration target in this setting. Mitochondria are central to energy metabolism and cellular signaling and are critical to proper cell function. Here, analyses of the mitochondrial proteome showed elevated protein nitration in the course of a 24-hour recovery following exposure to smoke. Mass spectrometry identification of several significantly nitrated mitochondrial proteins revealed diverse functions and involvement in central aspects of mitochondrial physiology. The nitrated proteins include the ubiquitous mitochondrial creatine kinase, F1-ATP synthase alpha subunit, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3), succinate dehydrogenase Fp subunit, and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC1) protein. Furthermore, acute exposure to combustion smoke significantly compromised the respiratory capacity of hippocampal mitochondria. Importantly, elevated protein nitration and reduced mitochondrial respiration in the hippocampus persisted beyond the time required for restoration of normal oxygen and carboxyhemoglobin blood levels after the cessation of exposure to smoke. Thus, the time frame for intensification of the various smoke-induced effects differs between blood and brain tissues. Taken together, our findings suggest that nitration of essential mitochondrial proteins may contribute to the reduction in mitochondrial respiratory capacity and underlie, in part, the brain pathophysiology after acute inhalation of combustion smoke. PMID:19133281

  4. Impaired mitochondrial respiration and protein nitration in the rat hippocampus after acute inhalation of combustion smoke

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Heung M.; Reed, Jason; Greeley, George H.; Englander, Ella W.

    2009-03-01

    Survivors of massive inhalation of combustion smoke endure critical injuries, including lasting neurological complications. We have previously reported that acute inhalation of combustion smoke disrupts the nitric oxide homeostasis in the rat brain. In this study, we extend our findings and report that a 30-minute exposure of awake rats to ambient wood combustion smoke induces protein nitration in the rat hippocampus and that mitochondrial proteins are a sensitive nitration target in this setting. Mitochondria are central to energy metabolism and cellular signaling and are critical to proper cell function. Here, analyses of the mitochondrial proteome showed elevated protein nitration in the course of a 24-hour recovery following exposure to smoke. Mass spectrometry identification of several significantly nitrated mitochondrial proteins revealed diverse functions and involvement in central aspects of mitochondrial physiology. The nitrated proteins include the ubiquitous mitochondrial creatine kinase, F1-ATP synthase {alpha} subunit, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3), succinate dehydrogenase Fp subunit, and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC1) protein. Furthermore, acute exposure to combustion smoke significantly compromised the respiratory capacity of hippocampal mitochondria. Importantly, elevated protein nitration and reduced mitochondrial respiration in the hippocampus persisted beyond the time required for restoration of normal oxygen and carboxyhemoglobin blood levels after the cessation of exposure to smoke. Thus, the time frame for intensification of the various smoke-induced effects differs between blood and brain tissues. Taken together, our findings suggest that nitration of essential mitochondrial proteins may contribute to the reduction in mitochondrial respiratory capacity and underlie, in part, the brain pathophysiology after acute inhalation of combustion smoke.

  5. Alterations in spatial memory and anxiety in the MAM E17 rat model of hippocampal pathology in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Gastambide, Francois; Taylor, Amy M; Palmer, Clare; Svard, Heta; Karjalainen, Maija; Janhunen, Sanna K; Tricklebank, Mark; Bannerman, David M

    2016-01-01

    Adult rats exposed to methylazoxymethanol acetate (MAM) at embryonic day 17 (E17) display robust pathological alterations in the hippocampus. However, discrepancies exist in the literature regarding the behavioural effects of this pre-natal manipulation. Therefore, a systematic assessment of MAM E17-induced behavioural alterations was conducted using a battery of dorsal and ventral hippocampus-dependent tests. Compared to saline controls, MAM E17-treated rats displayed deficits in spatial reference memory in both the aversive hidden platform watermaze task and an appetitive Y-maze task. Deficits in the spatial reference memory watermaze task were replicated across three different cohorts and two laboratories. In contrast, there was little, or no, effect on the non-spatial, visible platform watermaze task or an appetitive, non-spatial, visual discrimination task, respectively. MAM rats were also impaired in the spatial novelty preference task which assesses short-term memory, and displayed reduced anxiety levels in the elevated plus maze task. Thus, MAM E17 administration resulted in abnormal spatial information processing and reduced anxiety in a number of hippocampus-dependent behavioural tests, paralleling the effects of dorsal and ventral hippocampal lesions respectively. These findings corroborate recent pathological and physiological studies, further highlighting the usefulness of MAM E17 as a model of hippocampal dysfunction in at least some aspects of schizophrenia. PMID:25633092

  6. Alterations in spatial memory and anxiety in the MAM E17 rat model of hippocampal pathology in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Gastambide, Francois; Taylor, Amy M; Palmer, Clare; Svard, Heta; Karjalainen, Maija; Janhunen, Sanna K; Tricklebank, Mark; Bannerman, David M

    2015-11-01

    Adult rats exposed to methylazoxymethanol acetate (MAM) at embryonic day 17 (E17) display robust pathological alterations in the hippocampus. However, discrepancies exist in the literature regarding the behavioural effects of this pre-natal manipulation. Therefore, a systematic assessment of MAM E17-induced behavioural alterations was conducted using a battery of dorsal and ventral hippocampus-dependent tests. Compared to saline controls, MAM E17-treated rats displayed deficits in spatial reference memory in both the aversive hidden platform watermaze task and an appetitive Y-maze task. Deficits in the spatial reference memory watermaze task were replicated across three different cohorts and two laboratories. In contrast, there was little, or no, effect on the non-spatial, visible platform watermaze task or an appetitive, non-spatial, visual discrimination task, respectively. MAM rats were also impaired in the spatial novelty preference task which assesses short-term memory, and displayed reduced anxiety levels in the elevated plus maze task. Thus, MAM E17 administration resulted in abnormal spatial information processing and reduced anxiety in a number of hippocampus-dependent behavioural tests, paralleling the effects of dorsal and ventral hippocampal lesions, respectively. These findings corroborate recent pathological and physiological studies, further highlighting the usefulness of MAM E17 as a model of hippocampal dysfunction in at least some aspects of schizophrenia. PMID:25633092

  7. Neuropathological and Reelin Deficiencies in the Hippocampal Formation of Rats Exposed to MAM; Differences and Similarities with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Frieling, Helge; Kebir, Oussama; Le Pen, Gwenaëlle; Beuvon, Frédéric; Daumas-Duport, Catherine; Jay, Thérèse M.; Krebs, Marie-Odile

    2010-01-01

    Background Adult rats exposed to methylazoxymethanol (MAM) at embryonic day 17 (E17) consistently display behavioral characteristics similar to that observed in patients with schizophrenia and replicate neuropathological findings from the prefrontal cortex of psychotic individuals. However, a systematic neuropathological analysis of the hippocampal formation and the thalamus in these rats is lacking. It is also unclear if reelin, a protein consistently associated with schizophrenia and potentially involved in the mechanism of action of MAM, participates in the neuropathological effects of this compound. Therefore, a thorough assessment including cytoarchitectural and neuromorphometric measurements of eleven brain regions was conducted. Numbers of reelin positive cells and reelin expression and methylation levels were also studied. Principal Findings Compared to untreated rats, MAM-exposed animals showed a reduction in the volume of entorhinal cortex, hippocampus and mediodorsal thalamus associated with decreased neuronal soma. The entorhinal cortex also showed laminar disorganization and neuronal clusters. Reelin methylation in the hippocampus was decreased whereas reelin positive neurons and reelin expression were unchanged. Conclusions Our results indicate that E17-MAM exposure reproduces findings from the hippocampal formation and the mediodorsal thalamus of patients with schizophrenia while providing little support for reelin's involvement. Moreover, these results strongly suggest MAM-treated animals have a diminished neuropil, which likely arises from abnormal neurite formation; this supports a recently proposed pathophysiological hypothesis for schizophrenia. PMID:20421980

  8. Enhancement of Hippocampal CA3 Neuronal Dendritic Arborization by Glycyrrhiza glabra root extract Treatment in Wistar Albino Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarthi, Kosuri Kalyan; Avadhani, Ramakrishna

    2014-01-01

    Background: In the traditional system of medicine, the roots and rhizomes of Glycyrrhiza glabra (Gg) (family: Leguminosae) have been in clinical use for centuries. Aim: In the present study, we investigated the role of aqueous extract of root of Gg treatment on the dendritic morphology of hippocampal Cornu Ammonis area three (CA3) neurons, one of the regions concerned with learning and memory, in 1- month- old male Wistar albino rats. Materials and Methods: The aqueous extract of root of Gg was administered orally in four doses (75, 150, 225 and 300 mg/kg) for 4 weeks. After the treatment period, all experimental animals were subjected to spatial learning (Morris water maze, Hebb-William's maze and elevated plus maze) tests. At the end of the spatial memory tests, the rats were deeply anesthetized with Pentobarbitone and killed their brains were removed rapidly and fixed in rapid Golgi fixative. Hippocampal CA3 neurons were traced using camera lucida, and dendritic arborization and intersections were quantified. These data were compared to those of age-matched control rats. Results: The aqueous root extract of Gg in the dose of 150 and 225 mg/kg/p.o showed a significant (P < 0.01) enhancement of dendritic arborization (dendritic branching points) and dendritic intersections along the length of both apical and basal dendrites in hippocampal (CA3) pyramidal neurons is comparable to control. Conclusion: Based on our results obtained, we conclude that constituents present in aqueous root extract of Gg have neuronal dendritic growth stimulating properties. PMID:24678192

  9. Interstitial space, electrical resistance and ion concentrations during hypotonia of rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed Central

    Chebabo, S R; Hester, M A; Jing, J; Aitken, P G; Somjen, G G

    1995-01-01

    1. The degree to which mammalian brain cells swell in hypotonic environments has not previously been determined. We exposed hippocampal tissue slices prepared from anaesthetized rats to artificial cerebrospinal fluid from which varying amounts of NaCl had been deleted. Interstitial volume (ISV) change was determined from the volume of dilution of the marker ions tetramethylammonium (TMA+) or tetraethylammonium (TEA+). Tissue electrical resistance was measured as the voltage generated by constant current pulses. 2. ISV decreased as a function of lowered extracellular osmolality (osmotic pressure, pi o), indicating cell swelling. After reaching a minimum, ISV recovered partially, suggesting regulatory volume decrease of cells. After restoring normal pi o the ISV expanded, indicating post-hypotonic cell shrinkage. The electrical resistance of the tissue (Ro) increased when pi o was lowered, due to the reduced ionic strength, as well as restricted ISV. 3. To control for low NaCl concentration, reduced NaCl was replaced by mannitol or fructose. In isosmotic, NaCl-deficient solution, ISV showed inconsistent change, and Ro corrected for ionic strength tended to decrease. 4. Extracellular K+ concentration decreased slightly in low pi o except when spreading depression caused it to increase. Extracellular Ca2+ concentration decreased substantially, consistently and reversibly. Administration of isosmotic low-NaCl concentration solutions caused a similar decrease in extracellular Ca2+ concentrations. We propose that low Na+ concentration in extracellular fluid impaired the extrusion of Ca2+. 5. In severely hypotonic solution, ISV was reduced to 25% of its control volume, corresponding to a mean cell volume increase of at least 11%, probably more. From plotting relative changes in ISV against osmolarity we concluded that, within the range tested, hypotonic cell swelling was not opposed by the close approach of plasma membranes of neighbouring cells. PMID:8544131

  10. Active dendrites regulate the impact of gliotransmission on rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Ashhad, Sufyan; Narayanan, Rishikesh

    2016-06-01

    An important consequence of gliotransmission, a signaling mechanism that involves glial release of active transmitter molecules, is its manifestation as N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent slow inward currents in neurons. However, the intraneuronal spatial dynamics of these events or the role of active dendrites in regulating their amplitude and spatial spread have remained unexplored. Here, we used somatic and/or dendritic recordings from rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons and demonstrate that a majority of NMDAR-dependent spontaneous slow excitatory potentials (SEP) originate at dendritic locations and are significantly attenuated through their propagation across the neuronal arbor. We substantiated the astrocytic origin of SEPs through paired neuron-astrocyte recordings, where we found that specific infusion of inositol trisphosphate (InsP3) into either distal or proximal astrocytes enhanced the amplitude and frequency of neuronal SEPs. Importantly, SEPs recorded after InsP3 infusion into distal astrocytes exhibited significantly slower kinetics compared with those recorded after proximal infusion. Furthermore, using neuron-specific infusion of pharmacological agents and morphologically realistic conductance-based computational models, we demonstrate that dendritically expressed hyperpolarization-activated cyclic-nucleotide-gated (HCN) and transient potassium channels play critical roles in regulating the strength, kinetics, and compartmentalization of neuronal SEPs. Finally, through the application of subtype-specific receptor blockers during paired neuron-astrocyte recordings, we provide evidence that GluN2B- and GluN2D-containing NMDARs predominantly mediate perisomatic and dendritic SEPs, respectively. Our results unveil an important role for active dendrites in regulating the impact of gliotransmission on neurons and suggest astrocytes as a source of dendritic plateau potentials that have been implicated in localized plasticity and place cell

  11. Effects of monomethylarsonic and monomethylarsonous acid on evoked synaptic potentials in hippocampal slices of adult and young rats

    SciTech Connect

    Krueger, Katharina Straub, Heidrun; Hirner, Alfred V.; Hippler, Joerg; Binding, Norbert; Musshoff, Ulrich

    2009-04-01

    Arsenite and its metabolites, dimethylarsinic or dimethylarsinous acid, have previously been shown to disturb synaptic transmission in hippocampal slices of rats (Krueger, K., Gruner, J., Madeja, M., Hartmann, L.M., Hirner, A.V., Binding, N., Mu{beta}hoff, U., 2006a. Blockade and enhancement of glutamate receptor responses in Xenopus oocytes by methylated arsenicals. Arch. Toxicol. 80, 492-501, Krueger, K., Straub, H., Binding, N., Mu{beta}hoff, U., 2006b. Effects of arsenite on long-term potentiation in hippocampal slices from adult and young rats. Toxicol. Lett. 165, 167-173, Krueger, K., Repges, H., Hippler, J., Hartmann, L.M., Hirner, A.V., Straub, H., Binding, N., Mu{beta}hoff, U., 2007. Effects of dimethylarsinic and dimethylarsinous acid on evoked synaptic potentials in hippocampal slices of young and adult rats. Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 225, 40-46). The present experiments investigate, whether the important arsenic metabolites monomethylarsonic acid (MMA{sup V}) and monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}) also influence the synaptic functions of the hippocampus. In hippocampal slices of young (14-21 days-old) and adult (2-4 months-old) rats, evoked synaptic field potentials from the Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapse were measured under control conditions and during and after 30 and 60 min of application of the arsenic compounds. MMA{sup V} had no effect on the synapse functions neither in slices of adult nor in those from young rats. However, MMA{sup III} strongly influenced the synaptic transmission: it totally depressed the amplitudes of fEPSPs at concentrations of 50 {mu}mol/l (adult rats) and 25 {mu}mol/l (young rats) and LTP amplitudes at concentrations of 25 {mu}mol/l (adult rats) and 10 {mu}mol/l (young rats), respectively. In contrast, application of 1 {mu}mol/l MMA{sup III} led to an enhancement of the LTP amplitude in young rats, which is interpretable by an enhancing effect on NMDA receptors and a lack of the blocking effect on AMPA receptors at

  12. Distinct epigenetic and gene expression changes in rat hippocampal neurons after Morris water maze training

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Sylvia D.; Mifsud, Karen R.; Reul, Johannes M. H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Gene transcription and translation in the hippocampus is of critical importance in hippocampus-dependent memory formation, including during Morris water maze (MWM) learning. Previous work using gene deletion models has shown that the immediate-early genes (IEGs) c-Fos, Egr-1, and Arc are crucial for such learning. Recently, we reported that induction of IEGs in sparse dentate gyrus neurons requires ERK MAPK signaling and downstream formation of a distinct epigenetic histone mark (i.e., phospho-acetylated histone H3). Until now, this signaling, epigenetic and gene transcriptional pathway has not been comprehensively studied in the MWM model. Therefore, we conducted a detailed study of the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and serine10 in histone H3 (H3S10p) and induction of IEGs in the hippocampus of MWM trained rats and matched controls. MWM training evoked consecutive waves of ERK1/2 phosphorylation and H3S10 phosphorylation, as well as c-Fos, Egr-1, and Arc induction in sparse hippocampal neurons. The observed effects were most pronounced in the dentate gyrus. A positive correlation was found between the average latency to find the platform and the number of H3S10p-positive dentate gyrus neurons. Furthermore, chromatin immuno-precipitation (ChIP) revealed a significantly increased association of phospho-acetylated histone H3 (H3K9ac-S10p) with the gene promoters of c-Fos and Egr-1, but not Arc, after MWM exposure compared with controls. Surprisingly, however, we found very little difference between IEG responses (regarding both protein and mRNA) in MWM-trained rats compared with matched swim controls. We conclude that exposure to the water maze evokes ERK MAPK activation, distinct epigenetic changes and IEG induction predominantly in sparse dentate gyrus neurons. It appears, however, that a specific role for IEGs in the learning aspect of MWM training may become apparent in downstream AP-1- and Egr-1-regulated (second wave) genes and Arc-dependent effector mechanisms

  13. Rat hippocampal glutamate and GABA release exhibit biphasic effects as a function of chronic lead exposure level.

    PubMed

    Lasley, S M; Gilbert, M E

    2002-03-01

    Previous work has suggested that the lead (Pb) exposure-induced decrease in K(+)-evoked hippocampal glutamate (GLU) release is an important factor in the elevated threshold and diminished magnitude reported for hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) in exposed animals. In addition, complex dose-effect relationships between Pb exposure level and LTP have been reported. This investigation was conducted to determine the effects of Pb on hippocampal GLU and GABA release as a function of exposure level. Rats were continuously exposed to 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, or 1.0% Pb in the drinking water beginning at gestational day 15-16. Hippocampal transmitter release was induced in adult males by perfusion of 150 mM K(+) in the presence of Ca(+2) (total release) through a microdialysis probe in one test session, followed by perfusion through a contralateral probe in the absence of Ca(+2) (Ca(+2)-independent release) in the second session. Chronic exposure produced decreases in total K(+)-stimulated hippocampal GLU and GABA release at exposure levels of 0.1-0.5% Pb. Maximal effects were seen in the 0.2% group (blood Pb = 40 microg/100 ml), and changes in total release could be directly traced to alterations in the Ca(+2)-dependent component. However, these effects were less evident in the 0.5% group and were no longer present in the 1.0% Pb group, thus defining U-shaped dose-effect relationships. Moreover, in the absence of Ca(+2) in the dialysis perfusate, K(+)-induced release was elevated in the 2 highest exposure groups, suggesting a Pb(+2)-induced enhancement in evoked release. This pattern of results indicates the presence of 2 actions of Pb on in vivo transmitter release: a more potent suppression of stimulated release seen at lower exposure levels (27-62 microg/100 ml) combined with Ca+2-mimetic actions to independently induce exocytosis that is exhibited at higher exposure levels (> or =62 microg/100 ml). Furthermore, significant similarities in the dose-effect relationships

  14. Blocking GABA-A receptors in the medial septum enhances hippocampal acetylcholine release and behavior in a rat model of diencephalic amnesia.

    PubMed

    Roland, Jessica J; Savage, Lisa M

    2009-05-01

    Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS), a form of diencephalic amnesia caused by thiamine deficiency, results in severe anterograde memory loss. Pyrithiamine-induced thiamine deficiency (PTD), an animal model of WKS, produces cholinergic abnormalities including decreased functional hippocampal acetylcholine (ACh) release and poor spatial memory. Increasing hippocampal ACh levels has increased performance in PTD animals. Intraseptal bicuculline (GABA(A) antagonist) augments hippocampal ACh release in normal animals and we found it (0.50 microg/microl and 0.75 microg/microl) also increased in-vivo hippocampal ACh release in PTD animals. However, the 0.75 microg/microl dose produced a greater change in hippocampal ACh release in control animals. The 0.50 microg/microl dose of bicuculline was then selected to determine if it could enhance spontaneous alternation performance in PTD animals. This dose of bicuculline significantly increased hippocampal ACh levels above baseline in both PTD and control rats and resulted in complete behavioral recovery in PTD animals, without altering performance in control rats. This suggests that balancing ACh-GABA interactions in the septohippocampal circuit may be an effective therapeutic approach in certain amnestic syndromes. PMID:19463263

  15. Chronic Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol during Adolescence Differentially Modulates Striatal CB1 Receptor Expression and the Acute and Chronic Effects on Learning in Adult Rats.

    PubMed

    Weed, Peter F; Filipeanu, Catalin M; Ketchum, Myles J; Winsauer, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether chronic administration of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) during adolescence would (1) modify any sex-specific effects of THC on learning and (2) affect the development of tolerance to THC as an adult. Male and female rats received daily injections of saline or 5.6 mg/kg of THC from postnatal day 35-75, yielding four groups (female/saline, female/THC, male/saline, and male/THC). Rats were then trained on a procedure that assayed both learning and performance behavior and administered 0.32-18 mg/kg of THC acutely as adults (experiment 1). THC produced rate-decreasing and error-increasing effects in both sexes; however, female rats were more sensitive than male rats were to the rate-decreasing effects. Rats were then chronically administered 10 mg/kg of THC (experiment 2). Rats that received THC during adolescence developed tolerance to the rate-decreasing effects more slowly and less completely than did rats that received saline; in addition, females developed tolerance to the error-increasing effects of THC slower than males did. Western blot analysis of brain tissue indicated long-term changes in hippocampal and striatal cannabinoid type-1 receptor (CB1R) levels despite levels that were indistinguishable immediately after chronic treatment during adolescence. Striatal CB1R levels were increased in adult rats that received THC during adolescence; hippocampal CB1R levels varied by sex. In summary, female rats were more sensitive than male rats were to the acute and chronic effects of THC, and chronic administration of THC during adolescence produced long-term changes in CB1R levels that correlated with decreased tolerance development to the rate-decreasing effects of THC. PMID:26462539

  16. Simulated acute central Mycoplasma infections in rats induce fever, anorexia, body mass stunting and lethargy but spare memory.

    PubMed

    Swanepoel, Tanya; Sabbar, Mariam; Baartman, Tamzyn L; Laburn, Helen P; Mitchell, Duncan; Dukhan, Tanusha; Harden, Lois M

    2016-09-01

    Despite the documented post-infectious neurological complications of a central nervous system (CNS) Mycoplasma infection in humans, very few studies have investigated the acute inflammatory responses and sickness behaviours induced by CNS Mycoplasma infections. We therefore determined the effect of acute central administration of fibroblast-stimulating lipopeptide-1 (FSL-1), derived from Mycoplasma salivarium, and FAM-20 from a more pathogenic species, namely Mycoplasma pneumoniae, on behavioural and inflammatory responses in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats had radiotransmitters implanted, intra-abdominally, to measure body temperature and cage activity continuously. After recovery from surgery, rats were conditioned in a fear conditioning task and then immediately received an intra-cisterna magna (i.c.m.) injection of either: (1) FSL-1 (10 or 100μg/5μl) or its vehicle (phosphate-buffered saline, 5μl), or (2) FAM-20 (10 or 100μg/5μl) or its vehicle (dimethyl sulfoxide, 5μl). Body mass and food intake were measured daily. Memory was assessed seven days after injection using fear conditioning tests. A single, i.c.m. injection of either FSL-1 or FAM-20 induced profound, dose-dependent fever, anorexia, lethargy and body mass stunting in rats. Moreover, rats that received an i.c.m. injection of 100μg/5μl FAM-20 had a significant increase in the concentration of IL-1β in both the hypothalamus and the hippocampus for ~27h after injection. Seven days after FSL-1 or FAM-20 injection, when body mass of rats still was stunted, they maintained their memory for fear of the context and for fear of the tone, despite the increase in hippocampal IL-1β concentration after FAM-20 administration. Thus, acute simulated CNS Mycoplasma infections caused pronounced sickness responses and brain inflammation in rats, but spared fear memory. PMID:27180133

  17. Amphetamine-induced c-fos mRNA expression is altered in rats with neonatal ventral hippocampal damage.

    PubMed

    Lillrank, S M; Lipska, B K; Bachus, S E; Wood, G K; Weinberger, D R

    1996-08-01

    To further characterize the mechanisms underlying enhanced dopamine-related behaviors expressed during adulthood in rats with neonatal excitotoxic ventral hippocampal (VH) damage, we studied the expression of c-fos mRNA in these rats after a single saline or amphetamine (AMPH) (10 mg/kg, i.p.) injection using in situ hybridization. The VH of rat pups was lesioned with ibotenic acid on postnatal day 7 (PD7). At the age of 90 days, rats were challenged with AMPH or saline, and the expression of c-fos mRNA using an oligonucleotide probe was assessed 30, 90, and 180 min later. AMPH significantly increased c-fos mRNA expression in medial prefrontal cortex, piriform cortex, cingulate cortex, septal region, and dorsolateral and ventromedial striatum in control and lesioned rats. However, this response to AMPH was attenuated 30 min after AMPH injection in all of these regions in the lesioned as compared to the sham-operated rats. No significant changes were seen at other time points. These results indicate that the neonatal VH lesion alters time-dependent intracellular signal transduction mechanisms measured by AMPH-induced c-fos mRNA expression in cortical and subcortical brain regions. Changes in c-fos mRNA expression in this putative animal model of schizophrenia may have implications for long-term alterations in cellular phenotype because of altered regulation of certain target genes. PMID:8855514

  18. Adolescent voluntary exercise attenuated hippocampal innate immunity responses and depressive-like behaviors following maternal separation stress in male rats.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Mahsa; Peeri, Maghsoud; Hosseini, Mir-Jamal

    2016-09-01

    Early life stressful events have detrimental effects on the brain and behavior, which are associated with the development of depression. Immune-inflammatory responses have been reported to contribute in the pathophysiology of depression. Many studies have reported on the beneficial effects of exercise against stress. However, underlying mechanisms through which exercise exerts its effects were poorly studied. Therefore, it applied maternal separation (MS), as a valid animal model of early-life adversity, in rats from postnatal day (PND) 2 to 14 for 180min per day. At PND 28, male Wistar albino rats were subjected to 5 experimental groups; 1) controls 2) MS rats 3) MS rats treated with fluoxetine 5mg/kg to PND 60, 4) MS rats that were subjected to voluntary running wheel (RW) exercise and 5) MS rats that were subjected to mandatory treadmill (TM) exercise until adulthood. At PND 60, depressive-like behaviors were assessed by using forced swimming test (FST), splash test, and sucrose preference test (SPT). Our results revealed that depressive-like behaviors following MS stress were associated with an increase in expression of toll-like receptor 4 (Tlr-4) and its main signaling protein, Myd88, in the hippocampal formation. Also, we found that voluntary (and not mandatory) physical exercise during adolescence is protected against depressant effects of early-life stress at least partly through mitigating the innate immune responses in the hippocampus. PMID:27184238

  19. The effects of aqueous extract of Boswellia Serrata on hippocampal region CA1 and learning deficit in kindled rats.

    PubMed

    Jalili, C; Salahshoor, M R; Pourmotabbed, A; Moradi, S; Roshankhah, Sh; Darehdori, A Shabanizadeh; Motaghi, M

    2014-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is a disorder of the central nervous system in which hippocampus is mostly involved and causes memory impairment. Kindling is a model of inducing epilepsy which is created through pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) administration. This study examines the role of the aqueous extract of Boswellia on the learning and development of brain (formation of dendritic branches and axons) of the PTZ-induced kindled rats. The study is conducted on sixty-four male rats divided into 8 groups. Kindling seizures are induced by three injections of 25 mg/kg of PTZ every 15 min. The aqueous extracts (0, 0.1, 0.5, 1 g/kg, i.p) are administrated to all animals for three consecutive days. Passive avoidance learning of animals is examined using shuttle box apparatus and step-through latency (STL) method. Rats are anesthetized and their brains are fixed by transcardial perfusion method and are analyzed by morphometric methods after applying Golgi and Cresyl violet staining methods. PTZ-induced kindling indicates a significant decrease in the number of pyramidal neurons and dendritic spines in hippocampal region cornu ammonis (CA1). The STL of the kindled rats is significantly reduced compared with control ones. Also, Boswellia extract dramatically increased the number of neuronal processes in CA1 region and improves passive-avoidance learning ability in both control and PTZ-kindled animals in 1 g/kg dose administration of Boswellia extract, especially at high doses can eliminate adverse effects of seizures on cognitive function in hippocampal area CA1 in rats. PMID:25657807

  20. Hippocampal effects of neuronostatin on memory, anxiety-like behavior and food intake in rats.

    PubMed

    Carlini, V P; Ghersi, M; Gabach, L; Schiöth, H B; Pérez, M F; Ramirez, O A; Fiol de Cuneo, M; de Barioglio, S R

    2011-12-01

    A 13-amino acid peptide named neuronostatin (NST) encoded in the somatostatin pro-hormone has been recently reported. It is produced throughout the body, particularly in brain areas that have significant actions over the metabolic and autonomic regulation. The present study was performed in order to elucidate the functional role of NST on memory, anxiety-like behavior and food intake and the hippocampal participation in these effects. When the peptide was intra-hippocampally administered at 3.0 nmol/μl, it impaired memory retention in both, object recognition and step-down test. Also, this dose blocked the hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) generation. When NST was intra-hippocampally administered at 0.3 nmol/μl and 3.0 nmol/μl, anxiolytic effects were observed. Also, the administration in the third ventricle at the higher dose (3.0 nmol/μl) induced similar effects, and both doses reduced food intake. The main result of the present study is the relevance of the hippocampal formation in the behavioral effects induced by NST, and these effects could be associated to a reduced hippocampal synaptic plasticity. PMID:21978882

  1. Acute alterations of somatodendritic action potential dynamics in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells after kainate-induced status epilepticus in mice.

    PubMed

    Minge, Daniel; Bähring, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Pathophysiological remodeling processes at an early stage of an acquired epilepsy are critical but not well understood. Therefore, we examined acute changes in action potential (AP) dynamics immediately following status epilepticus (SE) in mice. SE was induced by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of kainate, and behavioral manifestation of SE was monitored for 3-4 h. After this time interval CA1 pyramidal cells were studied ex vivo with whole-cell current-clamp and Ca(2+) imaging techniques in a hippocampal slice preparation. Following acute SE both resting potential and firing threshold were modestly depolarized (2-5 mV). No changes were seen in input resistance or membrane time constant, but AP latency was prolonged and AP upstroke velocity reduced following acute SE. All cells showed an increase in AP halfwidth and regular (rather than burst) firing, and in a fraction of cells the notch, typically preceding spike afterdepolarization (ADP), was absent following acute SE. Notably, the typical attenuation of backpropagating action potential (b-AP)-induced Ca(2+) signals along the apical dendrite was strengthened following acute SE. The effects of acute SE on the retrograde spread of excitation were mimicked by applying the Kv4 current potentiating drug NS5806. Our data unveil a reduced somatodendritic excitability in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells immediately after acute SE with a possible involvement of both Na(+) and K(+) current components. PMID:22039527

  2. Acute Alterations of Somatodendritic Action Potential Dynamics in Hippocampal CA1 Pyramidal Cells after Kainate-Induced Status Epilepticus in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Minge, Daniel; Bähring, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Pathophysiological remodeling processes at an early stage of an acquired epilepsy are critical but not well understood. Therefore, we examined acute changes in action potential (AP) dynamics immediately following status epilepticus (SE) in mice. SE was induced by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of kainate, and behavioral manifestation of SE was monitored for 3–4 h. After this time interval CA1 pyramidal cells were studied ex vivo with whole-cell current-clamp and Ca2+ imaging techniques in a hippocampal slice preparation. Following acute SE both resting potential and firing threshold were modestly depolarized (2–5 mV). No changes were seen in input resistance or membrane time constant, but AP latency was prolonged and AP upstroke velocity reduced following acute SE. All cells showed an increase in AP halfwidth and regular (rather than burst) firing, and in a fraction of cells the notch, typically preceding spike afterdepolarization (ADP), was absent following acute SE. Notably, the typical attenuation of backpropagating action potential (b-AP)-induced Ca2+ signals along the apical dendrite was strengthened following acute SE. The effects of acute SE on the retrograde spread of excitation were mimicked by applying the Kv4 current potentiating drug NS5806. Our data unveil a reduced somatodendritic excitability in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells immediately after acute SE with a possible involvement of both Na+ and K+ current components. PMID:22039527

  3. Nicotine Effects in Adolescence and Adulthood on Cognition and α4β2-Nicotinic Receptors in the Neonatal Ventral Hippocampal Lesion Rat Model of Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Sarah A.; Sentir, Alena M.; Bell, Richard L.; Engleman, Eric A.; Chambers, R. Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Rational Nicotine use in schizophrenia has traditionally been explained as ‘self-medication’ of cognitive and/or nicotinic acetylcholinergic receptor (nAChR) abnormalities. Objectives We test this hypothesis in a neurodevelopmental rat model of schizophrenia that shows increased addiction behaviors including enhanced nicotine reinforcement and drug-seeking. Methods Nicotine transdermal patch (5 mg/kg/day vs. placebo × 10 days in adolescence or adulthood) effects on subsequent radial-arm maze learning (15 sessions) and frontal-cortical-striatal nAChR densities (α4β2; [3H]-epibatidine binding) were examined in neonatal ventral hippocampal lesion (NVHL) and SHAM-operated rats. Results NVHL cognitive deficits were not differentially affected by nicotine history compared to SHAMs. Nicotine history produced minimal cognitive effects while increasing food–reward consumption on the maze, compounding with NVHL-induced overconsumption. Acute nicotine (0.5 mg/kg) delivered before the final maze sessions produced modest improvements in maze performance in rats with nicotine patch histories only, but not differentially so in NVHLs. Consistent with in vivo neuroimaging of β2 nAChR binding in schizophrenia smokers vs. non-smokers and healthy controls, adult NVHLs showed 12% reductions in nAChR binding in MPFC (p<0.05) but not ventral striatum (<5% changes, p>.40), whereas nicotine history elevated nAChRs across both regions (>30%, p<0.001) without interacting with NVHLs. Adolescent vs. adult nicotine exposure did not alter nAChRs differentially. Conclusions Although replicating nicotine-induced up-regulation of nAChRs in human smokers and demonstrating NVHL validity in terms of schizophrenia-associated nAChR density patterns, these findings do not support hypotheses explaining increased nicotine use in schizophrenia as reflecting illness-specific effects of nicotine to therapeutically alter cognition or nAChR densities. PMID:25388292

  4. Montelukast, a cysteinyl leukotriene receptor-1 antagonist protects against hippocampal injury induced by transient global cerebral ischemia and reperfusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Saad, M A; Abdelsalam, R M; Kenawy, S A; Attia, A S

    2015-01-01

    Cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs) are potent pro-inflammatory and immune modulating lipid mediators involved in inflammatory diseases and were boosted in human brain after acute phase of cerebral ischemia. The antagonism of CysLTs receptors may offer protection against ischemic damage. Therefore it seemed interesting to study the possible neuroprotective effect of Montelukast, a CysLTR1 antagonist in global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury in rats. Global cerebral ischemia-reperfusion was induced by bilateral carotid artery occlusion for 15 min followed by 60 min reperfusion period. Animals were randomly allocated into three groups (n = 30 per group): Sham operated, I/R control and rats treated with montelukast (0.5 mg/kg, po) daily for 7 days then I/R was induced 1 h after the last dose of montelukast. After reperfusion rats were killed by decapitation, brains were removed and both hippocampi separated and the following biochemical parameters were estimated; lactate dehydrogenase activity, oxidative stress markers (lipid peroxides, nitric oxide and reduced glutathione), inflammatory markers (myeloperoxidase, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, nuclear factor kappa-B, interleukin-6 and interleukin-10), apoptotic biomarkers (caspase 3 and cytochrome C), neurotransmitters (glutamate, gamma aminobutyric acid), Cys-LTs contents and CysLT1 receptor expression; as well as total brain infarct size and histopathological examination of the hippocampus were assessed. Montelukast protected hippocampal tissue by reducing oxidative stress, inflammatory and apoptotic markers. Furthermore, it reduced glutamate and lactate dehydrogenase activity as well as infarct size elevated by I/R. These results were consistent with the histopathological findings. Montelukast showed a neuroprotective effects through antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic mechanisms. PMID:25403620

  5. Effects of memantine on hippocampal long-term potentiation, gamma activity, and sensorimotor gating in freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jingyi; Mufti, Asfandyar; Stan Leung, L

    2015-09-01

    Memantine, an uncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, is used for treatment of patients with Alzheimer's disease. The mechanisms of memantine in relieving cognitive and behavioral symptoms are unclear, and this study attempts to elucidate its action on network and synaptic functions of the hippocampus. The effects of memantine on electrographic activity and hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) were investigated in freely moving rats. Basal dendritic excitation on hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells showed a robust LTP after theta-frequency primed bursts, and the LTP was higher after 5-10 mg/kg intraperitoneal (ip) memantine pretreatment, as compared with saline pretreatment. Injection of scopolamine (5 mg/kg ip) before memantine failed to block the LTP-enhancing effect of memantine. Memantine as compared with saline pretreatment did not affect the LTP after an afterdischarge induced by high-frequency (200-Hz) train stimulation. Memantine (5 or 10 mg/kg ip) significantly enhanced gamma oscillations in the hippocampal local field potentials of 40-100 Hz during walking and awake immobility. Memantine at 10 mg/kg ip, but not at 5 mg/kg ip, increased prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle response, while both 5 and 10 mg/kg ip memantine enhanced the acoustic startle response as compared with saline-injected rats. These electrophysiological and behavioral effects of memantine are unique among N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists but are consistent with memantine's effects in improving cognitive and sensorimotor functions of Alzheimer's patients. PMID:26119223

  6. Stress and corticosteroids regulate rat hippocampal mitochondrial DNA gene expression via the glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Richard G; Seligsohn, Ma'ayan; Rubin, Todd G; Griffiths, Brian B; Ozdemir, Yildirim; Pfaff, Donald W; Datson, Nicole A; McEwen, Bruce S

    2016-08-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are involved in stress and circadian regulation, and produce many actions via the GC receptor (GR), which is classically understood to function as a nuclear transcription factor. However, the nuclear genome is not the only genome in eukaryotic cells. The mitochondria also contain a small circular genome, the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), that encodes 13 polypeptides. Recent work has established that, in the brain and other systems, the GR is translocated from the cytosol to the mitochondria and that stress and corticosteroids have a direct influence on mtDNA transcription and mitochondrial physiology. To determine if stress affects mitochondrially transcribed mRNA (mtRNA) expression, we exposed adult male rats to both acute and chronic immobilization stress and examined mtRNA expression using quantitative RT-PCR. We found that acute stress had a main effect on mtRNA expression and that expression of NADH dehydrogenase 1, 3, and 6 (ND-1, ND-3, ND-6) and ATP synthase 6 (ATP-6) genes was significantly down-regulated. Chronic stress induced a significant up-regulation of ND-6 expression. Adrenalectomy abolished acute stress-induced mtRNA regulation, demonstrating GC dependence. ChIP sequencing of GR showed that corticosterone treatment induced a dose-dependent association of the GR with the control region of the mitochondrial genome. These findings demonstrate GR and stress-dependent transcriptional regulation of the mitochondrial genome in vivo and are consistent with previous work linking stress and GCs with changes in the function of brain mitochondria. PMID:27457949

  7. Immunohistochemical evaluation of hippocampal CA1 region astrocytes in 10-day-old rats after monosodium glutamate treatment.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, A; Jaworska-Adamu, J; Rycerz, K

    2015-01-01

    High concentration of glutamate (Glu) is excitotoxic for nervous system structures. This may lead to glial reactivity ie. increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and S100β protein, and also to hypertrophy and proliferation of cells which are determined by the presence of Ki-67 antigen. The aim of the study was to analyse the immunoreactivity of the GFAP, S100β and Ki-67 proteins in astrocytes of hippocampal CA1 region in young rats after administration of monosodium glutamate (MSG) at two doses: 2 g/kg b.w. (I group) and 4 g/kg b.w. (II group). In rats from I and II group morphologically altered astrocytes with the GFAP expression were observed in the SLM of the hippocampal CA1 region. The cells had eccentrically located nuclei and on the opposite site of the nuclei there were single or double, long and weakly branched processes. Moreover, in the SLM the increase of the number of GFAP and S100β immunopositive astrocytes and nuclei with Ki-67 expression, in contrary to control individuals, was observed. These results suggest the increased expression of the proteins in early reactions or hyperplasia which, together with cell hypertrophy, indicate late reactivity of astroglia in response to glutamate noxious effect. PMID:26812818

  8. Pioglitazone and exenatide enhance cognition and downregulate hippocampal beta amyloid oligomer and microglia expression in insulin-resistant rats.

    PubMed

    Gad, Enas S; Zaitone, Sawsan A; Moustafa, Yasser M

    2016-08-01

    Insulin resistance is known to be a risk factor for cognitive impairment, most likely linked to insulin signaling, microglia overactivation, and beta amyloid (Aβ) deposition in the brain. Exenatide, a long lasting glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogue, enhances insulin signaling and shows neuroprotective properties. Pioglitazone, a peroxisome proliferated-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) agonist, was previously reported to enhance cognition through its effect on Aβ accumulation and clearance. In the present study, insulin resistance was induced in male rats by drinking fructose for 12 weeks. The effect of monotherapy with pioglitazone (10 mg·kg(-1)) and exenatide or their combination on memory dysfunction was determined and some of the probable underlying mechanisms were studied. The current results confirmed that (1) feeding male rats with fructose syrup for 12 weeks resulted in a decline of learning and memory registered in eight-arm radial maze test; (2) treatment with pioglitazone or exenatide enhanced cognition, reduced hippocampal neurodegeneration, and reduced hippocampal microglia expression and beta amyloid oligomer deposition in a manner that is equal to monotherapies. These results may give promise for the use of pioglitazone or exenatide for ameliorating the learning and memory deficits associated with insulin resistance in clinical setting. PMID:27389824

  9. Isovaline attenuates generalized epileptiform activity in hippocampal and primary sensory cortices and seizure behavior in pilocarpine treated rats.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wilson; Smith, Autumn B; Pilitsis, Julie G; Shin, Damian S

    2015-07-10

    Anti-seizure drugs are the most commonly employed treatment option for epilepsy and these generally provide effective management of seizures. However, 30% of patients with epilepsy are not adequately treated with anti-seizure medications and are considered intractable. Recently we reported that isovaline, a unique amino acid, could attenuate seizure like events (SLEs) in two in vitro hippocampal seizure models by selectively increasing the activity of interneurons, but not pyramidal neurons. Isovaline also attenuated hippocampal epileptiform activity and behavioral seizures in vivo in rats administered 4 aminopyridine (4AP). Here, we investigate whether isovaline is efficacious in attenuating secondarily generalized epileptiform activity and behavioral seizures in rats administered pilocarpine. We found that 150 mg/kg isovaline administered intravenously abolished pilocarpine-induced epileptiform activity in the primary sensory cortex and hippocampus and attenuated generalized forebrain behavioral seizures. We are the first to demonstrate that isovaline may be a plausible anti-seizure drug for secondarily generalized seizures and this could potentially lead to the development of a novel class of anti-seizure drugs focused around the unique mechanism(s) of isovaline. PMID:26007701

  10. Neonatal allopregnanolone or finasteride administration modifies hippocampal K(+) Cl(-) co-transporter expression during early development in male rats.

    PubMed

    Mòdol, Laura; Casas, Caty; Llidó, Anna; Navarro, Xavier; Pallarès, Marc; Darbra, Sònia

    2014-09-01

    The maintenance of levels of endogenous neurosteroids (NS) across early postnatal development of the brain, particularly to the hippocampus, is crucial for their maturation. Allopregnanolone (Allop) is a NS that exerts its effect mainly through the modulation of the GABAA receptor (GABAAR). During early development, GABA, acting through GABAAR, that predominantly produces depolarization shifts to hyperpolarization in mature neurons, around the second postnatal week in rats. Several factors contribute to this change including the progressive increase of the neuron-specific K(+)/Cl(-) co-transporter 2 (KCC2) (a chloride exporter) levels. Thus, we aimed to analyze whether a different profile of NS levels during development is critical and can alter this natural progression of KCC2 stages. We administrated sustained Allop (20mg/kg) or Finasteride (5α-reductase inhibitor, 50mg/kg) from the 5th postnatal day (PD5) to PD9 and assessed changes in the hippocampal expression of KCC2 at transcript and protein levels as well as its active phosphorylated state in male rats. Taken together data indicated that manipulation of NS levels during early development influence KCC2 levels and point out the importance of neonatal NS levels for the hippocampal development. PMID:24861264

  11. Maturation- and sex-sensitive depression of hippocampal excitatory transmission in a rat schizophrenia model.

    PubMed

    Patrich, Eti; Piontkewitz, Yael; Peretz, Asher; Weiner, Ina; Attali, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with behavioral and brain structural abnormalities, of which the hippocampus appears to be one of the most consistent region affected. Previous studies performed on the poly I:C model of schizophrenia suggest that alterations in hippocampal synaptic transmission and plasticity take place in the offspring. However, these investigations yielded conflicting results and the neurophysiological alterations responsible for these deficits are still unclear. Here we performed for the first time a longitudinal study examining the impact of prenatal poly I:C treatment and of gender on hippocampal excitatory neurotransmission. In addition, we examined the potential preventive/curative effects of risperidone (RIS) treatment during the peri-adolescence period. Excitatory synaptic transmission was determined by stimulating Schaffer collaterals and monitoring fiber volley amplitude and slope of field-EPSP (fEPSP) in CA1 pyramidal neurons in male and female offspring hippocampal slices from postnatal days (PNDs) 18-20, 34, 70 and 90. Depression of hippocampal excitatory transmission appeared at juvenile age in male offspring of the poly I:C group, while it expressed with a delay in female, manifesting at adulthood. In addition, a reduced hippocampal size was found in both adult male and female offspring of poly I:C treated dams. Treatment with RIS at the peri-adolescence period fully restored in males but partly repaired in females these deficiencies. A maturation- and sex-dependent decrease in hippocampal excitatory transmission occurs in the offspring of poly I:C treated pregnant mothers. Pharmacological intervention with RIS during peri-adolescence can cure in a gender-sensitive fashion early occurring hippocampal synaptic deficits. PMID:26327125

  12. [Peoniflorin activates Nrf2/ARE pathway to alleviate the Abeta(1-42)-induced hippocampal neuron injury in rats].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Shu-Zhi; ma, Shi-Ping; Hong, Zong-Yuan

    2013-08-01

    This study was to investigate the effect of peoniflorin on the expressions of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and its downstream signal molecules in the hippocampus of Alzheimer's disease (AD) rats for exploring the mechanism of peoniflorin protecting hippocampal neurons. AD model rats were established by bilateral intrahippocampal injection of beta-amyloid(1-42) (Abeta(1-42)) and divided randomly into 3 groups: AD model group, peoniflorin low-dose (15 mg x kg(-1)) group and peoniflorin high-dose (30 mg x kg(-1)) group. The vehicle control rats were given bilateral intrahippocampal injection of solvent with the same volume. After peoniflorin or saline was administered (ip) once daily for 14 days, the hippocampuses of all animals were taken out for measuring the expressions of Nrf2, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and gamma-glutamylcysteine synthethase (gamma-GCS) mRNA by reverse transcription PCR, determining the contents of glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA) and carbonyl protein (CP) using colorimetric method, and for assaying the expressions of neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein (NAIP) and Caspase-3 by immunohistochemical staining method. The results showed that peoniflorin markedly increased the expressions of Nrf2, HO-1 and gamma-GCS mRNA, enhanced the level of GSH and decreased the contents of MDA and CP in the hippocampus, as compared with the model group. Peoniflorin also improved the NAIP expression and reduced the Caspase-3 expression in the hippocampus neurons. In conclusion, peoniflorin protects against the Abeta(1-42)-mediated oxidative stress and hippocampal neuron injury in AD rats by activating the Nrf2/ARE pathway. PMID:24187848

  13. Dorsal hippocampal NMDA receptors mediate the interactive effects of arachidonylcyclopropylamide and MDMA/ecstasy on memory retrieval in rats.

    PubMed

    Ghaderi, Marzieh; Rezayof, Ameneh; Vousooghi, Nasim; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2016-04-01

    A combination of cannabis and ecstasy may change the cognitive functions more than either drug alone. The present study was designed to investigate the possible involvement of dorsal hippocampal NMDA receptors in the interactive effects of arachidonylcyclopropylamide (ACPA) and ecstasy/MDMA on memory retrieval. Adult male Wistar rats were cannulated into the CA1 regions of the dorsal hippocampus (intra-CA1) and memory retrieval was examined using the step-through type of passive avoidance task. Intra-CA1 microinjection of a selective CB1 receptor agonist, ACPA (0.5-4ng/rat) immediately before the testing phase (pre-test), but not after the training phase (post-training), impaired memory retrieval. In addition, pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of MDMA (0.5-1μg/rat) dose-dependently decreased step-through latency, indicating an amnesic effect of the drug by itself. Interestingly, pre-test microinjection of a higher dose of MDMA into the CA1 regions significantly improved ACPA-induced memory impairment. Moreover, pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of a selective NMDA receptor antagonist, D-AP5 (1 and 2μg/rat) inhibited the reversal effect of MDMA on the impairment of memory retrieval induced by ACPA. Pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of the same doses of D-AP5 had no effect on memory retrieval alone. These findings suggest that ACPA or MDMA consumption can induce memory retrieval impairment, while their co-administration improves this amnesic effect through interacting with hippocampal glutamatergic-NMDA receptor mechanism. Thus, it seems that the tendency to abuse cannabis with ecstasy may be for avoiding cognitive dysfunction. PMID:26612394

  14. Early postnatal exposure to methylphenidate alters stress reactivity and increases hippocampal ectopic granule cells in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Torres-Reveron, Annelyn; Gray, Jason D; Melton, Jay T; Punsoni, Michael; Tabori, Nora E; Ward, Mary J; Frys, Kelly; Iadecola, Costantino; Milner, Teresa A

    2009-03-16

    To mimic clinical treatment with methylphenidate (MPH; Ritalin) for attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), rat pups were injected with MPH (5 mg/kg, i.p.) or placebo twice daily during their nocturnal active phase from postnatal day (PND) 7-35. Thirty-nine days after the last MPH administration (PND 76), four litters of rats experienced stressful conditions during the 2003 New York City blackout. MPH-treated rats that endured the blackout lost more weight and regained it at a slower pace than controls (p<0.05; N=7-11 per group). Furthermore, MPH-treated rats had elevated systolic arterial blood pressure (from 115.6+/-1.2 to 126+/-1.8 mmHg; p<0.05), assessed on PND 130 by tail cuff plethysmography. Immunocytochemical studies of transmitter systems in the brain demonstrated rearrangements of catecholamine and neuropeptide Y fibers in select brain regions at PND 135, which did not differ between blackout and control groups. However, MPH-treated rats that endured the blackout had more ectopic granule cells in the hilus of the dorsal hippocampal dentate gyrus compared to controls at PND 135 (p<0.05; N=6 per group). These findings indicate that early postnatal exposure to high therapeutic doses of MPH can have long lasting effects on the plasticity of select brain regions and can induce changes in the reactivity to stress that persist into adulthood. PMID:19100815

  15. Suppressed proliferation and apoptotic changes in the rat dentate gyrus after acute and chronic stress are reversible.

    PubMed

    Heine, Vivi M; Maslam, Suharti; Zareno, Jessica; Joëls, Marian; Lucassen, Paul J

    2004-01-01

    Acute stress suppresses new cell birth in the hippocampus in several species. Relatively little is known, however, on how chronic stress affects the turnover, i.e. proliferation and apoptosis, of the rat dentate gyrus (DG) cells, and whether the stress effects are lasting. We investigated how 3 weeks of chronic unpredictable stress would influence the structural dynamic plasticity of the rat DG, and studied newborn cell proliferation, survival, apoptosis, volume and cell number in 10-week-old animals. To study lasting effects, another group of animals was allowed to recover for 3 weeks. Based on two independent parameters, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and Ki-67 immunocytochemistry, our results show that both chronic and acute stress decrease new cell proliferation rate. The reduced proliferation after acute stress normalized within 24 h. Interestingly, chronically stressed animals showed recovery after 3 weeks, albeit with still fewer proliferating cells than controls. Apoptosis, by contrast, increased after acute but decreased after chronic stress. These results demonstrate that, although chronic stress suppresses proliferation and apoptosis, 3 weeks of recovery again normalized most of these alterations. This may have important implications for our understanding of the reversibility of stress-related hippocampal volume changes, such as occur, for example, in depression. PMID:14750971

  16. Inhibition of NKCC1 Attenuated Hippocampal LTP Formation and Inhibitory Avoidance in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Amstislavskaya, Tamara G.; Tikhonova, Maria A.; Yang, Yi-Ling; Lu, Kwok-Tung

    2014-01-01

    The loop diuretic bumetanide (Bumex) is thought to have antiepileptic properties via modulate GABAA mediated signaling through their antagonism of cation-chloride cotransporters. Given that loop diuretics may act as antiepileptic drugs that modulate GABAergic signaling, we sought to investigate whether they also affect hippocampal function. The current study was performed to evaluate the possible role of NKCC1 on the hippocampal function. Brain slice extracellular recording, inhibitory avoidance, and western blot were applied in this study. Results showed that hippocampal Long-term potentiation was attenuated by suprafusion of NKCC1 inhibitor bumetanide, in a dose dependent manner. Sequent experiment result showed that Intravenous injection of bumetanide (15.2 mg/kg) 30 min prior to the training session blocked inhibitory avoidance learning significantly. Subsequent control experiment's results excluded the possible non-specific effect of bumetanide on avoidance learning. We also found the phosphorylation of hippocampal MAPK was attenuated after bumetanide administration. These results suggested that hippocampal NKCC1 may via MAPK signaling cascade to possess its function. PMID:25369049

  17. Inhibition of NKCC1 attenuated hippocampal LTP formation and inhibitory avoidance in rat.

    PubMed

    Ko, Meng Chang; Lee, Min Chong; Amstislavskaya, Tamara G; Tikhonova, Maria A; Yang, Yi-Ling; Lu, Kwok-Tung

    2014-01-01

    The loop diuretic bumetanide (Bumex) is thought to have antiepileptic properties via modulate GABAA mediated signaling through their antagonism of cation-chloride cotransporters. Given that loop diuretics may act as antiepileptic drugs that modulate GABAergic signaling, we sought to investigate whether they also affect hippocampal function. The current study was performed to evaluate the possible role of NKCC1 on the hippocampal function. Brain slice extracellular recording, inhibitory avoidance, and western blot were applied in this study. Results showed that hippocampal Long-term potentiation was attenuated by suprafusion of NKCC1 inhibitor bumetanide, in a dose dependent manner. Sequent experiment result showed that Intravenous injection of bumetanide (15.2 mg/kg) 30 min prior to the training session blocked inhibitory avoidance learning significantly. Subsequent control experiment's results excluded the possible non-specific effect of bumetanide on avoidance learning. We also found the phosphorylation of hippocampal MAPK was attenuated after bumetanide administration. These results suggested that hippocampal NKCC1 may via MAPK signaling cascade to possess its function. PMID:25369049

  18. Nanomolar ouabain augments Ca2+ signalling in rat hippocampal neurones and glia

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hong; Thompson, Scott M; Blaustein, Mordecai P

    2013-01-01

    Linkage of certain neurological diseases to Na+ pump mutations and some mood disorders to altered Na+ pump function has renewed interest in brain Na+ pumps. We tested nanomolar ouabain on Ca2+ signalling (fura-2) in rat hippocampal neurone–astrocyte co-cultures. The neurones and astrocytes express Na+ pumps with a high-ouabain-affinity catalytic subunit (α3 and α2, respectively); both also express pumps with a ouabain-resistant α1 subunit. Neurones and astrocytes were identified by immunocytochemistry and by stimulation; 3–4 μm l-glutamate (Glu) and 3 μm carbachol (CCh) evoked rapid Ca2+ transients only in neurones, and small, delayed transients in some astrocytes, whereas 0.5–1 μm ATP evoked Ca2+ transients only in astrocytes. Both cell types responded to 5–10 μm Glu or ATP. The signals evoked by 3–4 μm Glu in neurones were markedly inhibited by 3–10 μm MPEP (blocks metabotropic glutamate receptor mGluR5) and 10 μm LY341495 (non-selective mGluR blocker), but not by 80 μm AP5 (NMDA receptor blocker) or by selective block of mGluR1 or mGluR2. Pre-incubation (0.5–10 min) with 1–10 nm ouabain (EC50 < 1 nm) augmented Glu- and CCh-evoked signals in neurones. This augmentation was abolished by a blocker of the Na+–Ca2+ exchanger, SEA0400 (300 nm). Ouabain (3 nm) pre-incubation also augmented 10 μm cyclopiazonic acid plus 10 mm caffeine-evoked release of Ca2+ from the neuronal endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The implication is that nanomolar ouabain inhibits α3 Na+ pumps, increases (local) intracellular Na+, and promotes Na+–Ca2+ exchanger-mediated Ca2+ gain and increased storage in the adjacent ER. Ouabain (3 nm) also increased ER Ca2+ release and enhanced 0.5 μm ATP-evoked transients in astrocytes; these effects were mediated by α2 Na+ pumps. Thus, nanomolar ouabain may strongly influence synaptic transmission in the brain as a result of its actions on the high-ouabain-affinity Na+ pumps in both neurones and astrocytes. The significance of

  19. Lithium ions in nanomolar concentration modulate glycine-activated chloride current in rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Solntseva, E I; Bukanova, J V; Kondratenko, R V; Skrebitsky, V G

    2016-03-01

    Lithium salts are successfully used to treat bipolar disorder. At the same time, according to recent data lithium may be considered as a candidate medication for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. The mechanisms of therapeutic action of lithium have not been fully elucidated. In particular, in the literature there are no data on the effect of lithium on the glycine receptors. In the present study we investigated the effect of Li(+) on glycine-activated chloride current (IGly) in rat isolated pyramidal hippocampal neurons using patch-clamp technique. The effects of Li(+) were studied with two glycine concentrations: 100 μM (EC50) and 500 μM (nearly saturating). Li(+) was applied to the cell in two ways: first, by 600 ms co-application with glycine through micropipette (short application), and, second, by addition to an extracellular perfusate for 10 min (longer application). Li(+) was used in the range of concentrations of 1 nM-1 mM. Short application of Li(+) caused two effects: (1) an acceleration of desensitization (a decrease in the time of half-decay, or "τ") of IGly induced by both 100 μM and 500 μM glycine, and (2) a reduction of the peak amplitude of the IGly, induced by 100 μM, but not by 500 μM glycine. Both effects were not voltage-dependent. Dose-response curves for both effects were N-shaped with two maximums at 100 nM and 1 mM of Li(+) and a minimum at 1 μM of Li(+). This complex form of dose-response may indicate that the process activated by high concentrations of lithium inhibits the process that is sensitive to low concentrations of lithium. Longer application of Li(+)caused similar effects, but in this case 1 μM lithium was effective and the dose-effect curves were not N-shaped. The inhibitory effect of lithium ions on glycine-activated current suggests that lithium in low concentrations is able to modulate tonic inhibition in the hippocampus. This important property of lithium should be considered when using this drug as a

  20. Spike after-depolarization and burst generation in adult rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, M S; Azouz, R; Yaari, Y

    1996-01-01

    1. Intracellular recordings in adult rat hippocampal slices were used to investigate the properties and origins of intrinsically generated bursts in the somata of CA1 pyramidal cells (PCs). The CA1 PCs were classified as either non-bursters or bursters according to the firing patterns evoked by intrasomatically applied long ( > or = 100 ms) depolarizing current pulses. Non-bursters generated stimulus-graded trains of independent action potentials, whereas bursters generated clusters of three or more closely spaced spikes riding on a distinct depolarizing envelope. 2. In all PCs fast spike repolarization was incomplete and ended at a potential approximately 10 mV more positive than resting potential. Solitary spikes were followed by a distinct after-depolarizing potential (ADP) lasting 20-40 ms. The ADP in most non-bursters declined monotonically to baseline ('passive' ADP), whereas in most bursters it remained steady or even re-depolarized before declining to baseline ('active' ADP). 3. Active, but not passive, ADPs were associated with an apparent increase in input conductance. They were maximal in amplitude when the spike was evoked from resting potential and were reduced by mild depolarization or hyperpolarization (+/- 2 mV). 4. Evoked and spontaneous burst firing was sensitive to small changes in membrane potential. In most cases maximal bursts were generated at resting potential and were curtailed by small depolarizations or hyperpolarizations (+/- 5 mV). 5. Bursts comprising clusters of spikelets ('d-spikes') were observed in 12% of the bursters. Some of the d-spikes attained threshold for triggering full somatic spikes. Gradually hyperpolarizing these neurones blocked somatic spikes before blocking d-spikes, suggesting that the latter are generated at more remote sites. 6. The data suggest that active ADPs and intrinsic bursts in the somata of adult CA1 PCs are generated by a slow, voltage-gated inward current. Bursts arise in neurones in which this current

  1. Direct activation of GABAA receptors by barbiturates in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Rho, J M; Donevan, S D; Rogawski, M A

    1996-01-01

    1. The direct activation of the GABAA receptor by pentobarbitone (PB) and phenobarbitone (PHB) was characterized in cultured rat hippocampal neurons using whole-cell voltage clamp and single channel recording techniques. 2. In whole-cell recordings, PB and PHB produced a concentration-dependent activation of Cl- current (EC50 values, 0.33 and 3.0 mM, respectively). The response to the barbiturates was similar to that produced by GABA, although GABA was more potent (EC50, 5.5 microM). PB and PHB were substantially more potent in enhancing the response to 1 microM GABA (EC50 values, 94 microM and 0.89 mM, respectively). The maximal magnitude of the responses to PB was similar to that of the maximal response to GABA or GABA + PB. PHB appeared to be modestly less efficacious. 3. The mean deactivation time constant for whole-cell Cl- currents evoked by 1 mM PB + 1 microM GABA was significantly longer (480 +/- 34 ms) than for 1 mM PB (170 +/- 9 ms) or 1 microM GABA (180 +/- 14 ms) alone. 4. Whole-cell currents directly activated by 300 microM PB and 1 microM GABA were blocked by the GABA receptor antagonists bicuculline and picrotoxin. 5. Unitary GABAA receptor channel currents evoked by 300 microM PB had similar main conductance, mean open time and mean burst duration as those activated by 2 microM GABA alone. Single channel openings and bursts were of shorter mean duration when 100 and 300 microM PHB were used. 6. High concentrations of PB (1-3 mM) and PHB (3-10 mM) produced a rapid block of currents activated by the barbiturate alone or by the barbiturate in the presence of 1 microM GABA. The estimated IC50 values for block of PB- and PHB-potentiated GABA currents were 2.8 and 12.9 mM, respectively. 7. Single channel currents activated by high concentrations of PB and PHB alone or in the presence of GABA demonstrated flickering, probably reflecting fast channel block. 8. We conclude that the gating of the GABAA receptor channel by PHB and PB is functionally similar to

  2. ACUTE TRIETHYLTIN EXPOSURE: EFFECTS ON THE VISUAL EVOKED POTENTIAL AND HIPPOCAMPAL AFTERDISCHARGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute administration of triethyltin (TET) produces a well-described sequence of pathological events characterized by intramyelinic vacuolation, edema, and histotoxic hypoxia. Recent behavioral studies have attempted to characterize the functional consequences of TET exposures. In...

  3. Hippocampal acetylcholine depletion has no effect on anxiety, spatial novelty preference, or differential reward for low rates of responding (DRL) performance in rats.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Stephen B; Francis, Anna; McAuley, J Devin; Stewart, Amanda L; Baxter, Mark G; Bannerman, David M

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the role of the septo-hippocampal cholinergic projection in anxiety, spatial novelty preference, and differential reward for low rates of responding (DRL) performance. Cholinergic neurons of the rat medial septum (MS) and the vertical limb of the diagonal band of Broca (VDB) were lesioned using the selective immunotoxin, 192 IgG-saporin. Rats were then tested on several behavioral tests previously shown to be sensitive to either (a) hippocampal lesions or (b) nonselective MS/VDB lesions which target both cholinergic and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic projections, or both. Saporin lesions substantially reduced hippocampal cholinergic innervation, resulting in an absence of acetyl cholinesterase staining and markedly reduced choline acetyltransferase activity (mean reduction: 80 ± 5%; range: 50-97%). However, the saporin-lesioned rats did not differ from control rats in any of the behavioral tests. Thus we found no evidence from these lesion studies that the septo-hippocampal cholinergic projection plays an essential role in anxiety, spatial novelty preference, or DRL. PMID:26214215

  4. Hippocampal Acetylcholine Depletion Has No Effect on Anxiety, Spatial Novelty Preference, or Differential Reward for Low Rates of Responding (DRL) Performance in Rats

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the role of the septo-hippocampal cholinergic projection in anxiety, spatial novelty preference, and differential reward for low rates of responding (DRL) performance. Cholinergic neurons of the rat medial septum (MS) and the vertical limb of the diagonal band of Broca (VDB) were lesioned using the selective immunotoxin, 192 IgG-saporin. Rats were then tested on several behavioral tests previously shown to be sensitive to either (a) hippocampal lesions or (b) nonselective MS/VDB lesions which target both cholinergic and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic projections, or both. Saporin lesions substantially reduced hippocampal cholinergic innervation, resulting in an absence of acetyl cholinesterase staining and markedly reduced choline acetyltransferase activity (mean reduction: 80 ± 5%; range: 50–97%). However, the saporin-lesioned rats did not differ from control rats in any of the behavioral tests. Thus we found no evidence from these lesion studies that the septo-hippocampal cholinergic projection plays an essential role in anxiety, spatial novelty preference, or DRL. PMID:26214215

  5. Involvement of dopamine D1 receptors of the hippocampal dentate gyrus in spatial learning and memory deficits in a rat model of vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Wan, P; Wang, S; Zhang, Y; Lv, J; Jin, Q H

    2014-09-01

    We investigated the involvement of dopamine (DA) and its D1 receptors of the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) in spatial learning and memory deficits in a rat model of vascular dementia (VD) established by permanent bilateral carotid occlusion. Spatial learning and memory abilities of rats were measured by Morris water maze, and extracellular concentrations of DA in the DG were determined by in vivo microdialysis. The DA concentrations in the DG decreased in the VD rats compared with sham-operated group. Microinjection of SFK38393 (D1 receptor agonist) into the DG attenuates spatial learning and memory deficits in the VD rats. PMID:25272945

  6. VISUAL SYSTEM DYSFUNCTION FOLLOWING ACUTE TRIMETHYLTIN EXPOSURE IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trimethyltin (TMT) has been shown to produce damage in the limbic system and several other brain areas. To date, damage to sensory systems has not been reported. The present study investigated the integrity of the visual system following acute exposure to TMT. Rats were chronical...

  7. Ulinastatin suppresses endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis in the hippocampus of rats with acute paraquat poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hai-feng; Zhao, Shi-xing; Xing, Bao-peng; Sun, Ming-li

    2015-01-01

    Lung injury is the main manifestation of paraquat poisoning. Few studies have addressed brain damage after paraquat poisoning. Ulinastatin is a protease inhibitor that can effectively stabilize lysosomal membranes, prevent cell damage, and reduce the production of free radicals. This study assumed that ulinastatin would exert these effects on brain tissues that had been poisoned with paraquat. Rat models of paraquat poisoning were intraperitoneally injected with ulinastatin. Simultaneously, rats in the control group were administered normal saline. Hematoxylin-eosin staining showed that most hippocampal cells were contracted and nucleoli had disappeared in the paraquat group. Fewer cells in the hippocampus were concentrated and nucleoli had disappeared in the ulinastatin group. Western blot assay showed that expressions of GRP78 and cleaved-caspase-3 were significantly lower in the ulinastatin group than in the paraquat group. Immunohistochemical findings showed that CHOP immunoreactivity was significantly lower in the ulinastatin group than in the paraquat group. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling staining showed that the number of apoptotic cells was reduced in the paraquat and ulinastatin groups. These data confirmed that endoplasmic reticular stress can be induced by acute paraquat poisoning. Ulinastatin can effectively inhibit this stress as well as cell apoptosis, thereby exerting a neuroprotective effect. PMID:25878598

  8. Activation of the dorsal hippocampal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors improves tamoxifen-induced memory retrieval impairment in adult female rats.

    PubMed

    Tajik, Azam; Rezayof, Ameneh; Ghasemzadeh, Zahra; Sardari, Maryam

    2016-07-01

    Tamoxifen (TAM), a selective estrogen receptor modulator, has frequently been used in the treatment of breast cancer. In view of the fact that cognitive deficits in women who receive adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer is a common health problem, using female animal models for investigating the cognitive effects of TAM administration may improve our knowledge of TAM therapy. Therefore, the present study assessed the role of dorsal hippocampal cholinergic nicotinic receptors (nAChRs) in the effect of TAM administration on memory retrieval in ovariectomized (OVX) and non-OVX female rats using a passive avoidance learning task. Our results showed that pre-test administration of TAM (2-6mg/kg) impaired memory retrieval. Pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of nicotine (0.3-0.5μg/rat) reversed TAM-induced memory impairment. Pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of mecamylamine (0.1-0.3μg/rat) plus 2mg/kg (an ineffective dose) of TAM impaired memory retrieval. Pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of the same doses of nicotine and mecamylamine by themselves had no effect on memory retrieval. In OVX rats, the administration of TAM (6mg/kg) produced memory impairment but pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of nicotine (0.5μg/rat) had no effect on TAM response. Moreover, the administration of an ineffective dose of TAM (2mg/kg) had no effect on memory retrieval in OVX rats, while pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of mecamylamine (0.3μg/rat) impaired memory retrieval. Taken together, it can be concluded that the impairing effect of TAM on memory formation may be modulated by nAChRs of the CA1 regions. It seems that memory impairment may be considered as an important side effect of TAM. PMID:27072849

  9. Mephedrone in Adolescent Rats: Residual Memory Impairment and Acute but Not Lasting 5-HT Depletion

    PubMed Central

    Motbey, Craig P.; Karanges, Emily; Li, Kong M.; Wilkinson, Shane; Winstock, Adam R.; Ramsay, John; Hicks, Callum; Kendig, Michael D.; Wyatt, Naomi; Callaghan, Paul D.; McGregor, Iain S.

    2012-01-01

    Mephedrone (4-methylmethcathinone, MMC) is a popular recreational drug, yet its potential harms are yet to be fully established. The current study examined the impact of single or repeated MMC exposure on various neurochemical and behavioral measures in rats. In Experiment 1 male adolescent Wistar rats received single or repeated (once a day for 10 days) injections of MMC (30 mg/kg) or the comparator drug methamphetamine (METH, 2.5 mg/kg). Both MMC and METH caused robust hyperactivity in the 1 h following injection although this effect did not tend to sensitize with repeated treatment. Striatal dopamine (DA) levels were increased 1 h following either METH or MMC while striatal and hippocampal serotonin (5-HT) levels were decreased 1 h following MMC but not METH. MMC caused greater increases in 5-HT metabolism and greater reductions in DA metabolism in rats that had been previously exposed to MMC. Autoradiographic analysis showed no signs of neuroinflammation ([125I]CLINDE ligand used as a marker for translocator protein (TSPO) expression) with repeated exposure to either MMC or METH. In Experiment 2, rats received repeated MMC (7.5, 15 or 30 mg/kg once a day for 10 days) and were examined for residual behavioral effects following treatment. Repeated high (30 mg/kg) dose MMC produced impaired novel object recognition 5 weeks after drug treatment. However, no residual changes in 5-HT or DA tissue levels were observed at 7 weeks post-treatment. Overall these results show that MMC causes acute but not lasting changes in DA and 5-HT tissue concentrations. MMC can also cause long-term memory impairment. Future studies of cognitive function in MMC users are clearly warranted. PMID:23029034

  10. Neuroprotective effects of oleuropein against cognitive dysfunction induced by colchicine in hippocampal CA1 area in rats.

    PubMed

    Pourkhodadad, Soheila; Alirezaei, Masoud; Moghaddasi, Mehrnoush; Ahmadvand, Hassan; Karami, Manizheh; Delfan, Bahram; Khanipour, Zahra

    2016-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder with decline in memory. The role of oxidative stress is well known in the pathogenesis of the disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate pretreatment effects of oleuropein on oxidative status and cognitive dysfunction induced by colchicine in the hippocampal CA1 area. Male Wistar rats were pretreated orally once daily for 10 days with oleuropein at doses of 10, 15 and 20 mg/kg. Thereafter, colchicine (15 μg/rat) was administered into the CA1 area of the hippocampus to induce cognitive dysfunction. The Morris water maze was used to assess learning and memory. Biochemical parameters such as glutathione peroxidase and catalase activities, nitric oxide and malondialdehyde concentrations were measured to evaluate the antioxidant status in the rat hippocampus. Our results indicated that colchicine significantly impaired spatial memory and induced oxidative stress; in contrast, oleuropein pretreatment significantly improved learning and memory retention, and attenuated the oxidative damage. The results clearly indicate that oleuropein has neuroprotective effects against colchicine-induced cognitive dysfunction and oxidative damage in rats. PMID:26892487

  11. Low-frequency electrical stimulation enhances the effectiveness of phenobarbital on GABAergic currents in hippocampal slices of kindled rats.

    PubMed

    Asgari, Azam; Semnanian, Saeed; Atapour, Nafiseh; Shojaei, Amir; Moradi-Chameh, Homeira; Ghafouri, Samireh; Sheibani, Vahid; Mirnajafi-Zadeh, Javad

    2016-08-25

    Low frequency stimulation (LFS) has been proposed as a new approach in the treatment of epilepsy. The anticonvulsant mechanism of LFS may be through its effect on GABAA receptors, which are the main target of phenobarbital anticonvulsant action. We supposed that co-application of LFS and phenobarbital may increase the efficacy of phenobarbital. Therefore, the interaction of LFS and phenobarbital on GABAergic inhibitory post-synaptic currents (IPSCs) in kindled and control rats was investigated. Animals were kindled by electrical stimulation of basolateral amygdala in a semi rapid manner (12 stimulations/day). The effect of phenobarbital, LFS and phenobarbital+LFS was investigated on GABAA-mediated evoked and miniature IPSCs in the hippocampal brain slices in control and fully kindled animals. Phenobarbital and LFS had positive interaction on GABAergic currents. In vitro co-application of an ineffective pattern of LFS (100 pulses at afterdischarge threshold intensity) and a sub-threshold dose of phenobarbital (100μM) which had no significant effect on GABAergic currents alone, increased the amplitude and area under curve of GABAergic currents in CA1 pyramidal neurons of hippocampal slices significantly. Interestingly, the sub-threshold dose of phenobarbital potentiated the GABAergic currents when applied on the hippocampal slices of kindled animals which received LFS in vivo. Post-synaptic mechanisms may be involved in observed interactions. Obtained results implied a positive interaction between LFS and phenobarbital through GABAA currents. It may be suggested that a combined therapy of phenobarbital and LFS may be a useful manner for reinforcing the anticonvulsant action of phenobarbital. PMID:27235746

  12. Dual Electrophysiological Recordings of Synaptically-evoked Astroglial and Neuronal Responses in Acute Hippocampal Slices

    PubMed Central

    Rouach, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    Astrocytes form together with neurons tripartite synapses, where they integrate and modulate neuronal activity. Indeed, astrocytes sense neuronal inputs through activation of their ion channels and neurotransmitter receptors, and process information in part through activity-dependent release of gliotransmitters. Furthermore, astrocytes constitute the main uptake system for glutamate, contribute to potassium spatial buffering, as well as to GABA clearance. These cells therefore constantly monitor synaptic activity, and are thereby sensitive indicators for alterations in synaptically-released glutamate, GABA and extracellular potassium levels. Additionally, alterations in astroglial uptake activity or buffering capacity can have severe effects on neuronal functions, and might be overlooked when characterizing physiopathological situations or knockout mice. Dual recording of neuronal and astroglial activities is therefore an important method to study alterations in synaptic strength associated to concomitant changes in astroglial uptake and buffering capacities. Here we describe how to prepare hippocampal slices, how to identify stratum radiatum astrocytes, and how to record simultaneously neuronal and astroglial electrophysiological responses. Furthermore, we describe how to isolate pharmacologically the synaptically-evoked astroglial currents. PMID:23222635

  13. Developmental Age Differentially Mediates the Calcium-Binding Protein Parvalbumin in the Rat: Evidence for a Selective Decrease in Hippocampal Parvalbumin Cell Counts.

    PubMed

    Honeycutt, Jennifer A; Keary Iii, Kevin M; Kania, Vanessa M; Chrobak, James J

    2016-01-01

    Local circuit GABAergic neurons, including parvalbumin (PV)-containing basket cells, likely play a key role in the development, physiology, and pathology of neocortical circuits. Regionally selective and well-defined decreases in PV have been described in human postmortem schizophrenic brain tissue in both the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Animal models of schizophreniform dysfunction following acute and/or chronic ketamine treatment have also demonstrated decreases in PV expression. Conflicting reports with respect to PV immunoreactivity following acute and chronic ketamine treatments in rodents question the utility of using PV as a biological marker of pathology-related dysfunction. The current literature lacks sufficient and systematic characterization of normative PV expression in pharmacologically and behaviorally naïve rodent tissue. In order to understand developmental changes in PV and its putative role in neuropathology, we examined the baseline distribution of the number of cells expressing this protein at distinct developmental ages. The present study examined PV cell counts across the septotemporal axis of the CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus (DG) regions of the hippocampus, as well as within the retrosplenial, somatosensory, and prefrontal cortices, in 1-, 6-, and 12-month-old naïve rats. Our findings suggest that the hippocampal PV+ cell number significantly decreases as a function of age with considerable regional (CA1, CA3, and DG) and septotemporal variation, a finding that was specific to the hippocampus. Additionally, we observed a modest increase in PV cell number within the prefrontal (anterior cingulate) cortex, which is in line with findings indicating a delayed developmental maturation of this region. The present work highlights decreases in PV+ cell counts within the hippocampus across development, and points to the need for a greater understanding of the role of PV and local circuit developmental changes, as well as consideration of

  14. NMR based metabolomics reveals acute hippocampal metabolic fluctuations during cranial irradiation in murine model.

    PubMed

    Rana, Poonam; Gupta, Mamta; Khan, Ahmad Raza; Hemanth Kumar, B S; Roy, Raja; Khushu, Subash

    2014-07-01

    Cranial irradiation is widely used as a treatment modality or prophylactic treatment in cancer patients, but it is frequently related to neurocognitive impairment in cancer survivors. Though most of radiation-induced changes occur during early and late delayed phase of radiation sickness, recent reports have supported the evidence of impaired neurogenesis within 24-48 h of radiation exposure that may implicate changes in acute phase as well. Inspection of these acute changes could be considered important as they may have long lasting effect on cognitive development and functions. In the present study, (1)H NMR spectroscopy based metabolomic approach was used to obtain comprehensive information of hippocampus metabolic physiology during acute phase of radiation sickness in a mouse model for single dose 8 Gy cranial irradiation. The analysis demonstrated reduced metabolic activity in irradiated animals compared to controls, typically evident in citric acid cycle intermediates, glutamine/glutamate and ketone bodies metabolism thus providing strong indication that the hippocampus is metabolically responsive to radiation exposure. The data suggested reduced glucose utilization, altered intermediary and neurotransmitter metabolism in hippocampus tissue extract. To the best of our knowledge this is the first metabolomic study to document cranial irradiation induced acute metabolic changes using in vitro(1)H NMR spectroscopy. PMID:24787771

  15. Tetanus toxin induces long-term changes in excitation and inhibition in the rat hippocampal CA1 area.

    PubMed

    Vreugdenhil, M; Hack, S P; Draguhn, A; Jefferys, J G R

    2002-01-01

    Intrahippocampal tetanus toxin induces a period of chronic recurrent limbic seizures in adult rats, associated with a failure of inhibition in the hippocampus. The rats normally gain remission from their seizures after 6-8 weeks, but show persistent cognitive impairment. In this study we assessed which changes in cellular and network properties could account for the enduring changes in this model, using intracellular and extracellular field recordings in hippocampal slices from rats injected with tetanus toxin or vehicle, 5 months previously. In CA1 pyramidal neurones from toxin-injected rats, the slope of the action potential upstroke was reduced by 32%, the fast afterhyperpolarisation by 32% and the slow afterhyperpolarisation by 54%, suggesting changes in voltage-dependent conductances. The excitatory postsynaptic potential slope was reduced by 60% and the population synaptic potential slope was reduced at all stimulus intensities, suggesting a reduced afferent input in CA1. Paired-pulse stimulation showed an increase of the excitability ratio and an increase of cellular excitability only for the second pulse, suggesting a reduced inhibition. The polysynaptic inhibitory postsynaptic potential was reduced by 34%, whereas neither the inhibitory postsynaptic potential at subthreshold stimulus intensities,nor the pharmacologically isolated monosynaptic inhibitory postsynaptic potential were different in toxin-injected rats, suggesting a reduced synaptic excitation of interneurones. Stratum radiatum stimuli in toxin-injected rats, and not in controls, evoked antidromic activation of CA1 neurones, demonstrating axonal sprouting into areas normally devoid of CA1 pyramidal cell axons.We conclude that this combination of enduring changes in cellular and network properties, both pro-epileptic (increased recurrent excitatory connectivity, reduced recurrent inhibition and reduced afterhyperpolarisations) and anti-epileptic (impaired firing and reduced excitation), reaches a

  16. Blockade of Astrocytic Calcineurin/NFAT Signaling Helps to Normalize Hippocampal Synaptic Function and Plasticity in a Rat Model of Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Furman, Jennifer L.; Sompol, Pradoldej; Kraner, Susan D.; Pleiss, Melanie M.; Putman, Esther J.; Dunkerson, Jacob; Mohmmad Abdul, Hafiz; Roberts, Kelly N.; Scheff, Stephen W.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the calcineurin (CN)-dependent transcription factor NFAT (Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells) mediates deleterious effects of astrocytes in progressive neurodegenerative conditions. However, the impact of astrocytic CN/NFAT signaling on neural function/recovery after acute injury has not been investigated extensively. Using a controlled cortical impact (CCI) procedure in rats, we show that traumatic brain injury is associated with an increase in the activities of NFATs 1 and 4 in the hippocampus at 7 d after injury. NFAT4, but not NFAT1, exhibited extensive labeling in astrocytes and was found throughout the axon/dendrite layers of CA1 and the dentate gyrus. Blockade of the astrocytic CN/NFAT pathway in rats using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors expressing the astrocyte-specific promoter Gfa2 and the NFAT-inhibitory peptide VIVIT prevented the injury-related loss of basal CA1 synaptic strength and key synaptic proteins and reduced the susceptibility to induction of long-term depression. In conjunction with these seemingly beneficial effects, VIVIT treatment elicited a marked increase in the expression of the prosynaptogenic factor SPARCL1 (hevin), especially in hippocampal tissue ipsilateral to the CCI injury. However, in contrast to previous work on Alzheimer's mouse models, AAV-Gfa2-VIVIT had no effects on the levels of GFAP and Iba1, suggesting that synaptic benefits of VIVIT were not attributable to a reduction in glial activation per se. Together, the results implicate the astrocytic CN/NFAT4 pathway as a key mechanism for disrupting synaptic remodeling and homeostasis in the hippocampus after acute injury. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Similar to microglia, astrocytes become strongly “activated” with neural damage and exhibit numerous morphologic/biochemical changes, including an increase in the expression/activity of the protein phosphatase calcineurin. Using adeno-associated virus (AAV) to inhibit the calcineurin

  17. Single fluoxetine treatment before but not after stress prevents stress-induced hippocampal long-term depression and spatial memory retrieval impairment in rats.

    PubMed

    Han, Huili; Dai, Chunfang; Dong, Zhifang

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of evidence has shown that chronic treatment with fluoxetine, a widely prescribed medication for treatment of depression, can affect synaptic plasticity in the adult central nervous system. However, it is not well understood whether acute fluoxetine influences synaptic plasticity, especially on hippocampal CA1 long-term depression (LTD), and if so, whether it subsequently impacts hippocampal-dependent spatial memory. Here, we reported that LTD facilitated by elevated-platform stress in hippocampal slices was completely prevented by fluoxetine administration (10 mg/kg, i.p.) 30 min before stress. The LTD was not, however, significantly inhibited by fluoxetine administration immediately after stress. Similarly, fluoxetine incubation (10 μM) during electrophysiological recordings also displayed no influence on the stress-facilitated LTD. In addition, behavioral results showed that a single fluoxetine treatment 30 min before but not after acute stress fully reversed the impairment of spatial memory retrieval in the Morris water maze paradigm. Taken together, these results suggest that acute fluoxetine treatment only before, but not after stress, can prevent hippocampal CA1 LTD and spatial memory retrieval impairment caused by behavioral stress in adult animals. PMID:26218751

  18. Hippocampal VEGF is necessary for antidepressant-like behaviors but not sufficient for antidepressant-like effects of ketamine in rats.

    PubMed

    Choi, Miyeon; Lee, Seung Hoon; Chang, Ho Lee; Son, Hyeon

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the effects of ketamine on both the temporal and spatial profiles of neural precursor cells located in the hippocampus, and on antidepressant-like behaviors in rats. A single dose of ketamine resulted in a significant increase in the number of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine-positive (BrdU(+)) cells in the dentate gyrus (DG) of rats at 24h, but not at 28days, after treatment completion. Ketamine caused antidepressant-like behaviors in the forced swim test (FST) and novelty suppressed feeding test (NSFT). Viral-mediated hippocampal knockdown of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) produced depressive-like behaviors in the FST and NSFT, which were partially recovered by ketamine to the level observed in the control group. The behavioral effects of VEGF knock down were accompanied by a decrease in hippocampal neurogenesis, which was also partially recovered by ketamine. Our results suggest that basal hippocampal VEGF expression is necessary for ketamine-induced antidepressant-like behaviors in rats, but ketamine-induced VEGF expression only partially contributes to hippocampal neurogenesis and the antidepressant-like effects of ketamine. PMID:27063455

  19. Qualitative analysis of hippocampal plastic changes in rats with epilepsy supplemented with oral omega-3 fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Cysneiros, Roberta M; Ferrari, Danuza; Arida, Ricardo M; Terra, Vera C; de Almeida, Antonio-Carlos G; Cavalheiro, Esper A; Scorza, Fulvio A

    2010-01-01

    Studies have provided evidence of the important effects of omega-3 fatty acid on the brain in neurological conditions, including epilepsy. Previous data have indicated that omega-3 fatty acids lead to prevention of status epilepticus-associated neuropathological changes in the hippocampal formation of rats with epilepsy. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation has resulted in extensive preservation of GABAergic cells in animals with epilepsy. This study investigated the interplay of these effects with neurogenesis and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). The results clearly showed a positive effect of long-term omega-3 fatty acid supplementation on brain plasticity in animals with epilepsy. Enhanced hippocampal neurogenesis and BDNF levels and preservation of interneurons expressing parvalbumin were observed. Parvalbumin-positive cells were identified as surviving instead of newly formed cells. Additional investigations are needed to determine the electrophysiological properties of the newly formed cells and to clarify whether the effects of omega-3 fatty acids on brain plasticity are accompanied by functional gain in animals with epilepsy. PMID:19969506

  20. The protective role of ascorbic acid on hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons in a rat model of maternal lead exposure.

    PubMed

    Sepehri, Hamid; Ganji, Farzaneh

    2016-07-01

    Oxidative stress is a major pathogenic mechanism of lead neurotoxicity. The antioxidant ascorbic acid protects hippocampal pyramidal neurons against cell death during congenital lead exposure; however, critical functions like synaptic transmission, integration, and plasticity depend on preservation of dendritic and somal morphology. This study was designed to examine if ascorbic acid also protects neuronal morphology during developmental lead exposure. Timed pregnant rats were divided into four treatment groups: (1) control, (2) 100mg/kg ascorbic acid once a day via gavage, (3) 0.05% lead acetate in drinking water, and (4) 0.05% lead+100mg/kg oral ascorbic acid. Brains of eight male pups (P25) per treatment group were processed for Golgi staining. Changes in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons' somal size were estimated by cross-sectional area and changes in dendritic arborization by Sholl's analysis. One-way ANOVA was used to compare results among treatment groups. Lead-exposed pups exhibited a significant decrease in somal size compared to controls (P<0.01) that was reversed by cotreatment with ascorbic acid. Sholl's analysis revealed a significant increase in apical dendritic branch points near cell body (P<0.05) and a decreased total dendritic length in both apical and basal dendritic trees of CA1 neurons (P<0.05). Ascorbic acid significantly but only partially reversed the somal and dendritic damage caused by developmental lead exposure. Oxidative stress thus contributes to lead neurotoxicity but other pathogenic mechanisms are also involved. PMID:26783884

  1. The Impacts of Swimming Exercise on Hippocampal Expression of Neurotrophic Factors in Rats Exposed to Chronic Unpredictable Mild Stress

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Rui-Li; Zhang, Li-Hong; Xue, Ying; Tang, Mi-Mi

    2014-01-01

    Depression is associated with stress-induced neural atrophy in limbic brain regions, whereas exercise has antidepressant effects as well as increasing hippocampal synaptic plasticity by strengthening neurogenesis, metabolism, and vascular function. A key mechanism mediating these broad benefits of exercise on the brain is induction of neurotrophic factors, which instruct downstream structural and functional changes. To systematically evaluate the potential neurotrophic factors that were involved in the antidepressive effects of exercise, in this study, we assessed the effects of swimming exercise on hippocampal mRNA expression of several classes of the growth factors (BDNF, GDNF, NGF, NT-3, FGF2, VEGF, and IGF-1) and peptides (VGF and NPY) in rats exposed to chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS). Our study demonstrated that the swimming training paradigm significantly induced the expression of BDNF and BDNF-regulated peptides (VGF and NPY) and restored their stress-induced downregulation. Additionally, the exercise protocol also increased the antiapoptotic Bcl-xl expression and normalized the CUMS mediated induction of proapoptotic Bax mRNA level. Overall, our data suggest that swimming exercise has antidepressant effects, increasing the resistance to the neural damage caused by CUMS, and both BDNF and its downstream neurotrophic peptides may exert a major function in the exercise related adaptive processes to CUMS. PMID:25477997

  2. Nondestructive evaluation of progressive neuronal changes in organotypic rat hippocampal slice cultures using ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fengqiang; Song, Yu; Dryer, Alexandra; Cogguillo, William; Berdichevsky, Yevgeny; Zhou, Chao

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Three-dimensional tissue cultures have been used as effective models for studying different diseases, including epilepsy. High-throughput, nondestructive techniques are essential for rapid assessment of disease-related processes, such as progressive cell death. An ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence microscopy (UHR-OCM) system with ∼1.5  μm axial resolution and ∼2.3  μm transverse resolution was developed to evaluate seizure-induced neuronal injury in organotypic rat hippocampal cultures. The capability of UHR-OCM to visualize cells in neural tissue was confirmed by comparison of UHR-OCM images with confocal immunostained images of the same cultures. In order to evaluate the progression of neuronal injury, UHR-OCM images were obtained from cultures on 7, 14, 21, and 28 days in vitro (DIVs). In comparison to DIV 7, statistically significant reductions in three-dimensional cell count and culture thickness from UHR-OCM images were observed on subsequent time points. In cultures treated with kynurenic acid, significantly less reduction in cell count and culture thickness was observed compared to the control specimens. These results demonstrate the capability of UHR-OCM to perform rapid, label-free, and nondestructive evaluation of neuronal death in organotypic hippocampal cultures. UHR-OCM, in combination with three-dimensional tissue cultures, can potentially prove to be a promising tool for high-throughput screening of drugs targeting various disorders. PMID:25750928

  3. Platelet-activating factor attenuation of long-term potentiation in rat hippocampal slices via protein tyrosine kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Benjamin; Wang, Wenwei; Liu, Jianuo; Xiong, Huangui

    2016-02-26

    It is well established that HIV-1-infected mononuclear phagocytes release platelet activating factor (PAF) and elevated levels of PAF have been detected in blood and in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients with HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). It is our hypothesis that the elevated levels of PAF alter long-term potentiation (LTP) in the hippocampus, leading to neurocognitive dysfunction. To test this hypothesis, we studied the effects of PAF on LTP in the CA1 region of rat hippocampal slices. Our results showed incubation of hippocampal slices with PAF attenuated LTP. The PAF-mediated attenuation was blocked by ginkgolide B, a PAF receptor antagonist, suggesting PAF attenuation of LTP via PAF receptors. Application of lyso-PAF, an inactive PAF analog, had no apparent effect on LTP. Further investigation revealed an involvement of tyrosine kinase in PAF attenuation of LTP, which was demonstrated by lavendustin A (a specific protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor) blockage of PAF attenuation of LTP. As LTP is widely considered as the cellular and synaptic basis for learning and memory, the attenuation of LTP by PAF may contribute at least in part to the HAND pathogenesis. PMID:26808643

  4. Surgery-Induced Hippocampal Angiotensin II Elevation Causes Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption via MMP/TIMP in Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhengqian; Mo, Na; Li, Lunxu; Cao, Yiyun; Wang, Wenming; Liang, Yaoxian; Deng, Hui; Xing, Rui; Yang, Lin; Ni, Cheng; Chui, Dehua; Guo, Xiangyang

    2016-01-01

    Reversible blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption has been uniformly reported in several animal models of postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD). Nevertheless, the precise mechanism underlying this occurrence remains unclear. Using an aged rat model of POCD, we investigated the dynamic changes in expression of molecules involved in BBB disintegration, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and -9 (MMP-9), as well as three of their endogenous tissue inhibitors of MMP (TIMP-1, -2, -3), and tried to establish the correlation between MMP/TIMP balance and surgery-induced hippocampal BBB disruption. We validated the increased hippocampal expression of angiotensin II (Ang II) and Ang II receptor type 1 (AT1) after surgery. We also found MMP/TIMP imbalance as early as 6 h after surgery, together with increased BBB permeability and decreased expression of Occludin and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), as well as increased basal lamina protein laminin at 24 h postsurgery. The AT1 antagonist candesartan restored MMP/TIMP equilibrium and modulated expression of Occludin and laminin, but not ZO-1, thereby improving BBB permeability. These events were accompanied by suppression of the surgery-induced canonical nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation cascade. Nevertheless, AT1 antagonism did not affect nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) expression. Collectively, these findings suggest that surgery-induced Ang II release impairs BBB integrity by activating NF-κB signaling and disrupting downstream MMP/TIMP balance via AT1 receptor. PMID:27199659

  5. The impacts of swimming exercise on hippocampal expression of neurotrophic factors in rats exposed to chronic unpredictable mild stress.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Pei; Dang, Rui-Li; Li, Huan-De; Zhang, Li-Hong; Zhu, Wen-Ye; Xue, Ying; Tang, Mi-Mi

    2014-01-01

    Depression is associated with stress-induced neural atrophy in limbic brain regions, whereas exercise has antidepressant effects as well as increasing hippocampal synaptic plasticity by strengthening neurogenesis, metabolism, and vascular function. A key mechanism mediating these broad benefits of exercise on the brain is induction of neurotrophic factors, which instruct downstream structural and functional changes. To systematically evaluate the potential neurotrophic factors that were involved in the antidepressive effects of exercise, in this study, we assessed the effects of swimming exercise on hippocampal mRNA expression of several classes of the growth factors (BDNF, GDNF, NGF, NT-3, FGF2, VEGF, and IGF-1) and peptides (VGF and NPY) in rats exposed to chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS). Our study demonstrated that the swimming training paradigm significantly induced the expression of BDNF and BDNF-regulated peptides (VGF and NPY) and restored their stress-induced downregulation. Additionally, the exercise protocol also increased the antiapoptotic Bcl-xl expression and normalized the CUMS mediated induction of proapoptotic Bax mRNA level. Overall, our data suggest that swimming exercise has antidepressant effects, increasing the resistance to the neural damage caused by CUMS, and both BDNF and its downstream neurotrophic peptides may exert a major function in the exercise related adaptive processes to CUMS. PMID:25477997

  6. Effect of the PGD2-DP signaling pathway on primary cultured rat hippocampal neuron injury caused by aluminum overload

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jie; Yang, Qunfang; Wei, Yuling; Yang, Yang; Ji, Chaonan; Hu, Xinyue; Mai, Shaoshan; Kuang, Shengnan; Tian, Xiaoyan; Luo, Ying; Liang, Guojuan; Yang, Junqing

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the agonists and antagonists of DP receptor were used to examine whether the PGD2-DP signaling pathway affects neuronal function. Primary cultured hippocampal neuron was prepared and treated with aluminum maltolate (100 μM) to establish the neuronal damage model. PGD2 and cAMP content was detected by ELISA. L-PGDS and DPs mRNA and protein expression were measured by RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. The aluminium-load neuron was treated with the DP1 agonist BW245C, the DP1 antagonist BWA868C, the DP2 agonist DK-PGD2, and the DP2 antagonist CAY10471, respectively. Neuronal pathomorphology was observed using H-E staining. The cell viability and the lactate dehydrogenase leakage rates of neurons were measured with MTT and LDH kit, respectively. Ca2+ level was detected by Fluo-3/AM. In the model group, the MTT values obviously decreased; LDH leakage rates and PGD2 content increased significantly; L-PGDS, DP1 mRNA and protein expressions increased, and DP2 level decreased. BW245C reduced the Ca2+ fluorescence intensity and protected the neurons. DK-PGD2 increased the intensity of Ca2+ fluorescence, while CAY10471 had the opposite effect. In conclusion, contrary to the effect of DP2, the PGD2-DP1 signaling pathway protects against the primary cultured rat hippocampal neuronal injury caused by aluminum overload. PMID:27089935

  7. Early postnatal expression and localization of matrix metalloproteinases-2 and -9 during establishment of rat hippocampal synaptic circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Aujla, Paven K.; Huntley, George W.

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are extracellular proteolytic enzymes that contribute to pericellular remodeling in a variety of tissues, including brain, where they function in adult hippocampal synaptic structural and functional plasticity. Synaptic plasticity and remodeling are also important for development of connectivity, but it is unclear whether MMPs—particularly MMP-2 and -9, the major MMPs operative in brain—contribute at these stages. Here, we use a combination of biochemical and anatomical methods to characterize expression and localization of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in early postnatal and adult rat hippocampus. Gene and protein expression of these MMPs are evident throughout hippocampus at all ages examined, but expression levels were highest during the first postnatal week. MMP-2 and MMP-9 immunolocalized to punctate structures within the neuropil that codistributed with foci of proteolytic activity, as well as with markers of growing axons and synapses. Taken together, discrete foci of MMP proteolysis are likely important for actively shaping and remodeling cellular and connectional architecture as hippocampal circuitry is becoming established during early postnatal life. PMID:24114974

  8. Effect of modified Bo-yang-Hwan-o-Tang, a polyherbal medicine on the hippocampal neuronal damage in a rat model of global ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Tae Woo; Jung, Hyo Won; Park, Yong-Ki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion has been well-characterized as a common pathological status contributing to vascular dementia (VD). In this study, the neuroprotective effect of modified Bo-yang-Hwan-O Tang (mBHT), a polyherbal medicine for ischemic stroke, was investigated in a rat model for global ischemia. Materials and Methods: Global ischemia model was prepared in Sprague-Dawley rats by the permanent occlusion of bilateral common carotid arteries (two-vessel occlusion [2VO])-induced chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. mBHT at doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg was orally administrated for 4 weeks once a day, 24 h after 2VO. Histopathological change of the hippocampal region was observed by hematoxylin and eosin, Nissl, and Fluoro-Jade B staining and immunohistochemistry with anti-glial fibrillary acidic protein and anti-neuronal nuclei antibodies. The expression of Bax, Bcl-2, and caspase-3 was investigated in the hippocampus by Western blot. The nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) expression was also analyzed in hippocampal CA1 region using immunofluorescence staining. Results: The administration of mBHT at doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg significantly inhibited chronic cerebral hypoperfusion-induced neuronal damage and astroglial activation in the hippocampal CA1 region in 2VO rats. mBHT increased the NF-κB expression in the CA1 neuronal cells but decreased in activated astrocytes. In addition, mBHT significantly decreased the hippocampal expression of Bax and caspase-3 and increased the Bcl-2 expression in 2VO rats. Conclusions: Our data indicate that mBHT has a neuroprotective property in VD induced by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion through inhibiting the hippocampal neuronal damage and astrogliosis. PMID:26246747

  9. Tetrodotoxin-sensitive calcium-conducting channels in the rat hippocampal CA1 region.

    PubMed Central

    Akaike, N; Takahashi, K

    1992-01-01

    1. Tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive Ca2+ conducting channels which produce a transient inward current were investigated in pyramidal neurones freshly dissociated from the dorsal part of rat hippocampal CA1 region by the use of the suction-pipette technique, which allows for intracellular perfusion under a single-electrode voltage clamp. 2. In all cells superfused with Na(+)- and K(+)-free external solution containing 10 mM-Ca2+ and 10(-5) M-La3+, a transient inward Ca2+ current was evoked by a step depolarization to potentials more positive than about -50 mV from a holding potential (VH) of -100 mV. This current was inhibited by either removing the extracellular Ca2+ or adding TTX (termed as 'TTX-ICa'). 3. Activation and inactivation processes of the TTX-ICa were highly potential dependent at 20-22 degrees C, and the latter was fitted by a double exponential function. The time to peak of the current decreased from 5.0 to 2.3 ms at a test potential change from -50 to 0 mV. The time constants of the current decay decreased from 2.8 to 2.2 ms for fast component (tau if) and from 16.0 to 8.2 ms for slow component (tau is) at a potential change from -35 to -10 mV. 4. The TTX-ICa was activated at threshold potential of about -55 mV and reached full activation at -30 mV. The steady-state inactivation of TTX-ICa could be fitted by a Boltzmann equation with a slope factor of 6.0 mV and a half-inactivation voltage of -72.5 mV. 5. Biphasic recovery (reactivation) from the complete inactivation of TTX-ICa was observed. The time constant of the major component (78.8 to 91.6% of total) of the reactivation was 13.1 ms, and that of the minor one was 120 to 240 ms. Therefore, TTX-ICa remained fairly constant at a train of stimulation up to 3 Hz. However, the inhibition of current amplitude occurred as the repetitive stimulation increased more than 10 Hz, and considerable tonic inhibition occurred with increasing stimulation frequency. 6. When the peak amplitudes in the individual

  10. A diet high in fat and sugar reverses anxiety-like behaviour induced by limited nesting in male rats: Impacts on hippocampal markers.

    PubMed

    Maniam, Jayanthi; Antoniadis, Christopher P; Le, Vivian; Morris, Margaret J

    2016-06-01

    Stress exposure during early development is known to produce long-term mental health deficits. Stress promotes poor lifestyle choices such as poor diet. Early life adversity and diets high in fat and sugar (HFHS) are known to affect anxiety and memory. However additive effects of HFHS and stress during early development are less explored. Here, we examined whether early life stress (ELS) simulated by limited nesting (LN) induces anxiety-like behaviour and cognitive deficits that are modulated by HFHS diet. We examined key hippocampal markers involved in anxiety and cognition, testing the hypothesis that post-weaning HFHS following ELS would ameliorate anxiety-like behaviour but worsen memory and associated hippocampal changes. Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to LN, postnatal days 2-9, and at weaning, male siblings were given unlimited access to chow or HFHS resulting in (Con-Chow, Con-HFHS, LN-Chow, LN-HFHS, n=11-15/group). Anxiety-like behaviour was assessed by Elevated Plus Maze (EPM) at 10 weeks and spatial and object recognition tested at 11 weeks of age. Rats were culled at 13 weeks. Hippocampal mRNA expression was measured using TaqMan(®) Array Micro Fluidic cards (Life Technologies). As expected HFHS diet increased body weight; LN and control rats had similar weights at 13 weeks, energy intake was also similar across groups. LN-Chow rats showed increased anxiety-like behaviour relative to control rats, but this was reversed by HFHS diet. Spatial and object recognition memory were unaltered by LN exposure or consumption of HFHS diet. Hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor (GR) protein was not affected by LN exposure in chow rats, but was increased by 45% in HFHS rats relative to controls. Hippocampal genes involved in plasticity and mood regulation, GSKα and GSKβ were affected, with reductions in GSKβ under both diet conditions, and reduced GSKα only in LN-HFHS versus Con-HFHS. Interestingly, HFHS diet and LN exposure independently reduced expression of

  11. Differential responses of Trans-Resveratrol on proliferation of neural progenitor cells and aged rat hippocampal neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vivek; Pandey, Ankita; Jahan, Sadaf; Shukla, Rajendra Kumar; Kumar, Dipak; Srivastava, Akriti; Singh, Shripriya; Rajpurohit, Chetan Singh; Yadav, Sanjay; Khanna, Vinay Kumar; Pant, Aditya Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    The plethora of literature has supported the potential benefits of Resveratrol (RV) as a life-extending as well as an anticancer compound. However, these two functional discrepancies resulted at different concentration ranges. Likewise, the role of Resveratrol on adult neurogenesis still remains controversial and less understood despite its well documented health benefits. To gather insight into the biological effects of RV on neurogenesis, we evaluated the possible effects of the compound on the proliferation and survival of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) in culture, and in the hippocampus of aged rats. Resveratrol exerted biphasic effects on NPCs; low concentrations (10 μM) stimulated cell proliferation mediated by increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) and p38 kinases, whereas high concentrations (>20 μM) exhibited inhibitory effects. Administration of Resveratrol (20 mg/kg body weight) to adult rats significantly increased the number of newly generated cells in the hippocampus, with upregulation of p-CREB and SIRT1 proteins implicated in neuronal survival and lifespan extension respectively. We have successfully demonstrated that Resveratrol exhibits dose dependent discrepancies and at a lower concentration can have a positive impact on the proliferation, survival of NPCs and aged rat hippocampal neurogenesis implicating its potential as a candidate for restorative therapies against age related disorders. PMID:27334554

  12. Differential responses of Trans-Resveratrol on proliferation of neural progenitor cells and aged rat hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vivek; Pandey, Ankita; Jahan, Sadaf; Shukla, Rajendra Kumar; Kumar, Dipak; Srivastava, Akriti; Singh, Shripriya; Rajpurohit, Chetan Singh; Yadav, Sanjay; Khanna, Vinay Kumar; Pant, Aditya Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    The plethora of literature has supported the potential benefits of Resveratrol (RV) as a life-extending as well as an anticancer compound. However, these two functional discrepancies resulted at different concentration ranges. Likewise, the role of Resveratrol on adult neurogenesis still remains controversial and less understood despite its well documented health benefits. To gather insight into the biological effects of RV on neurogenesis, we evaluated the possible effects of the compound on the proliferation and survival of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) in culture, and in the hippocampus of aged rats. Resveratrol exerted biphasic effects on NPCs; low concentrations (10 μM) stimulated cell proliferation mediated by increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) and p38 kinases, whereas high concentrations (>20 μM) exhibited inhibitory effects. Administration of Resveratrol (20 mg/kg body weight) to adult rats significantly increased the number of newly generated cells in the hippocampus, with upregulation of p-CREB and SIRT1 proteins implicated in neuronal survival and lifespan extension respectively. We have successfully demonstrated that Resveratrol exhibits dose dependent discrepancies and at a lower concentration can have a positive impact on the proliferation, survival of NPCs and aged rat hippocampal neurogenesis implicating its potential as a candidate for restorative therapies against age related disorders. PMID:27334554

  13. Hippocampal lesions impair performance on a conditional delayed matching and non-matching to position task in the rat.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Hazel L; Döbrössy, Màtè; Dunnett, Stephen B

    2006-08-10

    The hippocampus is thought to be involved in a range of cognitive processes, from the ability to acquire new memories, to the ability to learn about spatial relationships. Humans and monkeys with damage to the hippocampus are typically impaired on delayed matching to sample tasks, of which the operant delayed matching to position task (DMTP) is a rat analogue. The reported effects of hippocampal damage on DMTP vary, ranging from delay-dependent deficits to no deficit whatsoever. The present study investigates a novel memory task; the conditional delayed matching/non-matching to position task (CDM/NMTP) in the Skinner box. CDM/NMTP uses the presence of specific stimulus cues to signify whether a particular trial is matching or non-matching in nature. Thus, it incorporates both the task contingencies within one session, and supplements the requirement for remembering the side of the lever in the sample phase with attending to the stimulus and remembering the conditional discrimination for the rule. Rats were trained preoperatively and the effects of bilateral excitotoxic lesions of the hippocampus were examined on postoperative retention of the task. Rats with lesions of the hippocampus incurred a significant impairment on the task that was manifest at all delays intervals. Despite a bias towards matching during training, trials of either type were performed with equivalent accuracy and neither rule was affected differentially by the lesion. This task may prove useful in determining the cognitive roles of a range of brain areas. PMID:16697059

  14. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol disrupts hippocampal neuroplasticity and neurogenesis in trained, but not untrained adolescent Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Steel, Ryan W J; Miller, John H; Sim, Dalice A; Day, Darren J

    2014-02-22

    Cannabis is the most widely used illicit drug, and disruption of learning and memory are commonly reported consequences of cannabis use. We have previously demonstrated a spatial learning impairment by ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in adolescent Sprague-Dawley rats (Steel et al., 2011). The molecular mechanisms underlying behavioural impairment by cannabis remain poorly understood, although the importance of adaptive changes in neuroplasticity (synaptic number and strength) and neurogenesis during learning are accepted. Here we aimed to identify any effects of THC on the early induction of these adaptive processes supporting learning, so we conducted our analyses at the mid-training point of our previous study. Both untrained and trained (15 days of training) adolescent (P28-P42) Sprague-Dawley rats were treated daily with THC (6 mg/kg i.p.) or its vehicle, and changes in the levels of markers of hippocampal neuroplasticity (CB1R, PSD95, synapsin-I, synapsin-III) and neurogenesis (Ki67, DCX, PSA-NCAM, BrdU labelling) by training were measured. Training of control animals, but not THC-treated animals increased neuroplasticity marker levels. However training of THC-treated animals, but not control animals reduced immature neuronal marker levels. Levels of hippocampal proliferation, and survival of the BrdU-labelled progeny of these divisions were unaffected by THC in trained and untrained animals. These data show a smaller neuroplastic response, and a reduction of new-born neuronal levels not attributable to effects on proliferation or survival by THC-treatment during training. Importantly no effects of THC were seen in the absence of training, indicating that these effects represent specific impairments by THC on training-induced responses. PMID:24398456

  15. The impact of fornix lesions in rats on spatial learning tasks sensitive to anterior thalamic and hippocampal damage

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Julie R.; Amin, Eman; Wright, Nicholas F.; Dillingham, Christopher M.; Aggleton, John P.

    2015-01-01

    The present study sought to understand how the hippocampus and anterior thalamic nuclei are conjointly required for spatial learning by examining the impact of cutting a major tract (the fornix) that interconnects these two sites. The initial experiments examined the consequences of fornix lesions in rats on spatial biconditional discrimination learning. The rationale arose from previous findings showing that fornix lesions spare the learning of spatial biconditional tasks, despite the same task being highly sensitive to both hippocampal and anterior thalamic nuclei lesions. In the present study, fornix lesions only delayed acquisition of the spatial biconditional task, pointing to additional contributions from non-fornical routes linking the hippocampus with the anterior thalamic nuclei. The same fornix lesions spared the learning of an analogous nonspatial biconditional task that used local contextual cues. Subsequent tests, including T-maze place alternation, place learning in a cross-maze, and a go/no-go place discrimination, highlighted the impact of fornix lesions when distal spatial information is used flexibly to guide behaviour. The final experiment examined the ability to learn incidentally the spatial features of a square water-maze that had differently patterned walls. Fornix lesions disrupted performance but did not stop the rats from distinguishing the various corners of the maze. Overall, the results indicate that interconnections between the hippocampus and anterior thalamus, via the fornix, help to resolve problems with flexible spatial and temporal cues, but the results also signal the importance of additional, non-fornical contributions to hippocampal-anterior thalamic spatial processing, particularly for problems with more stable spatial solutions. PMID:25453745

  16. Impaired ILK Function Is Associated with Deficits in Hippocampal Based Memory and Synaptic Plasticity in a FASD Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, D; Dunaway, E P; Bhattacharya, S; Bloemer, J; Buabeid, M; Escobar, M; Suppiramaniam, V; Dhanasekaran, M

    2015-01-01

    Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is an umbrella term that encompasses a wide range of anatomical and behavioral problems in children who are exposed to alcohol during the prenatal period. There is no effective treatment for FASD, because of lack of complete characterization of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this condition. Alcohol has been previously characterized to affect integrins and growth factor signaling receptors. Integrin Linked Kinase (ILK) is an effector of integrin and growth-factor signaling which regulates various signaling processes. In FASD, a downstream effector of ILK, Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β (GSK3β) remains highly active (reduced Ser9 phosphorylation). GSK3β has been known to modulate glutamate receptor trafficking and channel properties. Therefore, we hypothesize that the cognitive deficits accompanying FASD are associated with impairments in the ILK signaling pathway. Pregnant Sprague Dawley rats consumed a "moderate" amount of alcohol throughout gestation, or a calorie-equivalent sucrose solution. Contextual fear conditioning was used to evaluate memory performance in 32-33-day-old pups. Synaptic plasticity was assessed in the Schaffer Collateral pathway, and hippocampal protein lysates were used to evaluate ILK signaling. Alcohol exposed pups showed impaired contextual fear conditioning, as compared to control pups. This reduced memory performance was consistent with decrease in LTP as compared to controls. Hippocampal ILK activity and GSK3β Ser21/9 phosphorylation were significantly lower in alcohol-exposed pups than controls. Increased synaptic expression of GluR2 AMPA receptors was observed with immunoprecipitation of post-synaptic density protein 95 (PSD95). Furthermore, immunoprecipitation of ILK revealed a decreased interaction with GluR2. The ILK pathway appears to play a significant role in memory and synaptic plasticity impairments in FASD rats. These impairments appear to be mediated by reduced GSK3

  17. Impaired ILK Function Is Associated with Deficits in Hippocampal Based Memory and Synaptic Plasticity in a FASD Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, D.; Dunaway, E. P.; Bhattacharya, S.; Bloemer, J.; Buabeid, M.; Escobar, M.

    2015-01-01

    Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is an umbrella term that encompasses a wide range of anatomical and behavioral problems in children who are exposed to alcohol during the prenatal period. There is no effective treatment for FASD, because of lack of complete characterization of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this condition. Alcohol has been previously characterized to affect integrins and growth factor signaling receptors. Integrin Linked Kinase (ILK) is an effector of integrin and growth-factor signaling which regulates various signaling processes. In FASD, a downstream effector of ILK, Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β (GSK3β) remains highly active (reduced Ser9 phosphorylation). GSK3β has been known to modulate glutamate receptor trafficking and channel properties. Therefore, we hypothesize that the cognitive deficits accompanying FASD are associated with impairments in the ILK signaling pathway. Pregnant Sprague Dawley rats consumed a “moderate” amount of alcohol throughout gestation, or a calorie-equivalent sucrose solution. Contextual fear conditioning was used to evaluate memory performance in 32–33-day-old pups. Synaptic plasticity was assessed in the Schaffer Collateral pathway, and hippocampal protein lysates were used to evaluate ILK signaling. Alcohol exposed pups showed impaired contextual fear conditioning, as compared to control pups. This reduced memory performance was consistent with decrease in LTP as compared to controls. Hippocampal ILK activity and GSK3β Ser21/9 phosphorylation were significantly lower in alcohol-exposed pups than controls. Increased synaptic expression of GluR2 AMPA receptors was observed with immunoprecipitation of post-synaptic density protein 95 (PSD95). Furthermore, immunoprecipitation of ILK revealed a decreased interaction with GluR2. The ILK pathway appears to play a significant role in memory and synaptic plasticity impairments in FASD rats. These impairments appear to be mediated by reduced

  18. Effects of sucrose and high fructose corn syrup consumption on spatial memory function and hippocampal neuroinflammation in adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ted M; Konanur, Vaibhav R; Taing, Lilly; Usui, Ryan; Kayser, Brandon D; Goran, Michael I; Kanoski, Scott E

    2015-02-01

    Excessive consumption of added sugars negatively impacts metabolic systems; however, effects on cognitive function are poorly understood. Also unknown is whether negative outcomes associated with consumption of different sugars are exacerbated during critical periods of development (e.g., adolescence). Here we examined the effects of sucrose and high fructose corn syrup-55 (HFCS-55) intake during adolescence or adulthood on cognitive and metabolic outcomes. Adolescent or adult male rats were given 30-day access to chow, water, and either (1) 11% sucrose solution, (2) 11% HFCS-55 solution, or (3) an extra bottle of water (control). In adolescent rats, HFCS-55 intake impaired hippocampal-dependent spatial learning and memory in a Barne's maze, with moderate learning impairment also observed for the sucrose group. The learning and memory impairment is unlikely based on nonspecific behavioral effects as adolescent HFCS-55 consumption did not impact anxiety in the zero maze or performance in a non-spatial response learning task using the same mildly aversive stimuli as the Barne's maze. Protein expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin 6, interleukin 1β) was increased in the dorsal hippocampus for the adolescent HFCS-55 group relative to controls with no significant effect in the sucrose group, whereas liver interleukin 1β and plasma insulin levels were elevated for both adolescent-exposed sugar groups. In contrast, intake of HFCS-55 or sucrose in adults did not impact spatial learning, glucose tolerance, anxiety, or neuroinflammatory markers. These data show that consumption of added sugars, particularly HFCS-55, negatively impacts hippocampal function, metabolic outcomes, and neuroinflammation when consumed in excess during the adolescent period of development. PMID:25242636

  19. Effects of dimethylarsinic and dimethylarsinous acid on evoked synaptic potentials in hippocampal slices of young and adult rats

    SciTech Connect

    Krueger, Katharina Repges, Hendrik; Hippler, Joerg; Hartmann, Louise M.; Hirner, Alfred V.; Straub, Heidrun; Binding, Norbert; Musshoff, Ulrich

    2007-11-15

    In this study, the effects of pentavalent dimethylarsinic acid ((CH{sub 3}){sub 2}AsO(OH); DMA{sup V}) and trivalent dimethylarsinous acid ((CH{sub 3}){sub 2}As(OH); DMA{sup III}) on synaptic transmission generated by the excitatory Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapse were tested in hippocampal slices of young (14-21 day-old) and adult (2-4 month-old) rats. Both compounds were applied in concentrations of 1 to 100 {mu}mol/l. DMA{sup V} had no effect on the amplitudes of evoked fEPSPs or the induction of LTP recorded from the CA1 dendritic region either in adult or in young rats. However, application of DMA{sup III} significantly reduced the amplitudes of evoked fEPSPs in a concentration-dependent manner with a total depression following application of 100 {mu}mol/l DMA{sup III} in adult and 10 {mu}mol/l DMA{sup III} in young rats. Moreover, DMA{sup III} significantly affected the LTP-induction. Application of 10 {mu}mol/l DMA{sup III} resulted in a complete failure of the postsynaptic potentiation of the fEPSP amplitudes in slices taken both from adult and young rats. The depressant effect was not reversible after a 30-min washout of the DMA{sup III}. In slices of young rats, the depressant effects of DMA{sup III} were more pronounced than in those taken from adult ones. Compared to the (absent) effect of DMA{sup V} on synaptic transmission, the trivalent compound possesses a considerably higher neurotoxic potential.

  20. Long Term Hippocampal and Cortical Changes Induced by Maternal Deprivation and Neonatal Leptin Treatment in Male and Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mela, Virginia; Díaz, Francisca; Borcel, Erika; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A.; Viveros, Maria-Paz

    2015-01-01

    Maternal deprivation (MD) during neonatal life has diverse long-term behavioral effects and alters the development of the hippocampus and frontal cortex, with several of these effects being sexually dimorphic. MD animals show a marked reduction in their circulating leptin levels, not only during the MD period, but also several days later (PND 13). A neonatal leptin surge occurs in rodents (beginning around PND 5 and peaking between PND 9 and 10) that has an important neurotrophic role. We hypothesized that the deficient neonatal leptin signaling of MD rats could be involved in the altered development of their hippocampus and frontal cortex. Accordingly, a neonatal leptin treatment in MD rats would at least in part counteract their neurobehavioural alterations. MD was carried out in Wistar rats for 24 h on PND 9. Male and female MD and control rats were treated from PND 9 to 13 with rat leptin (3 mg/kg/day sc) or vehicle. In adulthood, the animals were submitted to the open field, novel object memory test and the elevated plus maze test of anxiety. Neuronal and glial population markers, components of the glutamatergic and cannabinoid systems and diverse synaptic plasticity markers were evaluated by PCR and/or western blotting. Main results include: 1) In some of the parameters analyzed, neonatal leptin treatment reversed the effects of MD (eg., mRNA expression of hippocampal IGF1 and protein expression of GFAP and vimentin) partially confirming our hypothesis; 2) The neonatal leptin treatment, per se, exerted a number of behavioral (increased anxiety) and neural effects (eg., expression of the following proteins: NG2, NeuN, PSD95, NCAM, synaptophysin). Most of these effects were sex dependent. An adequate neonatal leptin level (avoiding excess and deficiency) appears to be necessary for its correct neuro-programing effect. PMID:26382238

  1. Novel rat Alzheimer's disease models based on AAV-mediated gene transfer to selectively increase hippocampal Aβ levels

    PubMed Central

    Lawlor, Patricia A; Bland, Ross J; Das, Pritam; Price, Robert W; Holloway, Vallie; Smithson, Lisa; Dicker, Bridget L; During, Matthew J; Young, Deborah; Golde, Todd E

    2007-01-01

    Background Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by a decline in cognitive function and accumulation of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) in extracellular plaques. Mutations in amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilins alter APP metabolism resulting in accumulation of Aβ42, a peptide essential for the formation of amyloid deposits and proposed to initiate the cascade leading to AD. However, the role of Aβ40, the more prevalent Aβ peptide secreted by cells and a major component of cerebral Aβ deposits, is less clear. In this study, virally-mediated gene transfer was used to selectively increase hippocampal levels of human Aβ42 and Aβ40 in adult Wistar rats, allowing examination of the contribution of each to the cognitive deficits and pathology seen in AD. Results Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors encoding BRI-Aβ cDNAs were generated resulting in high-level hippocampal expression and secretion of the specific encoded Aβ peptide. As a comparison the effect of AAV-mediated overexpression of APPsw was also examined. Animals were tested for development of learning and memory deficits (open field, Morris water maze, passive avoidance, novel object recognition) three months after infusion of AAV. A range of impairments was found, with the most pronounced deficits observed in animals co-injected with both AAV-BRI-Aβ40 and AAV-BRI-Aβ42. Brain tissue was analyzed by ELISA and immunohistochemistry to quantify levels of detergent soluble and insoluble Aβ peptides. BRI-Aβ42 and the combination of BRI-Aβ40+42 overexpression resulted in elevated levels of detergent-insoluble Aβ. No significant increase in detergent-insoluble Aβ was seen in the rats expressing APPsw or BRI-Aβ40. No pathological features were noted in any rats, except the AAV-BRI-Aβ42 rats which showed focal, amorphous, Thioflavin-negative Aβ42 deposits. Conclusion The results show that AAV-mediated gene transfer is a valuable tool to model aspects of AD pathology in vivo, and demonstrate that

  2. [Uncaria tomentosa and acute ischemic kidney injury in rats].

    PubMed

    de Fátima Fernandes Vattimo, Maria; da Silva, Natalia Oliveira

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the renoprotective effects of Uncaria Tomentosa (cat's claw) on ischemic acute kidney injury induced by renal clamping in rats. The hypoxia and hypoperfusion increase the production of reactive species already present in the inflammatory process. Results showed that the renal function evaluated by creatinine clearance, the urinary excretion of peroxides and malondealdehyde indexes demonstrated that UT induced renoprotection, probably related to its antioxidant activities. PMID:21445508

  3. TNF-alpha inhibition prevents cognitive decline and maintains hippocampal BDNF levels in the unpredictable chronic mild stress rat model of depression.

    PubMed

    Şahin, Tuğçe Demirtaş; Karson, Ayşe; Balcı, Fuat; Yazır, Yusufhan; Bayramgürler, Dilek; Utkan, Tijen

    2015-10-01

    Previous findings have shown that patients with depression express higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-6. We have recently found that Infliximab (a TNF-α inhibitor) decreased anhedonia and despair-like behavior in the rat unpredictable chronic mild stress (UCMS) model of depression suggesting that inflammation might play an important role in depression. An increasing number of studies suggest that inflammation is also associated with cognitive impairments. The current study aimed to investigate the effect of UCMS on the cognitive performance of rats and their hippocampal BDNF levels and the effect of chronic Infliximab (5mg/kg/weekly, i.p.) treatment on these measures. Rats were subjected to different types of stressors daily for a period of 56 days to induce depression-like state. The UCMS resulted in impairments in spatial and emotional memory acquisition and retention with no effect on the level of locomotor activity. These behavioral effects of UCMS were accompanied by reduction in the level of BDNF in the CA1 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus. Chronic Infliximab treatment prevented the UCMS-induced cognitive impairments as well as the reduction in the levels of hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). These results suggest that Infliximab improves the spatial and emotional memory impairments induced by chronic stress in rats likely through its effects on hippocampal function by modulating inflammation. PMID:26112756

  4. Motivational responses to natural and drug rewards in rats with neonatal ventral hippocampal lesions: an animal model of dual diagnosis schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Chambers, R Andrew; Self, David W

    2002-12-01

    The high prevalence of substance use disorders in schizophrenia relative to the general population and other psychiatric diagnoses could result from developmental neuropathology in hippocampal and cortical structures that underlie schizophrenia. In this study, we tested the effects of neonatal ventral hippocampal lesions on instrumental behavior reinforced by sucrose pellets and intravenous cocaine injections. Lesioned rats acquired sucrose self-administration faster than sham-lesioned rats, but rates of extinction were not altered. Lesioned rats also responded at higher rates during acquisition of cocaine self-administration, and tended to acquire self-administration faster. Higher response rates reflected perseveration of responding during the post-injection "time-out" periods, and a greater incidence of binge-like cocaine intake, which persisted even after cocaine self-administration stabilized. In contrast to sucrose, extinction from cocaine self-administration was prolonged in lesioned rats, and reinstatement of cocaine seeking induced by cocaine priming increased compared with shams. These results suggest that neonatal ventral hippocampal lesions facilitate instrumental learning for both natural and drug rewards, and reduce inhibitory control over cocaine taking while promoting cocaine seeking and relapse after withdrawal. The findings are discussed in terms of possible developmental or direct effects of the lesions, and both positive reinforcement (substance use vulnerability as a primary disease symptom) and negative reinforcement (self-medication) theories of substance use comorbidity in schizophrenia. PMID:12464446

  5. Long term exposure to combination paradigm of environmental enrichment, physical exercise and diet reverses the spatial memory deficits and restores hippocampal neurogenesis in ventral subicular lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Kapgal, Vijayakumar; Prem, Neethi; Hegde, Preethi; Laxmi, T R; Kutty, Bindu M

    2016-04-01

    Subiculum is an important structure of the hippocampal formation and plays an imperative role in spatial learning and memory functions. We have demonstrated earlier the cognitive impairment following bilateral ventral subicular lesion (VSL) in rats. We found that short term exposure to enriched environment (EE) did not help to reverse the spatial memory deficits in water maze task suggesting the need for an appropriate enriched paradigm towards the recovery of spatial memory. In the present study, the efficacy of long term exposure of VSL rats to combination paradigm of environmental enrichment (EE), physical exercise and 18 C.W. diet (Combination Therapy - CT) in reversing the spatial memory deficits in Morris water maze task has been studied. Ibotenate lesioning of ventral subiculum produced significant impairment of performance in the Morris water maze and reduced the hippocampal neurogenesis in rats. Post lesion exposure to C.T. restored the hippocampal neurogenesis and improved the spatial memory functions in VSL rats. Our study supports the hypothesis that the combination paradigm is critical towards the development of an enhanced behavioral and cognitive experience especially in conditions of CNS insults and the associated cognitive dysfunctions. PMID:26851129

  6. Motivational Responses to Natural and Drug Rewards in Rats with Neonatal Ventral Hippocampal Lesions: An Animal Model of Dual Diagnosis Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, R. Andrew; Self, David W.

    2010-01-01

    The high prevalence of substance use disorders in schizophrenia relative to the general population and other psychiatric diagnoses could result from developmental neuropathology in hippocampal and cortical structures that underlie schizophrenia. In this study, we tested the effects of neonatal ventral hippocampal lesions on instrumental behavior reinforced by sucrose pellets and intravenous cocaine injections. Lesioned rats acquired sucrose self-administration faster than sham-lesioned rats, but rates of extinction were not altered. Lesioned rats also responded at higher rates during acquisition of cocaine self-administration, and tended to acquire self-administration faster. Higher response rates reflected perseveration of responding during the post-injection “time-out” periods, and a greater incidence of binge-like cocaine intake, which persisted even after cocaine self-administration stabilized. In contrast to sucrose, extinction from cocaine self-administration was prolonged in lesioned rats, and reinstatement of cocaine seeking induced by cocaine priming increased compared with shams. These results suggest that neonatal ventral hippocampal lesions facilitate instrumental learning for both natural and drug rewards, and reduce inhibitory control over cocaine taking while promoting cocaine seeking and relapse after withdrawal. The findings are discussed in terms of possible developmental or direct effects of the lesions, and both positive reinforcement (substance use vulnerability as a primary disease symptom) and negative reinforcement (self-medication) theories of substance use comorbidity in schizophrenia. PMID:12464446

  7. Exposure to social defeat stress in adolescence improves the working memory and anxiety-like behavior of adult female rats with intrauterine growth restriction, independently of hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Miyako; Ninomiya-Baba, Midori; Chiba, Shuichi; Funabashi, Toshiya; Akema, Tatsuo; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2015-04-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is a risk factor for memory impairment and emotional disturbance during growth and adulthood. However, this risk might be modulated by environmental factors during development. Here we examined whether exposing adolescent male and female rats with thromboxane A2-induced IUGR to social defeat stress (SDS) affected their working memory and anxiety-like behavior in adulthood. We also used BrdU staining to investigate hippocampal cellular proliferation and BrdU and NeuN double staining to investigate neural differentiation in female IUGR rats. In the absence of adolescent stress, IUGR female rats, but not male rats, scored significantly lower in the T-maze test of working memory and exhibited higher anxiety-like behavior in the elevated-plus maze test compared with controls. Adolescent exposure to SDS abolished these behavioral impairments in IUGR females. In the absence of adolescent stress, hippocampal cellular proliferation was significantly higher in IUGR females than in non-IUGR female controls and was not influenced by adolescent exposure to SDS. Hippocampal neural differentiation was equivalent in non-stressed control and IUGR females. Neural differentiation was significantly increased by adolescent exposure to SDS in controls but not in IUGR females. There was no significant difference in the serum corticosterone concentrations between non-stressed control and IUGR females; however, adolescent exposure to SDS significantly increased serum corticosterone concentration in control females but not in IUGR females. These results demonstrate that adolescent exposure to SDS improves behavioral impairment independent of hippocampal neurogenesis in adult rats with IUGR. PMID:25725425

  8. Acute and subchronic toxicity of danshensu in mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yonglin; Liu, Zhifeng; Li, Guisheng; Li, Chunmei; Li, Min; Li, Bafang

    2009-06-01

    Danshensu (3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl) lactic acid), a natural phenolic acid, is isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza root, and is the most widely used traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of various cardiovascular diseases. It has been reported to have potential protective effects from oxidative injury. However, there is a little information about its possible toxicity. In this study, acute and subchronic toxicity of danshensu in mice and rats have been evaluated. In the acute study, danshensu intraveniouslly administered to rats failed to induce any signs of toxicity or mortality up to a maximum practical dosage of 1500 mg/kg body weight. Test substance administered acutely to mice caused dose-dependent general behavior adverse effects and mortality with the medial lethal dose of 2356.33 mg/kg. The no observed adverse effect level and the lowest observed adverse effect level were 1835 mg/kg and 2000 mg/kg, respectively. In the subchronic study, rats were tested by daily intraperitoneal injection of danshensu at the doses of 50, 150, and 450 mg/kg for 90 days, resulting in no mortality, no changes in body weight, food consumption, hematological and serum chemistry parameters, organ weights, or gross pathology or histopathology. The only treatment-related finding was transient writhing response observed in the 450 mg/kg group after administration. PMID:19778213

  9. Impacts of thyroxine combined with donepezil on hippocampal ultrastructures and expressions of synaptotagmin-1 and SNAP-25 in adult rats with hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hao; Zha, Xiaoxue; Cai, Yaojun; Wang, Fen; Wu, Zhangbi; Wu, Bo; Jia, Xuemei; Zhu, Defa

    2015-01-01

    The study aims to observe the impacts of thyroxine (T4) combined with donepezil (DON) on hippocampal ultrastructures and expressions of synaptotagmin-1 and SNAP-25 in adult rats with hypothyroidism. All rats were randomly divided into five groups: the normal control group (CON), the hypothyroidism group (Hypo), the T4 treatment group (T4), the DON treatment group (DON) and the T4+DON combined treatment group (T4+DON). Technique of Electron Microscope (TEM) was used to observe the hippocampal ultrastructures of each group, Western blot and real-time RT-PCR were performed to analyze the protein and mRNA expressions of syt-1 and SNAP-25 in the hippocampus of each group. TEM revealed that the Hypo group exhibited the significant vacuolar degeneration of mitochondria in the hippocampal neurons, the free ribosomes were sparse, the synaptic structures were damaged, and the number of synaptic vesicles was reduced, the above injuries in the T4 or DON group were improved, and the performance of the T4+DON group was the most close to the CON group. From the protein and mRNA levels, the dorsal hippocampal syt-1 expression of the Hypo group was significantly reduced, while SNAP-25 was significantly increased, the expressions were partially recovered after the T4 treatment, and the T4+DON combined treatment made the expression return to normal. The adult hypothyroid rats exhibited pathological damages in the hippocampal ultrastructures, the expression of syt-1 was downregulated, while that of SNAP-25 was upregulated, the T4+DON combined therapy could repair the above injuries, and the roles were better than the single drug treatment. PMID:26770386

  10. Deferoxamine attenuates acute hydrocephalus after traumatic brain injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jinbing; Chen, Zhi; Xi, Guohua; Keep, Richard F.; Hua, Ya

    2014-01-01

    Acute post-traumatic ventricular dilation and hydrocephalus are relatively frequent consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Several recent studies have indicated that high iron level in brain may relate to hydrocephalus development after intracranial hemorrhage. However, the role of iron in the development of post-traumatic hydrocephalus is still unclear. This study was to determine whether or not iron has a role in hydrocephalus development after TBI. TBI was induced by lateral fluid-percussion in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Some rats had intraventricular injection of iron. Acute hydrocephalus was measured by magnetic resonance T2-weighted imaging and brain hemorrhage was determined by T2* gradient-echo sequence imaging and brain hemoglobin levels. The effect of deferoxamine on TBI-induced hydrocephalus was examined. TBI resulted in acute hydrocephalus at 24 hours (lateral ventricle volume: 24.1±3.0 vs. 9.9±0.2 mm3 in sham group). Intraventricular injection of iron also caused hydrocephalus (25.7 ± 3.4 vs. 9.0 ± 0.6 mm3 in saline group). Deferoxamine treatment attenuated TBI-induced hydrocephalus and heme oxygenase-1 upregulation. In conclusion, iron may contribute to acute hydrocephalus after TBI. PMID:24935175

  11. Brain perfusion in acute and chronic hyperglycemia in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kikano, G.E.; LaManna, J.C.; Harik, S.I. )

    1989-08-01

    Recent studies show that acute and chronic hyperglycemia cause a diffuse decrease in regional cerebral blood flow and that chronic hyperglycemia decreases the brain L-glucose space. Since these changes can be caused by a decreased density of perfused brain capillaries, we used 30 adult male Wistar rats to study the effect of acute and chronic hyperglycemia on (1) the brain intravascular space using radioiodinated albumin, (2) the anatomic density of brain capillaries using alkaline phosphatase histochemistry, and (3) the fraction of brain capillaries that are perfused using the fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran method. Our results indicate that acute and chronic hyperglycemia do not affect the brain intravascular space nor the anatomic density of brain capillaries. Also, there were no differences in capillary recruitment among normoglycemic, acutely hyperglycemic, and chronically hyperglycemic rats. These results suggest that the shrinkage of the brain L-glucose space in chronic hyperglycemia is more likely due to changes in the blood-brain barrier permeability to L-glucose.

  12. Sleep restriction acutely impairs glucose tolerance in rats.

    PubMed

    Jha, Pawan K; Foppen, Ewout; Kalsbeek, Andries; Challet, Etienne

    2016-06-01

    Chronic sleep curtailment in humans has been related to impairment of glucose metabolism. To better understand the underlying mechanisms, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of acute sleep deprivation on glucose tolerance in rats. A group of rats was challenged by 4-h sleep deprivation in the early rest period, leading to prolonged (16 h) wakefulness. Another group of rats was allowed to sleep during the first 4 h of the light period and sleep deprived in the next 4 h. During treatment, food was withdrawn to avoid a postmeal rise in plasma glucose. An intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) was performed immediately after the sleep deprivation period. Sleep deprivation at both times of the day similarly impaired glucose tolerance and reduced the early-phase insulin responses to a glucose challenge. Basal concentrations of plasma glucose, insulin, and corticosterone remained unchanged after sleep deprivation. Throughout IVGTTs, plasma corticosterone concentrations were not different between the control and sleep-deprived group. Together, these results demonstrate that independent of time of day and sleep pressure, short sleep deprivation during the resting phase favors glucose intolerance in rats by attenuating the first-phase insulin response to a glucose load. In conclusion, this study highlights the acute adverse effects of only a short sleep restriction on glucose homeostasis. PMID:27354542

  13. Effects of progesterone on hippocampal ultrastructure and expression of inflammatory mediators in neonatal rats with hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Junhe; Zhu, Xiaoqian; Hou, Ruanling; Li, Xinjuan; Dong, Xianhong; Wang, Xiaoyin; Lu, Chengbiao

    2014-05-01

    Progesterone (PROG) has been shown to exhibit a protective function against hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. The aim of the present study was to study the effects of PROG in a neonatal rat model of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. A total of 30 Wistar rats, aged 7 days, were randomly divided into three groups: Sham, model and PROG. The rats in the model and PROG groups underwent a left common carotid artery ligation and were placed in a sealed container at 37°C with 8% O2 and 92% N2 gas mixtures for 2.5 h to establish animal models of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. The rats in the PROG group were intraperitoneally treated with 8 mg/kg PROG solution 30 min prior to the induction of hypoxia-ischemia. All animals were sacrificed after 24 h and neuronal changes were observed with electron microscopy to investigate the hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. The protein and mRNA expression levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) in the hippocampus were detected by immunohistochemistry and quantitative polymerase chain reaction, respectively. The results revealed that the neuronal structures in the sham group were normal. The neuronal structures in the model group exhibited cavitation changes, but these were reduced following PROG administration. The protein and mRNA expression levels of TNF-α and NF-κB in the hippocampal neurons were increased in the model group, and pretreatment with 8 mg/kg PROG was shown to reduce the expression levels of these inflammatory mediators. Therefore, PROG was shown to exert an important protective function in hypoxic-ischemic brain injury by inhibiting the cascade of inflammatory injury induced by TNF-α and NF-κB. PMID:24940430

  14. Transcriptome analysis of the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cell region after kainic acid-induced status epilepticus in juvenile rats.

    PubMed

    Laurén, Hanna B; Lopez-Picon, Francisco R; Brandt, Annika M; Rios-Rojas, Clarissa J; Holopainen, Irma E

    2010-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms involved in epileptogenesis in the developing brain remain poorly understood. The gene array approach could reveal some of the factors involved by allowing the identification of a broad scale of genes altered by seizures. In this study we used microarray analysis to reveal the gene expression profile of the laser microdissected hippocampal CA1 subregion one week after kainic acid (KA)-induced status epilepticus (SE) in 21-day-old rats, which are developmentally roughly comparable to juvenile children. The gene expression analysis with the Chipster software generated a total of 1592 differently expressed genes in the CA1 subregion of KA-treated rats compared to control rats. The KEGG database revealed that the identified genes were involved in pathways such as oxidative phosporylation (26 genes changed), and long-term potentiation (LTP; 18 genes changed). Also genes involved in Ca(2+) homeostasis, gliosis, inflammation, and GABAergic transmission were altered. To validate the microarray results we further examined the protein expression for a subset of selected genes, glial fibrillary protein (GFAP), apolipoprotein E (apo E), cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1), Purkinje cell protein 4 (PEP-19), and interleukin 8 receptor (CXCR1), with immunohistochemistry, which confirmed the transcriptome results. Our results showed that SE resulted in no obvious CA1 neuronal loss, and alterations in the expression pattern of several genes during the early epileptogenic phase were comparable to previous gene expression studies of the adult hippocampus of both experimental epileptic animals and patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). However, some changes seem to occur after SE specifically in the juvenile rat hippocampus. Insight of the SE-induced alterations in gene expression and their related pathways could give us hints for the development of new target-specific antiepileptic drugs that interfere with the progression of the disease in the juvenile age

  15. Electroacupuncture pretreatment exhibits anti-depressive effects by regulating hippocampal proteomics in rats with chronic restraint stress

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhuo; Tu, Ya; Guo, Tian-wei; Wu, Yun-chu; Yang, Xue-qin; Sun, Lan; Yang, Xin-jing; Zhang, Wen-yue; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Xu-hui

    2015-01-01

    The clinical effect of electroacupuncture on depression is widely recognized. However, the signal transduction pathways and target proteins involved remain unclear. In the present study, rat models of chronic restraint stress were used to explore the mechanism by which electroacupuncture alleviates depression. Rats were randomly divided into control, model, and electroacupuncture groups. Chronic restraint stress was induced in the model and electroacupuncture groups by restraining rats for 28 days. In the electroacupuncture group, electroacupuncture pretreatment at Baihui (GV20) and Yintang (GV29) acupoints was performed daily (1 mA, 2 Hz, discontinuous wave, 20 minutes) prior to restraint for 28 days. Open field tests and body weight measurements were carried out to evaluate the depressive symptoms at specific time points. On day 28, the crossing number, rearing number, and body weights of the model group were significantly lower than those in the control group. Behavior test results indicated that rat models of depressive-like symptoms were successfully established by chronic restraint stress combined with solitary raising. On day 28, an isobaric tag for a relative and absolute quantitation-based quantitative proteomic approach was performed to identify differentially expressed proteins in hippocampal samples obtained from the model and electroacupuncture groups. The potential function of these differential proteins was predicted through the use of the Cluster of Orthologous Groups of proteins (COG) database. Twenty-seven differential proteins (uncharacteristic proteins expected) were selected from the model and electroacupuncture groups. In addition to unknown protein functions, COG are mainly concentrated in general prediction function, mechanism of signal transduction, amino acid transport and metabolism groups. This suggests that electroacupuncture improved depressive-like symptoms by regulating differential proteins, and most of these related proteins exist

  16. Human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells improve motor functions and are neuroprotective in the 6-hydroxydopamine-rat model for Parkinson's disease when cultured in monolayer cultures but suppress hippocampal neurogenesis and hippocampal memory function when cultured in spheroids.

    PubMed

    Berg, Jürgen; Roch, Manfred; Altschüler, Jennifer; Winter, Christine; Schwerk, Anne; Kurtz, Andreas; Steiner, Barbara

    2015-02-01

    Adult human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been reported to induce neuroprotective effects in models for Parkinson's disease (PD). However, these effects strongly depend on the most optimal application of the transplant. In the present study we compared monolayer-cultured (aMSC) and spheroid (sMSC) MSC following transplantation into the substantia nigra (SN) of 6-OHDA lesioned rats regarding effects on the local microenvironment, degeneration of dopaminergic neurons, neurogenesis in the hippocampal DG as well as motor and memory function in the 6-OHDA-rat model for PD. aMSC transplantation significantly increased tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in the SN, increased the levels of the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and improved motor functions compared to untreated and sMSC treated animals. In contrast, sMSC grafting induced an increased local microgliosis, decreased TH levels in the SN and reduced numbers of newly generated cells in the dentate gyrus (DG) without yet affecting hippocampal learning and memory function. We conclude that the neuroprotective potential of adipose-derived MSC in the rat model of PD crucially depends on the applied cellular phenotype. PMID:25120226

  17. Role of the Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter in Rat Hippocampal Neuronal Death After Pilocarpine-Induced Status Epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cui; Xie, Nanchang; Wang, Yunlong; Li, Yulin; Ge, Xinjie; Wang, Menglu

    2015-08-01

    The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) is reportedly involved in oxidative stress, apoptosis, and many neurological diseases. However, the role of the MCU in epilepsy remains unknown. In this study, we found that the MCU inhibitor Ru360 significantly attenuated neuronal death and exerted an anti-apoptotic effect on rat hippocampal neurons after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE), while the MCU activator spermine increased seizure-induced neuronal death and apoptosis. In addition, Ru360 decreased the level of seizure-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mitochondria isolated from rat hippocampi. Moreover, Ru360 restored the altered mitochondrial membrane potential and cytochrome c (CytC) release in epileptic hippocampi. However, spermine treatment exerted an opposite effect on seizure-induced ROS production and mitochondrial membrane potential alteration and CytC release compared with Ru360 treatment. Altogether, the findings of this study suggest that MCU inhibition exerts a neuroprotective effect on seizure-induced brain injury possibly through the mitochondria/ROS/CytC pathway. PMID:26148531

  18. Effects of Maternal Marginal Iodine Deficiency on Dendritic Morphology in the Hippocampal CA1 Pyramidal Neurons in Rat Offspring.

    PubMed

    Min, Hui; Wang, Yi; Dong, Jing; Wang, Yuan; Yu, Ye; Shan, Zhongyan; Xi, Qi; Teng, Weiping; Chen, Jie

    2016-06-01

    Although the salt iodization programmes are taken to control iodine deficiency (ID), some regions are still suffering from marginal ID. During pregnancy, marginal ID frequently leads to subtle insufficiency of thyroid hormones, characterized as low serum T4 levels. Therefore, the present research was to explore the effects of maternal marginal ID exposure on dendritic arbor growth in the hippocampal CA1 region and the underlying mechanisms. We established Wistar rat models with ID diet during pregnancy and lactation. The overall daily iodine intakes of the rats were estimated as 7.0, 5.0 and 1.5 μg/day in the control, marginal ID and severe ID groups, respectively. To study the morphological alterations of pyramidal neurons, Golgi-Cox procedure was conducted in the hippocampus. Sholl analyses demonstrated a slight decrease in the total length and branching numbers of basal dendrites on postnatal day (PN) 7, PN14 and PN21 in marginal ID group relative to the controls. However, there was no overt morphological change observed in apical dendrites. Immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis indicated that phosphorylation of MAP2, stathmin and JNK1 was down-regulated in marginal ID group. We speculate that the pups treated with maternal marginal ID subjected to subtle changes in dendritic growth of CA1 pyramidal neurons, which may be associated with the dysregulation of MAP2 and stathmin in a JNK1-dependent manner. PMID:27017219

  19. Hippocampal increase of 5-hmC in the glucocorticoid receptor gene following acute stress

    PubMed Central

    Kintner, Douglas B.; Sabat, Grzegorz; Barrett-Wilt, Gregory A.; Cengiz, Pelin; Alisch, Reid S.

    2015-01-01

    5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) is a novel environmentally sensitive DNA modification that is highly enriched in post-mitotic neurons and is associated with active transcription of neuronal genes. Recently, 5-hmC was functionally linked to learning and cognition and these studies revealed an accumulation of 5-hmC in the prefrontal cortex of mice undergoing fear extinction. These studies led us to hypothesize a role for 5-hmC in response to stress. To test this hypothesis, we combined immunohistochemistry, tandem mass spectrometry, and tet-assisted sodium bisulfite sequencing (TAB-seq) analyses on tissue and DNA from the hippocampus of 7-week old male mice exposed to a single thirty-minute restraint stress. After first identifying that the broad neuronal distribution of 5-hmC is not disrupted by acute stress, we used TAB-seq to find a stress-induced increase of 5-hmC in the 3’UTR of the glucocorticoid receptor gene (Nr3c1). Nr3c1 has a well-defined role in the stress pathway and these data suggest that 5-hmC contributes to these processes. Together, these data indicate that a deeper investigation of stress-related 5-hmC levels may reveal an environmental impact on this newly discovered epigenetic mark in the brain. PMID:25746451

  20. Hippocampal increase of 5-hmC in the glucocorticoid receptor gene following acute stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Sisi; Papale, Ligia A; Kintner, Douglas B; Sabat, Grzegorz; Barrett-Wilt, Gregory A; Cengiz, Pelin; Alisch, Reid S

    2015-06-01

    5-Hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) is a novel environmentally sensitive DNA modification that is highly enriched in post-mitotic neurons and is associated with active transcription of neuronal genes. Recently, 5-hmC was functionally linked to learning and cognition and these studies revealed an accumulation of 5-hmC in the prefrontal cortex of mice undergoing fear extinction. These studies led us to hypothesize a role for 5-hmC in response to stress. To test this hypothesis, we combined immunohistochemistry, tandem mass spectrometry, and tet-assisted sodium bisulfite sequencing (TAB-seq) analyses on tissue and DNA from the hippocampus of 7-week old male mice exposed to a single 30-min restraint stress. After first identifying that the broad neuronal distribution of 5-hmC is not disrupted by acute stress, we used TAB-seq to find a stress-induced increase of 5-hmC in the 3'UTR of the glucocorticoid receptor gene (Nr3c1). Nr3c1 has a well-defined role in the stress pathway and these data suggest that 5-hmC contributes to these processes. Together, these data indicate that a deeper investigation of stress-related 5-hmC levels may reveal an environmental impact on this newly discovered epigenetic mark in the brain. PMID:25746451

  1. Site-dependent effects of an acute intensive exercise on extracellular 5-HT and 5-HIAA levels in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Merino, D; Béquet, F; Berthelot, M; Chennaoui, M; Guezennec, C Y

    2001-03-30

    Previous neurochemical studies have reported different pattern of 5-HT release during exercise varying across either exercise conditions or forebrain sites. This in vivo microdialysis study is the first to examine the impact of an acute intensive treadmill running (2 h at 25 m.min(-1), which is close to exhaustion time), on extracellular 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) levels in two different brain areas in rats, the ventral hippocampus and the frontal cortex. Hippocampal and cortical 5-HT levels increased significantly after 90 min of exercise and were maximal in the first 30 min of recovery. Thereafter, cortical 5-HT levels followed a rapid and significant decrease when hippocampal levels are still maximal. During exercise, changes in extracellular 5-HIAA levels paralleled 5-HT changes, but showed no difference between the two brain areas during recovery. Thus, an intensive exercise induces a delayed increase in brain 5-HT release but recovery seems to display site-dependent patterns. PMID:11248443

  2. Upregulation of the vascular endothelial growth factor, Flt-1, in rat hippocampal neurons after envenoming by Phoneutria nigriventer; age-related modulation.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Monique Culturato Padilha; Siqueira Soares, Edilene; Miguel Stávale, Leila; Pierre Irazusta, Silvia; da Cruz-Höfling, Maria Alice

    2012-09-15

    This study characterizes the distribution and quantifies the expression of the tyrosine kinase receptor for the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), Flt-1, in the rat hippocampus following intra-peritoneal injection of Phoneutria nigriventer venom (PNV). Post-natal day 14 (P14) and 8-10 weeks (adult) old rats were used and analyses were done at 1, 2, 5 and 24 h after venom exposure and compared with saline-injected counterparts. PNV-injected animals showed hippocampal venules with perivascular edema indicating blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction. This was accompanied by significant overexpression of Flt-1 which though was not the same for CA1, CA2, CA3 and dentate gyrus (DG) hippocampal regions, neither for P14 and adult rats. Regional analysis using GIMP methodology showed that Flt-1 was constitutively distributed more densely in neurons of DG, followed by CA1/CA2 and CA3 of both control P14 and adult animals, without variation over time, but significantly more expressed in P14 than in adults. A time-course analysis showed that Flt-1 upregulation was progressive and that neurons VEGFR1/Flt-1+ of PNV-exposed animals are timely and regionally modulated depending on the hippocampal region, being CA2 the least responsive region regardless animal's age, whilst DG was the most susceptible with adult animals having higher upregulation than neonates. Since VEGF has been reported to confer protection in several pathological processes we suggest that VEGF may be involved in hippocampal neurons response via Flt-1 mediation following PNV envenoming; its higher upregulation in adult envenomed rats may be an indication that Flt-1 neuroprotective mediation is more efficient with age. The Flt-1 upregulation and the incidence of perivascular edema in young animals may indicate a pro-inflammatory role of the receptor. PMID:22659541

  3. Phase shift in the 24-hour rhythm of hippocampal EEG spiking activity in a rat model of temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, David A.; Talathi, Sachin S.; Parekh, Mansi B.; Cordiner, Daniel J.; Zhou, Junli; Mareci, Thomas H.; Ditto, William L.

    2013-01-01

    For over a century epileptic seizures have been known to cluster at specific times of the day. Recent studies have suggested that the circadian regulatory system may become permanently altered in epilepsy, but little is known about how this affects neural activity and the daily pattern of seizures. To investigate, we tracked long-term changes in the rate of spontaneous hippocampal EEG spikes (SPKs) in a rat model of temporal lobe epilepsy. In healthy animals, SPKs oscillated with near 24-h period; however, after injury by status epilepticus, a persistent phase shift of ∼12 h emerged in animals that later went on to develop chronic spontaneous seizures. Additional measurements showed that global 24-h rhythms, including core body temperature and theta state transitions, did not phase shift. Instead, we hypothesized that locally impaired circadian input to the hippocampus might be responsible for the SPK phase shift. This was investigated with a biophysical computer model in which we showed that subtle changes in the relative strengths of circadian input could produce a phase shift in hippocampal neural activity. MRI provided evidence that the medial septum, a putative circadian relay center for the hippocampus, exhibits signs of damage and therefore could contribute to local circadian impairment. Our results suggest that balanced circadian input is critical to maintaining natural circadian phase in the hippocampus and that damage to circadian relay centers, such as the medial septum, may disrupt this balance. We conclude by discussing how abnormal circadian regulation may contribute to the daily rhythms of epileptic seizures and related cognitive dysfunction. PMID:23678009

  4. The interactive role of CB(1) and GABA(B) receptors in hippocampal synaptic plasticity in rats.

    PubMed

    Nazari, Masoumeh; Komaki, Alireza; Karamian, Ruhollah; Shahidi, Siamak; Sarihi, Abdolrahman; Asadbegi, Masoumeh

    2016-01-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic transmission is a cellular process underlying learning and memory. Cannabinoids are known to be powerful modulators of this kind of synaptic plasticity. Changes in GABAergic inhibition have also been shown to affect synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. GABA receptor type B (GABAB) and cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) exhibit overlapping anatomical localization in some brain areas including the hippocampus. CB1 and GABAB are also localized to the same cells and share a common signaling pathway in some brain areas. In this study, we examined the hippocampal effects of co-administrating AM251 and CGP55845, which are CB1 and GABAB antagonists, respectively, on LTP induction in the dentate gyrus (DG) of rats. LTP in the hippocampal area was induced by high-frequency stimulation (HFS) of the perforant path. Our results showed that HFS coupled with administration of the CB1 antagonist increased both the population spike (PS) amplitude and field excitatory post-synaptic potential (fEPSP). Conversely, the GABAB antagonist decreased these parameters along with decreased LTP induction. We also demonstrated that the co-administration of CB1 and GABAB antagonists had different effects on the PS amplitude and fEPSP slope. It is likely that GABAB receptor antagonists modulate cannabinoid outputs that cause a decrease in synaptic plastisity, while in the simultaneous consumption of two antagonists, CB1 antagonists can alter the release of GABA which in turn results in enhancement of LTP induction. These findings suggest that there are functional interactions between the CB1 and GABAB receptor in the hippocampus. PMID:26611204

  5. Graph analysis of the anatomical network organization of the hippocampal formation and parahippocampal region in the rat.

    PubMed

    Binicewicz, F Z M; van Strien, N M; Wadman, W J; van den Heuvel, M P; Cappaert, N L M

    2016-04-01

    Graph theory was used to analyze the anatomical network of the rat hippocampal formation and the parahippocampal region (van Strien et al., Nat Rev Neurosci 10(4):272-282, 2009). For this analysis, the full network was decomposed along the three anatomical axes, resulting in three networks that describe the connectivity within the rostrocaudal, dorsoventral and laminar dimensions. The rostrocaudal network had a connection density of 12 % and a path length of 2.4. The dorsoventral network had a high cluster coefficient (0.53), a relatively high path length (1.62) and a rich club was identified. The modularity analysis revealed three modules in the dorsoventral network. The laminar network contained most information. The laminar dimension revealed a network with high clustering coefficient (0.47), a relatively high path length (2.11) and four significantly increased characteristic network building blocks (structural motifs). Thirteen rich club nodes were identified, almost all of them situated in the parahippocampal region. Six connector hubs were detected and all of them were located in the entorhinal cortex. Three large modules were revealed, indicating a close relationship between the perirhinal and postrhinal cortex as well as between the lateral and medial entorhinal cortex. These results confirmed the central position of the entorhinal cortex in the (para)hippocampal network and this possibly explains why pathology in this region has such profound impact on cognitive function, as seen in several brain diseases. The results also have implications for the idea of strict separation of the "spatial" and the "non-spatial" information stream into the hippocampus. This two-stream memory model suggests that the information influx from, respectively, the postrhinal-medial entorhinal cortex and the perirhinal-lateral entorhinal cortex is separate, but the current analysis shows that this apparent separation is not determined by anatomical constraints. PMID:25618022

  6. Propofol, but not etomidate, increases corticosterone levels and induces long-term alteration in hippocampal synaptic activity in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Changqing; Seubert, Christoph N; Gravenstein, Nikolaus; Martynyuk, Anatoly E

    2016-04-01

    Animal studies provide strong evidence that general anesthetics (GAs), administered during the early postnatal period, induce long-term cognitive and neurological abnormalities. Because the brain growth spurt in rodents is delayed compared to that in humans, a fundamental question is whether the postnatal human brain is similarly vulnerable. Sevoflurane and propofol, GAs that share positive modulation of the gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAAR) function cause marked increase in corticosterone levels and induce long-term developmental alterations in synaptic activity in rodents. If synaptogenesis is affected, investigation of mechanisms of the synaptic effects of GAs is of high interest because synaptogenesis in humans continues for several years after birth. Here, we compared long-term synaptic effects of etomidate with those of propofol. Etomidate and propofol both positively modulate GABAAR activity, but in contrast to propofol, etomidate inhibits the adrenal synthesis of corticosterone. Postnatal day (P) 4, 5, or 6 rats received five injections of etomidate, propofol, or vehicle control during 5h of maternal separation. Endocrine effects of the anesthetics were evaluated by measuring serum levels of corticosterone immediately after anesthesia or maternal separation. The frequency and amplitude of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs) in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons were measured at P24-40 and P≥80. Only propofol caused a significant increase in serum corticosterone levels (F(4.26)=17.739, P<0.001). In contrast to increased frequency of mIPSCs in the propofol group (F(4.23)=8.731, p<0.001), mIPSC activity in the etomidate group was not different from that in the vehicle groups. The results of this study together with previously published data suggest that anesthetic-caused increase in corticosterone levels is required for GABAergic GAs to induce synaptic effects in the form of a long-term increase in the frequency of hippocampal m

  7. Genetic damage in multiple organs of acutely exercised rats.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, Renan; Rosa, Jose C; Eguchi, Ricardo; Oller do Nascimento, Claudia M; Oyama, Lila M; Aguiar, Odair; Chaves, Marcelo D; Ribeiro, Daniel A

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of acute exercise on genomic damage in an animal model. Male adult Wistar rats were divided into the following groups: control and acute exercised (experimental). For this purpose, 15 animals were accustomed to running on a rodent treadmill for 15 min per day for 5 days (10-20 m min(-1); 08 grade). After 4 days at rest, active animals ran on the treadmill (22 m min(-1), 58 grade) till exhaustion. Cells from peripheral blood, liver, heart, and brain were collected after 0, 2, and 6 h after exercise. The results showed that acute exercise was able to induce genetic damage in peripheral blood cells after 2 and 6 h of exercise, whereas liver pointed out genetic damage for all periods evaluated. No genetic damage was induced either in brain or in heart cells. In conclusion, our results suggest that acute exercise could contribute to the genetic damage in peripheral blood and liver cells. It seems that liver is a sensitive organ to the genotoxic insult after acute exercise. PMID:20979236

  8. Early mood behavioral changes following exposure to monotonous environment during isolation stress is associated with altered hippocampal synaptic plasticity in male rats.

    PubMed

    Das, Saroj Kumar; Baitharu, Iswar; Barhwal, Kalpana; Hota, Sunil Kumar; Singh, Shashi Bala

    2016-01-26

    Social isolation stress and its effect on mood have been well reported, but the effect of monotony (a state of repetition of events for a considerable period of time without variation) on mood and hippocampal synaptic plasticity needs to be addressed. Present study was conducted on male Sprague-Dawley rats. Singly housed (SH) rats were subjected to monotony stress by physical, visual and pheromonal separation in specially designed animal segregation chamber. Fluoxetine (a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor) was administered orally. Behavioral assessment showed anxiety and depression like traits in SH group. Monotony stress exposure to SH group resulted in increased pyknosis, decreased apical dendritic arborization and increased asymmetric (excitatory) synapses with the corresponding decrease in the symmetric (inhibitory) synapses in the hippocampal CA3 region. Monotonous environment during isolation stress also decreased the serotonin level and reduced the expression of synaptophysin and pCREB in the hippocampus. Fluoxetine administration to singly housed rats resulted in amelioration of altered mood along with improvement in serotonin and decrease in excitatory synaptic density but no change in altered inhibitory synaptic density in the hippocampus. These findings suggest that monotony during isolation contributes to early impairment in mood state by altering hippocampal synaptic density and neuronal morphology. PMID:26724221

  9. Rhythms of the hippocampal network.

    PubMed

    Colgin, Laura Lee

    2016-04-01

    The hippocampal local field potential (LFP) shows three major types of rhythms: theta, sharp wave-ripples and gamma. These rhythms are defined by their frequencies, they have behavioural correlates in several species including rats and humans, and they have been proposed to carry out distinct functions in hippocampal memory processing. However, recent findings have challenged traditional views on these behavioural functions. In this Review, I discuss our current understanding of the origins and the mnemonic functions of hippocampal theta, sharp wave-ripples and gamma rhythms on the basis of findings from rodent studies. In addition, I present an updated synthesis of their roles and interactions within the hippocampal network. PMID:26961163

  10. Anterograde and Retrograde Amnesia of Place Discrimination in Retrosplenial Cortex and Hippocampal Lesioned Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haijima, Asahi; Ichitani, Yukio

    2008-01-01

    Retrograde and anterograde amnesic effects of excitotoxic lesions of the rat retrosplenial cortex (RS) and hippocampus (HPC) were investigated. To test retrograde amnesia, rats were trained with two-arm place discrimination in a radial maze 4 wk and 1 d before surgery with a different arm pair, respectively. In the retention test 1 wk after…

  11. Regulation of hippocampal synaptic plasticity thresholds and changes in exploratory and learning behavior in dominant negative NPR-B mutant rats

    PubMed Central

    Barmashenko, Gleb; Buttgereit, Jens; Herring, Neil; Bader, Michael; Özcelik, Cemil; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise; Braunewell, Karl H.

    2014-01-01

    The second messenger cyclic GMP affects synaptic transmission and modulates synaptic plasticity and certain types of learning and memory processes. The impact of the natriuretic peptide receptor B (NPR-B) and its ligand C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), one of several cGMP producing signaling systems, on hippocampal synaptic plasticity and learning is, however, less well understood. We have previously shown that the NPR-B ligand CNP increases the magnitude of long-term depression (LTD) in hippocampal area CA1, while reducing the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP). We have extended this line of research to show that bidirectional plasticity is affected in the opposite way in rats expressing a dominant-negative mutant of NPR-B (NSE-NPR-BΔKC) lacking the intracellular guanylyl cyclase domain under control of a promoter for neuron-specific enolase. The brain cells of these transgenic rats express functional dimers of the NPR-B receptor containing the dominant-negative NPR-BΔKC mutant, and therefore show decreased CNP-stimulated cGMP-production in brain membranes. The NPR-B transgenic rats display enhanced LTP but reduced LTD in hippocampal slices. When the frequency-dependence of synaptic modification to afferent stimulation in the range of 1–100 Hz was assessed in transgenic rats, the threshold for both, LTP and LTD induction, was shifted to lower frequencies. In parallel, NPR-BΔKC rats exhibited an enhancement in exploratory and learning behavior. These results indicate that bidirectional plasticity and learning and memory mechanism are affected in transgenic rats expressing a dominant-negative mutant of NPR-B. Our data substantiate the hypothesis that NPR-B-dependent cGMP signaling has a modulatory role for synaptic information storage and learning. PMID:25520616

  12. The acute toxicity of inhaled beryllium metal in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Haley, P.J.; Finch, G.L.; Hoover, M.D.; Cuddihy, R.G. )

    1990-01-01

    The authors exposed rats once by nose only for 50 min to a mean concentration of 800 [mu]g/m[sup 3] of beryllium metal to characterize the acute toxic effects within the lung. Histological changes within the lung and enzyme changes within bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid were evaluated at 3, 7, 10, 14, 31, 59, 115, and 171 days postexposure (dpe). Beryllium metal-exposed rats developed acute, necrotizing, hemorrhagic, exudative pneumonitis and intraalveolar fibrosis that peaked at 14 dpe. By 31 dpe, inflammatory lesions were replaced by minimal interstitial and intraalveolar fibrosis. Necrotizing inflammation was observed again at 59 dpe which progressed to chronic-active inflammation by 115 dpe. Low numbers of diffusely distributed lymphocytes were also present but they were not associated with granulomas as is observed in beryllium-induced disease in man. Lymphocytes were not elevated in BAL samples collected from beryllium-exposed rats at any time after exposure. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), [beta]-glucuronidase, and protein levels were elevated in BAL fluid from 3 through 14 dpe but returned to near normal levels by 31 dpe. LDH increased once again at 59 dpe and remained elevated at 171 dpe. [beta]-Glucuronidase and protein levels were slightly, but not significantly, elevated from 31 through 171 dpe.

  13. Direct intrawound administration of dimethylsulphoxide relieves acute pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Mayank; Prasoon, Pranav; Kumar, Rahul; Singh, Anurag; Shrimal, Prawal; Ray, Subrata B

    2016-04-01

    Wounds associated with injuries such as burns can produce moderate to severe pain. Besides causing distress to the patient, unrelieved pain could delay healing owing to stress-related problems. Thus, pain needs to be treated as early as possible after injury. It was hypothesised that local treatment of wounds with appropriate analgesic drugs could attenuate pain. HOE 140, a bradykinin receptor antagonist, reduced acute inflammatory pain in rats after intrawound administration. In this study, the analgesic effect of dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) was investigated in a similar hind-paw incision model in rats. An extremely small quantity (10 µl) of 100% DMSO was administered into the incision site just before closure of the wound. It persistently attenuated guarding behaviour in rats over a period of 3 days without affecting thermal hyperalgesia or allodynia. Accumulated evidence indicates that guarding is equivalent to pain at rest in humans. The possible mechanisms of the analgesic effect could be inhibition of C group of peripheral nerve fibres or even free radical scavenging. Healing of the wound was found to be normal at the end of the study period. In conclusion, DMSO could be useful in the treatment of acute pain resulting from tissue injuries such as burns. PMID:24750992

  14. Treadmill exercise improves short-term memory by enhancing hippocampal cell proliferation in quinolinic acid-induced Huntington’s disease rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, You-Mi; Ji, Eun-Sang; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Tae-Woon; Ko, Il-Gyu; Jin, Jun-Jang; Kim, Chang-Ju; Kim, Tae-Wook; Kim, Dong-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is an inherited genetic disorder, characterized by cognitive dysfunction and abnormal body movements called chorea. Quinolinic acid (QA) is an endogenous metabolite of tryptophan in the kynurenine pathway. QA-induced alterations are similar to the symptoms of HD patients. Physical exercise has beneficial effects on the brain functions. Exercise increases production of neurotrophic factors in the brain and improves learning ability and memory function. In the present study, we investigated the effects of treadmill exercise short-term memory on QA-induced HD rats in relation with cell proliferation. For the induction of Huntington’s animal model, 2 μL of 100 nmol QA was intrastriatal injected into the rats. The rats in the treadmill exercise groups were forced to run on a treadmill for 30 min once a day, five times a week for 2 weeks. Step-down avoidance test was conducted for the determination of short-term memory. Cell proliferation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus was determined by 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and doublecortin (DCX) immunohistochemistry. Western blot for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) were performed. In the present results, treadmill exercise alleviated QA-induced short-term memory impairment in HD rats. Treadmill exercise increased cell proliferation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus through enhancing BDNF expression in the HD rats. These results revealed that treadmill exercise is effective for the symptom improvement in the HD patients. PMID:25830138

  15. Modulation by adenine nucleotides of epileptiform activity in the CA3 region of rat hippocampal slices

    PubMed Central

    Ross, F M; Brodie, M J; Stone, T W

    1998-01-01

    Hippocampal slices (450 μm) generate epileptiform bursts of an interictal nature when perfused with a zero magnesium medium containing 4-aminopyridine (50 μM). The effect of adenine nucleotides on this activity was investigated.ATP and adenosine depressed this epileptiform activity in a concentration-dependent manner, with both purines being equipotent at concentrations above 10 μM.Adenosine deaminase 0.2 u ml−1, a concentration that annuls the effect of adenosine (50 μM), did not significantly alter the depression of activity caused by ATP (50 μM).8-Cyclopentyl-1, 3-dimethylxanthine (CPT), an A1 receptor antagonist, enhanced the discharge rate significantly and inhibited the depressant effect of both ATP and adenosine such that the net effect of ATP or adenosine plus CPT was excitatory.Several ATP analogues were also tested: α, β-methyleneATP (α, β-meATP), 2-methylthioATP (2-meSATP) and uridine triphosphate (UTP). Only α, β-meATP (10 μM) produced an increase in the frequency of spontaneous activity which suggests a lack of involvement of P2Y or P2U receptors.Suramin and pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2′, 4′-disulphonic acid (PPADS), P2 receptor antagonists, failed to inhibit the depression produced by ATP (50 μM). The excitatory effect of α, β-meATP (10 μM) was inhibited by suramin (50 μM) and PPADS (5 μM).ATP therefore depresses epileptiform activity in this model in a manner which is not consistent with the activation of known P1 or P2 receptors, suggesting the involvement of a xanthine-sensitive nucleotide receptor. The results are also indicative of an excitatory P2X receptor existing in the hippocampal CA3 region. PMID:9484856

  16. Neuroprotection against excitotoxicity by N-alkylglycines in rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Valera, Elvira; Fernández-Salguero, Pedro M; Planells-Cases, Rosa; Messeguer, Angel; Van Den Nest, Wim; Carreño, Cristina; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio; Merino, Jaime M

    2002-01-01

    Excessive activation of glutamate receptors of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype is considered a relevant initial step underlying different neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, with the approval of memantine to treat Alzheimer dementia, NMDA receptors have regained clinical interest. Accordingly, the development and validation of NMDA receptor antagonists is being reconsidered. We recently identified a family of trialkylglycines that act as channel blockers of the NMDAreceptor. Their neuroprotective activity against excitotoxic insults remains elusive. To address this issue, we first characterized the contribution of glutamate receptor subtypes to hippocampal death in culture as a function of days in culture in vitro (DIV). Whereas at 7 DIV neither NMDA nor glutamate produced a significant neuronal death, at 14 and 21 DIV, NMDA produced the death of 40% of the neurons exposed to this receptor agonist that was fully protected by MK-801. Similar results were obtained for L-glutamate at 14 DIV. In contrast, when neurons at 21 DIV were used, glutamate killed 51.1 +/- 4.9% of the neuronal population. This neuronal death was only partially prevented by MK-801, and fully abrogated by a combination of MK-801 and 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX). Glucose deprivation injured 37.1 +/- 9.2% of the neurons through a mechanism sensitive to MK-801. The family of recently identified N-alkylglycines tested protected neurons against NMDA and glucosedeprivation toxicity, but not against glutamate toxicity. Noteworthy, N-alkylglicines with a moderate protection against NMDA-induced toxicity strongly protected from beta-amyloid toxicity. Collectively, these findings imply both NMDA and non-NMDA receptors in excitotoxicity of hippocampal neurons, and suggest that blockade of NMDA receptors alone may not suffice to efficiently abrogate neurodegeneration. PMID:12622405

  17. Inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels by fluoxetine in rat hippocampal pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Deák, F; Lasztóczi, B; Pacher, P; Petheö, G L; Valéria Kecskeméti; Spät, A

    2000-04-01

    Fluoxetine, an antidepressant which is used world-wide, is a prominent member of the class of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors. Recently, inhibition of voltage-gated Na(+) and K(+) channels by fluoxetine has also been reported. We examined the effect of fluoxetine on voltage-gated calcium channels using the patch-clamp technique in the whole-cell configuration. In hippocampal pyramidal cells, fluoxetine inhibited the low-voltage-activated (T-type) calcium current with an IC(50) of 6.8 microM. Fluoxetine decreased the high-voltage-activated (HVA) calcium current with an IC(50) between 1 and 2 microM. Nifedipine and omega-conotoxin GVIA inhibited the HVA current by 24% and 43%, respectively. Fluoxetine (3 microM), applied in addition to nifedipine or omega-conotoxin, further reduced the current. When fluoxetine (3 microM) was applied first neither nifedipine nor omega-conotoxin attenuated the remaining component of the HVA current. This observation indicates that fluoxetine inhibits both L- and N-type currents. In addition, fluoxetine inhibited the HVA calcium current in carotid body type I chemoreceptor cells and pyramidal neurons prepared from prefrontal cortex. In hippocampal pyramidal cells high K(+)-induced seizure-like activity was inhibited by 1 microM fluoxetine; the mean burst duration was shortened by an average of 44%. These results provide evidence for inhibition of T-, N- and L-type voltage-gated calcium channels by fluoxetine at therapeutically relevant concentrations. PMID:10727713

  18. Fever and acute phase reactants in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    van Vugt, H.; van Gool, J.; Deutz, N. E.

    1988-01-01

    In rats synthesis of some acute phase reactants can be induced by a combination of corticosteroids and adrenaline. During fever both hormones show high plasma levels. We studied the effect of fever induced by intra-cerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of PGE2 on the acute phase response. Fever was continuously recorded and 24 h after induction acute phase reactant (APR) response was measured as indicated by the rise of alpha-macrofetoprotein (alpha M FP, alpha 2 macroglobulin of the rat). Controls received 0.9% saline i.c.v. Controls did not develop fever (dTmax less than or equal to 1 degree C) nor did they show significant APR response. The maximal rise in body temperature after PGE2 (2.6 +/- 0.7 degrees C) correlated significantly with the rise in alpha M FP concentration 24 h later. Adrenalectomy prevented the APR response completely but the magnitude of the fever reaction remained the same (2.1 +/- 0.3 degrees C). alpha-Blockade gave a smaller fever response but had no effect on the APR response. In alpha- and beta-blockade, fever response was normal but no APR response was obtained. Destroying the sympathetic nerve supply to the liver with 6-OH dopamine retarded the fever response but again APR response was not impeded. In order to differentiate between the role of fever as such and the effect of PGE2 on APR synthesis, we used heat exposure to induce hyperthermia in normal rats who showed an APR response comparable with that after i.c.v. PGE2. Pretreatment with sodium salicylate before inducing hyperthermia led to a variable rise in alpha M FP. Fever as such, without tissue injury, induces an APR response. The pathway to this effect probably involves circulating corticosterone and adrenaline, possibly via a beta-receptor mediated stimulation. PMID:2460123

  19. Acute colitis produced by chemotactic peptides in rats and mice.

    PubMed Central

    Chester, J. F.; Ross, J. S.; Malt, R. A.; Weitzman, S. A.

    1985-01-01

    Colonic inflammation was produced in rats and mice by peptides chemotactic for polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Instillation of formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) and formylnorleucyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FNLP) into isolated segments of rat colon caused marked mucosal edema and polymorphonuclear leukocyte infiltration within 2 hours. Higher concentrations of FNLP caused ulceration and necrosis as well. Formylmethionine (FMet), a compound with less chemotactic activity, caused much less inflammation. In mice, rectal instillation of FNLP caused dose-dependent acute mucosal inflammation which persisted for longer than 12 hours. Twice-weekly rectal instillation of FNLP provided a model of colitis based on neutrophil chemotaxis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:4061566

  20. Green Tea Extract-induced Acute Hepatotoxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Emoto, Yuko; Yoshizawa, Katsuhiko; Kinoshita, Yuichi; Yuki, Michiko; Yuri, Takashi; Yoshikawa, Yutaka; Sayama, Kazutoshi; Tsubura, Airo

    2014-01-01

    Although green tea is considered to be a healthy beverage, hepatotoxicity associated with the consumption of green tea extract has been reported. In the present study, we characterized the hepatotoxicity of green tea extract in rats and explored the responsible mechanism. Six-week-old IGS rats received a single intraperitoneal (ip) injection of 200 mg/kg green tea extract (THEA-FLAN 90S). At 8, 24, 48 and 72 hrs and 1 and 3 months after exposure, liver damage was assessed by using blood-chemistry, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry to detect cell death (TUNEL and caspase-3) and proliferative activity (PCNA). Analyses of malondialdehyde (MDA) in serum and the liver and of MDA and thymidine glycol (TG) by immunohistochemistry, as oxidative stress markers, were performed. Placental glutathione S-transferase (GST-P), which is a marker of hepatocarcinogenesis, was also immunohistochemically stained. To examine toxicity at older ages, 200 mg/kg green tea extract was administered to 18-wk-old female rats. In 6-wk-old rats, 12% of males and 50% of females died within 72 hrs. In 18-wk-old rats, 88% died within 72 hrs. The serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and/or total bilirubin increased in both males and females. Single-cell necrosis with positive signs of TUNEL and caspase-3 was seen in perilobular hepatocytes from 8 hrs onward in all lobular areas. PCNA-positive hepatocytes increased at 48 hrs. MDA levels in the serum and liver tended to increase, and MDA- and TG-positive hepatocytes were seen immunohistochemically. GST-P–positive hepatocellular altered foci were detected in one female rat at the 3-month time point. In conclusion, a single injection of green tea extract induced acute and severe hepatotoxicity, which might be associated with lipid peroxidation and DNA oxidative stress in hepatocytes. PMID:25378801

  1. Comparison of the Adulthood Chronic Stress Effect on Hippocampal BDNF Signaling in Male and Female Rats.

    PubMed

    Niknazar, Somayeh; Nahavandi, Arezo; Peyvandi, Ali Asghar; Peyvandi, Hassan; Akhtari, Amin Shams; Karimi, Mohsen

    2016-08-01

    Studies show that gender plays an important role in stress-related disorders, and women are more vulnerable to its effect. The present study was undertaken to investigate differences in the change in expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and its tyrosine intracellular kinase-activating receptor (TrkB) genes in the male and female rats' hippocampus (HPC) under chronic mild repeated stress (CMRS) conditions. In this experiment, male and female Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups: the CMRS and the control group. To induce stress, a repeated forced swimming paradigm was employed daily for adult male and female rats for 21 days. At the end of the stress phase, elevated plus maze (EPM) was used for measuring the stress behavioral effects. Serum corticosterone level was measured by ELISA. BDNF and TrkB gene methylation and protein expression in the HPC were detected using real-time PCR and Western blotting. Chronic stress in the adolescence had more effects on anxiety-like behavior and serum corticosterone concentration in female rats than males. Furthermore, stressed female rats had higher methylation levels and following reduced protein expression of BDNF but not TrkB compared to stressed male rats. These findings suggest that in exposure to a stressor, sex differences in BDNF methylation may be root cause of decreased BDNF levels in females and may underlie susceptibility to pathology development. PMID:26189832

  2. Acute toxicity of nickel nanoparticles in rats after intravenous injection

    PubMed Central

    Magaye, Ruth R; Yue, Xia; Zou, Baobo; Shi, Hongbo; Yu, Hongsheng; Liu, Kui; Lin, Xialu; Xu, Jin; Yang, Cui; Wu, Aiguo; Zhao, Jinshun

    2014-01-01

    This study was carried out to add scientific data in regard to the use of metallic nanoparticles in nanomedicine. The acute toxicity of nickel (Ni) nanoparticles (50 nm), intravenously injected through the dorsal penile vein of Sprague Dawley rats was evaluated in this study. Fourteen days after injection, Ni nanoparticles induced liver and spleen injury, lung inflammation, and caused cardiac toxicity. These results indicate that precautionary measures should be taken with regard to the use of Ni nanoparticles or Ni compounds in nanomedicine. PMID:24648736

  3. Insulin-like growth factor-I gene therapy increases hippocampal neurogenesis, astrocyte branching and improves spatial memory in female aging rats.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Joaquín; Uriarte, Maia; Cónsole, Gloria M; Reggiani, Paula C; Outeiro, Tiago F; Morel, Gustavo R; Goya, Rodolfo G

    2016-08-01

    In rats, learning and memory performance decline during aging, which makes this rodent species a suitable model to evaluate therapeutic strategies of potential value for correcting age-related cognitive deficits. Some of these strategies involve neurotrophic factors like insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), a powerful neuroprotective molecule in the brain. Here, we implemented 18-day long intracerebroventricular (ICV) IGF-I gene therapy in 28 months old Sprague-Dawley female rats, and assessed spatial memory performance in the Barnes maze. We also studied hippocampal morphology using an unbiased stereological approach. Adenovectors expressing the gene for rat IGF-I or the reporter DsRed were used. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were taken and IGF-I levels determined by radioimmunoassay. At the end of the study, IGF-I levels in the CSF were significantly higher in the experimental group than in the DsRed controls. After treatment, the IGF-I group showed a significant improvement in spatial memory accuracy as compared with DsRed counterparts. In the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus, the IGF-I group showed a higher number of immature neurons than the DsRed controls. The treatment increased hippocampal astrocyte branching and reduced their number in the hippocampal stratum radiatum. We conclude that the ependymal route is an effective approach to increase CSF levels of IGF-I and that this strategy improves the accuracy of spatial memory in aging rats. The favorable effect of the treatment on DG neurogenesis and astrocyte branching in the stratum radiatum may contribute to improving memory performance in aging rats. PMID:27188415

  4. Susceptibility for homeostatic plasticity is down-regulated in parallel with maturation of the rat hippocampal synaptic circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Huupponen, J; Molchanova, S M; Taira, T; Lauri, S E

    2007-01-01

    Homeostatic regulation, i.e. the ability of neurons and neuronal networks to adjust their output in response to chronic alterations in electrical activity is a prerequisite for the pronounced functional plasticity in the developing brain. Cellular mechanisms of homeostatic plasticity have mainly been studied in cultured preparations. To understand the developmental time frame and properties of homeostatic plasticity under more physiological conditions, we have here compared the effects of activity deprivation on synaptic transmission in acutely isolated and cultured hippocampal slices at different stages of development. We find that transmission at both glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses is strongly and rapidly (15 h) regulated in the opposite directions in response to inactivity during narrow, separated time windows early in development. Following this critical period of synaptic development, induction of the homeostatic response requires longer periods (40 h) of inactivity. At glutamatergic synapses, activity blockade led to an increase in the amplitude and frequency of mEPSCs, and the threshold for induction of this response was increased during development. In contrast, homeostatic regulation at GABAergic synapses was expressed in a qualitatively distinct manner at different developmental stages. Immature neurons responded rapidly to inactivity by regulating mIPSC frequency, while longer activity blockade led to a decrease in the mIPSC amplitude independent of the neuronal maturation. The susceptibility of immature networks to homeostatic regulation may serve as a safety mechanism against rapid runaway destability during the time of intense remodelling of the synaptic circuitry. PMID:17347263

  5. Susceptibility for homeostatic plasticity is down-regulated in parallel with maturation of the rat hippocampal synaptic circuitry.

    PubMed

    Huupponen, J; Molchanova, S M; Taira, T; Lauri, S E

    2007-06-01

    Homeostatic regulation, i.e. the ability of neurons and neuronal networks to adjust their output in response to chronic alterations in electrical activity is a prerequisite for the pronounced functional plasticity in the developing brain. Cellular mechanisms of homeostatic plasticity have mainly been studied in cultured preparations. To understand the developmental time frame and properties of homeostatic plasticity under more physiological conditions, we have here compared the effects of activity deprivation on synaptic transmission in acutely isolated and cultured hippocampal slices at different stages of development. We find that transmission at both glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses is strongly and rapidly (15 h) regulated in the opposite directions in response to inactivity during narrow, separated time windows early in development. Following this critical period of synaptic development, induction of the homeostatic response requires longer periods (40 h) of inactivity. At glutamatergic synapses, activity blockade led to an increase in the amplitude and frequency of mEPSCs, and the threshold for induction of this response was increased during development. In contrast, homeostatic regulation at GABAergic synapses was expressed in a qualitatively distinct manner at different developmental stages. Immature neurons responded rapidly to inactivity by regulating mIPSC frequency, while longer activity blockade led to a decrease in the mIPSC amplitude independent of the neuronal maturation. The susceptibility of immature networks to homeostatic regulation may serve as a safety mechanism against rapid runaway destability during the time of intense remodelling of the synaptic circuitry. PMID:17347263

  6. Intravenous immunoglobulin treatment preserves and protects primary rat hippocampal neurons and primary human brain cultures against oxidative insults.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, Debomoy K; Ray, Balmiki

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by deleterious accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide into senile plaque, neurofibrillary tangles formed from hyperphosphorylated tau protein, and loss of cholinergic synapses in the cerebral cortex. The deposition of Aβ-loaded plaques results in microglial activation and subsequent production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), including free radicals. Neurons in aging and AD brains are particularly vulnerable to ROS and other toxic stimuli. Therefore, agents that decrease the vulnerability of neurons against ROS may provide therapeutic values for the treatment or prevention of AD. In the present study, our goal was to test whether intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) treatment could preserve as well as protect neurons from oxidative damage. We report that treatment with IVIG protects neuronal viability and synaptic proteins in primary rat hippocampal neurons. Further, we demonstrate the tolerability of IVIG treatment in the primary human fetal mixed brain cultures. Indeed, a high dose (20 mg/ml) of IVIG treatment was well-tolerated by primary human brain cultures that exhibit a normal neuronal phenotype. We also observed a potent neuropreservatory effect of IVIG against ROS-mediated oxidative insults in these human fetal brain cultures. These results indicate that IVIG treatment has great potential to preserve and protect primary human neuronal-enriched cultures and to potentially rescue dying neurons from oxidative insults. Therefore, our findings suggest that IVIG treatment may represent an important therapeutic agent for clinical trials designed to prevent and delay the onset of neurodegeneration as well as AD pathology. PMID:25115544

  7. Effects of long-term agomelatine treatment on the cognitive performance and hippocampal plasticity of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Demir Özkay, Ümide; Söztutar, Erdem; Can, Özgür Devrim; Üçel, Umut İrfan; Öztürk, Yusuf; Ulupinar, Emel

    2015-08-01

    Agomelatine is an antidepressant with a distinct pharmacological mechanism of action as an MT1 and MT2 receptor agonist and as a 5-HT2C receptor antagonist. We evaluated the chronic effects of agomelatine administration (40 mg/kg, 20 weeks) on the cognitive performance of rats in the Morris water maze task. We applied unbiased stereological quantification methods to estimate the total numbers of granular and pyramidal neurons located in the dorsal hippocampus. We also analyzed the dendritic spines of pyramidal neurons in the CA1 region using the Golgi-Cox impregnation method. The agomelatine-treated group found the hidden platform more quickly than did the control group and spent significantly more time in the target quadrant. Agomelatine administration caused significant volumetric and numerical enhancements in granular and pyramidal neurons in the dentate gyrus and CA1-3 subregions, respectively. Increased densities of the mushroom and stubby types of spines, with no alteration in the thin-shaped spines, were observed in the agomelatine-treated group. These results showed that long-term agomelatine administration induced a nootropic effect supported by structural changes. Enhancement of the more stable types of dendritic spines might indicate improved adaptive capacity in hippocampal neurons. Future studies will provide a better understanding of the effect of this drug on synaptic plasticity. PMID:26110225

  8. Chronic treatment with levetiracetam reverses deficits in hippocampal LTP in vivo in experimental temporal lobe epilepsy rats.

    PubMed

    Ge, Yu-Xing; Tian, Xiang-Zhu; Lin, Ying-Ying; Liu, Xue-Yuan

    2016-08-15

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), the common form of epilepsy in adults, often displays complex partial seizures and cognitive deficits. The underlying mechanisms of such deficits are not yet well understood. Many contributing factors, such as initial epileptogenic lesion, seizure type, age of onset, and treatment side effects have been proposed. Levetiracetam (LEV) is a novel anti-epileptic drug (AED) used to treat partial seizures and idiopathic generalized epilepsy. It has been suggested that LEV exerts antiepileptic properties by modulation of synaptic release of neurotransmitters. However, its neuroprotective effects on learning and memory are not yet well demonstrated. Here we showed the impairment of spatial memory in the pilocarpine-induced experimental TLE rats, which can be improved by LEV. Furthermore, we found chronic LEV treatment partially reversed the SE-induced synaptic dysfunction in hippocampal LTP induction in vivo. In addition, LEV treatment can alleviate the SE-induced abnormal GluR1 phosphorylation at Ser(831) site, which may contribute to the rescue of synaptic transmission. These results indicate the neuroprotective role for LEV while it exhibits an antiseizure effect on experimental epileptic models. PMID:27345386

  9. Developmental Changes in Structural and Functional Properties of Hippocampal AMPARs Parallels the Emergence of Deliberative Spatial Navigation in Juvenile Rats

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Margaret G.; Nguyen, Nhu N.-Q.; Albani, Sarah H.; L'Etoile, Matthew M.; Andrawis, Marina M.; Owen, Leanna M.; Oliveira, Rodrigo F.; Johnson, Matthew W.; Purvis, Dianna L.; Sanders, Erin M.; Stoneham, Emily T.; Xu, Huaying

    2013-01-01

    The neural mechanisms that support the late postnatal development of spatial navigation are currently unknown. We investigated this in rats and found that an increase in the duration of AMPAR-mediated synaptic responses in the hippocampus was related to the emergence of spatial navigation. More specifically, spontaneous alternation rate, a behavioral indicator of hippocampal integrity, increased at the end of the third postnatal week in association with increases in AMPAR response duration at SC-CA1 synapses and synaptically driven postsynaptic discharge of CA1 pyramidal neurons. Pharmacological prolongation of glutamatergic synaptic transmission in juveniles increased the spontaneous alternation rate and CA1 postsynaptic discharge and reduced the threshold for the induction of activity-dependent synaptic plasticity at SC-CA1 synapses. A decrease in GluA1 and increases in GluA3 subunit and transmembrane AMPAR regulatory protein (TARP) expression at the end of the third postnatal week provide a molecular explanation for the increase in AMPAR response duration and reduced efficacy of AMPAR modulators with increasing age. A shift in the composition of AMPARs and increased association with AMPAR protein complex accessory proteins at the end of the third postnatal week likely “turns on” the hippocampus by increasing AMPAR response duration and postsynaptic excitability and reducing the threshold for activity-dependent synaptic potentiation. PMID:23884930

  10. Influence of iron deficiency and lead treatment on behavior and cerebellar and hippocampal polyamine levels in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Adhami, V M; Husain, R; Husain, R; Seth, P K

    1996-08-01

    Effect of lead exposure and iron-deficiency on polyamine levels in neuronal and glial cells of cerebellum and hippocampus was investigated in weaned rats. Lactating dams with one day old litters were given 0.2% (w/v) lead acetate in drinking water from postnatal day one to twenty one and maintained on an iron-deficient diet. There was an overall reduction of putrescine, spermidine and spermine in neuronal and glial cells of cerebellum and hippocampus consequent to lead exposure and iron-deficiency alone. Lead exposure and iron-deficiency together did not potentiate the polyamine levels in neuronal and glial cells of cerebellum and hippocampus uniformly. However, the enhanced lowering of putrescine in the hippocampal glia, spermidine in cerebellar neuronal and spermine in both neuronal and glial cells of cerebellum during the critical stage of brain development may result in stunted neuronal growth and sprouting in lead exposed and iron-deficient animals. The behavioral alterations as observed in the present study may be due to impaired neuronal development resulting from a depressed polyamine pathway and which could be attributed to cognitive deficits in growing children. PMID:8895845

  11. [Pre- and Postsynaptic Mechanisms of the Deprivational Potentiation of Population Responses in Rat Hippocampal CA1 Neurons].

    PubMed

    Popov, V A

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms of the deprivational potentiation (DeP) of the population responses in rat hippocampal CA1 neurons after 60-min period of the cessation of rare (0.05 Hz) test stimulation of Schaffer collaterals was investigated in vitro. It has been demonstrated that two independent mechanisms are involved in DeP induction: presynaptic component in initial phase of DeP and postsynaptic one responsible for the long-term phase of DeP. The competitive interference between mechanisms of the long-term phase of DeP and the protein phosphorylation phase of long-term potentiation (LTP) was confirmed. It was shown that not NMDA receptors, but purinergic P2 receptors participate in Ca(2+) -dependent mechanism of induction of the postsynaptic component of DeP. The common curve of dependence of synaptic strength on synaptic use/disuse, including the DeP, long-term depression (LTD) and LTP areas, is presented. PMID:27538284

  12. Neonatal finasteride administration alters hippocampal α4 and δ GABAAR subunits expression and behavioural responses to progesterone in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Modol, Laura; Casas, Caty; Navarro, Xavier; Llidó, Anna; Vallée, Monique; Pallarès, Marc; Darbra, Sònia

    2014-02-01

    Allopregnanolone is a neurosteroid that has been reported to fluctuate during early developmental stages. Previous experiments reported the importance of neonatal endogenous allopregnanolone levels for the maturation of the central nervous system and particularly for the hippocampus. Changes in neonatal allopregnanolone levels have been related to altered adult behaviour and with psychopathological susceptibility, including anxiety disorders, schizophrenia and drug abuse. However, the mechanism underlying these changes remains to be elucidated. In the present study we assessed changes in hippocampal expression of α4 and δ GABAA receptor (GABAAR) subunits as a consequence of neonatal finasteride (a 5-α reductase inhibitor) administration during early development (PD6 to PD15) in male rats. We observed that the treatment altered the temporal window of the natural peak in the expression of these subunits during development. Additionally, the level of these subunits were higher than in non-handled and control animals in the adult hippocampus. We observed that in adulthood, neonatal finasteride-treated animals presented an anxiogenic-like profile in response to progesterone administration which was absent in the rest of the groups. In conclusion, these results corroborate the relevance of neonatal maintenance of neurosteroid levels for behavioural anxiety responses in the adult, and point to some of the mechanisms involved in this alterations. PMID:24011224

  13. Early developmental bisphenol-A exposure sex-independently impairs spatial memory by remodeling hippocampal dendritic architecture and synaptic transmission in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Hua; Ding, Jin-Jun; Yang, Qian-Qian; Song, Hua-Zeng; Chen, Xiang-Tao; Xu, Yi; Xiao, Gui-Ran; Wang, Hui-Li

    2016-01-01

    Bisphenol-A (BPA, 4, 4'-isopropylidene-2-diphenol), a synthetic xenoestrogen that widely used in the production of polycarbonate plastics, has been reported to impair hippocampal development and function. Our previous study has shown that BPA exposure impairs Sprague-Dawley (SD) male hippocampal dendritic spine outgrowth. In this study, the sex-effect of chronic BPA exposure on spatial memory in SD male and female rats and the related synaptic mechanism were further investigated. We found that chronic BPA exposure impaired spatial memory in both SD male and female rats, suggesting a dysfunction of hippocampus without gender-specific effect. Further investigation indicated that BPA exposure causes significant impairment of dendrite and spine structure, manifested as decreased dendritic complexity, dendritic spine density and percentage of mushroom shaped spines in hippocampal CA1 and dentate gyrus (DG) neurons. Furthermore, a significant reduction in Arc expression was detected upon BPA exposure. Strikingly, BPA exposure significantly increased the mIPSC amplitude without altering the mEPSC amplitude or frequency, accompanied by increased GABAARβ2/3 on postsynaptic membrane in cultured CA1 neurons. In summary, our study indicated that Arc, together with the increased surface GABAARβ2/3, contributed to BPA induced spatial memory deficits, providing a novel molecular basis for BPA achieved brain impairment. PMID:27578147

  14. Leptin attenuates the detrimental effects of β-amyloid on spatial memory and hippocampal later-phase long term potentiation in rats.

    PubMed

    Tong, Jia-Qing; Zhang, Jun; Hao, Ming; Yang, Ju; Han, Yu-Fei; Liu, Xiao-Jie; Shi, Hui; Wu, Mei-Na; Liu, Qing-Song; Qi, Jin-Shun

    2015-07-01

    β-Amyloid (Aβ) is the main component of amyloid plaques developed in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The increasing burden of Aβ in the cortex and hippocampus is closely correlated with memory loss and cognition deficits in AD. Recently, leptin, a 16kD peptide derived mainly from white adipocyte tissue, has been appreciated for its neuroprotective function, although less is known about the effects of leptin on spatial memory and synaptic plasticity. The present study investigated the neuroprotective effects of leptin against Aβ-induced deficits in spatial memory and in vivo hippocampal late-phase long-term potentiation (L-LTP) in rats. Y maze spontaneous alternation was used to assess short term working memory, and the Morris water maze task was used to assess long term reference memory. Hippocampal field potential recordings were performed to observe changes in L-LTP. We found that chronically intracerebroventricular injection of leptin (1μg) effectively alleviated Aβ1-42 (20μg)-induced spatial memory impairments of Y maze spontaneous alternation and Morris water maze. In addition, chronic administration of leptin also reversed Aβ1-42-induced suppression of in vivo hippocampal L-LTP in rats. Together, these results suggest that chronic leptin treatments reversed Aβ-induced deficits in learning and memory and the maintenance of L-LTP. PMID:26135065

  15. Early developmental bisphenol-A exposure sex-independently impairs spatial memory by remodeling hippocampal dendritic architecture and synaptic transmission in rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi-Hua; Ding, Jin-Jun; Yang, Qian-Qian; Song, Hua-Zeng; Chen, Xiang-Tao; Xu, Yi; Xiao, Gui-Ran; Wang, Hui-Li

    2016-01-01

    Bisphenol-A (BPA, 4, 4′-isopropylidene-2-diphenol), a synthetic xenoestrogen that widely used in the production of polycarbonate plastics, has been reported to impair hippocampal development and function. Our previous study has shown that BPA exposure impairs Sprague-Dawley (SD) male hippocampal dendritic spine outgrowth. In this study, the sex-effect of chronic BPA exposure on spatial memory in SD male and female rats and the related synaptic mechanism were further investigated. We found that chronic BPA exposure impaired spatial memory in both SD male and female rats, suggesting a dysfunction of hippocampus without gender-specific effect. Further investigation indicated that BPA exposure causes significant impairment of dendrite and spine structure, manifested as decreased dendritic complexity, dendritic spine density and percentage of mushroom shaped spines in hippocampal CA1 and dentate gyrus (DG) neurons. Furthermore, a significant reduction in Arc expression was detected upon BPA exposure. Strikingly, BPA exposure significantly increased the mIPSC amplitude without altering the mEPSC amplitude or frequency, accompanied by increased GABAARβ2/3 on postsynaptic membrane in cultured CA1 neurons. In summary, our study indicated that Arc, together with the increased surface GABAARβ2/3, contributed to BPA induced spatial memory deficits, providing a novel molecular basis for BPA achieved brain impairment. PMID:27578147

  16. Retarded hippocampal development following prenatal exposure to ethanolic leaves extract of Datura metel in wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Ishola, Azeez Olakunle; Adeniyi, Philip Adeyemi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Datura metel contains atropine alkaloids and has been used to treat complication like asthma and, bronchitis, because of its anticholinergic properties. Aim: This study aimed to determine the prenatal effects of ethanolic extract of D. metel leaves exposure on the development of hippocampus. Materials and Methods: Twenty rats (12 females and 8 males) were purchased. The females were grouped into four groups (A_D). Group A were given 500 mg/kg body weight of the extract on the first day of fertilization to the end of gestation period, Group B were given 500 mg/kg body weight on the 8th day of fertilization to the end of gestation period, Group C were given 500 mg/kg body weight on 15th day of fertilization to the end of gestation period and Group D were given normal saline throughout the gestation period. Results: Rats in Group A showed no implantation, rats in Group B had abortion on the 7th day after administration, and rats in Group C gave birth with their litters showing retarded hippocampus development and neural degeneration and rats in Group D (control) showed normal development. Conclusion: Ethanolic extract of D. metel leaf is teratogenic in the late stage of pregnancy, is abortificient and can serve as a contraceptive. PMID:24665157

  17. Polymeric alkylpyridinium salts permit intracellular delivery of human Tau in rat hippocampal neurons: requirement of Tau phosphorylation for functional deficits.

    PubMed

    Koss, Dave J; Robinson, Lianne; Mietelska-Porowska, Anna; Gasiorowska, Anna; Sepčić, Kristina; Turk, Tom; Jaspars, Marcel; Niewiadomska, Grazyna; Scott, Roderick H; Platt, Bettina; Riedel, Gernot

    2015-12-01

    Patients suffering from tauopathies including frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) present with intra-neuronal aggregation of microtubule-associated protein Tau. During the disease process, Tau undergoes excessive phosphorylation, dissociates from microtubules and aggregates into insoluble neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), accumulating in the soma. While many aspects of the disease pathology have been replicated in transgenic mouse models, a region-specific non-transgenic expression model is missing. Complementing existing models, we here report a novel region-specific approach to modelling Tau pathology. Local co-administration of the pore-former polymeric 1,3-alkylpyridinium salts (Poly-APS) extracted from marine sponges, and synthetic full-length 4R recombinant human Tau (hTau) was performed in vitro and in vivo. At low doses, Poly-APS was non-toxic and cultured cells exposed to Poly-APS (0.5 µg/ml) and hTau (1 µg/ml; ~22 µM) had normal input resistance, resting-state membrane potentials and Ca(2+) transients induced either by glutamate or KCl, as did cells exposed to a low concentration of the phosphatase inhibitor Okadaic acid (OA; 1 nM, 24 h). Combined hTau loading and phosphatase inhibition resulted in a collapse of the membrane potential, suppressed excitation and diminished glutamate and KCl-stimulated Ca(2+) transients. Stereotaxic infusions of Poly-APS (0.005 µg/ml) and hTau (1 µg/ml) bilaterally into the dorsal hippocampus at multiple sites resulted in hTau loading of neurons in rats. A separate cohort received an additional 7-day minipump infusion of OA (1.2 nM) intrahippocampally. When tested 2 weeks after surgery, rats treated with Poly-APS+hTau+OA presented with subtle learning deficits, but were also impaired in cognitive flexibility and recall. Hippocampal plasticity recorded from slices ex vivo was diminished in Poly-APS+hTau+OA subjects, but not in other treatment groups. Histological sections confirmed the intracellular

  18. Effects of acute and chronic administration of methylprednisolone on oxidative stress in rat lungs* **

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Ronaldo Lopes; Torres, Iraci Lucena da Silva; Laste, Gabriela; Ferreira, Maria Beatriz Cardoso; Cardoso, Paulo Francisco Guerreiro; Belló-Klein, Adriane

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effects of acute and chronic administration of methylprednisolone on oxidative stress, as quantified by measuring lipid peroxidation (LPO) and total reactive antioxidant potential (TRAP), in rat lungs. Methods: Forty Wistar rats were divided into four groups: acute treatment, comprising rats receiving a single injection of methylprednisolone (50 mg/kg i.p.); acute control, comprising rats i.p. injected with saline; chronic treatment, comprising rats receiving methylprednisolone in drinking water (6 mg/kg per day for 30 days); and chronic control, comprising rats receiving normal drinking water. Results: The levels of TRAP were significantly higher in the acute treatment group rats than in the acute control rats, suggesting an improvement in the pulmonary defenses of the former. The levels of lung LPO were significantly higher in the chronic treatment group rats than in the chronic control rats, indicating oxidative damage in the lung tissue of the former. Conclusions: Our results suggest that the acute use of corticosteroids is beneficial to lung tissue, whereas their chronic use is not. The chronic use of methylprednisolone appears to increase lung LPO levels. PMID:25029646

  19. Influence of mild traumatic brain injury during pediatric stage on short-term memory and hippocampal apoptosis in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Park, Mi-Sook; Oh, Hyean-Ae; Ko, Il-Gyu; Kim, Sung-Eun; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Chang-Ju; Kim, Hyun-Bae; Kim, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of neurological deficit in the brain, which induces short- and long-term brain damage, cognitive impairment with/without structural alteration, motor deficits, emotional problems, and death both in children and adults. In the present study, we evaluated whether mild TBI in childhood causes persisting memory impairment until adulthood. Moreover, we investigated the influence of mild TBI on memory impairment in relation with hippocampal apoptosis. For this, step-down avoidance task, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay, and immunohistochemistry for caspase-3 were performed. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used in the experiments. The animals were randomly divided into two groups: sham-operation group and TBI-induction group. The mild TBI model was created with an electromagnetic contusion device activated at a velocity of 3.0 m/sec. The results showed that mild TBI during the pediatric stage significantly decreased memory retention. The numbers of TUNEL-positive and caspase-3-positive cells were increased in the TBI-induction group compared to those in the sham-operation group. Defective memory retention and apoptosis sustained up to the adult stage. The present results shows that mild TBI induces long-lasting cognitive impairment from pediatric to adult stages in rats through the high level of apoptosis. The finding of this study suggests that children with mild TBI may need intensive treatments for the reduction of long-lasting cognitive impairment by secondary neuronal damage. PMID:25061593

  20. Evidence for Ligand-Independent Activation of Hippocampal Estrogen Receptor-α by IGF-1 in Hippocampus of Ovariectomized Rats.

    PubMed

    Grissom, Elin M; Daniel, Jill M

    2016-08-01

    In the absence of ovarian estrogens, increased levels of estrogen receptor (ER)α in the hippocampus are associated with improvements in cognition. In vitro evidence indicates that under conditions of low estrogen, growth factors, including Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 (IGF-1), can activate ERα and regulate ERα-mediated transcription through mechanisms that likely involve modification of phosphorylation sites on the receptor. The goal of the current work was to investigate a role for IGF-1 in ligand-independent activation of ERα in the hippocampus of female rats. Ovariectomized rats received a single intracerebroventricular infusion of IGF-1 and hippocampi were collected 1 or 24 hours later. After 1 h, IGF-1 increased hippocampal levels of phosphorylated ERα at serine 118 (S118) as revealed by Western blotting. Coimmunoprecipitation revealed that at 1 hour after infusion, IGF-1 increased association between ERα and steroid receptor coactivator 1, a histone acetyltransferase that increases transcriptional activity of phosphorylated ERα. IGF-1 infusion increased levels of the ERα-regulated proteins ERα, choline acetyltransferase, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the hippocampus 24 hours after infusion. Results indicate that IGF-1 activates ERα in ligand-independent manner in the hippocampus via phosphorylation at S118 resulting in increased association of ERα with steroid receptor coactivator 1 and elevation of ER-regulated proteins. To our knowledge, these data are the first in vivo evidence of ligand-independent actions of ERα and provide a mechanism by which ERα can impact memory in the absence of ovarian estrogens. PMID:27254005

  1. Two different mechanisms underlie reversible, intrinsic optical signals in rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Fayuk, Dmitriy; Aitken, Peter G; Somjen, George G; Turner, Dennis A

    2002-04-01

    Intrinsic optical signals (IOSs) induced by synaptic stimulation and moderate hypotonic swelling in brain tissue slices consist of reduced light scattering and are usually attributed to cell swelling. During spreading depression (SD), however, light-scattering increases even though SD has been shown to cause strong cell swelling. To understand this phenomenon, we recorded extracellular voltage, light transmission (LT), which is inversely related to light scattering, and interstitial volume (ISV) simultaneously from the same site (stratum radiatum of CA1) in both interface and submerged hippocampal slices. As expected, moderate lowering of bath osmolarity caused concentration-dependent shrinkage of ISV and increase in LT, while increased osmolarity induced opposite changes in both variables. During severe hypotonia, however, after an initial increase of LT, the direction of the IOS reversed to a progressive decrease in spite of continuing ISV shrinkage. SD caused by hypotonia, by microinjection of high-K(+) solution, or by hypoxia, was associated with a pronounced LT decrease, during which ISV shrinkage indicated maximal cell swelling. If most of the extracellular Cl(-) was substituted by the impermeant anion methylsulfate and also in strongly hypertonic medium, the SD-related decrease in LT was suppressed and replaced by a monotonic increase. Nevertheless, the degree of ISV shrinkage was similar in low and in normal Cl(-) conditions. The optical signals and ISV changes were qualitatively identical in interface and submerged slices. We conclude that there are at least two mechanisms that underlie reversible optical responses in hippocampal slices. The first mechanism underlies light-scattering decrease (hence enhancing LT) when ISV shrinks (cell swelling) under synaptic stimulation and mild hypotonia. Similarly, as result of this mechanism, expansion of ISV (cell shrinkage) during mild hypertonia leads to an increased light scattering (and decreased LT). Thus

  2. Post-treatment with prolactin protects hippocampal CA1 neurons of the ovariectomized female rat against kainic acid-induced neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Mendoza, Julio; Morales, Teresa

    2016-07-22

    Kainic acid (KA) is a glutamate agonist widely used in studies of neurodegeneration due to its ability to induce excitotoxic damage in the rodent brain. Previously, we reported that pre-treatment with prolactin (PRL) prevents the neuron loss induced by KA administration in CA1, CA3 and CA4 of the hippocampus of the female rat. Here, we investigated if PRL has a neuroprotective effect in the dorsal hippocampus when it is administered after KA. For this, 100ng of KA or 0.9% saline was administered intracerebroventricularly (ICV) to ovariectomized female rats. One hour later, they received subcutaneous PRL (103μg/day for 7days) or saline through an osmotic minipump. Also, to determine the hippocampal neurogenesis rate, the rats were administered bromodeoxyuridine along with the PRL treatment. Immunostaining for NeuN revealed that neuronal loss is lower in the CA1 of PRL-treated rats compared with the untreated group, but PRL did not confer any protection in the CA3 and CA4 subfields. Furthermore, PRL prevented the KA-induced cognitive deficit measured as a better performance in the novel object recognition test. The PRL treatment did not modify the neurogenesis rate. These data indicate that post-treatment with PRL confers differential neuroprotection against KA-induced neuronal loss in hippocampal subfield CA1, which correlates with a more mild cognitive deficit compared with the untreated control group. PMID:27126559

  3. Prevention of acute adriamycin cardiotoxicity by dantrolene in rats.

    PubMed

    Büyükokuroğlu, Mehmet Emin; Taysi, Seyithan; Buyukavci, Mustafa; Bakan, Ebubekir

    2004-05-01

    Possible preventive effect of dantrolene against the peroxidative damage in rat heart which was induced by the administration of an acute dose of adriamycin (ADR, 20 mg/kg, i.p.) has been examined. Forty-eight hours after ADR administration, biochemical changes including the activities of serum creatine kinase isoenzyme (CK-MB), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) in heart tissue were measured. Pretreatment of rats with dantrolene, given i.p. 30 min prior to ADR injection, substantially reduced the peroxidative damage in the myocardium, and markedly lowered the serum CK-MB, LDH and AST. The protective effects obtained by dantrolene administration, however, were not complete and did not reach those of the control group. Dantrolene, at 5 mg/kg, was useful to obtain significant protective effects, while the protector effect of higher dantrolene dosing level (10 mg/kg) was weak or absent. These results suggest that, at least in part, due to antioxidative properties, dantrolene may provide a significant protective effect against acute ADR-induced cardiotoxicity. PMID:15222403

  4. Neuroprotective Mechanism of Lycium barbarum Polysaccharides against Hippocampal-Dependent Spatial Memory Deficits in a Rat Model of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Chun-Sing; Tipoe, George Lim; So, Kwok-Fai; Fung, Man-Lung

    2015-01-01

    Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) is a hallmark of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), which induces hippocampal injuries mediated by oxidative stress. This study aims to examine the neuroprotective mechanism of Lycium barbarum polysaccharides (LBP) against CIH-induced spatial memory deficits. Adult Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to hypoxic treatment resembling a severe OSA condition for a week. The animals were orally fed with LBP solution (1mg/kg) daily 2 hours prior to hypoxia or in air for the control. The effect of LBP on the spatial memory and levels of oxidative stress, inflammation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, apoptosis and neurogenesis in the hippocampus was examined. There was a significant deficit in the spatial memory and an elevated level of malondialdehyde with a decreased expression of antioxidant enzymes (SOD, GPx-1) in the hypoxic group when compared with the normoxic control. In addition, redox-sensitive nuclear factor kappa B (NFКB) canonical pathway was activated with a translocation of NFКB members (p65, p50) and increased expression levels of NFКB-dependent inflammatory cytokines and mediator (TNFα, IL-1β, COX-2); also, a significantly elevated level of ER stress (GRP78/Bip, PERK, CHOP) and autophagic flux in the hypoxic group, leading to neuronal apoptosis in hippocampal subfields (DG, CA1, CA3). Remarkably, LBP administration normalized the elevated level of oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, ER stress, autophagic flux and apoptosis induced by hypoxia. Moreover, LBP significantly mitigated both the caspase-dependent intrinsic (Bax, Bcl2, cytochrome C, cleaved caspase-3) and extrinsic (FADD, cleaved caspase-8, Bid) signaling apoptotic cascades. Furthermore, LBP administration prevented the spatial memory deficit and enhanced the hippocampal neurogenesis induced by hypoxia. Our results suggest that LBP is neuroprotective against CIH-induced hippocampal-dependent spatial memory deficits by promoting hippocampal neurogenesis and

  5. Ventral hippocampal kappa opioid receptors mediate the renewal of fear following extinction in the rat.

    PubMed

    Cole, Sindy; Richardson, Rick; McNally, Gavan P

    2013-01-01

    The hippocampus is part of a neural network which regulates the renewal of fear following extinction. Both the ventral (VH) and dorsal (DH) hippocampus have been shown to be necessary for renewal, however the critical receptors and neurotransmitters mediating these contributions are poorly understood. One candidate mechanism is the kappa opioid receptor (KOR) system, which has been implicated in fear learning and anxiety. Here we examined the effect of the KOR antagonist norbinaltorphamine hydrochloride (norBNI), infused into either the VH or DH, on the renewal of extinguished fear. We found that an infusion of norBNI into the VH significantly reduced the relapse of fear on test compared to that seen in saline controls (Experiment 1), while similar infusions of norBNI into the DH had no effect on renewal (Experiment 2). These findings show that hippocampal KORs are involved in fear renewal and also identify a dissociation in the contribution of VH and DH KORs to the expression of renewed fear. PMID:23675405

  6. Synaptic plasticity in area CA1 of rat hippocampal slices following intraventricular application of albumin.

    PubMed

    Salar, Seda; Lapilover, Ezequiel; Müller, Julia; Hollnagel, Jan-Oliver; Lippmann, Kristina; Friedman, Alon; Heinemann, Uwe

    2016-07-01

    Epileptogenesis following insults to the brain may be triggered by a dysfunctional blood-brain barrier (BBB) associated with albumin extravasation and activation of astrocytes. Using ex vivo recordings from the BBB-disrupted hippocampus after neocortical photothrombotic stroke, we previously demonstrated abnormal activity-dependent accumulation of extracellular potassium with facilitated generation of seizure like events and spreading depolarizations. Similar changes could be observed after intracerebroventricular (icv) application of albumin. We hypothesized that alterations in extracellular potassium and glutamate homeostasis might lead to alterations in synaptic interactions. We therefore assessed the effects of icv albumin on homo- and heterosynaptic plasticity in hippocampal CA1, 24h after a single injection or 7days after continuous infusion of icv albumin. We demonstrate alterations in both homo- and heterosynaptic plasticity compared to control conditions in ex vivo slice studies. Albumin-treated tissue reveals (1) reduced long-term depression following low-frequency stimulation; (2) increased long-term potentiation of population spikes in response to 20Hz stimulation; (3) potentiated responses to Schaffer collateral stimulation following high-frequency stimulation of the direct cortical input and low-frequency stimulation of alveus and finally, (4) TGFβ receptor II (TGFβR-II) involvement in albumin-induced homosynaptic plasticity changes. We conclude that albumin-induced network hyperexcitability is associated with abnormal homo- and heterosynaptic plasticity that could partly be reversed by interference with TGFβR-II-mediated signaling and therefore it might be an important factor in the process of epileptogenesis. PMID:26972679

  7. Assessment of the Optimal Stimulus Pattern to Achieve Rapid Dorsal Hippocampal Kindling in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Etemadi, Fatemeh; Sayyah, Mohammad; Gholami Pourbadie, Hamid; Babapour, Vahab

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Although hippocampus is the most famous brain area involved in temporal lobe epilepsy, hippocampal kindling (HK) develops very slowly. Hence, rapid kindling is usually preferred to the traditional kindling and it is widely used. In this article we aimed at finding the optimal stimulus pattern, which yields the fastest HK rate. Methods: Stimulus patterns with different duration (2, 3, 5 and 10 s) and inter-train interval (ITI) (5, 10 and 30 min) as well as number of trains in 24 h (8 and 12) were exerted to rats’ dorsal hippocampus. The stimuli were continued until appearance of 3 consecutive generalized seizures or maximum 7 days stimulations. Results: While the protocol with train duration of 10 s and ITI of 30 min caused the fastest kindling rate and the most growth of afterdischarges, the protocol with train duration of 5 s and ITI of 5 min was the most time-consuming protocol among protocols tested. Discussion: Rapid HK develops with a time course of days compared to weeks in traditional kindling. Train duration and inter-train interval are key factors for rapid HK. Among the patterns, 12 trains/24h of 50Hz monophasic square wave with 10 s duration and 30 min interval between trains, is the best stimulus pattern for eliciting rapid dorsal HK. PMID:27307955

  8. Ventral Hippocampal Kappa Opioid Receptors Mediate the Renewal of Fear following Extinction in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Sindy; Richardson, Rick; McNally, Gavan P.

    2013-01-01

    The hippocampus is part of a neural network which regulates the renewal of fear following extinction. Both the ventral (VH) and dorsal (DH) hippocampus have been shown to be necessary for renewal, however the critical receptors and neurotransmitters mediating these contributions are poorly understood. One candidate mechanism is the kappa opioid receptor (KOR) system, which has been implicated in fear learning and anxiety. Here we examined the effect of the KOR antagonist norbinaltorphamine hydrochloride (norBNI), infused into either the VH or DH, on the renewal of extinguished fear. We found that an infusion of norBNI into the VH significantly reduced the relapse of fear on test compared to that seen in saline controls (Experiment 1), while similar infusions of norBNI into the DH had no effect on renewal (Experiment 2). These findings show that hippocampal KORs are involved in fear renewal and also identify a dissociation in the contribution of VH and DH KORs to the expression of renewed fear. PMID:23675405

  9. Convulsant and subconvulsant doses of norfloxacin in the presence and absence of biphenylacetic acid alter extracellular hippocampal glutamate but not gamma-aminobutyric acid levels in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Smolders, I; Gousseau, C; Marchand, S; Couet, W; Ebinger, G; Michotte, Y

    2002-02-01

    Fluoroquinolones are antibiotics with central excitatory side effects. These adverse effects presumably result from inhibition of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) binding to GABA(A) receptors. This GABA antagonistic effect is greatly potentiated by the active metabolite of fenbufen, biphenylacetic acid (BPAA). Nevertheless, it remains questionable whether GABA receptor antagonism alone can explain the convulsant activity potentials of these antimicrobial agents. The present study was undertaken to investigate the possible effects of norfloxacin, both in the absence and in the presence of BPAA, on the extracellular hippocampal levels of GABA and glutamate, the main central inhibitory and excitatory amino acid neurotransmitters, respectively. This in vivo microdialysis approach with conscious rats allows monitoring of behavioral alterations and concomitant transmitter modulation in the hippocampus. Peroral administration of 100 mg of BPAA per kg of body weight had no effect on behavior and did not significantly alter extracellular GABA or glutamate concentrations. Intravenous perfusion of 300 mg of norfloxacin per kg did not change the rat's behavior or the concomitant neurotransmitter levels in about half of the experiments, while the remaining animals exhibited severe seizures. These norfloxacin-induced convulsions did not affect extracellular hippocampal GABA levels but were accompanied by enhanced glutamate concentrations. Half of the rats receiving both 100 mg of BPAA per kg and 50 mg of norfloxacin per kg displayed lethal seizures, while the remaining animals showed no seizure-related behavior. In the latter subgroup, again no significant alterations in extracellular GABA levels were observed, but glutamate overflow remained significantly elevated for at least 3 h. In conclusion, norfloxacin exerts convulsant activity in rats, accompanied by elevations of extracellular hippocampal glutamate levels but not GABA levels, even in the presence of BPAA. PMID:11796360

  10. Convulsant and Subconvulsant Doses of Norfloxacin in the Presence and Absence of Biphenylacetic Acid Alter Extracellular Hippocampal Glutamate but Not Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Levels in Conscious Rats

    PubMed Central

    Smolders, I.; Gousseau, C.; Marchand, S.; Couet, W.; Ebinger, G.; Michotte, Y.

    2002-01-01

    Fluoroquinolones are antibiotics with central excitatory side effects. These adverse effects presumably result from inhibition of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) binding to GABAA receptors. This GABA antagonistic effect is greatly potentiated by the active metabolite of fenbufen, biphenylacetic acid (BPAA). Nevertheless, it remains questionable whether GABA receptor antagonism alone can explain the convulsant activity potentials of these antimicrobial agents. The present study was undertaken to investigate the possible effects of norfloxacin, both in the absence and in the presence of BPAA, on the extracellular hippocampal levels of GABA and glutamate, the main central inhibitory and excitatory amino acid neurotransmitters, respectively. This in vivo microdialysis approach with conscious rats allows monitoring of behavioral alterations and concomitant transmitter modulation in the hippocampus. Peroral administration of 100 mg of BPAA per kg of body weight had no effect on behavior and did not significantly alter extracellular GABA or glutamate concentrations. Intravenous perfusion of 300 mg of norfloxacin per kg did not change the rat's behavior or the concomitant neurotransmitter levels in about half of the experiments, while the remaining animals exhibited severe seizures. These norfloxacin-induced convulsions did not affect extracellular hippocampal GABA levels but were accompanied by enhanced glutamate concentrations. Half of the rats receiving both 100 mg of BPAA per kg and 50 mg of norfloxacin per kg displayed lethal seizures, while the remaining animals showed no seizure-related behavior. In the latter subgroup, again no significant alterations in extracellular GABA levels were observed, but glutamate overflow remained significantly elevated for at least 3 h. In conclusion, norfloxacin exerts convulsant activity in rats, accompanied by elevations of extracellular hippocampal glutamate levels but not GABA levels, even in the presence of BPAA. PMID:11796360

  11. BMSCs transplantation improves cognitive impairment via up-regulation of hippocampal GABAergic system in a rat model of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion.

    PubMed

    Long, Q; Hei, Y; Luo, Q; Tian, Y; Yang, J; Li, J; Wei, L; Liu, W

    2015-12-17

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) transplantation can ameliorate cognitive impairment in chronic ischemic brain injury, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. It is considered that the hippocampus holds the capabilities of memory consolidation and spatial navigation, and the gamma amino butyric acid (GABA)ergic system plays an important role in the control of learning and memory processes. Herein, we investigated whether transplantation of BMSCs could improve cognitive impairment via regulating the hippocampal GABAergic system in a rat model of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. Animals treated with permanent bilateral occlusion of the common carotid arteries (two-vessel occlusion, 2VO) (a rat model of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion) received intravenous injections of BMSCs or saline as experimental group and control group I, the sham-operated rats received intravenous injections of BMSCs or saline as the sham group and control group II. Four weeks later, the Morris Water Maze was employed to evaluate the cognitive changes of each group, immunohistochemistry and western blotting was used to investigate the GABAergic system expression including GABA, glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) or GABA(B) receptor 1 (GABA(B)R1) in the hippocampus. Our results showed that the 2VO model presented decreased capacities of learning and memory and down-regulated the expression of GABA, GAD67 or GABA(B)R1 in the hippocampal CA1 subfield in comparison to the sham group (P<0.05), while administration of BMSCs (experimental group) manifested increased performances of learning sessions and probe tasks, as well as up-regulated expression of GABA, GAD67 or GABA(B)R1 compared with the control group I (P<0.05). Collectively, these findings suggest that transplantation of BMSCs is capable of improving cognitive impairment via up-regulating the hippocampal GABAergic system in a rat model of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. Hence, BMSCs transplantation could serve as an

  12. [Alteration of neural oscillations in hippocampal CA3 area in the fast avoidance response rat before and after electric shock avoidance training].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Wei; Wang, Dan-Dan; Wang, Dan; Guan, Yan; Tang, Ying-Ying; Ye, Zheng; Li, Jing; Li, Min; Zhu, Zai-Man; Pan, Qun-Wan

    2015-10-25

    The purpose of the present study is to explore the relationship of spatial learning ability and specific electrical activities of neural oscillations in the rat. The fast and general avoidance response groups were selected on the basis of the animals' responses to the electric shock in Y type maze, and their local field potentials (LFPs) of hippocampal CA3 area were recorded by wireless telemetry before and after shock avoidance training, respectively. The components of neural oscillations related to spatial identifying and learning ability were analyzed. The results showed that, compared with the general avoidance response group, the fast avoidance response group did not show any differences of LFPs in hippocampal CA3 area before electric shock avoidance trial, but showed significantly increased percentages of 0-10 Hz and 30-40 Hz rhythm in right hippocampal CA3 area after the shock avoidance training (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05). Fast Fourier transform showed that percentage increase of 0-10 Hz band occurred mainly in θ (3-7 Hz) frequency, and 30-40 Hz frequency change was equivalent to the γ1 band. Furthermore, compared with those before training, only the percentages of β, β2 (20-30 Hz) and γ1 rhythm increased (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05) in fast avoidance response rats after training, while the θ rhythm percentage remained unchanged. In contrast, θ rhythm percentage and the large amplitude (intensity: +2.5 - -2.5 db) θ waves in right CA3 area of general avoidance response rats were significantly reduced after training (P < 0.01). These results suggest that the increased percentages of β2 and γ1 rhythm and high-level (unchanged) percentage of θ rhythm in the right hippocampus CA3 area might be related to strong spatial cognition ability of fast avoidance response rats. PMID:26490066

  13. Perinatal asphyxia results in altered expression of the hippocampal acylethanolamide/endocannabinoid signaling system associated to memory impairments in postweaned rats.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Eduardo; Galeano, Pablo; Holubiec, Mariana I; Romero, Juan I; Logica, Tamara; Rivera, Patricia; Pavón, Francisco J; Suarez, Juan; Capani, Francisco; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Perinatal asphyxia (PA) is an obstetric complication that strongly affects the CNS. The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is a lipid transmitter system involved in several physiological processes including synaptic plasticity, neurogenesis, memory, and mood. Endocannabinoids, and other acylethanolamides (AEs) without endocannabinoid activity, have recently received growing attention due to their potential neuroprotective functions in neurological disorders, including cerebral ischemia. In the present study, we aimed to analyze the changes produced by PA in the major metabolic enzymes and receptors of the ECS/AEs in the hippocampus using a rodent model of PA. To induce PA, we removed uterine horns from ready-to-deliver rats and immersed them into a water bath during 19 min. Animals delivered spontaneously or by cesarean section were employed as controls. At 1 month of age, cognitive functions were assessed and immunohistochemical procedures were carried out to determine the expression of NeuN and glial fibrillary acidic protein, enzymes responsible for synthesis (DAGLα and NAPE-PLD) and degradation (FAAH) of ECS/AEs and their receptors (CB1 and PPARα) in the hippocampus. Postweaned asphyctic rats showed impaired recognition and spatial reference memory that were accompanied by hippocampal astrogliosis and changes in the expression of enzymes and receptors. The most remarkable findings in asphyctic rats were a decrease in the expression of NAPE-PLD and PPARα in both hippocampal areas CA1 and CA3. In addition, postweaned cesarean delivery rats showed an increase in the immunolabeling for FAAH in the hippocampal CA3 area. Since, NAPE-PLD and PPARα are proteins that participate in the biochemical process of AEs, specially the neuroprotective oleoylethanolamide, these results suggest that PA dysregulates this system. These data encourage conducting future studies using AEs as potential neuroprotective compounds in animal models of PA. PMID:26578900

  14. Omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids enhance the protective effect of levetiracetam against seizures, cognitive impairment and hippocampal oxidative DNA damage in young kindled rats.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Wahab, Basel A; Shaikh, Ibrahim A; Khateeb, Masood M; Habeeb, Shafiuddin M

    2015-08-01

    Levetiracetam (LEV) is a unique, effective, relatively safe antiepileptic drug that preferentially interacts with synaptic vesicle protein 2A (SV2A). This study aimed to explore the effect of combined treatment of LEV with omega 3 (OM3) on cognitive impairment and hippocampal oxidative stress and DNA damage induced by seizures in the PTZ-kindled young rat model. Cognitive functions, biomarkers of oxidative stress, and DNA damage were assessed in PTZ-kindled young rats pretreated with single and combined treatment of LEV (30mg/kg, i.p.) and OM3 (200mg/kg, p.o.). Pretreatment with LEV and OM3 at the tested doses significantly attenuated PTZ-induced seizures and decreased cognitive impairment in both passive avoidance and elevated plus maze tests in the PTZ-kindled rats. Moreover, the increase in hippocampal glutamate, malondialdehyde and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels, as well as the decrease in reduced glutathione (GSH) levels and GSH-peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities induced by PTZ kindling, significantly decreased. These effects were higher with combined treatment of LEV with OM3 and significantly more than the observed effects of single LEV or OM3. In conclusion, the combined treatment of LEV with OM3 is more effective in seizure control and alleviating the cognitive impairment induced by PTZ kindling in the young rat model, the effects that result from the decrease in hippocampal oxidative stress and DNA damage which can be attributed to the antioxidant properties of both LEV and OM3. These results may be promising for the use of LEV and OM3 combination in the treatment of epileptic children. PMID:26044965

  15. Perinatal asphyxia results in altered expression of the hippocampal acylethanolamide/endocannabinoid signaling system associated to memory impairments in postweaned rats

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Eduardo; Galeano, Pablo; Holubiec, Mariana I.; Romero, Juan I.; Logica, Tamara; Rivera, Patricia; Pavón, Francisco J.; Suarez, Juan; Capani, Francisco; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Perinatal asphyxia (PA) is an obstetric complication that strongly affects the CNS. The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is a lipid transmitter system involved in several physiological processes including synaptic plasticity, neurogenesis, memory, and mood. Endocannabinoids, and other acylethanolamides (AEs) without endocannabinoid activity, have recently received growing attention due to their potential neuroprotective functions in neurological disorders, including cerebral ischemia. In the present study, we aimed to analyze the changes produced by PA in the major metabolic enzymes and receptors of the ECS/AEs in the hippocampus using a rodent model of PA. To induce PA, we removed uterine horns from ready-to-deliver rats and immersed them into a water bath during 19 min. Animals delivered spontaneously or by cesarean section were employed as controls. At 1 month of age, cognitive functions were assessed and immunohistochemical procedures were carried out to determine the expression of NeuN and glial fibrillary acidic protein, enzymes responsible for synthesis (DAGLα and NAPE-PLD) and degradation (FAAH) of ECS/AEs and their receptors (CB1 and PPARα) in the hippocampus. Postweaned asphyctic rats showed impaired recognition and spatial reference memory that were accompanied by hippocampal astrogliosis and changes in the expression of enzymes and receptors. The most remarkable findings in asphyctic rats were a decrease in the expression of NAPE-PLD and PPARα in both hippocampal areas CA1 and CA3. In addition, postweaned cesarean delivery rats showed an increase in the immunolabeling for FAAH in the hippocampal CA3 area. Since, NAPE-PLD and PPARα are proteins that participate in the biochemical process of AEs, specially the neuroprotective oleoylethanolamide, these results suggest that PA dysregulates this system. These data encourage conducting future studies using AEs as potential neuroprotective compounds in animal models of PA. PMID:26578900

  16. Influence of exposure period on in vivo hippocampal glutamate and GABA release in rats chronically exposed to lead.

    PubMed

    Lasley, S M; Green, M C; Gilbert, M E

    1999-08-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that continual exposure to 0.2% lead (Pb) beginning at birth diminishes depolarization-induced hippocampal glutamate (GLU) and GABA release in vivo. The present study sought to extend these findings by examining Pb-induced changes as a function of exposure period. Rats were continually exposed to 0.2% Pb in the drinking water beginning at conception (Gestational-Life, GL) or two weeks after weaning (Wean-Life, WL), while exposure in a third group was begun at conception but terminated at weaning (Gestational-Wean, GW). Hippocampal transmitter release was induced in adult animals by perfusion of 150 mM K+ in the presence of Ca+2 (total release) through a microdialysis probe in one test session, followed by perfusion through a contralateral probe in the absence of Ca+2 (Ca+2-independent release) in the second session. Decreases in total GLU and GABA release were observed in the GL and WL groups compared to controls over the first 20-min after initiation of high K+, decrements that could be attributed to exposure-induced reductions in Ca+2-dependent release. The pattern of Pb-induced changes in the GL group is similar to that observed previously in a group continuously exposed from birth, indicating that gestational exposure did not further enhance the impact of Pb beginning at birth when exposure in both groups extends into adulthood. Similar responses were also found in the WL group, indicating that exposure during early development is not a requirement to induce changes in GLU and GABA release. Pb-induced decreases in response were also seen in the GW group: a decrease in Ca+2-dependent GLU release was observed, while decrements in total and Ca+2-dependent GABA release were similar to those in the GL and WL groups. Thus, exposure limited to early development is also sufficient to produce deficits in evoked transmitter release. In addition, the exposure-induced decreases in GLU responses correspond to Pb-induced impairments in long

  17. Genistein suppresses the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in hippocampal neurons in rats with Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Cai, Biao; Shao, Jing; Wang, Ting-ting; Cai, Run-ze; Ma, Chang-ju; Han, Tao; Du, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Genistein is effective against amyloid-β toxicity, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. We hypothesized that genistein may protect neurons by inhibiting the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, and thereby play a role in the prevention of Alzheimer’s disease. A rat model of Alzheimer’s disease was established by intraperitoneal injection of D-galactose and intracerebral injection of amyloid-β peptide (25–35). In the genistein treatment groups, a 7-day pretreatment with genistein (10, 30, 90 mg/kg) was given prior to establishing Alzheimer’s disease model, for 49 consecutive days. Terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay demonstrated a reduction in apoptosis in the hippocampus of rats treated with genistein. Western blot analysis showed that expression levels of capase-3, Bax and cytochrome c were decreased compared with the model group. Furthermore, immunohistochemical staining revealed reductions in cytochrome c and Bax immunoreactivity in these rats. Morris water maze revealed a substantial shortening of escape latency by genistein in Alzheimer’s disease rats. These findings suggest that genistein decreases neuronal loss in the hippocampus, and improves learning and memory ability. The neuroprotective effects of genistein are associated with the inhibition of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, as shown by its ability to reduce levels of caspase-3, Bax and cytochrome c.

  18. Transcriptional regulation of neuronal genes and its effect on neural functions: gene expression in response to static magnetism in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Takao; Yoneda, Yukio

    2005-07-01

    We have previously shown a marked but transient increase in DNA binding of the nuclear transcription factor activator protein-1 after brief exposure to static magnetic fields in cultured rat hippocampal neurons, suggesting that exposure to static magnetism would lead to long-term consolidation as well as amplification of different functional alterations through modulation of de novo protein synthesis at the level of gene transcription in the hippocampus. Hippocampal neurons were cultured under sustained exposure to static magnetic fields at 100 mT, followed by extraction of total RNA for differential display (DD) analysis using random primers. The first and the second DD polymerase chain reaction similarly showed the downregulation of particular genes in response to sustained magnetism. Nucleotide sequence analysis followed by BLASTN homology searching revealed high homology of these 2 DD-PCR products to the 3' non-coding regions of the mouse basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor ALF1 and that of histone H3.3A, respectively. On Northern blot analysis using the 2 cloned differentially expressed fragments labeled with [alpha-(32)P]dCTP by the random primer method, a marked decrease was seen in expression of mRNA for ALF1 and histone H3.3A in hippocampal neurons cultured under sustained exposure to static magnetic fields at 100 mT. It thus appears that static magnetism may modulate cellular integrity and functionality through expression of a variety of responsive genes required for gene transcription and translation, proliferation, differentiation, maturation, survival, and so on in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. PMID:16020920

  19. Acute and Sub-Acute Toxicity Studies of Plumeria alba Linn. (Apocynaceae) Hydroalcoholic Extract in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Tessou, K. Z.; Lawson-Evi, P.; Metowogo, K.; Diallo, A.; Eklu-Gadegkeku, K.; Aklikokou, K.; Gbeassor, M.

    2013-01-01

    Plumeria alba Linn (Apocynaceae) is used in Togolese traditional medicine to treat diabetes mellitus and wounds. The present investigation was carried out to evaluate the toxicity of hydroalcoholic extract of Plumeria alba roots in Sprague Dawley rats. The acute toxicity test was conducted by administering orally dose of 5 g/Kg. General behavior and mortality were examined for up to 14 days. The sub-acute toxicity test was performed by daily gavage at 250, 500 and 1000 mg/Kg for 28 days. Body weight and blood glucose were measured weekly. Hematological and biochemical parameters, relative organ weight were determined at the end of the 28 days administration. In acute study, no adverse effect of the extract was observed at 5.0 g/Kg. Sub-acute oral administration of the extract at the dose up to 1000 mg/Kg did not induce death or significant changes in body weight, relative weight of vital organs, hematological parameters and was not associated with liver and kidney toxicity. PMID:24711763

  20. Relationship between Phosphaturia and Acute Hypercapnia in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Webb, R. Kent; Woodhall, Philip B.; Tisher, C. Craig; Glaubiger, George; Neelon, Frank A.; Robinson, Roscoe R.

    1977-01-01

    Standard clearance studies were performed in mechanically ventilated intact and acutely thyroparathyroidectomized (TPTX) rats to document and characterize the effect of hypercapnia (HC) on urinary phosphorus excretion (UPV). HC as compared to normocapnia (NC) was associated with an increase in UPV in intact (62.5 vs. 7.93 μg/min) and TPTX (30.5 vs. 0.59 μg/min) rats, an increase in filtered load of phosphorus in intact (218 vs. 191 μg/min) and TPTX (243 vs. 146 μg/min) rats, an increase in blood bicarbonate concentration in intact (27.8 vs. 26.0 meq/liter) and TPTX (24.5 vs. 22.3 meq/liter) animals, and a decrease in blood pH in intact (7.15 vs. 7.42) and TPTX (7.07 vs. 7.39) rats. Additional TPTX rats with NC and HC were studied during phosphorus infusion at a comparable filtered load of phosphorus (NC = 307 μg/min and HC = 328 μg/min). UPV was 18.5 μg/min in NC and 85.2 μg/min in HC animals. Intact NC animals infused with NaHCO3 achieved a blood bicarbonate of 45.9 meq/liter compared to 26.0 meq/liter in intact NC NaCl-infused rats. UPV was 10.0 μg/min in the NaHCO3 and 7.93 μg/min in NaCl-infused animals. In intact HC animals infused with NaHCO3, blood pH was 7.36 compared to 7.42 in NC intact NaCl-infused animals. UPV was 83.2 μg/min in the HC bicarbonate-infused and 7.93 μg/min in the NC NaCl-infused rats. These experiments demonstrate that elevated blood carbon dioxide tension per se increases UPV. Increases in filtered load of phosphorus and blood bicarbonate which are associated with HC contribute to the phosphaturia as does parathyroid hormone. The phosphaturia is not dependent upon reduction of extracellular pH. PMID:19498

  1. Vitamin D deficiency aggravates ischemic acute kidney injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    de Bragança, Ana Carolina; Volpini, Rildo A; Canale, Daniele; Gonçalves, Janaína G; Shimizu, Maria Heloisa M; Sanches, Talita R; Seguro, Antonio C; Andrade, Lúcia

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency (VDD) increases the risk of death in hospitalized patients. Renal ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) induces acute kidney injury (AKI), which activates cell cycle inhibitors, including p21, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor and genomic target of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, which is in turn a potent immunomodulator with antiproliferative effects. In this study, we assess the impact of VDD in renal IRI. Wistar rats were divided into groups, each evaluated for 30 days: control (receiving a standard diet); VDD (receiving a vitamin D-free diet); IRI (receiving a standard diet and subjected to 45-min bilateral renal ischemia on day 28); and VDD + IRI (receiving a vitamin D-free diet and subjected to 45-min bilateral renal ischemia on day 28). At 48 h after IRI, animals were euthanized; blood, urine, and kidney tissue samples were collected. Compared with IRI rats, VDD + IRI rats showed a more severe decrease in glomerular filtration rate, greater urinary protein excretion, a higher kidney/body weight ratio and lower renal aquaporin 2 expression, as well as greater morphological damage, characterized by increased interstitial area and tubular necrosis. Our results suggest that the severity of tubular damage in IRI may be associated with downregulation of vitamin D receptors and p21. VDD increases renal inflammation, cell proliferation and cell injury in ischemic AKI. PMID:25780095

  2. Persistent Hyperactivity of Hippocampal Dentate Interneurons After a Silent Period in the Rat Pilocarpine Model of Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaochen; Song, Xinyu; Wu, Lin; Nadler, J. Victor; Zhan, Ren-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Profile of GABAergic interneuron activity after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE) was examined in the rat hippocampal dentate gyrus by analyzing immediate early gene expression and recording spontaneous firing at near resting membrane potential (REM). SE for exact 2 h or more than 2 h was induced in the male Sprague-Dawley rats by an intraperitoneal injection of pilocarpine. Expression of immediate early genes (IEGs) was examined at 1 h, 1 week, 2 weeks or more than 10 weeks after SE. For animals to be examined at 1 h after SE, SE lasted for exact 2 h was terminated by an intraperitoneal injection of diazepam. Spontaneous firing at near the REM was recorded in interneurons located along the border between the granule cell layer and the hilus more than 10 weeks after SE. Results showed that both c-fos and activity-regulated cytoskeleton associated protein (Arc) in hilar GABAergic interneurons were up-regulated after SE in a biphasic manner; they were increased at 1 h and more than 2 weeks, but not at 1 week after SE. Ten weeks after SE, nearly 60% of hilar GABAergic cells expressed c-fos. With the exception of calretinin (CR)-positive cells, percentages of hilar neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-, neuropeptide Y (NPY)-, parvalbumin (PV)-, and somatostatin (SOM)-positive cells with c-fos expression are significantly higher than those of controls more than 10 weeks after SE. Without the REM to be more depolarizing and changed threshold potential level in SE-induced rats, cell-attached recording revealed that nearly 90% of hilar interneurons fired spontaneously at near the REM while only 22% of the same cell population did so in the controls. In conclusion, pilocarpine-induced SE eventually leads to a state in which surviving dentate GABAergic interneurons become hyperactive with a subtype-dependent manner; this implies that a fragile balance between excitation and inhibition exists in the dentate gyrus and in addition, the activity-dependent up

  3. Imaging dendritic spines of rat primary hippocampal neurons using structured illumination microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schouten, Marijn; De Luca, Giulia M R; Alatriste González, Diana K; de Jong, Babette E; Timmermans, Wendy; Xiong, Hui; Krugers, Harm; Manders, Erik M M; Fitzsimons, Carlos P

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic spines are protrusions emerging from the dendrite of a neuron and represent the primary postsynaptic targets of excitatory inputs in the brain. Technological advances have identified these structures as key elements in neuron connectivity and synaptic plasticity. The quantitative analysis of spine morphology using light microscopy remains an essential problem due to technical limitations associated with light's intrinsic refraction limit. Dendritic spines can be readily identified by confocal laser-scanning fluorescence microscopy. However, measuring subtle changes in the shape and size of spines is difficult because spine dimensions other than length are usually smaller than conventional optical resolution fixed by light microscopy's theoretical resolution limit of 200 nm. Several recently developed super resolution techniques have been used to image cellular structures smaller than the 200 nm, including dendritic spines. These techniques are based on classical far-field operations and therefore allow the use of existing sample preparation methods and to image beyond the surface of a specimen. Described here is a working protocol to apply super resolution structured illumination microscopy (SIM) to the imaging of dendritic spines in primary hippocampal neuron cultures. Possible applications of SIM overlap with those of confocal microscopy. However, the two techniques present different applicability. SIM offers higher effective lateral resolution, while confocal microscopy, due to the usage of a physical pinhole, achieves resolution improvement at the expense of removal of out of focus light. In this protocol, primary neurons are cultured on glass coverslips using a standard protocol, transfected with DNA plasmids encoding fluorescent proteins and imaged using SIM. The whole protocol described herein takes approximately 2 weeks, because dendritic spines are imaged after 16-17 days in vitro, when dendritic development is optimal. After completion of the

  4. N-methyl-D-aspartate and non-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors mediate seizures and CA1 hippocampal damage induced by dendrotoxin-K in rats.

    PubMed

    Bagetta, G; Iannone, M; Palma, E; Nisticò, G; Dolly, J O

    1996-04-01

    The epileptogenic and neurodegenerative effects of dendrotoxin K, from Dendroaspis polylepis, a specific blocker of a non-inactivating, voltage-sensitive K+ channel, were studied after focal injection into one dorsal hippocampus in rats. Administration of 35 pmol dendrotoxin K elicited motor seizures and bilateral electrocortical discharges after a latent period (5.3 +/- 2.1 min), in all of the treated animals (n = 6). At 24 h, histological examination of brain (n = 5) coronal sections (10 microns; n = 6 per brain) detected bilateral damage to the hippocampal formation which extended 300 microns rostral and caudal to the injection tract. Quantitation of the damage revealed significant bilateral neuronal cell loss in the CA1 and CA4 pyramidal cell layer relative to the corresponding brain regions of rats (n = 3) injected with bovine serum albumin (105 pmol), which per se was ineffective in all respects. Dendrotoxin K (35 pmol) also caused a significant loss of CA3 pyramidal neurons and dentate gyrus granule cells ipsilateral to the site of toxin injection. In one out of six rats, a lower dose (3.5 pmol) of dendrotoxin K produced convulsive behaviour and electrocortical seizures but after a longer latency and these were accompanied by significant neuronal loss in the CA1, CA3 and CA4 pyramidal cell layer ipsilateral to the injected side. The lowest dose (0.35 pmol; n = 6 rats) of dendrotoxin K used failed to induce seizures and did not cause hippocampal damage (n = 6 rats). Systemic (i.p.) treatment with dizocilpine maleate (3 mg/kg) or LY 274614 (5 mg/kg i.p.), two N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists (given 15 min beforehand), prevented dendrotoxin K (35 pmol)-induced motor seizures and electrocortical epileptogenic discharges in 100% of the animals (n = 6 per group) treated. Similarly, these antagonists minimized the damage typically produced in the rat hippocampus, with no significant neuronal loss being observed. By contrast, NBQX (30 mg/kg, i.p. given 15

  5. Severely impaired hippocampal neurogenesis associates with an early serotonergic deficit in a BAC α-synuclein transgenic rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kohl, Zacharias; Ben Abdallah, Nada; Vogelgsang, Jonathan; Tischer, Lucas; Deusser, Janina; Amato, Davide; Anderson, Scott; Müller, Christian P; Riess, Olaf; Masliah, Eliezer; Nuber, Silke; Winkler, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a multisystem disorder, involving several monoaminergic neurotransmitter systems resulting in a broad range of motor and non-motor symptoms. Pathological hallmarks of PD are the loss of dopaminergic neurons and the accumulation of alpha-synuclein, however also being present in the serotonergic raphe nuclei early in the disease course. The dysfunction of the serotonergic system projecting to the hippocampus may contribute to early non-motor symptoms such as anxiety and depression. The adult hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG), a unique niche of the forebrain continuously generating new neurons, may particularly present enhanced susceptibility towards accumulating alpha-synuclein levels. The underlying molecular mechanisms in the context of neuronal maturation and survival of new-born neurons are yet not well understood. To characterize the effects of overexpression of human full-length alpha-synuclein on hippocampal cellular and synaptic plasticity, we used a recently generated BAC alpha-synuclein transgenic rat model showing important features of PD such as widespread and progressive alpha-synuclein aggregation pathology, dopamine loss and age-dependent motor decline. At the age of four months, thus prior to the occurrence of the motor phenotype, we observed a profoundly impaired dendritogenesis of neuroblasts in the hippocampal DG resulting in severely reduced survival of adult new-born neurons. Diminished neurogenesis concurred with a serotonergic deficit in the hippocampus as defined by reduced levels of serotonin (5-HT) 1B receptor, decreased 5-HT neurotransmitter levels, and a loss of serotonergic nerve terminals innervating the DG/CA3 subfield, while the number of serotonergic neurons in the raphe nuclei remained unchanged. Moreover, alpha-synuclein overexpression reduced proteins involved in vesicle release, in particular synapsin-1 and Rab3 interacting molecule (RIM3), in conjunction with an altered ultrastructural architecture of

  6. (-)-SCR1693 Protects against Memory Impairment and Hippocampal Damage in a Chronic Cerebral Hypoperfusion Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoyin; Tian, Jingwei; Sun, Songmei; Dong, Qiuju; Zhang, Fangxi; Zhang, Xiumei

    2016-01-01

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) is one of the most common causes of vascular dementia (VaD) and is recognised as an etiological factor in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). CCH can induce severe cognitive deficits, as assessed by the water maze task, along with neuronal loss in the hippocampus. However, there are currently no effective, approved pharmacological treatments available for VaD. In the present study, we created a rat model of CCH using bilateral common carotid artery occlusion and found that (-)-SCR1693, a novel compound, prevented rats from developing memory deficits and neuronal damage in the hippocampus by rectifying cholinergic dysfunction and decreasing the accumulation of the phospho-tau protein. These results strongly suggest that (-)-SCR1693 has therapeutic potential for the treatment of CCH-induced VaD. PMID:27349344

  7. (-)-SCR1693 Protects against Memory Impairment and Hippocampal Damage in a Chronic Cerebral Hypoperfusion Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaoyin; Tian, Jingwei; Sun, Songmei; Dong, Qiuju; Zhang, Fangxi; Zhang, Xiumei

    2016-01-01

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) is one of the most common causes of vascular dementia (VaD) and is recognised as an etiological factor in the development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). CCH can induce severe cognitive deficits, as assessed by the water maze task, along with neuronal loss in the hippocampus. However, there are currently no effective, approved pharmacological treatments available for VaD. In the present study, we created a rat model of CCH using bilateral common carotid artery occlusion and found that (-)-SCR1693, a novel compound, prevented rats from developing memory deficits and neuronal damage in the hippocampus by rectifying cholinergic dysfunction and decreasing the accumulation of the phospho-tau protein. These results strongly suggest that (-)-SCR1693 has therapeutic potential for the treatment of CCH-induced VaD. PMID:27349344

  8. Naltrexone Reverses Ethanol-Induced Rat Hippocampal and Serum Oxidative Damage

    PubMed Central

    Almansa, Inmaculada; Barcia, Jorge M.; López-Pedrajas, Rosa; Muriach, María; Miranda, María; Romero, Francisco Javier

    2013-01-01

    Naltrexone, an antagonist of μ-opioid receptors, is clinically used as adjuvant therapy of alcohol dishabituation. The aim of the present work was to test the effect of 1 mg/kg body weight of naltrexone to revert oxidative stress-related biochemical alterations, in the hippocampus and serum of chronic alcoholic adult rats. Malondialdehyde concentration was increased and glutathione peroxidase activity was decreased in hippocampus and serum of alcohol-treated rats. Naltrexone treatment restored these alterations. The in vitro antioxidant ability of Ntx could not justify these effects considering the doses used. Thus this apparent protective effect of Ntx can only be attributed to its pharmacological effects, as herein discussed. PMID:24363821

  9. Treadmill exercise enhances spatial learning ability through suppressing hippocampal apoptosis in Huntington’s disease rats

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Eun-Sang; Kim, You-Mi; Shin, Mal-Soon; Kim, Chang-Ju; Lee, Kwang-Sik; Kim, Kijeong; Ha, Jonglin; Chung, Yong-Rak

    2015-01-01

    Huntington’s disease is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion, and characterized as involuntary movement. Quinolinic acid has been used to produce an animal model of Huntington’s disease. In the present study, the effect of treadmill exercise on spatial-learning ability and motor coordination focusing on the apoptosis in the hippocampus was investigated using quinolinic acid-induced Huntington’s disease rats. Huntington’s disease was induced by unilateral intrastriatal injection of quinolinic acid (2 μL of 100 nmol) using stereotaxic instrument. The rats in the treadmill exercise groups were subjected to run on a treadmill for 30 min once a day during 14 days. Spatial learning ability and motor coordination were determined by radial 8-arm maze test and rota-rod test. Immunohistochemistry for caspase-3 and western blot for Bax and Bcl-2 were also conducted for the detection of apoptosis. In the present results, spatial learning ability and motor coordination were deteriorated by intrastriatal injection of quinolinic acid. In contrast, treadmill exercise exerted ameliorating effect on quinolinic acid-induced deterioration of spatial learning ability and motor coordination. Bcl-2 expression in the hippocampus was de-creased and expressions of casepase-3 and Bax in the hippocampus were increased in the quinolinic acid-induced Huntington’s disease rats. Treadmill exercise increased Bcl-2 expression and decreased expressions of casepase-3 and Bax in the Huntington’s disease rats. The present results showed that treadmill exercise might ameliorate quinolinic acid-induced loss of spatial learning ability and motor coordination by suppressing apoptosis in the hippocampus. PMID:26171378

  10. Treadmill exercise enhances spatial learning ability through suppressing hippocampal apoptosis in Huntington's disease rats.

    PubMed

    Ji, Eun-Sang; Kim, You-Mi; Shin, Mal-Soon; Kim, Chang-Ju; Lee, Kwang-Sik; Kim, Kijeong; Ha, Jonglin; Chung, Yong-Rak

    2015-06-01

    Huntington's disease is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion, and characterized as involuntary movement. Quinolinic acid has been used to produce an animal model of Huntington's disease. In the present study, the effect of treadmill exercise on spatial-learning ability and motor coordination focusing on the apoptosis in the hippocampus was investigated using quinolinic acid-induced Huntington's disease rats. Huntington's disease was induced by unilateral intrastriatal injection of quinolinic acid (2 μL of 100 nmol) using stereotaxic instrument. The rats in the treadmill exercise groups were subjected to run on a treadmill for 30 min once a day during 14 days. Spatial learning ability and motor coordination were determined by radial 8-arm maze test and rota-rod test. Immunohistochemistry for caspase-3 and western blot for Bax and Bcl-2 were also conducted for the detection of apoptosis. In the present results, spatial learning ability and motor coordination were deteriorated by intrastriatal injection of quinolinic acid. In contrast, treadmill exercise exerted ameliorating effect on quinolinic acid-induced deterioration of spatial learning ability and motor coordination. Bcl-2 expression in the hippocampus was de-creased and expressions of casepase-3 and Bax in the hippocampus were increased in the quinolinic acid-induced Huntington's disease rats. Treadmill exercise increased Bcl-2 expression and decreased expressions of casepase-3 and Bax in the Huntington's disease rats. The present results showed that treadmill exercise might ameliorate quinolinic acid-induced loss of spatial learning ability and motor coordination by suppressing apoptosis in the hippocampus. PMID:26171378

  11. Long-term changes in hippocampal physiology and learning ability of rats after intrahippocampal tetanus toxin.

    PubMed Central

    Brace, H M; Jefferys, J G; Mellanby, J

    1985-01-01

    A chronic epileptic syndrome can be induced by injecting minute doses of tetanus toxin into rat hippocampi. This causes intermittent epileptic fits over a period of 2-4 weeks, after which the fits cease, and the electroencephalogram (e.e.g.) appears to return to normal over the following 2-3 weeks. However, once they have recovered from the seizures, the rats exhibit a remarkably persistent impairment of learning and memory, which is the subject of the present study. Learning ability was assessed using a radial arm maze task, in which the rats had to visit each of eight arms for a food reward. The toxin-injected rats learnt this task more slowly than control-injected. Evoked potentials from the CA3 pyramidal cells were recorded in terminal experiments under halothane anaesthesia. Long term potentiation of the post-synaptic response to the commissural pathway from the contralateral hippocampus appeared to be unaffected by the previous toxin treatment, at least over periods of up to 5 h. The toxin-injected group differed from the control in having consistently smaller post-synaptic population spikes in their evoked responses, so that stimuli were less effective in exciting the post-synaptic neurones. This applied both to the contralateral commissural input, and to the ipsilateral mossy fibre input. No differences were found between the toxin and control groups in the size of the antidromic population spike in the commissural response, or in the population excitatory post-synaptic potential (e.p.s.p.) for either input. Thus the depressed output from CA3 pyramidal cells cannot be explained either by a loss of these neurones (confirming earlier neuropathological observations), or by a loss of excitatory afferents. While its precise cause remains unknown, the depressed output from the CA3 region was statistically correlated with the learning impairment, and we believe provides a reasonable explanation of this behavioural deficit. PMID:4078743

  12. Stress induced hippocampal mineralocorticoid and estrogen receptor β gene expression and long-term potentiation in male adult rats is sensitive to early-life stress experience.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han; Meyer, Katrin; Korz, Volker

    2013-02-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones and their receptors have been identified to be involved in emotional and cognitive disorders in early stressed subjects during adulthood. However, the impact of other steroid hormones and receptors has been considered less. Especially, functional roles of estrogen and estrogen receptors in male subjects are largely unknown. Therefore, we measured hippocampal concentrations of 17β-estradiol, corticosterone and testosterone, as well as the gene expression of estrogen receptor α and β (ERα, β), androgen receptor (AR), glucocorticoid (GR) and mineralocorticoid (MR) receptors after stress in adulthood in maternally separated (MS+; at postnatal days 14-16 for 6h each day) and control (MS-) male rats. In vivo hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) serves as a cellular model of learning and memory formation. Population spike- (PSA) and the fEPSP-LTP within the dentate gyrus (DG) were reinforced by elevated-platform-stress (EP-stress) in MS- but not in MS+ rats. MR- and ERβ-mRNA were upregulated 1h after EP-stress in MS- but not in MS+ rats as compared to non-stressed littermates. Infusion of an MR antagonist before LTP induction blocked early- and late-PSA- and -fEPSP-LTP, whereas blockade of ERβ impaired only the late PSA-LTP. Application of a DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitor partly restored the LTP-reinforcement in MS+ rats, accompanied by a retrieval of ERβ- but not MR-mRNA upregulation. Basal ERβ gene promoter methylation was similar between groups, whereas MS+ and MS- rats showed different methylation patterns across CpG sites after EP-stress. These findings indicate a key role of ERβ in early-stress mediated emotionality and emotion-induced late-LTP in adult male rats via DNA methylation mechanisms. PMID:22776422

  13. Sympathoadrenal responses to acute and chronic hypoxia in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, T S; Young, J B; Landsberg, L

    1983-01-01

    The sympathoadrenal responses to acute and chronic hypoxic exposure at 10.5 and 7.5% oxygen were determined in the rat. Cardiac norepinephrine (NE) turnover was used to assess sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity, and urinary excretion of epinephrine (E) was measured as an index of adrenal medullary activity. The responses of the adrenal medulla and SNS were distinct and dependent upon the degree and duration of hypoxic exposure. Chronic hypoxia at 10.5% oxygen increased cardiac NE turnover by 130% after 3, 7, and 14 d of hypoxic exposure. Urinary excretion of NE was similarly increased over this time interval, while urinary E excretion was marginally elevated. In contrast, acute exposure to moderate hypoxia at 10.5% oxygen was not associated with an increase in SNS activity; in fact, decreased SNS activity was suggested by diminished cardiac NE turnover and urinary NE excretion over the first 12 h of hypoxic exposure, and by a rebound increase in NE turnover after reexposure to normal oxygen tension. Adrenal medullary activity, on the other hand, increased substantially during acute exposure to moderate hypoxia (2-fold increase in urinary E excretion) and severe hypoxia (greater than 10-fold). In distinction to the lack of effect of acute hypoxic exposure (10.5% oxygen), the SNS was markedly stimulated during the first day of hypoxia exposure at 7.5% oxygen, an increase that was sustained throughout at least 7 d at 7.5% oxygen. These results demonstrate that chronic exposure to moderate and severe hypoxia increases the activity of the SNS and adrenal medulla, the effect being greater in severe hypoxic exposure. The response to acute hypoxic exposure is more complicated; during the first 12 h of exposure at 10.5% oxygen, the SNS is not stimulated and appears to be restrained, while adrenal medullary activity is enhanced. Acute exposure to a more severe degree of hypoxia (7.5% oxygen), however, is associated with stimulation of both the SNS and adrenal medulla

  14. Task- and Treatment Length–Dependent Effects of Vortioxetine on Scopolamine-Induced Cognitive Dysfunction and Hippocampal Extracellular Acetylcholine in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pehrson, Alan L.; Hillhouse, Todd M.; Haddjeri, Nasser; Rovera, Renaud; Porter, Joseph H.; Mørk, Arne; Smagin, Gennady; Song, Dekun; Budac, David; Cajina, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a common psychiatric disorder that often features impairments in cognitive function, and these cognitive symptoms can be important determinants of functional ability. Vortioxetine is a multimodal antidepressant that may improve some aspects of cognitive function in patients with MDD, including attention, processing speed, executive function, and memory. However, the cause of these effects is unclear, and there are several competing theories on the underlying mechanism, notably including regionally-selective downstream enhancement of glutamate neurotransmission and increased acetylcholine (ACh) neurotransmission. The current work sought to evaluate the ACh hypothesis by examining vortioxetine’s ability to reverse scopolamine-induced impairments in rodent tests of memory and attention. Additionally, vortioxetine’s effects on hippocampal extracellular ACh levels were examined alongside studies of vortioxetine’s pharmacokinetic profile. We found that acute vortioxetine reversed scopolamine-induced impairments in social and object recognition memory, but did not alter scopolamine-induced impairments in attention. Acute vortioxetine also induced a modest and short-lived increase in hippocampal ACh levels. However, this short-term effect is at variance with vortioxetine’s moderately long brain half life (5.1 hours). Interestingly, subchronic vortioxetine treatment failed to reverse scopolamine-induced social recognition memory deficits and had no effects on basal hippocampal ACh levels. These data suggest that vortioxetine has some effects on memory that could be mediated through cholinergic neurotransmission, however these effects are modest and only seen under acute dosing conditions. These limitations may argue against cholinergic mechanisms being the primary mediator of vortioxetine′s cognitive effects, which are observed under chronic dosing conditions in patients with MDD. PMID:27402279

  15. Task- and Treatment Length-Dependent Effects of Vortioxetine on Scopolamine-Induced Cognitive Dysfunction and Hippocampal Extracellular Acetylcholine in Rats.

    PubMed

    Pehrson, Alan L; Hillhouse, Todd M; Haddjeri, Nasser; Rovera, Renaud; Porter, Joseph H; Mørk, Arne; Smagin, Gennady; Song, Dekun; Budac, David; Cajina, Manuel; Sanchez, Connie

    2016-09-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a common psychiatric disorder that often features impairments in cognitive function, and these cognitive symptoms can be important determinants of functional ability. Vortioxetine is a multimodal antidepressant that may improve some aspects of cognitive function in patients with MDD, including attention, processing speed, executive function, and memory. However, the cause of these effects is unclear, and there are several competing theories on the underlying mechanism, notably including regionally-selective downstream enhancement of glutamate neurotransmission and increased acetylcholine (ACh) neurotransmission. The current work sought to evaluate the ACh hypothesis by examining vortioxetine's ability to reverse scopolamine-induced impairments in rodent tests of memory and attention. Additionally, vortioxetine's effects on hippocampal extracellular ACh levels were examined alongside studies of vortioxetine's pharmacokinetic profile. We found that acute vortioxetine reversed scopolamine-induced impairments in social and object recognition memory, but did not alter scopolamine-induced impairments in attention. Acute vortioxetine also induced a modest and short-lived increase in hippocampal ACh levels. However, this short-term effect is at variance with vortioxetine's moderately long brain half life (5.1 hours). Interestingly, subchronic vortioxetine treatment failed to reverse scopolamine-induced social recognition memory deficits and had no effects on basal hippocampal ACh levels. These data suggest that vortioxetine has some effects on memory that could be mediated through cholinergic neurotransmission, however these effects are modest and only seen under acute dosing conditions. These limitations may argue against cholinergic mechanisms being the primary mediator of vortioxetine's cognitive effects, which are observed under chronic dosing conditions in patients with MDD. PMID:27402279

  16. Syntaxin 5 Overexpression and β-Amyloid 1–42 Accumulation in Endoplasmic Reticulum of Hippocampal Cells in Rat Brain Induced by Ozone Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Zimbrón, Luis Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and it is currently accepted that oxidative damage precedes the overproduction of A42 peptide. We have reported that ozone causes oxidative stress inducing neurodegeneration in the brain of rats. It is associated with A42 overproduction and intracellular accumulation in hippocampus. Organelles like mitochondria, intracellular membranes, and endoplasmic reticulum have been identified as sites of A42 production and accumulation affecting cellular metabolism. However whether ozone exposure induces overproduction and/or accumulation of A42 in endoplasmic reticulum has not been studied. We evaluated this effect in the endoplasmic reticulum of hippocampal cells of rats exposed chronically to low doses of ozone (0.25 ppm) at 7, 15, 30, 60, and 90 days. The effect of the presence of A42 in endoplasmic reticulum was analyzed evaluating the expression of the chaperone Syntaxin 5. Our results show an accumulation of A42 peptide in this organelle. It was observed by immunofluorescence and by WB in endoplasmic fractions from hippocampal cells of rats at 60 and 90 days of treatment. Significant overexpression of the chaperone Syntaxin 5 at 60 and 90 days of treatment was observed (⁎P < 0.05). These results indicate that the exposure to environmental pollutants could be involved as a risk factor for neurodegenerative processes. PMID:27366738

  17. Repeated febrile convulsions impair hippocampal neurons and cause synaptic damage in immature rats: neuroprotective effect of fructose-1,6-diphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jianping; Wang, Fan; Zhang, Jun; Gao, Hui; Yang, Yufeng; Fu, Rongguo

    2014-01-01

    Fructose-1,6-diphosphate is a metabolic intermediate that promotes cell metabolism. We hypothesize that fructose-1,6-diphosphate can protect against neuronal damage induced by febrile convulsions. Hot-water bathing was used to establish a repetitive febrile convulsion model in rats aged 21 days, equivalent to 3–5 years in humans. Ninety minutes before each seizure induction, rats received an intraperitoneal injection of low- or high-dose fructose-1,6-diphosphate (500 or 1,000 mg/kg, respectively). Low- and high-dose fructose-1,6-diphosphate prolonged the latency and shortened the duration of seizures. Furthermore, high-dose fructose-1,6-diphosphate effectively reduced seizure severity. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that 24 hours after the last seizure, high-dose fructose-1,6-diphosphate reduced mitochondrial swelling, rough endoplasmic reticulum degranulation, Golgi dilation and synaptic cleft size, and increased synaptic active zone length, postsynaptic density thickness, and synaptic interface curvature in the hippocampal CA1 area. The present findings suggest that fructose-1,6-diphosphate is a neuroprotectant against hippocampal neuron and synapse damage induced by repeated febrile convulsion in immature rats. PMID:25206915

  18. Syntaxin 5 Overexpression and β-Amyloid 1-42 Accumulation in Endoplasmic Reticulum of Hippocampal Cells in Rat Brain Induced by Ozone Exposure.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Zimbrón, Luis Fernando; Rivas-Arancibia, Selva

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and it is currently accepted that oxidative damage precedes the overproduction of A42 peptide. We have reported that ozone causes oxidative stress inducing neurodegeneration in the brain of rats. It is associated with A42 overproduction and intracellular accumulation in hippocampus. Organelles like mitochondria, intracellular membranes, and endoplasmic reticulum have been identified as sites of A42 production and accumulation affecting cellular metabolism. However whether ozone exposure induces overproduction and/or accumulation of A42 in endoplasmic reticulum has not been studied. We evaluated this effect in the endoplasmic reticulum of hippocampal cells of rats exposed chronically to low doses of ozone (0.25 ppm) at 7, 15, 30, 60, and 90 days. The effect of the presence of A42 in endoplasmic reticulum was analyzed evaluating the expression of the chaperone Syntaxin 5. Our results show an accumulation of A42 peptide in this organelle. It was observed by immunofluorescence and by WB in endoplasmic fractions from hippocampal cells of rats at 60 and 90 days of treatment. Significant overexpression of the chaperone Syntaxin 5 at 60 and 90 days of treatment was observed ((⁎) P < 0.05). These results indicate that the exposure to environmental pollutants could be involved as a risk factor for neurodegenerative processes. PMID:27366738

  19. Heterogeneous responses of nucleus incertus neurons to corticotrophin-releasing factor and coherent activity with hippocampal theta rhythm in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Sherie; Blasiak, Anna; Olucha-Bordonau, Francisco E; Verberne, Anthony J M; Gundlach, Andrew L

    2013-01-01

    The nucleus incertus (NI) of the rat hindbrain is a putative node in the ascending control of the septohippocampal system and hippocampal theta rhythm and is stress and arousal responsive. NI contains GABA neurons that express multiple neuropeptides, including relaxin-3 (RLN3) and neuropeptide receptors, including corticotrophin-releasing factor receptor-1 (CRF-R1), but the precise anatomical and physiological characteristics of NI neurons are unclear. Therefore, we examined the firing properties of NI neurons and their responses to CRF, the correlation of these responses with occurrence of relaxin-3, and NI neuron morphology in the rat. Most NI neurons excited by intracerebroventricular CRF infusion were RLN3-positive (9 of 10), whereas all inhibited cells were RLN3-negative (8 of 8). The spontaneous firing of RLN3 (n= 6) but not non-RLN3 neurons (n= 6) was strongly modulated and phase-locked with the initial ascending phase of hippocampal theta oscillations. In brain slices, the majority of recorded NI neurons (15 of 19) displayed excitatory responses to CRF, which uniformly increased action potential frequency and membrane potential depolarization in the presence of tetrodotoxin, indicating a direct, postsynaptic action of CRF on NI neurons. This excitation was associated with reduction in the slow component of afterhyperpolarization and a strong depolarization. Quantitative analysis in naïve rats of validated CRF-R1, RLN3 and neuronal nuclear antigen (NeuN) immunoreactivity revealed 52% of NI neurons as CRF-R1 positive, of which 53% were RLN3 positive, while 48% of NI neurons lacked CRF-R1 and RLN3. All RLN3 neurons expressed CRF-R1. CRF neurons that projected to the NI were identified in lateral preoptic hypothalamus, but not in paraventricular hypothalamus, bed nucleus of stria terminalis or central amygdala. Our findings suggest NI is an important site for CRF modulation of hippocampal theta rhythm via effects on GABA/RLN3 transmission. PMID:23671163

  20. Augmenting saturated LTP by broadly spaced episodes of theta-burst stimulation in hippocampal area CA1 of adult rats and mice

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Guan

    2014-01-01

    Hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) is a model system for studying cellular mechanisms of learning and memory. Recent interest in mechanisms underlying the advantage of spaced over massed learning has prompted investigation into the effects of distributed episodes of LTP induction. The amount of LTP induced in hippocampal area CA1 by one train (1T) of theta-burst stimulation (TBS) in young Sprague-Dawley rats was further enhanced by additional bouts of 1T given at 1-h intervals. However, in young Long-Evans (LE) rats, 1T did not initially saturate LTP. Instead, a stronger LTP induction paradigm using eight trains of TBS (8T) induced saturated LTP in hippocampal slices from both young and adult LE rats as well as adult mice. The saturated LTP induced by 8T could be augmented by another episode of 8T following an interval of at least 90 min. The success rate across animals and slices in augmenting LTP by an additional episode of 8T increased significantly with longer intervals between the first and last episodes, ranging from 0% at 30- and 60-min intervals to 13–66% at 90- to 180-min intervals to 90–100% at 240-min intervals. Augmentation above initially saturated LTP was blocked by the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor antagonist d-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (d-APV). These findings suggest that the strength of induction and interval between episodes of TBS, as well as the strain and age of the animal, are important components in the augmentation of LTP. PMID:25057146

  1. Activity- and development-dependent down-regulation of TARPγ8 and GluA1 in cultured rat hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian-gang; Wang, Ya-li; Xu, Fang; Zhao, Jing-xi; Zhou, Si-yuan; Yu, Yi; Chazot, Paul L; Wang, Xiao-fang; Lu, Cheng-biao

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) regulate the trafficking and expression of AMPA receptors that are essential for the fast excitatory synaptic transmission and plasticity in the brain. This study aimed to investigate the activity-dependent regulation of TARPγ8 in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Methods: Rat hippocampal neurons cultured for 7–8 DIV or 17–18 DIV were exposed to the AMPA receptor agonist AMPA at a non-toxic concentration (100 μmol/L) for 4 h. The protein levels of TARPγ8 and AMPA receptor subunits (GluA1 and GluA2) were measured using Western blotting analysis. AMPA-induced currents were recorded in the neurons using a whole-cell recording method. Results: Four-hour exposure to AMPA significantly decreased the protein levels of TARPγ8 and GluA1 in the neurons at 17–18 DIV, but did not change the protein level of TARPγ8 in the neurons cultured at 7–8 DIV. AMPA-induced down-regulation of TARPγ8 and GluA1 was largely blocked by the calpain inhibitor calpeptin (50 μmol/L), but not affected by the caspase inhibitor zVAD (50 μmol/L). Four-hour exposure to AMPA significantly decreased AMPA-induced currents in the neurons at 17–18 DIV, which was blocked by co-exposure to calpeptin (50 μmol/L). Conclusion: The down-regulation of TARPγ8 and GluA1 protein levels and AMPA-induced currents in cultured rat hippocampal neurons is activity- and development-dependent, and mediated by endogenous calpain. PMID:26725511

  2. Properties of two calcium-activated hyperpolarizations in rat hippocampal neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, B; Nicoll, R A

    1987-01-01

    1. Intracellular recording from hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells in the slice preparation was used to analyse the pharmacological sensitivity of action potential repolarization and the hyperpolarizations that follow the action potential. The Ca2+-activated after-hyperpolarizations (a.h.p.s) could be divided into a fast a.h.p. with a time course of milliseconds, and a slow a.h.p. which lasted for a few seconds at a temperature of 30 degrees C. 2. The repolarization of the action potential is sensitive to the Ca2+ channel blocker Cd2+. This effect is simultaneous with a block of the fast a.h.p. which follows immediately upon the repolarization of the action potential. The slow a.h.p. was also blocked by Cd2+. 3. Low concentrations of the K+ channel blocker, tetraethylammonium (TEA; 200-500 microM), block the fast a.h.p. and slow down action potential repolarization. The slow a.h.p. was not affected by low concentrations of TEA. 4. The action potential repolarization and the fast a.h.p. are also reversibly sensitive to charybdotoxin. This agent had no effect on the slow a.h.p. 5. When EGTA or BAPTA were added to the normal recording electrolyte (KMeSO4), the generation of slow a.h.p.s was prevented. In addition, cells impaled with BAPTA-containing electrodes displayed broader action potentials and much reduced fast a.h.p.s compared to recordings made with electrodes containing KMeSO4 alone or with EGTA. 6. The slow a.h.p. can be eliminated by noradrenaline, 8-bromocyclic AMP or carbachol. Under these conditions there are no effects on the fast a.h.p. or on action potential duration. 7. Block of the fast a.h.p. with TEA or CTX (charybdotoxin) is associated with an increased frequency of the first few action potentials during a depolarization. This is a quite distinct effect from the greatly increased number of action potentials which results from block of the slow a.h.p. 8. The results support a conclusion that the fast a.h.p. is generated by the TEA- and voltage

  3. Effects of Blast Overpressure on Neurons and Glial Cells in Rat Organotypic Hippocampal Slice Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Anna P.; Shah, Alok S.; Aperi, Brandy V.; Budde, Matthew D.; Pintar, Frank A.; Tarima, Sergey; Kurpad, Shekar N.; Stemper, Brian D.; Glavaski-Joksimovic, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Due to recent involvement in military conflicts, and an increase in the use of explosives, there has been an escalation in the incidence of blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) among US military personnel. Having a better understanding of the cellular and molecular cascade of events in bTBI is prerequisite for the development of an effective therapy that currently is unavailable. The present study utilized organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHCs) exposed to blast overpressures of 150 kPa (low) and 280 kPa (high) as an in vitro bTBI model. Using this model, we further characterized the cellular effects of the blast injury. Blast-evoked cell death was visualized by a propidium iodide (PI) uptake assay as early as 2 h post-injury. Quantification of PI staining in the cornu Ammonis 1 and 3 (CA1 and CA3) and the dentate gyrus regions of the hippocampus at 2, 24, 48, and 72 h following blast exposure revealed significant time dependent effects. OHCs exposed to 150 kPa demonstrated a slow increase in cell death plateauing between 24 and 48 h, while OHCs from the high-blast group exhibited a rapid increase in cell death already at 2 h, peaking at ~24 h post-injury. Measurements of lactate dehydrogenase release into the culture medium also revealed a significant increase in cell lysis in both low- and high-blast groups compared to sham controls. OHCs were fixed at 72 h post-injury and immunostained for markers against neurons, astrocytes, and microglia. Labeling OHCs with PI, neuronal, and glial markers revealed that the blast-evoked extensive neuronal death and to a lesser extent loss of glial cells. Furthermore, our data demonstrated activation of astrocytes and microglial cells in low- and high-blasted OHCs, which reached a statistically significant difference in the high-blast group. These data confirmed that our in vitro bTBI model is a useful tool for studying cellular and molecular changes after blast exposure. PMID:25729377

  4. Sexual interactions with unfamiliar females reduce hippocampal neurogenesis among adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Spritzer, M D; Curtis, M G; DeLoach, J P; Maher, J; Shulman, L M

    2016-03-24

    Recent experiments have shown that sexual interactions prior to cell proliferation cause an increase in neurogenesis in adult male rats. Because adult neurogenesis is critical for some forms of memory, we hypothesized that sexually induced changes in neurogenesis may be involved in mate recognition. Sexually naive adult male rats were either exposed repeatedly to the same sexual partner (familiar group) or to a series of novel sexual partners (unfamiliar group), while control males never engaged in sexual interactions. Ovariectomized female rats were induced into estrus every four days. Males were given two injections of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) (200mg/kg) to label proliferating cells, and the first sexual interactions occurred three days later. Males in the familiar and unfamiliar groups engaged in four, 30-min sexual interactions at four-day intervals, and brain tissue was collected the day after the last sexual interaction. Immunohistochemistry followed by microscopy was used to quantify BrdU-labeled cells. Sexual interactions with unfamiliar females caused a significant reduction in neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus compared to males that interacted with familiar females and compared to the control group. The familiar group showed no difference in neurogenesis compared to the control group. Males in the familiar group engaged in significantly more sexual behavior (ejaculations and intromissions) than did males in the unfamiliar group, suggesting that level of sexual activity may influence neurogenesis levels. In a second experiment, we tested whether this effect was unique to sexual interactions by replicating the entire procedure using anestrus females. We found that interactions with unfamiliar anestrus females reduced neurogenesis relative to the other groups, but this effect was not statistically significant. In combination, these results indicate that interactions with unfamiliar females reduce adult neurogenesis and the effect is stronger for sexual

  5. Nociception-induced spatial and temporal plasticity of synaptic connection and function in the hippocampal formation of rats: a multi-electrode array recording

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiao-Yan; Liu, Ming-Gang; Yuan, Dong-Liang; Wang, Yan; He, Ying; Wang, Dan-Dan; Chen, Xue-Feng; Zhang, Fu-Kang; Li, Hua; He, Xiao-Sheng; Chen, Jun

    2009-01-01

    Background Pain is known to be processed by a complex neural network (neuromatrix) in the brain. It is hypothesized that under pathological state, persistent or chronic pain can affect various higher brain functions through ascending pathways, leading to co-morbidities or mental disability of pain. However, so far the influences of pathological pain on the higher brain functions are less clear and this may hinder the advances in pain therapy. In the current study, we studied spatiotemporal plasticity of synaptic connection and function in the hippocampal formation (HF) in response to persistent nociception. Results On the hippocampal slices of rats which had suffered from persistent nociception for 2 h by receiving subcutaneous bee venom (BV) or formalin injection into one hand paw, multisite recordings were performed by an 8 × 8 multi-electrode array probe. The waveform of the field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP), induced by perforant path electrical stimulation and pharmacologically identified as being activity-dependent and mediated by ionotropic glutamate receptors, was consistently positive-going in the dentate gyrus (DG), while that in the CA1 was negative-going in shape in naïve and saline control groups. For the spatial characteristics of synaptic plasticity, BV- or formalin-induced persistent pain significantly increased the number of detectable fEPSP in both DG and CA1 area, implicating enlargement of the synaptic connection size by the injury or acute inflammation. Moreover, the input-output function of synaptic efficacy was shown to be distinctly enhanced by the injury with the stimulus-response curve being moved leftward compared to the control. For the temporal plasticity, long-term potentiation produced by theta burst stimulation (TBS) conditioning was also remarkably enhanced by pain. Moreover, it is strikingly noted that the shape of fEPSP waveform was drastically deformed or split by a TBS conditioning under the condition of

  6. Effect of varied gestational stress on acquisition of spatial memory, hippocampal LTP and synaptic proteins in juvenile male rats.

    PubMed

    Yaka, Rami; Salomon, Shiri; Matzner, Henry; Weinstock, Marta

    2007-04-16

    Some but not other forms of prenatal stress have been shown to impair spatial memory in adult male offspring. It is not clear if this is because of the intensity of the stress, age of rats, or the way in which learning is assessed. We examined the effect of daily varied prenatal stress consisting of 30 min restraint, saline injections and 15 min forced swim on day 17-21 of gestation on spatial learning, synaptic plasticity and the expression of key proteins of the post synaptic density (PSD) in the hippocampus of males aged 4-5 weeks. Prenatal stress impaired spatial learning in the Morris water maze and induced a significant decrease in long-term potentiation (LTP) in hippocampal slices. There was no change in the paired pulse facilitation ratio but there was a significant reduction in the expression of the NR2B subunit of the glutamate type NMDA receptor and the GluR1 subunit of the AMPA receptor, both of which are important modulators of LTP. These changes were accompanied by a remarkable increase in the scaffolding protein PSD95, which interacts with the intracellular carboxy terminal domains of the NR2 subunits. The high levels of PSD95 may have contributed to the impairment of LTP by disrupting the clustering of NMDA receptors in CA1 synapses. The alteration by prenatal stress in the relative amounts of scaffolding proteins and those which compose glutamate receptors could explain the depression of LTP and impairment in the acquisition of spatial learning. PMID:17320196

  7. Determination of ζ-Potential and Tortuosity in Rat Organotypic Hippocampal Cultures from Electroosmotic Velocity Measurements under Feedback Control

    PubMed Central

    Guy, Yifat; Muha, Robert J.; Sandberg, Mats; Weber, Stephen G.

    2009-01-01

    Extracellular translational motion in the brain is generally considered to be governed by diffusion and tortuosity. However, the brain as a whole has a significant ζ-potential, thus translational motion is also governed by electrokinetic effects under a naturally occurring or applied electric field. We have previously measured ζ-potential and tortuosity in intact brain tissue, however the method was tedious. In this work, we use a four-electrode potentiostat to control the potential difference between two microreference electrodes in the tissue, creating a constant electric field. Additionally, some alterations have been made simplify our previous procedure. The method entails simultaneously injecting two 70 kDa dextran conjugated fluorophores into rat organotypic hippocampal cultures and observing their mobility using fluorescence microscopy. We further present two methods of data analysis: regression and two-probe analysis. Statistical comparisons are made between the previous and current methods as well as between the two data analysis methods. In comparison to the previous method, the current, simpler method with data analysis by regression gives statistically indistinguishable mean values of ζ-potential and tortuosity, with a similar variability for ζ-potential, −21.3 ± 2.8 mV, and a larger variability for the tortuosity, 1.98 ± 0.12. On the other hand, we find that the current method combined with the two-probe analysis produces accurate and more precise results, with a ζ-potential of −22.8 ± 0.8 mV and a tortuosity of 2.24 ± 0.10. PMID:19298057