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Sample records for acute reference dose

  1. Simulation of acute reference dose (ARfD) settings for pesticides in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Midori; Suzuki, Daisetsu; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Shirota, Mariko; Inoue, Kaoru; Takahashi, Miwa; Morita, Takeshi; Ono, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    In order to develop guidelines for setting acute reference doses (ARfDs) for pesticides in Japan, we conducted simulations of ARfD settings based on evaluation reports for 201 pesticides assessed by the Food Safety Commission (FSC) in Japan over the last 8 years. Our conceptual principles were based on the concepts written by Solecki et al. (2005) and were adapted for toxicological data required in Japan. Through this process, we were able to set the ARfDs for over 90% of the 201 pesticides tested. The studies that provided the rationale for ARfD setting were primarily reproductive and developmental toxicity studies, acute neurotoxicity studies, and pharmacology studies. For approximately 30% of the pesticides simulated in the present study, it was not necessary to establish ARfDs. Some of the simulated ARfDs resulting from their endpoints may be conservative estimates, because the evaluation reports were written for acceptable daily intake settings. Thus, it was sometimes difficult to distinguish acute toxic alerts from repeated toxicities. We were unable to set an ARfD for 14 pesticides because of insufficient data on acute toxicities. This could be improved by more complete recordkeeping. Furthermore, we categorized the 201 pesticides by mechanism of action or chemical structure. Our simulation indicates that the conceptual framework presented here can be used as a basis for the development of guidelines on ARfD settings for pesticides in Japan.

  2. Review of the Reference Dose and Reference Concentration Processes Document

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Summarizes the review and deliberations of the Risk Assessment Forum’s RfD/RfC Technical Panel and its recommendations for improvements in oral referencedose/inhalation reference concentration (RfD/RfC) process.

  3. Total dose performance of radiation hardened voltage regulators and references

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClure, S.; Gorelick, J.; Pease, R.; Rax, B.; Ladbury, R.

    2001-01-01

    Total dose test of commercially available radiation hardened bipolar voltage regulators and references show reduced sensitivity to dose rate and varying sensitivity to bias under pressure. Behavior of critical parameters in different dose rate and bias conditions is compared and the impact to hardness assurance methodology is discussed.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: acute promyelocytic leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... acute myeloid leukemia, a cancer of the blood-forming tissue ( bone marrow ). In normal bone marrow, hematopoietic ... 7186-203. Review. Citation on PubMed de Thé H, Chen Z. Acute promyelocytic leukaemia: novel insights into ...

  5. Single dose dipyrone for acute postoperative pain

    PubMed Central

    Derry, Sheena; Faura, Clara; Edwards, Jayne; McQuay, Henry J; Moore, R Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Dipyrone (metamizole) is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug used in some countries to treat pain (postoperative, colic, cancer, and migraine); it is banned in others because of an association with life-threatening blood agranulocytosis. This review updates a 2001 Cochrane review, and no relevant new studies were identified, but additional outcomes were sought. Objectives To assess the efficacy and adverse events of single dose dipyrone in acute postoperative pain. Search methods The earlier review searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS and the Oxford Pain Relief Database to December 1999. For the update we searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE,EMBASE and LILACS to February 2010. Selection criteria Single dose, randomised, double-blind, placebo or active controlled trials of dipyrone for relief of established moderate to severe postoperative pain in adults. We included oral, rectal, intramuscular or intravenous administration of study drugs. Data collection and analysis Studies were assessed for methodological quality and data extracted by two review authors independently. Summed total pain relief over six hours (TOTPAR) was used to calculate the number of participants achieving at least 50% pain relief. Derived results were used to calculate, with 95% confidence intervals, relative benefit compared to placebo, and the number needed to treat (NNT) for one participant to experience at least 50% pain relief over six hours. Use and time to use of rescue medication were additional measures of efficacy. Information on adverse events and withdrawals was collected. Main results Fifteen studies tested mainly 500 mg oral dipyrone (173 participants), 2.5 g intravenous dipyrone (101), 2.5 g intramuscular dipyrone (99); fewer than 60 participants received any other dose. All studies used active controls (ibuprofen, paracetamol, aspirin, flurbiprofen, ketoprofen, dexketoprofen, ketorolac, pethidine, tramadol, suprofen); eight used placebo controls. Over 70% of participants

  6. Acute Dystonia After Single Dose of Bupropion

    PubMed Central

    Elyasi, Forouzan; Mahtiyan, Elham

    2016-01-01

    Bupropion is an antidepressant that is effective in the treatment of major depressive disorders, smoking cessation, and sexual side effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Acute dystonia is characterized by prolonged muscle contraction often represented by spasms of the head and neck muscles as well as occasional jaw clenching and temporomandibular joint syndrome. Although it is believed that dystonia is the result of an abnormality of the basal ganglia, its pathophysiology is still unclear. A few cases of dystonia resulting from bupropion have been reported in prior research papers. This case report discusses a patient who had a neck spasm painful enough to wake him up and dystonic distortion after taking only one dose of 75 mg bupropion. The patient was a young 34-year-old man with a diagnosis of obsessive-compulsive disorder treated with 60 mg fluoxetine. Bupropion was added to his medications because of sexual side effects caused by the fluoxetine. It seems that we must be careful to watch for dystonic symptoms when bupropion is mixed with other drugs that affect serotonin reuptake. Although dystonia is a rare side effect of bupropion, physicians should be aware of it and manage it if it occurs. PMID:27833231

  7. A CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK FOR MANAGING RADIATION DOSE TO PATIENTS IN DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY USING REFERENCE DOSE LEVELS.

    PubMed

    Almén, Anja; Båth, Magnus

    2016-06-01

    The overall aim of the present work was to develop a conceptual framework for managing radiation dose in diagnostic radiology with the intention to support optimisation. An optimisation process was first derived. The framework for managing radiation dose, based on the derived optimisation process, was then outlined. The outset of the optimisation process is four stages: providing equipment, establishing methodology, performing examinations and ensuring quality. The optimisation process comprises a series of activities and actions at these stages. The current system of diagnostic reference levels is an activity in the last stage, ensuring quality. The system becomes a reactive activity only to a certain extent engaging the core activity in the radiology department, performing examinations. Three reference dose levels-possible, expected and established-were assigned to the three stages in the optimisation process, excluding ensuring quality. A reasonably achievable dose range is also derived, indicating an acceptable deviation from the established dose level. A reasonable radiation dose for a single patient is within this range. The suggested framework for managing radiation dose should be regarded as one part of the optimisation process. The optimisation process constitutes a variety of complementary activities, where managing radiation dose is only one part. This emphasises the need to take a holistic approach integrating the optimisation process in different clinical activities.

  8. Low-dose cyclophosphamide-induced acute hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, S. Ravih; Cader, Rizna Abdul; Mohd, Rozita; Yen, Kong Wei; Ghafor, Halim Abdul

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Male, 48 Final Diagnosis: Low dose cyclophosphamide-induced acute hepatotoxicity Symptoms: Epigastric pain Medication: Withdrawal of cyclophosphamide Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Nephrology • Hepatology • Gastroenterology • Toxicology Objective: Unexpected drug reaction Background: Cyclophosphamide is commonly used to treat cancers, systemic vasculitides, and kidney diseases (e.g., lupus nephritis and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis). Acute adverse effects include bone marrow suppression, hemorrhagic cystitis, nausea, vomiting, and hair loss. Hepatotoxicity with high dose cyclophosphamide is well recognized but hepatitis due to low dose cyclophosphamide has rarely been described. Case Report: We report the case of a 48-year-old Chinese man with a rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis secondary to granulomatosis with polyangiitis who developed severe acute hepatic failure within 24 hours of receiving low-dose intravenous cyclophosphamide. The diagnosis of granulomatosis with polyangiitis was supported with a positive c-ANCA serology. The patient was treated with high dose methylprednisolone, plasmapheresis, intermittent hemodialysis, and low-dose intravenous cyclophosphamide. Conclusions: Hepatotoxicity may occur even after low-dose intravenous cyclophosphamide treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of severe, non-viral, liver inflammation developing within 24 hours of administration of low-dose intravenous cyclophosphamide (200 mg). Physicians should be aware of this serious adverse reaction and should not repeat the cyclophosphamide dose when there is hepatotoxicity caused by the first dose. Initial and follow-up liver function tests should be monitored in all patients receiving cyclophosphamide treatment. PMID:24023976

  9. Derivation of a chronic oral reference dose for cobalt.

    PubMed

    Finley, Brent L; Monnot, Andrew D; Paustenbach, Dennis J; Gaffney, Shannon H

    2012-12-01

    Cobalt (Co) is an essential element in humans as a component of vitamin B12. However, at high levels Co exposure has been shown to have detrimental effects. This study was designed to identify a chronic oral reference dose (RfD) for Co. Currently available data indicate that non-cancer health effects associated with Co exposure may include hematological, neurological, immunological, reproductive, cardiovascular, and endocrine responses. This analysis employs the standard US EPA risk assessment methodology for establishing a chronic RfD. In this analysis, the Jaimet and Thode (1955) 10-week, multiple dose human study of thyroid effects (decreased iodine uptake) in children was determined to be the most robust and sensitive study for identifying a potential point of departure dose (POD). A dose of 0.9 mgCo/kg-day was chosen as the POD. Consistent with the US EPA's previous derivation of the perchlorate RfD, which is also based on decreased iodine uptake in humans, we considered several uncertainly factors (UFs), and determined that a factor of 10 for human variability was appropriate, as well as a factor of three for database adequacy. Applying an aggregate uncertainty factor of 30 to the POD yields a chronic oral RfD of 0.03 mg/kg-day. We believe this value would be protective of non-cancer health effects in the general population for a lifetime of daily exposure to Co.

  10. Comparison of dose at an interventional reference point between the displayed estimated value and measured value.

    PubMed

    Chida, Koichi; Inaba, Yohei; Morishima, Yoshiaki; Taura, Masaaki; Ebata, Ayako; Yanagawa, Isao; Takeda, Ken; Zuguchi, Masayuki

    2011-07-01

    Today, interventional radiology (IR) X-ray units are required for display of doses at an interventional reference point (IRP) for the operator (IR physician). The dose displayed at the IRP (the reference dose) of an X-ray unit has been reported to be helpful for characterizing patient exposure in real time. However, no detailed report has evaluated the accuracy of the reference doses displayed on X-ray equipment. Thus, in this study, we compared the displayed reference dose to the actual measured value in many IR X-ray systems. Although the displayed reference doses of many IR X-ray systems agreed with the measured actual values within approximately 15%, the doses of a few IR units were not close. Furthermore, some X-ray units made in Japan displayed reference doses quite different from the actual measured value, probably because the reference point of these units differs from the International Electrotechnical Commission standard. Thus, IR physicians should pay attention to the location of the IRP of the displayed reference dose in Japan. Furthermore, physicians should be aware of the accuracy of the displayed reference dose of the X-ray system that they use for IR. Thus, regular checks of the displayed reference dose of the X-ray system are important.

  11. Radiation Dose Deposition in the Active Marrow of Reference Man.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-10-31

    gamma ray-fission neutron exposure , the relative biological effec- tiveness (RBE) per unit marrow dose between neutrons and gamma rays in producing...calculations in terms of marrow dose (rad (marrow)) per unit incident fluence. The third presents in- tegral marrow doses calculated for exposure to...in the marrow than other devices. This is shown by the fact that the neutron dose deposited by a given total exposure from such a de- vice is as much

  12. High-Dose Amoxicillin with Clavulanate for the Treatment of Acute Otitis Media in Children

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Chia-Huei; Wang, Mao-Che; Lin, Liang-Yu; Tu, Tzong-Yang; Huang, Chii-Yuan; Liao, Wen-Huei; Shiao, An-Suey

    2014-01-01

    Objective. This study uses the acute otitis media clinical practice guideline proposed in 2004 as a reference to evaluate whether antibiotics doses that are in line with the recommendations lead to better prognosis. The study also attempts to clarify possible factors that influence the outcome. Study Design. Retrospective cohort study. Subjects and Methods. A total of 400 children with acute otitis media were enrolled. The dosage of amoxicillin was considered to be appropriate when in accord with clinical practice guidelines, that is, 80–90 mg/kg/day. The outcome was defined according to the description of tympanic membrane on medical records. Multivariate logistic regression was used to analyze the relationship between antibiotic dosage and prognosis after adjusting for baseline factors. Results. The majority of prescriptions were under dosage (89.1%) but it was not noticeably associated with outcome (P = 0.41). The correlation between under dosage and poor prognosis was significant in children below 20 kg with bilateral acute otitis media (odds ratio 1.63; 95% CI 1.02–2.59, P = 0.04). Conclusion. Treating acute otitis media in children, high-dose amoxicillin with clavulanate as recommended in the clinical practice guideline was superior to conventional doses only in children under 20 kg with bilateral diseases. PMID:24523659

  13. Linking Doses with Clinical Scores of Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shaowen

    2016-10-01

    In radiation accidents, determining the radiation dose the victim received is a key step for medical decision making and patient prognosis. To reconstruct and evaluate the absorbed dose, researchers have developed many physical devices and biological techniques during the last decades. However, using the physical parameter "absorbed dose" alone is not sufficient to predict the clinical development of the various organs injured in an individual patient. In operational situations for radiation accidents, medical responders need more urgently to classify the severity of the radiation injury based on the signs and symptoms of the patient. In this work, the author uses a unified hematopoietic model to describe dose-dependent dynamics of granulocytes, lymphocytes, and platelets, and the corresponding clinical grading of hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome. This approach not only visualizes the time course of the patient's probable outcome in the form of graphs but also indirectly gives information of the remaining stem and progenitor cells, which are responsible for the autologous recovery of the hematopoietic system. Because critical information on the patient's clinical evolution can be provided within a short time after exposure and only peripheral cell counts are required for the simulation, these modeling tools will be useful to assess radiation exposure and injury in human-involved radiation accident/incident scenarios.

  14. HADOC: a computer code for calculation of external and inhalation doses from acute radionuclide releases

    SciTech Connect

    Strenge, D.L.; Peloquin, R.A.

    1981-04-01

    The computer code HADOC (Hanford Acute Dose Calculations) is described and instructions for its use are presented. The code calculates external dose from air submersion and inhalation doses following acute radionuclide releases. Atmospheric dispersion is calculated using the Hanford model with options to determine maximum conditions. Building wake effects and terrain variation may also be considered. Doses are calculated using dose conversion factor supplied in a data library. Doses are reported for one and fifty year dose commitment periods for the maximum individual and the regional population (within 50 miles). The fractional contribution to dose by radionuclide and exposure mode are also printed if requested.

  15. Single dose oral ibuprofen for acute postoperative pain in adults

    PubMed Central

    Derry, Christopher J; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background This review updates a 1999 Cochrane review showing that ibuprofen at various doses was effective in postoperative pain in single dose studies designed to demonstrate analgesic efficacy. New studies have since been published. Ibuprofen is one of the most widely used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID) analgesics both by prescription and as an over-the-counter medicine. Ibuprofen is used for acute and chronic painful conditions. Objectives To assess analgesic efficacy of ibuprofen in single oral doses for moderate and severe postoperative pain in adults. Search methods We searched Cochrane CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Oxford Pain Relief Database for studies to May 2009. Selection criteria Randomised, double blind, placebo-controlled trials of single dose orally administered ibuprofen (any formulation) in adults with moderate to severe acute postoperative pain. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Pain relief or pain intensity data were extracted and converted into the dichotomous outcome of number of participants with at least 50% pain relief over 4 to 6 hours, from which relative risk and number-needed-to-treat-to-benefit (NNT) were calculated. Numbers of participants using rescue medication over specified time periods, and time to use of rescue medication, were sought as additional measures of efficacy. Information on adverse events and withdrawals were collected. Main results Seventy-two studies compared ibuprofen and placebo (9186 participants). Studies were predominantly of high reporting quality, and the bulk of the information concerned ibuprofen 200 mg and 400 mg. For at least 50% pain relief compared with placebo the NNT for ibuprofen 200 mg (2690 participants) was 2.7 (2.5 to 3.0) and for ibuprofen 400 mg (6475 participants) it was 2.5 (2.4 to 2.6). The proportion with at least 50% pain relief was 46% with 200 mg and 54% with 400 mg. Remedication within 6 hours was less

  16. Acute fever and delayed leukoencephalopathy following low dose intraventricular methotrexate.

    PubMed Central

    Boogerd, W; vd Sande, J J; Moffie, D

    1988-01-01

    Nine out of 14 patients treated with intraventricular methotrexate (MTX) for meningeal carcinomatosis from breast carcinoma and surviving more than 4 months developed disseminated necrotising leukoencephalopathy (DNL). All four patients who had received both intraventricular MTX and whole brain radiotherapy developed DNL. Five of the six patients who experienced an acute febrile reaction with mild encephalopathic signs following intraventricular administration of MTX developed DNL after a mean time of 5 months and a low mean dose of 44 mg MTX. DNL was also noted in two patients without a previous febrile reaction or whole brain radiotherapy, following prolonged intraventricular MTX therapy after a mean time of 19.5 months and a mean dose of 147 mg MTX. These findings confirm the hazards of (1) high cumulative doses of intrathecal MTX and (2) combined intrathecal chemotherapy and whole brain radiotherapy. This study also suggests a possible relationship between an early and transient febrile reaction during intraventricular administration of MTX and the development of DNL. Images PMID:3225584

  17. Acute fever and delayed leukoencephalopathy following low dose intraventricular methotrexate.

    PubMed

    Boogerd, W; vd Sande, J J; Moffie, D

    1988-10-01

    Nine out of 14 patients treated with intraventricular methotrexate (MTX) for meningeal carcinomatosis from breast carcinoma and surviving more than 4 months developed disseminated necrotising leukoencephalopathy (DNL). All four patients who had received both intraventricular MTX and whole brain radiotherapy developed DNL. Five of the six patients who experienced an acute febrile reaction with mild encephalopathic signs following intraventricular administration of MTX developed DNL after a mean time of 5 months and a low mean dose of 44 mg MTX. DNL was also noted in two patients without a previous febrile reaction or whole brain radiotherapy, following prolonged intraventricular MTX therapy after a mean time of 19.5 months and a mean dose of 147 mg MTX. These findings confirm the hazards of (1) high cumulative doses of intrathecal MTX and (2) combined intrathecal chemotherapy and whole brain radiotherapy. This study also suggests a possible relationship between an early and transient febrile reaction during intraventricular administration of MTX and the development of DNL.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... one form of a cancer of the blood-forming tissue (bone marrow) called acute myeloid leukemia. In ... 1 link) PubMed Sources for This Page Döhner H. Implication of the molecular characterization of acute myeloid ...

  19. Single dose oral tenoxicam for acute postoperative pain in adults

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Owen A; McIntyre, Mairead; Moore, R Andrew; Derry, Sheena; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background Tenoxicam is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) licensed for use in rheumatic disease and other musculoskeletal disorders in the UK, and is widely available in other countries worldwide. This review sought to evaluate the efficacy and safety of oral tenoxicam in acute postoperative pain, using clinical studies of patients with established pain, and with outcomes measured primarily over 6 hours using standard methods. This type of study has been used for many decades to establish that drugs have analgesic properties. Objectives To assess the efficacy of single dose oral tenoxicam in acute postoperative pain, and any associated adverse events. Search methods We searched The Cochrane Library (Issue 1, 2009), MEDLINE (March 2009); EMBASE via Ovid (March 2009); the Oxford Pain Relief Database. Selection criteria Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials of oral tenoxicam for relief of acute postoperative pain in adults. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. The area under the “pain relief versus time” curve was used to derive the proportion of participants with tenoxicam experiencing least 50% pain relief over 4 to 6 hours, using validated equations. The number needed to treat to benefit (NNT) was calculated using 95% confidence intervals (CI). The proportion of participants using rescue analgesia over a specified time period, and time to use of rescue analgesia, were sought as additional measures of efficacy. Information on adverse events and withdrawals was also collected. Main results Not one of sixteen studies identified by the searches and examined in detail studied oral tenoxicam in patients with established postoperative pain and therefore no results are available. Authors’ conclusions In the absence of evidence of efficacy for oral tenoxicam in acute postoperative pain, its use in this indication is not justified at present. Because trials clearly

  20. Absorbed dose to water reference dosimetry using solid phantoms in the context of absorbed-dose protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Seuntjens, Jan; Olivares, Marina; Evans, Michael; Podgorsak, Ervin

    2005-09-15

    For reasons of phantom material reproducibility, the absorbed dose protocols of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) (TG-51) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) (TRS-398) have made the use of liquid water as a phantom material for reference dosimetry mandatory. In this work we provide a formal framework for the measurement of absorbed dose to water using ionization chambers calibrated in terms of absorbed dose to water but irradiated in solid phantoms. Such a framework is useful when there is a desire to put dose measurements using solid phantoms on an absolute basis. Putting solid phantom measurements on an absolute basis has distinct advantages in verification measurements and quality assurance. We introduce a phantom dose conversion factor that converts a measurement made in a solid phantom and analyzed using an absorbed dose calibration protocol into absorbed dose to water under reference conditions. We provide techniques to measure and calculate the dose transfer from solid phantom to water. For an Exradin A12 ionization chamber, we measured and calculated the phantom dose conversion factor for six Solid Water{sup TM} phantoms and for a single Lucite phantom for photon energies between {sup 60}Co and 18 MV photons. For Solid Water{sup TM} of certified grade, the difference between measured and calculated factors varied between 0.0% and 0.7% with the average dose conversion factor being low by 0.4% compared with the calculation whereas for Lucite, the agreement was within 0.2% for the one phantom examined. The composition of commercial plastic phantoms and their homogeneity may not always be reproducible and consistent with assumed composition. By comparing measured and calculated phantom conversion factors, our work provides methods to verify the consistency of a given plastic for the purpose of clinical reference dosimetry.

  1. Pretreatment with low doses of acenocoumarol inhibits the development of acute ischemia/reperfusion-induced pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Warzecha, Z; Sendur, P; Ceranowicz, P; Dembinski, M; Cieszkowski, J; Kusnierz-Cabala, B; Tomaszewska, R; Dembinski, A

    2015-10-01

    Coagulative disorders are known to occur in acute pancreatitis and are related to the severity of this disease. Various experimental and clinical studies have shown protective and therapeutic effect of heparin in acute pancreatitis. Aim of the present study was to determine the influence of acenocoumarol, a vitamin K antagonist, on the development of acute pancreatitis. Studies were performed on male Wistar rats weighing 250 - 270 g. Acenocoumarol at the dose of 50, 100 or 150 μg/kg/dose or vehicle were administered once a day for 7 days before induction of acute pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis was induced in rats by pancreatic ischemia followed by reperfusion. The severity of acute pancreatitis was assessed after 5-h reperfusion. Pretreatment with acenocoumarol given at the dose of 50 or 100 μg/kg/dose reduced morphological signs of acute pancreatitis. These effects were accompanied with a decrease in the pancreatitis-evoked increase in serum activity of lipase and serum concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin-1β. Moreover, the pancreatitis-evoked reductions in pancreatic DNA synthesis and pancreatic blood flow were partially reversed by pretreatment with acenocoumarol given at the dose of 50 and 100 μg/kg/dose. Administration of acenocoumarol at the dose of 150 μg/kg/dose did not exhibit any protective effect against ischemia/reperfusion-induced pancreatitis. We concluded that pretreatment with low doses of acenocoumarol reduces the severity of ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute pancreatitis.

  2. Reference dose levels for patients undergoing common diagnostic X-ray examinations in Irish hospitals.

    PubMed

    Johnston, D A; Brennan, P C

    2000-04-01

    Wide variations in patient dose for the same type of X-ray examination have been evident from various international dose surveys. Reference dose levels provide a framework to reduce this variability and aid in the optimization of radiation protection. The aim of this study was to establish, for the first time, a baseline for national reference dose levels in Ireland for four of the most common X-ray examinations: chest, abdomen, pelvis and lumbar spine. Measurements of entrance surface dose using thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) for these four X-ray examinations were performed on 10 patients in each of 16 randomly selected hospitals. This represented 42% of Irish hospitals applicable to this study. Results have shown wide variation of mean hospital doses, from a factor of 3 for an anteroposterior lumbar spine to a factor of 23 for the chest X-ray. The difference between maximum and minimum individual patient dose values varied up to a factor of 75. Reasons for these dose variations were complex but, in general, low tube potential, high mAs and low filtration were associated with high-dose hospitals. This study also demonstrated lower reference dose levels of up to 40% when compared with those established by the UK and the Commission of the European Communities for four out of six projections. Only the chest X-ray exhibited a similar reference level to those established elsewhere. This emphasizes the importance of each country establishing its own reference dose levels that are appropriate to their own radiographic techniques and practices in order to optimize patient protection.

  3. Low-dose Ketamine Versus Morphine for Acute Pain In the ED: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    Original Contribution Low-dose ketamine vs morphine for acute pain in the ED: a randomized controlled trial☆,☆☆ Joshua P. Miller, MD a,b,⁎, Steven G...numeric rating scale (NRS) pain scores, in patients receiving low-dose ketamine (LDK) or morphine (MOR) for acute pain in the emergency department...convenience sample of patients aged 18 to 59 years with acute abdominal, flank, low back, or extremity pain were enrolled. Subjects were consented and

  4. Genetics Home Reference: familial acute myeloid leukemia with mutated CEBPA

    MedlinePlus

    ... terminal C/EBPalpha mutation. Genes Chromosomes Cancer. 2010 Mar;49(3):237-41. doi: 10.1002/gcc. ... EBPalpha), in acute myeloid leukemia. Nat Genet. 2001 Mar;27(3):263-70. Citation on PubMed Renneville ...

  5. Definition of Local Diagnostic Reference Levels in a Radiology Department Using a Dose Tracking Software.

    PubMed

    Ghetti, C; Ortenzia, O; Palleri, F; Sireus, M

    2016-09-10

    Dose optimization in radiological examinations is a mandatory issue: in this study local Diagnostic Reference Levels (lDRLs) for Clinical Mammography (MG), Computed Tomography (CT) and Interventional Cardiac Procedures (ICP) performed in our Radiology Department were established. Using a dose tracking software, we have collected Average Glandular Dose (AGD) for two clinical mammographic units; CTDIvol, Size-Specific Dose Estimate (SSDE), Dose Length Product (DLP) and total DLP (DLPtot) for five CT scanners; Fluoro Time, Fluoro Dose Area Product (DAP) and total DAP (DAPtot) for two angiographic systems. Data have been compared with Italian Regulation and with the recent literature. The 75th percentiles of the different dosimetric indices have been calculated. Automated methods of radiation dose data collection allow a fast and detailed analysis of a great amount of data and an easy determination of lDRLs for different radiological procedures.

  6. Sense and nonsense of high-dose cytarabine for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Löwenberg, Bob

    2013-01-03

    High-dose cytarabine applied during remission induction or as consolidation after attainment of a complete remission has become an established element in the treatment of adults with acute myeloid leukemia. Recent evidence has challenged the need for these exceptionally high-dose levels of cytarabine. In this review, we present a reappraisal of the usefulness of high-dose cytarabine for acute myeloid leukemia treatment.

  7. Evaluation of a low-dose CT protocol with oral contrast for assessment of acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Platon, Alexandra; Jlassi, Helmi; Rutschmann, Olivier T; Becker, Christoph D; Verdun, Francis R; Gervaz, Pascal; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a low-dose CT with oral contrast medium (LDCT) for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis and compare its performance with standard-dose i.v. contrast-enhanced CT (standard CT) according to patients' BMIs. Eighty-six consecutive patients admitted with suspicion of acute appendicitis underwent LDCT (30 mAs), followed by standard CT (180 mAs). Both examinations were reviewed by two experienced radiologists for direct and indirect signs of appendicitis. Clinical and surgical follow-up was considered as the reference standard. Appendicitis was confirmed by surgery in 37 (43%) of the 86 patients. Twenty-nine (34%) patients eventually had an alternative discharge diagnosis to explain their abdominal pain. Clinical and biological follow-up was uneventful in 20 (23%) patients. LDCT and standard CT had the same sensitivity (100%, 33/33) and specificity (98%, 45/46) to diagnose appendicitis in patients with a body mass index (BMI) >or= 18.5. In slim patients (BMI<18.5), sensitivity to diagnose appendicitis was 50% (2/4) for LDCT and 100% (4/4) for standard CT, while specificity was identical for both techniques (67%, 2/3). LDCT may play a role in the diagnostic workup of patients with a BMI >or= 18.5.

  8. Organ doses for reference adult male and female undergoing computed tomography estimated by Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Choonsik; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Long, Daniel; Fisher, Ryan; Tien, Chris; Simon, Steven L.; Bouville, Andre; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To develop a computed tomography (CT) organ dose estimation method designed to readily provide organ doses in a reference adult male and female for different scan ranges to investigate the degree to which existing commercial programs can reasonably match organ doses defined in these more anatomically realistic adult hybrid phantomsMethods: The x-ray fan beam in the SOMATOM Sensation 16 multidetector CT scanner was simulated within the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX2.6. The simulated CT scanner model was validated through comparison with experimentally measured lateral free-in-air dose profiles and computed tomography dose index (CTDI) values. The reference adult male and female hybrid phantoms were coupled with the established CT scanner model following arm removal to simulate clinical head and other body region scans. A set of organ dose matrices were calculated for a series of consecutive axial scans ranging from the top of the head to the bottom of the phantoms with a beam thickness of 10 mm and the tube potentials of 80, 100, and 120 kVp. The organ doses for head, chest, and abdomen/pelvis examinations were calculated based on the organ dose matrices and compared to those obtained from two commercial programs, CT-EXPO and CTDOSIMETRY. Organ dose calculations were repeated for an adult stylized phantom by using the same simulation method used for the adult hybrid phantom. Results: Comparisons of both lateral free-in-air dose profiles and CTDI values through experimental measurement with the Monte Carlo simulations showed good agreement to within 9%. Organ doses for head, chest, and abdomen/pelvis scans reported in the commercial programs exceeded those from the Monte Carlo calculations in both the hybrid and stylized phantoms in this study, sometimes by orders of magnitude. Conclusions: The organ dose estimation method and dose matrices established in this study readily provides organ doses for a reference adult male and female for different

  9. A new reference point for patient dose estimation in neurovascular interventional radiology.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Kohei; Imazeki, Masaharu; Hasegawa, Ryota; Shiba, Shinichi; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Sato, Kazuhiko; Ota, Jyoji; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Awai, Kazuo; Sakamoto, Hajime; Tajima, Osamu; Tsukamoto, Atsuko; Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Kageyama, Takahiro; Kato, Kyoichi

    2013-07-01

    In interventional radiology, dose estimation using the interventional reference point (IRP) is a practical method for obtaining the real-time skin dose of a patient. However, the IRP is defined in terms of adult cardiovascular radiology and is not suitable for dosimetry of the head. In the present study, we defined a new reference point (neuro-IRP) for neuro-interventional procedures. The neuro-IRP was located on the central ray of the X-ray beam, 9 cm from the isocenter, toward the focal spot. To verify whether the neuro-IRP was accurate in dose estimation, we compared calculated doses at the neuro-IRP and actual measured doses at the surface of the head phantom for various directions of the X-ray projection. The resulting calculated doses were fairly consistent with actual measured doses, with the error in this estimation within approximately 15%. These data suggest that dose estimation using the neuro-IRP for the head is valid.

  10. Evaluation of organ doses in brachytherapy treatment of uterus cancer using mathematical reference Indian adult phantom.

    PubMed

    Biju, K

    2012-01-01

    Quantifying organ dose to healthy organs during radiotherapy is essential to estimate the radiation risk. Dose factors are generated by simulating radiation transport through an anthropomorphic mathematical phantom representing a reference Indian adult using the Monte Carlo method. The mean organ dose factors (in mGy min(-1) GBq(-1)) are obtained considering the microselectron (192)Ir source and BEBIG (60)Co sources in the uterus of a reference Indian adult female phantom. The present study provides the factors for mean absorbed dose to organs applicable to the Indian female patient population undergoing brachytherapy treatment of uterus cancer. This study also includes a comparison of the dimension of organs in the phantom model with measured values of organs in the various investigated patients.

  11. Single dose oral dihydrocodeine for acute postoperative pain

    PubMed Central

    Moore, R Andrew; Edwards, Jayne; Derry, Sheena; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 2, 2000. Dihydrocodeine is a synthetic opioid analgesic developed in the early 1900s. Its structure and pharmacokinetics are similar to that of codeine and it is used for the treatment of postoperative pain or as an antitussive. It is becoming increasingly important to assess the relative efficacy and harm caused by different treatments. Relative efficacy can be determined when an analgesic is compared with control under similar clinical circumstances. Objectives To quantitatively assess the analgesic efficacy and adverse effects of single-dose dihydrocodeine compared with placebo in randomised trials in moderate to severe postoperative pain. Search methods Published reports were identified from electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, the Oxford Pain Relief Database in December 2007, the original search was conducted in October 1999). Additional studies were identified from the reference lists of retrieved reports. Selection criteria Inclusion criteria: full journal publication, clinical trial, random allocation of participants to treatment groups, double blind design, adult participants, baseline pain of moderate to severe intensity, postoperative administration of study drugs, treatment arms which included dihydrocodeine and placebo and either oral or injected (intramuscular or intravenous) administration of study drugs. Data collection and analysis Data collection and analysis: summed pain intensity and pain relief data over four to six hours were extracted and converted into dichotomous information to yield the number of participants obtaining at least 50% pain relief. This was used to calculate relative benefit and number-needed-to-treat-to-benefit (NNT) for one participant to obtain at least 50% pain relief. Single-dose adverse effect data were collected and used to calculate relative risk and number-needed-to-treat-to-harm (NNH). Main results Fifty-two reports

  12. Organ doses for reference pediatric and adolescent patients undergoing computed tomography estimated by Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Choonsik; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Long, Daniel J.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: To establish an organ dose database for pediatric and adolescent reference individuals undergoing computed tomography (CT) examinations by using Monte Carlo simulation. The data will permit rapid estimates of organ and effective doses for patients of different age, gender, examination type, and CT scanner model. Methods: The Monte Carlo simulation model of a Siemens Sensation 16 CT scanner previously published was employed as a base CT scanner model. A set of absorbed doses for 33 organs/tissues normalized to the product of 100 mAs and CTDI{sub vol} (mGy/100 mAs mGy) was established by coupling the CT scanner model with age-dependent reference pediatric hybrid phantoms. A series of single axial scans from the top of head to the feet of the phantoms was performed at a slice thickness of 10 mm, and at tube potentials of 80, 100, and 120 kVp. Using the established CTDI{sub vol}- and 100 mAs-normalized dose matrix, organ doses for different pediatric phantoms undergoing head, chest, abdomen-pelvis, and chest-abdomen-pelvis (CAP) scans with the Siemens Sensation 16 scanner were estimated and analyzed. The results were then compared with the values obtained from three independent published methods: CT-Expo software, organ dose for abdominal CT scan derived empirically from patient abdominal circumference, and effective dose per dose-length product (DLP). Results: Organ and effective doses were calculated and normalized to 100 mAs and CTDI{sub vol} for different CT examinations. At the same technical setting, dose to the organs, which were entirely included in the CT beam coverage, were higher by from 40 to 80% for newborn phantoms compared to those of 15-year phantoms. An increase of tube potential from 80 to 120 kVp resulted in 2.5-2.9-fold greater brain dose for head scans. The results from this study were compared with three different published studies and/or techniques. First, organ doses were compared to those given by CT-Expo which revealed dose

  13. Proposed Oral Reference Dose (RfD) for Barium and Compounds (Final Report, 2004)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is the final report from the 2004 external peer review of the Proposed Oral Reference Dose (RfD) for Barium and Compounds, prepared by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), National Center for Environmental Assessment (NCEA), for the Integrated Risk...

  14. Stage specificity, dose response, and doubling dose for mouse minisatellite germ-line mutation induced by acute radiation.

    PubMed

    Dubrova, Y E; Plumb, M; Brown, J; Fennelly, J; Bois, P; Goodhead, D; Jeffreys, A J

    1998-05-26

    Germ-line mutation induction at mouse minisatellite loci by acute irradiation with x-rays was studied at premeiotic and postmeiotic stages of spermatogenesis. An elevated paternal mutation rate was found after irradiation of premeiotic spermatogonia and stem cells, whereas the frequency of minisatellite mutation after postmeiotic irradiation of spermatids was similar to that in control litters. In contrast, paternal irradiation did not affect the maternal mutation rate. A linear dose-response curve for paternal mutation induced at premeiotic stages was found, with a doubling dose of 0.33 Gy, a value close to those obtained in mice after acute spermatogonia irradiation using other systems for mutation detection. High frequencies of spontaneous and induced mutations at minisatellite loci allow mutation induction to be evaluated at low doses of exposure in very small population samples, which currently makes minisatellite DNA the most powerful tool for monitoring radiation-induced germ-line mutation.

  15. Dose Assessment in Computed Tomography Examination and Establishment of Local Diagnostic Reference Levels in Mazandaran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Janbabanezhad Toori, A.; Shabestani-Monfared, A.; Deevband, M.R.; Abdi, R.; Nabahati, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Medical X-rays are the largest man-made source of public exposure to ionizing radiation. While the benefits of Computed Tomography (CT) are well known in accurate diagnosis, those benefits are not risk-free. CT is a device with higher patient dose in comparison with other conventional radiation procedures. Objective This study is aimed at evaluating radiation dose to patients from Computed Tomography (CT) examination in Mazandaran hospitals and defining diagnostic reference level (DRL). Methods Patient-related data on CT protocol for four common CT examinations including brain, sinus, chest and abdomen & pelvic were collected. In each center, Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI) measurements were performed using pencil ionization chamber and CT dosimetry phantom according to AAPM report No. 96 for those techniques. Then, Weighted Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDIW), Volume Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI vol) and Dose Length Product (DLP) were calculated. Results The CTDIw for brain, sinus, chest and abdomen & pelvic ranged (15.6-73), (3.8-25. 8), (4.5-16.3) and (7-16.3), respectively. Values of DLP had a range of (197.4-981), (41.8-184), (131-342.3) and (283.6-486) for brain, sinus, chest and abdomen & pelvic, respectively. The 3rd quartile of CTDIW, derived from dose distribution for each examination is the proposed quantity for DRL. The DRLs of brain, sinus, chest and abdomen & pelvic are measured 59.5, 17, 7.8 and 11 mGy, respectively. Conclusion Results of this study demonstrated large scales of dose for the same examination among different centers. For all examinations, our values were lower than international reference doses. PMID:26688796

  16. Air kerma and absorbed dose standards for reference dosimetry in brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews recent developments in primary standards for the calibration of brachytherapy sources, with an emphasis on the currently most common photon-emitting radionuclides. The introduction discusses the need for reference dosimetry in brachytherapy in general. The following section focuses on the three main quantities, i.e. reference air kerma rate, air kerma strength and absorbed dose rate to water, which are currently used for the specification of brachytherapy photon sources and which can be realized with primary standards from first principles. An overview of different air kerma and absorbed dose standards, which have been independently developed by various national metrology institutes over the past two decades, is given in the next two sections. Other dosimetry techniques for brachytherapy will also be discussed. The review closes with an outlook on a possible transition from air kerma to absorbed dose to water-based calibrations for brachytherapy sources in the future. PMID:24814696

  17. Factors affecting quality for beta dose rate measurements using ISO 6980 series I reference sources

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, R.E. Jr.; O`Brien, J.M. Jr.

    1993-12-31

    Atlan-Tech, Inc. has performed several calibrations of ISO 6980 Series 1 reference beta sources over the past two to three years. There were many problems encountered in attempting to compare the results of these calibrations with those from other laboratories, indicating the need for more standardization in the methodology employed for the measurement of the absorbed dose rate from ISO 6980 Series 1 reference beta sources. This document describes some of the problems encountered in attempting to intercompare results of beta dose-rate measurements. It proposes some solutions in an attempt to open a dialogue among facilities using reference beta standards for the purpose of promoting better measurement quality assurance through data intercomparison.

  18. Micro RNA responses to chronic or acute exposures to low dose ionizing radiation

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, M. Ahmad; Omaruddin, Romaica A.; Kreger, Bridget; de Toledo, Sonia M.; Azzam, Edouard I.

    2014-01-01

    Human health risks of exposure to low dose ionizing radiation remain ambiguous and are the subject of intense debate. A wide variety of biological effects are induced after cellular exposure to ionizing radiation, but the underlying molecular mechanism(s) remain to be completely understood. We hypothesized that low dose c-radiation-induced effects are controlled by the modulation of micro RNA (miRNA) that participate in the control of gene expression at the posttranscriptional level and are involved in many cellular processes. We monitored the expression of several miRNA in human cells exposed to acute or chronic low doses of 10 cGy or a moderate dose of 400 cGy of 137Cs γ-rays. Dose, dose rate and time dependent differences in the relative expression of several miRNA were investigated. The expression patterns of many miRNA differed after exposure to either chronic or acute 10 cGy. The expression of miRNA let-7e, a negative regulator of RAS oncogene, and the c-MYC miRNA cluster were upregulated after 10 cGy chronic dose but were downregulated after 3 h of acute 10 cGy. The miR-21 was upregulated in chronic or acute low dose and moderate dose treated cells and its target genes hPDCD4, hPTEN, hSPRY2, and hTPM1 were found to be downregulated. These findings provide evidence that low dose and dose rate c-irradiation dictate the modulation of miRNA, which can result in a differential cellular response than occurs at high doses. This information will contribute to understanding the risks to human health after exposure to low dose radiation. PMID:22367372

  19. Infertility after acute salpingitis with special reference to Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed

    Svensson, L; Mårdh, P A; Weström, L

    1983-09-01

    Of 552 women with laparoscopically verified acute salpingitis (AS), 299 were reviewed 2.5 to 7.5 years later. Cervical secretions from these women had been cultured for the presence of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. For 49 of 82 women with visually normal pelvic organs, such cultures were also performed; these women served as control subjects. In women exposing themselves to pregnancy, 50 (23.3%) of 197 AS patients and 2 (6.7%) of 30 control women were infertile for at least 1 year (P less than 0.02). After one episode of AS, women harboring chlamydiae, gonococci, both, or neither of these microorganisms in the cervix on admission seemed to have the same fertility prognosis. Infertility was correlated with the number of AS episodes, the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (millimeters per hour) at admission, and the severity of the inflammatory reactions of the tubes. The use of oral contraceptives at admission was found to be a positive prognostic factor regarding fertility. Oral contraceptives might protect the patient from severe tubal inflammatory reactions.

  20. Single dose oral indometacin for the treatment of acute postoperative pain

    PubMed Central

    Moore, R Andrew; Derry, Sheena; Mason, Lorna; McQuay, Henry J; Edwards, Jayne

    2014-01-01

    Background This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 4, 2004. Indometacin is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used most commonly for the treatment of inflammation and pain resulting from rheumatic disease (arthritis), and less commonly in postoperative pain management. When taken for chronic pain conditions, indometacin has been associated with a high incidence of adverse events. The benefits and harms of orally-administered indometacin for postoperative pain are not clear. Objectives To determine the efficacy of a single dose of oral indometacin compared with placebo in treating acute postoperative pain in adults, and to analyse information relating to adverse events. Search methods We searched the Cochrane CENTRAL Register of Controlled Trials in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Oxford Pain Relief Database for relevant studies in January 2002 and for the updated search in December 2007. Additional studies were sought from the reference lists of retrieved studies. Selection criteria Studies were included in the review if they were randomised, double blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials using a single oral dose of indometacin in adults with acute postoperative pain. Data collection and analysis Studies were assessed independently by two review authors. Pain relief or pain intensity data were extracted and converted into dichotomous information to give the number of participants with at least 50% pain relief over four to six hours. The relative benefit for at least 50% pain relief was calculated. Main results In the original review one study of 59 women with post-episiotomy pain met the inclusion criteria. The dose of indometacin assessed against placebo was 50 mg, and the results concluded that indometacin was not significantly better than placebo for relieving postoperative pain at four to six hours. There was insufficient information to conduct further efficacy analyses or assess adverse events

  1. Development of a chronic noncancer oral reference dose and drinking water screening level for sulfolane using benchmark dose modeling.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Chad M; Gaylor, David W; Tachovsky, J Andrew; Perry, Camarie; Carakostas, Michael C; Haws, Laurie C

    2013-12-01

    Sulfolane is a widely used industrial solvent that is often used for gas treatment (sour gas sweetening; hydrogen sulfide removal from shale and coal processes, etc.), and in the manufacture of polymers and electronics, and may be found in pharmaceuticals as a residual solvent used in the manufacturing processes. Sulfolane is considered a high production volume chemical with worldwide production around 18 000-36 000 tons per year. Given that sulfolane has been detected as a contaminant in groundwater, an important potential route of exposure is tap water ingestion. Because there are currently no federal drinking water standards for sulfolane in the USA, we developed a noncancer oral reference dose (RfD) based on benchmark dose modeling, as well as a tap water screening value that is protective of ingestion. Review of the available literature suggests that sulfolane is not likely to be mutagenic, clastogenic or carcinogenic, or pose reproductive or developmental health risks except perhaps at very high exposure concentrations. RfD values derived using benchmark dose modeling were 0.01-0.04 mg kg(-1) per day, although modeling of developmental endpoints resulted in higher values, approximately 0.4 mg kg(-1) per day. The lowest, most conservative, RfD of 0.01 mg kg(-1) per day was based on reduced white blood cell counts in female rats. This RfD was used to develop a tap water screening level that is protective of ingestion, viz. 365 µg l(-1). It is anticipated that these values, along with the hazard identification and dose-response modeling described herein, should be informative for risk assessors and regulators interested in setting health-protective drinking water guideline values for sulfolane.

  2. Neutron activation analysis for reference determination of the implantation dose of cobalt ions

    SciTech Connect

    Garten, R.P.H.; Bubert, H.; Palmetshofer, L.

    1992-05-15

    The authors prepared depth profilling reference materials by cobalt ion implantation at an ion energy of 300 keV into n-type silicon. The implanted Co dose was then determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) giving an analytical dynamic range of almost 5 decades and uncertainty of 1.5%. This form of analysis allows sources of error (beam spreading, misalignment) to be corrected. 70 refs., 3 tabs.

  3. Provisional Reference Dose for the Aromatic Fraction of Jet Fuel: Insight into Complex Mixtures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    Petroleum Hydrocarbon Criteria Working Group UF uncertainty factor UV ultraviolet light wt% weight percent vi PROVISIONAL REFERENCE DOSE FOR THE AROMATIC...week) included. RBC = red blood cell. UF = total uncertainty factor , including modifying factors when applied. aU.S. EPA (2004). bThis unpublished...approach applied uncertainty factors to NOAELs or LOAELs from the critical 11 studies. The TPHCWG primarily accepted default values of 10 for

  4. Patient doses in paediatric CT: feasibility of setting diagnostic reference levels.

    PubMed

    Järvinen, H; Merimaa, K; Seuri, R; Tyrväinen, E; Perhomaa, M; Savikurki-Heikkilä, P; Svedström, E; Ziliukas, J; Lintrop, M

    2011-09-01

    Despite the fact that doses to paediatric patients from computed tomography (CT) examinations are of special concern, only few data or studies for setting of paediatric diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) have been published. In this study, doses to children were estimated from chest and head CT, in order to study the feasibility of DRLs for these examinations. It is shown that for the DRLs, patient dose data from different CT scanners should be collected in age or weight groups, possibly for different indications. For practical reasons, the DRLs for paediatric chest CT should be given as a continuous DRL curve as a function of patient weight. For paediatric head CT, DRLs for a few age groups could be given. The users of the DRLs should be aware of the calibration phantom applied in the console calibration for different paediatric scanning protocols. The feasibility of DRLs should be re-evaluated every 2-3 y.

  5. Organ dose conversion coefficients for pediatric reference computational phantoms in external photon radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Lienard A.

    In the event of a radiological accident or attack, it is important to estimate the organ doses to those exposed. In general, it is difficult to measure organ dose directly in the field and therefore dose conversion coefficients (DCC) are needed to convert measurable values such as air kerma to organ dose. Previous work on these coefficients has been conducted mainly for adults with a focus on radiation protection workers. Hence, there is a large gap in the literature for pediatric values. This study coupled a Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code with International Council of Radiological Protection (ICRP)-adopted University of Florida and National Cancer Institute pediatric reference phantoms to calculate a comprehensive list of dose conversion coefficients (mGy/mGy) to convert air-kerma to organ dose. Parameters included ten phantoms (newborn, 1-year, 5-year, 10-year, 15-year old male and female), 28 organs over 33 energies between 0.01 and 20 MeV in six (6) irradiation geometries relevant to a child who might be exposed to a radiological release: anterior-posterior (AP), posterior-anterior (PA), right-lateral (RLAT), left-lateral (LLAT), rotational (ROT), and isotropic (ISO). Dose conversion coefficients to the red bone marrow over 36 skeletal sites were also calculated. It was hypothesized that the pediatric organ dose conversion coefficients would follow similar trends to the published adult values as dictated by human anatomy, but be of a higher magnitude. It was found that while the pediatric coefficients did yield similar patterns to that of the adult coefficients, depending on the organ and irradiation geometry, the pediatric values could be lower or higher than that of the adult coefficients.

  6. Mean glandular dose in six digital mammography services in Santiago, Chile: preliminary reference levels.

    PubMed

    Leyton, Fernando; Nogueira, Maria Do Socorro; Dantas, Marcelino; Duran, Maria Paz; Ubeda, Carlos

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this paper was to estimate mean glandular dose levels (DG) in six digital mammography systems in Santiago, Chile, and to propose preliminary reference levels to execute mammography in Chile. The study was carried out assessing two direct digital systems and four computer-based radiography (CR) systems. Estimates of DG were calculated for different thicknesses of polymethyl methacrylate according to the quality control protocol in digital mammography of the Spanish Society of Medical Physics and NHSBSP Equipment Report 0604 Version 3. DG values ranged between 0.64 and 7.26 mGy for a range of 20- to 70-mm thickness, respectively. Thirty-six per cent of DG was higher than the acceptable dose level and 100 % of DG was higher than the desirable level. It is therefore necessary to optimise doses. The initial proposal to establish dose reference levels for DG would range between 0.90 and 6.40 mGy for a thickness range of 20 to 70 mm.

  7. Evaluation of organ doses and effective dose according to the ICRP Publication 110 reference male/female phantom and the modified ImPACT CT patient dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masanao; Asada, Yasuki; Matsubara, Kosuke; Matsunaga, Yuta; Kawaguchi, Ai; Katada, Kazuhiro; Toyama, Hiroshi; Koshida, Kichiro; Suzuki, Shouichi

    2014-09-07

    We modified the Imaging Performance Assessment of CT scanners (ImPACT) to evaluate the organ doses and the effective dose based on the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 110 reference male/female phantom with the Aquilion ONE ViSION Edition scanner. To select the new CT scanner, the measurement results of the CTDI100,c and CTDI100,p for the 160 (head) and the 320 (body) mm polymethylmethacrylate phantoms, respectively, were entered on the Excel worksheet. To compute the organ doses and effective dose of the ICRP reference male/female phantom, the conversion factors obtained by comparison between the organ doses of different types of phantom were applied. The organ doses and the effective dose were almost identical for the ICRP reference male/female and modified ImPACT. The results of this study showed that, with the dose assessment of the ImPACT, the difference in sex influences only testes and ovaries. Because the MIRD-5 phantom represents a partially hermaphrodite adult, the phantom has the dimensions of the male reference man including testes, ovaries, and uterus but no female breasts, whereas the ICRP male/female phantom includes whole-body male and female anatomies based on high-resolution anatomical datasets. The conversion factors can be used to estimate the doses of a male and a female accurately, and efficient dose assessment can be performed with the modified ImPACT.

  8. Maintaining the Constant Exposure Condition for an Acute Caenorhabditis elegans Mortality Test Using Passive Dosing

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hyuck-Chul; Roh, Ji-Yeon; Lim, Dongyoung; Choi, Jinhee

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Maintaining the constant exposure to hydrophobic organic compouds in acute toxicity tests is one of the most difficult issues in the evaluation of their toxicity and corresponding risks. Passive dosing is an emerging tool to keep constant aqueous concentration because of the overwhelming mass loaded in the dosing phase. The primary objectives of this study were to develop the constant exposure condition for an acute mortality test and to compare the performance of the passive dosing method with the conventional spiking with co-solvent. Methods A custom cut polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) tubing loaded with benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP) was placed in each well of a 24-well plate containing assay medium. The rate of the release of BBP from PDMS was evaluated by measuring the change in the concentration of BBP in the assay medium. The efficiency of maintaining constant exposure condition was also evaluated using a simple two-compartment mass transport model employing a film-diffusion theory. An acute mortality test using 10 C. elegans in each well was conducted for the evaluation of the validity of passive dosing and the comparative evaluation of the passive dosing method and the conventional spiking method. Results Free concentration in the assay medium reached 95% steady state value within 2.2 hours without test organisms, indicating that this passive dosing method is useful for an acute toxicity test in 24 hours. The measured concentration after the mortality test agreed well with the estimated values from partitioning between PDMS and the assay medium. However, the difference between the nominal and the free concentration became larger as the spiked concentration approached water solubility, indicating the instability of the conventional spiking with a co-solvent. Conclusions The results in this study support that passive dosing provides a stable exposure condition for an acute toxicity test. Thus, it is likely that more reliable toxicity assessment can be

  9. Neutral red uptake cytotoxicity tests for estimating starting doses for acute oral toxicity tests.

    PubMed

    Stokes, William S; Casati, Silvia; Strickland, Judy; Paris, Michael

    2008-05-01

    In vitro cytotoxicity assays can be used as alternative toxicity tests to reduce the total number of animals needed for acute oral toxicity tests. This unit describes two methods for determining the in vitro cytotoxicity of test substances using neutral red uptake (NRU) and using the in vitro data to determine starting doses for in vivo acute oral systemic toxicity tests, e.g., the up-and-down procedure or the acute toxic class method. The use of the NRU methods to determine starting doses for acute oral toxicity tests may reduce the number of animals required, and for relatively toxic substances, this approach may also reduce the number of animals that die or require humane euthanasia due to severe toxicity. An interlaboratory validation study has demonstrated that the methods are useful and reproducible for these purposes. Two standardized protocols provide details for performing NRU tests with rodent and human cells.

  10. Acute ischemic stroke after cardiac catheterization: the protamine low-dose recombinant tissue plasminogen activator pathway.

    PubMed

    Guevara, Carlos; Quijada, Alonso; Rosas, Carolina; Bulatova, Katya; Lara, Hugo; Nieto, Elena; Morales, Marcelo

    2016-05-20

    Intravenous thrombolysis is the preferred treatment for acute ischemic stroke; however, it remains unestablished in the area of cardiac catheterization. We report three patients with acute ischemic stroke after cardiac catheterization. After reversing the anticoagulant effect of unfractionated heparin with protamine, all of the patients were successfully off-label thrombolyzed with reduced doses of intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (0.6 mg/kg). This dose was preferred to reduce the risk of symptomatic cerebral or systemic bleeding. The sequential pathway of protamine recombinant tissue plasminogen activator at reduced doses may be safer for reducing intracranial or systemic bleeding events, whereas remaining efficacious for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke after cardiac catheterization.

  11. Quantitative Evaluation and Selection of Reference Genes for Quantitative RT-PCR in Mouse Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Zhaoping; Gao, Jinhang; Lv, Xiuhe; Yang, Wenjuan; Wen, Shilei; Tong, Huan; Tang, Chengwei

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of differences in gene expression is dependent on normalization using reference genes. However, the expression of many of these reference genes, as evaluated by quantitative RT-PCR, is upregulated in acute pancreatitis, so they cannot be used as the standard for gene expression in this condition. For this reason, we sought to identify a stable reference gene, or a suitable combination, for expression analysis in acute pancreatitis. The expression stability of 10 reference genes (ACTB, GAPDH, 18sRNA, TUBB, B2M, HPRT1, UBC, YWHAZ, EF-1α, and RPL-13A) was analyzed using geNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper software and evaluated according to variations in the raw Ct values. These reference genes were evaluated using a comprehensive method, which ranked the expression stability of these genes as follows (from most stable to least stable): RPL-13A, YWHAZ > HPRT1 > GAPDH > UBC > EF-1α > 18sRNA > B2M > TUBB > ACTB. RPL-13A was the most suitable reference gene, and the combination of RPL-13A and YWHAZ was the most stable group of reference genes in our experiments. The expression levels of ACTB, TUBB, and B2M were found to be significantly upregulated during acute pancreatitis, whereas the expression level of 18sRNA was downregulated. Thus, we recommend the use of RPL-13A or a combination of RPL-13A and YWHAZ for normalization in qRT-PCR analyses of gene expression in mouse models of acute pancreatitis. PMID:27069927

  12. Detecting impairment: sensitive cognitive measures of dose-related acute alcohol intoxication.

    PubMed

    Cash, Catherine; Peacock, Amy; Barrington, Helen; Sinnett, Nicholas; Bruno, Raimondo

    2015-04-01

    The cognitive impairment that results from acute alcohol intoxication is associated with considerable safety risks. Other psychoactive substances, such as medications, pose a similar risk to road and workplace safety. However, there is currently no legal limit for operating vehicles or working while experiencing drug-related impairment. The current study sought to identify a brief cognitive task sensitive to a meaningful degree of impairment from acute alcohol intoxication to potentially stand as a reference from which to quantify impairment from other similar substances. A placebo-controlled single-blind crossover design was employed to determine the relative sensitivity of four commonly-administered cognitive tasks (Compensatory Tracking Task, Digit Symbol Substitution Test, Brief Stop Signal Task and Inspection Time Task) to alcohol-related impairment in male social drinkers at ~0.05% ascending breath alcohol concentration (BrAC), ~0.08% peak BrAC and 0.05% descending BrAC. The Inspection Time Task was identified as the most sensitive task, detecting a medium to large magnitude increase in impairment (g ≈ 0.60) at 0.05% ascending and descending BrAC, and a large magnitude effect size (g = 0.80) at 0.08% peak BrAC. The remaining tasks failed to demonstrate sensitivity to dose-dependent and limb-dependent changes in alcohol-induced impairment. The Inspection Time Task was deemed the most sensitive task for screening alcohol-related impairment based on the present results. Confirmation of equivalence with other drug-related impairment and sensitivity to alcohol-induced impairment in real-world settings should be established in future research.

  13. Acute generalized weakness in patients referred to Amirkola Children’s Hospital from 2005 to 2010

    PubMed Central

    Salehiomran, Mohammad Reza; Naserkhaki, Somayeh; Hajiahmadi, Mahmoud

    2012-01-01

    Background: Diseases that cause acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) often progress rapidly, thus may cause life threatening complications, therefore, their diagnosis and cure are important. This study was carried out to investigate the causes of acute generalized weakness in children referred to Amirkola Children’s Hospital, in Babol, Iran. Methods: In this case series, the epidemiological causes of the disease and clinical features of 15 cases with acute generalized weakness from April 2005 to September 2010 were evaluated. The data were collected and analyzed. Results: The mean age of cases was 4.7±3.5 years. The male/female ratio was 2. Twenty cases had Guillain-Barre syndrome, two with myositis and one with periodic hyperkalemic paralysis. Conclusion: Guillain-Barre syndrome is the most common cause of AFP in children admitted due to acute generalized weakness in Amirkola Children’s Hospital. PMID:24358438

  14. Low-dose total-body γ irradiation modulates immune response to acute proton radiation.

    PubMed

    Luo-Owen, Xian; Pecaut, Michael J; Rizvi, Asma; Gridley, Daila S

    2012-03-01

    Health risks due to exposure to low-dose/low-dose-rate radiation alone or when combined with acute irradiation are not yet clearly defined. This study quantified the effects of protracted exposure to low-dose/low-dose-rate γ rays with and without acute exposure to protons on the response of immune and other cell populations. C57BL/6 mice were irradiated with ⁵⁷Co (0.05 Gy at 0.025 cGy/h); subsets were subsequently exposed to high-dose/high-dose-rate proton radiation (250 MeV; 2 or 3 Gy at 0.5 Gy/min). Analyses were performed at 4 and 17 days postexposure. Spleen and thymus masses relative to body mass were decreased on day 4 after proton irradiation with or without pre-exposure to γ rays; by day 17, however, the decrease was attenuated by the priming dose. Proton dose-dependent decreases, either with or without pre-exposure to γ rays, occurred in white blood cell, lymphocyte and granulocyte counts in blood but not in spleen. A similar pattern was found for lymphocyte subpopulations, including CD3+ T, CD19+ B, CD4+ T, CD8+ T and NK1.1+ natural killer (NK) cells. Spontaneous DNA synthesis by leukocytes after proton irradiation was high in blood on day 4 and high in spleen on day 17; priming with γ radiation attenuated the effect of 3 Gy in both body compartments. Some differences were also noted among groups in erythrocyte and thrombocyte characteristics. Analysis of splenocytes activated with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 antibodies showed changes in T-helper 1 (Th1) and Th2 cytokines. Overall, the data demonstrate that pre-exposure of an intact mammal to low-dose/low-dose-rate γ rays can attenuate the response to acute exposure to proton radiation with respect to at least some cell populations.

  15. HMX: Analysis of Dosing Formulations Used in Acute, Sub-Acute and Sub-Chronic Toxicity Studies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-31

    14.72 - 1 50 78 1 79 1 1 I I 72 15.30 1 I 50 781 I I I 3 1 1 1 1 5 0 1 1 1 I i 15.07 -5 1 112 1 ,? 3 1 4,3 74 15.251 " 1 1 50 1 114 1 113 0 I I I 75...NUMBER 2. GOVT ACCESSION NO 3 . RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER 4. TITLE (end Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED HMX: Analysis of dosing formulations...HMX: Analysis of Dosing Formulations Used in Acute, Sub-acute and Sub-chronic Toxicity Studies Final Report by: M.S. Henderson 3 , July,, 1985 Supported

  16. Acute quetiapine dose-dependently exacerbates anhedonia induced by withdrawal from escalating doses of d-amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Zhornitsky, Simon; Potvin, Stéphane; Stip, Emmanuel; Rompré, Pierre-Paul

    2010-10-01

    Recent clinical studies show that the atypical antipsychotic medication, quetiapine, may be beneficial in the treatment of substance abuse by alleviating the withdrawal-negative affect stage of addiction. Since the effect of quetiapine on central reward function is largely unknown we studied its effects on brain stimulation reward in animals under withdrawal from escalating doses of d-amphetamine. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained to produce an operant response to receive a short train of electrical stimulation to the lateral hypothalamus. Measures of reward threshold were determined with the curve-shift method in different groups of rats before, and during four days after treatment with escalating doses (1 to 10mg/kg, i.p.) of d-amphetamine or its vehicle. At 24h of withdrawal, the effects of two doses of quetiapine (2 and 10mg/kg i.p.) were tested. Animals treated with d-amphetamine showed a 25% reward deficit at 24h of withdrawal, an effect that decreased progressively over the next three days. Quetiapine attenuated reward in the vehicle-control animals, and amplified the anhedonia at the moderate, but not the low, dose in the animals under withdrawal. These results show that acute treatment with clinically relevant doses of quetiapine for the treatment of schizophrenia may exacerbate anhedonia induced by amphetamine withdrawal. Further research should investigate whether repeated treatment with quetiapine has the ability to reverse amphetamine withdrawal-induced anhedonia.

  17. Stimulating effect of adaptogens: an overview with particular reference to their efficacy following single dose administration.

    PubMed

    Panossian, A; Wagner, H

    2005-10-01

    Plant adaptogens are compounds that increase the ability of an organism to adapt to environmental factors and to avoid damage from such factors. The beneficial effects of multi-dose administration of adaptogens are mainly associated with the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, a part of the stress-system that is believed to play a primary role in the reactions of the body to repeated stress and adaptation. In contrast, the single dose application of adaptogens is important in situations that require a rapid response to tension or to a stressful situation. In this case, the effects of the adaptogens are associated with another part of the stress-system, namely, the sympatho-adrenal-system (SAS), that provides a rapid response mechanism mainly to control the acute reaction of the organism to a stressor. This review focuses primarily on the SAS-mediated stimulating effects of single doses of adaptogens derived from Rhodiola rosea, Schizandra chinensis and Eleutherococcus senticosus. The use of these drugs typically generates no side effects, unlike traditional stimulants that possess addiction, tolerance and abuse potential, produce a negative effect on sleep structure, and cause rebound hypersomnolence or 'come down' effects. Furthermore, single administration of these adaptogens effectively increases mental performance and physical working capacity in humans. R. rosea is the most active of the three plant adaptogens producing, within 30 min of administration, a stimulating effect that continues for at least 4-6 h. The active principles of the three plants that exhibit single dose stimulating effects are glycosides of phenylpropane- and phenylethane-based phenolic compounds such as salidroside, rosavin, syringin and triandrin, the latter being the most active.

  18. On the performance of acute toxicity tests using the National Reference Toxicant Database

    SciTech Connect

    Zaidhk, B.

    1995-12-31

    The US National Reference Toxicant Database was used to compile data from 158 Ceriodaphnia dubia, and 187 fathead minnow acute toxicity tests. The data are analyzed using the EPA flow-chart for acute toxicity tests to determine the distribution of test methods selected. The data are reanalyzed using maximum likelihood estimation assuming probit, logit and Gompertz tolerance distributions and non-parametrically using the Spearman-Karber method with and without trimming. The results of these analyses are compared with respect to mean square error for the parametric methods and confidence intervals for the point estimate for all analyses.

  19. High-dose gallium-67 therapy in patients with relapsed acute leukaemia: a feasibility study.

    PubMed Central

    Jonkhoff, A. R.; Plaizier, M. A.; Ossenkoppele, G. J.; Teule, G. J.; Huijgens, P. C.

    1995-01-01

    Gallium-67 (67Ga) accumulates in malignant tissues via the transferrin receptor without need for a monoclonal antibody and emits cytotoxic low-energy electrons. In this study we investigated the feasibility, pharmacokinetics, toxicity and preliminary efficiency of high-dose 67Ga injected intravenously (i.v.) in patients with acute leukaemia not responding to conventional therapy. Twelve doses of 36-105 mCi of Gallium67 citrate were administered as a push injection to eight patients with resistant leukaemia in a pilot study. All five patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and three patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) had resistant disease or resistant relapse. No (sub)acute toxicity was observed. Independent of the administered dose, whole-blood radioactivity levels 10 min after administration measured only 1.25 +/- 1.39 microCi ml-1, indicating a large volume of distribution. Urine excretion in the first 24 h ranged from 18% to 51.5% (median 29.5%) of the administered dose. Cellular uptake of 67Ga was less than in previous in vitro studies. Whole-body radiation dose was estimated to be 0.25 +/- 0.03 cGy mCi-1. Red marrow dose was estimated to be between 0.18 +/- 0.02 and 0.97 +/- 0.12 cGy mCi-1. One definite response was observed in an ALL patient with disappearance of skin lesions, normalisation of the enlarged spleen and profound leucopenia. Three other patients showed transient reductions in white blood cell counts without disappearance of blasts from the peripheral blood. We conclude that high-dose i.v. 67Ga can be safely administered but that the uptake of 67Ga in blast cells must increase to make 67Ga therapeutically useful in patients with relapsed leukaemia. Images Figure 2 PMID:8519674

  20. Local-Reference Patient Dose Evaluation in Conventional Radiography Examinations in Mazandaran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Khoshdel-Navi, D.; Shabestani-Monfared, A.; Deevband, M. R.; Abdi, R.; Nabahati, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The most efficient application of ionizing radiation is serving medical purposes and using this radiation has caused people to learn that artificial sources of radiation exposure among these resources can be of highest exposure rate. Obiective The present study is aimed at initially establishing a baseline for local-reference dose level in Mazandaran, Iran in 12 projections of the most conventional x-ray examination. Methods In this study, 13 public hospitals in Mazandaran province were selected for review and required data collected for ten adult patients with mean weight of 70±10kg in each projection. Then, information of each center was separately analyzed. Next, in order to measure x-ray output tube, the dosimeter RTI model Barracuda calibrated has been applied for measuring air karma within energy rage of 40-150kvp. ESAK and ESD parameters, usually used for monitoring DRL in conventional radiography, were calculated. Results Mean ESDs in this study has been obtained to 1.47±0.98 for skull (PA/AP), 1.01±0.79 for skull (LAT), 0.67±0.38 for cervical spine (AP), 0.79±0.37 for cervical (LAT), 0.49±0.38 for chest (PA/AP), 1.06±0.44 for chest (LAT), 2.15±0.73 for thoracic spine (AP), 3±0.87 for thoracic spine (LAT), 2.81 ±0.82 for lumbar spine (AP), 4.28±0.78 for lumbar (LAT), 2.07±1.17 for abdomen and 1.90±0.99 for pelvis, respectively. The ESDs calculated for chest examination in both projections, PA and LAT are more than values recommended by the UK (2000), Brazil and Slovenia. Conclusion The present study has determined wide variations in radiation dose of x-ray examinations among hospitals in Mazandaran, Iran. In order to reduce skin dose, an optimization procedure should be considered. Application of a reference dose (DRL) could be a practical method for this purpose. The role of optimization of radiography parameters for reducing patient dose is a significant issue. Through optimizing parameters, it would be possible to preserve image

  1. Ultra-low dose comprehensive cardiac CT imaging in a patient with acute myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Tröbs, Monique; Brand, Michael; Achenbach, Stephan; Marwan, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    The ability of contrast-enhanced CT to detect "late enhancement" in a fashion similar to magnetic resonance imaging has been previously reported. We report a case of acute myocarditis with coronary CT angiography as well as "late enhancement" imaging with ultra-low effective radiation dose.

  2. COMPARING BEHAVIORAL DOSE-EFFECT CURVES FOR HUMANS AND LABORATORY ANIMALS ACUTELY EXPOSED TO TOLUENE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The utility of laboratory animal data in toxicology depends upon the ability to generalize the results quantitatively to humans. To compare the acute behavioral effects of inhaled toluene in humans to those in animals, dose-effect curves were fitted by meta-analysis of published...

  3. Acute buspirone dosing enhances abuse-related subjective effects of oral methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Pike, Erika; Stoops, William W; Rush, Craig R

    There is not an approved pharmacotherapy for treating methamphetamine use disorder. This study sought to determine the effects of acute buspirone treatment on the subjective and cardiovascular effects of oral methamphetamine in order to provide an initial assessment of the utility, safety, and tolerability of buspirone for managing methamphetamine use disorder. We predicted that acute buspirone administration would reduce the subjective effects of methamphetamine. We also predicted that the combination of buspirone and methamphetamine would be safe and well tolerated. Ten subjects completed the protocol, which tested three methamphetamine doses (0, 15, and 30mg) in combination with two buspirone doses (0 and 30mg) across 6 experimental sessions. Subjective effects and physiological measures were collected at regular intervals prior to and after dose administration. Methamphetamine produced prototypical subjective and cardiovascular effects. Acute buspirone administration increased some of the abuse-related subjective effects of methamphetamine and also attenuated some cardiovascular effects. The combination of oral methamphetamine and buspirone was safe and well tolerated. Acute buspirone administration may increase the abuse liability of oral methamphetamine. Chronic buspirone dosing studies remain to be conducted, but given preclinical findings and the outcomes of this work, the utility of buspirone for treating methamphetamine use disorder appears limited.

  4. Are higher doses of proton pump inhibitors better in acute peptic bleeding?

    PubMed

    Villalón, Alejandro; Olmos, Roberto; Rada, Gabriel

    2016-06-24

    Although there is broad consensus about the benefits of proton pump inhibitors in acute upper peptic bleeding, there is still controversy over their optimal dosing. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified six systematic reviews including 27 randomized trials addressing this question. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded high-dose proton pump inhibitors probably result in little or no difference in re-bleeding rate or mortality. The risk/benefit and cost/benefit balance probably favor use of low-doses.

  5. U.S. Diagnostic Reference Levels and Achievable Doses for 10 Adult CT Examinations.

    PubMed

    Kanal, Kalpana M; Butler, Priscilla F; Sengupta, Debapriya; Bhargavan-Chatfield, Mythreyi; Coombs, Laura P; Morin, Richard L

    2017-02-21

    Purpose To develop diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) and achievable doses (ADs) for the 10 most common adult computed tomographic (CT) examinations in the United States as a function of patient size by using the CT Dose Index Registry. Materials and Methods Data from the 10 most commonly performed adult CT head, neck, and body examinations from 583 facilities were analyzed. For head examinations, the lateral thickness was used as an indicator of patient size; for neck and body examinations, water-equivalent diameter was used. Data from 1 310 727 examinations (analyzed by using SAS 9.3) provided median values, as well as means and 25th and 75th (DRL) percentiles for volume CT dose index (CTDIvol), dose-length product (DLP), and size-specific dose estimate (SSDE). Applicable results were compared with DRLs from eight countries. Results More than 46% of the facilities were community hospitals; 13% were academic facilities. More than 48% were in metropolitan areas, 39% were suburban, and 13% were rural. More than 50% of the facilities performed fewer than 500 examinations per month. The abdomen and pelvis was the most frequently performed examination in the study (45%). For body examinations, DRLs (75th percentile) and ADs (median) for CTDIvol, SSDE, and DLP increased consistently with the patient's size (water-equivalent diameter). The relationships between patient size and DRLs and ADs were not as strong for head and neck examinations. These results agree well with the data from other countries. Conclusion DRLs and ADs as a function of patient size were developed for the 10 most common adult CT examinations performed in the United States. (©) RSNA, 2017.

  6. The delayed pulmonary syndrome following acute high-dose irradiation: a rhesus macaque model.

    PubMed

    Garofalo, Michael; Bennett, Alexander; Farese, Ann M; Harper, Jamie; Ward, Amanda; Taylor-Howell, Cheryl; Cui, Wanchang; Gibbs, Allison; Lasio, Giovanni; Jackson, William; MacVittie, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Several radiation dose- and time-dependent tissue sequelae develop following acute high-dose radiation exposure. One of the recognized delayed effects of such exposures is lung injury, characterized by respiratory failure as a result of pneumonitis that may subsequently develop into lung fibrosis. Since this pulmonary subsyndrome may be associated with high morbidity and mortality, comprehensive treatment following high-dose irradiation will ideally include treatments that mitigate both the acute hematologic and gastrointestinal subsyndromes as well as the delayed pulmonary syndrome. Currently, there are no drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration to counteract the effects of acute radiation exposure. Moreover, there are no relevant large animal models of radiation-induced lung injury that permit efficacy testing of new generation medical countermeasures in combination with medical management protocols under the FDA animal rule criteria. Herein is described a nonhuman primate model of delayed lung injury resulting from whole thorax lung irradiation. Rhesus macaques were exposed to 6 MV photon radiation over a dose range of 9.0-12.0 Gy and medical management administered according to a standardized treatment protocol. The primary endpoint was all-cause mortality at 180 d. A comparative multiparameter analysis is provided, focusing on the lethal dose response relationship characterized by a lethal dose50/180 of 10.27 Gy [9.88, 10.66] and slope of 1.112 probits per linear dose. Latency, incidence, and severity of lung injury were evaluated through clinical and radiographic parameters including respiratory rate, saturation of peripheral oxygen, corticosteroid requirements, and serial computed tomography. Gross anatomical and histological analyses were performed to assess radiation-induced injury. The model defines the dose response relationship and time course of the delayed pulmonary sequelae and consequent morbidity and mortality. Therefore, it may provide

  7. Acute Radiation Risk and BRYNTRN Organ Dose Projection Graphical User Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Hu, Shaowen; Nounu, Hateni N.; Kim, Myung-Hee

    2011-01-01

    The integration of human space applications risk projection models of organ dose and acute radiation risk has been a key problem. NASA has developed an organ dose projection model using the BRYNTRN with SUM DOSE computer codes, and a probabilistic model of Acute Radiation Risk (ARR). The codes BRYNTRN and SUM DOSE are a Baryon transport code and an output data processing code, respectively. The risk projection models of organ doses and ARR take the output from BRYNTRN as an input to their calculations. With a graphical user interface (GUI) to handle input and output for BRYNTRN, the response models can be connected easily and correctly to BRYNTRN. A GUI for the ARR and BRYNTRN Organ Dose (ARRBOD) projection code provides seamless integration of input and output manipulations, which are required for operations of the ARRBOD modules. The ARRBOD GUI is intended for mission planners, radiation shield designers, space operations in the mission operations directorate (MOD), and space biophysics researchers. BRYNTRN code operation requires extensive input preparation. Only a graphical user interface (GUI) can handle input and output for BRYNTRN to the response models easily and correctly. The purpose of the GUI development for ARRBOD is to provide seamless integration of input and output manipulations for the operations of projection modules (BRYNTRN, SLMDOSE, and the ARR probabilistic response model) in assessing the acute risk and the organ doses of significant Solar Particle Events (SPEs). The assessment of astronauts radiation risk from SPE is in support of mission design and operational planning to manage radiation risks in future space missions. The ARRBOD GUI can identify the proper shielding solutions using the gender-specific organ dose assessments in order to avoid ARR symptoms, and to stay within the current NASA short-term dose limits. The quantified evaluation of ARR severities based on any given shielding configuration and a specified EVA or other mission

  8. Gaps in Drug Dosing for Obese Children: A Systematic Review of Commonly Prescribed Acute Care Medications

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Stevie; Siegel, David; Benjamin, Daniel K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Approximately 1 out of 6 children in the United States is obese. This has important implications for drug dosing and safety, as pharmacokinetic (PK) changes are known to occur in obesity due to altered body composition and physiology. Inappropriate drug dosing can limit therapeutic efficacy and increase drug-related toxicity for obese children. Few systematic reviews examining PK and drug dosing in obese children have been performed. Methods We identified 25 acute care drugs from the Strategic National Stockpile and Acute Care Supportive Drugs List and performed a systematic review for each drug in 3 study populations: obese children (2–18 years of age), normal weight children, and obese adults. For each study population, we first reviewed a drug’s Food and Drug Administration (FDA) label, followed by a systematic literature review. From the literature, we extracted drug PK data, biochemical properties, and dosing information. We then reviewed data in 3 age subpopulations (2–7 years, 8–12 years, and 13–18 years) for obese and normal weight children and by route of drug administration (intramuscular, intravenous, by mouth, and inhaled). If sufficient PK data were not available by age/route of administration, a data gap was identified. Findings Only 2/25 acute care drugs (8%) contained dosing information on the FDA label for each obese children and adults compared with 22/25 (88%) for normal weight children. We found no sufficient PK data in the literature for any of the acute care drugs in obese children. Sufficient PK data were found for 7/25 acute care drugs (28%) in normal weight children and 3/25 (12%) in obese adults. Implications Insufficient information exists to guide dosing in obese children for any of the acute care drugs reviewed. This knowledge gap is alarming, given the known PK changes that occur in the setting of obesity. Future clinical trials examining the PK of acute care medications in obese children should be prioritized. PMID

  9. Acute and repeated dose toxicity studies of different β-cyclodextrin-based nanosponge formulations.

    PubMed

    Shende, Pravin; Kulkarni, Yogesh A; Gaud, R S; Deshmukh, Kiran; Cavalli, Roberta; Trotta, Francesco; Caldera, Fabrizio

    2015-05-01

    Nanosponges (NS) show promising results in different fields such as medicine, agriculture, water purification, fire engineering and so on. The present study was designed to evaluate toxicity of different NS formulations (namely, S1-S6) synthesized with different cross-linking agents such as carbonyl diimidazole, pyromellitic dianhydride and hexamethylene diisocynate; and preparation methods in experimental animals. Acute and repeated dose toxicity studies of formulations were carried out as per OECD guidelines 423 and 407, respectively. For acute toxicity study, formulations were administered to female rats at doses of 300 and 2000 mg/kg orally. The general behaviour of the rats was continuously monitored for 1 h after dosing, periodically during the first 24 h and daily thereafter for a total of 14 days. On day 14, animals were fasted overnight, weighed, and sacrificed. After sacrification, animals were subjected to necropsy. For repeated dose toxicity study, rats of either sex were orally administered with formulations at the dose of 300 mg/kg per day for a period of 28 days. The maximally tolerated dose of all formulations was found to be 2000 mg/kg. Repeated administration of formulations for 28 days did not show any significant changes in haematological and biochemical parameters in experimental animals. These results indicate that the formulations are safe, when tested in experimental animals.

  10. Acute high-dose X-radiation-induced genomic changes in A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Muradyan, A; Gilbertz, K; Stabentheiner, S; Klause, S; Madle, H; Meineke, V; Ullmann, R; Scherthan, H

    2011-06-01

    Accidents with ionizing radiation often involve single, acute high-dose exposures that can lead to acute radiation syndrome and late effects such as carcinogenesis. To study such effects at the cellular level, we investigated acute ionizing radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations in A549 adenocarcinoma cells at the genome-wide level by exposing the cells to an acute dose of 6 Gy 240 kV X rays. One sham-irradiated clone and four surviving irradiated clones were recovered by minimal dilution and further expanded and analyzed by chromosome painting and tiling-path array CGH, with the nonirradiated clone 0 serving as the control. Acute X-ray exposure induced specific translocations and changes in modal chromosome number in the four irradiated clones. Array CGH disclosed unique and recurrent genomic changes, predominantly losses, and revealed that the fragile sites FRA3B and FRA16D were preferential regions of genomic alterations in all irradiated clones, which is likely related to radioresistant S-phase progression and genomic stress. Furthermore, clone 4 displayed an increased radiosensitivity at doses >5 Gy. Pairwise comparisons of the gene expression patterns of all irradiated clones to the sham-irradiated clone 0 revealed an enrichment of the Gene Ontology term "M Phase" (P = 6.2 × 10(-7)) in the set of differentially expressed genes of clone 4 but not in those of clones 1-3. Ionizing radiation-induced genomic changes and fragile site expression highlight the capacity of a single acute radiation exposure to affect the genome of exposed cells by inflicting genomic stress.

  11. Monitoring and Treatment of Acute Kidney Injury in Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia After High Dose Methotrexate Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cong-Ping

    2016-01-01

    To investigate acute kidney injury (AKI) in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who received high dose methotrexate (MTX) chemotherapy and explore the corresponding treatment. Methods 180 children who received high dose MTX chemotherapy were observed with serum MTX concentration and serum creatinine. Patients with AKI of stage 3 or poor response to conventional treatment were performed on hemodialysis and assessed the treatment outcome. Results 9 patients (5%) have appeared AKI, including 7 cases of AKI of stage 3. However, there were not any significant correlation between age, gender, serum MTX concentration and AKI, respectively. Compared with normal serum MTX concentration, the patients with high serum MTX concentration easily were developed to AKI, the MTX and serum creatinine concentration had been significantly decreased in 9 patients after hemodialysis. Conclusion AKI has appeared in some children with ALL who receive high dose MTX chemotherapy, and this may due to increase of serum MTX concentration. The monitoring of serum MTX concentration and AKI index could help to find out AKI, and even to prevent the occurrence of it. Furthermore, once AKI is present, those patients with AKI stage 3 or poor response to conventional treatment should be performed on hemodialysis treatment. PMID:28243295

  12. The Hematopoietic Syndrome of the Acute Radiation Syndrome in Rhesus Macaques: A Systematic Review of the Lethal Dose Response Relationship.

    PubMed

    MacVittie, Thomas J; Farese, Ann M; Jackson, William

    2015-11-01

    Well characterized animal models that mimic the human response to potentially lethal doses of radiation are required to assess the efficacy of medical countermeasures under the criteria of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration "animal rule." Development of a model requires the determination of the radiation dose response relationship and time course of mortality and morbidity across the hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome. The nonhuman primate, rhesus macaque, is a relevant animal model that may be used to determine the efficacy of medical countermeasures to mitigate major signs of morbidity and mortality at selected lethal doses of total body irradiation. A systematic review of relevant studies that determined the dose response relationship for the hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome in the rhesus macaque relative to radiation quality, dose rate, and exposure uniformity has never been performed. The selection of data cohorts was made from the following sources: Ovid Medline (1957-present), PubMed (1954-present), AGRICOLA (1976-present), Web of Science (1954-present), and U.S. HHS REPORT (2002 to present). The following terms were used: Rhesus, total body-irradiation, total body x irradiation, TBI, irradiation, gamma radiation, hematopoiesis, LD50/60, Macaca mulatta, whole-body irradiation, nonhuman primate, NHP, monkey, primates, hematopoietic radiation syndrome, mortality, and nuclear radiation. The reference lists of all studies, published and unpublished, were reviewed for additional studies. The total number of hits across all search sites was 3,001. There were a number of referenced, unpublished, non-peer reviewed government reports that were unavailable for review. Fifteen studies, 11 primary (n = 863) and four secondary (n = 153) studies [n = 1,016 total nonhuman primates (NHP), rhesus Macaca mulatta] were evaluated to provide an informative and consistent review. The dose response relationships (DRRs) were determined for uniform or non-uniform total

  13. [Renoprotective efficacy of different doses of statins in experimental acute renal failure].

    PubMed

    Zeleniuk, V H; Zamors'kyĭ, I I; Horoshko, O M

    2014-01-01

    The effect of three statins (atorvastatin, lovastatin, simvastatin) on the renal function under conditions of experimental acute renal failure in rats was studied. The relatively effective doses were found to possess the most considerable renoprotective properties. All the statins were established to cause the restoration of functional activity of the kidneys under conditions of experimental rhabdomyolytic acute renal failure at various doses, but with the dose of 20 mg/kg they showed the most significant improvement in key indices of kidney function: an increase in diuresis by an average of 32% and glomerular filtration rate by an average of 90%, reduction of proteinuria in more than twice. At the same time, in the animals with acute renal failure the level of creatine phosphokinase was increased by 141%. However, the activity of blood plasma creatine phosphokinase of all animals treated with statins was 14% higher than in the intact control, indicating the minor myotrphic activity of statins in selected mode of administration. Thus, the use of 20 mg/kg dose is the most reasonable from the standpoint of renoprotective efficacy and safety.

  14. Low-Dose Versus Standard-Dose Tissue Plasminogen Activator in Acute Ischemic Stroke in Asian Populations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Meng-Dong; Ning, Wei-Dong; Wang, Ren-Cong; Chen, Wei; Yang, Yang; Lin, Yan; Hu, Da-Hai; Lau, Wayne-Bond; Qu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Recent studies have investigated the most efficacious dose of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV-tPA) for acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients. There remains no definitive consensus concerning the superior efficacious IV-tPA dose (standard- vs. low-dose), prompting us to perform a meta-analysis comparing the efficacy and safety profile of standard- versus low-dose IV-tPA. We identified relevant studies pertaining to the specific aim of our meta-analysis by searching PubMed and EMBASE (January 1990–September 2015) Either a fixed- or random-effects model was employed (dependent upon data heterogeneity) to analyze the efficacy and safety outcome. Ten cohort studies involving 4389 sum patients were included in the meta-analysis. By using the random-effects model, the meta-analysis indicated no statistically significant difference in favorable functional outcome (modified Rankin scale 0–1) at 3 months (heterogeneity: χ2 = 17.45, P = 0.04, I2 = 48%; OR: 0.88 [95% CI: 0.71–1.11]; P = 0.28) and incidence of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (SICH) (heterogeneity: χ2 = 14.41, P = 0.11, I2 = 38%; OR: 1.19 [95% CI: 0.76 to 1.87]; P = 0.45) between the standard- and low-dose groups. The fixed-effects model demonstrated no significant difference in mortality within 3 months (heterogeneity: χ2 = 6.73, P = 0.57, I2 = 0%; OR: 0.91 [95% CI: 0.73–1.12]; P = 0.37) between the standard- and low-dose groups. Low-dose IV-tPA is comparable to standard-dose IV-tPA in both efficacy (favorable functional outcome) and safety (SICH and mortality). Confirmation of these findings through randomized trials is warranted. PMID:26717400

  15. [Effectiveness of various dopamine doses in acute myocardial ischemia complicated by cardiogenic shock (an experimental study)].

    PubMed

    Kipshidze, N N; Korotkov, A A; Marsagishvili, L A; Prigolashvili, T Sh; Bokhua, M R

    1981-06-01

    The effect of various doses of dopamine on the values of cardiac contractile and hemodynamic function under conditions of acute two-hour ischemia complicated by cardiogenic shock was studied in 27 experiments on dogs. In a dose of 5 microgram/kg/min dopamine caused an optimum increase in cardiac productive capacity, reduction of peripheral resistance, adequate increase in coronary circulation and decrease in ST segment depression on the ECG. Infusion of 10 microgram/kg/min dopamine usually caused myocardial hyperfunction with an increase in total peripheral resistance and cardiac performance. Maximum dopamine doses (10 microgram/kg/min and more) were effective in the areactive form of cardiogenic shock. In longterm dopamine infusion it is necessary to establish continuous control over the hemodynamic parameters and the ECG to prevent aggravation of ischemia and for stage-by-stage reduction of the drug concentration and determination of the minimum maintenance dose.

  16. Overview of Graphical User Interface for ARRBOD (Acute Radiation Risk and BRYNTRN Organ Dose Projection)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Hu, Shaowen; Nounu, Hatem; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    Solar particle events (SPEs) pose the risk of acute radiation sickness (ARS) to astronauts be-cause organ doses from large SPEs may reach critical levels during extra vehicular activities (EVAs) or lightly shielded spacecraft. NASA has developed an organ dose projection model of Baryon transport code (BRYNTRN) with an output data processing module of SUMDOSE, and a probabilistic model of acute radiation risk (ARR). BRYNTRN code operation requires extensive input preparation, and the risk projection models of organ doses and ARR take the output from BRYNTRN as an input to their calculations. With a graphical user interface (GUI) to handle input and output for BRYNTRN, these response models can be connected easily and correctly to BRYNTRN in a user-friendly way. The GUI for the Acute Radiation Risk and BRYNTRN Organ Dose (ARRBOD) projection code provides seamless integration of input and output manipulations required for operations of the ARRBOD modules: BRYNTRN, SUMDOSE, and the ARR probabilistic response model. The ARRBOD GUI is intended for mission planners, radiation shield designers, space operations in the mission operations direc-torate (MOD), and space biophysics researchers. Assessment of astronauts' organ doses and ARS from the exposure to historically large SPEs is in support of mission design and opera-tion planning to avoid ARS and stay within the current NASA short-term dose limits. The ARRBOD GUI will serve as a proof-of-concept for future integration of other risk projection models for human space applications. We present an overview of the ARRBOD GUI prod-uct, which is a new self-contained product, for the major components of the overall system, subsystem interconnections, and external interfaces.

  17. Overview of Graphical User Interface for ARRBOD (Acute Radiation Risk and BRYNTRN Organ Dose Projection)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Hu, Shaowen; Nounu, Hatem N.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2010-01-01

    Solar particle events (SPEs) pose the risk of acute radiation sickness (ARS) to astronauts, because organ doses from large SPEs may reach critical levels during extra vehicular activities (EVAs) or lightly shielded spacecraft. NASA has developed an organ dose projection model of Baryon transport code (BRYNTRN) with an output data processing module of SUMDOSE, and a probabilistic model of acute radiation risk (ARR). BRYNTRN code operation requires extensive input preparation, and the risk projection models of organ doses and ARR take the output from BRYNTRN as an input to their calculations. With a graphical user interface (GUI) to handle input and output for BRYNTRN, these response models can be connected easily and correctly to BRYNTRN in a user friendly way. The GUI for the Acute Radiation Risk and BRYNTRN Organ Dose (ARRBOD) projection code provides seamless integration of input and output manipulations required for operations of the ARRBOD modules: BRYNTRN, SUMDOSE, and the ARR probabilistic response model. The ARRBOD GUI is intended for mission planners, radiation shield designers, space operations in the mission operations directorate (MOD), and space biophysics researchers. Assessment of astronauts organ doses and ARS from the exposure to historically large SPEs is in support of mission design and operation planning to avoid ARS and stay within the current NASA short-term dose limits. The ARRBOD GUI will serve as a proof-of-concept for future integration of other risk projection models for human space applications. We present an overview of the ARRBOD GUI product, which is a new self-contained product, for the major components of the overall system, subsystem interconnections, and external interfaces.

  18. Acute toxicity effects of Prunus avium fruit extract and selection of optimum dose against radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Sisodia, Rashmi; Sharma, K; Singh, Smita

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the acute toxicity of different doses of the methanolic extract of the fruit pulp of Prunus avium (family Rosaceae), which is used ethno-medicinally for the treatment of various diseases, and to find out the optimal dose of Prunus avium extract against 10 Gy gamma-radiation exposure. To test acute toxicity in mice, different doses of PAE (Prunus avium fruit extract) were given orally for 15 consecutive days, after which the animals were observed for another 15 days; the LD50/15 of the methanolic extract was calculated to be 4.947 gm/kg body weight (b.wt). In optimum dose selection against radiation exposure, oral administration of 450 mg/kg b.wt/d of PAE for 15 consecutive days before exposure to 10 Gy of gamma-radiation was found to afford maximum protection in terms of body weight and survivability of the mice in comparison to other doses.

  19. Acute Dystonia Following a Switch in Treatment from Atomoxetine to Low-dose Aripiprazole

    PubMed Central

    Başay, Ömer; Basay, Burge Kabukcu; Öztürk, Önder; Yüncü, Zeki

    2016-01-01

    The present report describes the cases of a 17-year-old male patient and a 13-year-old female patient who developed acute dystonia following the administration of low-dose aripiprazole (5 mg/day) after the cessation of atomoxetine treatment. Although aripiprazole-induced dystonia has been previously reported in the literature, it is rare, and most of these cases were associated with doses higher than 5 mg/day. Furthermore, both of the patients in the present study discontinued atomoxetine prior to the initiation of aripiprazole treatment; thus, this report also discussed the possible mechanisms underlying the manifestation of dystonia from the perspective of neurotransmitter activity. PMID:27121436

  20. Normalized organ doses and effective doses to a reference Indian adult male in conventional medical diagnostic x-ray examinations.

    PubMed

    Biju, K; Nagarajan, P S

    2006-03-01

    This work discusses the dose computations of 80 kV diagnostic x-rays made on a mathematical phantom representing an average Indian adult, since it is felt that results based on MIRD adult phantom calculations are not strictly appropriate for the population in India. Normalized organ equivalent doses and effective doses for an Indian adult male have been estimated. Normalization is done with respect to the entrance skin dose of the patient. Twenty common diagnostic x-ray examinations have been considered in this study and the doses are presented. This study would enable estimation of radiation induced detriment to the patient subpopulation in India. Since the external dimensions of the phantom are nearly the same as that of 15-y-old NRPB pediatric phantom, our results are also compared with those of latter and the agreement was found to be satisfactory.

  1. Construction of hybrid Chinese reference adult phantoms and estimation of dose conversion coefficients for muons.

    PubMed

    Dong, Liang; Li, Taosheng; Liu, Chunyu

    2015-04-01

    A set of fluence-to-effective dose conversion coefficients of external exposure to muons were investigated for Chinese hybrid phantom references, which include both male and female. Both polygon meshes and Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline (NURBS) surfaces were used to descried the boundary of the organs and tissues in these phantoms. The 3D-DOCTOR and Rhinoceros software were used to polygonise the colour slice images and generate the NURBS surfaces, respectively. The voxelisation is completed using the BINVOX software and the assembly finished by using MATLAB codes. The voxel resolutions were selected to be 0.22 × 0.22 × 0.22 cm(3) and 0.2 × 0.2 × 0.2 cm(3) for male and female phantoms, respectively. All parts of the final phantoms were matched to their reference organ masses within a tolerance of ±5%. The conversion coefficients for negative and positive muons were calculated with the FLUKA transport code. There were 21 external monoenergetic beams ranging from 0.01 GeV to 100 TeV in 5 different geometrical conditions of irradiation.

  2. Research design considerations for single-dose analgesic clinical trials in acute pain: IMMPACT recommendations.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Stephen A; Desjardins, Paul J; Turk, Dennis C; Dworkin, Robert H; Katz, Nathaniel P; Kehlet, Henrik; Ballantyne, Jane C; Burke, Laurie B; Carragee, Eugene; Cowan, Penney; Croll, Scott; Dionne, Raymond A; Farrar, John T; Gilron, Ian; Gordon, Debra B; Iyengar, Smriti; Jay, Gary W; Kalso, Eija A; Kerns, Robert D; McDermott, Michael P; Raja, Srinivasa N; Rappaport, Bob A; Rauschkolb, Christine; Royal, Mike A; Segerdahl, Märta; Stauffer, Joseph W; Todd, Knox H; Vanhove, Geertrui F; Wallace, Mark S; West, Christine; White, Richard E; Wu, Christopher

    2016-02-01

    This article summarizes the results of a meeting convened by the Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials (IMMPACT) on key considerations and best practices governing the design of acute pain clinical trials. We discuss the role of early phase clinical trials, including pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) trials, and the value of including both placebo and active standards of comparison in acute pain trials. This article focuses on single-dose and short-duration trials with emphasis on the perioperative and study design factors that influence assay sensitivity. Recommendations are presented on assessment measures, study designs, and operational factors. Although most of the methodological advances have come from studies of postoperative pain after dental impaction, bunionectomy, and other surgeries, the design considerations discussed are applicable to many other acute pain studies conducted in different settings.

  3. Acute and chronic bioeffects of single and multiple doses of piezoelectric shockwaves (EDAP LT.01).

    PubMed

    Ryan, P C; Jones, B J; Kay, E W; Nowlan, P; Kiely, E A; Gaffney, E F; Butler, M R

    1991-02-01

    Piezoelectric second generation lithotriptors are an established means of administering extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) enabling treatment to be performed without anaesthesia or analgesia, but higher shockwave doses and multiple or staged treatment are frequently required. The bioeffects of this modality of ESWL, therefore, require further assessment. Seven experimental groups of adult male rabbits were treated using the EDAP LT.01 in order to determine the acute and chronic bioeffects of clinical dose, excess dose, divided excess dose, high frequency and multiple treatment (X10) piezoelectric shockwaves (PSW). Renal function was measured before and after treatment using mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG 3) scans. Gross and histological morphological changes were assessed at one and 30 days following application of PSW. Application of single clinical dose PSW was not associated with any significant functional or morphological renal injury. Excess dose PSW caused transient gross renal contusion, which resolved in the majority of animals with no persistent microscopic abnormality. Divided excess dose PSW resulted in no gross or microscopic damage. High frequency PSW was associated with mild histological abnormality. Multiple PSW treatments caused small discrete fibrotic lesions in all cases, without any change in renal function.

  4. Outcomes for newly diagnosed patients with acute myeloid leukemia dosed on actual or adjusted body weight

    PubMed Central

    Bivona, Cory; Rockey, Michelle; Henry, Dave; Grauer, Dennis; Abhyankar, Sunil; Aljitawi, Omar; Ganguly, Siddhartha; McGuirk, Joseph; Singh, Anurag; Lin, Tara L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Data from solid tumor malignancies suggest that actual body weight (ABW) dosing improves overall outcomes. There is the potential to compromise efficacy when chemotherapy dosages are reduced, but the impact of dose adjustment on clinical response and toxicity in hematologic malignancies is unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of utilizing a percent of ABW for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) induction chemotherapy dosing. Methods This retrospective, single-center study included 146 patients who received 7 + 3 induction (cytarabine and anthracycline) for treatment of AML. Study design evaluated the relationship between percentage of ABW dosing and complete response (CR) rates in patients newly diagnosed with AML. Results Percentage of ABW dosing did not influence CR rates in patients undergoing induction chemotherapy for AML (p = 0.83); nor did it influence rate of death at 30 days or relapse at 6 months (p = 0.94). When comparing patients dosed at 90–100 % of ABW compared to <90 % ABW, CR rates were not significantly different in patients classified as poor risk (p = 0.907). All favorable risk category patients obtained CR. Conclusions Preemptive dose reductions for obesity did not influence CR rates for patients with AML undergoing induction chemotherapy and did not influence the composite endpoint of death at 30 days or disease relapse at 6 months. PMID:26231954

  5. Dose estimation for astronauts using dose conversion coefficients calculated with the PHITS code and the ICRP/ICRU adult reference computational phantoms.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tatsuhiko; Endo, Akira; Sihver, Lembit; Niita, Koji

    2011-03-01

    Absorbed-dose and dose-equivalent rates for astronauts were estimated by multiplying fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients in the units of Gy.cm(2) and Sv.cm(2), respectively, and cosmic-ray fluxes around spacecrafts in the unit of cm(-2) s(-1). The dose conversion coefficients employed in the calculation were evaluated using the general-purpose particle and heavy ion transport code system PHITS coupled to the male and female adult reference computational phantoms, which were released as a common ICRP/ICRU publication. The cosmic-ray fluxes inside and near to spacecrafts were also calculated by PHITS, using simplified geometries. The accuracy of the obtained absorbed-dose and dose-equivalent rates was verified by various experimental data measured both inside and outside spacecrafts. The calculations quantitatively show that the effective doses for astronauts are significantly greater than their corresponding effective dose equivalents, because of the numerical incompatibility between the radiation quality factors and the radiation weighting factors. These results demonstrate the usefulness of dose conversion coefficients in space dosimetry.

  6. Perchlorate exposure from infant formula and comparisons with the perchlorate reference dose.

    PubMed

    Schier, Joshua G; Wolkin, Amy F; Valentin-Blasini, Lisa; Belson, Martin G; Kieszak, Stephanie M; Rubin, Carol S; Blount, Benjamin C

    2010-05-01

    Perchlorate exposure may be higher in infants compared with older persons, due to diet (infant formula) and body weight versus intake considerations. Our primary objective was to quantitatively assess perchlorate concentrations in commercially available powdered infant formulas (PIFs). Secondary objectives were: (1) to estimate exposure in infants under different dosing scenarios and compare them with the perchlorate reference dose (RfD); (2) estimate the perchlorate concentration in water used for preparing PIFs that would result in a dose exceeding the RfD; and (3) estimate iodine intakes from PIFs. We quantified perchlorate levels in three samples (different lot numbers) of reconstituted PIF (using perchlorate-free water) from commercial brands of PIF in each of the following categories: bovine milk-based with lactose, soy-based, bovine milk-based but lactose-free, and elemental (typically consisting of synthetic amino acids). Exposure modeling was conducted to determine whether the RfD might be exceeded in 48 dosing scenarios that were dependent on age, centile energy intake per unit of body weight, body weight percentile, and PIF perchlorate concentration. We obtained three different samples in each of the five brands of bovine- and soy-based PIF, three different samples in each of the three brands of lactose-free PIF, and three different samples in two brands of elemental PIF. The results were as follows: bovine milk-based with lactose (1.72 microg/l, range: 0.68-5.05); soy-based (0.21 microg/l, range: 0.10-0.44); lactose-free (0.27 microg/l, range: 0.03-0.93); and elemental (0.18 microg/l, range: 0.08-0.4). Bovine milk-based PIFs with lactose had a significantly higher concentration of perchlorate (P<0.05) compared with all. Perchlorate was a contaminant of all commercially available PIFs tested. Bovine milk-based PIFs with lactose had a significantly higher perchlorate concentration perchlorate than soy, lactose-free, and elemental PIFs. The perchlorate Rf

  7. Diagnostic Performance on Low Dose Computed Tomography For Acute Appendicitis Among Attending and Resident Radiologists

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chih-Chen; Wong, Yon-Cheong; Wu, Cheng-Hsien; Chen, Huan-Wu; Wang, Li-Jen; Lee, Yu-Hsien; Wu, Patricia Wanping; Irama, Wiwan; Chen, Wei Yuan; Chang, Chee-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Background Low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) techniques can reduce exposure to radiation. Several previous studies have shown that radiation dose reduction in LDCT does not decrease the diagnostic performance for appendicitis among attending radiologists. But, the LDCT diagnostic performance for acute appendicitis in radiology residents with variable training levels has not been well discussed. Objectives To compare inter-observer and intra-observer differences of diagnostic performance on non-enhanced LDCT (NE-LDCT) and contrast-enhanced standard dose CT (CE-SDCT) for acute appendicitis among attending and resident radiologists. Patients and Methods This retrospective study included 101 patients with suspected acute appendicitis who underwent NE-LDCT and CE-SDCT. The CT examinations were interpreted and recorded on a five-point scale independently by three attending radiologists and three residents with 4, 1 and 1 years of training. Diagnostic performance for acute appendicitis of all readers on both examinations was represented by area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Inter-observer and intra-observer AUC values were compared using Jackknife FROC software on both modalities. The diagnostic accuracy of each reader on NE-LDCT was compared with body mass index (BMI) subgroups and noise using independent T test. Results Diagnostic performances for acute appendicitis were not statistically different for attending radiologists at both examinations. Better performance was noted on the CE-SDCT with a borderline significant difference (P = 0.05) for senior radiology resident. No statistical difference of AUC values was observed between attending radiologists and fourth year resident on both examinations. Statistically significant differences of AUC values were observed between attending radiologists and first year residents (P = 0.001 ~ 0.018) on NE-LDCT. Diagnostic accuracies of acute appendicitis on NE-LDCT for each reader were not significantly

  8. Antibiotic Dosing in Patients With Acute Kidney Injury: "Enough But Not Too Much".

    PubMed

    Lewis, Susan J; Mueller, Bruce A

    2016-03-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that antibiotic dosing in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) often does not achieve pharmacodynamic goals, and the continued high mortality rate due to infectious causes appears to confirm these findings. Although there are compelling reasons why clinicians should use more aggressive antibiotic dosing, particularly in patients receiving aggressive renal replacement therapies, concerns for toxicity associated with higher doses are real. The presence of multisystem organ failure and polypharmacy predispose these patients to drug toxicity. This article examines the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic consequences of critical illness, AKI, and renal replacement therapy and describes potential solutions to help clinicians give "enough but not too much" in these very complicated patients.

  9. High-dose radiation-induced meningiomas following acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children.

    PubMed

    Salvati, M; Cervoni, L; Artico, M

    1996-05-01

    The authors review three personal cases of patients who developed cerebral meningiomas following high-dose radiotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Two patients were female and one male. Their ages when the leukemia appeared were between 11 and 15 years. All patients were treated with a course of prophylactic irradiation to the neuraxis for a total dose of 24 Gy. After an average interval of 10.4 years, all three patients presented a meningioma; histologically, one was meningothelial and two were fibrous. All three meningiomas presented atypical features. At follow-up 1, 4, and 4 years respectively after surgery, none of these patients presents neurological deficits or neuroradiological signs of recurrence. Forty-nine cases of high-dose radiation-induced meningioma are also reviewed.

  10. Acceleration of atherogenesis in ApoE−/− mice exposed to acute or low-dose-rate ionizing radiation

    PubMed Central

    Mancuso, Mariateresa; Pasquali, Emanuela; Braga-Tanaka, Ignacia; Tanaka, Satoshi; Pannicelli, Alessandro; Giardullo, Paola; Pazzaglia, Simonetta; Tapio, Soile; Atkinson, Michael J.; Saran, Anna

    2015-01-01

    There is epidemiological evidence for increased non-cancer mortality, primarily due to circulatory diseases after radiation exposure above 0.5 Sv. We evaluated the effects of chronic low-dose rate versus acute exposures in a murine model of spontaneous atherogenesis. Female ApoE−/− mice (60 days) were chronically irradiated for 300 days with gamma rays at two different dose rates (1 mGy/day; 20 mGy/day), with total accumulated doses of 0.3 or 6 Gy. For comparison, age-matched ApoE−/− females were acutely exposed to the same doses and sacrificed 300 days post-irradiation. Mice acutely exposed to 0.3 or 6 Gy showed increased atherogenesis compared to age-matched controls, and this effect was persistent. When the same doses were delivered at low dose rate over 300 days, we again observed a significant impact on global development of atherosclerosis, although at 0.3 Gy effects were limited to the descending thoracic aorta. Our data suggest that a moderate dose of 0.3 Gy can have persistent detrimental effects on the cardiovascular system, and that a high dose of 6 Gy poses high risks at both high and low dose rates. Our results were clearly nonlinear with dose, suggesting that lower doses may be more damaging than predicted by a linear dose response. PMID:26359350

  11. Quantitative Evaluation of Acute Renal Transplant Dysfunction with Low-Dose Three-dimensional MR Renography

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jeff L.; Rusinek, Henry; Chandarana, Hersh; Vivier, Pierre-Hugues; Babb, James S.; Diflo, Thomas; John, Devon G.; Benstein, Judith A.; Barisoni, Laura; Stoffel, David R.; Lee, Vivian S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To assess prospectively the ability of quantitative low-dose three-dimensional magnetic resonance (MR) renography to help identify the cause of acute graft dysfunction. Materials and Methods: This HIPAA-compliant study was approved by the institutional review board, and written informed consent was obtained. Between December 2001 and May 2009, sixty patients with transplanted kidneys (41 men and 19 women; mean age, 49 years; age range, 22–71 years) were included. Thirty-one patients had normal function and 29 had acute dysfunction due to acute rejection (n = 12), acute tubular necrosis (ATN) (n = 8), chronic rejection (n = 6), or drug toxicity (n = 3). MR renography was performed at 1.5 T with three-dimensional gradient-echo imaging. With use of a multicompartment renal model, the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and the mean transit time (MTT) of the tracer for the vascular compartment (MTTA), the tubular compartment (MTTT), and the collecting system compartment (MTTC) were calculated. Also derived was MTT for the whole kidney (MTTK = MTTA + MTTT + MTTC) and fractional MTT of each compartment (MTTA/K = MTTA/MTTK, MTTT/K = MTTT/MTTK, MTTC/K = MTTC/MTTK). These parameters were compared in patients in the different study groups. Statistical analysis was performed by using analysis of covariance. Results: There were significant differences in GFR and MTTK between the acute dysfunction group (36.4 mL/min ± 20.8 [standard deviation] and 177.1 seconds ± 46.8, respectively) and the normal function group (65.9 mL/min ± 27.6 and 140.5 seconds ± 51.8, respectively) (P < .001 and P = .004). The MTTA/K was significantly higher in the acute rejection group (mean, 12.7% ± 2.9) than in the normal function group (mean, 8.3% ± 2.2; P < .001) or in the ATN group (mean, 7.1% ± 1.4; P < .001). The MTTT/K was significantly higher in the ATN group (mean, 83.2% ± 9.2) than in the normal function group (mean, 72.4% ± 10.2; P = .031) or in the acute rejection group

  12. Development of a Reference Dose for Perchlorate: Current Issues and Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pleus, R. C.; Goodman, G.; Mattie, D. R.

    2000-01-01

    The perchlorate anion (ClO4) is typically manufactured as the ammonium salt. The most common use of ammonium perchlorate is in the aerospace program as a component of solid rocket fuel. The perchlorate anion is exceedingly stable under environmental conditions and has been found in ground and surface waters in CA, NV, UT, AZ, TX, AK, NY, MD, WV and FL. The National Center for Environmental Assessment (NCEA) of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) is in the process of developing an oral reference dose (RfD) for perchlorate. An oral RfD is a body-weight-adjusted dose that can be consumed daily over an entire lifetime with the expectation of no adverse health effects. Once developed, the new RfD will be used by US EPA as the basis of a safe-drinking-water level (SDWL) guideline. US EPA and regional regulatory agencies will then jointly or separately propose clean-up action levels for ground and surface waters at contaminated sites. The toxicological database on CIO4- as of March 1997 was determined by an expert peer-review panel to be inadequate for the purpose of deriving an oral RfD. For example, little or no experimental data existed on the subchronic, reproductive, or developmental toxicity of perchlorate. To fill gaps in the toxicological database, eight animal studies were designed by a government-industry consortium that included US EPA and AFRL. These studies were performed in 1997-1998. It has been known for many years that in the thyroid, high doses of perchlorate block the function of iodide by competing for iodide binding sites. Perchlorate was used in the 1950s-60s as a treatment for Graves' disease (a hyperthyroid condition). Because of what was already known about the pharmacological mode of action of perchlorate, specific concerns addressed in the design of the recent animal studies included the potential for developmental toxicity, notably neurological development. Upon review of complete study reports from four of the studies and

  13. Development of Graphical User Interface for ARRBOD (Acute Radiation Risk and BRYNTRN Organ Dose Projection)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee; Hu, Shaowen; Nounu, Hatem N.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2010-01-01

    The space radiation environment, particularly solar particle events (SPEs), poses the risk of acute radiation sickness (ARS) to humans; and organ doses from SPE exposure may reach critical levels during extra vehicular activities (EVAs) or within lightly shielded spacecraft. NASA has developed an organ dose projection model using the BRYNTRN with SUMDOSE computer codes, and a probabilistic model of Acute Radiation Risk (ARR). The codes BRYNTRN and SUMDOSE, written in FORTRAN, are a Baryon transport code and an output data processing code, respectively. The ARR code is written in C. The risk projection models of organ doses and ARR take the output from BRYNTRN as an input to their calculations. BRYNTRN code operation requires extensive input preparation. With a graphical user interface (GUI) to handle input and output for BRYNTRN, the response models can be connected easily and correctly to BRYNTRN in friendly way. A GUI for the Acute Radiation Risk and BRYNTRN Organ Dose (ARRBOD) projection code provides seamless integration of input and output manipulations, which are required for operations of the ARRBOD modules: BRYNTRN, SUMDOSE, and the ARR probabilistic response model. The ARRBOD GUI is intended for mission planners, radiation shield designers, space operations in the mission operations directorate (MOD), and space biophysics researchers. The ARRBOD GUI will serve as a proof-of-concept example for future integration of other human space applications risk projection models. The current version of the ARRBOD GUI is a new self-contained product and will have follow-on versions, as options are added: 1) human geometries of MAX/FAX in addition to CAM/CAF; 2) shielding distributions for spacecraft, Mars surface and atmosphere; 3) various space environmental and biophysical models; and 4) other response models to be connected to the BRYNTRN. The major components of the overall system, the subsystem interconnections, and external interfaces are described in this

  14. Variability of Antithrombotic Dosing Among Veterans Presenting With Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Plomondon, Mary E.; Lambert‐Kerzner, Anne C.; Jennewein, Xuefei; Fagan, Katherine; McCreight, Marina; Fehling, Kelty B.; Tsai, Thomas T.; Ho, P. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Antithrombotic therapy for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients is recommended by clinical practice guidelines. Appropriate dosing of antithrombotic therapy is necessary to ensure effectiveness and safety and is an American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association ST elevated myocardial infarction/non‐ST elevated myocardial infarction performance measure. This study describes the variability in dosing of unfractionated heparin (UH) and low‐molecular‐weight heparin (LMWH) in an integrated health care system with electronic medical records and computerized physician order entry (CPOE). Methods and Results This was a mixed‐methods study of veterans presenting with ACS at 135 Veterans Health Administration hospitals from 2009 to 2011. Patients hospitalized with ACS and received antithrombotic therapy were included (n=36 682). The cohort was 98% male with an average age of 66 years and median body mass index (BMI) of 28.6. The average percentage of patients by hospital who received an above‐recommended dose of either antithrombotic was 7.5% and ranged 0% to 32.0%. By individual therapy, the average percentage of patients by hospital who received an above‐recommended dose of UH was 1.2% and LMWH was 12.9%. Risk‐adjusted analyses demonstrated that older age and higher BMI were associated with lower risk for receiving a dose above recommended levels. Additionally, there was an association between antithrombotic ordered by a resident and higher risk of the patient receiving an above‐recommended dose. Qualitative interviews supported the quantitative findings by highlighting the need to use current patient weight and the need to adequately train providers on the use of CPOE to improve antithrombotic dosing. Conclusion This study found wide hospital variability in dosing of antithrombotics above the recommended level for patients treated for ACS. PMID:25917444

  15. Acute Low-Dose Caffeine Supplementation Increases Electromyographic Fatigue Threshold in Healthy Men.

    PubMed

    Morse, Jacob J; Pallaska, Gramos; Pierce, Patrick R; Fields, Travis M; Galen, Sujay S; Malek, Moh H

    2016-11-01

    Morse, JJ, Pallaska, G, Pierce, PR, Fields, TM, Galen, SS, and Malek, MH. Acute low-dose caffeine supplementation increases electromyographic fatigue threshold in healthy men. J Strength Cond Res 30(11): 3236-3241, 2016-The purpose of this study is to determine whether consumption of a single low-dose caffeine drink will delay the onset of the electromyographic fatigue threshold (EMGFT) in the superficial quadriceps femoris muscles. We hypothesize that the EMGFT values for the caffeine condition will be significantly higher than the EMGFT values for the placebo condition. On separate occasions, 10 physically active men performed incremental single-leg knee-extensor ergometry 1 hour after caffeine (200 mg) or placebo consumption. The EMGFT was determined for each participant for both conditions. The results indicated a significant increase for maximal power output (16%; p = 0.004) and EMGFT (45%; p = 0.004) in the caffeine condition compared with placebo. These findings suggest that acute low-dose caffeine supplementation delays neuromuscular fatigue in the quadriceps femoris muscles.

  16. Low-dose radiation modifies skin response to acute gamma-rays and protons.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiao Wen; Pecaut, Michael J; Cao, Jeffrey D; Moldovan, Maria; Gridley, Daila S

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to obtain pilot data on the effects of protracted low-dose/low-dose-rate (LDR) γ-rays on the skin, both with and without acute gamma or proton irradiation (IR). Six groups of C57BL/6 mice were examined: a) 0 Gy control, b) LDR, c) Gamma, d) LDR+Gamma, e) Proton, and f) LDR+Proton. LDR radiation was delivered to a total dose of 0.01 Gy (0.03 cGy/h), whereas the Gamma and Proton groups received 2 Gy (0.9 Gy/min and 1.0 Gy/min, respectively). Assays were performed 56 days after exposure. Skin samples from all irradiated groups had activated caspase-3, indicative of apoptosis. The significant (p<0.05) increases in immunoreactivity in the Gamma and Proton groups were not present when LDR pre-exposure was included. However, the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling assay for DNA fragmentation and histological examination of hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections revealed no significant differences among groups, regardless of radiation regimen. The data demonstrate that caspase-3 activation initially triggered by both forms of acute radiation was greatly elevated in the skin nearly two months after whole-body exposure. In addition, LDR γ-ray priming ameliorated this response.

  17. The acute lethal dose 50 (LD50) of caffeine in albino rats.

    PubMed

    Adamson, Richard H

    2016-10-01

    An acute LD50 is a statistically derived amount of a substance that can be expected to cause death in 50% of the animals when given by a specified route as a single dose and the animals observed for a specified time period. Although conducting routine acute toxicity testing in rodents has been criticized, it can serve useful functions and also have practical implications. Material safety data sheets (MSDS) will reflect the acute toxicity of a substance and may require workers to wear protective gear, if appropriate, based on the LD50. There is no information in the scientific published literature which calculates a mean LD50 and standard deviation for caffeine administered orally to rats, using studies performed under good laboratory practice (GLP) or equivalent. This report does that and should be useful to manufacturers, packagers, transporters and regulators of this material. Using data from studies that are reproducible and reliable, the most accurate estimate of the acute LD50 of caffeine administered orally in male albino rats is hereby reported to be 367/mg/kg.

  18. Can the use of low-dose dopamine for treatment of acute renal failure be justified?

    PubMed

    Burton, C J; Tomson, C R

    1999-05-01

    The use of dopamine for the prevention and treatment of acute renal failure is widespread. Its use is based on physiology suggesting selective renal vasodilation when it is infused at low dose. This article reviews the available data on the clinical use of dopamine. When used to prevent acute renal failure in high-risk treatments there is no evidence of benefit of dopamine but, given the low incidence of significant renal failure, the studies are underpowered. In treatment of acute renal failure, the quality of the data is poor. Only in one small randomised trial of moderate acute renal failure in patients with malaria was a clinically significant benefit of dopamine shown. The rest of the data, in the form of case series, showed either no benefit of dopamine or small benefits of little clinical significance. Again, these studies are of insufficient power for conclusions to be drawn as to the overall benefits and risks. We conclude that benefits of dopamine use cannot be ruled out by currently available data but its use cannot be advised until trials examining clinically important endpoints in large numbers of patients have been performed.

  19. TLD skin dose measurements and acute and late effects after lumpectomy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy only for early breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, Francisco . E-mail: francisco.perera@lrcc.on.ca; Chisela, Frank; Stitt, Larry; Engel, Jay; Venkatesan, Varagur

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: This report examines the relationships between measured skin doses and the acute and late skin and soft tissue changes in a pilot study of lumpectomy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy only for breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Thirty-seven of 39 women enrolled in this pilot study of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (37.2 Gy in 10 fractions b.i.d.) each had thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) at 5 points on the skin of the breast overlying the implant volume. Skin changes at TLD dose points and fibrosis at the lumpectomy site were documented every 6 to 12 months posttreatment using a standardized physician-rated cosmesis questionnaire. The relationships between TLD dose and acute skin reaction, pigmentation, or telangiectasia at 5 years were analyzed using the GEE algorithm and the GENMOD procedure in the SAS statistical package. Fisher's exact test was used to determine whether there were any significant associations between acute skin reaction and late pigmentation or telangiectasia or between the volumes encompassed by various isodoses and fibrosis or fat necrosis. Results: The median TLD dose per fraction (185 dose points) multiplied by 10 was 9.2 Gy. In all 37 patients, acute skin reaction Grade 1 or higher was observed at 5.9% (6 of 102) of dose points receiving 10 Gy or less vs. 44.6% (37 of 83) of dose points receiving more than 10 Gy (p < 0.0001). In 25 patients at 60 months, 1.5% telangiectasia was seen at dose points receiving 10 Gy or less (1 of 69) vs. 18% (10 of 56) telangiectasia at dose points receiving more than 10 Gy (p 0.004). Grade 1 or more pigmentation developed at 1.5% (1 of 69) of dose points receiving less than 10 Gy vs. 25% (14 of 56) of dose points receiving more than 10 Gy (p < 0.001). A Grade 1 or more acute skin reaction was also significantly associated with development of Grade 1 or more pigmentation or telangiectasia at 60 months. This association was most significant for acute reaction and telangiectasia directly over the

  20. Th Cell Gene Expression and Function in Response to Low Dose and Acute Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Daila S. Gridley, PhD

    2012-03-30

    FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT Supported by the Low Dose Radiation Research Program, Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64345 Project ID: 0012965 Award Register#: ER64345 Project Manager: Noelle F. Metting, Sc.D. Phone: 301-903-8309 Division SC-23.2 noelle.metting@science.doe.gov Submitted March 2012 To: https://www.osti.gov/elink/241.3.jsp Title: Th Cell Gene Expression and Function in Response to Low Dose and Acute Radiation PI: Daila S. Gridley, Ph.D. Human low dose radiation data have been derived primarily from studies of space and airline flight personnel, nuclear plant workers and others exposed occupationally, as well as victims in the vicinity of atomic bomb explosions. The findings remain inconclusive due to population inconsistencies and complex interactions among total dose, dose rate, radiation quality and age at exposure. Thus, safe limits for low dose occupational irradiation are currently based on data obtained with doses far exceeding the levels expected for the general population and health risks have been largely extrapolated using the linear-nonthreshold dose-response model. The overall working hypothesis of the present study is that priming with low dose, low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation can ameliorate the response to acute high-dose radiation exposure. We also propose that the efficacy of low-dose induced protection will be dependent upon the form and regimen of the high-dose exposure: photons versus protons versus simulated solar particle event protons (sSPE). The emphasis has been on gene expression and function of CD4+ T helper (Th) lymphocytes harvested from spleens of whole-body irradiated C57BL/6 mice, a strain that provides the genetic background for many genetically engineered strains. Evaluations of the responses of other selected cells, tissues such as skin, and organs such as lung, liver and brain were also initiated (partially funded by other sources). The long-term goal is to provide information

  1. [High-dose radiation-induced meningioma following prophylactic cranial irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia].

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Ryosuke; Nikaido, Yuji; Yamada, Tomonori; Mishima, Hideaki; Tamaki, Ryo

    2005-03-01

    A 12 year-old girl was treated with prophylatic cranial irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). At the age of 39, she was admitted to our hospital for status epilepticus. Computed tomography demonstrated two, enhancing bilateral sided intracranial tumors. After surgery, this patient presented meningiomas which histologically, were of the meningothelial type. The high cure rate in childhood ALL, attributable to aggressive chemotherapy and prophylatic cranial irradiation, is capable of inducing secondary brain tumor. Twelve cases of high-dose radiation-induced meningioma following ALL are also reviewed.

  2. Basis of the Massachusetts Reference Dose and Drinking Water Standard for Perchlorate

    PubMed Central

    Zewdie, Tsedash; Smith, C. Mark; Hutcheson, Michael; West, Carol Rowan

    2010-01-01

    Objective Perchlorate inhibits the uptake of iodide in the thyroid. Iodide is required to synthesize hormones critical to fetal and neonatal development. Many water supplies and foods are contaminated with perchlorate. Exposure standards are needed but controversial. Here we summarize the basis of the Massachusetts (MA) perchlorate reference dose (RfD) and drinking water standard (DWS), which are considerably lower and more health protective than related values derived by several other agencies. We also review information regarding perchlorate risk assessment and policy. Data sources MA Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) scientists, with input from a science advisory committee, assessed a wide range of perchlorate risk and exposure information. Health outcomes associated with iodine insufficiency were considered, as were data on perchlorate in drinking water disinfectants. Data synthesis We used a weight-of-the-evidence approach to evaluate perchlorate risks, paying particular attention to sensitive life stages. A health protective RfD (0.07 μg/kg/day) was derived using an uncertainty factor approach with perchlorate-induced iodide uptake inhibition as the point of departure. The MA DWS (2 μg/L) was based on risk management decisions weighing information on perchlorate health risks and its presence in certain disinfectant solutions used to treat drinking water for pathogens. Conclusions Current data indicate that perchlorate exposures attributable to drinking water in individuals at sensitive life stages should be minimized and support the MA DEP perchlorate RfD and DWS. Widespread exposure to perchlorate and other thyroid toxicants in drinking water and foods suggests that more comprehensive policies to reduce overall exposures and enhance iodine nutrition are needed. PMID:20056583

  3. Organ doses, effective doses, and risk indices in adult CT: Comparison of four types of reference phantoms across different examination protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yakun; Li Xiang; Paul Segars, W.; Samei, Ehsan

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: Radiation exposure from computed tomography (CT) to the public has increased the concern among radiation protection professionals. Being able to accurately assess the radiation dose patients receive during CT procedures is a crucial step in the management of CT dose. Currently, various computational anthropomorphic phantoms are used to assess radiation dose by different research groups. It is desirable to better understand how the dose results are affected by different choices of phantoms. In this study, the authors assessed the uncertainties in CT dose and risk estimation associated with different types of computational phantoms for a selected group of representative CT protocols. Methods: Routinely used CT examinations were categorized into ten body and three neurological examination categories. Organ doses, effective doses, risk indices, and conversion coefficients to effective dose and risk index (k and q factors, respectively) were estimated for these examinations for a clinical CT system (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare). Four methods were used, each employing a different type of reference phantoms. The first and second methods employed a Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated in our laboratory. In the first method, the reference male and female extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantoms were used, which were initially created from the Visible Human data and later adjusted to match organ masses defined in ICRP publication 89. In the second method, the reference male and female phantoms described in ICRP publication 110 were used, which were initially developed from tomographic data of two patients and later modified to match ICRP 89 organ masses. The third method employed a commercial dosimetry spreadsheet (ImPACT group, London, England) with its own hermaphrodite stylized phantom. In the fourth method, another widely used dosimetry spreadsheet (CT-Expo, Medizinische Hochschule, Hannover, Germany) was employed together with its associated

  4. [The comparison between dose rates at the interventional reference point of the angiography systems in many facilities].

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Tooru; Imada, Naoyuki; Yamashita, Yukari; Asou, Hiroya; Matsumoto, Yoriaki; Inada, Satoshi; Okino, Mizuho; Nonaka, Haruki; Mizutani, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    The management of the radiation dose is very important in interventional radiology (IVR), especially in percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Therefore, we measured entrance surface doses at the interventional reference point of 27 cardiac intervention procedures in 22 cardiac catheterization laboratories around Hiroshima, and compared these doses. Recently, for cardiac interventional radiology, the X-ray machines using flat-panel detectors (FPD) instead of image intensifiers (I.I.) is increasing; 13 systems used FPD and 14 systems used I.I. For fluoroscopy rate, the difference between laboratories was 9 times. For cineangiography rate, the difference between laboratories was 7 times. In addition, between both devices, the I.I. group is bigger than the FPD group. When comparing by the same condition, for the dose at the interventional reference point, no significant difference was detected between the FPD group and the I.I. group. This study shows that FPD is not available for reducing the radiation dose simply. Therefore, it is necessary that we think of the balance with image quality and radiation dose. The optimization of the devices and cardiac intervention procedures becomes very important.

  5. Gene expression-based dosimetry by dose and time in mice following acute radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Tucker, James D; Divine, George W; Grever, William E; Thomas, Robert A; Joiner, Michael C; Smolinski, Joseph M; Auner, Gregory W

    2013-01-01

    Rapid and reliable methods for performing biological dosimetry are of paramount importance in the event of a large-scale nuclear event. Traditional dosimetry approaches lack the requisite rapid assessment capability, ease of use, portability and low cost, which are factors needed for triaging a large number of victims. Here we describe the results of experiments in which mice were acutely exposed to (60)Co gamma rays at doses of 0 (control) to 10 Gy. Blood was obtained from irradiated mice 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7 days after exposure. mRNA expression levels of 106 selected genes were obtained by reverse-transcription real time PCR. Stepwise regression of dose received against individual gene transcript expression levels provided optimal dosimetry at each time point. The results indicate that only 4-7 different gene transcripts are needed to explain ≥ 0.69 of the variance (R(2)), and that receiver-operator characteristics, a measure of sensitivity and specificity, of ≥ 0.93 for these statistical models were achieved at each time point. These models provide an excellent description of the relationship between the actual and predicted doses up to 6 Gy. At doses of 8 and 10 Gy there appears to be saturation of the radiation-response signals with a corresponding diminution of accuracy. These results suggest that similar analyses in humans may be advantageous for use in a field-portable device designed to assess exposures in mass casualty situations.

  6. Gene Expression-Based Dosimetry by Dose and Time in Mice Following Acute Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, James D.; Divine, George W.; Grever, William E.; Thomas, Robert A.; Joiner, Michael C.; Smolinski, Joseph M.; Auner, Gregory W.

    2013-01-01

    Rapid and reliable methods for performing biological dosimetry are of paramount importance in the event of a large-scale nuclear event. Traditional dosimetry approaches lack the requisite rapid assessment capability, ease of use, portability and low cost, which are factors needed for triaging a large number of victims. Here we describe the results of experiments in which mice were acutely exposed to 60Co gamma rays at doses of 0 (control) to 10 Gy. Blood was obtained from irradiated mice 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7 days after exposure. mRNA expression levels of 106 selected genes were obtained by reverse-transcription real time PCR. Stepwise regression of dose received against individual gene transcript expression levels provided optimal dosimetry at each time point. The results indicate that only 4–7 different gene transcripts are needed to explain ≥ 0.69 of the variance (R2), and that receiver-operator characteristics, a measure of sensitivity and specificity, of ≥ 0.93 for these statistical models were achieved at each time point. These models provide an excellent description of the relationship between the actual and predicted doses up to 6 Gy. At doses of 8 and 10 Gy there appears to be saturation of the radiation-response signals with a corresponding diminution of accuracy. These results suggest that similar analyses in humans may be advantageous for use in a field-portable device designed to assess exposures in mass casualty situations. PMID:24358280

  7. Identifying the lowest effective dose of acetazolamide for the prophylaxis of acute mountain sickness: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Low, Emma V; Gupta, Vaibhav; Schedlbauer, Angela; Grocott, Michael P W

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To assess the efficacy of three different daily doses of acetazolamide in the prevention of acute mountain sickness and to determine the lowest effective dose. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources Medline and Embase along with a hand search of selected bibliographies. No language restrictions were applied. Study selection Randomised controlled trials assessing the use of acetazolamide at 250 mg, 500 mg, or 750 mg daily versus placebo in adults as a drug intervention for the prophylaxis of acute mountain sickness. Included studies were required to state the administered dose of acetazolamide and to randomise participants before ascent to either acetazolamide or placebo. Two reviewers independently carried out the selection process. Data extraction Two reviewers extracted data concerning study methods, pharmacological intervention with acetazolamide, method of assessment of acute mountain sickness, and event rates in both control and intervention groups, which were verified and analysed by the review team collaboratively. Data synthesis 11 studies (with 12 interventions arms) were included in the review. Acetazolamide at doses of 250 mg, 500 mg, and 750 mg were all effective in preventing acute mountain sickness above 3000 m, with a combined odds ratio of 0.36 (95% confidence interval 0.28 to 0.46). At a dose of 250 mg daily the number needed to treat for acetazolamide to prevent acute mountain sickness was 6 (95% confidence interval 5 to 11). Heterogeneity ranged from I2=0% (500 mg subgroup) to I2=44% (750 mg subgroup). Conclusions Acetazolamide in doses of 250 mg, 500 mg, and 750 mg daily are all more effective than placebo for preventing acute mountain sickness. Acetazolamide 250 mg daily is the lowest effective dose to prevent acute mountain sickness for which evidence is available. PMID:23081689

  8. Long-term stability of liquid ionization chambers with regard to their qualification as local reference dosimeters for low dose-rate absorbed dose measurements in water.

    PubMed

    Bahar-Gogani, J; Grindborg, J E; Johansson, B E; Wickman, G

    2001-03-01

    The long-term sensitivity and calibration stability of liquid ionization chambers (LICs) has been studied at a local and a secondary standards dosimetry laboratory over a period of 3 years. The chambers were transported several times by mail between the two laboratories for measurements. The LICs used in this work are designed for absorbed dose measurements in the dose rate region of 0.1-100 mGy min(-1) and have a liquid layer thickness of 1 mm and a sensitive volume of 16.2 mm3. The liquids used as sensitive media in the chambers are mixtures of isooctane (C8H18) and tetramethylsilane (Si(CH3)4) in different proportions (about 2 to 1). Operating at a polarizing voltage of 300 V the leakage current of the chambers was stable and never exceeded 3% of the observable current at a dose rate of about 1 mGy min(-1). The volume sensitivity of the chambers was measured to be of the order of 10(-9) C Gy(-1) mm3. No systematic changes in the absorbed dose to water calibration was observed for any of the chambers during the test period (sigma < 0.2%). Variations in chamber dose response with small changes in the polarizing voltage as well as sensitivity changes with accumulated absorbed dose were also investigated. Measurements showed that the LIC response varies by 0.15% per 1% change in applied voltage around 300 V. No significant change could be observed in the LIC sensitivity after a single absorbed dose of 15 kGy. The results indicate that the LIC can be made to serve as a calibration transfer instrument and a reference detector for absorbed dose to water determinations providing good precision and long-term reproducibility.

  9. High-dose total-body irradiation and autologous marrow reconstitution in dogs: dose-rate-related acute toxicity and fractionation-dependent long-term survival

    SciTech Connect

    Deeg, H.J.; Storb, R.; Weiden, P.L.; Schumacher, D.; Shulman, H.; Graham, T.; Thomas, E.D.

    1981-11-01

    Beagle dogs treated by total-body irradiation (TBI) were given autologous marrow grafts in order to avoid death from marrow toxicity. Acute and delayed non-marrow toxicities of high single-dose (27 dogs) and fractionated TBI (20 dogs) delivered at 0.05 or 0.1 Gy/min were compared. Fractionated TBI was given in increments of 2 Gy every 6 hr for three increments per day. Acute toxicity and early mortality (<1 month) at identical total irradiation doses were comparable for dogs given fractionated or single-dose TBI. With single-dose TBI, 14, 16, and 18 Gy, respectively, given at 0.05 Gy/min, 0/5, 5/5, and 2/2 dogs died from acute toxicity; with 10, 12, and 14 Gy, respectively, given at 0.1 Gy/min, 1/5, 4/5, and 5/5 dogs died acutely. With fractionated TBI, 14 and 16 Gy, respectively, given at 0.1 Gy/min, 1/5, 4/5, and 2/2 dogs died auctely. Early deaths were due to radiation enteritis with or without associated septicemia (29 dogs; less than or equal to Day 10). Three dogs given 10 Gy of TBI at 0.1 Gy/min died from bacterial pneumonia; one (Day 18) had been given fractionated and two (Days 14, 22) single-dose TBI. Fifteen dogs survived beyond 1 month; eight of these had single-dose TBI (10-14 Gy) and all died within 7 months of irradiation from a syndrome consisting of hepatic damage, pancreatic fibrosis, malnutrition, wasting, and anemia. Seven of the 15 had fractionated TBI, and only one (14 Gy) died on Day 33 from hepatic failure, whereas 6 (10-14 Gy) are alive and well 250 to 500 days after irradiation. In conclusion, fractionated TBI did not offer advantages over single-dose TBI with regard to acute toxicity and early mortality; rather, these were dependent upon the total dose of TBI. The total acutely tolerated dose was dependent upon the exposure rate; however, only dogs given fractionated TBI became healthy long-term survivors.

  10. Single dose vitamin A treatment in acute shigellosis in Bangladesh children: randomised double blind controlled trial.

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, S.; Biswas, R.; Kabir, I.; Sarker, S.; Dibley, M.; Fuchs, G.; Mahalanabis, D.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of a single large oral dose of vitamin A in treating acute shigellosis in children in Bangladesh. DESIGN: Randomised double blind controlled clinical trial. SETTING: Dhaka Hospital, International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh. SUBJECTS: 83 children aged 1-7 years with bacteriologically proved shigellosis but no clinical signs of vitamin A deficiency; 42 were randomised to treatment with vitamin A and 41 formed a control group. INTERVENTION: Children were given a single oral dose of 200,000 IU of vitamin A plus 25 IU vitamin E or a control preparation of 25 IU vitamin E. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Clinical cure on study day 5 and bacteriological cure. RESULTS: Baseline characteristics of the subjects in the two treatment groups were similar. Significantly more children in the vitamin A group than in the control group achieved clinical cure (19/42 (45%) v 8/14 (20%); chi 2 = 5.14, 1 df, P = 0.02; risk ratio = 0.68 (95% confidence interval; 0.50 to 0.93)). When cure was determined bacteriologically, the groups had similar rates (16/42 (38%) v 16/41 (39%); chi 2 = 0.02, 1 df, P = 0.89; risk ratio = 0.98 (0.70 to 1.39)). CONCLUSIONS: Vitamin A reduces the severity of acute shigellosis in children living in areas where vitamin A deficiency is a major public health problem. PMID:9492664

  11. Computed organ doses to an Indian reference adult during brachytherapy treatment of esophagus, breast, and neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Keshavkumar, Biju

    2012-07-01

    This study aims to generate the normalized mean organ dose factors (mGy min(-1) GBq(-1)) to healthy organs during brachytherapy treatment of esophagus, breast, and neck cancers specific to the patient population in India. This study is in continuation to the earlier published studies on the estimation of organ doses during uterus brachytherapy treatments. The results are obtained by Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport through MIRD type anthropomorphic mathematical phantom representing reference Indian adult with (192)Ir and (60)Co high dose rate sources in the esophagus, breast, and neck of the phantom. The result of this study is compared with a published computational study using voxel-based phantom model. The variation in the organ dose of this study to the published values is within 50%.

  12. Single dose oral tiaprofenic acid for acute postoperative pain in adults

    PubMed Central

    Moore, R Andrew; Derry, Sheena; Moore, Maura; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background Tiaprofenic acid is a a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). It is widely available around the world, with indications for osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, periarticular disorders, and strains and sprains. This review sought to evaluate the efficacy and safety of oral tiaprofenic acid in acute postoperative pain, using clinical studies of patients with established pain, and with outcomes measured primarily over 6 hours using standard methods. This type of study has been used for many decades to establish that drugs have analgesic properties. Objectives To assess the efficacy of single dose oral tiaprofenic acid in acute postoperative pain, and any associated adverse events. Search methods We searched Cochrane CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Oxford Pain Relief Database for studies to June 2009. Selection criteria Randomised, double blind, placebo-controlled trials of single dose orally administered tiaprofenic acid in adults with moderate to severe acute postoperative pain. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We planned to use area under the “pain relief versus time” curve to derive the proportion of participants with tiaprofenic acid experiencing at least 50% pain relief over 4 to 6 hours, using validated equations; to use number needed to treat to benefit (NNT); the proportion of participants using rescue analgesia over a specified time period; time to use of rescue analgesia; information on adverse events and withdrawals. Main results Not one of eleven studies identified by the searches and examined in detail studied oral tiaprofenic acid against placebo in patients with established postoperative pain and therefore no results are available. Authors’ conclusions In the absence of evidence of efficacy for oral tiaprofenic acid in acute postoperative pain, its use in this indication is not justified at present. Because trials clearly

  13. Low Doses of Oxygen Ion Irradiation Cause Acute Damage to Hematopoietic Cells in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yingying; Pathak, Rupak; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Jones, Tamako; Mao, Xiao Wen; Nelson, Gregory; Boerma, Marjan; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Zhou, Daohong; Shao, Lijian

    2016-01-01

    One of the major health risks to astronauts is radiation on long-duration space missions. Space radiation from sun and galactic cosmic rays consists primarily of 85% protons, 14% helium nuclei and 1% high-energy high-charge (HZE) particles, such as oxygen (16O), carbon, silicon, and iron ions. HZE particles exhibit dense linear tracks of ionization associated with clustered DNA damage and often high relative biological effectiveness (RBE). Therefore, new knowledge of risks from HZE particle exposures must be obtained. In the present study, we investigated the acute effects of low doses of 16O irradiation on the hematopoietic system. Specifically, we exposed C57BL/6J mice to 0.1, 0.25 and 1.0 Gy whole body 16O (600 MeV/n) irradiation and examined the effects on peripheral blood (PB) cells, and bone marrow (BM) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) at two weeks after the exposure. The results showed that the numbers of white blood cells, lymphocytes, monocytes, neutrophils and platelets were significantly decreased in PB after exposure to 1.0 Gy, but not to 0.1 or 0.25 Gy. However, both the frequency and number of HPCs and HSCs were reduced in a radiation dose-dependent manner in comparison to un-irradiated controls. Furthermore, HPCs and HSCs from irradiated mice exhibited a significant reduction in clonogenic function determined by the colony-forming and cobblestone area-forming cell assays. These acute adverse effects of 16O irradiation on HSCs coincided with an increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), enhanced cell cycle entry of quiescent HSCs, and increased DNA damage. However, none of the 16O exposures induced apoptosis in HSCs. These data suggest that exposure to low doses of 16O irradiation induces acute BM injury in a dose-dependent manner primarily via increasing ROS production, cell cycling, and DNA damage in HSCs. This finding may aid in developing novel strategies in the protection of the hematopoietic

  14. Acute radiation enteritis caused by dose-dependent radiation exposure in dogs: experimental research.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenda; Chen, Jiang; Xu, Liu; Li, Hongyu; Guo, Xiaozhong

    2014-12-01

    Accidental or intended radiation exposure in mass casualty settings presents a serious and on-going threat. The development of mitigating and treating agents requires appropriate animal models. Unfortunately, the majority of research on radiation enteritis in animals has lacked specific assessments and targeted therapy. Our study showed beagle dogs, treated by intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for abdominal irradiation, were administered single X-ray doses of 8-30 Gy. The degree of intestinal tract injury for all of the animals after radiation exposure was evaluated with regard to clinical syndrome, endoscopic findings, histological features, and intestinal function. The range of single doses (8 Gy, 10-14 Gy, and 16-30 Gy) represented the degree of injury (mild, moderate, and severe, respectively). Acute radiation enteritis included clinical syndrome with fever, vomiting, diarrhea, hemafecia, and weight loss; typical endoscopic findings included edema, bleeding, mucosal abrasions, and ulcers; and intestinal biopsy results revealed mucosal necrosis, erosion, and loss, inflammatory cell infiltration, hemorrhage, and congestion. Changes in serum diamine oxides (DAOs) and d-xylose represented intestinal barrier function and absorption function, respectively, and correlated with the extent of damage (P < 0.05 and P < 0.05, respectively). We successfully developed a dog model of acute radiation enteritis, thus obtaining a relatively objective evaluation of intestinal tract injury based on clinical performance and laboratory examination. The method of assessment of the degree of intestinal tract injury after abdominal irradiation could be beneficial in the development of novel and effective therapeutic strategies for acute radiation enteritis.

  15. Survey of computed tomography doses and establishment of national diagnostic reference levels in the Republic of Belarus.

    PubMed

    Kharuzhyk, S A; Matskevich, S A; Filjustin, A E; Bogushevich, E V; Ugolkova, S A

    2010-01-01

    Computed tomography dose index (CTDI) was measured on eight CT scanners at seven public hospitals in the Republic of Belarus. The effective dose was calculated using normalised values of effective dose per dose-length product (DLP) over various body regions. Considerable variations of the dose values were observed. Mean effective doses amounted to 1.4 +/- 0.4 mSv for brain, 2.6 +/- 1.0 mSv for neck, 6.9 +/- 2.2 mSv for thorax, 7.0 +/- 2.3 mSv for abdomen and 8.8 +/- 3.2 mSv for pelvis. Diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) were proposed by calculating the third quartiles of dose value distributions (body region/volume CTDI, mGy/DLP, mGy cm): brain/60/730, neck/55/640, thorax/20/500, abdomen/25/600 and pelvis/25/490. It is evident that the protocols need to be optimised on some of the CT scanners, in view of the fact that these are the first formulated DRLs for the Republic of Belarus.

  16. Direct and indirect tasks on assessment of dose and time distributions and thresholds of acute radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Osovets, S V; Azizova, T V; Day, R D; Wald, N; Moseeva, M B

    2012-02-01

    Mathematical methods were developed to construct dose and time distributions and their associated risks and threshold values for lethal and non-lethal effects of acute radiation exposure to include mortality and incidence, prodromal vomiting, and agranulocytosis. A new distribution (T-model) was obtained to describe time parameters of acute radiation syndrome such as the latency period, time to onset of vomiting, and time to initiation of agranulocytosis. Based on the dose and time distributions, the parameter translation method was defined using an orthogonal regression, which allows one to solve for these distributions in the case of acute radiation exposure. The assessment of threshold doses was performed for some effects of acute radiation syndrome: for the latency period, ∼6-8 Gy absorbed dose and ∼0.7-0.9 h time to onset of vomiting; and for incidence (agranulocytosis), ∼2-3 Gy absorbed dose and ∼2-3 h time to onset of vomiting. The obtained new formula for assessment of radiation risk is applicable to the time parameters of acute radiation syndrome.

  17. Acute toxic effects of single dose dacarbazine: hematological and histological changes in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Milijašević, B; Stefanović, D; Lalić-Popović, M; Tomić, Z; Kolarović, J; Lalošević, D; Mikov, M

    2014-11-01

    Treatment of advanced soft tissue sarcoma usually includes dacarbazine (DTIC), an alkylating agent that methylates DNA and is active during all phases of the cell cycle. Common side effects of DTIC include nausea, vomiting, impaired liver and kidney function, myelosuppression, and pneumonia. There are no accounts, however, of histological and hematological changes caused by DTIC. We investigated acute hematological and morphological changes in different organs and in tumors that were caused by a single dose of DTIC. Adult Syrian golden hamsters were inoculated with a suspension of tumorigenic baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells by subcutaneous injection. On day 14 after inoculation, doses of 1.4, 1.6, 1.8 or 2.0 g/m(2) DTIC were injected intraperitoneally into the hamsters. Hamsters in the control group were injected with physiological saline in the same way. Seven days after drug or saline injection the animals were sacrificed and samples of blood, heart, kidney, liver, lungs, spleen, small intestine and tumor were excised, processed and analyzed. Mitoses were counted using an ocular extension with engraved frame. Anemia, thrombocytopenia and leukocytosis were found in the control group of hamsters with fibrosarcoma, whereas animals with fibrosarcoma treated with DTIC developed anemia, thrombocytopenia and leukopenia. Severe pneumonia and moderate hepatitis were detected in all DTIC treated groups. Effects of DTIC on tumor cells included rounding and enlargement of nuclei and rarefaction of chromatin. The number of mitoses was reduced with increasing doses of DTIC. Hepatitis, myelosuppression, pneumonia, and dose-related inhibition of tumor cell proliferation were observed after a single dose of DTIC.

  18. Single dose oral mefenamic acid for acute postoperative pain in adults

    PubMed Central

    Moll, Rachel; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background Mefenamic acid is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). It is most often used for treating pain of dysmenorrhoea in the short term (seven days or less), as well as mild to moderate pain including headache, dental pain, postoperative and postpartum pain. It is widely available in many countries worldwide. Objectives To assess the efficacy of single dose oral mefenamic acid in acute postoperative pain, and any associated adverse events. Search methods We searched Cochrane CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Oxford Pain Relief Database for studies to December 2010. Selection criteria Single oral dose, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of mefenamic acid for relief of established moderate to severe postoperative pain in adults. Data collection and analysis Studies were assessed for methodological quality and the data extracted by two review authors independently. Summed total pain relief (TOTPAR) or pain intensity difference (SPID) over 4 to 6 hours was used to calculate the number of participants achieving at least 50% pain relief. These derived results were used to calculate, with 95% confidence intervals, the relative benefit compared to placebo, and the number needed to treat (NNT) for one participant to experience at least 50% pain relief over 4 to 6 hours. Numbers of participants using rescue medication over specified time periods, and time to use of rescue medication, were sought as additional measures of efficacy. Information on adverse events and withdrawals was collected. Main results Four studies with 842 participants met the inclusion criteria; 126 participants were treated with mefenamic acid 500 mg, 67 with mefenamic acid 250 mg, 197 with placebo, and 452 with lignocaine, aspirin, zomepirac or nimesulide. Participants had pain following third molar extraction, episiotomy and orthopaedic surgery. The NNT for at least 50% pain relief over 6 hours with a single dose of mefenamic acid 500 mg compared to placebo was 4.0 (2

  19. A therapeutic dose of ketoprofen causes acute gastrointestinal bleeding, erosions, and ulcers in rats.

    PubMed

    Shientag, Lisa J; Wheeler, Suzanne M; Garlick, David S; Maranda, Louise S

    2012-11-01

    Perioperative treatment of several rats in our facility with ketoprofen (5 mg/kg SC) resulted in blood loss, peritonitis, and death within a day to a little more than a week after surgery that was not related to the gastrointestinal tract. Published reports have established the 5-mg/kg dose as safe and effective for rats. Because ketoprofen is a nonselective nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug that can damage the gastrointestinal tract, the putative diagnosis for these morbidities and mortalities was gastrointestinal toxicity caused by ketoprofen (5 mg/kg). We conducted a prospective study evaluating the effect of this therapeutic dose of ketoprofen on the rat gastrointestinal tract within 24 h. Ketoprofen (5 mg/kg SC) was administered to one group of rats that then received gas anesthesia for 30 min and to another group without subsequent anesthesia. A third group was injected with saline followed by 30 min of gas anesthesia. Our primary hypothesis was that noteworthy gastrointestinal bleeding and lesions would occur in both groups treated with ketoprofen but not in rats that received saline and anesthesia. Our results showed marked gastrointestinal bleeding, erosions, and small intestinal ulcers in the ketoprofen-treated rats and minimal damages in the saline-treated group. The combination of ketoprofen and anesthesia resulted in worse clinical signs than did ketoprofen alone. We conclude that a single 5-mg/kg dose of ketoprofen causes acute mucosal damage to the rat small intestine.

  20. Fractional model for pharmacokinetics of high dose methotrexate in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popović, Jovan K.; Spasić, Dragan T.; Tošić, Jela; Kolarović, Jovanka L.; Malti, Rachid; Mitić, Igor M.; Pilipović, Stevan; Atanacković, Teodor M.

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to promote a model based on the fractional differential calculus related to the pharmacokinetic individualization of high dose methotrexate treatment in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, especially in high risk patients. We applied two-compartment fractional model on 8 selected cases with the largest number (4-19) of measured concentrations, among 43 pediatric patients received 24-h methotrexate 2-5 g/m2 infusions. The plasma concentrations were determined by fluorescence polarization immunoassay. Our mathematical procedure, designed by combining Post's and Newton's method, was coded in Mathematica 8.0 and performed on Fujicu Celsius M470-2 PC. Experimental data show that most of the measured values of methotrexate were in decreasing order. However, in certain treatments local maximums were detected. On the other hand, integer order compartmental models do not give values which fit well with the observed data. By the use of our model, we obtained better results, since it gives more accurate behavior of the transmission, as well as the local maximums which were recognized in methotrexate monitoring. It follows from our method that an additional test with a small methotrexate dose can be suggested for the fractional system parameter identification and the prediction of a possible pattern with a full dose in the case of high risk patients. A special feature of the fractional model is that it can also recognize and better fit an observed non-monotonic behavior. A new parameter determination procedure can be successfully used.

  1. Mood influences on acute smoking responses are independent of nicotine intake and dose expectancy.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Kenneth A; Ciccocioppo, Melinda; Conklin, Cynthia A; Milanak, Melissa E; Grottenthaler, Amy; Sayette, Michael A

    2008-02-01

    Acute responses to smoking are influenced by nicotine and by nonpharmacological factors such as nicotine dose expectancy and sensory effects of smoke inhalation. Because negative mood increases smoking reinforcement, the authors examined whether these effects may be altered by mood context. Smokers (n=200) participated in 2 sessions, negative or positive mood induction, and were randomized to 1 of 5 groups. Four groups comprised the 2x2 balanced placebo design, varying actual (0.6 mg vs. 0.05 mg yield) and expected nicotine dose (expected nicotine vs. denicotinized [denic]) of cigarettes. A fifth group was a no-smoking control. Smoking, versus not smoking, attenuated negative affect, as well as withdrawal and craving. Negative mood increased smoking reinforcement. However, neither actual nor expected nicotine dose had much influence on these responses; even those smokers receiving and expecting a denic cigarette reported attenuated negative affect. A follow-up comparison suggested that the sensory effects of smoke inhalation, but not the simple motor effects of smoking behavior, were responsible. Thus, sensory effects of smoke inhalation had a greater influence on relieving negative affect than actual or expected nicotine intake.

  2. Consumption of an acute dose of caffeine reduces acquisition but not memory in the honey bee.

    PubMed

    Mustard, Julie A; Dews, Lauren; Brugato, Arlana; Dey, Kevin; Wright, Geraldine A

    2012-06-15

    Caffeine affects several molecules that are also involved in the processes underlying learning and memory such as cAMP and calcium. However, studies of caffeine's influence on learning and memory in mammals are often contradictory. Invertebrate model systems have provided valuable insight into the actions of many neuroactive compounds including ethanol and cocaine. We use the honey bee (Apis mellifera) to investigate how the ingestion of acute doses of caffeine before, during, and after conditioning influences performance in an appetitive olfactory learning and memory task. Consumption of caffeine doses of 0.01 M or greater during or prior to conditioning causes a significant reduction in response levels during acquisition. Although bees find the taste of caffeine to be aversive at high concentrations, the bitter taste does not explain the reduction in acquisition observed for bees fed caffeine before conditioning. While high doses of caffeine reduced performance during acquisition, the response levels of bees given caffeine were the same as those of the sucrose only control group in a recall test 24h after conditioning. In addition, caffeine administered after conditioning had no affect on recall. These results suggest that caffeine specifically affects performance during acquisition and not the processes involved in the formation of early long term memory.

  3. Preclinical safety evaluation of IQG-607 in rats: Acute and repeated dose toxicity studies.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues-Junior, Valnês S; Machado, Pablo; Calixto, João B; Siqueira, Jarbas M; Andrade, Edinéia; Bento, Allisson; Campos, Maria M; Basso, Luiz A; Santos, Diógenes S

    2017-02-20

    In the present study, we evaluated the safety and the possible toxic effects of IQG-607 after acute and 90-day repeated administrations in rats. Single oral administration of IQG-607 (300 or 2000 mg/kg) on female rats did not result in any mortality. No gross lesions were observed in the animals at necropsy. Ninety-day administration test resulted in 20% of deaths, in both male and female rats administered with the highest dose of IQG-607, 300 mg/kg. Repeated administration of the IQG 607 (25, 100 and 300 mg/kg) did not result in any significant body mass alteration, or changes in food and water consumption. The most important clinical sign observed was salivation in both sexes. Importantly, long-term treatment with IQG-607 did not induce alterations in any hematological (for both sex) and serum biochemical (for female) parameters evaluated, even at the highest dose tested. Treatment of male rats with 100 or 300 mg/kg of IQG-607 decreased total cholesterol levels, while animals treated with 100 mg/kg also presented reduction on triglyceride levels. Of note, no treatment induced significant histopathological alterations in tissues of all organs and glands analyzed, even in that group that received the highest dose of IQG-607.

  4. Cisplatin-induced acute renal failure is ameliorated by erdosteine in a dose-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Ozyurt, Hüseyin; Yildirim, Zeki; Kotuk, Mahir; Yilmaz, H Ramazan; Yağmurca, Murat; Iraz, Mustafa; Söğüt, Sad; Gergerlioglu, Serdar

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the optimum dosage of erdosteine to ameliorate cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Three different doses of erdosteine at 25, 50 and 75 mg kg(-1) were studied in rats. Intraperitoneal administration of 7 mg kg(-1) cisplatin led to acute renal failure, as indicated by kidney histology and increases in plasma creatinine and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels. At 5 days after cisplatin injection the BUN level was increased significantly from 15.1 +/- 4.3 to 126.7 +/- 152.6 mg dl(-1) and plasma creatinine levels increased from 0.37 +/- 0.005 to 1.68 +/- 1.9 mg dl(-1). When the rats were administered 50 and 75 mg kg(-1) erdosteine 24 h before cisplatin injection that was continued until sacrifice (total of 6 days), the BUN and creatinine levels remained similar to control levels and the grade of histology was similar. Erdosteine at doses of 50 and 75 mg kg(-1) ameliorates cisplatin-induced renal failure. The optimum dose of erdosteine may be 50 mg kg(-1) in this study.

  5. High-dose oral acyclovir in acute herpes zoster ophthalmicus: the end of the corticosteroid era.

    PubMed

    Herbort, C P; Buechi, E R; Piguet, B; Zografos, L; Fitting, P

    1991-01-01

    Systemic acyclovir (ACV), a new potent anti-herpes drug, was shown to reduce effectively the morbidity in the acute phase of herpes zoster ophthalmicus (AHZO). Using high dose oral ACV (5 X 800 mg/day) our aim in this study was: (1) to compare disease profiles in the ACV-treated group and in a group of zoster patients having had no ACV, analysed retrospectively; (2) to establish if high-dose ACV was able to prevent severe long term complications of AHZO; and (3) to determine the present role of corticosteroids in AHZO. From 1984 to 1988, 48 patients with AHZO of less than 3 days' duration were included. All patients received at least 7 days of oral ACV (5 X 800 mg/d) associated with topical ACV. Steroids were not given unless severe uveitis occurred. Follow-up was 2 years in 43 patients and 1 year in all 48 patients. Main conclusions from our study are: 1. Ocular involvement occurred in 67% of ACV-treated cases, a rate comparable to our retrospective group (59%) and to the literature (71%). However the rate of severe long term complications was minimal (4%) when compared to our non-treated retrospective group (21%). 2. Steroid treatment was not necessary in any of the ACV-treated patients. 3. ACV was well tolerated and did not have to be discontinued in any of the patients. High dose ACV and avoidance of steroids seems to eliminate the severe complications of AHZO.

  6. ESTIMATION OF CARDIAC CT ANGIOGRAPHY RADIATION DOSE TOWARD THE ESTABLISHMENT OF NATIONAL DIAGNOSTIC REFERENCE LEVEL FOR CCTA IN IRAN.

    PubMed

    Hosseini Nasab, Seyed Mohammad Bagher; Shabestani-Monfared, Ali; Deevband, Mohammad Reza; Paydar, Reza; Nabahati, Mehrdad

    2016-08-29

    In recent years, with the introduction of 64-slice CT and dual-source CT technology, coronary CT angiography (CCTA) has emerged as a useful diagnostic imaging modality as a non-invasive assessment of coronary heart disease. CT produces a larger radiation dose than other imaging tests and cardiac CT involves higher radiation dose with the advances in the spatial and temporal resolution. The aims of this study are patient dose assessment and establishment of national diagnostic reference level for CCTA in Iran. A questionnaire was sent to CCTA centers. Data for patient and CT protocols were obtained. The volumetric CT dose index (CTDIvol), dose length product (DLP) and total DLP were considered in the 32 cm standard body phantom. Calculation of estimated effective dose (ED) was obtained by multiplying the DLP by a conversion factor [k = 0.014 mSv (mGy·cm)(-1)]. Mean value of CTDIvol and DLP for CCTA was 50 mGy and 825 mGy·cm. The third quartile (75th) of the distribution of mean CTDIvol (66.54 mGy) and DLP (1073 mGy·cm) values was expressed as the diagnostic reference level (DRL) for CCTA in Iran. The median of ED was 10.26 mSv and interquartile range of ED was 7.08-15.03 mSv. A large variety in CTDIvol and DLP among CT scanner and different sites due to variability in CT parameter is noted. It seems that training could help to reduce patient's dose.

  7. Trebananib With or Without Low-Dose Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-14

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Inhalation exposure system used for acute and repeated-dose methyl isocyanate exposures of laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Adkins, B; O'Connor, R W; Dement, J M

    1987-06-01

    Laboratory animals were exposed by inhalation for 2 hr/day (acute) or 6 hr/day (four consecutive days, repeated dose) to methyl isocyanate (MIC). Exposures were conducted in stainless steel and glass inhalation exposure chambers placed in stainless steel, wire mesh cages. MIC was delivered with nitrogen via stainless steel and Teflon supply lines. Chamber concentrations ranged from 0 to 60 ppm and were monitored continuously with infrared spectrophotometers to 1 ppm and at 2-hr intervals to 20 ppb with a high performance liquid chromatograph equipped with a fluorescence detector. Other operational parameters monitored on a continuous basis included chamber temperature (20-27 degrees C), relative humidity (31-64%), static (transmural) pressure (-0.3 in.), and flow (300-500 L/min). The computer-assistance system interfaced with the inhalation exposure laboratory is described in detail, including the analytical instrumentation calibration system used throughout this investigation.

  9. Comparison of consolidation strategies in acute myeloid leukemia: high-dose cytarabine alone versus intermediate-dose cytarabine combined with anthracyclines.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Sik; Kang, Ka-Won; Lee, Se Ryeon; Park, Yong; Sung, Hwa Jung; Kim, Seok Jin; Choi, Chul Won; Kim, Byung Soo

    2015-09-01

    We compared the efficacy of high-dose cytarabine alone to that of intermediate-dose cytarabine combined with anthracyclines as consolidation therapy. Patients enrolled in the Korea University acute myeloid leukemia (AML) registry received remission induction chemotherapy with the same standard induction regimen (idarubicin and cytarabine 3 + 7). Postremission therapy was performed for three or four cycles according to one of the following regimens: high-dose cytarabine (3 g/m(2)) or combination of intermediate-dose cytarabine (1 g/m(2)) with anthracyclines (idarubicin or mitoxantrone). Among the 443 AML patients enrolled in the registry, 145 patients received consolidation chemotherapy. The median overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival (RFS) in the high-dose cytarabine group were significantly longer than those in the anthracycline combination group (OS, not reached vs. 16.6 months, p = 0.045; RFS, 38.6 months vs. 11.0 months, p = 0.011). The median duration of neutropenia was longer in the anthracycline combination group than in the high-dose cytarabine group (8 vs. 10 days, p = 0.001). This study suggests that high-dose cytarabine consolidation may produce superior outcomes than combination treatment with intermediate-dose cytarabine and anthracyclines and that the addition of anthracyclines during AML consolidation has limited value as compared to cytarabine intensification.

  10. Dose-Response Relationship between Alanine Aminotransferase Levels within the Reference Interval and Metabolic Syndrome in Chinese Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Peipei; Chen, Qicai; Chen, Lili; Zhang, Pengpeng; Xiao, Juan; Chen, Xiaoxiao; Liu, Meng

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Elevation in serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels is a biomarker for metabolic syndrome (MS); however, the relationship has not been fully investigated within the reference interval of ALT levels. Our objective was to explore the relationship between serum ALT levels within the reference interval and MS in Chinese adults. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study included 16028 adults, who attended routine health check-ups at Shengli Oilfield Central Hospital from January 2006 to March 2012. The reference interval of serum ALT level was defined as less than 40 U/L. Logistic regression models and restricted cubic spline were used to evaluate the association of ALT with MS. Results The prevalence of MS in the total population was 13.7% (6.4% for females and 18.4% for males). Multiple logistic regression showed that ALT levels were positively associated with MS after adjustment for potential confounding factors. The odds ratio of MS in the top quartile was 4.830 [95% confidence interval (CI): 2.980–7.829] in females and 3.168 (95% CI: 2.649–3.790) in males, compared with the ALT levels in the bottom quartile. The restricted cubic spline models revealed a positive non-linear dose-response relationship between ALT levels and the risk of MS in women (p for nonlinearity was 0.0327), but a positive linear dose-response relationship in men (p for nonlinearity was 0.0659). Conclusion Serum ALT levels within the reference interval are positively associated with MS in a dose-response manner. Elevated ALT levels, even within the reference interval, may reflect early dysmetabolic changes. PMID:27873509

  11. Inferior Frontal Cortex Modulation with an Acute Dose of Heroin During Cognitive Control

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, André; Walter, Marc; Gerber, Hana; Schmid, Otto; Smieskova, Renata; Bendfeldt, Kerstin; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A; Riecher-Rössler, Anita; Lang, Undine E; Rubia, Katya; McGuire, Philip; Borgwardt, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Impairments in inhibitory control and in stimulus-driven attention are hallmarks of drug addiction and are associated with decreased activation in the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). Although previous studies indicate that the response inhibition function is impaired in abstinent heroin dependents, and that this is mediated by reduced IFG activity, it remains completely unknown whether and how an acute dose of heroin modulates IFG activity during cognitive control in heroin-dependent patients. This study investigates the acute effects of heroin administration on IFG activity during response inhibition and stimulus-driven attention in heroin-dependent patients. Using a cross-over, double-blind, placebo-controlled design, saline and heroin were administered to 26 heroin-dependent patients from stable heroin-assisted treatment, while performing a Go/No–Go event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging task to assess right IFG activity during motor response inhibition, as well as during oddball-driven attention allocation. Relative to saline, heroin significantly reduced right IFG activity during both successful response inhibition and oddball-driven attention allocation, whereas it did not change right IFG activity during response inhibition after correction for the effect of attention allocation. These heroin-induced effects were not related to changes in drug craving, state anxiety, behavioral performance, or co-consumption of psychostimulant drugs. This study demonstrates that heroin administration acutely impairs stimulus-driven attention allocation, as indicated by reduced IFG activity in response to infrequently presented stimuli, and does not specifically modulate IFG activity during response inhibition. PMID:23673865

  12. Inferior frontal cortex modulation with an acute dose of heroin during cognitive control.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, André; Walter, Marc; Gerber, Hana; Schmid, Otto; Smieskova, Renata; Bendfeldt, Kerstin; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A; Riecher-Rössler, Anita; Lang, Undine E; Rubia, Katya; McGuire, Philip; Borgwardt, Stefan

    2013-10-01

    Impairments in inhibitory control and in stimulus-driven attention are hallmarks of drug addiction and are associated with decreased activation in the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). Although previous studies indicate that the response inhibition function is impaired in abstinent heroin dependents, and that this is mediated by reduced IFG activity, it remains completely unknown whether and how an acute dose of heroin modulates IFG activity during cognitive control in heroin-dependent patients. This study investigates the acute effects of heroin administration on IFG activity during response inhibition and stimulus-driven attention in heroin-dependent patients. Using a cross-over, double-blind, placebo-controlled design, saline and heroin were administered to 26 heroin-dependent patients from stable heroin-assisted treatment, while performing a Go/No-Go event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging task to assess right IFG activity during motor response inhibition, as well as during oddball-driven attention allocation. Relative to saline, heroin significantly reduced right IFG activity during both successful response inhibition and oddball-driven attention allocation, whereas it did not change right IFG activity during response inhibition after correction for the effect of attention allocation. These heroin-induced effects were not related to changes in drug craving, state anxiety, behavioral performance, or co-consumption of psychostimulant drugs. This study demonstrates that heroin administration acutely impairs stimulus-driven attention allocation, as indicated by reduced IFG activity in response to infrequently presented stimuli, and does not specifically modulate IFG activity during response inhibition.

  13. Acute effects of a low-dose atropine/scopolamine mixture as a food contaminant in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Perharič, Lucija; Juvan, Katja Ažman; Stanovnik, Lovro

    2013-09-01

    To verify the assumptions in our previous risk assessment of an atropine/scopolamine mixture in buckwheat flour, we performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over study in 20 healthy, adult volunteers. The volunteers ingested a traditional Slovenian buckwheat meal, made of boiled buckwheat flour to which alkaloids were added. In addition to the placebo they ingested 0.12/0.10, 0.37/0.29, 1.22/0.95, 3.58/2.81 and 12.10/9.50 µg kg(-1) body mass (BM) of the atropine/scopolamine mixture. The changes in body temperature, heart rate, salivary and sweat secretion, pupil size, near-point vision and subjective symptoms were recorded regularly for 4 h after the ingestion. Decreased salivary and sweat secretion, increased heart rate and pupil size and reduced near-point vision accompanied by characteristic subjective symptoms were observed at 12.10/9.50 µg kg(-1) BM. At doses of 0.37/0.29 and 1.22/0.95 µg kg(-1) BM, a significant decrease in the heart rate was noted, which we consider to be a critical effect of a low-dose exposure to the atropine/scopolamine mixture. Although this did not have any clinical relevance in our subjects, it may have serious implications if it occurred in people with pre-existent cardiac conditions or those on medications that may cause bradycardia. No significant changes in the observed end points were noted at 0.12/0.10 µg kg(-1) BM. We estimate that the NOAEL (No Observed Adverse Effect Level) for the atropine/scopolamine mixture lies between the lower two administered doses. Applying the uncertainty factor of 10, we propose a new provisional Acute Reference Doses (ARfDs) of the mixture, i.e. 0.01 µg kg(-1) BM for each alkaloid, and a further refinement using higher-tier approaches.

  14. Calculated organ doses using Monte Carlo simulations in a reference male phantom undergoing HDR brachytherapy applied to localized prostate carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Candela-Juan, Cristian; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Ballester, Facundo; Rivard, Mark J.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to obtain equivalent doses in radiosensitive organs (aside from the bladder and rectum) when applying high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy to a localized prostate carcinoma using {sup 60}Co or {sup 192}Ir sources. These data are compared with results in a water phantom and with expected values in an infinite water medium. A comparison with reported values from proton therapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is also provided. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations in Geant4 were performed using a voxelized phantom described in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 110, which reproduces masses and shapes from an adult reference man defined in ICRP Publication 89. Point sources of {sup 60}Co or {sup 192}Ir with photon energy spectra corresponding to those exiting their capsules were placed in the center of the prostate, and equivalent doses per clinical absorbed dose in this target organ were obtained in several radiosensitive organs. Values were corrected to account for clinical circumstances with the source located at various positions with differing dwell times throughout the prostate. This was repeated for a homogeneous water phantom. Results: For the nearest organs considered (bladder, rectum, testes, small intestine, and colon), equivalent doses given by {sup 60}Co source were smaller (8%-19%) than from {sup 192}Ir. However, as the distance increases, the more penetrating gamma rays produced by {sup 60}Co deliver higher organ equivalent doses. The overall result is that effective dose per clinical absorbed dose from a {sup 60}Co source (11.1 mSv/Gy) is lower than from a {sup 192}Ir source (13.2 mSv/Gy). On the other hand, equivalent doses were the same in the tissue and the homogeneous water phantom for those soft tissues closer to the prostate than about 30 cm. As the distance increased, the differences of photoelectric effect in water and soft tissue, and appearance of other materials

  15. Evidence of dose saving in routine CT practice using iterative reconstruction derived from a national diagnostic reference level survey

    PubMed Central

    Hayton, A; Beveridge, T; Marks, P; Wallace, A

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the influence and significance of the use of iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms on patient dose in CT in Australia. Methods: We examined survey data submitted to the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) National Diagnostic Reference Level Service (NDRLS) during 2013 and 2014. We compared median survey dose metrics with categorization by scan region and use of IR. Results: The use of IR results in a reduction in volume CT dose index of between 17% and 44% and a reduction in dose–length product of between 14% and 34% depending on the specific scan region. The reduction was highly significant (p < 0.001, Wilcoxon rank-sum test) for all six scan regions included in the NDRLS. Overall, 69% (806/1167) of surveys included in the analysis used IR. Conclusion: The use of IR in CT is achieving dose savings of 20–30% in routine practice in Australia. IR appears to be widely used by participants in the ARPANSA NDRLS with approximately 70% of surveys submitted employing this technique. Advances in knowledge: This study examines the impact of the use of IR on patient dose in CT on a national scale. PMID:26133224

  16. Acute reinforcing effects of low-dose nicotine nasal spray in humans.

    PubMed

    Perkins, K A; Grobe, J E; Caggiula, A; Wilson, A S; Stiller, R L

    1997-02-01

    Tobacco smoking behavior is reinforced by nicotine intake, but there has been little human research examining self-administration of nicotine per se, isolated from tobacco. In this study, 10 smokers (5 men, 5 women) who wanted to quit smoking sampled 0 (placebo), 0.75, and 1.5 ug/kg/spray nicotine via nasal spray during separate lab sessions before engaging in a free choice session, involving ad lib access to all three spray doses. Subjects also ad lib smoked during another session. For the group as a whole, neither nicotine spray dose was self-administered significantly more than placebo during the free choice session, suggesting low abuse potential. However, 4 of 10 subjects self-administered 1.5 ug/kg/spray on more than 50% of all sprays (vs. 33% chance) and were designated nicotine "choosers," while the others were "nonchoosers." Choosers responded to initial nicotine spray exposure during sampling sessions with greater positive subjective effects (similar to their responses to tobacco smoking), smoked more during the ad lib smoking session (i.e., self-administered more nicotine via tobacco smoking), and tended to be more heavily dependent smokers. They did not report greater withdrawal relief or less aversive effects from nicotine, suggesting their greater nicotine choice reflected greater positive reinforcement rather than negative reinforcement. These results are consistent with the few existing studies demonstrating that acute nicotine intake per se, in the absence of tobacco, may be reinforcing in some smokers.

  17. Single dose oral codeine, as a single agent, for acute postoperative pain in adults

    PubMed Central

    Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background Codeine is an opioid metabolised to active analgesic compounds, including morphine. It is widely available by prescription, and combination drugs including low doses of codeine are commonly available without prescription. Objectives To assess the efficacy, the time to onset of analgesia, the time to use of rescue medication and any associated adverse events of single dose oral codeine in acute postoperative pain. Search methods We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and PubMed to November 2009. Selection criteria Single oral dose, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of codeine for relief of established moderate to severe postoperative pain in adults. Data collection and analysis Studies were assessed for methodological quality and data independently extracted by two review authors. Summed total pain relief (TOTPAR) or pain intensity difference (SPID) over 4 to 6 hours were used to calculate the number of participants achieving at least 50% pain relief, which were used to calculate, with 95% confidence intervals, the relative benefit compared to placebo, and the number needed to treat (NNT) for one participant to experience at least 50% pain relief over 4 to 6 hours. Numbers using rescue medication over specified time periods, and time to use of rescue medication, were sought as additional measures of efficacy. Data on adverse events and withdrawals were collected. Main results Thirty-five studies were included (1223 participants received codeine 60 mg, 27 codeine 90 mg, and 1252 placebo). Combining all types of surgery (33 studies, 2411 participants), codeine 60 mg had an NNT of at least 50% pain relief over 4 to 6 hours of 12 (8.4 to 18) compared with placebo. At least 50% pain relief was achieved by 26% on codeine 60 mg and 17% on placebo. Following dental surgery the NNT was 21 (12 to 96) (15 studies, 1146 participants), and following other types of surgery the NNT was 6.8 (4.6 to 13) (18 studies, 1265 participants). The NNT to prevent

  18. Influence of Dose on Risk of Acute Urinary Retention After Iodine-125 Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Roeloffzen, Ellen M.A.; Battermann, Jan J.; Deursen, Marijke J.H. van; Monninkhof, Evelyn M.; Visscher, Mareije I.; Moerland, Marinus A.; Vulpen, Marco van

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To assess the influence of dose on the risk of acute urinary retention (AUR) after iodine-125 prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between January 2005 and December 2008, 714 consecutive patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with iodine-125 prostate brachytherapy at our department. All patients completed four imaging studies: magnetic resonance imaging before and 4 weeks after treatment and intraoperative three-dimensional transrectal ultrasonography before and after implantation. The development of AUR was prospectively recorded. The evaluated treatment and dosimetric parameters included prostate volume, number of needles and seeds used, intra- and postoperative prostate edema, percentage of prostate volume receiving 100%, 150%, and 200% of the prescribed dose to the prostate, minimal dose received by 90% of the prostate volume, and percentage of the urethra receiving 100%, 150%, and 200% of the prescribed dose. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine which factors were associated with AUR. Results: Of the 714 patients, 57 (8.0%) developed AUR. On univariate analysis, the following treatment and dosimetric factors were significantly associated with AUR: International Prostate Symptom Score (odds ratio [OR], 2.07, per 10-point increase), preimplant prostate volume (OR, 1.06), postimplant prostate volume (OR, 1.04), number of needles used (OR, 1.09), and number of seeds used (OR, 1.03). On multivariate analysis, the only independent predictive factors for AUR were pretreatment prostate volume (OR, 1.05) and International Prostate Symptom Score (OR, 1.76, per 10-point increase). Patients with a pretreatment prostate volume >35 cm{sup 3} had a 10.4% risk of developing AUR compared with 5.4% for those with a prostate volume of {<=}35 cm{sup 3}. No association was found between any of the dosimetric parameters and the development of AUR. Conclusion: The radiation dose, within the range studied, did not influence the risk of AUR

  19. Caudate neuronal recording in freely behaving animals following acute and chronic dose response methylphenidate exposure.

    PubMed

    Claussen, Catherine M; Dafny, Nachum

    2015-09-01

    The misuse and abuse of the psychostimulant, methylphenidate (MPD) the drug of choice in the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has seen a sharp uprising in recent years among both youth and adults for its cognitive enhancing effects and for recreational purposes. This uprise in illicit use has lead to many questions concerning the long-term consequences of MPD exposure. The objective of this study was to record animal behavior concomitantly with the caudate nucleus (CN) neuronal activity following acute and repetitive (chronic) dose response exposure to methylphenidate (MPD). A saline control and three MPD dose (0.6, 2.5, and 10.0mg/kg) groups were used. Behaviorally, the same MPD dose in some animals following chronic MPD exposure elicited behavioral sensitization and other animals elicited behavioral tolerance. Based on this finding, the CN neuronal population recorded from animals expressing behavioral sensitization was also evaluated separately from CN neurons recorded from animals expressing behavioral tolerance to chronic MPD exposure, respectively. Significant differences in CN neuronal population responses between the behaviorally sensitized and the behaviorally tolerant animals were observed for the 2.5 and 10.0mg/kg MPD exposed groups. For 2.5mg/kg MPD, behaviorally sensitized animals responded by decreasing their firing rates while behaviorally tolerant animals showed mainly an increase in their firing rates. The CN neuronal responses recorded from the behaviorally sensitized animals following 10.0mg/kg MPD responded by increasing their firing rates whereas the CN neuronal recordings from the behaviorally tolerant animals showed that approximately half decreased their firing rates in response to 10.0mg/kg MPD exposure. The comparison of percentage change in neuronal firing rates showed that the behaviorally tolerant animals trended to exhibit increases in their neuronal firing rates at ED1 following initial MPD exposure and

  20. Cancer risks after diagnostic doses of 131I with special reference to thyroid cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Holm, L.E. )

    1991-01-01

    Between 1951 and 1969 a total of 35,074 patients less than 75 years of age (mean = 44 years) were examined with diagnostic doses of 131I. The mean administered activity of 131I was 52 microCi and the radiation dose to the thyroid gland was on the average of 0.5 Gy. The cohort was matched with the Swedish Cancer Register for the years 1958-1984. During this period, 3746 cancers occurred more than 5 years after the 131I examination, and the resulting standardized incidence ratio (SIR) was 1.01 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.98 to 1.04). SIR for thyroid cancer was 1.18 (95% CI = 0.88 to 1.56). The risks for both cancer of all sites and for thyroid cancer were highest 5 to 9 years after examination (SIR = 1.07 and 2.06, respectively) and did not differ from unity thereafter. With greater than or equal to 10 years of follow-up, risk was not statistically associated with the dose of 131I.

  1. Cotrimoxazole plasma levels, dialyzer clearance and total removal by extended dialysis in a patient with acute kidney injury: risk of under-dosing using current dosing recommendations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dosing of antibiotics in critically ill patients is challenging. It becomes even more difficult if renal or hepatic impairment ensue. Modern means of renal replacement therapy are capable of removing antibiotics to a higher rate than decades ago, leaving clinicians with a high degree of uncertainty concerning the dose of antibiotics in this patient population. Cotrimoxazole, a combination of trimethoprim (TMP) and sulfamethoxazole (SMX) is frequently used in the treatment of several infections including Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP). Case presentation Here we describe a patient with acute kidney injury in which we investigated the TMP and SMX levels during the course of an ICU stay. Cotrimoxazole was administered every six hours i.v. in a dose of TMP/SMX 15/75 mg/kg/day. Extended dialysis was performed with a high-flux dialyzer. Blood samples, as well as pre- and postdialyzer samples and aliquots of the collected spent dialysate were collected. Observed peak concentrations (Cmax) were 7.51 mg/l for TMP and 80.80 mg/l for SMX. Decline of blood levels during extended dialysis (TMP 64%; SMX 84%) was mainly due to removal by the dialysis procedure, illustrated by the high dialyzer clearances (median of 4 extended dialysis sessions: TMP 94.0 / SMX 51.0 ml/min), as well as by the absolute amount of both substances in the collected spent dialysate (median of 6 extended dialysis sessions: TMP 556 mg / SMX 130 mg). Within the limitation of a case report our data from 4 consecutive extended dialysis sessions suggest that this procedure substantially removes both TMP and SMX. Conclusions Dose reduction, which is usually advocated in patients with acute kidney injury under renal replacement therapy, might lead to significant under-dosing. Pharmacokinetic studies for TMP/SMX dosing in this patient population are necessary to allow adequate dosing. PMID:23551893

  2. The Neuroprotection with Statin Therapy for Acute Recovery Trial (NeuSTART): an adaptive design phase I dose-escalation study of high-dose lovastatin in acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Elkind, Mitchell S. V.; Sacco, Ralph L.; MacArthur, Robert B.; Fink, Daniel J.; Peerschke, Ellinor; Andrews, Howard; Neils, Greg; Stillman, Josh; Corporan, Tania; Leifer, Dana; Cheung, Ken

    2014-01-01

    There is growing experimental and clinical evidence that by reducing downstream products of the mevalonate pathway other than cholesterol, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (‘statins’) have beneficial effects on endothelial function, coronary and cerebral blood flow, inflammation, and hemostasis. Statins have been shown in rodent models of acute ischemic stroke to reduce neuronal injury and infarct size in a dose-dependent fashion. The objective of this early phase trial will be to determine the maximal-tolerated dose of lovastatin for short-term acute stroke therapy. In this multicenter phase 1B dose-escalation and dose-finding study, 33 patients with acute ischemic stroke will be administered lovastatin in increasing doses from one to 10 mg/kg daily for 3 days beginning within 24 hours after symptom onset. The primary safety outcomewill be occurrence of myotoxicity or hepatotoxicity, defined by clinical and laboratory criteria, and the study is designed to determine the highest dose of lovastatin that can be administered with <10% risk of myotoxicity or hepatotoxicity. The statistical design of the study utilizes an adaptive design, the Continual Reassessment Method, which is novel to stroke trials, to find the optimal dosage. The dose–toxicity model is calibrated such that the method will eventually select a dose that causes 7–13% dose-limiting toxicity (within 3% of target). A sample size of 33 will ensure that estimates of any binary variables will have a 95% confidence interval of width ≤0·34, and enable us to detect any unexpected toxicity that occurs at 5% rate (in a non-dose-dependent fashion) with probability 0·82. The probability of choosing a dose for further trials with 25% or higher likelihood of toxicity is no more than 23%. The presently described trial represents a new approach for treatment of acute ischemic stroke, as well as a novel way of conducting a phase I trial, evaluating safety and determining an optimal dose of a potential

  3. PREDICTING THE ACUTE BEHAVIORAL EFFECTS OF TOLUENE INHALED FOR 24 HRS IN RATS: DOSE METRICS, METABOLISM AND BEHAVIORAL TOLERANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purpose: Recent research on the acute effects of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) suggests that extrapolation from short (~ 1 h) to long durations (up to 4 h) is improved by using estimates of brain toluene concentration ( Br[ToI)] instead of cumulative inhaled dose (C x t) as a...

  4. Acute Effects of Classroom Exercise Breaks on Executive Function and Math Performance: A Dose-Response Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howie, Erin K.; Schatz, Jeffrey; Pate, Russell R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the acute dose-response relationship of classroom exercise breaks with executive function and math performance in 9- to 12-year-old children by comparing 5-min, 10-min, or 20-min classroom exercise breaks to 10 min of sedentary classroom activity. Method: This study used a within-subjects…

  5. Oral Reference Dose for ethylene glycol based on oxalate crystal-induced renal tubule degeneration as the critical effect

    SciTech Connect

    Snellings, William M.; Corley, Richard A.; McMartin, K. E.; Kirman, Christopher R.; Bobst, Sol M.

    2013-03-31

    Several risk assessments have been conducted for ethylene glycol (EG). These assessments identified the kidney as the primary target organ for chronic effects. None of these assessments have incorporated the robust database of species-specific toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic studies with EG and its metabolites in defining uncertainty factors used in reference value derivation. Pertinent in vitro and in vivo studies related to one of these metabolites, calcium oxalate, and its role in crystal-induced nephropathy are summarized, and the weight of evidence to establish the mode of action for renal toxicity is reviewed. Previous risk assessments were based on chronic rat studies using a strain of rat that was later determined to be less sensitive to the toxic effects of EG. A recently published 12-month rat study using the more sensitive strain (Wistar) was selected to determine the point of departure for a new risk assessment. This approach incorporated toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic data and used Benchmark Dose methods to calculate a Human Equivalent Dose. Uncertainty factors were chosen, depending on the quality of the studies available, the extent of the database, and scientific judgment. The Reference Dose for long-term repeat oral exposure to EG was determined to be 15 mg/kg bw/d.

  6. Acute lethal toxicity of some reference chemicals to freshwater fishes of Scandinavia

    SciTech Connect

    Oikari, A.O.J.

    1987-07-01

    Relevance of the choice of a test organism intended to be representative for a given environment seems to be under continual debate in aquatic ecotoxicology. For instance, it is commonly argue that acute toxicity tests with rainbow trout, the species most often recommended as a standard cold water teleost, were not representative for Nordic countries because the species is an alien in local faunas. A comparative study with several freshwater species was therefore initiated to clarify the validity of this assumption. As a first approximation, standard LC 50 assays were conducted. The species used were chosen only on the basis of their local availability, i.e, they randomly represented the fish fauna of Nordic inland waters. Furthermore, inter-species variation of toxicity response was compared with certain other, quantitatively more important, intra-species sources of variability affecting the toxicity of chemicals. Use of reference toxicants has been recommended as a means of standardizing bioassays. Compounds, characteristic of effluents from the pulp and paper industry, were selected for the present study. The toxicity of organic acids such a phenols and resin acids, as well as that of pupmill effluents, strongly depends on water pH. Because of the possibility that species differences could exist in this respect, effects of water acidity on toxicity of these types of substances to a randomly selected local species was investigated. Finally, as an example of the biological source of assay variability, the effect of yolk absorption was studied with a subsequent crisis period due to moderate starvation under laboratory conditions.

  7. Acute Hematological Effects in Mice Exposed to the Expected Doses, Dose-rates, and Energies of Solar Particle Event-like Proton Radiation.

    PubMed

    Sanzari, Jenine K; Cengel, Keith A; Wan, X Steven; Rusek, Adam; Kennedy, Ann R

    2014-07-01

    NASA has funded several projects that have provided evidence for the radiation risk in space. One radiation concern arises from solar particle event (SPE) radiation, which is composed of energetic electrons, protons, alpha particles and heavier particles. SPEs are unpredictable and the accompanying SPE radiation can place astronauts at risk of blood cell death, contributing to a weakened immune system and increased susceptibility to infection. The doses, dose rates, and energies of the proton radiation expected to occur during a SPE have been simulated at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, delivering total body doses to mice. Hematological values were evaluated at acute time points, up to 24 hrs. post-radiation exposure.

  8. Acute Hematological Effects in Mice Exposed to the Expected Doses, Dose-rates, and Energies of Solar Particle Event-like Proton Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Sanzari, Jenine K.; Cengel, Keith A.; Wan, X. Steven; Rusek, Adam; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2014-01-01

    NASA has funded several projects that have provided evidence for the radiation risk in space. One radiation concern arises from solar particle event (SPE) radiation, which is composed of energetic electrons, protons, alpha particles and heavier particles. SPEs are unpredictable and the accompanying SPE radiation can place astronauts at risk of blood cell death, contributing to a weakened immune system and increased susceptibility to infection. The doses, dose rates, and energies of the proton radiation expected to occur during a SPE have been simulated at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, delivering total body doses to mice. Hematological values were evaluated at acute time points, up to 24 hrs. post-radiation exposure. PMID:25202654

  9. Acute hematological effects in mice exposed to the expected doses, dose-rates, and energies of solar particle event-like proton radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanzari, Jenine K.; Cengel, Keith A.; Steven Wan, X.; Rusek, Adam; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2014-07-01

    NASA has funded several projects that have provided evidence for the radiation risk in space. One radiation concern arises from solar particle event (SPE) radiation, which is composed of energetic electrons, protons, alpha particles and heavier particles. SPEs are unpredictable and the accompanying SPE radiation can place astronauts at risk of blood cell death, contributing to a weakened immune system and increased susceptibility to infection. The doses, dose rates, and energies of the proton radiation expected to occur during an SPE have been simulated at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, delivering total body doses to mice. Hematological values were evaluated at acute time points, up to 24 hours post-radiation exposure.

  10. Local patient dose diagnostic reference levels in pediatric interventional cardiology in Chile using age bands and patient weight values

    SciTech Connect

    Ubeda, Carlos; Miranda, Patricia; Vano, Eliseo

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: To present the results of a patient dose evaluation program in pediatric cardiology and propose local diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for different types of procedure and age range, in addition to suggesting approaches to correlate patient dose values with patient weight. This study was the first conducted in Latin America for pediatric interventional cardiology under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency. Methods: Over three years, the following data regarding demographic and patient dose values were collected: age, gender, weight, height, number of cine series, total number of cine frames, fluoroscopy time (FT), and two dosimetric quantities, dose-area product (DAP) and cumulative dose (CD), at the patient entrance reference point. The third quartile values for FT, DAP, CD, number of cine series, and the DAP/body weight ratio were proposed as the set of quantities to use as local DRLs. Results: Five hundred and seventeen patients were divided into four age groups. Sample sizes by age group were 120 for <1 yr; 213 for 1 to <5 yr; 82 for 5 to <10 yr; and 102 for 10 to <16 yr. The third quartile values obtained for DAP by diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and age range were 1.17 and 1.11 Gy cm{sup 2} for <1 yr; 1.74 and 1.90 Gy cm{sup 2} for 1 to <5 yr; 2.83 and 3.22 Gy cm{sup 2} for 5 to <10 yr; and 7.34 and 8.68 Gy cm{sup 2} for 10 to <16 yr, respectively. The third quartile value obtained for the DAP/body weight ratio for the full sample of procedures was 0.17 (Gy cm{sup 2}/kg) for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Conclusions: The data presented in this paper are an initial attempt at establishing local DRLs in pediatric interventional cardiology, from a large sample of procedures for the standard age bands used in Europe, complemented with the values of the ratio between DAP and patient weight. This permits a rough estimate of DRLs for different patient weights and the refining of these values for the age bands when there

  11. Acute oral administration of low doses of methylphenidate targets calretinin neurons in the rat septal area

    PubMed Central

    García-Avilés, Álvaro; Albert-Gascó, Héctor; Arnal-Vicente, Isabel; Elhajj, Ebtisam; Sanjuan-Arias, Julio; Sanchez-Perez, Ana María; Olucha-Bordonau, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Methylphenidate (MPD) is a commonly administered drug to treat children suffering from attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Alterations in septal driven hippocampal theta rhythm may underlie attention deficits observed in these patients. Amongst others, the septo-hippocampal connections have long been acknowledged to be important in preserving hippocampal function. Thus, we wanted to ascertain if MPD administration, which improves attention in patients, could affect septal areas connecting with hippocampus. We used low and orally administered MPD doses (1.3, 2.7 and 5 mg/Kg) to rats what mimics the dosage range in humans. In our model, we observed no effect when using 1.3 mg/Kg MPD; whereas 2.7 and 5 mg/Kg induced a significant increase in c-fos expression specifically in the medial septum (MS), an area intimately connected to the hippocampus. We analyzed dopaminergic areas such as nucleus accumbens and striatum, and found that only 5 mg/Kg induced c-fos levels increase. In these areas tyrosine hydroxylase correlated well with c-fos staining, whereas in the MS the sparse tyrosine hydroxylase fibers did not overlap with c-fos positive neurons. Double immunofluorescence of c-fos with neuronal markers in the septal area revealed that co-localization with choline acethyl transferase, parvalbumin, and calbindin with c-fos did not change with MPD treatment; whereas, calretinin and c-fos double labeled neurons increased after MPD administration. Altogether, these results suggest that low and acute doses of methylphenidate primary target specific populations of caltretinin medial septal neurons. PMID:25852493

  12. Low-dose intravenous nitrite improves hemodynamics in a canine model of acute pulmonary thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Dias-Junior, Carlos A C; Gladwin, Mark T; Tanus-Santos, Jose E

    2006-12-15

    Acute pulmonary thomboembolism (APT)-induced pulmonary hypertension can be counteracted by activating the nitric oxide (NO)-cGMP pathway. Recent studies have demonstrated that the naturally occurring anion nitrite (NO(2)(-)) is a bioactive storage reservoir for NO, and is reduced to NO under conditions of hypoxia and acidosis. We hypothesized that nitrite infused intravenously could attenuate the hemodynamic changes associated with APT. APT was induced with autologous blood clots injected into the right atrium in mongrel dogs. After APT (or saline), the dogs received an intravenous nitrite (or saline) infusion (6.75 micromol/kg over 15 min and then 0.28 micromol/kg/min) and hemodynamic evaluations were carried out for 2 h. Plasma nitrite concentrations were measured using ozone-based reductive chemiluminescence methodologies. APT decreased cardiac index (CI) and increased pulmonary vascular resistance index (PVRI); these effects were improved during infusions of sodium nitrite. Accordingly, nitrite infusion increased cardiac index by 28%, reduced the PVRI by 48%, and the systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI) by 21% in embolized dogs, suggesting a greater effect on the ischemic embolized vascular system than the systemic circulation following embolization. Interestingly, in nonembolized control dogs the same nitrite infusion decreased MAP and CI (all P<0.05). The nitrite infusion increased plasma nitrite concentrations by approximately 2 microM, and produced dose-dependent effects on PVRI, MAP, and SVRI. Remarkably, blood levels of nitrite as low as 500 nM decreased PVRI and SVRI in this model, suggesting a potential role of nitrite in physiological blood flow regulation. These results suggest that a low-dose nitrite infusion produces beneficial hemodynamic effects in a dog model of APT. These findings suggest a new therapeutic application for nitrite and support emerging evidence for a surprisingly potent and potentially physiological vasoactivity of nitrite.

  13. Reference computations of public dose and cancer risk from airborne releases of plutonium. Nuclear safety technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, V.L.

    1993-12-23

    This report presents results of computations of doses and the associated health risks of postulated accidental atmospheric releases from the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) of one gram of weapons-grade plutonium in a form that is respirable. These computations are intended to be reference computations that can be used to evaluate a variety of accident scenarios by scaling the dose and health risk results presented here according to the amount of plutonium postulated to be released, instead of repeating the computations for each scenario. The MACCS2 code has been used as the basis of these computations. The basis and capabilities of MACCS2 are summarized, the parameters used in the evaluations are discussed, and results are presented for the doses and health risks to the public, both the Maximum Offsite Individual (a maximally exposed individual at or beyond the plant boundaries) and the population within 50 miles of RFP. A number of different weather scenarios are evaluated, including constant weather conditions and observed weather for 1990, 1991, and 1992. The isotopic mix of weapons-grade plutonium will change as it ages, the {sup 241}Pu decaying into {sup 241}Am. The {sup 241}Am reaches a peak concentration after about 72 years. The doses to the bone surface, liver, and whole body will increase slightly but the dose to the lungs will decrease slightly. The overall cancer risk will show almost no change over this period. This change in cancer risk is much smaller than the year-to-year variations in cancer risk due to weather. Finally, x/Q values are also presented for other applications, such as for hazardous chemical releases. These include the x/Q values for the MOI, for a collocated worker at 100 meters downwind of an accident site, and the x/Q value integrated over the population out to 50 miles.

  14. Acute small bowel toxicity and preoperative chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer: Investigating dose-volume relationships and role for inverse planning

    SciTech Connect

    Tho, Lye Mun . E-mail: l.tho@beatson.gla.ac.uk; Glegg, Martin; Paterson, Jennifer; Yap, Christina; MacLeod, Alice; McCabe, Marie; McDonald, Alexander C.

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: The relationship between volume of irradiated small bowel (VSB) and acute toxicity in rectal cancer radiotherapy is poorly quantified, particularly in patients receiving concurrent preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Using treatment planning data, we studied a series of such patients. Methods and Materials: Details of 41 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer were reviewed. All received 45 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks, 3-4 fields three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with daily 5-fluorouracil and folinic acid during Weeks 1 and 5. Toxicity was assessed prospectively in a weekly clinic. Using computed tomography planning software, the VSB was determined at 5 Gy dose intervals (V{sub 5}, V{sub 1}, etc.). Eight patients with maximal VSB had dosimetry and radiobiological modeling outcomes compared between inverse and conformal three-dimensional planning. Results: VSB correlated strongly with diarrheal severity at every dose level (p < 0.03), with strongest correlation at lowest doses. Median VSB differed significantly between patients experiencing Grade 0-1 and Grade 2-4 diarrhea (p {<=} 0.05). No correlation was found with anorexia, nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps, age, body mass index, sex, tumor position, or number of fields. Analysis of 8 patients showed that inverse planning reduced median dose to small bowel by 5.1 Gy (p = 0.008) and calculated late normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) by 67% (p = 0.016). We constructed a model using mathematical analysis to predict for acute diarrhea occurring at V{sub 5} and V{sub 15}. Conclusions: A strong dose-volume relationship exists between VSB and acute diarrhea at all dose levels during preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Our constructed model may be useful in predicting toxicity, and this has been derived without the confounding influence of surgical excision on bowel function. Inverse planning can reduce calculated dose to small bowel and late NTCP, and its clinical role warrants further

  15. Correlation between bone marrow dose volumes and acute hematological toxicity in postoperative gynecological cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qian; Jiang, Ming-Hua; Chen, Jing; Liu, Wei; Zhu, Bi-Qing; Lu, E-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify the association between radiation dose volume and acute hematological toxicity (HT) in postoperative gynecological cancer patients receiving whole pelvic radiotherapy (RT) or intensity-modulated RT (IMRT), a principal component regression model was used to calculate HT. Methods: Women (n=100) receiving with or without chemotherapy RT were retrospectively analyzed, 52 of whom received chemotherapy (paclitaxel and nedaplatin). The pelvis and lumbar vertebrae, defined as the prolong-pelvic bone marrow, were divided into the (1) combined ilium, ischium and pubis and the (2) lumbar vertebrae and the sacrum. The V5-V40 of subsides was calculated. The complete blood counts were recorded weekly. The principal component analysis was performed on volumes which generated the principal components (PCs), followed by using a logistic regression model. Results: Forty-seven patients presented with grade 2-3 HT during RT. Chemotherapy increased the incidence of HT compared with RT alone (70.21% vs. 29.79%; p=0.001). Fifty-three patients with persistent HT developed more serious HT at an earlier stage of RT. The chemotherapy cycles and three PCs associated with grade 2-3 HT was identified to form the resulting principal logistic regression model. Conclusion: A new method to calculate the NTCP was achieved by PCs logistic regression. PMID:28083062

  16. Evaluation of alanine as a reference dosimeter for therapy level dose comparisons in megavoltage electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, Malcolm; Sharpe, Peter; Vörös, Sándor

    2015-04-01

    When comparing absorbed dose standards from different laboratories (e.g. National Measurement Institutes, NMIs, for Key or Supplementary comparisons) it is rarely possible to carry out a direct comparison of primary standard instruments, and therefore some form of transfer detector is required. Historically, air-filled, unsealed ionization chambers have been used because of the long history of using these instruments, very good stability over many years, and ease of transport. However, the use of ion chambers for therapy-level comparisons is not without its problems. Findings from recent investigations suggest that ion chambers are prone to non-random variations, they are not completely robust to standard courier practices, and failure at any step in a comparison can render all measurements potentially useless. An alternative approach is to identify a transfer system that is insensitive to some of these concerns—effectively a dosimeter that is inexpensive, simple to use, robust, but with sufficient precision and of a size relevant to the disseminated quantity in question. The alanine dosimetry system has been successfully used in a number of situations as an audit dosimeter and therefore the purpose of this investigation was to determine whether alanine could also be used as the transfer detector for dosimetric comparisons, which require a lower value for the measurement uncertainty. A measurement protocol was developed for comparing primary standards of absorbed dose to water in high-energy electron beams using alanine pellets irradiated in a water-equivalent plastic phantom. A trial comparison has been carried out between three NMIs and has indicated that alanine is a suitable alternative to ion chambers, with the system used achieving a precision of 0.1%. Although the focus of the evaluation was on the performance of the dosimeter, the comparison results are encouraging, showing agreement at the level of the combined uncertainties (~0.6%). Based on this

  17. Derived reference doses for three compounds used in the photovoltaics industry: Copper indium diselenide, copper gallium diselenide, and cadmium telluride

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Bernholc, N.; DePhillips, M.P.; Viren, J.

    1995-07-06

    Polycrystalline thin-film photovoltaic modules made from copper indium diselenide (CIS), copper gallium diselenide (CGS), and cadmium telluride (CdTe) arc nearing commercial development. A wide range of issues are being examined as these materials move from the laboratory to large-scale production facilities to ensure their commercial success. Issues of traditional interest include module efficiency, stability and cost. More recently, there is increased focus given to environmental, health and safety issues surrounding the commercialization of these same devices. An examination of the toxicological properties of these materials, and their chemical parents is fundamental to this discussion. Chemicals that can present large hazards to human health or the environment are regulated often more strictly than those that are less hazardous. Stricter control over how these materials are handled and disposed can increase the costs associated with the production and use of these modules dramatically. Similarly, public perception can be strongly influenced by the inherent biological hazard that these materials possess. Thus, this report: presents a brief background tutorial on how toxicological data are developed and used; overviews the toxicological data available for CIS, CGS and CdTe; develops ``reference doses`` for each of these compounds; compares the reference doses for these compounds with those of their parents; discusses the implications of these findings to photovoltaics industry.

  18. The point of transition on the dose-effect curve as a reference point in the evaluation of in vitro toxicity data.

    PubMed

    Sand, Salomon; Ringblom, Joakim; Håkansson, Helen; Öberg, Mattias

    2012-10-01

    Dose-effect evaluation is an increasingly important step of health risk assessment. The foreseen increase of in vitro methods argues for the development and evaluation of a clearly defined reference points for dose-effect modelling of in vitro data. In the present study, the traditional use of a concentration corresponding to 10% or 50% of the maximal effect (EC₁₀ or EC₅₀) is compared with a strategy, under which, a reference point (Benchmark dose, BMD(T) ) is calculated that represents the dose where the slope of the dose-effect curve changes the most (per unit log-dose) in the low dose region. To illustrate the importance of the reference point, dose-effect data on CYP1A1 enzyme activity for 30 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners were evaluated in order to calculate relative potencies, in relation to 2,3,7,8-TCDD, with confidence intervals (CIs). The present study shows that the interpretation of the results as potency and rank orders potentially depends on the choice and definition of the reference point (BMD(T) , EC₁₀ or EC₅₀). This is important as potency ranking may be used as a method for screening and prioritization, in research, in policy development or in pharmaceutical development. The use of the BMD(T) implies a focus on the change of structure in the parameter's dose-response rather than a particular percentage change in the response in such a parameter. In conclusion, the BMD(T) may be used as an alternative base for evaluation of dose-effect relationships in vitro. It offers an objective geometrical definition of a reference point in the low-dose region of the dose-effect curve.

  19. Behavioral effects of low, acute doses of morphine in nontolerant groups of rats in an open-field test.

    PubMed

    Schiørring, E; Hecht, A

    1979-06-28

    Groups of eight rats were treated with low, acute doses of morphine (2, 3.5, and 5 mg/kg body weight) or a corresponding volume of isotonic NaCl solution. The formation of groups, certain other features of social interaction, plus some individual items were recorded. Morphine induced an increase in the frequency of group formations without disruption of grooming and rearing patterns. The total picture of morphine-induced behavior changes at the dose levels used might be characterized as a polyactivation (or a varied stimulation); different from the selective stimulation reported for d-amphetamine.

  20. Combined acute interstitial pneumonitis and pancytopenia induced by low-dose methotrexate in a hemodialysis patient treated for bullous pemphigoid*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haibo; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Min; Yan, Wenliang; Sang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Methotrexate has been widely used for many years in the treatment of a variety of diseases. Acute pneumonitis and bone marrow suppression are very serious side effects in methotrexate treatment. A 48-year-old man with end-stage renal disease undergoing chronic hemodialysis developed combined acute pneumonitis and pancytopenia after a cumulative dose of 20 mg methotrexate for bullous pemphigoid. Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) can effi ciently decrease serum methotrexate concentration. A rapid improvement of clinical symptoms and resolution of pulmonary opacifi cation were found after CRRT. Blood cell counts returned to normal after component blood transfusion and cytokine supportive therapy. Patients with impaired renal function are at high risk of methotrexate toxicity, and low-dose methotrexate should be prescribed with great caution. PMID:26312671

  1. Acute renal failure after high-dose antibiotic bone cement: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    James, Alexia; Larson, Trent

    2015-07-01

    High-dose antibiotic-loaded bone cement (ALBC) spacers are commonly used to treat prosthetic joint infections following total hip and knee arthroplasties. This methodology can provide high local antibiotic concentrations while minimizing systemic exposure and toxicity. The occurrence of acute kidney injury (AKI) is rarely reported. Available literature suggests that the rate may be higher than previously thought. We report a case of significant systemic tobramycin absorption with concomitant acute renal failure in a 69-year-old female following the implantation of a high-dose ALBC spacer containing both tobramycin and vancomycin. The tobramycin level 24 h post-surgery was 5.8 mcg/mL. Due to concomitant renal failure, antibiotic clearance was poor and resulted in prolonged exposure to elevated aminoglycoside levels. Recovery of renal function occurred, but clinicians should be vigilant in considering the potential impact ALBC spacers can have on post-operative renal function if antibiotic elution is higher than expected.

  2. Background radiation, electrical work, and some other exposures associated with acute myeloid leukemia in a case-referent study.

    PubMed

    Flodin, U; Fredriksson, M; Persson, B; Hardell, L; Axelson, O

    1986-01-01

    The effect of potential risk factors for acute myeloid leukemia was evaluated in a case-referent study encompassing 59 cases and 354 referents, all of whom were alive. Information on exposure was obtained through a questionnaire mailed to the subjects. The possible effect of background radiation was evaluated by means of a gamma radiation index, which accounted for the differences between cases and referents in this respect, i.e., in time spent in concrete buildings both at home and at work places. In the 20-54 yr old age group, there was an association between leukemia morbidity and index of background radiation. X-ray treatment and electrical work were also associated with increased rate ratios. With regard to solvents, only styrene appeared as a risk factor, but the number of exposed subjects was small. Other exposures were less clearly associated with increased risks.

  3. Dose-response relationship of an environmental mixture of pyrethroids following an acute oral administration in the rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dose-response relationship of an environmental mixture of pyrethroids following an acute oral administration in the rat M.F. Hughes1, D.G. Ross1, J.M. Starr1, E.J. Scollon1,2, M.J. Wolansky1,3, K.M. Crofton1, M.J. DeVito1,4 1U.S. EPA, ORD, Research Triangle Park, NC, 2U.S. EPA,...

  4. Low-dose methotrexate-induced acute interstitial pneumonitis: Report of two cases from South India and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Iyyadurai, Ramya; Carey, Ronald Albert Benton; Satyendra, Sowmya

    2016-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is an antimetabolite used as a disease-modifying agent for various rheumatological conditions. We report two patients who were treated with daily low-dose MTX and developed acute interstitial pneumonitis requiring hospital admission. MTX-induced pneumonitis is a rare life-threatening side effect, high index of clinical suspicion is required, treatment is mainly withdrawal of MTX, supportive therapy, and adjunctive steroids, outcome is good if condition is recognized early, and appropriate treatment is given. PMID:28349012

  5. Acute exposure to acid fog: influence of breathing pattern on effective dose.

    PubMed

    Bowes, S M; Francis, M; Laube, B L; Frank, R

    1995-02-01

    Concern about the possible adverse health effects of acid fog has been fed by two observations: air pollution disasters earlier in this century were typically associated with fog, and current samples of fog water can be strongly acid. To study the acute effects of acid fog on the lung, the authors generated a monodisperse 10 microM MMAD aerosol of H2SO4 with a pH of 2.0 and a nominal concentration of 500 micrograms/m3. They exposed seven healthy young men on alternate days to acid or control equiosmolar NaCl aerosol during 40 min of resting ventilation and 20 min of exercise; the latter was sufficiently intense to induce oronasal breathing. Exposure was by means of a head dome, a head-only exposure device that permitted continuous measurement (unfettered breathing) of Vr, f, VE, and the onset and persistence of oronasal breathing. In this article the authors compare the relative importance of parameters contributing to the between-subject variability in estimated hydrogen ion dose to the lower airways (H+LAW), based on analysis of variance. Physiologic parameters accounted for 70% of the variability, of which 34% was due to differences in duration of oronasal breathing (tON) and 36% to differences in ventilation rate during oronasal breathing (VE(ON)); inhaled hydrogen ion concentration [H+], the environmental parameter, contributed only 30%. Minute ventilation at the time of transition from nasal to oronasal breathing varied significantly among subjects even if normalized to FVC, an index of lung size.

  6. Prevention of venous thromboembolism in hospitalized acutely ill medical patients: focus on the clinical utility of (low-dose) fondaparinux.

    PubMed

    Di Nisio, Marcello; Porreca, Ettore

    2013-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a frequent complication among acutely ill medical patients hospitalized for congestive heart failure, acute respiratory insufficiency, rheumatologic disorders, and acute infectious and/or inflammatory diseases. Based on robust data from randomized controlled studies and meta-analyses showing a reduced incidence of VTE by 40% to about 60% with pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis, prevention of VTE with low molecular weight heparin (LMWH), unfractionated heparin (UFH), or fondaparinux is currently recommended in all at-risk hospitalized acutely ill medical patients. In patients who are bleeding or are at high risk for major bleeding, mechanical prophylaxis with graduated compression stockings or intermittent pneumatic compression may be suggested. Thromboprophylaxis is generally continued for 6 to 14 days or for the duration of hospitalization. Selected cases could benefit from extended thromboprophylaxis beyond this period, although the risk of major bleeding remains a concern, and additional studies are needed to identify patients who may benefit from prolonged prophylaxis. For hospitalized acutely ill medical patients with renal insufficiency, a low dose (1.5 mg once daily) of fondaparinux or prophylactic LMWH subcutaneously appears to have a safe profile, although proper evaluation in randomized studies is lacking. The evidence on the use of prophylaxis for VTE in this latter group of patients, as well as in those at higher risk of bleeding complications, such as patients with thrombocytopenia, remains scarce. For critically ill patients hospitalized in intensive care units with no contraindications, LMWH or UFH are recommended, with frequent and careful assessment of the risk of bleeding. In this review, we discuss the evidence for use of thromboprophylaxis for VTE in acutely ill hospitalized medical patients, with a focus on (low-dose) fondaparinux.

  7. Decreasing incidence of acute appendicitis, with special reference to the consumption of dietary fiber.

    PubMed

    Arnbjörnsson, E; Asp, N G; Westin, S I

    1982-01-01

    The incidence of acute appendicitis and the total number of appendectomies performed in the adult population admitted to our medical center are both decreasing. The cause is not clear. Better nutrition and the wide-spread use of antibiotics are two possible factors which come to mind, but we know of no scientific evidence that these are responsible. There has been a slight decrease in the mean dietary fiber content in the Swedish diet during the last three decades. The decreased incidence of acute appendicitis cannot therefore be correlated with an increase in the mean dietary fiber intake.

  8. A study of acute muscle dysfunction with particular reference to dengue myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rajesh; Holla, Vikram V.; Kumar, Vijay; Jain, Amita; Husain, Nuzhat; Malhotra, Kiran Preet; Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Malhotra, Hardeep Singh; Sharma, Praveen Kumar; Kumar, Neeraj

    2017-01-01

    Background: Acute myopathy is a common cause of acute motor quadriparesis which has various etiologies with different courses of illness and prognosis depending on the cause. Understanding this diversity helps us in proper approach toward diagnosis, predicting the prognosis, and possible complications and in improving the treatments that are being provided. This study was planned to study the clinical, electrophysiological, and etiological profile of patients presenting with acute myopathy. We also studied how dengue-related acute myopathy differs from other causes and also difference between myopathy due to myositis and hypokalemia in cases of dengue. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective, observational study involving all clinically suspected cases of acute myopathy of not more than 4 weeks duration with raised serum creatine kinase (CK) level. They were subjected to detailed clinical evaluation along with hematological, biochemical, microbiological, and electrophysiological studies and followed-up for outcome at 1 and 3 months. Muscle biopsy and histopathological examination were done in selected patients after taking informed consent. Statistical analysis was performed by appropriate methods using SPSS version 16.0 (Chicago, IL, USA). Results: We evaluated thirty patients of acute myopathy with raised CK level. Seventeen patients had fever, 11 had myalgia, and 5 had skin lesions. All presented with symmetric weakness, 17 (56.7%) patients having predominantly proximal weakness, neck or truncal weakness in 6 (20%), hyporeflexia in 12 (40%), with mean Medical Research Council (MRC) sum score of 46.67 ± 6.0. Eight (mean modified Barthel index [MBI] at presentation - 15 ± 3.7) patients had poor functional status according to MBI and 15 according to modified Rankin scale (MRS) (mean MRS score - 2.5 ± 1.2). Etiology was dengue viral infection in 14 patients; hypokalemia due to various causes other than dengue in 8; pyomyositis in 3; dermatomyositis

  9. Correlation between the dose and development of acute tolerance to the hypothermic effect of THC.

    PubMed

    Uran, B; Tulunay, F C; Ayhan, I H; Ulkü, E; Kaymakçalan, S

    1980-01-01

    The administration of 0.3-40 mg/kg delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) produced a dose-dependent hypothermia in rats. The maximal hypothermic effect was obtained with the dose of 2.5 mg/kg of THC. When the same doses of THC were repeated on days 2 and 3, tolerance to the hypothermic effect of THC was apparent. Doses of THC higher than 2.5 mg/kg induced a significant and dose-dependent tolerance after the first administration whereas with the lower doses, tolerance was only apparent after the second injection. The possible mechanism of these effects of THC is discussed.

  10. Meta-analysis of high doses of ambroxol treatment for acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome based on randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiangdong; Li, Suwei; Zhang, Jiuzhi; Zhang, Yongli; Han, Lili; Deng, Qiuming; Wan, Xianyao

    2014-11-01

    This study seeks to evaluate the potential benefits of high doses of ambroxol treatment for acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) by conducting a meta-analysis based on randomized controlled trials (RCTs). We searched the Pubmed, Embase, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Wanfang databases through December 2013. Only RCTs evaluating high doses of ambroxol (≥15 mg/kg or 1000 mg/day) treatment for patients with ALI/ARDS were selected. We included 10 RCTs involving 508 patients. Adjuvant treatment with high doses of ambroxol increased PaO(2)/FiO(2) (weight mean differences [WMD] = 69.18, 95% confidence intervals [CI]: 41.71-96.65), PO(2) (WMD = 11.74, 95% CI: 8.50-14.99), and SaO(2) (WMD = 2.15, 95% CI: 1.60-2.71) compared with usual treatment. Treatment with high doses of ambroxol appeared to reduce serum tumor necrosis factor-α level (WMD -7.92 µg/L; 95% CI, -10.94 to -4.9) and interleukin-6 level (WMD = -20.65 µg/L, 95% CI: -24.74 to -16.55) and to increase serum superoxide dismutase level (WMD = 19.07 NU/mL, 95% CI: 6.16-31.97). The findings suggest that treatment with high doses of ambroxol appears to improve PaO(2)/FiO(2), PO(2), and SaO(2), and the benefits might be related to ambroxol's anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

  11. Acute parietal and chief cell changes induced by a lethal dose of lipopolysaccharide in mouse stomach before thrombus formation.

    PubMed

    Ito, K; Ishida, K; Shishido, T; Tabata, H; Miura, H; Okamiya, H; Hanada, T

    2000-01-01

    The common lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced gastric lesions, such as erosions or ulcers, have been investigated in depth. Little is known, however, about the acute gastric lesions following a high dose of LPS. In a time-course study, ICR female mice were given a high subcutaneous dose of LPS (50 mg/kg). Mice were sacrificed at 4, 6, 12, and 24 hours after dosing and were assessed histopathologically for acute gastric lesions. The major gastric changes were seen in the fundic region and included vacuolar degeneration of parietal cells and apoptosis of chief cells. The vacuole in parietal cells was apparent as early as 4 hours postinjection (PI), and apoptosis of chief cells was apparent at 12 hours PI. Thrombus formation, in contrast, was not seen until 24 hours PI. No erosion, ulcer, or hemorrhage was seen in any gastric region in any of the treated animals at 24 hours PI. These results indicate that a subcutaneous high dose of LPS in mice causes vacuolar degeneration of parietal cells and apoptosis of chief cells before thrombus formation or subsequent ulcerative lesions.

  12. [Experiences with polychemotherapy of acute leukemias in adults with special reference to the COAP combination].

    PubMed

    Gürtler, R; Raderecht, C

    1975-01-01

    The authors give a report on their experiences with polychemotherapy in 77 acute leukaemias in adults. On this occasion the COAP combination was identified to be well effective and to be an enrichment of therapy because of its low side effects.

  13. Acute toxicity, twenty-eight days repeated dose toxicity and genotoxicity of vanadyl trehalose in kunming mice.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Pingzhe; Ni, Zaizhong; Wang, Bin; Ma, Baicheng; Duan, Huikun; Li, Xiaodan; Ma, Xiaofeng; Wei, Qian; Ji, Xiangzhen; Liu, Qiqi; Xing, Shuguang; Li, Minggang

    2017-04-01

    A new trend has been developed using vanadium and organic ligands to form novel compounds in order to improve the beneficial actions and reduce the toxicity of vanadium compounds. In present study, vanadyl trehalose was explored the oral acute toxicity, 28 days repeated dose toxicity and genotoxicity in Kunming mice. The Median Lethal Dose (LD50) of vanadyl trehalose was revealed to be 1000 mg/kg body weight in fasted Kunming mice. Stomach and intestine were demonstrated to be the main target organs of vanadyl trehalose through 28 days repeated dose toxicity study. And vanadyl trehalose also showed particular genotoxicity through mouse bone marrow micronucleus and mouse sperm malformation assay. In brief, vanadyl trehalose presented certain, but finite toxicity, which may provide experimental basis for the clinical application.

  14. Idarubicin appears equivalent to dose-intense daunorubicin for remission induction in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Trifilio, Steven; Zhou, Zheng; Mehta, Jayesh; Czerniak, Colleen; Pi, Judy; Greenberg, Deborah; Koslosky, Molly; Pantiru, Mihaela; Altman, Jessica

    2013-08-01

    Daunorubicin has historically been considered the anthracycline of choice at many cancer centers for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Drug shortages have required the substitution of daunorubicin with idarubicin. Randomized studies have shown idarubicin (10-12mg/m(2)) to be comparable or superior to standard dose daunorubicin (45-60mg/m(2)) for achieving complete remission (CR). Whether these results can be extrapolated to dose-intense daunorubicin (90mg/m(2)), recently shown to improve CR rates when compared to standard daunorubicin doses remains uncertain. This observational study was conducted at Northwestern Memorial Hospital (NMH) to compare CR rates. The results suggest idarubicin is equivalent to daunorubicin, and for some subsets of patients, idarubicin may have superior CR rates.

  15. Acute effects of low and high dose alcohol on smoking lapse behavior in a laboratory analogue task

    PubMed Central

    Kahler, Christopher W.; Metrik, Jane; Spillane, Nichea S.; Day, Anne; Leventhal, Adam M.; McKee, Sherry A.; Tidey, Jennifer W.; McGeary, John E.; Knopik, Valerie S.; Rohsenow, Damaris J.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Smoking lapses (i.e., returns to smoking after quitting) often occur following alcohol consumption with observational data suggesting greater quantities of alcohol lead to greater risk. However, a causal dose-dependent effect of alcohol consumption on smoking lapse behavior has not been established, and the mechanisms that might account for such an effect have not been tested. Objectives In a within-subjects design, we examined effects of low (0.4 g/kg) and high (0.8 g/kg) dose alcohol, relative to placebo, on smokers’ ability to resist initiating smoking after acute smoking abstinence. Methods Participants were 100 heavy alcohol drinkers, smoking 10–30 cigarettes per day. Across three separate days, participants consumed placebo, low, or high dose alcohol following 3 h of smoking abstinence, and 35 min later were offered the opportunity to smoke while resisting smoking was monetarily reinforced proportional to the amount of time delayed. Results Consistent with a dose-response effect, participants smoked 3.35 min (95% CI [−7.09, 0.40], p=.08) earlier following low dose alcohol and 6.36 min (95% CI [−9.99, −2.73], p=.0006) earlier following high dose alcohol compared to drinking a placebo beverage. Effects of dose on smoking behavior were partially mediated by increases in urge to smoke. There was no evidence that alcohol’s effects on urge to smoke or ability to resist smoking were mediated through its stimulating or sedating effects. Conclusions Alcohol can reduce the ability to resist smoking in a dose-dependent fashion, in part, due to its effect on increasing the intensity of smoking urges. PMID:24858377

  16. [Decubitus lesions in patients referred to acute and post-acute home nursing care for the elderly in Genova].

    PubMed

    De Astis, V; Corbella, A; Bafico, F; Spinelli, E; Porcu, G; Bottari, L; Petrini, M; Madeddu, V

    1999-01-01

    The Elderly Services of USL 3 "Genovese" together with the team for Continuing Education designed and implemented a survey on the elderly clients referred to the home care and nursing home services. The aim of the study was to describe the frequency, distribution and severity of pressure ulcers. The data were collected during a period of seven months: from 1st November 1997 to 31st May 1998. One thousand seven hundred and twenty nine clients were observed; 705 (41%) had single or multiple pressure ulcers. Patients with multiple pressure ulcers accounted for 42% of the total. The sacrum was the most affected site (43% of the patients with a single ulcer and 33% with multiple ulcers). Patients with severe pressure ulcers (stages 3 degrees and 4 degrees NPUAP classification) accounted for 42% of the total. Pressure sores were observed in 15% of "at no risk" patients and in 40% of those at low risk (Norton Scale score). The study highlighted a lack of documentation (90% patients) on treatments performed in the hospital and prescribed at discharge for the pressure sores. These findings reflects possibly the fact that this aspect of care is unduly disregarded by nursing personnel, and that a goal-oriented retraining, underlining also the need of appropriate documentation, is warranted.

  17. Establishing a dose-response relationship between acute resistance-exercise and the immune system: Protocol for a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Szlezak, Adam Michael; Szlezak, Siri Lauluten; Keane, James; Tajouri, Lotti; Minahan, Clare

    2016-12-01

    Exercise immunology research has traditionally focussed on aerobic-exercise, however it has become apparent in more recent years that resistance-exercise can also considerably affect host immunobiology. To date however, no systematic process has been used to establish a dose-response relationship between resistance-exercise and the immune system. The present systematic review was thus conducted to determine the dose-response effects of a bout of resistance-exercise on acute leukocyte counts. In accordance with the PRISMA guidelines, a systematic literature search was conducted in the electronic databases, PubMed, Web of Science, and Google Scholar, over the date range of 1989-2016. Following the PICO elements, eligibility criteria included: i) participants: healthy humans aged 18-40; ii) intervention: a single bout of resistance-exercise; iii) comparator: at least one comparator group; iv) outcome: acute measures of circulating leukocyte counts. Specific exclusion criteria were also applied. Risk of bias and quality of evidence was assessed using the PEDro scale. Due to the individual designs of the admitted studies, a qualitative analysis (systematic narrative synthesis) was employed in the present review. The results of the present review demonstrate that a single bout of resistance-exercise induces an acute monocytosis, neutrophilia, and lymphocytosis. It became apparent that the reviewed literature either does not consistently specify, or does not describe with sufficient detail, the time-course between the onset of exercise and the collection of blood. We recommend that researchers consider addressing this in future studies, and also collect blood measures during exercise to aid with comparison of temporal effects. Regarding the determination of a dose-response relationship, an acute neutrophilia, monocytosis and lymphocytosis appears to occur more rapidly and to a greater magnitude following a single bout of high-dose vs low-dose resistance

  18. Activation of JNK pathway in spinal astrocytes contributes to acute ultra-low-dose morphine thermal hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Maria Domenica; Ghelardini, Carla; Galeotti, Nicoletta

    2015-07-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that opioid analgesics can lead to paradoxical sensitization to pain when delivered in different administration patterns. Although opioid tolerance-induced hyperalgesia is largely studied, little is known about the mechanisms underlying acute ultra-low-dose morphine hyperalgesia. Activation of spinal glial cells is reported to regulate pain hypersensitivity. To elucidate the mechanism involved in acute ultra-low-dose morphine hyperalgesia, we tested whether an opioid agonist promoted the activation of spinal astrocytes and microglia and investigated the cellular pathways involved. Ultra-low-dose morphine activated spinal astrocytes with no effect on microglia. The astrocyte activation was selectively prevented by the opioid antagonist naloxone, the μ-opioid receptor (MOR) silencing and the JNK inhibitor SP600125. Morphine elevated spinal JNK1, JNK2, and c-Jun phosphorylation. Conversely, phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 (STAT-1) was not elevated, and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) levels remained unmodified. Administration of SP600125 and the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist MK801 prevented morphine hyperalgesia. Ultra-low-dose morphine increased protein kinase C (PKC) γ phosphorylation. Pretreatment with a PKC inhibitor prevented morphine hyperalgesia and JNK and c-Jun overphosphorylation, indicating PKC is a JNK upstream modulator and illustrating the presence of a pathway involving PKC, NMDA, and JNK activated by morphine. Immunofluorescence experiments indicated the neuronal localization of spinal MOR. However, JNK was not detected in MOR-expressing cells, showing the presence of a neuron-astrocyte signaling pathway. These results illustrate the selective activation of an astrocyte JNK pathway after the stimulation of neuronal MOR, which contributes to ultra-low-dose morphine hyperalgesia.

  19. A phase I study of intermediate dose cytarabine in combination with lenalidomide in relapsed/refractory acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Elizabeth A; Brady, William E; Tan, Wei; Vigil, Carlos E; Thompson, James E; Ford, Laurie A; Dickey, Noelle M; L Bashaw, Heather; Sperrazza, Jill; Wetzler, Meir; Wang, Eunice S

    2016-04-01

    Relapsed/refractory (r/r) Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) remains a therapeutic challenge. Cytarabine arabinoside (AraC) forms the backbone of most regimens, with complete responses (CR) ranging from 17 to 20%. Lenalidomide (Len) is approved by the FDA for multiple myeloma and myelodysplasia and has demonstrated activity in AML. We developed a phase I study to evaluate the safety and tolerability of Len in combination with intermediate dose AraC (1.5 g/m(2)/day given on days 1-5) in adults with r/r AML. The maximally tolerated dose for this combination was 10mg daily on days 6-26 of a 28 day cycle. Dose de-escalation from 25mg was required due to rash, liver function abnormalities, and hypokalemia. Of 32 evaluable patients, five achieved CR (16%), 5CRi (16%) and 3 had hematological improvements for an overall response rate of 41% (13/32). Median overall survival (95% confidence interval) for patients treated on study was 5.8 (2.5-10.6) months and disease free survival was 3.4 (2.3-6.2) months. This single institute phase I trial of Len and intermediate dose AraC was associated with marked skin and other toxicities. At the dose and schedule tested, this combination did not appear to result in improved CR over single agent AraC for r/r AML.

  20. A Phase I Dose Escalation Study of the Triple Angiokinase Inhibitor Nintedanib Combined with Low-Dose Cytarabine in Elderly Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Schliemann, Christoph; Gerss, Joachim; Wiebe, Stefanie; Mikesch, Jan-Henrik; Knoblauch, Nicola; Sauer, Tim; Angenendt, Linus; Kewitz, Tobias; Urban, Marc; Butterfass-Bahloul, Trude; Edemir, Sabine; Vehring, Kerstin; Müller-Tidow, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Nintedanib (BIBF 1120), a potent multikinase inhibitor of VEGFR-1/-2/-3, FGFR-1/-2/-3 and PDGFR-α/-β, exerts growth inhibitory and pro-apoptotic effects in myeloid leukemic cells, especially when used in combination with cytarabine. This phase I study evaluated nintedanib in combination with low-dose cytarabine (LDAC) in elderly patients with untreated or relapsed/refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) ineligible for intensive chemotherapy in a 3+3 design. Nintedanib (dose levels 100, 150, and 200 mg orally twice daily) and LDAC (20 mg subcutaneous injection twice daily for 10 days) were administered in 28-day cycles. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as non-hematological severe adverse reaction CTC grade ≥ 4 with possible or definite relationship to nintedanib. Between April 2012 and October 2013, 13 patients (median age 73 [range: 62–86] years) were enrolled. One patient did not receive study medication and was replaced. Nine (69%) patients had relapsed or refractory disease and 6 (46%) patients had unfavorable cytogenetics. The most frequently reported treatment-related adverse events (AE) were gastrointestinal events. Twelve SAEs irrespective of relatedness were reported. Two SUSARs were observed, one fatal hypercalcemia and one fatal gastrointestinal infection. Two patients (17%) with relapsed AML achieved a complete remission (one CR, one CRi) and bone marrow blast reductions without fulfilling PR criteria were observed in 3 patients (25%). One-year overall survival was 33%. Nintedanib combined with LDAC shows an adequate safety profile and survival data are promising in a difficult-to-treat patient population. Continuation of this trial with a phase II recommended dose of 2 x 200 mg nintedanib in a randomized, placebo-controlled phase II study is planned. The trial is registered to EudraCT as 2011-001086-41. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01488344 PMID:27716819

  1. Dose Escalation of Total Marrow Irradiation With Concurrent Chemotherapy in Patients With Advanced Acute Leukemia Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.; Forman, Stephen; Somlo, George; Liu An; Schultheiss, Timothy; Radany, Eric; Palmer, Joycelynne; Stein, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We have demonstrated that toxicities are acceptable with total marrow irradiation (TMI) at 16 Gy without chemotherapy or TMI at 12 Gy and the reduced intensity regimen of fludarabine/melphalan in patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). This article reports results of a study of TMI combined with higher intensity chemotherapy regimens in 2 phase I trials in patients with advanced acute myelogenous leukemia or acute lymphoblastic leukemia (AML/ALL) who would do poorly on standard intent-to-cure HCT regimens. Methods and Materials: Trial 1 consisted of TMI on Days -10 to -6, etoposide (VP16) on Day -5 (60 mg/kg), and cyclophosphamide (CY) on Day -3 (100 mg/kg). TMI dose was 12 (n=3 patients), 13.5 (n=3 patients), and 15 (n=6 patients) Gy at 1.5 Gy twice daily. Trial 2 consisted of busulfan (BU) on Days -12 to -8 (800 {mu}M min), TMI on Days -8 to -4, and VP16 on Day -3 (30 mg/kg). TMI dose was 12 (n=18) and 13.5 (n=2) Gy at 1.5 Gy twice daily. Results: Trial 1 had 12 patients with a median age of 33 years. Six patients had induction failures (IF), and 6 had first relapses (1RL), 9 with leukemia blast involvement of bone marrow ranging from 10%-98%, 5 with circulating blasts (24%-85%), and 2 with chloromas. No dose-limiting toxicities were observed. Eleven patients achieved complete remission at Day 30. With a median follow-up of 14.75 months, 5 patients remained in complete remission from 13.5-37.7 months. Trial 2 had 20 patients with a median age of 41 years. Thirteen patients had IF, and 5 had 1RL, 2 in second relapse, 19 with marrow blasts (3%-100%) and 13 with peripheral blasts (6%-63%). Grade 4 dose-limiting toxicities were seen at 13.5 Gy (stomatitis and hepatotoxicity). Stomatitis was the most frequent toxicity in both trials. Conclusions: TMI dose escalation to 15 Gy is possible when combined with CY/VP16 and is associated with acceptable toxicities and encouraging outcomes. TMI dose escalation is not possible with BU/VP16 due to

  2. Low-Dose or High-Dose Conditioning Followed by Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-23

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Transient Myeloproliferative Disorder; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  3. Bovine laminitis: clinical aspects, pathology and pathogenesis with reference to acute equine laminitis.

    PubMed

    Boosman, R; Németh, F; Gruys, E

    1991-07-01

    This review deals with the features of clinical and subclinical laminitis in cattle. Prominent clinical signs of acute laminitis are a tender gait and arched back. The sole horn reveals red and yellowish discolourations within five days. In subacute and chronic cases clinical signs are less severe. In chronic laminitis the shape of the claws is altered. Laminitis is frequently followed by sole ulceration and white zone lesions. Blood tests showed no significant changes for laminitic animals. Arteriographic studies of claws affected by laminitis indicated that blood vessels had narrowed lumens. Gross pathology revealed congestion of the corium and rotation of the distal phalanx. Histopathologic studies indicate that laminitis is associated with changes of the vasculature. Peripartum management and nutrition are important factors in its aetiology. It is hypothesised that laminitis is evoked by disturbed digital circulation. In the pathogenesis of acute laminitis three factors are considered important: the occurrence of thrombosis, haemodynamic aspects of the corium, and endotoxins which trigger these pathologic events.

  4. Acute necrotizing eosinophilic myocarditis in a patient taking Garcinia cambogia extract successfully treated with high-dose corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Allen, Scott F; Godley, Robert W; Evron, Joshua M; Heider, Amer; Nicklas, John M; Thomas, Michael P

    2014-12-01

    A previously healthy 48-year-old woman was evaluated for lightheadedness and chest heaviness 2 weeks after starting the herbal supplement Garcinia cambogia. She was found to be hypotensive and had an elevated serum troponin level. The patient had a progressive clinical decline, ultimately experiencing fulminant heart failure and sustained ventricular arrhythmias, which required extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support. Endomyocardial biopsy results were consistent with acute necrotizing eosinophilic myocarditis (ANEM). High-dose corticosteroids were initiated promptly and her condition rapidly improved, with almost complete cardiac recovery 1 week later. In conclusion, we have described a case of ANEM associated with the use of Garcinia cambogia extract.

  5. Acute toxicity and the 28-day repeated dose study of a Siddha medicine Nuna Kadugu in rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nuna Kadugu (NK), a Siddha medicine prepared from leaves and fruits of Morinda Pubescens, used for the treatment of various skin diseases. Though NK has been widely used for several decades, no scientific report was available on its safety. Present study was undertaken to demonstrate the oral toxicity of NK in Sprague Dawley rats. Methods Acute and 28-day repeated oral toxicity studies were performed following OECD test guidelines 423 and 407, respectively, with minor modifications. In acute oral toxicity study, NK was administered at 2000mg/kg b.wt., p.o and animals were observed for toxic signs at 0, 0.5, 1, 4, 24 h and for next 14 days. Gross pathology was performed at the end of the study. In repeated dose, the 28- day oral toxicity study, NK was administered at 300, 600 and 900 mg/kg b.wt./p.o/day. Two satellite groups (control and high dose) were also maintained to determine the delayed onset toxicity of NK. Animals were observed for mortality, morbidity, body weight changes, feed and water intake. Haematology, clinical biochemistry, electrolytes, gross pathology, relative organ weight and histopathological examination were performed. Results In acute toxicity study, no treatment related death or toxic signs were observed with NK administration. In the repeated dose study, no significant differences in body weight changes, food / water intake, haematology, clinical biochemistry and electrolytes content were observed between control and NK groups. No gross pathological findings and difference in relative organ weights were observed between control and NK treated rats. Histopathological examination revealed no abnormalities with NK treatment. Conclusion Acute study reveals that the LD50 of NK is greater than 2000mg/kg, b.wt. in fasted female rats and can be classified as Category 5. 28-day repeated oral toxicity demonstrates that the No Observed Adverse Effect Level of NK is greater than 900 mg/kg b.wt./day, p.o in rats. There were no delayed effects

  6. Amifostine ameliorates recognition memory defect in acute radiation syndrome caused by relatively low-dose of gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hae-June; Kim, Joong-Sun; Song, Myoung-Sub; Seo, Heung-Sik; Yang, Miyoung; Kim, Jong Choon; Jo, Sung-Kee; Shin, Taekyun; Moon, Changjong; Kim, Sung-Ho

    2010-03-01

    This study examined whether amifostine (WR-2721) could attenuate memory impairment and suppress hippocampal neurogenesis in adult mice with the relatively low-dose exposure of acute radiation syndrome (ARS). These were assessed using object recognition memory test, the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling assay, and immunohistochemical markers of neurogenesis [Ki-67 and doublecortin (DCX)]. Amifostine treatment (214 mg/kg, i.p.) prior to irradiation significantly attenuated the recognition memory defect in ARS, and markedly blocked the apoptotic death and decrease of Ki-67- and DCX-positive cells in ARS. Therefore, amifostine may attenuate recognition memory defect in a relatively low-dose exposure of ARS in adult mice, possibly by inhibiting a detrimental effect of irradiation on hippocampal neurogenesis.

  7. Low-dose Ara-C in myelodysplastic syndromes and acute nonlymphoid leukemia. Experience with seven patients.

    PubMed

    Bruzzese, L; Abbadessa, A; Ottaiano, L; Arcidiacone, G

    1987-01-01

    Seven patients were treated with low dose Ara-C (LDAC). Five patients had acute nonlymphoid leukemia (ANLL), two patients had myelodisplastic syndrome (MDS): refractory anemia (RA) and refractory anemia with excess of blasts in transformation (RAEB-t). Ara-C treatment was given by s.c. injections at a dose of 10-11 mg/m2 every 12 h and only on two occasions by continuous infusion. No improvement, or limited improvement, was observed in five patients and they died of leukemia or of disease-related complications. Two patients with ANLL achieved remission: the first patient after bone marrow aplasia, the second without aplasia but with morphologic evidence of granulocytic differentiation of leukemic cells.

  8. Retrospective comparison of fludarabine in combination with intermediate-dose cytarabine versus high-dose cytarabine as consolidation therapies for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjun; Ding, Yi; Wu, Hao; Chen, Yuhua; Lu, Huina; Chen, Chunying; Fu, Jianfei; Wang, Weiguang; Liang, Aibin; Zou, Shanhua

    2014-12-01

    This retrospective study compared efficacy and safety of fludarabine combined with intermediate-dose cytarabine (FA regimen) versus high-dose cytarabine (HiDAC regimen) as consolidation therapy in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients who achieved complete remission. Disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) based on age (≥ 60, <60 years) and cytogenetics were evaluated from data between January 2005 and March 2013. Total 82 patients (FA, n = 45; HiDAC, n = 37; 14-65 years) were evaluated. Five-year DFS was 32.0% and 36.2% for FA and HiDAC groups, respectively (P = 0.729), and 5-year OS was 39.5% and 47.8% (P = 0.568), respectively. Among older patients (≥ 60 years), 3-year DFS was 26.0% for FA group and 12.5% for HiDAC group (P = 0.032), and 3-year OS was 34.6% and 12.5%, respectively (P = 0.026). In FA group, hematological toxicities were significantly lower. FA regimen was as effective as HiDAC regimen in patients with good/intermediate cytogenetics and significantly improved DFS and OS in older patients.

  9. USE OF FRACTIONAL DOSE-VOLUME HISTOGRAMS TO MODEL RISK OF ACUTE RECTAL TOXICITY AMONG PATIENTS TREATED ON RTOG 94-06

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Susan L.; Michalski, Jeff M.; Bosch, Walter R.; Mohan, Radhe; Dong, Lei; Winter, Kathryn; Purdy, James A.; Cox, James D.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose For toxicities occurring during the course of radiotherapy, it is conceptually inaccurate to perform normal-tissue complication probability analyses using the complete dose-volume histogram. The goal of this study was to analyze acute rectal toxicity using a novel approach in which the fit of the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model is based on the fractional rectal dose-volume histogram (DVH). Materials and Methods Grade ≥2 acute rectal toxicity was analyzed in 509 patients treated on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocol 94-06. These patients had no field reductions or treatment-plan revisions during therapy, allowing the fractional rectal DVH to be estimated from the complete rectal DVH based on the total number of dose fractions delivered. Results The majority of patients experiencing Grade ≥2 acute rectal toxicity did so before completion of radiotherapy (70/80=88%). Acute rectal toxicity depends on fractional mean rectal dose, with no significant improvement in the LKB model fit when the volume parameter differs from n=1. The incidence of toxicity was significantly lower for patients who received hormone therapy (P=0.024). Conclusions Variations in fractional mean dose explain the differences in incidence of acute rectal toxicity, with no detectable effect seen here for differences in numbers of dose fractions delivered. PMID:22673726

  10. A study of the shape of dose-response curves for acute lethality at low response: a megadaphnia study'

    SciTech Connect

    Sebaugh, J.L.; Wilson, J.D.; Tucker, M.W.; Adams, W.J. )

    1991-12-01

    Dose-response curves were developed for the immobilization response in Daphnia magna to four toxicants. The purpose of this work was to study the effect of the form of the model and the number of concentration levels used on the estimates of typical low-dose effective concentrations (1%, 5%, 10%). The generalized four-parameter logistic model was used as the reference. When using 12 concentration levels, one of the logistic family two- or three-parameter models was shown reliably to represent each of these various sets of dose-response data, and to provide adequate estimates of EC01 and EC05, as well as EC10 and EC50. For two of the toxicants, an asymmetric model was required. When reducing the number of concentrations to five, the EC10 and EC50 were well estimated by the probit model, with acceptable results at the EC05 level.

  11. Acute personalized habitual caffeine doses improve attention and have selective effects when considering the fractionation of executive functions.

    PubMed

    Lanini, Juliana; Galduróz, José Carlos Fernandes; Pompéia, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine is widely used, often consumed with food, and improves simple and complex/executive attention under fasting conditions. We investigated whether these cognitive effects are observed when personalized habitual doses of caffeine are ingested by caffeine consumers, whether they are influenced by nutriments and if various executive domains are susceptible to improvement. This was a double-blind, placebo-controlled study including 60 young, healthy, rested males randomly assigned to one of four treatments: placebo fasting, caffeine fasting, placebo meal and caffeine meal. Caffeine doses were individualized for each participant based on their self-reported caffeine consumption at the time of testing (morning). The test battery included measures of simple and sustained attention, executive domains (inhibiting, updating, shifting, dual tasking, planning and accessing long-term memory), control measures of subjective alterations, glucose and insulin levels, skin conductance, heart rate and pupil dilation. Regardless of meal intake, acute habitual doses of caffeine decreased fatigue, and improved simple and sustained attention and executive updating. This executive effect was not secondary to the habitual weekly dose consumed, changes in simple and sustained attention, mood, meal ingestion and increases in cognitive effort. We conclude that the morning caffeine "fix" has positive attentional effects and selectively improved executive updating whether or not caffeine is consumed with food.

  12. Patient radiation doses in interventional cardiology in the U.S.: Advisory data sets and possible initial values for U.S. reference levels

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Donald L.; Hilohi, C. Michael; Spelic, David C.

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To determine patient radiation doses from interventional cardiology procedures in the U.S and to suggest possible initial values for U.S. benchmarks for patient radiation dose from selected interventional cardiology procedures [fluoroscopically guided diagnostic cardiac catheterization and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)]. Methods: Patient radiation dose metrics were derived from analysis of data from the 2008 to 2009 Nationwide Evaluation of X-ray Trends (NEXT) survey of cardiac catheterization. This analysis used deidentified data and did not require review by an IRB. Data from 171 facilities in 30 states were analyzed. The distributions (percentiles) of radiation dose metrics were determined for diagnostic cardiac catheterizations, PCI, and combined diagnostic and PCI procedures. Confidence intervals for these dose distributions were determined using bootstrap resampling. Results: Percentile distributions (advisory data sets) and possible preliminary U.S. reference levels (based on the 75th percentile of the dose distributions) are provided for cumulative air kerma at the reference point (K{sub a,r}), cumulative air kerma-area product (P{sub KA}), fluoroscopy time, and number of cine runs. Dose distributions are sufficiently detailed to permit dose audits as described in National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Report No. 168. Fluoroscopy times are consistent with those observed in European studies, but P{sub KA} is higher in the U.S. Conclusions: Sufficient data exist to suggest possible initial benchmarks for patient radiation dose for certain interventional cardiology procedures in the U.S. Our data suggest that patient radiation dose in these procedures is not optimized in U.S. practice.

  13. SU-E-T-516: Measurement of the Absorbed Dose Rate in Water Under Reference Conditions in a CyberKnife Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Aragon-Martinez, N; Hernandez-Guzman, A; Gomez-Munoz, A; Massillon-JL, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to measure the absorbed-dose-rate in a CyberKnife unit reference-field (6cm diameter) using three ionization chambers (IC) following the new IAEA/AAPM formalism and Gafchromic film (MD-V3-55 and EBT3) protocol according to our work reported previously. Methods: The absorbed-dose-rates were measured at 90cm and 70cm SSD in a 10cmx10cm field and at 70cm SSD in a 5.4cmx5.4cm equivalent to 6cm diameter field using a linac Varian iX. All measurements were performed at 10cm depth in water. The correction factors that account for the difference between the IC response on the reference field and the CyberKnife reference field, k-(Q-msr,Q)^(f-msr,f-ref), were evaluated and Gafchromic film were calibrated using the results obtained above. Under the CyberKnife reference conditions, the factors were used to measure the absorbed-dose-rate with IC according to the new formalism and the calibrated film was irradiated in water. The film calibration curve was used to evaluate the absorbed-dose-rate in the CyberKnife unit. Results: Difference up to 2.56% is observed between dose-rate measured with IC in the reference 10cmx10cm field, depending where the chamber was calibrated, which was not reflected in the correction factor k-(Q-msr,Q)^(f-msr,f-ref ) where variations of ~0.15%-0.5% were obtained. Within measurements uncertainties, maximum difference of 1.8% on the absorbed-dose-rate in the CyberKnife reference field is observed between all IC and the films Conclusion: Absorbed-dose-rate to water was measured in a CyberKnife reference field with acceptable accuracy (combined uncertainties ~1.32%-1.73%, k=1) using three IC and films. The MD-V3-55 film as well as the new IAEA/AAPM formalism can be considered as a suitable dosimetric method to measure absorbed-dose-rate to water in small and non-standard CyberKnife fields used in clinical treatments However, the EBT3 film is not appropriated due to the high uncertainty provided (combined uncertainty ~9%, k=1

  14. Comparison between CT-based volumetric calculations and ICRU reference-point estimates of radiation doses delivered to bladder and rectum during intracavitary radiotherapy for cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pelloski, Christopher E.; Palmer, Matthew B.S.; Chronowski, Gregory M.; Jhingran, Anuja; Horton, John; Eifel, Patricia J. . E-mail: peifel@mdanderson.org

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: To compare CT-based volumetric calculations and International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) reference-point estimates of radiation doses to the bladder and rectum in patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix treated with definitive low-dose-rate intracavitary radiotherapy (ICRT). Methods and Materials: Between November 2001 and March 2003, 60 patients were prospectively enrolled in a pilot study of ICRT with CT-based dosimetry. Most patients underwent two ICRT insertions. After insertion of an afterloading ICRT applicator, intraoperative orthogonal films were obtained to ensure proper positioning of the system and to facilitate subsequent planning. Treatments were prescribed using standard two-dimensional dosimetry and planning. Patients also underwent helical CT of the pelvis for three-dimensional reconstruction of the radiation dose distributions. The systems were loaded with {sup 137}Cs sources using the Selectron remote afterloading system according to institutional practice for low-dose-rate brachytherapy. Three-dimensional dose distributions were generated using the Varian BrachyVision treatment planning system. The rectum was contoured from the bottom of the ischial tuberosities to the sigmoid flexure. The entire bladder was contoured. The minimal doses delivered to the 2 cm{sup 3} of bladder and rectum receiving the highest dose (D{sub BV2} and D{sub RV2}, respectively) were determined from dose-volume histograms, and these estimates were compared with two-dimensionally derived estimates of the doses to the corresponding ICRU reference points. Results: A total of 118 unique intracavitary insertions were performed, and 93 were evaluated and the subject of this analysis. For the rectum, the estimated doses to the ICRU reference point did not differ significantly from the D{sub RV2} (p = 0.561); the mean ({+-} standard deviation) difference was 21 cGy ({+-} 344 cGy). The median volume of the rectum that received at least

  15. Low-dose CT for quantitative analysis in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-31

    few studies on pulmonary emphysema [22-24], that showed that quantification of hyperinflated tissue is not affected by a reduction of tube current...Pulmonary emphysema : radiation dose and section thickness at multidetector CT quantification--comparison with macroscopic and microscopic...pulmonary emphysema using a low-dose technique. Radiol Med 2002, 104:13-24. 24. Nishio M, Matsumoto S, Ohno Y, Sugihara N, Inokawa H, Yoshikawa T

  16. Efficacy and Tolerability of Fixed-Dose Combination of Dexketoprofen and Dicyclomine Injection in Acute Renal Colic

    PubMed Central

    Porwal, A.; Mahajan, A. D.; Oswal, D. S.; Erram, S. S.; Sheth, D. N.; Balamurugan, S.; Kamat, V.; Enadle, R. P.; Badadare, A.; Bhatnagar, S. K.; Walvekar, R. S.; Dhorepatil, S.; Naik, R. C.; Basu, I.; Kshirsagar, S. N.; Keny, J. V.; Sengupta, S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of a fixed-dose combination of dexketoprofen and dicyclomine (DXD) injection in patients with acute renal colic. Patients and Methods. Two hundred and seventeen patients were randomized to receive either DXD (n = 109) or fixed-dose combination of diclofenac and dicyclomine injection (DLD; n = 108), intramuscularly. Pain intensity (PI) was self-evaluated by patients on visual analogue scale (VAS) at baseline and at 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 hours. Efficacy parameters were proportion of responders, difference in PI (PID) at 8 hours, and sum of analogue of pain intensity differences (SAPID). Tolerability was assessed by patients and physicians. Results. DXD showed superior efficacy in terms of proportion of responders (98.17% versus 81.48; P < 0.0001), PID at 8 hours (P = 0.002), and SAPID0–8 hours (P = 0.004). The clinical global impression for change in pain was significantly better for DXD than DLD. The incidence of adverse events was comparable in both groups. However, global assessment of tolerability was rated significantly better for DXD. Conclusion. DXD showed superior efficacy and tolerability than DLD in patients clinically diagnosed to be suffering from acute renal colic. PMID:22577544

  17. Efficacy of low dose gabapentin in acute herpes zoster for preventing postherpetic neuralgia: a prospective controlled study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eo G; Lee, Hee J; Hyun, Dong J; Min, Kyunghoon; Kim, Dong H; Yoon, Moon S

    2016-05-01

    Postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) is a sequela of herpes zoster that adversely affects quality of life seriously. The risk factors for PHN are well known but the effective interventions that reduce the incidence of PHN are less studied. The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of treatment with gabapentin in patients with acute herpes zoster for preventing PHN. We performed a prospective randomized controlled study of 120 participants diagnosed with acute herpes zoster, aged 50 and over and complaining moderate to severe pain. All patients were treated with valacyclovir and acetaminophen. Half of the participants were assigned to the gabapentin group and received gabapentin 300 mg three times a day additionally. The intensity of pain at every visit and the incidence of PHN in both groups were measured. Total 52 and 49 patients in the gabapentin group and the control group, respectively, had completed 12 weeks of follow-up period. Although the incidence of PHN was higher in the control group, the difference was not statistically significant (6.1% vs. 3.8%, p = 0.67). Our results indicate that the use of low-dose gabapentin in acute herpes zoster seems not effective in the prevention of PHN.

  18. Dose-related gene expression changes in forebrain following acute, low-level chlorpyrifos exposure in neonatal rats

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Anamika; Liu Jing; Ayoubi, Patricia; Pope, Carey

    2010-10-15

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is a widely used organophosphorus insecticide (OP) and putative developmental neurotoxicant in humans. The acute toxicity of CPF is elicited by acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition. We characterized dose-related (0.1, 0.5, 1 and 2 mg/kg) gene expression profiles and changes in cell signaling pathways 24 h following acute CPF exposure in 7-day-old rats. Microarray experiments indicated that approximately 9% of the 44,000 genes were differentially expressed following either one of the four CPF dosages studied (546, 505, 522, and 3,066 genes with 0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mg/kg CPF). Genes were grouped according to dose-related expression patterns using K-means clustering while gene networks and canonical pathways were evaluated using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (registered) . Twenty clusters were identified and differential expression of selected genes was verified by RT-PCR. The four largest clusters (each containing from 276 to 905 genes) constituted over 50% of all differentially expressed genes and exhibited up-regulation following exposure to the highest dosage (2 mg/kg CPF). The total number of gene networks affected by CPF also rose sharply with the highest dosage of CPF (18, 16, 18 and 50 with 0.1, 0.5, 1 and 2 mg/kg CPF). Forebrain cholinesterase (ChE) activity was significantly reduced (26%) only in the highest dosage group. Based on magnitude of dose-related changes in differentially expressed genes, relative numbers of gene clusters and signaling networks affected, and forebrain ChE inhibition only at 2 mg/kg CPF, we focused subsequent analyses on this treatment group. Six canonical pathways were identified that were significantly affected by 2 mg/kg CPF (MAPK, oxidative stress, NF{Kappa}B, mitochondrial dysfunction, arylhydrocarbon receptor and adrenergic receptor signaling). Evaluation of different cellular functions of the differentially expressed genes suggested changes related to olfactory receptors, cell adhesion/migration, synapse

  19. Dose-Volume Effects on Patient-Reported Acute Gastrointestinal Symptoms During Chemoradiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ronald C.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Killoran, Joseph H.; Crowley, Elizabeth M.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Wo, Jennifer Y.; Ryan, David P.; Hong, Theodore S.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Research on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in rectal cancer is limited. We examined whether dose-volume parameters of the small bowel and large bowel were associated with patient-reported gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms during 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemoradiation treatment for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: 66 patients treated at the Brigham and Women's Hospital or Massachusetts General Hospital between 2006 and 2008 were included. Weekly during treatment, patients completed a questionnaire assessing severity of diarrhea, urgency, pain, cramping, mucus, and tenesmus. The association between dosimetric parameters and changes in overall GI symptoms from baseline through treatment was examined by using Spearman's correlation. Potential associations between these parameters and individual GI symptoms were also explored. Results: The amount of small bowel receiving at least 15 Gy (V15) was significantly associated with acute symptoms (p = 0.01), and other dosimetric parameters ranging from V5 to V45 also trended toward association. For the large bowel, correlations between dosimetric parameters and overall GI symptoms at the higher dose levels from V25 to V45 did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.1), and a significant association was seen with rectal pain from V15 to V45 (p < 0.01). Other individual symptoms did not correlate with small bowel or large bowel dosimetric parameters. Conclusions: The results of this study using PROs are consistent with prior studies with physician-assessed acute toxicity, and they identify small bowel V15 as an important predictor of acute GI symptoms during 5-FU-based chemoradiation treatment. A better understanding of the relationship between radiation dosimetric parameters and PROs may allow physicians to improve radiation planning to optimize patient outcomes.

  20. Evaluation of absorbed and effective doses to patients from radiopharmaceuticals using the ICRP 110 reference computational phantoms and ICRP 103 formulation.

    PubMed

    Hadid, Lama; Gardumi, Anna; Desbrée, Aurélie

    2013-09-01

    In diagnostic nuclear medicine, mean absorbed doses to patients' organs and effective doses are published for standard stylised anatomic models. To provide more realistic and detailed geometries of the human morphology, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has recently adopted male and female voxel phantoms to represent the reference adult. This work investigates the impact of the use of these new computational phantoms. The absorbed doses were calculated for 11 different radiopharmaceuticals currently used in diagnostic nuclear medicine. They were calculated for the ICRP 110 reference computational phantoms using the OEDIPE software and the MCNP extended Monte Carlo code. The biokinetic models were issued from ICRP Publications 53, 80 and 106. The results were then compared with published values given in these ICRP Publications. To discriminate the effect of anatomical differences on organ doses from the effect of the calculation method, the Monte Carlo calculations were repeated for the reference adult stylised phantom. The voxel effect, the influence of the use of different densities and nuclear decay data were also investigated. Effective doses were determined for the ICRP 110 adult reference computational phantom with the tissue weighting factor of ICRP Publication 60 and the tissue weighting factors of ICRP Publication 103. The calculation method and, in particular, the simulation of the electron transport have a significant influence on the calculated doses, especially, for small and walled organs. Overestimates of >200 % were observed for the urinary bladder wall of the stylised phantom compared with the computational phantoms. The unrealistic organ topology of the stylised phantom leads to important dose differences, sometimes by an order of magnitude. The effective doses calculated using the new computational phantoms and the new tissue weighting factors are globally lower than the published ones, except for some

  1. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, multi-dose evaluation of the acute behavioural effects of guaraná in humans.

    PubMed

    Haskell, C F; Kennedy, D O; Wesnes, K A; Milne, A L; Scholey, A B

    2007-01-01

    The present study aimed to systematically assess acute, dose-related behavioural effects of an extract of guaraná plant for the first time in humans. This double-blind, counterbalanced, placebo-controlled study (n=26) assessed the acute mood and cognitive effects throughout the day of four different doses (37.5 mg, 75 mg, 150 mg and 300 mg) of a standardised guaraná extract (PC-102). Assessment included the Cognitive Drug Research computerized test battery and Bond-Lader mood scales. Guaraná improved secondary memory performance and increased alert and content mood ratings. The two lower doses produced more positive cognitive effects than the higher doses. This research supports previous findings of cognitive improvements following 75 mg guaraná and provides the first exploration of different dose effects of guaraná in humans. The findings suggest that the effects cannot be attributed to caffeine alone.

  2. Absence of hematological side effects in acute and subacute nasal dosing of erythropoietin with a low content of sialic acid.

    PubMed

    Lagarto, Alicia; Bueno, Viviana; Guerra, Isbel; Valdés, Odalys; Couret, Micaela; López, Raisel; Vega, Yamile

    2011-09-01

    The use of human recombinant erythropoietin (EPO) as a neuroprotective agent is limited due to its hematological side effects. An erythropoietin along with a low content of sialic acid (rhEPOb), similar to that produced in the brain during hypoxia, may be used as a neuroprotective agent without risk of thrombotic events. The objective of this investigation was to assess the toxicological potential of a nasal formulation with rhEPOb in acute, subacute and nasal irritation assays in rats. Healthy Wistar rats (Cenp:Wistar) were used for the assays. In an irritation test, animals received 15 μl of rhEPOb into the right nostril. Rats were sacrificed after 24 h and slides of the nasal mucosa tissues were examined. Control and treated groups showed signs of a minimal irritation consisting of week edema and vascular congestion in all animals. In the acute toxicity test, the dose of 47,143 UI/kg was administered by nasal route. Hematological patterns, body weight, relative organ weight, and organ integrity were not affected by single dosing with rhEPOb. In the subacute toxicity test, Wistar rats of both sexes received 6,600 UI/kg/day for 14 days. The toxicological endpoints examined included animal body weight, food consumption, hematological and biochemical patterns, selected tissue weights, and histopathological examinations. An increase of lymphocytes was observed in males that was considered to reflect an immune response to treatment. Histopathological examination of organs and tissues did not reveal treatment-induced changes. The administration of rhEPOb at daily doses of 6,600 UI/kg during 14 days did not produce hematological side effects. These results suggest that rhEPOb could offer the same neuroprotection as EPO, without hematological side effects.

  3. Combined Hydration and Antibiotics with Lisinopril to Mitigate Acute and Delayed High-dose Radiation Injuries to Multiple Organs.

    PubMed

    Fish, Brian L; Gao, Feng; Narayanan, Jayashree; Bergom, Carmen; Jacobs, Elizabeth R; Cohen, Eric P; Moulder, John E; Orschell, Christie M; Medhora, Meetha

    2016-11-01

    The NIAID Radiation and Nuclear Countermeasures Program is developing medical agents to mitigate the acute and delayed effects of radiation that may occur from a radionuclear attack or accident. To date, most such medical countermeasures have been developed for single organ injuries. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have been used to mitigate radiation-induced lung, skin, brain, and renal injuries in rats. ACE inhibitors have also been reported to decrease normal tissue complication in radiation oncology patients. In the current study, the authors have developed a rat partial-body irradiation (leg-out PBI) model with minimal bone marrow sparing (one leg shielded) that results in acute and late injuries to multiple organs. In this model, the ACE inhibitor lisinopril (at ~24 mg m d started orally in the drinking water at 7 d after irradiation and continued to ≥150 d) mitigated late effects in the lungs and kidneys after 12.5-Gy leg-out PBI. Also in this model, a short course of saline hydration and antibiotics mitigated acute radiation syndrome following doses as high as 13 Gy. Combining this supportive care with the lisinopril regimen mitigated overall morbidity for up to 150 d after 13-Gy leg-out PBI. Furthermore, lisinopril was an effective mitigator in the presence of the growth factor G-CSF (100 μg kg d from days 1-14), which is FDA-approved for use in a radionuclear event. In summary, by combining lisinopril (FDA-approved for other indications) with hydration and antibiotics, acute and delayed radiation injuries in multiple organs were mitigated.

  4. Effect of short-term, high-dose methylprednisolone on oxidative stress in children with acute immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Cura, Musa; Koç, Ahmet; Aksoy, Nurten

    2016-01-01

    Background Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is the most common cause of acquired childhood thrombocytopenia and is characterized by increased immune-mediated destruction of circulating thrombocytes. Oxidative damage may be involved in ITP pathogenesis; paraoxonase (PON) and arylesterase (ARE) enzymes are closely associated with the cellular antioxidant system. We investigated the effect of short-term high-dose methylprednisolone (HDMP) treatment on the total oxidant status (TOS), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), oxidative stress index (OSI), and PON and ARE enzymatic activity in children with acute ITP. Methods Thirty children with acute ITP constituted the study group and 30 healthy children constituted the control group. Children with acute ITP were treated with HDMP: 30 mg/kg for 3 days, then 20 mg/kg for 4 days. The TOS, TAC, OSI, PON, and ARE levels were determined before and after 7 days of HDMP treatment. Results The TAC level (P<0.001), and PON (P<0.001) and ARE (P=0.001) activities were lower and the TOS (P=0.003) and OSI (P<0.001) levels were higher in children with acute ITP than those in healthy children in the control group. We also observed statistically significant increases in the TAC (P<0.01), PON (P<0.001) and ARE levels (P=0.001) and decreases in the TOS (P<0.05) and OSI levels (P<0.05) with 7 days of HDMP treatment compared to their values before treatment. Conclusion Our study demonstrated increased oxidative stress (OSI and TOC) and decreased antioxidant capacity (TAC), PON, and ARE in ITP patients and that steroid treatment could be effective in reducing the oxidative stress. PMID:28090489

  5. Acute hemolytic vascular inflammatory processes are prevented by nitric oxide replacement or a single dose of hydroxyurea.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Camila Bononi; Souza, Lucas Eduardo Botelho; Leonardo, Flavia Costa; Costa, Fabio Trindade Maranhão; Werneck, Claudio C; Covas, Dimas Tadeu; Costa, Fernando Ferreira; Conran, Nicola

    2015-08-06

    Hemolysis and consequent release of cell-free hemoglobin (CFHb) impair vascular nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and cause oxidative and inflammatory processes. Hydroxyurea (HU), a common therapy for sickle cell disease (SCD), induces fetal Hb production and can act as an NO donor. We evaluated the acute inflammatory effects of intravenous water-induced hemolysis in C57BL/6 mice and determined the abilities of an NO donor, diethylamine NONOate (DEANO), and a single dose of HU to modulate this inflammation. Intravenous water induced acute hemolysis in C57BL/6 mice, attaining plasma Hb levels comparable to those observed in chimeric SCD mice. This hemolysis resulted in significant and rapid systemic inflammation and vascular leukocyte recruitment within 15 minutes, accompanied by NO metabolite generation. Administration of another potent NO scavenger (2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide) to C57BL/6 mice induced similar alterations in leukocyte recruitment, whereas hemin-induced inflammation occurred over a longer time frame. Importantly, the acute inflammatory effects of water-induced hemolysis were abolished by the simultaneous administration of DEANO or HU, without altering CFHb, in an NO pathway-mediated manner. In vitro, HU partially reversed the Hb-mediated induction of endothelial proinflammatory cytokine secretion and adhesion molecule expression. In summary, pathophysiological levels of hemolysis trigger an immediate inflammatory response, possibly mediated by vascular NO consumption. HU presents beneficial anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting rapid-onset hemolytic inflammation via an NO-dependent mechanism, independently of fetal Hb elevation. Data provide novel insights into mechanisms of hemolytic inflammation and further support perspectives for the use of HU as an acute treatment for SCD and other hemolytic disorders.

  6. Adverse neuropsychological effects associated with cumulative doses of corticosteroids to treat childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A literature review.

    PubMed

    Pépin, A J; Cloutier-Bergeron, A; Malboeuf-Hurtubise, C; Achille, M; Krajinovic, M; Laverdière, C; Lippé, S; Marcoux, S; Sinnett, D; Sultan, S

    2016-11-01

    Corticosteroids (CS) are an essential component of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatments (cALL). Although there is evidence that daily doses of CS can have neuropsychological effects, few studies have investigated the role of cumulative doses of CS in short- and long-term neuropsychological effects in cALL. The aims of this review were to identify the measures used for documenting adverse neuropsychological effects (ANEs) of CS treatment and to study the association between cumulative doses of CS and the presence of ANEs. Twenty-two articles met the inclusion criteria. A variety of measures were used to evaluate outcomes in the domains of emotion, behaviour, neurocognition, and fatigue/sleep. The results suggest that we cannot conclude in favour of an association between the cumulative dosage of CS and ANEs. Yet, several factors including the heterogeneity of measures used to evaluate outcomes and reporting biases may limit the scope of the results. We offer several recommendations that could help improve the future published evidence on ANEs in relation to CS treatment in cALL.

  7. High-dose, continuous-infusion cyclophosphamide, cytarabine, vincristine, and prednisone for remission induction in refractory adult acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, T H

    1987-04-01

    Fifteen consecutive patients with refractory adult acute leukemia (RAAL) were treated with a combination of high-dose, continuous-infusion cyclophosphamide, cytarabine, vincristine, and prednisone (Hi-COAP). The initial nine patients received cyclophosphamide 350 mg/m2 as a 24-hour intravenous (IV) infusion over 5 days; cytarabine, 100 mg/m2 IV bolus every 12 hours for ten doses; vincristine, 2.0 mg IV bolus on day 1; and prednisone, 100 mg orally for 7 days. The last six patients had the cyclophosphamide infusion lengthened to 7 days, and the cytarabine increased to 14 doses. All patients were evaluable for toxicity and response. Seven patients (47%) obtained a complete remission and six patients (40%) a partial remission. Median duration of all remissions has been 7.0 months with a range of 1 to 32 months. Toxicity has been limited to primarily myelosuppression with no hemorrhagic cystitis, central nervous system (CNS), hepatic, or pulmonary toxicity noted. Gastrointestinal toxicity was mild, with no effect on nutritional status noted. Median duration of complete responders was 8.5 months. Thus, Hi-COAP demonstrates promising efficacy with minimal toxicity in RAAL and warrants further exploration in multiinstitutional trials.

  8. Blast cell methotrexate-polyglutamate accumulation in vivo differs by lineage, ploidy, and methotrexate dose in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Synold, T W; Relling, M V; Boyett, J M; Rivera, G K; Sandlund, J T; Mahmoud, H; Crist, W M; Pui, C H; Evans, W E

    1994-01-01

    High-dose methotrexate (HDMTX) is a component of most treatment protocols for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), yet recent studies of receptor-mediated transport and saturable polyglutamylation have questioned its rationale. To investigate this in vivo, methotrexate and its active polyglutamated metabolites (MTX-PG) were measured in bone marrow blasts obtained from 101 children randomized to single-agent therapy with either HDMTX (1 g/m2 per 24 h i.v., n = 47) or low-dose MTX (LDMTX, 30 mg/m2 by mouth every 6 h x 6, n = 54), before remission induction therapy. Blast concentrations of total MTX-PGs (median 460 vs 1380 pmol/10(9) cells) and of long-chain MTX-glu4-6 were both significantly higher after HDMTX (P < 0.001). With either treatment, MTX-PGs were significantly higher in B-lineage blasts than in T-lineage blasts (LDMTX P = 0.001, HDMTX P = 0.03). In a multiple regression analysis of B-lineage ALL, blast MTX-PG was significantly related to MTX dose (or plasma MTX concentration), lymphoblast ploidy (hyperdiploid > nonhyperdiploid), and percentage S-phase. This is the first evidence that HDMTX achieves higher MTX-PG concentrations in ALL blasts in vivo, establishing a rationale for HDMTX in the treatment of childhood ALL, especially T-lineage or nonhyperdiploid B-lineage ALL, disease characteristics associated with a poor prognosis on conventional therapy. Images PMID:7525652

  9. Acute acetaminophen overdose is associated with dose-dependent hypokalaemia: a prospective study of 331 patients.

    PubMed

    Waring, W Stephen; Stephen, Alexandra F L; Malkowska, Aleks M; Robinson, Oliver D G

    2008-03-01

    Hypokalaemia is a recognized complication of acute acetaminophen overdose. It is unclear whether this might be a pharmacological effect of acetaminophen, or due to association with confounding factors. The present study sought to better characterize the relationship between acetaminophen concentrations and risk of hypokalaemia. A prospective study of patients received N-acetylcysteine treatment within 15 hr of acute acetaminophen ingestion. Serum potassium concentrations were determined before and after N-acetylcysteine. Serum acetaminophen concentrations were used to indicate overall drug exposure by comparison to the Rumack-Matthew nomogram. Hypokalaemia was pre-defined by serum concentrations <3.5 mmol/l, and groups compared by Mann-Whitney tests. There were 331 patients. Median (95% confidence interval) fall in serum potassium concentration after N-acetylcysteine was 0.05 mmol/l (-0.11-0.30 mmol/l) if acetaminophen concentrations were below the 'high-risk' treatment line, 0.30 mmol/l (0.17-0.40 mmol/l) if between the 'high-risk' and 'normal' treatment lines (P = 0.0358), and 0.40 mmol/l (0.20-0.50 mmol/l) if above the 'normal' treatment line (P = 0.0136). A receiver operating characteristic showed that high acetaminophen concentrations were predictive of hypokalaemia (P = 0.0001 versus zero discriminatory line), and 4 hr acetaminophen concentration >156 mmol/l gave 81% sensitivity and 48% specificity. The risk of hypokalaemia after acute acetaminophen overdose depends on the extent of acetaminophen exposure, irrespective of N-acetylcysteine administration and independent of whether vomiting occurred. Acetaminophen appears to cause concentration-dependent hypokalaemia after overdose, and the pharmacological basis requires further consideration.

  10. Appropriate antibiotic dosing in severe sepsis and acute renal failure: factors to consider.

    PubMed

    González de Molina, Francisco Javier; Ferrer, Ricard

    2011-08-01

    Severe sepsis and septic shock cause considerable morbidity and mortality. Early appropriate empiric broad-spectrum antibiotics and advanced resuscitation therapy are the cornerstones of treatment for these conditions. In prescribing an antibiotic regimen in septic patients with acute renal failure treated with continuous renal replacement therapy, several factors should be considered: pharmacokinetics, weight, residual renal function, hepatic function, mode of renal replacement therapy (membrane and surface area, sieving coefficient, effluent and dialysate rate, and blood flow rate), severity of illness, microorganism, minimum inhibitory concentration, and others. Studies that determine the serum antibiotic concentrations are very useful in establishing the correct dosage in critical patients.

  11. Behavioral emergency in the elderly: a descriptive study of patients referred to an Aggression Response Team in an acute hospital

    PubMed Central

    Simpkins, Daniel; Peisah, Carmelle; Boyatzis, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Aim The management of severely agitated elderly patients is not easy, and limited guidelines are available to assist practitioners. At a Sydney hospital, an Aggression Response Team (ART) comprising clinical and security staff can be alerted when a staff member has safety concerns. Our aims were to describe the patient population referred for ART calls, reasons for and interventions during ART calls, and complications following them. Methods Patients 65 years and older referred for ART calls in the emergency department or wards during 2014 were identified using the Incident Information Management System database and medical records were reviewed. Demographic and clinical data were collected. Results Of 43 elderly patients with ART calls, 30 had repeat ART calls. Thirty-one patients (72%) had underlying dementia, and 22 (51%) were agitated at the time of admission. The main reasons for ART calls were wandering and physical aggression. Pharmacological sedation was used in 88% of the ART calls, with a range of psychotropics, doses, and routes of administration, including intravenous (19%) and, most commonly, midazolam (53%). Complications were documented in 14% of cases where sedation was used. Conclusion We observed a high frequency of pharmacological sedation among the severely agitated elderly, with significant variance in the choice and dose of sedation and a high rate of complications arising from sedation, which may be an underestimate given the lack of post-sedation monitoring. We recommend the development of guidelines on the management of behavioral emergency in the elderly patients, including de-escalation strategies and standardized psychotropic guidelines. PMID:27826189

  12. Acute hematological tolerance to multiple fraction, whole body, low dose irradiation in an experimental murine system

    SciTech Connect

    Melamed, J.S.; Chen, M.G.; Brown, J.W.; Katagiri, C.A.

    1980-02-01

    Using a dose fractionation scheme patterned after the current regimen for treatment of disseminated non-Hodgkin lymphoma, the authors studied the effects of irradation on progenitor and effector cells for hematopoiesis in five-month-old BC3F/sub 1/ mice. Fractions of 20 or 50 rad (0.2 or 0.5 Gy) total body irradation were given twice weekly to a final total dose of 200 or 500 rad (2 or 5 Gy), respectively. Weekly assays revealed a marked, sustained depression of stem cell activity, measured as numbers of spleen colony-forming units (CFU-S) and in vitro colony-forming cells (CFU-C), without corresponding depression of effector cells (red and white cells, and platelets). The lack of correlation between numbers of stem cells and peripheral elements is relevant to clinical assessment of marrow reserve.

  13. Collective radiation biodosimetry for dose reconstruction of acute accidental exposures: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Pass, B

    1997-01-01

    Quantification of the biologically relevant dose is required to establish cause and effect between radiation detriment or burden and important biological outcomes. Most epidemiologic studies of unanticipated radiation exposure fail to establish cause and effect because researchers have not been able to construct a valid quantification of dose for the exposed population. However, no one biodosimetric technique (biophysical or biological) meets all the requirements of an ideal dosimeter. This paper reviews how the collection of biodosimetric data for victims of radiation accidents can be used to create a dosimetric "gold standard." Particular emphasis is placed on the use of electron spin resonance, a standard for radiation accident dosimetry. As an example of this technique, a review will be presented of a previously reported study of an individual exposed to a 60Co sterilization source. PMID:9467051

  14. (Depth-dose curves of the beta reference fields (147)Pm, (85)Kr and (90)Sr/(90)Y produced by the beta secondary standard BSS2.

    PubMed

    Brunzendorf, Jens

    2012-08-01

    The most common reference fields in beta dosimetry are the ISO 6980 series 1 radiation fields produced by the beta secondary standard BSS2 and its predecessor BSS. These reference fields require sealed beta radiation sources ((147)Pm, (85)Kr or (90)Sr/(90)Y) in combination with a source-specific beam-flattening filter, and are defined only at a given distance from the source. Every radiation sources shipped with the BSS2 is sold with a calibration certificate of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt. The calibration workflow also comprises regular depth-dose measurements. This work publishes complete depth-dose curves of the series 1 sources (147)Pm, (85)Kr and (90)Sr/(90)Y in ICRU tissue up to a depth of 11 mm,when all electrons are stopped. For this purpose, the individual depth-dose curves of all BSS2 sources calibrated so far have been determined, i.e. the complete datasets of all BSS2 beta sources have been re-evaluated. It includes 191 depth-dose curves of 116 different sources comprising more than 2200 data points in total. Appropriate analytical representations of the nuclide-specific depth-dose curves are provided for the first time.

  15. Dosimetric Coverage of the Prostate, Normal Tissue Sparing, and Acute Toxicity with High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Large Prostate Volumes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, George; Strom, Tobin J.; Wilder, Richard B.; Shrinath, Kushagra; Mellon, Eric A.; Fernandez, Daniel C.; Biagioli, Matthew C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose To evaluate dosimetric coverage of the prostate, normal tissue sparing, and acute toxicity with HDR brachytherapy for large prostate volumes. Materials and Methods One hundred and two prostate cancer patients with prostate volumes >50 mL (range: 5-29 mL) were treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy ± intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to 4,500 cGy in 25 daily fractions between 2009 and 2013. HDR brachytherapy monotherapy doses consisted of two 1,350-1,400 cGy fractions separated by 2-3 weeks, and HDR brachytherapy boost doses consisted of two 950-1,150 cGy fractions separated by 4 weeks. Twelve of 32 (38%) unfavorable intermediate risk, high risk, and very high risk patients received androgen deprivation therapy. Acute toxicity was graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 4. Results Median follow-up was 14 months. Dosimetric goals were achieved in over 90% of cases. Three of 102 (3%) patients developed Grade 2 acute proctitis. No variables were significantly associated with Grade 2 acute proctitis. Seventeen of 102 (17%) patients developed Grade 2 acute urinary retention. American Urological Association (AUA) symptom score was the only variable significantly associated with Grade 2 acute urinary retention (p=0.04). There was no ≥ Grade 3 acute toxicity. Conclusions Dosimetric coverage of the prostate and normal tissue sparing were adequate in patients with prostate volumes >50 mL. Higher pre-treatment AUA symptom scores increased the relative risk of Grade 2 acute urinary retention. However, the overall incidence of acute toxicity was acceptable in patients with large prostate volumes. PMID:26200536

  16. Acute respiratory distress syndrome and lung fibrosis after ingestion of a high dose of ortho-phenylphenol.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shih-Lung; Wang, Hao-Chien; Yang, Pan-Chyr

    2005-08-01

    Ortho-phenylphenol (OPP) and its sodium salt are used as fungicides and antibacterial agents, ingestion of which has been found to cause liver toxicity, renal toxicity and carcinomas in the urinary tract of rats. Lung damage due to OPP ingestion has not been reported in humans. We report a suicidal 39-year-old woman with stage II cervical cancer who drank a potentially lethal dose of OPP in the form of a commercial antiseptic, which led to the complication of liver and renal function impairment, severe lung damage with acute respiratory distress syndrome and subsequent severe lung fibrosis. Open lung biopsy showed diffuse alveolar damage. She was discharged after 34 days of hospitalization with continuing domiciliary oxygen therapy.

  17. Acute toxicity of high doses of the glycoalkaloids, alpha-solanine and alpha-chaconine, in the Syrian Golden hamster.

    PubMed

    Langkilde, Søren; Schrøder, Malene; Stewart, Derek; Meyer, Otto; Conner, Sean; Davies, Howard; Poulsen, Morten

    2008-09-24

    Sprouted, stressed, or spoiled potato tubers have reportedly led to human acute intoxication, coma, and death when consumed in high amounts. These effects have been attributed to glycoalkaloids (GAs), primarily alpha-solanine and alpha-chaconine, naturally present in all potatoes. The level of GAs in potato tubers has previously been shown to increase substantially as a result of improper handling and postharvest storage. A short-term study was performed to investigate the dose-response profile of alpha-solanine and alpha-chaconine alone or in combination, administered daily by oral gavage to Syrian Golden hamsters. Daily doses of 100 mg of alpha-solanine [kg body weight (BW)] (-1) induced death in two of four hamsters within 4 days, when administered by gavage to female Syrian hamsters. Doses of 100 mg of alpha-chaconine alone or alpha-solanine and alpha-chaconine combined in a ratio of 1:2.5, in doses of 75 or 100 mg (kg BW) (-1), induced death in one of four hamsters within the same period. Animals dosed with alpha-solanine alone or in combination with alpha-chaconine suffered from fluid-filled and dilated small intestines. The GA administration had no effect on acetyl cholinesterase (AChE) or butyryl cholinesterase (BuChE) activity in plasma or brain. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolomics showed that there was a specific accumulation of alpha-chaconine in the liver tissues. In addition, metabolomics gave direct evidence of glycolytic metabolism of the GA with the beta 1, beta 2, and gamma-GAs detected in the urine and, to a lesser extent, the feces. Doses from 75 mg (kg BW) (-1) of alpha-chaconine, alpha-solanine, or the two compounds combined were potentially lethal within 4-5 days in the Syrian Golden hamster. However, the cause of death in these studies could not be established. No synergistic effects of alpha-solanine combined with alpha-chaconine were evident.

  18. Sex differences in Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol metabolism and in vivo pharmacology following acute and repeated dosing in adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Jenny L; Burston, James J

    2014-07-25

    Mechanisms that may underlie age and sex differences in the pharmacological effects of cannabinoids are relatively unexplored. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether sex differences in metabolism of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), similar to those observed previously in adult rats, also occurred in adolescent rats and might contribute to age and sex differences in its in vivo pharmacology. Male and female adolescent rats were exposed to THC acutely or repeatedly for 10 days. Subsequently, some of the rats were sacrificed and blood and brain levels of THC and one of its metabolites, 11-hydroxy-Δ(9)-THC (11-OH-THC), were measured. Other rats were evaluated in a battery of in vivo tests that are sensitive to cannabinoids. Concentrations of 11-OH-THC in the brains of female adult and adolescent rats exceeded those observed in male conspecifics, particularly after repeated THC administration. In contrast, brain levels of THC did not differ between the sexes. In vivo, acute THC produced dose-related hypothermia, catalepsy and suppression of locomotion in adolescent rats of both sexes, with tolerance developing after repeated administration. With a minor exception, sex differences in THC's effects in the in vivo assays were not apparent. Together with previous findings, the present results suggest that sex differences in pharmacokinetics cannot fully explain the patterns of sex differences (and lack of sex differences) in cannabinoid effects across behaviors. Hormonal and/or pharmacodynamic factors are also likely to play a role.

  19. Acute and long-term effects of a single dose of MDMA on aggression in Dark Agouti rats.

    PubMed

    Kirilly, Eszter; Benko, Anita; Ferrington, Linda; Ando, Romeo D; Kelly, Paul A T; Bagdy, Gyorgy

    2006-02-01

    MDMA causes selective depletion of serotonergic terminals in experimental animals and the consequent decrease in synaptic 5-HT may, inter alia, increase impulsivity. To study the effects of MDMA upon brain function, the behaviour of male Dark Agouti rats exposed to MDMA (15 mg/kg i.p.), two 5-HT1B agonists (CGS-12066A and CP-94,253, both 5 mg/kg i.p.) or saline were investigated in the resident-intruder test. Studies were performed in drug-naive rats and also in rats exposed to MDMA (15 mg/kg i.p.) 21 d earlier. In parallel experiments the functional neuroanatomy of MDMA effects were assessed using 2-deoxyglucose imaging of local cerebral metabolic rate of glucose utilization (LCMRGlu) and neurotoxicity was assessed by measuring [3H]paroxetine binding. There was no significant difference in aggressive behaviour (biting, boxing, wrestling and their latencies) between drug-naive rats and rats previously exposed to MDMA 21 d earlier, despite reduced social behaviour, decreased LCMRGlu in several brain areas involved in aggression, and reductions in paroxetine binding by 30-60% in the forebrain. CGS-12066A, CP-94,253 and acute MDMA produced marked decreases in aggressive behaviours, especially in biting, boxing and kicking found in drug-naive rats. In animals previously exposed to the drug, acute anti-aggressive effects of MDMA were, in general, preserved as were MDMA-induced increases in LCMRGlu. Our studies provide evidence that in the resident-intruder test, where social isolation is a requirement, aggressive behaviour and acute anti-aggressive effects of MDMA and 5-HT1B receptor agonists remain intact 3 wk after a single dose of the drug despite significant damage to the serotonergic system.

  20. Fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for neutrons and protons calculated using the PHITS code and ICRP/ICRU adult reference computational phantoms.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tatsuhiko; Endo, Akira; Zankl, Maria; Petoussi-Henss, Nina; Niita, Koji

    2009-04-07

    The fluence to organ-dose and effective-dose conversion coefficients for neutrons and protons with energies up to 100 GeV was calculated using the PHITS code coupled to male and female adult reference computational phantoms, which are to be released as a common ICRP/ICRU publication. For the calculation, the radiation and tissue weighting factors, w(R) and w(T), respectively, as revised in ICRP Publication 103 were employed. The conversion coefficients for effective dose equivalents derived using the radiation quality factors of both Q(L) and Q(y) relationships were also estimated, utilizing the functions for calculating the probability densities of the absorbed dose in terms of LET (L) and lineal energy (y), respectively, implemented in PHITS. By comparing these data with the corresponding data for the effective dose, we found that the numerical compatibilities of the revised w(R) with the Q(L) and Q(y) relationships are fairly established. The calculated data of these dose conversion coefficients are indispensable for constructing the radiation protection systems based on the new recommendations given in ICRP103 for aircrews and astronauts, as well as for workers in accelerators and nuclear facilities.

  1. Acute High-Dose and Chronic Lifetime Exposure to Alcohol Consumption and Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: T-CALOS Korea

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Yunji; Lee, Kyu Eun; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Park, Young Joo; Chai, Young Jun; Kwon, Hyungju; Park, Do Joon; Cho, BeLong; Choi, Ho-Chun; Kang, Daehee; Park, Sue K.

    2016-01-01

    Background This study evaluated the effects of acute high-dose and chronic lifetime exposure to alcohol and exposure patterns on the development of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). Methods The Thyroid Cancer Longitudinal Study (T-CALOS) included 2,258 DTC patients (449 men and 1,809 women) and 22,580 healthy participants (4,490 men and 18,090 women) who were individually matched by age, gender, and enrollment year. In-person interviews were conducted with a structured questionnaire to obtain epidemiologic data. Clinicopathologic features of the patients were obtained by chart reviews. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were estimated using conditional regression models. Results While light or moderate drinking behavior was related to a reduced risk of DTC, acute heavy alcohol consumption (151 g or more per event or on a single occasion) was associated with increased risks in men (OR = 2.22, 95%CI = 1.27–3.87) and women (OR = 3.61, 95%CI = 1.52–8.58) compared with never-drinkers. The consumption of alcohol for 31 or more years was a significant risk factor for DTC for both men (31–40 years: OR = 1.58, 95%CI = 1.10–2.28; 41+ years: OR = 3.46, 95%CI = 2.06–5.80) and women (31–40 years: OR = 2.18, 95%CI = 1.62–2.92; 41+ years: OR = 2.71, 95%CI = 1.36–5.05) compared with never-drinkers. The consumption of a large amount of alcohol on a single occasion was also a significant risk factor, even after restricting DTC outcomes to tumor size, lymph node metastasis, extrathyroidal extension and TNM stage. Conclusion The findings of this study suggest that the threshold effects of acute high-dose alcohol consumption and long-term alcohol consumption are linked to an increased risk of DTC. PMID:26985827

  2. A phase 2 study of high-dose lenalidomide as initial therapy for older patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Fehniger, Todd A; Uy, Geoffrey L; Trinkaus, Kathryn; Nelson, Alissa D; Demland, Jeffery; Abboud, Camille N; Cashen, Amanda F; Stockerl-Goldstein, Keith E; Westervelt, Peter; DiPersio, John F; Vij, Ravi

    2011-02-10

    Older patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have limited treatment options and a poor prognosis, thereby warranting novel therapeutic strategies. We evaluated the efficacy of lenalidomide as front-line therapy for older AML patients. In this phase 2 study, patients 60 years of age or older with untreated AML received high-dose (HD) lenalidomide at 50 mg daily for up to 2 28-day cycles. If patients achieved a complete remission (CR)/CR with incomplete blood count recovery (CRi) or did not progress after 2 cycles of HD lenalidomide, they received low-dose lenalidomide (10 mg daily) until disease progression, an unacceptable adverse event, or completion of 12 cycles. Thirty-three AML patients (median age, 71 years) were enrolled with intermediate (55%), unfavorable (39%), or unknown (6%) cytogenetic risk. Overall CR/CRi rate was 30%, and 53% in patients completing HD lenalidomide. The CR/CRi rate was significantly higher in patients presenting with a low (< 1000/μL) circulating blast count (50%, P = .01). The median time to CR/CRi was 30 days, and duration of CR/CRi was 10 months (range, 1- ≥ 17 months). The most common grades ≥ 3 toxicities were thrombocytopenia, anemia, infection, and neutropenia. HD lenalidomide has evidence of clinical activity as initial therapy for older AML patients, and further study of lenalidomide in AML and MDS is warranted. This study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00546897.

  3. A phase 2 study of high-dose lenalidomide as initial therapy for older patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Fehniger, Todd A.; Uy, Geoffrey L.; Trinkaus, Kathryn; Nelson, Alissa D.; Demland, Jeffery; Abboud, Camille N.; Cashen, Amanda F.; Stockerl-Goldstein, Keith E.; Westervelt, Peter; DiPersio, John F.

    2011-01-01

    Older patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have limited treatment options and a poor prognosis, thereby warranting novel therapeutic strategies. We evaluated the efficacy of lenalidomide as front-line therapy for older AML patients. In this phase 2 study, patients 60 years of age or older with untreated AML received high-dose (HD) lenalidomide at 50 mg daily for up to 2 28-day cycles. If patients achieved a complete remission (CR)/CR with incomplete blood count recovery (CRi) or did not progress after 2 cycles of HD lenalidomide, they received low-dose lenalidomide (10 mg daily) until disease progression, an unacceptable adverse event, or completion of 12 cycles. Thirty-three AML patients (median age, 71 years) were enrolled with intermediate (55%), unfavorable (39%), or unknown (6%) cytogenetic risk. Overall CR/CRi rate was 30%, and 53% in patients completing HD lenalidomide. The CR/CRi rate was significantly higher in patients presenting with a low (< 1000/μL) circulating blast count (50%, P = .01). The median time to CR/CRi was 30 days, and duration of CR/CRi was 10 months (range, 1- ≥ 17 months). The most common grades ≥ 3 toxicities were thrombocytopenia, anemia, infection, and neutropenia. HD lenalidomide has evidence of clinical activity as initial therapy for older AML patients, and further study of lenalidomide in AML and MDS is warranted. This study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00546897. PMID:21051557

  4. GTI-2040 and High-Dose Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Urinary Obstruction in Prostate Cancer Patients From the Dutch Trial (68 Gy vs. 78 Gy): Relationships With Local Dose, Acute Effects, and Baseline Characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Heemsbergen, Wilma D.; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Witte, Marnix G.; Herk, Marcel van; Pos, Floris J.; Lebesque, Joos V.

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the relationship between late urinary obstruction and the details of the dose distribution of irradiated prostate cancer patients, taking into account their baseline symptoms and acute complaints. Patients and Methods: We selected patients from the Dutch multicenter trial randomized between 68 Gy and 78 Gy, for whom toxicity data and dose data were available (n = 557). The absolute dose surface parameters of the delineated bladder were calculated. Next, we constructed three-dimensional dose maps of the area around the prostate, providing an approximate identification of the corresponding anatomic locations. The dose difference maps were constructed by subtracting the mean dose maps of the patients with and without late urinary obstruction. Selected local dose points were analyzed using Cox regression analysis. Results: Urinary obstruction was scored for 40 patients, including 19 of 296 patients who received 68-72 Gy and 21 of 261 patients who received 76-78 Gy. A total of 19 events occurred within 2 years after irradiation and 21 events after 2 years. The bladder surface receiving {>=}80 Gy predicted (p <.01) the occurrence of obstruction within 2 years. The dose difference map indicated highly significant differences in the bladder neck situated in the trigonal region (p < .001) that were especially predictive of obstruction after 2 years and of the diagnosis of bladder neck obstruction. Baseline complaints and transurethral resection of the prostate and acute complaints were mainly predictive for obstruction within 2 years. Conclusion: Relatively early events of urinary obstruction were associated with urinary problems existing before RT, acute toxicity, previous transurethral resection of the prostate, and hotspots in the bladder. Events after 2 years were associated with the local dose in the trigonal area.

  6. Verification of absorbed dose rates in reference beta radiation fields: Measurements with an extrapolation chamber and radiochromic film.

    PubMed

    Reynaldo, S R; Benavente, J A; Da Silva, T A

    2016-11-01

    Beta Secondary Standard 2 (BSS 2) provides beta radiation fields with certified values of absorbed dose to tissue and the derived operational radiation protection quantities. As part of the quality assurance, the reliability of the CDTN BSS2 system was verified through measurements in the (90)Sr/(90)Y and (85)Kr beta radiation fields. Absorbed dose rates and their angular variation were measured with a 23392 model PTW extrapolation chamber and with Gafchromic radiochromic films on a PMMA slab phantom. The feasibility of using both methods was analyzed.

  7. Factors associated with acute-phase response of bisphosphonate-naïve or pretreated women with osteoporosis receiving an intravenous first dose of zoledronate or ibandronate.

    PubMed

    Popp, A W; Senn, R; Curkovic, I; Senn, C; Buffat, H; Popp, P F; Lippuner, K

    2017-03-15

    A first intravenous dose of bisphosphonates may be associated with an acute-phase response (APR). In bisphosphonate-naïve women with postmenopausal osteoporosis, the characteristics and frequency of APR may differ by compound. Prior bisphosphonate exposure was predictive of APR risk and severity.

  8. Intracellular β2-adrenergic receptor signaling specificity in mouse skeletal muscle in response to single-dose β2-agonist clenbuterol treatment and acute exercise.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shogo; Shirato, Ken; Mitsuhashi, Ryosuke; Inoue, Daisuke; Kizaki, Takako; Ohno, Hideki; Tachiyashiki, Kaoru; Imaizumi, Kazuhiko

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the intracellular β2-adrenergic receptor signaling specificity in mouse slow-twitch soleus and fast-twitch tibialis anterior (TA) muscles, resulting from single-dose β2-agonist clenbuterol treatment and acute exercise. At 1, 4, and 24 h after single-dose treatment with clenbuterol or after acute running exercise, the soleus and TA muscles were isolated and subjected to analysis. The phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) increased after single-dose clenbuterol treatment and acute exercise in the soleus muscle but not in the TA muscle. Although there was no change in the phosphorylation of Akt after acute exercise in either muscle, phosphorylation of Akt in the soleus muscle increased after single-dose clenbuterol treatment, whereas that in the TA muscle remained unchanged. These results suggest that p38 MAPK and Akt pathways play a functional role in the adaptation to clenbuterol treatment and exercise, particularly in slow-twitch muscles.

  9. Extrapolating the Acute Behavioral Effects of Toluene from 1-Hour to 24-Hour Exposures in Rats: Roles of Dose Metric, and Metabolic and Behavioral Tolerance.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent research on the acute effects of volatile organic compounds (VQCs) suggests that extrapolation from short (~ 1 h) to long durations (up to 4 h) may be improved by using estimates of brain toluene concentration (Br[Tol]) instead of cumulative inhaled dose (C x t) as a metri...

  10. Normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) modelling using spatial dose metrics and machine learning methods for severe acute oral mucositis resulting from head and neck radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Jamie A; Wong, Kee H; Welsh, Liam C; Jones, Ann-Britt; Schick, Ulrike; Newbold, Kate L; Bhide, Shreerang A; Harrington, Kevin J; Nutting, Christopher M; Gulliford, Sarah L

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Severe acute mucositis commonly results from head and neck (chemo)radiotherapy. A predictive model of mucositis could guide clinical decision-making and inform treatment planning. We aimed to generate such a model using spatial dose metrics and machine learning. Material and Methods Predictive models of severe acute mucositis were generated using radiotherapy dose (dose-volume and spatial dose metrics) and clinical data. Penalised logistic regression, support vector classification and random forest classification (RFC) models were generated and compared. Internal validation was performed (with 100-iteration cross-validation), using multiple metrics, including area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and calibration slope, to assess performance. Associations between covariates and severe mucositis were explored using the models. Results The dose-volume-based models (standard) performed equally to those incorporating spatial information. Discrimination was similar between models, but the RFCstandard had the best calibration. The mean AUC and calibration slope for this model were 0.71 (s.d.=0.09) and 3.9 (s.d.=2.2), respectively. The volumes of oral cavity receiving intermediate and high doses were associated with severe mucositis. Conclusions The RFCstandard model performance is modest-to-good, but should be improved, and requires external validation. Reducing the volumes of oral cavity receiving intermediate and high doses may reduce mucositis incidence. PMID:27240717

  11. Derivation of a bisphenol A oral reference dose (RfD) and drinking-water equivalent concentration.

    PubMed

    Willhite, Calvin C; Ball, Gwendolyn L; McLellan, Clifton J

    2008-02-01

    Human exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) is due to that found in the diet, and BPA and its metabolites were detected at parts per billion (or less) concentrations in human urine, milk, saliva, serum, plasma, ovarian follicular fluid, and amniotic fluid. Adverse health effects in mice and rats may be induced after parenteral injection or after massive oral doses. Controlled ingestion trials in healthy adult volunteers with 5 mg d16-BPA were unable to detect parent BPA in plasma despite exquisitely sensitive (limit of detection = 6 nM) methods, but by 96 h 100% of the administered dose was recovered in urine as the glucuronide. The extensive BPA glucuronidation following ingestion is not seen after parenteral injection; only the parent BPA binds plasma proteins and estrogen receptors (ER). The hypothesis that BPA dose-response may be described by a J- or U-shape curve was not supported by toxicogenomic data collected in fetal rat testes and epididymes (after repeated parenteral exposure at 2-400,000 microg/kg-d), where a clear monotonic dose-response both in the numbers of genes and magnitude of individual gene expression was evident. There is no clear indication from available data that the BPA doses normally consumed by humans pose an increased risk for immunologic or neurologic disease. There is no evidence that BPA poses a genotoxic or carcinogenic risk and clinical evaluations of 205 men and women with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-verified serum or urinary BPA conjugates showed (1) no objective signs, (2) no changes in reproductive hormones or clinical chemistry parameters, and (3) no alterations in the number of children or sons:daughters ratio. Results of benchmark dose (BMD10 and BMDL10) calculations and no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) inspections of all available and reproducible rodent studies with oral BPA found BMD and NOAEL values all greater than the 5 mg/kg-d NOAELs from mouse and rat multigeneration reproduction toxicity studies

  12. Acute transverse myelopathy complicating systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Propper, D J; Bucknall, R C

    1989-01-01

    A sixteen year old girl with systemic lupus erythematosus developed acute transverse myelopathy. She was treated with high dose steroids, cyclophosphamide, and plasma exchange and regained partial neurological function. Previous descriptions of transverse myelopathy complicating systemic lupus erythematosus are reviewed, with particular reference to the efficacy of high dose steroid treatment. PMID:2662918

  13. Dose-dependent increases in flow-mediated dilation following acute cocoa ingestion in healthy older adults

    PubMed Central

    Feehan, Robert P.; Kunselman, Allen R.; Preston, Amy G.; Miller, Debra L.; Lott, Mary E. J.

    2011-01-01

    An inverse relation exists between intake of flavonoid-rich foods, such as cocoa, and cardiovascular-related mortality. Favorable effects of flavonoids on the endothelium may underlie these associations. We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study to test the hypothesis that acute cocoa ingestion dose dependently increases endothelium-dependent vasodilation, as measured by an increase in brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD), in healthy older adults. Measurements were obtained before (preingestion) and after (1- and 2-h postingestion) ingestion of 0 (placebo), 2, 5, 13, and 26 g of cocoa in 23 adults (63 ± 2 yr old, mean ± SE). Changes in brachial artery FMD 1- and 2-h postingestion compared with preingestion were used to determine the effects of cocoa. FMD was unchanged 1 (Δ−0.3 ± 0.2%)- and 2-h (Δ0.1 ± 0.1%) after placebo (0 g cocoa). In contrast, FMD increased both 1-h postingestion (2 g cocoa Δ0.0 ± 0.2%, 5 g cocoa Δ0.8 ± 0.3%, 13 g cocoa Δ1.0 ± 0.3%, and 26 g cocoa Δ1.6 ± 0.3%: P < 0.05 compared with placebo for 5, 13, and 26 g cocoa) and 2-h postingestion (2 g cocoa Δ0.5 ± 0.3%, 5 g cocoa Δ1.0 ± 0.3%, 13 g cocoa Δ1.4 ± 0.2%, and 26 g cocoa Δ2.5 ± 0.4%: P < 0.05 compared with placebo for 5, 13, and 26 g cocoa) on the other study days. A serum marker of cocoa ingestion (total epicatechin) correlated with increased FMD 1- and 2-h postingestion (r = 0.44–0.48; both P < 0.05). Collectively, these results indicate that acute cocoa ingestion dose dependently increases brachial artery FMD in healthy older humans. These responses may help to explain associations between flavonoid intake and cardiovascular-related mortality in humans. PMID:21903881

  14. Selected acute phase proteins and interleukin-6 in systemic lupus erythematosus patients treated with low doses of quinagolide.

    PubMed

    Hrycek, Antoni; Pochopień-Kenig, Grazyna; Scieszka, Joanna

    2007-05-01

    The relationship between endocrine regulation and immune system has recently become the subject of intense investigations. The objective of this study was to determine the extent of selected serum acute phase proteins (APP), IL-6 and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients during quinagolide therapy. A further aim of this study was to evaluate the relationships between the above mentioned parameters. In 25 SLE patients treated with a low dose of quinagolide (12.5-50 microg per day) and in 25 healthy persons who constituted the control group, serum concentration of C-creative protein (CRP), alpha-1-antitripsin (AAT), ceruloplasmin (CER), IL-6 and prolactin (PRL) were estimated at entry and in patients after 3 months of treatment. Moreover, SLEDAI score was calculated at entry and after 3 months of therapy with quinagolide. IL-6 and PRL levels were significantly higher in SLE group whereas the concentrations of CRP, AAT and CER were higher than in the controls, but without statistical significance. After 3 month therapy statistically significant decrease of serum level of IL-6 and PRL was revealed. Statistically significant lower serum concentration of CER was also obtained after 3 months of therapy whereas serum CRP and AAT concentration was lower compared with the mean pretreatment level but the results did not reach statistical significance. A raised SLEDAI score at entry was significantly reduced after 3 month therapy and positive correlation with PRL level in examined group of patients with SLE was noted at entry. The decreased serum concentration of IL-6, APP and SLEDAI score observed during applied therapy with small dose of quinagolide confirms the hypothesis that quinagolide may become a valuable and safe drug in the therapy of patients with mild SLE.

  15. Evidence of a treatment dose response in acute nonlymphocytic leukemias which occur after therapy of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, M.H.; Young, R.C.; Merrill, J.M.; DeVita, V.T.

    1983-04-01

    We evaluated the occurrence of second cancers among 517 patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) treated at the National Cancer Institute. Nine cases of acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANL) were observed compared to 0.08 cases expected (ratio of observed to expected cases, 105; 95% confidence limits, 48; 199). The excess risk of ANL was 4.1 cases per 1000 patients per year; the cumulative risk of ANL at 10 years was 7.9 +/- 3.2% (S.E.). A case-control study within the NHL cohort revealed that patients treated with both radiation and chemotherapy were at greater risk of ANL than were patients who received single-modality therapy (relative risk, 6.0; p less than 0.05), especially if the therapy included total-body or hemibody radiation. A positive correlation between cumulative radiation dose to the bone marrow and risk of ANL was demonstrated, independent of chemotherapy duration. A similar correlation between chemotherapy dose and risk of ANL was suggested but could not be proven with the available data. An apparent association between ANL risk and indolent NHL histological subtypes was due to the significantly larger amounts of potentially leukemogenic therapy to which these patients were repeatedly exposed. Only one case of ANL occurred among NHL patients whose initial therapy produced a durable complete remission. Our data are compatible with a multistep model of leukemogenesis and also underscore the need for curative NHL treatment regimens which minimize the duration and quantity of therapy required for optimum patient management.

  16. The ampakine, Org 26576, bolsters early spatial reference learning and retrieval in the Morris water maze: a subchronic, dose-ranging study in rats.

    PubMed

    Hamlyn, Eugene; Brand, Linda; Shahid, Mohammed; Harvey, Brian H

    2009-10-01

    Ampakines have shown beneficial effects on cognition in selected animal models of learning. However, their ability to modify long-term spatial memory tasks has not been studied yet. This would lend credence to their possible value in treating disorders of cognition. We evaluated the actions of subchronic Org 26576 administration on spatial reference memory performance in the 5-day Morris water maze task in male Sprague-Dawley rats, at doses of 1, 3 and 10 mg/kg twice daily through intraperitoneal injection over 12 days. Org 26576 exerted a dose and time-dependent effect on spatial learning, with dosages of 3 and 10 mg/kg significantly enhancing acquisition on day 1. Globally, escape latency decreased significantly as the training days progressed in the saline and Org 26576-treated groups, indicating that significant and equal learning had taken place over the learning period. However, at the end of the learning period, all doses of Org 26576 significantly improved spatial memory storage/retrieval without confounding effects in the cued version of the task. Org 26576 offers early phase spatial memory benefits in rats, but particularly enhances search accuracy during reference memory retrieval. These results support its possible utility in treating disorders characterized by deficits in cognitive performance.

  17. Temporal changes in tissue repair permit survival of diet-restricted rats from an acute lethal dose of thioacetamide.

    PubMed

    Ramaiah, S K; Bucci, T J; Warbritton, A; Soni, M G; Mehendale, H M

    1998-10-01

    Although, diet restriction (DR) has been shown to substantially increase longevity while reducing or delaying the onset of age-related diseases, little is known about the mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of DR on acute toxic outcomes. An earlier study (S. K. Ramaiah et al., 1998, Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 150, 12-21) revealed that a 35% DR compared to ad libitum (AL) feeding leads to a substantial increase in liver injury of thioacetamide (TA) at a low dose (50 mg/kg, i.p.). Higher liver injury was accompanied by enhanced survival. A prompt and enhanced tissue repair response in DR rats at the low dose (sixfold higher liver injury) occurred, whereas at equitoxic doses (50 mg/kg in DR and 600 mg/kg in AL rats) tissue repair in AL rats was substantially diminished and delayed. The extent of liver injury did not appear to be closely related to the extent of stimulated tissue repair response. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the time course (0-120 h) of liver injury and liver tissue repair at the high dose (600 mg TA/kg, i.p., lethal in AL rats) in AL and DR rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (225-275 g) were 35% diet restricted compared to their AL cohorts for 21 days and on day 22 they received a single dose of TA (600 mg/kg, i.p.). Liver injury was assessed by plasma ALT and by histopathological examination of liver sections. Tissue repair was assessed by [3H]thymidine incorporation into hepatonuclear DNA and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunohistochemistry during 0-120 h after TA injection. In AL-fed rats hepatic necrosis was evident at 12 h, peaked at 60 h, and persisted thereafter until mortality (3 to 6 days). Peak liver injury was approximately twofold higher in DR rats compared to that seen in AL rats. Hepatic necrosis was evident at 36 h, peaked at 48 h, persisted until 96 h, and returned to normal by 120 h. Light microscopy of liver sections revealed progression of hepatic injury in AL rats whereas injury regressed

  18. Low-dose thymoglobulin as second-line treatment for steroid-resistant acute GvHD: an analysis of the JSHCT.

    PubMed

    Murata, M; Ikegame, K; Morishita, Y; Ogawa, H; Kaida, K; Nakamae, H; Ikeda, T; Nishida, T; Inoue, M; Eto, T; Kubo, K; Sakura, T; Mori, T; Uchida, N; Ashida, T; Matsuhashi, Y; Miyazaki, Y; Ichinohe, T; Atsuta, Y; Teshima, T

    2017-02-01

    A nationwide retrospective study for the clinical outcomes of 99 patients who had received thymoglobulin at a median total dose of 2.5 mg/kg (range, 0.5-18.5 mg/kg) as a second-line treatment for steroid-resistant acute GvHD was conducted. Of the 92 evaluable patients, improvement (complete or partial response) was observed in 55 patients (60%). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that male sex and grade III and IV acute GvHD were associated with a lower improvement rate, whereas thymoglobulin dose (<2.0, 2.0-3.9 and ⩾4.0 mg/kg) was NS. Factors associated with significantly higher nonrelapse mortality included higher patient age (⩾50 years), grade IV acute GvHD, no improvement of GvHD and higher dose of thymoglobulin (hazard ratio, 2.55; 95% confidence interval, 1.34-4.85; P=0.004 for 2.0-3.9 mg/kg group and 1.79; 0.91-3.55; P=0.093 for ⩾4.0 mg/kg group). Higher dose of thymoglobulin was associated with a higher incidence of bacterial infections, CMV antigenemia and any additional infection. Taken together, low-dose thymoglobulin at a median total dose of 2.5 mg/kg provides a comparable response rate to standard-dose thymoglobulin reported previously, and <2.0 mg/kg thymoglobulin is recommended in terms of the balance between efficacy and adverse effects.

  19. Predicting Grade 3 Acute Diarrhea During Radiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer Using a Cutoff-Dose Logistic Regression Normal Tissue Complication Probability Model

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, John M.; Soehn, Matthias; Yan Di

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: Understanding the dose-volume relationship of small bowel irradiation and severe acute diarrhea may help reduce the incidence of this side effect during adjuvant treatment for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patients treated curatively for rectal cancer were reviewed, and the maximum grade of acute diarrhea was determined. The small bowel was outlined on the treatment planning CT scan, and a dose-volume histogram was calculated for the initial pelvic treatment (45 Gy). Logistic regression models were fitted for varying cutoff-dose levels from 5 to 45 Gy in 5-Gy increments. The model with the highest LogLikelihood was used to develop a cutoff-dose normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model. Results: There were a total of 152 patients (48% preoperative, 47% postoperative, 5% other), predominantly treated prone (95%) with a three-field technique (94%) and a protracted venous infusion of 5-fluorouracil (78%). Acute Grade 3 diarrhea occurred in 21%. The largest LogLikelihood was found for the cutoff-dose logistic regression model with 15 Gy as the cutoff-dose, although the models for 20 Gy and 25 Gy had similar significance. According to this model, highly significant correlations (p <0.001) between small bowel volumes receiving at least 15 Gy and toxicity exist in the considered patient population. Similar findings applied to both the preoperatively (p = 0.001) and postoperatively irradiated groups (p = 0.001). Conclusion: The incidence of Grade 3 diarrhea was significantly correlated with the volume of small bowel receiving at least 15 Gy using a cutoff-dose NTCP model.

  20. Mitigation Effect of an FGF-2 Peptide on Acute Gastrointestinal Syndrome After High-Dose Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Lurong; Sun Weimin; Wang Jianjun; Zhang Mei; Yang Shanmin; Tian Yeping; Vidyasagar, Sadasivan; Pena, Louis A.; Zhang Kunzhong; Cao Yongbing; Yin Liangjie; Wang Wei; Zhang Lei; Schaefer, Katherine L.; Saubermann, Lawrence J.; Swarts, Steven G.; Fenton, Bruce M.; Keng, Peter C.; Okunieff, Paul

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: Acute gastrointestinal syndrome (AGS) resulting from ionizing radiation causes death within 7 days. Currently, no satisfactory agent exists for mitigation of AGS. A peptide derived from the receptor binding domain of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-P) was synthesized and its mitigation effect on AGS was examined. Methods and Materials: A subtotal body irradiation (sub-TBI) model was created to induce gastrointestinal (GI) death while avoiding bone marrow death. After 10.5 to 16 Gy sub-TBI, mice received an intramuscular injection of FGF-P (10 mg/kg/day) or saline (0.2 ml/day) for 5 days; survival (frequency and duration) was measured. Crypt cells and their proliferation were assessed by hematoxylin, eosin, and BrdU staining. In addition, GI hemoccult score, stool formation, and plasma levels of endotoxin, insulin, amylase, interleukin (IL)-6, keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC) monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha were evaluated. Results: Treatment with FGF-P rescued a significant fraction of four strains of mice (33-50%) exposed to a lethal dose of sub-TBI. Use of FGF-P improved crypt survival and repopulation and partially preserved or restored GI function. Furthermore, whereas sub-TBI increased plasma endotoxin levels and several pro-inflammation cytokines (IL-6, KC, MCP-1, and TNF-alpha), FGF-P reduced these adverse responses. Conclusions: The study data support pursuing FGF-P as a mitigator for AGS.

  1. Radiation dose in coronary angiography and intervention: initial results from the establishment of a multi-centre diagnostic reference level in Queensland public hospitals

    SciTech Connect

    Crowhurst, James A; Whitby, Mark; Thiele, David; Halligan, Toni; Westerink, Adam; Crown, Suzanne; Milne, Jillian

    2014-09-15

    Radiation dose to patients undergoing invasive coronary angiography (ICA) is relatively high. Guidelines suggest that a local benchmark or diagnostic reference level (DRL) be established for these procedures. This study sought to create a DRL for ICA procedures in Queensland public hospitals. Data were collected for all Cardiac Catheter Laboratories in Queensland public hospitals. Data were collected for diagnostic coronary angiography (CA) and single-vessel percutaneous intervention (PCI) procedures. Dose area product (P{sub KA}), skin surface entrance dose (K{sub AR}), fluoroscopy time (FT), and patient height and weight were collected for 3 months. The DRL was set from the 75th percentile of the P{sub KA.} 2590 patients were included in the CA group where the median FT was 3.5 min (inter-quartile range = 2.3–6.1). Median K{sub AR} = 581 mGy (374–876). Median P{sub KA} = 3908 uGym{sup 2} (2489–5865) DRL = 5865 uGym{sup 2}. 947 patients were included in the PCI group where median FT was 11.2 min (7.7–17.4). Median K{sub AR} = 1501 mGy (928–2224). Median P{sub KA} = 8736 uGym{sup 2} (5449–12,900) DRL = 12,900 uGym{sup 2}. This study established a benchmark for radiation dose for diagnostic and interventional coronary angiography in Queensland public facilities.

  2. Human health screening level risk assessments of tertiary-butyl acetate (TBAC): calculated acute and chronic reference concentration (RfC) and Hazard Quotient (HQ) values based on toxicity and exposure scenario evaluations.

    PubMed

    Bus, James S; Banton, Marcy I; Faber, Willem D; Kirman, Christopher R; McGregor, Douglas B; Pourreau, Daniel B

    2015-02-01

    A screening level risk assessment has been performed for tertiary-butyl acetate (TBAC) examining its primary uses as a solvent in industrial and consumer products. Hazard quotients (HQ) were developed by merging TBAC animal toxicity and dose-response data with population-level, occupational and consumer exposure scenarios. TBAC has a low order of toxicity following subchronic inhalation exposure, and neurobehavioral changes (hyperactivity) in mice observed immediately after termination of exposure were used as conservative endpoints for derivation of acute and chronic reference concentration (RfC) values. TBAC is not genotoxic but has not been tested for carcinogenicity. However, TBAC is unlikely to be a human carcinogen in that its non-genotoxic metabolic surrogates tertiary-butanol (TBA) and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) produce only male rat α-2u-globulin-mediated kidney cancer and high-dose specific mouse thyroid tumors, both of which have little qualitative or quantitative relevance to humans. Benchmark dose (BMD)-modeling of the neurobehavioral responses yielded acute and chronic RfC values of 1.5 ppm and 0.3 ppm, respectively. After conservative modeling of general population and near-source occupational and consumer product exposure scenarios, almost all HQs were substantially less than 1. HQs exceeding 1 were limited to consumer use of automotive products and paints in a poorly ventilated garage-sized room (HQ = 313) and occupational exposures in small and large brake shops using no personal protective equipment or ventilation controls (HQs = 3.4-126.6). The screening level risk assessments confirm low human health concerns with most uses of TBAC and indicate that further data-informed refinements can address problematic health/exposure scenarios. The assessments also illustrate how tier-based risk assessments using read-across toxicity information to metabolic surrogates reduce the need for comprehensive animal testing.

  3. Transient impairment of hippocampus-dependent learning and memory in relatively low-dose of acute radiation syndrome is associated with inhibition of hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joong-Sun; Lee, Hae-June; Kim, Jong Choon; Kang, Seong Soo; Bae, Chun-Sik; Shin, Taekyun; Jin, Jae-Kwang; Kim, Sung Ho; Wang, Hongbing; Moon, Changjong

    2008-09-01

    Neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus, which occurs constitutively, is vulnerable to ionizing radiation. In the relatively low-dose exposure of acute radiation syndrome (ARS), the change in the adult hippocampal function is poorly understood. This study analyzed the changes in apoptotic cell death and neurogenesis in the DGs of hippocampi from adult ICR mice with single whole-body gamma-irradiation using the TUNEL method and immunohistochemical markers of neurogenesis, Ki-67 and doublecortin (DCX). In addition, the hippocampus-dependent learning and memory tasks after single whole-body gamma-irradiation were examined in order to evaluate the hippocampus-related behavioral dysfunction in the relatively low-dose exposure of ARS. The number of TUNEL-positive apoptotic nuclei in the dentate gyrus (DG) was increased 6-12 h after acute gamma-irradiation (a single dose of 0.5 to 4 Gy). In contrast, the number of Ki-67- and DCX-positive cells began to decrease significantly 6 h postirradiation, reaching its lowest level 24 h after irradiation. The level of Ki-67 and DCX immunoreactivity decreased in a dose-dependent manner within the range of irradiation applied (0-4 Gy). In passive avoidance and object recognition memory test, the mice trained 1 day after acute irradiation (2 Gy) showed significant memory deficits, compared with the sham controls. In conclusion, the pattern of the hippocampus-dependent memory dysfunction is consistent with the change in neurogenesis after acute irradiation. It is suggested that a relatively low dose of ARS in adult ICR mice is sufficiently detrimental to interrupt the functioning of the hippocampus, including learning and memory, possibly through the inhibition of neurogenesis.

  4. Effects of acute and repeated oral doses of D-tagatose on plasma uric acid in normal and diabetic humans.

    PubMed

    Saunders, J P; Donner, T W; Sadler, J H; Levin, G V; Makris, N G

    1999-04-01

    D-tagatose, a stereoisomer of D-fructose, is a naturally occurring ketohexose proposed for use as a low-calorie bulk sweetener. Ingested D-tagatose appears to be poorly absorbed. The absorbed portion is metabolized in the liver by a pathway similar to that of D-fructose. The main purpose of this study was to determine if acute or repeated oral doses of D-tagatose would cause elevations in plasma uric acid (as is seen with fructose) in normal humans and Type 2 diabetics. In addition, effects of subchronic D-tagatose ingestion on fasting plasma phosphorus, magnesium, lipids, and glucose homeostasis were studied. Eight normal subjects and eight subjects with Type 2 diabetes participated in this two-phase study. Each group was comprised of four males and four females. In the first phase, all subjects were given separate 75 g 3-h oral glucose and D-tagatose tolerance tests. Uric acid, phosphorus, and magnesium were determined in blood samples collected from each subject at 0, 30, 60, 120, and 180 min after dose. In the 8-week phase of the study, the normals were randomly placed into two groups which received 75 g of either D-tagatose or sucrose (25 g with each meal) daily for 8 weeks. The diabetics were randomized into two groups which received either 75 g D-tagatose or no supplements of sugar daily for 8 weeks. Uric acid, phosphorus, magnesium, lipids, glycosylated hemoglobin, glucose, and insulin were determined in fasting blood plasma of all subjects at baseline (time zero) and biweekly over the 8 weeks. The 8-week test did not demonstrate an increase in fasting plasma uric acid in response to the daily intake of D-tagatose. However, a transient increase of plasma uric acid levels was observed after single doses of 75 g of D-tagatose in the tolerance test. Plasma uric acid levels were found to rise and peak at 60 min after such dosing. No clinical relevance was attributed to this treatment-related effect because excursions of plasma uric acid levels above the normal

  5. Predicting the acute behavioral effects in rats inhaling toluene (or up to 24 hrs: Inhaled vs. internal dose metrics.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The acute toxicity oftoluene, a model volatile organic compound (VOC), depends on the concentration (C) and duration (t) ofexposure, and guidelines for acute exposures have traditionally used ext relationships to extrapolate protective and/or effective concentrations across durat...

  6. Comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K8 of high dose rate 192Ir brachytherapy standards for reference air kerma rate of the NPL and the BIPM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, J. T.; Sander, T.; de Pooter, J. A.; Allisy-Roberts, P. J.; Kessler, C.

    2014-01-01

    An indirect comparison of the standards for reference air kerma rate for 192Ir high dose rate brachytherapy sources of the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), United Kingdom, and of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) was carried out at the NPL in June 2010. The comparison result, based on the calibration coefficients for a transfer standard and expressed as a ratio of the NPL and the BIPM standards for reference air kerma rate, is 0.9989 with a combined standard uncertainty of 0.0057. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  7. A system for protecting the environment from ionising radiation: selecting reference fauna and flora, and the possible dose models and environmental geometries that could be applied to them.

    PubMed

    Pentreath, R J; Woodhead, D S

    2001-09-28

    In order to demonstrate, explicitly, that the environment can be protected with respect to controlled sources of ionising radiation, it is essential to have a systematic framework within which dosimetry models for fauna and flora can be used. And because of the practical limitations on what could reasonably be modelled and the amount of information that could reasonably be obtained, it is also necessary to limit the application of such models to a 'set' of fauna and flora within a reference' context. This paper, therefore, outlines the factors that will need to be considered to select such 'reference' fauna and flora, and describes some of the factors and constraints necessary to develop the associated dosimetry models. It also describes some of the most basic environmental geometrics within which the dose models could be set in order to make comparisons amongst different radiation sources.

  8. Determination of absorbed dose in water at the reference point d(r0, theta0) for an 192Ir HDR brachytherapy source using a Fricke system.

    PubMed

    Austerlitz, C; Mota, H C; Sempau, J; Benhabib, S M; Campos, D; Allison, R; DeAlmeida, C E; Zhu, D; Sibata, C H

    2008-12-01

    A ring-shaped Fricke device was developed to measure the absolute dose on the transverse bisector of a 192Ir high dose rate (HDR) source at 1 cm from its center in water, D(r0, theta0). It consists of a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) rod (axial axis) with a cylindrical cavity at its center to insert the 192Ir radioactive source. A ring cavity around the source with 1.5 mm thickness and 5 mm height is centered at 1 cm from the central axis of the source. This ring cavity is etched in a disk shaped base with 2.65 cm diameter and 0.90 cm thickness. The cavity has a wall around it 0.25 cm thick. This ring is filled with Fricke solution, sealed, and the whole assembly is immersed in water during irradiations. The device takes advantage of the cylindrical geometry to measure D(r0, theta0). Irradiations were performed with a Nucletron microselectron HDR unit loaded with an 192Ir Alpha Omega radioactive source. A Spectronic 1001 spectrophotometer was used to measure the optical absorbance using a 1 mL quartz cuvette with 1.00 cm light pathlength. The PENELOPE Monte Carlo code (MC) was utilized to simulate the Fricke device and the 192Ir Alpha Omega source in detail to calculate the perturbation introduced by the PMMA material. A NIST traceable calibrated well type ionization chamber was used to determine the air-kerma strength, and a published dose-rate constant was used to determine the dose rate at the reference point. The time to deliver 30.00 Gy to the reference point was calculated. This absorbed dose was then compared to the absorbed dose measured by the Fricke solution. Based on MC simulation, the PMMA of the Fricke device increases the D(r0, theta0) by 2.0%. Applying the corresponding correction factor, the D(r0, theta0) value assessed with the Fricke device agrees within 2.0% with the expected value with a total combined uncertainty of 3.43% (k=1). The Fricke device provides a promising method towards calibration of brachytherapy radiation sources in terms of D(r0

  9. Efficacy of multiple exposure with low level He-Ne laser dose on acute wound healing: a pre-clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu, Vijendra; Rao, Bola Sadashiva S.; Mahato, Krishna Kishore

    2014-02-01

    Investigations on the use of Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) for wound healing especially with the red laser light have demonstrated its pro-healing potential on a variety of pre-clinical and surgical wounds. However, until now, in LLLT the effect of multiple exposure of low dose laser irradiation on acute wound healing on well-designed pre-clinical model is not much explored. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of multiple exposure of low dose Helium Neon laser on healing progression of full thickness excision wounds in Swiss albino mice. Further, the efficacy of the multiple exposure of low dose laser irradiation was compared with the single exposure of optimum dose. Full thickness excision wounds (circular) of 15 mm diameter were created, and subsequently illuminated with the multiple exposures (1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 exposure/ week until healing) of He-Ne (632.8 nm, 4.02 mWcm-2) laser at 0.5 Jcm-2 along with single exposure of optimum laser dose (2 J/cm-2) and un-illuminated controls. Classical biophysical parameters such as contraction kinetics, area under the curve and the mean healing time were documented as the assessment parameters to examine the efficacy of multiple exposures with low level laser dose. Experimental findings substantiated that either single or multiple exposures of 0.5 J/cm2 failed to produce any detectable alterations on wound contraction, area under the curve and mean healing time compared to single exposure of optimum dose (2 Jcm-2) and un-illuminated controls. Single exposure of optimum, laser dose was found to be ideal for acute wound healing.

  10. The effect of an acute dose of biotin at a post-implantation stage and its relation with female sex steriods in the rat.

    PubMed

    Paul, P K; Duttagupta, P N

    1976-01-01

    An acute dose (10 mg/100 g body weight) of biotin at the post-implantation stage (day 14 and 15) inhibited the fetal and placental growth, and in few rats it also caused resorption of fetuses and placentae. The maintenance of pregnancy with normal fetal and placental growth was effected with estrogen therapy, but progesterone failed to correct the biotin-induced effect. The uterine and placental glycogen, RNA and protein levels, as well as, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in the ovary, liver and uterus showed a reduction following biotin treatment. Estrogen therapy under such conditions corrected these adverse effects of biotin overdose, while progesterone had no significant effects. The study suggests that the acute dose of biotin at an advance stage of pregnancy may cause adverse effects on the physiological regulation of gestation, possibly by creating deficiency of estrogen and gestagen. The possible role of estrogen in the fetal and placental growth and regulation of gestagen secretion is discussed.

  11. Interactions between cannabidiol and Δ(9)-THC following acute and repeated dosing: Rebound hyperactivity, sensorimotor gating and epigenetic and neuroadaptive changes in the mesolimbic pathway.

    PubMed

    Todd, Stephanie M; Zhou, Cilla; Clarke, David J; Chohan, Tariq W; Bahceci, Dilara; Arnold, Jonathon C

    2017-02-01

    The evidence base for the use of medical cannabis preparations containing specific ratios of cannabidiol (CBD) and Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is limited. While there is abundant data on acute interactions between CBD and THC, few studies have assessed the impact of their repeated co-administration. We previously reported that CBD inhibited or potentiated the acute effects of THC dependent on the measure being examined at a 1:1 CBD:THC dose ratio. Further, CBD decreased THC effects on brain regions involved in memory, anxiety and body temperature regulation. Here we extend on these finding by examining over 15 days of treatment whether CBD modulated the repeated effects of THC on behaviour and neuroadaption markers in the mesolimbic dopamine pathway. After acute locomotor suppression, repeated THC caused rebound locomotor hyperactivity that was modestly inhibited by CBD. CBD also slightly reduced the acute effects of THC on sensorimotor gating. These subtle effects were found at a 1:1 CBD:THC dose ratio but were not accentuated by a 5:1 dose ratio. CBD did not alter the trajectory of enduring THC-induced anxiety nor tolerance to the pharmacological effects of THC. There was no evidence of CBD potentiating the behavioural effects of THC. However we demonstrated for the first time that repeated co-administration of CBD and THC increased histone 3 acetylation (H3K9/14ac) in the VTA and ΔFosB expression in the nucleus accumbens. These changes suggest that while CBD may have protective effects acutely, its long-term molecular actions on the brain are more complex and may be supradditive.

  12. Effect of single dose of diuretics on renal magnesium excretion in man, with special reference to their site of action.

    PubMed

    Sotorník, I; Schück, O

    1976-01-01

    The administration of a single dose of furosemide, ethacrynic acid and polythiazide to healthy individuals under conditions of maximum water diuresis produces a significant increase in renal magnesium excretion. Elevated Mg excretion displayed a direct correlation to renal sodium excretion after furosemide (r=0.689, p less than 0.001), ethacrynic acid (r=0.869, p less than 0.001) and polythiazide (r=0.586, p less than 0.01). The slopes of the various regression lines did not differe significantly from each other or from the slope of the regression line characterizing this correlation for mannitol (r= 0.603, p less than 0.01). A significant linear correlation was likewise found between the excretion of Mg and total osmotically active substances after furosemide (r=0.783, p less than 0.001), ethacrynic acid (r=0.88, p less than 0.001) and polythiazide (r=0.646, p less than 0.01). The regression lines of the given correlations did not differ significantlyfrom each other, but their slopes were significantly higher than that of the regression line for the correlation after mannitol (r=0.454, p less than 0.01). The findings indicate that tubular Mg transport is influenced both by a decrease in tubular Na resorption in the diluting segment (polythiazide) and by an effect on Na resorption in the parts of the nephron proximal to the diluting segment of the nephron (furosemide, ethacrynic acid).

  13. Predicting Dose-Response Relationships of Acute Cadmium Hepatoxicity and Metallothionein Regulation in the Rat Via In Vitro to In Vivo Extrapolation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    sensitivity to cadmium- induced hepatotoxicity in Fischer 344 and Sprague-Dawley rats . Toxicol. Sci. 67:329-40. Hoffman, E.O., Cook, J.A., DiLuzio, N.R...Vitro - In Vivo Extrapolation: Predicting Dose- Response Relationship of Acute Hepatotoxicity in the Rat (Rattus norvegicus) .............. 38 Appendix...absence of MT I and MT II has been shown to increase inorganic Cd- induced lethality and 3 hepatotoxicity , whereas gene over-expression causing

  14. A single-blind, randomized comparison of olanzapine at a starting dose of 5 mg versus 20 mg in acute schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Mauri, Massimo Carlo; Colasanti, Alessandro; Rossattini, Matteo; Moliterno, Donatella; Baldi, Marialuisa L; Papa, Pietro

    2006-01-01

    Acute psychotic episodes represent critical situations during the course of schizophrenia. Olanzapine (OLZ), a second-generation antipsychotic, is efficacious in acute settings at dosages of 5 to 20 mg/d, and it can be considered a first-line treatment for patients with an acute episode of schizophrenia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of OLZ at a starting dose of 5 mg versus 20 mg in acute schizophrenic patients and to compare titration versus nontitration.Fifty-one schizophrenic inpatients were randomly assigned to receive OLZ at 5 mg/d (26 patients, group 1) or 20 mg/d (25 patients, group 2) as a starting dosage during an exacerbation phase. In group 1, the OLZ dosage was increased to a mean dosage of 10.55 (+/- 4.00) mg/d. Group 2 received OLZ at a fixed dose of 20 mg throughout the hospitalization period. Olanzapine was significantly and clinically effective on Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, PANSS positive symptoms, and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression in both groups. There were no significant differences between groups 1 and 2 in the percent improvement in BPRS, Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, PANSS positive symptoms, PANSS negative symptoms, or Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression; but group 2 was significantly superior in the mean percent improvement in the BPRS items of anxiety (P < 0.001) and suspiciousness (P < 0.05). In conclusion, the higher doses evidence more efficacy on anxiety and suspiciousness, so it seems to be useful to begin therapy with a full dose of the drug to obtain the maximum effect without any significant side effects.

  15. Chronic oral administration of low-dose combination of fenofibrate and rosuvastatin protects the rat heart against experimentally induced acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Garg, Monika; Khanna, Deepa; Kalra, Sanjeev; Balakumar, Pitchai

    2016-10-01

    Fenofibrate and rosuvastatin at low doses might have experimental pleiotropic benefits. This study investigated the combined effect of low doses of fenofibrate and rosuvastatin in isoproterenol-induced experimental myocardial infarction. Rats administered isoproterenol (85 mg/kg/day, s.c.) for 2 days (day 29 and day 30) of 30 days experimental protocol developed significant myocardial infarction that was accompanied with high myocardial oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation, elevated serum markers of cardiac injury, lipid abnormalities, and elevated circulatory levels of C-reactive protein. Pretreatment with low doses of fenofibrate (30 mg/kg/day p.o., 30 days) and rosuvastatin (2 mg/kg/day p.o., 30 days) both alone or in combination markedly prevented isoproterenol-induced myocardial infarction and associated abnormalities while the low-dose combination of fenofibrate and rosuvastatin was more effective. Histopathological study in isoproterenol control rat heart showed necrosis with edema and acute inflammation at the margins of necrotic area. The rat heart from low-dose fenofibrate and rosuvastatin pretreated group showed scanty inflammation and no ischemia. In conclusion, fenofibrate and rosuvastatin pretreatment in low doses might have a therapeutic potential to prevent the pathogenesis of myocardial infarction. Moreover, their combined treatment option might offer superior therapeutic benefits via a marked reduction in myocardial infarct size and oxidative stress, suggesting a possibility of their pleiotropic cardioprotective action at low doses.

  16. An acute oral dose of caffeine does not alter glucose kinetics during prolonged dynamic exercise in trained endurance athletes.

    PubMed

    Roy, B D; Bosman, M J; Tarnopolsky, M A

    2001-08-01

    This study investigated the possible influence of oral caffeine administration on endogenous glucose production and energy substrate metabolism during prolonged endurance exercise. Twelve trained endurance athletes [seven male, five female; peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) = 65.5 ml.kg-1.min-1] performed 60 min of cycle ergometry at 65% VO2peak twice, once after oral caffeine administration (6 mg.kg-1) (CAF) and once following consumption of a placebo (PLA). CAF and PLA were administered in a randomized double-blind manner 75 min prior to exercise. Plasma glucose kinetics were determined with a primed-continuous infusion of [6,6-2H]glucose. No differences in oxygen consumption (VO2), and carbon dioxide production (VCO2) were observed between CAF and PLA, at rest or during exercise. Blood glucose concentrations were similar between the two conditions at rest and also during exercise. Exercise did lead to an increase in serum free fatty acid (FFA) concentrations for both conditions; however, no differences were observed between CAF and PLA. Both the plasma glucose rate of appearance (Ra) and disappearance (Rd) increased at the onset of exercise (P < 0.05), but were not affected by CAF, as compared to PLA. CAF did lead to a higher plasma lactate concentration during exercise (P < 0.05). It was concluded that an acute oral dose of caffeine does not influence plasma glucose kinetics or energy substrate oxidation during prolonged exercise in trained endurance athletes. However, CAF did lead to elevated plasma lactate concentrations. The exact mechanism of the increase in plasma lactate concentrations remains to be determined.

  17. Development of a reference dose for the persistent congeners of weathered toxaphene based on in vivo and in vitro effects related to tumor promotion.

    PubMed

    Simon, Ted; Manning, Randall

    2006-04-01

    Toxaphene is a mixture of chlorinated camphenes and bornanes that was produced and used in the United States until 1982. 1.3 million tons of toxaphene have been released worldwide. "Technical" toxaphene (TT) consists of a mixture of up to 800 different chemicals, known as congeners. TT weathers in the environment by both biotic and abiotic processes. The human body burden of toxaphene consists of only five persistent congeners that are not metabolized; three of these occur in considerably greater amounts than the other two. Because of the rapid metabolism and excretion of the non-persistent congeners, the persistent congeners that make up the human body burden most likely play a role in eliciting any potential adverse effects. EPA's toxicity assessment for TT is based on the occurrence of liver cancer in rodents, and considerable doubt exists whether this assessment is applicable to weathered toxaphene (WT). Using experimental results from European Union scientists, a reference dose (RfD) was developed for WT based on the three most persistent congeners that comprise the human body burden. The critical effect chosen was tumor promotion and this endpoint is considered protective for other endpoints as well. Although RfDs are typically derived for non-carcinogenic effects, the endpoint of tumor promotion is appropriate for RfD development because the experimental data suggest a dose threshold. The RfD for weathered toxaphene represented by the sum of the three major persistent congeners ( summation 3PC) is 2E-05 mg/kg-day. To apply this reference dose to a particular WT mixture, information is needed regarding the percentage of summation 3PC in the mixture.

  18. High phosphorus intakes acutely and negatively affect Ca and bone metabolism in a dose-dependent manner in healthy young females.

    PubMed

    Kemi, Virpi E; Kärkkäinen, Merja U M; Lamberg-Allardt, Christel J E

    2006-09-01

    Ca and P are both essential nutrients for bone and are known to affect one of the most important regulators of bone metabolism, parathyroid hormone (PTH). Too ample a P intake, typical of Western diets, could be deleterious to bone through the increased PTH secretion. Few controlled dose-response studies are available on the effects of high P intake in man. We studied the short-term effects of four P doses on Ca and bone metabolism in fourteen healthy women, 20-28 years of age, who were randomized to four controlled study days; thus each study subject served as her own control. P supplement doses of 0 (placebo), 250, 750 or 1500 mg were taken, divided into three doses during the study day. The meals served were exactly the same during each study day and provided 495 mg P and 250 mg Ca. The P doses affected the serum PTH (S-PTH) in a dose-dependent manner (P=0.0005). There was a decrease in serum ionized Ca concentration only in the highest P dose (P=0.004). The marker of bone formation, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, decreased (P=0.05) and the bone resorption marker, N-terminal telopeptide of collagen type I, increased in response to the P doses (P=0.05). This controlled dose-response study showed that P has a dose-dependent effect on S-PTH and increases PTH secretion significantly when Ca intake is low. Acutely high P intake adversely affects bone metabolism by decreasing bone formation and increasing bone resorption, as indicated by the bone metabolism markers.

  19. ACUTE AND CHRONIC INTAKES OF FALLOUT RADIONUCLIDES BY MARSHALLESE FROM NUCLEAR WEAPONS TESTING AT BIKINI AND ENEWETAK AND RELATED INTERNAL RADIATION DOSES

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Steven L.; Bouville, André; Melo, Dunstana; Beck, Harold L.; Weinstock, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Annual internal radiation doses resulting from both acute and chronic intakes of all important dose-contributing radionuclides occurring in fallout from nuclear weapons testing at Bikini and Enewetak from 1946 through 1958 have been estimated for the residents living on all atolls and separate reef islands of the Marshall Islands. Internal radiation absorbed doses to the tissues most at risk to cancer induction (red bone marrow, thyroid, stomach, and colon) have been estimated for representative persons of all population communities for all birth years from 1929 through 1968, and for all years of exposure from 1948 through 1970. The acute intake estimates rely on a model using, as its basis, historical urine bioassay data, for members of the Rongelap Island and Ailinginae communities as well as for Rongerik residents. The model also utilizes fallout times of arrival and radionuclide deposition densities estimated for all tests and all atolls. Acute intakes of 63 radionuclides were estimated for the populations of the 20 inhabited atolls and for the communities that were relocated during the testing years for reasons of safety and decontamination. The model used for chronic intake estimates is based on reported whole-body, urine, and blood counting data for residents of Utrik and Rongelap. Dose conversion coefficients relating intake to organ absorbed dose were developed using internationally accepted models but specifically tailored for intakes of particulate fallout by consideration of literature-based evidence to choose the most appropriate alimentary tract absorption fraction (f1) values. Dose estimates were much higher for the thyroid gland than for red marrow, stomach wall, or colon. The highest thyroid doses to adults were about 7,600 mGy for the people exposed on Rongelap; thyroid doses to adults were much lower, by a factor of 100 or more, for the people exposed on the populated atolls of Kwajalein and Majuro. The estimates of radionuclide intake and

  20. Acute and chronic intakes of fallout radionuclides by Marshallese from nuclear weapons testing at Bikini and Enewetak and related internal radiation doses.

    PubMed

    Simon, Steven L; Bouville, André; Melo, Dunstana; Beck, Harold L; Weinstock, Robert M

    2010-08-01

    Annual internal radiation doses resulting from both acute and chronic intakes of all important dose-contributing radionuclides occurring in fallout from nuclear weapons testing at Bikini and Enewetak from 1946 through 1958 have been estimated for the residents living on all atolls and separate reef islands of the Marshall Islands. Internal radiation absorbed doses to the tissues most at risk to cancer induction (red bone marrow, thyroid, stomach, and colon) have been estimated for representative persons of all population communities for all birth years from 1929 through 1968, and for all years of exposure from 1948 through 1970. The acute intake estimates rely on a model using, as its basis, historical urine bioassay data, for members of the Rongelap Island and Ailinginae communities as well as for Rongerik residents. The model also utilizes fallout times of arrival and radionuclide deposition densities estimated for all tests and all atolls. Acute intakes of 63 radionuclides were estimated for the populations of the 20 inhabited atolls and for the communities that were relocated during the testing years for reasons of safety and decontamination. The model used for chronic intake estimates is based on reported whole-body, urine, and blood counting data for residents of Utrik and Rongelap. Dose conversion coefficients relating intake to organ absorbed dose were developed using internationally accepted models but specifically tailored for intakes of particulate fallout by consideration of literature-based evidence to choose the most appropriate alimentary tract absorption fraction (f1) values. Dose estimates were much higher for the thyroid gland than for red marrow, stomach wall, or colon. The highest thyroid doses to adults were about 7,600 mGy for the people exposed on Rongelap; thyroid doses to adults were much lower, by a factor of 100 or more, for the people exposed on the populated atolls of Kwajalein and Majuro. The estimates of radionuclide intake and

  1. Longitudinal studies of cardiac troponin-I concentrations in serum from male Sprague Dawley rats: baseline reference ranges and effects of handling and placebo dosing on biological variability.

    PubMed

    Schultze, A Eric; Carpenter, Kent H; Wians, Frank H; Agee, Sara J; Minyard, Jennifer; Lu, Quynh Anh; Todd, John; Konrad, Robert J

    2009-10-01

    Serum cardiac troponin-I has been validated as a biomarker for cardiotoxicity in numerous animal models; however, baseline reference ranges for cTnI concentration in a healthy population of laboratory rats, as well as an investigation of biological cTnI variability in rats with respect to time, handling, and placebo dosing methods, have not been reported. In this study, we used an ultrasensitive cTnI immunoassay to quantify hourly concentrations of cTnI in live rats handled under standard laboratory conditions using 15 microL of serum per determination. The baseline reference range (mean 4.94 pg/mL, range 1-15 pg/mL, 99% confidence interval [CI]) of cTnI concentration in rats was consistent with previously reported reference ranges for cTnI in humans (1-12 pg/mL) and with preliminary studies in dogs (1-4 pg/mL) and monkeys (4-5 pg/mL) using the same cTnI assay method. In addition, cTnI concentrations in individual rat serum samples show minimal biological variability over a twenty-four-hour interval when compared to a meaningful reference change value of 193% to 206%. Furthermore, measurements of cTnI concentration were consistent within the reference limits in individual rats over long periods and under three different standard laboratory handling conditions. Thus, using this new method, rats can be followed longitudinally at hourly intervals, and a doubling of cTnI concentration would be significant above biological variability. This is a new paradigm for preclinical testing, which allows transient changes in cTnI concentration to be accurately quantified. This understanding of baseline and biological variability in rats will be fundamental for designing and analyzing future studies that assess potential cardiotoxicity in drug development.

  2. Acute genitourinary toxicity after high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated external-beam radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer: Second analysis to determine the correlation between the urethral dose in HDR brachytherapy and the severity of acute genitourinary toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Akimoto, Tetsuo . E-mail: takimoto@showa.gunma-u.ac.jp; Katoh, Hiroyuki; Noda, Shin-ei; Ito, Kazuto; Yamamoto, Takumi; Kashiwagi, Bunzo; Nakano, Takashi

    2005-10-01

    Purpose: We have been treating localized prostate cancer with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) at our institution. We recently reported the existence of a correlation between the severity of acute genitourinary (GU) toxicity and the urethral radiation dose in HDR brachytherapy by using different fractionation schema. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of the urethral dose in the development of acute GU toxicity more closely than in previous studies. For this purpose, we conducted an analysis of patients who had undergone HDR brachytherapy with a fixed fractionation schema combined with hypofractionated EBRT. Methods and Materials: Among the patients with localized prostate cancer who were treated by 192-iridium HDR brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated EBRT at Gunma University Hospital between August 2000 and November 2004, we analyzed 67 patients who were treated by HDR brachytherapy with the fractionation schema of 9 Gy x two times combined with hypofractionated EBRT. Hypofractionated EBRT was administered at a fraction dose of 3 Gy three times weekly, and a total dose of 51 Gy was delivered to the prostate gland and seminal vesicles using the four-field technique. No elective pelvic irradiation was performed. After the completion of EBRT, all the patients additionally received transrectal ultrasonography-guided HDR brachytherapy. The planning target volume was defined as the prostate gland with a 5-mm margin all around, and the planning was conducted based on computed tomography images. The tumor stage was T1c in 13 patients, T2 in 31 patients, and T3 in 23 patients. The Gleason score was 2-6 in 12 patients, 7 in 34 patients, and 8-10 in 21 patients. Androgen ablation was performed in all the patients. The median follow-up duration was 11 months (range 3-24 months). The toxicities were graded based on the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and the European Organization

  3. Dose to the Bladder Neck Is the Most Important Predictor for Acute and Late Toxicity After Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy: Implications for Establishing New Dose Constraints for Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Hathout, Lara; Folkert, Michael R.; Kollmeier, Marisa A.; Yamada, Yoshiya; Cohen, Gil'ad N.; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: To identify an anatomic structure predictive for acute (AUT) and late (LUT) urinary toxicity in patients with prostate cancer treated with low-dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR) with or without external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: From July 2002 to January 2013, 927 patients with prostate cancer (median age, 66 years) underwent LDR brachytherapy with Iodine 125 (n=753) or Palladium 103 (n=174) as definitive treatment (n=478) and as a boost (n=449) followed by supplemental EBRT (median dose, 50.4 Gy). Structures contoured on the computed tomographic (CT) scan on day 0 after implantation included prostate, urethra, bladder, and the bladder neck, defined as 5 mm around the urethra between the catheter balloon and the prostatic urethra. AUT and LUT were assessed with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version4. Clinical and dosimetric factors associated with AUT and LUT were analyzed with Cox regression and receiver operating characteristic analysis to calculate area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) (AUC). Results: Grade ≥2 AUT and grade ≥2 LUT occurred in 520 patients (56%) and 154 patients (20%), respectively. No grade 4 toxicities were observed. Bladder neck D2cc retained a significant association with AUT (hazard ratio [HR], 1.03; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-1.04; P<.0001) and LUT (HR, 1.01; 95% CI, 1.00-1.03; P=.014) on multivariable analysis. In a comparison of bladder neck with the standard dosimetric variables by use of ROC analysis (prostate V100 >90%, D90 >100%, V150 >60%, urethra D20 >130%), bladder neck D2cc >50% was shown to have the strongest prognostic power for AUT (AUC, 0.697; P<.0001) and LUT (AUC, 0.620; P<.001). Conclusions: Bladder neck D2cc >50% was the strongest predictor for grade ≥2 AUT and LUT in patients treated with LDR brachytherapy. These data support inclusion of bladder neck constraints into brachytherapy planning to decrease urinary toxicity.

  4. Radiation dose in coronary angiography and intervention: initial results from the establishment of a multi-centre diagnostic reference level in Queensland public hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Crowhurst, James A; Whitby, Mark; Thiele, David; Halligan, Toni; Westerink, Adam; Crown, Suzanne; Milne, Jillian

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Radiation dose to patients undergoing invasive coronary angiography (ICA) is relatively high. Guidelines suggest that a local benchmark or diagnostic reference level (DRL) be established for these procedures. This study sought to create a DRL for ICA procedures in Queensland public hospitals. Methods Data were collected for all Cardiac Catheter Laboratories in Queensland public hospitals. Data were collected for diagnostic coronary angiography (CA) and single-vessel percutaneous intervention (PCI) procedures. Dose area product (PKA), skin surface entrance dose (KAR), fluoroscopy time (FT), and patient height and weight were collected for 3 months. The DRL was set from the 75th percentile of the PKA. Results 2590 patients were included in the CA group where the median FT was 3.5 min (inter-quartile range = 2.3–6.1). Median KAR = 581 mGy (374–876). Median PKA = 3908 uGym2 (2489–5865) DRL = 5865 uGym2. 947 patients were included in the PCI group where median FT was 11.2 min (7.7–17.4). Median KAR = 1501 mGy (928–2224). Median PKA = 8736 uGym2 (5449–12,900) DRL = 12,900 uGym2. Conclusion This study established a benchmark for radiation dose for diagnostic and interventional coronary angiography in Queensland public facilities. PMID:26229649

  5. Monte Carlo simulated correction factors for machine specific reference field dose calibration and output factor measurement using fixed and iris collimators on the CyberKnife system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francescon, P.; Kilby, W.; Satariano, N.; Cora, S.

    2012-06-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of dose to water and dose to detector has been used to calculate the correction factors needed for dose calibration and output factor measurements on the CyberKnife system. Reference field ionization chambers simulated were the PTW 30006, Exradin A12, and NE 2571 Farmer chambers, and small volume chambers PTW 31014 and 31010. Correction factors for Farmer chambers were found to be 0.7%-0.9% larger than those determined from TRS-398 due mainly to the dose gradient across the chamber cavity. For one microchamber where comparison was possible, the factor was 0.5% lower than TRS-398 which is consistent with previous MC simulations of flattening filter free Linacs. Output factor detectors simulated were diode models PTW 60008, 60012, 60017, 60018, Sun Nuclear edge detector, air-filled microchambers Exradin A16 and PTW 31014, and liquid-filled microchamber PTW 31018 microLion. Factors were generated for both fixed and iris collimators. The resulting correction factors differ from unity by up to +11% for air-filled microchambers and -6% for diodes at the smallest field size (5 mm), and tend towards unity with increasing field size (correction factor magnitude <1% for all detectors at field sizes >15 mm). Output factor measurements performed using these detectors with fixed and iris collimators on two different CyberKnife systems showed initial differences between detectors of >15% at 5 mm field size. After correction the measurements on each unit agreed within ˜1.5% at the smallest field size. This paper provides a complete set of correction factors needed to apply a new small field dosimetry formalism to both collimator types on the CyberKnife system using a range of commonly used detectors.

  6. Possible benefit of consolidation therapy with high-dose cytarabine on overall survival of adults with non-promyelocytic acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, M C; Velloso, E D R P; Buccheri, V; Chamone, D A F; Dorlhiac-Llacer, P E

    2015-02-01

    In adults with non-promyelocytic acute myeloid leukemia (AML), high-dose cytarabine consolidation therapy has been shown to influence survival in selected patients, although the appropriate doses and schemes have not been defined. We evaluated survival after calculating the actual dose of cytarabine that patients received for consolidation therapy and divided them into 3 groups according to dose. We conducted a single-center, retrospective study involving 311 non-promyelocytic AML patients with a median age of 36 years (16-79 years) who received curative treatment between 1978 and 2007. The 131 patients who received cytarabine consolidation were assigned to study groups by their cytarabine dose protocol. Group 1 (n=69) received <1.5 g/m2 every 12 h on 3 alternate days for up to 4 cycles. The remaining patients received high-dose cytarabine (≥1.5 g/m2 every 12 h on 3 alternate days for up to 4 cycles). The actual dose received during the entire consolidation period in these patients was calculated, allowing us to divide these patients into 2 additional groups. Group 2 (n=27) received an intermediate-high-dose (<27 g/m2), and group 3 (n=35) received a very-high-dose (≥27 g/m2). Among the 311 patients receiving curative treatment, the 5-year survival rate was 20.2% (63 patients). The cytarabine consolidation dose was an independent determinant of survival in multivariate analysis; age, karyotype, induction protocol, French-American-British classification, and de novo leukemia were not. Comparisons showed that the risk of death was higher in the intermediate-high-dose group 2 (hazard ratio [HR]=4.51; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.81-11.21) and the low-dose group 1 (HR=4.43; 95% CI: 1.97-9.96) than in the very-high-dose group 3, with no significant difference between those two groups. Our findings indicated that very-high-dose cytarabine during consolidation in adults with non-promyelocytic AML may improve survival.

  7. Possible benefit of consolidation therapy with high-dose cytarabine on overall survival of adults with non-promyelocytic acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, M.C.; Velloso, E.D.R.P.; Buccheri, V.; Chamone, D.A.F.; Dorlhiac-Llacer, P.E.

    2014-01-01

    In adults with non-promyelocytic acute myeloid leukemia (AML), high-dose cytarabine consolidation therapy has been shown to influence survival in selected patients, although the appropriate doses and schemes have not been defined. We evaluated survival after calculating the actual dose of cytarabine that patients received for consolidation therapy and divided them into 3 groups according to dose. We conducted a single-center, retrospective study involving 311 non-promyelocytic AML patients with a median age of 36 years (16-79 years) who received curative treatment between 1978 and 2007. The 131 patients who received cytarabine consolidation were assigned to study groups by their cytarabine dose protocol. Group 1 (n=69) received <1.5 g/m2 every 12 h on 3 alternate days for up to 4 cycles. The remaining patients received high-dose cytarabine (≥1.5 g/m2 every 12 h on 3 alternate days for up to 4 cycles). The actual dose received during the entire consolidation period in these patients was calculated, allowing us to divide these patients into 2 additional groups. Group 2 (n=27) received an intermediate-high-dose (<27 g/m2), and group 3 (n=35) received a very-high-dose (≥27 g/m2). Among the 311 patients receiving curative treatment, the 5-year survival rate was 20.2% (63 patients). The cytarabine consolidation dose was an independent determinant of survival in multivariate analysis; age, karyotype, induction protocol, French-American-British classification, and de novo leukemia were not. Comparisons showed that the risk of death was higher in the intermediate-high-dose group 2 (hazard ratio [HR]=4.51; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.81-11.21) and the low-dose group 1 (HR=4.43; 95% CI: 1.97-9.96) than in the very-high-dose group 3, with no significant difference between those two groups. Our findings indicated that very-high-dose cytarabine during consolidation in adults with non-promyelocytic AML may improve survival. PMID:25517921

  8. Low and moderate doses of acute ethanol do not impair spatial cognition but facilitate accelerating rotarod performance in adolescent and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Novier, Adelle; Van Skike, Candice E; Chin, Vivien S; Diaz-Granados, Jaime L; Matthews, Douglas B

    2012-03-14

    Adolescents and adult rodents have differing sensitivities to the acute effects of ethanol on a variety of behavioral and electrophysiological measures. Often, these differences are revealed using high ethanol doses and consequently little is known about these age-related effects using lower ethanol doses. We sought to determine if low-dose ethanol produces differential effects on cognition and motor behavior in adolescent and adult rats. Adolescent (postnatal day PD 30-32) and adult (PD 70-72) male Sprague Dawley rats were trained on the standard version of the Morris Water Maze (MWM) for 5 days or received 5 training trials on an accelerating rotarod (ARR). Adolescents learned the location of the submerged platform in the MWM significantly slower than adults during training and, acute ethanol administration (0.5 g/kg, 0.75 g/kg, or 1.0 g/kg) 30 min before testing did not impair spatial memory in either age group. On the ARR test, adolescent rats spent significantly more time on the rotarod compared to adults and, alcohol exposure (1.0 g/kg) significantly increased ARR performance 30 min following administration. Our findings address the utility of investigating low and moderate doses of ethanol during different developmental stages in rats.

  9. Evaluating the consistency of location of the most severe acute skin reaction and highest skin dose measured by thermoluminescent dosimeter during radiotherapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li-Min; Huang, Chih-Jen; Chen, Hsiao-Yun; Chang, Gia-Hsin; Tsao, Min-Jen

    2016-01-01

    We conducted this prospective study to evaluate whether the location of the most severe acute skin reaction matches the highest skin dose measured by thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) during adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for patients with breast cancer after breast conservative surgery. To determine whether TLD measurement can reflect the location of the most severe acute skin reaction, 80 consecutive patients were enrolled in this prospective study. We divided the irradiated field into breast, axillary, inframammary fold, and areola/nipple areas. In 1 treatment session when obvious skin reaction occurred, we placed the TLD chips onto the 4 areas and measured the skin dose. We determined whether the highest measured skin dose area is consistent with the location of the most severe skin reaction. The McNemar test revealed that the clinical skin reaction and TLD measurement are more consistent when the most severe skin reaction occurred at the axillary area, and the p = 0.0108. On the contrary, TLD measurement of skin dose is less likely consistent with clinical observation when the most severe skin reaction occurred at the inframammary fold, breast, and areola/nipple areas (all the p > 0.05). Considering the common site of severe skin reaction over the axillary area, TLD measurement may be an appropriate way to predict skin reaction during RT.

  10. Favorable effect of priming with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in remission induction of acute myeloid leukemia restricted to dose escalation of cytarabine.

    PubMed

    Pabst, Thomas; Vellenga, Edo; van Putten, Wim; Schouten, Harry C; Graux, Carlos; Vekemans, Marie-Christiane; Biemond, Bart; Sonneveld, Peter; Passweg, Jakob; Verdonck, Leo; Legdeur, Marie-Cecile; Theobald, Matthias; Jacky, Emanuel; Bargetzi, Mario; Maertens, Johan; Ossenkoppele, Gert Jan; Löwenberg, Bob

    2012-06-07

    The clinical value of chemotherapy sensitization of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with G-CSF priming has remained controversial. Cytarabine is a key constituent of remission induction chemotherapy. The effect of G-CSF priming has not been investigated in relationship with variable dose levels of cytarabine. We randomized 917 AML patients to receive G-CSF (456 patients) or no G-CSF (461 patients) at the days of chemotherapy. In the initial part of the study, 406 patients were also randomized between 2 cytarabine regimens comparing conventional-dose (199 patients) versus escalated-dose (207 patients) cytarabine in cycles 1 and 2. We found that patients after induction chemotherapy plus G-CSF had similar overall survival (43% vs 40%, P = .88), event-free survival (37% vs 31%, P = .29), and relapse rates (34% vs 36%, P = .77) at 5 years as those not receiving G-CSF. However, patients treated with the escalated-dose cytarabine regimen benefited from G-CSF priming, with improved event-free survival (P = .01) and overall survival (P = .003), compared with patients without G-CSF undergoing escalated-dose cytarabine treatment. A significant survival advantage of sensitizing AML for chemotherapy with G-CSF was not apparent in the entire study group, but it was seen in patients treated with escalated-dose cytarabine during remission induction. The HOVON-42 study is registered under The Netherlands Trial Registry (www.trialregister.nl) as #NTR230.

  11. Identification of Differential Gene Expression Patterns after Acute Exposure to High and Low Doses of Low-LET Ionizing Radiation in a Reconstituted Human Skin Tissue.

    PubMed

    Tilton, Susan C; Markillie, Lye Meng; Hays, Spencer; Taylor, Ronald C; Stenoien, David L

    2016-11-01

    In this study we utilized a systems biology approach to identify dose- (0.1, 2.0 and 10 Gy) and time- (3 and 8 h) dependent responses to acute ionizing radiation exposure in a complex tissue, reconstituted human skin. The low dose used here (0.1 Gy) falls within the range of certain medical diagnostic procedures. Of the two higher doses used, 2.0 Gy is typically administered for radiotherapy, while 10 Gy is lethal. Because exposure to any of these doses is possible after an intentional or accidental radiation events, biomarkers are needed to rapidly and accurately triage potentially exposed individuals. Here, tissue samples were acutely exposed to X-ray-generated low-linear-energy transfer (LET) ionizing radiation, and direct RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) was used to quantify altered transcripts. The time points used for this study aid in assessing early responses to exposure, when key signaling pathways and biomarkers can be identified, which precede and regulate later phenotypic alterations that occur at high doses, including cell death. We determined that a total of 1,701 genes expressed were significantly affected by high-dose radiation, with the majority of genes affected at 10 Gy. Expression levels of a group of 29 genes, including GDF15, BBC3, PPM1D, FDXR, GADD45A, MDM2, CDKN1A, TP53INP1, CYCSP27, SESN1, SESN2, PCNA and AEN, were similarly altered at both 2 and 10 Gy, but not 0.1 Gy, at both time points. A much larger group of upregulated genes, including those involved in inflammatory responses, was significantly altered only after 10 Gy irradiation. At high doses, downregulated genes were associated with cell cycle regulation and exhibited an apparent linear response between 2 and 10 Gy. While only a few genes were significantly affected by 0.1 Gy irradiation, using stringent statistical filters, groups of related genes regulating cell cycle progression and inflammatory responses consistently exhibited opposite trends in their regulation compared to high-dose

  12. Expression of genes involved in mouse lung cell differentiation/regulation after acute exposure to photons and protons with or without low-dose preirradiation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jian; Zhao, WeiLing; Tian, Sisi; Slater, James M; Deng, Zhiyong; Gridley, Daila S

    2011-11-01

    The goal of this study was to compare the effects of acute 2 Gy irradiation with photons (0.8 Gy/min) or protons (0.9 Gy/min), both with and without pre-exposure to low-dose/low-dose-rate γ rays (0.01 Gy at 0.03 cGy/h), on 84 genes involved in stem cell differentiation or regulation in mouse lungs on days 21 and 56. Genes with a ≥1.5-fold difference in expression and P < 0.05 compared to 0 Gy controls are emphasized. Two proteins specific for lung stem cells/progenitors responsible for local tissue repair were also compared. Overall, striking differences were present between protons and photons in modulating the genes. More genes were affected by protons than by photons (22 compared to 2 and 6 compared to 2 on day 21 and day 56, respectively) compared to 0 Gy. Preirradiation with low-dose-rate γ rays enhanced the acute photon-induced gene modulation on day 21 (11 compared to 2), and all 11 genes were significantly downregulated on day 56. On day 21, seven genes (aldh2, bmp2, cdc2a, col1a1, dll1, foxa2 and notch1) were upregulated in response to most of the radiation regimens. Immunoreactivity of Clara cell secretory protein was enhanced by all radiation regimens. The number of alveolar type 2 cells positive for prosurfactant protein C in irradiated groups was higher on day 56 (12.4-14.6 cells/100) than on day 21 (8.5-11.2 cells/100) (P < 0.05). Taken together, these results showed that acute photons and protons induced different gene expression profiles in the lungs and that pre-exposure to low-dose-rate γ rays sometimes had modulatory effects. In addition, proteins associated with lung-specific stem cells/progenitors were highly sensitive to radiation.

  13. PROPOFOL-FENTANYL VERSUS PROPOFOL ALONE FOR LUMBAR PUNCTURE SEDATION IN CHILDREN WITH ACUTE HEMATOLOGIC MALIGNANCIES: PROPOFOL DOSING AND ADVERSE EVENTS

    PubMed Central

    Hollman, Gregory A.; Schultz, Meredith M; Eickhoff, Jens C; Christenson, Devon K

    2011-01-01

    Objective We sought to determine whether the combination of propofol and fentanyl results in lower propofol doses and fewer adverse cardiopulmonary events than propofol and placebo for lumbar puncture (LP) in children with acute hematologic malignancies. Design Randomized, controlled, double blind, crossover study. Setting Pediatric Sedation Program Patients Children with acute leukemia or lymphoma receiving sedation for LP. Interventions Each patient received two sedations in random order, one with propofol/placebo and one with propofol/fentanyl. The study investigator and patient/parent were blinded to placebo or fentanyl. Data collected included patient age and diagnosis, propofol dose and adverse events. Adverse events included oxygen saturation < 94%, airway obstruction, apnea, hypotension and bradycardia (< 5% mean for age). Logistic regression analysis was utilized to assess probability of adverse events and the Wilcoxon Signed Rank and McNemar’s tests were used for paired comparisons. Measurements and Main Results Twenty-two patients were enrolled. Fourteen patients were male and 8 were female. Each patient was studied twice for a total of 44 sedations. The median age was 5.0 years (range 2.2–17.2 years). All procedures were successfully completed. The median total dose of propofol was 5.05 mg/kg (range 2.4–10.2 mg/kg) for propofol/placebo versus 3.00 mg/kg (range 1.4–10.5 mg/kg) for propofol/fentanyl (p < 0.001). Twelve adverse events occurred in 11 of 22 patients (50.0%) propofol/placebo compared to 6 of 22 (18.2%) propofol/fentanyl (p= 0.02). The most common adverse event was hypotension. Conclusions The combination of propofol and fentanyl versus propofol alone for LP sedation in children with acute hematologic malignancies resulted in lower propofol doses and fewer adverse events. PMID:18838923

  14. Does Pre-Treatment with High Dose Atorvastatin Prevent Microvascular Dysfunction after Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bong-Ki; Nam, Chang-Wook; Doh, Joon-Hyung; Chung, Woo-Young; Cho, Byung-Ryul; Fearon, William F.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives There is controversy surrounding whether or not high dose statin administration before percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) decreases peri-procedural microvascular injury. We performed a prospective randomized study to investigate the mechanisms and effects of pre-treatment high dose atorvastatin on myocardial damage in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS) undergoing PCI. Subjects and Methods Seventy seven patients with NSTE-ACS were randomly assigned to either the high dose group (atorvastatin 80 mg loading 12 to 24 h before PCI with a further 40 mg loading 2 h before PCI, n=39) or low dose group (atorvastatin 10 mg administration 12 to 24 h before PCI, n=38). Index of microcirculatory resistance (IMR) was measured after stent implantation. Creatine kinase-myocardial band (CK-MB) and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were measured before and after PCI. Results The baseline characteristics were not different between the two patient groups. Compared to the low dose group, the high dose group had lower post PCI IMR (14.1±5.0 vs. 19.2±9.3 U, p=0.003). Post PCI CK-MB was also lower in the high dose group (median: 1.40 ng/mL (interquartile range [IQR: 0.75 to 3.45] vs. 4.00 [IQR: 1.70 to 7.37], p=0.002) as was the post-PCI CRP level (0.09 mg/dL [IQR: 0.04 to 0.16] vs. 0.22 [IQR: 0.08 to 0.60], p=0.001). Conclusion Pre-treatment with high dose atorvastatin reduces peri-PCI microvascular dysfunction verified by post-PCI IMR and exerts an immediate anti-inflammatory effect in patients with NSTE-ACS. PMID:27482255

  15. Comparison of two commonly practiced atropinization regimens in acute organophosphorus and carbamate poisoning, doubling doses vs. ad hoc: a prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Perera, P M S; Shahmy, S; Gawarammana, I; Dawson, A H

    2008-06-01

    There is a wide variation and lack of evidence in current recommendations for atropine dosing schedules leading to subsequent variation in clinical practice. Therefore, we sought to examine the safety and effectiveness of a titrated vs. ad hoc atropine treatment regimen in a cohort of patients with acute cholinesterase inhibitor pesticide poisoning. A prospective cohort study was conducted in three district secondary referral hospitals in Sri Lanka using a structured data collection form that collected details of clinical symptoms and outcomes of cholinesterase inhibitor pesticide poisoning, atropine doses, and signs of atropinization. We compared two hospitals that used a titrated dosing protocol based on a structured monitoring sheet for atropine infusion with another hospital using an ad hoc regime. During the study, 272 symptomatic patients with anticholinesterase poisoning requiring atropine were admitted to the three hospitals. Outcomes of death and ventilation were analyzed for all patients, 226 patients were prospectively assessed for atropine toxicity. At baseline, patients in the titrated dose cohort had clinical signs consistent with greater toxicity. This in part may be due to ingestion of more toxic organophosphates. They received less pralidoxime and atropine, and were less likely to develop features of atropine toxicity, such as delirium (1% vs. 17%), hallucinations (1% vs. 35%), or either (1% vs. 35%) and need for patient restraint (3% vs. 48%) compared with the ad hoc dose regime. After adjusting for the pesticides ingested, there was no difference in mortality and ventilatory rates between protocols. Ad hoc high dose atropine regimens are associated with more frequent atropine toxicity without any obvious improvement in patient outcome compared with doses titrated to clinical effect. Atropine doses should be titrated against response and toxicity. Further education and the use of a structured monitoring sheet may assist in more appropriate

  16. Dose study of the multikinase inhibitor, LY2457546, in patients with relapsed acute myeloid leukemia to assess safety, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Wacheck, Volker; Lahn, Michael; Dickinson, Gemma; Füreder, Wolfgang; Meyer, Renata; Herndlhofer, Susanne; Füreder, Thorsten; Dorfner, Georg; Pillay, Sada; André, Valérie; Burkholder, Timothy P; Akunda, Jacqueline K; Flye-Blakemore, Leann; Van Bockstaele, Dirk; Schlenk, Richard F; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Valent, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Background: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a life-threatening malignancy with limited treatment options in chemotherapy-refractory patients. A first-in-human dose study was designed to investigate a safe and biologically effective dose range for LY2457546, a novel multikinase inhibitor, in patients with relapsed AML. Methods: In this nonrandomized, open-label, dose escalation Phase I study, LY2457546 was administered orally once a day. Safety, pharmacokinetics, changes in phosphorylation of target kinases in AML blasts, and risk of drug–drug interactions (DDI) were assessed. Results: Five patients were treated at the starting and predicted minimal biologically effective dose of 50 mg/day. The most commonly observed adverse events were febrile neutropenia, epistaxis, petechiae, and headache. The majority of adverse events (81%) were Grade 1 or 2. One patient had generalized muscle weakness (Grade 3), which was deemed to be a dose-limiting toxicity. Notably, the pharmacokinetic profile of LY2457546 showed virtually no elimination of LY2457546 within 24 hours, and thus prevented further dose escalation. No significant DDI were observed. Ex vivo flow cytometry studies showed downregulation of the phosphoproteins, pcKIT, pFLT3, and pS6, in AML blasts after LY2457546 administration. No medically relevant responses were observed in the five treated patients. Conclusion: No biologically effective dose could be established for LY2457546 in chemotherapy-resistant AML patients. Lack of drug clearance prevented safe dose escalation, and the study was terminated early. Future efforts should be made to develop derivatives with a more favorable pharmacokinetic profile. PMID:21625399

  17. Improving Thermal Dose Accuracy in Magnetic Resonance-Guided Focused Ultrasound Surgery: Long-Term Thermometry Using a Prior Baseline as a Reference

    PubMed Central

    Bitton, Rachel R.; Webb, Taylor D.; Pauly, Kim Butts; Ghanouni, Pejman

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate thermal dose volume (TDV) and non-perfused volume (NPV) of magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) treatments in patients with soft tissue tumors, and describe a method for MR thermal dosimetry using a baseline reference. Materials and Methods Agreement between TDV and immediate post treatment NPV was evaluated from MRgFUS treatments of five patients with biopsy-proven desmoid tumors. Thermometry data (gradient echo, 3T) were analyzed over the entire course of the treatments to discern temperature errors in the standard approach. The technique searches previously acquired baseline images for a match using 2D normalized cross-correlation and a weighted mean of phase difference images. Thermal dose maps and TDVs were recalculated using the matched baseline and compared to NPV. Results TDV and NPV showed between 47%–91% disagreement, using the standard immediate baseline method for calculating TDV. Long-term thermometry showed a nonlinear local temperature accrual, where peak additional temperature varied between 4–13°C (mean = 7.8°C) across patients. The prior baseline method could be implemented by finding a previously acquired matching baseline 61% ± 8% (mean ± SD) of the time. We found 7%–42% of the disagreement between TDV and NPV was due to errors in thermometry caused by heat accrual. For all patients, the prior baseline method increased the estimated treatment volume and reduced the discrepancies between TDV and NPV (P = 0.023). Conclusion This study presents a mismatch between in-treatment and post treatment efficacy measures. The prior baseline approach accounts for local heating and improves the accuracy of thermal dose-predicted volume. PMID:26119129

  18. Fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients based on the posture modification of Adult Male (AM) and Adult Female (AF) reference phantoms of ICRP 110

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeano, D. C.; Santos, W. S.; Alves, M. C.; Souza, D. N.; Carvalho, A. B.

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this work was to modify the standing posture of the anthropomorphic reference phantoms of ICRP publication 110, AM (Adult Male) and AF (Adult Female), to the sitting posture. The change of posture was performed using the Visual Monte Carlo software (VMC) to rotate the thigh region of the phantoms and position it between the region of the leg and trunk. Scion Image software was used to reconstruct and smooth the knee and hip contours of the phantoms in a sitting posture. For 3D visualization of phantoms, the VolView software was used. In the change of postures, the organ and tissue masses were preserved. The MCNPX was used to calculate the equivalent and effective dose conversion coefficients (CCs) per fluence for photons for six irradiation geometries suggested by ICRP publication 110 (AP, PA, RLAT, LLAT, ROT and ISO) and energy range 0.010-10 MeV. The results were compared between the standing and sitting postures, for both sexes, in order to evaluate the differences of scattering and absorption of radiation for different postures. Significant differences in the CCs for equivalent dose were observed in the gonads, colon, prostate, urinary bladder and uterus, which are present in the pelvic region, and in organs distributed throughout the body, such as the lymphatic nodes, muscle, skeleton and skin, for the phantoms of both sexes. CCs for effective dose showed significant differences of up to 16% in the AP irradiation geometry, 27% in the PA irradiation geometry and 13% in the ROT irradiation geometry. These results demonstrate the importance of using phantoms in different postures in order to obtain more precise conversion coefficients for a given exposure scenario.

  19. Equivalent titanium dioxide nanoparticle deposition by intratracheal instillation and whole body inhalation: the effect of dose rate on acute respiratory tract inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The increased production of nanomaterials has caused a corresponding increase in concern about human exposures in consumer and occupational settings. Studies in rodents have evaluated dose–response relationships following respiratory tract (RT) delivery of nanoparticles (NPs) in order to identify potential hazards. However, these studies often use bolus methods that deliver NPs at high dose rates that do not reflect real world exposures and do not measure the actual deposited dose of NPs. We hypothesize that the delivered dose rate is a key determinant of the inflammatory response in the RT when the deposited dose is constant. Methods F-344 rats were exposed to the same deposited doses of titanium dioxide (TiO2) NPs by single or repeated high dose rate intratracheal instillation or low dose rate whole body aerosol inhalation. Controls were exposed to saline or filtered air. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) neutrophils, biochemical parameters and inflammatory mediator release were quantified 4, 8, and 24 hr and 7 days after exposure. Results Although the initial lung burdens of TiO2 were the same between the two methods, instillation resulted in greater short term retention than inhalation. There was a statistically significant increase in BALF neutrophils at 4, 8 and 24 hr after the single high dose TiO2 instillation compared to saline controls and to TiO2 inhalation, whereas TiO2 inhalation resulted in a modest, yet significant, increase in BALF neutrophils 24 hr after exposure. The acute inflammatory response following instillation was driven primarily by monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and macrophage inflammatory protein-2, mainly within the lung. Increases in heme oxygenase-1 in the lung were also higher following instillation than inhalation. TiO2 inhalation resulted in few time dependent changes in the inflammatory mediator release. The single low dose and repeated exposure scenarios had similar BALF cellular and mediator response trends

  20. Efficacy and safety of artemether-lumefantrine (Coartem) tablets (six-dose regimen) in African infants and children with acute, uncomplicated falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Falade, Catherine; Makanga, Michael; Premji, Zul; Ortmann, Christine-Elke; Stockmeyer, Marlies; de Palacios, Patricia Ibarra

    2005-06-01

    Approximately one million children die from malaria each year. A recently approved artemisinin-based tablet, Coartem (co-artemether), comprising artemether 120 mg plus lumefantrine 20 mg, given in four doses, provides effective antimalarial treatment for children in many sub-Saharan countries. However, this regimen is considered insufficient for non-immune infants and in areas where multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum predominates. This open-label study assessed the efficacy and safety of co-artemether administered to 310 African children weighing 5-25 kg, with acute, uncomplicated falciparum malaria. Six doses of co-artemether were given over 3 days, with follow-up at 7, 14 and 28 days. Treatment rapidly cleared parasitemia and fever. The overall 28-day cure rate was 86.5%, and 93.9% when corrected by PCR for reinfection. Cure rates at 7 and 14 days exceeded 97.0% (uncorrected) and, on day 28, were similar in infants (5-<10 kg) previously exposed to malaria infection (partially immune: 88.6% uncorrected; 93.3% corrected), and in those who were non-immune (82.5% uncorrected; 95.0% corrected). Adverse events were mostly mild. There was no electrocardiographic evidence of cardiotoxicity. The co-artemether six-dose regimen, treating acute uncomplicated falciparum malaria in African children, achieved rapid parasite clearance and a high cure rate. Treatment was generally safe and well tolerated.

  1. The Potential Role of an Extended-Release, Abuse-Deterrent Oxycodone/Acetaminophen Fixed-Dose Combination Product for the Treatment of Acute Pain.

    PubMed

    Pergolizzi, Joseph V; Taylor, Robert; Raffa, Robert B

    2015-06-01

    Acute pain, prevalent as part of postoperative and traumatic pain, is often sub-optimally or inadequately treated. Fixed-dose combination analgesic products that combine a reduced amount of opioid with a nonopioid analgesic such as acetaminophen (paracetamol) in a single tablet offer potential pharmacodynamic and/or pharmacokinetic benefits, and may also result in an opioid-sparing effect. A new analgesic product (XARTEMIS™ XR, Mallinckrodt Brand Pharmaceuticals, Dublin, Ireland) combines oxycodone (7.5 mg) with acetaminophen (325 mg) in an immediate-release/extended-release (ER) formulation that is indicated for the treatment of acute pain. The ER formulation of this product provides stable serum drug concentrations that in this case lasts 12 h. Oxycodone/acetaminophen is a drug combination that offers safe and effective pain relief in a variety of acute pain syndromes such as postoperative pain. The combination formulation allows a smaller amount of oxycodone per tablet and the biphasic-layered matrix of the pill for ER may present obstacles to potential abusers. No opioid is totally abuse resistant, but the lower opioid content and tamper-resistant formulation of this product might discourage abuse. Clinicians must still be mindful of the acetaminophen part of this product in the patient's overall daily intake (in light of acetaminophen hepatotoxicity). The new product appears to provide an important new choice in the armamentarium against acute pain.

  2. Low-dose copper infusion into the coronary circulation induces acute heart failure in diabetic rats: New mechanism of heart disease.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Carlos Chun Ho; Soon, Choong Yee; Chuang, Chia-Lin; Phillips, Anthony R J; Zhang, Shaoping; Cooper, Garth J S

    2015-09-01

    Diabetes impairs copper (Cu) regulation, causing elevated serum Cu and urinary Cu excretion in patients with established cardiovascular disease; it also causes cardiomyopathy and chronic cardiac impairment linked to defective Cu homeostasis in rats. However, the mechanisms that link impaired Cu regulation to cardiac dysfunction in diabetes are incompletely understood. Chronic treatment with triethylenetetramine (TETA), a Cu²⁺-selective chelator, improves cardiac function in diabetic patients, and in rats with heart disease; the latter displayed ∼3-fold elevations in free Cu²⁺ in the coronary effluent when TETA was infused into their coronary arteries. To further study the nature of defective cardiac Cu regulation in diabetes, we employed an isolated-perfused, working-heart model in which we infused micromolar doses of Cu²⁺ into the coronary arteries and measured acute effects on cardiac function in diabetic and non-diabetic-control rats. Infusion of CuCl₂ solutions caused acute dose-dependent cardiac dysfunction in normal hearts. Several measures of baseline cardiac function were impaired in diabetic hearts, and these defects were exacerbated by low-micromolar Cu²⁺ infusion. The response to infused Cu²⁺ was augmented in diabetic hearts, which became defective at lower infusion levels and underwent complete pump failure (cardiac output = 0 ml/min) more often (P < 0.0001) at concentrations that only moderately impaired function of control hearts. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the acute effects on cardiac function of pathophysiological elevations in coronary Cu²⁺. The effects of Cu²⁺ infusion occur within minutes in both control and diabetic hearts, which suggests that they are not due to remodelling. Heightened sensitivity to the acute effects of small elevations in Cu²⁺ could contribute substantively to impaired cardiac function in patients with diabetes and is thus identified as a new mechanism of heart disease.

  3. Differential effects of acute and repeat dosing with the H3 antagonist GSK189254 on the sleep–wake cycle and narcoleptic episodes in Ox−/− mice

    PubMed Central

    Guo, RX; Anaclet, C; Roberts, JC; Parmentier, R; Zhang, M; Guidon, G; Buda, C; Sastre, JP; Feng, JQ; Franco, P; Brown, SH; Upton, N; Medhurst, AD; Lin, JS

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Histamine H3 receptor antagonists are currently being evaluated in clinical trials for a number of central nervous system disorders including narcolepsy. These agents can increase wakefulness (W) in cats and rodents following acute administration, but their effects after repeat dosing have not been reported previously. Experimental approach: EEG and EMG recordings were used to investigate the effects of acute and repeat administration of the novel H3 antagonist GSK189254 on the sleep–wake cycle in wild-type (Ox+/+) and orexin knockout (Ox−/−) mice, the latter being genetically susceptible to narcoleptic episodes. In addition, we investigated H3 and H1 receptor expression in this model using radioligand binding and autoradiography. Key results: In Ox+/+ and Ox−/− mice, acute administration of GSK189254 (3 and 10 mg·kg−1 p.o.) increased W and decreased slow wave and paradoxical sleep to a similar degree to modafinil (64 mg·kg−1), while it reduced narcoleptic episodes in Ox−/− mice. After twice daily dosing for 8 days, the effect of GSK189254 (10 mg·kg−1) on W in both Ox+/+ and Ox−/− mice was significantly reduced, while the effect on narcoleptic episodes in Ox−/− mice was significantly increased. Binding studies revealed no significant differences in H3 or H1 receptor expression between Ox+/+ and Ox−/− mice. Conclusions and implications: These studies provide further evidence to support the potential use of H3 antagonists in the treatment of narcolepsy and excessive daytime sleepiness. Moreover, the differential effects observed on W and narcoleptic episodes following repeat dosing could have important implications in clinical studies. PMID:19413575

  4. Acute haemorrhagic oedema of infancy in a 5-week-old boy referred to the Child Protection Unit.

    PubMed

    Hawkrigg, Sharon; Johnson, Alice; Flynn, James; Thom, Graham; Wright, Helen

    2014-06-01

    We describe the case of a 5-week-old infant boy presenting with purpura and oedema to both hands and torso. He was otherwise well, with no antecedent history of illness or trauma. Laboratory investigations were within normal limits. A review by the Child Protection Unit was organised during his admission for consideration of inflicted trauma as a cause of the lesions; this was felt most unlikely. A clinical diagnosis, following a dermatology consultation, of acute haemorrhagic oedema of infancy (AHO) was made.

  5. Cytokine profile of conditioned medium from human tumor cell lines after acute and fractionated doses of gamma radiation and its effect on survival of bystander tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Desai, Sejal; Kumar, Amit; Laskar, S; Pandey, B N

    2013-01-01

    Cytokines are known to play pivotal roles in cancer initiation, progression and pathogenesis. Accumulating evidences suggest differences in basal and stress-induced cytokine profiles of cancers with diverse origin. However, a comprehensive investigation characterising the cytokine profile of various tumor types after acute and fractionated doses of gamma-irradiation, and its effect on survival of bystander cells is not well known in literature. In the present study, we have evaluated the cytokine secretion profile of human tumor cell lines (HT1080, U373MG, HT29, A549 and MCF-7) either before (basal) or after acute (2, 6 Gy) and fractionated doses (3×2 Gy) of gamma-irradiation in culture medium obtained from these cells by multiplex bead array/ELISA. Moreover, clonogenic assays were performed to evaluate the effect of conditioned medium (CM) on the survival and growth of respective cells. Based on the screening of 28 analytes, our results showed that the basal profiles of these cell lines varied considerably in terms of the number and magnitude of secreted factors, which was minimum in MCF-7. Interestingly, TNF-α, IL-1β, PDGF-AA, TGF-β1, fractalkine, IL-8, VEGF and GCSF were found in CM of all the cell lines. However, secretion of certain cytokines was cell line-specific. Moreover, CM caused increase in clonogenic survival of respective tumor cells (in the order HT1080>U373MG>HT29>A549>MCF-7), which was correlated with the levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, GMCSF and VEGF in their CM. After irradiation, the levels of most of the cytokines increased markedly in a dose dependent manner. The fold change in cytokine levels was lower in irradiated conditioned medium (ICM) of tumor cells collected after fractionated than respective acute dose, except in MCF-7. Interestingly, amongst these cell lines, the radiation-induced fold increase in cytokine levels was maximum in ICM of A549 cells. Moreover, bystander A549 cells treated with respective ICM showed dose dependent

  6. Predictors for Rectal and Intestinal Acute Toxicities During Prostate Cancer High-Dose 3D-CRT: Results of a Prospective Multicenter Study

    SciTech Connect

    Vavassori, Vittorio; Fiorino, Claudio . E-mail: fiorino.claudio@hsr.it; Rancati, Tiziana; Magli, Alessandro; Fellin, Gianni; Baccolini, Michela; Bianchi, Carla; Cagna, Emanuela; Mauro, Flora A.; Monti, Angelo F.; Munoz, Fernando; Stasi, Michele; Franzone, Paola; Valdagni, Riccardo

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: To find predictors for rectal and intestinal acute toxicity in patients with prostate cancer treated with {>=}70 Gy conformal radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between July 2002 and March 2004, 1,132 patients were entered into a cooperative study (AIROPROS01-02). Toxicity was scored using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer scale and by considering the changes (before and after treatment) of the scores of a self-administered questionnaire on rectal/intestinal toxicity. The correlation with a number of parameters was assessed by univariate and multivariate analyses. Concerning the questionnaire, only moderate/severe complications were considered. Results: Of 1,132 patients, 1,123 were evaluable. Of these patients, 375, 265, and 28 had Grade 1, 2, and 3 Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer toxicity, respectively. The mean rectal dose was the most predictive parameter (p = 0.0004; odds ratio, 1.035) for Grade 2 or worse toxicity, and the use of anticoagulants/antiaggregants (p 0.02; odds ratio, 0.63) and hormonal therapy (p = 0.04, odds ratio, 0.65) were protective. The questionnaire-based scoring revealed that a greater mean rectal dose was associated with a greater risk of bleeding; larger irradiated volumes were associated with frequency, tenesmus, incontinence, and bleeding; hormonal therapy was protective against frequency and tenesmus; hemorrhoids were associated with a greater risk of tenesmus and bleeding; and diabetes associated highly with diarrhea. Conclusion: The mean rectal dose correlated with acute rectal/intestinal toxicity in three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer, and hormonal therapy and the use of anticoagulants/antiaggregants were protective. According to the moderate/severe injury scores on the self-assessed questionnaire, several clinical and dose-volume parameters were independently predictive for

  7. Toxicity profile of repeated doses of PEG-asparaginase incorporated into a pediatric-type regimen for adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Aldoss, Ibrahim; Douer, Dan; Behrendt, Carolyn E; Chaudhary, Preeti; Mohrbacher, Ann; Vrona, Janice; Pullarkat, Vinod

    2016-04-01

    Despite having been long regarded as too toxic for adult patients, pediatric-like regimens containing L-asparaginase have resulted in improved outcomes for adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). To characterize the spectrum of toxicity of repeated doses of polyethylene glycolated-asparaginase (PEG-asp) in adults, we reviewed all doses (2000 IU/m(2) ) administered as part of a pediatric-inspired regimen in adult ALL at our center. Subjects aged 18-60 yr with ALL (n = 152, 69.1% male) contributed 522 dose cycles to the study. Hepatotoxicity was the most common adverse event: grades 3-4 transaminitis and hyperbilirubinemia occurred in 53.9% and 23.7% of subjects, respectively. Hepatotoxicity was reversible; no cases of fulminate hepatic failure were observed. Other toxicities affecting at least 5% of subjects were grades 3-4 triglyceridemia in 50.9%, hypofibrinogenemia (<100 mg/dL) in 47.9%, clinical pancreatitis in 12.6%, venous thromboembolism in 11.2%, allergic reaction in 7.2%, and any grade bleeding in 5.3%. PEG-asp was always discontinued after grades 3-4 pancreatitis or allergic reaction. Otherwise, toxicities did not preclude administration of additional cycles of the drug. Our results suggest that repeated PEG-asp dosing is safe in adults aged 18-60 yr, even after occurrence of a drug-related toxicity.

  8. [Effect of intracoronary and intravenous administration of tirofiban loading dose in patients underwent percutaneous coronary interventions because of acute coronary syndrome].

    PubMed

    Turkmen, S; Fettser, D V; Kagliian, K É; Serchelik, A; Arystanova, A Zh; Tekin, K; Balli, M; Batyraliev, T A; Samko, A N; Sidorenko, B A

    2013-01-01

    Aim of this multicenter retrospective study was assessment of effect of intracoronary administration of tirofiban loading dose in troponin positive patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). We analyzed multicenter data base of patients subjected to percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) because of ST-elevation or non-ST elevation ACS from October 2010 to October 2011. Patients who received loading doses of aspirin (300 mg) and clopidogrel (600 mg) before PCI and tirofiban (10 mg/kg bolus with subsequent infusion 0.15 mg/kg/min for 24 h) were selected for the study (n=133, 89 with intravenous and 44 - intracoronary administration of tirofiban loading dose). We assessed hospital mortality, myocardial reinfarctions (reMI), necessity of target vessel revascularization (TVR) and pronounced bleedings. There were no significant differences in mortality, reMI, and TVR between two groups. However major adverse cardiac events was significantly less in patients who received intracoronary tirofiban (6.8 vs. 21.3% in i.v. group; p=0.046). Hospital stay was significantly shorter in intracoronary compared with i.v. group (3.84+/-0.96 vs. 4.55+/-1.11 days; p=0.001). Rates of bleedings did not differ significantly between groups. Thus compared with i.v. intracoronary administration of tirofiban loading dose allows lower rate of major adverse cardiac events as well as to shorten length of hospital stay of patients with ACS.

  9. Low CD34 dose is associated with poor survival after reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Törlén, Johan; Ringdén, Olle; Le Rademacher, Jennifer; Batiwalla, Minoo; Chen, Junfang; Erkers, Tom; Ho, Vincent; Kebriaei, Partow; Keever-Taylor, Carolyn; Kindwall-Keller, Tamila; Lazarus, Hillard M; Laughlin, Mary J; Lill, Michael; O'Brien, Tracey; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Rocha, Vanderson; Savani, Bipin N; Szwajcer, David; Valcarcel, David; Eapen, Mary

    2014-09-01

    Reduced-intensity conditioning/nonmyeloablative conditioning regimens are increasingly used in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Reports have shown CD34(+) dose to be important for transplantation outcome using myeloablative conditioning. The role of CD34(+) dose of peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPC) has not been previously analyzed in a large population undergoing reduced-intensity conditioning/nonmyeloablative HCT. We studied 1054 patients, ages 45 to 75 years, with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome who underwent transplantation between 2002 and 2011. Results of multivariate analysis showed that PBPC from HLA-matched siblings containing <4 × 10(6) CD34(+)/kg was associated with higher nonrelapse mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 2.03; P = .001), overall mortality (HR, 1.48; P = .008), and lower neutrophil (odds ratio [OR], .76; P = .03) and platelet (OR, .76; P = .03) recovery. PBPC from unrelated donors with CD34(+) dose < 6 × 10(6) CD34(+)/kg was also associated with higher nonrelapse (HR, 1.38; P = .02) and overall mortality (HR, 1.20; P = .05). In contrast to reports after myeloablative HCT, CD34(+) dose did not affect relapse or graft-versus-host disease with either donor type. An upper cell dose limit was not associated with adverse outcomes. These data suggest that PBPC CD34(+) doses >4 × 10(6) CD34(+)/kg and >6 × 10(6) CD34(+)/kg are optimal for HLA-matched sibling and unrelated donor HCT, respectively.

  10. THE ACUTE INFLAMMATORY REACTION IN THE RABBIT EAR CHAMBER WITH PARTICULAR REFERENCE TO THE PHENOMENON OF LEUKOCYTIC MIGRATION

    PubMed Central

    Cliff, W. J.

    1966-01-01

    Responses to injections of various materials into rabbit ear chambers were studied by in vivo microscopy. The acute inflammatory responses provoked by injections of antibody-antigen complexes were both quantitatively and qualitatively different from the responses obtained after injections of either homologous sera or the antigens alone. The sticking of leukocytes to endothelium during these responses occurred only in the venules draining the injection sites and was frequently present only on the sides of the venules towards the injection sites. An explanation of this finding was proposed in terms of absorption by the minute vessels related to the injection sites of postulated mediator(s) with specific activity on venular endothelium. Analysis of the rates and direction of movement of leukocytes during the reactions produced by the antibody-antigen complexes was performed with the aid of time-lapse cinemicroscopy. The leukocytes that were sticking to the venular endothelium frequently exhibited amoeboid locomotion within the vessels. Twice as many of these cells moved against the direction of blood flow as with it. This finding was discussed and an explanation proposed. A method for detecting a drift in the overall population of emigrated leukocytes within the inflamed tissue was described and revealed that four times as many amoeboid cells moved away from the injection sites as towards them. This result was discussed in the light of the in vitro chemotactic properties of antibody-antigen complexes demonstrated for rabbit leukocytes. An alternative explanation was proposed in terms of variation in the population density of these cells and their random movements and collisions. The rates of amoeboid movement of leukocytes during the acute inflammatory reactions produced by antibody-antigen complexes were similar to the rates found during turpentine inflammation and were compared to other published values. PMID:5922284

  11. ISOTONIC DOSE-RESPONSE MODELING OF THE TRANSCRIPTIONAL RESPONSE OF RAT CEREBROCORTICAL TISSUE AFTER ACUTE PYRETHROID EXPOSURE IN VIVO.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pyrethroid insecticides produce neurotoxicity in mammals by disrupting ion channel function in excitable nerve membranes. Pyrethroid use has increased as regulatory guidelines have restricted the use of other pesticide classes. Currently, a sensitive, specific, and dose-responsiv...

  12. Ingestion pathway model developed for use with an acute atmospheric dose model at the Savannah River Site.

    PubMed

    Simpkins, A A; Marx, D R; Hamby, D M

    2000-09-01

    AXAIRQ is a straight-line Gaussian plume dose model used for prospective accident assessment at the Savannah River Site and currently includes the following dose pathways: inhalation, ground shine, and plume shine. In the event of an accident, another possible pathway for dose would be through ingestion of locally produced contaminated foodstuffs. A model, AXINGST, has been developed that would incorporate this pathway. Currently available ingestion models were referenced as a basis for AXINGST. The model calculates an ingestion dose following an atmospheric release of radionuclides and includes site-specific variables where applicable. AXINGST estimates tritium vegetation concentrations that are within a factor of 20-40 of measured data during previous accidental releases at SRS.

  13. Validation of a precision radiochromic film dosimetry system for quantitative two-dimensional imaging of acute exposure dose distributions.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, J F; Low, D A; Mutic, S; Markman, J; Kirov, A S; Nussbaum, G H; Williamson, J F

    2000-10-01

    We present an evaluation of the precision and accuracy of image-based radiochromic film (RCF) dosimetry performed using a commercial RCF product (Gafchromic MD-55-2, Nuclear Associates, Inc.) and a commercial high-spatial resolution (100 microm pixel size) He-Ne scanning-laser film-digitizer (Personal Densitometer, Molecular Dynamics, Inc.) as an optical density (OD) imaging system. The precision and accuracy of this dosimetry system are evaluated by performing RCF imaging dosimetry in well characterized conformal external beam and brachytherapy high dose-rate (HDR) radiation fields. Benchmarking of image-based RCF dosimetry is necessary due to many potential errors inherent to RCF dosimetry including: a temperature-dependent time evolution of RCF dose response; nonuniform response of RCF; and optical-polarization artifacts. In addition, laser-densitometer imaging artifacts can produce systematic OD measurement errors as large as 35% in the presence of high OD gradients. We present a RCF exposure and readout protocol that was developed for the accurate dosimetry of high dose rate (HDR) radiation sources. This protocol follows and expands upon the guidelines set forth by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group 55 report. Particular attention is focused on the OD imaging system, a scanning-laser film digitizer, modified to eliminate OD artifacts that were not addressed in the AAPM Task Group 55 report. RCF precision using this technique was evaluated with films given uniform 6 MV x-ray doses between 1 and 200 Gy. RCF absolute dose accuracy using this technique was evaluated by comparing RCF measurements to small volume ionization chamber measurements for conformal external-beam sources and an experimentally validated Monte Carlo photon-transport simulation code for a 192Ir brachytherapy source. Pixel-to-pixel standard deviations of uniformly irradiated films were less than 1% for doses between 10 and 150 Gy; between 1% and 5% for lower

  14. A comparison between augmentation with olanzapine and increased risperidone dose in acute schizophrenia patients showing early non-response to risperidone.

    PubMed

    Hatta, Kotaro; Otachi, Taro; Sudo, Yasuhiko; Kuga, Hironori; Takebayashi, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Hideaki; Ishii, Ryusuke; Kasuya, Masataka; Hayakawa, Tatsuro; Morikawa, Fumiyoshi; Hata, Kazuya; Nakamura, Mitsuru; Usui, Chie; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Hirata, Toyoaki; Sawa, Yutaka

    2012-07-30

    We examined whether augmentation with olanzapine would be superior to increased risperidone dose among acute schizophrenia patients showing early non-response to risperidone. We performed a rater-blinded, randomized controlled trial at psychiatric emergency sites. Eligible patients were newly admitted patients with acute schizophrenia. Early response was defined as Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement Scale score ≤3 following 2 weeks of treatment. Early non-responders were allocated to receive either augmentation with olanzapine (RIS+OLZ group) or increased risperidone dose (RIS+RIS group). The 78 patients who completed 2 weeks of treatment were divided into 52 early responders to risperidone and 26 early non-responders to risperidone (RIS+OLZ group, n=13; RIS+RIS group, n=13). No difference in the achievement of ≥50% improvement in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale total score was observed between RIS+OLZ and RIS+RIS groups. Although time to treatment discontinuation for any cause was significantly shorter in the RIS+RIS group (6.8 weeks [95% confidence interval, 5.2-8.4]) than in early responders to risperidone (8.6 weeks [7.9-9.3]; P=0.018), there was no significant difference between the RIS+OLZ group (7.9 weeks [6.3-9.5]) and early responders to risperidone. Secondary outcomes justify the inclusion of augmentation arms in additional, larger studies comparing strategies for early non-responders.

  15. Estimation of acute oral toxicity using the No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL) from the 28 day repeated dose toxicity studies in rats.

    PubMed

    Bulgheroni, Anna; Kinsner-Ovaskainen, Agnieszka; Hoffmann, Sebastian; Hartung, Thomas; Prieto, Pilar

    2009-02-01

    Acute systemic toxicity is one of the areas of particular concern due to the 2009 deadline set by the 7th Amendment of the Cosmetics Directive (76/768/EEC), which introduces a testing and marketing ban of cosmetic products with ingredients tested on animals. The scientific community is putting considerable effort into developing and validating non-animal alternatives in this area. However, it is unlikely that validated and regulatory accepted alternative methods and/or strategies will be available in March 2009. Following the initiatives undertaken in the pharmaceutical industry to waive the acute oral toxicity testing before going to clinical studies by using information from other in vivo studies, we proposed an approach to identify non-toxic compounds (LD50>2000mg/kg) using information from 28 days repeated dose toxicity studies. Taking into account the high prevalence of non-toxic substances (87%) in the New Chemicals Database, it was possible to set a NOAEL threshold of 200mg/kg that allowed the correct identification of 63% of non-toxic compounds, while <1% of harmful compounds were misclassified as non-toxic. Since repeated dose toxicity studies can be performed in vivo until 2013, the proposed approach could have an immediate impact for the testing of cosmetic ingredients.

  16. Clinical efficacy and safety of hypernormal shortened door to needle time (DNT) plus individualized low-dose alteplase therapy in treating acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Mei; Lei, Hongyan; Cui, Yansen; Yang, Daiqun; Wang, Liquang; Wang, Ziran

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to observe the clinical efficacies of hyper-early low-dose alteplase thrombolysis in treating acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Methods: Two hundred twenty AIS patients were randomly divided into group A (90 cases), group B (90 cases), and group C (40 cases). The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores, mRS score-evaluated prognosis, intracranial hemorrhage, and mortality of the three groups were observed before and after the treatment. Results: The NIHSS scores of the three groups were significantly reduced after the treatment (P<0.05), among which the NIHSS score of group A was the lowest (P<0.05); and the difference between group B and C was not significant (P>0.05). The incidence of such complications as cerebral hemorrhage in the three groups was low, and there was no significant difference among the groups (P>0.05). The modified Rankin Scale (mRS)scores of the three groups showed that group A had much better prognosis than group B and C, while the difference between group B and group C was not significant. Conclusions: The hyper-early low-dose alteplase thrombolysis was safe and effective in Acute ischemic stroke (AIS). PMID:27648019

  17. Protected Graft Copolymer Excipient Leads to a Higher Acute Maximum Tolerated Dose and Extends Residence Time of Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide Significantly Better than Sterically Stabilized Micelles

    PubMed Central

    Reichstetter, Sandra; Castillo, Gerardo M.; Rubinstein, Israel; Nishimoto-Ashfield, Akiko; Lai, ManShun; Jones, Cynthia C.; Banjeree, Aryamitra; Lyubimov, Alex; Bloedow, Duane C.; Bogdanov, Alexei; Bolotin, Elijah M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine and compare pharmacokinetics and toxicity of two nanoformulations of Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide (VIP). Methods VIP was formulated using a micellar (Sterically Stabilized Micelles, SSM) and a polymer-based (Protected Graft Copolymer, PGC) nanocarrier at various loading percentages. VIP binding to the nanocarriers, pharmacokinetics, blood pressure, blood chemistry, and acute maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of the formulations after injection into BALB/c mice were determined. Results Both formulations significantly extend in vivo residence time compared to unformulated VIP. Formulation toxicity is dependent on loading percentage, showing major differences between the two carrier types. Both formulations increase in vivo potency of unformulated VIP and show acute MTDs at least 140 times lower than unformulated VIP, but still at least 100 times higher than the anticipated highest human dose, 1–5 μg/kg. These nanocarriers prevented a significant drop in arterial blood pressure compared to unformulated VIP. Conclusions While both carriers enhance in vivo residence time compared to unformulated VIP and reduce the drop in blood pressure immediately after injection, PGC is the excipient of choice to extend residence time and improve the safety of potent therapeutic peptides such as VIP. PMID:23224976

  18. Derived Reference Doses (RfDs) for the environmental degradates of the herbicides alachlor and acetochlor: results of an independent expert panel deliberation.

    PubMed

    Gadagbui, Bernard; Maier, Andrew; Dourson, Michael; Parker, Ann; Willis, Alison; Christopher, John P; Hicks, Lebelle; Ramasamy, Santhini; Roberts, Stephen M

    2010-01-01

    An independent peer expert panel was convened under the auspices of the Alliance for Risk Assessment (ARA) to review toxicology data and derive oral Reference Doses (RfDs) for four environmental degradates of the acetanilide herbicides, alachlor and acetochlor. The degradates included in this evaluation were (1) alachlor tertiary-ethanesulfonic acid (ESA), (2) alachlor tertiary-oxanilic acid (OXA), (3) acetochlor ESA, and (4) acetochlor OXA. Each degradate was judged to have sufficient data for developing low to medium confidence RfD, with use of an additional uncertainty factor (UF) to cover data gaps. Body weight decreases were identified as the most sensitive treatment-related adverse effect for RfD development. A composite UF of 1000 (10 for human variability in sensitivity, 10 for interspecies differences in sensitivity, and 10 for subchronic to chronic and database deficiency combined; i.e., 10(A)x10(H)x10(S&D)) for each degradate was considered reasonable, while noting that an argument could be made for an UF of 3000 (10(A)x10(H)x30(S&D)). Based on the available data, an oral RfD of 0.2 mg/kg-day is recommended for both acetochlor ESA and acetochlor OXA and an oral RfD of 0.8 mg/kg-day is recommended for both alachlor ESA and alachlor OXA.

  19. Pretreatment by low-dose fibrates protects against acute free fatty acid-induced renal tubule toxicity by counteracting PPAR{alpha} deterioration

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Kyoko; Kamijo, Yuji; Hora, Kazuhiko; Hashimoto, Koji; Higuchi, Makoto; Nakajima, Takero; Ehara, Takashi; Shigematsu, Hidekazu; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Aoyama, Toshifumi

    2011-05-01

    Development of a preventive strategy against tubular damage associated with proteinuria is of great importance. Recently, free fatty acid (FFA) toxicities accompanying proteinuria were found to be a main cause of tubular damage, which was aggravated by insufficiency of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR{alpha}), suggesting the benefit of PPAR{alpha} activation. However, an earlier study using a murine acute tubular injury model, FFA-overload nephropathy, demonstrated that high-dose treatment of PPAR{alpha} agonist (0.5% clofibrate diet) aggravated the tubular damage as a consequence of excess serum accumulation of clofibrate metabolites due to decreased kidney elimination. To induce the renoprotective effects of PPAR{alpha} agonists without drug accumulation, we tried a pretreatment study using low-dose clofibrate (0.1% clofibrate diet) using the same murine model. Low-dose clofibrate pretreatment prevented acute tubular injuries without accumulation of its metabolites. The tubular protective effects appeared to be associated with the counteraction of PPAR{alpha} deterioration, resulting in the decrease of FFAs influx to the kidney, maintenance of fatty acid oxidation, diminution of intracellular accumulation of undigested FFAs, and attenuation of disease developmental factors including oxidative stress, apoptosis, and NF{kappa}B activation. These effects are common to other fibrates and dependent on PPAR{alpha} function. Interestingly, however, clofibrate pretreatment also exerted PPAR{alpha}-independent tubular toxicities in PPAR{alpha}-null mice with FFA-overload nephropathy. The favorable properties of fibrates are evident when PPAR{alpha}-dependent tubular protective effects outweigh their PPAR{alpha}-independent tubular toxicities. This delicate balance seems to be easily affected by the drug dose. It will be important to establish the appropriate dosage of fibrates for treatment against kidney disease and to develop a novel PPAR

  20. Acute and chronic administration of a low-dose combination of topiramate and ondansetron reduces ethanol's reinforcing effects in male alcohol preferring (P) rats.

    PubMed

    Moore, Catherine F; Lycas, Matthew D; Bond, Colin W; Johnson, Bankole A; Lynch, Wendy J

    2014-02-01

    Topiramate (a GABA/glutamate modulator) and ondansetron (a serotonin-3 antagonist) have shown promise as treatments for alcohol use disorders (AUDs), although efficacy is modest/variable for both medications. We recently showed in animal models of consumption and relapse that acute treatment with a combination of these medications was more efficacious than either alone. To determine whether the mechanism for its beneficial effects is through modulation of ethanol's reinforcing effects, we measured the effect of this combination in male alcohol preferring (P) rats (N = 22) responding for ethanol under a progressive-ratio (PR) schedule. Low doses, which either do not affect (ondansetron; 0.001 mg/kg) or only modestly affect (topiramate; 10 mg/kg) alcohol-related behaviors on their own, were selected in an attempt to maximize their combined efficacy while minimizing potential side effects. In addition to acute treatment (1 day), the effects of chronic administration (10 days) were examined in an attempt to model human treatment approaches. The effects of the combination were compared with the low dose of topiramate alone hypothesizing that the combination would be more efficacious than topiramate alone. Although both topiramate and the combination similarly reduced PR responding for ethanol following acute treatment and during the initial phase of chronic treatment (Days 1-5), after repeated administration (Days 6-10), only the combination produced a sustained reduction in ethanol-maintained responding. These results suggest an advantage of the combination over topiramate alone at producing a sustained reduction in ethanol's reinforcing effects following prolonged treatment, and lend further support for its use as a potential treatment for AUDs.

  1. Viral Dose and Immunosuppression Modulate the Progression of Acute BVDV-1 Infection in Calves: Evidence of Long Term Persistence after Intra-Nasal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Strong, Rebecca; La Rocca, Severina Anna; Paton, David; Bensaude, Emmanuelle; Sandvik, Torstein; Davis, Leanne; Turner, Jane; Drew, Trevor; Raue, Rudiger; Vangeel, Ilse; Steinbach, Falko

    2015-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) infection of cattle causes a diverse range of clinical outcomes from being asymptomatic, or a transient mild disease, to producing severe cases of acute disease leading to death. Four groups of calves were challenged with a type 1 BVDV strain, originating from a severe outbreak of BVDV in England, to study the effect of viral dose and immunosuppression on the viral replication and transmission of BVDV. Three groups received increasing amounts of virus: Group A received 102.55TCID50/ml, group B 105.25TCID50/ml and group C 106.7TCID 50/ml. A fourth group (D) was inoculated with a medium dose (105.25TCID50/ml) and concomitantly treated with dexamethasone (DMS) to assess the effects of chemically induced immunosuppression. Naïve calves were added as sentinel animals to assess virus transmission. The outcome of infection was dose dependent with animals given a higher dose developing severe disease and more pronounced viral replication. Despite virus being shed by the low-dose infection group, BVD was not transmitted to sentinel calves. Administration of dexamethasone (DMS) resulted in more severe clinical signs, prolonged viraemia and virus shedding. Using PCR techniques, viral RNA was detected in blood, several weeks after the limit of infectious virus recovery. Finally, a recently developed strand-specific RT-PCR detected negative strand viral RNA, indicative of actively replicating virus, in blood samples from convalescent animals, as late as 85 days post inoculation. This detection of long term replicating virus may indicate the way in which the virus persists and/or is reintroduced within herds. PMID:25955849

  2. Feasibility of Early and Repeated Low-dose Interscalene Brachial Plexus Block for Residual Pain in Acute Cervical Radiculopathy Treated with NSAIDS

    PubMed Central

    Mitoro, Mari; Kuzumoto, Naoya

    2014-01-01

    Background To improve residual pain management in acute cervical radiculopathy treated with NSAIDs, the feasibility of early and repeated low-dose interscalene brachial plexus block (IS-BPB) needs to be assessed. Methods This was a prospective study on patients receiving NSAIDs (loxoprofen) for cervical radiculopathy of ≤ 2-week onset. Pain was assessed using the visual analogue scale (VAS). A low-dose ultrasonography (USG)-guided IS-BPB (dexamethasone [1.65 mg; 0.5 ml] and mepivacaine [1%; 3.0 ml]) was performed at baseline and weekly thereafter for 4 weeks in an outpatient setting for the intervention group. All patients were evaluated using a visual satisfaction score (VSS) at week 4. Patients with baseline VAS scores < 70 (mild to moderate pain; MM group) and ≥ 70 (severe pain; SE group) were compared to the controls receiving NSAIDs. Results A total of 316 IS-BPBs were performed in the intervention group. There was a significant difference in the decline in the VAS from week 0 to week 3 in the MM and SE groups (P < 0.05); however, from week 3 to week 4, the therapeutic effect exhibited no significant difference. Thirteen patients at week 2 (15.5%; MM: 27.7%; SE: 0%), 43 at week 3 (51.2%; MM: 83.0%; SE: 10.8%), and 47 at week 4 (56.0%; MM: 85.1%; SE: 18.9%) achieved a VAS score of ≤ 20. Patient satisfaction was high, and the decrease in VAS scores in both groups was significant (P < 0.05) compared to the controls. Conclusions Weekly, low-dose, USG-guided IS-BPB can be implemented for early pain relief in acute cervical radiculopathy, with high patient satisfaction. PMID:24748940

  3. Busulfan and Etoposide Followed by Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant and Low-Dose Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-04

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Autologous bone marrow stromal cell transplantation as a treatment for acute radiation enteritis induced by a moderate dose of radiation in dogs.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenda; Chen, Jiang; Liu, Xu; Li, Hongyu; Qi, Xingshun; Guo, Xiaozhong

    2016-05-01

    Radiation enteritis is one of the most common complications of cancer radiotherapy, and the development of new and effective measures for its prevention and treatment is of great importance. Adult bone marrow stromal stem cells (ABMSCs) are capable of self-renewal and exhibit low immunogenicity. In this study, we investigated ABMSC transplantation as a treatment for acute radiation enteritis. We developed a dog model of acute radiation enteritis using abdominal intensity-modulated radiation therapy in a single X-ray dose of 14 Gy. ABMSCs were cultured in vitro, identified via immunofluorescence and flow cytometry, and double labeled with CM-Dil and superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) before transplantation, which took place 48 hours after abdominal irradiation in a single fraction. The dog model of acute radiation enteritis was transplanted with cultured ABMSCs labeled with CM-Dil and SPIO into the mesenteric artery through the femoral artery. Compared with untreated control groups, dogs treated with ABMSCs exhibited substantially longer survival time and improved relief of clinical symptoms. ABMSC transplantation induced the regeneration of the intestinal epithelium and the recovery of intestinal function. Furthermore, ABMSC transplantation resulted in elevated serum levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-11 (IL10) and intestinal radioprotective factors, such as keratinocyte growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor-2, and platelet-derived growth factor-B while reducing the serum level of the inflammatory cytokine IL17. ABMSCs induced the regeneration of the intestinal epithelium and regulated the secretion of serum cytokines and the expression of radioprotective proteins and thus could be beneficial in the development of novel and effective mitigators of and protectors against acute radiation enteritis.

  5. [Safety Evaluation of Rare Sugar Syrup: Single-dose Oral Toxicity in Rats, Reverse Mutation Assay, Chromosome Aberration Assay, and Acute Non-Effect Level for Diarrhea of a Single Dose in Humans].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takako; Iida, Tetsuo; Takamine, Satoshi; Hayashi, Noriko; Okuma, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The safety of rare sugar syrup obtained from high-fructose corn syrup under slightly alkaline conditions was studied. Mutagenicity of rare sugar syrup was assessed by a reverse mutation assay using Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli, and an in vitro chromosomal aberration assay using Chinese hamster lung cell line (CHL/IU). No mutagenicity of rare sugar syrup was detected under these experimental conditions. Oral administration of single dose (15,000 mg/kg) of rare sugar syrup to rats caused no abnormalities, suggesting no adverse effect of rare sugar syrup. In humans, the acute non-effect level of rare sugar syrup for causing diarrhea was estimated as 0.9 g/kg body weight as dry solid base in both males and females.

  6. Pilot study of the safety of starting administration of low-dose aspirin and cilostazol in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Keishi; Komatsu, Yoji; Sato, Naoaki; Higuchi, Osamu; Kujiraoka, Yuji; Kamezaki, Takao; Suzuki, Kensuke; Matsumura, Akira

    2011-01-01

    Progressive stroke is a serious problem due to the associated morbidity and mortality. Aspirin is recommended for acute ischemic stroke, but does not reduce the frequency of stroke progression. No standard treatment has been approved for the prevention of stroke progression. Cilostazol, which reduces platelet aggregation about 3 hours after single administration, does not increase the frequency of bleeding events when compared with aspirin or a placebo. Moreover, the combination of 100 mg aspirin and 200 mg cilostazol does not increase the frequency of bleeding events compared with only 100 mg aspirin, and thus is expected to prevent stroke progression with a high degree of safety. The present study investigated the safety of this combination of two drugs administered at the above concentrations in 54 patients with acute ischemic stroke within 48 hours of stroke onset. Modified National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) measurements were performed at baseline and again on day 4 to 7. Progressive stroke was defined as an increase greater than or equal to 1 point on NIHSS. Patient scores on the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) were evaluated at baseline and 3 months after enrollment. Stroke progression occurred in 11.1% of the patients. The percentages of patients with mRS score from 0 to 2 were 42.6% and 75% at baseline and 3 months, respectively. No symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage or major extracranial hemorrhage occurred. These results suggest that administration of aspirin and cilostazol is safe for acute ischemic stroke.

  7. Acute Normal Tissue Reactions in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Treated With IMRT: Influence of Dose and Association With Genetic Polymorphisms in DNA DSB Repair Genes

    SciTech Connect

    Werbrouck, Joke Ruyck, Kim de; Duprez, Frederic; Veldeman, Liv; Claes, Kathleen; Eijkeren, Marc van; Boterberg, Tom; Willems, Petra; Vral, Anne; Neve, Wilfried de; Thierens, Hubert

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the association between dose-related parameters and polymorphisms in DNA DSB repair genes XRCC3 (c.-1843A>G, c.562-14A>G, c.722C>T), Rad51 (c.-3429G>C, c.-3392G>T), Lig4 (c.26C>T, c.1704T>C), Ku70 (c.-1310C>G), and Ku80 (c.2110-2408G>A) and the occurrence of acute reactions after radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: The study population consisted of 88 intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)-treated head-and-neck cancer patients. Mucositis, dermatitis, and dysphagia were scored using the Common Terminology Criteria (CTC) for Adverse Events v.3.0 scale. The population was divided into a CTC0-2 and CTC3+ group for the analysis of each acute effect. The influence of the dose on critical structures was analyzed using dose-volume histograms. Genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) combined with restriction fragment length polymorphism or PCR-single base extension assays. Results: The mean dose (D{sub mean}) to the oral cavity and constrictor pharyngeus (PC) muscles was significantly associated with the development of mucositis and dysphagia, respectively. These parameters were considered confounding factors in the radiogenomics analyses. The XRCC3c.722CT/TT and Ku70c.-1310CG/GG genotypes were significantly associated with the development of severe dysphagia (CTC3+). No association was found between the investigated polymorphisms and the development of mucositis or dermatitis. A risk analysis model for severe dysphagia, which was developed based on the XRCC3c.722CT/TT and Ku70c.-1310CG/GG genotypes and the PC dose, showed a sensitivity of 78.6% and a specificity of 77.6%. Conclusions: The XRCC3c.722C>T and Ku70c.-1310C>G polymorphisms as well as the D{sub mean} to the PC muscles were highly associated with the development of severe dysphagia after IMRT. The prediction model developed using these parameters showed a high sensitivity and specificity.

  8. The pharmacologic basis for the efficacy of high-dose Ara-C and sequential asparaginase in adult acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Capizzi, R. L.; White, C.

    1988-01-01

    Dose-related effects of ara-C include overcoming a relative transport impediment in human leukemia cells. This result then allows intracellular metabolism and incorporation into DNA to proceed to the maximum extent possible. In addition, the increased synthesis of ara-CDP-choline associated with these high doses may serve as an alternate substrate for phosphatidyl choline synthesis, which may contribute to membrane fragility and cell lysis. HiDAC also serves as a "prodrug" for high concentrations of ara-U, which in turn diminishes ara-C catabolism with a prolonged gamma phase of systemic clearance and also causes cytostasis in S-phase with enhanced anabolism and cytotoxicity of subsequent doses of ara-C. This metabolite/drug interaction could be termed "self-potentiation," a feature which contributes to the overall activity of HiDAC. Asparaginase enhances these effects in a schedule-dependent fashion by lowering the cellular pool size of dCTP and consequent enhanced metabolism of ara-C. The therapeutic benefit of these pharmacologic manipulations has been verified in a randomized clinical trial in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia. PMID:3163212

  9. Pharmacokinetics and Dose Escalation of the Heat Shock Protein Inhibitor 17-AAG in Combination with Bortezomib in Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Alison R.; Klisovic, Rebecca; Johnston, Jeffrey S.; Jiang, Yao; Geyer, Susan; Kefauver, Cheryl; Binkley, Philip; Byrd, John C.; Grever, Michael R.; Garzon, Ramiro; Phelps, Mitch A.; Marcucci, Guido; Blum, Kristie A.; Blum, William

    2013-01-01

    This phase I study was conducted to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and dose limiting toxicities (DLT) of the heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) inhibitor 17-allyamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) in combination with bortezomib, and to provide pharmacokinetic data in relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Eleven patients were enrolled. The MTD was 17-AAG 150mg/m2 and bortezomib 0.7mg/m2. Hepatic toxicity and cardiac toxicity were dose limiting. Co-administration on day 4 led to a decrease in clearance (p=0.005) and increase in AUC (p=.032) of 17-amino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AG) not observed when 17-AAG was administered alone. Pharmacokinetic parameters of patients who developed toxicities and those who did not were not different. The combination of 17-AAG and bortezomib led to toxicity without measurable response in patients with relapsed or refractory AML. Pharmacokinetic data provide insight for studies of related agents in AML; next generation HSP90 inhibitors are appealing for further development in this area. PMID:23256542

  10. A truncated-dose regimen of daclizumab for prevention of acute rejection in kidney transplant recipients: a single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Soltero, Liliana; Carbajal, Hector; Sarkissian, Nadine; Khan, Abdul-Jabbar; Brennan, Stephen; Gonzalez, Juan M; Truong, Luan D; Suki, Wadi N

    2004-11-27

    Daclizumab can decrease the incidence of acute rejection (AR) in renal transplant (RTx) recipients. In this prospective study, 52 RTx patients were divided into two groups according to the dose of daclizumab: 1 mg/kg on day 0 and every 14 days for five doses (group 1, n = 30) or a truncated regimen of 2 mg/kg on day 0 and on the day of discharge (group 2, n = 22). The following variables were recorded: demographics; delayed graft function; AR at 3, 6, and 12 months; time to AR; chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN); and serum creatinine. The overall incidences of AR were 23% and 27% (P = 0.76) in groups 1 and 2, respectively, whereas at 6 months they were 21% and 18% (P = 1.0). Median time to AR was 10 days in group 1 and 94 days in group 2 (P = 0.09). The incidence of CAN was 6.6% in group 1 and 13% in group 2 (P = 0.63). These data suggest that the truncated dose of daclizumab is as effective as the standard regimen for AR prophylaxis.

  11. Dose-additivity modeling for acute and repeated exposure to a mixture of N-methycarbamate Pesticides

    EPA Science Inventory

    The toxicity of N-methylcarbamate pesticides is attributed to the reversible inhibition of cholinesterase (ChE) enzymes in the central and peripheral nervous system. The inhibition of ChE following a single exposure to this class of pesticides has been modeled using a dose-additi...

  12. Long-term effects of acute low-dose ionizing radiation on the neonatal mouse heart: a proteomic study.

    PubMed

    Bakshi, Mayur V; Barjaktarovic, Zarko; Azimzadeh, Omid; Kempf, Stefan J; Merl, Juliane; Hauck, Stefanie M; Eriksson, Per; Buratovic, Sonja; Atkinson, Michael J; Tapio, Soile

    2013-11-01

    Epidemiological studies establish that children and young adults are especially susceptible to radiation-induced cardiovascular disease (CVD). The biological mechanisms behind the elevated CVD risk following exposure at young age remain unknown. The present study aims to elucidate the long-term effects of ionizing radiation by studying the murine cardiac proteome after exposure to low and moderate radiation doses. NMRI mice received single doses of total body (60)Co gamma-irradiation on postnatal day 10 and were sacrificed 7 months later. Changes in cardiac protein expression were quantified using isotope-coded protein label and tandem mass spectrometry. We identified 32, 31, 66, and 34 significantly deregulated proteins after doses of 0.02, 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 Gy, respectively. The four doses shared 9 deregulated proteins. Bioinformatics analysis showed that most of the deregulated proteins belonged to a limited set of biological categories, including metabolic processes, inflammatory response, and cytoskeletal structure. The transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha was predicted as a common upstream regulator of several deregulated proteins. This study indicates that both adaptive and maladaptive responses to the initial radiation damage persist well into adulthood. It will contribute to the understanding of the long-term consequences of radiation-induced injury and developmental alterations in the neonatal heart.

  13. Acute response of rat liver microsomal lipids, lipid peroxidation, and membrane anisotropy to a single oral dose of polybrominated biphenyls.

    PubMed

    Bernert, J T; Groce, D F

    1984-01-01

    Liver microsomal lipids and lipid peroxidation activities were examined in adult male rats at intervals over a 2-mo period after the administration of a single oral dose of 0 or 500 mg/kg of FireMaster BP-6 in corn oil. Microsomal lipids were markedly altered in the polybrominated biphenyl- (PBB-) dosed animals at the earliest time examined (1 wk), and these changes persisted throughout the remainder of the study. An early decrease in the cholesterol-phospholipid ratio was noted, which probably contributed to the significant decrease in the steady-state fluorescence anisotropy demonstrable in both intact microsomes and in liposomes prepared from microsomal lipid extracts. Significant concentrations of PBBs were present in dosed rat microsomes, but the changes in anisotropy appeared to result from membrane lipid alterations rather than from a direct perturbation by PBBs. Iron ascorbate-induced peroxidation was also greatly enhanced in dosed rat microsomes, even when rats were maintained on a low-iron (25 ppm) diet. These early alterations in membrane fluidity and peroxidative capacity of microsomes may ultimately contribute to the hepatotoxicity of PBBs.

  14. Age related randomized comparison of sequentially applied high-dose versus intermediate dose cytosine arabinoside in combination with mitoxantrone (S-HAM) in the treatment of relapsed and refractory acute myeloid leukemia: study design and preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Hiddemann, W; Aul, C; Maschmeyer, G; Lathan, B; Köppler, H; Hoffmann, R; Grüneisen, T; Donhuijsen-Ant, R; Ludwig, W D; Balleisen, L

    1989-02-01

    In a prospective randomized trial, the pending question was addressed whether Cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C) should be applied at high or intermediate dose to patients with relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia. Based upon the previously established regimen of the sequential application of Ara-C and Mitoxantrone (S-HAM) patients below 60 years of age were randomized to receive Ara-C at either 3.0 g/m2 vs 1.0 g/m2 per dose while older patients were randomly assigned to either 1.0 g/m2 or 0.5 g/m2 Ara-C. At the present early stage 51 patients have entered the study and 37 are currently evaluable for response and toxicity. Complete remissions were achieved in 14 of 28 patients below 60 years of age and in 3 of 8 older cases. Predominant side effects consisted of nausea and vomiting, diarrhea and stomatitis. Further recruitment of patients and longer follow-up is required for the assessment of the various treatment arms.

  15. Effect of high-dose rosuvastatin loading before percutaneous coronary intervention in Chinese patients with acute coronary syndrome: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Su, Qiang; Guo, Wenqin; Dai, Weiran; Li, Hongqing; Yang, Huafeng; Li, Lang

    2017-01-01

    Background Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is an important disease threatening human life and health. Many studies have shown that the loading dose of atorvastatin can significantly improve the prognosis of patients with ACS, and reduce the mortality. However, this conclusion is not consistent. Thus, we aimed to evaluate the effect of high-dose rosuvastatin loading before percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in Chinese patients with ACS using a meta-analysis based on a systematic review of published articles. Methods We systematically reviewed published studies, evaluating the effect of high-dose rosuvastatin loading before percutaneous coronary intervention in Chinese patients with ACS. The retrieval time is limited from inception to 2 November 2016, and the retrieved databases included PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library, Web of Science, CBM, CNKI, the VIP database and the Wang Fang database. Two researchers independently assessed the quality of the included studies and then extracted the data. Stata 11.0 was used for data analysis. Results In total, 11 articles, which included 802 patients, were included in our meta-analysis. Among these patients, 398 patients were in the high-dose group (20 mg/day) and 404 patients were in the conventional dose group (10 mg/day). Meta-analysis results showed that compared with the conventional dose group: 1) The loading dose of rosuvastatin can significantly reduce the hs-CRP level after PCI, including at 24 hours (SMD = -0.65, 95%CI -0.84 ~ -0.47, P = 0.000), 48 hours (SMD = -0.40, 95%CI -0.68 ~ -0.11, P = 0.006), and four weeks (SMD = -1.64, 95%CI -2.01 ~ -1.26, P = 0.000). 2) The loading dose of rosuvastatin can significantly reduce the levels of LDL-C and cTnT, including the level of LDL-C at 30 d after PCI (SMD = -0.89, 95%CI -1.10 ~ -0.69, P = 0.000), and the level of cTnT at 24 h after PCI (SMD = -1.93, 95%CI -2.28 ~ -1.59, P = 0.000), and increase the level of HDL-C at 48 h after PCI (SMD = 0.61, 95%CI 0.34 ~ 0.88, P

  16. The comparison of single-dose ceftriaxone, five-day azithromycin, and ten-day amoxicillin/clavulanate for the treatment of children with acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Biner, Betül; Celtik, Coşkun; Oner, Naci; Küçükuğurluoğlu, Yasemin; Güzel, Ahmet; Yildirim, Cetin; Adali, Mustafa Kemal

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of short-course antimicrobial therapies [single intramuscular dose of ceftriaxone (50 mg/kg, not exceeding 1 g), 5 days of azithromycin (10 mg/kg on day 1, then 5 mg/kg daily on days 2-5) and the traditional 10-day course of amoxicillin/clavulanate (90/6.4 mg/kg/day in 2 doses)] in children with acute otitis media (AOM). The study was conducted as a prospective, comparative, open randomized trial between February 2001 and April 2003, and 104 children were enrolled, with a mean age of 3.8 (2.3) years. The clinical and otoscopic assessments of the children were made on days 0, 3, 11 and 30 after admission, and tympanometry was performed on day 30. The patients were diagnosed and followed with a scoring system. Clinical success was achieved in 29/34 patients (85.3%) in the ceftriaxone group, 27/31 patients (87.1%) in the azithromycin group and 34/39 children (87.2%) in the amoxicillin/clavulanate group. The rate of persistence of middle-ear fluid did not differ between the three groups (p>0.05). During the one-month period, no recurrent case was observed. The most common drug-related adverse effects were associated with the gastrointestinal system. In conclusion, for the treatment of children with AOM, the clinical success of single-dose intramuscular ceftriaxone and of five-day azithromycin treatments was comparable to that of the traditional 10-day therapy with high-dose amoxicillin/clavulanate.

  17. The Impact of Comorbid Depression on Educational Inequality in Survival after Acute Coronary Syndrome in a Cohort of 83 062 Patients and a Matched Reference Population

    PubMed Central

    Osler, Merete; Prescott, Eva; Wium-Andersen, Ida Kim; Ibfelt, Else Helene; Jørgensen, Martin Balslev; Andersen, Per Kragh; Jørgensen, Terese Sara Høj; Wium-Andersen, Marie Kim; Mårtensson, Solvej

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with low socioeconomic position have higher rates of mortality after diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome (ACS), but little is known about the mechanisms behind this social inequality. The aim of the present study was to examine whether any educational inequality in survival after ACS was influenced by comorbid conditions including depression. Methods From 2001 to 2009 all first-time ACS patients were identified in the Danish National Patient Registry. This cohort of 83 062 ACS patients and a matched reference population were followed for incident depression and mortality until December 2012 by linkage to person, patients and prescription registries. Educational status was defined at study entry and the impact of potential confounders and mediators (age, gender, cohabitation status, somatic comorbidity and depression) on the relation between education and mortality were identified by drawing a directed acyclic graph and analysed using multiple Cox regression analyses. Findings During follow-up, 29 583(35.6%) of ACS patients and 19 105(22.9%) of the reference population died. Cox regression analyses showed an increased mortality in the lowest educated compared to those with high education in both ACS patients and the reference population. Adjustment for previous and incident depression or other covariables only attenuated the relations slightly. This pattern of associations was seen for mortality after 30 days, 1 year and during total follow-up. Conclusion In this study the relative excess mortality rate in lower educated ACS patients was comparable with the excess risk associated with low education in the background population. This educational inequality in survival remained after adjustment for somatic comorbidity and depression. PMID:26513652

  18. Acute exposure to sarin increases blood brain barrier permeability and induces neuropathological changes in the rat brain: dose-response relationships.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, A; Shetty, A K; Abou-Donia, M B

    2002-01-01

    results indicate that, the early brain damage after acute exposure to sarin is clearly dose-dependent, and that exposure to 1 x LD(50) sarin induces detrimental changes in many regions of the adult rat brain as early as 24 hours after the exposure. The early neuropathological changes observed after a single dose of 1 x LD(50) sarin could lead to a profound long-term neurodegenerative changes in many regions of the brain, and resulting behavioral abnormalities.

  19. Measurement of brevetoxin levels by radioimmunoassay of blood collection cards after acute, long-term, and low-dose exposure in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Woofter, Ricky; Dechraoui, M-Yasmine Bottein; Garthwaite, Ian; Towers, Neale R; Gordon, Christopher J; Córdova, José; Ramsdell, John S

    2003-01-01

    We developed a radioimmunoassay (RIA) using a sheep anti-brevetoxin antiserum to evaluate detection of brevetoxin on blood collection cards from mice treated with the brevetoxin congener PbTx-3. The RIA has high affinity for PbTx-3 [half-maximal effective concentration (EC(50)) +/- SE = 1.2 +/- 0.2 nM; n = 10] and recognizes both type 1 and type 2 brevetoxins, but not ciguatoxin. Direct comparison of the RIA with a radiolabeled [(3)H]-PbTx-3 receptor-binding assay (RBA) revealed excellent sensitivity, congener selectivity, and minimal interference from blood matrix. We first analyzed blood samples from an acute time course exposure, using a maximal nonlethal dose [180 microg/kg body weight (bw)] for 0.5, 1, 2, 4, and 24 hr. Mean blood brevetoxin levels were 36 nM at 30 min and stayed above 20 nM during the 1-4 hr time points. We next analyzed blood brevetoxin levels after longer exposure (0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, or 7 days). Mean blood brevetoxin levels were 26.0 nM at 0.5 days, decreased to 8.2 nM at 1.0 day, and maintained a significant level (p < 0.05) of 1.3 nM at day 2. We next determined the lowest measurable dose using increasing concentrations of PbTx-3 (10-300 micro g/kg bw). Analysis of the blood samples at 60 min revealed a linear relationship between administered and internal doses (r(2) = 0.993). All doses of brevetoxin administered were detectable at 1 hr, with significant levels found for the lowest administered dose of 10 micro g/kg bw--a dose that was 10-fold lower than the lowest observable effect level. This RIA provides an optimal first-tier detection of brevetoxin from blood collection cards and, used in combination with the RBA and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, should provide a complete panel of methods to biomonitor brevetoxin exposure. PMID:14527838

  20. Outcome of Reinduction Chemotherapy with a Modified Dose of Idarubicin for Children with Marrow-Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Results of the Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (CALL)-0603 Study

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    This multicenter, prospective trial was conducted to develop an effective and safe reinduction regimen for marrow-relapsed pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) by modifying the dose of idarubicin. Between 2006 and 2009, the trial accrued 44 patients, 1 to 21 years old with first marrow-relapsed ALL. The reinduction regimen comprised prednisolone, vincristine, L-asparaginase, and idarubicin (10 mg/m2/week). The idarubicin dose was adjusted according to the degree of myelosuppression. The second complete remission (CR2) rate was 72.7%, obtained by 54.2% of patients with early relapse < 24 months after initial diagnosis and 95.0% of those with late relapse (P = 0.002). Five patients entered remission with extended treatment, resulting in a final CR2 rate of 84.1%. The CR2 rate was not significantly different according to the idarubicin dose. The induction death rate was 2.3% (1/44). The 5-year event-free and overall survival rates were 22.2% ± 6.4% and 27.3% ± 6.7% for all patients, 4.2% ± 4.1% and 8.3% ± 5.6% for early relapsers, and 43.8% ± 11.4% and 50.0% ± 11.2% for late relapsers, respectively. Early relapse and slow response to reinduction chemotherapy were predictors of poor outcomes. In conclusion, a modified dose of idarubicin was effectively incorporated into the reinduction regimen for late marrow-relapsed ALL with a low toxic death rate. However, the CR2 rate for early relapsers was suboptimal, and the second remission was not durable in most patients. PMID:28244291

  1. Therapeutic efficacy of fixed dose artesunate-mefloquine for the treatment of acute, uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Kampong Speu, Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cambodia stopped using co-blistered, non-fixed, artesunate-mefloquine (ASMQ) in 2008 when treatment failure rates approximated 20%. Fixed dose combination (FDC) ASMQ is efficacious against acute uncomplicated, drug resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Southeast Asia but has not been tested in Cambodia. Methods A 42-day WHO therapeutic efficacy study (TES) was conducted in 2010 in Oral, Kampong Speu province, south-west Cambodia, in patients with acute uncomplicated P. falciparum. Daily administered FDC ASMQ for three days was dosed by age. Genotyping of isolates at day 0 and day of recrudescence by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) classified post-treatment recurrent falciparum parasitaemia. Ex vivo drug sensitivity testing ([3H] hypoxanthine method) was performed on baseline parasites and reported as the drug concentration inhibiting 50% parasite growth vs no drug (IC50). Results Recruited patients numbered 45; five aged <15 years. On day 3, five of 45 [11.1 (3.7-24.05)] % patients were still parasite-positive; one of whom later failed treatment on day 21. There were 5/45 (11.1%) late treatment failures on day 21, 28 and 35; all were PCR diagnosed recrudescent infections. The day 0 MQ IC50s ranged from 11.5-238.9 (median 58.6) nM. Conclusions This TES demonstrated reasonable efficacy in an area of possible reduced artemisinin sensitivity and high MQ IC50s. Efficacy testing of FDC ASMQ should continue in Cambodia and be considered for reintroduction if efficacy returns. PMID:24060207

  2. Two learning tasks provide evidence for disrupted behavioural flexibility in an animal model of schizophrenia-like behaviour induced by acute MK-801: a dose-response study.

    PubMed

    Lobellova, Veronika; Entlerova, Marie; Svojanovska, Barbora; Hatalova, Hana; Prokopova, Iva; Petrasek, Tomas; Vales, Karel; Kubik, Stepan; Fajnerova, Iveta; Stuchlik, Ales

    2013-06-01

    Schizophrenia is a chronic and devastating illness. Exact causes of the disease remain elusive; however, neurodevelopmental changes in the brain glutamate system are recognized to play an important role. Several animal models of the disease are induced by a systemic blockade of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. This study examined the animal model of schizophrenia-like behaviours induced by acute treatment with MK-801, a non-competitive NMDA-receptor antagonist. Behavioural flexibility is an ability to adapt to the changes in environment, and schizophrenia is often accompanied by its decrease. The study tested the effect of MK-801 on behavioural flexibility in an active place avoidance task and the Morris water maze (MWM). Flexibility was tested under reversal conditions, i.e., after changing the location of the target. Each spatial task addressed different functions; continuous coordinate-frame segregation was present in the active place avoidance and precise place representation in the MWM. Results showed that reversal was altered in both tasks by MK-801 at doses of 0.10-0.15 mgkg(-1). Some impairment was observed in the active place avoidance task at 0.08 mgkg(-1). Swimming towards a visible platform was impaired only by the highest dose (0.15 mgkg(-1)). The results demonstrate that a significant impairment of behavioural flexibility accompanies this acute animal model of schizophrenia-like behaviours, and that active place avoidance had higher sensitivity for such deficits than the MWM. This suggests the usefulness of the reversal paradigm in both tasks for examining novel drugs with antipsychotic and procognitive actions.

  3. Low-Dose Adrenaline, Promethazine, and Hydrocortisone in the Prevention of Acute Adverse Reactions to Antivenom following Snakebite: A Randomised, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    de Silva, H. Asita; Pathmeswaran, Arunasalam; Ranasinha, Channa D.; Jayamanne, Shaluka; Samarakoon, Senarath B.; Hittharage, Ariyasena; Kalupahana, Ranjith; Ratnatilaka, G. Asoka; Uluwatthage, Wimalasiri; Aronson, Jeffrey K.; Armitage, Jane M.; Lalloo, David G.; de Silva, H. Janaka

    2011-01-01

    Background Envenoming from snakebites is most effectively treated by antivenom. However, the antivenom available in South Asian countries commonly causes acute allergic reactions, anaphylactic reactions being particularly serious. We investigated whether adrenaline, promethazine, and hydrocortisone prevent such reactions in secondary referral hospitals in Sri Lanka by conducting a randomised, double-blind placebo-controlled trial. Methods and Findings In total, 1,007 patients were randomized, using a 2×2×2 factorial design, in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of adrenaline (0.25 ml of a 1∶1,000 solution subcutaneously), promethazine (25 mg intravenously), and hydrocortisone (200 mg intravenously), each alone and in all possible combinations. The interventions, or matching placebo, were given immediately before infusion of antivenom. Patients were monitored for mild, moderate, or severe adverse reactions for at least 96 h. The prespecified primary end point was the effect of the interventions on the incidence of severe reactions up to and including 48 h after antivenom administration. In total, 752 (75%) patients had acute reactions to antivenom: 9% mild, 48% moderate, and 43% severe; 89% of the reactions occurred within 1 h; and 40% of all patients were given rescue medication (adrenaline, promethazine, and hydrocortisone) during the first hour. Compared with placebo, adrenaline significantly reduced severe reactions to antivenom by 43% (95% CI 25–67) at 1 h and by 38% (95% CI 26–49) up to and including 48 h after antivenom administration; hydrocortisone and promethazine did not. Adding hydrocortisone negated the benefit of adrenaline. Conclusions Pretreatment with low-dose adrenaline was safe and reduced the risk of acute severe reactions to snake antivenom. This may be of particular importance in countries where adverse reactions to antivenom are common, although the need to improve the quality of available antivenom cannot be overemphasized

  4. Combined effect of low-dose nitric oxide gas inhalation with partial liquid ventilation on hemodynamics, pulmonary function, and gas exchange in acute lung injury of newborn piglets.

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Chang Won; Hwang, Jong Hee; Chang, Yun Sil; Park, Won Soon

    2003-01-01

    We conducted a randomized animal study to determine whether there is a cumulative effect on hemodynamics, pulmonary function, and gas exchange when low-dose nitric oxide (NO) is added to partial liquid ventilation (PLV) in acute lung injury. Eighteen newborn piglets were saline-lavaged repeatedly, and randomly divided into two groups: PLV with perfluorocarbon group (n=8) and lavage only (control) group (n=10). Perfluorodecalin (30 mL/kg) was instilled into the endotracheal tube for 30 min, followed by 5-10 mL/kg/hr. Fifteen minutes after the completion of perfluorodecalin dosing, NO (10 ppm) was added to the inspiratory gas in an "on/off" manner. Perfluorodecalin instillation produced a significant improvement in gas exchange, pulmonary mechanics, shunt, and pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP). The addition of NO produced a further significant improvement in PaO2 and PAP. The "on/off" response to NO was seen apparently in PAP, PaO2, dynamic compliance, and shunt. All the variables in control group were remained at near the after-lavage levels without significant improvements until the end of the experiment. We concluded that NO might have a cumulative effect on gas exchange when combined with PLV, and this might be attributable to deceased PAP and V/Q mismatching. PMID:14676437

  5. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of cytarabine metabolic genes influence clinical outcome in acute myeloid leukemia patients receiving high-dose cytarabine therapy.

    PubMed

    Amaki, Jun; Onizuka, Makoto; Ohmachi, Ken; Aoyama, Yasuyuki; Hara, Ryujiro; Ichiki, Akifumi; Kawai, Hidetsugu; Sato, Ai; Miyamoto, Mitsuki; Toyosaki, Masako; Machida, Shinichiro; Kojima, Minoru; Shirasugi, Yukari; Kawada, Hiroshi; Ogawa, Yoshiaki; Ando, Kiyoshi

    2015-06-01

    Cytarabine arabinoside (Ara-C) is the most important agent for treating acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Here, we genotyped 11 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of seven Ara-C metabolism-related genes in 39 AML patients who had received high-dose Ara-C as a single-agent treatment. Univariate analysis identified three SNPs that were significantly associated with shorter time-to-relapse (TTR): CTPS rs12144160 GG compared to AA/AG, DCTD rs9990999 AG/GG compared to AA, and SLC29A1 rs693955 CC compared to AA/AC. Multivariate analysis of TTR revealed the SLC29A1 rs693955 CC genotype and first induction failure to be significantly associated with a shorter TTR. The DCTD rs9990999 AG/GG and SLC29A1 rs693955 CC genotypes were also significantly associated with shorter duration of neutropenia. The results of our study suggest that SNP analysis can be an important tool in improving drug responsiveness and enabling a better understanding of this condition and the development of tailor-made treatments for AML patients who benefit from consolidated high-dose Ara-C therapy.

  6. Chemomodulation of sequential high-dose cytarabine by fludarabine in relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia: a randomized trial of the AMLCG.

    PubMed

    Fiegl, M; Unterhalt, M; Kern, W; Braess, J; Spiekermann, K; Staib, P; Grüneisen, A; Wörmann, B; Schöndube, D; Serve, H; Reichle, A; Hentrich, M; Schiel, X; Sauerland, C; Heinecke, A; Rieger, C; Beelen, D; Berdel, W E; Büchner, T; Hiddemann, W

    2014-05-01

    Chemomodulation of cytarabine by fludarabine has been attributed with a higher antileukemic efficacy, but randomized trials to address this question are rare. We therefore conducted a multicenter, randomized phase III study to evaluate the antileukemic efficacy of adding fludarabine to sequential high-dose cytarabine+idarubicin (SHAI) re-induction chemotherapy in relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Patients (n=326, of which 281 were evaluable) were randomly assigned to SHAI (cytarabine, 1 g/m(2) bid, days 1-2 and 8-9 (3 g/m(2) for patients ≤ 60 years with refractory AML or ≥ 2nd relapse); idarubicin 10 mg/m(2) daily, days 3-4 and 10-11) or F-SHAI (SHAI with fludarabine, 15 mg/m(2), 4 h before cytarabine). Although complete remission (CR) rates (35% SHAI and 44% F-SHAI) and overall survival did not differ between both regimens, fludarabine prolonged time to treatment failure from 2.04 to 3.38 months (median, P<0.05). Twenty-seven percent of patients proceeded to allogeneic stem cell transplantation, with a significantly higher number of patients in CR or incomplete remission in the F-SHAI group (22 vs 10%, P<0.01). In conclusion, fludarabine has a beneficial, although moderate, impact on the antileukemic efficacy of high-dose cytarabine-based salvage therapy for relapsed and refractory AML.

  7. High-dose cytarabine as salvage therapy for relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia--is more better or more of the same?

    PubMed

    Wolach, Ofir; Itchaki, Gilad; Bar-Natan, Michal; Yeshurun, Moshe; Ram, Ron; Herscovici, Corina; Shpilberg, Ofer; Douer, Dan; Tallman, Martin S; Raanani, Pia

    2016-03-01

    Cytarabine is the backbone of most chemotherapeutic regimens for acute myeloid leukemia (AML), yet the optimal dose for salvage therapy of refractory or relapsed AML (RR-AML) has not been established. Very high dose single-agent cytarabine at 36 g/m(2) (ARA-36) was previously shown to be effective and tolerable in RR-AML. In this retrospective analysis, we aim to describe the toxicity and efficacy of ARA-36 as salvage therapy for patients with AML who are primary refractory to intensive daunorubicin-containing induction or those relapsing after allogeneic stem cell transplant (alloSCT). Fifteen patients, median age 53 years, were included in the analysis. Six patients were treated for induction failure, one had resistant APL, and eight relapsed after alloSCT. Complete remission was achieved in 60% of patients. Surviving patients were followed for a median of 8.5 months. One-year overall survival was 54% (95% CI 30%-86%), and relapse rate from remission (n = 9) was 56%. Grade III/IV pulmonary, infectious, ocular and gastrointestinal toxicities occurred in 26%, 20%, 20% and 20% of patients respectively. Salvage therapy with ARA-36 regimen for RR-AML has considerable efficacy with manageable toxicity in patients with induction failure or post-transplant relapse. Overall survival in these high-risk patients still remains poor.

  8. Acute low dose of MK-801 prevents memory deficits without altering hippocampal DARPP-32 expression and BDNF levels in sepsis survivor rats.

    PubMed

    Cassol-Jr, Omar J; Comim, Clarissa M; Constantino, Larissa S; Rosa, Daniela V F; Mango, Luiz Alexandre V; Stertz, Laura; Kapczinski, Flávio; Romano-Silva, Marco A; Quevedo, João; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe

    2011-01-01

    Sepsis is characterized by an intense inflammatory reaction with potential neurotoxic effects in the central nervous system and damage to memory and learning ability. We assessed the effects of acute low dose of MK-801 on the memory impairment, hippocampal BDNF levels and DARPP-32 expression ten days after sepsis. Under anesthesia, male Wistar rats underwent either cecal ligation and perforation (CLP) or sham. Then, the animals received either a single systemic injection of MK-801 (0.025 mg/kg) or saline solution. Ten days after CLP, the animals were submitted to the step-down inhibitory avoidance and object recognition tests. Also, the hippocampal BDNF protein levels and DARPP-32 expression were evaluated. MK-801 prevented cognitive impairment, but did not affect the hippocampal BDNF levels. DARPP-32 expression was significantly different only in the animals submitted to sepsis that received MK-801 treatment. Thus, we demonstrated that a single low dose of MK-801 prevented memory impairment without altering hippocampal DARPP-32 expression and BDNF levels.

  9. Low dose of the gamma acute radiation syndrome (1.5 Gy) does not significantly alter either cognitive behavior or dopaminergic and serotoninergic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Martin, C; Martin, S; Viret, R; Denis, J; Mirguet, F; Diserbo, M; Multon, E; Lamproglou, I

    2001-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the early-delayed effects of a low dose of the gamma acute radiation syndrome (1.5 Gy) on memory and on dopaminergic and serotoninergic metabolism in Swiss albino CD1 mice, of various ages (6, 10 and 20 weeks). At different times after irradiation (from 24 hr to three months), the mice were trained in a single-trial passive avoidance task and tested for retention either 24 hr or 5 days later. Their performance was compared to that of mice that were sham-irradiated. At the end of the behavioral test (days 3, 9, 30 and 93), the concentrations of dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5HT) and their metabolites were determined in hippocampus, anterior cortex and striatum of mice irradiated at the age of six weeks. No significant behavioral effect was observed whichever the age of the animals or the delay of observation. On the contrary at the moderate dose of 4.5 Gy we observed a significant memory deficit 9 days after the exposure. Considering the neurochemical study, in the striatum or in the frontal cortex, no significant modification was observed whichever the delay or the molecule. In the hippocampus slight modifications were noted: an increase (+144%, p = 0.002) in DA level on day 3 after exposure, and a decrease (-27%, p = 0.028) of 5HT level on day 30 post-irradiation. These modifications were only transient and not associated to modifications of the catabolites. This study demonstrates that total-body exposure to gamma radiation at low dose seems to induce only slight effects on the central nervous system.

  10. Incidence and risk factors of acute kidney injury associated with continuous intravenous high-dose vancomycin in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Lacave, Guillaume; Caille, Vincent; Bruneel, Fabrice; Palette, Catherine; Legriel, Stéphane; Grimaldi, David; Eurin, Mathilde; Bedos, Jean-Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Abstract For vancomycin therapy of severe infections, the Infectious Diseases Society of America recommends high vancomycin trough levels, whose potential for inducing nephrotoxicity is controversial. We evaluated the incidence and risk factors of acute kidney injury (AKI) in critically ill patients given continuous intravenous vancomycin with target serum vancomycin levels of 20 to 30 mg/L. We retrospectively studied 107 continuous intravenous vancomycin treatments of ≥48 hours’ duration with at least 2 serum vancomycin levels ≥20 mg/L in critically ill patients. Nephrotoxicity was defined according to the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes Clinical Practice Guideline for AKI (ie, serum creatinine elevation by ≥26.5 μmoL/L or to ≥1.5 times baseline). Risk factors for AKI were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses. AKI developed in 31 (29%) courses. Higher serum vancomycin levels were associated with AKI (P < 0.01). Factors independently associated with AKI were highest serum vancomycin ≥40 mg/L (odds ratio [OR], 3.75; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.40–10.37; P < 0.01), higher cumulative number of organ failures (OR, 2.63 95%CI, 1.42–5.31; P < 0.01), and cirrhosis of the liver (OR, 5.58; 95%CI, 1.08–31.59; P = 0.04). In this study, 29% of critically ill patients had AKI develop during continuous intravenous vancomycin therapy targeting serum levels of 20 to 30 mg/L. Serum vancomycin level ≥40 mg/L was independently associated with AKI. PMID:28207512

  11. Dose-dependent increase and decrease in active glucose uptake in jejunal epithelium of broilers after acute exposure to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Yunus, Agha Waqar; Awad, Wageha A; Kröger, Susan; Zentek, Jürgen; Böhm, Josef

    2011-06-01

    Little is known about the effects of ethanol on gastrointestinal tract of chicken. In this study, we investigated the effects of low levels of ethanol on electrophysiological variables of jejunal epithelium of commercial broilers. Jejunal tissues from 35- to 39-day-old broilers were exposed to either 0 or 0.1% ethanol in Ussing chambers, and electrophysiological variables were monitored for 40 min. After 40 and 60 min of incubation, glucose (20 mM) and carbamoylcholine (200 μM), respectively, were introduced into the chambers. The absolute and percent increase in short-circuit current (Isc) and potential difference (Vt) induced by glucose were increased significantly with 0.1% ethanol. There was no significant effect of 0.1% ethanol on carbamoylcholine-induced electrophysiological variables. To investigate if higher levels of ethanol have similar effects, we tested the effects of 0, 0.33, and 0.66% ethanol under similar experimental conditions until the glucose-addition step. Contrary to 0.1% ethanol, both the 0.33 and 0.66% ethanol levels significantly decreased the basal and glucose-induced Isc and Vt. Tissue conductivity remained unaffected in all cases. These results indicate that intestinal epithelia of chicken may be more sensitive to the effects of ethanol as compared with other species. This is the first report indicating dose-dependent increase and decrease in active glucose absorption in intestinal epithelia in the presence of ethanol.

  12. Relationship of inhaled ozone concentration to acute tracheobronchial epithelial injury, site-specific ozone dose, and glutathione depletion in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Plopper, C G; Hatch, G E; Wong, V; Duan, X; Weir, A J; Tarkington, B K; Devlin, R B; Becker, S; Buckpitt, A R

    1998-09-01

    Acute pulmonary epithelial injury produced by short-term exposure to ozone varies by site within the tracheobronchial tree. To test whether this variability is related to the local dose of ozone at the tissue site or to local concentrations of glutathione, we exposed adult male rhesus monkeys for 2 h to filtered air or to 0.4 or 1.0 ppm ozone generated from 18O2. Following exposure, lungs were split into lobes and specimens were selected by microdissection so that measurements could be made on airway tissue of similar branching history, including trachea, proximal (generation one or two) and distal (generation six or seven) intrapulmonary bronchi, and proximal respiratory bronchioles. One half of the lung was lavaged for analysis of extracellular components. In monkeys exposed to filtered air, the concentration of reduced glutathione (GSH) varied throughout the airway tree, with the proximal intrapulmonary bronchus having the lowest concentration and the parenchyma having the highest concentration. Exposure to 1.0 ppm ozone significantly reduced GSH only in the respiratory bronchiole, whereas exposure to 0.4 ppm increased GSH only in the proximal intrapulmonary bronchus. Local ozone dose (measured as excess 18O) varied by as much as a factor of three in different airways of monkeys exposed to 1.0 ppm, with respiratory bronchioles having the highest concentration and the parenchyma the lowest concentration. In monkeys exposed to 0.4 ppm, the ozone dose was 60% to 70% less than in the same site in monkeys exposed to 1.0 ppm. Epithelial disruption was present to some degree in all airway sites, but not in the parenchyma, in animals exposed to 1.0 ppm ozone. The mass of mucous and ciliated cells decreased in all airways, and necrotic and inflammatory cells increased. At 0.4 ppm, epithelial injury was minimal, except in the respiratory bronchiole, where cell loss and necrosis occurred, and was 50% that found in monkeys exposed to 1.0 ppm ozone. We conclude that there is

  13. Myeloid Sarcoma of the Uterine Cervix as Presentation of Acute Myeloid Leukaemia after Treatment with Low-Dose Radioiodine for Thyroid Cancer: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Weingertner, Anne Sophie; Wilt, Marc; Atallah, Ihab; Fohrer, Cécile; Mauvieux, Laurent; Rodier, Jean-François

    2009-01-01

    The development of acute myeloid leukaemia after low-dose radioiodine therapy and its presentation as a myeloid sarcoma of the uterine cervix are both rare events. We report a case of acute myeloid leukaemia revealed by a myeloid sarcoma of the uterine cervix in a 48-year-old woman, 17 months after receiving a total dose of 100 mCi 131I for papillary thyroid cancer. A strict hematological follow-up of patients treated with any dose of 131I is recommended to accurately detect any hematological complications which might have been underestimated. Unusual presentations, such as chloroma of the uterine cervix, may reveal myeloid malignancy and should be kept in mind. PMID:20844570

  14. Relief and Recurrence of Congestion During and After Hospitalization for Acute Heart Failure: Insights from DOSE-AHF and CARRESS-HF

    PubMed Central

    Lala, Anuradha; McNulty, Steven E.; Mentz, Robert J.; Dunlay, Shannon; Vader, Justin M.; AbouEzzeddine, Omar F.; DeVore, Adam D.; Khazanie, Prateeti; Redfield, Margaret M.; Goldsmith, Steven R.; Bart, Bradley A.; Anstrom, Kevin J.; Felker, Michael; Hernandez, Adrian F.; Stevenson, Lynne W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Congestion is the most frequent cause for hospitalization in acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF). Although decongestion is a major goal of acute therapy, it is unclear how the clinical components of congestion (e.g., peripheral edema, orthopnea) contribute to outcomes after discharge or how well decongestion is maintained. Methods and Results A post-hoc analysis was performed of 496 patients enrolled in the DOSE-AHF and CARRESS-HF trials during hospitalization with ADHF and clinical congestion. A simple “orthodema” congestion score was generated based on symptoms of orthopnea (≥2 pillows=2 points, <2 pillows=0 points) and peripheral edema (trace=0 points, moderate=1 point, severe=2 points) at baseline, discharge, and 60-day follow-up. Orthodema scores were classified as absent (score of 0), low-grade (score of 1–2), and high-grade (score of 3–4), and the association with death, rehospitalization or unscheduled medical visits through 60 days was assessed. At baseline, 65% of patients had high-grade orthodema and 35% had low-grade orthodema. At discharge, 52% patients were free from orthodema at discharge (score = 0) and these patients had lower 60-day rates of death, rehospitalization, or unscheduled visits (50%) compared to those with low-grade or high-grade orthodema (52% and 68%, respectively, p=0.038). Of the patients without orthodema at discharge, 27% relapsed to low-grade orthodema and 38% to high-grade orthodema at 60-day follow-up. Conclusions Increased severity of congestion by a simple orthodema assessment is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Despite intent to relieve congestion, current therapy often fails to relieve orthodema during hospitalization or to prevent recurrence after discharge. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifiers: NCT00608491, NCT00577135. PMID:26041600

  15. Medium dose ultraviolet A1 phototherapy and mRNA expression of interleukin 8, interferon γ, and chemokine receptor 4 in acute skin lesions in atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Malinowska, Karolina; Sysa-Jedrzejowska, Anna; Wozniacka, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Mechanisms responsible for UVA1 efficacy in atopic dermatitis (AD) are not fully elucidated. Aim To investigate IL-8, CCR-4, and IFN-γ mRNA expression in AD before and after UVA1, to identify correlations among them, and to determine whether and to what degree mRNA expression is influenced by UVA1. Material and methods Twenty-five patients with AD underwent medium dose UVA1-phototherapy at daily dosages of 10, 20, 30, 45, and then continuing 45 J/cm2 up to 20 days, from Monday to Friday for 4 weeks. Before and after UVA1, biopsies from acute skin lesions were studied using reverse-transcription and RT-PCR. Results The levels of CCR-4 mRNA correlated with those of IFN-γ, both before and after UVA1 phototherapy (p < 0.05). A significant correlation was found after UVA1 between mRNA levels of IL-8 and IFN-γ (p < 0.05). After UVA1 an increase in IL-8 mRNA expression in comparison to the baseline assessment (p = 0.02) was found, while no significant difference was revealed in the expression of CCR-4 and IFN-γ mRNA. UVA1 improved both SCORAD and severity of AD (p < 0.001). SCORAD and the severity of AD did not correlate with the degree of expression of measured cytokine mRNA, neither before nor after UVA1. Conclusions CCR-4 is expressed in parallel with IFN-γ in acute skin lesions of patients with AD both before and after UVA1 phototherapy. UVA1 significantly improves SCORAD index, lessens the severity of AD and increases the expression of IL-8, with no direct effects on other studied molecules. PMID:27512350

  16. Attempts to counteract phosgene-induced acute lung injury by instant high-dose aerosol exposure to hexamethylenetetramine, cysteine or glutathione.

    PubMed

    Pauluhn, Jürgen; Hai, Chun Xue

    2011-01-01

    Phosgene is an important high-production-volume intermediate with widespread industrial use. Consistent with other lung irritants causing ALI (acute lung injury), mode-of-action-based countermeasures remain rudimentary. This study was conducted to analyze whether extremely short high-level exposure to phosgene gas could be mitigated using three different inhaled nucleophiles administered by inhalation instantly after exposure to phosgene. Groups of young adult male Wistar rats were acutely exposed to carbonyl chloride (phosgene) using a directed-flow nose-only mode of exposure of 600 mg/m³ for 1.5 min (225 ppm × min). Immediately after exposure to phosgene gas the rats were similarly exposed to three strong nucleophiles with and without antioxidant properties for 5 or 15 min. The following nucleophiles were used: hexamethylenetetramine (HMT), l-cysteine (Cys), and l-glutathione (GSH). The concentration of the aerosol (mass median aerodynamic diameter 1.7-2 µm) was targeted to be in the range of 1 mg/L. Cys and GSH have antioxidant properties in addition. The calculated alveolar molar dosage of phosgene was 9 µmol/kg. At 15-min exposure duration, the respective inhaled dose of HMT, Csy, and GSH were 111, 103, and 46 µmol/kg, respectively. The alveolar dose of drugs was ~10-times lower. The efficacy of treatment was judged by protein concentrations in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) collected 1 day post-exposure. In spite of using optimized aerosolization techniques, none of the nucleophiles chosen had any mitigating effect on BALF-protein extravasation. This finding appear to suggest that inhaled phosgene gas acylates instantly nucleophilic moieties at the site of initial deposition and that the resultant reaction products can not be reactivated even following instant inhalation treatment with competing nucleophilic agents. In spite of using maximal technically attainable concentrations, it appears to be experimentally challenging to deliver

  17. Quantification of the acute effect of a low dose of red wine by nonlinear measures of RR and QT interval series in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Platiša, Mirjana M; Gal, Vera; Nestorović, Zorica; Gojković-Bukarica, Ljiljana

    2014-10-01

    The measures of nonlinear properties of RR interval and QT interval time series are sensitive to physiologically- or pathologically-induced complexity/regularity changes, but were not used to estimate the effect of alcohol intake. We wanted to examine the potential of these measures to quantify the acute effect of a low dose of red wine in healthy subjects. In separate experiments, fourteen young volunteers drank 200ml of red wine and a control drink with equal concentration of ethanol. ECG in supine position was recorded 20min before and 60min after drink intake. RR interval and QT interval series were extracted from ECG and we calculated variability, scaling exponents (α1 and α2) and sample entropy (SampEn) for both series. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures (BP) were measured every 10min. The immediate effect of both the drinks was equal: HR, BP and QT variability exhibited a sudden increase and then a decrease. However, the prolonged effect of wine and the control drink was different. Wine decreased both BP (p<0.05) and reduced complexity of RR and QT series (increased scaling exponents and decreased SampEn). The control drink prolonged QT and RR intervals (p<0.05). These results point out that the nonlinear properties of RR and QT interval series could be used to differentiate the effect of wine and ethanol. Changes in RR and QT interval series induced by a low dose of red wine are more detectable by methods that quantify the structure of the series than by methods that quantify their variability.

  18. Repeated administration of a mild acute toxic dose of di-n-butyltin dichloride at intervals of 3 weeks induces severe lesions in pancreas and liver of rats.

    PubMed

    Merkord, J; Weber, H; Kröning, G; Hennighausen, G

    2001-08-01

    Di-n-butyltin dichloride (DBTC) induced thymus atrophy, bile duct lesions, pancreatitis, and liver lesions in rats. Depending on dose [6 and 8 mg/kg intravenous (i.v.) DBTC] and time (1-24 weeks), the lesions in pancreas developed to a pancreatic fibrosis and the lesions in liver to liver cirrhosis. A single i.v. administration of 4 mg/kg DBTC induces a mild interstitial pancreatitis after 2-4 days followed by a restitutio ad integrum after 21-28 days. In the present study, the lesions of biliopancreatic duct, pancreas, and liver of rats after repeated administration of 4 mg/kg DBTC i.v. at intervals of 3 weeks have been investigated. The histopathological changes of pancreas and liver were examined by light microscopy 1,4, and 7 days and 2,3,4,6,9, and 12 weeks after administration of DBTC. Furthermore, pathobiochemical parameters of pancreatitis (amylase and lipase activity in serum), liver lesions (alkaline phosphatase activity and bilirubin in serum), and of fibrosis (hyaluronic acid in serum) were studied. Repeated administration of rats with DBTC (4 mg/kg i.v.) at intervals of 3 weeks induced an acute interstitial pancreatitis and after 9-12 weeks, a pancreatic fibrosis and liver lesions (intrahepatic bile duct hyperplasia, inflammation in periportal tract, and necrosis). In serum, elevated levels of alkaline phosphatase, bilirubin, and hyaluronic acid were found. This study demonstrates that the organotin compound induces toxic effects on pancreas and liver of rats by repeated administration of lower doses at long intervals. The risk of exposure to organotin at long intervals should be considered.

  19. Antifungal prophylaxis with posaconazole in patients with acute myeloid leukemia: dose intensification coupled with avoidance of proton pump inhibitors is beneficial in shortening time to effective concentrations.

    PubMed

    Cojutti, Piergiorgio; Candoni, Anna; Simeone, Erica; Franceschi, Loretta; Fanin, Renato; Pea, Federico

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to assess the influence of dose frequency and the presence or absence of cotreatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) on the time to a target trough concentration (Cmin) of >700 ng/ml with posaconazole in the first 8 days of antifungal prophylaxis in hematological patients. This was a retrospective, observational study performed with 42 adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia who underwent posaconazole prophylaxis with 200 mg every 8 h (q8h) or 200 mg q6h after receiving induction chemotherapy and who had at least three subsequent therapeutic drug monitoring assessments during the first 8 days of treatment. The cohort was split into four groups (group 1, 200 mg q8h without PPI; group 2, 200 mg q8h with PPI; group 3, 200 mg q6h without PPI; group 4, 200 mg q6h with PPI). Rapid attainment of the target Cmin was obtained only in group 3 (P < 0.01) (median Cmin on day 4 of 935.5 ng/ml [interquartile range, 760.0 to 1,270.0 ng/ml] in group 3, versus 567.0 ng/ml [346 to 906 ng/ml] in group 1, 420.0 ng/ml [326.2 to 527.2 ng/ml] in group 2, and 514.0 ng/ml [403.7 to 564.7 ng/ml] in group 4). A linear accumulation of posaconazole over time was observed among patients in groups 1 and 3, regardless of the total daily dosage, differently from what occurred among those receiving PPI cotreatment (groups 2 and 4). Dose intensification (200 mg q6h) coupled with avoidance of PPI coadministration may represent a very powerful strategy to rapidly achieve effective concentrations with posaconazole in neutropenic hematological patients.

  20. Phase II trial to assess the safety and efficacy of clofarabine in combination with low-dose cytarabine in elderly patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cuadrón, David; Montesinos, Pau; Oriol, Albert; Salamero, Olga; Vidriales, Belén; Bergua, Juan; Herrera, Pilar; Vives, Susanna; Sanz, Jaime; Carpio, Cecilia; Rodríguez-Veiga, Rebeca; Moscardó, Federico; Sanz, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that clofarabine plus low-dose cytarabine (LDAC) could induce roughly 60 % of complete remissions (CR) with acceptable toxicity and induction mortality in elderly acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients not suitable for intensive chemotherapy. The Programa Español de Tratamientos en Hematología group conducted a trial for patients diagnosed with untreated AML aged 60 years and older, using the combination of clofarabine (20 mg/m(2) × 5 days) plus low-dose cytarabine (20 mg/m(2) × 14 days). The protocol was flexible regarding the use of antifungal and antibacterial prophylaxis, and outpatient induction therapy was allowed. Although the planned recruitment goal was 75 patients, only 11 patients were enrolled (median age, 74 years) after observing high toxicity and unacceptable mortality (46 and 73 % at 4 and 8 weeks, respectively). The response assessment showed three CR (27 %), three resistant diseases (27 %), and five induction deaths (46 %). Induction was administered in an outpatient modality in five patients, while antifungal and antibacterial prophylaxis was not given in seven and five patients, respectively. In our context, induction therapy with the combination of clofarabine (20 mg/m(2)) plus LDAC was associated with high toxicity and unacceptable mortality in elderly AML patients, leading to the early interruption of the trial. Tight patients' clinical monitoring, follow-up, and intensive supportive care seem crucial to achieve at least acceptable clinical outcomes in elderly AML patients receiving clofarabine plus LDAC. This trial is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as no. NCT01193400.

  1. The Global Programme to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis: History and achievements with special reference to annual single-dose treatment with diethylcarbamazine in Samoa and Fiji

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Eisaku

    2011-01-01

    Diethylcarbamazine (DEC), first introduced in 1947, was shown to have strong efficacy and safety for treatment of human lymphatic filariasis, which is caused mostly by a species Wuchereria bancrofti. Many studies to optimize the dosage and treatment schedule of DEC followed, and, based on the results, control programs with various regimens were implemented in different endemic areas/countries. By the mid 1970s, with endorsement by the WHO Expert Committee on Filariasis (3rd report, 1974), the standard DEC regimen for W. bancrofti infection in mass treatment had been established in principle: a total dose of 72 mg/kg of body weight given in 12 divided doses, once weekly or monthly, at 6 mg/kg each. Not long after the committee report, the efficacy of annual single-dose treatment at 6 mg/kg, which is only one twelfth of the WHO-recommended dose in a year, was reported effective in French Polynesia (study period: 1973-78), and later in Samoa (study period: 1979-81). These results were published between 1978 and 1985 in the Bulletin of WHO but received little attention. In the mid 1980s, the efficacy of ivermectin, the first-choice drug for onchocerciasis, against lymphatic filariae came to light. Since the effect at a single dose was remarkable, and often better than DEC, it was predicted that the newly introduced drug would replace DEC. Treatment experiments with ivermectin increased quickly in number. Meanwhile, annual single-dose mass drug administration (MDA) with DEC at 6 mg/kg was under scrutiny in Samoa and Fiji. In the early 1990s, the Samoan study, which covered the entire population of 160,000 with 3 annual MDAs, reported a significant reduction in microfilaria (mf) prevalence and mean mf density, while in Fiji, the efficacy of 5 rounds of annual MDA (total dose, 30 mg/kg) was shown to be as effective as 28 multi-dose MDA spread over 2 years (6 weekly plus 22 monthly treatments at 5 mg/kg; total dose, 140 mg/kg). Several additional studies carried out in

  2. [Superior sagittal sinus thrombosis after intrathecal chemotherapy and intravenous high-dose cytarabine in an acute myeloid leukemia case with t(8;21)(q22;q22)].

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Keiki; Ito, Ryugo; Kageyama, Yuki; Nagaharu, Keiki; Yamaguchi, Takanori; Ito, Nobuo

    2016-04-01

    Superior sagittal sinus thrombosis (SSST) is a very rare but life-threatening complication in leukemia patients. SSST is very rare in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In leukemia patients, several risk factors for SSST have been reported such as administration of L-asparaginase, disseminated intravascular coagulation, congenital thrombophilia, meningeal leukemia, and intrathecal chemotherapy (IT). Lumbar puncture itself and corticosteroid administration have also been acknowledged as risk factors. We describe herein our clinical experience with SSST in a 29-year-old Japanese man suffering from AML with t(8;21)(q22;q22), who presented with abrupt onset of loss of consciousness, left hemiplegia, and seizure soon after IT and high-dose cytarabine (HD-AraC) with dexamethasone for post remission consolidation. Despite the presence of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) due to SSST rupture, we conducted anticoagulant therapy with heparin. Although ICH worsened temporarily, his clinical condition gradually improved with resolution of the SSST, and he eventually became fully ambulatory. There were no deficiencies of natural anticoagulants. Three additional cycles of HD-AraC without IT therapy were conducted, but no neurological complications recurred with the concomitant use of warfarin. He was discharged free of neurological deficits. In our case, there is a possibility that IT and the administration of corticosteroids along with HD-AraC triggered SSST.

  3. Low-dose cytarabine, aclarubicin and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor priming regimen versus idarubicin plus cytarabine regimen as induction therapy for older patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jie; Chen, Jian; Suo, Shanshan; Qian, Wenbin; Meng, Haitao; Mai, Wenyuan; Tong, Hongyan; Huang, Jian; Yu, Wenjuan; Wei, Juyin; Lou, Yinjun

    2015-06-01

    With limited data available on the low-dose cytarabine, aclarubicin and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (CAG) regimen in newly diagnosed older patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), this study aimed at comparing the efficacy and toxicity of CAG with idarubicin plus cytarabine (IA) remission induction therapy in these patients. A total of 154 consecutive patients (52 with CAG and 102 with IA) were retrospectively analyzed. The patients in the CAG group had a higher median age (68 vs. 65 years, p = 0.002) and a higher proportion of previous myelodysplastic syndrome (25.0% vs. 2.9%, p < 0.0001) compared to those in the IA group. The complete remission rates with the CAG and IA regimens were 55.8% and 52.9% (p = 0.864). The median overall survival (12.1 vs. 11.7 months, p = 0.650) and 3-year disease-free survival rates (29.6% vs. 48.6%, p = 0.657) were not statistically different in the two groups. The CAG regimen might be an alternative to conventional chemotherapy in older patients with AML.

  4. Effect of low dose acetylsalicylic acid on the frequency and hematologic activity of left ventricular thrombus in anterior wall acute myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Kuepper, A.J.V.; Verheugt, F.W.; Peels, C.H.; Galema, T.W.; den Hollander, W.; Roos, J.P.

    1989-04-15

    In this prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled trial the effect of 100 mg acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) once daily on the incidence, hematologic activity and embolic potential of left ventricular (LV) thrombosis was studied in 100 consecutive patients with a first anterior wall acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Patients were randomized to ASA or placebo less than 12 hours after onset of symptoms. Heparin, 5,000 IU subcutaneously twice daily, was given to all patients during immobilization. Echocardiography was performed less than 24 hours, 48 to 72 hours and 1, 2, and 12 weeks after AMI. LV thrombosis was detected by echocardiography in 30 (33%) of the 92 evaluable patients (15 patients given ASA and 15 given placebo). Indium-111 platelet scintigraphy was done in 17 of the 22 patients with an LV thrombus at the second week echocardiogram. Among 7 ASA-treated patients, 4 had positive images; among 10 placebo patients, 5 had positive images. LV thrombus resolution was noted in 3 of 9 patients with a positive scan and in 5 of 8 patients with a negative platelet scan. In 7 of 10 ASA-treated patients and 5 of 12 placebo-treated patients thrombus resolution was observed (difference not significant). Systemic embolism occurred in 2 patients, both given ASA, during the first week after AMI. Thus, low dose ASA has no effect on the incidence, hematologic activity and embolic potential of LV thrombosis in anterior wall AMI.

  5. Plasma homocysteine, methionine and S-adenosylhomocysteine levels following high-dose methotrexate treatment in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or Burkitt lymphoma: association with hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Masaru; Nakata, Rieko; Adachi, Souichi; Watanabe, Ken-Ichiro; Heike, Toshio; Takeshita, Yasufumi; Shima, Midori

    2014-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate: (i) changes of plasma homocysteine, methionine and S-adenosylhomocysteine levels following high-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX) treatment and (ii) the correlation of these sulfur-containing amino acids with MTX-induced hepatotoxicity. Fifteen pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and one patient with Burkitt lymphoma, with a total of 26 treatment courses of HD-MTX, were enrolled. Homocysteine levels increased at 24 h after HD-MTX treatment, and showed marginal decreases at 48 and 72 h. Methionine levels showed a biphasic pattern, i.e. an initial decrease at 24 h followed by increases at 48 and 72 h. S-adenosylhomocysteine exhibited a marginal decrease at 24 h. Changes of homocysteine exhibited significant correlation only with a maximum increase of alanine aminotransferase or total bilirubin from baseline. This study has demonstrated, for the first time, simultaneous changes of plasma homocysteine, methionine and S-adenosylhomocysteine following HD-MTX. The potential of homocysteine as a marker of hepatotoxicity is also presented.

  6. A critical role of acute bronchoconstriction in the mortality associated with high-dose sarin inhalation: effects of epinephrine and oxygen therapies.

    PubMed

    Gundavarapu, Sravanthi; Zhuang, Jianguo; Barrett, Edward G; Xu, Fadi; Russell, Robert G; Sopori, Mohan L

    2014-01-15

    Sarin is an organophosphate nerve agent that is among the most lethal chemical toxins known to mankind. Because of its vaporization properties and ease and low cost of production, sarin is the nerve agent with a strong potential for use by terrorists and rouge nations. The primary route of sarin exposure is through inhalation and, depending on the dose, sarin leads to acute respiratory failure and death. The mechanism(s) of sarin-induced respiratory failure is poorly understood. Sarin irreversibly inhibits acetylcholine esterase, leading to excessive synaptic levels of acetylcholine and, we have previously shown that sarin causes marked ventilatory changes including weakened response to hypoxia. We now show that LD50 sarin inhalation causes severe bronchoconstriction in rats, leading to airway resistance, increased hypoxia-induced factor-1α, and severe lung epithelium injury. Transferring animals into 60% oxygen chambers after sarin exposure improved the survival from about 50% to 75% at 24h; however, many animals died within hours after removal from the oxygen chambers. On the other hand, if LD50 sarin-exposed animals were administered the bronchodilator epinephrine, >90% of the animals survived. Moreover, while both epinephrine and oxygen treatments moderated cardiorespiratory parameters, the proinflammatory cytokine surge, and elevated expression of hypoxia-induced factor-1α, only epinephrine consistently reduced the sarin-induced bronchoconstriction. These data suggest that severe bronchoconstriction is a critical factor in the mortality induced by LD50 sarin inhalation, and epinephrine may limit the ventilatory, inflammatory, and lethal effects of sarin.

  7. Comparative study of acute effects of single doses of fexofenadine, olopatadine, d-chlorpheniramine and placebo on psychomotor function in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Hiroyuki; Noda, Yukihiro; Ishikawa, Kazuhiro; Senzaki, Koji; Muraoka, Isao; Hasegawa, Yoshinori; Hindmarch, Ian; Nabeshima, Toshitaka

    2003-12-01

    Since most classical (first-generation) antihistamines have undesirable sedative effects on the central nervous system (CNS), newer (second-generation) antihistamines have been developed to relieve the sedative effects and to improve the patient's quality of life. However, the psychomotor profiles of second-generation antihistamines are not fully elucidated. In this randomized, double-blind, crossover study, the acute effects of single doses of second-generation antihistamines, fexofenadine (120 mg) and olopatadine (10 mg), on cognitive and psychomotor performance were investigated in comparison with those of placebo and d-chlorpheniramine (4 mg), a first-generation antihistamine, using objective and subjective assessments, in 11 healthy Japanese volunteers. In a battery of psychomotor tests, d-chlorpheniramine impaired tracking ability in the compensatory tracking task and caused a reduction in behavioural activity as continuously measured by wrist actigraphy. Olopatadine, like d-chlorpheniramine, reduced the behavioural activity, while fexofenadine had no effect in any of the tests. No significant changes in the subjects' self-ratings of drowsiness were found with the three antihistamines. These results suggest that d-chlorpheniramine and olopatadine, but not fexofenadine, produce sedative effects on psychomotor performance, and that the CNS profile of fexofenadine is different from that of olopatadine.

  8. Comparison of intermediate-dose methotrexate with cranial irradiation for the post-induction treatment of acute lymphocytic leukemia in children

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, A.I.; Weinberg, V.; Brecher, M.L.

    1983-03-03

    We compared two regimens with respect to their ability to prolong disease-free survival in 506 children and adolescents with acute lymphocytic leukemia. All responders to induction therapy were randomized to treatment with 2400 rad of cranial irradiation plus intrathecal methotrexate or to treatment with intermediate-dose methotrexate plus intrathecal methotrexate, as prophylaxis for involvement of the central nervous system and other sanctuary areas. Patients were then treated with a standard maintenance regimen. Complete responders were stratified into either standard-risk or increased-risk groups on the basis of age and white-cell count at presentation. Among patients with standard risk, hematologic relapses occurred in 9 of 117 given methotrexate and 24 of 120 given irradiation (P less than 0.01). The rate of central-nervous-system relapse was higher in the methotrexate group (23 of 117) than in the irradiation group (8 of 120) (P . 0.01). Among patients with increased risk, radiation offered greater protection to the central nervous system than methotrexate (P . 0.03); there was no difference in the rate of hematologic relapse. In both risk strata the frequency of testicular relapse was significantly lower in the methotrexate group (1 patient) than the radiation group (10 patients) (P . 0.01). Methotrexate offered better protection against systemic relapse in standard-risk patients and better protection against testicular relapse overall, but it offered less protection against relapses in the central nervous system than cranial irradiation.

  9. Predicting the acute behavioral effects in rats inhaling toluene for up to 24 hrs: Inhaled vs, internal dose metrics and tolerance.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The acute toxicity of toluene, a model volatile organic compound (VOC), depends on the concentration (C) and duration (t) of exposure, and guidelines for acute exposures have traditionally used extrelationships to extrapolate protective and/or effective concentrations across dura...

  10. To evaluate efficacy and safety of fixed dose combination of aceclofenac + paracetamol + thiocolchicoside (acenac-MR) in the treatment of acute low back pain.

    PubMed

    Lahoti, Govind

    2012-01-01

    Low back pain is very common complaint in all age groups. Paracetamol, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and muscle relaxants are commonly prescribed in combination for the treatment of back pain. The aim of the study was to evaluate efficacy and safety of fixed dose combination of aceclofenac + paracetamol + thiocolchicoside (acenac-MR) in the treatment of acute low back pain. Thirty-five patients, age being 18 to 76 years suffering from acute low back pain were enrolled in the study. Study drug acenac-MR tablet, (Medley pharmaceutical, Mumbai) containing aceclofenac 100 mg + thiocolchicoside 4 mg + paracetamol 500 mg was prescribed twice daily for a duration of 7 days. Intensity of pain was evaluated at the start of the therapy and on day 3 and day 7 with the help of visual analogue scale. Mobility assessment in low back patients was evaluated at the start of the therapy and on day 3 and day 7. A simple graduated bar (0 value at floor) evaluated hand-to-floor distance. Tolerability and efficacy was evaluated based on the global assessment by the investigator based on a 3-point scale marked as excellent/good/poor. There were 20 males and 10 females who were included for final analysis, 5 patients lost to follow-up. Intensity of pain at rest (p< or =0.0014 at day 3, p< or =0.0001 at day 7), during movement (p< or =0.0001 at day 3, p< or =0.0001 at day 7) and at night (p< or =0.0001 at day 3, p< or =0.0001 at day 7) was significantly reduced by acenac-MR compared to baseline. The mobility assessment revealed a statistically significant improvement in hand-to-floor distance on the 3rd (< or =0.0001) and 7th day (< or =0.0001) as compared to baseline with acenac-MR. As per investigators' assessment about efficacy of trial drug, 70% of patients reported excellent, 26.66 % good and 3.33 % reported poor efficacy. As per investigators' assessment about tolerability, 60 % of patients reported excellent, 36.66 % good and 3.33 % reported poor tolerability. None of the

  11. Growth retardation and bilateral cataracts followed by anaplastic meningioma 23 years after high-dose cranial and whole-body irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Korenkov, Alexei I; Imhof, Hans G; Brandner, Sebastian; Taub, Ethan; Huguenin, Pia U; Gaab, Michael R; Yonekawa, Yasuhiro

    2005-09-01

    We report a case of meningioma diagnosed 23 years after high-dose cranial and whole-body irradiation for the treatment of acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). Radiotherapy in this case also caused early radiation injury to the lenses and the pituitary gland, with growth retardation and mineralizing angiopathy. Radiation-induced meningiomas are more commonly malignant, more commonly multiple, and more likely to recur after resection than non-radiation-induced meningiomas. Survivors of childhood ALL treated with high-dose cranial irradiation are at risk both for early radiation injury in radiosensitive organs, such as the lens and pituitary gland, and for the later development of a radiation-induced meningioma.

  12. Does High-Dose Cytarabine Cause More Fungal Infection in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Consolidation Therapy: A Multicenter, Prospective, Observational Study in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Hu, Jiong; Sun, Yuqian; Huang, He; Chen, Jing; Li, Jianyong; Ma, Jun; Li, Juan; Liang, Yingmin; Wang, Jianmin; Li, Yan; Yu, Kang; Hu, Jianda; Jin, Jie; Wang, Chun; Wu, Depei; Xiao, Yang; Huang, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Invasive fungal infection (IFI) remains as a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Here, we report the subgroup analysis of China Assessment of Antifungal Therapy in Haematological Disease (CAESAR) study to evaluate the risk of IFI in patients with AML in 1st remission receiving high-dose cytarabine (HiDAC) as consolidation. A total of 638 patients with AML in 1st complete remission were selected from the database. Among them, 130 patients received HiDAC alone with total dose of 2-3 g/m(2) × 6 while 508 patients received multiple-agent combination chemotherapy (multiagent chemo group). The patients' characteristics were generally not different but more patients in HiDAC group had peripherally inserted central catheter (61.5% vs 44.5%, P = 0.002). The median duration of neutropenia was 8.0 days in both HiDAC (2-20) and multiagent chemo group (2-28). Number of patients with prolonged neutropenia (>14 days) tended to be more in multiagent chemo group but not significant different (16.3% vs 8.8%, respectively). There was no significant difference between 2 groups in persistent neutropenic fever (40.8% vs 33.1%), antifungal treatment (11.5% vs 11.4%), and incidence of proven/probable IFI (4 probable in HiDAC vs 1 proven/4 probable in multiagent chemo, P = 0.35) or possible IFI. As to the clinical outcome in terms of duration of hospitalization and death in remission, there was a trend of shorter duration of hospitalization in HiDAC (19 days, 3-70) compare to multiagent chemo group (21 days, 1-367, P = 0.057) while no death documented in HiDAC group and only 2 patients died in the multiagent chemo group (0.4%). As to risk factors associated with IFI in all 638 patients, there was a trend of more IFI in patients with severe neutropenia (3.0%, P = 0.089) and previous history of IFI (3.85%, P = 0.086) while the antifungal prophylaxis was not associated significantly reduced IFI. Overall

  13. High-dose albumin treatment for acute ischaemic stroke (ALIAS): a phase 3, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Ginsberg, Myron D.; Palesch, Yuko Y.; Hill, Michael D.; Martin, Renee H.; Moy, Claudia S.; Barsan, William G.; Waldman, Bonnie D.; Tamariz, Diego; Ryckborst, Karla J.

    2014-01-01

    Background In animal models of ischaemic stroke, 25% albumin reduced brain infarction and improved neurobehavioral outcome. In a pilot clinical trial, albumin doses as high as 2 g per kg were safely tolerated. Trial Design and Methods This was a randomised, parallel-group, double-blind trial to test the superiority of 25% albumin (dose 2 g [8 ml] per kg; maximum, 750 ml) over an equivalent volume of isotonic saline in improving the outcome of acute ischaemic stroke. Eligibility criteria were an ischaemic (i.e., non-haemorrhagic) stroke with baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score of 6 or above, ability to treat within 5 hours of onset, age 18 through 83 years, and written informed consent. The major exclusion criteria were cardiovascular. The objective was to test the hypothesis that the primary outcome (defined as either a modified Rankin Scale score of 0 or 1, or a NIHSS score of 0 or 1, or both, at 90 days) with albumin treatment was superior to saline by an absolute margin of 10 percentage points. Centralised web-based randomisation was by a minimisation-plus-biased-coin algorithm. Thrombolytic therapies were permitted. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, Identifier: NCT00235495. Findings The trial was stopped prematurely for futility after 841 participants were randomised (422 patients to albumin and 419 to saline). The primary outcome did not differ by treatment assignment (albumin, 44.1%; saline, 44.2%; relative benefit, 0.96; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.84 – 1.10 adjusted for baseline NIHSS score and thrombolysis stratum). Secondary outcomes were also neutral. The chief adverse event was mild-to-moderate pulmonary edema, which was more common with albumin than saline (13.1% and 1.2%, respectively), as was symptomatic intracranial haemorrhage within 24 hours (albumin, 4.1%; saline, 1.7%). While the favourable outcome rate in albumin-treated subjects remained consistent at 44–45% over the course of the trial, the

  14. A FIM Study to Assess Safety and Exposure of Inhaled Single Doses of AP301—A Specific ENaC Channel Activator for the Treatment of Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Schwameis, Richard; Eder, Sandra; Pietschmann, Helmut; Fischer, Bernhard; Mascher, Hermann; Tzotzos, Susan; Fischer, Hendrik; Lucas, Rudolf; Zeitlinger, Markus; Hermann, Robert

    2014-01-01

    AP301 is an activator of ENaC-mediated Na+ uptake for the treatment of pulmonary permeability edema in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The purpose of this “first-in-man” study was to examine local and systemic safety and systemic exposure of ascending single doses of AP301, when inhaled by healthy male subjects. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 48 healthy male subjects were randomized to 6 ascending dose groups (single doses up to 120 mg) of 8 subjects each (3:1 randomization of AP301: placebo). Serial assessments included spirometry, exhaled nitric oxide (eNO), vital signs, ECG, safety laboratory, adverse events (AE), and blood samples for the quantification of AP301 in plasma. Descriptive statistics was applied. All 48 subjects received treatment, and completed the study as per protocol. No serious, local (e.g., hoarseness, cough, bronchospasm), or dose-limiting AEs were noted. None of the assessments indicated notable dose or time-related alterations of safety outcomes. Observed AP301 systemic exposure levels were very low, with mean Cmax values of <2.5 ng/mL in the highest dose groups. Inhaled AP301 single doses up to 120 mg were safe and well tolerated by healthy male subjects. Distribution of inhaled AP301 was largely confined to the lung, as indicated by very low AP301 systemic exposure levels. PMID:24515273

  15. Impact of an acute coronary syndrome pathway in achieving target heart rate and utilization of evidence-based doses of beta-blockers.

    PubMed

    Irani, Farzan; Herial, Nabeel; Colyer, William R

    2012-11-01

    Beta-blockers remain a cornerstone of therapy in the management of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The 2007 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association unstable angina/non-ST elevation myocardial infarction guideline revisions recommend a target heart rate (HR) of 50-60 beats per minute (bpm). Despite improved trends toward utilization of beta-blockers therapy, beta-blockers continue to be underdosed. Guideline-based tools have been shown to improve adherence to evidence-based therapy in patients with ACS. Implementation of a standardized ACS pathway would lead to titration of beta-blockers to recommended dosages with improved HRs in eligible patients. The ACS clinical protocol was implemented at the University of Toledo Medical Center in May 2007. A retrospective study of 516 patients admitted during a comparable 6-month period, before and after the institution of the protocol, was conducted. The preprotocol and protocol group included 237 and 279 patients, respectively. Patient information extracted from the medical records included age, gender, HR on admission, blood pressure on admission, duration of hospital stay, preadmission use of beta-blocker, type of beta-blocker and dosage, discharge beta-blocker and dosage, peak troponin levels, and therapeutic intervention. A target HR of less than 60 bpm was achieved in 19% of the protocol group, as compared with 6% in the preprotocol group (P < 0.001). The protocol group had a significantly lower mean discharge HR than the preprotocol group (67 vs. 74 bpm; P < 0.001). The mean discharge dose of metoprolol in the protocol group was noted to be significantly higher (118 vs. 80 mg/d; P < 0.001). The institution of an ACS clinical pathway led to utilization of beta-blockers in significantly higher dosages, resulting in improved HR control and increased attainment of target HR.

  16. G-CSF priming, clofarabine, and high dose cytarabine (GCLAC) for upfront treatment of acute myeloid leukemia, advanced myelodysplastic syndrome or advanced myeloproliferative neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Becker, Pamela S; Medeiros, Bruno C; Stein, Anthony S; Othus, Megan; Appelbaum, Frederick R; Forman, Stephen J; Scott, Bart L; Hendrie, Paul C; Gardner, Kelda M; Pagel, John M; Walter, Roland B; Parks, Cynthia; Wood, Brent L; Abkowitz, Janis L; Estey, Elihu H

    2015-04-01

    Prior study of the combination of clofarabine and high dose cytarabine with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) priming (GCLAC) in relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia resulted in a 46% rate of complete remission despite unfavorable risk cytogenetics. A multivariate analysis demonstrated that the remission rate and survival with GCLAC were superior to FLAG (fludarabine, cytarabine, G-CSF) in the relapsed setting. We therefore initiated a study of the GCLAC regimen in the upfront setting in a multicenter trial. The objectives were to evaluate the rates of complete remission (CR), overall and relapse-free survival (OS and RFS), and toxicity of GCLAC. Clofarabine was administered at 30 mg m(-2) day(-1) × 5 and cytarabine at 2 g m(-2) day(-1) × 5 after G-CSF priming in 50 newly-diagnosed patients ages 18-64 with AML or advanced myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or advanced myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN). Responses were assessed in the different cytogenetic risk groups and in patients with antecedent hematologic disorder. The overall CR rate was 76% (95% confidence interval [CI] 64-88%) and the CR + CRp (CR with incomplete platelet count recovery) was 82% (95% CI 71-93%). The CR rate was 100% for patients with favorable, 84% for those with intermediate, and 62% for those with unfavorable risk cytogenetics. For patients with an antecedent hematologic disorder (AHD), the CR rate was 65%, compared to 85% for those without an AHD. The 60 day mortality was 2%. Thus, front line GCLAC is a well-tolerated, effective induction regimen for AML and advanced myelodysplastic or myeloproliferative disorders.

  17. Azacitidine and low-dose cytarabine in palliative patients with acute myeloid leukemia and high bone marrow blast counts--a retrospective single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Radujkovic, Aleksandar; Dietrich, Sascha; Bochtler, Tilmann; Krämer, Alwin; Schöning, Tilman; Ho, Anthony D; Dreger, Peter; Luft, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    We retrospectively analyzed and compared the efficacy and toxicity of azacitidine (AZA) and low-dose cytarabine (LD-Ara-C) in 65 palliative patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) showing high bone marrow blast counts (≥30%) before start of treatment. Twenty-seven and 38 patients received AZA and LD-Ara-C, respectively. The median patient age was 71 yr. Patient and disease characteristics did not differ between the treatment groups, except for BM blast counts, and peripheral leukocyte and blast counts which were significantly higher in the LD-Ara-C group. AZA and LD-Ara-C were first-line treatment in 12 (44%) and 17 patients (45%), respectively. Response and hematologic improvement rates were low and similar in both treatment groups. In both treatment groups, most common non-hematologic toxicities included febrile neutropenia, pneumonia, and bleedings without significant differences regarding frequencies. Estimated 1-yr survival rates were 15% (95% CI 8-22) and 13% (95% CI 7-19) in the AZA and LD-Ara-C groups, respectively, without statistically significant difference. In multivariate analysis (n = 65), previous treatment (HR 2.27, 95% CI 1.00-5.22, P = 0.05) and adverse cytogenetics (HR 2.50, 95% CI 1.20-5.22, P = 0.02) were independent predictors of poor survival. In our center and within the limitations of a retrospective study, both treatment regimens showed similar but limited efficacy in palliative patients with AML and high BM blast counts.

  18. G-CSF Priming, Clofarabine, and High Dose Cytarabine (GCLAC) for Upfront Treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Advanced Myeloproliferative Neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Pamela S.; Medeiros, Bruno C.; Stein, Anthony S.; Othus, Megan; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Forman, Stephen J.; Scott, Bart L.; Hendrie, Paul C.; Gardner, Kelda M.; Pagel, John M.; Walter, Roland B.; Parks, Cynthia; Wood, Brent L.; Abkowitz, Janis L.; Estey, Elihu H.

    2016-01-01

    Prior study of the combination of clofarabine and high dose cytarabine with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) priming (GCLAC) in relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia resulted in a 46% rate of complete remission despite unfavorable risk cytogenetics. A multivariate analysis demonstrated that the remission rate and survival with GCLAC were superior to FLAG (fludarabine, cytarabine, G-CSF) in the relapsed setting. We therefore initiated a study of the GCLAC regimen in the upfront setting in a multicenter trial. The objectives were to evaluate the rates of complete remission (CR), overall and relapse-free survival (OS and RFS), and toxicity of GCLAC. Clofarabine was administered at 30 mg/m2/day × 5 and cytarabine at 2 gm/m2/day × 5 after G-CSF priming in 50 newly-diagnosed patients ages 18–64 with AML or advanced myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or advanced myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN). Responses were assessed in the different cytogenetic risk groups and in patients with antecedent hematologic disorder. The overall CR rate was 76% (95% confidence interval [CI] 64–88%) and the CR + CRp (CR with incomplete platelet count recovery) was 82% (95% CI 71–93%). The CR rate was 100% for patients with favorable, 84% for those with intermediate, and 62% for those with unfavorable risk cytogenetics. For patients with an antecedent hematologic disorder (AHD), the CR rate was 65%, compared to 85% for those without an AHD. The 60 day mortality was 2%. Thus, front line GCLAC is a well-tolerated, effective induction regimen for AML and advanced myelodysplastic or myeloproliferative disorders. PMID:25545153

  19. A critical role of acute bronchoconstriction in the mortality associated with high-dose sarin inhalation: Effects of epinephrine and oxygen therapies

    SciTech Connect

    Gundavarapu, Sravanthi; Zhuang, Jianguo; Barrett, Edward G.; Xu, Fadi; Russell, Robert G.; Sopori, Mohan L.

    2014-01-15

    Sarin is an organophosphate nerve agent that is among the most lethal chemical toxins known to mankind. Because of its vaporization properties and ease and low cost of production, sarin is the nerve agent with a strong potential for use by terrorists and rouge nations. The primary route of sarin exposure is through inhalation and, depending on the dose, sarin leads to acute respiratory failure and death. The mechanism(s) of sarin-induced respiratory failure is poorly understood. Sarin irreversibly inhibits acetylcholine esterase, leading to excessive synaptic levels of acetylcholine and, we have previously shown that sarin causes marked ventilatory changes including weakened response to hypoxia. We now show that LD{sub 50} sarin inhalation causes severe bronchoconstriction in rats, leading to airway resistance, increased hypoxia-induced factor-1α, and severe lung epithelium injury. Transferring animals into 60% oxygen chambers after sarin exposure improved the survival from about 50% to 75% at 24 h; however, many animals died within hours after removal from the oxygen chambers. On the other hand, if LD{sub 50} sarin-exposed animals were administered the bronchodilator epinephrine, > 90% of the animals survived. Moreover, while both epinephrine and oxygen treatments moderated cardiorespiratory parameters, the proinflammatory cytokine surge, and elevated expression of hypoxia-induced factor-1α, only epinephrine consistently reduced the sarin-induced bronchoconstriction. These data suggest that severe bronchoconstriction is a critical factor in the mortality induced by LD{sub 50} sarin inhalation, and epinephrine may limit the ventilatory, inflammatory, and lethal effects of sarin. - Highlights: • Inhalation exposure of rats to LD{sub 50} sarin causes death through respiratory failure. • Severe bronchoconstriction is the major cause of sarin-induced respiratory failure. • Transfer of sarin exposed rats to 60% oxygen improves the mortality temporarily.

  20. Assessment of myocardial viability in patients with acute myocardial infarction by two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography combined with low-dose dobutamine stress echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Gong, Lei; Li, Dongye; Chen, Junhong; Wang, Xiaoping; Xu, Tongda; Li, Wenhua; Ren, Shaoyang; Wang, Cheng

    2013-06-01

    It is clinically important to determine the myocardial viability of regional wall motion abnormality segments in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The purpose of this study was to ascertain the ability and value of a combination of speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) and low dose dobutamine stress echocardiography (LDDSE) for the evaluation of viable myocardium in patients with AMI. Forty-two hospitalized patients with AMI and left ventricular systolic dysfunction (left ventricular ejection fraction <50%) were underwent STE in conjunction with LDDSE and dual isotope simultaneous acquisition single photon emission computed tomography (DISA-SPECT). Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) was performed subsequently in all patients. STE was used to measure radial, circumferential, and longitudinal end-systolic strain and peak systolic strain rate. The movement of each segment was observed by routine echocardiography 1, 3, and 6 months after PCI, and its improvement over time was the criterion of viable myocardium. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of DISA-SPECT for the assessment of viable myocardium were 83.6, 74.4, and 80.7%, respectively. Among the radial, circumferential, and longitudinal strain and strain rate parameters, only longitudinal strain (LS) and longitudinal strain rate (LSr) at rest and LDDSE emerged as independent predictors of viable myocardium, When combining LS and LSr at LDDSE, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for the assessment of viable myocardium rose to 89.8, 90.2 and 89.9%, respectively. The sensitivity of STE in conjunction with LDDSE was similar to DISA-SPECT for detecting viable myocardium in patients with AMI, but the specificity and accuracy of STE performed with LDDSE were higher than DISA-SPECT.

  1. An acute, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study of 320 mg and 640 mg doses of a special extract of Bacopa monnieri (CDRI 08) on sustained cognitive performance.

    PubMed

    Downey, Luke A; Kean, James; Nemeh, Fiona; Lau, Angela; Poll, Alex; Gregory, Rebecca; Murray, Margaret; Rourke, Johanna; Patak, Brigit; Pase, Matthew P; Zangara, Andrea; Lomas, Justine; Scholey, Andrew; Stough, Con

    2013-09-01

    Standardized extracts of the traditional Ayurvedic medicine Bacopa monnieri (BM) (Brahmi) have been recently shown to have cognitive enhancing effects in chronic administration studies. Pre-clinical work has also identified a number of acute anxiolytic, nootropic, and cardiovascular effects of BM. There has, however, been little research on the acute effects of BM on cognitive function. The current study aimed to assess the acute effects of a specific extract of BM (KeenMind®-CDRI 08) in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study in normal healthy participants who completed a cognitively demanding series of tests. Twenty-four healthy volunteers completed six repetitions of the Cognitive Demand Battery (CDB) after consuming a placebo, 320 mg BM or 640 mg of BM in a cross-over design and provided cardiovascular and mood assessments before and after treatment. Change from baseline scores indicated that the 320 mg dose of BM improved performance at the first, second, and fourth repetition post-dosing on the CDB, and the treatments had no effect upon cardiovascular activity or in attenuating task-induced ratings of stress and fatigue. It was concluded that assessment of an earlier pharmacological window and use of less memory-specific cognitive tests together with more temporally sensitive measures of brain activity may improve our understanding of the acute neurocognitive properties of BM.

  2. A Phase I Study of Reduced-Intensity Conditioning and Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation Followed by Dose Escalation of Targeted Consolidation Immunotherapy with Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Children and Adolescents with CD33+ Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zahler, Stacey; Bhatia, Monica; Ricci, Angela; Roy, Sumith; Morris, Erin; Harrison, Lauren; van de Ven, Carmella; Fabricatore, Sandra; Wolownik, Karen; Cooney-Qualter, Erin; Baxter-Lowe, Lee Ann; Luisi, Paul; Militano, Olga; Kletzel, Morris; Cairo, Mitchell S

    2016-04-01

    Myeloablative conditioning and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (alloHSCT) in children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR1) may be associated with significant acute toxicity and late effects. Reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) and alloHSCT in children is safe, feasible, and may be associated with less adverse effects. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) induces a response in 30% of patients with CD33+ relapsed/refractory AML. The dose of GO is significantly lower when combined with chemotherapy. We examined the feasibility and toxicity of RIC alloHSCT followed by GO targeted immunotherapy in children with CD33+ AML in CR1/CR2. Conditioning consisted of fludarabine 30 mg/m2 × 6 days, busulfan 3.2 to 4 mg/kg × 2 days ± rabbit antithymocyte globulin 2 mg/kg × 4 days followed by alloHSCT from matched related/unrelated donors. GO was administered ≥60 days after alloHSCT in 2 doses (8 weeks apart), following a dose-escalation design (4.5, 6, 7.5, and 9 mg/m2). Fourteen patients with average risk AML received RIC alloHSCT and post-GO consolidation: median age 13.5 years at transplant (range, 1 to 21), male-to-female 8:6, and disease status at alloHSCT 11 CR1 and 3 CR2. Eleven patients received alloHSCT from 5-6/6 HLA-matched family donors: 8 received peripheral blood stem cells, 2 received bone marrow, and 1 received related cord blood transplantation. Three patients received an unrelated allograft (two 4-5/6 and one 9/10) from unrelated cord blood unit and bone marrow, respectively. Neutrophil and platelet engraftment was observed in all assessable patients (100%), achieved at median 15.5 days (range, 7 to 31) and 21 days (range, 10 to 52), respectively. Three patients received GO at dose level 1 (4.5 mg/m2 per dose), 5 at dose level 2 (6 mg/m2 per dose), 3 at dose level 3 (7.5 mg/m2 per dose), and 3 at dose level 4 (9 mg/m2 per dose). Three of 14 patients received only 1 dose of GO after alloHSCT. One patient experienced grade

  3. Feasibility of continuous, catheter-directed thrombolysis using low-dose urokinase in combination with low molecular-weight heparin for acute iliofemoral venous thrombosis in patients at risk of bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guoping; Shi, Wangyin; He, Xu; Lou, Wensheng; Chen, Liang; Gu, Jianping

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine the feasibility of catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) using continuous infusion of low-dose urokinase in combination with low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) for acute iliofemoral venous thrombosis. This retrospective analysis included patients with symptomatic acute iliofemoral venous thrombosis who received CDT using continuous infusion of low-dose urokinase in combination with LMWH within the past four years. Urokinase was administered at 1×104 U/h and 2×104 U/h in patients at high-risk and low-risk of bleeding, respectively. Measurements included urokinase dosage, duration, clinical outcomes and CDT-related complications. A total of 46 patients were included (high-risk, n=17; low-risk, n=29). In the high-risk patients, 64.7% experienced dissolution of ≥50% thrombi after a median CDT duration of 8 days (range, 6–10 days) and median total urokinase dose of 1.92×106 units (range, 1.44–2.4×106 units). In the low-risk patients, 82.8% achieved dissolution of ≥50% thrombi after a median CDT duration of 7 days (range, 4–10 days) and a median total urokinase dose of 3.36×106 units (range, 1.92–4.80×106 units). Remission of clinical symptoms after CDT was achieved in 15 (88.2%) and 28 (96.6%) cases in high-risk and low-risk patients, respectively. No treatment-associated pulmonary embolism or major bleeding was observed. Three (6.5%) subjects (high-risk, n=1; low-risk, n=2) experienced minor bleeding. In conclusion, continuous infusion of low-dose urokinase via CDT in combination with LMWH is effective and safe for acute iliofemoral venous thrombosis in patients with one or more risk factor for bleeding. PMID:28352362

  4. Severe palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia and aplasia in an adult undergoing re-induction treatment with high-dose cytarabine for acute myelogenous leukemia: a possible drug interaction between posaconazole and cytarabine.

    PubMed

    Alzghari, Saeed K; Seago, Susan E; Cable, Christian T; Herrington, Jon D

    2016-08-16

    High-dose cytarabine is recommended for re-induction chemotherapy in patients less than 60 years of age with acute myelogenous leukemia. This case describes a patient receiving high-dose cytarabine for re-induction and subsequently developed tingling and numbness in her hands and feet followed by severe pain, swelling, and erythema consistent with a diagnosis of palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia. Furthermore, the patient's hemoglobin, platelets, and neutrophils did not recover after over 30 days post high-dose cytarabine. The patient was concurrently receiving posaconazole for fungal prophylaxis which was initiated after the induction therapy. We speculate that posaconazole may inhibit the cytarabine efflux through P-glycoprotein inhibition leading to the patient's palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia and subsequent aplasia. Future pharmacokinetic studies need to be conducted to ascertain if posaconazole does influence the pharmacokinetics of cytarabine.

  5. TIME COURSE AND DOSE RESPONSE ASSESSMENT OF CHOLINESTERASE (CHE) INHIBITION IN ADULT RATS TREATED ACUTELY WITH CARBARYL, METHOMYL, METHIOCARB, OXAMYL, OR PROPOXUR.

    EPA Science Inventory

    To compare the toxicity of 5 N-methyl carbamates, the time course and dose response profiles for ChE inhibition were established for each. For the time course comparison, adult male Long Evans rats (n=5 dose group) were dosed orally with either carbaryl (CB; 30 mg/kg in corn oi...

  6. The need for a population-based, dose optimization study for recombinant tissue plasminogen activator in acute ischemic stroke: A study from a tertiary care teaching hospital from South India

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Siju V.; Thaha, Fazil; Krishnan, S. Vimal; Shajan, Athulya; Balakrishnan, Jayaraj Mymbilly; Palatty, Babu Urumese

    2017-01-01

    Context: The guideline recommended dose of intravenous (i.v) recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) for acute ischemic stroke is 0.9 mg/kg in the European and American populations. In Asiatic population, some studies have shown that a lower dose of i.v rt-PA is equally efficacious. Aims: To assess if there is a need for a dose optimization for i.v rt-PA study among Indians. Setting and Design: A prospective, observational database of acute stroke cases that presented to a tertiary care institute over a period of 1 year was made. Methods: The data procured using a prestructured elaborate pro forma. Based on the dose of rt-PA received, the individuals were divided into three groups; Group 1 (0.6–0.7 mg/kg), Group 2 (0.7–0.8 mg/kg), and Group 3 (0.8–0.9 mg/kg). Improvement was assessed in each group and between the thrombolysed and nonthrombolysed individuals. Statistical Analysis Used: The nonparametric Mann–Whitney U-test (Wilcoxon rank-sum test) was applied for assessing improvement of National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score with significance level of α < 0.05 (P < 0.012) and compliance level at 95%. Results: Between the thrombolysed (n = 46) and nonthrombolysed (n = 113) group, there was a statistically significant neurological improvement in the thrombolysed group. Clinical improvement was noted in 75%, 85.7%, and 66.7% of individuals receiving rt-PA in Groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Four out of the five who developed a clinically significant intracranial hemorrhage were thrombolysed at a dose of 0.8–0.9 mg/kg rt-PA (Group 3). Conclusion: There is a need for a properly randomized, dose optimization study of i.v rt-PA in the Indian subcontinent. PMID:28298840

  7. Usual Dose of Simvastatin Does Not Inhibit Plaque Progression and Lumen Loss at the Peri-Stent Reference Segments after Bare-Metal Stent Implantation: A Serial Intravascular Ultrasound Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Young Joon; Choi, Yun Ha; Ma, Eun Hye; Ko, Jum Suk; Lee, Min Goo; Park, Keun Ho; Sim, Doo Sun; Yoon, Nam Sik; Youn, Hyun Ju; Kim, Kye Hun; Park, Hyung Wook; Kim, Ju Han; Ahn, Youngkeun; Cho, Jeong Gwan; Park, Jong Chun; Kang, Jung Chaee

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims The aim of this study was to assess the effects of a usual dose of simvastatin (20 mg/day) on plaque regression and vascular remodeling at the peri-stent reference segments after bare-metal stent implantation. Methods We retrospectively investigated serial intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) findings in 380 peri-stent reference segments (184 proximal and 196 distal to the stent) in 196 patients (simvastatin group, n = 132 vs. non-statin group, n = 64). Quantitative volumetric IVUS analysis was performed in 5-mm vessel segments proximal and distal to the stent. Results IVUS follow-up was performed at a mean of 9.4 months after stenting (range, 5 to 19 months). No significant differences were observed in the changes in mean plaque plus media (P&M) area, mean lumen area, and mean external elastic membrane (EEM) area from post-stenting to follow-up at both proximal and distal edges between the simvastatin and non-statin group. Although lumen loss within the first 3 mm from each stent edge was primarily due to an increase in P&M area rather than a change in EEM area, and lumen loss beyond 3 mm from each stent edge was due to a combination of increased P&M area and decreased EEM area, no significant differences in changes were observed in P&M, EEM, and lumen area at every 1-mm subsegment between the simvastatin and non-statin group. Conclusions A usual dose of simvastatin does not inhibit plaque progression and lumen loss and does not affect vascular remodeling in peri-stent reference segments in patients undergoing bare-metal stent implantation. PMID:21179272

  8. Acute Biological Effects of Simulating the Whole-Body Radiation Dose Distribution from a Solar Particle Event Using a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Jolaine M.; Sanzari, Jenine K.; Diffenderfer, Eric S.; Yee, Stephanie S.; Seykora, John T.; Maks, Casey; Ware, Jeffrey H.; Litt, Harold I.; Reetz, Jennifer A.; McDonough, James; Weissman, Drew; Kennedy, Ann R.; Cengel, Keith A.

    2011-01-01

    In a solar particle event (SPE), an unshielded astronaut would receive proton radiation with an energy profile that produces a highly inhomogeneous dose distribution (skin receiving a greater dose than internal organs). The novel concept of using megavoltage electron-beam radiation to more accurately reproduce both the total dose and the dose distribution of SPE protons and make meaningful RBE comparisons between protons and conventional radiation has been described previously. Here, Yucatan minipigs were used to determine the effects of a superficial, SPE-like proton dose distribution using megavoltage electrons. In these experiments, dose-dependent increases in skin pigmentation, ulceration, keratinocyte necrosis and pigment incontinence were observed. Five of 18 animals (one each exposed to 7.5 Gy and 12.5 Gy radiation and three exposed to 25 Gy radiation) developed symptomatic, radiation-associated pneumonopathy approximately 90 days postirradiation. The three animals from the highest dose group showed evidence of mycoplasmal pneumonia along with radiation pneumonitis. Moreover, delayed-type hypersensitivity was found to be altered, suggesting that superficial irradiation of the skin with ionizing radiation might cause immune dysfunction or dysregulation. In conclusion, using total doses, patterns of dose distribution, and dose rates that are compatible with potential astronaut exposure to SPE radiation, animals experienced significant toxicities that were qualitatively different from toxicities previously reported in pigs for homogeneously delivered radiation at similar doses. PMID:21859326

  9. Acute biological effects of simulating the whole-body radiation dose distribution from a solar particle event using a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Jolaine M; Sanzari, Jenine K; Diffenderfer, Eric S; Yee, Stephanie S; Seykora, John T; Maks, Casey; Ware, Jeffrey H; Litt, Harold I; Reetz, Jennifer A; McDonough, James; Weissman, Drew; Kennedy, Ann R; Cengel, Keith A

    2011-11-01

    In a solar particle event (SPE), an unshielded astronaut would receive proton radiation with an energy profile that produces a highly inhomogeneous dose distribution (skin receiving a greater dose than internal organs). The novel concept of using megavoltage electron-beam radiation to more accurately reproduce both the total dose and the dose distribution of SPE protons and make meaningful RBE comparisons between protons and conventional radiation has been described previously. Here, Yucatan minipigs were used to determine the effects of a superficial, SPE-like proton dose distribution using megavoltage electrons. In these experiments, dose-dependent increases in skin pigmentation, ulceration, keratinocyte necrosis and pigment incontinence were observed. Five of 18 animals (one each exposed to 7.5 Gy and 12.5 Gy radiation and three exposed to 25 Gy radiation) developed symptomatic, radiation-associated pneumonopathy approximately 90 days postirradiation. The three animals from the highest dose group showed evidence of mycoplasmal pneumonia along with radiation pneumonitis. Moreover, delayed-type hypersensitivity was found to be altered, suggesting that superficial irradiation of the skin with ionizing radiation might cause immune dysfunction or dysregulation. In conclusion, using total doses, patterns of dose distribution, and dose rates that are compatible with potential astronaut exposure to SPE radiation, animals experienced significant toxicities that were qualitatively different from toxicities previously reported in pigs for homogeneously delivered radiation at similar doses.

  10. Dose intensification in acute myeloid leukaemia: greater effectiveness at lower cost. Principal report of the Medical Research Council's AML9 study. MRC Leukaemia in Adults Working Party.

    PubMed

    Rees, J K; Gray, R G; Wheatley, K

    1996-07-01

    Between 1984 and 1990, 972 patients aged 1-79 years with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), from 85 British hospitals, were entered into the MRC's 9th AML trial. Patients were randomized between DAT 1 + 5 (daunorubicin for 1 d, with cytarabine and 6-thioguanine for 5 d) and DAT 3 + 10 (same dose drugs for 3 and 10 d respectively) as induction therapy. The 63% who achieved complete remission (CR) were randomized to receive two courses of DAT 2 + 7 alternating with two courses of either MAZE (m-AMSA, 5-azacytidine, etoposide) or COAP (cyclophosphamide, vincristine, cytarabine, prednisone). Finally, those still in CR were randomized to receive either 1 year of maintenance treatment with eight courses of cytarabine and thioguanine followed by four courses of COAP, or no further cytotoxic therapy. Resistance to induction therapy was less common with the DAT 3 + 10 regimen than with DAT 1 + 5 (13% v 23%; P = 0.0001) and hence, despite a 5% increase in the risk of induction death, the CR rate was higher (66% v 61%; P = 0.15). Moreover, CR was achieved more rapidly with DAT 3 + 10 (median 34 v 46 d; P < 0.0001) and thus patients required less time in hospital (mean 20 v 29 d) and less blood product support. 5-year relapse-free survival (28% v 23%; P = 0.05) and survival (23% v 18%; P < 0.05) were also better with DAT 3 + 10. Post-remission intensification of therapy with MAZE resulted in fewer relapses (66% v 74% at 5 years; P = 0.03) but patients allocated MAZE required considerably more supportive care and 14 (4.5%) died following 312 MAZE courses, whereas no deaths occurred following COAP. 5-year survival was not significantly higher with MAZE (37% v 31%). Finally, although 1 year of outpatient maintenance treatment appeared to delay, but not prevent, recurrence it did not improve 5-year survival which was non-significantly worse for those allocated maintenance treatment (41% v 44%). We conclude that the more intensive induction regimen, DAT 3 + 10, is not only more

  11. Necrotizing pneumonia and acute purulent pericarditis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 19A in a healthy 4-year-old girl after one catch-up dose of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shay; Tsai, Jeng-Dau; Tsao, Ten-Fu; Liao, Pei-Fen; Sheu, Ji-Nan

    2016-08-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common cause of infectious diseases in children that may lead to life-threatening complications. Acute purulent pericarditis is an uncommon complication of S. pneumoniae in the antibiotic era. A healthy 4-year-old girl was admitted with pneumonia and pleural effusion. She had received one catch-up dose of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine at 2 years of age. She rapidly developed necrotizing pneumonia, complicated by bronchopleural fistula presenting as subcutaneous emphysema and pneumothorax and acute purulent pericarditis. S. pneumoniae serotype 19A was subsequently identified from blood, empyema and pericardial fluid cultures. After appropriate antibiotic therapy and a right lower lobectomy, her condition stabilized and she promptly recovered. This case highlights two rare potential clinical complications of pneumococcal disease in a child: necrotizing pneumonia and acute purulent pericarditis. This is the first report of a child who received just one catch-up dose of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine at 2 years of age, as per the United States' Advisory Committee on Immunization Practice's recommendations, but who still developed severe invasive pneumococcal disease with life-threatening complications caused by S. pneumoniae serotype 19A.

  12. Necrotizing pneumonia and acute purulent pericarditis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 19A in a healthy 4-year-old girl after one catch-up dose of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shay; Tsai, Jeng-Dau; Tsao, Ten-Fu; Liao, Pei-Fen; Sheu, Ji-Nan

    2016-01-29

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common cause of infectious diseases in children that may lead to life-threatening complications. Acute purulent pericarditis is an uncommon complication of S. pneumoniae in the antibiotic era. A healthy 4-year-old girl was admitted with pneumonia and pleural effusion. She had received one catch-up dose of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine at 2 years of age. She rapidly developed necrotizing pneumonia, complicated by bronchopleural fistula presenting as subcutaneous emphysema and pneumothorax and acute purulent pericarditis. S. pneumoniae serotype 19A was subsequently identified from blood, empyema and pericardial fluid cultures. After appropriate antibiotic therapy and a right lower lobectomy, her condition stabilized and she promptly recovered. This case highlights two rare potential clinical complications of pneumococcal disease in a child: necrotizing pneumonia and acute purulent pericarditis. This is the first report of a child who received just one catch-up dose of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine at 2 years of age, as per the United States' Advisory Committee on Immunization Practice's recommendations, but who still developed severe invasive pneumococcal disease with life-threatening complications caused by S. pneumoniae serotype 19A.

  13. No impact of high-dose cytarabine and asparaginase as early intensification with intermediate-risk paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: results of randomized trial TCCSG study L99-15.

    PubMed

    Kato, Motohiro; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Manabe, Atsushi; Saito, Tomohiro; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Isoyama, Keiichi; Kinoshita, Akitoshi; Maeda, Miho; Okimoto, Yuri; Kajiwara, Michiko; Kaneko, Takashi; Sugita, Kanji; Kikuchi, Akira; Tsuchida, Masahiro; Ohara, Akira

    2014-02-01

    The Tokyo Children's Cancer Study Group conducted a randomized controlled study to evaluate the effect of experimental early intensification using high-dose cytarabine and L-asparaginase in paediatric intermediate-risk (IR) acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). A total of 310 IR ALL patients were randomized to receive either experimental early intensification (n = 156) or standard early intensification including standard-dose cytarabine arm (n = 154) after induction therapy. The experimental arm consisted of high-dose cytarabine and L-asparaginase, while the standard arm consisted of standard-dose cytarabine, oral 6-mercaptopurine and cyclophosphamide. The probabilities of event-free survival at 8 years in the experimental and standard arms were 72·3 ± 3·7% and 77·5 ± 3·5%, respectively (P = 0·32). The 8-year overall survival rates for these two arms were 85·0 ± 3·0% and 86·9 ± 2·8%, respectively (P = 0·72). The frequency of infectious events was significantly higher in the experimental arm (66·4%) than in the standard arm (24·6%) (P < 0·001). In conclusion, experimental early intensification including high-dose cytarabine followed by L-asparaginase had no advantage over standard early intensification in paediatric IR ALL patients.

  14. Comparative study of equimolar doses of gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), 1,4-butanediol (1,4-BD) and gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) on catalepsy after acute and chronic administration.

    PubMed

    Towiwat, Pasarapa; Phattanarudee, Siripan; Maher, Timothy J

    2013-01-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), and its precursors 1,4-butanediol (1,4-BD) and gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) are known drugs of abuse. The ability of acute and chronic administration of equimolar doses of GHB (200mg/kg), 1,4-BD (174mg/kg) and GBL (166mg/kg) to produce catalepsy in male Swiss Webster mice was examined. GHB, 1,4-BD, GBL produced catalepsy when injected acutely. Drug treatment was then continued for 14days. Tolerance development was determined on days 6, 14, and challenged with a higher dose on day 15 in those chronically pretreated mice, and compared with naïve mice. Chronic GHB produced tolerance to catalepsy, as evidenced from area under the curve (AUC) of catalepsy versus time (min-sec) on days 6 (678±254), 14 (272±247), which were less than those on day 1 (1923±269). However, less tolerance was seen from GBL or 1,4-BD, as AUCs on days 6 and 14 were not significantly lower than that of day 1. In conclusion, although equimolar doses were used, expecting similar levels of GHB in the body, 1,4-BD and GBL shared only some of the in vivo effects of GHB. The rate of metabolic conversion of 1,4-BD and GBL into GHB might be responsible for the differences in the tolerance development to these drugs.

  15. Identification of Differential Gene Expression Patterns after Acute Exposure to High and Low Doses of Low-LET Ionizing Radiation in a Reconstituted Human Skin Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Tilton, Susan C.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Hays, Spencer; Taylor, Ronald C.; Stenoien, David L.

    2016-11-01

    Our goal here was to identify dose and temporal dependent radiation responses in a complex tissue, reconstituted human skin. Direct sequencing of RNA (RNA-seq) was used to quantify altered transcripts following exposure to 0.1, 2 and 10 Gy of ionizing radiation at 3 and 8 hours. These doses include a low dose in the range of some medical diagnostic procedures (0.1 Gy), a dose typically received during radiotherapy (2.0 Gy) and a lethal dose (10 Gy). These doses could be received after an intentional or accidental radiation exposure and biomarkers are needed to rapidly and accurately triage exposed individuals. A total of 1701 genes were deemed to be significantly affected by high dose radiation exposure with the majority of genes affected at 10 Gy. A group of 29 genes including GDF15, BBC3, PPM1D, FDXR, GADD45A, MDM2, CDKN1A, TP53INP1, CYCSP27, SESN1, SESN2, PCNA, and AEN were similarly altered at both 2 and 10 Gy, but not 0.1 Gy, at multiple time points. A much larger group of up regulated genes, including those involved in inflammatory responses, was significantly altered only after a 10 Gy exposure. At high doses, down regulated genes were associated with cell cycle regulation and exhibited an apparent linear response between 2 and 10 Gy. While only a handful of genes were significantly affected by 0.1 Gy exposure using stringent statistical filters, groups of related genes regulating cell cycle progression and inflammatory responses consistently exhibited opposite trends in their regulation compared to the high dose exposures. Differential regulation of PLK1 signaling at low and high doses was confirmed using qRT-PCR. These results indicate that some alterations in gene expression are qualitatively different at low and high doses of radiation in this model system.

  16. Acute and late vaginal toxicity after adjuvant high-dose-rate vaginal brachytherapy in patients with intermediate risk endometrial cancer: is local therapy with hyaluronic acid of clinical benefit?

    PubMed Central

    Delishaj, Durim; Fabrini, Maria Grazia; Gonnelli, Alessandra; Morganti, Riccardo; Perrone, Franco; Tana, Roberta; Paiar, Fabiola; Gadducci, Angiolo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of hyaluronic acid (HA) in the prevention of acute and late vaginal toxicities after high-dose-rate (HDR) vaginal brachytherapy (BT). Material and methods Between January 2011 and January 2015, we retrospectively analyzed 126 patients with endometrial cancer who underwent extrafascial hysterectomy with or without lymphadenectomy and adjuvant HDR-vaginal BT +/– adjuvant chemotherapy. The total dose prescription was 21 Gy in 3 fractions (one fraction for week). Vaginal ovules containing 5 mg of HA were given for whole duration of vaginal BT and for the two following weeks. Acute and late toxicities were evaluated according to CTCAE vs 4.02. Results According to the revised FIGO 2009 classification, most tumors were in stage IA (30.9%) and in stage IB (57.9%). Thirty-three patients (26.2%) received adjuvant chemotherapy before vaginal BT. Five-year disease-free survival (DFS) and five-year overall survival (OS) were 88% and 93%, respectively. The most common grade 1-2 acute toxicities were vaginal inflammation (18 patients, 14.3%) and dyspareunia (7 patients, 5.5%). Two patients (1.6%) had more than one toxicity. Late toxicity occurred in 20 patients (15.9%). Grade 1-2 late toxicities were fibrosis (14 patients, 11.1%) and telangiectasias (7 patients, 5.5%). Six patients (4.8%) had more than one late toxicity. No grade 3 or higher acute or late toxicities were observed. Conclusions These results appear to suggest that the local therapy with HA is of clinical benefit for intermediate risk endometrial cancer patients who receive adjuvant HDR-vaginal BT after surgery. A randomized trial comparing HA treatment vs. no local treatment in this clinical setting is warranted to further evaluate the efficacy of HA in preventing vaginal BT-related vaginal toxicity. PMID:28115957

  17. Age-related dose response of selected reproductive parameters to acute cadmium chloride exposure in the male Long-Evans rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Groups of Long Evans rats 30, 50, or 70 days old were injected subcutaneously (s.c.) with a single dose of between 0 and 52 micromoles Cd/Kg as cadmium (CD) chloride. Sixty days post dosing and two hours prior to sacrifice the rats were injected s.c. with 100 IU of hCG to stimula...

  18. Low Dose Radiation Response Curves, Networks and Pathways in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells Exposed from 1 to 10 cGy of Acute Gamma Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrobek, A. J.; Manohar, C. F.; Nelson, D. O.; Furtado, M. R.; Bhattacharya, M. S.; Marchetti, F.; Coleman, M.A.

    2011-04-18

    We investigated the low dose dependency of the transcriptional response of human cells to characterize the shape and biological functions associated with the dose response curve and to identify common and conserved functions of low dose expressed genes across cells and tissues. Human lymphoblastoid (HL) cells from two unrelated individuals were exposed to graded doses of radiation spanning the range of 1-10 cGy were analyzed by transcriptome profiling, qPCR and bioinformatics, in comparison to sham irradiated samples. A set of {approx}80 genes showed consistent responses in both cell lines; these genes were associated with homeostasis mechanisms (e.g., membrane signaling, molecule transport), subcellular locations (e.g., Golgi, and endoplasmic reticulum), and involved diverse signal transduction pathways. The majority of radiation-modulated genes had plateau-like responses across 1-10 cGy, some with suggestive evidence that transcription was modulated at doses below 1 cGy. MYC, FOS and TP53 were the major network nodes of the low-dose response in HL cells. Comparison our low dose expression findings in HL cells with those of prior studies in mouse brain after whole body exposure, in human keratinocyte cultures, and in endothelial cells cultures, indicates that certain components of the low dose radiation response are broadly conserved across cell types and tissues, independent of proliferation status.

  19. Pathology of acute ischemic myocardium. Special references to (I) evaluation of morphological methods for detection of early myocardial infarcts, and (II) lipid metabolism in infarcted myocardium.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, I

    1977-09-01

    Morphological changes of early myocardial infarction within 24 hours after the onset of the acute attack were described together with a review of the literatures. For the practical purpose in detecting very early infarcts, enzymatic histochemistry is the most reliable method. Other methods previously reported such as wavy pattern of the muscle fibers and fuchsinophilia are still controvertial. Lipid metabolism in the infarcted myocardium of dogs was studied both morphologically and biochemically. Up to 3 hours, after the coronary ligation, the tissue lipids accumulated in the necrotic areas with a rise of triglyceride, but later than 6 hours the lipids decreased and were lost from the necrotic tissue, while the surrounding living cells were accumulated with neutral lipids. Serum free fatty acids were elevated in the coronary sinus blood in 6 hours after the ligation. Linolic acids were contained in high proportion in both coronary venous blood after 6 hours, and normal myocardial phospholipid. These results may lead to another possible factor in addition to catecholamine activity to elevate serum FFA in acute myocardial infarction that fatty acids may be released partly from tissue phospholipid and once ever accumulated triglyceride.

  20. MAMMARY GLAND DEVELOPMENT AS A SENSITIVE END-POINT FOLLOWING ACUTE PERNATAL EXPOSURE TO A LOW DOSE ATRAZINE METABOLITE MIXTURE IN FEMALE LONG EVANS RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to characterize the potential developmental effects of atrazine (ATR) metabolites at low doses, an environmentally-based mixture (EBM) of ATR and its metabolites hydroxyatrazine, diaminochlorotriazine, deethylatrazine, and deisopropylatrazine was formulated based on surv...

  1. Effect of extended physiotherapy and high-dose vitamin D on rate of falls and hospital re-admission after acute hip fracture: a randomized controlled trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Guidelines for post-fracture care of elderly hip fracture patients are not established despite the significant socio-economic burden of post hip fracture morbidity and mortality. Using a factorial design, we studied the effects of extended physiotherapy (supervised 1 hour per day during acute care p...

  2. [Acute radiation injury].

    PubMed

    Saito, Tsutomu

    2012-03-01

    Cell death due to DNA damage by ionizing radiation causes acute radiation injury of tissues and organs. Frequency and severity of the injuries increase according to dose increase, when the dose becomes more than threshold dose. The threshold dose of acute human radiation death is 1 Gy and LD50 of human is 4 Gy. Human dies due to the cerebrovascular syndrome, the gastrointestinal syndrome or the hematopoetic syndrome, when he received more than 20 Gy, 10-20 Gy or 3-8 Gy to his total body, respectively. Any tissue or organ, including embryo and fetus, does not show the acute injury, when it received less than 100 mSv. Acute injuries are usually reversible, and late injuries are sometimes irreversible.

  3. Acute effects of higher than standard doses of salbutamol and ipratropium on tiotropium-induced bronchodilation in patients with stable COPD.

    PubMed

    Cazzola, Mario; Santus, Pierachille; D'Adda, Alice; Pizzolato, Silvia; Di Marco, Fabiano; Centanni, Stefano

    2009-06-01

    Knowledge on the effects of the additive bronchodilatory effects of short-acting agents on the top of the effect of long-acting bronchodilators is limited. In this trial, we examined the influence of higher than conventional doses of the short-acting inhaled beta(2)-adrenergic agent salbutamol and the short-acting anticholinergic drug ipratropium bromide on bronchodilation induced by a regular treatment with the long-acting anticholinergic drug tiotropium 18 microg/day in 30 patients with stable COPD. On 3 separate days, a dose-response curve to inhaled salbutamol (100 microg puff-1), ipratropium bromide (20 microg puff-1) or placebo was constructed 3h after inhalation of the last dose of tiotropium, using one puff, one puff, two puffs and two puffs, for a total cumulative dose of 600 microg salbutamol or 120 microg ipratropium bromide. Doses were given at 30-min intervals and measurements made 15 min after each dose. At the highest cumulative dose, salbutamol showed a trend to be more effective than ipratropium bromide in improving FEV(1) (0.157 L vs 0.125 L), and reducing sRaw (-4.52 kPa/s vs 3.57 kPa/s), although the differences between the two treatments were always not significant (p>0.05), whereas there was no substantial difference between the two drugs in changing FVC (0.179 L vs 0.168 L), IC (0.254 L vs 0.240 L), TGV (-0.444 L vs -0.441 L), TLC (-0.334 L vs -0.318 L) and RV (-0.467 L vs -0.498 L). Both drugs did not affect heart rate and SpO2. Our results indicate that there is not much difference in bronchodilation between adding higher than conventional doses of salbutamol or ipratropium bromide to tiotropium in patients with stable COPD. Effective improvement of the pulmonary function may be achieved in such a type of patients by adding salbutamol 600 microg or ipratropium bromide 120 microg to regular tiotropium. These is an interesting finding mainly for those COPD patients suffering from cardiovascular co-morbidities that are at highest risk of

  4. Beneficial effects of low-dose benidipine in acute autoimmune myocarditis: suppressive effects on inflammatory cytokines and inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zuyi; Kishimoto, Chiharu; Shioji, Keisuke

    2003-06-01

    Excessive production of nitric oxide (NO) by inducible NO synthase (iNOS) contributes to the progression of myocardial damage in myocarditis. Some dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers reportedly inhibit NO production and proinflammatory cytokines and the present study sought to clarify if a low dose of benidipine, a novel dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker, would ameliorate experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM). Rats with or without myocarditis were administered oral benidipine at a dose of 3 mg. kg(-1). day(-1) for 3 weeks. Low-dose benidipine did not decrease blood pressure significantly compared with the untreated group, but markedly reduced the severity of myocarditis. Myocardial interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) expression and IL-1beta-positive cells were significantly less in rats with EAM that were treated with low-dose benidipine compared with untreated rats. Also, myocardial iNOS expression and iNOS-positive cells were markedly reduced in in the treated rats compared with the untreated group. Furthermore, myocardial NO production and nitrotyrosine expression were suppressed by the treatment in rats with EAM. The cardioprotection of low-dose benidipine may be caused by suppression of inflammatory cytokines and inhibition of NO production.

  5. Fosfomycin trometamol: a review of its use as a single-dose oral treatment for patients with acute lower urinary tract infections and pregnant women with asymptomatic bacteriuria.

    PubMed

    Keating, Gillian M

    2013-11-01

    Fosfomycin trometamol (fosfomycin tromethamine) [Monuril(®), Monurol(®), Monural(®)] is approved in numerous countries worldwide, mainly for the treatment of uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTIs). Fosfomycin has good in vitro activity against common uropathogens, such as Escherichia coli (including extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing E. coli), Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Staphylococcus saprophyticus, and the susceptibility of uropathogens to fosfomycin has remained relatively stable over time. A single oral dose of fosfomycin trometamol 3 g (the approved dosage) achieves high concentrations in urine. Results of recent randomized trials indicate that single-dose fosfomycin trometamol had similar clinical and/or bacteriological efficacy to 3- to 7-day regimens of ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, cotrimoxazole or nitrofurantoin in women with uncomplicated lower UTIs. In addition, single-dose fosfomycin trometamol had similar bacteriological efficacy to a 5-day course of cefuroxime axetil or a 7-day course of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid in pregnant women with asymptomatic bacteriuria, and similar clinical and/or bacteriological efficacy to a 5-day course of cefuroxime axetil or amoxicillin/clavulanic acid or a 3-day course of ceftibuten in pregnant women with a lower UTI. Single-dose fosfomycin trometamol was generally well tolerated, with gastrointestinal adverse events (e.g. diarrhoea, nausea) reported most commonly. In conclusion, single-dose fosfomycin trometamol is an important option for the first-line empirical treatment of uncomplicated lower UTIs.

  6. Validation and Modification of a Prediction Model for Acute Cardiac Events in Patients With Breast Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy Based on Three-Dimensional Dose Distributions to Cardiac Substructures.

    PubMed

    van den Bogaard, Veerle A B; Ta, Bastiaan D P; van der Schaaf, Arjen; Bouma, Angelique B; Middag, Astrid M H; Bantema-Joppe, Enja J; van Dijk, Lisanne V; van Dijk-Peters, Femke B J; Marteijn, Laurens A W; de Bock, Gertruida H; Burgerhof, Johannes G M; Gietema, Jourik A; Langendijk, Johannes A; Maduro, John H; Crijns, Anne P G

    2017-01-17

    Purpose A relationship between mean heart dose (MHD) and acute coronary event (ACE) rate was reported in a study of patients with breast cancer (BC). The main objective of our cohort study was to validate this relationship and investigate if other dose-distribution parameters are better predictors for ACEs than MHD. Patients and Methods The cohort consisted of 910 consecutive female patients with BC treated with radiotherapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery. The primary end point was cumulative incidence of ACEs within 9 years of follow-up. Both MHD and various dose-distribution parameters of the cardiac substructures were collected from three-dimensional computed tomography planning data. Results The median MHD was 2.37 Gy (range, 0.51 to 15.25 Gy). The median follow-up time was 7.6 years (range, 0.1 to 10.1 years), during which 30 patients experienced an ACE. The cumulative incidence of ACE increased by 16.5% per Gy (95% CI, 0.6 to 35.0; P = .042). Analysis showed that the volume of the left ventricle receiving 5 Gy (LV-V5) was the most important prognostic dose-volume parameter. The most optimal multivariable normal tissue complication probability model for ACEs consisted of LV-V5, age, and weighted ACE risk score per patient (c-statistic, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.75 to 0.91). Conclusion A significant dose-effect relationship was found for ACEs within 9 years after RT. Using MHD, the relative increase per Gy was similar to that reported in the previous study. In addition, LV-V5 seemed to be a better predictor for ACEs than MHD. This study confirms the importance of reducing exposure of the heart to radiation to avoid excess risk of ACEs after radiotherapy for BC.

  7. Bortezomib Added to Daunorubicin and Cytarabine During Induction Therapy and to Intermediate-Dose Cytarabine for Consolidation in Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia Age 60 to 75 Years: CALGB (Alliance) Study 10502

    PubMed Central

    Attar, Eyal C.; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Amrein, Philip C.; Lozanski, Gerard; Wadleigh, Martha; DeAngelo, Daniel J.; Kolitz, Jonathan E.; Powell, Bayard L.; Voorhees, Peter; Wang, Eunice S.; Blum, William; Stone, Richard M.; Marcucci, Guido; Bloomfield, Clara D.; Moser, Barry; Larson, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine remission induction frequency when bortezomib was combined with daunorubicin and cytarabine in previously untreated older adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and safety of bortezomib in combination with consolidation chemotherapy consisting of intermediate-dose cytarabine (Int-DAC). Patients and Methods Ninety-five adults (age 60 to 75 years; median, 67 years) with previously untreated AML (including therapy-related and previous myelodysplastic syndrome) received bortezomib 1.3 mg/m2 intravenously (IV) on days 1, 4, 8, and 11 with daunorubicin 60 mg/m2 on days 1 through 3 and cytarabine 100 mg/m2 by continuous IV infusion on days 1 through 7. Patients who achieved complete remission (CR) received up to two courses of consolidation chemotherapy with cytarabine 2 gm/m2 on days 1 through 5 with bortezomib. Three cohorts with escalating dose levels of bortezomib were tested (0.7, 1.0, and 1.3 mg/m2). Dose-limiting toxicities were assessed during the first cycle of consolidation. The relationship between cell surface expression of CD74 and clinical outcome was assessed. Results Frequency of CR was 65% (62 of 95), and 4% of patients (four of 95) achieved CR with incomplete platelet recovery (CRp). Eleven patients developed grade 3 sensory neuropathy. Bortezomib plus Int-DAC proved tolerable at the highest dose tested. Lower CD74 expression was associated with CR/CRp (P = .04) but not with disease-free or overall survival. Conclusion The addition of bortezomib to standard 3 + 7 daunorubicin and cytarabine induction chemotherapy for AML resulted in an encouraging remission rate. The maximum tested dose of bortezomib administered in combination with Int-DAC for remission consolidation was 1.3 mg/m2 and proved tolerable. Further testing of this regimen is planned. PMID:23129738

  8. Intracoronary versus intravenous high-dose bolus plus maintenance administration of tirofiban in patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention for acute ST elevation myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Candemir, Basar; Kilickap, Mustafa; Ozcan, Ozgur Ulas; Kaya, Cansin Tulunay; Gerede, Menekse; Ozdemir, Aydan Ongun; Ozdol, Cagdas; Kumbasar, Deniz; Erol, Cetin

    2012-07-01

    We aimed to examine whether intracoronary high-dose bolus of tirofiban plus maintenance would result in improved clinical outcome in STEMI patients undergoing primary PCI in this pilot trial. A total of 56 patients were enrolled to receive either intracoronary high-dose bolus plus maintenance (n = 34) or intravenous high-dose bolus plus maintenance (n = 22) of tirofiban. Pre and post intervention TIMI flow grades, myocardial blush grades, peak CKMB and troponin levels, time to peak CKMB and troponin, time to 50% ST resolution and major composite adverse cardiac event rates at 30 days were recorded. Although incidence of major adverse cardiac events was not different, post intervention TIMI flow and TIMI blush grades, peak CKMB and troponin levels, and time to peak CKMB and time to peak troponin were significantly different, favoring intracoronary strategy. In conclusion, this regimen improved myocardial reperfusion and coronary flow, and reduced myocardial necrosis, but failed to improve clinical outcomes at 30 days.

  9. [Study of acute vulvovaginitis in sexually active adult women, with special reference to candidosis, in patients of the Francisco J. Muñiz Infectious Diseases Hospital].

    PubMed

    Buscemi, Luis; Arechavala, Alicia; Negroni, Ricardo

    2004-12-01

    The results of microbiological vaginal secretions samples obtained from 749 women (from July 2001 to July 2002) were studied in the Bacteriology Unit of the Francisco Javier Muñiz Hospital from Buenos Aires. All patients suffered acute vulvovaginitis were child bearing and sexually active women, 334 of them were HIV-positive. The following are the results of the microbiological studies: Lactobacillus spp 50.6%, Gardnerella vaginalis 25.6%, Candida spp 17.4%, Trichomonas vaginalis 5.3%, Neisseria gonorrhoeae 0.3% and B group Streptococcus 0.8%. Candida vaginitis was significantly more frequent in HIV-positive patients, (21.6% vs 14%; p = 0.0086); meanwhile, trichomoniasis was less common although the difference was not statistically significant (3.6 vs 6.7%, p = 0.0810). The following Candida species were isolated in this study: Candida albicans 76.8%, Candida glabrata 15.6%, Candida parapsilosis 2.9%, Candida tropicalis 1.5% and Candida krusei 0.7%. Eight cases (6.2%) of vaginitis were produced by two Candida species (C. albicans and C. glabrata), and in three cases (2.17%) Saccharomyces cerevisiae were isolated. Five women suffering acute vaginitis with Candida spp presented another etiologic agent of vaginal infection, three cases T. vaginalis and two cases G. vaginalis. The following are some of the most important findings of this study: 1) Half of the patients presented a normal microbial biota; 2) Candida spp vaginitis was significantly more frequent among HIV-positive women; 3) we observed a high incidence of Candida glabrata infections (15.9%), 4) 6.2% of vaginal candidiasis were caused by more than one Candida species and, 5) the susceptibility pattern of C. albicans and C. glabrata isolates against fluconazole was similar to the one observed in other studies. The majority of C. albicans isolates were susceptible to fluconazole (MIC90 = 0.5 microg/ml) meanwhile C. glabrata strains were much less susceptible to this drug (MIC50 and MIC90 = 32 microg/ml).

  10. RTOG 0529: A Phase 2 Evaluation of Dose-Painted Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Combination With 5-Fluorouracil and Mitomycin-C for the Reduction of Acute Morbidity in Carcinoma of the Anal Canal

    SciTech Connect

    Kachnic, Lisa A.; Winter, Kathryn; Myerson, Robert J.; Goodyear, Michael D.; Willins, John; Esthappan, Jacqueline; Haddock, Michael G.; Rotman, Marvin; Parikh, Parag J.; Safran, Howard; Willett, Christopher G.

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: A multi-institutional phase 2 trial assessed the utility of dose-painted intensity modulated radiation therapy (DP-IMRT) in reducing grade 2+ combined acute gastrointestinal and genitourinary adverse events (AEs) of 5-fluorouracil (5FU) and mitomycin-C (MMC) chemoradiation for anal cancer by at least 15% compared with the conventional radiation/5FU/MMC arm from RTOG 9811. Methods and Materials: T2-4N0-3M0 anal cancer patients received 5FU and MMC on days 1 and 29 of DP-IMRT, prescribed per stage: T2N0, 42 Gy elective nodal and 50.4 Gy anal tumor planning target volumes (PTVs) in 28 fractions; T3-4N0-3, 45 Gy elective nodal, 50.4 Gy ≤3 cm or 54 Gy >3 cm metastatic nodal and 54 Gy anal tumor PTVs in 30 fractions. The primary endpoint is described above. Planned secondary endpoints assessed all AEs and the investigator’s ability to perform DP-IMRT. Results: Of 63 accrued patients, 52 were evaluable. Tumor stage included 54% II, 25% IIIA, and 21% IIIB. In primary endpoint analysis, 77% experienced grade 2+ gastrointestinal/genitourinary acute AEs (9811 77%). There was, however, a significant reduction in acute grade 2+ hematologic, 73% (9811 85%, P=.032), grade 3+ gastrointestinal, 21% (9811 36%, P=.0082), and grade 3+ dermatologic AEs 23% (9811 49%, P<.0001) with DP-IMRT. On initial pretreatment review, 81% required DP-IMRT replanning, and final review revealed only 3 cases with normal tissue major deviations. Conclusions: Although the primary endpoint was not met, DP-IMRT was associated with significant sparing of acute grade 2+ hematologic and grade 3+ dermatologic and gastrointestinal toxicity. Although DP-IMRT proved feasible, the high pretreatment planning revision rate emphasizes the importance of real-time radiation quality assurance for IMRT trials.

  11. Modulation of mood and cognitive performance following acute administration of single doses of Melissa officinalis (Lemon balm) with human CNS nicotinic and muscarinic receptor-binding properties.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, D O; Wake, G; Savelev, S; Tildesley, N T J; Perry, E K; Wesnes, K A; Scholey, A B

    2003-10-01

    Melissa officinalis (Lemon balm) is a herbal medicine that has traditionally been attributed with memory-enhancing properties, but which is currently more widely used as a mild sedative and sleep aid. In a previous study it was demonstrated that a commercial Melissa extract led to dose-specific increases in calmness, and dose-dependent decrements in timed memory task performance. However, the extract utilized in that study did not exhibit in vitro cholinergic receptor-binding properties. The current study involved an initial screening of samples of M. officinalis for human acetylcholinesterase inhibition and cholinergic receptor-binding properties. The cognitive and mood effects of single doses of the most cholinergically active dried leaf were then assessed in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, balanced crossover study. Following the in vitro analysis, 20 healthy, young participants received single doses of 600, 1000, and 1600 mg of encapsulated dried leaf, or a matching placebo, at 7-day intervals. Cognitive performance and mood were assessed predose and at 1, 3, and 6 h postdose using the Cognitive Drug Research computerized assessment battery and Bond-Lader visual analog scales, respectively. In vitro analysis of the chosen extract established IC(50) concentrations of 0.18 and 3.47 mg ml(-1), respectively, for the displacement of [(3)H]-(N)-nicotine and [(3)H]-(N)-scopolamine from nicotinic and muscarinic receptors in the human cerebral cortex tissue. However, no cholinesterase inhibitory properties were detected. The most notable cognitive and mood effects were improved memory performance and increased 'calmness' at all postdose time points for the highest (1600 mg) dose. However, while the profile of results was overwhelmingly favorable for the highest dose, decrements in the speed of timed memory task performance and on a rapid visual information-processing task increased with decreasing dose. These results suggest that doses of Melissa

  12. A phase I/II study of oral clofarabine plus low-dose cytarabine in previously treated acute myeloid leukaemia and high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome patients at least 60 years of age.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Sarah A; Mawad, Raya; Gooley, Ted A; Becker, Pamela S; Sandhu, Vicky; Hendrie, Paul; Scott, Bart L; Wood, Brent L; Walter, Roland B; Smith, Kelly; Dean, Carol; Estey, Elihu H; Pagel, John M

    2015-08-01

    Outcomes for older adults with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) are generally poor, and new effective therapies are needed. We investigated oral clofarabine combined with low-dose cytarabine (LDAC) in patients aged 60 years and above with relapsed or refractory AML or high-risk MDS in a phase I/II trial. A 3 + 3 dose escalation of oral clofarabine was followed by a phase II expansion with the aim of obtaining a complete response (CR) rate ≥30%. We identified 20 mg/d for 5 d as the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of oral clofarabine. A total of 35 patients, with a median age of 72 years, were treated. Of 26 patients enrolled at the MTD, 4 had treatment-related grade 3-4 non-haematological toxicities, but none died within 28 d. The observed CR rate and median survival were 34% [95% confidence interval (CI), 18-50%] and 6.8 months overall and 38% [95% CI, 19-57%] and 7.2 months at the MTD. The median disease-free survival was 7.4 months. Fifty-two percent (23/44) of cycles administered at the MTD were done without hospital admission. This combination of oral clofarabine and LDAC demonstrated efficacy with a CR rate of >30% and acceptable toxicity in older patients.

  13. DEVELOPING AN EXPOSURE-DOSE-RESPONSE MODEL FOR THE ACUTE NEUROTOXICITY OF ORGANIC SOLVENTS: OVERVIEW AND PROGRESS ON IN VITRO MODELS AND DOSIMETRY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article provides an overview of the current status of an exposure-dose-response (EDR) model for the volatile organic compound toluene. This model is being developed as a vehicle for understanding the neurotoxicity of organic solvents and will be used to support risk assessme...

  14. Application of the hybrid approach to the benchmark dose of urinary cadmium as the reference level for renal effects in cadmium polluted and non-polluted areas in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Suwazono, Yasushi; Nogawa, Kazuhiro; Uetani, Mirei; Nakada, Satoru; Kido, Teruhiko; Nakagawa, Hideaki

    2011-02-15

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the reference level of urinary cadmium (Cd) that caused renal effects. An updated hybrid approach was used to estimate the benchmark doses (BMDs) and their 95% lower confidence limits (BMDL) in subjects with a wide range of exposure to Cd. Methods: The total number of subjects was 1509 (650 men and 859 women) in non-polluted areas and 3103 (1397 men and 1706 women) in the environmentally exposed Kakehashi river basin. We measured urinary cadmium (U-Cd) as a marker of long-term exposure, and {beta}2-microglobulin ({beta}2-MG) as a marker of renal effects. The BMD and BMDL that corresponded to an additional risk (BMR) of 5% were calculated with background risk at zero exposure set at 5%. Results: The U-Cd BMDL for {beta}2-MG was 3.5 {mu}g/g creatinine in men and 3.7 {mu}g/g creatinine in women. Conclusions: The BMDL values for a wide range of U-Cd were generally within the range of values measured in non-polluted areas in Japan. This indicated that the hybrid approach is a robust method for different ranges of cadmium exposure. The present results may contribute further to recent discussions on health risk assessment of Cd exposure.

  15. Effect of Low-Dose Selenium Supplementation on the Genotoxicity, Tissue Injury and Survival of Mice Exposed to Acute Whole-Body Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Verma, Prachi; Kunwar, Amit; Indira Priyadarsini, K

    2017-02-11

    The aim of the present study is to evaluate the radioprotective effect of low-dose selenium supplementation (multiple administrations) on radiation toxicities and mortality induced by lethal dose of whole-body irradiation (WBI). For this, BALB/c mice received sodium selenite (4 μg/kg body wt) intraperitoneally for five consecutive days and subjected to WBI at an absorbed dose of 8 Gy ((60)Co, 1 Gy/min). Administration of sodium selenite was continued even during the post irradiation days three times a week till the end of the experiment. The radioprotective effect was evaluated in terms of the improvement in 30 days post irradiation survival, protection from DNA damage, and biochemical and histological changes in radiosensitive organs. The results indicated that low-dose sodium selenite administration did not protect the mice from radiation-induced hematopoietic and gastrointestinal injuries and subsequent mortality. However, it significantly prevented the radiation-induced genotoxicity or DNA damage in peripheral leukocytes. Further sodium selenite administration modulated the messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of GPx1, GPx2, and GPx4 in the spleen and intestine differentially and led to a significant increase in GPx activity (∼1.5 to 2-folds) in these organs. In line with this observation, sodium selenite administration reduced the level of lipid peroxidation in the intestine. In conclusion, our study shows that low-dose sodium selenite supplementation can be an effective strategy to prevent WBI-induced genotoxicity but may not have an advantage against mortality sustained during nuclear emergencies.

  16. Characterization of the dose response relationship for lung injury following acute radiation exposure in three well-established murine strains: developing an interspecies bridge to link animal models with human lung.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Isabel L; Xu, Pu-Ting; Nguyen, Giao; Down, Julian D; Johnson, Cynthia S; Katz, Barry P; Hadley, Caroline C; Vujaskovic, Zeljko

    2014-01-01

    Approval of radiation countermeasures through the FDA Animal Rule requires pivotal efficacy screening in one or more species that are expected to react with a response similar to humans (21 C.F.R. § 314.610, drugs; § 601.91, biologics). Animal models used in screening studies should reflect the dose response relationship (DRR), clinical presentation, and pathogenesis of lung injury in humans. Over the past 5 y, the authors have characterized systematically the temporal onset, dose-response relationship (DRR), and pathologic outcomes associated with acute, high dose radiation exposure in three diverse mouse strains. In these studies, C57L/J, CBA/J, and C57BL/6J mice received wide field irradiation to the whole thorax with shielding of the head, abdomen, and forelimbs. Doses were delivered at a rate of 69 cGy min using an x-ray source operated at 320 kVp with half-value layer (HVL) of 1 mm Cu. For all strains, radiation dose was associated significantly with 180 d mortality (p < 0.0001). The lethal dose for 50% of animals within the first 180 d (LD50/180) was 11.35 Gy (95% CI 11.1-11.6 Gy) for C57L/J mice, 14.17 Gy (95% CI 13.9-14.5 Gy) for CBA/J mice, and 14.10 Gy (95% CI 12.2-16.4 Gy) for C57BL/6J mice. The LD50/180 in the C57L/J strain was most closely analogous to the DRR for clinical incidence of pneumonitis in non-human primates (10.28 Gy; 95% CI 9.9-10.7 Gy) and humans (10.60 Gy; 95% CI 9.9-12.1 Gy). Furthermore, in the C57L/J strain, there was no gender-specific difference in DRR (p = 0.5578). The reliability of the murine models is demonstrated by the reproducibility of the dose-response and consistency of disease presentation across studies.Health Phys. 106(1):000-000; 2014.

  17. Acute and Late Toxicity After Dose Escalation to 82 GyE Using Conformal Proton Radiation for Localized Prostate Cancer: Initial Report of American College of Radiology Phase II Study 03-12

    SciTech Connect

    Coen, John J.; Bae, Kyounghwa; Zietman, Anthony L.; Patel, Baldev; Shipley, William U.; Slater, Jerry D.; Rossi, Carl J.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Several randomized trials have shown a benefit of dose escalation to 78 to 79 Gy for men treated with external radiation for localized prostate cancer. Single-institution data suggest a benefit with even higher doses. American College of Radiology 03-12 is a Phase II trial testing the safety and efficacy of 82 GyE (Gray equivalent) delivered with conformal proton radiation. Methods and Materials: From 2003-2006, 85 men with localized prostate cancer were accrued to American College of Radiology 03-12. Eighty-four were eligible for analysis. They were treated with conformal proton radiation alone to a total dose of 82 GyE. The study was designed to test whether the rate of 18-month Grade 3+ late toxicity was greater than 10%. Results: The median follow-up was 31.6 months. Regarding treatment-related acute toxicity, there were 39 Grade 1 cases (46%), 19 Grade 2 cases (23%) and 2 Grade 3 cases (2%). Regarding genitourinary/gastrointestinal toxicity, there were 42 Grade 1 cases (50%), 12 Grade 2 cases (14%) and 1 Grade 3 case (1%). Regarding late toxicity, there were 28 Grade 1 cases (33%), 22 Grade 2 cases (26%), 6 Grade 3 cases (7%), and 1 Grade 4 case (1%). The late genitourinary/gastrointestinal rates were the same. The estimated rate of Grade 3+ late toxicity at 18 months was 6.08%. Conclusions: Although not free of late toxicity, 82 GyE at 2 GyE per fraction delivered with conformal proton radiation did not exceed the late morbidity target tested in this trial. There was sufficient morbidity, however, that this may be the maximal dose that can be delivered safely with this technique and fractionation.

  18. Decitabine Compared with Low-Dose Cytarabine for the Treatment of Older Patients with Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Pilot Study of Safety, Efficacy, and Cost-Effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Linu A; Aparna, S; Lakshmaiah, K C; Lokanatha, D; Babu, Govind; Babu, Suresh; Appachu, Sandhya

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The incidence of Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) increases progressively with age and its treatment is challenging. This prospective case control study was undertaken to compare the safety, efficacy, and cost-effectiveness of decitabine with those of cytarabine in older patients with newly diagnosed AML who are not fit for intensive chemotherapy. Materials and Methods. 30 eligible patients above 60 years old with newly diagnosed AML were assigned to receive decitabine or cytarabine. The primary end point was overall survival (OS). The secondary objective was to compare adverse events and cost-effectiveness of therapy in the two study groups. Results. In this study, 15 patients received decitabine and 15 patients received cytarabine. The median OS was 5.5 months for each of the treatment groups. The hazard ratio between the treatment groups was 0.811 with 95% CI of 0.390 to 1.687. Toxicity profile was similar in both groups. Cost per cycle of chemotherapy in INR was 24,200 for decitabine and 1,600 for low-dose cytarabine group. Median of simplified cost-effectiveness ratio was 0.00022 for decitabine group and 0.0034 for low-dose cytarabine group. Conclusions. For elderly patients with AML, decitabine and low-dose cytarabine should be chosen based on the patient's choice and affordability. Our study has shown that both of these agents have similar OS and toxicity. Low-dose cytarabine scores over decitabine in developing countries as it is more cost-effective.

  19. Estimation of the Dose and Dose Rate Effectiveness Factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappell, L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2013-01-01

    Current models to estimate radiation risk use the Life Span Study (LSS) cohort that received high doses and high dose rates of radiation. Transferring risks from these high dose rates to the low doses and dose rates received by astronauts in space is a source of uncertainty in our risk calculations. The solid cancer models recommended by BEIR VII [1], UNSCEAR [2], and Preston et al [3] is fitted adequately by a linear dose response model, which implies that low doses and dose rates would be estimated the same as high doses and dose rates. However animal and cell experiments imply there should be curvature in the dose response curve for tumor induction. Furthermore animal experiments that directly compare acute to chronic exposures show lower increases in tumor induction than acute exposures. A dose and dose rate effectiveness factor (DDREF) has been estimated and applied to transfer risks from the high doses and dose rates of the LSS cohort to low doses and dose rates such as from missions in space. The BEIR VII committee [1] combined DDREF estimates using the LSS cohort and animal experiments using Bayesian methods for their recommendation for a DDREF value of 1.5 with uncertainty. We reexamined the animal data considered by BEIR VII and included more animal data and human chromosome aberration data to improve the estimate for DDREF. Several experiments chosen by BEIR VII were deemed inappropriate for application to human risk models of solid cancer risk. Animal tumor experiments performed by Ullrich et al [4], Alpen et al [5], and Grahn et al [6] were analyzed to estimate the DDREF. Human chromosome aberration experiments performed on a sample of astronauts within NASA were also available to estimate the DDREF. The LSS cohort results reported by BEIR VII were combined with the new radiobiology results using Bayesian methods.

  20. A Pilot Study of Cerebral and Hemodynamic Changes During Sedation with Low Dose of Thiopental Sodium or Propofol in Patients with Acute Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yaghoobi, Siamak; Alamouti, Azam Mohammadi

    2015-01-01

    Background One of the most important therapeutic maneuvers in head injury patients is to maintain Intracranial Pressure (ICP) and Cerebral Perfusion Pressure (CPP) within normal levels. Aims To compare the effects of low dose of thiopental sodium and propofol on reducing ICP and CPP in patients with head injury that scheduled for neurosurgical interventions. Settings and Design Using a randomized, crossover pilot study, we enrolled patients with head injury that scheduled for neurosurgical interventions admitted to ICU unit of a teaching hospital during 2010 to 2011. Materials and Methods In this pilot study, patients randomized into two equal groups. The first group received bolus injection of thiopental sodium 2 mg/kg and a maintenance dose of 2 mg/kg/h and the second group was given a bolus dose of propofol 0.5 mg/kg followed by propofol infusion 20 μg/kg/min. All of patients were given dexamethasone 8 mg at time of catheter insertion. ICP measurement catheter was inserted for each patient and ICP, CPP, SPO2 and MAP were recorded hourly for a period of 6 hours. Results There was no significant difference in sex and age between the two study groups (p>0.05). The mean ICP, CPP, SPO2 and arterial blood pressure were found to be similar with no significant difference between both groups (p>0.05). Conclusion Both propofol and thiopental sodium were equally effective in monitoring and maintaining CPP and MAP and eventually an ideal SPO2. PMID:26436022

  1. Effects of an acute dose of gamma radiation exposure on stem diameter growth, carbon gain, and biomass partitioning in Helianthus annuus

    SciTech Connect

    Thiede, M.E.

    1988-05-25

    Nineteen-day-old dwarf sunflower plants (Helianthus annuus, variety NK894) received a variable dose (0-40 Gy) from a cobalt-60 gamma source. A very sensitive stem monitoring device, developed at Battelle's Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Richland, Washington was used to measure real-time changes in stem diameter. Exposure of plants caused a significant reduction in stem growth and root biomass. Doses as low as 5 Gy resulted in a significant increase in leaf density, suggesting that nonreversible morphological growth changes could be induced by very low doses of radiation. Carbohydrate analysis of 40-Gy irradiated plants demonstrated significantly more starch content in leaves and significantly less starch content in stems 18 days after exposure than did control plants. In contrast, the carbohydrate content in roots of 40-Gy irradiated plants were not significantly different from unirradiated plants 18 days after exposure. These results indicate that radiation either decreased phloem transport or reduced the availability of sugar reducing enzymes in irradiated plants. 44 refs., 12 figs.

  2. Age-related dose response of selected reproductive parameters to acute cadmium chloride exposure in the male Long-Evans rat

    SciTech Connect

    Laskey, J.W.; Rehnberg, G.L.; Laws, S.C.; Hein, J.F.

    1986-01-01

    Groups of male Long-Evans rats 30, 50, or 70 d old were injected subcutaneously (sc) with a single dose of 0, 5.5, 11.5, or 24.6 ..mu..mol Cd/kg as cadmium chloride. All animals were killed 60 d after treatment. At 2 h prior to sacrifice, the rats were injected sc with 100 IU human chlorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) to maximally stimulate serum testosterone concentrations. After sacrifice the testes, epididymides and seminal vesicles were removed and weighed. Cardiac blood was taken, and serum concentrations of testosterone (sT) and follicle-stimulating hormone (sFSH) were determined. Sperm concentration in luminal fluid collected from the vas deferens was determined. Significant (p < 0.01) dose-dependent effects for all measured reproductive parameters were noted in the 70-d-old animals, while no effects were seen in the 30- to 50-d-old rats in either seminal vesicles weight or hCG-stimulated sT concentration. In the absence of significant (p > 0.05) changes in body weight gain, effects were seen in testes and epididymides weight, sperm concentration, and sFSH in the 70-d-old rats at Cd doses that were lower than those necessary to bring about similar changes in the 30- or 50-d-old animals.

  3. The Effects of Low-Dose Ketamine on Acute Pain in an Emergency Setting: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Currently ketamine is not used often as an analgesic in the emergency department (ED). Nonetheless, it can increase the efficiency of opioids and decrease their side effects. The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate whether low-dose ketamine in the ED provides better analgesia with fewer adverse effects. Methods The PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases were searched by two reviewers independently (last search performed on January 2016). Data were also extracted independently. Results A total of 6 trials involving 438 patients were included in the current analysis. Our subgroup analysis of pain reduction indicates that the favorable effects of ketamine were similar or superior to those of placebo or opioids, although these effects were heterogeneous. However, low-dose ketamine was associated with a higher risk of neurological (relative risk [RR] = 2.17, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.37–3.42, P < 0.001) and psychological events (RR = 13.86, 95% CI = 4.85–39.58, P < 0.001). In contrast, the opioid group had a higher risk of major cardiopulmonary events (RR = 0.22, 95% CI = 0.05–1.01, P = 0.05). Conclusions The efficiency of ketamine varies depending on the pain site, but low-dose ketamine may be a key agent for pain control in the ED, as it has no side effects. It may also help to reduce the side effects of opioids. PMID:27788221

  4. Life-span exposure to sinusoidal-50 Hz magnetic field and acute low-dose γ radiation induce carcinogenic effects in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Soffritti, Morando; Tibaldi, Eva; Padovani, Michela; Hoel, David G; Giuliani, Livio; Bua, Luciano; Lauriola, Michelina; Falcioni, Laura; Manservigi, Marco; Manservisi, Fabiana; Panzacchi, Simona; Belpoggi, Fiorella

    2016-01-01

    Background In 2002 the International Agency for Research on Cancer classified extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELFMF) as a possible carcinogen on the basis of epidemiological evidence. Experimental bioassays on rats and mice performed up to now on ELFMF alone or in association with known carcinogens have failed to provide conclusive confirmation. Objectives To study the carcinogenic effects of combined exposure to sinusoidal-50 Hz (S-50 Hz) magnetic fields and acute γ radiation in Sprague-Dawley rats. Methods We studied groups of male and female Sprague-Dawley rats exposed from prenatal life until natural death to 20 or 1000 μT S-50 Hz MF and also to 0.1 Gy γ radiation delivered as a single acute exposure at 6 weeks of age. Results The results of the study showed significant carcinogenic effects for the mammary gland in males and females and a significant increased incidence of malignant schwannomas of the heart as well as increased incidence of lymphomas/leukemias in males. Conclusions These results call for a re-evaluation of the safety of non-ionizing radiation.

  5. Correlation Between Radiation Dose to {sup 18}F-FDG-PET Defined Active Bone Marrow Subregions and Acute Hematologic Toxicity in Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, Brent S.; Liang Yun; Lau, Steven K.; Jensen, Lindsay G.; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Hoh, Carl K.; Mell, Loren K.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that radiation dose to {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG-PET)-defined active bone marrow (BM{sub ACT}) subregions is correlated with hematologic toxicity in cervical cancer patients treated with chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The conditions of 26 women with cervical cancer who underwent {sup 18}F-FDG-PET before treatment with concurrent cisplatin and intensity-modulated radiation therapy were analyzed. BM{sub ACT} was defined as the subregion of total bone marrow (BM{sub TOT}) with a standardized uptake value (SUV) equal to or above the mean for that individual. Inactive bone marrow (BM{sub INACT}) was defined as BM{sub TOT} - BM{sub ACT}. Generalized linear modeling was used to test the correlation between BM{sub ACT} and BM{sub INACT} dose-volume metrics and hematologic nadirs, particularly white blood cell count (WBC) and absolute neutrophil count (ANC). Results: Increased BM{sub ACT} mean dose was significantly associated with decreased log(WBC) nadir ({beta} = -0.04; 95% CI, -0.07to -0.01; p = 0.009), decreased log(ANC) nadir ({beta} = -0.05; 95% CI, -0.08 to -0.02; p = 0.006), decreased hemoglobin nadir ({beta} = -0.16; 95% CI, -0.27 to -0.05; p = 0.010), and decreased platelet nadir ({beta} = -6.16; 95% CI, -9.37 to -2.96; p < 0.001). By contrast, there was no association between BM{sub INACT} mean dose and log(WBC) nadir ({beta} = -0.01; 95% CI, -0.06 to 0.05; p = 0.84), log(ANC) nadir ({beta} = -0.03; 95% CI, -0.10 to 0.04; p = 0.40), hemoglobin nadir ({beta} = -0.09; 95% CI, -0.31 to 0.14; p = 0.452), or platelet nadir ({beta} = -3.47; 95% CI, -10.44 to 3.50; p = 0.339). Conclusions: Irradiation of BM subregions with higher {sup 18}F-FDG-PET activity was associated with hematologic toxicity, supporting the hypothesis that reducing dose to BM{sub ACT} subregions could mitigate hematologic toxicity. Future investigation should seek to confirm these findings and to identify

  6. Single-dose (30 mg/kg) azithromycin compared with 10-day amoxicillin/clavulanate for the treatment of uncomplicated acute otitis media: a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial☆

    PubMed Central

    Block, Stan L; Arrieta, Antonio; Seibel, Matthew; McLinn, Samuel; Eppes, Stephen; Murphy, Mary J

    2003-01-01

    Background: The long half-life of azithromycin allows for single-dose oral therapy for acute otitis media (AOM). Objective: This study was designed to compare the efficacy and tolerability of single-dose azithromycin with 10-day, twice-daily amoxicillin/clavulanate for the treatment of new-onset, uncomplicated AOM in children. Methods: Children aged 6 months to 12 years with new-onset AOM were randomly assigned to receive either a single 30-mg/kg dose of azithromycin or standard-dose amoxicillin/clavulanate (45 mg/kg administered BID for 10 days) in a double-blind, double-placebo, multicenter clinical trial. The diagnosis of AOM was based on specific clinical signs and symptoms, and was confirmed by pneumatic otoscopy and acoustic reflectometry (level ≥3). Clinical response was assessed on days 12–16 and 28–32. Results: Mean (SD) age of children receiving azithromycin (n = 173) or amoxicillin/clavulanate (n = 173) was 2.7 (2.3) years and 3.4 (2.8) years, respectively, with 43% and 36% ≤2 years of age. Most (53.2%) of the children were boys, and most (51.2%) were white. Clinical success rates (intent-to-treat) for azithromycin and amoxicillin/clavulanate, respectively, were 87% and 88% (95% CI, −9.2 to 6.5) on day 12–16 and 75% and 75% (95% CI, −10.2 to 10.5) on day 28–32. The incidences of treatment-related adverse events for azithromycin and amoxicillin/clavulanate were 16.8% and 22.5%, respectively. Corresponding rates of diarrhea were 6.4% and 12.7%, respectively. Vomiting, which was generally mild, occurred in 7 children in each group. One azithromycin patient and 5 amoxicillin/clavulanate patients discontinued treatment because of adverse events. The compliance rate for azithromycin was significantly higher than that for amoxicillin/clavulanate (99% vs 83%; P<0.001). Conclusions: In this trial comparing the efficacy of single-dose azithromycin (30 mg/kg) with twice-daily amoxicillin/clavulanate (45 mg/kg) for the treatment of new

  7. Associations of novel genetic variations in the folate-related and ARID5B genes with the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of high-dose methotrexate in paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Csordas, Katalin; Lautner-Csorba, Orsolya; Semsei, Agnes F; Harnos, Andrea; Hegyi, Marta; Erdelyi, Daniel J; Eipel, Oliver T; Szalai, Csaba; Kovacs, Gabor T

    2014-08-01

    High-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX) plays an important role in the consolidation therapy of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in many treatment regimens worldwide. However, there is a large interpatient variability in the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of the drug. We investigated the influence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes of the folate metabolic pathway, transporter molecules and transcription proteins on the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of MTX and 7-hydroxy-methotrexate (7-OH-MTX). 63 SNPs of 14 genes were genotyped and a total of 463 HD-MTX courses (administered according to the ALL-BFM 95 and ALL IC-BFM 2002 protocols) were analysed. Haematological, hepatic and renal toxicities, estimated by routine laboratory parameters were evaluated. Random forest and regression trees were used for variable selection and model building. Linear mixed models were established to prove the significance of the selected variables. SNPs (rs4948502, rs4948496, rs4948487) of the ARID5B gene were associated with the serum levels of MTX (P < 0·02), serum levels and area under the curve of 7-OH-MTX (P < 0·02) and with hypoproteinaemia (P = 0·004). SLCO1B1 rs4149056 also showed a significant association with serum MTX levels (P < 0·001). Our findings confirm the association of novel genetic variations in folate-related and ARID5B genes with the serum MTX levels and acute toxicity.

  8. A Standard Reference Material for Calibration of the Cup Furnace Smoke Toxicity Method for Assessing the Acute Inhalation Toxicity of Combustion Products.

    PubMed

    Levin, Barbara C; Paabo, Maya; Schiller, Susannah B

    1991-01-01

    A standard reference material (SRM 1048) has been developed for use with the cup furnace smoke toxicity method. This SRM is to be used to calibrate the apparatus and to enable the user to have confidence that the method is being conducted in a correct manner and that the equipment is functioning properly. The toxicological results from this SRM should not be used to compare with those of other materials (i.e., to determine if the combustion products of a test material are more or less toxic than those from this SRM). SRM 1048 is an acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) and is the same as SRM 1007B which is used for calibrating the flaming mode of the Smoke Density Chamber test method (ASTM E-662 and NFPA 258). For the purposes of calibrating the cup furnace smoke toxicity method, LC50 and N-Gas values plus their respective 95% confidence limits have been determined and certified for two combustion modes (flaming and nonflaming) and two observation periods (for the 30 min exposure only and for the 30 min exposure plus a 14 d post-exposure period). The certified LC50 values plus 95% confidence intervals (in g/m(3)) are 27 ± 3 (30 min, flaming); 25 ± 3 (30 min+ 14 d, flaming); 58 ± 15 (30 min, nonflaming); and 53 + 12 (30 min+ 14 d, nonflaming). The certified N-Gas values plus 95% confidence intervals are 1.4 ± 0.2 (30 min, flaming); 1.5 ± 0.2 (30 min+ 14 d, flaming); 1.2 ± 0.2 (30 min, nonflaming); and 1.4 ± 0.2 (30 min+ 14 d, nonflaming). It is recommended that this SRM be used with the N-Gas approach to calibrate the cup furnace smoke toxicity method rather than to determine the complete LC50 values. The N-Gas approach has the advantage of providing information on the gases responsible for the lethalities as well as the toxic potency of the smoke. In addition, the N-Gas approach reduces the number of experimental animals, the time necessary to complete the calibration, and the expense.

  9. Acute Oral Toxicity of Tetrodotoxin in Mice: Determination of Lethal Dose 50 (LD50) and No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL)

    PubMed Central

    Abal, Paula; Louzao, M. Carmen; Antelo, Alvaro; Alvarez, Mercedes; Cagide, Eva; Vilariño, Natalia; Vieytes, Mercedes R.; Botana, Luis M.

    2017-01-01

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX) is starting to appear in molluscs from the European waters and is a hazard to seafood consumers. This toxin blocks sodium channels resulting in neuromuscular paralysis and even death. As a part of the risk assessment process leading to a safe seafood level for TTX, oral toxicity data are required. In this study, a 4-level Up and Down Procedure was designed in order to determine for the first time the oral lethal dose 50 (LD50) and the No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL) in mice by using an accurate well-characterized TTX standard. PMID:28245573

  10. Acute Oral Toxicity of Tetrodotoxin in Mice: Determination of Lethal Dose 50 (LD50) and No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL).

    PubMed

    Abal, Paula; Louzao, M Carmen; Antelo, Alvaro; Alvarez, Mercedes; Cagide, Eva; Vilariño, Natalia; Vieytes, Mercedes R; Botana, Luis M

    2017-02-24

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX) is starting to appear in molluscs from the European waters and is a hazard to seafood consumers. This toxin blocks sodium channels resulting in neuromuscular paralysis and even death. As a part of the risk assessment process leading to a safe seafood level for TTX, oral toxicity data are required. In this study, a 4-level Up and Down Procedure was designed in order to determine for the first time the oral lethal dose 50 (LD50) and the No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL) in mice by using an accurate well-characterized TTX standard.

  11. Acute administration of high doses of taurine does not substantially improve high-intensity running performance and the effect on maximal accumulated oxygen deficit is unclear.

    PubMed

    Milioni, Fabio; Malta, Elvis de Souza; Rocha, Leandro George Spinola do Amaral; Mesquita, Camila Angélica Asahi; de Freitas, Ellen Cristini; Zagatto, Alessandro Moura

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of acute administration of taurine overload on time to exhaustion (TTE) of high-intensity running performance and alternative maximal accumulated oxygen deficit (MAODALT). The study design was a randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover design. Seventeen healthy male volunteers (age: 25 ± 6 years; maximal oxygen uptake: 50.5 ± 7.6 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) performed an incremental treadmill-running test until voluntary exhaustion to determine maximal oxygen uptake and exercise intensity at maximal oxygen uptake. Subsequently, participants completed randomly 2 bouts of supramaximal treadmill-running at 110% exercise intensity at maximal oxygen uptake until exhaustion (placebo (6 g dextrose) or taurine (6 g) supplementation), separated by 1 week. MAODALT was determined using a single supramaximal effort by summating the contribution of the phosphagen and glycolytic pathways. When comparing the results of the supramaximal trials (i.e., placebo and taurine conditions) no differences were observed for high-intensity running TTE (237.70 ± 66.00 and 277.30 ± 40.64 s; p = 0.44) and MAODALT (55.77 ± 8.22 and 55.06 ± 7.89 mL·kg(-1); p = 0.61), which seem to indicate trivial and unclear differences using the magnitude-based inferences approach, respectively. In conclusion, acute 6 g taurine supplementation before exercise did not substantially improve high-intensity running performance and showed an unclear effect on MAODALT.

  12. Neurochemical differences in learning and memory paradigms among rats supplemented with anthocyanin-rich blueberry diets and exposed to acute doses of 56Fe particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulose, Shibu M.; Rabin, Bernard M.; Bielinski, Donna F.; Kelly, Megan E.; Miller, Marshall G.; Thanthaeng, Nopporn; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara

    2017-02-01

    The protective effects of anthocyanin-rich blueberries (BB) on brain health are well documented and are particularly important under conditions of high oxidative stress, which can lead to ;accelerated aging.; One such scenario is exposure to space radiation, consisting of high-energy and -charge particles (HZE), which are known to cause cognitive dysfunction and deleterious neurochemical alterations. We recently tested the behavioral and neurochemical effects of acute exposure to HZE particles such as 56Fe, within 24-48 h after exposure, and found that radiation primarily affects memory and not learning. Importantly, we observed that specific brain regions failed to upregulate antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms in response to this insult. To further examine these endogenous response mechanisms, we have supplemented young rats with diets rich in BB, which are known to contain high amounts of antioxidant-phytochemicals, prior to irradiation. Exposure to 56Fe caused significant neurochemical changes in hippocampus and frontal cortex, the two critical regions of the brain involved in cognitive function. BB supplementation significantly attenuated protein carbonylation, which was significantly increased by exposure to 56Fe in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. Moreover, BB supplementation significantly reduced radiation-induced elevations in NADPH-oxidoreductase-2 (NOX2) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and upregulated nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. Overall results indicate that 56Fe particles may induce their toxic effects on hippocampus and frontal cortex by reactive oxygen species (ROS) overload, which can cause alterations in the neuronal environment, eventually leading to hippocampal neuronal death and subsequent impairment of cognitive function. Blueberry supplementation provides an effective preventative measure to reduce the ROS load on the CNS in an event of acute HZE exposure.

  13. Neurochemical differences in learning and memory paradigms among rats supplemented with anthocyanin-rich blueberry diets and exposed to acute doses of (56)Fe particles.

    PubMed

    Poulose, Shibu M; Rabin, Bernard M; Bielinski, Donna F; Kelly, Megan E; Miller, Marshall G; Thanthaeng, Nopporn; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara

    2017-02-01

    The protective effects of anthocyanin-rich blueberries (BB) on brain health are well documented and are particularly important under conditions of high oxidative stress, which can lead to "accelerated aging." One such scenario is exposure to space radiation, consisting of high-energy and -charge particles (HZE), which are known to cause cognitive dysfunction and deleterious neurochemical alterations. We recently tested the behavioral and neurochemical effects of acute exposure to HZE particles such as (56)Fe, within 24-48h after exposure, and found that radiation primarily affects memory and not learning. Importantly, we observed that specific brain regions failed to upregulate antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms in response to this insult. To further examine these endogenous response mechanisms, we have supplemented young rats with diets rich in BB, which are known to contain high amounts of antioxidant-phytochemicals, prior to irradiation. Exposure to (56)Fe caused significant neurochemical changes in hippocampus and frontal cortex, the two critical regions of the brain involved in cognitive function. BB supplementation significantly attenuated protein carbonylation, which was significantly increased by exposure to (56)Fe in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. Moreover, BB supplementation significantly reduced radiation-induced elevations in NADPH-oxidoreductase-2 (NOX2) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and upregulated nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. Overall results indicate that (56)Fe particles may induce their toxic effects on hippocampus and frontal cortex by reactive oxygen species (ROS) overload, which can cause alterations in the neuronal environment, eventually leading to hippocampal neuronal death and subsequent impairment of cognitive function. Blueberry supplementation provides an effective preventative measure to reduce the ROS load on the CNS in an event of acute HZE exposure.

  14. Reference Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunge, Charles A.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses library reference services. Topics include the historical development of reference services; instruction in library use, particularly in college and university libraries; guidance; information and referral services and how they differ from traditional question-answering service; and future concerns, including user fees and the planning…

  15. Reference Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bivens-Tatum, Wayne

    2006-01-01

    This article presents interesting articles that explore several different areas of reference assessment, including practical case studies and theoretical articles that address a range of issues such as librarian behavior, patron satisfaction, virtual reference, or evaluation design. They include: (1) "Evaluating the Quality of a Chat Service"…

  16. Reference Revolutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Marilyn Gell

    1998-01-01

    Describes developments in Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) electronic reference services. Presents a background on networked cataloging and the initial implementation of reference services by OCLC. Discusses the introduction of OCLC FirstSearch service, which today offers access to over 65 databases, future developments in integrated…

  17. In vivo flow cytometric Pig-a and micronucleus assays: highly sensitive discrimination of the carcinogen/noncarcinogen pair benzo(a)pyrene and pyrene using acute and repeated-dose designs.

    PubMed

    Torous, Dorothea K; Phonethepswath, Souk; Avlasevich, Svetlana L; Mereness, Jared; Bryce, Steven M; Bemis, Jeffrey C; Weller, Pamela; Bell, Sara; Gleason, Carol; Custer, Laura L; MacGregor, James T; Dertinger, Stephen D

    2012-07-01

    frequencies were observed with BP, whereas Pyr had no effect. These results demonstrate that Pig-a and micronucleus endpoints discriminate between these structurally related carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic agents. Furthermore, the high sensitivity demonstrated with the enrichment protocol indicates that the Pig-a endpoint is suitable for both repeated-dose and acute studies, allowing integration of mutagenic and clastogenic endpoints into on-going toxicology studies, and use as a short-term assay that provides efficient screening and mechanistic information in vivo.

  18. Performance of Turbuhaler((R)) in Patients with Acute Airway Obstruction and COPD, and in Children with Asthma : Understanding the Clinical Importance of Adequate Peak Inspiratory Flow, High Lung Deposition, and Low In Vivo Dose Variability.

    PubMed

    Selroos, Olof; Borgström, Lars; Ingelf, Jarl

    2006-01-01

    The dry-powder inhaler (DPI) Turbuhaler((R)) has been on the market for nearly two decades. Products containing terbutaline, formoterol, budesonide, and the combination budesonide/formoterol are widely used by patients with asthma and COPD. Most patients and physicians find Turbuhaler((R)) easy to use, and local side effects are rare. This is thought to arise from the lack of additives or only small amounts in the formulation, in addition to minimal deposition of the drug in the oropharynx and on the vocal cords during inspiration.The function of Turbuhaler((R)) has frequently been questioned. This article aims to review and clarify some key issues that have been challenged in the literature (e.g. the effectiveness of Turbuhaler((R)) in patients with more restricting conditions), to discuss the importance of lung deposition, and to explain the low in vivo variability associated with Turbuhaler((R)) and the lack of correlation with the higher in vitro variability.Turbuhaler((R)), like other DPIs, is flow dependent to some degree. However, a peak inspiratory flow (PIF) through Turbuhaler((R)) of 30 L/min gives a good clinical effect. These PIF values can be obtained by patients with conditions thought to be difficult to manage with inhalational agents, such as asthmatic children and adult patients with acute severe airway obstruction and COPD. Excellent clinical results with Turbuhaler((R)) in large controlled studies in patients with COPD and acute severe airway obstruction provide indirect evidence that medication delivered via Turbuhaler((R)) reaches the target organ.Due to the large amount of small particles and the moderate inbuilt resistance in Turbuhaler((R)), which opens up the vocal cords during inhalation, Turbuhaler((R)) is associated with a high lung deposition (25-40% of the delivered dose) compared with pressurized metered-dose inhalers (pMDIs) and other DPIs. A good correlation has been found between lung deposition and clinical efficacy. A high lung

  19. Acute high dose of chlorpyrifos alters performance of rats in the elevated plus-maze and the elevated T-maze.

    PubMed

    López-Crespo, G A; Flores, P; Sánchez-Santed, F; Sánchez-Amate, M C

    2009-11-01

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is a broad spectrum organophosphate (OP) pesticide widely used in agriculture, industry and household. Several animal studies indicate emotional disturbances after CPF exposure, although the results are sometimes puzzling. Thus, both anxiolytic and anxiogenic effects of CPF have been reported in different animal models of anxiety [Sánchez-Amate MC, Flores P, Sánchez-Santed F. Effects of chlorpyrifos in the plus-maze model of anxiety. Behav Pharmacol 2001;12:285-92; Sánchez-Amate MC, Dávila E, Cañadas F, Flores P, Sánchez-Santed F. Chlorpyrifos shares stimulus properties with pentilenetetrazol as evaluated by and operant drug discrimination task. Neurotoxicology 2002;23:795-803; López-Crespo G, Carvajal F, Flores P, Sánchez-Santed F, Sánchez-Amate MC. Time-course of biochemical and behavioural effects of a single high dose of chlorpyrifos. Neurotoxicology 2007;28:541-7]. On the other hand, other behavioural effects of CPF are time-dependent [López-Crespo G, Carvajal F, Flores P, Sánchez-Santed F, Sánchez-Amate MC. Time-course of biochemical and behavioural effects of a single high dose of chlorpyrifos. Neurotoxicology 2007;28:541-7], raising the question that the effects of CPF could be task and post-administration time dependent. To test this hypothesis, three groups of rats were treated with a single high dose of CPF (250 mg/kg); one of the groups was tested on day 5 on the elevated plus-maze, to complete our previous study on day 2 [Sánchez-Amate MC, Flores P, Sánchez-Santed F. Effects of chlorpyrifos in the plus-maze model of anxiety. Behav Pharmacol 2001;12:285-92]. The remaining groups were tested on the elevated T-maze on days 2 and 5. CPF produced an increased open arm activity on the elevated plus-maze on day 5, an increased escape latency on the elevated T-maze on day 2 and an impaired inhibitory avoidance on day 5. Data are discussed taking together all studies carried out in our laboratory, confirming that CPF effects on

  20. IERS Reference System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, K.

    Present circumstances related to IERS activities are described from various points of view. The NASA Dynamics of Solid Earth (DOSE) program and the IERS intensive campaign proposed by J. Dickey of JPL are particularly interesting. It is important to implement international cooperation to establish a fundamental radio reference frame by carrying out global solution based on all geodetic observations, past and future. A precession and nutation model may be determined observationally with an accuracy of 0.2 - 0.3 mas in a few years. Then it will become possible to establish the radio reference frame with this accuracy.

  1. High dose cytarabine plus gemtuzumab ozogamicin for patients with relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia: Cancer and Leukemia Group B study 19902.

    PubMed

    Stone, Richard M; Moser, Barry; Sanford, Ben; Schulman, Philip; Kolitz, Jonathan E; Allen, Steven; Stock, Wendy; Galinsky, Ilene; Vij, Ravi; Marcucci, Guido; Hurd, David; Larson, Richard A

    2011-03-01

    Gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO), an anti-CD33 immunoconjugate, was combined with high dose cytarabine (HiDAC; cytarabine 3g/m(2) over 3h daily for 5 days) for adults with relapsed or refractory AML. HiDAC plus GO 9mg/m(2) on day 7 and 4.5mg/m(2) on day 14 was not tolerated, but HiDAC followed by GO 9mg/m(2) on day 7 was safe: 12/37 (32%) patients with relapsed AML achieved complete remission. Median overall survival was 8.9 months. No grade 4 hepatic veno-occlusive disease was observed. This regimen merits further study, both in this setting and as a remission consolidation therapy.

  2. Naproxen Twice Daily Versus as Needed (PRN) Dosing: Efficacy and Tolerability for Treatment of Acute Ankle Sprain, a Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hajimaghsoudi, Majid; Jalili, Mohammad; Mokhtari, Mehdi; Nejati, Amir; Mesbahi, Javad; Paydary, Koosha

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study was conducted to compare the efficacy and safety of naproxen 500 mg twice daily (BID) versus naproxen 500 mg as needed (PRN) for treatment of ankle sprain. Methods In this seven-day, randomized, parallel group trial, 135 patients with ankle sprain occurring less than 48 hours prior to the first dose of study medication were randomized to receive naproxen 500 mg BID (67 patients) and naproxen 500 mg as needed (PRN) (68 patients). The ankle pain was assessed at rest and on full weight bearing using Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) from 0 (no pain) to 10 (the worst imaginable pain). Ankle swelling was assessed as a 4-point scale ranging from 0 (no swelling) to 3 (severe swelling) rated by the investigator. The primary efficacy end point was the patient's assessment of ankle pain via NRS and the degree of swelling on day seven. Results Results showed a significant decrease in pain on weight bearing, pain at rest and the extent of swelling (P<0.001) in both groups, but there was no substantial difference between the two groups (P>0.05) after seven days. Assessing the safety profile of the two different dosing, 13.3% of the naproxen BID group and 6.7% of the as needed group had adverse events, showing that the as needed regimen was safer (P<0.001). Conclusion Results showed that naproxen as needed may reduce the pain and edema of the sprained ankle with no significant difference compared to the BID regimen, while it possesses better safety profile and lower total drug use. PMID:24799999

  3. Acute effects of single-dose aripiprazole and haloperidol on resting cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Handley, Rowena; Zelaya, Fernando O; Reinders, A A T Simone; Marques, Tiago Reis; Mehta, Mitul A; O'Gorman, Ruth; Alsop, David C; Taylor, Heather; Johnston, Atholl; Williams, Steve; McGuire, Philip; Pariante, Carmine M; Kapur, Shitij; Dazzan, Paola

    2013-02-01

    Antipsychotic drugs act on the dopaminergic system (first-generation antipsychotics, FGA), but some also directly affect serotonergic function (second-generation antipsychotics, SGA) in the brain. Short and long-term effects of these drugs on brain physiology remain poorly understood. Moreover, it remains unclear whether any physiological effect in the brain may be different for FGAs and SGAs. Immediate (+3.30 h) and different effects of single-dose FGA (haloperidol, 3 mg) and a SGA (aripiprazole, 10 mg) on resting cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were explored in the same 20 healthy volunteers using a pulsed continuous arterial spin labeling (pCASL) sequence (1.5T) in a placebo-controlled, repeated measures design. Both antipsychotics increased striatal rCBF but the effect was greater after haloperidol. Both decreased frontal rCBF, and opposite effects of the drugs were observed in the temporal cortex (haloperidol decreased, aripiprazole increased rCBF) and in the posterior cingulate (haloperidol increased, aripiprazole decreased rCBF). Further increases were evident in the insula, hippocampus, and anterior cingulate after both antipsychotics, in the motor cortex following haloperidol and in the occipital lobe the claustrum and the cerebellum after aripiprazole. Further decreases were observed in the parietal and occipital cortices after aripiprazole. This study suggests that early and different rCBF changes are evident following a single-dose of FGA and SGA. The effects occur in healthy volunteers, thus may be independent from any underlying pathology, and in the same regions identified as structurally and functionally altered in schizophrenia, suggesting a possible relationship between antipsychotic-induced rCBF changes and brain alterations in schizophrenia.

  4. High dose cytarabine, mitoxantrone and L-asparaginase (HAMA) salvage for relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Tamjeed; Holwerda, Scott; Klepin, Heidi D.; Isom, Scott; Ellis, Leslie R.; Lyerly, Susan; Manuel, Megan; Dralle, Sarah; Berenzon, Dmitriy; Powell, Bayard L.; Pardee, Timothy S.

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy that affects older patients. The role of salvage therapy in the elderly is controversial and there is little data on efficacy. Outcomes for 94 relapsed or refractory AML patients who received salvage HAMA therapy were analyzed. Of the 94 patients 66 were ≥60, including 26 patients ≥70, and 28 were <60 years old. Early mortality (30-day) was 14% (4% <60, 18% ≥60 years old). Overall, 27% of patients died during hospitalization or were discharged to hospice (11% <60, 33% ≥60 years old). CR/CRi was achieved in 41% of patients (61% <60, 33% ≥60 years old). Median survival was 6.1 months (15.7 <60, 5.2 ≥60). Patients ≥60 who achieved a CR/CRi had a median survival of 11.7 months. At 12 months 56% of patients <60 were alive versus 24% of patients ≥60. At 24 months these numbers fell to 40% and 2% respectively. In those <60 years old, 50% went on to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) whereas 14% of patients in the ≥60 cohort did so. In conclusion, HAMA salvage therapy results in a 33% response rate in patients ≥60 years old with acceptable toxicity. PMID:26154683

  5. High dose cytarabine, mitoxantrone and l-asparaginase (HAMA) salvage for relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Tamjeed; Holwerda, Scott; Klepin, Heidi D; Isom, Scott; Ellis, Leslie R; Lyerly, Susan; Manuel, Megan; Dralle, Sarah; Berenzon, Dmitriy; Powell, Bayard L; Pardee, Timothy S

    2015-09-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy that affects older patients. The role of salvage therapy in the elderly is controversial and there is little data on efficacy. Outcomes for 94 relapsed or refractory AML patients who received salvage HAMA therapy were analyzed. Of the 94 patients 66 were ≥60, including 26 patients ≥70, and 28 were <60 years old. Early mortality (30-day) was 14% (4%<60, 18%≥60 years old). Overall, 27% of patients died during hospitalization or were discharged to hospice (11%<60, 33%≥60 years old). CR/CRi was achieved in 41% of patients (61%<60, 33%≥60 years old). Median survival was 6.1 months (15.7<60, 5.2≥60). Patients ≥60 who achieved a CR/CRi had a median survival of 11.7 months. At 12 months 56% of patients <60 were alive versus 24% of patients ≥60. At 24 months these numbers fell to 40% and 2% respectively. In those <60 years old, 50% went on to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) whereas 14% of patients in the ≥60 cohort did so. In conclusion, HAMA salvage therapy results in a 33% response rate in patients ≥60 years old with acceptable toxicity.

  6. Effect of the Polymorphism of Folylpolyglutamate Synthetase on Treatment of High-Dose Methotrexate in Pediatric Patients with Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhen; Tong, Hong-Fei; Li, Yuan; Qian, Jiang-Chao; Wang, Ju-Xiang; Wang, Zhe; Ruan, Ji-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the association of the polymorphism of folylpolyglutamate synthetase (FPGS) with the dynamic plasma concentration of methotrexate (MTX) in pediatric patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), as well as the prognosis. Material/Methods 57 ALL patients and 31 age and sex-matched children (control) were included in this study. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism was performed for the analysis of the genotype of FPGS rs1544105 and high-performance liquid chromatography for measurement of MTX plasma concentration after 24-h and 44-h treatment. Overall survival was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier method. Results No differences were observed between patients and controls regarding the distribution frequency of genotype and alleles of rs1544105. Patients carrying AA genotype had a significantly higher plasma concentration of MTX after 24 h than those carrying GG or GA (P<0.05) and no differences were found after 44 h. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed a longer median survival time in patients with AA than other genotypes with significant difference in overall survival. Conclusions Polymorphism of FPGS rs1544105 might be used as an effective approach for prediction of the treatment outcome of MTX. PMID:27987364

  7. Ready Reference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koltay, Emery

    1999-01-01

    Includes the following ready reference information: "Publishers' Toll-Free Telephone Numbers"; "How to Obtain an ISBN (International Standard Book Number)"; "How to Obtain an ISSN (International Standard Serial Number)"; and "How to Obtain an SAN (Standard Address Number)". (AEF)

  8. Pharmacokinetics and tolerability (Study 1) with particular reference to ocular safety (Study 2) of tiotropium Respimat soft mist inhaler: findings from two dose-ranging studies in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Feifel, Ulrich; Wallenstein, Gudrun; Rominger, Karl-Ludwig; Trommeshauser, Dirk; Platz, Juliane

    2008-01-01

    Data are presented from two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies in which the tolerability of tiotropium Respimat Soft MistTM Inhaler (SMI), a new-generation, propellant-free device for use in COPD, and the ocular safety oftiotropium were examined. In Study 1, 36 healthy males received tiotropium 8, 16, or 32 microg (n = 9/dose) or placebo (n = 3/dose level), administered once daily via Respimat SMI for 14 days. Safety and pharmacokinetics were evaluated. In Study 2, 48 healthy males received tiotropium 0.02, 0.04, 0.08, 0.16, 0.28, or 0.40 microg (n = 6/dose) or placebo (n = 2/dose level), applied as two drops to one eye (the highest dose was a significant multiple of a percentage of the proposed Respimat SMI clinical dose that could be inadvertently deposited in the eye). Ocular parameters were measured over 24 hours. Tiotropium Respimat SMI at doses up to 32 microg was well tolerated in Study 1; typical dose-dependent anticholinergic adverse events of mild-to-moderate intensity were observed. In Study 2, ocular tiotropium administration did not affect pupil diameter, pupillary reflex, intraocular pressure, or accommodation. Tiotropium Respimat SMI was well tolerated. Inadvertent ocular exposure to tiotropium up to 0.40 g is unlikely to result in ocular adverse effects.

  9. Incidence and risk factors of acute kidney injury associated with continuous intravenous high-dose vancomycin in critically ill patients: A retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Lacave, Guillaume; Caille, Vincent; Bruneel, Fabrice; Palette, Catherine; Legriel, Stéphane; Grimaldi, David; Eurin, Mathilde; Bedos, Jean-Pierre

    2017-02-01

    For vancomycin therapy of severe infections, the Infectious Diseases Society of America recommends high vancomycin trough levels, whose potential for inducing nephrotoxicity is controversial. We evaluated the incidence and risk factors of acute kidney injury (AKI) in critically ill patients given continuous intravenous vancomycin with target serum vancomycin levels of 20 to 30 mg/L.We retrospectively studied 107 continuous intravenous vancomycin treatments of ≥48 hours' duration with at least 2 serum vancomycin levels ≥20 mg/L in critically ill patients. Nephrotoxicity was defined according to the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes Clinical Practice Guideline for AKI (ie, serum creatinine elevation by ≥26.5 μmoL/L or to ≥1.5 times baseline). Risk factors for AKI were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses.AKI developed in 31 (29%) courses. Higher serum vancomycin levels were associated with AKI (P < 0.01). Factors independently associated with AKI were highest serum vancomycin ≥40 mg/L (odds ratio [OR], 3.75; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.40-10.37; P < 0.01), higher cumulative number of organ failures (OR, 2.63 95%CI, 1.42-5.31; P < 0.01), and cirrhosis of the liver (OR, 5.58; 95%CI, 1.08-31.59; P = 0.04).In this study, 29% of critically ill patients had AKI develop during continuous intravenous vancomycin therapy targeting serum levels of 20 to 30 mg/L. Serum vancomycin level ≥40 mg/L was independently associated with AKI.

  10. Results of Phase II Randomized Study of Low-Dose Decitabine with or without Valproic Acid in Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Jean Pierre; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Huang, Xuelin; Cortes, Jorge; Ravandi, Farhad; Jabbour, Elias; Borthakur, Gautam; Brandt, Mark; Pierce, Sherry; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2014-01-01

    Background Hypomethylating agents have shown activity in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Pre-clinical and single-arm trials have suggested that adding histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors may synergize the epigenetic modulation of hypomethylating agents and improve treatment results. Study Aim To evaluate the possible benefit of adding valproic acid, an HDAC inhibitor, to decitabine, in the treatment of MDS and AML. Methods Patients with higher risk MDS or with AML and age 60 years or older were eligible. Patients were randomized in a Bayesian response-adaptive design to decitabine 20mg/m2 intravenously (IV) daily for 5 days or to decitabine with valproic acid 50mg/1kg orally daily for 7 days. Courses were repeated every 4 to 6 weeks. A maximum of 150 patients were to be treated. Results A total of 149 patients were treated on study, including 87 patients with MDS and 62 patients with AML. The median age was 69 years (range 20 to 89 years; 42% ≥ 70 years). Overall, 34% of patients achieved CR and 55% had an objective response. The median survival was 11.9 months and the estimated 2-year survival rate was 27%. Outcome was not different with the addition of valproic acid to decitabine versus decitabine alone in relation to CR, overall response, or survival. Subset analyses did not demonstrate a benefit within the MDS or AML categories. Toxicities were higher with the combination, in particular neurotoxicity. Conclusions Adding valproic acid to decitabine was not associated with improved outcome in the treatment of MDS or elderly AML. Future therapies may consider combining hypomethylating agents with better HDAC inhibitors and using different schedules. PMID:25336333

  11. Cost analysis of bivalirudin versus reference anticoagulants without GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention for acute coronary syndrome in routine clinical practice. Pompidou registry.

    PubMed

    Puymirat, E; Cohen, S; Védrenne, G; Caruba, T; Sabatier, B; Danchin, N; Durand, E

    2013-04-01

    Randomized controlled trials have shown improved