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Sample records for acute regulatory protein-related

  1. Clinical characteristics and prognosis of acute myeloid leukemia associated with DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Ryotokuji, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Ueki, Toshimitsu; Usuki, Kensuke; Kurosawa, Saiko; Kobayashi, Yutaka; Kawata, Eri; Tajika, Kenji; Gomi, Seiji; Kanda, Junya; Kobayashi, Anna; Omori, Ikuko; Marumo, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Yusuke; Yui, Shunsuke; Terada, Kazuki; Fukunaga, Keiko; Hirakawa, Tsuneaki; Arai, Kunihito; Kitano, Tomoaki; Kosaka, Fumiko; Tamai, Hayato; Nakayama, Kazutaka; Wakita, Satoshi; Fukuda, Takahiro; Inokuchi, Koiti

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, it has been reported that the frequency of DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutations - mutations of the genes that regulate gene expression through DNA methylation - is high in acute myeloid leukemia. The objective of the present study was to elucidate the clinical characteristics and prognosis of acute myeloid leukemia with associated DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation. We studied 308 patients with acute myeloid leukemia. DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutations were observed in 135 of the 308 cases (43.8%). Acute myeloid leukemia associated with a DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation was more frequent in older patients (P<0.0001) and in patients with intermediate cytogenetic risk (P<0.0001) accompanied by a high white blood cell count (P=0.0032). DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation was an unfavorable prognostic factor for overall survival in the whole cohort (P=0.0018), in patients aged ≤70 years, in patients with intermediate cytogenetic risk, and in FLT3-ITD-negative patients (P=0.0409). Among the patients with DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutations, 26.7% were found to have two or more such mutations and prognosis worsened with increasing number of mutations. In multivariate analysis DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation was an independent unfavorable prognostic factor for overall survival (P=0.0424). However, patients with a DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation in first remission had a significantly better prognosis than those who did not undergo such transplantation (P=0.0254). Our study establishes that DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation is an important unfavorable prognostic factor in acute myeloid leukemia.

  2. Clinical characteristics and prognosis of acute myeloid leukemia associated with DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ryotokuji, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Ueki, Toshimitsu; Usuki, Kensuke; Kurosawa, Saiko; Kobayashi, Yutaka; Kawata, Eri; Tajika, Kenji; Gomi, Seiji; Kanda, Junya; Kobayashi, Anna; Omori, Ikuko; Marumo, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Yusuke; Yui, Shunsuke; Terada, Kazuki; Fukunaga, Keiko; Hirakawa, Tsuneaki; Arai, Kunihito; Kitano, Tomoaki; Kosaka, Fumiko; Tamai, Hayato; Nakayama, Kazutaka; Wakita, Satoshi; Fukuda, Takahiro; Inokuchi, Koiti

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, it has been reported that the frequency of DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutations – mutations of the genes that regulate gene expression through DNA methylation – is high in acute myeloid leukemia. The objective of the present study was to elucidate the clinical characteristics and prognosis of acute myeloid leukemia with associated DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation. We studied 308 patients with acute myeloid leukemia. DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutations were observed in 135 of the 308 cases (43.8%). Acute myeloid leukemia associated with a DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation was more frequent in older patients (P<0.0001) and in patients with intermediate cytogenetic risk (P<0.0001) accompanied by a high white blood cell count (P=0.0032). DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation was an unfavorable prognostic factor for overall survival in the whole cohort (P=0.0018), in patients aged ≤70 years, in patients with intermediate cytogenetic risk, and in FLT3-ITD-negative patients (P=0.0409). Among the patients with DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutations, 26.7% were found to have two or more such mutations and prognosis worsened with increasing number of mutations. In multivariate analysis DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation was an independent unfavorable prognostic factor for overall survival (P=0.0424). However, patients with a DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation in first remission had a significantly better prognosis than those who did not undergo such transplantation (P=0.0254). Our study establishes that DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation is an important unfavorable prognostic factor in acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:27247325

  3. Regulatory T cells are decreased in acute RHDV lethal infection of adult rabbits.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Luzia; Marques, Raquel M; Aguas, Artur P; Ferreira, Paula G

    2012-08-15

    Rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) is the etiologic agent of rabbit hemorrhagic disease (RHD), an acute lethal infection that kills 90% of adult rabbits due to severe acute liver inflammation. Interestingly, young rabbits are naturally resistant to RHDV infection. Here, we have compared naturally occurring CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) between young and adult rabbits after infection by RHDV. The number and frequency of Tregs was decreased in the spleen of adult rabbits 24h after the RHDV infection; this was in contrast with the unchanged number and frequency of splenic Tregs found in young rabbits after the same infection. Also, serum levels of IL-10 and TGF-β were enhanced in the infected adult rabbits whereas no alteration was observed in infected young rabbits. However, this increase is accompanied by a burst of pro-inflammatory cytokines, but seems not able to prevent the death of the animals with severe acute liver inflammation in few days after infection. Since Tregs downregulate inflammation, we conclude that their decrease may contribute to the natural susceptibility of adult rabbits to RHDV infection.

  4. Increased frequencies of CD4+CD25high regulatory T cells in acute dengue infection

    PubMed Central

    Lühn, Kerstin; Simmons, Cameron P.; Moran, Edward; Dung, Nguyen Thi Phuong; Chau, Tran Nguyen Bich; Quyen, Nguyen Than Ha; Thao, Le Thi Thu; Van Ngoc, Tran; Dung, Nguyen Minh; Wills, Bridget; Farrar, Jeremy; McMichael, Andrew J.; Dong, Tao; Rowland-Jones, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Dengue virus infection is an increasingly important tropical disease, causing 100 million cases each year. Symptoms range from mild febrile illness to severe hemorrhagic fever. The pathogenesis is incompletely understood, but immunopathology is thought to play a part, with antibody-dependent enhancement and massive immune activation of T cells and monocytes/macrophages leading to a disproportionate production of proinflammatory cytokines. We sought to investigate whether a defective population of regulatory T cells (T reg cells) could be contributing to immunopathology in severe dengue disease. CD4+CD25highFoxP3+ T reg cells of patients with acute dengue infection of different severities showed a conventional phenotype. Unexpectedly, their capacity to suppress T cell proliferation and to secrete interleukin-10 was not altered. Moreover, T reg cells suppressed the production of vasoactive cytokines after dengue-specific stimulation. Furthermore, T reg cell frequencies and also T reg cell/effector T cell ratios were increased in patients with acute infection. A strong indication that a relative rise of T reg cell/effector T cell ratios is beneficial for disease outcome comes from patients with mild disease in which this ratio is significantly increased (P < 0.0001) in contrast to severe cases (P = 0.2145). We conclude that although T reg cells expand and function normally in acute dengue infection, their relative frequencies are insufficient to control the immunopathology of severe disease. PMID:17452519

  5. The reduced soluble fibrinogen-like protein 2 and regulatory T cells in acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kun; Li, Ting; Huang, Shiyuan; Long, Rui; You, Ya; Liu, Jinping

    2016-01-01

    Soluble fibrinogen-like protein 2, sfgl2, is the new effector of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T cell (Treg) and exerts immunosuppressive activity. We design this study to investigate the possible role of sfgl2 in atherosclerosis. A total of 58 acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients, together with 22 stable angina (SA) patients and 31 normal coronary artery (NCA) people were enrolled in our study. Serum level of sfgl2 and plasma level of Treg were respectively measured. In line with the change of Treg, serum level of sfgl2 in ACS (8.70 ng/mL) was significantly decreased (P = 0.003), compared with that in SA (11.86 ng/mL) and NCA (17.55 ng/mL). Both sfgl2 and Treg level were obviously decreased in ACS; Sfgl2 may play a protective role in atherosclerosis. PMID:26515143

  6. Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein Overexpression Correlates with Protein Kinase A Activation in Adrenocortical Adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jing; Su, Tingwei; Jiang, Lei; Jiang, Yiran; Cao, Yanan; Liu, Jianmin; Ning, Guang; Wang, Weiqing

    2016-01-01

    The association of pathological features of cortisol-producing adrenocortical adenomas (ACAs) with somatic driver mutations and their molecular classification remain unclear. In this study, we explored the association between steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) expression and the driver mutations activating cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling to identify the pathological markers of ACAs. Immunohistochemical staining for StAR and mutations in the protein kinase cAMP-activated catalytic subunit alpha (PRKACA), protein kinase cAMP-dependent type I regulatory subunit alpha (PRKAR1A) and guanine nucleotide binding protein, alpha stimulating (GNAS) genes were examined in 97 ACAs. The association of StAR expression with the clinical and mutational features of the ACAs was analyzed. ACAs with mutations in PRKACA, GNAS, and PRKAR1A showed strong immunopositive staining for StAR. The concordance between high StAR expression and mutations activating cAMP/PKA signaling in the ACAs was 99.0%. ACAs with high expression of StAR had significantly smaller tumor volume (P < 0.001) and higher urinary cortisol per tumor volume (P = 0.032) than those with low expression of StAR. Our findings suggest that immunohistochemical staining for StAR is a reliable pathological approach for the diagnosis and classification of ACAs with cAMP/PKA signaling-activating mutations. PMID:27606678

  7. Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein Overexpression Correlates with Protein Kinase A Activation in Adrenocortical Adenoma.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weiwei; Wu, Luming; Xie, Jing; Su, Tingwei; Jiang, Lei; Jiang, Yiran; Cao, Yanan; Liu, Jianmin; Ning, Guang; Wang, Weiqing

    2016-01-01

    The association of pathological features of cortisol-producing adrenocortical adenomas (ACAs) with somatic driver mutations and their molecular classification remain unclear. In this study, we explored the association between steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) expression and the driver mutations activating cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling to identify the pathological markers of ACAs. Immunohistochemical staining for StAR and mutations in the protein kinase cAMP-activated catalytic subunit alpha (PRKACA), protein kinase cAMP-dependent type I regulatory subunit alpha (PRKAR1A) and guanine nucleotide binding protein, alpha stimulating (GNAS) genes were examined in 97 ACAs. The association of StAR expression with the clinical and mutational features of the ACAs was analyzed. ACAs with mutations in PRKACA, GNAS, and PRKAR1A showed strong immunopositive staining for StAR. The concordance between high StAR expression and mutations activating cAMP/PKA signaling in the ACAs was 99.0%. ACAs with high expression of StAR had significantly smaller tumor volume (P < 0.001) and higher urinary cortisol per tumor volume (P = 0.032) than those with low expression of StAR. Our findings suggest that immunohistochemical staining for StAR is a reliable pathological approach for the diagnosis and classification of ACAs with cAMP/PKA signaling-activating mutations.

  8. Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein Overexpression Correlates with Protein Kinase A Activation in Adrenocortical Adenoma.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weiwei; Wu, Luming; Xie, Jing; Su, Tingwei; Jiang, Lei; Jiang, Yiran; Cao, Yanan; Liu, Jianmin; Ning, Guang; Wang, Weiqing

    2016-01-01

    The association of pathological features of cortisol-producing adrenocortical adenomas (ACAs) with somatic driver mutations and their molecular classification remain unclear. In this study, we explored the association between steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) expression and the driver mutations activating cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling to identify the pathological markers of ACAs. Immunohistochemical staining for StAR and mutations in the protein kinase cAMP-activated catalytic subunit alpha (PRKACA), protein kinase cAMP-dependent type I regulatory subunit alpha (PRKAR1A) and guanine nucleotide binding protein, alpha stimulating (GNAS) genes were examined in 97 ACAs. The association of StAR expression with the clinical and mutational features of the ACAs was analyzed. ACAs with mutations in PRKACA, GNAS, and PRKAR1A showed strong immunopositive staining for StAR. The concordance between high StAR expression and mutations activating cAMP/PKA signaling in the ACAs was 99.0%. ACAs with high expression of StAR had significantly smaller tumor volume (P < 0.001) and higher urinary cortisol per tumor volume (P = 0.032) than those with low expression of StAR. Our findings suggest that immunohistochemical staining for StAR is a reliable pathological approach for the diagnosis and classification of ACAs with cAMP/PKA signaling-activating mutations. PMID:27606678

  9. The life cycle of the steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein: from transcription through proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Granot, Zvi; Silverman, Eran; Friedlander, Ruth; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Eimerl, Sarah; Timberg, Rina; Hales, Karen H; Hales, Dale B; Stocco, Douglas M; Orly, Joseph

    2002-11-01

    The Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory (StAR) protein is a mitochondrial protein required for the transport of cholesterol substrate to the P450scc enzyme located in the inner mitochondrial membranes of steroid producing cells. This study suggests that the acute regulation of the rodent StAR gene in the ovary is mediated by two factors, C/EBPbeta and GATA-4. Once translated, the StAR precursor protein is either imported into the mitochondria, or it is rapidly degraded in the cytosol. We predicted that in order to perpetuate StAR activity cycles, imported StAR should turn over rapidly to avoid a potentially harmful accumulation of the protein in sub-mitochondrial compartments. Pulse-chase experiments in metabolically labeled cells showed that: (a) the turnover rate of mature mitochondrial StAR protein (30 kDa) is much faster (t(1/2) = 4-5 h) than that of other mitochondrial proteins; (b) dissipation of the inner membrane potential (-delta psi) by carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (mCCCP) accelerates the mitochondrial degradation of StAR; (c) unexpectedly, the mitochondrial degradation of StAR is inhibited by MG132 and lactacystin, but not by epoxomicin. Furthermore, StAR degradation becomes inhibitor-resistant two hours after import. Therefore, these studies suggest a bi-phasic route of StAR turnover in the mitochondria. Shortly after import, StAR is degraded by inhibitor-sensitive protease(s) (phase I), whereas at later times, StAR turnover proceeds to completion through an MG132-resistant proteolytic activity (phase II). Collectively, this study defines StAR as a unique protein that can authentically be used to probe multiple proteolytic activities in mammalian mitochondria.

  10. The life cycle of the steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein: from transcription through proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Granot, Zvi; Silverman, Eran; Friedlander, Ruth; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Eimerl, Sarah; Timberg, Rina; Hales, Karen H; Hales, Dale B; Stocco, Douglas M; Orly, Joseph

    2002-11-01

    The Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory (StAR) protein is a mitochondrial protein required for the transport of cholesterol substrate to the P450scc enzyme located in the inner mitochondrial membranes of steroid producing cells. This study suggests that the acute regulation of the rodent StAR gene in the ovary is mediated by two factors, C/EBPbeta and GATA-4. Once translated, the StAR precursor protein is either imported into the mitochondria, or it is rapidly degraded in the cytosol. We predicted that in order to perpetuate StAR activity cycles, imported StAR should turn over rapidly to avoid a potentially harmful accumulation of the protein in sub-mitochondrial compartments. Pulse-chase experiments in metabolically labeled cells showed that: (a) the turnover rate of mature mitochondrial StAR protein (30 kDa) is much faster (t(1/2) = 4-5 h) than that of other mitochondrial proteins; (b) dissipation of the inner membrane potential (-delta psi) by carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (mCCCP) accelerates the mitochondrial degradation of StAR; (c) unexpectedly, the mitochondrial degradation of StAR is inhibited by MG132 and lactacystin, but not by epoxomicin. Furthermore, StAR degradation becomes inhibitor-resistant two hours after import. Therefore, these studies suggest a bi-phasic route of StAR turnover in the mitochondria. Shortly after import, StAR is degraded by inhibitor-sensitive protease(s) (phase I), whereas at later times, StAR turnover proceeds to completion through an MG132-resistant proteolytic activity (phase II). Collectively, this study defines StAR as a unique protein that can authentically be used to probe multiple proteolytic activities in mammalian mitochondria. PMID:12530639

  11. Acute HIV Seroconversion Presenting with Active Tuberculosis and Associated with High Levels of T-Regulatory Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sued, Omar; Quiroga, María Florencia; Socías, María Eugenia; Turk, Gabriela; Salomón, Horacio

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A patient with well-defined acute HIV infection who developed concomitant pulmonary tuberculosis during the retroviral acute syndrome is reported here. In this patient high levels of T-regulatory cells (Tregs) and a low proliferation response to M. tuberculosis were initially detected, which normalized throughout follow-up. This case calls for the consideration of tuberculosis in patients in the early stages of HIV, and emphasizes the need for further study of the potential causal relationship between Treg cells and the risk of TB reactivation in HIV patients. PMID:21774688

  12. Regulatory T cells-derived IL-35 promotes the growth of adult acute myeloid leukemia blasts.

    PubMed

    Tao, Qianshan; Pan, Ying; Wang, Yiping; Wang, Huiping; Xiong, Shudao; Li, Qing; Wang, Jia; Tao, Lili; Wang, Zhitao; Wu, Fan; Zhang, Rui; Zhai, Zhimin

    2015-11-15

    Tumor immune escape mechanism mediated by CD4+CD25+regulatory T cells (Tregs) is a key factor in the pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). IL-35, as a novel inhibitory cytokine, is produced by Tregs specially and regulates functions of Tregs in murine. However, IL-35 expression of Tregs in human is still disputed, and its role in AML is yet to be elucidated. In this study, we found that IL-35 was expressed highly in peripheral blood plasma of adult patients with AML and significantly correlated with the clinical stages of malignancy. Tregs-derived from adult AML patients produced IL-35 in a stimulation-dependent manner. IL-35 promoted AML blasts immune escape by expanding Tregs and inhibiting CD4+CD25-effector T cells (Teffs). Furthermore, IL-35 directly promoted the proliferation of AML blasts and reduced the apoptosis of AML blasts. Together, our study demonstrates that IL-35-derived from Tregs promotes the growth of adult AML blasts, suggesting that IL-35 has an important role in the pathogenesis of AML.

  13. Retinoid regulated macrophage cholesterol efflux involves the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein

    PubMed Central

    Manna, Pulak R.

    2016-01-01

    Elimination of excess cholesteryl esters from macrophage-derived foam cells is known to be a key process in limiting plaque stability and progression of atherosclerotic lesions. We have recently demonstrated that regulation of retinoid mediated cholesterol efflux is influenced by liver X receptor (LXR) signaling in mouse macrophages (Manna, P.R. et al., 2015, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun., 464:312-317). The data presented in this article evaluate the importance of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) in retinoid mediated macrophage cholesterol efflux. Overexpression of StAR in mouse RAW 264.7 macrophages increased the effects of both all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) and 9-cis RA on cholesterol efflux, suggesting StAR enhances the efficacy of retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and/or retinoid X receptor (RXR) ligands. Additional data revealed that atRA enhances (Bu)2cAMP induced StAR and ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 protein levels. Treatment of macrophages transfected with an LXRE reporter plasmid (pLXREx3-Luc) was found to induce the effects of RAR and RXR analogs on LXR activity. PMID:27081671

  14. Mitochondrial Fusion and ERK Activity Regulate Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein Localization in Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Alejandra; Castillo, Ana Fernanda; Podestá, Ernesto J.; Poderoso, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    The rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of steroid hormones, known as the transfer of cholesterol from the outer to the inner mitochondrial membrane, is facilitated by StAR, the Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory protein. We have described that mitochondrial ERK1/2 phosphorylates StAR and that mitochondrial fusion, through the up-regulation of a fusion protein Mitofusin 2, is essential during steroidogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that mitochondrial StAR together with mitochondrial active ERK and PKA are necessary for maximal steroid production. Phosphorylation of StAR by ERK is required for the maintenance of this protein in mitochondria, observed by means of over-expression of a StAR variant lacking the ERK phosphorylation residue. Mitochondrial fusion regulates StAR levels in mitochondria after hormone stimulation. In this study, Mitofusin 2 knockdown and mitochondrial fusion inhibition in MA-10 Leydig cells diminished StAR mRNA levels and concomitantly mitochondrial StAR protein. Together our results unveil the requirement of mitochondrial fusion in the regulation of the localization and mRNA abundance of StAR. We here establish the relevance of mitochondrial phosphorylation events in the correct localization of this key protein to exert its action in specialized cells. These discoveries highlight the importance of mitochondrial fusion and ERK phosphorylation in cholesterol transport by means of directing StAR to the outer mitochondrial membrane to achieve a large number of steroid molecules per unit of StAR. PMID:24945345

  15. A European pharmaceutical company initiative challenging the regulatory requirement for acute toxicity studies in pharmaceutical drug development.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Sally; Delongeas, Jean-Luc; Donald, Elizabeth; Dreher, David; Festag, Matthias; Kervyn, Sophie; Lampo, Ann; Nahas, Kamil; Nogues, Vicente; Ockert, Deborah; Quinn, Kirsty; Old, Sally; Pickersgill, Nigel; Somers, Kev; Stark, Claudia; Stei, Peter; Waterson, Lynne; Chapman, Kathryn

    2008-04-01

    Regulatory guidelines indicate acute toxicity studies in animals are considered necessary for pharmaceuticals intended for human use. This is the only study type where lethality is mentioned as an endpoint. The studies are carried out, usually in rodents, to support marketing of new drugs and to identify the minimum lethal dose. A European initiative including 18 companies has undertaken an evidence-based review of acute toxicity studies and assessed the value of the data generated. Preclinical and clinical information was shared on 74 compounds. The analysis indicated acute toxicity data was not used to (i) terminate drugs from development (ii) support dose selection for repeat dose studies in animals or (iii) to set doses in the first clinical trials in humans. The conclusion of the working group is that acute toxicity studies are not needed prior to first clinical trials in humans. Instead, information can be obtained from other studies, which are performed at more relevant doses for humans and are already an integral part of drug development. The conclusions have been discussed and agreed with representatives of regulatory bodies from the US, Japan and Europe.

  16. Acute inflammation in peritoneal dialysis: experimental studies in rats. Characterization of regulatory mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Bazargani, Farhan

    2005-01-01

    The predominant problems associated with peritoneal dialysis (PD) are ultrafiltration failure and peritonitis. PD maintains a state of intraperitoneal inflammation that affects the structure and function of the peritoneal membrane, potentially impairing ultrafiltration efficiency. Paradoxically, some PD fluids also have anti-inflammatory properties that may compromise the immune defense against peritonitis. This anti-inflammatory feature is mostly due to the glucose degradation products (GDPs), formed during heat-sterilization and storage of PD fluids. The main purpose of the present thesis was to study regulatory mechanisms behind the acute intraperitoneal inflammatory response in PD in the presence and absence of experimental peritonitis. Rats were exposed to a single dose of heat- or filter sterilized PD fluids either as an i.p. injection or as an infusion through an indwelling catheter, with or without supplementations, or pretreatment of the animals. The dwell fluid was analyzed zero, two and four hours later concerning activation of the complement and coagulation cascades, neutrophil recruitment and respiratory burst, ultrafiltration volumes, cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC-1), rat mast cell protease 2 (RMCP-2), glucose, urea and histamine concentrations and ex vivo/in vitro intraperitoneal chemotactic activity. Exposure to filter sterilized PD fluid alone induced intraperitoneal complement activation and coagulation, neutrophil recruitment and increased the levels of CINC-1 during the dwell. Intraperitoneal concentrations of the mast cell markers histamine and RMCP-2 changed little during the dwells and did not indicate mast cell activation. Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) and C5 blockade improved ultrafiltration. Pretreatment with cobra venom factor, known decomplementing agent, blocked the CINC-1 release and the neutrophil recruitment and improved ultrafiltration. In combination with experimental peritonitis, heat sterilized PD fluid

  17. Regulatory T cells reduce acute lung injury fibroproliferation by decreasing fibrocyte recruitment.

    PubMed

    Garibaldi, Brian T; D'Alessio, Franco R; Mock, Jason R; Files, D Clark; Chau, Eric; Eto, Yoshiki; Drummond, M Bradley; Aggarwal, Neil R; Sidhaye, Venkataramana; King, Landon S

    2013-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) causes significant morbidity and mortality. Fibroproliferation in ALI results in worse outcomes, but the mechanisms governing fibroproliferation remain poorly understood. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are important in lung injury resolution. Their role in fibroproliferation is unknown. We sought to identify the role of Tregs in ALI fibroproliferation, using a murine model of lung injury. Wild-type (WT) and lymphocyte-deficient Rag-1(-/-) mice received intratracheal LPS. Fibroproliferation was characterized by histology and the measurement of lung collagen. Lung fibrocytes were measured by flow cytometry. To dissect the role of Tregs in fibroproliferation, Rag-1(-/-) mice received CD4(+)CD25(+) (Tregs) or CD4(+)CD25(-) Tcells (non-Tregs) at the time of LPS injury. To define the role of the chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 12 (CXCL12)-CXCR4 pathway in ALI fibroproliferation, Rag-1(-/-) mice were treated with the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 to block fibrocyte recruitment. WT and Rag-1(-/-) mice demonstrated significant collagen deposition on Day 3 after LPS. WT mice exhibited the clearance of collagen, but Rag-1(-/-) mice developed persistent fibrosis. This fibrosis was mediated by the sustained epithelial expression of CXCL12 (or stromal cell-derived factor 1 [SDF-1]) that led to increased fibrocyte recruitment. The adoptive transfer of Tregs resolved fibroproliferation by decreasing CXCL12 expression and subsequent fibrocyte recruitment. Blockade of the CXCL12-CXCR4 axis with AMD3100 also decreased lung fibrocytes and fibroproliferation. These results indicate a central role for Tregs in the resolution of ALI fibroproliferation by reducing fibrocyte recruitment along the CXCL12-CXCR4 axis. A dissection of the role of Tregs in ALI fibroproliferation may inform the design of new therapeutic tools for patients with ALI. PMID:23002097

  18. Violacein Treatment Modulates Acute and Chronic Inflammation through the Suppression of Cytokine Production and Induction of Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Verinaud, Liana; Lopes, Stefanie Costa Pinto; Prado, Isabel Cristina Naranjo; Zanucoli, Fábio; Alves da Costa, Thiago; Di Gangi, Rosária; Issayama, Luidy Kazuo; Carvalho, Ana Carolina; Bonfanti, Amanda Pires; Niederauer, Guilherme Francio; Duran, Nelson; Costa, Fábio Trindade Maranhão; Oliveira, Alexandre Leite Rodrigues; Höfling, Maria Alice da Cruz; Machado, Dagmar Ruth Stach; Thomé, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a necessary process to control infection. However, exacerbated inflammation, acute or chronic, promotes deleterious effects in the organism. Violacein (viola), a quorum sensing metabolite from the Gram-negative bacterium Chromobacterium violaceum, has been shown to protect mice from malaria and to have beneficial effects on tumors. However, it is not known whether this drug possesses anti-inflammatory activity. In this study, we investigated whether viola administration is able to reduce acute and chronic autoimmune inflammation. For that purpose, C57BL/6 mice were intraperitoneally injected with 1 μg of LPS and were treated with viola (3.5mg/kg) via i.p. at the same time-point. Three hours later, the levels of inflammatory cytokines in the sera and phenotypical characterization of leukocytes were determined. Mice treated with viola presented a significant reduction in the production of inflammatory cytokines compared with untreated mice. Interestingly, although viola is a compound derived from bacteria, it did not induce inflammation upon administration to naïve mice. To test whether viola would protect mice from an autoimmune inflammation, Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE)-inflicted mice were given viola i.p. at disease onset, at the 10th day from immunization. Viola-treated mice developed mild EAE disease in contrast with placebo-treated mice. The frequencies of dendritic cells and macrophages were unaltered in EAE mice treated with viola. However, the sole administration of viola augmented the levels of splenic regulatory T cells (CD4+Foxp3+). We also found that adoptive transfer of viola-elicited regulatory T cells significantly reduced EAE. Our study shows, for the first time, that violacein is able to modulate acute and chronic inflammation. Amelioration relied in suppression of cytokine production (in acute inflammation) and stimulation of regulatory T cells (in chronic inflammation). New studies must be conducted in order to

  19. Quercetin and vitamin E attenuate Bonny Light crude oil-induced alterations in testicular apoptosis, stress proteins and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Ebokaiwe, Azubuike P; Mathur, Premendu P; Farombi, Ebenezer O

    2016-10-01

    Studies have shown the reproductive effects of Bonny Light crude oil (BLCO) via the mechanism of oxidative stress and testicular apoptosis. We investigated the protective role of quercetin and vitamin E on BLCO-induced testicular apoptosis. Experimental rats were divided into four groups of four each. Animals were orally administered 2 ml/kg corn oil (control: group 1), BLCO-800 mg/kg body weight + 10 mg/kg quercetin (group 2), BLCO-800 mg/kg body weight + 50 mg/kg vitamin E (group 3) and BLCO-800 mg/kg body weight only (group 4) for 7 d. Protein levels of caspase 3, FasL, NF-kB, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and stress response proteins were determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Immunofluorescence staining was used to quantify the expression of caspase 3, FasL and NF-kB. Apoptosis was quantified by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay. Administration of BLCO resulted in a significant increase in the levels of stress response proteins and apoptosis-related proteins by 50% and above after 7 d following BLCO exposure and a concomitant increase in expression of caspase 3, FasL and NF-kB expression by immunofluorescence staining. Apoptosis showed a significant increase in TUNEL positive cells. Co-administration with quercetin or vitamin E reversed BLCO-induced apoptosis and levels of stress protein, relative to control. These findings suggest that quercetin and vitamin E may confer protection against BLCO-induced testicular oxidative stress-related apoptosis.

  20. The potential function of steroid sulphatase activity in steroid production and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein expression.

    PubMed Central

    Sugawara, Teruo; Fujimoto, Seiichiro

    2004-01-01

    The first step in the biosynthesis of steroid hormones is conversion of cholesterol into pregnenolone. StAR (steroidogenic acute regulatory) protein plays a crucial role in the intra-mitochondrial movement of cholesterol. STS (steroid sulphatase), which is present ubiquitously in mammalian tissues, including the placenta, adrenal gland, testis and ovary, desulphates a number of 3beta-hydroxysteroid sulphates, including cholesterol sulphate. The present study was designed to examine the effect of STS on StAR protein synthesis and steroidogenesis in cells. Steroidogenic activities of COS-1 cells that had been co-transfected with a vector for the cholesterol P450scc (cytochrome P450 side-chain-cleavage enzyme) system, named F2, a StAR expression vector (pStAR), and an STS expression vector (pSTS) were assayed. Whole-cell extracts were subjected to SDS/PAGE and then to Western blot analysis. pSTS co-expressed in COS-1 cells with F2 and pStAR increased pregnenolone synthesis 2-fold compared with that of co-expression with F2 and pStAR. Western blot analysis using COS-1 cells that had been co-transfected with pSTS, F2 and pStAR revealed that StAR protein levels increased, whereas STS and P450scc protein levels did not change. The amount of StAR protein translation products increased when pSTS was added to an in vitro transcription-translation reaction mixture. Pulse-chase experiments demonstrated that the 37 kDa StAR pre-protein disappeared significantly ( P <0.01) more slowly in COS-1 cells that had been transfected with pSTS than in COS-1 cells that had not been transfected with pSTS. The increase in StAR protein level is not a result of an increase in StAR gene expression, but is a result of both an increase in translation and a longer half-life of the 37 kDa pre-StAR protein. In conclusion, STS increases StAR protein expression level and stimulates steroid production. PMID:14969586

  1. Barriers to the Adoption of Safety-Engineered Needles Following a Regulatory Standard: Lessons Learned from Three Acute Care Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Andrea; Mustard, Cameron A.; Holness, D. Linn; Nichol, Kathryn; Breslin, F. Curtis

    2015-01-01

    Background: A number of jurisdictions have introduced regulation to accelerate the adoption of safety-engineered needles (SENs). This study examined the transition to SENs in three acute care hospitals prior to and following the implementation of a regulatory standard in Ontario. This paper focuses on the ongoing barriers to the prevention of needlestick injuries among healthcare workers. Methods: Information from document review and 30 informant interviews were used to prepare three case studies detailing each organization's implementation activities and outcomes. Results: All three hospitals responded to the regulatory requirements with integrity and needlestick injuries declined. However, needlestick injuries continued to occur during the activation of safety devices, during procedures and during instrument disposal. The study documented substantial barriers to further progress in needlestick injury prevention. Conclusions: Healthcare organizations should focus on understanding their site-specific challenges that contribute to ongoing injury risk to better understand issues related to product limitations, practice constraints and the work environment. PMID:26571471

  2. Expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein in the human corpus luteum throughout the luteal phase.

    PubMed

    Devoto, L; Kohen, P; Gonzalez, R R; Castro, O; Retamales, I; Vega, M; Carvallo, P; Christenson, L K; Strauss, J F

    2001-11-01

    The expression of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) in the human corpus luteum (CL) was examined throughout the luteal phase. The primary 1.6-kb StAR transcript was in greater abundance in early (3.1-fold) and mid (2.2-fold) luteal phase CL compared with late luteal phase CL. The larger StAR transcript (4.4 kb) was found in early and midluteal phase CL, but was not detected in late luteal phase specimens. Mature StAR protein (30 kDa) was present in lower amounts within late CL compared with early and midluteal phase CL. The StAR preprotein (37 kDa) was also detected in greater abundance in early and midluteal CL. Immunohistochemistry revealed that StAR staining was most prominent in thecal-lutein cells throughout the luteal phase. The intensity of the signal for StAR exhibited significant changes throughout the luteal phase, being most intense during the midluteal phase and least during the late luteal phase. Plasma progesterone concentrations were highly correlated (r = 0.73 and r = 0.79) with luteal expression of the preprotein and mature StAR isoforms, respectively, throughout the luteal phase. To examine the LH dependency of StAR expression, the GnRH antagonist, Cetrorelix, was administered during the midluteal phase. Cetrorelix caused a decline in serum LH levels within 2 h, which, in turn, caused a pronounced decline in plasma progesterone within 6 h. The StAR 4.4-kb transcript was not detectable, and the 1.6-kb transcript was reduced by approximately 50% within 24 h of Cetrorelix treatment. The mature 30-kDa StAR protein level declined approximately 30% after Cetrorelix treatment. We conclude that 1) StAR mRNA and protein are highly expressed in early and midluteal phase CL; 2) StAR protein is present in both thecal-lutein and granulosa-lutein cells throughout the luteal phase; 3) StAR protein levels in the CL are highly correlated with plasma progesterone levels; 4) declining StAR mRNA and protein levels are characteristic of late luteal

  3. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells and regulatory T cells in acute viral hepatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Barnaba, V; Tamburrini, E; Laghi, V; Cauda, R; Levrero, M; Ruocco, G; Ortona, L; Balsano, F

    1985-01-01

    During acute viral hepatitis, we observed a significant decrease in OKT4/OKT8 ratio with a significant increase in the OKT8 positive subset in acute type B and non-A-non-B hepatitis. This altered ratio persisted in type B for a long time until HBsAg antibody became detectable, while it soon returned to normal in type A and non-A-non-B hepatitis. In the majority of acute hepatitis the altered ratio is because of an increase and not to a decrease in the whole T cell population, as described in chronic HBV infection. The number of HNK-1 positive cells remained raised during the recovery phase of type B and non-A-non-B hepatitis, a finding consistent with the hypothesis that NK cells play a role in the host defence against B and non-A-non-B virus infections. Serum beta 2-microglobulin concentrations were increased only in acute hepatitis B and non-A-non-B where immunological mechanisms are suspected to be involved, and showed a good correlation with the population of activated OKIa positive cells. PMID:2862096

  4. Identification of a regulatory loop for the synthesis of neurosteroids: a steroidogenic acute regulatory protein-dependent mechanism involving hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis receptors.

    PubMed

    Meethal, Sivan Vadakkadath; Liu, Tianbing; Chan, Hsien W; Ginsburg, Erika; Wilson, Andrea C; Gray, Danielle N; Bowen, Richard L; Vonderhaar, Barbara K; Atwood, Craig S

    2009-08-01

    Brain sex steroids are derived from both peripheral (primarily gonadal) and local (neurosteroids) sources and are crucial for neurogenesis, neural differentiation and neural function. The mechanism(s) regulating the production of neurosteroids is not understood. To determine whether hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis components previously detected in the extra-hypothalamic brain comprise a feedback loop to regulate neuro-sex steroid (NSS) production, we assessed dynamic changes in expression patterns of steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein, a key regulator of steroidogenesis, and key hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal endocrine receptors, by modulating peripheral sex hormone levels in female mice. Ovariectomy (OVX; high serum gonadotropins, low serum sex steroids) had a differential effect on StAR protein levels in the extrahypothalamic brain; increasing the 30- and 32-kDa variants but decreasing the 37-kDa variant and is indicative of cholesterol transport into mitochondria for steroidogenesis. Treatment of OVX animals with E(2), P(4), or E(2) + P(4) for 3 days, which decreases OVX-induced increases in GnRH/gonadotropin production, reversed this pattern. Suppression of gonadotropin levels in OVX mice using the GnRH agonist leuprolide acetate inhibited the processing of the 37-kDa StAR protein into the 30-kDa StAR protein, confirming that the differential processing of brain StAR protein is regulated by gonadotropins. OVX dramatically suppressed extra-hypothalamic brain gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 receptor expression, and was further suppressed in E(2)- or P(4)-treated OVX mice. Together, these data indicate the existence of endocrine and autocrine/paracrine feedback loops that regulate NSS synthesis. Further delineation of these feedback loops that regulate NSS production will aid in developing therapies to maintain brain sex steroid levels and cognition.

  5. MAR binding protein SMAR1 favors IL-10 mediated regulatory T cell function in acute colitis

    SciTech Connect

    Mirlekar, Bhalchandra; Patil, Sachin; Bopanna, Ramanamurthy; Chattopadhyay, Samit

    2015-08-21

    T{sub reg} cells are not only crucial for controlling immune responses to autoantigens but also prevent those directed towards commensal pathogens. Control of effector immune responses by T{sub reg} cells depend on their capacity to accumulate at inflammatory site and accordingly accommodate to inflammatory environment. Till date, the factors associated with maintaining these aspects of T{sub reg} phenotype is not understood properly. Here we have shown that a known nuclear matrix binding protein SMAR1 is selectively expressed more in colonic T{sub reg} cells and is required for their ability to accumulate at inflammatory site and to sustain high levels of Foxp3 and IL-10 expression during acute colitis. Elimination of anti-inflammatory subsets revealed a protective role for IL-10 producing T{sub reg} cells in SMAR1{sup −/−} mice. Moreover, a combined action of Foxp3 and SMAR1 restricts effector cytokine production and enhance the production of IL-10 by colonic T{sub reg} cells that controls acute colitis. This data highlights a critical role of SMAR1 in maintaining T{sub reg} physiology during inflammatory disorders. - Highlights: • SMAR1 is essential to sustain high level of Foxp3 and IL-10 in T{sub reg} cells. • SMAR1{sup −/−} T{sub reg} cells produce pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-17 leads to inflammation. • IL-10 administration can control the inflammation in SMAR1{sup −/−} mice. • Both Foxp3 and SMAR1 maintain T{sub reg} phenotype that controls colitis.

  6. CCR7 Deficiency Exacerbates Injury in Acute Nephritis Due to Aberrant Localization of Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Eller, Kathrin; Weber, Tobias; Pruenster, Monika; Wolf, Anna M.; Mayer, Gert

    2010-01-01

    The homing of dendritic cells and T cells to secondary lymphoid organs requires chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) expression on these cells. T cells mediate the pathogenesis of experimental accelerated nephrotoxic serum nephritis (NTS), including its suppression by regulatory T cells (Tregs), but the contribution of CCR7 to this disease is unknown. Here, we compared the development of NTS in CCR7-knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice. Compared with WT mice, CCR7KO mice developed more severe disease with significantly more inflammatory cells infiltrating the kidney. These cells included FoxP3+ Tregs, which were virtually absent from WT kidneys. The adoptive transfer of WT Tregs into CCR7KO mice at the time of immunization protected the recipients from disease; these cells homed to secondary lymphoid organs but not to kidneys. Conversely, adoptive transfer of CCR7KO Tregs into WT mice did not inhibit development of NTS. These data suggest that NTS can develop without CCR7 expression, but Treg-mediated disease suppression, which seems to occur in secondary lymphoid organs, requires CCR7. PMID:19917782

  7. Volume regulatory loss of Na, Cl, and K from rat brain during acute hyponatremia

    SciTech Connect

    Melton, J.E.; Patlak, C.S.; Pettigrew, K.D.; Cserr, H.F.

    1987-04-01

    This study quantitatively evaluates the contribution of tissue Na, Cl, and K loss to brain volume regulation during acute dilutional hyponatremia (DH) and examines the mechanism of Na loss. DH was produced in pentobarbital sodium-anesthetized rats by intraperitoneal infusion of distilled water and brain water and electrolytes analyzed 30 min, 1 h, 3 h, 4 h, or 6 h later. The rate of Na and Cl loss was greatest during the first 30 min of DH. Net loss of Na and Cl was maximal after 3 h of DH. K loss was slower, achieving significance after 3 h. Electrolyte loss was sufficient to account for observed brain volume regulation after three or more hours of DH. Measurements of /sup 22/Na influx and efflux across the blood brain barrier showed that barrier permeability to Na is unchanged during DH. Analysis of results using a two-compartment model of plasma-brain exchange suggests that loss of brain Na during DH does not result solely from a shift of electrolyte across the blood-brain barrier to plasma, and thus provides indirect evidence for an additional pathway for Na loss, presumably via cerebrospinal fluid.

  8. Corruption of dendritic cell antigen presentation during acute GVHD leads to regulatory T-cell failure and chronic GVHD.

    PubMed

    Leveque-El Mouttie, Lucie; Koyama, Motoko; Le Texier, Laetitia; Markey, Kate A; Cheong, Melody; Kuns, Rachel D; Lineburg, Katie E; Teal, Bianca E; Alexander, Kylie A; Clouston, Andrew D; Blazar, Bruce R; Hill, Geoffrey R; MacDonald, Kelli P A

    2016-08-11

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) is a major cause of late mortality following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and is characterized by tissue fibrosis manifesting as scleroderma and bronchiolitis obliterans. The development of acute GVHD (aGVHD) is a powerful clinical predictor of subsequent cGVHD, suggesting that aGVHD may invoke the immunologic pathways responsible for cGVHD. In preclinical models in which sclerodermatous cGVHD develops after a preceding period of mild aGVHD, we show that antigen presentation within major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II of donor dendritic cells (DCs) is markedly impaired early after BMT. This is associated with a failure of regulatory T-cell (Treg) homeostasis and cGVHD. Donor DC-restricted deletion of MHC class II phenocopied this Treg deficiency and cGVHD. Moreover, specific depletion of donor Tregs after BMT also induced cGVHD, whereas adoptive transfer of Tregs ameliorated it. These data demonstrate that the defect in Treg homeostasis seen in cGVHD is a causative lesion and is downstream of defective antigen presentation within MHC class II that is induced by aGVHD. PMID:27338097

  9. Downregulation of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) gene expression by cyclic AMP in cultured Schwann cells.

    PubMed

    Benmessahel, Yasmina; Troadec, Jean-Denis; Cadepond, Françoise; Guennoun, Rachida; Hales, Dale Buchanan; Schumacher, Michael; Groyer, Ghislaine

    2004-02-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) plays a key role in the availability of cholesterol to the inner mitochondrial membrane, where the first step of steroidogenesis, its conversion to pregnenolone, takes place. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that the StAR gene is also expressed in the rat sciatic nerve and in cultured Schwann cells. The addition to the culture medium of the cAMP-elevating agent forskolin or of the cAMP analogue 8Br-cAMP produced a time-course extinction of StAR gene expression. An inverse relationship was demonstrated between StAR gene expression and the intracellular cAMP content. Accordingly, pharmacological inhibition of the activities of Schwann cell adenylyl cyclase or of phosphodiesterase IV resulted in modifications of StAR gene expression. Since StAR gene expression is stimulated by cAMP in classical steroidogenic cells, our work is the first demonstration of a negative regulation of StAR gene by cAMP.

  10. Corruption of dendritic cell antigen presentation during acute GVHD leads to regulatory T-cell failure and chronic GVHD.

    PubMed

    Leveque-El Mouttie, Lucie; Koyama, Motoko; Le Texier, Laetitia; Markey, Kate A; Cheong, Melody; Kuns, Rachel D; Lineburg, Katie E; Teal, Bianca E; Alexander, Kylie A; Clouston, Andrew D; Blazar, Bruce R; Hill, Geoffrey R; MacDonald, Kelli P A

    2016-08-11

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) is a major cause of late mortality following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and is characterized by tissue fibrosis manifesting as scleroderma and bronchiolitis obliterans. The development of acute GVHD (aGVHD) is a powerful clinical predictor of subsequent cGVHD, suggesting that aGVHD may invoke the immunologic pathways responsible for cGVHD. In preclinical models in which sclerodermatous cGVHD develops after a preceding period of mild aGVHD, we show that antigen presentation within major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II of donor dendritic cells (DCs) is markedly impaired early after BMT. This is associated with a failure of regulatory T-cell (Treg) homeostasis and cGVHD. Donor DC-restricted deletion of MHC class II phenocopied this Treg deficiency and cGVHD. Moreover, specific depletion of donor Tregs after BMT also induced cGVHD, whereas adoptive transfer of Tregs ameliorated it. These data demonstrate that the defect in Treg homeostasis seen in cGVHD is a causative lesion and is downstream of defective antigen presentation within MHC class II that is induced by aGVHD.

  11. Hormone-dependent expression of a steroidogenic acute regulatory protein natural antisense transcript in MA-10 mouse tumor Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Ana Fernanda; Fan, Jinjiang; Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2011-01-01

    Cholesterol transport is essential for many physiological processes, including steroidogenesis. In steroidogenic cells hormone-induced cholesterol transport is controlled by a protein complex that includes steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). Star is expressed as 3.5-, 2.8-, and 1.6-kb transcripts that differ only in their 3'-untranslated regions. Because these transcripts share the same promoter, mRNA stability may be involved in their differential regulation and expression. Recently, the identification of natural antisense transcripts (NATs) has added another level of regulation to eukaryotic gene expression. Here we identified a new NAT that is complementary to the spliced Star mRNA sequence. Using 5' and 3' RACE, strand-specific RT-PCR, and ribonuclease protection assays, we demonstrated that Star NAT is expressed in MA-10 Leydig cells and steroidogenic murine tissues. Furthermore, we established that human chorionic gonadotropin stimulates Star NAT expression via cAMP. Our results show that sense-antisense Star RNAs may be coordinately regulated since they are co-expressed in MA-10 cells. Overexpression of Star NAT had a differential effect on the expression of the different Star sense transcripts following cAMP stimulation. Meanwhile, the levels of StAR protein and progesterone production were downregulated in the presence of Star NAT. Our data identify antisense transcription as an additional mechanism involved in the regulation of steroid biosynthesis.

  12. Interferon Regulatory Factor-1 Mediates Alveolar Macrophage Pyroptosis During LPS-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dongdong; Pan, Pinhua; Su, Xiaoli; Zhang, Lemeng; Qin, Qingwu; Tan, Hongyi; Huang, Li; Li, Yuanyuan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Previously, we demonstrated that pyroptosis in alveolar macrophages (AMs) plays an essential role in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury. However, the underlying mechanism remains largely unclear. Here, we show that the absence of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) in genetic knock-out mice strongly abrogates pyroptosis in AMs and alleviates the LPS-induced lung injury and systemic inflammation. Our study demonstrates that IRF-1 contributes to caspase-1 activation and apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase activation and recruitment domain pyroptosome formation in AMs and leads to downstream inflammatory cytokine release, including that of IL-1β, IL-18, and HMGB1. The nuclear translocation of IRF-1 is linked to the presence of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Our findings suggest that pyroptosis and the downstream inflammatory response in AMs induced by LPS is a process that is dependent on TLR4-mediated up-regulation of IRF-1. In summary, IRF-1 plays a key role in controlling caspase-1-dependent pyroptosis and inflammation. PMID:26939040

  13. Curcumin Attenuates Acute Graft-versus-Host Disease Severity via In Vivo Regulations on Th1, Th17 and Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung-Hee; Yang, Eun-Ji; Min, Jun-Ki; Cho, Seok-Goo; Yang, Chul-Woo; Park, Sung-Hwan; Kim, Ho-Youn; Cho, Mi-La

    2013-01-01

    Background In this study we examined the in vivo and in vitro effects and mechanisms of action of curcumin on the development of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) using a murine model. Methodology/Principal Findings Mixed lymphocyte reactions were used to determine the in vitro effects of curcumin. Treatment with curcumin attenuated alloreactive T cell proliferation and inhibited the production of interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-17. In a murine acute GVHD model, transplantation of curcumin-treated allogeneic splenocytes into irradiated recipient mice significantly reduced the clinical severity scores of acute GVHD manifested in the liver, skin, colon and lung as compared with animals receiving vehicle-treated splenocytes. c-Fos and c-Jun expression levels in the skin and intestine, which are major target organs, were analyzed using immunohistochemical staining. Expression of both proteins was reduced in epithelial tissues of skin and intestine from curcumin-treated GVHD animals. The IFN-γ-expressing CD4+ splenocytes and IFN-γ-expressing lymph node cells were dramatically decreased in curcumin-treated mice. In contrast, CD4+Foxp3+ splenocytes were increased in the curcumin-treated acute GVHD animals. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that animals transplanted with curcumin-treated allogeneic splenocytes showed increased populations of CD4+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) as well as CD8+ Treg cells, compared to animals administered vehicle-treated splenocytes. Curcumin-treated acute GVHD animals could have a change in B cell subpopulations. Conclusion/Significance In the present study, we investigated the efficacy and mechanism of action of curcumin treatment against acute GVHD. The acute GVHD mice administered with curcumin-treated splenocytes showed significantly reduced severity of acute GVHD. Curcumin exerted in vivo preventive effects on acute GVHD by reciprocal regulation of T helper 1 (Th1) and Treg (both CD4+ and CD8+ Treg) cell lineages as well as

  14. Stimulatory effects of propylthiouracil on pregnenolone production through upregulation of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein expression in rat granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei-Chih; Wang, Shyi-Wu; Kan, Shu-Fen; Tsai, Shiow-Chwen; Wu, Yu-Ching; Wang, Paulus S

    2010-12-01

    Propylthiouracil (PTU) is a common and effective clinical medicine for the treatment of hyperthyroidism. Our previous study demonstrated that short-term treatment with PTU inhibits progesterone production in rat granulosa cells. However, our present results indicate that a 16-h treatment with PTU was able to stimulate pregnenolone production in rat granulosa cells, although progesterone production was diminished by PTU through inhibition of 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. Notably, we found that PTU treatment enhanced the conversion of cholesterol into pregnenolone, whereas the protein level of the cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc, which is the enzyme responding to this conversion) was not affected. Interestingly, the levels of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) in both total cell lysate and the mitochondrial fraction were significantly increased by PTU treatment. Furthermore, the binding of steroidogenic factor-1 (SF-1) to the StAR promoter region was also enhanced by PTU treatment, which suggests that PTU could upregulate StAR gene expression. In addition to SF-1 regulation, we found that mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase kinase activation is an important regulator of PTU-stimulated StAR protein expression, based on the effects of the MEK inhibitor PD98059. In conclusion, these results indicate that PTU plays opposite roles in the production of progesterone and its precursor, pregnenolone. The regulation of negative feedback on speeding the cholesterol transportation and pregnenolone conversion after a 16-h PTU treatment may be the mechanism explaining PTU's inhibition of progesterone production in rat granulosa cells.

  15. Targeted disruption of the mouse gene encoding steroidogenic acute regulatory protein provides insights into congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Caron, K M; Soo, S C; Wetsel, W C; Stocco, D M; Clark, B J; Parker, K L

    1997-10-14

    An essential component of regulated steroidogenesis is the translocation of cholesterol from the cytoplasm to the inner mitochondrial membrane where the cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme carries out the first committed step in steroidogenesis. Recent studies showed that a 30-kDa mitochondrial phosphoprotein, designated steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), is essential for this translocation. To allow us to explore the roles of StAR in a system amenable to experimental manipulation and to develop an animal model for the human disorder lipoid congenital adrenal hyperplasia (lipoid CAH), we used targeted gene disruption to produce StAR knockout mice. These StAR knockout mice were indistinguishable initially from wild-type littermates, except that males and females had female external genitalia. After birth, they failed to grow normally and died from adrenocortical insufficiency. Hormone assays confirmed severe defects in adrenal steroids-with loss of negative feedback regulation at hypothalamic-pituitary levels-whereas hormones constituting the gonadal axis did not differ significantly from levels in wild-type littermates. Histologically, the adrenal cortex of StAR knockout mice contained florid lipid deposits, with lesser deposits in the steroidogenic compartment of the testis and none in the ovary. The sex-specific differences in gonadal involvement support a two-stage model of the pathogenesis of StAR deficiency, with trophic hormone stimulation inducing progressive accumulation of lipids within the steroidogenic cells and ultimately causing their death. These StAR knockout mice provide a useful model system in which to determine the mechanisms of StAR's essential roles in adrenocortical and gonadal steroidogenesis.

  16. Infantile 4-tert-octylphenol exposure transiently inhibits rat ovarian steroidogenesis and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) expression

    SciTech Connect

    Myllymaeki, S.A. . E-mail: saanmy@utu.fi; Karjalainen, M.; Haavisto, T.E.; Toppari, J.; Paranko, J.

    2005-08-22

    Phenolic compounds, such as 4-tert-octylphenol (OP), have been shown to interfere with rat ovarian steroidogenesis. However, little is known about steroidogenic effects of infantile OP exposure on immature ovary. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of infantile OP exposure on plasma FSH, LH, estradiol, and progesterone levels in 14-day-old female rats. The effect on ovarian steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and FSH receptor (FSHr) expression was analyzed by Western blotting. Ex vivo analysis was carried out for follicular estradiol, progesterone, testosterone, and cAMP production. Sprague-Dawley rats were given OP (0, 10, 50, or 100 mg/kg) subcutaneously on postnatal days 6, 8, 10, and 12. On postnatal day 14, plasma FSH was decreased and progesterone increased significantly at a dose of 100 mg OP/kg. In addition, the highest OP dose advanced the time of vaginal opening in puberty. OP had no effect on infantile LH and estradiol levels or ovarian FSHr content. Ovarian StAR protein content and ex vivo hormone and cAMP production were decreased at all OP doses compared to controls. However, hormone levels recovered independent on FSH and even increased above the control level during a prolonged culture. On postnatal day 35, no statistically significant differences were seen between control and OP-exposed animals in plasma FSH, LH, estradiol, and progesterone levels, or in ovarian StAR protein content. The results indicate that the effect of OP on the infantile ovary is reversible, while more permanent effects in the hypothalamus and pituitary, as described earlier, are involved in the reduction of circulating FSH levels and premature vaginal opening.

  17. Turnover of mitochondrial steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein by Lon protease: the unexpected effect of proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Granot, Zvi; Kobiler, Oren; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Eimerl, Sarah; Bahat, Assaf; Lu, Bin; Braun, Sergei; Maurizi, Michael R; Suzuki, Carolyn K; Oppenheim, Amos B; Orly, Joseph

    2007-09-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) is a vital mitochondrial protein promoting transfer of cholesterol into steroid making mitochondria in specialized cells of the adrenal cortex and gonads. Our previous work has demonstrated that StAR is rapidly degraded upon import into the mitochondrial matrix. To identify the protease(s) responsible for this rapid turnover, murine StAR was expressed in wild-type Escherichia coli or in mutant strains lacking one of the four ATP-dependent proteolytic systems, three of which are conserved in mammalian mitochondria-ClpP, FtsH, and Lon. StAR was rapidly degraded in wild-type bacteria and stabilized only in lon (-)mutants; in such cells, StAR turnover was fully restored upon coexpression of human mitochondrial Lon. In mammalian cells, the rate of StAR turnover was proportional to the cell content of Lon protease after expression of a Lon-targeted small interfering RNA, or overexpression of the protein. In vitro assays using purified proteins showed that Lon-mediated degradation of StAR was ATP-dependent and blocked by the proteasome inhibitors MG132 (IC(50) = 20 microm) and clasto-lactacystin beta-lactone (cLbetaL, IC(50) = 3 microm); by contrast, epoxomicin, representing a different class of proteasome inhibitors, had no effect. Such inhibition is consistent with results in cultured rat ovarian granulosa cells demonstrating that degradation of StAR in the mitochondrial matrix is blocked by MG132 and cLbetaL but not by epoxomicin. Both inhibitors also blocked Lon-mediated cleavage of the model substrate fluorescein isothiocyanate-casein. Taken together, our former studies and the present results suggest that Lon is the primary ATP-dependent protease responsible for StAR turnover in mitochondria of steroidogenic cells.

  18. Chrysin, a natural flavonoid enhances steroidogenesis and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein gene expression in mouse Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Jana, Kuladip; Yin, Xiangling; Schiffer, Randolph B; Chen, Jau-Jiin; Pandey, Akhilesh K; Stocco, Douglas M; Grammas, Paula; Wang, Xingjia

    2008-05-01

    During the aging process of males, testosterone biosynthesis declines in testicular Leydig cells resulting in decreases in various physiological functions. To explore the possibility of delaying the decline using food supplements, we have studied steroidogenic effects of a natural flavonoid, chrysin, in mouse Leydig cells. Chrysin dramatically increased cyclic AMP (cAMP)-induced steroidogenesis in MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells. This result was confirmed using Leydig cells isolated from mouse testes. The steroidogenic effect of chrysin is not associated with an increase in expression of the P450 side-chain cleavage enzyme, required for the conversion of cholesterol to pregnenolone. In addition, when 22(R)hydroxylcholesterol was used as a substrate, chrysin induced a non-significant increase in steroid hormone, suggesting that the majority of the observed increase in steroidogenesis was due to the increased supply of substrate cholesterol. These observations were corroborated by showing that chrysin induced a marked increase in the expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein, the factor that controls mitochondrial cholesterol transfer. Also, chrysin significantly increased StAR promoter activity and StAR mRNA level. Further studies indicated that this compound depressed expression of DAX-1, a repressor in StAR gene transcription. In the absence of cAMP, chrysin did not increase steroidogenesis. However, when a sub-threshold level of cAMP was used, StAR protein and steroid hormone were increased by chrysin to the levels seen with maximal stimulation of cAMP. These results suggest that while chrysin itself is unable to induce StAR gene expression and steroidogenesis, it appears to function by increasing the sensitivity of Leydig cells to cAMP stimulation. PMID:18434361

  19. No relationship between most polymorphisms of steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) gene with polycystic ovarian syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nazouri, Azadeh-Sadat; Khosravifar, Mona; Akhlaghi, Ali-Asghar; Shiva, Marzieh; Afsharian, Parvaneh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrine women’s disorders in reproductive age. Hyperandrogenism has a critical role in the etiology of PCOS and it can cause fault in Steroidogenesis process. During steroidogenesis, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) seems to increase the delivery of cholesterol through mitochondrial membrane. Therefore, polymorphisms of StAR might effect on this protein and play a role in the etiology of PCOS. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between StAR SNPs with PCOS. Thus, seven polymorphisms in this gene: rs104894086, rs104894089, rs104894090, rs137852689, rs10489487, rs104894085 were detected. Materials and Methods: In this case control study, 45 PCOS women, 40 male factor/unexplained infertile women, and 40 fertile women as two control groups were participated from 2008-2012. Polymorphisms were detected using restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. Results: Heterozygote genotyping for rs137852689 SNP (amino acid 218 C > T) was only seen in seven PCOS patients, one in normal ovulatory women, and five in male factor/unexplained infertile women (15.5%, 2.5%, 12.5%, respectively) (p= 0.12). While, it has shown no association between other SNPS with PCOs. Conclusion: The RFLP results for seven chosen SNPs, which located in exon 5 and 7 showed normal status in three groups, it means no heterozygous or homozygous forms of selected SNPs were observed. So, it seems evaluation of the active amino acid sites should be investigated and also the study population should be increased. PMID:27141537

  20. Potential of acute phase proteins as predictor of postpartum uterine infections during transition period and its regulatory mechanism in dairy cattle

    PubMed Central

    Manimaran, A.; Kumaresan, A.; Jeyakumar, S.; Mohanty, T. K.; Sejian, V.; Kumar, Narender; Sreela, L.; Prakash, M. Arul; Mooventhan, P.; Anantharaj, A.; Das, D. N.

    2016-01-01

    Among the various systemic reactions against infection or injury, the acute phase response is the cascade of reaction and mostly coordinated by cytokines-mediated acute phase proteins (APPs) production. Since APPs are sensitive innate immune molecules, they are useful for early detection of inflammation in bovines and believed to be better discriminators than routine hematological parameters. Therefore, the possibility of using APPs as a diagnostic and prognostic marker of inflammation in major bovine health disorders including postpartum uterine infection has been explored by many workers. In this review, we discussed specifically importance of postpartum uterine infection, the role of energy balance in uterine infections and potential of APPs as a predictor of postpartum uterine infections during the transition period and its regulatory mechanism in dairy cattle. PMID:27051191

  1. Regulatory T Cells Contribute to the Inhibition of Radiation-Induced Acute Lung Inflammation via Bee Venom Phospholipase A2 in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Dasom; Lee, Gihyun; Sohn, Sung-Hwa; Park, Soojin; Jung, Kyung-Hwa; Lee, Ji Min; Yang, Jieun; Cho, Jaeho; Bae, Hyunsu

    2016-01-01

    Bee venom has long been used to treat various inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. Previously, we reported that bee venom phospholipase A2 (bvPLA2) has an anti-inflammatory effect through the induction of regulatory T cells. Radiotherapy is a common anti-cancer method, but often causes adverse effects, such as inflammation. This study was conducted to evaluate the protective effects of bvPLA2 in radiation-induced acute lung inflammation. Mice were focally irradiated with 75 Gy of X-rays in the lung and administered bvPLA2 six times after radiation. To evaluate the level of inflammation, the number of immune cells, mRNA level of inflammatory cytokine, and histological changes in the lung were measured. BvPLA2 treatment reduced the accumulation of immune cells, such as macrophages, neutrophils, lymphocytes, and eosinophils. In addition, bvPLA2 treatment decreased inflammasome-, chemokine-, cytokine- and fibrosis-related genes’ mRNA expression. The histological results also demonstrated the attenuating effect of bvPLA2 on radiation-induced lung inflammation. Furthermore, regulatory T cell depletion abolished the therapeutic effects of bvPLA2 in radiation-induced pneumonitis, implicating the anti-inflammatory effects of bvPLA2 are dependent upon regulatory T cells. These results support the therapeutic potential of bvPLA2 in radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis treatments. PMID:27144583

  2. Phospholipase A2 inhibits cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury by modulating regulatory T cells by the CD206 mannose receptor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunseong; Lee, Hyojung; Lee, Gihyun; Jang, Hyunil; Kim, Sung-Su; Yoon, Heera; Kang, Geun-Hyung; Hwang, Deok-Sang; Kim, Sun Kwang; Chung, Hwan-Suck; Bae, Hyunsu

    2015-09-01

    Previously, we found that Foxp3-expressing CD4(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells attenuate cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury in mice and that bee venom and its constituent phospholipase A2 (PLA2) are capable of modulating Treg cells. Here we tested whether PLA2 could inhibit cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury. As a result of treatment with PLA2, the population of Treg cells was significantly increased, both in vivo and in vitro. PLA2-injected mice showed reduced levels of serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, renal tissue damage, and pro-inflammatory cytokine production upon cisplatin administration. These renoprotective effects were abolished by depletion of Treg cells. Furthermore, PLA2 bound to CD206 mannose receptors on dendritic cells, essential for the PLA2-mediated protective effects on renal dysfunction. Interestingly, PLA2 treatment increased the secretion of IL-10 in the kidney from normal mice. Foxp3(+)IL-10(+) cells and CD11c(+)IL-10(+) cells were increased by PLA2 treatment. The anticancer effects of repeated administrations of a low dose of cisplatin were not affected by PLA2 treatment in a tumor-bearing model. Thus, PLA2 may prevent inflammatory responses in cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury by modulating Treg cells and IL-10 through the CD206 mannose receptor.

  3. The value of selected in vitro and in silico methods to predict acute oral toxicity in a regulatory context: results from the European Project ACuteTox.

    PubMed

    Prieto, P; Kinsner-Ovaskainen, A; Stanzel, S; Albella, B; Artursson, P; Campillo, N; Cecchelli, R; Cerrato, L; Díaz, L; Di Consiglio, E; Guerra, A; Gombau, L; Herrera, G; Honegger, P; Landry, C; O'Connor, J E; Páez, J A; Quintas, G; Svensson, R; Turco, L; Zurich, M G; Zurbano, M J; Kopp-Schneider, A

    2013-06-01

    ACuteTox is a project within the 6th European Framework Programme which had as one of its goals to develop, optimise and prevalidate a non-animal testing strategy for predicting human acute oral toxicity. In its last 6 months, a challenging exercise was conducted to assess the predictive capacity of the developed testing strategies and final identification of the most promising ones. Thirty-two chemicals were tested blind in the battery of in vitro and in silico methods selected during the first phase of the project. This paper describes the classification approaches studied: single step procedures and two step tiered testing strategies. In summary, four in vitro testing strategies were proposed as best performing in terms of predictive capacity with respect to the European acute oral toxicity classification. In addition, a heuristic testing strategy is suggested that combines the prediction results gained from the neutral red uptake assay performed in 3T3 cells, with information on neurotoxicity alerts identified by the primary rat brain aggregates test method. Octanol-water partition coefficients and in silico prediction of intestinal absorption and blood-brain barrier passage are also considered. This approach allows to reduce the number of chemicals wrongly predicted as not classified (LD50>2000 mg/kg b.w.).

  4. Protection of acute GVHD by all-trans retinoic acid through suppression of T cell expansion and induction of regulatory T cells through IL-2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haojun; Gu, Jian; Zhu, Qin; Lu, Hao; Wang, Kunpeng; Ni, Xuhao; Lu, Yunjie; Lu, Ling

    2015-10-01

    All-trans retinoic acid (atRA), the active derivative of vitamin A, has been shown to regulate Treg and T effector cell differentiation. However, the potential use of atRA as a treatment for acute graft-verse-host disease (aGVHD) has not been realized. Here we studied the ability of atRA to prevent and treat acute-GVHD in the B6-to-F1(D2B6F1) murine model. Our results showed that atRA consistently displayed a potent ability to control aGVHD development and reduce mortality by suppressing the expansion of donor T cells and inhibiting cytokine expression from donor CD8 cells. Interestingly, CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells were markedly increased in the spleens of atRA-treated mice. In vitro treatment with atRA inhibited T cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. Injection of an anti-IL-2 antibody impaired the protection by atRA in aGVHD. Therefore, these results strongly implicate atRA as a novel therapeutic strategy for controlling aGVHD progression and treating other inflammatory diseases. PMID:25864619

  5. Expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) in male American bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) and preliminary evaluation of the response to TNT.

    PubMed

    Paden, Norka E; Carr, James A; Kendall, Ronald J; Wages, Mike; Smith, Ernest E

    2010-06-01

    We examined the expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein mRNA in the American bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana). Primers and probes were designed to obtain a partial sequence of bullfrog StAR cDNA consisting of 349 base pairs. Quantitative PCR analysis of StAR mRNA equivalents was performed in tissues of juvenile and adult bullfrogs. In this study 18S mRNA was used as an internal standard. There were no differences in the expression of 18S RNA among tissues or between age groups. In juvenile males, the rank order for the constitutive levels of StAR was testes>skin>brain>kidneys. In adult males, StAR mRNA equivalent was greatest in testes, followed by kidneys, brain, and skin. In addition, stimulation and induction of testicular StAR by human chorionic gonadotropin significantly increased expression of StAR at 2, 4, and 6h after injection. Preliminary evaluation of 2, 4, 6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) revealed that acute exposure is associated with reduction of StAR mRNA expression. The information provided in this study will be useful for future research on StAR gene expression in amphibian reproductive biology and the development of reproductive biomarkers. PMID:20416921

  6. Expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) in male American bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) and preliminary evaluation of the response to TNT.

    PubMed

    Paden, Norka E; Carr, James A; Kendall, Ronald J; Wages, Mike; Smith, Ernest E

    2010-06-01

    We examined the expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein mRNA in the American bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana). Primers and probes were designed to obtain a partial sequence of bullfrog StAR cDNA consisting of 349 base pairs. Quantitative PCR analysis of StAR mRNA equivalents was performed in tissues of juvenile and adult bullfrogs. In this study 18S mRNA was used as an internal standard. There were no differences in the expression of 18S RNA among tissues or between age groups. In juvenile males, the rank order for the constitutive levels of StAR was testes>skin>brain>kidneys. In adult males, StAR mRNA equivalent was greatest in testes, followed by kidneys, brain, and skin. In addition, stimulation and induction of testicular StAR by human chorionic gonadotropin significantly increased expression of StAR at 2, 4, and 6h after injection. Preliminary evaluation of 2, 4, 6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) revealed that acute exposure is associated with reduction of StAR mRNA expression. The information provided in this study will be useful for future research on StAR gene expression in amphibian reproductive biology and the development of reproductive biomarkers.

  7. Tlr4-mutant mice are resistant to acute alcohol-induced sterol-regulatory element binding protein activation and hepatic lipid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Liu, Xiao-Qian; Zhang, Cheng; He, Wei; Wang, Hua; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Chen, Xi; Xu, De-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that acute alcohol intoxication caused hepatic lipid accumulation. The present study showed that acute alcohol intoxication caused hepatic lipid accumulation in Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic sterol-regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1, a transcription factor regulating fatty acid and triglyceride (TG) synthesis, was activated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic Fas, Acc, Scd-1 and Dgat-2, the key genes for fatty acid and TG synthesis, were up-regulated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Additional experiment showed that hepatic MyD88 was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic NF-κB was activated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Moreover, hepatic GSH content was reduced and hepatic MDA level was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic CYP2E1 was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic p67phox and gp91phox, two NADPH oxidase subunits, were up-regulated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Alpha-phenyl-N-t-butylnitrone (PBN), a free radical spin-trapping agent, protected against alcohol-induced hepatic SREBP-1 activation and hepatic lipid accumulation. In conclusion, Tlr4-mutant mice are resistant to acute alcohol-induced hepatic SREBP-1 activation and hepatic lipid accumulation. PMID:27627966

  8. Tlr4-mutant mice are resistant to acute alcohol-induced sterol-regulatory element binding protein activation and hepatic lipid accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Liu, Xiao-Qian; Zhang, Cheng; He, Wei; Wang, Hua; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Chen, Xi; Xu, De-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that acute alcohol intoxication caused hepatic lipid accumulation. The present study showed that acute alcohol intoxication caused hepatic lipid accumulation in Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic sterol-regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1, a transcription factor regulating fatty acid and triglyceride (TG) synthesis, was activated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic Fas, Acc, Scd-1 and Dgat-2, the key genes for fatty acid and TG synthesis, were up-regulated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Additional experiment showed that hepatic MyD88 was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic NF-κB was activated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Moreover, hepatic GSH content was reduced and hepatic MDA level was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic CYP2E1 was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic p67phox and gp91phox, two NADPH oxidase subunits, were up-regulated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Alpha-phenyl-N-t-butylnitrone (PBN), a free radical spin-trapping agent, protected against alcohol-induced hepatic SREBP-1 activation and hepatic lipid accumulation. In conclusion, Tlr4-mutant mice are resistant to acute alcohol-induced hepatic SREBP-1 activation and hepatic lipid accumulation. PMID:27627966

  9. The Effect of Citrus Peel Extracts on Cytokines Levels and T Regulatory Cells in Acute Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Iobadze, Manana; Pantsulaia, Nato; Chikovani, Tinatin

    2014-01-01

    Background. T cell-mediated immune responses contribute to the hepatocellular injury during autoimmune hepatitis, viral infection, and hepatotoxins. Pharmacological compounds regulating immune responses are suitable candidates for prevention/treatment of this pathology. Therefore, the main aim of this study was to define the effects of antioxidant, anti-inflammatory mixture of citrus peel extract (CPE) on the immune-mediated liver injury. Methods. The influence of CPE on liver injury was determined by the activity of transaminases in plasma and the histological changes. Anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects were studied by measuring frequency of T regulatory cells (Tregs), cytokines (TNF-α, IL-10, and IFN-γ), and nitric oxide levels. Results. The CPE application notably prevents development of liver injury through decreasing levels of both cytokines (TNF-alpha, INF) and regulatory T cells and increasing levels of IL-10. CPE injection also diminished the serum NO, which in turn resulted in evident reduction of the liver damage. Conclusion. Our findings represent the primary preclinical data indicating that the CPE in vivo could ameliorate Con A induced hepatitis. The low dose of CPE most likely can be used for the treatment of the T cell-mediated liver injury as in autoimmune hepatitis, alcoholic hepatitis, and chronic viral hepatitis. PMID:25126542

  10. Group X secretory phospholipase A2 regulates the expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) in mouse adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Shridas, Preetha; Bailey, William M; Boyanovsky, Boris B; Oslund, Rob C; Gelb, Michael H; Webb, Nancy R

    2010-06-25

    We developed C57BL/6 mice with targeted deletion of group X secretory phospholipase A(2) (GX KO). These mice have approximately 80% higher plasma corticosterone concentrations compared with wild-type (WT) mice under both basal and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-induced stress conditions. This increased corticosterone level was not associated with increased circulating ACTH or a defect in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis as evidenced by a normal response to dexamethasone challenge. Primary cultures of adrenal cells from GX KO mice exhibited significantly increased corticosteroid secretion compared with WT cells. Conversely, overexpression of GX secretory phospholipase A(2) (sPLA(2)), but not a catalytically inactive mutant form of GX sPLA(2), significantly reduced steroid production 30-40% in Y1 mouse adrenal cell line. This effect was reversed by the sPLA(2) inhibitor, indoxam. Silencing of endogenous M-type receptor expression did not restore steroid production in GX sPLA(2)-overexpressing Y1 cells, ruling out a role for this sPLA(2) receptor in this regulatory process. Expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), the rate-limiting protein in corticosteroid production, was approximately 2-fold higher in adrenal glands of GX KO mice compared with WT mice, whereas StAR expression was suppressed in Y1 cells overexpressing GX sPLA(2). Results from StAR-promoter luciferase reporter gene assays indicated that GX sPLA(2) antagonizes StAR promoter activity and liver X receptor-mediated StAR promoter activation. In summary, GX sPLA(2) is expressed in mouse adrenal glands and functions to negatively regulate corticosteroid synthesis, most likely by negatively regulating StAR expression.

  11. Group X Secretory Phospholipase A2 Regulates the Expression of Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein (StAR) in Mouse Adrenal Glands*

    PubMed Central

    Shridas, Preetha; Bailey, William M.; Boyanovsky, Boris B.; Oslund, Rob C.; Gelb, Michael H.; Webb, Nancy R.

    2010-01-01

    We developed C57BL/6 mice with targeted deletion of group X secretory phospholipase A2 (GX KO). These mice have ∼80% higher plasma corticosterone concentrations compared with wild-type (WT) mice under both basal and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-induced stress conditions. This increased corticosterone level was not associated with increased circulating ACTH or a defect in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis as evidenced by a normal response to dexamethasone challenge. Primary cultures of adrenal cells from GX KO mice exhibited significantly increased corticosteroid secretion compared with WT cells. Conversely, overexpression of GX secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2), but not a catalytically inactive mutant form of GX sPLA2, significantly reduced steroid production 30–40% in Y1 mouse adrenal cell line. This effect was reversed by the sPLA2 inhibitor, indoxam. Silencing of endogenous M-type receptor expression did not restore steroid production in GX sPLA2-overexpressing Y1 cells, ruling out a role for this sPLA2 receptor in this regulatory process. Expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), the rate-limiting protein in corticosteroid production, was ∼2-fold higher in adrenal glands of GX KO mice compared with WT mice, whereas StAR expression was suppressed in Y1 cells overexpressing GX sPLA2. Results from StAR-promoter luciferase reporter gene assays indicated that GX sPLA2 antagonizes StAR promoter activity and liver X receptor-mediated StAR promoter activation. In summary, GX sPLA2 is expressed in mouse adrenal glands and functions to negatively regulate corticosteroid synthesis, most likely by negatively regulating StAR expression. PMID:20421306

  12. Mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membrane (MAM) regulates steroidogenic activity via steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR)-voltage-dependent anion channel 2 (VDAC2) interaction.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Manoj; Kaur, Jasmeet; Pawlak, Kevin J; Bose, Mahuya; Whittal, Randy M; Bose, Himangshu S

    2015-01-30

    Steroid hormones are essential for carbohydrate metabolism, stress management, and reproduction and are synthesized from cholesterol in mitochondria of adrenal glands and gonads/ovaries. In acute stress or hormonal stimulation, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) transports substrate cholesterol into the mitochondria for steroidogenesis by an unknown mechanism. Here, we report for the first time that StAR interacts with voltage-dependent anion channel 2 (VDAC2) at the mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membrane (MAM) prior to its translocation to the mitochondrial matrix. In the MAM, StAR interacts with mitochondrial proteins Tom22 and VDAC2. However, Tom22 knockdown by siRNA had no effect on pregnenolone synthesis. In the absence of VDAC2, StAR was expressed but not processed into the mitochondria as a mature 30-kDa protein. VDAC2 interacted with StAR via its C-terminal 20 amino acids and N-terminal amino acids 221-229, regulating the mitochondrial processing of StAR into the mature protein. In the absence of VDAC2, StAR could not enter the mitochondria or interact with MAM-associated proteins, and therefore steroidogenesis was inhibited. Furthermore, the N terminus was not essential for StAR activity, and the N-terminal deletion mutant continued to interact with VDAC2. The endoplasmic reticulum-targeting prolactin signal sequence did not affect StAR association with the MAM and thus its mitochondrial targeting. Therefore, VDAC2 controls StAR processing and activity, and MAM is thus a central location for initiating mitochondrial steroidogenesis.

  13. Digestive cells from Mytilus galloprovincialis show a partial regulatory volume decrease following acute hypotonic stress through mechanisms involving inorganic ions.

    PubMed

    Torre, Agata; Trischitta, Francesca; Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Faggio, Caterina

    2013-08-01

    The response of isolated digestive cells of the digestive gland of Mytilus galloprovincialis to hypotonic shock was studied using videometric methods. The isolated cells exposed to a rapid change (from 1100 to 800 mosmol kg(-1) ) of the bathing solution osmolality swelled but thereafter underwent a regulatory volume decrease (RVD), tending to recover the original size. When the hypotonic stress was applied in the presence of quinine and glibenclamide, known inhibitors of swelling activated ion channels, the cells did not exhibit an RVD response; in addition, they showed a larger increase in size in respect to control cells. These observations suggest that the digestive cells of the digestive gland have the machinery to cope with the hyposmotic shock allowing them to exhibit a small but significant RVD preventing an excessive increase in cell size. The pharmacological treatment of digestive cells during the RVD experiments suggests that cell volume is regulated by K(+) and Cl(-) efflux followed by an obliged water efflux from the cell. The involvement of organic osmolytes such as taurine and betaine seems to be excluded by NMR measurement on digestive cells.

  14. High frequency of central memory regulatory T cells allows detection of liver recipients at risk of early acute rejection within the first month after transplantation.

    PubMed

    Boix-Giner, Francisco; Millan, Olga; San Segundo, David; Muñoz-Cacho, Pedro; Mancebo, Esther; Llorente, Santiago; Rafael-Valdivia, Lourdes; Rimola, Antoni; Fábrega, Emilio; Mrowiec, Anna; Allende, Luis; Minguela, Alfredo; Bolarín, Jose M; Paz-Artal, Estela; López-Hoyos, Marcos; Brunet, Mercé; Muro, Manuel

    2016-02-01

    Several studies have analyzed the potential of T regulatory cells (Treg cells) as biomarkers of acute rejection (AR). The aim of the present multicenter study was to correlate the percentage of peripheral Treg cells in liver graft recipients drawn at baseline up to 12 months after transplantation with the presence of AR. The percentage of central memory (cm) Treg cells (CD4(+)CD25(high)CD45RO(+)CD62L(+)) was monitored at pre-transplant and at 1 and 2 weeks, and 1, 2, 3 and 6 months and 1 year post-transplantation. The same validation standard operating procedures were used in all participating centers. Fifteen patients developed AR (23.4%). Hepatitis C virus recurrence was observed in 16 recipients, who displayed low peripheral blood cmTreg levels compared with patients who did not. A steady increase of cmTregs was observed during the first month after transplantation with statistically significant differences between AR and non-AR patients. The high frequency of memory Treg cells allowed us to monitor rejection episodes during the first month post-transplantation. On the basis of these data, we developed a prediction model for assessing risk of AR that can provide clinicians with useful information for managing patients individually and customizing immunosuppressive therapies.

  15. Lysosomes are involved in induction of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) gene expression and progesterone synthesis through low-density lipoprotein in cultured bovine granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin-You; Wu, Yi; Zhao, Shuan; Liu, Zhen-Xing; Zeng, Shen-Ming; Zhang, Gui-Xue

    2015-09-15

    Progesterone is an important steroid hormone in the regulation of the bovine estrous cycle. The steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) is an indispensable component for transporting cholesterol to the inner mitochondrial membrane, which is one of the rate-limiting steps for progesterone synthesis. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) supplies cholesterol precursors for progesterone formation, and the lysosomal degradation pathway of LDL is essential for progesterone biosynthesis in granulosa cells after ovulation. However, it is currently unknown how LDL and lysosomes coordinate the expression of the StAR gene and progesterone production in bovine granulosa cells. Here, we investigated the role of lysosomes in LDL-treated bovine granulosa cells. Our results reported that LDL induced expression of StAR messenger RNA and protein as well as expression of cholesterol side-chain cleavage cytochrome P-450 (CYP11A1) messenger RNA and progesterone production in cultured bovine granulosa cells. The number of lysosomes in the granulosa cells was also significantly increased by LDL; whereas the lysosomal inhibitor, chloroquine, strikingly abolished these LDL-induced effects. Our results indicate that LDL promotes StAR expression, synthesis of progesterone, and formation of lysosomes in bovine granulosa cells, and lysosomes participate in the process by releasing free cholesterol from hydrolyzed LDL.

  16. Expression and roles of steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein in 'non-classical', extra-adrenal and extra-gonadal cells and tissues.

    PubMed

    Anuka, Eli; Gal, Michael; Stocco, Douglas M; Orly, Joseph

    2013-05-22

    The activity of the steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein is indispensable and rate limiting for high output synthesis of steroid hormones in the adrenal cortex and the gonads, known as the 'classical' steroidogenic organs (StAR is not expressed in the human placenta). In addition, studies of recent years have shown that StAR is also expressed in many tissues that produce steroid hormones for local use, potentially conferring some functional advantage by acting via intracrine, autocrine or paracrine fashion. Others hypothesized that StAR might also function in non-steroidogenic roles in specific tissues. This review highlights the evidence for the presence of StAR in 17 extra-adrenal and extra-gonadal organs, cell types and malignancies. Provided is the physiological context and the rationale for searching for the presence of StAR in such cells. Since in many of the tissues the overall level of StAR is relatively low, we also reviewed the methods used for StAR detection. The gathered information suggests that a comprehensive understanding of StAR activity in 'non-classical' tissues will require the use of experimental approaches that are able to analyze StAR presence at single-cell resolution.

  17. Narrow-Band Ultraviolet B Phototherapy Ameliorates Acute Graft-Versus-Host Disease of the Intestine by Expansion of Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Akari; Sato, Tsutomu; Iyama, Satoshi; Yoshida, Masahiro; Ibata, Soushi; Tatekoshi, Ayumi; Kamihara, Yusuke; Horiguchi, Hiroto; Murase, Kazuyuki; Kawano, Yutaka; Takada, Kohichi; Miyanishi, Koji; Kobune, Masayoshi; Ichimiya, Shingo; Kato, Junji

    2016-01-01

    Narrowband ultraviolet B (NB-UVB) has been widely used in dermatological phototherapy. As for the application of NB-UVB phototherapy to graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), we previously reported that it was highly efficacious for cutaneous lesions of acute GVHD (aGVHD) and that expansion of regulatory T (Treg) cells induced by NB-UVB might be one of the mechanisms. In order to examine whether NB-UVB irradiation through expansion of Treg cells is effective for the treatment of not only cutaneous aGVHD but also aGVHD of inner organs such as the intestine or liver, we conducted experiments in which a murine lethal aGVHD model, characterized by severe involvement of the intestine, was irradiated with NB-UVB. We found that NB-UVB irradiation improved the clinical score and survival rate. The pathological score of aGVHD was improved in all affected organs: intestine, liver, and skin. In the serum of mice irradiated with NB-UVB, the levels of Treg cells-associated cytokines such as transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) were elevated. The numbers of infiltrating Treg cells in inflamed tissue of the intestine and those in spleen were increased in mice treated with NB-UVB. This is the first report demonstrating that NB-UVB phototherapy has the ability to ameliorate intestinal aGVHD through the expansion of Treg cells.

  18. Ultrastructural and biochemical evidence for the presence of mature steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) in the cytoplasm of human luteal cells.

    PubMed

    Sierralta, Walter D; Kohen, Paulina; Castro, Olga; Muñoz, Alex; Strauss, Jerome F; Devoto, Luigi

    2005-10-20

    The distribution of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) inside thecal and granulosa-lutein cells of human corpus luteum (CL) was assessed by immunoelectron microscopy. We found greater levels of StAR immunolabeling in steroidogenic cells from early- and mid-than in late luteal phase CL and lower levels in cells from women treated with a GnRH antagonist in the mid-luteal phase. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed significant levels of StAR antigen in the mitochondria and in the cytoplasm of luteal cells. The 30 kDa mature StAR protein was present in both mitochondria and cytosol (post-mitochondrial) fractions from homogenates of CL at different ages, whereas cytochrome c and mitochondrial HSP70 were detected only in the mitochondrial fraction. Therefore, we hypothesized that either appreciable processing of StAR 37 kDa pre-protein occurs outside the mitochondria, or mature StAR protein is selectively released into the cytoplasm after mitochondrial processing. The presence of mature StAR in the cytoplasm is consonant with the notion that StAR acts on the outer mitochondrial membrane to effect sterol import, and that StAR may interact with other cytoplasmic proteins involved in cholesterol metabolism, including hormone sensitive lipase. PMID:16162390

  19. Cadmium up-regulates transcription of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) gene through phosphorylated CREB rather than SF-1 in K28 cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Soo-Yun; Gomes, Cynthia; Oh, Sung-Dug; Soh, Jaemog

    2015-04-01

    Cadmium is a widely used heavy metal in industry and affects the male reproductive system of animals, including humans, as a result of occupational and environmental exposures. However, the molecular mechanism underlying its effect on steroidogenesis in gonads remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that exposure of K28 mouse testicular Leydig tumor cells to cadmium led to a significant increase in the mRNA level, promoter activity and protein level of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), an essential factor for steroid biosynthesis. It has been well documented that StAR gene transcription is regulated by multiple transcription factors, including cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) family members and SF-1. Cadmium treatment caused an increase in CREB phosphorylation but did not alter the CREB protein level in the nucleus. EMSA studies revealed that cadmium-induced phosphorylated CREB formed specific complexes with the proximal region of the StAR gene promoter. Furthermore, co-transfection with a CREB expression plasmid significantly increased cadmium-induced StAR promoter activity. However, the nuclear level and the affinity of SF-1 protein for the StAR proximal promoter were dramatically decreased upon exposure to cadmium. Taken together, these results suggest that cadmium up-regulates StAR gene expression through phosphorylated CREB rather than through SF-1 in mouse testicular Leydig cells. PMID:25786521

  20. Characterization and Developmental Expression Profile of the Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein (StAR) in the Gonad-Mesonephros Complex of Lithobates sylvaticus.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Courtney; Pauli, Bruce D; Trudeau, Vance L; Navarro-Martín, Laia

    2016-01-01

    The steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein is responsible for the movement of cholesterol across mitochondrial membranes and is therefore a key factor in regulating the timing and rate of steroidogenesis. In this study, we characterized the coding region of the star gene in the ranid Lithobates sylvaticus and studied star mRNA levels in steroidogenic tissues during development and under natural conditions. Our results support previous research showing that the StAR sequence is well conserved. We determined that star is expressed in both the interrenal and gonadal tissues of adults and in the tadpole gonad-mesonephros complex (GMC). The mRNA levels of star in the GMC were found to increase during tadpole development, reaching a maximum between Gosner stages (Gs) 32 and 38. We observed a significant drop in star mRNA levels at the end of prometamorphosis (Gs40-41), just before the start of the metamorphic climax. Significant differences in star levels between females and males, with males presenting higher levels than females, were detected at Gs36-38. To our knowledge, this is the first study that reports transitory star sex differences in tadpoles' developing GMC. Our results suggest an involvement of StAR in anuran late male GMC formation and development that requires further investigation.

  1. Narrow-Band Ultraviolet B Phototherapy Ameliorates Acute Graft-Versus-Host Disease of the Intestine by Expansion of Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Iyama, Satoshi; Yoshida, Masahiro; Ibata, Soushi; Tatekoshi, Ayumi; Kamihara, Yusuke; Horiguchi, Hiroto; Murase, Kazuyuki; Kawano, Yutaka; Takada, Kohichi; Miyanishi, Koji; Kobune, Masayoshi; Ichimiya, Shingo; Kato, Junji

    2016-01-01

    Narrowband ultraviolet B (NB-UVB) has been widely used in dermatological phototherapy. As for the application of NB-UVB phototherapy to graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), we previously reported that it was highly efficacious for cutaneous lesions of acute GVHD (aGVHD) and that expansion of regulatory T (Treg) cells induced by NB-UVB might be one of the mechanisms. In order to examine whether NB-UVB irradiation through expansion of Treg cells is effective for the treatment of not only cutaneous aGVHD but also aGVHD of inner organs such as the intestine or liver, we conducted experiments in which a murine lethal aGVHD model, characterized by severe involvement of the intestine, was irradiated with NB-UVB. We found that NB-UVB irradiation improved the clinical score and survival rate. The pathological score of aGVHD was improved in all affected organs: intestine, liver, and skin. In the serum of mice irradiated with NB-UVB, the levels of Treg cells-associated cytokines such as transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) were elevated. The numbers of infiltrating Treg cells in inflamed tissue of the intestine and those in spleen were increased in mice treated with NB-UVB. This is the first report demonstrating that NB-UVB phototherapy has the ability to ameliorate intestinal aGVHD through the expansion of Treg cells. PMID:27031239

  2. Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein in eels: cDNA cloning and effects of ACTH and seawater transfer on its mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan-You; Inoue, Koji; Takei, Yoshio

    2003-02-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) is a key molecule for steroid production by translocating cholesterol from the outer to inner mitochondrial membrane. Two cDNAs of different length encoding StAR was cloned from the head kidney of the eel (Anguilla japonica). In the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of the longer cDNA, two putative polyadenylation signals were found. The shorter one differed from the longer one solely by the lack of middle of 3'-UTR including the first polyadenylation signal. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) that differentiates the two mRNAs showed that the ratio of the two was highly variable among individuals, and no preferential expression was detected between freshwater and seawater eels. The predicted protein consists of 285 amino acid residues with 64-83% identity to other StARs thus far obtained. RT-PCR analyses revealed that eel StAR mRNA was expressed abundantly in the head kidney and gonad, and faintly in the brain; but no expression was detected in the gill, heart, liver, intestine, kidney and skeletal muscle. Plasma cortisol concentration increased, but StAR mRNA content in the head kidney did not change, 3 and 24 h after transfer of freshwater eels to seawater, indicating that the transcriptional regulation of StAR may not be involved in cortisol production after seawater transfer. However, ACTH elevated both plasma cortisol and StAR mRNA levels in the head kidney 1.5 and 4.5 h after injection. Thus, the steroidogenic effect of ACTH is mediated by increased StAR production as observed in mammals. PMID:12655184

  3. Intratesticular delivery of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and ceramide directly abrogates steroidogenic acute regulatory protein expression and Leydig cell steroidogenesis in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Morales, Victoria; Santana, Pino; Díaz, Raquel; Tabraue, Carlos; Gallardo, Germán; López Blanco, Félix; Hernández, Inmaculada; Fanjul, Luisa F; Ruiz de Galarreta, Carlos M

    2003-11-01

    Systemic or intratesticular release of TNF alpha and IL1 beta have been implicated in the reduced testosterone biosynthesis and impaired production of competent spermatozoa found in human patients suffering from sepsis or chronic inflammation. Although in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated that TNF alpha and IL1 beta intercept the hypothalamic-pituitary testis axis at different levels, the site(s) of action and relative contribution of each cytokine to the overall testicular failure associated to systemic inflammatory processes remains poorly defined. In this study we show that intratesticular delivery of TNF alpha induced a rapid (4 h) and sustained (up to 24 h) reduction in steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein expression and testosterone biosynthesis in nonstimulated or human chorionic gonadotropin-treated intact or hypophysectomized rats. Bilateral treatment with cell-permeant short-chain ceramides (C2-cer or C6-cer) reproduced the early (4 h) inhibitory action of TNFalpha on testosterone biosynthesis and testicular StAR expression. The inhibitory action of C2-cer or C6-cer was not observed in animals treated with inactive analogs (dihydroceramide), phosphorylcholine, sphingosine, or sphingosine-1P. In sharp contrast to the previously described ability of IL1 beta to prevent human chorionic gonadotropin-stimulated Leydig cell steroidogenesis in vitro, serum testosterone and testicular StAR protein expression remained unchanged in animals bilaterally injected with this cytokine. These data support the concept that TNF alpha triggers different effector mechanisms to directly inhibit Leydig cell StAR expression and steroidogenesis, which ultimately contribute to the global reproductive failure associated with chronic inflammation and sepsis.

  4. Upregulation of Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein by Hypoxia Stimulates Aldosterone Synthesis in Pulmonary Artery Endothelial Cells to Promote Pulmonary Vascular Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Maron, Bradley A.; Oldham, William M.; Chan, Stephen Y.; Vargas, Sara O.; Arons, Elena; Zhang, Ying-Yi; Loscalzo, Joseph; Leopold, Jane A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The molecular mechanism(s) regulating hypoxia-induced vascular fibrosis are unresolved. Hyperaldosteronism correlates positively with vascular remodeling in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), suggesting that aldosterone may contribute to the pulmonary vasculopathy of hypoxia. The hypoxia-sensitive transcription factors c-Fos/c-Jun regulate steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), which facilitates the rate-limiting step of aldosterone steroidogenesis. We hypothesized that c-Fos/c-Jun upregulation by hypoxia activates StAR-dependent aldosterone synthesis in human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAECs) to promote vascular fibrosis in PAH. Methods and Results Patients with PAH, rats with Sugen/hypoxia-PAH, and mice exposed to chronic hypoxia expressed increased StAR in remodeled pulmonary arterioles, providing a basis for investigating hypoxia-StAR signaling in HPAECs. Hypoxia (2.0% FiO2) increased aldosterone levels selectively in HPAECs, which was confirmed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Increased aldosterone by hypoxia resulted from enhanced c-Fos/c-Jun binding to the proximal activator protein (AP-1) site of the StAR promoter in HPAECs, which increased StAR expression and activity. In HPAECs transfected with StAR-siRNA or treated with the AP-1 inhibitor, SR-11302, hypoxia failed to increase aldosterone, confirming that aldosterone biosynthesis required StAR activation by c-Fos/c-Jun. The functional consequences of aldosterone were confirmed by pharmacological inhibition of the mineralocorticoid receptor with spironolactone or eplerenone, which attenuated hypoxia-induced upregulation of the fibrogenic protein connective tissue growth factor and collagen III in vitro, and decreased pulmonary vascular fibrosis to improve pulmonary hypertension in Conclusions Our findings identify autonomous aldosterone synthesis in HPAECs due to hypoxia-mediated upregulation of StAR as a novel molecular mechanism that promotes pulmonary vascular

  5. High-yield soluble expression, purification and characterization of human steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) fused to a cleavable Maltose-Binding Protein (MBP).

    PubMed

    Sluchanko, Nikolai N; Tugaeva, Kristina V; Faletrov, Yaroslav V; Levitsky, Dmitrii I

    2016-03-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) is responsible for the rapid delivery of cholesterol to mitochondria where the lipid serves as a source for steroid hormones biosynthesis in adrenals and gonads. Despite many successful investigations, current understanding of the mechanism of StAR action is far from being completely clear. StAR was mostly obtained using denaturation/renaturation or in minor quantities in a soluble form at decreased temperatures that, presumably, limited the possibilities for its consequent detailed exploration. In our hands, existing StAR expression constructs could be bacterially expressed almost exclusively as insoluble forms, even upon decreased expression temperatures and in specific strains of Escherichia coli, and isolated protein tended to aggregate and was difficult to handle. To maximize the yield of soluble protein, optimized StAR sequence encompassing functional domain STARD1 (residues 66-285) was fused to the C-terminus of His-tagged Maltose-Binding Protein (MBP) with the possibility to cleave off the whole tag by 3C protease. The developed protocol of expression and purification comprising of a combination of subtractive immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) and size-exclusion chromatography allowed us to obtain up to 25 mg/1 L culture of completely soluble StAR protein, which was (i) homogenous according to SDS-PAGE, (ii) gave a single symmetrical peak on a gel-filtration, (iii) showed the characteristic CD spectrum and (iv) pH-dependent ability to bind a fluorescently-labeled cholesterol analogue. We conclude that our strategy provides fully soluble and native StAR protein which in future could be efficiently used for biotechnology and drug discovery aimed at modulation of steroids production.

  6. Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein in eels: cDNA cloning and effects of ACTH and seawater transfer on its mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan-You; Inoue, Koji; Takei, Yoshio

    2003-02-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) is a key molecule for steroid production by translocating cholesterol from the outer to inner mitochondrial membrane. Two cDNAs of different length encoding StAR was cloned from the head kidney of the eel (Anguilla japonica). In the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of the longer cDNA, two putative polyadenylation signals were found. The shorter one differed from the longer one solely by the lack of middle of 3'-UTR including the first polyadenylation signal. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) that differentiates the two mRNAs showed that the ratio of the two was highly variable among individuals, and no preferential expression was detected between freshwater and seawater eels. The predicted protein consists of 285 amino acid residues with 64-83% identity to other StARs thus far obtained. RT-PCR analyses revealed that eel StAR mRNA was expressed abundantly in the head kidney and gonad, and faintly in the brain; but no expression was detected in the gill, heart, liver, intestine, kidney and skeletal muscle. Plasma cortisol concentration increased, but StAR mRNA content in the head kidney did not change, 3 and 24 h after transfer of freshwater eels to seawater, indicating that the transcriptional regulation of StAR may not be involved in cortisol production after seawater transfer. However, ACTH elevated both plasma cortisol and StAR mRNA levels in the head kidney 1.5 and 4.5 h after injection. Thus, the steroidogenic effect of ACTH is mediated by increased StAR production as observed in mammals.

  7. Expression of 17beta- and 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein in non-luteinizing bovine granulosa cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sahmi, M; Nicola, E S; Silva, J M; Price, C A

    2004-08-31

    Granulosa cells of small follicles differentiate in vitro in serum-free medium, resulting in increased estradiol secretion and abundance of mRNA encoding cytochrome P450aromatase (P450arom). We tested the hypothesis that differentiation in vitro also involves increased expression of 3beta- and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSD) in the absence of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) expression, as has been observed in vivo. Granulosa cells from small (<6 mm diameter) follicles were cultured for up to 6 days, and mRNA levels quantified by Northern hybridization or RT-PCR. Estradiol and progesterone concentrations in medium increased with time in culture, as did mRNA encoding P450arom, 3beta- and 17beta-HSD but not P450scc. Both P450arom and 17beta-HSD were significantly correlated with estradiol accumulation in culture medium. Progesterone secretion was correlated with 3beta-HSD but not P450scc mRNA levels. StAR mRNA was detectable by RT-PCR, did not change with duration of culture and was not correlated with progesterone secretion. FSH significantly stimulated P450arom and 17beta-HSD mRNA levels. Cell origin (from the antral or the basal layer of the membrana granulosa) did not affect steroidogenesis. We conclude that under the present cell culture system granulosa cells do not luteinize, and show expression of key steroidogenic enzymes in patterns similar to those occurring in differentiating follicles in vivo. Further, the data suggest that 17beta-HSD may be as important as P450arom in regulating estradiol secretion, and that 3beta-HSD is more important than P450scc as a regulator of progesterone secretion in non-luteinizing granulosa cells. PMID:15279910

  8. Mechanisms of action of hormone-sensitive lipase in mouse Leydig cells: its role in the regulation of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein.

    PubMed

    Manna, Pulak R; Cohen-Tannoudji, Joëlle; Counis, Raymond; Garner, Charles W; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo; Kraemer, Fredric B; Stocco, Douglas M

    2013-03-22

    Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) catalyzes the hydrolysis of cholesteryl esters in steroidogenic tissues and, thus, facilitates cholesterol availability for steroidogenesis. The steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) controls the rate-limiting step in steroid biosynthesis. However, the modes of action of HSL in the regulation of StAR expression remain obscure. We demonstrate in MA-10 mouse Leydig cells that activation of the protein kinase A (PKA) pathway, by a cAMP analog Bt2cAMP, enhanced expression of HSL and its phosphorylation (P) at Ser-660 and Ser-563, but not at Ser-565, concomitant with increased HSL activity. Phosphorylation and activation of HSL coincided with increases in StAR, P-StAR (Ser-194), and progesterone levels. Inhibition of HSL activity by CAY10499 effectively suppressed Bt2cAMP-induced StAR expression and progesterone synthesis. Targeted silencing of endogenous HSL, with siRNAs, resulted in increased cholesteryl ester levels and decreased cholesterol content in MA-10 cells. Depletion of HSL affected lipoprotein-derived cellular cholesterol influx, diminished the supply of cholesterol to the mitochondria, and resulted in the repression of StAR and P-StAR levels. Cells overexpressing HSL increased the efficacy of liver X receptor (LXR) ligands on StAR expression and steroid synthesis, suggesting HSL-mediated steroidogenesis entails enhanced oxysterol production. Conversely, cells deficient in LXRs exhibited decreased HSL responsiveness. Furthermore, an increase in HSL was correlated with the LXR target genes, steroid receptor element-binding protein 1c and ATP binding cassette transporter A1, demonstrating HSL-dependent regulation of steroidogenesis predominantly involves LXR signaling. LXRs interact/cooperate with RXRs and result in the activation of StAR gene transcription. These findings provide novel insight and demonstrate the molecular events by which HSL acts to drive cAMP/PKA-mediated regulation of StAR expression and

  9. Overexpression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein in rat aortic endothelial cells attenuates palmitic acid-induced inflammation and reduction in nitric oxide bioavailability

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Endothelial dysfunction is a well documented evidence for the onset of atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular diseases. Lipids disorder is among the main risk factors for endothelial dysfunction in these diseases. Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), one of the cholesterol transporters, plays an important role in the maintenance of intracellular lipid homeostasis. However, the effect of StAR on endothelial dysfunction is not well understood. Palmitic acid (PA) has been shown to decrease eNOS activity and induce inflammation, both are the causes of endothelial dysfunction, in an endothelial cell culture model. Methods StAR gene was introduced into primary rat aortic endothelial cells by adenovirus infection. Real-time PCR and Western blotting were performed to determine the relative genes and proteins expression level to elucidate the underlying mechanism. The free fatty acid and cholesterol quantification kits were used to detect total cellular free fatty acid and cholesterol. The levels of inflammatory factors and nitric oxide were determined by ELISA and classic Griess reagent methods respectively. Results We successfully overexpressed StAR in primary rat aortic endothelial cells. Following StAR overexpression, mRNA levels of IL-1β, TNFα, IL6 and VCAM-1 and protein levels of IL-1β, , TNFα and IL-6 in culture supernatant were significantly decreased, which duing to blocke NFκB nuclear translocation and activation. Moreover, StAR overexpression attenuated the PA-induced reduction of nitric oxide bioavailability by protecting the bioactivity of pAkt/peNOS/NO pathway. Furthermore, the key genes involved in lipid metabolism were greatly reduced following StAR overexpression. In order to investigate the underlying mechanism, cerulenin and lovastatin, the inhibitor of fatty acid and cholesterol synthase, were added prior to PA treatment. The results showed that both cerulenin and lovastatin had a similar effect as StAR overexpression. On the

  10. Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) aggregation and absence of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR)/PBR association in the mitochondrial membrane as determined by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET).

    PubMed

    Bogan, Randy L; Davis, Tracy L; Niswender, Gordon D

    2007-04-01

    The steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) is responsible for acute control of cholesterol transport across the mitochondrial membrane, however the mechanism of StAR-associated cholesterol transport is unknown and may involve the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR)/endozepine system. Several molecules of PBR may associate to form a channel through which cholesterol passes to the inner mitochondrial membrane, and endozepine is the natural ligand for PBR. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) was used to test StAR/PBR/endozepine interactions, PBR aggregation, and the effect of second messengers on interactions. There was no evidence of StAR/PBR, StAR/endozepine, or PBR/endozepine interactions. The StAR and PBR fusion proteins were trafficking to the mitochondria as expected, but the endozepine fusion protein was not localized to the mitochondria indicating that it was not biologically active. Data were obtained indicating that PBR forms aggregates in the mitochondrial membrane. Energy transfer between PBR fusion proteins was dose and time dependent, but there was no effect induced by PK11195 ligand binding or pharmacologic activation of PKA or PKC second messenger pathways. It appears that PBR aggregates in the mitochondrial membrane, however there was no evidence that PBR aggregation is regulated in the acute control of steroidogenesis, or that PBR and StAR interact.

  11. Steroidogenic impairment due to reduced ovarian transcription of cytochrome P450 side-chain-cleavage (P450scc) and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) during experimental nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Peña-Rico, Miguel; Guadalupe Ortiz-López, María; Camacho-Castillo, Luz; Cárdenas, Mario; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Menjívar, Marta

    2006-07-10

    The nephrotic syndrome is a renal disease characterized by proteinuria, hypoproteinemia, edema and hyperlipidemia. It has been reported that female nephrotic rats are characterized by loss of the oestrus cycle, follicle atresia, low gonadotropin and steroid concentrations; particularly, undetectable estradiol levels. Therefore, to determine the mechanisms involved in the ovarian steroidogenesis impairment, in this present study we evaluated the ovarian expression of the essential steroidogenesis components: cytochrome P450 side cholesterol chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc) and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). The experiments were conducted in the rat experimental model of nephrosis induced by puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN) and in control groups. The evaluation of the expression of P450scc and StAR mRNA were performed during the acute phase of nephrosis as well as after the exogenous administration of 1 or 4 doses of human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG), or a daily dose of FSH or FSH+hCG for 10 days. In addition, serum hormone concentrations, intra-ovarian steroid content, and the reproductive capacity were determined. The results revealed a decreased expression of mRNA of P450scc enzyme and StAR during nephrosis, and eventhough they increased after gonadotropins treatment, they did not conduce to a normal cycling rat period or fertility recovery. This study demonstrates that the mechanism by which ovarian steroid biosynthesis is altered during acute nephrosis involves damage at the P450scc and StAR mRNA synthesis and processing. PMID:16574160

  12. T-Regulatory Cells and Inflammatory and Inhibitory Cytokines in Malawian Children Residing in an Area of High and an Area of Low Malaria Transmission During Acute Uncomplicated Malaria and in Convalescence

    PubMed Central

    Nyirenda, Tonney S.; Molyneux, Malcolm E.; Kenefeck, Rupert; Walker, Lucy S. K.; MacLennan, Calman A.; Heyderman, Robert S.; Mandala, Wilson L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Malaria still infects many Malawian children, and it is a cause of death in some of them. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) help in negating immune-related pathology, it but can also favor multiplication of malaria parasites. The question remains whether children recovering from uncomplicated malaria (UCM) have higher Tregs and interleukin (IL)-10 levels in convalescence. Methods We recruited children between the ages of 6 and 60 months presenting with acute UCM in Blantyre (low transmission area) and Chikwawa (high transmission area). We observed the children after 1 month and 3 months and analyzed their blood samples for parasitemia, lymphocyte subsets, and levels of the cytokines interferon (IFN)-γ, IL-10, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β. Blood samples from age-matched controls were also analyzed for the same parameters. Results Compared with controls, acute UCM was associated with mild lymphopenia, splenomegaly, and high levels of IFN-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, and IL-10, which normalized in convalescence. In Chikwawa, Treg counts were significantly (P < .0001) higher in convalescence compared with acute disease, whereas in Blantyre, these were as low as in healthy controls both during acute disease and in convalescence. Blantyre had a higher percentage of parasiteamic children (15% versus 12%) in convalescence compared with Chikwawa, but none of these developed symptomatic malaria during the study duration. Concentrations of TGF-β were higher at time points for the study participants and in controls from Blantyre compared with those recruited in Chikwawa. Conclusions The high transmission area was associated with high Tregs counts and IL-10 concentrations in convalescence, which could have an effect on parasite clearance. We recommend that children recovering from UCM, especially those from high transmission area, should sleep under insecticide-treated nets, be screened for parasitemia, and a provision of antimalarial prophylaxis should be

  13. Multivariate Modeling of Proteins Related to Trapezius Myalgia, a Comparative Study of Female Cleaners with or without Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hadrevi, Jenny; Ghafouri, Bijar; Larsson, Britt; Gerdle, Björn; Hellström, Fredrik

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of chronic trapezius myalgia is high in women with high exposure to awkward working positions, repetitive movements and movements with high precision demands. The mechanisms behind chronic trapezius myalgia are not fully understood. The purpose of this study was to explore the differences in protein content between healthy and myalgic trapezius muscle using proteomics. Muscle biopsies from 12 female cleaners with work-related trapezius myalgia and 12 pain free female cleaners were obtained from the descending part of the trapezius. Proteins were separated with two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and selected proteins were identified with mass spectrometry. In order to discriminate the two groups, quantified proteins were fitted to a multivariate analysis: partial least square discriminate analysis. The model separated 28 unique proteins which were related to glycolysis, the tricaboxylic acid cycle, to the contractile apparatus, the cytoskeleton and to acute response proteins. The results suggest altered metabolism, a higher abundance of proteins related to inflammation in myalgic cleaners compared to healthy, and a possible alteration of the contractile apparatus. This explorative proteomic screening of proteins related to chronic pain in the trapezius muscle provides new important aspects of the pathophysiology behind chronic trapezius myalgia. PMID:24023854

  14. Removal of regulatory T cells prevents secondary chronic infection but increases the mortality of subsequent sub-acute infection in sepsis mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoya; Zhao, Yong; Wang, Yi; Zhao, Xiaomin; Chang, Lingling; Liu, Shan-lu; Tong, Dewen; Zhang, Hai; Huang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The immunosuppression following initial septic insult impairs resistance to secondary infection. Modulation of lymphocytes population may help to develop an effective therapeutic strategy. In this study, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxemia was employed as the initial septic insult. 24 hours later, mice underwent cecal ligation and puncture to induce chronic or sub-acute peritonitis. Potential usefulness of T regs deletion antibody (anti-CD25) in improving LPS-induced immunosuppression and the survival of subsequent different infections were evaluated. LPS injection induced lymphocyte loss and led to decreased IL-6, TNF-α and IFN-γ, and weakened bacteria clearance upon chronic peritonitis at 24 h post-LPS, whereas reconstitution with lymphocytes reversed these changes. LPS-induced T regs expansion contributed to T and NK cells decrease in number and activity during sepsis. Depletion of T regs using anti-CD25 antibodies partly prevented lymphocyte loss and increased the responses of T and NK cells to subsequent stimulation, resulting in significantly increased bacterial clearance and survival in a 2-hit model of chronic peritonitis, but which significantly increased early mortality upon subsequently sub-acute infection. Yet, using lower dosage of anti-CD25 antibodies to moderate down-regulate T regs levels could partly improve bacterial clearance and survival in either chronic or sub-acute infection. These results demonstrate that using anti-CD25 antibodies to deplete T regs can ameliorate immunosuppression through increasing T cells and NK cells responses in sepsis, which is beneficial for preventing subsequently chronic infection, but will probably bring some deleterious effects for subsequent sub-acute infection. PMID:26918357

  15. Influence of trial design, heterogeneity and regulatory environment on the results of clinical trials: An appraisal in the context of recent trials on acute stroke intervention

    PubMed Central

    Srijithesh, P. R.; Husain, Shakir

    2014-01-01

    The outcome of randomized controlled trials can vary depending on the eligibility criteria of the patients entering into the trial, as well as the heterogeneity of the eligible population and/or the interventions. If the subject population and/or interventions are heterogeneous, the final outcome of the trial depends on the degree of concordance of effects of the subgroups of interventions on the subgroups of the subject population. The considerations that go into the calculation of sample size and determination of the study stopping rules also would affect the nature of the outcome of the study. In this paper we try to examine these phenomena with respect to the recent trials on endovascular therapy in acute ischemic stroke. PMID:25506154

  16. Relationship between changes in mRNAs of the genes encoding steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and P450 cholesterol side chain cleavage in head kidney and plasma levels of cortisol in response to different kinds of acute stress in the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Geslin, Malika; Auperin, Benoit

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the expression of several genes involved in cortisol synthesis in head kidneys, the site of cortisol production, and in the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) was examined in response to two different acute stressors and an acute ACTH treatment. mRNAs levels of the "steroidogenic acute regulatory" (StAR) sterol transport protein, which transports cholesterol to the inner mitochondrial membrane as well as cytochrome P450 cholesterol side chain cleavage (P450(SCC)) were determined in head kidney (containing the interrenal tissue). In one experiment, we also quantified 3-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3B-HSD) and cytochrome P450(11beta) (11B-H) mRNAs. The presence of these four transcripts in the head kidney was confirmed by Northern blot analysis. For each stress condition, mRNA levels were quantified by quantitative or real-time RT-PCR. The results of these two methods were highly correlated. An acute stress induced by capture, short confinement (2min), and anesthesia (3min) resulted in significant elevation of plasma cortisol (30-fold higher than controls) and an increase in levels of StAR and P450(SCC) mRNAs 3h post-stress. When fish were submitted to an acute stress caused by 5min of chase with a net in a tank, plasma cortisol reached a peak within 1h, but after 3h, levels were only 5-fold higher in stressed trout than in controls and no variations in the expression of StAR, P450(SCC), 3B-HSD, and 11B-H were observed whatever the time post-stress. One hour after acute ACTH stimulation (5IU/kg), plasma cortisol level was 4-fold higher than in control trout and no changes in StAR and P450(SCC) mRNAs levels were detected. The data suggest that the high levels of cortisol after stress need an activation of genes involved in cortisol synthesis, but lower levels do not. Futhermore, under these three test conditions, we always found a strong positive correlation between mRNA levels of StAR and P450(SCC), in contrast to what has been described in

  17. Upregulation of CD19⁺CD24(hi)CD38(hi) regulatory B cells is associated with a reduced risk of acute lung injury in elderly pneumonia patients.

    PubMed

    Song, Haihan; Xi, Jianjun; Li, Guang-Gang; Xu, Shumin; Wang, Chunmei; Cheng, Tingting; Li, Hongqiang; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Xiandong; Bai, Jianwen

    2016-04-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a common complication in elderly pneumonia patients who have a rapid progression, and is accompanied by a high mortality rate. Because the treatment options of ALI are limited to supportive care, identifying pneumonia patients who are at higher risk of ALI development is the emphasis of many studies. Here, we approach this problem from an immunological perspective by examining CD19(+)CD24(hi)CD38(hi) B cells, an important participant in acute and chronic inflammation. We find that elderly pneumonia patients have elevated CD19(+)CD24(hi)CD38(hi) B cell frequency compared to healthy individuals. This B cell population may express a higher level of IL-10, which has been was shown to suppress CD4(+) T cell-mediated proinflammatory cytokine interferon gamma (IFNg) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFa) production, through an IL-10-dependent mechanism. We also observe that the frequency of CD19(+)CD24(hi)CD38(hi) B cell is positively correlated with the frequency of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+)Tregs in peripheral blood. Moreover, consistent with CD19(+)CD24(hi)CD38(hi) B cell's anti-inflammatory role, we find that pneumonia patients who later developed ALI have reduced level of CD19(+)CD24(hi)CD38(hi) B cells. Together, our results demonstrated that CD19(+)CD24(hi)CD38(hi) B cells in pneumonia patients possess regulatory function in vivo, and are associated with a reduced ALI risk.

  18. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... International clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of acute uncomplicated cystitis and pyelonephritis in women: A 2010 ...

  19. Gonadotropin-regulated testicular RNA helicase (GRTH/DDX25), a negative regulator of luteinizing/chorionic gonadotropin hormone-induced steroidogenesis in Leydig cells: central role of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR).

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Masato; Villar, Joaquin; Tsai-Morris, Chon-Hwa; Dufau, Maria L

    2011-08-26

    Gonadotropin-regulated testicular RNA helicase (GRTH/DDX25) is a testis-specific gonadotropin-regulated RNA helicase that is present in Leydig cells (LCs) and germ cells and is essential for spermatid development and completion of spermatogenesis. Normal basal levels of testosterone in serum and LCs were observed in GRTH null (GRTH(-/-)) mice. However, testosterone production was enhanced in LCs of GRTH(-/-) mice compared with WT mice by both in vivo and in vitro human chorionic gonadotropin stimulation. LCs of GRTH(-/-) mice had swollen mitochondria with a significantly increased cholesterol content in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Basal protein levels of SREBP2, HMG-CoA reductase, and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR; a protein that transports cholesterol to the inner mitochondrial membrane) were markedly increased in LCs of GRTH(-/-) mice compared with WT mice. Gonadotropin stimulation caused an increase in StAR mRNA levels and protein expression in GRTH(-/-) mice versus WT mice, with no further increase in SREBP2 and down-regulation of HMG-CoA reductase protein. The half-life of StAR mRNA was significantly increased in GRTH(-/-) mice. Moreover, association of StAR mRNA with GRTH protein was observed in WT mice. Human chorionic gonadotropin increased GRTH gene expression and its associated StAR protein at cytoplasmic sites. Taken together, these findings indicate that, through its negative role in StAR message stability, GRTH regulates cholesterol availability at the mitochondrial level. The finding of an inhibitory action of GRTH associated with gonadotropin-mediated steroidogenesis has provided insights into a novel negative autocrine molecular control mechanism of this helicase in the regulation of steroid production in the male.

  20. Sex differences, developmental changes, response to injury and cAMP regulation of the mRNA levels of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, cytochrome p450scc, and aromatase in the olivocerebellar system.

    PubMed

    Lavaque, Esteban; Mayen, Aurora; Azcoitia, Iñigo; Tena-Sempere, Manuel; Garcia-Segura, Luis M

    2006-02-15

    Compelling evidence has now demonstrated direct biological actions of sex steroids at the cerebellum. Likewise, the expression of key steroidogenic factors, such as the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage (P450scc), and aromatase, at this neural site has been reported. Little is known, however, about the regulation of their genes in the cerebellum. Assessment of StAR, P450scc, and aromatase mRNAs in the cerebellum of male and female rats revealed that the expression of these genes is developmentally regulated, with the highest levels at early postnatal ages in both sexes and with significantly higher mRNA levels in postnatal males. Expression of these genes in the female remained unaltered after perinatal androgenization and along the estrous cycle. In contrast, damage of cerebellar afferent neurons of the inferior olivary nucleus evoked a significant increase in StAR, P450scc, and aromatase mRNA levels at this site, as well as a transient elevation in StAR mRNA at the cerebellum. Finally, enhancement of cAMP levels in cultured cerebellar neurons induced a significant increase in StAR and aromatase mRNA levels. In summary, we present herein novel evidence for the developmentally regulated and partially sexually dimorphic pattern of expression of StAR, P450scc, and aromatase genes in the rat cerebellum. These observations, together with the finding that the mRNA levels of these steroidogenic molecules are sensitive to injury and are regulated by intracellular cAMP, strongly suggest that local steroidogenesis is likely to play an important role during development and adaptation to neurodegenerative processes in the olivocerebellar system. PMID:16329132

  1. Effect of adiponectin on the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, P450 side chain cleavage enzyme and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase gene expression, progesterone and androstenedione production by the porcine uterus during early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Smolinska, N; Dobrzyn, K; Kiezun, M; Szeszko, K; Maleszka, A; Kaminski, T

    2016-06-01

    Adiponectin and its receptors are expressed in the human and porcine uterus and this endocrine system has important role in the regulation of reproductive processes. The expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD3B1) were observed in the human and porcine uterus during the oestrous cycle and pregnancy. The de novo synthesis of steroids in the uterus might be a crucial factor for effective implantation and maintenance of pregnancy. We hypothesized that adiponectin modulates the expression of key enzymes in the synthesis of the steroids: StAR, P450 side chain cleavage enzyme (CYP11A1) and HSD3B1, as well as progesterone (P4) and androstenedione (A4) secretion by the porcine uterus. Endometrial and myometrial explants harvested from gilts (n = 5) on days 10 to 11, 12 to 13, 15 to 16 and 27 to 28 of pregnancy and on days 10 to 11 of the oestrous cycle were cultured in vitro in the presence of adiponectin (1, 10 μg/ml), adiponectin with insulin (10 ng/ml) and insulin alone (10 ng/ml). Gene expression was examined by real-time PCR, and the secretion of the steroids was determined by radioimmunoassay. The content of StAR, CYP11A1 and HSD3B1 mRNAs and the secretion of P4 and A4 was modulated by adiponectin in endometrial and myometrial tissue explants during early pregnancy and the oestrous cycle. In this action adiponectin interacted with insulin. Insulin itself also regulated the steroidogenic activity of the porcine uterus. ere we reported, for the first time, the expression of CYP11A1 genes in the porcine endometrium and myometrium. Our novel findings indicate that adiponectin affects basal and insulin-stimulated expression of key steroidogenic genes and production of steroid hormones by the porcine uterus during maternal recognition of pregnancy and implantation. PMID:27512005

  2. A protein relational database and protein family knowledge bases to facilitate structure-based design analyses.

    PubMed

    Mobilio, Dominick; Walker, Gary; Brooijmans, Natasja; Nilakantan, Ramaswamy; Denny, R Aldrin; Dejoannis, Jason; Feyfant, Eric; Kowticwar, Rupesh K; Mankala, Jyoti; Palli, Satish; Punyamantula, Sairam; Tatipally, Maneesh; John, Reji K; Humblet, Christine

    2010-08-01

    The Protein Data Bank is the most comprehensive source of experimental macromolecular structures. It can, however, be difficult at times to locate relevant structures with the Protein Data Bank search interface. This is particularly true when searching for complexes containing specific interactions between protein and ligand atoms. Moreover, searching within a family of proteins can be tedious. For example, one cannot search for some conserved residue as residue numbers vary across structures. We describe herein three databases, Protein Relational Database, Kinase Knowledge Base, and Matrix Metalloproteinase Knowledge Base, containing protein structures from the Protein Data Bank. In Protein Relational Database, atom-atom distances between protein and ligand have been precalculated allowing for millisecond retrieval based on atom identity and distance constraints. Ring centroids, centroid-centroid and centroid-atom distances and angles have also been included permitting queries for pi-stacking interactions and other structural motifs involving rings. Other geometric features can be searched through the inclusion of residue pair and triplet distances. In Kinase Knowledge Base and Matrix Metalloproteinase Knowledge Base, the catalytic domains have been aligned into common residue numbering schemes. Thus, by searching across Protein Relational Database and Kinase Knowledge Base, one can easily retrieve structures wherein, for example, a ligand of interest is making contact with the gatekeeper residue.

  3. Regulatory effect of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant, epithelial neutrophil-activating peptide 78 and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate on pulmonary neutrophil aggregation mediated by nuclear factor-κB in lipopolysaccharide-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongman; Zhao, Jiping; Xue, Guansheng; Wang, Junfei; Wu, Jinxiang; Wang, Donghui; Dong, Liang

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the regulatory effect of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC) and epithelial neutrophil-activating peptide 78 (ENA-78) on pulmonary neutrophil (PMN) accumulation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) mice, and the therapeutic effect of pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), was investigated. BALB/c mice were divided into control, LPS and PDTC + LPS groups using a random number table. The phosphorylation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) was detected using a western blot, and the mRNA expression levels of CINC were evaluated using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The expression of NF-κB, CINC and ENA-78 was detected using immunohistochemistry. The production of interleukin (IL)-8 and IL-10 in serum and broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was analyzed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The total number of leukocytes and proportion of PMNs in BALF was also determined. Following injection with LPS (20 mg/kg), the expression levels of p-NF-κB, CINC and ENA-78 were increased in lung tissue, and the expression levels of IL-8, IL-10 and the number of PMNs increased in serum and BALF. However, in comparison with the LPS group, the degree of lung injury was reduced in ARDS mice that were treated with PDTC. In addition, the expression level of p-NF-κB and the production of chemokines in lung tissue decreased in ARDS mice that were treated with PDTC, and the number of PMNs in BALF also decreased. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggest that the LPS-induced phosphorylation of NF-κB may result in the synthesis and release of CINC and ENA-78, which induce the accumulation of PMNs in the lung. Therefore, PDTC may be used to reduce the production of chemokines and cytokines, thereby decreasing the activation of PMNs in lung tissue and reducing the damage of lung tissue in ARDS. PMID:27602092

  4. Regulatory effect of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant, epithelial neutrophil-activating peptide 78 and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate on pulmonary neutrophil aggregation mediated by nuclear factor-κB in lipopolysaccharide-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongman; Zhao, Jiping; Xue, Guansheng; Wang, Junfei; Wu, Jinxiang; Wang, Donghui; Dong, Liang

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the regulatory effect of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC) and epithelial neutrophil-activating peptide 78 (ENA-78) on pulmonary neutrophil (PMN) accumulation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) mice, and the therapeutic effect of pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), was investigated. BALB/c mice were divided into control, LPS and PDTC + LPS groups using a random number table. The phosphorylation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) was detected using a western blot, and the mRNA expression levels of CINC were evaluated using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The expression of NF-κB, CINC and ENA-78 was detected using immunohistochemistry. The production of interleukin (IL)-8 and IL-10 in serum and broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was analyzed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The total number of leukocytes and proportion of PMNs in BALF was also determined. Following injection with LPS (20 mg/kg), the expression levels of p-NF-κB, CINC and ENA-78 were increased in lung tissue, and the expression levels of IL-8, IL-10 and the number of PMNs increased in serum and BALF. However, in comparison with the LPS group, the degree of lung injury was reduced in ARDS mice that were treated with PDTC. In addition, the expression level of p-NF-κB and the production of chemokines in lung tissue decreased in ARDS mice that were treated with PDTC, and the number of PMNs in BALF also decreased. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggest that the LPS-induced phosphorylation of NF-κB may result in the synthesis and release of CINC and ENA-78, which induce the accumulation of PMNs in the lung. Therefore, PDTC may be used to reduce the production of chemokines and cytokines, thereby decreasing the activation of PMNs in lung tissue and reducing the damage of lung tissue in ARDS.

  5. Programmed cell death receptor ligand 1 modulates the regulatory T cells' capacity to repress shock/sepsis-induced indirect acute lung injury by recruiting phosphatase SRC homology region 2 domain-containing phosphatase 1.

    PubMed

    Tang, Lunxian; Bai, Jianwen; Chung, Chun-Shiang; Lomas-Neira, Joanne; Chen, Yaping; Huang, Xin; Ayala, Alfred

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported that adoptively transferred (AT) exogenous CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) to wild-type (WT) mice can directly act to repress shock/sepsis-induced experimental indirect acute lung injury (iALI), and this is mediated in part by programmed cell death receptor 1 (PD-1). In this study, we further determine whether recipient mouse lacking PD-L1, one of the primary ligands for PD-1, contributes to the manipulation of the Tregs' capacity to repress lung injury. To do this, Tregs isolated from the spleen of WT mice were AT into PD-L1 mice subjected to hemorrhagic shock and subsequent to cecal ligation and puncture to induce iALI. Samples were collected for analyses 24 h after cecal ligation and puncture. We found that in PD-L1-recipient mice, AT WT-Tregs lost the ability to reverse the development of iALI seen in WT recipient mice (i.e., no reduction of lung injury indices assessed by histology and vascular leakage, failure to decrease the lung neutrophil influx [myeloperoxidase activity], or the rise in lung apoptosis [caspase 3 activity]). Also, a significant increase in interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and keratinocyte-derived chemokine, but no changes in IL-6, IL-10, and IL-17A levels in lung tissues were seen in these mice compared with iALI mice without AT of Tregs. Furthermore, we noted that the lung tissue tyrosine phosphatase Src homology region 2 domain-containing phosphatase 1 (SHP-1), but not SHP-2, was activated with the AT of Tregs in PD-L1(-/-) iALI mice. Finally, through local depletion of CD4+ T cells or CD25+ (Tregs) in the lung, prior to inducing iALI, we found that SHP-1 activation was associated with the loss of Tregs' protective effects in vivo. Collectively, our data reveal that PD-L1 is a critical modulator of Tregs' ability to suppress iALI, and this appears to involve SHP-1 activation.

  6. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... tightness. There are two main types of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis get better within several days. But your ... that cause colds and the flu often cause acute bronchitis. These viruses spread through the air when ...

  7. Alpha shape and Delaunay triangulation in studies of protein-related interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weiqiang; Yan, Hong

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, more 3D protein structures have become available, which has made the analysis of large molecular structures much easier. There is a strong demand for geometric models for the study of protein-related interactions. Alpha shape and Delaunay triangulation are powerful tools to represent protein structures and have advantages in characterizing the surface curvature and atom contacts. This review presents state-of-the-art applications of alpha shape and Delaunay triangulation in the studies on protein-DNA, protein-protein, protein-ligand interactions and protein structure analysis.

  8. Regulatory Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This article proposes the term “safety logics” to understand attempts within the European Union (EU) to harmonize member state legislation to ensure a safe and stable supply of human biological material for transplants and transfusions. With safety logics, I refer to assemblages of discourses, legal documents, technological devices, organizational structures, and work practices aimed at minimizing risk. I use this term to reorient the analytical attention with respect to safety regulation. Instead of evaluating whether safety is achieved, the point is to explore the types of “safety” produced through these logics as well as to consider the sometimes unintended consequences of such safety work. In fact, the EU rules have been giving rise to complaints from practitioners finding the directives problematic and inadequate. In this article, I explore the problems practitioners face and why they arise. In short, I expose the regulatory anatomy of the policy landscape. PMID:26139952

  9. Regulatory RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Anderson, Jorge; Contreras, Lydia M

    2013-01-01

    RNAs have many important functional properties, including that they are independently controllable and highly tunable. As a result of these advantageous properties, their use in a myriad of sophisticated devices has been widely explored. Yet, the exploitation of RNAs for synthetic applications is highly dependent on the ability to characterize the many new molecules that continue to be discovered by large-scale sequencing and high-throughput screening techniques. In this review, we present an exhaustive survey of the most recent synthetic bacterial riboswitches and small RNAs while emphasizing their virtues in gene expression management. We also explore the use of these RNA components as building blocks in the RNA synthetic biology toolbox and discuss examples of synthetic RNA components used to rewire bacterial regulatory circuitry. We anticipate that this field will expand its catalog of smart devices by mimicking and manipulating natural RNA mechanisms and functions. PMID:24356572

  10. Regulatory Physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, Helen W.; Whitson, Peggy A.; Putcha, Lakshmi; Baker, Ellen; Smith, Scott M.; Stewart, Karen; Gretebeck, Randall; Nimmagudda, R. R.; Schoeller, Dale A.; Davis-Street, Janis

    1999-01-01

    As noted elsewhere in this report, a central goal of the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP) was to ensure that cardiovascular and muscle function were adequate to perform an emergency egress after 16 days of spaceflight. The goals of the Regulatory Physiology component of the EDOMP were to identify and subsequently ameliorate those biochemical and nutritional factors that deplete physiological reserves or increase risk for disease, and to facilitate the development of effective muscle, exercise, and cardiovascular countermeasures. The component investigations designed to meet these goals focused on biochemical and physiological aspects of nutrition and metabolism, the risk of renal (kidney) stone formation, gastrointestinal function, and sleep in space. Investigations involved both ground-based protocols to validate proposed methods and flight studies to test those methods. Two hardware tests were also completed.

  11. Oxysterol binding protein-related protein 8 mediates the cytotoxicity of 25-hydroxycholesterol[S

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiwei; Zheng, Xiuting; Lou, Ning; Zhong, Wenbin; Yan, Daoguang

    2016-01-01

    Oxysterols are 27-carbon oxidized derivatives of cholesterol or by-products of cholesterol biosynthesis that can induce cell apoptosis in addition to a number of other bioactions. However, the mechanisms underlying this cytotoxicity are not completely understood. ORP8 is a member of the oxysterol binding protein-related protein (ORP) family, implicated in cellular lipid homeostasis, migration, and organization of the microtubule cytoskeleton. Here, we report that 25-hydroxycholesterol (OHC) induced apoptosis of the hepatoma cell lines, HepG2 and Huh7, via the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response pathway, and ORP8 overexpression resulted in a similar cell response as 25-OHC, indicating a putative functional relationship between oxysterol cytotoxicity and ORP8. Further experiments demonstrated that ORP8 overexpression significantly enhanced the 25-OHC effect on ER stress and apoptosis in HepG2 cells. A truncated ORP8 construct lacking the ligand-binding domain or a closely related protein, ORP5, was devoid of this activity, evidencing for specificity of the observed effects. Importantly, ORP8 knockdown markedly dampened such responses to 25-OHC. Taken together, the present study suggests that ORP8 may mediate the cytotoxicity of 25-OHC. PMID:27530118

  12. Proteins related to the spindle and checkpoint mitotic emphasize the different pathogenesis of hypoplastic MDS.

    PubMed

    Heredia, Fabiola Fernandes; de Sousa, Juliana Cordeiro; Ribeiro Junior, Howard Lopes; Carvalho, Alex Fiorini; Magalhaes, Silvia Maria Meira; Pinheiro, Ronald Feitosa

    2014-02-01

    Some studies show that alterations in expression of proteins related to mitotic spindle (AURORAS KINASE A and B) and mitotic checkpoint (CDC20 and MAD2L1) are involved in chromosomal instability and tumor progression in various solid and hematologic malignancies. This study aimed to evaluate these genes in MDS patients. The cytogenetics analysis was carried out by G-banding, AURKA and AURKB amplification was performed using FISH, and AURKA, AURKB, CDC20 and MAD2L1 gene expression was performed by qRT-PCR in 61 samples of bone marrow from MDS patients. AURKA gene amplification was observed in 10% of the cases, which also showed higher expression levels than the control group (p=0.038). Patients with normo/hypercellular BM presented significantly higher expression levels than hypocellular BM patients, but normo and hypercellular BM groups did not differ. After logistic regression analysis, our results showed that HIGH expression levels were associated with increased risk of developing normo/hypercellular MDS. It also indicated that age is associated with AURKA, CDC20 and MAD2L1 HIGH expression levels. The distinct expression of hypocellular patients emphasizes the prognostic importance of cellularity to MDS. The amplification/high expression of AURKA suggests that the increased expression of this gene may be related to the pathogenesis of disease. PMID:24314588

  13. Identification of the proteins related to SET-mediated hepatic cytotoxicity of trichloroethylene by proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiaohu; Yang, Xifei; Hong, Wen-Xu; Huang, Peiwu; Wang, Yong; Liu, Wei; Ye, Jinbo; Huang, Haiyan; Huang, Xinfeng; Shen, Liming; Yang, Linqing; Zhuang, Zhixiong; Liu, Jianjun

    2014-05-16

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is an effective solvent for a variety of organic materials. Since the wide use of TCE as industrial degreasing of metals, adhesive paint and polyvinyl chloride production, TCE has turned into an environmental and occupational toxicant. Exposure to TCE could cause severe hepatotoxicity; however, the toxic mechanisms of TCE remain poorly understood. Recently, we reported that SET protein mediated TCE-induced cytotoxicity in L-02 cells. Here, we further identified the proteins related to SET-mediated hepatic cytotoxicity of TCE using the techniques of DIGE (differential gel electrophoresis) and MALDI-TOF-MS/MS. Among the 20 differential proteins identified, 8 were found to be modulated by SET in TCE-induced cytotoxicity and three of them (cofilin-1, peroxiredoxin-2 and S100-A11) were validated by Western-blot analysis. The functional analysis revealed that most of the identified SET-modulated proteins are apoptosis-associated proteins. These data indicated that these proteins may be involved in SET-mediated hepatic cytotoxicity of TCE in L-02 cells.

  14. Proteins related to the spindle and checkpoint mitotic emphasize the different pathogenesis of hypoplastic MDS.

    PubMed

    Heredia, Fabiola Fernandes; de Sousa, Juliana Cordeiro; Ribeiro Junior, Howard Lopes; Carvalho, Alex Fiorini; Magalhaes, Silvia Maria Meira; Pinheiro, Ronald Feitosa

    2014-02-01

    Some studies show that alterations in expression of proteins related to mitotic spindle (AURORAS KINASE A and B) and mitotic checkpoint (CDC20 and MAD2L1) are involved in chromosomal instability and tumor progression in various solid and hematologic malignancies. This study aimed to evaluate these genes in MDS patients. The cytogenetics analysis was carried out by G-banding, AURKA and AURKB amplification was performed using FISH, and AURKA, AURKB, CDC20 and MAD2L1 gene expression was performed by qRT-PCR in 61 samples of bone marrow from MDS patients. AURKA gene amplification was observed in 10% of the cases, which also showed higher expression levels than the control group (p=0.038). Patients with normo/hypercellular BM presented significantly higher expression levels than hypocellular BM patients, but normo and hypercellular BM groups did not differ. After logistic regression analysis, our results showed that HIGH expression levels were associated with increased risk of developing normo/hypercellular MDS. It also indicated that age is associated with AURKA, CDC20 and MAD2L1 HIGH expression levels. The distinct expression of hypocellular patients emphasizes the prognostic importance of cellularity to MDS. The amplification/high expression of AURKA suggests that the increased expression of this gene may be related to the pathogenesis of disease.

  15. The Free Radical Scavenger NecroX-7 Attenuates Acute Graft-versus-Host Disease via Reciprocal Regulation of Th1/Regulatory T Cells and Inhibition of HMGB1 Release.

    PubMed

    Im, Keon-Il; Kim, Nayoun; Lim, Jung-Yeon; Nam, Young-Sun; Lee, Eun-Sol; Kim, Eun-Jung; Kim, Hyoung Jin; Kim, Soon Ha; Cho, Seok-Goo

    2015-06-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a major complication associated with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Despite the prominent role of the adaptive immune system, the importance of controlling the innate immune system in the pathogenesis of GVHD has recently been rediscovered. High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a crucial damage-associated molecular pattern signal that functions as a potent innate immune mediator in GVHD. In the present study, we investigated treatment of experimental GVHD through HMGB1 blockade using the compound cyclopentylamino carboxymethylthiazolylindole (NecroX)-7. Treated animals significantly attenuated GVHD-related mortality and inhibited severe tissue damage. These protective effects correlated with the decrease in HMGB1 expression and lower levels of reactive oxidative stress. Additionally, NecroX-7 inhibited the HMGB1-induced release of TNF and IL-6, as well as the expression of TLR-4 and receptor for advanced glycation end products. We also observed increased regulatory T cell numbers, which may be associated with regulation of differentiation signals independent of HMGB1. Taken together, these data indicate that NecroX-7 protects mice against lethal GVHD by reciprocal regulation of regulatory T/Th1 cells, attenuating systemic HMGB1 accumulation and inhibiting HMGB1-mediated inflammatory response. Our results indicate the possibility of a new use for a clinical drug that is effective for the treatment of GVHD.

  16. RNA-binding proteins related to stress response and differentiation in protozoa.

    PubMed

    Alves, Lysangela Ronalte; Goldenberg, Samuel

    2016-02-26

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) are key regulators of gene expression. There are several distinct families of RBPs and they are involved in the cellular response to environmental changes, cell differentiation and cell death. The RBPs can differentially combine with RNA molecules and form ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes, defining the function and fate of RNA molecules in the cell. RBPs display diverse domains that allow them to be categorized into distinct families. They play important roles in the cellular response to physiological stress, in cell differentiation, and, it is believed, in the cellular localization of certain mRNAs. In several protozoa, a physiological stress (nutritional, temperature or pH) triggers differentiation to a distinct developmental stage. Most of the RBPs characterized in protozoa arise from trypanosomatids. In these protozoa gene expression regulation is mostly post-transcriptional, which suggests that some RBPs might display regulatory functions distinct from those described for other eukaryotes. mRNA stability can be altered as a response to stress. Transcripts are sequestered to RNA granules that ultimately modulate their availability to the translation machinery, storage or degradation, depending on the associated proteins. These aggregates of mRNPs containing mRNAs that are not being translated colocalize in cytoplasmic foci, and their numbers and size vary according to cell conditions such as oxidative stress, nutritional status and treatment with drugs that inhibit translation.

  17. Acute systemic toxicity.

    PubMed

    Botham, Philip A

    2002-01-01

    Use of the test that aimed to identify the single lethal dose of a substance that kills half the animals in a test group (the LD50 test) should finally be discontinued by the end of 2002, after many years of controversy and debate. In its stead are three recently developed alternative animal tests that significantly improve animal welfare: the fixed dose procedure, the acute toxic class method, and the up and down procedure. These tests have already undergone revision, both to improve their scientific performance and, importantly, to increase their regulatory acceptance. They can now be used within a strategy of acute toxicity testing for all types of test substances and for all regulatory and in-house purposes. In vitro cytotoxicity tests could be used (perhaps by mid-2002) as adjuncts to these alternative animal tests to improve dose level selection and reduce (at least modestly) the number of animals used. However, the total replacement of animal tests requires a considerable amount of further test development, followed by validation, which will require at least 10 yr.

  18. Acute gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Graves, Nancy S

    2013-09-01

    Acute gastroenteritis is a common infectious disease syndrome, causing a combination of nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. There are more than 350 million cases of acute gastroenteritis in the United States annually and 48 million of these cases are caused by foodborne bacteria. Traveler's diarrhea affects more than half of people traveling from developed countries to developing countries. In adult and pediatric patients, the prevalence of Clostridium difficile is increasing. Contact precautions, public health education, and prudent use of antibiotics are necessary goals in decreasing the prevalence of Clostridium difficle. Preventing dehydration or providing appropriate rehydration is the primary supportive treatment of acute gastroenteritis.

  19. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... bronchitis? Acute bronchitis is almost always caused by viruses that attack the lining of the bronchial tree ... infection. As your body fights back against these viruses, more swelling occurs and more mucus is produced. ...

  20. Acute Pericarditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... large pericardial effusions). Acute pericarditis usually responds to colchicine or NSAIDs (such as aspirin and ibuprofen ) taken ... reduce pain but relieves it by reducing inflammation. Colchicine also decreases the chance of pericarditis returning later. ...

  1. Environmental regulatory update table

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.J.; Langston, M.E.; Tucker, C.S.; Reed, R.M.

    1987-06-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  2. Diarrhoea in adults (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction An estimated 4000 million cases of diarrhoea occurred worldwide in 1996, resulting in 2.5 million deaths. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for acute diarrhoea in adults living in resource-rich countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute mild-to-moderate diarrhoea in adults from resource-rich countries traveling to resource-poor countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute mild-to-moderate diarrhoea in adults living in resource-poor countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute severe diarrhoea in adults living in resource-poor countries? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to January 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 71 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics, antimotility agents, antisecretory agents, bismuth subsalicylate, diet, intravenous rehydration, nasogastric tube rehydration, and oral rehydration solutions (amino acid oral rehydration solution, bicarbonate oral rehydration solution, reduced osmolarity oral rehydration solution, rice-based oral rehydration solution, standard oral rehydration solution). PMID:19450323

  3. Diarrhoea in adults (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction An estimated 4.6 billion cases of diarrhoea occurred worldwide in 2004, resulting in 2.2 million deaths. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for acute diarrhoea in adults living in resource-rich countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute mild-to-moderate diarrhoea in adults from resource-rich countries travelling to resource-poor countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute mild-to-moderate diarrhoea in adults living in resource-poor countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute severe diarrhoea in adults living in resource-poor countries? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to January 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 72 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics, antimotility agents, antisecretory agents, bismuth subsalicylate, diet, intravenous rehydration, nasogastric tube rehydration, oral rehydration solutions (amino acid oral rehydration solution, bicarbonate oral rehydration solution, reduced osmolarity oral rehydration solution, rice-based oral rehydration solution, standard oral rehydration solution), vitamin A supplementation, and zinc supplementation. PMID:21718555

  4. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... agenda on April 26, 2010 (75 FR 21960). For this edition of the NRC's regulatory agenda, the most... publication of the last NRC semiannual agenda on April 26, 2010 (75 FR 21960). Within each group, the rules... regulations to improve the control over the distribution of source material to exempt persons and to...

  5. Regulatory guidance document

    SciTech Connect

    1994-05-01

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program Management System Manual requires preparation of the OCRWM Regulatory Guidance Document (RGD) that addresses licensing, environmental compliance, and safety and health compliance. The document provides: regulatory compliance policy; guidance to OCRWM organizational elements to ensure a consistent approach when complying with regulatory requirements; strategies to achieve policy objectives; organizational responsibilities for regulatory compliance; guidance with regard to Program compliance oversight; and guidance on the contents of a project-level Regulatory Compliance Plan. The scope of the RGD includes site suitability evaluation, licensing, environmental compliance, and safety and health compliance, in accordance with the direction provided by Section 4.6.3 of the PMS Manual. Site suitability evaluation and regulatory compliance during site characterization are significant activities, particularly with regard to the YW MSA. OCRWM`s evaluation of whether the Yucca Mountain site is suitable for repository development must precede its submittal of a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Accordingly, site suitability evaluation is discussed in Chapter 4, and the general statements of policy regarding site suitability evaluation are discussed in Section 2.1. Although much of the data and analyses may initially be similar, the licensing process is discussed separately in Chapter 5. Environmental compliance is discussed in Chapter 6. Safety and Health compliance is discussed in Chapter 7.

  6. Regulatory sequence analysis tools.

    PubMed

    van Helden, Jacques

    2003-07-01

    The web resource Regulatory Sequence Analysis Tools (RSAT) (http://rsat.ulb.ac.be/rsat) offers a collection of software tools dedicated to the prediction of regulatory sites in non-coding DNA sequences. These tools include sequence retrieval, pattern discovery, pattern matching, genome-scale pattern matching, feature-map drawing, random sequence generation and other utilities. Alternative formats are supported for the representation of regulatory motifs (strings or position-specific scoring matrices) and several algorithms are proposed for pattern discovery. RSAT currently holds >100 fully sequenced genomes and these data are regularly updated from GenBank.

  7. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary α-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  8. Modeling Emergence in Neuroprotective Regulatory Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Haack, Jereme N.; McDermott, Jason E.; Stevens, S.L.; Stenzel-Poore, Mary

    2013-01-05

    The use of predictive modeling in the analysis of gene expression data can greatly accelerate the pace of scientific discovery in biomedical research by enabling in silico experimentation to test disease triggers and potential drug therapies. Techniques that focus on modeling emergence, such as agent-based modeling and multi-agent simulations, are of particular interest as they support the discovery of pathways that may have never been observed in the past. Thus far, these techniques have been primarily applied at the multi-cellular level, or have focused on signaling and metabolic networks. We present an approach where emergence modeling is extended to regulatory networks and demonstrate its application to the discovery of neuroprotective pathways. An initial evaluation of the approach indicates that emergence modeling provides novel insights for the analysis of regulatory networks that can advance the discovery of acute treatments for stroke and other diseases.

  9. 3 CFR - Regulatory Review

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... been learned since that time. Far more is now known about regulation—not only about when it is... interests of future generations; identify methods of ensuring that regulatory review does not produce...

  10. Assessing the regulatory picture

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This article addresses the safety of the nation's drinking water supply and discusses compliance of the Clean Water Act. Right now, the shape of the regulatory future is uncertain. The results of the D-DBP regulatory negotiation are imminent. Congress is ready to begin debating reauthorization of the Safe Drinking Water Act, and utilities are trying to comply with the regulations while trying not to price water out of the reach of some of their customers.

  11. NRC regulatory initiatives

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, T.C.

    1989-11-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is addressing several low-level waste disposal issues that will be important to waste generators and to States and Compacts developing new disposal capacity. These issues include Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) waste, mixed waste, below regulatory concern (BRC) waste, and the low-level waste data base. This paper discusses these issues and their current status.

  12. Acute Vestibulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Yoon-Hee

    2011-01-01

    The presentation of acute vertigo may represent both a common benign disorder or a life threatening but rare one. Familiarity with the common peripheral vestibular disorders will allow the clinician to rapidly “rule-in” a benign disorder and recognize when further testing is required. Key features of vertigo required to make an accurate diagnosis are duration, chronicity, associated symptoms, and triggers. Bedside tests that are critical to the diagnosis of acute vertigo include the Dix-Hallpike maneuver and canalith repositioning manuever, occlusive ophthalmoscopy, and the head impulse test. The goal of this review is to provide the clinician with the clinical and pathophysiologic background of the most common disorders that present with vertigo to develop a logical differential diagnosis and management plan. PMID:23983835

  13. [Acute diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Burgmann, Konstantin; Schoepfer, Alain

    2014-09-01

    Diarrhea, defined as three or more loose or watery stools per day, represents a frequent problem in outpatients as well as inpatients. As most of the patients with acute diarrhea show a self-limiting disease course, the main challenge for the physician is to discriminate patients for whom symptomatic therapy is sufficient from those with severe disease course and threatening complications. This review aims to provide a practical guidance for such decisions.

  14. Inhalation exposure technology, dosimetry, and regulatory issues.

    PubMed

    Dorato, M A; Wolff, R K

    1991-01-01

    Inhalation toxicology technology has provided the scientific community with important advances in studies of inhaled toxicants. These advances include new and more efficient exposure systems (e.g., flow-past nose-only exposure systems), and improved approaches to inhalation chamber environmental control (e.g., temperature, humidity, air quality). Practical problems and approaches to testing and operating inhalation exposure systems and the advantages and disadvantages of the major inhalation exposure types (e.g., whole-body, nose-only) are discussed. Important aspects of study design, such as high level particulate exposures resulting in large lung burdens (e.g., greater than or equal to 2 mg/g of lung), slowed pulmonary clearance rates, and nonspecific toxicity are considered, along with practical issues of comparative dosimetry. Regulatory guidelines have continued to present challenges in designing and conducting acute, subchronic, and chronic inhalation studies. The important regulatory issue of performing acute inhalation toxicity studies at high aerosol concentrations and "respirable" particle size distribution is discussed. PMID:1813983

  15. Viral complement regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Rosengard, A M; Ahearn, J M

    1999-05-01

    The inactivation of complement provides cells and tissues critical protection from complement-mediated attack and decreases the associated recruitment of other inflammatory mediators. In an attempt to evade the host immune response, viruses have evolved two mechanisms to acquire complement regulatory proteins. They can directly seize the host cell complement regulators onto their outer envelope and/or they can produce their own proteins which are either secreted into the neighboring intercellular space or expressed as membrane-bound proteins on the infected host cell. The following review will concentrate on the viral homologues of the mammalian complement regulatory proteins, specifically those containing complement control protein (CCP) repeats. PMID:10408371

  16. Rationales for regulatory activity

    SciTech Connect

    Perhac, R.M.

    1997-02-01

    The author provides an outline which touches on the types of concerns about risk evaluation which are addressed in the process of establishing regulatory guides. Broadly he says regulatory activity serves three broad constituents: (1) Paternalism (private risk); (2) Promotion of social welfare (public risks); (3) Protection of individual rights (public risks). He then discusses some of the major issues encountered in reaching a decision on what is an acceptable level of risk within each of these areas, and how one establishes such a level.

  17. EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities

    SciTech Connect

    2011-11-21

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Program manages several transportation regulatory activities established by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct), as amended by the Energy Conservation Reauthorization Act of 1998, EPAct 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA).

  18. The regulatory horizon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, ED

    1987-01-01

    The author briefly discusses the FAA's position as it relates to cockpit resource management. For example, if Cockpit Resource Management (CRM) is a positive concept, why isn't everyone required to implement it? The regulatory practice of the FAA is discussed and questions and answers are presented.

  19. Small Regulatory RNA and Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Faucher, Sébastien P.; Shuman, Howard A.

    2011-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a gram-negative bacterial species that is ubiquitous in almost any aqueous environment. It is the agent of Legionnaires’ disease, an acute and often under-reported form of pneumonia. In mammals, L. pneumophila replicates inside macrophages within a modified vacuole. Many protein regulators have been identified that control virulence-related properties, including RpoS, LetA/LetS, and PmrA/PmrB. In the past few years, the importance of regulation of virulence factors by small regulatory RNA (sRNAs) has been increasingly appreciated. This is also the case in L. pneumophila where three sRNAs (RsmY, RsmZ, and 6S RNA) were recently shown to be important determinants of virulence regulation and 79 actively transcribed sRNAs were identified. In this review we describe current knowledge about sRNAs and their regulatory properties and how this relates to the known regulatory systems of L. pneumophila. We also provide a model for sRNA-mediated control of gene expression that serves as a framework for understanding the regulation of virulence-related properties of L. pneumophila. PMID:21833335

  20. Asthma in adults (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction About 10% of adults have suffered an attack of asthma, and up to 5% of these have severe disease that responds poorly to treatment. Patients with severe disease have an increased risk of death, but patients with mild to moderate disease are also at risk of exacerbations. Most guidelines about the management of asthma follow stepwise protocols. This review does not endorse or follow any particular protocol, but presents the evidence about specific interventions. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for acute asthma? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to April 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 100 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: beta2 agonists (plus ipratropium bromide, pressured metered-dose inhalers, short-acting continuous nebulised, short-acting intermittent nebulised, short-acting iv, and inhaled formoterol); corticosteroids (inhaled); corticosteroids (single oral, combined inhaled, and short courses); education about acute asthma; generalist care; helium–oxygen mixture (heliox); magnesium sulphate (iv and adding isotonic nebulised magnesium to inhaled beta2 agonists); mechanical ventilation; oxygen supplementation (controlled 28% oxygen and controlled 100% oxygen); and specialist care. PMID:21463536

  1. Acute sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Feldt, Brent; Dion, Gregory R; Weitzel, Erik K; McMains, Kevin C

    2013-10-01

    Sinusitis is a common patient complaint that carries with it a large economic burden. It is one of the most common reasons patients visit their primary care physician. Acute bacterial rhinosinusitis (ABRS) can be distinguished from other forms of rhinosinusitis based on symptom duration of <4 weeks in a patient with purulent rhinorrhea associated with facial pain or pressure. Native upper aerodigestive tract bacteria are the most common etiologic agents. Treatment of ABRS is targeted primarily at symptom improvement. Amoxicillin can be used based on the clinical scenario and patient comorbidities. Computed tomographic scans are reserved for complicated presentations or when there is concern for intracranial extension or other complications. A systematic approach to ABRS will allow for improved patient quality of life and a decreased overall economic burden of this common entity.

  2. Toxicogenomics and the Regulatory Framework

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicogenomics presents regulatory agencies with the opportunity to revolutionize their analyses by enabling the collection of information on a broader range of responses than currently considered in traditional regulatory decision making. Analyses of genomic responses are expec...

  3. Nuclear Regulatory Commission information digest

    SciTech Connect

    None,

    1990-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission information digest provides summary information regarding the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, its regulatory responsibilities, and areas licensed by the commission. This is an annual publication for the general use of the NRC Staff and is available to the public. The digest is divided into two parts: the first presents an overview of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the second provides data on NRC commercial nuclear reactor licensees and commercial nuclear power reactors worldwide.

  4. 12 CFR 562.2 - Regulatory reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... of the special supervisory, regulatory, and economic policy needs served by such reports. Regulatory... reflects the underlying economic substance of the transaction at issue. Regulatory reporting...

  5. 78 FR 44329 - Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ....nasa.gov/open . Timetable: Action Date FR Cite NPRM 10/00/13 Regulatory Flexibility Analysis Required... Administration (NASA). ACTION: Semiannual regulatory agenda. SUMMARY: NASA's regulatory agenda describes those regulations being considered for development or amendment by NASA, the need and legal basis for the...

  6. 75 FR 79759 - Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... Action 04/16/10 75 FR 2012 Regulatory Flexibility Analysis Required: Yes Agency Contact: Mohammed Khan... ``Regulatory Planning and Review,'' 58 FR 51735, and the Regulatory Flexibility Act, 5 U.S.C. 601 et seq... use throughout the rulemaking process. Timetable: Action Date FR Cite Notice: Public Meeting...

  7. Establishing regulatory priorities

    SciTech Connect

    Pontius, F.W.

    1995-12-01

    Statutory deadlines for setting regulations under the 1986 Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) have not been met. Faced with limited resources, the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) has historically set regulatory priorities based on perceived need, politics, and legal deadlines. This has resulted in a fragmented regulatory program and confusion on the part of the regulated community and on the part of other stakeholders. Even though the agency has been subject to court-imposed deadlines for most new regulations, resource limitations have caused these deadlines to be missed, resulting in new court-imposed deadlines. In 1994, the agency began considering a new approach for determining how many regulations can be developed and in what order. A draft strategic plan was prepared in December 1994. Based on discussion of this plan, USEPA requested the US District Court for Oregon to extend certain regulatory deadlines so that new priorities could be set for the highest-risk substances. An extension was granted until Aug. 1, 1995, and was subsequently extended to Dec. 15, 1995.

  8. Regulatory aspects on nanomedicines.

    PubMed

    Sainz, Vanessa; Conniot, João; Matos, Ana I; Peres, Carina; Zupancic, Eva; Moura, Liane; Silva, Liana C; Florindo, Helena F; Gaspar, Rogério S

    2015-12-18

    Nanomedicines have been in the forefront of pharmaceutical research in the last decades, creating new challenges for research community, industry, and regulators. There is a strong demand for the fast development of scientific and technological tools to address unmet medical needs, thus improving human health care and life quality. Tremendous advances in the biomaterials and nanotechnology fields have prompted their use as promising tools to overcome important drawbacks, mostly associated to the non-specific effects of conventional therapeutic approaches. However, the wide range of application of nanomedicines demands a profound knowledge and characterization of these complex products. Their properties need to be extensively understood to avoid unpredicted effects on patients, such as potential immune reactivity. Research policy and alliances have been bringing together scientists, regulators, industry, and, more frequently in recent years, patient representatives and patient advocacy institutions. In order to successfully enhance the development of new technologies, improved strategies for research-based corporate organizations, more integrated research tools dealing with appropriate translational requirements aiming at clinical development, and proactive regulatory policies are essential in the near future. This review focuses on the most important aspects currently recognized as key factors for the regulation of nanomedicines, discussing the efforts under development by industry and regulatory agencies to promote their translation into the market. Regulatory Science aspects driving a faster and safer development of nanomedicines will be a central issue for the next years.

  9. Acute Toluene Exposure alters expression of genes associated with synaptic structure and function

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toluene (TOL), a volatile organic compound, is a ubiquitous air pollutant of interest to EPA regulatory programs. Whereas its acute functional effects are well described, several potential modes of action in the CNS have been proposed. Therefore, the genomic response to acute TOL...

  10. Toxicogenomics in regulatory ecotoxicology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ankley, Gerald T.; Daston, George P.; Degitz, Sigmund J.; Denslow, Nancy D.; Hoke, Robert A.; Kennedy, Sean W.; Miracle, Ann L.; Perkins, Edward J.; Snape, Jason; Tillitt, Donald E.; Tyler, Charles R.; Versteeg, Donald

    2006-01-01

    Recently, we have witnessed an explosion of different genomic approaches that, through a combination of advanced biological, instrumental, and bioinformatic techniques, can yield a previously unparalleled amount of data concerning the molecular and biochemical status of organisms. Fueled partially by large, well-publicized efforts such as the Human Genome Project, genomic research has become a rapidly growing topical area in multiple biological disciplines. Since 1999, when the term “toxicogenomics” was coined to describe the application of genomics to toxicology (1), a rapid increase in publications on the topic has occurred (Figure 1). The potential utility of toxicogenomics in toxicological research and regulatory activities has been the subject of scientific discussions and, as with any new technology, has evoked a wide range of opinion (2–6). VIEWPOINT © 2006 american chemical Society july 1, 2006 / EnvironmEntal SciEncE & tEchnology n 4055 The purpose of this feature article is to consider the roles of toxicogenomics in the field of regulatory ecotoxicology, explore current limitations in the science and practice of genomics, and propose possible avenues to approach and resolve some of the major challenges. A significant amount of input to our analysis came from a workshop sponsored by the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC) in Pellston, Mich., in September 2005. A complete list of names and affiliations of the experts participating in that workshop is provided online in Table 1 of the Supporting Information for this paper.

  11. Quantitative proteomics analysis of varicose veins: identification of a set of differentially expressed proteins related to ATP generation and utilization.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chao-Jen; Liang, Shih-Shin; Hsi, Edward; Chiou, Shyh-Horng; Lin, Sin-Daw

    2013-11-01

    Although morphological and anatomical studies indicate that varicose veins are characterized by venous wall weakening and subendothelial fibrosis, the exact underlying biochemical mechanism of their development remains unknown. Additionally, no quantitative proteomic study of venous proteins leading to decreased contractility of varicose veins has been reported to date. Therefore, to elucidate the molecular mechanism of altered vascular contractility, this study performed shotgun proteomic analysis to obtain protein expression profiles in patients with varicose veins. Stable isotope dimethyl labeling coupled with nanoLC-MS/MS revealed downregulation in 12 polypeptides, including myosin light chain kinase, creatine kinase B-type, ATP synthase, phosphoglycerate kinase, and pyruvate kinase. However, analyses of protein species associated with cytoskeletal assembly or with cellular morphology showed no clear up- or down-regulation. These results indicate that defects in ATP generation and utilization may account for the dysfunction of vascular smooth muscle following formation of varicose veins. Collectively, the severity of varicose veins depends on the regulatory roles of various protein factors in the metabolic coordination of physiological functions. This pilot study improves understanding of the pathogenesis of varicose veins and lays the foundation for further validation and clinical translation of biomarkers for targeted therapies in treating this disease.

  12. Pentoxifylline Treatment in Acute Pancreatitis (AP)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-14

    Acute Pancreatitis (AP); Gallstone Pancreatitis; Alcoholic Pancreatitis; Post-ERCP/Post-procedural Pancreatitis; Trauma Acute Pancreatitis; Hypertriglyceridemia Acute Pancreatitis; Idiopathic (Unknown) Acute Pancreatitis; Medication Induced Acute Pancreatitis; Cancer Acute Pancreatitis; Miscellaneous (i.e. Acute on Chronic Pancreatitis)

  13. Regulatory Considerations for Biosimilars

    PubMed Central

    Nellore, Ranjani

    2010-01-01

    Currently there is considerable interest in the legislative debate around generic biological drugs or “biosimilars” in the EU and US due to the large, lucrative market that it offers to the industry. While some countries have issued a few regulatory guidelines as well as product specific requirements, there is no general consensus as to a single, simple mechanism similar to the bioequivalence determination that leads to approval of generic small molecules all over the world. The inherent complex nature of the molecules, along with complicated manufacturing and analytical techniques to characterize them make it difficult to rely on a single human pharmacokinetic study for assurance of safety and efficacy. In general, the concept of comparability has been used for evaluation of the currently approved “similar” biological where a step by step assessment on the quality, preclinical and clinical aspects is made. In India, the focus is primarily on the availability and affordability of life-saving drugs. In this context every product needs to be evaluated on its own merit irrespective of the innovator brand. The formation of the National Biotechnology Regulatory Authority may provide a step in the right direction for regulation of these complex molecules. However, in order to have an efficient machinery for initial approval and ongoing oversight with a country-specific focus, cooperation with international authorities for granting approvals and continuous risk-benefit review is essential. Several steps are still needed for India to be perceived as a country that leads the world in providing quality biological products. PMID:21829775

  14. Regulatory Streamlining and Improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Mark A. Carl

    2006-07-11

    The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) engaged in numerous projects outlined under the scope of work discussed in the United States Department of Energy (DOE) grant number DE-FC26-04NT15456 awarded to the IOGCC. Numerous projects were completed that were extremely valuable to state oil and gas agencies as a result of work performed utilizing resources provided by the grant. There are numerous areas in which state agencies still need assistance. This additional assistance will need to be addressed under future scopes of work submitted annually to DOE's Project Officer for this grant. This report discusses the progress of the projects outlined under the grant scope of work for the 2005-2006 areas of interest, which are as follows: Area of Interest No. 1--Regulatory Streamlining and Improvement: This area of interest continues to support IOGCC's regulatory streamlining efforts that include the identification and elimination of unnecessary duplications of efforts between and among state and federal programs dealing with exploration and production on public lands. Area of Interest No. 2--Technology: This area of interest seeks to improve efficiency in states through the identification of technologies that can reduce costs. Area of Interest No. 3--Training and Education: This area of interest is vital to upgrading the skills of regulators and industry alike. Within the National Energy Policy, there are many appropriate training and education opportunities. Education was strongly endorsed by the President's National Energy Policy Development group. Acting through the governors offices, states are very effective conduits for the dissemination of energy education information. While the IOGCC favors the development of a comprehensive, long-term energy education plan, states are also supportive of immediate action on important concerns, such as energy prices, availability and conservation. Area of Interest No. 4--Resource Assessment and Development: This area

  15. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... hard for blood to do its work. In acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), also called acute lymphoblastic leukemia, there are too ... of white blood cells called lymphocytes or lymphoblasts. ALL is the most common type of cancer in ...

  16. Acute kidney failure

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure; Renal failure; Renal failure - acute; ARF; Kidney injury - acute ... There are many possible causes of kidney damage. They include: ... cholesterol (cholesterol emboli) Decreased blood flow due to very ...

  17. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    Acute renal arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... main artery to the kidney is called the renal artery. Reduced blood flow through the renal artery ...

  18. Acute cerebellar ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    Cerebellar ataxia; Ataxia - acute cerebellar; Cerebellitis; Post-varicella acute cerebellar ataxia; PVACA ... virus. Viral infections that may cause this include chickenpox , Coxsackie disease, Epstein-Barr, and echovirus . Other causes ...

  19. 77 FR 7972 - Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-13

    ... agenda pursuant to Executive Order 12866, ``Regulatory Planning and Review,'' 58 FR 51735, and the... Identifier No. 396 National Standards to 1105-AB34 Prevent, Detect, and Respond to Prison Rape (Reg Plan Seq... Prevent, Detect, and Respond to Prison Rape Regulatory Plan: This entry is Seq. No. 85 in part II of...

  20. 78 FR 1634 - Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    ... Administration (NASA). ACTION: Semiannual regulatory agenda. SUMMARY: NASA's regulatory agenda describes those regulations being considered for development or amendment by NASA, the need and legal basis for the actions... Controls and Management Systems, Office of Management Systems Division, NASA Headquarters, Washington,...

  1. 78 FR 1574 - Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    ... and stability to receive opioid addiction treatment medication. Timetable: Action Date FR Cite NPRM 06/19/09 74 FR 29153 NPRM Comment Period End 08/18/09 Final Action 12/06/12 77 FR 72752 Regulatory... FR Cite NPRM 03/00/13 Regulatory Flexibility Analysis Required: Yes. Agency Contact: Charles...

  2. Regulatory Foci and Organizational Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markovits, Yannis; Ullrich, Johannes; van Dick, Rolf; Davis, Ann J.

    2008-01-01

    We use regulatory focus theory to derive specific predictions regarding the differential relationships between regulatory focus and commitment. We estimated a structural equation model using a sample of 520 private and public sector employees and found in line with our hypotheses that (a) promotion focus related more strongly to affective…

  3. A dynamic and intricate regulatory network determines Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Deepak; Schneper, Lisa; Kumari, Hansi; Mathee, Kalai

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a metabolically versatile bacterium that is found in a wide range of biotic and abiotic habitats. It is a major human opportunistic pathogen causing numerous acute and chronic infections. The critical traits contributing to the pathogenic potential of P. aeruginosa are the production of a myriad of virulence factors, formation of biofilms and antibiotic resistance. Expression of these traits is under stringent regulation, and it responds to largely unidentified environmental signals. This review is focused on providing a global picture of virulence gene regulation in P. aeruginosa. In addition to key regulatory pathways that control the transition from acute to chronic infection phenotypes, some regulators have been identified that modulate multiple virulence mechanisms. Despite of a propensity for chaotic behaviour, no chaotic motifs were readily observed in the P. aeruginosa virulence regulatory network. Having a ‘birds-eye’ view of the regulatory cascades provides the forum opportunities to pose questions, formulate hypotheses and evaluate theories in elucidating P. aeruginosa pathogenesis. Understanding the mechanisms involved in making P. aeruginosa a successful pathogen is essential in helping devise control strategies. PMID:23143271

  4. Management of acute neurorehabilitation programs.

    PubMed

    Vogl, Susan M

    2011-06-01

    Outcome management, performance improvement, evidence-based practice, and policy payment mechanisms are critical operational drivers at every level of health care delivery. It is essential that all health care providers involved in patient care have a working knowledge of health care operations, including the policies and reimbursement mechanisms that drive their particular clinical practice. Providing excellent patient care includes understanding health care policies, regulations, and outcomes that have a historical and current impact on health care delivery. Some of these factors include patient access, patient safety, and information measurement and management. Inpatient acute neurorehabilitation programs have standard outcome measures and a unique set of fiscal rules and regulations. This article discusses the most common variables and terms found in program evaluation systems for acute neurorehabilitation programs as well as some of the clinical and regulatory requirements and reimbursement and level-of-care considerations that are critical for neurorehabilitation health care practitioners. The current health care environment requires providers to understand and continually evaluate quality outcomes, patient access, and patient safety, all within the confines of an efficacy-based care delivery system. PMID:22810871

  5. Imaging of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Thoeni, Ruedi F

    2015-11-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammation of the pancreas. Several classification systems have been used in the past but were considered unsatisfactory. A revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis was published that assessed the clinical course and severity of disease; divided acute pancreatitis into interstitial edematous pancreatitis and necrotizing pancreatitis; discerned an early phase (first week) from a late phase (after the first week); and focused on systemic inflammatory response syndrome and organ failure. This article focuses on the revised classification of acute pancreatitis, with emphasis on imaging features, particularly on newly-termed fluid collections and implications for the radiologist.

  6. T follicular regulatory cells.

    PubMed

    Sage, Peter T; Sharpe, Arlene H

    2016-05-01

    Pathogen exposure elicits production of high-affinity antibodies stimulated by T follicular helper (Tfh) cells in the germinal center reaction. Tfh cells provide both costimulation and stimulatory cytokines to B cells to facilitate affinity maturation, class switch recombination, and plasma cell differentiation within the germinal center. Under normal circumstances, the germinal center reaction results in antibodies that precisely target foreign pathogens while limiting autoimmunity and excessive inflammation. In order to have this degree of control, the immune system ensures Tfh-mediated B-cell help is regulated locally in the germinal center. The recently identified T follicular regulatory (Tfr) cell subset can migrate to the germinal center and inhibit Tfh-mediated B-cell activation and antibody production. Although many aspects of Tfr cell biology are still unclear, recent data have begun to delineate the specialized roles of Tfr cells in controlling the germinal center reaction. Here we discuss the current understanding of Tfr-cell differentiation and function and how this knowledge is providing new insights into the dynamic regulation of germinal centers, and suggesting more efficacious vaccine strategies and ways to treat antibody-mediated diseases.

  7. Internationalization of regulatory requirements.

    PubMed

    Juillet, Y

    2003-02-01

    The aim of harmonisation of medicines regulatory requirements is to allow the patient quicker access to new drugs and to avoid animal and human duplications. Harmonisation in the European Union (EU) is now completed, and has led to the submission of one dossier in one language study leading to European marketing authorizations, thanks in particular to efficacy guidelines published at the European level. With the benefit of the European experience since 1989, more than 40 guidelines have been harmonised amongst the EU, Japan and the USA through the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH). ICH is a unique process gathering regulators and industry experts from the three regions. Its activity is built on expertise and trust. The Common Technical Document (CTD), an agreed common format for application in the three regions, is a logical follow-up to the ICH first phase harmonising the content of the dossier. The CTD final implementation in July 2003 will have considerable influence on the review process and on the exchange of information in the three regions.

  8. Healthcare regulatory concepts in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Robson Rocha de; Elias, Paulo Eduardo Mangeon

    2012-06-01

    The healthcare regulatory concepts used in Brazilian scientific publications on healthcare management were reviewed. A typo-logical classification for regulatory concepts was developed from the most current ideas in five disciplines: life sciences, law, economics, sociology and political science. Four ideas stood out: control, balance, adaptation and direction, with greatest emphasis on the technical nature of regulation. The political nature of regulation was secondary. It was considered that dis-cussion of healthcare regulatory concepts was connected with comprehension of the role that the state plays in this sector. De-finition of the forms of state intervention is the key convergence point between the different ways of conceptualizing healthcare regulation.

  9. Acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Georgios K; Harissis, Haralampos; Mitsis, Michalis; Batsis, Haralampos; Fatouros, Michalis

    2012-04-28

    We report a case of acute chylous ascites formation presenting as peritonitis (acute chylous peritonitis) in a patient suffering from acute pancreatitis due to hypertriglyceridemia and alcohol abuse. The development of chylous ascites is usually a chronic process mostly involving malignancy, trauma or surgery, and symptoms arise as a result of progressive abdominal distention. However, when accumulation of "chyle" occurs rapidly, the patient may present with signs of peritonitis. Preoperative diagnosis is difficult since the clinical picture usually suggests hollow organ perforation, appendicitis or visceral ischemia. Less than 100 cases of acute chylous peritonitis have been reported. Pancreatitis is a rare cause of chyloperitoneum and in almost all of the cases chylous ascites is discovered some days (or even weeks) after the onset of symptoms of pancreatitis. This is the second case in the literature where the patient presented with acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis, and the presence of chyle within the abdominal cavity was discovered simultaneously with the establishment of the diagnosis of pancreatitis. The patient underwent an exploratory laparotomy for suspected perforated duodenal ulcer, since, due to hypertriglyceridemia, serum amylase values appeared within the normal range. Moreover, abdominal computed tomography imaging was not diagnostic for pancreatitis. Following abdominal lavage and drainage, the patient was successfully treated with total parenteral nutrition and octreotide.

  10. Acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Georgiou, Georgios K; Harissis, Haralampos; Mitsis, Michalis; Batsis, Haralampos; Fatouros, Michalis

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of acute chylous ascites formation presenting as peritonitis (acute chylous peritonitis) in a patient suffering from acute pancreatitis due to hypertriglyceridemia and alcohol abuse. The development of chylous ascites is usually a chronic process mostly involving malignancy, trauma or surgery, and symptoms arise as a result of progressive abdominal distention. However, when accumulation of “chyle” occurs rapidly, the patient may present with signs of peritonitis. Preoperative diagnosis is difficult since the clinical picture usually suggests hollow organ perforation, appendicitis or visceral ischemia. Less than 100 cases of acute chylous peritonitis have been reported. Pancreatitis is a rare cause of chyloperitoneum and in almost all of the cases chylous ascites is discovered some days (or even weeks) after the onset of symptoms of pancreatitis. This is the second case in the literature where the patient presented with acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis, and the presence of chyle within the abdominal cavity was discovered simultaneously with the establishment of the diagnosis of pancreatitis. The patient underwent an exploratory laparotomy for suspected perforated duodenal ulcer, since, due to hypertriglyceridemia, serum amylase values appeared within the normal range. Moreover, abdominal computed tomography imaging was not diagnostic for pancreatitis. Following abdominal lavage and drainage, the patient was successfully treated with total parenteral nutrition and octreotide. PMID:22563182

  11. Acute otitis media and acute bacterial sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Wald, Ellen R

    2011-05-01

    Acute otitis media and acute bacterial sinusitis are 2 of the most common indications for antimicrobial agents in children. Together, they are responsible for billions of dollars of health care expenditures. The pathogenesis of the 2 conditions is identical. In the majority of children with each condition, a preceding viral upper respiratory tract infection predisposes to the development of the acute bacterial complication. It has been shown that viral upper respiratory tract infection predisposes to the development of acute otitis media in 37% of cases. Currently, precise microbiologic diagnosis of acute otitis media and acute bacterial sinusitis requires performance of tympanocentesis in the former and sinus aspiration in the latter. The identification of a virus from the nasopharynx in either case does not obviate the need for antimicrobial therapy. Furthermore, nasal and nasopharyngeal swabs are not useful in predicting the results of culture of the middle ear or paranasal sinus. However, it is possible that a combination of information regarding nasopharyngeal colonization with bacteria and infection with specific viruses may inform treatment decisions in the future.

  12. Acute mastoiditis--revisited.

    PubMed

    Luntz, M; Keren, G; Nusem, S; Kronenberg, J

    1994-09-01

    The clinical course and causative organisms were studied in 18 patients with acute mastoiditis, 13 of whom (72%) had no previous history of middle ear disease. Their age ranged from 5 months to 21 years, and duration of middle ear symptoms immediately prior to admission ranged from 1 to 45 days (average 9.7 days). None had undergone a myringotomy prior to admission, while 13 (72%) had been receiving antibiotic treatment for acute otitis media. Three were admitted with intracranial complications. Bacteria were isolated in 10 of the 16 patients in whom samples were available for bacterial culture, and included Streptococcus pneumonia (2), Streptococcus pyogenes (2), Staphylococcus aureus (2), Staphlococcus coagulase negative (2), Klebsiella pneumonia (1), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (1). Of the 17 patients treated by us, 11 received surgery. Acute otitis media, secretory otitis media, acute mastoiditis, subacute mastoiditis and masked mastoiditis create a continuum. Antibiotic treatment for acute otitis media cannot be considered as an absolute safeguard against acute mastoiditis. When antibiotics are prescribed for acute mastoiditis before culture result is available, an anti-staphylococcal agent should be included. At least some patients with acute mastoiditis develop a primary infection of the bony framework of the middle ear cleft. The prevalence of the intracranial complications in acute mastoiditis is still high and may appear soon after or concomitant with the first sign of acute mastioditis.

  13. Regulatory Snapshots: integrative mining of regulatory modules from expression time series and regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Joana P; Aires, Ricardo S; Francisco, Alexandre P; Madeira, Sara C

    2012-01-01

    Explaining regulatory mechanisms is crucial to understand complex cellular responses leading to system perturbations. Some strategies reverse engineer regulatory interactions from experimental data, while others identify functional regulatory units (modules) under the assumption that biological systems yield a modular organization. Most modular studies focus on network structure and static properties, ignoring that gene regulation is largely driven by stimulus-response behavior. Expression time series are key to gain insight into dynamics, but have been insufficiently explored by current methods, which often (1) apply generic algorithms unsuited for expression analysis over time, due to inability to maintain the chronology of events or incorporate time dependency; (2) ignore local patterns, abundant in most interesting cases of transcriptional activity; (3) neglect physical binding or lack automatic association of regulators, focusing mainly on expression patterns; or (4) limit the discovery to a predefined number of modules. We propose Regulatory Snapshots, an integrative mining approach to identify regulatory modules over time by combining transcriptional control with response, while overcoming the above challenges. Temporal biclustering is first used to reveal transcriptional modules composed of genes showing coherent expression profiles over time. Personalized ranking is then applied to prioritize prominent regulators targeting the modules at each time point using a network of documented regulatory associations and the expression data. Custom graphics are finally depicted to expose the regulatory activity in a module at consecutive time points (snapshots). Regulatory Snapshots successfully unraveled modules underlying yeast response to heat shock and human epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, based on regulations documented in the YEASTRACT and JASPAR databases, respectively, and available expression data. Regulatory players involved in functionally enriched

  14. Regulatory facility guide for Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.S.; Bock, R.E.; Francis, M.W.; Gove, R.M.; Johnson, P.E.; Kovac, F.M.; Mynatt, J.O.; Rymer, A.C.

    1994-02-28

    The Regulatory Facility Guide (RFG) has been developed for the DOE and contractor facilities located in the state of Ohio. It provides detailed compilations of international, federal, and state transportation-related regulations applicable to shipments originating at destined to Ohio facilities. This RFG was developed as an additional resource tool for use both by traffic managers who must ensure that transportation operations are in full compliance with all applicable regulatory requirements and by oversight personnel who must verify compliance activities.

  15. The limits of regulatory toxicology

    SciTech Connect

    Carrington, Clark D.; Bolger, P. Michael

    2010-03-01

    The Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) has been used by regulatory and public health organizations (e.g., the U.S. Food and Drug and Administration, and the World Health Organization) for chemicals for more than 50 years. The ADI concept was also initially employed at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency at its inception in 1971, although with the adoption of newer terminology, it later became known as the Reference Dose (RfD). It is clear from the literature that both were first devised as instruments of regulatory policy. In the intervening years, it has become common to use language that implies that these standards are statements of scientific fact. Similarly, some of the discretionary or default values that are used to derive regulatory standards are represented as scientific assumptions when in fact they also represent regulatory policy. This confusion impedes both the best use of the available science and informed public participation in policy making. In addition, the misconception of the ADI or the RfD as statements of scientific fact may impede the consideration of alternative means to reduce exposure to chemicals that may be harmful, including regulatory measures that do not involve prescribing a regulatory concentration limit.

  16. [Pathogenesis of acute encephalitis and acute encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Shiomi, Masashi

    2011-03-01

    Many aspects of the pathogenesis of acute encephalitis and acute encephalopathy have been clarified in this decade, although many unknown mechanisms remain to be elucidated. According to progress of MRI and neuroimmunological analysis and the observation of clinical findings, many new syndromes were found, which enhanced our understanding of acute encephalitis and acute encephalopathy. The pathogenesis of encephalitis is divided into infection and immune mediated mechanisms. The antibodies to neuronal surface antigens(NSA) such as NMDA receptors, leucin-rich glioma inactivated 1 (LGI1) and aquaporin 4 were demonstrated in specific encephalitis, limbic encephalitis and neuromyelitis optica. Anti-NSA antibody encephalitis should be treated by immunotherapy such as corticosteroid and plasmapheresis. Acute encephalitis with refractory repetitive partial seizures (AERRPS) is a devastating postinfectious disease in children and adults, although the pathogenesis of AERRPS is poorly understood. Influenza associated encephalopathy(IAE) is characterized by it's high incidence in Japanese children between 1 year and 5 years of age, its onset in the first or the second day of illness and its high mortality (15-30%) and morbidity (25-40%). We proposed the classification of IAE with poor prognosis from the neuroradiological findings. Four types of encephalopathy seem to be differentiated from each other, acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE) type, hemorrhagic shock and encephalopathy syndrome (HSES) type, acute brain swelling (ABS) type, febrile convulsive status epilepticus (FCSE) type. The notable radiological features are thalamic lesions in ANE, diffuse cerebral cortical cytotoxic edema in HSES, reversible cerebral swelling in ABS which sometimes reaches lethal brain herniation, and in FCSE type, dendritic high signal in subcortical white matter by DWI ("bright tree appearance") appears simultaneously with the later onset of repetitive focal seizure. These four types are

  17. Acute Vision Loss.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Nika; Mehta, Sonia

    2015-09-01

    Acute vision loss can be transient (lasting <24 hours) or persistent (lasting >24 hours). When patients present with acute vision loss, it is important to ascertain the duration of vision loss and whether it is a unilateral process affecting one eye or a bilateral process affecting both eyes. This article focuses on causes of acute vision loss in the nontraumatic setting and provides management pearls to help health care providers better triage these patients.

  18. Acute Vision Loss.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Nika; Mehta, Sonia

    2015-09-01

    Acute vision loss can be transient (lasting <24 hours) or persistent (lasting >24 hours). When patients present with acute vision loss, it is important to ascertain the duration of vision loss and whether it is a unilateral process affecting one eye or a bilateral process affecting both eyes. This article focuses on causes of acute vision loss in the nontraumatic setting and provides management pearls to help health care providers better triage these patients. PMID:26319342

  19. [Acute mastoiditis in children].

    PubMed

    Kajosaari, Lauri; Sinkkonen, Saku T; Laulajainen-Hongisto, Anu; Jero, Jussi

    2014-01-01

    Acute mastoiditis in children develops when acute otitis media (AOM) spreads into the mastoid air cells inside the temporal bone. The diagnosis is based on clinical findings of AOM with simultaneous signs of infection in the mastoid area. The most common pathogen causing acute mastoiditis in children is Streptococcus pneumoniae. Intravenous antimicrobial medication, tympanostomy and microbial sample are the cornerstones of the treatment. If a complication of mastoiditis is suspected, imaging studies are needed, preferably with magnetic resonance imaging. The most common complication of acute mastoiditis is a subperiosteal abscess. PMID:24660384

  20. Nurse leaders' experiences of implementing regulatory changes in sexual health nursing practice in British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Bungay, Vicky; Stevenson, Janine

    2013-05-01

    Most research about regulatory policy change concerning expanded nursing activities has emphasized advanced practice roles and acute care settings. This study is a contribution to the small pool of research concerned with regulatory policy implementation for nurses undertaking expanded nursing practice activities in a public health context. Using the regulatory changes in certified nursing practice in one Canadian province as our starting point, we investigated the experiences of nurse leaders in implementing this change. Using a qualitative interpretive descriptive approach informed by tenets of complexity theory, we examined the experiences of 16 nurse leaders as situated within the larger public health care system in which nurses practice. Two interrelated themes, (a) preparing for certification and (b) the certification process, were identified to illustrate how competing and contrasting demands between health care and regulatory organizations created substantial barriers to policy change. Implications for health service delivery and future research are discussed.

  1. 75 FR 79929 - Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... Commission ###Semiannual Regulatory Agenda### ] FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION (FTC) FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION 16 CFR Ch. I Semiannual Regulatory Agenda AGENCY: Federal Trade Commission. ACTION: Semiannual regulatory... 22(d)(1) of the Federal Trade Commission Act, 15 U.S.C. 57b-3(d)(1), and the Regulatory......

  2. Department of Energy Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... Semiannual Regulatory Agenda 10 CFR Chs. II, III, and X 48 CFR Ch. 9 Regulatory Agenda AGENCY: Department of... ``Regulatory Planning and Review,'' 58 FR 51735, and the Regulatory Flexibility Act, 5 U.S.C. 601 et seq... use throughout the rulemaking process. Timetable: Action Date FR Cite Notice: Public Meeting...

  3. Regulatory physiology discipline science plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The focus of the Regulatory Physiology discipline of the Space Physiology and Countermeasures Program is twofold. First, to determine and study how microgravity and associated factors of space flight affect the regulatory mechanisms by which humans adapt and achieve homeostasis and thereby regulate their ability to respond to internal and external signals; and, second, to study selected physiological systems that have been demonstrated to be influenced by gravity. The Regulatory Physiology discipline, as defined here, is composed of seven subdisciplines: (1) Circadian Rhythms, (2) Endocrinology, (3) Fluid and Electrolyte Regulation, (4) Hematology, (5) Immunology, (6) Metabolism and Nutrition, and (7) Temperature Regulation. The purpose of this Discipline Science Plan is to provide a conceptual strategy for NASA's Life Sciences Division research and development activities in the area of regulatory physiology. It covers the research areas critical to NASA's programmatic requirements for the Extended-Duration Orbiter, Space Station Freedom, and exploration mission science activities. These science activities include ground-based and flight; basic, applied, and operational; and animal and human research and development. This document summarizes the current status of the program, outlines available knowledge, establishes goals and objectives, identifies science priorities, and defines critical questions in regulatory physiology. It contains a general plan that will be used by both NASA Headquarters Program Offices and the field centers to review and plan basic, applied, and operational intramural and extramural research and development activities in this area.

  4. Acute systemic toxicity--prospects for tiered testing strategies.

    PubMed

    Botham, P A

    2004-04-01

    After many years of controversy and debate, the LD50 test was finally deleted by the end of 2002. Three alternative animal tests, the Fixed Dose Procedure, the Acute Toxic Class Method and the Up and Down Procedure have been developed which give rise to significant improvements in animal welfare. They have recently undergone revision to improve their scientific performance but more importantly to increase their regulatory acceptance. They can now be used within a strategy for acute toxicity testing for all types of test substances and for all regulatory and in-house purposes. In vitro cytotoxicity tests could be used as adjuncts to these alternative animal tests within the next year or so to improve dose level selection and thus give further modest improvements in the numbers of animals used. However, the total replacement of animal tests requires a considerable amount of further test development, followed by validation, and is at least 10 years away.

  5. Finding regulatory elements and regulatory motifs: a general probabilistic framework

    PubMed Central

    van Nimwegen, Erik

    2007-01-01

    Over the last two decades a large number of algorithms has been developed for regulatory motif finding. Here we show how many of these algorithms, especially those that model binding specificities of regulatory factors with position specific weight matrices (WMs), naturally arise within a general Bayesian probabilistic framework. We discuss how WMs are constructed from sets of regulatory sites, how sites for a given WM can be discovered by scanning of large sequences, how to cluster WMs, and more generally how to cluster large sets of sites from different WMs into clusters. We discuss how 'regulatory modules', clusters of sites for subsets of WMs, can be found in large intergenic sequences, and we discuss different methods for ab initio motif finding, including expectation maximization (EM) algorithms, and motif sampling algorithms. Finally, we extensively discuss how module finding methods and ab initio motif finding methods can be extended to take phylogenetic relations between the input sequences into account, i.e. we show how motif finding and phylogenetic footprinting can be integrated in a rigorous probabilistic framework. The article is intended for readers with a solid background in applied mathematics, and preferably with some knowledge of general Bayesian probabilistic methods. The main purpose of the article is to elucidate that all these methods are not a disconnected set of individual algorithmic recipes, but that they are just different facets of a single integrated probabilistic theory. PMID:17903285

  6. The rise of regulatory RNA

    PubMed Central

    Morris, K.V.; Mattick, J.S.

    2015-01-01

    Discoveries over the last decade portend a paradigm shift in molecular biology. Evidence suggests that RNA is not only functional as a messenger between DNA and protein but also in the regulation of genome organization and gene expression, which is increasingly elaborated in complex organisms. Regulatory RNAs appear to operate at many levels, but in particular to play an important role in the epigenetic processes that control differentiation and development. These discoveries suggest a central role for RNA in human evolution and ontogeny. Here we survey the emergence of the previously unsuspected world of regulatory RNAs from an historical perspective. PMID:24776770

  7. Below Regulatory Concern Owners Group:

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.F.; Phillips, L.B.; Williams, W.J.

    1988-03-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has indicated that Below Regulatory Concern (BRC) exemption of waste streams from the disposal requirements for low level radioactive waste should be based on actual expected nuclide concentration and variability. Because of variations in the importance and relative abundance of nuclides in waste, one or a small number of nuclides may control the detemination of a waste steam as BRC. This study wasconducted to evaluate the relative importance of the major radionucldies in dose assessments for the disposal options and geographic regions under consideration for BRC waste. 6 refs., 25 tabs.

  8. Glycoconjugate Vaccines: The Regulatory Framework.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Most vaccines, including the currently available glycoconjugate vaccines, are administered to healthy infants, to prevent future disease. The safety of a prospective vaccine is a key prerequisite for approval. Undesired side effects would not only have the potential to damage the individual infant but also lead to a loss of confidence in the respective vaccine-or vaccines in general-on a population level. Thus, regulatory requirements, particularly with regard to safety, are extremely rigorous. This chapter highlights regulatory aspects on carbohydrate-based vaccines with an emphasis on analytical approaches to ensure the consistent quality of successive manufacturing lots.

  9. Cell therapy, advanced materials, and new approaches to acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Yevzlin, Alexander S; Humes, H David

    2009-12-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is a common clinical syndrome characterized by an abrupt deterioration in kidney function, resulting in abnormalities in volume-regulatory, metabolic-regulatory, excretory, and endocrine functions. Despite decades of improvements in the provision of intensive care, and specifically in the provision of renal replacement therapy, the morbidity and mortality associated with acute kidney injury (AKI) remain extremely high. This article highlights novel cell therapies, advanced materials, and approaches to AKI with the aim of illuminating a potential path for future basic, translational, and clinical research using these novel modalities.

  10. Regulatory T cells enhance persistence of the zoonotic pathogen Seoul virus in its reservoir host.

    PubMed

    Easterbrook, Judith D; Zink, M Christine; Klein, Sabra L

    2007-09-25

    Hantaviruses are zoonotic pathogens that maintain a persistent infection in their reservoir hosts, yet the mechanisms mediating persistence remain unknown. Regulatory T cell responses cause persistent infection by suppressing proinflammatory and effector T cell activity; hantaviruses may exploit these responses to cause persistence. To test this hypothesis, male Norway rats were inoculated with Seoul virus and regulatory T cells were monitored during infection. Increased numbers of CD4(+)CD25(+)Forkhead box P3(+) T cells and expression of Forkhead box P3 and TGF-beta were observed in the lungs of male rats during persistent Seoul virus infection. To determine whether regulatory T cells modulate Seoul virus persistence, regulatory T cells were inactivated in male rats by using an anti-rat CD25 monoclonal antibody (NDS-63). Inactivation of regulatory T cells reduced the amount of Seoul virus RNA present in the lungs and the proportion of animals shedding viral RNA in saliva. Because regulatory T cells suppress proinflammatory-induced pathogenesis, pathologic observations in the lungs were evaluated during infection. Subclinical acute multifocal areas of hemorrhage and edema were noted in the lungs during infection; inactivation of regulatory T cells reduced the amount of pathologic foci. Expression of TNF was suppressed during the persistent phase of infection; inactivation of regulatory T cells eliminated the suppression of TNF. Taken together, these data suggest that regulatory T cells mediate Seoul virus persistence, possibly through elevated transcription and synthesis of TGF-beta and suppression of TNF. These data provide evidence of regulatory T cell involvement in the persistence of a zoonotic pathogen in its natural reservoir host.

  11. Acute Hepatic Porphyria

    PubMed Central

    Bissell, D. Montgomery; Wang, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    The porphyrias comprise a set of diseases, each representing an individual defect in one of the eight enzymes mediating the pathway of heme synthesis. The diseases are genetically distinct but have in common the overproduction of heme precursors. In the case of the acute (neurologic) porphyrias, the cause of symptoms appears to be overproduction of a neurotoxic precursor. For the cutaneous porphyrias, it is photosensitizing porphyrins. Some types have both acute and cutaneous manifestations. The clinical presentation of acute porphyria consists of abdominal pain, nausea, and occasionally seizures. Only a small minority of those who carry a mutation for acute porphyria have pain attacks. The triggers for an acute attack encompass certain medications and severely decreased caloric intake. The propensity of females to acute attacks has been linked to internal changes in ovarian physiology. Symptoms are accompanied by large increases in delta-aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen in plasma and urine. Treatment of an acute attack centers initially on pain relief and elimination of inducing factors such as medications; glucose is administered to reverse the fasting state. The only specific treatment is administration of intravenous hemin. An important goal of treatment is preventing progression of the symptoms to a neurological crisis. Patients who progress despite hemin administration have undergone liver transplantation with complete resolution of symptoms. A current issue is the unavailability of a rapid test for urine porphobilinogen in the urgent-care setting. PMID:26357631

  12. Uncomplicated acute bronchitis.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, R; Sande, M A

    2000-12-19

    Acute bronchitis is an acute cough illness in otherwise healthy adults that usually lasts 1 to 3 weeks. This review describes the pathophysiology of the condition and provides a practical approach to the evaluation and treatment of adults with uncomplicated acute bronchitis. Practical points to be made are:1. Respiratory viruses appear to cause the large majority of cases of uncomplicated acute bronchitis.2. Pertussis infection is present in up to 10% to 20% of adults with cough illness of more than 2 to 3 weeks' duration. No clinical features distinguish pertussis from nonpertussis infection in adults who were immunized against pertussis as children.3. Transient bronchial hyperresponsiveness appears to be the predominant mechanism of the bothersome cough of acute bronchitis.4. Ruling out pneumonia is the primary objective in evaluating adults with acute cough illness in whom comorbid conditions and occult asthma are absent or unlikely. In the absence of abnormalities in vital signs (heart rate > 100 beats/min, respiratory rate > 24 breaths/min, and oral body temperature > 38 degrees C), the likelihood of pneumonia is very low.5. Randomized, placebo-controlled trials do not support routine antibiotic treatment of uncomplicated acute bronchitis.6. Randomized, placebo-controlled trials have shown that inhaled albuterol decreases the duration of cough in adults with uncomplicated acute bronchitis.7. Intervention studies suggest that antibiotic treatment of acute bronchitis can be reduced by using a combination of patient and physician education. Decreased rates of antibiotic treatment are not associated with increased utilization, return visits, or dissatisfaction with care.

  13. 75 FR 79799 - Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... Hinchman, Senior Counsel, Office of Legal Policy, Department of Justice, Room 4252, 950 Pennsylvania Avenue... Department of Justice and the Access Board have each gathered a great deal of information regarding the... Justice ###Semiannual Regulatory Agenda### ] DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (DOJ) DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 8 CFR Ch....

  14. 78 FR 44279 - Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ... agenda pursuant to Executive Order 12866, ``Regulatory Planning and Review,'' 58 FR 51735, and the... destruction of controlled substances consistent with the Controlled Substances Act. Timetable: Action Date FR Cite ANPRM 01/21/09 74 FR 3480 ANPRM Comment Period End 03/23/09 Notice of Public Meeting 12/22/10...

  15. Acute mesenteric ischemia.

    PubMed

    Sise, Michael J

    2014-02-01

    Acute mesenteric ischemia is uncommon and always occurs in the setting of preexisting comorbidities. Mortality rates remain high. The 4 major types of acute mesenteric ischemia are acute superior mesenteric artery thromboembolic occlusion, mesenteric arterial thrombosis, mesenteric venous thrombosis, and nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia, including ischemic colitis. Delays in diagnosis are common and associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Prompt diagnosis requires attention to history and physical examination, a high index of suspicion, and early contract CT scanning. Selective use of nonoperative therapy has an important role in nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia of the small bowel and colon.

  16. Acute otitis media in children

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Acute otitis media (AOM) is a common reason for primary care visits in children. Yet, there is considerable debate on the most effective treatment. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments (analgesics, antibiotics, and myringotomy) in children with AOM? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to October 2013 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 17 studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: analgesics, antibiotics, delayed antibiotics, immediate antibiotics, longer courses of antibiotics, and myringotomy. PMID:25229555

  17. Acute genital ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-García, Silvia; Palacios-Marqués, Ana; Martínez-Escoriza, Juan Carlos; Martín-Bayón, Tina-Aurora

    2014-01-01

    Acute genital ulcers, also known as acute vulvar ulcers, ulcus vulvae acutum or Lipschütz ulcers, refer to an ulceration of the vulva or lower vagina of non-venereal origin that usually presents in young women, predominantly virgins. Although its incidence is unknown, it seems a rare entity, with few cases reported in the literature. Their aetiology and pathogenesis are still unknown. The disease is characterised by an acute onset of flu-like symptoms with single or multiple painful ulcers on the vulva. Diagnosis is mainly clinical, after exclusion of other causes of vulvar ulcers. The treatment is mainly symptomatic, with spontaneous resolution in 2 weeks and without recurrences in most cases. We present a case report of a 13-year-old girl with two episodes of acute ulcers that fit the clinical criteria for Lipschütz ulcers. PMID:24473429

  18. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... sudden inflammation of the pancreas manifested clinically by abdominal pain, nausea and dehydration that is usually self-limiting ... room for evaluation should they develop any abnormal abdominal pain symptoms. Conclusions While a rare event, acute pancreatitis ...

  19. Ear infection - acute

    MedlinePlus

    ... Risk factors for acute ear infections include: Attending day care (especially centers with more than 6 children) Changes ... hands and toys often. If possible, choose a day care that has 6 or fewer children. This can ...

  20. Treatment of acute gout.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, Naomi

    2014-05-01

    This article presents an overview of the treatment of acute gout. Nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic treatments, monotherapy versus combination therapy, suggested recommendations, guidelines for treatment, and drugs under development are discussed.

  1. Acute interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Bouros, D; Nicholson, A C; Polychronopoulos, V; du Bois, R M

    2000-02-01

    The term "acute interstitial pneumonia" (AIP) describes an idiopathic clinicopathological condition, characterized clinically by an interstitial lung disease causing rapid onset of respiratory failure, which is distinguishable from the other more chronic forms of interstitial pneumonia. It is synonymous with Hamman-Rich syndrome, occurring in patients without pre-existing lung disease. The histopathological findings are those of diffuse alveolar damage. AIP radiologically and physiologically resembles acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and is considered to represent the small subset of patients with idiopathic ARDS. It is frequently confused with other clinical entities characterized by rapidly progressive interstitial pneumonia, especially secondary acute interstitial pneumonia, acute exacerbations and accelerated forms of cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis . Furthermore, many authors use the above terms, both erroneously and interchangeably. It has a grave prognosis with >70% mortality in 3 months, despite mechanical ventilation. This review aims to clarify the relative clinical and pathological issues and terminology.

  2. Acute mountain sickness

    MedlinePlus

    High altitude cerebral edema; Altitude anoxia; Altitude sickness; Mountain sickness; High altitude pulmonary edema ... Acute mountain sickness is caused by reduced air pressure and lower oxygen levels at high altitudes. The faster you ...

  3. Acute genital ulcers.

    PubMed

    Delgado-García, Silvia; Palacios-Marqués, Ana; Martínez-Escoriza, Juan Carlos; Martín-Bayón, Tina-Aurora

    2014-01-28

    Acute genital ulcers, also known as acute vulvar ulcers, ulcus vulvae acutum or Lipschütz ulcers, refer to an ulceration of the vulva or lower vagina of non-venereal origin that usually presents in young women, predominantly virgins. Although its incidence is unknown, it seems a rare entity, with few cases reported in the literature. Their aetiology and pathogenesis are still unknown. The disease is characterised by an acute onset of flu-like symptoms with single or multiple painful ulcers on the vulva. Diagnosis is mainly clinical, after exclusion of other causes of vulvar ulcers. The treatment is mainly symptomatic, with spontaneous resolution in 2 weeks and without recurrences in most cases. We present a case report of a 13-year-old girl with two episodes of acute ulcers that fit the clinical criteria for Lipschütz ulcers.

  4. Weight Loss & Acute Porphyria

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sale You are here Home Diet and Nutrition Weight loss & acute Porphyria Being overweight is a particular problem ... one of these diseases before they enter a weight-loss program. Also, they should not participate in a ...

  5. Acute Radiation Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dictionary Radiation Emergencies & Your Health Possible Health Effects Contamination and Exposure Acute Radiation Syndrome (ARS) Cutaneous Radiation ... Decision Making in Radiation Emergencies Protective Actions Internal Contamination Clinical Reference (ICCR) Application Psychological First Aid in ...

  6. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling: from regulatory science to regulatory policy.

    PubMed

    Sinha, V; Zhao, P; Huang, S M; Zineh, I

    2014-05-01

    Assessment of controllable sources of intra- and interpatient variability in drug response is of critical importance in the regulatory evaluation of new drugs.(1) Although determinants of response variability would ideally be understood and accounted for before approval of a new pharmaceutical product, this is rarely the case for all; clinical trials in specific populations that definitively test optimal dosing in patient management strategies are not routinely performed prior to drug approval.

  7. Regulatory applications of sediment criteria. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-06-23

    The report briefly describes the development of sediment criteria, discusses their utility and appropriate regulatory applications, and recommends steps to enhance the acceptance of sediment criteria by the regulatory and regulated communities.

  8. Plant Evolution: Evolving Antagonistic Gene Regulatory Networks.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Endymion D

    2016-06-20

    Developing a structurally complex phenotype requires a complex regulatory network. A new study shows how gene duplication provides a potential source of antagonistic interactions, an important component of gene regulatory networks. PMID:27326708

  9. Small Business Administration Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... businesses. Timetable: Action Date FR Cite NPRM 08/00/10 Regulatory Flexibility Analysis Required: Yes Agency... Manufacturing Assistance Act of 2004 (Reauthorization Act) to regulate Small Business Lending Companies (SBLCs... Part XVI Small Business Administration Semiannual Regulatory Agenda ] SMALL...

  10. 75 FR 61531 - Issuance of Regulatory Guide

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... E. Norris, Component Integrity Branch, Division of Engineering, Office of Nuclear Regulatory... acceptable alternatives to requirements in the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and.... Harriet Karagiannis, Acting Chief, Regulatory Guide Development Branch, Division of Engineering, Office...

  11. Plant Evolution: Evolving Antagonistic Gene Regulatory Networks.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Endymion D

    2016-06-20

    Developing a structurally complex phenotype requires a complex regulatory network. A new study shows how gene duplication provides a potential source of antagonistic interactions, an important component of gene regulatory networks.

  12. Nuclear Regulatory Commission 1989 Information Digest

    SciTech Connect

    None,

    1989-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission 1989 Information Digest provides summary information regarding the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, its regulatory responsibilities, and areas licensed by the Commission. This is the first of an annual publication for the general use of the NRC staff and is available to the public. The Digest is divided into two parts: the first presents an overview of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the second provides data on NRC commercial nuclear reactor licensees and commercial nuclear power reactors worldwide.

  13. Differentiating Acute Otitis Media and Acute Mastoiditis in Hospitalized Children.

    PubMed

    Laulajainen-Hongisto, Anu; Aarnisalo, Antti A; Jero, Jussi

    2016-10-01

    Acute otitis media is a common infection in children. Most acute otitis media episodes can be treated at an outpatient setting with antimicrobials, or only expectant observation. Hospital treatment with parenteral medication, and myringotomy or tympanostomy, may be needed to treat those with severe, prolonged symptoms, or with complications. The most common intratemporal complication of acute otitis media is acute mastoiditis. If a child with acute mastoiditis does not respond to this treatment, or if complications develop, further examinations and other surgical procedures, including mastoidectomy, are considered. Since the treatment of complicated acute otitis media and complicated acute mastoiditis differs, it is important to differentiate these two conditions. This article focuses on the differential diagnostics of acute otitis media and acute mastoiditis in children. PMID:27613655

  14. Differentiating Acute Otitis Media and Acute Mastoiditis in Hospitalized Children.

    PubMed

    Laulajainen-Hongisto, Anu; Aarnisalo, Antti A; Jero, Jussi

    2016-10-01

    Acute otitis media is a common infection in children. Most acute otitis media episodes can be treated at an outpatient setting with antimicrobials, or only expectant observation. Hospital treatment with parenteral medication, and myringotomy or tympanostomy, may be needed to treat those with severe, prolonged symptoms, or with complications. The most common intratemporal complication of acute otitis media is acute mastoiditis. If a child with acute mastoiditis does not respond to this treatment, or if complications develop, further examinations and other surgical procedures, including mastoidectomy, are considered. Since the treatment of complicated acute otitis media and complicated acute mastoiditis differs, it is important to differentiate these two conditions. This article focuses on the differential diagnostics of acute otitis media and acute mastoiditis in children.

  15. Genetic flexibility of regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Hunziker, Alexander; Tuboly, Csaba; Horváth, Péter; Krishna, Sandeep; Semsey, Szabolcs

    2010-07-20

    Gene regulatory networks are based on simple building blocks such as promoters, transcription factors (TFs) and their binding sites on DNA. But how diverse are the functions that can be obtained by different arrangements of promoters and TF binding sites? In this work we constructed synthetic regulatory regions using promoter elements and binding sites of two noninteracting TFs, each sensing a single environmental input signal. We show that simply by combining these three kinds of elements, we can obtain 11 of the 16 Boolean logic gates that integrate two environmental signals in vivo. Further, we demonstrate how combination of logic gates can result in new logic functions. Our results suggest that simple elements of transcription regulation form a highly flexible toolbox that can generate diverse functions under natural selection.

  16. Regulatory cells and transplantation tolerance.

    PubMed

    Cobbold, Stephen P; Waldmann, Herman

    2013-06-01

    Transplantation tolerance is a continuing therapeutic goal, and it is now clear that a subpopulation of T cells with regulatory activity (Treg) that express the transcription factor foxp3 are crucial to this aspiration. Although reprogramming of the immune system to donor-specific transplantation tolerance can be readily achieved in adult mouse models, it has yet to be successfully translated in human clinical practice. This requires that we understand the fundamental mechanisms by which donor antigen-specific Treg are induced and function to maintain tolerance, so that we can target therapies to enhance rather than impede these regulatory processes. Our current understanding is that Treg act via numerous molecular mechanisms, and critical underlying components such as mTOR inhibition, are only now emerging. PMID:23732858

  17. 21 CFR 500.88 - Regulatory method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Regulatory method. 500.88 Section 500.88 Food and... § 500.88 Regulatory method. (a) The sponsor shall submit for evaluation and validation a regulatory method developed to monitor compliance with FDA's operational definition of no residue. (b)...

  18. 78 FR 44399 - Semiannual Regulatory Flexibility Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ... Capital, Implementation of Basel III, Minimum Regulatory Capital Ratios, Capital Adequacy, and Transition... leverage capital requirements. Timetable: Action Date FR Cite Board Requested Comment 08/30/12 77 FR 53059... Capital Rules: Regulatory Capital, Implementation of Basel III, Minimum Regulatory Capital Ratios,......

  19. Department of Energy Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... OF ENERGY Semiannual Regulatory Agenda 10 CFR Chs. II, III, and X 48 CFR Ch. 9 Regulatory Agenda... Review,'' 58 FR 51735, and the Regulatory Flexibility Act, 5 U.S.C. 601 et seq. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION... and direct heating equipment. This is the second review for water heaters. Timetable: Action Date...

  20. 78 FR 1624 - Fall 2012 Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    ... and not to existing residential wood-heating appliances. Timetable: Action Date FR Cite NPRM 06/00/13... that start up after the regulatory agenda is signed? H. What tools are available for mining regulatory..., ``Regulatory Planning and Review'' (58 FR 51735, Oct. 4, 1993), as supplemented by Executive Order (EO)...

  1. 78 FR 1594 - Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    .... Timetable: Action Date FR Cite ANPRM 01/00/13 Regulatory Flexibility Analysis Required: Yes. Agency Contact...: Action Date FR Cite Final Action 12/00/12 Regulatory Flexibility Analysis Required: Yes. Agency Contact... idle facilities. Completed: Reason Date FR Cite Withdrawn 10/18/12 Regulatory Flexibility...

  2. 78 FR 23507 - Notice of Regulatory Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-19

    ... regulations may be made more effective and less burdensome. \\1\\ Regulatory Review Plan, 77 FR 10351 (Feb. 22...'s Director. \\2\\ Notice of Regulatory Review Plan, 76 FR 59066 (Sept. 23, 2011). \\3\\ Regulatory Review Plan, 77 FR 10351 (Feb. 22, 2012). This Notice initiates the first such review. II. Request...

  3. 21 CFR 500.88 - Regulatory method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Regulatory method. 500.88 Section 500.88 Food and... § 500.88 Regulatory method. (a) The sponsor shall submit for evaluation and validation a regulatory method developed to monitor compliance with FDA's operational definition of no residue. (b)...

  4. Securities and Exchange Commission Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    .... Timetable: Action Date FR Cite NPRM 03/00/11 Regulatory Flexibility Analysis Required: Yes Agency Contact...: Action Date FR Cite NPRM 12/00/10 Regulatory Flexibility Analysis Required: Yes Agency Contact: Jennifer... Date FR Cite NPRM 09/00/10 Regulatory Flexibility Analysis Required: Yes Agency Contact: Anthony...

  5. Summation from a regulatory perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Ohanian, E.V.; Cotruvo, J.A.

    1986-11-01

    There is an urgent need to discuss the Office of Drinking Water's standard-setting or rule making process since most of the researchers whose papers are presented here directly or indirectly play a crucial role in this complex undertaking. Therefore, this paper will address the research data required to support policy making and regulatory decisions pertaining to health effects of disinfectants and disinfection by-products.

  6. Regulatory motifs in Chk1

    PubMed Central

    Caparelli, Michael L.; O’Connell, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    Chk1 is the effector kinase of the G2 DNA damage checkpoint. Chk1 homologs possess a highly conserved N-terminal kinase domain and a less conserved C-terminal regulatory domain. In response to DNA damage, Chk1 is recruited to mediator proteins assembled at lesions on replication protein A (RPA)-coated single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). Chk1 is then activated by phosphorylation on S345 in the C-terminal regulatory domain by the PI3 kinase-related kinases ATM and ATR to enforce a G2 cell cycle arrest to allow time for DNA repair. Models have emerged in which this C-terminal phosphorylation relieves auto-inhibitory regulation of the kinase domain by the regulatory domain. However, experiments in fission yeast have shown that deletion of this putative auto-inhibitory domain actually inactivates Chk1 function. We show here that Chk1 homologs possess a kinase-associated 1 (KA1) domain that possesses residues previously implicated in Chk1 auto-inhibition. In addition, all Chk1 homologs have a small and highly conserved C-terminal extension (CTE domain). In fission yeast, both of these motifs are essential for Chk1 activation through interaction with the mediator protein Crb2, the homolog of human 53BP1. Thus, through different intra- and intermolecular interactions, these motifs explain why the regulatory domain exerts both positive and negative control over Chk1 activation. Such motifs may provide alternative targets to the ATP-binding pocket on which to dock Chk1 inhibitors as anticancer therapeutics. PMID:23422000

  7. Regulatory aspects of neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, J.

    1999-11-01

    While full legislation for industrial radiography with gamma and X-rays already exists in many countries, the situation is different for neutron radiography. Therefore, the licensing for equipment and procedures in this field has to be based on basic principles of national and international rules. This contribution will explain how the regulatory body in Switzerland deals with neutron radiography installations in order to maintain national standards of health and safety.

  8. 77 FR 56686 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-13

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing of... interested persons. \\1\\ 15 U.S.C. 78s(b)(1). \\2\\ 17 CFR 240.19b-4. I. Self-Regulatory Organization's... FINRA and at the Commission's Public Reference Room. II. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of...

  9. 78 FR 70602 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-26

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing of... 240.19b-4. I. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Terms of Substance of the Proposed Rule... of the rules in accordance with the requirements of Form 19b-4. II. Self-Regulatory...

  10. Phylum-wide analysis of genes/proteins related to the last steps of assembly and export of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Sara B; Mota, Rita; Vieira, Cristina P; Vieira, Jorge; Tamagnini, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Many cyanobacteria produce extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) with particular characteristics (e.g. anionic nature and presence of sulfate) that make them suitable for industrial processes such as bioremediation of heavy metals or thickening, suspending or emulsifying agents. Nevertheless, their biosynthetic pathway(s) are still largely unknown, limiting their utilization. In this work, a phylum-wide analysis of genes/proteins putatively involved in the assembly and export of EPS in cyanobacteria was performed. Our results demonstrated that most strains harbor genes encoding proteins related to the three main pathways: Wzy-, ABC transporter-, and Synthase-dependent, but often not the complete set defining one pathway. Multiple gene copies are mainly correlated to larger genomes, and the strains with reduced genomes (e.g. the clade of marine unicellular Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus), seem to have lost most of the EPS-related genes. Overall, the distribution of the different genes/proteins within the cyanobacteria phylum raises the hypothesis that cyanobacterial EPS production may not strictly follow one of the pathways previously characterized. Moreover, for the proteins involved in EPS polymerization, amino acid patterns were defined and validated constituting a novel and robust tool to identify proteins with similar functions and giving a first insight to which polymer biosynthesis they are related to.

  11. Transforming growth factor beta 1 enhances expression of 50 kDa protein related to 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase in human sperm cells.

    PubMed

    Naz, R K; Kumar, R

    1991-01-01

    Human cellular polypeptide factors, namely interferon-alpha, interferon-gamma transforming growth factor (TGF)-alpha, and TGF-beta 1, were analyzed for their effect on motility of human sperm cells. Both interferons caused an inhibition of sperm cell motility due to direct cytotoxic effects without inducing 2'-5' oligoadenylate [2-5(A)]synthetase activity. TGF-alpha affected neither motility nor the levels of 2-5(A) synthetase in sperm cells. TGF-beta 1 had no affect on sperm motility, yet it caused an induction of 2-5(A)synthetase activity. Western immunoblot analysis of TGF-beta 1-treated sperm indicated an enhancement of a 50 kDa protein. Metabolic labeling of sperm cells revealed biosynthesis of one major protein of 50 kDa and at least five minor proteins in the range of 30-92 kDa; the level of 50 kDa protein increased after treatment with TGF-beta 1. The treatment of sperm cells with TGF-beta 1 did not affect their penetration in zona-free hamster eggs (SPA). These results indicate that TGF-beta 1 enhances expression of a 50 kDa protein related to 2-5(A) synthetase in human sperm cells along with other minor proteins, and this increase does not affect sperm motility and SPA.

  12. Phylum-wide analysis of genes/proteins related to the last steps of assembly and export of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in cyanobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Sara B.; Mota, Rita; Vieira, Cristina P.; Vieira, Jorge; Tamagnini, Paula

    2015-10-01

    Many cyanobacteria produce extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) with particular characteristics (e.g. anionic nature and presence of sulfate) that make them suitable for industrial processes such as bioremediation of heavy metals or thickening, suspending or emulsifying agents. Nevertheless, their biosynthetic pathway(s) are still largely unknown, limiting their utilization. In this work, a phylum-wide analysis of genes/proteins putatively involved in the assembly and export of EPS in cyanobacteria was performed. Our results demonstrated that most strains harbor genes encoding proteins related to the three main pathways: Wzy-, ABC transporter-, and Synthase-dependent, but often not the complete set defining one pathway. Multiple gene copies are mainly correlated to larger genomes, and the strains with reduced genomes (e.g. the clade of marine unicellular Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus), seem to have lost most of the EPS-related genes. Overall, the distribution of the different genes/proteins within the cyanobacteria phylum raises the hypothesis that cyanobacterial EPS production may not strictly follow one of the pathways previously characterized. Moreover, for the proteins involved in EPS polymerization, amino acid patterns were defined and validated constituting a novel and robust tool to identify proteins with similar functions and giving a first insight to which polymer biosynthesis they are related to.

  13. Phylum-wide analysis of genes/proteins related to the last steps of assembly and export of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Sara B.; Mota, Rita; Vieira, Cristina P.; Vieira, Jorge; Tamagnini, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Many cyanobacteria produce extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) with particular characteristics (e.g. anionic nature and presence of sulfate) that make them suitable for industrial processes such as bioremediation of heavy metals or thickening, suspending or emulsifying agents. Nevertheless, their biosynthetic pathway(s) are still largely unknown, limiting their utilization. In this work, a phylum-wide analysis of genes/proteins putatively involved in the assembly and export of EPS in cyanobacteria was performed. Our results demonstrated that most strains harbor genes encoding proteins related to the three main pathways: Wzy-, ABC transporter-, and Synthase-dependent, but often not the complete set defining one pathway. Multiple gene copies are mainly correlated to larger genomes, and the strains with reduced genomes (e.g. the clade of marine unicellular Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus), seem to have lost most of the EPS-related genes. Overall, the distribution of the different genes/proteins within the cyanobacteria phylum raises the hypothesis that cyanobacterial EPS production may not strictly follow one of the pathways previously characterized. Moreover, for the proteins involved in EPS polymerization, amino acid patterns were defined and validated constituting a novel and robust tool to identify proteins with similar functions and giving a first insight to which polymer biosynthesis they are related to. PMID:26437902

  14. Flavopiridol, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Acute bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    Grover, Sudhanshu; Jindal, Atul; Bansal, Arun; Singhi, Sunit C

    2011-11-01

    Acute asthma is the third commonest cause of pediatric emergency visits at PGIMER. Typically, it presents with acute onset respiratory distress and wheeze in a patient with past or family history of similar episodes. The severity of the acute episode of asthma is judged clinically and categorized as mild, moderate and severe. The initial therapy consists of oxygen, inhaled beta-2 agonists (salbutamol or terbutaline), inhaled budesonide (three doses over 1 h, at 20 min interval) in all and ipratropium bromide and systemic steroids (hydrocortisone or methylprednisolone) in acute severe asthma. Other causes of acute onset wheeze and breathing difficulty such as pneumonia, foreign body, cardiac failure etc. should be ruled out with help of chest radiography and appropriate laboratory investigations in first time wheezers and those not responding to 1 h of inhaled therapy. In case of inadequate response or worsening, intravenous infusion of magnesium sulphate, terbutaline or aminophylline may be used. Magnesium sulphate is the safest and most effective alternative among these. Severe cases may need ICU care and rarely, ventilatory support. PMID:21769523

  16. Thrombosis and acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Crespo-Solís, Erick

    2012-04-01

    Thrombosis is a common complication in patients with acute leukemia. While the presence of central venous lines, concomitant steroids, the use of Escherichia coli asparaginase and hereditary thrombophilic abnormalities are known risk factors for thrombosis in children, information on the pathogenesis, risk factors, and clinical outcome of thrombosis in adult patients with acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is still scarce. Expert consensus and guidelines regarding leukemia-specific risk factors, thrombosis prevention, and treatment strategies, as well as optimal type of central venous catheter in acute leukemia patients are required. It is likely that each subtype of acute leukemia represents a different setting for the development of thrombosis and the risk of bleeding. This is perhaps due to a combination of different disease-specific pathogenic mechanisms of thrombosis, including the type of chemotherapy protocol chosen, the underlying patients health, associated risk factors, as well as the biology of the disease itself. The risk of thrombosis may also vary according to ethnicity and prevalence of hereditary risk factors for thrombosis; thus, it is advisable for Latin American, Asian, and African countries to report on their specific patient population. PMID:22507812

  17. Acute Appendicitis Secondary to Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Eduardo A.; Lopez, Marvin A.; Valluri, Kartik; Wang, Danlu; Fischer, Andrew; Perdomo, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 43 Final Diagnosis: Myeloid sarcoma appendicitis Symptoms: Abdominal pain • chills • fever Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Laparoscopic appendectomy, bone marrow biopsy Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare disease Background: The gastrointestinal tract is a rare site for extramedullary involvement in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Case Report: A 43-year-old female with no past medical history presented complaining of mild abdominal pain, fever, and chills for the past day. On examination, she was tachycardic and febrile, with mild tenderness of her right lower quadrant and without signs of peritoneal irritation. Laboratory examination revealed pancytopenia and DIC, with a fibrinogen level of 290 mg/dL. CT of the abdomen showed a thickened and hyperemic appendix without perforation or abscess, compatible with acute appendicitis. The patient was given IV broad-spectrum antibiotics and was transfused with packed red blood cells and platelets. She underwent uncomplicated laparoscopic appendectomy and bone marrow biopsy, which revealed neo-plastic cells of 90% of the total bone marrow cellularity. Flow cytometry indicated presence of 92.4% of immature myeloid cells with t (15: 17) and q (22: 12) mutations, and FISH analysis for PML-RARA demonstrated a long-form fusion transcript, positive for APL. Appendix pathology described leukemic infiltration with co-expression of myeloperoxidase and CD68, consistent with myeloid sarcoma of the appendix. The patient completed a course of daunorubicin, cytarabine, and all trans-retinoic acid. Repeat bone marrow biopsy demonstrated complete remission. She will follow up with her primary care physician and hematologist/oncologist. Conclusions: Myeloid sarcoma of the appendix in the setting of APL is very rare and it might play a role in the development of acute appendicitis. Urgent management, including bone marrow biopsy for definitive diagnosis and urgent surgical intervention

  18. Regulatory pathways for vaccines for developing countries.

    PubMed

    Milstien, Julie; Belgharbi, Lahouari

    2004-02-01

    Vaccines that are designed for use only in developing countries face regulatory hurdles that may restrict their use. There are two primary reasons for this: most regulatory authorities are set up to address regulation of products for use only within their jurisdictions and regulatory authorities in developing countries traditionally have been considered weak. Some options for regulatory pathways for such products have been identified: licensing in the country of manufacture, file review by the European Medicines Evaluation Agency on behalf of WHO, export to a country with a competent national regulatory authority (NRA) that could handle all regulatory functions for the developing country market, shared manufacturing and licensing in a developing country with competent manufacturing and regulatory capacity, and use of a contracted independent entity for global regulatory approval. These options have been evaluated on the basis of five criteria: assurance of all regulatory functions for the life of the product, appropriateness of epidemiological assessment, applicability to products no longer used in the domestic market of the manufacturing country, reduction of regulatory risk for the manufacturer, and existing rules and regulations for implementation. No one option satisfies all criteria. For all options, national infrastructures (including the underlying regulatory legislative framework, particularly to formulate and implement local evidence-based vaccine policy) must be developed. WHO has led work to develop this capacity with some success. The paper outlines additional areas of action required by the international community to assure development and use of vaccines needed for the developing world. PMID:15042235

  19. Regulatory pathways for vaccines for developing countries.

    PubMed Central

    Milstien, Julie; Belgharbi, Lahouari

    2004-01-01

    Vaccines that are designed for use only in developing countries face regulatory hurdles that may restrict their use. There are two primary reasons for this: most regulatory authorities are set up to address regulation of products for use only within their jurisdictions and regulatory authorities in developing countries traditionally have been considered weak. Some options for regulatory pathways for such products have been identified: licensing in the country of manufacture, file review by the European Medicines Evaluation Agency on behalf of WHO, export to a country with a competent national regulatory authority (NRA) that could handle all regulatory functions for the developing country market, shared manufacturing and licensing in a developing country with competent manufacturing and regulatory capacity, and use of a contracted independent entity for global regulatory approval. These options have been evaluated on the basis of five criteria: assurance of all regulatory functions for the life of the product, appropriateness of epidemiological assessment, applicability to products no longer used in the domestic market of the manufacturing country, reduction of regulatory risk for the manufacturer, and existing rules and regulations for implementation. No one option satisfies all criteria. For all options, national infrastructures (including the underlying regulatory legislative framework, particularly to formulate and implement local evidence-based vaccine policy) must be developed. WHO has led work to develop this capacity with some success. The paper outlines additional areas of action required by the international community to assure development and use of vaccines needed for the developing world. PMID:15042235

  20. 75 FR 28073 - Draft Regulatory Guide: Issuance, Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Draft Regulatory Guide: Issuance, Availability AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice of Issuance and Availability of Draft Regulatory Guide, DG-3039, ``Standard Format and Content...

  1. 75 FR 48382 - Draft Regulatory Guide: Issuance, Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Draft Regulatory Guide: Issuance, Availability AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice of Issuance and Availability of Draft Regulatory Guide, DG-1228, ``Standard Format and Content...

  2. 78 FR 44165 - Nuclear Regulatory Commission Enforcement Policy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Nuclear Regulatory Commission Enforcement Policy AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Enforcement policy; request for comment. SUMMARY: The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is...

  3. 75 FR 16525 - Notice of Issuance of Regulatory Guide

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Notice of Issuance of Regulatory Guide AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice of... Branch, Division of Engineering, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, U.S. Nuclear...

  4. 75 FR 36715 - Final Regulatory Guide: Issuance, Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Final Regulatory Guide: Issuance, Availability AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION.... Sturzebecher, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555-0001, telephone: (301) 251- 7494 or...

  5. [Acute pancreatitis in children].

    PubMed

    Rottier, B L; Holl, R A; Draaisma, J M

    1998-02-21

    Acute pancreatitis is probably commoner in children than was previously thought. In children it is most commonly associated with trauma or viral infection. The presentation may be subtler than in adults, requiring a high index of suspicion in the clinician. In three children, two boys aged 4 and 10 and a girl of 15 years, acute pancreatitis was suspected because of the findings at ultrasonography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography performed when the disease recurred (the boy aged 4), apathy and immobility without dehydration or other obvious causes (the boy aged 10), and severe abdominal pain in combination with vomiting (the girl). All three patients had severely increased (urinary) amylase levels. Most often, acute pancreatitis in children tends to be a self-limiting disease which responds well to conservative treatment.

  6. EXPERIMENTAL ACUTE GLOMERULITIS

    PubMed Central

    Lukens, Francis D. W.; Longcope, Warfield T.

    1931-01-01

    1. Both focal and diffuse glomerulitis has been produced in rabbits by the injection directly into the left renal artery of suspensions of heat killed hemolytic streptococci. 2. Similar lesions in the glomeruli could not be obtained by the injection of suspensions of bismuth oxychloride into the left renal artery of normal rabbits. 3. The acute glomerulitis occurred in only about one-half of the rabbits employed for the experiments. 4. Glomerulitis was observed much more frequently in rabbits in which an acute localized streptococcus infection had been produced by the intracutaneous injection of living hemolytic streptococci, than in normal rabbits. The occurrence of acute glomerulitis was usually associated with a well marked skin reaction to the filtrates of hemolytic streptococci. PMID:19869861

  7. Acute Decompensated Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Susan M.; Cedars, Ari M.; Ewald, Gregory A.; Geltman, Edward M.; Mann, Douglas L.

    2009-01-01

    Hospitalizations for acute decompensated heart failure are increasing in the United States. Moreover, the prevalence of heart failure is increasing consequent to an increased number of older individuals, as well as to improvement in therapies for coronary artery disease and sudden cardiac death that have enabled patients to live longer with cardiovascular disease. The main treatment goals in the hospitalized patient with heart failure are to restore euvolemia and to minimize adverse events. Common in-hospital treatments include intravenous diuretics, vasodilators, and inotropic agents. Novel pharmaceutical agents have shown promise in the treatment of acute decompensated heart failure and may simplify the treatment and reduce the morbidity associated with the disease. This review summarizes the contemporary management of patients with acute decompensated heart failure. PMID:20069075

  8. A global regulatory science agenda for vaccines.

    PubMed

    Elmgren, Lindsay; Li, Xuguang; Wilson, Carolyn; Ball, Robert; Wang, Junzhi; Cichutek, Klaus; Pfleiderer, Michael; Kato, Atsushi; Cavaleri, Marco; Southern, James; Jivapaisarnpong, Teeranart; Minor, Philip; Griffiths, Elwyn; Sohn, Yeowon; Wood, David

    2013-04-18

    The Decade of Vaccines Collaboration and development of the Global Vaccine Action Plan provides a catalyst and unique opportunity for regulators worldwide to develop and propose a global regulatory science agenda for vaccines. Regulatory oversight is critical to allow access to vaccines that are safe, effective, and of assured quality. Methods used by regulators need to constantly evolve so that scientific and technological advances are applied to address challenges such as new products and technologies, and also to provide an increased understanding of benefits and risks of existing products. Regulatory science builds on high-quality basic research, and encompasses at least two broad categories. First, there is laboratory-based regulatory science. Illustrative examples include development of correlates of immunity; or correlates of safety; or of improved product characterization and potency assays. Included in such science would be tools to standardize assays used for regulatory purposes. Second, there is science to develop regulatory processes. Illustrative examples include adaptive clinical trial designs; or tools to analyze the benefit-risk decision-making process of regulators; or novel pharmacovigilance methodologies. Included in such science would be initiatives to standardize regulatory processes (e.g., definitions of terms for adverse events [AEs] following immunization). The aim of a global regulatory science agenda is to transform current national efforts, mainly by well-resourced regulatory agencies, into a coordinated action plan to support global immunization goals. This article provides examples of how regulatory science has, in the past, contributed to improved access to vaccines, and identifies gaps that could be addressed through a global regulatory science agenda. The article also identifies challenges to implementing a regulatory science agenda and proposes strategies and actions to fill these gaps. A global regulatory science agenda will enable

  9. Acute asthma during pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Stenius-Aarniala, B. S.; Hedman, J.; Teramo, K. A.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute asthma during pregnancy is potentially dangerous to the fetus. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of an acute attack of asthma during pregnancy on the course of pregnancy or delivery, or the health of the newborn infant, and to identify undertreatment as a possible cause of the exacerbations. METHODS: Five hundred and four pregnant asthmatic subjects were prospectively followed and treated. The data on 47 patients with an attack of asthma during pregnancy were compared with those of 457 asthmatics with no recorded acute exacerbation and with 237 healthy parturients. RESULTS: Of 504 asthmatics, 177 patients were not initially treated with inhaled corticosteroids. Of these, 17% had an acute attack compared with only 4% of the 257 patients who had been on inhaled anti-inflammatory treatment from the start of pregnancy. There were no differences between the groups as to length of gestation, length of the third stage of labour, or amount of haemorrhage after delivery. No differences were observed between pregnancies with and without an exacerbation with regard to relative birth weight, incidence of malformations, hypoglycaemia, or need for phototherapy for jaundice during the neonatal period. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with inadequate inhaled anti-inflammatory treatment during pregnancy run a higher risk of suffering an acute attack of asthma than those treated with an anti-inflammatory agent. However, if the acute attack of asthma is relatively mild and promptly treated, it does not have a serious effect on the pregnancy, delivery, or the health of the newborn infant. PMID:8733495

  10. Acute Intraoperative Pulmonary Aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Nason, Katie S.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Acute intraoperative aspiration is a potentially fatal complication with significant associated morbidity. Patients undergoing thoracic surgery are at increased risk for anesthesia-related aspiration, largely due to the predisposing conditions associated with this complication. Awareness of the risk factors, predisposing conditions, maneuvers to decrease risk and immediate management options by both the thoracic surgeon and the anesthesia team is imperative to reducing risk and optimizing patient outcomes associated with acute intraoperative pulmonary aspiration. Based on the root-cause analyses that many of the aspiration events can be traced back to provider factors, having an experienced anesthesiologist present for high-risk cases is also critical. PMID:26210926

  11. The Acute Abdominal Aorta.

    PubMed

    Mellnick, Vincent M; Heiken, Jay P

    2015-11-01

    Acute disorders of the abdominal aorta are potentially lethal conditions that require prompt evaluation and treatment. Computed tomography (CT) is the primary imaging method for evaluating these conditions because of its availability and speed. Volumetric CT acquisition with multiplanar reconstruction and three-dimensional analysis is now the standard technique for evaluating the aorta. MR imaging may be useful for select applications in stable patients in whom rupture has been excluded. Imaging is indispensable for diagnosis and treatment planning, because management has shifted toward endoluminal repair. Acute abdominal aortic conditions most commonly are complications of aneurysms and atherosclerosis. PMID:26526434

  12. Acute rheumatic fever

    PubMed Central

    Cumming, Gordon R.

    1974-01-01

    While rheumatic fever is relatively uncommon except where there are poor and crowded living conditions, sporadic acute attacks continue to occur in a family or pediatric medical practice. The physician's role in management of the sore throat in the diagnosis of suspected cases of rheumatic fever and in follow-up for continued prophylaxis is discussed. The frequency of admissions and presenting features of 159 patients with acute rheumatic fever is reviewed. Continued surveillance is required if we are to achieve a further reduction in attack rate and complications. PMID:4419123

  13. Acute sinusitis in children.

    PubMed

    Brook, Itzhak

    2013-04-01

    Acute rhinosinusitis is a common illness in children. Viral upper respiratory tract infection is the most common presentation of rhinosinusitis. Most children resolve the infection spontaneously and only a small proportion develops a secondary bacterial infection. The proper choice of antibiotic therapy depends on the likely infecting pathogens, bacterial antibiotic resistance, and pharmacologic profiles of antibiotics. Amoxicillin-clavulanate is currently recommended as the empiric treatment in those requiring antimicrobial therapy. Isolation of the causative agents should be considered in those who failed the initial treatment. In addition to antibiotics, adjuvant therapies and surgery may be used in the management of acute bacterial rhinosinusitis.

  14. Wetlands: The changing regulatory landscape

    SciTech Connect

    Glick, R.M. )

    1993-05-01

    Protection of wetlands became a national issue in 1988 when President George Bush pledged no net loss of wetlands in the US under his [open quotes]environmental presidency.[close quotes] As wetlands became a national issue, the job of protecting them became an obligation for many groups, including hydro-power developers. Now, when a site selected for development includes an area that may be classified as a wetland, the developer quickly discovers the importance of recognizing and protecting these natural habitats. Federal legislation severely limits development of wetland, and most states increase the restrictions with their own wetlands regulations. The difficulty of defining wetlands complicates federal and state enforcement. Land that appears to be dry may in fact be classified as a wetland. So, even if a site appears dry, potential hydro developers must confirm whether or not any jurisdictional wetlands are present. Regulated lands include much more than marshes and swamps. Further complicating the definition of wetlands, a recent court decision found that even artificially created wetlands, such as man-made ponds, may be subject to regulation. Hydro developers must be aware of current regulatory requirements before they consider development of any site that may contain wetlands. To be certain that a site is [open quotes]buildable[close quotes] from the standpoint of wetlands regulation, a developer must verify (with the help of state agencies) that the property does not contain any jurisdictional wetlands. If it does, the regulatory process before development becomes much more complicated. For the short term, uncertainty abounds and extreme caution is in order. Because the regulatory process has become so complex and an agreeable definition of wetlands so elusive, the trend among the Corps and collaborating agencies is to constrict nationwide permits in favor of narrowing the jurisdictional definition of wetlands.

  15. Childhood poverty and recruitment of adult emotion regulatory neurocircuitry.

    PubMed

    Liberzon, Israel; Ma, Sean T; Okada, Go; Ho, S Shaun; Swain, James E; Evans, Gary W

    2015-11-01

    One in five American children grows up in poverty. Childhood poverty has far-reaching adverse impacts on cognitive, social and emotional development. Altered development of neurocircuits, subserving emotion regulation, is one possible pathway for childhood poverty's ill effects. Children exposed to poverty were followed into young adulthood and then studied using functional brain imaging with an implicit emotion regulation task focused. Implicit emotion regulation involved attention shifting and appraisal components. Early poverty reduced left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex recruitment in the context of emotional regulation. Furthermore, this emotion regulation associated brain activation mediated the effects of poverty on adult task performance. Moreover, childhood poverty also predicted enhanced insula and reduced hippocampal activation, following exposure to acute stress. These results demonstrate that childhood poverty can alter adult emotion regulation neurocircuitry, revealing specific brain mechanisms that may underlie long-term effects of social inequalities on health. The role of poverty-related emotion regulatory neurocircuitry appears to be particularly salient during stressful conditions.

  16. Human System Integration: Regulatory Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This document was intended as an input to the Access 5 Policy Integrated Product team. Using a Human System Integration (HIS) perspective, a regulatory analyses of the FARS (specifically Part 91), the Airman s Information Manual (AIM) and the FAA Controllers Handbook (7110.65) was conducted as part of a front-end approach needed to derive HSI requirements for Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) operations in the National Airspace System above FL430. The review of the above aviation reference materials yielded eighty-four functions determined to be necessary or highly desirable for flight within the Air Traffic Management System. They include categories for Flight, Communications, Navigation, Surveillance, and Hazard Avoidance.

  17. Amblyomma americanum tick saliva insulin-like growth factor binding protein-related protein 1 binds insulin but not insulin-like growth factors.

    PubMed

    Radulović, Ž M; Porter, L M; Kim, T K; Bakshi, M; Mulenga, A

    2015-10-01

    Silencing Amblyomma americanum insulin-like growth factor binding protein-related protein 1 (AamIGFBP-rP1) mRNA prevented ticks from feeding to repletion. In this study, we used recombinant (r)AamIGFBP-rP1 in a series of assays to obtain further insight into the role(s) of this protein in tick feeding regulation. Our results suggest that AamIGFBP-1 is an antigenic protein that is apparently exclusively expressed in salivary glands. We found that both males and females secrete AamIGFBP-rP1 into the host during feeding and confirmed that female ticks secrete this protein from within 24-48 h after attachment. Our data suggest that native AamIGFBP-rP1 is a functional insulin binding protein in that both yeast- and insect cell-expressed rAamIGFBP-rP1 bound insulin, but not insulin-like growth factors. When subjected to anti-blood clotting and platelet aggregation assays, rAamIGFBP-rP1 did not have any effect. Unlike human IGFBP-rP1, which is controlled by trypsinization, rAamIGFBP-rP1 is resistant to digestion, suggesting that the tick protein may not be under mammalian host control at the tick feeding site. The majority of tick-borne pathogens are transmitted 48 h after the tick has attached. Thus, the demonstrated antigenicity and secretion into the host within 24-48 h of the tick starting to feed makes AamIGFBP-rP1 an attractive target for antitick vaccine development.

  18. Inhibition of HCV Replication by Oxysterol-Binding Protein-Related Protein 4 (ORP4) through Interaction with HCV NS5B and Alteration of Lipid Droplet Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yahong; Liu, Ziqing; Ridgway, Neale D.; Kao, C. Cheng; He, Johnny J.

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA replication involves complex interactions among the 3’x RNA element within the HCV 3’ untranslated region, viral and host proteins. However, many of the host proteins remain unknown. In this study, we devised an RNA affinity chromatography /2D/MASS proteomics strategy and identified nine putative 3’ X-associated host proteins; among them is oxysterol-binding protein-related protein 4 (ORP4), a cytoplasmic receptor for oxysterols. We determined the relationship between ORP4 expression and HCV replication. A very low level of constitutive ORP4 expression was detected in hepatocytes. Ectopically expressed ORP4 was detected in the endoplasmic reticulum and inhibited luciferase reporter gene expression in HCV subgenomic replicon cells and HCV core expression in JFH-1-infected cells. Expression of ORP4S, an ORP4 variant that lacked the N-terminal pleckstrin-homology domain but contained the C-terminal oxysterol-binding domain also inhibited HCV replication, pointing to an important role of the oxysterol-binding domain in ORP4-mediated inhibition of HCV replication. ORP4 was found to associate with HCV NS5B and its expression led to inhibition of the NS5B activity. ORP4 expression had little effect on intracellular lipid synthesis and secretion, but it induced lipid droplet formation in the context of HCV replication. Taken together, these results demonstrate that ORP4 is a negative regulator of HCV replication, likely via interaction with HCV NS5B in the replication complex and regulation of intracellular lipid homeostasis. This work supports the important role of lipids and their metabolism in HCV replication and pathogenesis. PMID:24069433

  19. What Is Acute Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... about acute myeloid leukemia? What is acute myeloid leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in a part of ... the body from doing their jobs. Types of leukemia Not all leukemias are the same. There are ...

  20. Nutrition, Inflammation, and Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Max

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is acute inflammatory disease of the pancreas. Nutrition has a number of anti-inflammatory effects that could affect outcomes of patients with pancreatitis. Further, it is the most promising nonspecific treatment modality in acute pancreatitis to date. This paper summarizes the best available evidence regarding the use of nutrition with a view of optimising clinical management of patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:24490104

  1. Regulatory RNAs in photosynthetic cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Kopf, Matthias; Hess, Wolfgang R

    2015-05-01

    Regulatory RNAs play versatile roles in bacteria in the coordination of gene expression during various physiological processes, especially during stress adaptation. Photosynthetic bacteria use sunlight as their major energy source. Therefore, they are particularly vulnerable to the damaging effects of excess light or UV irradiation. In addition, like all bacteria, photosynthetic bacteria must adapt to limiting nutrient concentrations and abiotic and biotic stress factors. Transcriptome analyses have identified hundreds of potential regulatory small RNAs (sRNAs) in model cyanobacteria such as Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 or Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, and in environmentally relevant genera such as Trichodesmium, Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus. Some sRNAs have been shown to actually contain μORFs and encode short proteins. Examples include the 40-amino-acid product of the sml0013 gene, which encodes the NdhP subunit of the NDH1 complex. In contrast, the functional characterization of the non-coding sRNA PsrR1 revealed that the 131 nt long sRNA controls photosynthetic functions by targeting multiple mRNAs, providing a paradigm for sRNA functions in photosynthetic bacteria. We suggest that actuatons comprise a new class of genetic elements in which an sRNA gene is inserted upstream of a coding region to modify or enable transcription of that region.

  2. RSAT: regulatory sequence analysis tools.

    PubMed

    Thomas-Chollier, Morgane; Sand, Olivier; Turatsinze, Jean-Valéry; Janky, Rekin's; Defrance, Matthieu; Vervisch, Eric; Brohée, Sylvain; van Helden, Jacques

    2008-07-01

    The regulatory sequence analysis tools (RSAT, http://rsat.ulb.ac.be/rsat/) is a software suite that integrates a wide collection of modular tools for the detection of cis-regulatory elements in genome sequences. The suite includes programs for sequence retrieval, pattern discovery, phylogenetic footprint detection, pattern matching, genome scanning and feature map drawing. Random controls can be performed with random gene selections or by generating random sequences according to a variety of background models (Bernoulli, Markov). Beyond the original word-based pattern-discovery tools (oligo-analysis and dyad-analysis), we recently added a battery of tools for matrix-based detection of cis-acting elements, with some original features (adaptive background models, Markov-chain estimation of P-values) that do not exist in other matrix-based scanning tools. The web server offers an intuitive interface, where each program can be accessed either separately or connected to the other tools. In addition, the tools are now available as web services, enabling their integration in programmatic workflows. Genomes are regularly updated from various genome repositories (NCBI and EnsEMBL) and 682 organisms are currently supported. Since 1998, the tools have been used by several hundreds of researchers from all over the world. Several predictions made with RSAT were validated experimentally and published.

  3. [Acute pancreatitis and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Scollo, P; Licitra, G

    1993-12-01

    Aetiologic factors (gallstones, hyperlipidemia I-IV, hypertriglyceridaemia) make their occurrence, mainly, in the third trimester of gestation. Two cases of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy are described; in both cases patients referred healthy diet, no habit to smoke and no previous episode of pancreatitis. An obstructive pathology of biliary tract was the aetiologic factor. Vomiting, upper abdominal pain are aspecific symptoms that impose a differential diagnosis with acute appendicitis, cholecystitis and obstructive intestinal pathology. Laboratory data (elevated serum amylase and lipase levels) and ultrasonography carry out an accurate diagnosis. The management of acute pancreatitis is based on the use of symptomatic drugs, a low fat diet alternated to the parenteral nutrition when triglycerides levels are more than 28 mmol/L. Surgical therapy, used only in case of obstructive pathology of biliary tract, is optimally collected in the third trimester or immediately after postpartum. Our patients, treated only medically, delivered respectively at 38th and 40th week of gestation. Tempestivity of diagnosis and appropriate therapy permit to improve prognosis of a pathology that, although really associated with pregnancy, presents high maternal mortality (37%) cause of complications (shock, coagulopathy, acute respiratory insufficiency) and fetal (37.9%) by occurrence of preterm delivery.

  4. [Acute arsenic poisoning].

    PubMed

    Montelescaut, Etienne; Vermeersch, Véronique; Commandeur, Diane; Huynh, Sophie; Danguy des Deserts, Marc; Sapin, Jeanne; Ould-Ahmed, Mehdi; Drouillard, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Acute arsenic poisoning is a rare cause of suicide attempt. It causes a multiple organs failure caused by cardiogenic shock. We report the case of a patient admitted twelve hours after an ingestion of trioxide arsenic having survived thanks to a premature treatment.

  5. [Acute arsenic poisoning].

    PubMed

    Montelescaut, Etienne; Vermeersch, Véronique; Commandeur, Diane; Huynh, Sophie; Danguy des Deserts, Marc; Sapin, Jeanne; Ould-Ahmed, Mehdi; Drouillard, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Acute arsenic poisoning is a rare cause of suicide attempt. It causes a multiple organs failure caused by cardiogenic shock. We report the case of a patient admitted twelve hours after an ingestion of trioxide arsenic having survived thanks to a premature treatment. PMID:25486670

  6. Acute radiation risk models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, Olga

    Biologically motivated mathematical models, which describe the dynamics of the major hematopoietic lineages (the thrombocytopoietic, lymphocytopoietic, granulocytopoietic, and erythropoietic systems) in acutely/chronically irradiated humans are developed. These models are implemented as systems of nonlinear differential equations, which variables and constant parameters have clear biological meaning. It is shown that the developed models are capable of reproducing clinical data on the dynamics of these systems in humans exposed to acute radiation in the result of incidents and accidents, as well as in humans exposed to low-level chronic radiation. Moreover, the averaged value of the "lethal" dose rates of chronic irradiation evaluated within models of these four major hematopoietic lineages coincides with the real minimal dose rate of lethal chronic irradiation. The demonstrated ability of the models of the human thrombocytopoietic, lymphocytopoietic, granulocytopoietic, and erythropoietic systems to predict the dynamical response of these systems to acute/chronic irradiation in wide ranges of doses and dose rates implies that these mathematical models form an universal tool for the investigation and prediction of the dynamics of the major human hematopoietic lineages for a vast pattern of irradiation scenarios. In particular, these models could be applied for the radiation risk assessment for health of astronauts exposed to space radiation during long-term space missions, such as voyages to Mars or Lunar colonies, as well as for health of people exposed to acute/chronic irradiation due to environmental radiological events.

  7. Acute coronary care 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Califf, R.M.; Wagner, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 22 chapters. Some of the titles are: The measurement of acute myocardial infarct size by CT; Magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of myocardial ischemia and infarction; Poistron imaging in the evaluation of ischemia and myocardial infarction; and New inotropic agents.

  8. Acute and chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Vlodov, J; Tenner, S M

    2001-09-01

    Acute pancreatitis has multiple causes, an unpredictable course, and myriad complications. The diagnosis relies on a combination of history, physical examination, serologic markers, and radiologic findings. The mainstay of therapy includes aggressive hydration, maintenance of NPO, and adequate analgesia with narcotics. Antibiotic and nutritional support with total parenteral nutrition should be used when appropriate.

  9. Low back pain - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Backache; Low back pain; Lumbar pain; Pain - back; Acute back pain; Back pain - new; Back pain - short-term; Back strain - new ... lower back supports most of your body's weight. Low back pain is the number two reason that Americans see ...

  10. [Management of acute tendinitis].

    PubMed

    Rapp, H J; Heisse, K; Becker, M; Stechele, M

    1992-12-01

    Ultrasonography must be used in combination with physical examination for the appropriate diagnosis of acute tendon injuries. Therapy should be designed to return the tendon to its normal function and appearance. Local and systemic anti-inflammatory agents, cold hydrotherapy and massage minimize excessive scar formation and progressively increasing tensile forces directs scar tissue to replace the tendon function.

  11. Acute streptococcal necrotising fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Frankish, P D; Mason, G H; Allen, P R; Milsom, F P; Christmas, T I

    1988-10-12

    Two cases of acute streptococcal necrotising fasciitis are reported. Both patients were taking nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs when they developed this infection. Urgent surgical debridement was undertaken and resulted in a successful outcome in both patients. The clinical and histopathological features of this condition are reviewed.

  12. [Advanced therapy: from European regulatory framework to national regulatory framework].

    PubMed

    Lucas-Samuel, S

    2013-05-01

    The European regulation n(o) 1394/2007/CE published on the 13th of November 2007 defined and harmonized the European regulatory framework for advanced therapy medicinal products. It creates a specialized committee located at the European Medicine Agency, in charge of the assessment of these medicinal products. The consequences of this regulation are introduced in the French regulation by the law n(o) 2011-302 published on the 22nd of March 2011. It detailed notably the possibility for public establishments (except health establishments) and nonprofit organisms to create pharmaceutical establishments. This law defined also a specific category of advanced therapy medicinal products, which fall under the "hospital exemption" framework. The rules regarding the authorizations of the establishments able to prepare these types of medicinal products and the authorization of the products are defined by the n(o) 2012-1236 decree published on the 6th of November 2012.

  13. Global Summit on Regulatory Science 2013.

    PubMed

    Howard, Paul C; Tong, Weida; Weichold, Frank; Healy, Marion; Slikker, William

    2014-12-01

    Regulatory science has been defined as the science that is used to develop regulatory decisions by government bodies. Regulatory science encompasses many scientific disciplines that oversee many studies producing a wide array of data. These may include fundamental research into the cellular interaction or response to a particular chemical or substance, hazard-assessment and dose-response studies in animal species, neurophysiological or neurobehavioral studies, best practices for the generation and analysis of genomics data, bioinformatics approaches, and mathematical modeling of risk. The Global Summit on Regulatory Science is an international conference with a mission to explore emerging and innovative technologies, and provide a platform to enhance translation of basic science into regulatory applications. The Third Global Summit on Regulatory Science which focused on nanotechnology is discussed.

  14. Model validation in aquatic toxicity testing: implications for regulatory practice.

    PubMed

    McCarty, L S

    2012-08-01

    Toxicity test validity is contingent on whether models and assumptions are appropriate and sufficient. A quality control evaluation of the acute toxicity testing protocol using the US. EPA fathead minnow database focused around three key assumptions that ensure results represent valid toxicological metrics: 1, it must be possible to estimate steady-state LC50s; 2, LC50s should occur at equivalent exposure durations; 3, all substantive toxicity modifying factors should be adequately controlled. About 8% of the tests failed the first assumption and are invalid and unusable. Examination of remaining data indicated variance from unquantified effects of toxicity modifying factors remained in LC50s, thereby failing assumption three. Such flaws in toxicity data generated via recommended LC50 testing protocols means resultant data do not represent consistent, comparable measures of relative toxicity. Current regulations employing LC50 testing data are acceptable due to the use of semiquantitative, policy-driven development guidance that considers such data uncertainty. Quantitative applications such as QSARs, mixture toxicity, and regulatory chemical grouping can be compromised. These validation failures justify a formal quality control review of the LC50 toxicity testing protocol. Interim improvements in the design, execution, interpretation, and regulatory applications of LC50 and related protocols using exposure-based dose surrogates are warranted.

  15. Prospective Clinical Testing of Regulatory Dendritic Cells in Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Angus W.; Zahorchak, Alan F.; Ezzelarab, Mohamed B.; Butterfield, Lisa H.; Lakkis, Fadi G.; Metes, Diana M.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are rare, professional antigen-presenting cells with ability to induce or regulate alloimmune responses. Regulatory DC (DCreg) with potential to down-modulate acute and chronic inflammatory conditions that occur in organ transplantation can be generated in vitro under a variety of conditions. Here, we provide a rationale for evaluation of DCreg therapy in clinical organ transplantation with the goal of promoting sustained, donor-specific hyporesponsiveness, while lowering the incidence and severity of rejection and reducing patients’ dependence on anti-rejection drugs. Generation of donor- or recipient-derived DCreg that suppress T cell responses and prolong transplant survival in rodents or non-human primates has been well-described. Recently, good manufacturing practice (GMP)-grade DCreg have been produced at our Institution for prospective use in human organ transplantation. We briefly review experience of regulatory immune therapy in organ transplantation and describe our experience generating and characterizing human monocyte-derived DCreg. We propose a phase I/II safety study in which the influence of donor-derived DCreg combined with conventional immunosuppression on subclinical and clinical rejection and host alloimmune responses will be examined in detail. PMID:26858719

  16. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, January 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, G.T.; Houlberg, L.M.; Salk, M.S.

    1991-02-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  17. Environmental regulatory update table, March 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, L.; Langston, M.E.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

    1989-04-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  18. Environmental regulatory update table, July 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1991-08-01

    This Environmental Regulatory Update Table (July 1991) provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  19. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, December 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, G.T.; Houlberg, L.M.; Noghrei-Nikbakht, P.A.; Salk, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  20. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, November 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, G.T.; Houlberg, L.M.; Noghrei-Nikbakht, P.A.; Salk, M.S.

    1990-12-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  1. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, September 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, L.M.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

    1990-10-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  2. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, October 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1991-11-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  3. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, October 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, L.M.; Noghrei-Nikbakht, P.A.; Salk, M.S.

    1990-11-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  4. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, April 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, L.; Langston, M.E.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

    1989-05-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  5. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, December 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Houlbert, L.M.; Langston, M.E. ); Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S. )

    1990-01-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  6. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, August 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, L.M., Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1991-09-01

    This Environmental Regulatory Update Table (August 1991) provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  7. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1992-01-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  8. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, November 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1991-12-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  9. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1991-10-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  10. The management of acute pericarditis.

    PubMed

    Wells, T A; Curzen, N P

    2005-01-01

    Acute pericarditis is usually a benign self-limiting condition, often of unexplained or viral aetiology, involving inflammation of the pericardial layers. It is often part of the differential diagnosis in patients admitted with acute chest pain and can be confused with acute myocardial infarction, acute pulmonary embolism and pleurisy. Occasionally it can result in cardiac tamponade and, if associated with myocarditis, in heart failure. This article sets out how to diagnose acute pericarditis, the common underlying causes, the possible treatment options and outcomes. PMID:21655516

  11. Acute gangrenous cholecystitis: radionuclide diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Brachman, M.B.; Tanasescu, D.E.; Ramanna, L.; Waxman, A.D.

    1984-04-01

    Radionuclide hepatobiliary imaging with Tc-99m IDA is a useful procedure for the diagnosis of acute cholecystitis. Visualization of the gallbladder essentially rules out acute cholecystitis. Nonvisualization suggest acute cholecystitis but may also be associated with chronic gallbladder disease or other conditions. The authors recently observed five patients in whom a rim of increased parenchymal liver activity was seen adjacent to the gallbladder fossa. All five patients had acute gangrenous cholecystitis. The rim of increased activity appears to be a useful secondary sign of acute cholecystitis.

  12. 21 CFR 26.18 - Regulatory collaboration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... RECOGNITION OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY SYSTEM AUDIT REPORTS... Specific Sector Provisions for Pharmaceutical Good Manufacturing Practices § 26.18 Regulatory...

  13. A genomic regulatory network for development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Eric H.; Rast, Jonathan P.; Oliveri, Paola; Ransick, Andrew; Calestani, Cristina; Yuh, Chiou-Hwa; Minokawa, Takuya; Amore, Gabriele; Hinman, Veronica; Arenas-Mena, Cesar; Otim, Ochan; Brown, C. Titus; Livi, Carolina B.; Lee, Pei Yun; Revilla, Roger; Rust, Alistair G.; Pan, Zheng jun; Schilstra, Maria J.; Clarke, Peter J C.; Arnone, Maria I.; Rowen, Lee; Cameron, R. Andrew; McClay, David R.; Hood, Leroy; Bolouri, Hamid

    2002-01-01

    Development of the body plan is controlled by large networks of regulatory genes. A gene regulatory network that controls the specification of endoderm and mesoderm in the sea urchin embryo is summarized here. The network was derived from large-scale perturbation analyses, in combination with computational methodologies, genomic data, cis-regulatory analysis, and molecular embryology. The network contains over 40 genes at present, and each node can be directly verified at the DNA sequence level by cis-regulatory analysis. Its architecture reveals specific and general aspects of development, such as how given cells generate their ordained fates in the embryo and why the process moves inexorably forward in developmental time.

  14. Immunometabolism of regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Ryan; Priyadharshini, Bhavana; Turka, Laurence A

    2016-01-01

    The bidirectional interaction between the immune system and whole-body metabolism has been well recognized for many years. Via effects on adipocytes and hepatocytes, immune cells can modulate whole-body metabolism (in metabolic syndromes such as type 2 diabetes and obesity) and, reciprocally, host nutrition and commensal-microbiota-derived metabolites modulate immunological homeostasis. Studies demonstrating the metabolic similarities of proliferating immune cells and cancer cells have helped give birth to the new field of immunometabolism, which focuses on how the cell-intrinsic metabolic properties of lymphocytes and macrophages can themselves dictate the fate and function of the cells and eventually shape an immune response. We focus on this aspect here, particularly as it relates to regulatory T cells. PMID:27196520

  15. Regulatory Analysis of Reactivity Transients

    SciTech Connect

    Beyer, Carl E.; Clifford, Paul M.; Geelhood, Kenneth J.; Voglewede, John C.

    2009-08-01

    This paper will describe modifications made to the FRAPCON-3 and FRAPTRAN fuel performance codes and models that impact reactivity initiated accident (RIA) analyses. The modified models include an upper bound empirical and best estimate release models for fast transients, and a revised fuel failure model that accounts for ductile and brittle failure. Because experimental data exists for discrete test conditions, the codes and models are used to interpolate and to some extent, to extrapolate these test conditions. An upper bound empirical model for release is used to establish new recommended release fractions for long-lived and short lived (radioactive) isotopes for RIA events in Regulatory Guide 1.183. A best estimate release model is used in FRAPTRAN 1.4 based on grain boundary gas concentrations from FRAPCON-3.4 to predict release for RIA events. Code and model predictions will be compared to failure and release data from RIA tests to demonstrate accuracy.

  16. Regulatory aspects of clinical xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Schuurman, Henk-Jan

    2015-11-01

    Xenotransplantation attracted interest from regulatory authorities, particularly after the demonstration of pig-to-human transmission of porcine endogenous retrovirus (1996). This added to the risk of a product, resulting in a Guidance of the US Food and Drug Administration (2003). This addresses the full flow chart in product manufacturing, starting with the designated pathogen-free status of the source animal; and special aspects regarding the recipient like informed consent and monitoring for infectious pathogens. Also archiving of records from the donor and recipient, as well as storage of samples is described. The European Medicines Agency issued a Guideline on xenogeneic cell therapy products (2009). Cell-based medicinal products are subject to specific regulations and directives, which apply also to xenogeneic products: the xenotransplant guidances/guidelines are an addition to these regulations. Noteworthy, acellular products like heart valves and decellularized cornea are not considered a cell therapy product, but rather a medical device with its own regulation. WHO issued relevant documents, especially about safety, and the International Xenotransplantation Association published consensus documents, a.o., addressing preclinical efficacy requirements before entering clinical trials. This manuscript presents an overview of the regulatory framework, with special focus on cell therapy products necause these are expected to reach the market first (i.e., pancreatic islets, hepatocytes and cellularized cornea); major illustrations are from the European situation. Albeit being complex, the regulation of xenotransplant products does not form a block in product development, but rather supports the introduction of efficacious and safe products to meet the medical need.

  17. Small regulatory RNAs in Archaea.

    PubMed

    Babski, Julia; Maier, Lisa-Katharina; Heyer, Ruth; Jaschinski, Katharina; Prasse, Daniela; Jäger, Dominik; Randau, Lennart; Schmitz, Ruth A; Marchfelder, Anita; Soppa, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) are universally distributed in all three domains of life, Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukaryotes. In bacteria, sRNAs typically function by binding near the translation start site of their target mRNAs and thereby inhibit or activate translation. In eukaryotes, miRNAs and siRNAs typically bind to the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of their target mRNAs and influence translation efficiency and/or mRNA stability. In archaea, sRNAs have been identified in all species investigated using bioinformatic approaches, RNomics, and RNA-Seq. Their size can vary significantly between less than 50 to more than 500 nucleotides. Differential expression of sRNA genes has been studied using northern blot analysis, microarrays, and RNA-Seq. In addition, biological functions have been unraveled by genetic approaches, i.e., by characterization of designed mutants. As in bacteria, it was revealed that archaeal sRNAs are involved in many biological processes, including metabolic regulation, adaptation to extreme conditions, stress responses, and even in regulation of morphology and cellular behavior. Recently, the first target mRNAs were identified in archaea, including one sRNA that binds to the 5'-region of two mRNAs in Methanosarcina mazei Gö1 and a few sRNAs that bind to 3'-UTRs in Sulfolobus solfataricus, three Pyrobaculum species, and Haloferax volcanii, indicating that archaeal sRNAs appear to be able to target both the 5'-UTR or the 3'-UTRs of their respective target mRNAs. In addition, archaea contain tRNA-derived fragments (tRFs), and one tRF has been identified as a major ribosome-binding sRNA in H. volcanii, which downregulates translation in response to stress. Besides regulatory sRNAs, archaea contain further classes of sRNAs, e.g., CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) and snoRNAs.

  18. Regulatory fit messages and physical activity motivation.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, Ines

    2013-04-01

    Targeted communication about health behaviors seems to be more effective than mass communication in which undifferentiated audiences receive identical messages. Regulatory focus is psychological variable that can be used to build two target groups: promotion-focused or prevention-focused people. It is hypothesized that targeting messages to an individual's regulatory focus creates regulatory fit and is more successful to promote a physically active lifestyle than nonfit messages. Two different print messages promoting a physically active lifestyle derived from regulatory focus theory (promotion message vs. prevention message) were randomly assigned to N = 98 participants after measuring their regulatory focus. It was examined whether regulatory fit between the regulatory focus and the assigned print message would lead to more positive evaluations in the dependent variables inclination toward the message (preference for the message), intention to perform the behavior, prospective and retrospective feelings associated with the behavior (positive and negative), and perceived value of the behavior directly after reading the message. Hierarchical linear regression analyses revealed that regulatory fit led to stronger intentions in the prevention-message condition and more prospective positive and retrospective positive feelings associated with the behavior in the promotion-message condition in contrast to the nonfit conditions. Prospective positive feelings associated with the behavior mediated the effect of regulatory fit on intention. The results partly provided support for the regulatory fit concept. Matching print messages to the regulatory focus of individuals seems to be a useful approach to enhance physical activity motivation. Future studies should include an objective measure of physical activity behavior.

  19. Acute pain management.

    PubMed

    Hansen, B

    2000-07-01

    We encounter patients with acute pain many times each day, and few aspects of veterinary practice offer such an opportunity to help so many in such a profoundly rewarding way. As emphasized here and elsewhere, we now have excellent tools with which to help these animals, and the biggest impediment to optimal treatment of their pain is often our own difficulty in recognizing its presence. Perhaps the single most important aspect of treating acute pain is to cultivate an ability to see past our personal biases and expectations which may limit treatment and to rediscover the common sense we had about pain before we entered the profession. By rededicating ourselves to seeking out, preventing, and relieving pain, we not only perform a vital service for our patients but also elevate our profession even as we reap financial and spiritual rewards for our efforts. What could be better? PMID:10932832

  20. [Schistosomiasis and acute appendicitis].

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Jacinta; Santos, Ângela; Clemente, Horácio; Lourenço, Augusto; Costa, Sandra; Grácio, Maria Amélia; Belo, Silvana

    2014-01-01

    Acute appendicitis associated to Schistosoma haematobium and S. mansoni infection has been found in patients submitted to urgent appendectomy at the Hospital Américo Boavida in Luanda. Due to the high prevalence and morbidity caused by schistosomiasis (or bilharziasis) in the country, we suspect that the involvement of Schistosoma infection on appendicular pathology could be very frequent, in particular for those individuals more exposed to the parasite transmission. We report two clinical cases of acute appendicitis whose surgical specimens of the appendix revealed S. haematobium and S. mansoni eggs in histological samples. The reported patients live in endemic areas and have been exposed to schistosome during childhood, which may explain the infection's chronicity. Information of these clinical cases could be relevant, particularly for surgery specialists and clinical pathologists, due to the possibility of finding more patients with concurrent appendicitis and schistosomiasis.

  1. Acute aortic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) is a term used to describe a constellation of life-threatening aortic diseases that have similar presentation, but appear to have distinct demographic, clinical, pathological and survival characteristics. Many believe that the three major entities that comprise AAS: aortic dissection (AD), intramural hematoma (IMH) and penetrating aortic ulcer (PAU), make up a spectrum of aortic disease in which one entity may evolve into or coexist with another. Much of the confusion in accurately classifying an AAS is that they present with similar symptoms: typically acute onset of severe chest or back pain, and may have similar radiographic features, since the disease entities all involve injury or disruption of the medial layer of the aortic wall. The accurate diagnosis of an AAS is often made at operation. This manuscript will attempt to clarify the similarities and differences between AD, IMH and PAU of the ascending aorta and describe the challenges in distinguishing them from one another. PMID:27386405

  2. Acute organophosphorus poisoning.

    PubMed

    Chowdhary, Sheemona; Bhattacharyya, Rajasri; Banerjee, Dibyajyoti

    2014-04-20

    Acute organophosphorus poisoning continues to be a detrimental problem and a potential cause of mortality especially in developing countries. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase enzyme is the main mechanism of toxicity of such pesticides and measurement of acetylcholinesterase activity is the commonly used laboratory diagnosis approved for the purpose. It is now proved beyond any doubt that early intervention is beneficial for cases of acute organophosphorus poisoning and, therefore, considerable current interest has been generated for development of point of care testing tool for screening of the same. However, to the best of our knowledge so far the matter is not reviewed from the view of point of care testing tool development. In this paper, this subject is reviewed highlighting the methodological aspects and point of care testing tool development in the context of organophosphorus poisoning.

  3. [Acute pancreatitis and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Laraki, M; Harti, A; Bouderka, M A; Barrou, H; Matar, N; Benaguida, M

    1993-10-01

    Acute pancreatitis during pregnancy is a serious condition and diagnosis is often difficult. The authors report the case of a 32-year-old woman in the 32nd week of her fifth pregnancy, in which the outcome was fatal for both mother and child. The cause of pancreatitis during pregnancy has been attributed to many factors, chiefly cholelithiasis. A number of recent studies have shown the relationship existing between the role played by pregnancy in predisposing to gallbladder disease with lithiasis. Many diagnosis errors are made in this condition. Thus modern treatment methods have improved the prognosis in acute pancreatitis but, when it occurs during pregnancy, diagnostic delays often lead to a gloomy outlook. PMID:8248696

  4. Acute aortic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Corvera, Joel S

    2016-05-01

    Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) is a term used to describe a constellation of life-threatening aortic diseases that have similar presentation, but appear to have distinct demographic, clinical, pathological and survival characteristics. Many believe that the three major entities that comprise AAS: aortic dissection (AD), intramural hematoma (IMH) and penetrating aortic ulcer (PAU), make up a spectrum of aortic disease in which one entity may evolve into or coexist with another. Much of the confusion in accurately classifying an AAS is that they present with similar symptoms: typically acute onset of severe chest or back pain, and may have similar radiographic features, since the disease entities all involve injury or disruption of the medial layer of the aortic wall. The accurate diagnosis of an AAS is often made at operation. This manuscript will attempt to clarify the similarities and differences between AD, IMH and PAU of the ascending aorta and describe the challenges in distinguishing them from one another. PMID:27386405

  5. Cytokines and acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Brady, M; Christmas, S; Sutton, R; Neoptolemos, J; Slavin, J

    1999-07-01

    Cytokines have been shown to play a pivotal role in multiple organ dysfunction, a major cause of death in severe acute pancreatitis. Moreover, the two-hit hypothesis of the cytokine-induced systemic inflammatory response syndrome explains the variable individual response to severe acute pancreatitis and the impact of secondary events such as sepsis or therapeutic intervention. Many experimental anti-cytokine therapies have been administered following induction of experimental pancreatitis, and have proved to be therapeutic. Patients with severe pancreatitis present early because of pain. Clearly then a window for therapeutic intervention is available between onset of symptoms and peak pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. It is this fundamental observation that convinces many in the field that the treatment of AP will be one of the first clinical successes for novel drugs or therapy that seek to modulate the inflammatory response.

  6. Acute arsenic intoxication.

    PubMed

    Campbell, J P; Alvarez, J A

    1989-12-01

    The diagnosis of acute arsenic poisoning should be considered in any patient presenting with severe gastrointestinal complaints. Signs and symptoms include nausea, vomiting, colicky abdominal pain and profuse, watery diarrhea. Hypotension, fluid and electrolyte disturbances, mental status changes, electrocardiographic abnormalities, respiratory failure and death can result. Quantitative measurement of 24-hour urinary arsenic excretion is the only reliable laboratory test to confirm arsenic poisoning. Treatment includes gastric emesis or lavage, chelation therapy, electrolyte and fluid replacement, and cardiorespiratory support.

  7. [Acute Chest Pain].

    PubMed

    Gmür, Christian

    2016-02-17

    Acute chest pain is a frequent consultation reason in general practice as well as in emergency departments. With the help of history, physical examination, ECG, laboratory and newly developed risk scores, potentially life-threatening diseases and high-risk patients may be detected and treated early, quickly and cost-effectively. New biomarkers and their combination with risk scores can increase the negative predictive value to exclude certain diseases. PMID:26886697

  8. IMMUNOTHERAPY IN ACUTE LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Wing

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in immunotherapy of cancer may represent a successful example in translational research, in which progress in knowledge and technology in immunology has lead to new strategies of immunotherapy, and even past failure in many clinical trials have led to a better understanding of basic cancer immunobiology. This article reviews the latest concepts in antitumor immunology and its application in the treatment of cancer, with particular focus on acute leukemia. PMID:19100371

  9. Neuropsychology of acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Sinanović, Osman

    2010-06-01

    Neuropsychology includes both the psychiatric manifestations of neurological illness (primary brain-based disorders) and neurobiology of "idiopathic" psychiatric disorders. Neurological primary brain disorders provoke broad spectrum of brain pathophysiology that cause deficit sin human behaviour, and the magnitude of neurobehavioral-related problems is a world wide health concern. Speech disorders of aphasic type, unilateral neglect, anosognosia (deficit disorders), delirium and mood disorders (productive disorders) in urgent neurology, first of all in acute phase of stroke are more frequent disorders then it verified in routine exam, not only in the developed and large neurological departments. Aphasia is common consequence of left hemispheric lesion and most common neuropsychological consequence of stroke, with prevalence of one third of all stroke patients in acute phase although exist reports on greater frequency. Unilateral neglect is a disorder that mostly effects the patient after the lesion of the right hemisphere, mostly caused by a cerebrovascular insult (infarct or haemorrhage affecting a large area - up to two thirds of the right hemisphere), and in general the left-side neglect is the most widespread neuropsychological deficit after the lesion of the right cerebral hemisphere. Reports on the incidence of visual neglect vary and they range from 13 to 85%. Anosognosia is on the second place as neuropsychological syndrome of stroke in right hemisphere, characterized by the denial of the motor, visual or cognitive deficit. This syndrome, defined as denial of hemiparesis or hemianopsia, is a common disorder verified in 17-28% of all patents with acute brain stoke. There are different reports on frequency of delirium in acute stroke, from 24 to 48%, and it is more frequent in hemorrhagic then ischemic stoke. Post stroke depression (PSD) is one of the more frequent consequences on the stroke, and the prevalence of PSD has ranged from 5 to 63% of patients in

  10. [Acute coronary syndromes: epidemiology].

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Alev Arat

    2013-04-01

    Coronary heart disease is the main cause of death in the world as well as in Turkey. It's not only a health issue but also a social problem with a high economic burden and negative impact on quality of life. The majority of deaths are attributable to acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and their complications.This review summarizes some important facts regarding ACS epidemiology in the world and in Turkey. PMID:27323430

  11. Acupuncture for acute hordeolum

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ke; Wang, Xue; Guo, Menghu; Wieland, L. Susan; Shen, Xueyong; Lao, Lixing

    2014-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: The objective of this review is to determine the effects and, when possible, the safety of acupuncture for the treatment of acute hordeola, in comparison to no specific treatment (e.g., observation), sham acupuncture, or other active treatments. Acupuncture as an adjuvant to another treatment also will be compared to that treatment alone. PMID:25214814

  12. 75 FR 71166 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-22

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing of... thereunder,\\2\\ notice is hereby given that on November 1, 2010, Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc... similar status or performing similar functions, or a natural person engaged in the investment banking...

  13. 76 FR 59751 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-27

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing and... thereunder,\\2\\ notice is hereby given that on September 7, 2011, Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc...), or are subject to a separate registration and qualification requirement, Investment...

  14. 77 FR 61647 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-10

    ... turn transactions in security futures. \\12\\ 15 U.S.C. 78o-3(b)(5). B. Self-Regulatory Organization's... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing and... in Security Futures October 3, 2012. Pursuant to Section 19(b)(1) of the Securities Exchange Act...

  15. 75 FR 53998 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing...

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    2010-09-02

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change To Amend the Security Futures Risk Disclosure Statement.... \\1\\ 15 U.S.C. 78s(b)(1). \\2\\ 17 CFR 240.19b-4. I. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of...

  16. 76 FR 37384 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-27

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Relating to Exemptions from the Order Audit Trail System..., Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc. (``FINRA'') filed with the Securities and Exchange...

  17. 76 FR 60567 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing of...

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    2011-09-29

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing of... Reporting Rules for Certain Alternative Trading Systems September 23, 2011. Pursuant to Section 19(b)(1) of... that on September 16, 2011, the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc. (``FINRA'') filed...

  18. 76 FR 71404 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-17

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Relating to the Order Audit Trail System Definitions of... November 4, 2011, Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc. (``FINRA'') filed with the Securities...

  19. 78 FR 30384 - Federal Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Hearing; Region X Regulatory Fairness Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-22

    ... ADMINISTRATION Federal Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Hearing; Region X Regulatory Fairness Board AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA). ACTION: Notice of open meeting of the Regional (Region X) Small... requested. Anyone wishing to attend and/or make a presentation to the Region X Regulatory Fairness...

  20. 77 FR 14052 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-08

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing of... Change in Ownership, Control, or Business Operations) To Adopt New Standardized Electronic Form CMA March.... 78s(b)(1). \\2\\ 17 CFR 240.19b-4. I. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Terms of...

  1. 75 FR 39603 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Order Approving...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-09

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Order Approving... Exchange Act Release No. 61189 (December 17, 2009), 74 FR 68648 (``Notice''). \\4\\ See Letter to Elizabeth M... obligations, if applicable, to the Commission or other regulatory authority; (3) FINRA has actual...

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-13

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing of... 19b-4 thereunder,\\2\\ notice is hereby given that on July 27, 2010, Financial Industry Regulatory... members in a timely fashion to facilitate its Regulation M compliance program. Rule 5190(d) sets forth...

  3. 75 FR 74766 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-01

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing and..., Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc. (``FINRA'') filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission...\\ See Exchange Act Release No. 62434 (July 1, 2010; 75 FR 39603 (July 9, 2010); SR-FINRA-2009-089...

  4. Diagnosis of acute rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Marchisio, Paola; Tenconi, Rossana; Tagliaferri, Laura; Albertario, Giada; Patria, Maria Francesca; Principi, Nicola

    2012-08-01

    Rhinosinusitis is almost always a complication of a viral infection involving the upper respiratory tract. A common cold is the first symptom of rhinosinusitis, but infectious processes involving the nose inevitably affect the paranasal sinuses because of their anatomical contiguity. The symptoms remain those of a common cold as long as nasal phlogosis is moderate and the ostia between the nose and sinuses are patent. If the inflammation is intense, edema may obliterate the ostia and isolate the sinuses, thus stopping the removal of the exudates. The duration of symptoms makes it possible to distinguish acute (10-30 days) from subacute (30-90 days) and chronic rhinosinusitis (>90 days). The diagnosis of rhinosinusitis should only be based on anamnestic and clinical criteria in children with serious or persistent symptoms of upper respiratory tract infection, or which appear within a short time of an apparent recovery. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance images of the paranasal sinuses should be reserved for children reasonably considered to be candidates for surgery. Antibiotics are recommended in cases of mild acute bacterial rhinosinusitis as a means of accelerating the resolution of symptoms. The use of antibiotics is mandatory in severe acute bacterial rhinosinusitis to cure the disease and avoid the possible onset of severe complications.

  5. Acute lung injury review.

    PubMed

    Tsushima, Kenji; King, Landon S; Aggarwal, Neil R; De Gorordo, Antonio; D'Alessio, Franco R; Kubo, Keishi

    2009-01-01

    The first report of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was published in 1967, and even now acute lung injury (ALI) and ARDS are severe forms of diffuse lung disease that impose a substantial health burden all over the world. Recent estimates indicate approximately 190,000 cases per year of ALI in the United States each year, with an associated 74,500 deaths per year. Common causes of ALI/ARDS are sepsis, pneumonia, trauma, aspiration pneumonia, pancreatitis, and so on. Several pathologic stages of ALI/ARDS have been described: acute inflammation with neutrophil infiltration, fibroproliferative phase with hyaline membranes, with varying degrees of interstitial fibrosis, and resolution phase. There has been intense investigation into the pathophysiologic events relevant to each stage of ALI/ARDS, and much has been learned in the alveolar epithelial, endobronchial homeostasis, and alveolar cell immune responses, especially neutrophils and alveolar macrophages in an animal model. However, these effective results in the animal models are not equally adoptive to those in randomized, controlled trials. The clinical course of ALI/ARDS is variable with the likely pathophysiologic complexity of human ALI/ARDS. In 1994, the definition was recommended by the American-European Consensus Conference Committee, which facilitated easy nomination of patients with ALI/ARDS for a randomized, clinical trial. Here, we review the recent randomized, clinical trials of ALI/ARDS.

  6. Department of Labor Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... Date FR Cite ANPRM 12/00/10 Regulatory Flexibility Analysis Required: Undetermined Government Levels...: Action Date FR Cite NPRM 12/00/10 Regulatory Flexibility Analysis Required: Undetermined Government..., 202, 205, 211, 301, 302, and 303 of EO 11246, as amended; 30 FR 12319; 32 FR 14303, as amended by...

  7. 47 CFR 101.533 - Regulatory status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Regulatory status. 101.533 Section 101.533 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.533 Regulatory status. (a)...

  8. 47 CFR 101.533 - Regulatory status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Regulatory status. 101.533 Section 101.533 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.533 Regulatory status. (a)...

  9. 47 CFR 27.10 - Regulatory status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Regulatory status. 27.10 Section 27.10 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Applications and Licenses § 27.10 Regulatory status. The following rules apply...

  10. 47 CFR 27.10 - Regulatory status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Regulatory status. 27.10 Section 27.10 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Applications and Licenses § 27.10 Regulatory status. The following rules apply...

  11. 47 CFR 27.10 - Regulatory status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Regulatory status. 27.10 Section 27.10 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Applications and Licenses § 27.10 Regulatory status. The following rules apply...

  12. 47 CFR 90.1309 - Regulatory status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Regulatory status. 90.1309 Section 90.1309 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Wireless Broadband Services in the 3650-3700 MHz Band § 90.1309 Regulatory...

  13. 47 CFR 27.10 - Regulatory status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Regulatory status. 27.10 Section 27.10 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Applications and Licenses § 27.10 Regulatory status. The following rules apply...

  14. 47 CFR 27.10 - Regulatory status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Regulatory status. 27.10 Section 27.10 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Applications and Licenses § 27.10 Regulatory status. The following rules apply...

  15. Department of Transportation Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... continues to have a SEIOSNOSE. Amendment No. 125-10 Amendment No. 125-10 required digital flight data... with Executive Order 12866 ``Regulatory Planning and Review'' (58 FR 51735; October 4, 1993) and the Department's Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979), the Department prepares...

  16. Federal Trade Commission Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... and Review'' of September 30, 1993, 58 FR 51735 (Oct. 4, 1993). This edition of the Unified Agenda of..., ``Federalism,'' of August 4, 1999, 64 FR 43255 (Aug. 10, 1999), which does not apply to independent regulatory...'s Telemarketing Sales Rule (TSR or Rule) to address the sale of debt relief services (74 FR...

  17. 5 CFR 340.201 - Regulatory requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 340.201 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS OTHER THAN FULL-TIME CAREER EMPLOYMENT (PART-TIME, SEASONAL, ON-CALL, AND INTERMITTENT) Regulatory Requirements-Part-Time Employment § 340.201 Regulatory requirements. This subpart contains the regulations of...

  18. 5 CFR 340.201 - Regulatory requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 340.201 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS OTHER THAN FULL-TIME CAREER EMPLOYMENT (PART-TIME, SEASONAL, ON-CALL, AND INTERMITTENT) Regulatory Requirements-Part-Time Employment § 340.201 Regulatory requirements. This subpart contains the regulations of...

  19. Department of Defense Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... American Act. Timetable: Action Date FR Cite NPRM 06/00/10 Regulatory Flexibility Analysis Required: Yes... DoD oversight of contractor business systems. Timetable: Action Date FR Cite NPRM 01/15/10 75 FR 2457... Part V Department of Defense Semiannual Regulatory Agenda ] DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE (DOD)...

  20. Environmental Protection Agency Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ...:// Not in FR www.epa.gov/lawsregs/search/regagenda.html Semiannual Regulatory Flexibility Agenda www....html issue ] Monthly Action Initiation List http://www.regulations.gov/fdmspublic/component/ Not in FR... Rulemaking Gateway www.epa.gov/rulemaking/ Not in FR B. What Are EPA's Regulatory Goals, and What...

  1. 75 FR 79843 - Fall 2010 Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... Locations Location Semiannual Regulatory Agenda www.reginfo.gov/, www.regulations.gov, and http:// Not in FR.../component/ Not in FR main?main=DocketDetail& d=EPA-HQ-OA-2008-0265 and http:// www.epa.gov/lawsregs/ search/ail.html Rulemaking Gateway www.epa.gov/rulemaking/ Not in FR B. What Are EPA's Regulatory...

  2. 5 CFR 847.102 - Regulatory structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Regulatory structure. 847.102 Section 847.102 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS... INSTRUMENTALITIES General Provisions § 847.102 Regulatory structure. (a)(1) Subpart A of this part...

  3. 40 CFR 92.6 - Regulatory structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and locomotive engines for which the regulations of this part (i.e., 40 CFR part 92) apply are... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Regulatory structure. 92.6 Section 92.6... Locomotives and Locomotive Engines § 92.6 Regulatory structure. This section provides an overview of...

  4. 5 CFR 847.102 - Regulatory structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Regulatory structure. 847.102 Section 847.102 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS... INSTRUMENTALITIES General Provisions § 847.102 Regulatory structure. (a)(1) Subpart A of this part...

  5. 40 CFR 92.6 - Regulatory structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... locomotives and locomotive engines for which the regulations of this part (i.e., 40 CFR part 92) apply are... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Regulatory structure. 92.6 Section 92... Regulations for Locomotives and Locomotive Engines § 92.6 Regulatory structure. This section provides...

  6. 5 CFR 880.102 - Regulatory structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Regulatory structure. 880.102 Section 880.102 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS... Regulatory structure. (a) This part contains the following subparts: (1) Subpart A contains...

  7. 5 CFR 880.102 - Regulatory structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Regulatory structure. 880.102 Section 880.102 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS... Regulatory structure. (a) This part contains the following subparts: (1) Subpart A contains...

  8. 40 CFR 94.6 - Regulatory structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... emissions from in-use marine engines. (b) The engines for which the regulations of this part (i.e., 40 CFR... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Regulatory structure. 94.6 Section 94... for Compression-Ignition Marine Engines § 94.6 Regulatory structure. This section provides an...

  9. 5 CFR 880.102 - Regulatory structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Regulatory structure. 880.102 Section 880.102 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS... Regulatory structure. (a) This part contains the following subparts: (1) Subpart A contains...

  10. 40 CFR 94.6 - Regulatory structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... emissions from in-use marine engines. (b) The engines for which the regulations of this part (i.e., 40 CFR... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Regulatory structure. 94.6 Section 94... for Compression-Ignition Marine Engines § 94.6 Regulatory structure. This section provides an...

  11. 5 CFR 847.102 - Regulatory structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Regulatory structure. 847.102 Section 847.102 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS... INSTRUMENTALITIES General Provisions § 847.102 Regulatory structure. (a)(1) Subpart A of this part...

  12. 40 CFR 94.6 - Regulatory structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... emissions from in-use marine engines. (b) The engines for which the regulations of this part (i.e., 40 CFR... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Regulatory structure. 94.6 Section 94... for Compression-Ignition Marine Engines § 94.6 Regulatory structure. This section provides an...

  13. 5 CFR 847.102 - Regulatory structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Regulatory structure. 847.102 Section 847.102 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS... INSTRUMENTALITIES General Provisions § 847.102 Regulatory structure. (a)(1) Subpart A of this part...

  14. 5 CFR 847.102 - Regulatory structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Regulatory structure. 847.102 Section 847.102 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS... INSTRUMENTALITIES General Provisions § 847.102 Regulatory structure. (a)(1) Subpart A of this part...

  15. 40 CFR 94.6 - Regulatory structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... emissions from in-use marine engines. (b) The engines for which the regulations of this part (i.e., 40 CFR... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Regulatory structure. 94.6 Section 94... for Compression-Ignition Marine Engines § 94.6 Regulatory structure. This section provides an...

  16. 5 CFR 880.102 - Regulatory structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Regulatory structure. 880.102 Section 880.102 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS... Regulatory structure. (a) This part contains the following subparts: (1) Subpart A contains...

  17. 40 CFR 94.6 - Regulatory structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... in-use marine engines. (b) The engines for which the regulations of this part (i.e., 40 CFR part 94... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Regulatory structure. 94.6 Section 94.6... Compression-Ignition Marine Engines § 94.6 Regulatory structure. This section provides an overview of...

  18. 5 CFR 880.102 - Regulatory structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Regulatory structure. 880.102 Section 880.102 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS... Regulatory structure. (a) This part contains the following subparts: (1) Subpart A contains...

  19. 40 CFR 92.6 - Regulatory structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... locomotives and locomotive engines for which the regulations of this part (i.e., 40 CFR part 92) apply are... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Regulatory structure. 92.6 Section 92... Regulations for Locomotives and Locomotive Engines § 92.6 Regulatory structure. This section provides...

  20. 40 CFR 92.6 - Regulatory structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... locomotives and locomotive engines for which the regulations of this part (i.e., 40 CFR part 92) apply are... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Regulatory structure. 92.6 Section 92... Regulations for Locomotives and Locomotive Engines § 92.6 Regulatory structure. This section provides...

  1. 40 CFR 92.6 - Regulatory structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... locomotives and locomotive engines for which the regulations of this part (i.e., 40 CFR part 92) apply are... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Regulatory structure. 92.6 Section 92... Regulations for Locomotives and Locomotive Engines § 92.6 Regulatory structure. This section provides...

  2. 78 FR 1698 - Semiannual Regulatory Flexibility Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    ..., Implementation of Basel III, Minimum Regulatory Capital Ratios, Capital Adequacy, and Transition Provisions..., Capital Adequacy, and Transition Provisions (Docket No. R-1442) Legal Authority: 12 U.S.C. 24; 12 U.S.C... disclosures related to regulatory capital instruments. Timetable: Action Date FR Cite Merged With 7100 AD87...

  3. 5 CFR 340.201 - Regulatory requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 340.201 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS OTHER THAN FULL-TIME CAREER EMPLOYMENT (PART-TIME, SEASONAL, ON-CALL, AND INTERMITTENT) Regulatory Requirements-Part-Time Employment § 340.201 Regulatory requirements. This subpart contains the regulations of...

  4. 5 CFR 340.201 - Regulatory requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 340.201 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS OTHER THAN FULL-TIME CAREER EMPLOYMENT (PART-TIME, SEASONAL, ON-CALL, AND INTERMITTENT) Regulatory Requirements-Part-Time Employment § 340.201 Regulatory requirements. This subpart contains the regulations of...

  5. 5 CFR 340.201 - Regulatory requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 340.201 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS OTHER THAN FULL-TIME CAREER EMPLOYMENT (PART-TIME, SEASONAL, ON-CALL, AND INTERMITTENT) Regulatory Requirements-Part-Time Employment § 340.201 Regulatory requirements. This subpart contains the regulations of...

  6. 47 CFR 101.1309 - Regulatory status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Regulatory status. 101.1309 Section 101.1309 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Multiple Address Systems General Provisions § 101.1309 Regulatory status. (a) The Commission...

  7. 47 CFR 101.1309 - Regulatory status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Regulatory status. 101.1309 Section 101.1309 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Multiple Address Systems General Provisions § 101.1309 Regulatory status. (a) The Commission...

  8. 12 CFR 1010.14 - Regulatory exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Regulatory exemptions. 1010.14 Section 1010.14 Banks and Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION LAND REGISTRATION (REGULATION J) General Requirements § 1010.14 Regulatory exemptions. (a) Eligibility requirements. The following transactions...

  9. 12 CFR 233.7 - Regulatory enforcement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Regulatory enforcement. 233.7 Section 233.7 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM PROHIBITION ON FUNDING OF UNLAWFUL INTERNET GAMBLING (REGULATION GG) § 233.7 Regulatory enforcement....

  10. 31 CFR 132.7 - Regulatory enforcement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Regulatory enforcement. 132.7 Section 132.7 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance PROHIBITION ON FUNDING OF UNLAWFUL INTERNET GAMBLING § 132.7 Regulatory enforcement. The requirements under this part are subject...

  11. 12 CFR 233.7 - Regulatory enforcement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Regulatory enforcement. 233.7 Section 233.7 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM PROHIBITION ON FUNDING OF UNLAWFUL INTERNET GAMBLING (REGULATION GG) § 233.7 Regulatory enforcement....

  12. 47 CFR 69.727 - Regulatory relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Regulatory relief. 69.727 Section 69.727 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) ACCESS CHARGES Pricing Flexibility § 69.727 Regulatory relief. (a) Phase I relief. Upon satisfaction of the Phase...

  13. 47 CFR 69.727 - Regulatory relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Regulatory relief. 69.727 Section 69.727 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) ACCESS CHARGES Pricing Flexibility § 69.727 Regulatory relief. (a) Phase I relief. Upon satisfaction of the Phase...

  14. 47 CFR 69.727 - Regulatory relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Regulatory relief. 69.727 Section 69.727 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) ACCESS CHARGES Pricing Flexibility § 69.727 Regulatory relief. (a) Phase I relief. Upon satisfaction of the Phase...

  15. 47 CFR 69.727 - Regulatory relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Regulatory relief. 69.727 Section 69.727 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) ACCESS CHARGES Pricing Flexibility § 69.727 Regulatory relief. (a) Phase I relief. Upon satisfaction of the Phase...

  16. 47 CFR 69.727 - Regulatory relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Regulatory relief. 69.727 Section 69.727 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) ACCESS CHARGES Pricing Flexibility § 69.727 Regulatory relief. (a) Phase I relief. Upon satisfaction of the Phase...

  17. 77 FR 58025 - Texas Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-19

    ... Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 943 Texas Regulatory Program AGENCY... the Texas regulatory program (Texas program) under the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA or the Act). Texas proposed revisions to its regulations regarding annual permit...

  18. Federal Trade Commission Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... Part XX Federal Trade Commission Semiannual Regulatory Agenda ] FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION (FTC) FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION 16 CFR Ch. I Semiannual Regulatory Agenda AGENCY: Federal Trade Commission... published in accordance with section 22(d)(1) of the Federal Trade Commission Act, 15 U.S.C.......

  19. 75 FR 61530 - Issuance of Regulatory Guides

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... Guides 1.84, Rev. 35, ``Design, Fabrication, and Materials Code Case Acceptability, ASME Section III... Engineering, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555..., Revision 16, on June 2, 2009, 74 FR 26303. On the same date, the NRC published a parallel notice...

  20. Department of Interior Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ...: Action Date FR Cite Final Action 04/00/10 Regulatory Flexibility Analysis Required: Yes Agency Contact... idle facilities. Timetable: Action Date FR Cite NPRM 12/00/10 NPRM Comment Period End 02/00/11... Part IX Department of the Interior Semiannual Regulatory Agenda ] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR...

  1. Genomics in the land of regulatory science.

    PubMed

    Tong, Weida; Ostroff, Stephen; Blais, Burton; Silva, Primal; Dubuc, Martine; Healy, Marion; Slikker, William

    2015-06-01

    Genomics science has played a major role in the generation of new knowledge in the basic research arena, and currently question arises as to its potential to support regulatory processes. However, the integration of genomics in the regulatory decision-making process requires rigorous assessment and would benefit from consensus amongst international partners and research communities. To that end, the Global Coalition for Regulatory Science Research (GCRSR) hosted the fourth Global Summit on Regulatory Science (GSRS2014) to discuss the role of genomics in regulatory decision making, with a specific emphasis on applications in food safety and medical product development. Challenges and issues were discussed in the context of developing an international consensus for objective criteria in the analysis, interpretation and reporting of genomics data with an emphasis on transparency, traceability and "fitness for purpose" for the intended application. It was recognized that there is a need for a global path in the establishment of a regulatory bioinformatics framework for the development of transparent, reliable, reproducible and auditable processes in the management of food and medical product safety risks. It was also recognized that training is an important mechanism in achieving internationally consistent outcomes. GSRS2014 provided an effective venue for regulators andresearchers to meet, discuss common issues, and develop collaborations to address the challenges posed by the application of genomics to regulatory science, with the ultimate goal of wisely integrating novel technical innovations into regulatory decision-making.

  2. Environmental regulatory update table, November 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Langston, M.E.; Sharples, F.E.; Tucker, C.S.

    1987-11-01

    This report provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  3. Environmental regulatory update table, September 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Langston, M.E.; Sharples, F.E.; Tucker, C.S.

    1987-10-01

    This report provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  4. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, May 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.J.; Tucker, C.S.; Reed, R.M.

    1987-06-01

    Information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management oversight is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  5. Meditation and its regulatory role on sleep.

    PubMed

    Nagendra, Ravindra P; Maruthai, Nirmala; Kutty, Bindu M

    2012-01-01

    Intense meditation practices help to achieve a harmony between body and mind. Meditation practices influence brain functions, induce various intrinsic neural plasticity events, modulate autonomic, metabolic, endocrine, and immune functions and thus mediate global regulatory changes in various behavioral states including sleep. This brief review focuses on the effect of meditation as a self regulatory phenomenon on sleep.

  6. 78 FR 44315 - Spring 2013 Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ... Agenda and the E-Agenda? G. How can you find out about rulemakings that start up after the Regulatory... requirements contained in numerous executive orders: 12866, ``Regulatory Planning and Review'' (58 FR 51735...'' (76 FR 3821, Jan. 21, 2011); 12898, ``Environmental Justice'' (59 FR 7629, Feb. 16, 1994);...

  7. 78 FR 1708 - Regulatory Flexibility Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    ... section 4(6) of the Securities Act. Timetable: Action Date FR Cite NPRM 12/00/12 Regulatory Flexibility... Expansion) of the JOBS Act. Timetable: Action Date FR Cite NPRM 01/00/13 Regulatory Flexibility Analysis... on existing exemptions under the Securities Act. Timetable: Action Date FR Cite Interim Final Rule...

  8. [Regulatory B cells in human autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Miyagaki, Tomomitsu

    2015-01-01

    B cells have been generally considered to be positive regulators of immune responses because of their ability to produce antigen-specific antibodies and to activate T cells through antigen presentation. Impairment of B cell development and function may cause autoimmune diseases. Recently, specific B cell subsets that can negatively regulate immune responses have been described in mouse models of a wide variety of autoimmune diseases. The concept of those B cells, termed regulatory B cells, is now recognized as important in the murine immune system. Among several regulatory B cell subsets, IL-10-producing regulatory B cells are the most widely investigated. On the basis of discoveries from studies of such mice, human regulatory B cells that produce IL-10 in most cases are becoming an active area of research. There have been emerging data suggesting the importance of human regulatory B cells in various diseases. Revealing the immune regulation mechanisms of human regulatory B cells in human autoimmune diseases could lead to the development of novel B cell targeted therapies. This review highlights the current knowledge on regulatory B cells, mainly IL-10-producing regulatory B cells, in clinical research using human samples. PMID:26725860

  9. Weight of evidence: regulatory toxicology in Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Somers, E.

    1986-12-01

    The legislative application of regulatory toxicology in Canada is reviewed, together with the sources of experimental evidence used for action. Examples are given of the critical toxicological information that led to a regulatory decision. Risk numbers have only been used to a limited extent in Canada. Some possibilities for future research are offered.

  10. 76 FR 40208 - Regulatory Flexibility Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ... Date FR Cite NPRM 03/00/12 Regulatory Flexibility Analysis Required: Yes. Agency Contact: Sean Harrison... Rule 506 of Regulation D. Timetable: Action Date FR Cite NPRM 06/01/11 76 FR 31518 NPRM Comment Period... by registrants. Timetable: Action Date FR Cite NPRM 03/00/12 Regulatory Flexibility Analysis...

  11. 76 FR 40050 - Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ... July 7, 2011 Part VII Department of Energy Semiannual Regulatory Agenda #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 76 , No. 130 / Thursday, July 7, 2011 / Unified Agenda#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Chs. II, III, and X 48 CFR Ch. 9 Semiannual Regulatory Agenda AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice...

  12. 78 FR 1570 - Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    ... January 8, 2013 Part VII Department of Energy Semiannual Regulatory Agenda #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 78 , No. 5 / Tuesday, January 8, 2013 / Unified Agenda#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Chs. II, III, and X 48 CFR Ch. 9 Semiannual Regulatory Agenda AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice...

  13. Regulatory Reform: Low Risk, High Promise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanenbaum, Morris

    The press of telecommunication technologies and their progeny have undermined the natural monopoly basis for long distance telecommunications and customer premise products, forced open regulatory doors, toppled barriers to market entry, and led to the reshaping of regulatory philosophy as regulators have seen new, wider horizons for the industry.…

  14. Department of Transportation Agency Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... accordance with Executive Order 12866 ``Regulatory Planning and Review'' (58 FR 51735; October 4, 1993) and the Department's Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979), the Department... last agenda was published in the Federal Register on April 26, 2010 (75 FR 21840). The next one...

  15. 76 FR 33181 - Regulatory Review Schedule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-08

    ... processes. (76 FR 18457, April 4, 2011). The Commission's regulatory review process establishes a detailed... National Indian Gaming Commission 25 CFR Chapter III Regulatory Review Schedule AGENCY: National Indian... Notice of Consultation advising the public that the NIGC was conducting a comprehensive review of all...

  16. 49 CFR 355.21 - Regulatory review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Regulatory review. 355.21 Section 355.21... AND REGULATIONS AFFECTING INTERSTATE MOTOR CARRIER OPERATIONS Requirements § 355.21 Regulatory review... review are provided in the appendix to this part. (b) Responsibility. The State agency designated as...

  17. 76 FR 54408 - Regulatory Review Schedule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-01

    .... (76 FR 18457, April 4, 2011). The Commission's regulatory review process established a tribal... National Indian Gaming Commission 25 CFR Chapter III Regulatory Review Schedule AGENCY: National Indian..., 1441 L Street, NW., Suite 9100, Washington, DC 20005. Telephone: 202-632-7003; e-mail:...

  18. 77 FR 10351 - Regulatory Review Plan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-22

    ... plan and requested comments on the plan. 76 FR 59066 (September 23, 2011). FHFA received no comments... XII Regulatory Review Plan AGENCY: Federal Housing Finance Agency. ACTION: Notice of final regulatory review plan. SUMMARY: The Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) is issuing a notice of the final...

  19. 76 FR 26967 - Regulatory Review Schedule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... National Indian Gaming Commission 25 CFR Chapter III Regulatory Review Schedule AGENCY: National Indian... advising the public that the NIGC was conducting a comprehensive review of its regulations and requesting public comment on the process for conducting the regulatory review. On April 4, 2011, after holding...

  20. 49 CFR 355.21 - Regulatory review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Regulatory review. 355.21 Section 355.21... AND REGULATIONS AFFECTING INTERSTATE MOTOR CARRIER OPERATIONS Requirements § 355.21 Regulatory review... review are provided in the appendix to this part. (b) Responsibility. The State agency designated as...

  1. 75 FR 79925 - Semiannual Regulatory Flexibility Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... FR Cite Board Issued Final Rule on 02/22/10 75 FR 7658 Regulatory Flexibility Analysis Required: Yes... FR 37526 Regulatory Flexibility Analysis Required: Yes Agency Contact: Amy Henderson, Senior Attorney... similar to the proposed rule. Timetable: Action Date FR Cite Board Requested Comment 08/26/09 74 FR...

  2. Cross-Sector Review of Drivers and Available 3Rs Approaches for Acute Systemic Toxicity Testing

    PubMed Central

    Seidle, Troy; Robinson, Sally; Holmes, Tom; Creton, Stuart; Prieto, Pilar; Scheel, Julia; Chlebus, Magda

    2010-01-01

    Acute systemic toxicity studies are carried out in many sectors in which synthetic chemicals are manufactured or used and are among the most criticized of all toxicology tests on both scientific and ethical grounds. A review of the drivers for acute toxicity testing within the pharmaceutical industry led to a paradigm shift whereby in vivo acute toxicity data are no longer routinely required in advance of human clinical trials. Based on this experience, the following review was undertaken to identify (1) regulatory and scientific drivers for acute toxicity testing in other industrial sectors, (2) activities aimed at replacing, reducing, or refining the use of animals, and (3) recommendations for future work in this area. PMID:20484382

  3. Mediation: Sanity in the regulatory process

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, D.S.

    1993-01-15

    The regulatory process is in need of change. The adversarial model used by most regulatory agencies is an inefficient, expensive, and conflict-producing procedure. Ill-adapted to resolving issues of great public policy concern, regulation calls out for non-adversarial alternative processes to address the resolution of public policy disputes between the players in the regulatory process. The adversarial model of regulation mimics traditional courtroom procedures. It is designed to determine issues of fact, not issues of public policy with legal maneuvering used to shroud the development of facts. Conflict maintenance and not conflict resolution has become the hallmark of the adversarial process in the regulatory arena. Unlike the courtroom process which provides a certain finality to conflicts, the adversarial process in the regulatory process is perpetual.

  4. Medical treatment of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Mayerle, Julia; Simon, Peter; Lerch, Markus M

    2004-12-01

    Eighty percent of all cases of acute pancreatitis are linked etiologically to gallstone disease or caused by immoderate alcohol consumption. No specific causal treatment for acute pancreatitis exists. Early prognostic factors that indicate severe disease are three or more signs on organ failure scores according to Ranson, Imrie, or Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) 11, extrapancreatic complications of the disease, or the detection of pancreatic necrosis on CT scans. Elevated CRP levels above 130 mg/L can also predict a severe course of acute pancreatitis. The essential medical treatment for acute pancreatitis is the correction of hypovolemia. Moreover, relief of often severe visceral pain is a high priority. Prophylactic antibiotics should be restricted to patients with necrotizing pancreatitis, infected necrosis, or other infectious complications. Enteral nutrition has no adverse effect compared with parenteral nutrition during the course of acute pancreatitis, and is probably beneficial in regard to outcome.

  5. Boolean Modelingof Genetic Regulatory Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Réka

    Biological systems form complex networks of interaction on several scales, ranging from the molecular to the ecosystem level. On the subcellular scale, interaction between genes and gene products (mRNAs, proteins) forms the basis of essential processes like signal transduction, cell metabolism or embryonic development. Recent experimental advances helped uncover the qualitative structure of many gene control networks, creating a surge of interest in the quantitative description of gene regulation. We give a brief description of the main frameworks and methods used in modeling gene regulatory networks, then focus on a recent model of the segment polarity genes of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. The basis of this model is the known interactions between the products of the segment polarity genes, and the network topology these interactions form. The interactions between mRNAs and proteins are described as logical (Boolean) functions. The success in reproducing both wild type and mutant gene expression patterns suggests that the kinetic details of the interactions are not essential as long as the network of interactions is unperturbed. The model predicts the gene patterns for cases that were not yet studied experimentally, and implies a remarkable robustness toward changes in internal parameters, initial conditions and even some mutations.

  6. Evolving Robust Gene Regulatory Networks

    PubMed Central

    Noman, Nasimul; Monjo, Taku; Moscato, Pablo; Iba, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Design and implementation of robust network modules is essential for construction of complex biological systems through hierarchical assembly of ‘parts’ and ‘devices’. The robustness of gene regulatory networks (GRNs) is ascribed chiefly to the underlying topology. The automatic designing capability of GRN topology that can exhibit robust behavior can dramatically change the current practice in synthetic biology. A recent study shows that Darwinian evolution can gradually develop higher topological robustness. Subsequently, this work presents an evolutionary algorithm that simulates natural evolution in silico, for identifying network topologies that are robust to perturbations. We present a Monte Carlo based method for quantifying topological robustness and designed a fitness approximation approach for efficient calculation of topological robustness which is computationally very intensive. The proposed framework was verified using two classic GRN behaviors: oscillation and bistability, although the framework is generalized for evolving other types of responses. The algorithm identified robust GRN architectures which were verified using different analysis and comparison. Analysis of the results also shed light on the relationship among robustness, cooperativity and complexity. This study also shows that nature has already evolved very robust architectures for its crucial systems; hence simulation of this natural process can be very valuable for designing robust biological systems. PMID:25616055

  7. Orphan drugs: the regulatory environment.

    PubMed

    Franco, Pedro

    2013-02-01

    The definition of a rare disease is not universal and depends on the legislation and policies adopted by each region or country. The main objective of this article is to describe and discuss the legal framework and the regulatory environment of orphan drugs worldwide. Some reflections and discussions on the need for specific orphan drug legislation or policies are described at length. Furthermore, some aspects of the history of each region in respect of the orphan drug legislation evolution are outlined. This article describes and compares the orphan drug legislation or policies of the following countries or regions: United Sates of America (US), European Union (EU), Japan, Australia, Singapore, Taiwan and Canada. The incentives described in the orphan drug legislations or policies, the criteria for designation of orphan status and the authorisation process of an orphan drug are also described and compared. The legislations and policies are to some extent similar but not the same. It is important to understand the main differences among all available legislative systems to improve the international collaboration in the field of orphan drugs and rare diseases.

  8. Targeted Therapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-28

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Myelodysplasia-Related Changes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  9. Toll-like receptor 2-mediated modulation of growth and functions of regulatory T cells by oral streptococci.

    PubMed

    Saeki, A; Segawa, T; Abe, T; Sugiyama, M; Arimoto, T; Hara, H; Hasebe, A; Ohtani, M; Tanizume, N; Ohuchi, M; Kataoka, H; Kawanami, M; Yokoyama, A; Shibata, K

    2013-08-01

    This study was designed to determine whether oral streptococci modulate the growth and functions of regulatory T cells. Heat-killed cells of wild-type strains of Streptococcus gordonii and Streptococcus mutans induced the Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) -mediated nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation, but their lipoprotein-deficient strains did not. Stimulation with these streptococci resulted in a significant increase in the frequency of CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells in splenocytes derived from both TLR2(+/+) and TLR2(-/-) mice, but the level of increase in TLR2(+/+) splenocytes was stronger than that in TLR2(-/-) splenocytes. Both strains of S. gordonii enhanced the proliferation of CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells isolated from TLR2(+/+) mice at the same level as those from TLR2(-/-) mice in an interleukin-2-independent manner. However, wild-type and lipoprotein-deficient strains of both streptococci did not enhance the suppressive activity of the isolated regulatory T cells in vitro, but rather inhibited it. TLR ligands also inhibited the suppressive activity of the regulatory T cells. Inhibition of the suppressive activity was recovered by the addition of anti-IL-6 antibody. Pretreatment of antigen-presenting cells with the NF-κB inhibitor BAY11-7082 enhanced the suppressive activity of the regulatory T cells. These results suggested that interleukin-6 produced by antigen-presenting cells inhibits the suppressive activity of the regulatory T cells. Wild-type strain, but not lipoprotein-deficient strain, of S. gordonii reduced the frequency of CD4(+)  CD25(+)  Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells in the acute infection model, whereas both strains of S. gordonii increased it in the chronic infection model mice. Hence, this study suggests that oral streptococci are capable of modulating the growth and functions of regulatory T cells in vitro and in vivo.

  10. [Computer tomography in acute pyelonephritis].

    PubMed

    Triller, J; Scheidegger, J; Terrier, F

    1983-07-01

    Computer tomography of the kidneys was performed on 30 patients with acute renal infections (acute suppurative pyelonephritis, acute renal abscess, infected cyst, pyelonephrosis, calculus perforation, retroperitoneal abscess). Computer tomography provided more accurate information concerning the extent of the renal and extra-renal inflammatory process than did the urogram or sonogram. This may significantly affect the choice of treatment, particularly concerning the use of drugs or of surgery. Angiography and retrograde pyelography may be used in selected cases, especially where there is a suspicion of acute bacterial nephritis, renal vein thrombosis or ureteric obstruction.

  11. Acute exacerbation of COPD.

    PubMed

    Ko, Fanny W; Chan, Ka Pang; Hui, David S; Goddard, John R; Shaw, Janet G; Reid, David W; Yang, Ian A

    2016-10-01

    The literature of acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is fast expanding. This review focuses on several aspects of acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD) including epidemiology, diagnosis and management. COPD poses a major health and economic burden in the Asia-Pacific region, as it does worldwide. Triggering factors of AECOPD include infectious (bacteria and viruses) and environmental (air pollution and meteorological effect) factors. Disruption in the dynamic balance between the 'pathogens' (viral and bacterial) and the normal bacterial communities that constitute the lung microbiome likely contributes to the risk of exacerbations. The diagnostic approach to AECOPD varies based on the clinical setting and severity of the exacerbation. After history and examination, a number of investigations may be useful, including oximetry, sputum culture, chest X-ray and blood tests for inflammatory markers. Arterial blood gases should be considered in severe exacerbations, to characterize respiratory failure. Depending on the severity, the acute management of AECOPD involves use of bronchodilators, steroids, antibiotics, oxygen and noninvasive ventilation. Hospitalization may be required, for severe exacerbations. Nonpharmacological interventions including disease-specific self-management, pulmonary rehabilitation, early medical follow-up, home visits by respiratory health workers, integrated programmes and telehealth-assisted hospital at home have been studied during hospitalization and shortly after discharge in patients who have had a recent AECOPD. Pharmacological approaches to reducing risk of future exacerbations include long-acting bronchodilators, inhaled steroids, mucolytics, vaccinations and long-term macrolides. Further studies are needed to assess the cost-effectiveness of these interventions in preventing COPD exacerbations.

  12. Acute panmyelosis with myelofibrosis.

    PubMed

    Thiele, Juergen; Kvasnicka, Hans M; Schmitt-Graeff, Annette

    2004-04-01

    Acute panmyelosis with myelofibrosis (APMF) is an ill-defined disorder that may either evolve as a clonal hematopoietic condition or as a sequel of toxic exposure to the bone marrow (BM). Therefore, controversy and discussion continues as to whether APMF may be considered as a hyperfibrotic (de novo) myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), as acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or as a severe toxic myelopathy with accompanying myelofibrosis. In this context scant knowledge exists about BM findings, but especially evolution of this disorder according to sequential examinations. Clinically patients present with pancytopenia, a very few blasts in the peripheral blood and no or little splenomegaly. Initially BM histopathology is characterized by different degrees of reticulin-collagen fibrosis and wide ranges of cellularity with a prominent left-shifted and often macrocytic erythropoiesis associated with a reduction and maturation defects of the neutrophil series. Most conspicuous are abnormalities of the megakaryocytes including loose clustering, dislocation towards the endosteal border and appearance of atypical microforms with compact nuclei. Moreover, besides myelofibrosis in a number of patients the interstitial compartment displays a remarkable inflammatory reaction with lymphoid nodules, abundant iron-laden macrophages, perivascular plasmacytosis and increase in microvessels. Repeatedly performed BM biopsies reveal an accumulation of dispersed or clustered CD34+ and lysozyme-expressing blasts in keeping with the insidious transformation into acute leukemia. Prognosis is unfavorable with a median survival of less than 1 year. In conclusion, APMF has to be regarded as a condition that shows considerable overlappings with primary hyperfibrotic MDS, AML and toxic myelopathy (secondary MDS) with accompanying myelofibrosis and therefore can not be considered as a definite clinical entity.

  13. Regulatory analysis technical evaluation handbook. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this Handbook is to provide guidance to the regulatory analyst to promote preparation of quality regulatory analysis documents and to implement the policies of the Regulatory Analysis Guidelines of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NUREG/BR-0058 Rev. 2). This Handbook expands upon policy concepts included in the NRC Guidelines and translates the six steps in preparing regulatory analyses into implementable methodologies for the analyst. It provides standardized methods of preparation and presentation of regulatory analyses, with the inclusion of input that will satisfy all backfit requirements and requirements of NRC`s Committee to Review Generic Requirements. Information on the objectives of the safety goal evaluation process and potential data sources for preparing a safety goal evaluation is also included. Consistent application of the methods provided here will result in more directly comparable analyses, thus aiding decision-makers in evaluating and comparing various regulatory actions. The handbook is being issued in loose-leaf format to facilitate revisions. NRC intends to periodically revise the handbook as new and improved guidance, data, and methods become available.

  14. Acute brain trauma.

    PubMed

    Martin, G T

    2016-01-01

    In the 20th century, the complications of head injuries were controlled but not eliminated. The wars of the 21st century turned attention to blast, the instant of impact and the primary injury of concussion. Computer calculations have established that in the first 5 milliseconds after the impact, four independent injuries on the brain are inflicted: 1) impact and its shockwave, 2) deceleration, 3) rotation and 4) skull deformity with vibration (or resonance). The recovery, pathology and symptoms after acute brain trauma have always been something of a puzzle. The variability of these four modes of injury, along with a variable reserve of neurones, explains some of this problem.

  15. [Infant acute leukemia].

    PubMed

    Brethon, Benoît; Cavé, Hélène; Fahd, Mony; Baruchel, André

    2016-03-01

    If acute leukemia is the most frequent cancer in childhood (33%), it remains a very rare diagnosis in infants less than one year old, e.g. less than 5% of cases. At this age, the frequency of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) (almost all of B-lineage) is quite similar to the one of myeloblastic forms (AML). Infant leukemia frequently presents with high hyperleucocytosis, major tumoral burden and numerous extra-hematological features, especially in central nervous system and skin. Whatever the lineage, the leukemic cell is often very immature cytologically and immunologically. Rearrangements of the Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) gene, located on band 11q23, are the hallmark of these immature leukemias and confer a particular resistance to conventional approaches, corticosteroids and chemotherapy. The immaturity of infants less than 1-year-old is associated to a decrease of the tolerable dose-intensity of some drugs (anthracyclines, alkylating agents) or asks questions about some procedures like radiotherapy or high dose conditioning regimen, responsible of inacceptable acute and late toxicities. The high level of severe infectious diseases and other high-grade side effects limits also the capacity to cure these infants. The survival of infants less than 1-year-old with AML is only 50% but similar to older children. On the other hand, survival of those with ALL is the same, then quite limited comparing the 80% survival in children over one year. Allogeneic stem cell transplantations are indicated in high-risk subgroups of infant ALL (age below 6 months, high hyperleucocytosis >300.10(9)/L, MLL-rearrangement, initial poor prednisone response). However, morbidity and mortality remain very important and these approaches cannot be extended to all cases. During the neonatal period, the dismal prognosis linked to the high number of primary failures or very early relapses and uncertainties about the late toxicities question physicians about ethics. It is an emergency to

  16. Feedlot Acute Interstitial Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Woolums, Amelia R

    2015-11-01

    Acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) of feedlot cattle is a sporadically occurring respiratory condition that is often fatal. Affected cattle have a sudden onset of labored breathing. There is no confirmed effective treatment of feedlot AIP; however, administration of antibiotics effective against common bacterial respiratory pathogens and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, especially aspirin, has been recommended. Protective strategies are not well defined, but efforts to limit dust exposure and heat stress; to ensure consistent formulation, mixing, and delivery of feed; and to identify and treat infectious respiratory disease in a timely manner may decrease rates of feedlot AIP.

  17. Acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Gretchen

    2014-03-01

    One in 4 children will have at least 1 episode of acute otitis media (AOM) by age 10 years. AOM results from infection of fluid that has become trapped in the middle ear. The bacteria that most often cause AOM are Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis. Differentiating AOM from otitis media with effusion (OME) is a critical skill for physicians, as accurate diagnosis will guide appropriate treatment of these conditions. Although fluid is present in the middle ear in both conditions, the fluid is not infected in OME as is seen in AOM patients. PMID:24439877

  18. [Acute necrotizing enteritis].

    PubMed

    Marincaş, M; Bratucu, E; Straja, D; Daha, C; Boru, C

    2003-01-01

    The authors present a retrospective clinical study done on a 13-pacients basis diagnosed during surgery with acute necrotizing enteritis. This study follows the complexity of pathogenic factors and the difficulties one confronts with when establishing a diagnosis since the clinical manifestations are non-specifical and shows the contribution of laboratory data to an earliest possible diagnosis. Both medical and surgical treatment are analyzed depending on the results achieved with an attempt to determine a therapeutic approach as beneficial as possible, aiming at making clear either enterectomy or a conservatory surgical decision should be made. Mortality rate under such therapeutical approach was 38%.

  19. Acute lead arsenate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Tallis, G A

    1989-12-01

    Three cases of acute lead arsenate poisoning which occurred in South Australia during a 12 month interval are described. The case reports demonstrate a number of features of the characteristic clinical syndrome which may follow ingestion of lead arsenate. The recommended management is immediate gastric lavage and subsequent chelation therapy with calcium EDTA and dimercaprol. Early gastric lavage may prevent significant lead absorption. However, arsenic acid (produced in the stomach when lead arsenate reacts with hydrochloric acid) is relatively water soluble and prompt gastric lavage is unlikely to prevent extensive arsenic absorption. It remains controversial as to whether chelation with dimercaprol prevents arsenical neuropathy.

  20. Acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Gretchen

    2014-03-01

    One in 4 children will have at least 1 episode of acute otitis media (AOM) by age 10 years. AOM results from infection of fluid that has become trapped in the middle ear. The bacteria that most often cause AOM are Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis. Differentiating AOM from otitis media with effusion (OME) is a critical skill for physicians, as accurate diagnosis will guide appropriate treatment of these conditions. Although fluid is present in the middle ear in both conditions, the fluid is not infected in OME as is seen in AOM patients.

  1. Acute acalculous cholecystitis.

    PubMed

    Barie, Philip S; Eachempati, Soumitra R

    2010-06-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis (ACC) can develop with or without gallstones after surgery and in critically ill or injured patients. Diabetes mellitus, malignant disease, abdominal vasculitis, congestive heart failure, cholesterol embolization, shock, and cardiac arrest also have been associated with AAC. The pathogenesis of AAC is complex and multifactorial. Ultrasound of the gallbladder is most accurate for the diagnosis of AAC in the critically ill patient. CT is probably of comparable accuracy, but carries both advantages and disadvantages. Rapid improvement may be expected when AAC is diagnosed correctly and cholecystostomy is performed timely. PMID:20478490

  2. Acute medial elbow ruptures.

    PubMed

    Norwood, L A; Shook, J A; Andrews, J R

    1981-01-01

    Disruption of the ulnar collateral ligament, flexor muscles, and anterior elbow capsule may result from valgus vector forces and subsequently cause difficulty in throwing, pulling, pushing and catching. Complete medial elbow tears were diagnosed acutely in four elbows by abduction stress tests at 15 degrees of flexion. Three elbows had associated ulnar nerve compression. We repaired torn medial structures by direct suture without ligamentous reconstruction. We also decompressed ulnar nerves and performed one anterior transposition. Full range of motion, strength, and return to previous functional level was attained without infection, neurovascular compression, or myositis ossificans.

  3. Acute ischemic stroke update.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Kathleen; Orr, Sean; Briand, Mary; Piazza, Carolyn; Veydt, Annita; McCoy, Stacey

    2010-05-01

    Stroke is the third most common cause of death in the United States and is the number one cause of long-term disability. Legislative mandates, largely the result of the American Heart Association, American Stroke Association, and Brain Attack Coalition working cooperatively, have resulted in nationwide standardization of care for patients who experience a stroke. Transport to a skilled facility that can provide optimal care, including immediate treatment to halt or reverse the damage caused by stroke, must occur swiftly. Admission to a certified stroke center is recommended for improving outcomes. Most strokes are ischemic in nature. Acute ischemic stroke is a heterogeneous group of vascular diseases, which makes targeted treatment challenging. To provide a thorough review of the literature since the 2007 acute ischemic stroke guidelines were developed, we performed a search of the MEDLINE database (January 1, 2004-July 1, 2009) for relevant English-language studies. Results (through July 1, 2009) from clinical trials included in the Internet Stroke Center registry were also accessed. Results from several pivotal studies have contributed to our knowledge of stroke. Additional data support the efficacy and safety of intravenous alteplase, the standard of care for acute ischemic stroke since 1995. Due to these study results, the American Stroke Association changed its recommendation to extend the time window for administration of intravenous alteplase from within 3 hours to 4.5 hours of symptom onset; this recommendation enables many more patients to receive the drug. Other findings included clinically useful biomarkers, the role of inflammation and infection, an expanded role for placement of intracranial stents, a reduced role for urgent carotid endarterectomy, alternative treatments for large-vessel disease, identification of nontraditional risk factors, including risk factors for women, and newly published pediatric stroke guidelines. In addition, new devices for

  4. Acute extremity compartment syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tumbarello, C

    2000-01-01

    Acute Extremity Compartment Syndrome is a disorder, which can cause loss of limb if left untreated. Compartment syndrome develops when pressures within the fascial compartments become elevated, resulting in decreased perfusion to muscles and nerves. Left untreated, tissue death occurs. Rapid identification of clinical signs can decrease severity of symptoms. Diligent nursing assessment and monitoring of clinical signs, with communication to the physician, will facilitate rapid treatment by the physician. The primary treatment option is early identification and intervention through performance of a fasciotomy.

  5. Early mRNAs, spatially restricted along the animal-vegetal axis of sea urchin embryos, include one encoding a protein related to tolloid and BMP-1.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, S D; Angerer, L M; Palis, J; Nasir, A; Angerer, R C

    1992-03-01

    The cloning and characterization of cDNAs representing four genes or small gene families that are coordinately expressed in a spatially restricted pattern during the very early blastula (VEB) stage of sea urchin development are presented. The VEB genes encode multiple transcripts that are expressed transiently in embryos of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus between 16-cell stage and hatching, with peak abundance 12 to 15 hours post-fertilization (approximately 150-250 cells). The VEB transcripts share the same spatial pattern in the early blastula embryo: they are asymmetrically distributed along the animal-vegetal axis but their distribution around this axis is uniform. Thus, the VEB transcripts are the earliest messages to reveal asymmetry along the primary axis in the sea urchin embryo. The temporal and spatial patterns of VEB transcript accumulation are not consistent with involvement of these gene products in cell division or in tissue-specific functions. Furthermore, VEB messages cannot be detected in either ovary or adult tissues, suggesting that these genes function exclusively during embryogenesis. We suggest that the VEB genes function in constructing the early blastula. Two VEB genes encode metalloendoproteases: one (SpHE) is hatching enzyme and the other (SpAN) is similar to bone morphogenetic protein-1 (BMP-1; Wozney et al., Science 242: 1528-1534, 1988) and the Tolloid gene product (tld) (Shimell et al., Cell 67: 459-482, 1991). Several lines of evidence suggest that the VEB genes are regulated directly by factors or regulatory activities localized along the maternally specificed animal-vegetal axis. PMID:1618141

  6. Regulatory bioinformatics for food and drug safety.

    PubMed

    Healy, Marion J; Tong, Weida; Ostroff, Stephen; Eichler, Hans-Georg; Patak, Alex; Neuspiel, Margaret; Deluyker, Hubert; Slikker, William

    2016-10-01

    "Regulatory Bioinformatics" strives to develop and implement a standardized and transparent bioinformatic framework to support the implementation of existing and emerging technologies in regulatory decision-making. It has great potential to improve public health through the development and use of clinically important medical products and tools to manage the safety of the food supply. However, the application of regulatory bioinformatics also poses new challenges and requires new knowledge and skill sets. In the latest Global Coalition on Regulatory Science Research (GCRSR) governed conference, Global Summit on Regulatory Science (GSRS2015), regulatory bioinformatics principles were presented with respect to global trends, initiatives and case studies. The discussion revealed that datasets, analytical tools, skills and expertise are rapidly developing, in many cases via large international collaborative consortia. It also revealed that significant research is still required to realize the potential applications of regulatory bioinformatics. While there is significant excitement in the possibilities offered by precision medicine to enhance treatments of serious and/or complex diseases, there is a clear need for further development of mechanisms to securely store, curate and share data, integrate databases, and standardized quality control and data analysis procedures. A greater understanding of the biological significance of the data is also required to fully exploit vast datasets that are becoming available. The application of bioinformatics in the microbiological risk analysis paradigm is delivering clear benefits both for the investigation of food borne pathogens and for decision making on clinically important treatments. It is recognized that regulatory bioinformatics will have many beneficial applications by ensuring high quality data, validated tools and standardized processes, which will help inform the regulatory science community of the requirements

  7. Regulatory bioinformatics for food and drug safety.

    PubMed

    Healy, Marion J; Tong, Weida; Ostroff, Stephen; Eichler, Hans-Georg; Patak, Alex; Neuspiel, Margaret; Deluyker, Hubert; Slikker, William

    2016-10-01

    "Regulatory Bioinformatics" strives to develop and implement a standardized and transparent bioinformatic framework to support the implementation of existing and emerging technologies in regulatory decision-making. It has great potential to improve public health through the development and use of clinically important medical products and tools to manage the safety of the food supply. However, the application of regulatory bioinformatics also poses new challenges and requires new knowledge and skill sets. In the latest Global Coalition on Regulatory Science Research (GCRSR) governed conference, Global Summit on Regulatory Science (GSRS2015), regulatory bioinformatics principles were presented with respect to global trends, initiatives and case studies. The discussion revealed that datasets, analytical tools, skills and expertise are rapidly developing, in many cases via large international collaborative consortia. It also revealed that significant research is still required to realize the potential applications of regulatory bioinformatics. While there is significant excitement in the possibilities offered by precision medicine to enhance treatments of serious and/or complex diseases, there is a clear need for further development of mechanisms to securely store, curate and share data, integrate databases, and standardized quality control and data analysis procedures. A greater understanding of the biological significance of the data is also required to fully exploit vast datasets that are becoming available. The application of bioinformatics in the microbiological risk analysis paradigm is delivering clear benefits both for the investigation of food borne pathogens and for decision making on clinically important treatments. It is recognized that regulatory bioinformatics will have many beneficial applications by ensuring high quality data, validated tools and standardized processes, which will help inform the regulatory science community of the requirements

  8. Acute Toluene Exposure Alters Expression of Genes in the Central Nervous System Associated With Synaptic Structure and Function

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toluene is a volatile organic compound (VOC) and a ubiquitous air pollutant of interest to EPA regulatory programs. Whereas its acute functional effects are well described, several modes of action in the CNS have been proposed. Therefore, we sought to identify potential pathways ...

  9. 75 FR 62436 - Notice of Issuance of Regulatory Guide

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Notice of Issuance of Regulatory Guide AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice of... Coatings Applied to Nuclear Power Plants.'' FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Bruce P. Lin, Division...

  10. 76 FR 31382 - Notice of Issuance of Regulatory Guide

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Notice of Issuance of Regulatory Guide AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice of... Surveys and Monitoring.'' FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Harriet Karagiannis, U.S. Nuclear...

  11. Regulatory T cells: balancing protection versus pathology.

    PubMed

    Rakebrandt, Nikolas; Littringer, Katharina; Joller, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) maintain immune tolerance, prevent autoimmunity and modulate immune responses during infection and cancer. Recent studies have revealed considerable heterogeneity and plasticity within the Treg compartment, depending on the immunological context, which may result in Tregs losing their suppressive function in inflammatory environments. We review how dysfunctional Tregs contribute to disease pathogenesis in inflammatory conditions and how inappropriate regulatory responses may hamper protective immunity in the context of infection and cancer. We also discuss how Tregs might be targeted therapeutically to re-establish a proper balance between regulatory and effector responses in autoimmunity, infections, and cancer. PMID:27497235

  12. REGULATORY T CELLS AND VASECTOMY

    PubMed Central

    Rival, Claudia; Wheeler, Karen; Jeffrey, Sarah; Qiao, Hui; Luu, Brian; Tewalt, Eric F; Engelhard, Victor H; Tardif, Stephen; Hardy, Daniel; del Rio, Roxana; Teuscher, Cory; Tung, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) strongly influence the early and late autoimmune responses to meiotic germ cell antigens (MGCA) and the gonadal immunopathology in vasectomized mice. This is supported by the published and recently acquired information presented here. Within 24 hours of unilateral vasectomy (uni-vx) the ipsilateral epididymis undergoes epithelial cell apoptosis followed by necrosis, severe inflammation, and granuloma formation. Unexpectedly, vasectomy alone induced MGCA-specific tolerance. In contrast, uni-vx plus simultaneous Treg depletion resulted in MGCA-specific autoimmune response and bilateral autoimmune orchitis. Both tolerance and autoimmunity were strictly linked to the early epididymal injury. We now discovered that testicular autoimmunity in uni-vx mice did not occur when Treg depletion was delayed by one week. Remarkably, this delayed Treg depletion also prevented tolerance induction. Therefore, tolerance depends on a rapid de novo Treg response to MGCA exposed after vasectomy. Moreover, tolerance was blunted in mice genetically deficient in PD-1 ligand, suggesting the involvement of induced Treg. We conclude that pre-existing natural Treg prevents post-vasectomy autoimmunity, whereas vasectomy-induced Treg maintains post-vasectomy tolerance. We further discovered that vasectomized mice were still resistant to autoimmune orchitis induction for at least 12–16 months; thus, tolerance is long-lasting. Although significant sperm autoantibodies of low titers became detectable in uni-vx mice at seven months, the antibody titers fluctuated over time, suggesting a dynamic “balance” between the autoimmune and tolerance states. Finally, we observed severe epididymal fibrosis and hypo-spermatogenesis at 12 months after uni-vx: findings of highly critical clinical significance. PMID:24080233

  13. Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kingsley, Edwin C.; Durie, Brian G. M.; Garewal, Harinder S.

    1987-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a subtype of acute myelogenous leukemia frequently associated with disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Data on 11 patients with APL treated at our institution were analyzed and compared with those of 147 published cases. Most had a bleeding diathesis at presentation and evidence of DIC eventually developed in all. Seven patients (64%) showed the t(15;17)(q22;q21) karyotype or a similar translocation. Using a chemotherapy induction regimen containing an anthracycline, complete remission, requiring a total of 14 courses of treatment, was achieved in six patients (55%). The median duration of response and median survival for complete responders were 10 and 15 months, respectively. Three patients (27%) died of bleeding complications during induction therapy. The tritiated-thymidine labeling index of leukemia cells predicted which patients would achieve a complete remission. Review of six studies of 147 patients with APL from the past 12 years supports the use of a chemotherapy induction regimen containing anthracycline or amsacrine and heparin for the treatment of DIC. PMID:3472414

  14. Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Zuk, Anna; Bonventre, Joseph V

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a global public health concern associated with high morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs. Other than dialysis, no therapeutic interventions reliably improve survival, limit injury, or speed recovery. Despite recognized shortcomings of in vivo animal models, the underlying pathophysiology of AKI and its consequence, chronic kidney disease (CKD), is rich with biological targets. We review recent findings relating to the renal vasculature and cellular stress responses, primarily the intersection of the unfolded protein response, mitochondrial dysfunction, autophagy, and the innate immune response. Maladaptive repair mechanisms that persist following the acute phase promote inflammation and fibrosis in the chronic phase. Here macrophages, growth-arrested tubular epithelial cells, the endothelium, and surrounding pericytes are key players in the progression to chronic disease. Better understanding of these complex interacting pathophysiological mechanisms, their relative importance in humans, and the utility of biomarkers will lead to therapeutic strategies to prevent and treat AKI or impede progression to CKD or end-stage renal disease (ESRD).

  15. Imaging acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    González, R Gilberto; Schwamm, Lee H

    2016-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is common and often treatable, but treatment requires reliable information on the state of the brain that may be provided by modern neuroimaging. Critical information includes: the presence of hemorrhage; the site of arterial occlusion; the size of the early infarct "core"; and the size of underperfused, potentially threatened brain parenchyma, commonly referred to as the "penumbra." In this chapter we review the major determinants of outcomes in ischemic stroke patients, and the clinical value of various advanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging methods that may provide key physiologic information in these patients. The focus is on major strokes due to occlusions of large arteries of the anterior circulation, the most common cause of a severe stroke syndrome. The current evidence-based approach to imaging the acute stroke patient at the Massachusetts General Hospital is presented, which is applicable for all stroke types. We conclude with new information on time and stroke evolution that imaging has revealed, and how it may open the possibilities of treating many more patients. PMID:27432672

  16. Management of acute sunburn.

    PubMed

    Han, Amy; Maibach, Howard I

    2004-01-01

    Current literature documents the use of many pharmacologic agents in the management of acute sunburn. While numerous studies have been undertaken, there is no consensus on an algorithm for such treatment. We review the literature for an evidence-based approach to the management of sunburn. A MEDLINE search was conducted whereby all published articles related to sunburn or ultraviolet (UV)-induced erythema from 1966-2001 were evaluated. Studies and reviews were excluded if they were not conducted in human beings. The results of these studies are varying and often conflicting in terms of clinical effectiveness or feasibility. A total of 40 studies were reviewed. Fourteen out of the 40 studies addressed the actual treatment of sunburn (i.e. the application of a substance after the development of signs or symptoms). The majority concluded that either corticosteroids, NSAIDs, antioxidants, antihistamines or emollients were ineffective at decreasing recovery time. The remaining studies showed mild improvement with such treatments, but study designs or methods were flawed. Furthermore, regardless of the treatment modality, the damage to epidermal cells is the same. Given the lack of convincing data and consensus of opinion regarding sunburn management, the most effective and practical approach to acute sunburn is symptomatic treatment of UV light-induced symptoms, including erythema, pain and pruritus.

  17. Neurological emergencies: acute stroke

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, R.; Dennis, M.

    2000-01-01

    Stroke causes a vast amount of death and disability throughout the world, yet for many healthcare professionals it remains an area of therapeutic nihilism, and thus uninteresting. This negative perception is shared by the general public, who often have a poor understanding of the early symptoms and significance of a stroke. Yet within the past few years there have been many important developments in the approach to caring for stroke patients, for both the acute management and secondary prevention. After the completion of numerous clinical trials, there is now robust evidence to either support or discredit various interventions. Even more exciting is the prospect of yet more data becoming available in the near future, testing a whole array of treatments, as clinical interest in stroke expands exponentially. In this review an evidence based approach to the management of acute stroke within the first few days is presented, including ischaemic and haemorrhagic events, but not subarachnoid haemorrhage. It is explained why stroke is regarded as a medical emergency, and the importance of a rational, methodic approach to the initial assessment, which is the key to accurate diagnosis and subsequent management, is emphasised. The potential early problems associated with stroke are identified and specific interventions for different stroke types are discussed. The review ends with a brief discussion of the implications that the evolving treatments have for the organisation of modern stroke services.

 PMID:10675208

  18. Acute Bacterial Cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Vincent; Lammert, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute bacterial cholangitis for the most part owing to common bile duct stones is common in gastroenterology practice and represents a potentially life-threatening condition often characterized by fever, abdominal pain, and jaundice (Charcot's triad) as well as confusion and septic shock (Reynolds' pentad). Methods This review is based on a systematic literature review in PubMed with the search items ‘cholangitis’, ‘choledocholithiasis’, ‘gallstone disease’, ‘biliary infection’, and ‘biliary sepsis’. Results Although most patients respond to empiric broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment, timely endoscopic biliary drainage depending on the severity of the disease is required to eliminate the underlying obstruction. Specific recommendations have been derived from the Tokyo guideline working group consensus 2006 and its update in 2013, albeit poorly evidence-based, providing a comprehensive overview of diagnosis, classification, risk stratification, and treatment algorithms in acute bacterial cholangitis. Conclusion Prompt clinical recognition and accurate diagnostic workup including adequate laboratory assessment and (aetiology-oriented) imaging are critical steps in the management of cholangitis. Treatment is directed at the two major interrelated pathophysiologic components, i.e. bacterial infection (immediate antimicrobial therapy) and bile duct obstruction (biliary drainage). As for the latter, transpapillary endoscopic drainage by stent or nasobiliary drain and/or same-session bile duct clearance, depending on individual disease severity, represent first-line treatment approaches. PMID:26468310

  19. Acute traumatic patellar dislocation.

    PubMed

    Duthon, V B

    2015-02-01

    Inaugural traumatic patellar dislocation is most often due to trauma sustained during physical or sports activity. Two-thirds of acute patellar dislocations occur in young active patients (less than 20 years old). Non-contact knee sprain in flexion and valgus is the leading mechanism in patellar dislocation, accounting for as many as 93% of all cases. The strong displacement of the patella tears the medial stabilizing structures, and notably the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL), which is almost always injured in acute patellar dislocation, most frequently at its femoral attachment. Lateral patellar glide can be assessed with the knee in extension or 20° flexion. Displacement by more than 50% of the patellar width is considered abnormal and may induce apprehension. Plain X-ray and CT are mandatory to diagnose bony risk factors for patellar dislocation, such as trochlear dysplasia or increased tibial tubercle-trochlear groove distance (TT-TG), and plan correction. MRI gives information on cartilage and capsulo-ligamentous status for treatment planning: free bodies or osteochondral fracture have to be treated surgically. If patellar dislocation occurs in an anatomically normal knee and osteochondral fracture is ruled out on MRI, non-operative treatment is usually recommended.

  20. BET bromodomain inhibition releases the Mediator complex from select cis-regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    Bhagwat, Anand S.; Roe, Jae-Seok; Mok, Beverly A.; Hohmann, Anja F.; Shi, Junwei; Vakoc, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    The bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) protein BRD4 can physically interact with the Mediator complex, but the relevance of this association to the therapeutic effects of BET inhibitors in cancer is unclear. Here, we show that BET inhibition causes a rapid release of Mediator from a subset of cis-regulatory elements in the genome of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. These sites of Mediator eviction were highly correlated with transcriptional suppression of neighboring genes, which are enriched for targets of the transcription factor MYB and for functions related to leukemogenesis. An shRNA screen of Mediator in AML cells identified the MED12, MED13, MED23, and MED24 subunits as performing a similar regulatory function to BRD4 in this context, including a shared role in sustaining a block in myeloid maturation. These findings suggest that the interaction between BRD4 and Mediator has functional importance for gene-specific transcriptional activation and for AML maintenance. PMID:27068464

  1. Bone marrow-resident NK cells prime monocytes for regulatory function during infection

    PubMed Central

    Askenase, Michael H.; Han, Seong-Ji; Byrd, Allyson L.; da Fonseca, Denise Morais; Bouladoux, Nicolas; Wilhelm, Christoph; Konkel, Joanne E.; Hand, Timothy W.; Lacerda-Queiroz, Norinne; Su, Xin-Zhuan; Trinchieri, Giorgio; Grainger, John R.; Belkaid, Yasmine

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Tissue-infiltrating Ly6Chi monocytes play diverse roles in immunity, ranging from pathogen killing to immune regulation. How and where this diversity of function is imposed remains poorly understood. Here we show that during acute gastrointestinal infection, priming of monocytes for regulatory function preceded systemic inflammation and was initiated prior to bone marrow egress. Notably, natural killer (NK) cell-derived IFN-γ promoted a regulatory program in monocyte progenitors during development. Early bone marrow NK cell activation was controlled by systemic interleukin-12 (IL-12) produced by Batf3-dependent dendritic cells (DC) in the mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT). This work challenges the paradigm that monocyte function is dominantly imposed by local signals following tissue recruitment, and instead proposes a sequential model of differentiation in which monocytes are pre-emptively educated during development in the bone marrow to promote their tissue-specific function. PMID:26070484

  2. What Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... key statistics about acute lymphocytic leukemia? What is acute lymphocytic leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... leukemias). The rest of this document focuses on acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) in adults. For information on ALL in ...

  3. A mathematical model of P53 gene regulatory networks under radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Qi, J P; Shao, S H; Xie, Jinli; Zhu, Y

    2007-01-01

    P53, a vital anticancer gene, controls the transcription and translation of a series of genes, and implement the cell cycle arrest and cell apoptosis by regulating their complicated signal pathways. Under radiotherapy, cell can trigger internal self-defense mechanisms in fighting against genome stresses induced by acute ion radiation (IR). To simulate the investigating of cellular responding acute IR at single cell level further, we propose a model of P53 gene regulatory networks under radiotherapy. Our model can successfully implement the kinetics of double strand breaks (DSBs) generating and their repair, ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) activation, as well as P53-MDM2 feedback regulating. By comparing simulations under different IR dose, we can try to find the optimal strategy in controlling of IR dose and therapy time, and provide some theoretical analysis to obtain much better outcome of radiotherapy further. PMID:17512110

  4. Large-scale proteome analysis of abscisic acid and ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE3-dependent proteins related to desiccation tolerance in Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Yotsui, Izumi; Serada, Satoshi; Naka, Tetsuji; Saruhashi, Masashi; Taji, Teruaki; Hayashi, Takahisa; Quatrano, Ralph S; Sakata, Yoichi

    2016-03-18

    Desiccation tolerance is an ancestral feature of land plants and is still retained in non-vascular plants such as bryophytes and some vascular plants. However, except for seeds and spores, this trait is absent in vegetative tissues of vascular plants. Although many studies have focused on understanding the molecular basis underlying desiccation tolerance using transcriptome and proteome approaches, the critical molecular differences between desiccation tolerant plants and non-desiccation plants are still not clear. The moss Physcomitrella patens cannot survive rapid desiccation under laboratory conditions, but if cells of the protonemata are treated by the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) prior to desiccation, it can survive 24 h exposure to desiccation and regrow after rehydration. The desiccation tolerance induced by ABA (AiDT) is specific to this hormone, but also depends on a plant transcription factor ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE3 (ABI3). Here we report the comparative proteomic analysis of AiDT between wild type and ABI3 deleted mutant (Δabi3) of P. patens using iTRAQ (Isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantification). From a total of 1980 unique proteins that we identified, only 16 proteins are significantly altered in Δabi3 compared to wild type after desiccation following ABA treatment. Among this group, three of the four proteins that were severely affected in Δabi3 tissue were Arabidopsis orthologous genes, which were expressed in maturing seeds under the regulation of ABI3. These included a Group 1 late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein, a short-chain dehydrogenase, and a desiccation-related protein. Our results suggest that at least three of these proteins expressed in desiccation tolerant cells of both Arabidopsis and the moss are very likely to play important roles in acquisition of desiccation tolerance in land plants. Furthermore, our results suggest that the regulatory machinery of ABA- and ABI3-mediated gene expression for desiccation

  5. Large-scale proteome analysis of abscisic acid and ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE3-dependent proteins related to desiccation tolerance in Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Yotsui, Izumi; Serada, Satoshi; Naka, Tetsuji; Saruhashi, Masashi; Taji, Teruaki; Hayashi, Takahisa; Quatrano, Ralph S; Sakata, Yoichi

    2016-03-18

    Desiccation tolerance is an ancestral feature of land plants and is still retained in non-vascular plants such as bryophytes and some vascular plants. However, except for seeds and spores, this trait is absent in vegetative tissues of vascular plants. Although many studies have focused on understanding the molecular basis underlying desiccation tolerance using transcriptome and proteome approaches, the critical molecular differences between desiccation tolerant plants and non-desiccation plants are still not clear. The moss Physcomitrella patens cannot survive rapid desiccation under laboratory conditions, but if cells of the protonemata are treated by the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) prior to desiccation, it can survive 24 h exposure to desiccation and regrow after rehydration. The desiccation tolerance induced by ABA (AiDT) is specific to this hormone, but also depends on a plant transcription factor ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE3 (ABI3). Here we report the comparative proteomic analysis of AiDT between wild type and ABI3 deleted mutant (Δabi3) of P. patens using iTRAQ (Isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantification). From a total of 1980 unique proteins that we identified, only 16 proteins are significantly altered in Δabi3 compared to wild type after desiccation following ABA treatment. Among this group, three of the four proteins that were severely affected in Δabi3 tissue were Arabidopsis orthologous genes, which were expressed in maturing seeds under the regulation of ABI3. These included a Group 1 late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein, a short-chain dehydrogenase, and a desiccation-related protein. Our results suggest that at least three of these proteins expressed in desiccation tolerant cells of both Arabidopsis and the moss are very likely to play important roles in acquisition of desiccation tolerance in land plants. Furthermore, our results suggest that the regulatory machinery of ABA- and ABI3-mediated gene expression for desiccation

  6. BIOSENSORS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING: A REGULATORY PERSPECTIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biosensors show the potential to complement laboratory-based analytical methods for environmental applications. Although biosensors for potential environmental-monitoring applications have been reported for a wide range of environmental pollutants, from a regulatory perspective, ...

  7. 21 CFR 26.18 - Regulatory collaboration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... RECOGNITION OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY SYSTEM AUDIT REPORTS, AND CERTAIN MEDICAL DEVICE PRODUCT EVALUATION REPORTS: UNITED STATES AND THE EUROPEAN COMMUNITY Specific Sector Provisions for Pharmaceutical Good Manufacturing Practices § 26.18 Regulatory...

  8. Electricity distribution networks: Changing regulatory approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambini, Carlo

    2016-09-01

    Increasing the penetration of distributed generation and smart grid technologies requires substantial investments. A study proposes an innovative approach that combines four regulatory tools to provide economic incentives for distribution system operators to facilitate these innovative practices.

  9. 21 CFR 26.18 - Regulatory collaboration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL MUTUAL RECOGNITION OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY SYSTEM AUDIT REPORTS... Specific Sector Provisions for Pharmaceutical Good Manufacturing Practices § 26.18 Regulatory...

  10. EVOLUTIONARY BIOSCIENCE AS REGULATORY SYSTEMS BIOLOGY

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Eric H.

    2011-01-01

    At present several entirely different explanatory approaches compete to illuminate the mechanisms by which animal body plans have evolved. Their respective relevance is briefly considered here in the light of modern knowledge of genomes and the regulatory processes by which development is controlled. Just as development is a system property of the regulatory genome, so causal explanation of evolutionary change in developmental process must be considered at a system level. Here I enumerate some mechanistic consequences that follow from the conclusion that evolution of the body plan has occurred by alteration of the structure of developmental gene regulatory networks. The hierarchy and multiple additional design features of these networks act to produce Boolean regulatory state specification functions at upstream phases of development of the body plan. These are created by the logic outputs of network subcircuits, and in modern animals these outputs are impervious to continuous adaptive variation unlike genes operating more peripherally in the network. PMID:21320483

  11. REGULATORY APPLICATIONS OF POREWATER TOXICITY TESTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this chapter is to evaluate the use of porewater toxicity tests in regulatory applications, including their potential use in the development of sediment quality guideline (SQG) values. Specifically, the following discussion focuses on the appropriateness and readin...

  12. 77 FR 26413 - Promoting International Regulatory Cooperation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-04

    ... global economy, international regulatory cooperation, consistent with domestic law and prerogatives and U... HOUSE, May 1, 2012. [FR Doc. 2012-10968 Filed 5-3-12; 8:45 am] Billing code 3295-F2-P...

  13. 21 CFR 26.34 - Regulatory authorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL MUTUAL RECOGNITION OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY SYSTEM AUDIT REPORTS... and monitoring of conformity assessment bodies (CAB's). Regulatory authorities will be specified...

  14. 21 CFR 26.34 - Regulatory authorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL MUTUAL RECOGNITION OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY SYSTEM AUDIT REPORTS... and monitoring of conformity assessment bodies (CAB's). Regulatory authorities will be specified...

  15. 21 CFR 500.88 - Regulatory method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... regulatory method must be able to confirm the identity of the marker residue in the target tissue at a... ascertaining the marker residue in the target tissue in accordance with the provisions of sections...

  16. Regulatory focus in predictions about others.

    PubMed

    Woltin, Karl-Andrew; Yzerbyt, Vincent

    2015-03-01

    Based on social projection research, four studies investigated whether people rely on their own regulatory focus when making predictions about others. Chronic (Study 1) and induced (Study 2) regulatory focus shaped estimations of others' strategic promotion or prevention inclinations and choices between enriched (fitting promotion) and impoverished options (fitting prevention). Providing indirect process evidence via boundary conditions, participants only relied on their induced regulatory focus in predictions of others' inclinations to seek romantic alternatives to the extent that this did not run counter to stereotypic gender beliefs (Study 3). In addition, participants only relied on their induced regulatory focus in preference predictions concerning promotion and prevention products when they lacked idiosyncratic target knowledge (Study 4). These effects were not mediated by mood, judgment-certainty, perceived task-enjoyment, or task-difficulty. Implications of these findings for social projection research as well as possible interpersonal consequences are delineated.

  17. Acute diabetic abdomen in childhood.

    PubMed

    Valerio, D

    1976-01-10

    Three children presented as acute surgical emergencies due to undiagnosed diabetes mellitus. Where diabetic ketoacidosis mimicks the acute abdomen three clinical features are important in reaching the right diagnosis-namely, a history of polydipsia, polyuria, and anorexia preceding the abdominal pain, the deep sighing and rapid respirations, and severe dehydration.

  18. Acute arsenic poisoning diagnosed late.

    PubMed

    Shumy, Farzana; Anam, Ahmad Mursel; Kamruzzaman, A K M; Amin, Md Robed; Chowdhury, M A Jalil

    2016-04-01

    Acute arsenicosis, although having a 'historical' background, is not common in our times. This report describes a case of acute arsenic poisoning, missed initially due to its gastroenteritis-like presentation, but suspected and confirmed much later, when the patient sought medical help for delayed complications after about 2 months.

  19. Acute arsenic poisoning diagnosed late.

    PubMed

    Shumy, Farzana; Anam, Ahmad Mursel; Kamruzzaman, A K M; Amin, Md Robed; Chowdhury, M A Jalil

    2016-04-01

    Acute arsenicosis, although having a 'historical' background, is not common in our times. This report describes a case of acute arsenic poisoning, missed initially due to its gastroenteritis-like presentation, but suspected and confirmed much later, when the patient sought medical help for delayed complications after about 2 months. PMID:26508422

  20. Regulatory implications of a linear non-threshold (LNT) dose-based risks.

    PubMed

    Aleta, C R

    2009-01-01

    Current radiation protection regulatory limits are based on the linear non-threshold (LNT) theory using health data from atomic bombing survivors. Studies in recent years sparked debate on the validity of the theory, especially at low doses. The present LNT overestimates radiation risks since the dosimetry included only acute gammas and neutrons; the role of other bomb-caused factors, e.g. fallout, induced radioactivity, thermal radiation (UVR), electromagnetic pulse (EMP), and blast, were excluded. Studies are proposed to improve the dose-response relationship. PMID:19299154

  1. Team structure and regulatory focus: the impact of regulatory fit on team dynamic.

    PubMed

    Dimotakis, Nikolaos; Davison, Robert B; Hollenbeck, John R

    2012-03-01

    We report a within-teams experiment testing the effects of fit between team structure and regulatory task demands on task performance and satisfaction through average team member positive affect and helping behaviors. We used a completely crossed repeated-observations design in which 21 teams enacted 2 tasks with different regulatory focus characteristics (prevention and promotion) in 2 organizational structures (functional and divisional), resulting in 84 observations. Results suggested that salient regulatory demands inherent in the task interacted with structure to determine objective and subjective team-level outcomes, such that functional structures were best suited to (i.e., had best fit with) tasks with a prevention regulatory focus and divisional structures were best suited to tasks with a promotion regulatory focus. This contingency finding integrates regulatory focus and structural contingency theories, and extends them to the team level with implications for models of performance, satisfaction, and team dynamics. PMID:22181678

  2. Team structure and regulatory focus: the impact of regulatory fit on team dynamic.

    PubMed

    Dimotakis, Nikolaos; Davison, Robert B; Hollenbeck, John R

    2012-03-01

    We report a within-teams experiment testing the effects of fit between team structure and regulatory task demands on task performance and satisfaction through average team member positive affect and helping behaviors. We used a completely crossed repeated-observations design in which 21 teams enacted 2 tasks with different regulatory focus characteristics (prevention and promotion) in 2 organizational structures (functional and divisional), resulting in 84 observations. Results suggested that salient regulatory demands inherent in the task interacted with structure to determine objective and subjective team-level outcomes, such that functional structures were best suited to (i.e., had best fit with) tasks with a prevention regulatory focus and divisional structures were best suited to tasks with a promotion regulatory focus. This contingency finding integrates regulatory focus and structural contingency theories, and extends them to the team level with implications for models of performance, satisfaction, and team dynamics.

  3. Advancing a Vision for Regulatory Science Training.

    PubMed

    Adamo, Joan E; Wilhelm, Erin E; Steele, Scott J

    2015-10-01

    Regulatory science, a complex field which draws on science, law, and policy, is a growing discipline in medical-related applications. Competencies help define both a discipline and the criteria to measure high-quality learning experiences. This paper identifies competencies for regulatory science, how they were developed, and broader recommendations to enhance education and training in this burgeoning field, including a multifaceted training approach.

  4. ATMPs for Cancer Immunotherapy: A Regulatory Overview.

    PubMed

    Galli, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    This chapter discusses European regulatory requirements for development of advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP) for cancer immunotherapy approaches, describing the framework for clinical trials and for marketing authorization.Regulatory critical issues and challenges for developing ATMP are also discussed, with focus on potency determination, long-term follow-up, comparability, and insertional mutagenesis issues. Some of the most critical features of GMP application to ATMP are also described.

  5. Mission Risk Reduction Regulatory Change Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scroggins, Sharon

    2007-01-01

    NASA Headquarters Environmental Management Division supports NASA's mission to pioneer the future in space exploration, scientific discovery, and aeronautics research by integrating environmental considerations into programs and projects early-on, thereby proactively reducing NASA's exposure to institutional, programmatic and operational risk. As part of this effort, NASA established the Principal Center for Regulatory Risk Analysis and Communication (RRAC PC) as a resource for detecting, analyzing, and communicating environmental regulatory risks to the NASA stakeholder community. The RRAC PC focuses on detecting emerging environmental regulations and other operational change drivers that may pose risks to NASA programs and facilities, and effectively communicating the potential risks. For example, regulatory change may restrict how and where certain activities or operations may be conducted. Regulatory change can also directly affect the ability to use certain materials by mandating a production phase-out or restricting usage applications of certain materials. Regulatory change can result in significant adverse impacts to NASA programs and facilities due to NASA's stringent performance requirements for materials and components related to human-rated space vehicles. Even if a regulation does not directly affect NASA operations, U.S. and international regulations can pose program risks indirectly through requirements levied on manufacturers and vendors of components and materials. For example, manufacturers can change their formulations to comply with new regulatory requirements. Such changes can require time-consuming and costly requalification certification for use in human spaceflight programs. The RRAC PC has implemented a system for proactively managing regulatory change to minimize potential adverse impacts to NASA programs and facilities. This presentation highlights the process utilized by the RRACPC to communicate regulatory change and the associated

  6. Regulatory changes for international satellite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roseman, Walda W.

    Proposals for mobile and broadcast satellite systems and advances in fixed satellite systems and applications are placing new demands on governments to find efficient means of access to spectrum and create regulatory policies that facilitate the cross-border harmonization of satellite services. In an environment where liberalization is proceeding, but doing so unevenly, special responsibilities devolve to consumers and to the satellite enterprises themselves to ensure that an appropriate international regulatory framework is adopted.

  7. Regulatory frameworks for mobile medical applications.

    PubMed

    Censi, Federica; Mattei, Eugenio; Triventi, Michele; Calcagnini, Giovanni

    2015-05-01

    A mobile application (app) is a software program that runs on mobile communication devices such as a smartphone. The concept of a mobile medical app has gained popularity and diffusion but its reference regulatory context has raised discussion and concerns. Theoretically, a mobile app can be developed and uploaded easily by any person or entity. Thus, if an app can have some effects on the health of the users, it is mandatory to identify its reference regulatory context and the applicable prescriptions.

  8. Acute pain medicine in anesthesiology

    PubMed Central

    Munro, Anastacia P.; Tighe, Patrick J.

    2013-01-01

    The American Academy of Pain Medicine and the American Society for Regional Anesthesia have recently focused on the evolving practice of acute pain medicine. There is increasing recognition that the scope and practice of acute pain therapies must extend beyond the subacute pain phase to include pre-pain and pre-intervention risk stratification, resident and fellow education in regional anesthesia and multimodal analgesia, as well as a deeper understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms that are integral to the variability observed among individual responses to nociception. Acute pain medicine is also being established as a vital component of successful systems-level acute pain management programs, inpatient cost containment, and patient satisfaction scores. In this review, we discuss the evolution and practice of acute pain medicine and we aim to facilitate further discussion on the evolution and advancement of this field as a subspecialty of anesthesiology. PMID:24381730

  9. Apprehending multicellularity: regulatory networks, genomics and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Aravind, L.; Anantharaman, Vivek; Venancio, Thiago M.

    2009-01-01

    The genomic revolution has provided the first glimpses of the architecture of regulatory networks. Combined with evolutionary information, the “network view” of life processes leads to remarkable insights into how biological systems have been shaped by various forces. This understanding is critical because biological systems, including regulatory networks, are not products of engineering but of historical contingencies. In this light, we attempt a synthetic overview of the natural history of regulatory networks operating in the development and differentiation of multicellular organisms. We first introduce regulatory networks and their organizational principles as can be deduced using ideas from the graph theory. We then discuss findings from comparative genomics to illustrate the effects of lineage-specific expansions, gene-loss, and non-protein-coding DNA on the architecture of networks. We consider the interaction between expansions of transcription factors, and cis regulatory and more general chromatin state stabilizing elements in the emergence of morphological complexity. Finally, we consider a case study of the Notch sub-network, which is present throughout Metazoa, to examine how such a regulatory system has been pieced together in evolution from new innovations and pre-existing components that were originally functionally distinct. PMID:19530132

  10. Cis-regulatory mutations in human disease

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Cis-acting regulatory sequences are required for the proper temporal and spatial control of gene expression. Variation in gene expression is highly heritable and a significant determinant of human disease susceptibility. The diversity of human genetic diseases attributed, in whole or in part, to mutations in non-coding regulatory sequences is on the rise. Improvements in genome-wide methods of associating genetic variation with human disease and predicting DNA with cis-regulatory potential are two of the major reasons for these recent advances. This review will highlight select examples from the literature that have successfully integrated genetic and genomic approaches to uncover the molecular basis by which cis-regulatory mutations alter gene expression and contribute to human disease. The fine mapping of disease-causing variants has led to the discovery of novel cis-acting regulatory elements that, in some instances, are located as far away as 1.5 Mb from the target gene. In other cases, the prior knowledge of the regulatory landscape surrounding the gene of interest aided in the selection of enhancers for mutation screening. The success of these studies should provide a framework for following up on the large number of genome-wide association studies that have identified common variants in non-coding regions of the genome that associate with increased risk of human diseases including, diabetes, autism, Crohn's, colorectal cancer, and asthma, to name a few. PMID:19641089

  11. Trypanosoma cruzi Induces Regulatory Dendritic Cells In Vitro▿

    PubMed Central

    Poncini, Carolina Verónica; Soto, Catalina Dirney Alba; Batalla, Estela; Solana, Maria Elisa; González Cappa, Stella Maris

    2008-01-01

    A main feature of acute infection with Trypanosoma cruzi is the presence of immunological disorders. A previous study demonstrated that acute infection with the virulent RA strain downregulates the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) on antigen-presenting cells and impairs the T-cell stimulatory capacity of splenic dendritic cells (DC). In the present work, we assessed the ability of trypomastigotes (Tp) to modulate the differentiation stage and functionality of bone marrow-derived DC in vitro. We observed that the Tp stage of T. cruzi failed to activate DC, which preserved their low expression of MHC-II and costimulatory molecules, as well as their endocytic activity. We also show that Tp induced transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) secretion by DC and enhanced the gap between interleukin-10 (IL-10) and IL-12p70 production, showing a higher IL-10/IL-12p70 ratio upon lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment. In addition, we observed that Tp prevented DC full activation induced by LPS, thereby downregulating their MHC-II surface expression and inhibiting their capacity to stimulate lymphocyte proliferation. In vitro IL-10 neutralization during the differentiation process of DC with Tp+LPS showed a reversion of their inhibitory effect during mixed lymphocyte reaction. In contrast, only simultaneous neutralization of IL-10 and TGF-β, after DC differentiation, was involved in the partial restitution of lymphocyte proliferation. Since both TGF-β and IL-10 are immunosuppressive cytokines essential in the modulation of the immune response and important in the induction of tolerance, our results suggest for the first time that Tp are responsible for the generation of regulatory DC in vitro. PMID:18347042

  12. Marine Biotoxins: Occurrence, Toxicity, Regulatory Limits and Reference Methods.

    PubMed

    Visciano, Pierina; Schirone, Maria; Berti, Miriam; Milandri, Anna; Tofalo, Rosanna; Suzzi, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms are natural phenomena caused by the massive growth of phytoplankton that may contain highly toxic chemicals, the so-called marine biotoxins causing illness and even death to both aquatic organisms and humans. Their occurrence has been increased in frequency and severity, suggesting a worldwide public health risk. Marine biotoxins can accumulate in bivalve molluscs and regulatory limits have been set for some classes according to European Union legislation. These compounds can be distinguished in water- and fat-soluble molecules. The first group involves those of Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning and Amnesic Shellfish Poisoning, whereas the toxins soluble in fat can cause Diarrheic Shellfish Poisoning and Neurotoxic Shellfish Poisoning. Due to the lack of long-term toxicity studies, establishing tolerable daily intakes for any of these marine biotoxins was not possible, but an acute reference dose can be considered more appropriate, because these molecules show an acute toxicity. Dietary exposure assessment is linked both to the levels of marine biotoxins present in bivalve molluscs and the portion that could be eaten by consumers. Symptoms may vary from a severe gastrointestinal intoxication with diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and abdominal cramps to neurological disorders such as ataxia, dizziness, partial paralysis, and respiratory distress. The official method for the detection of marine biotoxins is the mouse bioassay (MBA) showing some limits due to ethical restrictions and insufficient specificity. For this reason, the liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method has replaced MBA as the reference technique. However, the monitoring of algal blooms producing marine biotoxins should be regularly assessed in order to obtain more reliable, accurate estimates of bloom toxicity and their potential impacts. PMID:27458445

  13. Marine Biotoxins: Occurrence, Toxicity, Regulatory Limits and Reference Methods

    PubMed Central

    Visciano, Pierina; Schirone, Maria; Berti, Miriam; Milandri, Anna; Tofalo, Rosanna; Suzzi, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms are natural phenomena caused by the massive growth of phytoplankton that may contain highly toxic chemicals, the so-called marine biotoxins causing illness and even death to both aquatic organisms and humans. Their occurrence has been increased in frequency and severity, suggesting a worldwide public health risk. Marine biotoxins can accumulate in bivalve molluscs and regulatory limits have been set for some classes according to European Union legislation. These compounds can be distinguished in water- and fat-soluble molecules. The first group involves those of Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning and Amnesic Shellfish Poisoning, whereas the toxins soluble in fat can cause Diarrheic Shellfish Poisoning and Neurotoxic Shellfish Poisoning. Due to the lack of long-term toxicity studies, establishing tolerable daily intakes for any of these marine biotoxins was not possible, but an acute reference dose can be considered more appropriate, because these molecules show an acute toxicity. Dietary exposure assessment is linked both to the levels of marine biotoxins present in bivalve molluscs and the portion that could be eaten by consumers. Symptoms may vary from a severe gastrointestinal intoxication with diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and abdominal cramps to neurological disorders such as ataxia, dizziness, partial paralysis, and respiratory distress. The official method for the detection of marine biotoxins is the mouse bioassay (MBA) showing some limits due to ethical restrictions and insufficient specificity. For this reason, the liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry method has replaced MBA as the reference technique. However, the monitoring of algal blooms producing marine biotoxins should be regularly assessed in order to obtain more reliable, accurate estimates of bloom toxicity and their potential impacts. PMID:27458445

  14. Marine Biotoxins: Occurrence, Toxicity, Regulatory Limits and Reference Methods.

    PubMed

    Visciano, Pierina; Schirone, Maria; Berti, Miriam; Milandri, Anna; Tofalo, Rosanna; Suzzi, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms are natural phenomena caused by the massive growth of phytoplankton that may contain highly toxic chemicals, the so-called marine biotoxins causing illness and even death to both aquatic organisms and humans. Their occurrence has been increased in frequency and severity, suggesting a worldwide public health risk. Marine biotoxins can accumulate in bivalve molluscs and regulatory limits have been set for some classes according to European Union legislation. These compounds can be distinguished in water- and fat-soluble molecules. The first group involves those of Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning and Amnesic Shellfish Poisoning, whereas the toxins soluble in fat can cause Diarrheic Shellfish Poisoning and Neurotoxic Shellfish Poisoning. Due to the lack of long-term toxicity studies, establishing tolerable daily intakes for any of these marine biotoxins was not possible, but an acute reference dose can be considered more appropriate, because these molecules show an acute toxicity. Dietary exposure assessment is linked both to the levels of marine biotoxins present in bivalve molluscs and the portion that could be eaten by consumers. Symptoms may vary from a severe gastrointestinal intoxication with diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and abdominal cramps to neurological disorders such as ataxia, dizziness, partial paralysis, and respiratory distress. The official method for the detection of marine biotoxins is the mouse bioassay (MBA) showing some limits due to ethical restrictions and insufficient specificity. For this reason, the liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method has replaced MBA as the reference technique. However, the monitoring of algal blooms producing marine biotoxins should be regularly assessed in order to obtain more reliable, accurate estimates of bloom toxicity and their potential impacts.

  15. Immediate and Complex Cardiovascular Adaptation to an Acute Alcohol Dose

    PubMed Central

    Buckman, Jennifer F.; Eddie, David; Vaschillo, Evgeny G.; Vaschillo, Bronya; Garcia, Aaron; Bates, Marsha E.

    2016-01-01

    Background The detrimental effects of chronic heavy alcohol use on the cardiovascular system are well established and broadly appreciated. Integrated cardiovascular response to an acute dose of alcohol has been less studied. This study examined the early effects of an acute dose of alcohol on the cardiovascular system, with particular emphasis on system variability and sensitivity. The goal was to begin to understand how acute alcohol disrupts dynamic cardiovascular regulatory processes prior to the development of cardiovascular disease. Methods Healthy participants (N = 72, age 21 to 29) were randomly assigned to an alcohol, placebo, or no-alcohol control beverage condition. Beat-to-beat heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) were assessed during a low-demand cognitive task prior to and following beverage consumption. Between-group differences in neurocardiac response to an alcohol challenge (blood alcohol concentration ~ 0.06 mg/dl) were tested. Results The alcohol beverage group showed higher average HR, lower average stroke volume, lower HR variability and BP variability, and increased vascular tone baroreflex sensitivity after alcohol consumption. No changes were observed in the placebo group, but the control group showed slightly elevated average HR and BP after beverage consumption, possibly due to juice content. At the level of the individual, an active alcohol dose appeared to disrupt the typically tight coupling between cardiovascular processes. Conclusions A dose of alcohol quickly invoked multiple cardiovascular responses, possibly as an adaptive reaction to the acute pharmacological challenge. Future studies should assess how exposure to alcohol acutely disrupts or dissociates typically integrated neurocardiac functions. PMID:26614647

  16. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Acute Inhalation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gorguner, Metin; Akgun, Metin

    2010-01-01

    Inhaled substances may cause injury in pulmonary epithelium at various levels of respiratory tract, leading from simple symptoms to severe disease. Acute inhalation injury (AII) is not uncommon condition. There are certain high risk groups but AII may occur at various places including home or workplace. Environmental exposure is also possible. In addition to individual susceptibility, the characteristics of inhaled substances such as water solubility, size of substances and chemical properties may affect disease severity as well as its location. Although AII cases may recover in a few days but AII may cause long-term complications, even death. We aimed to discuss the effects of short-term exposures (minutes to hours) to toxic substances on the lungs. PMID:25610115

  18. Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Inaba, Hiroto; Greaves, Mel; Mullighan, Charles G.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is seen in both children and adults, but its incidence peaks between ages 2 and 5 years. The causation of ALL is considered to be multi-factorial, including exogenous or endogenous exposures, genetic susceptibility, and chance. The survival rate of paediatric ALL has improved to approximately 90% in recent trials with risk stratification by biologic features of leukaemic cells and response to therapy, therapy modification based on patient pharmacodynamics and pharmacogenomics, and improved supportive care. However, innovative approaches are needed to further improve survival while reducing adverse effects. While most children can be cured, the prognosis of infants and adults with ALL remains poor. Recent genome-wide profiling of germline and leukaemic cell DNA has identified novel submicroscopic structural genetic alterations and sequence mutations that contribute to leukaemogenesis, define new ALL subtypes, influence responsiveness to treatment, and may provide novel prognostic markers and therapeutic targets for personalized medicine. PMID:23523389

  19. [Acute intermittent porphyria].

    PubMed

    Catania, A; Caimi, G

    1983-11-10

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is a congenital disease which as its name suggests, runs intermittently. Biochemically it is characterised by over-production of hepatic ALA synthetase (ALA-s), inducible mitochondrial enzyme and an increase in prophyrinic precursors (PBG, ac S-ALA). Clinically it is characterised by an abdominal nervous symptomatology. The primary metabolic error has been identified as a deficiency in enzyme activity which partially blocks haem biosynthesis. During the appearance of clinical manifestations, certain factors are present which have the capacity of inducing hepatic ALA-s production in vitro. Apart from some preventive measures treatment is mainly of symptomatology and complications. More recently the use of ALA-s inhibitors has been introduced. PMID:6657112

  20. Nutrition in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Nompleggi, D J

    1999-08-01

    Pancreatitis is a common disorder. Numerous factors have been implicated in the pathogenesis of acute and chronic pancreatitis, but the exact mechanisms of these conditions are still poorly understood. Depending on the cause of the disorder, patients who have pancreatitis are usually not malnourished and are able to eat within 5 to 7 days of disease onset. In these patients, nutritional support is unnecessary. However, severe disease induces a catabolic state similar to that seen in trauma and sepsis, resulting in rapid weight loss and increased morbidity and mortality. Thus, vigorous nutritional support may be useful in the treatment of severe pancreatitis. Studies have shown that parenteral and enteral nutritional support are well tolerated and can maintain or improve nutritional status in patients with pancreatitis. This article reviews nutritional assessment and therapy in pancreatitis.

  1. Acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Helen; Wallis, Sebastian; Coatesworth, Andrew P

    2015-05-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is a common problem facing general practitioners, paediatricians and otolaryngologists. This article reviews the aetiopathogenesis, epidemiology, presentation, natural history, complications and management of AOM. The literature was reviewed by using the PubMed search engine and entering a combination of terms including 'AOM', 'epidemiology' and 'management'. Relevant articles were identified and examined for content. What is the take-home message? AOM is a very common problem affecting the majority of children at least once and places a large burden on health care systems throughout the world. Although symptomatic relief is often enough for most children, more severe and protracted cases require treatment with antibiotics, especially in younger children. PMID:25913598

  2. [Acute epiglottitis in adults].

    PubMed

    Castillo, A

    1992-09-01

    The author presents the clinical history of 14 patients, from 21 to 48 years of age, 10 men and 4 women, with a final diagnosis of acute epiglottitis who were hospitalized at Gorgas Army Hospital or at the San Fernando Clinic. All the patients had pharyngitis and dysphagia, a few with nasal voice, stridor and difficulty breathing, as the chief complaint. All the patients were initially intubated orally for diagnostic purposes and immediately after nasotracheal intubation was done until the patient improved in 2 or 3 days (one patient remained intubated for 5 days). All patients were kept in the Intensive Care Unit and were treated with Ampicillin and Chloramphenicol IV and lately with a second generation cephalosporin (Cefamandole). The patients allergic to Penicillin were treated with Clindamycin and Chloramphenicol. Corticosteroids were not used in any of the patients. There were no sequelae and none of the patients expired. PMID:1439005

  3. Acute haematogenous osteitis.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, J R; Orr, J D; Maclean, D A; Scobie, W G

    1980-01-01

    During a 10-year period 217 cases of acute haematogenous osteitis were treated. In 131 patients the diagnosis was confirmed either radiologically or bacteriologically, but in the other 86 the diagnosis was based on clinical examination. Either cloxacillin or lincomycin proved to be effective if given before bacteriological diagnosis. Frequent clinical examination, assessing both local signs and the child's general state, will decide which child requires surgery (which should be reserved for the toxic child, the child with concomitant medical disorders lowering host resistance, and the child who does not respond to, or has a lesion which flares up after, initial conservative treatment). Constant vigilance is required by clinicians looking after children with this disease in order to reduce the disabling long-term sequelae. PMID:7458395

  4. Acute Leukemias in Children

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Mohan K. R.

    1979-01-01

    With combination chemotherapy approximately 50% of children with lymphoblastic leukemia survive for five or more years and it is now realistic to hope for a cure. Development of sophisticated cytochemical and immunological techniques have enabled us to recognize the factors that predispose to treatment failures. The survival in acute non-lymphocytic leukemia continues to be poor despite the introduction of several innovative treatment regimens. Current research is focused on the manipulation of the host-tumor immune response to eradicate the disease by treatment modalities such as immunotherapy and bone marrow transplantation. Since the treatment regimens are becoming more complex, the initial diagnosis and treatment is best carried out at centres specialized in the management of childhood malignancies. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:21297755

  5. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Estenssoro, Elisa; Dubin, Arnaldo

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is an acute respiratory failure produced by an inflammatory edema secondary to increased lung capillary permeability. This causes alveolar flooding and subsequently deep hypoxemia, with intrapulmonary shunt as its most important underlying mechanism. Characteristically, this alteration is unresponsive to high FIO2 and only reverses with end-expiratory positive pressure (PEEP). Pulmonary infiltrates on CXR and CT are the hallmark, together with decreased lung compliance. ARDS always occurs within a week of exposition to a precipitating factor; most frequently pneumonia, shock, aspiration of gastric contents, sepsis, and trauma. In CT scan, the disease is frequently inhomogeneous, with gravitational infiltrates coexisting with normal-density areas and also with hyperaerated parenchyma. Mortality is high (30-60%) especially in ARDS associated with septic shock and neurocritical diseases. The cornerstone of therapy lies in the treatment of the underlying cause and in the use mechanical ventilation which, if inappropriately administered, can lead to ventilator-induced lung injury. Tidal volume = 6 ml/kg of ideal body weight to maintain an end-inspiratory (plateau) pressure = 30 cm H2O ("protective ventilation") is the only variable consistently associated with decreased mortality. Moderate-to-high PEEP levels are frequently required to treat hypoxemia, yet no specific level or titration strategy has improved outcomes. Recently, the use of early prone positioning in patients with PaO2/FIO2 = 150 was associated with increased survival. In severely hypoxemic patients, it may be necessary to use adjuvants of mechanical ventilation as recruitment maneuvers, pressure-controlled modes, neuromuscular blocking agents, and extracorporeal-membrane oxygenation. Fluid restriction appears beneficial. PMID:27576283

  6. Biomarkers in acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Aditi; Januzzi, James L

    2015-06-01

    The care of patients with acutely decompensated heart failure is being reshaped by the availability and understanding of several novel and emerging heart failure biomarkers. The gold standard biomarkers in heart failure are B-type natriuretic peptide and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, which play an important role in the diagnosis, prognosis, and management of acute decompensated heart failure. Novel biomarkers that are increasingly involved in the processes of myocardial injury, neurohormonal activation, and ventricular remodeling are showing promise in improving diagnosis and prognosis among patients with acute decompensated heart failure. These include midregional proatrial natriuretic peptide, soluble ST2, galectin-3, highly-sensitive troponin, and midregional proadrenomedullin. There has also been an emergence of biomarkers for evaluation of acute decompensated heart failure that assist in the differential diagnosis of dyspnea, such as procalcitonin (for identification of acute pneumonia), as well as markers that predict complications of acute decompensated heart failure, such as renal injury markers. In this article, we will review the pathophysiology and usefulness of established and emerging biomarkers for the clinical diagnosis, prognosis, and management of acute decompensated heart failure.

  7. [Latest advances in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    The present article analyses the main presentations on acute pancreatitis at Digestive Disease Week 2015. Arterial pseudoaneurysm is an uncommon complication of acute pancreatitis (incidence 0.7%) and mortality from this cause is currently anecdotal. Diabetes mellitus has little impact on the clinical course of acute pancreatitis, unlike cirrhosis, which doubles the risk of mortality. Intake of unsaturated fat could be associated with an increased severity of acute pancreatitis and is a confounding factor in studies evaluating the relationship between obesity and morbidity and mortality. PET-CT (positron emission tomography-computed tomography) could be a non-invasive tool to detect infection of collections in acute pancreatitis. Peripancreatic fat necrosis is less frequent than pancreatic fat necrosis and is associated with a better clinical course. If the clinical course is poor, increasing the calibre of the percutaneous drains used in the treatment of infected necrosis can avoid surgery in 20% of patients. The use of low molecular-weight heparin in moderate or severe pancreatitis could be associated with a better clinical course, specifically with a lower incidence of necrosis. In acute recurrent pancreatitis, simvastatin is a promising drug for prophylaxis of new episodes of acute pancreatitis. Nutritional support through a nasogastric tube does not improve clinical course compared with oral nutrition.

  8. Evolution of splicing regulatory networks in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    McManus, C. Joel; Coolon, Joseph D.; Eipper-Mains, Jodi; Wittkopp, Patricia J.; Graveley, Brenton R.

    2014-01-01

    The proteome expanding effects of alternative pre-mRNA splicing have had a profound impact on eukaryotic evolution. The events that create this diversity can be placed into four major classes: exon skipping, intron retention, alternative 5′ splice sites, and alternative 3′ splice sites. Although the regulatory mechanisms and evolutionary pressures among alternative splicing classes clearly differ, how these differences affect the evolution of splicing regulation remains poorly characterized. We used RNA-seq to investigate splicing differences in D. simulans, D. sechellia, and three strains of D. melanogaster. Regulation of exon skipping and tandem alternative 3′ splice sites (NAGNAGs) were more divergent than other splicing classes. Splicing regulation was most divergent in frame-preserving events and events in noncoding regions. We further determined the contributions of cis- and trans-acting changes in splicing regulatory networks by comparing allele-specific splicing in F1 interspecific hybrids, because differences in allele-specific splicing reflect changes in cis-regulatory element activity. We find that species-specific differences in intron retention and alternative splice site usage are primarily attributable to changes in cis-regulatory elements (median ∼80% cis), whereas species-specific exon skipping differences are driven by both cis- and trans-regulatory divergence (median ∼50% cis). These results help define the mechanisms and constraints that influence splicing regulatory evolution and show that networks regulating the four major classes of alternative splicing diverge through different genetic mechanisms. We propose a model in which differences in regulatory network architecture among classes of alternative splicing affect the evolution of splicing regulation. PMID:24515119

  9. Induced Disruption of the Iron-Regulatory Hormone Hepcidin Inhibits Acute Inflammatory Hypoferraemia.

    PubMed

    Armitage, Andrew E; Lim, Pei Jin; Frost, Joe N; Pasricha, Sant-Rayn; Soilleux, Elizabeth J; Evans, Emma; Morovat, Alireza; Santos, Ana; Diaz, Rebeca; Biggs, Daniel; Davies, Benjamin; Gileadi, Uzi; Robbins, Peter A; Lakhal-Littleton, Samira; Drakesmith, Hal

    2016-01-01

    Withdrawal of iron from serum (hypoferraemia) is a conserved innate immune antimicrobial strategy that can withhold this critical nutrient from invading pathogens, impairing their growth. Hepcidin (Hamp1) is the master regulator of iron and its expression is induced by inflammation. Mice lacking Hamp1 from birth rapidly accumulate iron and are susceptible to infection by blood-dwelling siderophilic bacteria such as Vibrio vulnificus. In order to study the innate immune role of hepcidin against a background of normal iron status, we developed a transgenic mouse model of tamoxifen-sensitive conditional Hamp1 deletion (termed iHamp1-KO mice). These mice attain adulthood with an iron status indistinguishable from littermate controls. Hamp1 disruption and the consequent decline of serum hepcidin concentrations occurred within hours of a single tamoxifen dose. We found that the TLR ligands LPS and Pam3CSK4 and heat-killed Brucella abortus caused an equivalent induction of inflammation in control and iHamp1-KO mice. Pam3CSK4 and B. abortus only caused a drop in serum iron in control mice, while hypoferraemia due to LPS was evident but substantially blunted in iHamp1-KO mice. Our results characterise a powerful new model of rapidly inducible hepcidin disruption, and demonstrate the critical contribution of hepcidin to the hypoferraemia of inflammation. PMID:27423740

  10. 12 CFR 742.1 - Regulatory Flexibility Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Regulatory Flexibility Program. 742.1 Section 742.1 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY PROGRAM § 742.1 Regulatory Flexibility Program. NCUA's Regulatory Flexibility...

  11. 12 CFR 742.1 - Regulatory Flexibility Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Regulatory Flexibility Program. 742.1 Section 742.1 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY PROGRAM § 742.1 Regulatory Flexibility Program. NCUA's Regulatory Flexibility...

  12. 12 CFR 742.1 - Regulatory Flexibility Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Regulatory Flexibility Program. 742.1 Section 742.1 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY PROGRAM § 742.1 Regulatory Flexibility Program. NCUA's Regulatory Flexibility...

  13. 10 CFR 1.45 - Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. 1.45 Section 1.45 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL INFORMATION Headquarters Program Offices § 1.45 Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. The Office of Nuclear Regulatory...

  14. 10 CFR 1.45 - Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. 1.45 Section 1.45 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL INFORMATION Headquarters Program Offices § 1.45 Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. The Office of Nuclear Regulatory...

  15. 10 CFR 1.45 - Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. 1.45 Section 1.45 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL INFORMATION Headquarters Program Offices § 1.45 Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. The Office of Nuclear Regulatory...

  16. 10 CFR 1.45 - Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. 1.45 Section 1.45 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL INFORMATION Headquarters Program Offices § 1.45 Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. The Office of Nuclear Regulatory...

  17. 10 CFR 1.45 - Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. 1.45 Section 1.45 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL INFORMATION Headquarters Program Offices § 1.45 Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. The Office of Nuclear Regulatory...

  18. A strategy to reduce the numbers of fish used in acute ecotoxicity testing of pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Thomas H; Barrett, Sarah; Buzby, Mary; Constable, David; Hartmann, Andreas; Hayes, Eileen; Huggett, Duane; Laenge, Reinhard; Lillicrap, Adam D; Straub, Jürg Oliver; Thompson, Roy S

    2003-12-01

    The pharmaceutical industry gives high priority to animal welfare in the process of drug discovery and safety assessment. In the context of environmental assessments of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), existing U.S. Food and Drug Administration and draft European regulations may require testing of APIs for acute ecotoxicity to algae, daphnids, and fish (base-set ecotoxicity data used to derive the predicted no-effect concentration [PNECwater] from the most sensitive of three species). Subject to regulatory approval, it is proposed that testing can be moved from fish median lethal concentration (LC50) testing (typically using > or = 42 fish/API) to acute threshold tests using fewer fish (typically 10 fish/API). To support this strategy, we have collated base-set ecotoxicity data from regulatory studies of 91 APIs (names coded for commercial reasons). For 73 of the 91 APIs, the algal median effect concentration (EC50) and daphnid EC50 values were lower than or equal to the fish LC50 data. Thus, for approximately 80% of these APIs, algal and daphnid acute EC50 data could have been used in the absence of fish LC50 data to derive PNECwater values. For the other 18 APIs, use of an acute threshold test with a step-down factor of 3.2 is predicted to give comparable PNECwater outcomes. Based on this preliminary scenario of 91 APIs, this approach is predicted to reduce the total number of fish used from 3,822 to 1,025 (approximately 73%). The present study, although preliminary, suggests that the current regulatory requirement for fish LC50 data regarding APIs should be succeeded by fish acute threshold (step-down) test data, thereby achieving significant animal welfare benefits with no loss of data for PNECwater estimates.

  19. [Cerebrolysin for acute ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    iganshina, L E; Abakumova, T R

    2013-01-01

    The review discusses existing evidence of benefits and risks of cerebrolysin--a mixture of low-molecular-weight peptides and amino acids derived from pigs' brain tissue with proposed neuroprotective and neurotrophic properties, for acute ischemic stroke. The review presents results of systematic search and analysis of randomised clinical trials comparing cerebrolysin with placebo in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Only one trial was selected as meeting quality criteria. No difference in death and adverse events between cerebrolysin and placebo was established. The authors conclude about insufficiency of evidence to evaluate the effect of cerebrolysin on survival and dependency in people with acute ischemic stroke.

  20. Early management of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Schepers, Nicolien J; Besselink, Marc G H; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; Bakker, Olaf J; Bruno, Marco J

    2013-10-01

    Acute pancreatitis is the most common gastro-intestinal indication for acute hospitalization and its incidence continues to rise. In severe pancreatitis, morbidity and mortality remains high and is mainly driven by organ failure and infectious complications. Early management strategies should aim to prevent or treat organ failure and to reduce infectious complications. This review addresses the management of acute pancreatitis in the first hours to days after onset of symptoms, including fluid therapy, nutrition and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography. This review also discusses the recently revised Atlanta classification which provides new uniform terminology, thereby facilitating communication regarding severity and complications of pancreatitis.

  1. MicroRNAs in acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Fan, Pei-Chun; Chen, Chia-Chun; Chen, Yung-Chang; Chang, Yu-Sun; Chu, Pao-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an important clinical issue that is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Despite research advances over the past decades, the complex pathophysiology of AKI is not fully understood. The regulatory mechanisms underlying post-AKI repair and fibrosis have not been clarified either. Furthermore, there is no definitively effective treatment for AKI. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous single-stranded noncoding RNAs of 19~23 nucleotides that have been shown to be crucial to the post-transcriptional regulation of various cellular biological functions, including proliferation, differentiation, metabolism, and apoptosis. In addition to being fundamental to normal development and physiology, miRNAs also play important roles in various human diseases. In AKI, some miRNAs appear to act pathogenically by promoting inflammation, apoptosis, and fibrosis, while others may act protectively by exerting anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, anti-fibrotic, and pro-angiogenic effects. Thus, miRNAs have not only emerged as novel biomarkers for AKI; they also hold promise to be potential therapeutic targets. PMID:27608623

  2. Pyelonephritis (acute) in non-pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Pyelonephritis is usually caused by ascent of bacteria (most often Escherichia coli) from the bladder, and is more likely in people with structural or functional urinary tract abnormalities. The prognosis is good if pyelonephritis is treated appropriately, but complications include renal abscess, renal impairment, and septic shock. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of antibiotic treatments for acute pyelonephritis in non-pregnant women with uncomplicated infection? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to November 2013 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found four studies that met our inclusion criteria. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics (intravenous), antibiotics (oral), and antibiotics (switch therapy). PMID:25373019

  3. Hiring appropriate providers for different populations: acute care nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Haut, Cathy; Madden, Maureen

    2015-06-01

    Acute care nurse practitioners, prepared as providers for a variety of populations of patients, continue to make substantial contributions to health care. Evidence indicates shorter stays, higher satisfaction among patients, increased work efficiency, and higher quality outcomes when acute care nurse practitioners are part of unit- or service-based provider teams. The Consensus Model for APRN Regulation: Licensure, Accreditation, Certification, and Education outlines detailed guidelines for matching nurse practitioners' education with certification and practice by using a population-focused algorithm. Despite national support for the model, nurse practitioners and employers continue to struggle with finding the right fit. Nurse practitioners often use their interest and previous nursing experience to apply for an available position, and hospitals may not understand preparation or regulations related to matching the appropriate provider to the work environment. Evidence and regulatory guidelines indicate appropriate providers for population-focused positions. This article presents history and recommendations for hiring acute care nurse practitioners as providers for different populations of patients.

  4. Acute oral toxicities of wildland fire control chemicals to birds.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Nimish B; Spann, James W; Hill, Elwood F

    2009-03-01

    Wildland fire control chemicals are released into the environment by aerial and ground applications to manage rangeland, grassland, and forest fires. Acute oral 24h median lethal dosages (LD50) for three fire retardants (Fire-Trol GTS-R, Phos-Chek D-75F, and Fire-Trol LCG-R) and two Class A fire suppressant foams (Silv-Ex and Phos-Chek WD881) were estimated for northern bobwhites, Colinus virginianus, American kestrels, Falco sparverius, and red-winged blackbirds, Agelaius phoeniceus. The LD50s of all chemicals for the bobwhites and red-winged blackbirds and for kestrels dosed with Phos-Chek WD881 and Silv-Ex were above the predetermined 2000mg chemical/kg body mass regulatory limit criteria for acute oral toxicity. The LD50s were not quantifiable for kestrels dosed with Fire-Trol GTS-R, Phos-Chek D-75F, and Fire-Trol LCG-R because of the number of birds which regurgitated the dosage. These chemicals appear to be of comparatively low order of acute oral toxicity to the avian species tested.

  5. Acute oral toxicities of wildland fire control chemicals to birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vyas, N.B.; Spann, J.W.; Hill, E.F.

    2009-01-01

    Wildland fire control chemicals are released into the environment by aerial and ground applications to manage rangeland, grassland, and forest fires. Acute oral 24 h median lethal dosages (LD50) for three fire retardants (Fire-Trol GTS-R?, Phos-Chek D-75F?, and Fire-Trol LCG-R?) and two Class A fire suppressant foams (Silv-Ex? and Phos-Chek WD881?) were estimated for northern bobwhites, Colinus virginianus, American kestrels, Falco sparverius, and red-winged blackbirds, Agelaius phoeniceus. The LD50s of all chemicals for the bobwhites and red-winged blackbirds and for kestrels dosed with Phos-Chek WD881? and Silv-Ex? were above the predetermined 2000 mg chemical/kg body mass regulatory limit criteria for acute oral toxicity. The LD50s were not quantifiable for kestrels dosed with Fire-Trol GTS-R?, Phos-Chek D-75F?, and Fire-Trol LCG-R? because of the number of birds which regurgitated the dosage. These chemicals appear to be of comparatively low order of acute oral toxicity to the avian species tested.

  6. 76 FR 41537 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change To Implement Revolving Door Restrictions on Former Officers of FINRA July 8, 2011. Pursuant...

  7. 76 FR 72463 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing of Proposed Rule Change Relating to FINRA's Code of Procedure November 18, 2011. Pursuant to Section 19(b)(1) of the Securities Exchange Act of...

  8. 76 FR 82014 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-29

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing of... Analysis Tools), 2215 (Communications With the Public Regarding Security Futures), and 2216 (Communications...), 76 FR 46870 (August 3, 2011). \\4\\ Comment letters are available at www.sec.gov . \\5\\ See letter...

  9. 76 FR 46340 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-02

    ... Securities Exchange Act Release No. 59921 (May 14, 2009), 74 FR 23912 (May 21, 2009) (``Notice''). I. Self... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing of... (October 21, 2010); 75 FR 66173 (October 27, 2010) (Order Granting Accelerated Approval of Proposed...

  10. 78 FR 72946 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-04

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing of....19b-4. \\3\\ See Securities Exchange Act Release No. 70312 (Sept. 4, 2013), 78 FR 55322 (Sept. 10, 2013... the identity of the beneficial owners of the fund of funds invested in the account. Thus, in...

  11. 75 FR 51147 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Order Approving the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Order Approving the Proposed Rule Change To Adopt FINRA Rule 5121 (Public Offerings of Securities With Conflicts of Interest... proposal to adopt FINRA Rule 5121 (Public Offerings of Securities With Conflicts of Interest) (``Rule'')...

  12. 75 FR 31825 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-04

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing of Proposed Rule Change To Adopt FINRA Rule 5121 (Public Offerings of Securities With Conflicts of Interest... Organization's Statement of the Terms of Substance of the Proposed Rule Change FINRA is proposing to adopt...

  13. 76 FR 67236 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-31

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing and... Securities Positions in Connection With Certain Corporate Control Transactions October 25, 2011. Pursuant to... interested persons. \\1\\ 15 U.S.C. 78s(b)(1). \\2\\ 17 CFR 240.19b-4. \\3\\ 17 CFR 240.19b-4(f)(6). I....

  14. 76 FR 77034 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Order Granting Accelerated Approval of Proposed Rule Change To Amend FINRA Rule 4512 (Customer Account Information) December 5, 2011....

  15. 75 FR 80556 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change To Update a Cross-Reference in FINRA Rule 2232 (Customer Confirmations) December 16,...

  16. 75 FR 62904 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change To Reconcile Certain Amendments Approved Pursuant to SR-FINRA-2009-061 and...

  17. 75 FR 34183 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Order Granting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Order Granting... Market Volatility) To Permit FINRA To Halt Trading by FINRA Members Otherwise Than on an Exchange Where a Primary Listing Market Has Issued a Trading Pause Due to Extraordinary Market Conditions June 10, 2010....

  18. 75 FR 39069 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-07

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing of Proposed Rule Change Relating to FINRA Rule 6121 (Trading Halts Due to Extraordinary Market Volatility... Rule 19b-4 thereunder,\\2\\ notice is hereby given that on June 30, 2010, Financial Industry...

  19. Special regulatory T cell review: How I became a T suppressor/regulatory cell maven

    PubMed Central

    Shevach, Ethan M

    2008-01-01

    I have briefly reviewed the factors that motivated me to change my views about the existence and importance of suppressor/regulatory T cells and to devote the majority of my laboratory efforts to this newly revitalized area of immunologic research. I am optimistic that manipulation of regulatory T-cell function will shortly be applicable to the clinic. PMID:18154610

  20. 77 FR 74249 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing of Proposed Rule Change To Establish Optional TRACE Data Delivery Services and Related Fees December 7, 2012. Pursuant to Section 19(b)(1) of...