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Sample records for acute respiratory illnesses

  1. A relationship between acute respiratory illnesses and weather.

    PubMed

    Costilla-Esquivel, A; Corona-Villavicencio, F; Velasco-Castañón, J G; Medina-DE LA Garza, C E; Martínez-Villarreal, R T; Cortes-Hernández, D E; Ramírez-López, L E; González-Farías, G

    2014-07-01

    Weekly data from 7 years (2004-2010) of primary-care counts of acute respiratory illnesses (ARIs) and local weather readings were used to adjust a multivariate time-series vector error correction model with covariates (VECMX). Weather variables were included through a partial least squares index that consisted of weekly minimum temperature (coefficient = - 0·26), weekly median of relative humidity (coefficient = 0·22) and weekly accumulated rainfall (coefficient = 0·5). The VECMX long-term test reported significance for trend (0·01, P = 0·00) and weather index (1·69, P = 0·00). Short-term relationship was influenced by seasonality. The model accounted for 76% of the variability in the series (adj. R 2 = 0·76), and the co-integration diagnostics confirmed its appropriateness. The procedure is easily reproducible by researchers in all climates, can be used to identify relevant weather fluctuations affecting the incidence of ARIs, and could help clarify the influence of contact rates on the spread of these diseases.

  2. Factors associated with acute respiratory illness in day care children.

    PubMed

    Hatakka, Katja; Piirainen, Laura; Pohjavuori, Sara; Poussa, Tuija; Savilahti, Erkki; Korpela, Riitta

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between child characteristics, parental and environmental factors and the occurrence of acute respiratory illness (ARI) and acute otitis media (AOM) among Finnish children attending day care centres (DCCs). The study was a cross-sectional questionnaire of 594 children aged 1-6 y from 18 DCCs in Helsinki, Finland. Recurrent (> or =4 diseases/y) ARI was present in 44% of the 1-3-y-olds and 23% of the 4-6-y-olds, and recurrent AOM in 15% and 2.5%, respectively. Parent atopic disease (odds ratio (OR) 1.53, p = 0.033), mother's academic education (OR 1.77, p = 0.008) and a medium length of DCC attendance compared to a short period (OR 1.67, p = 0.049) increased, while furry pets (OR 0.44, p = 0.003) and older child age (OR 0.38, p < 0.001) reduced the risk of recurrent ARI. Recurrent ARI (OR 3.96, p = 0.008), mother's academic education (OR 5.02, p = 0.003), and a medium length of DCC attendance compared to a short period (OR 3.34, p = 0.044) increased, while partial breastfeeding > or =6 months (OR 0.20, p = 0.002) and older child age (OR 0.05, p < 0.001) reduced the risk of recurrent AOM. Parental and environmental factors had a significant impact on recurrent ARI and AOM episodes in children attending DCCs. These risk factors should be considered in future studies intending to reduce DCC infections.

  3. Healthcare-seeking behaviors for acute respiratory illness in two communities of Java, Indonesia: a cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Praptiningsih, Catharina Y; Lafond, Kathryn E; Wahyuningrum, Yunita; Storms, Aaron D; Mangiri, Amalya; Iuliano, Angela D; Samaan, Gina; Titaley, Christiana R; Yelda, Fitra; Kreslake, Jennifer; Storey, Douglas; Uyeki, Timothy M

    2016-06-01

    Understanding healthcare-seeking patterns for respiratory illness can help improve estimations of disease burden and inform public health interventions to control acute respiratory disease in Indonesia. The objectives of this study were to describe healthcare-seeking behaviors for respiratory illnesses in one rural and one urban community in Western Java, and to explore the factors that affect care seeking. From February 8, 2012 to March 1, 2012, a survey was conducted in 2520 households in the East Jakarta and Bogor districts to identify reported recent respiratory illnesses, as well as all hospitalizations from the previous 12-month period. We found that 4% (10% of those less than 5years) of people had respiratory disease resulting in a visit to a healthcare provider in the past 2weeks; these episodes were most commonly treated at government (33%) or private (44%) clinics. Forty-five people (0.4% of those surveyed) had respiratory hospitalizations in the past year, and just over half of these (24/45, 53%) occurred at a public hospital. Public health programs targeting respiratory disease in this region should account for care at private hospitals and clinics, as well as illnesses that are treated at home, in order to capture the true burden of illness in these communities.

  4. Development and application of an enzyme immunoassay for coronavirus OC43 antibody in acute respiratory illness.

    PubMed Central

    Gill, E P; Dominguez, E A; Greenberg, S B; Atmar, R L; Hogue, B G; Baxter, B D; Couch, R B

    1994-01-01

    Study of coronavirus OC43 infections has been limited because of the lack of sensitive cell culture systems and serologic assays. To improve this circumstance, we developed an indirect enzyme immunoassay (EIA) to detect serum antibody to OC43. Antigen (100 ng) prepared by polyethylene glycol precipitation provided optimal results without a postcoat procedure. Evaluation of intraplate variation indicated that a > or = 2.5-fold increase in serum titer was significant. Sixteen of 18 (89%) paired serum samples with previously identified, reproducible increases in the level of hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) antibody to OC43 also showed significant increases as detected by EIA. Specificity for the EIA was established with paired sera obtained from persons given influenza immunizations or experiencing a respiratory infection. No rise in antibody titers occurred among 33 persons with documented coronavirus 229E infection. EIA was then performed on each of 419 paired serum samples from ambulatory chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients and healthy older adults, from asthmatic adults presenting for emergency room treatment, and from persons hospitalized with acute respiratory symptoms. Twenty-three antibody rises to OC43 were detected; only nine of these were detected by the HAI test, and the HAI test did not detect any increases in antibody titers that were not detected by EIA. Nineteen of 25 coronavirus OC43 infections for which a month of infection could be assigned occurred between November and February. Overall, 4.4% of acute respiratory illnesses in the studied populations were associated with a coronavirus OC43 infection. PMID:7814468

  5. Severe Acute Respiratory Illness (SARI) Surveillance in Louisiana, 2013-2014.

    PubMed

    Hand, Julie P; Serrano, Jose; Johnson, Jenna I; Jespersen, Megan; Ratard, Raoult C

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this article are to describe the severe acute respiratory illness (SARI) surveillance implemented in Louisiana during the 2013-2014 influenza season, present the epidemiology of reported SARI cases, and identify ways to improve this system by incorporating formal SARI surveillance into the influenza surveillance program. Of the 212 SARI cases, 181 (85%) had at least one underlying medical condition, 54 (25.7%) had two conditions, 43 (20.3%) had three conditions, and 25 (11.8%) reported four or more. The most common four underlying conditions were: obesity (43.4%), chronic cardiac conditions (39.6%), diabetes (29.7%), and chronic pulmonary conditions (26.9%). While obesity was the most reported underlying condition, it was three times more likely to be reported in less than 65 years old rather than those >65. Continuation of SARI data collection in future seasons will allow comparisons regarding severity, populations affected, and identify risk factors most commonly associated with severe illness. Reporting of SARI cases also increased influenza-associated adult mortality reporting to the Office of Public Health's Office of Infectious Diseases Epidemiology (ID Epi). Though all influenza-associated mortality is reportable in Louisiana, adult mortality was reported rarely prior to the 2013-2014 season. PMID:27159455

  6. [A couple suffering acute respiratory illness due to waterproofing spray exposure].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kashin; Tachikawa, Soichi; Horiguchi, Takahiko; Kondo, Rieko; Shiga, Mamoru; Hirose, Masahiro; Sasaki, Yasushi; Torigoe, Hiroshi

    2006-09-01

    The patients were a 28-year-old man and a his 27-year-old wife. The husband smoked a cigarette immediately after using a waterproofing spray, and developed fever, cough, and dyspnea 15 min later. The wife had nausea 2 hours later. Nine hours later, the husband visited a local clinic, and was referred to our hospital because of hypoxemia. In addition, chest CT showed ill-defined areas of increased density, predominantly in the bilateral upper lung fields, with interlobular septal thickening, and he was hospitalized. Although the wife was asymptomatic at the time of examination, she had chest CT findings similar to those of her husband, and was also hospitalized. After admission, the husband received steroid pulse therapy and oxygen inhalation for his symptoms and hypoxemia, with return of arterial blood gas analysis results to normal on the third day. The wife had no symptoms or hypoxemia during her hospital stay. Their chest CT findings improved on the seventh day after admission, and they were discharged. Thus, it appears that the couple suffered from acute respiratory illness due to waterproofing spray exposure, and probably heat degradation products from cigarette smoking caused the husband to have severe symptoms.

  7. Pneumococcal serotypes in sputum isolates during acute respiratory illness in Edinburgh.

    PubMed

    Gould, G A; Rhind, G B; Morgan, A D; Williamson, G; Calder, M A

    1987-08-01

    During the years 1978-83 serotyping was carried out on all sputum isolates of pneumococci obtained from patients in the chest wards of the City Hospital, Edinburgh. In 402 patients with acute respiratory illness the peak isolation rates occurred from January to April, and the serotype distribution was similar to that seen in previous UK studies, the commonest types being 3, 6, 9, 19, 23, and 8. The overall mortality rate was 8.7%, the serotype distribution in fatal cases reflecting the distribution of the whole group. The presence of mixed infection, predominantly with Haemophilus influenzae, was associated with a lower mortality rate of 3.5%. Nearly all patients (92%) were either elderly or had a chronic underlying disease and only one death occurred in a patient under 70 years who had no pre-existing disease. Of the pneumococcal serotypes isolated from the 292 patients with chronic chest disease, 82% are included in the new 23 valent pneumococcal vaccine and the efficacy of this needs to be assessed further in high risk patients.

  8. Effect of Antiplatelet Therapy on Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Mortality in Critically Ill Patients: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lijun; Li, Heng; Gu, Xiaofei; Wang, Zhen; Liu, Su; Chen, Liyong

    2016-01-01

    Background Antiplatelet agents are commonly used for cardiovascular diseases, but their pleiotropic effects in critically ill patients are controversial. We therefore performed a meta-analysis of cohort studies to investigate the effect of antiplatelet therapy in the critically ill. Methods Nine cohort studies, retrieved from PubMed and Embase before November 2015, involving 14,612 critically ill patients and 4765 cases of antiplatelet users, were meta-analysed. The main outcome was hospital or 30-day mortality. Secondary outcome was acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) or acute lung injury (ALI). Random- or fixed-effect models were taken for quantitative synthesis of the data. Results Antiplatelet therapy was associated with decreased mortality (odds ratio (OR) 0.61; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.52–0.71; I2 = 0%; P <0. 001) and ARDS/ALI (OR 0.64; 95% CI, 0.50–0.82; I2 = 0%; P <0. 001). In every stratum of subgroups, similar findings on mortality reduction were consistently observed in critically ill patients. Conclusions Antiplatelet therapy is associated with reduced mortality and lower incidence of ARDS/ALI in critically ill patients, particularly those with predisposing conditions such as high-risk surgery, trauma, pneumonia, and sepsis. However, it remains unclear whether similar findings can be observed in the unselected and broad population with critical illness. PMID:27182704

  9. Community-acquired pneumonia and survival of critically ill acute exacerbation of COPD patients in respiratory intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhiwei; Cheng, Yusheng; Tu, Xiongwen; Chen, Liang; Chen, Hu; Yang, Jian; Wang, Jinyan; Zhang, Liqin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to appraise the effect of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) on inhospital mortality in critically ill acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD) patients admitted to a respiratory intensive care unit. Patients and methods A retrospective observational study was performed. Consecutive critically ill AECOPD patients receiving treatment in a respiratory intensive care unit were reviewed from September 1, 2012, to August 31, 2015. Categorical variables were analyzed using chi-square tests, and continuous variables were analyzed by Mann–Whitney U-test. Kaplan–Meier analysis was used to assess the association of CAP with survival of critically ill AECOPD patients for univariate analysis. Cox’s proportional hazards regression model was performed to identify risk factors for multivariate analysis. Results A total of 80 consecutive eligible individuals were reviewed. These included 38 patients with CAP and 42 patients without CAP. Patients with CAP had a higher inhospital rate of mortality than patients without CAP (42% vs 33.3%, P<0.05). Kaplan–Meier survival analysis showed that patients with CAP had a worse survival rate than patients without CAP (P<0.05). Clinical characteristics, including Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score, C-reactive protein, and CAP, were found to be closely associated with survival of AECOPD individuals. Further multivariate Cox regression analysis confirmed that CAP and APACHE II were independent risk factors for inhospital mortality in critically ill AECOPD patients (CAP: hazard ratio, 5.29; 95% CI, 1.50–18.47, P<0.01 and APACHE II: hazard ratio, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.06–1.37, P<0.01). Conclusion CAP may be an independent risk factor for higher inhospital mortality in critically ill AECOPD patients. PMID:27563239

  10. Air quality and acute respiratory illness in biomass fuel using homes in Bagamoyo, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Kilabuko, James H; Matsuki, Hidieki; Nakai, Satoshi

    2007-03-01

    Respiratory Diseases are public health concern worldwide. The diseases have been associated with air pollution especially indoor air pollution from biomass fuel burning in developing countries. However, researches on pollution levels and on association of respiratory diseases with biomass fuel pollution are limited. A study was therefore undertaken to characterize the levels of pollutants in biomass fuel using homes and examine the association between biomass fuel smoke exposure and Acute Respiratory Infection (ARI) disease in Nianjema village in Bagamoyo, Tanzania. Pollution was assessed by measuring PM10, NO2, and CO concentrations in kitchen, living room and outdoors. ARI prevalence was assessed by use of questionnaire which gathered health information for all family members under the study. Results showed that PM10, NO2, and CO concentrations were highest in the kitchen and lowest outdoors. Kitchen concentrations were highest in the kitchen located in the living room for all pollutants except CO. Family size didn't have effect on the levels measured in kitchens. Overall ARI prevalence for cooks and children under age 5 making up the exposed group was 54.67% with odds ratio (OR) of 5.5; 95% CI 3.6 to 8.5 when compared with unexposed men and non-regular women cooks. Results of this study suggest an association between respiratory diseases and exposure to domestic biomass fuel smoke, but further studies with improved design are needed to confirm the association.

  11. Changes in Clinical Presentation and Epidemiology of Respiratory Pathogens Associated With Acute Respiratory Illness in Military Trainees After Reintroduction of Adenovirus Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Heather C.; Young, Adam N.; Caballero, Manuel Y.; Lott, Lisa; Cropper, Thomas L.; Murray, Clinton K.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Adenovirus (Ad) has long been the predominant cause of acute respiratory illness (ARI) in military trainees. In 2011, live oral Ad vaccines for serotypes 4 and 7 were reintroduced into US basic military training populations. This study evaluated the impact on clinical presentations and other respiratory pathogens. Methods. The Center for Advanced Molecular Detection at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland prospectively collects demographic, clinical, and polymerase chain reaction data from respiratory specimens (throat swab and nasal wash) among Air Force trainees presenting for care of ARI. Results. From June 2008 to August 2013, 2660 trainees enrolled and were tested for selected respiratory pathogens. Post-vaccine introduction (VI), reported systemic symptoms were less frequent, including fever (38% vs 94%) and myalgia (37% vs 67%; P < .01). Median temperature and heart rate decreased (98.4 vs 101.3°F, 81 vs 96 beats per minute; P < .01). Ad detection decreased for all Ad (3% vs 68%), Ad4 (1% vs 70%), 7 (0% vs 8%), 14 (0% vs 5%), and 3 (0.1% vs 2%); P < .01). Rhinovirus and cases with no pathogen identified increased in frequency (35% vs 18%, 51% vs 14%; P < .01). Conclusions. Acute respiratory illness in military trainees post-VI is associated with decreased severity of systemic symptoms and reduced fever and heart rate. Marked reductions in frequency of Ad serotypes are seen, including those in the vaccine, with no serotype shift. However, detection of several other respiratory pathogens, most notably rhinovirus, is observed in increasing proportions, and a majority are now undiagnosed clinical syndromes. PMID:26380351

  12. Data on respiratory variables in critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure placed on proportional assist ventilation with load adjustable gain factors (PAV+).

    PubMed

    Georgopoulos, Dimitris; Xirouchaki, Nectaria; Tzanakis, Nikolaos; Younes, Magdy

    2016-09-01

    The data show respiratory variables in 108 critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure placed on proportional assist ventilation with load adjustable gain factors (PAV+) after at least 36 h on passive mechanical ventilation. PAV+ was continued for 48 h until the patients met pre-defined criteria either for switching to controlled modes or for breathing without ventilator assistance. Data during passive mechanical ventilation and during PAV+ are reported. Data are acquired from the whole population, as well as from patients with and without acute respiratory distress syndrome. The reported variables are tidal volume, driving pressure (ΔP, the difference between static end-inspiratory plateau pressure and positive end-expiratory airway pressure), respiratory system compliance and resistance, and arterial blood gasses. The data are supplemental to our original research article, which described individual ΔP in these patients and examined how it related to ΔP when the same patients were ventilated with passive mechanical ventilation using the currently accepted lung-protective strategy "Driving pressure during assisted mechanical ventilation. Is it controlled by patient brain?" [1].

  13. [Social capital, poverty and self-perception of family support in cases of acute respiratory illness].

    PubMed

    Hamui-Sutton, Alicia; Ponce-Rosas R, E Raúl; Irigoyen-Coria, Arnulfo; Halabe-Cherem, José

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate the socio structural variables of the Simplified Index of Family Poverty with the self-perception of resources that conform social capital among patients with acute respiratory disease (ARD). We used a qualitative and quantitative methodology. The sample included 848 cases distributed in seven Rural Medicine Units of Mexico. We considered three pathways described by Kawachi where social capital might have an impact on individual health. The bivariate correlation and discriminant analysis showed that when there is evidence of poverty in the family, the statistically significant differences are mainly observed in self-perception. Moral support of sons and daughters is thereby increased when there is an ARD. We concluded that when there is a higher index of family poverty there is a decreased access to social resources when a family member is diagnosed with an ARD.

  14. Patient-ventilator interaction during acute lung injury, and the role of spontaneous breathing: part 1: respiratory muscle function during critical illness.

    PubMed

    Kallet, Richard H

    2011-02-01

    Since the early 1970s there has been an ongoing debate regarding the wisdom of promoting unassisted spontaneous breathing throughout the course of critical illness in patients with severe respiratory failure. The basis of this debate has focused on the clinical relevance of opposite problems. Historically, the term "disuse atrophy" has described a situation wherein sustained inactivity of the respiratory muscles (ie, passive ventilation) results in deconditioning and weakness. More recently it has been referred to as "ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction." In contrast, "use atrophy" describes a situation where chronic high-tension inspiratory work causes structural damage to the diaphragm and weakness. Both laboratory and clinical studies demonstrated that relatively brief periods of complete respiratory muscle inactivity, as well as intense muscle loading, result in acute inflammation, loss of muscle mass, and weakness. Yet in critical illness other factors also affect respiratory muscle function, including prolonged use of neuromuscular blocking agents, administration of corticosteroids, and sepsis. This makes the attribution of acquired respiratory muscle weakness and ventilator-dependence to either ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction or loaded breathing extremely difficult. Regardless, the clinical implications of this research strongly suggest that passive mechanical ventilation should be avoided whenever possible. However, promotion of unassisted spontaneous breathing in the acute phase of critical illness also may carry a substantial risk of respiratory muscle injury and weakness. Use of mechanical ventilation modes in a manner that induces spontaneous breathing effort, while simultaneously reducing the work load on the respiratory muscles, is probably sufficient to minimize both problems.

  15. Incidence and viral aetiologies of acute respiratory illnesses (ARIs) in the United States: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Szilagyi, P G; Blumkin, A; Treanor, J J; Gallivan, S; Albertin, C; Lofthus, G K; Schnabel, K C; Donahue, J G; Thompson, M G; Shay, D K

    2016-07-01

    We conducted prospective, community-wide surveillance for acute respiratory illnesses (ARIs) in Rochester, NY and Marshfield, WI during a 3-month period in winter 2011. We estimated the incidence of ARIs in each community, tested for viruses, and determined the proportion of ARIs associated with healthcare visits. We used a rolling cross-sectional design to sample participants, conducted telephone interviews to assess ARI symptoms (defined as a current illness with feverishness or cough within the past 7 days), collected nasal/throat swabs to identify viruses, and extracted healthcare utilization from outpatient/inpatient records. Of 6492 individuals, 321 reported an ARI within 7 days (4·9% total, 5·7% in Rochester, 4·4% in Marshfield); swabs were collected from 208 subjects. The cumulative ARI incidence for the entire 3-month period was 52% in Rochester [95% confidence interval (CI) 42-63] and 35% in Marshfield (95% CI 28-42). A specific virus was identified in 39% of specimens: human coronavirus (13% of samples), rhinovirus (12%), RSV (7%), influenza virus (4%), human metapneumovirus (4%), and adenovirus (1%). Only 39/200 (20%) had a healthcare visit (2/9 individuals with influenza). ARI incidence was ~5% per week during winter. PMID:26931351

  16. Genetic susceptibility to nosocomial pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome and poor outcome in patients at risk of critical illness.

    PubMed

    Salnikova, Lyubov E; Smelaya, Tamara V; Vesnina, Irina N; Golubev, Arkadiy M; Moroz, Viktor V

    2014-04-01

    Genetic susceptibility may partially explain the clinical variability observed during the course of similar infections. To establish the contribution of genetic host factors in the susceptibility to critical illness, we genotyped 750 subjects (419 at high risk of critical illness) for 14 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the xenobiotics detoxification/oxidative stress and vascular homeostasis metabolic pathways. In the group of nosocomial pneumonia (NP; 268 patients) the risk of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is significantly higher for the carriers of CYP1A1 rs2606345 T/T genotypes and AhR rs2066853 G/A-A/A genotypes. AGTR1 rs5186 allele C is more common among NP non-survivors. The duration of stay in intensive care units (ICU) is higher for NP patients with ABCB1 rs1045642-T allele. The cumulative effect of the risk alleles in the genes comprising two sets of genes partners (xenobiotics detoxification: CYP1A1, AhR and RAS family: ACE, AGT, AGTR1) is associated with the development of both NP and ARDS.

  17. Outbreak of acute febrile respiratory illness caused by human adenovirus B P14H11F14 in a military training camp in Shandong China.

    PubMed

    Dongliu, Yuan; Guoliang, Yang; Haocheng, Xu; Shuaijia, Qing; Li, Bing; Yanglei, Jia

    2016-09-01

    This study reports an outbreak of acute febrile respiratory illness caused by human adenovirus B [P14H11F14] in a military training center in China between May and June 2014. In total, 164 military personnel were affected, and two patients were admitted into the intensive care unit of the military regional central hospital. A HAdV-B [P14H11F14] virus was confirmed as the etiological pathogen of this acute outbreak of febrile respiratory illness based on clinical manifestations, epidemiological characteristics, specific molecular detection results, phylogenetic analysis, and serological assays. The virus was isolated by the rhabdomyosarcoma cell culture method, and the complete sequences of the E1A, penton base, hexon, and fiber genes were determined and deposited in the GenBank database. Phylogenetic and sequence homology analyses indicated that the isolated strain is most closely related to some HAdV-55 strains from mainland China. However, this strain appeared to be less virulent than former HAdV-55 strains. According to the chest X-ray results of 31 affected patients, there was no radiological evidence of pneumonia. The most frequent symptoms in these patients were sore throat (95.12 %, 156/164) and tonsillitis (93.29 %, 153/164). During the course of the outbreak, incorrect response measures and some potential risk factors, such as fire training and marching training, may have exacerbated the spread of the infection. This outbreak illustrates the urgent need to improve the epidemiological and etiological surveillance of HAdV infections and to improve the ability of doctors and health officials in basic units of the Chinese army to respond effectively to febrile respiratory illness. PMID:27352268

  18. Stress and acute respiratory infection

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, N.M.; Douglas, R.M.; Ryan, P.

    1986-09-01

    To examine the relationship between stress and upper respiratory tract infection, 235 adults aged 14-57 years, from 94 families affiliated with three suburban family physicians in Adelaide, South Australia, participated in a six-month prospective study. High and low stress groups were identified by median splits of data collected from the Life Events Inventory, the Daily Hassles Scale, and the General Health Questionnaire, which were administered both before and during the six months of respiratory diary data collection. Using intra-study stress data, the high stress group experienced significantly more episodes (mean of 2.71 vs. 1.56, p less than 0.0005) and symptom days (mean of 29.43 vs. 15.42, p = 0.005) of respiratory illness. The two groups were almost identical with respect to age, sex, occupational status, smoking, passive smoking, exposure to air pollution, family size, and proneness to acute respiratory infection in childhood. In a multivariate model with total respiratory episodes as the dependent variable, 21% of the variance was explained, and two stress variables accounted for 9% of the explained variance. Significant, but less strong relationships were also identified between intra-study stress variables and clinically definite episodes and symptom days in both clinically definite and total respiratory episodes. Pre-study measures of stress emphasized chronic stresses and were less strongly related to measures of respiratory illness than those collected during the study. However, significantly more episodes (mean of 2.50 vs. 1.75, p less than 0.02) and symptom days (mean of 28.00 vs. 17.06, p less than 0.03) were experienced in the high stress group. In the multivariate analyses, pre-study stress remained significantly associated with total respiratory episodes nd symptom days in total and ''definite'' respiratory episodes.

  19. Detection of viral and bacterial pathogens in hospitalized children with acute respiratory illnesses, Chongqing, 2009-2013.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lan; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Xiao-Ai; Liu, En-Mei; Wo, Yin; Cowling, Benjamin J; Cao, Wu-Chun

    2015-04-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARIs) cause large disease burden each year. The codetection of viral and bacterial pathogens is quite common; however, the significance for clinical severity remains controversial. We aimed to identify viruses and bacteria in hospitalized children with ARI and the impact of mixed detections.Hospitalized children with ARI aged ≤16 were recruited from 2009 to 2013 at the Children's Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China. Nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPAs) were collected for detection of common respiratory viruses by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) or PCR. Bacteria were isolated from NPAs by routine culture methods. Detection and codetection frequencies and clinical features and severity were compared.Of the 3181 hospitalized children, 2375 (74.7%) were detected with ≥1 virus and 707 (22.2%) with ≥1 bacteria, 901 (28.3%) with ≥2 viruses, 57 (1.8%) with ≥2 bacteria, and 542 (17.0%) with both virus and bacteria. The most frequently detected were Streptococcus pneumoniae, respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza virus, and influenza virus. Clinical characteristics were similar among different pathogen infections for older group (≥6 years old), with some significant difference for the younger. Cases with any codetection were more likely to present with fever; those with ≥2 virus detections had higher prevalence of cough; cases with virus and bacteria codetection were more likely to have cough and sputum. No significant difference in the risk of pneumonia, severe pneumonia, and intensive care unit admission were found for any codetection than monodetection.There was a high codetection rate of common respiratory pathogens among hospitalized pediatric ARI cases, with fever as a significant predictor. Cases with codetection showed no significant difference in severity than those with single pathogens. PMID:25906103

  20. A two-time-period comparison of the effects of ambient air pollution on outpatient visits for acute respiratory illnesses.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Amber Hughes; Edgerton, Eric S; Wyzga, Ron; Tolsma, Dennis

    2010-02-01

    Concentrations of numerous ambient air pollutants have declined in recent years across the United States. Although it can be expected that reductions in air pollutants are associated with reductions in health effects, it is unclear whether this is actually the case. The purpose of this analysis was to compare the levels of and relationships between air pollutants and acute respiratory outpatient visits for two consecutive time periods totaling 53 mo. Air pollution data were collected at a centrally located monitor in Atlanta, GA, and include 24-hr averages of particulate matter (PM) less than 2.5 microm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) and its components; coarse PM (PM10-2.5); PM less than 10 microm in aerodynamic diameter (PM10); oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs); 8-hr maximum ozone (O3); and 1-hr maximum nitrogen dioxide (NO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and sulfur dioxide (SO2). In addition, several metals and fractions of elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) were investigated. Daily outpatient visit data were obtained from the electronic data warehouse of the Atlanta-based region of a nonprofit managed care organization. Poisson general linear modeling determined associations between daily levels of acute visits for four diagnosis groups (adult and child asthma, upper and lower respiratory infection) and air pollution measurements. Overall declining trends were observed in air pollutants and acute visits over the study period. Childhood asthma had the greatest number of significant associations with air pollutants, namely zinc and EC. The significant lag time between pollutant measurement and visit occurrence changed from 3-5 days in the first time period to 6-8 days in the later time period, but there was general consistency in several childhood asthma and pollutant associations over both time periods. The greatest evidence for a reduction in pollution being associated with an improvement in health response was for lower respiratory disease

  1. Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus not detected in children hospitalized with acute respiratory illness in Amman, Jordan, March 2010 to September 2012.

    PubMed

    Khuri-Bulos, N; Payne, D C; Lu, X; Erdman, D; Wang, L; Faouri, S; Shehabi, A; Johnson, M; Becker, M M; Denison, M R; Williams, J V; Halasa, N B

    2014-07-01

    Hospitalized children < 2 years of age in Amman, Jordan, admitted for fever and/or respiratory symptoms, were tested for Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV): MERS-CoV by real-time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR). This was a prospective year-round viral surveillance study in children <2 years of age admitted with acute respiratory symptoms and/or fever from March 2010 to September 2012 and enrolled from a government-run hospital, Al-Bashir in Amman, Jordan. Clinical and demographic data, including antibiotic use, were collected. Combined nasal/throat swabs were collected, aliquoted, and frozen at -80°C. Specimen aliquots were shipped to Vanderbilt University and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and tested by rRT-PCR for MERS-CoV. Of the 2433 subjects enrolled from 16 March 2010 to 10 September 2012, 2427 subjects had viral testing and clinical data. Of 1898 specimens prospectively tested for other viruses between 16 March 2010 and 18 March 2012, 474 samples did not have other common respiratory viruses detected. These samples were tested at CDC for MERS-CoV and all were negative by rRT-PCR for MERS-CoV. Of the remaining 531 samples, collected from 19 March 2012 to 10 September 2012 and tested at Vanderbilt, none were positive for MERS-CoV. Our negative findings from a large sample of young Jordanian children hospitalized with fever and/or respiratory symptoms suggest that MERS-CoV was not widely circulating in Amman, Jordan, during the 30-month period of prospective, active surveillance occurring before and after the first documented MERS-CoV outbreak in the Middle East region.

  2. A UK general practice population cohort study investigating the association between lipid lowering drugs and 30-day mortality following medically attended acute respiratory illness

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Roshni; Myles, Puja R.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cholesterol lowering drugs HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) and PPARα activators (fibrates) have been shown to reduce host inflammation via non-disease specific immunomodulatory mechanisms. Recent studies suggest that commonly prescribed drugs in general practice, statins and fibrates, may be beneficial in influenza-like illness related mortality. This retrospective cohort study examines the association between two lipid lowering drugs, statins and fibrates, and all-cause 30-day mortality following a medically attended acute respiratory illness (MAARI). Methods. Primary care patient data were retrospectively extracted from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) database. The sample comprised 201,179 adults aged 30 years or older experiencing a MAARI episode. Patient exposure to statins or fibrates was coded as separate dichotomous variables and deemed current if the most recent GP prescription was issued in the 30 days prior to MAARI diagnosis. Multivariable logistic regression and Cox regression were used for analyses. Adjustment was carried out for chronic lung disease, heart failure, metformin and glitazones, comorbidity burden, socio-demographic and lifestyle variables such as smoking status and body mass index (BMI). Statistical interaction tests were carried out to check for effect modification by gender, body mass index, smoking status and comorbidity. Results. A total of 1,096 (5%) patients died within the 30-day follow up period. Of this group, 213 (19.4%) were statin users and 4 (0.4%) were fibrate users. After adjustment, a significant 35% reduction in odds [adj OR; 0.65 (95% CI [0.52–0.80])] and a 33% reduction in the hazard [adj HR: 0.67 (95% CI [0.55–0.83])] of all-cause 30-day mortality following MAARI was observed in statin users. A significant effect modification by comorbidity burden was observed for the association between statin use and MAARI-related mortality. Fibrate use was associated with a non

  3. A UK general practice population cohort study investigating the association between lipid lowering drugs and 30-day mortality following medically attended acute respiratory illness.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Roshni; Venkatesan, Sudhir; Myles, Puja R

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cholesterol lowering drugs HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) and PPARα activators (fibrates) have been shown to reduce host inflammation via non-disease specific immunomodulatory mechanisms. Recent studies suggest that commonly prescribed drugs in general practice, statins and fibrates, may be beneficial in influenza-like illness related mortality. This retrospective cohort study examines the association between two lipid lowering drugs, statins and fibrates, and all-cause 30-day mortality following a medically attended acute respiratory illness (MAARI). Methods. Primary care patient data were retrospectively extracted from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) database. The sample comprised 201,179 adults aged 30 years or older experiencing a MAARI episode. Patient exposure to statins or fibrates was coded as separate dichotomous variables and deemed current if the most recent GP prescription was issued in the 30 days prior to MAARI diagnosis. Multivariable logistic regression and Cox regression were used for analyses. Adjustment was carried out for chronic lung disease, heart failure, metformin and glitazones, comorbidity burden, socio-demographic and lifestyle variables such as smoking status and body mass index (BMI). Statistical interaction tests were carried out to check for effect modification by gender, body mass index, smoking status and comorbidity. Results. A total of 1,096 (5%) patients died within the 30-day follow up period. Of this group, 213 (19.4%) were statin users and 4 (0.4%) were fibrate users. After adjustment, a significant 35% reduction in odds [adj OR; 0.65 (95% CI [0.52-0.80])] and a 33% reduction in the hazard [adj HR: 0.67 (95% CI [0.55-0.83])] of all-cause 30-day mortality following MAARI was observed in statin users. A significant effect modification by comorbidity burden was observed for the association between statin use and MAARI-related mortality. Fibrate use was associated with a non

  4. Burden, seasonal pattern and symptomatology of acute respiratory illnesses with different viral aetiologies in children presenting at outpatient clinics in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Wei, L; Chan, K-H; Ip, D K M; Fang, V J; Fung, R O P; Leung, G M; Peiris, M J S; Cowling, B J

    2015-09-01

    Respiratory viruses cause acute respiratory diseases with a broad and overlapping spectrum of symptoms. We examined the clinical symptoms and explored the patterns of various respiratory viral infections in children in Hong Kong. Among 2090 specimens collected from outpatient care (2007-2010), 1343 (64.3%) were positive for any virus by the xTAG assay, and 81 (3.9%) were positive for co-infection. The most frequently detected viruses among children aged 6-15 years were enterovirus/rhinovirus and influenza virus A, whereas most non-influenza viruses were more frequently detected in younger children. Higher body temperature was more common for illnesses associated with influenza viruses than for those associated with non-influenza viruses, but other symptoms were largely similar across all infections. The seasonality pattern varied among different viruses, with influenza virus A being the predominant virus detected in winter, and enterovirus/rhinovirus being more commonly detected than influenza virus A in the other three seasons, except for 2009. PMID:26033670

  5. Inherent illnesses and attacks: an ethnographic study of interpretations of childhood Acute Respiratory Infections (ARIs) in Manhiça, southern Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pneumonia is a leading cause of childhood hospitalisation and child mortality in Africa. This study explores local interpretations of Acute Respiratory Infections (ARIs), focusing on caretakers of children under five in the context of hospital care seeking. Methods The study took place in Manhiça, southern Mozambique and used Focused Ethnographic Study tools (FES) including field exercises and interviews. Results Understandings of terms used to describe ARIs differed between caretakers and hospital staff. Children's sicknesses that hospital staff diagnosed as ARIs were interpreted by caretakers as intermittent "attacks" of xifuva, a permanent, inherent and incurable chest illness. Caretakers thought that it was possible to manage and treat the attacks, which were caused by immediate natural factors such as food or the weather, but not the underlying illness, which was seen as having more indirect and social causes. Explanations of illness could not be neatly separated into pluralistic categories, but were characterised by syncretism, with "lay" and "biomedical" terms and concepts intermingling in practical care-seeking interactions between caretakers and health staff. Conclusions Health promotion should take into account the syncretism involved in explanations of ARIs in the context of practical care seeking for children. In doing so, it should draw upon lay interpretations and terminologies in order to stress the importance of seeking hospital care for all xifuva-type illnesses as well as seeking care for any subsequent attacks of an already diagnosed xifuva. However, this should be undertaken with awareness that the meanings of the terms used in practical care-seeking interactions may change over time. Health communication about ARIs should therefore be ongoing and evidence-based, even if ARIs appear to be well understood. PMID:21752260

  6. Prospective surveillance study of acute respiratory infections, influenza-like illness and seasonal influenza vaccine in a cohort of juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are frequent in children and complications can occur in patients with chronic diseases. We evaluated the frequency and impact of ARI and influenza-like illness (ILI) episodes on disease activity, and the immunogenicity and safety of influenza vaccine in a cohort of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. Methods Surveillance of respiratory viruses was conducted in JIA patients during ARI season (March to August) in two consecutive years: 2007 (61 patients) and 2008 (63 patients). Patients with ARI or ILI had respiratory samples collected for virus detection by real time PCR. In 2008, 44 patients were immunized with influenza vaccine. JIA activity index (ACRPed30) was assessed during both surveillance periods. Influenza hemagglutination inhibition antibody titers were measured before and 30-40 days after vaccination. Results During the study period 105 ARI episodes were reported and 26.6% of them were ILI. Of 33 samples collected, 60% were positive for at least one virus. Influenza and rhinovirus were the most frequently detected, in 30% of the samples. Of the 50 JIA flares observed, 20% were temporally associated to ARI. Influenza seroprotection rates were higher than 70% (91-100%) for all strains, and seroconversion rates exceeded 40% (74-93%). In general, response to influenza vaccine was not influenced by therapy or disease activity, but patients using anti-TNF alpha drugs presented lower seroconversion to H1N1 strain. No significant differences were found in ACRPed30 after vaccination and no patient reported ILI for 6 months after vaccination. Conclusion ARI episodes are relatively frequent in JIA patients and may have a role triggering JIA flares. Trivalent split influenza vaccine seems to be immunogenic and safe in JIA patients. PMID:23510667

  7. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Estenssoro, Elisa; Dubin, Arnaldo

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is an acute respiratory failure produced by an inflammatory edema secondary to increased lung capillary permeability. This causes alveolar flooding and subsequently deep hypoxemia, with intrapulmonary shunt as its most important underlying mechanism. Characteristically, this alteration is unresponsive to high FIO2 and only reverses with end-expiratory positive pressure (PEEP). Pulmonary infiltrates on CXR and CT are the hallmark, together with decreased lung compliance. ARDS always occurs within a week of exposition to a precipitating factor; most frequently pneumonia, shock, aspiration of gastric contents, sepsis, and trauma. In CT scan, the disease is frequently inhomogeneous, with gravitational infiltrates coexisting with normal-density areas and also with hyperaerated parenchyma. Mortality is high (30-60%) especially in ARDS associated with septic shock and neurocritical diseases. The cornerstone of therapy lies in the treatment of the underlying cause and in the use mechanical ventilation which, if inappropriately administered, can lead to ventilator-induced lung injury. Tidal volume = 6 ml/kg of ideal body weight to maintain an end-inspiratory (plateau) pressure = 30 cm H2O ("protective ventilation") is the only variable consistently associated with decreased mortality. Moderate-to-high PEEP levels are frequently required to treat hypoxemia, yet no specific level or titration strategy has improved outcomes. Recently, the use of early prone positioning in patients with PaO2/FIO2 = 150 was associated with increased survival. In severely hypoxemic patients, it may be necessary to use adjuvants of mechanical ventilation as recruitment maneuvers, pressure-controlled modes, neuromuscular blocking agents, and extracorporeal-membrane oxygenation. Fluid restriction appears beneficial. PMID:27576283

  8. Mortality, Severe Acute Respiratory Infection, and Influenza-Like Illness Associated with Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in Argentina, 2009

    PubMed Central

    Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo; Cabrera, Ana María; Chang, Loretta; Calli, Rogelio; Kusznierz, Gabriela; Baez, Clarisa; Yedlin, Pablo; Zamora, Ana María; Cuezzo, Romina; Sarrouf, Elena Beatriz; Uboldi, Andrea; Herrmann, Juan; Zerbini, Elsa; Uez, Osvaldo; Rico Cordeiro, Pedro Osvaldo; Chavez, Pollyanna; Han, George; Antman, Julián; Coronado, Fatima; Bresee, Joseph; Kosacoff, Marina; Widdowson, Marc-Alain; Echenique, Horacio

    2012-01-01

    Introduction While there is much information about the burden of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in North America, little data exist on its burden in South America. Methods During April to December 2009, we actively searched for persons with severe acute respiratory infection and influenza-like illness (ILI) in three sentinel cities. A proportion of case-patients provided swabs for influenza testing. We estimated the number of case-patients that would have tested positive for influenza by multiplying the number of untested case-patients by the proportion who tested positive. We estimated rates by dividing the estimated number of case-patients by the census population after adjusting for the proportion of case-patients with missing illness onset information and ILI case-patients who visited physicians multiple times for one illness event. Results We estimated that the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 mortality rate per 100,000 person-years (py) ranged from 1.5 among persons aged 5–44 years to 5.6 among persons aged ≥65 years. A(H1N1)pdm09 hospitalization rates per 100,000 py ranged between 26.9 among children aged <5 years to 41.8 among persons aged ≥65 years. Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 ILI rates per 100 py ranged between 1.6 among children aged <5 to 17.1 among persons aged 45–64 years. While 9 (53%) of 17 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 decedents with available data had obesity and 7 (17%) of 40 had diabetes, less than 4% of surviving influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 case-patients had these pre-existing conditions (p≤0.001). Conclusion Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 caused a similar burden of disease in Argentina as in other countries. Such disease burden suggests the potential value of timely influenza vaccinations. PMID:23118877

  9. Nitrogen dioxide and respiratory illnesses in infants

    SciTech Connect

    Samet, J.M.; Lambert, W.E.; Skipper, B.J.; Cushing, A.H.; Hunt, W.C.; Young, S.A.; McLaren, L.C.; Schwab, M.; Spengler, J.D. )

    1993-11-01

    Nitrogen dioxide is an oxidant gas that contaminates outdoor air and indoor air in homes with unvented gas appliances. A prospective cohort study was carried out to test the hypothesis that residential exposure to NO2 increases incidence and severity of respiratory illnesses during the first 18 months of life. A cohort of 1,205 healthy infants from homes without smokers was enrolled. The daily occurrence of respiratory symptoms and illnesses was reported by the mothers every 2 wk. Illnesses with wheezing or wet cough were classified as lower respiratory tract. Indoor NO2 concentrations were serially measured with passive samplers place in the subjects' bedrooms. In stratified analyses, illness incidence rates did not consistently increase with exposure to NO2 or stove type. In multivariate analyses that adjusted for potential confounding factors, odds ratios were not significantly elevated for current or lagged NO2 exposures, or stove type. Illness duration, a measure of illness severity, was not associated with NO2 exposure. The findings can be extended to homes with gas stoves in regions of the United States where the outdoor air is not heavily polluted by NO2.

  10. Nitrogen dioxide and respiratory illnesses in infants.

    PubMed

    Samet, J M; Lambert, W E; Skipper, B J; Cushing, A H; Hunt, W C; Young, S A; McLaren, L C; Schwab, M; Spengler, J D

    1993-11-01

    Nitrogen dioxide is an oxidant gas that contaminates outdoor air and indoor air in homes with unvented gas appliances. A prospective cohort study was carried out to test the hypothesis that residential exposure to NO2 increases incidence and severity of respiratory illnesses during the first 18 months of life. A cohort of 1,205 healthy infants from homes without smokers was enrolled. The daily occurrence of respiratory symptoms and illnesses was reported by the mothers every 2 wk. Illnesses with wheezing or wet cough were classified as lower respiratory tract. Indoor NO2 concentrations were serially measured with passive samplers place in the subjects' bedrooms. In stratified analyses, illness incidence rates did not consistently increase with exposure to NO2 or stove type. In multivariate analyses that adjusted for potential confounding factors, odds ratios were not significantly elevated for current or lagged NO2 exposures, or stove type. Illness duration, a measure of illness severity, was not associated with NO2 exposure. The findings can be extended to homes with gas stoves in regions of the United States where the outdoor air is not heavily polluted by NO2.

  11. The rate of antibiotic utilization in Iranian under 5-year-old children with acute respiratory tract illness: A nationwide community-based study

    PubMed Central

    Mostafavi, Nasser; Rashidian, Arash; Karimi-Shahanjarini, Akram; Khosravi, Ardeshir; Kelishadi, Roya

    2015-01-01

    Background: To investigate the prevalence of antibiotic usage in children aged <5 years with acute respiratory tract illness (ARTI) in Iran. Materials and Methods: Data were collected from a national health survey conducted in 2010 (Iran's Multiple Indicator Demographic and Health Survey). Participants of this cross-sectional study were selected by multistage stratified cluster-random sampling from 31 provinces of Iran. Parents of children with <5 years of age responded to questions about the occurrence of any cough during the previous 2 weeks, referral to private/governmental/other health care systems, and utilization of any oral/injection form of antibiotics. Data were analyzed using SPSS software18. The chi-square test was used to determine antibiotic consumption in various gender and residency groups and also a place of residence with the referral health care system. Results: Of the 9345 children under 5 years who participated in the study, 1506 cases (16.2%) had ARTI during 2 weeks prior to the interview, in whom 1143 (75.9%) were referred to urban or rural health care centers (43.4 vs. 30.4%; P < 0.001). Antibiotics were utilized by 715 (62.6%) of affected children. Injection formulations were used for 150 (13.1%) patients. The frequency of receiving antibiotics was higher in urban than in rural inhabitants (66.0% vs. 57.7% P < 0.05). Conclusion: The prevalence of total and injection antibiotics usage in children <5 years with ARTI is alarmingly high in Iran. Therefore, interventions to reduce antibiotic use are urgently needed. PMID:26487870

  12. Acute respiratory failure in scrub typhus patients

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Jyoti Narayan; Gurjar, Mohan; Harde, Yogesh

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory failure is a serious complication of scrub typhus. In this prospective study, all patients with a diagnosis of scrub typhus were included from a single center Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Demographic, clinical characteristics, laboratory, and imaging parameters of these patients at the time of ICU admission were compared. Of the 55 scrub typhus patients, 27 (49%) had an acute respiratory failure. Seventeen patients had acute respiratory distress syndrome, and ten had cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Respiratory supported patients were older had significant chronic lungs disease and high severity illness scores (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation-II and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score). At ICU admission, these patients presented with more deranged laboratory markers, including high bilirubin, high creatine kinase, high lactate, metabolic acidosis, low serum albumin, and presence of ascites. The average ICU and hospital stay were 4.27 ± 2.74 and 6.53 ± 3.52 days, respectively, in the respiratory supported group. Three patients died in respiratory failure group, while only one patient died in nonrespiratory failure group.

  13. Acute respiratory failure in scrub typhus patients.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Jyoti Narayan; Gurjar, Mohan; Harde, Yogesh

    2016-08-01

    Respiratory failure is a serious complication of scrub typhus. In this prospective study, all patients with a diagnosis of scrub typhus were included from a single center Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Demographic, clinical characteristics, laboratory, and imaging parameters of these patients at the time of ICU admission were compared. Of the 55 scrub typhus patients, 27 (49%) had an acute respiratory failure. Seventeen patients had acute respiratory distress syndrome, and ten had cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Respiratory supported patients were older had significant chronic lungs disease and high severity illness scores (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation-II and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score). At ICU admission, these patients presented with more deranged laboratory markers, including high bilirubin, high creatine kinase, high lactate, metabolic acidosis, low serum albumin, and presence of ascites. The average ICU and hospital stay were 4.27 ± 2.74 and 6.53 ± 3.52 days, respectively, in the respiratory supported group. Three patients died in respiratory failure group, while only one patient died in nonrespiratory failure group. PMID:27630462

  14. Acute respiratory failure in scrub typhus patients

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Jyoti Narayan; Gurjar, Mohan; Harde, Yogesh

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory failure is a serious complication of scrub typhus. In this prospective study, all patients with a diagnosis of scrub typhus were included from a single center Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Demographic, clinical characteristics, laboratory, and imaging parameters of these patients at the time of ICU admission were compared. Of the 55 scrub typhus patients, 27 (49%) had an acute respiratory failure. Seventeen patients had acute respiratory distress syndrome, and ten had cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Respiratory supported patients were older had significant chronic lungs disease and high severity illness scores (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation-II and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score). At ICU admission, these patients presented with more deranged laboratory markers, including high bilirubin, high creatine kinase, high lactate, metabolic acidosis, low serum albumin, and presence of ascites. The average ICU and hospital stay were 4.27 ± 2.74 and 6.53 ± 3.52 days, respectively, in the respiratory supported group. Three patients died in respiratory failure group, while only one patient died in nonrespiratory failure group. PMID:27630462

  15. Acute respiratory failure in scrub typhus patients.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Jyoti Narayan; Gurjar, Mohan; Harde, Yogesh

    2016-08-01

    Respiratory failure is a serious complication of scrub typhus. In this prospective study, all patients with a diagnosis of scrub typhus were included from a single center Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Demographic, clinical characteristics, laboratory, and imaging parameters of these patients at the time of ICU admission were compared. Of the 55 scrub typhus patients, 27 (49%) had an acute respiratory failure. Seventeen patients had acute respiratory distress syndrome, and ten had cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Respiratory supported patients were older had significant chronic lungs disease and high severity illness scores (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation-II and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score). At ICU admission, these patients presented with more deranged laboratory markers, including high bilirubin, high creatine kinase, high lactate, metabolic acidosis, low serum albumin, and presence of ascites. The average ICU and hospital stay were 4.27 ± 2.74 and 6.53 ± 3.52 days, respectively, in the respiratory supported group. Three patients died in respiratory failure group, while only one patient died in nonrespiratory failure group.

  16. Total parenteral nutrition in acute illness.

    PubMed

    Phillips, G D

    1985-08-01

    Successful total parenteral nutrition in acute illness requires an appreciation of the pathophysiology of the illness and an understanding of the nutritional state of the patient, as well as a knowledge of the principles of total parenteral nutrition. Management of the acutely ill patient's general condition is essential prior to the introduction of nutritional support. A basic regimen which includes administration of 1-2g/kg/day of protein, and 8,400 kJ (2,000 kcal)/day of energy, part glucose and part lipid, together with all minerals, vitamins and zinc, in an appropriate amount of water, should be provided. Modifications to this regimen may be indicated to accommodate cardiac, respiratory, liver or renal failure. The questions of the optimum mix of carbohydrate and lipid, the ideal amount of protein and the correct mix of amino acids for a particular period in an individual patient's illness, are still debated. The fact that recent research supports many of the postulates of the Scandinavian pioneers of total parenteral nutrition suggests we may be returning to a correct approach.

  17. One-year mortality, quality of life and predicted life-time cost-utility in critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction High daily intensive care unit (ICU) costs are associated with the use of mechanical ventilation (MV) to treat acute respiratory failure (ARF), and assessment of quality of life (QOL) after critical illness and cost-effectiveness analyses are warranted. Methods Nationwide, prospective multicentre observational study in 25 Finnish ICUs. During an eight-week study period 958 consecutive adult ICU patients were treated with ventilatory support over 6 hours. Of those 958, 619 (64.6%) survived one year, of whom 288 (46.5%) answered the quality of life questionnaire (EQ-5D). We calculated EQ-5D index and predicted lifetime quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained using the age- and sex-matched life expectancy for survivors after one year. For expired patients the exact lifetime was used. We divided all hospital costs for all ARF patients by the number of hospital survivors, and by all predicted lifetime QALYs. We also adjusted for those who died before one year and for those with missing QOL to be able to estimate the total QALYs. Results One-year mortality was 35% (95% CI 32 to 38%). For the 288 respondents median [IQR] EQ-5D index after one year was lower than that of the age- and sex-matched general population 0.70 [0.45 to 0.89] vs. 0.84 [0.81 to 0.88]. For these 288, the mean (SD) predicted lifetime QALYs was 15.4 (13.3). After adjustment for missing QOL the mean predicted lifetime (SD) QALYs was 11.3 (13.0) for all the 958 ARF patients. The mean estimated costs were 20.739 € per hospital survivor, and mean predicted lifetime cost-utility for all ARF patients was 1391 € per QALY. Conclusions Despite lower health-related QOL compared to reference values, our result suggests that cost per hospital survivor and lifetime cost-utility remain reasonable regardless of age, disease severity, and type or duration of ventilation support in patients with ARF. PMID:20384998

  18. Indoor nitrogen dioxide and childhood respiratory illness.

    PubMed

    Pilotto, L S; Douglas, R M

    1992-09-01

    Nitrogen dioxide is produced from the combustion of fossil fuels and as an emission from gas-fired appliances, and is also a component of tobacco smoke. Nitrogen dioxide has been shown in experimental animals to be toxic to the respiratory tract. A n number of recent studies have suggested that children exposed to significant levels of nitrogen dioxide in the home may be more susceptible to respiratory illness than children exposed to normal ambient levels. Respiratory illness is a major cause of morbidity in children everywhere. Here, we review the available evidence of this association and explore methodological issues in measurement of nitrogen dioxide exposure--misclassification of subjects, symptom bias and confounding. It has recently been shown that some New South Wales school rooms, where unflued gas heaters are often used as a source of warmth, have nitrogen dioxide levels which are above recommended ambient levels for outside air. This has underlined the need for setting standards for indoor levels of various pollutants, and cohort studies are suggested, to include personal monitoring and prospective data collection techniques. PMID:1482716

  19. Incidence and severity of acute respiratory illness in families exposed to different levels of air pollution, New York metropolitan area, 1971-1972

    SciTech Connect

    Love, G.J.; Lan, S.P.; Shy, C.M.; Struba, R.J.

    1981-03-01

    The incidence and severity of acute respiratory disease was studied in families in three New York communities with different ambient levels of SO/sub 2/ and particulate air pollution. Upper, lower, and total respiratory disease rates in fathers, mothers, and school children tended to be higher in the communities with higher pollution levels. Similar higher rates, however, were not observed among preschool children. Regression analyses were used to adjust rates for socioeconomic status, parental smoking, chronic bronchitis in parents, and possible indoor pollution resulting from the use of a gas stove for cooking. After these adjustments the community differences were still significant (P < .01), for school children. The indoor pollution related to gas stoves was a significant covariate among children. The effects of smoking were inconsistent. It was not possible to attribute the higher rates observed to any specific pollutant, since both SO/sub 2/ and particulate matter levels were higher in the high pollution communities, nor was it possible to attribute the excesses to current levels of exposure or to a residual effect of previous higher exposure concentrations. The fact that young children did not follow the patern suggests the latter. It was concluded, however, that current or previous exposures to the complexity of air pollutants in New York City was at least partially responsible for increased incidences of acute respiratory disease.

  20. Prevalence, codetection and seasonal distribution of upper airway viruses and bacteria in children with acute respiratory illnesses with cough as a symptom.

    PubMed

    O'Grady, K F; Grimwood, K; Sloots, T P; Whiley, D M; Acworth, J P; Phillips, N; Goyal, V; Chang, A B

    2016-06-01

    Most studies exploring the role of upper airway viruses and bacteria in paediatric acute respiratory infections (ARI) focus on specific clinical diagnoses and/or do not account for virus-bacteria interactions. We aimed to describe the frequency and predictors of virus and bacteria codetection in children with ARI and cough, irrespective of clinical diagnosis. Bilateral nasal swabs, demographic, clinical and risk factor data were collected at enrollment in children aged <15 years presenting to an emergency department with an ARI and where cough was a symptom. Swabs were tested by polymerase chain reaction for 17 respiratory viruses and seven respiratory bacteria. Logistic regression was used to investigate associations between child characteristics and codetection of the organisms of interest. Between December 2011 and August 2014, swabs were collected from 817 (93.3%) of 876 enrolled children, median age 27.7 months (interquartile range 13.9-60.3 months). Overall, 740 (90.6%) of 817 specimens were positive for any organism. Both viruses and bacteria were detected in 423 specimens (51.8%). Factors associated with codetection were age (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) for age <12 months = 4.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.0, 7.9; age 12 to <24 months = 6.0, 95% CI 3.7, 9.8; age 24 to <60 months = 2.4, 95% CI 1.5, 3.9), male gender (aOR 1.46; 95% CI 1.1, 2.0), child care attendance (aOR 2.0; 95% CI 1.4, 2.8) and winter enrollment (aOR 2.0; 95% CI 1.3, 3.0). Haemophilus influenzae dominated the virus-bacteria pairs. Virus-H. influenzae interactions in ARI should be investigated further, especially as the contribution of nontypeable H. influenzae to acute and chronic respiratory diseases is being increasingly recognized. PMID:26916343

  1. Prevalence, codetection and seasonal distribution of upper airway viruses and bacteria in children with acute respiratory illnesses with cough as a symptom.

    PubMed

    O'Grady, K F; Grimwood, K; Sloots, T P; Whiley, D M; Acworth, J P; Phillips, N; Goyal, V; Chang, A B

    2016-06-01

    Most studies exploring the role of upper airway viruses and bacteria in paediatric acute respiratory infections (ARI) focus on specific clinical diagnoses and/or do not account for virus-bacteria interactions. We aimed to describe the frequency and predictors of virus and bacteria codetection in children with ARI and cough, irrespective of clinical diagnosis. Bilateral nasal swabs, demographic, clinical and risk factor data were collected at enrollment in children aged <15 years presenting to an emergency department with an ARI and where cough was a symptom. Swabs were tested by polymerase chain reaction for 17 respiratory viruses and seven respiratory bacteria. Logistic regression was used to investigate associations between child characteristics and codetection of the organisms of interest. Between December 2011 and August 2014, swabs were collected from 817 (93.3%) of 876 enrolled children, median age 27.7 months (interquartile range 13.9-60.3 months). Overall, 740 (90.6%) of 817 specimens were positive for any organism. Both viruses and bacteria were detected in 423 specimens (51.8%). Factors associated with codetection were age (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) for age <12 months = 4.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.0, 7.9; age 12 to <24 months = 6.0, 95% CI 3.7, 9.8; age 24 to <60 months = 2.4, 95% CI 1.5, 3.9), male gender (aOR 1.46; 95% CI 1.1, 2.0), child care attendance (aOR 2.0; 95% CI 1.4, 2.8) and winter enrollment (aOR 2.0; 95% CI 1.3, 3.0). Haemophilus influenzae dominated the virus-bacteria pairs. Virus-H. influenzae interactions in ARI should be investigated further, especially as the contribution of nontypeable H. influenzae to acute and chronic respiratory diseases is being increasingly recognized.

  2. Severe febrile respiratory illnesses as a cause of mass critical care.

    PubMed

    Sandrock, Christian E

    2008-01-01

    Febrile respiratory illnesses with respiratory failure are one of the most common reasons for admission to the intensive care unit. Most causes of febrile respiratory illness are bacterial and viral agents of community-acquired pneumonia. However, a small number of rare and highly contagious agents can initially present as febrile respiratory illnesses, which can lead to an epidemic that can greatly impact the health care system. This impact includes sustained mass critical care, with potential scarcity of critical resources (eg, positive-pressure ventilators), spread of disease to health care workers, sustained spread within the community, and extensive morbidity and mortality. The main agents of febrile respiratory illness that would lead to an epidemic include influenza, the coronavirus that causes severe acute respiratory syndrome, smallpox, viral hemorrhagic fever, plague, tularemia, and anthrax. Recognition of these agents occurs largely based on epidemiological clues, and management consists of antibiotics, antivirals, supportive care, and positive-pressure ventilation. Acute respiratory failure and acute respiratory distress syndrome occur with these agents, so a lung-protective (low tidal volume) ventilation strategy is indicated. Additional respiratory care measures, such as nebulized medications, bronchoscopy, humidified oxygen, and airway suctioning, potentiate aerosolization of the virus or bacteria and increase the risk of transmission to health care workers and patients. Thus, appropriate personal protective equipment, including an N95 mask or powered air-purifying respirator, is indicated. A basic understanding of the epidemiology, clinical findings, diagnosis, and treatment of these agents will provide a foundation for early isolation, evaluation, infection control, and public health involvement and response in cases of a febrile respiratory illness that causes respiratory failure. PMID:18173859

  3. Lower respiratory illness in infants and low socioeconomic status.

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, P A; Greenberg, R A; Keyes, L L; LaVange, L M; Chapman, R S; Denny, F W; Bauman, K E; Boat, B W

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. Infants from families of low socioeconomic status are said to suffer higher rates of lower respiratory illness, but this assertion has not been carefully examined. METHODS. We studied the frequency and determinants of lower respiratory illness in infants of different socioeconomic status (n = 393) by analyzing data from a community-based cohort study of respiratory illness during the first year of life in central North Carolina. RESULTS. The incidence of lower respiratory illness was 1.41 in the low socioeconomic group, 1.26 in the middle group, and 0.67 in the high group. The prevalence of persistent respiratory symptoms was 39% in infants in the low socioeconomic group, 24% in infants in the middle group, and 14% in infants in the high group. The odds of persistent respiratory symptoms in infants of low and middle socioeconomic status were reduced after controlling for environmental risk factors for lower respiratory illness. Enrollment in day care was associated with an increased risk of persistent symptoms among infants of high but not low socioeconomic status. CONCLUSIONS. Infants of low socioeconomic status are at increased risk of persistent respiratory symptoms. This risk can be partly attributed to environmental exposures, most of which could be changed. PMID:1636832

  4. Risk Factors for Primary Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Illness in Humans, Saudi Arabia, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Alraddadi, Basem M.; Watson, John T.; Almarashi, Abdulatif; Abedi, Glen R.; Turkistani, Amal; Sadran, Musallam; Housa, Abeer; Almazroa, Mohammad A.; Alraihan, Naif; Banjar, Ayman; Albalawi, Eman; Alhindi, Hanan; Choudhry, Abdul Jamil; Meiman, Jonathan G.; Paczkowski, Magdalena; Curns, Aaron; Mounts, Anthony; Feikin, Daniel R.; Marano, Nina; Swerdlow, David L.; Gerber, Susan I.; Hajjeh, Rana

    2016-01-01

    Risk factors for primary Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) illness in humans are incompletely understood. We identified all primary MERS-CoV cases reported in Saudi Arabia during March–November 2014 by excluding those with history of exposure to other cases of MERS-CoV or acute respiratory illness of unknown cause or exposure to healthcare settings within 14 days before illness onset. Using a case–control design, we assessed differences in underlying medical conditions and environmental exposures among primary case-patients and 2–4 controls matched by age, sex, and neighborhood. Using multivariable analysis, we found that direct exposure to dromedary camels during the 2 weeks before illness onset, as well as diabetes mellitus, heart disease, and smoking, were each independently associated with MERS-CoV illness. Further investigation is needed to better understand animal-to-human transmission of MERS-CoV. PMID:26692185

  5. Risk Factors for Primary Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Illness in Humans, Saudi Arabia, 2014.

    PubMed

    Alraddadi, Basem M; Watson, John T; Almarashi, Abdulatif; Abedi, Glen R; Turkistani, Amal; Sadran, Musallam; Housa, Abeer; Almazroa, Mohammad A; Alraihan, Naif; Banjar, Ayman; Albalawi, Eman; Alhindi, Hanan; Choudhry, Abdul Jamil; Meiman, Jonathan G; Paczkowski, Magdalena; Curns, Aaron; Mounts, Anthony; Feikin, Daniel R; Marano, Nina; Swerdlow, David L; Gerber, Susan I; Hajjeh, Rana; Madani, Tariq A

    2016-01-01

    Risk factors for primary Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) illness in humans are incompletely understood. We identified all primary MERS-CoV cases reported in Saudi Arabia during March-November 2014 by excluding those with history of exposure to other cases of MERS-CoV or acute respiratory illness of unknown cause or exposure to healthcare settings within 14 days before illness onset. Using a case-control design, we assessed differences in underlying medical conditions and environmental exposures among primary case-patients and 2-4 controls matched by age, sex, and neighborhood. Using multivariable analysis, we found that direct exposure to dromedary camels during the 2 weeks before illness onset, as well as diabetes mellitus, heart disease, and smoking, were each independently associated with MERS-CoV illness. Further investigation is needed to better understand animal-to-human transmission of MERS-CoV. PMID:26692185

  6. Human herpesviruses respiratory infections in patients with acute respiratory distress (ARDS).

    PubMed

    Bonizzoli, Manuela; Arvia, Rosaria; di Valvasone, Simona; Liotta, Francesco; Zakrzewska, Krystyna; Azzi, Alberta; Peris, Adriano

    2016-08-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is today a leading cause of hospitalization in intensive care unit (ICU). ARDS and pneumonia are closely related to critically ill patients; however, the etiologic agent is not always identified. The presence of human herpes simplex virus 1, human cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus in respiratory samples of critically ill patients is increasingly reported even without canonical immunosuppression. The main aim of this study was to better understand the significance of herpesviruses finding in lower respiratory tract of ARDS patients hospitalized in ICU. The presence of this group of herpesviruses, in addition to the research of influenza viruses and other common respiratory viruses, was investigated in respiratory samples from 54 patients hospitalized in ICU, without a known microbiological causative agent. Moreover, the immunophenotype of each patient was analyzed. Herpesviruses DNA presence in the lower respiratory tract seemed not attributable to an impaired immunophenotype, whereas a significant correlation was observed between herpesviruses positivity and influenza virus infection. A higher ICU mortality was significantly related to the presence of herpesvirus infection in the lower respiratory tract as well as to impaired immunophenotype, as patients with poor outcome showed severe lymphopenia, affecting in particular T (CD3+) cells, since the first days of ICU hospitalization. In conclusion, these results indicate that herpesviruses lower respiratory tract infection, which occurs more frequently following influenza virus infection, can be a negative prognostic marker. An independent risk factor for ICU patients with ARDS is an impaired immunophenotype.

  7. Severe acute respiratory syndrome and its lesions in digestive system

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian-Zhong

    2003-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is an infectious atypical pneumonia that has recently been recognized in the patients in 32 countries and regions. This brief review summarizes some of the initial etiologic findings, pathological description, and its lesions of digestive system caused by SARS virus. It is an attempt to draw gastroenterologists and hepatologists' attention to this fatal illness, especially when it manifests itself initially as digestive symptoms. PMID:12800212

  8. Acute otitis media and respiratory virus infections.

    PubMed

    Ruuskanen, O; Arola, M; Putto-Laurila, A; Mertsola, J; Meurman, O; Viljanen, M K; Halonen, P

    1989-02-01

    We studied the association of acute otitis media with different respiratory virus infections in a pediatric department on the basis of epidemics between 1980 and 1985. Altogether 4524 cases of acute otitis media were diagnosed. The diagnosis was confirmed by tympanocentesis in 3332 ears. Respiratory virus infection was diagnosed during the same period in 989 patients by detecting viral antigen in nasopharyngeal mucus. There was a significant correlation between acute otitis media and respiratory virus epidemics, especially respiratory syncytial virus epidemics. There was no significant correlation between outbreaks of other respiratory viruses and acute otitis media. Acute otitis media was diagnosed in 57% of respiratory syncytial virus, 35% of influenza A virus, 33% of parainfluenza type 3 virus, 30% of adenovirus, 28% of parainfluenza type 1 virus, 18% of influenza B virus and 10% of parainfluenza type 2 virus infections. These observations show a clear association of respiratory virus infections with acute otitis media. In this study on hospitalized children Haemophilus influenzae strains were the most common bacteriologic pathogens in middle ear fluid, occurring in 19% of cases. Streptococcus pneumoniae was present in 16% and Branhamella catarrhalis in 7% of cases. There was no association between specific viruses and bacteria observed in this study.

  9. Clinical role of respiratory virus infection in acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Arola, M; Ruuskanen, O; Ziegler, T; Mertsola, J; Näntö-Salonen, K; Putto-Laurila, A; Viljanen, M K; Halonen, P

    1990-12-01

    The clinical characteristics of acute otitis media in relation to coexisting respiratory virus infection were studied in a 1-year prospective study of 363 children with acute otitis media. Respiratory viruses were detected using virus isolation and virus antigen detection in nasopharyngeal specimens of 42% of the patients at the time of diagnosis. Rhinovirus (24%) and respiratory syncytial virus (13%) were the two most common viruses detected. Adenovirus, parainfluenza viruses, and coronavirus OC43 were found less frequently. The mean duration of preceding symptoms was 5.9 days before the diagnosis of acute otitis media. Ninety-four percent of the children had symptoms of upper respiratory tract infection. Fever was reported in 55% and earache in 47% of cases. Patients with respiratory syncytial virus infection had fever, cough, and vomiting significantly more often than patients with rhinovirus infection or virus-negative patients. No significant differences were found in the appearance of the tympanic membrane and outcome of illness between virus-negative and virus-positive patients with acute otitis. Most patients respond well to antimicrobial therapy despite the coexisting viral infection. If the symptoms of infection persist, they can be due to the underlying viral infection, and viral diagnostics preferably with rapid methods may be clinically useful in these patients.

  10. Determining Mechanism of Action of Antivirals for Respiratory Illness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Irma; Dobrovolny, Hana

    2015-03-01

    Viral infections in the respiratory tract are common in humans and can cause serious illness and death. Drug treatment is the principal line of protection against many of these illnesses and many compounds are tested as antivirals. Often the efficacy of these antivirals are determined before a mechanism of action is understood. We use mathematical models to represent the evolution of these diseases and establish which experiments can help determine the mechanism of action of antivirals.

  11. Respiratory Illness in Saskatoon Infants: The Impact of Housing and Neighbourhood Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Judith; Muhajarine, Nazeem

    2008-01-01

    Respiratory illness is an important childhood illness and a significant cause of infant mortality. This study examined the relationship between neighbourhood level variables and rates of respiratory illness for children less than 2 years of age, born in Saskatoon between 1992 and 1994. Rates of respiratory illness, as measured by proportion of…

  12. Acute kidney injury due to decompression illness

    PubMed Central

    Viecelli, Andrea; Jamboti, Jagadish; Waring, Andrew; Banham, Neil; Ferrari, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Decompression illness is a rare but serious complication of diving caused by intravascular or extravascular gas bubble formation. We report the first case of acute kidney injury in a 27-year-old diver following three rapid ascents. He presented with transient neurological symptoms and abdominal pain followed by rapidly progressive acute kidney injury (creatinine peak 1210 µmol/L) due to arterial air emboli. He received supportive care and 100% oxygen followed by hyperbaric therapy and recovered fully. Arterial air emboli caused by rapid decompression can affect multiple organs including the kidneys. Early transfer to a hyperbaric unit is important as complications may present delayed. PMID:25852912

  13. FGF23 in Acute and Chronic Illness

    PubMed Central

    Schnedl, Christian; Fahrleitner-Pammer, Astrid; Pietschmann, Peter; Amrein, Karin

    2015-01-01

    FGF23 is a bone-derived phosphaturic hormone that may become a useful biomarker for the identification of high-risk patients in chronic but also acute disease. It rises early in chronic kidney disease and is strongly and independently associated with excess morbidity and mortality. Emerging data suggest that FGF23 is also elevated in different scenarios of acute illness. In this review, we give an overview on the role of this interesting disease marker and potential and proven interventional strategies and discuss a blueprint for future research. PMID:26491212

  14. A neurogenic basis for acute altitude illness.

    PubMed

    Krasney, J A

    1994-02-01

    Acute altitude illnesses include acute mountain sickness (AMS), a benign condition involving headache, nausea, vomiting, irritability, insomnia, dizziness, lethargy, and peripheral edema, and potentially lethal high-altitude cerebral edema and pulmonary edema (HAPE). Recent evidence is summarized that AMS is related to cerebral edema secondary at least in part to hypoxic cerebral vasodilation and elevated cerebral capillary hydrostatic pressure. This results in reduced brain compliance with compression of intracranial structures in the absence of altered global brain metabolism. It is postulated that these primary intracranial events elevate peripheral sympathetic activity that acts neurogenically in the lung possibly in concert with pulmonary capillary stress failure to cause HAPE and in the kidney to promote salt and water retention. The adrenergic responses are likely modulated by striking increases of aldosterone, vasopressin and atrial natriuretic peptide. The effects of exercise on altitude-induced illness and various therapeutic regimens (acetazolamide, CO2 breathing, dexamethasone, and alpha adrenergic inhibitors) are discussed in light of this hypothesis.

  15. Human Bocavirus: Passenger or Pathogen in Acute Respiratory Tract Infections?

    PubMed Central

    Schildgen, Oliver; Müller, Andreas; Allander, Tobias; Mackay, Ian M.; Völz, Sebastian; Kupfer, Bernd; Simon, Arne

    2008-01-01

    Summary: Human bocavirus (HBoV) is a newly identified virus tentatively assigned to the family Parvoviridae, subfamily Parvovirinae, genus Bocavirus. HBoV was first described in 2005 and has since been detected in respiratory tract secretions worldwide. Herein we review the literature on HBoV and discuss the biology and potential clinical impact of this virus. Most studies have been PCR based and performed on patients with acute respiratory symptoms, from whom HBoV was detected in 2 to 19% of the samples. HBoV-positive samples have been derived mainly from infants and young children. HBoV DNA has also been detected in the blood of patients with respiratory tract infection and in fecal samples of patients with diarrhea with or without concomitant respiratory symptoms. A characteristic feature of HBoV studies is the high frequency of coinciding detections, or codetections, with other viruses. Available data nevertheless indicate a statistical association between HBoV and acute respiratory tract disease. We present a model incorporating these somewhat contradictory findings and suggest that primary HBoV infection causes respiratory tract symptoms which can be followed by prolonged low-level virus shedding in the respiratory tract. Detection of the virus in this phase will be facilitated by other infections, either simply via increased sample cell count or via reactivation of HBoV, leading to an increased detection frequency of HBoV during other virus infections. We conclude that the majority of available HBoV studies are limited by the sole use of PCR diagnostics on respiratory tract secretions, addressing virus prevalence but not disease association. The ability to detect primary infection through the development of improved diagnostic methods will be of great importance for future studies seeking to assign a role for HBoV in causing respiratory illnesses. PMID:18400798

  16. Sedation in Critically Ill Children with Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Vet, Nienke J.; Kleiber, Niina; Ista, Erwin; de Hoog, Matthijs; de Wildt, Saskia N.

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the rationale of sedation in respiratory failure, sedation goals, how to assess the need for sedation as well as effectiveness of interventions in critically ill children, with validated observational sedation scales. The drugs and non-pharmacological approaches used for optimal sedation in ventilated children are reviewed, and specifically the rationale for drug selection, including short- and long-term efficacy and safety aspects of the selected drugs. The specific pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic aspects of sedative drugs in the critically ill child and consequences for dosing are presented. Furthermore, we discuss different sedation strategies and their adverse events, such as iatrogenic withdrawal syndrome and delirium. These principles can guide clinicians in the choice of sedative drugs in pediatric respiratory failure.

  17. Sedation in Critically Ill Children with Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Vet, Nienke J.; Kleiber, Niina; Ista, Erwin; de Hoog, Matthijs; de Wildt, Saskia N.

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the rationale of sedation in respiratory failure, sedation goals, how to assess the need for sedation as well as effectiveness of interventions in critically ill children, with validated observational sedation scales. The drugs and non-pharmacological approaches used for optimal sedation in ventilated children are reviewed, and specifically the rationale for drug selection, including short- and long-term efficacy and safety aspects of the selected drugs. The specific pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic aspects of sedative drugs in the critically ill child and consequences for dosing are presented. Furthermore, we discuss different sedation strategies and their adverse events, such as iatrogenic withdrawal syndrome and delirium. These principles can guide clinicians in the choice of sedative drugs in pediatric respiratory failure. PMID:27606309

  18. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: the Berlin Definition.

    PubMed

    Ranieri, V Marco; Rubenfeld, Gordon D; Thompson, B Taylor; Ferguson, Niall D; Caldwell, Ellen; Fan, Eddy; Camporota, Luigi; Slutsky, Arthur S

    2012-06-20

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was defined in 1994 by the American-European Consensus Conference (AECC); since then, issues regarding the reliability and validity of this definition have emerged. Using a consensus process, a panel of experts convened in 2011 (an initiative of the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine endorsed by the American Thoracic Society and the Society of Critical Care Medicine) developed the Berlin Definition, focusing on feasibility, reliability, validity, and objective evaluation of its performance. A draft definition proposed 3 mutually exclusive categories of ARDS based on degree of hypoxemia: mild (200 mm Hg < PaO2/FIO2 ≤ 300 mm Hg), moderate (100 mm Hg < PaO2/FIO2 ≤ 200 mm Hg), and severe (PaO2/FIO2 ≤ 100 mm Hg) and 4 ancillary variables for severe ARDS: radiographic severity, respiratory system compliance (≤40 mL/cm H2O), positive end-expiratory pressure (≥10 cm H2O), and corrected expired volume per minute (≥10 L/min). The draft Berlin Definition was empirically evaluated using patient-level meta-analysis of 4188 patients with ARDS from 4 multicenter clinical data sets and 269 patients with ARDS from 3 single-center data sets containing physiologic information. The 4 ancillary variables did not contribute to the predictive validity of severe ARDS for mortality and were removed from the definition. Using the Berlin Definition, stages of mild, moderate, and severe ARDS were associated with increased mortality (27%; 95% CI, 24%-30%; 32%; 95% CI, 29%-34%; and 45%; 95% CI, 42%-48%, respectively; P < .001) and increased median duration of mechanical ventilation in survivors (5 days; interquartile [IQR], 2-11; 7 days; IQR, 4-14; and 9 days; IQR, 5-17, respectively; P < .001). Compared with the AECC definition, the final Berlin Definition had better predictive validity for mortality, with an area under the receiver operating curve of 0.577 (95% CI, 0.561-0.593) vs 0.536 (95% CI, 0.520-0.553; P

  19. Relapsing acute respiratory failure induced by minocycline.

    PubMed

    Oddo, Mauro; Liaudet, Lucas; Lepori, Mattia; Broccard, Alain F; Schaller, Marie-Denise

    2003-06-01

    The antibiotic minocycline, which is used in the treatment of acne, has been associated with various pulmonary complications such as pulmonary lupus and hypersensitivity pneumonitis. We now report a particularly severe case of minocycline-related pulmonary toxicity that was characterized by a relapsing form of hypersensitivity eosinophilic pneumonia complicated by acute respiratory failure.

  20. Acute respiratory distress caused by Neosartorya udagawae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We describe the first reported case of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) attributed to Neosartorya infection. The mold grew rapidly in culture of both sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from a previously healthy 43-year-old woman with ARDS, which developed as the culmination of a...

  1. Demographics and respiratory illness prevalence of sport scuba divers.

    PubMed

    Tetzlaff, K; Muth, C M

    2005-09-01

    This study aimed to establish epidemiological data on diving habits and outcome of subjects with respiratory diseases who are considered at increased risk for diving injuries. We conducted a cross-sectional demographics and prevalence study by distribution of an anonymous questionnaire with an issue of a widespread sport diving magazine. The questionnaire was designed to obtain medical and diving history data with an emphasis on respiratory diseases and complaints. The investigational population comprised sport scuba divers of any age and gender from Austria, Germany, and Switzerland. Two hundred and twenty-six male and 96 female divers sent completed questionnaires. Of the respondents 8.7 % indicated that they currently have asthma. Two thirds of asthmatics complained about regular dyspnoea. However, only 42.4 % used drugs relieving or controlling their symptoms regularly and 27.3 % used them in a prophylactic manner before diving. Five percent and 4.7 % of all divers reported a history of respiratory disease other than asthma or dyspnoea respectively. The divers with respiratory illness or complaints had logged a total of 17,386 dives. There were no cases of serious diving injuries. Despite the well-known limitations of postal surveys assessing self reported data, this study indicates that there is a population of subjects diving uneventfully with respiratory diseases that are considered medical contraindications to diving. These subjects deserve particular guidance on related risks and disease management.

  2. Pediatric Acute Q Fever Mimics Other Common Childhood Illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Bart, Ingeborg Y.; Schabos, Yvonne; van Hout, Roeland W. N. M.; Leenders, Alexander C. A. P.; de Vries, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of Q fever has increased over the last decades, but research has mainly focused on adults. Data in children are scarce, and current knowledge is mostly based on case reports. The aim of this study was to determine predictors for acute Q fever in children in the general population. We retrospectively studied all children tested for Coxiella burnetii by serology and/or PCR upon request of their general practitioner in the regional laboratory for Medical Microbiology of the Jeroen Bosch during the Q fever outbreak in the Netherlands between 2007 and 2011. A total of 1061 patients was analyzed. Influenza-like illness and respiratory tract infection were the most common presentations of acute Q fever, mimicking other common childhood illnesses. None of the reported symptoms was significantly related to a positive test outcome and therefore presenting signs or symptoms have no predictive value in diagnosing Q-fever in children. Only diagnostic tests are reliable. As the infection generally follows a mild and uncomplicated course, we question if the difficulty of recognizing pediatric Q fever is a problem worth solving. PMID:24520412

  3. Pediatric acute Q fever mimics other common childhood illnesses.

    PubMed

    Bart, Ingeborg Y; Schabos, Yvonne; van Hout, Roeland W N M; Leenders, Alexander C A P; de Vries, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of Q fever has increased over the last decades, but research has mainly focused on adults. Data in children are scarce, and current knowledge is mostly based on case reports. The aim of this study was to determine predictors for acute Q fever in children in the general population. We retrospectively studied all children tested for Coxiella burnetii by serology and/or PCR upon request of their general practitioner in the regional laboratory for Medical Microbiology of the Jeroen Bosch during the Q fever outbreak in the Netherlands between 2007 and 2011. A total of 1061 patients was analyzed. Influenza-like illness and respiratory tract infection were the most common presentations of acute Q fever, mimicking other common childhood illnesses. None of the reported symptoms was significantly related to a positive test outcome and therefore presenting signs or symptoms have no predictive value in diagnosing Q-fever in children. Only diagnostic tests are reliable. As the infection generally follows a mild and uncomplicated course, we question if the difficulty of recognizing pediatric Q fever is a problem worth solving. PMID:24520412

  4. Relative Moldiness Index as Predictor of Childhood Respiratory Illness

    SciTech Connect

    Vesper, Sephen J.; McKinstry, Craig A.; Haugland, Richard A.; Iossifova, Yulia; Lemasters, Grace; Levin, Linda; Hershey, Gurjit K.; Villareal, Manuel; Bernstein, David I.; Lockey, James; Reponen, Tina

    2007-01-01

    This study compared two classification methods to evaluate the mold condition in 271 homes of infants, 144 of which later developed symptoms of respiratory illness. A method using on-site visual mold inspection was compared to another method using a quantitative index of moldiness, calculated from mold specific quantitative PCR (MSQPCR) measurements on the concentration of 36 species of molds in floor dust samples called the EPA relative moldiness index© (ERMI©). The binary classification of homes as either moldy or non-moldy by on-site visual home inspection was not predictive of the development of wheeze and/or rhinitis. The odds-ratio of moldy vs. non-moldy homes to experience respiratory illness was estimated at 1.33 (p=0.27, Fisher’s exact test). Further, this method offers little flexibility in how it may be applied in support of decisions on mold remediation. On the other hand, a method developed and validated in this paper using the ERMI© index fit to a logistic function, can be used to predict the occurrence of illness in homes and allows stake holders to choose among various levels of risk. An example is given where an ERMI© value of -4.29 is used as a threshold for binary classification of homes producing an odds ratio of 2.53 (p=0.003, Fisher’s exact test). The ERMI© based methods presented here provide a new and more flexible platform to support mold remediation decisions.

  5. Relative moldiness index as predictor of childhood respiratory illness

    PubMed Central

    VESPER, STEPHEN J.; MCKINSTRY, CRAIG; HAUGLAND, RICHARD A.; IOSSIFOVA, YULIA; LEMASTERS, GRACE; LEVIN, LINDA; KHURANA HERSHEY, GURJIT K.; VILLAREAL, MANUEL; BERNSTEIN, DAVID I.; LOCKEY, JAMES; REPONEN, TIINA

    2007-01-01

    The results of a traditional visual mold inspection were compared to a mold evaluation based on the Relative Moldiness Index (RMI). The RMI is calculated from mold-specific quantitative PCR (MSQPCR) measurements of the concentration of 36 species of molds in floor dust samples. These two prospective mold evaluations were used to classify the mold condition in 271 homes of infants. Later, the development of respiratory illness was measured in the infants living in these homes and the predictive value of each classification system was evaluated. The binary classification of homes as either moldy or non-moldy by on-site visual home inspection was not predictive of the development of respiratory illness (wheeze and/or rhinitis) (P = 0.27). Conversely, a method developed and validated in this paper, using the RMI index fit to a logistic function, can be used to predict the occurrence of illness in homes and allows stake-holders the choice among various levels of risk. PMID:17033680

  6. Knowledge, attitude and practices regarding acute respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, S K; Reddaiah, V P; Murthy, G V

    1990-01-01

    One hundred and six mothers in a rural area were interviewed to determine as to how they recognise pneumonia in children, what therapies they practice with mild acute respiratory illnesses and pneumonias and the feeding practices they adopt. Most mothers recognised pneumonia by noticing fast respiratory rate and difficulty in breathing. More severe cases were recognised by these signs among a higher percentage of mothers. As regards management of mild ARI episodes, more than half the mothers preferred not to give any treatment or use only home remedies. In pneumonias, a majority of them preferred to consult a qualified doctor. Nearly a third of them were of the opinion that they would take the child to hospital if the disease was severe. Regarding feeding practices, most of them stated that they would continue feeding, fluids and breast feeds. Only 10% desired to stop and another 15% would decrease the amounts.

  7. Severe acute respiratory syndrome diagnostics using a coronavirus protein microarray.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Heng; Hu, Shaohui; Jona, Ghil; Zhu, Xiaowei; Kreiswirth, Nate; Willey, Barbara M; Mazzulli, Tony; Liu, Guozhen; Song, Qifeng; Chen, Peng; Cameron, Mark; Tyler, Andrea; Wang, Jian; Wen, Jie; Chen, Weijun; Compton, Susan; Snyder, Michael

    2006-03-14

    To monitor severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) infection, a coronavirus protein microarray that harbors proteins from SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and five additional coronaviruses was constructed. These microarrays were used to screen approximately 400 Canadian sera from the SARS outbreak, including samples from confirmed SARS-CoV cases, respiratory illness patients, and healthcare professionals. A computer algorithm that uses multiple classifiers to predict samples from SARS patients was developed and used to predict 206 sera from Chinese fever patients. The test assigned patients into two distinct groups: those with antibodies to SARS-CoV and those without. The microarray also identified patients with sera reactive against other coronavirus proteins. Our results correlated well with an indirect immunofluorescence test and demonstrated that viral infection can be monitored for many months after infection. We show that protein microarrays can serve as a rapid, sensitive, and simple tool for large-scale identification of viral-specific antibodies in sera.

  8. Nutritional demands in acute and chronic illness.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Rosemary A; Davidson, H Isobel M

    2003-11-01

    Common to both acute and chronic disease are disturbances in energy homeostasis, which are evidenced by quantitative and qualitative changes in dietary intake and increased energy expenditure. Negative energy balance results in loss of fat and lean tissue. The management of patients with metabolically-active disease appears to be simple; it would involve the provision of sufficient energy to promote tissue accretion. However, two fundamental issues serve to prevent nutritional demands in disease being met. The determination of appropriate energy requirements relies on predictive formulae. While equations have been developed for critically-ill populations, accurate energy prescribing in the acute setting is uncommon. Only 25-32% of the patients have energy intakes within 10% of their requirements. Clearly, the variation in energy expenditure has led to difficulties in accurately defining the energy needs of the individual. Second, the acute inflammatory response initiated by the host can have profound effects on ingestive behaviour, but this area is poorly understood by practising clinicians. For example, nutritional targets have been set for specific disease states, i.e. pancreatitis 105-147 kJ (25-35 kcal)/kg; chronic liver disease 147-168 kJ (35-40 kcal)/kg, but given the alterations in gut physiology that accompany the acute-phase response, targets are unlikely to be met. In cancer cachexia attenuation of the inflammatory response using eicosapentaenoic acid results in improved nutritional intake and status. This strategy poses an attractive proposition in the quest to define nutritional support as a clinically-effective treatment modality in other disorders. PMID:15018475

  9. Noninvasive ventilation in acute respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Mas, Arantxa; Masip, Josep

    2014-01-01

    After the institution of positive-pressure ventilation, the use of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) through an interface substantially increased. The first technique was continuous positive airway pressure; but, after the introduction of pressure support ventilation at the end of the 20th century, this became the main modality. Both techniques, and some others that have been recently introduced and which integrate some technological innovations, have extensively demonstrated a faster improvement of acute respiratory failure in different patient populations, avoiding endotracheal intubation and facilitating the release of conventional invasive mechanical ventilation. In acute settings, NIV is currently the first-line treatment for moderate-to-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation as well as for acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and should be considered in immunocompromised patients with acute respiratory insufficiency, in difficult weaning, and in the prevention of postextubation failure. Alternatively, it can also be used in the postoperative period and in cases of pneumonia and asthma or as a palliative treatment. NIV is currently used in a wide range of acute settings, such as critical care and emergency departments, hospital wards, palliative or pediatric units, and in pre-hospital care. It is also used as a home care therapy in patients with chronic pulmonary or sleep disorders. The appropriate selection of patients and the adaptation to the technique are the keys to success. This review essentially analyzes the evidence of benefits of NIV in different populations with acute respiratory failure and describes the main modalities, new devices, and some practical aspects of the use of this technique. PMID:25143721

  10. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS): a year in review.

    PubMed

    Skowronski, Danuta M; Astell, Caroline; Brunham, Robert C; Low, Donald E; Petric, Martin; Roper, Rachel L; Talbot, Pierre J; Tam, Theresa; Babiuk, Lorne

    2005-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) emerged from China as an untreatable and rapidly spreading respiratory illness of unknown etiology. Following point source exposure in February 2003, more than a dozen guests infected at a Hong Kong hotel seeded multi-country outbreaks that persisted through the spring of 2003. The World Health Organization responded by invoking traditional public health measures and advanced technologies to control the illness and contain the cause. A novel coronavirus was implicated and its entire genome was sequenced by mid-April 2003. The urgency of responding to this threat focused scientific endeavor and stimulated global collaboration. Through real-time application of accumulating knowledge, the world proved capable of arresting the first pandemic threat of the twenty-first century, despite early respiratory-borne spread and global susceptibility. This review synthesizes lessons learned from this remarkable achievement. These lessons can be applied to re-emergence of SARS or to the next pandemic threat to arise. PMID:15660517

  11. Acute respiratory failure following severe arsenic poisoning.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, C; Davies, S; McGowan, T; Schorer, A; Drage, C

    1979-11-01

    A 47-year-old man had an episode of severe respiratory failure after acute intoxication with arsenic. Features of the initial clinical presentation included nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea, acute psychosis, diffuse skin rash, and marked pancytopenia. A peripheral neuropathy then developed which resulted in severe weakness of all muscles of the limbs, the shoulder and pelvis girdles, and the trunk. The neuropathy continued to progress despite treatment with dimercaprol (BAL in oil). Five weeks after the initial exposure, the patient was no longer able to maintain adquate ventilation and required mechanical ventilatory support. Improvement in the patient's neuromuscular status permitted successful weaning from the ventilator after one month of mechanical ventilation. Long-term follow-up revealed no further respiratory difficulty and slow improvement in the strength of the peripheral muscles.

  12. Oxidative stress in severe acute illness.

    PubMed

    Bar-Or, David; Bar-Or, Raphael; Rael, Leonard T; Brody, Edward N

    2015-01-01

    The overall redox potential of a cell is primarily determined by oxidizable/reducible chemical pairs, including glutathione-glutathione disulfide, reduced thioredoxin-oxidized thioredoxin, and NAD(+)-NADH (and NADP-NADPH). Current methods for evaluating oxidative stress rely on detecting levels of individual byproducts of oxidative damage or by determining the total levels or activity of individual antioxidant enzymes. Oxidation-reduction potential (ORP), on the other hand, is an integrated, comprehensive measure of the balance between total (known and unknown) pro-oxidant and antioxidant components in a biological system. Much emphasis has been placed on the role of oxidative stress in chronic diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and atherosclerosis. The role of oxidative stress in acute diseases often seen in the emergency room and intensive care unit is considerable. New tools for the rapid, inexpensive measurement of both redox potential and total redox capacity should aid in introducing a new body of literature on the role of oxidative stress in acute illness and how to screen and monitor for potentially beneficial pharmacologic agents.

  13. Surveillance for hospitalized acute respiratory infection in Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Verani, Jennifer R; McCracken, John; Arvelo, Wences; Estevez, Alejandra; Lopez, Maria Renee; Reyes, Lissette; Moir, Juan Carlos; Bernart, Chris; Moscoso, Fabiola; Gray, Jennifer; Olsen, Sonja J; Lindblade, Kim A

    2013-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are an important cause of illness and death worldwide, yet data on the etiology of ARI and the population-level burden in developing countries are limited. Surveillance for ARI was conducted at two hospitals in Guatemala. Patients admitted with at least one sign of acute infection and one sign or symptom of respiratory illness met the criteria for a case of hospitalized ARI. Nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal swabs were collected and tested by polymerase chain reaction for adenovirus, parainfluenza virus types 1,2 and 3, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A and B viruses, human metapneumovirus, Chlamydia pneumioniae, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Urine specimens were tested for Streptococcus pneumoniae antigen. Blood culture and chest radiograph were done at the discretion of the treating physician. Between November 2007 and December 2011, 3,964 case-patients were enrolled. While cases occurred among all age groups, 2,396 (60.4%) cases occurred in children <5 years old and 463 (11.7%) among adults ≥65 years old. Viruses were found in 52.6% of all case-patients and 71.8% of those aged <1 year old; the most frequently detected was respiratory syncytial virus, affecting 26.4% of case-patients. Urine antigen testing for Streptococcus pneumoniae performed for case-patients ≥15 years old was positive in 15.1% of those tested. Among 2,364 (59.6%) of case-patients with a radiograph, 907 (40.0%) had findings suggestive of bacterial pneumonia. Overall, 230 (5.9%) case-patients died during the hospitalization. Using population denominators, the observed hospitalized ARI incidence was 128 cases per 100,000, with the highest rates seen among children <1 year old (1,703 per 100,000), followed by adults ≥65 years old (292 per 100,000). These data, which demonstrate a substantial burden of hospitalized ARI in Guatemala due to a variety of pathogens, can help guide public health policies aimed at reducing the burden of illness and death due to

  14. Surveillance for Hospitalized Acute Respiratory Infection in Guatemala

    PubMed Central

    Verani, Jennifer R.; McCracken, John; Arvelo, Wences; Estevez, Alejandra; Lopez, Maria Renee; Reyes, Lissette; Moir, Juan Carlos; Bernart, Chris; Moscoso, Fabiola; Gray, Jennifer; Olsen, Sonja J.; Lindblade, Kim A.

    2013-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are an important cause of illness and death worldwide, yet data on the etiology of ARI and the population-level burden in developing countries are limited. Surveillance for ARI was conducted at two hospitals in Guatemala. Patients admitted with at least one sign of acute infection and one sign or symptom of respiratory illness met the criteria for a case of hospitalized ARI. Nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal swabs were collected and tested by polymerase chain reaction for adenovirus, parainfluenza virus types 1,2 and 3, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A and B viruses, human metapneumovirus, Chlamydia pneumioniae, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Urine specimens were tested for Streptococcus pneumoniae antigen. Blood culture and chest radiograph were done at the discretion of the treating physician. Between November 2007 and December 2011, 3,964 case-patients were enrolled. While cases occurred among all age groups, 2,396 (60.4%) cases occurred in children <5 years old and 463 (11.7%) among adults ≥65 years old. Viruses were found in 52.6% of all case-patients and 71.8% of those aged <1 year old; the most frequently detected was respiratory syncytial virus, affecting 26.4% of case-patients. Urine antigen testing for Streptococcus pneumoniae performed for case-patients ≥15 years old was positive in 15.1% of those tested. Among 2,364 (59.6%) of case-patients with a radiograph, 907 (40.0%) had findings suggestive of bacterial pneumonia. Overall, 230 (5.9%) case-patients died during the hospitalization. Using population denominators, the observed hospitalized ARI incidence was 128 cases per 100,000, with the highest rates seen among children <1 year old (1,703 per 100,000), followed by adults ≥65 years old (292 per 100,000). These data, which demonstrate a substantial burden of hospitalized ARI in Guatemala due to a variety of pathogens, can help guide public health policies aimed at reducing the burden of illness and death due to

  15. Acute kidney injury with hypoxic respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Neubert, Zachary; Hoffmann, Paul; Owshalimpur, David

    2014-01-01

    A 27-year-old Caucasian man was transferred from a remote clinic with acute kidney injury for the prior 7–10 days preceded by gastroenteritis. His kidney biopsy showed non-specific mesangiopathic glomerular changes, minimal tubulointerstitial disease without sclerosis, crescents, nor evidence of vasculitis. On his third hospital day, he developed acute hypoxic respiratory failure requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation. Pulmonary renal syndromes ranked highest on his differential diagnosis. He was extubated after 2 days of mechanical ventilation and after pulse dose steroids. His lung biopsy showed pulmonary capillaritis. Our case describes a patient with clinically appearing renopulmonary syndrome, but found to have pulmonary capillaritis, a rare form of lung disease that may also cause acute kidney injury. PMID:25246473

  16. Noninvasive ventilation for patients with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nava, Stefano; Schreiber, Ania; Domenighetti, Guido

    2011-10-01

    Few studies have been performed on noninvasive ventilation (NIV) to treat hypoxic acute respiratory failure in patients with acute lung injury (ALI) or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The outcomes of these patients, for whom endotracheal intubation is not mandatory, depend on the degree of hypoxia, the presence of comorbidities and complications, and their illness severity. The use of NIV as an alternative to invasive ventilation in severely hypoxemic patients with ARDS (ie, P(aO(2))/F(IO(2)) < 200) is not generally advisable and should be limited to hemodynamically stable patients who can be closely monitored in an intensive care unit by highly skilled staff. Early NIV application may be extremely helpful in immunocompromised patients with pulmonary infiltrates, in whom intubation dramatically increases the risk of infection, pneumonia, and death. The use of NIV in patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome and other airborne diseases has generated debate, despite encouraging clinical results, mainly because of safety issues. Overall, the high rate of NIV failure suggests a cautious approach to NIV use in patients with ALI/ARDS, including early initiation, intensive monitoring, and prompt intubation if signs of NIV failure emerge. PMID:22008399

  17. Illness perception and related behaviour in lower respiratory tract infections—a European study

    PubMed Central

    Hordijk, Patricia M; Broekhuizen, Berna D L; Butler, Chris C; Coenen, Samuel; Godycki-Cwirko, Maciek; Goossens, Herman; Hood, Kerry; Smith, Richard; van Vugt, Saskia F; Little, Paul; Verheij, Theo J M

    2015-01-01

    Background. Lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) is a common presentation in primary care, but little is known about associated patients’ illness perception and related behaviour. Objective. To describe illness perceptions and related behaviour in patients with LRTI visiting their general practitioner (GP) and identify differences between European regions and types of health care system. Methods. Adult patients presenting with acute cough were included. GPs recorded co morbidities and clinical findings. Patients filled out a diary for up to 4 weeks on their symptoms, illness perception and related behaviour. The chi-square test was used to compare proportions between groups and the Mann-Whitney U or Kruskal Wallis tests were used to compare means. Results. Three thousand one hundred six patients from 12 European countries were included. Eighty-one per cent (n = 2530) of the patients completed the diary. Patients were feeling unwell for a mean of 9 (SD 8) days prior to consulting. More than half experienced impairment of normal or social activities for at least 1 week and were absent from work/school for a mean of 4 (SD 5) days. On average patients felt recovered 2 weeks after visiting their GP, but 21% (n = 539) of the patients did not feel recovered after 4 weeks. Twenty-seven per cent (n = 691) reported feeling anxious or depressed, and 28% (n = 702) re-consulted their GP at some point during the illness episode. Reported illness duration and days absent from work/school differed between countries and regions (North-West versus South-East), but there was little difference in reported illness course and related behaviour between health care systems (direct access versus gate-keeping). Conclusion. Illness course, perception and related behaviour in LRTI differ considerably between countries. These finding should be taken into account when developing International guidelines for LRTI and interventions for setting realistic expectations about illness course

  18. Surfactant treatment for acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Herce, J.; de Lucas, N.; Carrillo, A.; Bustinza, A.; Moral, R.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine prospectively the efficacy of surfactant in acute respiratory distress syndrome.
STUDY DESIGN—Twenty patients, 1 month to 16 years of age, diagnosed with an acute pulmonary disease with severe hypoxaemia (PaO2/FiO2 < 100) (13 with systemic or pulmonary disease and seven with cardiac disease) were treated with one to six doses of 50-200 mg/kg of porcine surfactant administered directly into the trachea. The surfactant was considered to be effective when the PaO2/FiO2 improved by > 20%.
RESULTS—After initial surfactant administration the PaO2/FiO2 increased significantly in patients with systemic or pulmonary disease from 68 to 111, and the oxygenation index (OI) diminished significantly from 36.9 to 27.1. The PaO2/FiO2 and OI did not improve in children with cardiac disease. The improvement of the patients who survived was greater than that of those who died.
CONCLUSIONS—Surfactant moderately improves oxygenation in some children with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome secondary to pulmonary or systemic disease.

 PMID:10325705

  19. Synchronization of Cardio-Respiratory Dynamics in Critically Ill Patients.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burykin, Anton; Buchman, Timothy

    2008-03-01

    We studied changes in cardio-respiratory synchronization and dynamics of cardiovascular system during transition from mechanical ventilation to spontaneous respiration in critically ill patients. This observational study exploits a standard clinical practice---the spontaneous breathing trial (SBT). The SBT consists of a period of mechanical ventilation, followed by a period of spontaneous breathing, followed by resumption of mechanical ventilation. We collected continuous respiratory, cardiac (EKG), and blood pressure signals of mechanically ventilated patients before, during and after SBT. The data were analyzed by means of spectral analysis, phase dynamics, and entropy measures. Mechanical ventilation appears to affect not only the lungs but also the cardiac and vascular systems. Spontaneous cardiovascular rhythms are entrained by the mechanical ventilator and are drawn into synchrony. Sudden interruption of mechanical ventilation causes gross desynchronization, which is restored by reinstitution of mechanical ventilation. The data suggest (1) therapies intended to support one organ system may propagate unanticipated effects to other organ systems and (2) sustained therapies may adversely affect recovery of normal organ system interactions.

  20. Critical care ultrasonography in acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Vignon, Philippe; Repessé, Xavier; Vieillard-Baron, Antoine; Maury, Eric

    2016-08-15

    Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is a leading indication for performing critical care ultrasonography (CCUS) which, in these patients, combines critical care echocardiography (CCE) and chest ultrasonography. CCE is ideally suited to guide the diagnostic work-up in patients presenting with ARF since it allows the assessment of left ventricular filling pressure and pulmonary artery pressure, and the identification of a potential underlying cardiopathy. In addition, CCE precisely depicts the consequences of pulmonary vascular lesions on right ventricular function and helps in adjusting the ventilator settings in patients sustaining moderate-to-severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. Similarly, CCE helps in identifying patients at high risk of ventilator weaning failure, depicts the mechanisms of weaning pulmonary edema in those patients who fail a spontaneous breathing trial, and guides tailored therapeutic strategy. In all these clinical settings, CCE provides unparalleled information on both the efficacy and tolerance of therapeutic changes. Chest ultrasonography provides further insights into pleural and lung abnormalities associated with ARF, irrespective of its origin. It also allows the assessment of the effects of treatment on lung aeration or pleural effusions. The major limitation of lung ultrasonography is that it is currently based on a qualitative approach in the absence of standardized quantification parameters. CCE combined with chest ultrasonography rapidly provides highly relevant information in patients sustaining ARF. A pragmatic strategy based on the serial use of CCUS for the management of patients presenting with ARF of various origins is detailed in the present manuscript.

  1. Critical care ultrasonography in acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Vignon, Philippe; Repessé, Xavier; Vieillard-Baron, Antoine; Maury, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is a leading indication for performing critical care ultrasonography (CCUS) which, in these patients, combines critical care echocardiography (CCE) and chest ultrasonography. CCE is ideally suited to guide the diagnostic work-up in patients presenting with ARF since it allows the assessment of left ventricular filling pressure and pulmonary artery pressure, and the identification of a potential underlying cardiopathy. In addition, CCE precisely depicts the consequences of pulmonary vascular lesions on right ventricular function and helps in adjusting the ventilator settings in patients sustaining moderate-to-severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. Similarly, CCE helps in identifying patients at high risk of ventilator weaning failure, depicts the mechanisms of weaning pulmonary edema in those patients who fail a spontaneous breathing trial, and guides tailored therapeutic strategy. In all these clinical settings, CCE provides unparalleled information on both the efficacy and tolerance of therapeutic changes. Chest ultrasonography provides further insights into pleural and lung abnormalities associated with ARF, irrespective of its origin. It also allows the assessment of the effects of treatment on lung aeration or pleural effusions. The major limitation of lung ultrasonography is that it is currently based on a qualitative approach in the absence of standardized quantification parameters. CCE combined with chest ultrasonography rapidly provides highly relevant information in patients sustaining ARF. A pragmatic strategy based on the serial use of CCUS for the management of patients presenting with ARF of various origins is detailed in the present manuscript. PMID:27524204

  2. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: prevention and early recognition.

    PubMed

    de Haro, Candelaria; Martin-Loeches, Ignacio; Torrents, Eva; Artigas, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is common in critically ill patients admitted to intensive care units (ICU). ARDS results in increased use of critical care resources and healthcare costs, yet the overall mortality associated with these conditions remains high. Research focusing on preventing ARDS and identifying patients at risk of developing ARDS is necessary to develop strategies to alter the clinical course and progression of the disease. To date, few strategies have shown clear benefits. One of the most important obstacles to preventive interventions is the difficulty of identifying patients likely to develop ARDS. Identifying patients at risk and implementing prevention strategies in this group are key factors in preventing ARDS. This review will discuss early identification of at-risk patients and the current prevention strategies. PMID:23617961

  3. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS): epidemiology and clinical features

    PubMed Central

    Hui, D; Chan, M; Wu, A; Ng, P

    2004-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a newly emerged infectious disease with a significant morbidity and mortality. The major clinical features include persistent fever, chills/rigor, myalgia, malaise, dry cough, headache, and dyspnoea. Older subjects may present without the typical febrile response. Common laboratory features include lymphopenia, thrombocytopenia, raised alanine transaminases, lactate dehydrogenase, and creatine kinase. The constellation of compatible clinical and laboratory findings, together with certain characteristic radiological features and lack of clinical response to broad spectrum antibiotics, should arouse suspicion of SARS. Measurement of serum RNA by real time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction technique has a detection rate of 75%–80% in the first week of the illness. PMID:15254300

  4. Infectious Etiologies of Acute Febrile Illness among Patients Seeking Health Care in South-Central Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Kasper, Matthew R.; Blair, Patrick J.; Touch, Sok; Sokhal, Buth; Yasuda, Chadwick Y.; Williams, Maya; Richards, Allen L.; Burgess, Timothy H.; Wierzba, Thomas F.; Putnam, Shannon D.

    2012-01-01

    The agents of human febrile illness can vary by region and country suggesting that diagnosis, treatment, and control programs need to be based on a methodical evaluation of area-specific etiologies. From December 2006 to December 2009, 9,997 individuals presenting with acute febrile illness at nine health care clinics in south-central Cambodia were enrolled in a study to elucidate the etiologies. Upon enrollment, respiratory specimens, whole blood, and serum were collected. Testing was performed for viral, bacterial, and parasitic pathogens. Etiologies were identified in 38.0% of patients. Influenza was the most frequent pathogen, followed by dengue, malaria, and bacterial pathogens isolated from blood culture. In addition, 3.5% of enrolled patients were infected with more than one pathogen. Our data provide the first systematic assessment of the etiologies of acute febrile illness in south-central Cambodia. Data from syndromic-based surveillance studies can help guide public health responses in developing nations. PMID:22302857

  5. Infectious etiologies of acute febrile illness among patients seeking health care in south-central Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Matthew R; Blair, Patrick J; Touch, Sok; Sokhal, Buth; Yasuda, Chadwick Y; Williams, Maya; Richards, Allen L; Burgess, Timothy H; Wierzba, Thomas F; Putnam, Shannon D

    2012-02-01

    The agents of human febrile illness can vary by region and country suggesting that diagnosis, treatment, and control programs need to be based on a methodical evaluation of area-specific etiologies. From December 2006 to December 2009, 9,997 individuals presenting with acute febrile illness at nine health care clinics in south-central Cambodia were enrolled in a study to elucidate the etiologies. Upon enrollment, respiratory specimens, whole blood, and serum were collected. Testing was performed for viral, bacterial, and parasitic pathogens. Etiologies were identified in 38.0% of patients. Influenza was the most frequent pathogen, followed by dengue, malaria, and bacterial pathogens isolated from blood culture. In addition, 3.5% of enrolled patients were infected with more than one pathogen. Our data provide the first systematic assessment of the etiologies of acute febrile illness in south-central Cambodia. Data from syndromic-based surveillance studies can help guide public health responses in developing nations.

  6. Emerging therapies for treatment of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bosma, Karen J; Lewis, James F

    2007-09-01

    Acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) is a life-threatening form of respiratory failure that affects a heterogeneous population of critically ill patients. Although overall mortality appears to be decreasing in recent years due to improvements in supportive care, there are presently no proven, effective pharmacological therapies to treat ARDS and prevent its associated complications. The most common cause of death in ARDS is not hypoxemia or pulmonary failure, but rather multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS), suggesting that improving survival in patients with ARDS may be linked to decreasing the incidence or severity of MODS. The key to developing novel treatments depends, in part, on identifying and understanding the mechanisms by which ARDS leads to MODS, although the heterogeneity and complexity of this disorder certainly poses a challenge to investigators. Novel therapies in development for treatment of ALI/ARDS include exogenous surfactant, therapies aimed at modulating neutrophil activity, such as prostaglandin and complement inhibitors, and treatments targeting earlier resolution of ARDS, such as beta-agonists and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor. From a clinical perspective, identifying subpopulations of patients most likely to benefit from a particular therapy and recognising the appropriate stage of illness in which to initiate treatment could potentially lead to better outcomes in the short term.

  7. Controversies involving hypercapnic acidosis in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nardelli, Liliane; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macedo; Garcia, Cristiane Sousa Nascimento Baez

    2009-12-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is characterized by a diffuse inflammatory reaction of lung parenchyma induced by a direct insult to the alveolar epithelium (pulmonary acute respiratory distress syndrome) or an indirect lesion through the vascular endothelium (extrapulmonary acute respiratory distress syndrome). The main therapeutic strategy for acute respiratory distress syndrome is the ventilatory support. However, mechanical ventilation can worsen lung injury. In this context, a protective ventilatory strategy with low tidal volume has been proposed. The use of low tidal volume reduced the mortality rate of acute respiratory distress syndrome patients, but result in hypercapnic acidosis. The current article presents a review of literature on the effects of permissive hypercapnia in acute respiratory distress syndrome. To that end, we carried out a systematic review of scientific literature based on established criteria for documental analysis including clinical and experimental articles, using as data bases MedLine, LILACS, SciELO, PubMed, Cochrane. Hypercapnic acidosis has been considered by some authors as a modulator of the inflammatory process of acute respiratory distress syndrome. However, clinical and experimental studies on the effects of hypercapnic acidosis have shown controversial results. Therefore it is important to better elucidate the role of hypercapnic acidosis in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

  8. Severe respiratory illness associated with a novel coronavirus--Saudi Arabia and Qatar, 2012.

    PubMed

    2012-10-12

    CDC is working closely with the World Health Organization (WHO) and other partners to better understand the public health risk presented by a recently detected, novel coronavirus. This virus has been identified in two patients, both previously healthy adults who suffered severe respiratory illness. The first patient, a man aged 60 years from Saudi Arabia, was hospitalized in June 2012 and died; the second patient, a man aged 49 years from Qatar with onset of symptoms in September 2012 was transported to the United Kingdom for intensive care. He remains hospitalized on life support with both pulmonary and renal failure. Person-to-person or health-care-associated transmission has not been identified to date. Interim case definitions based on acute respiratory illness and travel history were issued by WHO on September 29 and include criteria for "patient under investigation," "probable case," and "confirmed case". This information is current as of October 4. Updates on the investigation and the WHO case definition are available at http://www.who.int/csr/don/en/index.html. PMID:23051613

  9. Incidence of Medically Attended Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Influenza Illnesses in Children 6–59 Months Old During Four Seasons

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Melissa D.; Kieke, Burney A.; Sundaram, Maria E.; McClure, David L.; Meece, Jennifer K.; Sifakis, Frangiscos; Gasser, Robert A.; Belongia, Edward A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza are significant causes of seasonal respiratory illness in children. The incidence of influenza and RSV hospitalization is well documented, but the incidence of medically attended, laboratory-confirmed illness has not been assessed in a well defined community cohort. Methods. Children aged 6–59 months with medically attended acute respiratory illness were prospectively enrolled during the 2006–2007 through 2009–2010 influenza seasons in a Wisconsin community cohort. Nasal swabs were tested for RSV and influenza by multiplex reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. The population incidence of medically attended RSV and influenza was estimated separately and standardized to weeks 40 through 18 of each season. Results. The cohort included 2800–3073 children each season. There were 2384 children enrolled with acute respiratory illness; 627 (26%) were positive for RSV and 314 (13%) for influenza. The mean age was 28 months (standard deviation [SD] = 15) for RSV-positive and 38 months (SD = 16) for influenza-positive children. Seasonal incidence (cases per 10 000) was 1718 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1602–1843) for RSV and 768 (95% CI, 696–848) for influenza. Respiratory syncytial virus incidence was highest among children 6–11 (2927) and 12–23 months old (2377). Influenza incidence was highest (850) in children 24–59 months old. The incidence of RSV was higher than influenza across all seasons and age groups. Conclusions. The incidence of medically attended RSV was highest in children 6–23 months old, and it was consistently higher than influenza. The burden of RSV remains high throughout the first 2 years of life. PMID:27419158

  10. Incidence of Medically Attended Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Influenza Illnesses in Children 6-59 Months Old During Four Seasons.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Melissa D; Kieke, Burney A; Sundaram, Maria E; McClure, David L; Meece, Jennifer K; Sifakis, Frangiscos; Gasser, Robert A; Belongia, Edward A

    2016-04-01

    Background.  Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza are significant causes of seasonal respiratory illness in children. The incidence of influenza and RSV hospitalization is well documented, but the incidence of medically attended, laboratory-confirmed illness has not been assessed in a well defined community cohort. Methods.  Children aged 6-59 months with medically attended acute respiratory illness were prospectively enrolled during the 2006-2007 through 2009-2010 influenza seasons in a Wisconsin community cohort. Nasal swabs were tested for RSV and influenza by multiplex reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. The population incidence of medically attended RSV and influenza was estimated separately and standardized to weeks 40 through 18 of each season. Results.  The cohort included 2800-3073 children each season. There were 2384 children enrolled with acute respiratory illness; 627 (26%) were positive for RSV and 314 (13%) for influenza. The mean age was 28 months (standard deviation [SD] = 15) for RSV-positive and 38 months (SD = 16) for influenza-positive children. Seasonal incidence (cases per 10 000) was 1718 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1602-1843) for RSV and 768 (95% CI, 696-848) for influenza. Respiratory syncytial virus incidence was highest among children 6-11 (2927) and 12-23 months old (2377). Influenza incidence was highest (850) in children 24-59 months old. The incidence of RSV was higher than influenza across all seasons and age groups. Conclusions.  The incidence of medically attended RSV was highest in children 6-23 months old, and it was consistently higher than influenza. The burden of RSV remains high throughout the first 2 years of life. PMID:27419158

  11. Nutrition: A Primary Therapy in Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Bryan; Typpo, Katri

    2016-01-01

    Appropriate nutrition is an essential component of intensive care management of children with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and is linked to patient outcomes. One out of every two children in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) will develop malnutrition or have worsening of baseline malnutrition and present with specific micronutrient deficiencies. Early and adequate enteral nutrition (EN) is associated with improved 60-day survival after pediatric critical illness, and, yet, despite early EN guidelines, critically ill children receive on average only 55% of goal calories by PICU day 10. Inadequate delivery of EN is due to perceived feeding intolerance, reluctance to enterally feed children with hemodynamic instability, and fluid restriction. Underlying each of these factors is large practice variation between providers and across institutions for initiation, advancement, and maintenance of EN. Strategies to improve early initiation and advancement and to maintain delivery of EN are needed to improve morbidity and mortality from pediatric ARDS. Both, over and underfeeding, prolong duration of mechanical ventilation in children and worsen other organ function such that precise calorie goals are needed. The gut is thought to act as a “motor” of organ dysfunction, and emerging data regarding the role of intestinal barrier functions and the intestinal microbiome on organ dysfunction and outcomes of critical illness present exciting opportunities to improve patient outcomes. Nutrition should be considered a primary rather than supportive therapy for pediatric ARDS. Precise nutritional therapies, which are titrated and targeted to preservation of intestinal barrier function, prevention of intestinal dysbiosis, preservation of lean body mass, and blunting of the systemic inflammatory response, offer great potential for improving outcomes of pediatric ARDS. In this review, we examine the current evidence regarding dose, route, and timing of nutrition

  12. Acute otitis media and respiratory viruses.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Yunus; Güven, Mehmet; Otlu, Bariş; Yenişehirli, Gülgün; Aladağ, Ibrahim; Eyibilen, Ahmet; Doğru, Salim

    2007-03-01

    The present study was performed to elucidate the clinical outcome, and etiology of acute otitis media (AOM) in children based on virologic and bacteriologic tests. The study group consisted of 120 children aged 6 to 144 months with AOM. Middle ear fluid (MEF) was tested for viral pathogens by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and for bacteria by gram-staining and culture. Clinical response was assessed on day 2 to 4, 11 to 13, 26 to 28. Respiratory viruses were isolated in 39 patients (32.5%). Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (46.5%) was the most common virus identified in MEF samples, followed by human rhinovirus (HRV) (25.6%), human coronavirus (HCV) (11.6%), influenza (IV) type A (9.3%), adenovirus type sub type A (AV) (4%), and parainfluenza (PIV) type -3 (2%) by RT-PCR. In total 69 bacterial species were isolated from 65 (54.8%) of 120 patients. Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae) was the most frequently isolated bacteria. Viral RNA was detected in 31 (56.3%) of 55 bacteria-negative specimens and in 8 (12.3%) of 65 bacteria-positive MEF samples. No significant differences were found between children representing viral infection alone, combined viral and bacterial infection, bacterial infection alone, and neither viral nor bacterial infection, regarding clinical cure, relapse and reinfection rates. A significantly higher rate of secretory otitis media (SOM) was observed in alone or combined RSV infection with S. pneumonia or Haemophilus influenzae (H. influenzae) than in other viruses infection. Conclusion. This study provides information about etiologic agents and diagnosis of AOM in Turkish children. The findings highlight the importance of common respiratory viruses and bacterial pathogens, particularly RSV, HRV, S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae, in predisposing to and causing AOM in children.

  13. Pharmacotherapy of Acute Lung Injury and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Raghavendran, Krishnan; Pryhuber, Gloria S.; Chess, Patricia R.; Davidson, Bruce A.; Knight, Paul R.; Notter, Robert H.

    2009-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are characterized by rapid-onset respiratory failure following a variety of direct and indirect insults to the parenchyma or vasculature of the lungs. Mortality from ALI/ARDS is substantial, and current therapy primarily emphasizes mechanical ventilation and judicial fluid management plus standard treatment of the initiating insult and any known underlying disease. Current pharmacotherapy for ALI/ARDS is not optimal, and there is a significant need for more effective medicinal chemical agents for use in these severe and lethal lung injury syndromes. To facilitate future chemical-based drug discovery research on new agent development, this paper reviews present pharmacotherapy for ALI/ARDS in the context of biological and biochemical drug activities. The complex lung injury pathophysiology of ALI/ARDS offers an array of possible targets for drug therapy, including inflammation, cell and tissue injury, vascular dysfunction, surfactant dysfunction, and oxidant injury. Added targets for pharmacotherapy outside the lungs may also be present, since multiorgan or systemic pathology is common in ALI/ARDS. The biological and physiological complexity of ALI/ARDS requires the consideration of combined-agent treatments in addition to single-agent therapies. A number of pharmacologic agents have been studied individually in ALI/ARDS, with limited or minimal success in improving survival. However, many of these agents have complementary biological/biochemical activities with the potential for synergy or additivity in combination therapy as discussed in this article. PMID:18691048

  14. Acute respiratory infections in Pakistan: have we made any progress?

    PubMed

    Khan, Tauseef Ahmad; Madni, Syed Ali; Zaidi, Anita K M

    2004-07-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are the leading cause of death in young children in Pakistan, responsible for 20-30% of all child deaths under age 5 years. This paper summarizes the research and technical development efforts over the last 15 years which have contributed to improving the effectiveness of the case management strategy to reduce mortality from pneumonia in children in Pakistan. Community intervention is viable, effective and practical. Rising antimicrobial resistance among commonly used and low-cost oral agents is of significant concern. Appropriate monitoring and evaluation of the impact of the ARI control programme is lacking. Lack of funding for programmatic activities, lack of coordination with other child survival programs, inadequate training for community health workers and general practitioners in the private sector, lack of public awareness about seeking timely and appropriate care, and insufficient planning and support for ARI programmatic activities at provincial and district levels are major hindrances in decreasing the burden of ARI in the country. The recent introduction of the community-based Lady Health Worker (LHW) Programme and WHO and UNICEF-sponsored integrated management of childhood illness initiative present ideal opportunities for re-emphasizing early case detection and appropriate case management of ARI. Ultimately, focusing on preventive strategies such as improving nutrition, reducing indoor pollution, improving mass vaccination, as well as introduction of new vaccines effective against important respiratory pathogens will likely have the most impact on reducing severe ARI and deaths from severe disease. PMID:15279753

  15. Effects of air pollution on daily clinic visits for lower respiratory tract illness.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jing-Shiang; Chan, Chang-Chuan

    2002-01-01

    The authors used data obtained from clinic records and environmental monitoring stations in Taiwan during 1998 to estimate the association between air pollution and daily numbers of clinic visits for lower respiratory tract illness. A small-area design and hierarchical modeling were used for the analysis. Rates of daily clinic visits were associated with current-day concentrations of nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, and particulate matter less than or equal to 10 microm in aerometric diameter. People over age 65 years were the most susceptible, and estimated pollution effects decreased as the exposure time lag increased. The analysis also suggested that several community-specific variables, such as a community's population density and yearly air pollution levels, modified the effects of air pollution. In this paper, the authors demonstrate the use of a small-area design to assess acute health effects of air pollution.

  16. Acute respiratory infections: the forgotten pandemic. Communiqué from the International Conference on Acute Respiratory Infections, held in Canberra, Australia, 7-10 July 1997.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections kill 4 million children every year in developing countries, and most of these deaths are caused by pneumonia. This huge loss of life goes virtually unnoticed, despite the fact that we have two very effective ways of preventing many of the deaths from pneumonia: Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine, and standardised antibiotic treatment regimens. Although H. influenzae type b vaccine has virtually eliminated diseases caused by this organism in children in developed countries, failure to appreciate the importance of this organism and the high cost of the vaccine has meant that it has not been used in developing countries; urgent steps need to be taken to ensure that children in developing countries receive H. influenzae vaccine. Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of fatal pneumonia in developing countries. Controlled trials are needed to define the role of unconjugated 23-valent S. pneumoniae vaccine, and the new conjugate vaccine must be made available to children in developing countries soon after it is licensed. The World Health Organization has developed simple and effective guidelines for the treatment of pneumonia which have been incorporated into its Integrated Management of Childhood Illness strategy, and this programme should be strongly supported. In developed countries, acute respiratory infections are the leading cause of morbidity. The cost of these infections is enormous, because of lost earnings and the cost of treatment. There is an urgent need for systematic evaluation of existing knowledge about acute respiratory infections in developed countries, so that this knowledge can be applied to prevention and treatment. Approximately 75% of antibiotics are prescribed for acute respiratory infections, and many of these prescriptions are unnecessary. Unnecessary use of antibiotics is very expensive, and it has contributed to the rapid increase in resistance which has already made some bacteria resistant to all antibiotics

  17. Acute respiratory distress syndrome in the global context.

    PubMed

    Buregeya, Egide; Fowler, Robert A; Talmor, Daniel S; Twagirumugabe, Theogene; Kiviri, Willy; Riviello, Elisabeth D

    2014-09-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a clinically defined syndrome of hypoxia and bilateral pulmonary infiltrates due to inflammatory pathways triggered by pulmonary and nonpulmonary insults, and ARDS is pathologically correlated with diffuse alveolar damage. Estimates of ARDS's impact in the developed world vary widely, with some of the discrepancies attributed to marked differences in the availability of intensive care beds and mechanical ventilation. Almost nothing is known about the epidemiology of ARDS in the developing world, in part due to a clinical definition requiring positive pressure ventilation, arterial blood gases, and chest radiography. Current frameworks for comparing the epidemiology of death and disability across the world including the GBD (Global Burden of Disease Study) 2010 are ill-suited to quantifying critical illness syndromes including ARDS. Modifications to the definition of ARDS to allow a provision for environments without the capacity for positive pressure ventilation, and to allow for alternate diagnostic techniques including pulse oximetry and ultrasound, may make it possible to quantify and describe the impact of ARDS in the global context. PMID:25667180

  18. Nitrogen dioxide and respiratory illness in children. Part I: Health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Samet, J M; Lambert, W E; Skipper, B J; Cushing, A H; Hunt, W C; Young, S A; McLaren, L C; Schwab, M; Spengler, J D

    1993-06-01

    We have carried out a prospective cohort study to test the hypothesis that exposure to nitrogen dioxide increases the incidence and severity of respiratory infections during the first 18 months of life. Between January 1988 and June 1990, 1,315 infants were enrolled into the study at birth and followed with prospective surveillance for the occurrence of respiratory infections and monitoring of nitrogen dioxide concentrations in their homes. The subjects were healthy infants from homes without smokers; they were selected with stratification by type of cooking stove at a ratio of four to one for gas and electric stoves. Illness experience was monitored by a daily diary of symptoms completed by the mother and a telephone interview conducted every two weeks. Illnesses with wheezing or wet cough were classified as involving the lower respiratory tract; all other respiratory illnesses were designated as involving the upper respiratory tract. Exposure to nitrogen dioxide was estimated by two-week average concentrations measured in the subjects' bedrooms with passive samplers. This analysis is limited to the 1,205 subjects completing at least one month of observation; of these, 823 completed the full protocol, contributing 82.8% of the total number of days during which the subjects were under observation. Incidence rates for all respiratory illnesses, all upper respiratory illness, all lower respiratory illnesses, and lower respiratory illness further divided into those with any wheezing, or wet cough without wheezing, were examined within strata of nitrogen dioxide exposure at the time of the illness, nitrogen dioxide exposure during the prior month, and type of cooking stove. Consistent trends of increasing illness incidence rates with increasing exposure to nitrogen dioxide were not evident for either the lagged or unlagged exposure variables. The effect of nitrogen dioxide exposure on illness occurrence during at-risk intervals of two weeks' duration was examined using

  19. Farmer's Lung: Causes and Symptoms of Mold and Dust Induced Respiratory Illness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Educational Resources Farmer's Lung: Causes and Symptoms of Mold and Dust Induced Respiratory Illness ID 442-602 ( ... noninfectious allergic disease that is caused by inhaling mold spores in the dust from moldy hay, straw, ...

  20. Pathophysiology of Clinical Symptoms in Acute Viral Respiratory Tract Infections.

    PubMed

    Kuchar, E; Miśkiewicz, K; Nitsch-Osuch, Aneta; Szenborn, L

    2015-01-01

    In this article we discuss the pathophysiology of common symptoms of acute viral respiratory infections (e.g., sneezing, nasal discharge, sore throat, cough, muscle pains, malaise, and mood changes). Since clinical symptoms are not sufficient to determine the etiology of viral respiratory tract infections, we believe that the host defense mechanisms are critical for the symptomatology. Consequently, this review of literature is focused on the pathophysiology of respiratory symptoms regardless of their etiology. We assume that despite a high prevalence of symptoms of respiratory infection, their pathogenesis is not widely known. A better understanding of the symptoms' pathogenesis could improve the quality of care for patients with respiratory tract infections.

  1. The effects of indoor environmental factors on respiratory illness in primary school children in Kuala Lumpur.

    PubMed

    Azizi, B H; Henry, R L

    1991-03-01

    The effects of indoor environmental factors on respiratory illness were studied in 15017-12 year old school children in Kuala Lumpur. Exposure to mosquito coil smoke for at least three nights a week was independently associated with asthma and persistent wheeze. Passive smoking, defined as sharing a bedroom with an adult smoker, was independently associated with a chest illness in the past year. No relationships were found between exposure to kerosene stoves, wood stoves, fumigation mat mosquito repellents or aerosol insecticides and respiratory illness. Host factors predictive of at least one respiratory outcome included family history of chest illness, history of allergy, male sex, hospitalization in the neonatal period and low paternal education. With 95% confidence, avoidance of regular exposure to mosquito coil smoke and passive smoking could reduce the prevalences of persistent wheeze, asthma and chest illness by up to 29%. Measurements of lung function confirmed the validity of questions pertaining to wheezing and asthma in the study questionnaire.

  2. Acute Respiratory Distress: from syndrome to disease.

    PubMed

    Cardinal-Fernández, P; Correger, E; Villanueva, J; Rios, F

    2016-04-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is currently one of the most important critical entities given its high incidence, rate of mortality, long-term sequelae and non-specific pharmacological treatment. The histological hallmark of ARDS is diffuse alveolar damage (DAD). Approximately 50% of ARDS patients present DAD, the rest is made up of a heterogeneous group of histological patterns, many of which correspond to a well-recognized disease. For that reason, if these patterns could be diagnosed, patients could benefit from a treatment. Recently, the effect of DAD in clinical and analytical evolution of ARDS has been demonstrated, so the classical approach to ARDS as an entity defined solely by clinical, radiological and gasometrical variables should be reconsidered. This narrative review aims to examine the need to evolve from the concept of ARDS as a syndrome to ARDS as a specific disease. So we have raised 4 critical questions: a) What is a disease?; b) what is DAD?; c) how is DAD considered according to ARDS definition?, and d) what is the relationship between ARDS and DAD?

  3. Viral etiology of acute respiratory diseases in Rio de Janeiro: first two years of a longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Sutmoller, F.; Nascimento, J. P.; Chaves, J. R. S.; Ferreira, V.; Pereira, M. S.

    1983-01-01

    A two-year study was undertaken to establish the incidence and possible viral etiology of acute respiratory diseases among the child population of a shanty town in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The results demonstrated that nearly half of all the illnesses seen were respiratory infections, 10% of them affecting the lower respiratory tract. Viruses were isolated from 20% of the throat swabs collected. Of the viruses identified, 47% were adenoviruses, 25% were enteroviruses, 9% were influenza A, 8% herpes simplex, 7% parainfluenza, 3% respiratory syncytial and 1% influenza B viruses. PMID:6606500

  4. The cost of community-managed viral respiratory illnesses in a cohort of healthy preschool-aged children

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Stephen B; Allen, Kelly M; Carter, Robert C; Nolan, Terence M

    2008-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory illnesses (ARIs) during childhood are often caused by respiratory viruses, result in significant morbidity, and have associated costs for families and society. Despite their ubiquity, there is a lack of interdisciplinary epidemiologic and economic research that has collected primary impact data, particularly associated with indirect costs, from families during ARIs in children. Methods We conducted a 12-month cohort study in 234 preschool children with impact diary recording and PCR testing of nose-throat swabs for viruses during an ARI. We used applied values to estimate a virus-specific mean cost of ARIs. Results Impact diaries were available for 72% (523/725) of community-managed illnesses between January 2003 and January 2004. The mean cost of ARIs was AU$309 (95% confidence interval $263 to $354). Influenza illnesses had a mean cost of $904, compared with RSV, $304, the next most expensive single-virus illness, although confidence intervals overlapped. Mean carer time away from usual activity per day was two hours for influenza ARIs and between 30 and 45 minutes for all other ARI categories. Conclusion From a societal perspective, community-managed ARIs are a significant cost burden on families and society. The point estimate of the mean cost of community-managed influenza illnesses in healthy preschool aged children is three times greater than those illnesses caused by RSV and other respiratory viruses. Indirect costs, particularly carer time away from usual activity, are the key cost drivers for ARIs in children. The use of parent-collected specimens may enhance ARI surveillance and reduce any potential Hawthorne effect caused by compliance with study procedures. These findings reinforce the need for further integrated epidemiologic and economic research of ARIs in children to allow for comprehensive cost-effectiveness assessments of preventive and therapeutic options. PMID:18215329

  5. Relationship Between Upper Respiratory Tract Influenza Test Result and Clinical Outcomes Among Critically Ill Influenza Patients.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Krishna P; Bajwa, Ednan K; Parker, Robert A; Onderdonk, Andrew B; Walensky, Rochelle P

    2016-01-01

    Among critically ill patients with lower respiratory tract (LRT)-confirmed influenza, we retrospectively observed worse 28-day clinical outcomes in upper respiratory tract (URT)-negative versus URT-positive subjects. This finding may reflect disease progression and highlights the need for influenza testing of both URT and LRT specimens to improve diagnostic yield and possibly inform prognosis. PMID:26966696

  6. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) Prevention in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Hsueh-Erh

    2004-01-01

    Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) is a newly identified respiratory disease that threatened Taiwan between April 14 and July 5, 2003. Chang Gung University experienced various SARS-related episodes, such as the postponement of classes for 7 days, the reporting of probable SARS cases, and the isolation of students under Level A and B…

  7. Extended-duration rivaroxaban thromboprophylaxis in acutely ill medical patients: MAGELLAN study protocol.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Alexander Thomas; Spiro, Theodore Erich; Büller, Harry Roger; Haskell, Lloyd; Hu, Dayi; Hull, Russell; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Merli, Geno; Schellong, Sebastian; Spyropoulos, Alex; Tapson, Victor

    2011-05-01

    Patients with acute medical illnesses are at increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Thromboprophylaxis is recommended in these patients but questions remain regarding the optimal duration of therapy. The aim of this study is to determine whether oral rivaroxaban is non-inferior to standard-duration (approximately 10 days) subcutaneous (s.c.) enoxaparin for the prevention of VTE in acutely ill medical patients, and whether extended-duration (approximately 5 weeks) rivaroxaban is superior to standard-duration enoxaparin. Patients aged 40 years or older and hospitalized for various acute medical illnesses with risk factors for VTE randomly receive either s.c. enoxaparin 40 mg once daily (od) for 10 ± 4 days or oral rivaroxaban 10 mg od for 35 ± 4 days. The primary efficacy outcomes are the composite of asymptomatic proximal deep vein thrombosis (DVT), symptomatic DVT, symptomatic non-fatal pulmonary embolism (PE), and VTE-related death up to day 10 + 4 and up to day 35 + 4. The primary safety outcome is the composite of treatment-emergent major bleeding and clinically relevant non-major bleeding. As of July 2010, 8,101 patients from 52 countries have been randomized. These patients have a broad range of medical conditions: approximately one-third were diagnosed with acute heart failure, just under one-third were diagnosed with acute infectious disease, and just under one-quarter were diagnosed with acute respiratory insufficiency. MAGELLAN will determine the efficacy, safety, and pharmacological profile of oral rivaroxaban for the prevention of VTE in a diverse population of medically ill patients and the potential of extended-duration therapy to reduce incidence of VTE.

  8. A typhus-like illness caused by acute HIV seroconversion.

    PubMed Central

    Brook, M. G.; Barnes, A.; Cook, G. C.; Mabey, D. C.

    1991-01-01

    A patient is described in whom an acute human immunodeficiency virus seroconversion illness occurred following a trip to southern Africa. The presentation was strikingly similar to that of African tick typhus and could only be distinguished by serological testing. Images Figure 1 PMID:1905405

  9. Characteristics of patients with influenza-like illness, severe acture respiratory illness, and laboratory-confirmed influenza at a major children's hospital in Angola, 2009-2011.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Yolanda; Oliveira, Erika; Vasconcelos, Jocelyne; Cohen, Adam L; Francisco, Moises

    2012-12-15

    There are no published data on influenza trends in Angola, where pneumonia is a leading cause of death among young children. This study aims to describe the seasonal trends, types, and subtypes of influenza virus recovered from patients with respiratory illness who were admitted to the major children's hospital in Angola from May 2009 through April 2011. Nasal and oral swabs were collected from patients seen in the outpatient clinic with influenza-like illness (ILI) or hospitalized with severe acute respiratory illness (SARI) and tested for influenza virus by polymerase chain reaction assays. Of 691 samples collected, 334 (48%) were from case patients with ILI, and 357 (52%) were from case patients with SARI. Most (86%) of these children were <5 years of age. Thirty-nine samples (47% SARI, 53% outpatient) tested positive for influenza virus, including 2009 pandemic influenza A virus subtype H1N1 (A[H1N1]pdm09; n = 9), influenza A virus subtype H3, likely H3N2 (n = 12), and influenza B virus (n = 18). The proportion of specimens positive for influenza virus was 5% for ILI cases and 6% for SARI cases. After the peak of A(H1N1)pdm09 infection from May through September of 2009, additional peaks of ILI and SARI were seen, especially during February-April 2010. Influenza virus causes a small but preventable number of pneumonia cases among children in Angola.

  10. Acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Dushianthan, A; Grocott, M P W; Postle, A D; Cusack, R

    2011-09-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life threatening respiratory failure due to lung injury from a variety of precipitants. Pathologically ARDS is characterised by diffuse alveolar damage, alveolar capillary leakage, and protein rich pulmonary oedema leading to the clinical manifestation of poor lung compliance, severe hypoxaemia, and bilateral infiltrates on chest radiograph. Several aetiological factors associated with the development of ARDS are identified with sepsis, pneumonia, and trauma with multiple transfusions accounting for most cases. Despite the absence of a robust diagnostic definition, extensive epidemiological investigations suggest ARDS remains a significant health burden with substantial morbidity and mortality. Improvements in outcome following ARDS over the past decade are in part due to improved strategies of mechanical ventilation and advanced support of other failing organs. Optimal treatment involves judicious fluid management, protective lung ventilation with low tidal volumes and moderate positive end expiratory pressure, multi-organ support, and treatment where possible of the underlying cause. Moreover, advances in general supportive measures such as appropriate antimicrobial therapy, early enteral nutrition, prophylaxis against venous thromboembolism and gastrointestinal ulceration are likely contributory reasons for the improved outcomes. Although therapies such as corticosteroids, nitric oxide, prostacyclins, exogenous surfactants, ketoconazole and antioxidants have shown promising clinical effects in animal models, these have failed to translate positively in human studies. Most recently, clinical trials with β2 agonists aiding alveolar fluid clearance and immunonutrition with omega-3 fatty acids have also provided disappointing results. Despite these negative studies, mortality seems to be in decline due to advances in overall patient care. Future directions of research are likely to concentrate on identifying potential

  11. Air pollution and multiple acute respiratory outcomes.

    PubMed

    Faustini, Annunziata; Stafoggia, Massimo; Colais, Paola; Berti, Giovanna; Bisanti, Luigi; Cadum, Ennio; Cernigliaro, Achille; Mallone, Sandra; Scarnato, Corrado; Forastiere, Francesco

    2013-08-01

    Short-term effects of air pollutants on respiratory mortality and morbidity have been consistently reported but usually studied separately. To more completely assess air pollution effects, we studied hospitalisations for respiratory diseases together with out-of-hospital respiratory deaths. A time-stratified case-crossover study was carried out in six Italian cities from 2001 to 2005. Daily particulate matter (particles with a 50% cut-off aerodynamic diameter of 10 μm (PM10)) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) associations with hospitalisations for respiratory diseases (n = 100 690), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (n = 38 577), lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) among COPD patients (n = 9886) and out-of-hospital respiratory deaths (n = 5490) were estimated for residents aged ≥35 years. For an increase of 10 μg·m(-3) in PM10, we found an immediate 0.59% (lag 0-1 days) increase in hospitalisations for respiratory diseases and a 0.67% increase for COPD; the 1.91% increase in LRTI hospitalisations lasted longer (lag 0-3 days) and the 3.95% increase in respiratory mortality lasted 6 days. Effects of NO2 were stronger and lasted longer (lag 0-5 days). Age, sex and previous ischaemic heart disease acted as effect modifiers for different outcomes. Analysing multiple rather than single respiratory events shows stronger air pollution effects. The temporal relationship between the pollutant increases and hospitalisations or mortality for respiratory diseases differs.

  12. Severe acute respiratory failure secondary to acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia requiring mechanical ventilation: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    López-Cuenca, Sonia; Morales-García, Silvia; Martín-Hita, Ana; Frutos-Vivar, Fernando; Fernández-Segoviano, Pilar; Esteban, Andrés

    2012-08-01

    A 27-year-old woman was admitted to our ICU with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure and criteria for ARDS. Despite an F(IO(2)) of 1.0 and a lung protective strategy, the patient died on day 15 without any improvement. The relatives gave consent for post-mortem analysis. The histopathologic study of the lung showed findings typical of an acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia. Apropos of this case we performed a PubMed search. We found 13 articles, including a total of 29 patients. Acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia is an unusual cause of acute lung injury. The diagnostic criterion is histopathologic. There is little information regarding the pathophysiology of this illness. Important questions remain regarding this disease, including predisposing factors and management. Patients who require mechanical ventilation have poor outcomes.

  13. A breath of fresh air: images of respiratory illness in novels, poems, films, music, and paintings.

    PubMed

    Kaptein, Ad A; Meulenberg, Frans; Smyth, Joshua M

    2015-03-01

    The nature and severity of respiratory disease are typically expressed with biomedical measures such as pulmonary function, X-rays, blood tests, and other physiological characteristics. The impact of respiratory illness on the sufferer, however, is reflected in the stories patients tell: to themselves, their social environment, and their health care providers. Behavioral research often applies standardized questionnaires to assess this subjective impact. Additional approaches to sampling patients' experience of respiratory illness may, however, provide important and clinically useful information that is not captured by other methods. Herein, we assert that novels, poems, movies, music, and paintings may represent a rich, experiential understanding of the patient's point of view of asthma, cystic fibrosis, lung cancer, and tuberculosis. Examination of these works illustrates the broad range and major impact of respiratory illness on patients' quality of life. We suggest that examining how illness is represented in various art forms may help patients, their social environment, and their health care providers in coping with the illness and in humanizing medical care. Medical students' clinical skills may benefit when illness experiences as expressed in art are incorporated in the medical curriculum. More generally, Narrative Health Psychology, Narrative Medicine, and Medical Humanities deserve more attention in education, training, and clinical care of (respiratory) physicians, medical students, and other health care professionals.

  14. Thrombo-prophylaxis in acutely ill medical and critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Saigal, Saurabh; Sharma, Jai Prakash; Joshi, Rajnish; Singh, Dinesh Kumar

    2014-06-01

    Thrombo-prophylaxis has been shown to reduce the incidence of pulmonary embolism (PE) and mortality in surgical patients. The purpose of this review is to find out the evidence-based clinical practice criteria of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis in acutely ill medical and critically ill patients. English-language randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analysis were included if they provided clinical outcomes and evaluated therapy with low-dose heparin or related agents compared with placebo, no treatment, or other active prophylaxis in the critically ill and medically ill population. For the same, we searched MEDLINE, PUBMED, Cochrane Library, and Google Scholar. In acutely ill medical patients on the basis of meta-analysis by Lederle et al. (40 trials) and LIFENOX study, heparin prophylaxis had no significant effect on mortality. The prophylaxis may have reduced PE in acutely ill medical patients, but led to more bleeding events, thus resulting in no net benefit. In critically ill patients, results of meta-analysis by Alhazzani et al. and PROTECT Trial indicate that any heparin prophylaxis compared with placebo reduces the rate of DVT and PE, but not symptomatic DVT. Major bleeding risk and mortality rates were similar. On the basis of MAGELLAN trial and EINSTEIN program, rivaroxaban offers a single-drug approach to the short-term and continued treatment of venous thrombosis. Aspirin has been used as antiplatelet agent, but when the data from two trials the ASPIRE and WARFASA study were pooled, there was a 32% reduction in the rate of recurrence of venous thrombo-embolism and a 34% reduction in the rate of major vascular events.

  15. Brazilian medicinal plants to treat upper respiratory tract and bronchial illness: systematic review and meta-analyses—study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Luciane C; Silva, Maria Carolina O; Motta, Cristiane Bergamashi; Macho Quirós, Antonio; Biavatti, Maique Weber; de Oliveira, Jardel Corrêa; Guyatt, Gordon

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory illness, often associated with cough and sputum, is frequent. In Brazil, herbal medicines are often recommended as a first-line treatment for respiratory illness. There exists uncertainty regarding the effectiveness of these treatments. No systematic review has evaluated Brazilian medicinal plants (BMP) to treat upper respiratory tract and bronchial illness (URTI). Methods and analysis We will conduct a systematic review and, if appropriate, a series of meta-analyses evaluating the safety and effectiveness of BMP for URTI. Eligible randomised controlled trials and observational studies will enrol adult or paediatric patients presenting with URTI treated by BMP approved by the Brazilian Health Surveillance Agency compared with placebo, no treatment or an alternative therapy. Our search will include the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), which contains the Cochrane Acute Respiratory Illness Group's Specialized Register; MEDLINE; EMBASE; CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature); Web of Science; AMED; LILACS; CAB abstracts; clinical trial.gov; the WHO Trial Register and the Brazilian thesis database (CAPES) without any language restrictions. Outcomes of interest are time to resolution of clinical symptoms and/or signs (cough, sputum production or activity limitations), severity of symptoms prior to resolution and major/minor adverse events. Teams of reviewers will, independently and in duplicate, screen titles and abstracts and the complete full text to determine eligibility. For eligible studies, reviewers will perform data abstraction and assess risk of bias of eligible trials. When appropriate, we will conduct meta-analyses. We will also assess the quality of body of evidence (confidence in estimates of effect) for each of the outcomes using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. Ethics and dissemination The systematic review will be published in

  16. Burden of self-reported acute gastrointestinal illness in Cuba.

    PubMed

    Aguiar Prieto, Pablo; Finley, Rita L; Muchaal, P K; Guerin, Michele T; Isaacs, Sandy; Domínguez, Arnaldo Castro; Coutín Marie, Gisele; Perez, Enrique

    2009-06-01

    Acute gastrointestinal illness is an important public-health issue worldwide. Burden-of-illness studies have not previously been conducted in Cuba. The objective of the study was to determine the magnitude, distribution, and burden of self-reported acute gastrointestinal illness in Cuba. A retrospective, cross-sectional survey was conducted in three sentinel sites during June-July 2005 (rainy season) and during November 2005-January 2006 (dry season). Households were randomly selected from a list maintained by the medical offices in each site. One individual per household was selected to complete a questionnaire in a face-to-face interview. The case definition was three or more bouts of loose stools in a 24-hour period within the last 30 days. In total, 97.3% of 6,576 interviews were completed. The overall prevalence of acute gastrointestinal illness was 10.6%. The risk of acute gastrointestinal illness was higher during the rainy season (odds ratio [OR]=3.85, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.18-4.66) in children (OR=3.12, 95% CI 2.24-4.36) and teens (OR=2.27, 95% CI 1.51-3.41) compared to people aged 25-54 years, in males (OR=1.24, 95% CI 1.04-1.47), and in the municipality of Santiago de Cuba (OR=1.33, 95% CI 1.11-1.61). Of 680 cases, 17.1-38.1% visited a physician, depending on sentinel site. Of the cases who visited a physician, 33.3-53.9% were requested to submit a stool sample, and of those, 72.7-100.0% complied. Of the cases who sought medical care, 16.7-61.5% and 0-31.6% were treated with antidiarrhoeals and antibiotics respectively. Acute gastrointestinal illness represented a substantial burden of health compared to developed countries. Targeting the identified risk factors when allocating resources for education, food safety, and infrastructure might lower the morbidity associated with acute gastrointestinal illness.

  17. Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Fluid Management in the PICU

    PubMed Central

    Ingelse, Sarah A.; Wösten-van Asperen, Roelie M.; Lemson, Joris; Daams, Joost G.; Bem, Reinout A.; van Woensel, Job B.

    2016-01-01

    The administration of an appropriate volume of intravenous fluids, while avoiding fluid overload, is a major challenge in the pediatric intensive care unit. Despite our efforts, fluid overload is a very common clinical observation in critically ill children, in particular in those with pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome (PARDS). Patients with ARDS have widespread damage of the alveolar–capillary barrier, potentially making them vulnerable to fluid overload with the development of pulmonary edema leading to prolonged course of disease. Indeed, studies in adults with ARDS have shown that an increased cumulative fluid balance is associated with adverse outcome. However, age-related differences in the development and consequences of fluid overload in ARDS may exist due to disparities in immunologic response and body water distribution. This systematic review summarizes the current literature on fluid imbalance and management in PARDS, with special emphasis on potential differences with adult patients. It discusses the adverse effects associated with fluid overload and the corresponding possible pathophysiological mechanisms of its development. Our intent is to provide an incentive to develop age-specific fluid management protocols to improve PARDS outcomes. PMID:27047904

  18. Anxiety and depression on an acute respiratory ward

    PubMed Central

    Thew, Graham R; MacCallam, Jackie; Salkovskis, Paul M; Suntharalingam, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Psychological difficulties are a common complication among patients with respiratory disease, and are associated with poorer health outcomes and increased use of healthcare. As prevalence studies typically sample patients from community settings, this study aimed to explore the extent and nature of psychological difficulties during acute hospital admission. Methods: A case example of an acute respiratory ward is presented. In total, 41 acute respiratory inpatients completed standardised measures of depression, anxiety, and health anxiety. Results: Rates of clinically significant depression, anxiety, and health anxiety were 71%, 40%, and 21%, respectively, with 76% of participants showing clinically significant scores on at least one measure. Comparison to existing literature suggests depression rates may be elevated in the acute inpatient context. The difficulties experienced encompassed both contextual factors related to being in hospital and broader health concerns. Conclusion: We suggest that psychological distress may be particularly prevalent in inpatient settings and that larger-scale studies are warranted. PMID:27508081

  19. Respiratory viruses in children hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infection in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory tract infections are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality among young children in developing countries. Information on the viral aetiology of acute respiratory infections in developing countries is very limited. The study was done to identify viruses associated with acute lower respiratory tract infection among children less than 5 years. Method Nasopharyngeal samples and blood cultures were collected from children less than 5 years who have been hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infection. Viruses and bacteria were identified using Reverse Transcriptase Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction and conventional biochemical techniques. Results Out of 128 patients recruited, 33(25.88%%, 95%CI: 18.5% to 34.2%) were positive for one or more viruses. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) was detected in 18(14.1%, 95%CI: 8.5% to 21.3%) patients followed by Adenoviruses (AdV) in 13(10.2%, 95%CI: 5.5% to 16.7%), Parainfluenza (PIV type: 1, 2, 3) in 4(3.1%, 95%CI: 0.9% to 7.8%) and influenza B viruses in 1(0.8%, 95%CI: 0.0 to 4.3). Concomitant viral and bacterial co-infection occurred in two patients. There were no detectable significant differences in the clinical signs, symptoms and severity for the various pathogens isolated. A total of 61.1% (22/36) of positive viruses were detected during the rainy season and Respiratory Syncytial Virus was the most predominant. Conclusion The study has demonstrated an important burden of respiratory viruses as major causes of childhood acute respiratory infection in a tertiary health institution in Ghana. The data addresses a need for more studies on viral associated respiratory tract infection. PMID:22490115

  20. The Costs of Respiratory Illnesses Arising from Florida Gulf Coast Karenia brevis Blooms

    PubMed Central

    Hoagland, Porter; Jin, Di; Polansky, Lara Y.; Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Kirkpatrick, Gary; Fleming, Lora E.; Reich, Andrew; Watkins, Sharon M.; Ullmann, Steven G.; Backer, Lorraine C.

    2009-01-01

    Background Algal blooms of Karenia brevis, a harmful marine algae, occur almost annually off the west coast of Florida. At high concentrations, K. brevis blooms can cause harm through the release of potent toxins, known as brevetoxins, to the atmosphere. Epidemiologic studies suggest that aerosolized brevetoxins are linked to respiratory illnesses in humans. Objectives We hypothesized a relationship between K. brevis blooms and respiratory illness visits to hospital emergency departments (EDs) while controlling for environmental factors, disease, and tourism. We sought to use this relationship to estimate the costs of illness associated with aerosolized brevetoxins. Methods We developed a statistical exposure–response model to express hypotheses about the relationship between respiratory illnesses and bloom events. We estimated the model with data on ED visits, K. brevis cell densities, and measures of pollen, pollutants, respiratory disease, and intra-annual population changes. Results We found that lagged K. brevis cell counts, low air temperatures, influenza outbreaks, high pollen counts, and tourist visits helped explain the number of respiratory-specific ED diagnoses. The capitalized estimated marginal costs of illness for ED respiratory illnesses associated with K. brevis blooms in Sarasota County, Florida, alone ranged from $0.5 to $4 million, depending on bloom severity. Conclusions Blooms of K. brevis lead to significant economic impacts. The costs of illness of ED visits are a conservative estimate of the total economic impacts. It will become increasingly necessary to understand the scale of the economic losses associated with K. brevis blooms to make rational choices about appropriate mitigation. PMID:19672403

  1. Respiratory Failure in Acute Organophosphorus Pesticide Self-Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Eddleston, Michael; Mohamed, Fahim; Davies, James OJ; Eyer, Peter; Worek, Franz; Sheriff, MH Rezvi; Buckley, Nick A

    2006-01-01

    Background: Acute organophosphorus (OP) pesticide poisoning is a major clinical problem in the developing world. Textbooks ascribe most deaths to respiratory failure occurring in one of two distinct clinical syndromes - acute cholinergic respiratory failure or the intermediate syndrome. The delayed failure appears to be due to respiratory muscle weakness, but its pathophysiology is not yet clear. Aim: To describe the clinical patterns of OP-induced respiratory failure and to determine whether the two syndromes are clinically distinct. Design: Prospective cohort study of 376 patients with confirmed OP poisoning. Methods: Patients were observed throughout their admission to three Sri Lankan hospitals. Exposure was confirmed by butyrylcholinesterase and blood OP assays. Results: Ninety of 376 patients (24%) required intubation, 52 (58%) within 2 hrs of admission while unconscious with cholinergic features. Twenty-nine (32%) were well on admission but then required intubation after 24 hrs while conscious and without cholinergic features. These two syndromes were not clinically distinct and had much overlap. In particular, some patients who required intubation on arrival subsequently recovered conscious but could not be extubated, requiring ventilation for up to 6 days. Discussion: Respiratory failure did not occur as two discrete clinical syndromes within distinct time frames. Instead, the pattern of failure was variable and overlapped in some patients. There seemed to be two underlying mechanisms - an early acute mixed central and peripheral respiratory failure, and a late peripheral respiratory failure - rather than two defined clinical syndromes. PMID:16861715

  2. Does health status influence acceptance of illness in patients with chronic respiratory diseases?

    PubMed

    Kurpas, D; Mroczek, B; Brodowski, J; Urban, M; Nitsch-Osuch, A

    2015-01-01

    The level of illness acceptance correlates positively with compliance to the doctor's recommendations, and negatively with the frequency and intensity of complications of chronic diseases. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of the clinical condition on the level of illness acceptance, and to find variables which would have the most profound effect on the level of illness acceptance in patients with chronic respiratory diseases. The study group consisted of 594 adult patients (mean age: 60 ± 15 years) with mixed chronic respiratory diseases, recruited from patients of 136 general practitioners. The average score in the Acceptance of Illness Scale was 26.2 ± 7.6. The low level of illness acceptance was noted in 174 (62.6 %) and high in 46 (16.6 %) patients. Analysis of multiple regressions was used to examine the influence of explanatory variables on the level of illness acceptance. The variables which shaped the level of illness acceptance in our patients included: improvement of health, intensity of symptoms, age, marital status, education level, place of residence, BMI, and the number of chronic diseases. All above mentioned variables should be considered during a design of prevention programs for patients with mixed chronic respiratory diseases.

  3. Sleep Disturbances in Acutely Ill Patients with Cancer.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Ellyn E; Tanner, J Mark; Dumont, Natalie A

    2016-06-01

    Intensive care units may place acutely ill patients with cancer at additional risk for sleep loss and associated negative effects. Research suggests that communication about sleep in patients with cancer is suboptimal and sleep problems are not regularly assessed or adequately treated throughout the cancer trajectory. However, many sleep problems and fatigue can be managed effectively. This article synthesizes the current literature regarding the prevalence, cause, and risk factors that contribute to sleep disturbance in the context of acute cancer care. It describes the consequences of poor sleep and discusses appropriate assessment and treatment options. PMID:27215362

  4. Outdoor air pollution and acute respiratory infections among children in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Romieu, Isabelle; Samet, Jonathan M; Smith, Kirk R; Bruce, Nigel

    2002-07-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARIs) are the most common cause of illness and death in children in the developing world. This review focuses on outdoor air pollutants associated with pediatric ARI mortality and morbidity. Studies were identified using MEDLINE and other electronic databases. Four studies showed an increase in infant mortality in relation to outdoor air pollution. Short-term follow-up and time-series studies suggest that air pollutants act as risk factors for respiratory infection. Air pollution exposure increases the incidence of upper- and lower-respiratory infections in children. Because complex pollution mixtures are present in the studied urban areas, pollutant levels at which ARI risk would be expected to increase cannot be determined. Children may be at greater risk, given the poor environmental and nutritional conditions prevalent in developing countries.

  5. Extracorporeal life support for adults with severe acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Del Sorbo, Lorenzo; Cypel, Marcelo; Fan, Eddy

    2014-02-01

    Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) is an artificial means of maintaining adequate oxygenation and carbon dioxide elimination to enable injured lungs to recover from underlying disease. Technological advances have made ECLS devices smaller, less invasive, and easier to use. ECLS might, therefore, represent an important step towards improved management and outcomes of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Nevertheless, rigorous evidence of the ability of ECLS to improve short-term and long-term outcomes is needed before it can be widely implemented. Moreover, how to select patients and the timing and indications for ECLS in severe acute respiratory distress syndrome remain unclear. We describe the physiological principles, the putative risks and benefits, and the clinical evidence supporting the use of ECLS in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Additionally, we discuss controversies and future directions, such as novel technologies and indications, mechanical ventilation of the native lung during ECLS, and ethics considerations. PMID:24503270

  6. MicroRNA Regulation of Acute Lung Injury and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, Subbiah; Pattarayan, Dhamotharan; Rajaguru, P; Sudhakar Gandhi, P S; Thimmulappa, Rajesh K

    2016-10-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), a severe form of acute lung injury (ALI), is a very common condition associated with critically ill patients, which causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite decades of research, effective therapeutic strategies for clinical ALI/ARDS are not available. In recent years, microRNAs (miRNAs), small non-coding molecules have emerged as a major area of biomedical research as they post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression in diverse biological and pathological processes, including ALI/ARDS. In this context, this present review summarizes a large body of evidence implicating miRNAs and their target molecules in ALI/ARDS originating largely from studies using animal and cell culture model systems of ALI/ARDS. We have also focused on the involvement of miRNAs in macrophage polarization, which play a critical role in regulating the pathogenesis of ALI/ARDS. Finally, the possible future directions that might lead to novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of ALI/ARDS are also reviewed. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2097-2106, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Fine particulate matter pollution linked to respiratory illness in infants and increased hospital costs.

    PubMed

    Sheffield, Perry; Roy, Angkana; Wong, Kendrew; Trasande, Leonardo

    2011-05-01

    There has been little research to date on the linkages between air pollution and infectious respiratory illness in children, and the resulting health care costs. In this study we used data on air pollutants and national hospitalizations to study the relationship between fine particulate air pollution and health care charges and costs for the treatment of bronchiolitis, an acute viral infection of the lungs. We found that as the average exposure to fine particulate matter over the lifetime of an infant increased, so did costs for the child's health care. If the United States were to reduce levels of fine particulate matter to 7 percent below the current annual standard, the nation could save $15 million annually in reduced health care costs from hospitalizations of children with bronchiolitis living in urban areas. These findings reinforce the need for ongoing efforts to reduce levels of air pollutants. They should trigger additional investigation to determine if the current standards for fine-particulate matter are sufficiently protective of children's health.

  8. Pertussis immunisation and serious acute neurological illnesses in children.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, D; Madge, N; Diamond, J; Wadsworth, J; Ross, E

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine long term outcome in children who had a severe acute neurological illness in early childhood associated with pertussis immunisation. DESIGN--Follow up study of cases and matched controls. SETTING--Assessment of children at home and at school throughout Britain. SUBJECTS--Children recruited into the national childhood encephalopathy study in 1976-9 were followed up, with one of their two original matched controls, in 1986-9. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Performance in educational attainment tests; behaviour problems reported by teachers and parents; continuing convulsions; evidence of other neurological or physical dysfunction. RESULTS--Over 80% of cases and controls were traced. Case children were significantly more likely than controls to have died or to have some form of educational, behavioural, neurological, or physical dysfunction a decade after their illness. The prevalence of one or more of these adverse outcomes in case children who had been immunised with diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis vaccine within seven days before onset of their original illness was similar to that in case children who had not been immunised recently. The relative risk for recent diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis immunisation in children who had died or had any dysfunction in comparison with controls was 5.5 (95% confidence interval 1.6 to 23.7). However, the number of cases associated with vaccine (12) was extremely small and statistically vulnerable, and other possible agents or predisposing factors could not be excluded. CONCLUSIONS--Diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis vaccine may on rare occasions be associated with the development of severe acute neurological illnesses that can have serious sequelae. Some cases may occur by chance or have other causes. The role of pertussis vaccine as a prime or concomitant factor in the aetiology of these illnesses cannot be determined in any individual case. The balance of possible risk against known benefits from pertussis

  9. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in lambs. Hematology.

    PubMed

    Ulvund, M J; Grønstøl, H

    1984-01-01

    Lambs suffering from Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) showed elevated PCV, neutrophilia, a tendency towards lymphopenia, eosinopenia, hyperphosphatemia, hypoglycemia and extremely low serum Ca values during the first couple of days after the outbreak of symptoms. During the very early phase, plasma potassium values were mostly lowered (Figs. 1-3, Table I). The possible involvement of histamine is shortly discussed: either 1) through an atopic reaction, 2) because of acute ruminal acidosis and sudden histamine formation, or 3) involvement of endotoxins.

  10. Place of Child Care and Medicated Respiratory Illness among Young American Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Presser, Harriet B.

    1988-01-01

    Study based on Child Health Supplement to 1981 National Health Interview Survey showed higher prevalence of medicated respiratory illness among children under age five when they were cared for outside the home. For children under age three, prevalence was highest in child care centers, lower in other homes, and lowest in own home. (Author/NB)

  11. Biomarkers of Acute Respiratory Allergen Exposure: Screening For Sensitization Potential

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: An in vitro assay to identify respiratory sensitizers will provide a rapid screen and reduce animal use. The study goal was to identify biomarkers that differentiate allergen versus non-allergen responses following an acute exposure. Methods: Female BALB/c mice rec...

  12. Global reemergence of enterovirus D68 as an important pathogen for acute respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Tadatsugu; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2015-03-01

    We previously detected enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) in children with severe acute respiratory infections in the Philippines in 2008-2009. Since then, the detection frequency of EV-D68 has increased in different parts of the world, and EV-D68 is now recognized as a reemerging pathogen. However, the epidemiological profile and clinical significance of EV-D68 is yet to be defined, and the virological characteristics of EV-D68 are not fully understood. Recent studies have revealed that EV-D68 is detected among patients with acute respiratory infections of differing severities ranging from mild upper respiratory tract infections to severe pneumonia including fatal cases in pediatric and adult patients. In some study sites, the EV-D68 detection rate was higher among patients with lower respiratory tract infections than among those with upper respiratory tract infections, suggesting that EV-D68 infections are more likely to be associated with severe respiratory illnesses. EV-D68 strains circulating in recent years have been divided into three distinct genetic lineages with different antigenicity. However, the association between genetic differences and disease severity, as well as the occurrence of large-scale outbreaks, remains elusive. Previous studies have revealed that EV-D68 is acid sensitive and has an optimal growth temperature of 33 °C. EV-D68 binds to α2,6-linked sialic acids; hence, it is assumed that it has an affinity for the upper respiratory track where these glycans are present. However, the lack of suitable animal model constrains comprehensive understanding of the pathogenesis of EV-D68.

  13. Host Transcriptional Response to Influenza and Other Acute Respiratory Viral Infections – A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Yijie; Franco, Luis M.; Atmar, Robert L.; Quarles, John M.; Arden, Nancy; Bucasas, Kristine L.; Wells, Janet M.; Niño, Diane; Wang, Xueqing; Zapata, Gladys E.; Shaw, Chad A.; Belmont, John W.; Couch, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the systemic response to naturally acquired acute respiratory viral infections, we prospectively enrolled 1610 healthy adults in 2009 and 2010. Of these, 142 subjects were followed for detailed evaluation of acute viral respiratory illness. We examined peripheral blood gene expression at 7 timepoints: enrollment, 5 illness visits and the end of each year of the study. 133 completed all study visits and yielded technically adequate peripheral blood microarray gene expression data. Seventy-three (55%) had an influenza virus infection, 64 influenza A and 9 influenza B. The remaining subjects had a rhinovirus infection (N = 32), other viral infections (N = 4), or no viral agent identified (N = 24). The results, which were replicated between two seasons, showed a dramatic upregulation of interferon pathway and innate immunity genes. This persisted for 2-4 days. The data show a recovery phase at days 4 and 6 with differentially expressed transcripts implicated in cell proliferation and repair. By day 21 the gene expression pattern was indistinguishable from baseline (enrollment). Influenza virus infection induced a higher magnitude and longer duration of the shared expression signature of illness compared to the other viral infections. Using lineage and activation state-specific transcripts to produce cell composition scores, patterns of B and T lymphocyte depressions accompanied by a major activation of NK cells were detected in the acute phase of illness. The data also demonstrate multiple dynamic gene modules that are reorganized and strengthened following infection. Finally, we examined pre- and post-infection anti-influenza antibody titers defining novel gene expression correlates. PMID:26070066

  14. Diarrheal and Respiratory Illness Surveillance During US-RP Balikatan 2014.

    PubMed

    Velasco, John M; Valderamat, Maria T; Nogrado, Kathyleen; Wongstitwilairoong, Tippa; Swierczewski, Brett; Bodhidatta, Ladaporn; Lertsethtakarn, Paphavee; Klungthong, Chonticha; Fernandez, Stefan; Mason, Carl; Yoon, In-Kyu; Macareo, Louis

    2015-06-01

    Diarrheal and respiratory illness surveillance was conducted during the 2014 Republic of the Philippines-U.S. Exercise Balikatan in the Philippines. Seven stool and three respiratory specimens that met the inclusion criteria were collected. Diarrhea stool specimens were tested with commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for 12 viral, bacterial, and protozoan pathogens. Campylobacter, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) were detected in four of seven (57%), two of seven (29%), and four of seven (57%) specimens, respectively. There were co-infections of EPEC and ETEC in two cases and EPEC and Campylobacter spp. in one case. Respiratory samples were tested using RT-PCR. One of three samples was positive for influenza B. Laboratory-based surveillance is important in determining causative agents for illnesses experienced by military personnel during deployment. Development of vaccines for enteric diseases should be expedited to mitigate their impact on operational readiness.

  15. [Pain, agitation and delirium in acute respiratory failure].

    PubMed

    Funk, G-C

    2016-02-01

    Avoiding pain, agitation and delirium as well as avoiding unnecessary deep sedation is a powerful yet challenging strategy in critical care medicine. A number of interactions between cerebral function and respiratory function should be regarded in patients with respiratory failure and mechanical ventilation. A cooperative sedation strategy (i.e. patient is awake and free of pain and delirium) is feasible in many patients requiring invasive mechanical ventilation. Especially patients with mild acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) seem to benefit from preserved spontaneous breathing. While completely disabling spontaneous ventilation with or without neuromuscular blockade is not a standard strategy in ARDS, it might be temporarily required in patients with severe ARDS, who have substantial dyssynchrony or persistent hypoxaemia. Since pain, agitation and delirium compromise respiratory function they should also be regarded during noninvasive ventilation and during ventilator weaning. Pharmacological sedation can have favourable effects in these situations, but should not be given routinely or uncritically. PMID:26817653

  16. Noninvasive Mechanical Ventilation in Acute Respiratory Failure Patients: A Respiratory Therapist Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo, V; Giugliano-Jaramillo, C; Pérez, R; Cerpa, F; Budini, H; Cáceres, D; Gutiérrez, T; Molina, J; Keymer, J; Romero-Dapueto, C

    2015-01-01

    Physiotherapist in Chile and Respiratory Therapist worldwide are the professionals who are experts in respiratory care, in mechanical ventilation (MV), pathophysiology and connection and disconnection criteria. They should be experts in every aspect of the acute respiratory failure and its management, they and are the ones who in medical units are able to resolve doubts about ventilation and the setting of the ventilator. Noninvasive mechanical ventilation should be the first-line of treatment in acute respiratory failure, and the standard of care in severe exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema, and in immunosuppressed patients with high levels of evidence that support the work of physiotherapist. Exist other considerations where most of the time, physicians and other professionals in the critical units do not take into account when checking the patient ventilator synchrony, such as the appropriate patient selection, ventilator selection, mask selection, mode selection, and the selection of a trained team in NIMV. The physiotherapist needs to evaluate bedside; if patients are properly connected to the ventilator and in a synchronously manner. In Chile, since 2004, the physioterapist are included in the guidelines as a professional resource in the ICU organization, with the same skills and obligations as those described in the literature for respiratory therapists. PMID:26312104

  17. Noninvasive Mechanical Ventilation in Acute Respiratory Failure Patients: A Respiratory Therapist Perspective.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, V; Giugliano-Jaramillo, C; Pérez, R; Cerpa, F; Budini, H; Cáceres, D; Gutiérrez, T; Molina, J; Keymer, J; Romero-Dapueto, C

    2015-01-01

    Physiotherapist in Chile and Respiratory Therapist worldwide are the professionals who are experts in respiratory care, in mechanical ventilation (MV), pathophysiology and connection and disconnection criteria. They should be experts in every aspect of the acute respiratory failure and its management, they and are the ones who in medical units are able to resolve doubts about ventilation and the setting of the ventilator. Noninvasive mechanical ventilation should be the first-line of treatment in acute respiratory failure, and the standard of care in severe exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema, and in immunosuppressed patients with high levels of evidence that support the work of physiotherapist. Exist other considerations where most of the time, physicians and other professionals in the critical units do not take into account when checking the patient ventilator synchrony, such as the appropriate patient selection, ventilator selection, mask selection, mode selection, and the selection of a trained team in NIMV. The physiotherapist needs to evaluate bedside; if patients are properly connected to the ventilator and in a synchronously manner. In Chile, since 2004, the physioterapist are included in the guidelines as a professional resource in the ICU organization, with the same skills and obligations as those described in the literature for respiratory therapists.

  18. Respiratory syncytial virus, adenoviruses, and mixed acute lower respiratory infections in children in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Carlos E; Rodríguez, Diego Andrés; Nino, Gustavo

    2015-05-01

    There is growing evidence suggesting greater severity and worse outcomes in children with mixed as compared to single respiratory virus infections. However, studies that assess the risk factors that may predispose a child to a mixture of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and adenoviral infections, are scarce. In a retrospective cohort study, the study investigated the epidemiology of RSV and adenovirus infections and predictors of mixed RSV-adenoviral infections in young children hospitalized with acute lower respiratory infection in Bogota, Colombia, South America, over a 2-year period 2009-2011. Of a total of 5,539 children admitted with a diagnosis of acute lower respiratory infection, 2,267 (40.9%) who were positive for RSV and/or adenovirus were selected. Out the total number of cases, 1,416 (62.5%) infections occurred during the 3-month period from March to May, the first rainy season of Bogota, Colombia. After controlling for gender, month when the nasopharyngeal sample was taken, and other pre-existing conditions, it was found that an age greater than 6 months (OR:1.74; CI 95%:1.05-2.89; P = 0.030) and malnutrition as a comorbidity (OR:9.92; CI 95%:1.01-100.9; P = 0.049) were independent predictors of mixed RSV-adenoviral infections in the sample of patients. In conclusion, RSV and adenovirus are significant causes of acute lower respiratory infection in infants and young children in Bogota, Colombia, especially during the first rainy season. The identified predictors of mixed RSV-adenoviral infections should be taken into account when planning intervention, in order to reduce the burden of acute lower respiratory infection in young children living in the country.

  19. Trends in deaths from respiratory illness in children in England and Wales from 1968 to 2000

    PubMed Central

    Panickar, J; Dodd, S; Smyth, R; Couriel, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: Childhood mortality has decreased markedly over the last three decades. A study was undertaken to determine trends in deaths from respiratory illness in children in England and Wales. Methods: Mortality data collected by the Office for National Statistics were analysed. The data included all deaths registered from all causes in children aged between 28 days and 16 years in England and Wales from 1 January 1968 to 31 December 2000. The main outcome measures were overall and age-specific mortality rates due to all respiratory disorders and specific rates for pneumonia, asthma, cystic fibrosis (CF), and bronchiolitis. Results: In children aged 1–16 years the overall mortality rate (per 100 000 children) declined from 49.9 in 1968 to 16.3 in 2000, and rates due to respiratory illness fell from 8.6 to 1.3. The proportion of all deaths caused by respiratory illness in children aged 28 days to 16 years fell from 30.8% in 1968 to 9.9% in 2000. In post-neonatal infants (aged 28–364 days), the "all cause" mortality rate fell from 592.8 in 1968 to 176 in 2000 and the rates due to respiratory illness fell from 280 to 22.8. In 2000, pneumonia, asthma and CF together accounted for 73% of all respiratory deaths in 1–16 year olds. In this age group, mortality rates per 100 000 for pneumonia fell from 4.22 to 0.57, for asthma from 0.83 to 0.25, and for CF from 0.66 to 0.12 between 1968 and 2000. Over the same period mortality rates for pneumonia in post-neonatal infants fell from 165 to 6.78 per 100 000 and for CF from 4.88 to 0.33. Bronchiolitis mortality rates per 100 000 in post-neonatal infants fell from 21.47 in 1979 to 1.82 in 2000. Conclusions: Mortality rates due to all respiratory illnesses in children have fallen markedly in the last three decades. This decline has been more rapid than the overall decline in childhood mortality and respiratory diseases are now responsible for a smaller proportion of deaths in children. These data could provide a

  20. Importance of respiratory viruses in acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Heikkinen, Terho; Chonmaitree, Tasnee

    2003-04-01

    Acute otitis media is usually considered a simple bacterial infection that is treated with antibiotics. However, ample evidence derived from studies ranging from animal experiments to extensive clinical trials supports a crucial role for respiratory viruses in the etiology and pathogenesis of acute otitis media. Viral infection of the upper respiratory mucosa initiates the whole cascade of events that finally leads to the development of acute otitis media as a complication. The pathogenesis of acute otitis media involves a complex interplay between viruses, bacteria, and the host's inflammatory response. In a substantial number of children, viruses can be found in the middle-ear fluid either alone or together with bacteria, and recent studies indicate that at least some viruses actively invade the middle ear. Viruses appear to enhance the inflammatory process in the middle ear, and they may significantly impair the resolution of otitis media. Prevention of the predisposing viral infection by vaccination against the major viruses would probably be the most effective way to prevent acute otitis media. Alternatively, early treatment of the viral infection with specific antiviral agents would also be effective in reducing the occurrence of acute otitis media.

  1. Analysis of health services use for respiratory illness in Indonesian children: implications for policy.

    PubMed

    Thind, Amardeep

    2005-03-01

    Respiratory illness continues to be a leading cause of paediatric morbidity and mortality in Indonesia. The Indonesian government is moving towards a more managed care-based approach as it reforms its health care system following the 1997 financial crisis. In order to better design contractual relationships between the payor and different providers, there needs to be a better understanding of the patterns and predictors of health services utilization for respiratory illness. This study uses the Indonesia Demographic and Health Survey to study the determinants of private, public and non-formal provider utilization for respiratory illness. Multinomial logistic regression models for predicting use were constructed using the Andersen Behavioural Model as the conceptual framework. The findings indicate that age, household size, maternal education, religion, the asset index, location and illness severity play a role in determining use of private, public or non-formal providers. The results indicate that from a policy perspective, the Indonesian government needs be inclusive rather than exclusive in the choice of providers that are contracted by the managed care plans, in order to safeguard the health of the under-five population.

  2. From Data Patterns to Mechanistic Models in Acute Critical Illness

    PubMed Central

    Aerts, Jean-Marie; Haddad, Wassim M.; An, Gary; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of the physiologic and inflammatory response in acute critical illness has stymied the accurate diagnosis and development of therapies. The Society for Complex Acute Illness was formed a decade ago with the goal of leveraging multiple complex systems approaches in order to address this unmet need. Two main paths of development have characterized the Society’s approach: i) data pattern analysis, either defining the diagnostic/prognostic utility of complexity metrics of physiological signals or multivariate analyses of molecular and genetic data, and ii) mechanistic mathematical and computational modeling, all being performed with an explicit translational goal. Here, we summarize the progress to date on each of these approaches, along with pitfalls inherent in the use of each approach alone. We suggest that the next decade holds the potential to merge these approaches, connecting patient diagnosis to treatment via mechanism-based dynamical system modeling and feedback control, and allowing extrapolation from physiologic signals to biomarkers to novel drug candidates. As a predicate example, we focus on the role of data-driven and mechanistic models in neuroscience, and the impact that merging these modeling approaches can have on general anesthesia. PMID:24768566

  3. The acute respiratory distress syndrome: from mechanism to translation.

    PubMed

    Han, SeungHye; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2015-02-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a form of severe hypoxemic respiratory failure that is characterized by inflammatory injury to the alveolar capillary barrier, with extravasation of protein-rich edema fluid into the airspace. Although many modalities to treat ARDS have been investigated over the past several decades, supportive therapies remain the mainstay of treatment. In this article, we briefly review the definition, epidemiology, and pathophysiology of ARDS and present emerging aspects of ARDS pathophysiology that encompass modulators of the innate immune response, damage signals, and aberrant proteolysis that may serve as a foundation for future therapeutic targets.

  4. New Insights toward the Acute Non-Thyroidal Illness Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wajner, Simone Magagnin; Maia, Ana Luiza

    2012-01-01

    The non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) refers to changes in serum thyroid hormone levels observed in critically ill patients in the absence of hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid primary dysfunction. Affected individuals have low T3, elevated rT3, and inappropriately normal TSH levels. The pathophysiological mechanisms are poorly understood but the acute and chronic changes in pituitary-thyroid function are probably the consequence of the action of multiple factors. The early phase seems to reflect changes occurring primarily in the peripheral thyroid hormone metabolism, best seen in humans since 80-90% of the circulating T3 are derived from the pro-hormone T4. The conversion of T4 to T3 is catalyzed by type 1 (D1) and type 2 (D2) deiodinases via outer-ring deiodination. In contrast, type 3 deiodinase (D3) catalyzes the inactivation of both T4 and T3. Over the last decades, several studies have attempted to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the changes on circulating thyroid hormones in NTIS. Increased inflammatory cytokines, which occurs in response to virtually any illness, has long been speculated to play a role in derangements of deiodinase expression. On the other hand, oxidative stress due to augmented reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation is characteristic of many diseases that are associated with NTIS. Changes in the intracellular redox state may disrupt deiodinase function by independent mechanisms, which might include depletion of the as yet unidentified endogenous thiol cofactor. Here we aim to present an updated picture of the advances in understanding the mechanisms that result in the fall of thyroid hormone levels in the acute phase of NTIS.

  5. Hyperglycemia and acute kidney injury in critically ill children

    PubMed Central

    Gordillo, Roberto; Ahluwalia, Tania; Woroniecki, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Background Hyperglycemia and acute kidney injury (AKI) are common in critically ill children and have been associated with higher morbidity and mortality. The incidence of AKI in children is difficult to estimate because of the lack of a standard definition for AKI. The pediatric RIFLE (Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss of kidney function, and End-stage kidney disease) criteria can be used to define AKI in children. Various biomarkers in urine and blood have been studied to detect AKI in critically ill children. However, it is not clear whether hyperglycemia is associated with AKI. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of hyperglycemia on kidney function and its effect on neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) in children. Methods We studied retrospective and prospective cohorts of pediatric critically ill subjects admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). We analyzed data from admission that included estimated glomerular filtration rate, plasma and urine NGAL, serum glucose and peak glycemia (highest glycemia during PICU admission), and length of hospital and PICU stay from two different institutions. Results We found that the prevalence of hyperglycemia was 89% in the retrospective cohort and 86% in the prospective cohort, P=0.99. AKI was associated with peak glycemia, P=0.03. There was a statistically significant correlation between peak glycemia and hospital and PICU stays, P=<0.001 and P<0.001, respectively. Urine NGAL and plasma NGAL were not statistically different in subjects with and without hyperglycemia, P=0.99 and P=0.85, respectively. Subjects on vasopressors had lower estimated glomerular filtration rate and higher glycemia, P=0.01 and P=0.04, respectively. Conclusion We conclude that in critically ill children, hyperglycemia is associated with AKI and longer PICU stays. PMID:27601931

  6. Low usage of government healthcare facilities for acute respiratory infections in guatemala: implications for influenza surveillance

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Sentinel surveillance for severe acute respiratory infections in hospitals and influenza-like illness in ambulatory clinics is recommended to assist in global pandemic influenza preparedness. Healthcare utilization patterns will affect the generalizability of data from sentinel sites and the potential to use them to estimate burden of disease. The objective of this study was to measure healthcare utilization patterns in Guatemala to inform the establishment of a sentinel surveillance system for influenza and other respiratory infections, and allow estimation of disease burden. Methods We used a stratified, two-stage cluster survey sample to select 1200 households from the Department of Santa Rosa. Trained interviewers screened household residents for self-reported pneumonia in the last year and influenza-like illness (ILI) in the last month and asked about healthcare utilization for each illness episode. Results We surveyed 1131 (94%) households and 5449 residents between October and December 2006 and identified 323 (6%) cases of pneumonia and 628 (13%) cases of ILI. Treatment for pneumonia outside the home was sought by 92% of the children <5 years old and 73% of the persons aged five years and older. For both children <5 years old (53%) and persons aged five years and older (31%) who reported pneumonia, private clinics were the most frequently reported source of care. For ILI, treatment was sought outside the home by 81% of children <5 years old and 65% of persons aged five years and older. Government ambulatory clinics were the most frequently sought source of care for ILI both for children <5 years old (41%) and persons aged five years and older (36%). Conclusions Sentinel surveillance for influenza and other respiratory infections based in government health facilities in Guatemala will significantly underestimate the burden of disease. Adjustment for healthcare utilization practices will permit more accurate estimation of the incidence of influenza

  7. Prevalence and Impact of Active and Passive Cigarette Smoking in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, S. Jean; Zhuo, Hanjing; Benowitz, Neal L.; Thompson, B. Taylor; Liu, Kathleen D.; Matthay, Michael A.; Calfee, Carolyn S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cigarette smoke exposure has recently been found to be associated with increased susceptibility to trauma- and transfusion-associated acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We sought to determine 1) the prevalence of cigarette smoke exposure in a diverse multi-center sample of ARDS patients, and 2) whether cigarette smoke exposure is associated with severity of lung injury and mortality in ARDS. Design Analysis of the Albuterol for the Treatment of ALI (ALTA) and Omega ARDS Network studies. Setting Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network hospitals. Patients Three hundred eighty one patients with ARDS. Interventions None. Measurements NNAL (4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol), a validated tobacco-specific marker, was measured in urine samples from subjects enrolled in two NHLBI ARDS Network randomized controlled trials. Main Results Urine NNAL levels were consistent with active smoking in 36% of ARDS patients and with passive smoking in 41% of nonsmokers (vs 20% and 40% in general population, respectively). Patients with NNAL levels in the active smoking range were younger and had a higher prevalence of alcohol misuse, fewer comorbidities, lower severity of illness, and less septic shock at enrollment compared to patients with undetectable NNAL levels. Despite this lower severity of illness, the severity of lung injury did not significantly differ based on biomarker-determined smoking status. Cigarette smoke exposure was not significantly associated with death after adjusting for differences in age, alcohol use, comorbidities, and severity of illness. Conclusions In this first multicenter study of biomarker-determined cigarette smoke exposure in ARDS patients, we found that active cigarette smoke exposure was significantly more prevalent among ARDS patients compared to population averages. Despite their younger age, better overall health, and lower severity of illness, smokers by NNAL had similar severity of lung injury as patients with

  8. Acute gastrointestinal illness following a prolonged community-wide water emergency.

    PubMed

    Gargano, J W; Freeland, A L; Morrison, M A; Stevens, K; Zajac, L; Wolkon, A; Hightower, A; Miller, M D; Brunkard, J M

    2015-10-01

    The drinking water infrastructure in the United States is ageing; extreme weather events place additional stress on water systems that can lead to interruptions in the delivery of safe drinking water. We investigated the association between household exposures to water service problems and acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) and acute respiratory illness (ARI) in Alabama communities that experienced a freeze-related community-wide water emergency. Following the water emergency, investigators conducted a household survey. Logistic regression models were used to estimate adjusted prevalence ratios (aPR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for self-reported AGI and ARI by water exposures. AGI was higher in households that lost water service for ⩾7 days (aPR 2·4, 95% CI 1·1-5·2) and experienced low water pressure for ⩾7 days (aPR 3·6, 95% CI 1·4-9·0) compared to households that experienced normal service and pressure; prevalence of AGI increased with increasing duration of water service interruptions. Investments in the ageing drinking water infrastructure are needed to prevent future low-pressure events and to maintain uninterrupted access to the fundamental public health protection provided by safe water supplies. Households and communities need to increase their awareness of and preparedness for water emergencies to mitigate adverse health impacts. PMID:25608522

  9. Acute gastrointestinal illness following a prolonged community-wide water emergency.

    PubMed

    Gargano, J W; Freeland, A L; Morrison, M A; Stevens, K; Zajac, L; Wolkon, A; Hightower, A; Miller, M D; Brunkard, J M

    2015-10-01

    The drinking water infrastructure in the United States is ageing; extreme weather events place additional stress on water systems that can lead to interruptions in the delivery of safe drinking water. We investigated the association between household exposures to water service problems and acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) and acute respiratory illness (ARI) in Alabama communities that experienced a freeze-related community-wide water emergency. Following the water emergency, investigators conducted a household survey. Logistic regression models were used to estimate adjusted prevalence ratios (aPR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for self-reported AGI and ARI by water exposures. AGI was higher in households that lost water service for ⩾7 days (aPR 2·4, 95% CI 1·1-5·2) and experienced low water pressure for ⩾7 days (aPR 3·6, 95% CI 1·4-9·0) compared to households that experienced normal service and pressure; prevalence of AGI increased with increasing duration of water service interruptions. Investments in the ageing drinking water infrastructure are needed to prevent future low-pressure events and to maintain uninterrupted access to the fundamental public health protection provided by safe water supplies. Households and communities need to increase their awareness of and preparedness for water emergencies to mitigate adverse health impacts.

  10. The Influence of Prehospital Systemic Corticosteroid Use on Development of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Hospital Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Karnatovskaia, Lioudmila V.; Lee, Augustine S.; Gajic, Ognjen; Festic, Emir

    2015-01-01

    Objective The role of systemic corticosteroids in pathophysiology and treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome is controversial. Use of prehospital systemic corticosteroid therapy may prevent the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome and improve hospital outcomes. Design This is a preplanned retrospective subgroup analysis of the prospectively identified cohort from a trial by the U.S. Critical Illness and Injury Trials Group designed to validate the Lung Injury Prediction Score. Setting Twenty-two acute care hospitals. Patients Five thousand eighty-nine patients with at least one risk factor for acute respiratory distress syndrome at the time of hospitalization. Intervention Propensity-based analysis of previously recorded data. Measurements and Main Results Three hundred sixty-four patients were on systemic corticosteroids. Prevalence of acute respiratory distress syndrome was 7.7% and 6.9% (odds ratio, 1.1 [95% CI, 0.8–1.7]; p = 0.54) for patients on systemic corticosteroid and not on systemic corticosteroids, respectively. A propensity for being on systemic corticosteroids was derived through logistic regression by using all available covariates. Subsequently, 354 patients (97%) on systemic corticosteroids were matched to 1,093 not on systemic corticosteroids by their propensity score for a total of 1,447 patients in the matched set. Adjusted risk for acute respiratory distress syndrome (odds ratio, 0.96 [95% CI, 0.54–1.38]), invasive ventilation (odds ratio, 0.84 [95% CI, 0.62–1.12]), and inhospital mortality (odds ratio, 0.97 [95% CI, 0.63–1.49]) was then calculated from the propensity-matched sample using conditional logistic regression model. No significant associations were present. Conclusions Prehospital use of systemic corticosteroids neither decreased the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome among patients hospitalized with at one least risk factor, nor affected the need for mechanical ventilation or hospital

  11. Severe hypophosphataemia during recovery from acute respiratory acidosis.

    PubMed

    Storm, T L

    1984-08-25

    Three elderly patients with established chronic obstructive airways disease were admitted with a short history of increasing dyspnoea and tiredness and (in two cases) a deterioration in mental state. Acute respiratory acidosis was diagnosed and mechanical ventilation instituted. Two hours after beginning mechanical ventilation the mean arterial pH had risen to 7.40, but all patients showed a dramatic fall in the serum phosphate concentration (lowest value 0.3 mmol/l (0.9 mg/100 ml] accompanied by a low urinary excretion of phosphate. No patient could tolerate withdrawal of mechanical ventilation until the serum and urinary concentrations of phosphate had returned to normal. Recovery from acute respiratory acidosis should be added to the list of conditions associated with severe hypophosphataemia.

  12. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome after near-drowning (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Tempel, G; Jelen, S; Forster, B; Gullotta, U; Daum, S

    1977-08-01

    After successful rescue from drowning there may develop a situation which is called secondary drowning, resulting in acute respiratory distress characterized by interstitial pulmonary oedema, hypoxaemia, hypercapnia and acidosis during drowning, direct alteration of the alveolar membrane by aspirated water and particulate matters and a volume overloading by adsorption and--not seldom--inept therapy. This situation requires mechanical ventilation and forced diuresis, combined with high doses of steroids, antibiotics and digitalis. We present the case of an eleven year old patient whose clinical course demonstrate the necessity of exact clinical observation after rescue from drowning. After development of acute respiratory distress only the immediate utilization of the therapeutic modalities of an intensive care may result in a satisfactory outcome. Four months later our patient had normal pulmonary function except for a moderate reduction of compliance.

  13. Detection of multiple respiratory viruses associated with mortality and severity of illness in children

    PubMed Central

    Rehder, Kyle J.; Wilson, Elizabeth A.; Zimmerman, Kanecia O.; Cunningham, Coleen K.; Turner, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Respiratory viral infection is a common source of morbidity and mortality in children. Co-infection with multiple viruses occurs frequently; however, the clinical significance of concomitant viral pathogens is unclear. We hypothesized that presence of more than one respiratory virus is associated with increased morbidity and mortality when compared to children with a single respiratory virus. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting A tertiary care hospital. Patients All children at Duke Children’s Hospital over a two year period with isolation of a virus on an extended viral respiratory panel (EVRP) result. Demographic data, co-morbidities, and details of hospital encounter were recorded. Interventions None Measurements and Main Results 235 hospital encounters demonstrated positive EVRPs. Immunocompromised status (37%) and respiratory comorbidities (23%) were common. 28 patients (12%) tested positive for multiple viruses, with adenovirus (23/28) and respiratory syncytial virus (15/28) most prevalent in patients with multiple viruses. Viral co-detection was associated with increased use of non-invasive ventilation (p=0.02), extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (p=0.02), increased likelihood of moderate or severe illness (p=0.005) and increased mortality (p=0.01). Subgroup analysis demonstrated that this mortality association persisted for children with normal immune function (p=0.003) and children with no comorbidities (p=0.007). Conclusions Children with multiple respiratory viruses may be at increased risk of moderate or severe illness and mortality, with previously healthy children potentially being at greatest risk. Further studies are indicated to determine the significance and generalizability of this finding and to better understand the pathophysiology of viral co-infection. PMID:26121097

  14. Control Measures for Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Twu, Shiing-Jer; Chen, Tzay-Jinn; Chen, Chien-Jen; Olsen, Sonja J.; Lee, Long-Teng; Fisk, Tamara; Hsu, Kwo-Hsiung; Chang, Shan-Chwen; Chen, Kow-Tong; Chiang, I-Hsin; Wu, Yi-Chun; Wu, Jiunn-Shyan

    2003-01-01

    As of April 14, 2003, Taiwan had had 23 probable cases of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), all imported. Taiwan isolated these first 23 patients with probable SARS in negative-pressure rooms; extensive personal protective equipment was used for healthcare workers and visitors. For the first 6 weeks of the SARS outbreak, recognized spread was limited to one healthcare worker and three household contacts. PMID:12781013

  15. Isolation of Aspergillus spp. from the respiratory tract in critically ill patients: risk factors, clinical presentation and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Garnacho-Montero, José; Amaya-Villar, Rosario; Ortiz-Leyba, Carlos; León, Cristóbal; Álvarez-Lerma, Francisco; Nolla-Salas, Juan; Iruretagoyena, José R; Barcenilla, Fernando

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Our aims were to assess risk factors, clinical features, management and outcomes in critically ill patients in whom Aspergillus spp. were isolated from respiratory secretions, using a database from a study designed to assess fungal infections. Methods A multicentre prospective study was conducted over a 9-month period in 73 intensive care units (ICUs) and included patients with an ICU stay longer than 7 days. Tracheal aspirate and urine samples, and oropharyngeal and gastric swabs were collected and cultured each week. On admission to the ICU and at the initiation of antifungal therapy, the severity of illness was evaluated using the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score. Retrospectively, isolation of Aspergillus spp. was considered to reflect colonization if the patient did not fulfil criteria for pneumonia, and infection if the patient met criteria for pulmonary infection and if the clinician in charge considered the isolation to be clinically valuable. Risk factors, antifungal use and duration of therapy were noted. Results Out of a total of 1756 patients, Aspergillus spp. were recovered in 36. Treatment with steroids (odds ratio = 4.5) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (odds ratio = 2.9) were significantly associated with Aspergillus spp. isolation in multivariate analysis. In 14 patients isolation of Aspergillus spp. was interpreted as colonization, in 20 it was interpreted as invasive aspergillosis, and two cases were not classified. The mortality rates were 50% in the colonization group and 80% in the invasive infection group. Autopsy was performed in five patients with clinically suspected infection and confirmed the diagnosis in all of these cases. Conclusion In critically ill patients, treatment should be considered if features of pulmonary infection are present and Aspergillus spp. are isolated from respiratory secretions. PMID:15987390

  16. Epidemiological and clinical features of dengue versus other acute febrile illnesses amongst patients seen at government polyclinics.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, B; Hani, A W Asmah; Chem, Y K; Mariam, M; Khairul, A H; Abdul Rasid, K; Chua, K B

    2010-12-01

    Classical dengue fever is characterized by the clinical features of fever, headache, severe myalgia and occasionally rash, which can also be caused by a number of other viral and bacterial infections. Five hundred and fifty eight patients who fulfilled the criteria of clinical diagnosis of acute dengue from 4 government outpatient polyclinics were recruited in this prospective field study. Of the 558 patients, 190 patients were categorized as acute dengue fever, 86 as recent dengue and 282 as non-dengue febrile illnesses based on the results of a number of laboratory tests. Epidemiological features of febrile patients showed that the mean age of patients in the dengue fever group was significantly younger in comparison with patients in the non-dengue group. There was no significant difference between the two groups with respect to gender but there was significant ethnic difference with foreign workers representing a higher proportion in the dengue fever group. Patients with acute dengue fever were more likely to have patient-reported rash and a history of dengue in family or neighbourhood but less likely to have respiratory symptoms, sore-throat and jaundice in comparison to patients with non-dengue febrile illnesses. As with patients with dengue fever, patients in the recent dengue group were more likely to have history of patient-reported rash and a history of dengue contact and less likely to have respiratory symptoms in comparison to patients with non-dengue febrile illnesses. In contrast to patients with dengue fever, patients in the recent dengue group were more likely to have abdominal pain and jaundice in comparison to non-dengue febrile patients. The finding strongly suggests that a proportion of patients in the recent dengue group may actually represent a subset of patients with acute dengue fever at the late stage of illness.

  17. Acute Neurological Illness in a Kidney Transplant Recipient Following Infection With Enterovirus-D68: An Emerging Infection?

    PubMed

    Wali, R K; Lee, A H; Kam, J C; Jonsson, J; Thatcher, A; Poretz, D; Ambardar, S; Piper, J; Lynch, C; Kulkarni, S; Cochran, J; Djurkovic, S

    2015-12-01

    We report the first case of enterovirus-D68 infection in an adult living-donor kidney transplant recipient who developed rapidly progressive bulbar weakness and acute flaccid limb paralysis following an upper respiratory infection. We present a 45-year-old gentleman who underwent pre-emptive living-donor kidney transplantation for IgA nephropathy. Eight weeks following transplantation, he developed an acute respiratory illness from enterovirus/rhinovirus that was detectable in nasopharyngeal (NP) swabs. Within 24 h of onset of respiratory symptoms, the patient developed binocular diplopia which rapidly progressed to multiple cranial nerve dysfunctions (acute bulbar syndrome) over the next 24 h. Within the next 48 h, asymmetric flaccid paralysis of the left arm and urinary retention developed. While his neurological symptoms were evolving, the Centers for Disease Control reported that the enterovirus strain from the NP swabs was, in fact, Enterovirus-D68 (EV-D68). Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain demonstrated unique gray matter and anterior horn cell changes in the midbrain and spinal cord, respectively. Constellation of these neurological symptoms and signs was suggestive for postinfectious encephalomyelitis (acute disseminated encephalomyelitis [ADEM]) from EV-D68. Treatment based on the principles of ADEM included intensive physical therapy and other supportive measures, which resulted in a steady albeit slow improvement in his left arm and bulbar weakness, while maintaining stable allograft function. PMID:26228743

  18. Meditation or Exercise for Preventing Acute Respiratory Infection: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Bruce; Hayney, Mary S.; Muller, Daniel; Rakel, David; Ward, Ann; Obasi, Chidi N.; Brown, Roger; Zhang, Zhengjun; Zgierska, Aleksandra; Gern, James; West, Rebecca; Ewers, Tola; Barlow, Shari; Gassman, Michele; Coe, Christopher L.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE This study was designed to evaluate potential preventive effects of meditation or exercise on incidence, duration, and severity of acute respiratory infection (ARI) illness. METHODS Community-recruited adults aged 50 years and older were randomized to 1 of 3 study groups: 8-week training in mindfulness meditation, matched 8-week training in moderate-intensity sustained exercise, or observational control. The primary outcome was area-under-the-curve global illness severity during a single cold and influenza season, using the Wisconsin Upper Respiratory Symptom Survey (WURSS-24) to assess severity. Health care visits and days of missed work were counted. Nasal wash collected during ARI illness was assayed for neutrophils, interleukin-8, and viral nucleic acid. RESULTS Of 154 adults randomized into the study, 149 completed the trial (82% female, 94% white, mean age 59.3 ± 6.6 years). There were 27 ARI episodes and 257 days of ARI illness in the meditation group (n = 51), 26 episodes and 241 illness days in the exercise group (n = 47), and 40 episodes and 453 days in the control group (n = 51). Mean global severity was 144 for meditation, 248 for exercise, and 358 for control. Compared with control, global severity was significantly lower for meditation (P = .004). Both global severity and total days of illness (duration) trended toward being lower for the exercise group (P=.16 and P=.032, respectively), as did illness duration for the meditation group (P=.034). Adjusting for covariates using zero-inflated multivariate regression models gave similar results. There were 67 ARI-related days of-work missed in the control group, 32 in the exercise group (P = .041), and 16 in the meditation group (P <.001). Health care visits did not differ significantly. Viruses were identified in 54% of samples from meditation, 42% from exercise, and 54% from control groups. Neutrophil count and interleukin-8 levels were similar among intervention groups. CONCLUSIONS Training in

  19. Acute respiratory distress syndrome associated with tumor lysis syndrome in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Macaluso, Alessandra; Genova, Selene; Maringhini, Silvio; Coffaro, Giancarlo; Ziino, Ottavio; D'Angelo, Paolo

    2015-02-24

    Tumor lysis syndrome is a serious and dangerous complication usually associated with antiblastic treatment in some malignancies characterized by high cell turn-over. Mild or severe electrolyte abnormalities including high serum levels of uric acid, potassium, phosphorus, creatinine, bun and reduction of calcium can be responsible for multi-organ failure, involving mostly kidneys, heart and central nervous system. Renal damage can be followed by acute renal failure, weight gain, progressive liver impairment, overproduction of cytokines, and subsequent maintenance of multi-organ damage. Life-threatening acute respiratory failure associated with tumor lysis syndrome is rare. We describe a child with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, who developed an unusually dramatic tumor lysis syndrome, after administration of the first low doses of steroid, that was rapidly associated with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. Subsequent clinical course and treatment modalities that resulted in the gradual and full recovery of the child are also described. PMID:25918625

  20. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Associated with Tumor Lysis Syndrome in a Child with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Macaluso, Alessandra; Genova, Selene; Maringhini, Silvio; Coffaro, Giancarlo; Ziino, Ottavio; D’Angelo, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Tumor lysis syndrome is a serious and dangerous complication usually associated with antiblastic treatment in some malignancies characterized by high cell turn-over. Mild or severe electrolyte abnormalities including high serum levels of uric acid, potassium, phosphorus, creatinine, bun and reduction of calcium can be responsible for multi-organ failure, involving mostly kidneys, heart and central nervous system. Renal damage can be followed by acute renal failure, weight gain, progressive liver impairment, overproduction of cytokines, and subsequent maintenance of multi-organ damage. Life-threatening acute respiratory failure associated with tumor lysis syndrome is rare. We describe a child with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, who developed an unusually dramatic tumor lysis syndrome, after administration of the first low doses of steroid, that was rapidly associated with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. Subsequent clinical course and treatment modalities that resulted in the gradual and full recovery of the child are also described. PMID:25918625

  1. Respiratory failure of acute organophosphate and carbamate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Tsao, T C; Juang, Y C; Lan, R S; Shieh, W B; Lee, C H

    1990-09-01

    Respiratory failure (RF) developed in 43 (40.2 percent) of 107 patients with acute organophosphate or carbamate poisoning; 22 (51.2 percent) died. The 64 patients who did not develop RF survived. All cases of RF developed within 96 hours after poisoning: within 24 hours in 35 patients (acute onset) and between 24 and 96 hours in eight patients (subacute onset). Severity of poisoning was the primary determinating factor for RF. Cardiovascular collapse and pneumonia were also associated with RF. In 19 patients with cardiovascular collapse, 17 had acute onset of RF and two had subacute onset. In 28 patients with pneumonia, 17 developed acute onset of RF and eight developed subacute onset. No organophosphorus compound caused RF more frequently than another. The duration of ventilator support for subacute RF was significantly longer than for acute RF (287 +/- 186 vs 115 +/- 103 hours, p = 0.02). The use of pralidoxime did not reduce the incidence of RF. We found that severity of poisoning, cardiovascular collapse, and pneumonia were the predisposing factors to RF. The golden time for treatment of acute organophosphate or carbamate poisoning was the initial 96 hours. No RF occurred after this time. Aggressive treatment and prevention of the above three factors will reduce the incidence of RF, or in other words, reduce the mortality.

  2. Acute kidney injury in critically ill cancer patients: an update.

    PubMed

    Lameire, Norbert; Vanholder, Raymond; Van Biesen, Wim; Benoit, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Patients with cancer represent a growing group among actual ICU admissions (up to 20 %). Due to their increased susceptibility to infectious and noninfectious complications related to the underlying cancer itself or its treatment, these patients frequently develop acute kidney injury (AKI). A wide variety of definitions for AKI are still used in the cancer literature, despite existing guidelines on definitions and staging of AKI. Alternative diagnostic investigations such as Cystatin C and urinary biomarkers are discussed briefly. This review summarizes the literature between 2010 and 2015 on epidemiology and prognosis of AKI in this population. Overall, the causes of AKI in the setting of malignancy are similar to those in other clinical settings, including preexisting chronic kidney disease. In addition, nephrotoxicity induced by the anticancer treatments including the more recently introduced targeted therapies is increasingly observed. However, data are sometimes difficult to interpret because they are often presented from the oncological rather than from the nephrological point of view. Because the development of the acute tumor lysis syndrome is one of the major causes of AKI in patients with a high tumor burden or a high cell turnover, the diagnosis, risk factors, and preventive measures of the syndrome will be discussed. Finally, we will briefly discuss renal replacement therapy modalities and the emergence of chronic kidney disease in the growing subgroup of critically ill post-AKI survivors. PMID:27480256

  3. Human Respiratory Coronaviruses Detected In Patients with Influenza-Like Illness in Arkansas, USA

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Camila S; Mullis, Lisa B; Pereira, Olavo; Saif, Linda J; Vlasova, Anastasia; Zhang, Xuming; Owens, Randall J; Paulson, Dale; Taylor, Deborah; Haynes, Lia M; Azevedo, Marli P

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory viruses often result in significant morbidity and mortality. The potential impact of human respiratory coronavirus (CoV) infections was underestimated until the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-CoV) outbreak in 2003, which showed that new, highly pathogenic coronaviruses could be introduced to humans, highlighting the importance of monitoring the circulating coronaviruses. The use of sensitive molecular methods has contributed to the differential diagnosis of viruses circulating in humans. Our study aim was to investigate the molecular epidemiology of human CoV strains circulating in Arkansas, their genetic variability and their association with reported influenza-like symptoms. We analyzed 200 nasal swab samples, collected by the Arkansas Department of Health in 2010, for influenza diagnosis. All samples were from patients showing acute respiratory symptoms while testing negative for influenza. Samples were pre-screened, using a quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) multiprobe for coronavirus, and subjected to confirmatory pancoronavirus and/or strain-specific reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR followed by sequence analysis. Seventy-nine samples (39.5%) were positive by qRT-PCR and 35 samples (17.5%) were confirmed by conventional RT-PCR. Twenty-three of the confirmed samples (59%) were sequenced. The most frequent strain detected was HCoV-OC43-like followed by NL63-like; only one sample was positive for HCoV-229E and one for HCoV-HKU1. Feline-like CoV strains were detected in three samples, representing possible evidence of interspecies transmission or a new human strain. Seventeen percent of the coronavirus positive samples were also positive for other respiratory viruses, such as Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV), Parainfluenza 2 and 3, and Rhinovirus. Thus, HCoV-OC43, NL63, HKU1 and new feline-like strains were circulating in Arkansas in 2010. HCoV was the sole respiratory virus detected in 16% of the

  4. NIV-Helmet in Severe Hypoxemic Acute Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Joana; Nunes, P.; Silvestre, C.; Abadesso, C.; Loureiro, H.; Almeida, H.

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) is a method to be applied in acute respiratory failure, given the possibility of avoiding tracheal intubation and conventional ventilation. A previous healthy 5-month-old boy developed low-grade intermittent fever, flu-like symptoms, and dry cough for 3 days. On admission, he showed severe respiratory distress with SpO2/FiO2 ratio of 94. Subsequent evaluation identified an RSV infection complicated with an increase of inflammatory parameters (reactive C protein 15 mg/dL). Within the first hour after NIV-helmet CPAP SpO2/FiO2 ratio increased to 157. This sustained improvement allowed the continuing of this strategy. After 102 h, he was disconnected from the helmet CPAP device. The NIV use in severe hypoxemic acute respiratory failure should be carefully monitored as the absence of clinical improvement has a predictive value in the need to resume to intubation and mechanical ventilation. We emphasize that SpO2/FiO2 ratio is a valuable monitoring instrument. Helmet interface use represents a more comfortable alternative for providing ventilatory support, particularly to small infants, which constitute a sensitive group within pediatric patients. PMID:26000189

  5. [Severe acute respiratory syndrome: a global overview of the epidemic].

    PubMed

    Franco-Paredes, Carlos; Kuri-Morales, Pablo; Alvarez-Lucas, Carlos; Palacios-Zavala, Ethel; Nava-Frías, Margarita; Betancourt-Cravioto, Miguel; Santos-Preciado, José Ignacio; Tapia-Conyer, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    In early February 2003, the World Health Organization (WHO) began receiving reports of patients with a syndrome characterized by an atypical pneumonia with rapid progression to respiratory failure without an identified cause despite extensive diagnostic workups. Most of these reports pointed out that the outbreak started in Southern China, specifically in the Guandong Province. The initial outbreak in South East Asia has already spread to other Regions in Asia, Europe, North and South America, and South Africa. Many of these cases can be linked through chains of transmission to an index case from the Guandong Province who visited Hong Kong. Although the exact mode of transmission has not been clearly established, the etiology of this syndrome has already been identified. A novel Coronavirus has been identified by electron microscopy and molecular assays in multiple laboratories from respiratory specimens throughout the world. The syndrome has been defined as SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) by WHO, and is characterized by an incubation period between 1 and 10 days (average 5 days) and by a febrile phase that usually lasts approximately 3 days. During the respiratory phase that begins around day 3, patients start developing a dry cough, shortness of breath and hypoxemia. Mechanical ventilatory support is required in about 10 to 40% of cases and the case-fatality rate ranges between 3 and 16%. The laboratory findings in SARS cases include leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and a rise in transaminases and lactic dehydrogenase levels. Treatment of SARS includes supportive measures and the empiric use of ribavirin. Respiratory isolation, use of respiratory masks, and compulsory hand hygiene constitute the principal preventive measures. The confirmation of a case can be performed at reference laboratories by serologic and molecular assays. From the onset of this epidemic Mexico established a surveillance system as well as clinical guidelines and recommendations for

  6. Acute respiratory effects of summer smog in primary school children.

    PubMed

    Cuijpers, C E; Swaen, G M; Wesseling, G; Wouters, E F

    1994-06-01

    In 535 primary school children we studied the effects of exposure to summer smog on respiratory health. Baseline measurements were performed during low air pollution levels (max. 24-h concentrations of SO2, O3 and NO2 were 55, 49 and 58 micrograms/m3, respectively) consisting of lung function measurements using spirometry and the forced oscillation technique (FOT) and the prevalence of respiratory symptoms, determined by a written questionnaire. During a summer smog episode, 212 randomly chosen children were re-examined, characterised by 8-h ozone levels > 120 micrograms/m3 (max. 163 micrograms/m3) and 1-h ozone levels > 160 micrograms/m3 (max. 215 micrograms/m3). Overall, small decrements were observed in the forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), (P < 0.05) and the forced expiratory volume between 25 and 75% of the vital capacity (FEF25-75%) (P < 0.01). On the contrary, there was a statistically significant decrease in resistance parameters. No increases were observed in the prevalence of acute respiratory symptoms. In conclusion, in this study we found small inconsistent changes in lung function and no increase of respiratory symptoms after short-time exposure to moderately high ozone levels.

  7. Antibiotic use in acute upper respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Zoorob, Roger; Sidani, Mohamad A; Fremont, Richard D; Kihlberg, Courtney

    2012-11-01

    Upper respiratory tract infections account for millions of visits to family physicians each year in the United States. Although warranted in some cases, antibiotics are greatly overused. This article outlines the guidelines and indications for appropriate antibiotic use for common upper respiratory infections. Early antibiotic treatment may be indicated in patients with acute otitis media, group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal pharyngitis, epiglottitis, or bronchitis caused by pertussis. Persistent cases of rhinosinusitis may necessitate the use of antibiotics if symptoms persist beyond a period of observation. Antibiotics should not be considered in patients with the common cold or laryngitis. Judicious, evidence-based use of antibiotics will help contain costs and prevent adverse effects and drug resistance.

  8. High frequency of enterovirus D68 in children hospitalised with respiratory illness in Norway, autumn 2014

    PubMed Central

    Bragstad, Karoline; Jakobsen, Kirsti; Rojahn, Astrid E; Skram, Marius K; Vainio, Kirsti; Holberg-Petersen, Mona; Hungnes, Olav; Dudman, Susanne G; Kran, Anne-Marte B

    2015-01-01

    Objectives An unexpectedly high proportion of children were admitted for severe respiratory infections at the Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål, Norway, during September and October, 2014. In light of the ongoing outbreak of enterovirus-D68 (EV-D68) in North America a real-time RT-PCR for screening of enterovirus and enterovirus D68 was established. Design We developed a duplex real-time RT-PCR for rapid screening of enterovirus D68. The method target the 5′ non-translated region (NTR) of the HEV genome at a location generally used for enterovirus detection. Sample Nasopharyngeal samples (n = 354), from children <15 years of age, received for respiratory virus analysis in OUH during September 1st and October 31nd, 2014, were tested for enterovirus and screened for enterovirus D68. Main outcome measures and results The duplex real-time RT-PCR method was an efficient tool for rapid screening for EV-D68 in respiratory specimens. Enterovirus was detected in 66 (22%) of 303 pediatric nasopharyngeal samples collected from children hospitalised with acute respiratory infection within the two-month period. Out of these, 33 (50%) were EV-D68. EV-D68 was associated with acute flaccid paralysis in one child. Conclusions An unexpectedly high proportion of children admitted for severe respiratory infections at the Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål, Norway, were diagnosed with EV- D68 during September 1st and October 31nd, 2014. These results emphasise that greater vigilance is required throughout Europe as enteroviruses are cause of severe respiratory disease. PMID:25534826

  9. Update: Outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome--worldwide, 2003.

    PubMed

    2003-03-28

    CDC continues to support the World Health Organization (WHO) in the investigation of a multicountry outbreak of unexplained atypical pneumonia referred to as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). This report includes summaries of the epidemiologic investigations and public health responses in several affected locations where CDC is collaborating with international and national health authorities. This report also describes an unusual cluster of cases associated with a hotel in Hong Kong and identifies the potential etiologic agent of SARS. Epidemiologic and laboratory investigations of SAPS are ongoing. PMID:12680518

  10. Sepsis and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Recent Update.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won-Young; Hong, Sang-Bum

    2016-04-01

    Severe sepsis or septic shock is characterized by an excessive inflammatory response to infectious pathogens. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a devastating complication of severe sepsis, from which patients have high mortality. Advances in treatment modalities including lung protective ventilation, prone positioning, use of neuromuscular blockade, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, have improved the outcome over recent decades, nevertheless, the mortality rate still remains high. Timely treatment of underlying sepsis and early identification of patients at risk of ARDS can help to decrease its development. In addition, further studies are needed regarding pathogenesis and novel therapies in order to show promising future treatments of sepsis-induced ARDS. PMID:27066082

  11. Respiratory autoresuscitation following severe acute hypoxemia in anesthetized adult rats.

    PubMed

    Krause, A; Nowak, Z; Srbu, R; Bell, H J

    2016-10-01

    In the present study we investigated the pattern and efficacy of respiratory autoresuscitation in spontaneously breathing adult male rats across three separate anesthetic backgrounds. Each animal was administered one of three injectable anesthetics to achieve a surgical plane of anesthesia: ketamine-xylazine (KET, n=10), pentobarbital (PEN, n=10), or urethane (URE, n=10). Animals were tracheostomized and equipped with a femoral artery catheter to record airflow and arterial pressures. In response to a bout of breathing anoxic air, none of the 10 URE animals were able to mount a successful autoresuscitation response. In contrast, all KET and PEN animals survived all four consecutive anoxic exposures, restoring eupneic breathing in all cases. Moreover, only 4/10 URE animals expressed gasping breaths following the onset of respiratory arrest, and these were temporally delayed (p<0.001) and much smaller in volume (P≤0.012) compared to KET and PEN animals. URE animals showed no clear aberrations in their cardiovascular responses to anoxia, with the exception of lower arterial pulse pressures compared to either KET or PEN animals at specific points following RA. Ketamine-xylazine and pentobarbital anesthesia can be reliably and effectively used to create models for the study of autoresuscitation in adult rats. In contrast, urethane causes catastrophic failure of respiratory autoresuscitation, by delaying or outright preventing the elaboration of gasping breaths following anoxia-induced respiratory arrest. The neuronal and synaptic alterations accompanying urethane anesthesia may therefore provide a means of understanding potential pathological alterations in rhythm generation that can predispose the respiratory control system to failed autoresuscitation following an episode of acute severe hypoxemia. PMID:27378495

  12. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome: a review of the Berlin definition].

    PubMed

    de Luis Cabezón, N; Sánchez Castro, I; Bengoetxea Uriarte, U X; Rodrigo Casanova, M P; García Peña, J M; Aguilera Celorrio, L

    2014-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is due to many causes. The absence of a universal definition up until now has led to a series of practical problems for a definitive diagnosis. The incidences of ARDS and Acute Lung Injury (ALI) vary widely in the current literature. The American-European Consensus Conference definition has been applied since its publication in 1994 and has helped to improve knowledge about ARDS. However, 18 years later, in 2011, the European Intensive Medicine Society, requested a team of international experts to meet in Berlin to review the ARDS definition. The purpose of the Berlin definition is not to use it as a prognostic tool, but to improve coherence between research and clinical practice.

  13. [Alcohol and acute respiratory distress syndrome: casuality or causality?].

    PubMed

    Sarmiento, Xavier; Guardiola, Juan J; Soler, Manuel

    2013-06-18

    Alcohol has been considered an important risk factor for the development of pneumonia since the last century. Nevertheless, it was not thought that it had relevant effects on lung structure and functions until recently. Recent studies have shown that the risk for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is 2-4 times higher among alcoholic patients with sepsis or trauma, and that alcoholism can play a roll in more than 50% of cases in the pathogenesis of this syndrome. Although alcoholism per se does not cause acute lung injury it predisposes to pulmonary dysfunction after inflammatory stress, that is present in clinical situations that cause ARDS leading to its development and complicating its outcome. Recent investigations in animals and humans with alcohol abuse have uncovered several alterations currently known as the "alcoholic lung". This revision discusses the association between alcohol abuse and lung injury/ARDS and tries to explain the physiopathology along with possible treatments.

  14. Respiratory muscle dysfunction: a multicausal entity in the critically ill patient undergoing mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Magda C; Ospina-Tascón, Gustavo A; Salazar C, Blanca C

    2014-02-01

    Respiratory muscle dysfunction, particularly of the diaphragm, may play a key role in the pathophysiological mechanisms that lead to difficulty in weaning patients from mechanical ventilation. The limited mobility of critically ill patients, and of the diaphragm in particular when prolonged mechanical ventilation support is required, promotes the early onset of respiratory muscle dysfunction, but this can also be caused or exacerbated by other factors that are common in these patients, such as sepsis, malnutrition, advanced age, duration and type of ventilation, and use of certain medications, such as steroids and neuromuscular blocking agents. In this review we will study in depth this multicausal origin, in which a common mechanism is altered protein metabolism, according to the findings reported in various models. The understanding of this multicausality produced by the same pathophysiological mechanism could facilitate the management and monitoring of patients undergoing mechanical ventilation.

  15. Respiratory muscle dysfunction: a multicausal entity in the critically ill patient undergoing mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Magda C; Ospina-Tascón, Gustavo A; Salazar C, Blanca C

    2014-02-01

    Respiratory muscle dysfunction, particularly of the diaphragm, may play a key role in the pathophysiological mechanisms that lead to difficulty in weaning patients from mechanical ventilation. The limited mobility of critically ill patients, and of the diaphragm in particular when prolonged mechanical ventilation support is required, promotes the early onset of respiratory muscle dysfunction, but this can also be caused or exacerbated by other factors that are common in these patients, such as sepsis, malnutrition, advanced age, duration and type of ventilation, and use of certain medications, such as steroids and neuromuscular blocking agents. In this review we will study in depth this multicausal origin, in which a common mechanism is altered protein metabolism, according to the findings reported in various models. The understanding of this multicausality produced by the same pathophysiological mechanism could facilitate the management and monitoring of patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. PMID:23669061

  16. Detection of respiratory viruses and Bordetella bronchiseptica in dogs with acute respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Schulz, B S; Kurz, S; Weber, K; Balzer, H-J; Hartmann, K

    2014-09-01

    Canine infectious respiratory disease (CIRD) is an acute, highly contagious disease complex caused by a variety of infectious agents. At present, the role of viral and bacterial components as primary or secondary pathogens in CIRD is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of canine parainfluenza virus (CPIV), canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2), canine influenza virus (CIV), canine respiratory coronavirus (CRCoV), canine herpes virus-1 (CHV-1), canine distemper virus (CDV) and Bordetella bronchiseptica in dogs with CIRD and to compare the data with findings in healthy dogs. Sixty-one dogs with CIRD and 90 clinically healthy dogs from Southern Germany were prospectively enrolled in this study. Nasal and pharyngeal swabs were collected from all dogs and were analysed for CPIV, CAV-2, CIV, CRCoV, CHV-1, CDV, and B. bronchiseptica by real-time PCR. In dogs with acute respiratory signs, 37.7% tested positive for CPIV, 9.8% for CRCoV and 78.7% for B. bronchiseptica. Co-infections with more than one agent were detected in 47.9% of B. bronchiseptica-positive, 82.6% of CPIV-positive, and 100% of CRCoV-positive dogs. In clinically healthy dogs, 1.1% tested positive for CAV-2, 7.8% for CPIV and 45.6% for B. bronchiseptica. CPIV and B. bronchiseptica were detected significantly more often in dogs with CIRD than in clinically healthy dogs (P < 0.001 for each pathogen) and were the most common infectious agents in dogs with CIRD in Southern Germany. Mixed infections with several pathogens were common. In conclusion, clinically healthy dogs can carry respiratory pathogens and could act as sources of infection for susceptible dogs. PMID:24980809

  17. Detection of respiratory viruses and Bordetella bronchiseptica in dogs with acute respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Schulz, B S; Kurz, S; Weber, K; Balzer, H-J; Hartmann, K

    2014-09-01

    Canine infectious respiratory disease (CIRD) is an acute, highly contagious disease complex caused by a variety of infectious agents. At present, the role of viral and bacterial components as primary or secondary pathogens in CIRD is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of canine parainfluenza virus (CPIV), canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2), canine influenza virus (CIV), canine respiratory coronavirus (CRCoV), canine herpes virus-1 (CHV-1), canine distemper virus (CDV) and Bordetella bronchiseptica in dogs with CIRD and to compare the data with findings in healthy dogs. Sixty-one dogs with CIRD and 90 clinically healthy dogs from Southern Germany were prospectively enrolled in this study. Nasal and pharyngeal swabs were collected from all dogs and were analysed for CPIV, CAV-2, CIV, CRCoV, CHV-1, CDV, and B. bronchiseptica by real-time PCR. In dogs with acute respiratory signs, 37.7% tested positive for CPIV, 9.8% for CRCoV and 78.7% for B. bronchiseptica. Co-infections with more than one agent were detected in 47.9% of B. bronchiseptica-positive, 82.6% of CPIV-positive, and 100% of CRCoV-positive dogs. In clinically healthy dogs, 1.1% tested positive for CAV-2, 7.8% for CPIV and 45.6% for B. bronchiseptica. CPIV and B. bronchiseptica were detected significantly more often in dogs with CIRD than in clinically healthy dogs (P < 0.001 for each pathogen) and were the most common infectious agents in dogs with CIRD in Southern Germany. Mixed infections with several pathogens were common. In conclusion, clinically healthy dogs can carry respiratory pathogens and could act as sources of infection for susceptible dogs.

  18. Recruitment maneuvers in acute respiratory distress syndrome: The safe way is the best way.

    PubMed

    Santos, Raquel S; Silva, Pedro L; Pelosi, Paolo; Rocco, Patricia Rm

    2015-11-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) represents a serious problem in critically ill patients and is associated with in-hospital mortality rates of 33%-52%. Recruitment maneuvers (RMs) are a simple, low-cost, feasible intervention that can be performed at the bedside in patients with ARDS. RMs are characterized by the application of airway pressure to increase transpulmonary pressure transiently. Once non-aerated lung units are reopened, improvements are observed in respiratory system mechanics, alveolar reaeration on computed tomography, and improvements in gas exchange (functional recruitment). However, the reopening process could lead to vascular compression, which can be associated with overinflation, and gas exchange may not improve as expected (anatomical recruitment). The purpose of this review was to discuss the effects of different RM strategies - sustained inflation, intermittent sighs, and stepwise increases of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and/or airway inspiratory pressure - on the following parameters: hemodynamics, oxygenation, barotrauma episodes, and lung recruitability through physiological variables and imaging techniques. RMs and PEEP titration are interdependent events for the success of ventilatory management. PEEP should be adjusted on the basis of respiratory system mechanics and oxygenation. Recent systematic reviews and meta-analyses suggest that RMs are associated with lower mortality in patients with ARDS. However, the optimal RM method (i.e., that providing the best balance of benefit and harm) and the effects of RMs on clinical outcome are still under discussion, and further evidence is needed.

  19. Failure of zinc gluconate in treatment of acute upper respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D S; Helzner, E C; Nuttall, C E; Collins, M; Rofman, B A; Ginsberg, D; Goswick, C B; Magner, A

    1989-01-01

    Zinc is a trace metal with in vitro activity against rhinovirus, the major etiologic agent in acute upper respiratory tract infections (URIs). A previous trial of zinc gluconate supported its efficacy in treating URIs, but the effectiveness of blinding was uncertain. We conducted a prospective randomized trial of zinc gluconate versus a taste-matched placebo of sucrose octaacetate. Lozenges containing either 23 mg of elemental zinc or placebo were taken every 2 h. Eleven URI symptoms were rated daily on a scale of 0 (not present) to 3 (severe). Duration of illness, reflected in the proportion of subjects remaining symptomatic on each day, was not significantly reduced (maximum difference of 12.6% on day 7, P = 0.09; 95% confidence interval, -6 to 31%) by either treatment. Severity of illness, assessed by using a summed severity score, was reduced incrementally by 7 to 8% on days 5 to 7 (P = 0.02) in subjects taking zinc. Adverse effects, mostly nausea and altered taste, were reported by 50% of subjects taking zinc. We conclude that while zinc gluconate may produce a small reduction in overall severity of symptoms, this is not clinically significant. Given the additional high incidence of adverse effects, zinc gluconate cannot be recommended for use in the treatment of acute URIs. PMID:2665639

  20. Preparing to prevent severe acute respiratory syndrome and other respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Ho, Mei-Shang; Su, Ih-Jen

    2004-11-01

    Globalisation and its effect on human development has rendered an environment that is conducive for the rapid international spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), and other new infectious diseases yet to emerge. After the unprecedented multi-country outbreak of avian influenza with human cases in the winter of 2003-2004, an influenza pandemic is a current threat. A critical review of problems and solutions encountered during the 2003-2004 SARS epidemics will serve as the basis for considering national preparedness steps that can be taken to facilitate the early detection of avian influenza, and a rapid response to an influenza pandemic should it occur.

  1. Noninvasive ventilation in acute respiratory failure from respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis

    PubMed Central

    Nizarali, Zahara; Cabral, Marta; Silvestre, Catarina; Abadesso, Clara; Nunes, Pedro; Loureiro, Helena; Almeida, Helena

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The present study focused on respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis with respiratory failure. The aim of the study was to determine whether noninvasive ventilation reduces the need for endotracheal intubation or slows the clinical progression of acute respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis by reducing the incidence of infectious complications. Methods The present study was a retrospective cohort study. Cohort A was comprised of children who were admitted to the pediatric intensive and special care unit from 2003-2005 before starting noninvasive ventilation; cohort B was comprised of children who were admitted to the pediatric intensive and special care unit from 2006-2008 after starting noninvasive ventilation. With the exception of noninvasive ventilation, the therapeutic support was the same for the two groups. All children who were diagnosed with respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis and respiratory failure between November 2003 and March 2008 were included in the cohort. Demographic, clinical and blood gas variables were analyzed. Results A total of 162 children were included; 75% of the subjects were less than 3 months old. Group A included 64 children, and group B included 98 children. In group B, 34 of the children required noninvasive ventilation. The distributions of the variables age, preterm birth, congenital heart disease, cerebral palsy and chronic lung disease were similar between the two groups. On admission, the data for blood gas analysis and the number of apneas were not significantly different between the groups. In group B, fewer children required invasive ventilation (group A: 12/64 versus group B: 7/98; p=0.02), and there was a reduction in the number of cases of bacterial pneumonia (group A: 19/64 versus group B: 12/98; p=0.008). There was no record of mortality in either of the groups. Conclusion By comparing children with the same disease both before and after noninvasive ventilation was used for ventilation support, we

  2. [ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISTRESS SYNDROME CAUSED BY BETA-LACTAM ANTIBIOTICS].

    PubMed

    Skipskiy, I M; Efimov, N W; Remizov, A S; Miroshnikov, B I

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of iatrogenic lesion of the lungs in a 61 year old patient following simultaneous subtotal resection and plastic surgery of esophagus using a gastric stem with the removed cardial portion along with subtotal mediastinal lympho-dissection for the treatment of 2 x 1 cm T2NoMO tumour in the middle third of esophagus. The patient's medical history contained no evidence of previous pulmonary pathology, preoperative chest X-ray study revealed neither focal nor infiltrative changes in the lungs. On day 5 after extensive surgical intervention with the use of a parenteral beta-lactam antibiotic, the patient developed acute respiratory distress the symptoms of which increased wavelike during the next 4.5 weeks in association with subfebrility, leukocytosis, enhanced ESR and large shaded areas in the lungs. These conditions were regarded as signs of pneumonia that required the application of increasingly more powerful beta-lactam antibiotics. All these symptoms became less apparent and completely disappeared within 2 days and 1 week respectively after withdrawal of the antibiotics and prescription of parenteral prednisolone. It confirmed the iatrogenic origin of lung lesions regarded by the authors as recurring acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by beta-lactam antibiotics.

  3. Exposure to cold and acute upper respiratory tract infection.

    PubMed

    Eccles, R; Wilkinson, J E

    2015-06-01

    The incidence of acute upper respiratory tract viral infections (URTI) is directly correlated to air temperature with most URTI occurring seasonally in cold weather. This review looks at four types of cold exposure and examines the evidence and possible mechanisms for any relationship to URTI. The effects of cold are discussed as: 1) Chilling of the nose and upper respiratory tract by breathing cold air, 2) Chilling of the mouth and upper digestive tract by ingestion of cold drinks and food, 3) Acute chilling of the body surface, and, 4) Chilling of the body as a whole with a fall in body temperature, hypothermia. Some studies were found to support a relationship between breathing cold air and chilling the body surface with the development of URTI, although this area is controversial. No evidence was found in the literature to support any relationship between ingestion of cold drinks and food and URTI, and similarly no evidence was found to link hypothermia and URTI. PMID:26030031

  4. Relevant Outcomes in Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Studies

    PubMed Central

    Yehya, Nadir; Thomas, Neal J.

    2016-01-01

    Despite distinct epidemiology and outcomes, pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome (PARDS) is often managed based on evidence extrapolated from treatment of adults. The impact of non-pulmonary processes on mortality as well as the lower mortality rate compared to adults with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) renders the utilization of short-term mortality as a primary outcome measure for interventional studies problematic. However, data regarding alternatives to mortality are profoundly understudied, and proposed alternatives, such as ventilator-free days, may be themselves subject to hidden biases. Given the neuropsychiatric and functional impairment in adult survivors of ARDS, characterization of these morbidities in children with PARDS is of paramount importance. The purpose of this review is to frame these challenges in the context of the existing pediatric literature, and using adult ARDS as a guide, suggest potential clinically relevant outcomes that deserve further investigation. The goal is to identify important areas of study in order to better define clinical practice and facilitate future interventional trials in PARDS. PMID:27242980

  5. Acute respiratory disease in Spain: seven years of experience.

    PubMed

    Tellez, A; Perez-Breña, P; Fernandez-Patiño, M V; León, P; Anda, P; Nájera, R

    1990-01-01

    The clinical and epidemiologic features of viral and nonviral pathogens involved in acute respiratory diseases are described in the context of cases of infection (especially atypical pneumonia and bronchiolitis) studied at the Centro Nacional de Microbiología, Virología e Immunología Sanitarias in Madrid during a 7-year period (1979-1986). These etiologies were demonstrated in 1,637 (36.2%) of 4,521 cases. Among viruses, respiratory syncytial virus most frequently infected children; influenza virus showed the same pattern of circulation as in other European countries. Of nonviral agents, Mycoplasma pneumoniae and C. burnetii were most often involved in lower respiratory tract infections, with a variable predominance in patients of different ages. A high proportion of cases of M. pneumoniae infection occurred in infants and children aged less than 1 year, and most of these cases occurred during spring and summer. The majority of Q fever cases, including those observed in two outbreaks, occurred in the northern region.

  6. Adenovirus Pneumonia Complicated With Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Ka-Ho; Lin, Lung-Huang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Severe adenovirus infection in children can manifest with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and respiratory failure, leading to the need for prolonged mechanical support in the form of either mechanical ventilation or extracorporeal life support. Early extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) intervention for children with ARDS should be considered if selection criteria fulfill. We report on a 9-month-old boy who had adenovirus pneumonia with rapid progression to ARDS. Real-time polymerase chain reaction tests of sputum and pleural effusion samples confirmed adenovirus serotype 7. Chest x-rays showed progressively increasing infiltrations and pleural effusions in both lung fields within 11 days. Because conventional ARDS therapies failed, we initiated ECMO with high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) for 9 days. Chest x-rays showed gradual improvements in lung expansion. This patient was subsequently discharged after a hospital stay of 38 days. Post-ECMO and adenovirus sequelae were followed in our outpatient department. Adenovirus pneumonia in children can manifest with severe pulmonary morbidity and respiratory failure. The unique lung recruitment by HFOV can be a useful therapeutic option for severe ARDS patients when combined with sufficient lung rest provided by ECMO. PMID:25997046

  7. Progress in Global Surveillance and Response Capacity 10 Years after Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Braden, Christopher R.; Dowell, Scott F.; Jernigan, Daniel B.

    2013-01-01

    Ten years have elapsed since the World Health Organization issued its first global alert for an unexplained illness named severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). The anniversary provides an opportunity to reflect on the international response to this new global microbial threat. While global surveillance and response capacity for public health threats have been strengthened, critical gaps remain. Of 194 World Health Organization member states that signed on to the International Health Regulations (2005), <20% had achieved compliance with the core capacities required by the deadline in June 2012. Lessons learned from the global SARS outbreak highlight the need to avoid complacency, strengthen efforts to improve global capacity to address the next pandemic using all available 21st century tools, and support research to develop new treatment options, countermeasures, and insights while striving to address the global inequities that are the root cause of many of these challenges. PMID:23731871

  8. Progress in global surveillance and response capacity 10 years after severe acute respiratory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Braden, Christopher R; Dowell, Scott F; Jernigan, Daniel B; Hughes, James M

    2013-06-01

    Ten years have elapsed since the World Health Organization issued its first global alert for an unexplained illness named severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). The anniversary provides an opportunity to reflect on the international response to this new global microbial threat. While global surveillance and response capacity for public health threats have been strengthened, critical gaps remain. Of 194 World Health Organization member states that signed on to the International Health Regulations (2005), <20% had achieved compliance with the core capacities required by the deadline in June 2012. Lessons learned from the global SARS outbreak highlight the need to avoid complacency, strengthen efforts to improve global capacity to address the next pandemic using all available 21st century tools, and support research to develop new treatment options, countermeasures, and insights while striving to address the global inequities that are the root cause of many of these challenges. PMID:23731871

  9. Hydrophilic Fungi and Ergosterol Associated with Respiratory Illness in a Water-Damaged Building

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ju-Hyeong; Cox-Ganser, Jean M.; Kreiss, Kathleen; White, Sandra K.; Rao, Carol Y.

    2008-01-01

    Background Damp building–related respiratory illnesses are an important public health issue. Objective We compared three respiratory case groups defined by questionnaire responses [200 respiratory cases, 123 of the respiratory cases who met the epidemiologic asthma definition, and 49 of the epidemiologic asthma cases who had current physician-diagnosed asthma with post-occupancy onset] to a comparison group of 152 asymptomatic employees in an office building with a history of water damage. Methods We analyzed dust samples collected from floors and chairs of 323 cases and comparisons for culturable fungi, ergosterol, endotoxin, and cat and dog allergens. We examined associations of total fungi, hydrophilic fungi (requiring water activity ≥ 0.9), and ergosterol with the health outcomes using logistic regression models. Results In models adjusted for demographics, respiratory illnesses showed significant linear exposure–response relationships to total culturable fungi [interquartile range odds ratios (IQR-OR) = 1.37–1.72], hydrophilic fungi (IQR-OR = 1.45–2.19), and ergosterol (IQR-OR = 1.54–1.60) in floor and chair dusts. Of three outcomes analyzed, current asthma with postoccupancy physician diagnosis was most strongly associated with exposure to hydrophilic fungi in models adjusted for ergosterol, endotoxin, and demographics (IQR-OR = 2.09 for floor and 1.79 for chair dusts). Ergosterol levels in floor dust were significantly associated with epidemiologic asthma independent of culturable fungi (IQR-OR = 1.54–1.55). Conclusions Our findings extend the 2004 conclusions of the Institute of Medicine [Human health effects associated with damp indoor environments. In: Damp Indoor Spaces and Health. Washington DC:National Academies Press, 183–269] by showing that mold levels in dust were associated with new-onset asthma in this damp indoor environment. Hydrophilic fungi and ergosterol as measures of fungal biomass may have promise as markers of risk of

  10. Positive end expiratory pressure in acute and chronic respiratory distress.

    PubMed

    Greenough, A; Chan, V; Hird, M F

    1992-03-01

    The optimum level of positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) was determined in 16 infants with respiratory distress syndrome (median gestational age 29 weeks, median postnatal age 1 day) and in 16 infants with chronic respiratory distress (median gestational age 25 weeks, median postnatal age 15 days). All infants were studied at a PEEP sequence of 3, 0, 3, 6, and 3 cm H2O, all other ventilator parameters being kept constant. Each PEEP level was maintained for 20 minutes and at the end of each period arterial blood gas was checked. During acute respiratory distress syndrome there were no significant changes in oxygenation but arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2) significantly decreased from a mean of 4.93 kPa at 3 cm H2O to 4.40 kPa at 0 cm H2O and increased to a mean of 5.87 kPa at 6 cm H2O. In the infants with chronic respiratory distress, oxygenation fell from a mean of 8.66 kPa at 3 cm H2O to 6.40 kPa at 0 cm H2O and improved at 6 cm H2O to a mean of 10.50 kPa. There were no significant changes in PaCO2. We conclude that addition of PEEP, up to 6 cm H2O, may be useful even after the first week of life. High levels of PEEP, however, have previously been reported, in certain infants, to result in circulatory disturbance. It is therefore important to assess the use of 6 cm H2O PEEP in a controlled study of longer term clinical outcome.

  11. Positive end expiratory pressure in acute and chronic respiratory distress.

    PubMed Central

    Greenough, A; Chan, V; Hird, M F

    1992-01-01

    The optimum level of positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) was determined in 16 infants with respiratory distress syndrome (median gestational age 29 weeks, median postnatal age 1 day) and in 16 infants with chronic respiratory distress (median gestational age 25 weeks, median postnatal age 15 days). All infants were studied at a PEEP sequence of 3, 0, 3, 6, and 3 cm H2O, all other ventilator parameters being kept constant. Each PEEP level was maintained for 20 minutes and at the end of each period arterial blood gas was checked. During acute respiratory distress syndrome there were no significant changes in oxygenation but arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2) significantly decreased from a mean of 4.93 kPa at 3 cm H2O to 4.40 kPa at 0 cm H2O and increased to a mean of 5.87 kPa at 6 cm H2O. In the infants with chronic respiratory distress, oxygenation fell from a mean of 8.66 kPa at 3 cm H2O to 6.40 kPa at 0 cm H2O and improved at 6 cm H2O to a mean of 10.50 kPa. There were no significant changes in PaCO2. We conclude that addition of PEEP, up to 6 cm H2O, may be useful even after the first week of life. High levels of PEEP, however, have previously been reported, in certain infants, to result in circulatory disturbance. It is therefore important to assess the use of 6 cm H2O PEEP in a controlled study of longer term clinical outcome. PMID:1575557

  12. A Clinical Study of Acute Kidney Injury in Tropical Acute Febrile Illness

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Ajay; Prabhu, Mangalore Venkatraya

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Tropical Acute Febrile Illness (TAFI) is one of the most common causes of morbidity within the community. Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) due to infective and non infective causes is a major complication. Presence of AKI is a major cause of mortality among patients with TAFI. Aim To study the spectrum of tropical acute febrile illness; the proportion, spectrum and staging of acute kidney injury; Renal Replacement Therapy (RRT) initiation and in-hospital mortality. Materials and Methods A total of 600 TAFI patients were prospectively studied at a tertiary care centre in coastal Karnataka between September 2012 and September 2014 for the aetiology of TAFI; the development and staging of AKI based on Kidney disease: Improving global outcomes (KDIGO) guidelines; the initiation of RRT and in-hospital mortality. Statistical Analysis: Data analysis was done using SPSS version 17.0 with statistical significance calculated using chi-square and Fisher’s exact t-test for which p-value <0.05 was considered significant. Results The spectrum of TAFI, in decreasing order, was vivax malaria, leptospirosis, dengue fever, falciparum malaria, mixed malaria, enteric fever, scrub typhus and the most common aetiology was malaria. The proportion of AKI was 54%. The most common cause of AKI, its stages 2 and 3, RRT initiation and in-hospital mortality was leptospirosis; and AKI stage 1 was dengue fever. KDIGO AKI stage 1, 2 and 3 was seen in 46.9%, 31.2% and 21.9% of AKI patients, respectively. RRT initiation was required in 10.2% of AKI patients and in-hospital mortality was 3% among all patients. AKI, RRT initiationand in-hospital mortality were significantly associated with older age, fever duration and other presenting complaints, examination findings, renal function and other parameters, leptospirosis, dengue fever, falciparum malaria. Conclusion The aetiology in about half of TAFI patients in coastal Karnataka was malaria. More than 50% develop AKI with greater than one

  13. Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Fibrosis versus Repair

    PubMed Central

    Im, Daniel; Shi, Wei; Driscoll, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Clinical and basic experimental approaches to pediatric acute lung injury (ALI), including acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), have historically focused on acute care and management of the patient. Additional efforts have focused on the etiology of pediatric ALI and ARDS, clinically defined as diffuse, bilateral diseases of the lung that compromise function leading to severe hypoxemia within 7 days of defined insult. Insults can include ancillary events related to prematurity, can follow trauma and/or transfusion, or can present as sequelae of pulmonary infections and cardiovascular disease and/or injury. Pediatric ALI/ARDS remains one of the leading causes of infant and childhood morbidity and mortality, particularly in the developing world. Though incidence is relatively low, ranging from 2.9 to 9.5 cases/100,000 patients/year, mortality remains high, approaching 35% in some studies. However, this is a significant decrease from the historical mortality rate of over 50%. Several decades of advances in acute management and treatment, as well as better understanding of approaches to ventilation, oxygenation, and surfactant regulation have contributed to improvements in patient recovery. As such, there is a burgeoning interest in the long-term impact of pediatric ALI/ARDS. Chronic pulmonary deficiencies in survivors appear to be caused by inappropriate injury repair, with fibrosis and predisposition to emphysema arising as irreversible secondary events that can severely compromise pulmonary development and function, as well as the overall health of the patient. In this chapter, the long-term effectiveness of current treatments will be examined, as will the potential efficacy of novel, acute, and long-term therapies that support repair and delay or even impede the onset of secondary events, including fibrosis. PMID:27066462

  14. Acute respiratory failure due to thyroid storm developing immediately after delivery.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Chie; Aoki, Shigeru; Takahashi, Tsuneo; Hirahara, Fumiki

    2015-12-01

    Acute respiratory failure occurs in less than 0.1% of pregnancies. Thyroid storm should be included in the differential diagnosis of possible causes of acute respiratory failure occurring immediately after delivery, and delivery is a high risk factor for thyroid storm in pregnant women with thyrotoxicosis.

  15. Outbreaks of Short-Incubation Ocular and Respiratory Illness Following Exposure to Indoor Swimming Pools

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Anna B.; Kile, James C.; Otto, Charles; Kazerouni, Neely; Austin, Connie; Blount, Benjamin C.; Wong, Hong-Nei; Beach, Michael J.; Fry, Alicia M.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives Chlorination destroys pathogens in swimming pool water, but by-products of chlorination can cause human illness. We investigated outbreaks of ocular and respiratory symptoms associated with chlorinated indoor swimming pools at two hotels. Measurements We interviewed registered guests and companions who stayed at hotels X and Y within 2 days of outbreak onset. We performed bivariate and stratified analyses, calculated relative risks (RR), and conducted environmental investigations of indoor pool areas. Results Of 77 guests at hotel X, 47 (61%) completed questionnaires. Among persons exposed to the indoor pool area, 22 (71%) of 31 developed ocular symptoms [RR = 24; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.5–370], and 14 (45%) developed respiratory symptoms (RR = 6.8; 95% CI, 1.0–47) with a median duration of 10 hr (0.25–24 hr). We interviewed 30 (39%) of 77 registered persons and 59 unregistered companions at hotel Y. Among persons exposed to the indoor pool area, 41 (59%) of 69 developed ocular symptoms (RR = 24; 95% CI, 1.5–370), and 28 (41%) developed respiratory symptoms (RR = 17; 95% CI, 1.1–260) with a median duration of 2.5 hr (2 min–14 days). Four persons sought medical care. During the outbreak, the hotel X’s ventilation system malfunctioned. Appropriate water and air samples were not available for laboratory analysis. Conclusions and relevance to professional practice Indoor pool areas were associated with illness in these outbreaks. A large proportion of bathers were affected; symptoms were consistent with chloramine exposure and were sometimes severe. Improved staff training, pool maintenance, and pool area ventilation could prevent future outbreaks. PMID:17384776

  16. Medically-attended respiratory illnesses amongst pregnant women in Brisbane, Australia.

    PubMed

    Rufus Ashiedu, Precious; Andrews, Ross M; Lambert, Stephen B; McHugh, Lisa; LeGros-Wilson, Sallyanne; Zenchyson, Judith; Arnold, Daniel; Shevell, Clementine; O'Grady, Kerry-Ann F

    2015-09-01

    There are limited community-based data on the burden of influenza and influenza-like illnesses during pregnancy to inform disease surveillance and control. We aimed to determine the incidence of medically-attended respiratory illnesses (MARI) in pregnant women and the proportion of women who are tested for respiratory pathogens at these visits. We conducted a nested retrospective cohort study of a non-random sample of women aged 18 years or over who had a live birth in maternity units in Brisbane, Queensland, from March 2012 to October 2014. The primary outcomes were self-reported doctor visits for MARI and laboratory investigations for respiratory pathogens. Descriptive analyses were performed. Among 1,202 participants, 222 (18.5%, 95%CI 16.3%-20.7%) self-reported MARI during their pregnancy. Of those with an MARI, 20.3% (45/222) self-reported a laboratory test was performed. We were able to confirm with health service providers that 46.7% (21/45) of tests were undertaken, responses from providers were not received for the remainder. Whilst one in 5 women in this population reported a MARI in pregnancy, only 3.7% (45/1,202) reported a clinical specimen had been arranged at the consultation and the ability to validate that self-report was problematic. As the focus on maternal immunisation increases, ascertainment of the aetiological agent causing MARI in this population will be required and efficient and reliable methods for obtaining these data at the community level need to be established.

  17. Non-invasive ventilation in acute respiratory failure in children

    PubMed Central

    Abadesso, Clara; Nunes, Pedro; Silvestre, Catarina; Matias, Ester; Loureiro, Helena; Almeida, Helena

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to assess the clinical efficacy of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) in avoiding endotracheal intubation (ETI), to demonstrate clinical and gasometric improvement and to identify predictive risk factors associated with NIV failure. An observational prospective clinical study was carried out. Included Patients with acute respiratory disease (ARD) treated with NIV, from November 2006 to January 2010 in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU). NIV was used in 151 patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF). Patients were divided in two groups: NIV success and NIV failure, if ETI was required. Mean age was 7.2±20.3 months (median: 1 min: 0,3 max.: 156). Main diagnoses were bronchiolitis in 102 (67.5%), and pneumonia in 44 (29%) patients. There was a significant improvement in respiratory rate (RR), heart rate (HR), pH, and pCO2 at 2, 6, 12 and 24 hours after NIV onset (P<0.05) in both groups. Improvement in pulse oximetric saturation/fraction of inspired oxygen (SpO2/FiO2) was verified at 2, 4, 6, 12 and 24 hours after NIV onset in the success group (P<0.001). In the failure group, significant SpO2/FiO2 improvement was only observed in the first 4 hours. NIV failure occurred in 34 patients (22.5%). Risk factors for NIV failure were apnea, prematurity, pneumonia, and bacterial co-infection (P<0.05). Independent risk factors for NIV failure were apneia (P<0.001; odds ratio 15.8; 95% confidence interval: 3.42–71.4) and pneumonia (P<0.001, odds ratio 31.25; 95% confidence interval: 8.33–111.11). There were no major complications related with NIV. In conclusion this study demonstrates the efficacy of NIV as a form of respiratory support for children and infants with ARF, preventing clinical deterioration and avoiding ETI in most of the patients. Risk factors for failure were related with immaturity and severe infection. PMID:22802994

  18. Screening for Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Isolation Strategies in Children Hospitalized With acute Respiratory Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pfeil, Johannes; Tabatabai, Julia; Sander, Anja; Ries, Markus; Grulich-Henn, Jürgen; Schnitzler, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Nosocomial infection with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an important health risk in pediatric care but is largely preventable by efficient infection control measures. Commonly applied rapid antigen detection tests (RADTs) miss a considerable number of RSV-infected patients. The objective of our analysis was to evaluate whether readily available host parameters are associated with false-negative RADT, and to assess how these parameters could be applied in an optimized RSV isolation strategy. We retrospectively analyzed a cohort of 242 children under the age of 2 years hospitalized with acute respiratory tract infection to identify host parameters associated with false-negative RADT test result. We subsequently simulated the outcome of different isolation strategies based on RADT result and host parameters in view of the overall isolation efficacy. Out of 242 hospitalized patients, 134 (55%) patients were found RSV-positive by RT-PCR, whereas 108 (45%) patients were tested negative. The performance of the RADT was compared with the result obtained by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction on the identical nasopharyngeal wash. Overall, we found that 85 patients (35%) were tested true positive, 108 (45%) were tested true negative, whereas a false-negative test result was obtained in 49 patients (20%). Duration of respiratory symptoms for >3 days and a respiratory admission diagnosis are associated with false-negative RADT result. In comparison with RADT alone, consideration of these clinical parameters and RADT result can decrease the rate of nonisolated RSV-infected patients from approximately 24% to 8% (65% RSV pretest probability). Consideration of both RADT and clinical parameters associated with false-negative RADT can result in an optimized RSV infection control policy. PMID:25437026

  19. Experience with a Simplified Computer Based Intensive Care Monitoring System in the Management of Acutely Ill Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hadley, H. Roger; Rutherford, Harold G.; Smith, Louis L.; Briggs, Burton A.; Neilsen, Ivan R.; Rau, Richard

    1979-01-01

    The need exists for a simplified and ecomonical computer based monitoring system for critically ill surgical patients. Such a system would enjoy widespread use in surgical intensive care units in regional, as well as larger community hospitals. We have assembled such a system which provides digital readout of the usual physiologic parameters, and also provide computer storage of accumulated data for review and evaluation of patient care. The computer provides graphic and digital display and digital printout for subsequent inclusion in the patient records. Most frequent indications for this system include the development of acute respiratory insufficiency or acute circulatory failure due to invasive sepsis and/or severe arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Information most beneficial in patient care included measurement of cardiac output;alveolar arterial oxygen gradient. ImagesFigure 1Figure 5Figure 9Figure 11

  20. The use of noninvasive ventilation in acute respiratory failure associated with oral contrast aspiration pneumonitis.

    PubMed

    Keddissi, J I; Metcalf, J P

    2000-05-01

    Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) has been used to treat patients with acute respiratory failure, including cases of pneumonia. We used this technique in the management of an 83-year-old patient with acute respiratory failure secondary to inadvertent administration of oral contrast material into the lung, and who did not want to be intubated. NIV resulted in immediate improvement of respiratory status. The patient was weaned from NIV over the next 24 hours and eventually discharged from the hospital.

  1. Investigation of a Potential Zoonotic Transmission of Orthoreovirus Associated with Acute Influenza-Like Illness in an Adult Patient

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Kaw Bing; Voon, Kenny; Yu, Meng; Keniscope, Canady; Abdul Rasid, Kasri; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2011-01-01

    Bats are increasingly being recognized as important reservoir hosts for a large number of viruses, some of them can be highly virulent when they infect human and livestock animals. Among the new bat zoonotic viruses discovered in recent years, several reoviruses (respiratory enteric orphan viruses) were found to be able to cause acute respiratory infections in humans, which included Melaka and Kampar viruses discovered in Malaysia, all of them belong to the genus Orthoreovirus, family Reoviridae. In this report, we describe the isolation of a highly related virus from an adult patient who suffered acute respiratory illness in Malaysia. Although there was no direct evidence of bat origin, epidemiological study indicated the potential exposure of the patient to bats before the onset of disease. The current study further demonstrates that spillover events of different strains of related orthoreoviruses from bats to humans are occurring on a regular basis, which calls for more intensive and systematic surveillances to fully assess the true public health impact of these newly discovered bat-borne zoonotic reoviruses. PMID:22022394

  2. Aspiration-Related Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Acute Stroke Patient

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jiang-nan; Liu, Yao; Li, Huai-chen

    2015-01-01

    Background Aspiration of oral or gastric contents into the larynx and lower respiratory tract is a common problem in acute stroke patients, which significantly increases the incidence of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, little is known about the clinical characteristics of aspiration-related ARDS in acute stroke patients. Methods Over 17-month period a retrospective cohort study was done on 1495 consecutive patients with acute stroke. The data including demographic characteristics, clinical manifestations, laboratory examinations, chest imaging, and hospital discharge status were collected to analysis. Results Aspiration-related ARDS was diagnosed in 54 patients (3.6%). The most common presenting symptom was tachypnea (respiratory rate ≥25 breaths/min) in 50 cases. Computed tomography (CT) images usually demonstrated diffuse ground-glass opacities (GGOs) and inhomogeneous patchy consolidations involving the low lobes. Age, NIHSS score, GCS score, dysphagia, dysarthria, hemoglobin concentration, serum aspertate aminotransferase (AST), serum albumin, serum sodium, and admission glucose level were independently associated with aspiration-related ARDS (odds ratio (OR) 1.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) (1.04–1.07); OR 2.87, (2.68–3.63); OR 4.21, (3.57–5.09); OR 2.18, (1.23–3.86); OR 1.67, (1.31–2.14); OR 2.31, (1.11–4.84); OR 1.68, (1.01–2.80); OR 2.15, (1.19–3.90); OR 1.92, (1.10–3.36) and OR 1.14, (1.06–1.21) respectively). Conclusions Aspiration-related ARDS frequently occurs in acute stroke patient with impairment consciousness. It is advisable that performing chest CT timely may identify disease early and prompt treatment to rescue patients. PMID:25790377

  3. The Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Mechanisms and Perspective Therapeutic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, JN; Lucas, R; Verin, AD

    2015-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is a severe lung inflammatory disorder with a 30–50% mortality. Sepsis and pneumonia are the leading causes of ARDS. On the cellular level there is pulmonary capillary endothelial cell permeability and fluid leakage into the pulmonary parenchyma, followed by neutrophils, cytokines and an acute inflammatory response. When fluid increases in the interstitium then the outward movement continues and protein rich fluid floods the alveolar spaces through the tight junctions of the epithelial cells. Neutrophils play an important role in the development of pulmonary edema associated with acute lung injury or ARDS. Animal studies have shown that endothelial injury appears within minutes to hours after Acute Lung Injury (ALI) initiation with resulting intercellular gaps of the endothelial cells. The Endothelial Cell (EC) gaps allow for permeability of fluid, neutrophils and cytokines into the pulmonary parenchymal space. The neutrophils that infiltrate the lungs and migrate into the airways express pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), and contribute to both the endothelial and epithelial integrity disruption of the barriers. Pharmacological treatments have been ineffective. The ARDS Network trial identified low tidal volume mechanical ventilation, positive end expiratory pressure and fluid management guidelines that have improved outcomes for patients with ARDS. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation is used in specialized centers for severe cases. Prone positioning has recently proven to have significantly decreased ventilator days and days in the intensive care unit. Current investigation includes administration of mesenchymal stem cell therapy, partial fluid ventilation, TIP peptide nebulized administration and the continued examination of pharmacologic drugs. PMID:26973981

  4. [A case of Ramsey Hunt syndrome with multiple cranial nerve paralysis and acute respiratory failure].

    PubMed

    Sato, K; Nakamura, S; Koseki, T; Yamauchi, F; Baba, M; Mikami, M; Kobayashi, R; Fujikawa, T; Nagaoka, S

    1991-08-01

    The authors report a 56-year-old woman with Ramsey Hunt syndrome with multiple cranial nerve paralysis and acute respiratory failure. Five days before admission, she experienced right otalgia and right facial pain and consulted an otolaryngologist of our hospital, who diagnosed the illness as acute parotitis and laryngopharyngitis. One day before admission, she experienced mild dyspnea and general fatigue and came to our hospital emergency room. A chest X-ray film revealed no abnormalities but some blisters were observed around her right ear. The next day, her dyspnea became more severe and she was admitted. A chest X-ray film on admission revealed right lower lobe consolidation, and neurological examination disclosed multiple cranial nerve paralysis, i.e., paralysis of the right fifth, seventh, eighth, ninth, tenth, eleventh, twelfth and left tenth cranial nerve. The serum titer of anti-herpes zoster antibody was elevated to 1,024, and the patient was diagnosed as having Ramsey Hunt syndrome with multiple cranial nerve paralysis. Arterial blood gas analysis revealed hypoxemia with hypercapnea, which was considered to be due to aspiration pneumonia and central airway obstruction caused by vocal cord paralysis. Mechanical ventilation was soon instituted and several antibiotics and acyclovir were administered intravenously, with marked effects. Three months after admission, the patient was discharged with no sequelae except mild hoarseness. Patients with herpes zoster oticus, facial nerve paralysis and auditory symptoms are diagnosed as having Ramsey Hunt syndrome. This case was complicated by lower cranial nerve paralysis and acute respiratory failure, which is very rare.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Dress syndrome with sepsis, acute respiratory distress syndrome and pneumomediastinum.

    PubMed

    Giri, Prabhas Prasun; Roy, Swapan; Bhattyacharya, Sukanta; Pal, Priyankar; Dhar, Sandipan

    2011-11-01

    Drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome reflects a serious hypersensitivity reaction to drugs, and is characterized by skin rash, fever, lymph node enlargement, and internal organ involvement. So far, numerous drugs such as sulfonamides, phenobarbital, sulfasalazine, carbamazepine, and phenytoin have been reported to cause DRESS syndrome. We report a case of a 10-year-old girl who developed clinical manifestations of fever, rash, lymphadenopathy, hypereosinophilia, and visceral involvement (hepatitis and pneumonitis) after taking phenobarbital for seizures, with subsequent development of sepsis, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and spontaneous air leak syndrome (pnemothorax and pneumomediastinum). She was put on steroids and various antibiotics and was ventilated, but ultimately succumbed to sepsis and pulmonary complications. PMID:22345792

  6. Infants born to mothers with severe acute respiratory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shek, Chi C; Ng, Pak C; Fung, Genevieve P G; Cheng, Frankie W T; Chan, Paul K S; Peiris, Malik J S; Lee, Kim H; Wong, Shell F; Cheung, Hon M; Li, Albert M; Hon, Ellis K L; Yeung, Chung K; Chow, Chun B; Tam, John S; Chiu, Man C; Fok, Tai F

    2003-10-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a newly discovered infectious disease caused by a novel coronavirus. During the community outbreak in Hong Kong, 5 liveborn infants were born to pregnant women with SARS. A systematic search for perinatal transmission of the SARS-associated coronavirus, including serial reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assays, viral cultures, and paired serologic titers, failed to detect the virus in any of the infants. In addition, none of the infants developed clinical, radiologic, hematologic, or biochemical evidence suggestive of SARS. One preterm infant developed jejunal perforation and another developed necrotizing enterocolitis with ileal perforation shortly after birth. This case series is the first report to describe the clinical course of the first cohort of liveborn infants born to pregnant women with SARS. PMID:14523207

  7. PEEP titration during prone positioning for acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Beitler, Jeremy R; Guérin, Claude; Ayzac, Louis; Mancebo, Jordi; Bates, Dina M; Malhotra, Atul; Talmor, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    No major trial evaluating prone positioning for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has incorporated a high-positive end-expiratory pressure (high-PEEP) strategy despite complementary physiological rationales. We evaluated generalizability of three recent proning trials to patients receiving a high-PEEP strategy. All trials employed a relatively low-PEEP strategy. After protocol ventilator settings were initiated and the patient was positioned per treatment assignment, post-intervention PEEP was not more than 5 cm H2O in 16.7 % and not more than 10 cm H2O in 66.0 % of patients. Post-intervention PEEP would have been nearly twice the set PEEP had a high-PEEP strategy been employed. Use of either proning or high-PEEP likely improves survival in moderate-severe ARDS; the role for both concomitantly remains unknown.

  8. Airway microbiota and acute respiratory infection in children

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Kohei; Camargo, Carlos A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Acute respiratory infection (ARI), such as bronchiolitis and pneumonia, is the leading cause of hospitalization for U.S. infants. While the incidence and severity of ARI can vary widely among children, the reasons for these differences are not fully explained by traditional risk factors (e.g., prematurity, viral pathogens). The recent advent of molecular diagnostic techniques has revealed the presence of highly functional communities of microbes inhabiting the human body (i.e., microbiota) that appear to influence development of local and systemic immune response. We propose a “risk and resilience” model in which airway microbiota are associated with an increased (risk microbiota) or decreased (resilience microbiota) incidence and severity of ARI in children. We also propose that modulating airway microbiota (e.g., from risk to resilience microbiota) during early childhood will optimize airway immunity, and thereby decrease ARI incidence and severity in children. PMID:25961472

  9. Bronchoalveolar hemostasis in lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Glas, G J; Van Der Sluijs, K F; Schultz, M J; Hofstra, J-J H; Van Der Poll, T; Levi, M

    2013-01-01

    Enhanced intrapulmonary fibrin deposition as a result of abnormal broncho-alveolar fibrin turnover is a hallmark of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), pneumonia and ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), and is important to the pathogenesis of these conditions. The mechanisms that contribute to alveolar coagulopathy are localized tissue factor-mediated thrombin generation, impaired activity of natural coagulation inhibitors and depression of bronchoalveolar urokinase plasminogen activator-mediated fibrinolysis, caused by the increase of plasminogen activator inhibitors. There is an intense and bidirectional interaction between coagulation and inflammatory pathways in the bronchoalveolar compartment. Systemic or local administration of anticoagulant agents (including activated protein C, antithrombin and heparin) and profibrinolytic agents (such as plasminogen activators) attenuate pulmonary coagulopathy. Several preclinical studies show additional anti-inflammatory effects of these therapies in ARDS and pneumonia. PMID:23114008

  10. Lower respiratory tract illness and RSV prophylaxis in very premature infants

    PubMed Central

    Lacaze-Masmonteil, T; Truffert, P; Pinquier, D; Daoud, P; Goldfarb, G; Vicaut, E; Fauroux, B

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To determine the frequency of and the risk factors for readmissions for any lower respiratory tract illness (LRTI) and for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) documented LRTI in children born very prematurely who had or had not received RSV prophylaxis. Methods: Multicentre prospective longitudinal cohort study of 2813 infants, born between April 2000 and December 2000 at less than 33 weeks of gestational age, and followed until the end of the epidemic season. Results: Among the 2256 children who had no bronchopulmonary dysplasia at 36 weeks of postmenstrual age and were not submitted to RSV prophylaxis, 27.4% were readmitted at least once for any reason during the epidemic season; 15.1% and 7.2% were readmitted at least once for any LRTI and RSV related LRTI, respectively. Children born at less than 31 weeks' gestation, having an intrauterine growth restriction, or living in a single mother family were at a significantly higher risk of readmission for LRTI in general as well as for RSV related LRTI. Of the 376 children submitted to prophylaxis, 28.2% were readmitted at least once for any LRTI and 6.1% for RSV related LRTI. Conclusion: One out of four children who had received no prophylaxis, was born very prematurely, and was without bronchopulmonary dysplasia at 36 weeks of postmenstrual age, was readmitted at least once for any reason. Roughly 50% and 20% of these readmissions were related to a LRTI and an RSV infection, respectively. Further epidemiological studies are warranted to assess the aetiology and impact of other respiratory pathogens on post-discharge readmission and respiratory morbidity in this population. PMID:15155404

  11. Approach to the Patient with the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Janz, David R; Ware, Lorraine B

    2014-01-01

    Given the high incidence and mortality of ARDS in critically ill patients, every practitioner needs a bedside approach both for early identification of patients at risk for ARDS and for the appropriate evaluation of patients who meet the diagnostic criteria of ARDS. Recent advances such as the Lung Injury Prediction Score, the Early Acute Lung Injury score, and validation of the SpO2/FiO2 ratio for assessing the degree of hypoxemia are all practical tools to aid the practitioner in caring for patients at risk of ARDS and will likely become more important in the future as more preventative therapies for ARDS are investigated. For patients who meet the diagnostic criteria for ARDS, the practitioner should focus on a thorough search for an underlying cause as well as the concurrent possibility of an underlying disease process that mimics the clinical syndrome of ARDS. PMID:25453418

  12. Epidemiology of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS): adults and children.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Nan-Shan; Wong, Gary W K

    2004-12-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a newly described respiratory infection with pandemic potential. The causative agent is a new strain of coronavirus most likely originating from wild animals. This disease first emerged in November 2002 in Guangdong Province, China. Early in the outbreak the infection had been transmitted primarily via household contacts and healthcare settings. In late February 2003 the infection was transmitted to Hong Kong when an infected doctor from the mainland visited there. During his stay in Hong Kong at least 17 guests and visitors were infected at the hotel at which he stayed. By modern day air travel, the infection was rapidly spread to other countries including Vietnam, Singapore and Canada by these infected guests. With the implementation of effective control strategies including early isolation of suspected cases, strict infection control measures in the hospital setting, meticulous contact tracing and quarantine, the outbreak was finally brought under control by July 2003. In addition, there were another two events of SARS in China between the end of December 2003 and January 2004 and from March to May 2004; both were readily controlled without significant patient spread. PMID:15531250

  13. Associations between presence of handwashing stations and soap in the home and diarrhoea and respiratory illness, in children less than five years old in rural western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Kamm, K. B.; Feikin, D. R.; Bigogo, G. M.; Aol, G.; Audi, A.; Cohen, A. L.; Shah, M. M.; Yu, J.; Breiman, R. F.; Ram, P. K.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We tested whether soap presence in the home or a designated handwashing station was associated with diarrhoea and respiratory illness in Kenya. METHODS In April 2009, we observed presence of a handwashing station and soap in households participating in a longitudinal health surveillance system in rural Kenya. Diarrhoea and acute respiratory illness (ARI) in children < 5 years old were identified using parent-reported syndromic surveillance collected January–April 2009. We used multivariate generalised linear regression to estimate differences in prevalence of illness between households with and without the presence of soap in the home and a handwashing station. RESULTS Among 2547 children, prevalence of diarrhoea and ARI was 2.3 and 11.4 days per 100 child-days, respectively. Soap was observed in 97% of households. Children in households with soap had 1.3 fewer days of diarrhoea/100 child-days (95% CI −2.6, −0.1) than children in households without soap. ARI prevalence was not associated with presence of soap. A handwashing station was identified in 1.4% of households and was not associated with a difference in diarrhoea or ARI prevalence. CONCLUSIONS Soap presence in the home was significantly associated with reduced diarrhoea, but not ARI, in children in rural western Kenya. Whereas most households had soap in the home, almost none had a designated handwashing station, which may prevent handwashing at key times of hand contamination. PMID:24405627

  14. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS): lessons learnt in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Many healthcare workers were infected while looking after the SARS patients on the medical wards in 2003. The high infectivity of the SARS coronavirus with peak viral load on day 10 of illness when patients were ill, overcrowding of the old medical wards with low air changes/hr (ACH), and aerosol-generating procedures while resuscitating the patients were the major factors. Procedures reported to present an increased risk of SARS transmission include tracheal intubation, non-invasive ventilation, tracheotomy and manual ventilation before intubation whereas oxygen therapy and bed distance <1 m were also implicated. Studies based on laser visualization technique with smoke particles as smokers in the human patient simulator has shown that oxygen therapy via Hudson mask and nasal cannula could disperse exhaled air of patients to 0.4 and 1 m respectively whereas jet nebulizer could disperse exhaled air >0.8 m from the patient. Bigger isolation rooms with 16 ACH are more effective than smaller isolation rooms with 12 ACH in removing exhaled air and preventing room contamination but at the expense of more noise and electricity consumption. Non-invasive ventilation via face masks and single circuit can disperse exhaled air from 0.4 to 1 m. Both higher inspiratory pressures and use of whisper swivel device (to facilitate carbon dioxide removal) could increase the exhaled air leakage and isolation room contamination during on-invasive ventilation. Addition of a viral-bacterial filter during manual ventilation by bagging may reduce the exhaled air leakage forward and yet increase the sideway leakage. N95 mask was more effective than surgical mask in preventing expelled air leakage during patient’s coughing but there was still significant sideway leakage to 15 cm. Clinicians should be aware of air leakage from the various face masks and adopt strict infection control measures during resuscitation of patients with severe respiratory infections. Carefully designed clinical

  15. Acute and chronic respiratory effects of sodium borate particulate exposures.

    PubMed Central

    Wegman, D H; Eisen, E A; Hu, X; Woskie, S R; Smith, R G; Garabrant, D H

    1994-01-01

    This study examined work-related chronic abnormality in pulmonary function and work-related acute irritant symptoms associated with exposure to borate dust in mining and processing operations. Chronic effects were examined by pulmonary function at the beginning and end of a 7-year interval. Time-specific estimates of sodium borate particulate exposures were used to estimate cumulative exposure during the study interval. Change in pulmonary function over the 7 years was found unrelated to the estimate of cumulative exposure during that interval. Exposure-response associations also were examined with respect to short-term peak exposures and incidence of five symptoms of acute respiratory irritation. Hourly measures of health outcome and continuous measures of particulate exposure were made on each subject throughout the day. Whenever a subject reported one of the irritant symptoms, a symptom intensity score was also recorded along with the approximate time of onset. The findings indicated that exposure-response relationships were present for each of the specific symptoms at several symptom intensity levels. The associations were present when exposure was estimated by both day-long and short-term (15-min) time-weighted average exposures. Associations persisted after taking account of smoking, age, and the presence of a common cold. No significant difference in response rate was found between workers exposed to different types of sodium borate dusts. PMID:7889871

  16. An indolent case of severe acute respiratory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lam, Man-Fai; Ooi, Gaik C; Lam, Bing; Ho, James C; Seto, Wing H; Ho, Pak L; Wong, Poon C; Liang, Raymond; Lam, Wah K; Tsang, Kenneth W

    2004-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a highly contagious and typically rapidly progressive form of atypical pneumonia, which spread from Asia to many parts of the world in early 2003. Clinical diagnosis of SARS requires the presence of unremitting fever and progressive pneumonia despite antibiotic therapy, particularly in the presence of lymphopenia and raised transaminase levels. We report the case of a woman who had undergone a successful allogeneic bone marrow transplant for acute myeloid leukemia. She presented initially with fever and a normal chest radiograph. Her indolent clinical course of SARS was punctuated by resolution of fever, but there was progressive radiologic deterioration and increasing serum antibody titer against SARS coronavirus. Treatment with oral prednisolone and ribavirin normalized her lymphopenia, altered transaminases, chest radiograph and high-resolution computed tomography appearances rapidly. Our experience should alert other clinicians in recognizing this atypical indolent presentation of SARS, to protect health care workers and the community at large and to ensure that these patients are properly treated.

  17. Enrichment of the lung microbiome with gut bacteria in sepsis and the acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Robert P; Singer, Benjamin H; Newstead, Michael W; Falkowski, Nicole R; Erb-Downward, John R; Standiford, Theodore J; Huffnagle, Gary B

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis and the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are major causes of mortality without targeted therapies. Although many experimental and clinical observations have implicated gut microbiota in the pathogenesis of these diseases, culture-based studies have failed to demonstrate translocation of bacteria to the lungs in critically ill patients. Here, we report culture-independent evidence that the lung microbiome is enriched with gut bacteria both in a murine model of sepsis and in humans with established ARDS. Following experimental sepsis, lung communities were dominated by viable gut-associated bacteria. Ecological analysis identified the lower gastrointestinal tract, rather than the upper respiratory tract, as the likely source community of post-sepsis lung bacteria. In bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from humans with ARDS, gut-specific bacteria (Bacteroides spp.) were common and abundant, undetected by culture and correlated with the intensity of systemic inflammation. Alveolar TNF-α, a key mediator of alveolar inflammation in ARDS, was significantly correlated with altered lung microbiota. Our results demonstrate that the lung microbiome is enriched with gut-associated bacteria in sepsis and ARDS, potentially representing a shared mechanism of pathogenesis in these common and lethal diseases. PMID:27670109

  18. Severity Quantification of Pediatric Viral Respiratory Illnesses in Chest X-ray Images

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Kazunori; Golbaz, Marzieh; Mansoor, Awais; Perez, Geovanny F; Pancham, Krishna; Khan, Abia; Nino, Gustavo; Linguraru, Marius George

    2015-01-01

    Accurate assessment of severity of viral respiratory illnesses (VRIs) allows early interventions to prevent morbidity and mortality in young children. This paper proposes a novel imaging biomarker framework with chest X-ray image for assessing VRI’s severity in infants, developed specifically to meet the distinct challenges for pediatric population. The proposed framework integrates three novel technical contributions: a) lung segmentation using weighted partitioned active shape model, b) obtrusive object removal using graph cut segmentation with asymmetry constraint, and c) severity quantification using information-theoretic heterogeneity measures. This paper presents our pilot experimental results with a dataset of 148 images and the ground-truth severity scores given by a board-certified pediatric pulmonologist, demonstrating the effectiveness and clinical relevance of the presented framework. PMID:26736226

  19. Acute occupational disinfectant-related illness among youth, 1993-1998.

    PubMed Central

    Brevard, Theresa A; Calvert, Geoffrey M; Blondell, Jerome M; Mehler, Louise N

    2003-01-01

    Working youths face many safety and health risks. Among these risks are those posed by disinfectant exposures. In this study we describe acute occupational disinfectant-related illness among youth. Data on U.S. children younger than 18 years with acute occupational disinfectant-related illnesses between 1993 and 1998 were collected from the Toxic Exposure Surveillance System and from the California Department of Pesticide Regulation. We analyzed data from persons with exposures who met the case definition for acute occupational disinfectant-related illness. The case definition required onset of new adverse health effects that were both temporally related to a disinfectant exposure and consistent with the known toxicology of the disinfectant. We calculated incidence rates of acute occupational disinfectant-related illness among youths 15-17 years old and incidence rate ratios to compare these rates with those of adults 25-44 years old. We found 307 children with disinfectant-related illnesses. The average annual incidence rate was 16.8/billion hours worked with a relative risk compared with adults of 4.14 (95% confidence interval, 3.66-4.68). Most illnesses were of mild severity (78%). There were no fatalities. Hypochlorites (e.g., bleach) were responsible for 45% of the illnesses. Among the 206 cases where the responsible disinfectant's U.S. Environmental Protection Agency toxicity category was known, 80% were in category I (highest toxicity level). These findings suggest the need for greater efforts to prevent adolescent acute occupational disinfectant-related illness. This may require strengthening regulations and enforcement as well as increased educational efforts directed at employers, youths, parents, school officials, and physicians. Better mechanisms for reporting and tracking chemical illnesses among working adolescents are also needed. PMID:14527846

  20. Challenges in acute care of people with co-morbid mental illness.

    PubMed

    Giandinoto, Jo-Ann; Edward, Karen-Leigh

    Acute secondary care settings are complex environments that offer a range of challenges for healthcare staff. These challenges can be exacerbated when patients present with a co-morbid mental illness. This article is a systematic review of the literature that has investigated the challenges imposed on health professionals working in acute secondary care settings where they care for patients who experience co-morbid physical and mental illnesses. A systematic search of the bibliographic databases was conducted and a total of 25 articles were included in this review. A number of challenges were identified including experience of fear, negative attitudes, poor mental health literacy, being positive and optimistic in providing care as a profession and environmental factors. Health professionals working in acute secondary care settings require organisational support and training in mental health care. Acute secondary care environments conducive to providing holistic care to patients experiencing mental illness co-morbidity are required.

  1. Postmortem diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction in patients with acute respiratory failure - demographics, etiologic and pulmonary histologic analysis

    PubMed Central

    de Matos Soeiro, Alexandre; Ruppert, Aline D; Canzian, Mauro; Capelozzi, Vera L; Serrano, Carlos V

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Acute respiratory failure is present in 5% of patients with acute myocardial infarction and is responsible for 20% to 30% of the fatal post-acute myocardial infarction. The role of inflammation associated with pulmonary edema as a cause of acute respiratory failure post-acute myocardial infarction remains to be determined. We aimed to describe the demographics, etiologic data and histological pulmonary findings obtained through autopsies of patients who died during the period from 1990 to 2008 due to acute respiratory failure with no diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction during life. METHODS: This study considers 4,223 autopsies of patients who died of acute respiratory failure that was not preceded by any particular diagnosis while they were alive. The diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction was given in 218 (4.63%) patients. The age, sex and major associated diseases were recorded for each patient. Pulmonary histopathology was categorized as follows: diffuse alveolar damage, pulmonary edema, alveolar hemorrhage and lymphoplasmacytic interstitial pneumonia. The odds ratio of acute myocardial infarction associated with specific histopathology was determined by logistic regression. RESULTS: In total, 147 men were included in the study. The mean age at the time of death was 64 years. Pulmonary histopathology revealed pulmonary edema as well as the presence of diffuse alveolar damage in 72.9% of patients. Bacterial bronchopneumonia was present in 11.9% of patients, systemic arterial hypertension in 10.1% and dilated cardiomyopathy in 6.9%. A multivariate analysis demonstrated a significant positive association between acute myocardial infarction with diffuse alveolar damage and pulmonary edema. CONCLUSIONS: For the first time, we demonstrated that in autopsies of patients with acute respiratory failure as the cause of death, 5% were diagnosed with acute myocardial infarction. Pulmonary histology revealed a significant inflammatory response, which has

  2. Chikungunya as a Cause of Acute Febrile Illness in Southern Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    Reller, Megan E.; Akoroda, Ufuoma; Nagahawatte, Ajith; Devasiri, Vasantha; Kodikaarachchi, Wasantha; Strouse, John J.; Chua, Robert; Hou, Yan'an; Chow, Angelia; Sessions, October M.; Østbye, Truls; Gubler, Duane J.; Woods, Christopher W.; Bodinayake, Champica

    2013-01-01

    Background Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) re-emerged in Sri Lanka in late 2006 after a 40-year hiatus. We sought to identify and characterize acute chikungunya infection (CHIK) in patients presenting with acute undifferentiated febrile illness in unstudied rural and semi-urban southern Sri Lanka in 2007. Methodology/Principal Findings We enrolled febrile patients ≥ 2 years of age, collected uniform epidemiologic and clinical data, and obtained serum samples for serology, virus isolation, and real-time reverse-transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR). Serology on paired acute and convalescent samples identified acute chikungunya infection in 3.5% (28/797) patients without acute dengue virus (DENV) infection, 64.3% (18/28) of which were confirmed by viral isolation and/or real-time RT-PCR. No CHIKV/DENV co-infections were detected among 54 patients with confirmed acute DENV. Sequencing of the E1 coding region of six temporally distinct CHIKV isolates (April through October 2007) showed that all isolates posessed the E1-226A residue and were most closely related to Sri Lankan and Indian isolates from the same time period. Except for more frequent and persistent musculoskeletal symptoms, acute chikungunya infections mimicked DENV and other acute febrile illnesses. Only 12/797 (1.5%) patients had serological evidence of past chikungunya infection. Conclusions/Significance Our findings suggest CHIKV is a prominent cause of non-specific acute febrile illness in southern Sri Lanka. PMID:24312651

  3. Mechanisms of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gralinski, Lisa E.; Bankhead, Armand; Jeng, Sophia; Menachery, Vineet D.; Proll, Sean; Belisle, Sarah E.; Matzke, Melissa; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Luna, Maria L.; Shukla, Anil K.; Ferris, Martin T.; Bolles, Meagan; Chang, Jean; Aicher, Lauri; Waters, Katrina M.; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.; Law, G. Lynn; Katze, Michael G.; McWeeney, Shannon; Baric, Ralph S.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Systems biology offers considerable promise in uncovering novel pathways by which viruses and other microbial pathogens interact with host signaling and expression networks to mediate disease severity. In this study, we have developed an unbiased modeling approach to identify new pathways and network connections mediating acute lung injury, using severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) as a model pathogen. We utilized a time course of matched virologic, pathological, and transcriptomic data within a novel methodological framework that can detect pathway enrichment among key highly connected network genes. This unbiased approach produced a high-priority list of 4 genes in one pathway out of over 3,500 genes that were differentially expressed following SARS-CoV infection. With these data, we predicted that the urokinase and other wound repair pathways would regulate lethal versus sublethal disease following SARS-CoV infection in mice. We validated the importance of the urokinase pathway for SARS-CoV disease severity using genetically defined knockout mice, proteomic correlates of pathway activation, and pathological disease severity. The results of these studies demonstrate that a fine balance exists between host coagulation and fibrinolysin pathways regulating pathological disease outcomes, including diffuse alveolar damage and acute lung injury, following infection with highly pathogenic respiratory viruses, such as SARS-CoV. PMID:23919993

  4. Clinical predictors of antibiotic prescribing for acutely ill children in primary care: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Kathryn; Bellis, Thomas Wyn; Kelson, Mark; Hood, Kerenza; Butler, Christopher C; Edwards, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Background Antibiotic overuse and inappropriate prescribing drive antibiotic resistance. Children account for a high proportion of antibiotics prescribed in primary care. Aim To determine the predictors of antibiotic prescription in young children presenting to UK general practices with acute illness. Design and setting Prospective observational study in general practices in Wales. Method A total of 999 children were recruited from 13 practices between March 2008 and July 2010. Multilevel, multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to determine predictors of antibiotic prescribing. Results Oral antibiotics were prescribed to 261 children (26.1%). Respiratory infections were responsible for 77.4% of antibiotic prescriptions. The multivariable model included 719 children. Children were more likely to be prescribed antibiotics if they were older (odds ratio [OR] 1.3; 95% confidence intervals [CI] = 1.1 to 1.7); presented with poor sleep (OR 2.7; 95% CI = 1.5 to 5.0); had abnormal ear (OR 6.5; 95% CI = 2.5 to 17.2), throat (OR 2.2; 95% CI = 1.1 to 4.5) or chest examination (OR 13.6; 95% CI = 5.8 to 32.2); were diagnosed with lower respiratory tract infection (OR 9.5; 95% CI = 3.7 to 25.5), tonsillitis/sore throat (OR 119.3; 95% CI = 28.2 to 504.6), ear infection (OR 26.5; 95% CI = 7.4 to 95.7) or urinary tract infection (OR 12.7; 95% CI = 4.4 to 36.5); or if the responsible clinician perceived the child to be moderately to severely unwell (OR 4.0; 95% CI = 1.4 to 11.4). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.9371. Conclusion Respiratory infections were responsible for 74.4% of antibiotic prescriptions. Diagnoses of tonsillitis, sore throat, or ear infection were associated most with antibiotic prescribing. Diagnosis seemed to be more important than abnormal examination findings in predicting antibiotic prescribing, although these were correlated. PMID:26324495

  5. Two episodes of acute illness in a machine shop

    SciTech Connect

    Sinks, T.; Kerndt, P.R.; Wallingford, K.M.

    1989-08-01

    Following an explosion in a machine shop and temporary plant closure, on the day the plant returned to full operations a degreaser malfunctioned. Workers in the assembly room were exposed to trichloroethylene levels later estimated to have exceeded 220 ppm (OSHA PEL 100 ppm). The plant was evacuated and the degreaser taken out of operation. Blood testing for carbon monoxide (CO) on five employees found carboxyhemoglobin levels in excess of normal. The plant reopened the following morning. Over the next two weeks, 15 employees were seen by the plant nurses for similar complaints; although all returned to work, their carboxyhemoglobin levels, later found to be inaccurate, were reported by a local medical clinic to range from 13.7 to 20.0 percent. At the end of the second week, another outbreak of illness occurred, but carboxyhemoglobin, trichloroethylene, fluorocarbons, and methylene chloride were not elevated in all 17 persons tested; plant-wide monitoring for CO found no elevated levels. During the first outbreak of illness, cases were 2.26 times as likely to have entered the assembly room as noncases. During the second outbreak, cases were no more likely than noncases to have entered the assembly room. We believe the explosion, earlier toxic exposures and illness, and the misleading blood test results led to plant-wide anxiety which culminated in a collective stress reaction and the second outbreak. An open meeting with all employees, informing them of our findings, provided reassurance and no further episodes of illness occurred in this workforce.

  6. Noninvasive ventilation on mortality of acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Ling; Wang, Jian; Xu, Xiaobo; Song, Yuanlin; Jiang, Jinjun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). [Subjects and Methods] The clinical data of 58 patients with ARDS that required mechanical ventilation in two intensive care units (ICU) was reviewed. [Results] Endotracheal intubation was performed in 55.17% of the total patients and in 39.53% of the patients who received NIV treatment. The APACHE II score for patients who only received IV was significantly higher than those who only underwent NIV (25.67 ± 5.30 vs. 18.12 ± 7.20). However, there were no significant differences in 28-day/90-day survival rates, duration of mechanical ventilation, and length of ICU stay between these two groups. For patients from a NIV-to-IV group, the APACHE II scores before endotracheal intubation were higher than the scores from IV patients (26.12 ± 4.08 vs. 21.94 ± 6.10). The 90-day survival rate in the NIV-to-IV group was significantly lower than that of the IV-only group (23.5% vs. 73.3%), although there was no difference in the 28-day survival rate between the two groups. [Conclusion] The application of NIV reduces the percentage of patients requiring endotracheal intubation.

  7. Clinical Practice Guideline of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Young-Jae; Moon, Jae Young; Shin, Ein-Soon; Kim, Je Hyeong; Jung, Hoon; Park, So Young; Kim, Ho Cheol; Sim, Yun Su; Rhee, Chin Kook; Lim, Jaemin; Lee, Seok Jeong; Lee, Won-Yeon; Lee, Hyun Jeong; Kwak, Sang Hyun; Kang, Eun Kyeong; Chung, Kyung Soo

    2016-01-01

    There is no well-stated practical guideline for mechanically ventilated patients with or without acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We generate strong (1) and weak (2) grade of recommendations based on high (A), moderate (B) and low (C) grade in the quality of evidence. In patients with ARDS, we recommend low tidal volume ventilation (1A) and prone position if it is not contraindicated (1B) to reduce their mortality. However, we did not support high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (1B) and inhaled nitric oxide (1A) as a standard treatment. We also suggest high positive end-expiratory pressure (2B), extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as a rescue therapy (2C), and neuromuscular blockage for 48 hours after starting mechanical ventilation (2B). The application of recruitment maneuver may reduce mortality (2B), however, the use of systemic steroids cannot reduce mortality (2B). In mechanically ventilated patients, we recommend light sedation (1B) and low tidal volume even without ARDS (1B) and suggest lung protective ventilation strategy during the operation to lower the incidence of lung complications including ARDS (2B). Early tracheostomy in mechanically ventilated patients can be performed only in limited patients (2A). In conclusion, of 12 recommendations, nine were in the management of ARDS, and three for mechanically ventilated patients. PMID:27790273

  8. Noninvasive ventilation on mortality of acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Ling; Wang, Jian; Xu, Xiaobo; Song, Yuanlin; Jiang, Jinjun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). [Subjects and Methods] The clinical data of 58 patients with ARDS that required mechanical ventilation in two intensive care units (ICU) was reviewed. [Results] Endotracheal intubation was performed in 55.17% of the total patients and in 39.53% of the patients who received NIV treatment. The APACHE II score for patients who only received IV was significantly higher than those who only underwent NIV (25.67 ± 5.30 vs. 18.12 ± 7.20). However, there were no significant differences in 28-day/90-day survival rates, duration of mechanical ventilation, and length of ICU stay between these two groups. For patients from a NIV-to-IV group, the APACHE II scores before endotracheal intubation were higher than the scores from IV patients (26.12 ± 4.08 vs. 21.94 ± 6.10). The 90-day survival rate in the NIV-to-IV group was significantly lower than that of the IV-only group (23.5% vs. 73.3%), although there was no difference in the 28-day survival rate between the two groups. [Conclusion] The application of NIV reduces the percentage of patients requiring endotracheal intubation. PMID:27630415

  9. Noninvasive ventilation on mortality of acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ling; Wang, Jian; Xu, Xiaobo; Song, Yuanlin; Jiang, Jinjun

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). [Subjects and Methods] The clinical data of 58 patients with ARDS that required mechanical ventilation in two intensive care units (ICU) was reviewed. [Results] Endotracheal intubation was performed in 55.17% of the total patients and in 39.53% of the patients who received NIV treatment. The APACHE II score for patients who only received IV was significantly higher than those who only underwent NIV (25.67 ± 5.30 vs. 18.12 ± 7.20). However, there were no significant differences in 28-day/90-day survival rates, duration of mechanical ventilation, and length of ICU stay between these two groups. For patients from a NIV-to-IV group, the APACHE II scores before endotracheal intubation were higher than the scores from IV patients (26.12 ± 4.08 vs. 21.94 ± 6.10). The 90-day survival rate in the NIV-to-IV group was significantly lower than that of the IV-only group (23.5% vs. 73.3%), although there was no difference in the 28-day survival rate between the two groups. [Conclusion] The application of NIV reduces the percentage of patients requiring endotracheal intubation. PMID:27630415

  10. Extracorporeal lung assist for sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Iwashita, Yoshiaki; Imai, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is one of the major causes of ICU deaths. Extracorporeal lung assist (ECLA) has been used as a rescue therapy for most severe form of ARDS. However, its survival benefit had not been shown until CESAR trial in 2009. This has been because the concept of lung protective ventilation strategy had not yet known. Since CESAR trial, the clinical application of ECLA for ARDS as a method to achieve lung rest has wide spread. The effectiveness is further appreciated during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic. The succeeded countries achieved building the transportation systems to collect ECLA patients. With the accumulating evidences of survival benefit, the long-term outcome such as pulmonary function and quality of life are in concern. PumplessECLA which is a newly developed form of ECLA is also reviewed. In this essay we will firstly review the basics of ARDS and ECLA. Then the historical development of ECLA evidences for ARDS are reviewed. PMID:25567336

  11. Acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP): relationship to Hamman-Rich syndrome, diffuse alveolar damage (DAD), and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjay; Parambil, Joseph G

    2012-10-01

    Acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) is a term used for an idiopathic form of acute lung injury characterized clinically by acute respiratory failure with bilateral lung infiltrates and histologically by diffuse alveolar damage (DAD), a combination of findings previously known as the Hamman-Rich syndrome. This review aims to clarify the diagnostic criteria of AIP, its relationship with DAD and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), key etiologies that need to be excluded before making the diagnosis, and the salient clinical features. Cases that meet clinical and pathologic criteria for AIP overlap substantially with those that fulfill clinical criteria for ARDS. The main differences between AIP and ARDS are that AIP requires a histologic diagnosis of DAD and exclusion of known etiologies. AIP should also be distinguished from "acute exacerbation of IPF," a condition in which acute lung injury (usually DAD) supervenes on underlying usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP)/idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF).

  12. The economic impact of the insured patients with severe chronic and acute illnesses: a qualitative approach

    PubMed Central

    Aji, Budi; Yamamoto, Shelby Suzanne; Sauerborn, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Background Little research has focused on the economic hardship among the insured with severe illnesses and high treatment costs, in particular, the consequence of poorer insurance coverage for high-cost illnesses. Therefore, we presented the case for identifying the experiences of insured patients with severe chronic and acute illnesses. This study identified a qualitative understanding of the economic impact of severe chronic and acute illnesses and household strategies to deal with high treatment costs. Design Interviews were conducted with 19 insured households of three different health insurance programs with a family member that had been hospitalized for severe chronic or acute illnesses in either Banyumas or Margono Sukarjo hospitals in Banyumas, Central Java, Indonesia. A thematic analysis was applied to guide the interpretation of the data. Results Insured households with a family member that had been hospitalized for severe chronic and acute illnesses were greatly affected by the high treatment costs. Four major issues emerged from this qualitative study: insured patients are still burdened with high out-of-pocket payments, households adopt various strategies to cope with the high cost of treatments, households experience financial hardships, and positive and negative perceptions of the insured regarding their health insurance coverage for acute and chronic illnesses. Conclusions Askes and Jamsostek patients faced financial burdens from high cost sharing for hospital amenities, non-covered drugs, and treatments and other indirect costs. Meanwhile, Jamkesmas beneficiaries faced no financial burden for related medical services but were rather burdened with indirect costs for the carers. Households relied on internal resources to cover hospital bills as the first strategy, which included the mobilization of savings, sale of assets, and borrowing of money. External support was tapped secondarily and included financial support from extended family members

  13. Total ginsenosides synergize with ulinastatin against septic acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sun, Rongju; Li, Yana; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Fei; Li, Tanshi

    2015-01-01

    Total ginsenosides synergize with ulinastatin (UTI) against septic acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We randomly divided 80 cases of severe sepsis-induced ALI and ARDS into a UTI group and a ginsenosides (GS)+UTI group. Continuous electrocardiac monitoring of pulse, respiratory rate, blood pressure, and heart rate; invasive hemodynamic monitoring; ventilator-assisted breathing and circulation support; and anti-infection as well as UTI treatment were given in the UTI group with GS treatment added for 7 consecutive days in the GS+UTI group. The indicators of pulmonary vascular permeability, pulmonary circulation, blood gases, and hemodynamics as well as APACHE II and ALI scores were detected on days 1, 3, and 7. The ALI score in the GS+UTI group was significantly decreased (P < 0.05) compared with that of the UTI group, and the indicators of pulmonary capillary permeability such as pulmonary vascular permeability index, extravascular lung water index, and oxygenation index, in the GS+UTI group improved significantly more than that of the UTI group. The indicators of hemodynamics and pulmonary circulation such as cardiac index, intrathoracic blood volume index, and central venous pressure improved significantly (P < 0.05), and the APACHE II score in the GS+UTI group was lower than that of the UTI group. GS can effectively collaborate with UTI against ALI and/or ARDS.

  14. Loss of appetite in acutely ill medical inpatients: physiological response or therapeutic target?

    PubMed

    Schütz, Philipp; Bally, Martina; Stanga, Zeno; Keller, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Loss of appetite and ensuing weight loss is a key feature of severe illnesses. Protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) contributes significantly to the adverse outcome of these conditions. Pharmacological interventions to target appetite stimulation have little efficacy but considerable side effects. Therefore nutritional therapy appears to be the logical step to combat inadequate nutrition. However, clinical trial data demonstrating benefits are sparse and there is no current established standard algorithm for use of nutritional support in malnourished, acutely ill medical inpatients. Recent high-quality evidence from critical care demonstrating harmful effects when parenteral nutritional support is used indiscriminately has led to speculation that loss of appetite in the acute phase of illness is indeed an adaptive, protective response that improves cell recycling (autophagy) and detoxification. Outside critical care, there is an important gap in high quality clinical trial data shedding further light on these important issues. The selection, timing, and doses of nutrition should be evaluated as carefully as with any other therapeutic intervention, with the aim of maximising efficacy and minimising adverse effects and costs. In light of the current controversy, a reappraisal of how nutritional support should be used in acutely ill medical inpatients outside critical care is urgently required. The aim of this review is to discuss current pathophysiological concepts of PEM and to review the current evidence for the efficacy of nutritional support regarding patient outcomes when used in an acutely ill medical patient population outside critical care. PMID:24782139

  15. Viral-bacterial interactions and risk of acute otitis media complicating upper respiratory tract infection.

    PubMed

    Pettigrew, Melinda M; Gent, Janneane F; Pyles, Richard B; Miller, Aaron L; Nokso-Koivisto, Johanna; Chonmaitree, Tasnee

    2011-11-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is a common complication of upper respiratory tract infection whose pathogenesis involves both viruses and bacteria. We examined risks of acute otitis media associated with specific combinations of respiratory viruses and acute otitis media bacterial pathogens. Data were from a prospective study of children ages 6 to 36 months and included viral and bacterial culture and quantitative PCR for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human bocavirus, and human metapneumovirus. Repeated-measure logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between specific viruses, bacteria, and the risk of acute otitis media complicating upper respiratory tract infection. In unadjusted analyses of data from 194 children, adenovirus, bocavirus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis were significantly associated with AOM (P < 0.05 by χ(2) test). Children with high respiratory syncytial virus loads (≥3.16 × 10(7) copies/ml) experienced increased acute otitis media risk. Higher viral loads of bocavirus and metapneumovirus were not significantly associated with acute otitis media. In adjusted models controlling for the presence of key viruses, bacteria, and acute otitis media risk factors, acute otitis media risk was independently associated with high RSV viral load with Streptococcus pneumoniae (odds ratio [OR], 4.40; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.90 and 10.19) and Haemophilus influenzae (OR, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.38 and 3.02). The risk was higher for the presence of bocavirus and H. influenzae together (OR, 3.61; 95% CI, 1.90 and 6.86). Acute otitis media risk differs by the specific viruses and bacteria involved. Acute otitis media prevention efforts should consider methods for reducing infections caused by respiratory syncytial virus, bocavirus, and adenovirus in addition to acute otitis media bacterial pathogens.

  16. Provider Decisions to Treat Respiratory Illnesses with Antibiotics: Insights from a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Branche, Angela R.; Walsh, Edward E.; Jadhav, Nagesh; Karmally, Rachel; Baran, Andrea; Peterson, Derick R.; Falsey, Ann R.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Lower respiratory tract illness (LRTI) frequently causes adult hospitalization and antibiotic overuse. Procalcitonin (PCT) treatment algorithms have been used successfully in Europe to safely reduce antibiotic use for LRTI but have not been adopted in the United States. We recently performed a feasibility study for a randomized clinical trial (RCT) of PCT and viral testing to guide therapy for non-pneumonic LRTI. Objective The primary objective of the current study was to understand factors influencing PCT algorithm adherence during the RCT and evaluate factors influencing provider antibiotic prescribing practices for LRTI. Study Design From October 2013-April 2014, 300 patients hospitalized at a community teaching hospital with non-pneumonic LRTI were randomized to standard or PCT-guided care with viral PCR testing. Algorithm adherence data was collected and multivariate stepwise logistic regression of clinical variables used to model algorithm compliance. 134 providers were surveyed anonymously before and after the trial to assess knowledge of biomarkers and viral testing and antibiotic prescribing practices. Results Diagnosis of pneumonia on admission was the only variable significantly associated with non-adherence [7% (adherence) vs. 26% (nonadherence), p = 0.01]. Surveys confirmed possible infiltrate on chest radiograph as important for provider decisions, as were severity of illness, positive sputum culture, abnormal CBC and fever. However, age, patient expectations and medical-legal concerns were also at least somewhat important to prescribing practices. Physician agreement with the importance of viral and PCT testing increased from 42% to 64% (p = 0.007) and 49% to 74% (p = 0.001), respectively, after the study. Conclusions Optimal algorithm adherence will be important for definitive PCT intervention trials in the US to determine if PCT guided algorithms result in better outcomes than reliance on traditional clinical variables. Factors

  17. Acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute renal failure from Plasmodium ovale infection with fatal outcome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plasmodium ovale is one of the causative agents of human malaria. Plasmodium ovale infection has long been thought to be non-fatal. Due to its lower morbidity, P. ovale receives little attention in malaria research. Methods Two Malaysians went to Nigeria for two weeks. After returning to Malaysia, they fell sick and were admitted to different hospitals. Plasmodium ovale parasites were identified from blood smears of these patients. The species identification was further confirmed with nested PCR. One of them was successfully treated with no incident of relapse within 12-month medical follow-up. The other patient came down with malaria-induced respiratory complication during the course of treatment. Although parasites were cleared off the circulation, the patient’s condition worsened. He succumbed to multiple complications including acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute renal failure. Results Sequencing of the malaria parasite DNA from both cases, followed by multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree construction suggested that the causative agent for both malaria cases was P. ovale curtisi. Discussion In this report, the differences between both cases were discussed, and the potential capability of P. ovale in causing severe complications and death as seen in this case report was highlighted. Conclusion Plasmodium ovale is potentially capable of causing severe complications, if not death. Complete travel and clinical history of malaria patient are vital for successful diagnoses and treatment. Monitoring of respiratory and renal function of malaria patients, regardless of the species of malaria parasites involved is crucial during the course of hospital admission. PMID:24180319

  18. Two episodes of acute illness in a machine shop.

    PubMed Central

    Sinks, T; Kerndt, P R; Wallingford, K M

    1989-01-01

    Following an explosion in a machine shop and temporary plant closure, on the day the plant returned to full operations a degreaser malfunctioned. Workers in the assembly room were exposed to trichloroethylene levels later estimated to have exceeded 220 ppm (OSHA PEL 100 ppm). The plant was evacuated and the degreaser taken out of operation. Blood testing for carbon monoxide (CO) on five employees found carboxyhemoglobin levels in excess of normal. The plant reopened the following morning. Over the next two weeks, 15 employees were seen by the plant nurses for similar complaints; although all returned to work, their carboxyhemoglobin levels, later found to be inaccurate, were reported by a local medical clinic to range from 13.7 to 20.0 percent. At the end of the second week, another outbreak of illness occurred, but carboxyhemoglobin, trichloroethylene, fluorocarbons, and methylene chloride were not elevated in all 17 persons tested; plant-wide monitoring for CO found no elevated levels. During the first outbreak of illness, cases were 2.26 times as likely to have entered the assembly room as noncases. During the second outbreak, cases were no more likely than noncases to have entered the assembly room. We believe the explosion, earlier toxic exposures and illness, and the misleading blood test results led to plant-wide anxiety which culminated in a collective stress reaction and the second outbreak. An open meeting with all employees, informing them of our findings, provided reassurance and no further episodes of illness occurred in this workforce. PMID:2751018

  19. Respiratory muscle strength and muscle endurance are not affected by acute metabolic acidemia.

    PubMed

    Nizet, Tessa A C; Heijdra, Yvonne F; van den Elshout, Frank J J; van de Ven, Marjo J T; Bosch, Frank H; Mulder, Paul H; Folgering, Hans Th M

    2009-11-01

    Respiratory muscle fatigue in asthma and chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) contributes to respiratory failure with hypercapnia, and subsequent respiratory acidosis. Therapeutic induction of acute metabolic acidosis further increases the respiratory drive and, therefore, may diminish ventilatory failure and hypercapnia. On the other hand, it is known that acute metabolic acidosis can also negatively affect (respiratory) muscle function and, therefore, could lead to a deterioration of respiratory failure. Moreover, we reasoned that the impact of metabolic acidosis on respiratory muscle strength and respiratory muscle endurance could be more pronounced in COPD patients as compared to asthma patients and healthy subjects, due to already impaired respiratory muscle function. In this study, the effect of metabolic acidosis was studied on peripheral muscle strength, peripheral muscle endurance, airway resistance, and on arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO(2)). Acute metabolic acidosis was induced by administration of ammonium chloride (NH(4)Cl). The effect of metabolic acidosis was studied on inspiratory and expiratory muscle strength and on respiratory muscle endurance. Effects were studied in a randomized, placebo-controlled cross-over design in 15 healthy subjects (4 male; age 33.2 +/- 11.5 years; FEV(1) 108.3 +/- 16.2% predicted), 14 asthma patients (5 male; age 48.1 +/- 16.1 years; FEV(1) 101.6 +/- 15.3% predicted), and 15 moderate to severe COPD patients (9 male; age 62.8 +/- 6.8 years; FEV(1) 50.0 +/- 11.8% predicted). An acute metabolic acidemia of BE -3.1 mmol x L(-1) was induced. Acute metabolic acidemia did not significantly affect strength or endurance of respiratory and peripheral muscles, respectively. In all subjects airway resistance was significantly decreased after induction of metabolic acidemia (mean difference -0.1 kPa x sec x L(-1) [95%-CI: -0.1 - -0.02]. In COPD patients PaCO(2) was significantly lowered during metabolic acidemia (mean

  20. Incidence of high altitude illnesses among unacclimatized persons who acutely ascended to Tibet.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yusheng; Fu, Zhongming; Shen, Weimin; Jiang, Ping; He, Yanlin; Peng, Shaojun; Wu, Zonggui; Cui, Bo

    2010-01-01

    High altitude illnesses pose health threats to unwary travelers after their acute ascent to high altitude locations. The incidence of high altitude illnesses among unacclimatized persons who acutely ascend to Tibet has not been previously reported. In the present study, we surveyed the incidence of high altitude illness among 3628 unacclimatized persons who had no previous high altitude experience and who traveled to Tibet by air to an altitude of 3600 m. These subjects were asked to answer questions in a written questionnaire about symptoms associated with high altitude illnesses that occurred within 2 weeks of their first arrival, their severity, and possible contributing factors. Physical examination and appropriate laboratory tests were also performed for hospitalized subjects. We found that 2063 respondents had mild acute mountain sickness with an incidence of 57.2%, and 249 (12.07%) of them were hospitalized for treatment. The incidence of high altitude pulmonary edema was 1.9%, while no case of high altitude cerebral edema was found. Additionally, there was no report of death. Psychological stresses and excessive physical exertions possibly contributed to the onset of HAPE. Acute mountain sickness is common among unacclimatized persons after their acute ascent to Tibet. The incidence of HAPE and HACE, however, is very low among them. PMID:20367487

  1. [Do clinical decision models improve the triage of acutely ill children?].

    PubMed

    Berger, Marjolein Y

    2015-01-01

    Acute infection is the most common presentation of children in primary care, with only a few having serious infections. To avoid complications, early recognition and appropriate referral are essential. Clinical decision models have the potential to improve diagnostic decision-making for these serious conditions. Although many models have been developed, few have proven cost-effective. A recent model developed in acutely ill children presenting in Belgian primary care and validated in a new cohort has been shown to adequately identify children that are hospitalised with acute infections. The results are impressive but raise questions about generalisability and cost-effectiveness. In conclusion, clinical decision models appear currently incapable of improving decision-making in acutely ill children. As an alternative, we should consider asking the general practitioner to perform telephone triage.

  2. Human bocavirus infection in young children with acute respiratory tract infection in Lanzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Li-shu; Yuan, Xin-hui; Xie, Zhi-ping; Jin, Yu; Gao, Han-chun; Song, Jing-rong; Zhang, Rong-fang; Xu, Zi-qian; Hou, Yun-de; Duan, Zhao-jun

    2010-02-01

    Human bocavirus (HBoV) is a recognized human parvovirus associated with acute respiratory tract infection. However, HBoV has yet to be established as a causative agent of respiratory disease. In this study, the epidemiological and virological characteristics of HBoV infection were studied in children with acute respiratory tract infection in China. In total, 406 children younger than 14 years of age with acute respiratory tract infection were included in this prospective 1-year study. HBoV was detected in 29 (7.1%) of the 406 children. No clear seasonal fluctuation was observed in infection rates of HBoV. Of the 29 children infected with HBoV, 16 (55.2%) were coinfected with other respiratory viruses, most commonly respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Viral coinfection with HBoV did not affect the severity of the respiratory disease (P = 0.291). The number of HBoV genome copies ranged from 5.80 x 10(2) to 9.72 x 10(8) copies/ml in nasopharyngeal aspirates among HBoV-positive specimens by real-time PCR, and neither coinfection nor the severity of disease correlated with the viral load (P = 0.148, P = 0.354, respectively). The most common clinical features were cough and acute upper respiratory infection, and acute bronchopneumonia. Additionally, the NP-1 gene of HBoV showed minimal sequence variation. These data suggest that HBoV is frequent in young children with acute respiratory tract infection in Lanzhou, China, and RSV is the most common coinfecting virus. There was no apparent association between the viral load of HBoV and coinfection or disease severity. The NP-1 gene was highly conserved in HBoV. PMID:20029808

  3. Viral upper respiratory tract infections in young children with emphasis on acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Nokso-Koivisto, Johanna; Hovi, Tapani; Pitkäranta, Anne

    2006-08-01

    Viral upper respiratory infection is the most common reason for seeking medical care for children. Recurrent viral respiratory infections and subsequent complications (e.g. acute otitis media (AOM)) are a burden for children, their families and society. Over the past decade, our knowledge on the significance of respiratory viruses has broadened remarkably. Viruses cause large variety of respiratory diseases and cause alone diseases, which previously have been assumed to be bacterial only (e.g. AOM and pneumonia). Methods for detection analysis of respiratory viruses are developing making both the diagnosis and epidemiological investigations of respiratory infections easier. Accurate diagnosis of respiratory infections and awareness of possible viral etiology could reduce the use of antibiotics. Etiologic studies of viral infections are becoming increasingly important, with the emergence of new antiviral drugs and vaccines.

  4. Both hyper- and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism occur transiently in acute illness: bio- and immunoactive gonadotropins.

    PubMed

    Spratt, D I; Bigos, S T; Beitins, I; Cox, P; Longcope, C; Orav, J

    1992-12-01

    Previous reports of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in critically ill men may not reflect the complexity of changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis during acute illness. We sampled blood throughout hospitalization in 55 men admitted to acute care units to delineate the spectrum of changes in circulating gonadotropin and sex steroid levels at the onset and during recovery from acute illness. Bioactive LH and FSH were measured in a subset of patients. Percent free testosterone was measured to assess changes in binding to sex hormone binding globulin. Medications and serum estrogen and prolactin levels were monitored as potential causes of hypogonadotropism. Sustained suppression of serum testosterone levels below the normal range occurred in 62% of men with varying diagnoses and disease severity. Percent free testosterone remained constant. Hypogonadotropism was observed in most men (60%) and occurred independently from head injury, surgery, medications, or hyperprolactinemia. In a subset of men (n = 16), LH and/or FSH rose transiently above the normal range. Bioactivity of both LH and FSH remained constant while serum testosterone levels decreased. In contrast to serum testosterone levels, mean serum levels of E1, E2 and androstenedione were not less than control values. We conclude that both primary and secondary hypogonadism occur transiently in acutely ill men and cannot be explained solely by medications, hyperprolactinemia, or hyperestrogenemia. Neither biopotency of gonadotropins nor binding of testosterone to SHBG change across the course of acute illness. The hypogonadism, often severe and prolonged, may contribute to the persistent catabolic state observed in many critically ill patients.

  5. "Eat your lunch!" - controversies in the nutrition of the acutely, non-critically ill medical inpatient.

    PubMed

    Schuetz, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    There is no doubt about the strong association of malnutrition and adverse medical outcomes including mortality, morbidity and quality of life. Particularly in the elderly and frail medical inpatient population, loss of appetite due to the acute illness further aggravates nutritional status. In fact, this relationship between acute disease and eating behaviour / nutritional status may well be bidirectional, with not only illness affecting nutritional status, but also dietary factors influencing the course of illness. Whether loss of appetite associated with acute illness is indeed a protective physiological response or a therapeutic target needing early corrective nutritional therapy is a matter of current debate and can only be resolved within a large and well-designed randomised controlled trial comparing early nutritional therapy with "appetite-guided" nutrition in this patient population. Apart from in critical care, where various large trials have recently been published, there is an important lack of high quality data from large randomised trials in unselected acutely ill medical inpatients to support the early use of nutritional therapy, to shed light on the optimal type, caloric amount and timing of nutritional therapy and to answer ultimately the question as to which patient population will in fact benefit from nutritional interventions. Currently, the EFFORT trial is enrolling patients and aims to fill these literature gaps. The aim of this review is to discuss the current evidence regarding nutritional therapy in acutely ill medical inpatients, and to recommend whether or not, based on today's available evidence, physician should indeed encourage their malnourished patients to "…finish their lunch". PMID:25906253

  6. Biomarkers of acute respiratory allergen exposure: Screening for sensitization potential

    SciTech Connect

    Pucheu-Haston, Cherie M.; Copeland, Lisa B.; Vallanat, Beena; Boykin, Elizabeth; Ward, Marsha D.W.

    2010-04-15

    Effective hazard screening will require the development of high-throughput or in vitro assays for the identification of potential sensitizers. The goal of this preliminary study was to identify potential biomarkers that differentiate the response to allergens vs non-allergens following an acute exposure in naive individuals. Female BALB/c mice received a single intratracheal aspiration exposure to Metarhizium anisopliae crude antigen (MACA) or bovine serum albumin (BSA) in Hank's Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS) or HBSS alone. Mice were terminated after 1, 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 h. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was evaluated to determine total and differential cellularity, total protein concentration and LDH activity. RNA was isolated from lung tissue for microarray analysis and qRT-PCR. MACA administration induced a rapid increase in BALF neutrophils, lymphocytes, eosinophils and total protein compared to BSA or HBSS. Microarray analysis demonstrated differential expression of genes involved in cytokine production, signaling, inflammatory cell recruitment, adhesion and activation in 3 and 12 h MACA-treated samples compared to BSA or HBSS. Further analyses allowed identification of approx 100 candidate biomarker genes. Eleven genes were selected for further assessment by qRT-PCR. Of these, 6 demonstrated persistently increased expression (Ccl17, Ccl22, Ccl7, Cxcl10, Cxcl2, Saa1), while C3ar1 increased from 6-24 h. In conclusion, a single respiratory exposure of mice to an allergenic mold extract induces an inflammatory response which is distinct in phenotype and gene transcription from the response to a control protein. Further validation of these biomarkers with additional allergens and irritants is needed. These biomarkers may facilitate improvements in screening methods.

  7. Biomarkers of acute respiratory allergen exposure: screening for sensitization potential.

    PubMed

    Pucheu-Haston, Cherie M; Copeland, Lisa B; Vallanat, Beena; Boykin, Elizabeth; Ward, Marsha D W

    2010-04-15

    Effective hazard screening will require the development of high-throughput or in vitro assays for the identification of potential sensitizers. The goal of this preliminary study was to identify potential biomarkers that differentiate the response to allergens vs non-allergens following an acute exposure in naïve individuals. Female BALB/c mice received a single intratracheal aspiration exposure to Metarhizium anisopliae crude antigen (MACA) or bovine serum albumin (BSA) in Hank's Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS) or HBSS alone. Mice were terminated after 1, 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 h. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was evaluated to determine total and differential cellularity, total protein concentration and LDH activity. RNA was isolated from lung tissue for microarray analysis and qRT-PCR. MACA administration induced a rapid increase in BALF neutrophils, lymphocytes, eosinophils and total protein compared to BSA or HBSS. Microarray analysis demonstrated differential expression of genes involved in cytokine production, signaling, inflammatory cell recruitment, adhesion and activation in 3 and 12 h MACA-treated samples compared to BSA or HBSS. Further analyses allowed identification of approximately 100 candidate biomarker genes. Eleven genes were selected for further assessment by qRT-PCR. Of these, 6 demonstrated persistently increased expression (Ccl17, Ccl22, Ccl7, Cxcl10, Cxcl2, Saa1), while C3ar1 increased from 6-24 h. In conclusion, a single respiratory exposure of mice to an allergenic mold extract induces an inflammatory response which is distinct in phenotype and gene transcription from the response to a control protein. Further validation of these biomarkers with additional allergens and irritants is needed. These biomarkers may facilitate improvements in screening methods. PMID:20045013

  8. The severe acute respiratory syndrome epidemic in mainland China dissected

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Wu-Chun; de Vlas, Sake J.; Richardus, Jan Hendrik

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides a review of a recently published series of studies that give a detailed and comprehensive documentation of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic in mainland China, which severely struck the country in the spring of 2003. The epidemic spanned a large geographical extent but clustered in two areas: first in Guangdong Province, and about 3 months later in Beijing with its surrounding areas. Reanalysis of all available epidemiological data resulted in a total of 5327 probable cases of SARS, of whom 343 died. The resulting case fatality ratio (CFR) of 6.4% was less than half of that in other SARS-affected countries or areas, and this difference could only partly be explained by younger age of patients and higher number of community acquired infections. Analysis of the impact of interventions demonstrated that strong political commitment and a centrally coordinated response was the most important factor to control SARS in mainland China, whereas the most stringent control measures were all initiated when the epidemic was already dying down. The long-term economic consequence of the epidemic was limited, much consumption was merely postponed, but for Beijing irrecoverable losses to the tourist sector were considerable. An important finding from a cohort study was that many former SARS patients currently suffer from avascular osteonecrosis, as a consequence of the treatment with corticosteroids during their infection. The SARS epidemic provided valuable information and lessons relevant in controlling outbreaks of newly emerging infectious diseases, and has led to fundamental reforms of the Chinese health system. In particular, a comprehensive nationwide internet-based disease reporting system was established. PMID:24470901

  9. Management of Acute Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome in Critically Ill Patients.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Deepali; Endicott, Jeffrey; Burry, Lisa; Ramos, Liz; Yeung, Siu Yan Amy; Devabhakthuni, Sandeep; Chan, Claire; Tobia, Anthony; Bulloch, Marilyn N

    2016-07-01

    Approximately 16-31% of patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) have an alcohol use disorder and are at risk for developing alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS). Patients admitted to the ICU with AWS have an increased hospital and ICU length of stay, longer duration of mechanical ventilation, higher costs, and increased mortality compared with those admitted without an alcohol-related disorder. Despite the high prevalence of AWS among ICU patients, no guidelines for the recognition or management of AWS or delirium tremens in the critically ill currently exist, leading to tremendous variability in clinical practice. Goals of care should include immediate management of dehydration, nutritional deficits, and electrolyte derangements; relief of withdrawal symptoms; prevention of progression of symptoms; and treatment of comorbid illnesses. Symptom-triggered treatment of AWS with γ-aminobutyric acid receptor agonists is the cornerstone of therapy. Benzodiazepines (BZDs) are most studied and are often the preferred first-line agents due to their efficacy and safety profile. However, controversy still exists as to who should receive treatment, how to administer BZDs, and which BZD to use. Although most patients with AWS respond to usual doses of BZDs, ICU clinicians are challenged with managing BZD-resistant patients. Recent literature has shown that using an early multimodal approach to managing BZD-resistant patients appears beneficial in rapidly improving symptoms. This review highlights the results of recent promising studies published between 2011 and 2015 evaluating adjunctive therapies for BZD-resistant alcohol withdrawal such as antiepileptics, baclofen, dexmedetomidine, ethanol, ketamine, phenobarbital, propofol, and ketamine. We provide guidance on the places in therapy for select agents for management of critically ill patients in the presence of AWS. PMID:27196747

  10. [Assessment of chronic glucose metabolism disorders coexisting with respiratory failure in non-critical ill patients hospitalized with lower respiratory tract infections].

    PubMed

    Sobocińska, Magdalena Barbara; Loba, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    Lungs are the target organ in chronic hyperglycemia, but its large reserves causes a subclinical course of these changes. Given the results of other researchers indicating reduced active surface of gas exchange and pulmonary capillary damage, it can be assumed that diabetes and other hyperglycemic states diminish these reserves and impair effectiveness of respiratory gas exchange during pneumonia. So it is plausible to observe coexistence of glucose metabolism disorders and respiratory failure in patients hospitalized with lower respiratory tract infection. An observational study was conducted on 130 patients hospitalized with bacteriologically confirmed pneumonia. 63 patients suffering from chronic glucose metabolism disorders (A) and 67 randomly selected patients in control group (B) were observed on laboratory and clinical findings. There was no significant difference in prevalence of acute respiratory failure, although in the study group a slightly greater number of patients diagnosed with acute respiratory failure was observed. There was a significantly greater number of patients with previously confirmed chronic respiratory failure using long-term oxygen theraphy in A group (p = 0.029). The B patients with average blood glucose level > 108 mg/dl had significantly lower partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2)(gIc ≤ 108: 58.6 +/- 9.8; glc > 108: 51.7 +/- 11.1; p = 0.042). There was a statistically significant negative correlation of the average blood glucose level and PaO2 in the control group (p = 0.0152) and a significant inverse association between the average blood glucose level and the partial pressure of oxygen in patients without COPD belonging to the control group (p = 0.049). Respiratory failure is frequent in patients hospitalized with pneumonia. In patients without chronic glucose metabolism disorders with blood glucose level rising the oxygen tension decreases The association is stronger in patients without COPD.

  11. Acute Respiratory Infections among Under-Five Age Group Children at Urban Slums of Gulbarga City: A Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Pattankar, Jayashree; Puttahonnappa, Suresh Kuralayanapalya

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Among all illness, Acute Respiratory Infections (ARI) account for 30-60% of paediatric outpatient attendance and 20-30% of hospital admissions. Aim To study the morbidity pattern of ARI among under-five-age group children and to assess the determinants. Materials and Methods A longitudinal cohort study was conducted for a one year period, comprising a cumulative sample of 400 children from 3 urban slums of Gulbarga city. History of nasal discharge, cough, fever, sore throat, breathing difficulty, any discharge from ear alone or in combination, was used in the recognition of an ARI episode. Respiratory rate >60/minute (<2 month infants), >50(2-11 months) and >40(1-5 years) in a child with cough, cold or fever singly or in combination was considered the criteria for recognition of pneumonia. Results Out of the 400 surveyed, ARI was detected among 109 children giving an incidence of 27.25%. Among these, Upper Respiratory Tract Infection (URTI) was found among 19.25% and Lower Respiratory Tract Infection (LRTI) among 8%. ARI was observed among 38.04% of infants, 37.84% of 2-3-year-old children, 36.87% of boys, 40.43% of children born to illiterate father’s, 35.77% of SES class IV & 40.79% of SES class V, and 41.89% of children with family history of respiratory illness. All these data were found to be statistically significant. High rates of ARI were also observed among 41.36% of children living in households with firewood fuel usage, 35.04% of children with pets in the household, 34.82% of children with delayed milestones, 53.85% of children with grade IV and 66.67% of children with grade V malnutrition. More episodes occurred during winter months of the year (Oct – Jan). During the follow-up phase of study done on a cohort of 112 children for a period of one year, an attack rate of 3.27 episodes/child/year was observed. Conclusion Community education programs should focus on addressing specific issues viz. identification of respiratory illness

  12. Diminishing willingness to pay per quality-adjusted life year: valuing acute foodborne illness.

    PubMed

    Haninger, Kevin; Hammitt, James K

    2011-09-01

    We design and conduct a stated-preference survey to estimate willingness to pay (WTP) to reduce foodborne risk of acute illness and to test whether WTP is proportional to the corresponding gain in expected quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). If QALYs measure utility for health, then economic theory requires WTP to be nearly proportional to changes in both health quality and duration of illness and WTP could be estimated by multiplying the expected change in QALYs by an appropriate monetary value. WTP is elicited using double-bounded, dichotomous-choice questions in which respondents (randomly selected from the U.S. general adult population, n = 2,858) decide whether to purchase a more expensive food to reduce the risk of foodborne illness. Health risks vary by baseline probability of illness, reduction in probability, duration and severity of illness, and conditional probability of mortality. The expected gain in QALYs is calculated using respondent-assessed decrements in health-related quality of life if ill combined with the duration of illness and reduction in probability specified in the survey. We find sharply diminishing marginal WTP for severity and duration of illness prevented. Our results suggest that individuals do not have a constant rate of WTP per QALY, which implies that WTP cannot be accurately estimated by multiplying the change in QALYs by an appropriate monetary value. PMID:21488924

  13. Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal for patients with acute respiratory failure secondary to the acute respiratory distress syndrome: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Marianne; Millar, Jonathan; Blackwood, Bronagh; Davies, Andrew; Brett, Stephen J; McAuley, Daniel F; McNamee, James J

    2014-05-15

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) continues to have significant mortality and morbidity. The only intervention proven to reduce mortality is the use of lung-protective mechanical ventilation strategies, although such a strategy may lead to problematic hypercapnia. Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal (ECCO₂R) devices allow uncoupling of ventilation from oxygenation, thereby removing carbon dioxide and facilitating lower tidal volume ventilation. We performed a systematic review to assess efficacy, complication rates, and utility of ECCO₂R devices. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), case-control studies and case series with 10 or more patients. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS (Literatura Latino Americana em Ciências da Saúde), and ISI Web of Science, in addition to grey literature and clinical trials registries. Data were independently extracted by two reviewers against predefined criteria and agreement was reached by consensus. Outcomes of interest included mortality, intensive care and hospital lengths of stay, respiratory parameters and complications. The review included 14 studies with 495 patients (two RCTs and 12 observational studies). Arteriovenous ECCO₂R was used in seven studies, and venovenous ECCO₂R in seven studies. Available evidence suggests no mortality benefit to ECCO₂R, although post hoc analysis of data from the most recent RCT showed an improvement in ventilator-free days in more severe ARDS. Organ failure-free days or ICU stay have not been shown to decrease with ECCOvR. Carbon dioxide removal was widely demonstrated as feasible, facilitating the use of lower tidal volume ventilation. Complication rates varied greatly across the included studies, representing technological advances. There was a general paucity of high-quality data and significant variation in both practice and technology used among studies, which confounded analysis. ECCO₂R is a rapidly evolving technology and is an efficacious treatment

  14. Serious mental illness and acute hospital readmission in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Jennifer S; Hirshon, Jon Mark; Goldberg, Richard; Langenberg, Patricia; Day, Hannah R; Morgan, Daniel J; Comer, Angela C; Harris, Anthony D; Furuno, Jon P

    2012-01-01

    Patients with serious mental illness (SMI), particularly those with other chronic illnesses, may be vulnerable to unplanned hospital readmission. The authors hypothesized that SMI would be associated with increased 30-day hospital readmission in a cohort of adult patients with comorbid diabetes admitted to a tertiary care facility from 2005 to 2009. SMI was defined by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, discharge diagnosis codes for schizophrenia, schizoaffective, bipolar, manic, or major depressive disorders, or other psychosis. The primary outcome was 30-day readmission to the index hospital. Among 26 878 eligible admissions, the prevalence of SMI was 6% and the incidence of 30-day hospital admission was 16%. Among patients aged <35 years, SMI was significantly associated with decreased odds of 30-day hospital readmission (odds ratio [OR] = 0.39; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.17, 0.91). However, among patients ≥35 years, SMI was not significantly associated with 30-day hospital readmission (OR = 1.11; 95% CI = 0.86, 1.42). SMI may not be associated with increased odds of 30-day hospital readmission in this population.

  15. Serious mental illness and acute hospital readmission in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Jennifer S; Hirshon, Jon Mark; Goldberg, Richard; Langenberg, Patricia; Day, Hannah R; Morgan, Daniel J; Comer, Angela C; Harris, Anthony D; Furuno, Jon P

    2012-01-01

    Patients with serious mental illness (SMI), particularly those with other chronic illnesses, may be vulnerable to unplanned hospital readmission. The authors hypothesized that SMI would be associated with increased 30-day hospital readmission in a cohort of adult patients with comorbid diabetes admitted to a tertiary care facility from 2005 to 2009. SMI was defined by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, discharge diagnosis codes for schizophrenia, schizoaffective, bipolar, manic, or major depressive disorders, or other psychosis. The primary outcome was 30-day readmission to the index hospital. Among 26 878 eligible admissions, the prevalence of SMI was 6% and the incidence of 30-day hospital admission was 16%. Among patients aged <35 years, SMI was significantly associated with decreased odds of 30-day hospital readmission (odds ratio [OR] = 0.39; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.17, 0.91). However, among patients ≥35 years, SMI was not significantly associated with 30-day hospital readmission (OR = 1.11; 95% CI = 0.86, 1.42). SMI may not be associated with increased odds of 30-day hospital readmission in this population. PMID:22539798

  16. Parents' help-seeking behaviours during acute childhood illness at home: A contribution to explanatory theory.

    PubMed

    Neill, Sarah J; Jones, Caroline H D; Lakhanpaul, Monica; Roland, Damian T; Thompson, Matthew J

    2016-03-01

    Uncertainty and anxiety surround parents' decisions to seek medical help for an acutely ill child. Consultation rates for children are rising, yet little is known about factors that influence parents' help-seeking behaviours. We used focus groups and interviews to examine how 27 parents of children under five years, from a range of socioeconomic groups in the East Midlands of England, use information to make decisions during acute childhood illness at home. This article reports findings elucidating factors that influence help-seeking behaviours. Parents reported that decision-making during acute childhood illness was influenced by a range of personal, social and health service factors. Principal among these was parents' concern to do the right thing for their child. Their ability to assess the severity of the illness was influenced by knowledge and experience of childhood illness. When parents were unable to access their general practitioner (GP), feared criticism from or had lost trust in their GP, some parents reported using services elsewhere such as Accident and Emergency. These findings contribute to explanatory theory concerning parents' help-seeking behaviours. Professional and political solutions have not reduced demand; therefore, collaborative approaches involving the public and professionals are now needed to improve parents' access to information.

  17. A case of acute respiratory failure in a rheumatoid arthritis patient after the administration of abatacept

    PubMed Central

    Doğu, Birsen; Atilla, Nurhan; Çetin, Gözde Yıldırım; Yılmaz, Nezir; Öksüz, Hafize

    2016-01-01

    Drug-induced pulmonary disease is an important consideration in the differential diagnosis of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who present with respiratory symptoms. We report a patient with RA who developed acute respiratory failure two weeks after the administration of abatacept. The clinical findings were consistent with drug-induced acute respiratory failure, most likely acute eosinophilic pneumonia. Pulse steroid was administered at 1000 mg/kg/day in the emergency department. Chest X-ray and arterial blood gas values revealed significant improvement on the second day of hospitalization. However, in the second week, the patient’s fever rose up to 40°C, procalcitonin level increased to 15 ng/mL (<0.5 ng/mL is normal), and the patient died because of sepsis in the fourth week. This is the second report of respiratory failure, after the abatacept administration in the literature. We have reported an acute respiratory failure that occurred after use of the biological agent abatacept. With the increasing use of novel immunomodulatory agents, it is important for clinicians and pathologists to add the possibility of a drug reaction to the traditional differentials of acute respiratory failures occurring in these settings. PMID:27733944

  18. The role of respiratory syncytial virus and other viral pathogens in acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Klein, B S; Dollete, F R; Yolken, R H

    1982-07-01

    We utilized recently developed enzyme immunoassay techniques to examine the role of selected viruses in the etiology of acute otitis media. Viral pathogens were found in middle ear fluids obtained from 13 (24%) of 53 children with acute otitis media; respiratory syncytial virus accounted for ten of the 13 viral agents identified. In addition, respiratory syncytial viral antigen was found in nasopharyngeal washings obtained from 15 of the 53 children. Seven of these children had RSV identified as the sole middle ear pathogen, whereas six children had otitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae as either the sole middle ear pathogen or in combination with RSV. Similarly, all three children with respiratory infections caused by influenza virus had ear infections caused by bacterial pathogens, either alone or in combination with influenza virus. These findings suggest that, in patients with viral respiratory infection, coexisting acute otitis media may be associated with the recovery of either viruses or bacteria from the middle ear exudates.

  19. Does virus-bacteria coinfection increase the clinical severity of acute respiratory infection?

    PubMed

    Damasio, Guilherme A C; Pereira, Luciane A; Moreira, Suzana D R; Duarte dos Santos, Claudia N; Dalla-Costa, Libera M; Raboni, Sonia M

    2015-09-01

    This retrospective cohort study investigated the presence of bacteria in respiratory secretions of patients hospitalized with acute respiratory infections and analyzed the impact of viral and bacterial coinfection on severity and the mortality rate. A total of 169 patients with acute respiratory infections were included, viruses and bacteria in respiratory samples were detected using molecular methods. Among all samples, 73.3% and 59.7% were positive for viruses and bacteria, respectively; 45% contained both virus and bacteria. Bacterial coinfection was more frequent in patients infected by community respiratory viruses than influenza A H1N1pdm (83.3% vs. 40.6%). The most frequently bacteria detected were Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae. Both species were co-detected in 54 patients and identified alone in 22 and 21 patients, respectively. Overall, there were no significant differences in the period of hospitalization, severity, or mortality rate between patients infected with respiratory viruses alone and those coinfected by viruses and bacteria. The detection of mixed respiratory pathogens is frequent in hospitalized patients with acute respiratory infections, but its impact on the clinical outcome does not appear substantial. However, it should be noted that most of the patients received broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy, which may have contributed to this favorable outcome.

  20. Facial Emotion Processing in Acutely Ill and Euthymic Patients with Pediatric Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schenkel, Lindsay S.; Pavuluri, Mani N.; Herbener, Ellen S.; Harral, Erin M.; Sweeney, John A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Past investigations indicate facial emotion-processing abnormalities in pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD) subjects. However, the extent to which these deficits represent state- and trait-related factors is unclear. We investigated facial affect processing in acutely ill and clinically stabilized children with PBD and matched healthy…

  1. Emergency room visits for acute gastrointestinal illness following flooding: A case-crossover study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Climate change may alter the frequency of precipitation and flooding which can increase fecal-oral transmission of acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) through contact with contaminated items or water. Few studies have quantified the risk associated with flood events in the Unite...

  2. Cynomolgus Macaque as an Animal Model for Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lawler, James V; Endy, Timothy P; Hensley, Lisa E; Garrison, Aura; Fritz, Elizabeth A; Lesar, May; Baric, Ralph S; Kulesh, David A; Norwood, David A; Wasieloski, Leonard P; Ulrich, Melanie P; Slezak, Tom R; Vitalis, Elizabeth; Huggins, John W; Jahrling, Peter B; Paragas, Jason

    2006-01-01

    Background The emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in 2002 and 2003 affected global health and caused major economic disruption. Adequate animal models are required to study the underlying pathogenesis of SARS-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) infection and to develop effective vaccines and therapeutics. We report the first findings of measurable clinical disease in nonhuman primates (NHPs) infected with SARS-CoV. Methods and Findings In order to characterize clinically relevant parameters of SARS-CoV infection in NHPs, we infected cynomolgus macaques with SARS-CoV in three groups: Group I was infected in the nares and bronchus, group II in the nares and conjunctiva, and group III intravenously. Nonhuman primates in groups I and II developed mild to moderate symptomatic illness. All NHPs demonstrated evidence of viral replication and developed neutralizing antibodies. Chest radiographs from several animals in groups I and II revealed unifocal or multifocal pneumonia that peaked between days 8 and 10 postinfection. Clinical laboratory tests were not significantly changed. Overall, inoculation by a mucosal route produced more prominent disease than did intravenous inoculation. Half of the group I animals were infected with a recombinant infectious clone SARS-CoV derived from the SARS-CoV Urbani strain. This infectious clone produced disease indistinguishable from wild-type Urbani strain. Conclusions SARS-CoV infection of cynomolgus macaques did not reproduce the severe illness seen in the majority of adult human cases of SARS; however, our results suggest similarities to the milder syndrome of SARS-CoV infection characteristically seen in young children. PMID:16605302

  3. Study of Aetiology and Outcome in Acute Febrile Illness Patients with Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Muthaiah, Bhanukumar; Kondareddy, Srinivas; Chikkegowda, Prathima

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Acute febrile illness with Multi Organ Dysfunction Syndrome (MODS) carries significant morbidity and mortality despite standard therapy in intensive care settings. Infections are the most common cause of MODS followed by polytrauma. Present study was undertaken in medical intensive care units of a tertiary hospital to study the aetiology and outcome among patients with acute febrile illness developing MODS. Aim 1) To study the aetiology of acute febrile illness in patients developing MODS. 2) To study the final outcome among these patients. Materials and Methods The present study was conducted at a tertiary care hospital in Mysuru, Karnataka, India, over a period of 6 months from July 2013 to December 2013. The Institutional Ethics Committee Approval (IEC) was obtained before the commencement of the study. A total of 213 cases admitted in intensive care unit with acute febrile illness with two or more organ dysfunction were screened for the inclusion and exclusion criterias. Results A total of 213 cases of acute febrile illness with one or more organ dysfunction were screened. Of the screened patients 75 patients were finally included in the study out of which 46 (61.3%) patients were males and 29 (38.7%) patients were females. Aetiology for acute febrile illness with MODS could be established in 49 (65.3%) patients and it was obscure in 26 (34.7%) patients despite repeated investigations. Dengue infection (29.3%) was the commonest cause of febrile illness with MODS followed by leptospirosis (22.7%). Majority of these patients had haematological derangements (78.7%) and liver function test abnormalities (68%). Out of these 75 cases, 54 (72%) patients recovered completely and 21 (28%) patients died. Among males (N=46), 35 (76.1%) patients recovered and 11 (23.9%) patients died where as among females (N=29), 19 (65.5%) patients recovered and 10 (34.5%) patients died. Mortality was proportionate with the number of organ dysfunction, especially Central

  4. Parents' difficulties and information needs in coping with acute illness in preschool children: a qualitative study.

    PubMed Central

    Kai, J.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify and explore difficulties parents experience with acute illness in young children and the information they seek to help them. DESIGN: Qualitative study using semi-structured one t one and group interviews with parents of preschool children. SETTING: Disadvantaged inner city community. SUBJECTS: 95 parents of preschool children. RESULTS: Parents felt disempowered when dealing with acute illness in their children because of difficulties making sense of the illness. Central to parents' difficulties were their experiences of inadequate information sharing by their general practitioners and variations in their doctors' decisions and behaviour. Disparity between parents' beliefs and expectations about illness and treatment and professionals' behaviour further frustrated parents' attempts to understand illness. Parents expressed a need for a range of accessible and specific information to support them through their negotiation of children's illness. CONCLUSIONS: Communication with parents requires greater recognition of parents' difficulties. Professionals have considerable potential to empower parents by sharing more information and skills. Such information should be consistent and address parents' concerns, beliefs, and expressed needs if this potential is to be realised. PMID:8892421

  5. Viral load and acute otitis media development after human metapneumovirus upper respiratory tract infection.

    PubMed

    Nokso-Koivisto, Johanna; Pyles, Richard B; Miller, Aaron L; Patel, Janak A; Loeffelholz, Michael; Chonmaitree, Tasnee

    2012-07-01

    The role of human metapneumovirus (hMPV) in acute otitis media complicating upper respiratory tract infection (URI) was studied. Nasopharyngeal specimens from 700 URI episodes in 200 children were evaluated; 47 (7%) were positive for hMPV, 25 (3.6%) with hMPV as the only virus. Overall, 24% of URI episodes with hMPV only were complicated by acute otitis media, which was the lowest rate compared with other respiratory viruses. hMPV viral load was significantly higher in children with fever, but there was no difference in viral load in children with hMPV-positive URI with or without acute otitis media complication.

  6. Can nutrition support interfere with recovery from acute critical illness?

    PubMed

    Schulman, Rifka C; Mechanick, Jeffrey I

    2013-01-01

    Malnutrition, following critical illness-related metabolic and immune neuroendocrine derangements, is exacerbated by energy and protein deficits beginning early in the intensive care unit (ICU) stay. While nutrition support is an important component of ICU care, adverse effects can occur. Underfeeding, due to insufficient energy and/or protein is associated with poor patient outcomes. Overfeeding carbohydrates, lipids, and/or protein can result in hyperglycemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hepatic dysfunction, and/or azotemia. Individualization of the nutritional prescription with clinical monitoring and repeated adjustment is necessary to avoid harm. Appropriate use of tight glycemic control protocols in combination with nutrition support can prevent hyperglycemia, while minimizing glycemic variability and hypoglycemic events. While the enteral route is favored for nutrition support, early supplemental parenteral nutrition should be considered in selected high-risk patients. Thus, risk stratification of patients upon admission to the ICU can be helpful to design individualized nutritional prescriptions maximizing benefit while avoiding potential interference with recovery. PMID:23075588

  7. Outbreak of respiratory illness on board a ship cruising to ports in southern Europe and northern Africa.

    PubMed

    Christenson, B; Lidin-Janson, G; Kallings, I

    1987-05-01

    A large outbreak of influenza-like and diarrhoeal illness took place over a period of 21 days in April 1984 on board a ship cruising to ports in southern Europe and northern Africa. A cohort study of the 418 passengers was made by postal questionnaire and personal interview. Of the 391 passengers who were interviewed or who returned a questionnaire, 335 (86%) were affected. Of the ill passengers, 295 (88%) had an influenza-like illness. These included 20 with signs of lower respiratory tract infection. In 24 passengers, a viral infection was diagnosed. Influenza B virus infection was identified in 14 cases; other diagnoses were influenza A, para-influenza, respiratory syncytial virus and Epstein-Barr virus infections. In two of the 81 patients tested for Legionella antibodies, a titre of 128 was found; in 16 and 44 patients, titres of 64 and 32 respectively. The outbreak was thus evidently caused by multiple pathogens mainly affecting the respiratory tract. Although most of the passengers acquired their infections on board the ship, a common source was not discovered. A steep rise in the epidemic curve the day after the air-conditioning was switched on, however, is worth noting. If and when similar instances of the 'Sick Boat Syndrome' recur, a search for environmental sources of infection is to be recommended. PMID:3585036

  8. Risk factors for asthma prevalence and chronic respiratory illnesses among residents of different neighbourhoods in Buffalo, New York

    PubMed Central

    Lwebuga-Mukasa, J.; Oyana, T.; Wydro, P.

    2004-01-01

    Study objective: The aim of this study is to identify risk factors for asthma prevalence and chronic respiratory illnesses in Buffalo's neighbourhoods after previous studies reported increased levels of asthma among residents on Buffalo's west side. Design: Cross sectional surveys. Setting: Buffalo neighbourhoods along a US-Canada border crossing point. Subjects: A systematic random survey of 82% of the 2000 targeted households was conducted between January and August 2002. Main results: A multivariate logistic regression model shows that the risk of persons with asthma and chronic respiratory illnesses is significantly (p⩽0.05) high among children and young adults living in Buffalo's west side, newer housing units, and of Latino ethnicity. In a separate analysis of the nine risk factors, it was observed that location, gender, age, and race were significant risk factors even after adjusting for age of housing, pets, moulds, animal trigger, and smoking. Conclusions: These findings confirm the hypothesis that a considerable risk of asthma and chronic respiratory illnesses exists particularly among Buffalo's west side residents. Further evaluation of these risk factors is warranted to determine the severity of asthma and the reasons for such a significant disease burden. PMID:15483313

  9. Dyschloremia Is a Risk Factor for the Development of Acute Kidney Injury in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Min; Li, Guangxi; Sarvottam, Kumar; Wang, Shengyu; Thongprayoon, Charat; Dong, Yue; Gajic, Ognjen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dyschloremia is common in critically ill patients, although its impact has not been well studied. We investigated the epidemiology of dyschloremia and its associations with the incidence of acute kidney injury and other intensive care unit outcomes. Material and Methods This is a single-center, retrospective cohort study at Mayo Clinic Hospital—Rochester. All adult patients admitted to intensive care units from January 1st, 2006, through December 30th, 2012 were included. Patients with known acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease stage 5 before intensive care unit admission were excluded. We evaluated the association of dyschloremia with ICU outcomes, after adjustments for the effect of age, gender, Charlson comorbidity index and severity of illness score. Results A total of 6,025 patients were enrolled in the final analysis following the implementation of eligibility criteria. From the cohort, 1,970 patients (33%) developed acute kidney injury. Of the total patients enrolled, 4,174 had a baseline serum chloride. In this group, 1,530 (37%) had hypochloremia, and 257 (6%) were hyperchloremic. The incidence of acute kidney injury was higher in hypochloremic and hyperchloremic patients compared to those with a normal serum chloride level (43% vs.30% and 34% vs. 30%, respectively; P < .001). Baseline serum chloride was lower in the acute kidney injury group vs. the non-acute kidney injury group [100 mmol/L (96–104) vs. 102 mmol/L (98–105), P < .0001]. In a multivariable logistic regression model, baseline serum chloride of ≤94 mmol/L found to be independently associated with the risk of acute kidney injury (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.1–2.6; P = .01). Discussion Dyschloremia is common in critically ill patients, and severe hypochloremia is independently associated with an increased risk of development of acute kidney injury. PMID:27490461

  10. Working as a doctor when acutely ill: comments made by doctors responding to United Kingdom surveys

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Fay; Goldacre, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objectives We undertook multi-purpose surveys of doctors who qualified in the United Kingdom between 1993 and 2012. Doctors were asked specific questions about their careers and were asked to comment about any aspect of their training or work. We report doctors’ comments about working whilst acutely ill. Design Self-completed questionnaire surveys. Setting United Kingdom. Participants Nine cohorts of doctors, comprising all United Kingdom medical qualifiers of 1993, 1996, 1999, 2000, 2002, 2005, 2008, 2009 and 2012. Main outcome measures Comments made by doctors about working when ill, in surveys one, five and 10 years after graduation. Results The response rate, overall, was 57.4% (38,613/67,224 doctors). Free-text comments were provided by 30.7% (11,859/38,613). Three-hundred and twenty one doctors (2.7% of those who wrote comments) wrote about working when feeling acutely ill. Working with Exhaustion/fatigue was the most frequent topic raised (195 doctors), followed by problems with Taking time off for illness (112), and general comments on Physical/mental health problems (66). Other topics raised included Support from others, Leaving or adapting/coping with the situation, Bullying, the Doctor’s ability to care for patients and Death/bereavement. Arrangements for cover due to illness were regarded as insufficient by some respondents; some wrote that doctors were expected to work harder and longer to cover for colleagues absent because of illness. Conclusions We recommend that employers ensure that it is not unduly difficult for doctors to take time off work when ill, and that employers review their strategies for covering ill doctors who are off work. PMID:27066264

  11. Severe acute respiratory syndrome: clinical and laboratory manifestations.

    PubMed

    Lam, Christopher W K; Chan, Michael H M; Wong, Chun K

    2004-05-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a recently emerged infectious disease with significant morbidity and mortality. An epidemic in 2003 affected 8,098 patients in 29 countries with 774 deaths. The aetiological agent is a new coronavirus spread by droplet transmission. Clinical and general laboratory manifestations included fever, chills, rigor, myalgia, malaise, diarrhoea, cough, dyspnoea, pneumonia, lymphopenia, neutrophilia, thrombocytopenia, and elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase (LD), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and creatine kinase (CK) activities. Treatment has been empirical; initial potent antibiotic cover, followed by simultaneous ribavirin and corticosteroids, with or without pulse high-dose methylprednisolone, have been used. The postulated disease progression comprises (1) active viral infection, (2) hyperactive immune response, and (3) recovery or pulmonary destruction and death. We investigated serum LD isoenzymes and blood lymphocyte subsets of SARS patients, and found LD1 activity as the best biochemical prognostic indicator for death, while CD3+, CD4+, CD8+ and natural killer cell counts were promising predictors for intensive care unit (ICU) admission. Plasma cytokine and chemokine profiles showed markedly elevated Th1 cytokine interferon (IFN)-gamma, inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6 and IL-12, neutrophil chemokine IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and Th1 chemokine IFN-gamma-inducible protein-10 (IP-10) for at least two weeks after disease onset, but there was no significant elevation of inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Corticosteroid reduced IL-8, MCP-1 and IP-10 concentrations from 5-8 days after treatment. Measurement of biochemical markers of bone metabolism demonstrated significant but transient increase in bone resorption from Day 28-44 after onset of fever, when pulse steroid was most frequently given. With tapering down of steroid

  12. Incidence and Outcomes of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Chen, Yih-Yuan; Tsai, Ching-Fang; Chen, Solomon Chih-Cheng; Lin, Ming-Shian; Ware, Lorraine B.; Chen, Chuan-Mu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Most epidemiological studies of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) have been conducted in western countries, and studies in Asia are limited. The aim of our study was to evaluate the incidence, in-hospital mortality, and 1-year mortality of ARDS in Taiwan. We conducted a nationwide inpatient cohort study based on the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database between 1997 and 2011. A total of 40,876 ARDS patients (68% male; mean age 66 years) were identified by International Classification of Diseases, 9th edition coding and further analyzed for clinical characteristics, medical costs, and mortality. The overall crude incidence of ARDS was 15.74 per 100,000 person-years, and increased from 2.53 to 19.26 per 100,000 person-years during the study period. The age-adjusted incidence of ARDS was 15.19 per 100,000 person-years. The overall in-hospital mortality was 57.8%. In-hospital mortality decreased from 59.7% in 1997 to 47.5% in 2011 (P < 0.001). The in-hospital mortality rate was lowest (33.5%) in the youngest patients (age 18–29 years) and highest (68.2%) in the oldest patients (>80 years, P < 0.001). The overall 1-year mortality rate was 72.1%, and decreased from 75.8% to 54.7% during the study period. Patients who died during hospitalization were older (69 ± 17 versus 62 ± 19, P < 0.001) and predominantly male (69.8% versus 65.3%, P < 0.001). In addition, patients who died during hospitalization had significantly higher medical costs (6421 versus 5825 US Dollars, P < 0.001) and shorter lengths of stay (13 versus 19 days, P < 0.001) than patients who survived. We provide the first large-scale epidemiological analysis of ARDS incidence and outcomes in Asia. Although the overall incidence was lower than has been reported in a prospective US study, this may reflect underdiagnosis by International Classification of Diseases, 9th edition code and identification of only patients with more severe ARDS in this

  13. Effects of bovine colostrum supplementation on upper respiratory illness in active males.

    PubMed

    Jones, Arwel W; Cameron, Simon J S; Thatcher, Rhys; Beecroft, Marikka S; Mur, Luis A J; Davison, Glen

    2014-07-01

    Bovine colostrum (COL) has been advocated as a nutritional countermeasure to exercise-induced immune dysfunction and increased risk of upper respiratory illness (URI) in athletic populations, however, the mechanisms remain unclear. During winter months, under double-blind procedures, 53 males (mean training load±SD, 50.5±28.9 MET-hweek(-1)) were randomized to daily supplementation of 20g of COL (N=25) or an isoenergetic/isomacronutrient placebo (PLA) (N=28) for 12weeks. Venous blood was collected at baseline and at 12weeks and unstimulated saliva samples at 4 weeks intervals. There was a significantly lower proportion of URI days and number of URI episodes with COL compared to PLA over the 12weeks (p<0.05). There was no effect of COL on in vitro neutrophil oxidative burst, salivary secretory IgA or salivary antimicrobial peptides (p>0.05), which does not support previously suggested mechanisms. In a subset of participants (COL=14, PLA=17), real-time quantitative PCR, targeting the 16S rRNA gene showed there was an increase in salivary bacterial load over the 12 weeks period with PLA (p<0.05) which was not as evident with COL. Discriminant function analysis of outputs received from serum metabolomics showed changes across time but not between groups. This is the first study to demonstrate that COL limits the increased salivary bacterial load in physically active males during the winter months which may provide a novel mechanism of immune-modulation with COL and a relevant marker of in vivo (innate) immunity and risk of URI. PMID:24200515

  14. Acute Respiratory Tract Infection Visits of Veterans With Spinal Cord Injuries and Disorders: Rates, Trends, and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Bridget M; Evans, Charlesnika T; Kurichi, Jibby E; Weaver, Frances M; Patel, Nayna; Burns, Stephen P

    2007-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Respiratory complications are a major cause of illness and death in persons with spinal cord injuries and dysfunction (SCI&Ds). The objectives of this study were to examine rates of outpatient visits over 5 years for acute respiratory tract infections (ARIs), including pneumonia and influenza (P&I), lower respiratory tract infections (LRIs), and upper respiratory tract infections (URIs), in veterans with SCI&Ds and to determine whether individual characteristics were associated with the number of annual visits for each type of ARI. Methods: This was a longitudinal (fiscal years 1998–2002) study of ARI visits at the Veterans Health Administration (VA) in 18,693 veterans with SCI&Ds. To examine the associations between time, patient characteristics, and annual number of ARI visits, we used random effect negative binomial models. Results: Veterans with SCI&Ds had a total of 11,113 ARI visits over the 5-year period. There was a slightly decreasing trend for LRI visits over time (P < 0.01) but no significant change for other ARIs over time. There were 30 to 35 pneumonia visits and 21 to 30 acute bronchitis visits per 1,000 SCI&D veterans per year. Older veterans were more likely than younger to have P&I visits and less likely to have URI visits (P < 0.01). Veterans with paraplegia had fewer P&I visits than subjects with tetraplegia (IRR = 0.58; CI = 0.51–0.67). Conclusions: Visit rates for ARIs are stable for veterans with SCI&Ds. Identifying risk factors associated with ARI visits is an important first step to improve prevention and treatment of ARIs and to improve the health of veterans with SCI&Ds. PMID:17853657

  15. Therapeutic modulation of coagulation and fibrinolysis in acute lung injury and the acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sebag, Sara C; Bastarache, Julie A; Ware, Lorraine B

    2011-09-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and acute lung injury (ALI) are characterized by excessive intraalveolar fibrin deposition, driven, at least in part by inflammation. The imbalance between activation of coagulation and inhibition of fibrinolysis in patients with ALI/ARDS favors fibrin formation and appears to occur both systemically and in the lung and airspace. Tissue factor (TF), a key mediator of the activation of coagulation in the lung, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of ALI/ARDS. As such, there have been numerous investigations modulating TF activity in a variety of experimental systems in order to develop new therapeutic strategies for ALI/ARDS. This review will summarize current understanding of the role of TF and other proteins of the coagulation cascade as well the fibrinolysis pathway in the development of ALI/ARDS with an emphasis on the pathways that are potential therapeutic targets. These include the TF inhibitor pathway, the protein C pathway, antithrombin, heparin, and modulation of fibrinolysis through plasminogen activator- 1 (PAI-1) or plasminogen activators (PA). Although experimental studies show promising results, clinical trials to date have proven unsuccessful in improving patient outcomes. Modulation of coagulation and fibrinolysis has complex effects on both hemostasis and inflammatory pathways and further studies are needed to develop new treatment strategies for patients with ALI/ARDS. PMID:21401517

  16. Influence of chronic respiratory acid-base disorders on acute CO2 titration curve.

    PubMed

    Adrogué, H J; Madias, N E

    1985-04-01

    We have recently shown that background presence of chronic metabolic acid-base disorder markedly alters in vivo acute CO2 titration curve. These studies were carried out to assess the influence of chronic respiratory acid-base disorders on response to acute hypercapnia and to explore whether the chronic level of plasma pH is the factor responsible for alterations in the CO2 titration curve. We compared whole-body responses to acute hypercapnia of dogs with preexisting chronic respiratory alkalosis (n = 8) with that of normal animals (n = 4) and animals with chronic respiratory acidosis (n = 13). Chronic respiratory alkalosis and acidosis, as well as the acute CO2 titrations, were produced in unanesthetized dogs within a large environmental chamber. For comparison with our data on chronic metabolic acidosis and alkalosis, plasma bicarbonate levels, which are secondarily altered in chronic respiratory acid-base disorders, were used as an index of chronic acid-base status of the animals. Results indicate that, as with chronic metabolic acid-base disorders, a larger increment in plasma bicarbonate occurs during acute hypercapnia when steady-state plasma bicarbonate is low (respiratory alkalosis) than when it is high (respiratory acidosis). Yet, in further analogy with the metabolic studies, plasma hydrogen ion concentration is better defended at higher plasma bicarbonate levels in accordance with mathematical relationships defined by the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation. Combined results demonstrate that the influence of chronic acid-base status on whole-body response to acute hypercapnia is independent of initial plasma pH.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Understanding Heroin Overdose: A Study of the Acute Respiratory Depressant Effects of Injected Pharmaceutical Heroin.

    PubMed

    Jolley, Caroline J; Bell, James; Rafferty, Gerrard F; Moxham, John; Strang, John

    2015-01-01

    Opioids are respiratory depressants and heroin/opioid overdose is a major contributor to the excess mortality of heroin addicts. The individual and situational variability of respiratory depression caused by intravenous heroin is poorly understood. This study used advanced respiratory monitoring to follow the time course and severity of acute opioid-induced respiratory depression. 10 patients (9/10 with chronic airflow obstruction) undergoing supervised injectable opioid treatment for heroin addiction received their usual prescribed dose of injectable opioid (diamorphine or methadone) (IOT), and their usual prescribed dose of oral opioid (methadone or sustained release oral morphine) after 30 minutes. The main outcome measures were pulse oximetry (SpO2%), end-tidal CO2% (ETCO2%) and neural respiratory drive (NRD) (quantified using parasternal intercostal muscle electromyography). Significant respiratory depression was defined as absence of inspiratory airflow >10s, SpO2% < 90% for >10s and ETCO2% per breath >6.5%. Increases in ETCO2% indicated significant respiratory depression following IOT in 8/10 patients at 30 minutes. In contrast, SpO2% indicated significant respiratory depression in only 4/10 patients, with small absolute changes in SpO2% at 30 minutes. A decline in NRD from baseline to 30 minutes post IOT was also observed, but was not statistically significant. Baseline NRD and opioid-induced drop in SpO2% were inversely related. We conclude that significant acute respiratory depression is commonly induced by opioid drugs prescribed to treat opioid addiction. Hypoventilation is reliably detected by capnography, but not by SpO2% alone. Chronic suppression of NRD in the presence of underlying lung disease may be a risk factor for acute opioid-induced respiratory depression.

  18. Understanding Heroin Overdose: A Study of the Acute Respiratory Depressant Effects of Injected Pharmaceutical Heroin

    PubMed Central

    Jolley, Caroline J.; Bell, James; Rafferty, Gerrard F.; Moxham, John; Strang, John

    2015-01-01

    Opioids are respiratory depressants and heroin/opioid overdose is a major contributor to the excess mortality of heroin addicts. The individual and situational variability of respiratory depression caused by intravenous heroin is poorly understood. This study used advanced respiratory monitoring to follow the time course and severity of acute opioid-induced respiratory depression. 10 patients (9/10 with chronic airflow obstruction) undergoing supervised injectable opioid treatment for heroin addiction received their usual prescribed dose of injectable opioid (diamorphine or methadone) (IOT), and their usual prescribed dose of oral opioid (methadone or sustained release oral morphine) after 30 minutes. The main outcome measures were pulse oximetry (SpO2%), end-tidal CO2% (ETCO2%) and neural respiratory drive (NRD) (quantified using parasternal intercostal muscle electromyography). Significant respiratory depression was defined as absence of inspiratory airflow >10s, SpO2% < 90% for >10s and ETCO2% per breath >6.5%. Increases in ETCO2% indicated significant respiratory depression following IOT in 8/10 patients at 30 minutes. In contrast, SpO2% indicated significant respiratory depression in only 4/10 patients, with small absolute changes in SpO2% at 30 minutes. A decline in NRD from baseline to 30 minutes post IOT was also observed, but was not statistically significant. Baseline NRD and opioid-induced drop in SpO2% were inversely related. We conclude that significant acute respiratory depression is commonly induced by opioid drugs prescribed to treat opioid addiction. Hypoventilation is reliably detected by capnography, but not by SpO2% alone. Chronic suppression of NRD in the presence of underlying lung disease may be a risk factor for acute opioid-induced respiratory depression. PMID:26495843

  19. Understanding Heroin Overdose: A Study of the Acute Respiratory Depressant Effects of Injected Pharmaceutical Heroin.

    PubMed

    Jolley, Caroline J; Bell, James; Rafferty, Gerrard F; Moxham, John; Strang, John

    2015-01-01

    Opioids are respiratory depressants and heroin/opioid overdose is a major contributor to the excess mortality of heroin addicts. The individual and situational variability of respiratory depression caused by intravenous heroin is poorly understood. This study used advanced respiratory monitoring to follow the time course and severity of acute opioid-induced respiratory depression. 10 patients (9/10 with chronic airflow obstruction) undergoing supervised injectable opioid treatment for heroin addiction received their usual prescribed dose of injectable opioid (diamorphine or methadone) (IOT), and their usual prescribed dose of oral opioid (methadone or sustained release oral morphine) after 30 minutes. The main outcome measures were pulse oximetry (SpO2%), end-tidal CO2% (ETCO2%) and neural respiratory drive (NRD) (quantified using parasternal intercostal muscle electromyography). Significant respiratory depression was defined as absence of inspiratory airflow >10s, SpO2% < 90% for >10s and ETCO2% per breath >6.5%. Increases in ETCO2% indicated significant respiratory depression following IOT in 8/10 patients at 30 minutes. In contrast, SpO2% indicated significant respiratory depression in only 4/10 patients, with small absolute changes in SpO2% at 30 minutes. A decline in NRD from baseline to 30 minutes post IOT was also observed, but was not statistically significant. Baseline NRD and opioid-induced drop in SpO2% were inversely related. We conclude that significant acute respiratory depression is commonly induced by opioid drugs prescribed to treat opioid addiction. Hypoventilation is reliably detected by capnography, but not by SpO2% alone. Chronic suppression of NRD in the presence of underlying lung disease may be a risk factor for acute opioid-induced respiratory depression. PMID:26495843

  20. Physiology in Medicine: A physiologic approach to prevention and treatment of acute high-altitude illnesses.

    PubMed

    Luks, Andrew M

    2015-03-01

    With the growing interest in adventure travel and the increasing ease and affordability of air, rail, and road-based transportation, increasing numbers of individuals are traveling to high altitude. The decline in barometric pressure and ambient oxygen tensions in this environment trigger a series of physiologic responses across organ systems and over a varying time frame that help the individual acclimatize to the low oxygen conditions but occasionally lead to maladaptive responses and one or several forms of acute altitude illness. The goal of this Physiology in Medicine article is to provide information that providers can use when counseling patients who present to primary care or travel medicine clinics seeking advice about how to prevent these problems. After discussing the primary physiologic responses to acute hypoxia from the organ to the molecular level in normal individuals, the review describes the main forms of acute altitude illness--acute mountain sickness, high-altitude cerebral edema, and high-altitude pulmonary edema--and the basic approaches to their prevention and treatment of these problems, with an emphasis throughout on the physiologic basis for the development of these illnesses and their management.

  1. Physiology in Medicine: A physiologic approach to prevention and treatment of acute high-altitude illnesses.

    PubMed

    Luks, Andrew M

    2015-03-01

    With the growing interest in adventure travel and the increasing ease and affordability of air, rail, and road-based transportation, increasing numbers of individuals are traveling to high altitude. The decline in barometric pressure and ambient oxygen tensions in this environment trigger a series of physiologic responses across organ systems and over a varying time frame that help the individual acclimatize to the low oxygen conditions but occasionally lead to maladaptive responses and one or several forms of acute altitude illness. The goal of this Physiology in Medicine article is to provide information that providers can use when counseling patients who present to primary care or travel medicine clinics seeking advice about how to prevent these problems. After discussing the primary physiologic responses to acute hypoxia from the organ to the molecular level in normal individuals, the review describes the main forms of acute altitude illness--acute mountain sickness, high-altitude cerebral edema, and high-altitude pulmonary edema--and the basic approaches to their prevention and treatment of these problems, with an emphasis throughout on the physiologic basis for the development of these illnesses and their management. PMID:25539941

  2. Toward Smarter Lumping and Smarter Splitting: Rethinking Strategies for Sepsis and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Clinical Trial Design.

    PubMed

    Prescott, Hallie C; Calfee, Carolyn S; Thompson, B Taylor; Angus, Derek C; Liu, Vincent X

    2016-07-15

    Both quality improvement and clinical research efforts over the past few decades have focused on consensus definition of sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Although clinical definitions based on readily available clinical data have advanced recognition and timely use of broad supportive treatments, they likely hinder the identification of more targeted therapies that manipulate select biological mechanisms underlying critical illness. Sepsis and ARDS are by definition heterogeneous, and patients vary in both their underlying biology and their severity of illness. We have long been able to identify subtypes of sepsis and ARDS that confer different prognoses. The key is that we are now on the verge of identifying subtypes that may confer different response to therapy. In this perspective, inspired by a 2015 American Thoracic Society International Conference Symposium entitled "Lumpers and Splitters: Phenotyping in Critical Illness," we highlight promising approaches to uncovering patient subtypes that may predict treatment responsiveness and not just differences in prognosis. We then discuss how this information can be leveraged to improve the success and translatability of clinical trials by using predictive enrichment and other design strategies. Last, we discuss the challenges and limitations to identifying biomarkers and endotypes and incorporating them into routine clinical practice. PMID:27244481

  3. E-health and consultation rates for respiratory illnesses in infants: a randomised clinical trial in primary care

    PubMed Central

    van der Gugten, Anne C; Uiterwaal, Cuno SPM; Verheij, Theo JM; van der Ent, Cornelis K

    2015-01-01

    Background It is assumed that clear and complete information on the internet can reduce healthcare consumption. Aim We assessed in a randomised clinical trial whether a personalised online parent information program on infant respiratory symptoms can reduce primary care utilisation. Design and setting Randomised clinical trial in primary healthcare centres in a new residential area in the Netherlands. Method A web-based program (WHISTLER-online) was developed for parents that offered general information on childhood respiratory disease and personalised risk assessments. Parents of infants who enrolled from June 2009 to June 2012 in WHISTLER, an ongoing population-based birth cohort, were randomly allocated to ‘WHISTLER-online’ or ‘usual care’. Information about, first, consultations and, second, associated prescriptions for respiratory symptoms during the first year of life was collected from the electronic patient files. Results A total of 323 infants were randomly assigned to WHISTLER-online and 322 to usual care, and 314 and 305, respectively, were analysed. Of the parents, 70% used WHISTLER-online, and 99% of them judged it to be clear and useful information. There were differences neither in consultation rates for respiratory symptoms (incidence rate ratio 0.96 [95% CI = 0.85 to 1.09, P = 0.532]) nor in associated drug prescriptions. Conclusion Although parents greatly appreciate the provided facilities, a personalised e-support program on respiratory illnesses in infants does not substantially reduce healthcare utilisation. PMID:25624309

  4. Respiratory symptoms in households as an effective marker for influenza-like illness surveillance in the community.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shui Shan; Wong, Ngai Sze

    2014-06-01

    To effectively track the growth of influenza, we piloted an online system to monitor influenza-like illness (ILI) in the community in one district of Hong Kong. Four syndromic markers, namely fever, respiratory symptoms, fever with respiratory symptoms, fever and/or respiratory symptoms, either of the individual or of the household, were collected during the study period from June 2012 to October 2013. A total of 132 residents of Tuen Mun District reported syndromic markers at the individual and household levels on a weekly basis. Temporal patterns of these markers were compared with data derived from laboratory surveillance by dynamic linear regression. Household respiratory symptoms were found to be an effective syndromic marker, pre-dating overall laboratory virus surveillance results on influenza diseases in two influenza seasons by 3-4 weeks. To conclude, respiratory symptoms can be a good marker predicting the onset of the influenza season in the community, and is particularly useful with regard to data from households, even if the sample size may not be a large one.

  5. Respiratory symptoms in households as an effective marker for influenza-like illness surveillance in the community.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shui Shan; Wong, Ngai Sze

    2014-06-01

    To effectively track the growth of influenza, we piloted an online system to monitor influenza-like illness (ILI) in the community in one district of Hong Kong. Four syndromic markers, namely fever, respiratory symptoms, fever with respiratory symptoms, fever and/or respiratory symptoms, either of the individual or of the household, were collected during the study period from June 2012 to October 2013. A total of 132 residents of Tuen Mun District reported syndromic markers at the individual and household levels on a weekly basis. Temporal patterns of these markers were compared with data derived from laboratory surveillance by dynamic linear regression. Household respiratory symptoms were found to be an effective syndromic marker, pre-dating overall laboratory virus surveillance results on influenza diseases in two influenza seasons by 3-4 weeks. To conclude, respiratory symptoms can be a good marker predicting the onset of the influenza season in the community, and is particularly useful with regard to data from households, even if the sample size may not be a large one. PMID:24680819

  6. [Two cases of acute respiratory distress syndrome related to zinc fumes and zinc dust inhalation].

    PubMed

    Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Oda, Keishi; Kawanami, Toshinori; Soda, Hiroshi; Kohno, Shigeru; Mukae, Hiroshi

    2014-06-01

    Two cases of acute respiratory distress syndrome related to zinc fume inhalation and zinc powder inhalation are presented. Case 1 demonstrated acute respiratory symptoms during the work of distortion correction of iron boards, coated with a rust preventative including rich zinc using an acetylene gas burner. Case 2 occurred after the work of applying a rust preventative that included zinc powder, mainly using an airless compressor. Since both were working in a boathouse, without using protective equipment, the possible causes of Case 1 and 2 were inhalation exposure to zinc fumes and zinc powder, respectively. The two patients showed similar clinical courses, including favorable treatment outcomes, mimicking acute respiratory failure complicated by a metal fume fever. PMID:24930880

  7. [Two cases of acute respiratory distress syndrome related to zinc fumes and zinc dust inhalation].

    PubMed

    Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Oda, Keishi; Kawanami, Toshinori; Soda, Hiroshi; Kohno, Shigeru; Mukae, Hiroshi

    2014-06-01

    Two cases of acute respiratory distress syndrome related to zinc fume inhalation and zinc powder inhalation are presented. Case 1 demonstrated acute respiratory symptoms during the work of distortion correction of iron boards, coated with a rust preventative including rich zinc using an acetylene gas burner. Case 2 occurred after the work of applying a rust preventative that included zinc powder, mainly using an airless compressor. Since both were working in a boathouse, without using protective equipment, the possible causes of Case 1 and 2 were inhalation exposure to zinc fumes and zinc powder, respectively. The two patients showed similar clinical courses, including favorable treatment outcomes, mimicking acute respiratory failure complicated by a metal fume fever.

  8. The association between obesity and outpatient visits for acute respiratory infections in Ontario, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Campitelli, Michael A.; Rosella, Laura C.; Kwong, Jeffrey C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Recent evidence suggests that obesity increases the risk of severe outcomes following respiratory infection. It is less clear whether obesity is associated with the risk of being infected with influenza or other respiratory pathogens. Therefore, we examined the association between obesity and outpatient visits for acute respiratory infections. Design We conducted a retrospective cohort study over 13 years on 104,665 individuals in Ontario, Canada who responded to population health surveys and agreed to linkage with health administrative data. Individuals aged 18–64 years who responded to a survey within 5 years prior to the start of an influenza season were included. Poisson regression, with adjustment for relevant confounders, was used to measure the association between self-reported BMI and outpatient visits coded as acute respiratory infection. We conducted numerous sensitivity analyses to assess the robustness of our findings. Results We observed higher rates of outpatient visits for ARI during influenza season periods compared with normal weight individuals for those who were overweight (BMI 25–29.9) (Rate Ratio [RR] 1.10; 95% Confidence Interval [95% CI] 1.07–1.13), obese class I (BMI 30–34.9) (RR 1.17; 95% CI 1.13–1.22), and obese class II or III (BMI ≥35) (RR 1.19; 95% CI 1.12–1.25) Associations of a similar magnitude were observed during non-influenza season periods. Obesity was a greater risk factor for acute respiratory infections managed in emergency departments than physician offices. Conclusions Obese individuals are at an increased risk of outpatient visits for acute respiratory infection during both influenza and non-influenza season periods, suggesting that the effect of obesity on the risk of respiratory infections is not limited to influenza. Interventions designed to reduce the prevalence of obesity may have the added benefit reducing the population burden of respiratory infections. PMID:23670219

  9. Adverse outcomes following hospitalization in acutely ill older patients

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Roger Y; Miller, William C

    2008-01-01

    Background The longitudinal outcomes of patients admitted to acute care for elders units (ACE) are mixed. We studied the associations between socio-demographic and functional measures with hospital length of stay (LOS), and which variables predicted adverse events (non-independent living, readmission, death) 3 and 6 months later. Methods Prospective cohort study of community-living, medical patients age 75 or over admitted to ACE at a teaching hospital. Results The population included 147 subjects, median LOS of 9 days (interquartile range 5–15 days). All returned home/community after hospitalization. Just prior to discharge, baseline timed up and go test (TUG, P < 0.001), bipedal stance balance (P = 0.001), and clinical frailty scale scores (P = 0.02) predicted LOS, with TUG as the only independent predictor (P < 0.001) in multiple regression analysis. By 3 months, 59.9% of subjects remained free of an adverse event, and by 6 months, 49.0% were event free. The 3 and 6-month mortality was 10.2% and 12.9% respectively. Almost one-third of subjects had developed an adverse event by 6 months, with the highest risk within the first 3 months post discharge. An abnormal TUG score was associated with increased adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.28, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.03 to 1.59, P = 0.03. A higher FMMSE score (adjusted HR 0.89, 95% CI 0.82 to 0.96, P = 0.003) and independent living before hospitalization (adjusted HR 0.42, 95% CI 0.21 to 0.84, P = 0.01) were associated with reduced risk of adverse outcome. Conclusion Some ACE patients demonstrate further functional decline following hospitalization, resulting in loss of independence, repeat hospitalization, or death. Abnormal TUG is associated with prolonged LOS and future adverse outcomes. PMID:18479512

  10. Clinical review: Early treatment of acute lung injury - paradigm shift toward prevention and treatment prior to respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Despite improved understanding of the pathogenesis of ALI, supportive care with a lung protective strategy of mechanical ventilation remains the only treatment with a proven survival advantage. Most clinical trials in ALI have targeted mechanically ventilated patients. Past trials of pharmacologic agents may have failed to demonstrate efficacy in part due to the resultant delay in initiation of therapy until several days after the onset of lung injury. Improved early identification of at-risk patients provides new opportunities for risk factor modification to prevent the development of ALI and novel patient groups to target for early treatment of ALI before progression to the need for mechanical ventilation. This review will discuss current strategies that target prevention of ALI and some of the most promising pharmacologic agents for early treatment of ALI prior to the onset of respiratory failure that requires mechanical ventilation. PMID:22713281

  11. Exposure, probable PTSD and lower respiratory illness among World Trade Center rescue, recovery and clean-up workers

    PubMed Central

    Luft, B. J.; Schechter, C.; Kotov, R.; Broihier, J.; Reissman, D.; Guerrera, K.; Udasin, I.; Moline, J.; Harrison, D.; Friedman-Jimenez, G.; Pietrzak, R. H.; Southwick, S. M.; Bromet, E. J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Thousands of rescue and recovery workers descended on the World Trade Center (WTC) in the wake of the terrorist attack of September 11, 2001 (9/11). Recent studies show that respiratory illness and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are the hallmark health problems, but relationships between them are poorly understood. The current study examined this link and evaluated contributions of WTC exposures. Method Participants were 8508 police and 12 333 non-traditional responders examined at the WTC Medical Monitoring and Treatment Program (WTC-MMTP), a clinic network in the New York area established by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). We used structural equation modeling (SEM) to explore patterns of association among exposures, other risk factors, probable WTC-related PTSD [based on the PTSD Checklist (PCL)], physician-assessed respiratory symptoms arising after 9/11 and present at examination, and abnormal pulmonary functioning defined by low forced vital capacity (FVC). Results Fewer police than non-traditional responders had probable PTSD (5.9% v. 23.0%) and respiratory symptoms (22.5% v. 28.4%), whereas pulmonary function was similar. PTSD and respiratory symptoms were moderately correlated (r=0.28 for police and 0.27 for non-traditional responders). Exposure was more strongly associated with respiratory symptoms than with PTSD or lung function. The SEM model that best fit the data in both groups suggested that PTSD statistically mediated the association of exposure with respiratory symptoms. Conclusions Although longitudinal data are needed to confirm the mediation hypothesis, the link between PTSD and respiratory symptoms is noteworthy and calls for further investigation. The findings also support the value of integrated medical and psychiatric treatment for disaster responders. PMID:22459506

  12. Sick building syndrome: Acute illness among office workers--the role of building ventilation, airborne contaminants and work stress

    SciTech Connect

    Letz, G.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Outbreaks of acute illness among office workers have been reported with increasing frequency during the past 10-15 years. In the majority of cases, hazardous levels of airborne contaminants have not been found. Generally, health complaints have involved mucous membrane and respiratory tract irritation and nonspecific symptoms such as headache and fatigue. Except for rare examples of hypersensitivity pneumonitis related to microbiologic antigens, there have been no reports of serious morbidity or permanent sequelae. However, the anxiety, lost work time, decreased productivity and resources spent in investigating complaints has been substantial. NIOSH has reported on 446 Health Hazards Evaluations that were done in response to indoor air complaints. This data base is the source of most of the published accounts of building-related illness. Their results are summarized here with a discussion of common pollutants (tobacco smoke, formaldehyde, other organic volatiles), and the limitations of the available industrial hygiene and epidemiologic data. There has been one large scale epidemiologic survey of symptoms among office workers. The results associate risk of symptoms to building design and characteristics of the heating/air-conditioning systems, consistent with the NIOSH experience. Building construction since the 1970s has utilized energy conservation measures such as improved insulation, reduced air exchange, and construction without opening windows. These buildings are considered airtight and are commonly involved in episodes of building-associated illness in which no specific etiologic agent can be identified. After increasing the percentage of air exchange or correcting specific deficiencies found in the heating/air-conditioning systems, the health complaints often resolve, hence, the term tight building syndrome or sick building syndrome.

  13. Nitrogen dioxide and respiratory illness in children. Part II: Assessment of exposure to nitrogen dioxide.

    PubMed

    Lambert, W E; Samet, J M; Hunt, W C; Skipper, B J; Schwab, M; Spengler, J D

    1993-06-01

    Repeated measurements of nitrogen dioxide were obtained from 1988 to 1991 in the homes of 1,205 infants living in Albuquerque, NM. Passive diffusion samplers were used to obtain a series of two-week integrated measurements from the home of each infant for use in a cohort study of the relation of residential exposure to nitrogen dioxide and respiratory illnesses. Information on stove use and time spent inside the residence was collected at two-week and two-month intervals, respectively. During the winter, in the bedrooms of homes with gas cooking stoves, mean nitrogen dioxide concentrations were 21 parts per billion (ppb); mean concentrations in the living room and kitchen were 29 ppb and 34 ppb, respectively. In homes with electric cooking stoves, the mean bedroom concentration was 7 ppb during the winter. Lower indoor concentrations were observed during the summer in homes with both gas and electric stoves. On average, infants spent approximately 12.3 hours per day in their bedrooms, 7.3 hours in the living rooms, 35 minutes in the kitchens, and 3.8 hours out of their homes. (As a condition of participation, none of the infants spent more than 20 hours per week in day care outside of their homes). The mean time infants spent in the kitchen during cooking was approximately nine minutes per day. We tested whether exposures of infants living in homes with gas stoves could be reasonably estimated by measurements in the bedroom in comparison with time-weighted average concentrations based on time-activity data and simultaneous nitrogen dioxide measurements in the kitchen, living room, and bedroom. In 1,937 two-week intervals from 587 infants, 90% of time-weighted exposure (on the three-level classification used in this study) estimates were in agreement with estimates based on bedroom concentrations alone. The agreement of the time-weighted nitrogen dioxide exposure estimates with the bedroom concentrations is attributed to limited amounts of cooking stove use (the

  14. Immunoadjuvant Therapy and Noninvasive Ventilation for Acute Respiratory Failure in Lung Tuberculosis: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Franco, René Agustín; Olivas-Medina, Dahyr Alberto; Pacheco-Tena, Cesar Francisco; Duque-Rodríguez, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory failure caused by pulmonary tuberculosis is a rare event but with a high mortality even while receiving mechanical ventilatory support. We report the case of a young man with severe pulmonary tuberculosis refractory to conventional therapy who successfully overcame the critical period of his condition using noninvasive ventilation and immunoadjuvant therapy that included three doses of etanercept 25 mg subcutaneously. We conclude that the use of etanercept along with antituberculosis treatment appears to be safe and effective in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis presenting with acute respiratory failure. PMID:26273486

  15. A patient-centered research agenda for the care of the acutely ill older patient

    PubMed Central

    Wald, Heidi L.; Leykum, Luci K.; Mattison, Melissa L. P.; Vasilevskis, Eduard E.; Meltzer, David O.

    2015-01-01

    Hospitalists and others acute care providers are limited by gaps in evidence addressing the needs of the acutely ill older adult population. The Society of Hospital Medicine (SHM) sponsored the Acute Care of Older Patients (ACOP) Priority Setting Partnership to develop a research agenda focused on bridging this gap. Informed by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) framework for identification and prioritization of research areas, we adapted a methodology developed by the James Lind Alliance to engage diverse stakeholders in the research agenda setting process. The work of the Partnership proceeded through four steps: convening, consulting, collating, and prioritizing. First, the steering committee convened a Partnership of 18 stakeholder organizations in May 2013. Next, stakeholder organizations surveyed members to identify important unanswered questions in the acute care of older persons, receiving 1299 responses from 580 individuals. Finally, an extensive and structured process of collation and prioritization resulted in a final list of ten research questions in the following areas: advanced care planning, care transitions, delirium, dementia, depression, medications, models of care, physical function, surgery, and training. With the changing demographics of the hospitalized population, a workforce with limited geriatrics training, and gaps in evidence to inform clinical decision-making for acutely ill older patients, the identified research questions deserve the highest priority in directing future research efforts to improve care for the older hospitalized patient and enrich training. PMID:25877486

  16. Progress in Pediatrics in 2012: choices in allergy, endocrinology, gastroenterology, hematology, infectious diseases, neurology, nutrition and respiratory tract illnesses.

    PubMed

    Caffarelli, Carlo; Santamaria, Francesca; Vottero, Alessandra; Bernasconi, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    In this review, we summarize the progresses in allergy, endocrinology, gastroenterology, hematology, infectious diseases, neurology, nutrition and respiratory tract illnesses that have been published in The Italian Journal of Pediatrics in 2012. The induction of Treg activity by probiotics might be effective for promoting tolerance towards food allergens. Nasal cytology is useful in patients with rhinitis for diagnosing chronic non-allergic non-infectious diseases. Atopic eczema is associated both with an aberrant skin matrix and impaired systemic immune response. Therefore, isolated topical treatment may have suboptimal effect. Diagnostic work-up of exercise-induced anaphylaxis, including exercise challenge test, is necessary to reach a diagnosis. Studies may support a role for nutrition on prevention of asthma and cardiovascular diseases. Clinicians need to early identify adolescent menstrual abnormalities to minimize sequelae, and to promote health information. In Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 2B investigations include acetylcholinesterase study of rectal mucosa followed by the molecular analysis of RET mutation. Low adherence to gluten-free diet and osteopenia are common problems in children with diabetes mellitus type 1 and celiac disease. In infantile colic, laboratory tests are usually unnecessary and the treatment is based on reassurance. Prevalence of obesity and stunting is elucidated by several studies. Evidences are growing that dietetic measures are needed to prevent obesity in children with acute leukemia. Treatment studies for infectious diseases show promise for probiotics along with standard triple therapy in children with Helicobacter pilori infection, while zinc has no effect on pneumonia. Educational programs about the proper management of the febrile child are warranted. A new hour-specific total serum bilirubin nomogram has been shown to be able to predict newborns without hyperbilirubinemia after 48 to 72 hours of life. Newborns with

  17. Progress in Pediatrics in 2012: choices in allergy, endocrinology, gastroenterology, hematology, infectious diseases, neurology, nutrition and respiratory tract illnesses.

    PubMed

    Caffarelli, Carlo; Santamaria, Francesca; Vottero, Alessandra; Bernasconi, Sergio

    2013-05-08

    In this review, we summarize the progresses in allergy, endocrinology, gastroenterology, hematology, infectious diseases, neurology, nutrition and respiratory tract illnesses that have been published in The Italian Journal of Pediatrics in 2012. The induction of Treg activity by probiotics might be effective for promoting tolerance towards food allergens. Nasal cytology is useful in patients with rhinitis for diagnosing chronic non-allergic non-infectious diseases. Atopic eczema is associated both with an aberrant skin matrix and impaired systemic immune response. Therefore, isolated topical treatment may have suboptimal effect. Diagnostic work-up of exercise-induced anaphylaxis, including exercise challenge test, is necessary to reach a diagnosis. Studies may support a role for nutrition on prevention of asthma and cardiovascular diseases. Clinicians need to early identify adolescent menstrual abnormalities to minimize sequelae, and to promote health information. In Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 2B investigations include acetylcholinesterase study of rectal mucosa followed by the molecular analysis of RET mutation. Low adherence to gluten-free diet and osteopenia are common problems in children with diabetes mellitus type 1 and celiac disease. In infantile colic, laboratory tests are usually unnecessary and the treatment is based on reassurance. Prevalence of obesity and stunting is elucidated by several studies. Evidences are growing that dietetic measures are needed to prevent obesity in children with acute leukemia. Treatment studies for infectious diseases show promise for probiotics along with standard triple therapy in children with Helicobacter pilori infection, while zinc has no effect on pneumonia. Educational programs about the proper management of the febrile child are warranted. A new hour-specific total serum bilirubin nomogram has been shown to be able to predict newborns without hyperbilirubinemia after 48 to 72 hours of life. Newborns with

  18. Magnitude and distribution of acute, self-reported gastrointestinal illness in a Canadian community.

    PubMed Central

    Majowicz, S. E.; Doré, K.; Flint, J. A.; Edge, V. L.; Read, S.; Buffett, M. C.; McEwen, S.; McNab, W. B.; Stacey, D.; Sockett, P.; Wilson, J. B.

    2004-01-01

    To estimate the magnitude and distribution of self-reported, acute gastrointestinal illness in a Canadian-based population, we conducted a retrospective, cross-sectional telephone survey of approximately 3500 randomly selected residents of the city of Hamilton (Ontario, Canada) from February 2001 to February 2002. The observed monthly prevalence was 10% (95 % CI 9.94-10.14) and the incidence rate was 1.3 (95 % CI 1.1-1.4) episodes per person-year; this is within the range of estimates from other developed countries. The prevalence was higher in females and in those aged < 10 years and 20-24 years. Overall, prevalence peaked in April and October, but a different temporal distribution was observed for those aged < 10 years. Although these data were derived from one community, they demonstrate that the epidemiology of acute gastrointestinal illness in a Canadian-based population is similar to that reported for other developed countries. PMID:15310162

  19. Influence of age, previous health status, and severity of acute illness on outcome from intensive care.

    PubMed

    Le Gall, J R; Brun-Buisson, C; Trunet, P; Latournerie, J; Chantereau, S; Rapin, M

    1982-09-01

    Age, previous health status (HS), and severity of acute illness were assessed prospectively on 228 unselected patients admitted over 1 yr to the multidisciplinary ICU, to determine their influence on outcome. One hundred and fifty patients (66%) were discharged from the ICU, but the survival rate fell to 50% at 6 months, and was similar after 1 yr (49%). Over a 6-month period, there was improved HS in survivors which gradually leveled off. Compared to prior HS, the final HS was worsened in 37% of survivors. Three factors were important predictors of late survival: age under 50, good previous HS, and less than two visceral failures. We conclude that evaluation of ICU outcome should provide information on 6-month survival and HS and include important variables as age, previous HS, and severity of acute illness. PMID:7105766

  20. New Pneumococcal Carriage Acquired in Association with Acute Respiratory Infection Is Prone to Cause Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Leino, Tuija; Kilpi, Terhi

    2016-01-01

    For considering vaccine-prevention of pneumococcal acute otitis media (PncAOM), relationships between pneumococcal carriage, respiratory infection and PncAOM need to be understood. We analyzed nasopharyngeal samples collected from 329 unvaccinated Finnish children aged 2–24 months at scheduled visits and at visits during respiratory infection in 1994–97. We assessed temporal associations of respiratory infection with pneumococcal acquisition and whether PncAOM hazard depends on the relative timing of acquisition and the infection onset. The data comprised 607 person-years of risk-time for acquisition, 245 person-months of concurrent respiratory infection and carriage, and 119 episodes of PncAOM. The acquisition hazard was 3-fold in the month preceding respiratory sickness (hazard ratio, HR 3.5, 90% credible interval CI 2.9, 4.1) as compared to acquisition in healthy children. Moreover, the PncAOM hazard was markedly higher (HR 3.7, 90% CI 2.4, 5.3) during the first month of carriage acquired around the acute phase of respiratory infection (between 1 month before and 1 week after the sickness onset), as compared to carriage acquired later during sickness. The high proportion (76%) of PncAOM events occurring within 1 month of acquisition was due to frequent acquisition being associated with respiratory infection as well as the susceptibility of such acquisition to cause otitis media. PMID:27257789

  1. [Italian Program for Surveillance of Acute Pesticide-Related Illnesses: cases identified in 2005].

    PubMed

    Settimi, L; Davanzo, F; Travaglia, A; Locatelli, C; Cilento, I; Volpe, C; Russo, A; Miceli, G; Fracassi, A; Maiozzi, P; Marcello, I; Sesan, F; Urbani, E

    2007-01-01

    In 2005, the Italian System for Surveillance of Acute Pesticide-Related Illnesses (SIAF) identified 625 cases, among which 520 unintentionally exposed. The majority of these subjects were men (75%) and aged 26-65 years (65%). About 63% of all exposures occurred at work. Severity for these illnesses was low for 94% and moderate for 5%. Four cases were classified as illnesses of high severity. Some 70% of all the reported exposures occurred between May and September. The active ingredients responsible for the largest number of cases were: glyphosate (n. 56), copper sulphate (n. 55), methomyl (n. = 52), metam-sodium (n. 24). Three episodes of collective environmental exposure to soil fumigants involving 23 subjects were also detected.

  2. What worries parents when their preschool children are acutely ill, and why: a qualitative study.

    PubMed Central

    Kai, J.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify and explore parents' concerns when young children become acutely ill. DESIGN: Qualitative study making use of semi-structured one to one and group interviews with parents of preschool children. SETTING: Disadvantaged inner city community. SUBJECTS: 95 parents of preschool children. RESULTS: Fever, cough, and the possibility of meningitis were parents' primary concerns when their children became acutely ill. Parents' concerns reflected lay beliefs, their interpretation of medical knowledge, and their fears that their child might die or be permanently harmed. Parents worried about failing to recognise a serious problem. Concerns were expressed within the context of keenly felt pressure, emphasising parents' responsibility to protect their child from harm. They were grounded in two linked factors: parents' sense of personal control when faced with illness in their child and the perceived threat posed by an illness. CONCLUSIONS: Better understanding of parents' concerns may promote effective communication between health professionals and parents. Modification of parents' personal control and perceived threat using appropriate information and education that acknowledge and address their concerns may be a means of empowering parents. PMID:8892420

  3. The respiratory system.

    PubMed

    Zifko, U; Chen, R

    1996-10-01

    Neurological disorders frequently contribute to respiratory failure in critically ill patients. They may be the primary reason for the initiation of mechanical ventilation, or may develop later as a secondary complication. Disorders of the central nervous system leading to respiratory failure include metabolic encephalopathies, acute stroke, lesions of the motor cortex and brain-stem respiratory centres, and their descending pathways. Guillan-Barré syndrome, critical illness polyneuropathy and acute quadriplegic myopathy are the more common neuromuscular causes of respiratory failure. Clinical observations and pulmonary function tests are important in monitoring respiratory function. Respiratory electrophysiological studies are useful in the investigation and monitoring of respiratory failure. Transcortical and cervical magnetic stimulation can assess the central respiratory drive, and may be useful in determining the prognosis in ventilated patients, with cervical cord dysfunction. It is also helpful in the assessment of failure to wean, which is often caused by a combination of central and peripheral nervous system disorders. Phrenic nerve conduction studies and needle electromyography of the diaphragm and chest wall muscles are useful to characterize neuropathies and myopathies affecting the diaphragm. Repetitive phrenic nerve stimulation can assess neuromuscular transmission defects. It is important to identify patients at risk of respiratory failure. They should be carefully monitored and mechanical ventilation should be initiated before the development of severe hypoxaemia.

  4. Methylprednisolone exacerbates acute critical illness-related corticosteroid insufficiency associated with traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Zhang, Bin; Chai, Yan; Dong, Bo; Lei, Ping; Jiang, Rongcai; Zhang, Jianning

    2011-03-25

    Emerging evidence demonstrates that severe illness could induce critical illness-related corticosteroid insufficiency (CIRCI) and cause poor prognosis. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that methylprednisolone (MP), a synthetic glucocorticoid, promotes post-traumatic apoptosis in both the hypothalamus and pituitary, resulting in acute CIRCI and increased mortality in the acute phase of traumatic brain injury (TBI). We tested this hypothesis by measuring acute CIRCI in rats subjected to fluid percussion injury (FPI) and treated with MP (5-30mg/kg). The corticosteroid response to TBI was evaluated using the corticosterone increase index (CII), where values less than 2.5 were considered indicative of acute CIRCI. The CII of MP treated rats was comparable to that of saline treated control rats before injury but was significantly decreased in injured rats receiving high-dose MP on post-injury day 7. Similarly, the incidence of acute CIRCI was significantly higher in the high-dose MP group on post-injury day 7. Furthermore, the CII of rats that did not survive post-injury was significantly lower compared to that of survival and was indicative of acute CIRCI. We also examined apoptosis in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus and the adenohypophysis of the pituitary, using a TUNEL assay and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The number of TUNEL-positive cells was significantly higher in injured rats treated with high-dose MP. No TUNEL-positive cells were detected in the adenohypophysis across experimental groups at either 7 or 14days after TBI. However, autopsies performed on rats that did not survive post-injury revealed obvious apoptotic cells in the adenohypophysis. Moreover, TEM revealed morphological changes characteristic of apoptosis in both the PVN and adenohypophysis of high-dose MP treated rats. These data suggest that MP therapy for TBI could increase neuronal apoptosis in both the hypothalamus and pituitary and

  5. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Burn Patients: A Comparison of the Berlin and American-European Definitions.

    PubMed

    Sine, Christy R; Belenkiy, Slava M; Buel, Allison R; Waters, J Alan; Lundy, Jonathan B; Henderson, Jonathan L; Stewart, Ian J; Aden, James K; Liu, Nehemiah T; Batchinsky, Andriy; Cannon, Jeremy W; Cancio, Leopoldo C; Chung, Kevin K

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the Berlin definition to the American-European Consensus Conference (AECC) definition in determining the prevalence of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and associated mortality in the critically ill burn population. Consecutive patients admitted to our institution with burn injury that required mechanical ventilation for more than 24 hours were included for analysis. Included patients (N = 891) were classified by both definitions. The median age, % TBSA burn, and injury severity score (interquartile ranges) were 35 (24-51), 25 (11-45), and 18 (9-26), respectively. Inhalation injury was present in 35.5%. The prevalence of ARDS was 34% using the Berlin definition and 30.5% using the AECC definition (combined acute lung injury and ARDS), with associated mortality rates of 40.9 and 42.9%, respectively. Under the Berlin definition, mortality rose with increased ARDS severity (14.6% no ARDS; 16.7% mild; 44% moderate; and 59.7% severe, P < 0.001). By contrast, under the AECC definition increased mortality was seen only for ARDS category (14.7% no ARDS; 15.1% acute lung injury; and 46.0% ARDS, P < 0.001). The mortality of the 22 subjects meeting the AECC, but not the Berlin definition was not different from patients without ARDS (P = .91). The Berlin definition better stratifies ARDS in terms of severity and correctly excludes those with minimal disease previously captured by the AECC.

  6. Can We Optimize Long-Term Outcomes in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome by Targeting Normoxemia?

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Brian; Christie, Jason D.; Hopkins, Ramona O.; Lanken, Paul N.

    2014-01-01

    Since its original description in 1967, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has been recognized as a devastating condition associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Advances in critical care medicine and ARDS management have led to a substantial increase in the number of ARDS survivors. Long-term cognitive impairment after critical illness is a significant public health concern. ARDS survivors frequently experience long-term cognitive impairment, as well as physical impairment, psychiatric morbidity, and reduced health-related quality of life. At present, no intensive care unit–based intervention has been proven to reduce the risk of long-term cognitive impairment after ARDS. To address the urgent need to identify strategies to preserve long-term health, investigators have advocated the measurement of short- and long-term outcomes in clinical trials. Maintaining adequate oxygen delivery to preserve organ function is of vital importance in ARDS management. The optimal target range for arterial oxygenation in ARDS remains unknown, due in part to the challenge to maintain adequate tissue oxygenation and to minimize harm, such as oxygen toxicity. An approach targeted to subnormal oxygenation values (partial pressure of arterial oxygen, 55–80 mm Hg) has emerged as a means to accomplish these aims. In this perspective, we critically evaluate this strategy from short- and long-term perspectives, with a focus on the potential long-term cognitive effects of the strategy. We conclude with a proposal to consider resetting the target range for arterial oxygenation higher (85–110 mm Hg) as a potential strategy to improve the long-term outcomes of ARDS survivors. PMID:24621125

  7. Circulating nucleosomes are associated with mortality in pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yehya, Nadir; Thomas, Neal J; Margulies, Susan S

    2016-06-01

    Mechanisms underlying pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome (PARDS) are poorly understood. The recent implication of circulating nucleosomes as pathogenic in sepsis and trauma-associated ARDS in adults led us to investigate the significance of nucleosomes in PARDS. We conducted a prospective, observational study on children with PARDS at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia between July 2014 and September 2015. Plasma was collected within 48 h of PARDS onset and nucleosomes quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Samples from 76 children with PARDS (11 deaths, 14%) were collected early [median 15 (IQR 7, 21) h] after PARDS onset. Nucleosome levels were higher in nonsurvivors [0.59 AU (IQR 0.46, 0.84)] relative to survivors [0.21 AU (IQR 0.08, 0.33), rank sum P < 0.001]. Nucleosome levels were not associated with either Berlin (P = 0.845) or PALICC (P = 0.886) oxygenation categories, nor with etiology of PARDS (P = 0.527). Nucleosomes were correlated with increasing numbers of nonpulmonary organ failures (P = 0.009 for trend), and were higher in patients whose PaO2 /FiO2 worsened (P = 0.012) over the first 72 h of PARDS. In regression analysis, nucleosome levels were independently associated with mortality after adjusting for either age, severity of illness score, number of nonpulmonary organ failures, vasopressor score, or PaO2 /FiO2 (all P < 0.05). In conclusion, plasma nucleosome levels in early PARDS were associated with increased mortality, correlated with number of nonpulmonary organ failures, and preceded worsening oxygenation. The potential utility of this biomarker for prognostication, risk stratification, and mechanistic insight should be investigated further. PMID:27130528

  8. Successful management of acute respiratory failure with noninvasive mechanical ventilation after drowning, in an epileptic-patient

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, Paolo; Calcaterra, Salvatore; Bottari, Antonio; Girbino, Giuseppe; Fodale, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Sea drowning is a common cause of accidental death worldwide. Respiratory complications such as acute pulmonary oedema, which is often complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome, is often seen. Noninvasive ventilation is already widely used as a first approach to treat acute respiratory failure resulting from multiple diseases. We report a case of a 45 year old man with a history of epilepsy, motor and mental handicap who developed acute respiratory failure secondary to sea water drowning after an epileptic crisis. We illustrate successful and rapid management of this case with noninvasive ventilation. We emphasize the advantages and limitations of using noninvasive ventilation to treat acute respiratory failure due to sea water drowning syndrome. PMID:27222793

  9. Successful management of acute respiratory failure with noninvasive mechanical ventilation after drowning, in an epileptic-patient.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, Paolo; Calcaterra, Salvatore; Bottari, Antonio; Girbino, Giuseppe; Fodale, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Sea drowning is a common cause of accidental death worldwide. Respiratory complications such as acute pulmonary oedema, which is often complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome, is often seen. Noninvasive ventilation is already widely used as a first approach to treat acute respiratory failure resulting from multiple diseases. We report a case of a 45 year old man with a history of epilepsy, motor and mental handicap who developed acute respiratory failure secondary to sea water drowning after an epileptic crisis. We illustrate successful and rapid management of this case with noninvasive ventilation. We emphasize the advantages and limitations of using noninvasive ventilation to treat acute respiratory failure due to sea water drowning syndrome.

  10. Successful management of acute respiratory failure with noninvasive mechanical ventilation after drowning, in an epileptic-patient.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, Paolo; Calcaterra, Salvatore; Bottari, Antonio; Girbino, Giuseppe; Fodale, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Sea drowning is a common cause of accidental death worldwide. Respiratory complications such as acute pulmonary oedema, which is often complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome, is often seen. Noninvasive ventilation is already widely used as a first approach to treat acute respiratory failure resulting from multiple diseases. We report a case of a 45 year old man with a history of epilepsy, motor and mental handicap who developed acute respiratory failure secondary to sea water drowning after an epileptic crisis. We illustrate successful and rapid management of this case with noninvasive ventilation. We emphasize the advantages and limitations of using noninvasive ventilation to treat acute respiratory failure due to sea water drowning syndrome. PMID:27222793

  11. Prevalence of antibiotic use for pediatric acute upper respiratory tract infections in Korea.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sun Mi; Shin, Ju-Young; Kim, Mi Hee; Lee, Shin Haeng; Choi, Sohyun; Park, Byung-Joo

    2015-05-01

    This study was conducted to estimate the prevalence of antimicrobial prescribing for acute upper respiratory tract infections (URI) among pediatric outpatients and to identify the national patterns of its use from 2009 to 2011 in Korea. Using National Patients Sample database from 2009 to 2011, we estimated the frequency of antibiotics prescribing for URI in pediatric outpatients with diagnoses of acute nasopharyngitis (common cold), acute sinusitis, acute pharyngitis, acute tonsillitis, acute laryngitis/tracheitis, acute obstructive laryngitis/epiglottitis, and acute upper respiratory infections of multiple and unspecified sites. The proportions of each antibiotic class were calculated by year and absolute and relative differences were estimated. Also, we investigated daily amount of prescribed antibiotics per defined population according to the type of medical care institution, physician specialty, and geographic region. The overall antibiotic prescribing proportion was 58.7% and its annual proportion slightly decreased (55.4% in 2011 vs. 60.5% in 2009; adjusted odds ratio, 0.82; 95% confidence interval, 0.82-0.83). Variations by the type of medical care institution were observed. Tertiary hospitals (45.0%) were less likely to prescribe antibiotics than primary care clinics (59.4%), hospitals (59.0%), and general hospitals (61.2%); they showed different tendencies in choosing antibiotics. Variations by physician specialty and region were also observed. Prevalence of antimicrobial prescribing for pediatric URI is still considered higher than that of western countries and varies by the type of medical care institution, physician specialty, and geographic region.

  12. Rare Presentation of Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis Causing Acute Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Kroll, Ryan R; Kumar, Sameer; Grossman, Ronald F; Price, Charles; Srigley, John R

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare condition characterized by dysfunctional alveolar macrophages, which ineffectively clear surfactant and typically cause mild hypoxemia. Characteristic Computed Tomography findings are septal reticulations superimposed on ground-glass opacities in a crazy paving pattern, with a clear juxtaposition between affected and unaffected parenchyma. While traditionally PAP was diagnosed via biopsy, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) is usually sufficient; the fluid appears milky, and on microscopic examination there are foamy macrophages with eosinophilic granules and extracellular hyaline material that is Periodic Acid-Schiff positive. Standard therapy is whole lung lavage (WLL), although novel treatments are under development. The case presented is a 55-year-old woman with six months of progressive dyspnea, who developed hypoxemic respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation; she had typical findings of PAP on imaging and BAL. WLL was ultimately successful in restoring adequate oxygenation. Respiratory failure of this magnitude is a rare finding in PAP. PMID:27445536

  13. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome and the Delivery of Continuing Medical Education: Case Study from Toronto

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Dave; Ryan, David; Sibbald, Gary; Rachlis, Anita; Davies, Sharon; Manchul, Lee; Parikh, Sagar

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) struck Toronto in the spring of 2003, causing many deaths, serious morbidity, forced quarantine of thousands of individuals, and the closure of all provincial hospitals for several weeks. Given the direction by public health authorities to cancel or postpone all continuing medical education…

  14. Social support and response to AIDS and severe acute respiratory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Arijit; Tracy, Melissa; Aiello, Allison; Des Jarlais, Don C; Galea, Sandro

    2008-05-01

    Negative public reactions to emerging infectious diseases can adversely affect population health. We assessed whether social support was associated with knowledge of, worry about, and attitudes towards AIDS and severe acute respiratory syndrome. Our findings suggest that social support may be central to our understanding of public responses to emerging infectious diseases.

  15. Exploring the Roles and Nature of Science: A Case Study of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yeung Chung

    2008-01-01

    The roles of science in society and the nature of science are the focus of many science curricula. Current views about these two aspects of science have largely been informed by the history of scientific development. This article uses the outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome--a recent health scare--as a case study to explore the roles of…

  16. Acute middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection in livestock Dromedaries, Dubai, 2014.

    PubMed

    Wernery, Ulrich; Corman, Victor M; Wong, Emily Y M; Tsang, Alan K L; Muth, Doreen; Lau, Susanna K P; Khazanehdari, Kamal; Zirkel, Florian; Ali, Mansoor; Nagy, Peter; Juhasz, Jutka; Wernery, Renate; Joseph, Sunitha; Syriac, Ginu; Elizabeth, Shyna K; Patteril, Nissy Annie Georgy; Woo, Patrick C Y; Drosten, Christian

    2015-06-01

    Camels carry Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, but little is known about infection age or prevalence. We studied >800 dromedaries of all ages and 15 mother-calf pairs. This syndrome constitutes an acute, epidemic, and time-limited infection in camels <4 years of age, particularly calves. Delayed social separation of calves might reduce human infection risk.

  17. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by tropical eosinophilic lung disease: a case in Gabon].

    PubMed

    Chani, M; Iken, M; Eljahiri, Y; Nzenze, J R; Mion, G

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the case of a 28-year-old woman in whom acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) following cholecystectomy led to the discovery of eosinophilic lung disease. Outcome was favorable after oxygenotherapy and medical treatment using ivermectin and corticosteroids. The case shows that hypereosinophilic syndrome can be the underlying cause of ARDS. PMID:21695880

  18. Fear of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) among Health Care Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Samuel M. Y.; Kwong-Lo, Rosalie S. Y.; Mak, Christine W. Y.; Wong, Joe S.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined fear related to severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) among 2 samples of hospital staff in Hong Kong. Sample 1 included health care workers (n = 82) and was assessed during the peak of the SARS epidemic. Sample 2 included hospital staff who recovered from SARS (n = 97). The results show that participants in…

  19. Acute effects of a winter air pollution episode on pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms of children

    SciTech Connect

    Hoek, G.; Brunekreef, B. )

    1993-09-01

    The acute respiratory effects of a wintertime air pollution episode were studied in a general population sample of 112 children who were 7-12 y of age and who lived in a nonurban community. Spirometry was performed on 6 d, with a fixed interval of 3 wk between successive tests. During an air pollution episode, an additional pulmonary function test was made. Acute respiratory symptoms of the children were noted in a diary. Ambient concentrations of sulfur dioxide, black smoke, particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 10 microns, and nitrogen dioxide were considered as exposure variables. The association of air pollution with pulmonary function and prevalence of acute respiratory symptoms was assessed by individual linear regression analysis and time series analysis, respectively. In February 1991, an air pollution episode occurred during which daily average sulfur dioxide concentrations were slightly above 100 micrograms/m3, and particulate matter (with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 10 microns) concentrations reached 174 micrograms/m3. During the episode, forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, and maximal mid-expiratory flow were lower than on baseline tests. Significant negative associations were found between the concentration of sulfur dioxide, black smoke, and particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 10 microns. No association between prevalence of acute respiratory symptoms and the concentration of these compounds was found.

  20. Early exercise rehabilitation of muscle weakness in acute respiratory failure patients.

    PubMed

    Berry, Michael J; Morris, Peter E

    2013-10-01

    Acute respiratory failure patients experience significant muscle weakness, which contributes to prolonged hospitalization and functional impairments after hospital discharge. Based on our previous work, we hypothesize that an exercise intervention initiated early in the intensive care unit aimed at improving skeletal muscle strength could decrease hospital stay and attenuate the deconditioning and skeletal muscle weakness experienced by these patients.

  1. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Epidemic and Change of People's Health Behavior in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Xiaodong; Li, Shiyue; Wang, Chunhong; Chen, Xiaoqing; Wu, Xiaomin

    2004-01-01

    Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) has become a new worldwide epidemic whose origin was until recently unknown. It is the unpredictable nature of this epidemic that makes people want answers to some important questions about what they can do to protect themselves. This study presents an inquiry into peoples knowledge and self-reported…

  2. The role of high flow oxygen therapy in acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Masclans, J R; Pérez-Terán, P; Roca, O

    2015-11-01

    Acute respiratory failure represents one of the most common causes of intensive care unit admission and oxygen therapy remains the first-line therapy in the management of these patients. In recent years, high-flow oxygen via nasal cannula has been described as a useful alternative to conventional oxygen therapy in patients with acute respiratory failure. High-flow oxygen via nasal cannula rapidly alleviates symptoms of acute respiratory failure and improves oxygenation by several mechanisms, including dead space washout, reduction in oxygen dilution and inspiratory nasopharyngeal resistance, a moderate positive airway pressure effect that may generate alveolar recruitment and an overall greater tolerance and comfort with the interface and the heated and humidified inspired gases. However, the experience in adults is still limited and there are no clinical guidelines to establish recommendations for their use. This article aims to review the existing evidence on the use of high-flow oxygen via nasal cannula in adults with acute respiratory failure and its possible applications, advantages and limitations.

  3. Organophosphate poisoning complicated by a tachyarrhythmia and acute respiratory distress syndrome in a child.

    PubMed

    Nel, L; Hatherill, M; Davies, J; Andronikou, S; Stirling, J; Reynolds, L; Argent, A

    2002-10-01

    A 9-year-old child presented with documented organophosphate insecticide poisoning. His course was initially complicated by a tachyarrhythmia with QT-interval prolongation that responded promptly to intravenous magnesium. However, following partial recovery, he developed progressive acute respiratory distress syndrome characterized by irreversible fibrosis and obliteration of the lung parenchyma. PMID:12354276

  4. Acute effects of a winter air pollution episode on pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms of children.

    PubMed

    Hoek, G; Brunekreef, B

    1993-01-01

    The acute respiratory effects of a wintertime air pollution episode were studied in a general population sample of 112 children who were 7-12 y of age and who lived in a nonurban community. Spirometry was performed on 6 d, with a fixed interval of 3 wk between successive tests. During an air pollution episode, an additional pulmonary function test was made. Acute respiratory symptoms of the children were noted in a diary. Ambient concentrations of sulfur dioxide, black smoke, particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 10 microns, and nitrogen dioxide were considered as exposure variables. The association of air pollution with pulmonary function and prevalence of acute respiratory symptoms was assessed by individual linear regression analysis and time series analysis, respectively. In February 1991, an air pollution episode occurred during which daily average sulfur dioxide concentrations were slightly above 100 micrograms/m3, and particulate matter (with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 10 microns) concentrations reached 174 micrograms/m3. During the episode, forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, and maximal mid-expiratory flow were lower than on baseline tests. Significant negative associations were found between the concentration of sulfur dioxide, black smoke, and particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 10 microns. No association between prevalence of acute respiratory symptoms and the concentration of these compounds was found.

  5. The role of high flow oxygen therapy in acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Masclans, J R; Pérez-Terán, P; Roca, O

    2015-11-01

    Acute respiratory failure represents one of the most common causes of intensive care unit admission and oxygen therapy remains the first-line therapy in the management of these patients. In recent years, high-flow oxygen via nasal cannula has been described as a useful alternative to conventional oxygen therapy in patients with acute respiratory failure. High-flow oxygen via nasal cannula rapidly alleviates symptoms of acute respiratory failure and improves oxygenation by several mechanisms, including dead space washout, reduction in oxygen dilution and inspiratory nasopharyngeal resistance, a moderate positive airway pressure effect that may generate alveolar recruitment and an overall greater tolerance and comfort with the interface and the heated and humidified inspired gases. However, the experience in adults is still limited and there are no clinical guidelines to establish recommendations for their use. This article aims to review the existing evidence on the use of high-flow oxygen via nasal cannula in adults with acute respiratory failure and its possible applications, advantages and limitations. PMID:26429697

  6. Unsuspected Dengue and Acute Febrile Illness in Rural and Semi-Urban Southern Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    Bodinayake, Champika; Nagahawatte, Ajith; Devasiri, Vasantha; Kodikara-Arachichi, Wasantha; Strouse, John J.; Broadwater, Anne; Østbye, Truls; de Silva, Aravinda; Woods, Christopher W.

    2012-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV), a globally emerging cause of undifferentiated fever, has been documented in the heavily urbanized western coast of Sri Lanka since the 1960s. New areas of Sri Lanka are now being affected, and the reported number and severity of cases have increased. To study emerging DENV in southern Sri Lanka, we obtained epidemiologic and clinical data and acute- and convalescent-phase serum samples from patients >2 years old with febrile illness. We tested paired serum samples for DENV IgG and IgM and serotyped virus by using isolation and reverse transcription PCR. We identified acute DENV infection (serotypes 2, 3, and 4) in 54 (6.3%) of 859 patients. Only 14% of patients had clinically suspected dengue; however, 54% had serologically confirmed acute or past DENV infection. DENV is a major and largely unrecognized cause of fever in southern Sri Lanka, especially in young adults. PMID:22304972

  7. Unsuspected dengue and acute febrile illness in rural and semi-urban southern Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Reller, Megan E; Bodinayake, Champika; Nagahawatte, Ajith; Devasiri, Vasantha; Kodikara-Arachichi, Wasantha; Strouse, John J; Broadwater, Anne; Østbye, Truls; de Silva, Aravinda; Woods, Christopher W

    2012-02-01

    Dengue virus (DENV), a globally emerging cause of undifferentiated fever, has been documented in the heavily urbanized western coast of Sri Lanka since the 1960s. New areas of Sri Lanka are now being affected, and the reported number and severity of cases have increased. To study emerging DENV in southern Sri Lanka, we obtained epidemiologic and clinical data and acute- and convalescent-phase serum samples from patients >2 years old with febrile illness. We tested paired serum samples for DENV IgG and IgM and serotyped virus by using isolation and reverse transcription PCR. We identified acute DENV infection (serotypes 2, 3, and 4) in 54 (6.3%) of 859 patients. Only 14% of patients had clinically suspected dengue; however, 54% had serologically confirmed acute or past DENV infection. DENV is a major and largely unrecognized cause of fever in southern Sri Lanka, especially in young adults.

  8. Aetiology of Acute Respiratory Tract Infections in Hospitalised Children in Cyprus

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Jan; Panayiotou, Christakis; Tryfonos, Christina; Koptides, Dana; Koliou, Maria; Kalogirou, Nikolas; Georgiou, Eleni; Christodoulou, Christina

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve clinical management and prevention of viral infections in hospitalised children improved etiological insight is needed. The aim of the present study was to assess the spectrum of respiratory viral pathogens in children admitted to hospital with acute respiratory tract infections in Cyprus. For this purpose nasopharyngeal swab samples from 424 children less than 12 years of age with acute respiratory tract infections were collected over three epidemic seasons and were analysed for the presence of the most common 15 respiratory viruses. A viral pathogen was identified in 86% of the samples, with multiple infections being observed in almost 20% of the samples. The most frequently detected viruses were RSV (30.4%) and Rhinovirus (27.4%). RSV exhibited a clear seasonality with marked peaks in January/February, while rhinovirus infections did not exhibit a pronounced seasonality being detected almost throughout the year. While RSV and PIV3 incidence decreased significantly with age, the opposite was observed for influenza A and B as well as adenovirus infections. The data presented expand our understanding of the epidemiology of viral respiratory tract infections in Cypriot children and will be helpful to the clinicians and researchers interested in the treatment and control of viral respiratory tract infections. PMID:26761647

  9. Aetiology of Acute Respiratory Tract Infections in Hospitalised Children in Cyprus.

    PubMed

    Richter, Jan; Panayiotou, Christakis; Tryfonos, Christina; Koptides, Dana; Koliou, Maria; Kalogirou, Nikolas; Georgiou, Eleni; Christodoulou, Christina

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve clinical management and prevention of viral infections in hospitalised children improved etiological insight is needed. The aim of the present study was to assess the spectrum of respiratory viral pathogens in children admitted to hospital with acute respiratory tract infections in Cyprus. For this purpose nasopharyngeal swab samples from 424 children less than 12 years of age with acute respiratory tract infections were collected over three epidemic seasons and were analysed for the presence of the most common 15 respiratory viruses. A viral pathogen was identified in 86% of the samples, with multiple infections being observed in almost 20% of the samples. The most frequently detected viruses were RSV (30.4%) and Rhinovirus (27.4%). RSV exhibited a clear seasonality with marked peaks in January/February, while rhinovirus infections did not exhibit a pronounced seasonality being detected almost throughout the year. While RSV and PIV3 incidence decreased significantly with age, the opposite was observed for influenza A and B as well as adenovirus infections. The data presented expand our understanding of the epidemiology of viral respiratory tract infections in Cypriot children and will be helpful to the clinicians and researchers interested in the treatment and control of viral respiratory tract infections. PMID:26761647

  10. The significance of tubular and glomerular proteinuria in critically ill patients with severe acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Christopher Thiam Seong; Tan, Han Khim; Lau, Yeow Kok

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Critically ill patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) frequently need acute renal replacement therapy (aRRT). We evaluated an inexpensive, rapid quantitative and qualitative analysis of proteinuria on the course of AKI patients requiring aRRT in intensive care. Method: This was a prospective, observational study of critically ill patients with severe established AKI or Acute on Chronic Kidney Injury (AoCKI) requiring aRRT. Urine samples were analyzed using Sodium-Dodecyl-Sulphate-Polyacryamide Gel Electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Results: A total of 30 critically ill patients were studied. Those who died have higher APACHE II (29 ± 6 vs. 20 ± 5, p<0.001), multi-organ failure (0.7 ± 0.5 vs. 0.2 ± 0.4, p < 0.02) and Tubular/Glomerular ratio (114 ± 60 vs. 75± 37, p < 0.05).The renal non-recoverers have higher baseline creatinine (415 ± 328 vs. 125± 19 umol/l, p < 0.01), urinary Dipstick value (1.8±0.8 vs. 0.5±0, p <0.05) and Glomerular score (3.0 ± 1.8 vs. 0.6 ± 0.2, p < 0.02).Heavy tubular proteinuria also predicts a longer duration of interim dialysis support and mortality whereas glomerular proteinuria correlates with development of chronicity and End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD). Conclusions: The dominant presence of tubular proteinuria is associated with poor survival in patients who have high APACHE II score and multi-organ failure. It also correlates with a longer duration of dialysis support in survivals. Renal Non-recoverers had heavy dominant presence of glomerular proteinuria. SDS-PAGE proteinuria analysis offers a reliable and inexpensive method to prognosticate proteinuria in this group of critically ill patients. PMID:25674105

  11. Is albumin administration in the acutely ill associated with increased mortality? Results of the SOAP study

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Jean-Louis; Sakr, Yasser; Reinhart, Konrad; Sprung, Charles L; Gerlach, Herwig; Ranieri, V Marco

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Albumin administration in the critically ill has been the subject of some controversy. We investigated the use of albumin solutions in European intensive care units (ICUs) and its relationship to outcome. Methods In a cohort, multicenter, observational study, all patients admitted to one of the participating ICUs between 1 May and 15 May 2002 were followed up until death, hospital discharge, or for 60 days. Patients were classified according to whether or not they received albumin at any time during their ICU stay. Results Of 3,147 admitted patients, 354 (11.2%) received albumin and 2,793 (88.8%) did not. Patients who received albumin were more likely to have cancer or liver cirrhosis, to be surgical admissions, and to have sepsis. They had a longer length of ICU stay and a higher mortality rate, but were also more severely ill, as manifested by higher simplified acute physiology score (SAPS) II and sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores than the other patients. A Cox proportional hazard model indicated that albumin administration was significantly associated with decreased 30-day survival. Moreover, in 339 pairs matched according to a propensity score, ICU and hospital mortality rates were higher in the patients who had received albumin than in those who had not (34.8 versus 20.9% and 41.3 versus 27.7%, respectively, both p < 0.001). Conclusion Albumin administration was associated with decreased survival in this population of acutely ill patients. Further prospective randomized controlled trials are needed to examine the effects of albumin administration in sub-groups of acutely ill patients. PMID:16356223

  12. Individualized positive end-expiratory pressure application in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pintado, M C; de Pablo, R

    2014-11-01

    Current treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome is based on ventilatory support with a lung protective strategy, avoiding the development of iatrogenic injury, including ventilator-induced lung injury. One of the mechanisms underlying such injury is atelectrauma, and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) is advocated in order to avoid it. The indicated PEEP level has not been defined, and in many cases is based on the patient oxygen requirements for maintaining adequate oxygenation. However, this strategy does not consider the mechanics of the respiratory system, which varies in each patient and depends on many factors-including particularly the duration of acute respiratory distress syndrome. A review is therefore made of the different methods for adjusting PEEP, focusing on the benefits of individualized application.

  13. Phagocyte respiratory burst activates macrophage erythropoietin signalling to promote acute inflammation resolution

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Bangwei; Wang, Jinsong; Liu, Zongwei; Shen, Zigang; Shi, Rongchen; Liu, Yu-Qi; Liu, Yu; Jiang, Man; Wu, Yuzhang; Zhang, Zhiren

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation resolution is an active process, the failure of which causes uncontrolled inflammation which underlies many chronic diseases. Therefore, endogenous pathways that regulate inflammation resolution are fundamental and of wide interest. Here, we demonstrate that phagocyte respiratory burst-induced hypoxia activates macrophage erythropoietin signalling to promote acute inflammation resolution. This signalling is activated following acute but not chronic inflammation. Pharmacological or genetical inhibition of the respiratory burst suppresses hypoxia and macrophage erythropoietin signalling. Macrophage-specific erythropoietin receptor-deficient mice and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) mice, which lack the capacity for respiratory burst, display impaired inflammation resolution, and exogenous erythropoietin enhances this resolution in WT and CGD mice. Mechanistically, erythropoietin increases macrophage engulfment of apoptotic neutrophils via PPARγ, promotes macrophage removal of debris and enhances macrophage migration to draining lymph nodes. Together, our results provide evidences of an endogenous pathway that regulates inflammation resolution, with important implications for treating inflammatory conditions. PMID:27397585

  14. [A toxicometric assessment of pneumonias and acute respiratory failure in poisonings].

    PubMed

    Iskandarov, A I

    1993-01-01

    The author analyzes clinical and morphologic manifestations of pneumonia and the conditions under which acute respiratory failure formed in 572 subjects who suffered poisoning with psychotropic and soporific drugs, chlorinated hydrocarbons, organophosphorus insecticides, caustic poisons, alcohol and its surrogates. Toxicometric (quantitative) assessment of the toxic effects and measurement of the toxins concentrations under which respiratory failure developed helped detect new mechanisms in the patho- and thanatogenesis of pneumonias and acute respiratory failure in poisonings. These data are of great interest for practical forensic medicine, since they permit substantiating the causes of death in various types of poisonings. The diagram proposed by the author permits assessment of the initial chemical trauma from the clinical and morphologic picture of poisoning.

  15. Individualized positive end-expiratory pressure application in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pintado, M C; de Pablo, R

    2014-11-01

    Current treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome is based on ventilatory support with a lung protective strategy, avoiding the development of iatrogenic injury, including ventilator-induced lung injury. One of the mechanisms underlying such injury is atelectrauma, and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) is advocated in order to avoid it. The indicated PEEP level has not been defined, and in many cases is based on the patient oxygen requirements for maintaining adequate oxygenation. However, this strategy does not consider the mechanics of the respiratory system, which varies in each patient and depends on many factors-including particularly the duration of acute respiratory distress syndrome. A review is therefore made of the different methods for adjusting PEEP, focusing on the benefits of individualized application. PMID:24485531

  16. Hsp72 Is a Novel Biomarker to Predict Acute Kidney Injury in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Buenrostro, Luis E.; Salas-Nolasco, Omar I.; Barrera-Chimal, Jonatan; Casas-Aparicio, Gustavo; Irizar-Santana, Sergio; Pérez-Villalva, Rosalba; Bobadilla, Norma A.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives Acute kidney injury (AKI) complicates the course of disease in critically ill patients. Efforts to change its clinical course have failed because of the fail in the early detection. This study was designed to assess whether heat shock protein (Hsp72) is an early and sensitive biomarker of acute kidney injury (AKI) compared with kidney injury molecule (Kim-1), neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), and interleukin-18 (IL-18) biomarkers. Methods A total of 56 critically ill patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. From these patients, 17 developed AKI and 20 were selected as controls. In AKI patients, Kim-1, IL-18, NGAL, and Hsp72 were measured from 3 days before and until 2 days after the AKI diagnosis and in no-AKI patients at 1, 5 and 10 days after admission. Biomarker sensitivity and specificity were determined. To validate the results obtained with ROC curves for Hsp72, a new set of critically ill patients was included, 10 with AKI and 12 with no-AKI patients. Results Urinary Hsp72 levels rose since 3 days before the AKI diagnosis in critically ill patients; this early increase was not seen with any other tested biomarkers. Kim-1, IL-18, NGAL, and Hsp72 significantly increased from 2 days before AKI and remained elevated during the AKI diagnosis. The best sensitivity/specificity was observed in Kim-1 and Hsp72: 83/95% and 100/90%, respectively, whereas 1 day before the AKI diagnosis, the values were 100/100% and 100/90%, respectively. The sensibility, specificity and accuracy in the validation test for Hsp72 were 100%, 83.3% and 90.9%, respectively. Conclusions The biomarker Hsp72 is enough sensitive and specific to predict AKI in critically ill patients up to 3 days before the diagnosis. PMID:25313566

  17. Unsuspected Leptospirosis Is a Cause of Acute Febrile Illness in Nicaragua

    PubMed Central

    Reller, Megan E.; Wunder, Elsio A.; Miles, Jeremy J.; Flom, Judith E.; Mayorga, Orlando; Woods, Christopher W.; Ko, Albert I.; Dumler, J. Stephen; Matute, Armando J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidemic severe leptospirosis was recognized in Nicaragua in 1995, but unrecognized epidemic and endemic disease remains unstudied. Methodology/Principal Findings To determine the burden of and risk factors associated with symptomatic leptospirosis in Nicaragua, we prospectively studied patients presenting with fever at a large teaching hospital. Epidemiologic and clinical features were systematically recorded, and paired sera tested by IgM-ELISA to identify patients with probable and possible acute leptospirosis. Microscopic Agglutination Test and PCR were used to confirm acute leptospirosis. Among 704 patients with paired sera tested by MAT, 44 had acute leptospirosis. Patients with acute leptospirosis were more likely to present during rainy months and to report rural residence and fresh water exposure. The sensitivity of clinical impression and acute-phase IgM detected by ELISA were poor. Conclusions/Significance Leptospirosis is a common (6.3%) but unrecognized cause of acute febrile illness in Nicaragua. Rapid point-of-care tests to support early diagnosis and treatment as well as tests to support population-based studies to delineate the epidemiology, incidence, and clinical spectrum of leptospirosis, both ideally pathogen-based, are needed. PMID:25058149

  18. Injury and illness surveillance in hospitals and acute-care facilities after Hurricanes Katrina And Rita--New Orleans area, Louisiana, September 25-October 15, 2005.

    PubMed

    2006-01-20

    In response to Hurricane Katrina, CDC and the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals (LDHH) implemented active surveillance on September 9, 2005, to monitor for injuries and illnesses at functioning hospitals and other acute-care facilities in the greater New Orleans area (Jefferson, Orleans, Plaquemines, St. Bernard, St. Charles, and St. Tammany parishes). On September 20, the system was interrupted because of mandatory evacuation for Hurricane Rita. Surveillance was reestablished on September 24, and repopulation of Orleans Parish began on September 30. This report updates a previous report on injuries and illness surveillance during September 8-25, 2005, after Hurricane Katrina and describes frequencies of these events during the days after Hurricane Rita and during repopulation of the city. The results indicate that 17,446 visits occurred at participating facilities during this period. Whereas the proportion of relief workers who had acute respiratory illnesses and unintentional injuries was higher compared with residents, the proportion of falls and motor-vehicle crashes among relief workers was lower. Moreover, although the collection of detailed data using a paper-based active surveillance system was required in response to Hurricane Katrina, the burden of this system required the implementation of an electronic syndromic surveillance system, which is more sustainable.

  19. Effect of antiplatelet therapy on mortality and acute lung injury in critically ill patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mohananey, Divyanshu; Sethi, Jaskaran; Villablanca, Pedro A.; Ali, Muhammad S.; Kumar, Rohit; Baruah, Anushka; Bhatia, Nirmanmoh; Agrawal, Sahil; Hussain, Zeeshan; Shamoun, Fadi E.; Augoustides, John T.; Ramakrishna, Harish

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Platelet function is intricately linked to the pathophysiology of critical Illness, and some studies have shown that antiplatelet therapy (APT) may decrease mortality and incidence of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in these patients. Our objective was to understand the efficacy of APT by conducting a meta-analysis. Materials and Methods: We conducted a meta-analysis using PubMed, Central, Embase, The Cochrane Central Register, the ClinicalTrials.gov Website, and Google Scholar. Studies were included if they investigated critically ill patients receiving antiplatelet therapy and mentioned the outcomes being studied (mortality, duration of hospitalization, ARDS, and need for mechanical ventilation). Results: We found that there was a significant reduction in all-cause mortality in patients on APT compared to control (odds ratio [OR]: 0.83; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.70–0.97). Both the incidence of acute lung injury/ARDS (OR: 0.67; 95% CI: 0.57–0.78) and need for mechanical ventilation (OR: 0.74; 95% CI: 0.60–0.91) were lower in the antiplatelet group. No significant difference in duration of hospitalization was observed between the two groups (standardized mean difference: −0.02; 95% CI: −0.11–0.07). Conclusion: Our meta-analysis suggests that critically ill patients who are on APT have an improved survival, decreased incidence of ARDS, and decreased need for mechanical ventilation. PMID:27716693

  20. The amylase-to-creatinine clearance ratio--a non-specific response to acute illness?

    PubMed

    McMahon, M J; Playforth, M J; Rashid, S A; Cooper, E H

    1982-01-01

    It was felt that the apparent specificity of the amylase-to-creatine clearance ratio (ACCR) in several previous studies of pancreatitis might reflect a failure to utilize adequately ill control subjects. The ACCR and the renal clearances of beta 2-microglobulin (B2-m), similarly related to creatinine (BCCR) as well as the urinary concentration of albumin, were compared in 27 patients with acute pancreatitis, 8 with a perforated peptic ulcer and 7 with mild biliary colic, during the first 5 days in hospital. Acute pancreatitis was graded as mild (6), moderate (14) or severe (7), using a combination of clinical data, diagnostic peritoneal lavage and multiple criteria. Further assessment of the severity of the acute illness was obtained from measurement of C-reactive protein (C-RP). Lowest C-RP levels were found in the patients with mild pancreatitis and biliary colic, and highest levels in the patients with severe pancreatitis and perforated ulcer (P less than 0.002). Similarly, ACCR and BCCR levels were significantly lower in the two mild groups than in the two severe ones (P less than 0.01 and less than 0.002 respectively), although plasma amylase was raised only in patients with pancreatitis and plasma B2-m was similar in all groups. Electrophoresis of urine showed dense bands of tubuloprotein in patients from both severe groups. Urine albumin was higher in severe pancreatitis than in perforated ulcer (P less than 0.1), perhaps indicating a more specific glomerular lesion in pancreatitis. Thus a rise in amylase clearance appeared to be related to the severity of the acute illness, and may be a component of a non-specific tubuloproteinuria. In this study patients with a perforated peptic ulcer had increases in ACCR similar to those seen in patients with severe pancreatitis, and we are therefore doubtful whether ACCR has any role in the clinical diagnosis of pancreatic disease.

  1. Access to medicines for acute illness in middle income countries in Central America

    PubMed Central

    Emmerick, Isabel Cristina Martins; Luiza, Vera Lucia; Camacho, Luiz Antonio Bastos; Ross-Degnan, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the main predictors of access to medicines for persons who experienced acute health conditions. METHODS This was a cross-sectional analytic study, based on data from household surveys. We examined the predictors of: (1) seeking care for acute illness in the formal health care system and (2) obtaining all medicines sought for the acute condition. RESULTS The significant predictors of seeking health care for acute illnesses were urban geographic location, head of household with secondary school education or above, age under 15, severity of illness perceived by the respondent, and having health insurance. The most important predictor of obtaining full access to medicines was seeking care in the formal health care system. People who sought care in the formal system were three times more likely to receive all the medicines sought (OR 3.0, 95%CI 2.3;4.0). For those who sought care in the formal health system, the strongest predictors of full access to medicines were seeking care in the private sector, having secondary school education or above, and positive perceptions of quality of health care and medicines in public sector health facilities. For patients who did not seek care in the formal health system, full access to medicines was more likely in Honduras or Nicaragua than in Guatemala. Urban geographic location, higher economic status, and male gender were also significant predictors. CONCLUSIONS A substantial part of the population in these three countries sought and obtained medicines outside of the formal health care system, which may compromise quality of care and pose a risk to patients. Determinants of full access to medicines inside and outside the formal health care system differ, and thus may require different strategies to improve access to medicines.  PMID:24626545

  2. The amylase-to-creatinine clearance ratio--a non-specific response to acute illness?

    PubMed

    McMahon, M J; Playforth, M J; Rashid, S A; Cooper, E H

    1982-01-01

    It was felt that the apparent specificity of the amylase-to-creatine clearance ratio (ACCR) in several previous studies of pancreatitis might reflect a failure to utilize adequately ill control subjects. The ACCR and the renal clearances of beta 2-microglobulin (B2-m), similarly related to creatinine (BCCR) as well as the urinary concentration of albumin, were compared in 27 patients with acute pancreatitis, 8 with a perforated peptic ulcer and 7 with mild biliary colic, during the first 5 days in hospital. Acute pancreatitis was graded as mild (6), moderate (14) or severe (7), using a combination of clinical data, diagnostic peritoneal lavage and multiple criteria. Further assessment of the severity of the acute illness was obtained from measurement of C-reactive protein (C-RP). Lowest C-RP levels were found in the patients with mild pancreatitis and biliary colic, and highest levels in the patients with severe pancreatitis and perforated ulcer (P less than 0.002). Similarly, ACCR and BCCR levels were significantly lower in the two mild groups than in the two severe ones (P less than 0.01 and less than 0.002 respectively), although plasma amylase was raised only in patients with pancreatitis and plasma B2-m was similar in all groups. Electrophoresis of urine showed dense bands of tubuloprotein in patients from both severe groups. Urine albumin was higher in severe pancreatitis than in perforated ulcer (P less than 0.1), perhaps indicating a more specific glomerular lesion in pancreatitis. Thus a rise in amylase clearance appeared to be related to the severity of the acute illness, and may be a component of a non-specific tubuloproteinuria. In this study patients with a perforated peptic ulcer had increases in ACCR similar to those seen in patients with severe pancreatitis, and we are therefore doubtful whether ACCR has any role in the clinical diagnosis of pancreatic disease. PMID:6172175

  3. Influenza and other respiratory viruses detected by influenza-like illness surveillance in Leyte Island, the Philippines, 2010-2013.

    PubMed

    Otomaru, Hirono; Kamigaki, Taro; Tamaki, Raita; Opinion, Jamie; Santo, Arlene; Daya, Edgard; Okamoto, Michiko; Saito, Mariko; Tallo, Veronica; Lupisan, Soccoro; Suzuki, Akira; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the role of influenza-like illness (ILI) surveillance conducted on Leyte Island, the Philippines, including involvement of other respiratory viruses, from 2010 to 2013. ILI surveillance was conducted from January 2010 to March 2013 with 3 sentinel sites located in Tacloban city, Palo and Tanauan of Leyte Island. ILI was defined as fever ≥38°C or feverish feeling and either cough or running nose in a patient of any age. Influenza virus and other 5 respiratory viruses were searched. A total of 5,550 ILI cases visited the 3 sites and specimens were collected from 2,031 (36.6%) cases. Among the cases sampled, 1,637 (75.6%) were children aged <5 years. 874 (43.0%) cases were positive for at least one of the respiratory viruses tested. Influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) were predominantly detected (both were 25.7%) followed by human rhinovirus (HRV) (17.5%). The age distributions were significantly different between those who were positive for influenza, HRV, and RSV. ILI cases were reported throughout the year and influenza virus was co-detected with those viruses on approximately half of the weeks of study period (RSV in 60.5% and HRV 47.4%). In terms of clinical manifestations, only the rates of headache and sore throat were significantly higher in influenza positive cases than cases positive to other viruses. In conclusion, syndromic ILI surveillance in this area is difficult to detect the start of influenza epidemic without laboratory confirmation which requires huge resources. Age was an important factor that affected positive rates of influenza and other respiratory viruses. Involvement of older age children may be useful to detect influenza more effectively. PMID:25893441

  4. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Detected by Influenza-Like Illness Surveillance in Leyte Island, the Philippines, 2010–2013

    PubMed Central

    Otomaru, Hirono; Kamigaki, Taro; Tamaki, Raita; Opinion, Jamie; Santo, Arlene; Daya, Edgard; Okamoto, Michiko; Saito, Mariko; Tallo, Veronica; Lupisan, Soccoro; Suzuki, Akira; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the role of influenza-like illness (ILI) surveillance conducted on Leyte Island, the Philippines, including involvement of other respiratory viruses, from 2010 to 2013. ILI surveillance was conducted from January 2010 to March 2013 with 3 sentinel sites located in Tacloban city, Palo and Tanauan of Leyte Island. ILI was defined as fever ≥38°C or feverish feeling and either cough or running nose in a patient of any age. Influenza virus and other 5 respiratory viruses were searched. A total of 5,550 ILI cases visited the 3 sites and specimens were collected from 2,031 (36.6%) cases. Among the cases sampled, 1,637 (75.6%) were children aged <5 years. 874 (43.0%) cases were positive for at least one of the respiratory viruses tested. Influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) were predominantly detected (both were 25.7%) followed by human rhinovirus (HRV) (17.5%). The age distributions were significantly different between those who were positive for influenza, HRV, and RSV. ILI cases were reported throughout the year and influenza virus was co-detected with those viruses on approximately half of the weeks of study period (RSV in 60.5% and HRV 47.4%). In terms of clinical manifestations, only the rates of headache and sore throat were significantly higher in influenza positive cases than cases positive to other viruses. In conclusion, syndromic ILI surveillance in this area is difficult to detect the start of influenza epidemic without laboratory confirmation which requires huge resources. Age was an important factor that affected positive rates of influenza and other respiratory viruses. Involvement of older age children may be useful to detect influenza more effectively. PMID:25893441

  5. Symptoms of respiratory illness in young children and the use of wood-burning stoves for indoor heating

    SciTech Connect

    Honicky, R.E.; Osborne, J.S.; Akpom, C.A.

    1985-03-01

    The occurrence of symptoms of respiratory illness among preschool children living in homes heated by wood-burning stoves was examined by conducting an historical prospective study (n . 62) with an internal control group (matched for age, sex, and town of residence). Exposures of subjects were not significantly different (P greater than .05) with respect to parental smoking, urea-formaldehyde foam insulation, and use of humidifiers. The control group made significantly greater use of gas stoves for cooking whereas the study group made greater use of electric stoves for cooking and of air filters (P less than .05). Only one home used a kerosene space heater. During the winter of 1982, moderate and severe symptoms in all categories were significantly greater for the study group compared with the control group (P less than .001). These differences could not be accounted for by medical histories (eg, allergies, asthma), demographic or socioeconomic characteristics, or by exposure to sources of indoor air pollution other than wood-burning stoves. Present findings suggest that indoor heating with wood-burning stoves may be a significant etiologic factor in the occurrence of symptoms of respiratory illness in young children.

  6. Acute and chronic respiratory effects of occupational exposure to ammonia.

    PubMed

    Holness, D L; Purdham, J T; Nethercott, J R

    1989-12-01

    In a soda ash plant, 58 workers exposed to mean airborne ammonia levels of 9.2 +/- 1.4 ppm were compared with 31 control workers with a mean exposure of 0.3 +/- 0.1 ppm. There were no differences between the groups in the reporting of respiratory or cutaneous symptoms, sense of smell, baseline lung function, or change in lung function over a work shift at the beginning and end of a workweek. No relationships between level or length of ammonia exposure and lung function results were demonstrated. PMID:2596404

  7. Spatiotemporal interplay of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus and respiratory mucosal cells drives viral dissemination in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Wei, Q; Nishiura, K; Peng, J; Wang, H; Midkiff, C; Alvarez, X; Qin, C; Lackner, A; Chen, Z

    2016-07-01

    Innate immune responses have a critical role in the control of early virus replication and dissemination. It remains unknown, however, how severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) evades respiratory innate immunity to establish a systemic infection. Here we show in Chinese macaques that SARS-CoV traversed the mucosa through the respiratory tract within 2 days, resulting in extensive mucosal infiltration by T cells, MAC387(+), and CD163(+) monocytes/macrophages followed by limited viral replication in the lung but persistent viral shedding into the upper airway. Mucosal monocytes/macrophages sequestered virions in intracellular vesicles together with infected Langerhans cells and migrated into the tonsils and/or draining lymph nodes within 2 days. In lymphoid tissues, viral RNA and proteins were detected in infected monocytes upon differentiation into dendritic cells (DCs) within 3 days. Systemic viral dissemination was observed within 7 days. This study provides a comprehensive overview of the spatiotemporal interactions of SARS-CoV, monocytes/macrophages, and the DC network in mucosal tissues and highlights the fact that, while these innate cells contribute to viral clearance, they probably also serve as shelters and vehicles to provide a mechanism for the virus to escape host mucosal innate immunity and disseminate systemically. PMID:26647718

  8. Physiological Correlation of Airway Pressure and Transpulmonary Pressure Stress Index on Respiratory Mechanics in Acute Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Chun; Chen, Lu; Zhang, Yun-Hang; Liu, Wei; Urbino, Rosario; Ranieri, V Marco; Qiu, Hai-Bo; Yang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stress index at post-recruitment maneuvers could be a method of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) titration in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) patients. However, airway pressure (Paw) stress index may not reflect lung mechanics in the patients with high chest wall elastance. This study was to evaluate the Paw stress index on lung mechanics and the correlation between Paw stress index and transpulmonary pressure (PL) stress index in acute respiratory failure (ARF) patients. Methods: Twenty-four ARF patients with mechanical ventilation (MV) were consecutively recruited from July 2011 to April 2013 in Zhongda Hospital, Nanjing, China and Ospedale S. Giovanni Battista-Molinette Hospital, Turin, Italy. All patients underwent MV with volume control (tidal volume 6 ml/kg) for 20 min. PEEP was set according to the ARDSnet study protocol. The patients were divided into two groups according to the chest wall elastance/respiratory system elastance ratio. The high elastance group (H group, n = 14) had a ratio ≥30%, and the low elastance group (L group, n = 10) had a ratio <30%. Respiratory elastance, gas-exchange, Paw stress index, and PL stress index were measured. Student's t-test, regression analysis, and Bland–Altman analysis were used for statistical analysis. Results: Pneumonia was the major cause of respiratory failure (71.0%). Compared with the L group, PEEP was lower in the H group (5.7 ± 1.7 cmH2O vs. 9.0 ± 2.3 cmH2O, P < 0.01). Compared with the H group, lung elastance was higher (20.0 ± 7.8 cmH2O/L vs. 11.6 ± 3.6 cmH2O/L, P < 0.01), and stress was higher in the L group (7.0 ± 1.9 vs. 4.9 ± 1.9, P = 0.02). A linear relationship was observed between the Paw stress index and the PL stress index in H group (R2= 0.56, P < 0.01) and L group (R2= 0.85, P < 0.01). Conclusion: In the ARF patients with MV, Paw stress index can substitute for PL to guide ventilator settings. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02196870 (https

  9. [Epidemiologic features of acute viral respiratory infections in familial foci].

    PubMed

    Lidina, P V; Mironovskaia, A V

    1977-03-01

    A study was made of the epidemiological peculiarities of viral respiratory infections of various etiology in the familial foci with the use of a methodical approach permitting to detect the true spread of infection in the familial foci, with consideration to the subclinical forme fruste of the disease and "carrier state". It appeared that in the familial foci the infectiousness of the majority of respiratory viral infections was greater than in the closed collective bodies uniting persons of the same age. The age composition of the family influences the manifestness (particularly in parainfluenza infection) and the intensity of the epidemic process characterized by the coefficient of the secondary affections. The type of the apartment, the floor on which it is located, and the number of persons residing in it had no significant influence on the spread of the viral infections in the familial foci. A definite role in this process is played by the level of specific serum antibodies in the members of the family surrounding the patient. The association of morbidity level with the antibody level proved to be the most distinct in children with influenza and adenoviral infection; this association was less significant in adults. PMID:193325

  10. Effectiveness of N95 respirators versus surgical masks in protecting health care workers from acute respiratory infection: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jeffrey D.; MacDougall, Colin C.; Johnstone, Jennie; Copes, Ray A.; Schwartz, Brian; Garber, Gary E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Conflicting recommendations exist related to which facial protection should be used by health care workers to prevent transmission of acute respiratory infections, including pandemic influenza. We performed a systematic review of both clinical and surrogate exposure data comparing N95 respirators and surgical masks for the prevention of transmissible acute respiratory infections. Methods: We searched various electronic databases and the grey literature for relevant studies published from January 1990 to December 2014. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs), cohort studies and case–control studies that included data on health care workers wearing N95 respirators and surgical masks to prevent acute respiratory infections were included in the meta-analysis. Surrogate exposure studies comparing N95 respirators and surgical masks using manikins or adult volunteers under simulated conditions were summarized separately. Outcomes from clinical studies were laboratory-confirmed respiratory infection, influenza-like illness and workplace absenteeism. Outcomes from surrogate exposure studies were filter penetration, face-seal leakage and total inward leakage. Results: We identified 6 clinical studies (3 RCTs, 1 cohort study and 2 case–control studies) and 23 surrogate exposure studies. In the meta-analysis of the clinical studies, we found no significant difference between N95 respirators and surgical masks in associated risk of (a) laboratory-confirmed respiratory infection (RCTs: odds ratio [OR] 0.89, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.64–1.24; cohort study: OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.03–6.41; case–control studies: OR 0.91, 95% CI 0.25–3.36); (b) influenza-like illness (RCTs: OR 0.51, 95% CI 0.19–1.41); or (c) reported workplace absenteeism (RCT: OR 0.92, 95% CI 0.57–1.50). In the surrogate exposure studies, N95 respirators were associated with less filter penetration, less face-seal leakage and less total inward leakage under laboratory experimental conditions

  11. The central role of hypothalamic inflammation in the acute illness response and cachexia.

    PubMed

    Burfeind, Kevin G; Michaelis, Katherine A; Marks, Daniel L

    2016-06-01

    When challenged with a variety of inflammatory threats, multiple systems across the body undergo physiological responses to promote defense and survival. The constellation of fever, anorexia, and fatigue is known as the acute illness response, and represents an adaptive behavioral and physiological reaction to stimuli such as infection. On the other end of the spectrum, cachexia is a deadly and clinically challenging syndrome involving anorexia, fatigue, and muscle wasting. Both of these processes are governed by inflammatory mediators including cytokines, chemokines, and immune cells. Though the effects of cachexia can be partially explained by direct effects of disease processes on wasting tissues, a growing body of evidence shows the central nervous system (CNS) also plays an essential mechanistic role in cachexia. In the context of inflammatory stress, the hypothalamus integrates signals from peripheral systems, which it translates into neuroendocrine perturbations, altered neuronal signaling, and global metabolic derangements. Therefore, we will discuss how hypothalamic inflammation is an essential driver of both the acute illness response and cachexia, and why this organ is uniquely equipped to generate and maintain chronic inflammation. First, we will focus on the role of the hypothalamus in acute responses to dietary and infectious stimuli. Next, we will discuss the role of cytokines in driving homeostatic disequilibrium, resulting in muscle wasting, anorexia, and weight loss. Finally, we will address mechanisms and mediators of chronic hypothalamic inflammation, including endothelial cells, chemokines, and peripheral leukocytes. PMID:26541482

  12. The central role of hypothalamic inflammation in the acute illness response and cachexia.

    PubMed

    Burfeind, Kevin G; Michaelis, Katherine A; Marks, Daniel L

    2016-06-01

    When challenged with a variety of inflammatory threats, multiple systems across the body undergo physiological responses to promote defense and survival. The constellation of fever, anorexia, and fatigue is known as the acute illness response, and represents an adaptive behavioral and physiological reaction to stimuli such as infection. On the other end of the spectrum, cachexia is a deadly and clinically challenging syndrome involving anorexia, fatigue, and muscle wasting. Both of these processes are governed by inflammatory mediators including cytokines, chemokines, and immune cells. Though the effects of cachexia can be partially explained by direct effects of disease processes on wasting tissues, a growing body of evidence shows the central nervous system (CNS) also plays an essential mechanistic role in cachexia. In the context of inflammatory stress, the hypothalamus integrates signals from peripheral systems, which it translates into neuroendocrine perturbations, altered neuronal signaling, and global metabolic derangements. Therefore, we will discuss how hypothalamic inflammation is an essential driver of both the acute illness response and cachexia, and why this organ is uniquely equipped to generate and maintain chronic inflammation. First, we will focus on the role of the hypothalamus in acute responses to dietary and infectious stimuli. Next, we will discuss the role of cytokines in driving homeostatic disequilibrium, resulting in muscle wasting, anorexia, and weight loss. Finally, we will address mechanisms and mediators of chronic hypothalamic inflammation, including endothelial cells, chemokines, and peripheral leukocytes.

  13. Unsuspected Dengue as a Cause of Acute Febrile Illness in Children and Adults in Western Nicaragua

    PubMed Central

    Reller, Megan E.; de Silva, Aravinda M.; Miles, Jeremy J.; Jadi, Ramesh S.; Broadwater, Anne; Walker, Katie; Woods, Christopher; Mayorga, Orlando; Matute, Armando

    2016-01-01

    Background Dengue is an emerging infectious disease of global significance. Suspected dengue, especially in children in Nicaragua’s heavily-urbanized capital of Managua, has been well documented, but unsuspected dengue among children and adults with undifferentitated fever has not. Methodology/Principal Findings To prospectively study dengue in semi-urban and rural western Nicaragua, we obtained epidemiologic and clinical data as well as acute and convalescent sera (2 to 4 weeks after onset of illness) from a convenience sample (enrollment Monday to Saturday daytime to early evening) of consecutively enrolled patients (n = 740) aged ≥ 1 years presenting with acute febrile illness. We tested paired sera for dengue IgG and IgM and serotyped dengue virus using reverse transcriptase-PCR. Among 740 febrile patients enrolled, 90% had paired sera. We found 470 (63.5%) were seropositive for dengue at enrollment. The dengue seroprevalance increased with age and reached >90% in people over the age of 20 years. We identified acute dengue (serotypes 1 and 2) in 38 (5.1%) patients. Only 8.1% (3/37) of confirmed cases were suspected clinically. Conclusions/Significance Dengue is an important and largely unrecognized cause of fever in rural western Nicaragua. Since Zika virus is transmitted by the same vector and has been associated with severe congenital infections, the population we studied is at particular risk for being devastated by the Zika epidemic that has now reached Central America. PMID:27792777

  14. [An unusual cause of acute respiratory distress: obstructive bronchial aspergillosis].

    PubMed

    Margery, J; Perez, J-P; Vaylet, F; Bordier, E; Dot, J-M; Saint-Blancard, P; Bonnichon, A; Guigay, J; Pats, B; L'Her, P

    2004-06-01

    We report the case of a 77-Year-old immunocompetent woman who required intensive care for acute dyspnea revealing complete atelectasia of the left lung related to an aspergillus mycelium plug blocking the principal bronchus. The clinical course was favorable after deobstruction by thermocoagulation and oral itraconazole given for six Months. The patient was free of parenchymatous or endobronchial sequelae. Adjuvant oral corticoid therapy was given temporarily during the second Month of treatment when signs of transition towards allergic aspergillosis developed. Four Months after discontinuing the antifungal treatment, the patient developed a new episode of acute dyspnea caused by atelectasia limited to the right lower lobe. Treatment by itraconazole was resumed and continued as long-term therapy. No recurrence has been observed for eighteen Months. The diagnostic and therapeutic problems raised by Aspergillus fumigatus are well known in the immunocompromised subject, but can also be encountered in the immunocompetent subject. PMID:15292826

  15. Chronic respiratory illness as a predictor of survival in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy: the Washington, DC, Dilated Cardiomyopathy Study.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, S. A.; Coughlin, S. S.; Metayer, C.; René, A. A.; Hammond, I. W.

    1996-01-01

    Although bronchial asthma and emphysema have been associated with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy in case-control studies, little is known about the prognostic importance of chronic respiratory disease in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. To study this, we examined history of bronchial asthma, emphysema and chronic bronchitis, and respiratory medication use as possible predictors of survival in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy using data from a Washington, DC, population-based study (n = 129). The cumulative survival rates among patients with a history of emphysema or chronic bronchitis were 60% and 48% at 12 and 36 months, respectively, compared with 81.8% and 67.2% among patients without emphysema or chronic bronchitis. The survival rates of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy patients with and without a history of bronchial asthma at the time of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy diagnosis were similar. In multivariate analysis using the proportional hazards model, only ventricular arrhythmias and ejection fraction were found to be statistically significant predictors of survival in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. The adjusted relative risk estimate for emphysema and chronic bronchitis was close to one. Thus, the results of this population-based study do not suggest that history of chronic respiratory illness is an independent predictor of survival in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:8961693

  16. Probabilistic differential diagnosis of Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) using the time from immigration to illness onset among imported cases.

    PubMed

    Ejima, Keisuke; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Nishiura, Hiroshi

    2014-04-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) has spread worldwide since 2012. As the clinical symptoms of MERS tend to be non-specific, the incubation period has been shown to complement differential diagnosis, especially to rule out influenza. However, because an infection event is seldom directly observable, the present study aims to construct a diagnostic model that predicts the probability of MERS diagnosis given the time from immigration to illness onset among imported cases which are suspected of MERS. Addressing censoring by considering the transmission dynamics in an exporting country, we demonstrate that the illness onset within 2 days from immigration is suggestive of influenza. Two exceptions to suspect MERS even for those with illness onset within 2 days since immigration are (i) when we observe substantial community transmissions of MERS and (ii) when the cases are at high risk of MERS (e.g. cases with close contact in hospital or household). It is vital to collect the information of the incubation period upon emergence of a novel infectious disease, and moreover, in our model, the fundamental transmission dynamics including the initial growth rate has to be explored to differentiate the disease diagnoses with non-specific symptoms.

  17. Respiratory virus infection as a cause of prolonged symptoms in acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Arola, M; Ziegler, T; Ruuskanen, O

    1990-05-01

    We studied respiratory viruses in 22 children with acute otitis media who had failed to improve after at least 48 hours of antimicrobial therapy. The mean duration of preenrollment antimicrobial therapy was 4.8 days. For comparison we studied 66 children with newly diagnosed acute otitis media. Respiratory viruses were isolated from middle ear fluid or from the nasopharynx, or both, significantly more often in the patients unresponsive to initial antimicrobial therapy than in the comparison patients (68% vs 41%, p less than 0.05). Viruses were recovered from the middle ear fluid in 32% of the study patients and from 15% of the comparison group. Bacteria were isolated from the middle ear fluid of four (18%) children in the study group; one child had an isolate resistant to initial antimicrobial therapy. All four children with bacteria in the middle ear fluid had evidence of concomitant respiratory virus infection. Our results indicate that respiratory virus infection is often present in patients with acute otitis media unresponsive to initial antimicrobial therapy, and may explain the prolongation of symptoms of infection. Resistant bacteria seem to be a less common cause of failure of the initial treatment.

  18. [Respiratory tract symptoms and illnesses in rescue and clearance workers after the World Trade Center catastrophe].

    PubMed

    Aro, Leena; Sauni, Riitta; Lusa, Sirpa; Lindholm, Harri; Uitti, Jukka

    2009-01-01

    The World Trade Center catastrophe and subsequent rescue and clearance operations caused unusual respiratory tract symptoms in fire fighters and rescue workers. Persistent cough was a common symptom, being extraordinarily often associated with the gastroesophageal reflux symptom. Irritant dusts caused reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS). Tracheal hyperreactivity increased with the exposure, and the risk of asthma is estimated to have increased up to 12 times higher as compared with the normal population. Investigation and treatment of exposed persons have yielded generalizable information about the reactions of the respiratory system in situations of heavy exposure. PMID:19839191

  19. Keynote Presentation at the Eight International Congress of Behavioral Medicine: the Pittsburgh common cold studies: psychosocial predictors of susceptibility to respiratory infectious illness.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Sheldon

    2005-01-01

    This article provides a selected overview of 20 years of research on the role of psychosocial factors in susceptibility to upper respiratory infections. We present evidence from our laboratory that psychological stress is associated with increased risk for developing respiratory illness for persons intentionally exposed to a common cold virus, that the longer the duration of the stressor the greater the risk, and that stress association with susceptibility may be mediated by stress-induced disruption of the regulation of proinflammatory cytokines. We further provide evidence that social relationships (social integration and social support) are also associated with risk for respiratory illness: Social integration is associated with reduced risk irrespective of stress level and social support protects persons from the pathogenic influences of stress. Finally, we report recent evidence that lower levels of early childhood socioeconomic status (SES) are associated with greater risk of viral-induced illness during adulthood, independent of adult SES. PMID:16083315

  20. Acute Monocytic Leukemia Masquerading Behçet's Disease-Like Illness at Onset in an Elderly Female

    PubMed Central

    Koba, Shigeru; Sekioka, Toshio; Takeda, Sorou; Miyagawa-Hayashino, Aya; Nishimura, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    A previously healthy 74-year-old Japanese female was hospitalized with fever and high C-reactive protein. She developed palatal herpangina-like aphthous ulcers, localized intestinal wall thickening, terminal ileum ulcers, and an erythematous acneiform rash; thus Behçet's disease-like illness was suspected. Significant peripheral blood acute monocytosis developed during her hospitalization and acute monocytic leukemia (FAB M5b) with normal karyotype was diagnosed. By immunostaining, the infiltrating cells in the skin and the terminal ileum were identified as monocytic leukemic cells. This case exhibited a unique initial presentation of Behçet's disease-like illness associated with acute monocytic leukemia.

  1. Acute Monocytic Leukemia Masquerading Behçet's Disease-Like Illness at Onset in an Elderly Female.

    PubMed

    Koba, Shigeru; Sekioka, Toshio; Takeda, Sorou; Miyagawa-Hayashino, Aya; Nishimura, Keisuke; Imashuku, Shinsaku

    2016-01-01

    A previously healthy 74-year-old Japanese female was hospitalized with fever and high C-reactive protein. She developed palatal herpangina-like aphthous ulcers, localized intestinal wall thickening, terminal ileum ulcers, and an erythematous acneiform rash; thus Behçet's disease-like illness was suspected. Significant peripheral blood acute monocytosis developed during her hospitalization and acute monocytic leukemia (FAB M5b) with normal karyotype was diagnosed. By immunostaining, the infiltrating cells in the skin and the terminal ileum were identified as monocytic leukemic cells. This case exhibited a unique initial presentation of Behçet's disease-like illness associated with acute monocytic leukemia. PMID:27610252

  2. Acute Monocytic Leukemia Masquerading Behçet's Disease-Like Illness at Onset in an Elderly Female

    PubMed Central

    Koba, Shigeru; Sekioka, Toshio; Takeda, Sorou; Miyagawa-Hayashino, Aya; Nishimura, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    A previously healthy 74-year-old Japanese female was hospitalized with fever and high C-reactive protein. She developed palatal herpangina-like aphthous ulcers, localized intestinal wall thickening, terminal ileum ulcers, and an erythematous acneiform rash; thus Behçet's disease-like illness was suspected. Significant peripheral blood acute monocytosis developed during her hospitalization and acute monocytic leukemia (FAB M5b) with normal karyotype was diagnosed. By immunostaining, the infiltrating cells in the skin and the terminal ileum were identified as monocytic leukemic cells. This case exhibited a unique initial presentation of Behçet's disease-like illness associated with acute monocytic leukemia. PMID:27610252

  3. Adenovirus type 7 associated with severe and fatal acute lower respiratory infections in Argentine children

    PubMed Central

    Carballal, Guadalupe; Videla, Cristina; Misirlian, Alicia; Requeijo, Paula V; Aguilar, María del Carmen

    2002-01-01

    Background Adenoviruses are the second most prevalent cause of acute lower respiratory infection of viral origin in children under four years of age in Buenos Aires, Argentina. The purpose of this study was to analyze the clinical features and outcome of acute lower respiratory infection associated with different adenovirus genotypes in children. Methods Twenty-four cases of acute lower respiratory infection and adenovirus diagnosis reported in a pediatric unit during a two-year period were retrospectively reviewed. Adenovirus was detected by antigen detection and isolation in HEp-2 cells. Adenovirus DNA from 17 isolates was studied by restriction enzyme analysis with Bam HI and Sma I. Results Subgenus b was found in 82.3% of the cases, and subgenus c in 17.7%. Within subgenus b, only genotype 7 was detected, with genomic variant 7h in 85.7% (12/14) and genomic variant 7i in 14.3% (2/14). Mean age was 8.8 ±; 6 months, and male to female ratio was 3.8: 1. At admission, pneumonia was observed in 71% of the cases and bronchiolitis in 29%. Malnutrition occurred in 37% of the cases; tachypnea in 79%; chest indrawing in 66%; wheezing in 58%; apneas in 16%; and conjunctivitis in 29%. Blood cultures for bacteria and antigen detection of other respiratory viruses were negative. During hospitalization, fatality rate was 16.7% (4 /24). Of the patients who died, three had Ad 7h and one Ad 7i. Thus, fatality rate for adenovirus type 7 reached 28.6% (4/14). Conclusions These results show the predominance of adenovirus 7 and high lethality associated with the genomic variants 7h and 7i in children hospitalized with acute lower respiratory infection. PMID:12184818

  4. Intensity of Renal Support in Critically Ill Patients with Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND The optimal intensity of renal-replacement therapy in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury is controversial. METHODS We randomly assigned critically ill patients with acute kidney injury and failure of at least one nonrenal organ or sepsis to receive intensive or less intensive renal-replacement therapy. The primary end point was death from any cause by day 60. In both study groups, hemodynamically stable patients underwent intermittent hemodialysis, and hemodynamically unstable patients underwent continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration or sustained low-efficiency dialysis. Patients receiving the intensive treatment strategy underwent intermittent hemodialysis and sustained low-efficiency dialysis six times per week and continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration at 35 ml per kilogram of body weight per hour; for patients receiving the less-intensive treatment strategy, the corresponding treatments were provided thrice weekly and at 20 ml per kilogram per hour. RESULTS Baseline characteristics of the 1124 patients in the two groups were similar. The rate of death from any cause by day 60 was 53.6% with intensive therapy and 51.5% with less-intensive therapy (odds ratio, 1.09; 95% confidence interval, 0.86 to 1.40; P = 0.47). There was no significant difference between the two groups in the duration of renalreplacement therapy or the rate of recovery of kidney function or nonrenal organ failure. Hypotension during intermittent dialysis occurred in more patients randomly assigned to receive intensive therapy, although the frequency of hemodialysis sessions complicated by hypotension was similar in the two groups. CONCLUSIONS Intensive renal support in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury did not decrease mortality, improve recovery of kidney function, or reduce the rate of nonrenal organ failure as compared with less-intensive therapy involving a defined dose of intermittent hemodialysis three times per week and continuous renal

  5. [Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for treatment of acute respiratory failure in adults].

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Charles Marinus; Jensen, Reinhold; Lindskov, Christian

    2016-09-19

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) can support gas exchange independently of mechanical ventilation in patients with severe acute respiratory failure. Veno-venous ECMO is a temporary technique for providing life support by pulmonary dysfunction. ECMO should be considered for patients with respiratory failure when they cannot survive with conventional therapy. ECMO may be used either as a rescue therapy or to prevent ventilator-associated lung injury. Exact criteria for ECMO are not available. Transportation while using ECMO is safe when a team from the management centre provides it. PMID:27649710

  6. Nitrogen mustard hydrochloride-induced acute respiratory failure and myelosuppression: A case report

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, XIAOJUAN; ZHANG, ZHIDAN; CHEN, SONG; ZHAO, DONGMEI; ZHANG, FANGXIAO; HU, ZIWEI; XIAO, FENG; MA, XIAOCHUN

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen mustards are chemical agents that are similar to sulfur mustards, with similar toxicities. The present study describes a case of nitrogen mustard-induced acute respiratory failure and myelosuppression in a 33-year-old man. The patient, who was accidentally exposed to nitrogen mustard hydrochloride in a pharmaceutical factory, exhibited severe inhalation injury and respiratory symptoms. Laboratory tests revealed reduced white blood cell counts and lowered platelet levels during the first 6 days after the skin exposure to nitrogen mustard. Following treatment with mechanical ventilation, immunity-enhancing agents and nutritional supplements for 1 month, the patient successfully recovered and was released from hospital. PMID:26622480

  7. Relationship between haze and acute cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and respiratory diseases in Beijing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin-Jun; Cui, Meng-Meng; Fan, Da; Zhang, De-Shan; Lian, Hui-Xin; Yin, Zhao-Yin; Li, Jin

    2015-03-01

    Haze is an atmospheric phenomenon in which dry particulate pollutants obscure the sky. Haze has been associated with chronic diseases, but its relationship with acute diseases is less clear. We aimed to determine the association between haze and acute cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and respiratory diseases, in order to determine the influence of haze on human health. We compared the number of cases of acute cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and respiratory diseases in Beijing Emergency Center between 2006 and 2013, with haze data from Beijing Observatory. The relationship between the number of hazy days and the number of cases of the above types of diseases was analyzed using univariate analyses. Both the number of cases and the number of hazy days showed a rising trend. The average number of cases per day for all three diseases was higher on hazy days than on non-hazy days. There was a positive correlation between the number of hazy days and the number of cases, and this correlation showed a hysteretic quality. Haze has an influence on acute cardiovascular (CVDs), cerebrovascular (CBDs), and respiratory system (RSDs) diseases. Haze seems to have an additive effect, since the associations between haze and number of cases were stronger in the following month than in the preceding month. The increasing trend in the number of hazy days might worsen the problem of haze-related diseases.

  8. Homeopathic medications as clinical alternatives for symptomatic care of acute otitis media and upper respiratory infections in children.

    PubMed

    Bell, Iris R; Boyer, Nancy N

    2013-01-01

    The public health and individual risks of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing and conventional over-the-counter symptomatic drugs in pediatric treatment of acute otitis media (AOM) and upper respiratory infections (URIs) are significant. Clinical research suggests that over-the-counter homeopathic medicines offer pragmatic treatment alternatives to conventional drugs for symptom relief in children with uncomplicated AOM or URIs. Homeopathy is a controversial but demonstrably safe and effective 200-year-old whole system of complementary and alternative medicine used worldwide. Numerous clinical studies demonstrate that homeopathy accelerates early symptom relief in acute illnesses at much lower risk than conventional drug approaches. Evidence-based advantages for homeopathy include lower antibiotic fill rates during watchful waiting in otitis media, fewer and less serious side effects, absence of drug-drug interactions, and reduced parental sick leave from work. Emerging evidence from basic and preclinical science research counter the skeptics' claims that homeopathic remedies are biologically inert placebos. Consumers already accept and use homeopathic medicines for self care, as evidenced by annual US consumer expenditures of $2.9 billion on homeopathic remedies. Homeopathy appears equivalent to and safer than conventional standard care in comparative effectiveness trials, but additional well-designed efficacy trials are indicated. Nonetheless, the existing research evidence on safety supports pragmatic use of homeopathy in order to "first do no harm" in the early symptom management of otherwise uncomplicated AOM and URIs in children.

  9. Homeopathic Medications as Clinical Alternatives for Symptomatic Care of Acute Otitis Media and Upper Respiratory Infections in Children

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Nancy N

    2013-01-01

    The public health and individual risks of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing and conventional over-the-counter symptomatic drugs in pediatric treatment of acute otitis media (AOM) and upper respiratory infections (URIs) are significant. Clinical research suggests that over-the-counter homeopathic medicines offer pragmatic treatment alternatives to conventional drugs for symptom relief in children with uncomplicated AOM or URIs. Homeopathy is a controversial but demonstrably safe and effective 200-year-old whole system of complementary and alternative medicine used worldwide. Numerous clinical studies demonstrate that homeopathy accelerates early symptom relief in acute illnesses at much lower risk than conventional drug approaches. Evidence-based advantages for homeopathy include lower antibiotic fill rates during watchful waiting in otitis media, fewer and less serious side effects, absence of drug-drug interactions, and reduced parental sick leave from work. Emerging evidence from basic and preclinical science research counter the skeptics' claims that homeopathic remedies are biologically inert placebos. Consumers already accept and use homeopathic medicines for self care, as evidenced by annual US consumer expenditures of $2.9 billion on homeopathic remedies. Homeopathy appears equivalent to and safer than conventional standard care in comparative effectiveness trials, but additional well-designed efficacy trials are indicated. Nonetheless, the existing research evidence on safety supports pragmatic use of homeopathy in order to “first do no harm” in the early symptom management of otherwise uncomplicated AOM and URIs in children. PMID:24381823

  10. Noninvasive ventilation for acute respiratory failure: a prospective randomised placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Thys, F; Roeseler, J; Reynaert, M; Liistro, G; Rodenstein, D O

    2002-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to clarify whether the known effects of noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation (NPPV) in patients with respiratory failure are real or due to placebo effects and whether early application of NPPV in the emergency department leads to rapid improvement of the patients condition and outcome. A prospective randomised placebo-controlled study was conducted in 20 patients with severe acute respiratory failure (ARF) secondary to an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or acute pulmonary oedema, not improving under conventional medical therapy and on the edge of intubation. Patients received either conventional medical therapy plus two-level NPPV (hi-level NPPV) or conventional medical therapy plus "placebo" NPPV. The main outcome measures involved the need for endotracheal intubation in the bi-level NPPV arm and in the placebo arm after crossing over to active NPPV. Morbidity, length of stay, mortality and the effect of the ventilatory mode on clinical, arterial-blood gas parameters, and the sternocleidomastoid muscles electromyogram (EMG) activity were also measured. The 10 patients in the active NPPV group rapidly improved and none needed intubation. Placebo NPPV resulted in no change in the clinical condition of patients that continued to worsen and the 10 patients were crossed over to active NPPV. Three patients were intubated. No differences in terms of morbidity, length of stay or mortality between the two groups were observed. Active NPPV (but not placebo NPPV) led to a rapid and significant improvement in the clinical parameters, pH and the carbon dioxide tension in arterial blood and to a decrease in respiratory frequency and sternocleidomastoid EMG activity. Early application of bi-level noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation in patients with severe acute respiratory failure, due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and acute pulmonary oedema, leads to a rapid improvement in clinical status

  11. Effect of passive smoking on frequency of respiratory illnesses and serum immunoglobulin-E (IgE) and interleukin-4 (IL-4) concentrations in exposed children.

    PubMed

    el-Nawawy, A; Soliman, A T; el-Azzouni, O; Amer el-S; Demian, S; el-Sayed, M

    1996-06-01

    We studied the relationship of serum immunoglobulin-E (Ig-E) and interleukin-4 (IL-4) concentrations, eosinophil counts, and frequency of respiratory illness with passive smoking in 70 randomly selected children of smoking parents. Fifty randomly selected age-matched children of non-smoking parents served as controls. Children of smoking parents had higher frequency of respiratory illnesses per year (P < 0.01), significantly higher total leucocytic and eosinophil counts, higher percentage of eosinophils (P < 0.01), and higher serum IgE and IL-4 concentrations (P < 0.05) compared to the control group. Serum IgE level was correlated positively with the average number of smoked cigarettes/day, number of siblings, and total leucocytic count. Interleukin-4 concentrations were significantly correlated with the number of smoked cigarettes and IgE levels. Although IgE levels were higher in children of smoking parents (587 +/- 359 IU/ml) compared to controls (189 +/- 21 IU/ml), they did not differ significantly between children with and those without frequent respiratory illness (605 +/- 365 and 557 +/- 354 IU/ml, respectively). Interleukin-4 concentrations were significantly higher in children of smoking parents with frequent respiratory illness (1.8 +/- 0.5 pg/ml) v. those without frequent respiratory illness (1.3 +/- 0.45 pg/ml). Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that the overall positivity of the risk factors predisposing to respiratory diseases in the study children was 79 percent, and the highest odds ratio was that for IL-4 (OR = 5.15). In conclusion, there is a significant increase in IL-4 and Ig-E concentrations, high eosinophil count and frequent respiratory symptoms in children of smoking parents. It remains that the current state of knowledge on health risks associated with passive smoking warrants that strong preventive action be promoted. PMID:8699585

  12. Traffic Air Pollution and Other Risk Factors for Respiratory Illness in Schoolchildren in the Niger-Delta Region of Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Mustapha, B. Adetoun; Blangiardo, Marta; Briggs, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Association of childhood respiratory illness with traffic air pollution has been investigated largely in developed but not in developing countries, where pollution levels are often very high. Objectives: In this study we investigated associations between respiratory health and outdoor and indoor air pollution in schoolchildren 7–14 years of age in low socioeconomic status areas in the Niger Delta. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was carried out among 1,397 schoolchildren. Exposure to home outdoor and indoor air pollution was assessed by self-report questionnaire. School air pollution exposures were assessed using traffic counts, distance of schools to major streets, and particulate matter and carbon monoxide measurements, combined using principal components analysis. Hierarchical logistic regression was used to examine associations with reported respiratory health, adjusting for potential confounders. Results: Traffic disturbance at home (i.e., traffic noise and/or fumes evident inside the home vs. none) was associated with wheeze [odds ratio (OR) = 2.16; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.28–3.64], night cough (OR = 1.37; 95% CI, 1.03–1.82), phlegm (OR = 1.49; 95% CI, 1.09–2.04), and nose symptoms (OR = 1.40; 95% CI, 1.03–1.90), whereas school exposure to a component variable indicating exposure to fine particles was associated with increased phlegm (OR = 1.38; 95% CI, 1.09–1.75). Nonsignificant positive associations were found between cooking with wood/coal (OR = 2.99; 95% CI, 0.88–10.18) or kerosene (OR = 2.83; 95% CI, 0.85–9.44) and phlegm compared with cooking with gas. Conclusion: Traffic pollution is associated with respiratory symptoms in schoolchildren in a deprived area of western Africa. Associations may have been underestimated because of nondifferential misclassification resulting from limitations in exposure measurement. PMID:21719372

  13. Etiology and Incidence of Viral Acute Respiratory Infections Among Refugees Aged 5 Years and Older in Hagadera Camp, Dadaab, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Gedi A; Ahmed, Jamal A; Marano, Nina; Mohamed, Abdinoor; Moturi, Edna; Burton, Wagacha; Otieno, Samora; Fields, Barry; Montgomery, Joel; Kabugi, Willy; Musa, Hashim; Cookson, Susan T

    2015-12-01

    We used the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-Kenya Medical Research Institute Acute Respiratory Infection (ARI) Surveillance System data to estimate severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) hospitalization rates, viral etiology, and associated complaints of influenza-like illnesses (ILI) and SARI conditions among those aged 5 years and older in Hagadera, Dadaab refugee camp, Kenya, for 2010-2012. A total of 471 patients aged ≥ 5 years met the case definition for ILI or SARI. SARI hospitalization rates per 10,000 person-years were 14.7 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 9.1, 22.2) for those aged 5-14 years; 3.4 (95% CI = 1.6, 7.2) for those aged 15-24 year; and 3.8 (95% CI = 1.6, 7.2) for those aged ≥ 25 years. Persons between the ages of 5 and 14 years had 3.5 greater odds to have been hospitalized as a result of SARI than those aged ≥ 25 years (odds ratio [OR] = 3.5, P < 0.001). Among the 419 samples tested, 169 (40.3%) were positive for one or more virus. Of those samples having viruses, 36.9% had influenza A; 29.9% had adenovirus; 20.2% had influenza B; and 14.4% had parainfluenza 1, 2, or 3. Muscle/joint pain was associated with influenza A (P = 0.002), whereas headache was associated with influenza B (P = 0.019). ARIs were responsible for a substantial disease burden in Hagadera camp. PMID:26458776

  14. Aetiological role of viral and bacterial infections in acute adult lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Creer, D D; Dilworth, J P; Gillespie, S H; Johnston, A R; Johnston, S L; Ling, C; Patel, S; Sanderson, G; Wallace, P G; McHugh, T D

    2006-01-01

    Background Lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) are a common reason for consulting general practitioners (GPs). In most cases the aetiology is unknown, yet most result in an antibiotic prescription. The aetiology of LRTI was investigated in a prospective controlled study. Methods Eighty adults presenting to GPs with acute LRTI were recruited together with 49 controls over 12 months. Throat swabs, nasal aspirates (patients and controls), and sputum (patients) were obtained and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT‐PCR) assays were used to detect Streptococcus pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila, influenza viruses (AH1, AH3 and B), parainfluenza viruses 1–3, coronaviruses, respiratory syncytial virus, adenoviruses, rhinoviruses, and enteroviruses. Standard sputum bacteriology was also performed. Outcome was recorded at a follow up visit. Results Potential pathogens were identified in 55 patients with LRTI (69%) and seven controls (14%; p<0.0001). The identification rate was 63% (viruses) and 26% (bacteria) for patients and 12% (p<0.0001) and 6% (p = 0.013), respectively, for controls. The most common organisms identified in the patients were rhinoviruses (33%), influenza viruses (24%), and Streptococcus pneumoniae (19%) compared with 2% (p<0.001), 6% (p = 0.013), and 4% (p = 0.034), respectively, in controls. Multiple pathogens were identified in 18 of the 80 LRTI patients (22.5%) and in two of the 49 controls (4%; p = 0.011). Atypical organisms were rarely identified. Cases with bacterial aetiology were clinically indistinguishable from those with viral aetiology. Conclusion Patients presenting to GPs with acute adult LRTI predominantly have a viral illness which is most commonly caused by rhinoviruses and influenza viruses. PMID:16227331

  15. Etiology and Incidence of Viral Acute Respiratory Infections Among Refugees Aged 5 Years and Older in Hagadera Camp, Dadaab, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Gedi A; Ahmed, Jamal A; Marano, Nina; Mohamed, Abdinoor; Moturi, Edna; Burton, Wagacha; Otieno, Samora; Fields, Barry; Montgomery, Joel; Kabugi, Willy; Musa, Hashim; Cookson, Susan T

    2015-12-01

    We used the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-Kenya Medical Research Institute Acute Respiratory Infection (ARI) Surveillance System data to estimate severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) hospitalization rates, viral etiology, and associated complaints of influenza-like illnesses (ILI) and SARI conditions among those aged 5 years and older in Hagadera, Dadaab refugee camp, Kenya, for 2010-2012. A total of 471 patients aged ≥ 5 years met the case definition for ILI or SARI. SARI hospitalization rates per 10,000 person-years were 14.7 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 9.1, 22.2) for those aged 5-14 years; 3.4 (95% CI = 1.6, 7.2) for those aged 15-24 year; and 3.8 (95% CI = 1.6, 7.2) for those aged ≥ 25 years. Persons between the ages of 5 and 14 years had 3.5 greater odds to have been hospitalized as a result of SARI than those aged ≥ 25 years (odds ratio [OR] = 3.5, P < 0.001). Among the 419 samples tested, 169 (40.3%) were positive for one or more virus. Of those samples having viruses, 36.9% had influenza A; 29.9% had adenovirus; 20.2% had influenza B; and 14.4% had parainfluenza 1, 2, or 3. Muscle/joint pain was associated with influenza A (P = 0.002), whereas headache was associated with influenza B (P = 0.019). ARIs were responsible for a substantial disease burden in Hagadera camp.

  16. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for the prevention and treatment of acute altitude illness: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    Luks, Andrew M; McIntosh, Scott E; Grissom, Colin K; Auerbach, Paul S; Rodway, George W; Schoene, Robert B; Zafren, Ken; Hackett, Peter H

    2014-12-01

    To provide guidance to clinicians about best practices, the Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based guidelines for prevention and treatment of acute mountain sickness, high altitude cerebral edema, and high altitude pulmonary edema. These guidelines present the main prophylactic and therapeutic modalities for each disorder and provide recommendations about their role in disease management. Recommendations are graded based on the quality of supporting evidence and balance between the benefits and risks/burdens according to criteria put forth by the American College of Chest Physicians. The guidelines also provide suggested approaches to prevention and management of each disorder that incorporate these recommendations. This is an updated version of the original WMS Consensus Guidelines for the Prevention and Treatment of Acute Altitude Illness published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2010;21(2):146-155.

  17. Perceived social support among adults seeking care for acute respiratory tract infections in US EDs.

    PubMed

    Levin, Sara K; Metlay, Joshua P; Maselli, Judith H; Kersey, Ayanna S; Camargo, Carlos A; Gonzales, Ralph

    2009-06-01

    Emergency departments (EDs) provide a disproportionate amount of care to disenfranchised and vulnerable populations. We examined social support levels among a diverse population of adults seeking ED care for acute respiratory tract infections. A convenience sample of adults seeking care in 1 of 15 US EDs was telephone interviewed 1 to 6 weeks postvisit. The Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (7-point Likert) assessed social support across 3 domains: friends, family, and significant others. Higher scores indicate higher support. Of 1104 subjects enrolled, 704 (64%) completed the follow-up interview. Factor analysis yielded 3 factors. Mean social support score was 5.54 (SD 1.04). Female sex, greater household income, and better health status were independently associated with higher levels of social support. Social support levels among adults seeking care in the ED for acute respiratory tract infections are similar to general population cohorts, suggesting that social support is not a strong determinant of health care seeking in EDs.

  18. Recruitment manoeuvres in acute respiratory distress syndrome: Little evidence for routine use.

    PubMed

    Poole, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    The use of alveolar recruitment manoeuvres for the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome is a topic of uncertainty in current critical care practice. Acute respiratory distress syndrome leads to inflammatory atelectasis, which challenges the gas exchange properties of the lung. Recruitment of atelectatic lung tissue requires elevation of transpulmonary pressure. Transpulmonary pressure can be suppressed at a given airway pressure when pleural pressures are elevated. The present review discusses recruitment of lung tissue in detail, highlighting the key research in the field. Differing techniques for recruiting lung tissue, as well as various outcome measures to determine efficacy, are analyzed and critiqued. The commonly used sustained inflation manoeuvre is perhaps regarded as the only strategy to recruit the lung, explaining its prevalence. Staircase recruitment with positive end-expiratory pressure titration is shown to be an equally - if not more - effective therapy that devotes attention to the maintenance of lung recruitment.

  19. Management of acute respiratory infections by community health volunteers: experience of Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee (BRAC).

    PubMed Central

    Hadi, Abdullahel

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the role of management practices for acute respiratory infections (ARIs) in improving the competency of community health volunteers in diagnosing and treating acute respiratory infections among children. METHODS: Data were collected by a group of research physicians who observed the performance of a sample of 120 health volunteers in 10 sub-districts in Bangladesh in which Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee (BRAC) had run a community-based ARI control programme since mid-1992. Standardized tests were conducted until the 95% interphysician reliability on the observation of clinical examination was achieved. FINDINGS:The sensitivity, specificity, and overall agreement rates in diagnosing and treating ARIs were significantly higher among the health volunteers who had basic training and were supervised routinely than among those who had not. CONCLUSION: Diagnosis and treatment of ARIs at the household level in developing countries are possible if intensive basic training and the close supervision of service providers are ensured. PMID:12764514

  20. Acute respiratory failure caused by organizing pneumonia secondary to antineoplastic therapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Adriell Ramalho; Amorim, Fábio Ferreira; Soares, Paulo Henrique Alves; de Moura, Edmilson Bastos; Maia, Marcelo de Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Interstitial lung diseases belong to a group of diseases that typically exhibit a subacute or chronic progression but that may cause acute respiratory failure. The male patient, who was 37 years of age and undergoing therapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, was admitted with cough, fever, dyspnea and acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. Mechanical ventilation and antibiotic therapy were initiated but were associated with unfavorable progression. Thoracic computed tomography showed bilateral pulmonary "ground glass" opacities. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy was initiated with satisfactory response because the patient had used three drugs related to organizing pneumonia (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin and rituximab), and the clinical and radiological symptoms were suggestive. Organizing pneumonia may be idiopathic or linked to collagen diseases, drugs and cancer and usually responds to corticosteroid therapy. The diagnosis was anatomopathological, but the patient's clinical condition precluded performing a lung biopsy. Organizing pneumonia should be a differential diagnosis in patients with apparent pneumonia and a progression that is unfavorable to antimicrobial treatment. PMID:23917942

  1. Proteomic study of acute respiratory distress syndrome: current knowledge and implications for drug development.

    PubMed

    Levitt, Joseph E; Rogers, Angela J

    2016-05-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a common cause of acute respiratory failure, and is associated with substantial mortality and morbidity. Dozens of clinical trials targeting ARDS have failed, with no drug specifically targeting lung injury in widespread clinical use. Thus, the need for drug development in ARDS is great. Targeted proteomic studies in ARDS have identified many key pathways in the disease, including inflammation, epithelial injury, endothelial injury or activation, and disordered coagulation and repair. Recent studies reveal the potential for proteomic changes to identify novel subphenotypes of ARDS patients who may be most likely to respond to therapy and could thus be targeted for enrollment in clinical trials. Nontargeted studies of proteomics in ARDS are just beginning and have the potential to identify novel drug targets and key pathways in the disease. Proteomics will play an important role in phenotyping of patients and developing novel therapies for ARDS in the future. PMID:27031735

  2. Association between outdoor ozone and compensated acute respiratory diseases among workers in Quebec (Canada)

    PubMed Central

    ADAM-POUPART, Ariane; LABRÈCHE, France; BUSQUE, Marc-Antoine; BRAND, Allan; DUGUAY, Patrice; FOURNIER, Michel; ZAYED, Joseph; SMARGIASSI, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory effects of ozone in the workplace have not been extensively studied. Our aim was to explore the relationship between daily average ozone levels and compensated acute respiratory problems among workers in Quebec between 2003 and 2010 using a time-stratified case-crossover design. Health data came from the Workers’ Compensation Board. Daily concentrations of ozone were estimated using a spatiotemporal model. Conditional logistic regressions, with and without adjustment for temperature, were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs, per 1 ppb increase of ozone), and lag effects were assessed. Relationships with respiratory compensations in all industrial sectors were essentially null. Positive non-statistically significant associations were observed for outdoor sectors, and decreased after controlling for temperature (ORs of 0.98; 1.01 and 1.05 at Lags 0, 1 and 2 respectively). Considering the predicted increase of air pollutant concentrations in the context of climate change, closer investigation should be carried out on outdoor workers. PMID:25736778

  3. The burden of acute gastrointestinal illness in Ontario, Canada, 2005–2006

    PubMed Central

    SARGEANT, J. M.; MAJOWICZ, S. E.; SNELGROVE, J.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY A retrospective, cross-sectional telephone survey (n=2090) was conducted in Ontario, Canada, between May 2005 and April 2006, to determine the burden of acute gastrointestinal illness in the population. The 4-week prevalence was 8·56% (95% CI 7·36–9·76); in households with more than one resident, 35% of cases reported someone else in their household had similar symptoms at the same time. The annual adjusted incidence rate was 1·17 (95% CI 0·99–1·35) episodes per person-year, with higher rates in females, rural residents, and in the winter and spring. Health care was sought by 22% of cases, of which 33% were asked to provide a stool sample. Interestingly, 2·2% of cases who did not visit a health-care provider reported self-administering antibiotics. Overall, acute gastrointestinal illness appears to pose a significant burden in the Ontario population. Further research into the specific aetiologies and risk factors is now needed to better target intervention strategies. PMID:17565767

  4. The relationship between serum ferritin levels and electrocardiogram characteristics in acutely ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Laudanski, Krzysztof; Ali, Huma; Himmel, Andrew; Godula, Kasia; Stettmeier, Mary; Calvocoressi, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiac arrhythmias are common comorbidities among acutely ill patients admitted to hospitals. An abnormal iron metabolism may contribute to the abnormalities in the conduction and propagation of action potentials through myocardium. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether serum indexes of iron metabolism correlate with electrocardiogram (ECG) changes. METHODS: In the present retrospective, pilot chart review, serum levels of iron, ferritin, Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+ and total iron-binding capacity in 77 hospitalized patients with acute illness were correlated with ECG variables. RESULTS: The serum ferritin level correlated strongly (r=0.49) with QT/QTs interval. There were three subjects with QT prolongation (longer than 450 ms) within the high serum ferritin (576 ng/mL or greater) group versus subjects with low ferritin. Multiple regression analysis showed that serum ferritin level and serum iron level contributed to the variance in the QT/QTs prolongation. No other correlation between the studied serum markers and ECG characteristics were found. CONCLUSION: The present study suggests that serum ferritin and iron levels affect the QT interval in a variety of medical conditions, possibly contributing to the emergence of fatal cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:20098576

  5. Thyrostimulin deficiency does not alter peripheral responses to acute inflammation-induced nonthyroidal illness.

    PubMed

    van Zeijl, Clementine J J; Surovtseva, Olga V; Kwakkel, Joan; van Beeren, Hermina C; Bassett, J H Duncan; Duncan Bassett, J H; Williams, Graham R; Wiersinga, Wilmar M; Fliers, Eric; Boelen, Anita

    2014-09-15

    Thyrostimulin, a putative glycoprotein hormone, comprises the subunits GPA2 and GPB5 and activates the TSH receptor (TSHR). The observation that proinflammatory cytokines stimulate GPB5 transcription suggested a role for thyrostimulin in the pathogenesis of nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS). In the present study, we induced acute inflammation by LPS administration to GPB5(-/-) and WT mice to evaluate the role of thyrostimulin in peripheral thyroid hormone metabolism during NTIS. In addition to serum thyroid hormone concentrations, we studied mRNA expression and activity of deiodinase types I, II, and III (D1, D2, and D3) in peripheral T3 target tissues, including liver, muscle, and white and brown adipose tissue (WAT and BAT), of which the latter three express the TSHR. LPS decreased serum free (f)T4 and fT3 indexes to a similar extent in GPB5(-/-) and WT mice. Serum reverse (r)T3 did not change following LPS administration. LPS also induced significant alterations in tissue D1, D2, and D3 mRNA and activity levels, but only the LPS-induced increase in WAT D2 mRNA expression differed between GPB5(-/-) and WT mice. In conclusion, lacking GPB5 during acute illness does not affect the LPS-induced decrease of serum thyroid hormones while resulting in subtle changes in tissue D2 expression that are unlikely to be mediated via the TSHR. PMID:25117405

  6. Enhanced Surveillance for Fatal Dengue-Like Acute Febrile Illness in Puerto Rico, 2010-2012

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Aidsa; Torres-Velasquez, Brenda; Hunsperger, Elizabeth A.; Munoz-Jordan, Jorge L.; Sharp, Tyler M.; Rivera, Irma; Sanabria, Dario; Blau, Dianna M.; Galloway, Renee; Torres, Jose; Rodriguez, Rosa; Serrano, Javier; Chávez, Carlos; Dávila, Francisco; Perez-Padilla, Janice; Ellis, Esther M.; Caballero, Gladys; Wright, Laura; Zaki, Sherif R.; Deseda, Carmen; Rodriguez, Edda; Margolis, Harold S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Dengue is a leading cause of morbidity throughout the tropics; however, accurate population-based estimates of mortality rates are not available. Methods/Principal Findings We established the Enhanced Fatal Acute Febrile Illness Surveillance System (EFASS) to estimate dengue mortality rates in Puerto Rico. Healthcare professionals submitted serum and tissue specimens from patients who died from a dengue-like acute febrile illness, and death certificates were reviewed to identify additional cases. Specimens were tested for markers of dengue virus (DENV) infection by molecular, immunologic, and immunohistochemical methods, and were also tested for West Nile virus, Leptospira spp., and other pathogens based on histopathologic findings. Medical records were reviewed and clinical data abstracted. A total of 311 deaths were identified, of which 58 (19%) were DENV laboratory-positive. Dengue mortality rates were 1.05 per 100,000 population in 2010, 0.16 in 2011 and 0.36 in 2012. Dengue mortality was highest among adults 19–64 years and seniors ≥65 years (1.17 and 1.66 deaths per 100,000, respectively). Other pathogens identified included 34 Leptospira spp. cases and one case of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Neisseria meningitidis. Conclusions/Significance EFASS showed that dengue mortality rates among adults were higher than reported for influenza, and identified a leptospirosis outbreak and index cases of melioidosis and meningitis. PMID:27727271

  7. Thyrostimulin deficiency does not alter peripheral responses to acute inflammation-induced nonthyroidal illness.

    PubMed

    van Zeijl, Clementine J J; Surovtseva, Olga V; Kwakkel, Joan; van Beeren, Hermina C; Bassett, J H Duncan; Duncan Bassett, J H; Williams, Graham R; Wiersinga, Wilmar M; Fliers, Eric; Boelen, Anita

    2014-09-15

    Thyrostimulin, a putative glycoprotein hormone, comprises the subunits GPA2 and GPB5 and activates the TSH receptor (TSHR). The observation that proinflammatory cytokines stimulate GPB5 transcription suggested a role for thyrostimulin in the pathogenesis of nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS). In the present study, we induced acute inflammation by LPS administration to GPB5(-/-) and WT mice to evaluate the role of thyrostimulin in peripheral thyroid hormone metabolism during NTIS. In addition to serum thyroid hormone concentrations, we studied mRNA expression and activity of deiodinase types I, II, and III (D1, D2, and D3) in peripheral T3 target tissues, including liver, muscle, and white and brown adipose tissue (WAT and BAT), of which the latter three express the TSHR. LPS decreased serum free (f)T4 and fT3 indexes to a similar extent in GPB5(-/-) and WT mice. Serum reverse (r)T3 did not change following LPS administration. LPS also induced significant alterations in tissue D1, D2, and D3 mRNA and activity levels, but only the LPS-induced increase in WAT D2 mRNA expression differed between GPB5(-/-) and WT mice. In conclusion, lacking GPB5 during acute illness does not affect the LPS-induced decrease of serum thyroid hormones while resulting in subtle changes in tissue D2 expression that are unlikely to be mediated via the TSHR.

  8. Acute Uncomplicated Febrile Illness in Children Aged 2-59 months in Zanzibar – Aetiologies, Antibiotic Treatment and Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Elfving, Kristina; Shakely, Deler; Andersson, Maria; Baltzell, Kimberly; Ali, Abdullah S.; Bachelard, Marc; Falk, Kerstin I.; Ljung, Annika; Msellem, Mwinyi I.; Omar, Rahila S.; Parola, Philippe; Xu, Weiping; Petzold, Max; Trollfors, Birger; Björkman, Anders; Lindh, Magnus; Mårtensson, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the fact that a large proportion of children with fever in Africa present at primary health care facilities, few studies have been designed to specifically study the causes of uncomplicated childhood febrile illness at this level of care, especially in areas like Zanzibar that has recently undergone a dramatic change from high to low malaria transmission. Methods We prospectively studied the aetiology of febrile illness in 677 children aged 2–59 months with acute uncomplicated fever managed by IMCI (Integrated Management of Childhood Illness) guidelines in Zanzibar, using point-of-care tests, urine culture, blood-PCR, chest X-ray (CXR) of IMCI-pneumonia classified patients, and multiple quantitative (q)PCR investigations of nasopharyngeal (NPH) (all patients) and rectal (GE) swabs (diarrhoea patients). For comparison, we also performed NPH and GE qPCR analyses in 167 healthy community controls. Final fever diagnoses were retrospectively established based on all clinical and laboratory data. Clinical outcome was assessed during a 14-day follow-up. The utility of IMCI for identifying infections presumed to require antibiotics was evaluated. Findings NPH-qPCR and GE-qPCR detected ≥1 pathogen in 657/672 (98%) and 153/164 (93%) of patients and 158/166 (95%) and 144/165 (87%) of controls, respectively. Overall, 57% (387/677) had IMCI-pneumonia, but only 12% (42/342) had CXR-confirmed pneumonia. Two patients were positive for Plasmodium falciparum. Respiratory syncytial virus (24.5%), influenza A/B (22.3%), rhinovirus (10.5%) and group-A streptococci (6.4%), CXR-confirmed pneumonia (6.2%), Shigella (4.3%) were the most common viral and bacterial fever diagnoses, respectively. Blood-PCR conducted in a sub-group of patients (n = 83) without defined fever diagnosis was negative for rickettsiae, chikungunya, dengue, Rift Valley fever and West Nile viruses. Antibiotics were prescribed to 500 (74%) patients, but only 152 (22%) had an infection

  9. Fatal measles presenting as acute respiratory distress syndrome in an immunocompetent adult

    PubMed Central

    Karanth, Suman S; Marupudi, Krishna Chaitanya; Gupta, Anurag; Rau, Nileshwar Radhakrishna

    2014-01-01

    Fatal measles is known to occur among immunocompromised adults. We report a rare case of an immunocompetent non-pregnant young lady who suffered from fatal acute respiratory distress syndrome due to measles. Physicians must be vigilant to this deadly presentation of measles even in immunocompetent individuals. We emphasise the inadequacies of vaccination programmes in India reflected not only by the existing high measles-related childhood mortalities, but also an emerging rise in deaths among adults. PMID:25139919

  10. [Comments on treatment of severe acute respiratory syndrome by integrated traditional Chinese and western medicine].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Lu; Zhou, Yong-Hong

    2003-07-01

    There are obvious advantages of the integrated traditional Chinese and western medicine on the treatment of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). Combining the ancient and present literature with the special epidemic patterns, pathological changes and clinical symptoms of SARS, the paper discussed the methods of application of the integrated traditional Chinese and western medicine on the treatment of SARS, and some matters needing attention in clinic.

  11. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: use of specialized nutrients in pediatric patients and infants.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Leslie A; Trobaugh, Kimberly A

    2011-02-01

    With a high rate of mortality, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has limited treatments options. Immune-enhanced formulas, containing eicosapentaenoic acid, borage oil, and antioxidants, have shown to be beneficial in adults patients with ARDS, decreasing mortality, length of mechanical ventilation, and new organ dysfunction. There is promising research in pediatric patients with improvement in oxygenation status found, but further trials are needed to realize these benefits in pediatric and infant populations. PMID:21266694

  12. Low-level Circulation of Enterovirus D68–Associated Acute Respiratory Infections, Germany, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Reiche, Janine; Böttcher, Sindy; Diedrich, Sabine; Buchholz, Udo; Buda, Silke; Haas, Walter; Schweiger, Brunhilde

    2015-01-01

    We used physician sentinel surveillance to identify 25 (7.7%) mild to severe infections with enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) in children and adults among 325 outpatients with acute respiratory infections in Germany during August–October 2014. Results suggested low-level circulation of enterovirus D68 in Germany. Viruses were characterized by sequencing viral protein (VP) 1 and VP4/VP2 genomic regions. PMID:25898320

  13. [Nemaline rod myopathy revealed by acute respiratory failure after an outpatient cataract surgery].

    PubMed

    Raveau, T; Lassalle, V; Dubourg, O; Legout, A; Tirot, P

    2012-01-01

    We report the case of a 63-year-old patient admitted to the ICU for an acute respiratory failure one week after an outpatient cataract surgery that revealed a nemaline rod myopathy. We present this rare myopathy whose particularities are its aetiology, which can be inherited, mostly with a congenital onset, or sporadic, and the variability of the age at presentation. We discuss the exceptional onset of severe unknown underlying diseases in the context of outpatient surgery. PMID:22749553

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of a Novel Human WU Polyomavirus Isolate Associated with Acute Respiratory Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dehority, Walter N.; Schwalm, Kurt C.; Young, Jesse M.; Gross, Stephen M.; Schroth, Gary P.; Young, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of a WU polyomavirus (WUPyV) isolate, NM040708, collected from a patient with an acute respiratory infection in New Mexico. The double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genome of NM040708 is 5,229 bp in length and differs from the WUPyV reference with accession no. NC_009539 by 6 nucleotides and 2 amino acids. PMID:27151782

  15. Fatal measles presenting as acute respiratory distress syndrome in an immunocompetent adult.

    PubMed

    Karanth, Suman S; Marupudi, Krishna Chaitanya; Gupta, Anurag; Rau, Nileshwar Radhakrishna

    2014-08-19

    Fatal measles is known to occur among immunocompromised adults. We report a rare case of an immunocompetent non-pregnant young lady who suffered from fatal acute respiratory distress syndrome due to measles. Physicians must be vigilant to this deadly presentation of measles even in immunocompetent individuals. We emphasise the inadequacies of vaccination programmes in India reflected not only by the existing high measles-related childhood mortalities, but also an emerging rise in deaths among adults.

  16. [Pneumomediastinum: an aspect of pulmonary barotrauma during mechanical ventilation of acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Aissaoui, Y; En-Nafaa, I; Chkoura, K; Boughalem, M; Kamili, N Drissi

    2014-06-01

    Mechanical ventilation is a fundamental treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Despite compliance with the recommendations of protective mechanical ventilation, it can results in serious complications including the pulmonary barotrauma. This is often manifested by a pneumothorax. This observation describes an unusual aspect of barotrauma which is pneumomediastinum. The authors also point out the role of chest imaging in the management of mechanical ventilation during ARDS.

  17. Prognostic and diagnostic value of plasma soluble ST2 concentrations in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, Ednan K.; Volk, Jessica A.; Christiani, David C.; Harris, R. Scott; Matthay, Michael A.; Thompson, B. Taylor; Januzzi, James L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Soluble ST2 (sST2) is a biomarker of myocardial strain and inflammation. The characteristics of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) include inflammation and cardiovascular dysfunction. We sought to determine whether plasma sST2 concentration is associated with outcome and response to conservative fluid management, and whether sST2 concentration discriminates ARDS from decompensated heart failure (HF). Design, Setting, and Patients We assayed plasma sST2 concentrations in 826 patients in the Fluid and Catheter Treatment Trial (FACTT), a multi-center randomized controlled trial of conservative fluid management in ARDS, as well as a cohort of patients with decompensated HF. We tested whether sST2 was associated with outcome, response to therapy, and diagnostic utility for ARDS vs. HF. Measurements and Main Results Non-survivors had higher day 0 (P<.0001) and day 3 (P<.0001) sST2 concentrations. After adjustment for severity of illness, higher sST2 concentration was associated with mortality, with odds ratio (ORadj) 1.47 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.99 – 2.20, P=.06) at day 0, 2.94 (95% CI 2.00 – 4.33, P<.0001) at day 3, and 3.63 (95% CI 2.38 – 5.53, P<.0001) if sST2 increased between days. Cumulative fluid balance was more positive among patients with higher day 0 (median 5212 mL, interquartile range [IQR] 200 – 12284 vs. 2020 mL, −2034 – 7091; P<0.0001), and day 3 sST2 (median 7678 mL, IQR 2217 – 14278 vs. 1492 mL, −2384 – 6239; P<0.0001). sST2 showed excellent discriminative ability between the FACTT and HF populations (Area under ROC curve=0.98, P<0.0001). Conclusions Higher sST2 concentrations are associated with worse outcome in ARDS and may have value for discriminating ARDS from heart failure. PMID:23939353

  18. A previously unknown reovirus of bat origin is associated with an acute respiratory disease in humans

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Kaw Bing; Crameri, Gary; Hyatt, Alex; Yu, Meng; Tompang, Mohd Rosli; Rosli, Juliana; McEachern, Jennifer; Crameri, Sandra; Kumarasamy, Verasingam; Eaton, Bryan T.; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2007-01-01

    Respiratory infections constitute the most widespread human infectious disease, and a substantial proportion of them are caused by unknown etiological agents. Reoviruses (respiratory enteric orphan viruses) were first isolated from humans in the early 1950s and so named because they were not associated with any known disease. Here, we report a previously unknown reovirus (named “Melaka virus”) isolated from a 39-year-old male patient in Melaka, Malaysia, who was suffering from high fever and acute respiratory disease at the time of virus isolation. Two of his family members developed similar symptoms ≈1 week later and had serological evidence of infection with the same virus. Epidemiological tracing revealed that the family was exposed to a bat in the house ≈1 week before the onset of the father's clinical symptoms. Genome sequence analysis indicated a close genetic relationship between Melaka virus and Pulau virus, a reovirus isolated in 1999 from fruit bats in Tioman Island, Malaysia. Screening of sera collected from human volunteers on the island revealed that 14 of 109 (13%) were positive for both Pulau and Melaka viruses. This is the first report of an orthoreovirus in association with acute human respiratory diseases. Melaka virus is serologically not related to the different types of mammalian reoviruses that were known to infect humans asymptomatically. These data indicate that bat-borne reoviruses can be transmitted to and cause clinical diseases in humans. PMID:17592121

  19. Re-utilization outcomes and costs of minor acute illness treated at family physician offices, walk-in clinics, and emergency departments

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, M. Karen; Silver, Rachel Wulf; Hoch, Jeffrey S.; Østbye, Truls; Stewart, Moira; Barnsley, Jan; Hutchison, Brian; Mathews, Maria; Tyrrell, Christine

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine factors associated with re-utilization of health services and to estimate and compare costs of treatment for minor acute illnesses in family physicians’ offices (FPOs), walk-in clinics (WICs), and emergency departments (EDs). DESIGN Prospective cohort study using questionnaires, telephone follow up, medical chart data, and costs according to Ontario Health Insurance Plan (OHIP) schedules. SETTING 16 FPOs, 12 WICs, and 13 EDs in three Ontario cities. PARTICIPANTS Consecutive patients with one of eight predefined minor acute illnesses found in all three settings (upper respiratory infection, pharyngitis, acute bronchitis, acute otitis media, serous otitis media, low back pain, gastroenteritis, and urinary tract infection). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES “Early” (<3 days) versus “later” (3 days to 2 weeks) re-utilization of health services after initial encounter and direct cost to OHIP. RESULTS The overall rate of re-utilization of health services for the same episode of illness was 11.3% for early and 20.6% for later re-utilization. Factors associated with early re-utilization were initial evaluation in ED setting (odds ratio [OR]=6.5, confidence interval [CI]=2.2-19.2) and, regardless of setting, less satisfaction with patient-centred care (OR=1.7 for each one-point decrease on a four-point scale; CI=1.1-2.7). Factors associated with later re-utilization were ED setting (OR=4.9; CI=2.4-9.9) and diagnosis of urinary tract infection (OR=2.4; CI=1.1-5.2). Factors tested and found not signifcantly associated with rate of re-utilization were patients’ age, sex, responses to a variety of questions assessing psychosocial factors (stress, social support, independence), and opinions on health care. Cost of care was similar for FPOs and WICs and higher for EDs for all diagnoses. The initial visit was the largest component of cost in all settings, and this component (as well as total cost) was consistently higher in EDs. CONCLUSION Both re

  20. Noninvasive ventilation for acute respiratory distress syndrome: the importance of ventilator settings

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Eduardo L. V.; Nakamura, Maria A. M.; Morais, Caio C. A.

    2016-01-01

    Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) is commonly used to prevent endotracheal intubation in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Patients with hypoxemic acute respiratory failure who fail an NIV trial carry a worse prognosis as compared to those who succeed. Additional factors are also knowingly associated with worse outcomes: higher values of ICU severity score, presence of severe sepsis, and lower ratio of arterial oxygen tension to fraction of inspired oxygen. However, it is still unclear whether NIV failure is responsible for the worse prognosis or if it is merely a marker of the underlying disease severity. There is therefore an ongoing debate as to whether and which ARDS patients are good candidates to an NIV trial. In a recent paper published in JAMA, “Effect of Noninvasive Ventilation Delivered by Helmet vs. Face Mask on the Rate of Endotracheal Intubation in Patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: A Randomized Clinical Trial”, Patel et al. evaluated ARDS patients submitted to NIV and drew attention to the importance of the NIV interface. We discussed their interesting findings focusing also on the ventilator settings and on the current barriers to lung protective ventilation in ARDS patients during NIV. PMID:27747041

  1. Viral respiratory tract infections among patients with acute undifferentiated fever in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Phuong, Hoang Lan; Nga, Tran T T; van Doornum, Gerard J; Groen, Jan; Binh, Tran Q; Giao, Phan T; Hung, Le Q; Nams, Nguyen V; Kager, P A; de Vries, Peter J

    2010-09-01

    To investigate the proportion of viral respiratory tract infections among acute undifferentiated fevers (AUFs) at primary health facilities in southern Vietnam during 2001-2005, patients with AUF not caused by malaria were enrolled at twelve primary health facilities and a clinic for malaria control program. Serum was collected on first presentation (t0) and after 3 weeks (t3) for serology. After exclusion of acute dengue infection, acute and convalescent serum samples from 606 patients were using enzyme-linked immunoassays to detect IgA, as well as IgM and IgG antibodies against common respiratory viruses. Paired sera showed the following infections: human parainfluenza virus (HPIV, 4.7%), influenza B virus (FLUBV, 2.2%), influenza A virus (FLUAV, 1.9%) and human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV, 0.6%). There was no association between type of infection and age, sex or seasonality; some inter-annual differences were observed for influenza. Antibody prevalence, indicative of previous infections, was relatively low: HPV, 56.8%, FLUBV, 12.1%; FLUAV, 5.9% and HRSV, 6.8%.

  2. Acute effects of summer air pollution on respiratory health of asthmatic children.

    PubMed

    Gielen, M H; van der Zee, S C; van Wijnen, J H; van Steen, C J; Brunekreef, B

    1997-06-01

    In the early summer of 1995, the acute respiratory effects of ambient air pollution were studied in a panel of 61 children, ages 7 to 13 yr, of whom 77% were taking asthma medication. Peak flow was measured twice daily with MiniWright meters at home and the occurrence of acute respiratory symptoms and medication use was registered daily by the parents in a diary. Exposure to air pollution was characterized by the ambient concentrations of ozone, PM10, and black smoke. During the study period, maximal 1-h ozone concentrations never exceeded 130 microg/m3, and 24-h black smoke and PM10 concentrations were never higher than 41 and 60 microg/m3 respectively. Associations of air pollution and health outcomes were evaluated using time series analysis. After adjusting for pollen, time trend, and day of the week, black smoke in particular was associated with acute respiratory symptoms and with medication use. Less strong associations were found for PM10 and ozone. These results suggest that in this panel of children, most of whom had asthma, relatively low levels of particulate matter and ozone in ambient air are able to increase symptoms and medication use.

  3. Interdisciplinary Peripartum Management of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome with Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation – a Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Weyrich, J.; Bogdanski, R.; Ortiz, J. U.; Kuschel, B.; Schneider, K. T. M.; Lobmaier, S. M.

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is increasingly used for the management of acute severe cardiac and respiratory failure. One of the indications is acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) for which, in some severe cases, ECMO represents the only possibility to save lives. We report on the successful long-term use of ECMO in a postpartum patient with recurrent pulmonary decompensation after peripartum uterine rupture with extensive blood loss. PMID:27065489

  4. Validating a decision tree for serious infection: diagnostic accuracy in acutely ill children in ambulatory care

    PubMed Central

    Verbakel, Jan Y; Lemiengre, Marieke B; De Burghgraeve, Tine; De Sutter, An; Aertgeerts, Bert; Bullens, Dominique M A; Shinkins, Bethany; Van den Bruel, Ann; Buntinx, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Objective Acute infection is the most common presentation of children in primary care with only few having a serious infection (eg, sepsis, meningitis, pneumonia). To avoid complications or death, early recognition and adequate referral are essential. Clinical prediction rules have the potential to improve diagnostic decision-making for rare but serious conditions. In this study, we aimed to validate a recently developed decision tree in a new but similar population. Design Diagnostic accuracy study validating a clinical prediction rule. Setting and participants Acutely ill children presenting to ambulatory care in Flanders, Belgium, consisting of general practice and paediatric assessment in outpatient clinics or the emergency department. Intervention Physicians were asked to score the decision tree in every child. Primary outcome measures The outcome of interest was hospital admission for at least 24 h with a serious infection within 5 days after initial presentation. We report the diagnostic accuracy of the decision tree in sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratios and predictive values. Results In total, 8962 acute illness episodes were included, of which 283 lead to admission to hospital with a serious infection. Sensitivity of the decision tree was 100% (95% CI 71.5% to 100%) at a specificity of 83.6% (95% CI 82.3% to 84.9%) in the general practitioner setting with 17% of children testing positive. In the paediatric outpatient and emergency department setting, sensitivities were below 92%, with specificities below 44.8%. Conclusions In an independent validation cohort, this clinical prediction rule has shown to be extremely sensitive to identify children at risk of hospital admission for a serious infection in general practice, making it suitable for ruling out. Trial registration number NCT02024282. PMID:26254472

  5. Geographic Access to High Capability Severe Acute Respiratory Failure Centers in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, David J.; Angus, Derek C.; Seymour, Christopher W.; Yealy, Donald M.; Carr, Brendan G.; Kurland, Kristen; Boujoukos, Arthur; Kahn, Jeremy M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Optimal care of adults with severe acute respiratory failure requires specific resources and expertise. We sought to measure geographic access to these centers in the United States. Design Cross-sectional analysis of geographic access to high capability severe acute respiratory failure centers in the United States. We defined high capability centers using two criteria: (1) provision of adult extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), based on either 2008–2013 Extracorporeal Life Support Organization reporting or provision of ECMO to 2010 Medicare beneficiaries; or (2) high annual hospital mechanical ventilation volume, based 2010 Medicare claims. Setting Nonfederal acute care hospitals in the United States. Measurements and Main Results We defined geographic access as the percentage of the state, region and national population with either direct or hospital-transferred access within one or two hours by air or ground transport. Of 4,822 acute care hospitals, 148 hospitals met our ECMO criteria and 447 hospitals met our mechanical ventilation criteria. Geographic access varied substantially across states and regions in the United States, depending on center criteria. Without interhospital transfer, an estimated 58.5% of the national adult population had geographic access to hospitals performing ECMO and 79.0% had geographic access to hospitals performing a high annual volume of mechanical ventilation. With interhospital transfer and under ideal circumstances, an estimated 96.4% of the national adult population had geographic access to hospitals performing ECMO and 98.6% had geographic access to hospitals performing a high annual volume of mechanical ventilation. However, this degree of geographic access required substantial interhospital transfer of patients, including up to two hours by air. Conclusions Geographic access to high capability severe acute respiratory failure centers varies widely across states and regions in the United States. Adequate

  6. Associations between respiratory illness and PM{sub 10} air pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhury, A.H.; Gordian, M.E.; Morris, S.S.

    1997-03-01

    In this study, the association between daily morbidity and respirable particulate pollution (i.e., particles with a mass median aerodynamic diameter of {le} 10 microns [PM{sub 10}]) was evaluated in the general population of Anchorage, Alaska. Using insurance claims data for state employees and their dependents who lived in Anchorage, Alaska, the authors determined the number of medical visits for asthma, bronchitis, and upper respiratory infections. The number of visits were related to the level of particulate pollution in ambient air measured at air-monitoring sites. 17 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Septic versus non-septic acute kidney injury in critically ill patients: characteristics and clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Marília Galvão; Dantas, João Gabriel Athayde de Oliveira; Levi, Talita Machado; Rocha, Mário de Seixas; de Souza, Sérgio Pinto; Boa-Sorte, Ney; de Moura, Carlos Geraldo Guerreiro; Cruz, Constança Margarida Sampaio

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to describe and compare the characteristics and clinical outcomes of patients with septic and non-septic acute kidney injury. Methods This study evaluated an open cohort of 117 critically ill patients with acute kidney injury who were consecutively admitted to an intensive care unit, excluding patients with a history of advanced-stage chronic kidney disease, kidney transplantation, hospitalization or death in a period shorter than 24 hours. The presence of sepsis and in-hospital death were the exposure and primary variables in this study, respectively. A confounding analysis was performed using logistic regression. Results No significant differences were found between the mean ages of the groups with septic and non-septic acute kidney injury [65.30±21.27 years versus 66.35±12.82 years, respectively; p=0.75]. In the septic and non-septic acute kidney injury groups, a predominance of females (57.4% versus 52.4%, respectively; p=0.49) and Afro-descendants (81.5% versus 76.2%, respectively; p=0.49) was observed. Compared with the non-septic patients, the patients with sepsis had a higher mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score [21.73±7.26 versus 15.75±5.98; p<0.001)] and a higher mean water balance (p=0.001). Arterial hypertension (p=0.01) and heart failure (p<0.001) were more common in the non-septic patients. Septic acute kidney injury was associated with a greater number of patients who required dialysis (p=0.001) and a greater number of deaths (p<0.001); however, renal function recovery was more common in this group (p=0.01). Sepsis (OR: 3.88; 95%CI: 1.51-10.00) and an Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score >18.5 (OR: 9.77; 95%CI: 3.73-25.58) were associated with death in the multivariate analysis. Conclusion Sepsis was an independent predictor of death. Significant differences were found between the characteristics and clinical outcomes of patients with septic versus non-septic acute kidney

  8. Estimating the risks of smoking, air pollution, and passive smoke on acute respiratory conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ostro, B.D. )

    1989-06-01

    Five years of the annual Health Interview Survey, conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics, are used to estimate the effects of air pollution, smoking, and environmental tobacco smoke on respiratory restrictions in activity for adults, and bed disability for children. After adjusting for several socioeconomic factors, the multiple regression estimates indicate that an independent and statistically significant association exists between these three forms of air pollution and respiratory morbidity. The comparative risks of these exposures are computed and the plausibility of the relative risks is examined by comparing the equivalent doses with actual measurements of exposure taken in the homes of smokers. The results indicate that: (1) smokers will have a 55-75% excess in days with respiratory conditions severe enough to cause reductions in normal activity; (2) a 1 microgram increase in fine particulate matter air pollution is associated with a 3% excess in acute respiratory disease; and (3) a pack-a-day smoker will increase respiratory restricted days for a nonsmoking spouse by 20% and increase the number of bed disability days for young children living in the household by 20%. The results also indicate that the estimates of the effects of secondhand smoking on children are improved when the mother's work status is known and incorporated into the exposure estimate.

  9. Estimating the risks of smoking, air pollution, and passive smoke on acute respiratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Ostro, B D

    1989-06-01

    Five years of the annual Health Interview Survey, conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics, are used to estimate the effects of air pollution, smoking, and environmental tobacco smoke on respiratory restrictions in activity for adults, and bed disability for children. After adjusting for several socioeconomic factors, the multiple regression estimates indicate that an independent and statistically significant association exists between these three forms of air pollution and respiratory morbidity. The comparative risks of these exposures are computed and the plausibility of the relative risks is examined by comparing the equivalent doses with actual measurements of exposure taken in the homes of smokers. The results indicate that: (1) smokers will have a 55-75% excess in days with respiratory conditions severe enough to cause reductions in normal activity; (2) a 1 microgram increase in fine particulate matter air pollution is associated with a 3% excess in acute respiratory disease; and (3) a pack-a-day smoker will increase respiratory restricted days for a nonsmoking spouse by 20% and increase the number of bed disability days for young children living in the household by 20%. The results also indicate that the estimates of the effects of secondhand smoking on children are improved when the mother's work status is known and incorporated into the exposure estimate.

  10. Acute illness associated with use of pest strips - seven U.S. States and Canada, 2000-2013.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Rebecca J; Sievert, Jennifer; Prado, Joanne; Buhl, Kaci; Stone, Dave L; Forrester, Mathias; Higgins, Shelia; Mitchell, Yvette; Schwartz, Abby; Calvert, Geoffrey M

    2014-01-17

    Dichlorvos-impregnated resin strips (DDVP pest strips) are among the few organophosphate products still available for indoor residential use. The residential uses for most other organophosphate products, including most DDVP products, were canceled because they posed unreasonable risks to children. DDVP pest strips act by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase activity in the brain and nerves of insect pests and are designed to gradually release DDVP vapor for up to 4 months. Acute illnesses in humans associated with nonlethal acute exposures usually resolve completely, but recovery is not always rapid. To assess the frequency of acute illnesses associated with DDVP pest strips, cases from 2000 through June 2013 were sought from the 12 states that participate in the Sentinel Event Notification System for Occupational Risks (SENSOR)-Pesticides Program, the National Pesticide Information Center (NPIC), and Health Canada.* A total of 31 acute DDVP pest strip-related illness cases were identified in seven U.S. states and Canada. The majority of these illnesses resulted from use of the product in commonly occupied living areas (e.g., kitchens and bedrooms), in violation of label directions. Although 26 of the 31 cases involved mild health effects of short duration, five persons had moderate health effects. Illnesses caused by excess exposure to DDVP pest strips can be reduced by educating the public about the proper usage of DDVP pest strips and with improvements in label directions.

  11. Arboviral Etiologies of Acute Febrile Illnesses in Western South America, 2000–2007

    PubMed Central

    Forshey, Brett M.; Guevara, Carolina; Laguna-Torres, V. Alberto; Cespedes, Manuel; Vargas, Jorge; Gianella, Alberto; Vallejo, Efrain; Madrid, César; Aguayo, Nicolas; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Suarez, Victor; Morales, Ana Maria; Beingolea, Luis; Reyes, Nora; Perez, Juan; Negrete, Monica; Rocha, Claudio; Morrison, Amy C.; Russell, Kevin L.; J. Blair, Patrick; Olson, James G.; Kochel, Tadeusz J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) are among the most common agents of human febrile illness worldwide and the most important emerging pathogens, causing multiple notable epidemics of human disease over recent decades. Despite the public health relevance, little is know about the geographic distribution, relative impact, and risk factors for arbovirus infection in many regions of the world. Our objectives were to describe the arboviruses associated with acute undifferentiated febrile illness in participating clinics in four countries in South America and to provide detailed epidemiological analysis of arbovirus infection in Iquitos, Peru, where more extensive monitoring was conducted. Methodology/Findings A clinic-based syndromic surveillance system was implemented in 13 locations in Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, and Paraguay. Serum samples and demographic information were collected from febrile participants reporting to local health clinics or hospitals. Acute-phase sera were tested for viral infection by immunofluorescence assay or RT-PCR, while acute- and convalescent-phase sera were tested for pathogen-specific IgM by ELISA. Between May 2000 and December 2007, 20,880 participants were included in the study, with evidence for recent arbovirus infection detected for 6,793 (32.5%). Dengue viruses (Flavivirus) were the most common arbovirus infections, totaling 26.0% of febrile episodes, with DENV-3 as the most common serotype. Alphavirus (Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus [VEEV] and Mayaro virus [MAYV]) and Orthobunyavirus (Oropouche virus [OROV], Group C viruses, and Guaroa virus) infections were both observed in approximately 3% of febrile episodes. In Iquitos, risk factors for VEEV and MAYV infection included being male and reporting to a rural (vs urban) clinic. In contrast, OROV infection was similar between sexes and type of clinic. Conclusions/Significance Our data provide a better understanding of the geographic range of arboviruses in South

  12. Non-invasive ventilation in immunocompromised patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Del Sorbo, Lorenzo; Jerath, Angela; Dres, Martin; Parotto, Matteo

    2016-03-01

    The survival rate of immunocompromised patients has improved over the past decades in light of remarkable progress in diagnostic and therapeutic options. Simultaneously, there has been an increase in the number of immunocompromised patients with life threatening complications requiring intensive care unit (ICU) treatment. ICU admission is necessary in up to 15% of patients with acute leukemia and 20% of bone marrow transplantation recipients, and the main reason for ICU referral in this patient population is acute hypoxemic respiratory failure, which is associated with a high mortality rate, particularly in patients requiring endotracheal intubation. The application of non-invasive ventilation (NIV), and thus the avoidance of endotracheal intubation and invasive mechanical ventilation with its side effects, appears therefore of great importance in this patient population. Early trials supported the benefits of NIV in these settings, and the 2011 Canadian guidelines for the use of NIV in critical care settings suggest the use of NIV in immune-compromised patients with a grade 2B recommendation. However, the very encouraging results from initial seminal trials were not confirmed in subsequent observational and randomized clinical studies, questioning the beneficial effect of NIV in immune-compromised patients. Based on these observations, a French group led by Azoulay decided to assess whether early intermittent respiratory support with NIV had a role in reducing the mortality rate of immune-compromised patients with non-hypercapnic hypoxemic respiratory failure developed in less than 72 h, and hence conducted a multicenter randomized controlled trial (RCT) in experienced ICUs in France. This perspective reviews the findings from their RCT in the context of the current critical care landscape, and in light of recent results from other trials focused on the early management of acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. PMID:27076972

  13. Fluid Management With a Simplified Conservative Protocol for the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome*

    PubMed Central

    Grissom, Colin K.; Hirshberg, Eliotte L.; Dickerson, Justin B.; Brown, Samuel M.; Lanspa, Michael J.; Liu, Kathleen D.; Schoenfeld, David; Tidswell, Mark; Hite, R. Duncan; Rock, Peter; Miller, Russell R.; Morris, Alan H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives In the Fluid and Catheter Treatment Trial (FACTT) of the National Institutes of Health Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network, a conservative fluid protocol (FACTT Conservative) resulted in a lower cumulative fluid balance and better outcomes than a liberal fluid protocol (FACTT Liberal). Subsequent Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network studies used a simplified conservative fluid protocol (FACTT Lite). The objective of this study was to compare the performance of FACTT Lite, FACTT Conservative, and FACTT Liberal protocols. Design Retrospective comparison of FACTT Lite, FACTT Conservative, and FACTT Liberal. Primary outcome was cumulative fluid balance over 7 days. Secondary outcomes were 60-day adjusted mortality and ventilator-free days through day 28. Safety outcomes were prevalence of acute kidney injury and new shock. Setting ICUs of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network participating hospitals. Patients Five hundred three subjects managed with FACTT Conservative, 497 subjects managed with FACTT Liberal, and 1,124 subjects managed with FACTT Lite. Interventions Fluid management by protocol. Measurements and Main Results Cumulative fluid balance was 1,918 ± 323 mL in FACTT Lite, −136 ±491 mL in FACTT Conservative, and 6,992 ± 502 mL in FACTT Liberal (p < 0.001). Mortality was not different between groups (24% in FACTT Lite, 25% in FACTT Conservative and Liberal, p = 0.84). Ventilator-free days in FACTT Lite (14.9 ±0.3) were equivalent to FACTT Conservative (14.6±0.5) (p = 0.61) and greater than in FACTT Liberal (12.1 ±0.5, p < 0.001 vs Lite). Acute kidney injury prevalence was 58% in FACTT Lite and 57% in FACTT Conservative (p = 0.72). Prevalence of new shock in FACTT Lite (9%) was lower than in FACTT Conservative (13%) (p = 0.007 vs Lite) and similar to FACTT Liberal (11%) (p = 0.18 vs Lite). Conclusions FACTT Lite had a greater cumulative fluid balance than FACTT Conservative but had equivalent clinical and safety outcomes

  14. Viral Co-Infections in Pediatric Patients Hospitalized with Lower Tract Acute Respiratory Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cebey-López, Miriam; Herberg, Jethro; Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Salas, Antonio; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Gormley, Stuart; Sumner, Edward; Fink, Colin; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Background Molecular techniques can often reveal a broader range of pathogens in respiratory infections. We aim to investigate the prevalence and age pattern of viral co-infection in children hospitalized with lower tract acute respiratory infection (LT-ARI), using molecular techniques. Methods A nested polymerase chain reaction approach was used to detect Influenza (A, B), metapneumovirus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), parainfluenza (1–4), rhinovirus, adenovirus (A—F), bocavirus and coronaviruses (NL63, 229E, OC43) in respiratory samples of children with acute respiratory infection prospectively admitted to any of the GENDRES network hospitals between 2011–2013. The results were corroborated in an independent cohort collected in the UK. Results A total of 204 and 97 nasopharyngeal samples were collected in the GENDRES and UK cohorts, respectively. In both cohorts, RSV was the most frequent pathogen (52.9% and 36.1% of the cohorts, respectively). Co-infection with multiple viruses was found in 92 samples (45.1%) and 29 samples (29.9%), respectively; this was most frequent in the 12–24 months age group. The most frequently observed co-infection patterns were RSV—Rhinovirus (23 patients, 11.3%, GENDRES cohort) and RSV—bocavirus / bocavirus—influenza (5 patients, 5.2%, UK cohort). Conclusion The presence of more than one virus in pediatric patients admitted to hospital with LT-ARI is very frequent and seems to peak at 12–24 months of age. The clinical significance of these findings is unclear but should warrant further analysis. PMID:26332375

  15. Acute respiratory effects of low level summer smog in primary school children.

    PubMed

    Cuijpers, C E; Swaen, G M; Wesseling, G; Hoek, G; Sturmans, F; Wouters, E F

    1995-06-01

    We aimed to study the possible effects of exposure to a summer smog episode on the respiratory health of 212 school children. Furthermore, the suitability of the forced oscillation technique (FOT) to demonstrate such effects was evaluated. Acute respiratory symptoms were evaluated by questionnaire and lung function was assessed by spirometry and respiratory impedance measurements. For each child, comparisons were made between measurements performed at baseline (low levels of air pollutant: 55 micrograms.m-3 for SO2 and 58 micrograms.m-3 for NO2 (maximum 24 h means); O3 levels ranged from 2-56 micrograms.m-3 (8 h mean)); and after a summer smog episode (characterized by 8 h O3 levels > 120 micrograms.m-3 (163 micrograms.m-3) and 1 h levels > 160 micrograms.m-3 (215 micrograms.m-3). No significant effects were observed on the prevalence of acute respiratory symptoms. When individual changes in lung function indices (delta LF) were regressed on changes in previous day ozone (8 h mean) and changes in mean daily temperature (delta MTemp), using multiple linear regression analysis, a significant negative association was observed with peak expiratory flow (PEF), but not with other spirometry indices. Although significant associations were observed with reactance at 8 Hz (Xrs8), resonant frequency (f0) and frequency dependence of resistance (FD), the signs of the beta s were opposite to the direction expected when O3 adversely affected the impedance outcomes. In conclusion, in this study short-term exposure to moderately high levels of ozone did not result in clear adverse effects on the respiratory health of the children.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Disseminated Cryptococcal Infection Resulting in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) as the Initial Clinical Presentation of AIDS.

    PubMed

    Orsini, Jose; Blaak, Christa; Tam, Eric; Rajayer, Salil; Morante, Joaquin

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcosis is a cosmopolitan but rare opportunistic mycosis which is usually caused by Cryptococcus neoformans. Although the most common and worrisome disease manifestation is meningoencephalitis, pulmonary cryptococcosis has the potential to be lethal. The diagnosis of cryptococcal pneumonia is challenging, given its non-specific clinical and radiographic features. Respiratory failure leading to acute respiratory distress syndrome as a consequence of cryptococcal disease has been infrequently addressed in the literature. We herein present a case of disseminated cryptococcal infection leading to acute respiratory distress syndrome, refractory shock, and multiorgan dysfunction as the initial clinical manifestation in a patient who was newly diagnosed with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. PMID:27086819

  17. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease masquerading as acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis-like illness.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gun-Ha; Kim, Kyoung Min; Suh, Sang-Il; Ki, Chang-Seok; Eun, Baik-Lin

    2014-07-01

    X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTX1) is a clinically heterogeneous hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy with X-linked transmission. Common clinical manifestations of CMTX1 disease, as in other forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, are distal muscle wasting and weakness, hyporeflexia, distal sensory disturbance, and foot deformities. Mutations in the connexin-32 gene (gap junction protein β1 [GJB1]) are responsible for CMTX1 disease. In this report, we describe a patient with CMTX1 disease presenting with recurrent attacks of transient and episodic acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis (ADEM)-like symptoms without previous signs of lower extremity weakness or foot deformities; the patient, as well as his asymptomatic mother, exhibited a novel GJB1 mutation (p.Met1Ile). Differential diagnosis of recurrent and transient ADEM-like illness, if unexplained, should include the possibility of CMTX1 disease.

  18. There is need for antigen-based rapid diagnostic tests to identify common acute tropical illnesses.

    PubMed

    Wilde, Henry; Suankratay, Chusana

    2007-01-01

    Enteric fever, typhus, leptospirosis, dengue, melioidosis, and tuberculous meningitis present urgent diagnostic problems that require experience and clinical judgment to make early evidence-based management decisions. Basic and applied research dealing with reliable antigen-based diagnostics has been published and confirmed for several of these infections. This should have initiated commercial production but has not. Established international firms see little profit in such diagnostic kits since they would be used in poor countries with little prospects for return of investment capital. We attempt to illustrate this issue, using common causes of acute febrile illnesses in the Southeast Asian region. We believe that rapid diagnostic technology could prevent significant delay in starting appropriate therapy, reduce hospital expenses, and even save lives.

  19. Clinical Evaluation of a Single-Tube Multiple RT-PCR Assay for the Detection of 13 Common Virus Types/Subtypes Associated with Acute Respiratory Infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dan; Feng, Zhishan; Zhao, Mengchuan; Wang, Hao; Wang, Le; Yang, Shuo; Li, Guixia; Lu, Li; Ma, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory viruses are among the most important causes of human morbidity and mortality worldwide, especially for infants and young children. In the past years, a few commercial multiplex RT-PCR assays have been used to detect respiratory viruses in spite of the high cost. In the present study, an improved single-tube multiplex reverse transcription PCR assay for simultaneous detection of 13 respiratory viruses was evaluated and compared with a previously reported two-tube assay as the reference method using clinical nasopharyngeal aspirates samples. Of 310 prospectively tested respiratory specimens selected from children hospitalized with acute respiratory illness, 226 (72.90%, 226/310) and 214 (69.03%, 214/310) positive for one or more viruses were identified by the single-tube and the two-tube assays, respectively, with combined test results showing good concordance (Kappa value = 0.874). Individually, the single-tube assay for adenovirus (Adv), human metapneumovirus (HMPV), human rhinovirus (HRV), parainfluenza virus type 1 (PIV1), parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3) and parainfluenza virus type 4 (PIV4) showed the significantly superior sensitivities to those of the two-tube assay. No false positives were found. In conclusion, our results demonstrates the one-tube assay revealed significant improvements over the two-tube assay in terms of the better sensitivity, more accurate quality control, less nonspecific amplification, more cost-effective and shorter turn-around time and will be a valuable tool for routine surveillance of respiratory virus infection in China.

  20. Clinical Evaluation of a Single-Tube Multiple RT-PCR Assay for the Detection of 13 Common Virus Types/Subtypes Associated with Acute Respiratory Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Le; Yang, Shuo; Li, Guixia; Lu, Li; Ma, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory viruses are among the most important causes of human morbidity and mortality worldwide, especially for infants and young children. In the past years, a few commercial multiplex RT-PCR assays have been used to detect respiratory viruses in spite of the high cost. In the present study, an improved single-tube multiplex reverse transcription PCR assay for simultaneous detection of 13 respiratory viruses was evaluated and compared with a previously reported two-tube assay as the reference method using clinical nasopharyngeal aspirates samples. Of 310 prospectively tested respiratory specimens selected from children hospitalized with acute respiratory illness, 226 (72.90%, 226/310) and 214 (69.03%, 214/310) positive for one or more viruses were identified by the single-tube and the two-tube assays, respectively, with combined test results showing good concordance (Kappa value = 0.874). Individually, the single-tube assay for adenovirus (Adv), human metapneumovirus (HMPV), human rhinovirus (HRV), parainfluenza virus type 1 (PIV1), parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3) and parainfluenza virus type 4 (PIV4) showed the significantly superior sensitivities to those of the two-tube assay. No false positives were found. In conclusion, our results demonstrates the one-tube assay revealed significant improvements over the two-tube assay in terms of the better sensitivity, more accurate quality control, less nonspecific amplification, more cost-effective and shorter turn-around time and will be a valuable tool for routine surveillance of respiratory virus infection in China. PMID:27043208

  1. Clinical Evaluation of a Single-Tube Multiple RT-PCR Assay for the Detection of 13 Common Virus Types/Subtypes Associated with Acute Respiratory Infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dan; Feng, Zhishan; Zhao, Mengchuan; Wang, Hao; Wang, Le; Yang, Shuo; Li, Guixia; Lu, Li; Ma, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory viruses are among the most important causes of human morbidity and mortality worldwide, especially for infants and young children. In the past years, a few commercial multiplex RT-PCR assays have been used to detect respiratory viruses in spite of the high cost. In the present study, an improved single-tube multiplex reverse transcription PCR assay for simultaneous detection of 13 respiratory viruses was evaluated and compared with a previously reported two-tube assay as the reference method using clinical nasopharyngeal aspirates samples. Of 310 prospectively tested respiratory specimens selected from children hospitalized with acute respiratory illness, 226 (72.90%, 226/310) and 214 (69.03%, 214/310) positive for one or more viruses were identified by the single-tube and the two-tube assays, respectively, with combined test results showing good concordance (Kappa value = 0.874). Individually, the single-tube assay for adenovirus (Adv), human metapneumovirus (HMPV), human rhinovirus (HRV), parainfluenza virus type 1 (PIV1), parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3) and parainfluenza virus type 4 (PIV4) showed the significantly superior sensitivities to those of the two-tube assay. No false positives were found. In conclusion, our results demonstrates the one-tube assay revealed significant improvements over the two-tube assay in terms of the better sensitivity, more accurate quality control, less nonspecific amplification, more cost-effective and shorter turn-around time and will be a valuable tool for routine surveillance of respiratory virus infection in China. PMID:27043208

  2. The Role of Open Lung Biopsy in Critically Ill Patients with Hypoxic Respiratory Failure: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Almotairi, Abdullah; Biswas, Sharmistha; Shahin, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to assess the utility of open lung biopsy in patients with hypoxic respiratory failure of unknown etiology admitted to an ICU and to examine the use of steroid therapy in this patient population. Methods. A retrospective cohort study was performed of all consecutive patients admitted to three tertiary care, university-affiliated, ICUs during the period from January 2000 to January 2012 with the principal diagnosis of hypoxic respiratory failure and who underwent an open lung biopsy. Results. Open lung biopsy resulted in a diagnostic yield of 68% and in a 67% change of management in patients. A multivariable analysis of clinical variables associated with acute hospital mortality demonstrated that postbiopsy systemic steroid therapy (OR 0.24, 95% C.I 0.06–0.96) was significantly associated with improved survival. Complications arising from the biopsy occurred in 30% of patients. Conclusion. Open lung biopsy had significant diagnostic yield and led to major changes in management and aided in end-of-life decision-making in the ICU. Systemic steroid therapy was associated with improved survival. The risk-benefit ratio of open lung biopsy is still unclear, especially given the availability of newer diagnostic tests and possible empirical therapy with steroids. PMID:27445567

  3. Viral Infection in Adults with Severe Acute Respiratory Infection in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Remolina, Yuly Andrea; Ulloa, María Mercedes; Vargas, Hernán; Díaz, Liliana; Gómez, Sandra Liliana; Saavedra, Alfredo; Sánchez, Edgar; Cortés, Jorge Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To identify the viral aetiology in adult patients with severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) admitted to sentinel surveillance institutions in Bogotá in 2012. Design A cross-sectional study was conducted in which microarray molecular techniques for viral identification were used on nasopharyngeal samples of adult patients submitted to the surveillance system, and further descriptions of clinical features and relevant clinical outcomes, such as mortality, need for critical care, use of mechanical ventilation and hospital stay, were obtained. Setting Respiratory infections requiring hospital admission in surveillance centres in Bogotá, Colombia. Participants Ninety-one adult patients with acute respiratory infection (55% were female). Measurements Viral identification, intensive care unit admission, hospital stay, and mortality. Results Viral identification was achieved for 63 patients (69.2%). Comorbidity was frequently identified and mainly involved chronic pulmonary disease or pregnancy. Influenza, Bocavirus and Adenovirus were identified in 30.8%, 28.6% and 18.7% of the cases, respectively. Admission to the intensive care unit occurred in 42.9% of the cases, while mechanical ventilation was required for 36.3%. The average hospital stay was 9.9 days, and mortality was 15.4%. Antibiotics were empirically used in 90.1% of patients. Conclusions The prevalence of viral aetiology of SARI in this study was high, with adverse clinical outcomes, intensive care requirements and high mortality. PMID:26576054

  4. [Bocavirus in infants under 5 years with acute respiratory infection. Chaco Province, Argentina, 2014].

    PubMed

    Deluca, Gerardo D; Urquijo, María Cecilia; Passarella, Carolina; Picón, César; Picón, Dimas; Acosta, María; Rovira, Carina; Marín, Héctor M

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory infection (ARI) is the most frequent pathology along human life, being the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in children under 5 years. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of bocavirus (BoV) in infants under 5 years with symptoms of ARI from north Argentina (Chaco province). The study was performed on nasopharyngeal aspirates from 488 patients, in the period of January-December 2014. The samples were tested by real time PCR and 36 positive BoV cases (7.4%) were detected. The period with the highest detection rate was June-September with 28 cases (77.8%), of which 26 (72.2%) were infants between 6-18 moths of life. In half of BoV positive cases this virus was detected as single infection of the upper respiratory tract, and in the remaining 50%, as concomitant infection with other microorganisms. To our knowledge, this would be the first study on molecular epidemiology of BoV in northern Argentina. We emphasize the importance of investigating these new viruses capable of generating acute respiratory disease and also to disseminate awareness on their circulation within the community.

  5. [Bocavirus in infants under 5 years with acute respiratory infection. Chaco Province, Argentina, 2014].

    PubMed

    Deluca, Gerardo D; Urquijo, María Cecilia; Passarella, Carolina; Picón, César; Picón, Dimas; Acosta, María; Rovira, Carina; Marín, Héctor M

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory infection (ARI) is the most frequent pathology along human life, being the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in children under 5 years. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of bocavirus (BoV) in infants under 5 years with symptoms of ARI from north Argentina (Chaco province). The study was performed on nasopharyngeal aspirates from 488 patients, in the period of January-December 2014. The samples were tested by real time PCR and 36 positive BoV cases (7.4%) were detected. The period with the highest detection rate was June-September with 28 cases (77.8%), of which 26 (72.2%) were infants between 6-18 moths of life. In half of BoV positive cases this virus was detected as single infection of the upper respiratory tract, and in the remaining 50%, as concomitant infection with other microorganisms. To our knowledge, this would be the first study on molecular epidemiology of BoV in northern Argentina. We emphasize the importance of investigating these new viruses capable of generating acute respiratory disease and also to disseminate awareness on their circulation within the community. PMID:27295701

  6. Molecular viral epidemiology and clinical characterization of acute febrile respiratory infections in hospitalized children in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chun-Yi; Chang, Yu-Fen; Lee, Chia-Lin; Wu, Meng-Che; Ho, Chi-Lin; Chang, Yu-Chuan; Chan, Yu-Jiun

    2015-11-01

    Acute respiratory infection (ARI) is a leading cause of morbidity and hospitalization in children. To profile the viruses causing ARI in children admitted to a community-based hospital in central Taiwan, a cross-sectional study was conducted on children under 14 years of age that were hospitalized with febrile ARI. Viral etiology was determined using conventional cell culture and a commercial respiratory virus panel fast assay (xTAG RVP), capable of detecting 19 different respiratory viruses and subtype targets. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were recorded and analyzed. The RVP fast assay identified at least one respiratory virus in 130 of the 216 specimens examined (60.2%) and rose to 137 (63.4%) by combining the results of cell culture and RVP fast assay. In order of frequency, the etiological agents identified were, rhinovirus/enterovirus (24.6%), respiratory syncytial virus (13.8%), adenovirus (11.5%), parainfluenza virus (9.2%), influenza B (8.4%), influenza A (5.4%), human metapneumovirus (4.6%), human coronavirus (2%), and human bocavirus (2%). Co-infection did not result in an increase in clinical severity. The RVP assay detected more positive specimens, but failed to detect 6 viruses identified by culture. The viral detection rate for the RVP assay was affected by how many days after admission the samples were taken (P = 0.03). In conclusion, Rhinovirus/enterovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, and adenovirus were prevalent in this study by adopting RVP assay. The viral detection rate is influenced by sampling time, especially if the tests are performed during the first three days of hospitalization.

  7. Low-Dose Heparin Anticoagulation During Extracorporeal Life Support for Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Conscious Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Prat, Nicolas J.; Meyer, Andrew D.; Langer, Thomas; Montgomery, Robbie K.; Parida, Bijaya K.; Batchinsky, Andriy I.; Cap, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Over 32% of burned battlefield causalities develop trauma-induced hypoxic respiratory failure, also known as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Recently, 9 out of 10 US combat soldiers’ survived life-threatening trauma-induced ARDS supported with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), a portable form of cardiopulmonary bypass. Unfortunately, the size, incidence of coagulation complications, and the need for systematic anticoagulation for traditional ECMO devices have prevented widespread use of this lifesaving technology. Therefore, a compact, mobile, ECMO system using minimal anticoagulation may be the solution to reduce ARDS in critically ill military and civilian patients. Methods: We conducted a prospective cohort laboratory investigation to evaluate the coagulation function in an ovine model of oleic acid induced ARDS supported with veno-venous ECMO. The experimental design approximated the time needed to transport from a battlefield setting to an advanced facility and compared bolus versus standard heparin anticoagulation therapy. Results: Comprehensive coagulation and hemostasis assays did not show any difference because of ECMO support over 10 h between the two groups but did show changes because of injury. Platelet count and function did decrease with support on ECMO, but there was no significant bleeding or clot formation during the entire experiment. Conclusions: A bolus heparin injection is sufficient to maintain ECMO support for up to 10 h in an ovine model of ARDS. With a reduced need for systematic anticoagulation, ECMO use for battlefield trauma could reduce significant morbidity and mortality from ventilator-induced lung injury and ARDS. Future studies will investigate the mechanisms and therapies to support patients for longer periods on ECMO without coagulation complications. Level of Evidence: V—therapeutic animal experiment. PMID:26263439

  8. The global burden of respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Ferkol, Thomas; Schraufnagel, Dean

    2014-03-01

    The Forum of International Respiratory Societies has released a report entitled Respiratory Disease in the World: Realities of Today-Opportunities for Tomorrow. The report identifies five conditions that primarily contribute to the global burden of respiratory disease (asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, acute respiratory infections, tuberculosis, and lung cancer), and offers an action plan to prevent and treat those diseases. It describes the staggering magnitude of the global burden of lung disease: hundreds of millions of people suffer and four million people die prematurely from respiratory diseases each year. The situation is not hopeless, because most major respiratory illnesses are avoidable. Much of the disease burden can be mitigated by reducing exposure to indoor and outdoor air pollution, restraining tobacco use, and relieving urban overcrowding. Implementation of the strategies described in the Forum of International Respiratory Societies respiratory diseases report would have a profound effect on respiratory health, reduce economic costs, and enhance health equality in the world.

  9. Burden of self-reported acute gastrointestinal illness in China: a population-based survey

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) is an important public-health problem worldwide. Previous national studies of the incidence of AGI in China were performed decades ago, and detailed information was not available. This study therefore sought to determine the magnitude, distribution, and burden of self-reported AGI in China. Methods Twelve-month, retrospective face-to-face surveys were conducted in 20 sentinel sites from six provinces between July 2010 and July 2011. Results In total, 39686 interviews were completed. The overall adjusted monthly prevalence of AGI was 4.2% (95% confidence interval, 4.0–4.4), corresponding to 0.56 episodes of AGI per person-year. Rates of AGI were highest in children aged < 5 years. Healthcare was sought by 56.1% of those reporting illness. Of the cases who visited a doctor, 32.7% submitted a stool sample. The use of antibiotics was reported by 49.7% of the cases who sought medical care and 54.0% took antidiarrhoeals. In the multivariable model, gender, age, education, household type, residence, season, province and travel were significant risk factors of being a case of AGI. Conclusions This first population-based study in China indicated that AGI represents a substantial burden of health. Further research into the specific pathogens is needed to better estimate the burden of AGI and foodborne disease in China. PMID:23656835

  10. Alterations in theophylline protein binding in acutely ill patients with COPD.

    PubMed

    Zarowitz, B; Shlom, J; Eichenhorn, M S; Popovich, J

    1985-06-01

    We investigated the role of decreased theophylline protein binding as a possible explanation for observed decreases in total theophylline concentrations (TC) in acutely-ill patients (AIP). Multiple blood samples were obtained from nine AIP with underlying chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and from 13 stable COPD patients. The mean albumin concentration +/- SD was 2.7 +/- .61 mg/dl in the AIP vs 4.0 +/- 0.52 mg/dl in the stable COPD patients (p less than 0.005). Total (TC) and unbound theophylline concentrations (UTC) were determined. Theophylline protein binding was assessed at room temperature by centrifugal ultrafiltration of the patients' sera. The TC was 13.7 +/- 4.8 micrograms/ml in the stable COPD patients vs 11.8 +/- 4.1 micrograms/ml in the AIP although the mean dose was larger (17.21 +/- 5.41 vs 10.7 +/- 4.09 mg/kg/day of theophylline) in the AIP (p less than 0.005). There was no difference in UTC between the two groups (7.4 +/- 2.5 micrograms/ml and 8.1 +/- 2.6 micrograms/ml); however, the unbound fraction was higher in the AIP (p less than 0.005). We conclude that theophylline protein binding appears altered in AIP and that the altered binding relates predominantly to the severity of the clinical illness.

  11. Hydroclimatic variables and acute gastro-intestinal illness in British Columbia, Canada: A time series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galway, L. P.; Allen, D. M.; Parkes, M. W.; Li, L.; Takaro, T. K.

    2015-02-01

    Using epidemiologic time series analysis, we examine associations between three hydroclimatic variables (temperature, precipitation, and streamflow) and waterborne acute gastro-intestinal illness (AGI) in two communities in the province of British Columbia (BC), Canada. The communities were selected to represent the major hydroclimatic regimes that characterize BC: rainfall-dominated and snowfall dominated. Our results show that the number of monthly cases of AGI increased with increasing temperature, precipitation, and streamflow in the same month in the context of a rainfall-dominated regime, and with increasing streamflow in the previous month in the context of a snowfall-dominated regime. These results suggest that hydroclimatology plays a role in driving the occurrence and variability of AGI in these settings. Further, this study highlights that the nature and magnitude of the effects of hydroclimatic variability on AGI are different in the context of a snowfall-dominated regime versus a rainfall-dominated regimes. We conclude by proposing that the watershed may be an appropriate context for enhancing our understanding of the complex linkages between hydroclimatic variability and waterborne illness in the context of a changing climate.

  12. Gene Expression Profiles Link Respiratory Viral Infection, Platelet Response to Aspirin, and Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Cyr, Derek D.; Lucas, Joseph E.; Zaas, Aimee K.; Woods, Christopher W.; Newby, L. Kristin; Kraus, William E.; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Influenza infection is associated with myocardial infarction (MI), suggesting that respiratory viral infection may induce biologic pathways that contribute to MI. We tested the hypotheses that 1) a validated blood gene expression signature of respiratory viral infection (viral GES) was associated with MI and 2) respiratory viral exposure changes levels of a validated platelet gene expression signature (platelet GES) of platelet function in response to aspirin that is associated with MI. Methods A previously defined viral GES was projected into blood RNA data from 594 patients undergoing elective cardiac catheterization and used to classify patients as having evidence of viral infection or not and tested for association with acute MI using logistic regression. A previously defined platelet GES was projected into blood RNA data from 81 healthy subjects before and after exposure to four respiratory viruses: Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) (n=20), Human Rhinovirus (HRV) (n=20), Influenza A virus subtype H1N1 (H1N1) (n=24), Influenza A Virus subtype H3N2 (H3N2) (n=17). We tested for the change in platelet GES with viral exposure using linear mixed-effects regression and by symptom status. Results In the catheterization cohort, 32 patients had evidence of viral infection based upon the viral GES, of which 25% (8/32) had MI versus 12.2% (69/567) among those without evidence of viral infection (OR 2.3; CI [1.03-5.5], p=0.04). In the infection cohorts, only H1N1 exposure increased platelet GES over time (time course p-value = 1e-04). Conclusions A viral GES of non-specific, respiratory viral infection was associated with acute MI; 18% of the top 49 genes in the viral GES are involved with hemostasis and/or platelet aggregation. Separately, H1N1 exposure, but not exposure to other respiratory viruses, increased a platelet GES previously shown to be associated with MI. Together, these results highlight specific genes and pathways that link viral infection

  13. Respiratory Illness and Allergy Related to Work and Home Environment among Commercial Pilots

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xi; Lindgren, Torsten; Wieslander, Gunilla; Janson, Christer; Norbäck, Dan

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to study associations between work and home environment and prevalence and incidence of respiratory health and a history of atopy in a 3-y cohort of commercial pilots. A questionnaire was mailed in 1997 to all pilots in a Scandinavian airline company (N = 622); 577 (93%) participated. The same questionnaire was sent to the participants 3 years later, 436 participated (76%). There were questions on asthma, respiratory symptoms and infections, allergies, the cabin environment, psychosocial environment and the home environment. Associations were analyzed by multiple logistic regression, calculating odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95%CI). The incidence of doctors’ diagnosed asthma and atopy were 2.4 and 16.6 per 1000 person years, respectively. Pilots changing type of flight during follow-up got more airway infections (OR = 11.27; 95% CI 2.39–53.14). Those reporting decreased work control (OR = 1.85; 95% CI 1.03–3.31 for 1 unit change) and those with environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) at home (OR = 3.73; 95% CI 1.09–12.83) had a higher incidence of atopy during follow up. Dampness or mould at home was associated with a higher prevalence of asthma symptoms (OR = 3.55; 95% CI 1.43–8.82) and airway infections (OR = 3.12 95% CI 1.27–7.68). Window pane condensation in winter at home, reported at baseline, was associated with increased incidence of asthma symptoms (OR = 4.14; 95% CI 1.32–12.97) and pilots living in newer buildings at baseline had a higher incidence of airway infections (OR = 5.23; 95% CI 1.43–19.10). In conclusion, lack of work control and ETS at home can be a risk factors for development of allergic symptoms in pilots. Window pane condensation at home can be a risk factor for incidence of asthma symptoms. Dampness and mould at home can be a risk factor for prevalence of asthma symptoms and airway infections and living in newer buildings can be a risk factor for incidence of airway infections. PMID:27741314

  14. Safety and Efficacy of Combined Extracorporeal Co2 Removal and Renal Replacement Therapy in Patients With Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Acute Kidney Injury: The Pulmonary and Renal Support in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Study*

    PubMed Central

    Castanier, Matthias; Signouret, Thomas; Soundaravelou, Rettinavelou; Lepidi, Anne; Seghboyan, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the safety and efficacy of combining extracorporeal Co2 removal with continuous renal replacement therapy in patients presenting with acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute kidney injury. Design: Prospective human observational study. Settings: Patients received volume-controlled mechanical ventilation according to the acute respiratory distress syndrome net protocol. Continuous venovenous hemofiltration therapy was titrated to maintain maximum blood flow and an effluent flow of 45 mL/kg/h with 33% predilution. Patients: Eleven patients presenting with both acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute kidney injury required renal replacement therapy. Interventions: A membrane oxygenator (0.65 m2) was inserted within the hemofiltration circuit, either upstream (n = 7) or downstream (n = 5) of the hemofilter. Baseline corresponded to tidal volume 6 mL/kg of predicted body weight without extracorporeal Co2 removal. The primary endpoint was 20% reduction in Paco2 at 20 minutes after extracorporeal Co2 removal initiation. Tidal volume was subsequently reduced to 4 mL/kg for the remaining 72 hours. Measurements and Main Results: Twelve combined therapies were conducted in the 11 patients. Age was 70 ± 9 years, Simplified Acute Physiology Score II was 69 ± 13, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score was 14 ± 4, lung injury score was 3 ± 0.5, and Pao2/Fio2 was 135 ± 41. Adding extracorporeal Co2 removal at tidal volume 6 mL/kg decreased Paco2 by 21% (95% CI, 17–25%), from 47 ± 11 to 37 ± 8 Torr (p < 0.001). Lowering tidal volume to 4 mL/kg reduced minute ventilation from 7.8 ± 1.5 to 5.2 ± 1.1 L/min and plateau pressure from 25 ± 4 to 21 ± 3 cm H2O and raised Paco2 from 37 ± 8 to 48 ± 10 Torr (all p < 0.001). On an average of both positions, the oxygenator’s blood flow was 410 ± 30 mL/min and the Co2 removal rate was 83 ± 20 mL/min. The oxygenator blood flow (p <0.001) and the Co2 removal rate (p = 0.083) were higher when

  15. Changes in surveillance of acute respiratory infections including influenza in the Slovak Republic during 1993-2008.

    PubMed

    Seligová, Jana; Culmanová, Andrea; Kristufková, Zuzana; Cisláková, Lydia; Hudecková, Henrieta

    2011-03-01

    The authors evaluated surveillance of acute respiratory infections (ARI), influenza and influenza-like illnesses (ILI) in the Slovak Republic (SR). They analyze morbidity, age-specific morbidity, complications, mortality, number of influenza viruses isolations and vaccination coverage rates in the SR in the years 1993-2008. They focus mainly on the analysis during the epidemic. Most epidemics have been caused by influenza virus A subtype H3N2. The age group mostly affected by morbidity during the year were children at the age of 0-5, while during the epidemic, the highest morbidity was recorded among school children at the age of 6-14. A complicated clinical course of the disease was reported in 1,422,836 patients (5.1%). Since the 2002/2003 influenza season, the sentinel physicians have participated in taking biological material, which ensures monitoring of influenza viruses circulating in the SR. As of the 2006/2007 season, the ARI/ILI have been reported separately in the SR in accordance with the monitoring requirements set by the European Influenza Surveillance Scheme (EISS) project, and the calculation of morbidity is done from the number of persons, who are in care of the reporting physicians: Vaccination coverage in SR is still very low in comparison with other European Union (EU) countries. PMID:21526651

  16. [Role of biomarkers in the differential diagnosis of acute respiratory failure in the immediate postoperative period of lung transplantation].

    PubMed

    Ruano, L; Sacanell, J; Roman, A; Rello, J

    2013-01-01

    Lung transplant recipients are at high risk of suffering many complications during the immediate postoperative period, such as primary graft dysfunction, acute graft rejection or infection. The most common symptom is the presence of acute respiratory failure, and the use of biomarkers could be useful for establishing an early diagnosis of these conditions. Different biomarkers have been studied, but none have proven to be the gold standard in the differential diagnosis of acute respiratory failure. This paper offers a review of the different biomarkers that have been studied in this field.

  17. [Role of biomarkers in the differential diagnosis of acute respiratory failure in the immediate postoperative period of lung transplantation].

    PubMed

    Ruano, L; Sacanell, J; Roman, A; Rello, J

    2013-01-01

    Lung transplant recipients are at high risk of suffering many complications during the immediate postoperative period, such as primary graft dysfunction, acute graft rejection or infection. The most common symptom is the presence of acute respiratory failure, and the use of biomarkers could be useful for establishing an early diagnosis of these conditions. Different biomarkers have been studied, but none have proven to be the gold standard in the differential diagnosis of acute respiratory failure. This paper offers a review of the different biomarkers that have been studied in this field. PMID:23462428

  18. Clinical review: Exogenous surfactant therapy for acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome - where do we go from here?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are characterised by severe hypoxemic respiratory failure and poor lung compliance. Despite advances in clinical management, morbidity and mortality remains high. Supportive measures including protective lung ventilation confer a survival advantage in patients with ARDS, but management is otherwise limited by the lack of effective pharmacological therapies. Surfactant dysfunction with quantitative and qualitative abnormalities of both phospholipids and proteins are characteristic of patients with ARDS. Exogenous surfactant replacement in animal models of ARDS and neonatal respiratory distress syndrome shows consistent improvements in gas exchange and survival. However, whilst some adult studies have shown improved oxygenation, no survival benefit has been demonstrated to date. This lack of clinical efficacy may be related to disease heterogeneity (where treatment responders may be obscured by nonresponders), limited understanding of surfactant biology in patients or an absence of therapeutic effect in this population. Crucially, the mechanism of lung injury in neonates is different from that in ARDS: surfactant inhibition by plasma constituents is a typical feature of ARDS, whereas the primary pathology in neonates is the deficiency of surfactant material due to reduced synthesis. Absence of phenotypic characterisation of patients, the lack of an ideal natural surfactant material with adequate surfactant proteins, coupled with uncertainty about optimal timing, dosing and delivery method are some of the limitations of published surfactant replacement clinical trials. Recent advances in stable isotope labelling of surfactant phospholipids coupled with analytical methods using electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry enable highly specific molecular assessment of phospholipid subclasses and synthetic rates that can be utilised for phenotypic characterisation and individualisation of exogenous surfactant

  19. Computerised Analysis of Telemonitored Respiratory Sounds for Predicting Acute Exacerbations of COPD

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Granero, Miguel Angel; Sanchez-Morillo, Daniel; Leon-Jimenez, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the commonest causes of death in the world and poses a substantial burden on healthcare systems and patients’ quality of life. The largest component of the related healthcare costs is attributable to admissions due to acute exacerbation (AECOPD). The evidence that might support the effectiveness of the telemonitoring interventions in COPD is limited partially due to the lack of useful predictors for the early detection of AECOPD. Electronic stethoscopes and computerised analyses of respiratory sounds (CARS) techniques provide an opportunity for substantial improvement in the management of respiratory diseases. This exploratory study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of using: (a) a respiratory sensor embedded in a self-tailored housing for ageing users; (b) a telehealth framework; (c) CARS and (d) machine learning techniques for the remote early detection of the AECOPD. In a 6-month pilot study, 16 patients with COPD were equipped with a home base-station and a sensor to daily record their respiratory sounds. Principal component analysis (PCA) and a support vector machine (SVM) classifier was designed to predict AECOPD. 75.8% exacerbations were early detected with an average of 5 ± 1.9 days in advance at medical attention. The proposed method could provide support to patients, physicians and healthcare systems. PMID:26512667

  20. Bacterial lysate in the prevention of acute exacerbation of COPD and in respiratory recurrent infections

    PubMed Central

    Braido, F; Tarantini, F; Ghiglione, V; Melioli, G; Canonica, G W

    2007-01-01

    Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) represent a serious problem because they are one of the most common cause of human death by infection. The search for the treatment of those diseases has therefore a great importance. In this study we provide an overview of the currently available treatments for RTIs with particular attention to chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases exacerbations and recurrent respiratory infections therapy and a description of bacterial lysate action, in particular making reference to the medical literature dealing with its clinical efficacy. Those studies are based on a very large number of clinical trials aimed to evaluate the effects of this drug in maintaining the immune system in a state of alert, and in increasing the defences against microbial infections. From this analysis it comes out that bacterial lysates have a protective effect, which induce a significant reduction of the symptoms related to respiratory infections. Those results could be very interesting also from an economic point of view, because they envisage a reduction in the number of acute exacerbations and a shorter duration of hospitalization. The use of bacterial lysate could therefore represent an important means to achieve an extension of life duration in patients affected by respiratory diseases. PMID:18229572

  1. Antibiotic identification, use, and self-medication for respiratory illnesses among urban Latinos

    PubMed Central

    Landers, Timothy F.; Ferng, Yu-hui; McLoughlin, Jennifer Wong; Barrett, Angela E.; Larson, Elaine

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to describe the extent to which antibiotic and nonantibiotic medications commonly used for upper respiratory infections (URIs) were correctly identified by a sample of urban dwelling Latinas and the association of medication identification with antibiotic use and self-medication. Data sources One hundred women completed an interview and were asked to identify whether a list of 39 medications (17 antibiotics, 22 nonantibiotics) were antibiotics or not, whether anyone in the household had used the medication, their ages, and the source of the medication. Results Overall, participants correctly identified 62% of nonantibiotics and 34% of antibiotics. Seventy three (73%) women in the study reported antibiotic use by at least one member of the household in the past year. Among users, self-medication was reported in 67.2% of antibiotics for adults, but in only 2.4% of children. There was no difference in antibiotic recognition between those who self-medicated and those who did not, but antibiotic self-medication was associated with a significantly lower recognition of nonantibiotics (p = .01). Implications for practice Measures to improve antibiotic utilization should address self-medication and consider the cultural and social context in which antibiotic use occurs. PMID:20854641

  2. The acute respiratory distress syndrome: role of nutritional modulation of inflammation through dietary lipids.

    PubMed

    Mizock, Barry A; DeMichele, Stephen J

    2004-12-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is the most serious form of acute hypoxic respiratory failure. ARDS represents the expression of an acute, diffuse, inflammatory process in the lungs consequent to a variety of infectious and noninfectious conditions. It is characterized pathologically by damage to pulmonary epithelial and endothelial cells, with subsequent alveolar-capillary leak and exudative pulmonary edema. The main clinical features of ARDS include rapid onset of dyspnea, severe defects in gas exchange, and imaging studies demonstrating diffuse pulmonary infiltrates. The role of nutrition in the management of ARDS has traditionally been supportive. Recent research has demonstrated the potential of certain dietary oils (eg, fish oil, borage oil) to modulate pulmonary inflammation, thereby improving lung compliance and oxygenation, and reducing time on mechanical ventilation. This article reviews the alterations in the immune response that underlie ARDS, discusses the physiology of dietary oils as immunonutrients, summarizes animal and human studies that explore the therapeutic effects of dietary oils, and provides clinical recommendations for their use. PMID:16215155

  3. Acute respiratory failure due to refeeding syndrome and hypophosphatemia induced by hypocaloric enteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Patel, Utpal; Sriram, Krishnan

    2009-03-01

    We report a case of acute respiratory failure due to refeeding syndrome caused by hypocaloric enteral tube feeds. A 60-y-old obese man, with a diagnosis of esophageal carcinoma with local metastases, underwent feeding jejunostomy tube insertion. Enteral tube feeding was initiated at small volumes providing 4.4 kcal x kg(-1) x d(-1) and gradually increased over 48 h to 29 kcal x kg(-1) x d(-1) (based on adjusted body weight). The patient then developed acute respiratory distress requiring intubation and ventilatory support. Serum phosphorus (P) level was extremely low at <0.7 mg/dL. Serum potassium (K) and magnesium (Mg) levels were also low. It took >4 d to adequately correct the electrolyte derangements. Successful liberation from mechanical ventilation was then possible. In chronically malnourished patients undergoing nutritional support, even hypocaloric feeding should be considered a risk factor for developing refeeding syndrome leading to severe and acute electrolyte fluid-balance and metabolic abnormalities.

  4. Pathophysiological Basis of Acute Respiratory Failure on Non-Invasive Mechanical Ventilation.

    PubMed

    Romero-Dapueto, C; Budini, H; Cerpa, F; Caceres, D; Hidalgo, V; Gutiérrez, T; Keymer, J; Pérez, R; Molina, J; Giugliano-Jaramillo, C

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV) was created for patients who needed noninvasive ventilator support, this procedure decreases the complications associated with the use of endotracheal intubation (ETT). The application of NIMV has acquired major relevance in the last few years in the management of acute respiratory failure (ARF), in patients with hypoxemic and hypercapnic failure. The main advantage of NIMV as compared to invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) is that it can be used earlier outside intensive care units (ICUs). The evidence strongly supports its use in patients with COPD exacerbation, support in weaning process in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, patients with acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE), and Immunosuppressed patients. On the other hand, there is poor evidence that supports the use of NIMV in other pathologies such as pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and during procedures as bronchoscopy, where its use is still controversial because the results of these studies are inconclusive against the decrease in the rate of intubation or mortality.

  5. Pathophysiological Basis of Acute Respiratory Failure on Non-Invasive Mechanical Ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Dapueto, C; Budini, H; Cerpa, F; Caceres, D; Hidalgo, V; Gutiérrez, T; Keymer, J; Pérez, R; Molina, J; Giugliano-Jaramillo, C

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV) was created for patients who needed noninvasive ventilator support, this procedure decreases the complications associated with the use of endotracheal intubation (ETT). The application of NIMV has acquired major relevance in the last few years in the management of acute respiratory failure (ARF), in patients with hypoxemic and hypercapnic failure. The main advantage of NIMV as compared to invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) is that it can be used earlier outside intensive care units (ICUs). The evidence strongly supports its use in patients with COPD exacerbation, support in weaning process in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, patients with acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE), and Immunosuppressed patients. On the other hand, there is poor evidence that supports the use of NIMV in other pathologies such as pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and during procedures as bronchoscopy, where its use is still controversial because the results of these studies are inconclusive against the decrease in the rate of intubation or mortality. PMID:26312101

  6. [Mucolytics in acute and chronic respiratory tract disorders. I. Pathophysiology and mechanisms of action].

    PubMed

    Kupczyk, Maciej; Kuna, Piotr

    2002-03-01

    Mucus hypersecretion is a cardinal sign of both acute and chronic pulmonary diseases. Normally, mucus protects respiratory tract, but its overproduction leads to airway obstruction and promotes bacterial colonization. In the first part of our review we outlined the possible factors responsible for mucus hypersecretion and clinical consequences of this process. Mucolytic agents such as Ambroxol and N-acetylcysteine are able to alter the secretion of mucus and its physical properties which results in improvement of mucociliary clearance. Mechanisms of action and indications for use of mucolytics are presented. Mucolytics have been shown to have a role in improving lung functions and patients' quality of life. Undoubtedly they are useful as an adjunctive therapy of respiratory tract disorders. PMID:12053600

  7. Guillain-Barre syndrome masquerading as acute respiratory failure in an infant.

    PubMed

    Kishore, Praveen; Sharma, Pradeep Kumar; Saikia, Bhaskar; Khilnani, Praveen

    2015-01-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is a rare entity in infants. We report a case of GBS in a 5-month-old girl. The child presented with cough, loose stools, breathing difficulty, and listlessness. The child was treated as pneumonia with respiratory failure. Due to difficulty in weaning from ventilation with areflexia, marked hypotonia, and reduced power in all four limbs; possibilities of spinal muscular atrophy, poliomyelitis, and myopathies were kept. Nerve conduction velocity study was suggestive of mixed sensory-motor, severe axonal, and demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. Cerebrospinal fluid study revealed albuminocytological dissociation. Child was diagnosed as GBS and treated with intravenous immunoglobulin. Child recovered completely on follow-up. GBS should be considered as a differential diagnosis in acute onset respiratory failure with neuromuscular weakness in infants. PMID:26962356

  8. Imported Case of Acute Respiratory Tract Infection Associated with a Member of Species Nelson Bay Orthoreovirus

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Kouji; Singh, Harpal; Himeji, Daisuke; Kikuchi, Ikuo; Ueda, Akira; Yamamoto, Seigo; Miura, Miho; Shioyama, Yoko; Kawano, Kimiko; Nagaishi, Tokiko; Saito, Minako; Minomo, Masumi; Iwamoto, Naoyasu; Hidaka, Yoshio; Sohma, Hirotoshi; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Kanai, Yuta; Kawagishi, Takehiro; Nagata, Noriyo; Fukushi, Shuetsu; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Tani, Hideki; Taniguchi, Satoshi; Fukuma, Aiko; Shimojima, Masayuki; Kurane, Ichiro; Kageyama, Tsutomu; Odagiri, Takato; Saijo, Masayuki; Morikawa, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    A Japanese man suffered from acute respiratory tract infection after returning to Japan from Bali, Indonesia in 2007. Miyazaki-Bali/2007, a strain of the species of Nelson Bay orthoreovirus, was isolated from the patient's throat swab using Vero cells, in which syncytium formation was observed. This is the sixth report describing a patient with respiratory tract infection caused by an orthoreovirus classified to the species of Nelson Bay orthoreovirus. Given the possibility that all of the patients were infected in Malaysia and Indonesia, prospective surveillance on orthoreovirus infections should be carried out in Southeast Asia. Furthermore, contact surveillance study suggests that the risk of human-to-human infection of the species of Nelson Bay orthoreovirus would seem to be low. PMID:24667794

  9. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome: how to optimize oxygen transport and to improve prognosis].

    PubMed

    Shtabnitskiy, V A; Chuchalin, A G

    2014-01-01

    The paper reviews the state-of-the-art of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and current approaches to correcting respiratory failure. It highlights the historical and present-day data on the efficiency of extracorporeal membrane hemoxygenation, high-frequency ventilation, surfactant and inhaled nitric oxide therapy, and prone ventilation. The examinations have shown that ventilation in the prone position and extracorporeal membrane hemoxygenation not only improve gas exchange, but have a positive prognostic impact. The use of inhaled nitric oxide and surfactant achieves improved oxygenation for a while, but has no substantial effect on prognosis. The place of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation in the treatment of patients with ARDS has not been fully determined as some examinations have indicated a positive prognostic impact and other examinations have shown none or a negative impact.

  10. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as the Initial Clinical Manifestation of an Antisynthetase Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seo-Hyun; Park, I-Nae

    2016-07-01

    Antisynthetase syndrome has been recognized as an important cause of autoimmune inflammatory myopathy in a subset of patients with polymyositis and dermatomyositis. It is associated with serum antibody to aminoacyl-transfer RNA synthetases and is characterized by a constellation of manifestations, including fever, myositis, interstitial lung disease, mechanic's hand-like cutaneous involvement, Raynaud phenomenon, and polyarthritis. Lung disease is the presenting feature in 50% of the cases. We report a case of a 60-year-old female with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which later proved to be an unexpected and initial manifestation of anti-Jo-1 antibody-positive antisynthetase syndrome. The present case showed resolution of ARDS after treatment with high-dose corticosteroids. Given that steroids are not greatly beneficial in the treatment of ARDS, it is likely that the improvement of the respiratory symptoms in this patient also resulted from the prompt suppression of the inflammatory systemic response by corticosteroids. PMID:27433180

  11. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as the Initial Clinical Manifestation of an Antisynthetase Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seo-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Antisynthetase syndrome has been recognized as an important cause of autoimmune inflammatory myopathy in a subset of patients with polymyositis and dermatomyositis. It is associated with serum antibody to aminoacyl-transfer RNA synthetases and is characterized by a constellation of manifestations, including fever, myositis, interstitial lung disease, mechanic's hand-like cutaneous involvement, Raynaud phenomenon, and polyarthritis. Lung disease is the presenting feature in 50% of the cases. We report a case of a 60-year-old female with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which later proved to be an unexpected and initial manifestation of anti-Jo-1 antibody–positive antisynthetase syndrome. The present case showed resolution of ARDS after treatment with high-dose corticosteroids. Given that steroids are not greatly beneficial in the treatment of ARDS, it is likely that the improvement of the respiratory symptoms in this patient also resulted from the prompt suppression of the inflammatory systemic response by corticosteroids. PMID:27433180

  12. Role of respiratory syncytial virus in acute otitis media: implications for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Patel, Janak A; Nguyen, Dang T; Revai, Krystal; Chonmaitree, Tasnee

    2007-02-19

    We summarize herein the results of various virologic studies of acute otitis media (AOM) conducted at our site over a 10-year period. Among 566 children with AOM, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) was the most common virus identified in either middle ear fluid or nasal wash; it was found in 16% of all children and 38% of virus-positive children. Seventy-one percent of the children with RSV were 1 year of age or older, which was significantly older than all other viruses combined (P=0.045). RSV infection was associated with the common bacterial pathogens causing AOM. Past efforts to develop vaccines for RSV have emphasized prevention of lower respiratory tract infection in infants, which is a more serious problem but less common than AOM. Our results suggest that RSV vaccines that work only against infection in older children may have value in preventing AOM, the most common pediatric disease.

  13. Value of serological tests in the diagnosis of viral acute respiratory infections in adults.

    PubMed

    Căruntu, F; Dogaru, D; Stefan, D; Căruntu, V; Angelescu, C; Streinu-Cercel, A; Colţan, G; Petrescu, A L; Tarţă, D; Bârnaure, F

    1986-01-01

    The dynamics of the antibody response to influenza viruses A (H1N1), A (H3N2) and B, to parainfluenza viruses 1, 2, 3, to adenoviruses and respiratory syncytial virus was studied in paired serum samples collected from 110 patients hospitalized with acute respiratory infections (ARI) and in 40 patients suffering from other diseases. Rises in serum antibody titers to 1--5 of the above mentioned antigens were detected in many of the patients of both groups. The fact is most likely due to the presence of some epidemiologically and clinically uncharacteristic viral ARI (influenza included); simultaneous or successive infections with influenza virus and different other viruses were very frequent. A greater efficiency of the etiological diagnosis of viral ARI can be achieved only by the association of epidemiological and clinical criteria with serological data, the visualization of viral antigens and virus isolation. PMID:3727398

  14. Acute Muscular Sarcocystosis: an international investigation among ill travelers returning from Tioman Island, Malaysia, 2011 and 2012

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two provider-based traveler-focused networks allowed for the detection of a large outbreak of acute muscular sarcocystosis (AMS). Clinicians evaluating travelers returning ill from Malaysia with fever and myalgia noted the biphasic aspect of the disease, the later onset of elevated CPK and eosinophi...

  15. Pulmonary histopathology in dalmatians with familial acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).

    PubMed

    Syrjä, P; Saari, S; Rajamäki, M; Saario, E; Järvinen, A-K

    2009-11-01

    The histopathological changes in the lungs of 12 related Dalmatians with idiopathic acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are described. Affected dogs had multiple foci of marked atypical hyperplasia and squamous metaplasia of the bronchiolar epithelium, patchy ongoing fibrosis with myofibroblastic metaplasia, smooth muscle hyperplasia and occasional honeycombing of alveolar walls, and hyperplasia of atypical type II pneumocytes. There was an abrupt transition between these proliferative lesions and areas of acute alveolar oedema with hyaline membranes in partially normal lung. Diseased areas were associated with moderate lymphohistiocytic interstitial inflammation. Immunohistochemical labelling for cytokeratin expression indicated that the metaplastic epithelium was of bronchiolar origin and that it extended into peribronchiolar alveolar spaces. Some of the bronchiolar lesions were pre-neoplastic and one adult dog suffered from bronchoalveolar carcinoma. These lesions are compared with the two forms of idiopathic interstitial pneumonia reported as causes of ARDS in man: acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) and acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). The observed lesions in the Dalmatians are distinct from the diffuse alveolar damage that characterizes AIP, but show some histological similarities to the usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) that occurs in IPF with acute exacerbation in man. UIP has not previously been described in the dog.

  16. Content-Area Framework for Conducting Family Meetings for Acutely Ill Psychiatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Pon, Natalie C; Gordon, Mollie R; Coverdale, John; Nguyen, Phuong T

    2016-09-01

    Family meetings are a critically important component of managing acutely psychiatrically ill patients, and learning how to conduct such a meeting is critically important in the training of psychiatrists. Because we found no published comprehensive tools that dealt with the biopsychosocial content areas to be covered in family meetings in acute psychiatric settings, we developed and present such a comprehensive tool that is based in part on a review of existing tools utilized by other disciplines. This article describes the specific steps involved in premeeting planning, the formal topic areas that might be canvassed during the meeting, and postmeeting documentation and debriefing. The general content areas for discussion during the meeting include the setting of goals and expectations, relevant history-gathering, assessment of the family's understanding of the issues at stake, formal psychoeducation, and review of specific treatment strategies and clinical progress. The meeting may also include a discussion of resources available to the patient and family members and a review of issues related to the safety of the patient and others, management of early warning signs, and sensitive topics such as trauma, abuse, or violence that may play a role in the presentation or treatment of the patient to best translate established goals into a longer term plan of care. Implementation of this comprehensive and necessarily structured model should enhance the patient's and family's understanding of the issues at stake and should improve satisfaction, promote trust and an effective working alliance, and enhance the quality of the biopsychosocial care plan. PMID:27648507

  17. Causes of acute, undifferentiated, febrile illness in rural Thailand: results of a prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Suttinont, C; Losuwanaluk, K; Niwatayakul, K; Hoontrakul, S; Intaranongpai, W; Silpasakorn, S; Suwancharoen, D; Panlar, P; Saisongkorh, W; Rolain, J M; Raoult, D; Suputtamongkol, Y

    2006-06-01

    The adult patients who, between July 2001 and June 2002, presented at any of five hospitals in Thailand with acute febrile illness in the absence of an obvious focus of infection were prospectively investigated. Blood samples were taken from all of the patients and checked for aerobic bacteria and leptospires by culture. In addition, at least two samples of serum were collected at different times (on admission and 2-4 weeks post-discharge) from each patient and tested, in serological tests, for evidence of leptospirosis, rickettsioses, dengue and influenza. The 845 patients investigated, of whom 661 were male, had a median age of 38 years and a median duration of fever, on presentation, of 3.5 days. Most (76.5%) were agricultural workers and most (68.3%) had the cause of their fever identified, as leptospirosis (36.9%), scrub typhus (19.9%), dengue infection or influenza (10.7%), murine typhus (2.8%), Rickettsia helvetica infection (1.3%), Q fever (1%), or other bacterial infection (1.2%). The serological results indicated that 103 (12.2%) and nine (1%) of the patients may have had double and triple infections, respectively. Leptospirosis and rickettsioses, especially scrub typhus, were thus found to be major causes of acute, undifferentiated fever in Thai agricultural workers.

  18. Identification and Characterization of a New Orthoreovirus from Patients with Acute Respiratory Infections

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Kaw Bing; Voon, Kenny; Crameri, Gary; Tan, Hui Siu; Rosli, Juliana; McEachern, Jennifer A.; Suluraju, Sivagami; Yu, Meng; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2008-01-01

    First discovered in the early 1950s, reoviruses (respiratory enteric orphan viruses) were not associated with any known disease, and hence named orphan viruses. Recently, our group reported the isolation of the Melaka virus from a patient with acute respiratory disease and provided data suggesting that this new orthoreovirus is capable of human-to-human transmission and is probably of bat origin. Here we report yet another Melaka-like reovirus (named Kampar virus) isolated from the throat swab of a 54 year old male patient in Kampar, Perak, Malaysia who was suffering from high fever, acute respiratory disease and vomiting at the time of virus isolation. Serological studies indicated that Kampar virus was transmitted from the index case to at least one other individual and caused respiratory disease in the contact case. Sequence analysis of the four small class genome segments indicated that Kampar and Melaka viruses are closely related. This was confirmed by virus neutralization assay, showing an effective two-way cross neutralization, i.e., the serum against one virus was able to neutralize the other. Although the exact origin of Kampar virus is unknown, epidemiological tracing revealed that the house of the index case is surrounded by fruit trees frequently visited by fruit bats. There is a high probability that Kampar virus originated from bats and was transmitted to humans via bat droppings or contaminated fruits. The discovery of Kampar virus highlights the increasing trend of emergence of bat zoonotic viruses and the need to expand our understanding of bats as a source of many unknown viruses. PMID:19030226

  19. Characterization of oleic acid-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome model in rat.

    PubMed

    Akella, Aparna; Sharma, Parul; Pandey, Ratna; Deshpande, Shripad B

    2014-07-01

    Animal studies using oleic acid (OA) model to produce acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) have been inconsistent. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to establish an acute model of ARDS in rats using OA and to characterize its effect on cardio-respiratory parameters and lethality. The trachea, jugular vein and femoral artery of anesthetized adult rats were cannulated. A dose of OA (30-90 microL; iv) was injected in each animal and changes in respiratory frequency (RF), heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were recorded. Minute ventilation and PaO2/FiO2 (P/F) ratio were also determined. At the end, lungs were excised for determination of pulmonary water content and histological examination. At all doses of OA, there was immediate decrease followed by increase in RF, however at 75 and 90 microL of OA, RF decreased abruptly and the animals died by 63 +/- 8.2 min and 19 +/- 6.3 min; respectively. In all the groups, HR and MAP changes followed the respiratory changes. The minute ventilation increased in a dose-dependent manner while the values of P/F ratio decreased correspondingly. Pulmonary edema was induced at all doses. Histological examination of the lung showed alveolar damage, microvascular congestion, microvascular injury, infiltration of inflammatory cells, pulmonary edema and necrosis in a dose-dependent manner. With these results, OA can be used to induce different grades of ARDS in rats and OA doses of 50, 60 and 75 microL resemble mild, moderate and severe forms of ARDS respectively. Hence, OA model serves as a useful tool to study the pathophysiology of ARDS.

  20. Viruses as Sole Causative Agents of Severe Acute Respiratory Tract Infections in Children

    PubMed Central

    Moesker, Fleur M.; van Kampen, Jeroen J. A.; van Rossum, Annemarie M. C.; de Hoog, Matthijs; Koopmans, Marion P. G.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Fraaij, Pieter L. A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza A viruses are known to cause severe acute respiratory tract infections (SARIs) in children. For other viruses like human rhinoviruses (HRVs) this is less well established. Viral or bacterial co-infections are often considered essential for severe manifestations of these virus infections. Objective The study aims at identifying viruses that may cause SARI in children in the absence of viral and bacterial co-infections, at identifying disease characteristics associated with these single virus infections, and at identifying a possible correlation between viral loads and disease severities. Study Design Between April 2007 and March 2012, we identified children (<18 year) with or without a medical history, admitted to our paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) with SARI or to the medium care (MC) with an acute respiratory tract infection (ARTI) (controls). Data were extracted from the clinical and laboratory databases of our tertiary care paediatric hospital. Patient specimens were tested for fifteen respiratory viruses with real-time reverse transcriptase PCR assays and we selected patients with a single virus infection only. Typical bacterial co-infections were considered unlikely to have contributed to the PICU or MC admission based on C-reactive protein-levels or bacteriological test results if performed. Results We identified 44 patients admitted to PICU with SARI and 40 patients admitted to MC with ARTI. Twelve viruses were associated with SARI, ten of which were also associated with ARTI in the absence of typical bacterial and viral co-infections, with RSV and HRV being the most frequent causes. Viral loads were not different between PICU-SARI patients and MC-ARTI patients. Conclusion Both SARI and ARTI may be caused by single viral pathogens in previously healthy children as well as in children with a medical history. No relationship between viral load and disease severity was identified. PMID:26964038

  1. Acute undifferentiated febrile illness in adult hospitalized patients: the disease spectrum and diagnostic predictors - an experience from a tertiary care hospital in South India.

    PubMed

    Chrispal, Anugrah; Boorugu, Harikishan; Gopinath, Kango Gopal; Chandy, Sara; Prakash, John Antony Jude; Thomas, Elsa Mary; Abraham, Asha Mary; Abraham, O C; Thomas, Kurien

    2010-10-01

    Local prevalences of individual diseases influence the prioritization of the differential diagnoses of a clinical syndrome of acute undifferentiated febrile illness (AFI). This study was conducted in order to delineate the aetiology of AFI that present to a tertiary hospital in southern India and to describe disease-specific clinical profiles. An 1-year prospective, observational study was conducted in adults (age >16 years) who presented with an undifferentiated febrile illness of duration 5-21 days, requiring hospitalization. Blood cultures, malarial parasites and febrile serology (acute and convalescent), in addition to clinical evaluations and basic investigations were performed. Comparisons were made between each disease and the other AFIs. A total of 398 AFI patients were diagnosed with: scrub typhus (47.5%); malaria (17.1%); enteric fever (8.0%); dengue (7.0%); leptospirosis (3.0%); spotted fever rickettsiosis (1.8%); Hantavirus (0.3%); alternate diagnosis (7.3%); and unclear diagnoses (8.0%). Leucocytosis, acute respiratory distress syndrome, aseptic meningitis, mild serum transaminase elevation and hypoalbuminaemia were independently associated with scrub typhus. Normal leukocyte counts, moderate to severe thrombocytopenia, renal failure, splenomegaly and hyperbilirubinaemia with mildly elevated serum transaminases were associated with malaria. Rash, overt bleeding manifestations, normal to low leukocyte counts, moderate to severe thrombocytopenia and significantly elevated hepatic transaminases were associated with dengue. Enteric fever was associated with loose stools, normal to low leukocyte counts and normal platelet counts. It is imperative to maintain a sound epidemiological database of AFIs so that evidence-based diagnostic criteria and treatment guidelines can be developed.

  2. Acute undifferentiated febrile illness in adult hospitalized patients: the disease spectrum and diagnostic predictors - an experience from a tertiary care hospital in South India.

    PubMed

    Chrispal, Anugrah; Boorugu, Harikishan; Gopinath, Kango Gopal; Chandy, Sara; Prakash, John Antony Jude; Thomas, Elsa Mary; Abraham, Asha Mary; Abraham, O C; Thomas, Kurien

    2010-10-01

    Local prevalences of individual diseases influence the prioritization of the differential diagnoses of a clinical syndrome of acute undifferentiated febrile illness (AFI). This study was conducted in order to delineate the aetiology of AFI that present to a tertiary hospital in southern India and to describe disease-specific clinical profiles. An 1-year prospective, observational study was conducted in adults (age >16 years) who presented with an undifferentiated febrile illness of duration 5-21 days, requiring hospitalization. Blood cultures, malarial parasites and febrile serology (acute and convalescent), in addition to clinical evaluations and basic investigations were performed. Comparisons were made between each disease and the other AFIs. A total of 398 AFI patients were diagnosed with: scrub typhus (47.5%); malaria (17.1%); enteric fever (8.0%); dengue (7.0%); leptospirosis (3.0%); spotted fever rickettsiosis (1.8%); Hantavirus (0.3%); alternate diagnosis (7.3%); and unclear diagnoses (8.0%). Leucocytosis, acute respiratory distress syndrome, aseptic meningitis, mild serum transaminase elevation and hypoalbuminaemia were independently associated with scrub typhus. Normal leukocyte counts, moderate to severe thrombocytopenia, renal failure, splenomegaly and hyperbilirubinaemia with mildly elevated serum transaminases were associated with malaria. Rash, overt bleeding manifestations, normal to low leukocyte counts, moderate to severe thrombocytopenia and significantly elevated hepatic transaminases were associated with dengue. Enteric fever was associated with loose stools, normal to low leukocyte counts and normal platelet counts. It is imperative to maintain a sound epidemiological database of AFIs so that evidence-based diagnostic criteria and treatment guidelines can be developed. PMID:20870680

  3. Evidence of Recombination and Genetic Diversity in Human Rhinoviruses in Children with Acute Respiratory Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Peijun; Sheng, Jun; Yan, Huajie; Zhang, Jing; Lin, Xin; Wang, Yongjin; Delpeyroux, Francis; Deubel, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Background Human rhinoviruses (HRVs) are a highly prevalent cause of acute respiratory infection in children. They are classified into at least three species, HRV-A, HRV-B and HRV-C, which are characterized by sequencing the 5′ untranslated region (UTR) or the VP4/VP2 region of the genome. Given the increased interest for novel HRV strain identification and their worldwide distribution, we have carried out clinical and molecular diagnosis of HRV strains in a 2-year study of children with acute respiratory infection visiting one district hospital in Shanghai. Methodology/Findings We cloned and sequenced a 924-nt fragment that covered part of the 5′UTR and the VP4/VP2 capsid genes. Sixty-four HRV-infected outpatients were diagnosed amongst 827 children with acute low respiratory tract infection. Two samples were co-infected with HRV-A and HRV-B or HRV-C. By comparative analysis of the VP4/VP2 sequences of the 66 HRVs, we showed a high diversity of strains in HRV-A and HRV-B species, and a prevalence of 51.5% of strains that belonged to the recently identified HRV-C species. When analyzing a fragment of the 5′ UTR, we characterized at least two subspecies of HRV-C: HRV-Cc, which clustered differently from HRV-A and HRV-B, and HRV-Ca, which resulted from previous recombination in this region with sequences related to HRV-A. The full-length sequence of one strain of each HRV-Ca and HRV-Cc subspecies was obtained for comparative analysis. We confirmed the close relationship of their structural proteins but showed apparent additional recombination events in the 2A gene and 3′UTR of the HRV-Ca strain. Double or triple infections with HRV-C and respiratory syncytial virus and/or bocavirus were diagnosed in 33.3% of the HRV-infected patients, but no correlation with severity of clinical outcome was observed. Conclusion Our study showed a high diversity of HRV strains that cause bronchitis and pneumonia in children. A predominance of HRV-C over HRV-A and HRV-B was

  4. Gradual versus abrupt weaning from respiratory support in acute respiratory failure and advanced chronic obstructive lung disease.

    PubMed<