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Sample records for acute sensorineural impairment

  1. [The experience with the use of neuromedin preparations for the treatment of sensorineural impairment of hearing].

    PubMed

    Tambovtseva, O V; Platonova, I S; Vankova, S N; Ushkov, E V; Vorozheĭkina, N G; Turkina, T A

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the application of neuromedin for the treatment of sensorineural loss of hearing of different etiology. A total of 230 patients at the age varying from 20 to 60 years presenting with sensorineural impairment of hearing were available for the observation. Neuromedin was administered intramuscularly at 15 mg/day (1.5% solution at a dose of 1.0 ml) for 10 day; thereafter, the patients took 20 mg neuromedin tablets thrice daily during one month. The majority of the patients reported an improvement of hearing and speech intelligibility. Complete restoration of hearing was documented in certain patients presenting with acute sensorineural impairment of hearing. PMID:25588490

  2. Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss With Minimal Hearing Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Chin Saeng

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the study was to determine the characteristics of patients who did not match the audiometric criteria of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) but complained of acute hearing loss. Methods By thorough medical chart reviews, historical cohort study was performed with consecutive data of 589 patients complaining of acute unilateral sensorineural hearing loss without identifiable causes between 2005 and 2013. Those patients demonstrating a hearing loss of at least 30 dB at three consecutive frequencies based on pure tone audiometry were classified as group I; the others were classified as group II. Patients' characteristics, final hearing, and hearing improvement rate (HIR) between the two groups were compared. Results Group II exhibited distinctive characteristics, including an early age of onset of the hearing loss (P<0.01), an absence of accompanying diabetes (P<0.01) and hypertension (P<0.01), and better unaffected hearing and final hearing compared with group I (P<0.001). However, the HIR of the patients in the two groups was not significantly different (P>0.05). Conclusion Patients who did not meet the audiological criteria of SSNHL exhibited distinctive characteristics compared to SSNHL patients. PMID:26622953

  3. [The specific clinical features of acute sensorineural loss of hearing associated with vertigo].

    PubMed

    Pal'chun, V T; Guseva, A L; Levina, Yu V; Chistov, S D

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to estimate the prevalence of vertigo and to determine the type of the lesion of the vestibular analyzer in the patients presenting with acute sensorineural loss of hearing (ASNLH). The secondary objective was to evaluate the possibility of the restoration of the auditory thresholds. The results of the examination and treatment of 94 patients suffering from ASNLH are presented. It was shown that the development of acute sensorineural loss of hearing was accompanied by unilateral peripheral vestibulopathy in 22.3% of the patients. In 5.3% of these cases, dizziness could be attributed to benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and canalolythias is of the posterior semicircular canal on the side of hearing impairment. It is concluded that the presence of the clinical signs of lesions of the vestibular analyzer and peripheral vestibular dysfunction in the form of latent spontaneous nystagmus without gaze fixation and/or asymmetric nystagmus with unilateral weakness in the caloric test is a negative prognostic factor for the restoration of the auditory thresholds in the patients presenting with acute sensorineural loss of hearing. PMID:26977560

  4. [Clinical observations of acute low-tone sensorineural hearing loss considered as cochlear hydrops].

    PubMed

    Yamasoba, T; Sugasawa, T; Yagi, M; Harada, T; Futaki, T

    1990-02-01

    Acute low-tone sensorineural hearing loss (ALHL) has the following three criteria; obscure origin, acute onset and sensorineural hearing loss limited to low frequencies. Sixteen cases of ALHL which were considered as cochlear hydrops using glycerol test and electrocochleogram were studied. All patients visited our department within two weeks after onset and were followed up for one year or more after initial examination. The subjective symptoms, the character of vestibular and hearing impairment and prognosis of 16 cases with ALHL were also investigated. The results were as follows. 1. Patients complained of ear fullness rather than hearing impairment. Four patients were unaware of hearing loss. 2. Recruitment phenomenon was found in all of 15 cases examined. Vestibular findings were mostly normal, except that spontaneous nystagmus was found in two cases and head-shaking nystagmus in one. 3. Recurrence and fluctuation of hearing impairment occurred in 14 cases. Three cases had an attack of rotatory vertigo once and two has diagnosed as Meniere's disease later. 4. During three months prior to last examination, hearing was stabilized in nine cases and continued to fluctuate in seven cases. In the former, hearing was improved in four cases, unchanged in three, and worsened in two. 5. Two patients underwent an endolymphatic sac operation and have had a good prognosis. 6. The authors suggest that most of ALHL should be considered as transient cochlear hydrops because the subjective symptom and audiological and vestibular findings of our cases are similar to those of cases which were reported as ALHL by other investigators. According to the findings of glycerol test and electrocochleogram, endolymphatic hydrops in ALHL is considered to exist in all turns of cochlea. PMID:2348281

  5. A new nonsyndromic X-linked sensorineural hearing impairment linked to Xp21.2

    SciTech Connect

    Lalwani, A.K.; Brister, J.R.; Fex, J.; Grundfast, K.M.; Pikus, A.T.; Ploplis, B.; San Agustin, T.; Skarka, H.; Wilcox, E.R.

    1994-10-01

    X-linked deafness is a rare cause of hereditary hearing impairment. We have identified a family with X-linked dominant sensorineural hearing impairment, characterized by incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity in carrier females, that is linked to the Xp21.2, which contains the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) locus. The auditory impairment in affected males was congenital, bilateral, profound, sensorineural, affecting all frequencies, and without evidence of radiographic abnormality of the temporal bone. Adult carrier females manifested bilateral, mild-to-moderate high-frequency sensorineural hearing impairment of delayed onset during adulthood. Eighteen commercially available polymorphic markers from the X chromosome, generating a 10-15-cM map, were initially used for identification of a candidate region. DXS997, located within the DMD gene, generated a two-point LOD score of 2.91 at {theta} = 0, with every carrier mother heterozygous at this locus. Recombination events at DXS992 (located within the DMD locus, 3{prime} to exon 50 of the dystrophin gene) and at DXS1068 (5{prime} to the brain promoter of the dystrophin gene) were observed. No recombination events were noted with the following markers within the DMD locus: 5{prime}DYS II, intron 44, DXS997, and intron 50. There was no clinical evidence of Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy in any family member. It is likely that this family represents a new locus on the X chromosome, which when mutated results in nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss and is distinct from the heterogeneous group of X-linked hearing losses that have been previously described. 57 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  6. [The clinical aspects of occupational sensorineural impairment of hearing of the acoustic origin].

    PubMed

    Zinkin, V N; Sheshegov, P M; Chistov, S D

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to elucidate the specific clinical features of occupational sensorineural impairment of hearing (OSNHI) depending on the origin of this pathology, viz. noise, infrasound and/or their combination. The review of research concerning this problem made it possible to systematize variants of ODNHI based on the clinical signs taking into consideration the influence of these physical factors. Pathophysiological features of the exposure of the organs of hearing to infrasound are described. PMID:27006983

  7. [The algorithm for the medical maintenance of the aircraft personnel suffering from chronic sensorineural impairment of hearing].

    PubMed

    Pankova, V B; Skryabina, L Yu; Barkhatova, O A

    2016-01-01

    The present study was designed to systematize the causes underlying the development of chronic sensorineural impairment of hearing in the aircraft personnel engaged in commercial aviation of the Russian Federation. A detailed clinical and audiological picture of chronic sensorineural loss of hearing in the aircraft personnel is presented with special reference to the criteria accepted in the civil aviationfor the evaluation of professional suitability and occupational selection in terms of hearing conditions. The study has demonstrated the paramount importance of the aviation medical expertise for the flight safety control in civil aviation. We analyzed the results of the audiological examination of the aircraft personnel suffering from chronic sensorineural impairment of hearing and proposed the algorithm for the rehabilitation of such subjects taking into consideration the stage of the chronic process. PMID:27213653

  8. [Equilibrium function in patients with acute sensorineural hearing loss].

    PubMed

    Pal'chun, V T; Ganichkina, I Ia; Luchikhin, L A; Derevianko, S N

    2002-01-01

    Equilibrium function was investigated with computer-assisted stabilography (CS) in patients with acute neurosensory hypoacusis. This new diagnostic tool was employed in combination with extended vestibulometric and audiologic examinations. Correlations were found between stabilographic and vestibulometric findings. CS is recommended as a method of screening diagnosis in examination of patients with imbalanced equilibrium. PMID:12227024

  9. The Effects of Sensorineural Hearing Impairment on Asynchronous Glimpsing of Speech

    PubMed Central

    Buss, Emily; Hall, Joseph W.

    2016-01-01

    In a previous study with normal-hearing listeners, we evaluated consonant identification masked by two or more spectrally contiguous bands of noise, with asynchronous square-wave modulation applied to neighboring bands. Speech recognition thresholds were 5.1–8.5 dB better when neighboring bands were presented to different ears (dichotic) than when all bands were presented to one ear (monaural), depending on the spectral width of the frequency bands. This dichotic advantage was interpreted as reflecting masking release from peripheral spread of masking from neighboring frequency bands. The present study evaluated this effect in listeners with sensorineural hearing loss, a population more susceptible to spread of masking. Speech perception (vowel-consonant-vowel stimuli, as in /aBa/) was measured in the presence of fluctuating noise that was either modulated synchronously across frequency or asynchronously. Hearing-impaired listeners (n = 9) and normal-hearing controls were tested at either the same intensity (n = 7) or same sensation level (n = 8). Hearing-impaired listeners had mild-to-moderate hearing loss and symmetrical, flat audiometric thresholds. While all groups of listeners performed better in the dichotic than monaural condition, this effect was smaller for the hearing-impaired (3.5 dB) and equivalent-sensation-level controls (3.3 dB) than controls tested at the same intensity (11.0 dB). The present study is consistent with the idea that dichotic presentation can improve speech-in-noise listening for hearing-impaired listeners, and may be enhanced when combined with amplification. PMID:27144601

  10. Course of hearing recovery according to frequency in patients with acute acoustic sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Harada, Hirofumi; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Imamura, Akihide

    2008-01-01

    Through pure-tone audiometry, we studied the course of hearing recovery in 24 ears of 20 men (ages 18-48 years) who had acute acoustic sensorineural hearing loss (ASHL). All subjects were members of the Japanese Self-Defense Force. The hearing level in 5 ears returned to normal, the hearing level of 13 ears recovered but was not within the normal range, and the hearing level of 6 ears was unchanged. The time from noise exposure to presentation was longer in patients with unchanged hearing than in other patients. Recovery of hearing was poorest at 4,000 Hz, followed by 8,000 and 2,000 Hz. We concluded that hearing in patients with acute ASHL is likely to return to normal when the hearing level at 4,000 Hz recovers gradually; partial recovery of hearing is expected when the hearing level at 4,000 Hz reaches an early plateau. PMID:18616091

  11. AICA syndrome with facial palsy following vertigo and acute sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Ikegami-Takada, Tomoko; Izumikawa, Masahiko; Doi, Tadashi; Takada, Yohei; Tomoda, Koichi

    2012-04-01

    We report a case of infarction of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) with peripheral facial palsy following vertigo and acute sensorineural hearing loss. A 39-year-old female presented with vertigo and sudden hearing loss, tinnitus, and aural fullness of the right ear. An audiogram revealed a severe hearing loss at all tested frequencies in the right ear. Spontaneous nystagmus toward the left side was also observed. Otoneurological examinations showed sensorineural hearing loss of the right ear and horizontal and rotatory gaze nystagmus toward the left side, and a caloric reflex test demonstrated canal paresis. Initially, we diagnosed the patient for sudden deafness with vertigo. However, right peripheral facial palsy appeared 2 days later. An eye tracking test (ETT) and optokinetic pattern test (OKP) showed centralis abnormality. The patient's brain was examined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance angioglaphy (MRA) and showed an infarction localized in the pons and cerebellum. MRI and MRA revealed infarction of the right cerebellar hemisphere indicating occlusion of the AICA. Consequently, the patient was diagnosed with AICA syndrome but demonstrated regression following steroid and edaravone treatment. We suggest that performing MRI and MRA in the early stage of AICA syndrome is important for distinguishing cerebellar infarction resulting from vestibular disease. PMID:21862260

  12. Acupuncture as a primary and independent treatment in the acute phases of sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yuanyuan; Lu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL) is an otological emergency defined as a rapid hearing loss, seriously affects patient's social life. To data, no study has reported the treatment by acupuncture alone in the acute phase. In this report, Acupuncture and Moxibustion therapy of excitation-focus transfer is outlined. The patient was a 26-year-old young woman who had an SSHL coupled with ear fullness. The patient had no past medical history, but she had undergone variable emotions and had a history of excessive noise exposure. The patient refused to receive any medicine especially steroids and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. She just only received acupuncture treatment. Her symptoms and outcome measurements were improved every week and completely recovered after the last week. Even though the article presents a single case and is based on self-reports, there are very clear trends on how patients with SSHL responded to acupuncture treatments. PMID:27368045

  13. Application of Massively Parallel Sequencing to Genetic Diagnosis in Multiplex Families with Idiopathic Sensorineural Hearing Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chen-Chi; Lin, Yin-Hung; Lu, Ying-Chang; Chen, Pei-Jer; Yang, Wei-Shiung; Hsu, Chuan-Jen; Chen, Pei-Lung

    2013-01-01

    Despite the clinical utility of genetic diagnosis to address idiopathic sensorineural hearing impairment (SNHI), the current strategy for screening mutations via Sanger sequencing suffers from the limitation that only a limited number of DNA fragments associated with common deafness mutations can be genotyped. Consequently, a definitive genetic diagnosis cannot be achieved in many families with discernible family history. To investigate the diagnostic utility of massively parallel sequencing (MPS), we applied the MPS technique to 12 multiplex families with idiopathic SNHI in which common deafness mutations had previously been ruled out. NimbleGen sequence capture array was designed to target all protein coding sequences (CDSs) and 100 bp of the flanking sequence of 80 common deafness genes. We performed MPS on the Illumina HiSeq2000, and applied BWA, SAMtools, Picard, GATK, Variant Tools, ANNOVAR, and IGV for bioinformatics analyses. Initial data filtering with allele frequencies (<5% in the 1000 Genomes Project and 5400 NHLBI exomes) and PolyPhen2/SIFT scores (>0.95) prioritized 5 indels (insertions/deletions) and 36 missense variants in the 12 multiplex families. After further validation by Sanger sequencing, segregation pattern, and evolutionary conservation of amino acid residues, we identified 4 variants in 4 different genes, which might lead to SNHI in 4 families compatible with autosomal dominant inheritance. These included GJB2 p.R75Q, MYO7A p.T381M, KCNQ4 p.S680F, and MYH9 p.E1256K. Among them, KCNQ4 p.S680F and MYH9 p.E1256K were novel. In conclusion, MPS allows genetic diagnosis in multiplex families with idiopathic SNHI by detecting mutations in relatively uncommon deafness genes. PMID:23451214

  14. Short-Term Outcomes of Acute Low-Tone Sensorineural Hearing Loss According to Treatment Modality

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jinkyung; Yum, Gunhwee; Im, Ha-Young; Jung, Jong Yoon; Rah, Yoon Chan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives We compared improvements in hearing thresholds in acute low-tone sensorineural hearing loss (ALHL) patients after two different treatments: steroid alone and steroid and diuretic combined. We analyzed how the duration between the onset of symptoms and the initiation of treatment affected hearing loss improvement and investigated the relation between presence of vertigo in ALHL patients and ALHL progression to Ménière's disease (MD). Subjects and Methods We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 47 ALHL patients aged 21 to 76 years. Patients received either orally administered steroid alone (n=12) or steroid and diuretic combined (n=35). We compared improvements in the two groups' hearing thresholds at three lower frequencies (125, 250, and 500 Hz) after participants had received one month of each respective treatment. Results Our two treatments did not show any statistical difference in hearing loss improvement after one month. Forty percent of ALHL patients with vertigo developed MD, which was a significantly higher rate than the 12.5% of ALHL patients without vertigo who developed MD. The shorter duration between the onset of symptoms and the initiation of treatment significantly increased improvement in the sum of lower frequency hearing threshold after one month. Conclusions The current study suggests that steroid and diuretic administered together and steroid alone similarly improve the hearing threshold in ALHL patients after one month. We concluded that patients should initiate ALHL treatment as soon as they experience symptoms. ALHL patients should also be notified of their higher risk of developing MD. PMID:27144234

  15. Working memory and referential communication—multimodal aspects of interaction between children with sensorineural hearing impairment and normal hearing peers

    PubMed Central

    Sandgren, Olof; Hansson, Kristina; Sahlén, Birgitta

    2015-01-01

    Whereas the language development of children with sensorineural hearing impairment (SNHI) has repeatedly been shown to differ from that of peers with normal hearing (NH), few studies have used an experimental approach to investigate the consequences on everyday communicative interaction. This mini review gives an overview of a range of studies on children with SNHI and NH exploring intra- and inter-individual cognitive and linguistic systems during communication. Over the last decade, our research group has studied the conversational strategies of Swedish speaking children and adolescents with SNHI and NH using referential communication, an experimental analog to problem-solving in the classroom. We have established verbal and non-verbal control and validation mechanisms, related to working memory capacity and phonological short term memory. We present main findings and future directions relevant for the field of cognitive hearing science and for the clinical and school-based management of children and adolescents with SNHI. PMID:25806012

  16. Sensorineural deafness

    MedlinePlus

    ... at birth (congenital) is most often due to: Genetic syndromes Infections that the mother passes to her baby in the womb ( toxoplasmosis , rubella , herpes ) Sensorineural hearing loss may develop ...

  17. The Prevalence and Characteristics of Tinnitus with Profound Sensori-Neural Hearing Impairment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drukier, Gale S.

    1989-01-01

    Of 331 children (aged 6-18) with profound hearing impairment, 96 were found to have tinnitus. More females than males reported tinnitus. Most of the children with tinnitus were bothered to some degree by it and indicated that the noises adversely affected their ability to hear voices. (JDD)

  18. Altered Contralateral Auditory Cortical Morphology in Unilateral Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Wenliang; Zhang, Wenjuan; Li, Jing; Zhao, Xueyan; Mella, Grace; Lei, Ping; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Haha; Cheng, Huamao; Shi, Hong; Xu, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the cerebral gray matter volume alterations in unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients within the acute period by the voxel-based morphometry method, and to determine if hearing impairment is associated with regional gray matter alterations in unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients. Study Design: Prospective case study. Setting: Tertiary class A teaching hospital. Patients: Thirty-nine patients with left-side unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss and 47 patients with right-side unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Intervention: Diagnostic. Main Outcome Measure: To compare the regional gray matter of unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients and healthy control participants. Results: Compared with control groups, patients with left side unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss had significant gray matter reductions in the right middle temporal gyrus and right superior temporal gyrus, whereas patients with right side unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss showed gray matter decreases in the left superior temporal gyrus and left middle temporal gyrus. A significant negative correlation with the duration of the sudden sensorineural hearing loss (R = −0.427, p = 0.012 for left-side unilateral SSNHL and R = −0.412, p = 0.013 for right-side unilateral SSNHL) was also found in these brain areas. There was no region with increased gray matter found in both groups of unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients. Conclusions: This study confirms that detectable decreased contralateral auditory cortical morphological changes have occurred in unilateral SSNHL patients within the acute period by voxel-based morphometry methods. The gray matter volumes of these brain areas also perform a negative correlation with the duration of the disease, which suggests a gradual brain structural impairment after the progression of the disease. PMID:26595717

  19. [A case of steroid psychosis caused by treatment for acute sensorineural hearing loss].

    PubMed

    Sato, Yuki; Masuda, Masatsugu; Kohno, Naoyuki

    2013-08-01

    A 36 y/o female presented with the chief complaint of diarrhea and vomiting which had lasted for four days, and with a family history of suicide. The first general examination showed severe dehydration with hyponatremia. After admission, she was diagnosed as having isolated adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) deficiency and mixed connective tissue disease, and the steroid replacement therapy was started with the dose equivalent to 7.5 mg/day of prednisolone (PSL). Three days later, she had right sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). She was given 40 mg/day PSL in addition to the steroid replacement therapy. On the next day, she developed a persecutory type of paranoid disorder, and then was given psychiatric medication. After tapering off PSL for SNHL, the delusion began to improve with psychiatric medication. Three weeks after the onset of SNHL, her hearing level had partially recovered. Ten months later, she did not show any psychic instability. A family history of psychosis and the present history of malnutrition and connective tissue disease are risk factors of steroid psychosis. It can develop even with 5 mg PSL if the patient has a risk factor. Careful medical history taking and knowledge about the steroid psychosis will prevent the severe side effects associated with steroid treatment. PMID:24044173

  20. Acute liver impairment after sodium valproate overdose

    PubMed Central

    Waring, William Stephen; Nixon, Andrew C

    2009-01-01

    Liver impairment is a recognised adverse effect of long-term sodium valproate treatment, but there are few reports concerning its occurrence after acute overdose. This report describes a 36-year-old woman who deliberately ingested 32 g of sodium valproate (Epilim). Serum valproate concentration was 4370 μmol/l (630 mg/l) at 4.3 h post-ingestion (therapeutic reference range: 300–600 μmol/l), and the elimination half-life was 14.1 h. Liver biochemistry tests were initially normal but gradually became impaired, and highest alanine aminotransferase (761 U/l) occurred 2.3 days after ingestion. Supportive measures alone were sufficient to allow recovery of liver function. This case indicates that sodium valproate overdose may cause acute hepatocellular injury, even in the absence of pre-existing liver disease. PMID:21686945

  1. MTHFR 677T Is a Strong Determinant of the Degree of Hearing Loss Among Polish Males with Postlingual Sensorineural Hearing Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Pollak, Agnieszka; Mueller-Malesinska, Malgorzata; Lechowicz, Urszula; Skorka, Agata; Korniszewski, Lech; Sobczyk-Kopciol, Agnieszka; Waskiewicz, Anna; Broda, Grazyna; Iwanicka-Pronicka, Katarzyna; Oldak, Monika; Skarzynski, Henryk

    2012-01-01

    Hearing impairment (HI) is the most common sensory handicap. Congenital HI often has a genetic basis, whereas the etiology of nonsyndromic postlingual HI (npHI) usually remains unidentified. Our purpose was to test whether the MTHFR C677T (rs1801133) polymorphism affecting folate metabolism is associated with the occurrence or severity of npHI. We studied rs1801133 genotypes in 647 npHI patients (age <40, sudden sensorineural loss excluded, HI characterized as mean of better ear hearing thresholds for 0.5–8 kHz) and 3273 adult controls from the background population. Genotype distribution among patients and controls was similar, but among male cases (n=302) we found a dose-dependent correlation of MTHFR 677T with the degree of HI (mean thresholds in dB: 38.8, 44.9, and 53.3, for CC, CT, and TT genotypes, respectively; p=0.0013, pcor.=0.017). Among male patients rs1801133 TT significantly increased the risk of severe/profound HI (odds ratio=4.88, p=0.001). Among controls the known effect of MTHFR 677T on plasma total homocysteine was more pronounced in men than in women (p<0.00004 for genotype-sex interaction) suggesting that in Poland folate deficiency is more prevalent in males. In conclusion, we report a novel strong effect of MTHFR 677T among males with npHI. The functional significance of rs1801133 suggests that these patients may benefit from folate supplementation—an intervention which is simple, cheap, and devoid of side effects. PMID:22424391

  2. Sensorineural hearing loss in Lassa fever: two case reports

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Lassa fever is an acute arena viral haemorrhagic fever with varied neurological sequelae. Sensorineural hearing loss is one of the rare complications which occur usually during the convalescent stage of the infection. Case presentation The cases of two female patients aged 19 and 43 years old, respectively, with clinical features suggestive of Lassa fever and confirmed by immunoserological/Lassa-virus-specific reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction are presented. Both patients developed severe sensorineural hearing loss at acute phases of the infections. Conclusion Sensorineural hearing loss from Lassa fever infections can occur in both acute and convalescent stages and is probably induced by an immune response. PMID:19178735

  3. Congenital sensorineural hearing loss

    SciTech Connect

    Mafee, M.F.; Selis, J.E.; Yannias, D.A.; Valvassori, G.E.; Pruzansky, S.; Applebaum, E.L.; Capek, V.

    1984-02-01

    The ears of 47 selected patients with congenital sensorineural hearing loss were examined with complex-motion tomography. The patients were divided into 3 general categories: those with a recognized syndrome, those with sensorineural hearing loss unrelated to any known syndrome, and those with microtia. A great variety of inner ear anomalies was detected, but rarely were these characteristic of a particular clinical entity. The most common finding was the Mondini malformation or one of its variants. Isolated dysplasia of the internal auditory canal or the vestibular aqueduct may be responsible for sensorineural hearing loss in some patients. Patients with microtia may also have severe inner ear abnormalities despite the fact that the outer and inner ears develop embryologically from completely separate systems.

  4. Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Maggie; Heman-Ackah, Selena E.; Shaikh, Jamil A.

    2011-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is commonly encountered in audiologic and otolaryngologic practice. SSNHL is most commonly defined as sensorineural hearing loss of 30dB or greater over at least three contiguous audiometric frequencies occurring within a 72-hr period. Although the differential for SSNHL is vast, for the majority of patients an etiologic factor is not identified. Treatment for SSNHL of known etiology is directed toward that agent, with poor hearing outcomes characteristic for discoverable etiologies that cause inner ear hair cell loss. Steroid therapy is the current mainstay of treatment of idiopathic SSNHL in the United States. The prognosis for hearing recovery for idiopathic SSNHL is dependent on a number of factors including the severity of hearing loss, age, presence of vertigo, and shape of the audiogram. PMID:21606048

  5. Acute stress selectively impairs learning to act.

    PubMed

    de Berker, Archy O; Tirole, Margot; Rutledge, Robb B; Cross, Gemma F; Dolan, Raymond J; Bestmann, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Stress interferes with instrumental learning. However, choice is also influenced by non-instrumental factors, most strikingly by biases arising from Pavlovian associations that facilitate action in pursuit of rewards and inaction in the face of punishment. Whether stress impacts on instrumental learning via these Pavlovian associations is unknown. Here, in a task where valence (reward or punishment) and action (go or no-go) were orthogonalised, we asked whether the impact of stress on learning was action or valence specific. We exposed 60 human participants either to stress (socially-evaluated cold pressor test) or a control condition (room temperature water). We contrasted two hypotheses: that stress would lead to a non-selective increase in the expression of Pavlovian biases; or that stress, as an aversive state, might specifically impact action production due to the Pavlovian linkage between inaction and aversive states. We found support for the second of these hypotheses. Stress specifically impaired learning to produce an action, irrespective of the valence of the outcome, an effect consistent with a Pavlovian linkage between punishment and inaction. This deficit in action-learning was also reflected in pupillary responses; stressed individuals showed attenuated pupillary responses to action, hinting at a noradrenergic contribution to impaired action-learning under stress. PMID:27436299

  6. Acute stress selectively impairs learning to act

    PubMed Central

    de Berker, Archy O.; Tirole, Margot; Rutledge, Robb B.; Cross, Gemma F.; Dolan, Raymond J.; Bestmann, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Stress interferes with instrumental learning. However, choice is also influenced by non-instrumental factors, most strikingly by biases arising from Pavlovian associations that facilitate action in pursuit of rewards and inaction in the face of punishment. Whether stress impacts on instrumental learning via these Pavlovian associations is unknown. Here, in a task where valence (reward or punishment) and action (go or no-go) were orthogonalised, we asked whether the impact of stress on learning was action or valence specific. We exposed 60 human participants either to stress (socially-evaluated cold pressor test) or a control condition (room temperature water). We contrasted two hypotheses: that stress would lead to a non-selective increase in the expression of Pavlovian biases; or that stress, as an aversive state, might specifically impact action production due to the Pavlovian linkage between inaction and aversive states. We found support for the second of these hypotheses. Stress specifically impaired learning to produce an action, irrespective of the valence of the outcome, an effect consistent with a Pavlovian linkage between punishment and inaction. This deficit in action-learning was also reflected in pupillary responses; stressed individuals showed attenuated pupillary responses to action, hinting at a noradrenergic contribution to impaired action-learning under stress. PMID:27436299

  7. Disrupted functional brain connectome in unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haibo; Fan, Wenliang; Zhao, Xueyan; Li, Jing; Zhang, Wenjuan; Lei, Ping; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Haha; Cheng, Huamao; Shi, Hong

    2016-05-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is generally defined as sensorineural hearing loss of 30 dB or greater over at least three contiguous audiometric frequencies and within a three-day period. This hearing loss is usually unilateral and can be associated with tinnitus and vertigo. The pathogenesis of unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss is still unknown, and the alterations in the functional connectivity are suspected to involve one possible pathogenesis. Despite scarce findings with respect to alterations in brain functional networks in unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss, the alterations of the whole brain functional connectome and whether these alterations were already in existence in the acute period remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the alterations of brain functional connectome in two large samples of unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients and to investigate the correlation between unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss characteristics and changes in the functional network properties. Pure tone audiometry was performed to assess hearing ability. Abnormal changes in the peripheral auditory system were examined using conventional magnetic resonance imaging. The graph theoretical network analysis method was used to detect brain connectome alterations in unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Compared with the control groups, both groups of unilateral SSNHL patients exhibited a significantly increased clustering coefficient, global efficiency, and local efficiency but a significantly decreased characteristic path length. In addition, the primary increased nodal strength (e.g., nodal betweenness, hubs) was observed in several regions primarily, including the limbic and paralimbic systems, and in the auditory network brain areas. These findings suggest that the alteration of network organization already exists in unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients within the acute period

  8. Depressive Symptoms and Impaired Physical Function after Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Mendez-Tellez, Pedro A.; Dinglas, Victor D.; Shanholtz, Carl; Husain, Nadia; Dennison, Cheryl R.; Herridge, Margaret S.; Pronovost, Peter J.; Needham, Dale M.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Survivors of acute lung injury (ALI) frequently have substantial depressive symptoms and physical impairment, but the longitudinal epidemiology of these conditions remains unclear. Objectives: To evaluate the 2-year incidence and duration of depressive symptoms and physical impairment after ALI, as well as risk factors for these conditions. Methods: This prospective, longitudinal cohort study recruited patients from 13 intensive care units (ICUs) in four hospitals, with follow-up 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after ALI. The outcomes were Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale depression score greater than or equal to 8 (“depressive symptoms”) in patients without a history of depression before ALI, and two or more dependencies in instrumental activities of daily living (“impaired physical function”) in patients without baseline impairment. Measurements and Main Results: During 2-year follow-up of 186 ALI survivors, the cumulative incidences of depressive symptoms and impaired physical function were 40 and 66%, respectively, with greatest incidence by 3-month follow-up; modal durations were greater than 21 months for each outcome. Risk factors for incident depressive symptoms were education 12 years or less, baseline disability or unemployment, higher baseline medical comorbidity, and lower blood glucose in the ICU. Risk factors for incident impaired physical function were longer ICU stay and prior depressive symptoms. Conclusions: Incident depressive symptoms and impaired physical function are common and long-lasting during the first 2 years after ALI. Interventions targeting potentially modifiable risk factors (e.g., substantial depressive symptoms in early recovery) should be evaluated to improve ALI survivors’ long-term outcomes. PMID:22161158

  9. [Steroid-responsive sensorineural hearing loss with low tone loss].

    PubMed

    Toriya, R; Yamashita, H; Hisashi, K; Komune, S; Komiyama, S

    1995-11-01

    Five cases of sensorineural hearing loss of sudden onset were reviewed. They were not responsive to administration of ATP and Vit. B12, but very responsive to steroid administration. All the patients were male and showed hearing loss in low frequencies in pure tone audiogram. Administration of steroid recovered hearing impairment immediately. However, cessation of steroid aggravated the recovered hearing. Serological and immunological examinations did not show any abnormal findings on all the patients. It was considered that these five patients had characteristics of both steroid-sensitive and low tone-loss type sensorineural hearing losses. PMID:8566929

  10. [New recurrent extended deletion, including GJB2 and GJB6 genes, results in isolated sensorineural hearing impairment with autosomal recessive type of inheritance].

    PubMed

    Bliznets, E A; Makienko, O N; Okuneva, E G; Markova, T G; Poliakov, A V

    2014-04-01

    Hereditary hearing loss with the autosomal recessive type of inheritance of the DFNB 1 genetic type, caused by mutations in the GJB2 gene, is the main reason of innate non-syndromal hearing impairment in most developed countries of the world (including Russia). Intragenic point mutations prevail among the GJB2 gene defectors; however, extended deletions in the DFNB1 locus are also found with considerable frequency in some populations (for example, Spain, Great Britain, France, United States, and Brazil). Among the four known extended deletions, only one deletion affects directly the GJB2 gene sequence and was described in a single family. A new extended deletion in the GJB2 and GJB6 gene sequences (approximately 101 kb in size; NC_000013.10:g.20,757,021_20,858,394del), detected in three unrelated Russian patients, was described and characterized. Ingush origin of this mutation is assumed. If the new deletion is frequent, its detection is very important for the genetic consulting of families with hereditary hearing impairment. PMID:25715449

  11. Sleep restriction acutely impairs glucose tolerance in rats.

    PubMed

    Jha, Pawan K; Foppen, Ewout; Kalsbeek, Andries; Challet, Etienne

    2016-06-01

    Chronic sleep curtailment in humans has been related to impairment of glucose metabolism. To better understand the underlying mechanisms, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of acute sleep deprivation on glucose tolerance in rats. A group of rats was challenged by 4-h sleep deprivation in the early rest period, leading to prolonged (16 h) wakefulness. Another group of rats was allowed to sleep during the first 4 h of the light period and sleep deprived in the next 4 h. During treatment, food was withdrawn to avoid a postmeal rise in plasma glucose. An intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) was performed immediately after the sleep deprivation period. Sleep deprivation at both times of the day similarly impaired glucose tolerance and reduced the early-phase insulin responses to a glucose challenge. Basal concentrations of plasma glucose, insulin, and corticosterone remained unchanged after sleep deprivation. Throughout IVGTTs, plasma corticosterone concentrations were not different between the control and sleep-deprived group. Together, these results demonstrate that independent of time of day and sleep pressure, short sleep deprivation during the resting phase favors glucose intolerance in rats by attenuating the first-phase insulin response to a glucose load. In conclusion, this study highlights the acute adverse effects of only a short sleep restriction on glucose homeostasis. PMID:27354542

  12. Transient electro-oculogram impairment in unilateral acute idiopathic maculopathy.

    PubMed

    Lam, Byron L; Lopez, Pedro F; Dubovy, Sander R; Liu, Mu

    2009-10-01

    Unilateral acute idiopathic maculopathy (UAIM) is a rare distinct entity characterized by acute exudative maculopathy occurring in young persons. The purpose of this case study is to report transient electro-oculogram (EOG) impairment during the acute stage of UAIM. A 16-year-old healthy female with UAIM in the left eye underwent serial visual field, fluorescein angiography, indocyanine green angiography, full-field electroretinogram (ERG), and EOG. Initial visual acuity of the affected left eye was 4/200 with macular subretinal exudates. Indocyanine green angiography disclosed early phase foveal hypocyanescence persisting into late phase along with late phase foci of pinpoint hypocyanescence scattered in the macular and mid-peripheral regions. Standard full-field ERG responses performed 18 days after the onset of symptoms were normal. Standard EOG revealed a marked reduced light-peak to dark-trough amplitude ratio (Arden ratio) of 1.20 left eye (normal >or= 1.7) and a normal ratio of 2.24 right eye. Five weeks later, the left eye improved to 20/50, and the exudative maculopathy resolved with residual irregular foveal hyperpigmentation. Repeat EOG performed 69 days after onset of symptoms showed recovery and normalization of the EOG amplitude ratio of the left eye from 1.20 to 2.54. Transient EOG impairment with a normal full-field ERG may occur during the early stage of UAIM. This finding suggests a more widespread dysfunction of the retinal pigment epithelium in at least some cases of UAIM. PMID:19533190

  13. Pediatric Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Kizilay, Ahmet; Koca, Çiğdem Firat

    2016-06-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss is defined as sudden unilateral or bilateral sensorineural hearing loss with at least 30 dB decrease in threshold in 3 contiguous test frequencies occurring over 72 hours or less. It is rare among children. The mechanism of the process and prognosis of the disorder remains unclear. The current incidence of sudden sensorineural hearing loss among pediatric population is unknown. The authors carried out a retrospective chart analysis of patients under 15 years of age from 2004 to 2015, who consulted to the Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery Department of Inonu University Medical Faculty. Age, sex, number of affected ear and side, audiometric evaluations, medical follow-up, treatment method, duration of treatment recovery, associated complaints; tinnitus and/or vertigo, presence of mumps disease were recorded for each patient. A 4-frequency pure-tone average (500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz) was calculated for each ear. Complete recovery, defined as some hearing level compared with the nonaffected ear, was observed in 3 patients (21.4 %) and there was no partial hearing recovery. The hearing loss of 11 patient remained unchanged after prednisolone treatment. Two of the 11 patients had bilaterally total sensorineural hearing loss and evaluated as appropriate for cochlear implantation. Sex of patient and laterality of hearing loss were not correlated with hearing recovery. Sensorineural hearing loss among pediatrics has been the issue of otolaryngologists. The incidence, etiology, and treatment methods should be more studied. PMID:27171971

  14. Acute and chronic tramadol administration impair spatial memory in rat

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini-Sharifabad, Ali; Rabbani, Mohammad; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad; Bagheri, Narges

    2016-01-01

    Tramadol hydrochloride, a synthetic opioid, acts via a multiple mechanism of action. Tramadol can potentially change the behavioral phenomena. The present study evaluates the effect of tramadol after single or multiple dose/s on the spatial memory of rat using object recognition task (ORT). Tramadol, 20 mg/kg, was injected intraperitoneally (i.p) as a single dose or once a day for 21 successive days considered as acute or chronic treatment respectively. After treatment, animals underwent two trials in the ORT. In the first trial (T1), animals encountered with two identical objects for exploration in a five-minute period. After 1 h, in the T2 trial, the animals were exposed to a familiar and a nonfamiliar object. The exploration times and frequency of the exploration for any objects were recorded. The results showed that tramadol decreased the exploration times for the nonfamiliar object in the T2 trial when administered either as a single dose (P<0.001) or as the multiple dose (P<0.05) compared to the respective control groups. Both acute and chronic tramadol administration eliminated the different frequency of exploration between the familiar and nonfamiliar objects. Our findings revealed that tramadol impaired memory when administered acutely or chronically. Single dose administration of tramadol showed more destructive effect than multiple doses of tramadol on the memory. The observed data can be explained by the inhibitory effects of tramadol on the wide range of neurotransmitters and receptors including muscarinic, N-methyl D-aspartate, AMPA as well as some second messenger like cAMP and cGMP or its stimulatory effect on the opioid, gama amino butyric acid, dopamine or serotonin in the brain. PMID:27051432

  15. Acute stress impairs the retrieval of extinction memory in humans

    PubMed Central

    Raio, Candace M.; Brignoni-Perez, Edith; Goldman, Rachel; Phelps, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Extinction training is a form of inhibitory learning that allows an organism to associate a previously aversive cue with a new, safe outcome. Extinction does not erase a fear association, but instead creates a competing association that may or may not be retrieved when a cue is subsequently encountered. Characterizing the conditions under which extinction learning is expressed is important to enhancing the treatment of anxiety disorders that rely on extinction-based exposure therapy as a primary treatment technique. The ventromedial prefrontal cortex, which plays an important role in the expression of extinction memory, has been shown to be functionally impaired after stress exposure. Further, recent research in rodents found that exposure to stress led to deficits in extinction retrieval, although this has yet to be tested in humans. To explore how stress might influence extinction retrieval in humans, participants underwent a differential aversive learning paradigm, in which one image was probabilistically paired with an aversive shock while the other image denoted safety. Extinction training directly followed, at which point reinforcement was omitted. A day later, participants returned to the lab and either completed an acute stress manipulation (i.e., cold pressor), or a control task, before undergoing an extinction retrieval test. Skin conductance responses and salivary cortisol concentrations were measured throughout each session as indices of fear arousal and neuroendocrine stress responses, respectively. The efficacy of our stress induction was established by observing significant increases in cortisol for the stress condition only. We examined extinction retrieval by comparing conditioned responses during the last trial of extinction (day 1) with that of the first trial of re-extinction (day 2). Groups did not differ on initial fear acquisition or extinction, however, one day later participants in the stress group (n = 27) demonstrated significantly less

  16. Sensorineural hearing loss in otitis media.

    PubMed

    Paparella, M M; Morizono, T; Le, C T; Mancini, F; Sipilä, P; Choo, Y B; Lidén, G; Kim, C S

    1984-01-01

    Additional evidence is presented to support the hypothesis that both acute purulent otitis media (POM) and chronic suppurative otitis media (COM) can cause high frequency sensorineural hearing loss. In selected patients and in animals (chinchillas) in a pilot study using electrophysiological methods, both temporary threshold shifts and permanent threshold shifts of basal cochlear turn involvement were demonstrated in POM. Data of cochlear involvement in 475 ears with bilateral COM, 607 ears with unilateral COM, and 607 ears serving as controls were obtained from six centers in five countries. In group 1 (15 dB or greater), 43% of ears with unilateral COM and 42% of ears with bilateral COM showed losses, for a combined odds ratio eight times that in controls. In group 2 (30 dB or greater), 16% of ears with unilateral COM and 17% of ears with bilateral COM demonstrated, respectively, seven and ten times that in controls. These statistically significant findings influence clinical considerations. PMID:6508134

  17. Neuro-rehabilitation Approach for Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Sekiya, Kenichi; Fukushima, Munehisa; Teismann, Henning; Lagemann, Lothar; Kakigi, Ryusuke; Pantev, Christo; Okamoto, Hidehiko

    2016-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL) is characterized by acute, idiopathic hearing loss. The estimated incidence rate is 5-30 cases per 100,000 people per year. The causes of SSHL and the mechanisms underlying SSHL currently remain unknown. Based on several hypotheses such as a circulatory disturbance to the cochlea, viral infection, and autoimmune disease, pharmaco-therapeutic approaches have been applied to treat SSHL patients; however, the efficacy of the standard treatment, corticosteroid therapy, is still under debate. Exposure to intense sounds has been shown to cause permanent damage to the auditory system; however, exposure to a moderate level enriched acoustic environment after noise trauma may reduce hearing impairments. Several neuroimaging studies recently suggested that the onset of SSHL induced maladaptive cortical reorganization in the human auditory cortex, and that the degree of cortical reorganization in the acute SSHL phase negatively correlated with the recovery rate from hearing loss. This article reports the development of a novel neuro-rehabilitation approach for SSHL, "constraint-induced sound therapy (CIST)". The aim of the CIST protocol is to prevent or reduce maladaptive cortical reorganization by using an enriched acoustic environment. The canal of the intact ear of SSHL patients is plugged in order to motivate them to actively use the affected ear and thereby prevent progress of maladaptive cortical reorganization. The affected ear is also exposed to music via a headphone for 6 hr per day during hospitalization. The CIST protocol appears to be a safe, easy, inexpensive, and effective treatment for SSHL. PMID:26863274

  18. Neuro-rehabilitation Approach for Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Sekiya, Kenichi; Fukushima, Munehisa; Teismann, Henning; Lagemann, Lothar; Kakigi, Ryusuke; Pantev, Christo; Okamoto, Hidehiko

    2016-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL) is characterized by acute, idiopathic hearing loss. The estimated incidence rate is 5-30 cases per 100,000 people per year. The causes of SSHL and the mechanisms underlying SSHL currently remain unknown. Based on several hypotheses such as a circulatory disturbance to the cochlea, viral infection, and autoimmune disease, pharmaco-therapeutic approaches have been applied to treat SSHL patients; however, the efficacy of the standard treatment, corticosteroid therapy, is still under debate. Exposure to intense sounds has been shown to cause permanent damage to the auditory system; however, exposure to a moderate level enriched acoustic environment after noise trauma may reduce hearing impairments. Several neuroimaging studies recently suggested that the onset of SSHL induced maladaptive cortical reorganization in the human auditory cortex, and that the degree of cortical reorganization in the acute SSHL phase negatively correlated with the recovery rate from hearing loss. This article reports the development of a novel neuro-rehabilitation approach for SSHL, "constraint-induced sound therapy (CIST)". The aim of the CIST protocol is to prevent or reduce maladaptive cortical reorganization by using an enriched acoustic environment. The canal of the intact ear of SSHL patients is plugged in order to motivate them to actively use the affected ear and thereby prevent progress of maladaptive cortical reorganization. The affected ear is also exposed to music via a headphone for 6 hr per day during hospitalization. The CIST protocol appears to be a safe, easy, inexpensive, and effective treatment for SSHL. PMID:26863274

  19. Impairment of striatal mitochondrial function by acute paraquat poisoning.

    PubMed

    Czerniczyniec, Analía; Lanza, E M; Karadayian, A G; Bustamante, J; Lores-Arnaiz, S

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondria are essential for survival. Their primary function is to support aerobic respiration and to provide energy for intracellular metabolic pathways. Paraquat is a redox cycling agent capable of generating reactive oxygen species. The aim of the present study was to evaluate changes in cortical and striatal mitochondrial function in an experimental model of acute paraquat toxicity and to compare if the brain areas and the molecular mechanisms involved were similar to those observed after chronic exposure. Sprague-Dawley rats received paraquat (25 mg/Kg i.p.) or saline and were sacrificed after 24 h. Paraquat treatment decreased complex I and IV activity by 37 and 21 % respectively in striatal mitochondria. Paraquat inhibited striatal state 4 and state 3 KCN-sensitive respiration by 80 % and 62 % respectively, indicating a direct effect on respiratory chain. An increase of 2.2 fold in state 4 and 2.3 fold in state 3 in KCN-insensitive respiration was observed in striatal mitochondria from paraquat animals, suggesting that paraquat redox cycling also consumed oxygen. Paraquat treatment increased hydrogen peroxide production (150 %), TBARS production (42 %) and cardiolipin oxidation/depletion (12 %) in striatal mitochondria. Also, changes in mitochondrial polarization was induced after paraquat treatment. However, no changes were observed in any of these parameters in cortical mitochondria from paraquat treated-animals. These results suggest that paraquat treatment induced a clear striatal mitochondrial dysfunction due to both paraquat redox cycling reactions and impairment of the mitochondrial electron transport, causing oxidative damage. As a consequence, mitochondrial dysfunction could probably lead to alterations in cellular bioenergetics. PMID:26350412

  20. Pain Assessment with Cognitively Impaired Older People in the Acute Hospital Setting

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Research reveals that older people continue to experience much suffering from acute and chronic pain conditions. People with cognitive impairment receive less analgesia than their cognitively intact peers. Postoperative pain assessment with older people in the acute hospital setting remains a challenge. Context and culture have a significant impact of pain assessment practices. Due to a paucity of research exploring how pain assessment and management practices with cognitively impaired older people may be realised in the acute hospital setting, there is a need for further research to be conducted. PMID:26524985

  1. Acute stress does not affect the impairing effect of chronic stress on memory retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Ozbaki, Jamile; Goudarzi, Iran; Salmani, Mahmoud Elahdadi; Rashidy-Pour, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Due to the prevalence and pervasiveness of stress in modern life and exposure to both chronic and acute stresses, it is not clear whether prior exposure to chronic stress can influence the impairing effects of acute stress on memory retrieval. This issue was tested in this study. Materials and Methods: Adult male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to the following groups: control, acute, chronic, and chronic + acute stress groups. The rats were trained with six trials per day for 6 consecutive days in the water maze. Following training, the rats were either kept in control conditions or exposed to chronic stress in a restrainer 6 hr/day for 21 days. On day 22, a probe test was done to measure memory retention. Time spent in target and opposite areas, platform location latency, and proximity were used as indices of memory retention. To induce acute stress, 30 min before the probe test, animals received a mild footshock. Results: Stressed animals spent significantly less time in the target quadrant and more time in the opposite quadrant than control animals. Moreover, the stressed animals showed significantly increased platform location latency and proximity as compared with control animals. No significant differences were found in these measures among stress exposure groups. Finally, both chronic and acute stress significantly increased corticosterone levels. Conclusion: Our results indicate that both chronic and acute stress impair memory retrieval similarly. Additionally, the impairing effects of chronic stress on memory retrieval were not influenced by acute stress.

  2. Acute Ethanol Withdrawal Impairs Contextual Learning and Enhances Cued Learning

    PubMed Central

    Tipps, Megan E.; Raybuck, Jonathan D.; Buck, Kari J.; Lattal, K. Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Background Alcohol affects many of the brain regions and neural processes that support learning and memory, and these effects are thought to underlie, at least in part, the development of addiction. Although much work has been done regarding the effects of alcohol intoxication on learning and memory, little is known about the effects of acute withdrawal from a single alcohol exposure. Methods We assess the effects of acute ethanol withdrawal (6 h post-injection with 4 g/kg ethanol) on two forms of fear conditioning (delay and trace fear conditioning) in C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice. The influence of a number of experimental parameters (pre- and post-training withdrawal exposure; foreground/background processing; training strength; non-associative effects) is also investigated. Results Acute ethanol withdrawal during training had a bidirectional effect on fear conditioned responses, decreasing contextual responses and increasing cued responses. These effects were apparent for both trace and delay conditioning in DBA/2J mice and for trace conditioning in C57BL/6J mice; however, C57BL/6J mice were selectively resistant to the effects of acute withdrawal on delay cued responses. Conclusions Our results show that acute withdrawal from a single, initial ethanol exposure is sufficient to alter long-term learning in mice. In addition, the differences between the strains and conditioning paradigms used suggest that specific learning processes can be differentially affected by acute withdrawal in a manner that is distinct from the reported effects of both alcohol intoxication and withdrawal following chronic alcohol exposure. Thus, our results suggest a unique effect of acute alcohol withdrawal on learning and memory processes. PMID:25684050

  3. Acute anxiety impairs accuracy in identifying photographed faces.

    PubMed

    Attwood, Angela S; Penton-Voak, Ian S; Burton, A Mike; Munafò, Marcus R

    2013-08-01

    We investigated whether acutely induced anxiety modifies the ability to match photographed faces. Establishing the extent to which anxiety affects face-matching accuracy is important because of the relevance of face-matching performance to critical security-related applications. Participants (N = 28) completed the Glasgow Face Matching Test twice, once during a 20-min inhalation of medical air and once during a similar inhalation of air enriched with 7.5% CO2, which is a validated method for inducing acute anxiety. Anxiety degraded performance, but only with respect to hits, not false alarms. This finding provides further support for the dissociation between the ability to accurately identify a genuine match between faces and the ability to identify the lack of a match. Problems with the accuracy of facial identification are not resolved even when viewers are presented with a good photographic image of a face, and identification inaccuracy may be heightened when viewers are experiencing acute anxiety. PMID:23780726

  4. [Acute bilateral impaired vision with central scotoma in an 11-year-old boy].

    PubMed

    Pollithy, S; Ach, T; Schaal, K B; Dithmar, S

    2012-09-01

    This article presents a case of acute bilateral impaired vision and central scotoma in an 11-year-old boy. Looking directly into a laser beam of a laser pointer for only a few seconds can cause retinal damage in the form of lesions of the retinal pigment epithelium and the photoreceptor layer, up to retinal hemorrhage. Patients often complain about impaired vision and a central scotoma of the affected eye. PMID:22740016

  5. Sinus Balloon Dilation as Treatment for Acute Sphenoid Sinusitis with Impaired Vision for a Child

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yin; Chen, Kangbing; Wang, Zonggui

    2016-01-01

    This paper is about sinus balloon dilatation in treatment of acute left sphenoid sinusitis with left impaired vision in a child. Balloon catheter dilatation (BCD) of the sinus ostia is a new technique. It has been shown to be a minimally invasive technique to manage chronic sinusitis. However, this method is rarely used in the treatment of acute sinusitis. So far, we know of no reported cases of sinus balloon dilatation in treatment of this case, especially for children. PMID:27006660

  6. Reduced Acute Recovery from Alcohol Impairment in Adults with ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Walter; Milich, Richard; Fillmore, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Prior research has found that adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) show increased sensitivity to the impairing effects of alcohol (Weafer et al. 2009). However, these studies have focused exclusively on the ascending limb of the blood alcohol concentration (BAC) curve, and it is unclear whether these adults continue to show increased sensitivity during the later phase of the dose as BAC is declining. Objective This study tested the hypothesis that those with ADHD would display increased response to alcohol during the ascending limb of the BAC curve and less recovery from the impairing effects during the descending limb. Methods Adult social drinkers with ADHD and control adults completed measures of motor coordination, reaction time, and subjective intoxication twice following 0.64 g/kg alcohol and placebo. The measures were administered during the ascending limb of the BAC curve and again during the descending limb. Results During the ascending limb, alcohol reduced motor coordination, slowed reaction time (RT), and increased self-reports of subjective intoxication. Those with ADHD displayed greater impairment of motor coordination compared with controls. During the descending limb, controls reported diminished subjective intoxication and showed recovery from the impairing effects of alcohol on both their motor coordination and their RT. Those with ADHD showed reduced subjective intoxication and faster RT during this time, but they did not recover motor control. Conclusions The protracted time course of motor impairment in adults with ADHD despite reductions in subjective intoxication may contribute to poor decision making and diminished behavioral control in this group. PMID:23430161

  7. Profile and Stability of Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Persistent Pulmonary Hypertension of the Newborn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Joseph P.; Hendricks-Munoz, Karen

    1991-01-01

    This study found that 19 of 51 infants with persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn were diagnosed with sensorineural hearing loss, an incidence 25 times greater than that of intensive care unit infants in general. Treatment durations with mechanical ventilation were significantly longer for the hearing-impaired group compared to the…

  8. Cognitive Impairment and Whole Brain Diffusion in Patients with Neuromyelitis Optica after Acute Relapse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Diane; Wu, Qizhu; Chen, Xiuying; Zhao, Daidi; Gong, Qiyong; Zhou, Hongyu

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study investigated cognitive impairments and their correlations with fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) in patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO) without visible lesions on conventional brain MRI during acute relapse. Twenty one patients with NMO and 21 normal control subjects received several cognitive…

  9. Spontaneous improvement in sensorineural hearing loss developed as a complication of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Sameen; Qadir, Maqbool; Salat, Muhammad Sohail

    2015-09-01

    Icterus neonatorum, or neonatal jaundice, is defined as a total serum bilirubin level above 5mg/dl. Acute bilirubin encephalopathy and kernicterus are known to be the two major complications associated with it, resulting in neurotoxic effects, including sensorineural hearing loss, hypotonia, delayed motor skills and intellectual deficits. We report two similar cases of neonatal jaundice requiring exchange transfusion that subsequently developed sensorineural hearing loss. Follow-up at the end of 1year revealed spontaneous recovery of hearing with normal speech. This report aims at increasing awareness of this condition among physicians to allow early detection of risk factors and prompt management and follow-up. PMID:26338755

  10. Impaired lipid clearance in patients with previous acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán, S; Nervi, F; Llanos, O; León, P; Valdivieso, V

    1985-01-01

    Fasting serum triglycerides were measured in 52 patients who had sustained an attack of pancreatitis (gall stone related 33, alcoholism six) at least six months earlier. Several patients (23%) had raised fasting serum triglycerides, with a type IV phenotype in all but one patient. The 40 patients with normal fasting serum triglycerides received an oral load of 100 g sunflower oil to compare their clearance of dietary triglycerides with that of a control group of 54 subjects. The clearance of ingested triglycerides was significantly impaired in the patients - irrespective of the presumed aetiological factor, or clinical condition associated with pancreatitis - compared with the clearance in controls. A triglyceride tolerance test is the only way to detect those patients in whom a future attack of pancreatitis may be precipitated by a diet rich in fat, or endogenous over production of triglycerides as after an alcoholic debauch. PMID:4029716

  11. Constraint-induced sound therapy for sudden sensorineural hearing loss--behavioral and neurophysiological outcomes.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Hidehiko; Fukushima, Munehisa; Teismann, Henning; Lagemann, Lothar; Kitahara, Tadashi; Inohara, Hidenori; Kakigi, Ryusuke; Pantev, Christo

    2014-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss is characterized by acute, idiopathic hearing deterioration. We report here the development and evaluation of "constraint-induced sound therapy", which is based on a well-established neuro-rehabilitation approach, and which is characterized by the plugging of the intact ear ("constraint") and the simultaneous, extensive stimulation of the affected ear with music. The sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients who received the constraint-induced sound therapy in addition to the standard corticosteroid therapy showed significantly better recovery of hearing function compared to those who had only received corticosteroid treatments. Additionally, the brain activity obtained in a subgroup of patients suggested that the constraint-induced sound therapy could have prevented maladaptive auditory cortex reorganization. Constraint-induced sound therapy thus appears to be an effective, practical, and safe treatment option for sudden sensorineural hearing loss. PMID:24473277

  12. Constraint-induced sound therapy for sudden sensorineural hearing loss – behavioral and neurophysiological outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Hidehiko; Fukushima, Munehisa; Teismann, Henning; Lagemann, Lothar; Kitahara, Tadashi; Inohara, Hidenori; Kakigi, Ryusuke; Pantev, Christo

    2014-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss is characterized by acute, idiopathic hearing deterioration. We report here the development and evaluation of “constraint-induced sound therapy”, which is based on a well-established neuro-rehabilitation approach, and which is characterized by the plugging of the intact ear (“constraint”) and the simultaneous, extensive stimulation of the affected ear with music. The sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients who received the constraint-induced sound therapy in addition to the standard corticosteroid therapy showed significantly better recovery of hearing function compared to those who had only received corticosteroid treatments. Additionally, the brain activity obtained in a subgroup of patients suggested that the constraint-induced sound therapy could have prevented maladaptive auditory cortex reorganization. Constraint-induced sound therapy thus appears to be an effective, practical, and safe treatment option for sudden sensorineural hearing loss. PMID:24473277

  13. Does acute exposure to aldehydes impair pulmonary function and structure?

    PubMed

    Abreu, Mariana de; Neto, Alcendino Cândido; Carvalho, Giovanna; Casquillo, Natalia Vasconcelos; Carvalho, Niedja; Okuro, Renata; Ribeiro, Gabriel C Motta; Machado, Mariana; Cardozo, Aléxia; Silva, Aline Santos E; Barboza, Thiago; Vasconcellos, Luiz Ricardo; Rodrigues, Danielle Araujo; Camilo, Luciana; Carneiro, Leticia de A M; Jandre, Frederico; Pino, Alexandre V; Giannella-Neto, Antonio; Zin, Walter A; Corrêa, Leonardo Holanda Travassos; Souza, Marcio Nogueira de; Carvalho, Alysson R

    2016-07-15

    Mixtures of anhydrous ethyl alcohol and gasoline substituted for pure gasoline as a fuel in many Brazilian vehicles. Consequently, the concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as ketones, other organic compounds, and particularly aldehydes increased in many Brazilian cities. The current study aims to investigate whether formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, or mixtures of both impair lung function, morphology, inflammatory and redox responses at environmentally relevant concentrations. For such purpose, C57BL/6 mice were exposed to either medical compressed air or to 4 different mixtures of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde. Eight hours later animals were anesthetized, paralyzed and lung mechanics and morphology, inflammatory cells and IL-1β, KC, TNF-α, IL-6, CCL2, MCP-1 contents, superoxide dismutase and catalalase activities were determined. The extra pulmonary respiratory tract was also analyzed. No differences could be detected between any exposed and control groups. In conclusion, no morpho-functional alterations were detected in exposed mice in relation to the control group. PMID:27102012

  14. Human mitochondrial oxidative capacity is acutely impaired following burn trauma

    PubMed Central

    Cree, Melanie G.; Fram, Ricki Y.; Herndon, David N.; Qian, Ting; Angel, Carlos; Green, Justin M.; Mlcak, Ronald; Aarsland, Asle; Wolfe, Robert R.

    2008-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial proteins and genes are damaged after burn injury in animals but have not previously been assessed in human burn patients. Methods The rates of maximal muscle mitochondrial oxidative capacity(ATP production) and uncoupled oxidation(heat production) for both palmitate and pyruvate were measured in muscle biopsies from 40 children sustaining burns >40% body surface area and from 13 healthy children controls. Results Maximal mitochondrial oxidation of pyruvate and palmitate were reduced in burn patients compared to controls (4.0±0.2:1.9±0.1 µmolO2/citrate synthase activity/mg protein/min pyruvate; Control:Burn;P<0.001 and 3.0±0.1:0.9±0.03 µmolO2/citrate synthase activity/mg protein/min palmatyl CoA; Control:Burn;P=0.003). Uncoupled oxidation was the same between groups. Conclusions The maximal coupled mitochondrial oxidative capacity is severely impaired after burn injury, although there are no alterations in the rate of uncoupled oxidative capacity. It may be that the ratio of these indicates that a larger portion of energy production in trauma patients is wasted through uncoupling, rather than used for healing. PMID:18639661

  15. Dynamic Cerebral Autoregulation Is Acutely Impaired during Maximal Apnoea in Trained Divers

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Troy J.; Kavanagh, Justin J.; Breskovic, Toni; Johnson, Bruce D.; Dujic, Zeljko

    2014-01-01

    Aims To examine whether dynamic cerebral autoregulation is acutely impaired during maximal voluntary apnoea in trained divers. Methods Mean arterial pressure (MAP), cerebral blood flow-velocity (CBFV) and end-tidal partial pressures of O2 and CO2 (PETO2 and PETCO2) were measured in eleven trained, male apnoea divers (28±2 yr; 182±2 cm, 76±7 kg) during maximal “dry” breath holding. Dynamic cerebral autoregulation was assessed by determining the strength of phase synchronisation between MAP and CBFV during maximal apnoea. Results The strength of phase synchronisation between MAP and CBFV increased from rest until the end of maximal voluntary apnoea (P<0.05), suggesting that dynamic cerebral autoregulation had weakened by the apnoea breakpoint. The magnitude of impairment in dynamic cerebral autoregulation was strongly, and positively related to the rise in PETCO2 observed during maximal breath holding (R2 = 0.67, P<0.05). Interestingly, the impairment in dynamic cerebral autoregulation was not related to the fall in PETO2 induced by apnoea (R2 = 0.01, P = 0.75). Conclusions This study is the first to report that dynamic cerebral autoregulation is acutely impaired in trained divers performing maximal voluntary apnoea. Furthermore, our data suggest that the impaired autoregulatory response is related to the change in PETCO2, but not PETO2, during maximal apnoea in trained divers. PMID:24498340

  16. Studying nursing interventions in acutely ill, cognitively impaired older adults

    PubMed Central

    McCauley, Kathleen; Bradway, Christine; Hirschman, Karen B; Naylor, Mary D

    2015-01-01

    Background Between one and two of every five hospitalized older adults have cognitive deficits, often not accurately assessed or well managed. Cognitive impairment adds substantially to the complexity of these patients’ care, places them at high risk for poor outcomes and increases the cost of health care. Methods We describe three evidence-based interventions, each capitalizing on the unique contributions of nurses and designed to improve outcomes of hospitalized older adults who have cognitive deficits. Interventions of varying intensity were compared across three hospitals (Phase I) and subsequently within the same hospitals (Phase II). All enrolled patients were screened during their index hospitalizations and cognitive deficits were communicated to relevant health care team members (Augmented Standard Care-ASC, lowest intensity). At one hospital, ASC was the only intervention. Patients at a second hospital also had care influenced by specially prepared registered nurses (Resource Nurse Care-RNC, medium intensity). Finally, patients at third hospital also received advanced practice nurse coordinated care (Transitional Care Model-TCM, higher intensity). In Phase II, newly enrolled patients at these same hospitals all received the TCM. We summarize major themes from review of multiple data sources and researcher recollections related to facilitators and barriers to implementing a complex research study. Findings Effective implementation of the three intervention strategies depended on clinician engagement and communication; degree of participation by nurses in the educational program with subsequent practice improvement; and success of advanced practice nurses in implementing the TCM with both with patients, family caregivers and clinicians. Implications Based on lessons learned in implementing complex research studies within the “real world” of clinical practice settings, recommendations focus on strengthening facilitators, minimizing barriers and gaining

  17. Impaired sympathetic vascular regulation in humans after acute dynamic exercise.

    PubMed Central

    Halliwill, J R; Taylor, J A; Eckberg, D L

    1996-01-01

    1. The reduction in vascular resistance which accompanies acute dynamic exercise does not subside immediately during recovery, resulting in a post-exercise hypotension. This sustained vasodilatation suggests that sympathetic vascular regulation is altered after exercise. 2. Therefore, we assessed the baroreflex control of sympathetic outflow in response to arterial pressure changes, and transduction of sympathetic activity into vascular resistance during a sympatho-excitatory stimulus (isometric handgrip exercise) after either exercise (60 min cycling at 60% peak aerobic power (VO2,peak)) or sham treatment (60 min seated rest) in nine healthy subjects. 3. Both muscle sympathetic nerve activity and calf vascular resistance were reduced after exercise (-29.7 +/- 8.8 and -25.3 +/- 9.1%, both P < 0.05). The baroreflex relation between diastolic pressure and sympathetic outflow was shifted downward after exercise (post-exercise intercept, 218 +/- 38 total integrated activity (heartbeat)-1; post-sham intercept, 318 +/- 51 total integrated activity (heartbeat)-1, P < 0.05), indicating less sympathetic outflow across all diastolic pressures. Further, the relation between sympathetic activity and vascular resistance was attenuated after exercise (post-exercise slope, 0.0031 +/- 0.0007 units (total integrated activity)-1 min; post-sham slope, 0.0100 +/- 0.0033 units (total integrated activity)-1 min, P < 0.05), indicating less vasoconstriction with any increase in sympathetic activity. 4. Thus, both baroreflex control of sympathetic outflow and the transduction of sympathetic activity into vascular resistance are altered after dynamic exercise. We conclude that the vasodilation which underlies post-exercise hypotension results from both neural and vascular phenomena. Images Figure 7 PMID:8866370

  18. Impaired sympathetic vascular regulation in humans after acute dynamic exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halliwill, J. R.; Taylor, J. A.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1996-01-01

    1. The reduction in vascular resistance which accompanies acute dynamic exercise does not subside immediately during recovery, resulting in a post-exercise hypotension. This sustained vasodilatation suggests that sympathetic vascular regulation is altered after exercise. 2. Therefore, we assessed the baroreflex control of sympathetic outflow in response to arterial pressure changes, and transduction of sympathetic activity into vascular resistance during a sympatho-excitatory stimulus (isometric handgrip exercise) after either exercise (60 min cycling at 60% peak aerobic power (VO2,peak)) or sham treatment (60 min seated rest) in nine healthy subjects. 3. Both muscle sympathetic nerve activity and calf vascular resistance were reduced after exercise (-29.7 +/- 8.8 and -25.3 +/- 9.1%, both P < 0.05). The baroreflex relation between diastolic pressure and sympathetic outflow was shifted downward after exercise (post-exercise intercept, 218 +/- 38 total integrated activity (heartbeat)-1; post-sham intercept, 318 +/- 51 total integrated activity (heartbeat)-1, P < 0.05), indicating less sympathetic outflow across all diastolic pressures. Further, the relation between sympathetic activity and vascular resistance was attenuated after exercise (post-exercise slope, 0.0031 +/- 0.0007 units (total integrated activity)-1 min; post-sham slope, 0.0100 +/- 0.0033 units (total integrated activity)-1 min, P < 0.05), indicating less vasoconstriction with any increase in sympathetic activity. 4. Thus, both baroreflex control of sympathetic outflow and the transduction of sympathetic activity into vascular resistance are altered after dynamic exercise. We conclude that the vasodilation which underlies post-exercise hypotension results from both neural and vascular phenomena.

  19. Impaired Bile Acid Homeostasis in Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ling; Voskuijl, Wieger; Mouzaki, Marialena; Groen, Albert K.; Alexander, Jennifer; Bourdon, Celine; Wang, Alice; Versloot, Christian J.; Di Giovanni, Valeria; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Bandsma, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Objective Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) is a major cause of mortality in children under 5 years and is associated with hepatic steatosis. Bile acids are synthesized in the liver and participate in dietary fat digestion, regulation of energy expenditure, and immune responses. The aim of this work was to investigate whether SAM is associated with clinically relevant changes in bile acid homeostasis. Design An initial discovery cohort with 5 healthy controls and 22 SAM-patients was used to identify altered bile acid homeostasis. A follow up cohort of 40 SAM-patients were then studied on admission and 3 days after clinical stabilization to assess recovery in bile acid metabolism. Recruited children were 6–60 months old and admitted for SAM in Malawi. Clinical characteristics, feces and blood were collected on admission and prior to discharge. Bile acids, 7α-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one (C4) and FGF-19 were quantified. Results On admission, total serum bile acids were higher in children with SAM than in healthy controls and glycine-conjugates accounted for most of this accumulation with median and interquartile range (IQR) of 24.6 μmol/L [8.6–47.7] compared to 1.9 μmol/L [1.7–3.3] (p = 0.01) in controls. Total serum bile acid concentrations did not decrease prior to discharge. On admission, fecal conjugated bile acids were lower and secondary bile acids higher at admission compared to pre- discharge, suggesting increased bacterial conversion. FGF19 (Fibroblast growth factor 19), a marker of intestinal bile acid signaling, was higher on admission and was associated with decreased C4 concentrations as a marker of bile acid synthesis. Upon recovery, fecal calprotectin, a marker of intestinal inflammation, was lower. Conclusion SAM is associated with increased serum bile acid levels despite reduced synthesis rates. In SAM, there tends to be increased deconjugation of bile acids and conversion from primary to secondary bile acids, which may contribute to the

  20. Genetics Home Reference: sensorineural deafness and male infertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... deafness and male infertility sensorineural deafness and male infertility Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Sensorineural deafness and male infertility is a condition characterized by hearing loss and ...

  1. Sensorineural hearing loss in chronic otitis media.

    PubMed

    MacAndie, C; O'Reilly, B F

    1999-06-01

    Although many studies have demonstrated an association between chronic otitis media (COM) and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), there still remains disagreement about the relationship. A retrospective study was conducted to examine the relationship between sensorineural hearing loss and chronic otitis media. Forty-one patients met the following criteria: unilateral COM and no history of head injury, meningitis or previous otological surgery. The differences in preoperative bone conduction threshold between diseased and control (contralateral normal) ear were statistically significant (P < 0.01) and varied from 5.24 to 9.02 dB across the frequency range. The effect of duration of disease on the degree of SNHL was also analysed but no correlation was found. The presence of cholesteatoma and/or ossicular erosion was not associated with a significantly increased risk of sensorineural hearing loss. PMID:10384849

  2. Neurophysiological sensitivity for impaired phonological processing in the acute stage of aphasia.

    PubMed

    Aerts, Annelies; van Mierlo, Pieter; Hartsuiker, Robert J; Santens, Patrick; De Letter, Miet

    2015-10-01

    The present study aimed to investigate neurophysiological substrates of phoneme and word processing in 10 patients with acute aphasia (PWA). More specifically, phoneme discrimination was studied in a passive and active oddball task with respect to different phonemic contrasts, while lexical detection was investigated by presenting infrequent pseudowords among frequent words in a passive oddball task. Concerning phoneme discrimination, PWA in the acute stage had smaller MMN and P300 amplitudes than the norm group for voicing, whereas for place and manner they only demonstrated smaller P300 amplitudes. PWA showed a distinct pattern of impaired phonemic contrast sensitivity, with place displaying the largest amplitude and voicing the smallest. Concerning lexical detection, pseudowords elicited larger responses than words in both groups, but with a delay and larger P200 amplitude for pseudowords in PWA compared to the norm group. For clinical practice, passive tasks seem more suitable than active tasks in acute aphasia. PMID:26197257

  3. 38 CFR 17.149 - Sensori-neural aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sensori-neural aids. 17... Prosthetic, Sensory, and Rehabilitative Aids § 17.149 Sensori-neural aids. (a) Notwithstanding any other provision of this part, VA will furnish needed sensori-neural aids (i.e., eyeglasses, contact...

  4. 38 CFR 17.149 - Sensori-neural aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sensori-neural aids. 17... Prosthetic, Sensory, and Rehabilitative Aids § 17.149 Sensori-neural aids. (a) Notwithstanding any other provision of this part, VA will furnish needed sensori-neural aids (i.e., eyeglasses, contact...

  5. 38 CFR 17.149 - Sensori-neural aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sensori-neural aids. 17... Prosthetic, Sensory, and Rehabilitative Aids § 17.149 Sensori-neural aids. (a) Notwithstanding any other provision of this part, VA will furnish needed sensori-neural aids (i.e., eyeglasses, contact...

  6. 38 CFR 17.149 - Sensori-neural aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sensori-neural aids. 17... Prosthetic, Sensory, and Rehabilitative Aids § 17.149 Sensori-neural aids. (a) Notwithstanding any other provision of this part, VA will furnish needed sensori-neural aids (i.e., eyeglasses, contact...

  7. 38 CFR 17.149 - Sensori-neural aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sensori-neural aids. 17... Prosthetic, Sensory, and Rehabilitative Aids § 17.149 Sensori-neural aids. (a) Notwithstanding any other provision of this part, VA will furnish needed sensori-neural aids (i.e., eyeglasses, contact...

  8. Impairment of inhibitory control processing related to acute psychotomimetic effects of cannabis.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Sagnik; Atakan, Z; Martin-Santos, R; Crippa, J A; Kambeitz, J; Malhi, S; Giampietro, V; Williams, S; Brammer, M; Rubia, K; Collier, D A; McGuire, P K

    2015-01-01

    Cannabis use can induce acute psychotic symptoms and increase the risk of schizophrenia. Impairments in inhibitory control and processing are known to occur both under the influence of cannabis and in schizophrenia. Whether cannabis-induced impairment in inhibitory processing is related to the acute induction of psychotic symptoms under its influence is unclear. We investigated the effects of acute oral administration of 10mg of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-9-THC), the main psychoactive ingredient of cannabis, on inhibitory control and regional brain activation during inhibitory processing in humans and examined whether these effects are related to the induction of psychotic symptoms under its influence using a repeated-measures, placebo-controlled, double-blind, within-subject design. We studied thirty-six healthy, English-speaking, right-handed men with minimal previous exposure to cannabis and other illicit drugs twice using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while they performed a response inhibition (Go/No-Go) task. Relative to placebo, delta-9-THC caused transient psychotic symptoms, anxiety, intoxication and sedation, inhibition errors and impaired inhibition efficiency. Severity of psychotic symptoms was directly correlated with inhibition error frequency and inversely with inhibition efficiency under the influence of delta-9-THC. Delta-9-THC attenuated left inferior frontal activation which was inversely correlated with the frequency of inhibition errors and severity of psychotic symptoms and positively with inhibition efficiency under its influence. These results provide experimental evidence that impairments in cognitive processes involved in the inhibitory control of thoughts and actions and inferior frontal function under the influence of cannabis may have a role in the emergence of transient psychotic symptoms under its influence. PMID:25532865

  9. The interaction of acute and chronic stress impairs model-based behavioral control.

    PubMed

    Radenbach, Christoph; Reiter, Andrea M F; Engert, Veronika; Sjoerds, Zsuzsika; Villringer, Arno; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Deserno, Lorenz; Schlagenhauf, Florian

    2015-03-01

    It is suggested that acute stress shifts behavioral control from goal-directed, model-based toward habitual, model-free strategies. Recent findings indicate that interindividual differences in the cortisol stress response influence model-based decision-making. Although not yet investigated in humans, animal studies show that chronic stress also shifts decision-making toward more habitual behavior. Here, we ask whether acute stress and individual vulnerability factors, such as stress reactivity and previous exposure to stressful life events, impact the balance between model-free and model-based control systems. To test this, 39 male participants (21-30 years old) were exposed to a potent psychosocial stressor (Trier Social Stress Test) and a control condition in a within-subjects design before they performed a sequential decision-making task which evaluates the balance between the two systems. Physiological and subjective stress reactivity was assessed before, during, and after acute stress exposure. By means of computational modeling, we demonstrate that interindividual variability in stress reactivity predicts impairments in model-based decision-making. Whereas acute psychosocial stress did not alter model-based behavioral control, we found chronic and acute stress to interact in their detrimental effect on decision-making: subjects with high but not low chronic stress levels as indicated by stressful life events exhibited reduced model-based control in response to acute psychosocial stress. These findings emphasize that stress reactivity and chronic stress play an important role in mediating the relationship between stress and decision-making. Our results might stimulate new insights into the interplay between chronic and acute stress, attenuated model-based control, and the pathogenesis of various psychiatric diseases. PMID:25662093

  10. Impaired gas exchange: accuracy of defining characteristics in children with acute respiratory infection1

    PubMed Central

    Pascoal, Lívia Maia; Lopes, Marcos Venícios de Oliveira; Chaves, Daniel Bruno Resende; Beltrão, Beatriz Amorim; da Silva, Viviane Martins; Monteiro, Flávia Paula Magalhães

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to analyze the accuracy of the defining characteristics of the Impaired gas exchange nursing diagnosis in children with acute respiratory infection. METHOD: open prospective cohort study conducted with 136 children monitored for a consecutive period of at least six days and not more than ten days. An instrument based on the defining characteristics of the Impaired gas exchange diagnosis and on literature addressing pulmonary assessment was used to collect data. The accuracy means of all the defining characteristics under study were computed. RESULTS: the Impaired gas exchange diagnosis was present in 42.6% of the children in the first assessment. Hypoxemia was the characteristic that presented the best measures of accuracy. Abnormal breathing presented high sensitivity, while restlessness, cyanosis, and abnormal skin color showed high specificity. All the characteristics presented negative predictive values of 70% and cyanosis stood out by its high positive predictive value. CONCLUSION: hypoxemia was the defining characteristic that presented the best predictive ability to determine Impaired gas exchange. Studies of this nature enable nurses to minimize variability in clinical situations presented by the patient and to identify more precisely the nursing diagnosis that represents the patient's true clinical condition. PMID:26155010

  11. Dextran sulfate sodium-induced acute colitis impairs dermal lymphatic function in mice

    PubMed Central

    Agollah, Germaine D; Wu, Grace; Peng, Ho-Lan; Kwon, Sunkuk

    2015-01-01

    , indicating impaired uptake of a lipid tracer within mesenteric lymphatics. Our in vivo NIRF imaging data demonstrated dilated dermal lymphatic vessels, which were confirmed by immunohistochemical staining of lymphatic vessels, and significantly reduced lymphatic contractile function in the skin of mice with DSS-induced acute colitis. Quantification of the fluorescent intensity remaining in the depot as a function of time showed that there was significantly higher Alexa680-BSA fluorescence in mice with DSS-induced acute colitis compared to pre-treatment with DSS, indicative of impaired lymphatic drainage. CONCLUSION: The lymphatics are locally and systemically altered in acute colitis, and functional NIRF imaging is useful for noninvasively monitoring systemic lymphatic changes during inflammation. PMID:26668501

  12. Clinical Features and Prognosis of Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss Secondary to Intralabyrinthine Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Woo; Park, Yoon Ah; Park, Sang Man; Kong, Tae Hoon; Park, Sang Yoo; Bong, Jeong Pyo; Park, Dong-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives A number of etiologies of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL) have been proposed, including viral infection, vascular disturbance, and immune-mediated mechanisms. Intralabyrinthine hemorrhage (ILH) as a cause of SSNHL is extremely rare, and there have been no studies defining the characteristics of hearing impairment and prognosis in patients with ISSNHL due to ILH. This study aimed to investigate the difference in impaired hearing patterns and prognosis for hearing recovery between patients with ISSNHL due to ILH confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and sex- and age-matched patients with ISSNHL due to causes other than ILH. Subjects and Methods We compared the results of audiometry and MRI in 12 patients who had ILH on MRI (hemorrhage group) and in 23 sex- and age-matched controls without abnormal findings related to their hearing loss on MRI (non-hemorrhage group). Initial hearing impairment, progression, and recovery of hearing loss were compared between the two groups. Results A majority of patients (92%) in the hemorrhage group complained of dizziness. Initial hearing impairment was more frequent in the hemorrhage group than in the non-hemorrhage group (94.09±35.9 vs. 66.66±30.1, p-value=0.036). The final recovery threshold in the hemorrhage group was worse (78.19±46.26 vs. 37.17±31.96, p-value=0.014) than that in the non-hemorrhage group. In the hemorrhage group, hearing recovery seemed to occur less often at high frequencies (2,000, 4,000, and 8,000 Hz) than at low frequencies (250, 500, and 1,000 Hz). Conclusions The presence of ILH was associated with poor hearing prognosis and the occurrence of vertigo. The abrupt onset of hearing loss associated with vertigo and the presence of hyperresonance on fat-suppressed T1-weighted MRI images of labyrinthic fluid strongly suggests acute intralabyrinthine hemorrhage, and is predictive of considerable hearing impairment and poor prognosis. PMID:27144231

  13. Cannabis and tolerance: acute drug impairment as a function of cannabis use history

    PubMed Central

    Ramaekers, J. G.; van Wel, J. H.; Spronk, D. B.; Toennes, S. W.; Kuypers, K. P. C.; Theunissen, E. L.; Verkes, R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis use history as predictor of neurocognitive response to cannabis intoxication remains subject to scientific and policy debates. The present study assessed the influence of cannabis on neurocognition in cannabis users whose cannabis use history ranged from infrequent to daily use. Drug users (N = 122) received acute doses of cannabis (300 μg/kg THC), cocaine HCl (300 mg) and placebo. Cocaine served as active control for demonstrating neurocognitive test sensitivity. Executive function, impulse control, attention, psychomotor function and subjective intoxication were significantly worse after cannabis administration relative to placebo. Cocaine improved psychomotor function and attention, impaired impulse control and increased feelings of intoxication. Acute effects of cannabis and cocaine on neurocognitive performance were similar across cannabis users irrespective of their cannabis use history. Absence of tolerance implies that that frequent cannabis use and intoxication can be expected to interfere with neurocognitive performance in many daily environments such as school, work or traffic. PMID:27225696

  14. Cannabis and tolerance: acute drug impairment as a function of cannabis use history.

    PubMed

    Ramaekers, J G; van Wel, J H; Spronk, D B; Toennes, S W; Kuypers, K P C; Theunissen, E L; Verkes, R J

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis use history as predictor of neurocognitive response to cannabis intoxication remains subject to scientific and policy debates. The present study assessed the influence of cannabis on neurocognition in cannabis users whose cannabis use history ranged from infrequent to daily use. Drug users (N = 122) received acute doses of cannabis (300 μg/kg THC), cocaine HCl (300 mg) and placebo. Cocaine served as active control for demonstrating neurocognitive test sensitivity. Executive function, impulse control, attention, psychomotor function and subjective intoxication were significantly worse after cannabis administration relative to placebo. Cocaine improved psychomotor function and attention, impaired impulse control and increased feelings of intoxication. Acute effects of cannabis and cocaine on neurocognitive performance were similar across cannabis users irrespective of their cannabis use history. Absence of tolerance implies that that frequent cannabis use and intoxication can be expected to interfere with neurocognitive performance in many daily environments such as school, work or traffic. PMID:27225696

  15. Risk Factors for Physical Impairment after Acute Lung Injury in a National, Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Wozniak, Amy W.; Hough, Catherine L.; Morris, Peter E.; Dinglas, Victor D.; Jackson, James C.; Mendez-Tellez, Pedro A.; Shanholtz, Carl; Ely, E. Wesley; Colantuoni, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Existing studies of risk factors for physical impairments in acute lung injury (ALI) survivors were potentially limited by single-center design or relatively small sample size. Objectives: To evaluate risk factors for three measures of physical impairments commonly experienced by survivors of ALI in the first year after hospitalization. Methods: A prospective, longitudinal study of 6- and 12-month physical outcomes (muscle strength, 6-minute-walk distance, and Short Form [SF]-36 Physical Function score) for 203 survivors of ALI enrolled from 12 hospitals participating in the ARDS Network randomized trials. Multivariable regression analyses evaluated the independent association of critical illness–related variables and intensive care interventions with impairments in each physical outcome measure, after adjusting for patient demographics, comorbidities, and baseline functional status. Measurements and Main Results: At 6 and 12 months, respectively, mean (± SD) values for strength (presented as proportion of maximum strength score evaluated using manual muscle testing) was 92% (± 8%) and 93% (± 9%), 6-minute-walk distance (as percent-predicted) was 64% (± 22%) and 67% (± 26%), and SF-36 Physical Function score (as percent-predicted) was 61% (± 36%) and 67% (± 37%). After accounting for patient baseline status, there was significant association and statistical interaction of mean daily dose of corticosteroids and intensive care unit length of stay with impairments in physical outcomes. Conclusions: Patients had substantial impairments, from predicted values, for 6-minute-walk distance and SF-36 Physical Function outcome measures. Minimizing corticosteroid dose and implementing existing evidence-based methods to reduce duration of intensive care unit stay and associated patient immobilization may be important interventions for improving ALI survivors’ physical outcomes. PMID:24716641

  16. Atypical Structural Connectome Organization and Cognitive Impairment in Young Survivors of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kesler, Shelli R; Gugel, Meike; Huston-Warren, Emily; Watson, Christa

    2016-05-01

    Survivors of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are at increased risk for cognitive impairments that disrupt everyday functioning and decrease quality of life. The specific biological mechanisms underlying cognitive impairment following ALL remain largely unclear, but previous studies consistently demonstrate significant white matter pathology. We aimed to extend this literature by examining the organization of the white matter connectome in young patients with a history of ALL treated with chemotherapy only. We applied graph theoretical analysis to diffusion tensor imaging obtained from 31 survivors of ALL age 5-19 years and 39 matched healthy controls. Results indicated significantly lower small-worldness (p = 0.007) and network clustering coefficient (p = 0.019), as well as greater cognitive impairment (p = 0.027) in the ALL group. Regional analysis indicated that clustered connectivity in parietal, frontal, hippocampal, amygdalar, thalamic, and occipital regions was altered in the ALL group. Random forest analysis revealed a model of connectome and demographic variables that could automatically classify survivors of ALL as having cognitive impairment or not (accuracy = 0.89, p < 0.0001). These findings provide further evidence of brain injury in young survivors of ALL, even those without a history of central nervous system (CNS) disease or cranial radiation. Efficiency of local information processing, reorganization of hub connectivity, and cognitive reserve may contribute to cognitive outcome in these children. Certain connectome properties showed U-shaped relationships with cognitive impairment suggesting an optimal range of regional connectivity. PMID:26850738

  17. Impairment of electron transfer chain induced by acute carnosine administration in skeletal muscle of young rats.

    PubMed

    Macarini, José Roberto; Maravai, Soliany Grassi; Cararo, José Henrique; Dimer, Nádia Webber; Gonçalves, Cinara Ludvig; Kist, Luiza Wilges; Bogo, Mauricio Reis; Schuck, Patrícia Fernanda; Streck, Emilio Luiz; Ferreira, Gustavo Costa

    2014-01-01

    Serum carnosinase deficiency is an inherited disorder that leads to an accumulation of carnosine in the brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid, skeletal muscle, and other tissues of affected patients. Considering that high levels of carnosine are associated with neurological dysfunction and that the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in serum carnosinase deficiency remain poorly understood, we investigated the in vivo effects of carnosine on bioenergetics parameters, namely, respiratory chain complexes (I-III, II, and II-III), malate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, and creatine kinase activities and the expression of mitochondrial-specific transcription factors (NRF-1, PGC-1α , and TFAM) in skeletal muscle of young Wistar rats. We observed a significant decrease of complexes I-III and II activities in animals receiving carnosine acutely, as compared to control group. However, no significant alterations in respiratory chain complexes, citric acid cycle enzymes, and creatine kinase activities were found between rats receiving carnosine chronically and control group animals. As compared to control group, mRNA levels of NRF-1, PGC-1α , and TFAM were unchanged. The present findings indicate that electron transfer through the respiratory chain is impaired in skeletal muscle of rats receiving carnosine acutely. In case these findings are confirmed by further studies and ATP depletion is also observed, impairment of bioenergetics could be considered a putative mechanism responsible for the muscle damage observed in serum carnosinase-deficient patients. PMID:24877122

  18. Impairment of Electron Transfer Chain Induced by Acute Carnosine Administration in Skeletal Muscle of Young Rats

    PubMed Central

    Macarini, José Roberto; Maravai, Soliany Grassi; Cararo, José Henrique; Dimer, Nádia Webber; Gonçalves, Cinara Ludvig; Kist, Luiza Wilges; Bogo, Mauricio Reis; Schuck, Patrícia Fernanda; Streck, Emilio Luiz; Ferreira, Gustavo Costa

    2014-01-01

    Serum carnosinase deficiency is an inherited disorder that leads to an accumulation of carnosine in the brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid, skeletal muscle, and other tissues of affected patients. Considering that high levels of carnosine are associated with neurological dysfunction and that the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in serum carnosinase deficiency remain poorly understood, we investigated the in vivo effects of carnosine on bioenergetics parameters, namely, respiratory chain complexes (I–III, II, and II-III), malate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, and creatine kinase activities and the expression of mitochondrial-specific transcription factors (NRF-1, PGC-1α, and TFAM) in skeletal muscle of young Wistar rats. We observed a significant decrease of complexes I–III and II activities in animals receiving carnosine acutely, as compared to control group. However, no significant alterations in respiratory chain complexes, citric acid cycle enzymes, and creatine kinase activities were found between rats receiving carnosine chronically and control group animals. As compared to control group, mRNA levels of NRF-1, PGC-1α, and TFAM were unchanged. The present findings indicate that electron transfer through the respiratory chain is impaired in skeletal muscle of rats receiving carnosine acutely. In case these findings are confirmed by further studies and ATP depletion is also observed, impairment of bioenergetics could be considered a putative mechanism responsible for the muscle damage observed in serum carnosinase-deficient patients. PMID:24877122

  19. Impaired mental rotation in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and acute vestibular neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Candidi, Matteo; Micarelli, Alessandro; Viziano, Andrea; Aglioti, Salvatore M.; Minio-Paluello, Ilaria; Alessandrini, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Vestibular processing is fundamental to our sense of orientation in space which is a core aspect of the representation of the self. Vestibular information is processed in a large subcortical–cortical neural network. Tasks requiring mental rotations of human bodies in space are known to activate neural regions within this network suggesting that vestibular processing is involved in the control of mental rotation. We studied whether mental rotation is impaired in patients suffering from two different forms of unilateral vestibular disorders (vestibular neuritis – VN – and Benign Paroxysmal positional Vertigo – BPPV) with respect to healthy matched controls (C). We used two mental rotation tasks in which participants were required to: (i) mentally rotate their own body in space (egocentric rotation) thus using vestibular processing to a large extent and (ii) mentally rotate human figures (allocentric rotation) thus using own body representations to a smaller degree. Reaction times and accuracy of responses showed that VN and BPPV patients were impaired in both tasks with respect to C. Significantly, the pattern of results was similar in the three groups suggesting that patients were actually performing the mental rotation without using a different strategy from the control individuals. These results show that dysfunctional vestibular inflow impairs mental rotation of both own body and human figures suggesting that unilateral acute disorders of the peripheral vestibular input massively affect the cerebral processes underlying mental rotations. PMID:24324422

  20. Acute hypoxic gas breathing severely impairs cognition and task learning in humans.

    PubMed

    Turner, Clare E; Barker-Collo, Suzanne L; Connell, Charlotte J W; Gant, Nicholas

    2015-04-01

    Impairments in neural function are common when oxygen supply to the brain is reduced. This study examined neurocognitive processes that are vulnerable to oxygen deprivation. We induced moderate-to-severe hypoxia in healthy adults, thereby inducing impairments caused by low brain oxygen availability. 22 healthy adults participated in this matched-pairs study with a single-blind, randomised design. Baseline neurocognitive function was examined during a familiarisation trial and participants were assigned to hypoxia (10% O2) or sham (21% O2) groups. Neurocognitive performance was assessed via computerised test battery after 50 min of breathing a gas mixture that reduced arterial oxygen saturation by 20% (p<0.01). Hypoxia severely reduced performance across all neurocognitive domain scores; with significant drops in neurocognitive index (-20%), composite memory (-30%), verbal memory (-34%), visual memory (-23%), processing speed (-36%), executive function (-20%), psychomotor speed (-24%), reaction time (-10%), complex attention (-19%) and cognitive flexibility (-18%; all p<0.05). Practice effects were blocked by hypoxia but occurred in sham for information processing speed (+30%), executive function (+14%), psychomotor speed (+18%), reaction time (+5%), cognitive flexibility (+14%), and overall cognitive functioning (+9%; all p<0.05). Neuropsychological performance decrements caused by acute experimental hypoxia are comparable to cognitive domains impaired with high altitude exposure and mild traumatic brain injury. PMID:25660759

  1. Infection related renal impairment: a major cause of acute allograft dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Nampoory, Mangalathillam R N; Johny, Kaivilayil V; Costandy, Jamal N; Nair, Madhavan P; Said, Tarek; Homoud, Hani; Al-Muzairai, Ibrahim; Samhan, Mohmoud; Al-Moussawi, Mustafa

    2003-06-01

    We prospectively analyzed the impact of post-transplant infections on the renal function in 532 stable renal transplant recipients (M=340; F=192) over a period of 5 years. Their age ranged from 3-75 years (40+14 years). During the follow-up period, 52 patients expired and 64 lost on followup. We defined renal impairment (RI) as a persistent rise in serum creatinine above 20% from baseline value. 495 episodes of RI occurred in 269 recipients. This included 180-36% episodes of acute rejection, 53-10.7% Cyclosporine toxicity, 236-47.7% infection related renal impairment [IRRI] and 26-5.3% others. The severity of renal failure is less in IRRI (100+90.2) than that of acute rejection (166+127.1), but was more than that in cyclosporine toxicity (50+42.2). Sites of infection in IRRI were urinary (33%), respiratory (26.3%), septicemia (15.7%) and others (25.4%). Episode of IRRI occurred more frequently in LURD (159-67.4%) compared to LRD-RTR (50-21.2%). Occurrence of IRRI is more significantly higher in patients on triple drug immunosuppression (IS) (34.3%) than those on two drug IS (13.2%) (P=or<0.01). Ecoli (23.1%), Pseudomonas (11.1%), Salmonella (8.8%), Klebsiella (8.8%) and Staphylococai (8.3%) were the major organisms producing IRRI. IRRI is frequent (27.8%) during the first six months. Present study denotes that IRRI is a major cause of acute failure in RTR. PMID:15859909

  2. Early-onset sensorineural hearing loss in Lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Ibekwe, T S; Okokhere, P O; Asogun, D; Blackie, F F; Nwegbu, M M; Wahab, K W; Omilabu, S A; Akpede, G O

    2011-02-01

    Lassa fever (LF) is a viral hemorrhagic disease which affects one-fourth to two million people annually with the fatality rate of about 10,000. It is associated with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) usually at the convalescent stage. Recently, cases of SNHL at the acute phase have been reported. This study was done to further investigate the incidence and features of SNHL in acute phase of LF. It is a prospective case-control study of LF patients seen with acute SNHL conducted between July 2007 and April 2009 at Irrua Specialist Teaching Hospital Nigeria. The diagnosis of acute LF was based on the clinical features and detection of IgM antibodies and/or positive Lassa virus-specific reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction using primers S36+ and LVS 339 while SNHL was diagnosed clinically and confirmed with PTA and speech discrimination tests. Patients with other acute febrile illnesses were used as control. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS version 11 and Fisher's exact test while level of significance was set at p < 0.05. Out of the 37 confirmed cases of LF, 5 (13.5%) and none (0%) of the control developed early-onset SNHL (p = 0.03). Forty percent of the cases studied had negative IgM. The audiograms showed involvement at all frequency groups with pure tone average 65-85 dB and the speech discrimination 20-40%. The overall case fatality rate was 27.0%, and for early SNHL cases 60.0% (p > 0.05). The incidence of SNHL in LF infection is about 13.5% and could be a reflection of a worse disease process. There is possibility of direct viral invasion aside immunological reaction as a causative mechanism. PMID:20809263

  3. Acute Inactivity Impairs Glycemic Control but Not Blood Flow to Glucose Ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Leryn J; Credeur, Daniel P; Holwerda, Seth W; Leidy, Heather J; Fadel, Paul J; Thyfault, John P

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Insulin-stimulated increases in skeletal muscle blood flow play a role in glucose disposal. Indeed, 7 days of aerobic exercise in type 2 diabetes patients increased blood flow responses to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and improved glucose tolerance. More recent work suggests that reduced daily physical activity impairs glycemic control (GC) in healthy individuals. Herein, we sought to determine if an acute reduction in daily activity (from >10,000 to <5,000 steps/day) for 5 days (RA5) in healthy individuals reduced insulin-stimulated blood flow and GC in parallel and if a 1 day return to activity (RTA1) improved these outcomes. Methods OGTTs were performed as a stimulus to increase insulin in 14 healthy, recreationally active men (24±1.1 yrs) at baseline, RA5, and RTA1. Measures of insulin sensitivity (Matsuda index) and femoral and brachial artery blood flow were made during the OGTT. Free living measures of GC including peak postprandial glucose (peak PPG) were also made via continuous glucose monitoring. Results Femoral and brachial artery blood flow increased during the OGTT but neither was significantly impacted by changes in physical activity (p>0.05). However, insulin sensitivity was decreased by RA5 (11.3±1.5 to 8.0±1.0; p<0.05). Likewise, free living GC measures of peak post prandial blood glucose (113±3 to 123±5 mg/dL; p<0.05) was significantly increased at RA5. Interestingly, insulin sensitivity and GC as assessed by peak PPG were not restored after RTA1 (p>0.05). Conclusions Thus, acute reductions in physical activity impaired GC and insulin sensitivity; however blood flow responses to an OGTT were not affected. Further, a 1 day return to activity was not sufficient to normalize GC following 5 days of reduced daily physical activity. PMID:25207931

  4. Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss: Primary Care Update.

    PubMed

    Leung, Marcia A; Flaherty, Anna; Zhang, Julia A; Hara, Jared; Barber, Wayne; Burgess, Lawrence

    2016-06-01

    The primary care physician's role in recognizing sudden sensorineural hearing (SSNHL) loss and delivering initial treatment is critical in the management of the syndrome. This role involves recognizing its clinical symptoms, distinguishing it from conductive hearing loss with the Weber tuning fork or the Rauch hum test, and urgent administration of high dose oral corticosteroids. Diagnosis and treatment should not be delayed for audiometric testing or referral to otolaryngology. This paper provides an update on the initial evaluation and treatment of this syndrome based on the literature and clinical guideline recommendations. PMID:27413627

  5. Fluctuating sensorineural hearing loss in children.

    PubMed

    Brookhouser, Patrick E

    2002-08-01

    Childhood sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) that fluctuates or is progressive enhances parental concern and complicates medical management, hearing aid selection, and individualized educational planning for the affected child. Despite intensive multidisciplinary evaluation and intervention, continued threshold fluctuation or a gradual decline in auditory acuity may proceed unabated in a significant percentage of these youngsters. With the adoption of universal newborn hearing screening mandates by an increasing number of states, any challenges to the accurate determination of auditory thresholds must be addressed within the first few months of life. PMID:12487089

  6. Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss: Primary Care Update

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Marcia A; Flaherty, Anna; Zhang, Julia A; Hara, Jared; Barber, Wayne

    2016-01-01

    The primary care physician's role in recognizing sudden sensorineural hearing (SSNHL) loss and delivering initial treatment is critical in the management of the syndrome. This role involves recognizing its clinical symptoms, distinguishing it from conductive hearing loss with the Weber tuning fork or the Rauch hum test, and urgent administration of high dose oral corticosteroids. Diagnosis and treatment should not be delayed for audiometric testing or referral to otolaryngology. This paper provides an update on the initial evaluation and treatment of this syndrome based on the literature and clinical guideline recommendations. PMID:27413627

  7. Pressor recovery after acute stress is impaired in high fructose-fed Lean Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Jennifer A; D'Angelo, Gerard; Mintz, James D; Fulton, David J; Stepp, David W

    2016-06-01

    Insulin resistance is a powerful predictor of cardiovascular disease; however, the mechanistic link remains unclear. This study aims to determine if early cardiovascular changes associated with short-term fructose feeding in the absence of obesity manifest as abnormal blood pressure control. Metabolic dysfunction was induced in Lean Zucker rats by short-term high-fructose feeding. Rats were implanted with telemetry devices for the measurement of mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and subjected to air jet stress at 5 and 8 weeks after feeding. Additional animals were catheterized under anesthesia for the determination of MAP and blood flow responses in the hind limb and mesenteric vascular beds to intravenous injection of isoproterenol (0.001-0.5 μm), a β-adrenergic agonist. Metabolic dysfunction in high-fructose rats was not accompanied by changes in 24-h MAP Yet, animals fed a high-fructose diet for 8 weeks exhibited a marked impairment in blood pressure recovery after air-jet stress. Dose-dependent decreases in MAP and peripheral blood flow in response to isoproterenol treatment were significantly attenuated in high-fructose rats. These data suggest that impaired blood pressure recovery to acute mental stress precedes the onset of hypertension in the early stages of insulin resistance. Further, blunted responses to isoproterenol implicate β2-adrenergic sensitivity as a possible mechanism responsible for altered blood pressure control after short-term high-fructose feeding. PMID:27335430

  8. Polygenic inheritance of sensorineural hearing loss (Snhl2, -3, and -4) and organ of Corti patterning defect in the ALR/LtJ mouse strain.

    PubMed

    Latoche, Joseph R; Neely, Harold R; Noben-Trauth, Konrad

    2011-05-01

    Progressive sensorineural hearing loss in humans is a common and debilitating impairment. Sensorineural deafness in inbred strains of mice is a similarly common and genetically diverse phenotype providing experimental models to study the underlying genetics and the biological effects of the risk factors. Here, we report that ALR/LtJ mice develop early-onset profound sensorineural hearing loss as evidenced by high-to-low frequency hearing threshold shifts, absent distortion-product otoacoustic emissions, and normal endocochlear potentials. Linkage analyses of a segregating backcross revealed three novel quantitative trait loci named sensorineural hearing loss (Snhl) -2, -3, and -4. The QTLs achieved very high LOD scores with markers on chromosome 1 (Snhl2, LOD: 12), chromosome 6 (Snhl3, LOD: 24) and chromosome 10 (Snhl4, LOD: 11). Together, they explained 90% of the phenotypic variance. While Snhl2 and Snhl3 affected hearing thresholds across a broad range of test frequencies, Snhl4 caused primarily high-frequency hearing loss. The hearing impairment is accompanied by an organ of Corti patterning defect that is characterized by the ectopic expression of supernumerary outer hair cells organized in rows along the abneural site of the sensory epithelium in the presence of unaltered planar polarity and otherwise normal cochlear duct morphology. Cloning the Snhl2, -3, and -4 genes in the ALR/LtJ mice may provide important genetic and mechanistic insights into the pathology of human progressive sensorineural deafness. PMID:21185929

  9. Neuropsychological impairment in acute HIV and the effect of immediate antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kore, Idil; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Valcour, Victor; Fletcher, James LK; Chalermchai, Thep; Paul, Robert; Reynolds, Jesse; Tipsuk, Somporn; Ubolyam, Sasiwimol; Rattanamanee, Somprartthana; Jagodzinski, Linda; Kim, Jerome; Spudich, Serena

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate neuropsychological performance (NP) during acute HIV infection (AHI) before and after combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). DESIGN Prospective study of Thai AHI participants examined at 3 and 6 months following initiation of cART. METHODS 36 AHI participants were evaluated pre-cART at median 19 days since HIV exposure and 3 and 6 months after cART with the Grooved Pegboard test (GP), Color Trails 1 & 2 (CT1, CT2), and Trail Making Test A (TM). Raw scores were standardized to 251 age-and-education-matched HIV-uninfected Thais. To account for learning effects, change in NP performance was compared to that of controls at 6 months. Analyses included multivariable regression, non-parametric repeated measures ANOVA, and Mann-Whitney U test. RESULTS Baseline NP scores for the AHI group were within normal range (Z scores range: −0.26 to −0.13). NP performance improved on CT1, CT2, and TM in the initial 3 months (ps <0.01) with no significant change during the last 3 months. Only improvement in CT1 was greater than that seen in controls at 6 months (p=0.018). Participants that performed >1 standard deviation below normative means on >2 tests (n=8) exhibited higher baseline cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) HIV RNA (p=0.047) and had no improvement after cART. CONCLUSIONS Most AHI individuals had normal NP performance and early cART slightly improved their psychomotor function. However, approximately 25% had impaired NP performance which correlated with higher CSF HIV RNA, and these abnormalities were not reversed by early cART possibly indicating limited reversibility of cognitive impairment in a subset of AHI individuals. PMID:26509933

  10. Mephedrone in Adolescent Rats: Residual Memory Impairment and Acute but Not Lasting 5-HT Depletion

    PubMed Central

    Motbey, Craig P.; Karanges, Emily; Li, Kong M.; Wilkinson, Shane; Winstock, Adam R.; Ramsay, John; Hicks, Callum; Kendig, Michael D.; Wyatt, Naomi; Callaghan, Paul D.; McGregor, Iain S.

    2012-01-01

    Mephedrone (4-methylmethcathinone, MMC) is a popular recreational drug, yet its potential harms are yet to be fully established. The current study examined the impact of single or repeated MMC exposure on various neurochemical and behavioral measures in rats. In Experiment 1 male adolescent Wistar rats received single or repeated (once a day for 10 days) injections of MMC (30 mg/kg) or the comparator drug methamphetamine (METH, 2.5 mg/kg). Both MMC and METH caused robust hyperactivity in the 1 h following injection although this effect did not tend to sensitize with repeated treatment. Striatal dopamine (DA) levels were increased 1 h following either METH or MMC while striatal and hippocampal serotonin (5-HT) levels were decreased 1 h following MMC but not METH. MMC caused greater increases in 5-HT metabolism and greater reductions in DA metabolism in rats that had been previously exposed to MMC. Autoradiographic analysis showed no signs of neuroinflammation ([125I]CLINDE ligand used as a marker for translocator protein (TSPO) expression) with repeated exposure to either MMC or METH. In Experiment 2, rats received repeated MMC (7.5, 15 or 30 mg/kg once a day for 10 days) and were examined for residual behavioral effects following treatment. Repeated high (30 mg/kg) dose MMC produced impaired novel object recognition 5 weeks after drug treatment. However, no residual changes in 5-HT or DA tissue levels were observed at 7 weeks post-treatment. Overall these results show that MMC causes acute but not lasting changes in DA and 5-HT tissue concentrations. MMC can also cause long-term memory impairment. Future studies of cognitive function in MMC users are clearly warranted. PMID:23029034

  11. Speech Coding in the Midbrain: Effects of Sensorineural Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Carney, Laurel H; Kim, Duck O; Kuwada, Shigeyuki

    2016-01-01

    In response to voiced speech sounds, auditory-nerve (AN) fibres phase-lock to harmonics near best frequency (BF) and to the fundamental frequency (F0) of voiced sounds. Due to nonlinearities in the healthy ear, phase-locking in each frequency channel is dominated either by a single harmonic, for channels tuned near formants, or by F0, for channels between formants. The alternating dominance of these factors sets up a robust pattern of F0-synchronized rate across best frequency (BF). This profile of a temporally coded measure is transformed into a mean rate profile in the midbrain (inferior colliculus, IC), where neurons are sensitive to low-frequency fluctuations. In the impaired ear, the F0-synchronized rate profile is affected by several factors: Reduced synchrony capture decreases the dominance of a single harmonic near BF on the response. Elevated thresholds also reduce the effect of rate saturation, resulting in increased F0-synchrony. Wider peripheral tuning results in a wider-band envelope with reduced F0 amplitude. In general, sensorineural hearing loss reduces the contrast in AN F0-synchronized rates across BF. Computational models for AN and IC neurons illustrate how hearing loss would affect the F0-synchronized rate profiles set up in response to voiced speech sounds. PMID:27080684

  12. The N-terminal CEBPA mutant in acute myeloid leukemia impairs CXCR4 expression.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yuan-Yeh; Hou, Hsin-An; Chen, Yin-Kai; Li, Li-Yu; Chen, Po-Hsuen; Tseng, Mei-Hsuan; Huang, Chi-Fei; Lee, Fen-Yu; Liu, Ming-Chih; Liu, Chia-Wen; Chou, Wen-Chien; Liu, Chieh-Yu; Tang, Jih-Luh; Yao, Ming; Tien, Hwei-Fang

    2014-12-01

    CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) is an essential regulator for homing and maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells within the bone marrow niches. Analysis of clinical implications of bone marrow CXCR4 expression in patients with acute myeloid leukemia showed not only higher CXCR4 expression was an independent poor prognostic factor, irrespective of age, white blood cell counts, cytogenetics, and mutation status of NPM1/FLT3-ITD and CEBPA, but also showed CXCR4 expression was inversely associated with mutations of CEBPA, a gene encoding transcription factor C/EBPα. Patients with wild-type CEBPA had significantly higher CXCR4 expression than those with mutated CEBPA. We hypothesized that CEBPA might influence the expression of CXCR4. To test this hypothesis, we first examined endogenous CXCR4 expression in 293T and K562 cells over-expressing wild-type C/EBPα p42 and demonstrated that CXCR4 levels were increased in these cells, whilst the expression of the N-terminal mutant, C/EBPα p30, diminished CXCR4 transcription. We further showed p42 was bound to the CXCR4 promoter by the chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Induction of p42 in the inducible K562-C/EBPα cell lines increased the chemotactic migration. Moreover, decreased expression of C/EBPα by RNA interference decreased levels of CXCR4 protein expression in U937 cells, thereby abrogating CXCR4-mediated chemotaxis. Our results provide, for the first time, evidence that C/EBPα indeed regulates the activation of CXCR4, which is critical for the homing and engraftment of acute myeloid leukemia cells, while p30 mutant impairs CXCR4 expression. PMID:25193961

  13. Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss; Prognostic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Arjun, Dass; Neha, Goel; Surinder K, Singhal; Ravi, Kapoor

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is a frightening and frustrating symptom for the patient as well as the physician. Prognosis is affected by multiple factors including duration of hearing loss, presence of associated vertigo and tinnitus, and co-morbidities such as hypertension and diabetes. Materials and Methods: Forty subjects presenting to our department with features of sudden hearing loss were included in the study. Detailed otological history and examination, serial audiometric findings and course of disease were studied. Results: Subjects presenting late (in older age), having associated vertigo, hypertension and diabetes had a significantly lower rate of recovery. Conclusion: Only 60–65% of patients experiencing SSNHL recover within a period of 1 month; this rate is further affected by presence of multiple prognostic indicators. PMID:26568939

  14. Progressive Hearing Impairment in Children with Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahle, Arthur J.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Audiological assessment of 86 children (mean age 38 months at last evaluation time) with congenital cytomegalovirus infection revealed progressive hearing loss in four of 12 Ss with sensorineural hearing impairments. Case descriptions documented the progression of the hearing loss. (Author)

  15. LSD Acutely Impairs Fear Recognition and Enhances Emotional Empathy and Sociality.

    PubMed

    Dolder, Patrick C; Schmid, Yasmin; Müller, Felix; Borgwardt, Stefan; Liechti, Matthias E

    2016-10-01

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is used recreationally and has been evaluated as an adjunct to psychotherapy to treat anxiety in patients with life-threatening illness. LSD is well-known to induce perceptual alterations, but unknown is whether LSD alters emotional processing in ways that can support psychotherapy. We investigated the acute effects of LSD on emotional processing using the Face Emotion Recognition Task (FERT) and Multifaceted Empathy Test (MET). The effects of LSD on social behavior were tested using the Social Value Orientation (SVO) test. Two similar placebo-controlled, double-blind, random-order, crossover studies were conducted using 100 μg LSD in 24 subjects and 200 μg LSD in 16 subjects. All of the subjects were healthy and mostly hallucinogen-naive 25- to 65-year-old volunteers (20 men, 20 women). LSD produced feelings of happiness, trust, closeness to others, enhanced explicit and implicit emotional empathy on the MET, and impaired the recognition of sad and fearful faces on the FERT. LSD enhanced the participants' desire to be with other people and increased their prosocial behavior on the SVO test. These effects of LSD on emotion processing and sociality may be useful for LSD-assisted psychotherapy. PMID:27249781

  16. Skeletal, neuromuscular and fitness impairments among children with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ness, Kirsten K; Kaste, Sue C; Zhu, Liang; Pui, Ching-Hon; Jeha, Sima; Nathan, Paul C; Inaba, Hiroto; Wasilewski-Masker, Karen; Shah, Durga; Wells, Robert J; Karlage, Robyn E; Robison, Leslie L; Cox, Cheryl L

    2015-04-01

    This study describes skeletal, neuromuscular and fitness impairments among 109 children (median age 10 [range 4-18] years, 65.1% male, 63.3% white) with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Outcomes were measured 7-10 days after diagnosis and compared to age- and sex-specific expected values. Associations between function and health-related quality of life (HRQL) were evaluated with logistic regression. Children with ALL had sub-optimal bone mineral density (BMD) Z-score/height (mean ± standard error: - 0.53 ± 0.16 vs. 0.00 ± 0.14, p < 0.01), body mass index percentile (57.6 ± 3.15 vs. 50.0 ± 3.27%, p = 0.02), quadriceps strength (201.9 ± 8.3 vs. 236.1 ± 5.4 N, p < 0.01), 6 min walk distance (385.0 ± 13.1 vs. 628.2 ± 7.1 m, p < 0.001) and Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency scores (23 ± 2.5 vs. 50 ± 3.4%, p < 0.01). Quadriceps weakness was associated with a 20.9-fold (95% confidence interval 2.5-173.3) increase in poor physical HRQL. Children with newly diagnosed ALL have weakness and poor endurance and may benefit from early rehabilitation that includes strengthening and aerobic conditioning. PMID:25030039

  17. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy in sudden sensorineural hearing loss following spinal anesthesia: case reports.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Sandra N; Guerreiro, Ditza V; Cunha, Anita M; Camacho, Óscar F; Aguiar, Isabel C

    2016-01-01

    The management of sudden sensorineural hearing loss following spinal anesthesia is currently an open problem. Several strategies have been used with variable results and, to the best of our knowledge, there are no prior accounts in the literature on the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in the treatment of this complication. We report two cases of acute onset of unilateral hearing loss after spinal anesthesia, with significantly improved results after hyperbaric oxygen therapy. A hypothesis on the possible mechanism behind this complication is discussed. A relation is established between hyperbaric oxygen therapy and this hypothetical mechanism, in order to explain successful results in the reported cases. PMID:27265992

  18. Sensorineural hearing loss and celiac disease: A coincidental finding

    PubMed Central

    Volta, Umberto; Ferri, Gian Gaetano; De Giorgio, Roberto; Fabbri, Angela; Parisi, Claudia; Sciajno, Laura; Castellari, Alessandra; Fiorini, Erica; Piscaglia, Maria; Barbara, Giovanni; Granito, Alessandro; Pirodda, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Celiac disease (CD) can be associated with a variety of extraintestinal manifestations, including neurological diseases. A new neurological correlation has been found between CD and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). OBJECTIVE To verify the association between SNHL and CD, and to establish whether the neurological hearing impairment in CD is related to nonorgan-specific and antineuronal antibodies, as well as the presence of autoimmune disorders. METHODS A sample of 59 consecutive biopsy- and serologically proven CD patients were studied. Among CD patients, 11 were newly diagnosed and 48 were on a gluten-free diet. Hearing function was assessed by audiometric analysis in all CD patients as well as in 59 age- and sex-matched controls. Patients were tested for a panel of immune markers including nonorgan-specific autoantibodies and antineuronal antibodies. RESULTS SNHL was detected in five CD patients (8.5%) and in two controls (3.4%). In one patient, the SNHL was bilateral, whereas the remaining four had a monolateral impairment. The prevalence of SNHL was not significantly different between CD patients and controls. At least one of the antibodies tested for was positive in two of the five CD patients with SNHL and in 12 of the 54 CD patients without SNHL. Antineuronal antibodies to central nervous system antigens were consistently negative in the five CD patients with SNHL. Only one of the five CD patients with SNHL had Hashimoto thyroiditis. CONCLUSIONS SNHL and CD occur coincidentally. Hearing function should be assessed only in CD patients with clinical signs of hearing deficiency. PMID:19668795

  19. Dynamic cerebral autoregulation is transiently impaired for one week after large-vessel acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Nils H.; Ortega-Gutierrez, Santiago; Reccius, Andres; Masurkar, Arjun; Huang, Amy; Marshall, Randolph S

    2016-01-01

    Background Dynamic cerebral autoregulation (DCA) is the continuous counterregulation of cerebral blood flow to fluctuations in blood pressure. DCA can become impaired after acute stroke, but it remains unclear to what extent and over what interval this occurs. Methods We included 28 patients (NIHSS=12±6.5, age=68.4±17.1, 16F) with acute large-vessel ischemic stroke in the middle cerebral artery territory and 29 healthy controls (mean age 54.9±9, 16F). DCA was assessed by simultaneous measurement of blood pressure together with blood flow velocities using finger plethysmography/arterial catheter and transcranial Doppler over three 10-minute recordings on days 0–2, 3–6 and >=7 days after stroke. Transfer function analysis was applied to calculate average phase shift (PS) in the low frequency range (0.06–0.12 Hz). Less PS indicated poorer autoregulation. The affected side was compared with the unaffected side and controls. Univariate comparisons of data were performed using t-tests at single time points, and generalized estimating equations with an exchangeable correlation matrix to examine the change in PS over time. Results At mean 1.3±0.5 days after stroke the average PS in the affected hemisphere was 29.6±10.5 degrees versus 42.5±13 degrees in the unaffected hemisphere (p=0.004). At 4.1±1 days, the PS in affected and unaffected hemisphere was 23.2±19.1 vs. 41.7±18.5 degrees, respectively (p=0.003). At mean 9.75±2.2 days stroke there was no difference between affected and unaffected hemisphere (53.2±28.2 versus 50.7±29.2 degrees, p=0.69). Control subjects had an average PS=47.9±16.8, significantly different from patients’ affected hemisphere at the first two measurements (p=0.001), but not the third (p=0.37). The PS in controls remained unchanged on repeat testing after an average 19.1 days (48.4±17.1, p=0.61). Using the last recording as the reference, the average PS in the affected hemisphere was −23.54 (−44.1, −3) degrees lower on

  20. Sensorineural hearing loss in patients with Kawasaki disease

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sun Young; Kim, Young Hyun; Kim, Yeo Hyang; Hyun, Myung Chul

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Kawasaki disease involves acute febrile systemic vasculitis that can cause a variety of symptoms by affecting various organs. Here, we aimed to evaluate the prevalence, causes, and prognosis of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) occurring in children with Kawasaki disease. Methods Patients who were diagnosed with Kawasaki disease and received inpatient treatment in the Pediatrics Department at one of three university hospitals in Daegu city from February 2012 to September 2012 were enrolled in the study. The clinical features, hematological results, echocardiography results, audiometry results, and aspirin and salicylic acid serum levels of the patients were evaluated. Results Of the 59 children enrolled in the study, three showed mild bilateral SNHL on audiometry tests conducted after 48 hours of defervescence; these patients demonstrated normal patterns of recovery on follow-up tests 8 weeks later. Aspirin serum levels were significantly higher in the SNHL group after 48 hours of afebrile condition with high dose aspirin intake (P=0.034). However, no significant differences were found in other laboratory tests or for fever duration (P>0.05). Upon echocardiography, coronary artery abnormality was observed in 9 cases, but none of these patients showed hearing loss. Conclusion The results indicate that SNHL in children with Kawasaki disease might occur during treatment of the acute phase; this SNHL usually involves mild bilateral hearing loss and recovers naturally. However, this study suggests that determination of the causes and clinical implications of hearing loss in Kawasaki disease requires long-term follow-up studies with more cases. PMID:26692879

  1. Acute Free-Iron Exposure Does Not Explain the Impaired Haemorheology Associated with Haemochromatosis

    PubMed Central

    McNamee, Antony P.; Sabapathy, Surendran; Singh, Indu; Horobin, Jarod; Guerrero, Janelle; Simmonds, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    . Acute exposure to elevated iron levels does not appear (in isolation) to account for these differences. Further consideration is required prior to utilising routine venesection blood for harvesting RBC concentrates due to the potential risk of microvascular disorders arising from impaired haemorheology. PMID:26741993

  2. Advanced Glycation End Products Acutely Impair Ca2+ Signaling in Bovine Aortic Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Naser, Nadim; Januszewski, Andrzej S.; Brown, Bronwyn E.; Jenkins, Alicia J.; Hill, Michael A.; Murphy, Timothy V.

    2013-01-01

    Post-translational modification of proteins in diabetes, including formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are believed to contribute to vascular dysfunction and disease. Impaired function of the endothelium is an early indicator of vascular dysfunction in diabetes and as many endothelial cell processes are dependent upon intracellular [Ca2+] and Ca2+ signaling, the aim of this study was to examine the acute effects of AGEs on Ca2+ signaling in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). Ca2+ signaling was studied using the fluorescent indicator dye Fura-2-AM. AGEs were generated by incubating bovine serum albumin with 0–250 mM glucose or glucose-6-phosphate for 0–120 days at 37°C. Under all conditions, the main AGE species generated was carboxymethyl lysine (CML) as assayed using both gas-liquid chromatograph-mass spectroscopy and high-performance liquid chromatography. In Ca2+-replete solution, exposure of BAEC to AGEs for 5 min caused an elevation in basal [Ca2+] and attenuated the increase in intracellular [Ca2+] caused by ATP (100 μM). In the absence of extracellular Ca2+, exposure of BAEC to AGEs for 5 min caused an elevation in basal [Ca2+] and attenuated subsequent intracellular Ca2+ release caused by ATP, thapsigargin (0.1 μM), and ionomycin (3 μM), but AGEs did not affect extracellular Ca2+ entry induced by the re-addition of Ca2+ to the bathing solution in the presence of any of these agents. The anti-oxidant α-lipoic acid (2 μM) and NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitors apocynin (500 μM) and diphenyleneiodonium (1 μM) abolished these effects of AGEs on BAECs, as did the IP3 receptor antagonist xestospongin C (1 μM). In summary, AGEs caused an acute depletion of Ca2+ from the intracellular store in BAECs, such that the Ca2+ signal stimulated by the subsequent application other agents acting upon this store is reduced. The mechanism may involve generation of reactive oxygen species from NAD(P)H oxidase and possible

  3. Acute glutathione depletion induces hepatic methylglyoxal accumulation by impairing its detoxification to D-lactate.

    PubMed

    Masterjohn, Christopher; Mah, Eunice; Park, Youngki; Pei, Ruisong; Lee, Jiyoung; Manautou, Jose E; Bruno, Richard S

    2013-04-01

    Methylglyoxal (MGO) is a dicarbonyl that reacts with amino acids and nucleic acids to form advanced glycation endproducts, which may contribute to diabetes and its cardiovascular complications. MGO detoxification through the glyoxalase (GLO) pathway is glutathione (GSH)-dependent, but no studies have investigated whether acute depletion of GSH regulates MGO accumulation in vivo. We therefore administered a single intraperitoneal injection of the specific GSH biosynthesis inhibitor l-buthionine-(RS)-sulfoximine (BSO; 4 mmol/kg) or phosphate-buffered saline vehicle to six-week-old Sprague Dawley rats (n = 48) prior to sacrificing at 0, 6, 12 and 48 h (n = 6/time point/treatment). BSO had no effect (P > 0.05) on adipose or plasma MGO at any specific time points following treatment. In contrast, hepatic GSH was 68-71% lower (P < 0.05) at 6-12 h following BSO, and MGO was 27% higher at 12 h. At 12 h, hepatic d-lactate was 13% lower and GLO activity was 52% lower following BSO, which was fully restored by the exogenous addition of GSH. Hepatic GSH was inversely related to hepatic MGO (r = -0.81; P < 0.01) and positively correlated with hepatic GLO activity (r = 0.72; P < 0.01), whereas hepatic GLO activity was positively correlated with hepatic d-lactate (r = 0.63; P < 0.05). BSO had no effect on hepatic malondialdehyde or vitamin E. These findings demonstrate that GSH depletion in vivo increases hepatic MGO accumulation by impairing its GSH-dependent, GLO-mediated detoxification to d-lactate independent of oxidative stress. PMID:23760001

  4. Senescence of human skeletal muscle impairs the local inflammatory cytokine response to acute eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Koichiro; Vannier, Edouard; Sacheck, Jennifer M; Witsell, Alice L; Roubenoff, Ronenn

    2005-02-01

    The impact of aging on the cytokine response of human skeletal muscle to exercise-induced injury remains poorly understood. We enrolled physically active, young (23-35 years old, n=15) and old (66-78 years old, n=15) men to perform 45 min of downhill running (16% descent) at 75% VO2max. Biopsies of vastus lateralis were obtained 24 h before and 72 h after acute eccentric exercise. Transcripts for inflammatory (TNF-alpha, IL-1beta) and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TGF-beta1) were quantified by real-time PCR. Before exercise, cytokine transcripts did not differ with age. At old age, exercise induced a blunted accumulation of transcripts encoding the pan-leukocyte surface marker CD18 (young: 10.1-fold increase, P<0.005; old: 4.7-fold increase, P=0.02; young vs. old: P<0.05). In both age groups, CD18 transcript accumulation strongly correlated with TNF-alpha (young, r=0.87, P<0.001; old, r=0.72, P=0.002) and TGF-beta1 transcript accumulation (young, r=0.80, P<0.001; old, r=0.64, P=0.008). At old age, there was no correlation between IL-1beta and CD18 transcript accumulation. Furthermore, exercise induced IL-6 transcript accumulation in young (3.6-fold, P=0.057) but not in old men. Our results suggest that aging impairs the adaptive response of human skeletal muscle to eccentric exercise by differential modulation of a discrete set of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine genes. PMID:15556970

  5. Impaired endothelial proliferation and mesenchymal transition contribute to vascular rarefaction following acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Basile, David P; Friedrich, Jessica L; Spahic, Jasmina; Knipe, Nicole; Mang, Henry; Leonard, Ellen C; Changizi-Ashtiyani, Saeed; Bacallao, Robert L; Molitoris, Bruce A; Sutton, Timothy A

    2011-03-01

    Acute kidney injury induces the loss of renal microvessels, but the fate of endothelial cells and the mechanism of potential vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-mediated protection is unknown. Cumulative cell proliferation was analyzed in the kidney of Sprague-Dawley rats following ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury by repetitive administration of BrdU (twice daily) and colocalization in endothelial cells with CD31 or cablin. Proliferating endothelial cells were undetectable for up to 2 days following I/R and accounted for only ∼1% of BrdU-positive cells after 7 days. VEGF-121 preserved vascular loss following I/R but did not affect proliferation of endothelial, perivascular cells or tubular cells. Endothelial mesenchymal transition states were identified by localizing endothelial markers (CD31, cablin, or infused tomato lectin) with the fibroblast marker S100A4. Such structures were prominent within 6 h and sustained for at least 7 days following I/R. A Tie-2-cre transgenic crossed with a yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) reporter mouse was used to trace the fate of endothelial cells and demonstrated interstititial expansion of YFP-positive cells colocalizing with S100A4 and smooth muscle actin following I/R. The interstitial expansion of YFP cells was attenuated by VEGF-121. Multiphoton imaging of transgenic mice revealed the alteration of YFP-positive vascular cells associated with blood vessels characterized by limited perfusion in vivo. Taken together, these data indicate that vascular dropout post-AKI results from endothelial phenotypic transition combined with an impaired regenerative capacity, which may contribute to progressive chronic kidney disease. PMID:21123492

  6. Sensorineural hearing loss in Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Varun; Etinger, Veronica; Orjuela, Andres F

    2016-01-01

    Kawasaki disease is a common nonspecific vasculitis seen in childhood. The most significant long-term sequela is coronary artery aneurysm. However, the spectrum of complications involves not only the heart, but also other organs such as the eyes, skin, kidneys, gallbladder, liver, and central nervous system. Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is a relatively unrecognized complication of the disease. Although most of the complications (except coronary artery aneurysm) are self-limiting, SNHL can be persistent. It is, especially important in infants and young children who might not be able to report the hearing deficits and are most likely to have cognitive and speech delays if this hearing loss is not addressed in a timely manner. We report a child with Kawasaki disease who had SNHL during the 2(nd) week of the illness. The aim of this article is to briefly review the pathophysiology behind this hearing loss and strongly emphasize the importance of universal hearing evaluation in all children diagnosed with Kawasaki disease. This screening in children with Kawasaki disease may provide some timely intervention if needed. Since most Kawasaki disease patients will be seen by cardiologists, we hope to create more awareness about this complication to the cardiology community as well. PMID:27011703

  7. Acute Cardiac Impairment Associated With Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy for Esophageal Cancer: Magnetic Resonance Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Hatakenaka, Masamitsu; Yonezawa, Masato; Nonoshita, Takeshi; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Yabuuchi, Hidetake; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Nagao, Michinobu; Matsuo, Yoshio; Kamitani, Takeshi; Higo, Taiki; Nishikawa, Kei; Setoguchi, Taro; Honda, Hiroshi

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate acute cardiac effects of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: This prospective study was approved by the institutional review board, and written informed consent was obtained from all participants. The left ventricular function (LVF) of 31 patients with esophageal cancer who received cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil-based CCRT was evaluated using cardiac cine magnetic resonance imaging. The patients were classified into two groups according to mean LV dose. The parameters related to LVF were compared between before and during (40 Gy) or between before and after CCRT using a Wilcoxon matched-pairs single rank test, and parameter ratios (during/before CCRT, after/before CCRT) were also compared between the groups with a t test. Data were expressed as mean {+-} SE. Results: In the low LV-dose group (n = 10; mean LV dose <0.6 Gy), LV ejection fraction decreased significantly (before vs. during vs. after CCRT; 62.7% {+-} 2.98% vs. 59.8% {+-} 2.56% vs. 60.6% {+-} 3.89%; p < 0.05). In the high LV-dose group (n = 21; mean LV dose of 3.6-41.2 Gy), LV end-diastolic volume index (before vs. after CCRT; 69.1 {+-} 2.93 vs. 57.0 {+-} 3.23 mL/m{sup 2}), LV stroke volume index (38.6 {+-} 1.56 vs. 29.9 {+-} 1.60 mL/m{sup 2}), and LV ejection fraction (56.9% {+-} 1.79% vs. 52.8% {+-} 1.15%) decreased significantly (p < 0.05) after CCRT. Heart rate increased significantly (before vs. during vs. after CCRT; 66.8 {+-} 3.05 vs. 72.4 {+-} 4.04 vs. 85.4 {+-} 3.75 beats per minute, p < 0.01). Left ventricle wall motion decreased significantly (p < 0.05) in segments 8 (before vs. during vs. after CCRT; 6.64 {+-} 0.54 vs. 4.78 {+-} 0.43 vs. 4.79 {+-} 0.50 mm), 9 (6.88 {+-} 0.45 vs. 5.04 {+-} 0.38 vs. 5.27 {+-} 0.47 mm), and 10 (9.22 {+-} 0.48 vs. 8.08 {+-} 0.34 vs. 8.19 {+-} 0.56 mm). The parameter ratios of LV end-diastolic volume index, stroke volume index, wall motion in segment 9, and heart rate showed significant difference

  8. Gestational vitamin A deficiency: a novel cause of sensorineural hearing loss in the developing world?

    PubMed

    Emmett, Susan D; West, Keith P

    2014-01-01

    Hearing loss is a substantial public health problem with profound social and economic consequences in the developing world. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that there are 360 million people living with disabling hearing loss globally, and 80% of these individuals are from low- and middle-income countries. The epidemiology of hearing impairment remains poorly defined in most impoverished societies. Middle ear infections in childhood are a key determinant; however, congenital anomalies may also comprise an important etiology and may arise from gestational malnutrition. While evidence exists that preventable vitamin A deficiency exacerbates the severity of ear infections and, consequently, hearing loss, antenatal vitamin A deficiency during sensitive periods of fetal development may represent an etiologically distinct and virtually unexplored causal pathway. Evidence from multiple animal systems clearly shows that fetal inner ear development requires adequate vitamin A nutriture to proceed normally. Inner ear malformations occur in experimentally imposed maternal vitamin A deficiency in multiple species in a dose-response manner. These anomalies are likely due to the loss of retinoic acid-dependent regulation of both hindbrain development and otic morphogenic processes. Based on in vivo evidence in experimental animals, we hypothesize that preventable gestational vitamin A deficiency, especially during early stages of fetal development, may predispose offspring to inner ear malformations and sensorineural hearing loss. As vitamin A deficiency affects an estimated 20 million pregnant women globally, we hypothesize that, in undernourished settings, routine provision of supplemental vitamin A at the recommended allowance throughout pregnancy may promote normal inner ear development and reduce risk of an as yet unknown fraction of sensorineural hearing loss. If our hypothesis proves correct, gestational vitamin A deficiency would represent a potentially

  9. Multiple Inhibitory Pathways Contribute to Lung CD8+ T Cell Impairment and Protect against Immunopathology during Acute Viral Respiratory Infection.

    PubMed

    Erickson, John J; Rogers, Meredith C; Tollefson, Sharon J; Boyd, Kelli L; Williams, John V

    2016-07-01

    Viruses are frequent causes of lower respiratory infection (LRI). Programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) signaling contributes to pulmonary CD8(+) T cell (TCD8) functional impairment during acute viral LRI, but the role of TCD8 impairment in viral clearance and immunopathology is unclear. We now find that human metapneumovirus infection induces virus-specific lung TCD8 that fail to produce effector cytokines or degranulate late postinfection, with minimally increased function even in the absence of PD-1 signaling. Impaired lung TCD8 upregulated multiple inhibitory receptors, including PD-1, lymphocyte activation gene 3 (LAG-3), T cell Ig mucin 3, and 2B4. Moreover, coexpression of these receptors continued to increase even after viral clearance, with most virus-specific lung TCD8 expressing three or more inhibitory receptors on day 14 postinfection. Viral infection also increased expression of inhibitory ligands by both airway epithelial cells and APCs, further establishing an inhibitory environment. In vitro Ab blockade revealed that multiple inhibitory receptors contribute to TCD8 impairment induced by either human metapneumovirus or influenza virus infection. In vivo blockade of T cell Ig mucin 3 signaling failed to enhance TCD8 function or reduce viral titers. However, blockade of LAG-3 in PD-1-deficient mice restored TCD8 effector functions but increased lung pathology, indicating that LAG-3 mediates lung TCD8 impairment in vivo and contributes to protection from immunopathology during viral clearance. These results demonstrate that an orchestrated network of pathways modifies lung TCD8 functionality during viral LRI, with PD-1 and LAG-3 serving prominent roles. Lung TCD8 impairment may prevent immunopathology but also contributes to recurrent lung infections. PMID:27259857

  10. Reversible acute axonal polyneuropathy associated with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome: impaired physiological nerve conduction due to thiamine deficiency?

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, S; Yokota, T; Shiojiri, T; Matunaga, T; Tanaka, H; Nishina, K; Hirota, H; Inaba, A; Yamada, M; Kanda, T; Mizusawa, H

    2003-05-01

    Acute axonal polyneuropathy and Wernicke-Korsakoff encephalopathy developed simultaneously in three patients. Nerve conduction studies (NCS) detected markedly decreased compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) and sensory nerve action potentials (SNAPs) with minimal conduction slowing; sympathetic skin responses (SSRs) were also notably decreased. Sural nerve biopsies showed only mild axonal degeneration with scattered myelin ovoid formation. The symptoms of neuropathy lessened within two weeks after an intravenous thiamine infusion. CMAPs, SNAPs, and SSRs also increased considerably. We suggest that this is a new type of peripheral nerve impairment: physiological conduction failure with minimal conduction delay due to thiamine deficiency. PMID:12700319

  11. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a diagnostic biomarker in mild cognitive impairment following stroke in acute phase.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ningqin; Shi, Shengliang; Su, Ying

    2016-05-25

    To investigate proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HMRS) as a diagnostic biomarker to identify mild cognitive impairment (MCI) following stroke in the acute phase. A total of 72 stroke patients were recruited in the acute phase of stroke from the Department of Neurology, including 36 stroke patients with MCI and 36 stroke patients without MCI. All patients underwent brain MRI/MRS examination on a 3.0 T scanner and a neuropsychological test in the acute phase of stroke. Single-voxel HMRS was performed to obtain hippocampal metabolism intensities and brain infarcts were assessed on MRI. Group difference in metabolite ratios was analyzed using a T-test. Spearman rank correlation was used to study the correlation between metabolite ratios and Montreal Cognitive Assessment scores. The hippocampal n-acetylaspartate/creatine (NAA/Cr) ratio was found to be significantly lower in stroke patients with MCI compared with stroke patients without MCI (P<0.02). However, we found no differences in the metabolite ratios between hippocampus ipsilateral to infarctions and the contralateral side (P>0.05) in stroke patients with MCI. Furthermore, a correlation was found between hippocampal NAA/Cr ratios and Montreal Cognitive Assessment scores in stroke patients with MCI (P<0.01). HMRS could be a biomarker to identify MCI following stroke in the acute phase by capturing neurodegenerative changes. PMID:26981713

  12. B lymphocytes trigger monocyte mobilization and impair heart function after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Zouggari, Yasmine; Ait-Oufella, Hafid; Bonnin, Philippe; Simon, Tabassome; Sage, Andrew P; Guérin, Coralie; Vilar, José; Caligiuri, Giuseppina; Tsiantoulas, Dimitrios; Laurans, Ludivine; Dumeau, Edouard; Kotti, Salma; Bruneval, Patrick; Charo, Israel F; Binder, Christoph J; Danchin, Nicolas; Tedgui, Alain; Tedder, Thomas F; Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien; Mallat, Ziad

    2013-10-01

    Acute myocardial infarction is a severe ischemic disease responsible for heart failure and sudden death. Here, we show that after acute myocardial infarction in mice, mature B lymphocytes selectively produce Ccl7 and induce Ly6C(hi) monocyte mobilization and recruitment to the heart, leading to enhanced tissue injury and deterioration of myocardial function. Genetic (Baff receptor deficiency) or antibody-mediated (CD20- or Baff-specific antibody) depletion of mature B lymphocytes impeded Ccl7 production and monocyte mobilization, limited myocardial injury and improved heart function. These effects were recapitulated in mice with B cell-selective Ccl7 deficiency. We also show that high circulating concentrations of CCL7 and BAFF in patients with acute myocardial infarction predict increased risk of death or recurrent myocardial infarction. This work identifies a crucial interaction between mature B lymphocytes and monocytes after acute myocardial ischemia and identifies new therapeutic targets for acute myocardial infarction. PMID:24037091

  13. Diagnostic value of Hoover sign and motor-evoked potentials in acute somatoform unilateral weakness and sensory impairment mimicking vascular stroke.

    PubMed

    Shahar, Eli; Ravid, Sarit; Hafner, Hava; Chistyakov, Andrei; Shcif, Aharon

    2012-07-01

    Acute unilateral weakness along with sensory impairment is commonly caused by obstruction of major cortical arteries in either adults or children. A somatoform presentation mimicking acute vascular stroke is very rare, especially in the pediatric age group. Here we report three adolescents presenting with acute unilateral weakness and sensory impairment along with diminished tendon reflexes who were suspected to have an acute stroke but who had developed a somatoform psychogenic disorder. Two adolescents had complete hemiplegia and one had weakness of the left leg - two had moved the alleged paralytic limbs during sleep. A normal Hoover sign was suggestive of a somatoform psychogenic etiology rather than true vascular stroke. Cortical and spinal MRI, motor-evoked potentials (MEP) and somatosensory-evoked potentials were normal. All adolescents recovered completely. Therefore, a somatoform conversion reaction should be considered in children presenting with acute unilateral weakness and sensory alterations, which is corroborated by a normal Hoover sign and intact MEP. PMID:22537658

  14. Pontine hypoplasia in a child with sensorineural deafness.

    PubMed

    Maeoka, Y; Yamamoto, T; Ohtani, K; Takeshita, K

    1997-09-01

    A 2-year-old girl with bilateral sensorineural deafness showed pontine hypoplasia as well as a bulging contour of the pontine tegmentum on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). There were no bilateral responses of brainstem auditory-evoked potentials (BAEPs). The absent late components of blink reflex (BR) indicated brainstem dysfunction. Chromosomal abnormalities and neurodegenerative or neurometabolic disorders, which might have been the cause of the pontine hypoplasia, were ruled out. The authors describe a rare case with pontine hypoplasia combined with sensorineural deafness and absent blink reflex and suggest that the brainstem in this child may become involved in the early gestation period. PMID:9339875

  15. Sensori-neural hearing loss in patients treated with irradiation for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Grau, C.; Moller, K.; Overgaard, M.; Overgaard, J.; Elbrond, O. )

    1991-08-01

    The present investigation has been carried out to evaluate the sensitivity of the inner ear to irradiation. Cochlear function was tested in a cohort of 22 patients before and 7-84 months after receiving external irradiation for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The pre-irradiation sensori-neural hearing threshold at 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz was used as a baseline for the individual patient, and the observed sensori-neural hearing loss (SNHL) was calculated as the difference between pre- and post-irradiation values. The pre-irradiation hearing level or patient age was not correlated with the actual SNHL. In contrast, there was a significant correlation between the total radiation dose to the inner ear and the observed hearing impairment. SNHL was most pronounced in the high frequencies, with values up to 35 dB (4000 Hz) and 25 dB (2000 Hz) in some patients. The latent period for the complication appeared to be 12 months or more. The deleterious effect of irradiation on the hearing should be kept in mind both in treatment planning and in the follow-up after radiotherapy.

  16. Carboxy alkyl esters of Uncaria tomentosa augment recovery of sensorineural functions following noise injury.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, O'neil W; Gearhart, Caroline A; Fulton, Sherry; Fechter, Laurence D

    2011-08-17

    This study tested the hypothesis that hydrophilic chemotypes of the medicinal vine Uncaria tomentosa (UT) would facilitate recovery of sensorineural functions following exposure to a damaging level of noise. The particular chemotypes investigated were carboxy alkyl esters (CAE) which are known to exhibit multifunctional cytoprotective properties that include: enhanced cellular DNA repair, antioxidation and anti-inflammation. Long-Evans rats were divided into four treatment groups: vehicle-control, noise-only, CAE-only and CAE+noise. The noise exposure was an 8kHz octave band of noise at 105dB SPL for 4h. Outer hair cell (OHC) function was measured with the cubic 2f(1)-f(2) distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) at the start of the study (baseline) and at time-points that corresponded to 1day, 1week and 4weeks post-noise exposure to determine within-group effects. Compound action potentials to puretone stimuli were recorded from the VIIIth craniofacial nerve at 4weeks post-noise exposure to determine between-group effects. Additionally, cytocochleograms were constructed for each row of OHCs from each group. Noise exposure produced significant sensorineural impairments. However, CAE treatment facilitated almost complete recovery of OHC function and limited the magnitude of cell loss. The loss of neural sensitivity to puretone stimuli was inhibited with CAE treatment. Therefore, it appears that the multifunctional cytoprotective capacity of CAE from UT may generalize to otoprotection from acoustic over-exposure. PMID:21762882

  17. Prognostic Factors in Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Atay, Gamze; Kayahan, Bahar; çınar, Betül çiçek; Saraç, Sarp; Sennaroğlu, Levent

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is still a complex and challenging process which requires clinical evidence regarding its etiology, treatment and prognostic factors. Therefore, determination of prognostic factors might aid in the selection of proper treatment modality. Aims: The aim of this study is to analyze whether there is correlation between SSNHL outcomes and (1) systemic steroid therapy, (2) time gap between onset of symptoms and initiation of therapy and (3) audiological pattern of hearing loss. Study Design: Retrospective chart review. Methods: Patients diagnosed at our clinic with SSNHL between May 2005 and December 2011 were reviewed. A detailed history of demographic features, side of hearing loss, previous SSNHL and/or ear surgery, recent upper respiratory tract infection, season of admission, duration of symptoms before admission and the presence of co-morbid diseases was obtained. Radiological and audiological evaluations were recorded and treatment protocol was assessed to determine whether systemic steroids were administered or not. Treatment started ≤5 days was regarded as “early” and >5 days as “delayed”. Initial audiological configurations were grouped as “upward sloping”, “downward sloping”, “flat” and “profound” hearing loss. Significant recovery was defined as thresholds improved to the same level with the unaffected ear or improved ≥30 dB on average. Slight recovery was hearing improvement between 10–30dB on average. Hearing recovery less than 10 dB was accepted as unchanged. Results: Among the 181 patients who met the inclusion criteria, systemic steroid was administered to 122 patients (67.4%), whereas 59 (32.6%) patients did not have steroids. It was found that steroid administration did not have any statistically significant effect in either recovered or unchanged hearing groups. Early treatment was achieved in 105 patients (58%) and 76 patients (42%) had delayed treatment. Recovery

  18. KCNQ/Kv7 channel activator flupirtine protects against acute stress-induced impairments of spatial memory retrieval and hippocampal LTP in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, C; Huang, P; Lu, Q; Zhou, M; Guo, L; Xu, X

    2014-11-01

    Spatial memory retrieval and hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) are impaired by stress. KCNQ/Kv7 channels are closely associated with memory and the KCNQ/Kv7 channel activator flupirtine represents neuroprotective effects. This study aims to test whether KCNQ/Kv7 channel activation prevents acute stress-induced impairments of spatial memory retrieval and hippocampal LTP. Rats were placed on an elevated platform in the middle of a bright room for 30 min to evoke acute stress. The expression of KCNQ/Kv7 subunits was analyzed at 1, 3 and 12 h after stress by Western blotting. Spatial memory was examined by the Morris water maze (MWM) and the field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP) in the hippocampal CA1 area was recorded in vivo. Acute stress transiently decreased the expression of KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 in the hippocampus. Acute stress impaired the spatial memory retrieval and hippocampal LTP, the KCNQ/Kv7 channel activator flupirtine prevented the impairments, and the protective effects of flupirtine were blocked by XE-991 (10,10-bis(4-Pyridinylmethyl)-9(10H)-anthracenone), a selective KCNQ channel blocker. Furthermore, acute stress decreased the phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) at Ser9 in the hippocampus, and flupirtine inhibited the reduction. These results suggest that the KCNQ/Kv7 channels may be a potential target for protecting both hippocampal synaptic plasticity and spatial memory retrieval from acute stress influences. PMID:25234320

  19. Fish Oil Diet Associated with Acute Reperfusion Related Hemorrhage, and with Reduced Stroke-Related Sickness Behaviors and Motor Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Pascoe, Michaela C.; Howells, David W.; Crewther, David P.; Constantinou, Nicki; Carey, Leeanne M.; Rewell, Sarah S.; Turchini, Giovanni M.; Kaur, Gunveen; Crewther, Sheila G.

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is associated with motor impairment and increased incidence of affective disorders such as anxiety/clinical depression. In non-stroke populations, successful management of such disorders and symptoms has been reported following diet supplementation with long chain omega-3-polyunsaturated-fatty-acids (PUFAs). However, the potential protective effects of PUFA supplementation on affective behaviors after experimentally induced stroke and sham surgery have not been examined previously. This study investigated the behavioral effects of PUFA supplementation over a 6-week period following either middle cerebral artery occlusion or sham surgery in the hooded-Wistar rat. The PUFA diet supplied during the acclimation period prior to surgery was found to be associated with an increased risk of acute hemorrhage following the reperfusion component of the surgery. In surviving animals, PUFA supplementation did not influence infarct size as determined 6 weeks after surgery, but did decrease omega-6-fatty-acid levels, moderate sickness behaviors, acute motor impairment, and longer-term locomotor hyperactivity and depression/anxiety-like behavior. PMID:24567728

  20. Fish oil diet associated with acute reperfusion related hemorrhage, and with reduced stroke-related sickness behaviors and motor impairment.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, Michaela C; Howells, David W; Crewther, David P; Constantinou, Nicki; Carey, Leeanne M; Rewell, Sarah S; Turchini, Giovanni M; Kaur, Gunveen; Crewther, Sheila G

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is associated with motor impairment and increased incidence of affective disorders such as anxiety/clinical depression. In non-stroke populations, successful management of such disorders and symptoms has been reported following diet supplementation with long chain omega-3-polyunsaturated-fatty-acids (PUFAs). However, the potential protective effects of PUFA supplementation on affective behaviors after experimentally induced stroke and sham surgery have not been examined previously. This study investigated the behavioral effects of PUFA supplementation over a 6-week period following either middle cerebral artery occlusion or sham surgery in the hooded-Wistar rat. The PUFA diet supplied during the acclimation period prior to surgery was found to be associated with an increased risk of acute hemorrhage following the reperfusion component of the surgery. In surviving animals, PUFA supplementation did not influence infarct size as determined 6 weeks after surgery, but did decrease omega-6-fatty-acid levels, moderate sickness behaviors, acute motor impairment, and longer-term locomotor hyperactivity and depression/anxiety-like behavior. PMID:24567728

  1. The muscle oxidative regulatory response to acute exercise is not impaired in less advanced COPD despite a decreased oxidative phenotype.

    PubMed

    Slot, Ilse G M; van den Borst, Bram; Hellwig, Valéry A C V; Barreiro, Esther; Schols, Annemie M W J; Gosker, Harry R

    2014-01-01

    Already in an early disease stage, patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are confronted with impaired skeletal muscle function and physical performance due to a loss of oxidative type I muscle fibers and oxidative capacity (i.e. oxidative phenotype; Oxphen). Physical activity is a well-known stimulus of muscle Oxphen and crucial for its maintenance. We hypothesized that a blunted response of Oxphen genes to an acute bout of exercise could contribute to decreased Oxphen in COPD. For this, 28 patients with less advanced COPD (age 65 ± 7 yrs, FEV1 59 ± 16% predicted) and 15 age- and gender-matched healthy controls performed an incremental cycle ergometry test. The Oxphen response to exercise was determined by the measurement of gene expression levels of Oxphen markers in pre and 4h-post exercise quadriceps biopsies. Because exercise-induced hypoxia and oxidative stress may interfere with Oxphen response, oxygen saturation and oxidative stress markers were assessed as well. Regardless of oxygen desaturation and absolute exercise intensities, the Oxphen regulatory response to exercise was comparable between COPD patients and controls with no evidence of increased oxidative stress. In conclusion, the muscle Oxphen regulatory response to acute exercise is not blunted in less advanced COPD, regardless of exercise-induced hypoxia. Hence, this study provides further rationale for incorporation of exercise training as integrated part of disease management to prevent or slow down loss of muscle Oxphen and related functional impairment in COPD. PMID:24587251

  2. Acute phosphate restriction leads to impaired fracture healing and resistance to BMP-2.

    PubMed

    Wigner, Nathan A; Luderer, Hilary F; Cox, Megan K; Sooy, Karen; Gerstenfeld, Louis C; Demay, Marie B

    2010-04-01

    Hypophosphatemia leads to rickets and osteomalacia, the latter of which results in decreased biomechanical integrity of bones, accompanied by poor fracture healing. Impaired phosphate-dependent apoptosis of hypertrophic chondrocytes is the molecular basis for rickets. However, the underlying pathophysiology of impaired fracture healing has not been characterized previously. To address the role of phosphate in fracture repair, mice were placed on a phosphate-restricted diet 2 days prior to or 3 days after induction of a mid-diaphyseal femoral fracture to assess the effects of phosphate deficiency on the initial recruitment of mesenchymal stem cells and their subsequent differentiation. Histologic and micro-computed tomographic (microCT) analyses demonstrated that both phosphate restriction models dramatically impaired fracture healing primarily owing to a defect in differentiation along the chondrogenic lineage. Based on Sox9 and Sox5 mRNA levels, neither the initial recruitment of cells to the callus nor their lineage commitment was effected by hypophosphatemia. However, differentiation of these cells was impaired in association with impaired bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling. In vivo ectopic bone-formation assays and in vitro investigations in ST2 stromal cells confirmed that phosphate restriction leads to BMP-2 resistance. Marrow ablation studies demonstrate that hypophosphatemia has different effects on injury-induced intramembranous bone formation compared with endochondral bone formation. Thus phosphate plays an important role in the skeleton that extends beyond mineralized matrix formation and growth plate maturation and is critical for endochondral bone repair. PMID:19839770

  3. Nitric oxide associated with iNOS expression inhibits acetylcholinesterase activity and induces memory impairment during acute hypobaric hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Udayabanu, M; Kumaran, D; Nair, R Unnikrishnan; Srinivas, P; Bhagat, Neeta; Aneja, R; Katyal, Anju

    2008-09-16

    The mechanisms responsible for cholinergic dysfunction associated learning and memory impairment during hypoxia are not well-understood. However it is known that inflammatory mediators like inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) hamper the functions of cholinergic neurons. In this present experiment we made an effort to study the iNOS expression mediated retrograde and anterograde memory impairment in Balb/c mice following acute hypobaric hypoxia (at an altitude of 23,000ft for 6h) using elevated plus maze and passive avoidance step-through tasks. Our results demonstrated that hypoxia transiently impairs the retrograde memory without affecting the anterograde memory functions, accompanied with a substantial rise in iNOS expression and nitric oxide levels in cerebral cortex on days 2 and 3 post hypoxia. Treatment with aminoguanidine (iNOS inhibitor ), resulted in down-regulation of the iNOS expression, attenuation of the surge of nitric oxide (NO) in cerebral cortex and reversal of retrograde memory impairment due to hypoxia. Moreover the reduced AChE activity and elevated lipid peroxidation in cerebral cortex were evident during post hypoxia re-oxygenation period, which was not observed in the hippocampus. Additionally, NO donor spermine NONOate could inhibit the AChE activity in brain homogenates in a concentration-dependent manner, which further substantiate that nitric oxide produced during post hypoxia re-oxygenation, primarily contributes to the observed inhibition of cortical AChE activity. Based on these experiments we hypothesize that the NO burst as a result of iNOS upregulation during hypoxia interrupts the memory consolidation by altering the cholinergic functions. PMID:18639532

  4. Acute ozone (O3) -induced impairment of glucose regulation: Age-related and temporal changes

    EPA Science Inventory

    O3 is associated with adverse cardiopulmonary health effects in humans and is thought to produce metabolic effects, such as insulin resistance. Recently, we showed that episodic O3 exposure increased insulin levels in aged rats. We hypothesized that O3 exposure could impair gluc...

  5. The relationship between hearing aid frequency response and acceptable noise level in patients with sensorineural hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Jalilvand, Hamid; Pourbakht, Akram; Jalaee, Shohreh

    2015-01-01

    Background: When fitting hearing aid as a compensatory device for an impaired cochlea in a patient with sensorineural hearing loss (HL), it is needed to the effective and efficient frequency response would be selected regarding providing the patient's perfect speech perception. There is not any research about the effects of frequency modifications on speech perception in patients with HL regarding the cochlear desensitization. The effect (s) of modifications in frequency response of hearing aid amplification on the results of acceptable noise level (ANL) test is the main aim of this study. Materials and Methods: The amounts of ANL in two conditions of linear amplification (high frequency emphasis [HFE] and mid frequency emphasis [MFE]) were measured. Thirty-two male subjects who participated in this study had the moderate to severe sensorineural HL. Results: There was not any significant difference between ANL in linear amplification of hearing aid with HFE frequency response and ANL in linear amplification of hearing aid with MFE frequency response. Conclusion: The gain modification of frequency response not only does not affect the patient's performance of speech intelligibility in ANL test. This indicates that we need to note to the cochlear desensitization phenomenon when fitting hearing aid as a compensatory device for an impaired cochlea in a patient. The cochlear desensitization has not been considered properly in hearing aid fitting formula which is needed to be explored more about the bio-mechanisms of impaired cochlea. PMID:26918238

  6. Acute Alcohol Consumption Impairs Controlled but Not Automatic Processes in a Psychophysical Pointing Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Kevin; Timney, Brian; Goodale, Melvyn A.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the effects of alcohol consumption on controlled and automatic cognitive processes. Such studies have shown that alcohol impairs performance on tasks requiring conscious, intentional control, while leaving automatic performance relatively intact. Here, we sought to extend these findings to aspects of visuomotor control by investigating the effects of alcohol in a visuomotor pointing paradigm that allowed us to separate the influence of controlled and automatic processes. Six male participants were assigned to an experimental “correction” condition in which they were instructed to point at a visual target as quickly and accurately as possible. On a small percentage of trials, the target “jumped” to a new location. On these trials, the participants’ task was to amend their movement such that they pointed to the new target location. A second group of 6 participants were assigned to a “countermanding” condition, in which they were instructed to terminate their movements upon detection of target “jumps”. In both the correction and countermanding conditions, participants served as their own controls, taking part in alcohol and no-alcohol conditions on separate days. Alcohol had no effect on participants’ ability to correct movements “in flight”, but impaired the ability to withhold such automatic corrections. Our data support the notion that alcohol selectively impairs controlled processes in the visuomotor domain. PMID:23861934

  7. [Acute coronary syndrome with impaired left ventricular function in a carbon monoxide poisoning].

    PubMed

    Capilla, E; Pons, F; Poyet, R; Kerebel, S; Jego, C; Louge, P; Cellarier, G-R

    2016-02-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning is the leading cause of death by poisoning in France. Neuropsychological symptoms are most common. We report on a patient with acute coronary syndrome and transient left ventricular dysfunction in carbon monoxide poisoning. Patient improved under hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Coronary angiography shows no significant lesion leading to myocardial stunning diagnose. Patients exposed to carbon monoxide must have systematic cardiac evaluation with electrocardiogram and dosage of biomarkers. PMID:25261170

  8. Renal impairment and worsening of renal function in acute heart failure: can new therapies help? The potential role of serelaxin.

    PubMed

    Schmieder, Roland E; Mitrovic, Veselin; Hengstenberg, Christian

    2015-08-01

    Renal dysfunction is a frequent finding in patients with acute heart failure (AHF) and an important prognostic factor for adverse outcomes. Worsening of renal function occurs in 30-50% of patients hospitalised for AHF, and is associated with increased mortality, prolonged hospital stay and increased risk of readmission. Likely mechanisms involved in the decrease in renal function include impaired haemodynamics and activation of neurohormonal factors, such as the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, the sympathetic nervous system and the arginine-vasopressin system. Additionally, many drugs currently used to treat AHF have a detrimental effect on renal function. Therefore, pharmacotherapy for AHF should carefully take into account any potential complications related to renal function. Serelaxin, currently in clinical development for the treatment of AHF is a recombinant form of human relaxin-2, identical in structure to the naturally occurring human relaxin-2 peptide hormone that mediates cardiac and renal adaptations during pregnancy. Data from both pre-clinical and clinical studies indicate a potentially beneficial effect of serelaxin on kidney function. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms and impact of impairment of renal function in AHF, and the potential benefits of new therapies, such as serelaxin, in this context. PMID:25787721

  9. Trauma-Related Altered States of Consciousness (TRASC) and Functional Impairment I: Prospective Study in Acutely Traumatized Persons.

    PubMed

    Frewen, Paul; Hegadoren, Kathy; Coupland, Nick J; Rowe, Brian H; Neufeld, Richard W J; Lanius, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    A theoretical framework referred to as a 4-D model has been described for classifying posttraumatic stress symptoms into those potentially occurring within normal waking consciousness (NWC) versus those thought to intrinsically exemplify dissociative experiences, specifically, trauma-related altered states of consciousness (TRASC). As a further test of this theoretical distinction, this prospective study evaluated whether TRASC and NWC forms of distress incrementally and prospectively predicted functional impairment at 6 and 12 weeks following presentation at hospital emergency departments in the acute aftermath of traumatic events in 180 persons. Establishing the clinical significance of both TRASC and NWC-distress symptoms, we found that 6-week markers of TRASC and NWC-distress independently predicted 12-week self-reported levels of social and occupational impairment. We also observed broad support for various predictions of the 4-D model except that, in contrast with hypotheses, childhood trauma history was generally more strongly correlated with symptoms of NWC-distress than with TRASC. Future research directions are discussed. PMID:26378486

  10. Acute hyperglycemia alters von Willebrand factor but not the fibrinolytic system in elderly subjects with normal or impaired glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Ludovico; Coppola, Antonino; Grassia, Antonio; Mastrolorenzo, Luigia; Lettieri, Biagio; De Lucia, Domenico; De Nanzio, Annarita; Gombos, Giorgio

    2004-10-01

    To assess whether acute hyperglycemia affects fibrinolytic balance in elderly subjects with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), 40 non-obese elderly subjects (20 NGT, age 68 +/- 8 years; and 20 IGT, age 69 +/- 11 years) were studied. On two experimental days, randomly allocated and spaced 1 week apart, plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin, fibrinogen, tissue plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 and von Willebrand factor (vWF) were measured in each subject at baseline (0) and 30, 60, 90, 120 min after the ingestion of 75 g glucose or a similarly sweet dose of aspartame (250 mg) (control test). In both NGT and IGT elderly subjects, tissue plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 and fibrinogen plasma levels did not significantly change after both oral aspartame and glucose load. In IGT subjects, vWF plasmatic levels decreased after glucose (not aspartame) oral load, reaching the minimum level at 90 min after load (82.7 +/- 7.8 versus 93.7 +/- 10.2, P <0.01). These results demonstrate that acute hyperglycemia does not modify plasma fibrinolysis in elderly subjects. The decrease of plasma concentration of vWF in IGT elderly subjects requires cautious interpretation and further extensive investigations. PMID:15613917

  11. ACUTE ELEVATION OF BLOOD CARBOXYHEMOGLOBIN TO 6% IMPAIRS EXERCISE PERFORMANCE AND AGGRAVATES SYMPTOMS IN PATIENTS WITH ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute exposure to carbon monoxide has the potential to impair exercise capacity in patients with ischemic heart disease. We studied the effect of inhalation of this compound sufficient to gradually produce a level of 6% carboxyhemoglobin in 30 non-smoking patients with obstructiv...

  12. Global impairment of coronary blood flow in the setting of acute coronary syndromes (a RESTORE substudy). Randomized Efficacy Study of Tirofiban for Outcomes and Restenosis.

    PubMed

    Gibson, C M; Goel, M; Murphy, S A; Dotani, I; Marble, S J; Deckelbaum, L I; Dodge, J T; King, S B

    2000-12-15

    Acute coronary syndromes result in a global impairment of coronary blood flow with nonculprit artery blood flow being associated with culprit artery flow and vice versa. Improvements in nonculprit artery flow are related to improvements in culprit artery flow after percutaneous intervention; nonculprit arteries with abnormal flow sustain greater improvements in their flow after culprit artery intervention. PMID:11113417

  13. Impaired mitochondrial respiration and protein nitration in the rat hippocampus after acute inhalation of combustion smoke.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heung M; Reed, Jason; Greeley, George H; Englander, Ella W

    2009-03-01

    Survivors of massive inhalation of combustion smoke endure critical injuries, including lasting neurological complications. We have previously reported that acute inhalation of combustion smoke disrupts the nitric oxide homeostasis in the rat brain. In this study, we extend our findings and report that a 30-minute exposure of awake rats to ambient wood combustion smoke induces protein nitration in the rat hippocampus and that mitochondrial proteins are a sensitive nitration target in this setting. Mitochondria are central to energy metabolism and cellular signaling and are critical to proper cell function. Here, analyses of the mitochondrial proteome showed elevated protein nitration in the course of a 24-hour recovery following exposure to smoke. Mass spectrometry identification of several significantly nitrated mitochondrial proteins revealed diverse functions and involvement in central aspects of mitochondrial physiology. The nitrated proteins include the ubiquitous mitochondrial creatine kinase, F1-ATP synthase alpha subunit, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3), succinate dehydrogenase Fp subunit, and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC1) protein. Furthermore, acute exposure to combustion smoke significantly compromised the respiratory capacity of hippocampal mitochondria. Importantly, elevated protein nitration and reduced mitochondrial respiration in the hippocampus persisted beyond the time required for restoration of normal oxygen and carboxyhemoglobin blood levels after the cessation of exposure to smoke. Thus, the time frame for intensification of the various smoke-induced effects differs between blood and brain tissues. Taken together, our findings suggest that nitration of essential mitochondrial proteins may contribute to the reduction in mitochondrial respiratory capacity and underlie, in part, the brain pathophysiology after acute inhalation of combustion smoke. PMID:19133281

  14. Impaired mitochondrial respiration and protein nitration in the rat hippocampus after acute inhalation of combustion smoke

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Heung M.; Reed, Jason; Greeley, George H.; Englander, Ella W.

    2009-03-01

    Survivors of massive inhalation of combustion smoke endure critical injuries, including lasting neurological complications. We have previously reported that acute inhalation of combustion smoke disrupts the nitric oxide homeostasis in the rat brain. In this study, we extend our findings and report that a 30-minute exposure of awake rats to ambient wood combustion smoke induces protein nitration in the rat hippocampus and that mitochondrial proteins are a sensitive nitration target in this setting. Mitochondria are central to energy metabolism and cellular signaling and are critical to proper cell function. Here, analyses of the mitochondrial proteome showed elevated protein nitration in the course of a 24-hour recovery following exposure to smoke. Mass spectrometry identification of several significantly nitrated mitochondrial proteins revealed diverse functions and involvement in central aspects of mitochondrial physiology. The nitrated proteins include the ubiquitous mitochondrial creatine kinase, F1-ATP synthase {alpha} subunit, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3), succinate dehydrogenase Fp subunit, and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC1) protein. Furthermore, acute exposure to combustion smoke significantly compromised the respiratory capacity of hippocampal mitochondria. Importantly, elevated protein nitration and reduced mitochondrial respiration in the hippocampus persisted beyond the time required for restoration of normal oxygen and carboxyhemoglobin blood levels after the cessation of exposure to smoke. Thus, the time frame for intensification of the various smoke-induced effects differs between blood and brain tissues. Taken together, our findings suggest that nitration of essential mitochondrial proteins may contribute to the reduction in mitochondrial respiratory capacity and underlie, in part, the brain pathophysiology after acute inhalation of combustion smoke.

  15. Impairment of T cell development and acute inflammatory response in HIV-1 Tat transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Fiume, Giuseppe; Scialdone, Annarita; Albano, Francesco; Rossi, Annalisa; Maria Tuccillo, Franca; Rea, Domenica; Palmieri, Camillo; Caiazzo, Elisabetta; Cicala, Carla; Bellevicine, Claudio; Falcone, Cristina; Vecchio, Eleonora; Pisano, Antonio; Ceglia, Simona; Mimmi, Selena; Iaccino, Enrico; Laurentiis, Annamaria de; Pontoriero, Marilena; Agosti, Valter; Troncone, Giancarlo; Mignogna, Chiara; Palma, Giuseppe; Arra, Claudio; Mallardo, Massimo; Maria Buonaguro, Franco; Scala, Giuseppe; Quinto, Ileana

    2015-01-01

    Immune activation and chronic inflammation are hallmark features of HIV infection causing T-cell depletion and cellular immune dysfunction in AIDS. Here, we addressed the issue whether HIV-1 Tat could affect T cell development and acute inflammatory response by generating a transgenic mouse expressing Tat in lymphoid tissue. Tat-Tg mice showed thymus atrophy and the maturation block from DN4 to DP thymic subpopulations, resulting in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells depletion in peripheral blood. In Tat-positive thymus, we observed the increased p65/NF-κB activity and deregulated expression of cytokines/chemokines and microRNA-181a-1, which are involved in T-lymphopoiesis. Upon LPS intraperitoneal injection, Tat-Tg mice developed an abnormal acute inflammatory response, which was characterized by enhanced lethality and production of inflammatory cytokines. Based on these findings, Tat-Tg mouse could represent an animal model for testing adjunctive therapies of HIV-1-associated inflammation and immune deregulation. PMID:26343909

  16. Impairment of T cell development and acute inflammatory response in HIV-1 Tat transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Fiume, Giuseppe; Scialdone, Annarita; Albano, Francesco; Rossi, Annalisa; Tuccillo, Franca Maria; Rea, Domenica; Palmieri, Camillo; Caiazzo, Elisabetta; Cicala, Carla; Bellevicine, Claudio; Falcone, Cristina; Vecchio, Eleonora; Pisano, Antonio; Ceglia, Simona; Mimmi, Selena; Iaccino, Enrico; de Laurentiis, Annamaria; Pontoriero, Marilena; Agosti, Valter; Troncone, Giancarlo; Mignogna, Chiara; Palma, Giuseppe; Arra, Claudio; Mallardo, Massimo; Buonaguro, Franco Maria; Scala, Giuseppe; Quinto, Ileana

    2015-01-01

    Immune activation and chronic inflammation are hallmark features of HIV infection causing T-cell depletion and cellular immune dysfunction in AIDS. Here, we addressed the issue whether HIV-1 Tat could affect T cell development and acute inflammatory response by generating a transgenic mouse expressing Tat in lymphoid tissue. Tat-Tg mice showed thymus atrophy and the maturation block from DN4 to DP thymic subpopulations, resulting in CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells depletion in peripheral blood. In Tat-positive thymus, we observed the increased p65/NF-κB activity and deregulated expression of cytokines/chemokines and microRNA-181a-1, which are involved in T-lymphopoiesis. Upon LPS intraperitoneal injection, Tat-Tg mice developed an abnormal acute inflammatory response, which was characterized by enhanced lethality and production of inflammatory cytokines. Based on these findings, Tat-Tg mouse could represent an animal model for testing adjunctive therapies of HIV-1-associated inflammation and immune deregulation. PMID:26343909

  17. Impairment of Venous Drainage on Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Secondary to Air Trapping in Acute Asphyxial Asthma.

    PubMed

    Niimi, Kevin S; Lewis, Leslie S; Fanning, Jeffrey J

    2015-06-01

    The inability to adequately support a patient on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) due to impaired drainage is not an uncommon occurrence during support. Typically, the causes include hypovolemia, kinks in the circuit, cannula malposition, or inadequate cannula size. In this report we present an uncommon etiology of this problem. A 3-year-old female presented to our hospital in status asthmaticus and pulseless electrical activity (PEA). This was a result of dynamic hyperinflation of the lungs causing physical obstruction of venous return to the heart. Upon initiating venoarterial (VA) ECMO, we experienced inadequate drainage that did not improve despite multiple interventions. This resolved with the addition of an inhaled anesthetic gas to treat this patient's severe bronchospasm. This case illustrates the importance of considering a patient's physiology or disease state and how that may affect the mechanics of ECMO support. PMID:26405359

  18. Acute and chronic methyl mercury poisoning impairs rat adrenal and testicular function

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, G.V.; Meikle, A.W.

    1980-05-01

    Animals poisoned with methyl mercury (CH/sub 3/Hg) exhibit stress intolerance and decreased sexual activity, which suggest both adrenal and testicular dysfunction. Adrenal and testicular function was studied in male rats after treatment with CH/sub 3/Hg. In animals treated chronically, the adrenal glands were markedly hyperplastic with enlargement of the zona fasciculata. The mean basal serum levels of corticosterone were similar in experimental (17.8 ..mu..g/dl) and control (16.8 ..mu..g/dl) groups. However, with ether stress, experimental animals had a subnormal response, and the mean serum levels of corticosterone increased to only 23.9 ..mu../dl compared to 40.6 ..mu..g/dl in the controls. Exogenous ACTH stimulation produced a mean level of 19.0 ..mu..g/dl in the CH/sub 3/Hg-treated animals and 49.7 ..mu..g/dl in the controls. In vitro studies demonstrated a defect in the conversion of cholesterol to pregnenolone. A profound impairment in swimming was partially reversed with glucocorticoid therapy. In animals treated with CH/sub 3/Hg, serum testosterone was lower than normal in the basal state. Human chorionic gonadotropin stimulation increased the mean serum concentration of testosterone to 23.4 ng/ml in controls, but it was only 4.50 ng/ml in experimental animals. The data indicate that CH/sub 3/Hg poisoning impairs adrenal and testicular steroid hormone secretion, which accounts in part for the diminished stress tolerance and decreased sexual activity observed in CH/sub 3/Hg-intoxicated animals.

  19. Neuroglobin mitigates mitochondrial impairments induced by acute inhalation of combustion smoke in the mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Gorgun, Falih Murat; Zhuo, Ming; Singh, Shilpee; Englander, Ella W.

    2014-01-01

    Context Acute inhalation of combustion smoke adversely affects brain homeostasis and energy metabolism. We previously showed that overexpressed neuroglobin (neuron specific globin protein) attenuates the formation of smoke inhalation-induced oxidative DNA damage, in vivo, in the mouse brain, while others reported protection by neuroglobin in diverse models of brain injury, mainly involving oxidative stress and hypoxic/ischemic insults. Objective To determine to what extent elevated neuroglobin ameliorates post smoke-inhalation brain bioenergetics and homeostasis in neuroglobin overexpressing transgenic mouse. Methods Smoke inhalation induced changes in bioenergetics were measured in the wild type and neuroglobin transgene mouse brain. Modulations of mitochondrial respiration were analyzed using the Seahorse XF24 flux analyzer and changes in cytoplasmic energy metabolism were assessed by measuring enzymatic activities and lactate in the course of post smoke recovery. Results Cortical mitochondria from neuroglobin transgene, better maintained ATP synthesis-linked oxygen consumption and unlike wild type mitochondria did not increase futile oxygen consumption feeding the proton leak, reflecting lesser smoke-induced mitochondrial compromise. Measurements revealed lesser reduction of mitochondrial ATP content and lesser compensatory increases in cytosolic energy metabolism, involving pyruvate kinase and lactate dehydrogenase activities as well as cytosolic lactate levels. Additionally, induction of c-Fos, the early response gene and key neuronal stress sensor, was attenuated in neuroglobin transgene compared to wild type brain after smoke. Conclusion Considered together, these differences reflect lesser perturbations produced by acute inhalation of combustion smoke in the neuroglobin overexpressing mouse, suggesting that neuroglobin mitigates mitochondrial dysfunction and neurotoxicity and raises the threshold of smoke inhalation-induced brain injury. PMID:24730682

  20. Copper acutely impairs behavioral function and muscle acetylcholinesterase activity in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Haverroth, Gabriela M B; Welang, Chariane; Mocelin, Riciéri N; Postay, Daniela; Bertoncello, Kanandra T; Franscescon, Francini; Rosemberg, Denis B; Dal Magro, Jacir; Dalla Corte, Cristiane L

    2015-12-01

    Copper is a heavy metal found at relatively high concentrations in surface waters around the world. Copper is a micronutrient at low concentrations and is essential to several organisms. At higher concentrations copper can become toxic, which reveal the importance of studying the toxic effects of this metal on the aquatic life. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate the toxic effects of copper on the behavior and biochemical parameters of zebrafish (Danio rerio). Zebrafish were exposed for 24h at a concentration of 0.006 mg/L Cu. After the exposure period, behavioral profile of animals was recorded through 6 min using two different apparatuses tests: the Novel Tank and the Light-Dark test. After behavioral testing, animals were euthanized with a solution of 250 mg/L of tricaine (MS-222). Brain, muscle, liver and gills were extracted for analysis of parameters related to oxidative stress and accumulation of copper in these tissues. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was determined in brain and muscle. Results showed acute exposure to copper induces significant changes in behavioral profile of zebrafish by changing locomotion and natural tendency to avoid brightly lit area. On the other hand, there were no significant effects on parameters related to oxidative stress. AChE activity decreased significantly in zebrafish muscle, but there were no significant changes in cerebral AChE activity. Copper levels in tissues did not increase significantly compared to the controls. Taken together, these results indicate that a low concentration of copper can acutely affect behavioral profile of adult zebrafish which could be partially related to an inhibition on muscle AChE activity. These results reinforce the need of additional tests to establishment of safe copper concentrations to aquatic organisms and the importance of behavioral parameters in ecotoxicological studies. PMID:26386335

  1. Relationships between acute imaging biomarkers and theory of mind impairment in post-acute pediatric traumatic brain injury: A prospective analysis using susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI).

    PubMed

    Ryan, Nicholas P; Catroppa, Cathy; Cooper, Janine M; Beare, Richard; Ditchfield, Michael; Coleman, Lee; Silk, Timothy; Crossley, Louise; Rogers, Kirrily; Beauchamp, Miriam H; Yeates, Keith O; Anderson, Vicki A

    2015-01-01

    Theory of Mind (ToM) forms an integral component of socially skilled behavior, and is critical for attaining developmentally appropriate goals. The protracted development of ToM is mediated by increasing connectivity between regions of the anatomically distributed 'mentalizing network', and may be vulnerable to disruption from pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI). The present study aimed to evaluate the post-acute effects of TBI on first-order ToM, and examine relations between ToM and both local and global indices of macrostructural damage detected using susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI). 104 children and adolescents with TBI and 43 age-matched typically developing (TD) controls underwent magnetic resonance imaging including a susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) sequence 2-8 weeks post-injury and were assessed on cognitive ToM tasks at 6-months after injury. Compared to TD controls and children with mild-moderate injuries, children with severe TBI showed significantly poorer ToM. Moreover, impairments in ToM were related to diffuse neuropathology, and parietal lobe lesions. Our findings support the vulnerability of the immature social brain network to disruption from TBI, and suggest that global macrostructural damage commonly associated with traumatic axonal injury (TAI) may contribute to structural disconnection of anatomically distributed regions that underlie ToM. This study suggests that SWI may be a valuable imaging biomarker to predict outcome and recovery of social cognition after pediatric TBI. PMID:25445779

  2. The effects of repetitive vibration on sensorineural function: biomarkers of sensorineural injury in an animal model of metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kiedrowski, Megan; Waugh, Stacey; Miller, Roger; Johnson, Claud; Krajnak, Kristine

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to hand-transmitted vibration in the work-place can result in the loss of sensation and pain in workers. These effects may be exacerbated by pre-existing conditions such as diabetes or the presence of primary Raynaud's phenomena. The goal of these studies was to use an established model of vibration-induced injury in Zucker rats. Lean Zucker rats have a normal metabolic profile, while obese Zucker rats display symptoms of metabolic disorder or Type II diabetes. This study examined the effects of vibration in obese and lean rats. Zucker rats were exposed to 4 h of vibration for 10 consecutive days at a frequency of 125 Hz and acceleration of 49 m/s2 for 10 consecutive days. Sensory function was checked using transcutaneous electrical stimulation on days 1, 5 and 9 of the exposure. Once the study was complete the ventral tail nerves, dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord were dissected, and levels of various transcripts involved in sensorineural dysfunction were measured. Sensorineural dysfunction was assessed using transcutaneous electrical stimulation. Obese Zucker rats displayed very few changes in sensorineural function. However they did display significant changes in transcript levels for factors involved in synapse formation, peripheral nerve remodeling, and inflammation. The changes in transcript levels suggested that obese Zucker rats had some level of sensory nerve injury prior to exposure, and that exposure to vibration activated pathways involved in injury and re-innervation. PMID:26433044

  3. The effects of repetitive vibration on sensorineural function: biomarkers of sensorineural injury in an animal model of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kiedrowski, Megan; Waugh, Stacey; Miller, Roger; Johnson, Claud; Krajnak, Kristine

    2015-11-19

    Exposure to hand-transmitted vibration in the work-place can result in the loss of sensation and pain in workers. These effects may be exacerbated by pre-existing conditions such as diabetes or the presence of primary Raynaud's phenomena. The goal of these studies was to use an established model of vibration-induced injury in Zucker rats. Lean Zucker rats have a normal metabolic profile, while obese Zucker rats display symptoms of metabolic disorder or Type II diabetes. This study examined the effects of vibration in obese and lean rats. Zucker rats were exposed to 4h of vibration for 10 consecutive days at a frequency of 125 Hz and acceleration of 49 m/s(2) for 10 consecutive days. Sensory function was checked using transcutaneous electrical stimulation on days 1, 5 and 9 of the exposure. Once the study was complete the ventral tail nerves, dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord were dissected, and levels of various transcripts involved in sensorineural dysfunction were measured. Sensorineural dysfunction was assessed using transcutaneous electrical stimulation. Obese Zucker rats displayed very few changes in sensorineural function. However they did display significant changes in transcript levels for factors involved in synapse formation, peripheral nerve remodeling, and inflammation. The changes in transcript levels suggested that obese Zucker rats had some level of sensory nerve injury prior to exposure, and that exposure to vibration activated pathways involved in injury and re-innervation. PMID:26433044

  4. Steroid-dependent sensorineural hearing loss in a patient with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease showing auditory neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Yukihide; Kataoka, Yuko; Sugaya, Akiko; Kariya, Shin; Kobayashi, Katsuhiro; Nishizaki, Kazunori

    2015-06-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most common form of hereditary sensorimotor neuropathy and sometimes involves disorders of the peripheral auditory system. We present a case of steroid-dependent auditory neuropathy associated with CMT, in which the patient experienced 3 episodes of acute exacerbation of hearing loss and successful rescue of hearing by prednisolone. An 8-year-old boy was referred to the otolaryngology department at the University Hospital. He had been diagnosed with CMT type 1 (demyelinating type) at the Child Neurology Department and was suffering from mild hearing loss due to auditory neuropathy. An audiological diagnosis of auditory neuropathy was confirmed by auditory brainstem response and distortion-product otoacoustic emissions. At 9 years and 0 months old, 9 years and 2 months old, and 10 years and 0 months old, he had experienced acute exacerbations of hearing loss, each of which was successfully rescued by intravenous or oral prednisolone within 2 weeks. Steroid-responsive cases of CMT have been reported, but this is the first case report of steroid-responsive sensorineural hearing loss in CMT. The present case may have implications for the mechanisms of action of glucocorticoids in the treatment of sensorineural hearing loss. PMID:25440412

  5. The Acute Coagulopathy of Trauma is due to Impaired Initial Thrombin Generation but not Clot Formation or Clot Strength

    PubMed Central

    Harr, Jeffrey N.; Moore, Ernest E.; Wohlauer, Max V.; Droz, Nathan; Fragoso, Miguel; Banerjee, Anirban; Silliman, Christopher C.

    2011-01-01

    The Acute Coagulopathy of Trauma (ACOT) has been described as a very early hypocoagulable state, but the mechanism remains controversial. One proposed mechanism is tissue hypoperfusion leading to protein C activation, with subsequent inhibition of Factors V and VIII. Variability in trauma has impeded the use of clinical data towards the elucidation of the mechanisms of ACOT, but thrombelastography (TEG) may provide insight by assessing hemostatic function from initial thrombin activation to fibrinolysis. We hypothesized that, in a controlled animal model of trauma/hemorrhagic shock, clotting factor dysfunction is the predominant mechanism in early ACOT. Methods Rats anesthetized by inhaled isoflurane (n=6) underwent laparotomy, and hemorrhage was induced to maintain a MAP of 35 mmHg for 30 minutes. Rats were then resuscitated with twice their shed blood volume in normal saline. TEG was performed at baseline, shock, and post-resuscitation periods. No heparin was given. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA with post-hoc Fisher’s test. Results Coagulation factor function was significantly impaired in the early stages of trauma/hemorrhagic shock. TEG R and SP-values were significantly increased from baseline to shock (p<0.001) and from shock to post-resuscitation periods (p<0.05). Delta (R-SP), a measure of thrombin generation, showed a significant increase (p<0.05) from baseline to shock. No significant changes were found in K, Angle, MA, and LY30 values. Conclusion Clotting factor derangement leading to impaired thrombin generation is the principle etiology of ACOT in this model and not the dynamics of clot formation, fibrin cross-linking, clot strength/platelet function, or fibrinolysis. PMID:21550061

  6. Loss of activator of G-protein signaling 3 impairs renal tubular regeneration following acute kidney injury in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Regner, Kevin R.; Nozu, Kandai; Lanier, Stephen M.; Blumer, Joe B.; Avner, Ellis D.; Sweeney, William E.; Park, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The intracellular mechanisms underlying renal tubular epithelial cell proliferation and tubular repair following ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) remain poorly understood. In this report, we demonstrate that activator of G-protein signaling 3 (AGS3), an unconventional receptor-independent regulator of heterotrimeric G-protein function, influences renal tubular regeneration following IRI. In rat kidneys exposed to IRI, there was a temporal induction in renal AGS3 protein expression that peaked 72 h after reperfusion and corresponded to the repair and recovery phase following ischemic injury. Renal AGS3 expression was localized predominantly to the recovering outer medullary proximal tubular cells and was highly coexpressed with Ki-67, a marker of cell proliferation. Kidneys from mice deficient in the expression of AGS3 exhibited impaired renal tubular recovery 7 d following IRI compared to wild-type AGS3-expressing mice. Mechanistically, genetic knockdown of endogenous AGS3 mRNA and protein in renal tubular epithelial cells reduced cell proliferation in vitro. Similar reductions in renal tubular epithelial cell proliferation were observed following incubation with gallein, a selective inhibitor of Gβγ subunit activity, and lentiviral overexpression of the carboxyl-terminus of G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2ct), a scavenger of Gβγ subunits. In summary, these data suggest that AGS3 acts through a novel receptor-independent mechanism to facilitate renal tubular epithelial cell proliferation and renal tubular regeneration.—Regner, K. R., Nozu, K., Lanier, S. M., Blumer, J. B., Avner, E. D., Sweeney, Jr., W. E., Park, F. Loss of activator of G-protein signaling 3 impairs renal tubular regeneration following acute kidney injury in rodents. PMID:21343176

  7. Analysis of Phase 3 telavancin nosocomial pneumonia data excluding patients with severe renal impairment and acute renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Torres, A.; Rubinstein, E.; Corey, G. R.; Stryjewski, M. E.; Barriere, S. L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Telavancin is approved in Europe for the treatment of nosocomial pneumonia caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus when other alternatives are not suitable. The approved European prescribing information contraindicates the use of telavancin in patients with severe renal impairment (creatinine clearance <30 mL/min, including patients on haemodialysis) and pre-existing acute renal failure owing to the higher observed mortality in these patients. Data from the ATTAIN studies were reanalysed, excluding patients with these contraindicating conditions at baseline. (At the time of submission of this article, the European marketing authorization of telavancin for the treatment of nosocomial pneumonia was suspended pending evidence of a new European Medicines Agency-approved supplier. Clinigen Healthcare Ltd, Theravance's commercialization partner for telavancin in Europe, is in the process of seeking approval of a new manufacturing source.) Methods A post hoc analysis of data from two Phase 3 ATTAIN trials of telavancin for the treatment of Gram-positive nosocomial pneumonia assessing clinical outcomes and safety. Results The all-treated population for this analysis represented 84.2% (1266/1503) of the ATTAIN all-treated population. The cure rates in the clinically evaluable population were similar in the telavancin (82.5%, 231/280) and vancomycin (81.3%, 243/299) groups [treatment difference (95% CI): 1.3% (−5.0% to 7.6%)], and were consistent with the overall ATTAIN study results. The cure rate was higher in the telavancin than the vancomycin treatment group in microbiologically evaluable patients with only Gram-positive pathogens isolated at baseline [85.0% (130/153) versus 75.2% (109/145), respectively; treatment difference (95% CI): 9.7% (0.6%–18.8%)]. The incidences of adverse events were similar between treatment groups and consistent with the overall findings of the ATTAIN study. Conclusions This analysis demonstrated that in the subset

  8. Acute Thermotherapy Prevents Impairments in Cutaneous Microvascular Function Induced by a High Fat Meal

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Jennifer C.; Roseguini, Bruno T.; Goerger, Benjamin M.; Fallon, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that a high fat meal (HFM) would impair cutaneous vasodilation, while thermotherapy (TT) would reverse the detrimental effects. Eight participants were instrumented with skin heaters and laser-Doppler (LD) probes and tested in three trials: control, HFM, and HFM + TT. Participants wore a water-perfused suit perfused with 33°C (control and HFM) or 50°C (HFM + TT) water. Participants consumed 1 g fat/kg body weight. Blood samples were taken at baseline and two hours post-HFM. Blood pressure was measured every 5–10 minutes. Microvascular function was assessed via skin local heating from 33°C to 39°C two hours after HFM. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated and normalized to maximal vasodilation (%CVCmax). HFM had no effect on initial peak (48 ± 4 %CVCmax) compared to control (49 ± 4 %CVCmax) but attenuated the plateau (51 ± 4 %CVCmax) compared to control (63 ± 4 %CVCmax, P < 0.001). Initial peak was augmented in HFM + TT (66 ± 4 %CVCmax) compared to control and HFM (P < 0.05), while plateau (73 ± 3 % CVCmax) was augmented only compared to the HFM trial (P < 0.001). These data suggest that HFM negatively affects cutaneous vasodilation but can be minimized by TT. PMID:27595112

  9. Acute Thermotherapy Prevents Impairments in Cutaneous Microvascular Function Induced by a High Fat Meal.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Jennifer C; Roseguini, Bruno T; Goerger, Benjamin M; Fallon, Elizabeth A; Wong, Brett J

    2016-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that a high fat meal (HFM) would impair cutaneous vasodilation, while thermotherapy (TT) would reverse the detrimental effects. Eight participants were instrumented with skin heaters and laser-Doppler (LD) probes and tested in three trials: control, HFM, and HFM + TT. Participants wore a water-perfused suit perfused with 33°C (control and HFM) or 50°C (HFM + TT) water. Participants consumed 1 g fat/kg body weight. Blood samples were taken at baseline and two hours post-HFM. Blood pressure was measured every 5-10 minutes. Microvascular function was assessed via skin local heating from 33°C to 39°C two hours after HFM. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated and normalized to maximal vasodilation (%CVCmax). HFM had no effect on initial peak (48 ± 4 %CVCmax) compared to control (49 ± 4 %CVCmax) but attenuated the plateau (51 ± 4 %CVCmax) compared to control (63 ± 4 %CVCmax, P < 0.001). Initial peak was augmented in HFM + TT (66 ± 4 %CVCmax) compared to control and HFM (P < 0.05), while plateau (73 ± 3 % CVCmax) was augmented only compared to the HFM trial (P < 0.001). These data suggest that HFM negatively affects cutaneous vasodilation but can be minimized by TT. PMID:27595112

  10. Para-cresyl sulfate acutely impairs vascular reactivity and induces vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Gross, Priscilla; Massy, Ziad A; Henaut, Lucie; Boudot, Cédric; Cagnard, Joanna; March, Cécilia; Kamel, Saïd; Drueke, Tilman B; Six, Isabelle

    2015-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by vascular remodeling and the retention of uremic toxins, several of which are independently associated with the high cardiovascular mortality rate in CKD patients. Whether the association between these uremic toxins and cardiovascular mortality is due to induction of vascular dysfunction and resulting vascular remodeling remains to be determined. This study evaluates the effects of para-cresyl sulfate (PCS), a newly identified uremic toxin, on vascular function and remodeling. PCS acutely induced oxidative stress in both endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells, with a maximal effect at 0.15 mM, corresponding to the mean "uremic" concentration found in dialysis patients. PCS significantly increased within 30 min phenylephrine-induced contraction of mouse thoracic aorta, through direct activation of rho-kinase, independently of oxidative stress induction, as demonstrated by the capacity of rho-kinase inhibitor Y-27632 to abolish this effect. After exposure of the aorta to PCS for 48 h, we observed inward eutrophic remodeling, a hallmark of uremic vasculopathy characterized by a reduction of the area of both lumen and media, with unchanged media/lumen ratio. In conclusion, elevated PCS concentrations such as those observed in CKD patients, by promoting both vascular dysfunction and vascular remodeling, may contribute to the development of hypertension and to cardiovascular mortality in CKD. PMID:25899466

  11. Impaired glucose tolerance in pediatric burn patients at discharge from the acute hospital stay

    PubMed Central

    Fram, Ricki Y.; Cree, Melanie G.; Wolfe, Robert R.; Barr, David; Herndon, David N.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Hyperglycemia, secondary to the hypermetabolic stress response, is a common occurrence after thermal injury. This stress response has been documented to persist up to 9 months post burn. The purpose of this study was to measure insulin sensitivity in severely burned children prior to discharge when wounds are 95% healed. Methods Twenty-four children, aged 4–17 years, with burns ≥ 40% total body surface area (TBSA) underwent a 2 hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) prior to discharge from the acute pediatric burn unit. Plasma glucose and insulin levels, as well as the Homeostasis Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance (HOMAIR) were compared to published OGTT data from healthy, non-burned children. Results There was a significant difference between severely burned children and non-burned, healthy children with respect to the HOMAIR. Severely burned children had a HOMAIR of 3.53±1.62 compared to the value in non-burned healthy children was 1.28±0.16 (p<0.05). Conclusion Insulin resistance secondary to the hypermetabolic stress response persists in severely burned children when burn wounds are at least 95% healed. The results of this study warrant future investigations into therapeutic options for the burned child during the rehabilitative phase of their care after injury. PMID:20634704

  12. Acute cortical deafness in a child with MELAS syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pittet, Marie P; Idan, Roni B; Kern, Ilse; Guinand, Nils; Van, Hélène Cao; Toso, Seema; Fluss, Joël

    2016-05-01

    Auditory impairment in mitochondrial disorders are usually due to peripheral sensorineural dysfunction. Central deafness is only rarely reported. We report here an 11-year-old boy with MELAS syndrome who presented with subacute deafness after waking up from sleep. Peripheral hearing loss was rapidly excluded. A brain MRI documented bilateral stroke-like lesions predominantly affecting the superior temporal lobe, including the primary auditory cortex, confirming the central nature of deafness. Slow recovery was observed in the following weeks. This case serves to illustrate the numerous challenges caused by MELAS and the unusual occurrence of acute cortical deafness, that to our knowledge has not be described so far in a child in this setting. PMID:27056553

  13. Extrapancreatic organ impairment during acute pancreatitis induced by bile-pancreatic duct obstruction. Effect of N-acetylcysteine

    PubMed Central

    Manso, Manuel A; Ramudo, Laura; De Dios, Isabel

    2007-01-01

    Summary Multiple organ failure is frequently associated with acute pancreatitis (AP). Our aim was to study pulmonary, hepatic and renal complications developed in the course of AP experimentally induced in rats by bile-pancreatic duct obstruction (BPDO), differentiating the complications caused by AP itself, from those directly caused by bile duct obstruction (BDO), after ligating the choledocus. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) was administered as a therapeutic approach. Myeloperoxidase activity revealed neutrophil infiltration in lungs from 12 h after BDO, even if AP was not triggered. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity indicated hepatocyte death from 48 h after BDO, and from 24 h following BPDO-induced AP onwards, an effect delayed until 48 h by NAC treatment. Rats with single cholestasis (BDO) and rats with BPDO-induced AP showed a significant increase in plasma aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and bilirubin concentration from 12 h onwards, whose values were reduced by NAC treatment at early BPDO. No renal failure was found during 120 h of bile-pancreatic obstruction. Our results showed lung and liver impairment as a result of BDO, even if AP does not develop. Pancreatic damage and extrapancreatic complications during AP induced by BPDO were palliated by NAC treatment. PMID:17877536

  14. Acute and chronic wound fluids inversely influence adipose-derived stem cell function: molecular insights into impaired wound healing.

    PubMed

    Koenen, Paola; Spanholtz, Timo A; Maegele, Marc; Stürmer, Ewa; Brockamp, Thomas; Neugebauer, Edmund; Thamm, Oliver C

    2015-02-01

    Wound healing is a complex biological process that requires a well-orchestrated interaction of mediators as well as resident and infiltrating cells. In this context, mesenchymal stem cells play a crucial role as they are attracted to the wound site and influence tissue regeneration by various mechanisms. In chronic wounds, these processes are disturbed. In a comparative approach, adipose-derived stem cells (ASC) were treated with acute and chronic wound fluids (AWF and CWF, respectively). Proliferation and migration were investigated using 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) test and transwell migration assay. Gene expression changes were analysed using quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction. AWF had a significantly stronger chemotactic impact on ASC than CWF (77·5% versus 59·8% migrated cells). While proliferation was stimulated by AWF up to 136·3%, CWF had a negative effect on proliferation over time (80·3%). Expression of b-FGF, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 was strongly induced by CWF compared with a mild induction by AWF. These results give an insight into impaired ASC function in chronic wounds. The detected effect of CWF on proliferation and migration of ASC might be one reason for an insufficient healing process in chronic wounds. PMID:23490259

  15. Impaired cardiovascular structure and function in adult survivors of severe acute malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Tennant, Ingrid A; Barnett, Alan T; Thompson, Debbie S; Kips, Jan; Boyne, Michael S; Chung, Edward E; Chung, Andrene P; Osmond, Clive; Hanson, Mark A; Gluckman, Peter D; Segers, Patrick; Cruickshank, J Kennedy; Forrester, Terrence E

    2014-09-01

    Malnutrition below 5 years remains a global health issue. Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) presents in childhood as oedematous (kwashiorkor) or nonoedematous (marasmic) forms, with unknown long-term cardiovascular consequences. We hypothesized that cardiovascular structure and function would be poorer in SAM survivors than unexposed controls. We studied 116 adult SAM survivors, 54 after marasmus, 62 kwashiorkor, and 45 age/sex/body mass index-matched community controls who had standardized anthropometry, blood pressure, echocardiography, and arterial tonometry performed. Left ventricular indices and outflow tract diameter, carotid parameters, and pulse wave velocity were measured, with systemic vascular resistance calculated. All were expressed as SD scores. Mean (SD) age was 28.8±7.8 years (55% men). Adjusting for age, sex, height, and weight, SAM survivors had mean (SE) reductions for left ventricular outflow tract diameter of 0.67 (0.16; P<0.001), stroke volume 0.44 (0.17; P=0.009), cardiac output 0.5 (0.16; P=0.001), and pulse wave velocity 0.32 (0.15; P=0.03) compared with controls but higher diastolic blood pressures (by 4.3; 1.2-7.3 mm Hg; P=0.007). Systemic vascular resistance was higher in marasmus and kwashiorkor survivors (30.2 [1.2] and 30.8 [1.1], respectively) than controls 25.3 (0.8), overall difference 5.5 (95% confidence interval, 2.8-8.4 mm Hg min/L; P<0.0001). No evidence of large vessel or cardiac remodeling was found, except closer relationships between these indices in former marasmic survivors. Other parameters did not differ between SAM survivor groups. We conclude that adult SAM survivors had smaller outflow tracts and cardiac output when compared with controls, yet markedly elevated peripheral resistance. Malnutrition survivors are thus likely to develop excess hypertension in later life, especially when exposed to obesity. PMID:24980666

  16. Implications of Sensorineural Hearing Loss With Hydrocodone/Acetaminophen Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Novac, Andrei; Iosif, Anamaria M.; Groysman, Regina; Bota, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is an infrequently recognized side effect of pain medication abuse. Chronic pain patients treated with opiates develop different degrees of tolerance to pain medications. In many cases, the tolerance becomes the gateway to a variety of cycles of overuse and unmasking of significant psychiatric morbidity and mortality. An individualized approach utilizing combined treatment modalities (including nonopiate pharmaceuticals) is expected to become the norm. Patients can now be provided with multidisciplinary care that addresses an individual’s psychiatric, social, and medical needs, which requires close cooperation between physicians of varying specialties. This report describes a patient who experienced hearing loss from hydrocodone/acetaminophen abuse. PMID:26835162

  17. Implications of Sensorineural Hearing Loss With Hydrocodone/Acetaminophen Abuse.

    PubMed

    Novac, Andrei; Iosif, Anamaria M; Groysman, Regina; Bota, Robert G

    2015-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is an infrequently recognized side effect of pain medication abuse. Chronic pain patients treated with opiates develop different degrees of tolerance to pain medications. In many cases, the tolerance becomes the gateway to a variety of cycles of overuse and unmasking of significant psychiatric morbidity and mortality. An individualized approach utilizing combined treatment modalities (including nonopiate pharmaceuticals) is expected to become the norm. Patients can now be provided with multidisciplinary care that addresses an individual's psychiatric, social, and medical needs, which requires close cooperation between physicians of varying specialties. This report describes a patient who experienced hearing loss from hydrocodone/acetaminophen abuse. PMID:26835162

  18. Rapid and Reversible Impairments of Short- and Long-Term Social Recognition Memory Are Caused by Acute Isolation of Adult Rats via Distinct Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Shahar-Gold, Hadar; Gur, Rotem; Wagner, Shlomo

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian social organizations require the ability to recognize and remember individual conspecifics. This social recognition memory (SRM) can be examined in rodents using their innate tendency to investigate novel conspecifics more persistently than familiar ones. Here we used the SRM paradigm to examine the influence of housing conditions on the social memory of adult rats. We found that acute social isolation caused within few days a significant impairment in acquisition of short-term SRM of male and female rats. Moreover, SRM consolidation into long-term memory was blocked following only one day of social isolation. Both impairments were reversible, but with different time courses. Furthermore, only the impairment in SRM consolidation was reversed by systemic administration of arginine-vasopressin (AVP). In contrast to SRM, object recognition memory was not affected by social isolation. We conclude that acute social isolation rapidly induces reversible changes in the brain neuronal and molecular mechanisms underlying SRM, which hamper its acquisition and completely block its consolidation. These changes occur via distinct, AVP sensitive and insensitive mechanisms. Thus, acute social isolation of rats swiftly causes changes in their brain and interferes with their normal social behavior. PMID:23741464

  19. Resolution of sudden sensorineural hearing loss following a roller coaster ride.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Aman; Sinha, Amrita; Al-Waa, Ahmad M

    2011-07-01

    We report a case of sudden unilateral sensorineural hearing loss of sudden onset during an aeroplane flight, which completely resolved during a roller coaster ride at Alton Towers theme park. A review of the literature concerning sudden idiopathic sensorineural hearing loss and spontaneous resolution are discussed. Initially, pure-tone audiometry showed a profound sensorineural hearing loss in the right ear and mild sensorineural hearing loss in the left ear (of note, the hearing was normal prior to the episode). Following resolution of the patient's symptoms during a roller coaster ride, pure-tone audiometry showed normal hearing thresholds in both ears. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss is a symptom of cochlear injury and the mechanism of the patient's symptoms was attributed to a patent cochlear aqueduct. PMID:22754856

  20. Assessment of Impairment in Patients with Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Furlan, Julio C.; Noonan, Vanessa; Singh, Anoushka

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The most common primary end-point of the trial on treatment of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is the degree of impairment. The American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Standards have been widely used to assess motor function and pin-prick and light-touch sensory function. In addition, pain assessment is another clinically relevant aspect of the impairment in individuals with SCI. Given this, we sought to systematically review the studies that focused on the psychometric properties of ASIA Standards and all previously used outcome measures of pain in the SCI population in the acute care setting. For the primary literature search strategy, the MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases were sought out. Subsequently, a secondary search strategy was carried out using the articles listed in the references of meta-analysis, systematic, and non-systematic review articles. Two reviewers (JCF and VN) independently selected the articles that fulfill the inclusion and exclusion, assessed the level of evidence of each article, and appraised the psychometric properties of each instrument. Divergences during those steps were solved by consensus between both reviewers. Of 400 abstracts captured in our primary search strategy on the ASIA Standards, 16 full articles fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria. An additional 40 references were obtained from two prior systematic reviews on ASIA Standards. While 45 of 56 of the studies on ASIA Standards provided level 4 evidence, there were 11 level 2b evidence studies. Convergent construct validity (n = 34), reliability (n = 12), and responsiveness (n = 10) were the most commonly studied psychometric properties of the ASIA Standards, but two prior studies examined their content validity. Of the 267 abstracts yielded in our primary search on pain assessment, 24 articles with level 4 evidence fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria. There was no study that examined pain assessment in the acute

  1. Sudden onset unilateral sensorineural hearing loss after rabies vaccination.

    PubMed

    Okhovat, Saleh; Fox, Richard; Magill, Jennifer; Narula, Antony

    2015-01-01

    A 33-year-old man developed profound sudden onset right-sided hearing loss with tinnitus and vertigo, within 24 h of pretravel rabies vaccination. There was no history of upper respiratory tract infection, systemic illness, ototoxic medication or trauma, and normal otoscopic examination. Pure tone audiograms (PTA) demonstrated right-sided sensorineural hearing loss (thresholds 90-100 dB) and normal left-sided hearing. MRI internal acoustic meatus, viral serology (hepatitis B, C, HIV and cytomegalovirus) and syphilis screen were normal. Positive Epstein-Barr virus IgG, viral capsid IgG and anticochlear antibodies (anti-HSP-70) were noted. Initial treatment involved a course of high-dose oral prednisolone and acyclovir. Repeat PTAs after 12 days of treatment showed a small improvement in hearing thresholds. Salvage intratympanic steroid injections were attempted but failed to improve hearing further. Sudden onset sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is an uncommon but frightening experience for patients. This is the first report of SSNHL following rabies immunisation in an adult. PMID:26670892

  2. Isolated Sensorineural Hearing Loss as a Sequela after Lightning Strike.

    PubMed

    Turan, Mahfuz; Kalkan, Ferhat; Bozan, Nazım; Özçalimli, İsa; Zeki Erdem, Mehmet; Yalınkılıç, Abdülaziz; Garca, Mehmet Fatih

    2015-01-01

    In most of the surviving patients after a lightning strike, audiovestibular abnormalities have been reported. The most frequently reported type of abnormalities is a tympanic membrane perforation with hearing loss and external ear canal burn. However a sensor neural hearing loss and mixed type hearing loss can also occur, but these occur rarely. A nineteen-year-old female patient had, after a lightning strike, serious burns on the left ear, behind the ear, and on the chest and neck. She also had in her left ear 108 dB hearing loss with irregular central perforation and in her right ear 52 dB sensorineural hearing loss. There was no hearing loss before the strike. A hearing aid was recommended for the right ear and good care and follow-up were recommended for the left ear. A lightning strike can cause serious audiological damage. Therefore, it is necessary to make a careful audiovestibular evaluation of the patients. Although there exist rarely healed cases from sensorineural hearing loss after lightning strike in literature, in our case hearing loss occurred bilaterally and then it healed unilaterally. This condition is quite rare in literature. PMID:26161278

  3. Endothelial Dysfunction in Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss: A Review.

    PubMed

    Quaranta, Nicola; De Ceglie, Vincenzo; D'Elia, Alessandra

    2016-04-20

    An endothelial dysfunction has been described in idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL) patients. The purpose of our review was to: i) identify, evaluate and review recent research about cardiovascular risk factors involvement and signs of endothelial dysfunction in ISSHL; ii) implication of these discovering in clinical practice and future research. A Medline literature search was conducted to identify any study on the involvement of endothelial dysfunction in ISSHL, published in the English language in the last decade. The following MEDLINE search terms were used: sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL) and endothelial dysfunction (text words). Additional studies were identified by hand searching the references of original articles and review articles. Studies were not excluded on the basis of the qualitative or quantitative definitions of SSHL, treatment regimens, or outcome measures. Data were extracted from included papers by a reviewer. Information on the patients, investigations, methods, interventions, and outcomes were systematically analyzed. Characteristics and results of all included studies were reviewed systematically. High levels of adhesion molecules, hyperhomocysteinemia and lower folate levels, unbalanced oxidative status, a lower value of flow-mediated dilatation of brachial artery and a reduced percentage of circulating endothelial progenitor cells in patients affected by ISSHL support the hypothesis that this syndrome should be considered as a microcirculation disorder based on endothelial dysfunction and drive clinicians to implement all the traditional strategies used for preventing cardiovascular events, to also reduce the likelihood of ISSHL occurrence. PMID:27588164

  4. Endothelial Dysfunction in Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Quaranta, Nicola; De Ceglie, Vincenzo; D’Elia, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    An endothelial dysfunction has been described in idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL) patients. The purpose of our review was to: i) identify, evaluate and review recent research about cardiovascular risk factors involvement and signs of endothelial dysfunction in ISSHL; ii) implication of these discovering in clinical practice and future research. A Medline literature search was conducted to identify any study on the involvement of endothelial dysfunction in ISSHL, published in the English language in the last decade. The following MEDLINE search terms were used: sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL) and endothelial dysfunction (text words). Additional studies were identified by hand searching the references of original articles and review articles. Studies were not excluded on the basis of the qualitative or quantitative definitions of SSHL, treatment regimens, or outcome measures. Data were extracted from included papers by a reviewer. Information on the patients, investigations, methods, interventions, and outcomes were systematically analyzed. Characteristics and results of all included studies were reviewed systematically. High levels of adhesion molecules, hyperhomocysteinemia and lower folate levels, unbalanced oxidative status, a lower value of flow-mediated dilatation of brachial artery and a reduced percentage of circulating endothelial progenitor cells in patients affected by ISSHL support the hypothesis that this syndrome should be considered as a microcirculation disorder based on endothelial dysfunction and drive clinicians to implement all the traditional strategies used for preventing cardiovascular events, to also reduce the likelihood of ISSHL occurrence. PMID:27588164

  5. Perforin- and granulysin-mediated cytotoxicity and interleukin 15 play roles in neurocognitive impairment in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Petranovic, Duska; Pilcic, Gorazd; Valkovic, Toni; Sotosek Tokmadzic, Vlatka; Laskarin, Gordana

    2014-07-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is an aggressive disease. The course of disease is regulated by pro-inflammatory agents, and malignant cell infiltration of tissues plays a deleterious role in disease progression, greatly impacting quality of life, especially in the cognitive domains. Our hypothesis is that significant serum concentrations of interleukin 15 (IL-15) are responsible for higher expression of adhesion molecules on endothelial cells of blood-brain barrier (BBB) which allow leukaemia cells and/or normal lymphocytes the infiltration into the brain. In brain tissue these cells could be stimulated to release perforin and granulysin causing induction of apoptosis in brain cells that are involved in complex neural signalling mediated by neurotransmitters, and consequent fine cognitive impairment. Such changes could be detected early, even before notable clinical psycho-neurological or radiological changes in patients with ALL. To evaluate this hypothesis we propose measuring cognitive function using Complex Reactiometer Drenovac (CRD) scores in patients with ALL. The expression of different adhesion molecules on BBB as well as presence and distribution of different lymphocytes in brain tissue will be analyzed. We will then correlate CRD scores with levels of IL-15 and the percentages of T cells, natural killer T cells, and natural killer cells expressing perforin and/or granulysin proteins. CRD is a scientifically recognised and highly sensitive psychometric laboratory test based on the complex chronometric mathematical measuring of speed of reaction to various stimuli. It provides an objective assessment of cognitive functions from the most complex mental activities to the simplest reaction reflexes. Early recognition of cognitive dysfunction might be important when selecting the most appropriate chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy regimens, and could allow for the implementation of preventive measures against further deterioration in cognitive function and

  6. Deep Sequencing Reveals Novel Genetic Variants in Children with Acute Liver Failure and Tissue Evidence of Impaired Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Valencia, C. Alexander; Wang, Xinjian; Wang, Jin; Peters, Anna; Simmons, Julia R.; Moran, Molly C.; Mathur, Abhinav; Husami, Ammar; Qian, Yaping; Sheridan, Rachel; Bove, Kevin E.; Witte, David; Huang, Taosheng; Miethke, Alexander G.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims The etiology of acute liver failure (ALF) remains elusive in almost half of affected children. We hypothesized that inherited mitochondrial and fatty acid oxidation disorders were occult etiological factors in patients with idiopathic ALF and impaired energy metabolism. Methods Twelve patients with elevated blood molar lactate/pyruvate ratio and indeterminate etiology were selected from a retrospective cohort of 74 subjects with ALF because their fixed and frozen liver samples were available for histological, ultrastructural, molecular and biochemical analysis. Results A customized next-generation sequencing panel for 26 genes associated with mitochondrial and fatty acid oxidation defects revealed mutations and sequence variants in five subjects. Variants involved the genes ACAD9, POLG, POLG2, DGUOK, and RRM2B; the latter not previously reported in subjects with ALF. The explanted livers of the patients with heterozygous, truncating insertion mutations in RRM2B showed patchy micro- and macrovesicular steatosis, decreased mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content <30% of controls, and reduced respiratory chain complex activity; both patients had good post-transplant outcome. One infant with severe lactic acidosis was found to carry two heterozygous variants in ACAD9, which was associated with isolated complex I deficiency and diffuse hypergranular hepatocytes. The two subjects with heterozygous variants of unknown clinical significance in POLG and DGUOK developed ALF following drug exposure. Their hepatocytes displayed abnormal mitochondria by electron microscopy. Conclusion Targeted next generation sequencing and correlation with histological, ultrastructural and functional studies on liver tissue in children with elevated lactate/pyruvate ratio expand the spectrum of genes associated with pediatric ALF. PMID:27483465

  7. The severity of shock is associated with impaired rates of net alveolar fluid clearance in clinical acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Zeyed, Yosaf F; Bastarache, Julie A; Matthay, Michael A; Ware, Lorraine B

    2012-09-15

    The rate of alveolar fluid clearance (AFC) is associated with mortality in clinical acute lung injury (ALI). Patients with ALI often develop circulatory shock, but how shock affects the rate of AFC is unknown. To determine the effect of circulatory shock on the rate of AFC in patients with ALI, the rate of net AFC was measured in 116 patients with ALI by serial sampling of pulmonary edema fluid. The primary outcome was the rate of AFC in patients with shock compared with those without shock. We also tested the effects of shock severity and bacteremia. Patients with ALI and shock (n = 86) had significantly slower rates of net AFC compared with those without shock (n = 30, P = 0.03), and AFC decreased significantly as the number of vasopressors increased. Patients with positive blood cultures (n = 21) had slower AFC compared with patients with negative blood cultures (n = 96, P = 0.023). In addition, the edema fluid-to-plasma protein ratio, an index of alveolar-capillary barrier permeability, was highest in patients requiring the most vasopressors (P < 0.05). Patients with ALI complicated by circulatory shock and bacteremia had slower rates of AFC compared with patients without shock or bacteremia. An impaired capacity to reabsorb alveolar edema fluid may contribute to high mortality among patients with sepsis-induced ALI. These findings also suggest that vasopressor use may be a marker of alveolar-capillary barrier permeability in ALI and provide justification for new therapies that enhance alveolar epithelial and endothelial barrier integrity in ALI, particularly in patients with shock. PMID:22821995

  8. Acute Sleep Deprivation and Circadian Misalignment Associated with Transition onto the First Night of Work Impairs Visual Selective Attention

    PubMed Central

    Santhi, Nayantara; Horowitz, Todd S.; Duffy, Jeanne F.; Czeisler, Charles A.

    2007-01-01

    Background Overnight operations pose a challenge because our circadian biology promotes sleepiness and dissipates wakefulness at night. Since the circadian effect on cognitive functions magnifies with increasing sleep pressure, cognitive deficits associated with night work are likely to be most acute with extended wakefulness, such as during the transition from a day shift to night shift. Methodology/Principal Findings To test this hypothesis we measured selective attention (with visual search), vigilance (with Psychomotor Vigilance Task [PVT]) and alertness (with a visual analog scale) in a shift work simulation protocol, which included four day shifts followed by three night shifts. There was a nocturnal decline in cognitive processes, some of which were most pronounced on the first night shift. The nighttime decrease in visual search sensitivity was most pronounced on the first night compared with subsequent nights (p = .04), and this was accompanied by a trend towards selective attention becoming ‘fast and sloppy’. The nighttime increase in attentional lapses on the PVT was significantly greater on the first night compared to subsequent nights (p<.05) indicating an impaired ability to sustain focus. The nighttime decrease in subjective alertness was also greatest on the first night compared with subsequent nights (p<.05). Conclusions/Significance These nocturnal deficits in attention and alertness offer some insight into why occupational errors, accidents, and injuries are pronounced during night work compared to day work. Examination of the nighttime vulnerabilities underlying the deployment of attention can be informative for the design of optimal work schedules and the implementation of effective countermeasures for performance deficits during night work. PMID:18043740

  9. Concussive Brain Trauma in the Mouse Results in Acute Cognitive Deficits and Sustained Impairment of Axonal Function

    PubMed Central

    Creed, Jennifer A.; DiLeonardi, Ann Mae; Fox, Douglas P.; Tessler, Alan R.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Concussive brain injury (CBI) accounts for approximately 75% of all brain-injured people in the United States each year and is particularly prevalent in contact sports. Concussion is the mildest form of diffuse traumatic brain injury (TBI) and results in transient cognitive dysfunction, the neuropathologic basis for which is traumatic axonal injury (TAI). To evaluate the structural and functional changes associated with concussion-induced cognitive deficits, adult mice were subjected to an impact on the intact skull over the midline suture that resulted in a brief apneic period and loss of the righting reflex. Closed head injury also resulted in an increase in the wet weight:dry weight ratio in the cortex suggestive of edema in the first 24 h, and the appearance of Fluoro-Jade-B-labeled degenerating neurons in the cortex and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus within the first 3 days post-injury. Compared to sham-injured mice, brain-injured mice exhibited significant deficits in spatial acquisition and working memory as measured using the Morris water maze over the first 3 days (p<0.001), but not after the fourth day post-injury. At 1 and 3 days post-injury, intra-axonal accumulation of amyloid precursor protein in the corpus callosum and cingulum was accompanied by neurofilament dephosphorylation, impaired transport of Fluoro-Gold and synaptophysin, and deficits in axonal conductance. Importantly, deficits in retrograde transport and in action potential of myelinated axons continued to be observed until 14 days post-injury, at which time axonal degeneration was apparent. These data suggest that despite recovery from acute cognitive deficits, concussive brain trauma leads to axonal degeneration and a sustained perturbation of axonal function. PMID:21299360

  10. KCNJ10 gene mutations causing EAST syndrome (epilepsy, ataxia, sensorineural deafness, and tubulopathy) disrupt channel function

    PubMed Central

    Reichold, Markus; Zdebik, Anselm A.; Lieberer, Evelyn; Rapedius, Markus; Schmidt, Katharina; Bandulik, Sascha; Sterner, Christina; Tegtmeier, Ines; Penton, David; Baukrowitz, Thomas; Hulton, Sally-Anne; Witzgall, Ralph; Ben-Zeev, Bruria; Howie, Alexander J.; Kleta, Robert; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Warth, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Mutations of the KCNJ10 (Kir4.1) K+ channel underlie autosomal recessive epilepsy, ataxia, sensorineural deafness, and (a salt-wasting) renal tubulopathy (EAST) syndrome. We investigated the localization of KCNJ10 and the homologous KCNJ16 in kidney and the functional consequences of KCNJ10 mutations found in our patients with EAST syndrome. Kcnj10 and Kcnj16 were found in the basolateral membrane of mouse distal convoluted tubules, connecting tubules, and cortical collecting ducts. In the human kidney, KCNJ10 staining was additionally observed in the basolateral membrane of the cortical thick ascending limb of Henle's loop. EM of distal tubular cells of a patient with EAST syndrome showed reduced basal infoldings in this nephron segment, which likely reflects the morphological consequences of the impaired salt reabsorption capacity. When expressed in CHO and HEK293 cells, the KCNJ10 mutations R65P, G77R, and R175Q caused a marked impairment of channel function. R199X showed complete loss of function. Single-channel analysis revealed a strongly reduced mean open time. Qualitatively similar results were obtained with coexpression of KCNJ10/KCNJ16, suggesting a dominance of KCNJ10 function in native renal KCNJ10/KCNJ16 heteromers. The decrease in the current of R65P and R175Q was mainly caused by a remarkable shift of pH sensitivity to the alkaline range. In summary, EAST mutations of KCNJ10 lead to impaired channel function and structural changes in distal convoluted tubules. Intriguingly, the metabolic alkalosis present in patients carrying the R65P mutation possibly improves residual function of KCNJ10, which shows higher activity at alkaline pH. PMID:20651251

  11. Effects of sensorineural hearing loss on visually guided attention in a multitalker environment.

    PubMed

    Best, Virginia; Marrone, Nicole; Mason, Christine R; Kidd, Gerald; Shinn-Cunningham, Barbara G

    2009-03-01

    This study asked whether or not listeners with sensorineural hearing loss have an impaired ability to use top-down attention to enhance speech intelligibility in the presence of interfering talkers. Listeners were presented with a target string of spoken digits embedded in a mixture of five spatially separated speech streams. The benefit of providing simple visual cues indicating when and/or where the target would occur was measured in listeners with hearing loss, listeners with normal hearing, and a control group of listeners with normal hearing who were tested at a lower target-to-masker ratio to equate their baseline (no cue) performance with the hearing-loss group. All groups received robust benefits from the visual cues. The magnitude of the spatial-cue benefit, however, was significantly smaller in listeners with hearing loss. Results suggest that reduced utility of selective attention for resolving competition between simultaneous sounds contributes to the communication difficulties experienced by listeners with hearing loss in everyday listening situations. PMID:19009321

  12. Screening for cognitive impairment with the Montreal Cognitive Assessment in Chinese patients with acute mild stroke and transient ischaemic attack: a validation study

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Lijun; Dong, Yanhong; Zhu, Rongyan; Jin, Zhao; Li, Zixiao; Wang, Yilong; Zhao, Xingquan; Sachdev, Perminder; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Objective We aimed to establish the cut-off point of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA-Beijing) in screening for cognitive impairment (CI) within 2 weeks of mild stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA). Methods A total of 80 acute mild ischaemic stroke patients and 22 TIA patients were recruited. They received the MoCA-Beijing and a formal neuropsychological test battery. CI was defined by 1.5 SD below the established norms on a formal neuropsychological test battery. Results Most stroke and TIA patients were in their 50s (53.95±11.43 years old), with greater than primary school level of education. The optimal cut-off point for MoCA-Beijing in discriminating patients with CI from those with no cognitive impairment (NCI) was 22/23 (sensitivity 85%, specificity 88%, positive predictive value=91%, negative predictive value=80%, classification accuracy=86%). The predominant cognitive deficits were characteristic of frontal-subcortical impairment, such as visuomotor speed (46.08%), attention/executive function (42.16%) and visuospatial ability (40.20%). Conclusions A MoCA-Beijing cut-off score of 22/23 is optimally sensitive and specific for detecting CI after mild stroke, and TIA in the acute stroke phase, and is recommended for routine clinical practice. PMID:27406642

  13. Sensorineural hearing loss associated with a factitious disorder.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Ayako; Noguchi, Yoshihiro; Ito, Taku; Narushima, Kenji; Kitamura, Ken

    2015-12-01

    Factitious disorders are characterized by intentionally abnormal physical and/or psychological behavior, and affected patients often make up their symptoms and clinical histories. The most serious and chronic type of factitious disorder is Munchausen syndrome. We report the case of a 24-year-old woman with a 2-year history of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) who later confessed to feigning her hearing loss. She was eventually diagnosed with a factitious disorder. During those 2 years, she was able to induce her SNHL by exposing herself to excessive noise or high doses of aspirin. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing an association between a factitious disorder and SNHL. PMID:26670765

  14. Cognitive Impairment and Outcomes in Older Adult Survivors of Acute Myocardial Infarction: Findings from the TRIUMPH Registry

    PubMed Central

    Gharacholou, S. Michael; Reid, Kimberly J.; Arnold, Suzanne V.; Spertus, John; Rich, Michael W.; Pellikka, Patricia A.; Singh, Mandeep; Holsinger, Tracey; Krumholz, Harlan M.; Peterson, Eric D.; Alexander, Karen P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Cognitive impairment without dementia (CIND) and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) are prevalent in older adults; however, the association of CIND with outcomes after AMI is unknown. Methods We used a multicenter registry to study 772 patients ≥65 years with AMI, enrolled between April 2005 and December 2008, who underwent cognitive function assessment with the Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status-modified (TICS-m) 1 month after AMI. Patients were categorized by cognitive status to describe characteristics and in-hospital treatment, including quality of life and survival 1 year after AMI. Results Mean age was 73.2±6.3 years; 58.5% were males and 78.2% were white. Normal cognitive function (TICS-m>22) was present in 44.4%; mild CIND (TICS-m 19–22) in 29.8% and moderate/severe CIND (TICS-m <19) in 25.8% of patients. Rates of hypertension (72.6%, 77.4%, 81.9%), cerebrovascular accidents (3.5%, 7.0%, 9.0%), and myocardial infarction (20.1%, 22.2%, 29.6%) were higher in those with lower TICS-m scores (p<0.05 for comparisons). AMI medications were similar by cognitive status; however, CIND was associated with lower cardiac catheterization rates (p=0.002) and cardiac rehabilitation referrals (p<0.001). Patients with moderate/severe CIND had higher risk-adjusted 1 year mortality that was non-statistically significant (adjusted HR 1.97; 95% CI 0.99 – 3.94; p=0.054; referent normal, TICS-m >22). Quality of life across cognitive status was similar at 1 year. Conclusions Most older patients surviving AMI have measurable CIND. CIND was associated with less invasive care, less referral and participation in cardiac rehabilitation, and worse risk-adjusted 1 year survival in those with moderate/severe CIND, making it an important condition to consider in optimizing AMI care. PMID:22093202

  15. Characteristics and Spontaneous Recovery of Tinnitus Related to Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Mühlmeier, Guido; Baguley, David; Cox, Tony; Suckfüll, Markus; Meyer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the characteristics and spontaneous recovery of tinnitus related to idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL). Study Design: Retrospective analysis from two randomized placebo-controlled clinical trials for treatment of ISSNHL within 48 hours from onset (Study A), or of tinnitus related to ISSNHL within 3 months from onset (Study B). Setting: Forty-eight European sites (academic tertiary referral centers, private ENT practices). Patients: One hundred thirteen adult patients of which 65 with hearing loss ≥30 dB (Study A) and 48 with persistent acute tinnitus (Study B) at baseline. Interventions: Intratympanic (i.t.) injection of placebo gel in single dose or in triple dose during 3 consecutive days. Main Outcome Measures: Frequency of tinnitus, subjective tinnitus loudness, rates of complete tinnitus remission, and complete hearing recovery during 3 months follow-up. Results: In acute ISSNHL, tinnitus loudness decreased rapidly in cases of mild-moderate hearing loss, and tinnitus had completely resolved in two-thirds of patients after 3 months. Hearing recovery preceded tinnitus resolution. When associated with severe-profound hearing loss, tinnitus improved significantly less. Complete hearing recovery and full tinnitus remission were both about three times more frequent in mild-moderate hearing loss patients than in severe-profound cases. Improvement in tinnitus loudness over time can be approximated by a negative exponential function. Conclusions: Prognosis for ISSNHL-related tinnitus is relatively poor in case of severe-profound hearing loss and the longer it has persisted. Alleviation or management of tinnitus should be a key therapeutic objective especially in pronounced ISSNHL cases. PMID:27228021

  16. ONTOGENY OF ETHANOL INDUCED MOTOR IMPAIRMENT FOLLOWING ACUTE ETHANOL: ASSESSMENT VIA THE NEGATIVE GEOTAXIS REFLEX IN ADOLESCENT AND ADULT RATS

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Ruby Liane; Spear, Linda Patia

    2010-01-01

    Adolescent rats have been observed to be less sensitive than adults to a number of ethanol effects that may serve as feedback cues to reduce further ethanol intake. Among these findings are a few reports of attenuated sensitivities of adolescents to ethanol-induced motor impairment. The purpose of the present study was to further explore potential age-related differences in ethanol-induced motor impairment in both male and female adolescent (postnatal day [P]28–32), and adult (P68-72) Sprague-Dawley rats using an inclined plane assessment of the negative geotaxis reflex. Adult males displayed significant motor impairment at 1.5 g/kg, whereas adolescent males required higher doses, showing significant motor impairment only at doses of 2.25 g/kg ethanol or greater. Intoxicated practice did not significantly influence level of motor impairment at either age. When female rats of both ages were separately analyzed in terms of their response to ethanol, a dose of 1.5 g/kg ethanol was found to significantly impair adults, whereas adolescent females showed significant motor impairment when challenged with 2.25 g/kg but not 1.5 g/kg ethanol. Yet when the 1.5 g/kg data of females at the two ages were directly compared, no significant age difference was seen at this dose. These data document an attenuated sensitivity of adolescent relative to adult rats to the motor impairing effects of ethanol using a stationary inclined plane test, an effect particularly robust in male animals, and demonstrates the utility of this test for assessment of motor coordination in adolescent and adult rats. PMID:20138187

  17. Chronic Stress Induces a Hyporeactivity of the Autonomic Nervous System in Response to Acute Mental Stressor and Impairs Cognitive Performance in Business Executives

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Renata Roland; Díaz, Miguel Mauricio; Santos, Tatiane Vanessa da Silva; Bernardes, Jean Tofoles Martins; Peixoto, Leonardo Gomes; Bocanegra, Olga Lucia; Neto, Morun Bernardino; Espindola, Foued Salmen

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the incidence of chronic stress in business executives (109 subjects: 75 male and 34 female) and its relationship with cortisol levels, cognitive performance, and autonomic nervous system (ANS) reactivity after an acute mental stressor. Blood samples were collected from the subjects to measure cortisol concentration. After the sample collection, the subjects completed the Lipp Inventory of Stress Symptoms for Adults and the Stroop Color-Word Test to evaluate stress and cognitive performance levels, respectively. Saliva samples were collected prior to, immediately after, and five minutes after the test. The results revealed that 90.1% of the stressed subjects experienced stress phases that are considered chronic stress. At rest, the subjects with chronic stress showed higher cortisol levels, and no gender differences were observed. No differences were found between the stressed and non-stressed subjects regarding salivary amylase activity prior to test. Chronic stress also impaired performance on the Stroop test, which revealed higher rates of error and longer reaction times in the incongruent stimulus task independently of gender. For the congruent stimulus task of the Stroop test, the stressed males presented a higher rate of errors than the non-stressed males and a longer reaction time than the stressed females. After the acute mental stressor, the non-stressed male group showed an increase in salivary alpha-amylase activity, which returned to the initial values five minutes after the test; this ANS reactivity was not observed in the chronically stressed male subjects. The ANS responses of the non-stressed vs stressed female groups were not different prior to or after the Stroop test. This study is the first to demonstrate a blunted reactivity of the ANS when male subjects with chronic psychological stress were subjected to an acute mental stressor, and this change could contribute to impairments in cognitive performance. PMID:25807003

  18. Chronic stress induces a hyporeactivity of the autonomic nervous system in response to acute mental stressor and impairs cognitive performance in business executives.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Renata Roland; Díaz, Miguel Mauricio; Santos, Tatiane Vanessa da Silva; Bernardes, Jean Tofoles Martins; Peixoto, Leonardo Gomes; Bocanegra, Olga Lucia; Neto, Morun Bernardino; Espindola, Foued Salmen

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the incidence of chronic stress in business executives (109 subjects: 75 male and 34 female) and its relationship with cortisol levels, cognitive performance, and autonomic nervous system (ANS) reactivity after an acute mental stressor. Blood samples were collected from the subjects to measure cortisol concentration. After the sample collection, the subjects completed the Lipp Inventory of Stress Symptoms for Adults and the Stroop Color-Word Test to evaluate stress and cognitive performance levels, respectively. Saliva samples were collected prior to, immediately after, and five minutes after the test. The results revealed that 90.1% of the stressed subjects experienced stress phases that are considered chronic stress. At rest, the subjects with chronic stress showed higher cortisol levels, and no gender differences were observed. No differences were found between the stressed and non-stressed subjects regarding salivary amylase activity prior to test. Chronic stress also impaired performance on the Stroop test, which revealed higher rates of error and longer reaction times in the incongruent stimulus task independently of gender. For the congruent stimulus task of the Stroop test, the stressed males presented a higher rate of errors than the non-stressed males and a longer reaction time than the stressed females. After the acute mental stressor, the non-stressed male group showed an increase in salivary alpha-amylase activity, which returned to the initial values five minutes after the test; this ANS reactivity was not observed in the chronically stressed male subjects. The ANS responses of the non-stressed vs stressed female groups were not different prior to or after the Stroop test. This study is the first to demonstrate a blunted reactivity of the ANS when male subjects with chronic psychological stress were subjected to an acute mental stressor, and this change could contribute to impairments in cognitive performance. PMID:25807003

  19. Gentamicin Exposure and Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Aline; Zimmermann, Lara; Bickle Graz, Myriam; Cherpillod, Jacques; Tolsa, Jean-François; Buclin, Thierry; Giannoni, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of gentamicin exposure on sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in very low birth weight (VLBW) infants. Methods Exposure to gentamicin was determined in infants born between 1993 and 2010 at a gestational age < 32 weeks and/or with a birthweight < 1500 g, who presented with SNHL during the first 5 years of life. For each case, we selected two controls matched for gender, gestational age, birthweight, and year of birth. Results We identified 25 infants affected by SNHL, leading to an incidence of SNHL of 1.58% in our population of VLBW infants. The proportion of infants treated with gentamicin was 76% in the study group and 70% in controls (p = 0.78). The total cumulated dose of gentamicin administered did not differ between the study group (median 10.2 mg/kg, Q1-Q3 1.6–13.2) and the control group (median 7.9 mg/kg, Q1-Q3 0–12.8, p = 0.47). The median duration of gentamicin treatment was 3 days both in the study group and the control group (p = 0.58). Maximum predicted trough serum levels of gentamicin, cumulative area under the curve and gentamicin clearance were not different between cases and controls. Conclusion The impact of gentamicin on SNHL can be minimized with treatments of short duration, monitoring of blood levels and dose adjustment. PMID:27390846

  20. Complex-Tone Pitch Discrimination in Listeners With Sensorineural Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Federica; Fereczkowski, Michal; Zaar, Johannes; Santurette, Sébastien; Dau, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Physiological studies have shown that noise-induced sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) enhances the amplitude of envelope coding in auditory-nerve fibers. As pitch coding of unresolved complex tones is assumed to rely on temporal envelope coding mechanisms, this study investigated pitch-discrimination performance in listeners with SNHL. Pitch-discrimination thresholds were obtained for 14 normal-hearing (NH) and 10 hearing-impaired (HI) listeners for sine-phase (SP) and random-phase (RP) complex tones. When all harmonics were unresolved, the HI listeners performed, on average, worse than NH listeners in the RP condition but similarly to NH listeners in the SP condition. The increase in pitch-discrimination performance for the SP relative to the RP condition (F0DL ratio) was significantly larger in the HI as compared with the NH listeners. Cochlear compression and auditory-filter bandwidths were estimated in the same listeners. The estimated reduction of cochlear compression was significantly correlated with the increase in the F0DL ratio, while no correlation was found with filter bandwidth. The effects of degraded frequency selectivity and loss of compression were considered in a simplified peripheral model as potential factors in envelope enhancement. The model revealed that reducing cochlear compression significantly enhanced the envelope of an unresolved SP complex tone, while not affecting the envelope of a RP complex tone. This envelope enhancement in the SP condition was significantly correlated with the increased pitch-discrimination performance for the SP relative to the RP condition in the HI listeners. PMID:27604780

  1. Phosphodiesterase 4D gene polymorphisms in sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Chien, Chen-Yu; Tai, Shu-Yu; Wang, Ling-Feng; Hsi, Edward; Chang, Ning-Chia; Wang, Hsun-Mo; Wu, Ming-Tsang; Ho, Kuen-Yao

    2016-09-01

    The phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D) gene has been reported as a risk gene for ischemic stroke. The vascular factors are between the hypothesized etiologies of sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL), and this genetic effect might be attributed for its role in SSNHL. We hypothesized that genetic variants of the PDE4D gene are associated with susceptibility to SSNHL. We conducted a case-control study with 362 SSNHL cases and 209 controls. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected. The genotypes were determined using TaqMan technology. Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) was tested for each SNP, and genetic effects were evaluated according to three inheritance modes. We carried out sex-specific analysis to analyze the overall data. All three SNPs were in HWE. When subjects were stratified by sex, the genetic effect was only evident in females but not in males. The TT genotype of rs702553 exhibited an adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 3.83 (95 % confidence interval = 1.46-11.18) (p = 0.006) in female SSNHL. The TT genotype of SNP rs702553 was associated with female SSNHL under the recessive model (p = 0.004, OR 3.70). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, TT genotype of rs702553 was significantly associated with female SSNHL (p = 0.0043, OR 3.70). These results suggest that PDE4D gene polymorphisms influence the susceptibility for the development of SSNHL in the southern Taiwanese female population. PMID:26521189

  2. Clinical Study on 136 Children with Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng-Jiao; Wang, Da-Yong; Wang, Hong-Yang; Wang, Li; Yang, Feng-Bo; Lan, Lan; Guan, Jing; Yin, Zi-Fang; Rosenhall, Ulf; Yu, Lan; Hellstrom, Sten; Xue, Xi-Jun; Duan, Mao-Li; Wang, Qiu-Ju

    2016-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of sudden sensorineural hearing loss in children (CSSNHL) is consistently increasing. However, the pathology and prognosis of CSSNHL are still poorly understood. This retrospective study evaluated clinical characteristics and possible associated factors of CSSNHL. Methods: One hundred and thirty-six CSSNHL patients treated in Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and Institute of Otolaryngology at Chinese PLA General Hospital between July 2008 and August 2015 were included in this study. These patients were analyzed for clinical characteristics, audiological characteristics, laboratory examinations, and prognostic factors. Results: Among the 136 patients (151 ears), 121 patients (121 ears, 80.1%) were diagnosed with unilaterally CSSNHL, and 15 patients (30 ears, 19.9%) with bilateral CSSNHL. The complete recovery rate of CSSNHL was 9.3%, and the overall recovery rate was 37.7%. We found that initial degree of hearing loss, onset of treatment, tinnitus, the ascending type audiogram, gender, side of hearing loss, the recorded auditory brainstem response (ABR), and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) had prognostic significance. Age, ear fullness, and vertigo had no significant correlation with recovery. Furthermore, the relevant blood tests showed 30.8% of the children had abnormal white blood cell (WBC) counts, 22.1% had elevated homocysteine levels, 65.8% had high alkaline phosphatase (ALP), 33.8% had high IgE antibody levels, and 86.1% had positive cytomegalovirus (CMV) IgG antibodies. Conclusions: CSSNHL commonly occurs unilaterally and results in severe hearing loss. Initial severe hearing loss and bilateral hearing loss are negative prognostic factors for hearing recovery, while positive prognostic factors include tinnitus, gender, the ascending type audiogram, early treatment, identifiable ABR waves, and DPOAEs. Age, vertigo, and ear fullness are not correlated with the recovery. Some serologic indicators

  3. Sensorineural Hearing Loss – A Changing Paradigm for Its Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Richard J.H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective 1) Determine how practicing clinicians evaluate patients with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), and 2) analyze the cost-effectiveness of current algorithms in the evaluation of these patients. Study Design/Setting An interactive online survey allowing respondents to order diagnostic testing in the evaluation of four simulated patients with SNHL across two testing encounters per patient. Subjects and Methods The survey was distributed to clinician members of the American Society of Pediatric Otolaryngology and the American Society of Human Genetics between May and August 2014. Statistical tests included Chi-square and non-parametric testing with Mann-Whitney U test. Results Otolaryngologists were significantly more likely to order repeat audiometric testing and significantly less likely to order genetic testing than other clinicians. Respondents who completed training more recently were significantly more likely to order MRI and EKG. On average, respondents spent $4,756 in the evaluation of a single patient, with otolaryngologists spending significantly more than other clinicians. CT of the temporal bone (40%), ophthalmology consultation (39%), and genetics consultation (37%) were ordered most frequently in the first encounter. Comprehensive genetic testing was ordered least frequently on the first encounter (20%) but was the most frequently ordered test on the second encounter (30%). Conclusion Recent guidelines advocate comprehensive genetic testing in the evaluation of patients with SNHL as early genetic testing can prevent uninformative additional tests which otherwise increase healthcare expenditures. Results from this survey indicate that comprehensive genetic testing is now frequently, but not uniformly, included in evaluation of patients with SNHL. PMID:26216887

  4. Endothelial dysfunction in patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Berjis, Nezamoddin; Moeinimehr, Maryam; Hashemi, Seyyed Mostafa; Hashemi, Seyyed Mohammad; Bakhtiari, Elham Khosravi; Nasiri, Safoura

    2016-01-01

    Background: Endothelial dysfunction probably has a role in the etiology of sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL). The aim of this study was determining of the relationship between endothelial dysfunction and SSNHL. Materials and Methods: In a case–control study, 30 patients with SSNHL and 30 otherwise healthy age and sex-matched controls were studied. Demographic data gathered included age, gender, family history of SSNHL, and history of smoking, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. Laboratory data included measurement of hemoglobin, fasting blood sugar (FBS) and lipid profile. Endothelial function was assessed by measuring flow-mediated dilation (FMD). Results: The two groups were the same in age (47.9 ± 9.3 and 48.1 ± 9.6 years, P = 0.946) with female/male ratio of 1:1 in both groups. Diabetes and dyslipidemia were more frequent in patients than controls (20% vs. 0%, P = 0.024). Brachial artery diameter was greater in patients than controls before (4.24 ± 0.39 vs. 3.84 ± 0.23 mm, P < 0.001) and after ischemia (4.51 ± 0.43 vs. 4.28 ± 0.27 mm, P = 0.020), but FMD was lower in patients than controls (6.21 ± 3.0 vs. 11.52 ± 2.30%, P < 0.001). Binary logistic regression analysis showed that FMD was associated with SSNHL independent from FBS and lipid profile (odds ratio [95% confidence interval] =0.439 [0.260–0.740], P = 0.002). Conclusion: Endothelial dysfunction, among other cardiovascular risk factors, is associated with SSNHL. This association is independent from other cardiovascular risk factors including diabetes and dyslipidemia. PMID:26955626

  5. A putative low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet elicits mild nutritional ketosis but does not impair the acute or chronic hypertrophic responses to resistance exercise in rodents.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Michael D; Holland, A Maleah; Kephart, Wesley C; Mobley, C Brooks; Mumford, Petey W; Lowery, Ryan P; Fox, Carlton D; McCloskey, Anna E; Shake, Joshua J; Mesquita, Paulo; Patel, Romil K; Martin, Jeffrey S; Young, Kaelin C; Kavazis, Andreas N; Wilson, Jacob M

    2016-05-15

    We examined whether acute and/or chronic skeletal muscle anabolism is impaired with a low-carbohydrate diet formulated to elicit ketosis (LCKD) vs. a mixed macronutrient Western diet (WD). Male Sprague-Dawley rats (9-10 wk of age, 300-325 g) were provided isoenergetic amounts of a LCKD or a WD for 6 wk. In AIM 1, basal serum and gastrocnemius assessments were performed. In AIM 2, rats were resistance exercised for one bout and were euthanized 90-270 min following exercise for gastrocnemius analyses. In AIM 3, rats voluntarily exercised daily with resistance-loaded running wheels, and hind limb muscles were analyzed for hypertrophy markers at the end of the 6-wk protocol. In AIM 1, basal levels of gastrocnemius phosphorylated (p)-rps6, p-4EBP1, and p-AMPKα were similar between diets, although serum insulin (P < 0.01), serum glucose (P < 0.001), and several essential amino acid levels (P < 0.05) were lower in LCKD-fed rats. In AIM 2, LCKD- and WD-fed rats exhibited increased postexercise muscle protein synthesis levels (P < 0.0125), but no diet effect was observed (P = 0.59). In AIM 3, chronically exercise-trained LCKD- and WD-fed rats presented similar increases in relative hind limb muscle masses compared with their sedentary counterparts (12-24%, P < 0.05), but there was no between-diet effects. Importantly, the LCKD induced "mild" nutritional ketosis, as the LCKD-fed rats in AIM 2 exhibited ∼1.5-fold greater serum β-hydroxybutyrate levels relative to WD-fed rats (diet effect P = 0.003). This study demonstrates that the tested LCKD in rodents, while only eliciting mild nutritional ketosis, does not impair the acute or chronic skeletal muscle hypertrophic responses to resistance exercise. PMID:26718785

  6. Time-resolved functional analysis of acute impairment of frataxin expression in an inducible cell model of Friedreich ataxia.

    PubMed

    Poburski, Dörte; Boerner, Josefine Barbara; Koenig, Michel; Ristow, Michael; Thierbach, René

    2016-01-01

    Friedreich ataxia is a neurodegenerative disease caused by a GAA triplet repeat expansion in the first intron of the frataxin gene, which results in reduced expression levels of the corresponding protein. Despite numerous animal and cellular models, therapeutic options that mechanistically address impaired frataxin expression are lacking. Here, we have developed a new mammalian cell model employing the Cre/loxP recombination system to induce a homozygous or heterozygous frataxin knockout in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Induction of Cre-mediated disruption by tamoxifen was successfully tested on RNA and protein levels. After loss of frataxin protein, cell division, aconitase activity and oxygen consumption rates were found to be decreased, while ROS production was increased in the homozygous state. By contrast, in the heterozygous state no such changes were observed. A time-resolved analysis revealed the loss of aconitase activity as an initial event after induction of complete frataxin deficiency, followed by secondarily elevated ROS production and a late increase in iron content. Initial impairments of oxygen consumption and ATP production were found to be compensated in the late state and seemed to play a minor role in Friedreich ataxia pathophysiology. In conclusion and as predicted from its proposed role in iron sulfur cluster (ISC) biosynthesis, disruption of frataxin primarily causes impaired function of ISC-containing enzymes, whereas other consequences, including elevated ROS production and iron accumulation, appear secondary. These parameters and the robustness of the newly established system may additionally be used for a time-resolved study of pharmacological candidates in a HTS manner. PMID:27106929

  7. Time-resolved functional analysis of acute impairment of frataxin expression in an inducible cell model of Friedreich ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Poburski, Dörte; Boerner, Josefine Barbara; Koenig, Michel; Ristow, Michael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Friedreich ataxia is a neurodegenerative disease caused by a GAA triplet repeat expansion in the first intron of the frataxin gene, which results in reduced expression levels of the corresponding protein. Despite numerous animal and cellular models, therapeutic options that mechanistically address impaired frataxin expression are lacking. Here, we have developed a new mammalian cell model employing the Cre/loxP recombination system to induce a homozygous or heterozygous frataxin knockout in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Induction of Cre-mediated disruption by tamoxifen was successfully tested on RNA and protein levels. After loss of frataxin protein, cell division, aconitase activity and oxygen consumption rates were found to be decreased, while ROS production was increased in the homozygous state. By contrast, in the heterozygous state no such changes were observed. A time-resolved analysis revealed the loss of aconitase activity as an initial event after induction of complete frataxin deficiency, followed by secondarily elevated ROS production and a late increase in iron content. Initial impairments of oxygen consumption and ATP production were found to be compensated in the late state and seemed to play a minor role in Friedreich ataxia pathophysiology. In conclusion and as predicted from its proposed role in iron sulfur cluster (ISC) biosynthesis, disruption of frataxin primarily causes impaired function of ISC-containing enzymes, whereas other consequences, including elevated ROS production and iron accumulation, appear secondary. These parameters and the robustness of the newly established system may additionally be used for a time-resolved study of pharmacological candidates in a HTS manner. PMID:27106929

  8. Impaired acquired resistance of mice to Klebsiella pneumoniae infection induced by acute NO/sub 2/ exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Bouley, G.; Azoulay-Dupuis, E.; Gaudebout, C.

    1985-12-01

    The natural resistance of nonimmunized C57B1/6 mice to an intraperitoneal Klebsiella pneumoniae challenge was not significantly affected by prior continuous exposure to 20 ppm NO/sub 2/ for 4 days. In contrast, the acquired resistance of mice immunized just before and infected just after NO/sub 2/ exposure was seriously impaired. This could not be explained by the loss of appetite (about 30%) observed in NO/sub 2/ treated mice, for neither the natural nor acquired resistance of control air exposure mice given approximately 70% ad libitum food and water were significantly modified.

  9. Immunological Reconstitution in Children After Completing Conventional Chemotherapy of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia is Marked by Impaired B-cell Compartment.

    PubMed

    Koskenvuo, Minna; Ekman, Ilse; Saha, Emmi; Salokannel, Ellinoora; Matomäki, Jaakko; Ilonen, Jorma; Kainulainen, Leena; Arola, Mikko; Lähteenmäki, Päivi Maria

    2016-09-01

    Humoral and cellular immunity were studied in 28 children completing conventional treatment of standard-risk (SR) or intermediate-risk (IR) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Both naïve and memory B cells were most severely affected and showed slow recovery during the 2-year follow-up, while the T-cell compartment showed only minor changes. Immunoglobulins and IgG subclasses, components, and antibodies against vaccine-preventable diseases were not significantly affected. In conclusion, immune recovery after conventional chemotherapy for SR and IR ALL is marked by B-cell depletion, but otherwise did not show any severe deficiencies in lymphocyte function. PMID:27163649

  10. Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss after Orthopedic Surgery under Combined Spinal and Epidural Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Vilhena, Ditza; Pereira, Luís; Duarte, Delfim; Oliveira, Nuno

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative hearing loss following nonotologic surgery is rare. For patients undergoing subarachnoid anesthesia, the loss of cerebral spinal fluid and hence the drop in intracranial pressure can result in hearing loss and cranial nerve palsy. We report a case in which a patient sustained orthopedic surgery under combined spinal and epidural anesthesia complicated by severe and persistent sensorineural hearing loss. This report is a reminder that postoperative sudden sensorineural hearing loss is a poorly understood complication. A high index of suspicion is required for early diagnosis of this complication, although prompt treatment does not guarantee a good outcome. PMID:26904339

  11. Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss after Orthopedic Surgery under Combined Spinal and Epidural Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Vilhena, Ditza; Pereira, Luís; Duarte, Delfim; Oliveira, Nuno

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative hearing loss following nonotologic surgery is rare. For patients undergoing subarachnoid anesthesia, the loss of cerebral spinal fluid and hence the drop in intracranial pressure can result in hearing loss and cranial nerve palsy. We report a case in which a patient sustained orthopedic surgery under combined spinal and epidural anesthesia complicated by severe and persistent sensorineural hearing loss. This report is a reminder that postoperative sudden sensorineural hearing loss is a poorly understood complication. A high index of suspicion is required for early diagnosis of this complication, although prompt treatment does not guarantee a good outcome. PMID:26904339

  12. Mutation in mitochondrial ribosomal protein S7 (MRPS7) causes congenital sensorineural deafness, progressive hepatic and renal failure and lactic acidemia.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Minal J; Guo, Yiran; Zhang, Jianguo; Riley, Lisa G; Cooper, Sandra T; Thorburn, David R; Li, Jiankang; Dong, Daoyuan; Li, Zhijun; Glessner, Joseph; Davis, Ryan L; Sue, Carolyn M; Alexander, Stephen I; Arbuckle, Susan; Kirwan, Paul; Keating, Brendan J; Xu, Xun; Hakonarson, Hakon; Christodoulou, John

    2015-04-15

    Functional defects of the mitochondrial translation machinery, as a result of mutations in nuclear-encoded genes, have been associated with combined oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) deficiencies. We report siblings with congenital sensorineural deafness and lactic acidemia in association with combined respiratory chain (RC) deficiencies of complexes I, III and IV observed in fibroblasts and liver. One of the siblings had a more severe phenotype showing progressive hepatic and renal failure. Whole-exome sequencing revealed a homozygous mutation in the gene encoding mitochondrial ribosomal protein S7 (MRPS7), a c.550A>G transition that encodes a substitution of valine for a highly conserved methionine (p.Met184Val) in both affected siblings. MRPS7 is a 12S ribosomal RNA-binding subunit of the small mitochondrial ribosomal subunit, and is required for the assembly of the small ribosomal subunit. Pulse labeling of mitochondrial protein synthesis products revealed impaired mitochondrial protein synthesis in patient fibroblasts. Exogenous expression of wild-type MRPS7 in patient fibroblasts rescued complexes I and IV activities, demonstrating the deleterious effect of the mutation on RC function. Moreover, reduced 12S rRNA transcript levels observed in the patient's fibroblasts were also restored to normal levels by exogenous expression of wild-type MRPS7. Our data demonstrate the pathogenicity of the identified MRPS7 mutation as a novel cause of mitochondrial RC dysfunction, congenital sensorineural deafness and progressive hepatic and renal failure. PMID:25556185

  13. Role of Cystathionine Gamma-Lyase in Immediate Renal Impairment and Inflammatory Response in Acute Ischemic Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Markó, Lajos; Szijártó, István A; Filipovic, Milos R; Kaßmann, Mario; Balogh, András; Park, Joon-Keun; Przybyl, Lukasz; N'diaye, Gabriele; Krämer, Stephanie; Anders, Juliane; Ishii, Isao; Müller, Dominik N; Gollasch, Maik

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is known to act protectively during renal ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI). However, the role of the endogenous H2S in acute kidney injury (AKI) is largely unclear. Here, we analyzed the role of cystathionine gamma-lyase (CTH) in acute renal IRI using CTH-deficient (Cth(-/-)) mice whose renal H2S levels were approximately 50% of control (wild-type) mice. Although levels of serum creatinine and renal expression of AKI marker proteins were equivalent between Cth(-/-) and control mice, histological analysis revealed that IRI caused less renal tubular damage in Cth(-/-) mice. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that renal population of infiltrated granulocytes/macrophages was equivalent in these mice. However, renal expression levels of certain inflammatory cytokines/adhesion molecules believed to play a role in IRI were found to be lower after IRI only in Cth(-/-) mice. Our results indicate that the systemic CTH loss does not deteriorate but rather ameliorates the immediate AKI outcome probably due to reduced inflammatory responses in the kidney. The renal expression of CTH and other H2S-producing enzymes was markedly suppressed after IRI, which could be an integrated adaptive response for renal cell protection. PMID:27273292

  14. Role of Cystathionine Gamma-Lyase in Immediate Renal Impairment and Inflammatory Response in Acute Ischemic Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Markó, Lajos; Szijártó, István A.; Filipovic, Milos R.; Kaßmann, Mario; Balogh, András; Park, Joon-Keun; Przybyl, Lukasz; N’diaye, Gabriele; Krämer, Stephanie; Anders, Juliane; Ishii, Isao; Müller, Dominik N.; Gollasch, Maik

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is known to act protectively during renal ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI). However, the role of the endogenous H2S in acute kidney injury (AKI) is largely unclear. Here, we analyzed the role of cystathionine gamma-lyase (CTH) in acute renal IRI using CTH-deficient (Cth−/−) mice whose renal H2S levels were approximately 50% of control (wild-type) mice. Although levels of serum creatinine and renal expression of AKI marker proteins were equivalent between Cth−/− and control mice, histological analysis revealed that IRI caused less renal tubular damage in Cth−/− mice. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that renal population of infiltrated granulocytes/macrophages was equivalent in these mice. However, renal expression levels of certain inflammatory cytokines/adhesion molecules believed to play a role in IRI were found to be lower after IRI only in Cth−/− mice. Our results indicate that the systemic CTH loss does not deteriorate but rather ameliorates the immediate AKI outcome probably due to reduced inflammatory responses in the kidney. The renal expression of CTH and other H2S-producing enzymes was markedly suppressed after IRI, which could be an integrated adaptive response for renal cell protection. PMID:27273292

  15. Effect of Two Approaches to Auditory Training on Speech Recognition by Hearing-Impaired Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubinstein, Adrienne; Boothroyd, Arthur

    1987-01-01

    Two approaches to auditory training for improved speech recognition using 20 adults with mild to moderate sensorineural hearing impairments were compared. No significant differences were found between group one which spent training time on activities involving sentence perception and perceptual strategy and group two which focused on consonant…

  16. An Across-Frequency Processing Deficit in Listeners with Hearing Impairment Is Supported by Acoustic Correlation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healy, Eric W.; Kannabiran, Anand; Bacon, Sid P.

    2005-01-01

    It has been recently suggested that listeners having a sensorineural hearing impairment (HI) may possess a deficit in their ability to integrate speech information across different frequencies. When presented with a task that required across-frequency integration of speech patterns, listeners with HI performed more poorly than their normal-hearing…

  17. Acute leukemia after radiotherapy in a patient with Turcot's syndrome. Impaired colony formation in skin fibroblast cultures after irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, F.P.; Little, J.B.; Bech-Hansen, N.T.; Paterson, M.C.; Arlett, C.; Garnick, M.B.; Mayer, R.J.

    1983-02-01

    Colonic polyposis and carcinoma developed in a woman with Turcot's syndrome at the age of 31 years; astrocytoma developed when she was 37. Her brother and sister had died of astrocytoma at the ages of 18 and 33 years, respectively. Progressive neutropenia developed in the patient three months after radiotherapy for her brain tumor and acute myelomonocytic leukemia 19 months after treatment. Three laboratories independently evaluated cultures of her skin fibroblasts for in vitro sensitivity to cell killing (loss of colony-forming ability) by x-rays. Survival assays consistently revealed slight but significant radiosensitivity in an early-passage (six to 10 doublings) fibroblast subculture. A later subculture (21 to 29 doublings) showed no abnormality, a possible effect of selective in vitro loss of radiosensitive cells.

  18. Acute Heat-Evoked Temperature Sensation Is Impaired but Not Abolished in Mice Lacking TRPV1 and TRPV3 Channels

    PubMed Central

    Reynders, Ana; Gaillard, Stéphane; Moqrich, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of heat-sensitive Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid ion channels (ThermoTRPVs) greatly advanced our molecular understanding of acute and injury-evoked heat temperature sensation. ThermoTRPV channels are activated by partially overlapping temperatures ranging from warm to supra-threshold noxious heat. TRPV1 is activated by noxious heat temperature whereas TRPV3 can be activated by warm as well as noxious heat temperatures. Loss-of-function studies in single TRPV1 and TRPV3 knock-out mice have shown that heat temperature sensation is not completely abolished suggesting functional redundancies among these two channels and highlighting the need of a detailed analysis of TRPV1::TRPV3 double knock-out mice (V1V3dKO) which is hampered by the close proximity of the loci expressing the two channels. Here we describe the generation of a novel mouse model in which trpv1 and trpv3 genes have been inactivated using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-based homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells. In these mice, using classical thermosensory tests such hot plate, tail flick and the thermotaxis gradient paradigms, we confirm that TRPV1 is the master channel for sensing noxious heat temperatures and identify a cooperative role of TRPV1 and TRPV3 for sensing a well-defined window of acute moderate heat temperature. Using the dynamic hot plate assay, we unravel an intriguing and unexpected pronounced escape behavior in TRPV1 knock-out mice that was attenuated in the V1V3dKO. Together, and in agreement with the temperature activation overlap between TRPV1 and TRPV3 channels, our data provide in vivo evidence of a cooperative role between skin-derived TRPV3 and primary sensory neurons-enriched TRPV1 in modulation of moderate and noxious heat temperature sensation and suggest that other mechanisms are required for heat temperature sensation. PMID:24925072

  19. Can Mild Bilateral Sensorineural Hearing Loss Affect Developmental Abilities in Younger School-Age Children?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ðokovic, Sanja; Gligorovic, Milica; Ostojic, Sanja; Dimic, Nadežda; Radic-Šestic, Marina; Slavnic, Svetlana

    2014-01-01

    The research study was conducted for the purpose of examining the influence of mild bilateral sensorineural hearing loss (MBSNHL) on developmental abilities of younger school-age children. The sample encompassed 144 children with MBSNHL, aged 7.5-11 (M = 8.85). MBSNHL (20-40 dB HL) was identified by pure tone audiometry. The control group…

  20. Sudden post-traumatic sensorineural hearing loss reverted to normal by sneezing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    An 11-year-old child with sudden post-traumatic sensorineural hearing loss regained his hearing functions after sneezing. This case report is a first in medical literature in describing recovery from hearing loss by sneezing. The therapeutic implications of this rare case deserve further investigation. PMID:27489670

  1. Profound Bilateral Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Nigerian Children: Any Shift in Etiology?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunmade, A. D.; Segun-Busari, S.; Olajide, T. G.; Ologe, F. E.

    2007-01-01

    Deafness, profound hearing loss, is a global problem. However, the causes of, attitudes toward, and management options for deafness differ considerably from region to region. This study seeks to identify the present causes of profound sensorineural hearing loss in Nigeria, which in our environment is almost synonymous to a life sentence of silence…

  2. Neurodevelopmental Disorders in Children with Severe to Profound Sensorineural Hearing Loss: A Clinical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chilosi, Anna M.; Comparini, Alessandro; Scusa, Maria F.; Berrettini, Stefano; Forli, Francesca; Battini, Roberta; Cipriani, Paola; Cioni, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The effects of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) are often complicated by additional disabilities, but the epidemiology of associated disorders is not clearly defined. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency and type of additional neurodevelopmental disabilities in a sample of children with SNHL and to investigate the relation…

  3. Eye color as a risk factor for acquired sensorineural hearing loss: a review.

    PubMed

    Mujica-Mota, Mario A; Schermbrucker, Jonah; Daniel, Sam J

    2015-02-01

    Eye color may be an indicator of inner ear melanin content and has been associated with hearing loss. There is controversy as to whether eye color has an effect on acquired causes of sensorineural hearing loss. This review was conducted to analyze the literature evaluating the relationship between eye color and causes of sensorineural hearing loss. Six databases were searched to identify eligible studies. Included articles were independently assessed for quality by two authors. Eighteen articles were eligible for review. Eye color was not found to have an effect in the non-exposed population or in presbycusis. In noise-induced sensorineural hearing loss, light-eyed patients had more significant loss following noise exposure, although the variability reported due to eye color was modest (r(2) = 0.01-0.14). Two out of three studies reported that dark eye color is associated with cisplatin ototoxicity. In one study, green-eyed patients were found to be at higher risk of radiation-induced hearing loss. Eye color does not appear to play a role in hearing loss in non-exposed individuals or presbycusis. It is possible that dark-eyed individuals, with greater inner ear melanin content, are better protected against noise-induced hearing loss. Evidence suggests that melanin can be protective against radiation-induced sensorineural hearing loss, but may predispose individuals to cisplatin ototoxicity. Future studies are required to support these conclusions. PMID:25529530

  4. Acute cholesterol depletion impairs functional expression of tissue factor in fibroblasts: modulation of tissue factor activity by membrane cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Samir K.; Iakhiaev, Alexei; Pendurthi, Usha R.; Mohan Rao, L. Vijaya

    2010-01-01

    Cholesterol, in addition to providing rigidity to the fluid membrane, plays a critical role in receptor function, endocytosis, recycling, and signal transduction. In the present study, we examined the effect of membrane cholesterol on functional expression of tissue factor (TF), a cellular receptor for clotting factor VIIa. Depletion of cholesterol in human fibroblasts (WI-38) with methyl-β-cyclodextrin–reduced TF activity at the cell surface. Binding studies with radiolabeled VIIa and TF monoclonal antibody (mAB) revealed that reduced TF activity in cholesterol-depleted cells stems from the impairment of VIIa interaction with TF rather than the loss of TF receptors at the cell surface. Repletion of cholesterol-depleted cells with cholesterol restored TF function. Loss of caveolar structure on cholesterol removal is not responsible for reduced TF activity. Solubilization of cellular TF in different detergents indicated that a substantial portion of TF in fibroblasts is associated with noncaveolar lipid rafts. Cholesterol depletion studies showed that the TF association with these rafts is cholesterol dependent. Overall, the data presented herein suggest that membrane cholesterol functions as a positive regulator of TF function by maintaining TF receptors, probably in noncaveolar lipid rafts, in a high-affinity state for VIIa binding. PMID:15328160

  5. Selective TNF-α targeting with infliximab attenuates impaired oxygen metabolism and contractile function induced by an acute exposure to air particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Marchini, Timoteo; D'Annunzio, Verónica; Paz, Mariela L; Cáceres, Lourdes; Garcés, Mariana; Perez, Virginia; Tasat, Deborah; Vanasco, Virginia; Magnani, Natalia; Gonzalez Maglio, Daniel; Gelpi, Ricardo J; Alvarez, Silvia; Evelson, Pablo

    2015-11-15

    Inflammation plays a central role in the onset and progression of cardiovascular diseases associated with the exposure to air pollution particulate matter (PM). The aim of this work was to analyze the cardioprotective effect of selective TNF-α targeting with a blocking anti-TNF-α antibody (infliximab) in an in vivo mice model of acute exposure to residual oil fly ash (ROFA). Female Swiss mice received an intraperitoneal injection of infliximab (10 mg/kg body wt) or saline solution, and were intranasally instilled with a ROFA suspension (1 mg/kg body wt). Control animals were instilled with saline solution and handled in parallel. After 3 h, heart O2 consumption was assessed by high-resolution respirometry in left ventricle tissue cubes and isolated mitochondria, and ventricular contractile reserve and lusitropic reserve were evaluated according to the Langendorff technique. ROFA instillation induced a significant decrease in tissue O2 consumption and active mitochondrial respiration by 32 and 31%, respectively, compared with the control group. While ventricular contractile state and isovolumic relaxation were not altered in ROFA-exposed mice, impaired contractile reserve and lusitropic reserve were observed in this group. Infliximab pretreatment significantly attenuated the decrease in heart O2 consumption and prevented the decrease in ventricular contractile and lusitropic reserve in ROFA-exposed mice. Moreover, infliximab-pretreated ROFA-exposed mice showed conserved left ventricular developed pressure and cardiac O2 consumption in response to a β-adrenergic stimulus with isoproterenol. These results provides direct evidence linking systemic inflammation and altered cardiac function following an acute exposure to PM and contribute to the understanding of PM-associated cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:26386109

  6. Impairment of antioxidant defense via glutathione depletion sensitizes acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells for Smac mimetic-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Schoeneberger, H; Belz, K; Schenk, B; Fulda, S

    2015-07-30

    Evasion of apoptosis in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is linked to aberrant expression of inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins and dysregulated redox homeostasis, rendering leukemic cells vulnerable to redox-targeting therapies. Here we discover that inhibition of antioxidant defenses via glutathione (GSH) depletion by buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) primes ALL cells for apoptosis induced by the Smac mimetic BV6 that antagonizes IAP proteins. Similarly, BSO cooperates with BV6 to induce cell death in patient-derived primary leukemic samples, underscoring the clinical relevance. In contrast, BSO does not sensitize non-malignant lymphohematopoietic cells from healthy donors toward BV6, pointing to some tumor selectivity. Mechanistically, both agents cooperate to stimulate reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, which is required for BSO/BV6-induced cell death, as ROS inhibitors (that is, N-acetylcysteine, MnTBAP, Trolox) significantly rescue cell death. Further, BSO and BV6 cooperate to trigger lipid peroxidation, which is necessary for cell death, as genetic or pharmacological blockage of lipid peroxidation by GSH peroxidase 4 (GPX4) overexpression or α-tocopherol significantly inhibits BSO/BV6-mediated cell death. Consistently, GPX4 knockdown or GPX4 inhibitor RSL3 enhances lipid peroxidation and cell death by BSO/BV6 cotreatment. The discovery of redox regulation of Smac mimetic-induced cell death has important implications for developing rational Smac mimetic-based combination therapies. PMID:25381820

  7. Acute insulin resistance in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction in non-diabetic patients is associated with incomplete myocardial reperfusion and impaired coronary microcirculatory function

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    acute phase of the first anterior STEMI in patients without diabetes treated by pPCI is independently associated with poorer myocardial reperfusion, impaired coronary microcirculatory function and potentially with larger final infarct size. PMID:24708817

  8. Numerical impairment of nestin(+) bone marrow niches in acute GvHD after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for AML.

    PubMed

    Medinger, M; Krenger, W; Jakab, A; Halter, J; Buser, A; Bucher, C; Passweg, J; Tzankov, A

    2015-11-01

    The nestin(+) perivascular bone marrow (BM) stem cell niche (N(+)SCN) may be involved in GvHD. To investigate whether acute GvHD (aGvHD) reduces the number of N(+)SCN, we examined patients with AML who had undergone allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. In the test cohort (n=8), the number of N(+)SCN per mm(2) in BM biopsies was significantly reduced in aGvHD patients at the time of aGvHD compared with patients who did not have aGvHD (1.2±0.78 versus 2.6±0.93, P=0.04). In the validation cohort (n=40), the number of N(+)SCN was reduced (1.9±0.99 versus 2.6±0.90 N(+)SCN/mm(2), P=0.05) in aGvHD patients. Receiver operating curves suggested that the cutoff score that best discriminated between patients with and without aGvHD was 2.29 N(+)SCN/mm(2). Applying this cutoff score, 9/11 patients with clinically relevant aGvHD (⩾grade 2) and 13/20 with any type of GvHD had decreased N(+)SCN numbers compared with only 10/29 patients without clinically relevant aGvHD (P=0.007) and 6/20 patients without any type of GvHD (P=0.028). In patients tracked over time, N(+)SCN density returned to normal after aGvHD resolved or remained stable in patients who did not have aGvHD. Our results show a decrease in the number of N(+)SCN in aGvHD. PMID:26301968

  9. Increase in the Late Diastolic Filling Force is Associated With Impaired Transmitral Flow Efficiency in Acute Moderate Elevation of Left Ventricular Afterload

    PubMed Central

    Jiamsripong, Panupong; Calleja, Anna M.; Alharthi, Mohsen S.; Cho, Eun Joo; McMahon, Eileen M.; Heys, Jeffrey J.; Milano, Michele; Sengupta, Partho P.; Khandheria, Bijoy K.; Belohlavek, Marek

    2009-01-01

    Aims Analysis of intraventricular flow force and efficiency is a novel concept of quantitatively assessing left ventricular (LV) hemodynamic performance. We have parametrically characterized diastolic filling flow by early inflow force (EIF), late inflow force (LIF), and total inflow force (TIF) and by vortex formation time (VFT), a fundamental parameter of fluid transport efficiency. The purpose was to determine what changes in inflow forces characterize a decrease in diastolic blood transport efficiency in acute moderate elevation of LV afterload. Methods and Results In 8 open-chest pigs, the flow force and VFT parameters were calculated from conventional and flow Doppler echocardiography measurements at baseline and during brief (3-minute) moderate elevation in afterload induced by increasing systolic blood pressure to 130% of baseline value. Systolic LV function decreased significantly during elevated afterload. EIF did not significantly change, whereas LIF increased from 5,822.09 ± 1,656.50 to 13,948.25 ± 9,773.96 dyn (P = 0.0490) and TIF increased from 13,783.35 ± 4,816.58 to 21,836.67 ± 8,635.33 dyn (P = 0.0310). VFT decreased from 4.09 ± 0.29 to 2.79 ± 1.10 (P = 0.0068), confirming suboptimal flow transport efficiency. Conclusions Even a brief moderate increase of LV afterload causes a significant increase in the late diastolic filling force and impairs transmitral flow efficiency. PMID:19168767

  10. Real-time point-of-care measurement of impaired renal function in a rat acute injury model employing exogenous fluorescent tracer agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorshow, Richard B.; Fitch, Richard M.; Galen, Karen P.; Wojdyla, Jolette K.; Poreddy, Amruta R.; Freskos, John N.; Rajagopalan, Raghavan; Shieh, Jeng-Jong; Demirjian, Sevag G.

    2013-02-01

    Renal function assessment is needed for the detection of acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is now widely accepted as the best indicator of renal function, and current clinical guidelines advocate its use in the staging of kidney disease. The optimum measure of GFR is by the use of exogenous tracer agents. However current clinically employed agents lack sensitivity or are cumbersome to use. An exogenous GFR fluorescent tracer agent, whose elimination rate could be monitored noninvasively through skin would provide a substantial improvement over currently available methods. We developed a series of novel aminopyrazine analogs for use as exogenous fluorescent GFR tracer agents that emit light in the visible region for monitoring GFR noninvasively over skin. In rats, these compounds are eliminated by the kidney with urine recovery greater than 90% of injected dose, are not broken down or metabolized in vivo, are not secreted by the renal tubules, and have clearance values similar to a GFR reference compound, iothalamate. In addition, biological half-life of these compounds measured in rats by noninvasive optical methods correlated with plasma derived methods. In this study, we show that this noninvasive methodology with our novel fluorescent tracer agents can detect impaired renal function. A 5/6th nephrectomy rat model is employed.

  11. Pediatric sensorineural hearing loss, part 2: syndromic and acquired causes.

    PubMed

    Huang, B Y; Zdanski, C; Castillo, M

    2012-03-01

    This article is the second in a 2-part series reviewing neuroimaging in childhood SNHL. Previously, we discussed the clinical work-up of children with hearing impairment, the classification of inner ear malformations, and congenital nonsyndromic causes of hearing loss. Here, we review and illustrate the most common syndromic hereditary and acquired causes of childhood SNHL, with an emphasis on entities that demonstrate inner ear abnormalities on cross-sectional imaging. Syndromes discussed include BOR syndrome, CHARGE syndrome, Pendred syndrome, Waardenburg syndrome, and X-linked hearing loss with stapes gusher. We conclude the article with a review of acquired causes of childhood SNHL, including infections, trauma, and neoplasms. PMID:21596810

  12. Mechanisms of sensorineural cell damage, death and survival in the cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ann C. Y.; Ryan, Allen F.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of acquired hearing loss, including presbycusis, is caused by irreversible damage to the sensorineural tissues of the cochlea. This article reviews the intracellular mechanisms that contribute to sensorineural damage in the cochlea, as well as the survival signaling pathways that can provide endogenous protection and tissue rescue. These data have primarily been generated in hearing loss not directly related to age. However, there is evidence that similar mechanisms operate in presbycusis. Moreover, accumulation of damage from other causes can contribute to age-related hearing loss (ARHL). Potential therapeutic interventions to balance opposing but interconnected cell damage and survival pathways, such as antioxidants, anti-apoptotics, and pro-inflammatory cytokine inhibitors, are also discussed. PMID:25954196

  13. Auditory hair cell defects as potential cause for sensorineural deafness in Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Mohi; Ura, Kiyoe; Streit, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT WHSC1 is a histone methyltransferase (HMT) that catalyses the addition of methyl groups to lysine 36 on histone 3. In humans, WHSC1 haploinsufficiency is associated with all known cases of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS). The cardinal feature of WHS is a craniofacial dysmorphism, which is accompanied by sensorineural hearing loss in 15% of individuals with WHS. Here, we show that WHSC1-deficient mice display craniofacial defects that overlap with WHS, including cochlea anomalies. Although auditory hair cells are specified normally, their stereocilia hair bundles required for sound perception fail to develop the appropriate morphology. Furthermore, the orientation and cellular organisation of cochlear hair cells and their innervation are defective. These findings identify, for the first time, the likely cause of sensorineural hearing loss in individuals with WHS. PMID:26092122

  14. Auditory hair cell defects as potential cause for sensorineural deafness in Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mohi; Ura, Kiyoe; Streit, Andrea

    2015-09-01

    WHSC1 is a histone methyltransferase (HMT) that catalyses the addition of methyl groups to lysine 36 on histone 3. In humans, WHSC1 haploinsufficiency is associated with all known cases of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS). The cardinal feature of WHS is a craniofacial dysmorphism, which is accompanied by sensorineural hearing loss in 15% of individuals with WHS. Here, we show that WHSC1-deficient mice display craniofacial defects that overlap with WHS, including cochlea anomalies. Although auditory hair cells are specified normally, their stereocilia hair bundles required for sound perception fail to develop the appropriate morphology. Furthermore, the orientation and cellular organisation of cochlear hair cells and their innervation are defective. These findings identify, for the first time, the likely cause of sensorineural hearing loss in individuals with WHS. PMID:26092122

  15. Prevention by Regular Exercise of Acute Sleep Deprivation-Induced Impairment of Late Phase LTP and Related Signaling Molecules in the Dentate Gyrus.

    PubMed

    Zagaar, Munder A; Dao, An T; Alhaider, Ibrahim A; Alkadhi, Karim A

    2016-07-01

    The dentate gyrus (DG) and CA1 regions of the hippocampus are intimately related physically and functionally, yet they react differently to insults. The purpose of this study was to determine the protective effects of regular treadmill exercise on late phase long-term potentiation (L-LTP) and its signaling cascade in the DG region of the hippocampus of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep-deprived rats. Adult Wistar rats ran on treadmills for 4 weeks then were acutely sleep deprived for 24 h using the modified multiple platform method. After sleep deprivation, the rats were anesthetized and L-LTP was induced in the DG region. Extracellular field potentials from the DG were recorded in vivo, and levels of L-LTP-related signaling proteins were assessed both before and after L-LTP expression using immunoblot analysis. Sleep deprivation reduced the basal levels of phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (P-CREB) as well as other upstream modulators including calcium/calmodulin kinase IV (CaMKIV) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the DG of the hippocampus. Regular exercise prevented impairment of the basal levels of P-CREB and total CREB as well as those of CaMKIV in sleep-deprived animals. Furthermore, regular exercise prevented sleep deprivation-induced inhibition of L-LTP and post-L-LTP downregulation of P-CREB and BDNF levels in the DG. The current findings show that our exercise regimen prevents sleep deprivation-induced deficits in L-LTP as well as the basal and poststimulation levels of key signaling molecules. PMID:25902862

  16. Mutations in OTOGL, Encoding the Inner Ear Protein Otogelin-like, Cause Moderate Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Yariz, Kemal O.; Duman, Duygu; Seco, Celia Zazo; Dallman, Julia; Huang, Mingqian; Peters, Theo A.; Sirmaci, Asli; Lu, Na; Schraders, Margit; Skromne, Isaac; Oostrik, Jaap; Diaz-Horta, Oscar; Young, Juan I.; Tokgoz-Yilmaz, Suna; Konukseven, Ozlem; Shahin, Hashem; Hetterschijt, Lisette; Kanaan, Moien; Oonk, Anne M.M.; Edwards, Yvonne J.K.; Li, Huawei; Atalay, Semra; Blanton, Susan; DeSmidt, Alexandra A.; Liu, Xue-Zhong; Pennings, Ronald J.E.; Lu, Zhongmin; Chen, Zheng-Yi; Kremer, Hannie; Tekin, Mustafa

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary hearing loss is characterized by a high degree of genetic heterogeneity. Here we present OTOGL mutations, a homozygous one base pair deletion (c.1430 delT) causing a frameshift (p.Val477Glufs∗25) in a large consanguineous family and two compound heterozygous mutations, c.547C>T (p.Arg183∗) and c.5238+5G>A, in a nonconsanguineous family with moderate nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss. OTOGL maps to the DFNB84 locus at 12q21.31 and encodes otogelin-like, which has structural similarities to the epithelial-secreted mucin protein family. We demonstrate that Otogl is expressed in the inner ear of vertebrates with a transcription level that is high in embryonic, lower in neonatal, and much lower in adult stages. Otogelin-like is localized to the acellular membranes of the cochlea and the vestibular system and to a variety of inner ear cells located underneath these membranes. Knocking down of otogl with morpholinos in zebrafish leads to sensorineural hearing loss and anatomical changes in the inner ear, supporting that otogelin-like is essential for normal inner ear function. We propose that OTOGL mutations affect the production and/or function of acellular structures of the inner ear, which ultimately leads to sensorineural hearing loss. PMID:23122586

  17. Case report: post-stroke interventional BCI rehabilitation in an individual with preexisting sensorineural disability

    PubMed Central

    Young, Brittany M.; Nigogosyan, Zack; Nair, Veena A.; Walton, Léo M.; Song, Jie; Tyler, Mitchell E.; Edwards, Dorothy F.; Caldera, Kristin; Sattin, Justin A.; Williams, Justin C.; Prabhakaran, Vivek

    2014-01-01

    Therapies involving new technologies such as brain-computer interfaces (BCI) are being studied to determine their potential for interventional rehabilitation after acute events such as stroke produce lasting impairments. While studies have examined the use of BCI devices by individuals with disabilities, many such devices are intended to address a specific limitation and have been studied when this limitation or disability is present in isolation. Little is known about the therapeutic potential of these devices for individuals with multiple disabilities with an acquired impairment overlaid on a secondary long-standing disability. We describe a case in which a male patient with congenital deafness suffered a right pontine ischemic stroke, resulting in persistent weakness of his left hand and arm. This patient volunteer completed four baseline assessments beginning at 4 months after stroke onset and subsequently underwent 6 weeks of interventional rehabilitation therapy using a closed-loop neurofeedback BCI device with visual, functional electrical stimulation, and tongue stimulation feedback modalities. Additional assessments were conducted at the midpoint of therapy, upon completion of therapy, and 1 month after completing all BCI therapy. Anatomical and functional MRI scans were obtained at each assessment, along with behavioral measures including the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) and the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT). Clinically significant improvements in behavioral measures were noted over the course of BCI therapy, with more than 10 point gains in both the ARAT scores and scores for the SIS hand function domain. Neuroimaging during finger tapping of the impaired hand also showed changes in brain activation patterns associated with BCI therapy. This case study demonstrates the potential for individuals who have preexisting disability or possible atypical brain organization to learn to use a BCI system that may confer some rehabilitative benefit. PMID:25009491

  18. Case report: post-stroke interventional BCI rehabilitation in an individual with preexisting sensorineural disability.

    PubMed

    Young, Brittany M; Nigogosyan, Zack; Nair, Veena A; Walton, Léo M; Song, Jie; Tyler, Mitchell E; Edwards, Dorothy F; Caldera, Kristin; Sattin, Justin A; Williams, Justin C; Prabhakaran, Vivek

    2014-01-01

    Therapies involving new technologies such as brain-computer interfaces (BCI) are being studied to determine their potential for interventional rehabilitation after acute events such as stroke produce lasting impairments. While studies have examined the use of BCI devices by individuals with disabilities, many such devices are intended to address a specific limitation and have been studied when this limitation or disability is present in isolation. Little is known about the therapeutic potential of these devices for individuals with multiple disabilities with an acquired impairment overlaid on a secondary long-standing disability. We describe a case in which a male patient with congenital deafness suffered a right pontine ischemic stroke, resulting in persistent weakness of his left hand and arm. This patient volunteer completed four baseline assessments beginning at 4 months after stroke onset and subsequently underwent 6 weeks of interventional rehabilitation therapy using a closed-loop neurofeedback BCI device with visual, functional electrical stimulation, and tongue stimulation feedback modalities. Additional assessments were conducted at the midpoint of therapy, upon completion of therapy, and 1 month after completing all BCI therapy. Anatomical and functional MRI scans were obtained at each assessment, along with behavioral measures including the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) and the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT). Clinically significant improvements in behavioral measures were noted over the course of BCI therapy, with more than 10 point gains in both the ARAT scores and scores for the SIS hand function domain. Neuroimaging during finger tapping of the impaired hand also showed changes in brain activation patterns associated with BCI therapy. This case study demonstrates the potential for individuals who have preexisting disability or possible atypical brain organization to learn to use a BCI system that may confer some rehabilitative benefit. PMID:25009491

  19. Hearing Instruments for Unilateral Severe-to-Profound Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sandra Nelson; Lucas, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: A systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis was conducted to assess the nature and quality of the evidence for the use of hearing instruments in adults with a unilateral severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss. Design: The PubMed, EMBASE, MEDLINE, Cochrane, CINAHL, and DARE databases were searched with no restrictions on language. The search included articles from the start of each database until February 11, 2015. Studies were included that (a) assessed the impact of any form of hearing instrument, including devices that reroute signals between the ears or restore aspects of hearing to a deaf ear, in adults with a sensorineural severe to profound loss in one ear and normal or near-normal hearing in the other ear; (b) compared different devices or compared a device with placebo or the unaided condition; (c) measured outcomes in terms of speech perception, spatial listening, or quality of life; (d) were prospective controlled or observational studies. Studies that met prospectively defined criteria were subjected to random effects meta-analyses. Results: Twenty-seven studies reported in 30 articles were included. The evidence was graded as low-to-moderate quality having been obtained primarily from observational before-after comparisons. The meta-analysis identified statistically significant benefits to speech perception in noise for devices that rerouted the speech signals of interest from the worse ear to the better ear using either air or bone conduction (mean benefit, 2.5 dB). However, these devices also degraded speech understanding significantly and to a similar extent (mean deficit, 3.1 dB) when noise was rerouted to the better ear. Data on the effects of cochlear implantation on speech perception could not be pooled as the prospectively defined criteria for meta-analysis were not met. Inconsistency in the assessment of outcomes relating to sound localization also precluded the synthesis of evidence across studies. Evidence for

  20. Inflectional morphology in German hearing-impaired children.

    PubMed

    Penke, Martina; Wimmer, Eva; Hennies, Johannes; Hess, Markus; Rothweiler, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Despite modern hearing aids, children with hearing impairment often have only restricted access to spoken language input during the 'critical' years for language acquisition. Specifically, a sensorineural hearing impairment affects the perception of voiceless coronal consonants which realize verbal affixes in German. The aim of this study is to explore if German hearing-impaired children have problems in producing and/or acquiring inflectional suffixes expressed by such phonemes. The findings of two experiments (an elicitation task and a picture-naming task) conducted with a group of hearing-impaired monolingual German children (age 3-4 years) demonstrate that difficulties in perceiving specific phonemes relate to the avoidance of these same sounds in speech production independent of the grammatical function these phonemes have. PMID:25175166

  1. A case of sudden unilateral sensorineural hearing loss with contralateral psychogenic hearing loss induced by gunshot noise.

    PubMed

    Hong, Young-Ho; Mun, Seog-Kyun

    2011-10-01

    The reasons behind sudden sensorineural hearing loss are mostly unknown, but viral infections, blood disorders, ototoxicity, noise trauma, autoimmune disease, acoustic tumor, and even mental stress may be related to the disease. In cases of hearing loss as a result of psychogenic factors, early diagnosis and adequate treatment under collaboration with the psychiatric department are crucial, since failure to take appropriate measures may result in permanent sequela. We report a case, with a review of the literature, of sudden unilateral sensorineural hearing loss with contralateral psychogenic hearing loss induced by gunshot noise. PMID:22128658

  2. [Drug-induced Cognitive Impairment].

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Moeko; Yamada, Masahito

    2016-04-01

    Elderly people are more likely than young people to develop cognitive impairments associated with medication use. One of the reasons for this is that renal and liver functions are often impaired in elderly people. Dementia and delirium (an acute confused state) are known to be associated with drug toxicity. Anticholinergic medications are common causes of both acute and chronic cognitive impairment. Psychoactive drugs, antidepressants and anticonvulsants can cause dementia and delirium. In addition, non-psychoactive drugs such as histamine H2 receptor antagonists, corticosteroids, NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent), and cardiac medications, may cause acute or chronic cognitive impairment. Early diagnosis and withdrawal of the offending agent are essential for the prevention of drug-induced dementia and delirium. PMID:27056860

  3. Perspectives for the treatment of sensorineural hearing loss by cellular regeneration of the inner ear.

    PubMed

    Almeida-Branco, Mario S; Cabrera, Sonia; Lopez-Escamez, Jose A

    2015-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is a caused by the loss of the cochlear hair cells with the consequent deafferentation of spiral ganglion neurons. Humans do not show endogenous cellular regeneration in the inner ear and there is no exogenous therapy that allows the replacement of the damaged hair cells. Currently, treatment is based on the use of hearing aids and cochlear implants that present different outcomes, some difficulties in auditory discrimination and a limited useful life. More advanced technology is hindered by the functional capacity of the remaining spiral ganglion neurons. The latest advances with stem cell therapy and cellular reprogramming have developed several possibilities to induce endogenous regeneration or stem cell transplantation to replace damaged inner ear hair cells and restore hearing function. With further knowledge of the cellular and molecular biology of the inner ear and its embryonic development, it will be possible to use induced stem cells as in vitro models of disease and as replacement cellular therapy. Investigation in this area is focused on generating cellular therapy with clinical use for the treatment of profound sensorineural hearing loss. PMID:25459416

  4. Role of Platelet Parameters on Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss: A Case-Control Study in Iran

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is a common otological disorder characterized by a hearing loss greater than 30 dB over three consecutive frequencies, in less than 72 hours. It has been established that platelet parameters, such as mean platelet volume, are associated with ischemic heart events, whose clinical manifestations are similar to those of SSNHL. Hence, we aimed to determine if the platelet count, mean platelet volume and platelet distribution width are related to the occurrence and severity of sudden sensorineural hearing loss. A case-control prospective study was conducted in a teaching hospital in Iran. One hundred-eight patients with SSNHL and an equal number of healthy, age- and sex-matched controls were enrolled in the study. Peripheral venous blood samples were collected from the subjects, and the platelet count, mean platelet volume and platelet distribution width were measured with an automated blood cell counter. Analysis of the audiometry and hematological test results using SPSS22 software showed no statistical correlation between the platelet parameters and the occurrence of SSNHL, but correlation coefficients showed a significant correlation between PDW and hearing loss severity in patients group. However, further investigation is required to unequivocally establish the absence of correlation between the platelet parameters and occurrence of SSNHL. PMID:26829393

  5. Low Level Laser Effect in Treatment of Patients with Intractable Tinnitus Due To Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Mirvakili, Abbas; Mehrparvar, Amirhoushang; Mostaghaci, Mehrdad; Mollasadeghi, Abolfazl; Mirvakili, Masud; Baradaranfar, Mohammadhosein; Davari, Mohammadhosein

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Tinnitus is defined as a perception of sound without an external acoustic stimulus. Due to large number of causes and limited knowledge of its pathophysiology, tinnitus still remains an obscure symptom. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study on 120 patients with tinnitus and sensorineural hearing loss who were randomly divided into two groups; one group received low-level laser and the second group used the same instrument but off, for 20 sessions of 20 minutes. A tinnitus handicap inventory (THI) and Visual Analog Scale (VAS) were used to evaluate the severity of patients’ symptoms. Severity and frequency of tinnitus were also determined using Audiometric tests. Results: The average age of the 120 patients in the two groups of study were not statistically significantly different. The mean difference of severity of tinnitus between the two groups was statistically significant at the end of the study and 3 month after completion of treatment. The VAS and THI mean differences after the treatment were statistically significant between the two groups but not statistically significant after 3 months of completion the study. Conclusion: Low level laser radiation is effective for short-term treatment of Tinnitus caused by sensorineural hearing loss and its impact may be reduced over the time. PMID:25653802

  6. The Design and Screening of Drugs to Prevent Acquired Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjea, Debashree; Rybak, Leonard P.; Sheehan, Kelly E; Kaur, Tejbeer; Ramkumar, Vickram; Jajoo, Sarvesh; Sheth, Sandeep

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Sensorineural hearing loss affects a high percentage of the population. Ototoxicity is a serious and pervasive problem in patients treated with cisplatin. Strategies to ameliorate ototoxicity without compromising on antitumor activity of treatments are urgently needed. Similar problems occur with aminoglycoside antibiotic therapy for infections. Noise-induced hearing loss affects a large number of people. The use of ear protection is not always possible or effective. The prevention of hearing loss with drug therapy would have a huge impact in reducing the number of persons with hearing loss from these major causes. Areas covered This review discusses significant research findings dealing with the use of protective agents against hearing loss caused by cisplatin, aminoglycoside antibiotics and noise trauma. The efficacy in animal studies and the application of these protective agents in clinical trials that are ongoing are presented. Expert opinion The reader will gain new insights into current and projected future strategies to prevent sensorineural hearing loss from cisplatin chemotherapy, aminoglycoside antibiotic therapy and noise exposure. The future appears to offer numerous agents to prevent hearing loss caused by cisplatin, aminoglycoside antibiotics and noise. Novel delivery systems will provide ways to guide these protective agents to the desired target areas in the inner ear and will circumvent problems with therapeutic interference of anti-tumor and antibiotics agents and will minimize undesired side effects. PMID:22646075

  7. Comparison of Frequency of Frailty and Severely Impaired Physical Function in Patients ≥60 Years Hospitalized With Acute Decompensated Heart Failure Versus Chronic Stable Heart Failure With Reduced and Preserved Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Gordon R; Whellan, David J; Patel, Mahesh J; O'Connor, Christopher M; Duncan, Pamela; Eggebeen, Joel D; Morgan, Timothy M; Hewston, Leigh A; Pastva, Amy M; Kitzman, Dalane W

    2016-06-15

    Older patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) have persistently poor outcomes including frequent rehospitalization despite guidelines-based therapy. We hypothesized that such patients have multiple, severe impairments in physical function, cognition, and mood that are not addressed by current care pathways. We prospectively examined frailty, physical function, cognition, mood, and quality of life in 27 consecutive older patients with ADHF at 3 medical centers and compared these with 197 participants in 3 age-matched cohorts: stable heart failure (HF) with preserved ejection fraction (n = 80), stable HF with reduced ejection fraction (n = 56), and healthy older adults (n = 61). Based on Fried criteria, frailty was present in 56% of patients with ADHF versus 0 for the age-matched chronic HF and health cohorts. Patients with ADHF had markedly reduced Short Physical Performance Battery score (5.3 ± 2.8) and 6-minute walk distance (178 ± 102 m) (p <0.001 vs other cohorts), with severe deficits in all domains of physical function: balance, mobility, strength, and endurance. In the patients with ADHF, cognitive impairment (78%) and depression (30%) were common, and quality of life was poor. In conclusion, older patients with ADHF are frequently frail with severe and widespread impairments in physical function, cognition, mood, and quality of life that may contribute to their persistently poor outcomes, are frequently unrecognized, are not addressed in current ADHF care paradigms, and are potentially modifiable with targeted interventions. PMID:27156830

  8. Sensorineural deafness

    MedlinePlus

    ... or dizzy (more common with Meniere's disease and acoustic neuromas ) Ringing or buzzing sound in the ears ( ... a long time Meniere's disease Tumor, such as acoustic neuroma Use of certain medicines Working around loud ...

  9. Better-ear glimpsing in hearing-impaired listeners

    PubMed Central

    Best, Virginia; Mason, Christine R.; Kidd, Gerald; Iyer, Nandini; Brungart, Douglas S.

    2015-01-01

    When competing speech sounds are spatially separated, listeners can make use of the ear with the better target-to-masker ratio. Recent studies showed that listeners with normal hearing are able to efficiently make use of this “better-ear,” even when it alternates between left and right ears at different times in different frequency bands, which may contribute to the ability to listen in spatialized speech mixtures. In the present study, better-ear glimpsing in listeners with bilateral sensorineural hearing impairment, who perform poorly in spatialized speech mixtures, was investigated. The results suggest that this deficit is not related to better-ear glimpsing. PMID:25698053

  10. A Comparison of Phonological Processing Skills of Children with Mild to Moderate Sensorineural Hearing Loss and Children with Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Jungjun; Lombardino, Linda J.

    2012-01-01

    Using the Comprehensive Test of Phonological Processes (Wagner, Torgesen, & Rashotte, 1999), the researchers compared strengths and weaknesses in phonological processing skills in three groups: 21 children with mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss (MSNH group), 29 children with dyslexia, and 30 age-matched controls. The MSNH group showed…

  11. Concurrent hyperbaric oxygen therapy and intratympanic steroid application as salvage therapy after severe sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Lamm, Hans; Müller-Kortkamp, Claus; Warnecke, Athanasia; Pohl, Friederike; Paasche, Gerrit; Lenarz, Thomas; Stolle, Stefan R O

    2016-03-01

    Concurrent hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) and intratympanic steroid application (ITS) are beneficial as salvage therapy for therapy-refractory sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL). The findings encourage further research on the treatment of noise-induced and idiopathic SSNHL with concurrent use of HBOT and ITS respecting also patients with long-term or therapy-refractory SSNHL. PMID:27014454

  12. Risk Factors for Sensorineural Hearing Loss Among High-Risk Infants in Golestan Province, Iran in 2010 - 2011

    PubMed Central

    Alaee, Ehsan; Sirati, Mohsen; Taziki, Mohammad Hossein; Fouladinejad, Mahnaz

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hearing impairment, as one of the most common birth defects, is a hidden disability with negative impacts on speech and cognitive development. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and determine the associated risk factors among infants admitted to neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) and neonatal wards of teaching hospitals, affiliated to Golestan University of Medical Sciences, Gorgan, Iran. Patients and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 791 infants were recruited via non-random sampling. Demographic and clinical characteristics of the subjects were gathered, and the Automated Auditory Brainstem Response (AABR) test was performed upon admission. Afterwards, the subjects were followed-up and re-assessed, using the AABR test. For infants with abnormal AABR results, the Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR) test was performed on the day of discharge. Results: The mean age of the infants was 3.75 ± 4.86 days upon admission, and 56.4% of the subjects were female. The mean length of hospital stay was 9.63 ± 1.1 days; the subjects were hospitalized for 3.50 ± 10.21 days in the NICUs and 6.1 ± 5.27 days in the neonatal wards. In total, 3.4% of the infants presented with SNHL. No significant difference was found between SNHL and neonates’ age (P = 0.52), sex (P = 0.5), or sepsis (P = 0.94). However, SNHL was significantly associated with gestational age (P = 0.045), birth weight (P < 0.001), length of hospital stay (P < 0.001), pathological jaundice (P=0.033), antibiotic treatments (P = 0.007), and total serum bilirubin level (P = 0.01). Additionally, binary logistic regression analysis demonstrated the association between SNHL and these factors. Conclusions: In this study, the prevalence of SNHL among hospitalized neonates was similar to previous reports in Iran and other countries. Based on the findings, administration of ototoxic drugs during the neonatal period can lead to SNHL

  13. A novel mutation of EYA4 in a large Chinese family with autosomal dominant middle-frequency sensorineural hearing loss by targeted exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi; Zhang, Zhao; Cheng, Jing; Lu, Yu; Yang, Chang-Liang; Luo, Yan-Yun; Yang, Guang; Yang, Hui; Zhu, Li; Zhou, Jia; Yao, Hang-Qi

    2015-06-01

    The middle-frequency sensorineural hearing loss (MFSNHL) is rare among hereditary non-syndromic hearing loss. To date, only three genes are reported to be associated with MFSNHL, including TECTA, EYA4 and COL11A2. In this report, we analyzed and explored the clinical audiological characteristics and the causative gene of a Chinese family named HG-Z087 with non-syndromic autosomal dominant inherited MFSNHL. Clinical audiological characteristics and inheritance pattern of a family were evaluated, and pedigree was drawn based on medical history investigation. Our results showed that the Chinese family was characterized by late onset, progressive, non-sydromic autosomal dominant MFSNHL. Targeted exome sequencing, conducted using DNA samples of an affected member in this family, revealed a novel heterozygous missense mutation c.1643C>G in exon 18 of EYA4, causing amino-acid (aa) substitution Arg for Thr at a conserved position aa-548. The p.T548R mutation related to hearing loss in the selected Chinese family was validated by Sanger sequencing. However, the mutation was absent in control group containing 100 DNA samples from normal Chinese families. In conclusion, we identified the pathogenic gene and found that the novel missense mutation c.1643C>G (p.T548R) in EYA4 might have caused autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing impairment in the selected Chinese family. PMID:25809937

  14. Mutation in the transcriptional coactivator EYA4 causes dilated cardiomyopathy and sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Schönberger, Jost; Wang, Libin; Shin, Jordan T; Kim, Sang Do; Depreux, Frederic F S; Zhu, Hao; Zon, Leonard; Pizard, Anne; Kim, Jae B; Macrae, Calum A; Mungall, Andy J; Seidman, J G; Seidman, Christine E

    2005-04-01

    We identified a human mutation that causes dilated cardiomyopathy and heart failure preceded by sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). Unlike previously described mutations causing dilated cardiomyopathy that affect structural proteins, this mutation deletes 4,846 bp of the human transcriptional coactivator gene EYA4. To elucidate the roles of eya4 in heart function, we studied zebrafish embryos injected with antisense morpholino oligonucleotides. Attenuated eya4 transcript levels produced morphologic and hemodynamic features of heart failure. To determine why previously described mutated EYA4 alleles cause SNHL without heart disease, we examined biochemical interactions of mutant Eya4 peptides. Eya4 peptides associated with SNHL, but not the shortened 193-amino acid peptide associated with dilated cardiomyopathy and SNHL, bound wild-type Eya4 and associated with Six proteins. These data define unrecognized and crucial roles for Eya4-Six-mediated transcriptional regulation in normal heart function. PMID:15735644

  15. Pontobulbar palsy and sensorineural deafness (Brown-Vialetto-van Laere syndrome): the first case from Libya.

    PubMed

    Dakhil, Fathi O; Bensreiti, Salah M; Zew, Mohammad H

    2010-08-01

    We report the first case of Brown-Vialetto-van Laere syndrome from Libya. A 27-year-old female patient with progressive pontobulbar palsy, sensorineural deafness and generalized muscle weakness is described. Although she was born to consanguineous first cousin parents, she was the only one affected among five brothers and six sisters. The first symptoms appeared at the age of 18 years with tinnitus, weakness and unsteadiness that progressed over the course of a few weeks to deafness, blurring of vision, dysphagia, and dysarthria. Over the last nine years her symptoms progressed slowly, although interrupted with periods of rapid deterioration. Fifty-eight cases have been reported since the first case was described in 1894. PMID:20001484

  16. HDR Syndrome (Hypoparathyroidism, Sensorineural Deafness and Renal Disease) Accompanied by Hirschsprung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sepahi, Mohsen Akhavan; Baraty, Behrouz; Shooshtary, Fatemeh Khalifeh

    2010-01-01

    Background HDR syndrome (hypoparathyroidism, sensorineural deafness and renal disease) is an autosomal dominant condition, defined by the triad hypoparathyroidism, renal dysplasia and hearing loss. Hirschsprung (HSCR) disease is a variable congenital absence of ganglion cells of the enteric nervous system resulting in degrees of functional bowel obstruction. Rarer chromosomal anomalies are reported in combination with Hirschsprung disease like DiGeorge syndrome, mosaic trisomy 8, XXY chromosomal constitution, partial duplication of chromosome 2q, tetrasomy 9p, and 20p deletion. Case Presentation Here, we describe an 8 year-old girl with HDR syndrome accompanied by Hirschsprung disease. Although the association of Hirschsprung disease with chromosomal anomalies has been reported, according to our knowledge, this is the first report of associated HSCR with HDR syndrome. PMID:23056694

  17. Infantile variant of Bartter syndrome and sensorineural deafness: A new autosomal recessive disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Landau, D.; Shalev, H.; Carmi, Rivka; Ohaly, M.

    1995-12-04

    The infantile variant of Bartter syndrome (IBS) is usually associated with maternal polyhydramnios, premature birth, postnatal polyuria and hypokalemic hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis and a typical appearance. IBS is thought to be an autosomal recessive trait. Several congenital tubular defects are associated with sensorineural deafness (SND). However, an association between the IBS and SND has not been reported so far. Here we describe 5 children of an extended consanguineous Bedouin family with IBS and SND. In 3 of the cases, the typical electrolyte imbalance and facial appearance were detected neonatally. SND was detected as early as age 1 month, suggesting either coincidental homozygotization of 2 recessive genes or a pleiotropic effect of one autosomal recessive gene. This association suggests that evaluation of SND is warranted in every case of IBS. 35 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Risk factors in the genesis of sensorineural hearing loss in Finnish forestry workers.

    PubMed Central

    Pyykkö, I; Koskimies, K; Starck, J; Pekkarinen, J; Färkkilä, M; Inaba, R

    1989-01-01

    A detailed analysis of risk factors for the development of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) was carried out in 199 forest workers. The hearing threshold of both ears at 4000 Hz was measured, and the effect of age, exposure to noise, blood pressure, presence of vibration induced white finger (VWF), tobacco smoking, plasma LDL-cholesterol concentration, and consumption of drugs were evaluated by multiple linear regression analysis. Aging was the major risk factor, followed by exposure to occupational noise and the presence of VWF. Plasma LDL-cholesterol concentration and the use of antihypertensive drugs also correlated significantly with SNHL. These main factors were able to explain about 28% of the SNHL variance. Additional factors in the analysis, including smoking, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and consumption of salicylates did not significantly contribute to the genesis of SNHL. PMID:2765417

  19. X-linked ocular albinism and sensorineural deafness: Linkage to Xp22. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Winship, I.M.; Babaya, M.; Ramesar, R.S. )

    1993-11-01

    X-linked ocular albinism with late-onset sensorineural deafness (OASD) is an autonomous disorder that poses significant clinical problems, causing affected individuals to be blind and deaf by early middle age. Classical X-linked ocular albinism (without deafness; OA1) has recently been linked to markers in the Xp22.2-Xp22.3 region of the human genome. In the present report, a large South African family with OASD was investigated at the molecular level and tight linkage was found to the DXS452 locus at Xp22.3 using 25 informative meioses, with a maximum lod score of 7.1 at a recombination fraction of 0.00. These findings suggest that OA1 and OASD are allelic variants or that they may be due to contiguous gene defects. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  20. The dichotic lead effect of CV syllables in sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Cattey, T J

    1981-01-01

    This study investigated central processing of dichotic CV syllables on 10 patients with sensorineural hearing losses. Porter's Dichotic Lag Index (DLI) was established for each S at asynchronies of alignment of 30, 60, 90, and 150 msec by presenting the lagging syllable first to the R and then to the L ear. Ss were required to record a response to both CV syllables. Patients exhibited a dichotic lead advantage while 10 normal-hearing control Ss exhibited a dichotic lag advantage. A R ear advantage was not abolished when the lagging syllable was presented to the L ear and was not enhanced when the lagging syllable was presented to the R ear. The lead advantage of the patients may be attributed to the distortion of acoustic encoding for speech, causing a reduction in the special processing requirements of CV syllables. The reduction in special processing may then be responsible for the shift in temporal advantage. PMID:7349869

  1. Cognitive Impairment After Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Gauba, Charu; Chaudhari, Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Vascular dementia is extremely common and contributes to stroke-associated morbidity and mortality. The study of vascular dementia may help to plan preventive interventions. Aims: To study the frequency of cognitive impairment after stroke in a series of consecutive patients with acute stroke, along with factors which influence it. Methods: Fifty adults with acute infarct or hemorrhage (as seen on computed tomography of the brain) were included in the study. The National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and Barthel’s Index scores were done. Cognitive testing was done by PGI Battery of Brain Dysfunction (PGI-BBD) and Short Form of the Informant Questionnaire on Cognitive Decline in the Elderly (SIQCODE). Statistical analysis was by Student’s t-test, Chi-square test, Fisher’s exact test, and Mann-Whitney U test. Results: Mean age of patients was 61.82 years; males and ischemic strokes predominated. Dementia was seen in 30%, cognitive impairment no dementia (CIND) in 42%, and normal cognition in 28% patients. Factors associated with vascular cognitive impairment included old age, male sex, low education, hemorrhages, recurrent or severe stroke, silent infarcts, severe cortical atrophy, and left hemispheric or subcortical involvement. Conclusions: Up to 72% of patients have some form of cognitive impairment after a stroke. Secondary stroke prevention could reduce the incidence of vascular dementia. PMID:26543693

  2. Even in the era of congenital hypothyroidism screening mild and subclinical sensorineural hearing loss remains a relatively common complication of severe congenital hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Rocco; Aversa, Tommaso; Catena, Mariaausilia; Valenzise, Mariella; Lombardo, Fortunato; De Luca, Filippo; Wasniewska, Malgorzata

    2015-09-01

    Only few studies have focused on neurosensory hearing function of patients with congenital hypothyroidism (CH) identified by CH screening programs and treated early and, therefore, this issue remains still controversial. The aim of this study was to ascertain whether an early and adequate replacement treatment may be able to prevent sensorineural hearing loss in 32 screened children with CH and no associated risk factors for neuro-otologic alterations. These patients were recruited according to highly selective criteria aiming to preliminarily exclude the negative interference of both treatment variables and other underlying risk factors. All the selected patients underwent, at a median age of 15.4 years, an audiologic investigation, which evidenced a mild and subclinical hearing loss in 25% of them. The poorest hearing scores were recorded in the individuals with athyreosis and in those with absence of distal femur bony nucleus at CH diagnosis. The prevalence of hearing impairment was significantly higher in CH patients than in 32 age-matched control subjects with no CH (χ(2) = 6.3, p < 0.025). In light of these findings, we concluded that: a) 25% of CH patients detected by CH screening may show, at a median age of 15.4 years, a mild and subclinical hearing impairment, despite early and adequate replacement treatment; b) the risk of hearing loss is higher in CH young patients than in age-matched control subjects without CH; c) the risk of hearing loss is closely associated with the severity of CH; d) this risk is particularly relevant in the children with pre-natal onset of hypothyroidism. PMID:25987501

  3. [The problems of hearing impairment in the flying staff of commercial aviation in Russia].

    PubMed

    Pankova, V B; Bushmanov, A Y U

    2014-01-01

    The authors discuss the problems pertaining to the growing incidence of hearing impairment in the members of the flying staff employed in commercial aviation of Russia and the main criteria used to elucidate the causes behind occupational diseases of the organs of hearing. Special attention is given to the principal normative documents regulating the methodological basis on which the acoustic factor in the aircraft cockpit is evaluated, peculiarities of occupational sensorineural hearing impairment and the methods for its detection. The main errors in the determination of the relationship between the working conditions and the diseases of the organs of hearing are discussed. PMID:25734302

  4. Acute Viral Escape Selectively Impairs Nef-Mediated Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Downmodulation and Increases Susceptibility to Antiviral T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Weiler, Andrea M.; Das, Arpita; Akinyosoye, Oluwasayo; Cui, Sherry; O'Connor, Shelby L.; Scheef, Elizabeth A.; Reed, Jason S.; Panganiban, Antonito T.; Sacha, Jonah B.; Rakasz, Eva G.; Friedrich, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    Nef-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes (CD8TL) are associated with control of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) despite extensive nef variation between and within animals. Deep viral sequencing of the immunodominant Mamu-B*017:01-restricted Nef165–173IW9 epitope revealed highly restricted evolution. A common acute escape variant, T170I, unexpectedly and uniquely degraded Nef's major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) downregulatory capacity, rendering the virus more vulnerable to CD8TL targeting other epitopes. These data aid in a mechanistic understanding of Nef functions and suggest means of immunity-mediated control of lentivirus replication. PMID:26637459

  5. Acute Viral Escape Selectively Impairs Nef-Mediated Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Downmodulation and Increases Susceptibility to Antiviral T Cells.

    PubMed

    Weiler, Andrea M; Das, Arpita; Akinyosoye, Oluwasayo; Cui, Sherry; O'Connor, Shelby L; Scheef, Elizabeth A; Reed, Jason S; Panganiban, Antonito T; Sacha, Jonah B; Rakasz, Eva G; Friedrich, Thomas C; Maness, Nicholas J

    2016-02-01

    Nef-specific CD8(+) T lymphocytes (CD8TL) are associated with control of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) despite extensive nef variation between and within animals. Deep viral sequencing of the immunodominant Mamu-B*017:01-restricted Nef165-173IW9 epitope revealed highly restricted evolution. A common acute escape variant, T170I, unexpectedly and uniquely degraded Nef's major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) downregulatory capacity, rendering the virus more vulnerable to CD8TL targeting other epitopes. These data aid in a mechanistic understanding of Nef functions and suggest means of immunity-mediated control of lentivirus replication. PMID:26637459

  6. Hearing impairment in Stickler syndrome: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Stickler syndrome is a connective tissue disorder characterized by ocular, skeletal, orofacial and auditory defects. It is caused by mutations in different collagen genes, namely COL2A1, COL11A1 and COL11A2 (autosomal dominant inheritance), and COL9A1 and COL9A2 (autosomal recessive inheritance). The auditory phenotype in Stickler syndrome is inconsistently reported. Therefore we performed a systematic review of the literature to give an up-to-date overview of hearing loss in Stickler syndrome, and correlated it with the genotype. Methods English-language literature was reviewed through searches of PubMed and Web of Science, in order to find relevant articles describing auditory features in Stickler patients, along with genotype. Prevalences of hearing loss are calculated and correlated with the different affected genes and type of mutation. Results 313 patients (102 families) individually described in 46 articles were included. Hearing loss was found in 62.9%, mostly mild to moderate when reported. Hearing impairment was predominantly sensorineural (67.8%). Conductive (14.1%) and mixed (18.1%) hearing loss was primarily found in young patients or patients with a palatal defect. Overall, mutations in COL11A1 (82.5%) and COL11A2 (94.1%) seem to be more frequently associated with hearing impairment than mutations in COL2A1 (52.2%). Conclusions Hearing impairment in patients with Stickler syndrome is common. Sensorineural hearing loss predominates, but also conductive hearing loss, especially in children and patients with a palatal defect, may occur. The distinct disease-causing collagen genes are associated with a different prevalence of hearing impairment, but still large phenotypic variation exists. Regular auditory follow-up is strongly advised, particularly because many Stickler patients are visually impaired. PMID:23110709

  7. Loss of osteoprotegerin expression in the inner ear causes degeneration of the cochlear nerve and sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Kao, Shyan-Yuan; Kempfle, Judith S; Jensen, Jane B; Perez-Fernandez, Deborah; Lysaght, Andrew C; Edge, Albert S; Stankovic, Konstantina M

    2013-08-01

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is a key regulator of bone remodeling. Mutations and variations in the OPG gene cause many human diseases that are characterized by not only skeletal abnormalities but also poorly understood hearing loss: Paget's disease, osteoporosis, and celiac disease. To gain insight into the mechanisms of hearing loss in OPG deficiency, we studied OPG knockout (Opg(-/-)) mice. We show that they develop sensorineural hearing loss, in addition to conductive hearing loss due to abnormal middle-ear bones. OPG deficiency caused demyelination and degeneration of the cochlear nerve in vivo. It also activated ERK, sensitized spiral ganglion cells (SGC) to apoptosis, and inhibited proliferation and survival of cochlear stem cells in vitro, which could be rescued by treatment with exogenous OPG, an ERK inhibitor, or bisphosphonate. Our results demonstrate a novel role for OPG in the regulation of SGC survival, and suggest a mechanism for sensorineural hearing loss in OPG deficiency. PMID:23607938

  8. Transition between Acute and Chronic Hepatotoxicity in Mice Is Associated with Impaired Energy Metabolism and Induction of Mitochondrial Heme Oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Nikam, Aniket; Patankar, Jay V.; Lackner, Carolin; Schöck, Elisabeth; Kratky, Dagmar; Zatloukal, Kurt; Abuja, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    The formation of protein inclusions is frequently associated with chronic metabolic diseases. In mice, short-term intoxication with 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC) leads to hepatocellular damage indicated by elevated serum liver enzyme activities, whereas only minor morphological changes are observed. Conversely, chronic administration of DDC for several weeks results in severe morphological damage, characterized by hepatocellular ballooning, disruption of the intermediate filament cytoskeleton, and formation of Mallory-Denk bodies consisting predominantly of misfolded keratins, Sqstm1/p62, and heat shock proteins. To evaluate the mechanistic underpinnings for this dichotomy we dissected the time-course of DDC intoxication for up to 10 weeks. We determined body weight change, serum liver enzyme activities, morphologic alterations, induction of antioxidant response (heme oxygenase-1, HO-1), oxidative damage and ATP content in livers as well as respiration, oxidative damage and the presence and activity of HO-1 in endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria (mtHO-1). Elevated serum liver enzyme activity and oxidative liver damage were already present at early intoxication stages without further subsequent increase. After 2 weeks of intoxication, mice had transiently lost 9% of their body weight, liver ATP-content was reduced to 58% of controls, succinate-driven respiration was uncoupled from ATP-production and antioxidant response was associated with the appearance of catalytically active mtHO-1. Oxidative damage was associated with both acute and chronic DDC toxicity whereas the onset of chronic intoxication was specifically associated with mitochondrial dysfunction which was maximal after 2 weeks of intoxication. At this transition stage, adaptive responses involving mtHO-1 were induced, indirectly leading to improved respiration and preventing further drop of ATP levels. Our observations clearly demonstrate principally different mechanisms for acute and

  9. Strategy for the customized mass screening of genetic sensorineural hearing loss in koreans.

    PubMed

    Chang, Mun Young; Choi, Byung Yoon

    2014-09-01

    Hearing loss is one of the most common sensorineural disorder. More than half of congenital bilateral profound deafness cases have been estimated to be attributed to genetic cause. Identification of genetic cause can provide valuable information. We developed new diagnostic strategy combining phenotype-driven candidate gene approach and targeted exome sequencing to find out the causative mutation of hearing loss. The causative mutation detection rates of this strategy were 78.1% and 54.8% in Korean multiplex families and sporadic severe to profound hearing loss families, respectively. The most frequent causative genes of Korean multiplex families were SLC26A4 and POU3F4. The other causative genes were MRNR1, WFS1, COCH, TECTA, MYO6, COL11A2, EYA4, GJB3, OTOF, STRC, MYO3A, and GJB2. The most frequent causative gene of Korean sporadic severe to profound hearing loss families was SLC26A4 followed by GJB2, CHD7, and CDH23. Based upon the results, the value of this strategy as a diagnostic tool seems to be promising. Although whole genome and exome sequencing have advanced as the development of next-generation sequencing, this new strategy could be a good screening and diagnostic tool to find the causative mutations. PMID:25279224

  10. Strategy for the Customized Mass Screening of Genetic Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Koreans

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Mun Young

    2014-01-01

    Hearing loss is one of the most common sensorineural disorder. More than half of congenital bilateral profound deafness cases have been estimated to be attributed to genetic cause. Identification of genetic cause can provide valuable information. We developed new diagnostic strategy combining phenotype-driven candidate gene approach and targeted exome sequencing to find out the causative mutation of hearing loss. The causative mutation detection rates of this strategy were 78.1% and 54.8% in Korean multiplex families and sporadic severe to profound hearing loss families, respectively. The most frequent causative genes of Korean multiplex families were SLC26A4 and POU3F4. The other causative genes were MRNR1, WFS1, COCH, TECTA, MYO6, COL11A2, EYA4, GJB3, OTOF, STRC, MYO3A, and GJB2. The most frequent causative gene of Korean sporadic severe to profound hearing loss families was SLC26A4 followed by GJB2, CHD7, and CDH23. Based upon the results, the value of this strategy as a diagnostic tool seems to be promising. Although whole genome and exome sequencing have advanced as the development of next-generation sequencing, this new strategy could be a good screening and diagnostic tool to find the causative mutations. PMID:25279224

  11. Prevalence, heritability and genetic correlations of congenital sensorineural deafness and pigmentation phenotypes in the Border Collie.

    PubMed

    De Risio, Luisa; Lewis, Tom; Freeman, Julia; de Stefani, Alberta; Matiasek, Lara; Blott, Sarah

    2011-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to estimate prevalence, heritability and genetic correlations of congenital sensorineural deafness (CSD) and pigmentation phenotypes in the Border Collie. Entire litters of Border Collies that presented to the Animal Health Trust (1994-2008) for assessment of hearing status by brain stem auditory evoked response (BAER) at 4-10 weeks of age were included. Heritability and genetic correlations were estimated using residual maximum likelihood (REML). Of 4143 puppies that met the inclusion criteria, 97.6% had normal hearing status, 2.0% were unilaterally deaf and 0.4% were bilaterally deaf. Heritability of deafness as a trichotomous trait (normal/unilaterally deaf/bilaterally deaf) was estimated at 0.42 using multivariate analysis. Genetic correlations of deafness with iris colour and merle coat colour were 0.58 and 0.26, respectively. These results indicate that there is a significant genetic effect on CSD in Border Collies and that some of the genes determining deafness also influence pigmentation phenotypes. PMID:20570536

  12. PSIP1/LEDGF: a new gene likely involved in sensorineural progressive hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Girotto, Giorgia; Scheffer, Déborah I.; Morgan, Anna; Vozzi, Diego; Rubinato, Elisa; Di Stazio, Mariateresa; Muzzi, Enrico; Pensiero, Stefano; Giersch, Anne B.; Corey, David P.; Gasparini, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary Hearing Loss (HHL) is an extremely heterogeneous disorder. Approximately 30 out of 80 known HHL genes are associated with autosomal dominant forms. Here, we identified PSIP1/LEDGF (isoform p75) as a novel strong candidate gene involved in dominant HHL. Using exome sequencing we found a frameshift deletion (c.1554_1555del leading to p.E518Dfs*2) in an Italian pedigree affected by sensorineural mild-to-moderate HHL but also showing a variable eye phenotype (i.e. uveitis, optic neuropathy). This deletion led to a premature stop codon (p.T519X) with truncation of the last 12 amino acids. PSIP1 was recently described as a transcriptional co-activator regulated by miR-135b in vestibular hair cells of the mouse inner ear as well as a possible protector against photoreceptor degeneration. Here, we demonstrate that it is ubiquitously expressed in the mouse inner ear. The PSIP1 mutation is associated with a peculiar audiometric slope toward the high frequencies. These findings indicate that PSIP1 likely plays an important role in HHL. PMID:26689366

  13. [A case of ipsilateral ageusia, sensorineural hearing loss and facial sensorimotor disturbance due to pontine lesion].

    PubMed

    Sato, K; Nitta, E

    2000-05-01

    We report a 58-year-old woman with pontine lesion presented with subacute onset of unilateral gustatory disturbance accompanied by facial numbness, and hearing loss. Neurologic examination revealed superficial hypesthesia and paresthesia on the right side of the face, right peripheral type facial paresis, ageusia on the right half of the tongue and right sensorineural deafness. No other neurologic signs were observed, and laboratory data were all normal. Brain MRI revealed a small lesion in the right dorsolateral tegmentum of the middle pons. Electrogustometry showed marked reduction in the sense of taste on the right half of the tongue. ABR showed diminished amplitude in the IV-V wave of the right side, while SEP and VEP were normal. The clinical diagnosis was demyelinating lesion and intravenous methylprednisolone (1 g/day) was administered for 3 consecutive days, resulting in prompt improvement in the symptoms. The lesion was suspected of affecting ipsilateral side of the spinal trigeminal nerve tract and the nucleus, the intraaxial infranuclear facial nerve fiber, the lateral lemniscus adjacent to the superior olivary nucleus and the central gustatory tract. Our case suggests that the central gustatory pathway projecting from the nucleus of the solitary tract to the parabrachial nucleus, presumed to be pontine taste area, ascends ipsilaterally and is located laterally from the medial lemniscus. PMID:11002734

  14. Cytomegalovirus-induced sensorineural hearing loss with persistent cochlear inflammation in neonatal mice.

    PubMed

    Schachtele, Scott J; Mutnal, Manohar B; Schleiss, Mark R; Lokensgard, James R

    2011-06-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is the leading cause of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in children. During murine (M)CMV-induced encephalitis, the immune response is important for both the control of viral dissemination and the clearance of virus from the brain. While the importance of CMV-induced SNHL has been described, the mechanisms surrounding its pathogenesis and the role of inflammatory responses remain unclear. This study presents a neonatal mouse model of profound SNHL in which MCMV preferentially infected both cochlear perilymphatic epithelial cells and spiral ganglion neurons. Interestingly, MCMV infection induced cochlear hair cell death by 21 days post-infection, despite a clear lack of direct infection of hair cells and the complete clearance of the virus from the cochlea by 14 dpi. Flow cytometric, immunohistochemical, and quantitative PCR analysis of MCMV-infected cochlea revealed a robust and chronic inflammatory response, including a prolonged increase in reactive oxygen species production by infiltrating macrophages. These data support a pivotal role for inflammation during MCMV-induced SNHL. PMID:21416394

  15. Generation and validation of a zebrafish model of EAST (epilepsy, ataxia, sensorineural deafness and tubulopathy) syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Fahad; Mozere, Monika; Zdebik, Anselm A.; Stanescu, Horia C.; Tobin, Jonathan; Beales, Philip L.; Kleta, Robert; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Russell, Claire

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Recessive mutations in KCNJ10, which encodes an inwardly rectifying potassium channel, were recently identified as the cause of EAST syndrome, a severe and disabling multi-organ disorder consisting of epilepsy, ataxia, sensorineural deafness and tubulopathy that becomes clinically apparent with seizures in infancy. A Kcnj10 knockout mouse shows postnatal mortality and is therefore not suitable for drug discovery. Because zebrafish are ideal for in vivo screening for potential therapeutics, we tested whether kcnj10 knockdown in zebrafish would fill this need. We cloned zebrafish kcnj10 and demonstrated that its function is equivalent to that of human KCNJ10. We next injected splice- and translation-blocking kcnj10 antisense morpholino oligonucleotides and reproduced the cardinal symptoms of EAST syndrome – ataxia, epilepsy and renal tubular defects. Several of these phenotypes could be assayed in an automated manner. We could rescue the morphant phenotype with complementary RNA (cRNA) encoding human wild-type KCNJ10, but not with cRNA encoding a KCNJ10 mutation identified in individuals with EAST syndrome. Our results suggest that zebrafish will be a valuable tool to screen for compounds that are potentially therapeutic for EAST syndrome or its individual symptoms. Knockdown of kcnj10 represents the first zebrafish model of a salt-losing tubulopathy, which has relevance for blood pressure control. PMID:23471908

  16. Abnormal Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Patients With Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Kyung-Hwa; Choi, Jin Woo; Shin, Jung Eun; Kim, Chang-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The etiology of sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) remains unclear in most cases. This study aimed to assess abnormal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in patients with SSNHL and evaluate the value of MRI in identifying the cause of SSNHL. A retrospective analysis of the charts and MRI findings of 291 patients with SSNHL was performed. In 291 patients, MRI abnormality, which was considered a cause of SSNHL, was detected in 13 patients. Vestibular schwannoma involving the internal auditory canal (IAC) and/or cerebellopontine angle was observed in 9 patients. All 9 patients had intrameatal tumors, and 6 of the 9 patients displayed extrameatal extension of their tumors. The tumor was small (<1 cm) or medium-sized (1.1–2.9 cm) in these 6 patients. Intralabyrinthine schwannoma, labyrinthine hemorrhage, IAC metastasis, and a ruptured dermoid cyst were each observed in 1 patient. The most commonly observed MRI abnormality in patients with SSNHL was vestibular schwannoma, and all of the lesions were small or medium-sized tumors involving the IAC. PMID:27124066

  17. Sudden Bilateral Sensorineural Hearing Loss Associated with HLA A1-B8-DR3 Haplotype.

    PubMed

    Psillas, G; Daniilidis, M; Gerofotis, A; Veros, K; Vasilaki, A; Vital, I; Markou, K

    2013-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss may be present as a symptom in systemic autoimmune diseases or may occur as a primary disorder without another organ involvement (autoimmune inner ear disease). The diagnosis of autoimmune inner ear disease is still predicated on clinical features, and to date specific diagnostic tests are not available. We report a case of bilateral sudden hearing loss, tinnitus, intense rotatory vertigo, and nausea in a female patient in which the clinical manifestations, in addition to raised levels of circulating immune complexes, antithyroglobulin antibodies, and the presence of the HLA A1-B8-DR3 haplotype, allowed us to hypothesize an autoimmune inner ear disease. Cyclosporine-A immunosuppressive treatment in addition to steroids helped in hearing recovery that occurred progressively with normalization of the hearing function after a five-month treatment. Cyclosporine-A could be proposed as a therapeutic option in case of autoimmune inner ear disease allowing the suspension of corticosteroids that, at high dose, expose patients to potentially serious adverse events. PMID:24106629

  18. Characteristics of hearing loss in HDR (hypoparathyroidism, sensorineural deafness, renal dysplasia) syndrome.

    PubMed

    van Looij, Marjolein A J; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Beetz, Rolf; Thakker, Rajesh V; Christie, Paul T; Feenstra, Lou W; van Zanten, Bert G A

    2006-01-01

    Haploinsufficiency of the zinc finger transcription factor GATA3 causes the triad of hypoparathyroidism, deafness and renal dysplasia, known by its acronym HDR syndrome. The purpose of the current study was to describe in detail the auditory phenotype in human HDR patients and compare these to audiometrical and histological data previously described in a mouse model of this disease. Pure tone audiometry, speech audiometry, speech in noise, auditory brainstem responses and transiently evoked otoacoustic emissions were measured in 2 patients affected by HDR syndrome. Both patients were affected by a moderate-to-severe sensorineural hearing loss. Speech reception thresholds were shifted and speech recognition in noise was disturbed. No otoacoustic emissions could be generated in either patient. Auditory brainstem response interpeak intervals were normal. The human and murine audiological phenotypes seem to correspond well. Hearing loss in HDR syndrome is moderate to severe, seems to be slightly worse at the higher end of the frequency spectrum and may be progressive with age. The absence of otoacoustic emissions and the loss of frequency selectivity suggest an important role for outer hair cells in causing the hearing loss. PMID:16988501

  19. Study of 100 patients with bilateral sensorineural hearing loss for lipid abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Lowry, L D; Isaacson, S R

    1978-01-01

    One hundred persons were selected from our audiology records who showed at least 20 dB bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. The number 100 was picked for an adequate statistical analysis. The patients were taken from the chart files which are filed in chronological order. Letters were mailed with instructions for fasting 14 hours prior to testing except for the consumption of water. On presentation, a history was taken for diabetes, height and weight, and the blood pressure was recorded. The blood samples were drawn in clot tubes and taken to a commercial laboratory for overnight refrigeration and testing of the serum. Testing included observation of serum for massive chylomicronemia, triglycerides, cholesterol and lipoprotein electrophoresis (by the cellulose acetate method). Lipoprotein testing results showed 12 patients with Type II A or II B and 8 patients with Type IV abnormalities. No Types I, III or V were found. These 20 patients represent a lower number of hyperlipoproteinemic patients than would be expected in the general population. PMID:207213

  20. Is Hearing Impairment Associated with Rheumatoid Arthritis? A Review

    PubMed Central

    Emamifar, Amir; Bjoerndal, Kristine; Hansen, Inger M.J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic, inflammatory disease that affects 1% of the population. The auditory system may be involved during the course of disease; however the association of RA and hearing impairment has not been clearly defined. Objective: The objective of this review is to evaluate published clinical reports related to hearing impairment in patients with RA. Furthermore, we discuss possible pathologies and associated factors as well as new treatment modalities. Method: A thorough literature search was performed using available databases including Pubmed, Embase, Cochrane and ComDisDome to cover all relative reports. The following keywords were used: hearing loss, hearing difficulties, hearing disorders, hearing impairment, sensorineural hearing loss, conductive hearing loss, mixed hearing loss, autoimmune hearing loss, drug ototoxicity, drug-induced hearing loss, hearing test, audiometry, auditory dysfunction and rheumatoid arthritis. Conclusion: Based on our review it can be postulated that patients with RA are at higher risk of hearing impairment compared to healthy subjects in their course of the disease. The hearing impairment in RA seems to be a multifactorial condition; however the mechanisms of injury, as well as the relative risk factors, are not completely clear. This review can aid to clarify this condition and is a guide for further evaluation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first review of hearing impairment in RA. PMID:27053970

  1. High testosterone levels and sensitivity to acute stress in perpetrators of domestic violence with low cognitive flexibility and impairments in their emotional decoding process: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Romero-Martínez, Angel; Lila, Marisol; Sariñana-González, Patricia; González-Bono, Esperanza; Moya-Albiol, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Hormonal and neuropsychological impairment in intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetrators could play a role in domestic violence. For characterizing whether there is a specific psychobiological response to stress, participants who had previously been jailed for IPV and controls were compared for testosterone and cortisol levels, tested for 2D:4D ratio (as an indicator of masculinization), and given several trait questionnaires and neuropsychological tests related to executive functions and theory of mind. After performing the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), IPV perpetrators experienced decreases in salivary testosterone (T) levels, a moderate worsening of mood, slight anxiety, and a salivary cortisol (C) level increase. Moreover, high basal T was related with high levels of anger and anxiety and worse mood. However, that basal mood does not significantly alter T levels in response to stress. Nonetheless, controls experienced smaller changes in T and larger changes in C and psychological mood. With respect to neuropsychological and cognitive empathic features, IPV perpetrators showed poorer executive performance and emotional recognition than controls. In addition, deficits in both neuropsychological domains were positively associated. Regarding emotional empathy, IPV perpetrators showed higher levels of personal distress than controls. The 2D:4D ratio was lower in IPV perpetrators than in controls. Moreover, only in the former a smaller 2D:4D ratio was related to large increases in T in response to stress and poor emotional recognition. Together with social aspects involved in IPV, differences in psychobiological variables and their relationships could play a relevant role in the onset and perpetuation of violent behavior. PMID:23677518

  2. Masking of spondees by interrupted noise in hearing-impaired listeners.

    PubMed

    Punch, J L

    1978-01-01

    The effects of changing the duty cycle of an interrupted-broad band masker on the spondee thresholds of hearing-impaired subjects were explored. Two diagnostic groups of sensorineural hearing loss, presbycusics and cochlear otosclerotics, were investigated. The interruption rate of the masker was 10/sec, and its duty cycle was varied at 25% intervals. Thresholds also were obtained in continuous noise and in quiet. Results when compared with earlier data from normal listeners revealed that subjects with sensorineural impairment exhibited poorer performance in all instances, including the continuous noise condition, when mean masker levels were adjusted to comparable sound pressure levels. The overall pattern of masking was more similar for the normal and hearing-impaired groups when performance was equated in terms of the mean threshold shift each group experienced in continuous noise. Even under these circumstances, however, hearing-impaired subjects demostrated notably greater residual masking under the 25 and 50% noise-on conditions. A major determinant of speech reception in fluctuating noise backgrounds is the dependence of the pattern of masking upon the difference between an individual's masked threshold in continuous noise and his threshold in quiet, rather than upon the sound pressure level of the masker. PMID:681196

  3. Impaired long-term expansion and self-renewal potential of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia-initiating cells by PTK787/ZK 222584.

    PubMed

    Weidenaar, Alida C; Ter Elst, Arja; Kampen, Kim R; Meeuwsen-de Boer, Tiny; Kamps, Willem A; Schuringa, Jan Jacob; de Bont, Eveline S J M

    2013-04-01

    Although most children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) achieve complete remission, the relapse rate is 30% to 40%. Because it is thought that leukemia-initiating cells (LIC) are responsible for AML relapses, targeting these cells might improve outcome. Treatment of pediatric AML blasts with the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) inhibitor PTK787/ZK 222584 (PTK/ZK) induces cell death in vitro. However, the role of PTK/ZK inhibition on outgrowth of (pediatric) LICs is unknown. In this study, we cultured CD34+ cells from pediatric patients with AML on MS5 stromal cells in long-term cocultures. In analogy to adult AML, long-term expansion of leukemic cells up to 10 weeks could be generated in 9 of 13 pediatric AMLs. Addition of PTK/ZK to long-term cocultures significantly inhibited leukemic expansion in all samples, ranging from 4% to 80% growth inhibition at week 5 compared with untreated samples. In 75% of the samples, the inhibitory effect was more pronounced at week 10. Proteome profiler array analysis of downstream kinases revealed that PTK/ZK reduced activation of PI3K/Akt kinase signaling. Although main targets of PTK/ZK are VEGF receptors (VEGFR), no effect was seen on outgrowth of LICs when cultured with bevacizumab (monoclonal VEGFA-antibody), specific antibodies against VEGFR2 or VEGFR3, or exposed to stroma-derived VEGFA. These data suggest that the effect of PTK/ZK on LICs is not only dependent on inhibition of VEGFA/VEGFR signaling. Taken together, our data elucidated antileukemic properties of PTK/ZK in long-term expansion cultures, and suggest that targeting multiple RTKs by PTK/ZK might be a potential effective approach in eradicating (pediatric) LICs. PMID:23393162

  4. Sensorineural Hearing Loss After Treatment of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: A Longitudinal Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, S.H. Ng, W.T.; Kam, K.L.; Lee, Michael C.H.; Choi, C.W.; Yau, T.K.; Lee, Anne W.M.; Chow, S.K.

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To analyze the effects of radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy in relation to sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) after contemporary treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 87 nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients were treated with RT or chemoradiotherapy using either three-dimensional conformal RT or intensity-modulated RT between 2004 and 2005. Tympanometry and pure-tone audiogram assessments were performed before treatment and then serially at 6-month intervals. The dose-volume data of the cochlea were analyzed. The effects of cisplatin administered in concurrent and nonconcurrent phases was explored. Results: Of the 170 eligible ears, RT (n = 30) and chemoradiotherapy (n = 140) resulted in 40% (n = 12) and 56.4% (n = 79) persistent SNHL ({>=}15 dB loss), respectively, after a median follow-up of 2 years. SNHL at a high frequency was more frequent statistically in the chemoradiotherapy group than in the RT-alone group (55% vs. 33.3%, p < 0.01), but not at a low frequency (7.9% vs. 16.7%, p = 0.14). Within the chemoradiotherapy group, the mean cochlea dose and concurrent cisplatin dose were important determinants of high-frequency SNHL, with an odds ratio of 1.07/Gy increase (p = 0.01) and an odds ratio of 1.008/mg/m{sup 2} increase (p < 0.01), respectively. Age, gender, and nonconcurrent cisplatin dose were not statistically significant factors. A mean radiation dose to the cochlea of <47 Gy would result in <15% of patients developing severe ({>=}30 dB) high-frequency SNHL. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that high-frequency SNHL is significantly related to the mean cochlea dose and the concurrent cisplatin dose. A mean dose constraint of 47 Gy to the cochlea is recommended to minimize SNHL after chemoradiotherapy.

  5. Cochlear microphonics in sensorineural hearing loss: lesson from newborn hearing screening.

    PubMed

    Ahmmed, Ansar; Brockbank, Christopher; Adshead, June

    2008-08-01

    The diagnostic dilemma surrounding the presence of cochlear microphonics (CM) coupled with significantly elevated auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds in babies failing the newborn hearing screening is highlighted. A case report is presented where initial electo-diagnostic assessment could not help in differentiating between Auditory Neuropathy/Auditory Dys-synchrony (AN/AD) and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). In line with the protocol and guidelines provided by the national Newborn Hearing Screening Programme in the UK (NHSP) AN/AD was suspected in a baby due to the presence of CM at 85 dBnHL along with click evoked ABR thresholds of 95 dBnHL in one ear and 100 dBnHL in the other ear. Significantly elevated thresholds for 0.5 and 1kHz tone pip ABR fulfilled the audiological diagnostic criteria for AN/AD. However, the possibility of a SNHL could not be ruled out as the 85 dBnHL stimuli presented through inserts for the CM would have been significantly enhanced in the ear canals of the young baby to exceed the threshold level of the ABR that was carried out using headphones. SNHL was eventually diagnosed through clinical and family history, physical examination and imaging that showed enlarged vestibular aqueducts. Presence of CM in the presence of very high click ABR thresholds only suggests a pattern of test results and in such cases measuring thresholds for 0.5 and 1 kHz tone pip ABR may not be adequate to differentiate between SNHL and other conditions associated with AN/AD. There is a need for reviewing the existing AN/AD protocol from NHSP in the UK and new research to establish parameters for CM to assist in the differential diagnosis. A holistic audiological and medical approach is essential to manage babies who fail the newborn hearing screening. PMID:18571245

  6. Intratympanic steroids as a salvage treatment for sudden sensorineural hearing loss? A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ng, Jia Hui; Ho, Roger Chun Man; Cheong, Crystal Shuk Jin; Ng, Adele; Yuen, Heng Wai; Ngo, Raymond Yeow Seng

    2015-10-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss is typically treated with systemic steroids. The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the efficacy of salvage intratympanic steroid treatment in patients who have initial treatment failure with systemic steroids. A MEDLINE literature search was performed, supported by searches of Web of Science, Biosis, and Science Direct. Articles of all languages were included. Selection of relevant publications was conducted independently by three authors. Only randomized controlled trials were considered. In one arm of the studies, the patients received salvage intratympanic steroids. In the other arm, patients did not receive further treatment. The standard difference in mean (SDM) amount of improvement in hearing threshold between patients who did and did not receive salvage intratympanic steroids was calculated. From an initial 184 studies found via the search strategy, 5 studies met inclusion criteria and were included. There was a statistically significant greater reduction in hearing threshold on pure-tone audiometry in patients who received salvage intratympanic steroids than in those who did not (SDM = -0.401, p = 0.005). Subgroup analysis showed that administration by intratympanic injection (SDM = -0.375, p = 0.013) rather than a round window catheter (SDM = -0.629, p = 0.160) yielded significant improvement in outcome. The usage of dexamethasone yielded better outcomes (SDM = -0.379, p = 0.039) than the use of methylprednisolone (SDM = -0.459, p = 0.187). No serious side effect of treatment was reported. In patients who have failed initial treatment with systemic steroids, additional treatment with salvage intratympanic dexamethasone injections demonstrate a statistically significant reduction in the hearing thresholds as compared to controls. PMID:25217083

  7. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy as salvage treatment for sudden sensorineural hearing loss: a prospective controlled study.

    PubMed

    Pezzoli, M; Magnano, M; Maffi, L; Pezzoli, L; Marcato, P; Orione, M; Cupi, D; Bongioannini, G

    2015-07-01

    The most commonly used treatment for sensorineural sudden hearing loss (SSHL) in clinical practice is the administration of steroids; however, a favorable result is not always obtained. We studied 58 patients who failed to recover after primary treatment with IV steroids, 44 of these met our inclusion criteria (mean age 50.7, 27 males, range 30-74). We treated 23 patients (mean age 47.3, 16 males, age range 22-74) with hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO) (2.5 ATA for 60 min for 15 treatments), while 21 (mean age 54.5, 11 males, age range 22-71) patients refused to be treated and served as a non-randomized control group. Patients treated with HBO had a mean improvement of 15.6 dB (SD ± 15.3), with 1 of them completely healed, 5 with a good recovery, 10 with a fair recovery and 7 unchanged. Patients who were not treated had a spontaneous mean improvement of 5.0 dB (SD ± 11.4) with 3 patients with a good recovery, 1 patient with a fair recovery and 17 patients unchanged. Mean improvement was significantly better in patients treated with HBO compared to controls (p = 0.0133). Patients with worst hearing had the greater degree of improvement whether or not they were treated in the first 10 days after the onset of the hearing loss or between 11 and 30 days. In conclusion, hyperbaric oxygen therapy can lead to significant improvement of pure tone hearing thresholds in patients with SSHL who failed primary corticosteroid treatment and are within 4 weeks of the onset of deafness. PMID:25318685

  8. Intratympanic dexamethasone injection vs methylprednisolone for the treatment of refractory sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Berjis, Nezamoddin; Soheilipour, Saeed; Musavi, Alireza; Hashemi, Seyed Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Background: During the past years various drugs have been used for sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) treatment including steroids that are shown to be beneficial. Directed delivery of high doses of steroids into the inner ear is suggested for its potential and known as intratympanic steroids therapy (IST). Despite the use of dexamethasone and methylprednisolone as the traditional treatments, there are still debates about the optimal dosage, preferred drug, and the route of administration. Materials and Methods: We performed a randomized clinical trial study in which 50 patients suffering from SSNHL and resistant to standard therapy were employed. Each patient took 0.5 ml methylprednisolone (40 mg/mg) along with bicarbonate or dexamethasone (4 mg/mL) through direct intratympanic injection. This method was performed and scheduled once every 2 days for three times only for the dexamethasone receiving group. Hearing test was carried out and the results were analyzed according to a four-frequency (0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0 kHz) pure tone average (PTA) and Siegel's criteria. Results: According to Siegel's criteria, three out of 25 (12%) dexamethasone receiving patients were healed in 1 and 4 (16%), 9 (32%) were respectively recovered in Siegel's criteria 2, 3, and 9 (32%) showed no recovery. In the group receiving methylprednisolone, recovery was found in 6 (24%), 8 (32%), 7 (28%) patients in the Siegel's criteria 1, 2, 3, respectively, and in 4 (16%) patients no recovery was recorded. In methylprednisolone group, hearing was significantly improved compared to the dexamethasone group (P < 0.05). The general hearing improvement rate was 84% in methylprednisolone receiving patients showing a significantly higher improvement than 64% in the dexamethasone group. Conclusions: Topical intratympanic treatment with methylprednisolone is safe and an effective treatment approach for those SSNHL cases that are refractory to the common therapies by Dexamethasone. PMID:27403406

  9. Impairment of the cellular immune response in acute murine toxoplasmosis: regulation of interleukin 2 production and macrophage-mediated inhibitory effects.

    PubMed Central

    Haque, S; Khan, I; Haque, A; Kasper, L

    1994-01-01

    infected and normal splenocytes. These results indicate that during acute murine toxoplasmosis, there is a well-defined period (day 7) during which both the T-cell mitogen and parasite antigen-associated lymphoproliferative response are reduced. Further, there is a reduction in the production of IL-2 and an increase in IL-10, which appear to mediate, in part, the observed downregulation of immunity to T. gondii. PMID:8005679

  10. Hearing Impairments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavender, Anna; Ladner, Richard E.

    For many people with hearing impairments, the degree of hearing loss is only a small aspect of their disability and does not necessarily determine the types of accessibility solutions or accommodations that may be required. For some people, the ability to adjust the audio volume may be sufficient. For others, translation to a signed language may be more appropriate. For still others, access to text alternatives may be the best solution. Because of these differences, it is important for researchers in Web accessibility to understand that people with hearing impairments may have very different cultural-linguistic traditions and personal backgrounds.

  11. [Effect of cochlear implantation on sound localization for patients with unilateral sensorineural hearing loss].

    PubMed

    Liu, J F; Dai, J S; Wang, N Y

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this review was to examine the current literature regarding application of cochlear implantation on patients with unilateral sensorineural hearing loss (USNHL) for improvement on sound localization. The literature were searched in the PubMed database with 'cochlear implantation AND single-sided deafness' or 'cochlear implantation AND unilateral deafness' as keywords. The publication date of the articles was up to 2015-2-12. A total of 12 articles were included. The results show that the ability of sound localization for most of the USNHL subjects (90%) with cochlear implantation was significantly improved than that without CI, which suggests that CI is a superior auditory rehabilitation treatment than BAHA and CROS hearing aids for patients with USNHL, because of the re-establishment of the benefits of binaural hearing. In addition, the benefit of CI for USNHL requires a period of auditory experience or training. About 30% subjects showed significantly improvement on sound localization ability after CI worked for three months. For most of the patients (90%), the sound localization ability improved after CI worked for six months. When CI worked for nine months, all the subjects would show improvement on sound localization ability. Sound localization of the USNHL subjects with a CI is based primarily on interaural level differences (ILD) while interaural time differences (ITD) provide little advantage or probably not perceptible at all. The younger subject suffers from USNHL, the stronger the plasticity of the auditory center shows, which results in more obvious degeneration of the affected side and adaptive enhancement of the contralateral side of the auditory pathway. Similarly, the longer duration of USNHL lead to more obvious degeneration of the affected side and adaptive enhancement of the contralateral side. An adaptive enhancement of auditory pathway corresponding to the healthy ear will rely more on the monaural spatial cues that available to the

  12. Genetic characteristics of the couple with non-syndromic sensorineural hearing loss and fertility guidance

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ri-Ming; Liu, Hong-Jie; Cong, Jiang-Lin; Sun, Ai-Ling; Du, Jiang-Dong; Sun, Cheng-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We aim to report a genetic testing and fertility guidance for the deaf through analyzing pedigree and molecular genetic characteristics of the couple who have non-syndromic sensorineural hearing loss (NSHL). Methods: One of hospitalized congenial deaf couple and family members were included in this study. The wife was twin pregnant woman and her gestational age was 31+5 pregnant weeks. The DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and umbilical vein blood, respectively. Mutation screening of common deafness genes was performed in pregnant women and other family members. Nine common mutations in four major deafness genes, GJB2 (35delG, 176del16, 235delC, 299delAT), GjB3 (C538T), SLC26A4 (IVS7-2A>G, A2168G) and Mitochondrial 12S rRNA (A1555G, C1494T), were detected simultaneously with a microarray based method. SLC26A4 whole genome sequencing was carried out for the results of the DNA microarray. According to the test results, the couple chose abortion termination of pregnancy twins, and after one year obtained singleton pregnancy by artificial insemination by donor (AID). In week 16 of pregnancy, amniocentesis had been done to collect fetal somatic cell and extract DNA, and then the above tests had been repeated. Results: The couple had SLC26A4 combined heterozygous mutation. Both parents had SLC26A4 single heterozygous mutation. Twin fetuses had SLC26A4 combined heterozygous mutation. The probability of naturally being pregnant and bearing deaf children for the pregnant women was 100%. Fetus obtained by AID had SLC26A4 single heterozygous mutation. After the birth of the baby, her hearing has been normal. Conclusions: To reduce children with congenital deafness, screening high mutation sites by microarray, combined with pedigree analysis and gene sequencing is effective, and should be used as a routine inspection item for the deaf before marriage and pregnancy. On the basis of genetic testing for the couple with hearing loss, human assisted reproductive

  13. Vitamins A, C, and E and selenium in the treatment of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Hakan; Koç, Arzu Karaman; Sayın, İbrahim; Güneş, Selçuk; Altıntaş, Ahmet; Yeğin, Yakup; Kayhan, Fatma Tülin

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of vitamins A, C, and E, with selenium, in the treatment of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL). This was a prospective, controlled study performed at a tertiary teaching and research hospital. Over a 32-month period, patients were treated with either our standard ISSNHL treatment regimen plus vitamins A, C, and E and selenium (ACE+ group) or with only our standard ISSNHL treatment regimen (ACE- group). The demographics, additional symptoms, mean initial and final hearing levels, mean hearing gain, and recovery data were compared between the two groups. The ACE+ group, consisting of 70 (55.5 %) patients, received vitamin A (natural beta-carotene, 26,000 IU), vitamin C (ascorbic acid, 200 mg), vitamin E (d-alpha-tocopherol, 200 IU), and selenium (50 μg) twice daily for 30 days in addition to our ISSNHL treatment regimen: methylprednisolone at an initial dose of 1 mg/kg body weight per day, tapered over 14 days; Rheomacrodex(®) [(10 g of dextran and 0.9 g of NaCl)/100 ml] 500 ml daily for 5 days; Vastarel(®) 20-mg tablet (20 mg of trimetazidine dihydrochloride) three times daily for 30 days; and ten 60-min hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) sessions (2.5 absolute atmospheres of 100 % O2), once daily, starting the day of hospitalization. The ACE- group comprised 56 (44.4 %) patients, who received only our ISSNHL treatment regimen. The mean hearing gains were 36.2 ± 20.3 dB in the ACE+ group and 27.1 ± 20.6 dB in the ACE- group. The mean hearing gain rates were significantly higher in the ACE+ group than in the ACE- group (p = 0.014). Treatment with vitamins A, C, and E and selenium was effective in ISSNHL patients undergoing treatment with methylprednisolone, dextran, trimetazidine dihydrochloride, and HBO, and might be more effective when the initial hearing level is below 46 dB. PMID:24519034

  14. Comparison of two different steroid treatments with hyperbaric oxygen for idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Sevil, Ergun; Bercin, Sami; Muderris, Togay; Gul, Fatih; Kiris, Muzaffer

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the efficacy of the association of intratympanic (IT) steroid and hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy in patients presenting with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL), and to compare this protocol with another consisting of intravenous (IV) steroid administration and HBO therapy. A total of 80 patients diagnosed with ISSNHL were included in this prospective trial. Patients were divided into three categories: a mild-to-moderate ISSNHL group with a pure-tone average (PTA) ≤60 decibels (dB), a severe ISSNHL group with a PTA of 60-80 dB, and a profound ISSNHL group with a PTA ≥81 dB. The first protocol consisted of 20 sessions of HBO therapy together with IV methylprednisolone 1 mg/kg body weight and a 10 mg taper every 3 days for 10 days. The second protocol consisted of HBO therapy for 20 sessions, together with an IT injection of dexamethasone at a dose of 4 mg/mL, 0.5-0.7 mL once a day for 7 consecutive days, performed 3 h before the HBO therapy. In the mild-to-moderate ISSNHL patients, the mean hearing gain and successful treatment rate was 19 (0-27) dB and 78.9 %, respectively in the IT + HBO treatment group, and 18 (3-44) dB and 70.5 % in the IV + HBO therapy group. In the severe ISSNHL patients, the mean hearing gain and successful treatment rate was 33 (1-54) dB and 81.8 %, respectively in the IT + HBO treatment group and 33.5 (7-57) dB and 58.2 % in the IV + HBO group. In the profound ISSNHL patients, the mean hearing gain and successful treatment rate was 36 (4-69) dB and 40 %, respectively in the IT + HBO therapy group, and 39.5 (0-92) dB and 72.7 % in the IV + HBO treatment group. The results demonstrated that patients with severe hearing loss success rate was superior in the group submitted to IT + HBO treatment, conversely IV + HBO therapy may be benefit for patients with profound hearing loss. Nevertheless, these clinical results were not statistically significant

  15. Imaging Evaluation of Pediatric Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Potential Candidates for Cochlear Implantation.

    PubMed

    Jallu, Aleena Shafi; Jehangir, Majid; Ul Hamid, Waqar; Pampori, Rafiq Ahmad

    2015-12-01

    Computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) are complementary in the imaging of the labyrinth, the internal auditory canal and the brain in children with sensorineural hearing loss who are being evaluated for cochlear implantation. An accurate anatomical description of the inner ear is essential in the preoperative work up. Computerized tomography visualizes the bony structures, whereas MR can discern soft-tissue components including intra labyrinthine fluid, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), nerves, and vessels within the IAC. This prospective study was conducted in the Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, Government Medical College, Srinagar. 40 children in the age group of 1-16 years with unidentified causes of bilateral SNHL were analysed radiologically over the period of 2 years from Dec 2011 to Jan 2014. Each patient underwent MRI and high resolution CT scanning of temporal bone in axial and coronal planes. Out of the 40 patients 22 were males (55 %) and 18 were females (45 %). 30 patients (72.5 %)in our study had normal radiological scans. Five patients (12.5 %) had B/L large vestibular aqueduct and two patients (5 %) had internal auditory canal stenosis with cochlear nerve hypoplasia on CT and MR imaging. Cochlear dysplasia was present in two patients (5 %) and semicircular canal dysplasia was present in one patient (2.5 %) as an isolated finding on HRCT. In addition isolated cochlear nerve hypoplasia was present in one patient (2.5 %). Hyperintense basal ganglia lesion suggestive of kernicterus was present in one patient (2.5 %) and hyperintense posterior parietal and occipital white matter lesions suggestive of congenital CMV infection was present in one patient (2.5 %) on MR imaging. Arachnoid cysts of middle cranial fossa was an incidental finding present in one patient. Radiological abnormalities of the inner ear are not uncommon. Computerized tomography and MRI are important modalities to analyze the inner ear in

  16. Persistent fear of aftershocks, impairment of working memory, and acute stress disorder predict post-traumatic stress disorder: 6-month follow-up of help seekers following the L'Aquila earthquake.

    PubMed

    Roncone, Rita; Giusti, Laura; Mazza, Monica; Bianchini, Valeria; Ussorio, Donatella; Pollice, Rocco; Casacchia, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    The aim of our 6-month follow-up study was to assess predictors of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among individuals seeking treatment at the General Hospital Psychiatric Unit within the first month following the L'Aquila earthquake. Clinical, trauma-related and neurocognitive variables were considered. At the 6-month follow-up, 91 (74.5%) out of 122 subjects were re-assessed and administered the Impact of Events Scale-revised (IES-R) for the detection of PTSD according to DSM-IV criteria. Within 4 weeks following the earthquake, patients were assessed with a checklist of traumatic-event-related variables, along with the Stanford Acute Stress Disorder Questionnaire (SASDQ) for the detection of ASD, with a short battery on working (Wechler Memory Scale-R, Digit Forward and Backward) and verbal memory (subtest of Milan Overall Dementia Assessment, MODA). A statistically significant higher proportion of subjects affected by 'partial' ASD showed a PTSD diagnosis (80.6%, N = 29) compared to not diagnosed subjects (40%, N = 22) and a PTSD diagnosis was shown by all the 4 subjects (4.4%) affected by 'full' ASD at the entry in the study. At the 6-month follow-up 56% of the sample could be considered affected by PTSD on the IES-R scale. The results of the logistic regression analysis on our selected predictors indicated that the persistent fear of aftershocks seemed to increase by over 57 times the likelihood of positive estimate of PTSD, followed by impairment of working memory backward (OR 48.2), and having being diagnosed as ASD case in the first 4 week after the earthquake (OR 17.4). This study underlines the importance of identifying PTSD predictors, in order to planning early treatment interventions after natural disasters. PMID:24324929

  17. Impact of aerobic exercise training during chemotherapy on cancer related cognitive impairments in patients suffering from acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome - Study protocol of a randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, P; Oberste, M; Bloch, W; Schenk, A; Joisten, N; Hartig, P; Wolf, F; Baumann, F T; Garthe, A; Hallek, M; Elter, T

    2016-07-01

    Cancer related cognitive impairments (CRCI) are frequently reported by patients prior to, during and after medical treatment. Although this cognitive decline severely affects patients' quality of life, little is known about effective treatments. Exercise programs represent a promising supportive strategy in this field. However, evidence is sparse and existing studies display methodological limitations. In the planned study, 83 men and women newly diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) will be randomized into one of three treatment groups. During 4weeks of induction chemotherapy with Anthracycline and Cytarabin patients allocated to exercise group will cycle 3×/week for 30min at moderate to vigorous intensity on an ergometer. Patients allocated to placebo group will receive a supervised myofascial release training (3×/week, approx. 30min) and patients at control group will get usual care. As primary endpoints a cognitive test battery will be conducted measuring performances depending on verbal/spatial memory and executive functioning. Secondary endpoints will be self-perceived cognitive functioning, as well as neurotrophic and inflammatory serum markers. All assessments will be conducted immediately after hospitalization and before chemotherapy is commenced, immediately before discharge of hospital after 4-5weeks as well as before continuing medical treatment 3-4weeks after discharge. This will be the first study investigating the impact of an aerobic exercise training on CRCI in AML/MDS patients. We hope that the study design and the state-of-the-art assessments will help to increase knowledge about CRCI in general and exercise as potential treatment option in this under investigated population. PMID:27261170

  18. Comparison of simultaneous systemic steroid and hyperbaric oxygen treatment versus only steroid in idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Ersoy Callioglu, Elif; Tuzuner, Arzu; Demirci, Sule; Cengiz, Ceyhun; Caylan, Refik

    2015-01-01

    A retrospective chart review to assess the effectiveness of hyperbaric oxygen treatment in sudden sensorineural hearing loss. 44 patients aged between 17-67 years diagnosed with idiopathic sensorineural hearing loss less than 30 days were admitted to our clinic Patients were treated with systemic steroid alone or systemic steroid plus hyperbaric oxygen therapy. In the comparison of two groups, there was no statistically significant difference of audiometric evaluation (P>0.0028) found in hearing improvement for each frequency on 5th day of the treatment and post treatment. Age (≤45 and >45) and initial hearing level (≤60 dB. And >60 dB.) does not seem to be an influential factor according to the results of the study (P>0.0007). The present study did not show more superior healing effect of hyperbaric oxygen therapy added to systemic steroid therapy than steroid infusion alone. The results are consistent with those of some papers. However there are also conflicting data that support significant effect of hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Routine administration of this therapy seems to be unnecessary in view of these results. PMID:26309671

  19. Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss and Polymorphisms in Iron Homeostasis Genes: New Insights from a Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Ciorba, Andrea; Aimoni, Claudia; Orioli, Elisa; Zeri, Giulia; Vigliano, Marco; Gemmati, Donato

    2015-01-01

    Background. Even if various pathophysiological events have been proposed as explanations, the putative cause of sudden hearing loss remains unclear. Objectives. To investigate and to reveal associations (if any) between the main iron-related gene variants and idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Study Design. Case-control study. Materials and Methods. A total of 200 sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients (median age 63.65 years; range 10–92) were compared with 400 healthy control subjects. The following genetic variants were investigated: the polymorphism c.−8CG in the promoter of the ferroportin gene (FPN1; SLC40A1), the two isoforms C1 and C2 (p.P570S) of the transferrin protein (TF), the amino acidic substitutions p.H63D and p.C282Y in the hereditary hemochromatosis protein (HFE), and the polymorphism c.–582AG in the promoter of the HEPC gene, which encodes the protein hepcidin (HAMP). Results. The homozygous genotype c.−8GG of the SLC40A1 gene revealed an OR for ISSNHL risk of 4.27 (CI 95%, 2.65–6.89; P = 0.001), being overrepresented among cases. Conclusions. Our study indicates that the homozygous genotype FPN1 −8GG was significantly associated with increased risk of developing sudden hearing loss. These findings suggest new research should be conducted in the field of iron homeostasis in the inner ear. PMID:25789325

  20. A novel nonsense CDK5RAP2 mutation in a Somali child with primary microcephaly and sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Pagnamenta, Alistair T; Murray, Jennie E; Yoon, Grace; Sadighi Akha, Elham; Harrison, Victoria; Bicknell, Louise S; Ajilogba, Kaseem; Stewart, Helen; Kini, Usha; Taylor, Jenny C; Keays, David A; Jackson, Andrew P; Knight, Samantha J L

    2012-10-01

    Primary microcephaly is a genetically heterogeneous condition characterized by reduced head circumference (-3 SDS or more) and mild-to-moderate learning disability. Here, we describe clinical and molecular investigations of a microcephalic child with sensorineural hearing loss. Although consanguinity was unreported initially, detection of 13.7 Mb of copy neutral loss of heterozygosity (cnLOH) on chromosome 9 implicated the CDK5RAP2 gene. Targeted sequencing identified a homozygous E234X mutation, only the third mutation to be described in CDK5RAP2, the first in an individual of non-Pakistani descent. Sensorineural hearing loss is not generally considered to be consistent with autosomal recessive microcephaly and therefore it seems likely that the deafness in this individual is caused by the co-occurrence of a further gene mutation, independent of CDK5RAP2. Nevertheless, further detailed clinical descriptions of rare CDK5RAP2 patients, including hearing assessments will be needed to resolve fully the phenotypic range associated with mutations in this gene. This study also highlights the utility of SNP-array testing to guide disease gene identification where an autosomal recessive condition is plausible. PMID:22887808

  1. Frequency Discrimination and Literacy Skills in Children with Mild to Moderate Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halliday, L. F.; Bishop, D. V. M.

    2005-01-01

    It has been suggested that specific reading disability (SRD) may be attributable to an impaired ability to perceive spectral differences between sounds that leads to a deficit in frequency discrimination and subsequent problems with language and literacy. The objective of the present study was threefold. We aimed to (a) determine whether children…

  2. Predicted effects of sensorineural hearing loss on across-fiber envelope coding in the auditory nervea

    PubMed Central

    Swaminathan, Jayaganesh; Heinz, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    Cross-channel envelope correlations are hypothesized to influence speech intelligibility, particularly in adverse conditions. Acoustic analyses suggest speech envelope correlations differ for syllabic and phonemic ranges of modulation frequency. The influence of cochlear filtering was examined here by predicting cross-channel envelope correlations in different speech modulation ranges for normal and impaired auditory-nerve (AN) responses. Neural cross-correlation coefficients quantified across-fiber envelope coding in syllabic (0–5 Hz), phonemic (5–64 Hz), and periodicity (64–300 Hz) modulation ranges. Spike trains were generated from a physiologically based AN model. Correlations were also computed using the model with selective hair-cell damage. Neural predictions revealed that envelope cross-correlation decreased with increased characteristic-frequency separation for all modulation ranges (with greater syllabic-envelope correlation than phonemic or periodicity). Syllabic envelope was highly correlated across many spectral channels, whereas phonemic and periodicity envelopes were correlated mainly between adjacent channels. Outer-hair-cell impairment increased the degree of cross-channel correlation for phonemic and periodicity ranges for speech in quiet and in noise, thereby reducing the number of independent neural information channels for envelope coding. In contrast, outer-hair-cell impairment was predicted to decrease cross-channel correlation for syllabic envelopes in noise, which may partially account for the reduced ability of hearing-impaired listeners to segregate speech in complex backgrounds. PMID:21682421

  3. All Vision Impairment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jobs Home > Statistics and Data > All Vision Impairment All Vision Impairment Vision Impairment Defined Vision impairment is ... being blind by the U.S. definition.) The category “All Vision Impairment” includes both low vision and blindness. ...

  4. Phonology Matters: A Comprehensive Investigation of Reading and Spelling Skills of School-Age Children with Mild to Moderate Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Jungjun; Lombardino, Linda J.; Ritter, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    The investigators measured 7 literacy skills in a group of 21 school-age children with mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss (MSNH group), and compared the scores to those of 2 age-matched groups: children with dyslexia (DYS group) and, as a control, typically developing hearing children (CA group). The MSNH group performed consistently…

  5. Congenital Sensorineural Deafness in Australian Stumpy-Tail Cattle Dogs Is an Autosomal Recessive Trait That Maps to CFA10

    PubMed Central

    Sommerlad, Susan; McRae, Allan F.; McDonald, Brenda; Johnstone, Isobel; Cuttell, Leigh; Seddon, Jennifer M.; O'Leary, Caroline A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Congenital sensorineural deafness is an inherited condition found in many dog breeds, including Australian Stumpy-tail Cattle Dogs (ASCD). This deafness is evident in young pups and may affect one ear (unilateral) or both ears (bilateral). The genetic locus/loci involved is unknown for all dog breeds. The aims of this study were to determine incidence, inheritance mechanism, and possible association of congenital sensorineural deafness with coat colour in ASCD and to identify the genetic locus underpinning this disease. Methodology/Principal Findings A total of 315 ASCD were tested for sensorineural deafness using the brain stem auditory evoked response (BAER) test. Disease penetrance was estimated directly, using the ratio of unilaterally to bilaterally deaf dogs, and segregation analysis was performed using Mendel. A complete genome screen was undertaken using 325 microsatellites spread throughout the genome, on a pedigree of 50 BAER tested ASCD in which deafness was segregating. Fifty-six dogs (17.8%) were deaf, with 17 bilaterally and 39 unilaterally deaf. Unilaterally deaf dogs showed no significant left/right bias (p = 0.19) and no significant difference was observed in frequencies between the sexes (p = 0.18). Penetrance of deafness was estimated as 0.72. Testing the association of red/blue coat colour and deafness without accounting for pedigree structure showed that red dogs were 1.8 times more likely to be deaf (p = 0.045). The within family association between red/blue coat colour and deafness was strongly significant (p = 0.00036), with red coat colour segregating more frequently with deafness (COR = 0.48). The relationship between deafness and coat speckling approached significance (p = 0.07), with the lack of statistical significance possibly due to only four families co-segregating for both deafness and speckling. The deafness phenotype was mapped to CFA10 (maximum linkage peak on CFA10 −log10 p-value = 3

  6. Visual impairment.

    PubMed

    Ellenberger, Carl

    2016-01-01

    This chapter can guide the use of imaging in the evaluation of common visual syndromes: transient visual disturbance, including migraine and amaurosis fugax; acute optic neuropathy complicating multiple sclerosis, neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy, and Susac syndrome; papilledema and pseudotumor cerebri syndrome; cerebral disturbances of vision, including posterior cerebral arterial occlusion, posterior reversible encephalopathy, hemianopia after anterior temporal lobe resection, posterior cortical atrophy, and conversion blindness. Finally, practical efforts in visual rehabilitation by sensory substitution for blind patients can improve their lives and disclose new information about the brain. PMID:27430448

  7. Acute necrosis after Gamma Knife surgery in vestibular schwannoma leading to multiple cranial nerve palsies.

    PubMed

    Kapitza, Sandra; Pangalu, Athina; Horstmann, Gerhard A; van Eck, Albert T; Regli, Luca; Tarnutzer, Alexander A

    2016-08-01

    We discuss a rare acute complication after Gamma Knife therapy (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) in a single patient. A 52-year-old woman presented with vertigo, facial weakness and hearing loss emerging 48hours following Gamma Knife radiosurgery for a right-sided vestibular schwannoma. Neurological examination 6days after symptom onset showed right-sided facial palsy, spontaneous left-beating nystagmus and pathologic head-impulse testing to the right. Pure-tone audiogram revealed right-sided sensorineural hearing loss. A diagnosis of acute vestibulocochlear and facial neuropathy was made. Brain MRI demonstrated focal contrast sparing within the schwannoma, likely related to acute radiation necrosis. Acute multiple cranial neuropathies of the cerebellopontine angle after Gamma Knife treatment should raise suspicion of acute tissue damage within the schwannoma and should result in urgent MRI. Treatment with steroids may be considered based on accompanying swelling and edema. PMID:26947104

  8. Complete recovery following hyperbaric oxygen therapy in idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss--a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Swati; Sharma, Nishi

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL), a common otologic emergency, presents mostly as an abrupt onset unilateral hearing loss, aural fullness, often with vertigo and tinnitus, usually upon awakening in the morning. Its etiopathogenesis is multifactorial, so a number of different therapeutic regimens are in practice, hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) therapy being an effective yet underutilized one. Not all cases recover completely even after treatment. Here we describe two cases of ISSHL, diagnosed on the basis of clinical examination and pure-tone audiometry, who had a complete recovery following administration of HBO2 therapy in addition to medical treatment. These cases are reported to highlight the effectiveness of this modality in a physician's armamentarium. PMID:27265993

  9. Evaluation of a dual-channel full dynamic range compression system for people with sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Moore, B C; Johnson, J S; Clark, T M; Pluvinage, V

    1992-10-01

    This article describes an evaluation of an in the ear hearing aid, which applies fast-acting full dynamic range compression independently in two frequency bands. This can compensate for the loudness recruitment typically associated with sensorineural hearing loss. The crossover frequency between the two bands and the gain and compression ratio in each band are programmable to suit the individual patient. Twenty subjects with moderate sensorineural hearing loss were tested in a counterbalanced order using the aid programmed as a linear amplifier (condition L) and as a two-band compressor (condition C). All subjects were fitted binaurally. Subjects were also tested without hearing aids (condition U) and using the hearing aids that they normally wore (condition Own). Speech intelligibility was measured in quiet at three sound levels (50, 65, and 80 dB SPL), and speech reception thresholds (SRTs) in 12-talker babble were measured under monaurally and binaurally aided conditions, with the speech and babble both coincident and spatially separated. In condition C, speech intelligibility in quiet was high at all sound levels. Speech intelligibility at the two lower levels decreased in condition L, and decreased still further in conditions Own and U. Condition C gave, on average, better speech intelligibility in babble (lower SRTs) than conditions L, Own, or U. The advantage of condition C over condition L varied across subjects and was correlated with the dynamic range for tones at high frequencies; small dynamic ranges were associated with greater benefit from compression. A significant advantage for binaural aiding was found both when the speech and noise were spatially separated and when they were coincident. The binaural advantage was similar for the C and L conditions, indicating that the independent compression at the two ears did not adversely affect the use of binaural cues. Questionnaires on the subjects' experiences with the aids in everyday life indicated that

  10. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... or though physical contact (for example, on unwashed hands). Being exposed to tobacco smoke, air pollution, dusts, vapors, and fumes can also cause acute bronchitis. Less often, bacteria can also cause acute bronchitis. To diagnose acute ...

  11. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... control. Menopause also increases the risk for a urinary tract infection. The following also increase your chances of having ...

  12. Recognition Memory Is Impaired in Children after Prolonged Febrile Seizures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinos, Marina M.; Yoong, Michael; Patil, Shekhar; Chin, Richard F. M.; Neville, Brian G.; Scott, Rod C.; de Haan, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Children with a history of a prolonged febrile seizure show signs of acute hippocampal injury on magnetic resonance imaging. In addition, animal studies have shown that adult rats who suffered febrile seizures during development reveal memory impairments. Together, these lines of evidence suggest that memory impairments related to hippocampal…

  13. [Inner Ear Hearing Loss Part II: Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss, Therapeutic Options].

    PubMed

    Hesse, Gerhard

    2016-07-01

    The great majority of hearing disorders generates from pathologies in the inner ear, mainly the outer hair cells, as mentioned in the first part of this review. Very often, however, hearing loss appears suddenly and even without external causes like noise exposure. This sudden hearing loss is mostly unilateral, recovers very often spontaneously and should be treated, if persisting. Only in this acute stage there are therapeutic options available. If the inner ear hearing loss is chronic there is no curative therapy, an effective management of the hearing disorder is only possible through rehabilitation. This is due to the fact, that hair cells of all mammals, incl. humans, have no regenerative capacity and neither pharmaceutic agents nor other means can induce regeneration and recovery of hair cells. Even a gen-therapy is not available yet. In the second part of this review the main focus lies in sudden hearing loss and general therapeutic options for inner ear hearing loss. PMID:27392187

  14. Acute pancreatitis and acute renal failure complicating doxylamine succinate intoxication.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yang Deok; Lee, Soo Teik

    2002-06-01

    Doxylamine succinate is an antihistaminic drugwith additional hypnotic, anticholinergic and local anesthetic effects first described in 1948. In Korea and many other countries, it is a common-over-the counter medication frequently involved in overdoses. Clinical symtomatology of doxylamine succinate overdose includes somnolence, coma, seizures, mydriasis, tachycardia, psychosis, and rhabdomyolysis. A serious complication may be rhabdomyolysis with subsequent impairment of renal function and acute renal failure. We report a case of acute renal failure and acute pancreatitis complicating a doxylamine succinate intoxication. PMID:12046971

  15. Factors Affecting the Variation of Maximum Speech Intelligibility in Patients With Sensorineural Hearing Loss Other Than Apparent Retrocochlear Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Yahata, Izumi; Miyazaki, Hiromitsu; Takata, Yusuke; Yamauchi, Daisuke; Nomura, Kazuhiro; Katori, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine the relationship between speech intelligibilities among the similar level of hearing loss and threshold elevation of the auditory brainstem response (ABR). Methods The relationship between maximum speech intelligibilities among similar levels of hearing loss and relative threshold elevation of the click-evoked ABR (ABR threshold - pure tone average at 2,000 and 4,000 Hz) was retrospectively reviewed in patients with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) other than apparent retrocochlear lesions as auditory neuropathy, vestibular schwannoma and the other brain lesions. Results Comparison of the speech intelligibilities in subjects with similar levels of hearing loss found that the variation in maximum speech intelligibility was significantly correlated with the threshold elevation of the ABR. Conclusion The present results appear to support the idea that variation in maximum speech intelligibility in patients with similar levels of SNHL may be related to the different degree of dysfunctions of the inner hair cells and/or cochlear nerves in addition to those of outer hair cells. PMID:26330909

  16. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation improves both hearing function and tinnitus perception in sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dai; Ma, Yuewen

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL) affects not only cochlear activity but also neural activity in the central auditory system. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) above the auditory cortex has been reported to improve auditory processing and to reduce the perception of tinnitus, which results from network dysfunction involving both auditory and non-auditory brain regions. SSHL patients who were refractory to standard corticosteroid therapy (SCT) and hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy received 20 sessions of 1 Hz rTMS to the temporoparietal junction ipsilateral to the symptomatic ear (rTMS group). RTMS therapy administered in addition to SCT and HBO therapy resulted in significantly greater recovery of hearing function and improvement of tinnitus perception compared SCT and HBO therapy without rTMS therapy. Additionally, the single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) measurements obtained in a subgroup of patients suggested that the rTMS therapy could have alleviated the decrease in regional cerebral brain flow (rCBF) in SSHL patients. RTMS appears to be an effective, practical, and safe treatment strategy for SSHL. PMID:26463446

  17. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation improves both hearing function and tinnitus perception in sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dai; Ma, Yuewen

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL) affects not only cochlear activity but also neural activity in the central auditory system. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) above the auditory cortex has been reported to improve auditory processing and to reduce the perception of tinnitus, which results from network dysfunction involving both auditory and non-auditory brain regions. SSHL patients who were refractory to standard corticosteroid therapy (SCT) and hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy received 20 sessions of 1 Hz rTMS to the temporoparietal junction ipsilateral to the symptomatic ear (rTMS group). RTMS therapy administered in addition to SCT and HBO therapy resulted in significantly greater recovery of hearing function and improvement of tinnitus perception compared SCT and HBO therapy without rTMS therapy. Additionally, the single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) measurements obtained in a subgroup of patients suggested that the rTMS therapy could have alleviated the decrease in regional cerebral brain flow (rCBF) in SSHL patients. RTMS appears to be an effective, practical, and safe treatment strategy for SSHL. PMID:26463446

  18. Pregnancy is not a risk factor for idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss: A nationwide population-based study.

    PubMed

    Yen, Ting-Ting; Lin, Ching-Heng; Shiao, Jiun-Yih; Liang, Kai-Li

    2016-05-01

    Conclusion Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) in pregnancy is rare. It usually occurs in the third trimester. SSNHL in pregnancy does not increase risks during delivery or subsequent stroke. Objectives This study aimed to investigate the incidence and to determine the factors associated with SSNHL in pregnancy. Method Data were retrieved from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Database (NHIRD), covering the years 2000-2009. Patients admitted for SSNHL during pregnancy were enrolled. An age-matched controlled cohort was randomly selected from pregnant women without SSNHL in the NHIRD. The clinical characteristics of both cohorts were collected for further analyses. Results Thirty-three patients with SSNHL in pregnancy were enrolled. The estimated incidence of SSNHL in pregnancy in Taiwan was 2.71 per 100,000 pregnancies. The incidence of SSNHL in pregnancy was lower than that of the general female population. The incidence of SSNHL in the third trimester was higher compared to the other two. The incidence of SSNHL occurring in the 30-39 years old age group was higher than other groups. Women with better socioeconomic status had a higher incidence of SSNHL. There were no identified systemic diseases before SSNHL. Two patients had pre-eclampsia and one patient had premature delivery. Nevertheless, SSNHL in pregnancy did not increase the risk for stroke. PMID:27052963

  19. Acute calcific tendinitis in children.

    PubMed

    Lassoued, S; Billey, T; Millet, J P; Henia, A O

    1999-01-01

    Acute calcific tendinitis is uncommon in children. Clinical manifestations are similar to those in adults. The abrupt onset, functional impairment, and frequent presence of fever suggest an infection. Radiographic findings establish the diagnosis, obviating the need for further investigations. PMID:10526384

  20. Binaural speech discrimination under noise in hearing-impaired listeners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, K. V.; Rao, A. B.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an assessment of speech discrimination by hearing-impaired listeners (sensori-neural, conductive, and mixed groups) under binaural free-field listening in the presence of background noise. Subjects with pure-tone thresholds greater than 20 dB in 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 kHz were presented with a version of the W-22 list of phonetically balanced words under three conditions: (1) 'quiet', with the chamber noise below 28 dB and speech at 60 dB; (2) at a constant S/N ratio of +10 dB, and with a background white noise at 70 dB; and (3) same as condition (2), but with the background noise at 80 dB. The mean speech discrimination scores decreased significantly with noise in all groups. However, the decrease in binaural speech discrimination scores with an increase in hearing impairment was less for material presented under the noise conditions than for the material presented in quiet.

  1. Effect of Early Intervention on Language Development in Hearing-Impaired Children

    PubMed Central

    Shojaei, Elahe; Jafari, Zahra; Gholami, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Hearing loss from birth up to the age of 3 years has a negative effect on speech/language development and results in sensory, cognitive, emotional, and academic defects in adulthood by causing delayed development of communicative-linguistic abilities. The present study was performed in order to assess the effect of early intervention on language development in Persian children aged 6-7 years with severe sensorineural hearing loss. Materials and Methods: Thirty boys and girls aged 6-7 years participated in this study, all of them had severe congenital sensorineural hearing loss in both ears. All children were using bilateral behind-the-ear hearing aid, and had similar economic/socio-cultural backgrounds. Subjects were categorized into two groups based on the age of identification/intervention of hearing loss (3-6 and 12-15 months of age). The Persian TOLD-P3 test was used to evaluate language development in all subjects. Data collection was accomplished by observation, completion of questionnaires, and speech recording. Results: There was a significant difference in language development in 11 sub-tests and five lingual gains on the Persian TOLD-P3 test between early (3-6 months of age) and late identified/intervened (12-15 months of age) hearing-impaired children (P<0.05). Early identified/intervened hearing-impaired children had a notable preference in all assessed sub-tests and lingual gains. Conclusion: Early identification/intervention of hearing loss before the age of 6 months has a significant positive effect on a child’s language development in terms of picture/relational/oral vocabulary, grammatical comprehension, sentence combining, grammatical completion, phonologic analysis, word differentiation, word production, semantics, and syntax. Moreover, early identification/ intervention of hearing loss develops the hearing-impaired child’s lingual gains in visual vocabulary, grammatical completion, word differentiation, phonologic analysis, and

  2. Impaired Hepatitis C Virus (HCV)-Specific Effector CD8+ T Cells Undergo Massive Apoptosis in the Peripheral Blood during Acute HCV Infection and in the Liver during the Chronic Phase of Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Radziewicz, Henry; Ibegbu, Chris C.; Hon, Huiming; Osborn, Melissa K.; Obideen, Kamil; Wehbi, Mohammad; Freeman, Gordon J.; Lennox, Jeffrey L.; Workowski, Kimberly A.; Hanson, Holly L.; Grakoui, Arash

    2008-01-01

    A majority of patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) do not sustain an effective T-cell response, and viremia persists. The mechanism leading to failure of the HCV-specific CD8+ T-cell response in patients developing chronic infection is unclear. We investigated apoptosis susceptibility of HCV-specific CD8+ T cells during the acute and chronic stages of infection. Although HCV-specific CD8+ T cells in the blood during the acute phase of infection and in the liver during the chronic phase were highly activated and expressed an effector phenotype, the majority was undergoing apoptosis. In contrast, peripheral blood HCV-specific CD8+ T cells during the chronic phase expressed a resting memory phenotype. Apoptosis susceptibility of HCV-specific CD8+ T cells was associated with very high levels of programmed death-1 (PD-1) and low CD127 expression and with significant functional T-cell deficits. Further evaluation of the “death phase” of HCV-specific CD8+ T cells during acute HCV infection showed that the majority of cells were dying by a process of cytokine withdrawal, mediated by activated caspase 9. Contraction during the acute phase occurred rapidly via this process despite the persistence of the virus. Remarkably, in the chronic phase of HCV infection, at the site of infection in the liver, a substantial frequency of caspase 9-mediated T-cell death was also present. This study highlights the importance of cytokine deprivation-mediated apoptosis with consequent down-modulation of the immune response to HCV during acute and chronic infections. PMID:18667503

  3. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    Bronchitis is an inflammation of the bronchial tubes, the airways that carry air to your lungs. It ... chest tightness. There are two main types of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis ...

  4. Smartphone-based hearing test as an aid in the initial evaluation of unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Handzel, Ophir; Ben-Ari, Oded; Damian, Doris; Priel, Maayan M; Cohen, Jacob; Himmelfarb, Mordechai

    2013-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) can cause significant morbidity. Treatment with steroids can improve outcome. Delay in initiation of treatment reduces the chance to regain hearing. For this reason SSNHL is considered an emergency. Diagnosis is based on history, physical examination and a standard audiogram, the latter requiring specialized equipment and personnel. Standard audiogram may not be available at the time and place of patient presentation. A smartphone or tablet computer-based hearing test may aid in the decision to prescribe steroids in this setting. In this study the uHear™ hearing test application was utilized. The output of this ear-level air conduction hearing test is reported in hearing grades for 6 frequencies ranging from 250 to 6000 Hz. A total of 32 patients with unilateral SSNHL proven by a standard audiogram were tested. The results of standard and iPod hearing tests were compared. Based on the accepted criterion of SSNHL (at least 30 dB loss - or 2 hearing grades - in 3 consecutive frequencies) the test had a sensitivity of 0.76 and specificity of 0.91. Using a less stringent criterion of a loss of 2 hearing grades over at least 2 frequencies the sensitivity was 0.96 and specificity 0.86. The correlation coefficient for the comparison of the average hearing grade across the 6 measured frequencies of the study and standard audiogram was 0.83. uHear more accurately reflected hearing thresholds at mid and high tones. Similarly to previously published data, low frequency thresholds could be artificially elevated. In conclusion, uHear can be useful in the initial evaluation of patients with single-sided SSNHL by providing important information guiding the decision to initiate treatment before a standard audiogram is available. PMID:23689282

  5. Changes of the directional brain networks related with brain plasticity in patients with long-term unilateral sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Zhang, G-Y; Yang, M; Liu, B; Huang, Z-C; Li, J; Chen, J-Y; Chen, H; Zhang, P-P; Liu, L-J; Wang, J; Teng, G-J

    2016-01-28

    Previous studies often report that early auditory deprivation or congenital deafness contributes to cross-modal reorganization in the auditory-deprived cortex, and this cross-modal reorganization limits clinical benefit from cochlear prosthetics. However, there are inconsistencies among study results on cortical reorganization in those subjects with long-term unilateral sensorineural hearing loss (USNHL). It is also unclear whether there exists a similar cross-modal plasticity of the auditory cortex for acquired monaural deafness and early or congenital deafness. To address this issue, we constructed the directional brain functional networks based on entropy connectivity of resting-state functional MRI and researched changes of the networks. Thirty-four long-term USNHL individuals and seventeen normally hearing individuals participated in the test, and all USNHL patients had acquired deafness. We found that certain brain regions of the sensorimotor and visual networks presented enhanced synchronous output entropy connectivity with the left primary auditory cortex in the left long-term USNHL individuals as compared with normally hearing individuals. Especially, the left USNHL showed more significant changes of entropy connectivity than the right USNHL. No significant plastic changes were observed in the right USNHL. Our results indicate that the left primary auditory cortex (non-auditory-deprived cortex) in patients with left USNHL has been reorganized by visual and sensorimotor modalities through cross-modal plasticity. Furthermore, the cross-modal reorganization also alters the directional brain functional networks. The auditory deprivation from the left or right side generates different influences on the human brain. PMID:26621123

  6. Evaluation of the Endothelial Cell Antibodies in Serum and Perilymphatic Fluid of Cochlear Implanted Children with Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Farhadi, Mohammad; Noorbakhsh, Samileh; Tabatabaei, Azardokht; Daneshi, Ahamad; Darestani, Sahar Ghavidel; Jomeh, Emam

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Serum Anti endothelial Cell Antibodies (AECAs) play a prominent role in idiopathic Sensorineural Hearing Loss (SNHL) in that they induce vascular damage (immune mediated). The of the current study is To compare AECAs in serum and perilymphatic fluid of idiopathic SNHL children (<15y) undergoing cochlear implant surgery. Methods This was a cross sectional study performed in the cochlear implant ward in Rasoul Akram hospital, Tehran, Iran (2008 -2010) on 99 SNHL children undergoing cochlear implant surgery. The data collected from47 idiopathic and 52 non-idiopathic SNHL cases. AECAs were measured by indirect immuno fluorescence assay and compared in sera and perilymphatic fluids between the two groups. P-value < 0.05 was considered significant. Results Idiopathic SNHL was diagnosed in 47.5% of cases. Positive AECA results in serum and perilymphatic fluid were 10% and 12%, respectively. Although AECA results in perilymphatic fluids were different between idiopathic and non-Idiopathic SNHL patients (PV < 0.05), AECAs in serum showed no significant difference between the two (PV = 0.1). No significant difference was detected between the mean age of idiopathic and non-idiopathic SNHL patients with positive AECAs in serum and perilymphatic fluids (PV = 0.2; PV = 0.2). Discussion Idiopathic SNHL was diagnosed in 47.5% of studied cases. Idiopathic SNHL has a poor out come in children. In cases with idiopathic SNHL, finding AECAs in perilymphatic fluids are more valuable than in the serum. We suggest that serum and perilymphatic fluids testing for AECAs would be helpful in management of idiopathic SNHL cases. Specific immunosuppressive treatments for selected cases suffering from Idiopathic SNHL (only in those older than 5) might be successful in disease management. However, this theory should first be validated by randomized clinical trials. PMID:25337353

  7. Risk of sudden sensorineural hearing loss in stroke patients: A 5-year nationwide investigation of 44,460 patients.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chin-Lung; Shiao, An-Suey; Wang, Shuu-Jiun; Chang, Wei-Pin; Lin, Yung-Yang

    2016-09-01

    Poststroke sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) can hinder communication between patients and healthcare professionals, thereby restricting participation in rehabilitation programs and limiting improvements in physical performance. However, the relationship between stroke and SSNHL remains unclear. This study employed a nationwide population-based dataset to investigate the relationship between stroke and SSNHL.The Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database was used to compile data from 11,115 stroke patients and a comparison cohort of 33,345 matched nonstroke enrollees. Each patient was followed for 5 years to identify new-onset SSNHL. Stratified Cox proportional-hazard regression analysis was used to examine the association of stroke with subsequent SSNHL.Among the 44,460 patients, 66 patients (55,378 person-years) from the stroke cohort and 105 patients (166,586 person-years) from the comparison cohort were diagnosed with SSNHL. The incidence of SSNHL was approximately twice as high among stroke patients than among nonstroke patients (1.19 and 0.63/1000 person-years, respectively). Stroke patients had a 71% increased risk of SSNHL, compared with nonstroke patients (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.71, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.24-2.36). We also observed a remarkable increase in risk of SSNHL in stroke patients within 1-year of follow-up (adjusted HR 5.65, 95% CI 3.07-10.41) or under steroid therapy during hospitalization (adjusted HR 5.14, 95% CI 2.08-12.75).Patients with stroke had a higher risk of subsequent SSNHL compared with patients without stroke. In particular, stroke patients within 1-year follow-up and those undergoing steroid therapy during hospitalization should be treated with the utmost caution, considering that the risk of SSNHL increases by more than 5-fold. PMID:27603402

  8. Impact of Nonaspirin Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Agents and Acetaminophen on Sensorineural Hearing Loss: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Kyle, Meghann E.; Wang, James C.; Shin, Jennifer J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To perform a systematic review evaluating the association between sensorineural hearing loss and (1) nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) as a class, (2) NSAIDs available over the counter, (3) NSAIDs in short intravenous courses, (4) prescription NSAIDs utilized by patients without systemic inflammatory conditions, (5) prescription NSAIDs in patients with arthritides, and (6) acetaminophen with and without concomitant narcotic usage. Data Sources Computerized searches of PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library were updated through May 2014, along with manual searches and inquiries to topic experts. Review Methods The systematic review was performed according to an a priori protocol. Data extraction was performed by 2 independent investigators, and it focused on relevant audiologic measurements, methodological elements related to risk of bias, and potential confounders. Results The 23 criterion-meeting studies included a total of 92,532 participants, with mixed results. Sulindac was the only specific agent to have been studied with formal audiometry in a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial in which hearing was the reported primary outcome: Although an effect was seen in the unadjusted analysis (pure tone threshold > 15 dB, 9.3% vs 2.9%; relative risk [RR], 3.2; confidence interval [CI], 1.09-9.55; P = .02), the effect dissipated in the adjusted analysis (P = .09). There was a significant effect on self-reported hearing loss from NSAIDs as a class (RR, 1.21; CI, 1.11-1.33), ibuprofen (RR, 1.13; CI, 1.06-1.19), and acetaminophen (RR, 1.21; CI, 1.11-1.33), but no formal audiometric data confirm or refute this suggested effect. Audiometry has demonstrated profound loss in some instances of acetaminophen-narcotic combination ingestions. Conclusions Data are varied regarding the impact of NSAIDs and acetaminophen on population hearing health. PMID:25560405

  9. Seizures, sensorineural deafness, ataxia, mental retardation, and electrolyte imbalance (SeSAME syndrome) caused by mutations in KCNJ10

    PubMed Central

    Scholl, Ute I.; Choi, Murim; Liu, Tiewen; Ramaekers, Vincent T.; Häusler, Martin G.; Grimmer, Joanne; Tobe, Sheldon W.; Farhi, Anita; Nelson-Williams, Carol; Lifton, Richard P.

    2009-01-01

    We describe members of 4 kindreds with a previously unrecognized syndrome characterized by seizures, sensorineural deafness, ataxia, mental retardation, and electrolyte imbalance (hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis, and hypomagnesemia). By analysis of linkage we localize the putative causative gene to a 2.5-Mb segment of chromosome 1q23.2–23.3. Direct DNA sequencing of KCNJ10, which encodes an inwardly rectifying K+ channel, identifies previously unidentified missense or nonsense mutations on both alleles in all affected subjects. These mutations alter highly conserved amino acids and are absent among control chromosomes. Many of these mutations have been shown to cause loss of function in related K+ channels. These findings demonstrate that loss-of-function mutations in KCNJ10 cause this syndrome, which we name SeSAME. KCNJ10 is expressed in glia in the brain and spinal cord, where it is believed to take up K+ released by neuronal repolarization, in cochlea, where it is involved in the generation of endolymph, and on the basolateral membrane in the distal nephron. We propose that KCNJ10 is required in the kidney for normal salt reabsorption in the distal convoluted tubule because of the need for K+ recycling across the basolateral membrane to enable normal activity of the Na+-K+-ATPase; loss of this function accounts for the observed electrolyte defects. Mice deficient for KCNJ10 show a related phenotype with seizures, ataxia, and hearing loss, further supporting KCNJ10's role in this syndrome. These findings define a unique human syndrome, and establish the essential role of basolateral K+ channels in renal electrolyte homeostasis. PMID:19289823

  10. Speech impairment (adult)

    MedlinePlus

    Language impairment; Impairment of speech; Inability to speak; Aphasia; Dysarthria; Slurred speech; Dysphonia voice disorders ... disorders develop gradually, but anyone can develop a speech and ... suddenly, usually in a trauma. APHASIA Alzheimer disease ...

  11. Mild Cognitive Impairment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Portfolio (IADRP) AMP-AD Detecting Cognitive Impairment Database ... Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a condition in which people have more memory or other thinking problems than normal for their ...

  12. Speech impairment (adult)

    MedlinePlus

    Language impairment; Impairment of speech; Inability to speak; Aphasia; Dysarthria; Slurred speech; Dysphonia voice disorders ... Common speech and language disorders include: APHASIA Aphasia is ... understand or express spoken or written language. It commonly ...

  13. A novel biallelic splice site mutation of TECTA causes moderate to severe hearing impairment in an Algerian family.

    PubMed

    Behlouli, Asma; Bonnet, Crystel; Abdi, Samia; Hasbellaoui, Mokhtar; Boudjenah, Farid; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Louha, Malek; Makrelouf, Mohamed; Ammar-Khodja, Fatima; Zenati, Akila; Petit, Christine

    2016-08-01

    Congenital deafness is certainly one of the most common monogenic diseases in humans, but it is also one of the most genetically heterogeneous, which makes molecular diagnosis challenging in most cases. Whole-exome sequencing in two out of three Algerian siblings affected by recessively-inherited, moderate to severe sensorineural deafness allowed us to identify a novel splice donor site mutation (c.5272+1G > A) in the gene encoding α-tectorin, a major component of the cochlear tectorial membrane. The mutation was present at the homozygous state in the three affected siblings, and at the heterozygous state in their unaffected, consanguineous parents. To our knowledge, this is the first reported TECTA mutation leading to the DFNB21 form of hearing impairment among Maghrebian individuals suffering from congenital hearing impairment, which further illustrates the diversity of the genes involved in congenital deafness in the Maghreb. PMID:27368438

  14. The Impaired Social Worker.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reamer, Frederic G.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses concept of the impaired professional; reviews research on various types of impairment (personality disorders, depression and other emotional problems, marital problems, and physical illness), prevalence and causes of impairment, and responses to it; and outlines model assessment and action plan for social workers who encounter an…

  15. ABE. The Hearing Impaired.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carver, L. Sue

    This handbook was written to help teachers of adult basic education (ABE) adapt their teaching methods for hearing impaired persons. Written in a narrative format, the guide covers the following topics: ABE for the hearing impaired, hints for working with the hearing impaired without an interpreter, peer pairing, interpreters in the classroom…

  16. Adapting for Impaired Patrons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuyler, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Describes how a library, with an MCI Corporation grant, approached the process of setting up computers for the visually impaired. Discusses preparations, which included hiring a visually-impaired user as a consultant and contacting the VIP (Visually Impaired Persons) group; equipment; problems with the graphical user interface; and training.…

  17. MARVELD2 (DFNB49) Mutations in the Hearing Impaired Central European Roma Population - Prevalence, Clinical Impact and the Common Origin

    PubMed Central

    Mátyás, Petra; Ficek, Andrej; Hučková, Miloslava; Sůrová, Martina; Šafka-Brožková, Dana; Anwar, Saima; Bene, Judit; Straka, Slavomír; Janicsek, Ingrid; Ahmed, Zubair M.; Seeman, Pavel; Melegh, Béla; Profant, Milan; Klimeš, Iwar; Riazuddin, Saima; Kádasi, Ľudevít; Gašperíková, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Background In the present study we aimed: 1) To establish the prevalence and clinical impact of DFNB49 mutations in deaf Roma from 2 Central European countries (Slovakia and Hungary), and 2) to analyze a possible common origin of the c.1331+2T>C mutation among Roma and Pakistani mutation carriers identified in the present and previous studies. Methods We sequenced 6 exons of the MARVELD2 gene in a group of 143 unrelated hearing impaired Slovak Roma patients. Simultaneously, we used RFLP to detect the c.1331+2T>C mutation in 85 Hungarian deaf Roma patients, control groups of 702 normal hearing Romanies from both countries and 375 hearing impaired Slovak Caucasians. We analyzed the haplotype using 21 SNPs spanning a 5.34Mb around the mutation c.1331+2T>C. Results One pathogenic mutation (c.1331+2T>C) was identified in 12 homozygous hearing impaired Roma patients. Allele frequency of this mutation was higher in Hungarian (10%) than in Slovak (3.85%) Roma patients. The identified common haplotype in Roma patients was defined by 18 SNP markers (3.89 Mb). Fourteen common SNPs were also shared among Pakistani and Roma homozygotes. Biallelic mutation carriers suffered from prelingual bilateral moderate to profound sensorineural hearing loss. Conclusions We demonstrate different frequencies of the c.1331+2T>C mutation in hearing impaired Romanies from 3 Central European countries. In addition, our results provide support for the hypothesis of a possible common ancestor of the Slovak, Hungarian and Czech Roma as well as Pakistani deaf patients. Testing for the c.1331+2T>C mutation may be recommended in GJB2 negative Roma cases with early-onset sensorineural hearing loss. PMID:25885414

  18. Memory Impairment in Children with Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Gillian; Dworzynski, Katharina; Slonims, Vicky; Simonoff, Emily

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to assess whether any memory impairment co-occurring with language impairment is global, affecting both verbal and visual domains, or domain specific. Method: Visual and verbal memory, learning, and processing speed were assessed in children aged 6 years to 16 years 11 months (mean 9y 9m, SD 2y 6mo) with current,…

  19. A Physiological Signal Transmission Model to be Used for Specific Diagnosis of Cochlear Impairments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saremi, Amin; Stenfelt, Stefan

    2011-11-01

    Many of the sophisticated characteristics of human auditory system are attributed to cochlea. Also, most of patients with a hearing loss suffer from impairments that originate from cochlea (sensorineural). Despite this, today's clinical diagnosis methods do not probe the specific origins of such cochlear lesions. The aim of this research is to introduce a physiological signal transmission model to be clinically used as a tool for diagnosis of cochlear losses. This model enables simulation of different bio-mechano-electrical processes which occur in the auditory organ of Corti inside the cochlea. What makes this model different from many available computational models is its loyalty to physiology since the ultimate goal is to model each single physiological phenomenon. This includes passive BM vibration, outer hair cells' performances such as nonlinear mechanoelectrical transduction (MET), active amplifications by somatic motor, as well as vibration to neural conversion at the inner hair cells.

  20. Telephone speech enhancement for hearing-impaired listeners using multi-channel compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, Harikrishna P.; Krishnamurthy, Ashok K.; Feth, Lawrence L.

    2002-05-01

    Elderly listeners with sensorineural hearing impairment usually have difficulty with telephone communication if they do not use a hearing aid or telephone amplifier. In many cases, these devices may not be readily available or maybe uncomfortable to use. We describe here an alternative strategy to enhance the speech by pre-processing the signal before sending it over the telephone line. The pre-processing is based on a multi-channel compression algorithm that modifies the critical band spectrum of the speech signal to bring it within the dynamic hearing range of the listener, while also compensating for the effects of the telephone line. We describe the algorithm and the results of a simulation study in which the Articulation Index (AI) is used to measure the intelligibility enhancement, and the Glasberg, Moore and Stone (1999) model is used to simulate the effects of the hearing loss.

  1. [Acute blood pressure elevations].

    PubMed

    Chamontin, B; Amar, J; Chollet, F; Rouge, P; Bonetti-d'Esteve, L; Guittard, J; Salvador, M

    2000-11-01

    Blood pressure (BP) elevations may correspond to different clinical situations. Hypertensives emergencies are situations that require immediate reduction in BP because of acute or rapidly progressing target organ damage: accelerated malignant hypertension, hypertensive encephalopathy, acute myocardial infarction, acute aortic dissection, acute left ventricular failure, and eclampsia. Hypertensive urgencies are those with marked elevated BP in which it is desirable to reduce BP progressively within few hours, such as severe hypertension, progressive target organ damage, perioperative hypertension. Cerebrovascular accidents have to be individualized. In most patients in the immediate post-stroke period, BP should not be lowered. Caution is advised in lowering BP in these patients because excessive falls may precipitate cerebral ischemia. In situations without symptoms or progressive target organ it is necessary to exclude proximate causes of elevated BP such as pain and elevated BP alone rarely requires antihypertensive treatment. Among parenteral antihypertensive (AH) drugs labetalol, nicardipine, urapidil, and nitroprussiate are generally used, and the choice of AH drug depends on the clinical situation. It is not required to normalize BP immediately but to reduce mean BP no more than 25%, then toward 160/100 mmHg as recommended by JNC VI, in order to avoid an impairment of renal, cerebral or coronary ischemia. Oral long-acting dihydropyridines are often subsequently administrated, except in myocardial ischemia. Therapeutic attitudes vary considerably according to the clinical situation: abstention, immediate decrease or progressive decrease in BP have to be decided. PMID:11190294

  2. The effect of symmetrical and asymmetrical hearing impairment on music quality perception.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yuexin; Zhao, Fei; Chen, Yuebo; Liang, Maojin; Chen, Ling; Yang, Haidi; Xiong, Hao; Zhang, Xueyuan; Zheng, Yiqing

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of symmetrical, asymmetrical and unilateral hearing impairment on music quality perception. Six validated music pieces in the categories of classical music, folk music and pop music were used to assess music quality in terms of its 'pleasantness', 'naturalness', 'fullness', 'roughness' and 'sharpness'. 58 participants with sensorineural hearing loss [20 with unilateral hearing loss (UHL), 20 with bilateral symmetrical hearing loss (BSHL) and 18 with bilateral asymmetrical hearing loss (BAHL)] and 29 normal hearing (NH) subjects participated in the present study. Hearing impaired (HI) participants had greater difficulty in overall music quality perception than NH participants. Participants with BSHL rated music pleasantness and naturalness to be higher than participants with BAHL. Moreover, the hearing thresholds of the better ears from BSHL and BAHL participants as well as the hearing thresholds of the worse ears from BSHL participants were negatively correlated to the pleasantness and naturalness perception. HI participants rated the familiar music pieces higher than unfamiliar music pieces in the three music categories. Music quality perception in participants with hearing impairment appeared to be affected by symmetry of hearing loss, degree of hearing loss and music familiarity when they were assessed using the music quality rating test (MQRT). This indicates that binaural symmetrical hearing is important to achieve a high level of music quality perception in HI listeners. This emphasizes the importance of provision of bilateral hearing assistive devices for people with asymmetrical hearing impairment. PMID:26611684

  3. Acupuncture Therapy for Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin-chang; Xu, Xiu-ping; Xu, Wen-tao; Hou, Wen-zhen; Cheng, Ying-ying; Li, Chang-xi; Ni, Guang-xia

    2015-01-01

    Objective Acupuncture has commonly been used in China, either alone or in combination with Western medicine, to treat sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL). The purpose of this systematic review is to assess the efficacy and safety of acupuncture therapy for patients with SSHL. Methods We searched PubMed, the Cochrane Library, Embase, China National Knowledge Internet (CNKI), Database for Chinese Technical Periodicals (VIP), and Chinese Biomedical literature service system (SinoMed) to collect randomized controlled trials of acupuncture for SSHL published before July 2014. A meta-analysis was conducted according to the Cochrane systematic review method using RevMan 5.2 software. The evidence level for each outcome was assessed using the GRADE methodology. Results Twelve trials involving 863 patients were included. A meta-analysis showed that the effect of manual acupuncture combined with Western medicine comprehensive treatment (WMCT) was better than WMCT alone (RR 1.33, 95%CI 1.19–1.49) and the same as the effect of electroacupuncture combined with WMCT (RR 1.33, 95%CI 1.19–1.50). One study showed a better effect of electroacupuncture than of WMCT (RR 1.34, 95%CI 1.24–1.45). For mean changes in hearing over all frequencies, the meta-analysis showed a better effect with the combination of acupuncture and WMCT than with WMCT alone (MD 10.85, 95%CI 6.84–14.86). However, the evidence levels for these interventions were low or very low due to a high risk of bias and small sample sizes in the included studies. Conclusion There was not sufficient evidence showing that acupuncture therapy alone was beneficial for treating SSHL. However, interventions combining acupuncture with WMCT had more efficacious results in the treatment of SSHL than WMCT alone. Electroacupuncture alone might be a viable alternative treatment besides WMCT for SSHL. However, given that there were fewer eligible RCTs and limitations in the included trials, such as methodological drawbacks

  4. Relative Contributions of Radiation and Cisplatin-Based Chemotherapy to Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Hitchcock, Ying J. Tward, Jonathan D.; Szabo, Aniko; Bentz, Brandon G.; Shrieve, Dennis C.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate the risk of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in patients with head-and-neck cancer and treated with radiation therapy (RT) or concomitant cisplatin-based chemoradiation, the relationship among SNHL and radiation dose to the cochlea, the use of two common cisplatin dose regimens. Methods and Materials: A total of 62 head-and-neck cancer patients treated with curative intent were included in this prospective study. Of the patients, 21 received RT alone, 27 received 40 mg/m{sup 2} weekly cisplatin, 13 received 100 mg/m{sup 2} every 3 weeks during RT, and 1 received RT with weekly epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor antibody. The effect of chemotherapy and RT dose on hearing was determined using a model that accounted for the age and variability between each ear for each patient. Results: We constructed a model to predict dose-dependent hearing loss for RT or cisplatin-based chemotherapy either alone or in combination. For patients only receiving RT, no significant hearing loss was found at doses to the cochlea of less than 40 Gy. Patients receiving 100 mg/m{sup 2} or 40 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin chemotherapy had an estimated +21.5 dB and +9.5 dB hearing loss at 8,000 Hz with low radiation doses (10 Gy), which rose to +38.4 dB and +18.9 dB for high radiation doses (40 Gy). Conclusions: Use of RT alone with doses of less than 40 Gy did not result in clinically significant hearing loss. High-frequency SNHL was profoundly damaged in patients who received concomitant cisplatin when doses of 100 mg/m{sup 2} were used. The threshold cochlear dose for hearing loss with cisplatin-based chemotherapy and RT was predicted to be 10 Gy. The inner ear radiation dose constraints and cisplatin dose intensity should be considered in the treatment of advanced head-and-neck cancer.

  5. Acute nephritic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Glomerulonephritis - acute; Acute glomerulonephritis; Nephritis syndrome - acute ... Acute nephritic syndrome is often caused by an immune response triggered by an infection or other disease. Common causes ...

  6. Simultaneous Labyrinthectomy and Cochlear Implantation for Patients with Single-Sided Ménière's Disease and Profound Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Doobe, G.; Ernst, A.; Ramalingam, R.; Mittmann, P.; Todt, I.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the treatment outcome of a simultaneous labyrinthectomy and cochlear implantation in patients with single-sided Ménière's disease and profound sensorineural hearing loss. Study Design. Prospective study. Method. Five patients with single-sided Ménière's disease with active vertigo and functional deafness were included. In all cases, simultaneous cochlear implantation combined with labyrinthectomy surgery was performed. The outcome has been evaluated by the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) and speech recognition. Results. The combined labyrinthectomy and cochlear implantation led in all patients to a highly significant reduction of dizziness up to a restitutio ad integrum. After activation of the cochlear implant and rehabilitation, a mean monosyllabic speech understanding of 69% at 65 dB was observed. Conclusion. For patients with single-sided Ménière's disease and profound sensorineural hearing loss the simultaneous labyrinthectomy and cochlear implantation are efficient method for the treatment of vertigo as well as the rehabilitation of the auditory system. PMID:26380275

  7. The acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Pooja

    2015-01-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a major cause of acute respiratory failure. Its development leads to high rates of mortality, as well as short- and long-term complications, such as physical and cognitive impairment. Therefore, early recognition of this syndrome and application of demonstrated therapeutic interventions are essential to change the natural course of this devastating entity. In this review article, we describe updated concepts in ARDS. Specifically, we discuss the new definition of ARDS, its risk factors and pathophysiology, and current evidence regarding ventilation management, adjunctive therapies, and intervention required in refractory hypoxemia. PMID:25829644

  8. Spectral and binaural loudness summation for hearing-impaired listeners.

    PubMed

    Oetting, Dirk; Hohmann, Volker; Appell, Jens-E; Kollmeier, Birger; Ewert, Stephan D

    2016-05-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss typically results in a steepened loudness function and a reduced dynamic range from elevated thresholds to uncomfortably loud levels for narrowband and broadband signals. Restoring narrowband loudness perception for hearing-impaired (HI) listeners can lead to overly loud perception of broadband signals and it is unclear how binaural presentation affects loudness perception in this case. Here, loudness perception quantified by categorical loudness scaling for nine normal-hearing (NH) and ten HI listeners was compared for signals with different bandwidth and different spectral shape in monaural and in binaural conditions. For the HI listeners, frequency- and level-dependent amplification was used to match the narrowband monaural loudness functions of the NH listeners. The average loudness functions for NH and HI listeners showed good agreement for monaural broadband signals. However, HI listeners showed substantially greater loudness for binaural broadband signals than NH listeners: on average a 14.1 dB lower level was required to reach "very loud" (range 30.8 to -3.7 dB). Overall, with narrowband loudness compensation, a given binaural loudness for broadband signals above "medium loud" was reached at systematically lower levels for HI than for NH listeners. Such increased binaural loudness summation was not found for loudness categories below "medium loud" or for narrowband signals. Large individual variations in the increased loudness summation were observed and could not be explained by the audiogram or the narrowband loudness functions. PMID:27006003

  9. Acute sacroiliitis.

    PubMed

    Slobodin, Gleb; Rimar, Doron; Boulman, Nina; Kaly, Lisa; Rozenbaum, Michael; Rosner, Itzhak; Odeh, Majed

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the data on the etiology, risk factors, clinical presentations, and diagnosis of acute sacroiliitis. A Pubmed search utilizing the indexing term "acute sacroiliitis" was conducted and the data pertinent to the aim of the review was extracted and organized in accordance with the preplanned structure of the manuscript. The diagnosis of acute sacroiliitis is often challenging because of both the relative rarity of this presentation and diverse character of acute sacroiliac pain, frequently mimicking other, more prevalent disorders. Technetium bone scintigraphy can localize the disease process to the sacroiliac joint, while computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging can be used for the detailed characterization and the extent of the disease as well as the diagnosis of complications. Pyogenic sacroiliitis is by far the most common cause of acute sacroiliitis. Brucellosis, acute sacroiliitis in the course of reactive arthritis, and crystalline-induced sacroiliitis frequently imitate pyogenic sacroiliitis. Acute sacroiliitis can rarely be also related to hematological malignancies or treatment with isotretinoin. Awareness to the possibility of acute sacroiliitis and a thorough physical examination are the necessary prerequisites to its timely diagnosis, while the appropriate laboratory and imaging studies should confirm the precise diagnosis and direct the appropriate treatment strategy. PMID:26847855

  10. Current state of knowledge: outcomes research in children with mild to severe hearing impairment--approaches and methodological considerations.

    PubMed

    Tomblin, Bruce; Hebbeler, Kathleen

    2007-12-01

    This paper will provide a backdrop to the others in this section on outcomes of children with mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss. Our objective here is to provide an overview of the research approaches used to study the outcomes of these children to provide guidance for future studies of children with mild to severe sensorineural hearing impairment (HI). During the past 20 yr there has been a gradual coalescence of research practices concerned with examining outcomes. Those who have done this work have come from different disciplines and in many cases were motivated by different circumstances. As a result, terminology and perspectives on outcomes research often still bears the features of these different disciplines and objectives of this research. This paper is an effort to provide the reader with an overview of this research endeavor that will highlight the diversity of the work being conducted on outcomes but also emphasizes the common properties. This overview will emphasize the kinds of research questions that are asked in this area of research and the associated evidence obtained to address these research questions. After this initial section there will be a consideration of the methodological issues that need to be considered, particularly for outcome research in children with HI. PMID:17982360

  11. Cognitive impairment and stroke in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Lo Coco, Daniele; Lopez, Gianluca; Corrao, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    We reviewed current knowledge about the interaction between stroke and vascular risk factors and the development of cognitive impairment and dementia. Stroke is increasingly recognized as an important cause of cognitive problems and has been implicated in the development of both Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. The prevalence of cognitive impairment after stroke is high, and their combined effects significantly increase the cost of care and health resource utilization, with reflections on hospital readmissions and increased mortality rates. There is also substantial evidence that vascular risk factors (such as hypertension, diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia, and tobacco smoking) are independently associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline and dementia. Thus, a successful management of these factors, as well as optimal acute stroke management, might have a great impact on the development of cognitive impairment. Notwithstanding, the pathological link between cognitive impairment, stroke, and vascular risk factors is complex and still partially unclear so that further studies are needed to better elucidate the boundaries of this relationship. Many specific pharmacological treatments, including anticholinergic drugs and antihypertensive medications, and nonpharmacological approaches, such as diet, cognitive rehabilitation, and physical activity, have been studied for patients with vascular cognitive impairment, but the optimal care is still far away. Meanwhile, according to the most recent knowledge, optimal stroke care should also include cognitive assessment in the short and long term, and great efforts should be oriented toward a multidisciplinary approach, including quality-of-life assessment and support of caregivers. PMID:27069366

  12. Cognitive impairment and stroke in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Lo Coco, Daniele; Lopez, Gianluca; Corrao, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    We reviewed current knowledge about the interaction between stroke and vascular risk factors and the development of cognitive impairment and dementia. Stroke is increasingly recognized as an important cause of cognitive problems and has been implicated in the development of both Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia. The prevalence of cognitive impairment after stroke is high, and their combined effects significantly increase the cost of care and health resource utilization, with reflections on hospital readmissions and increased mortality rates. There is also substantial evidence that vascular risk factors (such as hypertension, diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia, and tobacco smoking) are independently associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline and dementia. Thus, a successful management of these factors, as well as optimal acute stroke management, might have a great impact on the development of cognitive impairment. Notwithstanding, the pathological link between cognitive impairment, stroke, and vascular risk factors is complex and still partially unclear so that further studies are needed to better elucidate the boundaries of this relationship. Many specific pharmacological treatments, including anticholinergic drugs and antihypertensive medications, and nonpharmacological approaches, such as diet, cognitive rehabilitation, and physical activity, have been studied for patients with vascular cognitive impairment, but the optimal care is still far away. Meanwhile, according to the most recent knowledge, optimal stroke care should also include cognitive assessment in the short and long term, and great efforts should be oriented toward a multidisciplinary approach, including quality-of-life assessment and support of caregivers. PMID:27069366

  13. Optimization of speech in noise with three signal processing algorithms for normal-hearing and hearing-impaired subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franck, Bas A. M.; Dreschler, Wouter A.; Lyzenga, Johannes

    2002-05-01

    In this study a three-dimensional Simplex procedure was applied to optimize speech in noise by a combination of signal processing algorithms for different acoustic conditions and hearing losses. The algorithms used to span the three dimensions are noise reduction, spectral tilting, and spectral enhancement, respectively. Additionally, we studied the algorithms for their main effects and interaction effects within the optimization process. The subjects were asked to evaluate two consecutive, differently processed sentences on listening comfort. Three different noise types and two signal-to-noise ratios (S/N) were used. Three groups of subjects participated: normal hearing, normal hearing with simulated impaired auditory filtering (by spectral smearing), and sensorineurally hearing-impaired subjects. For the normal-hearing group we applied S/N=0 dB. For the hearing-impaired and the simulated hearing-impaired subjects we applied S/N=5 dB. We will discuss the similarities and differences in the response patterns of the three groups. Also, the individual preferences will be related to the hearing capacity, and to the type of interfering noise. Finally, we will discuss differences in the perceptual features that are used to judge listening comfort of the fragments by normal-hearing and hearing-impaired subjects.

  14. Education for the Hearing Impaired (Auditorily Impaired).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Federation of the Deaf, Rome (Italy).

    Education for the hearing impaired is discussed in nine conference papers. J. N. Howarth describes "The Education of Deaf Children in Schools for Hearing Pupils in the United Kingdom" and A.I.Dyachkov of the U.S.S.R. outlines Didactical Principles of Educating the Deaf in the Light of their Rehabilitation Goal." Seven papers from Poland are also…

  15. Longitudinal Development of Phonology and Morphology in Children with Late-Identified Mild-Moderate Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Moeller, Mary Pat; McCleary, Elizabeth; Putman, Coille; Tyler-Krings, Amy; Hoover, Brenda; Stelmachowicz, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Objective Studies of language development in children with mild-moderate hearing loss are relatively rare. Longitudinal studies of children with late-identified hearing loss have not been conducted, and they are relevant for determining how a period of unaided mild-moderate hearing loss impacts development. In recent years, newborn hearing screening programs have effectively reduced the ages of identification for most children with permanent hearing loss. However, some children continue to be identified late and research is needed to guide management decisions. Further, studies of this group may help to discern if language normalizes following intervention, and/or if certain aspects of language might be vulnerable to persistent delays. The current study examines the impact of late identification and reduced audibility on speech and language outcomes via a longitudinal study of four children with mild-moderate sensorineural hearing loss. Design Longitudinal outcomes of four children with late-identified mild-moderate sensorinueral hearing loss were studied using standardized measures and language sampling procedures, from at or near the point of identification (28 – 41 months) through 84 months of age. The children with hearing loss were compared to ten age-matched children with normal hearing on a majority of the measures through 60 months of age. Spontaneous language samples were collected from mother-child interaction sessions, recorded at consistent intervals in a laboratory-based play setting. Transcripts were analyzed using computer-based procedures (Systematic Analysis of Language Transcripts) and the Index of Productive Syntax. Possible influences of audibility were explored by examining the onset and productive use of a set of verb tense markers, and by monitoring the children’s accuracy in use of morphological endings. Phonological samples at baseline were transcribed and analyzed using Computerized Profiling. Results At entry to the study, the four

  16. Development or Impairment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hakansson, Gisela

    2010-01-01

    Joanne Paradis' Keynote Article on bilingualism and specific language impairment (SLI) is an impressive overview of research in language acquisition and language impairment. Studying different populations is crucial both for theorizing about language acquisition mechanisms, and for practical purposes of diagnosing and supporting children with…

  17. Acute malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Dupont, John S

    2006-01-01

    Acute malocclusion can result from disturbances in the maxillary/mandibular tooth relationship. These alterations in the occlusal position can result from high fillings, sinus problems, abscesses, periodontal disease, and moving or erupting teeth. Conditions seen less frequently include acute malocclusions secondary to an event (such as trauma) that make a stable dental relationship an unstable one. Patients can demonstrate any of a number of clinical conditions that interfere with their comfort and ability to function. This article provides information on some of the less familiar causes of acute malocclusion. PMID:16689064

  18. Binaural Loudness Summation in the Hearing Impaired.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, David B.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Binaural loudness summation was measured using three different paradigms with 10 normally hearing and 20 bilaterally symmetrical high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss subjects. Binaural summation increased with presentation level using the loudness matching procedure, with values in the 6-10 dB range. Summation decreased with level using the…

  19. PI3K pan-inhibition impairs more efficiently proliferation and survival of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines when compared to isoform-selective PI3K inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Spartà, Antonino Maria; Chiarini, Francesca; Buontempo, Francesca; Evangelisti, Camilla; Evangelisti, Cecilia; Orsini, Ester; McCubrey, James A.; Martelli, Alberto Maria

    2015-01-01

    Class I phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3Ks) are frequently activated in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), mainly due to the loss of PTEN function. Therefore, targeting PI3Ks is a promising innovative approach for T-ALL treatment, however at present no definitive evidence indicated which is the better therapeutic strategy between pan or selective isoform inhibition, as all the four catalytic subunits might participate in leukemogenesis. Here, we demonstrated that in both PTEN deleted and PTEN non deleted T-ALL cell lines, PI3K pan-inhibition exerted the highest cytotoxic effects when compared to both selective isoform inhibition or dual p110γ/δ inhibition. Intriguingly, the dual p110γ/δ inhibitor IPI-145 was effective in Loucy cells, which are representative of early T-precursor (ETP)-ALL, a T-ALL subtype associated with a poor outcome. PTEN gene deletion did not confer a peculiar reliance of T-ALL cells on PI3K activity for their proliferation/survival, as PTEN was inactivated in PTEN non deleted cells, due to posttranslational mechanisms. PI3K pan-inhibition suppressed Akt activation and induced caspase-independent apoptosis. We further demonstrated that in some T-ALL cell lines, autophagy could exert a protective role against PI3K inhibition. Our findings strongly support clinical application of class I PI3K pan-inhibitors in T-ALL treatment, with the possible exception of ETP-ALL cases. PMID:25871383

  20. Acute intracerebral treatment with amyloid-beta (1–42) alters the profile of neuronal oscillations that accompany LTP induction and results in impaired LTP in freely behaving rats

    PubMed Central

    Kalweit, Alexander Nikolai; Yang, Honghong; Colitti-Klausnitzer, Jens; Fülöp, Livia; Bozsó, Zsolt; Penke, Botond; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of amyloid plaques comprises one of the major hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In rodents, acute treatment with amyloid-beta (Aβ; 1–42) elicits immediate debilitating effects on hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). Whereas LTP contributes to synaptic information storage, information is transferred across neurons by means of neuronal oscillations. Furthermore, changes in theta-gamma oscillations, that appear during high-frequency stimulation (HFS) to induce LTP, predict whether successful LTP will occur. Here, we explored if intra-cerebral treatment with Aβ(1–42), that prevents LTP, also results in alterations of hippocampal oscillations that occur during HFS of the perforant path-dentate gyrus synapse in 6-month-old behaving rats. HFS resulted in LTP that lasted for over 24 h. In Aβ-treated animals, LTP was significantly prevented. During HFS, spectral power for oscillations below 100 Hz (δ, θ, α, β and γ) was significantly higher in Aβ-treated animals compared to controls. In addition, the trough-to-peak amplitudes of theta and gamma cycles were higher during HFS in Aβ-treated animals. We also observed a lower amount of envelope-to-signal correlations during HFS in Aβ-treated animals. Overall, the characteristic profile of theta-gamma oscillations that accompany successful LTP induction was disrupted. These data indicate that alterations in network oscillations accompany Aβ-effects on hippocampal LTP. This may comprise an underlying mechanism through which disturbances in synaptic information storage and hippocampus-dependent memory occurs in AD. PMID:25999827

  1. Malignant meningitis secondary to oesophageal adenocarcinoma presenting with sensorineural hearing loss: a series of three cases and discussion of the literature.

    PubMed

    Adams, Mark; Doherty, Carolynne; O'Kane, Anna; Hall, Samuel; Forbes, Raeburn B; Herron, Brian; McNaboe, Edward J

    2016-09-01

    Malignant meningitis may rarely present to the otolaryngologist. We report our experience with 3 patients presenting with sudden, progressive bilateral sensorineural hearing loss secondary to malignant meningitis. The primary tumour in all 3 cases was oesophageal adenocarcinoma. All 3 cases were notable for the rapidity of the patients' clinical deterioration; the interval from presentation to death ranged from 21 to 28 days. We suggest that otolaryngologists should remain vigilant to the possibility of this devastating diagnosis and have a low threshold for further investigation in patients with suspicious features. It is important to note that initial MRI and lumbar puncture may be negative and repeat testing should be undertaken if there is clinical suspicion. PMID:26645106

  2. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... bronchitis? Acute bronchitis is almost always caused by viruses that attack the lining of the bronchial tree ... infection. As your body fights back against these viruses, more swelling occurs and more mucus is produced. ...

  3. Acute Pericarditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... large pericardial effusions). Acute pericarditis usually responds to colchicine or NSAIDs (such as aspirin and ibuprofen ) taken ... reduce pain but relieves it by reducing inflammation. Colchicine also decreases the chance of pericarditis returning later. ...

  4. Impairment in Non-Word Repetition: A Marker for Language Impairment or Reading Impairment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Gillian; Slonims, Vicky; Simonoff, Emily; Dworzynski, Katharina

    2011-01-01

    Aim: A deficit in non-word repetition (NWR), a measure of short-term phonological memory proposed as a marker for language impairment, is found not only in language impairment but also in reading impairment. We evaluated the strength of association between language impairment and reading impairment in children with current, past, and no language…

  5. Intratympanic steroids as primary initial treatment of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss. The Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal experience and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Labatut, Tomás; Daza, María José; Alonso, Antonio

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness, dosage, safety and comfort of intratympanic steroids as primary initial treatment of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL). Prospective nonrandomized clinical practice study was performed in Tertiary referral center university hospital. A total of 35 consecutive patients suffering from newly diagnosed sudden sensorineural hearing loss with mean pure-tone average thresholds of 81 ± 21 dB were treated. No previous therapy had been undertaken. Intratympanic steroid injection as primary initial treatment was administered during 2 weeks on a twice a week schedule, between 2010 and 2011. Treatment was started on average within 2 days of symptoms onset. Pre and post-treatment audiometric evaluations were analyzed on follow-up as well as tolerance of the procedure and possible adverse effects. 66-85 % of patients achieved successful treatment according to the different outcome criteria used to evaluate hearing improvement (Furuhashi criteria/improvement of ≥10 dB in pure-tone average). Mean post-treatment improvement regarding pure-tone average was 34 ± 21 dB. A 48 ± 43 % improvement in speech discrimination score was observed. Patients received an average of 18 mg of methylprednisolone per injection and a total dose of 72 mg per treatment cycle. No serious adverse effects were noted. Intratympanic steroid injection is an effective, safe and well-tolerated office based-procedure for the treatment of ISSHL as primary initial treatment that can avoid the potential adverse effects of systemic steroids. A higher dose, schedule of administration as well as standardization of hearing recovery criteria still need to be established. PMID:23254396

  6. Hearing or speech impairment - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - hearing or speech impairment ... The following organizations are good resources for information on hearing impairment or speech impairment: Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing -- www.agbell. ...

  7. Advanced IT Education for the Vision Impaired via e-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Helen L.

    2009-01-01

    Lack of accessibility in the design of e-learning courses continues to hinder students with vision impairment. E-learning materials are predominantly vision-centric, incorporating images, animation, and interactive media, and as a result students with acute vision impairment do not have equal opportunity to gain tertiary qualifications or skills…

  8. Impairments to Vision

    MedlinePlus

    ... an external Non-Government web site. Impairments to Vision Normal Vision Diabetic Retinopathy Age-related Macular Degeneration In this ... pictures, fixate on the nose to simulate the vision loss. In diabetic retinopathy, the blood vessels in ...

  9. Kids' Quest: Vision Impairment

    MedlinePlus

    ... important job. Â Return to Steps World-Wide Web Search Kids Health: What is Vision Impairment What ... for the Blind (AFB) created the Braille Bug web site to teach sighted children about braille, and ...

  10. Mild Cognitive Impairment

    MedlinePlus

    ... other people their age. This condition is called mild cognitive impairment, or MCI. People with MCI can take care of themselves and do their normal activities. MCI memory problems may include Losing things often Forgetting ...

  11. Hearing impairment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: association with anti-citrullinated protein antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Fabrício Silva; Dossi, Mario Orlando; Batista, Lígia; Shinzato, Márcia Midori

    2016-09-01

    It has been suggested that hearing impairment (HI) is one of the extra-articular features of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Nevertheless, the prevalence and nature of HI in RA is still uncertain. The objectives were to study hearing function in patients with RA using audiometric tests and to examine whether HI correlates with autoantibodies. Hearing functions were investigated in 43 consecutive RA patients and 23 control subjects (less than 60 years old). Their sera were evaluated for the presence of rheumatoid factor (RF), anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP), and anti-mutated citrullinated vimentin (anti-MCV) antibodies. HI was observed in 46.5 % of RA patients and in 30.4 % of control subjects, p = 0.32. HI was characterized as sensorineural in 80 and 85.7 % of RA patients and control subjects with HI, respectively, p = 1.00. RA patients had a worse hearing threshold for air conduction at 6 kHz in the right ear (p = 0.019) and had a decreased amplitude of otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) at 2 kHz bilaterally (p = 0.04) compared with control subjects. In the RA group, patients with and without HI were 80 and 34.78 % anti-CCP positive, respectively, p = 0.008. RA patients with and without HI were 85 and 43.48 % anti-MCV positive, respectively, p = 0.013. HI in RA patients was mainly sensorineural and was associated with anti-CCP and anti-MCV antibodies. PMID:27112144

  12. Acute Glucose Response Properties Beyond Feeding.

    PubMed

    Burnett, C Joseph; Krashes, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    Hypothalamic AgRP neurons potently coordinate feeding behavior to ensure an organism's viability. However, their acute role in glucose-regulatory function remains to be addressed. Steculorum et al. now report that activation of a specific set of AgRP neurons results in an impairment of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in brown fat through a myogenic signature program. PMID:27052261

  13. Association between idiopathic hearing loss and mitochondrial DNA mutations: A study on 169 hearing-impaired subjects

    PubMed Central

    GUARAN, VALERIA; ASTOLFI, LAURA; CASTIGLIONE, ALESSANDRO; SIMONI, EDI; OLIVETTO, ELENA; GALASSO, MARCO; TREVISI, PATRIZIA; BUSI, MICOL; VOLINIA, STEFANO; MARTINI, ALESSANDRO

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been shown to be an important cause of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). In this study, we performed a clinical and genetic analysis of 169 hearing-impaired patients and some of their relatives suffering from idiopathic SNHL, both familial and sporadic. The analysis of four fragments of their mtDNA identified several polymorphisms, the well known pathogenic mutation, A1555G, and some novel mutations in different genes, implying changes in the aminoacidic sequence. A novel sporadic mutation in 12S rRNA (MT-RNR1), not previously reported in the literature, was found in a case of possible aminoglycoside-induced progressive deafness. PMID:23969527

  14. Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) - children

    MedlinePlus

    Acute myelogenous leukemia - children; AML; Acute myeloid leukemia - children; Acute granulocytic leukemia - children; Acute myeloblastic leukemia - children; Acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) - children

  15. Inflammatory remodeling of the HDL proteome impairs cholesterol efflux capacity.

    PubMed

    Vaisar, Tomáš; Tang, Chongren; Babenko, Ilona; Hutchins, Patrick; Wimberger, Jake; Suffredini, Anthony F; Heinecke, Jay W

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies demonstrate that HDL's ability to promote cholesterol efflux from macrophages associates strongly with cardioprotection in humans independently of HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) and apoA-I, HDL's major protein. However, the mechanisms that impair cholesterol efflux capacity during vascular disease are unclear. Inflammation, a well-established risk factor for cardiovascular disease, has been shown to impair HDL's cholesterol efflux capacity. We therefore tested the hypothesis that HDL's impaired efflux capacity is mediated by specific changes of its protein cargo. Humans with acute inflammation induced by low-level endotoxin had unchanged HDL-C levels, but their HDL-C efflux capacity was significantly impaired. Proteomic analyses demonstrated that HDL's cholesterol efflux capacity correlated inversely with HDL content of serum amyloid A (SAA)1 and SAA2. In mice, acute inflammation caused a marked impairment of HDL-C efflux capacity that correlated with a large increase in HDL SAA. In striking contrast, the efflux capacity of mouse inflammatory HDL was preserved with genetic ablation of SAA1 and SAA2. Our observations indicate that the inflammatory impairment of HDL-C efflux capacity is due in part to SAA-mediated remodeling of HDL's protein cargo. PMID:25995210

  16. Stress impairs cognitive flexibility in infants

    PubMed Central

    Seehagen, Sabine; Schneider, Silvia; Rudolph, Julia; Ernst, Stephanie; Zmyj, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    In human adults, learning and memory under acute stress are characterized by an increased use of rigid habitual response strategies at the cost of flexible cognitive strategies. The immediate effects of stress on cognitive functioning early in life are not well understood. Here we show experimentally that acute stress leads human infants to perform habitual behavior rigidly. We found that 15-mo-old infants exposed to stress thereafter kept performing a previously effective action, even after the action suddenly became ineffective. Infants in a no-stress control group flexibly adjusted their behavior by disengaging from the newly ineffective action in favor of exploring an alternative action. This finding demonstrates that stress impairs infants’ ability to adjust their behavior to changing circumstances. PMID:26417100

  17. Hearing Impairment and Retirement

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Mary E; Cruickshanks, Karen J; Pinto, Alex; Klein, Barbara E K; Klein, Ronald; Dalton, Dayna S

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Many factors influence the decision to retire including age, insurance and pension availability along with physical and mental health. Hearing impairment may be one such factor. PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to compare the 15 year retirement rate among subjects with and without hearing impairment. RESEARCH DESIGN Prospective, population-based study STUDY SAMPLE Subjects were participants in the Epidemiology of Hearing Loss Study (EHLS), a longitudinal investigation of age-related hearing loss. Participants who were working full- or part-time in 1993–1995 were included (n=1410, mean age=57.8 years). DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS Data from four EHLS phases (1993–1995, 1998–2000, 2003–2005, and 2009–2010) were analyzed in 2010–2012. Hearing impairment was defined as a pure tone threshold average (at 0.5,1,2 and 4 kHz) greater than 25 dB HL in the worse ear. Employment status was determined at each of the four phases. Kaplan-Meier estimates of the cumulative incidence of retirement were calculated and Cox discrete-time modeling was used to determine the effect of hearing impairment on the rate of retirement. RESULTS The cumulative incidence of retirement was significantly (p < 0.02) higher in those with a hearing impairment (77%) compared to those without a hearing impairment (74%). After adjustment for age, gender, self-reported health, and history of chronic disease, there was no significant difference in the rate of retirement between those with and without a hearing impairment (Hazard Ratio (HR) = 0.9, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) = 0.7, 1.1). Similar results were observed when hearing aid users were excluded, when hearing impairment was based on the better ear thresholds, and when analyses were restricted to those less than 65 years of age and working full-time at baseline. Participants with a hearing impairment were less likely to state that the main reason for retirement was that the time seemed right. CONCLUSIONS Hearing impairment

  18. SLC26A4 gene is frequently involved in nonsyndromic hearing impairment with enlarged vestibular aqueduct in Caucasian populations.

    PubMed

    Albert, Sébastien; Blons, Hélène; Jonard, Laurence; Feldmann, Delphine; Chauvin, Pierre; Loundon, Nathalie; Sergent-Allaoui, Annie; Houang, Muriel; Joannard, Alain; Schmerber, Sébastien; Delobel, Bruno; Leman, Jacques; Journel, Hubert; Catros, Hélène; Dollfus, Hélène; Eliot, Marie-Madeleine; David, Albert; Calais, Catherine; Drouin-Garraud, Valérie; Obstoy, Marie-Françoise; Tran Ba Huy, Patrice; Lacombe, Didier; Duriez, Françoise; Francannet, Christine; Bitoun, Pierre; Petit, Christine; Garabédian, Eréa-Noël; Couderc, Rémy; Marlin, Sandrine; Denoyelle, Françoise

    2006-06-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is the most frequent sensory deficit of childhood and is of genetic origin in up to 75% of cases. It has been shown that mutations of the SLC26A4 (PDS) gene were involved in syndromic deafness characterized by congenital sensorineural hearing impairment and goitre (Pendred's syndrome), as well as in congenital isolated deafness (DFNB4). While the prevalence of SLC26A4 mutations in Pendred's syndrome is clearly established, it remains to be studied in large cohorts of patients with nonsyndromic deafness and detailed clinical informations. In this report, 109 patients from 100 unrelated families, aged from 1 to 32 years (median age: 10 years), with nonsyndromic deafness and enlarged vestibular aqueduct, were genotyped for SLC26A4 using DHPLC molecular screening and sequencing. In all, 91 allelic variants were observed in 100 unrelated families, of which 19 have never been reported. The prevalence of SLC26A4 mutations was 40% (40/100), with biallelic mutation in 24% (24/100), while six families were homozygous. All patients included in this series had documented deafness, associated with EVA and without any evidence of syndromic disease. Among patients with SLC26A4 biallelic mutations, deafness was more severe, fluctuated more than in patients with no mutation. In conclusion, the incidence of SLC26A4 mutations is high in patients with isolated deafness and enlarged vestibular aqueduct and could represent up to 4% of nonsyndromic hearing impairment. SLC26A4 could be the second most frequent gene implicated in nonsyndromic deafness after GJB2, in this Caucasian population. PMID:16570074

  19. Acute Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Hammad; Fasanya, Adebayo; Cheema, Tariq; Singh, Anil C

    2016-01-01

    Acute pneumonia is an active infection of the lungs that results when an individual at risk gets exposed to a particular microbiological pathogen. Acute pneumonia is the leading cause of death in the United States that is attributable to an infection. The risk factors, pathogenesis, and microbiological organisms involved differ if the pneumonia develops in the community versus health care-associated environment. The development of concise and comprehensive guidelines has led to an improvement in the management of the problem. However, the emergence of multidrug-resistant organisms and the increase in the percentage of elderly population keep mortality risk very substantial. PMID:26919676

  20. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary α-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  1. HEARING IMPAIRMENT IN CHILDREN

    PubMed Central

    Kohlmoos, H. W.

    1953-01-01

    Abnormal behavior in children may frequently be caused by impairment of hearing. Early detection of the impairment and of the cause are of utmost importance, not only to prevent irreversible changes where that is possible, but to permit early beginning of special training for children who are permanently deaf. Recent studies have shown that deafness of infants may follow rubella in the mother in early pregnancy, or kernicterus caused by Rh incompatibilities. Measures to control these disorders are being investigated. Adequate and careful treatment of diseases of the nose, as well as surgical drainage of infected ears when necessary, are important factors in the prevention of hearing loss in children. PMID:13009516

  2. Comparison of Consanguinity between Parents of Hearing Impaired and Public School Children with Estimation of Risk.

    PubMed

    Sattar, M A; Sultana, M T

    2015-10-01

    Deafness is the hidden disability and the most common human sensory defects which lead to poor educational and employment prospects of childhood. Is there any association of consanguinity and hearing loss or are there any difference of association of consanguinity and hearing loss in specialized and public school children and how much risk is associated?--were the research questions of this study. Total 428 participants have been selected randomly. Hearing impaired were 186 participants and 242 participants were normal hearing school boy. This was a case control, analytical, hypotheses testing study. In normal public school children group, consanguinity was present in 2.5% parents. The rest were married with non relatives. In parents of hearing impaired children group, consanguinity was very high (17.2%). Pearson chi-square test and Odds ratio analysis was done. The value was less than 0.05 and ratio was 8.173. The 'p' value of Pearson chi-square test was less than 0.05. So, the test was highly significant at 95% confidence interval. Odds ratio showed that the risk of profound sensorineural hearing loss in the baby of parents of consanguineous marriages 8.173 times higher than that of non consanguineous marriages. PMID:26620013

  3. Better-ear glimpsing at low frequencies in normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners.

    PubMed

    Rana, Baljeet; Buchholz, Jörg M

    2016-08-01

    Better-ear glimpsing is an auditory process that takes advantage of short-term interaural level differences (ILDs) to improve the understanding of speech in spatial fluctuating noise. Since ILDs are mainly present at high frequencies, where most hearing-impaired (HI) listeners have the strongest hearing loss, HI individuals cannot fully utilize ILDs for better-ear glimpsing, which may lead to poorer understanding of speech in noise. This problem may be alleviated by hearing aids that artificially generate ILDs at low frequencies where hearing is typically less impaired. The present study therefore investigated the spatial benefit in speech intelligibility that is provided by better-ear glimpsing with low-frequency extended ILDs in a symmetric two-distractor speech background. Speech reception thresholds were measured in a spatially co-located and separated condition as a function of frequency region in ten normal-hearing (NH) and ten mild-to-moderate sensorineural HI subjects. In both groups the extended ILDs provided a substantial spatial advantage on top of the advantage already provided by natural ILDs. Moreover, the spatial advantage was largely independent of frequency region, suggesting that both NH and HI subjects can utilize low-frequency ILDs for improving speech understanding in noise. Overall performance as well as spatial advantage was reduced in the HI group. PMID:27586748

  4. Dysphagia Management in Acute and Sub-acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Vose, Alicia; Nonnenmacher, Jodi; Singer, Michele L.; González-Fernández, Marlís

    2014-01-01

    Swallowing dysfunction is common after stroke. More than 50% of the 665 thousand stroke survivors will experience dysphagia acutely of which approximately 80 thousand will experience persistent dysphagia at 6 months. The physiologic impairments that result in post-stroke dysphagia are varied. This review focuses primarily on well-established dysphagia treatments in the context of the physiologic impairments they treat. Traditional dysphagia therapies including volume and texture modifications, strategies such as chin tuck, head tilt, head turn, effortful swallow, supraglottic swallow, super-supraglottic swallow, Mendelsohn maneuver and exercises such as the Shaker exercise and Masako (tongue hold) maneuver are discussed. Other more recent treatment interventions are discussed in the context of the evidence available. PMID:26484001

  5. Dose-Response Analysis of Developmental Iodide Deficiency: Reductions in Thyroid Hormones and Impaired Hippocampal Synaptic Transmission

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iodide is an essential nutrient for thyroid hormone synthesis and severe iodide deficiency (ID) during early development is associated with neurological impairments. Several environmental contaminants can perturb the thyroid axis and this perturbation may be more acute under cond...

  6. [Cognitive Impairment in Patients with Bacterial Meningitis and Encephalitides].

    PubMed

    Kamei, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    Cognitive impairments, including dementia, can present as first symptoms at the acute stage, and/or as sequelae in the chronic stages, in some patients with bacterial meningitis (BM) or encephalitides. BM and encephalitides are lifethreatening neurological emergencies, and early recognition, efficient decision-making, and rapid commencement of therapy can be lifesaving. Empirical therapy should be initiated promptly whenever BM or encephalitides are a probable diagnosis. In this article cognitive impairments, including dementia, presenting in patients with BM, Herpes simplex virus encephalitis (HSVE), Human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) encephalitis, and Anti N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis are reviewed. In the above mentioned diseases, cognitive impairment without fever might be observed at the time of disease onset. cognitive impairment has been also noted in some aged or immunocompromised patients at the onset of BM. Immediate memory disturbance as one of the first symptoms of HHV-6 encephalitis presented in 74% of patients with this disease. Cognitive impairment, including dementia as sequela, was also found in 10-27% of patients with BM, 54-69% of patients with HSVE, 33% of HHV-6 encephalitis patients, and 39% of patients with anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis. Suitable therapeutic management of these diseases at the acute stage is thus required in order to avoid these sequelae. PMID:27056850

  7. Specific Language Impairment

    MedlinePlus

    ... to distinguish between children who are struggling to learn a new language and children with true language impairments. After studying a large group of Hispanic children who speak English as a second language, NIDCD-funded researchers have developed a dual ...

  8. Acute diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Barr, Wendy; Smith, Andrew

    2014-02-01

    Acute diarrhea in adults is a common problem encountered by family physicians. The most common etiology is viral gastroenteritis, a self-limited disease. Increases in travel, comorbidities, and foodborne illness lead to more bacteria-related cases of acute diarrhea. A history and physical examination evaluating for risk factors and signs of inflammatory diarrhea and/or severe dehydration can direct any needed testing and treatment. Most patients do not require laboratory workup, and routine stool cultures are not recommended. Treatment focuses on preventing and treating dehydration. Diagnostic investigation should be reserved for patients with severe dehydration or illness, persistent fever, bloody stool, or immunosuppression, and for cases of suspected nosocomial infection or outbreak. Oral rehydration therapy with early refeeding is the preferred treatment for dehydration. Antimotility agents should be avoided in patients with bloody diarrhea, but loperamide/simethicone may improve symptoms in patients with watery diarrhea. Probiotic use may shorten the duration of illness. When used appropriately, antibiotics are effective in the treatment of shigellosis, campylobacteriosis, Clostridium difficile, traveler's diarrhea, and protozoal infections. Prevention of acute diarrhea is promoted through adequate hand washing, safe food preparation, access to clean water, and vaccinations. PMID:24506120

  9. Sinusitis (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Acute sinusitis is defined pathologically, by transient inflammation of the mucosal lining of the paranasal sinuses lasting less than 4 weeks. Clinically, it is characterised by nasal congestion, rhinorrhoea, facial pain, hyposmia, sneezing, and, if more severe, additional malaise and fever. It affects 1−5% of the adult population each year in Europe. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments in people with clinically diagnosed acute sinusitis, and with radiologically or bacteriologically confirmed acute sinusitis? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to August 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 19 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics (amoxicillin, co-amoxiclav, doxycycline, cephalosporins, macrolides, different doses [amoxicillin, co-amoxiclav, doxycycline, cephalosporins, macrolides], long-course regimens), antihistamines, cephalosporins or macrolides, decongestants (xylometazoline, phenylephrine, pseudoephedrine), doxycycline, saline nasal washes, steam inhalation, and topical corticosteroids (intra-nasal). PMID:19450327

  10. Sinusitis (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Acute sinusitis is defined pathologically, by transient inflammation of the mucosal lining of the paranasal sinuses lasting less than 4 weeks. Clinically, it is characterised by nasal congestion, rhinorrhoea, facial pain, hyposmia, sneezing, and, if more severe, additional malaise and fever. It affects 1% to 5% of the adult population each year in Europe. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments in people with clinically diagnosed acute sinusitis, and in people with radiologically or bacteriologically confirmed acute sinusitis? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 19 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics (amoxicillin, amoxicillin–clavulanic acid [co-amoxiclav], doxycycline, cephalosporins, macrolides; different doses, long-course regimens), antihistamines, decongestants (xylometazoline, phenylephrine, pseudoephedrine), saline nasal washes, steam inhalation, and topical corticosteroids (intranasal). PMID:22189346

  11. Acute glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, N

    2000-09-01

    Acute glomerulonephritis (AGN) is a representative disease of acute nephritic syndrome characterized by the sudden appearance of edema, hematuria, proteinuria, and hypertension. The prototype of AGN is acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (APSGN). "Nephritogenic streptococci" are defined as organisms that are cultured from a patient who develops AGN. Although only a limited number of M-types of streptococci have been recognized as "nephritogenic streptococci", all M-types of streptococci may have nephritogenic potential because the genes for major putative nephritogenic antigens such as SPEB and NAPIr are found to be present in all group A streptococci thus far examined. Pathogenic mechanisms for APSGN involving both humoral and cell-mediated immunity have been recently proposed. The role of humoral immunity is presumed to be mediated by the in situ formation of nephritogenic streptococcal antigen-antibody complexes and circulating immune complexes. While in the cellular immune component a role for delayed-type hypersensitivity has been suggested to contribute to the pathogenesis of APSGN. PMID:10969898

  12. Management of acute myeloid leukemia during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Avivi, Irit; Brenner, Benjamin

    2014-06-01

    Diagnosis of acute leukemia during pregnancy presents significant medical challenges. Pancytopenia, caused by bone marrow substitution with leukemic cells, impairs maternal and fetal health. Chemotherapeutic agents required to be immediately used to save the mother's life are likely to adversely affect fetal development and outcome, especially if administered at an early gestational stage. Patients diagnosed with acute leukemia during the first trimester are, therefore, recommended to undergo pregnancy termination. At later gestational stages, antileukemic therapy can be administered, although in this case, fetal outcome is still associated with increased incidence of growth restriction and loss. Special attention to the issue of future reproduction, adopting a personalized fertility preservation approach, is required. This article addresses these subjects, presenting women diagnosed with acute myeloid and acute promyelocytic leukemia in pregnancy. The rarity of this event, resulting in insufficient data, emphasizes the need for collaborative efforts to optimize management of this complicated clinical condition. PMID:25052751

  13. Early features in acute macular neuroretinopathy.

    PubMed

    Garg, Anurag; Shah, Anish N; Richardson, Theresa; O'Sullivan, Eoin; Eleftheriadis, Haralabos

    2014-06-01

    Acute macular neuroretinopathy (AMNR) is a rare disorder characterised by acute onset of unilateral or bilateral visual impairment associated with reddish-brown wedge-shaped outer macular lesions. It is more frequently reported in young females and though the pathophysiology remains unclear, factors reported in association with its onset include post-viral illness and vasoconstrictor use. We report a case of AMNR in an 18-year old female patient presenting with a 2-day history of acute painless blurring of central vision bilaterally, following 1 month of preceding flu-like illness. For 1 week prior to presentation, the patient had taken large doses of oral preparations containing phenylephrine hydrochloride. In addition to demonstrating characteristic optical coherence tomography findings seen in AMNR, we illustrate some rarely seen acute ophthalmoscopic features. Based on associations from this case, we add further insight into the pathophysiology of this condition which remains poorly understood. PMID:24037593

  14. A missense variant of the ATP1A2 gene is associated with a novel phenotype of progressive sensorineural hearing loss associated with migraine.

    PubMed

    Oh, Se-Kyung; Baek, Jeong-In; Weigand, Karl M; Venselaar, Hanka; Swarts, Herman G P; Park, Seong-Hyun; Hashim Raza, Muhammad; Jung, Da Jung; Choi, Soo-Young; Lee, Sang-Heun; Friedrich, Thomas; Vriend, Gert; Koenderink, Jan B; Kim, Un-Kyung; Lee, Kyu-Yup

    2015-05-01

    Hereditary sensorineural hearing loss is an extremely clinical and genetic heterogeneous disorder in humans. Especially, syndromic hearing loss is subdivided by combinations of various phenotypes, and each subtype is related to different genes. We present a new form of progressive hearing loss with migraine found to be associated with a variant in the ATP1A2 gene. The ATP1A2 gene has been reported as the major genetic cause of familial migraine by several previous studies. A Korean family presenting progressive hearing loss with migraine was ascertained. The affected members did not show any aura or other neurologic symptoms during migraine attacks, indicating on a novel phenotype of syndromic hearing loss. To identify the causative gene, linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing were performed. A novel missense variant, c.571G>A (p.(Val191Met)), was identified in the ATP1A2 gene that showed co-segregation with the phenotype in the family. In silico studies suggest that this variant causes a change in hydrophobic interactions and thereby slightly destabilize the A-domain of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. However, functional studies failed to show any effect of the p.(Val191Met) substitution on the catalytic rate of this enzyme. We describe a new phenotype of progressive hearing loss with migraine associated with a variant in the ATP1A2 gene. This study suggests that a variant in Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase can be involved in both migraine and hearing loss. PMID:25138102

  15. CAOS-Episodic Cerebellar Ataxia, Areflexia, Optic Atrophy, and Sensorineural Hearing Loss: A Third Allelic Disorder of the ATP1A3 Gene.

    PubMed

    Heimer, Gali; Sadaka, Yair; Israelian, Lori; Feiglin, Ariel; Ruggieri, Alessandra; Marshall, Christian R; Scherer, Stephen W; Ganelin-Cohen, Esther; Marek-Yagel, Dina; Tzadok, Michal; Nissenkorn, Andreea; Anikster, Yair; Minassian, Berge A; Zeev, Bruria Ben

    2015-11-01

    We describe the molecular basis of a distinctive syndrome characterized by infantile stress-induced episodic weakness, ataxia, and sensorineural hearing loss, with permanent areflexia and optic nerve pallor. Whole exome sequencing identified a deleterious heterozygous c.2452 G>A, p.(E818K) variant in the ATP1A3 gene and structural analysis predicted its protein-destabilizing effect. This variant has not been reported in context with rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism and alternating hemiplegia of childhood, the 2 main diseases associated with ATP1A3. The clinical presentation in the family described here differs categorically from these diseases in age of onset, clinical course, cerebellar over extrapyramidal movement disorder predominance, and peripheral nervous system involvement. While this paper was in review, a highly resembling phenotype was reported in additional patients carrying the same c.2452 G>A variant. Our findings substantiate this variant as the cause of a unique inherited autosomal dominant neurologic syndrome that constitutes a third allelic disease of the ATP1A3 gene. PMID:25895915

  16. Exogenous IL-4-Expressing Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells for the Treatment of Autoimmune Sensorineural Hearing Loss in a Guinea Pig Model

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Chang-qiang; Gao, Xia; Guo, Lang; Huang, He

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) expressing recombinant IL-4 have the potential to remediate inflammatory diseases. We thus investigated whether BMSCs expressing exogenous IL-4 could alleviate autoimmune sensorineural hearing loss. BMSCs isolated from guinea pigs were transfected with recombinant lentivirus expressing IL-4. A total of 33 animals were divided into three groups. Group A received scala tympani injection of IL-4-expressing BMSCs, and Group B received control vector-expressing BMSCs, and Group C received phosphate-buffered saline. The distribution of implanted BMSCs in the inner ears was assessed by immunohistochemistry and fluorescence microscopy. Auditory brain-stem response (ABR) was monitored to evaluate the auditory changes. Following BMSCs transplantation, the threshold levels of ABR wave III decreased in Groups A and B and significant differences were observed between these two groups (P < 0.05). Transplanted BMSCs distributed in the scala tympani and scala vestibuli. In some ears with hearing loss, there was a decrease in the number of spiral ganglion cells and varying degrees of endolymphatic hydrops or floccule. Following transplantation, the lentivirus-infected BMSCs migrated to the inner ear and produced IL-4. Our results demonstrate that, upon transplantation, BMSCs and BMSCs expressing recombinant IL-4 have the ability to remediate the inflammatory injury in autoimmune inner ear diseases. PMID:24864261

  17. Association between the V Leiden G1691A mutation and sudden sensorineural hearing loss in Italian population: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Shu, Jingcheng; Si, Yongfeng; Yin, Shihua; He, Meirong

    2016-09-01

    Epidemiological studies have reported inconsistent findings on the association between the V Leiden G1691A mutation and sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) in Italian population. The aim of this meta-analysis was to clarify this association. PubMed, Embase, and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) were searched up to April 1, 2015. We used STATA12.0 to calculate summary odds ratios (ORs) with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs). Four studies including 958 patients were identified. Pooled data showed no significant association between V Leiden G1691A mutation and risk of SSNHL in Italian population: A vs. G (OR = 1.660, 95 % CI 0.428-6.446, P OR = 0.464) and AG vs. GG (OR = 1.680, 95 % CI 0.422-6.688, P OR = 0.462). The present meta-analysis suggests that V Leiden G1691A mutation is not significantly associated with increased risk of SSNHL disease in Italian population. Further large and well-designed studies are needed to confirm this association. PMID:26620341

  18. Grammatical Impairments in PPA

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Cynthia K.; Mack, Jennifer E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Grammatical impairments are commonly observed in the agrammatic subtype of primary progressive aphasia (PPA-G), whereas grammatical processing is relatively preserved in logopenic (PPA-L) and semantic (PPA-S) subtypes. Aims We review research on grammatical deficits in PPA and associated neural mechanisms, with discussion focused on production and comprehension of four aspects of morphosyntactic structure: grammatical morphology, functional categories, verbs and verb argument structure, and complex syntactic structures. We also address assessment of grammatical deficits in PPA, with emphasis on behavioral tests of grammatical processing. Finally, we address research examining the effects of treatment for progressive grammatical impairments. Main Contribution PPA-G is associated with grammatical deficits that are evident across linguistic domains in both production and comprehension. PPA-G is associated with damage to regions including the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and dorsal white matter tracts, which have been linked to impaired comprehension and production of complex sentences. Detailing grammatical deficits in PPA is important for estimating the trajectory of language decline and associated neuropathology. We, therefore, highlight several new assessment tools for examining different aspects of morphosyntactic processing in PPA. Conclusions Individuals with PPA-G present with agrammatic deficit patterns distinct from those associated with PPA-L and PPA-S, but similar to those seen in agrammatism resulting from stroke, and patterns of cortical atrophy and white matter changes associated with PPA-G have been identified. Methods for clinical evaluation of agrammatism, focusing on comprehension and production of grammatical morphology, functional categories, verbs and verb argument structure, and complex syntactic structures are recommended and tools for this are emerging in the literature. Further research is needed to investigate the real

  19. Hearing or speech impairment - resources

    MedlinePlus

    ... resources for information on hearing impairment or speech impairment: Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing -- www.agbell.org American Speech-Language-Hearing Association -- www.asha.org/public Center for ...

  20. Chemistry for the Visually Impaired.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratliff, Judy L.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses modifications to general education or introductory chemistry courses that allow visually impaired students to participate productively. Describes a strategy for teaching about elements and density, and the construction of a conductivity tester for visually impaired students. (JRH)

  1. Perceptual Weighting of Stop Consonant Cues by Normal and Impaired Listeners in Reverberation versus Noise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedrick, Mark S.; Younger, Mary Sue

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if listeners with normal hearing and listeners with sensorineural hearing loss give different perceptual weightings to cues for stop consonant place of articulation in noise versus reverberation listening conditions. Method: Nine listeners with normal hearing (23-28 years of age) and 10 listeners with sensorineural hearing…

  2. Neurological Impairment: Nomenclature and Consequences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spears, Catherine E.; Weber, Robert E.

    Neurological impairment as discussed includes a range of disabilities referred to as neurological impairment: minimal brain dysfunction/damage, developmental disability, perceptual handicap, learning disability, hyperkinetic behavioral syndrome, and others. Defined are causes of neurological impairment and methods of diagnosis. Symptoms…

  3. The impaired radiologist.

    PubMed

    Magnavita, N; Magnavita, G; Bergamaschi, A

    2010-08-01

    The concept of the "impaired physician" is an oxymoron. Physicians are by definition bearers of health, which can lead to overlooking the possibility of them contracting an illness that reduces their diagnostic and therapeutic abilities, with a consequent danger to their patients' health. The clinical reasons for which a radiologist may constitute a danger to patients can be divided into two categories: infectious blood-borne diseases, which can be transmitted to the patient during interventional radiology procedures; and neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders, including alcohol and drug abuse, which temporarily or permanently impair the faculty of judgement. All radiologists have a duty to periodically verify their own state of health and seek help as soon as possible when they fear it may be a danger. This individual responsibility towards one's own patients is flanked by the health and safety requirements provided by European regulations for radiologists who are employers, directors or department heads. The occupational health physician plays a key role in identifying and managing the impaired radiologist. PMID:20221712

  4. Diabetes and Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Zilliox, Lindsay A; Chadrasekaran, Krish; Kwan, Justin Y; Russell, James W

    2016-09-01

    Both type 1 (T1DM) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have been associated with reduced performance on multiple domains of cognitive function and with evidence of abnormal structural and functional brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Cognitive deficits may occur at the very earliest stages of diabetes and are further exacerbated by the metabolic syndrome. The duration of diabetes and glycemic control may have an impact on the type and severity of cognitive impairment, but as yet we cannot predict who is at greatest risk of developing cognitive impairment. The pathophysiology of cognitive impairment is multifactorial, although dysfunction in each interconnecting pathway ultimately leads to discordance in metabolic signaling. The pathophysiology includes defects in insulin signaling, autonomic function, neuroinflammatory pathways, mitochondrial (Mt) metabolism, the sirtuin-peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma co-activator 1α (SIRT-PGC-1α) axis, and Tau signaling. Several promising therapies have been identified in pre-clinical studies, but remain to be validated in clinical trials. PMID:27491830

  5. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES) After Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Tara; Al-Sharief, Khalid; Sethi, Vineeta; Ranger, Gurpreet S.

    2015-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is an unusual condition typified by acute visual impairment caused by sudden, marked parieto-occipital vasogenic edema. Thought to be inflammatory in origin, it has been described in patients undergoing chemotherapy, with autoimmune disease, and in some infections. We report a case of PRES that occurred one week after an episode of acute pancreatitis in an otherwise healthy 40-year-old female. There was progressive visual impairment over a 24-hour period with almost complete visual loss, with characteristic findings on magnetic resonance imaging. After treatment with steroids, the visual loss recovered. Clinicians should retain an index of suspicion of this rare condition in patients with visual impairment after acute pancreatitis. PMID:26759673

  6. Individual residual symptoms and functional impairment in patients with depression.

    PubMed

    Romera, Irene; Pérez, Víctor; Quail, Deborah; Berggren, Lovisa; Lenox-Smith, Alan; Gilaberte, Inmaculada

    2014-12-15

    The aim of treatment of depression is remission of symptoms and functioning. Although there is a relationship between remission of symptoms and remission of functioning, it is not known how individual residual symptoms are related to functioning. Here we report a post-hoc analysis of two studies which treated depressed patients with duloxetine in an open fashion for 10-12 weeks. We evaluated the association of individual residual symptoms and functional impairment in patients who remitted or partially remitted after acute treatment. Logistic regression was used to investigate residual symptoms associated with functional impairment at endpoint. Our results suggest that in partial remitters, the only residual symptom associated with a reduction in the risk of having impaired function was the resolution of painful physical symptoms (PPS). In patients who remitted, the presence of residual core mood symptoms (CMS), particularly in patients without any anxiety, predicted impaired functioning. The resolution of PPS in the presence of residual CMS was associated with less risk of impaired functioning. Our results contribute to understand better the role of specific residual symptoms on functional impairment. To achieve normal functioning, intervention on specific residual symptoms is recommended. PMID:25149132

  7. [Acute myocarditis].

    PubMed

    Combes, Alain

    2012-06-01

    Myocarditis is defined as inflammation of the myocardium accompanied by myocellular necrosis. Acute myocarditis must be considered in patients who present with recent-onset of cardiac failure or arrhythmia. Fulminant myocarditis is a distinct entity characterized by sudden onset of severe congestive heart failure or cardiogenic shock, usually following a flu-like illness, parvovirus B19, human herpesvirus 6, coxsackievirus and adenovirus being the most frequently viruses responsible for the disease. Treatment of myocarditis remains largely supportive, since immunosuppression has not been proven to be beneficial for acute lymphocytic myocarditis. Trials of antiviral therapies, or immunostimulants such as interferons, suggest a potential therapeutic role but require further investigation. Lastly, early recognition of patients rapidly progressing to refractory cardiac failure and their immediate transfer to a medical-surgical center experienced in mechanical circulatory support is warranted. In this setting, ECMO should be the first-line mechanical assistance. For highly unstable patients, a Mobile Cardiac Assistance Unit, that rapidly travels to primary care hospitals with a portable ECMO system and hooks it up before refractory multiorgan failure takes hold, is the preferred option. PMID:22515999

  8. [Acute myocarditis].

    PubMed

    Combes, Alain

    2013-05-01

    Myocarditis is defined as inflammation of the myocardium accompanied by myocellular necrosis. Acute myocarditis must be considered in patients who present with recent onset of cardiac failure or arrhythmia. Fulminant myocarditis is a distinct entity characterized by sudden onset of severe congestive heart failure or cardiogenic shock, usually following a flu-like illness, parvovirus B19, human herpesvirus 6, coxsackievirus and adenovirus being the most frequently viruses responsible for the disease. Treatment of myocarditis remains largely supportive, since immunosuppression has not been proven to be beneficial for acute lymphocytic myocarditis. Trials of antiviral therapies, or immunostimulants such as interferons, suggest a potential therapeutic role but require further investigation. Lastly, early recognition of patients rapidly progressing to refractory cardiac failure and their immediate transfer to a medical-surgical center experienced in mechanical circulatory support is warranted. In this setting, ECMO should be the first-line mechanical assistance. For highly unstable patients, a Mobile Cardiac Assistance Unit, that rapidly travels to primary care hospitals with a portable ECMO system and hooks it up before refractory multiorgan failure takes hold, is the preferred option. PMID:23789482

  9. ESTIMATED RATE OF FATAL AUTOMOBILE ACCIDENTS ATTRIBUTABLE TO ACUTE SOLVENT EXPOSURE AT LOW INHALED CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute solvent exposures may contribute to automobile accidents because they increase reaction time and decrease attention, in addition to impairing other behaviors. These effects resemble those of ethanol consumption, both with respect to behavioral effects and neurological mecha...

  10. Informational Masking in Normal-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Listeners Measured in a Nonspeech Pattern Identification Task.

    PubMed

    Roverud, Elin; Best, Virginia; Mason, Christine R; Swaminathan, Jayaganesh; Kidd, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) often experience more difficulty with listening in multisource environments than do normal-hearing (NH) listeners. While the peripheral effects of sensorineural hearing loss certainly contribute to this difficulty, differences in central processing of auditory information may also contribute. To explore this issue, it is important to account for peripheral differences between NH and these hearing-impaired (HI) listeners so that central effects in multisource listening can be examined. In the present study, NH and HI listeners performed a tonal pattern identification task at two distant center frequencies (CFs), 850 and 3500 Hz. In an attempt to control for differences in the peripheral representations of the stimuli, the patterns were presented at the same sensation level (15 dB SL), and the frequency deviation of the tones comprising the patterns was adjusted to obtain equal quiet pattern identification performance across all listeners at both CFs. Tonal sequences were then presented at both CFs simultaneously (informational masking conditions), and listeners were asked either to selectively attend to a source (CF) or to divide attention between CFs and identify the pattern at a CF designated after each trial. There were large differences between groups in the frequency deviations necessary to perform the pattern identification task. After compensating for these differences, there were small differences between NH and HI listeners in the informational masking conditions. HI listeners showed slightly greater performance asymmetry between the low and high CFs than did NH listeners, possibly due to central differences in frequency weighting between groups. PMID:27059627

  11. Informational Masking in Normal-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Listeners Measured in a Nonspeech Pattern Identification Task

    PubMed Central

    Best, Virginia; Mason, Christine R.; Swaminathan, Jayaganesh; Kidd, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) often experience more difficulty with listening in multisource environments than do normal-hearing (NH) listeners. While the peripheral effects of sensorineural hearing loss certainly contribute to this difficulty, differences in central processing of auditory information may also contribute. To explore this issue, it is important to account for peripheral differences between NH and these hearing-impaired (HI) listeners so that central effects in multisource listening can be examined. In the present study, NH and HI listeners performed a tonal pattern identification task at two distant center frequencies (CFs), 850 and 3500 Hz. In an attempt to control for differences in the peripheral representations of the stimuli, the patterns were presented at the same sensation level (15 dB SL), and the frequency deviation of the tones comprising the patterns was adjusted to obtain equal quiet pattern identification performance across all listeners at both CFs. Tonal sequences were then presented at both CFs simultaneously (informational masking conditions), and listeners were asked either to selectively attend to a source (CF) or to divide attention between CFs and identify the pattern at a CF designated after each trial. There were large differences between groups in the frequency deviations necessary to perform the pattern identification task. After compensating for these differences, there were small differences between NH and HI listeners in the informational masking conditions. HI listeners showed slightly greater performance asymmetry between the low and high CFs than did NH listeners, possibly due to central differences in frequency weighting between groups. PMID:27059627

  12. Acute cerebellar ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    Cerebellar ataxia; Ataxia - acute cerebellar; Cerebellitis; Post-varicella acute cerebellar ataxia; PVACA ... Acute cerebellar ataxia in children, especially younger than age 3, may occur several weeks after an illness caused by a virus. ...

  13. Ear infection - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Otitis media - acute; Infection - inner ear; Middle ear infection - acute ... Casselbrandt ML, Mandel EM. Acute otitis media and otitis media with effusion. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund V, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 6th ed. ...

  14. Neuropsychological impairments in anorexia nervosa: a spanish sample pilot study.

    PubMed

    Oltra-Cucarella, Javier; Espert, Raul; Rojo, Luís; Jacas, Carlos; Guillén, Verónica; Moreno, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    This work was aimed at obtaining a profile of neuropsychological impairments in young Spanish participants with anorexia nervosa (AN) to demonstrate that right-hemisphere and frontal capacity impairments are present not only in the acute phase but also after weight recovery in a Spanish sample compared with a healthy control group. Twelve patients with AN in the acute phase (body mass index [BMI] < 17) were compared both to 16 healthy control subjects and 12 weight-recovered AN participants (BMI ≥ 17) matched by age, IQ, and educational level by utilizing a wide neuropsychological battery. Differences were found between AN groups only for long-term verbal memory, which worsens as BMI increases. Among participants with AN as a group, results showed differences in speed of information processing, working memory, visual memory, and inhibition, unrelated to attentional capabilities. We cannot support the hypothesis of a specific right cerebral dysfunction in patients with AN. A general cognitive dysfunction, primarily in information processing, working memory, visual and verbal memory, as well as frontal impairments such as impulsivity and poor behavioral control, appeared unrelated to BMI. We support previous works affirming that neuropsychological impairments in AN are not a consequence of the illness but a risk factor for it to develop. PMID:25084841

  15. A Sound Therapy-Based Intervention to Expand the Auditory Dynamic Range for Loudness among Persons with Sensorineural Hearing Losses: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Formby, Craig; Hawley, Monica L.; Sherlock, LaGuinn P.; Gold, Susan; Payne, JoAnne; Brooks, Rebecca; Parton, Jason M.; Juneau, Roger; Desporte, Edward J.; Siegle, Gregory R.

    2015-01-01

    The primary aim of this research was to evaluate the validity, efficacy, and generalization of principles underlying a sound therapy–based treatment for promoting expansion of the auditory dynamic range (DR) for loudness. The basic sound therapy principles, originally devised for treatment of hyperacusis among patients with tinnitus, were evaluated in this study in a target sample of unsuccessfully fit and/or problematic prospective hearing aid users with diminished DRs (owing to their elevated audiometric thresholds and reduced sound tolerance). Secondary aims included: (1) delineation of the treatment contributions from the counseling and sound therapy components to the full-treatment protocol and, in turn, the isolated treatment effects from each of these individual components to intervention success; and (2) characterization of the respective dynamics for full, partial, and control treatments. Thirty-six participants with bilateral sensorineural hearing losses and reduced DRs, which affected their actual or perceived ability to use hearing aids, were enrolled in and completed a placebo-controlled (for sound therapy) randomized clinical trial. The 2 × 2 factorial trial design was implemented with or without various assignments of counseling and sound therapy. Specifically, participants were assigned randomly to one of four treatment groups (nine participants per group), including: (1) group 1—full treatment achieved with scripted counseling plus sound therapy implemented with binaural sound generators; (2) group 2—partial treatment achieved with counseling and placebo sound generators (PSGs); (3) group 3—partial treatment achieved with binaural sound generators alone; and (4) group 4—a neutral control treatment implemented with the PSGs alone. Repeated measurements of categorical loudness judgments served as the primary outcome measure. The full-treatment categorical-loudness judgments for group 1, measured at treatment termination, were

  16. Bi-allelic Truncating Mutations in CEP78, Encoding Centrosomal Protein 78, Cause Cone-Rod Degeneration with Sensorineural Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Namburi, Prasanthi; Ratnapriya, Rinki; Khateb, Samer; Lazar, Csilla H; Kinarty, Yael; Obolensky, Alexey; Erdinest, Inbar; Marks-Ohana, Devorah; Pras, Eran; Ben-Yosef, Tamar; Newman, Hadas; Gross, Menachem; Swaroop, Anand; Banin, Eyal; Sharon, Dror

    2016-09-01

    Inherited retinal diseases (IRDs) are a diverse group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous retinal abnormalities. The present study was designed to identify genetic defects in individuals with an uncommon combination of autosomal recessive progressive cone-rod degeneration accompanied by sensorineural hearing loss (arCRD-SNHL). Homozygosity mapping followed by whole-exome sequencing (WES) and founder mutation screening revealed two truncating rare variants (c.893-1G>A and c.534delT) in CEP78, which encodes centrosomal protein 78, in six individuals of Jewish ancestry with CRD and SNHL. RT-PCR analysis of CEP78 in blood leukocytes of affected individuals revealed that the c.893-1G>A mutation causes exon 7 skipping leading to deletion of 65bp, predicted to result in a frameshift and therefore a truncated protein (p.Asp298Valfs(∗)17). RT-PCR analysis of 17 human tissues demonstrated ubiquitous expression of different CEP78 transcripts. RNA-seq analysis revealed three transcripts in the human retina and relatively higher expression in S-cone-like photoreceptors of Nrl-knockout retina compared to rods. Immunohistochemistry studies in the human retina showed intense labeling of cone inner segments compared to rods. CEP78 was reported previously to interact with c-nap1, encoded by CEP250 that we reported earlier to cause atypical Usher syndrome. We conclude that truncating mutations in CEP78 result in a phenotype involving both the visual and auditory systems but different from typical Usher syndrome. PMID:27588452

  17. The efficacy and safety of systemic injection of Ginkgo biloba extract, EGb761, in idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss: a randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Koo, Ja-Won; Chang, Mun Young; Yun, Sung-Cheol; Kim, Tae Su; Kong, Soo-Keun; Chung, Jong Woo; Goh, Eui-Kyung

    2016-09-01

    Steroids are currently the most frequently accepted agents for idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL). However, the therapeutic effect of steroids is not always satisfactory. In this pilot study, we evaluated whether systemic treatment with Ginkgo biloba extract (EGb761) has an additive therapeutic effect in patients receiving a systemic steroid due to ISSNHL. A multicenter, randomized, double-blind clinical trial was performed. Fifty-six patients with ISSNHL were allocated to either EGb761 or placebo. In both groups, methylprednisolone was administered for 14 days. EGb761 was infused intravenously for 5 days in the EGb761 group, while the same amount of normal saline was infused in the placebo group. For the efficacy evaluation, pure-tone audiometry, speech audiometry, tinnitus handicap inventory (THI) and short form-36 health (SF-36) survey outcomes were obtained before administration and on days 3, 5, 14 and 28 of administration. Twenty-four patients in each group completed the study protocol. There was no difference in hearing loss between the two groups before treatment. At day 28, air conduction threshold values in the placebo and EGb761 groups were 34.63 ± 28.90 and 23.84 ± 25.42 dB, respectively (p = 0.082). Speech discrimination scores in the placebo and EGb761 groups were 69.17 ± 40.89 and 87.48 ± 28.65 %, respectively (p = 0.050). THI and SF-36 scores in the placebo and EGb761 groups were similar. Although a combination of steroid and EGb761 for initial treatment did not show better pure tone threshold, compared with steroid alone, speech discrimination was significantly improved in combination therapy. Further studies will be needed to know if addition of EGb761 actually improves the outcome of ISSNHL treatment. PMID:26559533

  18. Establishment of a Flexible Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction-Based Platform for Detecting Prevalent Deafness Mutations Associated with Variable Degree of Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Koreans.

    PubMed

    Han, Kyu-Hee; Kim, Ah Reum; Kim, Min Young; Ahn, Soyeon; Oh, Seung-Ha; Song, Ju Hun; Choi, Byung Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Many cutting-edge technologies based on next-generation sequencing (NGS) have been employed to identify candidate variants responsible for sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). However, these methods have limitations preventing their wide clinical use for primary screening, in that they remain costly and it is not always suitable to analyze massive amounts of data. Several different DNA chips have been developed for screening prevalent mutations at a lower cost. However, most of these platforms do not offer the flexibility to add or remove target mutations, thereby limiting their wider use in a field that requires frequent updates. Therefore, we aimed to establish a simpler and more flexible molecular diagnostic platform based on ethnicity-specific mutation spectrums of SNHL, which would enable bypassing unnecessary filtering steps in a substantial portion of cases. In addition, we expanded the screening platform to cover varying degrees of SNHL. With this aim, we selected 11 variants of 5 genes (GJB2, SLC26A4, MTRNR1, TMPRSS3, and CDH23) showing high prevalence with varying degrees in Koreans and developed the U-TOP™ HL Genotyping Kit, a real-time PCR-based method using the MeltingArray technique and peptide nucleic acid probes. The results of 271 DNA samples with wild type sequences or mutations in homo- or heterozygote form were compared between the U-TOP™ HL Genotyping Kit and Sanger sequencing. The positive and negative predictive values were 100%, and this method showed perfect agreement with Sanger sequencing, with a Kappa value of 1.00. The U-TOP™ HL Genotyping Kit showed excellent performance in detecting varying degrees and phenotypes of SNHL mutations in both homozygote and heterozygote forms, which are highly prevalent in the Korean population. This platform will serve as a useful and cost-effective first-line screening tool for varying degrees of genetic SNHL and facilitate genome-based personalized hearing rehabilitation for the Korean population

  19. The visually impaired child.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Lisa; Kaufman, Lawrence M

    2003-02-01

    This article discusses the causes of childhood blindness and how the primary care provider may begin the appropriate steps toward diagnosing and managing the visually impaired child. Community resources (see Box 3) and low-vision programs in schools should be used so that parents do not need to reinvent strategies to raise a blind child. Worldwide, childhood blindness, which places is a tremendous burden on families and communities of the third world, is mostly preventable with improved hygiene, diet, and immunization. PMID:12713115

  20. Acute pain.

    PubMed

    Good, M

    1999-01-01

    The review of acute pain describes the problem of unresolved pain and its effects on the neural, autonomic, and immune systems. Conceptualizations and mechanisms of pain are reviewed as well as theories of pain management. Descriptive studies of patient and nurse factors that inhibit effective pain management are discussed, followed by studies of pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions. Critical analysis reveals that most studies were atheoretical, and therefore, this proliferation of information lacked conceptual coherence and organization. Furthermore, the nature and extent of barriers to pain management were described, but few intervention studies have been devised, as yet, to modify the knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes of nurses and patients that are barriers to pain management. Although some of the complementary therapies have sufficient research support to be used in clinical pain management, the physiological mechanisms and outcomes need to be studied. It is critical at this time to design studies of interventions to improve assessment, decision making, attentive care, and patient teaching. PMID:10418655

  1. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Associated with Tumor Lysis Syndrome in a Child with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Macaluso, Alessandra; Genova, Selene; Maringhini, Silvio; Coffaro, Giancarlo; Ziino, Ottavio; D’Angelo, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Tumor lysis syndrome is a serious and dangerous complication usually associated with antiblastic treatment in some malignancies characterized by high cell turn-over. Mild or severe electrolyte abnormalities including high serum levels of uric acid, potassium, phosphorus, creatinine, bun and reduction of calcium can be responsible for multi-organ failure, involving mostly kidneys, heart and central nervous system. Renal damage can be followed by acute renal failure, weight gain, progressive liver impairment, overproduction of cytokines, and subsequent maintenance of multi-organ damage. Life-threatening acute respiratory failure associated with tumor lysis syndrome is rare. We describe a child with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, who developed an unusually dramatic tumor lysis syndrome, after administration of the first low doses of steroid, that was rapidly associated with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. Subsequent clinical course and treatment modalities that resulted in the gradual and full recovery of the child are also described. PMID:25918625

  2. Specific language impairment.

    PubMed

    Kamhi, Alan G; Clark, Mary Kristen

    2013-01-01

    The acquisition of language is one of the most important achievements in young children, in part because most children appear to acquire language with little effort. Some children are not so fortunate, however. There is a large group of children who also have difficulty learning language, but do not have obvious neurological, cognitive, sensory, emotional, or environmental deficits. Clinicians often refer to these children as language disordered or language impaired. Researchers tend to refer to these children as specific language impaired (SLI). Children with SLI have intrigued researchers for many years because there is no obvious reason for their language learning difficulties. SLI has been found to be an enduring condition that begins in early childhood and often persists into adolescence and adulthood. The language problems of children with SLI are not limited to spoken language; they also affect reading and writing and thus much of academic learning. Knowledge of the characteristics of SLI should aid physicians, pediatricians, and early childhood specialists to identify these children during the preschool years and ensure that they receive appropriate services. With high-quality language intervention and literacy instruction, most children with SLI should be able to perform and function adequately in school and beyond. PMID:23622167

  3. Dimethylfumarate Impairs Neutrophil Functions.

    PubMed

    Müller, Susen; Behnen, Martina; Bieber, Katja; Möller, Sonja; Hellberg, Lars; Witte, Mareike; Hänsel, Martin; Zillikens, Detlef; Solbach, Werner; Laskay, Tamás; Ludwig, Ralf J

    2016-01-01

    Host defense against pathogens relies on neutrophil activation. Inadequate neutrophil activation is often associated with chronic inflammatory diseases. Neutrophils also constitute a significant portion of infiltrating cells in chronic inflammatory diseases, for example, psoriasis and multiple sclerosis. Fumarates improve the latter diseases, which so far has been attributed to the effects on lymphocytes and dendritic cells. Here, we focused on the effects of dimethylfumarate (DMF) on neutrophils. In vitro, DMF inhibited neutrophil activation, including changes in surface marker expression, reactive oxygen species production, formation of neutrophil extracellular traps, and migration. Phagocytic ability and autoantibody-induced, neutrophil-dependent tissue injury ex vivo was also impaired by DMF. Regarding the mode of action, DMF modulates-in a stimulus-dependent manner-neutrophil activation using the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 pathways. For in vivo validation, mouse models of epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, an organ-specific autoimmune disease caused by autoantibodies to type VII collagen, were employed. In the presence of DMF, blistering induced by injection of anti-type VII collagen antibodies into mice was significantly impaired. DMF treatment of mice with clinically already-manifested epidermolysis bullosa acquisita led to disease improvement. Collectively, we demonstrate a profound inhibitory activity of DMF on neutrophil functions. These findings encourage wider use of DMF in patients with neutrophil-mediated diseases. PMID:26763431

  4. Impaired executive functioning after left anterior insular stroke: a case report.

    PubMed

    Markostamou, Ioanna; Rudolf, Jobst; Tsiptsios, Iakovos; Kosmidis, Mary H

    2015-01-01

    Given the insular's anatomic complexity and functional interconnectivity, acute lesions may result in varied clinical presentations, including autonomic, somatosensory, perceptual, motor, affective, and cognitive deficits. Although functional neuroimaging studies have demonstrated its role in executive functions, no clinical manifestations have been reported to date. We present the case of a woman with an acute left anterior insular infarction leading to executive (i.e., word and design fluency, mental flexibility, sustained attention, inhibitory control), but not language, visuoperceptual, or memory impairment. This case confirms the left anterior insula's involvement in executive functioning and suggests that an infarction may result in executive impairment. PMID:25537237

  5. Renal Dysfunction in Acute Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seong Woo

    2011-01-01

    During treatment of acute heart failure (AHF), worsening renal function is often complicated and results in a complex clinical course. Furthermore, renal dysfunction is a strong independent predictor of long-term adverse outcomes in patients with AHF. Traditionally, the predominant cause of renal dysfunction has been attributed to impairment of cardiac output and relative underfilling of arterial perfusion. Recently, emerging data have led to the importance of venous congestion and elevated intra-abdominal pressure rather than confining it to impaired forward cardiac output as the primary driver of renal impairment. Relief of congestion is a major objective of AHF treatment but therapy is still based on the administration of loop diuretics. The results of the recently performed controlled studies for the assessment of new treatments to overcome resistance to diuretic treatment to protect kidneys from untoward effects have been mostly neutral. Better treatment of congestion in heart failure remains a major problem. PMID:22125554

  6. Acute optic neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Galetta, Steven L.; Villoslada, Pablo; Levin, Netta; Shindler, Kenneth; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Parr, Edward; Cadavid, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic demyelinating optic neuritis (ON) most commonly presents as acute unilateral vision loss and eye pain and is frequently associated with multiple sclerosis. Although emphasis is often placed on the good recovery of high-contrast visual acuity, persistent deficits are frequently observed in other aspects of vision, including contrast sensitivity, visual field testing, color vision, motion perception, and vision-related quality of life. Persistent and profound structural and functional changes are often revealed by imaging and electrophysiologic techniques, including optical coherence tomography, visual-evoked potentials, and nonconventional MRI. These abnormalities can impair patients' abilities to perform daily activities (e.g., driving, working) so they have important implications for patients' quality of life. In this article, we review the sequelae from ON, including clinical, structural, and functional changes and their interrelationships. The unmet needs in each of these areas are considered and the progress made toward meeting those needs is examined. Finally, we provide an overview of past and present investigational approaches for disease modification in ON. PMID:26236761

  7. A boy with mild mental retardation, mild sensorineural hearing loss and mild facial dysmorphism caused by a 19p13.2 deletion: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Schwemmle, Cornelia; Rost, Imma; Spranger, Stephanie; Jungheim, Michael; Ptok, Martin

    2014-07-01

    The investigation of patients with congenital anomalies and/or intellectual disability with modern genetic methods allows the recognition of an increasing number of cases with these chromosomal rearrangements. Here, we present a mildly mentally retarded boy with mild facial dysmorphism, language development delay, mild sensorineural hearing loss due to a deletion of 1,14 Mb on chromosome 19p 13.2. The deletion was de novo and familial history negative for this disorder. To our knowledge this is the first description of a patient with symptoms mentioned above associated with a 19p13.2-p13.2 deletion. PMID:24814572

  8. Neurological complications of acute multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy.

    PubMed

    Brownlee, W J; Anderson, N E; Sims, J; Pereira, J A

    2016-09-01

    Acute multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy (AMPPE) is an autoimmune chorioretinal disease that can be complicated by neurological involvement. There is limited information on this potentially treatable condition in the neurological literature. The objective of this patient series is to describe the neurological complications of AMPPE. We retrospectively identified patients with neurological complications of AMPPE seen at Auckland Hospital between 2008 and 2013 and summarised cases in the literature between 1976 and 2013. We identified five patients with neurological complications of AMPPE at Auckland Hospital and 47 reported patients. These patients demonstrated a spectrum of neurological involvement including isolated headache, stroke or transient ischaemic attack, seizures, venous sinus thrombosis, optic neuritis, sensorineural hearing loss and peripheral vestibular disorder. We propose criteria to define AMPPE with neurological complications. A cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lymphocytosis in a patient with isolated headache may predict the development of cerebrovascular complications of AMPPE. Patients with cerebrovascular complications of AMPPE have a poor prognosis with high rates of death and neurological disability among survivors. Predictors of poor outcome in those who develop neurological complications of AMPPE are a relapsing course, generalised seizures and multifocal infarction on MRI. All patients with neurological complications of AMPPE, including headache alone, should be investigated with an MRI brain and CSF examination. Patients with focal neurological symptoms should receive intravenous (IV) methylprednisolone followed by a tapering course of oral steroids for at least 3months. Patients with AMPPE and an isolated headache with a CSF pleocytosis should be treated with oral steroids. PMID:27183958

  9. Vascular cognitive impairment and dementia.

    PubMed

    Gorelick, Philip B; Counts, Scott E; Nyenhuis, David

    2016-05-01

    Vascular contributions to cognitive impairment are receiving heightened attention as potentially modifiable factors for dementias of later life. These factors have now been linked not only to vascular cognitive disorders but also Alzheimer's disease. In this chapter we review 3 related topics that address vascular contributions to cognitive impairment: 1. vascular pathogenesis and mechanisms; 2. neuropsychological and neuroimaging phenotypic manifestations of cerebrovascular disease; and 3. prospects for prevention of cognitive impairment of later life based on cardiovascular and stroke risk modification. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock. PMID:26704177

  10. Developmental hearing loss impairs signal detection in noise: putative central mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Jennifer D.; Voytenko, Sergiy V.; Galazyuk, Alexander V.; Rosen, Merri J.

    2014-01-01

    Listeners with hearing loss have difficulty processing sounds in noisy environments. This is most noticeable for speech perception, but is reflected in a basic auditory processing task: detecting a tonal signal in a noise background, i.e., simultaneous masking. It is unresolved whether the mechanisms underlying simultaneous masking arise from the auditory periphery or from the central auditory system. Poor detection in listeners with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is attributed to cochlear hair cell damage. However, hearing loss alters neural processing in the central auditory system. Additionally, both psychophysical and neurophysiological data from normally hearing and impaired listeners suggest that there are additional contributions to simultaneous masking that arise centrally. With SNHL, it is difficult to separate peripheral from central contributions to signal detection deficits. We have thus excluded peripheral contributions by using an animal model of early conductive hearing loss (CHL) that provides auditory deprivation but does not induce cochlear damage. When tested as adults, animals raised with CHL had increased thresholds for detecting tones in simultaneous noise. Furthermore, intracellular in vivo recordings in control animals revealed a cortical correlate of simultaneous masking: local cortical processing reduced tone-evoked responses in the presence of noise. This raises the possibility that altered cortical responses which occur with early CHL can influence even simple signal detection in noise. PMID:25249949

  11. Noise induced hearing loss impairs spatial learning/memory and hippocampal neurogenesis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lijie; Shen, Pei; He, Tingting; Chang, Ying; Shi, Lijuan; Tao, Shan; Li, Xiaowei; Xun, Qingying; Guo, Xiaojing; Yu, Zhiping; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Hearing loss has been associated with cognitive decline in the elderly and is considered to be an independent risk factor for dementia. One of the most common causes for acquired sensorineural hearing loss is exposure to excessive noise, which has been found to impair learning ability and cognitive performance in human subjects and animal models. Noise exposure has also been found to depress neurogenesis in the hippocampus. However, the effect is mainly attributed to the oxidant stress of noise on the cognitive brain. In the present study, young adult CBA/CAJ mice (between 1.5 and 2 months of age) were briefly exposed a high sound level to produce moderate-to-severe hearing loss. In both the blood and hippocampus, only transient oxidative stress was observed after noise exposure. However, a deficit in spatial learning/memory was revealed 3 months after noise exposure. Moreover, the deficit was correlated with the degree of hearing loss and was associated with a decrease in neurogenesis in the hippocampus. We believe that the observed effects were likely due to hearing loss rather than the initial oxidant stress, which only lasted for a short period of time. PMID:26842803

  12. Excitatory, inhibitory and facilitatory frequency response areas in the inferior colliculus of hearing impaired mice.

    PubMed

    Felix, Richard A; Portfors, Christine V

    2007-06-01

    Individuals with age-related hearing loss often have difficulty understanding complex sounds such as basic speech. The C57BL/6 mouse suffers from progressive sensorineural hearing loss and thus is an effective tool for dissecting the neural mechanisms underlying changes in complex sound processing observed in humans. Neural mechanisms important for processing complex sounds include multiple tuning and combination sensitivity, and these responses are common in the inferior colliculus (IC) of normal hearing mice. We examined neural responses in the IC of C57Bl/6 mice to single and combinations of tones to examine the extent of spectral integration in the IC after age-related high frequency hearing loss. Ten percent of the neurons were tuned to multiple frequency bands and an additional 10% displayed non-linear facilitation to the combination of two different tones (combination sensitivity). No combination-sensitive inhibition was observed. By comparing these findings to spectral integration properties in the IC of normal hearing CBA/CaJ mice, we suggest that high frequency hearing loss affects some of the neural mechanisms in the IC that underlie the processing of complex sounds. The loss of spectral integration properties in the IC during aging likely impairs the central auditory system's ability to process complex sounds such as speech. PMID:17412539

  13. The effects of an acute psychosocial stressor on episodic memory

    PubMed Central

    Stawski, Robert S.; Sliwinski, Martin J.; Smyth, Joshua M.

    2009-01-01

    Although stressors are believed to impair memory, experimental studies with humans have provided inconsistent support for this conclusion. The current study was designed to examine the effect of an acute psychosocial stressor, and subsequent reactivity, on episodic memory. One hundred participants completed a list-recall task before and after random assignment into a stressor or nonstressor condition. Participants assigned to the stressor condition exhibited both impaired delayed and immediate recall, and also exhibited increasesin the commission of intrusions and perseverations. The experience of off-task thoughts and intentional suppression of such thoughts, were associated with greater impairment of immediate recall. Changes in state anxiety, negative mood, and heart rate were unrelated to changes in memory. These data indicate that exposure to a stressor impaired the recall of previously learned information, and compromised the recall of newly acquired information. Furthermore, cognitive interference is an important factor regarding stress-related impairments of episodic memory. memory. PMID:19727439

  14. Traumatic Memories in Acute Stress Disorder: An Analysis of Narratives before and after Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moulds, Michelle L.; Bryant, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    The dissociative reactions in acute stress disorder purportedly impede encoding and organization of traumatic memories and consequently impair the individual's ability to retrieve trauma-related details. A qualitative examination was conducted on trauma narratives of individuals with acute stress disorder (N = 15) prior to cognitive behavior…

  15. Acute Stress Symptoms in Children: Results From an International Data Archive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kassam-Adams, Nancy; Palmieri, Patrick A.; Rork, Kristine; Delahanty, Douglas L.; Kenardy, Justin; Kohser, Kristen L.; Landolt, Markus A.; Le Brocque, Robyne; Marsac, Meghan L.; Meiser-Stedman, Richard; Nixon, Reginald D.V.; Bui, Eric; McGrath, Caitlin

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To describe the prevalence of acute stress disorder (ASD) symptoms and to examine proposed "DSM-5" symptom criteria in relation to concurrent functional impairment in children and adolescents. Method: From an international archive, datasets were identified that included assessment of acute traumatic stress reactions and concurrent…

  16. Impaired Verb Fluency: A Sign of Mild Cognitive Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostberg, Per; Fernaeus, Sven-Erik; Hellstrom, Ake; Bogdanovic, Nenad; Wahlund, Lars Olof

    2005-01-01

    We assessed verb fluency vs. noun and letter-based fluency in 199 subjects referred for cognitive complaints including Subjective Cognitive Impairment, Mild Cognitive Impairment, and Alzheimer's disease. ANCOVAs and factor analyses identified verb, noun, and letter-based fluency as distinct tasks. Verb fluency performance in Mild Cognitive…

  17. Acute and long term respiratory damage following inhalation of ammonia.

    PubMed Central

    Leduc, D; Gris, P; Lheureux, P; Gevenois, P A; De Vuyst, P; Yernault, J C

    1992-01-01

    A lifelong non-smoker who was the victim of a massive accidental exposure to anhydrous ammonia gas was followed up for 10 years. In the acute phase the patient presented with severe tracheobronchitis and respiratory failure, caused by very severe burns of the respiratory mucosa. After some improvement he was left with severe and fixed airways obstruction. Isotope studies of mucociliary clearance, computed tomography, and bronchography showed mild bronchiectasis. It is concluded that acute exposure to high concentrations of ammonia may lead to acute respiratory injury but also to long term impairment of respiratory function. Images PMID:1440475

  18. Influence of high carbohydrate versus high fat diet in ozone induced pulmonary injury and systemic metabolic impairment in a Brown Norway (BN) rat model of healthy aging

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Air pollution has been recently linked to the increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome. It has been postulated that dietary risk factors might exacerbate air pollution-induced metabolic impairment. We have recently reported that ozone exposure induces acute systemic ...

  19. Astrocytes Underlie Neuroinflammatory Memory Impairment.

    PubMed

    Osso, Lindsay A; Chan, Jonah R

    2015-12-17

    Neuroinflammation is being increasingly recognized as a potential mediator of cognitive impairments in various neurological conditions. Habbas et al. demonstrate that the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha signals through astrocytes to alter synaptic transmission and impair cognition in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis. PMID:26687350

  20. Communication Disorders and Treatment in the Acute Trauma Center Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz-Cowley, Roberta; Stepanik, Mark J.

    1989-01-01

    The Shock Trauma Center of the Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems instituted a comprehensive speech-language pathology program to provide acute intervention for communicative disorders in a critical/intensive care environment. This article provides a profile of the Center, a review of communicative impairments, and examples…

  1. De novo 9 Mb deletion of 6q23.2q24.1 disrupting the gene EYA4 in a patient with sensorineural hearing loss, cardiac malformation, and mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Dutrannoy, Véronique; Klopocki, Eva; Wei, Ran; Bommer, Christiane; Mundlos, Stefan; Graul-Neumann, Luitgard M; Trimborn, Marc

    2009-01-01

    We report on a patient carrying a de novo interstitial deletion of chromosomal region 6q23.2-24.1. Interstitial deletions of 6q are rarely reported in the literature. Indeed, only four patients with interstitial deletions overlapping partially with the deleted region in our patient are described in the literature. The aberration was detected by GTG-banding. The size of the deletion was further refined by array-CGH and subsequently fine mapped by quantitative real-time PCR. The exact size of the deletion and the sequence composition of the breakpoints were determined by breakpoint spanning PCR and subsequent sequencing. The patient presented with microcephaly, short stature, patent ductus arteriosus, sensorineural hearing loss, mental retardation, reduced speech development, and abnormal behaviour. The deletion disrupts the gene EYA4. Mutations within this gene are associated with postlingual sensorineural hearing loss. The sequencing of the breakpoint indicated non homologous end joining as the most likely mechanism leading to the rearrangement. PMID:19576303

  2. The A1555G Mutation in the 12S rRNA Gene of Human mtDNA: Recurrent Origins and Founder Events in Families Affected by Sensorineural Deafness

    PubMed Central

    Torroni, Antonio; Cruciani, Fulvio; Rengo, Chiara; Sellitto, Daniele; López-Bigas, Núria; Rabionet, Raquel; Govea, Nancy; López de Munain, Adolfo; Sarduy, Maritza; Romero, Lourdes; Villamar, Manuela; del Castillo, Ignacio; Moreno, Felipe; Estivill, Xavier; Scozzari, Rosaria

    1999-01-01

    Summary The mtDNA variation of 50 Spanish and 4 Cuban families affected by nonsyndromic sensorineural deafness due to the A1555G mutation in the 12S rRNA gene was studied by high-resolution RFLP analysis and sequencing of the control region. Phylogenetic analyses of haplotypes and detailed survey of population controls revealed that the A1555G mutation can be attributed to ⩾30 independent mutational events among the 50 Spanish families and that it occurs on mtDNA haplogroups that are common in all European populations. This indicates that the relatively high detection rate of this mutation in Spain is not due to sampling biases or to a single major founder event. Moreover, the distribution of these mutational events on different haplogroups is compatible with a random occurrence of the A1555G mutation and tends to support the conclusion that mtDNA backgrounds do not play a significant role in the expression of the mutation. Overall, these findings appear to indicate that the rare detection of this mutation in other populations is most likely due to inadequacy in patient ascertainment and molecular screening. This probable lack of identification of the A1555G mutation in subjects affected by sensorineural hearing loss implies that their maternally related relatives are not benefiting from presymptomatic detection and information concerning their increased risk of ototoxicity due to aminoglycoside treatments. PMID:10521300

  3. Glucocorticoids mediate stress-induced impairment of retrieval of stimulus-response memory.

    PubMed

    Atsak, Piray; Guenzel, Friederike M; Kantar-Gok, Deniz; Zalachoras, Ioannis; Yargicoglu, Piraye; Meijer, Onno C; Quirarte, Gina L; Wolf, Oliver T; Schwabe, Lars; Roozendaal, Benno

    2016-05-01

    Acute stress and elevated glucocorticoid hormone levels are well known to impair the retrieval of hippocampus-dependent 'declarative' memory. Recent findings suggest that stress might also impair the retrieval of non-hippocampal memories. In particular, stress shortly before retention testing was shown to impair the retrieval of striatal stimulus-response associations in humans. However, the mechanism underlying this stress-induced retrieval impairment of non-hippocampal stimulus-response memory remains elusive. In the present study, we investigated whether an acute elevation in glucocorticoid levels mediates the impairing effects of stress on retrieval of stimulus-response memory. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained on a stimulus-response task in an eight-arm radial maze until they learned to associate a stimulus, i.e., cue, with a food reward in one of the arms. Twenty-four hours after successful acquisition, they received a systemic injection of vehicle, corticosterone (1mg/kg), the corticosterone-synthesis inhibitor metyrapone (35mg/kg) or were left untreated 1h before retention testing. We found that the corticosterone injection impaired the retrieval of stimulus-response memory. We further found that the systemic injection procedure per se was stressful as the vehicle administration also increased plasma corticosterone levels and impaired the retrieval of stimulus-response memory. However, memory retrieval was not impaired when rats were tested 2min after the systemic vehicle injection, before any stress-induced elevation in corticosterone levels had occurred. Moreover, metyrapone treatment blocked the effect of injection stress on both plasma corticosterone levels and memory retrieval impairment, indicating that the endogenous corticosterone response mediates the stress-induced memory retrieval impairment. None of the treatments affected rats' locomotor activity or motivation to search for the food reward within the maze. These findings show that stress

  4. Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy: Mother Fabricates Infant's Hearing Impairment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Gerri; Goldman, Ellen

    1991-01-01

    Case study reports a case of Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy, a form of child abuse in which the mother presents a child for treatment for a condition she herself has invented or created. This case study describes the ways in which a mother obtained a diagnosis of sensorineural hearing loss as well as amplification for her normally hearing infant.…

  5. Epigenetics in acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jinhua; Zhuang, Shougang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Recent advances in epigenetics indicate the involvement of several epigenetic modifications in the pathogenesis of acute kidney injury (AKI). The purpose of this review is to summarize our understanding of recent advances in epigenetic regulation of AKI and provide mechanistic insight into the role of acetylation, methylation, and microRNA expression in the pathological processes of AKI. Recent findings Enhancement of protein acetylation by pharmacological inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACs) leads to more severe tubular injury and impairment of renal structural and functional recovery. The changes in promoter DNA methylation occur in the kidney with ischemia/reperfusion. microRNA expression is associated with regulation of both renal injury and regeneration after AKI. Summary Recent studies on epigenetic regulation indicate that acetylation, methylation, and microRNA expression are critically implicated in the pathogenesis of AKI. Strategies targeting epigenetic processes may hold a therapeutic potential for patients with AKI. PMID:26050122

  6. Management of acute upside-down stomach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Upside-down stomach (UDS) is characterized by herniation of the entire stomach or most gastric portions into the posterior mediastinum. Symptoms may vary heavily as they are related to reflux and mechanically impaired gastric emptying. UDS is associated with a risk of incarceration and volvulus development which both might be complicated by acute gastric outlet obstruction, advanced ischemia, gastric bleeding and perforation. Case presentation A 32-year-old male presented with acute intolerant epigastralgia and anterior chest pain associated with acute onset of nausea and vomiting. He reported on a previous surgical intervention due to a hiatal hernia. Chest radiography and computer tomography showed an incarcerated UDS. After immediate esophago-gastroscopy, urgent laparoscopic reduction, repair with a 360° floppy Nissen fundoplication and insertion of a gradually absorbable GORE® BIO-A®-mesh was performed. Conclusion Given the high risk of life-threatening complications of an incarcerated UDS as ischemia, gastric perforation or severe bleeding, emergent surgery is indicated. In stable patients with acute presentation of large paraesophageal hernia or UDS exhibiting acute mechanical gastric outlet obstruction, after esophago-gastroscopy laparoscopic reduction and hernia repair followed by an anti-reflux procedure is suggested. However, in cases of unstable patients open repair is the surgical method of choice. Here, we present an exceptionally challenging case of a young patient with a giant recurrent hiatal hernia becoming clinically manifest in an incarcerated UDS. PMID:24228771

  7. Specific Language Impairment in Families: Evidence for Co-Occurrence with Reading Impairments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flax, Judy F.; Realpe-Bonilla, Teresa; Hirsch, Linda S.; Brzustowicz, Linda M.; Bartlett, Christopher W.; Tallal, Paula

    2003-01-01

    Two family aggregation studies involving 25 children (ages 5-10) with specific language impairment (SLI) report the occurrence and co-occurrence of oral language impairments and reading impairments. Results indicate that when language impairments occur within families of SLI probands, these impairments generally co-occur with reading impairments.…

  8. Acute kidney failure

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure; Renal failure; Renal failure - acute; ARF; Kidney injury - acute ... There are many possible causes of kidney damage. They include: ... cholesterol (cholesterol emboli) Decreased blood flow due to very ...

  9. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    Acute renal arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... kidneys need a good blood supply. The main artery to the kidney is called the renal artery. ...

  10. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    ... arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... often result in permanent kidney failure. Acute arterial occlusion of the renal artery can occur after injury ...

  11. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... hard for blood to do its work. In acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), also called acute lymphoblastic leukemia, there are too ... of white blood cells called lymphocytes or lymphoblasts. ALL is the most common type of cancer in ...

  12. [Role of computed tomography in the diagnosis of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Mazzei, Maria Antonietta; Guerrini, Susanna; Cioffi Squitieri, Nevada; Franchi, Federico; Volterrani, Luca; Genovese, Eugenio Annibale; Macarini, Luca

    2012-11-01

    Acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) is a complex pulmonary pathology with high mortality rates, manifesting over a wide range of severity. Clinical diagnosis relies on the following 4 criteria stated by the American-European Consensus Conference: acute onset of impaired gas exchange, severe hypoxemia defined as a PaO2 to FiO2 ratio <300 (PaO2 in mmHg), bilateral diffuse infiltration on chest X-ray; pulmonary artery wedge pressure of ≤18 mmHg to rule out cardiogenic causes of pulmonary edema. The aim of this study was to determine the usefulness of CT in the diagnosis and management of this condition. PMID:23096732

  13. Acute fatty liver of pregnancy associated with severe acute pancreatitis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Cássio Vieira; Moreira, Alecsandro; Baima, Julio P; Franzoni, Leticia de C; Lima, Talles B; Yamashiro, Fabio da S; Coelho, Kunie Yabuki Rabelo; Sassaki, Ligia Y; Caramori, Carlos Antonio; Romeiro, Fernando G; Silva, Giovanni F

    2014-01-01

    Acute fatty liver of pregnancy is a rare disease that affects women in the third trimester of pregnancy. Although infrequent, the disease can cause maternal mortality. The diagnosis is not always clear until the pregnancy is terminated, and significant complications, such as acute pancreatitis, can occur. Pancreatic involvement typically only occurs in severe cases after the development of hepatic and renal impairment. To date, little knowledge is available regarding how the disease causes pancreatitis. Treatment involves supportive measures and pregnancy interruption. In this report, we describe a case of a previously healthy 26-year-old woman at a gestational age of 27 wk and 6 d who was admitted with severe abdominal pain and vomiting. This case illustrates the clinical and laboratory overlap between acute fatty liver of pregnancy and pancreatitis, highlighting the difficulties in differentiating each disease. Furthermore, the hypothesis for this overlapping is presented, and the therapeutic options are discussed. PMID:25068005

  14. Psychiatric Issues in Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Aarsland, Dag; Taylor, John-Paul; Weintraub, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) such as depression, hallucinations and apathy commonly occur in Parkinson’s disease (PD) and have major clinical consequences including a negative impact on quality of life. This review discusses the epidemiology, clinical features, diagnostic procedures and treatment issues of NPS in PD and related disorders in the perspective of cognitive impairment, focusing on depression, anxiety, visual hallucinations, apathy, sleep disturbances, impulse control disorder and non-motor fluctuations. The majority of NPS are more common in PD patients with dementia, possibly related to shared underlying pathologies. Recent studies also suggest that NPS are associated with mild cognitive impairment in PD, in particular with the amnestic type. Accurate diagnosis of NPS is important but can be difficult, due to overlapping symptoms and similar appearance of symptoms of motor symptoms of parkinsonism, cognitive impairment, mood disorders and apathy. There are few systematic studies focusing on the management of NPS in PD with cognitive impairment. PMID:24757113

  15. [Cognitive Impairment in Multiple Sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Niino, Masaaki; Miyazaki, Yusei

    2016-04-01

    While cognitive impairment is a major symptom of multiple sclerosis (MS), it is commonly overlooked. This may be explained by the fact that it is difficult to evaluate cognitive function in patients with MS using screening batteries for the detection of dementia such as the mini-mental state examination. Further more, cognitive impairment in MS typically involves domain-specific deficits such as imparement of sustained attention and information processing speed rather than global cognitive decline. Cognitive impairment may influence the daily living and social lines of affected patients. This review discusses the characteristics of cognitive impairment, appropreate tests to evaluate its symptoms, and the current status of clinical trials for the treatment of MS. PMID:27056855

  16. Premenstrual changes. Impaired hormonal homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Halbreich, U; Alt, I H; Paul, L

    1988-03-01

    Premenstrual changes (PMCs) in mood and behavior are very prevalent. Nonetheless, their pathophysiology is still obscure and no proven treatment is yet available. Evaluation of the plethora of available data leads to the suggestion that PMCs may result from a temporary impairment of homeostasis among a multitude of systems. This impairment is triggered by a differential pace and magnitude of change-over-time in levels of several hormones and other substances during the luteal phase. PMID:3288473

  17. Chemistry for the Visually Impaired

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratliff, Judy L.

    1997-06-01

    Methods used to try to provide a valuable experience for visually impaired students in a general education or an introductory chemistry class are discussed. Modifications that can be made cheaply and with little time commitment which will allow visually impaired students to participate productively in the laboratory are examined. A conductivity tester that cost less than $4.00 to construct, is easy to assemble, very rugged, and provides a great deal of entertainment for sighted and non-sighted students is described.

  18. Characterization of Lung Function Impairment in Adults with Bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhi-ya; Tang, Yan; Li, Hui-min; Lin, Zhi-min; Zheng, Jin-ping; Chen, Rong-chang; Zhong, Nan-shan

    2014-01-01

    Background Characteristics of lung function impairment in bronchiectasis is not fully understood. Objectives To determine the factors associated with lung function impairment and to compare changes in spirometry during bronchiectasis exacerbation and convalescence (1 week following 14-day antibiotic therapy). Methods We recruited 142 patients with steady-state bronchiectasis, of whom 44 with acute exacerbations in the follow-up were included in subgroup analyses. Baseline measurements consisted of chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT), sputum volume, purulence and bacteriology, spirometry and diffusing capacity. Spirometry, but not diffusing capacity, was examined during acute exacerbations and convalescence. Results In the final multivariate models, having bronchiectasis symptoms for 10 years or greater (OR = 4.75, 95%CI: 1.46–15.43, P = 0.01), sputum culture positive for Pseudomonas aeruginosa (OR = 4.93, 95%CI: 1.52–15.94, P<0.01) and HRCT total score being 12 or greater (OR = 7.77, 95%CI: 3.21–18.79, P<0.01) were the major variables associated with FEV1 being 50%pred or less; and the only variable associated with reduced DLCO was 4 or more bronchiectatic lobes (OR = 5.91, 95%CI: 2.20–17.23, P<0.01). Overall differences in FVC and FEV1 during exacerbations and convalescence were significant (P<0.05), whereas changes in other spirometric parameters were less notable. This applied even when stratified by the magnitude of FEV1 and DLCO reduction at baseline. Conclusion Significant lung function impairment should raise alert of chest HRCT abnormality and sputum culture positive for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, in patients with predominantly mild to moderate steady-state bronchiectasis. Acute exacerbations elicited reductions in FVC and FEV1. Changes of other spirometric parameters were less significant during exacerbations. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01761214 PMID:25405614

  19. Impairment of Endothelial Function by Little Cigar Secondhand Smoke

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiangtao; Wang, Xiaoyin; Narayan, Shilpa; Glantz, Stanton A.; Schick, Suzaynn F.; Springer, Matthew L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Little cigars and cigarillos are gaining in popularity as cigarette use wanes, mainly due to relaxed regulatory standards that make them cheaper, easier to buy individually, and available in a variety of flavors not allowed in cigarettes. To address whether they should be regulated as strictly as cigarettes, we investigated whether little cigar secondhand smoke (SHS) decreases vascular endothelial function like that of cigarettes. Methods We exposed rats to SHS from little cigars, cigarettes, or chamber air, for 10 minutes and measured the resulting acute impairment of arterial flow-mediated dilation (FMD). Results SHS from both little cigars and cigarettes impaired FMD. Impairment was greater after exposure to little cigar SHS than by cigarette SHS relative to pre-exposure values, although the post-exposure FMD values were not significantly different from each other. Conclusions Exposure to little cigar SHS leads to impairment of FMD that is at least equal to that resulting from similar levels of cigarette SHS. Our findings support the need to prevent even brief exposure to little cigar SHS, and support tobacco control policies that regulate little cigars as strictly as cigarettes. PMID:26753171

  20. Zymosan-mediated inflammation impairs in vivo reverse cholesterol transport.

    PubMed

    Malik, Priya; Berisha, Stela Z; Santore, Jennifer; Agatisa-Boyle, Colin; Brubaker, Gregory; Smith, Jonathan D

    2011-05-01

    Inflammation has been proposed to impair HDL function and reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). We investigated the effects of inflammation mediated by zymosan, a yeast glucan, on multiple steps along the RCT pathway in vivo and ex vivo. Acute inflammation with 70 mg/kg zymosan impaired RCT to plasma, liver, and feces similarly by 17-22% (P < 0.05), with no additional block at the liver. Hepatic gene expression further demonstrated no change in ABCG5, ABCB4, and ABCB11 expression but a decline in ABCG8 mRNA (32% P < 0.05). Plasma from zymosan-treated mice had a 21% decrease in cholesterol acceptor ability (P < 0.01) and a 35% decrease in ABCA1-specific efflux capacity (P < 0.01) in vitro. Zymosan treatment also decreased HDL levels and led to HDL remodeling with increased incorporation of serum amyloid A. In addition, cholesterol efflux from cultured macrophages declined with zymosan treatment in a dose dependent manner. Taken together, our results suggest that zymosan impairs in vivo RCT primarily by decreasing macrophage-derived cholesterol entering the plasma, with minimal additional blocks downstream. Our study supports the notion that RCT impairment is one of the mechanisms for the increased atherosclerotic burden observed in inflammatory conditions. PMID:21335620

  1. Brief Exposure to Secondhand Smoke Reversibly Impairs Endothelial Vasodilatory Function

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: We sought to determine the effects of brief exposures to low concentrations of tobacco secondhand smoke (SHS) on arterial flow-mediated dilation (FMD, a nitric oxide-dependent measure of vascular endothelial function), in a controlled animal model never before exposed to smoke. In humans, SHS exposure for 30min impairs FMD. It is important to gain a better understanding of the acute effects of exposure to SHS at low concentrations and for brief periods of time. Methods: We measured changes in FMD in rats exposed to a range of real-world levels of SHS for durations of 30min, 10min, 1min, and 4 breaths (roughly 15 s). Results: We observed a dose-response relationship between SHS particle concentration over 30min and post-exposure impairment of FMD, which was linear through the range typically encountered in smoky restaurants and then saturated at higher concentrations. One min of exposure to SHS at moderate concentrations was sufficient to impair FMD. Conclusions: Brief SHS exposure at real-world levels reversibly impairs FMD. Even 1min of SHS exposure can cause reduction of endothelial function. PMID:24302638

  2. Cognitive Status in Patients Hospitalized with Acute Decompensated Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Seth N.; Hajduk, Alexandra M.; McManus, David D.; Darling, Chad E.; Gurwitz, Jerry H.; Spencer, Frederick A.; Goldberg, Robert J.; Saczynski, Jane S.

    2015-01-01

    Structured Abstract Background Cognitive impairment is highly prevalent in patients with heart failure and is associated with adverse outcomes. However, whether specific cognitive abilities (e.g., memory versus executive function) are impaired in heart failure has not been fully examined. We investigated the prevalence of impairment in three cognitive domains in patients hospitalized with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) and the associations of impairment with demographic and clinical characteristics. Methods The sample included 744 patients hospitalized with ADHF (mean age = 72 years, 46% female) at 5 medical centers. Impairment was assessed in three cognitive domains (memory, processing speed, executive function) using standardized measures. Demographic and clinical characteristics were obtained from a structured interview and medical record review. Results A total of 593 of 744 (80%) patients were impaired in at least one cognitive domain; 32%, 31%, and 17% of patients were impaired in one, two, or all three cognitive domains, respectively. Patients impaired in more than one cognitive domain were significantly older, had less formal education, and had more non-cardiac comorbidities (all p’s < 0.05). In multivariable adjusted analyses, patients with older age and lower education had higher odds of impairment in two or more cognitive domains. Depressed patients had twice the odds of being impaired in all three cognitive domains (OR = 1.98, 95% CI: 1.08, 3.64). Conclusion Impairments in executive function, processing speed and memory are common among patients hospitalized for ADHF. Recognition of these prevalent cognitive deficits is critical for the clinical management of these high risk patients. PMID:25458656

  3. Rapid word-learning in normal-hearing and hearing-impaired children

    PubMed Central

    Pittman, A. L.; Lewis, D. E.; Hoover, B. M.; Stelmachowicz, P. G.

    2008-01-01

    Objective This study examined rapid word learning in 5- to 14-year-old children with normal and impaired hearing. The effects of age and receptive vocabulary were examined as well as those of high-frequency amplification. Novel words were low-pass filtered at 4 kHz (typical of current amplification devices) and at 9 kHz. It was hypothesized that: 1) the children with normal hearing would learn more words than the children with hearing loss, 2) word learning would increase with age and receptive vocabulary for both groups, and 3) both groups would benefit from a broader frequency bandwidth. Design Sixty children with normal hearing and 37 children with moderate sensorineural hearing losses participated in this study. Each child viewed a 4-minute animated slideshow containing 8 nonsense words created using the 24 English consonant phonemes (3 consonants per word). Each word was repeated 3 times. Half of the 8 words were low-pass filtered at 4 kHz and half were filtered at 9 kHz. After viewing the story twice, each child was asked to identify the words from among pictures in the slide show. Prior to testing, a measure of current receptive vocabulary was obtained using the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT-III). Results The PPVT-III scores of the hearing-impaired children were consistently poorer than those of the normal-hearing children across the age range tested. A similar pattern of results was observed for word-learning in that the performance of the hearing-impaired children was significantly poorer than that of the normal-hearing children. Further analysis of the PPVT and word learning scores suggested that although word learning was delayed in the hearing-impaired children, their performance was consistent with their receptive vocabularies. Additionally, no correlation was found between overall performance and the age of identification, age of amplification, or years of amplification in the children with hearing loss. Results also revealed a small increase

  4. Effects of intranasal insulin on cognition in memory-impaired older adults: modulation by APOE genotype.

    PubMed

    Reger, M A; Watson, G S; Frey, W H; Baker, L D; Cholerton, B; Keeling, M L; Belongia, D A; Fishel, M A; Plymate, S R; Schellenberg, G D; Cherrier, M M; Craft, S

    2006-03-01

    Raising insulin acutely in the periphery and in brain improves verbal memory. Intranasal insulin administration, which raises insulin acutely in the CNS without raising plasma insulin levels, provides an opportunity to determine whether these effects are mediated by central insulin or peripheral processes. Based on prior research with intravenous insulin, we predicted that the treatment response would differ between subjects with (epsilon4+) and without (epsilon4-) the APOE-epsilon4 allele. On separate mornings, 26 memory-impaired subjects (13 with early Alzheimer's disease and 13 with amnestic mild cognitive impairment) and 35 normal controls each underwent three intranasal treatment conditions consisting of saline (placebo) or insulin (20 or 40 IU). Cognition was tested 15 min post-treatment, and blood was acquired at baseline and 45 min after treatment. Intranasal insulin treatment did not change plasma insulin or glucose levels. Insulin treatment facilitated recall on two measures of verbal memory in memory-impaired epsilon4- adults. These effects were stronger for memory-impaired epsilon4- subjects than for memory-impaired epsilon4+ subjects and normal adults. Unexpectedly, memory-impaired epsilon4+ subjects showed poorer recall following insulin administration on one test of memory. These findings suggest that intranasal insulin administration may have therapeutic benefit without the risk of peripheral hypoglycemia and provide further evidence for apolipoprotein E (APOE) related differences in insulin metabolism. PMID:15964100

  5. [Acute kidney injury in children].

    PubMed

    Amira-Peco-Antić; Paripović, Dusan

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a clinical condition considered to be the consequence of a sudden decrease (> 25%) or discontinuation of renal function. The term AKI is used instead of the previous term acute renal failure, because it has been demonstrated that even minor renal lesions may cause far-reaching consequences on human health. Contemporary classifications of AKI (RIFLE and AKIN) are based on the change of serum creatinine and urinary output. In the developed countries, AKI is most often caused by renal ischemia, nephrotoxins and sepsis, rather than a (primary) diffuse renal disease, such as glomerulonephritis, interstitial nephritis, renovascular disorder and thrombotic microangiopathy. The main risk factors for hospital AKI are mechanical ventilation, use of vasoactive drugs, stem cell transplantation and diuretic-resistant hypervolemia. Prerenal and parenchymal AKI (previously known as acute tubular necrosis) jointly account for 2/3 of all AKI causes. Diuresis and serum creatinine concentration are not early diagnostic markers of AKI. Potential early biomarkers of AKI are neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), cystatin C, kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), interleukins 6, 8 and 18, and liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP). Early detection of kidney impairment, before the increase of serum creatinine, is important for timely initiated therapy and recovery. The goal of AKI treatment is to normalize the fluid and electrolyte status, as well as the correction of acidosis and blood pressure. Since a severe fluid overload resistant to diuretics and inotropic agents is associated with a poor outcome, the initiation of dialysis should not be delayed. The mortality rate of AKI is highest in critically ill children with multiple organ failure and hemodynamically unstable patients. PMID:25033598

  6. Immunological processes related to cognitive impairment in MS.

    PubMed

    Berger, T

    2016-09-01

    In this review, the immune-to-brain communication pathways are briefly summarized, with emphasis on the impact of immune cells and their mediators on learning, memory and other cognitive domains. Further, the acute response of the central nervous system to peripherally generated inflammatory stimuli - termed as sickness behaviour - is described, and the central role of microglia in this immune-to-brain crosstalk in physiological and pathological conditions is highlighted. Finally, the role and consequences of immunological processes related to cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis are discussed. PMID:27580904

  7. Impairment-driven cancer rehabilitation: an essential component of quality care and survivorship.

    PubMed

    Silver, Julie K; Baima, Jennifer; Mayer, R Samuel

    2013-09-01

    Adult cancer survivors suffer an extremely diverse and complex set of impairments, affecting virtually every organ system. Both physical and psychological impairments may contribute to a decreased health-related quality of life and should be identified throughout the care continuum. Recent evidence suggests that more cancer survivors have a reduced health-related quality of life as a result of physical impairments than due to psychological ones. Research has also demonstrated that the majority of cancer survivors will have significant impairments and that these often go undetected and/or untreated, and consequently may result in disability. Furthermore, physical disability is a leading cause of distress in this population. The scientific literature has shown that rehabilitation improves pain, function, and quality of life in cancer survivors. In fact, rehabilitation efforts can ameliorate physical (including cognitive) impairments at every stage along the course of treatment. This includes prehabilitation before cancer treatment commences and multimodal interdisciplinary rehabilitation during and after acute cancer treatment. Rehabilitation appears to be cost-effective and may reduce both direct and indirect health care costs, thereby reducing the enormous financial burden of cancer. Therefore, it is critical that survivors are screened for both psychological and physical impairments and then referred appropriately to trained rehabilitation health care professionals. This review suggests an impairment-driven cancer rehabilitation model that includes screening and treating impairments all along the care continuum in order to minimize disability and maximize quality of life. PMID:23856764

  8. Nitric oxide, prostaglandins, and impaired cerebral blood flow autoregulation in group B streptococcal neonatal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Mertineit, C; Samlalsingh-Parker, J; Glibetic, M; Ricard, G; Noya, F J; Aranda, J V

    2000-03-01

    Impaired autoregulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) contributes to CNS damage during neonatal meningitis. We tested (i) the hypothesis that cerebrovascular autoregulation is impaired during early onset group B streptococcal (GBS) meningitis, (ii) whether this impairment is regulated by vasoactive mediators such as prostaglandins and (or) nitric oxide (NO), and (iii) whether this impairment is preventable by specific and (or) nonspecific inhibitors: dexamethasone, ibuprofen, and Nomega-nitro-L-arginine, a NO inhibitor. Sterile saline or 10(9) colony-forming units (cfu) of heat-killed GBS was injected into the cerebral ventricle of newborn piglets. CBF autoregulation was determined by altering cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) with balloon-tipped catheters placed in the aorta. GBS produced a narrow range of CBF autoregulation due to an impairment at the upper limit of CPP. We report that in vivo in the early stages (first 2 h) of induced GBS inflammation (i) GBS impairs the upper limit of cerebrovascular autoregulation; (ii) ibuprofen, dexamethasone, and Nomega-nitro-L-arginine not only prevent this GBS-induced autoregulatory impairment but improve the range of cerebrovascular autoregulation; (iii) these autoregulatory changes do not involve circulating cerebral prostanoids; and (iv) the observed changes correlate with the induction of NO synthase gene expression. Thus, acute early onset GBS-induced impairment of the upper limit of CBF autoregulation can be correlated with increases of NO synthase production, suggesting that NO is a vasoactive mediator of CBF. PMID:10721813

  9. Homozygosity mapping reveals mutations of GRXCR1 as a cause of autosomal-recessive nonsyndromic hearing impairment.

    PubMed

    Schraders, Margit; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Oostrik, Jaap; Huygen, Patrick L M; Ali, Ghazanfar; Hoefsloot, Lies H; Veltman, Joris A; Cremers, Frans P M; Basit, Sulman; Ansar, Muhammad; Cremers, Cor W R J; Kunst, Henricus P M; Ahmad, Wasim; Admiraal, Ronald J C; Leal, Suzanne M; Kremer, Hannie

    2010-02-12

    We identified overlapping homozygous regions within the DFNB25 locus in two Dutch and ten Pakistani families with sensorineural autosomal-recessive nonsyndromic hearing impairment (arNSHI). Only one of the families, W98-053, was not consanguineous, and its sibship pointed toward a reduced critical region of 0.9 Mb. This region contained the GRXCR1 gene, and the orthologous mouse gene was described to be mutated in the pirouette (pi) mutant with resulting hearing loss and circling behavior. Sequence analysis of the GRXCR1 gene in hearing-impaired family members revealed splice-site mutations in two Dutch families and a missense and nonsense mutation, respectively, in two Pakistani families. The splice-site mutations are predicted to cause frameshifts and premature stop codons. In family W98-053, this could be confirmed by cDNA analysis. GRXCR1 is predicted to contain a GRX-like domain. GRX domains are involved in reversible S-glutathionylation of proteins and thereby in the modulation of activity and/or localization of these proteins. The missense mutation is located in this domain, whereas the nonsense and splice-site mutations may result in complete or partial absence of the GRX-like domain or of the complete protein. Hearing loss in patients with GRXCR1 mutations is congenital and is moderate to profound. Progression of the hearing loss was observed in family W98-053. Vestibular dysfunction was observed in some but not all affected individuals. Quantitative analysis of GRXCR1 transcripts in fetal and adult human tissues revealed a preferential expression of the gene in fetal cochlea, which may explain the nonsyndromic nature of the hearing impairment. PMID:20137778

  10. Imaging of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Thoeni, Ruedi F

    2015-11-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammation of the pancreas. Several classification systems have been used in the past but were considered unsatisfactory. A revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis was published that assessed the clinical course and severity of disease; divided acute pancreatitis into interstitial edematous pancreatitis and necrotizing pancreatitis; discerned an early phase (first week) from a late phase (after the first week); and focused on systemic inflammatory response syndrome and organ failure. This article focuses on the revised classification of acute pancreatitis, with emphasis on imaging features, particularly on newly-termed fluid collections and implications for the radiologist. PMID:26526433

  11. Dystypia: isolated typing impairment without aphasia, apraxia or visuospatial impairment.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Mika; Soma, Yoshiaki; Arihiro, Shoji; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Moriwaki, Hiroshi; Naritomi, Hiroaki

    2002-01-01

    We report a 60-year-old right-handed Japanese man who showed an isolated persistent typing impairment without aphasia, agraphia, apraxia or any other neuropsychological deficit. We coined the term 'dystypia' for this peculiar neuropsychological manifestation. The symptom was caused by an infarction in the left frontal lobe involving the foot of the second frontal convolution and the frontal operculum. The patient's typing impairment was not attributable to a disturbance of the linguistic process, since he had no aphasia or agraphia. The impairment was not attributable to the impairment of the motor execution process either, since he had no apraxia. Thus, his typing impairment was deduced to be based on a disturbance of the intermediate process where the linguistic phonological information is converted into the corresponding performance. We hypothesized that there is a specific process for typing which branches from the motor programming process presented in neurolinguistic models. The foot of the left second frontal convolution and the operculum may play an important role in the manifestation of 'dystypia'. PMID:11914550

  12. Acute loss of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Tristán, Bekinschtein; Gleichgerrcht, Ezequiel; Manes, Facundo

    2015-01-01

    Acute loss of consciousness poses a fascinating scenario for theoretical and clinical research. This chapter introduces a simple yet powerful framework to investigate altered states of consciousness. We then explore the different disorders of consciousness that result from acute brain injury, and techniques used in the acute phase to predict clinical outcome in different patient populations in light of models of acute loss of consciousness. We further delve into post-traumatic amnesia as a model for predicting cognitive sequels following acute loss of consciousness. We approach the study of acute loss of consciousness from a theoretical and clinical perspective to conclude that clinicians in acute care centers must incorporate new measurements and techniques besides the classic coma scales in order to assess their patients with loss of consciousness. PMID:25702218

  13. Acute Kidney Injury Associated with Linagliptin.

    PubMed

    Nandikanti, Deepak K; Gosmanova, Elvira O; Gosmanov, Aidar R

    2016-01-01

    Linagliptin is a dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) inhibitor that is approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. About 5% of linagliptin is eliminated by the kidneys and no dose adjustment is recommended in kidney impairment. We report a first case of linagliptin-associated acute kidney injury (AKI) in a patient with preexisting chronic kidney disease (CKD). We hypothesize that AKI was due to renal hypoperfusion from linagliptin-induced natriuresis and intravascular volume contraction in the setting of concomitant lisinopril use, which is known to impair autoregulation and potentiate hypotension-induced AKI. It may be prudent to exert caution and closely monitor kidney function when initiating linagliptin in combination with ACE-inhibitors in CKD patients. PMID:26981294

  14. Acute Kidney Injury Associated with Linagliptin

    PubMed Central

    Nandikanti, Deepak K.; Gosmanova, Elvira O.; Gosmanov, Aidar R.

    2016-01-01

    Linagliptin is a dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) inhibitor that is approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. About 5% of linagliptin is eliminated by the kidneys and no dose adjustment is recommended in kidney impairment. We report a first case of linagliptin-associated acute kidney injury (AKI) in a patient with preexisting chronic kidney disease (CKD). We hypothesize that AKI was due to renal hypoperfusion from linagliptin-induced natriuresis and intravascular volume contraction in the setting of concomitant lisinopril use, which is known to impair autoregulation and potentiate hypotension-induced AKI. It may be prudent to exert caution and closely monitor kidney function when initiating linagliptin in combination with ACE-inhibitors in CKD patients. PMID:26981294

  15. Streptococcus pneumoniae Meningitis Presenting with Acute Urinary Retention and Emphysematous Cystitis.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Yasushi; Doi, Asako; Endo, Akiko; Nishioka, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    A combination of acute urinary retention and aseptic meningitis has occasionally been described, which is referred to as meningitis-retention syndrome. In contrast, acute urinary retention has rarely been reported in bacterial meningitis. We herein report a case of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis presenting with acute urinary retention which led to emphysematous cystitis in an elderly woman. She presented with impaired consciousness and a distended lower abdomen. She was diagnosed with pneumococcal meningitis by lumbar puncture. Abdominal computed tomography revealed the presence of emphysematous cystitis. She completely recovered with antibiotic therapy without any complications. Acute urinary retention can occur secondary to pneumococcal meningitis. PMID:27477423

  16. Decitabine in Treating Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Agraphia caused by acute right parietal infarction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Manyong; Suh, Mee Kyung; Lee, Myung Hyun; Lee, Jin Soo; Moon, So Young

    2015-04-01

    Injury in the dominant language hemisphere typically leads to agraphia, however we report a patient with agraphia after injury to the right angular gyrus. A 71-year-old Korean woman presented with the complaint of an inability to write for the last 7 days. The patient had been illiterate for most of her life, but had started learning to write Hangul, the Korean alphabet, at a welfare center 3 years ago. On language screening she was unable to write although she could read, and other language functions showed no abnormalities. Brain MRI showed acute infarction in the right angular gyrus. Her writing patterns displayed features of surface agraphia, indicative of phoneme-to-grapheme conversion with phonetic writing of targets. Additionally, she manifested visual errors. A functional MRI indicated that her left hemisphere was language dominant. This patient experienced agraphia resulting from pure impairment of visuo-constructive function after acute infarction in the right angular gyrus. PMID:25564267

  18. Microcirculation in Acute and Chronic Kidney Diseases.

    PubMed

    Zafrani, Lara; Ince, Can

    2015-12-01

    The renal microvasculature is emerging as a key player in acute and chronic kidney diseases. Renal microvascular disease involves alterations in endothelial barrier permeability, exaggerated inflammation, impairment of endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation involving the nitric oxide system, increased oxidative stress, and loss of angiogenic factors. Moreover, evidence suggests that there is a microvascular component to the pathogenesis of renal scarring. New technology is being developed to explore renal microcirculation in vivo in experimental models and humans. This technology will provide a better understanding of the pathogenesis of kidney diseases and will help guide specific therapeutic strategies aimed at restoring the renal microcirculation. This article reviews the cellular and molecular mechanisms of renal microvascular dysfunction in acute and chronic kidney diseases and the potential diagnostic and therapeutic implications of these findings. Recent developments in the monitoring of renal microcirculation are described with respect to their advantages and limitations, and future directions are outlined. PMID:26231789

  19. Acute Cytomegalovirus Infection as a Cause of Venous Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Francesca; Lissandrin, Raffaella; Mojoli, Francesco; Baldanti, Fausto; Brunetti, Enrico; Pascarella, Michela; Giordani, Maria Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Acute Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection is an unusual cause of venous thromboembolism, a potentially life-threatening condition. Thrombus formation can occur at the onset of the disease or later during the recovery and may also occur in the absence of acute HCMV hepatitis. It is likely due to both vascular endothelium damage caused by HCMV and impairment of the clotting balance caused by the virus itself. Here we report on two immunocompetent women with splanchnic thrombosis that occurred during the course of acute HCMV infection. Although the prevalence of venous thrombosis in patients with acute HCMV infection is unknown, physicians should be aware of its occurrence, particularly in immunocompetent patients presenting with fever and unexplained abdominal pain. PMID:24959338

  20. Whole-Person Impairment in Younger Retired NFL Players

    PubMed Central

    Domb, Benjamin G.; Carter, Chris; Finch, Nathan A.; Hammarstedt, Jon E.; Dunne, Kevin F.; Stake, Christine E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Professional American football is a physically demanding, high-impact sport with an elevated risk of injury. Orthopaedic injuries may impose acute, short-term or cumulative consequences throughout a player’s lifetime. Several studies have addressed health and psychosocial concerns of an older, retired population of players in the National Football League (NFL); however, minimal research has examined the orthopaedic toll on younger, retired players. Purpose: This study reports total whole-person impairment (WPI) percentages in a cohort of younger, retired NFL players who presented for disability evaluations based on the use of standardized American Medical Association (AMA) impairment guidelines. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: During the study period of February 2011 to August 2013, 65 younger retired NFL players presented for impairment evaluations. The mean time between retirement and impairment evaluation was 3.1 years (range, 0.3-16.4 years). A complete history and physical examination was performed on all symptomatic joints. A retrospective chart review was conducted on 100% of presenting players to assess orthopaedic burden. Body-part impairment (BPI) percentage for each affected joint was generated. The impairment data for each extremity were then combined with spine impairment data to create WPI percentage. Player demographics, including age, position, and playing time, were also recorded. Results: The average WPI percentage was 37% (range, 19%-53%). Players participating in >30 games (n = 54) had a higher mean WPI percentage (38%) than those playing in <30 games (31%; n = 11) (P = .004). Players competing in >5 seasons (n = 46) were 2.4 times more likely to have a WPI of at least 37% (P = .007). The most common joints players reported as symptomatic were lumbar (n = 63; 97%) and cervical spine (n = 58; 89%). The mean age at evaluation was 33.5 years (range, 27-42 years), and the mean number of seasons played was 7

  1. Acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Georgios K; Harissis, Haralampos; Mitsis, Michalis; Batsis, Haralampos; Fatouros, Michalis

    2012-04-28

    We report a case of acute chylous ascites formation presenting as peritonitis (acute chylous peritonitis) in a patient suffering from acute pancreatitis due to hypertriglyceridemia and alcohol abuse. The development of chylous ascites is usually a chronic process mostly involving malignancy, trauma or surgery, and symptoms arise as a result of progressive abdominal distention. However, when accumulation of "chyle" occurs rapidly, the patient may present with signs of peritonitis. Preoperative diagnosis is difficult since the clinical picture usually suggests hollow organ perforation, appendicitis or visceral ischemia. Less than 100 cases of acute chylous peritonitis have been reported. Pancreatitis is a rare cause of chyloperitoneum and in almost all of the cases chylous ascites is discovered some days (or even weeks) after the onset of symptoms of pancreatitis. This is the second case in the literature where the patient presented with acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis, and the presence of chyle within the abdominal cavity was discovered simultaneously with the establishment of the diagnosis of pancreatitis. The patient underwent an exploratory laparotomy for suspected perforated duodenal ulcer, since, due to hypertriglyceridemia, serum amylase values appeared within the normal range. Moreover, abdominal computed tomography imaging was not diagnostic for pancreatitis. Following abdominal lavage and drainage, the patient was successfully treated with total parenteral nutrition and octreotide. PMID:22563182

  2. Adipocytes impair leukemia treatment in mice

    PubMed Central

    Behan, James W.; Yun, Jason P.; Proektor, Marina P.; Ehsanipour, Ehsan A.; Arutyunyan, Anna; Moses, Ara S.; Avramis, Vassilios I.; Louie, Stan G.; Butturini, Anna; Heisterkamp, Nora; Mittelman, Steven D.

    2009-01-01

    Obesity is associated with increased cancer incidence and mortality. We have previously found that obesity in children is associated with a 50% increased recurrence of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in high-risk patients. We have therefore developed novel in vivo and in vitro preclinical models to study the mechanism(s) of this association. Obesity increased relapse after monotherapy with vincristine (p=0.03) in obese mice injected with syngeneic ALL cells. This occurred even though the drug was dosed proportionally to body weight, equalizing blood and tissue drug levels. In co-culture, 3T3-L1 adipocytes significantly impaired the anti-leukemia efficacy of vincristine, as well as 3 other chemotherapies (p<0.05). Interestingly, this protection was independent of cell-cell contact, and it extended to human leukemia cell lines as well. Adipocytes prevented chemotherapy-induced apoptosis, and this was associated with increased expression of the two pro-survival signals Bcl-2 and Pim-2. These findings highlight the role of the adipocyte in fostering leukemia chemotherapy resistance, and may help explain the increased leukemia relapse rate in obese children and adults. Given the growing prevalence of obesity worldwide, these effects are likely to have increasing importance to cancer treatment. PMID:19773440

  3. Shigella impairs T lymphocyte dynamics in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara; Celli, Susanna; Arena, Ellen T.; Nothelfer, Katharina; Roux, Pascal; Sellge, Gernot; Frigimelica, Elisabetta; Bousso, Philippe; Sansonetti, Philippe J.; Phalipon, Armelle

    2013-01-01

    The Gram-negative enteroinvasive bacterium Shigella flexneri is responsible for the endemic form of bacillary dysentery, an acute rectocolitis in humans. S. flexneri uses a type III secretion system to inject effector proteins into host cells, thus diverting cellular functions to its own benefit. Protective immunity to reinfection requires several rounds of infection to be elicited and is short-lasting, suggesting that S. flexneri interferes with the priming of specific immunity. Considering the key role played by T-lymphocyte trafficking in priming of adaptive immunity, we investigated the impact of S. flexneri on T-cell dynamics in vivo. By using two-photon microscopy to visualize bacterium–T-cell cross-talks in the lymph nodes, where the adaptive immunity is initiated, we provide evidence that S. flexneri, via its type III secretion system, impairs the migration pattern of CD4+ T cells independently of cognate recognition of bacterial antigens. We show that bacterial invasion of CD4+ T lymphocytes occurs in vivo, and results in cell migration arrest. In the absence of invasion, CD4+ T-cell migration parameters are also dramatically altered. Signals resulting from S. flexneri interactions with subcapsular sinus macrophages and dendritic cells, and recruitment of polymorphonuclear cells are likely to contribute to this phenomenon. These findings indicate that S. flexneri targets T lymphocytes in vivo and highlight the role of type III effector secretion in modulating host adaptive immune responses. PMID:23417297

  4. The assessment of quality of life in acute cough with the Leicester Cough Questionnaire (LCQ-acute)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Acute cough has a significant impact on physical and psychosocial health and is associated with an impaired quality of life (QOL). The Leicester Cough Questionnaire (LCQ) is a validated cough-related health status questionnaire designed for patients with chronic cough. The purpose of this study was to validate the LCQ for the assessment of health related QOL in patients with acute cough and determine the clinical minimal important difference (MID). Methods 10 subjects with cough due to acute upper respiratory tract infection underwent focused interviews to investigate the face validity of the LCQ. The LCQ was also evaluated by a multidisciplinary team. 30 subjects completed the revised LCQ-acute and a cough visual analogue score (VAS: 0-100 mm) within one week of onset of cough and again <2 weeks later and at resolution of cough. The concurrent validity, internal reliability, repeatability and responsiveness of the LCQ-acute were also assessed. Patients also completed a Global Rating of Change Questionnaire that assessed the change in cough severity between visits. The MID was calculated as the change in LCQ-acute score for patients responding to GRCQ category representing the smallest change in health status that patients found worthwhile. Results Health status was severely impaired at baseline affecting all domains; median (interquartile range) total LCQ-acute score 13.0 (3.4). All subjects found the LCQ-acute questionnaire acceptable for assessing their cough. Internal reliability of the LCQ-acute was good for all domains and total score, Cronbach's α coefficients >0.9. There was a significant correlation between LCQ-acute and VAS (ρ = -0.48, p = 0.007). The LCQ-acute and its domains were highly responsive to change; effect sizes 1.7-2.3. The MID for total LCQ and VAS were 2.5 and 13 mm respectively. Conclusion The LCQ-acute is a brief, simple and valid instrument to assess cough specific health related QOL in patients with acute cough. It is a

  5. 20 CFR 404.1598 - If you become disabled by another impairment(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false If you become disabled by another impairment... Disability § 404.1598 If you become disabled by another impairment(s). If a new severe impairment(s) begins... are still disabled under § 404.1594....

  6. 20 CFR 404.1598 - If you become disabled by another impairment(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false If you become disabled by another impairment... Disability § 404.1598 If you become disabled by another impairment(s). If a new severe impairment(s) begins... are still disabled under § 404.1594....

  7. 20 CFR 404.1598 - If you become disabled by another impairment(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false If you become disabled by another impairment... Disability § 404.1598 If you become disabled by another impairment(s). If a new severe impairment(s) begins... are still disabled under § 404.1594....

  8. 20 CFR 404.1598 - If you become disabled by another impairment(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false If you become disabled by another impairment... Disability § 404.1598 If you become disabled by another impairment(s). If a new severe impairment(s) begins... are still disabled under § 404.1594....

  9. 20 CFR 404.1598 - If you become disabled by another impairment(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false If you become disabled by another impairment... Disability § 404.1598 If you become disabled by another impairment(s). If a new severe impairment(s) begins... are still disabled under § 404.1594....

  10. Lacking power impairs executive functions.

    PubMed

    Smith, Pamela K; Jostmann, Nils B; Galinsky, Adam D; van Dijk, Wilco W

    2008-05-01

    Four experiments explored whether lacking power impairs executive functioning, testing the hypothesis that the cognitive presses of powerlessness increase vulnerability to performance decrements during complex executive tasks. In the first three experiments, low power impaired performance on executive-function tasks: The powerless were less effective than the powerful at updating (Experiment 1), inhibiting (Experiment 2), and planning (Experiment 3). Existing research suggests that the powerless have difficulty distinguishing between what is goal relevant and what is goal irrelevant in the environment. A fourth experiment established that the executive-function impairment associated with low power is driven by goal neglect. The current research implies that the cognitive alterations arising from powerlessness may help foster stable social hierarchies and that empowering employees may reduce costly organizational errors. PMID:18466404

  11. Mutations Impairing GSK3-Mediated MAF Phosphorylation Cause Cataract, Deafness, Intellectual Disability, Seizures, and a Down Syndrome-like Facies

    PubMed Central

    Niceta, Marcello; Stellacci, Emilia; Gripp, Karen W.; Zampino, Giuseppe; Kousi, Maria; Anselmi, Massimiliano; Traversa, Alice; Ciolfi, Andrea; Stabley, Deborah; Bruselles, Alessandro; Caputo, Viviana; Cecchetti, Serena; Prudente, Sabrina; Fiorenza, Maria T.; Boitani, Carla; Philip, Nicole; Niyazov, Dmitriy; Leoni, Chiara; Nakane, Takaya; Keppler-Noreuil, Kim; Braddock, Stephen R.; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Palleschi, Antonio; Campeau, Philippe M.; Lee, Brendan H.L.; Pouponnot, Celio; Stella, Lorenzo; Bocchinfuso, Gianfranco; Katsanis, Nicholas; Sol-Church, Katia; Tartaglia, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors operate in developmental processes to mediate inductive events and cell competence, and perturbation of their function or regulation can dramatically affect morphogenesis, organogenesis, and growth. We report that a narrow spectrum of amino-acid substitutions within the transactivation domain of the v-maf avian musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog (MAF), a leucine zipper-containing transcription factor of the AP1 superfamily, profoundly affect development. Seven different de novo missense mutations involving conserved residues of the four GSK3 phosphorylation motifs were identified in eight unrelated individuals. The distinctive clinical phenotype, for which we propose the eponym Aymé-Gripp syndrome, is not limited to lens and eye defects as previously reported for MAF/Maf loss of function but includes sensorineural deafness, intellectual disability, seizures, brachycephaly, distinctive flat facial appearance, skeletal anomalies, mammary gland hypoplasia, and reduced growth. Disease-causing mutations were demonstrated to impair proper MAF phosphorylation, ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation, perturbed gene expression in primary skin fibroblasts, and induced neurodevelopmental defects in an in vivo model. Our findings nosologically and clinically delineate a previously poorly understood recognizable multisystem disorder, provide evidence for MAF governing a wider range of developmental programs than previously appreciated, and describe a novel instance of protein dosage effect severely perturbing development. PMID:25865493

  12. Mutations in PTPRQ are a cause of autosomal-recessive nonsyndromic hearing impairment DFNB84 and associated with vestibular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Schraders, Margit; Oostrik, Jaap; Huygen, Patrick L M; Strom, Tim M; van Wijk, Erwin; Kunst, Henricus P M; Hoefsloot, Lies H; Cremers, Cor W R J; Admiraal, Ronald J C; Kremer, Hannie

    2010-04-01

    We identified overlapping homozygous regions within the DFNB84 locus in a nonconsanguineous Dutch family and a consanguineous Moroccan family with sensorineural autosomal-recessive nonsyndromic hearing impairment (arNSHI). The critical region of 3.17 Mb harbored the PTPRQ gene and mouse models with homozygous mutations in the orthologous gene display severe hearing loss. We show that the human PTPRQ gene was not completely annotated and that additional, alternatively spliced exons are present at the 5' end of the gene. Different PTPRQ isoforms are encoded with a varying number of fibronectin type 3 (FN3) domains, a transmembrane domain, and a phosphatase domain. Sequence analysis of the PTPRQ gene in members of the families revealed a nonsense mutation in the Dutch family and a missense mutation in the Moroccan family. The missense mutation is located in one of the FN3 domains. The nonsense mutation results in a truncated protein with only a small number of FN3 domains and no transmembrane or phosphatase domain. Hearing loss in the patients with PTPRQ mutations is likely to be congenital and moderate to profound and most severe in the family with the nonsense mutation. Progression of the hearing loss was observed in both families. The hearing loss is accompanied by vestibular dysfunction in all affected individuals. Although we show that PTPRQ is expressed in many tissues, no symptoms other than deafness were observed in the patients. PMID:20346435

  13. Mutations Impairing GSK3-Mediated MAF Phosphorylation Cause Cataract, Deafness, Intellectual Disability, Seizures, and a Down Syndrome-like Facies.

    PubMed

    Niceta, Marcello; Stellacci, Emilia; Gripp, Karen W; Zampino, Giuseppe; Kousi, Maria; Anselmi, Massimiliano; Traversa, Alice; Ciolfi, Andrea; Stabley, Deborah; Bruselles, Alessandro; Caputo, Viviana; Cecchetti, Serena; Prudente, Sabrina; Fiorenza, Maria T; Boitani, Carla; Philip, Nicole; Niyazov, Dmitriy; Leoni, Chiara; Nakane, Takaya; Keppler-Noreuil, Kim; Braddock, Stephen R; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Palleschi, Antonio; Campeau, Philippe M; Lee, Brendan H L; Pouponnot, Celio; Stella, Lorenzo; Bocchinfuso, Gianfranco; Katsanis, Nicholas; Sol-Church, Katia; Tartaglia, Marco

    2015-05-01

    Transcription factors operate in developmental processes to mediate inductive events and cell competence, and perturbation of their function or regulation can dramatically affect morphogenesis, organogenesis, and growth. We report that a narrow spectrum of amino-acid substitutions within the transactivation domain of the v-maf avian musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog (MAF), a leucine zipper-containing transcription factor of the AP1 superfamily, profoundly affect development. Seven different de novo missense mutations involving conserved residues of the four GSK3 phosphorylation motifs were identified in eight unrelated individuals. The distinctive clinical phenotype, for which we propose the eponym Aymé-Gripp syndrome, is not limited to lens and eye defects as previously reported for MAF/Maf loss of function but includes sensorineural deafness, intellectual disability, seizures, brachycephaly, distinctive flat facial appearance, skeletal anomalies, mammary gland hypoplasia, and reduced growth. Disease-causing mutations were demonstrated to impair proper MAF phosphorylation, ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation, perturbed gene expression in primary skin fibroblasts, and induced neurodevelopmental defects in an in vivo model. Our findings nosologically and clinically delineate a previously poorly understood recognizable multisystem disorder, provide evidence for MAF governing a wider range of developmental programs than previously appreciated, and describe a novel instance of protein dosage effect severely perturbing development. PMID:25865493

  14. Vascular contributions to cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Unlike many neurodegenerative causes of cognitive impairment and dementia, vascular damage is preventable. Despite the heterogeneity of vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) and the complexity of its clinical presentations, the potential for limiting progression and changing the trajectory of damage makes it all the more important for physicians to be educated about the syndrome and to remain vigilant when taking care of patients. In this review, we outline an approach to patients with possible VCI, summarize current treatment and prevention guidelines, and provide an overview with case examples. PMID:26124978

  15. Visitation arrangements for impaired parents.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Stephen A; Street, David F

    2011-07-01

    Forensic mental health professionals are frequently asked to evaluate the parenting skills of divorcing parents because the court seeks help in determining the custody, visitation, and parenting time arrangements for the children. When one of the parents is impaired, the court wants to know the way to help the children have a good relationship with that parent and keep the children safe. There is little empirical research to answer such questions. In this article, the authors describe their methodology for providing useful clinical information to the court to help guide their decisions regarding visitation with impaired parents. PMID:21683915

  16. Driver Compensation: Impairment or Improvement?

    PubMed

    Young, Richard A

    2015-12-01

    Strayer et al.'s conclusion that their "cognitive distraction scale" for auditory-vocal tasks indicates "significant impairments to driving" is not supported by their data. Additional analysis demonstrates that slower brake reaction times during auditory-vocal tasks were fully compensated for by longer following distances to the lead car. Naturalistic driving data demonstrate that cellular conversation decreases crash risk, the opposite of the article's assumption. Hence, the scale's internal and external validities for indicating driving impairment are highly questionable. PMID:26534851

  17. Loss of Periostin Results in Impaired Regeneration and Pancreatic Atrophy after Cerulein-Induced Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hausmann, Simone; Regel, Ivonne; Steiger, Katja; Wagner, Nadine; Thorwirth, Manja; Schlitter, Anna M; Esposito, Irene; Michalski, Christoph W; Friess, Helmut; Kleeff, Jörg; Erkan, Mert

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix molecule periostin (POSTN, encoded by POSTN), which is secreted by activated pancreatic stellate cells, has important functions in chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. However, the role of POSTN in acute pancreatitis and subsequent regeneration processes has not been addressed so far. We analyzed the function of POSTN in pancreatic exocrine regeneration after the induction of a severe acute pancreatitis. Postn-deficient mice and wild-type control animals received repetitive cerulein injections, and a detailed histologic analysis of pancreatic tissues was performed. Although there was no difference in pancreatitis severity in the acute inflammatory phase, the recovery of the exocrine pancreas was massively impaired in Postn-deficient mice. Loss of Postn expression was accompanied by strong pancreatic atrophy and acinar-to-adipocyte differentiation, which was also reflected in gene expression patterns. Our data suggest that POSTN is a crucial factor for proper exocrine lineage-specific regeneration after severe acute pancreatitis. PMID:26632158

  18. Worsening Cognitive Impairment and Neurodegenerative Pathology Progressively Increase Risk for Delirium

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Daniel H.J.; Skelly, Donal T.; Murray, Carol; Hennessy, Edel; Bowen, Jordan; Norton, Samuel; Brayne, Carol; Rahkonen, Terhi; Sulkava, Raimo; Sanderson, David J.; Rawlins, J. Nicholas; Bannerman, David M.; MacLullich, Alasdair M.J.; Cunningham, Colm

    2015-01-01

    Background Delirium is a profound neuropsychiatric disturbance precipitated by acute illness. Although dementia is the major risk factor this has typically been considered a binary quantity (i.e., cognitively impaired versus cognitively normal) with respect to delirium risk. We used humans and mice to address the hypothesis that the severity of underlying neurodegenerative changes and/or cognitive impairment progressively alters delirium risk. Methods Humans in a population-based longitudinal study, Vantaa 85+, were followed for incident delirium. Odds for reporting delirium at follow-up (outcome) were modeled using random-effects logistic regression, where prior cognitive impairment measured by Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE) (exposure) was considered. To address whether underlying neurodegenerative pathology increased susceptibility to acute cognitive change, mice at three stages of neurodegenerative disease progression (ME7 model of neurodegeneration: controls, 12 weeks, and 16 weeks) were assessed for acute cognitive dysfunction upon systemic inflammation induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 100 μg/kg). Synaptic and axonal correlates of susceptibility to acute dysfunction were assessed using immunohistochemistry. Results In the Vantaa cohort, 465 persons (88.4 ± 2.8 years) completed MMSE at baseline. For every MMSE point lost, risk of incident delirium increased by 5% (p = 0.02). LPS precipitated severe and fluctuating cognitive deficits in 16-week ME7 mice but lower incidence or no deficits in 12-week ME7 and controls, respectively. This was associated with progressive thalamic synaptic loss and axonal pathology. Conclusion A human population-based cohort with graded severity of existing cognitive impairment and a mouse model with progressing neurodegeneration both indicate that the risk of delirium increases with greater severity of pre-existing cognitive impairment and neuropathology. PMID:25239680

  19. Cerebral changes and cognitive impairment after an ischemic heart disease: a multimodal MRI study.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Charlotte; Catheline, Gwénaëlle; Dilharreguy, Bixente; Couffinhal, Thierry; Ledure, Sylvain; Lassalle-Lagadec, Saioa; Callaert, Dorothée; Allard, Michèle; Sibon, Igor

    2016-09-01

    Three to 6 months after an acute coronary syndrome (ACS), cognitive impairment is observed in more than 30 % of the patients, mainly in executive functioning. The aim of this study was to investigate, using multimodal MRI, cerebral anatomo-functional substratum of executive dysfunction. Thirty-three patients were recruited 4 ± 1 months after a first ACS. Executive functions were evaluated with the Trail-Making-Test-B (TMTB) at baseline (ie 4 ± 1 months after ACS) and 6 months later (ie 10 ± 1 months after ACS). Using both time-points, we identified 3 groups of patients according to normative data based on age, gender and education level: 15 'cognitively normal' patients without impairment at each follow-up, 10 'transient impaired' patients with an impairment only at baseline and 8 'impairing' patients with an impairment only at follow-up. We explored, in the whole-brain, the structural integrity using Voxel-Based Morphometry and Tract-Based Spatial Statistics and the resting-state functional connectivity using Network-Based Statistics. No structural difference was observed between impaired and cognitively normal patients. At the functional level, compared to the 'cognitively normal' group, the 'transient impaired' patients presented an increased functional connectivity in a network centered on middle-orbito-frontal regions, whereas the 'impairing' patients presented only a non-significant decrease of functional connectivity. Executive dysfunction in ACS patients is associated to functional but no structural characteristics, particularly to an increased functional connectivity in cognitive networks in transient impaired patients. Further studies with larger sample size are needed to confirm these results and to determine if these patients could be at higher risk for developing permanent cognitive disorders. PMID:26589710

  20. Acute Arterial Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Dagnone, L. E.; Brown, P. M.

    1983-01-01

    The response of the primary care physician in the initial assessment and management of acute arterial injuries will often be the deciding factor in survival of life, limb or organ system. Most arterial emergencies occur as a result of trauma, disruption of vessel wall and/or occlusion of flow. The common clinical syndromes of acute arterial emergencies are injuries to and beyond the aorta, acute aortic dissection, ruptured aortic aneurysm, and thromboembolic occlusive arterial disease. The role of arteriography and the urgency of definitive surgical repair in acute arterial emergencies is summarized. PMID:21283323

  1. Association between Carotid Artery Stenosis and Cognitive Impairment in Stroke Patients: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Yue, Wei; Wang, Anxin; Zhu, Runxiu; Yan, Zhongrui; Zheng, Shouhuan; Wang, Jingwei; Huo, Jia; Liu, Yunlin; Li, Xin; Ji, Yong

    2016-01-01

    To investigate potential associations between carotid artery stenosis and cognitive impairment among patients with acute ischemic stroke and to provide important clinical implications. We measured the degree of carotid artery stenosis and recorded the Mini-Mental State Examination score (MMSE) at admission in 3116 acute ischemic stroke patients. The association between carotid stenosis and cognitive impairment assessed by MMSE was tested using multivariate regression analysis. Other clinical variables of interest were also studied. After adjusting for age, gender, education level, marriage, alcohol use, tobacco use, physical activity, hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, atrial fibrillation, myocardial infarction and NIHSS (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale) score, we found that participants with high-grade stenosis of the carotid artery had a higher likelihood of cognitive impairment compared to those without carotid artery stenosis (OR = 1.49, 95%CI: 1.05-2.11, p<0.001). Left common carotid artery stenosis was associated with cognitive impairment in the univariate analysis, although this effect did not persist after adjustment for the NIHSS score. Cognitive impairment was associated with high-grade stenosis of the right carotid artery. PMID:26751070

  2. Language Impairment in Autistic Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deaton, Ann Virginia

    Discussed is the language impairment of children with infantile autism. The speech patterns of autistic children, including echolalia, pronomial reversal, silent language, and voice imitation, are described. The clinical picture of the autistic child is compared to that of children with such other disorders as deafness, retardation, and…

  3. Oceanography for the Visually Impaired

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Kate

    2008-01-01

    Amy Bower is a physical oceanographer and senior scientist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) in Woods Hole, Massachusetts--she has also been legally blind for 14 years. Through her partnership with the Perkins School for the Blind in Watertown, Massachusetts, the oldest K-12 school for the visually impaired in the United States,…

  4. [Cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Ochi, Hirofumi

    2014-10-01

    Cognitive impairment may occur in up to 70% of all patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Although MS can affect various sites within the central nervous system, a specific pattern of cognitive deficits tends to be seen, especially in the early stages of the disease. These deficits include problems with attention, information processing speed, and working memory. This constellation of deficits can occur with any disease course, and a minimal correlation has been found between physical disability assessed by EDSS and cognitive impairment. Many studies have shown that cognitive impairment is correlated with brain lesion volume, as well as brain atrophy. There are promising neuroimaging indicators that may be useful for identifying patients at risk for cognitive impairment, such as diffusion tensor imaging, the magnetization transfer ratio, and N-acetyl aspartate levels. Cognitive dysfunction is associated with adverse effects on quality of life, employment status, and social activities. Today, there are three avenues for treatment: disease modifying therapies, symptomatic treatments, and cognitive rehabilitation. Unfortunately, data linking therapeutic interventions are limited. A better understanding of cognitive function and its correlation with disease mechanisms will assist in providing a new comprehensive treatment strategy that begins immediately with the diagnosis of MS. PMID:25296874

  5. Acute phase reaction and acute phase proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Gruys, E.; Toussaint, M.J.M.; Niewold, T.A.; Koopmans, S.J.

    2005-01-01

    A review of the systemic acute phase reaction with major cytokines involved, and the hepatic metabolic changes, negative and positive acute phase proteins (APPs) with function and associated pathology is given. It appears that APPs represent appropriate analytes for assessment of animal health. Whereas they represent non-specific markers as biological effect reactants, they can be used for assessing nutritional deficits and reactive processes, especially when positive and negative acute phase variables are combined in an index. When such acute phase index is applied to separate healthy animals from animals with some disease, much better results are obtained than with single analytes and statistically acceptable results for culling individual animals may be reached. Unfortunately at present no cheap, comprehensive and easy to use system is available for assessing various acute phase proteins in serum or blood samples at the same time. Protein microarray or fluid phase microchip technology may satisfy this need; and permit simultaneous analysis of numerous analytes in the same small volume sample and enable integration of information derived from systemic reactivity and nutrition with disease specific variables. Applying such technology may help to solve health problems in various countries not only in animal husbandry but also in human populations. PMID:16252337

  6. Cumulative disease activity predicts incidental hearing impairment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

    PubMed

    Pascual-Ramos, Virginia; Contreras-Yáñez, Irazú; Rivera-Hoyos, Paula; Enríquez, Lorena; Ramírez-Anguiano, Jaqueline

    2014-03-01

    We previously reported that 24% of 113 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients had hearing impairment (HI). We investigated if disease activity was a predictor of incidental HI. One hundred and four patients completed three consecutive 6 months-apart rheumatic evaluations and concomitant audiometric evaluations which included at least an interview, an otoscopic evaluation, and a pure tone audiometry. HI was defined if the average thresholds for at least one of low-, mid-, or high-frequency ranges were ≥25 decibels (dB) hearing level in one or both ears. Appropriated statistics was used. Internal review board approval was obtained. Patients were most frequently middle-aged (43.4 ± 13.3 years), female (89.4%), and had median disease duration of 5 years and low disease activity. All were receiving RA treatment. At inclusion, 24 patients had HI which was sensorineural in 91.7% of them. Among the 80 patients without HI at baseline, 10 (12.5%) developed incidental HI, and they had more disease activity either at baseline ([median, range] disease activity score-28 joints evaluated-C-reactive protein [DAS28-CRP], 3.9 [1.6-7.3] vs. 2.1 [1-8.7], p = 0.006) or cumulative previous incidental HI (3.4 [1.8-4.8] vs. 2 [1-6.2], p = 0.007) and were more frequently on combined methotrexate and sulfasalazine (20 vs. 1.4%, p = 0.05) than their counterparts. In the adjusted Cox proportional model, cumulative DAS28-CRP was the only variable to predict incidental HI (odds ratio, 1.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-2.7; p = 0.01). Almost 13% of RA patients with short disease duration and low disease activity developed incidental HI during 1 year. Cumulative disease activity predicted incidental HI. PMID:24435352

  7. Effects of noise reduction on AM perception for hearing-impaired listeners.

    PubMed

    Ives, D Timothy; Kalluri, Sridhar; Strelcyk, Olaf; Sheft, Stanley; Miermont, Franck; Coez, Arnaud; Bizaguet, Eric; Lorenzi, Christian

    2014-10-01

    Noise reduction (NR) systems are commonplace in modern digital hearing aids. Though not improving speech intelligibility, NR helps the hearing-aid user in terms of lowering noise annoyance, reducing cognitive load and improving ease of listening. Previous psychophysical work has shown that NR does in fact improve the ability of normal-hearing (NH) listeners to discriminate the slow amplitude-modulation (AM) cues representative of those found in speech. The goal of this study was to assess whether this improvement of AM discrimination with NR can also be observed for hearing-impaired (HI) listeners. AM discrimination was measured at two audio frequencies of 500 Hz and 2 kHz in a background noise with a signal-to-noise ratio of 12 dB. Discrimination was measured for ten HI and ten NH listeners with and without NR processing. The HI listeners had a moderate sensorineural hearing loss of about 50 dB HL at 2 kHz and normal hearing (≤ 20 dB HL) at 500 Hz. The results showed that most of the HI listeners tended to benefit from NR at 500 Hz but not at 2 kHz. However, statistical analyses showed that HI listeners did not benefit significantly from NR at any frequency region. In comparison, the NH listeners showed a significant benefit from NR at both frequencies. For each condition, the fidelity of AM transmission was quantified by a computational model of early auditory processing. The parameters of the model were adjusted separately for the two groups (NH and HI) of listeners. The AM discrimination performance of the HI group (with and without NR) was best captured by a model simulating the loss of the fast-acting amplitude compression applied by the normal cochlea. This suggests that the lack of benefit from NR for HI listeners results from loudness recruitment. PMID:24899379

  8. Auditory Spatial Discrimination and the Mismatch Negativity Response in Hearing-Impaired Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yuexin; Zheng, Yiqing; Liang, Maojin; Zhao, Fei; Yu, Guangzheng; Liu, Yu; Chen, Yuebo; Chen, Guisheng

    2015-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to investigate the ability of hearing-impaired (HI) individuals with different binaural hearing conditions to discriminate spatial auditory-sources at the midline and lateral positions, and to explore the possible central processing mechanisms by measuring the minimal audible angle (MAA) and mismatch negativity (MMN) response. To measure MAA at the left/right 0°, 45° and 90° positions, 12 normal-hearing (NH) participants and 36 patients with sensorineural hearing loss, which included 12 patients with symmetrical hearing loss (SHL) and 24 patients with asymmetrical hearing loss (AHL) [12 with unilateral hearing loss on the left (UHLL) and 12 with unilateral hearing loss on the right (UHLR)] were recruited. In addition, 128-electrode electroencephalography was used to record the MMN response in a separate group of 60 patients (20 UHLL, 20 UHLR and 20 SHL patients) and 20 NH participants. The results showed MAA thresholds of the NH participants to be significantly lower than the HI participants. Also, a significantly smaller MAA threshold was obtained at the midline position than at the lateral position in both NH and SHL groups. However, in the AHL group, MAA threshold for the 90° position on the affected side was significantly smaller than the MMA thresholds obtained at other positions. Significantly reduced amplitudes and prolonged latencies of the MMN were found in the HI groups compared to the NH group. In addition, contralateral activation was found in the UHL group for sounds emanating from the 90° position on the affected side and in the NH group. These findings suggest that the abilities of spatial discrimination at the midline and lateral positions vary significantly in different hearing conditions. A reduced MMN amplitude and prolonged latency together with bilaterally symmetrical cortical activations over the auditory hemispheres indicate possible cortical compensatory changes associated with poor behavioral spatial

  9. Sensory impairments and health concerns related to the degree of intellectual disability in people with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Määttä, Tuomo; Kaski, Markus; Taanila, Anja; Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Iivanainen, Matti

    2006-09-01

    The relationship between poor health and cognitive impairment is not fully understood yet. People with Down syndrome are prone to a number of health problems, including congenital heart defect, visual impairment, hearing loss, autoimmune diseases, epilepsy, early-onset Alzheimer's disease and intellectual disability. Our aim was to assess the impact of impaired health on cognitive performance in people with Down syndrome. A series of people with Down syndrome (n=129) were studied for their intellectual disability, sensory impairments and health concerns. The medical and psychological records of all persons with Down syndrome in the Intellectual Disability Service Register of Kainuu from 1970 to 2004 were analysed. The detected health issues were related to the individuals' cognitive levels. Visual impairment, poor dental health and acute neurological disease were associated with the severity of intellectual disability and ageing. PMID:17048801

  10. Cognitive impairments may mimic delusions.

    PubMed

    Eterović, Marija; Kozarić-Kovačić, Dragica

    2015-12-01

    Delusions are often recognized as key to the concept of psychosis. What is delusion is one of the basic questions of psychopathology. The common denominator of definitions of delusions is the divergence between the strong conviction in the delusional belief and superior evidences to the contrary which are continually ignored. An implicit, sustainably unspoken assumption is that the person with delusional belief has cognitive capacities to process the (counter-)arguments relevant to their delusion. However, individual's cognitive capacities are not being emphasized when delusions are evaluated. Moreover, the impact of cognitive decline on formation of delusions is neglected, both in theory and practice. We elaborate that cognitive deficits may facilitate, oppose, or mimic delusions. We focus on the last, which can lead to diagnosing as delusion what could be explained by cognitive decline and better called pseudo-delusion. The risk is significant when cognition is impaired, as in demented people; an issue which has not yet been debated. True delusions are incompatible with person's cognitive capacities, i.e., if we take into account person's cognitive status, we still cannot understand how the person holds the strange belief with an extraordinary conviction. Pseudo-delusions would be beliefs, thoughts or judgments that at first seem delusional (they are false, subculturally atypical beliefs that are strongly maintained in the face of counterargument), but lose the essence of delusions after we take cognitive impairment into account. Pseudo-delusions could actually be explained or understood by person's cognitive impairments, they "fit into" them. The reported reality-based contents of delusions in the elderly, poor response to antipsychotics and lack of association with early or family history of psychiatric disorders could in part be accounted for by the bias of misdiagnosing the cognitive impairment as the delusion. Not recognizing that the cognitive impairment

  11. [Alcoholism and aging. 2. Alcoholic dementia or alcoholic cognitive impairment?].

    PubMed

    Pierucci-Lagha, Amira; Derouesné, Christian

    2003-12-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption results in considerable damage to many of the body's organs, and particularly to the brain. Beyond the confusional state occurring with acute intoxication or withdrawal, alcohol abuse is responsible of a constellation of neuropsychiatric syndromes including cognitive dysfunction, Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome, alcoholic cerebellar degeneration, Marchiafava-Bignami disease and alcohol-related dementia, ARD. ARD would account for nearly 20% of all admissions to state mental hospitals in the United-States. According to the DSM-IV, ARD is defined by a dementia associated with alcohol abuse. However, the concept of a dementia directly related to the neurotoxicity of alcohol for brain neurons is still a matter of debate. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the mechanisms of cognitive deficits related to chronic alcohol intoxication. This paper presents the epidemiological, neuropathological, neurochemical and clinical data on ARD. Alcoholism is responsible for cognitive deficits of various severity, which could be reversible or not with alcohol abstinence, but can also participate to the cognitive impairment related to other pathologies, such as Alzheimer disease. On account of this review, it is suggested that the term alcohol-related cognitive impairment should be more convenient than that of ARD, more restrictive and more confusing. Presently, there are no established treatment for alcohol-related cognitive impairment. Alcohol abstinence is a most important step. Psychosocial interventions are essential to support the patients in the daily life. PMID:15683959

  12. 2-arachidonoylglycerol signaling impairs short-term fear extinction

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, N D; Gunduz-Cinar, O; Halladay, L; Bukalo, O; Holmes, A; Patel, S

    2016-01-01

    Impairments in fear extinction are thought to be central to the psychopathology of posttraumatic stress disorder, and endocannabinoid (eCB) signaling has been strongly implicated in extinction learning. Here we utilized the monoacylglycerol lipase inhibitor JZL184 to selectively augment brain 2-AG levels combined with an auditory cue fear-conditioning paradigm to test the hypothesis that 2-AG-mediated eCB signaling modulates short-term fear extinction learning in mice. We show that systemic JZL184 impairs short-term extinction learning in a CB1 receptor-dependent manner without affecting non-specific freezing behavior or the acquisition of conditioned fear. This effect was also observed in over-conditioned mice environmentally manipulated to re-acquire fear extinction. Cumulatively, the effects of JZL184 appear to be partly due to augmentation of 2-AG signaling in the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA), as direct microinfusion of JZL184 into the BLA produced similar results. Moreover, we elucidate a short ~3-day temporal window during which 2-AG augmentation impairs extinction behavior, suggesting a preferential role for 2-AG-mediated eCB signaling in the modulation of short-term behavioral sequelae to acute traumatic stress exposure. PMID:26926885

  13. Alcohol Impairment and Social Drinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Marsha E.

    Cognitive abilities of social drinkers are generally thought to be affected by alcohol only during acute intoxication, but several studies suggest that sober-state performance may be affected by the quantity of alcohol consumed per drinking episode. Although the findings regarding sober-state mental deficits in social drinkers are inconclusive,…

  14. Functional impairment in social anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Aderka, Idan M; Hofmann, Stefan G; Nickerson, Angela; Hermesh, Haggai; Gilboa-Schechtman, Eva; Marom, Sofi

    2012-04-01

    The present study examined functional impairment among treatment seekers with social anxiety disorder (SAD). We investigated the effects of diagnostic subtypes of SAD and comorbidity with mood and anxiety disorders on impairment. In addition, we used cluster analysis procedures to empirically identify subgroups of individuals with distinct patterns of impairment. Participants were 216 treatment-seeking individuals with SAD. Clinical interviews were undertaken to determine diagnoses of anxiety disorders and major depressive disorder, and a battery of self-report measures was administered to index symptoms of social anxiety, depression and extent of impairment. Results indicated that individuals with the generalized subtype of SAD had greater impairment in all three life domains compared to individuals with the nongeneralized subtype. Comorbidity with mood disorders was associated with greater impairment than SAD alone, but comorbidity with anxiety disorders was not. Four distinct impairment profiles emerged from the cluster analysis: primary work/studies impairment, primary social life impairment, both work/studies and social impairment, and impairment in all domains. Findings from this study suggest that SAD is associated with substantial impairment across multiple domains, and that individuals with SAD present diverse impairment profiles. These profiles may inform subtyping of the disorder as well as therapeutic interventions. PMID:22306132

  15. Acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Lang, Joanna; Zuber, Kim; Davis, Jane

    2016-04-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) complicates up to 20% of all hospital admissions. Responding to the increase in admissions, complications, mortality, morbidity, and cost of AKI, Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes convened an expert panel to study the issue, review the literature, and publish guidelines to evaluate and treat patients with AKI in the acute setting. This article reviews those guidelines. PMID:27023656

  16. Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Gray, Matthew Philip; Gorelick, Marc H

    2016-06-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is a primarily pediatric, immune-mediated disease characterized by demyelination and polyfocal neurologic symptoms that typically occur after a preceding viral infection or recent immunization. This article presents the pathophysiology, diagnostic criteria, and magnetic resonance imaging characteristics of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. We also present evaluation and management strategies. PMID:27253358

  17. Poznan acute Astronomical Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    This Poznan acute Astronomical Observatory is a unit of the Adam Mickiewicz University, located in Poznan acute, Poland. From its foundation in 1919, it has specialized in astrometry and celestial mechanics (reference frames, dynamics of satellites and small solar system bodies). Recently, research activities have also included planetary and stellar astrophysics (asteroid photometry, catalysmic b...

  18. Acute and Chronic Effects of Cannabinoids on Human Cognition-A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Broyd, Samantha J; van Hell, Hendrika H; Beale, Camilla; Yücel, Murat; Solowij, Nadia

    2016-04-01

    Cannabis use has been associated with impaired cognition during acute intoxication as well as in the unintoxicated state in long-term users. However, the evidence has been mixed and contested, and no systematic reviews of the literature on neuropsychological task-based measures of cognition have been conducted in an attempt to synthesize the findings. We systematically review the empirical research published in the past decade (from January 2004 to February 2015) on acute and chronic effects of cannabis and cannabinoids and on persistence or recovery after abstinence. We summarize the findings into the major categories of the cognitive domains investigated, considering sample characteristics and associations with various cannabis use parameters. Verbal learning and memory and attention are most consistently impaired by acute and chronic exposure to cannabis. Psychomotor function is most affected during acute intoxication, with some evidence for persistence in chronic users and after cessation of use. Impaired verbal memory, attention, and some executive functions may persist after prolonged abstinence, but persistence or recovery across all cognitive domains remains underresearched. Associations between poorer performance and a range of cannabis use parameters, including a younger age of onset, are frequently reported. Little further evidence has emerged for the development of tolerance to the acutely impairing effects of cannabis. Evidence for potential protection from harmful effects by cannabidiol continues to increase but is not definitive. In light of increasing trends toward legalization of cannabis, the knowledge gained from this body of research needs to be incorporated into strategies to minimize harm. PMID:26858214

  19. [Cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Hisao

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is a common finding in Parkinson's disease (PD), even in the early stages. The concept of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in PD was recently formalized with diagnosis being reached after impairments in neuropsychological tasks become significant in at least one domain. The brain profile of cognitive deficits involves executive functions (e. g., planning, set shifting, set maintenance, problem solving), attention and memory function. Memory deficits are characterized by impairments in delayed recall, temporal ordering and conditional associate learning. PD patients demonstrate relatively preserved recognition. Visuospatial dysfunctions have also been reported, while language is largely preserved. The existence of two distinct mild cognitive syndromes has also been suggested. One of these affects mainly the frontostriatal executive deficits that are modulated by dopaminergic medications and by a genetically determined level of prefrontal cortex dopamine release. The other affects the more-posterior cortical abilities, such as visuospatial and memory functions, and is suggested to be associated with an increased risk for conversion to dementia. Cross-sectional studies have commonly reported dementia in 20-30% of PD patients, although the 8-year cumulative incidence of dementia may be as high as 78%. Factors associated with dementia in PD are age at onset, age at the time of examination, akinetic-rigid form PD, depression, hallucination, rapid eye movement sleep behavioral disorder and severe olfactory deficits. Clinical features generally involve the same type of deficits as those found in MCI patients, which are more severe and more extensive. The phenomenology of the dementia syndrome is similar to that seen in dementia with Lewy bodies, and clinicopathological correlation studies have revealed varying results with regard to neurochemical deficits and the pathological substrate underlying cognitive impairment and dementia. Early cognitive

  20. Methamphetamine Alters Brain Structures, Impairs Mental Flexibility

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alters Brain Structures, Impairs Mental Flexibility Methamphetamine Alters Brain Structures, Impairs Mental Flexibility Email Facebook Twitter March ... methamphetamine use, such as tobacco smoking. Can the Brain Recover? The UCLA study’s findings underscore the importance ...