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Sample records for acute septic arthritis

  1. Septic arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... acute septic arthritis are caused by Staphylococcus or Streptococcus bacteria . Chronic septic arthritis (which is less common) ... cases are caused by the bacteria group B streptococcus. Another common cause is Haemophilus influenza , especially if ...

  2. Gram staining in the diagnosis of acute septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Faraj, A A; Omonbude, O D; Godwin, P

    2002-10-01

    This study aimed at determining the sensitivity and specificity of Gram staining of synovial fluid as a diagnostic tool in acute septic arthritis. A retrospective study was made of 22 patients who had arthroscopic lavage following a provisional diagnosis of acute septic arthritis of the knee joint. Gram stains and cultures of the knee aspirates were compared with the clinical and laboratory parameters, to evaluate their usefulness in diagnosing acute arthritis. All patients who had septic arthritis had pain, swelling and limitation of movement. CRP was elevated in 90% of patients. The incidence of elevated white blood cell count was higher in the group of patients with a positive Gram stain study (60%) as compared to patients with a negative Gram stain study (33%). Gram staining sensitivity was 45%. Its specificity was however 100%. Gram staining is an unreliable tool in early decision making in patients requiring urgent surgical drainage and washout.

  3. Bilateral knee replacements for treatment of acute septic arthritis in both knees.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Muhammad Omer; Asumu, Theophilus

    2013-11-01

    A case report of bilateral acute septic arthritis of knees is presented, which was managed with staged total knee replacements for both knees. A literature review on septic arthritis treated with knee arthroplasty is also presented.

  4. Elbow septic arthritis associated with pediatric acute leukemia: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Takuya; Yagi, Hirohisa; Okada, Mitsuhiro; Yokoi, Takuya; Shintani, Kosuke; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Acute leukemia in children presents with various clinical manifestations that mimic orthopaedic conditions. The association of septic arthritis of the elbow with acute leukemia is very rare, and the correct diagnosis of acute leukemia is often established only after treatment of the septic arthritis. In this article, we present a three-year-old child patient with elbow septic arthritis related to acute leukemia, diagnosed promptly by bone marrow aspiration on the same day as emergency surgical debridement of the septic elbow joint due to the maintenance of a high index of suspicion, and treated with chemotherapy as soon as possible. The emergency physician and orthopaedist must recognize unusual patterns of presentation like this. Since delay in initiating treatment of septic arthritis may result in growth disturbance, elbow septic arthritis associated with pediatric acute leukemia must be treated promptly and appropriately. Early diagnosis is a good prognostic feature of childhood acute leukemia.

  5. Acute pseudo-septic arthritis following viscosuplementation of the knee.

    PubMed

    Idrissi, Zineb; Benbouazza, Karima; Fourtassi, Maryam; Raissouni, Hanae; El Aadmi, Meriem; Zanat, Fatima; Hajjaj-Hassouni, Najia

    2012-01-01

    A 70-year-old woman with a history of medial femoro-tibial compartment of knee osteoarthritis was admitted for acute arthritis six days after a second intra-articular injection of Hyaluronic acid. The joint fluid was inflammatory, with no crystals, and laboratory tests showed marked inflammation leading to antibiotic treatment for suspected septic arthritis. The persistent symptoms and negative results of joint fluid and blood cultures led to discontinuation of the antibiotic therapy after 10 days. Anti-inflammatory with rehabilitation therapy of the knee relieved the symptoms, and the patient was discharged home 3 weeks after her admission. Aseptic arthritis induced by repeated Hyaluronic acid injection is the most likely diagnosis. Physicians should be conscious of this extremely severe complication.

  6. Application of a Novel Diagnostic Rule in the Differential Diagnosis between Acute Gouty Arthritis and Septic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang-Hoon; Choi, Sang-Tae; Lee, Soo-Kyung; Lee, Joo-Hyun; Yoon, Bo-Young

    2015-06-01

    Septic arthritis and gout are major diseases that should be suspected in patients with acute monoarthritis. These two diseases are clinically similar and often indistinguishable without the help of synovial fluid analysis. Recently, a novel diagnostic rule for gout without synovial fluid analysis was developed and showed relevant performances. This study aimed to determine whether this diagnostic rule could perform well in distinguishing gout from septic arthritis. The diagnostic rule comprises 7 clinical and laboratory variables, each of which is given a specified score. The probability of gout is classified into 3 groups according to the sum of the scores: high (≥ 8), intermediate (> 4 to < 8) and low probability (≤ 4). In this retrospective study, we applied this diagnostic rule to 136 patients who presented as acute monoarthritis and were subsequently diagnosed as acute gout (n = 82) and septic arthritis (n = 54) based on synovial fluid analysis. The mean sum of scores of acute gout patients was significantly higher than that of those with septic arthritis (8.6 ± 0.2 vs. 3.6 ± 0.32, P < 0.001). Patients with acute gout had significantly more 'high', and less 'low' probabilities compared to those with septic arthritis (Eta[η]: 0.776). The prevalence of acute gouty arthritis, as confirmed by the presence of monosodium crystal, was 95.5% (61/64), 57.5% (19/33), and 5.1% (2/39) in high, intermediate and low probability group, respectively. The recently introduced diagnostic rule properly discriminates acute gout from septic arthritis. It may help physicians diagnose gout in cases difficult to be differentiated from septic arthritis.

  7. Management of a child with suspected acute septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pääkkönen, M; Peltola, H

    2012-03-01

    Acute septic arthritis of childhood is a potentially devastating disease that causes permanent disability and can result in death. Traditional treatment consists of a prolonged course of intravenous antibiotics combined with aggressive surgery. However, this approach is challenged by trials showing satisfactory outcomes with shorter treatment and less invasive surgery. Diagnostic arthrocentesis alone and an antibiotic for a fortnight, including initial intravenous administration for 2-4 days, suffice in most non-neonatal cases. A good penetrating agent, such as clindamycin or a first-generation cephalosporin, exceptionally high doses, and administration four times a day are probably key factors. If the symptoms and signs subside within a few days, and the serum C-reactive protein level drops below 20 mg/l, the antibiotic can usually be safely discontinued. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is a concern, but fortunately, most strains have retained susceptibility to clindamycin. The above guidance is not applicable to neonates and immunocompromised patients who may require a different approach.

  8. Update on the Management of Pediatric Acute Osteomyelitis and Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Castellazzi, Luca; Mantero, Marco; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis are two infections whose frequencies are increasing in pediatric patients. Acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis need to be carefully assessed, diagnosed, and treated to avoid devastating sequelae. Traditionally, the treatment of acute osteoarticular infection in pediatrics was based on prolonged intravenous anti-infective therapy. However, results from clinical trials have suggested that in uncomplicated cases, a short course of a few days of parenteral antibiotics followed by oral therapy is safe and effective. The aim of this review is to provide clinicians an update on recent controversies and advances regarding the management of acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis in children. In recent years, the emergence of bacterial species resistant to commonly used antibiotics that are particularly aggressive highlights the necessity for further research to optimize treatment approaches and to develop new molecules able to fight the war against acute osteoarticular infection in pediatric patients. PMID:27258258

  9. Update on the Management of Pediatric Acute Osteomyelitis and Septic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Castellazzi, Luca; Mantero, Marco; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis are two infections whose frequencies are increasing in pediatric patients. Acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis need to be carefully assessed, diagnosed, and treated to avoid devastating sequelae. Traditionally, the treatment of acute osteoarticular infection in pediatrics was based on prolonged intravenous anti-infective therapy. However, results from clinical trials have suggested that in uncomplicated cases, a short course of a few days of parenteral antibiotics followed by oral therapy is safe and effective. The aim of this review is to provide clinicians an update on recent controversies and advances regarding the management of acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis in children. In recent years, the emergence of bacterial species resistant to commonly used antibiotics that are particularly aggressive highlights the necessity for further research to optimize treatment approaches and to develop new molecules able to fight the war against acute osteoarticular infection in pediatric patients.

  10. Success rates of first-line antibiotics for culture-negative sub-acute and chronic septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chuckpaiwong, Bavornrit; Phoompoung, Saravut

    2014-09-01

    A combination of surgical and medical treatment is normally required for patients with septic arthritis. Antibiotics selected for use on these patients are normally based on tissue culture results. However, in sub-acute and chronic septic arthritis cases, the results of the culture are usually negative as a result of prior treatment. The present study will investigate the incidence of culture-negative septic arthritis and the outcomes based on the use of first-line drug antibiotics for the treatment of sub-acute and chronic septic arthritis. For the present study, the authors retrospectively reviewed medical records of surgically treated septic arthritis cases over the past 10 years at Siriraj Hospital. The patient culture results, the antibiotics used, and the results of treatment were all recorded and analyzed. One hundredfifty-three septic arthritis patients were reviewed. Sixty-two patients were classified as having been diagnosed with either sub-acute or chronic septic arthritis. Thirty-six of 62 patients (58.1%) had a negative culture result. In the culture-positive patients, 42.3% had Streptococcus, 26.9% had Staphylococcus aureus, 11.5% had other gram positive bacteria, 15.4% had gram-negative bacteria, and 3.8% had tuberculus infection. In the culture-negative sub-acute and chronic group (36 of 62), 23 patients received Cefazolin, nine patients received Cloxacillin, and four patients received Clindamycin. Successful results were 69.9%, 66.7% and 75%, respectively. The present study reflects that the incidence ofculture-negative, sub-acute and chronic septic arthritis is approximately 58.1%. The first-line class of antibiotics remains the appropriate antibiotic choice for these patients because they are still effective for treatment of septic arthritis in up to 70% of all cases.

  11. [Septic arthritis and spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Yosuke

    2014-10-01

    Septic arthritis and spondylitis in elderly adult are uncommon disease. But symptoms and signs of septic arthritis and spondylitis are an important medical emergency, with high mortality and morbidity. Delayed or inadequate treatment can result in irreversible joint destruction and neurological condition. Early diagnoses as well as prompt and effective treatment are essential for avoiding severe outcomes. In spite of advances in diagnostic imaging techniques, the incidence of septic arthritis and spondylitis appears to have been increased. The aging of the population, the widespread use of immunosuppressant therapies, including systemic corticosteroids, cytokines and anticytokines, and growing resistance to conventional antibiotics seem to be the major cause.

  12. Aeromonas hydrophila septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Danaher, Patrick J; Mueller, William P

    2011-12-01

    Septic arthritis is a serious, life and limb threatening infection. If suspected, empiric treatment must begin immediately and account for the most likely pathogens. Eight days following left knee arthroscopic surgery, a 51-year-old active duty male spent approximately 1 hour driving a personal watercraft on Okaloosa Bay near the Gulf of Mexico. Eight days later, he presented to the emergency room with septic arthritis of that knee. Fluid aspirated from the joint yielded Aeromonas hydrophila. The infection resolved with surgical drainage and 21 days of levofloxacin. A. hydrophila is a rare cause of septic arthritis, and reported cases have involved exposure to water after trauma to the affected joint. Many U.S. military bases are located in coastal areas and military members frequently participate in activities which compromise skin integrity and place them at increased risk for contracting waterborne infections. We present the ninth case of A. hydrophila septic arthritis described in the English language literature, highlight the importance of considering this pathogen in at-risk populations, and review the diagnosis and management of septic arthritis.

  13. Acute septic arthritis of the acromioclavicular joint caused by Haemophilus parainfluenzae: a rare causative origin.

    PubMed

    Hong, Myong-Joo; Kim, Yeon-Dong; Ham, Hyang-Do

    2015-04-01

    Septic arthritis of the acromioclavicular (AC) joint is a rare entity with symptoms that include erythema, swelling, and tenderness over the AC joint, fever, and limitation of shoulder motion with pain. In previous reports, Staphylococcus and Streptococcus species have been mentioned as common causative organisms. Haemophilus parainfluenzae is a normal inhabitant of the oral cavity, respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract, and urogenital tract. However, it sometimes causes opportunistic infections leading to septic arthritis and osteomyelitis. AC joint infection associated with H.parainfluenzae is very rare, and only one case has been reported in the literature. Moreover, septic arthritis in immunocompetent patients is also very rare. Here, we report the case of a healthy patient with H. parainfluenzae-related septic arthritis of the AC joint.

  14. [SEIP-SERPE-SEOP Consensus document on the treatment of uncomplicated acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Saavedra-Lozano, J; Calvo, C; Huguet Carol, R; Rodrigo, C; Núñez, E; Obando, I; Rojo, P; Merino, R; Pérez, C; Downey, F J; Colino, E; García, J J; Cilleruelo, M J; Torner, F; García, L

    2015-04-01

    This is a Consensus Document of the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases (Sociedad Española de Infectología Pediatrica), Spanish Society of Paediatric Rheumatology (Sociedad Española de Reumatología Pediátrica) and the Spanish Society of Paediatric Orthopaedics (Sociedad Española de Ortopedia Pediátrica), on the treatment of uncomplicated acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis. A review is presented on the medical and surgical treatment of acute osteoarticular infection, defined as a process with less than 14 days of symptomatology, uncomplicated and community-acquired. The different possible options are evaluated based on the best available scientific knowledge, and a number of evidence-based recommendations for clinical practice are provided.

  15. Clinical management of septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Sharff, Katie A; Richards, Eric P; Townes, John M

    2013-06-01

    Septic arthritis is a rheumatologic emergency as joint destruction occurs rapidly and can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Accurate diagnosis can be particularly challenging in patients with underlying inflammatory joint disease. This review outlines the risk factors for septic arthritis and summarizes the causative bacterial organisms. We highlight advances in antibiotic management with a focus on new drugs for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and discuss the use of adjunctive therapies for treatment of septic arthritis in adults.

  16. Septic arthritis of the neonatal hip: acute management and late reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Samora, Julie Balch; Klingele, Kevin

    2013-10-01

    Septic arthritis of the hip in neonates is rare but can have devastating consequences. Presenting signs and symptoms may differ from those encountered in older children, which may result in diagnostic challenge or delay. Many risk factors predispose neonates to septic arthritis, including the presence of transphyseal vessels and invasive procedures. Bacterial infection of the joint occurs via hematogenous invasion, extension from an adjacent site, or direct inoculation. A strong correlation exists between younger age at presentation and severity of residual hip deformity. Diagnosis is based on clinical examination, laboratory markers, and ultrasound evaluation. Early management includes parenteral antibiotics and surgical drainage. Late-stage management options include femoral and pelvic osteotomies, trochanteric arthroplasty, arthrodesis, pelvic support procedures, and nonsurgical measures. Early diagnosis and management continues to be the most important prognostic factor for a favorable outcome in the neonate with septic arthritis.

  17. Septic arthritis in adult horses.

    PubMed

    Carstanjen, B; Boehart, S; Cislakova, M

    2010-01-01

    Septic arthritis in horses is a serious disease which can become life-threatening. In case the infection can be eliminated before irreversible joint damage occurs, complete recovery is possible. This article gives an overview of the literature concerning etiology, diagnosis and strategies of therapy in cases of septic arthritis in adult horses, with special reference to novel options of treatment.

  18. Management of septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Avinash K; Gedalia, Abraham

    2004-09-01

    Septic arthritis in children remains a serious disease with the potential for significant systemic and musculoskeletal morbidity. Staphlococcus aureus is the most common cause of bone and joint infections in all age groups. Microbial invasion of the synovial space occurs typically results from hematogenous seeding. Diagnosis in neonates and young infants can be difficult since the clinical signs are much less specific in these age groups. Early diagnosis by needle aspiration of the affected joint and prompt initiation of appropriate antimicrobial therapy in conjunction with drainage of the affected joint is critical to avoid destruction of the articular cartilage and prevent disability. Septic arthritis in infants and children should always be managed by a pediatrician in close consultation with an orthopedic surgeon. Empiric antibiotic regimens should always include adequate anti-staphylococcal coverage. Antibiotic treatment should be started with appropriate doses of intravenous antibiotics. Switch to oral antibiotic therapy can be made when patient demonstrates clinical improvement. A minimum of 3-4 weeks of therapy is recommended. Close follow-up is warranted to monitor the growth of the affected limb until skeletal maturity.

  19. Acromioclavicular septic arthritis and sternoclavicular septic arthritis with contiguous pyomyositis.

    PubMed

    Corey, Sally A; Agger, William A; Saterbak, Andrew T

    2015-03-01

    Acromioclavicular (AC) and sternoclavicular (SC) septic arthritis with contiguous pyomyositis are rare, especially in immunocompetent individuals. We report a case of septic AC joint with pyomyositis of the deltoid and supraspinatus muscles and a separate case with septic SC joint with pyomysitis of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. Both patients had similar presentations of infections with Staphylococcus aureus and were successfully treated with surgical incision and drainage followed by prolonged antibiotic therapy.

  20. [Septic arthritis in adults].

    PubMed

    Loock, J; Haustedt, N; Wollenhaupt, J

    2014-09-01

    Septic arthritis is a true rheumatological emergency requiring immediate and thoughtful effort for rapid diagnosis establishment and treatment initiation. Children and elderly persons as well as immunocompromised individuals, patients with pre-existing joint damage and with inflammatory rheumatic joint diseases are preferentially affected. Bacteremia, joint surgery and intra-articular injections pose risk situations for the development of joint infections. The most frequent causative organism is Staphylococcus aureus but other relevant pathogens include coagulase-negative staphylococci, streptococci and mycobacteria. Synovial fluid analysis (e.g. appearance, cell count and microbiological examination) is the most important step to establish the diagnosis. The two main components of therapy consist of joint drainage and antibiotic treatment. The approach to periprosthetic joint infections depends on the duration of symptoms, causative organism and individual factors.

  1. The potential use of microcalorimetry in rapid differentiation between septic arthritis and other causes of arthritis.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, E; Hügle, T; Daikeler, T; Voide, C; Borens, O; Trampuz, A

    2015-03-01

    Current diagnostic methods in differentiating septic from non-septic arthritis are time-consuming (culture) or have limited sensitivity (Gram stain). Microcalorimetry is a novel method that can rapidly detect microorganisms by their heat production. We investigated the accuracy and time to detection of septic arthritis by using microcalorimetry. Patients older than 18 years of age with acute arthritis of native joints were prospectively included. Synovial fluid was aspirated and investigated by Gram stain, culture and microcalorimetry. The diagnosis of septic arthritis and non-septic arthritis were made by experienced rheumatologists or orthopaedic surgeons. Septic arthritis was diagnosed by considering the finding of acute arthritis together with findings such as positive Gram stain or positive culture of synovial fluid or positive blood culture. The sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing septic arthritis and the time to positivity of microcalorimetry were determined. Of 90 patients (mean age 64 years), nine had septic arthritis, of whom four (44 %) had positive Gram stain, six (67 %) positive synovial fluid culture and four (44 %) had positive blood culture. The sensitivity of microcalorimetry was 89 %, the specificity was 99 % and the mean detection time was 5.0 h (range, 2.2-8.0 h). Microcalorimetry is an accurate and rapid method for the diagnosis of septic arthritis. It has potential to be used in clinical practice in diagnosing septic arthritis.

  2. Septic arthritis involving Capnocytophaga ochracea.

    PubMed Central

    Winn, R E; Chase, W F; Lauderdale, P W; McCleskey, F K

    1984-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the knee developed in a 21-month-old child. The causative organism, isolated from two separate arthrocenteses, was identified as Capnocytophaga ochracea morphologically and by biochemical reactions. Previous human infections (bacteremias) have occurred in granulocytopenic hosts with concomitant oral pathology including periodontitis and gingivitis. No abnormalities of oral hygiene were present in this patient, and granulocyte numbers were normal or elevated. Eradication of the infection was accomplished with 8 weeks of antibiotic therapy combined with surgical drainage. Septic arthritis expands the spectrum of infections reported to be caused by Capnocytophaga spp. PMID:6715520

  3. Indicators for detection of septic arthritis in the acutely swollen joint cohort of those without joint prostheses.

    PubMed

    Roberts, John; Schaefer, Eric; Gallo, Robert A

    2014-02-01

    Differentiating septic arthritis from culture-negative, acute atraumatic joint effusion is difficult. Studies have attempted to elucidate factors that herald infection, but, due to overlap, most conclude that the diagnosis ultimately relies on clinical judgment. Furthermore, studies are limited by broad inclusion criteria. The current retrospective case study sought to examine (1) which markers differentiate a culture-positive septic joint from culture-negative effusion in patients suspicious for infection despite no growth on Gram stain and without previous surgery in the affected joint and (2) whether threshold values of these markers exist that predict septic arthritis. The study was performed by reviewing records of those who underwent operative irrigation and debridement involving the shoulder, elbow, wrist, hip, knee, and ankle. Patients were included if they were older than 18 years and had an acutely swollen/painful joint and no organisms on initial Gram stain. Exclusion criteria were lack of serum markers or synovial fluid aspirate, antibiotics within 1 week, adjacent wound or skin infection, recent trauma to the joint, and previous joint infection or surgery to the joint. Several clinical, serological, and synovial parameters were collected and analyzed using paired t test with Bonferonni correction. Serum C-reactive protein was the only significantly different variable between groups. Serum C-reactive protein greater than 10.5 mg/dL was predictive of infection. In those suspicious for infection despite no growth on Gram stain and without previous surgery in the affected joint, C-reactive protein greater than 10.5 mg/dL is suspicious for joint sepsis and should warrant consideration for urgent irrigation and debridement.

  4. [SEIP-SERPE-SEOP Consensus Document on aetiopathogenesis and diagnosis of uncomplicated acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Saavedra-Lozano, J; Calvo, C; Huguet Carol, R; Rodrigo, C; Núñez, E; Pérez, C; Merino, R; Rojo, P; Obando, I; Downey, F J; Colino, E; García, J J; Cilleruelo, M J; Torner, F; García, L

    2015-09-01

    This is a Consensus Document of the Sociedad Española de Infectología Pediátrica, Sociedad Española de Reumatología Pediátrica and Sociedad Española de Ortopedia Pediátrica on the aetiology and diagnosis of uncomplicated acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis. A review is presented of the aetiopathogenesis and pathophysiology of acute osteoarticular infection defined as a process with less than 14 days of symptomatology, uncomplicated, and community-acquired. The diagnostic approach to these conditions is summarised based on the best available scientific knowledge. Based on this evidence, a number of recommendations for clinical practice are provided.

  5. Bone and Joint Infections in Children: Septic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Anil; Aggarwal, Aditya N

    2016-08-01

    The pathological invasion of a joint and subsequent inflammation is known as septic arthritis. The knee and hip are the most frequently involved joints. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common cause of septic arthritis in children. An acute onset of illness with an inflamed painful joint and restricted movements and inability to use joint (pseudoparalysis) clinically indicates septic arthritis. The diagnosis is difficult in a neonate or young child where refusal to feed, crying, discomfort during change of diaper (if hip is involved) or attempted joint movement may be the only findings. Fever and other systemic signs may also be absent in neonates. Septic arthritis is diagnosed clinically, supported by appropriate radiological and laboratory investigations. The peripheral blood white cell count is frequently raised with a predominance of polymorphonuclear cells. The acute phase reactants such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) are often markedly raised. Ultrasonography and MRI are preferred investigations in pediatric septic arthritis. Determination of infecting organism in septic arthritis is the key to the correct antibiotic choice, treatment duration and overall management. Joint aspirate and/or blood culture should be obtained before starting antibiotic treatment. Several effective antibiotic regimes are available for managing septic arthritis in children. Presence of large collections, thick pus, joint loculations and pus evacuating into surrounding soft tissues are main indications for surgical drainage. Joint aspiration can be a practical alternative in case the lesion is diagnosed early, with uncomplicated presentations and superficial joints. PMID:26189923

  6. Bone and Joint Infections in Children: Septic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Anil; Aggarwal, Aditya N

    2016-08-01

    The pathological invasion of a joint and subsequent inflammation is known as septic arthritis. The knee and hip are the most frequently involved joints. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common cause of septic arthritis in children. An acute onset of illness with an inflamed painful joint and restricted movements and inability to use joint (pseudoparalysis) clinically indicates septic arthritis. The diagnosis is difficult in a neonate or young child where refusal to feed, crying, discomfort during change of diaper (if hip is involved) or attempted joint movement may be the only findings. Fever and other systemic signs may also be absent in neonates. Septic arthritis is diagnosed clinically, supported by appropriate radiological and laboratory investigations. The peripheral blood white cell count is frequently raised with a predominance of polymorphonuclear cells. The acute phase reactants such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) are often markedly raised. Ultrasonography and MRI are preferred investigations in pediatric septic arthritis. Determination of infecting organism in septic arthritis is the key to the correct antibiotic choice, treatment duration and overall management. Joint aspirate and/or blood culture should be obtained before starting antibiotic treatment. Several effective antibiotic regimes are available for managing septic arthritis in children. Presence of large collections, thick pus, joint loculations and pus evacuating into surrounding soft tissues are main indications for surgical drainage. Joint aspiration can be a practical alternative in case the lesion is diagnosed early, with uncomplicated presentations and superficial joints.

  7. Septic arthritis in immunocompetent and immunosuppressed hosts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dingyuan Alvin; Tambyah, Paul Anantharajah

    2015-04-01

    Septic arthritis has long been considered an orthopedic emergency. Historically, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Staphylococcus aureus have been the most common causes of septic arthritis worldwide but in the modern era of biological therapy and extensive use of prosthetic joint replacements, the spectrum of microbiological causes of septic arthritis has widened considerably. There are also new approaches to diagnosis but therapy remains a challenge, with a need for careful consideration of a combined medical and surgical approach in most cases.

  8. Fungal osteomyelitis and septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bariteau, Jason T; Waryasz, Gregory R; McDonnell, Matthew; Fischer, Staci A; Hayda, Roman A; Born, Christopher T

    2014-06-01

    Management of fungal osteomyelitis and fungal septic arthritis is challenging, especially in the setting of immunodeficiency and conditions that require immunosuppression. Because fungal osteomyelitis and fungal septic arthritis are rare conditions, study of their pathophysiology and treatment has been limited. In the literature, evidence-based treatment is lacking and, historically, outcomes have been poor. The most common offending organisms are Candida and Aspergillus, which are widely distributed in humans and soil. However, some fungal pathogens, such as Histoplasma, Blastomyces, Coccidioides, Cryptococcus, and Sporothrix, have more focal areas of endemicity. Fungal bone and joint infections result from direct inoculation, contiguous infection spread, or hematogenous seeding of organisms. These infections may be difficult to diagnose and eradicate, especially in the setting of total joint arthroplasty. Although there is no clear consensus on treatment, guidelines are available for management of many of these pathogens.

  9. Polyarticular septic arthritis in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Clements, J; Dinneen, A; Heilpern, G

    2013-03-01

    Septic arthritis is an uncommon condition with an incidence of 2-3/100,000. It is clinically notable, however, as it is a rapidly destructive joint disease with significant associated morbidity and mortality. Polyarticular septic arthritis has an estimated incidence of 15% of all cases of infectious arthritis. We report a case of polyarticular septic arthritis with involvement of bilateral shoulders and wrist to highlight the importance of early diagnosis and treatment as well as the high mortality rates associated with this condition. Bilateral septic shoulder arthritis poses a challenge to treat, and its significance should not be underestimated as even with early surgical intervention and aggressive antibiotic and fluid resuscitation death is a sad but perhaps not uncommon outcome. It is therefore imperative that the diagnosis of polyarticular septic arthritis is kept prominent in the physician's mind when confronted with a patient with symptomatic polyarthralgia.

  10. Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare disease. The most common symptoms of this disease are acute malocclusion, limited mouth opening, swelling, and tenderness of affected TMJ. These symptoms are often confused with internal derangement of the articular disc, rheumatoid arthritis, retrodiscitis, or osteoarthritis. Therefore, differential diagnosis by image examination is required. Usually, antimicrobial treatment and surgical drainage by needle aspiration, arthroscopy, or arthrotomy are effective treatment approaches. In this study, a patient who was diagnosed with septic arthritis was treated with arthrocentesis and antibiotics without significant complications. We present a case report with a review of the literature.

  11. Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sung-Won; Cho, Jin-Yong; Kim, Hyeon-Min

    2016-08-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare disease. The most common symptoms of this disease are acute malocclusion, limited mouth opening, swelling, and tenderness of affected TMJ. These symptoms are often confused with internal derangement of the articular disc, rheumatoid arthritis, retrodiscitis, or osteoarthritis. Therefore, differential diagnosis by image examination is required. Usually, antimicrobial treatment and surgical drainage by needle aspiration, arthroscopy, or arthrotomy are effective treatment approaches. In this study, a patient who was diagnosed with septic arthritis was treated with arthrocentesis and antibiotics without significant complications. We present a case report with a review of the literature. PMID:27595091

  12. Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare disease. The most common symptoms of this disease are acute malocclusion, limited mouth opening, swelling, and tenderness of affected TMJ. These symptoms are often confused with internal derangement of the articular disc, rheumatoid arthritis, retrodiscitis, or osteoarthritis. Therefore, differential diagnosis by image examination is required. Usually, antimicrobial treatment and surgical drainage by needle aspiration, arthroscopy, or arthrotomy are effective treatment approaches. In this study, a patient who was diagnosed with septic arthritis was treated with arthrocentesis and antibiotics without significant complications. We present a case report with a review of the literature. PMID:27595091

  13. Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sung-Won; Cho, Jin-Yong; Kim, Hyeon-Min

    2016-08-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare disease. The most common symptoms of this disease are acute malocclusion, limited mouth opening, swelling, and tenderness of affected TMJ. These symptoms are often confused with internal derangement of the articular disc, rheumatoid arthritis, retrodiscitis, or osteoarthritis. Therefore, differential diagnosis by image examination is required. Usually, antimicrobial treatment and surgical drainage by needle aspiration, arthroscopy, or arthrotomy are effective treatment approaches. In this study, a patient who was diagnosed with septic arthritis was treated with arthrocentesis and antibiotics without significant complications. We present a case report with a review of the literature.

  14. Isolated septic facet joint arthritis as a rare cause of acute and chronic low back pain – a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Klekot, Dominika; Zimny, Anna; Czapiga, Bogdan; Sąsiadek, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: The most common cause of low back pain is degenerative disease of the intervertebral disc and other structures of the lumbar spine. However, in some cases other less frequent causes of such pain can be seen, for example septic facet joint arthritis. Until now, only 40 cases of such inflammatory changes within the spine have been reported in the literature. The disease is probably underestimated due to improper diagnostic pathway. Case Report: The authors describe a case of a 53-year-old woman who was repeatedly hospitalized during a five-month period because of an acute, severe low back pain, with sphincter dysfunction, partially resembling sciatic symptoms. Physical examinations revealed also focal tenderness in the area of the lumbar spine. Inflammatory markers (ESR – erythrocyte sedimentation rate, CRP – C-reactive protein) were elevated. Conservative analgetic treatment brought only partial and temporary relief of the pain and symptoms. The final accurate diagnosis of isolated septic facet joint arthritis at the level of L5/S1 was established after several months from the onset of the first symptoms, after performing various imaging examinations, including bone scintigraphy as well as CT and MRI of the lumbosacral spine. The patient fully recovered after antibiotic therapy and surgery, which was proven in several follow-up examinations showing no relevant pathology of the lumbar spine. The authors broadly describe the etiology and clinical symptoms of the septic facet joint arthritis as well as the significant role of imaging methods, especially MRI, in diagnostic process. The authors also discuss currently available treatment options, both conservative and surgical. Conclusions: The diagnostic procedure of septic facet joint arthritis requires several steps to be taken. Establishing a correct diagnosis may be difficult, that is why it is important to remember about rare causes of low back pain and to perform detailed physical

  15. Management of melioidosis osteomyelitis and septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Shetty, R P; Mathew, M; Smith, J; Morse, L P; Mehta, J A; Currie, B J

    2015-02-01

    Little information is available about several important aspects of the treatment of melioidosis osteomyelitis and septic arthritis. We undertook a retrospective review of 50 patients with these conditions in an attempt to determine the effect of location of the disease, type of surgical intervention and duration of antibiotic treatment on outcome, particularly complications and relapse. We found that there was a 27.5% risk of osteomyelitis of the adjacent bone in patients with septic arthritis in the lower limb. Patients with septic arthritis and osteomyelitis of an adjacent bone were in hospital significantly longer (p = 0.001), needed more operations (p = 0.031) and had a significantly higher rate of complications and re-presentation (p = 0.048). More than half the patients (61%), most particularly those with multifocal bone and joint involvement, and those with septic arthritis and osteomyelitis of an adjacent bone who were treated operatively, needed more visits to theatre.

  16. Clinical management of septic arthritis in cattle.

    PubMed

    Desrochers, André; Francoz, David

    2014-03-01

    Synovial fluid, ultrasound, and radiographic imaging are common diagnostic tools for septic arthritis. Mycoplasma septic arthritis is suspected in calves with clinical signs of otitis and pneumonia. Commonly affected joints are carpus, stifle, and tarsus. Treatment strategy must include long-term antibiotics, anti-inflammatories, and joint lavage. Knowledge of communication and boundaries for commonly affected joints is essential to perform joint lavage and arthrotomy.

  17. [Septic arthritis of thoracic facet joint].

    PubMed

    Ben Abdelghani, K; Gérard-Dran, D; Combe, B

    2009-08-01

    Septic arthritis of the facet joint is a rare condition. We report a case of septic arthritis of both a thoracic facet joint and a wrist. Clinical manifestations were consistent with a spondylodiscitis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine demonstrated infection of facet joints of T1 and T2. A surgical biopsy of the wrist isolated a type B streptococcus. The same organism was found in urine culture. The patient had an uneventful recovery on antibiotics.

  18. Septic Arthritis of the Temporomandibular Joint in an Infant.

    PubMed

    Chuk, Raymond; Arvier, John; Laing, Barbara; Coman, David

    2015-04-24

    Infantile temporomandibular joint septic arthritis is an uncommon paediatric infection, but one which carries the potential for severe morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis and aggressive medical and possibly surgical management is indicated for the best outcomes. The presenting clinical features are non-specific in a neonate and an infant; as such a high degree of clinical suspicion is required. We present the case of an eleven-month-old boy who has made a full recovery from an acute temporomandibular joint septic arthritis and review the relevant literature.

  19. Septic arthritis in the era of immunosuppressive treatments.

    PubMed

    Salar, O; Baker, B; Kurien, T; Taylor, A; Moran, C

    2014-03-01

    Immunosuppressants have been the mainstay of treatment for certain inflammatory joint conditions for many years. Developments in this field, namely biological treatments, have led to a change in the classical presentation of acute bone, joint and soft tissue infections. The normal findings of severe pain and tenderness on examination may be absent or simply mimic a typical exacerbation of the chronic joint condition. A minimally raised white cell count and elevated C-reactive protein in the absence of systemic signs of infection may be interpreted as further evidence for the diagnosis of an exacerbation of inflammatory arthritis. We present a unique case of recurrent polyarticular septic arthritis in a patient treated with immunosuppression for refractory rheumatoid arthritis. We hope this article will enable doctors to appreciate and recognise the changing face of septic arthritis in the modern era of immunosuppressant treatments.

  20. Diagnosis and treatment of septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Morton, Alison J

    2005-12-01

    Septic arthritis (SA) is a common orthopedic condition encountered in horses that are presented to equine veterinarians. Successful out-come is dependent on prompt and thorough evaluation and treatment. This article briefly reviews the pathophysiology, outlines diagnostics, describes treatment options and prognostics, and discusses current research in diagnosis and treatment of SA.

  1. Bacillus pumilus Septic Arthritis in a Healthy Child

    PubMed Central

    Shivamurthy, V. M.; Gantt, Soren; Reilly, Christopher; Tilley, Peter; Guzman, Jaime; Tucker, Lori

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of septic arthritis caused by a Bacillus species, B. pumilus, occurring in a healthy child. This organism rarely causes serious infections and has only been described in newborns and immunocompromised individuals or as a skin infection. This child developed an indolent joint swelling after a minor skin injury, and symptoms were initially thought most consistent with chronic arthritis. The case demonstrates that clinicians should consider joint infection in children presenting with acute monoarticular swelling, even without prominent systemic features. PMID:27366165

  2. Arthroscopic management of septic arthritis of the wrist.

    PubMed

    Sammer, Douglas M; Shin, Alexander Y

    2011-08-01

    Bacterial septic arthritis of the wrist is a joint-threatening emergency that is often treated by open irrigation and debridement (I and D). There is evidence that patients with isolated septic arthritis of the wrist require fewer operations and have a shorter hospital stay when treated arthroscopically. This article describes the surgical technique for arthroscopic I and D of the wrist and discusses the indications and benefits of arthroscopic versus open I and D for septic arthritis of the wrist.

  3. A rare cause of septic arthritis: melioidosis.

    PubMed

    Caldera, Aruna Sanjeewa; Kumanan, Thirunavukarasu; Corea, Enoka

    2013-10-01

    Melioidosis is a pyogenic infection with high mortality caused by the bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei. As the clinical presentation is not distinctive, a high index of clinical suspicion is required for diagnosis. We present a case of a 50-year-old farmer who was diabetic and a chronic alcoholic, who presented to us with pneumonia, followed by septic arthritis. He was ultimately diagnosed as having melioidosis.

  4. Septic Arthritis in the Temporomandibular Joint

    PubMed Central

    Al-Khalisy, Hassan Mahdi; Nikiforov, Ivan; Mansoora, Qurat; Goldman, John; Cheriyath, Pramil

    2015-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare event that has only been reported a few dozen times worldwide. This case is remarkable for septic arthritis of the TMJ joint in an otherwise healthy male. Case Report: A 24-year-old male presented to the emergency department with periauricular swelling, erythema, fever, myalgia's and generalized joint pain. He had previously sought medical attention and was placed on ciprofloxacin. However, he developed facial swelling and a rash and had to discontinue the antibiotic. On physical exam the patient had a large swelling and tenderness in his left periauricular area, with erythema and deviation of the right mandible which limited his ability to open the mouth. A computed tomography showed mild asymmetric soft tissue swelling in the left pharyngeal region but did not show joint effusion. Subsequent magnetic resonance imaging did show effusion of the joint space. The effusion was drained, and the synovial fluid was submitted for gram stain, culture, and sensitivity. The cultures grew menthicillin sensitive Staphyloccocus Aureus. The patient was discharged to complete a two week course of intravenous (IV) Ceftriaxone and IV Vancomycin via home infusion. Conclusion: Septic Arthritis of the TMJ is a rare event with very specific clinical symptoms. Due to the low sensitivity of the computed tomography scan, magnetic resonance imaging should be considered when computed tomography scan is negative for TMJ effusion. PMID:26713295

  5. Staphylococcal septic arthritis in three horses.

    PubMed

    Rose, R J; Love, D N

    1979-04-01

    Three horses were diagnosed as having monarticular septic arthritis due to Staphylococcus aureus on the basis of culture of articular cartilage, synovial membrane and/or synovial fluid. The organisms were all well recognised human phage types and in two cases demonstrated beta-lactamase (penicillinase) activity. Details of case histories are presented and the bacteriological techniques and antibiotic management with cloxacillin, methicillin and penicillin discussed. Following treatment, sterile cultures of synovial fluid were achieved in all cases, but in two horses the infections resulted in degenerative articular changes. This necessitated arthrodesis of the fetlock joint in one case.

  6. Septic arthritis caused by Mycobacterium marinum.

    PubMed

    Riera, Jaume; Conesa, Xavier; Pisa, Jose; Moreno, Josefa; Siles, Eduard; Novell, Josep

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of infection by Mycobacterium marinum is rising, mainly due to the increasing popularity of home aquariums. The infection typically manifests as skin lesions, with septic arthritis being a rare presentation form. The disease is difficult to diagnose even when there is a high clinical suspicion, as culture in specific media may not yield positive findings. Thus, establishment of appropriate treatment is often delayed. Synovectomy, capsular thinning, and joint drainage together with prolonged, combined antibiotic therapy may be needed to cure the infection.

  7. Septic Arthritis Due to Cellulosimicrobium cellulans▿

    PubMed Central

    Magro-Checa, César; Chaves-Chaparro, Lara; Parra-Ruiz, Jorge; Peña-Monje, Alejandro; Rosales-Alexander, José Luis; Salvatierra, Juan; Raya, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    Cellulosimicrobium cellulans has been reported as a rare cause of human pathogenesis. Infections mainly occur in immunocompromised patients and very often are associated with a foreign body. We report the first case of septic arthritis caused by C. cellulans in an immunocompetent patient. Our patient suffered a penetrating palm tree thorn injury to his left knee 8 weeks before admission. Although no foreign objects were found, they were suspected because previous reports suggest a frequent association with this microorganism, and open debridament was performed. Removal of foreign bodies related to this organism must be considered a high-priority treatment in these patients to achieve a complete recovery. PMID:21998421

  8. Septic arthritis caused by Mycobacterium marinum.

    PubMed

    Riera, Jaume; Conesa, Xavier; Pisa, Jose; Moreno, Josefa; Siles, Eduard; Novell, Josep

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of infection by Mycobacterium marinum is rising, mainly due to the increasing popularity of home aquariums. The infection typically manifests as skin lesions, with septic arthritis being a rare presentation form. The disease is difficult to diagnose even when there is a high clinical suspicion, as culture in specific media may not yield positive findings. Thus, establishment of appropriate treatment is often delayed. Synovectomy, capsular thinning, and joint drainage together with prolonged, combined antibiotic therapy may be needed to cure the infection. PMID:26511731

  9. Streptococcus pyogenes sternoclavicular septic arthritis in a healthy adult.

    PubMed

    Savcic-Kos, Radmila M; Mali, Padmavati; Abraham, Ajit; Issa, Meltiady; Rangu, Venu; Nasser, Rana

    2014-12-01

    Sternoclavicular septic arthritis is a rare infection, accounting for approximately 1% of septic arthritis in the general population. Staphylococcus aureus is the predominant etiologic agent, and it usually occurs in relatively young adults with some type of predisposition to infection. We report, to the best of our knowledge, the first case of group A streptococcal, sternoclavicular arthritis in a previously healthy 62-year-old male patient. We present a detailed history and physical examination, with laboratory findings, imaging studies, cultures, and therapy.

  10. Septic arthritis of the acromioclavicular joint: an uncommon location.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Morillo, Melania; Mateo Soria, Lourdes; Riveros Frutos, Anne; Tejera Segura, Beatriz; Holgado Pérez, Susana; Olivé Marqués, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    Septic pyogenic arthritis of the acromioclavicular joint is a rare entity that occurs in immunosuppressed patients or those with discontinuity of defense barriers. There are only 15 cases described in the literature. The diagnosis is based on clinical features and the isolation of a microorganism in synovial fluid or blood cultures. The evidence of arthritis by imaging (MRI, ultrasound or scintigraphy) may be useful. Antibiotic treatment is the same as in septic arthritis in other locations. Staphylococcus aureus is the microorganism most frequently isolated. Our objective was to describe the clinical features, treatment and outcome of patients diagnosed with septic arthritis of the acromioclavicular joint at a Rheumatology Department. We developed a study with a retrospective design (1989-2012). The medical records of patients with septic arthritis were reviewed (101 patients). Those involving the acromioclavicular joint were selected (6 patients; 6%).

  11. [Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint: report of one case].

    PubMed

    Pintor, Fernanda; Carrasco, Rolando; Verdugo-Avello, Francisco; Landaeta, Mirtha

    2015-06-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is an uncommon condition, caused by hematic bacterial migration or direct migration of other head and neck infections. We report a 41 year old female who presented a right temporomandibular joint involvement, with bone destruction of the mandibular condyle and an infectious process spreading to the temporal space, following a necrotizing medial and external otitis with associated mastoiditis. A septic arthritis of the TMJ by continuity was diagnosed and treated with antimicrobials, TMJ arthrocentesis and occlusal stabilization, with a positive evolution. However, the patient remains in control due a secondary TMJ osteoarthritis caused by the septic arthritis.

  12. Septic arthritis of the shoulder in a dental patient.

    PubMed

    Dolin, Elana; Perlmutter, Leigh D; Segelnick, Stuart L; Weinberg, Mea A; Schoor, Robert

    2014-11-01

    Septic arthritis of the glenohumoral joint is rare following dental procedures, comprising approximately 3% of all joint infections. Septic arthritis following bacteremia from dental procedures is uncommon and generally occurs in prosthetic joints. Predisposing causes may include immunocompromising diseases such as diabetes, HIV infection, renal failure and intravenous drug abuse. We report a rare case of unilateral glenohumoral joint septic arthritis in a 60-year-old male patient (without a prosthetic joint) secondary to a dental procedure. The insidious nature of the presentation is highlighted. Septic arthritis infections, though rare, require a high level of clinical suspicion. Vague symptoms of shoulder pain may mask the initial diagnosis, as was the case in our patient. Incision and drainage via surgical intervention are often required, followed by parenteral antibiotics.

  13. Septic arthritis of the shoulder in a dental patient.

    PubMed

    Dolin, Elana; Perlmutter, Leigh D; Segelnick, Stuart L; Weinberg, Mea A; Schoor, Robert

    2014-11-01

    Septic arthritis of the glenohumoral joint is rare following dental procedures, comprising approximately 3% of all joint infections. Septic arthritis following bacteremia from dental procedures is uncommon and generally occurs in prosthetic joints. Predisposing causes may include immunocompromising diseases such as diabetes, HIV infection, renal failure and intravenous drug abuse. We report a rare case of unilateral glenohumoral joint septic arthritis in a 60-year-old male patient (without a prosthetic joint) secondary to a dental procedure. The insidious nature of the presentation is highlighted. Septic arthritis infections, though rare, require a high level of clinical suspicion. Vague symptoms of shoulder pain may mask the initial diagnosis, as was the case in our patient. Incision and drainage via surgical intervention are often required, followed by parenteral antibiotics. PMID:25647886

  14. Septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis caused by Streptococcus mitis.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, E; Hofer, M; Steinrücken, J; Trampuz, A; Borens, O

    2014-12-01

    Septic arthritis of the pubic symphisis is distinguished from osteitis pubis by positive cultures. The symptoms, physical examination and laboratory findings of these two conditions are comparable. We present a case of 57-year-old woman with septic arthritis of pubic symphisis caused by Streptococcus mitis, a commensal oral flora that belongs to viridans group streptococci, which normally reside in the oral cavity, the gastrointestinal and the urogenital tract.

  15. Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint: Case reports and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Gayle, Eryka A.; Young, Sean M.; McKenna, Samuel J.; McNaughton, Candace D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular (TM) joint is rare, but it is associated with high risk for significant morbidity. Objective We reviewed the available literature regarding the presentation, evaluation, treatment, and clinical course of TM joint septic arthritis, focusing on elements relevant to emergency medicine physicians. Case Reports In the first case, a healthy 6-year-old boy presented with fever and trismus; computed tomography with contrast revealed a TM joint effusion. After empiric intravenous antibiotics, intraoperative arthrocentesis of the TM joint returned one milliliter of flocculent fluid, which was cultured and grew pan-sensitive Streptococcus pyogenes. He was discharge home with amoxicillin/clavulanate and experienced complete resolution of his symptoms. In the second case, more than three weeks after extraction of her third molars, an 18-year-old woman presented with facial pain, swelling, and trismus and was found to have a loculated abscess involving the left masseteric and pterygomandibular spaces with extension to the left deep temporal region and the skull base. She experienced a complicated postoperative course and required multiple procedures and intravenous antibiotics for growth of multiple bacteria. More than a month later underwent TM joint arthrotomy for TM joint septic arthritis, and she was found to have acute osteomyelitis. She continued to require multiple treatment modalities; twenty months after her initial presentation, she underwent left total TM joint arthroplasty for fibrous ankylosis of the TM joint. Conclusion Septic arthritis of the TM joint may be caused by hematogenous spread of distant infection or local spread of deep masticator space infections. Patients may present with TM joint septic arthritis acutely or sub-acutely. Septic arthritis of the TM joint should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients who present with trismus and pain or fever. PMID:23896057

  16. Septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis: an atypical abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Ghislain, L; Heylen, A; Alexis, F; Tintillier, M

    2015-02-01

    Septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis is a rare infection mostly caused by Staphylococcus aureus, and is traditionally associated with risk factors (sports, female incontinence surgery). Typical features of pubic symphysis infection include abdominal, pelvic, or groin pain that increases upon standing and walking, causing limping to occur. Acute onset of fever is often associated. It is important to distinguish septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis from its aseptic homologue, improperly called 'osteitis pubis' in English literature. This general term is mostly used to designate a mechanical pubic pain and has several aetiological meanings (joint stress, postoperative pain, rheumatic diseases). However, some authors consider the infection of the pubic symphysis as a variant of osteitis pubis, placing the two diseases in the continuum of the same entity. This confusion in pubic pathology related to its rarity and its atypical presentation, may in some cases lead to diagnostic and therapeutic delay. In this article, we would like to make practitioners aware of this uncommon and often ignored anatomical site, so that it can recover its place in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain.

  17. Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint as a complication of acute otitis media in a child: A rare case and the importance of real-time PCR for diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Bast, F; Collier, S; Chadha, P; Collier, J

    2015-11-01

    We document the case of a 7-year-old boy who presented with pain in his left ear and trismus after a diagnosis of acute otitis media one week previously. His blood inflammatory markers were raised and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed significant left temporomandibular joint effusion and partial attenuation of the left mastoid. A clinical diagnosis of septic arthritis of the TMJ was made and the patient was commenced on broad-spectrum antibiotics. Analysis using real time PCR enabled identification of the offending organism, confirmation of the diagnosis and antibiotic treatment to be specifically tailored for treatment.

  18. Disseminated Mycobacterium abscessus Infection Following Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Shoichi; Sekiya, Noritaka; Takizawa, Yasunobu; Morioka, Hiroshi; Kato, Hirofumi; Aono, Akio; Chikamatsu, Kinuyo; Mitarai, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Satomi; Kamei, Satoshi; Setoguchi, Keigo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mycobacterium abscessus is a rapidly growing mycobacterium found mainly in patients with respiratory or cutaneous infections, but it rarely causes disseminated infections. Little is known about the clinical characteristics, treatment, and prognosis of disseminated M abscessus infection. A 75-year-old Japanese woman who had been treated for 17 years with a corticosteroid for antisynthetase syndrome with antithreonyl-tRNA synthetase antibody developed swelling of her right elbow. X-ray of her right elbow joint showed osteolysis, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed fluid in her right elbow joint. M abscessus grew in joint fluid and blood cultures. She was diagnosed with a disseminated M abscessus infection following septic arthritis. Antimicrobial treatment by clarithromycin, amikacin, and imipenem/cilastatin combined with surgical debridement was administered. Although blood and joint fluid cultures became negative 1 week later, the patient died at 6 weeks from starting antimicrobial treatment. We reviewed 34 cases of disseminated M abscessus infections from the literature. Most of the patients had immunosuppressive backgrounds such as transplantation, use of immunosuppressive agents, hematological malignancy, and end stage renal disease. The duration from onset of symptoms to diagnosis was over 3 months in half of the cases. All fatal cases had positive blood cultures or use of immunosuppressive agents. Clinicians should bear in mind that mycobacterial infections including M abscessus are one of the differential diagnoses in patients with subacute arthritis and soft tissue infections. PMID:26020393

  19. Technetium phosphate bone scan in the diagnosis of septic arthritis in childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Sundberg, S.B.; Savage, J.P.; Foster, B.K. )

    1989-09-01

    The technetium phosphate bone scans of 106 children with suspected septic arthritis were reviewed to determine whether the bone scan can accurately differentiate septic from nonseptic arthropathy. Only 13% of children with proved septic arthritis had correct blind scan interpretation. The clinically adjusted interpretation did not identify septic arthritis in 30%. Septic arthritis was incorrectly identified in 32% of children with no evidence of septic arthritis. No statistically significant differences were noted between the scan findings in the septic and nonseptic groups and no scan findings correlated specifically with the presence or absence of joint sepsis.

  20. Predictors of Septic Arthritis in the Adult Population.

    PubMed

    Borzio, Robert; Mulchandani, Neil; Pivec, Robert; Kapadia, Bhaveen H; Leven, Dante; Harwin, Steven F; Urban, William P

    2016-07-01

    Septic arthritis is a devastating condition; well-established criteria for diagnosis exist in the pediatric population, but not for adults. This study evaluated patient factors and laboratory parameters that may be associated with the diagnosis of septic arthritis in adults. A total of 458 knee aspirates for suspected septic arthritis were evaluated with serum and synovial leukocyte counts and differentials as well as Kocher criteria for pediatric septic arthritis. Twenty-two patients (4.8%) had septic arthritis confirmed by a positive synovial fluid culture. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and serum white blood cell (WBC) counts were not statistically different between the 2 groups, with 64% of septic arthritis patients having a normal serum WBC count and 77% being afebrile. Mean synovial fluid WBC count was 26,758 cells/µL and 70,581 cells/µL in the nonseptic and septic groups, respectively. The likelihood ratio for a synovial fluid WBC count greater than 65,000 cells/µL was 2.8 (95% confidence interval, 1.2-6.7). Evaluation receiver operating characteristic curves using synovial WBC counts resulted in a significant area under the curve of 0.66 (P=.02). To achieve 90% specificity, a WBC cutoff of 64,000 cells/µL was required with a corresponding sensitivity of 40%. There was no significant difference in the synovial cell differential of 80% vs 90% in diagnosing infection. Synovial fluid WBC count greater than 64,000 cells/µL yielded the optimal combination of sensitivity and specificity. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes, ESR, serum WBC count, fever, and weight-bearing status were not significant predictors of septic arthritis. This study demonstrates the limited utility of Kocher criteria in the adult population and the importance of synovial leukocyte counts. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(4):e657-e663.]. PMID:27286047

  1. Predictors of Septic Arthritis in the Adult Population.

    PubMed

    Borzio, Robert; Mulchandani, Neil; Pivec, Robert; Kapadia, Bhaveen H; Leven, Dante; Harwin, Steven F; Urban, William P

    2016-07-01

    Septic arthritis is a devastating condition; well-established criteria for diagnosis exist in the pediatric population, but not for adults. This study evaluated patient factors and laboratory parameters that may be associated with the diagnosis of septic arthritis in adults. A total of 458 knee aspirates for suspected septic arthritis were evaluated with serum and synovial leukocyte counts and differentials as well as Kocher criteria for pediatric septic arthritis. Twenty-two patients (4.8%) had septic arthritis confirmed by a positive synovial fluid culture. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and serum white blood cell (WBC) counts were not statistically different between the 2 groups, with 64% of septic arthritis patients having a normal serum WBC count and 77% being afebrile. Mean synovial fluid WBC count was 26,758 cells/µL and 70,581 cells/µL in the nonseptic and septic groups, respectively. The likelihood ratio for a synovial fluid WBC count greater than 65,000 cells/µL was 2.8 (95% confidence interval, 1.2-6.7). Evaluation receiver operating characteristic curves using synovial WBC counts resulted in a significant area under the curve of 0.66 (P=.02). To achieve 90% specificity, a WBC cutoff of 64,000 cells/µL was required with a corresponding sensitivity of 40%. There was no significant difference in the synovial cell differential of 80% vs 90% in diagnosing infection. Synovial fluid WBC count greater than 64,000 cells/µL yielded the optimal combination of sensitivity and specificity. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes, ESR, serum WBC count, fever, and weight-bearing status were not significant predictors of septic arthritis. This study demonstrates the limited utility of Kocher criteria in the adult population and the importance of synovial leukocyte counts. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(4):e657-e663.].

  2. Streptococcus pyogenes Sternoclavicular Septic Arthritis in a Healthy Adult

    PubMed Central

    Savcic-Kos, Radmila M.; Mali, Padmavati; Abraham, Ajit; Issa, Meltiady; Rangu, Venu; Nasser, Rana

    2014-01-01

    Sternoclavicular septic arthritis is a rare infection, accounting for approximately 1% of septic arthritis in the general population. Staphylococcus aureus is the predominant etiologic agent, and it usually occurs in relatively young adults with some type of predisposition to infection. We report, to the best of our knowledge, the first case of group A streptococcal, sternoclavicular arthritis in a previously healthy 62-year-old male patient. We present a detailed history and physical examination, with laboratory findings, imaging studies, cultures, and therapy. PMID:24667224

  3. Subtalar joint septic arthritis in a patient with hypogammaglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Wynes, Jacob; Harris, William; Hadfield, Robert A; Malay, D Scot

    2013-01-01

    The clinical presentation of a monoarticular, red, hot, and swollen joint has many possible diagnoses, including septic arthritis, which is 1 of the most devastating. The morbidity associated with this pathologic process involves permanent joint damage and the potential for progression to systemic illness and, even, mortality. The common risk factors for joint sepsis include a history of rheumatoid arthritis, previous joint surgery, joint prosthesis, intravenous drug abuse, alcoholism, diabetes, previous intra-articular steroid use, and cutaneous ulceration. The diagnosis is primarily determined from the culture results after arthrocentesis and correlation with direct visualization, imaging, and various serologies, including synovial analysis. In the present report, a case of an insidious presentation of subtalar joint septic arthritis and its association with a unique patient presentation concomitant with primary immunodeficiency and culture-proven Myocplasma hominis infection is discussed. Septic arthritis has a predilection for the lower extremities and typically is isolated to the hip or knee, with less common involvement of the ankle or metatarsophalangeal joints. Owing to the uncommon nature of primary immunodeficiency disorders and the paucity of studies discussing their association with septic arthridites, we aimed to raise awareness of subtalar joint septic arthritis and to provide a brief overview of the pathogenesis as it presented in a 33-year-old male with X-linked hypogammaglobulinemia/agammaglobulinema.

  4. Surgical Procedures Needed to Eradicate Infection in Knee Septic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Dave, Omkar H; Patel, Karan A; Andersen, Clark R; Carmichael, Kelly D

    2016-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the knee is encountered on a regular basis by orthopedists and nonorthopedists. No established therapeutic algorithm exists for septic arthritis of the knee, and there is much variability in management. This study assessed the number of surgical procedures, arthroscopic or open, required to eradicate infection. The study was a retrospective analysis of 79 patients who were treated for septic knee arthritis from 1995 to 2011. Patients who were included in the study had native septic knee arthritis that had resolved with treatment consisting of irrigation and debridement, either open or arthroscopic. Logistic regression analysis was used to explore the relation between the interval between onset of symptoms and index surgery and the use of arthroscopy and the need for multiple procedures. Fifty-two patients met the inclusion criteria, and 53% were male, with average follow-up of 7.2 years (range, 1-16.2 years). Arthroscopic irrigation and debridement was performed in 70% of cases. On average, successful treatment required 1.3 procedures (SD, 0.6; range, 1-4 procedures). A significant relation (P=.012) was found between time from presentation to surgery and the need for multiple procedures. With arthroscopic irrigation and debridement, most patients with septic knee arthritis require only 1 surgical procedure to eradicate infection. The need for multiple procedures increases with time from onset of symptoms to surgery.

  5. The significance of interleukin-6 and lactate in the synovial fluid for diagnosing native septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lenski, Markus; Scherer, Michael A

    2014-03-01

    Aim of this study was to evaluate the role of synovial interleukin-6 and synovial lactate for predicting native septic arthritis. We analyzed retrospectively synovial fluid parameters (interleukin-6, total-protein, glucose, lactate, synovial-fluid-white-blood-cell-count) of 62 patients with culture-verified native septic arthritis and compared them to 57 patients with acute aseptic arthritis. Receiver-Operating-Characteristic-curves were calculated to determine the 'Area-under-the-curves' (AUC), the best thresholds and the corresponding likelihood-ratios. The best parameter for diagnosing septic arthritis was synovial lactate (AUC = 0.864, sensitivity = 74.5%, specificity = 87.2%), followed by synovial interleukin-6 (AUC = 0.803, sensitivity = 92.5%, specificity = 64.1%) and the synovial-fluid-white-blood-cell-count (AUC = 0.782, sensitivity = 71.2%, specificity = 84.9%). Synovial lactate levels above 10 mmol/l almost proofed septic arthritis (interval-Likelihood-Ratio = 20.4), synovial interleukin-6 levels lower than 7000 pg/ml almost ruled out infection (interval-Likelihood-Ratio = 0.12). If none of these thresholds are met, physicians should estimate disease probability by the simultaneous use of the interval-Likelihood-Ratios of synovial lactate, synovial interleukin-6 and synovial-fluid-white-blood-cell-count.

  6. What's New in the Management of Bacterial Septic Arthritis?

    PubMed

    Chander, Sumeet; Coakley, Gerald

    2011-10-01

    Septic arthritis is a common rheumatological emergency requiring prompt diagnosis and treatment, since delays in management can lead to high morbidity and mortality. In this review article, we discuss the epidemiology and recent advances in knowledge of the pathogenesis of septic arthritis, with a special emphasis on various bacterial and host factors involved in mediating the inflammatory process and the potential for targeted therapy to modulate the immune response. Recent advances in laboratory and imaging techniques are reviewed along with treatment and potential new therapies.

  7. Septic arthritis of the knee associated with calf abscess.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Masashi; Ikeuchi, Masahiko; Tani, Toshikazu

    2012-08-01

    Septic arthritis associated with extra-articular abscess is rare. We report on 2 non-rheumatic patients with septic arthritis of the knee associated with calf abscess. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a distinct leakage pathway from the knee joint in each patient. One was a ruptured popliteal cyst (posteromedial). Another was a pathologic popliteus hiatus (posterolateral). These patients underwent open drainage of the calf abscess via a small incision, followed by arthroscopic debridement of the knee. Careful palpation of the lower leg, followed by magnetic resonance imaging and needle aspiration, is important to exclude a possible extra-articular abscess regardless of the presence of a popliteal cyst.

  8. X-linked agammaglobulinemia combined with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and invasive Klebsiella pneumoniae polyarticular septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zaihua; Kang, Yuli; Lin, Zhenlang; Huang, Yanjing; Lv, Huoyang; Li, Yasong

    2015-02-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency disease caused by mutations in the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) gene. XLA can also present in combination with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), the major chronic rheumatologic disease in children. We report herein the first known case of a juvenile patient diagnosed with XLA combined with JIA that later developed into invasive Klebsiella pneumoniae polyarticular septic polyarthritis. An additional comprehensive review of XLA combined with JIA and invasive K. pneumoniae septic arthritis is also presented. XLA was identified by the detection of BTK mutations while the diagnosis of JIA was established by clinical and laboratory assessments. Septic arthritis caused by invasive K. pneumoniae was confirmed by culturing of the synovia and gene detection of the isolates. Invasive K. pneumoniae infections can not only result in liver abscesses but also septic arthritis, although this is rare. XLA combined with JIA may contribute to invasive K. pneumoniae infection.

  9. Bilateral shoulder septic arthritis in a fit and well 47-year-old man.

    PubMed

    Hotonu, Sesi Ayodele; Khan, Shoaib; Jeavons, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Bilateral septic arthritis of the shoulder is uncommon in the immunocompetent patient with no previous risk factors for joint infection, and is thus easily missed. Septic arthritis is associated with significant rates of morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis and management is the key to a favourable outcome; septic arthritis should be considered as a differential diagnosis in the unwell patient presenting with shoulder pain and reduced range of joint movement. We present a case of a 47-year-old previously fit and well man with bilateral shoulder septic arthritis. We will also review the current literature on management and long-term outcomes of patients with septic arthritis of the glenohumeral joint.

  10. Sphingomonas paucimobilis bacteraemia and septic arthritis in a diabetic patient presenting with septic pulmonary emboli.

    PubMed

    Kuo, I-Ching; Lu, Po-Liang; Lin, Wei-Ru; Lin, Chun-Yu; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chen, Tun-Chieh; Chen, Yen-Hsu

    2009-09-01

    Sphingomonas paucimobilis, a yellow-pigmented, aerobic, glucose non-fermenting, Gram-negative bacillus, is a rare cause of human infection normally associated with immunocompromised hosts. We report a case of bacteraemia and septic arthritis in a 47-year-old diabetic man who presented with septic pulmonary emboli due to S. paucimobilis. The patient had an initial presentation of fever, right knee pain, coughing, dyspnoea and chest pain. The infection was treated successfully by surgical debridement combined with meropenem plus ciprofloxacin, based on the patient's antibiotic susceptibility profile. To our knowledge, this is the first case report for septic pulmonary emboli having arisen from an S. paucimobilis infection.

  11. Septic arthritis and subsequent fatal septic shock caused by Vibrio vulnificus infection.

    PubMed

    Emamifar, Amir; Asmussen Andreasen, Rikke; Skaarup Andersen, Nanna; Jensen Hansen, Inger Marie

    2015-11-24

    Vibrio vulnificus is a rare but potential fatal bacterium that can cause severe infections. Wound infections, primary sepsis and gastroenteritis are the most common clinical features. Septic arthritis caused by V. vulnificus is an atypical presentation that has been reported in only two case reports; however, it has not been previously noted in Denmark. The authors report a case of septic arthritis caused by V. vulnificus in an immunocompromised patient. The disease progressed to severe sepsis and subsequent death within 10 h of admission.

  12. Brucella Septic Arthritis: Case Reports and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Elzein, Fatehi Elnour; Sherbeeni, Nisreen

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is one of the commonest zoonotic infections worldwide. The disease is endemic in Saudi Arabia, the Middle East, and the Mediterranean area. Osteoarticular involvement is a frequent manifestation of brucellosis. It tends to involve the sacroiliac joints more commonly; however, spondylitis and peripheral arthritis are increasingly reported. Brucellosis can be overlooked especially in the presence of companion bacteria. Hence, it should be suspected in all patients with septic arthritis in endemic areas or in patients visiting such areas. PMID:27200196

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in horses with septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Easley, Jeremiah T; Brokken, Matthew T; Zubrod, Chad J; Morton, Alison J; Garrett, Katherine S; Holmes, Shannon P

    2011-01-01

    Fourteen horses with septic arthritis underwent high-field (1.5 T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Septic arthritis was diagnosed based on results from historical and clinical findings, synovial fluid analyses and culture, and radiographic, ultrasonographic, arthroscopic, and histopathologic findings. MR findings included diffuse hyperintensity within bone and extracapsular tissue on fat-suppressed images in 14/14 horses (100%), joint effusion, synovial proliferation, and capsular thickening in 13/14 horses (93%), bone sclerosis in 11/14 horses (79%), and evidence of cartilage and subchondral bone damage in 8/14 horses (57%). Intravenous gadolinium was administered to five of the 14 horses and fibrin deposition was noted in all horses. Other findings after gadolinium administration included synovial enhancement in 4/5 (80%) horses, and bone enhancement in 1/5 (20%) horses. The MR findings of septic arthritis in horses were consistent with those reported in people. MRI may allow earlier and more accurate diagnosis of septic arthritis in horses as compared with other imaging modalities, especially when the clinical diagnosis is challenging. It also provides additional information not afforded by other methods that may influence and enhance treatment.

  14. Septic Arthritis of the Pediatric Shoulder: From Infancy to Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. Septic arthritis of the glenohumeral joint in the pediatric population (<18 yo) is not commonly described in the literature. There is a corresponding paucity of information regarding its presentation and treatment. Methods. An IRB approved review of patients treated with irrigation and debridement by the Orthopaedic Department was completed. This retrospective study includes four patients, presenting from 2005 to 2015, with septic arthritis of the shoulder. Results. The mean age (Mage) at presentation was 5 years, with a range of 1 month to 15 years. Patients presented on average after 7 days with pain and a mean temperature of 39°C, erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 66 mm/hr, a C-reactive protein level of 11.17 g/dL, and a white blood cell count of 20.2 × 103/mcL. Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were cultured from the wounds. All cases were treated operatively with irrigation and debridement and with antimicrobial therapy. Patients received antibiotics for an average of 6 weeks. Conclusion. Septic arthritis of the shoulder occurs in all pediatric ages. Successful treatment of septic arthritis of the shoulder was accomplished in four cases without division of the biceps sheath, with an average follow-up of 8 months. PMID:27635147

  15. Osteomyelitis and septic arthritis caused by Kingella kingae.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, J M; Peel, M M

    1982-01-01

    The clinical and bacteriological findings in two cases of osteomyelitis and one case of septic arthritis caused by Kingella kingae are presented. This appears to be the first report providing clear evidence for a pathogenic role for this species in bone and joint infections. PMID:7068914

  16. Septic arthritis and osteomyelitis due to Bordetella petrii.

    PubMed

    Nogi, Masayuki; Bankowski, Matthew J; Pien, Francis D

    2015-03-01

    A case of Bordetella petrii septic arthritis and osteomyelitis in an elbow resulted from a dirt bike accident in Hawaii. Two months of intravenous antibiotics and repeated surgeries were required to cure this infection. Our case, and literature review, suggests that extended-spectrum penicillins, tetracycline, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole are good treatment options.

  17. Nocardia Septic Arthritis Complicating an Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repair

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Elaine Y. L.; Boutlis, Craig S.; Chen, Darren B.; Liu, Eunice Y.-T.

    2015-01-01

    Nocardia infection following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) allograft reconstruction is a rare occurrence. We report a case of Nocardia infection of an allograft ACL reconstruction and septic arthritis of the knee joint due to an organism most similar to the novel Nocardia species Nocardia aobensis. PMID:26041900

  18. Nocardia Septic Arthritis Complicating an Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repair.

    PubMed

    Yong, Elaine X L; Cheong, Elaine Y L; Boutlis, Craig S; Chen, Darren B; Liu, Eunice Y-T; McKew, Genevieve L

    2015-08-01

    Nocardia infection following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) allograft reconstruction is a rare occurrence. We report a case of Nocardia infection of an allograft ACL reconstruction and septic arthritis of the knee joint due to an organism most similar to the novel Nocardia species Nocardia aobensis.

  19. Septic Arthritis of the Pediatric Shoulder: From Infancy to Adolescence.

    PubMed

    Walker, Justin W; Hennrikus, William L

    2016-01-01

    Background. Septic arthritis of the glenohumeral joint in the pediatric population (<18 yo) is not commonly described in the literature. There is a corresponding paucity of information regarding its presentation and treatment. Methods. An IRB approved review of patients treated with irrigation and debridement by the Orthopaedic Department was completed. This retrospective study includes four patients, presenting from 2005 to 2015, with septic arthritis of the shoulder. Results. The mean age (M age) at presentation was 5 years, with a range of 1 month to 15 years. Patients presented on average after 7 days with pain and a mean temperature of 39°C, erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 66 mm/hr, a C-reactive protein level of 11.17 g/dL, and a white blood cell count of 20.2 × 10(3)/mcL. Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were cultured from the wounds. All cases were treated operatively with irrigation and debridement and with antimicrobial therapy. Patients received antibiotics for an average of 6 weeks. Conclusion. Septic arthritis of the shoulder occurs in all pediatric ages. Successful treatment of septic arthritis of the shoulder was accomplished in four cases without division of the biceps sheath, with an average follow-up of 8 months. PMID:27635147

  20. Nocardia Septic Arthritis Complicating an Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repair.

    PubMed

    Yong, Elaine X L; Cheong, Elaine Y L; Boutlis, Craig S; Chen, Darren B; Liu, Eunice Y-T; McKew, Genevieve L

    2015-08-01

    Nocardia infection following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) allograft reconstruction is a rare occurrence. We report a case of Nocardia infection of an allograft ACL reconstruction and septic arthritis of the knee joint due to an organism most similar to the novel Nocardia species Nocardia aobensis. PMID:26041900

  1. Septic Arthritis of the Pediatric Shoulder: From Infancy to Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. Septic arthritis of the glenohumeral joint in the pediatric population (<18 yo) is not commonly described in the literature. There is a corresponding paucity of information regarding its presentation and treatment. Methods. An IRB approved review of patients treated with irrigation and debridement by the Orthopaedic Department was completed. This retrospective study includes four patients, presenting from 2005 to 2015, with septic arthritis of the shoulder. Results. The mean age (Mage) at presentation was 5 years, with a range of 1 month to 15 years. Patients presented on average after 7 days with pain and a mean temperature of 39°C, erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 66 mm/hr, a C-reactive protein level of 11.17 g/dL, and a white blood cell count of 20.2 × 103/mcL. Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were cultured from the wounds. All cases were treated operatively with irrigation and debridement and with antimicrobial therapy. Patients received antibiotics for an average of 6 weeks. Conclusion. Septic arthritis of the shoulder occurs in all pediatric ages. Successful treatment of septic arthritis of the shoulder was accomplished in four cases without division of the biceps sheath, with an average follow-up of 8 months.

  2. Osteomyelitis and secondary septic arthritis caused by Sphingomonas paucimobilis.

    PubMed

    Charity, R M; Foukas, A F

    2005-04-01

    We describe a case of osteomyelitis and secondary septic arthritis caused by Sphingomonas paucimobilis in an immunosupressed adolescent which did not present typically, leading to a delay in diagnosis. This case highlights the need to thoroughly investigate musculoskeletal pain in the immunocompromised patient in order to exclude an infection as a cause.

  3. [Treatment Strategies for Septic Arthritis of the Sternoclavicular Joint].

    PubMed

    Kuhtin, O; Schmidt-Rohlfing, B; Dittrich, M; Lampl, L; Hohls, M; Haas, V

    2015-10-01

    Septic arthritis of the sternoclavicular joint (SCJ) is a relatively rare disease. Due to serious complications including mediastinitis and generalised sepsis early diagnosis and rapid onset of treatment are mandatory. The disease often affects immunocompromised patients, diabetics, or patients with other infectious diseases. The therapeutic options range from administration of antibiotics to extended surgery including reconstructive procedures. Apart from rare situations where conservative treatment with antibiotics is sufficient, joint resection followed by plastic surgical procedures are required. We present a retrospective analysis with data from two hospitals. From January 2008 to December 2012 23 patients with radiographically confirmed septic arthritis of various aetiology were included. Fourteen (60.8 %) male, nine (39.2 %) female patients with an average age of 60.3 ± 14.2 years (range: 23-88 years) with septic arthritis of the SCJ were treated. Seven (30.4 %) patients suffered from Diabetes mellitus, nine (39.1 %) had underlying diseases with a compromised immune system. In 14 (60.8 %) out of 23 patients a bacterial focus was detected. Only six (26 %) patients suffered from confined septic arthritis of the SCG, in 17 (73,9 %) patients osteomyelitis of the adjacent sternum, and the clavicle was present. In addition, 15 (65.2 %) patients already suffered from mediastinitis at the time of diagnosis, eight (35 %) patients even from septicaemia. In conclusion, septic arthritis requires an active surgical treatment. Limited incision of the joint and debridement alone is only successful at early stages of the disease. The treatment concept has to include the local joint and bone resection as well as complications like mediastinitis. After successful treatment of the infection, the defect of the chest wall requires secondary reconstructive surgery using a pedicled pectoralis muscle flap.

  4. Ultrasonographic findings in 38 horses with septic arthritis/tenosynovitis.

    PubMed

    Beccati, Francesca; Gialletti, Rodolfo; Passamonti, Fabrizio; Nannarone, Sara; Di Meo, Antonio; Pepe, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Septic arthritis/tenosynovitis in the horse can have life-threatening consequences. The purpose of this cross-sectional retrospective study was to describe ultrasound characteristics of septic arthritis/tenosynovitis in a group of horses. Diagnosis of septic arthritis/tenosynovitis was based on historical and clinical findings as well as the results of the synovial fluid analysis and/or positive synovial culture. Ultrasonographic findings recorded were degree of joint/sheath effusion, degree of synovial membrane thickening, echogenicity of the synovial fluid, and presence of hyperechogenic spots and fibrinous loculations. Ultrasonographic findings were tested for dependence on the cause of sepsis, time between admission and beginning of clinical signs, and the white blood cell counts in the synovial fluid. Thirty-eight horses with confirmed septic arthritis/tenosynovitis of 43 joints/sheaths were included. Degree of effusion was marked in 81.4% of cases, mild in 16.3%, and absent in 2.3%. Synovial thickening was mild in 30.9% of cases and moderate/severe in 69.1%. Synovial fluid was anechogenic in 45.2% of cases and echogenic in 54.8%. Hyperechogenic spots were identified in 32.5% of structures and fibrinous loculations in 64.3%. Relationships between the degree of synovial effusion, degree of the synovial thickening, presence of fibrinous loculations, and the time between admission and beginning of clinical signs were identified, as well as between the presence of fibrinous loculations and the cause of sepsis (P ≤ 0.05). Findings indicated that ultrasonographic findings of septic arthritis/tenosynovitis may vary in horses, and may be influenced by time between admission and beginning of clinical signs.

  5. Spontaneous Septic Arthritis of Pubic Symphysis in an Elite Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Schaeffeler, Christoph; Sommer, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis is a potentially severe disease. Athletes are at risk of this form of spontaneous arthritis, as inflammation of the pubic bone due to muscular stress is relatively common. Oedema due to inflammation might predispose to infection through bacteraemia or local bacterial translocation. Suspicion should be raised when an athlete complains of groin pain and has signs of infection (i.e., fever, elevated white blood cell count, and elevated C-reactive protein). Diagnosis is made by imaging showing signs of inflammation combined with positive (blood) cultures. Broad spectrum antibiotics should be started upon suspicion and adjusted according to cultures. An abscess causing clinical deterioration under antibiotic treatment is an indication for invasive intervention (i.e., surgical or image-guided drainage). This is the first case of spontaneous septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis in an athlete requiring surgical and additional image-guided drainage. PMID:27703831

  6. Arthroscopic Treatment for Primary Septic Arthritis of the Hip in Adults

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Primary septic arthritis is a rare differential diagnosis of acute hip pain in adults. Inspired by the success of all-arthroscopic treatment in pediatric patients, we developed a diagnostic and surgical pathway for our adult patients. Methods. Seven patients, average age 44 ± 13.7 years with acute hip pain since 4.4 ± 2.9 days in the average, were included. Septic arthritis was confirmed by joint aspiration and dissemination was excluded by MRI and standard radiographs. Surgical treatment consisted of immediate arthroscopic lavage using 4 portals for debridement, high-volume irrigation, partial synovectomy, and drainage. Results. Patients were treated in hospital for 12.4 ± 3.1 days (range 7–16 days). WBC and CRP returned to physiological levels. During the mean follow-up of 26.4 ± 19.4 months (range 13–66 months) no patient showed recurrence of infection. The 5 patients with an unimpaired hip joint prior to the infection had a mean modified Harris Hip Score of 94 ± 5.6 points (range 91–100) at final follow-up. Conclusions. Arthroscopic therapy using a minimally invasive approach with low perioperative morbidity for the treatment of primary septic arthritis of the adult hip is able to restore normal hip function in acute cases without dissemination of the infection. Level of Evidence. IV. PMID:27800188

  7. Septic versus inflammatory arthritis: discriminating the ability of serum inflammatory markers.

    PubMed

    Talebi-Taher, Mahshid; Shirani, Fatemeh; Nikanjam, Najmeh; Shekarabi, Mehdi

    2013-02-01

    Early diagnosis of septic arthritis is very important. Few studies showed diagnostic accuracy of serum inflammatory markers in septic arthritis. The aim of our study was to compare the serum and synovial fluid markers [procalcitonin, serum IL-6, TNF-α, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, synovial fluid white blood cell counts and PMN percentage] in septic and inflammatory arthritis. Seventy-five patients, including 25 and 50 septic and non-septic arthritis, were enrolled in the study. The serum and synovial fluid markers [procalcitonin, serum IL-6, TNF-α, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, synovial fluid white blood cell counts, and PMN percentage] were compared in septic and inflammatory arthritis. Patients with septic arthritis had significantly elevated levels of procalcitonin, serum TNF-α, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, synovial fluid white blood cell counts, and PMN percentage in comparison with the inflammatory arthritis group (P < 0.00). Serum IL-6 level does not differ among the two groups. In a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, synovial fluid WBC counts, PMN percentage, TNF-α, ESR, and serum PCT preformed best in distinguishing between septic and non-septic arthritis. Our study suggests that PCT can be used to diagnose the septic arthritis, but more studies warranted in order to determine the specificity and sensitivity of the test.

  8. Three cases of septic arthritis following a recent arthroscopic procedure.

    PubMed

    Rowton, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    We report three cases of septic arthritis in patients who presented with a painful, swollen and supurative knee joint following a recent arthroscopic procedure, 8-15 days prior to attendance. In all three cases, patients presented with pain and swelling of the affected knee joint with discharge from the port sites. All were sent for washout of the affected joint and received intravenous antibiotic cover. Any patient presenting within 1 month of a recent arthroscopic procedure with pain and swelling of that joint should be presumed to have septic arthritis until proven otherwise. They must have urgent treatment in the form of joint washout and intravenous antibiotics, and receive 6 weeks oral antibiotics on discharge.

  9. [Post-surgical septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis].

    PubMed

    Salomon, S; Lasselin-Boyard, P; Lasselin, J; Goëb, V

    2015-03-01

    The post-surgical septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis is a rare infection, often unrecognized because sometimes it is difficult to diagnose. It should be suspected in the presence of pelvic pain with fever and sometimes lameness or painful radiation to the lower limbs but the symptoms can be misleading. We report 3 cases of post surgical septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis to illustrate it. Differential diagnoses are numerous and additional tests not always specific. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations are essential to substantiate the diagnosis or to guide sampling. The appropriate antibiotic treatment against the identified germ, which is extended at least six weeks, will most often, when started early, allow the healing though pain can persist for several months.

  10. Evaluation of sodium hyaluronate therapy in induced septic arthritis in the horse.

    PubMed

    Brusie, R W; Sullins, K E; White, N A; Coffin, P C; Parker, G A; Anver, M R; Rosenberger, J L

    1992-02-01

    This study was conducted to determine the efficacy of sodium hyaluronate (SH) with antibiotic therapy and joint lavage for reducing acute inflammatory and degenerative changes induced by septic arthritis. Septic arthritis was induced in six adult horses by inoculating the tarsocrural joints with 1 x 10(4) colony-forming units of Staphylococcus aureus. When clinical signs appeared, trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole (30 mg/kg bodyweight [bwt] daily) and phenylbutazone (4.4 mg/kg bwt sid) were administered and continued until termination of the study (Treatment Day 18). Twenty-four hours post inoculation, all joints were lavaged with sterile lactated Ringer's solution. Following lavage, one joint of each horse was injected with 10 mg of SH, and the contralateral joint served as the control. Sodium hyaluronate treated joints showed significant reductions in lameness, tarsal circumference and synovial fluid protein and WBC concentrations. The synovial membrane of the SH-treated joints contained less cellular infiltrate, less granulation tissue formation and retained a more normal villous structure compared with controls. The total glycosaminoglycan loss from the articular cartilage in the SH treated joints was consistently less than that from the control joints; however, this difference was not statistically significant. Sodium hyaluronate with joint lavage appears to be more beneficial than lavage alone for treatment of septic arthritis.

  11. Primary meningococcal septic arthritis of the ankle joint: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gee, Christopher; Tandon, Tarang; Avasthi, Adish; Jerwood, Susie; Rao, Biyyam M; Cavanagh, Simon

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a healthy 18-year-old female who presented with history of an acute onset, painful, swollen right ankle joint. Microbiologic samples from the ankle aspirate grew Neisseria meningitidis. She had had no previous contact with a patient with meningitis nor any existing or preceding clinical symptoms of meningitis. She was treated with surgical drainage with mini-open arthrotomy and a repeat washout at 48 hours. The identification of the organism was expedited using the Analytical Profiling Index (bioMérieux UK, Basingstoke, UK). Our patient was treated with 2 weeks of third-generation cephalosporin antibiotics. At the final follow-up visit, the inflammatory markers had returned to normal, with a normal ankle joint and no evidence of long-term sequelae of septic arthritis. Primary septic arthritis with N. meningitidis is exceptionally rare in the adult population and has been most often reported in the knee. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of primary septic arthritis of the native adult ankle joint in a healthy individual due to N. meningitides that was diagnosed and treated appropriately with no residual sequelae of the disease.

  12. Salmonella septic arthritis of the knees in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Kim, S S; Perino, G; Boettner, F; Miller, A; Goodman, S

    2013-06-01

    Hematogenous Salmonella osteomyelitis is uncommon in immunocompetent hosts, but occurs with some regularity in immunosuppressed patients affected by systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Surgical debridement with resection of compromised tissue is central to the surgical management of osteomyelitis. Persistence of septic arthropathy may result from inadequate debridement, areas of osteonecrosis (ON), and an abnormal cellular and humoral dysregulation characteristic of SLE. We describe a 53-year-old Hispanic female with SLE on immunosuppressive therapy, who developed acute salmonella-induced septic arthritis and osteomyelitis of both knees associated with ON and recurrent SLE synovitis. She received prolonged antibiotic therapy and an extensive surgical debridement as part of a successful two-stage bilateral total knee replacement. This report illustrates the significance of Salmonella enterica infection in SLE patients, and the role of underlying bone and joint pathology such as bone infarcts, sub-acute osteomyelitis, and SLE synovitis.

  13. Evolution of a fatal septic arthritis caused by a Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL)-producing Staphylococcus aureus strain.

    PubMed

    Rafai, Mostafa; Abouelalaa, Khalil; Skhsoukh, Yassine; Balkhi, Hicham; Belyamani, Lahcen; Dimou, M'barek

    2013-10-01

    We report the observation of a septic arthritis of the knee complicated within first 36 hours by multiorgan failure including acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), heart failure, acute renal failure and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). A diagnosis of staphylococcal arthritis was suspected confirmed by direct examination, and culture showed a Staphylococcus aureus sensitive to methicillin. The sample sent to the National Reference Centre for Staphylococci (Lyon, France) for genetic analysis confirmed the isolate positive for the PVL gene expression. The fulminating evolution of a septic S. aureus arthritis in an otherwise healthy man should probably evoke the possibility of LPV strain. Anti-PLV antibiotics with anti-staphylococcal activity, such as clindamycin and linezolid should be started without waiting for typing of the S. aureus strain.

  14. Rheumatic disease presenting as septic arthritis: a report of 10 cases.

    PubMed

    Eberst-Ledoux, Julie; Tournadre, Anne; Makarawiez, Claudie; Le Quang, Catherine; Soubrier, Martin; Dubost, Jean-Jacques

    2013-08-01

    To determine the forms and characteristics of rheumatic diseases whose initial presentation mimics septic arthritis. Retrospective study of 398 patients hospitalized between 1979 and 2005 for arthritis diagnosed and treated as septic. In 10 cases, initial presentation of a rheumatic disease was highly suggestive of septic arthritis, and the patient was treated as such. Three had rheumatoid arthritis, 3 spondyloarthropathies, 2 unclassified rheumatic diseases, 1 Wegener granulomatosis and 1 cytosteatonecrosis. Mean time to diagnosis of rheumatic arthritis was 6 months. There were 7 males and 3 females aged from 15 to 77 years. Six had fever, and 3 had leucocytosis. Average ESR was 68 mm/1 h, and C-reactive protein was above 100 mg/l in 6 patients. Five patients had radiological signs suggestive of septic arthritis. Joint fluid count was above 100,000 WBCs/mm(3) in 2/5. Synovial biopsy suggested septic arthritis in 5 out of 6. These cases of pseudoseptic arthritis were indistinguishable from true septic arthritis. Follow-up is required in septic arthritis with negative culture findings to exclude rheumatic disease.

  15. Septic arthritis of a native knee joint due to Corynebacterium striatum.

    PubMed

    Westblade, Lars F; Shams, Farah; Duong, Scott; Tariq, Oosman; Bulbin, Alan; Klirsfeld, Dava; Zhen, Wei; Sakaria, Smita; Ford, Bradley A; Burnham, Carey-Ann D; Ginocchio, Christine C

    2014-05-01

    We report a case of septic arthritis of a native knee joint due to Corynebacterium striatum, a rare and unusual cause of septic arthritis of native joints. The isolate was identified by a combination of phenotypic, mass spectrometric, and nucleic acid-based assays and exhibited high-level resistance to most antimicrobials.

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa septic arthritis of knee after intra-articular ozone injection.

    PubMed

    Seyman, Derya; Ozen, Nevgun Sepin; Inan, Dilara; Ongut, Gozde; Ogunc, Dilara

    2012-07-01

    We describe a case of septic arthritis caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in an immunocompetent patient following intra-articular ozone injection into the knee. To the best of our knowledge, and after considering the current literature,we believe this case is unique as no other reports of septic arthritis caused by P. aeruginosa following intra-articular ozone injection has been made.

  17. Intra-articular therapy to treat septic arthritis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Hewes, Christina A; Macintire, Douglass K

    2011-01-01

    A 6 yr old female spayed Labrador retriever was examined for severe pain and a nonweight-bearing right forelimb lameness due to swelling and wounds with direct communication into the elbow joint. The medical management of β hemolytic Streptococcus septic arthritis with needle lavage of the joint, systemic and local antibiotic therapy, and analgesic therapy is described. This case provides information on the need to address septic arthritis in the dog as an emergency situation and the treatment with intra-articular medication. Earlier medical management for septic joints could be considered in dogs to help decrease the long-term complications that can result from septic arthritis.

  18. Septic arthritis in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Rivera, J; Monteagudo, I; Lopez-Longo, J; Sanchez-Atrio, A

    1992-12-01

    We have evaluated the presence and characteristics of septic arthritis in intravenous (iv) drug users with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Sixteen patients with both HIV infection and septic arthritis were studied and compared with 5 patients with septic arthritis but no HIV infection. Clinical profile, laboratory findings at the time of onset, localization, causative organisms, mean hospitalization time and presence of complications were the same in HIV positive and HIV negative patients. Staphylococcus aureus was the most commonly isolated organism in both groups. We conclude that septic arthritis in HIV infected iv drug users is not uncommon, it is produced by the same organisms and presents similar characteristics to the ones found in iv drug users without HIV infection. Therefore, the presence of HIV infection does not appear to modify the characteristics of septic arthritis.

  19. Surgical treatment options for septic arthritis of the hip in children.

    PubMed

    Xu, Gang; Spoerri, Muriel; Rutz, Erich

    2016-01-01

    Septic arthritis is the result of bacterial infection of the hip joint and is often found in infants and toddlers. It is the most common septic joint condition during growth and may cause the most devastating complications without prompt and proper treatment. Early diagnosis and intervention are required to avoid irreversible complications. This review documents the systematic approach to diagnosis and management of septic arthritis in children.

  20. Predictors of treatment failure and mortality in native septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Maneiro, Jose R; Souto, Alejandro; Cervantes, Evelin C; Mera, Antonio; Carmona, Loreto; Gomez-Reino, Juan J

    2015-11-01

    The aims of this study are to analyse the characteristics of septic arthritis stratified by age and to identify the predictors of treatment failure and mortality in septic arthritis. A retrospective single-centre study was conducted in patients with native septic arthritis between 1994 and 2012. The primary outcome was treatment failure. Secondary outcomes included mortality, complications, endocarditis, bacteraemia, hospital readmission and the duration of the hospital stay. Logistic regression analyses with a propensity score were performed to identify the predictors of response and mortality. Additional analyses were performed according to age and the initial treatment (surgery or conservative). A total of 186 patients were studied. The median (interquartile range) age was 64 (46, 74) years, and the percentage of male patients was 68.9%. A logistic regression analysis showed that Staphylococcus aureus infection [OR 2.39 (1.20-4.77), p = 0.013], endocarditis [OR 4.74 (1.16-19.24), p = 0.029] and the involvement of joints difficult to access with needle drainage [OR 2.33 (1.06-5.11), p = 0.034] predict treatment failure and that age [OR 1.27 (1.07 = 1.50), p = 0.005], the leucocyte count at baseline [OR 1.01 (1.00-1.02), p = 0.023], bacteraemia [OR 27.66 (1.39-551.20), p = 0.030], diabetes mellitus [OR 15.33 (1.36-172.67), p = 0.027] and chronic renal failure [OR 81.27 (3.32-1990.20), p = 0.007] predict mortality. No significant differences in treatment failure by age were found. In septic arthritis, the predictors of mortality and the predictors of treatment failure differ. The predictors of treatment failure concern local factors and systemic complications, whereas conditions related to the host's immune competence, such as age and comorbidities that hamper the host's response, predict mortality.

  1. First diagnosis of septic arthritis in a dinosaur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anné, Jennifer; Hedrick, Brandon P.; Schein, Jason P.

    2016-08-01

    Identification and interpretation of pathologies in the fossil record allows for unique insights into the life histories of extinct organisms. However, the rarity of such finds limits not only the sample size for palaeopathologic studies, but also the types of analyses that may be performed. In this study, we present the first occurrence of a palaeopathology in a vertebrate from the Mesozoic of the East Coast of North America (Appalachia), a pathologic ulna and radius of an indeterminate hadrosaur from the Navesink Formation (New Jersey). X-ray microtomography allowed for both detailed and more accurate diagnosis of the pathologic condition as well as virtual conservation of the specimen. Based on extant archosaurian comparisons, the hadrosaur was diagnosed with severe septic arthritis affecting the proximal ulna and radius. Diagnosis was based on erosion of the joint and highly reactive periosteal bone growth and fusion of the elements. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first recorded account of septic arthritis in dinosaurs. The severity of the pathology suggests the animal suffered with this condition for some time before death. Unfortunately, only the ulna and radius were found. Thus, the extent to which the condition spread to other parts of the body is unknown.

  2. Parvimonas micra: A rare cause of native joint septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Baghban, Adam; Gupta, Shaili

    2016-06-01

    Parvimonas micra is a fastidious, anaerobic, gram positive coccus, which is found in normal human oral and gastrointestinal flora. It has also been known as Peptostreptococcus micros and Micromonas micros with its most recent re-classification in 2006. It has been described in association with hematogenous seeding of prosthetic joints [1,2]. Several cases of discitis and osteomyelitis have been described in association with dental procedures and periodontal disease often with a subacute presentation. However, cases of native joint septic arthritis are limited [3-5]. Per our literature review, there is one case of native knee septic arthritis described in 1999, with a prolonged time to diagnosis and treatment due to difficulty culturing P. micra. The previously reported patient experienced significant joint destruction and morbidity [6]. Advances in culture techniques and new methods of organism identification including MALDI-TOF and 16s rRNA sequencing have lead to increased identification of this organism, which may be a more frequent bone and joint pathogen than previously realized.

  3. [Septic arthritis in children with normal initial C-reactive protein: clinical and biological features].

    PubMed

    Basmaci, R; Ilharreborde, B; Bonacorsi, S; Kahil, M; Mallet, C; Aupiais, C; Doit, C; Dugué, S; Lorrot, M

    2014-11-01

    Septic arthritis has to be suspected in children with joint effusion and fever so as to perform joint aspiration, which will confirm the diagnosis by bacteriological methods, and to perform surgical treatment by joint lavage. Since development of current molecular methods, such as real-time PCR, Kingella kingae has become the first microbial agent of osteoarticular infections in young children, whereas Staphylococcus aureus is second. C-reactive protein (CRP) is an aid used to diagnose septic arthritis, but its elevation could be moderate. In a previous study, conducted at our hospital, 10% of children hospitalized for S. aureus or K. kingae septic arthritis had a CRP level<10 mg/L. To determine if diagnosis of septic arthritis could be made by other parameters, we analyzed the clinical and biologic features of these patients and compared them to those of children hospitalized for septic arthritis with initial CRP ≥10 mg/L. Among the 89 children with septic arthritis, 10% (n=9) had initial CRP<10 mg/L (K. kingae, n=5/63 ; S. aureus, n=4/26). Initial temperature and fibrinogen were significantly lower in the CRP<10 mg/L group than in the other (37.3°C vs. 37.9°C, P=0.039 and 4.19 vs. 5.72 g/L, P=0.003, respectively). Age, symptom duration before diagnosis, as well as leukocyte and platelet counts were similar in both groups. Two children (2/89=2.2%) with S. aureus septic arthritis had no fever, CRP elevation, or fibrinogen elevation. In the CRP-negative group, three of four children with S. aureus arthritis and one of five with K. kingae arthritis had a high CRP level (34, 40, 61, and 13 mg/L, respectively) 3 days after surgery and antibiotic treatment. One child with K. kingae septic arthritis and initial CRP<10 mg/L needed a second surgical drainage because of relapse of arthritis. In the S. aureus arthritis group, none of the children with initial CRP<10 mg/L experienced complications, while six of those with initial CRP≥10 mg/L needed a second surgical act

  4. Ankylosis of the distal interphalangeal joint in a horse after septic arthritis and septic navicular bursitis.

    PubMed

    Honnas, C M; Schumacher, J; Kuesis, B S

    1992-04-01

    A 6-month-old 300-kg Quarter Horse filly was treated for septic arthritis of the distal interphalangeal joint and septic navicular bursitis that developed as a result of a deep puncture to the foot. Initial treatment consisted of establishing ventral drainage for the navicular bursa, lavage of the distal interphalangeal joint, and administration of broad-spectrum antimicrobial drugs and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Because of continuing sepsis in the distal interphalangeal joint, subsequent treatment included packing the defect in the bottom of the foot with cancellous bone in an attempt to prevent ascending contamination of the joint, placing the limb in a short limb cast, and inserting a Penrose drain into the joint for passive drainage of septic exudate. The goal of treatment was to encourage ankylosis of the distal interphalangeal joint. Because of the filly's persistent lameness and laxity of the lateral collateral ligament in the contralateral carpus, the palmar nerves of the affected foot were injected with a long-acting local anesthetic at the level of the proximal sesamoid bones to encourage weight-bearing. Ankylosis of the distal interphalangeal joint was complete 9 months after the puncture, but a grade-2 lameness remained and the horse had a varus deformity resulting from ligamentous laxity of the lateral collateral ligament in the contralateral carpus.

  5. Simultaneous bilateral septic arthritis of the knee after intraarticular steroid injection: A clinical report.

    PubMed

    Munigangaiah, Sudarshan; O'Sullivan, Theresa A; Lenehan, Brian

    2014-07-01

    Osteoarthritis of knee is one of the common problems in elderly population. Intraarticular corticosteroid injection is a conservative management modality in osteoarthritis of knee. Septic arthritis is an infective complication of intraarticular corticosteroid injection. Septic arthritis in rheumatoid arthritis patients have worse prognosis because of delay in diagnosis. A higher rate of infectious complications following intraarticular injection is expected in immunocompromised and rheumatoid patients. We would like to report an extremely rare case of simultaneous bilateral knee septic arthritis after bilateral knee intraarticular steroid injection in a rheumatoid arthritis patient. Patient was treated successfully with multiple bilateral knee arthroscopic washouts and long-term intravenous antibiotics. This case report emphasizes the increased risk of infection in rheumatoid arthritis patients and a risk benefit assessment on individual basis before carrying out intraarticular steroid injection. Patient should be aware of this increased risk of infection.

  6. Ureaplasma septic arthritis in an immunosuppressed patient with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    George, Michael David; Cardenas, Ana Maria; Birnbaum, Belinda K; Gluckman, Stephen J

    2015-06-01

    Mycoplasmas, including Ureaplasma and Mycoplasma species, are uncommon but important causes of septic arthritis, especially affecting immunosuppressed patients. Many of the reported cases have been associated with congenital immunodeficiency disorders, especially hypogammaglobulinemia. Mycoplasmas are difficult to grow in the laboratory, and these infections may be underdiagnosed using culture techniques. We report a case of a 21-year-old woman with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and hip arthroplasties treated with rituximab and adalimumab who developed urogenital infections and soft tissue abscesses followed by knee arthritis with negative routine cultures. Ureaplasma species was identified from synovial fluid on 2 separate occasions using a broad-range 16S ribosomal RNA gene polymerase chain reaction. Azithromycin led to rapid improvement in symptoms, but after completion of therapy, involvement of the hip prosthesis became apparent, and again, 16S rRNA gene polymerase chain reaction was positive for Ureaplasma species. The literature is reviewed with a discussion of risk factors for Mycoplasma septic arthritis, clinical presentation, methods of diagnosis, and treatment.

  7. Septic arthritis of the distal interphalangeal joint in 12 horses.

    PubMed

    Honnas, C M; Welch, R D; Ford, T S; Vacek, J R; Watkins, J P

    1992-01-01

    The medical records of 12 horses with septic arthritis of a distal interphalangeal joint were reviewed to determine clinical features and response to treatment. Sepsis was caused by trauma or an injection that resulted in an open or contaminated distal interphalangeal joint. All horses were severely lame. Treatment included broad-spectrum parenterally administered antimicrobial drugs (ten horses), percutaneous through-and-through joint lavage (eight horses), indwelling drains (three horses), immobilization of the limb in a cast (three horses), intraarticular injection of sodium hyaluronate (one horse), intraarticular injection of antimicrobial drugs (five horses), curettage of the distal phalanx (one horse), and cancellous bone grafting to promote fusion (one horse). Five horses were euthanatized. Ankylosis of the affected joint developed in five horses, four of which are pasture sound. Two horses treated medically are sound although one underwent subsequent palmar digital neurectomy for treatment of navicular syndrome.

  8. Septic Arthritis and Osteomyelitis Caused by Pasteurella multocida.

    PubMed

    Vranis, Neil; Paryavi, Ebrahim; Christian, Matthew; Joshi, Manjari; Pensy, Raymond A

    2015-07-01

    This report presents a case of progressive septic arthritis and osteomyelitis caused by a rare pathogen, Pasteurella multocida, thought to be provoked by the use of systemic corticosteroids. Despite initial improvement after antibiotics and surgical procedure, the patient returned with new, associated symptoms 1 month later. This concurrent set of circumstances leading to a life-threatening condition has not been reported, to the best of our knowledge. Physicians aware of such a case will be better prepared to diagnose, treat, and educate their patients. Additionally, the diagnostic challenge presented by this case report emphasizes the need for vigilance and thoroughness in obtaining histories from patients presenting with seemingly benign complaints, especially in vulnerable populations, such as infants, pregnant women, and immunocompromised adults.

  9. Septic arthritis due to tubercular and Aspergillus co-infection.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mukesh; Thilak, Jai; Zahoor, Adnan; Jyothi, Arun

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus septic arthritis is a rare and serious medical and surgical problem. It occurs mainly in immunocompromised patients. Aspergillus fumigatus is the most common causative organism followed by Aspergillus flavus. The most common site affected is knee followed by shoulder, ankle, wrist, hip and sacroiliac joint. Debridement and voriconazole are primary treatment of articular aspergilosis. To the best of our knowledge, there are no reported cases of co-infection of tuberculosis (TB) and Aspergillus infecting joints. We report a case of co-infection of TB and A. flavus of hip and knee of a 60-year-old male, with type 2 diabetes mellitus. He was treated with debridement, intravenous voriconazole, and antitubercular drugs.

  10. Septic Arthritis and Concern for Osteomyelitis in a Child with Rat Bite Fever

    PubMed Central

    Akinboyo, Ibukunoluwa; Ty, Jennifer M.; Averill, Lauren W.; Freedman, Abigail

    2013-01-01

    Rat bite fever is a rare infection usually caused by Streptobacillus moniliformis. A case of septic arthritis and possible osteomyelitis as sequelae of rat bite fever in a pediatric patient is described. PMID:23554193

  11. Spontaneous septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis in an afebrile patient.

    PubMed

    Simon, Erin L; Kovacs, Mitch; Gair, Leslie

    2016-05-01

    Septic arthritis is a rare infection usually involving the knee or hip but can infrequently affect less obvious joints such as the pubic symphysis.Risk factors for septic arthritis include joint repair or replacement surgery, systemic infection, intravenous recreational drug use, and alcoholism.We present the case of a 48-year-old man with a final diagnosis of septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis who had no risk factors besides alcoholism. The presentation was unusual in that the patient was afebrile,and the infection seemed to be spontaneous. The infecting pathogen was identified as Streptococcus anginosus or S constellatus, both being normal intestinal flora. Infection by either bacterium is rare in septic arthritis.

  12. Uncommon pathogen: Serious manifestation: A rare case of Achromobacter xylosoxidans septic arthritis in immunocompetetant patient.

    PubMed

    Suryavanshi, Kalpana Tikaram; Lalwani, Sanjay K

    2015-01-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans is a rare opportunistic Gram-negative bacilli and rarer etiology of septic arthritis. We present here the first Indian case of septic arthritis due to A. xylosoxidans in 11-month-old male child confirmed by 16S rRNA sequencing. The child was admitted as suspected case of septic arthritis and underwent arthrotomy. Drained pus revealed Gram-negative bacilli, identified as Serratia odorifera by API (bioMérieux, Marcy l'Ιtoile, France), later subjected to VITEK 2 (bioMérieux, Marcy l'Ιtoile, France) identification revealing it to be A. xylosoxidans. It being a rare etiology of septic arthritis confirmation was done with 16S rRNA Sequencing.

  13. Septic arthritis of the shoulder in a dental patient: a case report and review.

    PubMed

    Dolin, Elana; Perlmutter, Leigh D; Segelnick, Stuart L; Weinberg, Mea A; Schoor, Robert

    2014-04-01

    Septic arthritis of the glenohumoral joint is rare following dental procedures, comprising approximately 3% of all joint infections. Septic arthritis following bacteremia from dental procedures is uncommon and generally occurs in prosthetic joints. Predisposing causes may include immunocompromising diseases such as diabetes, HIV infection, renal failure and intravenous drug abuse. We report a rare case of unilateral glenohumoral joint septic arthritis in a 60-year-old male patient (without a prosthetic joint) secondary to a dental procedure. The insidious nature of the presentation is highlighted. Septic arthritis infections, though rare, require a high level of clinical suspicion. Vague symptoms of shoulder pain may mask the initial diagnosis, as was the case in our patient. Incision and drainage via surgical intervention are often required, followed by parenteral antibiotics.

  14. Editorial Commentary: Arthroscopy Is a Generally Effective Treatment for Septic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, James H

    2015-07-01

    Hip bacterial septic arthritis is an indication for arthroscopy in combination with medical management. After arthroscopy, patients must be vigilantly observed; some patients require more than one irrigation and debridement.

  15. Septic arthritis secondary to rat bite fever: a challenging diagnostic course.

    PubMed

    Budair, Basil; Goswami, Karan; Dhukaram, Vivek

    2014-01-01

    We describe a challenging diagnostic course of a case of septic arthritis secondary to rat bite fever (Streptobacillus moniliformis) in a 29-year-old man who presented with generalised malaise, polyarthralgia and bilateral palmoplantar rash.

  16. Septic arthritis of the shoulder in a dental patient: a case report and review.

    PubMed

    Dolin, Elana; Perlmutter, Leigh D; Segelnick, Stuart L; Weinberg, Mea A; Schoor, Robert

    2014-04-01

    Septic arthritis of the glenohumoral joint is rare following dental procedures, comprising approximately 3% of all joint infections. Septic arthritis following bacteremia from dental procedures is uncommon and generally occurs in prosthetic joints. Predisposing causes may include immunocompromising diseases such as diabetes, HIV infection, renal failure and intravenous drug abuse. We report a rare case of unilateral glenohumoral joint septic arthritis in a 60-year-old male patient (without a prosthetic joint) secondary to a dental procedure. The insidious nature of the presentation is highlighted. Septic arthritis infections, though rare, require a high level of clinical suspicion. Vague symptoms of shoulder pain may mask the initial diagnosis, as was the case in our patient. Incision and drainage via surgical intervention are often required, followed by parenteral antibiotics. PMID:24933767

  17. Effect of intraarticular propolis in an experimental septic arthritis model.

    PubMed

    Oner, Mithat; Kafadar, Ibrahim; Guney, Ahmet; Halici, Mehmet; Deniz, Kemal; Turk, Yildirim; Argun, Mahmut

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of intraarticular propolis compared with systemic antibiotic treatment in an experimental septic arthritis model. Thirty-two rabbits were infected intraarticularly by Staphylococcus aureus. The rabbits were randomly divided into four groups, including a control group and three experimental groups. Drainage was the only procedure performed in group I (control group). The animals were treated with daily intramuscular cefazolin sodium (75 mg/kg) for 7 days in group II. In group III, intraarticular ethanolic extract of propolis (0.5 mg/ml) was injected to the infected knees under sterile conditions on days 7, 14, and 21 after drainage. In group IV, the rabbits received both intramuscular cefazolin sodium as in group II and intraarticular ethanolic extract of propolis as in group III. After 8 weeks, the animals were killed and joint histopathological and scanning electron microscopic parameters were assessed. The best clinical score was obtained in group IV. There were statistically significant differences among all the groups (P<0.05). The highest total score of the histological examination was found in group I and the best total score was obtained in group IV. There were statistically significant differences among the groups when we evaluated the scores of the parameters as loss of chondrocytes, loss of matrix, and pannus in-growth (P<0.05). But there was no significant difference among the groups for the scores of cloning of the chondrocytes (P>0.05). The highest scanning electron microscopy score was found in group I and the best score was obtained in group IV. Our results confirm the safety and efficacy of intraarticular propolis and synergistic effect of propolis when used with cefazolin in an experimental septic arthritis model.

  18. Septic arthritis following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using tendon allografts--Florida and Louisiana, 2000.

    PubMed

    2001-12-01

    In the United States, approximately 50,000 knee surgeries are performed each year for repairing anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. Tissue allografts frequently are used for ACL reconstruction, and septic arthritis is a rare complication of such procedures. This report describes four patients who acquired postsurgical septic arthritis probably associated with contaminated bone-tendon-bone allografts used for ACL reconstruction. Effective sterilization methods that do not functionally alter musculoskeletal tissue are needed to prevent allograft-related infections.

  19. Septic Arthritis and Hemarthroses Caused by Haemophilus Influenzae Serotype A in Children

    PubMed Central

    Samraj, Ravi S.; Fergie, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Invasive disease caused by Haemophilus influenzae serotype A (Hia) is rare in children. Clinical syndromes caused by Hia include meningitis, sepsis and respiratory tract infections. Septic arthritis is rare in children with invasive Hia infection and hemarthrosis has not been described in the published literature. We report a case of septic arthritis and hemarthrosis caused by Hia infection in a 2.5 year-old-boy and review invasive Hia infection in children.

  20. Eikenella corrodens septic hip arthritis in a healthy adult treated with arthroscopic irrigation and debridement.

    PubMed

    Gowda, Ashok L; Mease, Samuel J; Dhar, Yasmin

    2014-09-01

    We present the case of a seemingly spontaneous septic hip arthritis in a patient with no pertinent medical history. Our patient presented with persistent and worsening sharp lower back pain and underwent arthrocentesis of the hip joint, yielding purulent fluid positive for Eikenella corrodens. Our patient's treatment consisted of arthroscopic irrigation with debridement and limited synovectomy that used a supine 2-incision technique. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an E corrodens septic hip arthritis.

  1. Haemophilus influenzae serotype f as a rare cause of septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ungprasert, Patompong; Prasidthrathsint, Kunatum; Permpalung, Nitipong; Srivali, Narat; Kaewpoowat, Quanhathai

    2013-07-01

    Non-type B Haemophilus influenzae emerges as a new pathogen in the post H. influenzae serotype b vaccine era. We describe a case of polyarticular septic arthritis caused by H. influenzae serotype f in an adult. The patient was successfully treated with surgical debridement and antibiotic. To the best of our knowledge, this is the fourth reported case of H. influenzae serotype f septic arthritis in adults.

  2. Septic arthritis following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using tendon allografts--Florida and Louisiana, 2000.

    PubMed

    2001-12-01

    In the United States, approximately 50,000 knee surgeries are performed each year for repairing anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. Tissue allografts frequently are used for ACL reconstruction, and septic arthritis is a rare complication of such procedures. This report describes four patients who acquired postsurgical septic arthritis probably associated with contaminated bone-tendon-bone allografts used for ACL reconstruction. Effective sterilization methods that do not functionally alter musculoskeletal tissue are needed to prevent allograft-related infections. PMID:11770503

  3. Septic versus non-septic acute kidney injury in critically ill patients: characteristics and clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Marília Galvão; Dantas, João Gabriel Athayde de Oliveira; Levi, Talita Machado; Rocha, Mário de Seixas; de Souza, Sérgio Pinto; Boa-Sorte, Ney; de Moura, Carlos Geraldo Guerreiro; Cruz, Constança Margarida Sampaio

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to describe and compare the characteristics and clinical outcomes of patients with septic and non-septic acute kidney injury. Methods This study evaluated an open cohort of 117 critically ill patients with acute kidney injury who were consecutively admitted to an intensive care unit, excluding patients with a history of advanced-stage chronic kidney disease, kidney transplantation, hospitalization or death in a period shorter than 24 hours. The presence of sepsis and in-hospital death were the exposure and primary variables in this study, respectively. A confounding analysis was performed using logistic regression. Results No significant differences were found between the mean ages of the groups with septic and non-septic acute kidney injury [65.30±21.27 years versus 66.35±12.82 years, respectively; p=0.75]. In the septic and non-septic acute kidney injury groups, a predominance of females (57.4% versus 52.4%, respectively; p=0.49) and Afro-descendants (81.5% versus 76.2%, respectively; p=0.49) was observed. Compared with the non-septic patients, the patients with sepsis had a higher mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score [21.73±7.26 versus 15.75±5.98; p<0.001)] and a higher mean water balance (p=0.001). Arterial hypertension (p=0.01) and heart failure (p<0.001) were more common in the non-septic patients. Septic acute kidney injury was associated with a greater number of patients who required dialysis (p=0.001) and a greater number of deaths (p<0.001); however, renal function recovery was more common in this group (p=0.01). Sepsis (OR: 3.88; 95%CI: 1.51-10.00) and an Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score >18.5 (OR: 9.77; 95%CI: 3.73-25.58) were associated with death in the multivariate analysis. Conclusion Sepsis was an independent predictor of death. Significant differences were found between the characteristics and clinical outcomes of patients with septic versus non-septic acute kidney

  4. Septic arthritis of both knees following intra-articular injection of petrol.

    PubMed

    Janbakhsh, Alireza; Mansouri, Feizollah; Vaziri, Siavash; Sayad, Babak; Afsharian, Mandana; Ghaffari, Parviz

    2015-01-01

    A 70 years old man was referred to our center with bilateral knee arthritis following intra-articular petrol injection. Because of previous antibiotics use gram stain and culture were negative. Septic arthritis was diagnosed and antibiotics and drainage were started. After 2 years he improved eventually and was able to walk. But, some movement limitation remained.

  5. A Case of Septic Arthritis of Shoulder Presenting as Stiffness of the Shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Sambandam, Senthil Nathan; Atturu, Mukesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Septic arthritis of the shoulder is uncommon in adults. It is a surgical emergency as joint destruction occurs rapidly and can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Accurate diagnosis can be particularly challenging in patients with underlying liver disease. MRI is a useful adjunct in early detection of atypical causes of shoulder pain. Case report: A 43 years old male came to our outpatient department with complaints of pain and stiffness of his left shoulder. On examination, his shoulder movements were severely restricted. Further evaluation with MRI revealed septic arthritis of left gleno-humeral joint for which emergency arthroscopic debridement was done. Conclusion: Septic arthritis of shoulder may not present with classical clinical features. Hence, a through clinical and radiological evaluation will help us prognosticate and treat accordingly thereby preventing complications like septic shock, osteomyelitis.

  6. [Differential diagnosis of acute arthritis].

    PubMed

    Eviltis, Egidijus

    2003-01-01

    Acute arthritis can first present as a symptom of dangerous and rapidly progressing disease. It is quite easy to differentiate between arthritis and periarthritis. More problematical is correct early differential diagnosis of the acute arthritis. Determining whether one, several or many joints are affected can narrow the diagnostic possibilities. Arthrocentesis and synovial fluid testing provide much information and should be done at initial evaluation if possible. The presence or absence of fever, rash, family history of joint disease and exposure to infective organisms can further direct diagnostic studies and treatment. In general, to avoid masking clues, drug therapy should be delayed for mild symptoms until diagnosis is complete. This article is designed mostly for primary care physicians, residents and includes author's original data and review of recommended reading. PMID:12794379

  7. Spontaneous septic arthritis in a patient without trauma, coinfection, or immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Peter L; Griffin, Gregory D; Simon, Erin L

    2013-11-01

    Septic arthritis is a rare infection, most often affecting the knee and hip [1]. Infections are often secondary to joint repair or replacement surgery, systemic infection, or intravenous recreational drug use [1,2].Diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, hepatic dysfunction, and immunosuppression are common risk factors [1,2]. Although septic arthritis can occur spontaneously, such occurrences are rare. We report a case of a previously healthy 54-year-old woman with no known risk factors presenting to a freestanding emergency department with 5 days of shoulder pain.

  8. Unusual cause of neck pain: septic arthritis of a cervical facet.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jaime L; Ernst, Amy A

    2012-11-01

    Neck pain is a common cause for presentation to an emergency department. Most causes are benign and often secondary to arthritis or injuries. We present a case of septic cervical facet arthritis, a very rare cause of neck pain. The clinical presentation of septic cervical facet arthritis includes fever, neck pain that is often unilateral that is worse with movement, nerve root symptoms, and radiation of pain to the shoulder. Consequences may be severe and include joint destruction and infection progression. Symptoms may be indolent, and a high index of suspicion is necessary to make this diagnosis.

  9. Septic arthritis: a unique complication of nasal septal abscess.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Steven M; Koch, Cody A; Ekbom, Dale C

    2015-03-01

    Nasal septal abscesses (NSAs) occur between the mucoperichondrium and the nasal septum. They most often arise when an untreated septal hematoma becomes infected. The most commonly reported sequela is a loss of septal cartilage support, which can result in a nasal deformity. Other sequelae include potentially life-threatening conditions such as meningitis, cavernous sinus thrombosis, brain abscess, and subarachnoid empyema. We report the case of a 17-year-old boy who developed an NSA after he had been struck in the face with a basketball. He presented to his primary care physician 5 days after the injury and again the next day, but his condition was not correctly diagnosed. Finally, 7 days after his injury, he presented to an emergency department with more serious symptoms, and he was correctly diagnosed with NSA. He was admitted to the intensive care unit, and he remained hospitalized for 6 days. Among the abscess sequelae he experienced was septic arthritis, which has heretofore not been reported as a complication of NSA. He responded well to appropriate treatment, although he lost a considerable amount of septal cartilage. He was discharged home on intravenous antibiotic therapy, and his condition improved. Reconstruction of the nasal septum will likely need to be pursued in the future. PMID:25738728

  10. Post-arthroscopy septic arthritis: Current data and practical recommendations.

    PubMed

    Bauer, T; Boisrenoult, P; Jenny, J Y

    2015-12-01

    Septic arthritis develops after less than 1% of all arthroscopy procedures. The clinical symptoms may resemble those seen after uncomplicated arthroscopy, raising diagnostic challenges. The diagnosis rests on emergent joint aspiration with microscopic smear examination and prolonged culturing on specific media. Urgent therapeutic measures must be taken, including abundant arthroscopic lavage, synovectomy, and the concomitant administration of two effective antibiotics for at least 6 weeks. Preservation of implants or transplants is increasingly accepted, and repeated joint lavage is a component of the treatment strategy. After knee arthroscopy, infection is the most common complication; most cases occur after cruciate ligament reconstruction, and staphylococci are the predominant causative organisms. Emergent synovectomy with transplant preservation and appropriate antibiotic therapy ensures eradication of the infection in 85% of cases, with no adverse effect on final functional outcomes. After shoulder arthroscopy, infection is 10 times less common than neurological complications and occurs mainly after rotator cuff repair procedures; the diagnosis may be difficult and delayed if Propionibacterium acnes is the causative organism. The update presented here is based on both a literature review and a practice survey. The findings have been used to develop practical recommendations aimed at improving the management of post-arthroscopy infections, which are exceedingly rare but can induce devastating functional impairments. PMID:26412207

  11. Post-arthroscopy septic arthritis: Current data and practical recommendations.

    PubMed

    Bauer, T; Boisrenoult, P; Jenny, J Y

    2015-12-01

    Septic arthritis develops after less than 1% of all arthroscopy procedures. The clinical symptoms may resemble those seen after uncomplicated arthroscopy, raising diagnostic challenges. The diagnosis rests on emergent joint aspiration with microscopic smear examination and prolonged culturing on specific media. Urgent therapeutic measures must be taken, including abundant arthroscopic lavage, synovectomy, and the concomitant administration of two effective antibiotics for at least 6 weeks. Preservation of implants or transplants is increasingly accepted, and repeated joint lavage is a component of the treatment strategy. After knee arthroscopy, infection is the most common complication; most cases occur after cruciate ligament reconstruction, and staphylococci are the predominant causative organisms. Emergent synovectomy with transplant preservation and appropriate antibiotic therapy ensures eradication of the infection in 85% of cases, with no adverse effect on final functional outcomes. After shoulder arthroscopy, infection is 10 times less common than neurological complications and occurs mainly after rotator cuff repair procedures; the diagnosis may be difficult and delayed if Propionibacterium acnes is the causative organism. The update presented here is based on both a literature review and a practice survey. The findings have been used to develop practical recommendations aimed at improving the management of post-arthroscopy infections, which are exceedingly rare but can induce devastating functional impairments.

  12. Septic arthritis: a unique complication of nasal septal abscess.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Steven M; Koch, Cody A; Ekbom, Dale C

    2015-03-01

    Nasal septal abscesses (NSAs) occur between the mucoperichondrium and the nasal septum. They most often arise when an untreated septal hematoma becomes infected. The most commonly reported sequela is a loss of septal cartilage support, which can result in a nasal deformity. Other sequelae include potentially life-threatening conditions such as meningitis, cavernous sinus thrombosis, brain abscess, and subarachnoid empyema. We report the case of a 17-year-old boy who developed an NSA after he had been struck in the face with a basketball. He presented to his primary care physician 5 days after the injury and again the next day, but his condition was not correctly diagnosed. Finally, 7 days after his injury, he presented to an emergency department with more serious symptoms, and he was correctly diagnosed with NSA. He was admitted to the intensive care unit, and he remained hospitalized for 6 days. Among the abscess sequelae he experienced was septic arthritis, which has heretofore not been reported as a complication of NSA. He responded well to appropriate treatment, although he lost a considerable amount of septal cartilage. He was discharged home on intravenous antibiotic therapy, and his condition improved. Reconstruction of the nasal septum will likely need to be pursued in the future.

  13. A Case of Septic Arthritis of the Shoulder Due to Yersinia enterocolitica with Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Justin; Gandhi, Rajesh Tim

    2014-01-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica infection rarely can cause extra-intestinal infections. We present a case of septic arthritis of the shoulder due to this organism in an elderly man with liver and cardiac disease. We review previously published cases of Y. enterocolitica septic arthritis, and discuss risk factors and management. PMID:25734124

  14. A Case of Septic Arthritis of the Shoulder Due to Yersinia enterocolitica with Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Chan, Justin; Gandhi, Rajesh Tim

    2014-09-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica infection rarely can cause extra-intestinal infections. We present a case of septic arthritis of the shoulder due to this organism in an elderly man with liver and cardiac disease. We review previously published cases of Y. enterocolitica septic arthritis, and discuss risk factors and management.

  15. Pyomyositis of the obturator internus muscle extending to septic arthritis of the hip in a child: a case report.

    PubMed

    Amari, Rui; Yokoi, Hiromichi

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of primary pyomyositis in the obturator internus muscle. Pyomyositis involving muscles around the hip needs to be differentiated from septic arthritis because these infections show similar symptoms. Management with antibiotics can avoid the need for surgical intervention. Uncontrolled pyomyosistis can cause sequelae such as septic shock, osteomyelitis of adjacent bone, and septic arthritis. Awareness of this condition will facilitate correct diagnosis and early treatment.

  16. A Neonatal Septic Arthritis Case Caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ozsari, Tamer; Ozdemir, Özmert M.A; Kiliç, Ilknur

    2016-01-01

    Septic arthritis is encountered very rarely during the neonatal period and its diagnosis can delay because of atypical symptoms, thus it may lead to serious sequelae. The sequale can be prevented by early diagnosis and concomitant treatment. In neonates, pain can be experienced as a result of pseudoparalysis and of movement of the effected joints. A 17-day-old neonatal patient was brought to our hospital with complaint of unrest and then diagnosed with septic arthritis due to propagation of Klebsiella pneumoniae in joint fluid culture was represented because of the rarity of such a case. PMID:27042550

  17. The use of ultrasound in the management of septic arthritis of the hip.

    PubMed

    Laine, Jennifer C; Denning, Jaime R; Riccio, Anthony I; Jo, ChanHee; Joglar, Jeanne M; Wimberly, Robert L

    2015-03-01

    In the assessment of septic arthritis of the hip in a pediatric population, ultrasound is a safe and easily conducted method to confirm an effusion. The need for MRI to further evaluate the patient for adjacent infection before treatment is debatable. Once an effusion is confirmed on ultrasonography, we have found that septic arthritis of the hip does not need advanced imaging before arthrotomy and debridement. Patients who fail to clinically respond to an initial hip arthrotomy and appropriate antibiotics may benefit from an MRI for the identification of concomitant infections that may require surgical intervention.

  18. Management of septic arthritis following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a review of current practices and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Cadet, Edwin R; Makhni, Eric C; Mehran, Nima; Schulz, Brian M

    2013-11-01

    Septic arthritis following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is a rare and potentially devastating complication that often leads to articular destruction and adverse clinical outcomes. Because of its rare occurrence, best practices for diagnosis and management have yet to be established. However, graft retention and favorable outcomes are possible with early diagnosis, surgical intervention, and appropriate antibiotic management. Clinicians must be familiar with the diagnostic criteria and management options for septic arthritis. Most patients require multiple procedures to effectively eradicate infection. When the original reconstructed graft cannot be salvaged, a staged anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction revision is required.

  19. Selective IgM deficiency in an adult presenting with Streptococcus pneumoniae septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Phuphuakrat, Angsana; Ngamjanyaporn, Pintip; Nantiruj, Kanokrat; Luangwedchakarn, Voravich; Malathum, Kumthorn

    2016-02-01

    Septic arthritis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae is uncommon. Most of the patients who have invasive pneumococcal infection have underlying diseases associated with impaired immune function. We report a case of polyarticular pneumococcal septic arthritis in a previously healthy adult as the first manifestation of selective immunoglobulin (Ig)M deficiency. The patient had no evidence of autoimmune disease or malignancy. Serum IgG, IgA, and complement levels were normal. Numbers of lymphocyte subsets were in normal range except that of CD4+ cells, which was slightly low. Invasive pneumococcal disease in a healthy adult should lead to further investigation for underlying diseases including primary immunodeficiencies.

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa septic trapezo-metacarpal arthritis after prostate laser vaporization.

    PubMed

    Lepetit, C; Le Gal, S; Michon, J; Collon, S; Tillou, X

    2015-08-01

    Prostatic laser vaporization resection is a new and fast growing technique. Most publications compare this technique to the standard diathermic snare prostate resection without considering its particular complications. Septic arthritis of the trapezio-metacarpal joint is particularly rare if it has a haematogenous origin. We present here the case of a 65-year-old man with an isolated trapezio-metacarpal Pseudomonas aeruginosa arthritis with a haematogenous origin following a laser vaporization prostate resection.

  1. Septic Arthritis of the Temporomandibular Joint--Unusual Presentations.

    PubMed

    Lohiya, Sapna; Dillon, Jasjit

    2016-01-01

    This report describes 2 patients whose septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (SATMJ) presented atypically, resulting in treatment delay and complications. A 49-year-old man developed left-side facial allodynia, which was first treated unsuccessfully as trigeminal neuralgia. On day 21, the patient sustained facial trauma from a fall and presented to the emergency department (ED). Maxillofacial contrast-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) scan was suggestive of parotiditis, SATMJ, or hemarthrosis. His condition did not improve with empiric antibiotic treatment. On day 30, contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed SATMJ. Incision and drainage yielded 6 mL of pus and produced clinical improvement. Cultures grew methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, which was treated with amoxicillin plus clavulanate and sulfamethoxazole plus trimethoprim for 30 days. On day 59, the patient still had slight preauricular pain and CT-proved TMJ osteoarthritic changes. A 56-year-old woman developed right-side facial pain after a crown procedure on her right mandibular second molar. Oral prednisone (and clindamycin) produced partial relief. Her primary physician suspected temporal arteritis, but its biopsy result on day 11 was normal. Gradually, the patient developed trismus and malocclusion refractory to various medicines. On day 49, she presented to the ED. A contrast-enhanced maxillofacial CT scan suggested SATMJ. Incision and drainage yielded 30 mL of pus and produced clinical improvement. During days 50 to 57, the patient received intravenous ampicillin plus sulbactam and metronidazole. However, preauricular tenderness and drainage from the surgical incision persisted. On day 55, CT scan showed a residual abscess. Secondary debridement yielded 5 mL of pus. Culture grew coagulase-negative S aureus. On day 141, the patient still had slight preauricular pain and TMJ osteoarthritic changes on MRI. In these cases, the SATMJ diagnosis was delayed owing

  2. Septic arthritis due to a Sneathia species most closely related to Sneathia sanguinegens.

    PubMed

    Bachy, B; Bémer, P; Tortellier, L; Giraudeau, C; Reynaud, A; Corvec, S

    2011-11-01

    Sneathia sanguinegens is an infrequent bacterium in clinical specimens. We describe a case of right elbow septic arthritis due to a Sneathia species most closely related to S. sanguinegens in a young immunocompetent woman. S. sanguinegens has never been implicated in osteoarticular infections.

  3. Septic Arthritis Caused by Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae in a Prosthetic Knee Joint ▿

    PubMed Central

    Hocqueloux, Laurent; Poisson, Didier Marc; Sunder, Simon; Guilbert, Sébastien; Prazuck, Thierry

    2010-01-01

    We describe the third case of prosthetic infection due to Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae. The patient, a 68-year-old woman, had had total knee arthroplasty 12 months before diagnosis. She had been in contact with swine at home. We review the seven previous reports of septic arthritis due to E. rhusiopathiae. PMID:19923477

  4. Septic arthritis in Western and sub-Saharan African children - a review

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews what is known about the incidence, aetiology, presentation, bacteriology and management of septic arthritis in children. It compares where possible the different presentations and characteristics of this condition in the Western and sub-Saharan African regions. PMID:16741731

  5. Influence of Culture Results on Management and Outcome of Pediatric Osteomyelitis and/or Septic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Ashley M; Heizer, Heather R; Todd, James K

    2012-06-01

    Children with uncomplicated osteomyelitis and/or septic arthritis were more likely (P < .01) to have positive focus than blood cultures. Those who grew a pathogen and/or started on a single antibiotic were more likely to be discharged on a single antibiotic, and those sent home on oral therapy had fewer adverse events.

  6. Septic arthritis due to a Sneathia species most closely related to Sneathia sanguinegens.

    PubMed

    Bachy, B; Bémer, P; Tortellier, L; Giraudeau, C; Reynaud, A; Corvec, S

    2011-11-01

    Sneathia sanguinegens is an infrequent bacterium in clinical specimens. We describe a case of right elbow septic arthritis due to a Sneathia species most closely related to S. sanguinegens in a young immunocompetent woman. S. sanguinegens has never been implicated in osteoarticular infections. PMID:21737545

  7. Diagnosing Septic Arthritis in the Synovial White Cell Count "Gray Zone".

    PubMed

    Ruzbarsky, Joseph J; Gladnick, Brian P; Dodwell, Emily

    2016-07-01

    Differentiating septic arthritis of the pediatric hip from other causes of hip pain and effusion continues to present a diagnostic challenge for the clinician. Although septic arthritis traditionally has been reported to have a synovial white blood cell count of 75,000 cells/mm3 or greater, lower counts can be seen in this condition. In cases where a synovial sample has been obtained and the cell count falls in the intermediate range between 25,000 and 75,000 cells/mm(3), it is unclear what proportion of these cases may be truly septic hips. In this evidence-based review, we examine Heyworth et al's study focusing on the predictive value of this intermediate white cell count range in a Lyme-endemic region.

  8. A retrospective study of 192 horses affected with septic arthritis/tenosynovitis.

    PubMed

    Schneider, R K; Bramlage, L R; Moore, R M; Mecklenburg, L M; Kohn, C W; Gabel, A A

    1992-11-01

    The medical records of 192 horses with septic arthritis/tenosynovitis 1979-1989 were reviewed. Forty-three horses developed infection after an intra-articular injection, 46 following a penetrating wound, 25 following surgery, 66 were foals less than 6 months old, and 12 were adult horses without a known aetiology. Haematogenous infection of a joint occurs in adult horses and should be considered as a differential diagnosis in horses with an acute onset of severe lameness. The aetiology of the infection had a significant effect on the type of bacteria identified by culture. Staphylococcus was cultured from most of the horses that developed infection following a joint injection or surgery, 69% of the horses from which an organism was identified. Horses that developed infection secondary to a penetrating wound frequently provided cultures of more than one organism; Enterobacteriaceae and anaerobes were more frequently isolated in this group. The most common organisms isolated from foals were Enterobacteriaceae; E. coli was identified in more than 27% of the foals. The hock was the most frequently involved joint. Multiple treatments were used over the 10-year period of study. Survival rates were lowest in foals; only 45% survived to be released from the hospital. Survival was greater in adult horses; 85% of the horses that were treated were released from the hospital. Survival was significantly greater in horses with septic tenosynovitis; all 14 of the horses that were treated survived. Survival was not significantly affected by the joint involved or by the type of bacteria cultured from the synovial fluid.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Deficiency of the Complement Component 3 but Not Factor B Aggravates Staphylococcus aureus Septic Arthritis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Na, Manli; Jarneborn, Anders; Ali, Abukar; Welin, Amanda; Magnusson, Malin; Stokowska, Anna; Pekna, Marcela; Jin, Tao

    2016-04-01

    The complement system plays an essential role in the innate immune response and protection against bacterial infections. However, detailed knowledge regarding the role of complement in Staphylococcus aureus septic arthritis is still largely missing. In this study, we elucidated the roles of selected complement proteins in S. aureus septic arthritis. Mice lacking the complement component 3 (C3(-/-)), complement factor B (fB(-/-)), and receptor for C3-derived anaphylatoxin C3a (C3aR(-/-)) and wild-type (WT) control mice were intravenously or intra-articularly inoculated with S. aureus strain Newman. The clinical course of septic arthritis, as well as histopathological and radiological changes in joints, was assessed. After intravenous inoculation, arthritis severity and frequency were significantly higher in C3(-/-)mice than in WT controls, whereas fB(-/-)mice displayed intermediate arthritis severity and frequency. This was in accordance with both histopathological and radiological findings. C3, but not fB, deficiency was associated with greater weight loss, more frequent kidney abscesses, and higher bacterial burden in kidneys. S. aureus opsonized with C3(-/-)sera displayed decreased uptake by mouse peritoneal macrophages compared with bacteria opsonized with WT or fB(-/-)sera. C3aR deficiency had no effect on the course of hematogenous S. aureus septic arthritis. We conclude that C3 deficiency increases susceptibility to hematogenous S. aureus septic arthritis and impairs host bacterial clearance, conceivably due to diminished opsonization and phagocytosis of S. aureus.

  10. A case of unusual septic knee arthritis with Brucella abortus after arthroscopic meniscus surgery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keun Hwa; Kang, Hyunseong; Kim, Taejung; Choi, Sungwook

    2016-01-01

    We present a 51-year-old male patient with Brucella abortus septic arthritis in the right knee following arthroscopic meniscus surgery. He had eaten a traditional dish of raw minced cattle conceptus (bovine fetus) that was prepared after the cow was slaughtered. Despite treatment with empirical antibiotics and debridement of the postoperative surgical wound, the infection persisted without improvement. Polymerase chain reaction sequencing identified Brucella abortus from tissue samples obtained from the patient. After confirmation of the diagnosis of brucellar infection, antibiotics were replaced with doxycycline and rifampin, which were used for 4 months. In patients with a non-specific arthralgia who eat raw meat or live close to animals, it is important to consider the possibility of septic arthritis due to infection with Brucella spp.

  11. A case of unusual Gram-negative bacilli septic arthritis in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Li Qi; Wang, Wilson

    2013-08-01

    The Gram-negative bacilli Acinetobacter baumannii, Burkholderia cepacia, Ochrobactrum anthropi, Pseudomonas mendocina, Ralstonia spp., Serratia marcescens and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia are ubiquitous environmental organisms of low virulence, and do not usually cause illness in immunocompetent hosts. We report a case of multiple concurrent opportunistic Gram-negative bacilli causing septic arthritis in a healthy patient following trauma to the knee. Repeated operations, including arthroscopy, arthrotomy and debridement, were required before tissue cultures became negative. The patient also required an extended duration of intravenous and oral antibiotic treatment before he was discharged. Gram-negative bacillary septic arthritis is an uncommon but significant condition that requires repeated debridement and washouts in order to achieve bacterial eradication. This case report highlights the importance of an awareness of the external environment at the time of injury, as it impacts the type of organisms causing the infection, and consequently, the choice of empiric antibiotics required for successful treatment.

  12. A case of unusual septic knee arthritis with Brucella abortus after arthroscopic meniscus surgery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keun Hwa; Kang, Hyunseong; Kim, Taejung; Choi, Sungwook

    2016-01-01

    We present a 51-year-old male patient with Brucella abortus septic arthritis in the right knee following arthroscopic meniscus surgery. He had eaten a traditional dish of raw minced cattle conceptus (bovine fetus) that was prepared after the cow was slaughtered. Despite treatment with empirical antibiotics and debridement of the postoperative surgical wound, the infection persisted without improvement. Polymerase chain reaction sequencing identified Brucella abortus from tissue samples obtained from the patient. After confirmation of the diagnosis of brucellar infection, antibiotics were replaced with doxycycline and rifampin, which were used for 4 months. In patients with a non-specific arthralgia who eat raw meat or live close to animals, it is important to consider the possibility of septic arthritis due to infection with Brucella spp. PMID:27130400

  13. Atraumatic posterior dislocation of the native hip: an unusual presentation of septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Patel, N K; Windley, J; Naique, S

    2014-06-01

    We present a case of chronic posterior hip dislocation after severe joint destruction following septic arthritis. In the absence of trauma, infection must be considered in the differential diagnosis of a dislocated joint particularly in patients with risk factors such as intravenous drug abuse and immune compromise. Excision arthroplasty of the hip was performed with good pain relief and functional outcomes. This is an excellent temporary or permanent solution in managing such complex cases although alternative management options are discussed.

  14. Primary septic arthritis of the manubriosternal joint in a heroin user

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Longo, F.J.; Monteagudo, I.; Vaquero, F.J.; Martinez Moreno, J.L.; Carreno, L.

    1986-01-01

    A 20-year-old heroin user developed staphylococcus septic arthritis of the manubrium joint. The diagnosis was established by a culture of the infected tissue and blood culture. The clinical impression was aided by 99mTc radionuclide scintimetry. Early diagnosis localized the infection. Immediate antibiotic therapy solved a problem in the sternum that seems not to have been reported in the English literature.

  15. Coexistent Pseudogout and Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare Septic Arthritis in a Patient with HIV and ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Wali, Omer M.; Cervellione, Kelly L.; Singh, Bhupinder B.; Bagheri, Farshad

    2016-01-01

    Pseudogout is a crystal-induced arthropathy characterized by the deposition of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystals in synovial fluid, menisci, or articular cartilage. Although not very common, this entity can be seen in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Septic arthritis due to Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI) is a rare entity that can affect immunocompromised patients such as those with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or those who are on immunosuppressive drugs. Here, we describe a 51-year-old female who presented with fever, right knee pain, swelling, warmth, and decreased range of motion for several days. The initial assessment was consistent with pseudogout, with negative bacterial and fungal cultures. However, due to high white blood cell (WBC) count in the synovial fluid analysis, she was empirically started on intravenous (IV) vancomycin and piperacillin-tazobactam and discharged on IV vancomycin and cefepime, while acid-fast bacilli (AFB) culture was still in process. Seventeen days later, AFB culture grew Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI), and she was readmitted for relevant management. This case illustrates that septic arthritis due to MAI should be considered in the differential diagnosis of septic arthritis in immunocompromised patients. PMID:27803833

  16. Alpha-Toxin and Gamma-Toxin Jointly Promote Staphylococcus aureus Virulence in Murine Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Ing-Marie; Hartford, Orla; Foster, Timothy; Tarkowski, Andrzej

    1999-01-01

    Septic arthritis is a common and feared complication of staphylococcal infections. Staphylococcus aureus produces a number of potential virulence factors including certain adhesins and enterotoxins. In this study we have assessed the roles of cytolytic toxins in the development of septic arthritis by inoculating mice with S. aureus wild-type strain 8325-4 or isogenic mutants differing in the expression of alpha-, beta-, and gamma-toxin production patterns. Mice inoculated with either an alpha- or beta-toxin mutant showed degrees of inflammation, joint damage, and weight decrease similar to wild-type-inoculated mice. In contrast, mice inoculated with either double (alpha- and gamma-toxin-deficient)- or triple (alpha-, beta-, and gamma-toxin-deficient)-mutant S. aureus strains showed lower frequency and severity of arthritis, measured both clinically and histologically, than mice inoculated with the wild-type strain. We conclude that simultaneous production of alpha- and gamma-toxin is a virulence factor in S. aureus arthritis. PMID:10024541

  17. Appearance of acute gouty arthritis on indium-111-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Palestro, C.J.; Vega, A.; Kim, C.K.; Swyer, A.J.; Goldsmith, S.J. )

    1990-05-01

    Indium-111-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy was performed on a 66-yr-old male with polyarticular acute gouty arthritis. Images revealed intense labeled leukocyte accumulation in a pattern indistinguishable from septic arthritis, in both knees and ankles, and the metatarsophalangeal joint of both great toes, all of which were involved in the acute gouty attack. Joint aspirate as well as blood cultures were reported as no growth; the patient was treated with intravenous colchicine and ACTH for 10 days with dramatic improvement noted. Labeled leukocyte imaging, repeated 12 days after the initial study, revealed near total resolution of joint abnormalities, concordant with the patient's clinical improvement. This case demonstrates that while acute gouty arthritis is a potential pitfall in labeled leukocyte imaging, in the presence of known gout, it may provide a simple, objective, noninvasive method of evaluating patient response to therapy.

  18. Microorganisms and their sensitivity pattern in septic arthritis of north Indian children: a prospective study from tertiary care level hospital.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Sanjay; Dhillon, Mandeep Singh; Aggrawal, Sameer; Tripathy, Sujit Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Background. Septic arthritis is a true orthopaedic emergency. Important factors determining outcome are rapid diagnosis and timely intervention. Changing trends in microbiological spectrum and emerging drug resistance poses big challenge. Present study evaluates bacterial strains and their sensitivity pattern in septic arthritis of North Indian children. Methods. Fifty children with septic arthritis of any joint were evaluated. Joint was aspirated and 2 cc of aspirated fluid was sent for gram stain and culture. Blood cultures were also sent for bacteriological evaluation. Results. Fifty percent cases had definite radiological evidence of septic arthritis whereas ultrasound revealed fluid in 98% cases. Aspirated fluid showed isolates in 72% cases. The most common organism was Staphylococcus aureus (62%) followed by Streptococcus pneumoniae and Gr. B Streptococcus. Blood culture could grow the organism in 34% cases only. The bacterial strain showed significant resistance to common antibiotic cocktail in routine practice. Resistance to cloxacillin and ceftriaxone was 62% and 14% respectively. No organisms were resistant to vancomycin and linezolid. Conclusion. S. aureus is still the most common organism in septic arthritis. Though a significant resistance to common antibiotic cocktail is noticed, the strain is susceptible to higher antibiotics. We recommend using these antibiotics as an empirical therapy till culture and sensitivity report is available. PMID:24967110

  19. Acute arthritis of the hip--case series describing emergency physician performed ultrasound guided hip arthrocentesis.

    PubMed

    Minardi, Joseph; Denne, Nick; Miller, Miryam; Larrabee, Hollynn; Lander, Owen

    2013-01-01

    We report two cases of acute hip arthritis where arthrocentesis was able to be performed rapidly, at the bedside by the emergency physician using ultrasound guidance, expediting diagnosis and patient care. In the first case, the patient, who was 23 weeks pregnant, was diagnosed with septic hip arthritis, taken for operative washout of the joint and did very well postoperatively with no pregnancy or other complications. In the second case, the patient was determined to have a noninfectious etiology and also did well. Skilled ultrasound guidance allows hip arthrocentesis to be performed by the treating clinician, decreasing the time to diagnosis and definitive care.

  20. A retrospective study of septic arthritis in a tertiary hospital in West Texas with high rates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sian Yik; Pannikath, Deepa; Nugent, Kenneth

    2015-07-01

    Septic arthritis is an important concern for rheumatologists in the evaluation of joint disease. Very few studies have addressed the microbiologic epidemiology and outcomes of septic arthritis in the USA since the year 2000. We performed a retrospective study of septic arthritis in a tertiary hospital in West Texas from the year 2000 to 2013. We recorded data on patient demographics, microbiologic etiology, treatment patterns, and outcomes. The most common causative organisms were Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus spp. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) caused septic arthritis in 22.6 % of the cases. MRSA septic arthritis was associated with low rates of adequate empiric antimicrobial therapy. The mortality due to sepsis in our study was 5.5 %. Patients with septic arthritis had a mean length of stay of 13.5 ± 12.1 days and required 2.1 ± 1.4 joint operations. Many patients (29.2 %) had readmissions due to complications, and these patients had high rates of home health utilization and transfers to other facilities post hospital discharge. In our logistic regression analysis model, factors associated with poor outcomes in septic arthritis were MRSA, older age, and prosthetic joint infection. Septic arthritis is associated with significant mortality, morbidity, and health care costs, and more studies are needed to improve outcomes, especially considering the increasing rates of MRSA as the pathogen.

  1. A retrospective study of septic arthritis in a tertiary hospital in West Texas with high rates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sian Yik; Pannikath, Deepa; Nugent, Kenneth

    2015-07-01

    Septic arthritis is an important concern for rheumatologists in the evaluation of joint disease. Very few studies have addressed the microbiologic epidemiology and outcomes of septic arthritis in the USA since the year 2000. We performed a retrospective study of septic arthritis in a tertiary hospital in West Texas from the year 2000 to 2013. We recorded data on patient demographics, microbiologic etiology, treatment patterns, and outcomes. The most common causative organisms were Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus spp. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) caused septic arthritis in 22.6 % of the cases. MRSA septic arthritis was associated with low rates of adequate empiric antimicrobial therapy. The mortality due to sepsis in our study was 5.5 %. Patients with septic arthritis had a mean length of stay of 13.5 ± 12.1 days and required 2.1 ± 1.4 joint operations. Many patients (29.2 %) had readmissions due to complications, and these patients had high rates of home health utilization and transfers to other facilities post hospital discharge. In our logistic regression analysis model, factors associated with poor outcomes in septic arthritis were MRSA, older age, and prosthetic joint infection. Septic arthritis is associated with significant mortality, morbidity, and health care costs, and more studies are needed to improve outcomes, especially considering the increasing rates of MRSA as the pathogen. PMID:25572838

  2. The Staphylococcus aureus collagen adhesin is a virulence determinant in experimental septic arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Patti, J M; Bremell, T; Krajewska-Pietrasik, D; Abdelnour, A; Tarkowski, A; Rydén, C; Höök, M

    1994-01-01

    The importance of a collagen-binding adhesin in the pathogenesis of septic arthritis has been examined by comparing the virulence of two sets of Staphylococcus aureus mutants in an animal model. Collagen adhesin-negative mutant PH100 was constructed by replacing the chromosomal collagen adhesin gene (cna) in a clinical strain, Phillips, with an inactivated copy of the gene. Collagen adhesin-positive mutant S. aureus CYL574 was generated by introducing the cna gene into CYL316, a strain that normally lacks the cna gene. Biochemical, immunological, and functional analyses of the generated mutants and their respective parent strains showed that binding of 125I-labeled collagen, expression of an immunoreactive collagen adhesin, and bacterial adherence to cartilage were directly correlated with the presence of a functional cna gene. Greater than 70% of the mice injected with the Cna+ strains developed clinical signs of arthritis, whereas less than 27% of the animals injected with Cna- strains showed symptoms of disease. Furthermore, mice injected with the Cna+ strain Phillips had remarkably elevated levels of immunoglobulin G1 and interleukin-6 compared with mice injected with the Cna- mutant PH100. Taken together, these results demonstrate that collagen adhesin plays an important role in the pathogenesis of septic arthritis induced by S. aureus. Images PMID:8262622

  3. [Primary meningococcal infection of the knee. A rare cause of septic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Klatte, T O; Lehmann, W; Rueger, J M

    2015-10-01

    This article presents a case of primary septic arthritis of the knee due to serogroup C Neisseria meningitidis. A 19-year-old female presented to the emergency department with a painless but swollen knee joint which had started 2 days previously and fever (38 °C). The patient reported that she suddenly felt unwell 3 days ago and developed a rush at the same time which had almost disappeared when arrived at the emergency department. The patient was admitted to hospital and an antibiotic therapy was started with sulbactam and ampicillin. Initially, incubation of synovial fluid over the next 3 days did not result in detection of any pathogens; therefore, a reactive arthritis was assumed until Neisseria meningitidis was detected in cultures of the synovial fluid. Therapy was then switched to antibiotic therapy with ceftriaxon and arthroscopic irrigation was performed. The patient quickly recovered and was discharged from hospital after 14 days. This case example shows the difficulties of the clinical and microbiological diagnostics of a primary septic meningococcal arthritis; however, the treatment is relatively easy and mostly successful compared to other forms of bacterial joint infection.

  4. Pediatric osteomyelitis and septic arthritis: the pathology of neonatal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ogden, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    The morphologic and histologic examination of over fifty-five foci of metaphyseal/epiphyseal osteomyelitis and eleven septic joints from five cases of neonatal osteomyelitis and joint sepsis are described in detail. The severity of the bone and joint involvement varied considerably, allowing a better understanding of the pathophysiologic sequence of events in the disease in the neonatal time period. Of particular importance were (1) the multifocal nature of the disease, (2) the highly variable destruction of the growth plate (physis) by several discrete mechanisms, and (3) the invasion of the chondroepiphysis through the cartilage canal systems. Two of the cases died from respiratory complications several months following presumed successful treatment of their skeletal infections. S&pecimens showed significant growth plate damage continuing beyond the neonatal period. These findings support the need for rapid diagnosis and drainage, whenever feasible, to prevent long-term skeletal growth damage. The severity of involvement also should emphasize that this disease, especially in the neonate, is not an innocuous condition, as a recent review suggested. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 FIG. 7 FIG. 8 FIG. 9 FIG. 10 FIG. 11 FIG. 12 FIG. 13 FIG. 14 FIG. 15 FIG. 16 FIG. 17 FIG. 18 FIG. 19 FIG. 20 PMID:524924

  5. Septic knee arthritis in Crohn’s disease biological therapy-free patient. Case report

    PubMed Central

    Pop, C; Calagiu, D; Jantea, P; Nemes, R

    2015-01-01

    A 52-year-old woman with Crohn’s disease presented with septic arthrtis of the knee. This condition coincided with a symptomatic flare of her Crohn’s disease due to an ileal inflammatory stenosis, manifested as a phlegmonous mass palpable in the right lower quadrant and a small bowel obstruction. Results of synovial fluid cultures showed the presence of Gram-negative bacillus, Klebsiella pneumoniae and the CT scan images were highly suggestive of abdominal abscess within Crohn’s disease. The patient’s condition improved after following an antibiotic treatment and after the initiation of Anti-TNF-alpha agent Adalimumab, with no further exacerbation. Septic arthritis in Crohn’s disease should be considered to have a communicating source of sepsis consisting of an abdominal abscess or fistula. Abbreviations: Anti-TNF-alpha agent = anti tumor necrosis factor alpha agent, 5-ASA = 5-aminosalicylic acid PMID:26664477

  6. Complicated septic arthritis after knee arthroscopy in a 75-year-old man with osteoarthritis and a popliteal cyst.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Antonios; Karachalios, Theofilos S; Malizos, Constantinos N; Varitimidis, Sokratis

    2015-04-09

    A 75-year-old man presented in shock secondary to septic arthritis of the knee. The patient, with a known history of knee osteoarthritis, was treated elsewhere for mechanical locking symptoms and effusion with arthroscopic debridement, and developed septic arthritis, which disseminated to the leg and foot after a tear in the capsule, and a ruptured pyogenic popliteal cyst. Open debridement of the knee joint, and drainage of the abscesses of the leg and foot, were performed. Antibiotic-loaded cement beads were left in the residual space. Debridement was repeated and cement beads removed after 4 days, and finally the infection was eradicated without any serious consequences for the patient. There is debate over arthroscopic intervention for osteoarthritic knees. The presence of a popliteal cyst, which is a rather common finding in the latter, could be related to a significant number of complications, such as septic arthritis.

  7. Temporomandibular Joint Septic Arthritis and Mandibular Osteomyelitis Arising From an Odontogenic Infection: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Gams, Kevin; Freeman, Phillip

    2016-04-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has been infrequently reported in the literature. Some investigators believe that this condition is under-reported because it is underdiagnosed. Misdiagnosis or late diagnosis of this condition can lead to serious morbidity, including fistula formation, intracranial abscess, fibrous or bony ankylosis, temporal bone or condylar osteomyelitis, growth alteration, and several others. This report describes a case of septic TMJ arthritis arising from direct spread of an odontogenic infection with subsequent development of mandibular osteomyelitis. The purpose of this case report is to 1) increase awareness of an underdiagnosed condition, 2) establish the seriousness of this infection, 3) for the first time report on a case of TMJ septic arthritis caused by Bacteroides infection, and 4) provide a review of the relevant literature.

  8. Contribution of arthroscopy in case of septic appearance arthritis of the wrist: a nine cases series.

    PubMed

    Hariri, A; Lebailly, F; Zemirline, A; Hendriks, S; Facca, S; Liverneaux, P

    2013-09-01

    Septic arthritis of the wrist is a diagnostic and therapeutic emergency. Synovectomy and lavage by arthrotomy is often followed by stiffness. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic and therapeutic contribution of emergency arthroscopic synovectomy with intraarticular lavage. Nine patients were operated on for wrist pathology with septic appearance. All had signs of local inflammation, three showed locoregional inflammation, three were febrile. In one patient several joints were involved. Seven patients presented with inflammatory or degenerative arthritis. All patients underwent emergency surgery using radiocarpal joint puncture, arthroscopic exploration, intraarticular lavage and synovectomy at both the radiocarpal and midcarpal joints. The results were evaluated by pain, Quick DASH, grip strength, and wrist range of motion. In three cases, joint fluid appeared clear, in three it was turbid, and in three purulent. Gram stain and culture revealed bacteria in four cases. Synovitis was radiocarpal four times, radiocarpal and midcarpal once. In one case, there was radiocarpal and midcarpal chondritis. Average pain was 5.3/10 preoperatively and 2/10 at the last clinical follow-up visit. Mean grip strength was 23.3 kg on the involved side vs. 33.5 kg on the opposite one. Mean flexion was 55° for the involved wrist vs. 68°; mean extension was 52° for the affected wrist vs. 59°. No patient was reoperated on. In all cases, there was no sign of local inflammation, regional lymphadenopathy or systemic infection at the last follow-up. One patient died of colon metastatic cancer. Another patient developed a severe Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type I (CRPS1). Our results suggest three principles of management of wrist arthritis with septic appearance: extended surgical indication, emergency operation and arthroscopic procedure.

  9. Midterm results of Ilizarov hip reconstruction for late sequelae of childhood septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    El-Rosasy, Mahmoud A; Ayoub, Mostafa A

    2014-11-01

    The management of hip instability as a consequence of septic arthritis in childhood is difficult. Ilizarov hip reconstruction is a double-level femoral osteotomy with the objective of eliminating hip instability, through a proximal valgus-extension-derotation osteotomy and a distal varization-lengthening osteotomy for mechanical axis correction and equalization limb length. Ilizarov hip reconstruction was performed for 16 adult patients with complaints of hip pain, leg-length discrepancy, limping, reduced activity and limited abduction of the hip as a result of childhood septic arthritis. Their ages ranged from 19 to 32 years (mean 23.2 ± 4.2). Ilizarov external fixator was used in all cases. At the time of last follow-up that ranged from 60 to 132 months (mean 85.6 ± 23.5), the Harris hip score (HHS) showed excellent functional outcome in two cases (12.50 %), good in 13 cases (81.25 %) and fair in one case (6.25 %). There was no poor functional outcome in any case. Preoperatively, the mean HHS was 56.18 points, and at the time of last follow-up, it improved to a mean of 84.62 points. Pain subsided in all patients, the Trendelenburg sign became negative in all but three (19 %) patients, no patient had limb-length discrepancy, and the alignment of the extremity was reestablished in all cases. No additional operations were required. Ilizarov hip reconstruction is a valuable and durable solution for the late sequelae of childhood septic arthritis of the hip presenting in adult patients.

  10. Septic arthritis of the knee: the use and effect of antibiotics prior to diagnostic aspiration.

    PubMed

    Hindle, P; Davidson, E; Biant, L C

    2012-07-01

    Septic arthritis of the native knee joint and total knee arthroplasty both cause diagnostic and treatment issues. There is no gold standard test to diagnose a joint infection and the use of joint aspiration is commonly relied on. It is widely accepted by orthopaedic surgeons that antibiotics should be withheld until aspiration has been performed to increase the odds of identifying an organism. Patients often present to other specialties that may not be as familiar with these principles. Our study found that 25 (51%) of the 49 patients treated for septic arthritis of the native or prosthetic knee in our unit over a 3-year period had received antibiotics prior to discussion or review by the on-call orthopaedic service. Patients were significantly less likely to demonstrate an organism on initial microscopy (entire cohort: p = 0.001, native knees: p = 0.006, prosthetic knees: p = 0.033) or on subsequent culture (entire cohort: p = 0.001, native knees: p = 0.017, prosthetic knees: p = 0.012) of their aspirate if they had received antibiotics. The sensitivity of microscopy in all patients dropped from 58% to 12% when patients had received antibiotics (native knees: 46% to 0%, prosthetic knees: 72% to 27%). The sensitivity of the culture dropped from 79% to 28% in all patients when the patient had received antibiotics (native knees: 69% to 21%, prosthetic knees: 91% to 36%). This study demonstrated how the management of patients with suspected cases of septic arthritis of the knee may be compromised by empirical administration of antibiotics. These patients were significantly less likely to demonstrate an organism on microscopy and culture of their initial aspirate. There is a significant high false negative rate associated with knee aspiration with prior administration of antibiotic therapy.

  11. Kingella kingae Causing Septic Arthritis of the Knee in an Immunocompetent Adult.

    PubMed

    Ricketts, J; Rehmatullah, N N T; Sutton, P

    2015-01-01

    The bacterium Kingella kingae is a species of Gram-negative coccobacillus usually found in the oropharynx. This is an emerging pathogen reported to cause bacteraemia, endocarditis, and osteoarticular infections in children and endocarditis in the immunocompromised adult. However, there are few cases of isolated joint infections reported in the immunocompetent adult. Due to specific isolation techniques required, delay in diagnosis can compromise patient outcome. We report a rare case of septic arthritis of the knee in an immunocompetent adult caused by K. kingae.

  12. Computer assisted knee arthrodesis in a primary case of septic arthritis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Maniar, Rajesh N; Baviskar, Jayesh V

    2011-12-01

    We report a case of a 78 year old patient with primary septic arthritis who was treated with knee arthrodesis using computer navigation. Use of computer navigation avoided violating the medullary canal and its associated risks. Also, it offered the advantage of making precise bone cuts in all the three planes, thus minimizing the risk of malalignment. At 3 months, our patient showed good appositional contact of the bone ends, stable fusion, with no sign of infection and was mobilized with a simple brace. At 6 months review, the patient was walking painlessly without support. We achieved a mechanical axis alignment of 0° and 11° flexion as planned.

  13. Morganella morganii osteomyelitis complicated by secondary septic knee arthritis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Koyuncu, Şemmi; Ozan, Firat

    2012-01-01

    Morganella morganii is a gram-negative, facultative anaerobic bacillus whose natural habitat is the gastrointestinal system. While it rarely causes infection alone, it is generally encountered in people with suppressed immunity and in cases of hospital infection. It may also manifest itself as a superinfection. Morganella morganii often demonstrates a course characterized by slow-paced progression with occasional attacks and remissions. Osteoarticular pathologies are not commonly observed in Morganella morganii infections and it has a high mortality rate. We present a 56-year-old male patient with Morganella morganii osteomyelitis in the distal femur and proximal tibia, complicated by septic arthritis in the knee joint.

  14. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus enterocolitis sequentially complicated with septic arthritis: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although most reports describing patients infected with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus enterocolitis have been published in Japan, this concept remains a matter of debate and diagnostic criteria have not yet been defined. Case presentation The general status of a 74-year-old Japanese man referred to our hospital (day 1) with severe community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia gradually improved with antibiotic therapy. Thereafter, up to 4 L/day of acute watery diarrhea that started on day 19 was refractory to metronidazole but responded immediately to oral vancomycin. Gram staining stool samples was positive for abundant fecal leukocytes from which dominant methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (104 CFU/mL) were isolated, suggesting methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus enterocolitis. High fever with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia was evident at day 30, and suppurative right hip arthritis developed around day 71. All methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from stools, blood and aspirated synovial fluid separated in the same manner on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, as well as two other strains isolated from sputum, belonged to the same clone as sequence type (ST) 764 (complex clonal 5), and carried SCCmec type II. Conclusion The clinical, microbiological and molecular biological findings of this patient indicated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus enterocolitis that led to septic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus arthritis. PMID:24405901

  15. [Septic arthritis of the hoof joint in the horse--diagnosis, radiologic changes and therapy].

    PubMed

    Stanek, C

    1997-01-01

    A retrospective study (1984-1994) was made of 10 cases of septic arthritis of the distal interphalangeal joint in horses aged 7 months to 17 years. In 6 cases a hind limb was affected, in 4 cases a front limb. The arthritis was caused either by a puncture wound in the sole area (8 cases), by a perforating wound in the coronary region (1) or iatrogenic (1). All horses exhibited a severe lameness at the walk. Radiography showed no typical lesions in fresh cases, whilst later an increasing subluxation of the joint was observed followed by periosteal reactions. Therapy included partial resection of the deep flexor tendon and fenestration of the Lig.impar in cases of nail puncture, single or repeated joint lavages carried out either under general anesthesia or on the standing horse, and broad spectrum antibiotic therapy, using mainly penicillin and gentamicin. 5 out of 10 horses were treated successfully.

  16. Septic Arthritis Due to Moraxella osloensis in a Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Wren, Melissa A; Caskey, John R; Liu, David X; Embers, Monica E

    2013-01-01

    A 5.5-y-old Chinese-origin female rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) presented for bilateral hindlimb lameness. The primate had been group-reared in an SPF breeding colony and was seronegative for Macacine herpesvirus 1, SIV, simian retrovirus type D, and simian T-lymphotropic virus. The macaque's previous medical history included multiple occasions of swelling in the left tarsus, and trauma to the right arm and bilateral hands. In addition, the macaque had experienced osteomyelitis of the left distal tibia and rupture of the right cranial cruciate ligament that had been surgically repaired. Abnormal physical examination findings on presentation included a thin body condition, mild dehydration, and bilaterally swollen stifles that were warm to the touch, with the right stifle more severely affected. Mild instability in the left stifle was noted, and decreased range of motion and muscle atrophy were present bilaterally. Hematologic findings included marked neutrophilia and lymphopenia and moderate anemia. Arthrocentesis and culture of joint fluid revealed Moraxella-like organisms. Treatment with enrofloxacin was initiated empirically and subsequently switched to cephalexin, which over time alleviated the joint swelling and inflammation. Definitive diagnosis of Moraxella osloensis septic arthritis was made through isolation of the organism and sequencing of the 16S rDNA region. To our knowledge, this report is the first description of Moraxella osloensis septic arthritis in a rhesus macaque. PMID:24326229

  17. Arthrodesis of the proximal interphalangeal joint affected with septic arthritis in 8 horses.

    PubMed

    Groom, L J; Gaughan, E M; Lillich, J D; Valentino, L W

    2000-02-01

    Arthrodesis was performed to treat septic arthritis of the proximal interphalangeal joint of 8 horses. Records of the horses were reviewed to determine outcome and possible factors that influenced success or failure. All horses were female. Seven horses had 1 joint treated and 1 horse was treated for bilateral pelvic limb involvement. The duration of sepsis before surgery ranged from 1 to 66 days. Bone lysis and production was radiographically apparent in 7 horses before surgery. Six horses had multiple bacterial organisms cultured from bone or synovial tissues; 2 horses had single isolates identified. After aggressive curettage, arthrodesis was accomplished with 3 parallel screws in 1 horse, 2 divergent narrow dynamic compression plates in 3 horses, and a single broad dynamic compression plate in 4 horses. Casts were applied to all horses for 1 to 6 weeks. Four horses survived to successful brood mare status. Four horses were euthanized during hospitalization because of continued discomfort or complications of sepsis. Arthrodesis of the proximal interphalangeal joint affected with septic arthritis appears to be an acceptable alternative to euthanasia for some horses.

  18. Septic arthritis due to moraxella osloensis in a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Wren, Melissa A; Caskey, John R; Liu, David X; Embers, Monica E

    2013-01-01

    A 5.5-y-old Chinese-origin female rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) presented for bilateral hindlimb lameness. The primate had been group-reared in an SPF breeding colony and was seronegative for Macacine herpesvirus 1, SIV, simian retrovirus type D, and simian T-lymphotropic virus. The macaque's previous medical history included multiple occasions of swelling in the left tarsus, and trauma to the right arm and bilateral hands. In addition, the macaque had experienced osteomyelitis of the left distal tibia and rupture of the right cranial cruciate ligament that had been surgically repaired. Abnormal physical examination findings on presentation included a thin body condition, mild dehydration, and bilaterally swollen stifles that were warm to the touch, with the right stifle more severely affected. Mild instability in the left stifle was noted, and decreased range of motion and muscle atrophy were present bilaterally. Hematologic findings included marked neutrophilia and lymphopenia and moderate anemia. Arthrocentesis and culture of joint fluid revealed Moraxella-like organisms. Treatment with enrofloxacin was initiated empirically and subsequently switched to cephalexin, which over time alleviated the joint swelling and inflammation. Definitive diagnosis of Moraxella osloensis septic arthritis was made through isolation of the organism and sequencing of the 16S rDNA region. To our knowledge, this report is the first description of Moraxella osloensis septic arthritis in a rhesus macaque.

  19. Septic arthritis with Staphylococcus lugdunensis following arthroscopic ACL revision with BPTB allograft.

    PubMed

    Mei-Dan, Omer; Mann, Gideon; Steinbacher, Gilbert; Ballester, Soleda J; Cugat, Ramon Bertomeu; Alvarez, Pedro Diaz

    2008-01-01

    Septic arthritis following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is an uncommon but a serious complication resulting in six times greater hospital costs than that of uncomplicated ACL surgery and an inferior postoperative activity level. Promptly initiating a specific antibiotic therapy is the most critical treatment, followed by open or arthroscopic joint decompression, debridement and lavage. Staphylococcus lugdunensis is a coagulase-negative staphylococcus predominantly infecting the skin and soft tissue. The few reported cases of bone and joint infections by S. lugdunensis indicate that the clinical manifestations were severe, the diagnosis elusive, and the treatment difficult. If the microbiology laboratory does not use the tube coagulase (long) test to confirm the slide coagulase test result, the organism might be misidentified as Staphylococcus aureus. S. lugdunensis is more virulent than other coagulase-negative staphylococcus; in many clinical situations it behaves like S. aureus, further increasing the confusion and worsening the expected outcome. S. lugdunensis is known to cause infective endocarditis with a worse outcome, septicemia, deep tissue infection, vascular and joint prosthesis infection, osteomyelitis, discitis, breast abscess, urine tract infections, toxic shock and osteitis pubis. We present the first case report in the literature of septic arthritis with S. lugdunensis following arthroscopic ACL revision with bone-patellar-tendon-bone allograft.

  20. Polyarticular Septic Arthritis in an Immunocompetent Adult: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Miller, Annelise; Abduljabbar, Fahad; Jarzem, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Septic arthritis is a clinical emergency requiring prompt diagnosis and treatment to avoid significant morbidity and mortality. Polyarticular septic arthritis (PASA) accounts for 15% of all infectious arthritides and rarely occurs in immunocompetent adults. Staphylococcus aureus is the most commonly isolated organism, with infection primarily affecting knees, shoulders, elbows, and hips. The morbidity associated with PASA is very high, and mortality in treated cases of PASA may be as high as 50% of cases. We report a case of PASA with associated epidural abscess in a healthy adult male, who presented with complaints of arthralgia and limited range of motion of his left shoulder, wrist, and ankle. He also presented with low back pain and motor weakness associated with an epidural abscess spanning L2-S1, with multilevel vertebral osteomyelitis. Surgical washout of the affected joints as well as decompressive laminectomies was performed, and he received a standard course of intravenous antibiotics. Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from joint aspirations and from blood cultures. The patient had a full neurological and functional recovery postoperatively with no sequelae. To the best of our knowledge this is the only case report of Staphylococcus aureus PASA with concomitant epidural abscess in an immunocompetent adult.

  1. Septic arthritis with Staphylococcus lugdunensis following arthroscopic ACL revision with BPTB allograft.

    PubMed

    Mei-Dan, Omer; Mann, Gideon; Steinbacher, Gilbert; Ballester, Soleda J; Cugat, Ramon Bertomeu; Alvarez, Pedro Diaz

    2008-01-01

    Septic arthritis following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is an uncommon but a serious complication resulting in six times greater hospital costs than that of uncomplicated ACL surgery and an inferior postoperative activity level. Promptly initiating a specific antibiotic therapy is the most critical treatment, followed by open or arthroscopic joint decompression, debridement and lavage. Staphylococcus lugdunensis is a coagulase-negative staphylococcus predominantly infecting the skin and soft tissue. The few reported cases of bone and joint infections by S. lugdunensis indicate that the clinical manifestations were severe, the diagnosis elusive, and the treatment difficult. If the microbiology laboratory does not use the tube coagulase (long) test to confirm the slide coagulase test result, the organism might be misidentified as Staphylococcus aureus. S. lugdunensis is more virulent than other coagulase-negative staphylococcus; in many clinical situations it behaves like S. aureus, further increasing the confusion and worsening the expected outcome. S. lugdunensis is known to cause infective endocarditis with a worse outcome, septicemia, deep tissue infection, vascular and joint prosthesis infection, osteomyelitis, discitis, breast abscess, urine tract infections, toxic shock and osteitis pubis. We present the first case report in the literature of septic arthritis with S. lugdunensis following arthroscopic ACL revision with bone-patellar-tendon-bone allograft. PMID:17684731

  2. Moraxella lacunata infection associated with septicemia, endocarditis, and bilateral septic arthritis in a patient undergoing hemodialysis: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Asami; Yamanaka, Katsuo; Hayashi, Hiroki; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi

    2014-01-01

    We report the first case of both endocarditis and bilateral septic arthritis in a patient caused by Moraxella lacunata and successful management of the infection with antimicrobial therapy. The route of entry leading to bacteremia may have been the oral cavity given the poor oral hygiene of the patient as evidenced by bleeding gums. We hypothesize that the bacteremia led to septic arthritis and mitral valve infective endocarditis. In this case report, we also review the literature on M. lacunata infections and conclude that this organism should be considered in bilateral septic arthritis in a patient with underlying heart abnormalities and/or with renal failure.

  3. Slow release antibiotics for treatment of septic arthritis in large animals.

    PubMed

    Haerdi-Landerer, M Christina; Habermacher, Judith; Wenger, Barbara; Suter, Maja M; Steiner, Adrian

    2010-04-01

    The search for an effective treatment for septic arthritis is ongoing. Current therapies are expensive since they require repeated joint lavage and long term antibiotic treatment. Local application of antimicrobial drugs is advantageous because high concentrations can be attained at the infection site, although repeated injections increase the risk of superinfection of the joint. Thus, slow release formulations, which have the advantage of local treatment yet single application of the drug, are appealing. Antibiotics used in slow release formulations are selected for tissue compatibility, an appropriate antibacterial spectrum, and stability both during the mixing procedure and within the carrier during the release period. Ideally the carriers should be bioresorbable. Promising reports on the clinical use of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) mixed with several different antibiotics, and of collagen sponges impregnated with gentamicin, should encourage the search for formulations optimally adapted to veterinary medical requirements.

  4. Group C streptococcal septic arthritis of a prosthetic hip joint following dental treatment.

    PubMed

    Al-Himdani, Sarah; Woodnutt, David

    2015-10-22

    We report a case of a prosthetic joint infection occurring secondary to group C Streptococcus following dental treatment in a 66-year-old woman. This patient presented 11 years following a right hip resurfacing procedure with increasing pain and difficulty mobilising the right hip. An ultrasound and MRI scan identified a collection in the right hip joint, which was subsequently aspirated. Cultures revealed a group C Streptococcus. Extensive washout and surgical debridement of the hip joint was undertaken and the patient was treated with a protracted course of antibiotics. At 1 year follow-up, the patient demonstrated no evidence of recurrent infection. We discuss the evidence underlying prophylactic antibiotic usage regarding dental procedures in the prevention of septic arthritis in patients with prosthetic joints. We also review the spectrum of diseases caused by this organism.

  5. Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) osteomyelitis and septic arthritis in an immunocompetent host.

    PubMed

    Jones, A R; Bartlett, J; McCormack, J G

    1995-01-01

    We describe a case of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) osteomyelitis and septic arthritis in an immunocompetent man. Infection was derived from a chainsaw injury sustained on the lateral aspect of the ankle 13 years earlier, and had spread through the bone, joint and soft tissue emerging at the medial aspect. This was successfully treated with surgical debridement, drainage, arthrodesis and 18 months of chemotherapy consisting of clarithromycin, rifampicin, ethambutol, and ciprofloxacin with an initial 2 weeks of amikacin. Infections with this organisms are generally associated with immunocompromised states, particularly advanced AIDS. However, our patient illustrates that atypical mycobacterial infections must also be considered in immunocompetent patients who have a prolonged clinical course and an appropriate potential source of infection.

  6. Septic arthritis following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a comprehensive review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Scully, William F; Fisher, Susan G; Parada, Stephen A; Arrington, Edward D; Arrington, Edward A

    2013-01-01

    Septic arthritis following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is an uncommon but potentially serious complication. The incidence of infection is approximately 0.44%. Staphylococcus and streptococcus strains are the most common infectious pathogens. Infection is typically via direct inoculation. Articular cartilage damage is primarily the result of the unregulated host inflammatory response. The timing of presentation is typically <2 months following surgery. Presenting symptoms commonly mirror normal postoperative findings, making diagnosis difficult. Although laboratory inflammatory markers are often elevated, knee arthrocentesis is the gold standard for diagnosis. Treatment involves serial arthroscopic or open irrigation and debridement procedures and antibiotic management. Graft retention is often possible, although fixation implants may require removal or exchange. Successful results have been reported following infection eradication in both graft retention and early revision ACL reconstruction scenarios.

  7. Chronic septic arthritis and osteomyelitis in a prosthetic knee joint due to Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Pron, B; Merckx, J; Touzet, P; Ferroni, A; Poyart, C; Berche, P; Gaillard, J L

    1995-07-01

    A case of chronic septic arthritis and osteomyelitis in a prosthetic knee joint due to Clostridium difficile is reported. A knee prosthesis was installed in a 16-year-old boy for surgical treatment of an osteosarcoma of the femur. Later, the patient suffered a traumatic closed fracture of his patella, and a sterile fluid was aspirated. One month later, the joint displayed inflammation. Culture of the articular fluid yielded a nontoxigenic Clostridium difficile strain. Despite several attempts using conservative medical treatment with penicillins and ornidazole, Clostridium difficile strains with the same antibiotic susceptibility pattern were repeatedly isolated from the joint over an eight-month period. The foreign material was then ablated, and finally, the patient's leg was amputated one year after Clostridium difficile was first isolated. The possible sources of contamination in our case and other reported cases of extraintestinal infection due to Clostridium difficile are discussed.

  8. Septic Arthritis in Infants Younger Than 3 Months: A Retrospective Review.

    PubMed

    Bono, Kenneth T; Samora, Julie Balch; Klingele, Kevin E

    2015-09-01

    Septic arthritis in infants is rare and can be difficult to diagnose. This study reviewed a series of patients younger than 3 months to identify factors that may assist in early diagnosis and treatment. A query of records at a large Midwestern pediatric hospital (1994-2010) was performed to identify all patients younger than 3 months at the time of diagnosis. Analysis included birth history, joint involvement, physical examination findings, laboratory results, imaging results, method of treatment, and outcome. In 14 cases (11 boys, 3 girls; mean age at diagnosis, 42.2 days), complete records were available for review. Involved joints included the knee, hip, and shoulder. The most common findings on physical examination were decreased range of motion (100%), tenderness (100%), and swelling (71.4%). Mean temperature was 38.5°C. Mean white blood cell count was 18.5 K/µL, mean erythrocyte sedimentation rate was 48.9 mm/h, and mean C-reactive protein level was 6.1 mg/dL. More than half (57.1%) of joint aspirates grew positive cultures, and 41.7% of blood cultures had positive results. Causative organisms were group B streptococcus, methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus, Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Salmonella enterica, and Candida albicans. The most common physical examination findings in infants younger than 3 months with septic arthritis include tenderness, decreased range of motion, and swelling. White blood cell count, C-reactive protein level, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate are likely to be elevated, but these findings should be used in combination with findings on physical examination and radiographic studies to aid in diagnosis.

  9. Procalcitonin levels in fresh serum and fresh synovial fluid for the differential diagnosis of knee septic arthritis from rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis and gouty arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenggong; Zhong, DA; Liao, Qiande; Kong, Lingyu; Liu, Ansong; Xiao, Han

    2014-10-01

    Whether the levels of procalcitonin (PCT) in the serum and synovial fluid are effective indicators for distinguishing septic arthritis (SA) from non-infectious arthritis remains controversial. The present study aimed to evaluate whether PCT levels in fresh serum or fresh joint fluid may be used in the differential diagnosis of SA from rheumatoid arthritis (RA), osteoarthritis (OA) and gouty arthritis (GA). From January 2012 to June 2013, 23 patients with knee SA, 21 patients with RA, 40 patients with OA and 11 patients with GA were enrolled in the current study. The levels of PCT were measured within 24 h after specimen collection at room temperature. An enzyme-linked fluorescence assay (ELFA) was used to detect the levels of PCT in the serum and synovial fluid. The correlations between the levels of PCT in the serum and synovial fluid and the arthritic patient groups were determined by the Nemenyi test. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve were calculated to evaluate the accuracy of the correlations. The levels of PCT in the serum and joint fluid of the patients in the SA group were higher compared with those of the other groups (P<0.01) and there were no significant differences among the RA, OA and GA groups in these levels. A PCT level of <0.5 μg/l in the serum and synovial fluid had high specificity in the differential diagnosis of SA from RA, OA and GA. Synovial fluid PCT revealed significantly greater sensitivity than serum PCT. The accuracy of the differential diagnosis of SA by the serum levels of PCT was significantly lower than that by the synovial fluid levels of PCT. The levels of PCT in the serum and synovial fluid may be used as alternative laboratory indicators to distinguish between SA and the non-infectious types of arthritis; however, the PCT levels in fresh synovial fluid are more sensitive and accurate indicators than PCT levels in fresh serum.

  10. Regional limb perfusion for antibiotic treatment of experimentally induced septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Whithair, K J; Bowersock, T L; Blevins, W E; Fessler, J F; White, M R; Van Sickle, D C

    1992-01-01

    Septic arthritis was induced in one antebrachiocarpal joint of seven horses by the intra-articular injection of 1 mL Staphylococcus aureus suspension containing a mean of 10(5) colony-forming units. Twenty-four hours after inoculation, four horses were treated by regional perfusion with 1 g of gentamicin sulfate, and three horses received 2.2 mg/kg gentamicin sulfate intravenously (IV) every 6 hours. Synovial fluid was collected for culture and cytology at regular intervals, and the synovial membranes were collected for culture and histologic examination at euthanasia 24 hours after the first treatment. Gentamicin concentration in the septic synovial fluid after three successful perfusions was 221.2 +/- 71.4 (SD) micrograms/mL; after gentamicin IV, it was 7.6 +/- 1.6 (SD) micrograms/mL. The mean leukocyte count in the inoculated joints decreased significantly by hour 24 in the successfully perfused joints. Terminal bacterial cultures of synovial fluid and synovial membranes were negative in two horses with successfully perfused joints. S. aureus was isolated from the infected joints in all three horses treated with gentamicin IV.

  11. Septic arthritis of the hip in a Cambodian child caused by multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi with intermediate susceptibility to ciprofloxacin treated with ceftriaxone and azithromycin.

    PubMed

    Pocock, J M; Khun, P A; Moore, C E; Vuthy, S; Stoesser, N; Parry, C M

    2014-08-01

    Septic arthritis is a rare complication of typhoid fever. A 12-year-old boy without pre-existing disease attended a paediatric hospital in Cambodia with fever and left hip pain. A hip synovial fluid aspirate grew multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica ser. Typhi with intermediate susceptibility to ciprofloxacin. Arthrotomy, 2 weeks of intravenous ceftriaxone and 4 weeks of oral azithromycin led to resolution of symptoms. The optimum management of septic arthritis in drug-resistant typhoid is undefined.

  12. Evaluation of a balloon constant rate infusion system for treatment of septic arthritis, septic tenosynovitis, and contaminated synovial wounds: 23 cases (2002-2005).

    PubMed

    Meagher, Daniel T; Latimer, Federico G; Sutter, W Wes; Saville, William J A

    2006-06-15

    OBJECTIVE-To determine clinical findings and outcome in horses treated by means of a balloon constant rate infusion system. DESIGN-Retrospective case series. ANIMALS-23 horses. PROCEDURES-Medical records of horses examined at The Ohio State University veterinary teaching hospital from 2002 to 2005 that had septic arthritis, septic tenosynovitis, or penetration of a synovial structure and in which treatment involved a balloon constant rate infusion system were searched. Information pertaining to signalment, history, physical examination findings, clinicopathologic data, treatment, and duration of hospitalization was recorded. RESULTS-Mean+/- SD duration of hospitalization was 11.5+/-5.26 days. No correlation between duration of clinical signs and duration of hospitalization or duration of infusion pump use was detected, but correlations between WBC count and duration of hospitalization and WBC and duration of infusion-pump use were observed. All horses survived to discharge. Follow-up information was obtained on 17 horses, 16 of which were alive at the time of follow-up. Twelve of 13 horses for which followup information was available for at least 5 months were alive 5 months or longer after discharge. Thirteen of the 16 horses alive at follow-up were reported by owners as not lame, whereas the remaining 3 were mildly lame or intermittently moderately lame or had developed angular limb deformity in the contralateral limb. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE-Balloon constant rate infusion systems may be used effectively in treatment of septic arthritis, septic tenosynovitis, and contaminated synovial wounds. Clinical response and long-term outcome appeared to be comparable to results obtained with other techniques.

  13. Vertebral Osteomyelitis and Septic Arthritis Associated With Staphylococcus hyicus in a Juvenile Peregrine Falcon ( Falco peregrinus ).

    PubMed

    Maier, Kristina; Fischer, Dominik; Hartmann, Antje; Kershaw, Olivia; Prenger-Berninghoff, Ellen; Pendl, Helene; Schmidt, Martin J; Lierz, Michael

    2015-09-01

    A 6-week-old, parent-reared peregrine falcon ( Falco peregrinus ) was presented with spastic hypertonus of its hind limbs of unknown origin and duration. Radiologic examination revealed smooth periosteal reactions ventrally at thoracic vertebrae 5 to 7. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography identified the swelling as inflammation; antibiotic, antimycotic, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic treatments were initiated, and vitamins and minerals were supplemented. Because the bird's condition did not improve after 10 days, it was euthanatized and submitted for postmortem examination. On histopathologic examination, chronic, active osteomyelitis was diagnosed in thoracic vertebrae 5 to 7, and chronic, active arthritis was present in both the right shoulder and left elbow joints. Staphylococcus hyicus was isolated from these 3 locations, as well as from lungs and liver, indicating a chronic septic staphylococcosis. Although infections with Staphylococcus species are occasional causes of vertebral osteomyelitis in juvenile poultry with active growth plates, it is only sporadically reported in raptors and companion birds. This case report is the first description of the clinical features and diagnostic and pathologic findings in a juvenile peregrine falcon with hematogenous osteomyelitis and arthritis associated with septicemia caused by S hyicus.

  14. Disseminated Mycobacterium abscessus Infection Following Septic Arthritis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Shoichi; Sekiya, Noritaka; Takizawa, Yasunobu; Morioka, Hiroshi; Kato, Hirofumi; Aono, Akio; Chikamatsu, Kinuyo; Mitarai, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Satomi; Kamei, Satoshi; Setoguchi, Keigo

    2015-05-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus is a rapidly growing mycobacterium found mainly in patients with respiratory or cutaneous infections, but it rarely causes disseminated infections. Little is known about the clinical characteristics, treatment, and prognosis of disseminated M abscessus infection. A 75-year-old Japanese woman who had been treated for 17 years with a corticosteroid for antisynthetase syndrome with antithreonyl-tRNA synthetase antibody developed swelling of her right elbow. X-ray of her right elbow joint showed osteolysis, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed fluid in her right elbow joint. M abscessus grew in joint fluid and blood cultures. She was diagnosed with a disseminated M abscessus infection following septic arthritis. Antimicrobial treatment by clarithromycin, amikacin, and imipenem/cilastatin combined with surgical debridement was administered. Although blood and joint fluid cultures became negative 1 week later, the patient died at 6 weeks from starting antimicrobial treatment. We reviewed 34 cases of disseminated M abscessus infections from the literature. Most of the patients had immunosuppressive backgrounds such as transplantation, use of immunosuppressive agents, hematological malignancy, and end stage renal disease. The duration from onset of symptoms to diagnosis was over 3 months in half of the cases. All fatal cases had positive blood cultures or use of immunosuppressive agents. Clinicians should bear in mind that mycobacterial infections including M abscessus are one of the differential diagnoses in patients with subacute arthritis and soft tissue infections.

  15. Septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis from Pseudomonas aeruginosa: reconsidering traditional risk factors and symptoms in the elderly patient

    PubMed Central

    To, Fergus; Tam, Penny; Villanyi, Diane

    2012-01-01

    A high-functioning 82-year-old man presented with lower lumbar pain and pubic tenderness. On admission he was afebrile with a normal white count. A grossly elevated C reactive protein was noted. CT scan of the pelvis showed a fluid collection anterior to the pubic symphysis and to the right of the midline measuring 2.0 × 2.2 cm. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was cultured from the fluid collection. The patient had no history of intravenous drug use, pelvic surgeries, malignancies or trauma. We report what we believe is the first documented case of P aeruginosa infection of the pubic symphysis in an elderly patient that did not have any of the traditional risk factors associated with neither P aeruginosa septic arthritis nor infections of the pubic symphysis. Instead, we propose that phimosis with chronic infection of the foreskin and balanitis may have led to septic arthritis. PMID:22922933

  16. Septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis from Pseudomonas aeruginosa: reconsidering traditional risk factors and symptoms in the elderly patient.

    PubMed

    To, Fergus; Tam, Penny; Villanyi, Diane

    2012-01-01

    A high-functioning 82-year-old man presented with lower lumbar pain and pubic tenderness. On admission he was afebrile with a normal white count. A grossly elevated C reactive protein was noted. CT scan of the pelvis showed a fluid collection anterior to the pubic symphysis and to the right of the midline measuring 2.0 × 2.2 cm. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was cultured from the fluid collection. The patient had no history of intravenous drug use, pelvic surgeries, malignancies or trauma. We report what we believe is the first documented case of P aeruginosa infection of the pubic symphysis in an elderly patient that did not have any of the traditional risk factors associated with neither P aeruginosa septic arthritis nor infections of the pubic symphysis. Instead, we propose that phimosis with chronic infection of the foreskin and balanitis may have led to septic arthritis. PMID:22922933

  17. Surgical treatment for septic arthritis of the knee joint in elderly patients: a 10-year retrospective clinical study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao-Ming; Lin, Hsi-Hsien; Hung, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Tung-Fu; Chen, Wei-Ming; Liu, Chien-Lin; Chen, Tain-Hsiung

    2013-04-01

    Septic arthritis is the most rapidly destructive joint disease, but its early diagnosis remains challenging; delayed or inadequate treatment, even by expert physicians, can lead to irreversible joint destruction. Between 25% and 50% of patients develop irreversible loss of joint function, which is especially concerning in elderly patients. To understand the factors influencing the outcome of septic arthritis, the authors reviewed patients aged older than 50 years who had undergone debridement surgery for primary septic arthritis at their institution between 1998 and 2008. Ninety-two patients (92 knees) were enrolled in the study; 14 did not meet inclusion criteria and were excluded from the final analysis. Of the 78 included patients, 7 underwent arthrodesis, 22 underwent total knee arthroplasty, 19 were indicated for total knee arthroplasty for severe knee joint osteoarthritis but did not undergo surgery by the end of this study, and the remaining 30 had no or mild symptoms of osteoarthrosis and did not receive any surgical procedure. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common pathogenic agent (38%), followed by mixed bacterial infection (10%). Several factors negatively influenced the final clinical outcome, including delayed treatment, advanced macroscopic staging made during debridement surgery, performing multiple debridement surgeries, and a larger Lysholm score difference pre- and posttreatment. More antibiotics administered, longer duration of antibiotic treatment, and more pathogenic agents present were also significantly correlated with poor outcome. These findings shed new light on the management of septic arthritis. Accurate diagnoses and effective treatments are important for the clinical outcome of knee joint bacterial infection in elderly patients.

  18. Spontaneous septic arthritis of the lumbar facet caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in an otherwise healthy adolescent.

    PubMed

    Papaliodis, Dean N; Roberts, Timothy T; Richardson, Nicholas G; Lawrence, James B

    2014-07-01

    We report the case of a 16-year-old boy with isolated septic arthritis of a lumbar facet. This rare presentation of an infection in a lumbar facet joint occurred after minor trauma sustained in a football game. Septic arthritis of the spinal facet joint is an uncommon phenomenon. Only 5 cases have been reported in immunocompromised pediatric patients. To our knowledge, no case of septic arthritis in an immunocompetent pediatric patient has been reported. An otherwise healthy 16-year-old boy presented with 4 weeks of escalating back pain after a minor athletics-related trauma. Evaluation showed incapacitating pain, lumbar musculature spasms, and the absence of fever, hemodynamic, or neurologic changes. Laboratory values were within normal limits. Magnetic resonance images showed a fluid collection within the L3-L4 facet and a localized abscess. Computed tomographic-guided aspiration showed methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection, for which the patient received 6 weeks of vancomycin with complete resolution of symptoms. Refractory lumbago in an adolescent requires careful evaluation.

  19. False-negative rate of gram-stain microscopy for diagnosis of septic arthritis: suggestions for improvement.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Paul; Faroug, Radwane; Amanat, Suheil; Ahmed, Abdulkhaled; Armstrong, Malcolm; Sharma, Pankaj; Qamruddin, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    We quantify the false-negative diagnostic rate of septic arthritis using Gram-stain microscopy of synovial fluid and compare this to values reported in the peer-reviewed literature. We propose a method of improving the diagnostic value of Gram-stain microscopy using Lithium Heparin containers that prevent synovial fluid coagulation. Retrospective study of the Manchester Royal Infirmary microbiology database of patients undergoing synovial fluid Gram-stain and culture between December 2003 and March 2012 was undertaken. The initial cohort of 1896 synovial fluid analyses for suspected septic arthritis was reduced to 143 after exclusion criteria were applied. Analysis of our Gram-stain microscopy yielded 111 false-negative results from a cohort size of 143 positive synovial fluid cultures, giving a false-negative rate of 78%. We report a false-negative rate of Gram-stain microscopy for septic arthritis of 78%. Clinicians should therefore avoid the investigation until a statistically significant data set confirms its efficacy. The investigation's value could be improved by using Lithium Heparin containers to collect homogenous synovial fluid samples. Ongoing research aims to establish how much this could reduce the false-negative rate.

  20. False-Negative Rate of Gram-Stain Microscopy for Diagnosis of Septic Arthritis: Suggestions for Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Amanat, Suheil; Ahmed, Abdulkhaled; Armstrong, Malcolm; Sharma, Pankaj; Qamruddin, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    We quantify the false-negative diagnostic rate of septic arthritis using Gram-stain microscopy of synovial fluid and compare this to values reported in the peer-reviewed literature. We propose a method of improving the diagnostic value of Gram-stain microscopy using Lithium Heparin containers that prevent synovial fluid coagulation. Retrospective study of the Manchester Royal Infirmary microbiology database of patients undergoing synovial fluid Gram-stain and culture between December 2003 and March 2012 was undertaken. The initial cohort of 1896 synovial fluid analyses for suspected septic arthritis was reduced to 143 after exclusion criteria were applied. Analysis of our Gram-stain microscopy yielded 111 false-negative results from a cohort size of 143 positive synovial fluid cultures, giving a false-negative rate of 78%. We report a false-negative rate of Gram-stain microscopy for septic arthritis of 78%. Clinicians should therefore avoid the investigation until a statistically significant data set confirms its efficacy. The investigation's value could be improved by using Lithium Heparin containers to collect homogenous synovial fluid samples. Ongoing research aims to establish how much this could reduce the false-negative rate. PMID:24678320

  1. A case of septic arthritis caused by a Mycoplasma salivarium strain resistant towards Ciprofloxacin and Clarithromycin in a patient with chronic lymphatic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Büchsel, Martin; Pletschen, Lars; Fleiner, Michael; Häcker, Georg; Serr, Annerose

    2016-09-01

    Mycoplasma salivarium is a rare agent of septic arthritis in immunocompromised patients. We report a case of septic arthritis due to Mycoplasma salivarium in a patient with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia who underwent chemotherapy with rituximab and bendamustin. Therapy of arthritis due to Mycoplasma salivarium is difficult because there are almost no susceptibility data available. The present case illustrates that antimicrobial susceptibility of Mycoplasma strains is not necessarily predictable and that antibiotic therapy should therefore be guided by in vitro susceptibility testing. PMID:27342785

  2. A case of septic arthritis caused by a Mycoplasma salivarium strain resistant towards Ciprofloxacin and Clarithromycin in a patient with chronic lymphatic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Büchsel, Martin; Pletschen, Lars; Fleiner, Michael; Häcker, Georg; Serr, Annerose

    2016-09-01

    Mycoplasma salivarium is a rare agent of septic arthritis in immunocompromised patients. We report a case of septic arthritis due to Mycoplasma salivarium in a patient with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia who underwent chemotherapy with rituximab and bendamustin. Therapy of arthritis due to Mycoplasma salivarium is difficult because there are almost no susceptibility data available. The present case illustrates that antimicrobial susceptibility of Mycoplasma strains is not necessarily predictable and that antibiotic therapy should therefore be guided by in vitro susceptibility testing.

  3. Effects of Low-Level Laser Therapy, 660 nm, in Experimental Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Bruna Formentão; Silva, Lígia Inez; Meireles, Anamaria; Rosa, Camila Thieimi; Gioppo, Nereida Mello da Rosa; Jorge, Alex Sandro; Kunz, Regina Inês; Ribeiro, Lucinéia de Fátima Chasko; Brancalhão, Rose Meire Costa; Bertolini, Gladson Ricardo Flor

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in the presence of an infectious process has not been well elucidated. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of LLLT in an experimental model of septic arthritis. Methods. Twenty-one Wistar rats were divided as follows: control group, no bacteria; placebo group, bacteria were inoculated; Treated group, bacteria were injected and treatment with LLLTwas performed. To assess nociception, a von Frey digital analgesimeter was applied. Synovial fluid was streaked to analyze bacterial growth. The standard strain of S. aureus was inoculated in the right knee. LLLT was performed with 660 nm, 2 J/cm2, over 10 days. After treatment, the knees were fixed and processed for morphological analysis by light microscopy. Results. It was found that nociception increases in the right knee. There was a lack of results for the seeding of the synovial fluid. The morphological analysis showed slight recovery areas in the articular cartilage and synovia; however, there was the maintenance of the inflammatory infiltrate. Conclusion. The parameters used were not effective in the nociception reduction, even with the slight tissue recovery due to the maintenance of inflammatory infiltrate, but produced no change in the natural history of resolution of the infectious process. PMID:23997964

  4. Clinical experiences of treating septic arthritis in the equine by repeated joint lavage: a series of 39 cases.

    PubMed

    Meijer, M C; van Weeren, P R; Rijkenhuizen, A B

    2000-08-01

    The condition of septic arthritis was treated in 12 foals with 21 affected joints (Group I) and in 27 adult horses. The adult horses were divided into three groups, based on aetiology of the condition: haematogenous (Group II, n = 6), iatrogenic (Group III, n = 6), and perforating trauma (Group IV, n = 15). The treatment consisted of an initial systemic antibiotic that anticipated the microbial agents that were considered most likely per group, repeated through-and-through joint lavages every other day and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The antibiotics were adjusted to the results of bacteriological culture and susceptibility tests. Joint lavages were continued until the white blood cell count dropped below 15 G/l and bacteriological culture was negative, after which a single dose of a short-acting corticosteroid was administered intra-articularly. Joint recovery rate in group I was 71%. Patient recovery rate of the foals, however, was lower (42%). Three foals were killed for reasons other than arthritis; one foal because of an arthritis-related problem and three foals because of persistent arthritis. Overall joint recovery rate, equalling patient recovery rate, in the adult horses was 81%. The expected predominance of Streptococcus spp. in haematogenous arthritis in adult horses was not confirmed, indicating that in these cases also, an initial antibiotic treatment with a broad-spectrum combination is preferable. It is concluded that with intensive treatment, the prognosis of septic arthritis in the adult horse can be classified as fair to even good. Results in the foals are not as good, but this seems to be more due to the specific problems surrounding the equine neonate than to unresponsiveness to the treatment.

  5. Septic arthritis in 15 standardbred racehorses after intra-articular injection.

    PubMed

    Lapointe, J M; Laverty, S; Lavoie, J P

    1992-11-01

    Case histories, results of synovial fluid analyses, treatment regimens and outcome are described for 15 adult Standardbred horses with confirmed post-injection septic arthritis. Joint sepsis followed injection of corticosteroids, hyaluronic acid, polysulphated glycosaminoglycan, or local anaesthetic. The median interval from injection to appearance of clinical signs was 2.5 days, and median interval from injection to referral was 9 days. The median initial synovial leucocyte count on admission was 57 x 10(9)/litre, but there was a wide range of values (18-258 x 10(9)/litre). The median synovial neutrophil percentage was 95% (77-99%). All bacterial isolates were Gram-positive cocci, 86% of which were staphylococci. All treated horses (12/15) initially received broad-spectrum parenteral antibiotic therapy, and the articulations of all horses except one were lavaged, either with non-surgical through-and-through techniques only (N = 3), or surgically with arthrotomy (N = 1) or arthroscopy (N = 7). The owners of all treated horses were contacted and racing records were consulted. Eleven of 12 horses returned to racing. Outcome was judged as either satisfactory (3/12) if the horse had returned to racing levels similar to or better than before treatment, or unsatisfactory (9/12) if the horse had poorer performance or could not return to racing. The 3 horses with satisfactory follow-up had been treated with arthroscopy and post-surgical closed suction drainage. The results of bacterial cultures suggest that the initial antimicrobial agents used should be effective against penicillin-resistant staphylococci.

  6. Adult Native Septic Arthritis in an Inner City Hospital: Effects on Length of Stay.

    PubMed

    Daynes, Jacob; Roth, Matthew F; Zekaj, Mark; Hudson, Ian; Pearson, Claire; Vaidya, Rahul

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this retrospective study was to assess what factors affected length of stay (LOS) in 183 adult patients with native septic arthritis. Diagnosis was based on a representative physical examination, fluid cell count/Gram stain, and organisms isolated from joint fluid culture. Data included demographics, comorbidities, laboratory results, treatment, and discharge times. Joint fluid cultures were positive in 55% (100 of 183) of the patients, and these patients were the subjects of this study. Blood cultures were taken for 65 patients and were positive in 54%; when positive, they were found to be the same as isolates from joint fluid analysis 91% of the time. Pathogens found in joint fluid analysis were as follows: methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), 44%; methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA), 21%; Streptococcus species, 14%; Pseudomonas, 10%; and other organisms, 11%. Surgical washout less than 24 hours from diagnosis affected LOS (12.25 vs 16.96 days for >24 hours; P<.05), but pathogen type and comorbid conditions did not. Average time for culture sensitivities was 4±1 days. Almost half of the patients had MSSA. Delays that could be controlled were getting an early diagnosis and expedient surgical washout of the joint. A lack of insurance and a requirement of intravenous antibiotics prolonged stay, whereas age, sex, and ethnicity did not. Waiting for bacterial sensitivities was a factor that could not be controlled. The authors believe that polymerase chain reaction or other technologies could lead to early diagnosis and expedient surgery. Effective oral antibiotics against resistant organisms would help the patients leave the hospital earlier. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(4):e674-e679.].

  7. Septic acute kidney injury: molecular mechanisms and the importance of stratification and targeting therapy.

    PubMed

    Morrell, Eric D; Kellum, John A; Pastor-Soler, Núria M; Hallows, Kenneth R

    2014-01-01

    The most common cause of acute kidney injury (AKI) in hospitalized patients is sepsis. However, the molecular pathways and mechanisms that mediate septic AKI are not well defined. Experiments performed over the past 20 years suggest that there are profound differences in the pathogenesis between septic and ischemic AKI. Septic AKI often occurs independently of hypoperfusion, and is mediated by a concomitant pro- and anti-inflammatory state that is activated in response to various pathogen-associated molecular patterns, such as endotoxin, as well as damage-associated molecular patterns. These molecular patterns are recognized by Toll-like receptors (TLRs) found in the kidney, and effectuate downstream inflammatory pathways. Additionally, apoptosis has been proposed to play a role in the pathogenesis of septic AKI. However, targeted therapies designed to mitigate the above aspects of the inflammatory state, TLR-related pathways, and apoptosis have failed to show significant clinical benefit. This failure is likely due to the protean nature of septic AKI, whereby different patients present at different points along the immunologic spectrum. While one patient may benefit from targeted therapy at one end of the spectrum, another patient at the other end may be harmed by the same therapy. We propose that a next important step in septic AKI research will be to identify where patients lie on the immunologic spectrum in order to appropriately target therapies at the inflammatory cascade, TLRs, and possibly apoptosis. PMID:25575158

  8. Concomitant septic arthritis and tophaceous gout of the knee managed with intermittent closed joint irrigation combined with negative pressure therapy: a case study and literature review.

    PubMed

    V N, Panicker; J K, Turner; M J, Chehade

    2014-01-01

    Tophaceous gout complicated by septic arthritis presents a management dilemma which can often require multiple surgical debridements. There is little published in the literature regarding treatment of these concomitant conditions. We postulate that biofilm may play a role increasing the difficulty of sterilising a tophaceous joint. The use of topical negative pressure therapy that targets biofilm has been well established for a range of wounds. A new device that incorporates both intermittent negative pressure therapy and wound irrigation was introduced in 2012. This case report describes the use of this topical negative device with the instillation option in the management of severe septic arthritis with concomitant gout and suggests directions for further research.

  9. Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... training for muscle tone. Your provider may suggest physical therapy. This might include: Heat or ice Splints or ... American College of Rheumatology guidelines for management of gout. Part 2: therapy and anti-inflammatory prophylaxis of acute gouty arthritis. ...

  10. Spondylitic psoriatic arthritis presenting as acute urinary retention

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Tom Edward Ngo; Que, Mary Lareine V; Tee, Michael L

    2014-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is a seronegative arthropathy occurring in the presence of psoriasis. In majority of cases, typical psoriatic skin lesions precede joint disease, making diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis without typical skin lesions, a diagnostic challenge. Nail lesions are commonly seen in patients affected by this condition, making it a useful clue in the diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis. This is a case of a 58-year-old Filipino woman presenting with sudden acute urinary retention and weakness of both lower extremities accompanied with active polyarthritis. Onycholytic nail changes initially thought to be a fungal nail infection led to the diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis involving the spine. The patient was eventually treated with methotrexate and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs leading to full resolution of symptoms. The patient is currently ambulatory and on regular follow-up. This case report highlights the importance of clinical and physical findings particularly the nails that would lead to a diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis. PMID:24789155

  11. Bacterial arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ho, G

    2001-07-01

    The septic arthritis literature of 2000 revisited several topics previously examined in some detail. These include septic arthritis in rheumatoid arthritis, rheumatic manifestations of bacterial endocarditis, and infectious complications of prosthetic joints. The trend in antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent late infections in total joint replacement is to narrow the targeted hosts to those most at risk, to define the procedures associated with the greatest risk of bacteremia, and to simplify the antibiotic regimen. The diagnoses of septic arthritis of the lumbar facet joint and septic arthritis caused by direct inoculation of bacteria by a foreign object penetrating the joint are facilitated by noninvasive imaging technologies. Septic arthritis caused by uncommon microorganisms and septic arthritis in immunocompromised hosts are other noteworthy topics in this year's literature. PMID:11555734

  12. Otitis interna, media, and externa with destruction of the left tympanic bulla and subluxation and septic arthritis of the left temporomandibular joint in an alpaca (Vicugna pacos).

    PubMed

    Galvan, Noe; Middleton, John R; Cook, Cristi; Britt, Lisa G; Kuroki, Keiichi

    2013-03-01

    A 1.5-year-old, 37.7 kg, female alpaca was evaluated for a 2-week history of weight loss, left ear droop, and deviation of the rostral mandible to the right. Antemortem radiography and postmortem examination revealed otitis interna, media, and externa, destruction of the left tympanic bulla, and subluxation and septic arthritis of the left temporomandibular joint.

  13. Polyarticular Septic Arthritis Caused by Haemophilus influenzae Serotype f in an 8-Month-Old Immunocompetent Infant: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Raheel Ahmed; Kaplan, Sheldon L.; Rosenfeld, Scott B.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The standard use of vaccinations against pathogens has resulted in a decreased incidence of musculoskeletal infections caused by these previously common bacterial pathogens. Consequently, the incidence of infections caused by atypical bacteria is rising. This report presents a case of septic arthritis caused by non-type b H. influenzae in a pediatric patient. Methods. We report a case of an infant with polyarticular septic arthritis caused by H. influenzae serotype f. A literature review was conducted with the inclusion criteria of case reports and studies published between 2004 and 2013 addressing musculoskeletal H. influenzae infections. Results. An 8-month-old female presented with pain and swelling in her right ankle and left elbow. The patient was diagnosed with septic arthritis and underwent incision and drainage. Wound and blood cultures were positive for Haemophilus influenzae serotype f. In addition to treatment with IV antibiotics, the patient underwent immunocompetency studies, which were normal. Subsequent follow-up revealed eradication of the infection. Conclusions. Haemophilus influenzae non-type b may cause serious invasive infections such as sepsis or septic arthritis in children with or without predisposing factors such as immunodeficiency or asplenia. Optimal treatment includes surgical management, culture driven IV antibiotics, and an immunologic workup. PMID:26064739

  14. Polyarticular Septic Arthritis Caused by Haemophilus influenzae Serotype f in an 8-Month-Old Immunocompetent Infant: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Ali, Raheel Ahmed; Kaplan, Sheldon L; Rosenfeld, Scott B

    2015-01-01

    Background. The standard use of vaccinations against pathogens has resulted in a decreased incidence of musculoskeletal infections caused by these previously common bacterial pathogens. Consequently, the incidence of infections caused by atypical bacteria is rising. This report presents a case of septic arthritis caused by non-type b H. influenzae in a pediatric patient. Methods. We report a case of an infant with polyarticular septic arthritis caused by H. influenzae serotype f. A literature review was conducted with the inclusion criteria of case reports and studies published between 2004 and 2013 addressing musculoskeletal H. influenzae infections. Results. An 8-month-old female presented with pain and swelling in her right ankle and left elbow. The patient was diagnosed with septic arthritis and underwent incision and drainage. Wound and blood cultures were positive for Haemophilus influenzae serotype f. In addition to treatment with IV antibiotics, the patient underwent immunocompetency studies, which were normal. Subsequent follow-up revealed eradication of the infection. Conclusions. Haemophilus influenzae non-type b may cause serious invasive infections such as sepsis or septic arthritis in children with or without predisposing factors such as immunodeficiency or asplenia. Optimal treatment includes surgical management, culture driven IV antibiotics, and an immunologic workup.

  15. Total ginsenosides synergize with ulinastatin against septic acute lung injury and acute respir atory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Rongju; Li, Yana; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Fei; Li, Tanshi

    2015-01-01

    Total ginsenosides synergize with ulinastatin (UTI) against septic acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We randomly divided 80 cases of severe sepsis-induced ALI and ARDS into a UTI group and a ginsenosides (GS)+UTI group. Continuous electrocardiac monitoring of pulse, respiratory rate, blood pressure, and heart rate; invasive hemodynamic monitoring; ventilator-assisted breathing and circulation support; and anti-infection as well as UTI treatment were given in the UTI group with GS treatment added for 7 consecutive days in the GS+UTI group. The indicators of pulmonary vascular permeability, pulmonary circulation, blood gases, and hemodynamics as well as APACHE II and ALI scores were detected on days 1, 3, and 7. The ALI score in the GS+UTI group was significantly decreased (P < 0.05) compared with that of the UTI group, and the indicators of pulmonary capillary permeability such as pulmonary vascular permeability index, extravascular lung water index, and oxygenation index, in the GS+UTI group improved significantly more than that of the UTI group. The indicators of hemodynamics and pulmonary circulation such as cardiac index, intrathoracic blood volume index, and central venous pressure improved significantly (P < 0.05), and the APACHE II score in the GS+UTI group was lower than that of the UTI group. GS can effectively collaborate with UTI against ALI and/or ARDS. PMID:26261640

  16. Total ginsenosides synergize with ulinastatin against septic acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sun, Rongju; Li, Yana; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Fei; Li, Tanshi

    2015-01-01

    Total ginsenosides synergize with ulinastatin (UTI) against septic acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We randomly divided 80 cases of severe sepsis-induced ALI and ARDS into a UTI group and a ginsenosides (GS)+UTI group. Continuous electrocardiac monitoring of pulse, respiratory rate, blood pressure, and heart rate; invasive hemodynamic monitoring; ventilator-assisted breathing and circulation support; and anti-infection as well as UTI treatment were given in the UTI group with GS treatment added for 7 consecutive days in the GS+UTI group. The indicators of pulmonary vascular permeability, pulmonary circulation, blood gases, and hemodynamics as well as APACHE II and ALI scores were detected on days 1, 3, and 7. The ALI score in the GS+UTI group was significantly decreased (P < 0.05) compared with that of the UTI group, and the indicators of pulmonary capillary permeability such as pulmonary vascular permeability index, extravascular lung water index, and oxygenation index, in the GS+UTI group improved significantly more than that of the UTI group. The indicators of hemodynamics and pulmonary circulation such as cardiac index, intrathoracic blood volume index, and central venous pressure improved significantly (P < 0.05), and the APACHE II score in the GS+UTI group was lower than that of the UTI group. GS can effectively collaborate with UTI against ALI and/or ARDS.

  17. Diagnostic accuracy of urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin in patients with septic acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Munna Lal; Sachan, Rekha; Shyam, Radhey; Kumar, Satish; Kamal, Ritul; Misra, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    Background Sepsis is the most common cause of acute kidney injury (AKI). Very few studies have investigated the predictive properties of urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (uNGAL) as a marker of AKI in septic patients. The aim of this study is to examine uNGAL in septic patients with and without AKI and to evaluate its predictive value. Methods We prospectively studied 155 patients with sepsis over a period of 1 year. Urine was analyzed for neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin at 12, 24, and 48 hours after admission. Patients with <24-hour stay and those with chronic kidney disease were excluded. AKI was classified according to the Acute Kidney Injury Network guidelines. Results The differences in mean change of uNGAL at 12, 24, and 48 hours were 80.00±7.00 ng/mL and 128.13±22.46 ng/mL, respectively in septic AKI, and 02.07±0.80 ng/mL and 26.13±15.12 ng/mL, respectively in septic non-AKI. At baseline or 12 hours, the cutoff value of 34.32 ng/mL had a sensitivity and specificity of 86.36 and 80.60, respectively and an area under curve of 0.81 (95% CI: 0.73–0.89) for predicting AKI. At the cutoff value 199.99 ng/mL sensitivity and specificity of 90.0 and 64.66, respectively and an area under curve of 0.82 (95% CI, 0.75–0.88) for predicting AKI. Conclusion The baseline or 12-hour uNGAL is highly sensitive but a less specific predictor of AKI in septic patients. PMID:27471404

  18. Gouty Arthritis: A Review of Acute Management and Prevention.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Liza; Saseen, Joseph J

    2016-08-01

    Gouty arthritis is one of the most common rheumatic diseases. The clinical burden of gouty arthritis has historically been well recognized; however, gout is often misdiagnosed and mismanaged. The prevalence of gout is rising and is likely attributed to several factors including increased incidence of comorbidities, lifestyle factors, and increased use of causative medications. With the increasing prevalence, there have been several innovations and evidence-based updates related to the diagnosis and management of gout. Acute gouty arthritis should be treated with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), colchicine, or corticosteroids, or a combination of two agents. Xanthine oxidase inhibitor therapy remains the consensus first-line treatment option for the prevention of recurrent gout. Add-on therapies that reduce serum urate concentration include traditional uricosuric agents and a novel uric acid reabsorption inhibitor. Prophylaxis of acute gout with NSAIDs, colchicine, or corticosteroids is universally recommended when initiating any urate-lowering therapy in order to prevent acute gouty arthritis for a period of at least 6 months. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology and risk factors for gouty arthritis and evaluate diagnostic strategies and therapeutic regimens for the management of gout, including a new drug approval. PMID:27318031

  19. Mycoplasma hominis septic arthritis in a pediatric renal transplant recipient: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Mian, Ayesa N; Farney, Alan C; Mendley, Susan R

    2005-01-01

    Septic arthritis (SA) typically occurs in young children, often from Staphylococcus. With chronic immunosuppression, however, pathogens may be atypical. A 15-year-old African-American female developed Mycoplasma hominis SA in her right hip 2 months following cadaveric renal transplant (Tx). Her presentation was subtle and indolent, without fever or leukocytosis. Although reported in adult Tx recipients, M. hominis infections have not been described in pediatric recipients. Early immunosuppression (basiliximab, prednisone, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and Thymoglobulin) may have increased her susceptibility to M. hominis. Optimal therapy for M. hominis SA is not well established and relapses occur. This patient underwent joint incision and drainage, treatment for 8 weeks with doxycycline and levofloxacin guided by in vitro sensitivities, and a reduction in immunosuppression. She has been free of ongoing infection for 3 years with stable graft function (Cr 1.1 mg/dL) on moderate immunosuppression with prednisone, tacrolimus and MMF.

  20. Sternoclavicular septic arthritis due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a patient with a suprapubic catheter.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Nadine; Moleiro, Filipa; Lérias, Graça; Silva, Alberto Mello

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 74-year-old man who presented to the emergency department with a 1-week history of fever. He had a meatal stenosis and had a suprapubic catheter for 10 months, and had a recent hospitalisation for urosepsis with bacteraemia due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus after manipulation of the catheter. Clinical examinations were performed in the emergency department and the patient was hospitalised with the diagnosis of recurrent urinary tract infection. The following day, we noticed the development of a mass in the left sternoclavicular joint with inflammatory signs and excruciating pain. Ultrasonographic findings led to the diagnosis of left sternoclavicular synovitis, and methicillin-resistant S. aureus grew in blood cultures leading to the diagnosis of sternoclavicular septic arthritis. Treatment with vancomycin and gentamicin was started and maintained for 4 weeks with complete resolution of symptoms and no complications or sequelae.

  1. Sternoclavicular septic arthritis due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a patient with a suprapubic catheter.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Nadine; Moleiro, Filipa; Lérias, Graça; Silva, Alberto Mello

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 74-year-old man who presented to the emergency department with a 1-week history of fever. He had a meatal stenosis and had a suprapubic catheter for 10 months, and had a recent hospitalisation for urosepsis with bacteraemia due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus after manipulation of the catheter. Clinical examinations were performed in the emergency department and the patient was hospitalised with the diagnosis of recurrent urinary tract infection. The following day, we noticed the development of a mass in the left sternoclavicular joint with inflammatory signs and excruciating pain. Ultrasonographic findings led to the diagnosis of left sternoclavicular synovitis, and methicillin-resistant S. aureus grew in blood cultures leading to the diagnosis of sternoclavicular septic arthritis. Treatment with vancomycin and gentamicin was started and maintained for 4 weeks with complete resolution of symptoms and no complications or sequelae. PMID:25694643

  2. Effects of simvastatin on the expression of inducible NOS in acute lung injury in septic rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei-Chao; Zou, Zi-Jun; Zhou, Ming-Gen; Chen, Liang; Zhou, Lin; Zheng, Yu-Kai; He, Zhi-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Background: The available evidence suggests that simvastatin plays a beneficial role in lung injury. In addition, statins have been shown to inhibit the activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of simvastatin on iNOS expression based on a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced septic rat model. Methods: Thirty-six rats were randomly divided into 3 groups (control group, sepsis group and simvastatin group). A rat model of sepsis was established with LPS. The simvastatin group was pre-treated with simvastatin, whereas the control and sepsis groups were treated with saline before LPS treatment. LPS was injected into the rats in the simvastatin and sepsis groups, while as a negative control, the control group received saline alone. The oxygenation index, expression levels of iNOS and IL-6, and pathological integral of lung injury were analyzed to evaluate the effect of simvastatin on septic rats. Results: Compared with the septic group, significant decreases in the oxygenation index and expression level of iNOS were observed in the simvastatin group. Furthermore, simvastatin treatment resulted in a significant decrease in iNOS levels and the pathological integral of lung injury score in septic rats. Conclusion: Simvastatin can relieve acute lung injury induced by sepsis in rats. Decreasing iNOS levels may contribute to the protective role of simvastatin in lung injury. PMID:26823851

  3. Polymerase chain reaction detection of Kingella kingae in children with culture-negative septic arthritis in eastern Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Slinger, Robert; Moldovan, Ioana; Bowes, Jennifer; Chan, Francis

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The bacterium Kingella kingae may be an under-recognized cause of septic arthritis in Canadian children because it is difficult to grow in culture and best detected using molecular methods. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether K kingae is present in culture-negative joint fluid specimens from children in eastern Ontario using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection methods. METHODS: K kingae PCR testing was performed using residual bacterial culture-negative joint fluid collected from 2010 to 2013 at a children’s hospital in Ottawa, Ontario. The clinical features of children with infections caused by K kingae were compared with those of children with infections caused by the ‘typical’ septic arthritis bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. RESULTS: A total of 50 joint fluid specimens were submitted over the study period. Ten were culture-positive, eight for S aureus and two for S pyogenes. Residual joint fluid was available for 27 of the 40 culture-negative specimens and K kingae was detected using PCR in seven (25.93%) of these samples. Children with K kingae were significantly younger (median age 1.7 versus 11.3 years; P=0.01) and had lower C-reactive protein levels (median 23.8 mg/L versus 117.6. mg/L; P=0.01) than those infected with other bacteria. CONCLUSIONS: K kingae was frequently detected using PCR in culture-negative joint fluid specimens from children in eastern Ontario. K kingae PCR testing of culture-negative joint samples in children appears to be warranted. PMID:27095882

  4. Pattern of Brain Injury in the Acute Setting of Human Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sepsis-associated brain dysfunction has been linked to white matter lesions (leukoencephalopathy) and ischemic stroke. Our objective was to assess the prevalence of brain lesions in septic shock patients requiring magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for an acute neurologic change. Method Seventy-one septic shock patients were included in a prospective observational study. Patients underwent daily neurological examination. Brain MRI was obtained in patients who developed focal neurological deficit, seizure, coma, or delirium. Electroencephalogy was performed in case of coma, delirium, or seizure. Leukoencephalopathy was graded and considered present when white matter lesions were either confluent or diffuse. Patient outcome was evaluated at 6 months with the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS). Results We included 71 patients with median age of 65 years (56 to 76) and SAPS II at admission of 49 (38 to 60). MRI was indicated on focal neurological sign in 13 (18%), seizure in 7 (10%), coma in 33 (46%), and delirium in 35 (49%). MRI was normal in 37 patients (52%) and showed cerebral infarcts in 21 (29%), leukoencephalopathy in 15 (21%), and mixed lesions in 6 (8%). EEG malignant pattern was more frequent in patients with ischemic stroke or leukoencephalopathy. Ischemic stroke was independently associated with disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), focal neurologic signs, increased mortality, and worse GOS at 6 months. Conclusions Brain MRI in septic shock patients who developed acute brain dysfunction can reveal leukoencephalopathy and ischemic stroke, which is associated with DIC and increased mortality. PMID:24047502

  5. Lyme arthritis of the pediatric ankle.

    PubMed

    Aiyer, Amiethab; Walrath, Jessica; Hennrikus, William

    2014-10-01

    Lyme arthritis results from acute inflammation caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. The number of cases per year has been rising since 2006, with a majority of patients being affected in the northeastern United States. Development of Lyme arthritis is of particular importance to the orthopedic surgeon because Lyme arthritis often presents as an acute episode of joint swelling and tenderness and may be confused with bacterial septic arthritis. Considering the vast difference in treatment management between these 2 pathologies, differentiating between them is of critical importance. Septic arthritis often needs to be addressed surgically, whereas Lyme arthritis can be treated with oral antibiotics alone. Laboratory testing for Lyme disease often results in a delay in diagnosis because many laboratories batch-test Lyme specimens only a few times per week because of increased expense. The authors present a case of Lyme arthritis in the pediatric ankle in an endemic region. No clear algorithm exists to delineate between septic arthritis and Lyme arthritis of the joint. Improved clinical guidelines for the identification and diagnosis of Lyme arthritis of the ankle are important so that appropriate antibiotics can be used and surgery can be avoided.

  6. Intrarenal and urinary oxygenation during norepinephrine resuscitation in ovine septic acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Lankadeva, Yugeesh R; Kosaka, Junko; Evans, Roger G; Bailey, Simon R; Bellomo, Rinaldo; May, Clive N

    2016-07-01

    Norepinephrine is the principal vasopressor used to restore blood pressure in sepsis, but its effects on intrarenal oxygenation are unknown. To clarify this, we examined renal cortical, medullary, and urinary oxygenation in ovine septic acute kidney injury and the response to resuscitation with norepinephrine. A renal artery flow probe and fiberoptic probes were placed in the cortex and medulla of sheep to measure tissue perfusion and oxygenation. A probe in the bladder catheter measured urinary oxygenation. Sepsis was induced in conscious sheep by infusion of Escherichia coli for 32 hours. At 24 to 30 hours of sepsis, either norepinephrine, to restore mean arterial pressure to preseptic levels or vehicle-saline was infused (8 sheep per group). Septic acute kidney injury was characterized by a reduction in blood pressure of ∼12 mm Hg, renal hyperperfusion, and oliguria. Sepsis reduced medullary perfusion (from an average of 1289 to 628 blood perfusion units), medullary oxygenation (from 32 to 16 mm Hg), and urinary oxygenation (from 36 to 24 mm Hg). Restoring blood pressure with norepinephrine further reduced medullary perfusion to an average of 331 blood perfusion units, medullary oxygenation to 8 mm Hg and urinary oxygenation to 18 mm Hg. Cortical perfusion and oxygenation were preserved. Thus, renal medullary hypoxia caused by intrarenal blood flow redistribution may contribute to the development of septic acute kidney injury, and resuscitation of blood pressure with norepinephrine exacerbates medullary hypoxia. The parallel changes in medullary and urinary oxygenation suggest that urinary oxygenation may be a useful real-time biomarker for risk of acute kidney injury. PMID:27165831

  7. Concomitant Septic Arthritis and Tophaceous Gout of the Knee Managed with Intermittent Closed Joint Irrigation Combined with Negative Pressure Therapy: A Case Study and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    V.N, Panicker; J.K, Turner; M.J, Chehade

    2014-01-01

    Tophaceous gout complicated by septic arthritis presents a management dilemma which can often require multiple surgical debridements. There is little published in the literature regarding treatment of these concomitant conditions. We postulate that biofilm may play a role increasing the difficulty of sterilising a tophaceous joint. The use of topical negative pressure therapy that targets biofilm has been well established for a range of wounds. A new device that incorporates both intermittent negative pressure therapy and wound irrigation was introduced in 2012. This case report describes the use of this topical negative device with the instillation option in the management of severe septic arthritis with concomitant gout and suggests directions for further research. PMID:25621084

  8. Characteristics of patients with definite septic arthritis at Hamad General Hospital, Qatar: a hospital-based study from 2006 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Khan, Fahmi Yousef; Abu-Khattab, Mohammed; Baagar, Khalid; Mohamed, Shehab Fareed; Elgendy, Islam; Anand, Deshmukh; Malallah, Hani; Sanjay, Doiphode

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the epidemiological and clinical characteristics, coexisting conditions, causative organisms, and outcomes of all adult patients 15 years of age or older who had definite septic arthritis at Hamad General Hospital, Qatar, from 2006 to 2011. During this period, 56 patients were diagnosed with septic arthritis (mean age ± SD, 49.0 ± 16.6 years). In 53 of 56 (94.6%) patients, arthritis was diagnosed in a single joint, while polyarthritis was diagnosed in 3 of 56 (5.4%) patients; the most commonly involved joint was the knee (40 of 59 joints, 67.7%). The most frequent coexisting condition was diabetes mellitus (24 of 56 patients, 42.8%). Joint pain and restriction of movement were reported by all patients. Gram-positive bacteria accounted for 36 of all 57 (63.0%) isolated microorganisms, and Staphylococcus aureus was the most common pathogen (20 of 57 microorganisms, 35.0%). Three cases of tuberculous arthritis were seen. The most favored antibiotic combinations were cloxacillin/ciprofloxacin, cefazolin/ciprofloxacin, and vancomycin/ciprofloxacin. Repeated needle aspiration, open joint drainage, and arthroscopic techniques were performed in 18 (32.1%), 22 (39.3%), and 11 (19.6%) of the 56 patients, respectively. The 30-day mortality was 3.6%, and the remaining patients showed clinical improvement upon discharge. In conclusion, there was no specific sign or symptom for diagnosing septic arthritis. Isolation of bacteria from the synovial fluid confirmed the diagnosis, and S. aureus and streptococci were the most common pathogens isolated. Prompt treatment with appropriate antibiotics and synovial drainage are mandatory to improve the outcome.

  9. Management of Acute Kidney Injury and Acid-Base Balance in the Septic Patient.

    PubMed

    Weyker, Paul D; Pérez, Xosé L; Liu, Kathleen D

    2016-06-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an abrupt decrease in kidney function that takes place over hours to days. Sepsis is the leading cause of AKI and portends a particularly high morbidity and mortality, although the severity may vary from a transient rise in serum creatinine to end-stage renal disease. With regard to acid-base management in septic AKI, caution should be used with hyperchloremic crystalloid solutions, and dialysis is often used in the setting of severe acidosis. In the future, biomarkers may help clinicians identify AKI earlier and allow for potential interventions before the development of severe AKI. PMID:27229644

  10. Renal blood flow and acute kidney injury in septic shock: an arduous conflict that smolders intrarenally?

    PubMed

    Honore, Patrick M; Jacobs, Rita; De Waele, Elisabeth; Diltoer, Marc; Spapen, Herbert D

    2016-07-01

    Sepsis-induced acute kidney injury (SAKI) is traditionally viewed as a process driven by a reduced blood flow and prone to benefit from vasopressive support. In ovine hyperdynamic septic shock, Lankadeva et al. report a significant and flow-independent intrarenal perfusion and oxygenation "mismatch" jeopardizing the renal medulla that was aggravated by norepinephrine. Medullary and urinary oxygenation changed in parallel, suggesting that urinary oxygenation may act as a biomarker to predict SAKI. PMID:27312443

  11. L-arginine and asymmetric dimethylarginine are early predictors for survival in septic patients with acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Thorsten; Fleming, Thomas H; Rosenhagen, Claudia; Krauser, Ute; Mieth, Markus; Bruckner, Thomas; Martin, Eike; Nawroth, Peter P; Weigand, Markus A; Bierhaus, Angelika; Hofer, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Dysfunctions of the L-arginine (L-arg)/nitric-oxide (NO) pathway are suspected to be important for the pathogenesis of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) in septic shock. Therefore plasma concentrations of L-arg and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) were measured in 60 patients with septic shock, 30 surgical patients and 30 healthy volunteers using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. Plasma samples from patients with septic shock were collected at sepsis onset, and 24 h, 4 d, 7 d, 14 d and 28 d later. Samples from surgical patients were collected prior to surgery, immediately after the end of the surgical procedure as well as 24 h later and from healthy volunteers once. In comparison to healthy volunteers and surgical patients, individuals with septic shock showed significantly increased levels of ADMA, as well as a decrease in the ratio of L-arg and ADMA at all timepoints. In septic patients with an acute liver failure (ALF), plasma levels of ADMA and L-arg were significantly increased in comparison to septic patients with an intact hepatic function. In summary it can be stated, that bioavailability of NO is reduced in septic shock. Moreover, measurements of ADMA and L-arg appear to be early predictors for survival in patients with sepsis-associated ALF.

  12. Hospital-Based Acute Care Use in Survivors of Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Ortego, Alexandra; Gaieski, David F.; Fuchs, Barry D.; Jones, Tiffanie; Halpern, Scott D.; Small, Dylan S.; Sante, S. Cham; Drumheller, Byron; Christie, Jason D.; Mikkelsen, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Septic shock is associated with increased long-term morbidity and mortality. However, little is known about the use of hospital-based acute care in survivors after hospital discharge. The objectives of the study were to examine the frequency, timing, causes, and risk factors associated with Emergency Department (ED) visits and hospital readmissions within 30 days of discharge. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Tertiary, academic hospital in the United States. Patients Patients admitted with septic shock (serum lactate ≥ 4 mmol/L or refractory hypotension) and discharged alive to a non-hospice setting between 2007 and 2010. Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results The co-primary outcomes were all-cause hospital readmission and ED visits (treat-and-release encounters) within 30 days to any of the three health system hospitals. Of 269 at-risk survivors, 63 (23.4%, 95% confidence interval (CI): 18.2, 28.5) were readmitted within 30 days of discharge and another 12 (4.5%, 95% CI: 2.3, 7.7) returned to the ED for a treat-and-release visit. Readmissions occurred within 15 days of discharge in 75% of cases and were more likely in oncology patients (p=0.001) and patients with a longer hospital length of stay (p=0.04). Readmissions were frequently due to another life-threatening condition and resulted in death or discharge to hospice in 16% of cases. The reasons for readmission were deemed potentially related to the index septic shock hospitalization in 78% (49/63) of cases. The most common cause was infection-related, accounting for 46% of all 30-day readmissions, followed by cardiovascular or thromboembolic events (18%). Conclusions The use of hospital-based acute care appeared to be common in septic shock survivors. Encounters often led to readmission within 15 days of discharge, were frequently due to another acute condition, and appeared to result in substantial morbidity and mortality. Given the potential public health implications of

  13. Open drainage, intra-articular and systemic antibiotics in the treatment of septic arthritis/tenosynovitis in horses.

    PubMed

    Schneider, R K; Bramlage, L R; Mecklenburg, L M; Moore, R M; Gabel, A A

    1992-11-01

    Open drainage was used to treat 26 horses with persistent or severe septic arthritis/tenosynovitis. Infected synovial structures were drained through a small (3 cm) arthrotomy incision that was left open and protected by a sterile bandage. Joint lavage was performed in all 26 horses. In addition to systemic antibiotics, 23 of these horses were also treated with intra-articular antibiotics; amikacin (17 horses), gentamycin (2 horses), cefazolin (2 horses), and 2 horses were injected at different times with gentamycin and amikacin. The infection was eliminated from the involved synovial structures in 25 of 26 horses; 24 survived and were released from the hospital. The arthrotomy incisions healed by granulation in 16 horses; in 9 horses the arthrotomy incision was sutured closed once the infection was eliminated. Seventeen horses returned to soundness and resumed athletic function. Open drainage was an effective method of achieving chronic drainage from a joint or tendon sheath. It is indicated in horses that have established intra-synovial infections or in horses that do not respond to joint lavage through needles.

  14. Haemodynamics in acute arthritis of the knee in puppies.

    PubMed

    Bünger, C; Hjermind, J; Bach, P; Bünger, E H; Myhre-Jensen, O

    1984-04-01

    In order to study the haemodynamic changes of the juvenile knee in acute arthritis, an experimental model was developed in puppies by unilateral intra-articular injections of Carragheenin solution into the knee. Tissue blood flow was studied by the tracer microsphere technique in eight dogs and simultaneous intra-articular and intraosseous pressure recordings were performed in seven other dogs. The intra-articular pressure was elevated in all arthritic knees. Hyperaemia was found in the knee-joint capsule and distal femoral metaphysis, whereas juxta-articular epiphyseal blood flow rates were not significantly changed. A decrease of femoral muscle blood flow was encountered. Intraosseous pressure recordings during venous tamponade of the knee-joint capsules suggested a qualitative change of bone vasculature in acute arthritis. The juxta-articular bone blood flow in arthritis appears to be influenced by synovial hyperaemia, synovial effusion pressure, an "inflammatory resistance factor" and the anatomical relationship of the epiphyseal vessels to the knee-joint capsule. PMID:6711289

  15. Systemic over-release of interleukin-17 in acute kidney injury after septic shock: Clinical and experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Maravitsa, Panagiota; Adamopoulou, Maria; Pistiki, Aikaterini; Netea, Mihai G; Louis, Konstantinos; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J

    2016-10-01

    In order to investigate the role of T-helper 17 (Th17) cell activation in acute kidney injury (AKI) after septic shock, a two-stage approach was used. Firstly, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and CD4-lymphocytes were isolated the first 24h after septic shock from 26 patients with AKI and 18 patients with chronic renal disease (CRD) without AKI and stimulated for the release of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα), interleukin (IL)-10, IL-17, IL-22 and interferon-gamma (IFNγ). Results were compared with 15 healthy volunteers and 13 patients with uncomplicated sepsis. Secondly, a murine model of multiple organ dysfunction (MODS) complicated with AKI and bacterial gut translocation was studied, and IL-10, IL-17, IL-22 and IFNγ were measured in kidney homogenates. IL-17 was the only cytokine produced at greater quantities from PBMCs and CD4-lymphocytes of patients with septic shock and AKI than comparators. When PBMCs of patients with septic shock and AKI were ex-vivo stimulated, intracellular staining for IL-17 was greater in CD3(+)/CD4(+)/CD196(+) cells compared to patients with septic shock and CRD. IL-17 was released at greater amounts from PBMCs of non-survivors by septic shock and AKI but not of septic shock and CRD. In the murine model of MODS, a gradual decrease of IL-17, but not of IL-10, IL-22 and IFNγ, of kidney homogenates was found indicating over-consumption. These results suggest that AKI after septic shock is driven through IL-17 release by Th17 cells; this is gradually consumed in the kidney.

  16. XB130 deficiency enhances lipopolysaccharide-induced septic response and acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Toba, Hiroaki; Tomankova, Tereza; Wang, Yingchun; Bai, Xiaohui; Cho, Hae-Ra; Guan, Zhehong; Adeyi, Oyedele A.; Tian, Feng; Keshavjee, Shaf; Liu, Mingyao

    2016-01-01

    XB130 is a novel oncoprotein that promotes cancer cell survival, proliferation and migration. Its physiological function in vivo is largely unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the role of XB130 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced septic responses and acute lung injury. LPS was intraperitoneally administrated to Xb130 knockout (KO) and wild type (WT) mice. There was a significant weight loss in KO mice at Day 2 and significantly higher disease scores during the 7 days of observation. The levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, interleukin-6 and interleukin-10 in the serum were significantly higher in KO mice at Day 2. In KO mice there were a significantly higher lung injury score, higher wet/dry lung weight ratio, more apoptotic cells and less proliferative cells in the lung. Macrophage infiltration was significantly elevated in the lung of KO mice. There was significantly increased number of p-GSK-3β positive cells in KO mice, which were mainly neutrophils and macrophages. XB130 is expressed in alveolar type I and type II cells in the lung. The expression in these cells was significantly reduced after LPS challenge. XB130 deficiency delayed the recovery from systemic septic responses, and the presence of XB130 in the alveolar epithelial cells may provide protective mechanisms by reducing cell death and promoting cell proliferation, and reducing pulmonary permeability. PMID:27029000

  17. Problem based review: The patient with acute monoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Ernest

    2013-01-01

    Acute monoarthritis is a common medical emergency with wide differential diagnosis. Common underlying causes include trauma, septic arthritis, crystal induced arthritis (gout and pseudogout), and reactive arthritis. Of these, septic arthritis is the diagnosis not to miss because of its association with significant morbidity and mortality. Precise diagnosis of the underlying cause of monoarthritis relies on a good history, physical examination findings, and results of focussed investigations. In this article, a practical approach to diagnosis and initial management of patients presenting with acute monoarthritis is described with the aid of a case vignette.

  18. Is this acute lymphoblastic leukaemia or juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kirubakaran, Chellam; Scott, Julius Xavier; Ebenezer, Sam

    2011-08-01

    Arthritis could be a presenting feature of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and could be wrongly diagnosed as juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). Clinical and laboratory parameters might differentiate ALL and JRA in children who present with arthritis. Out of a total of 250 children of ALL, 10 were referred to the department of child health and paediatric haemato-oncology of Christian Medical College, Vellore during 1990-2002. They were compared with 10 age-matched children who had systematic onset of JRA. The age groups in ALL and JRA were 6.05 +/- 2.45 years and 5.47 +/- 4.4 years respectively. Severe pain as evidenced by inability to walk was found in children but one child with JRA was unable to walk (p < 0.05). Lymphocytosis was noticed in 7 children (70%) with ALL whereas none had in JRA group. ESR was elevated in all cases in both the groups. One case in each group had antinuclear antibody positivity. It can be concluded that ALL can masquerade as systematic onset of JRA. So paediatricians should be careful enough while diagnosing the disease process.

  19. Septic shock during platelet transfusion in a patient with acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Haesebaert, Julie; Bénet, Thomas; Michallet, Mauricette; Vanhems, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Although rare, transfusion-associated bacterial contamination (TABC) is nowadays the main risk associated with platelet concentrate (PC) transfusion. Consequences vary from spontaneously resolving symptoms to severe sepsis and death. In this report we have summarised a case of bacterial contamination and sepsis during PC transfusion in a patient with acute myeloid leukaemia. Fifteen minutes after the PC transfusion began, she developed chills and rapidly worsened to septic shock. The episode was managed appropriately. The patient's blood cultures and PC unit cultures grew Escherichia coli. The microbiological susceptibilities of isolates from the patient and platelet bag were identical. No other source of E coli was found. Donor and blood products issued from the same donation investigations were negative. The causality between sepsis and PC transfusion might be difficult to confirm. As no method is available in daily practice to eliminate TABC risk, physicians should always consider TABC by immediately stopping the transfusion and conducting appropriate investigations. PMID:24172770

  20. [APPLICATION OF PRESEPSIN IN DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF PURULENT-SEPTIC COMPLICATIONS OF ACUTE NECROTIC PANCREATITIS].

    PubMed

    Rotar, O V

    2016-01-01

    In 70 patients, suffering an acute necrotic pancreatitis (ANP), and 10 practically healthy persons a content of presepsin in a blood plasm, using immunochemiluminescent method and conducted bacteriological investigations, were analyzed. The infection occurrence is accompanied by plausible upgrading of a presepsin level in a blood plasm, depending on activity and severity of a septic process: in local infection--up to (677 ± 30) pg/ml, sepsis--up to (988 ± 47) pg/ml, severe sepsis--up to 2668 pg/ml; in an ANP without infection it have constituted (332 ± 38) pg/mI at average, in practically healthy persons--(184 ± 16) pg/mI. A presepsin level correlates with a state severity in accordance to APACHE I scale, what permits to estimate the patients state severity objectively, to prognosticate a favorable and unfavorable consequences of treatment, rapidly changing, depending on efficacy of treatment. PMID:27249919

  1. Septic arthritis of the knee following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: results of a survey of sports medicine fellowship directors.

    PubMed

    Matava, M J; Evans, T A; Wright, R W; Shively, R A

    1998-10-01

    To determine the incidence of joint sepsis following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and the prevailing attitudes toward its treatment, we surveyed the directors of Sports Medicine Fellowship programs about their practices in treating and preventing this complication. Of the 74 surgeons surveyed, 61 (82%) responded. These 61 surgeons performed an average of 98 ACL reconstructions yearly; 31 (51 %) routinely used a drain after ACL surgery, 18 (30%) had treated an ACL infection within the past 2 years, and 26 (43%) had treated an infection within the past 5 years. There was no significant difference in the number of infections and the surgeons' case load, graft choice, or method of reconstruction. Fifty-two surgeons (85%) selected culture-specific intravenous (IV) antibiotics and surgical irrigation of the joint with graft retention as initial treatment for the infected patellar tendon autograft, and 39 (64%) chose this regimen to treat the infected allograft. For the resistant infection unresponsive to initial treatment, IV antibiotics with surgical irrigation and graft retention were also selected as the most common treatment combination for 25 (39%) of the 61 respondents. After graft removal, the earliest a revision procedure would be considered was 6 to 9 months. The results of this survey confirm the widely held belief that septic arthritis of the knee is a relatively rare complication following ACL reconstruction. Once an infection is encountered, culture-specific IV antibiotics and surgical joint irrigation with graft retention are recommended as initial treatment. Graft excision and hardware removal is considered only for those infections resistant to initial treatment and for the infected allograft.

  2. Septic arthritis of the knee following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: results of a survey of sports medicine fellowship directors.

    PubMed

    Matava, M J; Evans, T A; Wright, R W; Shively, R A

    1998-10-01

    To determine the incidence of joint sepsis following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and the prevailing attitudes toward its treatment, we surveyed the directors of Sports Medicine Fellowship programs about their practices in treating and preventing this complication. Of the 74 surgeons surveyed, 61 (82%) responded. These 61 surgeons performed an average of 98 ACL reconstructions yearly; 31 (51 %) routinely used a drain after ACL surgery, 18 (30%) had treated an ACL infection within the past 2 years, and 26 (43%) had treated an infection within the past 5 years. There was no significant difference in the number of infections and the surgeons' case load, graft choice, or method of reconstruction. Fifty-two surgeons (85%) selected culture-specific intravenous (IV) antibiotics and surgical irrigation of the joint with graft retention as initial treatment for the infected patellar tendon autograft, and 39 (64%) chose this regimen to treat the infected allograft. For the resistant infection unresponsive to initial treatment, IV antibiotics with surgical irrigation and graft retention were also selected as the most common treatment combination for 25 (39%) of the 61 respondents. After graft removal, the earliest a revision procedure would be considered was 6 to 9 months. The results of this survey confirm the widely held belief that septic arthritis of the knee is a relatively rare complication following ACL reconstruction. Once an infection is encountered, culture-specific IV antibiotics and surgical joint irrigation with graft retention are recommended as initial treatment. Graft excision and hardware removal is considered only for those infections resistant to initial treatment and for the infected allograft. PMID:9788367

  3. Septic arthritis and granulomatous synovitis caused by infection with Mycobacterium avium complex in a horse.

    PubMed

    Hewes, Christina A; Schneider, Robert K; Baszler, Timothy V; Oaks, J Lindsay

    2005-06-15

    A 12-year-old American Saddlebred gelding was referred to a veterinary teaching hospital for evaluation of a chronic lameness problem in the right radiocarpal joint. The horse had been treated for osteoarthritis of the right radiocarpal joint with multiple injections of cortisone during the past 3 years. The horse was severely lame on the right forelimb at a trot. Radiography and computed tomography revealed a 3 x 2-cm lytic defect in the distal portion of the radius and periarticular bone proliferation around the right radiocarpal joint. Ultrasonography of the distal portion of the radius revealed a soft tissue mass in the palmarolateral aspect of the joint. Proliferative synovium with a large amount of fibrin was observed in the dorsal and palmar aspects of the joint via arthroscopic examination of the right radiocarpal joint. Histologic examination of synovial biopsy specimens revealed proliferative granulomatous synovitis with giant cells. Mycobacterium avium complex was cultured from the synovial fluid. Infection with M avium complex should be considered in horses with chronic recurring arthritis associated with granulomatous synovitis.

  4. Acute-onset paralysis in a patient of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Varshney, Ankur Nandan; Prasad, Pratibha; Kumar, Nilesh; Singh, Nand Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Renal tubular acidosis (RTA) is a disorder of renal acidification characterized by inability to acidify urine to pH < 5.5 despite the presence of severe systemic metabolic acidosis and hypokalemia. Hypokalemia leads to acute-onset paralysis and may be a presenting manifestation of RTA. Its association with various autoimmune disease has been reported previously in published reports, but has not been much emphasized. We, hereby, report a case of RTA that presented during the flare of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A 42-year-old female, a known case of RA for 5 years, presented with persistent joint pain for 1 week and acute-onset quadriparesis for 3 days. Primary investigations revealed hypokalemia with metabolic acidosis. She was managed conservatively with potassium supplements and bicarbonate supplements along with steroids and disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. Such a presentation of renal tubular acidosis in a patient during the flare of rheumatoid arthritis is distinctly rare and previously unreported in published studies. PMID:26142942

  5. [Community-acquired bacterial septic arthritis in adults: diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Kohlprath, R; Uçkay, I; Cuerel, C; Al-Mayahi M; Fleury, T Rod; Suva, D; Miozzari, H H

    2015-04-15

    The diagnosis of acute native joint bacterial infection can be difficult, because of its non- specific clinical and biological manifestation. Its management is often an emergency. Following a joint puncture, early joint lavage is performed, either by surgical drainage or by repeated arthrocentesis; and accompanied by systemic antibiotics, of which the ideal duration and route of administration remains unknown. The postoperative care is characterized by joint mobilization to avoid joint stiffening.

  6. Electrolyte and mineral disturbances in septic acute kidney injury patients undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Jung, Su-Young; Kim, Hyunwook; Park, Seohyun; Jhee, Jong Hyun; Yun, Hae-Ryong; Kim, Hyoungnae; Kee, Youn Kyung; Yoon, Chang-Yun; Oh, Hyung Jung; Chang, Tae Ik; Park, Jung Tak; Yoo, Tae-Hyun; Kang, Shin-Wook; Lee, Hajeong; Kim, Dong Ki; Han, Seung Hyeok

    2016-09-01

    Electrolyte and mineral disturbances remain a major concern in patients undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT); however, it is not clear whether those imbalances are associated with adverse outcomes in patients with septic acute kidney injury (AKI) undergoing CRRT. We conducted a post-hoc analysis of data from a prospective randomized controlled trial. A total of 210 patients with a mean age of 62.2 years (136 [64.8%] males) in 2 hospitals were enrolled. Levels of sodium, potassium, calcium, and phosphate measured before (0 hour) and 24 hours after CRRT initiation. Before starting CRRT, at least 1 deficiency and excess in electrolytes or minerals were observed in 126 (60.0%) and 188 (67.6%) patients, respectively. The excess in these parameters was greatly improved, whereas hypokalemia and hypophosphatemia became more prevalent at 24 hours after CRRT. However, 1 and 2 or more deficiencies in those parameters at the 2 time points were not associated with mortality. However, during 28 days, 89 (71.2%) deaths occurred in patients with phosphate levels at 0 hour of ≥4.5 mg/dL as compared with 49 (57.6%) in patients with phosphate levels <4.5 mg/dL. The 90-day mortality was also significantly higher in patients with hyperphosphatemia. Similarly, in 184 patients who survived at 24 hours after CRRT, hyperphosphatemia conferred a 2.2-fold and 2.6-fold increased risk of 28- and 90-day mortality, respectively. The results remained unaltered when the serum phosphate level was analyzed as a continuous variable. Electrolyte and mineral disturbances are common, and hyperphosphatemia may predict poor prognosis in septic AKI patients undergoing CRRT. PMID:27603344

  7. Electrolyte and mineral disturbances in septic acute kidney injury patients undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Su-Young; Kim, Hyunwook; Park, Seohyun; Jhee, Jong Hyun; Yun, Hae-Ryong; Kim, Hyoungnae; Kee, Youn Kyung; Yoon, Chang-Yun; Oh, Hyung Jung; Chang, Tae Ik; Park, Jung Tak; Yoo, Tae-Hyun; Kang, Shin-Wook; Lee, Hajeong; Kim, Dong Ki; Han, Seung Hyeok

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Electrolyte and mineral disturbances remain a major concern in patients undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT); however, it is not clear whether those imbalances are associated with adverse outcomes in patients with septic acute kidney injury (AKI) undergoing CRRT. We conducted a post-hoc analysis of data from a prospective randomized controlled trial. A total of 210 patients with a mean age of 62.2 years (136 [64.8%] males) in 2 hospitals were enrolled. Levels of sodium, potassium, calcium, and phosphate measured before (0 hour) and 24 hours after CRRT initiation. Before starting CRRT, at least 1 deficiency and excess in electrolytes or minerals were observed in 126 (60.0%) and 188 (67.6%) patients, respectively. The excess in these parameters was greatly improved, whereas hypokalemia and hypophosphatemia became more prevalent at 24 hours after CRRT. However, 1 and 2 or more deficiencies in those parameters at the 2 time points were not associated with mortality. However, during 28 days, 89 (71.2%) deaths occurred in patients with phosphate levels at 0 hour of ≥4.5 mg/dL as compared with 49 (57.6%) in patients with phosphate levels <4.5 mg/dL. The 90-day mortality was also significantly higher in patients with hyperphosphatemia. Similarly, in 184 patients who survived at 24 hours after CRRT, hyperphosphatemia conferred a 2.2-fold and 2.6-fold increased risk of 28- and 90-day mortality, respectively. The results remained unaltered when the serum phosphate level was analyzed as a continuous variable. Electrolyte and mineral disturbances are common, and hyperphosphatemia may predict poor prognosis in septic AKI patients undergoing CRRT. PMID:27603344

  8. Acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction due to septic embolism: a case report and review of management options.

    PubMed

    Singh, Maninder; Mishra, Abhishek; Kaluski, Edo

    2015-05-01

    Acute ST-elevation myocardial (STEMI) infarction due to septic embolism is rare and management strategies differ from those applied to atherothrombotic STEMI. A 70-year-old male with aortic valve endocarditis and persistent bacteremia developed acute inferior wall STEMI due to septic embolism. Due to inferior STEMI accompanied by hemodynamic instability, coronary angiography and primary PCI (stenting) to a totally occluded right coronary artery (RCA) was performed. Despite excellent immediate angiographic results and hemodynamic stabilization, repeat angiogram two weeks later showed mycotic aneurysms at the site of stent placement. Patient later suffered from intracranial hemorrhage and splenic infarct and had worsening aortic regurgitation, prompting surgical aortic valve replacement with bypass of the RCA. Despite aggressive medical, interventional and surgical management, he expired four weeks after the surgery. Selection of an optimal revascularization strategy in this scenario is unclear with a potential harm from standard therapies. We have reviewed prior reports and summarized results in a tabular form.

  9. Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... or have trouble moving around, you might have arthritis. Most kinds of arthritis cause pain and swelling in your joints. Joints ... joint can become severely damaged. Some kinds of arthritis can also cause problems in your organs, such ...

  10. [Septic shock Fusobacterium necrophorum from origin gynecological at complicated an acute respiratory distress syndrome: a variant of Lemierre's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Huynh-Moynot, Sophie; Commandeur, Diane; Danguy des Déserts, Marc; Drouillard, Isabelle; Leguen, Patrick; Ould-Ahmed, Mehdi

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of a female patient of 47 years old who presents in a state of septic shock with acute insufficient respiratory complicated with syndrome of acute respiratory distress, together with a list of abdominal pain and polyarthralgia too. In her case of medical history, it is retained that she has had a intra-uterine device since 6 years without medical follow up. The initial thoraco-abdomino-pelvic scan shows a left ovarian vein thrombosis, as well as the opaqueness alveolus diffused interstitiel bilaterally and an aspect of ileitis. The IUD is taken off because of sudden occuring of purulent leucorrhoea. This results in a clinical and paraclinical improvement, whereas aminopenicillin was administered to the patient since 1 week. The microbiological blood test allows to put in evidence Fusobacterium necrophorum found in a blood culture and is sensitive to the amoxicilline-acide clavulanique and metronidazole. Isolation of this bacteria, classically found in Lemierre's syndrome, allowed to explain the multilfocalization of the symtoms and the list of pain. The whole concerns about a variant of Lemierre's syndrom: a state of septic shock secondary then caused by the anaerobic Gram negative bacilli, which is a commensal bacteria of the female genital tractus, complicated of septic emboli typical.

  11. Use of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 and white blood cell counts in monitoring the treatment and predicting the survival of horses with septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kidd, J A; Barr, A R S; Tarlton, J F

    2007-09-01

    Thirty-nine samples of synovial fluid were collected from the joints of 32 horses with suspected septic arthritis and 39 samples were collected from horses euthanased for non-orthopaedic conditions. The white blood cell counts (WBCC) were determined and the pro and active forms of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) 2 and 9 were measured by gelatin zymography and image analysis in each sample. The initial measurements of the ratio of proMMP9:proMMp2 and WBCC were good prognostic indicators of the survival of the horses. There was no significant relationship between the interval between the injury and the horse being referred for treatment and either the WBCC or the levels of MMP2 and MMP9 initially, and no evidence that this interval significantly affected the chances of the horses surviving.

  12. Lactate clearance is associated with mortality in septic patients with acute kidney injury requiring continuous renal replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Passos, Rogério da Hora; Ramos, Joao Gabriel Rosa; Gobatto, André; Mendonça, Evandro José Bulhões; Miranda, Eva Alves; Dutra, Fábio Ricardo Dantas; Coelho, Maria Fernanda R; Pedroza, Andrea C; Batista, Paulo Benigno Pena; Dutra, Margarida Maria Dantas

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to assess the clinical utility of lactate measured at different time points to predict mortality at 48 hours and 28 days in septic patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) requiring continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). Consecutive critically ill patients with septic AKI requiring CRRT were prospectively studied. Variables were collected at initiation of CRRT and 24 hours later. In total, 186 patients were analyzed. Overall mortality at 48 hours was 28% and at 28 days was 69%. Initial lactate, lactate at 24 hours and the proportion of patients with a lactate clearance superior to 10% were different between survivors at 28 days [2.0 mmol/L, 1.95 mmol/L and 18/45 (40%)] and nonsurvivors [3.46 mmol, 4.66 mmol, and 18/94 (19%)]. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that lactate at 24 hours and lactate clearance, but not initial lactate, were independently associated to mortality. Area under the ROC curves for 28-day mortality was 0.635 for initial lactate; 0.828 for lactate at 24 hours and 0.701 for lactate clearance. Lactate clearance and lactate after 24 hours of CRRT, but not initial lactate, were independently associated with mortality in septic AKI patients undergoing CRRT. Serial lactate measurements may be useful prognostic markers than initial lactate in these patients. PMID:27749594

  13. Fish Oil-Based Fat Emulsion Reduces Acute Kidney Injury and Inflammatory Response in Antibiotic-Treated Polymicrobial Septic Mice.

    PubMed

    Shih, Juey-Ming; Shih, Yao-Ming; Pai, Man-Hui; Hou, Yu-Chen; Yeh, Chiu-Li; Yeh, Sung-Ling

    2016-03-15

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication in sepsis. This study compared the effects of a fish oil-based with a mixed oil fat emulsion on remote renal injury in an antibiotic-treated septic murine model. Mice were randomly assigned to a normal control (NC) group and three septic groups. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). The antibiotic was injected intraperitoneally (IP) after CLP and then daily till the time of sacrifice. Three hours after antibiotic treatment, one of the septic groups was injected IP with a fish oil-based emulsion (FO), while the other two groups were given either a mixed oil emulsion (MO) or saline (SC). The septic groups were further divided into two separate time groups, with blood and kidneys samples collected at 24 h or 72 h post-CLP. The results showed that sepsis leads to the activation of neutrophils, T helper (Th)1/Th-2/Th-17 and Treg cells (p < 0.05). Plasma NGAL and mRNA expressions of renal MyD88 and TLR4 were also enhanced (p < 0.05). Compared to the SC group, the group given the fish oil-based emulsion had decreased plasma NGAL by 22% and Treg by 33%. Furthermore, renal gene expressions of MyD88 and TLR4 reduced by 46% and 62%, respectively, whereas heat shock protein 70 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ increased by 158% and 69%, respectively (p < 0.05), at Day 3 after CLP. These results suggest that administration of a fish oil-based emulsion has favorable effects, maintaining blood T cell percentage, downregulating Treg expression, attenuating systemic and local inflammation and offering renal protection under conditions of antibiotic-treated polymicrobial sepsis.

  14. Fish Oil-Based Fat Emulsion Reduces Acute Kidney Injury and Inflammatory Response in Antibiotic-Treated Polymicrobial Septic Mice.

    PubMed

    Shih, Juey-Ming; Shih, Yao-Ming; Pai, Man-Hui; Hou, Yu-Chen; Yeh, Chiu-Li; Yeh, Sung-Ling

    2016-03-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication in sepsis. This study compared the effects of a fish oil-based with a mixed oil fat emulsion on remote renal injury in an antibiotic-treated septic murine model. Mice were randomly assigned to a normal control (NC) group and three septic groups. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). The antibiotic was injected intraperitoneally (IP) after CLP and then daily till the time of sacrifice. Three hours after antibiotic treatment, one of the septic groups was injected IP with a fish oil-based emulsion (FO), while the other two groups were given either a mixed oil emulsion (MO) or saline (SC). The septic groups were further divided into two separate time groups, with blood and kidneys samples collected at 24 h or 72 h post-CLP. The results showed that sepsis leads to the activation of neutrophils, T helper (Th)1/Th-2/Th-17 and Treg cells (p < 0.05). Plasma NGAL and mRNA expressions of renal MyD88 and TLR4 were also enhanced (p < 0.05). Compared to the SC group, the group given the fish oil-based emulsion had decreased plasma NGAL by 22% and Treg by 33%. Furthermore, renal gene expressions of MyD88 and TLR4 reduced by 46% and 62%, respectively, whereas heat shock protein 70 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ increased by 158% and 69%, respectively (p < 0.05), at Day 3 after CLP. These results suggest that administration of a fish oil-based emulsion has favorable effects, maintaining blood T cell percentage, downregulating Treg expression, attenuating systemic and local inflammation and offering renal protection under conditions of antibiotic-treated polymicrobial sepsis. PMID:26999192

  15. Fish Oil-Based Fat Emulsion Reduces Acute Kidney Injury and Inflammatory Response in Antibiotic-Treated Polymicrobial Septic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Juey-Ming; Shih, Yao-Ming; Pai, Man-Hui; Hou, Yu-Chen; Yeh, Chiu-Li; Yeh, Sung-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication in sepsis. This study compared the effects of a fish oil-based with a mixed oil fat emulsion on remote renal injury in an antibiotic-treated septic murine model. Mice were randomly assigned to a normal control (NC) group and three septic groups. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). The antibiotic was injected intraperitoneally (IP) after CLP and then daily till the time of sacrifice. Three hours after antibiotic treatment, one of the septic groups was injected IP with a fish oil-based emulsion (FO), while the other two groups were given either a mixed oil emulsion (MO) or saline (SC). The septic groups were further divided into two separate time groups, with blood and kidneys samples collected at 24 h or 72 h post-CLP. The results showed that sepsis leads to the activation of neutrophils, T helper (Th)1/Th-2/Th-17 and Treg cells (p < 0.05). Plasma NGAL and mRNA expressions of renal MyD88 and TLR4 were also enhanced (p < 0.05). Compared to the SC group, the group given the fish oil-based emulsion had decreased plasma NGAL by 22% and Treg by 33%. Furthermore, renal gene expressions of MyD88 and TLR4 reduced by 46% and 62%, respectively, whereas heat shock protein 70 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ increased by 158% and 69%, respectively (p < 0.05), at Day 3 after CLP. These results suggest that administration of a fish oil-based emulsion has favorable effects, maintaining blood T cell percentage, downregulating Treg expression, attenuating systemic and local inflammation and offering renal protection under conditions of antibiotic-treated polymicrobial sepsis. PMID:26999192

  16. Endotoxin adsorption therapy using polymyxin B-immobilized fiber as a treatment for septic shock-associated severe acute cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yoshihiro; Fujino, Yasuhisa; Onodera, Makoto; Kikuchi, Satoshi; Takahashi, Gaku; Kojika, Masahiro; Endo, Shigeatsu

    2013-10-01

    The application of endotoxin adsorption therapy for severe acute cholangitis is controversial. We present a survival case of septic shock and multiple organ failure due to severe acute cholangitis. The patient was treated by endotoxin adsorption therapy using polymyxin B-immobilized fiber because he continued to remain in shock even after successful endoscopic nasobiliary drainage. The patient was an 84-year-old male diagnosed with acute cholangitis and acute pancreatitis who was transferred to our department because of shock and severe dyspnea. The patient had already developed acute respiratory failure, acute renal failure, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. We performed endoscopic nasobiliary drainage immediately, but the patient continued to remain in shock and plasma endotoxin level was markedly elevated at 133.6 pg/mL. Therefore, we performed direct hemoperfusion with polymyxin B-immobilized fiber. On starting the hemoperfusion, blood pressure and urine volume increased, and the plasma endotoxin level reduced considerably. On the basis of our experience in this case, we think that direct hemoperfusion with polymyxin B-immobilized fiber may be a useful modality in the management of severe acute cholangitis.

  17. Acute calcium pyrophosphate deposition arthropathy.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Thomas; Furman, Janet

    2016-06-01

    Acute calcium pyrophosphate deposition (CPPD) arthropathy, also called pseudogout, is common, and becomes more prevalent as patients age. The presenting symptoms are similar to both gout and septic arthritis but may be treated differently. This article describes a typical patient presentation and management from an emergency medicine and orthopedic surgery standpoint. PMID:27228038

  18. Transpulmonary thermodilution-derived cardiac function index identifies cardiac dysfunction in acute heart failure and septic patients: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction There is limited clinical experience with the single-indicator transpulmonary thermodilution (pulse contour cardiac output, or PiCCO) technique in critically ill medical patients, particularly in those with acute heart failure (AHF). Therefore, we compared the cardiac function of patients with AHF or sepsis using the pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) and the PiCCO technology. Methods This retrospective observational study was conducted in the medical intensive care unit of a university hospital. Twelve patients with AHF and nine patients with severe sepsis or septic shock had four simultaneous hemodynamic measurements by PAC and PiCCO during a 24-hour observation period. Comparisons between groups were made with the use of the Mann-Whitney U test. Including all measurements, correlations between data pairs were established using linear regression analysis and are expressed as the square of Pearson's correlation coefficients (r2). Results Compared to septic patients, AHF patients had a significantly lower cardiac index, cardiac function index (CFI), global ejection fraction, mixed venous oxygen saturation (SmvO2) and pulmonary vascular permeability index, but higher pulmonary artery occlusion pressure. All patients with a CFI less than 4.5 per minute had an SmvO2 not greater than 70%. In both groups, the CFI correlated with the left ventricular stroke work index (sepsis: r2 = 0.30, P < 0.05; AHF: r2 = 0.23, P < 0.05) and cardiac power (sepsis: r2 = 0.39, P < 0.05; AHF: r2 = 0.45, P < 0.05). Conclusions In critically ill medical patients, assessment of cardiac function using transpulmonary thermodilution technique is an alternative to the PAC. A low CFI identifies cardiac dysfunction in both AHF and septic patients. PMID:19671146

  19. Pantoea agglomerans as a cause of septic arthritis after palm tree thorn injury; case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Kratz, A; Greenberg, D; Barki, Y; Cohen, E; Lifshitz, M

    2003-01-01

    A review of the literature between 1953 and 2002 revealed that bacterial growth after plant thorn injuries is reported infrequently. Yet when reported, Pantoea agglomearns is the most common organism found. Therefore, it must be considered and suspected in "aseptic" cases of arthritis, when there is a history of a plant thorn injury. We also emphasise the efficacy of ultrasound examination in these cases to identify the presence and location of a plant thorn. PMID:12765929

  20. Evaluation of a real-time PCR assay for simultaneous detection of Kingella kingae and Staphylococcus aureus from synovial fluid in suspected septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Malay; Butler, Meghan; Quinn, Criziel D; Stratton, Charles W; Tang, Yi-Wei; Burnham, Carey-Ann D

    2014-07-01

    Direct plating of synovial fluid (SF) on agar-based media often fails to identify pathogens in septic arthritis (SA). We developed a PCR assay for the simultaneous detection of Kingella kingae and Staphylococcus aureus from SF to evaluate molecular detection in SF and to estimate the incidence of K. kingae in SA in North America. The assay was based on detection of the cpn60 gene of K. kingae and the spa gene of S. aureus in multiplex real-time PCR. K. kingae was identified in 50% of patients between 0 and 5 yr of age (n=6) but not in any patients >18 yr old (n=105). Direct plating of SF on agar-based media failed to detect K. kingae in all samples. The PCR assay was inferior to the culture-based method for S. aureus, detecting only 50% of culture-positive cases. Our findings suggest that K. kingae is a common pathogen in pediatric SA in North America, in agreement with previous reports from Europe. PCR-based assays for the detection of K. kingae may be considered in children with SA, especially in those with a high degree of clinical suspicion.

  1. Double-blind trial of flurbiprofen and phenylbutazone in acute gouty arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Butler, R C; Goddard, D H; Higgens, C S; Hollingworth, P; Pease, C T; Stodell, M A; Scott, J T

    1985-01-01

    Flurbiprofen has been compared with phenylbutazone in a double-blind study involving 33 patients with acute gout. Patients received either flurbiprofen 400 mg daily for 48 h followed by 200 mg daily, or phenylbutazone 800 mg daily for 48 h followed by 400 mg daily. The drugs were of comparable efficacy, while side-effects were uncommon and relatively mild. Flurbiprofen appears to be a satisfactory alternative to phenylbutazone in the management of acute gouty arthritis. PMID:3907678

  2. Development of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia in a Patient With Gouty Arthritis on Long Term Colchicine.

    PubMed

    Buyukkurt, Nurhilal; Korur, Asli; Boga, Can

    2016-06-01

    Colchicine is a frequently used drug in rheumatological diseases. Acute promyelocytic leukemia developed in a patient who used colchicine for gouty arthritis since 10 years is presented and the possible relation between the long term use of colchicine and hematological malignancies is discussed. PMID:27408362

  3. Role of Complement C5 in Experimental Blunt Chest Trauma-Induced Septic Acute Lung Injury (ALI)

    PubMed Central

    Karbach, Michael; Braumueller, Sonja; Kellermann, Philipp; Gebhard, Florian; Huber-Lang, Markus; Perl, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe blunt chest trauma is associated with high mortality. Sepsis represents a serious risk factor for mortality in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In septic patients with ARDS complement activation products were found to be elevated in the plasma. In single models like LPS or trauma complement has been studied to some degree, however in clinically highly relevant double hit models such as the one used here little data is available. Here, we hypothesized that absence of C5 is correlated with a decreased inflammatory response in trauma induced septic acute lung injury. Methods 12 hrs after DH in mice the local and systemic cytokines and chemokines were quantified by multiplex bead array or ELISA, activated caspase-3 by western blot. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA followed by post-hoc Sidak’s multiple comparison test (significance, p≤ 0.05). Results In lung tissue interleukin (IL)-6, monocyte chemo attractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) was elevated in both C5-/- mice and wildtype littermates (wt), whereas caspase-3 was reduced in lungs after DH in C5-/- mice. Systemically, reduced keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC) levels were observed after DH in C5-/- compared to wt mice. Locally, lung myeloperoxidase (MPO), protein, IL-6, MCP-1 and G-CSF in brochoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were elevated after DH in C5-/- compared to wt. Conclusions In the complex but clinically relevant DH model the local and systemic inflammatory immune response features both, C5-dependent and C5-independent characteristics. Activation of caspase-3 in lung tissue after DH was C5-dependent whereas local inflammation in lung tissue was C5-independent. PMID:27437704

  4. Antiarthritic effects of Ajuga bracteosa Wall ex Benth. in acute and chronic models of arthritis in albino rats

    PubMed Central

    Kaithwas, Gaurav; Gautam, Raju; Jachak, Sanjay M; Saklani, Arvind

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the antiarthritic activity of Ajuga bracteosa using albino rats. Methods The antiarthritic activity of 70% ethanolic extract of Ajuga bracteosa (EEAB) was evaluated against turpentine oil- and formaldehyde- induced acute non immunological and complete freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced chronic immunological arthritis in albino rats. Results EEAB showed a significant (P<0.05) and dose dependent inhibitory effect against acute and chronic models of arthritis. EEAB exhibited better antiarthritic activity than the standard aspirin. Conclusions EEAB exhibits a significant and promising antiarthritic activity against acute and chronic arthritis and supports the traditional use of Ajuga bracteosa for rheumatism and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:23569895

  5. Acute- or subacute-onset lung complications in treating patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Reiko; Sakai, Fumikazu; Mimura, Toshihide; Tokuda, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Masahiro; Kimura, Fumiko

    2013-08-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common systemic disease that manifests as inflammatory arthritis of multiple joints and produces a wide variety of intrathoracic lesions, including pleural diseases, diffuse interstitial pneumonia, rheumatoid nodules, and airway disease. Patients treated for RA can have associated lung disease that commonly manifests as diffuse interstitial pneumonia, drug-induced lung injury, and infection. The purpose of this pictorial review is to illustrate the radiographic and clinical features of lung complications of acute or subacute onset in patients treated for RA and to show the computed tomography features of these complications.

  6. Randomised double blind trial of etoricoxib and indometacin in treatment of acute gouty arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, H Ralph; Boice, Judith A; Daikh, David I; Mukhopadhyay, Saurabh; Malmstrom, Kerstin; Ng, Jennifer; Tate, Guillermo A; Molina, Javier

    2002-01-01

    Objective To assess the safety and efficacy of etoricoxib, a selective cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitor, in comparison with indometacin in the treatment of acute gouty arthritis. Design Randomised, double blind, active comparator controlled trial. Setting 43 outpatient study centres in 11 countries. Participants 142 men and eight women (75 patients per treatment group) aged 18 years or over presenting with clinically diagnosed acute gout within 48 hours of onset. Interventions Etoricoxib 120 mg administered orally once daily versus indometacin 50 mg administered orally three times daily, both for 8 days Main outcome measures Patients' assessment of pain in the study joint over days 2 to 5 (primary end point); investigators' and patients' global assessments of response to treatment and tenderness of the study joint (key secondary end points). Results Etoricoxib showed efficacy comparable to indometacin. Patients' assessment of pain in the study joint (0-4 point Likert scale, “no pain” to “extreme pain”) over days 2 to 5 showed a least squares mean change from baseline of −1.72 (95% confidence interval −1.90 to −1.55) for etoricoxib and −1.83 (−2.01 to −1.65) for indometacin. The difference between treatment groups met prespecified comparability criteria. All other efficacy end points, including those reflecting reduction in inflammation and analgesia, provided corroborative evidence of comparable efficacy. Significant pain relief was evident at the first measurement, 4 hours after the first dose of treatment. Prespecified safety analyses revealed that drug related adverse experiences occurred significantly less frequently with etoricoxib (22.7%) than with indometacin (46.7%) (P=0.003), although overall adverse experience rates were similar between the two treatment groups. Conclusion Etoricoxib 120 mg once daily provides rapid and effective treatment for acute gouty arthritis comparable to indometacin 50 mg three times daily. Etoricoxib was generally

  7. A Multicentre Study of Acute Kidney Injury in Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock: Association with Inflammatory Phenotype and HLA Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Legrand, Matthieu; Gayat, Etienne; Faivre, Valérie; Megarbane, Bruno; Azoulay, Elie; Fieux, Fabienne; Charron, Dominique; Loiseau, Pascale; Busson, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Background To investigate the association between severity of acute kidney injury (AKI) and outcome, systemic inflammatory phenotype and HLA genotype in severe sepsis. Methodology/Principal Findings Prospective multicenter observational study done in 4 intensive care units in two university hospitals. Severe sepsis and septic shock patients with at least 2 organ failures based on the SOFA score were classified: 1) "no AKI", 2) "mild AKI" (grouping stage 1 and 2 of AKIN score) and 3) "severe AKI" (stage 3 of AKIN score). Sequential measurements: The vasopressor dependency index (VDI; dose and types of drugs) to evaluate the association between hemodynamic status and the development of early AKI; plasma levels of IL-10, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), IL-6 and HLA-DR monocyte expression. Genotyping of the 13 HLA-DRB1 alleles with deduction of presence of HLA-DRB3, -DRB4 and -DRB5 genes. We used multivariate analysis with competitive risk model to study associations. Overall, 176 study patients (146 with septic shock) were classified from AKIN score as "no AKI" (n = 43), "mild AKI" (n = 74) or "severe AKI" (n = 59). The VDI did not differ between groups of AKI. After adjustment, "mild and severe AKI" were an independent risk factor for mortality (HR 2.42 95%CI[1.01-5.83], p = 0.048 and HR 1.99 95%CI[1.30-3.03], p = 0.001 respectively). "Severe AKI" had higher levels of plasma IL-10, MIF and IL-6 compared to “no AKI” and mild AKI (p<0.05 for each), with no difference in mHLA-DR at day 0. HLA-DRB genotyping showed a significantly lower proportion of 4 HLA-DRB alleles among patients requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT) (58%) than in patients with severe AKI who did not receive RRT (84%) (p = 0.004). Conclusions AKI severity is independently associated with mortality and plasma IL-10, MIF or IL-6 levels. Presence of 4 alleles of HLA-DRB in severe AKI patients seems associated with a lower need of RRT. PMID:22701553

  8. [Acute gouty arthritis in adolescents with renal transplants].

    PubMed

    Pela, I; Seracini, D; Lavoratti, G; Materassi, M

    1999-01-01

    Hyperuricemia is a common metabolic abnormality in subjects with renal transplantation: in fact in transplanted adults receiving immunosuppressive and diuretic drugs the frequency of hyperuricemia varied from 30 to 84% according to treatment. Conversely, the gout is an uncommon eventuality, representing less than 10%; predisposing factors are impaired renal function and older age. In the younger patients with renal transplantation hyperuricemia is also frequent, but the gout doesn't considered a possible complication in paediatric age. We reported our observation of 5 patients (3 males and 2 females), 13-18 years old who developed gout 2-84 months after renal transplantation. All the patients were receiving cyclosporine, 4 even with prednisone and azathioprine. Two patients were treated with furosemide because hypertension. The average of uric acid serum levels in the post transplantation follow-up was 7 +/- 2 mg/dl; at the moment of gout attack the uric acid serum levels raised to 12 +/- 1 mg/dl. The arthritis diagnosis were made by clinical, laboratory and instrumental data (Rx and US). In the most severe cases, uricasi therapy resolved clinical picture. The analysis of immunosuppressive and diuretic treatment, renal function and dietary uses induces us to think that the gout episode may be the result of many concomitant factors, in adolescents with renal transplant. PMID:10687163

  9. Prospective Clinical Trial for Septic Arthritis: Cartilage Degradation and Inflammation Are Associated with Upregulation of Cartilage Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Anke; Pham, That Minh

    2016-01-01

    Background. Intra-articular infections can rapidly lead to osteoarthritic degradation. The aim of this clinical biomarker analysis was to investigate the influence of inflammation on cartilage destruction and metabolism. Methods. Patients with acute joint infections were enrolled in a prospective clinical trial and the cytokine composition of effusions (n = 76) was analyzed. Characteristics of epidemiology and disease severity were correlated with levels of cytokines with known roles in cartilage turnover and degradation. Results. Higher synovial IL-1β concentrations were associated with clinical parameters indicating a higher disease severity (p < 0.03) excluding the incidence of sepsis. Additionally, intra-articular IL-1β levels correlated with inflammatory serum parameters as leucocyte counts (LC) and C-reactive protein concentrations (p < 0.05) but not with age or comorbidity. Both higher LC and synovial IL-1β levels were associated with increased intra-articular collagen type II cleavage products (C2C) indicating cartilage degradation. Joints with preinfectious lesions had higher C2C levels. Intra-articular inflammation led to increased concentrations of typical cartilage metabolites as bFGF, BMP-2, and BMP-7. Infections with Staphylococcus species induced higher IL-1β expression but less cartilage destruction than other bacteria. Conclusion. Articular infections have bacteria-specific implications on cartilage metabolism. Collagen type II cleavage products reliably mark destruction, which is associated with upregulation of typical cartilage turnover cytokines. This trial is registered with DRKS00003536, MISSinG.

  10. Prospective Clinical Trial for Septic Arthritis: Cartilage Degradation and Inflammation Are Associated with Upregulation of Cartilage Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Anke; Pham, That Minh

    2016-01-01

    Background. Intra-articular infections can rapidly lead to osteoarthritic degradation. The aim of this clinical biomarker analysis was to investigate the influence of inflammation on cartilage destruction and metabolism. Methods. Patients with acute joint infections were enrolled in a prospective clinical trial and the cytokine composition of effusions (n = 76) was analyzed. Characteristics of epidemiology and disease severity were correlated with levels of cytokines with known roles in cartilage turnover and degradation. Results. Higher synovial IL-1β concentrations were associated with clinical parameters indicating a higher disease severity (p < 0.03) excluding the incidence of sepsis. Additionally, intra-articular IL-1β levels correlated with inflammatory serum parameters as leucocyte counts (LC) and C-reactive protein concentrations (p < 0.05) but not with age or comorbidity. Both higher LC and synovial IL-1β levels were associated with increased intra-articular collagen type II cleavage products (C2C) indicating cartilage degradation. Joints with preinfectious lesions had higher C2C levels. Intra-articular inflammation led to increased concentrations of typical cartilage metabolites as bFGF, BMP-2, and BMP-7. Infections with Staphylococcus species induced higher IL-1β expression but less cartilage destruction than other bacteria. Conclusion. Articular infections have bacteria-specific implications on cartilage metabolism. Collagen type II cleavage products reliably mark destruction, which is associated with upregulation of typical cartilage turnover cytokines. This trial is registered with DRKS00003536, MISSinG. PMID:27688601

  11. High-volume hemofiltration and prone ventilation in subarachnoid hemorrhage complicated by severe acute respiratory distress syndrome and refractory septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Cornejo, Rodrigo; Romero, Carlos; Ugalde, Diego; Bustos, Patricio; Diaz, Gonzalo; Galvez, Ricardo; Llanos, Osvaldo; Tobar, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    We report the successful treatment of two patients with aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage complicated by severe respiratory failure and refractory septic shock using simultaneous prone position ventilation and high-volume hemofiltration. These rescue therapies allowed the patients to overcome the critical situation without associated complications and with no detrimental effects on the intracranial and cerebral perfusion pressures. Prone position ventilation is now an accepted therapy for severe acute respiratory distress syndrome, and high-volume hemofiltration is a non-conventional hemodynamic support that has several potential mechanisms for improving septic shock. In this manuscript, we briefly review these therapies and the related evidence. When other conventional treatments are insufficient for providing safe limits of oxygenation and perfusion as part of basic neuroprotective care in subarachnoid hemorrhage patients, these rescue therapies should be considered on a case-by-case basis by an experienced critical care team. PMID:25028955

  12. Tumor Necrosis Factor, but Not Neutrophils, Alters the Metabolic Profile in Acute Experimental Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marina C; Tavares, Luciana P; Vago, Juliana P; Batista, Nathália V; Queiroz-Junior, Celso M; Vieira, Angelica T; Menezes, Gustavo B; Sousa, Lirlândia P; van de Loo, Fons A J; Teixeira, Mauro M; Amaral, Flávio A; Ferreira, Adaliene V M

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic alterations are associated with arthritis apart from obesity. However, it is still unclear which is the underlying process behind these metabolic changes. Here, we investigate the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in this process in an acute model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). Immunized male BALB/c mice received an intra-articular injection of PBS (control) or methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA) into their knees, and were also pre-treated with different drugs: Etanercept, an anti-TNF drug, DF2156A, a CXCR1/2 receptor antagonist, or a monoclonal antibody RB6-8C5 to deplete neutrophils. Local challenge with mBSA evoked an acute neutrophil influx into the knee joint, and enhanced the joint nociception, along with a transient systemic metabolic alteration (higher levels of glucose and lipids, and altered adipocytokines). Pre-treatment with the conventional biological Etanercept, an inhibitor of TNF action, ameliorated the nociception and the acute joint inflammation dominated by neutrophils, and markedly improved many of the altered systemic metabolites (glucose and lipids), adipocytokines and PTX3. However, the lessening of metabolic changes was not due to diminished accumulation of neutrophils in the joint by Etanercept. Reduction of neutrophil recruitment by pre-treating AIA mice with DF2156A, or even the depletion of these cells by using RB6-8C5 reduced all of the inflammatory parameters and hypernociception developed after AIA challenge, but could not prevent the metabolic changes. Therefore, the induction of joint inflammation provoked acute metabolic alterations which were involved with TNF. We suggest that the role of TNF in arthritis-associated metabolic changes is not due to local neutrophils, which are the major cells present in this model, but rather due to cytokines. PMID:26742100

  13. Tumor Necrosis Factor, but Not Neutrophils, Alters the Metabolic Profile in Acute Experimental Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Marina C.; Tavares, Luciana P.; Vago, Juliana P.; Batista, Nathália V.; Queiroz-Junior, Celso M.; Vieira, Angelica T.; Menezes, Gustavo B.; Sousa, Lirlândia P.; van de Loo, Fons A. J.; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Amaral, Flávio A.; Ferreira, Adaliene V. M.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic alterations are associated with arthritis apart from obesity. However, it is still unclear which is the underlying process behind these metabolic changes. Here, we investigate the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in this process in an acute model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). Immunized male BALB/c mice received an intra-articular injection of PBS (control) or methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA) into their knees, and were also pre-treated with different drugs: Etanercept, an anti-TNF drug, DF2156A, a CXCR1/2 receptor antagonist, or a monoclonal antibody RB6-8C5 to deplete neutrophils. Local challenge with mBSA evoked an acute neutrophil influx into the knee joint, and enhanced the joint nociception, along with a transient systemic metabolic alteration (higher levels of glucose and lipids, and altered adipocytokines). Pre-treatment with the conventional biological Etanercept, an inhibitor of TNF action, ameliorated the nociception and the acute joint inflammation dominated by neutrophils, and markedly improved many of the altered systemic metabolites (glucose and lipids), adipocytokines and PTX3. However, the lessening of metabolic changes was not due to diminished accumulation of neutrophils in the joint by Etanercept. Reduction of neutrophil recruitment by pre-treating AIA mice with DF2156A, or even the depletion of these cells by using RB6-8C5 reduced all of the inflammatory parameters and hypernociception developed after AIA challenge, but could not prevent the metabolic changes. Therefore, the induction of joint inflammation provoked acute metabolic alterations which were involved with TNF. We suggest that the role of TNF in arthritis-associated metabolic changes is not due to local neutrophils, which are the major cells present in this model, but rather due to cytokines. PMID:26742100

  14. Adalimumab-induced acute interstitial lung disease in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis*

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Olívia Meira; Pereira, Daniel Antunes Silva; Baldi, Bruno Guedes; Costa, André Nathan; Athanazio, Rodrigo Abensur; Kairalla, Ronaldo Adib; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    The use of immunobiological agents for the treatment of autoimmune diseases is increasing in medical practice. Anti-TNF therapies have been increasingly used in refractory autoimmune diseases, especially rheumatoid arthritis, with promising results. However, the use of such therapies has been associated with an increased risk of developing other autoimmune diseases. In addition, the use of anti-TNF agents can cause pulmonary complications, such as reactivation of mycobacterial and fungal infections, as well as sarcoidosis and other interstitial lung diseases (ILDs). There is evidence of an association between ILD and the use of anti-TNF agents, etanercept and infliximab in particular. Adalimumab is the newest drug in this class, and some authors have suggested that its use might induce or exacerbate preexisting ILDs. In this study, we report the first case of acute ILD secondary to the use of adalimumab in Brazil, in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis and without a history of ILD. PMID:24626274

  15. Performance of the Existing Classification Criteria for Gout in Thai Patients Presenting With Acute Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Jatuworapruk, Kanon; Lhakum, Panomkorn; Pattamapaspong, Nuttaya; Kasitanon, Nuntana; Wangkaew, Suparaporn; Louthrenoo, Worawit

    2016-02-01

    Currently, there are 5 existing classification criteria for gout: the Rome, New York, American Rheumatism Association (ARA), Mexico, and Netherlands criteria. This study was carried out to determine the performance of these classification criteria in Thai patients presenting with acute arthritis.All consecutive patients presenting with acute arthritis and being consulted at the Rheumatology Unit, Chiang Mai University Hospital from January 2013 to May 2015 were invited to join the study. Gout was defined by the presence of monosodium urate crystals in the synovial fluid or tissue examined by experienced rheumatologists. The 5 existing gout classification criteria were performed and evaluated in all of the patients, who were divided in subgroups of early disease (≤2 years), established disease (>2 years), and those without tophus.There were 136 gout and 97 nongout patients. Sensitivity and specificity across all criteria ranged from 75.7% to 97.1% and 68.0% to 84.5%, respectively. Overall, the Mexico criteria had the highest sensitivity (97.1%), and the ARA survey criteria the highest specificity (84.5%), whereas the Mexico criteria performed well in early disease with sensitivity and specificity of 97.1% and 81.7%, respectively. All 5 criteria showed high sensitivity (from 76.4% to 99.1%) but low specificity (from 30.8% to 65.4%) in established disease. In patients without tophus, the sensitivity and specificity ranged from 64.1% to 95.7% and 68.8% to 85.4%, respectively. The ARA survey criteria across all groups showed consistently high specificity for gout.The 5 existing classification criteria for gout had limited sensitivity and specificity in Thai patients presenting with acute arthritis. The ARA survey criteria are the most suitable for diagnosing gout in Thai people when crystal identification is not available.

  16. Grisel syndrome, acute otitis media, and temporo-mandibular reactive arthritis: A rare association.

    PubMed

    Martins, J; Almeida, S; Nunes, P; Prata, F; Lobo, M L; Marques, J G

    2015-08-01

    We present a case report of a four-year-old boy with torcicollis and trismus after acute otitis media. Grisel Syndrome diagnosis in association with temporo-mandibular reactive arthritis was admitted, leading to early conservative treatment. GS should be suspected in a child presenting with torticollis after an upper respiratory tract infection or an ENT surgical procedure. The association with temporo-mandibular reactive findings is somehow rarer but not impossible, due to the close vascular communication between retropharyngeal and pterigoid spaces.

  17. Increased Risk of Acute Pancreatitis in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chi Ching; Chiou, Chi Sheng; Lin, Hsiu Li; Wang, Li Hsuan; Chang, Yu Sheng; Lin, Hsiu-Chen

    2015-01-01

    The study was conducted to determine whether patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at increased risk of acute pancreatitis compared with those without RA and to determine if the risk of acute pancreatitis varied by anti-RA drug use. We used the large population-based dataset from the National Health Insurance (NHI) program in Taiwan to conduct a retrospective cohort study. Patients newly diagnosed with RA between 2000 and 2011 were referred to as the RA group. The comparator non-RA group was matched with propensity score, using age and sex, in the same time period. We presented the incidence density by 100,000 person-years. The propensity score and all variables were analyzed in fully adjusted Cox proportional hazard regression. The cumulative incidence of acute pancreatitis was assessed by Kaplan-Meier analysis, with significance based on the log-rank test. From claims data of one million enrollees randomly sampled from the Taiwan NHI database, 29,755 adults with RA were identified and 119,020 non- RA persons were matched as a comparison group. The RA cohort had higher incidence density of acute pancreatitis (185.7 versus 119.0 per 100,000 person-years) than the non-RA cohort. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) was 1.62 (95% CI [confidence interval] 1.43–1.83) for patients with RA to develop acute pancreatitis. Oral corticosteroid use decreased the risk of acute pancreatitis (adjusted HR 0.83, 95% CI 0.73–0.94) but without a dose-dependent effect. Current use of disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs or tumor necrosis factor blockers did not decrease the risk of acute pancreatitis. In conclusion, patients with RA are at an elevated risk of acute pancreatitis. Use of oral corticosteroids may reduce the risk of acute pancreatitis. PMID:26262880

  18. A case of acute respiratory failure in a rheumatoid arthritis patient after the administration of abatacept

    PubMed Central

    Doğu, Birsen; Atilla, Nurhan; Çetin, Gözde Yıldırım; Yılmaz, Nezir; Öksüz, Hafize

    2016-01-01

    Drug-induced pulmonary disease is an important consideration in the differential diagnosis of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who present with respiratory symptoms. We report a patient with RA who developed acute respiratory failure two weeks after the administration of abatacept. The clinical findings were consistent with drug-induced acute respiratory failure, most likely acute eosinophilic pneumonia. Pulse steroid was administered at 1000 mg/kg/day in the emergency department. Chest X-ray and arterial blood gas values revealed significant improvement on the second day of hospitalization. However, in the second week, the patient’s fever rose up to 40°C, procalcitonin level increased to 15 ng/mL (<0.5 ng/mL is normal), and the patient died because of sepsis in the fourth week. This is the second report of respiratory failure, after the abatacept administration in the literature. We have reported an acute respiratory failure that occurred after use of the biological agent abatacept. With the increasing use of novel immunomodulatory agents, it is important for clinicians and pathologists to add the possibility of a drug reaction to the traditional differentials of acute respiratory failures occurring in these settings. PMID:27733944

  19. Toll-like receptor 2 and 6 interdependency in the erosive stage of Staphylococcus aureus induced septic arthritis mediated by IFN-γ and IL-6--A possible involvement of IL-17 in the progression of the disease.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Chandrayee; Bishayi, Biswadev

    2015-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus induced septic arthritis has emerged as a potent disabling and life threatening disease; hence combating this malady has become an imperative need of medical science. Role of TLR-2 in innate recognition of S. aureus and activation of inflammatory cascade by the interplay of some proinflammatory cytokines, resulting in joint inflammation has been established. Variation in the reports suggesting both functional dependency and independency of TLR-2 on its heterodimeric partner TLR-6 in response to ligands exists, thus this study was postulated to observe the expression pattern of TLR-6 in synovial tissue and lymphoid organs after inducing septic arthritis by S. aureus in Swiss albino mouse model and the instigated cytokine profile could affirm its plausible role in SA. The functional relation of TLR-2 and 6 was verified by simulating an in vitro study design on synovial mononuclear cells, blocking TLR-2 and 6, and it was found that they are required to co-express for generating cytokine, NO and H2O2 on infection. IFN-γ, IL-6 and IL-17 were identified to play a distinguished role in SA from their secretion pattern in both in vivo and in vitro study. IFN-γ and IL-6 remained high throughout the infection possibly by the shift of response from Th1 to Th2 and Th17 and contribute in various converging pathways of inflammation. IL-17 increased with the onset of the disease but reduced on the late period. Hence IFN-γ, IL-6, IL-17 along with TLR-6 can be a potent target for therapeutic approach because of their significant contribution in SA.

  20. The thromboelastometric discrepancy between septic and trauma induced disseminated intravascular coagulation diagnosed by the scoring system from the Japanese association for acute medicine

    PubMed Central

    Koami, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Yuichiro; Sakurai, Ryota; Ohta, Miho; Imahase, Hisashi; Yahata, Mayuko; Umeka, Mitsuru; Miike, Toru; Nagashima, Futoshi; Iwamura, Takashi; Yamada, Kosuke Chris; Inoue, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study is to evaluate the hematological differences between septic and traumatic disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) using the rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM). This retrospective study includes all sepsis or severe trauma patients transported to our emergency department who underwent ROTEM from 2013 to 2014. All patients were divided into 2 groups based on the presence of DIC diagnosed by the Japanese Association for Acute Medicine (JAAM) DIC score. We statistically analyzed the demographics, clinical characteristics, laboratory data, ROTEM findings (EXTEM and FIBTEM), and outcome. Fifty-seven patients (30 sepsis and 27 severe trauma) were included in primary analysis. Sepsis cases were significantly older and had higher systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) scores, whereas there were no significant differences in other parameters including Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score. Twenty-six patients (14 sepsis and 12 severe trauma) were diagnosed with DIC. The Septic DIC (S-DIC) group was significantly older and had higher DIC scores than the traumatic DIC (T-DIC) group. Hematologic examination revealed significantly higher CRP, fibrinogen, lower FDP, DD, and higher FDP/DD ratio were found in the S-DIC group in comparison with the T-DIC group. ROTEM findings showed that the A10, A20, and MCF in the FIBTEM test were significantly higher in the S-DIC group. However, no statistical differences were confirmed in the LI30, LI45, and ML in EXTEM test. The plasma fibrinogen level and fibrinogen based clot firmness in whole-blood test revealed statistical significance between septic and traumatic DIC patients. PMID:27495106

  1. Possible protective role of chloramphenicol in TSST-1 and coagulase-positive Staphylococcus aureus-induced septic arthritis with altered levels of inflammatory mediators.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Sayantani; Dutta, Kallol; Manna, Sunil K; Basu, Anirban; Bishayi, Biswadev

    2011-08-01

    Chloramphenicol is mostly used against coagulase-negative Staphylococcus aureus, and its protective role against coagulase-positive S. aureus is not well studied. In our study, arthritis was induced in mice by S. aureus (Apollo Gleneagles 33 (AG-33) or American Type Culture Collection 25923 (ATCC-25923)) infection. Chloramphenicol was administered after 2 h of infection. Mice were killed at 1, 3, 5 days post-infection. Mice inoculated with pathogenic Staphylococci (AG-33) expressing coagulase and Toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1), displayed severe arthritis with enhanced bacterial burden in the spleen, cytokine production in serum and synovial tissue, neutrophil recruitment, and cyclooxegenase-2 expression in synovial tissue compared with ATCC-25923-infected groups. Severity of arthritis was regulated by chloramphenicol treatment. Our study suggests that alteration in the inflammatory cytokine levels and pronounced production of cyclooxygenase-2 play important roles in progression of arthritis which is regulated by application of chloramphenicol.

  2. [Levosimendan for septic shock with takotsubo cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Schlürmann, C-N; Reinöhl, J; Kalbhenn, J

    2016-01-01

    As a stress-induced disease, takotsubo cardiomyopathy can also occur in septic syndromes; however, the hemodynamic management is fundamentally different from the treatment approaches for classical septic cardiomyopathy, as beta mimetics can increase the heart failure symptoms in takotsubo cardiomyopathy. This article reports the case of an 82-year-old female patient who presented with acute abdomen due to adhesion ileus and takotsubo cardiomyopathy, developed severe septic shock with peritonitis and could be successfully hemodynamically stabilized with levosimendan.

  3. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia masquerading as juvenile rheumatoid arthritis: diagnostic pitfall and association with survival.

    PubMed

    Marwaha, Ram Kumar; Kulkarni, Ketan Prasad; Bansal, Deepak; Trehan, Amita

    2010-03-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) often presents with osteoarthritic manifestations which may lead to misdiagnosis with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). This study was designed to identify ALL patients with initial diagnosis of JRA, compare their clinicolaboratory characteristics and outcome with other ALL patients treated at our center. Case records of 762 patients with ALL were analyzed. Information regarding the clinical-demographic profile, therapy and outcome were recorded. Of the children, 49 (6.4%) had initial presentation mimicking JRA. Asymmetric oligoarthritis was the most common pattern of joint involvement. Majority presented with fever, pallor, arthritis, night pain, and bone pain. None of the routine prognostic factors including age, gender, lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, total leukocytes count (TLC), and platelet count were significantly associated with relapse/death. The mean symptom-presentation interval (SPI), hemoglobin was significantly higher whilst the TLC was significantly lower in these patients compared to other ALL patients. The 5 year overall-survival was better than other patients with ALL (p = 0.06, by logrank test). Significantly longer SPI in these patients underscores the need for prompt and early investigations to rule out ALL in patients of JRA with atypical features and pointers of ALL. Children with ALL-mimicking JRA may belong to a subgroup of ALL with a better prognosis.

  4. Management of a Septic Open Abdomen Patient with Spontaneous Jejunal Perforation after Emergent C/S with Confounding Factor of Mild Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yetisir, Fahri; Sarer, Akgün Ebru; Acar, Hasan Zafer; Osmanoglu, Gokhan; Özer, Mehmet; Yaylak, Faik

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. We report the management of a septic Open Abdomen (OA) patient by the help of negative pressure therapy (NPT) and abdominal reapproximation anchor (ABRA) system in pregnant woman with spontaneous jejunal perforation after emergent cesarean section (C/S) with confounding factor of mild acute pancreatitis (AP). Presentation of Case. A 29-year-old and 34-week pregnant woman with AP underwent C/S. She was arrested after anesthesia induction and responded to cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). There were only ash-colored serosanguinous fluid within abdomen during C/S. After C/S, she was transferred to intensive care unit (ICU) with vasopressor support. On postoperative 1st day, she underwent reoperation due to fecal fluid coming near the drainage. Leakage point could not be identified exactly and operation had to be deliberately abbreviated due to hemodynamic instability. NPT was applied. Two days later source control was provided by conversion of enteroatmospheric fistula (EAF) to jejunostomy. ABRA was added and OA was closed. No hernia developed at 10-month follow-up period. Conclusion. NPT application in septic OA patient may gain time to patient until adequate source control could be achieved. Using ABRA in conjunction with NPT increases the fascial closure rate in infected OA patient. PMID:27006853

  5. Management of a Septic Open Abdomen Patient with Spontaneous Jejunal Perforation after Emergent C/S with Confounding Factor of Mild Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Yetisir, Fahri; Sarer, Akgün Ebru; Acar, Hasan Zafer; Osmanoglu, Gokhan; Özer, Mehmet; Yaylak, Faik

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. We report the management of a septic Open Abdomen (OA) patient by the help of negative pressure therapy (NPT) and abdominal reapproximation anchor (ABRA) system in pregnant woman with spontaneous jejunal perforation after emergent cesarean section (C/S) with confounding factor of mild acute pancreatitis (AP). Presentation of Case. A 29-year-old and 34-week pregnant woman with AP underwent C/S. She was arrested after anesthesia induction and responded to cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). There were only ash-colored serosanguinous fluid within abdomen during C/S. After C/S, she was transferred to intensive care unit (ICU) with vasopressor support. On postoperative 1st day, she underwent reoperation due to fecal fluid coming near the drainage. Leakage point could not be identified exactly and operation had to be deliberately abbreviated due to hemodynamic instability. NPT was applied. Two days later source control was provided by conversion of enteroatmospheric fistula (EAF) to jejunostomy. ABRA was added and OA was closed. No hernia developed at 10-month follow-up period. Conclusion. NPT application in septic OA patient may gain time to patient until adequate source control could be achieved. Using ABRA in conjunction with NPT increases the fascial closure rate in infected OA patient. PMID:27006853

  6. Salmonella Typhi-Induced Septic Shock and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Previously Healthy Teenage Patient Treated With High-Dose Dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Ugas, Melissa Brosset; Carroll, Timothy; Kovar, Lacey; Chavez-Bueno, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Typhoid fever is commonly characterized by fever and abdominal pain. Rare complications include intestinal hemorrhage, bowel perforation, delirium, obtundation, and septic shock. Herein we describe the case of a previously healthy 16-year-old male without history of travel, diagnosed with typhoid fever complicated by septic shock and acute respiratory distress syndrome treated with high-dose dexamethasone. This case details severe complications of typhoid fever that are uncommonly seen in developed countries, and the successful response to high-dose dexamethasone as adjunct therapy. High-dose dexamethasone treatment has reportedly decreased Salmonella Typhi mortality, but controlled studies specifically performed in children are lacking, and most reports of its use are over 30 years old and all have originated in developing countries. Providers should include Salmonella Typhi in the differential diagnosis of the pediatric patient with fever, severe abdominal pain, and enteritis, and be aware of its potentially severe complications and the limited data on safety and efficacy of adjunctive therapies that can be considered in addition to antibiotics. PMID:27294165

  7. [Septic monarthritis caused by Sphingomonas paucimobilis].

    PubMed

    Dischereit, G; Burk, M; Storck-Müller, K; Lange, U

    2013-10-01

    Sphingomonas paucimobilis, formerly known as Pseudomonas paucimobilis, is a rare cause of septic arthritis and is therefore regarded as being of minor clinical interest in rheumatological diagnostics. In this connection the yellow pigmented, aerobic, glucose non-fermenting, Gram negative bacillus is usually associated with immunocompromised patients. A case of septic arthritis in a 70-year-old man with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) initially presenting with right knee pain, swelling and redness is reported. After diagnosis of septic gonarthritis due to Sphingomonas paucimobilis, the infection was successfully treated by oral antibiotic therapy with ofloxacine based on the patient's antibiotic susceptibility profile, combined with analgesic and anti-inflammatory local physical therapy several times a day leading to a considerable improvement in the symptoms so that operative interventions could therefore be avoided.

  8. Viral arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Michael; Marks, Jonathan L

    2016-01-01

    Acute-onset arthritis is a common clinical problem facing both the general clinician and the rheumatologist. A viral aetiology is though to be responsible for approximately 1% of all cases of acute arthritis with a wide range of causal agents recognised. The epidemiology of acute viral arthritis continues to evolve, with some aetiologies, such as rubella, becoming less common due to vaccination, while some vector-borne viruses have become more widespread. A travel history therefore forms an important part of the assessment of patients presenting with an acute arthritis. Worldwide, parvovirus B19, hepatitis B and C, HIV and the alphaviruses are among the most important causes of virally mediated arthritis. Targeted serological testing may be of value in establishing a diagnosis, and clinicians must also be aware that low-titre autoantibodies, such as rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibody, can occur in the context of acute viral arthritis. A careful consideration of epidemiological, clinical and serological features is therefore required to guide clinicians in making diagnostic and treatment decisions. While most virally mediated arthritides are self-limiting some warrant the initiation of specific antiviral therapy. PMID:27037381

  9. Acute cyst rupture, hemorrhage and septic shock after a shockwave lithotripsy in a patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeong Gon; Bae, Sang Rak; Lho, Yong Soo; Park, Hyoung Keun; Paick, Sung Hyun

    2013-06-01

    The incidence of urinary calculi in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) ranges from 10 to 36 %. Shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) for urinary calculi in ADPKD was reported to be a safe and effective treatment option. However, there is a potential risk of cyst rupture and traumatic hemorrhage because of shockwaves. A 39-year-old female with polycystic kidneys and upper ureter stone was treated with SWL and developed life-threatening complications of cyst rupture, traumatic hemorrhage and septic shock. She was initially treated with supportive care in the intensive care unit, but in the end nephrectomy was performed.

  10. Fucosylation and galactosylation of IgG heavy chains differ between acute and remission phases of juvenile chronic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Flögel, M; Lauc, G; Gornik, I; Macek, B

    1998-02-01

    Oligosaccharide structures are attached to nearly all membrane and serum proteins, and their composition changes significantly in many diseases. We have analysed glycosylation of IgG heavy chains in 34 patients with juvenile chronic arthritis and 13 control individuals. IgG was purified from 0.7 ml of serum, separated by electrophoresis and transferred on to polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membrane. Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA I) and Bandeirea simplicifolia (BSA II) and Ulex europaeus (UEA I) lectins were used to measure galactose, N-acetylglucosamine and fucose, respectively. While there was no significant difference in average levels of galactose and N-acetylglucosamine, patients with juvenile chronic arthritis had 2.4 times more fucose attached to IgG heavy chains than control individuals. A different picture emerged when patients were divided into those with acute disease and those in remission. Patients in whom juvenile chronic arthritis was currently active had significantly lower levels of galactose than those in remission, in whom galactose levels were comparable to the control group. Fucose levels in both groups of patients were significantly higher than in the control group. These results show that whereas de-galactosylation is a good test to detect and measure the activity of juvenile chronic arthritis, increased fucosylation is a much more reliable measure for diagnosis of the disease itself.

  11. Tuberculous arthritis of the elbow joint: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Yazıcı, Ayten; Kayan, Gökçen; Yaylacı, Selçuk; Demir, Mustafa Volkan; Karakeçe, Engin; Tamer, Ali; Karabay, Oğuz

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculous arthritis of the elbow joint is rare. A 57-year-old male patient presented with swelling, pain, and redness of the elbow. The symptoms first appeared one month ago; he was given antibiotic treatment after the diagnosis of septic arthritis at another center. The patient who did not improve with treatment was diagnosed with tuberculous arthritis according to the culture and was started on antituberculosis treatment. Tuberculous arthritis usually presents with chronic arthritis. However, it can also present in patients with septic arthritis. PMID:27733947

  12. Protective effects of hydroxytyrosol-supplemented refined olive oil in animal models of acute inflammation and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Silva, S; Sepodes, B; Rocha, J; Direito, R; Fernandes, A; Brites, D; Freitas, M; Fernandes, E; Bronze, M R; Figueira, M E

    2015-04-01

    Virgin olive oil is the primary source of fat in the Mediterranean diet, and its beneficial health effects have been related with oleic acid and phenolic compounds content. Hydroxytyrosol, a typical virgin olive oil phenolic compound, has beneficial antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties as previously reported. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of hydroxytyrosol-supplemented refined olive oil at 0.5 and 5 mg/kg in a rodent model of rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis was induced by intradermic administration, in male Wistar rats, of Freund's adjuvant with collagen type II on days 1 and 21. Hydroxytyrosol-supplemented refined olive oils were administrated by gavage from day 23 until day 35. The treatment at 5-mg/kg dose significantly decreased paw edema (P<.01), histological damage, cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression, and markedly reduced the degree of bone resorption, soft tissue swelling and osteophyte formation, improving articular function in treated animals. Acute inflammation, induced by carrageenan, was also evaluated for hydroxytyrosol-supplemented refined olive oils at 0.5 and 5 mg/kg. Both doses significantly reduced paw edema (P<.001). Our results suggest that the supplementation of refined olive oil with hydroxytyrosol may be advantageous in rheumatoid arthritis with significant impact not only on chronic inflammation but also on acute inflammatory processes.

  13. Protective effects of hydroxytyrosol-supplemented refined olive oil in animal models of acute inflammation and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Silva, S; Sepodes, B; Rocha, J; Direito, R; Fernandes, A; Brites, D; Freitas, M; Fernandes, E; Bronze, M R; Figueira, M E

    2015-04-01

    Virgin olive oil is the primary source of fat in the Mediterranean diet, and its beneficial health effects have been related with oleic acid and phenolic compounds content. Hydroxytyrosol, a typical virgin olive oil phenolic compound, has beneficial antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties as previously reported. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of hydroxytyrosol-supplemented refined olive oil at 0.5 and 5 mg/kg in a rodent model of rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis was induced by intradermic administration, in male Wistar rats, of Freund's adjuvant with collagen type II on days 1 and 21. Hydroxytyrosol-supplemented refined olive oils were administrated by gavage from day 23 until day 35. The treatment at 5-mg/kg dose significantly decreased paw edema (P<.01), histological damage, cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression, and markedly reduced the degree of bone resorption, soft tissue swelling and osteophyte formation, improving articular function in treated animals. Acute inflammation, induced by carrageenan, was also evaluated for hydroxytyrosol-supplemented refined olive oils at 0.5 and 5 mg/kg. Both doses significantly reduced paw edema (P<.001). Our results suggest that the supplementation of refined olive oil with hydroxytyrosol may be advantageous in rheumatoid arthritis with significant impact not only on chronic inflammation but also on acute inflammatory processes. PMID:25620693

  14. The Acute and Chronic Presentation of Gluteus Medius Calcific Tendinitis- A Case Report of Two

    PubMed Central

    Almedghio, Sami; Garneti, Narendra

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The calcific tendinitis is a common to happen around the shoulder, calcific tendinitis of tendons adjacent to the hip is not common like the shoulder. It can present either as acute hip pain and limitation of movement or chronic hip pain. We present two patients one with acute presentation and the other one chronic. Case Report: We present a case series of two patients with calcific tendinitis of the gluteus medius muscle. One patient a 37-year-old male presented with acute severe hip pain associated with a raised temperature, prompting concern about septic arthritis. The second patient presented with chronic hip pain. Calcification of the soft tissues adjacent to the greater trochanter was evident on plain radiographs in both patients. CT and MRI scans excluded septic or inflammatory arthritis in the patient with an acute presentation, the patient’s condition settled with analgesia and NSAIDs. Conclusion: An unusual combination of symptoms and finding mimicking septic arthritis should be considered in patients presenting with acute calcific tendinitis of the hip gluteus medius muscle. PMID:27299002

  15. Kinetics of leukocyte sequestration in the lungs of acutely septic primates: A study using sup 111 In-labeled autologous leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Hangen, D.H.; Segall, G.M.; Harney, E.W.; Stevens, J.H.; McDougall, I.R.; Raffin, T.A. )

    1990-03-01

    To further clarify the role of leukocytes in the pathogenesis of ARDS, we studied the localization and kinetics of leukocyte migration using 111In-labeled autologous white cell scans ({sup 111}In wbc scans) in four primates made acutely septic with infusions of Escherichia coli. Whole body images were obtained with a gamma camera and were acquired on computer every 15 min beginning immediately after the E. coli infusion. Simultaneous measurements of C5a and peripheral blood leukocyte count were also obtained. Within 5 min of initiating sepsis, three major events occurred: complement activation as measured by the production of C5a, a profound fall in peripheral leukocyte count, and a significant increase in the sequestration of leukocytes in the lungs. The pulmonary sequestration reached a peak at 15 min with a mean of 152% of baseline activity. This sequestration consisted of a population that was predominantly neutrophils. Damage to the pulmonary capillary endothelium was demonstrated by an increase in extravascular lung water. The results support a role for neutrophils and complement as mediators in the pathogenesis of ARDS.

  16. [A 42-year-old farmer with nonspecific leucocytosis and elevated transaminases. Acute septic reaction in Coxiella burnetii infection].

    PubMed

    Hempel, U; Schäffler, A; Salzberger, B; Rümmele, P; Schölmerich, J

    2008-06-01

    We report about a 42-year-old farmer with leucocytosis, elevation of transaminases and liver cirrhosis as an underlying condition. The diagnosis of Q fever hepatitis was made through liver biopsy and serology. Under therapy with doxycycline, transaminases initially increased again; after switching to ciprofloxacin, the patient could be discharged 3 weeks after admission. Q fever is caused by Coxiella burnetii. The most frequent acute manifestation is a self-limiting flu-like illness. Chronic Q fever mostly presents as endocarditis. The diagnosis is made through histology ("doughnut" granulomas), PCR, serology (acute: anti-phase II antibodies, chronic: anti-phase I antibodies) and culture. Standard therapy is doxycycline.

  17. Induction of acute and chronic arthritis by intra-articular injection of preformed collagen-anticollagen complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Steffen, C; Kovac, W; Endler, T A; Menzel, J; Smolen, J

    1977-01-01

    Three groups of rabbits were injected intra-articularly into the knee joints with preformed complexes of hydroxamated collagen and antiserum to denatured collagen respectively, with hydroxamated collagen and normal serum, hydroxamated collagen, anticollagen serum or saline as controls. From twelve rabbits, receiving only one injection and investigated 8 h later, only the joint tissues of rabbits which received immune complexes showed acute arthritis with severe infiltration of polymorphonuclears, leucocyte thrombi in vessels and haemorrhages. From six rabbits, receiving two consecutive injections (day 0 and day 2) and investigated 12 h after the last injection, only the joint tissue of rabbits which received immune complexes showed subacute-chronic arthritis. From sixteen rabbits receiving four consecutive injections day 0, day 2, day 7 and day 14) and investigated 7 days after the last injection, only the joint tissue of rabbits which received immune complexes showed severe chronic arthritis with infiltration of plasma cells, lymphocytes and nodule-like accumulation of lymphocytes whilst their joint fluid showed additionally a distinctly increased number of polymorphonuclears (3-15 x 10(6)) which differed with P less than 0-01 statistically from all controls. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:844892

  18. RGD peptides protects against acute lung injury in septic mice through Wisp1-integrin β6 pathway inhibition.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xibing; Wang, Xin; Zhao, Xiang; Jin, Shuqing; Tong, Yao; Ren, Hao; Chen, Zhixia; Li, Quan

    2015-04-01

    Acute lung injury is a common consequence of sepsis, a life-threatening inflammatory response caused by severe infection. In this study, we elucidate the attenuating effects of synthetic Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser peptides (RGDs) on acute lung injury in a sepsis mouse model. We further reveal that the beneficial effects of RGDs stem from their negative regulation of the Wisp1 (WNT1-inducible signaling pathway)-integrin β6 pathway. After inducing sepsis using cecal ligation and puncture (CLP), mice were randomized into experimental and control groups, and survival rates were recorded over 7 days, whereas only 20% of mice subjected to CLP survived when compared with untreated controls; the addition of RGDs to this treatment regimen dramatically increased the survival rate to 80%. Histological analysis revealed acute lung injury in CLP-treated mice, whereas those subjected to the combined treatment of CLP and RGDs showed a considerable decrease in lung injury severity. The addition of RGDs also dramatically attenuated other common sepsis-associated effects, such as increased white blood cell number in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and decreased pulmonary capillary barrier function. Furthermore, treatment with RGDs decreased the serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid levels of inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 6, contrary to the CLP treatment alone that increased the levels of these proteins. Interestingly, however, RGDs had no detectable effect on bacterial invasion following sepsis induction. In addition, mice treated with RGDs showed decreased levels of wisp1 and integrin β6 when compared with CLP-treated mice. In the present study, a linkage between Wisp1 and integrin β6 was evaluated in vivo. Most strikingly, RGDs resulted in a decreased association of Wisp1 with integrin β6 based on coimmunoprecipitation analyses. These data suggest that RGDs ameliorate acute lung injury in a sepsis mouse model by inhibiting the Wisp1-integrin β6

  19. Pathogenesis of acute arthritis due to viable Chlamydia trachomatis (mouse pneumonitis agent) in C57Bl/6 mice.

    PubMed Central

    Hough, A. J.; Rank, R. G.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the natural history and pathogenesis of the acute arthritis induced by inoculation of a viable Chlamydia trachomatis biovar (mouse pneumonitis agent or MoPn) in C57Bl/6 mice. Immunologically naive (previously unsensitized) mice as well as mice immunized against Chlamydia (MoPn) by vaginal infection were employed. Both intravenous and intraarticular inoculations were employed. No arthritis developed after intravenous injections of MoPn although statistically significant antibody titers and splenic enlargement ensued. Intra-articular inoculation into knee joints produced a definite arthritis of 7 to 10 days duration marked by granulocyte and mononuclear cell infiltration of the joint and vacuolated synovial macrophages that stained heavily for chlamydial antigen by immunoperoxidase technique. Statistically significant increases in articular acute and chronic inflammation (P less than 0.02 were observed in previously sensitized, but not unsensitized, female mice at 2 but not 7 days after intra-articular chlamydial challenge. Chlamydiae were isolated from injected joints up to day 5, but not at day 10, after challenge. Chlamydial antigen disappeared rapidly from knee joints between day 10 and 15 after challenge. Electron micrographs demonstrated vacuolated synovial cells of the macrophage type, many of which contained degenerating chlamydial elementary bodies. Reticulate and intermediate bodies also were seen but were far less frequent than degenerating elementary bodies. Unaltered elementary bodies were difficult to identify beyond day 2 after articular inoculation. Thus, it appears likely that intra-articular chlamydial survival is shorter than the duration of the arthropathy. This may have important implications in attempts to identify chlamydiae in human joints in Reiter's Disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:2705510

  20. Psoriatic arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Arthritis - psoriatic; Psoriasis - psoriatic arthritis; Spondylitis - psoriatic arthritis ... inflammatory condition. About 1 in 20 people with psoriasis may develop arthritis with the skin condition. Nail psoriasis is linked ...

  1. Arthritis - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - arthritis ... The following organizations provide more information on arthritis : American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons -- orthoinfo.aaos.org/menus/arthritis.cfm Arthritis Foundation -- www.arthritis.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www. ...

  2. Septic acute kidney injury in critically ill patients - a single-center study on its incidence, clinical characteristics, and outcome predictors.

    PubMed

    Shum, Hoi-Ping; Kong, Harriet Hoi-Yan; Chan, King-Chung; Yan, Wing-Wa; Chan, Tak Mao

    2016-06-01

    Purpose The objective of this study is to examine the incidence, clinical characteristics, and outcome (90-day mortality) of critically ill Chinese patients with septic AKI. Methods Patients admitted to the ICU of a regional hospital from 1 January 2011 to 31 December 2013 were included, excluding those on chronic renal replacement therapy. AKI was defined using KDIGO criteria. Patients were followed till 90 days from ICU admission or death, whichever occurred earlier. Demographics, diagnosis, clinical characteristics, and outcome were analyzed. Results In total, 3687 patients were included and 54.7% patients developed AKI. Sepsis was the most common cause of AKI (49.2%). Compared to those without AKI, AKI patients had higher disease severity, more physiological and biochemical disturbance, and carried significant co-morbidities. Ninety-day mortality increased with severity of AKI (16.7, 27.5, and 48.3% for KDIGO stage 1, 2, and 3 AKI, p < 0.001). Full renal recovery was achieved in 71.6% of AKI patients. Compared with non-septic AKI, septic AKI was associated with higher disease severity and required more aggressive support. Non-recovery of renal function occurred in 2.5% of patients with septic AKI, compared with 6.4% in non-septic AKI (p < 0.001). Cox regression analysis showed that age, emergency ICU admission, post-operative cases, admission diagnosis, etiology of AKI, disease severity score, mechanical ventilation, vasopressor support, and blood parameters (like albumin, potassium and pH) independently predicted 90-day mortality. Conclusions AKI, especially septic AKI is common in critically ill Chinese patients and is associated with poor patient outcome. Etiology of AKI has a significant impact on 90-day mortality and may affect renal outcome. PMID:26981621

  3. Investigation of Antiarthritic Potential of Plumeria alba L. Leaves in Acute and Chronic Models of Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vipin; Gupta, Pankaj; Singh, Surender

    2014-01-01

    Aim. The present investigation was designed to evaluate antiarthritic potential of fractions of hydroalcoholic extract from leaves of P. alba. Materials and Methods. Plumeria alba L. leaves were extracted with hydroalcohol (30 : 70) to obtain hydroalcoholic extract of P. alba. This extract was further fractionated with solvents ethyl acetate and n-butanol to obtain EAPA and BPA, respectively. These fractions were tested against formaldehyde and Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) induced arthritis. Arthritis assessment, paw volume, body weight, motor incoordination, and nociceptive threshold were measured. On day 21, the animals were sacrificed and histopathology was done. Results. The 100 and 200 mg/kg doses of EAPA and BPA caused a significant (P ≤ 0.05–0.01) reduction in paw swelling in both models. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and spleen weight decreased significantly (P < 0.01) in arthritic rats treated with extracts. There was significant (P < 0.05) improvement in thymus weight in EAPA treated rats whereas significant (P < 0.01) improvement was also seen in haemoglobin level (Hb) in diclofenac treated group. Motor incoordination and nociceptive threshold were also significantly (P ≤ 0.05–0.01) improved. Conclusion. The present study suggests that Plumeria alba L. has protective activity against arthritis and supports the traditional use of P. alba for rheumatism and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:25025056

  4. Inhaled nitric oxide in acute respiratory distress syndrome with and without septic shock requiring norepinephrine administration: a dose–response study

    PubMed Central

    Mourgeon, Eric; Puybasset, Louis; Law-Koune, Jean-Dominique; Lu, Qin; Abdennour, Lamine; Gallart, Lluis; Malassine, Patrick; Rao, GS Umamaheswara; Cluzel, Philippe; Bennani, Abdelhai; Coriat, Pierre; Rouby, Jean-Jacques

    1997-01-01

    Background: The aim of this prospective study was to assess whether the presence of septic shock could influence the dose response to inhaled nitric oxide (NO) in NO-responding patients with adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Results: Eight patients with ARDS and without septic shock (PaO2 = 95 ± 16 mmHg, PEEP = 0, FiO2 = 1.0), and eight patients with ARDS and septic shock (PaO2 = 88 ± 11 mmHg, PEEP = 0, FiO2 = 1.0) receiving exclusively norepinephrine were studied. All responded to 15 ppm inhaled NO with an increase in PaO2 of at least 40 mmHg, at FiO2 1.0 and PEEP 10 cmH2O. Inspiratory intratracheal NO concentrations were recorded continuously using a fast response time chemiluminescence apparatus. Seven inspiratory NO concentrations were randomly administered: 0.15, 0.45, 1.5, 4.5, 15, 45 and 150 ppm. In both groups, NO induced a dose-dependent decrease in mean pulmonary artery pressure (MPAP), pulmonary vascular resistance index (PVRI), and venous admixture (QVA/QT), and a dose-dependent increase in PaO2/FiO2 (P ≤ 0.012). Dose-response of MPAP and PVRI were similar in both groups with a plateau effect at 4.5 ppm. Dose-response of PaO2/FiO2 was influenced by the presence of septic shock. No plateau effect was observed in patients with septic shock and PaO2/FiO2 increased by 173 ± 37% at 150 ppm. In patients without septic shock, an 82 ± 26% increase in PaO2/FiO2 was observed with a plateau effect obtained at 15 ppm. In both groups, dose-response curves demonstrated a marked interindividual variability and in five patients pulmonary vascular effect and improvement in arterial oxygenation were dissociated. Conclusion: For similar NOinduced decreases in MPAP and PVRI in both groups, the increase in arterial oxygenation was more marked in patients with septic shock. PMID:11056694

  5. The Role of Complement System in Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Charchaflieh, Jean; Wei, Jiandong; Labaze, Georges; Hou, Yunfang Joan; Babarsh, Benjamin; Stutz, Helen; Lee, Haekyung; Worah, Samrat; Zhang, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Septic shock is a critical clinical condition with a high mortality rate. A better understanding of the underlying mechanisms is important to develop effective therapies. Basic and clinical studies suggest that activation of complements in the common cascade, for example, complement component 3 (C3) and C5, is involved in the development of septic shock. The involvement of three upstream complement pathways in septic shock is more complicated. Both the classical and alternative pathways appear to be activated in septic shock, but the alternative pathway may be activated earlier than the classical pathway. Activation of these two pathways is essential to clear endotoxin. Recent investigations have shed light on the role of lectin complement pathway in septic shock. Published reports suggest a protective role of mannose-binding lectin (MBL) against sepsis. Our preliminary study of MBL-associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2) in septic shock patients indicated that acute decrease of MASP-2 in the early phase of septic shock might correlate with in-hospital mortality. It is unknown whether excessive activation of these three upstream complement pathways may contribute to the detrimental effects in septic shock. This paper also discusses additional complement-related pathogenic mechanisms and intervention strategies for septic shock. PMID:23049598

  6. [Salmonella enteritidis arthritis complicating systemic lupus erythematosus].

    PubMed

    Marzouk, S; El Aoud, S; Hriz, H; Jallouli, M; Zribi, W; Bahloul, Z

    2013-12-01

    Septic arthritis due to Salmonella in systemic lupus erythematosus is rare. We report a case of septic arthritis by Salmonella enteritidis which occurred during the evolution of systemic lupus erythematosus. A 23-year-old man was diagnosed as suffering from systemic lupus erythematosus. This diagnosis was taken on the basis of general symptoms, skin lesions, hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and glomerulonephritis (class III). He was treated with three methylprednisolone boli related by high-dose regimen of prednisolone. A month and a half later, he presented fever with monoarthritis of the left elbow without any other new sign of underlying systemic disease. Bacteriological examinations isolated S. enteritidis. The patient improved with antibiotics and joint lavage. Feverish monoarthritis in systemic lupus erythematosus should be suspect to be septic arthritis. Appropriate treatment should be promptly instituted to improve the prognosis.

  7. Acute-onset opioid-induced hyperalgesia in a child with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, Vini; Moran, Ryan; Elder, Melissa E; Sukumaran, Sukesh

    2012-10-01

    We describe a child with polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) presenting with severe diffuse pain refractory to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents and high-dose opioids. Her JIA involved her knees and ankles and was mildly active on etanercept and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents. At presentation, she complained of hip pain progressing to severe diffuse pain and allodynia involving her extremities. No abnormalities were seen in her laboratory parameters and imaging of her lower extremities. After appreciating no substantial benefit by increasing her opioids, her opioids were tapered and discontinued, and this was followed by significant alleviation in her pain, and a diagnosis of opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH) was made. Despite reports in adults, the phenomenon of OIH has been reported infrequently in children. To our knowledge, OIH has not been described in children with rheumatologic conditions. We recommend investigating the possibility of OIH when treating a child with JIA and severe refractory pain.

  8. Septic Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Arian, Mahdieh; Kamali, Azadeh; Tabatabaeichehr, Mahbubeh; Arashnia, Parisa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Septic cavernous sinus thrombosis (CST) is a rare condition that can result in high mortality and morbidity rates if not treated immediately. CST may be aseptic or septic. Less common primary sites of infection include the tonsils, soft palate, middle ear, and orbit. Reported cases of middle ear infection are very rare, and response to treatment is poor. Case Presentation The present study is a case report of acute otitis media which led to septic cavernous sinus thrombosis in a 56-year-old woman in Bojnord city, North Khorasan, Iran. Conclusions Findings of laboratory tests and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed the clinical diagnosis. Clinical-based medical care led to successful management of the patient with broad spectrum intravenous antibiotics that prevented serious complications. PMID:27781123

  9. Enthesitis-related arthritis.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Amita; Misra, Durga Prasanna

    2015-11-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common chronic arthritis of childhood. Currently, it is characterized by seven categories. The enthesitis-related arthritis (ERA) category usually affects boys older than 6 years and presents with lower limb asymmetrical arthritis associated with enthesitis. Later, these children can develop inflammatory lumbosacral pain (IBP). These children are at risk of developing acute anterior uveitis. A recently devised disease activity index, Juvenile Spondyloarthropathy Disease Activity Index (JSpADA), has been validated in retrospective cohorts. The corner stone of treatment is NSAIDs, local corticosteroid injections, and exercise. Methotrexate and sulfasalazine can be used for peripheral arthritis while anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agents are sometimes used to treat refractory enthesitis and sacroiliitis. Almost two third of patients with ERA have persistent disease and often have impairments in their quality of life. The presence of hip or ankle arthritis and a family history of spondyloarthropathy or polyarticular joint involvement at onset are associated with poorer prognosis.

  10. Fungal arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Mycotic arthritis; Infectious arthritis - fungal ... Marquez J, Espinoza LR. Infectious arthritis II: mycobacterial, brucellar, fungal, and parasitic arthritis. In: Hochberg MC, Silman AJ, Smolen JS, Weinblatt ME, Weisman MH, eds. Rheumatology . ...

  11. The correlation between ferritin level and acute phase parameters in rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Seyhan, Serkan; Pamuk, Ömer Nuri; Pamuk, Gülsüm Emel; Çakır, Necati

    2014-01-01

    Objective In this study, we evaluated the relationship between ferritin levels and disease activation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Material and Methods We included 44 patients with RA, 20 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 25 patients with infection, 22 patients with malignancy, and 20 healthy control subjects. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), whole blood count, and serum iron parameters were determined in all cases. The joint findings in RA patients were recorded, and disease activity score (DAS) was calculated. In SLE patients, antinuclear antibody (ANA) and anti-dsDNA titers and C3 and C4 complement levels were determined. SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI) score was calculated. Results Serum ferritin levels in the RA, SLE, and control groups were lower than those in the infection and malignancy groups (p<0.05). The ferritin levels in the RA group did not differ significantly from the SLE and control groups. In RA patients, serum ferritin level had a positive correlation with ESR, CRP, RF, platelet count, and DAS score and had a negative correlation with hematocrit (all p values <0.05). In SLE patients, on the other hand, serum ferritin had a positive correlation with ANA, anti-dsDNA, and SLEDAI (all p values <0.05). According to DAS, ferritin level in inactive RA patients was lower than that in active RA patients. When transferrin saturation was considered, iron deficiency anemia was a quite frequent finding in both active and inactive RA patients. Conclusion Interestingly, we observed that ferritin level in RA patients was similar to the control group; however, it was a good parameter of disease activation. This is because a reduction in storage iron and resultant iron deficiency anemia are very common in RA patients.

  12. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI features of acute gouty arthritis on top of chronic gouty involvement in different joints.

    PubMed

    Emad, Yasser; Ragab, Yasser; El-Naggar, Ahmed; El-Shaarawy, Nashwa; Abd-Allah, Mayada A; Gamal, Rania M; Fathy, Ahmed; Hawass, Mona; Rasker, Johannes J

    2015-11-01

    The aims of the current study are to describe gadolinium-enhanced MRI features of an acute flare of established gouty arthritis in different joints and to examine a possible association between serum uric acid and MRI signs indicative of ongoing inflammation and/or structural joint damage as well as association with disease characteristics and laboratory findings. Twenty-seven male patients with established chronic gout agreed to participate, mean age 47.6 years, and mean disease duration in months 43.2 (±31.8). For all patients, detailed demographic, disease characteristics, and laboratory findings were obtained and correlated with MRI findings. In 27 patients with established gout, a total of 50 MRI studies were performed of the following joints: feet joints (n = 23), ankles (n = 18), knees (n = 5), and hand and wrist joints (n = 4). MRI revealed capsular thickening in 19 patients, bone marrow edema (BME) in 15, soft tissue edema (STE) in 20, joint effusion in 21, bone erosions in 17, cartilaginous erosions in 4, and tenosynovitis in 9 cases. In 17 cases, tophaceous lesions were found. Post contrast MRI showed synovial thickening in seven cases. Positive correlations were observed between serum uric acid levels and the following MRI findings: capsular thickening (r = 0.552, p = 0.003), BME (r = 0.668, p ≤ 0.0001), STE (r = 0.559, p = 0.002), and tenosynovitis (r = 0.513, p = 0.006). Using MRI in chronic gout, important features can be detected like BME, minute cartilaginous erosions, and hypertrophic synovial inflammation in post contrast MR images. Serum uric acid (SUA) was positively correlated with capsular thickening, BME, STE, and tenosynovitis.

  13. Tissue vitality in septic gonitis. 99mTc-DPD scintimetry in puppies.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, V E; Hansen, E S; Holm, I E; Ewald, H; Noer, I; Christensen, S B; Bünger, C

    1987-08-01

    After a single intraarticular injection of 10(9) Staphylococcus aureus in 12 puppies, septic arthritis developed in all the experimental knees after 48 hours. A considerable variability in scintigraphic appearance was observed. The juxtaarticular growth plates showed either unchanged or slightly decreased uptake except in 1 dog exhibiting a definite increase in tracer uptake. The epiphyseal uptake showed no consistent pattern. The intraarticular pressure of the arthritic joints increased significantly, but was not related to the tracer uptake pattern. We conclude that delayed joint scintigraphy as a single investigation in early septic arthritis does not provide diagnostic information and may be misleading. PMID:3673525

  14. Near infrared lymphatic imaging demonstrates the dynamics of lymph flow and lymphangiogenesis during the acute vs. chronic phases of arthritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Quan; Wood, Ronald; Schwarz, Edward M.; Wang, Yong-Jun; Xing, Lianping

    2010-01-01

    Objective Development of an in vivo imaging method to assess lymphatic draining function in the K/B×N mouse model of inflammatory arthritis. Methods Indocyanine green (ICG), a near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye, was injected intradermally into the footpad of wild-type mice, the limb was illuminated with an 806 nm NIR laser, and the movement of ICG from the injection site to the draining popliteal lymph node (PLN) was recorded with a CCD camera. ICG-NIR images were analyzed to obtain 5 measures of lymphatic function across time. K/B×N arthritic mice and control non-arthritic littermates were imaged at one-month of age when acute joint inflammation commenced, and repeated at 3 months when joint inflammation became chronic. Lymphangiogenesis in PLNs was assessed by immunochemistry. Results ICG and its transport within lymphatic vessels were readily visualized and quantitative measures derived. During the acute phase of arthritis, the lymphatic vessels were dilated with increased ICG signal intensity and lymphatic pulses, and PLNs became fluorescent quickly. During the chronic phase, new lymphatic vessels were present near the foot. However, ICG appearance in lymphatic vessels was delayed. The size and area of PLN lymphatic sinuses progressively increased in the K/B×N mice. Conclusion ICG-NIR lymphatic imaging is a valuable method to assess the lymphatic draining function in mice with inflammatory arthritis. ICG-NIR imaging of K/B×N mice identified two distinct lymphatic phenotypes during the acute and chronic phase of inflammation. This technique can be used to assess new therapies for lymphatic disorders. PMID:20309866

  15. Staphylococcal peptidoglycans induce arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zai-Qing; Deng, Guo-Min; Foster, Simon; Tarkowski, Andrej

    2001-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most important pathogens in septic arthritis. To analyse the arthritogenic properties of staphylococcal peptidoglycan (PGN), highly purified PGN from S. aureus was intra-articularly injected into murine joints. The results demonstrate that PGN will trigger arthritis in a dose-dependent manner. A single injection of this compound leads to massive infiltration of predominantly macrophages and polymorphonuclear cells with occasional signs of cartilage and/or bone destruction, lasting for at least 14 days. Further studies showed that this condition is mediated by the combined impact of acquired and innate immune systems. Our results indicate that PGN exerts a central role in joint inflammation triggered by S. aureus. PMID:11714392

  16. Improved early diagnosis of acute inflammatory skeletal-articular diseases in children: A two-radiopharmaceutical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Handmaker, H.; Giammona, S.T.

    1984-05-01

    The febrile child with a painful bone or joint still presents a difficult pediatric diagnostic problem. Acute hematogenous osteomyelitis, septic arthritis, and cellulitis are the most common causes of this symptom. Thirty-seven patients with these disorders were studied. Because findings from technetium-99m phosphate bone scans and roentgenograms are often normal in patients in the early stages of acute hematogenous osteomyelitis, children suspected of having this disorder were tested using gallium-67 citrate scans in addition to the other diagnostic procedures. The increased diagnostic accuracy of this approach over that of bone scan and roentgenogram studies alone was observed in the children with fever and bone or joint pain.

  17. Pathophysiology of septic shock and implications for therapy.

    PubMed

    Barron, R L

    1993-11-01

    Current knowledge about the pathophysiology of septic shock is reviewed, and biotechnology-based therapies under development are discussed. Patients with septic shock begin their clinical course with leukocytosis, fever, tachycardia, tachypnea, and organ hypoperfusion; shock ensues as immunologic and vasoactive mediators produce hypotension. There are many metabolic and cardiovascular responses, and single- or multiple-organ failure is common. Patients may experience adult respiratory distress syndrome. A multitude of endogenous and exogenous factors have been linked to the pathophysiology of sepsis and septic shock, including (1) endotoxin from gram-negative bacteria, (2) peptidoglycan and exotoxins from gram-negative bacteria, (3) endotoxin-binding proteins and receptors, (4) bactericidal proteases, (5) exotoxins from gram-positive bacteria, (6) acute-phase proteins and proteases, (7) cytokines, (8) arachidonic acid metabolites, (9) complement, (10) beta-endorphin, (11) histamine, (12) stimulation of intrinsic and extrinsic coagulation pathways and proteases, and (13) endothelium-derived factors and adhesion molecules. Molecular entities and strategies under development to combat septic shock include monoclonal antibodies to endotoxin, active immunization with lipid-A analogues, bactericidal permeability-increasing protein, interleukin inhibitors, and inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Successful treatment of septic shock will probably require a combination of agents, including antimicrobials. An ideal goal for biotechnology in the area of septic shock is to prevent invading pathogens from overstimulating the host's immune system and to systematically eliminate those pathogens. Biotechnology is opening new avenues to the treatment of septic shock.

  18. Association of disease activity with acute exacerbation of interstitial lung disease during tocilizumab treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a retrospective, case-control study.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Mitsuhiro; Kaneko, Yuko; Yamaoka, Kunihiro; Kondo, Harumi; Takeuchi, Tsutomu

    2016-06-01

    The objective of the study was to identify risk factors for acute exacerbation of interstitial lung disease (ILD) during tocilizumab treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This is a retrospective, case-control study. We reviewed 395 consecutive RA patients who received tocilizumab. First, we divided the patients according to the presence (RA-ILD) or absence of ILD (non-ILD) assessed by chest X-ray or high-resolution computed tomography, and compared them for characteristics relevant to RA-ILD. Subsequently, focusing on the patients with RA-ILD, we assessed their baseline characteristics and clinical courses comparing patients with acute exacerbation to those without. Comparing 78 with ILD and 317 without ILD, the following were identified as factors related to RA-ILD on multivariate analysis: age 60 years or older (OR 4.5, 95 % CI 2.2-9.4, P < 0.0001), smoking habit (OR 2.9, 95 % CI 1.5-5.5, P = 0.002), and high rheumatoid factor levels (OR 2.8, 95 % CI 1.4-5.5, P = 0.002). Of 78 RA-ILD patients, six developed acute exacerbation during tocilizumab treatment. The median duration between the initiation of tocilizumab treatment and the acute exacerbation occurrence was 48 weeks. While baseline characteristics did not differ between acute exacerbation and non-acute exacerbation groups, patients experiencing acute exacerbation had significantly higher Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI) at 24 weeks (20.8 vs. 6.2, P = 0.019). Univariate analysis showed that CDAI > 10 at 24 weeks was a risk factor for acute exacerbation (OR 4.7, 95 % CI 2.1-10.4, P = 0.02). Uncontrolled arthritis activity during tocilizumab treatment may be associated with acute exacerbation of RA-ILD, suggesting post-treatment monitoring of disease activity is important not only with respect to RA itself but also for RA-ILD.

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a form of arthritis that causes pain, swelling, stiffness and loss of function in ... wrist and fingers. More women than men get rheumatoid arthritis. It often starts in middle age and is ...

  20. Juvenile Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Juvenile arthritis (JA) is arthritis that happens in children. It causes joint swelling, pain, stiffness, and loss ... common type of JA that children get is juvenile idiopathic arthritis. There are several other forms of ...

  1. Community Acquired Chronic Arthritis due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a Previously Healthy Pregnant Woman

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Mesut; Arslan, Ferhat; Mert, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Septic arthritis caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is uncommon in the immunocompetent population, despite its occurrence in younger patients with open injuries and in intravenous drug abusers. Here we report a case of septic arthritis caused by P. aeruginosa. This case is unique for several reasons. First, it is a case of septic arthritis in a pregnant woman with no traditional risk factors reported in the literature including history of prior traumatic events, hospitalisation, or chronic underlying disease. She was suspected of having transient osteoporosis associated with pregnancy to involve both hip joints. Second, this is the first reported case of a community acquired chronic septic arthritis due to P. aeruginosa involving large joints of both upper and lower extremities. The patient was treated successfully with a combination of ceftazidime and amikacin for 4 weeks followed by oral ciprofloxacin 750 mg twice daily for 8 weeks. PMID:25371836

  2. Impact on mortality of the timing of renal replacement therapy in patients with severe acute kidney injury in septic shock: the IDEAL-ICU study (initiation of dialysis early versus delayed in the intensive care unit): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background One of the most dreaded complications of septic shock is acute kidney injury. It occurs in around 50% of patients, with a mortality rate of about 60% at 3 months. There is no consensus on the optimal time to initiate renal replacement therapy. Retrospective and observational studies suggest that early implementation of renal replacement therapy could improve the prognosis for these patients. Methods/design This protocol summarizes the rationale and design of a randomized, controlled, multicenter trial investigating the effect of early versus delayed renal replacement therapy in patients with severe acute kidney injury in early septic shock. In total, 864 critically ill adults with septic shock and evidence of acute kidney injury, defined as the failure stage of the RIFLE classification, will be enrolled. The primary outcome is mortality at 90 days. Secondary outcomes include safety, number of days free of mechanical ventilation, number of days free of renal replacement therapy, intensive care length of stay, in-hospital length of stay, quality of life as evaluated by the EQ-5D and renal replacement therapy dependence at hospital discharge. The primary analysis will be intention to treat. Recruitment started in March 2012 and will be completed by March 2015. Discussion This protocol for a randomized controlled study investigating the impact of the timing of renal replacement therapy initiation should provide an answer to a key question for the management of patients with acute kidney injury in the context of septic shock, for whom the mortality rate remains close to 60% despite improved understanding of physiopathology and recent therapeutic advances. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01682590, registered on 10 September 2012. PMID:24998258

  3. Efficacy and safety profile of combination of tramadol-diclofenac versus tramadol-paracetamol in patients with acute musculoskeletal conditions, postoperative pain, and acute flare of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis: a Phase III, 5-day open-label study

    PubMed Central

    Chandanwale, Ajay S; Sundar, Subramanian; Latchoumibady, Kaliaperumal; Biswas, Swati; Gabhane, Mukesh; Naik, Manoj; Patel, Kamlesh

    2014-01-01

    Objective We aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a fixed-dose combination (FDC) of tramadol and diclofenac versus a standard approved FDC of tramadol and paracetamol, in patients with acute moderate to severe pain. Methods A total of 204 patients with moderate to severe pain due to acute musculoskeletal conditions (n=52), acute flare of osteoarthritis (n=52), acute flare of rheumatoid arthritis (n=50), or postoperative pain (n=50) were enrolled in the study at baseline. Each disease category was then randomized to receive either of two treatments for 5 days: group A received an FDC of immediate-release tramadol hydrochloride (50 mg) and sustained-release diclofenac sodium (75 mg) (one tablet, twice daily), and group B received an FDC of tramadol hydrochloride (37.5 mg) and paracetamol (325 mg) (two tablets every 4–6 hours, up to a maximum of eight tablets daily). The primary efficacy end points were reductions in pain intensity from baseline at day 3 and day 5 as assessed by a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) score. Results Group A showed a significant reduction in the VAS score for overall pain from baseline on day 3 (P=0.001) and day 5 (P<0.0001) as compared with group B. The combination of tramadol-diclofenac resulted in few mild to moderate adverse events (nausea, vomiting, epigastric pain, and gastritis), which required minimal management, without any treatment discontinuation. The number of adverse events in group A was nine (8.82%) compared with 22 (21.78%) in group B, after 5 days of treatment. Conclusion An FDC of tramadol-diclofenac showed a significantly greater reduction in pain intensity and was well tolerated compared with tramadol-paracetamol, resulting in better analgesia in patients suffering from moderate to severe pain due to acute musculoskeletal conditions, postoperative pain following orthopedic surgery, or acute flare of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:25152629

  4. The diagnosis and treatment of arthritis in horses.

    PubMed

    Rose, R J

    1983-01-01

    In this paper on the diagnosis and treatment of arthritis in horses, both degenerative arthritis and septic arthritis are considered. Diagnosis should be made on the combination of clinical examination together with the use of diagnostic aids such as radiology, intra-articular local anaesthesia and synovial fluid analysis. Intra-articular therapy appears to be the most effective in the treatment of degenerative arthritis. Excellent responses to therapy have been reported with corticosteroids, sodium hyaluronate, orgotein and synovial fluid transfer, where joints showed an absence of degenerative changes on radiographs. In septic arthritis, systemic treatment with the appropriate antibiotic, following bacterial culture and sensitivity testing, can produce good results if prompt diagnosis is made.

  5. Clinical disease activity and acute phase reactant levels are discordant among patients with active rheumatoid arthritis: acute phase reactant levels contribute separately to predicting outcome at one year

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Clinical trials of new treatments for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) typically require subjects to have an elevated acute phase reactant (APR), in addition to tender and swollen joints. However, despite the elevation of individual components of the Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI) (tender and swollen joint counts and patient and physician global assessment), some patients with active RA may have normal erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and/or C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and thus fail to meet entry criteria for clinical trials. We assessed the relationship between CDAI and APRs in the Consortium of Rheumatology Researchers of North America (CORRONA) registry by comparing baseline characteristics and one-year clinical outcomes of patients with active RA, grouped by baseline APR levels. Methods This was an observational study of 9,135 RA patients who had both ESR and CRP drawn and a visit at which CDAI was >2.8 (not in remission). Results Of 9,135 patients with active RA, 58% had neither elevated ESR nor CRP; only 16% had both elevated ESR and CRP and 26% had either ESR or CRP elevated. Among the 4,228 patients who had a one-year follow-up visit, both baseline and one-year follow-up modified Health Assessment Questionnaire (mHAQ) and CDAI scores were lowest for patients with active RA but with neither APR elevated; both mHAQ and CDAI scores increased sequentially with the increase in number of elevated APR levels at baseline. Each individual component of the CDAI followed the same trend, both at baseline and at one-year follow-up. The magnitude of improvement in both CDAI and mHAQ scores at one year was associated positively with the number of APRs elevated at baseline. Conclusions In a large United States registry of RA patients, APR levels often do not correlate with disease activity as measured by joint counts and global assessments. These data strongly suggest that it is appropriate to obtain both ESR and CRP from RA patients at the initial

  6. Psoriatic arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, L.H.; Espinoza, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 11 chapters. Some of the titles are: The history and epidemiologic definition of psoriatic arthritis as a distinct entity; Psoriatic arthritis: Further epidemiologic and genetic considerations; The radiologic features of psoriatic arthritis; and Laboratory findings and pathology of psoriatic arthritis.

  7. Right Coronary Artery Septic Embolization Secondary to Aerococcus urinae Native Mitral Valve Endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Kotkar, Kunal D; Said, Sameh M; Michelena, Hector; Wanta, Brendan; Fritock, Maria D; Baddour, Larry M

    2016-10-01

    Septic embolization to the coronary arteries from infective endocarditis is a rare occurrence. Appropriate treatment is not yet fully determined. We report a case of mitral valve endocarditis due to Aerococcus urinae presenting as acute inferior myocardial infarction. PMID:27645966

  8. Striatal opioid receptor availability is related to acute and chronic pain perception in arthritis: does opioid adaptation increase resilience to chronic pain?

    PubMed

    Brown, Christopher A; Matthews, Julian; Fairclough, Michael; McMahon, Adam; Barnett, Elizabeth; Al-Kaysi, Ali; El-Deredy, Wael; Jones, Anthony K P

    2015-11-01

    The experience of pain in humans is modulated by endogenous opioids, but it is largely unknown how the opioid system adapts to chronic pain states. Animal models of chronic pain point to upregulation of opioid receptors (OpR) in the brain, with unknown functional significance. We sought evidence for a similar relationship between chronic pain and OpR availability in humans. Using positron emission tomography and the radiotracer (11)C-diprenorphine, patients with arthritis pain (n = 17) and healthy controls (n = 9) underwent whole-brain positron emission tomography scanning to calculate parametric maps of OpR availability. Consistent with the upregulation hypothesis, within the arthritis group, greater OpR availability was found in the striatum (including the caudate) of patients reporting higher levels of recent chronic pain, as well as regions of interest in the descending opioidergic pathway including the anterior cingulate cortex, thalamus, and periaqueductal gray. The functional significance of striatal changes were clarified with respect to acute pain thresholds: data across patients and controls revealed that striatal OpR availability was related to reduced pain perception. These findings are consistent with the view that chronic pain may upregulate OpR availability to dampen pain. Finally, patients with arthritis pain, compared with healthy controls, had overall less OpR availability within the striatum specifically, consistent with the greater endogenous opioid binding that would be expected in chronic pain states. Our observational evidence points to the need for further studies to establish the causal relationship between chronic pain states and OpR adaptation.

  9. Septic shock in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Knuppel, R A; Rao, P S; Cavanagh, D

    1984-03-01

    Septic shock in obstetric patients can be prevented by recognition of patients at risk and aggressive intervention in the warm-hypotensive phase. These patients must be monitored closely. Rarely will an obstetrical floor be capable of providing adequate monitoring of these patients; therefore, the patient should be transferred to an intensive care unit. Individualize therapy, but do not procrastinate in the surgical removal of the nidus of infection.

  10. Recurrent septic shock in a 34-year-old woman.

    PubMed

    Shah, Shenil; Mertz, Thomas; Craig, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    A 34-year-old woman presented to the Emergency Room (ER) with an acute presentation of septic shock that required fluid and pressor support in the Intensive Care Unit. History revealed this was her third episode of such a presentation with asymptomatic periods in between. She responded well to medical interventions but reported persistent joint pain. Immunologic workup revealed her diagnosis.

  11. Serum and Urinary NGAL in Septic Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Suchojad, Anna; Majcherczyk, Malgorzata; Jadamus-Niebroj, Danuta; Owsianka-Podlesny, Teresa; Brzozowska, Aniceta

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) is postulated to be a potentially new and highly specific/sensitive marker of acute kidney injury (AKI). The aim of this study was to assess the impact of inflammation on serum and urine NGAL in newborns that were treated due to infection. We determined serum and urine NGAL concentrations in 73 infants (51 with sepsis; 22 with severe sepsis) admitted to the Intensive Care Unit in the first month of life, for three consecutive days during the course of treatment for infection. 29 neonates without infection served as the control group. Septic patients, in particular, severe sepsis patients, had increased serum and urinary NGAL levels in the three subsequent days of observation. Five septic patients who developed AKI had elevated serum and urinary NGAL values to a similar extent as septic neonates without AKI. A strong correlation was found between the concentration of serum and urinary NGAL and inflammatory markers, such as CRP and procalcitonin. Serum and urinary NGAL levels were also significantly associated with NTISS (neonatal therapeutic intervention scoring system) values. We conclude that increased serum and urinary NGAL values are not solely a marker of AKI, and more accurately reflect the severity of inflammatory status. PMID:24579085

  12. Three atypical lethal cases associated with acute Zika virus infection in Suriname.

    PubMed

    Zonneveld, Rens; Roosblad, Jimmy; Staveren, Jan Willem van; Wilschut, Jan C; Vreden, Stephen G S; Codrington, John

    2016-01-01

    Acute Zika virus infection usually presents with a self-limiting triad of fever, rash and arthritis. There is limited information on severe or lethal cases. We report three cases of lethal acute Zika infection, confirmed with polymerase chain reaction, in adult patients with some co-morbidities. The patients showed rapid clinical deterioration with hemorrhagic and septic shock, and exaggerated acute and innate inflammatory responses with pronounced coagulopathy, and died soon after admission to the hospital. It remains unclear whether the fatal outcomes were due to acute Zika virus infection alone or to the combination with exacerbated underlying prior disease or co-infection. Nonetheless, the severity of these cases implies that increased awareness for atypical presentations of Zika virus infection, and careful clinical assessment of patients with symptoms of Zika, is warranted during current and future outbreaks.

  13. Three atypical lethal cases associated with acute Zika virus infection in Suriname.

    PubMed

    Zonneveld, Rens; Roosblad, Jimmy; Staveren, Jan Willem van; Wilschut, Jan C; Vreden, Stephen G S; Codrington, John

    2016-01-01

    Acute Zika virus infection usually presents with a self-limiting triad of fever, rash and arthritis. There is limited information on severe or lethal cases. We report three cases of lethal acute Zika infection, confirmed with polymerase chain reaction, in adult patients with some co-morbidities. The patients showed rapid clinical deterioration with hemorrhagic and septic shock, and exaggerated acute and innate inflammatory responses with pronounced coagulopathy, and died soon after admission to the hospital. It remains unclear whether the fatal outcomes were due to acute Zika virus infection alone or to the combination with exacerbated underlying prior disease or co-infection. Nonetheless, the severity of these cases implies that increased awareness for atypical presentations of Zika virus infection, and careful clinical assessment of patients with symptoms of Zika, is warranted during current and future outbreaks. PMID:27630820

  14. Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... your body. Some people with psoriasis have psoriatic arthritis. It causes pain, stiffness, and swelling of the ... physical exam and imaging tests to diagnose psoriatic arthritis. There is no cure, but medicines can help ...

  15. Viral arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Infectious arthritis - viral ... Ohl CA, Forster D. Infectious arthritis of native joints. In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, eds. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious ...

  16. Infectious Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Infectious arthritis is an infection in the joint. The infection ... from another part of the body. Symptoms of infectious arthritis include Intense pain in the joint Joint redness ...

  17. Arthroscopy of septic carpitis in donkeys (Equus asinus)

    PubMed Central

    Elkasapy, A.H.; AbdelGalil, A.I.; Al-Akraa, A.M.; Ibrahim, I.M.; Ismail, S.F.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental septic arthritis was induced in the radiocarpal joint of 18 donkeys by intra-articular injection of Staphylococcus aureus (3-4X106 CFU). The inoculated animals were divided into three groups (6 donkeys in each group). The arthroscopic examination was carried out before induction of septic carpitis and 3 days (group I), 14 days (group II), and 28 days (group III) after induction of infection. The arthroscopic examination of group I revealed hyperemia of synovial membrane and hypertrophied villi. In group II, severe hyperemia of synovial membrane, hypertrophied villi, pannus in the joint cavity and beginning of articular cartilage erosion were found. In group III, severe hyperemia of synovial membrane, hypertrophied villi and more prominent articular cartilage erosion were present. PMID:26623350

  18. Monoarticular arthritis update: Current evidence for diagnosis and treatment in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Genes, Nicholas; Chisolm-Straker, Makini

    2012-05-01

    Monoarticular arthritis presentations in the emergency department are increasing as the population ages and gets heavier. Many etiologies--from trauma to infection to autoimmune-mediated inflammation--are associated with significant disability or early mortality, and their treatments are associated with adverse effects. A systematic approach to evaluating patients with monoarticular arthritic complaints is important for relieving pain, diagnosing systemic illness, and unmasking true arthritis emergencies. Septic arthritis is a rapidly destructive process that can cause significant disability in a matter of hours or days, with relatively high mortality. Other causes of monoarticular arthritis may cause disability in the long term. In all cases, accurate diagnosis and appropriate therapies are crucial for resuming activities and preventing long-term deficits. This review examines the diagnosis and treatment of monoarticular arthritis, with a focus on recent evidence in the diagnosis of septic arthritis and new research on gout therapies. Modalities for pain control and new techniques for imaging are discussed.

  19. Reactive arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hind, C. R. K.

    1982-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is a rare complication of certain infections. The similar features and HLA associations with the seronegative arthropathies have raised the possibility that the latter may be forms of reactive arthritis. This review describes the clinical and epidemiological features, and the recent advances in our understanding of the underlying pathogenesis of reactive arthritis. PMID:7100033

  20. Cardiovascular devices; reclassification of intra-aortic balloon and control systems for acute coronary syndrome, cardiac and non-cardiac surgery, or complications of heart failure; effective date of requirement for premarket approval for intra-aortic balloon and control systems for septic shock or pulsatile flow generation. Final order.

    PubMed

    2013-12-30

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final order to reclassify intra-aortic balloon and control system (IABP) devices when indicated for acute coronary syndrome, cardiac and non-cardiac surgery, or complications of heart failure, a preamendments class III device, into class II (special controls), and to require the filing of a premarket approval application (PMA) or a notice of completion of a product development protocol (PDP) for IABPs when indicated for septic shock or pulsatile flow generation. PMID:24383147

  1. Pancreatic injury in patients with septic shock: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Chaari, Anis; Abdel Hakim, Karim; Bousselmi, Kamel; Etman, Mahmoud; El Bahr, Mohamed; El Saka, Ahmed; Hamza, Eman; Ismail, Mohamed; Khalil, Elsayed Mahmoud; Kauts, Vipin; Casey, William Francis

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis and septic shock are life threatening condition associated with high mortality rate in critically-ill patients. This high mortality is mainly related to the inadequacy between oxygen delivery and cellular demand leading to the onset of multiorgan dysfunction. Whether this multiorgan failure affect the pancreas is not fully investigated. In fact, pancreatic injury may occur because of ischemia, overwhelming inflammatory response, oxidative stress, cellular apoptosis and/or metabolic derangement. Increased serum amylase and/or lipase levels are common in patients with septic shock. However, imaging test rarely reveal significant pancreatic damage. Whether pancreatic dysfunction does affect the prognosis of patients with septic shock or not is still a matter of debate. In fact, only few studies with limited sample size assessed the clinical relevance of the pancreatic injury in this group of patients. In this review, we aimed to describe the epidemiology and the physiopathology of pancreatic injury in septic shock patients, to clarify whether it requires specific management and to assess its prognostic value. Our main finding is that pancreatic injury does not significantly affect the outcome in septic shock patients. Hence, increased serum pancreatic enzymes without clinical features of acute pancreatitis do not require further imaging investigations and specific therapeutic intervention. PMID:27559431

  2. Pancreatic injury in patients with septic shock: A literature review.

    PubMed

    Chaari, Anis; Abdel Hakim, Karim; Bousselmi, Kamel; Etman, Mahmoud; El Bahr, Mohamed; El Saka, Ahmed; Hamza, Eman; Ismail, Mohamed; Khalil, Elsayed Mahmoud; Kauts, Vipin; Casey, William Francis

    2016-07-15

    Sepsis and septic shock are life threatening condition associated with high mortality rate in critically-ill patients. This high mortality is mainly related to the inadequacy between oxygen delivery and cellular demand leading to the onset of multiorgan dysfunction. Whether this multiorgan failure affect the pancreas is not fully investigated. In fact, pancreatic injury may occur because of ischemia, overwhelming inflammatory response, oxidative stress, cellular apoptosis and/or metabolic derangement. Increased serum amylase and/or lipase levels are common in patients with septic shock. However, imaging test rarely reveal significant pancreatic damage. Whether pancreatic dysfunction does affect the prognosis of patients with septic shock or not is still a matter of debate. In fact, only few studies with limited sample size assessed the clinical relevance of the pancreatic injury in this group of patients. In this review, we aimed to describe the epidemiology and the physiopathology of pancreatic injury in septic shock patients, to clarify whether it requires specific management and to assess its prognostic value. Our main finding is that pancreatic injury does not significantly affect the outcome in septic shock patients. Hence, increased serum pancreatic enzymes without clinical features of acute pancreatitis do not require further imaging investigations and specific therapeutic intervention. PMID:27559431

  3. What Is Reactive Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arthritis PDF Version Size: 69 KB November 2014 What is Reactive Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... Information About Reactive Arthritis and Other Related Conditions What Causes Reactive Arthritis? Sometimes, reactive arthritis is set ...

  4. Pseudomonas arthritis treated with parenteral and intra-articular ceftazidime.

    PubMed Central

    Walton, K; Hilton, R C; Sen, R A

    1985-01-01

    A 73-year-old diabetic presented with septic arthritis of the knee; Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated. She was successfully treated with a combination of parenteral and intra-articular ceftazidime, after failure to eradicate the organism with adequate serum levels of gentamicin and full doses of azlocillin. PMID:3896166

  5. Geode development and multiple fractures in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lowthian, P J; Calin, A

    1985-02-01

    The radiological development from normal bone of geodes and subsequent fractures in phalanges of two adjacent fingers is described in a patient with classical rheumatoid arthritis. Presentation was as a septic, discharging focus, but infection was excluded; the pathology is described.

  6. Identification of phosphorylated MYL12B as a potential plasma biomarker for septic acute kidney injury using a quantitative proteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fan; Dong, Xiu-Juan; Li, Yan-Yan; Zhao, Yan; Xu, Qiu-Lin; Su, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common and increasingly encountered complication in hospitalized patients with critical illness in intensive care units (ICU). According to the etiology, Sepsis-induced AKI (SAKI) is a leading contributor to AKI and significantly has very poor prognosis, which might be related to the late detection when the elevation of BUN and serum creatinine (SCr) is used. Many genes are up-regulated in the damaged kidney with the corresponding protein products appearing in plasma and urine. Some of these are candidate biomarkers for more timely diagnosis of SAKI. Therefore, extensive research efforts over this past decade have been directed at the discovery and validation of novel SAKI biomarkers to detect injury prior to changes in kidney function, a number of serum and urinary proteins, including NGAL, KIM-1, cystatin-C, IL-18, and L-FABP, have been identified for predicting SAKI before a rise in BUN and serum creatinine in several experimental and clinical trainings. Unfortunately, an ideal biomarker of SAKI with highly sensitivity and specificity has not been identified yet. Recent progresses in quantitative proteomics have offered opportunities to discover biomarkers for SAKI. In the present study, kidney tissue samples from SAKI mice were analyzed by two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), and 4 up-regulated proteins, which were actin (ACTB), myosin regulatory light chain 12B (MYL12B), myosin regulatory light polypeptide 9 (MYL9), and myosin regulatory light chain 12A (MYL12A) were identified by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight/time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS). Among all the varied proteins, MYL12B was validated by western blot. Interestingly, there was no change between the SAKI and control kidney tissues, however, phosphorylated MYL12B was detected to be consistent with the proteomics data. Furthermore, phosphorylated MYL12B was found similarly to be increased in SAKI plasma

  7. Identification of phosphorylated MYL12B as a potential plasma biomarker for septic acute kidney injury using a quantitative proteomic approach

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fan; Dong, Xiu-Juan; Li, Yan-Yan; Zhao, Yan; Xu, Qiu-Lin; Su, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common and increasingly encountered complication in hospitalized patients with critical illness in intensive care units (ICU). According to the etiology, Sepsis-induced AKI (SAKI) is a leading contributor to AKI and significantly has very poor prognosis, which might be related to the late detection when the elevation of BUN and serum creatinine (SCr) is used. Many genes are up-regulated in the damaged kidney with the corresponding protein products appearing in plasma and urine. Some of these are candidate biomarkers for more timely diagnosis of SAKI. Therefore, extensive research efforts over this past decade have been directed at the discovery and validation of novel SAKI biomarkers to detect injury prior to changes in kidney function, a number of serum and urinary proteins, including NGAL, KIM-1, cystatin-C, IL-18, and L-FABP, have been identified for predicting SAKI before a rise in BUN and serum creatinine in several experimental and clinical trainings. Unfortunately, an ideal biomarker of SAKI with highly sensitivity and specificity has not been identified yet. Recent progresses in quantitative proteomics have offered opportunities to discover biomarkers for SAKI. In the present study, kidney tissue samples from SAKI mice were analyzed by two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), and 4 up-regulated proteins, which were actin (ACTB), myosin regulatory light chain 12B (MYL12B), myosin regulatory light polypeptide 9 (MYL9), and myosin regulatory light chain 12A (MYL12A) were identified by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight/time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS). Among all the varied proteins, MYL12B was validated by western blot. Interestingly, there was no change between the SAKI and control kidney tissues, however, phosphorylated MYL12B was detected to be consistent with the proteomics data. Furthermore, phosphorylated MYL12B was found similarly to be increased in SAKI plasma

  8. Immunopathological features of rat Staphylococcus aureus arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Bremell, T; Lange, S; Holmdahl, R; Rydén, C; Hansson, G K; Tarkowski, A

    1994-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the most common bacterial species found in nongonococcal bacterial arthritis in humans. We present the first description, to our knowledge, of an outbreak of spontaneous staphylococcal arthritis in a rat colony. In a group of 10 rats, 9 displayed arthritis. Clinically, the most obvious findings were arthritis of one or both hindpaws and malaise. Bacteriophage typing showed the common phage type 85 in isolates recovered from the joints, blood, and bedding of rats and from the nose and cheeks of one person from the staff of the animal facility. The S. aureus strain proved to produce staphylococcal enterotoxin A and exhibited strong binding to collagen types I and II and bone sialoprotein, which are potentially important virulence factors. When the recovered S. aureus strain was injected intravenously into healthy rats, severe septic arthritis was induced in almost all of the animals. The arthritic lesions were characterized by infiltration of phagocytic cells and T lymphocytes into the synovium. Many of the synovial cells strongly expressed major histocompatibility complex class II molecules. Increased levels of interleukin 6 in serum as well as a prominent polyclonal B-cell activation were noted throughout the disease course. Pretreatment of S. aureus-injected rats in vivo with an antibody to the alpha beta T-cell receptor significantly decreased the severity of the arthritis. Our results indicate that alpha beta + T lymphocytes contribute to an erosive and persistent course of S. aureus arthritis. Images PMID:8188356

  9. Cytomegalovirus Reactivation Induced Acute Hepatitis and Gastric Erosions in a Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis under Treatment with an Anti-IL-6 Receptor Antibody, Tocilizumab.

    PubMed

    Komura, Takuya; Ohta, Hajime; Nakai, Ryotaro; Seishima, Jun; Yamato, Masatoshi; Miyazawa, Masaki; Kaji, Kiichiro; Marukawa, Yohei; Kagaya, Takashi; Kitagawa, Kiyoki; Kawashima, Atsuhiro; Kaneko, Shuichi; Unoura, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Tocilizumab, an anti-human interleukin 6 receptor (IL-6R) monoclonal antibody, is widely used to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and is expected to exhibit clinical efficacy when used to treat other autoimmune diseases. However, a risk of opportunistic infection is occasionally recognized. A 54-year-old woman had received an oral corticosteroid and methotrexate to treat RA. Despite receiving these treatments, she received additional treatment with tocilizumab due to poor control of the disease activity. She presented at our hospital with a high fever and epigastralgia 19 days after receiving this treatment. A laboratory evaluation revealed liver injury and cytomegalovirus (CMV) viremia. Abdominal ultrasonography and computed tomography (CT) revealed hepatosplenomegaly, but no ascites. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed gastric erosions induced by CMV, which were confirmed immunohistochemically. Hence, we diagnosed the patient with CMV reactivation-induced acute hepatitis and gastric erosions under tocilizumab treatment. She received an anti-cytomegalovirus drug, ganciclovir, for 14 days due to her viremia and impaired general condition, which was suggestive of a severe infection. Her general condition subsequently improved, the liver function test results normalized, and the gastric erosions disappeared. In conclusion, although tocilizumab is very useful for treating certain autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, and will be prescribed more widely in the future, associated CMV infections must be closely monitored, as these can be lethal. PMID:27432105

  10. Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... physical exam as well as x rays or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the affected joints. Although there is no lab test to diagnose psoriatic arthritis, your doctor may order tests on blood or joint fluid to rule out other forms of arthritis with ...

  11. Gastritis and gastric blood flow in hyperdynamic septic pigs.

    PubMed

    Lucas, C E; Ravikant, T; Walt, A J

    1976-01-01

    The present study was designed to determine the gastric hemodynamics in a septic model that causes both a hyperdynamic state and acute erosive gastritis. Sepsis was established in twelve pigs by the intramuscular shank injection of Pastuerella multocida (42 X 10(8) colonies) in triptose phosphate broth; four pigs received sterile broth injections (shams) and eight received sterile saline injections (controls). After 18 hours, cardiac output was measured by both the cardiogreen dilution technic and the radioactive microsphere dilution technic; cardiac output was then compared to total and regional gastric blood flow measured by the raioactive microsphere entrapment technic. Acute erosive gastritis developed in septic pigs in the fundus and body of the stomach; the antrum was spared. Cardiac output was significantly increased in septic pigs compared with sham and control pigs. Total gastric blood flow and regional blood flow to the fundus, body, and antrum were also increased in direct proportion to the increase in cardiac output. These data suggest that acute erosive gastritis is primarily due to an end-organ cellular insult from sepsis and is not primarily due to a decrease or redistribution in gastric blood flow.

  12. Metabolic theory of septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Pravda, Jay

    2014-01-01

    Septic shock is a life threatening condition that can develop subsequent to infection. Mortality can reach as high as 80% with over 150000 deaths yearly in the United States alone. Septic shock causes progressive failure of vital homeostatic mechanisms culminating in immunosuppression, coagulopathy and microvascular dysfunction which can lead to refractory hypotension, organ failure and death. The hypermetabolic response that accompanies a systemic inflammatory reaction places high demands upon stored nutritional resources. A crucial element that can become depleted early during the progression to septic shock is glutathione. Glutathione is chiefly responsible for supplying reducing equivalents to neutralize hydrogen peroxide, a toxic oxidizing agent that is produced during normal metabolism. Without glutathione, hydrogen peroxide can rise to toxic levels in tissues and blood where it can cause severe oxidative injury to organs and to the microvasculature. Continued exposure can result in microvascular dysfunction, capillary leakage and septic shock. It is the aim of this paper to present evidence that elevated systemic levels of hydrogen peroxide are present in septic shock victims and that it significantly contributes to the development and progression of this frequently lethal condition. PMID:24892019

  13. Septic tank additive impacts on microbial populations.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, S; Hoover, M T; Clark, G H; Gumpertz, M; Wollum, A G; Cobb, C; Strock, J

    2008-01-01

    Environmental health specialists, other onsite wastewater professionals, scientists, and homeowners have questioned the effectiveness of septic tank additives. This paper describes an independent, third-party, field scale, research study of the effects of three liquid bacterial septic tank additives and a control (no additive) on septic tank microbial populations. Microbial populations were measured quarterly in a field study for 12 months in 48 full-size, functioning septic tanks. Bacterial populations in the 48 septic tanks were statistically analyzed with a mixed linear model. Additive effects were assessed for three septic tank maintenance levels (low, intermediate, and high). Dunnett's t-test for tank bacteria (alpha = .05) indicated that none of the treatments were significantly different, overall, from the control at the statistical level tested. In addition, the additives had no significant effects on septic tank bacterial populations at any of the septic tank maintenance levels. Additional controlled, field-based research iswarranted, however, to address additional additives and experimental conditions.

  14. Vasopressor weaning in patients with septic shock.

    PubMed

    Arellano, Daniel L; Hanneman, Sandra K

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to propose optimal weaning of vasopressors in patients with septic shock. Topics discussed include pathophysiology of sepsis and septic shock, treatment guidelines for sepsis, autoregulation of blood flow, vasopressors used in septic shock, weaning recommendations, monitor alarms in the intensive care unit, and new directions in sepsis research.

  15. Forms of Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... It typically begins during the early-adult years. Juvenile arthritisarthritis that is diagnosed before age 16. The most common form of juvenile arthritis, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, affects between 30,000 and ...

  16. Calcium pyrophosphate arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease that can cause attacks of arthritis. Like gout, crystals form in the joints. But in this ... CPPD arthritis can be confused with: Gouty arthritis (gout) Osteoarthritis Rheumatoid arthritis Exams and Tests Most arthritic ...

  17. Prospective surveillance study of acute respiratory infections, influenza-like illness and seasonal influenza vaccine in a cohort of juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are frequent in children and complications can occur in patients with chronic diseases. We evaluated the frequency and impact of ARI and influenza-like illness (ILI) episodes on disease activity, and the immunogenicity and safety of influenza vaccine in a cohort of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. Methods Surveillance of respiratory viruses was conducted in JIA patients during ARI season (March to August) in two consecutive years: 2007 (61 patients) and 2008 (63 patients). Patients with ARI or ILI had respiratory samples collected for virus detection by real time PCR. In 2008, 44 patients were immunized with influenza vaccine. JIA activity index (ACRPed30) was assessed during both surveillance periods. Influenza hemagglutination inhibition antibody titers were measured before and 30-40 days after vaccination. Results During the study period 105 ARI episodes were reported and 26.6% of them were ILI. Of 33 samples collected, 60% were positive for at least one virus. Influenza and rhinovirus were the most frequently detected, in 30% of the samples. Of the 50 JIA flares observed, 20% were temporally associated to ARI. Influenza seroprotection rates were higher than 70% (91-100%) for all strains, and seroconversion rates exceeded 40% (74-93%). In general, response to influenza vaccine was not influenced by therapy or disease activity, but patients using anti-TNF alpha drugs presented lower seroconversion to H1N1 strain. No significant differences were found in ACRPed30 after vaccination and no patient reported ILI for 6 months after vaccination. Conclusion ARI episodes are relatively frequent in JIA patients and may have a role triggering JIA flares. Trivalent split influenza vaccine seems to be immunogenic and safe in JIA patients. PMID:23510667

  18. Gonococcal arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... people who have gonorrhea caused by the bacteria Neisseria gonorrhoeae . Gonococcal arthritis affects women more often than ... Saunders; 2013:chap 109. Marrazzo JM, Apicella MA. Neisseria gonorrhoeae (gonnorrhea). In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser ...

  19. Septic arthritis, tenosynovitis, and infections of hoof structures.

    PubMed

    Lugo, Joel; Gaughan, Earl M

    2006-08-01

    Infectious diseases of synovial and hoof structures in horses can be devastating to soundness and can result in life-threatening complications. Timely diagnosis and early aggressive treatment can result in successful outcomes and resumption of athletic careers; however, delays in recognition and therapy can be the most costly reasons for failure. Sterilization of affected compartments and tissues requires removal of microorganisms and compromised tissue. Debridement, lavage, and appropriate antimicrobial drug use are the most reliable avenues of treatment. Antimicrobial drugs can be administered by local, regional, and systemic routes. Lavage techniques and debridement typically require surgical manipulations.

  20. Septic Pulmonary Embolism Requiring Critical Care: Clinicoradiological Spectrum, Causative Pathogens and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Deng-Wei; Wu, Shu-Ling; Chung, Kuo-Mou; Han, Shu-Chen; Cheung, Bruno Man-Hon

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Septic pulmonary embolism is an uncommon but life-threatening disorder. However, data on patients with septic pulmonary embolism who require critical care have not been well reported. This study elucidated the clinicoradiological spectrum, causative pathogens and outcomes of septic pulmonary embolism in patients requiring critical care. METHODS: The electronic medical records of 20 patients with septic pulmonary embolism who required intensive care unit admission between January 2005 and December 2013 were reviewed. RESULTS: Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome developed in 85% of the patients, and acute respiratory failure was the most common organ failure (75%). The most common computed tomographic findings included a feeding vessel sign (90%), peripheral nodules without cavities (80%) or with cavities (65%), and peripheral wedge-shaped opacities (75%). The most common primary source of infection was liver abscess (40%), followed by pneumonia (25%). The two most frequent causative pathogens were Klebsiella pneumoniae (50%) and Staphylococcus aureus (35%). Compared with survivors, nonsurvivors had significantly higher serum creatinine, arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment scores, and they were significantly more likely to have acute kidney injury, disseminated intravascular coagulation and lung abscesses. The in-hospital mortality rate was 30%. Pneumonia was the most common cause of death, followed by liver abscess. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with septic pulmonary embolism who require critical care, especially those with pneumonia and liver abscess, are associated with high mortality. Early diagnosis, appropriate antibiotic therapy, surgical intervention and respiratory support are essential. PMID:27759843

  1. Successful staged hip replacement in septic hip osteoarthritis in osteopetrosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Osteopetrosis is a rare, inherited, bone disorder, characterized by osteosclerosis, obliteration of the medullary cavity and calcified cartilage. The autosomal dominant form is compatible with a normal life span, although fractures often result from minimal trauma, due to the pathologic nature of bone. Osteomyelitis is common in patients with osteopetrosis because of a reduced resistance to infection, attributed to the lack of marrow vascularity and impairment of white cell function. Only one case of osteomyelitis of the proximal third of the femur has been previously reported, treated with several repeated debridements and finally with femoral head resection. Here we present for the first time a case of a staged implant of a cementless total hip prosthesis for the treatment of a septic hip in femoral neck nonunion in osteopetrosis. Case presentation A 36-years-old woman, affected by autosomal dominant osteopetrosis was referred to our department because of a septic hip arthritis associated with femoral neck septic non-union, with draining fistulas. The infection occurred early after a plate osteosynthesis for a closed perthrocanteric fracture of the femur and persisted in spite of osteosynthesis removal, surgical debridement and external fixation. In our hospital the patient underwent accurate debridement, femoral head and greater trochanter resection, preparation of the diaphyseal intramedullary canal and implant of an antibiotic-loaded cement spacer. The spacer was exchanged after one month, due to infection recurrence and four months later, a cementless total hip arthroplasty was implanted, with no clinical and laboratory signs of infection recurrence at two years follow-up. Conclusions In case of hip septic arthritis and proximal femur septic non-union, femoral head resection may not be the only option available and staged total hip arthroplasty can be considered. PMID:22472060

  2. Rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Scott, David L; Wolfe, Frederick; Huizinga, Tom W J

    2010-09-25

    Rheumatoid arthritis is characterised by persistent synovitis, systemic inflammation, and autoantibodies (particularly to rheumatoid factor and citrullinated peptide). 50% of the risk for development of rheumatoid arthritis is attributable to genetic factors. Smoking is the main environmental risk. In industrialised countries, rheumatoid arthritis affects 0·5-1·0% of adults, with 5-50 per 100 000 new cases annually. The disorder is most typical in women and elderly people. Uncontrolled active rheumatoid arthritis causes joint damage, disability, decreased quality of life, and cardiovascular and other comorbidities. Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), the key therapeutic agents, reduce synovitis and systemic inflammation and improve function. The leading DMARD is methotrexate, which can be combined with other drugs of this type. Biological agents are used when arthritis is uncontrolled or toxic effects arise with DMARDs. Tumour necrosis factor inhibitors were the first biological agents, followed by abatacept, rituximab, and tocilizumab. Infections and high costs restrict prescription of biological agents. Long-term remission induced by intensive, short-term treatment selected by biomarker profiles is the ultimate goal.

  3. Haemophilic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Steven, M M; Yogarajah, S; Madhok, R; Forbes, C D; Sturrock, R D

    1986-02-01

    A detailed clinical and radiological examination of the joints and laboratory studies were carried out on 139 haemophiliacs attending a single centre. The group included more patients with mild and moderate haemophilia (factor levels 6 to 60 per cent) than in previous studies. Haemarthrosis, the most common bleeding manifestation, had affected more than two-thirds of patients including many with mild or moderate disease. Restriction and contracture of the knees and elbows were the most common clinical features and, with the ankles, these joints were most frequently affected both clinically and radiologically. Using a combination of clinical and radiological features, 42 per cent of the patients could be classed as having 'definite' and a further 14 per cent 'possible' haemophilic arthritis. Although haemarthroses were equally prevalent in patients with classical haemophilia and Christmas disease, arthritis was more frequently present in the former. Haemarthrosis and joint disease were exceptional in von Willebrand's disease. The prevalence of arthritis generally related to disease severity as measured by factor level but, in contrast to earlier studies, definite arthritis was seen in some patients with factor levels up to 20 per cent of normal although the number of affected joints was less in these patients with milder disease. Laboratory test abnormalities including circulating immune complexes and hypocomplementaemia were noted in some patients but the abnormalities correlated poorly with clinical features. The present results suggest a recent slight reduction in the prevalence or severity of haemophilic arthritis, possibly attributable to recent improvements in factor replacement treatment. Longer-term studies are required to show whether arthritis is indeed lessening or whether the onset is merely being delayed.

  4. Morganella morganii-associated arthritis in a diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Meryem; Ocak, Sabahattin; Kuvandik, Guven; Aslan, Bahadir; Temiz, Muhyittin; Aslan, Ahmet

    2008-03-01

    This case report involves a 60-year-old diabetic man who developed septic arthritis as a result of the pathogen Morganella morganii. The patient had complaints of elevated body temperature, malaise, rigors and pain in the left knee, despite no history of trauma. On examination of the knee, erythema, warmth, tenderness and swelling was observed. Arthrocentesis performed on his left knee indicated the presence of straw-coloured, cloudy fluid without crystals. Bacterial identification based on biochemical and automated methods indicated the growth of M morganii. M morganii was also isolated sedimentafrom the exudate of a diabetic ulcer in the left foot, with antibiotic susceptibilities identical to those from the knee effusion. This case indicates that M morganii may be considered as a possible cause of septic arthritis in diabetic patients, especially those with diabetic foot infections.

  5. Coagulation disorders in septic shock.

    PubMed

    Thijs, L G; de Boer, J P; de Groot, M C; Hack, C E

    1993-01-01

    Abnormalities in coagulation and fibrinolysis are frequently observed in septic shock. The most pronounced clinical manifestation is disseminated intravascular coagulation. Recent studies in human volunteers and animal models have clarified the early dynamics and route of activation of both coagulation and fibrinolytic pathways. In healthy subjects subjected to a low dose of either endotoxin or TNF an imbalance in the procoagulant and the fibrinolytic mechanisms is apparent, resulting in a procoagulant state. Also in patients with septic shock a dynamic process of coagulation and fibrinolysis is ongoing with evidence of impaired fibrinolysis. These abnormalities have prognostic significance; the extent of disturbances of coagulation and fibrinolysis is related to the development of multiple organ failure and death.

  6. Septic cerebral venous sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Ismail A; Wasay, Mohammad

    2016-03-15

    Septic cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, once a common and deadly disease, has fortunately become rare now. Not only that the incidence has fallen significantly after the antibiotic era, the morbidity and mortality has also decreased substantially. Cavernous sinus thrombosis is by far the commonest form of septic cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Due to its rare occurrence, a lot of current generation clinicians have not encountered the entity in person. Despite all the advances in diagnostic modalities, a high index of clinical suspicion remains the mainstay in prompt diagnosis and management of this potentially lethal condition. Keeping this in view, the authors have reviewed the subject including the old literature and have summarized the current approach to diagnosis and management. Septic cavernous thrombosis is a fulminant disease with dramatic presentation in most cases comprised of fever, periorbital pain and swelling, associated with systemic symptoms and signs. The preceding infection is usually in the central face or paranasal sinuses. The disease rapidly spreads to contralateral side and if remains undiagnosed and untreated can result in severe complications or even death. Prompt diagnosis using radiological imaging in suspected patient, early use of broad spectrum antibiotics, and judicial use of anticoagulation may save the life and prevent disability. Surgery is used only to treat the nidus of infection. PMID:26944152

  7. Grammatical Arthritis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Don

    1994-01-01

    Discusses grammatical arthritis (an internal buildup of rules that hinders writing flexibility); four new "rules" (concerning "data is,""none are,""hopefully," and the restrictive "which"); attitudes toward English grammar; how to be a helpful editor; and where to learn about grammar. (SR)

  8. Imaging in Foot and Ankle Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Victoria H; Rowbotham, Emma L; Grainger, Andrew J

    2016-04-01

    The foot and ankle are commonly involved in a range of arthritides that affect the joints, bones, and soft tissues. Accurate plain film interpretation can often aid the diagnosis and monitor disease progression and treatment response. Ultrasound and MRI afford superior depiction of the soft tissues, and advances over recent years have centered on early detection of synovitis, enabling earlier diagnosis and treatment. Advantages and disadvantages of the imaging techniques of radiography, multidetector computed tomography, ultrasound, and MRI are discussed, as is optimization of these modalities for the assessment of the anatomically complex joints of the foot and ankle. Diagnostic features enabling differentiation between rheumatoid arthritis, seronegative spondyloarthropathies, osteoarthritis, gout, crystal deposition disease, pigmented villonodular synovitis, Charcot arthropathy, septic arthritis, synovial osteochondromatosis, hemophilia, and reflex sympathetic dystrophy are also reviewed. PMID:27336451

  9. Arthritis of the Wrist

    MedlinePlus

    ... is caused by just two types: osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Osteoarthritis Osteoarthritis (OA) is a progressive condition that ... other, it results in pain, stiffness, and weakness. Rheumatoid Arthritis Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic disease that ...

  10. What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Arthritis Find a Clinical Trial Journal Articles Rheumatoid Arthritis PDF Version Size: 57 KB Audio Version Time: ... Size: 9.7 MB November 2014 What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to-Read Series of ...

  11. Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bursitis and Tendinitis, Q&A Fibromyalgia, Q&A Gout, Q&A Juvenile Arthritis, Q&A Childhood Arthritis ( ... Many people also experience fatigue and sleep disturbances. Gout. A type of arthritis resulting from deposits of ...

  12. Septic Mice Are Susceptible to Pulmonary Aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Benjamim, Claudia F.; Hogaboam, Cory M.; Lukacs, Nicholas W.; Kunkel, Steven L.

    2003-01-01

    Clinical data underscores the fact that subsequent high mortality rates occur in patients who survive acute septic episodes. Herein, we described a clinically relevant model of experimental sepsis that we believe will allow further investigation of the manner in which the pulmonary innate immune response is modulated after sepsis. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model, whereby the cecum was partially ligated and punctured nine times with a 21-gauge needle. This procedure was associated with 100% mortality at 3 days after surgery. In contrast, when mice subjected to CLP were treated with antibiotic beginning at 8 hours after surgery, and every 12 hours thereafter until 3 days, ∼60% of the mice survived. Interestingly, CLP survivors quickly succumbed (100% mortality) to pulmonary infection when intratracheally challenged, at day 3 after CLP, with viable Aspergillus fumigatus conidia. No mortality was observed in conidia-challenged sham-operated mice. The defective innate immune response against A. fumigatus in CLP mice could not be explained by a failure of neutrophils to infiltrate the lungs. Instead, gene array analysis revealed that several components of the innate immune response, including the nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway, were down-regulated. Thus, we describe a system of sepsis-induced innate immune failure in the lungs of C57BL/6 mice. PMID:14633632

  13. Recent developments in septic bursitis.

    PubMed

    Hanrahan, Jennifer A

    2013-10-01

    Septic bursitis is a disease that can be difficult to distinguish from aseptic bursitis. There are no definitive treatment guidelines. The optimal duration of antibiotic therapy is not defined. Most of the cases are due to infection with Staphylococcus aureus, although many other pathogens can also cause this infection. The optimal management includes early recognition and prompt initiation of appropriate antibiotic therapy. Surgical management may be necessary, and complications can arise from open procedures. Endoscopic bursectomy may be considered for patients requiring surgical debridement. This approach may lead to decreased morbidity in those requiring surgical intervention. PMID:23933823

  14. Human bacterial arthritis caused by Streptococcus zooepidemicus: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Friederichs, Jan; Hungerer, Sven; Werle, Regina; Militz, Matthias; Bühren, Volker

    2010-09-01

    Septic arthritis caused by Streptococcus zooepidemicus is a rare event in humans. Of the four cases reported in the literature, only two patients had direct animal contact, and the portal of entry remained unclear in all cases. We report herein the case of a patient who suffered a purulent arthritis of the left shoulder caused by S. zooepidemicus, successfully treated in our department. A diagnostic FDG-PET-CT scan ruled out other foci of infection, but detected a hyperkeratotic plantar chronic soft tissue lesion of the left foot, acquired in a paragliding accident 10 years earlier. The fact that the patient habitually took care of his horses barefoot in boots, identifies the cutaneous portal of entry as most likely. To our knowledge this is the first report of a septic arthritis caused by S. zooepidemicus where a cutaneous entry route is described.

  15. Assessment, investigation, and management of acute monoarthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Till, S H; Snaith, M L

    1999-01-01

    Trauma is the commonest cause of acute monoarticular joint pain and swelling in patients attending an accident and emergency (A&E) department. However, in a significant minority of patients there will be no history of trauma and consequently a different approach to assessment and investigation is required. Our aim is to offer an outline of how to assess, investigate, and manage a patient with monoarthritis. Despite advances in antibiotic treatment diagnostic delay partly explains why septic arthritis is still associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. It is therefore imperative that joint infection is considered above all other diagnoses. Arthrocentesis is a relatively safe procedure and doctors in A&E medicine are encouraged to develop the skills required to aspirate large joints. In the same way that the A&E department is often portrayed as the shop window of a hospital, the joint can reflect a wide variety of internal diseases. Connective tissue disease, inflammatory bowel disease, sarcoidosis, and vasculitis can all present with a monoarthritis. A non-specific reactive monoarthritis may be a feature of a wide variety of common and uncommon infections including, brucellosis, Lyme disease, and leptospirosis. Drugs are also associated with acute arthritis either through their metabolic consequences or as idiosyncratic drug reactions. The ability for the joint to reflect multisystem disease necessitates close liaison with specialists from other fields. A multidisciplinary approach to the management of these patients is strongly encouraged as some will have unusual diseases that require specialist advice. It is not difficult to appreciate how the patient with monoarthritis can present the clinician with a fascinating diagnostic and therapeutic challenge, which we hope this article will help to unravel. Images PMID:10505918

  16. The anti-inflammatory and anti-hyperuricemic effects of Chinese herbal formula danggui-nian-tong-tang on acute gouty arthritis: a comparative study with indomethacin and allopurinol.

    PubMed

    Chou, C T; Kuo, S C

    1995-01-01

    The traditional Chinese antirheumatic herb Danggui-Nian-Tong-Tang (DGNTT) was studied comparatively with indomethacin and allopurinol to evaluate its anti-inflammatory and antihyperuricemic effects in patients with gout. Results in this study did not show any significant improvement in reducing the total number of painful and swollen joints, articular index and pain score (P > 0.05) by treatment with DGNTT. Unlike allopurinol, DGNTT did not lower the high serum level of uric acid. In vitro study in rats showed that DGNTT significantly inhibits the activity of beta-glucuronidase (P < 0.05) and lysozyme release (P < 0.01) from neutrophils. In conclusion, despite the effect of inhibition on enzyme release from neutrophils, DGNTT is not effective in treating acute arthritis or hyperuricemia.

  17. Septic shock caused by Sphingomonas paucimobilis bacteremia in a patient with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Al-Anazi, K A; Abu Jafar, S; Al-Jasser, A M; Al-Shangeeti, A; Chaudri, N A; Al Jurf, M D; Al-Mohareb, F I

    2008-04-01

    Sphingomonas paucimobilis is an aerobic gram-negative bacillus that causes a variety of infections in healthy as well as in immunocompromised individuals. The organism is usually susceptible to tetracycline, chloramphenicol, aminoglycosides, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and carbapenems. However, resistance to penicillins and the first-generation cephalosporins is commonly encountered. Reported here is a patient with acute myeloid leukemia who developed S. paucimobilis bacteremia complicated by septic shock just before receiving an autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant (SCT) at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre in Riyadh. The septic episode was successfully treated in the intensive care unit. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of septic shock caused by S. paucimobilis bacteremia in a hematopoietic SCT recipient.

  18. Fluid therapy for septic shock resuscitation: which fluid should be used?

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa, Thiago Domingos; Rocha, Leonardo Lima; Pessoa, Camila Menezes Souza; Silva, Eliézer; de Assuncao, Murillo Santucci Cesar

    2015-01-01

    Early resuscitation of septic shock patients reduces the sepsis-related morbidity and mortality. The main goals of septic shock resuscitation include volemic expansion, maintenance of adequate tissue perfusion and oxygen delivery, guided by central venous pressure, mean arterial pressure, mixed or central venous oxygen saturation and arterial lactate levels. An aggressive fluid resuscitation, possibly in association with vasopressors, inotropes and red blood cell concentrate transfusion may be necessary to achieve those hemodynamic goals. Nonetheless, even though fluid administration is one of the most common interventions offered to critically ill patients, the most appropriate type of fluid to be used remains controversial. According to recently published clinical trials, crystalloid solutions seem to be the most appropriate type of fluids for initial resuscitation of septic shock patients. Balanced crystalloids have theoretical advantages over the classic solutions, but there is not enough evidence to indicate it as first-line treatment. Additionally, when large amounts of fluids are necessary to restore the hemodynamic stability, albumin solutions may be a safe and effective alternative. Hydroxyethyl starches solutions must be avoided in septic patients due to the increased risk of acute renal failure, increased need for renal replacement therapy and increased mortality. Our objective was to present a narrative review of the literature regarding the major types of fluids and their main drawbacks in the initial resuscitation of the septic shock patients. PMID:26313437

  19. Urinary liver-type fatty acid-binding protein in septic shock: effect of polymyxin B-immobilized fiber hemoperfusion.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tsukasa; Sugaya, Takeshi; Koide, Hikaru

    2009-05-01

    We aimed to determine retrospectively whether urinary liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) levels are altered in patients with septic shock or severe sepsis without shock and whether polymyxin B-immobilized fiber (PMX-F) hemoperfusion affects these levels. Forty patients with septic shock, 20 patients with severe sepsis without shock, 20 acute renal failure (ARF) patients without septic shock (mean serum creatinine, 2.8 mg/dL), and 30 healthy volunteers were included in this study. Polymyxin B-immobilized fiber hemoperfusion was performed twice in 40 patients. In addition, 10 patients with septic shock without PMX-F treatment (conventional treatment) were also enrolled in this study. Their families did not choose PMX-F treatment. Thus, their informed consents to perform PMX-F treatment were not obtained. Septic shock or severe sepsis was defined by the American College of Chest Physicians/Society of Critical Care Medicine Consensus Conference Committee. Patients with septic shock were eligible for inclusion in the study if they had a definable source of infection and/or positive blood cultures. Patients with cardiogenic or hemorrhagic shock were excluded from the study. The patients were not randomly allocated to receive PMX-F treatment. Urinary and serum L-FABP levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. Plasma endotoxin levels in patients with septic shock were significantly higher than those in patients with severe sepsis (P < 0.05), patients with ARF (P < 0.001), and healthy subjects (P < 0.001). Urinary L-FABP levels in patients with septic shock were significantly higher than those in patients with severe sepsis without shock (P < 0.001), patients with ARF (P < 0.001), and healthy subjects (P < 0.001), whereas serum L-FABP levels showed no significant differences between patients with septic shock, patients with severe sepsis, patients with ARF, and healthy subjects. Urinary L-FABP was not correlated with serum L-FABP. Twenty

  20. [Rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Strunk, J; Lange, U; Müller-Ladner, U

    2005-07-29

    The development of novel anti-rheumatic drugs revolutionizes currently therapeutic strategies and diagnostic management of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, facilitating the goal of true remission instead of only symptomatic treatment as in former years. Since early treatment is known to be crucial for the longterm outcome, imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging and high-frequency ultrasonography including Doppler sonography, which allow direct visualization of very early pathologic alterations of synovitis, or even initial destruction, become increasingly important. Besides the established therapy with methotrexate, new drugs such as leflunomide or the use of various combination therapies have been successfully introduced into the therapeutic armamentarium. Especially the introduction of cytokine-antagonists such as TNF-a inhibitors target the aim of remission. In addition, the upcoming therapeutic agents, which influence very effectively the inflammatory and destructive process need also to be integrated into the concert of different therapeutic strategies in the management of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, which includes the mandatory complementary factors such as physiotherapy, ergotherapy and orthopedic surgery.

  1. Mortality Risk Factors for Patients with Septic Shock after Implementation of the Surviving Sepsis Campaign Bundles

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Moo Hyun; Jeong, Woo Yong; Jung, In Young; Oh, Dong Hyun; Kim, Yong Chan; Kim, Eun Jin; Jeong, Su Jin; Ku, Nam Su; Kim, June Myung

    2016-01-01

    Background Septic shock remains a leading cause of death, despite advances in critical care management. The Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) has reduced morbidity and mortality. This study evaluated risk factors for mortality in patients with septic shock who received treatment following the SSC bundles. Materials and Methods This retrospective cohort study included patients with septic shock who received treatments following SSC bundles in an urban emergency department between November 2007 and November 2011. Primary and secondary endpoints were all-cause 7- and 28-day mortality. Results Among 436 patients, 7- and 28-day mortality rates were 7.11% (31/436) and 14% (61/436), respectively. In multivariate analysis, high lactate level (odds ratio [OR], 1.286; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.016–1.627; P=0.036) and low estimated glomerular filtration rate (OR, 0.953; 95% CI, 0.913–0.996; P=0.032) were independent risk factors for 7-day mortality. Risk factors for 28-day mortality were high lactate level (OR, 1.346; 95% CI, 1.083–1.673; P=0.008) and high Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score (OR, 1.153; 95% CI, 1.029–1.293; P=0.014). Conclusion The risk of mortality of septic shock patients remains high in patients with high lactate levels and acute kidney injury. PMID:27659434

  2. Review of a large clinical series: Predicting death for patients with abdominal septic shock.

    PubMed

    Hanisch, Ernst; Brause, Rüdiger; Paetz, Jürgen; Arlt, Björn

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the result of the MEDAN project that analyzes a multicenter septic shock patient data collection. The mortality prognosis based on 4 scores that are often used is compared with the prognosis of a trained neural network. We built an alarm system using the network classification results. Method. We analyzed the data of 382 patients with abdominal septic shock who were admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) from 1998 to 2002. The analysis includes the calculation of daily sepsis-related organ failure assessment (SOFA), Acute Physiological and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II, simplified acute physiology score (SAPS) II, multiple-organ dysfunction score (MODS) scores for each patient and the training and testing of an appropriate neural network. Results. For our patients with abdominal septic shock, the analysis shows that it is not possible to predict their individual fate correctly on the day of admission to the ICU on the basis of any current score. However, when the trained network computes a score value below the threshold during the ICU stay, there is a high probability that the patient will die within 3 days. The trained neural network obtains the same outcome prediction performance as the best score, the SOFA score, using narrower confidence intervals and considering three variables only: systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and the number of thrombocytes. We conclude that the currently best available score for abdominal septic shock may be replaced by the output of a trained neural network with only 3 input variables. PMID:21262751

  3. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos was designed to help you ... Educational Videos for Patients Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Psoriatic Arthritis 101 2010 E.S.C.A.P. ...

  4. Nocardia brasiliensis infection mimicking juvenile idiopathic arthritis in a 4-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Nitin; Adib, Navid; Grimwood, Keith

    2013-11-01

    Nocardia are ubiquitous environmental saprophytes that cause pneumonia and disseminated disease in immunocompromised patients. They can also cause localized cutaneous and soft tissue infections in healthy people after direct percutaneous inoculation. Nocardia arthritis is rare in both forms of the disease. Here we present the first published case of a child with septic arthritis caused by N brasiliensis. Importantly, this otherwise well 4-year-old girl had no known history of trauma but presented with transient cutaneous lesions and a 6-week history of arthritis involving the right fourth digit proximal interphalangeal joint without accompanying fever or raised systemic inflammatory markers. She received a diagnosis of juvenile idiopathic arthritis and underwent antiinflammatory and immunosuppressant therapy. After 2 months she developed frank septic arthritis, which necessitated a surgical joint washout, from which an intraoperative swab grew N brasiliensis. The patient received 6 months of high-dose trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and remains well more than 4 years after treatment. This unusual case highlights the importance of considering an indolent infection from slow-growing organisms, including Nocardia, when diagnosing the oligoarthritis subtype of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. This is especially relevant when a single joint is involved and response to antiinflammatory therapy is suboptimal because antiinflammatory agents may mask evolving signs of infection.

  5. Chemical characterization of a red raspberry fruit extract and evaluation of its pharmacological effects in experimental models of acute inflammation and collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Figueira, M E; Câmara, M B; Direito, R; Rocha, J; Serra, A T; Duarte, C M M; Fernandes, A; Freitas, M; Fernandes, E; Marques, M C; Bronze, M R; Sepodes, B

    2014-12-01

    Berries are an important dietary source of fibres, vitamins, minerals and some biologically active non-nutrients. A red raspberry fruit extract was characterized in terms of phenolic content and the anti-inflammatory properties and protective effects were evaluated in two experimental models of inflammation. The antioxidant potential of the extract, the cellular antioxidant activity and the effects over neutrophils' oxidative burst were also studied to provide a mechanistic insight for the anti-inflammatory effects observed. The extract was administered in a dose of 15 mg kg(-1), i.p. and significantly inhibited paw oedema formation in the rat. The same dose was administered via i.p. and p.o. routes in the collagen-induced arthritis model in the rat. The extract showed pharmacological activity and was able to significantly reduce the development of clinical signs of arthritis and markedly reduce the degree of bone resorption, soft tissue swelling and osteophyte formation, preventing articular destruction in treated animals.

  6. Menstrual arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    McDonagh, J E; Singh, M M; Griffiths, I D

    1993-01-01

    The menstrual cycle is characterised by variations in the absolute and relative concentrations of the hormones of the hypothalamic pituitary ovarian axis, which in turn affect cell function and cytokine and heat shock protein production. Menstruation involves the shedding of the secretory endometrium, which is part of the mucosal associated lymphoid tissue and hence is rich in immunologically competent cells such as CD8 T cells and macrophages. The case is reported here of a patient presenting with a recurrent but transient symmetrical inflammatory polyarthritis which only occurred at menstruation with no residual damage. The disease was suppressed by danazol. Endometrial degradation products are suggested as the trigger of this 'menstrual arthritis'. PMID:8427519

  7. Septic system density and infectious diarrhea in a defined population of children.

    PubMed Central

    Borchardt, Mark A; Chyou, Po-Huang; DeVries, Edna O; Belongia, Edward A

    2003-01-01

    One-quarter of U.S. households use a septic system for wastewater disposal. In this study we investigated whether septic system density was associated with endemic diarrheal illness in children. Cases--children 1 to < 19 years old seeking medical care for acute diarrhea--and controls resided in the Marshfield Epidemiologic Study Area, a population-based cohort in central Wisconsin. Enrollment was from February 1997 through September 1998. Study participants completed a structured interview, and septic system density was determined from county sanitary permits. Household wells were sampled for bacterial pathogens and indicators of water sanitary quality. Risk factors were assessed for cases grouped by diarrhea etiology. In multivariate analyses, viral diarrhea was associated with the number of holding tank septic systems in the 640-acre section surrounding the case residence [adjusted odds ratio (AOR), 1.08; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.02-1.15; p = 0.008], and bacterial diarrhea was associated with the number of holding tanks per 40-acre quarter-quarter section (AOR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.02-1.46; p = 0.026). Diarrhea of unknown etiology was independently associated with drinking from a household well contaminated with fecal enterococci (AOR, 6.18; 95% CI, 1.22-31.46; p = 0.028). Septic system densities were associated with endemic diarrheal illness in central Wisconsin. The association should be investigated in other regions, and standards for septic systems should be evaluated to ensure that the public health is protected. PMID:12727604

  8. Treating Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Psoriatic Arthritis Info Kit Resources Community icon: Link text: Post your questions in our online community and ... psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Talk Psoriasis icon: Link text: Contact our Patient Navigators for free and confidential ...

  9. Classification of Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Psoriatic Arthritis Info Kit Resources Community icon: Link text: Post your questions in our online community and ... psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Talk Psoriasis icon: Link text: Contact our Patient Navigators for free and confidential ...

  10. Diagnosing Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Psoriatic Arthritis Info Kit Resources Community icon: Link text: Post your questions in our online community and ... psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Talk Psoriasis icon: Link text: Contact our Patient Navigators for free and confidential ...

  11. Rheumatoid arthritis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease in which the body's immune system attacks itself. The pattern of joints ... other joints and is worse in the morning. Rheumatoid arthritis is also a systemic disease, involving other body ...

  12. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA); Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; Still disease; Juvenile spondyloarthritis ... The cause of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is not known. It is thought to be an autoimmune illness . This means the body attacks ...

  13. Septic Shock Secondary to a Urinary Tract Infection with Pediococcus Pentosaceus.

    PubMed

    Han, Amneet; Mehta, Jeet; Pauly, Rebecca R

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a urinary tract infection secondary to Pediococcus pentosaceus causing septic shock and acute kidney injury in a 70-year-old male. We demonstrate successful treatment with a 10-day course of piperacillin/tazobactam. Recently, Pediococci have been found to be the cause of opportunistic infections in humans. This has posed a challenge to treating infections caused by this species because it has been found to be resistant to multiple antibiotics, including glycopeptides. PMID:27443041

  14. [Septic shock due to a community acquired Clostridium difficile infection. A case study and a review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Bermejo, C; Maseda, E; Salgado, P; Gabilondo, G; Gilsanz, F

    2014-04-01

    The epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection has changed in the past decade. The incidence rate of community acquired cases has increased in patients with no typical risk factors. We present a patient who was diagnosed with community-acquired Clostridium difficile infection who presented with acute abdominal pain, and subsequently developed acute renal failure and septic shock. We describe the diagnosis, treatment and outcome and brief review of the literature.

  15. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic considerations when treating patients with sepsis and septic shock.

    PubMed

    De Paepe, Peter; Belpaire, Frans M; Buylaert, Walter A

    2002-01-01

    Sepsis and septic shock are accompanied by profound changes in the organism that may alter both the pharmacokinetics and the pharmacodynamics of drugs. This review elaborates on the mechanisms by which sepsis-induced pathophysiological changes may influence pharmacological processes. Drug absorption following intramuscular, subcutaneous, transdermal and oral administration may be reduced due to a decreased perfusion of muscles, skin and splanchnic organs. Compromised tissue perfusion may also affect drug distribution, resulting in a decrease of distribution volume. On the other hand, the increase in capillary permeability and interstitial oedema during sepsis and septic shock may enhance drug distribution. Changes in plasma protein binding, body water, tissue mass and pH may also affect drug distribution. For basic drugs that are bound to the acute phase reactant alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein, the increase in plasma concentration of this protein will result in a decreased distribution volume. The opposite may be observed for drugs that are extensively bound to albumin, as the latter protein decreases during septic conditions. For many drugs, the liver is the main organ for metabolism. The determinants of hepatic clearance of drugs are liver blood flow, drug binding in plasma and the activity of the metabolic enzymes; each of these may be influenced by sepsis and septic shock. For high extraction drugs, clearance is mainly flow-dependent, and sepsis-induced liver hypoperfusion may result in a decreased clearance. For low extraction drugs, clearance is determined by the degree of plasma binding and the activity of the metabolic enzymes. Oxidative metabolism via the cytochrome P450 enzyme system is an important clearance mechanism for many drugs, and has been shown to be markedly affected in septic conditions, resulting in decreased drug clearance. The kidneys are an important excretion pathway for many drugs. Renal failure, which often accompanies sepsis and septic

  16. Histopathology of Lyme arthritis in LSH hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Hejka, A.; Schmitz, J.L.; England, D.M.; Callister, S.M.; Schell, R.F.

    1989-05-01

    The authors studied the histopathologic evolution of arthritis in nonirradiated and irradiated hamsters infected with Borrelia burgdorferi. Nonirradiated hamsters injected in the hind paws with B. burgdorferi developed an acute inflammatory reaction involving the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and dermis. This acute inflammatory reaction was short-lived and was replaced by a mild chronic synovitis as the number of detectable spirochetes in the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and perineurovascular areas diminished. Exposing hamsters to radiation before inoculation with B. burgdorferi exacerbated and prolonged the acute inflammatory phase. Spirochetes also persisted longer in the periarticular soft tissues. A major histopathologic finding was destructive and erosive bone changes of the hind paws, which resulted in deformation of the joints. These studies should be helpful in defining the immune mechanism participating in the onset, progression, and resolution of Lyme arthritis.

  17. Septic cavernous sinus thrombosis caused by tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Xia, Peng; Jiao, Yang

    2014-01-01

    We report a rare case of acute, septic cavernous sinus thrombosis (SCST) caused by tuberculosis infection. The diagnosis of SCST was suspected and rapidly confirmed based on high fever, dramatic and typical signs of left cranial nerve paralysis and the result of digital subtraction angiography after the onset of the disease. However, the diagnosis of tuberculosis infection was missed, and the 55-year-old patient was treated with high-dose glucocorticoid, anticoagulants and a series of intravenous antibiotics for bacteria. His symptoms failed to improve, and steroid treatment resulted in serious haematogenous dissemination of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, including miliary tuberculosis and tuberculosis verrucosa cutis, which led to the final diagnosis. Then, the patient received a five-agent antituberculosis treatment. He was recently followed up with only the sequelae of left side ptosis and oculomotor weakness. PMID:25425249

  18. Animal Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis (I): Pristane-Induced Arthritis in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Tuncel, Jonatan; Haag, Sabrina; Hoffmann, Markus H.; Yau, Anthony C. Y.; Hultqvist, Malin; Olofsson, Peter; Bäcklund, Johan; Nandakumar, Kutty Selva; Weidner, Daniela; Fischer, Anita; Leichsenring, Anna; Lange, Franziska; Haase, Claus; Lu, Shemin; Gulko, Percio S.; Steiner, Günter; Holmdahl, Rikard

    2016-01-01

    Background To facilitate the development of therapies for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the Innovative Medicines Initiative BTCure has combined the experience from several laboratories worldwide to establish a series of protocols for different animal models of arthritis that reflect the pathogenesis of RA. Here, we describe chronic pristane-induced arthritis (PIA) model in DA rats, and provide detailed instructions to set up and evaluate the model and for reporting data. Methods We optimized dose of pristane and immunization procedures and determined the effect of age, gender, and housing conditions. We further assessed cage-effects, reproducibility, and frequency of chronic arthritis, disease markers, and efficacy of standard and novel therapies. Results Out of 271 rats, 99.6% developed arthritis after pristane-administration. Mean values for day of onset, day of maximum arthritis severity and maximum clinical scores were 11.8±2.0 days, 20.3±5.1 days and 34.2±11 points on a 60-point scale, respectively. The mean frequency of chronic arthritis was 86% but approached 100% in long-term experiments over 110 days. Pristane was arthritogenic even at 5 microliters dose but needed to be administrated intradermally to induce robust disease with minimal variation. The development of arthritis was age-dependent but independent of gender and whether the rats were housed in conventional or barrier facilities. PIA correlated well with weight loss and acute phase reactants, and was ameliorated by etanercept, dexamethasone, cyclosporine A and fingolimod treatment. Conclusions PIA has high incidence and excellent reproducibility. The chronic relapsing-remitting disease and limited systemic manifestations make it more suitable than adjuvant arthritis for long-term studies of joint-inflammation and screening and validation of new therapeutics. PMID:27227821

  19. Peripheral arthritis in the elderly: a hospital study.

    PubMed Central

    Jenkinson, M L; Bliss, M R; Brain, A T; Scott, D L

    1989-01-01

    One hundred consecutive patients admitted to an acute geriatric unit were examined for evidence of peripheral arthritis with recognised criteria used to define osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, pyrophosphate arthropathy, gout, and disorders of the shoulder joint. The presence of arthritis and its severity were related both to functional independence and to a recognition by the patient that joint problems were impairing independence. Seventy six patients had clinical peripheral arthritis; 48 had arthritis contributing to loss of function, and 19 of these did not volunteer evidence of their joint disease. The common occurrence of arthritic conditions in the elderly, with consequential disability and dependency, suggests that increased medical awareness may be required to prevent unnecessary morbidity. Our findings need confirmation in community based studies. PMID:2930278

  20. Effectiveness of mechanical embolectomy for septic embolus in the cerebral artery complicated with infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Gimoon; Yang, Tae Ki; Choi, Joon Hyouk; Heo, Sang Taek

    2013-08-01

    There has been a controversy over data of thrombolytic and endovascular surgical treatment about cerebral infarction secondary to infective endocarditis. We report a woman who received early mechanical embolectomy as a treatment of acute stroke with infective endocarditis. A 35-yr-old woman was hospitalized due to right hemiparesis. Brain image showed cerebral infarction at the middle cerebral artery and echocardiography demonstrated vegetation at the mitral valve. She was successfully treated with embolectomy and parenteral antibiotics without any neurologic sequelae. This report shows that the early retrieve of septic cerebral emboli can be a helpful treatment of acute stroke associated with endocarditis.

  1. ICPMS analysis of proteins separated by Native-PAGE: Evaluation of metaloprotein profiles in human synovial fluid with acute and chronic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Moyano, Mario F; Mariño-Repizo, Leonardo; Tamashiro, Héctor; Villegas, Liliana; Acosta, Mariano; Gil, Raúl A

    2016-07-01

    The role of trace elements bound to proteins in the etiology and pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remains unclear. In this sense, the identification and detection of metalloproteins has a strong and growing interest. Metalloprotein studies are currently carried out by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) associated to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS), and despite that complete information can be obtained for metals such as Fe, Cu and Zn, difficulties due to poor sensitivity for other trace elements such as Sn, As, etc, are currently faced. In the present work, a simple and fast method for the determination of trace metals bound to synovial fluid (SF) proteins was optimized. Proteins from SF (long and short-term RA) were separated in ten fractions by native PAGE, then dissolved in nitric acid and peroxide hydrogen, and analyzed by ICPMS. Fifteen metals were determined in each separated protein fraction (band). Adequate calibration of proteins molecular weight allowed stablishing which protein type were bound to different metals.

  2. Developing a New Definition and Assessing New Clinical Criteria for Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Shankar-Hari, Manu; Phillips, Gary S.; Levy, Mitchell L.; Seymour, Christopher W.; Liu, Vincent X.; Deutschman, Clifford S.; Angus, Derek C.; Rubenfeld, Gordon D.; Singer, Mervyn

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Septic shock currently refers to a state of acute circulatory failure associated with infection. Emerging biological insights and reported variation in epidemiology challenge the validity of this definition. OBJECTIVE To develop a new definition and clinical criteria for identifying septic shock in adults. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS The Society of Critical Care Medicine and the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine convened a task force (19 participants) to revise current sepsis/septic shock definitions. Three sets of studies were conducted: (1) a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies in adults published between January 1, 1992, and December 25, 2015, to determine clinical criteria currently reported to identify septic shock and inform the Delphi process; (2) a Delphi study among the task force comprising 3 surveys and discussions of results from the systematic review, surveys, and cohort studies to achieve consensus on a new septic shock definition and clinical criteria; and (3) cohort studies to test variables identified by the Delphi process using Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) (2005–2010; n = 28 150), University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) (2010–2012; n = 1 309 025), and Kaiser Permanente Northern California (KPNC) (2009–2013; n = 1 847 165) electronic health record (EHR) data sets. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Evidence for and agreement on septic shock definitions and criteria. RESULTS The systematic review identified 44 studies reporting septic shock outcomes (total of 166 479 patients) from a total of 92 sepsis epidemiology studies reporting different cutoffs and combinations for blood pressure (BP), fluid resuscitation, vasopressors, serum lactate level, and base deficit to identify septic shock. The septic shock–associated crude mortality was 46.5% (95%CI, 42.7%–50.3%), with significant between-study statistical heterogeneity (I2 = 99.5%; τ2 = 182.5; P < .001). The Delphi process identified

  3. Arthritis: joints inflamed.

    PubMed

    Casey, Georgina

    2015-06-01

    ARTHRITIS IS a generic term for inflammatory joint disease. There are various forms of arthritis, including osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthritis. Arthritis can be a chronic debilitating condition or a transient effect of bacterial or viral infections. As a chronic condition, arthritis can cause loss of quality of life, disability and, with rheumatoid disease, early death. The economic burden of arthritis, in terms of management and loss of productivity due to disability, is high and set to increase with the ageing population. Recent advances in our understanding of the causes and progression of a number of forms of arthritis have raised hopes of better management and possible remission. Pharmacotherapy has moved from symptom management to addressing underlying disease processes. However, therapies that prevent or cure arthritis remain elusive. Current care for people with arthritis relies on a multidisciplinary approach and substantial pharmacological intervention. Nurses have a key role to play in guiding patients through treatment, ensuring they receive optimal therapy to reduce the impact of arthritis and its management on their lives.

  4. Norovirus outbreak caused by a new septic system in a dolomite aquifer.

    PubMed

    Borchardt, Mark A; Bradbury, Kenneth R; Alexander, E Calvin; Kolberg, Rhonda J; Alexander, Scott C; Archer, John R; Braatz, Laurel A; Forest, Brian M; Green, Jeffrey A; Spencer, Susan K

    2011-01-01

    Septic systems that are built in compliance with regulations are generally not expected to be the cause of groundwater borne disease outbreaks, especially in areas with thick vadose zones. However, this case study demonstrates that a disease outbreak can occur in such a setting and outlines the combination of epidemiological, microbiological, and hydrogeological methods used to confirm the source of the outbreak. In early June 2007, 229 patrons and employees of a new restaurant in northeastern Wisconsin were affected by acute gastroenteritis; 6 people were hospitalized. Epidemiological case-control analysis indicated that drinking the restaurant's well water was associated with illness (odds ratio = 3.2, 95% confidence interval = 0.9 to 11.4, P = 0.06). Microbiological analysis (quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction) measured 50 genomic copies per liter of norovirus genogroup I in the well water. Nucleotide sequencing determined the genotype as GI.2 and further showed the identical virus was present in patrons' stool specimens and in the septic tank. Tracer tests using dyes injected at two points in the septic system showed that effluent was traveling from the tanks (through a leaking fitting) and infiltration field to the well in 6 and 15 d, respectively. The restaurant septic system and well (85-m deep, in a fractured dolomite aquifer) both conformed to state building codes. The early arrival of dye in the well, which was 188 m from the septic field and located beneath a 35-m thick vadose zone, demonstrates that in highly vulnerable hydrogeological settings, compliance with regulations may not provide adequate protection from fecal pathogens.

  5. Norovirus Outbreak Caused by a New Septic System in a Dolomite Aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borchardt, M. A.; Bradbury, K.R.; Alexander, E.C.; Kolberg, R.J.; Alexander, S.C.; Archer, J.R.; Braatz, L.A.; Forest, B.M.; Green, J.A.; Spencer, S. K.

    2011-01-01

    Septic systems that are built in compliance with regulations are generally not expected to be the cause of groundwater borne disease outbreaks, especially in areas with thick vadose zones. However, this case study demonstrates that a disease outbreak can occur in such a setting and outlines the combination of epidemiological, microbiological, and hydrogeological methods used to confirm the source of the outbreak. In early June 2007, 229 patrons and employees of a new restaurant in northeastern Wisconsin were affected by acute gastroenteritis; 6 people were hospitalized. Epidemiological case-control analysis indicated that drinking the restaurant's well water was associated with illness (odds ratio = 3.2, 95% confidence interval = 0.9 to 11.4, P = 0.06). Microbiological analysis (quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction) measured 50 genomic copies per liter of norovirus genogroup I in the well water. Nucleotide sequencing determined the genotype as GI.2 and further showed the identical virus was present in patrons' stool specimens and in the septic tank. Tracer tests using dyes injected at two points in the septic system showed that effluent was traveling from the tanks (through a leaking fitting) and infiltration field to the well in 6 and 15 d, respectively. The restaurant septic system and well (85-m deep, in a fractured dolomite aquifer) both conformed to state building codes. The early arrival of dye in the well, which was 188 m from the septic field and located beneath a 35-m thick vadose zone, demonstrates that in highly vulnerable hydrogeological settings, compliance with regulations may not provide adequate protection from fecal pathogens. Copyright ?? 2010 The Author(s). Journal compilation ?? 2010 National Ground Water Association.

  6. Domestic wells have high probability of pumping septic tank leachate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, J. E.; Harter, T.

    2011-06-01

    Onsite wastewater treatment systems such as septic systems are common in rural and semi-rural areas around the world; in the US, about 25-30 % of households are served by a septic system and a private drinking water well. Site-specific conditions and local groundwater flow are often ignored when installing septic systems and wells. Particularly in areas with small lots, thus a high septic system density, these typically shallow wells are prone to contamination by septic system leachate. Typically, mass balance approaches are used to determine a maximum septic system density that would prevent contamination of the aquifer. In this study, we estimate the probability of a well pumping partially septic system leachate. A detailed groundwater and transport model is used to calculate the capture zone of a typical drinking water well. A spatial probability analysis is performed to assess the probability that a capture zone overlaps with a septic system drainfield depending on aquifer properties, lot and drainfield size. We show that a high septic system density poses a high probability of pumping septic system leachate. The hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer has a strong influence on the intersection probability. We conclude that mass balances calculations applied on a regional scale underestimate the contamination risk of individual drinking water wells by septic systems. This is particularly relevant for contaminants released at high concentrations, for substances which experience limited attenuation, and those being harmful even in low concentrations.

  7. Domestic wells have high probability of pumping septic tank leachate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremer, J. E.; Harter, T.

    2012-08-01

    Onsite wastewater treatment systems are common in rural and semi-rural areas around the world; in the US, about 25-30% of households are served by a septic (onsite) wastewater treatment system, and many property owners also operate their own domestic well nearby. Site-specific conditions and local groundwater flow are often ignored when installing septic systems and wells. In areas with small lots (thus high spatial septic system densities), shallow domestic wells are prone to contamination by septic system leachate. Mass balance approaches have been used to determine a maximum septic system density that would prevent contamination of groundwater resources. In this study, a source area model based on detailed groundwater flow and transport modeling is applied for a stochastic analysis of domestic well contamination by septic leachate. Specifically, we determine the probability that a source area overlaps with a septic system drainfield as a function of aquifer properties, septic system density and drainfield size. We show that high spatial septic system density poses a high probability of pumping septic system leachate. The hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer has a strong influence on the intersection probability. We find that mass balance calculations applied on a regional scale underestimate the contamination risk of individual drinking water wells by septic systems. This is particularly relevant for contaminants released at high concentrations, for substances that experience limited attenuation, and those that are harmful even at low concentrations (e.g., pathogens).

  8. Long term prognosis of reactive salmonella arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Leirisalo-Repo, M; Helenius, P; Hannu, T; Lehtinen, A; Kreula, J; Taavitsainen, M; Koskimies, S

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Reactive joint complications triggered by salmonella gastroenteritis are increasingly reported, but the outcome and long term prognosis of the patients is incompletely known. This study looked at the prognosis of salmonella arthritis in patients hospitalised in 1970-1986.
METHODS—Hospital records from two hospitals in southern Finland were screened for patients with the discharge diagnosis of salmonellosis or reactive, postinfectious arthritis or Reiter's disease. For the patients with confirmed diagnosis of reactive salmonella arthritis, data about the acute disease were collected from the hospital records. A follow up study was performed.
RESULTS—There were 63 patients (28 women, 35 men, mean age 36.5 years) with salmonella arthritis. Urethritis occurred in 27%, eye inflammation in 13%, and low back pain in 44% of the patients. HLA-B27 was present in 88%. More men than women were HLA-B27 positive. HLA-B27 positive patients had higher erythrocyte sedimentation rate (mean 80.9 v 46.5 mm 1st h, p = 0.0180). Also, extra-articular features and radiological sacroiliitis were seen only in HLA-B27 positive patients. A follow up study was performed on 50 patients mean 11.0 (range 5-22 years) later. Twenty patients had recovered completely. Ten patients had mild joint symptoms, 11 patients had had a new acute transient arthritis, and five acute iritis. Eight patients had developed chronic spondyloarthropathy. Radiological sacroiliitis was seen in six of 44 patients, more frequently in male than in female patients (32% v 0%; p = 0.0289). Recurrent or chronic arthritis, iritis or radiological sacroiliitis developed only in HLA-B27 positive patients.
CONCLUSION—Joint symptoms are common after reactive salmonella arthritis. HLA-B27 contributes to the severity of acute disease and to the late prognosis.

 PMID:9370874

  9. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos was designed ... Activity Role of Body Weight in Osteoarthritis Educational Videos for Patients Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Psoriatic ...

  10. Septic Pelvic Thrombophlebitis Following Laparoscopic Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Farhady, Parastoo; Lemyre, Madeleine

    2009-01-01

    Background: The diagnosis of septic pelvic thrombophlebitis is frequently one of exclusion; a suspicion should arise when fever fails to respond to standard broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy and defervesces within 48 hours of the addition of systemic anticoagulation. The risk of a thromboembolic event following minimally invasive surgery is not well defined. Case Report: We report the first case of septic pelvic thrombophlebitis following laparoscopic hysterectomy in a 51-year-old woman who developed fever on postoperative day 4. The fever workup was negative. The patient's temperature spikes were unresponsive to medical management. A clinical diagnosis of septic pelvic thrombophlebitis was made, and the patient responded excellently to anticoagulation in conjunction with antibiotic therapy. Conclusion: Although rare, septic pelvic thrombophlebitis should be suspected after laparoscopy in patients with appropriate risk factors and persistent fever despite antibiotic therapy. Considerable benefit will be derived from clinical trials that study and provide data on the risk and incidence of thromboembolism after laparoscopic procedures. PMID:19366549

  11. Costochondral junction osteomyelitis in 3 septic foals

    PubMed Central

    Cesarini, Carla; Macieira, Susana; Girard, Christiane; Drolet, Richard; d’Anjou, Marc-André; Jean, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The costochondral junction constitutes a potential site of infection in septic foals and it could be favored by thoracic trauma. Standard radiographs and ultrasonography are useful tools for diagnosis of this condition and ultrasound-guided needle aspiration could permit the definitive confirmation of infection. PMID:22210943

  12. Infectious arthritis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Mateo Soria, L; Miquel Nolla Solé, J; Rozadilla Sacanell, A; Valverde García, J; Roig Escofet, D

    1992-01-01

    Eleven cases of infectious arthritis occurring in patients with rheumatoid arthritis are reported. Staphylococcus aureus was the causative organism in eight patients. Streptococcus anginosus and Streptococcus agalactiae in one patient each, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in two patients. The mean duration of symptoms before diagnosis was 16 days in patients with pyogenic arthritis. The diagnosis of joint infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis was especially delayed (57 days). Four patients died; they were found to have a longer time to diagnosis and two of them had multiple joint infection. Although Staphylococcus aureus is the microorganism most often affecting patients with rheumatoid arthritis, infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis must also be considered in such patients. PMID:1575593

  13. The effects of a minimally invasive laser needle system on complete Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Heesung; Son, Taeyoon; Lee, Aeju; Youn, Inchan; Seo, Dong Hyun; Kim, Han Sung; Jung, Byungjo

    2014-09-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of a minimally invasive laser needle system (MILNS) on the acute progression of arthritis. Previous studies showed controversial clinical results regarding the effects of low-level laser therapy on arthritis, with the outcomes depending upon stimulation parameters such as laser wavelength and dosage. Based on the positive effects of MILNS on osteoporotic mice, we hypothesized that MILNS could potentially suppress the progression of arthritis owing to its biostimulation effects. Eight C57BL/6 mice with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced arthritis were used as acute progression arthritis models and divided into the laser and control groups (n = 4 each). In the laser group, after minimally invasive laser stimulation, laser speckle contrast images (LSCIs) were obtained every 6 h for a total of 108 h. The LSCIs in the control group were obtained without laser stimulation. The effects of MILNS on the acute progression of arthritis were indirectly evaluated by calculating the paw area and the average laser speckle index (LSI) at the arthritis-induced area. Moreover, the macrophage population was estimated in the arthritis-induced area. Compared to the control group, the laser group showed (1) lower relative variations of the paw area, (2) lower average LSI in the arthritis-induced area, and (3) lower macrophage population in the arthritis-induced area. These results indicate that MILNS may suppress the acute progression of CFA-induced arthritis in mice and may thus be used as a potential treatment modality of arthritis in clinics.

  14. An unusual cause of factitious arthritis.

    PubMed

    Süha, T; Ali, A; Ozgen, C G; Ozgür, T; Yunus, K

    2013-04-01

    Septic arthritis and toxic synovitis are clinical conditions that can develop in association with various causes and involve symptoms such as pain, swelling, redness, sensitivity and restricted movement in the joint. A 42-year-old male presented to the emergency department with severe joint pain and nausea after injecting a 1-cc mixture of turpentine oil, eucalyptus oil, mint oil and thyme oil, which he purchased from an alternative medicine store, into his right knee with a syringe because of chronic knee pain. Ballottement and sensitivity were present at physical examination. Knee puncture yielded 60 cc of cloudy fluid. There was no growth in the material obtained. Improvement was observed following subsequent arthroscopic washing of the joint space and IV antibiotherapy, and the patient was discharged on day 21 of hospitalization with oral antibiotic and analgesic therapy. Intra-articular injection of foreign bodies into the knee joint space for therapeutic purposes, as in this case report, is a very rare occurrence, but may lead to potentially complicated arthritis. PMID:22918066

  15. Morin, a dietary bioflavonol suppresses monosodium urate crystal-induced inflammation in an animal model of acute gouty arthritis with reference to NLRP3 inflammasome, hypo-xanthine phospho-ribosyl transferase, and inflammatory mediators.

    PubMed

    Dhanasekar, Chitra; Rasool, Mahaboobkhan

    2016-09-01

    The anti-inflammatory effect of morin, a dietary bioflavanol was explored on monosodium urate (MSU) crystal-induced inflammation in rats, an experimental model for acute gouty arthritis. Morin treatment (30mg/kg b.wt) significantly attenuated the ankle swelling and the levels of lipid peroxidation, nitric oxide, serum pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor (TNF) -α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6), monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and articular elastase along with an increased anti-oxidant status (catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) in the joint homogenate of MSU crystal-induced rats. Histological assessment revealed that morin limited the diffusion of joint space, synovial hyperplasia, and inflammatory cell infiltrations. The mRNA expression of NLRP3 (nucleotide oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3) inflammasome, caspase-1, pro-inflammatory cytokines, MCP-1, inflammatory enzymes (inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)), and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65 was found downregulated and HPRT (hypo-xanthine phospho-ribosyl transferase) mRNA expression was upregulated in morin treated MSU crystal-induced rats. In addition, morin treatment reduced the protein expression of NF-κB p65, p-NF-κB p65, iNOS, COX-2, and TNF-α. The results clearly demonstrated that morin exert a potent anti-inflammatory effect on MSU crystal-induced inflammation in rats.

  16. Enhanced sludge reduction in septic tanks by increasing temperature.

    PubMed

    Pussayanavin, Tatchai; Koottatep, Thammarat; Eamrat, Rawintra; Polprasert, Chongrak

    2015-01-01

    Septic tanks in most developing countries are constructed without drainage trenches or leaching fields to treat toilet wastewater and /or grey water. Due to the short hydraulic retention time, effluents of these septic tanks are still highly polluted, and there is usually high accumulation of septic tank sludge or septage containing high levels of organics and pathogens that requires frequent desludging and subsequent treatment. This study aimed to reduce sludge accumulation in septic tanks by increasing temperatures of the septic tank content. An experimental study employing two laboratory-scale septic tanks fed with diluted septage and operating at temperatures of 40 and 30°C was conducted. At steady-state conditions, there were more methanogenic activities occurring in the sludge layer of the septic tank operating at the temperature of 40°C, resulting in less total volatile solids (TVS) or sludge accumulation and more methane (CH4) production than in the unit operating at 30°C. Molecular analysis found more abundance and diversity of methanogenic microorganisms in the septic tank sludge operating at 40°C than at 30°C. The reduced TVS accumulation in the 40°C septic tank would lengthen the period of septage removal, resulting in a cost-saving in desluging and septage treatment. Cost-benefit analysis of increasing temperatures in septic tanks was discussed.

  17. Emergency percutaneous nephrostomy in the septic kidney.

    PubMed

    Nicolescu, D; Boja, R; Osanu, V; Bakos, I; Negrut, I; Cantar, C; Schwartz, L

    1992-01-01

    From 250 upper tract obstructive uropathy cases we have studied 64 patients hospitalized with toxico-septic shock. The constant symptom was arterial hypotension. Other 3 patients with long-standing urinary infection due to lithiasis developed this dreaded complication after PNL (staghorn stones-2, pyelic stone-1). In complicated obstructive uropathy cases associated with toxico-septic shock, percutaneous nephrostomy for high urinary derivation in emergency is usually made under local anaesthesia. Its aim is rapid and efficient clearance of kidney obstruction, with minimal damage for the patient; then it is followed by strong antibiotherapy associated with other reanimation and intensive care measures. There were 11 deaths. The stone generating obstructive uropathy was removed subsequently, after the improvement of biological constants and general state of the patient, under the protection of percutaneous nephrostomy.

  18. Septic neonate rescued by polymyxin B hemoperfusion.

    PubMed

    Hirakawa, Eiji; Ibara, Satoshi; Tokuhisa, Takuya; Hiwatashi, Sayuri; Hayashida, Yoshihiro; Maede, Yoshinobu; Matsui, Takako; Nakazawa, Yusuke; Inoue, Takeshi; Kodaira, Yuichi

    2013-06-01

    Sepsis caused by group B streptococcus has been well controlled with aminobenzylpenicillin, but the incidence of Escherichia coli sepsis has increased in proportion. E. coli is a Gram-negative bacillus associated with poor prognosis due to the release of endotoxins. Conventional treatment with antibiotics alone may not be sufficient because the inflammatory response exacerbates the unstable hemodynamic status. Polymyxin B hemoperfusion has been established as a treatment option for septic shock in adults. Polymyxin B hemoperfusion adsorbs endotoxins and cannabinoids such as anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol. Reported herein is a case of severe septic shock induced by E. coli. The concomitant use of polymyxin B hemoperfusion rapidly reduced the requirement for catecholamines and the patient was discharged without short-term neurological or respiratory sequelae. It is suggested that polymyxin B hemoperfusion might be an innovative therapy for severe sepsis, and could improve outcome.

  19. [The painful hip joint in the child: differential diagnosis and therapy of coxitis fugax, Perthes disease and septic coxitis].

    PubMed

    Parsch, K

    1992-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of a painful hip joint in children is important. Transient synovitis is frequently seen in children from 3 to 7 years of age with a short history of limping. The joint effusion is visualized by ultrasound. Radiograms and laboratory data are negative. Therapy consists of short term bed rest supported by an oral antiphlogistic drug. Children with Legg-Calve-Perthes disease complain about knee or hip pain in an early stage. X-ray documentation in the a.p and axial view are mandatory as well as ultrasound visualization of the accompanying effusion. Healing of the capital femural epiphysis is aided by weight relief and improved head containment. This may need from one to three years according to the age of the child and the amount of head involvement. More than half of the children's hips with Perthes disease surgical help to achieve a satisfactory result. Hip pain is overwhelming in cases of septic arthritis of the hip joint. This is the most important help to differentiate septic coxitis from transient synovitis or Perthes disease. Rapidly rising values of red cell sedimentation and c-reactive protein are important for early diagnosis. Septic effusions are visualized by ultrasound. X-ray changes are absent in the beginning and are seen only in delayed cases. Early arthrotomy with scrupulous rinsing of the joint, followed by parenteral antibiotic treatment, is the treatment of choice.

  20. Vasopressin in sepsis and septic shock.

    PubMed

    Kampmeier, T G; Rehberg, S; Westphal, M; Lange, M

    2010-10-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) and its synthetic, long-acting analog terlipressin (TP) are potent alternative vasoconstrictors in the treatment of septic patients with catecholamine-refractive vasodilatatory shock. The results from one large randomized clinical trial suggest that AVP plus norepinephrine (NE) infusion is as safe and effective as treatment with NE alone in patients with septic shock. Because the desired effects of vasopressin analogs are basically related to their vasopressinergic effects via the V1a receptor, more selective V1 agonists, such as TP, may be more potent in reversing sepsis-related arterial hypotension. In this regard, recent evidence from small-scale studies suggests that continuous low-dose infusion rather than intermittent bolus injection of TP is associated with fewer side effects, such as depression of cardiac output and rebound arterial hypotension. However, because clinical data on the administration of TP in patients with sepsis are limited, it should not currently be used beyond the scope of controlled trials. The optimal time point for the initiation of therapy with vasopressin analogs has yet to be determined. While AVP and TP are commonly used as last-resort therapies in severe septic shock, some evidence supports the initiation of treatment in a less severe state of the disease.

  1. Postinfectious Arthritis in Pediatric Practice

    PubMed Central

    PLESCA, Doina Anca; LUMINOS, Monica; SPATARIU, Luminita; STEFANESCU, Mihaela; CINTEZA, Eliza; BALGRADEAN, Mihaela

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Postinfectious arthritis is a relatively often encountered in pediatric practice. The authors present the most important data concerneing this pathology, with up to date informations exemplifying with case presentations. Clinical cases bring to attention the most common forms of postinfectious arthritis (reactive arthritis, postinfectious arthritis bacterial, viral, spirochete, and so on). Although highly studied and commonly found in current pediatric practice, arthritis occurring after infections remains controversial entities, especially regarding terminology. While, according to some authors, postinfectious arthritis belongs to the large group of reactive arthritis, by other authors, these joint events are independent entities. PMID:24371480

  2. Dynamics of Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus in septic tanks.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Andrew J; Amador, Manuel; Diaz, Annette; Smith, Josh; Barrera, Roberto

    2009-12-01

    Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus were found in large numbers emerging from septic tanks in southern Puerto Rico during the dry season. Previous studies suggested that Ae. aegypti uses subterranean aquatic habitats only during dry periods when surface containers do not have water. This research investigated whether septic tanks are alternative aquatic habitats that this mosquito uses during unfavorable times of the year, or whether Ae. aegypti uses this aquatic habitat throughout the year. To assess temporal change, exit traps were used to collect mosquitoes emerging from septic tanks in Playa/Playita, southern Puerto Rico, from November 2006 to October 2007. We also investigated the hypotheses that (1) the production of Ae. aegypti in septic tanks was larger than in surface containers and (2) adult mosquitoes emerging from septic tanks were larger than those emerging from surface containers. This study demonstrated that unsealed septic tanks produced large numbers of Ae. aegypti and Cx. quinquefasciatus throughout the year, without any significant relationship with rainfall. The number of adult Ae. aegypti emerging per day from septic tanks in each community was 3 to 9 times larger than those produced in surface containers. It was also demonstrated that Ae. aegypti emerging from septic tanks were significantly larger than those emerging from surface container habitats. It is recommended that dengue prevention programs include regular inspection and maintenance of septic tanks in communities lacking sewerage.

  3. Oxygen challenge test in septic shock patients: prognostic value and influence of respiratory status.

    PubMed

    Mari, Arnaud; Vallée, Fabrice; Bedel, Jérome; Riu, Béatrice; Ruiz, Jean; Sanchez-Verlaan, Pascale; Geeraerts, Thomas; Génestal, Michèle; Silva, Stein; Fourcade, Olivier

    2014-06-01

    Transcutaneous oxygen pressure (PtcO2) value in response to an increase of FiO2 or oxygen challenge test (OCT) in ventilated patients has been reported to be related to peripheral perfusion and outcome during septic shock. However, patients with sepsis-related acute respiratory distress syndrome could demonstrate compromised arterial oxygenation with OCT impairment decoupled to circulatory failure. The aims of this study were to confirm the prognostic value of OCT and to explore the influence of respiratory status on OCT results. This was a prospective study set in an intensive care unit of a tertiary teaching hospital. Fifty-six mechanically ventilated patients with septic shock criteria were studied. Transcutaneous oxygen pressure was measured at baseline and after OCT, at intensive care unit admittance (T0), and 24 h later (T24). Survival at day 28 and hemodynamic and respiratory parameters were analyzed and compared according to outcome and respiratory status. Central hemodynamic parameters or static transcutaneous data did not differ between survivors and nonsurvivors at enrollment. The OCT was statistically different at T24 according to outcome (P < 0.001), but sensitivity was low (53%). Moreover, patients with low OCT results at T24 exhibited more severe respiratory failure (P < 0.01). The OCT at T24 is related to outcome but is influenced by the severity of respiratory failure. Our results suggest considering with caution hemodynamic management based on OCT in septic shock patients with altered pulmonary function.

  4. [Direct endoscopic approach improves prognosis of septic-synovitis in the horse].

    PubMed

    ter Braake, F

    The medical records of 71 horses with sepic arthritis, bursitis, or tenosynovitis, treated between 1996 and 2001 at Dierenkliniek Enmeloord, were reviewed. A total number of 81 joints, tendon sheaths and bursae were treated (21 tarsi, 17 digital tendon sheaths, 14 metacarpo/metatarso-phalangeal joints, 12 stifles, 6 carpi, 4 coffin joints, 2 navicular bursae, 1 elbow joint, 1 proximal-interphalangeal joint, 1 tarsal sheath, 1 bursa calcanei subtendineum). The aetiology in 42 cases was a penetrating wound (group 1), in 4 cases an intra-articular injection, and in 2 cases arthroscopic surgery (group II), and in 13 cases septic arthritis in young foals (group III); in 10 cases the aetiology was unknown (group V). A total of 93 endoscopic lavages was performed on 81 joints, tendon sheaths, and bursae (1-3 lavages, mean 1.18 lavage per synovial structure). Survival rates were 95% for group I, 100% for group II, 73% for group III and 100% for group IV. Horses were discharged after 4-73 days of hospitalization (mean 20 days). Longterm follow-up revealed a survival rate of 92% for group I, 100% for group II, 67% for group III, and 90% for group IV. Of the surviving horses, 89% were sound and 11% had some degree of residual lameness. It is concluded that instant aggressive treatment using endoscopic techniques yields the best results so far and is therefore recommended.

  5. Analysis of septic biomarker patterns: prognostic value in predicting septic state.

    PubMed

    Carlyn, Cynthia J; Andersen, Nancy J; Baltch, Aldona L; Smith, Raymond; Reilly, Andrew A; Lawrence, David A

    2015-11-01

    Patients with infection, sepsis, severe sepsis, or septic shock were compared to each other and to healthy controls with regard to serum levels of biomarkers and clinical symptoms. Of the 15 biomarkers assayed, 9 were detectable in patients, and 4, in controls. Both proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines were detected in the patients. No single biomarker could differentiate the 3 septic levels of severity from each other; however, interleukin (IL) 1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) had the best sensitivity and specificity for differentiating sepsis and severe sepsis from septic shock. IL-6 was the only cytokine able to differentiate infected patients without signs of sepsis from those with sepsis. Although IL-1ra, IL-6, IL-8, and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 could differentiate infection, sepsis, and severe sepsis from septic shock, the biomarkers could not differentiate sepsis from severe sepsis. The top scoring pair algorithm with clinical and biomarker analyses was able to correctly diagnose those with sepsis who will progress to a more severe state.

  6. Arthritis and IBD

    MedlinePlus

    ... Events Search: What are Crohn's & Colitis? What is Crohn's Disease What is Ulcerative Colitis Types of Medications What’s ... affect as many as 25% of people with Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis. Although arthritis is typically associated ...

  7. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... vein that are done regularly at the hospital. Physical Therapy An appropriate physical therapy program is essential to the management of any type of arthritis. A physical therapist will explain the importance of certain activities ...

  8. Living with Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... effects. Learn more about biologic treatments . Reducing your sensitivity to pain When the pain of psoriatic arthritis ... your doctor about medication that helps reduce your sensitivity to pain. Prescription pain medications such as Gabapentin ...

  9. Arthritis of the Hand

    MedlinePlus

    ... of hand and wrist arthritis. (Note: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not test dietary supplements. These compounds may cause negative interactions with other medications. Always consult your doctor before taking dietary supplements.) ...

  10. Arthritis and the Feet

    MedlinePlus

    ... for months, or years, then abate, sometimes permanently. Gout (gouty arthritis) : Gout is a condition caused by a buildup of ... sauces, shellfish, and brandy is popularly associated with gout, there are other protein compounds in foods such ...

  11. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gowdie, Peter J; Tse, Shirley M L

    2012-04-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) encompasses a complex group of disorders with arthritis as a common feature. This article provides the pediatrician with a review of the epidemiology, classification, clinical manifestations, and complications of JIA. It also provides an update on the current understanding of the cause of JIA and recent developments in management and a recent review of the long-term outcome in JIA.

  12. The race against the "septic shark"

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Great white sharks are responsible for about 10 cases of death annually worldwide, as compared with millions of deaths caused by sepsis. However, the basic principles of avoiding shark attacks and fighting sepsis seem to be similar: avoidance, attention, and speed, if necessary. The present review discusses the current status of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria, which are actually content for discussion because of their low specificity. Current data suggest that one in eight patients with severe sepsis does not fulfill the SIRS criteria and is consequently missed, and therefore the calls for new definitions of sepsis are getting louder. Furthermore, the need for early treatment of sepsis and fast admission to an intensive care unit (ICU) with experienced stuff is reviewed as well as the early and appropriate initiation of therapy, namely antibiotic and volume therapy. A key feature is the analysis of the studies from the so-called "Sepsis Trilogy" (ProCESS, ARISE, and ProMiSe studies), with a focus on the status of early goal-directed therapy (EGDT). The authors of the "Sepsis Trilogy" concluded that there is no benefit regarding survival in septic patients by using EGDT as compared with standard therapy. However, the low mortality of the control groups within the "Sepsis Trilogy" studies as compared with the Rivers et al. study from 2001 leads to the conclusion that there has been an improvement in the therapy of septic patients, most probably due to the early initiation of therapy as a kind of "standard" in sepsis therapy. Finally, the phenomenon of a "large trial disease" is discussed, exemplary in a trial which investigated the maintenance of the "right" mean arterial pressure in sepsis patients. Even if the result of a large randomized trial might be that there is no difference between two study groups, the real exercise is to identify the patient collectives who might benefit or experience harm due to an intervention. In summary, as

  13. Painful os acromiale presenting as septic shoulder.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Nirav S; Demetracopoulos, Constantine A; Fayad, Laura M; McFarland, Edward G; Millin, Michael G

    2011-10-01

    The unfused acromial apophysis of an os acromiale typically is an undetected orthopedic anomaly with minimal symptoms. In some instances, however, pain and disability can result from motion between the unfused bone fragments. Trauma to the acromion can similarly displace the unfused os acromiale or can result in chronic symptoms of pain and swelling. In this article, we report the case of a young man who had a fractured os acromiale secondary to trauma and presented with the signs and symptoms of a septic glenohumeral joint.

  14. The race against the "septic shark".

    PubMed

    Westphal, Martin; Kampmeier, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Great white sharks are responsible for about 10 cases of death annually worldwide, as compared with millions of deaths caused by sepsis. However, the basic principles of avoiding shark attacks and fighting sepsis seem to be similar: avoidance, attention, and speed, if necessary. The present review discusses the current status of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria, which are actually content for discussion because of their low specificity. Current data suggest that one in eight patients with severe sepsis does not fulfill the SIRS criteria and is consequently missed, and therefore the calls for new definitions of sepsis are getting louder. Furthermore, the need for early treatment of sepsis and fast admission to an intensive care unit (ICU) with experienced stuff is reviewed as well as the early and appropriate initiation of therapy, namely antibiotic and volume therapy. A key feature is the analysis of the studies from the so-called "Sepsis Trilogy" (ProCESS, ARISE, and ProMiSe studies), with a focus on the status of early goal-directed therapy (EGDT). The authors of the "Sepsis Trilogy" concluded that there is no benefit regarding survival in septic patients by using EGDT as compared with standard therapy. However, the low mortality of the control groups within the "Sepsis Trilogy" studies as compared with the Rivers et al. study from 2001 leads to the conclusion that there has been an improvement in the therapy of septic patients, most probably due to the early initiation of therapy as a kind of "standard" in sepsis therapy. Finally, the phenomenon of a "large trial disease" is discussed, exemplary in a trial which investigated the maintenance of the "right" mean arterial pressure in sepsis patients. Even if the result of a large randomized trial might be that there is no difference between two study groups, the real exercise is to identify the patient collectives who might benefit or experience harm due to an intervention. In summary, as

  15. The race against the "septic shark".

    PubMed

    Westphal, Martin; Kampmeier, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Great white sharks are responsible for about 10 cases of death annually worldwide, as compared with millions of deaths caused by sepsis. However, the basic principles of avoiding shark attacks and fighting sepsis seem to be similar: avoidance, attention, and speed, if necessary. The present review discusses the current status of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria, which are actually content for discussion because of their low specificity. Current data suggest that one in eight patients with severe sepsis does not fulfill the SIRS criteria and is consequently missed, and therefore the calls for new definitions of sepsis are getting louder. Furthermore, the need for early treatment of sepsis and fast admission to an intensive care unit (ICU) with experienced stuff is reviewed as well as the early and appropriate initiation of therapy, namely antibiotic and volume therapy. A key feature is the analysis of the studies from the so-called "Sepsis Trilogy" (ProCESS, ARISE, and ProMiSe studies), with a focus on the status of early goal-directed therapy (EGDT). The authors of the "Sepsis Trilogy" concluded that there is no benefit regarding survival in septic patients by using EGDT as compared with standard therapy. However, the low mortality of the control groups within the "Sepsis Trilogy" studies as compared with the Rivers et al. study from 2001 leads to the conclusion that there has been an improvement in the therapy of septic patients, most probably due to the early initiation of therapy as a kind of "standard" in sepsis therapy. Finally, the phenomenon of a "large trial disease" is discussed, exemplary in a trial which investigated the maintenance of the "right" mean arterial pressure in sepsis patients. Even if the result of a large randomized trial might be that there is no difference between two study groups, the real exercise is to identify the patient collectives who might benefit or experience harm due to an intervention. In summary, as

  16. Sepsis and septic shock: a review.

    PubMed

    Chong, Josebelo; Dumont, Tiffany; Francis-Frank, Lyndave; Balaan, Marvin

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis and septic shock are a continuum of disease resulting from a complex host response to infection. They are major health issues in the United States, causing significant financial burden to the health care system in addition to multisystem morbidity and high rates of mortality. In recent decades, landmark trials in sepsis management have demonstrated improved mortality. Although the value of protocol-driven care is currently under question, it is clear that early recognition, prompt resuscitation, and timely use of antibiotics are of utmost importance.

  17. Induction of lyme arthritis in LSH hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, J.L.; Schell, R.F.; Hejka, A.; England, D.M.; Konick, L.

    1988-09-01

    In studies of experimental Lyme disease, a major obstacle has been the unavailability of a suitable animal model. We found that irradiated LSH/Ss Lak hamsters developed arthritis after injection of Borrelia burgdorferi in the hind paws. When nonirradiated hamsters were injected in the hind paws with B. burgdorferi, acute transient synovitis was present. A diffuse neutrophilic infiltrate involved the synovia and periarticular structures. The inflammation was associated with edema, hyperemia, and granulation tissue. Numerous spirochetes were seen in the synovial and subsynovial tissues. The histopathologic changes were enhanced in irradiated hamsters. The onset and duration of the induced swelling were dependent on the dose of radiation and the inoculum of spirochetes. Inoculation of irradiated hamsters with Formalin-killed spirochetes or medium in which B. burgdorferi had grown for 7 days failed to induce swelling. This animal model should prove useful for studies of the immune response to B. burgdorferi and the pathogenesis of Lyme arthritis.

  18. Physical Activity and Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Psoriatic Arthritis Info Kit Resources Community icon: Link text: Post your questions in our online community and ... psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Talk Psoriasis icon: Link text: Contact our Patient Navigators for free and confidential ...

  19. Derivation of Urine Output Thresholds That Identify a Very High Risk of AKI in Patients with Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Leedahl, David D.; Schramm, Garrett E.; Dierkhising, Ross A.; Bergstralh, Eric J.; Chawla, Lakhmir S.; Kashani, Kianoush B.

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives To promote early detection of AKI, recently proposed pretest probability models combine sub–Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) AKI criteria with baseline AKI risk. The primary objective of this study was to determine sub-KDIGO thresholds that identify patients with septic shock at highest risk for AKI. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This was a retrospective analysis of 390 adult patients admitted to the medical intensive care unit (ICU) of a tertiary, academic medical center with septic shock between January 2008 and December 2010. Hourly urine output was collected from the time of septic shock recognition (hour 0) to hour 96, urine catheter removal, or ICU discharge (whichever occurred first). All available serum creatinine (SCr) measurements were collected until hour 96. The AKI pretest probability model was assessed during the first 12 hours of resuscitation and included the initial episode of oliguria, increase from baseline to peak SCr level, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) III score in a multivariable receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) analysis. The primary outcome was the incidence of stage II or III (stage II+) AKI defined by KDIGO criteria. Secondary outcomes included the need for RRT and 28-day mortality. Results Ninety-eight (25%) patients developed stage II+ AKI after septic shock recognition. APACHE III score and increase in SCr level in the first 12 hours were not statistically associated with stage II+ AKI in multivariable ROC analysis. Consecutive oliguria for 3 hours had fair predictive ability for achieving stage II+ AKI criteria (area under ROC curve, 0.73; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.68 to 0.78), and oliguria for 5 hours demonstrated optimal accuracy (82%; 95% CI, 79% to 86%). Conclusions Three to 5 hours of consecutive oliguria in patients with septic shock may provide a valuable measure of AKI risk. Further validation to support this finding is

  20. An alternate pathophysiologic paradigm of sepsis and septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anand

    2014-01-01

    The advent of modern antimicrobial therapy following the discovery of penicillin during the 1940s yielded remarkable improvements in case fatality rate of serious infections including septic shock. Since then, pathogens have continuously evolved under selective antimicrobial pressure resulting in a lack of significant improvement in clinical effectiveness in the antimicrobial therapy of septic shock despite ever more broad-spectrum and potent drugs. In addition, although substantial effort and money has been expended on the development novel non-antimicrobial therapies of sepsis in the past 30 years, clinical progress in this regard has been limited. This review explores the possibility that the current pathophysiologic paradigm of septic shock fails to appropriately consider the primacy of the microbial burden of infection as the primary driver of septic organ dysfunction. An alternate paradigm is offered that suggests that has substantial implications for optimizing antimicrobial therapy in septic shock. This model of disease progression suggests the key to significant improvement in the outcome of septic shock may lie, in great part, with improvements in delivery of existing antimicrobials and other anti-infectious strategies. Recognition of the role of delays in administration of antimicrobial therapy in the poor outcomes of septic shock is central to this effort. However, therapeutic strategies that improve the degree of antimicrobial cidality likely also have a crucial role. PMID:24184742

  1. Cloxacillin control of experimental arthritis induced by SEC(+) Staphylococcus aureus is associated with downmodulation of local and systemic cytokines.

    PubMed

    Colavite, Priscila Maria; Ishikawa, Larissa Lumi Watanabe; Zorzella-Pezavento, Sofia Fernanda Gonçalves; Oliveira, Larissa Ragozo Cardoso de; França, Thaís Graziela Donegá; da Rosa, Larissa Camargo; Chiuso-Minicucci, Fernanda; Vieira, Andreia Espíndola; Francisconi, Carolina Fávaro; da Cunha, Maria de Lourdes Ribeiro de Souza; Garlet, Gustavo Pompermaier; Sartori, Alexandrina

    2016-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the most common agent of septic arthritis (SA) that is a severe, rapidly progressive and erosive disease. In this work we investigated the clinical, histopathological and immunological characteristics of the SA triggered by an enterotoxin C producer S. aureus strain. The effect of a β-lactamic antibiotic over disease evolution and cytokine production was also evaluated. After confirmation that ATCC 19095 SEC(+) strain preserved its ability to produce enterotoxin C, this bacteria was used to infect C57BL/6 male mice. Body weight, clinical score and disease prevalence were daily evaluated during 14 days. Cytokine production by splenocytes, cytokine mRNA expression in arthritic lesions, transcription factors mRNA expression in inguinal lymph nodes and histopathological analysis were performed 7 and 14 days after infection. ATCC 19095 SEC(+) strain caused a severe arthritis characterized by weight loss, high clinical scores and a 100% disease prevalence. Histopathological analysis revealed inflammation, pannus formation and bone erosion. Arthritis aggravation was associated with elevated production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, higher local mRNA expression of these cytokines and also higher mRNA expression of T-bet, ROR-γ and GATA-3. Disease control by cloxacillin was associated with decreased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines but not of IL-10. These findings indicate that the ATCC 19095 SEC(+) strain is able to initiate a severe septic arthritis in mice associated with elevated cytokine production that can be, however, controlled by cloxacillin.

  2. A review of current knowledge of the complement system and the therapeutic opportunities in inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, M

    2006-01-01

    The complement activation system, a key component of the innate immune system, protects the host from microorganisms such as bacteria, and other foreign threats including abnormal cells. However, it is also double-edged in that it can have negative effects in the host; excessive complement activation damages the host and can even kill in anaphylactic shock and septic shock. Regulation of the complement system is a useful strategy to control inflammatory diseases, including inflammatory arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis is a common inflammatory disease worldwide. Many medicines are developed to control inflammation, including recently developed biological response modifiers such as anti-TNF and IL-6 agents. Nevertheless, in some patients disease remains difficult to control because of complications, side effects and tolerance of medicines. In inflammatory arthritis, including rheumatoid arthritis, there is abundant evidence implicating complement activation in humans and animal models. Therefore, anti-complement agents might be beneficial as part of clinical treatment. However, at present, there are still no applicable agents for therapeutic regulation of excessive complement activation in chronic disease. Novel agents in development might be useful as a strategy to control complement activation. Here I describe recent knowledge of the complement system in inflammatory arthritis, the recent developments in anti-complement agents and their considerable potential for the future.

  3. Septic Shock Due to Biliary Stones in a Postcholecystectomy Patient.

    PubMed

    Azfar, Mohammad Feroz; Khan, Muhammad Faisal; Khursheed, Moazzum

    2015-10-01

    Septic shock leading to multi-organ failure is not uncommon. Early diagnosis to confirm the source is the distinctive attribute of sepsis management guidelines. Cholangitis as the source of sepsis can become a diagnostic dilemma in patients who have had cholecystectomy in the past. CT abdomen should be the investigation of choice in this group of patients. This report describes two postcholecystectomy patients who presented with septic shock secondary to biliary stones. The source of septic shock in both patients were biliary stones was confirmed with abdominal CT. Ultrasound abdomen failed to report biliary stones in these patients. Both improved on percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage.

  4. Dermatoglyphics in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ravindranath, Roopa; Shubha, R; Nagesh, H V; Johnson, Job; Rajangam, Sayee

    2003-10-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis have been referred to Division of Human Genetics for counselling. Qualitative dermatoglyphics comprising of finger print pattern, interdigital pattern, hypothenar pattern and palmar crease were studied on 26 female and 11 male rheumatoid arthritis patients. Comparison between patient male and control male; and patient female and control female has been done. 'Chi' square test was performed. In male patients, with hands together, arches were increased, loops/ whorls were decreased. Partial Simian crease was significantly increased. In the right hand, patterns were increased in the 3rd interdigital area. On the other hand, in female patients there was a significant increase in whorls and decrease in loops on the first finger on both the hands, increase in arches on the 3rd finger; both arches and whorls on the 4th finger of left hand. Present study has emphasized that dermatoglyphics could be applied as a diagnostic tool to patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  5. [Interstitial lung disease in rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Froidevaux-Janin, Sylvie; Dudler, Jean; Nicod, Laurent P; Lazor, Romain

    2011-11-23

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is found in up to 30% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and is clinically manifest in 5 to 10%, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. The most frequent histopathological forms are usual interstitial pneumonia and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia. Another recently described presentation is combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema. Similarly to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, acute exacerbation of ILD may occur in RA and is associated with severe prognosis. Smoking is a known risk factor of RA and may also play a role in the pathogenesis of RA-associated ILD, in combination with genetic and immunologic mechanisms. Several treatments of RA may also lead to drug-induced ILD.

  6. Blood coagulation disorders in septic patients.

    PubMed

    Knoebl, Paul

    2010-03-01

    Host defense and blood coagulation are tightly connected and interacting systems, necessary for the integrity of an organism. Complex mechanisms regulate the intensity of a host response to invading pathogens or other potentially dangerous situations. Under regular conditions, this response is limited in time and located to the site of injury. Sometimes, however, systemic host response is overwhelming and disproportional and causes damage, not cure. Dependent on the genetical predisposition of the host, its current immunocompetence, or the type of injury, the reaction leads to the clinical picture of the different degrees of sepsis. Septic organ dysfunction is caused by intravascular fibrin deposition as a result of coagulation activation, anticoagulant breakdown, and shut down of fibrinolysis. This article describes the major pathophysiologic reactions in these situations and presents www.SepDIC.eu, an online tool on sepsis and associated coagulopathy.

  7. Neisseria meningitidis Serogroup C Causing Primary Arthritis in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Straticiuc, Sergiu; Ignat, Ancuta; Hanganu, Elena; Lupu, Vasile Valeriu; Ciubara, Alexandru Bogdan; Cretu, Roxana

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Neisseria meningitidis (N. meningitidis) is associated with severe invasive infections such as meningitis and fulminant septicemia. Septic arthritis due to N. meningitidis is rare and bone infections have been reported exceptionally. We report the case of a 1-year old girl who presented with a painful, swollen right knee, accompanied by fever and agitation. Arthrocentesis of the right knee, while patient was under anesthesia, yielded grossly purulent fluid, so we made arthrotomy and drainage. The culture from synovial fluid revealed N. meningitidis, sensitive to Ceftriaxone. The patient received intravenous antibiotherapy with Ceftriaxone. The status of the patient improved after surgical drainage and intravenous antibiotic therapy. She recovered completely after 1 month. Conclusion: This observation illustrates an unusual presentation of invasive meningococcal infection and the early identification of the bacteria, combined with the correct treatment, prevent the complications and even death. PMID:26844522

  8. Glucocorticoids and Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Joana Fonseca; Ahmed Mohamed, Alaa Abdelkhalik; Emery, Paul

    2016-02-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) were discovered in the 1940s and were administered for the first time to patients with rheumatoid arthritis in 1948. However, side effects were subsequently reported. In the last 7 decades, the mechanisms of action for both therapeutic properties and side effects have been elucidated. Mechanisms for minimizing side effects were also developed. GCs are the most frequently used class of drugs in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis because of their efficacy in relieving symptoms and their low cost. A review of clinical applications, side effects, and drug interactions is presented. PMID:26611549

  9. Psoriatic Arthritis Registries.

    PubMed

    Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo; Varisco, Valentina; Ditto, Maria Chiara; Benucci, Maurizio; Atzeni, Fabiola

    2015-11-01

    The introduction of new biological drugs for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthritis has led to the creation of a number of registries in Europe and the United States. Most of them are sponsored by national rheumatology societies, and provide information that is useful in clinical practice concerning the clinical characteristics, efficacy, and safety of all licensed biological drugs. Their findings also help to improve our understanding of the quality of life and working ability of patients receiving biological drugs, and suggest methods for allocating resources. However, there are only a few registries for psoriatic arthritis, and efforts should be made to increase their number to obtain further reliable and useful data.

  10. Newer drugs for arthritis.

    PubMed

    McGillivray, D C

    1977-01-01

    The major area of new drug discoveries for the treatment of arthritis is in non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIA). Unfortunately, as yet no new and safe drug of major significance has appeared. Aspirin still ranks high beside the newcomers. Indomethacin, ibuprofen, naproxen, fenoprofen and tolmetin are described and their roles in therapy are discussed. A further group of older drugs receiving new application in the treatment of arthritis is presented. These include penicillamine and the immunosuppressive drugs. Gold and chloroquin are also discussed to put these agents in their proper perspective.

  11. Relations among synovial membrane histopathologic findings, synovial fluid cytologic findings, and bacterial culture results in horses with suspected infectious arthritis: 64 cases (1979-1987).

    PubMed

    Madison, J B; Sommer, M; Spencer, P A

    1991-05-01

    A retrospective evaluation of 64 cases of suspected infectious arthritis in horses was undertaken to determine the relations among histopathologic findings in synovial membrane specimens, cytologic findings in synovial fluid samples, and bacterial culture results. Positive cultures were obtained from 55% of the joints, and 18 different bacterial organisms were cultured. Culturing of synovial fluid yielded bacterial growth more often than did culturing of synovial membrane. Histologic evaluation (H&E and Gram stain) of synovial membrane specimens provided little information to help distinguish infected from culture-negative joints. We do not advocate the routine use of closed synovial biopsy in suspected cases of equine septic arthritis.

  12. Preliminary characterization of abandoned septic tank systems. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    This report documents the activities and findings of the Phase I Preliminary Characterization of Abandoned Septic Tank Systems. The purpose of the preliminary characterization activity was to investigate the Tiger Team abandoned septic systems (tanks and associated leachfields) for the purpose of identifying waste streams for closure at a later date. The work performed was not to fully characterize or remediate the sites. The abandoned systems potentially received wastes or effluent from buildings which could have discharged non-domestic, petroleum hydrocarbons, hazardous, radioactive and/or mixed wastes. A total of 20 sites were investigated for the preliminary characterization of identified abandoned septic systems. Of the 20 sites, 19 were located and characterized through samples collected from each tank(s) and, where applicable, associated leachfields. The abandoned septic tank systems are located in Areas 5, 12, 15, 25, and 26 on the Nevada Test Site.

  13. [Current concepts on hemodynamic support and therapy in septic shock].

    PubMed

    Rocha, Leonardo Lima; Pessoa, Camila Menezes Souza; Corrêa, Thiago Domingos; Pereira, Adriano José; de Assunção, Murillo Santucci Cesar; Silva, Eliézer

    2015-01-01

    Severe sepsis and septic shock represent a major healthcare challenge. Much of the improvement in mortality associated with septic shock is related to early recognition combined with timely fluid resuscitation and adequate antibiotics administration. The main goals of septic shock resuscitation include intravascular replenishment, maintenance of adequate perfusion pressure and oxygen delivery to tissues. To achieve those goals, fluid responsiveness evaluation and complementary interventions - i.e. vasopressors, inotropes and blood transfusion - may be necessary. This article is a literature review of the available evidence on the initial hemodynamic support of the septic shock patients presenting to the emergency room or to the intensive care unit and the main interventions available to reach those targets, focusing on fluid and vasopressor therapy, blood transfusion and inotrope administration.

  14. Current concepts on hemodynamic support and therapy in septic shock.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Leonardo Lima; Pessoa, Camila Menezes Souza; Corrêa, Thiago Domingos; Pereira, Adriano José; de Assunção, Murillo Santucci Cesar; Silva, Eliézer

    2015-01-01

    Severe sepsis and septic shock represent a major healthcare challenge. Much of the improvement in mortality associated with septic shock is related to early recognition combined with timely fluid resuscitation and adequate antibiotics administration. The main goals of septic shock resuscitation include intravascular replenishment, maintenance of adequate perfusion pressure and oxygen delivery to tissues. To achieve those goals, fluid responsiveness evaluation and complementary interventions - i.e. vasopressors, inotropes and blood transfusion - may be necessary. This article is a literature review of the available evidence on the initial hemodynamic support of the septic shock patients presenting to the emergency room or to the intensive care unit and the main interventions available to reach those targets, focusing on fluid and vasopressor therapy, blood transfusion and inotrope administration.

  15. Suppression of arthritis-induced bone erosion by a CRAC channel antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Harry C; Soboloff, Jonathan; Robinson, Lisa J; Tourkova, Irina L; Larrouture, Quitterie C; Witt, Michelle R; Holaskova, Ida; Schafer, Rosana; Elliott, Meenal; Hirsch, Raphael; Barnett, John B

    2016-01-01

    Objective We have shown in vitro and in vivo that osteoclast maturation requires calcium-release activated calcium (CRAC) channels. In inflammatory arthritis, osteoclasts mediate severe and debilitating bone erosion. In the current study, we assess the value of CRAC channels as a therapeutic target to suppress bone erosion in acute inflammatory arthritis. Methods Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was induced in mice. The CRAC channel inhibitor 3,4-dichloropropionaniline (DCPA) and a placebo was administered 1 day prior to collagen II booster to induce arthritis. Effects on swelling, inflammatory cell invasion in joints, serum cytokines and bone erosion were measured. Results Assays, by blinded observers, of arthritis severity showed that DCPA, 21 mg/kg/day, suppressed arthritis development over 3 weeks. Bone and cartilage damage in sections of animal feet was reduced approximately 50%; overall swelling of joints was reduced by a similar amount. Effects on bone density by µCT showed clear separation in DCPA-treated CIA animals from CIA without treatment, while differences between controls without CIA and CIA treated with DCPA differed by small amounts and in most cases were not statistically different. Response was not related to anticollagen titres. There were no adverse effects in the treated group on animal weight or activity, consistent with low toxicity. The effect was maximal 12–17 days after collagen booster, during the rapid appearance of arthritis in untreated CIA. At 20 days after treatment (day 40), differences in arthritis score were reduced and tumour necrosis factor α, interleukin (IL)-1, or IL-6 in the serum of the animals were similar in treated and untreated animals. Conclusions DCPA, a novel inhibitor of CRAC channels, suppresses bone erosion associated with acute arthritis in mice and might represent a new treatment modality for acute arthrits. PMID:26819750

  16. Advanced Hemodynamic Management in Patients with Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Wolfgang; Nierhaus, Axel; Kluge, Stefan; Reuter, Daniel A.; Wagner, Julia Y.

    2016-01-01

    In patients with sepsis and septic shock, the hemodynamic management in both early and later phases of these “organ dysfunction syndromes” is a key therapeutic component. It needs, however, to be differentiated between “early goal-directed therapy” (EGDT) as proposed for the first 6 hours of emergency department treatment by Rivers et al. in 2001 and “hemodynamic management” using advanced hemodynamic monitoring in the intensive care unit (ICU). Recent large trials demonstrated that nowadays protocolized EGDT does not seem to be superior to “usual care” in terms of a reduction in mortality in emergency department patients with early identified septic shock who promptly receive antibiotic therapy and fluid resuscitation. “Hemodynamic management” comprises (a) making the diagnosis of septic shock as one differential diagnosis of circulatory shock, (b) assessing the hemodynamic status including the identification of therapeutic conflicts, and (c) guiding therapeutic interventions. We propose two algorithms for hemodynamic management using transpulmonary thermodilution-derived variables aiming to optimize the cardiocirculatory and pulmonary status in adult ICU patients with septic shock. The complexity and heterogeneity of patients with septic shock implies that individualized approaches for hemodynamic management are mandatory. Defining individual hemodynamic target values for patients with septic shock in different phases of the disease must be the focus of future studies. PMID:27703980

  17. [The value of quantitative analysis of procalcitonine in diagnostics of septic complications in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Lapin, S V; Maslianskiĭ, A L; Lazareva, N M; Vasil'eva, E Iu; Totolian, A A

    2013-01-01

    The infections very often complicate the course of autoimmune rheumatic diseases. In diagnostic of septic complications in rheumatic patients the new biomarkers of infections can have a decisive importance. The procalciotonine test is one of them. The issue was to evaluate the diagnostic informativity of this test. The sample included 93 patients. The examination was applied to 65 patients with rheumatic diseases. Among them, 13 patients had bacterial infections. The group consisted of 33 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, 11 patients with systemic lupus erythematous, 6 patients with systemic angiitis, and 15 patients with other rheumatic diseases. The comparative group included 27 patients of cardio-therapeutic profile and 8 of these patients had bacterial infections. The procalcitonine test was applied with quantitative electrochemiluminescent technique. In patients with rheumatoid arthritis the mean levels of procalciotonine test consisted 0.10 +/- 0.13 ng/ml; with systemic lupus erythematous--0.08 +/- 0.06 ng/ml; with systemic angiitis--0.22 +/- 0.2 ng/ml; with other rheumatic diseases--0.12 +/- 0.15 ng/ml; of cardio-therapeutic profile without infections--0.08 +/- 0.06 ng/vl/ With threshold of procalcitonine test higher than 0.5/ml the sensitivity to diagnostic of infections consisted of 58%, specificity--94% in the group with rheumatic diseases. The procalciotonine test in case of no infection process with values higher than 0.5 ng/ml was detected in three patients. The evaluation of dependence of sensitivity and specificity for procalciotonine test and C-reactive protein the area under curve of procalcitonine test was larger in patients with rheumatic diseases (0.85 against 0.79) and in patients of cardio-therapeutic profile (0.92 against 0.90). The quantitative procalcitonine test is the best technique to detect septic complications in rheumatic patients. PMID:23807991

  18. Arthritis associated with calcium oxalate crystals in an anephric patient treated with peritoneal dialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, A.; Ryan, L.M.; McCarty, D.J.

    1988-09-02

    The authors report a case of calcium oxalate arthropathy in a woman undergoing intermittent peritoneal dialysis who was not receiving pharmacologic doses of ascorbic acid. She developed acute arthritis, with calcium oxalate crystals in Heberden's and Bouchard's nodes, a phenomenon previously described in gout. Intermittent peritoneal dialysis may be less efficient than hemodialysis in clearing oxalate, and physicians should now consider calcium oxalate-associated arthritis in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis who are not receiving large doses of ascorbic acid.

  19. Idiopathic septic arthritis of a lumbar facet joint associated with paraspinal abscess.

    PubMed

    Kitova-John, Margarita Borislavova; Azim-Araghi, Ali; Sheikh, Faraz Tariq; Kitov, Borislav Dimitrov

    2015-08-13

    A 48-year-old woman presented with a 1-month history of severe lower back pain on a background of 24 h of mild fever and general tiredness with an associated right-sided foot drop. Five weeks after the onset and with no improvement in symptoms in spite of analgesia and physiotherapy, the patient had a lumbar spine MRI which demonstrated a collection extending from the facet joints of L5 and L6 to the iliacus muscle on the right. A CT-guided aspiration was performed with a lengthy hospital stay for intravenous antibiotic treatment. The culture and sensitivity study of the aspirate isolated Streptococcus pneumoniae.

  20. Postoperative Surgical Infection After Spinal Surgery in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Kensuke; Ohba, Tetsuro; Ebata, Shigeto; Haro, Hirotaka

    2016-05-01

    Individuals with rheumatoid arthritis are at higher risk for infection than the general population, and surgical site infection after spinal surgery in this population can result in clinically significant complications. The goal of this study was to identify risk factors for acute surgical site infection after spinal surgery in patients with rheumatoid arthritis who were treated with nonbiologic (conventional) disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) alone or with biologic DMARDs. All patients treated with biologic agents were treated with nonbiologic agents as well. The authors performed a retrospective, single-center review of 47 consecutive patients with rheumatoid arthritis who underwent spinal surgery and had follow-up of 3 months or longer. The incidence of surgical site infection was examined, and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to test the association of surgical site infection with putative risk factors, including the use of biologic agents, methotrexate, and prednisolone, as well as the duration of rheumatoid arthritis, the presence of diabetes, patient age, length of surgery, and number of operative levels. After spinal surgery, 14.89% (7 of 47) of patients had surgical site infection. Use of methotrexate and/or prednisolone, patient age, diabetes, duration of rheumatoid arthritis, length of surgery, number of operative levels, and use of biologic DMARDs did not significantly increase the risk of infection associated with spinal surgery. All patients who had surgical site infection had undergone spinal surgery with instrumentation. The findings show that greater attention to preventing surgical site infection may be needed in patients with rheumatoid arthritis who undergo spinal surgery with instrumentation. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study to show that the use of biologic agents did not increase the incidence of surgical site infection after spinal surgery in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

  1. Alternative for Anti-TNF Antibodies for Arthritis Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Paquet, Joseph; Henrionnet, Christel; Pinzano, Astrid; Vincourt, Jean-Baptiste; Gillet, Pierre; Netter, Patrick; Chary-Valckenaere, Isabelle; Loeuille, Damien; Pourel, Jacques; Grossin, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), a proinflammatory cytokine, plays a key role in the pathogenesis of many inflammatory diseases, including arthritis. Neutralization of this cytokine by anti-TNF-α antibodies has shown its efficacy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and is now widely used. Nevertheless, some patients currently treated with anti-TNF-α remain refractory or become nonresponder to these treatments. In this context, there is a need for new or complementary therapeutic strategies. In this study, we investigated in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory potentialities of an anti-TNF-α triplex-forming oligonucleotide (TFO), as judged from effects on two rat arthritis models. The inhibitory activity of this TFO on articular cells (synoviocytes and chondrocytes) was verified and compared to that of small interfering RNA (siRNA) in vitro. The use of the anti-TNF-α TFO as a preventive and local treatment in both acute and chronic arthritis models significantly reduced disease development. Furthermore, the TFO efficiently blocked synovitis and cartilage and bone destruction in the joints. The results presented here provide the first evidence that gene targeting by anti-TNF-α TFO modulates arthritis in vivo, thus providing proof-of-concept that it could be used as therapeutic tool for TNF-α-dependent inflammatory disorders. PMID:21811249

  2. Alternative for anti-TNF antibodies for arthritis treatment.

    PubMed

    Paquet, Joseph; Henrionnet, Christel; Pinzano, Astrid; Vincourt, Jean-Baptiste; Gillet, Pierre; Netter, Patrick; Chary-Valckenaere, Isabelle; Loeuille, Damien; Pourel, Jacques; Grossin, Laurent

    2011-10-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), a proinflammatory cytokine, plays a key role in the pathogenesis of many inflammatory diseases, including arthritis. Neutralization of this cytokine by anti-TNF-α antibodies has shown its efficacy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and is now widely used. Nevertheless, some patients currently treated with anti-TNF-α remain refractory or become nonresponder to these treatments. In this context, there is a need for new or complementary therapeutic strategies. In this study, we investigated in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory potentialities of an anti-TNF-α triplex-forming oligonucleotide (TFO), as judged from effects on two rat arthritis models. The inhibitory activity of this TFO on articular cells (synoviocytes and chondrocytes) was verified and compared to that of small interfering RNA (siRNA) in vitro. The use of the anti-TNF-α TFO as a preventive and local treatment in both acute and chronic arthritis models significantly reduced disease development. Furthermore, the TFO efficiently blocked synovitis and cartilage and bone destruction in the joints. The results presented here provide the first evidence that gene targeting by anti-TNF-α TFO modulates arthritis in vivo, thus providing proof-of-concept that it could be used as therapeutic tool for TNF-α-dependent inflammatory disorders.

  3. A case of reactive arthritis due to Clostridium difficile colitis.

    PubMed

    Essenmacher, Alex C; Khurram, Nazish; Bismack, Gregory T

    2016-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is an acute, aseptic, inflammatory arthropathy following an infectious process but removed from the site of primary infection. It is often attributed to genitourinary and enteric pathogens, such as Chlamydia, Salmonella, Shigella, Campylobacter, and Yersinia, in susceptible individuals. An uncommon and less recognized cause of this disease is preceding colonic infection with Clostridium difficile, an organism associated with pseudomembranous colitis and diarrhea in hospitalized patients and those recently exposed to antibiotics. Recognition of this association may be complicated by non-specific presentation of diarrhea, the interval between gastrointestinal and arthritic symptoms, and the wide differential in mono- and oligoarthritis. We present the case of a 61-year-old, hospitalized patient recently treated for C. difficile colitis who developed sudden, non-traumatic, right knee pain and swelling. Physical examination and radiographs disclosed joint effusion, and sterile aspiration produced cloudy fluid with predominant neutrophils and no growth on cultures. Diagnostic accuracy is enhanced by contemporaneous laboratory investigations excluding other entities such as gout and rheumatoid arthritis and other infections that typically precede reactive arthritis. Contribution of Clostridium infection to reactive arthritis is an obscure association frequently difficult to prove, but this organism is warranted inclusion in the differential of reactive arthritis. PMID:26908381

  4. A case of reactive arthritis due to Clostridium difficile colitis

    PubMed Central

    Essenmacher, Alex C.; Khurram, Nazish; Bismack, Gregory T.

    2016-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is an acute, aseptic, inflammatory arthropathy following an infectious process but removed from the site of primary infection. It is often attributed to genitourinary and enteric pathogens, such as Chlamydia, Salmonella, Shigella, Campylobacter, and Yersinia, in susceptible individuals. An uncommon and less recognized cause of this disease is preceding colonic infection with Clostridium difficile, an organism associated with pseudomembranous colitis and diarrhea in hospitalized patients and those recently exposed to antibiotics. Recognition of this association may be complicated by non-specific presentation of diarrhea, the interval between gastrointestinal and arthritic symptoms, and the wide differential in mono- and oligoarthritis. We present the case of a 61-year-old, hospitalized patient recently treated for C. difficile colitis who developed sudden, non-traumatic, right knee pain and swelling. Physical examination and radiographs disclosed joint effusion, and sterile aspiration produced cloudy fluid with predominant neutrophils and no growth on cultures. Diagnostic accuracy is enhanced by contemporaneous laboratory investigations excluding other entities such as gout and rheumatoid arthritis and other infections that typically precede reactive arthritis. Contribution of Clostridium infection to reactive arthritis is an obscure association frequently difficult to prove, but this organism is warranted inclusion in the differential of reactive arthritis. PMID:26908381

  5. Red cell distribution width and early mortality in elderly patients with severe sepsis and septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sejin; Lee, Kyoungmi; Kim, Inbyung; Jung, Siyoung; Kim, Moon-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association of red cell distribution width (RDW) with 30-day mortality in elderly patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. Methods Patients were recruited from a single tertiary emergency department. Patients with age over 65 years were selected. The main outcome was 30-day mortality. Potential confounders as Acute Physiologic and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score along with initial vital signs were collected. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis was performed to identify independent predictors of 30-day mortality. The discriminative ability of RDW for 30-day mortality was evaluated using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Results Overall, 458 patients were included. Univariate analysis showed that patients’ survival was significantly associated with sites of infection, comorbidities, and severity scores. In the multivariate Cox proportional hazard model, the RDW was an independent predictor of 30-day mortality (hazards ratio, 1.10; 95% confidence interval, 1.04 to 1.17; P<0.001). Conclusion In this study, initial RDW values were significantly associated with 30-day mortality in older patients hospitalized with severe sepsis and septic shock.

  6. Early initiation of low-dose corticosteroid therapy in the management of septic shock: a retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The use of low-dose steroid therapy in the management of septic shock has been extensively studied. However, the association between the timing of low-dose steroid therapy and the outcome has not been evaluated. Therefore, we evaluated whether early initiation of low-dose steroid therapy is associated with mortality in patients with septic shock. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 178 patients who received low-dose corticosteroid therapy for septic shock between January 2008 and December 2009. Time-dependent Cox regression models were used to adjust for potential confounding factors in the association between the time to initiation of low-dose corticosteroid therapy and in-hospital mortality. Results The study population consisted of 107 men and 71 women with a median age of 66 (interquartile range, 54 to 71) years. The 28-day mortality was 44% and low-dose corticosteroid therapy was initiated within a median of 8.5 (3.8 to 19.1) hours after onset of septic shock-related hypotension. Median time to initiation of low-dose corticosteroid therapy was significantly shorter in survivors than in non-survivors (6.5 hours versus 10.4 hours; P = 0.0135). The mortality rates increased significantly with increasing quintiles of time to initiation of low-dose corticosteroid therapy (P = 0.0107 for trend). Other factors associated with 28-day mortality were higher Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) 3 (P < 0.0001) and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores (P = 0.0007), dose of vasopressor at the time of initiation of low-dose corticosteroid therapy (P < 0.0001), need for mechanical ventilation (P = 0.0001) and renal replacement therapy (P < 0.0001), while the impaired adrenal reserve did not affect 28-day mortality (81% versus 82%; P = 0.8679). After adjusting for potential confounding factors, the time to initiation of low-dose corticosteroid therapy was still significantly associated with 28-day mortality (adjusted odds

  7. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Septic Systems in New York State.

    PubMed

    Truhlar, Allison M; Rahm, Brian G; Brooks, Rachael A; Nadeau, Sarah A; Makarsky, Erin T; Walter, M Todd

    2016-07-01

    Onsite septic systems use microbial processes to eliminate organic wastes and nutrients such as nitrogen; these processes can contribute to air pollution through the release of greenhouse gases (GHGs). Current USEPA estimates for septic system GHG emissions are based on one study conducted in north-central California and are limited to methane; therefore, the contribution of these systems to the overall GHG emission budget is unclear. This study quantified and compared septic system GHG emissions from the soil over leach fields and the roof vent, which are the most likely locations for gas emissions during normal septic system operation. At each of eight septic systems, we measured fluxes of CH, CO, and NO using a static chamber method. The roof vent released the majority of septic system gas emissions. In addition, the leach field was a significant source of NO fluxes. Comparisons between leach field and vent emissions suggest that biological processes in the leach field soil may influence the type and quantity of gas released. Overall, our results suggest that (i) revisions are needed in USEPA guidance (e.g., septic systems are not currently listed as a source of NO emissions) and (ii) similar studies representing a wider range of climatic and geographic settings are needed. The total vent, sand filter, and leach field GHG emissions were 0.17, 0.045, and 0.050 t CO-equivalents capita yr, respectively. In total, this represents about 1.5% of the annual carbon footprint of an individual living in the United States. PMID:27380062

  8. Natural course of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Beger, H G; Rau, B; Mayer, J; Pralle, U

    1997-02-01

    Acute pancreatitis comprises, in terms of clinical, pathologic, biochemical, and bacteriologic data, four entities. Interstitial edematous pancreatitis and necrotizing pancreatitis are the most frequent clinical manifestations; pancreatic pseudocyst and pancreatic abscess are late complications after necrotizing pancreatitis, developing after 3 to 5 weeks. Determinants of the natural course of acute pancreatitis are pancreatic parenchymal necrosis, extrapancreatic retroperitoneal fatty tissue necrosis, biologically active compounds in pancreatic ascites, and infection of necrosis. Early in the course of acute pancreatitis multiple organ failure is the consequence of various inflammatory mediators that are released from the inflammatory process and from activated leukocytes attracted by pancreatic injury. During the late course, starting the second week, local and systemic septic complications are dominant. Around 80% of deaths in acute pancreatitis are caused by septic complications. The infection of pancreatic necrosis occurs in 8% to 12% of acute pancreatitis and in 30% to 40% of patients with necrotizing pancreatitis. Bacteriologic analysis of intraoperative smears and aspirates reveals predominantly gram-negative germs deriving from the intestine, most frequently Escherichia coli. It has been confirmed that after necrotizing pancreatitis a considerable large group of patients suffer long-lasting exocrine and endocrine insufficiency.

  9. Arthritis associated with hidradenitis suppurativa.

    PubMed Central

    Bhalla, R; Sequeira, W

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To review the presentation and clinical findings of arthritis associated with hidradenitis suppurativa. METHOD--Medical records from the rheumatology clinics of two major teaching hospitals were reviewed for arthritis and hidradenitis suppurativa. The nine patient records fulfilling these criteria were reviewed and compared with 20 previous reports. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION--The arthritis associated with hidradenitis suppurativa is rare and most commonly affects the peripheral joints. The axial skeleton is less frequently involved and is often asymptomatic. Images PMID:8311560

  10. Septic pulmonary embolism induced by dental infection.

    PubMed

    Shiota, Yutaro; Taniguchi, Akihiko; Yuzurio, Syota; Horita, Naokatsu; Hosokawa, Shinobu; Watanabe, Yoichi; Tohmori, Hidetoshi; Ono, Tetsuya

    2013-01-01

    Dental infection can be an important source for septic pulmonary embolism (SPE), but only a few cases of SPE accompanying dental infection have been reported. The aim of this study was to characterize the clinical features of SPE induced by dental infection. Patients who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria described in the text were recruited in a retrospective fashion. All 9 patients were men, with a median age of 59 years (range:47 to 74 years). Eight patients had chest pain (88.9%), 5 had a preceding toothache (55.6%) and 3 had preceding gingival swelling (33.3%). Blood cultures obtained from 7 patients were negative. Periodontitis was found in all of the cases, periapical periodontitis in 5 cases, and gingival abscess in 3 cases. The median duration of hospitalization was 15 days, and symptoms were mild in some cases. In addition to antimicrobial therapy, tooth extraction was performed in 3 cases, tooth scaling in 6. SPE induced by dental infection has prominent clinical characteristics such as male preponderance, chest pain, preceding toothache, and mild clinical course.

  11. Arthritis in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Aarli, J A; Milde, E J; Thunold, S

    1975-11-01

    Seven patients with myasthenia gravis developed clinical signs of arthropathy. In two patients, the symptoms were due to a deforming rheumatoid arthritis and the myasthenic symptoms appeared as a transitory phase during the course of the disease. Muscle antibodies of IgG class were demonstrated with sera from both patients. Autoreactivity between muscle antibodies and rheumatoid factor was detected in one patient. Both patients died from sudden cardiac failure. Necropsy was performed in one and revealed a spotty myocardial necrosis. One patient had juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Two patients had mild articular symptoms with indices of multivisceral disease and serological findings indicating a systemic lupus erythematous. One patient had classical ankylosing spondylitis, and one, unspecified arthropathy.

  12. [Reactive arthritis. A review].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, F; Espinoza, L R

    1990-07-01

    The arthritides that meet the definition or reactive arthritis include the so-called seronegative spondyloarthropathies. Patients are usually aged less than thirty-two. Preceding infection is generally intestinal or venereal, although the involved agent may remain unknown. Enteric forms occur in small epidemics, whereas venereal forms correlate with a recent new sexual partner. The clinical picture varies in severity, with manifestations overlapping between disorders, and often the first complaint is extra-articular. Highly suggestive of reactive arthritis is "sausage" deformity of fingers and toes, pain and stiffness about multiple joints accompanied by radiating lower back discomfort, and enthesitis, particularly at the Achilles tendon. One out of six or seven patients becomes disabled; therapy aimed at preventing disability is vital since medication has little effect on spinal involvement. Antibiotic therapy may be effective in cases in which specific etiologic agents are well defined.

  13. Rheumatoid arthritis: vocational rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, G M

    1982-01-01

    The consequences of inflation and accelerating introduction of automation and microprocessors into industry are a shift from unskilled to skilled work, the lessening of opportunities for the unskilled worker, and growing unemployment. If disabled people are competing for employment they must take every opportunity to extend education and acquire skills. Juvenile chronic arthritis presents one set of problems in vocational rehabilitation at the beginning of a working career and adult rheumatoid arthritis another, commonly in those over 45 years old and previously established in work. The prevalence of severe disability in juvenile chronic arthritis is about 1 in 20 000 of the population, females are affected twice as often as males and 1 in 10 has defective vision or blindness due to chronic iridocyclitis. At school, besides education, there must be emphasis on encouraging independence, self-confidence, mobility and determination. A School Leavers' Conference early in the last year at school gives the adolescent the best chance of choosing a career. Rheumatoid arthritis is three times more common in women and increasingly, over the last 40 years, women are working besides home-making. Morning stiffness, fatigue, immobility and pain are the common symptoms of widespread involvement of joints and systemic disturbance. The principal determinant in the success of vocational rehabilitation is personality, and the social and environmental factors are more significant than the degree of disability. The Disablement Resettlement Officer can assure continuity of rehabilitation between the health and employment services: a favourable outcome is work, self-derived income independence and freedom of movement using whatever technical aids are required to achieve this.

  14. Chronic arthritis in children.

    PubMed

    Prieur, A M

    1994-09-01

    Chronic inflammatory arthritides in children include a wide range of various diseases. One of the main concerns of physicians who treat these disorders is the risk of permanent physical disability resulting from joint damage. Actual classification relies mainly on clinical features, particularly the number of joints affected at onset, although the general feeling is that chronic childhood arthritis exists in many different entities gathered together under the common names juvenile chronic arthritis or juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. The past 2 years were rather fertile in debates for proposing a progression for more objectivity in nomenclature, which was the theme of the Pediatric Rheumatology Study Group session at the American College of Rheumatology annual meeting held in Atlanta in 1992. The viewpoints from North America and Europe addressed at this meeting were published in a supplement of the Journal of Rheumatology in 1993. A debate on this topic was also organized at the International League Against Rheumatism Congress held in Barcelona in 1993. At present, the main criteria rely on clinical experience and natural history of the diseases and on biology and immunogenetics. Another important concern among pediatric rheumatologists is efficacy of treatment. Questions include, "Are we doing enough?" and "How safe are the therapeutic strategies?" In this review some of the recent studies that may be important for classification and nomenclature and therapy and management are discussed.

  15. Right ventricular dysfunction in patients with septic shock.

    PubMed

    Dhainaut, J F; Lanore, J J; de Gournay, J M; Huyghebaert, M F; Brunet, F; Villemant, D; Monsallier, J F

    1988-01-01

    Using a rapid computerized thermodilution method, we examined the evolution of right ventricular performance in 23 patients with septic shock. Nine survived the episode of septic shock. The other 14 patients died of refractory circulatory shock. Significant right ventricular systolic dysfunction, defined as decreased ejection fraction (-39%) and right ventricular dilation (+38%) was observed in all patients with septic shock. However, in the survivors, increased right ventricular preload may prevent hemodynamic evidence of right ventricular pump failure by utilizing the Frank-Starling mechanism to maintain stroke volume. Conversely, in the nonsurvivors, right ventricular dysfunction was more prononced two days after the onset of septic shock, leading to a fall in stroke. In the last patients, a decrease in contractility appears to be the major factor accounting for decreased right ventricular performance, as evidenced by the marked increase in end-systolic volume (+27%) without significant change in pulmonary artery pressure, during the later stage of septic shock. The observed right ventricular pump failure then appears associated with an alteration in diastolic mechanical properties of this ventricle, as suggested by a leftward displacement of the individual pressure-volume curves. PMID:3403793

  16. Septic wastewater treatment using recycled rubber particles as biofiltration media.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jin Hwan; Park, Jaeyoung; Ellis, Timothy G

    2014-01-01

    Performance of the laboratory-scale recycled rubber particles (RRP) biofilter was compared to a conventional gravel system and a peat biofilter for treatment of septic tank effluent. During the study, the RRP biofilter provided similar or better performance than other systems in terms of organic removal and hydraulic capacity. After the start-up period, RRP biofilter achieved removal efficiencies for BOD5, total suspended solids (TSS), ammonia nitrogen of 96%, 93%, and 90%, respectively, over the range of hydraulic loading rates of 57-204 L/m2/d. On the other hand, the peat biofilter failed hydraulically and the gravel system showed high TSS concentrations in the effluent. RRP provided high surface area and sufficient time for biological treatment. In addition, RRP was observed to provide ammonia adsorption capacity. The results showed that RRP has the potential to be used as substitutes for natural aggregate such as gravel in septic system drainfields. The RRP biofilter can be used as alternative septic systems for the sites where an existing septic system has failed or site conditions, such as high groundwater table or small lot size, are not suitable for the installation of conventional septic systems.

  17. Greenhouse gas emissions from septic systems in New York State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truhlar, A. M.; Rahm, B. G.; Brooks, R. A.; Nadeau, S. A.; Walter, M. T.

    2015-12-01

    Onsite septic systems are a practical way to treat wastewater in rural or less-densely populated areas. Septic systems utilize microbial processes to eliminate organic wastes and nutrients such as nitrogen; these processes can contribute to air pollution through the release of greenhouse gases (GHGs). At each of nine septic systems, we measured fluxes of CH4, CO2, and N2O from the soil over the leach field and sand filter, and from the roof outlet vent. These are the most likely locations for gas emissions during normal operation of the septic system. The majority of all septic system gas emissions were released from the roof vent. However, our comparisons of the gas fluxes from these locations suggest that biological processes in the soil, especially the soil over the leach field, can influence the type and quantity of gas that is released from the system. The total vent, sand filter, and leach field GHG emissions were 0.12, 0.045, and 0.046 tonne CO2e capita-1 year-1, respectively. In total, this represents about 1.5% of the annual carbon footprint of an individual living in the US.

  18. Mycoplasma bovis mastitis and arthritis in a dairy heifer.

    PubMed

    2015-12-19

    Mycoplasma bovis causing mastitis and arthritis in a dairy heifer. Nutritional myopathy in a three-month-old suckler calf. Acute fasciolosis in ewes in Ayrshire. Cardiomyopathy of unknown aetiology causing death of a three-year-old Suffolk ram. Spinal aspergillosis in a seven-week-old pheasant poult These are among matters discussed in the disease surveillance report for August from SAC Consulting: Veterinary Services (SAC C VS).

  19. Mycoplasma bovis mastitis and arthritis in a dairy heifer.

    PubMed

    2015-12-19

    Mycoplasma bovis causing mastitis and arthritis in a dairy heifer. Nutritional myopathy in a three-month-old suckler calf. Acute fasciolosis in ewes in Ayrshire. Cardiomyopathy of unknown aetiology causing death of a three-year-old Suffolk ram. Spinal aspergillosis in a seven-week-old pheasant poult These are among matters discussed in the disease surveillance report for August from SAC Consulting: Veterinary Services (SAC C VS). PMID:26679914

  20. The clinical features of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Grassi, W; De Angelis, R; Lamanna, G; Cervini, C

    1998-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by progressive damage of synovial-lined joints and variable extra-articular manifestations. Tendon and bursal involvement are frequent and often clinically dominant in early disease. RA can affect any joint, but it is usually found in metacarpophalangeal, proximal interphalangeal and metatarsophalangeal joints, as well as in the wrists and knee. Articular and periarticular manifestations include joint swelling and tenderness to palpation, with morning stiffness and severe motion impairment in the involved joints. The clinical presentation of RA varies, but an insidious onset of pain with symmetric swelling of small joints is the most frequent finding. RA onset is acute or subacute in about 25% of patients, but its patterns of presentation also include palindromic onset, monoarticular presentation (both slow and acute forms), extra-articular synovitis (tenosynovitis, bursitis), polymyalgic-like onset, and general symptoms (malaise, fatigue, weight loss, fever). The palindromic onset is characterized by recurrent episodes of oligoarthritis with no residual radiologic damage, while the polymyalgic-like onset may be clinically indistinguishable from polymyalgia rheumatica in elderly subjects. RA is characteristically a symmetric erosive disease. Although any joint, including the cricoarytenoid joint, can be affected, the distal interphalangeal, the sacroiliac, and the lumbar spine joints are rarely involved. The clinical features of synovitis are particularly apparent in the morning. Morning stiffness in and around the joints, lasting at least 1 h before maximal improvement is a typical sign of RA. It is a subjective sign and the patient needs to be carefully informed as to the difference between pain and stiffness. Morning stiffness duration is related to disease activity. Hand involvement is the typical early manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis. Synovitis involving the metacarpophalangeal

  1. Glucose–insulin–potassium infusion in sepsis and septic shock: no hard evidence yet

    PubMed Central

    van der Horst, Iwan CC; Ligtenberg, Jack JM; Bilo, Henk JG; Zijlstra, Felix; Gans, Rijk OB

    2003-01-01

    There is no hard evidence yet for a positive effect of glucose–insulin–potassium infusion in sepsis, septic shock or burn patients. Each individual element of the glucose–insulin–potassium regimen, and eventually euglycaemia, should theoretically be beneficial. At present, evidence exists only for reduced mortality with strict metabolic treatment (i.e. blood glucose levels of 4.4–6.1 mmol/l) in critically ill patients admitted to surgical intensive care units, and for better metabolic regulation (i.e. blood glucose levels of 7.0–10.0 mmol/l) in patients with hyperglycaemia and/or diabetes mellitus, and in patients without signs of heart failure (i.e. Killip class I) during acute myocardial infarction. PMID:12617733

  2. Use of a novel hemoadsorption device for cytokine removal as adjuvant therapy in a patient with septic shock with multi-organ dysfunction: A case study.

    PubMed

    Basu, Reshma; Pathak, Sunjay; Goyal, Jyoti; Chaudhry, Rajeev; Goel, Rati B; Barwal, Anil

    2014-12-01

    CytoSorb(®) (CytoSorbents Corporation, USA) is a novel sorbent hemoadsorption device for cytokine removal. The aim of this study was to examine the clinical use of CytoSorb(®) in the management of patient with septic shock. We used this device as an adjuvant to stabilize a young patient with multi-organ failure and severe sepsis with septic shock. A 36-year-old female patient was hospitalized with the complaints of malaise, general body ache, and breathing difficulty and had a medical history of diabetes mellitus type II, hypertension, obstructive sleep apnea, hypothyroidism and morbid obesity. She was diagnosed to have septic shock with multi-organ dysfunction (MODS) and a low perfusion state. CytoSorb(®) hemoadsorption column was used as an attempt at blood purification. Acute physiology and chronic health evaluation score, MODS score, and sequential organ failure assessment score were measured before and after the device application. CytoSorb application as an adjuvant therapy could be considered in septic shock.

  3. The peroxynitrite catalyst WW-85 improves pulmonary function in ovine septic shock.

    PubMed

    Maybauer, Dirk M; Maybauer, Marc O; Szabó, Csaba; Cox, Robert A; Westphal, Martin; Kiss, Levente; Horvath, Eszter M; Traber, Lillian D; Hawkins, Hal K; Salzman, Andrew L; Southan, Garry J; Herndon, David N; Traber, Daniel L

    2011-02-01

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome is associated with excessive production of nitric oxide (NO·) and superoxide (O2), forming peroxynitrite, which in turn, acts as a terminal mediator of cellular injury by producing cell necrosis and apoptosis. We examined the effect of the peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst, WW-85, in a sheep model of acute lung injury and septic shock. Eighteen sheep were operatively prepared and randomly allocated to the sham, control, or WW-85 group (n = 6 each). After a tracheotomy, acute lung injury was produced in the control and WW-85 groups by insufflation of four sets of 12 breaths of cotton smoke. Then, a 30-mL suspension of live Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria (containing 2 - 5 × 10¹¹ colony-forming units) was instilled into the lungs according to an established protocol. The sham group received only the vehicle (30 mL saline). The sheep were studied in awake state for 24 h and ventilated with 100% oxygen. WW-85 was administered 1 h after injury as bolus infusion (0.1 mg/kg), followed by a continuous infusion of 0.02 mg·kg⁻¹·h⁻¹ until the end of the 24-h experimental period. Compared with injured but untreated controls, WW-85-treated animals had significantly improved gas exchange, reductions in airway obstruction, shunt formation, lung myeloperoxidase concentrations, lung malondialdehyde concentrations, lung 3-nitrotyrosine concentrations, and plasma nitrate-to-nitrite levels. Animals treated with WW-85 exhibited less microvascular leakage and improvements in pulmonary function. These results provide evidence that blockade of the nitric oxide-peroxynitrite pathway improves disturbances from septic shock, as demonstrated in a clinically relevant ovine experimental model.

  4. Septic systems as hot-spots of pollutants in the environment: Fate and mass balance of micropollutants in septic drainfields.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yun-Ya; Toor, Gurpal S; Wilson, P Chris; Williams, Clinton F

    2016-10-01

    Septic systems, a common type of onsite wastewater treatment systems, can be an important source of micropollutants in the environment. We investigated the fate and mass balance of 17 micropollutants, including wastewater markers, hormones, pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in the drainfield of a septic system. Drainfields were replicated in lysimeters (1.5m length, 0.9m width, 0.9m height) and managed similar to the field practice. In each lysimeter, a drip line dispersed 9L of septic tank effluent (STE) per day (equivalent to 32.29L/m(2) per day). Fourteen micropollutants in the STE and 12 in the leachate from drainfields were detected over eight months. Concentrations of most micropollutants in the leachate were low (<200ng/L) when compared to STE because >85% of the added micropollutants except for sucralose were attenuated in the drainfield. We discovered that sorption was the key mechanism for retention of carbamazepine and partially for sulfamethoxazole, whereas microbial degradation likely attenuated acetaminophen in the drainfield. This data suggests that sorption and microbial degradation limited transport of micropollutants from the drainfields. However, the leaching of small amounts of micropollutants indicate that septic systems are hot-spots of micropollutants in the environment and a better understanding of micropollutants in septic systems is needed to protect groundwater quality. PMID:27312276

  5. Septic systems as hot-spots of pollutants in the environment: Fate and mass balance of micropollutants in septic drainfields.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yun-Ya; Toor, Gurpal S; Wilson, P Chris; Williams, Clinton F

    2016-10-01

    Septic systems, a common type of onsite wastewater treatment systems, can be an important source of micropollutants in the environment. We investigated the fate and mass balance of 17 micropollutants, including wastewater markers, hormones, pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in the drainfield of a septic system. Drainfields were replicated in lysimeters (1.5m length, 0.9m width, 0.9m height) and managed similar to the field practice. In each lysimeter, a drip line dispersed 9L of septic tank effluent (STE) per day (equivalent to 32.29L/m(2) per day). Fourteen micropollutants in the STE and 12 in the leachate from drainfields were detected over eight months. Concentrations of most micropollutants in the leachate were low (<200ng/L) when compared to STE because >85% of the added micropollutants except for sucralose were attenuated in the drainfield. We discovered that sorption was the key mechanism for retention of carbamazepine and partially for sulfamethoxazole, whereas microbial degradation likely attenuated acetaminophen in the drainfield. This data suggests that sorption and microbial degradation limited transport of micropollutants from the drainfields. However, the leaching of small amounts of micropollutants indicate that septic systems are hot-spots of micropollutants in the environment and a better understanding of micropollutants in septic systems is needed to protect groundwater quality.

  6. Lake phosphorus loading form septic systems by seasonally perched groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilliom, R.J.; Patmont, C.R.

    1983-01-01

    The movement of effluent phosphorus (P) from old septic systems by seasonally perched groundwater was investigated. A previous study indicated a correlation between P loadings and the presence of old homes. Water samples were taken from shallow wells installed 10 to 50 m downgradient from seven septic systems 20 to 40 years old. The equivalent volumetric fraction of each sample consisting of undiluted effluent was estimated from chloride concentration. A Monte Carlo analysis was used to account for the various sources of uncertainty. Movement of diluted septic effluent to the lake was common, but transport of more than 1% of effluent P through the soil was probable for only 4 of 26 samples. The greatest apparent P movement was associated with persistently saturated conditions.

  7. The hemodynamics of septic shock: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Feihl, Francois; Waeber, Bernard; Liaudet, Lucas

    2013-03-01

    In the late 19th century, it was already known that severe infections could be associated with cardiovascular collapse, a fact essentially attributed to cardiac failure. A major experimental work in the rabbit, published by Romberg and Pässler in 1899, shifted attention to disturbed peripheral vascular tone as the mechanism of hypotension in these conditions. In the first half of the 20th century, great progresses were made in the pathophysiologic understanding of hemorrhagic and traumatic shocks, while researchers devoted relatively little attention to septic shock. Progress in the hemodynamic understanding of septic shock resumed with the advent of critical care units. The hyperdynamic state was recognized in the late fifties and early sixties. The present short review ends with landmark studies by Max Harry Weil, demonstrating the importance of venous pooling, and John H. Siegel, which introduced the concept of deficient peripheral utilization of oxygen, inspiring later work on the microvascular disturbances of septic shock.

  8. Immunoregulatory biological response modifiers: effect of cytokines on septic shock

    PubMed Central

    De Simone, Claudio

    1993-01-01

    Whole bacteria or bacterial components or their extracts were employed to restore or augment the immune system. Beneficial effects were attained with these agents in treating various diseases. These agents were named biological response modifiers (BRMs) because they regulated certain cellular components of the immune system. The cellular regulation induced by these BRMs was found to be due to cytokines. The cytokines were shown to act directly on the various cellular components and to provide therapeutic benefit in various autoimmune and immune deficiency diseases. Overproduction of specific cytokines however leads to a deleterious effect on the host. Overproduction of tumour necrosis factor (endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide) leads to septic shock. Bacteraemia is the leading cause of overproduction of tumour necrosis factor (TNF). Septic shock in many cases leads to death. Several monoclonal antibodies to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and anticytokines have demonstrated protection against septic shock. PMID:18475571

  9. Mouse Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Caplazi, P; Baca, M; Barck, K; Carano, R A D; DeVoss, J; Lee, W P; Bolon, B; Diehl, L

    2015-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic debilitating autoimmune disorder characterized by synovitis that leads to cartilage and bone erosion by invading fibrovascular tissue. Mouse models of RA recapitulate many features of the human disease. Despite the availability of medicines that are highly effective in many patient populations, autoimmune diseases (including RA) remain an area of active biomedical research, and consequently mouse models of RA are still extensively used for mechanistic studies and validation of therapeutic targets. This review aims to integrate morphologic features with model biology and cover the key characteristics of the most commonly used induced and spontaneous mouse models of RA. Induced models emphasized in this review include collagen-induced arthritis and antibody-induced arthritis. Collagen-induced arthritis is an example of an active immunization strategy, whereas antibody- induced arthritis models, such as collagen antibody-induced arthritis and K/BxN antibody transfer arthritis, represent examples of passive immunization strategies. The coverage of spontaneous models in this review is focused on the TNFΔ (ARE) mouse, in which arthritis results from overexpression of TNF-α, a master proinflammatory cytokine that drives disease in many patients.

  10. Treatment of domestic wastewater using conventional and baffled septic tanks.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Fayza Aly; Mikhaeil, Basem

    2013-01-01

    The main theme of the study was a comparative study of domestic wastewater treatment using conventional and baffled septic tanks. The septic tanks were fed continuously with domestic wastewater at three different hydraulic retention times (HRTs). The HRTs chosen were 24, 48 and 72 h with corresponding organic loads of 0.321, 0.436 and 0.885 kg chemical oxygen demand (COD) per m3 per day, respectively. The performance of the septic tanks at the three HRTs gave satisfactory results. For the conventional septic tank, COD removal was 53.4%, 56% and 65.3%, at an HRT of 24, 48 and 72 h, respectively, with residual COD of 412, 380 and 334mg/l, respectively. At HRTs of 72, 48 and 24 h, the following percentages removals were realized for: biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), 68.4%, 57, 53.5%; total suspended solid (TSS), 65.3%, 58.3, 55%; phosphorus, 29.3%, 26.9, 25.6%; total Kjeldahl nitrogen 26.8%, 20.8, 17.7%, respectively. On the contrary, ammonia concentrations increased by 7.1%, 5.2 and 4.2% under the same conditions. Consequently, the results showed that the removal of fecal coliform at all HRTs was less than one log. The two baffled septic tanks exhibited superior results at HRTs of 72, 48 and 24 h. Comparing the treated domestic wastewater quality produced by the two types of septic tanks in terms of physico-chemical and biological characteristics, better results were obtained using the two baffles type.

  11. Panayiotopoulos syndrome in a child masquerading as septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, Syed Ahmed; Verma, Devendra Kumar; Tayde, Pavan

    2016-01-01

    Panayiotopoulos syndrome (PS) is a benign childhood epilepsy with predominant autonomic symptoms. The syndrome can have varied presentations resulting in diagnostic dilemma. We herein describe a 3-year-old boy with PS, who had manifestations similar to septic shock. His investigations were normal and had a complete recovery. Through this case, we wish to highlight the unusual presentation of PS as septic shock. Physicians should be aware of the different ways in which this syndrome can present to ensure its early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27390462

  12. Hampton's hump in a patient with endocarditis and septic emboli.

    PubMed

    Basso, Mark; Goldstein, Scott

    2016-05-01

    We discuss a case of a 20-year-old woman presenting with chest pain found to have a Hampton's hump on chest x-ray and corresponding wedge infarct on computed tomographic scan. Contrary to our suspicion that this febrile and tachycardic patient had a pulmonary embolism, she was later determined to have a septic embolus secondary to endocarditis. We highlight the difficulties in diagnosing certain cases of endocarditis in the emergency department, as well as the difficulties in distinguishing septic emboli from pulmonary emboli,especially with plain radiographs.

  13. Involvement of T-cell immunoregulation by ochnaflavone in therapeutic effect on fungal arthritis due to Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jue-Hee

    2011-07-01

    Arthritis due to pathogenic fungi is a serious disease causing rapid destruction of the joint. In the pathogenesis of arthritis, T lymphocytes are considered to be one of the major immune cells. In present study, we examined the T cell immunoregulatory effect by ochnaflavone (Och), a biflavonoid, on arthritis caused by Candida albicans that is the most commonly associated with fungal arthritis. To examine the effects of ochnaflavonon Candida albicans-caused septic arthritis, an emulsified mixture of C. albicans cell wall and complete Freund's adjuvant (CACW/CFA) was injected into BALB/c mice via hind footpad route on days -3, -2, and -1. On Day 0, Och at 1 or 2 mg/dose/time was intratraperitoneally given to mice with the swollen footpad every other day for 3 times. The footpad-edema was measured for 20 days. Results revealed that Och reduced the edema at all dose levels and furthermore, there was app. 45% reduction of the edema in animals given 2 mg-dose at the peak of septic arthritis (p < 0.05). This anti-arthritic effect was accompanied by the diminishing of the DTH (delayed type hypersensitivity) activity against the CACW and by the provoking of the dominant T helper 2 (Th2) type cytokines production (IL-4 and Il-10), which appeared to result in a suppression of T helper 1 cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-2). Besides the T cell immunoregulatory activity, Och inhibited T cells activation as evidenced by the IL-2 reduction from PMA/ionomycin-stimulated Jurkat cell line and in addition, the compound killed macrophages in a dose-dependent manner (p < 0.05). However, Och caused no hemolysis (p < 0.05). These data implicate that Och, which has anti-arthritic activity based on the Th2 dominance as well as macrophage removal, can be safely administered into the blood circulation for treatment of the arthritis caused by C. albicans. Thus, it can be concluded that Och would be an ideal immunologically evaluated agent for treating of Candida arthritis.

  14. Acute appendicitis complicated by pylephlebitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Castro, Ricardo; Fernandes, Teresa; Oliveira, Maria I; Castro, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Pylephlebitis is defined as septic thrombophlebitis of the portal vein. It is a rare but serious complication of an intraabdominal infection, more commonly diverticulitis and appendicitis. It has an unspecific clinical presentation and the diagnosis is difficult. The authors report a case of a 21-year-old man with acute appendicitis complicated by pylephlebitis. The diagnosis was made with contrast enhanced CT.

  15. Prevalence of acute and chronic viral seropositivity and characteristics of disease in patients with psoriatic arthritis treated with cyclosporine: a post hoc analysis from a sex point of view on the observational study of infectious events in psoriasis complicated by active psoriatic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Delia; Chimenti, Sergio; Grossi, Paolo Antonio; Marchesoni, Antonio; Bardazzi, Federico; Ayala, Fabio; Simoni, Lucia; Vassellatti, Donatella; Bellia, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    Background Sex medicine studies have shown that there are sex differences with regard to disease characteristics in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, including psoriasis, in immune response and susceptibility to viral infections. We performed a post hoc analysis of the Observational Study of infectious events in psoriasis complicated by active psoriatic arthritis (SYNERGY) study in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) treated with immunosuppressive regimens including cyclosporine, in order to evaluate potential between-sex differences in severity of disease and prevalence of viral infections. Methods SYNERGY was an observational study conducted in 24 Italian dermatology clinics, which included 238 consecutively enrolled patients with PsA, under treatment with immunosuppressant regimens including cyclosporin A. In this post hoc analysis, patients’ demographical data and clinical characteristics of psoriasis, severity and activity of PsA, prevalence of seropositivity for at least one viral infection, and treatments administered for PsA and infections were compared between sexes. Results A total of 225 patients were evaluated in this post hoc analysis, and 121 (54%) were males. Demographic characteristics and concomitant diseases were comparable between sexes. Statistically significant sex differences were observed at baseline in Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score (higher in males), mean number of painful joints, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, and the global activity of disease assessed by patients (all higher in females). The percentage of patients with at least one seropositivity detected at baseline, indicative of concomitant or former viral infection, was significantly higher among women than among men. No between-sex differences were detected in other measures, at other time points, and in treatments. Patients developed no hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus reactivation during cyclosporine treatment. Conclusion Our post hoc

  16. Autoantibodies in inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Conigliaro, P; Chimenti, M S; Triggianese, P; Sunzini, F; Novelli, L; Perricone, C; Perricone, R

    2016-07-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic chronic inflammatory disease characterized by extensive synovitis resulting in erosions of articular cartilage and marginal bone with joint destruction. The lack of immunological tolerance in RA represents the first step toward the development of autoimmunity. Susceptible individuals, under the influence of environmental factors, such as tobacco smoke, and silica exposure, develop autoimmune phenomena that result in the presence of autoantibodies. HLA and non-HLA haplotypes play a major role in determining the development of specific autoantibodies differentiating anti-citrullinated antibodies (ACPA)-positive and negative RA patients. Rheumatoid factor (RF) and ACPA are the serological markers for RA, and during the preclinical immunological phase, autoantibody titers increase with a progressive spread of ACPA antigens repertoire. The presence of ACPA represents an independent risk factor for developing RA in patients with undifferentiated arthritis or arthralgia. Moreover, anti-CarP antibodies have been identified in patients with RA as well as in individuals before the onset of clinical symptoms of RA. Several autoantibodies mainly targeting post-translational modified proteins have been investigated as possible biomarkers to improve the early diagnosis, prognosis and response to therapy in RA patients. Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is distinguished from RA by infrequent positivity for RF and ACPA, together with other distinctive clinical features. Actually, specific autoantibodies have not been described. Recently, anti-CarP antibodies have been reported in sera from PsA patients with active disease. Further investigations on autoantibodies showing high specificity and sensibility as well as relevant correlation with disease severity, progression, and response to therapy are awaited in inflammatory arthritides.

  17. Eosinophilia in an Acutely Limping Child: An Easy Guess of Rare Systemic Aetiology!

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Harshita; Ahmed, Maaz; Rathi, Surbhi

    2016-01-01

    Painful limping child is often considered due to septic arthritis. Iliopsoas abscess (IPA) is rare in adults and children. The aetiology is often related to tuberculosis of spine. Hereby we report a case of staphylococcal IPA where incidental evaluations led to obvious diagnosis of a rare primary immunodeficiency syndrome called Job syndrome or hyperimmunoglobulin E and Eosinophilia Syndrome (HIES). This was the first case of IPA in a case of immunodeficiency syndrome including HIES. PMID:27504370

  18. [Optic neuritis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis patient].

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Daniela M R; Buscatti, Izabel M; Lourenço, Benito; Monti, Fernanda C; Paz, José Albino; Silva, Clovis A

    2014-01-01

    Optic neuritis (ON) was rarely reported in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients, particularly in those under anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha blockage. However, to our knowledge, the prevalence of ON in JIA population has not been studied. Therefore, 5,793 patients were followed up at our University Hospital and 630 (11%) had JIA. One patient (0.15%) had ON and was reported herein. A 6-year-old male was diagnosed with extended oligoarticular JIA, and received naproxen and methotrexate subsequently replaced by leflunomide. At 11 years old, he was diagnosed with aseptic meningitis, followed by a partial motor seizure with secondary generalization. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electroencephalogram showed diffuse disorganization of the brain electric activity and leflunomide was suspended. Seven days later, the patient presented acute ocular pain, loss of acuity for color, blurred vision, photophobia, redness and short progressive visual loss in the right eye. A fundoscopic exam detected unilateral papilledema without retinal exudates. Orbital MRI suggested right ON. The anti-aquaporin 4 (anti-AQP4) antibody was negative. Pulse therapy with methylprednisolone was administered for five days, and subsequently with prednisone, he had clinical and laboratory improvement. In conclusion, a low prevalence of ON was observed in our JIA population. The absence of anti-AQP4 antibody and the normal brain MRI do not exclude the possibility of demyelinating disease associated with chronic arthritis. Therefore, rigorous follow up is required.

  19. Campylobacter Reactive Arthritis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Janet E.; Krizova, Adriana; Garg, Amit X.; Thiessen-Philbrook, Heather; Ouimet, Janine M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To review the literature on the epidemiology of Campylobacter associated ReA. Methods A Medline (PubMed) search identified studies from 1966–2006 that investigated the epidemiology of Campylobacter associated ReA. Search terms included: “reactive arthritis”, “spondyloarthropathy”, “Reiter’s syndrome”, “gastroenteritis”, “diarrhea”, “epidemiology”, “incidence”, “prevalence”, and “Campylobacter”. Results The literature available to date suggests that the incidence of Campylobacter reactive arthritis may occur in 1 to 5% of those infected. The annual incidence of ReA after Campylobacter or Shigella may be 4.3 and 1.3 respectively per 100,000. The duration of acute ReA varies considerably between reports, and the incidence and impact of chronic reactive arthritis from Campylobacter infection is virtually unknown. Conclusions Campylobacter associated ReA incidence and prevalence varies widely from reviews such as: case ascertainment differences, exposure differences, lack of diagnostic criteria for ReA and perhaps genetics and ages of exposed individuals. At the population level it may not be associated with HLA-B27 and inflammatory back involvement is uncommon. Follow up for long-term sequelae is largely unknown. Five percent of Campylobacter ReA may be chronic or relapsing (with respect to musculoskeletal symptoms). PMID:17360026

  20. Targeting GM-CSF in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Avci, Ali Berkant; Feist, Eugen; Burmester, Gerd-Rüdiger

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is well-known as a haemopoietic growth factor. However, it is also essential in regulating functions of mature myeloid cells such as macrophages. Preclinical studies and observations of flares of arthritis in patients following GM-CSF treatment supported its important contribution to the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). As the most advanced compound, mavrilimumab, a monoclonal antibody against GM-CSF receptor, has already completed phase II trials with a long term of follow-up period of 74 weeks. During this exposure period, an acceptable sustained safety and tolerability profile has been observed addressing the concerns of development of cytopenias or pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. Of note, a rapid and sustained efficacy and normalisation of acute phase reactants were consistently shown in studies both targeting GM-CSF and its receptor. Its tumour necrosis factor (TNF) independent mode of action with concurrent blockade of GM-CSF as well as IL-17 signalling reported from preclinical studies supports the assumption that it can be a useful biologic and an alternative agent in TNF inhibitor resistant patients with RA. Therefore, subsequent studies are warranted to investigate the safety and efficacy of GM-CSF blocking agents in different subgroups of RA. PMID:27586802