Science.gov

Sample records for acute septic arthritis

  1. Acute Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shirtliff, Mark E.; Mader, Jon T.

    2002-01-01

    Acute septic arthritis may develop as a result of hematogenous seeding, direct introduction, or extension from a contiguous focus of infection. The pathogenesis of acute septic arthritis is multifactorial and depends on the interaction of the host immune response and the adherence factors, toxins, and immunoavoidance strategies of the invading pathogen. Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Staphylococcus aureus are used in discussing the host-pathogen interaction in the pathogenesis of acute septic arthritis. While diagnosis rests on isolation of the bacterial species from synovial fluid samples, patient history, clinical presentation, laboratory findings, and imaging studies are also important. Acute nongonococcal septic arthritis is a medical emergency that can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Therefore, prompt recognition, rapid and aggressive antimicrobial therapy, and surgical treatment are critical to ensuring a good prognosis. Even with prompt diagnosis and treatment, high mortality and morbidity rates still occur. In contrast, gonococcal arthritis is often successfully treated with antimicrobial therapy alone and demonstrates a very low rate of complications and an excellent prognosis for full return of normal joint function. In the case of prosthetic joint infections, the hardware must be eventually removed by a two-stage revision in order to cure the infection. PMID:12364368

  2. Septic arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2013:chap 109. Krogstad P. Septic arthritis. In: Cherry JD, Harrison GJ, Kaplan SL, Steinbach WJ, Hotez PJ. Feigin and Cherry's Textbook of Pediatric Infectious Diseases . 7th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  3. Acute pseudo-septic arthritis following viscosuplementation of the knee.

    PubMed

    Idrissi, Zineb; Benbouazza, Karima; Fourtassi, Maryam; Raissouni, Hanae; El Aadmi, Meriem; Zanat, Fatima; Hajjaj-Hassouni, Najia

    2012-01-01

    A 70-year-old woman with a history of medial femoro-tibial compartment of knee osteoarthritis was admitted for acute arthritis six days after a second intra-articular injection of Hyaluronic acid. The joint fluid was inflammatory, with no crystals, and laboratory tests showed marked inflammation leading to antibiotic treatment for suspected septic arthritis. The persistent symptoms and negative results of joint fluid and blood cultures led to discontinuation of the antibiotic therapy after 10 days. Anti-inflammatory with rehabilitation therapy of the knee relieved the symptoms, and the patient was discharged home 3 weeks after her admission. Aseptic arthritis induced by repeated Hyaluronic acid injection is the most likely diagnosis. Physicians should be conscious of this extremely severe complication. PMID:22937184

  4. Acute pseudo-septic arthritis following viscosuplementation of the knee

    PubMed Central

    Idrissi, Zineb; Benbouazza, Karima; Fourtassi, Maryam; Raissouni, Hanae; El Aadmi, Meriem; Zanat, Fatima; Hajjaj-Hassouni, Najia

    2012-01-01

    A 70-year-old woman with a history of medial femoro-tibial compartment of knee osteoarthritis was admitted for acute arthritis six days after a second intra-articular injection of Hyaluronic acid. The joint fluid was inflammatory, with no crystals, and laboratory tests showed marked inflammation leading to antibiotic treatment for suspected septic arthritis. The persistent symptoms and negative results of joint fluid and blood cultures led to discontinuation of the antibiotic therapy after 10 days. Anti-inflammatory with rehabilitation therapy of the knee relieved the symptoms, and the patient was discharged home 3 weeks after her admission. Aseptic arthritis induced by repeated Hyaluronic acid injection is the most likely diagnosis. Physicians should be conscious of this extremely severe complication. PMID:22937184

  5. Update on the Management of Pediatric Acute Osteomyelitis and Septic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Castellazzi, Luca; Mantero, Marco; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis are two infections whose frequencies are increasing in pediatric patients. Acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis need to be carefully assessed, diagnosed, and treated to avoid devastating sequelae. Traditionally, the treatment of acute osteoarticular infection in pediatrics was based on prolonged intravenous anti-infective therapy. However, results from clinical trials have suggested that in uncomplicated cases, a short course of a few days of parenteral antibiotics followed by oral therapy is safe and effective. The aim of this review is to provide clinicians an update on recent controversies and advances regarding the management of acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis in children. In recent years, the emergence of bacterial species resistant to commonly used antibiotics that are particularly aggressive highlights the necessity for further research to optimize treatment approaches and to develop new molecules able to fight the war against acute osteoarticular infection in pediatric patients. PMID:27258258

  6. Update on the Management of Pediatric Acute Osteomyelitis and Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Castellazzi, Luca; Mantero, Marco; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis are two infections whose frequencies are increasing in pediatric patients. Acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis need to be carefully assessed, diagnosed, and treated to avoid devastating sequelae. Traditionally, the treatment of acute osteoarticular infection in pediatrics was based on prolonged intravenous anti-infective therapy. However, results from clinical trials have suggested that in uncomplicated cases, a short course of a few days of parenteral antibiotics followed by oral therapy is safe and effective. The aim of this review is to provide clinicians an update on recent controversies and advances regarding the management of acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis in children. In recent years, the emergence of bacterial species resistant to commonly used antibiotics that are particularly aggressive highlights the necessity for further research to optimize treatment approaches and to develop new molecules able to fight the war against acute osteoarticular infection in pediatric patients. PMID:27258258

  7. Bone and Joint Infections in Children: Septic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Anil; Aggarwal, Aditya N

    2016-08-01

    The pathological invasion of a joint and subsequent inflammation is known as septic arthritis. The knee and hip are the most frequently involved joints. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common cause of septic arthritis in children. An acute onset of illness with an inflamed painful joint and restricted movements and inability to use joint (pseudoparalysis) clinically indicates septic arthritis. The diagnosis is difficult in a neonate or young child where refusal to feed, crying, discomfort during change of diaper (if hip is involved) or attempted joint movement may be the only findings. Fever and other systemic signs may also be absent in neonates. Septic arthritis is diagnosed clinically, supported by appropriate radiological and laboratory investigations. The peripheral blood white cell count is frequently raised with a predominance of polymorphonuclear cells. The acute phase reactants such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) are often markedly raised. Ultrasonography and MRI are preferred investigations in pediatric septic arthritis. Determination of infecting organism in septic arthritis is the key to the correct antibiotic choice, treatment duration and overall management. Joint aspirate and/or blood culture should be obtained before starting antibiotic treatment. Several effective antibiotic regimes are available for managing septic arthritis in children. Presence of large collections, thick pus, joint loculations and pus evacuating into surrounding soft tissues are main indications for surgical drainage. Joint aspiration can be a practical alternative in case the lesion is diagnosed early, with uncomplicated presentations and superficial joints. PMID:26189923

  8. Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sung-Won; Cho, Jin-Yong; Kim, Hyeon-Min

    2016-08-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare disease. The most common symptoms of this disease are acute malocclusion, limited mouth opening, swelling, and tenderness of affected TMJ. These symptoms are often confused with internal derangement of the articular disc, rheumatoid arthritis, retrodiscitis, or osteoarthritis. Therefore, differential diagnosis by image examination is required. Usually, antimicrobial treatment and surgical drainage by needle aspiration, arthroscopy, or arthrotomy are effective treatment approaches. In this study, a patient who was diagnosed with septic arthritis was treated with arthrocentesis and antibiotics without significant complications. We present a case report with a review of the literature. PMID:27595091

  9. Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare disease. The most common symptoms of this disease are acute malocclusion, limited mouth opening, swelling, and tenderness of affected TMJ. These symptoms are often confused with internal derangement of the articular disc, rheumatoid arthritis, retrodiscitis, or osteoarthritis. Therefore, differential diagnosis by image examination is required. Usually, antimicrobial treatment and surgical drainage by needle aspiration, arthroscopy, or arthrotomy are effective treatment approaches. In this study, a patient who was diagnosed with septic arthritis was treated with arthrocentesis and antibiotics without significant complications. We present a case report with a review of the literature. PMID:27595091

  10. Acute Biliary Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Forty-seven cases of biliary tract infection with septic shock are presented. The sepsis was caused by empyema of the gallbladder in 23 cases and by cholangitis in the remainder. Gallstones were most frequently the cause of the sepsis. An appropriate diagnostic description of the syndrome of biliary tract infection and septic shock should therefore include a description of the underlying biliary disease as well as the term acute biliary shock. In this series, emergency surgical management by removal of gallstones and drainage of suppuration was felt to be the most appropriate treatment. There was a high incidence of gallbladder rupture (10.6%) and intrahepatic stones (53.2%). Of the 13 patients who died, 8 might have survived if early operation had been performed after the diagnosis of acute biliary septic shock was established. PMID:2278914

  11. Isolated septic facet joint arthritis as a rare cause of acute and chronic low back pain – a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Klekot, Dominika; Zimny, Anna; Czapiga, Bogdan; Sąsiadek, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: The most common cause of low back pain is degenerative disease of the intervertebral disc and other structures of the lumbar spine. However, in some cases other less frequent causes of such pain can be seen, for example septic facet joint arthritis. Until now, only 40 cases of such inflammatory changes within the spine have been reported in the literature. The disease is probably underestimated due to improper diagnostic pathway. Case Report: The authors describe a case of a 53-year-old woman who was repeatedly hospitalized during a five-month period because of an acute, severe low back pain, with sphincter dysfunction, partially resembling sciatic symptoms. Physical examinations revealed also focal tenderness in the area of the lumbar spine. Inflammatory markers (ESR – erythrocyte sedimentation rate, CRP – C-reactive protein) were elevated. Conservative analgetic treatment brought only partial and temporary relief of the pain and symptoms. The final accurate diagnosis of isolated septic facet joint arthritis at the level of L5/S1 was established after several months from the onset of the first symptoms, after performing various imaging examinations, including bone scintigraphy as well as CT and MRI of the lumbosacral spine. The patient fully recovered after antibiotic therapy and surgery, which was proven in several follow-up examinations showing no relevant pathology of the lumbar spine. The authors broadly describe the etiology and clinical symptoms of the septic facet joint arthritis as well as the significant role of imaging methods, especially MRI, in diagnostic process. The authors also discuss currently available treatment options, both conservative and surgical. Conclusions: The diagnostic procedure of septic facet joint arthritis requires several steps to be taken. Establishing a correct diagnosis may be difficult, that is why it is important to remember about rare causes of low back pain and to perform detailed physical

  12. Septic arthritis due to Aerococcus viridans.

    PubMed

    Taylor, P W; Trueblood, M C

    1985-10-01

    A 20-year-old woman was found to have septic arthritis of the hip due to Aerococcus viridans. This organism closely resembles Streptococcus viridans, but forms gram positive tetrads rather than chains in broth media. The organism has been reported rarely to cause endocarditis and one case of osteomyelitis has been observed. To our knowledge septic arthritis due to Aerococcus viridans has not been previously reported. PMID:4087248

  13. Septic arthritis in the era of immunosuppressive treatments.

    PubMed

    Salar, O; Baker, B; Kurien, T; Taylor, A; Moran, C

    2014-03-01

    Immunosuppressants have been the mainstay of treatment for certain inflammatory joint conditions for many years. Developments in this field, namely biological treatments, have led to a change in the classical presentation of acute bone, joint and soft tissue infections. The normal findings of severe pain and tenderness on examination may be absent or simply mimic a typical exacerbation of the chronic joint condition. A minimally raised white cell count and elevated C-reactive protein in the absence of systemic signs of infection may be interpreted as further evidence for the diagnosis of an exacerbation of inflammatory arthritis. We present a unique case of recurrent polyarticular septic arthritis in a patient treated with immunosuppression for refractory rheumatoid arthritis. We hope this article will enable doctors to appreciate and recognise the changing face of septic arthritis in the modern era of immunosuppressant treatments. PMID:24780657

  14. Septic and aseptic arthritis: a continuum?

    PubMed

    Taylor-Robinson, D; Keat, A

    1999-03-01

    This chapter considers the likelihood that a wide spectrum of infection-provoked arthritis exists, ranging from overt sepsis to apparently aseptic chronic arthritis in which very small numbers of causal bacteria can be detected only by using highly sensitive techniques. It asks whether joints are, as conventionally held, normally devoid of micro-organisms and how to judge the significance of bacteria detected within apparently sterile joints. Through a consideration of known septic, probably infective and apparently aseptic forms of arthritis, a set of criteria for attributing causality to putative arthritogenic micro-organisms is proposed. PMID:10952856

  15. Septic arthritis of the hip - current concepts.

    PubMed

    Rutz, E; Brunner, R

    2009-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the hip is the commonest septic condition during growth, reaching a distinct peak in frequency during infancy. The aetiology is a haematogenous joint infection. Indicative signs are severe pain when moving the joint, septic appearance and a poor general condition of these small and young patients. The diagnosis often can be difficult in infants since septic temperatures are not always present. An ultrasound scan shows the hip joint effusion and the capsular distension. X-ray investigation helps to exclude defective situations. Therapeutic options are: in patients with short history without radiologically visible complications we recommend repeated arthroscopic irrigation and in patients with long history and a radiologically visible defect of the femoral head or dislocation we recommend arthrotomy and open revision or reduction of the hip joint. PMID:19306242

  16. Bacillus pumilus Septic Arthritis in a Healthy Child

    PubMed Central

    Shivamurthy, V. M.; Gantt, Soren; Reilly, Christopher; Tilley, Peter; Guzman, Jaime; Tucker, Lori

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of septic arthritis caused by a Bacillus species, B. pumilus, occurring in a healthy child. This organism rarely causes serious infections and has only been described in newborns and immunocompromised individuals or as a skin infection. This child developed an indolent joint swelling after a minor skin injury, and symptoms were initially thought most consistent with chronic arthritis. The case demonstrates that clinicians should consider joint infection in children presenting with acute monoarticular swelling, even without prominent systemic features. PMID:27366165

  17. A rare cause of septic arthritis: melioidosis.

    PubMed

    Caldera, Aruna Sanjeewa; Kumanan, Thirunavukarasu; Corea, Enoka

    2013-10-01

    Melioidosis is a pyogenic infection with high mortality caused by the bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei. As the clinical presentation is not distinctive, a high index of clinical suspicion is required for diagnosis. We present a case of a 50-year-old farmer who was diabetic and a chronic alcoholic, who presented to us with pneumonia, followed by septic arthritis. He was ultimately diagnosed as having melioidosis. PMID:24067292

  18. Septic Arthritis in the Temporomandibular Joint

    PubMed Central

    Al-Khalisy, Hassan Mahdi; Nikiforov, Ivan; Mansoora, Qurat; Goldman, John; Cheriyath, Pramil

    2015-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare event that has only been reported a few dozen times worldwide. This case is remarkable for septic arthritis of the TMJ joint in an otherwise healthy male. Case Report: A 24-year-old male presented to the emergency department with periauricular swelling, erythema, fever, myalgia's and generalized joint pain. He had previously sought medical attention and was placed on ciprofloxacin. However, he developed facial swelling and a rash and had to discontinue the antibiotic. On physical exam the patient had a large swelling and tenderness in his left periauricular area, with erythema and deviation of the right mandible which limited his ability to open the mouth. A computed tomography showed mild asymmetric soft tissue swelling in the left pharyngeal region but did not show joint effusion. Subsequent magnetic resonance imaging did show effusion of the joint space. The effusion was drained, and the synovial fluid was submitted for gram stain, culture, and sensitivity. The cultures grew menthicillin sensitive Staphyloccocus Aureus. The patient was discharged to complete a two week course of intravenous (IV) Ceftriaxone and IV Vancomycin via home infusion. Conclusion: Septic Arthritis of the TMJ is a rare event with very specific clinical symptoms. Due to the low sensitivity of the computed tomography scan, magnetic resonance imaging should be considered when computed tomography scan is negative for TMJ effusion. PMID:26713295

  19. Streptococcus gordonii septic arthritis : two cases and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite advances in antimicrobial and surgical therapy, septic arthritis remains a rheumatologic emergency that can lead to rapid joint destruction and irreversible loss of function. In adults, Staphylococcus aureus is the most common microorganism isolated from native joints. Streptococcus gordonii is a prominent member of the viridans group of oral bacteria and is among the bacteria most frequently identified as being primary agent of subacute bacterial endocarditis. To the best of our knowledge, Streptococcus gordonii has not yet been described as agent of septic arthritis. Case Presentation We describe here two cases of septic arthritis due to Streptococcus gordonii. It gives us an opportunity to review epidemiology, diagnosis criteria and management of septic arthritis. Conclusion Although implication of S. gordonii as aetiologic agent of subacute endocarditis is well known, this organism is a rare cause of septic arthritis. In this case, the exclusion of associated endocarditis is warranted. PMID:22974507

  20. Septic Arthritis Due to Cellulosimicrobium cellulans▿

    PubMed Central

    Magro-Checa, César; Chaves-Chaparro, Lara; Parra-Ruiz, Jorge; Peña-Monje, Alejandro; Rosales-Alexander, José Luis; Salvatierra, Juan; Raya, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    Cellulosimicrobium cellulans has been reported as a rare cause of human pathogenesis. Infections mainly occur in immunocompromised patients and very often are associated with a foreign body. We report the first case of septic arthritis caused by C. cellulans in an immunocompetent patient. Our patient suffered a penetrating palm tree thorn injury to his left knee 8 weeks before admission. Although no foreign objects were found, they were suspected because previous reports suggest a frequent association with this microorganism, and open debridament was performed. Removal of foreign bodies related to this organism must be considered a high-priority treatment in these patients to achieve a complete recovery. PMID:21998421

  1. Septic arthritis caused by Mycobacterium marinum.

    PubMed

    Riera, Jaume; Conesa, Xavier; Pisa, Jose; Moreno, Josefa; Siles, Eduard; Novell, Josep

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of infection by Mycobacterium marinum is rising, mainly due to the increasing popularity of home aquariums. The infection typically manifests as skin lesions, with septic arthritis being a rare presentation form. The disease is difficult to diagnose even when there is a high clinical suspicion, as culture in specific media may not yield positive findings. Thus, establishment of appropriate treatment is often delayed. Synovectomy, capsular thinning, and joint drainage together with prolonged, combined antibiotic therapy may be needed to cure the infection. PMID:26511731

  2. Pelvic osteomyelitis mimicking septic hip arthritis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Richelle C; Strongwater, Allan M

    2009-09-01

    Peripelvic infections are rare, compared with the incidence of septic hip arthritis, but are serious, requiring emergent treatment. They often are not included in differential diagnoses for patients presenting with fever, pain, inability to bear weight, elevated white blood cell count, and elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Most patients are treated initially as a septic hip arthritis. Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial to outcome in peripelvic abscess. Use of MRI may help to elucidate the correct diagnosis. Previously reported peripelvic infections included obturator internus and externus, and psoas, but to the best of our knowledge, this is first case report of infection of the ischiopubic ramus synchondrosis presenting as septic arthritis. PMID:19491707

  3. Septic arthritis caused by chronic osteomyelitis.

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, J. L.; Watson, P. A.; Crouch, C. A.

    1997-01-01

    We have treated four cases of previously quiescent osteomyelitis which presented as septic arthritis in an adjacent joint. The osteomyelitic focus was in the bone proximal to the involved joints (zero to ten centimeters above the joint line). Based on the presenting history, physical findings, laboratory tests and cultures of joint fluids, the joint sepsis was low grade in all patients which led to delays in diagnosis and treatment. Aggressive surgical debridement of both bone and joint, followed by a prolonged course of antibiotics led to resolution in all patients. A high index of suspicion combined with adequate radiographs of the surrounding bones should lead to the appropriate diagnosis and treatment. Images Figure 1A-B Figure 1C Figure 1D Figure 2 PMID:9234979

  4. Diagnostic challenges in acromioclavicular septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Williams, Mark

    2016-01-01

    A 69-year-old man with Klinefelter's syndrome presented with a painful shoulder and staphylococcal sepsis. He received intravenous antibiotics while investigations were performed to locate the source of infection. MRI demonstrated infection in the acromioclavicular joint (ACJ). The patient clinically improved and a further 5 weeks of oral antibiotics were given. He remained asymptomatic at 2-year follow-up. Although ACJ septic arthritis is rare, independent of immune-competent status, a high index of suspicion is essential for prompt diagnosis. The condition presents additional diagnostic challenges due to unfamiliarity, the challenges of interpreting imaging, desire for radiological guided arthrocentesis and low volume aspirates. Overcoming these pitfalls is essential to avoid significant morbidity and mortality. PMID:27257000

  5. Septic Arthritis of the Shoulder Complicating Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Raiser, Sara; Davidson, Kathryn; Walsh, Ashley; Egerman, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Septic arthropathy leads to rapid joint destruction, impairment, and disability. Staphylococcus can be particularly virulent to bone and joints leading to adverse obstetric events. At 28 of weeks gestation, a patient presented with pyelonephritis and progressive left shoulder pain. Magnetic resonance imaging indicated early clavicular destruction and acromial involvement. Glenohumeral joint aspiration produced Staphylococcus aureus. The patient then had premature rupture of membranes and progressed rapidly to preterm delivery. Placental pathology revealed chorioamnionitis and microabscesses. Treatment of the infected joint required further surgical drainage and bone resection as well as extended antibiotics. It is important to remember that joint pain in pregnancy may indicate infective arthritis, and pyelonephritis can be a source of such an infection. Evaluation includes magnetic resonance imaging and consultation for joint aspiration. Prompt recognition and treatment are necessary to prevent joint destruction. PMID:24959364

  6. Septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis caused by Streptococcus mitis.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, E; Hofer, M; Steinrücken, J; Trampuz, A; Borens, O

    2014-12-01

    Septic arthritis of the pubic symphisis is distinguished from osteitis pubis by positive cultures. The symptoms, physical examination and laboratory findings of these two conditions are comparable. We present a case of 57-year-old woman with septic arthritis of pubic symphisis caused by Streptococcus mitis, a commensal oral flora that belongs to viridans group streptococci, which normally reside in the oral cavity, the gastrointestinal and the urogenital tract. PMID:25109348

  7. Disseminated Mycobacterium abscessus Infection Following Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Shoichi; Sekiya, Noritaka; Takizawa, Yasunobu; Morioka, Hiroshi; Kato, Hirofumi; Aono, Akio; Chikamatsu, Kinuyo; Mitarai, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Satomi; Kamei, Satoshi; Setoguchi, Keigo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mycobacterium abscessus is a rapidly growing mycobacterium found mainly in patients with respiratory or cutaneous infections, but it rarely causes disseminated infections. Little is known about the clinical characteristics, treatment, and prognosis of disseminated M abscessus infection. A 75-year-old Japanese woman who had been treated for 17 years with a corticosteroid for antisynthetase syndrome with antithreonyl-tRNA synthetase antibody developed swelling of her right elbow. X-ray of her right elbow joint showed osteolysis, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed fluid in her right elbow joint. M abscessus grew in joint fluid and blood cultures. She was diagnosed with a disseminated M abscessus infection following septic arthritis. Antimicrobial treatment by clarithromycin, amikacin, and imipenem/cilastatin combined with surgical debridement was administered. Although blood and joint fluid cultures became negative 1 week later, the patient died at 6 weeks from starting antimicrobial treatment. We reviewed 34 cases of disseminated M abscessus infections from the literature. Most of the patients had immunosuppressive backgrounds such as transplantation, use of immunosuppressive agents, hematological malignancy, and end stage renal disease. The duration from onset of symptoms to diagnosis was over 3 months in half of the cases. All fatal cases had positive blood cultures or use of immunosuppressive agents. Clinicians should bear in mind that mycobacterial infections including M abscessus are one of the differential diagnoses in patients with subacute arthritis and soft tissue infections. PMID:26020393

  8. Septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis: an atypical abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Ghislain, L; Heylen, A; Alexis, F; Tintillier, M

    2015-02-01

    Septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis is a rare infection mostly caused by Staphylococcus aureus, and is traditionally associated with risk factors (sports, female incontinence surgery). Typical features of pubic symphysis infection include abdominal, pelvic, or groin pain that increases upon standing and walking, causing limping to occur. Acute onset of fever is often associated. It is important to distinguish septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis from its aseptic homologue, improperly called 'osteitis pubis' in English literature. This general term is mostly used to designate a mechanical pubic pain and has several aetiological meanings (joint stress, postoperative pain, rheumatic diseases). However, some authors consider the infection of the pubic symphysis as a variant of osteitis pubis, placing the two diseases in the continuum of the same entity. This confusion in pubic pathology related to its rarity and its atypical presentation, may in some cases lead to diagnostic and therapeutic delay. In this article, we would like to make practitioners aware of this uncommon and often ignored anatomical site, so that it can recover its place in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain. PMID:25227947

  9. Technetium phosphate bone scan in the diagnosis of septic arthritis in childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Sundberg, S.B.; Savage, J.P.; Foster, B.K. )

    1989-09-01

    The technetium phosphate bone scans of 106 children with suspected septic arthritis were reviewed to determine whether the bone scan can accurately differentiate septic from nonseptic arthropathy. Only 13% of children with proved septic arthritis had correct blind scan interpretation. The clinically adjusted interpretation did not identify septic arthritis in 30%. Septic arthritis was incorrectly identified in 32% of children with no evidence of septic arthritis. No statistically significant differences were noted between the scan findings in the septic and nonseptic groups and no scan findings correlated specifically with the presence or absence of joint sepsis.

  10. Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint as a complication of acute otitis media in a child: A rare case and the importance of real-time PCR for diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Bast, F; Collier, S; Chadha, P; Collier, J

    2015-11-01

    We document the case of a 7-year-old boy who presented with pain in his left ear and trismus after a diagnosis of acute otitis media one week previously. His blood inflammatory markers were raised and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed significant left temporomandibular joint effusion and partial attenuation of the left mastoid. A clinical diagnosis of septic arthritis of the TMJ was made and the patient was commenced on broad-spectrum antibiotics. Analysis using real time PCR enabled identification of the offending organism, confirmation of the diagnosis and antibiotic treatment to be specifically tailored for treatment. PMID:26340928

  11. Bilateral Acromioclavicular Septic Arthritis as an Initial Presentation of Streptococcus pneumoniae Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi-Sadraei, Neda; Gupta, Rohan; Machicado, Jorge D.; Govindu, Rukma

    2014-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is infrequently associated with septic arthritis. Moreover, septic arthritis of the acromioclavicular (AC) joint is rarely reported in the literature. We report a case of Streptococcus pneumoniae IE in a patient who presented with bilateral AC joint septic arthritis and we review the literature on the topic. PMID:24987538

  12. Septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    El Mezouar, Imane; Abourazzak, Fatema Zahra; Mansouri, Samia; Harzy, Taoufik

    2014-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis, so called osteomyelitis pubis is the infection which involves pubic symphysis and its joint. It is a rare condition, representing less than one percent of all cases of osteomyelitis. It affects most frequently young athletes and women undergoing gynecologic or urologic surgery. It presents itself with fever and pubic pain which irradiates to the genitals and increases when hip is mobilized, and this fact produces gait claudication. Diagnosis is based on clinic supported by microbiologic culture results, image methods, and proteins augment during acute phase. The etiologic agents most commonly found are Staphylococcus aureus, followed by gram-negative bacilli, and polymicrobial infection in recent pelvis surgery. The antibiotic treatment is adjusted depending on the microbiological diagnosis, adding NSAIDs, and bed rest. We report a 16 year-old male presenting with pubic pain and fever. Magnetic resonance imagery showed arthritis of the pubic symphysis. The patient was treated with antibiotics with a good clinical response. PMID:25419287

  13. Ultrasound Detection of Salmonella Septic Arthritis in a Rheumatoid Arthritis Patient on Anti-TNF Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of Salmonella septic arthritis detected by ultrasound in a 40-year-old man with rheumatoid arthritis while he was on anti–tumor necrosis factor-α monoclonal antibody certolizumab. An aspirate of his left elbow joint showed Salmonella enteritidis infection that was sensitive to ceftraixone. This was preceded by a brief episode of loose stools following a visit to the Far East. He was treated with antibiotics and made a good recovery. There have only been a few case reports of Salmonella septic arthritis in a rheumatoid arthritis patient on anti–tumor necrosis factor treatment but none previously in association with certolizumab. PMID:26425605

  14. X-linked agammaglobulinemia combined with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and invasive Klebsiella pneumoniae polyarticular septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zaihua; Kang, Yuli; Lin, Zhenlang; Huang, Yanjing; Lv, Huoyang; Li, Yasong

    2015-02-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency disease caused by mutations in the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) gene. XLA can also present in combination with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), the major chronic rheumatologic disease in children. We report herein the first known case of a juvenile patient diagnosed with XLA combined with JIA that later developed into invasive Klebsiella pneumoniae polyarticular septic polyarthritis. An additional comprehensive review of XLA combined with JIA and invasive K. pneumoniae septic arthritis is also presented. XLA was identified by the detection of BTK mutations while the diagnosis of JIA was established by clinical and laboratory assessments. Septic arthritis caused by invasive K. pneumoniae was confirmed by culturing of the synovia and gene detection of the isolates. Invasive K. pneumoniae infections can not only result in liver abscesses but also septic arthritis, although this is rare. XLA combined with JIA may contribute to invasive K. pneumoniae infection. PMID:24567239

  15. Brucella Septic Arthritis: Case Reports and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Elzein, Fatehi Elnour; Sherbeeni, Nisreen

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is one of the commonest zoonotic infections worldwide. The disease is endemic in Saudi Arabia, the Middle East, and the Mediterranean area. Osteoarticular involvement is a frequent manifestation of brucellosis. It tends to involve the sacroiliac joints more commonly; however, spondylitis and peripheral arthritis are increasingly reported. Brucellosis can be overlooked especially in the presence of companion bacteria. Hence, it should be suspected in all patients with septic arthritis in endemic areas or in patients visiting such areas. PMID:27200196

  16. Septic Arthritis and Osteomyelitis Due to Bordetella petrii

    PubMed Central

    Bankowski, Matthew J.; Pien, Francis D.

    2014-01-01

    A case of Bordetella petrii septic arthritis and osteomyelitis in an elbow resulted from a dirt bike accident in Hawaii. Two months of intravenous antibiotics and repeated surgeries were required to cure this infection. Our case, and literature review, suggests that extended-spectrum penicillins, tetracycline, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole are good treatment options. PMID:25540393

  17. Septic Arthritis of the Pediatric Shoulder: From Infancy to Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. Septic arthritis of the glenohumeral joint in the pediatric population (<18 yo) is not commonly described in the literature. There is a corresponding paucity of information regarding its presentation and treatment. Methods. An IRB approved review of patients treated with irrigation and debridement by the Orthopaedic Department was completed. This retrospective study includes four patients, presenting from 2005 to 2015, with septic arthritis of the shoulder. Results. The mean age (Mage) at presentation was 5 years, with a range of 1 month to 15 years. Patients presented on average after 7 days with pain and a mean temperature of 39°C, erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 66 mm/hr, a C-reactive protein level of 11.17 g/dL, and a white blood cell count of 20.2 × 103/mcL. Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were cultured from the wounds. All cases were treated operatively with irrigation and debridement and with antimicrobial therapy. Patients received antibiotics for an average of 6 weeks. Conclusion. Septic arthritis of the shoulder occurs in all pediatric ages. Successful treatment of septic arthritis of the shoulder was accomplished in four cases without division of the biceps sheath, with an average follow-up of 8 months.

  18. Campylobacter Fetus Septic Arthritis: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Fick, Robert B.; Isturiz, Raul; Cadman, Ed C.

    1979-01-01

    We report a case of septic arthritis caused by the fastidious gram-negative rod Campylobacter fetus. We suggest that the organism may be part of the endogenous flora and that the clinical infections tend to occur in compromised hosts. Our patient is the first to be described with multiple myeloma and C. fetus septic arthritis. The documented cases of culture-proven C. fetus septic arthritis reported to date have occurred in three men and one woman, all in the seventh and eighth decades of life, with a mono-articular large joint distribution. The septic arthritis always occurred in previously injured joints and curiously enough need not be associated with a toxic-appearing patient. C. fetus infections are also associated with the signs and symptoms of clinical thrombophlebitis. We stress caution in establishing this diagnosis of phlebitis on clinical evaluation only and urge differentiation of true deep vein thrombophlebitis from pseudothrombophlebitis or dissected popliteal synovial cyst. This latter diagnosis may be made non-invasively by ultrasound techniques. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:494668

  19. Nocardia Septic Arthritis Complicating an Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repair

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Elaine Y. L.; Boutlis, Craig S.; Chen, Darren B.; Liu, Eunice Y.-T.

    2015-01-01

    Nocardia infection following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) allograft reconstruction is a rare occurrence. We report a case of Nocardia infection of an allograft ACL reconstruction and septic arthritis of the knee joint due to an organism most similar to the novel Nocardia species Nocardia aobensis. PMID:26041900

  20. Nocardia Septic Arthritis Complicating an Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repair.

    PubMed

    Yong, Elaine X L; Cheong, Elaine Y L; Boutlis, Craig S; Chen, Darren B; Liu, Eunice Y-T; McKew, Genevieve L

    2015-08-01

    Nocardia infection following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) allograft reconstruction is a rare occurrence. We report a case of Nocardia infection of an allograft ACL reconstruction and septic arthritis of the knee joint due to an organism most similar to the novel Nocardia species Nocardia aobensis. PMID:26041900

  1. Ultrasonographic findings in 38 horses with septic arthritis/tenosynovitis.

    PubMed

    Beccati, Francesca; Gialletti, Rodolfo; Passamonti, Fabrizio; Nannarone, Sara; Di Meo, Antonio; Pepe, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Septic arthritis/tenosynovitis in the horse can have life-threatening consequences. The purpose of this cross-sectional retrospective study was to describe ultrasound characteristics of septic arthritis/tenosynovitis in a group of horses. Diagnosis of septic arthritis/tenosynovitis was based on historical and clinical findings as well as the results of the synovial fluid analysis and/or positive synovial culture. Ultrasonographic findings recorded were degree of joint/sheath effusion, degree of synovial membrane thickening, echogenicity of the synovial fluid, and presence of hyperechogenic spots and fibrinous loculations. Ultrasonographic findings were tested for dependence on the cause of sepsis, time between admission and beginning of clinical signs, and the white blood cell counts in the synovial fluid. Thirty-eight horses with confirmed septic arthritis/tenosynovitis of 43 joints/sheaths were included. Degree of effusion was marked in 81.4% of cases, mild in 16.3%, and absent in 2.3%. Synovial thickening was mild in 30.9% of cases and moderate/severe in 69.1%. Synovial fluid was anechogenic in 45.2% of cases and echogenic in 54.8%. Hyperechogenic spots were identified in 32.5% of structures and fibrinous loculations in 64.3%. Relationships between the degree of synovial effusion, degree of the synovial thickening, presence of fibrinous loculations, and the time between admission and beginning of clinical signs were identified, as well as between the presence of fibrinous loculations and the cause of sepsis (P ≤ 0.05). Findings indicated that ultrasonographic findings of septic arthritis/tenosynovitis may vary in horses, and may be influenced by time between admission and beginning of clinical signs. PMID:25046562

  2. [Septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis in two athletes].

    PubMed

    Andrews, José A; Rizzato Lede, Daniel; Senderovsky, Melisa; Finn, Bárbara C; Emery, Nicholas; Bottaro, Federico; Bruetman, Julio E; Young, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis, so called osteomyelitis pubis is the infection which involves pubic symphysis and its joint. It is a rare condition, representing less than one percent of all cases of osteomyelitis. It affects most frequently young athletes and women undergoing gynecologic or urologic surgery. It presents itself with fever and pubic pain which irradiates to the genitals and increases when hip is mobilized, and this fact produces gait claudication. Differential diagnosis should be made with pubic osteitis, which is a sterile inflammatory condition. Diagnosis is based on clinic supported by microbiologic culture results, image methods, and proteins augment during acute phase. Image guided puncture is often necessary for the differential diagnosis with pubic osteitis. The etiologic agents most commonly found are Staphylococcus aureus, followed by gram-negative bacilli, and polymicrobial infection in recent pelvis surgery. The antibiotic treatment is adjusted depending on the microbiological diagnosis, adding NSAIDs, and bed rest. Surgical debridement is required up to 55% of the cases. Two cases of osteomyelitis of the pubis by S. aureus, with good outcome to treatment with antibiotics, NSAIDs and rest are here described. Both patients were healthy relevant athletes. PMID:22763164

  3. Septic acute kidney injury: the glomerular arterioles.

    PubMed

    Bellomo, Rinaldo; Wan, Li; Langenberg, Christoph; Ishikawa, Ken; May, Clive N

    2011-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a serious condition that affects many intensive care unit (ICU) patients. The most common causes of AKI in the ICU are severe sepsis and septic shock. The mortality of AKI in septic critically ill patients remains high despite our increasing ability to support vital organs. This is partly due to our poor understanding of the pathogenesis of sepsis-induced renal dysfunction. However, new concepts are emerging to explain the pathogenesis of septic AKI, which challenge previously held dogma. Throughout the past half century, septic AKI has essentially been considered secondary to tubular injury, which, in turn, has been considered secondary to renal ischemia. This belief is curious because the hallmark of septic AKI and AKI in general is the loss of glomerular filtration rate (GFR). It would seem logical, therefore, to focus on the glomerulus in trying to understand why such loss of GFR occurs. Recent experimental observations suggest that, at least in the initial phases of septic AKI, profound changes occur which involve glomerular hemodynamics and lead to loss of GFR. These observations imply that changes in the vasoconstrictor tone of both the afferent and efferent arterioles are an important component of the pathogenesis of septic AKI. PMID:21921614

  4. Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis as a Complication of Neonatal Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Saadi, Noor J.; Bakathir, Abdulaziz A.; Al-Hashmi, Ahmed K.; Al-Ismaili, Mohammad I.

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis as a complication of neonatal septic arthritis is rarely reported in the literature. We report two clinical cases of unilateral TMJ ankylosis occurring in paediatric patients subsequent to neonatal septic arthritis. The first case was a 15-month-old male infant who presented to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Muscat, Oman, in May 2010. According to the published English scientific literature, he is the youngest person yet to be diagnosed with this condition. The second case was a five-year-old female who presented to the Al-Nahda Hospital, Muscat, Oman, in October 2011. Both cases presented with facial asymmetry and trismus. They subsequently underwent gap arthroplasty and interpositional temporalis muscle and fascia grafts which resulted in an immediate improvement in mouth opening. Postoperatively, the patients underwent active jaw physiotherapy which was initially successful. Both patients were followed up for a minimum of two years following their surgeries. PMID:26629387

  5. Systemic lupus erythematosus presenting as pneumococcal septicaemia and septic arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Webster, J; Williams, B D; Smith, A P; Hall, M; Jessop, J D

    1990-01-01

    A 50 year old woman presented with pneumococcal septicaemia, septic arthritis, and a lobar pneumonia and was subsequently diagnosed as having systemic lupus erythematosus. The blood film and splenic 99mTc sulphur colloid uptake were normal, although selective functional hyposplenism was shown by the impaired clearance of immunoglobulin coated erythrocytes. Systemic lupus erythematosus presenting with fulminating pneumococcal sepsis in the presence of selective defects in spleen function is previously unreported. PMID:2322028

  6. Gallium scintigraphy for diagnosis of septic arthritis and osteomyelitis in children

    SciTech Connect

    Borman, T.R.; Johnson, R.A.; Sherman, F.C.

    1986-05-01

    Thirty-four children with presumptive acute osteomyelitis or septic arthritis underwent early gallium-67 citrate scintigraphy and have been retrospectively reviewed. Diagnostic accuracy using this technique was 91%. Gallium-67 citrate is a more reliable radiopharmaceutical agent for the detection of selected acute musculoskeletal infections than either technetium methylene diphosphonate or indium-111. However, the radiation dosage from gallium is higher than from other radiopharmaceutical agents, and the authors would recommend its use only in cases where the diagnosis cannot be made on the basis of clinical, laboratory, or plain roentgenographic criteria.

  7. Surgical treatment options for septic arthritis of the hip in children

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Gang; Spoerri, Muriel; Rutz, Erich

    2016-01-01

    Septic arthritis is the result of bacterial infection of the hip joint and is often found in infants and toddlers. It is the most common septic joint condition during growth and may cause the most devastating complications without prompt and proper treatment. Early diagnosis and intervention are required to avoid irreversible complications. This review documents the systematic approach to diagnosis and management of septic arthritis in children. PMID:27251515

  8. A Case of Polyarticular Pasteurella multocida Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Nitoslawski, Sarah; McConnell, Todd M.; Semret, Makeda; Stein, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    A 76-year-old man with a history of osteoarthritis presents with right leg erythema and inability to weight-bear and pain in his right shoulder. Synovial fluid cell count of the knee and shoulder showed abundant neutrophils, and cultures of the knee showed growth of Pasteurella multocida. The patient owned four cats with which he had frequent contact, but history and physical examination elicited no evidence of scratches or bites. This case highlights the invasive potential of Pasteurella multocida in an immunocompetent individual and its capacity to cause septic arthritis in the setting of frequent animal contact. PMID:27366169

  9. Complement depletion aggravates Staphylococcus aureus septicaemia and septic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sakiniene, E; Bremell, T; Tarkowski, A

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the role of the complement system in Staphylococcus aureus arthritis and septicaemia. The murine model of haematogenously acquired septic arthritis was used, injecting intravenously toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1), producing S. aureus LS-1. Complement was depleted using cobra venom factor (CVF). Evaluation of arthritis was performed clinically and histopathologically. In addition, the effect of complement depletion on the phagocytic activity of leucocytes was assessed in vivo and in vitro. Six days after inoculation of S. aureus the prevalence of arthritis in decomplemented mice was three-fold higher than that in controls (91% versus 25%). The clinical severity of arthritis at the end of the experiment, expressed as arthritic index, was 7.3 and 1.9, respectively. These findings were confirmed by histological index of synovitis as well as of cartilage and/or bone destruction being significantly higher in decomplemented mice than in controls (9.8 ± 1.7 versus 4.9 ± 1.2, P < 0.05; and 7.9 ± 1.7 versus 3.0 ± 0.9, P < 0.05, respectively). Also, the septicaemia-induced mortality was clearly higher in decomplemented mice compared with the controls. CVF treatment significantly reduced in vivo polymorphonuclear cell-dependent inflammation induced by subcutaneous injection of olive oil and mirroring the capacity of polymorphonuclear cells (PMNC) to migrate and/or extravasate. Besides, the decomplementation procedure significantly impaired phagocytic activity of peripheral blood leucocytes in vitro, since the number of phagocytes being able to ingest bacteria decreased by 50% when the cells were maintained in decomplemented serum compared with those in intact serum. The conclusion is that complement depletion aggravates the clinical course of S. aureus arthritis and septicaemia, possibly by a combination of decreased migration/extravasation of PMNC and an impairment of phagocytosis. PMID:9933426

  10. Parvimonas micra: A rare cause of native joint septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Baghban, Adam; Gupta, Shaili

    2016-06-01

    Parvimonas micra is a fastidious, anaerobic, gram positive coccus, which is found in normal human oral and gastrointestinal flora. It has also been known as Peptostreptococcus micros and Micromonas micros with its most recent re-classification in 2006. It has been described in association with hematogenous seeding of prosthetic joints [1,2]. Several cases of discitis and osteomyelitis have been described in association with dental procedures and periodontal disease often with a subacute presentation. However, cases of native joint septic arthritis are limited [3-5]. Per our literature review, there is one case of native knee septic arthritis described in 1999, with a prolonged time to diagnosis and treatment due to difficulty culturing P. micra. The previously reported patient experienced significant joint destruction and morbidity [6]. Advances in culture techniques and new methods of organism identification including MALDI-TOF and 16s rRNA sequencing have lead to increased identification of this organism, which may be a more frequent bone and joint pathogen than previously realized. PMID:26911898

  11. Ureaplasma septic arthritis in an immunosuppressed patient with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    George, Michael David; Cardenas, Ana Maria; Birnbaum, Belinda K; Gluckman, Stephen J

    2015-06-01

    Mycoplasmas, including Ureaplasma and Mycoplasma species, are uncommon but important causes of septic arthritis, especially affecting immunosuppressed patients. Many of the reported cases have been associated with congenital immunodeficiency disorders, especially hypogammaglobulinemia. Mycoplasmas are difficult to grow in the laboratory, and these infections may be underdiagnosed using culture techniques. We report a case of a 21-year-old woman with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and hip arthroplasties treated with rituximab and adalimumab who developed urogenital infections and soft tissue abscesses followed by knee arthritis with negative routine cultures. Ureaplasma species was identified from synovial fluid on 2 separate occasions using a broad-range 16S ribosomal RNA gene polymerase chain reaction. Azithromycin led to rapid improvement in symptoms, but after completion of therapy, involvement of the hip prosthesis became apparent, and again, 16S rRNA gene polymerase chain reaction was positive for Ureaplasma species. The literature is reviewed with a discussion of risk factors for Mycoplasma septic arthritis, clinical presentation, methods of diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:26010188

  12. Septic Arthritis and Osteomyelitis Caused by Pasteurella multocida.

    PubMed

    Vranis, Neil; Paryavi, Ebrahim; Christian, Matthew; Joshi, Manjari; Pensy, Raymond A

    2015-07-01

    This report presents a case of progressive septic arthritis and osteomyelitis caused by a rare pathogen, Pasteurella multocida, thought to be provoked by the use of systemic corticosteroids. Despite initial improvement after antibiotics and surgical procedure, the patient returned with new, associated symptoms 1 month later. This concurrent set of circumstances leading to a life-threatening condition has not been reported, to the best of our knowledge. Physicians aware of such a case will be better prepared to diagnose, treat, and educate their patients. Additionally, the diagnostic challenge presented by this case report emphasizes the need for vigilance and thoroughness in obtaining histories from patients presenting with seemingly benign complaints, especially in vulnerable populations, such as infants, pregnant women, and immunocompromised adults. PMID:26161771

  13. Radionuclide imaging in the evaluation of osteomyelitis and septic arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, E.E.; Haynie, T.P.; Podoloff, D.A.; Lowry, P.A.; Harle, T.S. )

    1989-01-01

    Despite controversy over its exact role, radionuclide imaging plays an important role in the evaluation of patients suspected of having osteomyelitis. The differentiation between osteomyelitis and cellulitis is best accomplished by using a three-phase technique using Tc-99m methylene diphosphonate (MDP). Frequently, it is necessary to obtain multiple projections and magnification views to adequately assess suspected areas. It is recommended that a Ga-67 or In-111 leukocyte scan be performed in those cases where osteomyelitis is strongly suspected clinically and the routine bone scan is equivocal or normal. Repeated bone scan after 48 to 72 h may demonstrate increased radioactivity in the case of early osteomyelitis with the initial photon-deficient lesion. In-111 leukocyte imaging is useful for the evaluation of suspected osteomyelitis complicating recent fracture or operation, but must be used in conjunction with clinical and radiographic correlation. The recognition of certain imaging patterns appears helpful to separate osteomyelitis from septic arthritis or cellulitis. 83 references.

  14. Septic arthritis due to tubercular and Aspergillus co-infection.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mukesh; Thilak, Jai; Zahoor, Adnan; Jyothi, Arun

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus septic arthritis is a rare and serious medical and surgical problem. It occurs mainly in immunocompromised patients. Aspergillus fumigatus is the most common causative organism followed by Aspergillus flavus. The most common site affected is knee followed by shoulder, ankle, wrist, hip and sacroiliac joint. Debridement and voriconazole are primary treatment of articular aspergilosis. To the best of our knowledge, there are no reported cases of co-infection of tuberculosis (TB) and Aspergillus infecting joints. We report a case of co-infection of TB and A. flavus of hip and knee of a 60-year-old male, with type 2 diabetes mellitus. He was treated with debridement, intravenous voriconazole, and antitubercular drugs. PMID:27293296

  15. Septic Arthritis and Concern for Osteomyelitis in a Child with Rat Bite Fever

    PubMed Central

    Akinboyo, Ibukunoluwa; Ty, Jennifer M.; Averill, Lauren W.; Freedman, Abigail

    2013-01-01

    Rat bite fever is a rare infection usually caused by Streptobacillus moniliformis. A case of septic arthritis and possible osteomyelitis as sequelae of rat bite fever in a pediatric patient is described. PMID:23554193

  16. Bilateral septic knee arthritis after treatment of an ectopic pregnancy with methotrexate

    PubMed Central

    Karaaslan, Fatih; Mermerkaya, Musa Uğur; Yurdakul, Emre; Tanın, Özlem

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of bilateral septic knee arthritis that followed the administration of methotrexate for nonsurgical termination of an ectopic pregnancy. We believe that methotrexate is a relatively effective alternative to surgery in patients with early unruptured tubal pregnancies, but suggest that it be used with caution in view of possible septic events. PMID:25610005

  17. [Generalized septic infections in rheumatoid arthritis. Study of autopsy material].

    PubMed

    Bély, M; Apáthy, A

    1994-11-01

    In the randomized autopsy material of 161 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a letal, generalized septic infection (GSI) was observed in 22 cases (13.66%). The GSI was accompanied by a pyarthros in 12 (7.45%) and no pyarthros in 10 (6.21%) cases. The clinical parameters of 22 septic RA patients were compared with 139 age and sex matched RA patients without GSI. The average age of septic patients decreased (p < 0.02), with low serum electrophoretic b-globulin level (p < 0.04), and high Waaler-Rose (p < 0.02) and Latex level (p < 0.004). The clinical parameters of 22 septic patients were compared with 76 age and sex matched RA patients without sepsis, vasculitis, or generalized secondary amyloidosis (GSA), and/or miliary epitheloid granulomas of tuberculous type (mT). The differences between the two groups of patients were the same, with a statistically more pronounced age difference (p < 0.005). 29 out of 161 patients (18.01 %) suffered from a clinically manifest diabetes mellitus (in 6 patients accompanied by sepsis), and 11 (6.83 %) from a clinically latent diabetes mellitus (in 2 patients accompanied by sepsis). There was no significant relationship between sepsis and manifest diabetes mellitus. The controlled and treated diabetes mellitus does not influence the frequency of lethal sepsis. Significant correlations were found between sepsis and latent diabetes mellitus (based on the histological detection of amyloid deposition localized to the islets of Langerhans (p < 0.02). 34 out of 161 patients (21.12%) suffered from a generalized secondary amyloidosis (in 3 patients accompanied by sepsis). There was no significant relationship between sepsis and generalized secondary amyloidosis. The thickness of adrenal cortex represents the effect of steroid therapy. Critical random check, using the Mann-Whitney tests, supports significance relationship between the adrenal cortex atrophy and fatal sepsis (p < 0.010). The follicular lymphoid depletion in the spleen

  18. Septic arthritis of both knees following intra-articular injection of petrol

    PubMed Central

    Janbakhsh, Alireza; Mansouri, Feizollah; Vaziri, Siavash; Sayad, Babak; Afsharian, Mandana; Ghaffari, Parviz

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: A 70 years old man was referred to our center with bilateral knee arthritis following intra-articular petrol injection. Because of previous antibiotics use gram stain and culture were negative. Septic arthritis was diagnosed and antibiotics and drainage were started. After 2 years he improved eventually and was able to walk. But, some movement limitation remained. PMID:24879072

  19. Septic versus non-septic acute kidney injury in critically ill patients: characteristics and clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Marília Galvão; Dantas, João Gabriel Athayde de Oliveira; Levi, Talita Machado; Rocha, Mário de Seixas; de Souza, Sérgio Pinto; Boa-Sorte, Ney; de Moura, Carlos Geraldo Guerreiro; Cruz, Constança Margarida Sampaio

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to describe and compare the characteristics and clinical outcomes of patients with septic and non-septic acute kidney injury. Methods This study evaluated an open cohort of 117 critically ill patients with acute kidney injury who were consecutively admitted to an intensive care unit, excluding patients with a history of advanced-stage chronic kidney disease, kidney transplantation, hospitalization or death in a period shorter than 24 hours. The presence of sepsis and in-hospital death were the exposure and primary variables in this study, respectively. A confounding analysis was performed using logistic regression. Results No significant differences were found between the mean ages of the groups with septic and non-septic acute kidney injury [65.30±21.27 years versus 66.35±12.82 years, respectively; p=0.75]. In the septic and non-septic acute kidney injury groups, a predominance of females (57.4% versus 52.4%, respectively; p=0.49) and Afro-descendants (81.5% versus 76.2%, respectively; p=0.49) was observed. Compared with the non-septic patients, the patients with sepsis had a higher mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score [21.73±7.26 versus 15.75±5.98; p<0.001)] and a higher mean water balance (p=0.001). Arterial hypertension (p=0.01) and heart failure (p<0.001) were more common in the non-septic patients. Septic acute kidney injury was associated with a greater number of patients who required dialysis (p=0.001) and a greater number of deaths (p<0.001); however, renal function recovery was more common in this group (p=0.01). Sepsis (OR: 3.88; 95%CI: 1.51-10.00) and an Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score >18.5 (OR: 9.77; 95%CI: 3.73-25.58) were associated with death in the multivariate analysis. Conclusion Sepsis was an independent predictor of death. Significant differences were found between the characteristics and clinical outcomes of patients with septic versus non-septic acute kidney

  20. Septic arthritis: a unique complication of nasal septal abscess.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Steven M; Koch, Cody A; Ekbom, Dale C

    2015-03-01

    Nasal septal abscesses (NSAs) occur between the mucoperichondrium and the nasal septum. They most often arise when an untreated septal hematoma becomes infected. The most commonly reported sequela is a loss of septal cartilage support, which can result in a nasal deformity. Other sequelae include potentially life-threatening conditions such as meningitis, cavernous sinus thrombosis, brain abscess, and subarachnoid empyema. We report the case of a 17-year-old boy who developed an NSA after he had been struck in the face with a basketball. He presented to his primary care physician 5 days after the injury and again the next day, but his condition was not correctly diagnosed. Finally, 7 days after his injury, he presented to an emergency department with more serious symptoms, and he was correctly diagnosed with NSA. He was admitted to the intensive care unit, and he remained hospitalized for 6 days. Among the abscess sequelae he experienced was septic arthritis, which has heretofore not been reported as a complication of NSA. He responded well to appropriate treatment, although he lost a considerable amount of septal cartilage. He was discharged home on intravenous antibiotic therapy, and his condition improved. Reconstruction of the nasal septum will likely need to be pursued in the future. PMID:25738728

  1. Post-arthroscopy septic arthritis: Current data and practical recommendations.

    PubMed

    Bauer, T; Boisrenoult, P; Jenny, J Y

    2015-12-01

    Septic arthritis develops after less than 1% of all arthroscopy procedures. The clinical symptoms may resemble those seen after uncomplicated arthroscopy, raising diagnostic challenges. The diagnosis rests on emergent joint aspiration with microscopic smear examination and prolonged culturing on specific media. Urgent therapeutic measures must be taken, including abundant arthroscopic lavage, synovectomy, and the concomitant administration of two effective antibiotics for at least 6 weeks. Preservation of implants or transplants is increasingly accepted, and repeated joint lavage is a component of the treatment strategy. After knee arthroscopy, infection is the most common complication; most cases occur after cruciate ligament reconstruction, and staphylococci are the predominant causative organisms. Emergent synovectomy with transplant preservation and appropriate antibiotic therapy ensures eradication of the infection in 85% of cases, with no adverse effect on final functional outcomes. After shoulder arthroscopy, infection is 10 times less common than neurological complications and occurs mainly after rotator cuff repair procedures; the diagnosis may be difficult and delayed if Propionibacterium acnes is the causative organism. The update presented here is based on both a literature review and a practice survey. The findings have been used to develop practical recommendations aimed at improving the management of post-arthroscopy infections, which are exceedingly rare but can induce devastating functional impairments. PMID:26412207

  2. Aspergillus Septic Arthritis of the Hip in an Immunocompetent Middle-aged Female with Undiagnosed Recurrent Pulmonary Aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Pil Whan; Song, Joo Ho; Yoon, Kang Sup; Chang, Jae Suk; Kim, Hee Joong

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of Aspergillus septic hip arthritis in an immunocompetent patient with undiagnosed recurrent pulmonary aspergillosis who underwent arthroscopic surgery. Biopsy specimens of synovium revealed fungal hyphae, confirming Aspergillus infection. Aspergillus septic hip arthritis can occur in immunocompetent patients, and arthroscopy can be a noninvasive surgical option in these cases. PMID:27536626

  3. Nontyphoidal Salmonella Septic arthritis of the elbow in a healthy infant

    PubMed Central

    Nafeesah, Abdullah Saleh Al

    2015-01-01

    A case of rarely encountered nontyphoidal Salmonella septic arthritis of the elbow in an infant with no preexisting disease is reported. Salmonella etiology was not suspected in this case, and the diagnosis was made only after bacterial isolation. Aspiration of the infected joint with radiological guidance initially failed to give a good clinical response. Arthrotomy was done with intravenous cefotaxime for 4 weeks followed by 2 weeks oral ciprofloxacin therapy to which the child responded favorably. Up to our knowledge this is the first case of nontyphoidal salmonella elbow septic arthritis in an infant in Saudi Arabia to be reported in the English literature. PMID:26985275

  4. A Neonatal Septic Arthritis Case Caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ozsari, Tamer; Ozdemir, Özmert M.A; Kiliç, Ilknur

    2016-01-01

    Septic arthritis is encountered very rarely during the neonatal period and its diagnosis can delay because of atypical symptoms, thus it may lead to serious sequelae. The sequale can be prevented by early diagnosis and concomitant treatment. In neonates, pain can be experienced as a result of pseudoparalysis and of movement of the effected joints. A 17-day-old neonatal patient was brought to our hospital with complaint of unrest and then diagnosed with septic arthritis due to propagation of Klebsiella pneumoniae in joint fluid culture was represented because of the rarity of such a case. PMID:27042550

  5. Septic Arthritis of the Temporomandibular Joint--Unusual Presentations.

    PubMed

    Lohiya, Sapna; Dillon, Jasjit

    2016-01-01

    This report describes 2 patients whose septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (SATMJ) presented atypically, resulting in treatment delay and complications. A 49-year-old man developed left-side facial allodynia, which was first treated unsuccessfully as trigeminal neuralgia. On day 21, the patient sustained facial trauma from a fall and presented to the emergency department (ED). Maxillofacial contrast-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) scan was suggestive of parotiditis, SATMJ, or hemarthrosis. His condition did not improve with empiric antibiotic treatment. On day 30, contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed SATMJ. Incision and drainage yielded 6 mL of pus and produced clinical improvement. Cultures grew methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, which was treated with amoxicillin plus clavulanate and sulfamethoxazole plus trimethoprim for 30 days. On day 59, the patient still had slight preauricular pain and CT-proved TMJ osteoarthritic changes. A 56-year-old woman developed right-side facial pain after a crown procedure on her right mandibular second molar. Oral prednisone (and clindamycin) produced partial relief. Her primary physician suspected temporal arteritis, but its biopsy result on day 11 was normal. Gradually, the patient developed trismus and malocclusion refractory to various medicines. On day 49, she presented to the ED. A contrast-enhanced maxillofacial CT scan suggested SATMJ. Incision and drainage yielded 30 mL of pus and produced clinical improvement. During days 50 to 57, the patient received intravenous ampicillin plus sulbactam and metronidazole. However, preauricular tenderness and drainage from the surgical incision persisted. On day 55, CT scan showed a residual abscess. Secondary debridement yielded 5 mL of pus. Culture grew coagulase-negative S aureus. On day 141, the patient still had slight preauricular pain and TMJ osteoarthritic changes on MRI. In these cases, the SATMJ diagnosis was delayed owing

  6. Septic arthritis due to a Sneathia species most closely related to Sneathia sanguinegens.

    PubMed

    Bachy, B; Bémer, P; Tortellier, L; Giraudeau, C; Reynaud, A; Corvec, S

    2011-11-01

    Sneathia sanguinegens is an infrequent bacterium in clinical specimens. We describe a case of right elbow septic arthritis due to a Sneathia species most closely related to S. sanguinegens in a young immunocompetent woman. S. sanguinegens has never been implicated in osteoarticular infections. PMID:21737545

  7. Diagnosing Septic Arthritis in the Synovial White Cell Count "Gray Zone".

    PubMed

    Ruzbarsky, Joseph J; Gladnick, Brian P; Dodwell, Emily

    2016-07-01

    Differentiating septic arthritis of the pediatric hip from other causes of hip pain and effusion continues to present a diagnostic challenge for the clinician. Although septic arthritis traditionally has been reported to have a synovial white blood cell count of 75,000 cells/mm3 or greater, lower counts can be seen in this condition. In cases where a synovial sample has been obtained and the cell count falls in the intermediate range between 25,000 and 75,000 cells/mm(3), it is unclear what proportion of these cases may be truly septic hips. In this evidence-based review, we examine Heyworth et al's study focusing on the predictive value of this intermediate white cell count range in a Lyme-endemic region. PMID:27385951

  8. Psoas abscess with associated septic arthritis of the hip in infants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Enbo; Ma, Lili; Edmonds, Eric W; Zhao, Qun; Zhang, Lijun; Ji, Shijun

    2010-12-01

    We describe psoas abscess with concomitant septic hip arthritis in 2 infants, 3 and 7 months old. The common clinical features were a palpable mass in the inguinal region, irritable hip, and delayed treatment. The diagnosis of septic hip was delayed in one child, and they both had residual hip deformity at follow-up. It is possible that initial delay in diagnoses resulted in the concurrent pathologic condition because of spread of infection. These 2 cases demonstrate the first known reports of concurrent psoas abscess and septic hip arthritis in infancy. Magnetic resonance imaging is a valuable method to identify these concurrent pathologic conditions. A proposed etiologic mechanism is also discussed in the article. PMID:21129563

  9. Methylene Blue for Acute Septic Cardiomyopathy in a Burned Patient.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, Joseph J; Burger, Christina F

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this case summary was to describe the use of methylene blue (MB) in a burned patient with acute septic cardiomyopathy. A 60-year-old Caucasian man was admitted to the Burn Intensive Care Unit with 45% TBSA burns after a house explosion. During the course of his care, he experienced hypotension that was refractory to fluid therapy and vasoactive medications. Echocardiography and right heart catheterization showed new acute systolic dysfunction with concurrent elevated systemic vascular resistance (SVR). High-dose inotropic agents did not improve cardiac function, and septic shock rendered him a poor candidate for mechanical intra-aortic balloon pump support. MB was administered to sensitize the myocardium to catecholamines and improve contractility with the goal of weaning the other vasoactive medications and diuresing for afterload reduction when hemodynamic stability was achieved. MB has been described in critical care medicine predominately for vasoplegia after cardiopulmonary bypass and vasodilatory septic shock., Our patient had acute septic cardiomyopathy that was refractory to standard pharmacologic approaches to inotropy with concurrent elevated SVR. Hypothesizing the differential temporal effect of inducible nitric oxide synthase on the vasculature and myocardium, we administered MB to improve contractility and support the impending vasodilatory effects of distributive shock. Although MB is not a new drug, the application for septic cardiomyopathy with a supranormal SVR is a unique application. Because of the risk profile associated with MB, we recommend drug monitoring utilizing serial echocardiography and/or right heart catheterization. PMID:25798807

  10. Streptococcus agalactiae Septic Arthritis of the Shoulder and the Sacroiliac Joints: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Imam, Yahia Z.; Sarakbi, Housam Aldeen; Abdelwahab, Nagui; Mattar, Issa

    2012-01-01

    Invasive group beta-streptococcal arthritis is being increasingly diagnosed as suggested by recent data. We report a case of a middle-aged lady from Sri Lanka who developed septic arthritis of the right shoulder and the left sacroiliac joint as well as an iliopsoas collection caused by Streptococcus agalactiae shortly after labor at Hamad General Hospital in Doha, Qatar. We conclude that Streptococcus agalactiae septic arthritis is rare. It can present with invasive disease in adults. It usually targets older females and immuno compromised patients especially those with risk factors for bacteraemia. Therefore a high index of suspicion is needed. Shoulder and sacroiliac joint affection is not uncommon for unknown reasons. Utilizing imaging modalities such as ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging is helpful. PMID:22937455

  11. High Prevalence of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus among Patients with Septic Arthritis Caused by Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Ting; Wu, Chung-Da; Cheng, Shun-Chien; Chiu, Chong-Chi; Tseng, Chi-Chou; Chan, Huan-Tee; Chen, Po-Yih; Chao, Chien-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background This study investigated the clinical characteristics of patients with septic arthritis caused by Staphylococcus aureus and tried to identify the risk factors for methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) arthritis. Methods Between January 2008 and December 2011, patients with septic arthritis caused by S. aureus were identified from the computerized databases of a regional hospital and a medical center in southern Taiwan. The medical records of these patients were retrospectively reviewed. Results A total of 93 patients with S. aureus arthritis were identified, and MRSA arthritis was found in 38 (40.9%) cases. The mean age of the patients was 58 years, and 86 (92.5%) episodes were classified as community-acquired infections. Diabetes mellitus (n = 41, 44.1%) was the most common underlying disease, followed by chronic kidney disease and liver cirrhosis. Patients with MRSA arthritis were more frequently elderly and found in the setting of healthcare-associated infection than patients with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) infections. No other significant differences in clinical manifestations and outcomes were noted between these two groups of patients. Overall, the in-hospital mortality rate was 5.4%, and diabetes mellitus was the only risk factor for mortality. Conclusions MRSA is emerging in the setting of community-acquired septic arthritis. MRSA septic arthritis is more likely to develop in the elderly and in healthcare-associated infections than MSSA septic arthritis. PMID:25996145

  12. Differentiation of psoas muscle abscess from septic arthritis of the hip in children.

    PubMed

    Song, J; Letts, M; Monson, R

    2001-10-01

    A 20-year review was conducted of children presenting with psoas abscess at two major pediatric hospitals. Eleven children with psoas abscesses were identified. The extreme variability in the clinical presentation of this condition is shown. Psoas abscess was most difficult to differentiate from septic arthritis of the hip in pediatric patients. This study also shows the often circuitous investigative route traversed before arriving at the diagnosis of psoas abscess. Atypical features, such as femoral nerve neurapraxia or bladder irritability in association with hip pain, should alert the clinician to consider psoas abscess. Based on this study, a diagnostic algorithm to differentiate between psoas abscess and septic hip was formulated. PMID:11603678

  13. Diagnosis of Ureaplasma urealyticum Septic Polyarthritis by PCR Assay and Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry in a Patient with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Galicier, Lionel; Wargnier, Alain; Pereyre, Sabine; Itzykson, Raphaël; Zouakh, Myriem; Bébéar, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of polyarthritis with axial involvement in a young female patient treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Detection in the hip fluid of Ureaplasma urealyticum by broad-range PCR followed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry allowed the diagnosis of septic arthritis and ad integrum recovery upon adapted antibiotic therapy. PMID:24958801

  14. Diagnosis of ureaplasma urealyticum septic polyarthritis by PCR assay and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Balsat, Marie; Galicier, Lionel; Wargnier, Alain; Pereyre, Sabine; Itzykson, Raphaël; Zouakh, Myriem; Bébéar, Cécile; Boissel, Nicolas

    2014-09-01

    We report a case of polyarthritis with axial involvement in a young female patient treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Detection in the hip fluid of Ureaplasma urealyticum by broad-range PCR followed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry allowed the diagnosis of septic arthritis and ad integrum recovery upon adapted antibiotic therapy. PMID:24958801

  15. Bilateral iliopsoas abscess associated with right hip septic arthritis in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Al-Zaiem, Maher M; Bajuifer, Salem J; Fattani, Mohammed O; Al-Zaiem, Feras M

    2014-07-01

    Iliopsoas abscess is a very rare pathology in the neonatal period. There is a lack of reports in the literature on bilateral psoas abscess with hip joint arthritis. We report a case of bilateral iliopsoas abscess with concomitant right hip septic arthritis, caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a 28-day-old male infant. The baby presented with bilateral diffuse swelling of the groins and upper thighs. He was treated successfully by ultrasound-guided percutaneous drainage along with systemic antibiotic therapy. Clinical improvement was observed within 24-48 hours of drainage. PMID:25028234

  16. Deficiency of the Complement Component 3 but Not Factor B Aggravates Staphylococcus aureus Septic Arthritis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Na, Manli; Jarneborn, Anders; Ali, Abukar; Welin, Amanda; Magnusson, Malin; Stokowska, Anna; Pekna, Marcela; Jin, Tao

    2016-04-01

    The complement system plays an essential role in the innate immune response and protection against bacterial infections. However, detailed knowledge regarding the role of complement in Staphylococcus aureus septic arthritis is still largely missing. In this study, we elucidated the roles of selected complement proteins in S. aureus septic arthritis. Mice lacking the complement component 3 (C3(-/-)), complement factor B (fB(-/-)), and receptor for C3-derived anaphylatoxin C3a (C3aR(-/-)) and wild-type (WT) control mice were intravenously or intra-articularly inoculated with S. aureus strain Newman. The clinical course of septic arthritis, as well as histopathological and radiological changes in joints, was assessed. After intravenous inoculation, arthritis severity and frequency were significantly higher in C3(-/-)mice than in WT controls, whereas fB(-/-)mice displayed intermediate arthritis severity and frequency. This was in accordance with both histopathological and radiological findings. C3, but not fB, deficiency was associated with greater weight loss, more frequent kidney abscesses, and higher bacterial burden in kidneys. S. aureus opsonized with C3(-/-)sera displayed decreased uptake by mouse peritoneal macrophages compared with bacteria opsonized with WT or fB(-/-)sera. C3aR deficiency had no effect on the course of hematogenous S. aureus septic arthritis. We conclude that C3 deficiency increases susceptibility to hematogenous S. aureus septic arthritis and impairs host bacterial clearance, conceivably due to diminished opsonization and phagocytosis of S. aureus. PMID:26787717

  17. A case of unusual septic knee arthritis with Brucella abortus after arthroscopic meniscus surgery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keun Hwa; Kang, Hyunseong; Kim, Taejung; Choi, Sungwook

    2016-01-01

    We present a 51-year-old male patient with Brucella abortus septic arthritis in the right knee following arthroscopic meniscus surgery. He had eaten a traditional dish of raw minced cattle conceptus (bovine fetus) that was prepared after the cow was slaughtered. Despite treatment with empirical antibiotics and debridement of the postoperative surgical wound, the infection persisted without improvement. Polymerase chain reaction sequencing identified Brucella abortus from tissue samples obtained from the patient. After confirmation of the diagnosis of brucellar infection, antibiotics were replaced with doxycycline and rifampin, which were used for 4 months. In patients with a non-specific arthralgia who eat raw meat or live close to animals, it is important to consider the possibility of septic arthritis due to infection with Brucella spp. PMID:27130400

  18. Bilateral sternoclavicular joint septic arthritis secondary to indwelling central venous catheter: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Charita; Watson, Nicholas FS; Jagasia, Nitin; Chari, Ray; Patterson, Jane E

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Septic arthritis of the sternoclavicular joint is rare, comprising approximately 0.5% to 1% of all joint infections. Predisposing causes include immunocompromising diseases such as diabetes, HIV infection, renal failure and intravenous drug abuse. Case presentation We report a rare case of bilateral sternoclavicular joint septic arthritis in an elderly patient secondary to an indwelling right subclavian vein catheter. The insidious nature of the presentation is highlighted. We also review the literature regarding the epidemiology, investigation and methods of treatment of the condition. Conclusion SCJ infections are rare, and require a high degree of clinical suspicion. Vague symptoms of neck and shoulder pain may cloud the initial diagnosis, as was the case in our patient. Surgical intervention is often required; however, our patient avoided major intervention and settled with parenteral antibiotics and washout of the joint. PMID:18445257

  19. Septic Arthritis of Hip Caused by Salmonella typhi: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Shanthi, M.; Sekar, Uma; Sridharan, K. S.

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella typhi usually produces enteric fever and gastroenteritis. The infection may spread through blood stream and present as local suppurative lesions which may involve any site including the bone and joints. We report a case of septic arthritis of hip in a patient with systemic lupus erthematosis. The case is presented for its rarity and to highlight the atypical manifestations of Salmonella typhi in endemic regions. PMID:22991677

  20. Primary septic arthritis of the manubriosternal joint in a heroin user

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Longo, F.J.; Monteagudo, I.; Vaquero, F.J.; Martinez Moreno, J.L.; Carreno, L.

    1986-01-01

    A 20-year-old heroin user developed staphylococcus septic arthritis of the manubrium joint. The diagnosis was established by a culture of the infected tissue and blood culture. The clinical impression was aided by 99mTc radionuclide scintimetry. Early diagnosis localized the infection. Immediate antibiotic therapy solved a problem in the sternum that seems not to have been reported in the English literature.

  1. Acute pseudoseptic arthritis and palmoplantar pustulosis.

    PubMed

    Chamot, A M; Vion, B; Gerster, J C

    1986-01-01

    The case of a 60-year-old woman who developed acute peripheral arthritis of a pseudoseptic character (high synovial leucocytosis and fever) associated to a palmoplantar pustulosis is reported. PMID:3514079

  2. Alpha-Toxin and Gamma-Toxin Jointly Promote Staphylococcus aureus Virulence in Murine Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Ing-Marie; Hartford, Orla; Foster, Timothy; Tarkowski, Andrzej

    1999-01-01

    Septic arthritis is a common and feared complication of staphylococcal infections. Staphylococcus aureus produces a number of potential virulence factors including certain adhesins and enterotoxins. In this study we have assessed the roles of cytolytic toxins in the development of septic arthritis by inoculating mice with S. aureus wild-type strain 8325-4 or isogenic mutants differing in the expression of alpha-, beta-, and gamma-toxin production patterns. Mice inoculated with either an alpha- or beta-toxin mutant showed degrees of inflammation, joint damage, and weight decrease similar to wild-type-inoculated mice. In contrast, mice inoculated with either double (alpha- and gamma-toxin-deficient)- or triple (alpha-, beta-, and gamma-toxin-deficient)-mutant S. aureus strains showed lower frequency and severity of arthritis, measured both clinically and histologically, than mice inoculated with the wild-type strain. We conclude that simultaneous production of alpha- and gamma-toxin is a virulence factor in S. aureus arthritis. PMID:10024541

  3. Pediatric osteomyelitis and septic arthritis: the pathology of neonatal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ogden, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    The morphologic and histologic examination of over fifty-five foci of metaphyseal/epiphyseal osteomyelitis and eleven septic joints from five cases of neonatal osteomyelitis and joint sepsis are described in detail. The severity of the bone and joint involvement varied considerably, allowing a better understanding of the pathophysiologic sequence of events in the disease in the neonatal time period. Of particular importance were (1) the multifocal nature of the disease, (2) the highly variable destruction of the growth plate (physis) by several discrete mechanisms, and (3) the invasion of the chondroepiphysis through the cartilage canal systems. Two of the cases died from respiratory complications several months following presumed successful treatment of their skeletal infections. S&pecimens showed significant growth plate damage continuing beyond the neonatal period. These findings support the need for rapid diagnosis and drainage, whenever feasible, to prevent long-term skeletal growth damage. The severity of involvement also should emphasize that this disease, especially in the neonate, is not an innocuous condition, as a recent review suggested. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 FIG. 7 FIG. 8 FIG. 9 FIG. 10 FIG. 11 FIG. 12 FIG. 13 FIG. 14 FIG. 15 FIG. 16 FIG. 17 FIG. 18 FIG. 19 FIG. 20 PMID:524924

  4. The Staphylococcus aureus collagen adhesin is a virulence determinant in experimental septic arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Patti, J M; Bremell, T; Krajewska-Pietrasik, D; Abdelnour, A; Tarkowski, A; Rydén, C; Höök, M

    1994-01-01

    The importance of a collagen-binding adhesin in the pathogenesis of septic arthritis has been examined by comparing the virulence of two sets of Staphylococcus aureus mutants in an animal model. Collagen adhesin-negative mutant PH100 was constructed by replacing the chromosomal collagen adhesin gene (cna) in a clinical strain, Phillips, with an inactivated copy of the gene. Collagen adhesin-positive mutant S. aureus CYL574 was generated by introducing the cna gene into CYL316, a strain that normally lacks the cna gene. Biochemical, immunological, and functional analyses of the generated mutants and their respective parent strains showed that binding of 125I-labeled collagen, expression of an immunoreactive collagen adhesin, and bacterial adherence to cartilage were directly correlated with the presence of a functional cna gene. Greater than 70% of the mice injected with the Cna+ strains developed clinical signs of arthritis, whereas less than 27% of the animals injected with Cna- strains showed symptoms of disease. Furthermore, mice injected with the Cna+ strain Phillips had remarkably elevated levels of immunoglobulin G1 and interleukin-6 compared with mice injected with the Cna- mutant PH100. Taken together, these results demonstrate that collagen adhesin plays an important role in the pathogenesis of septic arthritis induced by S. aureus. Images PMID:8262622

  5. Role of the staphylococcal accessory gene regulator (sar) in septic arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, I M; Bremell, T; Rydén, C; Cheung, A L; Tarkowski, A

    1996-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus arthritis is a highly erosive disease in which both host and bacterial factors are of importance for its induction and progression. At the transcriptional level, three known loci act in regulating production of exoproteins and expression of cell wall structures. The aim of our study was to assess the role of the sar locus as a virulence determinant in the pathogenesis of septic arthritis. A recently established murine model of hematogenously spread S. aureus arthritis was employed. S. aureus strains, isogenic for the sar locus, were inoculated intravenously into NMRI mice, and the clinical, bacteriological, serological, and histopathological progression of the disease was studied. Within 1 week after inoculation of bacteria, the frequency of arthritis was 79% in the group of mice inoculated with the sar+ strain, whereas the corresponding frequency in sar mutants was 21% (P < 0.01). Mice inoculated with the sar+ staphylococcal strain exhibited a more pronounced T- and B-lymphocyte activation than those inoculated with the sar mutant, evidenced by splenomegaly, polyclonal B-cell activation, and high serum levels of interleukin 6 and gamma interferon. Also, infection with sar+ staphylococci induced a pronounced weight loss. To assess the relationship between clinical signs and spread of bacteria, we analyzed the homing pattern and persistence of S. aureus in host tissues. Kidneys and joints from sar+-inoculated subjects displayed a higher degree of bacterial persistence than other organs. Our results suggest that molecules controlled by the sar locus are important virulence determinants in the induction and progression of septic arthritis. PMID:8890189

  6. A retrospective study of septic arthritis in a tertiary hospital in West Texas with high rates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sian Yik; Pannikath, Deepa; Nugent, Kenneth

    2015-07-01

    Septic arthritis is an important concern for rheumatologists in the evaluation of joint disease. Very few studies have addressed the microbiologic epidemiology and outcomes of septic arthritis in the USA since the year 2000. We performed a retrospective study of septic arthritis in a tertiary hospital in West Texas from the year 2000 to 2013. We recorded data on patient demographics, microbiologic etiology, treatment patterns, and outcomes. The most common causative organisms were Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus spp. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) caused septic arthritis in 22.6 % of the cases. MRSA septic arthritis was associated with low rates of adequate empiric antimicrobial therapy. The mortality due to sepsis in our study was 5.5 %. Patients with septic arthritis had a mean length of stay of 13.5 ± 12.1 days and required 2.1 ± 1.4 joint operations. Many patients (29.2 %) had readmissions due to complications, and these patients had high rates of home health utilization and transfers to other facilities post hospital discharge. In our logistic regression analysis model, factors associated with poor outcomes in septic arthritis were MRSA, older age, and prosthetic joint infection. Septic arthritis is associated with significant mortality, morbidity, and health care costs, and more studies are needed to improve outcomes, especially considering the increasing rates of MRSA as the pathogen. PMID:25572838

  7. Temporomandibular Joint Septic Arthritis and Mandibular Osteomyelitis Arising From an Odontogenic Infection: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Gams, Kevin; Freeman, Phillip

    2016-04-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has been infrequently reported in the literature. Some investigators believe that this condition is under-reported because it is underdiagnosed. Misdiagnosis or late diagnosis of this condition can lead to serious morbidity, including fistula formation, intracranial abscess, fibrous or bony ankylosis, temporal bone or condylar osteomyelitis, growth alteration, and several others. This report describes a case of septic TMJ arthritis arising from direct spread of an odontogenic infection with subsequent development of mandibular osteomyelitis. The purpose of this case report is to 1) increase awareness of an underdiagnosed condition, 2) establish the seriousness of this infection, 3) for the first time report on a case of TMJ septic arthritis caused by Bacteroides infection, and 4) provide a review of the relevant literature. PMID:26657399

  8. Septic arthritis of the knee: the use and effect of antibiotics prior to diagnostic aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Hindle, P; Davidson, E; Biant, LC

    2012-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the native knee joint and total knee arthroplasty both cause diagnostic and treatment issues. There is no gold standard test to diagnose a joint infection and the use of joint aspiration is commonly relied on. It is widely accepted by orthopaedic surgeons that antibiotics should be withheld until aspiration has been performed to increase the odds of identifying an organism. Patients often present to other specialties that may not be as familiar with these principles. Our study found that 25 (51%) of the 49 patients treated for septic arthritis of the native or prosthetic knee in our unit over a 3-year period had received antibiotics prior to discussion or review by the on-call orthopaedic service. Patients were significantly less likely to demonstrate an organism on initial microscopy (entire cohort: p=0.001, native knees: p=0.006, prosthetic knees: p=0.033) or on subsequent culture (entire cohort: p=0.001, native knees: p=0.017, prosthetic knees: p=0.012) of their aspirate if they had received antibiotics. The sensitivity of microscopy in all patients dropped from 58% to 12% when patients had received antibiotics (native knees: 46% to 0%, prosthetic knees: 72% to 27%). The sensitivity of the culture dropped from 79% to 28% in all patients when the patient had received antibiotics (native knees: 69% to 21%, prosthetic knees: 91% to 36%). This study demonstrated how the management of patients with suspected cases of septic arthritis of the knee may be compromised by empirical administration of antibiotics. These patients were significantly less likely to demonstrate an organism on microscopy and culture of their initial aspirate. There is a significant high false negative rate associated with knee aspiration with prior administration of antibiotic therapy. PMID:22943233

  9. Facet joint septic arthritis due to community acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) - A case report.

    PubMed

    Purushothaman, Rajesh; Inassi, Jojo; Marthya, Anwar

    2015-10-01

    Septic arthritis of facet joint (SAFJ) is extremely rare. Only about sixty cases have been reported so far. A single case of SAFJ in a series of 491 cases of spinal infections was first reported by David-Chaussé in 1981. A case report of SAFJ was published by Halpin in 1987. With the growing availability and use of MRI, more and more cases are being reported. The most common organism that causes SAFJ is Staphylococcus aureus. We are reporting a case of SAFJ caused by community acquired, methicillin resistant S aureus (MRSA) successfully treated by Linezolid. PMID:26719620

  10. Septic arthritis of a lumbar facet joint: Detection with bone SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Swayne, L.C.; Dorsky, S.; Caruana, V.; Kaplan, I.L. )

    1989-08-01

    We present a rare case of septic arthritis of a lumbar facet joint with an associated epidural abscess resulting from Staphylococcus aureus. The infection was initially detected with planar bone scintigraphy and precisely localized with single photon emission computed tomography bone scintigraphy, despite an initially negative radiologic evaluation that included radiographs of the lumbar spine, lumbar myelography, and a postmyelography x-ray computed tomography scan. In the appropriate clinical setting, a bone scan demonstrating unilateral increased activity within the spine should raise the suspicion of inflammatory involvement of the posterior elements.

  11. Appearance of acute gouty arthritis on indium-111-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Palestro, C.J.; Vega, A.; Kim, C.K.; Swyer, A.J.; Goldsmith, S.J. )

    1990-05-01

    Indium-111-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy was performed on a 66-yr-old male with polyarticular acute gouty arthritis. Images revealed intense labeled leukocyte accumulation in a pattern indistinguishable from septic arthritis, in both knees and ankles, and the metatarsophalangeal joint of both great toes, all of which were involved in the acute gouty attack. Joint aspirate as well as blood cultures were reported as no growth; the patient was treated with intravenous colchicine and ACTH for 10 days with dramatic improvement noted. Labeled leukocyte imaging, repeated 12 days after the initial study, revealed near total resolution of joint abnormalities, concordant with the patient's clinical improvement. This case demonstrates that while acute gouty arthritis is a potential pitfall in labeled leukocyte imaging, in the presence of known gout, it may provide a simple, objective, noninvasive method of evaluating patient response to therapy.

  12. Enterococcus hirae Bacteremia Associated with Acute Pancreatitis and Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Dicpinigaitis, Peter V.; De Aguirre, Manuel; Divito, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Infection with Enterococcus hirae has rarely been reported in humans but is not uncommon in mammals and birds. We describe a case of Enterococcus hirae bacteremia associated with acute pancreatitis, acute cholecystitis, and septic shock responsive to antibiotic therapy and supportive critical care management. Unique aspects of this case of Enterococcus hirae bacteremia are its association with acute pancreatitis and its geographical origin. To our knowledge, this is the first report of Enterococcus hirae bacteremia occurring in a patient in the United States. Although human infection with this organism appears to be rare, all cases reported to date describe bacteremia associated with severe and life-threatening illness. Thus, physicians need to be cognizant of the clinical significance of this heretofore little recognized pathogen. PMID:26417465

  13. Deficiency of the Complement Component 3 but Not Factor B Aggravates Staphylococcus aureus Septic Arthritis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Na, Manli; Jarneborn, Anders; Ali, Abukar; Welin, Amanda; Magnusson, Malin; Stokowska, Anna; Pekna, Marcela

    2016-01-01

    The complement system plays an essential role in the innate immune response and protection against bacterial infections. However, detailed knowledge regarding the role of complement in Staphylococcus aureus septic arthritis is still largely missing. In this study, we elucidated the roles of selected complement proteins in S. aureus septic arthritis. Mice lacking the complement component 3 (C3−/−), complement factor B (fB−/−), and receptor for C3-derived anaphylatoxin C3a (C3aR−/−) and wild-type (WT) control mice were intravenously or intra-articularly inoculated with S. aureus strain Newman. The clinical course of septic arthritis, as well as histopathological and radiological changes in joints, was assessed. After intravenous inoculation, arthritis severity and frequency were significantly higher in C3−/− mice than in WT controls, whereas fB−/− mice displayed intermediate arthritis severity and frequency. This was in accordance with both histopathological and radiological findings. C3, but not fB, deficiency was associated with greater weight loss, more frequent kidney abscesses, and higher bacterial burden in kidneys. S. aureus opsonized with C3−/− sera displayed decreased uptake by mouse peritoneal macrophages compared with bacteria opsonized with WT or fB−/− sera. C3aR deficiency had no effect on the course of hematogenous S. aureus septic arthritis. We conclude that C3 deficiency increases susceptibility to hematogenous S. aureus septic arthritis and impairs host bacterial clearance, conceivably due to diminished opsonization and phagocytosis of S. aureus. PMID:26787717

  14. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus enterocolitis sequentially complicated with septic arthritis: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although most reports describing patients infected with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus enterocolitis have been published in Japan, this concept remains a matter of debate and diagnostic criteria have not yet been defined. Case presentation The general status of a 74-year-old Japanese man referred to our hospital (day 1) with severe community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia gradually improved with antibiotic therapy. Thereafter, up to 4 L/day of acute watery diarrhea that started on day 19 was refractory to metronidazole but responded immediately to oral vancomycin. Gram staining stool samples was positive for abundant fecal leukocytes from which dominant methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (104 CFU/mL) were isolated, suggesting methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus enterocolitis. High fever with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia was evident at day 30, and suppurative right hip arthritis developed around day 71. All methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from stools, blood and aspirated synovial fluid separated in the same manner on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, as well as two other strains isolated from sputum, belonged to the same clone as sequence type (ST) 764 (complex clonal 5), and carried SCCmec type II. Conclusion The clinical, microbiological and molecular biological findings of this patient indicated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus enterocolitis that led to septic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus arthritis. PMID:24405901

  15. Glutaminyl Cyclases as Novel Targets for the Treatment of Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hellvard, Annelie; Maresz, Katarzyna; Schilling, Stephan; Graubner, Sigrid; Heiser, Ulrich; Jonsson, Roland; Cynis, Holger; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich; Potempa, Jan; Mydel, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Background. Septic arthritis is a severe and rapidly debilitating disease mainly caused by Staphylococcus aureus. Here, we assess the antiarthritic efficiency of glutaminyl cyclase (QC) inhibitors. Methods. Mice were inoculated with an arthritogenic amount of S. aureus intravenously or by local administration into the knee joint. Animals were treated with QC inhibitors (PBD155 and PQ529) via chow during the experiment. QC and isoQC knockout mice were also analyzed for arthritis symptoms after local administration of bacteria. Results. Both QC inhibitors significantly delayed the onset of clinical signs of arthritis, and inhibitors significantly decreased weight loss in treated animals. Following intraarticular injection of S. aureus, PBD155-treated mice had lower levels of synovitis and bone erosion, as well as less myeloperoxidase in synovial tissue. Fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis revealed that PBD155 treatment affected the expression pattern of adhesion molecules, preventing the upregulation of cells expressing CD11b/CD18. Conclusion. The compounds investigated here represent a novel class of small molecular antiarthritic inhibitors. In our studies, they exerted strong antiinflammatory actions, and therefore they might be suited for disease-modifying treatment of infectious arthritis. PMID:23204180

  16. Case Report of Iliac Osteomyelitis in A Child, Presenting as Septic Arthritis of the Hip

    PubMed Central

    Kocialkowski, Cezary; Ryan, William; Davis, Naomi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Osteomyelitis of the pelvis can be a difficult condition to diagnose and can present in a number of different ways. The ilium is the bone most frequently affected and staphylococcus aureus is the organism most commonly responsible. CaseReport: This case report describes a six year old girl, who presented with right sided hip pain, fevers and altered weight bearing. She was initially diagnosed with septic arthritis of the hip and underwent open joint washout. A magnet resonance imaging scan was subsequently performed which confirmed the diagnosis of iliac osteomyelitis with abscesses of the iliopsoas and iliacus. The patient underwent further operative debridement and required prolonged antibiotic therapy but she eventually made a full recovery. Conclusion: Pelvic osteomyelitis can present very similarly to hip septic arthritis and early magnetic resonance imaging is beneficial in diagnosing the condition. Surgical intervention can be required if there is abscess formation, although recovery is usually very good and the incidence of long term complications is rare. PMID:27298994

  17. Septic arthritis with Staphylococcus lugdunensis following arthroscopic ACL revision with BPTB allograft.

    PubMed

    Mei-Dan, Omer; Mann, Gideon; Steinbacher, Gilbert; Ballester, Soleda J; Cugat, Ramon Bertomeu; Alvarez, Pedro Diaz

    2008-01-01

    Septic arthritis following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is an uncommon but a serious complication resulting in six times greater hospital costs than that of uncomplicated ACL surgery and an inferior postoperative activity level. Promptly initiating a specific antibiotic therapy is the most critical treatment, followed by open or arthroscopic joint decompression, debridement and lavage. Staphylococcus lugdunensis is a coagulase-negative staphylococcus predominantly infecting the skin and soft tissue. The few reported cases of bone and joint infections by S. lugdunensis indicate that the clinical manifestations were severe, the diagnosis elusive, and the treatment difficult. If the microbiology laboratory does not use the tube coagulase (long) test to confirm the slide coagulase test result, the organism might be misidentified as Staphylococcus aureus. S. lugdunensis is more virulent than other coagulase-negative staphylococcus; in many clinical situations it behaves like S. aureus, further increasing the confusion and worsening the expected outcome. S. lugdunensis is known to cause infective endocarditis with a worse outcome, septicemia, deep tissue infection, vascular and joint prosthesis infection, osteomyelitis, discitis, breast abscess, urine tract infections, toxic shock and osteitis pubis. We present the first case report in the literature of septic arthritis with S. lugdunensis following arthroscopic ACL revision with bone-patellar-tendon-bone allograft. PMID:17684731

  18. Septic Arthritis Due to Moraxella osloensis in a Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Wren, Melissa A; Caskey, John R; Liu, David X; Embers, Monica E

    2013-01-01

    A 5.5-y-old Chinese-origin female rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) presented for bilateral hindlimb lameness. The primate had been group-reared in an SPF breeding colony and was seronegative for Macacine herpesvirus 1, SIV, simian retrovirus type D, and simian T-lymphotropic virus. The macaque's previous medical history included multiple occasions of swelling in the left tarsus, and trauma to the right arm and bilateral hands. In addition, the macaque had experienced osteomyelitis of the left distal tibia and rupture of the right cranial cruciate ligament that had been surgically repaired. Abnormal physical examination findings on presentation included a thin body condition, mild dehydration, and bilaterally swollen stifles that were warm to the touch, with the right stifle more severely affected. Mild instability in the left stifle was noted, and decreased range of motion and muscle atrophy were present bilaterally. Hematologic findings included marked neutrophilia and lymphopenia and moderate anemia. Arthrocentesis and culture of joint fluid revealed Moraxella-like organisms. Treatment with enrofloxacin was initiated empirically and subsequently switched to cephalexin, which over time alleviated the joint swelling and inflammation. Definitive diagnosis of Moraxella osloensis septic arthritis was made through isolation of the organism and sequencing of the 16S rDNA region. To our knowledge, this report is the first description of Moraxella osloensis septic arthritis in a rhesus macaque. PMID:24326229

  19. Septic arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... when bacteria or other tiny disease-causing organisms (microorganisms) spread through the blood to a joint. It ... when the joint is directly infected with a microorganism from an injury or during surgery. Joints that ...

  20. Preventive strategies for septic complications of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Oláh, A; Pardavi, G; Belágyi, T; Romics, L

    2007-01-01

    The diagram of the mortality of acute pancreatitis is characterized by two distinct peaks, in a similar manner to other generalized acute inflammatory responses. In the first phase, which is characterized by "hyper-inflammatory" mechanisms, death occurs due to overwhelming SIRS and subsequent multi-organ failure. The second peak of death is usually detected much later, at least two weeks after the onset of acute pancreatitis. Infection in necrotising pancreatitis is frequently observed in this so-called "compensatory antiinflammatory" phase. Since there has been no effective therapy evolved to prevent the activation of inflammatory and proteolytic cascades, the treatment of acute pancreatitis is merely symptomatic. Adequate fluid resuscitation and analgesia are the mainstays of treatment. In case of development of multi-organ failure, extensive medical and ventilatory supportive therapy is usually necessary. However, recent studies suggested certain methods might decrease the incidence of infection in pancreatic necrosis, which is usually due to bacterial translocation from the gut. Numerous attempts have been published in the literature to decrease the frequency of septic complications. Furthermore, the outcome of studies favouring antibiotic prophylaxis in acute pancreatitis were debatable. The development of multi-resistant strains of Gram-positive bacteria and Candida, due to long-term antibiotic use, is a strong argument against the indication of prophylactic antibiotic use. Recently, various clinical studies aimed to decrease bacterial translocation, including probiotic use and enteral feeding as part of the treatment. This paper provides a systematic review on data available in the evidence based literature on the use of antibiotics and the role of alternative and supportive therapy in the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis. PMID:17966933

  1. Vertebral Osteomyelitis and Septic Arthritis Associated With Staphylococcus hyicus in a Juvenile Peregrine Falcon ( Falco peregrinus ).

    PubMed

    Maier, Kristina; Fischer, Dominik; Hartmann, Antje; Kershaw, Olivia; Prenger-Berninghoff, Ellen; Pendl, Helene; Schmidt, Martin J; Lierz, Michael

    2015-09-01

    A 6-week-old, parent-reared peregrine falcon ( Falco peregrinus ) was presented with spastic hypertonus of its hind limbs of unknown origin and duration. Radiologic examination revealed smooth periosteal reactions ventrally at thoracic vertebrae 5 to 7. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography identified the swelling as inflammation; antibiotic, antimycotic, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic treatments were initiated, and vitamins and minerals were supplemented. Because the bird's condition did not improve after 10 days, it was euthanatized and submitted for postmortem examination. On histopathologic examination, chronic, active osteomyelitis was diagnosed in thoracic vertebrae 5 to 7, and chronic, active arthritis was present in both the right shoulder and left elbow joints. Staphylococcus hyicus was isolated from these 3 locations, as well as from lungs and liver, indicating a chronic septic staphylococcosis. Although infections with Staphylococcus species are occasional causes of vertebral osteomyelitis in juvenile poultry with active growth plates, it is only sporadically reported in raptors and companion birds. This case report is the first description of the clinical features and diagnostic and pathologic findings in a juvenile peregrine falcon with hematogenous osteomyelitis and arthritis associated with septicemia caused by S hyicus. PMID:26378668

  2. Hypogammaglobulinemic patient with polyarthritis mimicking rheumatoid arthritis finally diagnosed as septic arthritis caused by Mycoplasma hominis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hiroe; Iino, Noriaki; Ohashi, Riuko; Saeki, Takako; Ito, Tomoyuki; Saito, Maki; Tsubata, Yutaka; Yamamoto, Suguru; Murakami, Shuichi; Kuroda, Takeshi; Tanabe, Yoshinari; Fujisawa, Junichi; Murai, Takehiro; Nakano, Masaaki; Narita, Ichiei; Gejyo, Fumitake

    2012-01-01

    Hypogammaglobulinemia is a reduction or absence of immunoglobulin, which may be congenital or associated with immunosuppressive therapy. In addition to infectious diseases, autoimmune diseases have also been reported in patients with hypogammaglobulinemia. A 26-year-old man with hypogammaglobulinemia had multiple joint pain and swelling with erosive changes in the proximal interphalangeal joint of the right middle finger on X-ray film, mimicking rheumatoid arthritis (RA). As polyarthritis remained after immunoglobulin replacement therapy and there was no finding indicating any infection at that time, a diagnosis of RA was made. Prednisolone and etanercept were started. However, his polyarthritis did not improve and he developed meningitis and massive brain ischemia. Finally, a diagnosis of disseminated Mycoplasma hominis infection was made. The differential diagnosis of polyarthritis in patients with hypogammaglobulinemia should strictly exclude Mycoplasma infection by culture with special media or longer anaerobic culture, and molecular methods for mycoplasma. PMID:22333381

  3. High prevalence of Kingella kingae in joint fluid from children with septic arthritis revealed by the BACTEC blood culture system.

    PubMed Central

    Yagupsky, P; Dagan, R; Howard, C W; Einhorn, M; Kassis, I; Simu, A

    1992-01-01

    In an effort to improve detection of fastidious organisms, joint fluid aspirates of pediatric patients were inoculated into BACTEC 460 aerobic blood culture bottles, in addition to cultures on solid media. Culture records for the 1988 to 1991 period were reviewed to compare the performance of both methods for the recovery of pathogens. Overall, 216 children underwent a diagnostic joint tap, and 63 specimens grew significant organisms, including Kingella kingae in 14. While both methods were comparable for recovery of usual pathogens, with a single exception, K. kingae isolates were detected by the BACTEC system only. K. kingae appears to be a more common cause of septic arthritis in children than has been previously recognized. The BACTEC blood culture system enhances the recovery of K. kingae from joint fluid and improves bacteriologic diagnosis of pediatric septic arthritis. PMID:1583131

  4. Spontaneous septic arthritis of the lumbar facet caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in an otherwise healthy adolescent.

    PubMed

    Papaliodis, Dean N; Roberts, Timothy T; Richardson, Nicholas G; Lawrence, James B

    2014-07-01

    We report the case of a 16-year-old boy with isolated septic arthritis of a lumbar facet. This rare presentation of an infection in a lumbar facet joint occurred after minor trauma sustained in a football game. Septic arthritis of the spinal facet joint is an uncommon phenomenon. Only 5 cases have been reported in immunocompromised pediatric patients. To our knowledge, no case of septic arthritis in an immunocompetent pediatric patient has been reported. An otherwise healthy 16-year-old boy presented with 4 weeks of escalating back pain after a minor athletics-related trauma. Evaluation showed incapacitating pain, lumbar musculature spasms, and the absence of fever, hemodynamic, or neurologic changes. Laboratory values were within normal limits. Magnetic resonance images showed a fluid collection within the L3-L4 facet and a localized abscess. Computed tomographic-guided aspiration showed methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection, for which the patient received 6 weeks of vancomycin with complete resolution of symptoms. Refractory lumbago in an adolescent requires careful evaluation. PMID:25046186

  5. False-Negative Rate of Gram-Stain Microscopy for Diagnosis of Septic Arthritis: Suggestions for Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Amanat, Suheil; Ahmed, Abdulkhaled; Armstrong, Malcolm; Sharma, Pankaj; Qamruddin, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    We quantify the false-negative diagnostic rate of septic arthritis using Gram-stain microscopy of synovial fluid and compare this to values reported in the peer-reviewed literature. We propose a method of improving the diagnostic value of Gram-stain microscopy using Lithium Heparin containers that prevent synovial fluid coagulation. Retrospective study of the Manchester Royal Infirmary microbiology database of patients undergoing synovial fluid Gram-stain and culture between December 2003 and March 2012 was undertaken. The initial cohort of 1896 synovial fluid analyses for suspected septic arthritis was reduced to 143 after exclusion criteria were applied. Analysis of our Gram-stain microscopy yielded 111 false-negative results from a cohort size of 143 positive synovial fluid cultures, giving a false-negative rate of 78%. We report a false-negative rate of Gram-stain microscopy for septic arthritis of 78%. Clinicians should therefore avoid the investigation until a statistically significant data set confirms its efficacy. The investigation's value could be improved by using Lithium Heparin containers to collect homogenous synovial fluid samples. Ongoing research aims to establish how much this could reduce the false-negative rate. PMID:24678320

  6. A case of septic arthritis caused by a Mycoplasma salivarium strain resistant towards Ciprofloxacin and Clarithromycin in a patient with chronic lymphatic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Büchsel, Martin; Pletschen, Lars; Fleiner, Michael; Häcker, Georg; Serr, Annerose

    2016-09-01

    Mycoplasma salivarium is a rare agent of septic arthritis in immunocompromised patients. We report a case of septic arthritis due to Mycoplasma salivarium in a patient with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia who underwent chemotherapy with rituximab and bendamustin. Therapy of arthritis due to Mycoplasma salivarium is difficult because there are almost no susceptibility data available. The present case illustrates that antimicrobial susceptibility of Mycoplasma strains is not necessarily predictable and that antibiotic therapy should therefore be guided by in vitro susceptibility testing. PMID:27342785

  7. Atypical arthritis revisited: Acute rheumatic fever

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Binoy; Bhutia, Euden; Kumar, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    A 13-year-old boy presented with vague musculoskeletal pain and involvement of multiple small and large joints along with axial skeleton for the last 3 years, poorly responsive to aspirin. However, on account of presence of carditis and fulfilment of Jones criteria, a diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) with atypical arthritis was made. We report this case to break the myth and sensitize pediatricians and rheumatologists to keep the possibility of atypical articular presentations, as in our case, in patients with ARF and prevent delayed diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27212853

  8. Effects of Low-Level Laser Therapy, 660 nm, in Experimental Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Bruna Formentão; Silva, Lígia Inez; Meireles, Anamaria; Rosa, Camila Thieimi; Gioppo, Nereida Mello da Rosa; Jorge, Alex Sandro; Kunz, Regina Inês; Ribeiro, Lucinéia de Fátima Chasko; Brancalhão, Rose Meire Costa; Bertolini, Gladson Ricardo Flor

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in the presence of an infectious process has not been well elucidated. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of LLLT in an experimental model of septic arthritis. Methods. Twenty-one Wistar rats were divided as follows: control group, no bacteria; placebo group, bacteria were inoculated; Treated group, bacteria were injected and treatment with LLLTwas performed. To assess nociception, a von Frey digital analgesimeter was applied. Synovial fluid was streaked to analyze bacterial growth. The standard strain of S. aureus was inoculated in the right knee. LLLT was performed with 660 nm, 2 J/cm2, over 10 days. After treatment, the knees were fixed and processed for morphological analysis by light microscopy. Results. It was found that nociception increases in the right knee. There was a lack of results for the seeding of the synovial fluid. The morphological analysis showed slight recovery areas in the articular cartilage and synovia; however, there was the maintenance of the inflammatory infiltrate. Conclusion. The parameters used were not effective in the nociception reduction, even with the slight tissue recovery due to the maintenance of inflammatory infiltrate, but produced no change in the natural history of resolution of the infectious process. PMID:23997964

  9. Streptococcus suis causes septic arthritis and bacteremia: phenotypic characterization and molecular confirmation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hanah; Lee, Sang Hoon; Moon, Hee-Won; Kim, Ji Young; Lee, Sun Hwa; Hur, Mina; Yun, Yeo-Min

    2011-04-01

    Streptococcus suis is a swine pathogen that causes meningitis, septicemia, pneumonia, and endocarditis. The first case of human S. suis infection was reported in Denmark in 1968, and since then, this infection with has been reported in many countries, especially in Southeast Asia because of the high density of pigs in this region. We report the case of a patient with septic arthritis and bacteremia caused by S. suis. Cases in which S. suis is isolated from the joint fluid are very rare, and to the best of our knowledge, this is first case report of S. suis infection in Korea. The identity of this organism was confirmed by phenotypic characterization and 16S rRNA sequence analysis. An 81-yr-old Korean woman who presented with fever, arthralgia, and headache was admitted to a secondary referral center in Korea. Culture of aspirated joint fluid and blood samples showed the growth of S. suis biotype II, which was identified by the Vitek2 GPI and API 20 Strep systems (bioMérieux, USA), and this organism was susceptible to penicillin G and vancomycin. The 16S rRNA sequences of the blood culture isolates showed 99% homology with those of S. suis subsp. suis, which are reported in GenBank. The patient's fever subsided, and blood and joint cultures were negative for bacterial growth after antibiotic therapy; however, the swelling and pain in her left knee joint persisted. She plans to undergo total knee replacement. PMID:21474987

  10. Septic acute kidney injury: molecular mechanisms and the importance of stratification and targeting therapy.

    PubMed

    Morrell, Eric D; Kellum, John A; Pastor-Soler, Núria M; Hallows, Kenneth R

    2014-01-01

    The most common cause of acute kidney injury (AKI) in hospitalized patients is sepsis. However, the molecular pathways and mechanisms that mediate septic AKI are not well defined. Experiments performed over the past 20 years suggest that there are profound differences in the pathogenesis between septic and ischemic AKI. Septic AKI often occurs independently of hypoperfusion, and is mediated by a concomitant pro- and anti-inflammatory state that is activated in response to various pathogen-associated molecular patterns, such as endotoxin, as well as damage-associated molecular patterns. These molecular patterns are recognized by Toll-like receptors (TLRs) found in the kidney, and effectuate downstream inflammatory pathways. Additionally, apoptosis has been proposed to play a role in the pathogenesis of septic AKI. However, targeted therapies designed to mitigate the above aspects of the inflammatory state, TLR-related pathways, and apoptosis have failed to show significant clinical benefit. This failure is likely due to the protean nature of septic AKI, whereby different patients present at different points along the immunologic spectrum. While one patient may benefit from targeted therapy at one end of the spectrum, another patient at the other end may be harmed by the same therapy. We propose that a next important step in septic AKI research will be to identify where patients lie on the immunologic spectrum in order to appropriately target therapies at the inflammatory cascade, TLRs, and possibly apoptosis. PMID:25575158

  11. Acute Arthritis in Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever

    PubMed Central

    Ahmeti, Salih; Ajazaj-Berisha, Lindita; Halili, Bahrije; Shala, Anita

    2014-01-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever is a severe viral disease caused by a Nairovirus. An atypical manifestation in the form of acute arthritis was found in a confirmed Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus Kosova-Hoti strain positive patient. Acute arthritis in Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) may be as a result of immune mechanisms or the bleeding disorder underlying CCHF. PMID:24926169

  12. Prognostic Factors of Septic Arthritis of Hip in Infants and Neonates: Minimum 5-Year Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soon Chul; Seo, Sung Wook; Lee, Sung San

    2015-01-01

    Background The authors conducted the present study to identify clinical and radiological prognostic factors in infants and neonates with septic arthritis of the hip. Methods The authors retrospectively reviewed the records of 31 patients with septic arthritis of the hip. All of the patients were younger than 18 months old. Follow-up periods ranged from 5 to 17 years. The following potential variables for predicting the prognosis were included in the assessment: gender, age, underlying diseases, duration of symptoms, changes of hip joint in X-ray, concomitant osteomyelitis, elevation of erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein, sepsis, pus drainage, synovial fluid culture, and infecting organisms. Clinical and radiological prognoses were analyzed at the final follow-up. Results Univariate analysis demonstrated that radiological prognoses were poorer in patients who had underlying diseases, a longer duration of symptoms, and pus drainage. However, on multivariate analysis, only the variable-duration of symptoms-was found to be statistically related with a poor radiological prognosis. Conclusions Although poor prognosis for patients with several underlying diseases and radiological changes has already been established, a favorable outcome might be expected with prompt surgical drainage and appropriate antibiotics. PMID:25729527

  13. Spondylitic psoriatic arthritis presenting as acute urinary retention

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Tom Edward Ngo; Que, Mary Lareine V; Tee, Michael L

    2014-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is a seronegative arthropathy occurring in the presence of psoriasis. In majority of cases, typical psoriatic skin lesions precede joint disease, making diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis without typical skin lesions, a diagnostic challenge. Nail lesions are commonly seen in patients affected by this condition, making it a useful clue in the diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis. This is a case of a 58-year-old Filipino woman presenting with sudden acute urinary retention and weakness of both lower extremities accompanied with active polyarthritis. Onycholytic nail changes initially thought to be a fungal nail infection led to the diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis involving the spine. The patient was eventually treated with methotrexate and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs leading to full resolution of symptoms. The patient is currently ambulatory and on regular follow-up. This case report highlights the importance of clinical and physical findings particularly the nails that would lead to a diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis. PMID:24789155

  14. Sternoclavicular septic arthritis due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a patient with a suprapubic catheter.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Nadine; Moleiro, Filipa; Lérias, Graça; Silva, Alberto Mello

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 74-year-old man who presented to the emergency department with a 1-week history of fever. He had a meatal stenosis and had a suprapubic catheter for 10 months, and had a recent hospitalisation for urosepsis with bacteraemia due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus after manipulation of the catheter. Clinical examinations were performed in the emergency department and the patient was hospitalised with the diagnosis of recurrent urinary tract infection. The following day, we noticed the development of a mass in the left sternoclavicular joint with inflammatory signs and excruciating pain. Ultrasonographic findings led to the diagnosis of left sternoclavicular synovitis, and methicillin-resistant S. aureus grew in blood cultures leading to the diagnosis of sternoclavicular septic arthritis. Treatment with vancomycin and gentamicin was started and maintained for 4 weeks with complete resolution of symptoms and no complications or sequelae. PMID:25694643

  15. Diagnostic accuracy of urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin in patients with septic acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Munna Lal; Sachan, Rekha; Shyam, Radhey; Kumar, Satish; Kamal, Ritul; Misra, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    Background Sepsis is the most common cause of acute kidney injury (AKI). Very few studies have investigated the predictive properties of urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (uNGAL) as a marker of AKI in septic patients. The aim of this study is to examine uNGAL in septic patients with and without AKI and to evaluate its predictive value. Methods We prospectively studied 155 patients with sepsis over a period of 1 year. Urine was analyzed for neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin at 12, 24, and 48 hours after admission. Patients with <24-hour stay and those with chronic kidney disease were excluded. AKI was classified according to the Acute Kidney Injury Network guidelines. Results The differences in mean change of uNGAL at 12, 24, and 48 hours were 80.00±7.00 ng/mL and 128.13±22.46 ng/mL, respectively in septic AKI, and 02.07±0.80 ng/mL and 26.13±15.12 ng/mL, respectively in septic non-AKI. At baseline or 12 hours, the cutoff value of 34.32 ng/mL had a sensitivity and specificity of 86.36 and 80.60, respectively and an area under curve of 0.81 (95% CI: 0.73–0.89) for predicting AKI. At the cutoff value 199.99 ng/mL sensitivity and specificity of 90.0 and 64.66, respectively and an area under curve of 0.82 (95% CI, 0.75–0.88) for predicting AKI. Conclusion The baseline or 12-hour uNGAL is highly sensitive but a less specific predictor of AKI in septic patients. PMID:27471404

  16. Polymerase chain reaction detection of Kingella kingae in children with culture-negative septic arthritis in eastern Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Slinger, Robert; Moldovan, Ioana; Bowes, Jennifer; Chan, Francis

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The bacterium Kingella kingae may be an under-recognized cause of septic arthritis in Canadian children because it is difficult to grow in culture and best detected using molecular methods. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether K kingae is present in culture-negative joint fluid specimens from children in eastern Ontario using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection methods. METHODS: K kingae PCR testing was performed using residual bacterial culture-negative joint fluid collected from 2010 to 2013 at a children’s hospital in Ottawa, Ontario. The clinical features of children with infections caused by K kingae were compared with those of children with infections caused by the ‘typical’ septic arthritis bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. RESULTS: A total of 50 joint fluid specimens were submitted over the study period. Ten were culture-positive, eight for S aureus and two for S pyogenes. Residual joint fluid was available for 27 of the 40 culture-negative specimens and K kingae was detected using PCR in seven (25.93%) of these samples. Children with K kingae were significantly younger (median age 1.7 versus 11.3 years; P=0.01) and had lower C-reactive protein levels (median 23.8 mg/L versus 117.6. mg/L; P=0.01) than those infected with other bacteria. CONCLUSIONS: K kingae was frequently detected using PCR in culture-negative joint fluid specimens from children in eastern Ontario. K kingae PCR testing of culture-negative joint samples in children appears to be warranted. PMID:27095882

  17. Gouty Arthritis: A Review of Acute Management and Prevention.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Liza; Saseen, Joseph J

    2016-08-01

    Gouty arthritis is one of the most common rheumatic diseases. The clinical burden of gouty arthritis has historically been well recognized; however, gout is often misdiagnosed and mismanaged. The prevalence of gout is rising and is likely attributed to several factors including increased incidence of comorbidities, lifestyle factors, and increased use of causative medications. With the increasing prevalence, there have been several innovations and evidence-based updates related to the diagnosis and management of gout. Acute gouty arthritis should be treated with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), colchicine, or corticosteroids, or a combination of two agents. Xanthine oxidase inhibitor therapy remains the consensus first-line treatment option for the prevention of recurrent gout. Add-on therapies that reduce serum urate concentration include traditional uricosuric agents and a novel uric acid reabsorption inhibitor. Prophylaxis of acute gout with NSAIDs, colchicine, or corticosteroids is universally recommended when initiating any urate-lowering therapy in order to prevent acute gouty arthritis for a period of at least 6 months. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology and risk factors for gouty arthritis and evaluate diagnostic strategies and therapeutic regimens for the management of gout, including a new drug approval. PMID:27318031

  18. Intrarenal and urinary oxygenation during norepinephrine resuscitation in ovine septic acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Lankadeva, Yugeesh R; Kosaka, Junko; Evans, Roger G; Bailey, Simon R; Bellomo, Rinaldo; May, Clive N

    2016-07-01

    Norepinephrine is the principal vasopressor used to restore blood pressure in sepsis, but its effects on intrarenal oxygenation are unknown. To clarify this, we examined renal cortical, medullary, and urinary oxygenation in ovine septic acute kidney injury and the response to resuscitation with norepinephrine. A renal artery flow probe and fiberoptic probes were placed in the cortex and medulla of sheep to measure tissue perfusion and oxygenation. A probe in the bladder catheter measured urinary oxygenation. Sepsis was induced in conscious sheep by infusion of Escherichia coli for 32 hours. At 24 to 30 hours of sepsis, either norepinephrine, to restore mean arterial pressure to preseptic levels or vehicle-saline was infused (8 sheep per group). Septic acute kidney injury was characterized by a reduction in blood pressure of ∼12 mm Hg, renal hyperperfusion, and oliguria. Sepsis reduced medullary perfusion (from an average of 1289 to 628 blood perfusion units), medullary oxygenation (from 32 to 16 mm Hg), and urinary oxygenation (from 36 to 24 mm Hg). Restoring blood pressure with norepinephrine further reduced medullary perfusion to an average of 331 blood perfusion units, medullary oxygenation to 8 mm Hg and urinary oxygenation to 18 mm Hg. Cortical perfusion and oxygenation were preserved. Thus, renal medullary hypoxia caused by intrarenal blood flow redistribution may contribute to the development of septic acute kidney injury, and resuscitation of blood pressure with norepinephrine exacerbates medullary hypoxia. The parallel changes in medullary and urinary oxygenation suggest that urinary oxygenation may be a useful real-time biomarker for risk of acute kidney injury. PMID:27165831

  19. Infections and arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Ashish Jacob; Ravindran, Vinod

    2014-12-01

    Bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites can all cause arthritis of either acute or chronic nature, which can be divided into infective/septic, reactive, or inflammatory. Considerable advances have occurred in diagnostic techniques in the recent decades resulting in better treatment outcomes in patients with infective arthritis. Detection of emerging arthritogenic viruses has changed the epidemiology of infection-related arthritis. The role of viruses in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory arthritides such as rheumatoid arthritis is increasingly being recognized. We discuss the various causative agents of infective arthritis and emphasize on the approach to each type of arthritis, highlighting the diagnostic tests, along with their statistical accuracy. Various investigations including newer methods such as nucleic acid amplification using polymerase chain reaction are discussed along with the pitfalls in interpreting the tests. PMID:26096095

  20. Lyme arthritis of the pediatric ankle.

    PubMed

    Aiyer, Amiethab; Walrath, Jessica; Hennrikus, William

    2014-10-01

    Lyme arthritis results from acute inflammation caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. The number of cases per year has been rising since 2006, with a majority of patients being affected in the northeastern United States. Development of Lyme arthritis is of particular importance to the orthopedic surgeon because Lyme arthritis often presents as an acute episode of joint swelling and tenderness and may be confused with bacterial septic arthritis. Considering the vast difference in treatment management between these 2 pathologies, differentiating between them is of critical importance. Septic arthritis often needs to be addressed surgically, whereas Lyme arthritis can be treated with oral antibiotics alone. Laboratory testing for Lyme disease often results in a delay in diagnosis because many laboratories batch-test Lyme specimens only a few times per week because of increased expense. The authors present a case of Lyme arthritis in the pediatric ankle in an endemic region. No clear algorithm exists to delineate between septic arthritis and Lyme arthritis of the joint. Improved clinical guidelines for the identification and diagnosis of Lyme arthritis of the ankle are important so that appropriate antibiotics can be used and surgery can be avoided. PMID:25275987

  1. [Early jejunal feeding in acute pancreatitis: prevention of septic complications and multiorgan failure].

    PubMed

    Oláh, A; Pardavi, G; Belágyi, T

    2000-02-01

    Authors evaluate the effect of early jejunal feeding on septic complications and mortality in acute pancreatitis, based on the results of a two-phase, prospective, randomized study. In the first part of the study they compared the conventional parenteral nutrition with early (started within 24 hours) enteral nutrition in a prospective, randomized trial on 89 patients. Forty-eight patients were randomized into the parenteral group "A" (Rindex 10, Infusamin S, Intralipid 10%: 30 kcal/kg) and 41 patients into the enteral group "B" (fed by nasogastric jejunal tube Survimed OPD, 30 kcal/kg). The rate of septic complications (infected necrosis, abscess, infected pseudocyst) were significantly lower in the enteral group (p = 0.08 chi-square test). In the second phase of the study early jejunal feeding was combined with imipenem prophylaxis (Tienam, 2 x 500 mg i.v.) in the necrotizing cases detected by CT scan. According to the results of 92 patients the rate of septic complications (p = 0.03), multiple organ failure (p = 0.14), and mortality (p = 0.13) were further reduced in this group. Authors believe that combination of early enteral nutrition and a selective, adequate antibiotic therapy may give a chance for prevention of multiple organ failure. PMID:11299593

  2. IMPACT OF CONTINUOUS RENAL REPLACEMENT THERAPY INTENSITY ON SEPTIC ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Mayumi, Kengo; Yamashita, Tetsushi; Hamasaki, Yoshifumi; Noiri, Eisei; Nangaku, Masaomi; Yahagi, Naoki; Doi, Kent

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The intensity of continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) for acute kidney injury (AKI) has been evaluated, but recent randomized clinical trials have failed to demonstrate a beneficial impact of high intensity on the outcomes. High intensity might cause some detrimental results recognized recently as CRRT trauma. This study was undertaken to evaluate the association of CRRT intensity with mortality in a population of AKI patients treated with lower-intensity CRRT in Japan. A retrospective single-center cohort study enrolled 125 AKI patients treated with CRRT in mixed intensive care units of a university hospital in Japan. Subanalysis was conducted for septic and postsurgical AKI. The median value of the prescribed total effluent rate was 20.1 (interquartile range 15.3–27.1) mL/kg/h. Overall, univariate Cox regression analysis indicated no association of the CRRT intensity with the 60-day in-hospital mortality rate (hazard ratio 1.006, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.991–1.018, P = 0.343). In subanalysis with the septic AKI patients, multivariate analysis revealed two factors associated independently with the 60-day mortality rate: the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score at initiation of CRRT (hazard ratio 1.152, 95% CI 1.025–1.301, P = 0.0171) and the CRRT intensity (hazard ratio 1.024, 95% CI 1.004–1.042, P = 0.0195). The CRRT intensity was associated significantly with higher 60-day in-hospital mortality in septic AKI, suggesting that unknown detrimental effects of CRRT with high-intensity CRRT might worsen the outcomes in septic AKI patients. PMID:26771934

  3. IMPACT OF CONTINUOUS RENAL REPLACEMENT THERAPY INTENSITY ON SEPTIC ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY.

    PubMed

    Mayumi, Kengo; Yamashita, Tetsushi; Hamasaki, Yoshifumi; Noiri, Eisei; Nangaku, Masaomi; Yahagi, Naoki; Doi, Kent

    2016-02-01

    The intensity of continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) for acute kidney injury (AKI) has been evaluated, but recent randomized clinical trials have failed to demonstrate a beneficial impact of high intensity on the outcomes. High intensity might cause some detrimental results recognized recently as CRRT trauma. This study was undertaken to evaluate the association of CRRT intensity with mortality in a population of AKI patients treated with lower-intensity CRRT in Japan. A retrospective single-center cohort study enrolled 125 AKI patients treated with CRRT in mixed intensive care units of a university hospital in Japan. Subanalysis was conducted for septic and postsurgical AKI. The median value of the prescribed total effluent rate was 20.1 (interquartile range 15.3-27.1) mL/kg/h. Overall, univariate Cox regression analysis indicated no association of the CRRT intensity with the 60-day in-hospital mortality rate (hazard ratio 1.006, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.991-1.018, P = 0.343). In subanalysis with the septic AKI patients, multivariate analysis revealed two factors associated independently with the 60-day mortality rate: the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score at initiation of CRRT (hazard ratio 1.152, 95% CI 1.025-1.301, P = 0.0171) and the CRRT intensity (hazard ratio 1.024, 95% CI 1.004-1.042, P = 0.0195). The CRRT intensity was associated significantly with higher 60-day in-hospital mortality in septic AKI, suggesting that unknown detrimental effects of CRRT with high-intensity CRRT might worsen the outcomes in septic AKI patients. PMID:26771934

  4. [The prevention and treatment of suppurative-septic complications in patients with acute appendicitis].

    PubMed

    Korotkiĭ, V N; Geleskul, V F; Kolosovich, I V; Butyrin, S A

    1993-01-01

    In the experiment on mongrel dogs, the absorption of indigo carmine dye after its retroperitoneal administration with 10% dimexide solution into the lymphatic and venous systems was studied. More rapid delivery of a dye into the portal system, including the cases with portal hypertension, and into the lymphatic system was established. A method for retroperitoneal administration of antibiotics with 10% dimexide solution for prevention and treatment of purulent-septic complications in patients with acute appendicitis has been developed. The method was used in 120 patients, the result of treatment is good. PMID:10912051

  5. Management of Acute Kidney Injury and Acid-Base Balance in the Septic Patient.

    PubMed

    Weyker, Paul D; Pérez, Xosé L; Liu, Kathleen D

    2016-06-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an abrupt decrease in kidney function that takes place over hours to days. Sepsis is the leading cause of AKI and portends a particularly high morbidity and mortality, although the severity may vary from a transient rise in serum creatinine to end-stage renal disease. With regard to acid-base management in septic AKI, caution should be used with hyperchloremic crystalloid solutions, and dialysis is often used in the setting of severe acidosis. In the future, biomarkers may help clinicians identify AKI earlier and allow for potential interventions before the development of severe AKI. PMID:27229644

  6. Non-typhoid salmonella septic arthritis in dual living liver transplant recipient: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Cheon Soo; Song, Gi-Won; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2014-01-01

    Non-typhoid salmonellosis is an infectious disease caused by Salmonella species other than Salmonella typhi. Although the usual clinical course of non-typhoid salmonellosis is a benign self-limiting gastroenteritis, these bacteria are especially problematic in immunocompromised individuals, including patients with malignancies, human immunodeficiency virus, or diabetes, and those receiving corticosteroids or other immunotherapy agents. In addition to enteric symptoms, Salmonella species give rise to extra-intestinal complications, including self-limiting arthritis, which appears 1 to 3 weeks after the onset of infection and lasts from a few weeks to several months. In some patients, however, this arthritis spears to be chronic in nature. We describe herein a living-donor liver transplant recipient who experienced non-typhoid Salmonella-triggered arthritis in the left hip. The patient recovered uneventfully after 6-month-long antibiotics treatment. Clinicians involved in transplantation should be aware of the possibility that transplant recipients, like other immunocompromised individuals, are at risk of salmonellosis and therefore require careful clinical and microbiological evaluation, with the goals of prevention and early recognition of infection. PMID:26155244

  7. Role of neutrophils in experimental septicemia and septic arthritis induced by Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Verdrengh, M; Tarkowski, A

    1997-01-01

    We have previously described a murine model of hematogenously induced Staphylococcus aureus sepsis and arthritis. In this model, large numbers of granulocytes can be observed both in the circulation and locally in the inflamed synovium within 24 h after bacterial inoculation. To assess the role of neutrophils in this severe infection, mice were given granulocyte-depleting monoclonal antibody RB6-8C5 before being inoculated with S. aureus. All the control mice survived their intravenous injection with 3 x 10(7) CFU of S. aureus, whereas all the mice given RB6-8C5 antibody died of sepsis within 2 to 3 days. Even when the inoculum size was reduced sixfold (i.e., 6 x 10(6) CFU/mouse), 50% of the RB6-8C5-treated animals died within 6 days. The RB6-8C5-treated mice had a significantly higher burden of bacteria in their blood and kidneys 24 and 48 h after bacterial inoculation. In addition, when a suboptimal dose of bacteria was administered, the neutrophil-depleted animals displayed a higher frequency of arthritis than did the controls. The granulocyte-depleted animals exhibited increased levels of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-6, and gamma interferon, reflecting the severity of their disease. This is the first direct demonstration of neutrophils playing a crucial protective role in the early phase of S. aureus infection. PMID:9199413

  8. Brachial plexus neuropathy secondary to septic arthritis and osteomyelitis: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y C; Lin, F K; Hung, K L; Wu, D Y

    1994-01-01

    Two infants, delivered uneventfully, later developed right brachial plexus palsy secondary to pyogenic osteomyelitis and arthritis of the right shoulder joint. Weakness of right arms occurred at the sixth and tenth days of age respectively. Both had right arm tenderness on palpation and passive movement. Roentgenograms of their right shoulder joints showed irregular radiolucency of the proximal margin of right humerus head. In both cases, electromyography revealed various degrees of significant denervation pattern for the C5-C7 innervated muscles. Pus culture from right shoulder joints grew Streptococcus viridans and Staphylococcus aureus, respectively. After antibiotic therapy and arthrotomy with drainage, weakness improved gradually following continuous rehabilitation. Follow-up at six months of age showed almost complete recovery of right upper extremity function in one patient, but mild residual weakness in the other. Follow-up electromyography studies showed continued improvement. The possible mechanism of this rare occurrence is discussed. PMID:7942033

  9. Role of activated neutrophils in chest trauma-induced septic acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Perl, Mario; Hohmann, Christoph; Denk, Stephanie; Kellermann, Philipp; Lu, Dapeng; Braumüller, Sonja; Bachem, Max G; Thomas, Jörg; Knöferl, Markus W; Ayala, Alfred; Gebhard, Florian; Huber-Lang, Markus S

    2012-07-01

    More than 50% of severely injured patients have chest trauma. Second insults frequently result in acute lung injury (ALI), with sepsis being the main underlying condition. We aimed to develop a standardized, reproducible, and clinically relevant double-hit mouse model of ALI induced by chest trauma and polymicrobial sepsis and to investigate the pathophysiologic role of activated neutrophils. Lung contusion was applied to C57Bl/6 mice via a focused blast wave. Twenty-four hours later, sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture. For polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) depletion, animals received intravenous injections of PMN-depleting antibody. In response to blunt chest trauma followed by sepsis as well as after sepsis alone, a significant local and systemic inflammatory response with increased cytokine/chemokine levels in lung and plasma was observed. In contrast, lung apoptosis was markedly elevated only after a double hit. Intra-alveolar neutrophils and total bronchoalveolar lavage protein concentrations were markedly increased following isolated chest trauma or the combined insult, but not after sepsis alone. Lung myeloperoxidase activity was enhanced only in response to the double hit accompanied by histological disruption of the alveolar architecture, lung congestion, and marked cellular infiltrates. Neutrophil depletion significantly diminished lung interleukin 1β and interleukin 6 concentrations and reduced the degree of septic ALI. Here we have established a novel and highly reproducible mouse model of chest trauma-induced septic ALI characterizing a clinical relevant double-hit scenario. In particular, the depletion of neutrophils substantially mitigated the extent of lung injury, indicating a pathomechanistic role for neutrophils in chest trauma-induced septic ALI. PMID:22552016

  10. Use of antimicrobial-impregnated polymethyl methacrylate beads for treatment of chronic, refractory septic arthritis and osteomyelitis of the digit in a bull.

    PubMed

    Trostle, S S; Hendrickson, D A; Stone, W C; Klohnen, A A

    1996-02-01

    A 6-year-old 895-kg Angus bull was evaluated for a 6-month history of left hind limb lameness that was refractory to antimicrobial treatment. On physical examination, there was soft-tissue swelling associated with the lateral digit. Radiography revealed septic arthritis of the distal interphalangeal joint and osteomyelitis of the distal and middle phalanges. Treatment included debridement and lavage. Bacteriologic culture of debrided tissues yielded aerobic and anaerobic organisms. Antimicrobials were administered parenterally and locally in the form of antimicrobial-impregnated polymethyl methacrylate beads. The limb also was placed in a cast to promote ankylosis. The bull recovered, and the digit was salvaged. PMID:8575974

  11. [APPLICATION OF PRESEPSIN IN DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF PURULENT-SEPTIC COMPLICATIONS OF ACUTE NECROTIC PANCREATITIS].

    PubMed

    Rotar, O V

    2016-01-01

    In 70 patients, suffering an acute necrotic pancreatitis (ANP), and 10 practically healthy persons a content of presepsin in a blood plasm, using immunochemiluminescent method and conducted bacteriological investigations, were analyzed. The infection occurrence is accompanied by plausible upgrading of a presepsin level in a blood plasm, depending on activity and severity of a septic process: in local infection--up to (677 ± 30) pg/ml, sepsis--up to (988 ± 47) pg/ml, severe sepsis--up to 2668 pg/ml; in an ANP without infection it have constituted (332 ± 38) pg/mI at average, in practically healthy persons--(184 ± 16) pg/mI. A presepsin level correlates with a state severity in accordance to APACHE I scale, what permits to estimate the patients state severity objectively, to prognosticate a favorable and unfavorable consequences of treatment, rapidly changing, depending on efficacy of treatment. PMID:27249919

  12. Septic shock during platelet transfusion in a patient with acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Haesebaert, Julie; Bénet, Thomas; Michallet, Mauricette; Vanhems, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Although rare, transfusion-associated bacterial contamination (TABC) is nowadays the main risk associated with platelet concentrate (PC) transfusion. Consequences vary from spontaneously resolving symptoms to severe sepsis and death. In this report we have summarised a case of bacterial contamination and sepsis during PC transfusion in a patient with acute myeloid leukaemia. Fifteen minutes after the PC transfusion began, she developed chills and rapidly worsened to septic shock. The episode was managed appropriately. The patient's blood cultures and PC unit cultures grew Escherichia coli. The microbiological susceptibilities of isolates from the patient and platelet bag were identical. No other source of E coli was found. Donor and blood products issued from the same donation investigations were negative. The causality between sepsis and PC transfusion might be difficult to confirm. As no method is available in daily practice to eliminate TABC risk, physicians should always consider TABC by immediately stopping the transfusion and conducting appropriate investigations. PMID:24172770

  13. Histamine receptor antagonists, cyclooxygenase blockade, and tumor necrosis factor during acute septic insult.

    PubMed

    Leeper-Woodford, S K; Carey, D; Byrne, K; Walsh, C; Fisher, B; Sugerman, H J; Fowler, A A

    1998-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) may be a major endogenous mediator of sepsis-induced acute organ injury. We proposed that treatment of septic pigs with the combined agents ibuprofen, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, and histamine receptor antagonists, cimetidine (H2 antagonist) and diphenhydramine (H1 antagonist) would result in lower circulating levels of TNF and decreased parameters of sepsis-induced injury in these animals. To test this, plasma TNF activity, cardiac index, systemic and pulmonary arterial pressures, arterial PO2 and bronchoalveolar lavage protein content were monitored for 300 min in four groups of anesthetized pigs: saline-infused control pigs (n = 4); pigs infused for 60 min with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (5 x 10(8) organisms/mL, .3 mL/20 kg/min) (n = 5) and pigs infused for 60 min with P. aeruginosa plus ibuprofen (12.5 mg/kg) alone (n = 4) or ibuprofen plus cimetidine (150 mg) and diphenhydramine (30 mg/kg) at 0 and 120 min (CID, n = 4). Within 60 min, pigs infused with P. aeruginosa exhibited increased plasma TNF activity (>8-fold increase in ng/mL TNF; L929 cytolysis assay) and showed alterations in all hemodynamic and pulmonary parameters. Ibuprofen or CID administration in the septic pigs decreased peak TNF activity by 4.6 and 10.2 ng/mL, respectively, and CID treatment was correlated with better attenuation of certain sepsis-induced alterations. These results show that CID treatment attenuates sepsis-induced injury and that this is correlated with reduced plasma TNF activity in a porcine model of sepsis-induced acute organ injury. PMID:9488252

  14. Key role of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of infections around the hip and pelvic girdle mimicking septic arthritis of the hip in children.

    PubMed

    Song, Kwang Soon; Lee, Si Wook; Bae, Ki Cheor

    2016-05-01

    Infections around the hip and the pelvic girdle mimicking septic hip arthritis are rare conditions in the pediatric population requiring urgent treatment. They are not readily diagnosed because of rarity, resemblance to septic hip, and unclear pathophysiology, which often results in misdiagnosis, delayed diagnosis, and delayed treatment. The aim of this study was to prove the key role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the first-line modality in making a early definite diagnosis of an uncommon perihip infection in children. We retrospectively reviewed 20 children with a provisional diagnosis of unilateral septic hip who were confirmed finally to have perihip infections and combined with concomitant osteomyeltis using MRI. All patients were treated with intravenous antibiotics with or without abscess aspiration until normalization of clinical symptoms and laboratory tests including serum C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. All infections healed successfully and the final C-reactive protein was recovered to a mean of 0.37 mg/dl (range 0.01-0.78 mg/dl) without recurrence or complication. Although the MRI is costly and limited in practical application, it was found to be effective as a primary diagnostic tool for an early, accurate diagnosis of infections around the hip and the pelvic girdle in children to correctly guide the decision and the approach for treatment. PMID:27007545

  15. Impact of timing of renal replacement therapy initiation on outcome of septic acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Sepsis is the leading cause of acute kidney injury (AKI) in critical patients. The optimal timing of initiating renal replacement therapy (RRT) in septic AKI patients remains controversial. The objective of this study is to determine the impact of early or late initiation of RRT, as defined using the simplified RIFLE (risk, injury, failure, loss of kidney function, and end-stage renal failure) classification (sRIFLE), on hospital mortality among septic AKI patients. Methods Patient with sepsis and AKI requiring RRT in surgical intensive care units were enrolled between January 2002 and October 2009. The patients were divided into early (sRIFLE-0 or -Risk) or late (sRIFLE-Injury or -Failure) initiation of RRT by sRIFLE criteria. Cox proportional hazard ratios for in hospital mortality were determined to assess the impact of timing of RRT. Results Among the 370 patients, 192 (51.9%) underwent early RRT and 259 (70.0%) died during hospitalization. The mortality rate in early and late RRT groups were 70.8% and 69.7% respectively (P > 0.05). Early dialysis did not relate to hospital mortality by Cox proportional hazard model (P > 0.05). Patients with heart failure, male gender, higher admission creatinine, and operation were more likely to be in the late RRT group. Cox proportional hazard model, after adjustment with propensity score including all patients based on the probability of late RRT, showed early dialysis was not related to hospital mortality. Further model matched patients by 1:1 fashion according to each patient's propensity to late RRT showed no differences in hospital mortality according to head-to-head comparison of demographic data (P > 0.05). Conclusions Use of sRIFLE classification as a marker poorly predicted the benefits of early or late RRT in the context of septic AKI. In the future, more physiologically meaningful markers with which to determine the optimal timing of RRT initiation should be identified. PMID:21645350

  16. Electrolyte and mineral disturbances in septic acute kidney injury patients undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Jung, Su-Young; Kim, Hyunwook; Park, Seohyun; Jhee, Jong Hyun; Yun, Hae-Ryong; Kim, Hyoungnae; Kee, Youn Kyung; Yoon, Chang-Yun; Oh, Hyung Jung; Chang, Tae Ik; Park, Jung Tak; Yoo, Tae-Hyun; Kang, Shin-Wook; Lee, Hajeong; Kim, Dong Ki; Han, Seung Hyeok

    2016-09-01

    Electrolyte and mineral disturbances remain a major concern in patients undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT); however, it is not clear whether those imbalances are associated with adverse outcomes in patients with septic acute kidney injury (AKI) undergoing CRRT. We conducted a post-hoc analysis of data from a prospective randomized controlled trial. A total of 210 patients with a mean age of 62.2 years (136 [64.8%] males) in 2 hospitals were enrolled. Levels of sodium, potassium, calcium, and phosphate measured before (0 hour) and 24 hours after CRRT initiation. Before starting CRRT, at least 1 deficiency and excess in electrolytes or minerals were observed in 126 (60.0%) and 188 (67.6%) patients, respectively. The excess in these parameters was greatly improved, whereas hypokalemia and hypophosphatemia became more prevalent at 24 hours after CRRT. However, 1 and 2 or more deficiencies in those parameters at the 2 time points were not associated with mortality. However, during 28 days, 89 (71.2%) deaths occurred in patients with phosphate levels at 0 hour of ≥4.5 mg/dL as compared with 49 (57.6%) in patients with phosphate levels <4.5 mg/dL. The 90-day mortality was also significantly higher in patients with hyperphosphatemia. Similarly, in 184 patients who survived at 24 hours after CRRT, hyperphosphatemia conferred a 2.2-fold and 2.6-fold increased risk of 28- and 90-day mortality, respectively. The results remained unaltered when the serum phosphate level was analyzed as a continuous variable. Electrolyte and mineral disturbances are common, and hyperphosphatemia may predict poor prognosis in septic AKI patients undergoing CRRT. PMID:27603344

  17. Effects and mechanism analysis of combined infusion by levosimendan and vasopressin on acute lung injury in rats septic shock.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuebing; Ma, Shaolin; Liu, Yang; Xu, Wei; Li, Zhanxia

    2014-12-01

    This research is aimed to discover the influence and underling mechanism of combined infusion of arginine vasopressin with levosimendan on acute lung injury in rat septic shock with norepinephrine supplemented. The traditional fecal peritonitis-induced septic shock model was undergone in rats for study. It is observed that the combined infusion supplemented with norepinephrine brought about a lower mean pulmonary artery pressure; lower high-mobility group box 1 levels, pulmonary levels of interleukin-6, and arterial total nitrate/nitrite; lower apoptotic cells scores and total histological scores; but higher pulmonary gas exchange when compared with the separate infusion group and norepinephrine group. This therapy shows potential clinical beneficial assistance in sepsis-induced acute lung injury. The results suggest the mechanism of such effect is through abating pulmonary artery pressure, and more importantly suppressing inflammatory responses in lung when compared with norepinephrine infusion group and the separate infusion of levosimendan or vasopressin alone. PMID:25002345

  18. Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... or have trouble moving around, you might have arthritis. Most kinds of arthritis cause pain and swelling in your joints. Joints ... joint can become severely damaged. Some kinds of arthritis can also cause problems in your organs, such ...

  19. [Septic shock Fusobacterium necrophorum from origin gynecological at complicated an acute respiratory distress syndrome: a variant of Lemierre's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Huynh-Moynot, Sophie; Commandeur, Diane; Danguy des Déserts, Marc; Drouillard, Isabelle; Leguen, Patrick; Ould-Ahmed, Mehdi

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of a female patient of 47 years old who presents in a state of septic shock with acute insufficient respiratory complicated with syndrome of acute respiratory distress, together with a list of abdominal pain and polyarthralgia too. In her case of medical history, it is retained that she has had a intra-uterine device since 6 years without medical follow up. The initial thoraco-abdomino-pelvic scan shows a left ovarian vein thrombosis, as well as the opaqueness alveolus diffused interstitiel bilaterally and an aspect of ileitis. The IUD is taken off because of sudden occuring of purulent leucorrhoea. This results in a clinical and paraclinical improvement, whereas aminopenicillin was administered to the patient since 1 week. The microbiological blood test allows to put in evidence Fusobacterium necrophorum found in a blood culture and is sensitive to the amoxicilline-acide clavulanique and metronidazole. Isolation of this bacteria, classically found in Lemierre's syndrome, allowed to explain the multilfocalization of the symtoms and the list of pain. The whole concerns about a variant of Lemierre's syndrom: a state of septic shock secondary then caused by the anaerobic Gram negative bacilli, which is a commensal bacteria of the female genital tractus, complicated of septic emboli typical. PMID:21464014

  20. Interleukin-1β and Interleukin-6 in Arthritis Animal Models: Roles in the Early Phase of Transition from Acute to Chronic Inflammation and Relevance for Human Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ferraccioli, Gianfranco; Bracci-Laudiero, Luisa; Alivernini, Stefano; Gremese, Elisa; Tolusso, Barbara; De Benedetti, Fabrizio

    2010-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is the major target of the therapeutic approach in rheumatoid arthritis. A key issue in the approach to chronic arthritis is the understanding of the crucial molecules driving the transition from the acute phase to the chronic irreversible phase of the disease. In this review we analyzed five experimental arthritis animal models (antigen-induced arthritis, adjuvant-induced arthritis, streptococcal cell wall arthritis, collagen-induced arthritis and SKG) considered as possible scenarios to facilitate interpretation of the biology of human rheumatoid arthritis. The SKG model is strictly dependent on interleukin (IL)-6. In the other models, IL-1β and IL-6, more than TNF-α, appear to be relevant in driving the transition, which suggests that these should be the targets of an early intervention to stop the course toward the chronic form of the disease. PMID:20683549

  1. Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... when taking arthritis medicines . Over-the-counter medicines: Acetaminophen (Tylenol) is often the first medicine tried. Take up to 4000 mg a day (two arthritis-strength Tylenol every 8 hours). To prevent damage to your ...

  2. Fish Oil-Based Fat Emulsion Reduces Acute Kidney Injury and Inflammatory Response in Antibiotic-Treated Polymicrobial Septic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Juey-Ming; Shih, Yao-Ming; Pai, Man-Hui; Hou, Yu-Chen; Yeh, Chiu-Li; Yeh, Sung-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication in sepsis. This study compared the effects of a fish oil-based with a mixed oil fat emulsion on remote renal injury in an antibiotic-treated septic murine model. Mice were randomly assigned to a normal control (NC) group and three septic groups. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). The antibiotic was injected intraperitoneally (IP) after CLP and then daily till the time of sacrifice. Three hours after antibiotic treatment, one of the septic groups was injected IP with a fish oil-based emulsion (FO), while the other two groups were given either a mixed oil emulsion (MO) or saline (SC). The septic groups were further divided into two separate time groups, with blood and kidneys samples collected at 24 h or 72 h post-CLP. The results showed that sepsis leads to the activation of neutrophils, T helper (Th)1/Th-2/Th-17 and Treg cells (p < 0.05). Plasma NGAL and mRNA expressions of renal MyD88 and TLR4 were also enhanced (p < 0.05). Compared to the SC group, the group given the fish oil-based emulsion had decreased plasma NGAL by 22% and Treg by 33%. Furthermore, renal gene expressions of MyD88 and TLR4 reduced by 46% and 62%, respectively, whereas heat shock protein 70 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ increased by 158% and 69%, respectively (p < 0.05), at Day 3 after CLP. These results suggest that administration of a fish oil-based emulsion has favorable effects, maintaining blood T cell percentage, downregulating Treg expression, attenuating systemic and local inflammation and offering renal protection under conditions of antibiotic-treated polymicrobial sepsis. PMID:26999192

  3. Angiopoietin Balance in Septic Shock Patients With Acute Kidney Injury: Effects of Direct Hemoperfusion With Polymyxin B-Immobilized Fiber.

    PubMed

    Ebihara, Itaru; Hirayama, Kouichi; Nagai, Miho; Shiina, Eri; Koda, Megumi; Gunji, Masanobu; Okubo, Yuki; Sato, Chihiro; Usui, Joichi; Yamagata, Kunihiro; Kobayashi, Masaki

    2016-08-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) occurs in approximately 50% of patients in septic shock, and mortality from septic AKI is extremely high. Angiopoietin levels may play a role in the pathogenesis of vascular permeability. It was reported that direct hemoperfusion with a polymyxin B-immobilized fiber column (DHP-PMX) therapy ameliorates the angiopoietin balance in patients with sepsis. Although dysregulated angiopoietin balance in sepsis has been demonstrated, mechanisms underlying the development of AKI in sepsis have not been identified. We investigated angiopoietin levels in septic patients with/without AKI treated with DHP-PMX therapy. We used an enzyme-linked immunoassay to measure serum angiopoietin-1 and -2 levels in 38 septic shock patients treated with DHP-PMX. The renal function of all patients was normal for less than 3 months. Twenty-seven of the patients were diagnosed with AKI. The angiopoietin-1 level of the AKI group was significantly lower than that of the non-AKI group at the initiation of DHP-PMX therapy, but there was no significant difference between the two groups at the end of DHP-PMX therapy. In the AKI group with recovery, the mean angiopoietin-1 level at the end of DHP-PMX therapy was significantly elevated compared to the level before DHP-PMX therapy, and the mean angiopoietin-2 level at the end of DHP-PMX therapy was significantly decreased compared to the level before DHP-PMX therapy. These results suggest that angiopoietins may play a role in the pathogenesis of AKI and that DHP-PMX therapy may ameliorate the angiopoietin balance in AKI patients with sepsis. PMID:27523077

  4. Fish Oil-Based Fat Emulsion Reduces Acute Kidney Injury and Inflammatory Response in Antibiotic-Treated Polymicrobial Septic Mice.

    PubMed

    Shih, Juey-Ming; Shih, Yao-Ming; Pai, Man-Hui; Hou, Yu-Chen; Yeh, Chiu-Li; Yeh, Sung-Ling

    2016-03-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication in sepsis. This study compared the effects of a fish oil-based with a mixed oil fat emulsion on remote renal injury in an antibiotic-treated septic murine model. Mice were randomly assigned to a normal control (NC) group and three septic groups. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). The antibiotic was injected intraperitoneally (IP) after CLP and then daily till the time of sacrifice. Three hours after antibiotic treatment, one of the septic groups was injected IP with a fish oil-based emulsion (FO), while the other two groups were given either a mixed oil emulsion (MO) or saline (SC). The septic groups were further divided into two separate time groups, with blood and kidneys samples collected at 24 h or 72 h post-CLP. The results showed that sepsis leads to the activation of neutrophils, T helper (Th)1/Th-2/Th-17 and Treg cells (p < 0.05). Plasma NGAL and mRNA expressions of renal MyD88 and TLR4 were also enhanced (p < 0.05). Compared to the SC group, the group given the fish oil-based emulsion had decreased plasma NGAL by 22% and Treg by 33%. Furthermore, renal gene expressions of MyD88 and TLR4 reduced by 46% and 62%, respectively, whereas heat shock protein 70 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ increased by 158% and 69%, respectively (p < 0.05), at Day 3 after CLP. These results suggest that administration of a fish oil-based emulsion has favorable effects, maintaining blood T cell percentage, downregulating Treg expression, attenuating systemic and local inflammation and offering renal protection under conditions of antibiotic-treated polymicrobial sepsis. PMID:26999192

  5. Bacterial arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ho, G

    1991-08-01

    In this review of the 1990 septic arthritis literature, we revisit synovial fluid leukocytosis, examine the utility of synovial fluid glucose and protein measurements, and look at the levels of two cytokines, tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-1, in infected joint fluids. We see the many faces of gonococcal arthritis and the ravages of septic arthritis when the host has rheumatoid arthritis. Should we recommend antibiotic prophylaxis for the rheumatoid patient with a prosthetic joint who is undergoing a procedure that leads to transient bacteremia? What are some of the salient features of septic arthritis when it involves the sternoclavicular or sacroiliac joints? We also look at some unusual microorganisms, eg, group C Streptococcus, Streptococcus viridans, Listeria monocytogenes, Pseudomonas cepacia, Pseudomonas maltophilia, and Neisseria sicca. In patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, we encounter reports of septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and spinal epidural abscess caused by opportunistic microorganisms. Two unusual sites of infection include the C1-2 lateral facet joint and subacromial bursa without involvement of the glenohumeral joint. Finally, we examine how to drain a septic knee: the orthopedic point of view. PMID:1911055

  6. Acute calcium pyrophosphate deposition arthropathy.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Thomas; Furman, Janet

    2016-06-01

    Acute calcium pyrophosphate deposition (CPPD) arthropathy, also called pseudogout, is common, and becomes more prevalent as patients age. The presenting symptoms are similar to both gout and septic arthritis but may be treated differently. This article describes a typical patient presentation and management from an emergency medicine and orthopedic surgery standpoint. PMID:27228038

  7. Septic Encephalopathy Characterized by Acute Encephalopathy with Biphasic Seizures and Late Reduced Diffusion and Early Nonconvulsive Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Tsukasa; Maruyama, Azusa; Nagase, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Infection, whether viral or bacterial, can result in various forms of brain dysfunction (encephalopathy). Septic encephalopathy (SE) is caused by an excessive immune reaction to infection, with clinical features including disturbed consciousness and seizures. Acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD) is usually accompanied by viral infection in children and is characterized by biphasic seizures and impaired consciousness. The initial neurologic symptom of AESD is typically a febrile seizure that frequently lasts longer than 30 minutes. However, the possible forms this seizure takes are unclear. For example, it is unknown if nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) could be an early seizure symptomatic of AESD. In addition, thus far no cases of combined SE and AESD have been reported. Here, we describe the first reported case of SE with AESD that notably demonstrated NCSE as an early seizure. PMID:27051542

  8. Extravascular lung water monitoring of renal replacement therapy in lung water scavenging for septic acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Han; Liu, Ying; Sun, Jia-Kui; Xu, Qiao-Lian; Yan, Ying; Chen, Yong-Ming; Hong, Liang; Xu, Huan

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the extravascular lung water index (EVLWI) in lung water scavenging of sepsis patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) by renal replacement therapy (RRT). 57 septic acute kidney injury patients with EVLWI > 7 ml/kg were selected and randomly divided into two groups: the treatment group with continued RRT for 24 h per day, the control group with RRT for ≤8 h per day. Fluid resuscitation and RRT were performed simultaneously. After fluid resuscitation, EVLWI, hemodynamics, oxygenation index, blood lactate, and intensive care unit (ICU) stay were determined. The values of EVLWI, pulmonary vascular permeability index (PVPI), and blood lactate decreased and the intrathoracic blood volume index (ITBVI) increased significantly at 24 h, 48 h and 72 h, after RRT, compared with those before RRT in the two groups (P < 0.05). The values of EVLWI at 48 h and 72 h after RRT in the treatment group were significantly lower than that in the control group (P < 0.05). The cardiac index (CI) at 48 h and 72 h after RRT in the treatment group was significantly higher than that before RRT (P < 0.05). The values of PVPI, ITBVI, CI, blood lactate, transcutaneous oxygen saturation pulse (SPO2), oxygenation index (PO2/FiO2) and arterial oxygen (PO2) before and 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h after RRT. The 28d mortality had no significant difference in the two groups (P > 0.05). The average ICU stay for the treatment group was significantly shorter than that of the control group (P < 0.05). EVLWI monitoring of septic patients with AKI in RRT time had clinical reference value. PMID:26770515

  9. Role of Complement C5 in Experimental Blunt Chest Trauma-Induced Septic Acute Lung Injury (ALI)

    PubMed Central

    Karbach, Michael; Braumueller, Sonja; Kellermann, Philipp; Gebhard, Florian; Huber-Lang, Markus; Perl, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe blunt chest trauma is associated with high mortality. Sepsis represents a serious risk factor for mortality in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In septic patients with ARDS complement activation products were found to be elevated in the plasma. In single models like LPS or trauma complement has been studied to some degree, however in clinically highly relevant double hit models such as the one used here little data is available. Here, we hypothesized that absence of C5 is correlated with a decreased inflammatory response in trauma induced septic acute lung injury. Methods 12 hrs after DH in mice the local and systemic cytokines and chemokines were quantified by multiplex bead array or ELISA, activated caspase-3 by western blot. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA followed by post-hoc Sidak’s multiple comparison test (significance, p≤ 0.05). Results In lung tissue interleukin (IL)-6, monocyte chemo attractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) was elevated in both C5-/- mice and wildtype littermates (wt), whereas caspase-3 was reduced in lungs after DH in C5-/- mice. Systemically, reduced keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC) levels were observed after DH in C5-/- compared to wt mice. Locally, lung myeloperoxidase (MPO), protein, IL-6, MCP-1 and G-CSF in brochoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were elevated after DH in C5-/- compared to wt. Conclusions In the complex but clinically relevant DH model the local and systemic inflammatory immune response features both, C5-dependent and C5-independent characteristics. Activation of caspase-3 in lung tissue after DH was C5-dependent whereas local inflammation in lung tissue was C5-independent. PMID:27437704

  10. Septic shock

    MedlinePlus

    Septic shock is a serious condition that occurs when a body-wide infection leads to dangerously low blood ... Septic shock occurs most often in the very old and the very young. It may also occur in ...

  11. Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Difficulty moving a joint (called "limited range of motion") Some types of arthritis may cause joint deformity. ... exercise). Walking is a good example. Range of motion exercises for flexibility. Strength training for muscle tone. ...

  12. Development of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia in a Patient With Gouty Arthritis on Long Term Colchicine.

    PubMed

    Buyukkurt, Nurhilal; Korur, Asli; Boga, Can

    2016-06-01

    Colchicine is a frequently used drug in rheumatological diseases. Acute promyelocytic leukemia developed in a patient who used colchicine for gouty arthritis since 10 years is presented and the possible relation between the long term use of colchicine and hematological malignancies is discussed. PMID:27408362

  13. Antiarthritic effects of Ajuga bracteosa Wall ex Benth. in acute and chronic models of arthritis in albino rats

    PubMed Central

    Kaithwas, Gaurav; Gautam, Raju; Jachak, Sanjay M; Saklani, Arvind

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the antiarthritic activity of Ajuga bracteosa using albino rats. Methods The antiarthritic activity of 70% ethanolic extract of Ajuga bracteosa (EEAB) was evaluated against turpentine oil- and formaldehyde- induced acute non immunological and complete freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced chronic immunological arthritis in albino rats. Results EEAB showed a significant (P<0.05) and dose dependent inhibitory effect against acute and chronic models of arthritis. EEAB exhibited better antiarthritic activity than the standard aspirin. Conclusions EEAB exhibits a significant and promising antiarthritic activity against acute and chronic arthritis and supports the traditional use of Ajuga bracteosa for rheumatism and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:23569895

  14. Varicella arthritis in a child.

    PubMed Central

    Shuper, A; Mimouni, M; Mukamel, M; Varsano, I

    1980-01-01

    A 2 1/2-year-old girl developed arthritis in a metatarsophalangeal joint concomitantly with varicella. As she recovered within 2 days without antimicrobial treatment, it was considered that the arthritis was directly due to the viral infection. The importance of differentiating viral arthritis from septic arthritis, a well-known complication of varicella, is stressed. PMID:7436508

  15. The effects of combined therapy of rheumatoid arthritis on the acute phase reactants.

    PubMed

    Rexhepi, Sylejman; Rexhepi, Mjellma; Sahatçiu-Meka, Vjollca; Pllana, Ejup; Dragusha, Gani; Gashi, Masar; Rexhepi, Blerta

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents the results of studies of acute phase reactants in the 60 treated patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Patients were divided into two groups, depending on the applied treatment: group I (n = 30) was treated with methotrexate, sulfasalazine and hydroxychloroquine, and group II (n = 30) with methotrexate. The results of our study shows that there is a statistically significant reduction in the value of acute phase reactants and clinical parameters after treatment in both investigated groups of patients, and also a significant statistical difference between the first and second group of treated patients. PMID:20429264

  16. Incidence and outcome of arthritis in meningococcal disease.

    PubMed

    Sud, Ritika; Bhatnagar, M K; Sud, Alok; Tiwari, Akshay

    2009-03-01

    Meningococcal outbreaks are a major health concern in Delhi and adjoining regions. Besides acute pyogenic meningitis, meningococcal disease can also manifest as vasculitis, dermatitis and arthritis. To study the frequency, characteristics and long-term outcome of joint involvement in May 2005 meningococcal outbreak in New Delhi, 24 patients with proven meningococcal disease admitted to the hospital from May, 2005 through August, 2005 were studied for occurrence and outcome of joint involvement, and were followed up and evaluated for any complications. The frequency of arthritis was found to be 20%, which is much higher than reported. Diplococci could be identified in the joint aspirate of all 5 patients who developed arthritis. All patients had features of acute septic arthritis which healed without residual deformity following arthrotomy. A significant percentage of patients can still be expected to develop acute septic arthritis in an outbreak of meningococcal meningitis, and a high index of suspicion should be kept for the same. Prompt diagnosis and management will lead to healing without complications in most cases. PMID:19810382

  17. Tumor Necrosis Factor, but Not Neutrophils, Alters the Metabolic Profile in Acute Experimental Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marina C; Tavares, Luciana P; Vago, Juliana P; Batista, Nathália V; Queiroz-Junior, Celso M; Vieira, Angelica T; Menezes, Gustavo B; Sousa, Lirlândia P; van de Loo, Fons A J; Teixeira, Mauro M; Amaral, Flávio A; Ferreira, Adaliene V M

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic alterations are associated with arthritis apart from obesity. However, it is still unclear which is the underlying process behind these metabolic changes. Here, we investigate the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in this process in an acute model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). Immunized male BALB/c mice received an intra-articular injection of PBS (control) or methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA) into their knees, and were also pre-treated with different drugs: Etanercept, an anti-TNF drug, DF2156A, a CXCR1/2 receptor antagonist, or a monoclonal antibody RB6-8C5 to deplete neutrophils. Local challenge with mBSA evoked an acute neutrophil influx into the knee joint, and enhanced the joint nociception, along with a transient systemic metabolic alteration (higher levels of glucose and lipids, and altered adipocytokines). Pre-treatment with the conventional biological Etanercept, an inhibitor of TNF action, ameliorated the nociception and the acute joint inflammation dominated by neutrophils, and markedly improved many of the altered systemic metabolites (glucose and lipids), adipocytokines and PTX3. However, the lessening of metabolic changes was not due to diminished accumulation of neutrophils in the joint by Etanercept. Reduction of neutrophil recruitment by pre-treating AIA mice with DF2156A, or even the depletion of these cells by using RB6-8C5 reduced all of the inflammatory parameters and hypernociception developed after AIA challenge, but could not prevent the metabolic changes. Therefore, the induction of joint inflammation provoked acute metabolic alterations which were involved with TNF. We suggest that the role of TNF in arthritis-associated metabolic changes is not due to local neutrophils, which are the major cells present in this model, but rather due to cytokines. PMID:26742100

  18. Tumor Necrosis Factor, but Not Neutrophils, Alters the Metabolic Profile in Acute Experimental Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Marina C.; Tavares, Luciana P.; Vago, Juliana P.; Batista, Nathália V.; Queiroz-Junior, Celso M.; Vieira, Angelica T.; Menezes, Gustavo B.; Sousa, Lirlândia P.; van de Loo, Fons A. J.; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Amaral, Flávio A.; Ferreira, Adaliene V. M.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic alterations are associated with arthritis apart from obesity. However, it is still unclear which is the underlying process behind these metabolic changes. Here, we investigate the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in this process in an acute model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). Immunized male BALB/c mice received an intra-articular injection of PBS (control) or methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA) into their knees, and were also pre-treated with different drugs: Etanercept, an anti-TNF drug, DF2156A, a CXCR1/2 receptor antagonist, or a monoclonal antibody RB6-8C5 to deplete neutrophils. Local challenge with mBSA evoked an acute neutrophil influx into the knee joint, and enhanced the joint nociception, along with a transient systemic metabolic alteration (higher levels of glucose and lipids, and altered adipocytokines). Pre-treatment with the conventional biological Etanercept, an inhibitor of TNF action, ameliorated the nociception and the acute joint inflammation dominated by neutrophils, and markedly improved many of the altered systemic metabolites (glucose and lipids), adipocytokines and PTX3. However, the lessening of metabolic changes was not due to diminished accumulation of neutrophils in the joint by Etanercept. Reduction of neutrophil recruitment by pre-treating AIA mice with DF2156A, or even the depletion of these cells by using RB6-8C5 reduced all of the inflammatory parameters and hypernociception developed after AIA challenge, but could not prevent the metabolic changes. Therefore, the induction of joint inflammation provoked acute metabolic alterations which were involved with TNF. We suggest that the role of TNF in arthritis-associated metabolic changes is not due to local neutrophils, which are the major cells present in this model, but rather due to cytokines. PMID:26742100

  19. Adalimumab-induced acute interstitial lung disease in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis*

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Olívia Meira; Pereira, Daniel Antunes Silva; Baldi, Bruno Guedes; Costa, André Nathan; Athanazio, Rodrigo Abensur; Kairalla, Ronaldo Adib; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    The use of immunobiological agents for the treatment of autoimmune diseases is increasing in medical practice. Anti-TNF therapies have been increasingly used in refractory autoimmune diseases, especially rheumatoid arthritis, with promising results. However, the use of such therapies has been associated with an increased risk of developing other autoimmune diseases. In addition, the use of anti-TNF agents can cause pulmonary complications, such as reactivation of mycobacterial and fungal infections, as well as sarcoidosis and other interstitial lung diseases (ILDs). There is evidence of an association between ILD and the use of anti-TNF agents, etanercept and infliximab in particular. Adalimumab is the newest drug in this class, and some authors have suggested that its use might induce or exacerbate preexisting ILDs. In this study, we report the first case of acute ILD secondary to the use of adalimumab in Brazil, in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis and without a history of ILD. PMID:24626274

  20. Performance of the Existing Classification Criteria for Gout in Thai Patients Presenting With Acute Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jatuworapruk, Kanon; Lhakum, Panomkorn; Pattamapaspong, Nuttaya; Kasitanon, Nuntana; Wangkaew, Suparaporn; Louthrenoo, Worawit

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Currently, there are 5 existing classification criteria for gout: the Rome, New York, American Rheumatism Association (ARA), Mexico, and Netherlands criteria. This study was carried out to determine the performance of these classification criteria in Thai patients presenting with acute arthritis. All consecutive patients presenting with acute arthritis and being consulted at the Rheumatology Unit, Chiang Mai University Hospital from January 2013 to May 2015 were invited to join the study. Gout was defined by the presence of monosodium urate crystals in the synovial fluid or tissue examined by experienced rheumatologists. The 5 existing gout classification criteria were performed and evaluated in all of the patients, who were divided in subgroups of early disease (≤2 years), established disease (>2 years), and those without tophus. There were 136 gout and 97 nongout patients. Sensitivity and specificity across all criteria ranged from 75.7% to 97.1% and 68.0% to 84.5%, respectively. Overall, the Mexico criteria had the highest sensitivity (97.1%), and the ARA survey criteria the highest specificity (84.5%), whereas the Mexico criteria performed well in early disease with sensitivity and specificity of 97.1% and 81.7%, respectively. All 5 criteria showed high sensitivity (from 76.4% to 99.1%) but low specificity (from 30.8% to 65.4%) in established disease. In patients without tophus, the sensitivity and specificity ranged from 64.1% to 95.7% and 68.8% to 85.4%, respectively. The ARA survey criteria across all groups showed consistently high specificity for gout. The 5 existing classification criteria for gout had limited sensitivity and specificity in Thai patients presenting with acute arthritis. The ARA survey criteria are the most suitable for diagnosing gout in Thai people when crystal identification is not available. PMID:26844519

  1. Post-streptococcal reactive arthritis in children: a distinct entity from acute rheumatic fever

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    There is a debate whether post-streptococcal reactive arthritis (PSRA) is a separate entity or a condition on the spectrum of acute rheumatic fever (ARF). We believe that PSRA is a distinct entity and in this paper we review the substantial differences between PSRA and ARF. We show how the demographic, clinical, genetic and treatment characteristics of PSRA differ from ARF. We review diagnostic criteria and regression formulas that attempt to classify patients with PSRA as opposed to ARF. The important implication of these findings may relate to the issue of prophylactic antibiotics after PSRA. However, future trials will be necessary to conclusively answer that question. PMID:22013970

  2. Grisel syndrome, acute otitis media, and temporo-mandibular reactive arthritis: A rare association.

    PubMed

    Martins, J; Almeida, S; Nunes, P; Prata, F; Lobo, M L; Marques, J G

    2015-08-01

    We present a case report of a four-year-old boy with torcicollis and trismus after acute otitis media. Grisel Syndrome diagnosis in association with temporo-mandibular reactive arthritis was admitted, leading to early conservative treatment. GS should be suspected in a child presenting with torticollis after an upper respiratory tract infection or an ENT surgical procedure. The association with temporo-mandibular reactive findings is somehow rarer but not impossible, due to the close vascular communication between retropharyngeal and pterigoid spaces. PMID:26060148

  3. The thromboelastometric discrepancy between septic and trauma induced disseminated intravascular coagulation diagnosed by the scoring system from the Japanese association for acute medicine

    PubMed Central

    Koami, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Yuichiro; Sakurai, Ryota; Ohta, Miho; Imahase, Hisashi; Yahata, Mayuko; Umeka, Mitsuru; Miike, Toru; Nagashima, Futoshi; Iwamura, Takashi; Yamada, Kosuke Chris; Inoue, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study is to evaluate the hematological differences between septic and traumatic disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) using the rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM). This retrospective study includes all sepsis or severe trauma patients transported to our emergency department who underwent ROTEM from 2013 to 2014. All patients were divided into 2 groups based on the presence of DIC diagnosed by the Japanese Association for Acute Medicine (JAAM) DIC score. We statistically analyzed the demographics, clinical characteristics, laboratory data, ROTEM findings (EXTEM and FIBTEM), and outcome. Fifty-seven patients (30 sepsis and 27 severe trauma) were included in primary analysis. Sepsis cases were significantly older and had higher systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) scores, whereas there were no significant differences in other parameters including Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score. Twenty-six patients (14 sepsis and 12 severe trauma) were diagnosed with DIC. The Septic DIC (S-DIC) group was significantly older and had higher DIC scores than the traumatic DIC (T-DIC) group. Hematologic examination revealed significantly higher CRP, fibrinogen, lower FDP, DD, and higher FDP/DD ratio were found in the S-DIC group in comparison with the T-DIC group. ROTEM findings showed that the A10, A20, and MCF in the FIBTEM test were significantly higher in the S-DIC group. However, no statistical differences were confirmed in the LI30, LI45, and ML in EXTEM test. The plasma fibrinogen level and fibrinogen based clot firmness in whole-blood test revealed statistical significance between septic and traumatic DIC patients. PMID:27495106

  4. The thromboelastometric discrepancy between septic and trauma induced disseminated intravascular coagulation diagnosed by the scoring system from the Japanese association for acute medicine.

    PubMed

    Koami, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Yuichiro; Sakurai, Ryota; Ohta, Miho; Imahase, Hisashi; Yahata, Mayuko; Umeka, Mitsuru; Miike, Toru; Nagashima, Futoshi; Iwamura, Takashi; Yamada, Kosuke Chris; Inoue, Satoshi

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the hematological differences between septic and traumatic disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) using the rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM).This retrospective study includes all sepsis or severe trauma patients transported to our emergency department who underwent ROTEM from 2013 to 2014. All patients were divided into 2 groups based on the presence of DIC diagnosed by the Japanese Association for Acute Medicine (JAAM) DIC score. We statistically analyzed the demographics, clinical characteristics, laboratory data, ROTEM findings (EXTEM and FIBTEM), and outcome.Fifty-seven patients (30 sepsis and 27 severe trauma) were included in primary analysis. Sepsis cases were significantly older and had higher systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) scores, whereas there were no significant differences in other parameters including Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score. Twenty-six patients (14 sepsis and 12 severe trauma) were diagnosed with DIC. The Septic DIC (S-DIC) group was significantly older and had higher DIC scores than the traumatic DIC (T-DIC) group. Hematologic examination revealed significantly higher CRP, fibrinogen, lower FDP, DD, and higher FDP/DD ratio were found in the S-DIC group in comparison with the T-DIC group. ROTEM findings showed that the A10, A20, and MCF in the FIBTEM test were significantly higher in the S-DIC group. However, no statistical differences were confirmed in the LI30, LI45, and ML in EXTEM test.The plasma fibrinogen level and fibrinogen based clot firmness in whole-blood test revealed statistical significance between septic and traumatic DIC patients. PMID:27495106

  5. Transforming growth factor beta 1 suppresses acute and chronic arthritis in experimental animals.

    PubMed Central

    Brandes, M E; Allen, J B; Ogawa, Y; Wahl, S M

    1991-01-01

    Systemic administration of the cytokine, TGF beta 1, profoundly antagonized the development of polyarthritis in susceptible rats. TGF beta 1 administration (1 or 5 micrograms/animal), initiated one day before an arthritogenic dose of streptococcal cell wall (SCW) fragments, virtually eliminated the joint swelling and distortion typically observed during both the acute phase (articular index, AI = 2.5 vs. 11; P less than 0.025) and the chronic phase (AI = 0 vs. 12.5) of the disease. Moreover, TGF beta 1 suppressed the evolution of arthritis even when administration was begun after the acute phase of the disease. Histopathological examination of the joint revealed the systemic TGF beta 1 treatment greatly reduced inflammatory cell infiltration, pannus formation, and joint erosion. Consistent with the inhibition of inflammatory cell recruitment into the synovium, TGF beta 1 reversed the leukocytosis associated with the chronic phase of the arthritis. Control animals subjected to the same TGF beta 1 dosing regimen displayed no discernable immunosuppressive or toxic effects even after 4 wk of treatment. These observations not only provide insight into the immunoregulatory effects of TGF beta, but also implicate this cytokine as a potentially important therapeutic agent. Images PMID:1999490

  6. Silencing of fas, fas-associated via death domain, or caspase 3 differentially affects lung inflammation, apoptosis, and development of trauma-induced septic acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Messer, Mirko Philipp; Kellermann, Philipp; Weber, Sascha Jörn; Hohmann, Christoph; Denk, Stephanie; Klohs, Bettina; Schultze, Anke; Braumüller, Sonja; Huber-Lang, Markus Stefan; Perl, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Activation of Fas signaling is a potentially important pathophysiological mechanism in the development of septic acute lung injury (ALI). However, so far the optimal targets within this signaling cascade remain elusive. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that in vivo gene silencing of Fas, Fas-associated via death domain (FADD), or caspase 3 by intratracheal administration of small interfering RNA would ameliorate ALI in a clinically relevant double-hit mouse model of trauma induced septic lung injury. Male C57Bl/6 mice received small interfering (Fas, FADD, caspase 3) or control RNA 24 h before and 12 h after blunt chest trauma or sham procedures. Polymicrobial sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture 24 h after chest trauma. Twelve or 24 h later, lung tissue, plasma, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were harvested. During ALI, lung apoptosis (active caspase 3 Western blotting, TUNEL staining) was substantially increased when compared with sham. Silencing of caspase 3 or FADD both markedly reduced pulmonary apoptosis. Fas- and FADD-small interfering RNA administration substantially decreased lung cytokine concentration, whereas caspase 3 silencing did not reduce lung inflammation. In addition, Fas silencing markedly decreased lung neutrophil infiltration. Interestingly, only in response to caspase 3 silencing, ALI-induced lung epithelial barrier dysfunction was substantially improved, and histological appearance was beneficially affected. Taken together, downstream inhibition of lung apoptosis via caspase 3 silencing proved to be superior in mitigating ALI when compared with upstream inhibition of apoptosis via Fas or FADD silencing, even in the presence of additional anti-inflammatory effects. This indicates a major pathophysiological role of lung apoptosis and suggests the importance of other than Fas-driven apoptotic pathways in trauma-induced septic ALI. PMID:23247118

  7. Salmonella Typhi–Induced Septic Shock and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Previously Healthy Teenage Patient Treated With High-Dose Dexamethasone

    PubMed Central

    Ugas, Melissa Brosset; Carroll, Timothy; Kovar, Lacey; Chavez-Bueno, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Typhoid fever is commonly characterized by fever and abdominal pain. Rare complications include intestinal hemorrhage, bowel perforation, delirium, obtundation, and septic shock. Herein we describe the case of a previously healthy 16-year-old male without history of travel, diagnosed with typhoid fever complicated by septic shock and acute respiratory distress syndrome treated with high-dose dexamethasone. This case details severe complications of typhoid fever that are uncommonly seen in developed countries, and the successful response to high-dose dexamethasone as adjunct therapy. High-dose dexamethasone treatment has reportedly decreased Salmonella Typhi mortality, but controlled studies specifically performed in children are lacking, and most reports of its use are over 30 years old and all have originated in developing countries. Providers should include Salmonella Typhi in the differential diagnosis of the pediatric patient with fever, severe abdominal pain, and enteritis, and be aware of its potentially severe complications and the limited data on safety and efficacy of adjunctive therapies that can be considered in addition to antibiotics. PMID:27294165

  8. Management of a Septic Open Abdomen Patient with Spontaneous Jejunal Perforation after Emergent C/S with Confounding Factor of Mild Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yetisir, Fahri; Sarer, Akgün Ebru; Acar, Hasan Zafer; Osmanoglu, Gokhan; Özer, Mehmet; Yaylak, Faik

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. We report the management of a septic Open Abdomen (OA) patient by the help of negative pressure therapy (NPT) and abdominal reapproximation anchor (ABRA) system in pregnant woman with spontaneous jejunal perforation after emergent cesarean section (C/S) with confounding factor of mild acute pancreatitis (AP). Presentation of Case. A 29-year-old and 34-week pregnant woman with AP underwent C/S. She was arrested after anesthesia induction and responded to cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). There were only ash-colored serosanguinous fluid within abdomen during C/S. After C/S, she was transferred to intensive care unit (ICU) with vasopressor support. On postoperative 1st day, she underwent reoperation due to fecal fluid coming near the drainage. Leakage point could not be identified exactly and operation had to be deliberately abbreviated due to hemodynamic instability. NPT was applied. Two days later source control was provided by conversion of enteroatmospheric fistula (EAF) to jejunostomy. ABRA was added and OA was closed. No hernia developed at 10-month follow-up period. Conclusion. NPT application in septic OA patient may gain time to patient until adequate source control could be achieved. Using ABRA in conjunction with NPT increases the fascial closure rate in infected OA patient. PMID:27006853

  9. Salmonella Typhi-Induced Septic Shock and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Previously Healthy Teenage Patient Treated With High-Dose Dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Ugas, Melissa Brosset; Carroll, Timothy; Kovar, Lacey; Chavez-Bueno, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Typhoid fever is commonly characterized by fever and abdominal pain. Rare complications include intestinal hemorrhage, bowel perforation, delirium, obtundation, and septic shock. Herein we describe the case of a previously healthy 16-year-old male without history of travel, diagnosed with typhoid fever complicated by septic shock and acute respiratory distress syndrome treated with high-dose dexamethasone. This case details severe complications of typhoid fever that are uncommonly seen in developed countries, and the successful response to high-dose dexamethasone as adjunct therapy. High-dose dexamethasone treatment has reportedly decreased Salmonella Typhi mortality, but controlled studies specifically performed in children are lacking, and most reports of its use are over 30 years old and all have originated in developing countries. Providers should include Salmonella Typhi in the differential diagnosis of the pediatric patient with fever, severe abdominal pain, and enteritis, and be aware of its potentially severe complications and the limited data on safety and efficacy of adjunctive therapies that can be considered in addition to antibiotics. PMID:27294165

  10. Mass transfer, clearance and plasma concentration of procalcitonin during continuous venovenous hemofiltration in patients with septic shock and acute oliguric renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Level, Claude; Chauveau, Philippe; Guisset, Olivier; Cazin, Marie Cécile; Lasseur, Catherine; Gabinsky, Claude; Winnock, Stéphane; Montaudon, Danièle; Bedry, Régis; Nouts, Caroline; Pillet, Odile; Benissan, Georges Gbikpi; Favarel-Guarrigues, Jean Claude; Castaing, Yves

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To measure the mass transfer and clearance of procalcitonin (PCT) in patients with septic shock during continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH), and to assess the mechanisms of elimination of PCT. Setting The medical department of intensive care. Design A prospective, observational study. Patients Thirteen critically ill patients with septic shock and oliguric acute renal failure requiring continuous venovenous postdilution hemofiltration with a high-flux membrane (AN69 or polyamide) and a 'conventional' substitution volume (< 2.5 l/hour). Measurements and main results PCT was measured with the Lumitest PCT Brahms® in the prefilter and postfilter plasma, in the ultrafiltrate at the beginning of CVVH (T0) and 15 min (T15'), 60 min (T60') and 6 hours (T6h) after setup of CVVH, and in the prefilter every 24 hours during 4 days. Mass transfer was determined and the clearance and the sieving coefficient were calculated according to the mass conservation principle. Plasma and ultrafiltrate clearances, respectively, at T15', T60' and T6h were 37 ± 8.6 ml/min (not significant) and 1.8 ± 1.7 ml/min (P < 0.01), 34.7 ± 4.1 ml/min (not significant) and 2.3 ± 1.8 ml/min (P < 0.01), and 31.5 ± 7 ml/min (not significant) and 5 ± 2.3 ml/min (P < 0.01). The sieving coefficient significantly increased from 0.07 at T15' to 0.19 at T6h, with no difference according to the nature of the membrane. PCT plasma levels were not significantly modified during the course of CCVH. Conclusions We conclude that PCT is removed from the plasma of patients with septic shock during CCVH. Most of the mass is eliminated by convective flow, but adsorption also contributes to elimination during the first hours of CVVH. The effect of PCT removal with a conventional CVVH substitution fluid rate (<2.5 l/hour) on PCT plasma concentration seems to be limited, and PCT remains a useful diagnostic marker in these septic patients. The impact of high-volume hemofiltration on the PCT clearance

  11. Rofecoxib: a review of its use in the management of osteoarthritis, acute pain and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Matheson, A J; Figgitt, D P

    2001-01-01

    Rofecoxib is a selective cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor which has little or no effect on the COX-1 isoenzyme at doses up to 1000 mg/day. Rofecoxib has greater selectivity for COX-2 than celecoxib, meloxicam, diclofenac and indomethacin. In well-controlled clinical trials, rofecoxib 12.5 to 500 mg/day has been evaluated for its efficacy in the treatment of osteoarthritis, acute pain and rheumatoid arthritis [lower dosages (5 to 125 mg/day) were generally used in the chronic pain indications]. In the treatment of patients with osteoarthritis, rofecoxib was more effective in providing symptomatic relief than placebo, paracetamol (acetaminophen) and celecoxib and was similar in efficacy to ibuprofen, diclofenac, naproxen and nabumetone. Overall, both the physician's assessment of disease status and the patient's assessment of response to therapy tended to favour rofecoxib. In patients with postsurgical dental pain, pain after spinal fusion or orthopaedic surgery, or primary dysmenorrhoea, rofecoxib provided more rapid and more sustained pain relief and reduced requirements for supplemental morphine use after surgery than placebo. Rofecoxib was more efficacious than celecoxib in patients with acute dental pain and pain after spinal fusion surgery, although celecoxib may have been used at a subtherapeutic dose. In comparison with traditional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) ibuprofen, diclofenac and naproxen sodium, rofecoxib was similar in efficacy in the treatment of acute pain. Although naproxen sodium provided more rapid pain relief than rofecoxib in patients with primary dysmenorrhoea, the reverse was true after orthopaedic surgery: rofecoxib provided more rapid pain relief and less supplemental morphine was needed. Rofecoxib was as effective as naproxen in providing symptomatic relief for over 8700 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Compared with traditional NSAID therapy, rofecoxib had a significantly lower incidence of endoscopically confirmed

  12. [Bacteriophage therapy of septic complications of orthopaedic surgery (author's transl].

    PubMed

    Lang, G; Kehr, P; Mathevon, H; Clavert, J M; Séjourne, P; Pointu, J

    1979-01-01

    Seven septic cases have been treated by bacteriophage; two infections after insertion of a hip prosthesis, two septic arthritis of the knee, one osteomyelitis of the tibia, one septic non-union of the femur and one septic complication following Harrington rodding. Only specific phages were used in association with several types of surgical procedure. The technique of treatment is described. All cases were long-term infections with resistant organisms. Results were good in five, fair in one and one case was a failure. It is concluded that phage therapy may be helpful in the treatment of long-term infections. PMID:156386

  13. Viral arthritis.

    PubMed

    Marks, Michael; Marks, Jonathan L

    2016-04-01

    Acute-onset arthritis is a common clinical problem facing both the general clinician and the rheumatologist. A viral aetiology is though to be responsible for approximately 1% of all cases of acute arthritis with a wide range of causal agents recognised. The epidemiology of acute viral arthritis continues to evolve, with some aetiologies, such as rubella, becoming less common due to vaccination, while some vector-borne viruses have become more widespread. A travel history therefore forms an important part of the assessment of patients presenting with an acute arthritis. Worldwide, parvovirus B19, hepatitis B and C, HIV and the alphaviruses are among the most important causes of virally mediated arthritis. Targeted serological testing may be of value in establishing a diagnosis, and clinicians must also be aware that low-titre autoantibodies, such as rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibody, can occur in the context of acute viral arthritis. A careful consideration of epidemiological, clinical and serological features is therefore required to guide clinicians in making diagnostic and treatment decisions. While most virally mediated arthritides are self-limiting some warrant the initiation of specific antiviral therapy. PMID:27037381

  14. [Arthritis and osteitis at the hand].

    PubMed

    Meier, R; Pillukat, T

    2011-06-01

    Septic arthritis and osteitis at the hand are associated with a high morbidity. Trauma is the major cause for these infections. In the majority of cases the fingers are involved. Causative microorganisms are predominantly Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. In addition, an increasing number of Gram-negative bacteria have been found in hand infections. As differential diagnosis, tumours and non-septic arthritis must be considered. Treatment includes surgical debridement, immobilisation and functional rehabilitation. Crucial for the surgical strategy are the virulence of the pathogens, the resistance of the patient and the location of the infection. If functional recovery cannot be expected, salvage procedures like arthrodeses and resection arthroplasties are sometimes required. Surgical treatment is sufficient in septic arthritis and osteomyelitis of the hand. However, to avoid permanent disability, rapid diagnosis and therapy are essential. This review describes our treatment concepts in septic arthritis and osteomyelitis at the hand. PMID:21494997

  15. Reactive arthritis.

    PubMed

    Keat, A

    1999-01-01

    infection at a distant site without traditional evidence of sepsis at the affected joint(s). Although several forms of disease could be described as "reactive", particularly acute rheumatic fever, post-meningococcal septicaemia arthritis and Lyme disease, in clinical practice the term is restricted to an acute spondyloarthritis, usually, but not exclusively, linked to acute genitourinary or gastrointestinal infection. A proportion of patients fulfil criteria for Reiter's Syndrome [1]. PMID:10599344

  16. Kinetics of leukocyte sequestration in the lungs of acutely septic primates: A study using sup 111 In-labeled autologous leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Hangen, D.H.; Segall, G.M.; Harney, E.W.; Stevens, J.H.; McDougall, I.R.; Raffin, T.A. )

    1990-03-01

    To further clarify the role of leukocytes in the pathogenesis of ARDS, we studied the localization and kinetics of leukocyte migration using 111In-labeled autologous white cell scans ({sup 111}In wbc scans) in four primates made acutely septic with infusions of Escherichia coli. Whole body images were obtained with a gamma camera and were acquired on computer every 15 min beginning immediately after the E. coli infusion. Simultaneous measurements of C5a and peripheral blood leukocyte count were also obtained. Within 5 min of initiating sepsis, three major events occurred: complement activation as measured by the production of C5a, a profound fall in peripheral leukocyte count, and a significant increase in the sequestration of leukocytes in the lungs. The pulmonary sequestration reached a peak at 15 min with a mean of 152% of baseline activity. This sequestration consisted of a population that was predominantly neutrophils. Damage to the pulmonary capillary endothelium was demonstrated by an increase in extravascular lung water. The results support a role for neutrophils and complement as mediators in the pathogenesis of ARDS.

  17. The Acute and Chronic Presentation of Gluteus Medius Calcific Tendinitis- A Case Report of Two

    PubMed Central

    Almedghio, Sami; Garneti, Narendra

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The calcific tendinitis is a common to happen around the shoulder, calcific tendinitis of tendons adjacent to the hip is not common like the shoulder. It can present either as acute hip pain and limitation of movement or chronic hip pain. We present two patients one with acute presentation and the other one chronic. Case Report: We present a case series of two patients with calcific tendinitis of the gluteus medius muscle. One patient a 37-year-old male presented with acute severe hip pain associated with a raised temperature, prompting concern about septic arthritis. The second patient presented with chronic hip pain. Calcification of the soft tissues adjacent to the greater trochanter was evident on plain radiographs in both patients. CT and MRI scans excluded septic or inflammatory arthritis in the patient with an acute presentation, the patient’s condition settled with analgesia and NSAIDs. Conclusion: An unusual combination of symptoms and finding mimicking septic arthritis should be considered in patients presenting with acute calcific tendinitis of the hip gluteus medius muscle. PMID:27299002

  18. The influence of corticosteroids on sequential clinical and synovial fluid parameters in joints with acute infectious arthritis in the horse.

    PubMed

    Tulamo, R M; Bramlage, L R; Gabel, A A

    1989-09-01

    Infectious arthritis was induced experimentally in one tarsocrural joint of six horses by intra-articular injection of 1 ml Staphylococcus aureus-saline suspension with the addition of 200 mg methylprednisolone acetate. The corresponding contralateral joint was injected with 1 ml of saline with the addition of 200 mg methylprednisolone acetate, and served as a control. The purpose of the experiment was to examine the effect of corticosteroids on the acute clinical signs of infectious arthritis, and the associated changes in synovial fluid, to separate the effects of a steroid injection from those of infection alone. This should aid early diagnosis of infection. The progression of the infectious arthritis was assessed over nine days by clinical examination and sequential synovial fluid analysis. The corticosteroids masked the clinical signs in some horses for up to the third day although changes in the synovial fluid were present earlier. Cellular changes preceded biochemical changes initially. Leucocyte counts showed a significant increase in cell numbers after infection was established. Persistent neutrophilia, over 90 per cent, together with a pH under 6.9 were the most consistent findings in the infected synovia. Total protein values were lower in infected joints with, than those without, corticosteroids; although there was a progressive rise in total protein concentration throughout the experiment in both groups. Serum and synovial glucose difference and synovial lactate had very little diagnostic value because significant increases due to the corticosteroids were documented in the control joints. PMID:2776719

  19. The comparison of stroke volume variation with central venous pressure in predicting fluid responsiveness in septic patients with acute circulatory failure

    PubMed Central

    Angappan, Santhalakshmi; Parida, Satyen; Vasudevan, Arumugam; Badhe, Ashok Shankar

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The present study was designed to investigate the efficacy of stroke volume variation (SVV) in predicting fluid responsiveness and compare it to traditional measures of volume status assessment like central venous pressure (CVP). Methods: Forty-five mechanically ventilated patients in sepsis with acute circulatory failure. Patients were not included when they had atrial fibrillation, other severe arrhythmias, permanent pacemaker, or needed mechanical cardiac support. Furthermore, excluded were patients with hypoxemia and a CVP >12. Patients received volume expansion in the form of 500 ml of 6% hydroxyethyl starch. Results: The volume expansion-induced increase in  cardiac index (CI) was >15% in 29 patients (labeled responders) and <15% in 16 patients (labeled nonresponders). Before volume expansion, SVV was higher in responders than in nonresponders. Receiver operating characteristic curves analysis showed that SVV was a more accurate indicator of fluid responsiveness than CVP. Before volume expansion, an SVV value of 13% allowed discrimination between responders and nonresponders with a sensitivity of 78% and a specificity of 89%. Volume expansion-induced changes in CI weakly and positively correlated with SVV before volume expansion. Volume expansion decreased SVV from 18.86 ± 4.35 to 7.57 ± 1.80 and volume expansion-induced changes in SVV moderately correlated with volume expansion-induced changes in CI. Conclusions: When predicting fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients in septic shock, SVV is more effective than CVP. Nevertheless, the overall correlation of baseline SVV with increases in CI remains poor. Trends in SVV, as reflected by decreases with volume replacement, seem to correlate much better with increases in CI. PMID:26180432

  20. Chuanhu Anti-Gout Mixture versus Colchicine for Acute Gouty Arthritis: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Double-Dummy, Non-Inferiority Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wang, YanGang; Wang, Luan; Li, EnZe; Li, Yang; Wang, ZhongChao; Sun, XiaoFang; Yu, XiaoLong; Ma, Lin; Wang, YunLong; Wang, YouXin

    2014-01-01

    Background The Chuanhu anti-gout mixture has been used for many years in the treatment of gout in Chinese Traditional Medicine, and current methods for treatments for acute gouty arthritis have been either less effective or have had serious side effects. Methods In this 12-week, double-blind, double-dummy, non-inferiority study, outpatient individuals with newly diagnosed acute gouty arthritis were randomly assigned to receive Chuanhu anti-gout mixture or colchicine. Both the study investigators and the participants were masked to the treatment assignments. The primary outcome was the recurrence rate of acute gouty arthritis, and the secondary outcomes were changes in white blood cells (WHC) and C-reactive protein (CRP). This trial is registered at ISRCTN.org as trial ISRCTN65219941. Results A total of 176 patients were randomly assigned to receive either the Chuanhu anti-gout mixture or Colchicine. The overall recurrence rates in the Chuanhu anti-gout mixture group (CH group) and the Colchicine group (Col group) were 12.50% vs 14.77% (difference -2.22%, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): -10.78%~6.23%), meeting the predefined non-inferiority criterion of 15%, as did the data for WHC and CRP. The incidence of adverse events (mainly diarrhea) was less in the Col group than in the CH group (2.27% vs 28.41%, 95% CI 0.01~0.26). In addition, changes in blood uric acid, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and creatinine in the CH group were significantly larger compared to those in the Col group (P<0.05). Conclusions The Chuanhu anti-gout mixture was non-inferior to colchicine for the treatment of acute gouty arthritis. The study suggested that the Chuanhu anti-gout mixture can be considered an alternative choice for the treatment of acute gouty arthritis because of its lower incidence of adverse events and its protection of kidney and renal function. PMID:25013367

  1. Arthritis - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - arthritis ... The following organizations provide more information on arthritis : American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons -- orthoinfo.aaos.org/menus/arthritis.cfm Arthritis Foundation -- www.arthritis.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www. ...

  2. Inhaled nitric oxide in acute respiratory distress syndrome with and without septic shock requiring norepinephrine administration: a dose–response study

    PubMed Central

    Mourgeon, Eric; Puybasset, Louis; Law-Koune, Jean-Dominique; Lu, Qin; Abdennour, Lamine; Gallart, Lluis; Malassine, Patrick; Rao, GS Umamaheswara; Cluzel, Philippe; Bennani, Abdelhai; Coriat, Pierre; Rouby, Jean-Jacques

    1997-01-01

    Background: The aim of this prospective study was to assess whether the presence of septic shock could influence the dose response to inhaled nitric oxide (NO) in NO-responding patients with adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Results: Eight patients with ARDS and without septic shock (PaO2 = 95 ± 16 mmHg, PEEP = 0, FiO2 = 1.0), and eight patients with ARDS and septic shock (PaO2 = 88 ± 11 mmHg, PEEP = 0, FiO2 = 1.0) receiving exclusively norepinephrine were studied. All responded to 15 ppm inhaled NO with an increase in PaO2 of at least 40 mmHg, at FiO2 1.0 and PEEP 10 cmH2O. Inspiratory intratracheal NO concentrations were recorded continuously using a fast response time chemiluminescence apparatus. Seven inspiratory NO concentrations were randomly administered: 0.15, 0.45, 1.5, 4.5, 15, 45 and 150 ppm. In both groups, NO induced a dose-dependent decrease in mean pulmonary artery pressure (MPAP), pulmonary vascular resistance index (PVRI), and venous admixture (QVA/QT), and a dose-dependent increase in PaO2/FiO2 (P ≤ 0.012). Dose-response of MPAP and PVRI were similar in both groups with a plateau effect at 4.5 ppm. Dose-response of PaO2/FiO2 was influenced by the presence of septic shock. No plateau effect was observed in patients with septic shock and PaO2/FiO2 increased by 173 ± 37% at 150 ppm. In patients without septic shock, an 82 ± 26% increase in PaO2/FiO2 was observed with a plateau effect obtained at 15 ppm. In both groups, dose-response curves demonstrated a marked interindividual variability and in five patients pulmonary vascular effect and improvement in arterial oxygenation were dissociated. Conclusion: For similar NOinduced decreases in MPAP and PVRI in both groups, the increase in arterial oxygenation was more marked in patients with septic shock. PMID:11056694

  3. Investigation of Antiarthritic Potential of Plumeria alba L. Leaves in Acute and Chronic Models of Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vipin; Gupta, Pankaj; Singh, Surender

    2014-01-01

    Aim. The present investigation was designed to evaluate antiarthritic potential of fractions of hydroalcoholic extract from leaves of P. alba. Materials and Methods. Plumeria alba L. leaves were extracted with hydroalcohol (30 : 70) to obtain hydroalcoholic extract of P. alba. This extract was further fractionated with solvents ethyl acetate and n-butanol to obtain EAPA and BPA, respectively. These fractions were tested against formaldehyde and Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) induced arthritis. Arthritis assessment, paw volume, body weight, motor incoordination, and nociceptive threshold were measured. On day 21, the animals were sacrificed and histopathology was done. Results. The 100 and 200 mg/kg doses of EAPA and BPA caused a significant (P ≤ 0.05–0.01) reduction in paw swelling in both models. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and spleen weight decreased significantly (P < 0.01) in arthritic rats treated with extracts. There was significant (P < 0.05) improvement in thymus weight in EAPA treated rats whereas significant (P < 0.01) improvement was also seen in haemoglobin level (Hb) in diclofenac treated group. Motor incoordination and nociceptive threshold were also significantly (P ≤ 0.05–0.01) improved. Conclusion. The present study suggests that Plumeria alba L. has protective activity against arthritis and supports the traditional use of P. alba for rheumatism and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:25025056

  4. The pathogenesis of arthritis associated with acute hepatitis-B surface antigen-positive hepatitis. Complement activation and characterization of circulating immune complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Wands, J R; Mann, E; Alpert, E; Isselbacher, K J

    1975-01-01

    Circulating immune complexes were identified in cryoproteins isolated from serial samples of serum from six patients with acute viral hepatitis with and without arthritic symptoms. Cryoprecipitates were analyzed for the presence of hepatitis-B surface antigen (HBsAg) and hepatitis-B surface antibody (anti-HBs) by hemagglutination inhibition and hemagglutination. Complement components were detected by counter electrophoresis, and immunoglobulins were detected by gel diffusion. HBsAg, IgG, and IgM were identified in cryoprecipitates from all hepatitis patients, but were higher in concentration in patients with arthritis. Only cryoprecipitates from hepatitis patients with arthritis contained IgA and complement components C3, C4, and C5 as well as IgG and IgM, which disappear with resolution of the arthritis. The subtypes of IgG in these cryoprecipitates were predominantly the complement-fixing IgG1 and IgG3, HBsAg and anti-HBs were concentrated several-fold in the cryoprecipitates when compared to the serum concentration. Sequential studies in two patients demonstrated that the initial appearance of anti-HBs in the cryoprotein complex was associated with the detection in the complex of IgM suggesting a primary immune response to HBsAg. The C3 activator fragment (C3A) of the properdin complex was found in fresh serum obtained from three hepatitis patients with arthritis and not in uncomplicated hepatitis. The cryoprecipitable immune complexes from patients with arthritis converted C3PA in fresh normal sera to C3A in vitro whereas cryoprotein isolated from patients with uncomplicated hepatitis had no such effect. Thus, the transient appearance of circulating complement-fixing immune complexes in patients with the arthritis of acute hepatitis is associated with activation of both classical and alternate complement pathways and suggests that they play an important role in the pathogenesis of these serum sickness-like extrahepatic symptoms. Images PMID:1123429

  5. Circulating Cytokine Profiles and Their Relationships with Autoantibodies, Acute Phase Reactants, and Disease Activity in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Pieter W. A.; Hodkinson, Bridget; Ally, Mahmood; Musenge, Eustasius; Wadee, Ahmed A.; Fickl, Heidi; Tikly, Mohammed; Anderson, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Our objective was to analyse the relationship between circulating cytokines, autoantibodies, acute phase reactants, and disease activity in DMARDs-naïve rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients (n = 140). All cytokines were significantly higher in the RA cohort than in healthy controls. Moderate-to-strong positive intercorrelations were observed between Th1/Th2/macrophage/fibroblast-derived cytokines. RF correlated significantly with IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, IL-12, G-CSF, GM-CSF, IFN-γ, and TNF (P < .0001), and aCCP and aMCV with IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, and IL-10 (P < .0002), while IL-6 correlated best with the acute phase reactants, CRP, and SAA (P < .0001). In patients with a DAS28 score of ≥5.1, IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-1Ra, TNF, GM-CSF, and VEGF were significantly correlated (P < .04–.001) with high disease activity (HDA). Circulating cytokines in RA reflect a multifaceted increase in immune reactivity encompassing Th1 and Th2 cells, monocytes/macrophages, and synovial fibroblasts, underscored by strong correlations between these cytokines, as well as their relationships with RF, aCCP, and aMCV, with some cytokines showing promise as biomarkers of HDA. PMID:21437211

  6. Pseudogout: A Rare Cause of Acute Arthritis Following Arthroscopic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Mahvash; Sabir, Numaera; Charalambous, Charalambos P.

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of an acute pseudogout attack following single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in a 35-year-old man. At the initial reconstruction surgery, he was found to have early degenerative changes mainly in the lateral compartment. He presented with acute onset pain and swelling following reconstruction of the ACL. Arthroscopic irrigation was performed and the synovial fluid was positive for calcium pyrophosphate crystals. A pseudogout attack must be considered in the differential diagnosis in cases of acute onset pain and swelling after arthroscopic surgery, especially with the background of degenerative knee changes, and this may signify a poorer long-term outcome. PMID:26389074

  7. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rheumatoid Arthritis What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis? An Inflammatory, Autoimmune Disease Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory disease that causes ... sometimes feverish. Rheumatoid arthritis is classified as an autoimmune disease. An autoimmune disease occurs when the immune system ...

  8. Comparison of Prednisolone, Etoricoxib, and Indomethacin in Treatment of Acute Gouty Arthritis: An Open-Label, Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lingling; Liu, Shiqun; Guan, Meiping; Xue, Yaoming

    2016-01-01

    Background At present there are several kinds of medicine for treating acute gout arthritis (AGA). This study compared the efficacy and safety of prednisolone, etoricoxib, and indomethacin in the treatment of AGA. Material/Methods This was an open-label, randomized, active-comparator study in patients with AGA. Patients were randomized to 4 days of prednisolone 35 mg qd, etoricoxib 120 mg qd, or indomethacin 50 mg tid. The primary efficacy endpoint was the reduction of self-assessed pain in the index joint from baseline. Secondary endpoints included changes in physician’s assessment of tenderness, erythema, swelling, and joint activity; patient assessment of response to therapy; and safety. Results We analyzed 113 patients. Baseline demographics were comparable among treatment groups. Oral prednisolone, etoricoxib, and indomethacin were similarly effective in improving pain, tenderness, and joint activity over 4 days. For inflammation, oral prednisolone, etoricoxib, and indomethacin were similarly effective in reducing erythema, but prednisolone might be more effective in reducing swelling than indomethacin. The patient response to therapy was similar in the 3 groups. There were more total adverse events with indomethacin compared with the other 2 drugs. Conclusions Efficacy was comparable among prednisolone, etoricoxib, and indomethacin for the treatment of AGA. Prednisolone might be more effective in reducing inflammation and it had a better safety profile. PMID:26965791

  9. An interesting septic embolism

    PubMed Central

    Uluorman, Funda; Tanrıverdi, Zülkif; Sevinç, Can; Badak, Özer; Çatalyürek, Hüdai

    2014-01-01

    Septic pulmonary embolism is a rare disease but mortality and morbidity of it is high. Septic pulmonary emboli comes from infected heart valves, thrombophlebitis, and pulmonary artery catheter or infected pacemaker wires as many sources [1,2]. In recent years, pacemaker is a common treatment of the bradiarrhythmia that is persisted in the etiology of septic embolism, its applications has started to pick up [3]. There is the growing number of patients with pacemaker, according to this the frequency of pacemaker lead infection and the number of patients at risk for right-sided endocarditis increase [4]. The patients don't have specific clinical and radiological features because of this it is very difficult to define, so the diagnosis is often delayed [5]. A detailed medical history, a detailed physical examination in diagnosis and evaluation of good additional imaging methods is very important. Early diagnosis and proper treatment, the implementation of the management, can provide good results. PMID:26029562

  10. Septic complications of hemorrhoidal banding.

    PubMed

    Quevedo-Bonilla, G; Farkas, A M; Abcarian, H; Hambrick, E; Orsay, C P

    1988-05-01

    Rubber band ligation is an efficacious and cost-effective alternative to conventional hemorrhoidectomy for symptomatic internal hemorrhoids. Even though the well-recognized complications of bleeding and thrombosis occur infrequently, far more serious septic complications have only recently been described, as evidenced in five of our patients: four cases were serious enough to necessitate surgical intervention, and one patient died. Pain followed by urinary dysfunction with or without toxic symptoms should alert the physician to the probability of localized perianal or systemic sepsis. Acute awareness of these rare but potentially life-threatening complications and immediate aggressive treatment is mandatory if death is to be prevented. Rubber band ligation of internal hemorrhoids need not be abandoned; however, the indications should be clear, the technique mastered, and a close patient follow-up maintained. PMID:3358691

  11. The effectiveness of Echinacea extract or composite glucosamine, chondroitin and methyl sulfonyl methane supplements on acute and chronic rheumatoid arthritis rat model.

    PubMed

    Arafa, Nadia Ms; Hamuda, Hayam M; Melek, Samuel T; Darwish, Sahar K

    2013-03-01

    The study aimed to investigate the effect of the oral administration for 15 days of either Echinacea (E) or genuphil (a composite of chondroitin sulphate, glucosamine and methyl sulfonyl methane [GCM]) nutraceutical supplements on female rat model of acute or chronic arthritis induced by bacterial outer membrane protein (OMP) from faecal flora of healthy and rheumatic humans. Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP2), C-reactive protein (CRP) and rheumatoid factor (RF) values increased (p < 0.05) in both arthritic groups as compared to normal values. The rheumatic markers anti-CCP2, CRP and RF values decreased significantly in E- and GCM-treated groups compared to arthritic none-treated acute or chronic groups. The results of RF values of GCM-treated groups in acute and chronic models decreased exhibiting no statistical difference compared with the normal value. Histological examinations of the hind paw sections revealed moderate inflammation, oedema and mild proliferation of synovial cells in acute arthritic rats and more damage to cartilage and bone with severe inflammation in chronic ones. Echinacea acute treated group showed edema with proliferated synovial membrane and partial damage in cartilage and bone. While in the E-chronic treated group, rough edge with destructed cartilage and bone existed. However, the acute GCM group revealed mild cartilage damage. But the chronic GCM group showed mild synovial cells proliferation and revealed no inflammation with mild cartilage damage edge. Results demonstrated the OMP arthropathic property and through promising light on arthritis treatment using E- or GCM, with the advantage of GMC results over that of E-. The composite GCM is needed for further studies over the dose and duration to assess its preventive effects against the bacterial OMP arthrogenicity. PMID:22173958

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a form of arthritis that causes pain, swelling, stiffness and loss of function in ... wrist and fingers. More women than men get rheumatoid arthritis. It often starts in middle age and is ...

  13. Viral arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Infectious arthritis - viral ... Arthritis may be a symptom of many virus-related illnesses. It usually disappears on its own without ... the rubella vaccine, only a few people develop arthritis. No risk factors are known.

  14. Near infrared lymphatic imaging demonstrates the dynamics of lymph flow and lymphangiogenesis during the acute vs. chronic phases of arthritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Quan; Wood, Ronald; Schwarz, Edward M.; Wang, Yong-Jun; Xing, Lianping

    2010-01-01

    Objective Development of an in vivo imaging method to assess lymphatic draining function in the K/B×N mouse model of inflammatory arthritis. Methods Indocyanine green (ICG), a near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye, was injected intradermally into the footpad of wild-type mice, the limb was illuminated with an 806 nm NIR laser, and the movement of ICG from the injection site to the draining popliteal lymph node (PLN) was recorded with a CCD camera. ICG-NIR images were analyzed to obtain 5 measures of lymphatic function across time. K/B×N arthritic mice and control non-arthritic littermates were imaged at one-month of age when acute joint inflammation commenced, and repeated at 3 months when joint inflammation became chronic. Lymphangiogenesis in PLNs was assessed by immunochemistry. Results ICG and its transport within lymphatic vessels were readily visualized and quantitative measures derived. During the acute phase of arthritis, the lymphatic vessels were dilated with increased ICG signal intensity and lymphatic pulses, and PLNs became fluorescent quickly. During the chronic phase, new lymphatic vessels were present near the foot. However, ICG appearance in lymphatic vessels was delayed. The size and area of PLN lymphatic sinuses progressively increased in the K/B×N mice. Conclusion ICG-NIR lymphatic imaging is a valuable method to assess the lymphatic draining function in mice with inflammatory arthritis. ICG-NIR imaging of K/B×N mice identified two distinct lymphatic phenotypes during the acute and chronic phase of inflammation. This technique can be used to assess new therapies for lymphatic disorders. PMID:20309866

  15. Associations and Outcomes of Septic Pulmonary Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Umesh; Brenes, Jorge A; Punjabi, Gopal V; LeClaire, Michele M; Williams, David N

    2014-01-01

    Background: Septic pulmonary embolism is a serious but uncommon syndrome posing diagnostic challenges because of its broad range of clinical presentation and etiologies. Objective: To understand the clinical and radiographic associations of septic pulmonary embolism in patients presenting to an acute care safety net hospital. Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of imaging and electronic health records of all patients diagnosed with septic pulmonary embolism in our hospital between January 2000 and January 2013. Results: 41 episodes of septic pulmonary embolism were identified in 40 patients aged 17 to 71 years (median 46); 29 (72%) were men. Presenting symptoms included: febrile illness (85%); pulmonary complaints (66%) including pleuritic chest pain (22%), cough (19%) and dyspnea (15%); and those related to the peripheral foci of infection (24%) and shock (19%). Sources of infection included: skin and soft tissue (44%); infective endocarditis (27%); and infected peripheral deep venous thrombosis (17%). 35/41 (85%) were bacteremic with staphylococcus aureus. All patients had peripheral nodular lesions on chest CT scan. Treatment included intravenous antibiotics in all patients. Twenty six (63%) patients required pleural drainage and/or drainage of peripheral abscesses. Seven (17%) patients received systemic anticoagulants. Eight (20%) patients died due to various complications. Conclusion: The epidemiology of septic pulmonary embolism has broadened over the past decade with an increase in identified extrapulmonary, non-cardiac sources. In the context of an extrapulmonary infection, clinical features of persistent fever, bacteremia and pulmonary complaints should raise suspicion for this syndrome, and typical findings on the chest CT scans confirm the diagnosis. Antibiotics, local drainage procedures and increasingly, anticoagulation are keys to successful outcomes. PMID:25184008

  16. Impact on mortality of the timing of renal replacement therapy in patients with severe acute kidney injury in septic shock: the IDEAL-ICU study (initiation of dialysis early versus delayed in the intensive care unit): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background One of the most dreaded complications of septic shock is acute kidney injury. It occurs in around 50% of patients, with a mortality rate of about 60% at 3 months. There is no consensus on the optimal time to initiate renal replacement therapy. Retrospective and observational studies suggest that early implementation of renal replacement therapy could improve the prognosis for these patients. Methods/design This protocol summarizes the rationale and design of a randomized, controlled, multicenter trial investigating the effect of early versus delayed renal replacement therapy in patients with severe acute kidney injury in early septic shock. In total, 864 critically ill adults with septic shock and evidence of acute kidney injury, defined as the failure stage of the RIFLE classification, will be enrolled. The primary outcome is mortality at 90 days. Secondary outcomes include safety, number of days free of mechanical ventilation, number of days free of renal replacement therapy, intensive care length of stay, in-hospital length of stay, quality of life as evaluated by the EQ-5D and renal replacement therapy dependence at hospital discharge. The primary analysis will be intention to treat. Recruitment started in March 2012 and will be completed by March 2015. Discussion This protocol for a randomized controlled study investigating the impact of the timing of renal replacement therapy initiation should provide an answer to a key question for the management of patients with acute kidney injury in the context of septic shock, for whom the mortality rate remains close to 60% despite improved understanding of physiopathology and recent therapeutic advances. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01682590, registered on 10 September 2012. PMID:24998258

  17. Community Acquired Chronic Arthritis due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a Previously Healthy Pregnant Woman

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Mesut; Arslan, Ferhat; Mert, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Septic arthritis caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is uncommon in the immunocompetent population, despite its occurrence in younger patients with open injuries and in intravenous drug abusers. Here we report a case of septic arthritis caused by P. aeruginosa. This case is unique for several reasons. First, it is a case of septic arthritis in a pregnant woman with no traditional risk factors reported in the literature including history of prior traumatic events, hospitalisation, or chronic underlying disease. She was suspected of having transient osteoporosis associated with pregnancy to involve both hip joints. Second, this is the first reported case of a community acquired chronic septic arthritis due to P. aeruginosa involving large joints of both upper and lower extremities. The patient was treated successfully with a combination of ceftazidime and amikacin for 4 weeks followed by oral ciprofloxacin 750 mg twice daily for 8 weeks. PMID:25371836

  18. Association of disease activity with acute exacerbation of interstitial lung disease during tocilizumab treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a retrospective, case-control study.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Mitsuhiro; Kaneko, Yuko; Yamaoka, Kunihiro; Kondo, Harumi; Takeuchi, Tsutomu

    2016-06-01

    The objective of the study was to identify risk factors for acute exacerbation of interstitial lung disease (ILD) during tocilizumab treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This is a retrospective, case-control study. We reviewed 395 consecutive RA patients who received tocilizumab. First, we divided the patients according to the presence (RA-ILD) or absence of ILD (non-ILD) assessed by chest X-ray or high-resolution computed tomography, and compared them for characteristics relevant to RA-ILD. Subsequently, focusing on the patients with RA-ILD, we assessed their baseline characteristics and clinical courses comparing patients with acute exacerbation to those without. Comparing 78 with ILD and 317 without ILD, the following were identified as factors related to RA-ILD on multivariate analysis: age 60 years or older (OR 4.5, 95 % CI 2.2-9.4, P < 0.0001), smoking habit (OR 2.9, 95 % CI 1.5-5.5, P = 0.002), and high rheumatoid factor levels (OR 2.8, 95 % CI 1.4-5.5, P = 0.002). Of 78 RA-ILD patients, six developed acute exacerbation during tocilizumab treatment. The median duration between the initiation of tocilizumab treatment and the acute exacerbation occurrence was 48 weeks. While baseline characteristics did not differ between acute exacerbation and non-acute exacerbation groups, patients experiencing acute exacerbation had significantly higher Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI) at 24 weeks (20.8 vs. 6.2, P = 0.019). Univariate analysis showed that CDAI > 10 at 24 weeks was a risk factor for acute exacerbation (OR 4.7, 95 % CI 2.1-10.4, P = 0.02). Uncontrolled arthritis activity during tocilizumab treatment may be associated with acute exacerbation of RA-ILD, suggesting post-treatment monitoring of disease activity is important not only with respect to RA itself but also for RA-ILD. PMID:27072347

  19. Improved early diagnosis of acute inflammatory skeletal-articular diseases in children: A two-radiopharmaceutical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Handmaker, H.; Giammona, S.T.

    1984-05-01

    The febrile child with a painful bone or joint still presents a difficult pediatric diagnostic problem. Acute hematogenous osteomyelitis, septic arthritis, and cellulitis are the most common causes of this symptom. Thirty-seven patients with these disorders were studied. Because findings from technetium-99m phosphate bone scans and roentgenograms are often normal in patients in the early stages of acute hematogenous osteomyelitis, children suspected of having this disorder were tested using gallium-67 citrate scans in addition to the other diagnostic procedures. The increased diagnostic accuracy of this approach over that of bone scan and roentgenogram studies alone was observed in the children with fever and bone or joint pain.

  20. The current management of septic shock.

    PubMed

    Russel, J A

    2008-10-01

    study was a randomized trial of vasopressin versus norepinephrine in septic shock. There was no difference in mortality between vasopressin versus norepinephrine-treated patients (35% versus 39% respectively). In patients who had less severe septic shock, patients treated with vasopressin may have lowered mortality compared with norepinephrine (26% vs 36%). Annane et al. found that hydrocortisone plus fludrocortisone (compared to placebo) was associated with lower mortality in patients who had an inadequate response to corticotropin stimulation test (mortality 53% vs 63% respectively). Sprung et al. did a randomized controlled trial of hydrocortisone (50 mg intravenously every 6 hours) compared to placebo (CORTICUS) to address lingering questions regarding the Annane trial. There was no difference in mortality (39.2% hydrocortisone vs 36.1%) or organ dysfunction. Several randomized controlled trials of intensive insulin versus conventional insulin in the critically ill have yielded conflicting results and do not support the routine use of intensive insulin in the ancillary management of septic shock. A recent randomized controlled trial of intensive versus less intensive renal support in patients who had acute kidney injury found no difference in mortality (53.6% vs 51.5% respectively), duration of renal support, or rates of recovery of renal and non-renal organ dysfunction. PMID:18971911

  1. Efficacy and safety profile of combination of tramadol-diclofenac versus tramadol-paracetamol in patients with acute musculoskeletal conditions, postoperative pain, and acute flare of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis: a Phase III, 5-day open-label study

    PubMed Central

    Chandanwale, Ajay S; Sundar, Subramanian; Latchoumibady, Kaliaperumal; Biswas, Swati; Gabhane, Mukesh; Naik, Manoj; Patel, Kamlesh

    2014-01-01

    Objective We aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a fixed-dose combination (FDC) of tramadol and diclofenac versus a standard approved FDC of tramadol and paracetamol, in patients with acute moderate to severe pain. Methods A total of 204 patients with moderate to severe pain due to acute musculoskeletal conditions (n=52), acute flare of osteoarthritis (n=52), acute flare of rheumatoid arthritis (n=50), or postoperative pain (n=50) were enrolled in the study at baseline. Each disease category was then randomized to receive either of two treatments for 5 days: group A received an FDC of immediate-release tramadol hydrochloride (50 mg) and sustained-release diclofenac sodium (75 mg) (one tablet, twice daily), and group B received an FDC of tramadol hydrochloride (37.5 mg) and paracetamol (325 mg) (two tablets every 4–6 hours, up to a maximum of eight tablets daily). The primary efficacy end points were reductions in pain intensity from baseline at day 3 and day 5 as assessed by a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) score. Results Group A showed a significant reduction in the VAS score for overall pain from baseline on day 3 (P=0.001) and day 5 (P<0.0001) as compared with group B. The combination of tramadol-diclofenac resulted in few mild to moderate adverse events (nausea, vomiting, epigastric pain, and gastritis), which required minimal management, without any treatment discontinuation. The number of adverse events in group A was nine (8.82%) compared with 22 (21.78%) in group B, after 5 days of treatment. Conclusion An FDC of tramadol-diclofenac showed a significantly greater reduction in pain intensity and was well tolerated compared with tramadol-paracetamol, resulting in better analgesia in patients suffering from moderate to severe pain due to acute musculoskeletal conditions, postoperative pain following orthopedic surgery, or acute flare of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:25152629

  2. Femur chondrosarcoma misdiagnosed as acute knee arthritis and osteomyelitis--further developing a hitherto unreported complication of tumor embolic ischemic ileal perforation after arthroscopic lavage.

    PubMed

    Chow, Louis Tsun Cheung

    2014-12-01

    The differentiation between osteomyelitis and bone tumor may be difficult due to their overlapping clinical and radiological features. A 25-year-old lady presented with left knee pain and joint effusion associated with redness and hotness. A sub-optimally taken plain radiograph showed mixed osteolytic and osteoblastic lesion in the left lower femur with surrounding soft tissue swelling. Since the clinical diagnosis was acute osteomyelitis and arthritis, arthroscopic lavage was performed as a diagnostic and therapeutic procedure. The removed loose bodies and fibrinous tissue showed pathological features suspicious of chondrosarcoma. Subsequent MRI revealed an infiltrative tumor eroding through the cortex and joint cartilage. En bloc excision of the left lower femur, upper tibia including the knee joint and patella was performed, and the final diagnosis was grade 2 chondrosarcoma. The patient developed bilateral pulmonary metastasis 33 months after operation. Five months later, she suffered from a hitherto undescribed complication of ischemic perforation of the terminal ileum secondary to tumor embolic arterial obstruction with no macroscopic intestinal or peritoneal tumor deposit. The patient developed multiple brain metastases and died 43 months after initial presentation. Our case illustrates that malignant bone tumor as a differential diagnosis of acute osteomyelitis and arthritis merits recognition and exclusion before arthroscopic lavage, which may enhance tumor dissemination and in our patient results in embolic ischemic ileal perforation. PMID:25242025

  3. Juvenile Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Juvenile arthritis (JA) is arthritis that happens in children. It causes joint swelling, pain, stiffness, and loss of motion. It can affect any joint, but ... of JA that children get is juvenile idiopathic arthritis. There are several other forms of arthritis affecting ...

  4. Psoriatic arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, L.H.; Espinoza, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 11 chapters. Some of the titles are: The history and epidemiologic definition of psoriatic arthritis as a distinct entity; Psoriatic arthritis: Further epidemiologic and genetic considerations; The radiologic features of psoriatic arthritis; and Laboratory findings and pathology of psoriatic arthritis.

  5. Reactive arthritis or post-infective arthritis?

    PubMed

    Keat, Andrew

    2002-09-01

    Infective mechanisms probably underlie a wide range of inflammatory arthropathies. There appears to be a spectrum of mechanisms ranging from the frankly septic, through low-grade infection with very small numbers of microorganisms in the joint to arthritides in which no hard evidence for an infective cause exists. In the midst of the spectrum lie 'post-infective' and 'reactive' arthritides, characterized clinically, genetically and by epidemiological links with infection. Identification of bacterial components within joint material from such patients suggested that the causes of the arthritis had been found. It is now clear that many bacteria are present in inflamed joints; establishing their significance will be of crucial importance, but not easy. PMID:12406424

  6. Characterization of the acute and persistent pain state present in K/BxN serum transfer arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Christianson, Christina A.; Corr, Maripat; Firestein, Gary S.; Mobargha, Anahita; Yaksh, Tony L.; Svensson, Camilla I.

    2010-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune arthritis that affects approximately 1% of the population. Synovial inflammation cannot fully explain the level of pain reported by patients and facilitation of pain processing at the spinal level has been implicated. We characterized the K/BxN serum transfer arthritis model as a model of joint inflammation-induced pain and examine pharmacologic responsiveness and spinal glia activation. Mechanical allodynia developed congruently with joint swelling. Surprisingly, allodynia persisted after resolution of inflammation. At the peak of joint inflammation, (days 4–10) hypersensitivity was attenuated with i.p. etanercept, gabapentin, and ketorolac. Following resolution of synovial inflammation (day 19–28), only gabapentin relieved allodynia. The superficial dorsal horn of arthritic mice displayed increased staining of microglia at early and late time points, but astrocyte staining increased only during the inflammatory phase. ATF3, a marker of nerve injury, was significantly increased in the lumbar dorsal root ganglia during the late phase (day 28). Hence, serum transfer in the K/BxN serum transfer arthritis model produces a persistent pain state, where the allodynia during the inflammatory state is attenuated by TNF and prostaglandin inhibitors, and the pharmacology and histochemistry data suggest a transition from an inflammatory state to a state that resembles a neuropathic condition over time. Therefore, the K/BxN serum transfer model represents a multifaceted model for studies exploring pain mechanisms in conditions of joint inflammation and may serve as a platform for exploring novel treatment strategies for pain in human arthritic conditions. K/BxN serum transfer arthritis produces persistent mechanical hypersensitivity despite resolution of clinical signs with evidence of transition from an inflammatory to neuropathic pain state. PMID:20739123

  7. Arthroscopy of septic carpitis in donkeys (Equus asinus)

    PubMed Central

    Elkasapy, A.H.; AbdelGalil, A.I.; Al-Akraa, A.M.; Ibrahim, I.M.; Ismail, S.F.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental septic arthritis was induced in the radiocarpal joint of 18 donkeys by intra-articular injection of Staphylococcus aureus (3-4X106 CFU). The inoculated animals were divided into three groups (6 donkeys in each group). The arthroscopic examination was carried out before induction of septic carpitis and 3 days (group I), 14 days (group II), and 28 days (group III) after induction of infection. The arthroscopic examination of group I revealed hyperemia of synovial membrane and hypertrophied villi. In group II, severe hyperemia of synovial membrane, hypertrophied villi, pannus in the joint cavity and beginning of articular cartilage erosion were found. In group III, severe hyperemia of synovial membrane, hypertrophied villi and more prominent articular cartilage erosion were present. PMID:26623350

  8. Methylmalonic acidemia mimicking diabetic ketoacidosis and septic shock in infants

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Navdeep; Malhotra, Ashwini; Chhabra, Sanjay; Chhabra, Sunny

    2015-01-01

    Methylmalonic acidemia (MMA) is most common inherited type of organic acidemia. It has diverse presentation in older infants without any initial apparent symptoms. MMA sometimes present with sudden metabolic decompensation, which may mimics common emergencies like septic shock and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) without early recognition can be fatal. In born error of metabolism especially organic acidemia should be suspected in any infant presented with severe high anion gap metabolic acidosis. We report two cases of MMA in infants presented acutely mimicking DKA and septic shock. PMID:25810618

  9. Infectious Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Most kinds of arthritis cause pain and swelling in your joints. Joints are places where two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Infectious arthritis is an infection in the joint. The infection ...

  10. Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... your body. Some people with psoriasis have psoriatic arthritis. It causes pain, stiffness, and swelling of the ... physical exam and imaging tests to diagnose psoriatic arthritis. There is no cure, but medicines can help ...

  11. Arthritis Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... hour massage will be donated to the Arthritis Foundation! Jingle Bell Run Join us for the nation's ... a cure! Answers When You Need Them Arthritis Foundation licensed social workers provide 24/7 assistance on ...

  12. Fungal arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... and irritation (inflammation) of a joint by a fungal infection. It is also called mycotic arthritis. Causes Fungal ... symptoms of fungal arthritis. Prevention Thorough treatment of fungal infections elsewhere in the body may help prevent fungal ...

  13. Pancreatic injury in patients with septic shock: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Chaari, Anis; Abdel Hakim, Karim; Bousselmi, Kamel; Etman, Mahmoud; El Bahr, Mohamed; El Saka, Ahmed; Hamza, Eman; Ismail, Mohamed; Khalil, Elsayed Mahmoud; Kauts, Vipin; Casey, William Francis

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis and septic shock are life threatening condition associated with high mortality rate in critically-ill patients. This high mortality is mainly related to the inadequacy between oxygen delivery and cellular demand leading to the onset of multiorgan dysfunction. Whether this multiorgan failure affect the pancreas is not fully investigated. In fact, pancreatic injury may occur because of ischemia, overwhelming inflammatory response, oxidative stress, cellular apoptosis and/or metabolic derangement. Increased serum amylase and/or lipase levels are common in patients with septic shock. However, imaging test rarely reveal significant pancreatic damage. Whether pancreatic dysfunction does affect the prognosis of patients with septic shock or not is still a matter of debate. In fact, only few studies with limited sample size assessed the clinical relevance of the pancreatic injury in this group of patients. In this review, we aimed to describe the epidemiology and the physiopathology of pancreatic injury in septic shock patients, to clarify whether it requires specific management and to assess its prognostic value. Our main finding is that pancreatic injury does not significantly affect the outcome in septic shock patients. Hence, increased serum pancreatic enzymes without clinical features of acute pancreatitis do not require further imaging investigations and specific therapeutic intervention. PMID:27559431

  14. Pancreatic injury in patients with septic shock: A literature review.

    PubMed

    Chaari, Anis; Abdel Hakim, Karim; Bousselmi, Kamel; Etman, Mahmoud; El Bahr, Mohamed; El Saka, Ahmed; Hamza, Eman; Ismail, Mohamed; Khalil, Elsayed Mahmoud; Kauts, Vipin; Casey, William Francis

    2016-07-15

    Sepsis and septic shock are life threatening condition associated with high mortality rate in critically-ill patients. This high mortality is mainly related to the inadequacy between oxygen delivery and cellular demand leading to the onset of multiorgan dysfunction. Whether this multiorgan failure affect the pancreas is not fully investigated. In fact, pancreatic injury may occur because of ischemia, overwhelming inflammatory response, oxidative stress, cellular apoptosis and/or metabolic derangement. Increased serum amylase and/or lipase levels are common in patients with septic shock. However, imaging test rarely reveal significant pancreatic damage. Whether pancreatic dysfunction does affect the prognosis of patients with septic shock or not is still a matter of debate. In fact, only few studies with limited sample size assessed the clinical relevance of the pancreatic injury in this group of patients. In this review, we aimed to describe the epidemiology and the physiopathology of pancreatic injury in septic shock patients, to clarify whether it requires specific management and to assess its prognostic value. Our main finding is that pancreatic injury does not significantly affect the outcome in septic shock patients. Hence, increased serum pancreatic enzymes without clinical features of acute pancreatitis do not require further imaging investigations and specific therapeutic intervention. PMID:27559431

  15. Septic abortion caused by Campylobacter jejuni bacteraemia.

    PubMed

    Skuhala, Tomislava; Škerk, Višnja; Markotić, Alemka; Bukovski, Suzana; Desnica, Boško

    2016-08-01

    A 20-year-old female patient, 14 weeks pregnant, was admitted to hospital with anamnestic and clinical features of acute pyelonephritis. Clinical signs of septic abortion developed and after obstetric examination the therapy was changed to ampicillin, gentamicin and clindamycin. Campylobacter jejuni was isolated from blood cultures. Pathohistological findings confirmed diagnosis of purulent chorioamnionitis. After 2 weeks of ciprofloxacin administration the patient fully recovered. Campylobacter jejuni was not isolated from stool culture and no signs of acute enteritis were registered during the illness. Invasive forms of Campylobacter disease without enteritis are not unusual in immunocompromised hosts but they are restricted to C. fetus rather than C. jejuni isolates. PMID:25872616

  16. Cardiovascular devices; reclassification of intra-aortic balloon and control systems for acute coronary syndrome, cardiac and non-cardiac surgery, or complications of heart failure; effective date of requirement for premarket approval for intra-aortic balloon and control systems for septic shock or pulsatile flow generation. Final order.

    PubMed

    2013-12-30

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final order to reclassify intra-aortic balloon and control system (IABP) devices when indicated for acute coronary syndrome, cardiac and non-cardiac surgery, or complications of heart failure, a preamendments class III device, into class II (special controls), and to require the filing of a premarket approval application (PMA) or a notice of completion of a product development protocol (PDP) for IABPs when indicated for septic shock or pulsatile flow generation. PMID:24383147

  17. Comparison of the suppressive effects of soluble CR1 and C5a receptor antagonist in acute arthritis induced in rats by blocking of CD59

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, M; Nishikawa, K; Morgan, B P; Matsuo, S

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the effects of suppression of complement activation at C3 level and inhibition of C5a on acute synovitis in rats. Acute synovitis was induced in Wistar rats by intra-articular (i.a.) injection into one knee of 0.3 mg of MoAb 6D1 (anti-rat CD59 antibody). In the treatment groups, soluble CR1 (sCR1) or C5a receptor (C5aR) antagonist was administered intra-articularly or intravenously and effects on the course of the acute synovitis were monitored. Synovitis induced by 6D1 was characterized by joint swelling, thickening of synovial tissue, cellular infiltration and deposition of membrane attack complex (MAC) on the synovial surface. Neither inflammatory change nor MAC deposition was found in rats which received an i.a. injection of sCR1 to suppress complement activity in the joint. Intra-articular injection of sCR1 did not reduce plasma complement activity. Intravenous administration of sCR1 suppressed plasma complement activity but had no effect on the course of the arthritis and synovitis with MAC deposition was observed. Neither i.a. nor i.v. injection of C5aR antagonist had any suppressive effects on inflammatory change or MAC deposition in synovium. The data show that inflammatory change induced by 6D1 was mediated by local complement activation and was not accompanied by systemic complement activation. C5a generation was not responsible for the observed inflammation, suggesting that other complement activation products, possibly MAC, mediate the inflammatory change observed in this model of acute synovitis in rats. PMID:10632677

  18. Identification of phosphorylated MYL12B as a potential plasma biomarker for septic acute kidney injury using a quantitative proteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fan; Dong, Xiu-Juan; Li, Yan-Yan; Zhao, Yan; Xu, Qiu-Lin; Su, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common and increasingly encountered complication in hospitalized patients with critical illness in intensive care units (ICU). According to the etiology, Sepsis-induced AKI (SAKI) is a leading contributor to AKI and significantly has very poor prognosis, which might be related to the late detection when the elevation of BUN and serum creatinine (SCr) is used. Many genes are up-regulated in the damaged kidney with the corresponding protein products appearing in plasma and urine. Some of these are candidate biomarkers for more timely diagnosis of SAKI. Therefore, extensive research efforts over this past decade have been directed at the discovery and validation of novel SAKI biomarkers to detect injury prior to changes in kidney function, a number of serum and urinary proteins, including NGAL, KIM-1, cystatin-C, IL-18, and L-FABP, have been identified for predicting SAKI before a rise in BUN and serum creatinine in several experimental and clinical trainings. Unfortunately, an ideal biomarker of SAKI with highly sensitivity and specificity has not been identified yet. Recent progresses in quantitative proteomics have offered opportunities to discover biomarkers for SAKI. In the present study, kidney tissue samples from SAKI mice were analyzed by two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), and 4 up-regulated proteins, which were actin (ACTB), myosin regulatory light chain 12B (MYL12B), myosin regulatory light polypeptide 9 (MYL9), and myosin regulatory light chain 12A (MYL12A) were identified by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight/time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS). Among all the varied proteins, MYL12B was validated by western blot. Interestingly, there was no change between the SAKI and control kidney tissues, however, phosphorylated MYL12B was detected to be consistent with the proteomics data. Furthermore, phosphorylated MYL12B was found similarly to be increased in SAKI plasma

  19. Identification of phosphorylated MYL12B as a potential plasma biomarker for septic acute kidney injury using a quantitative proteomic approach

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fan; Dong, Xiu-Juan; Li, Yan-Yan; Zhao, Yan; Xu, Qiu-Lin; Su, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common and increasingly encountered complication in hospitalized patients with critical illness in intensive care units (ICU). According to the etiology, Sepsis-induced AKI (SAKI) is a leading contributor to AKI and significantly has very poor prognosis, which might be related to the late detection when the elevation of BUN and serum creatinine (SCr) is used. Many genes are up-regulated in the damaged kidney with the corresponding protein products appearing in plasma and urine. Some of these are candidate biomarkers for more timely diagnosis of SAKI. Therefore, extensive research efforts over this past decade have been directed at the discovery and validation of novel SAKI biomarkers to detect injury prior to changes in kidney function, a number of serum and urinary proteins, including NGAL, KIM-1, cystatin-C, IL-18, and L-FABP, have been identified for predicting SAKI before a rise in BUN and serum creatinine in several experimental and clinical trainings. Unfortunately, an ideal biomarker of SAKI with highly sensitivity and specificity has not been identified yet. Recent progresses in quantitative proteomics have offered opportunities to discover biomarkers for SAKI. In the present study, kidney tissue samples from SAKI mice were analyzed by two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), and 4 up-regulated proteins, which were actin (ACTB), myosin regulatory light chain 12B (MYL12B), myosin regulatory light polypeptide 9 (MYL9), and myosin regulatory light chain 12A (MYL12A) were identified by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight/time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS). Among all the varied proteins, MYL12B was validated by western blot. Interestingly, there was no change between the SAKI and control kidney tissues, however, phosphorylated MYL12B was detected to be consistent with the proteomics data. Furthermore, phosphorylated MYL12B was found similarly to be increased in SAKI plasma

  20. What Is Reactive Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arthritis PDF Version Size: 69 KB November 2014 What is Reactive Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... Information About Reactive Arthritis and Other Related Conditions What Causes Reactive Arthritis? Sometimes, reactive arthritis is set ...

  1. Geode development and multiple fractures in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Lowthian, P J; Calin, A

    1985-01-01

    The radiological development from normal bone of geodes and subsequent fractures in phalanges of two adjacent fingers is described in a patient with classical rheumatoid arthritis. Presentation was as a septic, discharging focus, but infection was excluded; the pathology is described. Images PMID:3977410

  2. Geode development and multiple fractures in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lowthian, P J; Calin, A

    1985-02-01

    The radiological development from normal bone of geodes and subsequent fractures in phalanges of two adjacent fingers is described in a patient with classical rheumatoid arthritis. Presentation was as a septic, discharging focus, but infection was excluded; the pathology is described. PMID:3977410

  3. Canakinumab reduces the risk of acute gouty arthritis flares during initiation of allopurinol treatment: results of a double-blind, randomised study

    PubMed Central

    Schlesinger, Naomi; Mysler, Eduardo; Lin, Hsiao-Yi; De Meulemeester, Marc; Rovensky, Jozef; Arulmani, Udayasankar; Balfour, Alison; Krammer, Gerhard; Sallstig, Peter; So, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Objective This study assessed the efficacy and safety of canakinumab, a fully human anti-interleukin 1β monoclonal antibody, for prophylaxis against acute gouty arthritis flares in patients initiating urate-lowering treatment. Methods In this double-blind, double-dummy, dose-ranging study, 432 patients with gouty arthritis initiating allopurinol treatment were randomised 1:1:1:1:1:1:2 to receive: a single dose of canakinumab, 25, 50, 100, 200, or 300 mg subcutaneously; 4×4-weekly doses of canakinumab (50+50+25+25 mg subcutaneously); or daily colchicine 0.5 mg orally for 16 weeks. Patients recorded details of flares in diaries. The study aimed to determine the canakinumab dose having equivalent efficacy to colchicine 0.5 mg at 16 weeks. Results A dose-response for canakinumab was not apparent with any of the four predefined dose-response models. The estimated canakinumab dose with equivalent efficacy to colchicine was below the range of doses tested. At 16 weeks, there was a 62% to 72% reduction in the mean number of flares per patient for canakinumab doses ≥50 mg versus colchicine based on a negative binomial model (rate ratio: 0.28–0.38, p≤0.0083), and the percentage of patients experiencing ≥1 flare was significantly lower for all canakinumab doses (15% to 27%) versus colchicine (44%, p<0.05). There was a 64% to 72% reduction in the risk of experiencing ≥1 flare for canakinumab doses ≥50 mg versus colchicine at 16 weeks (hazard ratio (HR): 0.28–0.36, p≤0.05). The incidence of adverse events was similar across treatment groups. Conclusions Single canakinumab doses ≥50 mg or four 4-weekly doses provided superior prophylaxis against flares compared with daily colchicine 0.5 mg. PMID:21540198

  4. Septic Coronary Artery Embolism Treated with Aspiration Thrombectomy: Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Sarwar, Nosheen; Eftekhari, Hossein; Lotfi, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Coronary embolization is a potentially fatal sequela of endocarditis. We report a case of Candida endocarditis with septic embolism to the left anterior descending coronary artery. This embolism was successfully treated with aspiration thrombectomy followed by balloon angioplasty. The treatment of acute coronary syndrome in the presence of septic embolism is controversial. Aspiration thrombectomy has been performed in this situation before, and it appears to be safer and more feasible than is thrombolysis or percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. PMID:25120402

  5. Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... physical exam as well as x rays or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the affected joints. Although there is no lab test to diagnose psoriatic arthritis, your doctor may order tests on blood or joint fluid to rule out other forms of arthritis with ...

  6. Infectious Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Another form of reactive arthritis starts with eating food or handling something that has bacteria on it. To diagnose infectious arthritis, your health care provider may do tests of your blood, urine, and joint fluid. Treatment includes medicines and sometimes surgery.

  7. Reactive arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Reactive arthritis is a group of conditions that may involve the joints, eyes, and urinary and genital systems. ... The exact cause of reactive arthritis is unknown. It occurs most often in men younger than age 40. It may follow an infection in the urethra ...

  8. Psoriatic arthritis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cantini, Fabrizio; Niccoli, Laura; Nannini, Carlotta; Kaloudi, Olga; Bertoni, Michele; Cassarà, Emanuele

    2010-10-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is an inflammatory rheumatic disorder of unknown etiology occurring in patients with psoriasis. The Classification Criteria for Psoriatic Arthritis study group has recently developed a validated set of classification criteria for psoriatic arthritis with a sensitivity of 91.4% and a specificity of 98.7%. Three main clinical patterns have been identified: oligoarticular (≤ 4 involved joints) or polyarticular (≥ 5 involved joints) peripheral disease and axial disease with or without associated peripheral arthritis. In this context distal interphalangeal arthritis and arthritis mutilans may occur. According to other reports, also in our centre, asymmetric oligoarthritis is the most frequent pattern at onset. Axial disease has been estimated between 5% and 36% of patients. It is characterized by an irregular involvement of the axial skeleton with a predilection for the cervical spine. Recurrent episodes of enthesitis and dactylitis represent a hallmark of psoriatic arthritis. In around 20% of cases distal extremity swelling with pitting edema of the hands or feet is observed. Unilateral acute iridocyclitis, usually recurrent in alternate fashion, is the most frequent extra-articular manifestation, and accelerated atherosclerosis is the prominent comorbidity. The clinical course of peripheral and axial psoriatic arthritis is usually less severe than rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis, respectively. Local corticosteroid injections and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are recommended in milder forms. Sulphasalazine and methotrexate are effective in peripheral psoriatic arthritis. Recent studies have provided evidence on the efficacy of anti-tumor necrosis factor-α drugs to control symptoms and to slow or arrest radiological disease progression. PMID:21199465

  9. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis with cardiac tamponade.

    PubMed Central

    Majeed, H A; Kvasnicka, J

    1978-01-01

    A 4-year-old girl with seronegative systemic juvenile rheumatoid arthritis developed acute cardiac tamponade. Pericardiocentesis and systemic corticosteroids resulted in complete recovery of the pericardial involvement. This was followed by complete remission of rheumatoid disease. Images PMID:686861

  10. Septic arthritis, tenosynovitis, and infections of hoof structures.

    PubMed

    Lugo, Joel; Gaughan, Earl M

    2006-08-01

    Infectious diseases of synovial and hoof structures in horses can be devastating to soundness and can result in life-threatening complications. Timely diagnosis and early aggressive treatment can result in successful outcomes and resumption of athletic careers; however, delays in recognition and therapy can be the most costly reasons for failure. Sterilization of affected compartments and tissues requires removal of microorganisms and compromised tissue. Debridement, lavage, and appropriate antimicrobial drug use are the most reliable avenues of treatment. Antimicrobial drugs can be administered by local, regional, and systemic routes. Lavage techniques and debridement typically require surgical manipulations. PMID:16882480

  11. Calcium pyrophosphate arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease that can cause attacks of arthritis. Like gout, crystals form in the joints. But in this ... CPPD arthritis can be confused with: Gouty arthritis (gout) Osteoarthritis Rheumatoid arthritis Exams and Tests Most arthritic ...

  12. Calcium pyrophosphate arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... that can cause attacks of arthritis. Like with gout, crystals form in the joints. But in calcium ... pyrophosphate arthritis can be misdiagnosed as: Gouty arthritis (gout) Osteoarthritis Rheumatoid arthritis

  13. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Is Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis the same as Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis? Yes, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) is a new ... of chronic inflammatory diseases that affect children. Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA) is the older term that was used ...

  14. Rheumatoid arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... rheumatoid arthritis drugs. However, because they are very expensive, insurance approval is generally required. Most of them ... rich in fish oils (omega-3 fatty acids). Smoking cigarettes should be stopped. Excessive alcohol should also ...

  15. Enteropathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... as well. Those who test positive for the HLA-B27 genetic marker are much more likely to have spinal involvement with enteropathic arthritis than those who test negative. Disease Course/Prognosis ...

  16. Gonococcal arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... people who have gonorrhea caused by the bacteria Neisseria gonorrhoeae . Gonococcal arthritis affects women more often than men. ... Saunders; 2013:chap 109. Marrazzo JM, Apicella MA. Neisseria gonorrhoeae (gonnorrhea). In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, ...

  17. Psoriatic arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... that often occurs with a skin condition called psoriasis . ... inflammatory condition. About 1 in 20 people with psoriasis may develop arthritis with the skin condition. In most cases, psoriasis ...

  18. Reactive Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... with treatment and may cause joint damage. What Research Is Being Conducted on Reactive Arthritis? Researchers continue ... such as methotrexate and sulfasalazine. More information on research is available from the following websites: National Institutes ...

  19. Psoriatic arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... that often occurs with a skin condition called psoriasis . Causes Psoriasis is a common skin problem that causes red ... inflammatory condition. About 1 in 20 people with psoriasis may develop arthritis with the skin condition. In ...

  20. Prospective surveillance study of acute respiratory infections, influenza-like illness and seasonal influenza vaccine in a cohort of juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are frequent in children and complications can occur in patients with chronic diseases. We evaluated the frequency and impact of ARI and influenza-like illness (ILI) episodes on disease activity, and the immunogenicity and safety of influenza vaccine in a cohort of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. Methods Surveillance of respiratory viruses was conducted in JIA patients during ARI season (March to August) in two consecutive years: 2007 (61 patients) and 2008 (63 patients). Patients with ARI or ILI had respiratory samples collected for virus detection by real time PCR. In 2008, 44 patients were immunized with influenza vaccine. JIA activity index (ACRPed30) was assessed during both surveillance periods. Influenza hemagglutination inhibition antibody titers were measured before and 30-40 days after vaccination. Results During the study period 105 ARI episodes were reported and 26.6% of them were ILI. Of 33 samples collected, 60% were positive for at least one virus. Influenza and rhinovirus were the most frequently detected, in 30% of the samples. Of the 50 JIA flares observed, 20% were temporally associated to ARI. Influenza seroprotection rates were higher than 70% (91-100%) for all strains, and seroconversion rates exceeded 40% (74-93%). In general, response to influenza vaccine was not influenced by therapy or disease activity, but patients using anti-TNF alpha drugs presented lower seroconversion to H1N1 strain. No significant differences were found in ACRPed30 after vaccination and no patient reported ILI for 6 months after vaccination. Conclusion ARI episodes are relatively frequent in JIA patients and may have a role triggering JIA flares. Trivalent split influenza vaccine seems to be immunogenic and safe in JIA patients. PMID:23510667

  1. Tofacitinib for acute rheumatoid arthritis patients who have had an inadequate response to disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD): a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xingming; Liang, Fuxiang; Yin, Xiaoxue; Xiao, Xiaojuan; Shi, Peiyu; Wei, Dang; Yao, Liang; Wang, Qi; Chen, Yaolong

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to assess the efficacy and safety of tofacitinib for the treatment of patients with acute rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who have had an inadequate response to disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD). Randomized controlled trials were searched in MEDLINE (1966-2013), Embase (1947-2013), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (1948-2013), WHO International Clinical Trial Registration Platform (2004-2013), Clinical Trial.gov (1999-2013), and China Biology Medicine disc (1978-2013). The review included 10 studies involving 4,929 patients. A pooled analysis of six studies showed that tofacitinib had a superior effect over placebo (both with background therapy) at weeks 12 and 24. Also, the pooled results of three studies showed that tofacitinib monotherapy had a significantly greater effect over placebo. Compared to adalimumab, tofacitinib was found to be more efficacious as well. For safety, tofacitinib monotherapy had less serious adverse events (sAE) than placebo but not other adverse effects (oAE). In the comparison of tofacitinib and placebo both with background therapy, no difference in sAE and oAE were found. However, the quality of the evidence was quite low when evaluated using GRADE. Tofacitinib alone, or together with non-biologic DMARDs, was associated with more favorable remission in the signs and symptoms of RA than adalimumab or placebo. Also, tofacitinib monotherapy was safer than placebo with regards to reported sAE, but not oAE. However, the quality of evidence is exceedingly low; long-term, large-scale, and high-quality post-marketing research is suggested to further verify the conclusion. PMID:24389749

  2. Successful staged hip replacement in septic hip osteoarthritis in osteopetrosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Osteopetrosis is a rare, inherited, bone disorder, characterized by osteosclerosis, obliteration of the medullary cavity and calcified cartilage. The autosomal dominant form is compatible with a normal life span, although fractures often result from minimal trauma, due to the pathologic nature of bone. Osteomyelitis is common in patients with osteopetrosis because of a reduced resistance to infection, attributed to the lack of marrow vascularity and impairment of white cell function. Only one case of osteomyelitis of the proximal third of the femur has been previously reported, treated with several repeated debridements and finally with femoral head resection. Here we present for the first time a case of a staged implant of a cementless total hip prosthesis for the treatment of a septic hip in femoral neck nonunion in osteopetrosis. Case presentation A 36-years-old woman, affected by autosomal dominant osteopetrosis was referred to our department because of a septic hip arthritis associated with femoral neck septic non-union, with draining fistulas. The infection occurred early after a plate osteosynthesis for a closed perthrocanteric fracture of the femur and persisted in spite of osteosynthesis removal, surgical debridement and external fixation. In our hospital the patient underwent accurate debridement, femoral head and greater trochanter resection, preparation of the diaphyseal intramedullary canal and implant of an antibiotic-loaded cement spacer. The spacer was exchanged after one month, due to infection recurrence and four months later, a cementless total hip arthroplasty was implanted, with no clinical and laboratory signs of infection recurrence at two years follow-up. Conclusions In case of hip septic arthritis and proximal femur septic non-union, femoral head resection may not be the only option available and staged total hip arthroplasty can be considered. PMID:22472060

  3. [CLINICAL ASPECTS OF SEPTIC ENCEPHALOPATHY].

    PubMed

    Fesenko, O V; Sinopal'nikov, A I; Filatov, V V; Danishevsky, S V; Styrt, E A

    2016-01-01

    Septic encephalopathy is a form of general cerebral dysfunction caused by a systemic inflammatory reaction. Its investigation encounters enormous difficulties for the lack of reliable biological markers of neuronal lesions and methods for the evaluation of consciousness in severely ill patients. Hence, the importance of correct clinical interpretation of the character and magnitude of CNS activity. Examples are presented demonstrating the difficulty of interpreting disorders in CNS activity associated with evere community-acquired pneumonia. PMID:27172727

  4. Vasoplegia in septic shock (review).

    PubMed

    Gamcrlidze, M M; Intskirveli, N A; Vardosanidze, K D; Chikhladze, Kh E; Goliadze, L Sh; Ratiani, L R

    2015-02-01

    Vasoplegia is considered as a key factor responsible for the death of patients with septic shock, due to persistent and irreversible hypotension. The latter associated with vascular hyporeactivity to vasoconstrictors is a significant independent prognostic factor of mortality in severe sepsis. Loss of control of the vascular tone occurs through the complex, multifactorial mechanism and implicates deeply disrupted balance between vasoconstrictors and vasodilators. The aim of this review is to discuss in detail the recent suggested alternative mechanisms of vasoplegia in severe sepsis: Overproduction of nitric oxide (NO) by activation of inducible form of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS); up-regulation of prostacyclin (PG12); vasopressin deficiency; significantly elevated levels of circulating endothelin; increased concentrations of vasodilator peptides such as adrenomedulin (AM) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP); oxidative stress inducing endothelial dysfunction and vascular hyporeactivity to vasoconstrictors; inactivation of catecholamines by oxidation; over-activation of ATP-sensitive potassium channels (KATP channels) during septic shock and their involvement in vascular dysfunction. The review also discusses some therapeutic approaches based on pathogenetic mechanisms of severe sepsis and their efficacy in treatment of patients with septic shock. The loss of vascular tone control occurs through the complex, multifactorial mechanism and implicates deeply disrupted balance between vasoconstrictors and vasodilators in the pathogenesis of septic shock. Overproduction of nitric oxide (NO) by the inducible form of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS); up-regulation of prostacyclin (PG12); vasopressin deficiency; elevated levels of circulating endothelin; increased concentrations of vasodilator peptides such as adrenomedulin (AM) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP); oxidative stress inducing endothelial dysfunction and vascular hyporeactivity to vasoconstrictors

  5. Co-existence of acute myeloid leukemia with multilineage dysplasia and Epstein-Barr virus-associated T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Tokuhira, Michihide; Hanzawa, Kyoko; Watanabe, Reiko; Sekiguchi, Yasunobu; Nemoto, Tomoe; Toyozumi, Yasuo; Tamaru, Jun-ichi; Itoyama, Shinji; Suzuki, Katsuya; Kameda, Hideto; Mori, Shigehisa; Kizaki, Masahiro

    2009-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease mediated by inflammatory processes mainly at the joints. Recently, awareness of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder (T-LPD) has been heightened for its association with methotraxate usage in RA patients. In the contrary, acute myeloid leukemia with multilineage dysplasia (AML-MLD) has never been documented to be present concomitantly with the above two conditions. In this report we present a case of an autopsy-proven co-existence of AML-MLD and EBV-associated T-LPD in a patient with RA. PMID:19566938

  6. Septic cerebral venous sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Ismail A; Wasay, Mohammad

    2016-03-15

    Septic cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, once a common and deadly disease, has fortunately become rare now. Not only that the incidence has fallen significantly after the antibiotic era, the morbidity and mortality has also decreased substantially. Cavernous sinus thrombosis is by far the commonest form of septic cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Due to its rare occurrence, a lot of current generation clinicians have not encountered the entity in person. Despite all the advances in diagnostic modalities, a high index of clinical suspicion remains the mainstay in prompt diagnosis and management of this potentially lethal condition. Keeping this in view, the authors have reviewed the subject including the old literature and have summarized the current approach to diagnosis and management. Septic cavernous thrombosis is a fulminant disease with dramatic presentation in most cases comprised of fever, periorbital pain and swelling, associated with systemic symptoms and signs. The preceding infection is usually in the central face or paranasal sinuses. The disease rapidly spreads to contralateral side and if remains undiagnosed and untreated can result in severe complications or even death. Prompt diagnosis using radiological imaging in suspected patient, early use of broad spectrum antibiotics, and judicial use of anticoagulation may save the life and prevent disability. Surgery is used only to treat the nidus of infection. PMID:26944152

  7. Grammatical Arthritis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Don

    1994-01-01

    Discusses grammatical arthritis (an internal buildup of rules that hinders writing flexibility); four new "rules" (concerning "data is,""none are,""hopefully," and the restrictive "which"); attitudes toward English grammar; how to be a helpful editor; and where to learn about grammar. (SR)

  8. A Homeowner's Guide to Septic Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sponenberg, Torsten D.; And Others

    This booklet provides basic information on septic system use and maintenance. Written for current and prospective homeowners, it offers guidelines for proper operation of household septic systems. In addition, (1) components of individual systems are diagrammatically explained; (2) suggestions for maintenance are outlined; (3) problem areas and…

  9. Lemierre's syndrome presenting with septic shock.

    PubMed

    Marulasiddappa, Vinay; Tejesh, C A

    2013-11-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is a rare condition characterized by septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein and metastatic abscesses following oropharyngeal infection. Though classically caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum, a number of other causative organisms have been reported in literature. We report a case of Lemierre's syndrome following parapharyngeal abscess due to staphylococcus aureus which progressed to septic shock. PMID:24501493

  10. Lemierre's syndrome presenting with septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Marulasiddappa, Vinay; Tejesh, C. A.

    2013-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is a rare condition characterized by septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein and metastatic abscesses following oropharyngeal infection. Though classically caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum, a number of other causative organisms have been reported in literature. We report a case of Lemierre's syndrome following parapharyngeal abscess due to staphylococcus aureus which progressed to septic shock. PMID:24501493

  11. Imaging in Foot and Ankle Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Victoria H; Rowbotham, Emma L; Grainger, Andrew J

    2016-04-01

    The foot and ankle are commonly involved in a range of arthritides that affect the joints, bones, and soft tissues. Accurate plain film interpretation can often aid the diagnosis and monitor disease progression and treatment response. Ultrasound and MRI afford superior depiction of the soft tissues, and advances over recent years have centered on early detection of synovitis, enabling earlier diagnosis and treatment. Advantages and disadvantages of the imaging techniques of radiography, multidetector computed tomography, ultrasound, and MRI are discussed, as is optimization of these modalities for the assessment of the anatomically complex joints of the foot and ankle. Diagnostic features enabling differentiation between rheumatoid arthritis, seronegative spondyloarthropathies, osteoarthritis, gout, crystal deposition disease, pigmented villonodular synovitis, Charcot arthropathy, septic arthritis, synovial osteochondromatosis, hemophilia, and reflex sympathetic dystrophy are also reviewed. PMID:27336451

  12. Septic Mice Are Susceptible to Pulmonary Aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Benjamim, Claudia F.; Hogaboam, Cory M.; Lukacs, Nicholas W.; Kunkel, Steven L.

    2003-01-01

    Clinical data underscores the fact that subsequent high mortality rates occur in patients who survive acute septic episodes. Herein, we described a clinically relevant model of experimental sepsis that we believe will allow further investigation of the manner in which the pulmonary innate immune response is modulated after sepsis. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model, whereby the cecum was partially ligated and punctured nine times with a 21-gauge needle. This procedure was associated with 100% mortality at 3 days after surgery. In contrast, when mice subjected to CLP were treated with antibiotic beginning at 8 hours after surgery, and every 12 hours thereafter until 3 days, ∼60% of the mice survived. Interestingly, CLP survivors quickly succumbed (100% mortality) to pulmonary infection when intratracheally challenged, at day 3 after CLP, with viable Aspergillus fumigatus conidia. No mortality was observed in conidia-challenged sham-operated mice. The defective innate immune response against A. fumigatus in CLP mice could not be explained by a failure of neutrophils to infiltrate the lungs. Instead, gene array analysis revealed that several components of the innate immune response, including the nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway, were down-regulated. Thus, we describe a system of sepsis-induced innate immune failure in the lungs of C57BL/6 mice. PMID:14633632

  13. Arthritis of the Wrist

    MedlinePlus

    ... is caused by just two types: osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Osteoarthritis Osteoarthritis (OA) is a progressive condition that ... other, it results in pain, stiffness, and weakness. Rheumatoid Arthritis Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic disease that ...

  14. What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Arthritis Find a Clinical Trial Journal Articles Rheumatoid Arthritis PDF Version Size: 57 KB Audio Version Time: ... Size: 9.7 MB November 2014 What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to-Read Series of ...

  15. Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bursitis and Tendinitis, Q&A Fibromyalgia, Q&A Gout, Q&A Juvenile Arthritis, Q&A Childhood Arthritis ( ... Many people also experience fatigue and sleep disturbances. Gout. A type of arthritis resulting from deposits of ...

  16. Forms of Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... stiffness, inflammation, swelling and, sometimes, destruction of joints. Gout — a form of arthritis that occurs when uric ... the joints. Some 2.1 million Americans have gout. Lupus — a form of arthritis, like rheumatoid arthritis, ...

  17. Reactive Arthritis Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Of Spondylitis The Heart In Spondyloarthritis Inflammatory vs. Mechanical Back ... Arthritis Symptoms Because there is no specific laboratory test for reactive arthritis, doctors sometimes find it difficult ...

  18. Circulating plasma factors induce tubular and glomerular alterations in septic burns patients

    PubMed Central

    Mariano, Filippo; Cantaluppi, Vincenzo; Stella, Maurizio; Romanazzi, Giuseppe Mauriello; Assenzio, Barbara; Cairo, Monica; Biancone, Luigi; Triolo, Giorgio; Ranieri, V Marco; Camussi, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    Background Severe burn is a systemic illness often complicated by sepsis. Kidney is one of the organs invariably affected, and proteinuria is a constant clinical finding. We studied the relationships between proteinuria and patient outcome, severity of renal dysfunction and systemic inflammatory state in burns patients who developed sepsis-associated acute renal failure (ARF). We then tested the hypothesis that plasma in these patients induces apoptosis and functional alterations that could account for proteinuria and severity of renal dysfunction in tubular cells and podocytes. Methods We studied the correlation between proteinuria and indexes of systemic inflammation or renal function prospectively in 19 severe burns patients with septic shock and ARF, and we evaluated the effect of plasma on apoptosis, polarity and functional alterations in cultured human tubular cells and podocytes. As controls, we collected plasma from 10 burns patients with septic shock but without ARF, 10 burns patients with septic shock and ARF, 10 non-burns patients with septic shock without ARF, 10 chronic uremic patients and 10 healthy volunteers. Results Septic burns patients with ARF presented a severe proteinuria that correlated to outcome, glomerular (creatinine/urea clearance) and tubular (fractional excretion of sodium and potassium) functional impairment and systemic inflammation (white blood cell (WBC) and platelet counts). Plasma from these patients induced a pro-apoptotic effect in tubular cells and podocytes that correlated with the extent of proteinuria. Plasma-induced apoptosis was significantly higher in septic severe burns patients with ARF with respect to those without ARF or with septic shock without burns. Moreover, plasma from septic burns patients induced an alteration of polarity in tubular cells, as well as reduced expression of the tight junction protein ZO-1 and of the endocytic receptor megalin. In podocytes, plasma from septic burns patients increased

  19. Midfoot arthritis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Amar; Rao, Smita; Nawoczenski, Deborah; Flemister, Adolf S; DiGiovanni, Benedict; Baumhauer, Judith F

    2010-07-01

    Midfoot arthritis is a common cause of significant pain and disability. Although the medial tarsometatarsal (TMT) joints provide < 7 degrees of sagittal plane motion, the more mobile lateral fourth and fifth TMT joints provide balance and accommodation on uneven ground. These small constrained TMT joints also provide stability and translate the forward propulsion motion of the hindfoot and ankle joint to the forefoot metatarsophalangeal joints from heel rise to toe-off. Posttraumatic degeneration is the primary cause of midfoot arthritis, although primary degeneration and inflammatory conditions can also affect this area. The result is a painful midfoot that can no longer effectively transmit load from the hindfoot to the forefoot. Shoe modifications and orthotic inserts are the mainstay of nonsurgical management. Successful management of midfoot arthritis with orthoses is predicated on achieving adequate joint stabilization while still allowing function. Surgical intervention typically involves arthrodesis of the medial midfoot, although the best treatment of the more mobile lateral column is a subject of debate. PMID:20595134

  20. Fluid therapy for septic shock resuscitation: which fluid should be used?

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Thiago Domingos; Rocha, Leonardo Lima; Pessoa, Camila Menezes Souza; Silva, Eliézer; de Assuncao, Murillo Santucci Cesar

    2015-01-01

    Early resuscitation of septic shock patients reduces the sepsis-related morbidity and mortality. The main goals of septic shock resuscitation include volemic expansion, maintenance of adequate tissue perfusion and oxygen delivery, guided by central venous pressure, mean arterial pressure, mixed or central venous oxygen saturation and arterial lactate levels. An aggressive fluid resuscitation, possibly in association with vasopressors, inotropes and red blood cell concentrate transfusion may be necessary to achieve those hemodynamic goals. Nonetheless, even though fluid administration is one of the most common interventions offered to critically ill patients, the most appropriate type of fluid to be used remains controversial. According to recently published clinical trials, crystalloid solutions seem to be the most appropriate type of fluids for initial resuscitation of septic shock patients. Balanced crystalloids have theoretical advantages over the classic solutions, but there is not enough evidence to indicate it as first-line treatment. Additionally, when large amounts of fluids are necessary to restore the hemodynamic stability, albumin solutions may be a safe and effective alternative. Hydroxyethyl starches solutions must be avoided in septic patients due to the increased risk of acute renal failure, increased need for renal replacement therapy and increased mortality. Our objective was to present a narrative review of the literature regarding the major types of fluids and their main drawbacks in the initial resuscitation of the septic shock patients. PMID:26313437

  1. Radical surgery in septic abortion.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, P; Ghosh, M; Ghosh, S

    1979-08-01

    At R.G. Kar Medical College Hospital, Calcutta, 10 cases of septic abortion from 1975-1977 were studied. Hysterectomies were preformed on 4 cases due to emergency situations including traumatised uterine fundus and perforated cervix, and on 6 cases after conservative treatment. Upon performing laparotomy in 9 cases, a uterine rent was detected; in 1 case there was a perforation in the posterior wall of the cervix, and in 5 cases mechanical obstructions due to internal adhesions to the uterine rent were found. 4 patients died primarily because of the patients seeking help too late. It is suggested that under high risk circumstances, laparotomy is advantageous to conservative medical management since bowel injuries and mechanical obstructions can only be detected by laparotomy. Radical surgery, however, should be undertaken before the patients general condition deteriorates to the point that the patient cannot tolerate surgical intervention. PMID:12336028

  2. Severe sepsis and septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Schorr, Christa A; Zanotti, Sergio; Dellinger, R Phillip

    2014-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality from sepsis remains unacceptably high. Large variability in clinical practice, plus the increasing awareness that certain processes of care associated with improved critical care outcomes, has led to the development of clinical practice guidelines in a variety of areas related to infection and sepsis. The Surviving Sepsis Guidelines for Management of Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock were first published in 2004, revised in 2008, and recently revised again and published in 2013. The first part of this manuscript is a summary of the 2013 guidelines with some editorial comment. The second part of the manuscript characterizes hospital based sepsis performance improvement programs and highlights the sepsis bundles from the Surviving Sepsis Campaign as a key component of such a program. PMID:24335487

  3. Postpartum septic sacroiliitis misdiagnosed as sciatic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Qing; Li, Fang-Cai; Wang, Jia-Wei; Wang, Shuang

    2010-03-01

    Early diagnosis of septic sacroiliitis is difficult because symptoms are nonspecific, especially during pregnancy and the postpartum period. We describe a female patient with left buttock pain radiating down the thigh after an uncomplicated induction delivery. She was afebrile and had no apparent abnormality on pelvic x-ray or computed tomography scan. A sensory deficit in the lateral portion of her left lower limb was found, and electromyography showed neurogenic abnormalities in the left lower limb. She was initially misdiagnosed as sciatic neuropathy. As her symptoms worsened, septic sacroiliitis is considered. Bone scintigraphy showed increased Tc-methylene diphosphonate uptake in the left sacroiliac joint, and magnetic resonance imaging scan showed a signal abnormality in the left sacroiliac joint. The diagnosis of septic sacroiliitis was then confirmed by the rapid efficacy of antibiotic therapy. This report suggests that irritation and injury of spinal nerves can be the presenting signs in septic sacroiliitis. PMID:20090512

  4. Use of technetium-99m methylene diphosphonate and gallium-67 citrate scans after intraarticular injection of Staphylococcus aureus into knee joints of rabbits with chronic antigen-induced arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Mahowald, M.L.; Raskind, J.R.; Peterson, L.; Gerding, D.; Raddatz, D.A.; Shafer, R.

    1986-08-01

    Numerous clinical studies have questioned the ability of radionuclide scans to differentiate septic from aseptic joint inflammation. A clinical study may not be able to document an underlying disease process or duration of infection and, thus, may make conclusions about the accuracy of scan interpretations open to debate. In this study, the Dumonde-Glynn model of antigen-induced arthritis in rabbits was used as the experimental model to study technetium and gallium scans in Staphylococcus aureus infection of arthritic and normal joints. Gallium scans were negative in normal rabbits, usually negative in antigen-induced arthritis, but positive in septic arthritis. The bone scan was usually negative in early infection but positive in late septic arthritis, a finding reflecting greater penetration of bacteria into subchondral bone because of the underlying inflammatory process.

  5. Polymorphonuclear leucocyte function and previous yersinia arthritis: enhanced chemokinetic migration and oxygen radical production correlate with the severity of the acute disease.

    PubMed Central

    Koivuranta-Vaara, P; Leirisalo-Repo, M; Repo, H

    1987-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leucocyte (PMN) functions (migration in vitro, chemiluminescence, O-2 production, binding of chemotactic peptide, and aggregation) were studied in HLA-B27 positive patients with previous yersinia arthritis (YA). PMNs of patients whose disease had been severe showed chemokinetic and chemiluminescence responses significantly higher than the PMNs of those with a mild disease. The results support the view that enhanced PMN function contributes to inflammatory symptoms in patients with YA. PMID:3592787

  6. Review of a large clinical series: Predicting death for patients with abdominal septic shock.

    PubMed

    Hanisch, Ernst; Brause, Rüdiger; Paetz, Jürgen; Arlt, Björn

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the result of the MEDAN project that analyzes a multicenter septic shock patient data collection. The mortality prognosis based on 4 scores that are often used is compared with the prognosis of a trained neural network. We built an alarm system using the network classification results. Method. We analyzed the data of 382 patients with abdominal septic shock who were admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) from 1998 to 2002. The analysis includes the calculation of daily sepsis-related organ failure assessment (SOFA), Acute Physiological and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II, simplified acute physiology score (SAPS) II, multiple-organ dysfunction score (MODS) scores for each patient and the training and testing of an appropriate neural network. Results. For our patients with abdominal septic shock, the analysis shows that it is not possible to predict their individual fate correctly on the day of admission to the ICU on the basis of any current score. However, when the trained network computes a score value below the threshold during the ICU stay, there is a high probability that the patient will die within 3 days. The trained neural network obtains the same outcome prediction performance as the best score, the SOFA score, using narrower confidence intervals and considering three variables only: systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and the number of thrombocytes. We conclude that the currently best available score for abdominal septic shock may be replaced by the output of a trained neural network with only 3 input variables. PMID:21262751

  7. Assessment, investigation, and management of acute monoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Till, S H; Snaith, M L

    1999-09-01

    Trauma is the commonest cause of acute monoarticular joint pain and swelling in patients attending an accident and emergency (A&E) department. However, in a significant minority of patients there will be no history of trauma and consequently a different approach to assessment and investigation is required. Our aim is to offer an outline of how to assess, investigate, and manage a patient with monoarthritis. Despite advances in antibiotic treatment diagnostic delay partly explains why septic arthritis is still associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. It is therefore imperative that joint infection is considered above all other diagnoses. Arthrocentesis is a relatively safe procedure and doctors in A&E medicine are encouraged to develop the skills required to aspirate large joints. In the same way that the A&E department is often portrayed as the shop window of a hospital, the joint can reflect a wide variety of internal diseases. Connective tissue disease, inflammatory bowel disease, sarcoidosis, and vasculitis can all present with a monoarthritis. A non-specific reactive monoarthritis may be a feature of a wide variety of common and uncommon infections including, brucellosis, Lyme disease, and leptospirosis. Drugs are also associated with acute arthritis either through their metabolic consequences or as idiosyncratic drug reactions. The ability for the joint to reflect multisystem disease necessitates close liaison with specialists from other fields. A multidisciplinary approach to the management of these patients is strongly encouraged as some will have unusual diseases that require specialist advice. It is not difficult to appreciate how the patient with monoarthritis can present the clinician with a fascinating diagnostic and therapeutic challenge, which we hope this article will help to unravel. PMID:10505918

  8. Arthritis related to systemic meningococcal disease: 34 years' experience.

    PubMed

    Cabellos, C; Nolla, J M; Verdaguer, R; Pelegrin, I; Ribera, A; Ariza, J; Viladrich, P F

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess the clinical characteristics, therapeutic aspects, and outcome of arthritis related to invasive meningococcal disease (IMD). All episodes of bacterial meningitis and IMD are recorded systematically. We selected all episodes of IMD, with or without meningitis, that presented arthritis. From 1977 to 2010, 522 episodes of IMD were treated. Thirty-nine of these (7.5 %, 26 women, mean age 33 years) presented arthritis. Of these 39, 37 (95 %) presented skin lesions and 31 (79 %) had meningitis. Twenty (51 %) had positive blood cultures and six (15 %) had shock. No differences were found in skin lesions, shock, or bacteremia compared to cases without arthritis. In contrast to other septic forms, arthritis related to IMD was cured with short antibiotic therapy and without surgical drainage. There was no mortality. All patients recovered and none presented joint sequelae; however, 13 adult patients (33 %) required long-term treatment with steroids due to persistent symptoms. Arthritis related to IMD most frequently affects the knees and ankles, and may be a cause of fever relapse. Short antibiotic therapy is enough in all cases and surgical drainage is not needed. In some adult patients, especially those over 50 years of age, evolution is torpid and steroid therapy may be required in order to achieve recovery. PMID:22476361

  9. [Pancreatitis and nutrition. Significance of the gastrointestinal tract and nutrition for septic complications].

    PubMed

    Foitzik, T

    2001-01-01

    Septic complications are an important factor for the morbidity and mortality of acute pancreatitis. The gut has been identified as a source of infection early in the course of the disease allowing intestinal bacteria to translocate into pancreatic necrosis and other organs. Bacterial translocation is promoted by an impaired intestinal mucosal barrier which can be attributed to the reduced oxygen and substrate supply of the intestine during the early systemic response to the pancreatic injury. A rat model of severe acute pancreatitis has been used to confirm the hypothesis that an impaired mucosal barrier can be stabilized by supplying certain nutritients, vitamins and trace elements. Following a discussion of the many aspects of bacterial translocation and gut derived sepsis, the role of the gut and nutrition for the development of septic complications in acute pancreatitis is summarized as follows: Early in the course of acute pancreatitis the gut is a target organ of the primary systemic inflammatory response (SIRS) to pancreatic injury. SIRS-induced gut barrier dysfunction promoting bacterial translocation makes the gut the motor for secondary (septic) complications. As a septic focus the gut becomes a target for therapeutic measures aimed at stabilizing the impaired gut barrier. Nutritive factors demonstrated to improve impaired gut barrier function include early enteral feeding and specific factors like glutamine which are essential for enterocytes and colonocytes in stress. Experimental data are presented to underline the significance of these nutritive factors and subsequent randomized multicenter trials performed to verify the positive experimental results are introduced. The effect of other nutritive factors (e.g. omega-3-fatty acids) has not yet been systemically investigated. Thus, experimental and clinical studies need to be performed for evaluating their effect on bacterial translocation and the disease course in acute pancreatitis. PMID:11227293

  10. [The criteria of differentiated diagnostics of early arthritis on the basis of analysis of serum hyaluronidase and deoxyribonuclease activity].

    PubMed

    Volkova, M V; Kunder, E V

    2012-10-01

    The study analyzed serum hyaluronidase and deoxyribonuclease activity in patients with early arthritis--early rheumatoid arthritis and acute reactive arthritis. The criteria of their differential diagnostics were developed on the basis of data obtained. The genuine methods were applied to analyze hyaluronidase and deoxyribonuclease activity of blood serum based on formation of clot of etacridine acetate (rivanol) with hyaluronic acid and DNA inversely proportionally to their polymerization under the impact of enzymes. The increased serum hyaluronidase and deoxyribonuclease activity was established in patients with early arthritis as compared with control group (p < 0.001). The prevalence of mentioned types of activity under early rheumatoid arthritis as compared with acute reactive arthritis was detected too. The rests for differentiate diagnostics of early rheumatoid arthritis and acute reactive arthritis were developed conformed to criteria of the most useful diagnostic tests in rheumatology. PMID:23265051

  11. Menstrual arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    McDonagh, J E; Singh, M M; Griffiths, I D

    1993-01-01

    The menstrual cycle is characterised by variations in the absolute and relative concentrations of the hormones of the hypothalamic pituitary ovarian axis, which in turn affect cell function and cytokine and heat shock protein production. Menstruation involves the shedding of the secretory endometrium, which is part of the mucosal associated lymphoid tissue and hence is rich in immunologically competent cells such as CD8 T cells and macrophages. The case is reported here of a patient presenting with a recurrent but transient symmetrical inflammatory polyarthritis which only occurred at menstruation with no residual damage. The disease was suppressed by danazol. Endometrial degradation products are suggested as the trigger of this 'menstrual arthritis'. PMID:8427519

  12. Septic Shock Secondary to a Urinary Tract Infection with Pediococcus Pentosaceus.

    PubMed

    Han, Amneet; Mehta, Jeet; Pauly, Rebecca R

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a urinary tract infection secondary to Pediococcus pentosaceus causing septic shock and acute kidney injury in a 70-year-old male. We demonstrate successful treatment with a 10-day course of piperacillin/tazobactam. Recently, Pediococci have been found to be the cause of opportunistic infections in humans. This has posed a challenge to treating infections caused by this species because it has been found to be resistant to multiple antibiotics, including glycopeptides. PMID:27443041

  13. [A case of severe systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis introduced tocilizumab in early phase of the disease].

    PubMed

    Ikegawa, Takeshi; Yamazaki, Kazuko; Nishimura, Kenichi; Kanetaka, Taichi; Kikuchi, Masako; Nozawa, Tomo; Hara, Ryouki; Sato, Tomomi; Sakurai, Nodoka; Yokota, Shumpei

    2014-01-01

    A 14-year-old boy was admitted in the former hospital with remittent fever, erythematous rash, joint pain, and muscle pain. Antibiotics were ineffectively administered and then, methylprednisolone (mPSL) pulse therapy with methotrexate was introduced under the diagnosis of suspected systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). However, he still had clinical symptoms and signs, and was transferred to our hospital. Re-examination revealed no malignancies including acute leukemia by bone marrow aspiration, no infectious agents by septic work, and no significant increases of antibodies against several viruses including CMV, EBV, HSV, Parvovirus B19, adenovirus, and so forth. FDG-PET demonstrated the accumulation of (18)F-FDG in bone marrows suggesting systemic JIA. Laboratory findings were leukocytosis and granulocytosis, elevated levels of C-reactive protein, D-dimer, ferritin, and interleukin-6. He was finally diagnosed as having severe systemic JIA. Thus, soon after the additional mPSL pulse therapy, tocilizumab (TCZ) was successfully introduced. In conclusion, for systemic JIA patients with severe systemic inflammation, it will be reasonable to introduce tocilizumab earlier than the guideline suggested to reduce side effects of long-term and large amounts of steroids and to protect the transition to macrophage activation syndrome. Further studies will be needed to recommend appropriate timing of tocilizumab introduction. PMID:24974931

  14. Rheumatoid arthritis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease in which the body's immune system attacks itself. The pattern of joints ... other joints and is worse in the morning. Rheumatoid arthritis is also a systemic disease, involving other body ...

  15. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... joints. This form of JIA may turn into rheumatoid arthritis. It may involve five or more large and ... no known prevention for JIA. Alternative Names Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA); Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; Still disease; Juvenile spondyloarthritis ...

  16. Treating Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Psoriatic Arthritis Info Kit Resources Community icon: Link text: Post your questions in our online community and ... psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Talk Psoriasis icon: Link text: Contact our Patient Navigators for free and confidential ...

  17. Classification of Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Psoriatic Arthritis Info Kit Resources Community icon: Link text: Post your questions in our online community and ... psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Talk Psoriasis icon: Link text: Contact our Patient Navigators for free and confidential ...

  18. Diagnosing Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Psoriatic Arthritis Info Kit Resources Community icon: Link text: Post your questions in our online community and ... psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Talk Psoriasis icon: Link text: Contact our Patient Navigators for free and confidential ...

  19. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA); Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; Still disease; Juvenile spondyloarthritis ... The cause of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is not known. It ... illness . This means the body attacks and destroys healthy body ...

  20. Forms of Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Forms of Arthritis Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents Today, ... of Linda Saisselin Osteoarthritis (OA) — the form of arthritis typically occurring during middle or old age, this ...

  1. What Is Juvenile Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... children with arthritis Preventing anemia in children with chronic inflammatory diseases such as arthritis Whether daily calcium supplements ... density in children with arthritis The impact of chronic and recurrent pain on ... role of an inflammatory chemical called interleukin-15 (IL-15). For More ...

  2. Gait changes precede overt arthritis and strongly correlate with symptoms and histopathological events in pristane-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Pristane-induced arthritis (PIA) in the rat has been described as an animal model of inflammatory arthritis which exhibits features similar to rheumatoid arthritis in humans, such as a chronic, destructive, and symmetrical involvement of peripheral joints. However, so far little is known about the earliest inflammatory events and their influence on locomotor behaviour during the course of PIA. To investigate this issue a detailed analysis of the pathologic changes occurring during the prodromal and early stages of PIA was performed. Methods Arthritis was induced in DA.rats by injection of 150 μl 2,6,10,4-tetramethyl-pentadecane (pristane) at the base of the tail and changes in locomotor behaviour of the affected paws were monitored using the CatWalk quantitative gait analysis system. The pathologic events occurring in the joints of pristane-injected animals were studied before onset, at onset, and during acute phase of arthritis by histological methods. Results Gait analysis revealed that changes in locomotion such as reduced paw print areas and stance phase time are already apparent before the onset of clinically discernible arthritis symptoms (erythema, paw swelling) and correlate with PIA scores. In agreement with these findings, inflammatory tenosynovitis could be observed by histology already before the onset of erythema and swelling of the respective paws. In the most heavily affected rats also irregularities in step sequence patterns occurred A kinetic analysis of clinical and histological findings demonstrated that gait changes precede the pathological changes occurring during the acute phase of pristane-induced arthritis. Conclusions Gait analysis allows for pinpointing the initial inflammatory changes in experimental arthritis models such as pristane-induced arthritis. Analysis of early clinically relevant symptoms in arthritis models may facilitate the search for novel therapeutics to interfere with pain, inflammation and joint destruction

  3. Histopathology of Lyme arthritis in LSH hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Hejka, A.; Schmitz, J.L.; England, D.M.; Callister, S.M.; Schell, R.F.

    1989-05-01

    The authors studied the histopathologic evolution of arthritis in nonirradiated and irradiated hamsters infected with Borrelia burgdorferi. Nonirradiated hamsters injected in the hind paws with B. burgdorferi developed an acute inflammatory reaction involving the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and dermis. This acute inflammatory reaction was short-lived and was replaced by a mild chronic synovitis as the number of detectable spirochetes in the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and perineurovascular areas diminished. Exposing hamsters to radiation before inoculation with B. burgdorferi exacerbated and prolonged the acute inflammatory phase. Spirochetes also persisted longer in the periarticular soft tissues. A major histopathologic finding was destructive and erosive bone changes of the hind paws, which resulted in deformation of the joints. These studies should be helpful in defining the immune mechanism participating in the onset, progression, and resolution of Lyme arthritis.

  4. Costochondral junction osteomyelitis in 3 septic foals

    PubMed Central

    Cesarini, Carla; Macieira, Susana; Girard, Christiane; Drolet, Richard; d’Anjou, Marc-André; Jean, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The costochondral junction constitutes a potential site of infection in septic foals and it could be favored by thoracic trauma. Standard radiographs and ultrasonography are useful tools for diagnosis of this condition and ultrasound-guided needle aspiration could permit the definitive confirmation of infection. PMID:22210943

  5. Symmetrical peripheral gangrene caused by septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Shimbo, Keisuke; Yokota, Kazunori; Miyamoto, Junpei; Okuhara, Yukako; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2015-01-01

    We report three cases of symmetrical peripheral gangrene (SPG) caused by septic shock. Most of sepsis survivors with SPG require amputation of the affected extremities. To preserve the length of the thumb and fingers, we performed surgical amputation and used flaps to cover the amputated peripheral extremities.

  6. Erythrocyte selenium concentration predicts intensive care unit and hospital mortality in patients with septic shock: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Selenoenzymes can modulate the extent of oxidative stress, which is recognized as a key feature of septic shock. The pathophysiologic role of erythrocyte selenium concentration in patients with septic shock remains unknown. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the association of erythrocyte selenium concentration with glutathione peroxidase (GPx1) activity, GPx1 polymorphisms and with ICU and hospital mortality in septic shock patients. Methods This prospective study included all patients older than 18 years with septic shock on admission or during their ICU stay, admitted to one of the three ICUs of our institution, from January to August 2012. At the time of the patients’ enrollment, demographic information was recorded. Blood samples were taken within the first 72 hours of the patients’ admission or within 72 hours of the septic shock diagnosis for determination of selenium status, protein carbonyl concentration, GPx1 activity and GPx1 Pro198Leu polymorphism (rs 1050450) genotyping. Results A total of 110 consecutive patients were evaluated. The mean age was 57.6 ± 15.9 years, 63.6% were male. Regarding selenium status, only erythrocyte selenium concentration was lower in patients who died in the ICU. The frequencies for GPx1 Pro198Leu polymorphism were 55%, 38% and 7% for Pro/Pro, Pro/Leu and Leu/Leu, respectively. In the logistic regression models, erythrocyte selenium concentration was associated with ICU and hospital mortality in patients with septic shock even after adjustment for protein carbonyl concentration and acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II score (APACHE II) or sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA). Conclusions Erythrocyte selenium concentration was a predictor of ICU and hospital mortality in patients with septic shock. However, this effect was not due to GPx1 activity or Pro198Leu polymorphism. PMID:24887198

  7. Domestic wells have high probability of pumping septic tank leachate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremer, J. E.; Harter, T.

    2012-08-01

    Onsite wastewater treatment systems are common in rural and semi-rural areas around the world; in the US, about 25-30% of households are served by a septic (onsite) wastewater treatment system, and many property owners also operate their own domestic well nearby. Site-specific conditions and local groundwater flow are often ignored when installing septic systems and wells. In areas with small lots (thus high spatial septic system densities), shallow domestic wells are prone to contamination by septic system leachate. Mass balance approaches have been used to determine a maximum septic system density that would prevent contamination of groundwater resources. In this study, a source area model based on detailed groundwater flow and transport modeling is applied for a stochastic analysis of domestic well contamination by septic leachate. Specifically, we determine the probability that a source area overlaps with a septic system drainfield as a function of aquifer properties, septic system density and drainfield size. We show that high spatial septic system density poses a high probability of pumping septic system leachate. The hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer has a strong influence on the intersection probability. We find that mass balance calculations applied on a regional scale underestimate the contamination risk of individual drinking water wells by septic systems. This is particularly relevant for contaminants released at high concentrations, for substances that experience limited attenuation, and those that are harmful even at low concentrations (e.g., pathogens).

  8. Domestic wells have high probability of pumping septic tank leachate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, J. E.; Harter, T.

    2011-06-01

    Onsite wastewater treatment systems such as septic systems are common in rural and semi-rural areas around the world; in the US, about 25-30 % of households are served by a septic system and a private drinking water well. Site-specific conditions and local groundwater flow are often ignored when installing septic systems and wells. Particularly in areas with small lots, thus a high septic system density, these typically shallow wells are prone to contamination by septic system leachate. Typically, mass balance approaches are used to determine a maximum septic system density that would prevent contamination of the aquifer. In this study, we estimate the probability of a well pumping partially septic system leachate. A detailed groundwater and transport model is used to calculate the capture zone of a typical drinking water well. A spatial probability analysis is performed to assess the probability that a capture zone overlaps with a septic system drainfield depending on aquifer properties, lot and drainfield size. We show that a high septic system density poses a high probability of pumping septic system leachate. The hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer has a strong influence on the intersection probability. We conclude that mass balances calculations applied on a regional scale underestimate the contamination risk of individual drinking water wells by septic systems. This is particularly relevant for contaminants released at high concentrations, for substances which experience limited attenuation, and those being harmful even in low concentrations.

  9. Animal Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis (I): Pristane-Induced Arthritis in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Tuncel, Jonatan; Haag, Sabrina; Hoffmann, Markus H.; Yau, Anthony C. Y.; Hultqvist, Malin; Olofsson, Peter; Bäcklund, Johan; Nandakumar, Kutty Selva; Weidner, Daniela; Fischer, Anita; Leichsenring, Anna; Lange, Franziska; Haase, Claus; Lu, Shemin; Gulko, Percio S.; Steiner, Günter; Holmdahl, Rikard

    2016-01-01

    Background To facilitate the development of therapies for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the Innovative Medicines Initiative BTCure has combined the experience from several laboratories worldwide to establish a series of protocols for different animal models of arthritis that reflect the pathogenesis of RA. Here, we describe chronic pristane-induced arthritis (PIA) model in DA rats, and provide detailed instructions to set up and evaluate the model and for reporting data. Methods We optimized dose of pristane and immunization procedures and determined the effect of age, gender, and housing conditions. We further assessed cage-effects, reproducibility, and frequency of chronic arthritis, disease markers, and efficacy of standard and novel therapies. Results Out of 271 rats, 99.6% developed arthritis after pristane-administration. Mean values for day of onset, day of maximum arthritis severity and maximum clinical scores were 11.8±2.0 days, 20.3±5.1 days and 34.2±11 points on a 60-point scale, respectively. The mean frequency of chronic arthritis was 86% but approached 100% in long-term experiments over 110 days. Pristane was arthritogenic even at 5 microliters dose but needed to be administrated intradermally to induce robust disease with minimal variation. The development of arthritis was age-dependent but independent of gender and whether the rats were housed in conventional or barrier facilities. PIA correlated well with weight loss and acute phase reactants, and was ameliorated by etanercept, dexamethasone, cyclosporine A and fingolimod treatment. Conclusions PIA has high incidence and excellent reproducibility. The chronic relapsing-remitting disease and limited systemic manifestations make it more suitable than adjuvant arthritis for long-term studies of joint-inflammation and screening and validation of new therapeutics. PMID:27227821

  10. Developing a New Definition and Assessing New Clinical Criteria for Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Shankar-Hari, Manu; Phillips, Gary S.; Levy, Mitchell L.; Seymour, Christopher W.; Liu, Vincent X.; Deutschman, Clifford S.; Angus, Derek C.; Rubenfeld, Gordon D.; Singer, Mervyn

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Septic shock currently refers to a state of acute circulatory failure associated with infection. Emerging biological insights and reported variation in epidemiology challenge the validity of this definition. OBJECTIVE To develop a new definition and clinical criteria for identifying septic shock in adults. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS The Society of Critical Care Medicine and the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine convened a task force (19 participants) to revise current sepsis/septic shock definitions. Three sets of studies were conducted: (1) a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies in adults published between January 1, 1992, and December 25, 2015, to determine clinical criteria currently reported to identify septic shock and inform the Delphi process; (2) a Delphi study among the task force comprising 3 surveys and discussions of results from the systematic review, surveys, and cohort studies to achieve consensus on a new septic shock definition and clinical criteria; and (3) cohort studies to test variables identified by the Delphi process using Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) (2005–2010; n = 28 150), University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) (2010–2012; n = 1 309 025), and Kaiser Permanente Northern California (KPNC) (2009–2013; n = 1 847 165) electronic health record (EHR) data sets. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Evidence for and agreement on septic shock definitions and criteria. RESULTS The systematic review identified 44 studies reporting septic shock outcomes (total of 166 479 patients) from a total of 92 sepsis epidemiology studies reporting different cutoffs and combinations for blood pressure (BP), fluid resuscitation, vasopressors, serum lactate level, and base deficit to identify septic shock. The septic shock–associated crude mortality was 46.5% (95%CI, 42.7%–50.3%), with significant between-study statistical heterogeneity (I2 = 99.5%; τ2 = 182.5; P < .001). The Delphi process identified

  11. ICPMS analysis of proteins separated by Native-PAGE: Evaluation of metaloprotein profiles in human synovial fluid with acute and chronic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Moyano, Mario F; Mariño-Repizo, Leonardo; Tamashiro, Héctor; Villegas, Liliana; Acosta, Mariano; Gil, Raúl A

    2016-07-01

    The role of trace elements bound to proteins in the etiology and pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remains unclear. In this sense, the identification and detection of metalloproteins has a strong and growing interest. Metalloprotein studies are currently carried out by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) associated to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS), and despite that complete information can be obtained for metals such as Fe, Cu and Zn, difficulties due to poor sensitivity for other trace elements such as Sn, As, etc, are currently faced. In the present work, a simple and fast method for the determination of trace metals bound to synovial fluid (SF) proteins was optimized. Proteins from SF (long and short-term RA) were separated in ten fractions by native PAGE, then dissolved in nitric acid and peroxide hydrogen, and analyzed by ICPMS. Fifteen metals were determined in each separated protein fraction (band). Adequate calibration of proteins molecular weight allowed stablishing which protein type were bound to different metals. PMID:27259351

  12. Severe necrotic and septic pancreatitis. Indications to endoscopic, surgical, and nutritional therapy

    PubMed Central

    MANGIANTE, G.; RODELLA, L.; CEROFOLINI, A.; GIACOPUZZI, S.; PASSERI, V.; STERZI, E.; CATALANO, F.; SCHENAL, G.; de MANZONI, G.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) management has changed over the last fifteen years, and from too aggressive behaviour, we moved to a cautious one. In every case, we can appreciate defect of extremist conceptual position. We reviewed our strategy on disease treatment, and we analyzed treatment of single cases. We collected 4 SAP cases from January 2009 to January 2010. All patients were septic, and we adopted the same approach for all of them, avoiding surgery without peritoneal infection. In all patients we placed jejumostomy and, after cleaning of septic site, we started immediate enteral nutrition (EN). Antibiotic therapy against Gram+, Gram− and antifugal drug had been started. No one died and all patients were back to an active life even if social costs are considerably high especially due to very long hospital stay. PMID:24629818

  13. Enhanced sludge reduction in septic tanks by increasing temperature.

    PubMed

    Pussayanavin, Tatchai; Koottatep, Thammarat; Eamrat, Rawintra; Polprasert, Chongrak

    2015-01-01

    Septic tanks in most developing countries are constructed without drainage trenches or leaching fields to treat toilet wastewater and /or grey water. Due to the short hydraulic retention time, effluents of these septic tanks are still highly polluted, and there is usually high accumulation of septic tank sludge or septage containing high levels of organics and pathogens that requires frequent desludging and subsequent treatment. This study aimed to reduce sludge accumulation in septic tanks by increasing temperatures of the septic tank content. An experimental study employing two laboratory-scale septic tanks fed with diluted septage and operating at temperatures of 40 and 30°C was conducted. At steady-state conditions, there were more methanogenic activities occurring in the sludge layer of the septic tank operating at the temperature of 40°C, resulting in less total volatile solids (TVS) or sludge accumulation and more methane (CH4) production than in the unit operating at 30°C. Molecular analysis found more abundance and diversity of methanogenic microorganisms in the septic tank sludge operating at 40°C than at 30°C. The reduced TVS accumulation in the 40°C septic tank would lengthen the period of septage removal, resulting in a cost-saving in desluging and septage treatment. Cost-benefit analysis of increasing temperatures in septic tanks was discussed. PMID:25438134

  14. [Manifestation of Lyme arthritis in the puerperal period].

    PubMed

    Bussen, S; Steck, T

    1994-08-01

    Lyme disease, a tick-transmitted spirochetal illness caused by Borrelia burgdorferi, usually begins with a characteristic erythema chronicum migrans accompanied by flu-like symptoms. This phase may later be followed by meningitis, neuritis, carditis or arthritis. Congenital abnormalities due to maternal infection during pregnancy have been described. We report on a case of a 36-year old V gravida III para. After a normal pregnancy and a Cesarean section the patient developed postpartal an acute Lyme arthritis. PMID:7975802

  15. Severe inflammatory arthritis and lymphadenopathy in the absence of TNF

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Ian K.; O’Donnell, Kristy; Lawlor, Kate E.; Wicks, Ian P.

    2001-01-01

    It has been postulated that TNF has a pivotal role in a cytokine cascade that results in joint inflammation and destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To evaluate this, we examined the response of TNF-deficient (Tnf–/–) mice in two models of RA. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was induced by injection of chick type II collagen (CII) in CFA. Tnf–/– mice had some reduction in the clinical parameters of CIA and, on histology, significantly more normal joints. However, severe disease was evident in 54% of arthritic Tnf–/– joints. Tnf–/– mice had impaired Ig class switching, but preserved T cell proliferative responses to CII and enhanced IFN-γ production. Interestingly, CII-immunized Tnf–/– mice developed lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly associated with increased memory CD4+ T cells and activated lymph node B cells. Acute inflammatory arthritis was also reduced in Tnf–/– mice, although again some mice exhibited severe disease. We conclude that TNF is important but not essential for inflammatory arthritis; in each model, severe arthritis could proceed even in the complete absence of TNF. These results call into doubt the concept that TNF is obligatory for chronic autoimmune and acute inflammatory arthritis and provide a rationale for further studies into TNF-independent cytokine pathways in arthritis. PMID:11413159

  16. Severe inflammatory arthritis and lymphadenopathy in the absence of TNF.

    PubMed

    Campbell, I K; O'Donnell, K; Lawlor, K E; Wicks, I P

    2001-06-01

    It has been postulated that TNF has a pivotal role in a cytokine cascade that results in joint inflammation and destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To evaluate this, we examined the response of TNF-deficient (Tnf(-/-)) mice in two models of RA. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was induced by injection of chick type II collagen (CII) in CFA. Tnf(-/-) mice had some reduction in the clinical parameters of CIA and, on histology, significantly more normal joints. However, severe disease was evident in 54% of arthritic Tnf(-/-) joints. Tnf(-/-) mice had impaired Ig class switching, but preserved T cell proliferative responses to CII and enhanced IFN-gamma production. Interestingly, CII-immunized Tnf(-/-) mice developed lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly associated with increased memory CD4(+) T cells and activated lymph node B cells. Acute inflammatory arthritis was also reduced in Tnf(-/-) mice, although again some mice exhibited severe disease. We conclude that TNF is important but not essential for inflammatory arthritis; in each model, severe arthritis could proceed even in the complete absence of TNF. These results call into doubt the concept that TNF is obligatory for chronic autoimmune and acute inflammatory arthritis and provide a rationale for further studies into TNF-independent cytokine pathways in arthritis. PMID:11413159

  17. Long term prognosis of reactive salmonella arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Leirisalo-Repo, M; Helenius, P; Hannu, T; Lehtinen, A; Kreula, J; Taavitsainen, M; Koskimies, S

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Reactive joint complications triggered by salmonella gastroenteritis are increasingly reported, but the outcome and long term prognosis of the patients is incompletely known. This study looked at the prognosis of salmonella arthritis in patients hospitalised in 1970-1986.
METHODS—Hospital records from two hospitals in southern Finland were screened for patients with the discharge diagnosis of salmonellosis or reactive, postinfectious arthritis or Reiter's disease. For the patients with confirmed diagnosis of reactive salmonella arthritis, data about the acute disease were collected from the hospital records. A follow up study was performed.
RESULTS—There were 63 patients (28 women, 35 men, mean age 36.5 years) with salmonella arthritis. Urethritis occurred in 27%, eye inflammation in 13%, and low back pain in 44% of the patients. HLA-B27 was present in 88%. More men than women were HLA-B27 positive. HLA-B27 positive patients had higher erythrocyte sedimentation rate (mean 80.9 v 46.5 mm 1st h, p = 0.0180). Also, extra-articular features and radiological sacroiliitis were seen only in HLA-B27 positive patients. A follow up study was performed on 50 patients mean 11.0 (range 5-22 years) later. Twenty patients had recovered completely. Ten patients had mild joint symptoms, 11 patients had had a new acute transient arthritis, and five acute iritis. Eight patients had developed chronic spondyloarthropathy. Radiological sacroiliitis was seen in six of 44 patients, more frequently in male than in female patients (32% v 0%; p = 0.0289). Recurrent or chronic arthritis, iritis or radiological sacroiliitis developed only in HLA-B27 positive patients.
CONCLUSION—Joint symptoms are common after reactive salmonella arthritis. HLA-B27 contributes to the severity of acute disease and to the late prognosis.

 PMID:9370874

  18. The potential role of thromboxane and prostacyclin in endotoxic and septic shock.

    PubMed

    Cook, J A; Wise, W C; Butler, R R; Reines, H D; Rambo, W; Halushka, P V

    1984-01-01

    The potential role of thromboxane (TxA2), a platelet aggregator and vasoconstrictor, and prostacyclin (PGI2) a platelet anti-aggregator and vasodilator, in endotoxic and septic shock was investigated. Early endotoxic shock in the rat is associated with marked elevations of plasma TxB2 (the stable metabolite of TxA2) and lesser increases in plasma 6-keto-PGF1 alpha (the stable metabolite of PGI2). Selective inhibition of TxA2 synthesis by several different chemical classes of Tx synthetase inhibitors was beneficial in endotoxic shock. In contrast, shock induced by acute intra-abdominal sepsis in the rat was characterized by high levels of plasma 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, which exceeded plasma TxA2 six- to eight fold at most time intervals studied. Tx synthetase inhibitors were not protective in this model of acute sepsis, but treatment with fatty acid cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors, an antibiotic (gentamicin), or reduction in arachidonic acid metabolism by essential fatty acid (EFA) deficiency significantly prolonged survival time. An important aspect of the latter study is that decreased arachidonic acid metabolism was an effective adjunct to antibiotic therapy. Conjoint administration of gentamicin in EFA-deficient rats or with indomethacin synergistically improved long-term survival, a result that was not evident with single treatment interventions. In addition to experimental studies, plasma TxB2 levels were measured during clinical sepsis. These studies demonstrated that plasma TxB2 levels were elevated tenfold in patients dying of septic shock compared with septic survivors or nonseptic controls. These composite experimental and clinical observations suggest that arachidonic acid metabolites play a role in the pathogenesis of endotoxic and septic shock. PMID:6440569

  19. When is arthritis reactive?

    PubMed

    Hamdulay, S S; Glynne, S J; Keat, A

    2006-07-01

    Reactive arthritis is an important cause of lower limb oligoarthritis, mainly in young adults. It is one of the spondyloarthropathy family; it is distinguishable from other forms of inflammatory arthritis by virtue of the distribution of affected sites and the high prevalence of characteristic extra-articular lesions. Many terms have been used to refer to this and related forms of arthritis leading to some confusion. Reactive arthritis is precipitated by an infection at a distant site and genetic susceptibility is marked by possession of the HLA-B27 gene, although the mechanism remains uncertain. Diagnosis is a two stage process and requires demonstration of a temporal link with a recognised "trigger" infection. The identification and management of "sexually acquired" and "enteric" forms of reactive arthritis are considered. Putative links with HIV infection are also discussed. The clinical features, approach to investigation, diagnosis, and management of reactive arthritis are reviewed. PMID:16822921

  20. When is arthritis reactive?

    PubMed Central

    Hamdulay, S S; Glynne, S J; Keat, A

    2006-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is an important cause of lower limb oligoarthritis, mainly in young adults. It is one of the spondyloarthropathy family; it is distinguishable from other forms of inflammatory arthritis by virtue of the distribution of affected sites and the high prevalence of characteristic extra‐articular lesions. Many terms have been used to refer to this and related forms of arthritis leading to some confusion. Reactive arthritis is precipitated by an infection at a distant site and genetic susceptibility is marked by possession of the HLA‐B27 gene, although the mechanism remains uncertain. Diagnosis is a two stage process and requires demonstration of a temporal link with a recognised “trigger” infection. The identification and management of “sexually acquired” and “enteric” forms of reactive arthritis are considered. Putative links with HIV infection are also discussed. The clinical features, approach to investigation, diagnosis, and management of reactive arthritis are reviewed. PMID:16822921

  1. Tumour necrosis factor soluble receptors behave as acute phase reactants following surgery in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, chronic osteomyelitis and osteoarthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Chikanza, I C; Roux-Lombard, P; Dayer, J M; Panayi, G S

    1993-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is involved in diverse biological processes including immune and inflammatory reactions and the response to surgical stress. Two soluble TNF receptor protein fragments, TNF-sR55 (from the p55 kD TNF receptor) and TNF-sR75 (from the p75 kD TNF receptor), are released by cells during inflammation and may modulate the e effects of TNF-alpha. We have studied the kinetics of secretion of TNF-alpha, TNF-sR55 and TNF-sR75 in the sera of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and control subjects with osteoarthritis (OA) or chronic osteomyelitis (OM) before and after major surgery. Significantly higher pre-operative levels of TNF-sR55 and TNF-sR75 were found in RA and OM as compared with OA (P < 0.02). Following surgery, TNF-sR55 increased within 24 h in RA, OM and OA (P < 0.05), whereas TNF-sR75 increased significantly only in OM and OA patients (P < 0.05). By contrast, no TNF-alpha was detectable before and after surgery in any of the subjects, but this may have been due to impaired detection (by ELISA) of TNF-alpha when it is bound to TNF-sR. These findings suggest that TNF-sR55 and TNF-sR75 may be further markers of the host's reaction to inflammatory insults. They may also play a role in modulating the immune and inflammatory reactions by inhibiting the systemic effects of TNF-alpha. PMID:8385584

  2. Hallux metatarsophalangeal arthritis.

    PubMed

    Weinfeld, S B; Schon, L C

    1998-04-01

    Arthritis of the hallux metatarsophalangeal joint is a common disorder that affects shoewear, ambulation, and other activities of daily living. Etiologies include degenerative arthritis (hallux rigidus), crystal induced arthropathy (gout, pseudogout), rheumatoid arthritis, the seronegative spondyloathropathies, posttraumatic degeneration, and advanced hallux valgus. Accurate diagnosis and selection of the appropriate intervention depends on recognition of pertinent clinical and radiographic features. This study presents a synopsis of the senior author's (LCS) experience with 439 surgically treated patients with hallux metatarsophalangeal arthritis, focusing on origin and treatment. PMID:9584362

  3. Microencapsulation: an acclaimed novel drug-delivery system for NSAIDs in arthritis.

    PubMed

    Manjanna, K M; Shivakumar, B; Pramod Kumar, T M

    2010-01-01

    Arthritis refers to different medical conditions associated with disorders of the primary structures that determine joint functioning, such as bones, cartilage, and synovial membranes. Drug discovery and delivery to retard the degeneration of joint tissues are challenging. Current treatment of different types of arthritis such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, septic arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis involves the administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin, diclofenac, aceclofenac, ibuprofen, flurbiprofen, indomethacin piroxicam, dexibuprofen, ketoprofen, nabumetone, nimesulide, and naproxen, mainly by the oral, parenteral, or topical route. However, the frequent dosing that is required with NSAIDs often leads to patient noncompliance, so drug-delivery technologies should be developed to reduce the frequency of dosing and to allow sustained release of medications. Microencapsulation is one of the novel drug-delivery technologies employed to sustain drug release. This method reduces dosing and eliminates gastrointestinal irritation, thus ultimately improving patient compliance in the pharmacotherapy of arthritis. We provide a comprehensive overview of several microencapsulation technologies used in the treatment of arthritis that may reduce the dose-related adverse effects caused by NSAIDs. PMID:21175420

  4. Septic lung and shock lung in man.

    PubMed Central

    Clowes, G H; Hirsch, E; Williams, L; Kwasnik, E; O'Donnell, T F; Cuevas, P; Saini, V K; Moradi, I; Farizan, M; Saravis, C

    1975-01-01

    Two series of patients were studied by serial measurements of blood gas exchange and pulmonarmonary dysfunction and to evaluate the dangers of respiratory failure in post traumatic patients. There were 27 patients who had sustained profound hemorrhagic shock and massive blood replacement averaging 9.7 liters and 38 patients who suffered general peritonitis or other forms of fulminating nonthoracic sepsis. All were supported by endotrachael intubation and volume controlled ventilators. The overall mortality for the post shock patients without sepsis was 12% while in the septic patients it was 35%. The maximal pulmonary arteriovenous shunt encountered in the post hemorrhagic shock patients at 36 hours averaged 20 plus or minus 8% and was accompanied by high cardiac indices (average 5.1 plus or minus 1.3 L/M-2/min) but no significant rise of pulmonary arterial pressure or peak inspiratory pressure (PIP). Severe pulmonary dysfunction subsequently occurred only in those patients who later became septic. The studies on the septic patients were divided according to the magnitude of the cardiac indices (the high indices averaged 4.8 plus or minus 1.6L/M-2/min) and thelow indices averaged 1.9 plus or minus 1.0 L/M-2/min. In the former, the average maximal shunt of 30 plus or minus 6% was sustained for 4 or more days, accompanied by an elevation of PIP to 36 plus or minus 6 cm H2O and by Pa pressure of 28 plus or minus 5 mm Hg. The patients in low output septic shock usually had an associated bronchopneumonia and had an average venous admixture of 34 plus or minus 8% and PIP values of 41 plus or minus 8 cm H2O. The mean Pa pressure in this group was 29 plus or minus 6 mm Hg. PMID:236738

  5. Management of gouty arthritis in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Abdellatif, Abdul A; Elkhalili, Naser

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a comorbid condition that affects, based on recent estimates, between 47% and 54% of patients with gouty arthritis. However, data from randomized controlled trials in patients with gouty arthritis and CKD are limited, and current gouty arthritis treatment guidelines do not address the challenges associated with managing this patient population. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and colchicine are recommended first-line treatments for acute gouty arthritis attacks. However, in patients with CKD, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are not recommended because their use can exacerbate or cause acute kidney injury. Also, colchicine toxicity is increased in patients with CKD, and dosage reduction is required based on level of kidney function. Allopurinol, febuxostat, and pegloticase are all effective treatments for controlling elevated uric acid levels after the treatment of an acute attack. However, in patients with CKD, required allopurinol dosage reductions may limit efficacy; pegloticase requires further investigation in this population, and febuxostat has not been studied in patients with creatinine clearance<30 mL/min. This article reviews the risks and benefits associated with currently available pharmacologic agents for the management of acute and chronic gouty arthritis including urate-lowering therapy in patients with CKD. Challenges specific to primary care providers are addressed, including guidance to help them decide when to collaborate with, or refer patients to, rheumatology and nephrology specialists based on the severity of gout and CKD. PMID:22960848

  6. Morin, a dietary bioflavonol suppresses monosodium urate crystal-induced inflammation in an animal model of acute gouty arthritis with reference to NLRP3 inflammasome, hypo-xanthine phospho-ribosyl transferase, and inflammatory mediators.

    PubMed

    Dhanasekar, Chitra; Rasool, Mahaboobkhan

    2016-09-01

    The anti-inflammatory effect of morin, a dietary bioflavanol was explored on monosodium urate (MSU) crystal-induced inflammation in rats, an experimental model for acute gouty arthritis. Morin treatment (30mg/kg b.wt) significantly attenuated the ankle swelling and the levels of lipid peroxidation, nitric oxide, serum pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor (TNF) -α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6), monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and articular elastase along with an increased anti-oxidant status (catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) in the joint homogenate of MSU crystal-induced rats. Histological assessment revealed that morin limited the diffusion of joint space, synovial hyperplasia, and inflammatory cell infiltrations. The mRNA expression of NLRP3 (nucleotide oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3) inflammasome, caspase-1, pro-inflammatory cytokines, MCP-1, inflammatory enzymes (inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)), and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65 was found downregulated and HPRT (hypo-xanthine phospho-ribosyl transferase) mRNA expression was upregulated in morin treated MSU crystal-induced rats. In addition, morin treatment reduced the protein expression of NF-κB p65, p-NF-κB p65, iNOS, COX-2, and TNF-α. The results clearly demonstrated that morin exert a potent anti-inflammatory effect on MSU crystal-induced inflammation in rats. PMID:27268719

  7. Acute sacroiliitis.

    PubMed

    Slobodin, Gleb; Rimar, Doron; Boulman, Nina; Kaly, Lisa; Rozenbaum, Michael; Rosner, Itzhak; Odeh, Majed

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the data on the etiology, risk factors, clinical presentations, and diagnosis of acute sacroiliitis. A Pubmed search utilizing the indexing term "acute sacroiliitis" was conducted and the data pertinent to the aim of the review was extracted and organized in accordance with the preplanned structure of the manuscript. The diagnosis of acute sacroiliitis is often challenging because of both the relative rarity of this presentation and diverse character of acute sacroiliac pain, frequently mimicking other, more prevalent disorders. Technetium bone scintigraphy can localize the disease process to the sacroiliac joint, while computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging can be used for the detailed characterization and the extent of the disease as well as the diagnosis of complications. Pyogenic sacroiliitis is by far the most common cause of acute sacroiliitis. Brucellosis, acute sacroiliitis in the course of reactive arthritis, and crystalline-induced sacroiliitis frequently imitate pyogenic sacroiliitis. Acute sacroiliitis can rarely be also related to hematological malignancies or treatment with isotretinoin. Awareness to the possibility of acute sacroiliitis and a thorough physical examination are the necessary prerequisites to its timely diagnosis, while the appropriate laboratory and imaging studies should confirm the precise diagnosis and direct the appropriate treatment strategy. PMID:26847855

  8. Oxygen challenge test in septic shock patients: prognostic value and influence of respiratory status.

    PubMed

    Mari, Arnaud; Vallée, Fabrice; Bedel, Jérome; Riu, Béatrice; Ruiz, Jean; Sanchez-Verlaan, Pascale; Geeraerts, Thomas; Génestal, Michèle; Silva, Stein; Fourcade, Olivier

    2014-06-01

    Transcutaneous oxygen pressure (PtcO2) value in response to an increase of FiO2 or oxygen challenge test (OCT) in ventilated patients has been reported to be related to peripheral perfusion and outcome during septic shock. However, patients with sepsis-related acute respiratory distress syndrome could demonstrate compromised arterial oxygenation with OCT impairment decoupled to circulatory failure. The aims of this study were to confirm the prognostic value of OCT and to explore the influence of respiratory status on OCT results. This was a prospective study set in an intensive care unit of a tertiary teaching hospital. Fifty-six mechanically ventilated patients with septic shock criteria were studied. Transcutaneous oxygen pressure was measured at baseline and after OCT, at intensive care unit admittance (T0), and 24 h later (T24). Survival at day 28 and hemodynamic and respiratory parameters were analyzed and compared according to outcome and respiratory status. Central hemodynamic parameters or static transcutaneous data did not differ between survivors and nonsurvivors at enrollment. The OCT was statistically different at T24 according to outcome (P < 0.001), but sensitivity was low (53%). Moreover, patients with low OCT results at T24 exhibited more severe respiratory failure (P < 0.01). The OCT at T24 is related to outcome but is influenced by the severity of respiratory failure. Our results suggest considering with caution hemodynamic management based on OCT in septic shock patients with altered pulmonary function. PMID:24667627

  9. Venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support for neonatal and pediatric refractory septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Rambaud, Jerome; Guellec, Isabelle; Léger, Pierre-Louis; Renolleau, Sylvain; Guilbert, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To report our institutional experience of veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA ECMO) in children with refractory septic shock. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed our ECMO database to identify patients who received VA ECMO for septic shock from January 2004 to June 2013 at our Pediatric Intensive Care Unit in Armand-Trousseau Hospital. We included all neonates and children up to the age of 18 years who received VA ECMO for septic shock. For each patient, we collected the pre-ECMO inotrope score, clinical circulatory and ventilatory parameters, infecting organism, ECMO duration and complications, and length of hospital stay. Main Results: The study included 14 neonates and 8 older children (the pediatric population, with a mean age of 30 months, range: 1–113 months). Survival was 64% among newborns and 50% among pediatric patients. Multiorgan failure or severity scores did not show any correlation with mortality (Pediatric Logistic Organ Dysfunction score, P = 0.94; the score for neonatal acute physiology-perinatal extension II, P = 0.34). In the pediatric population, the inotrope score was higher in the survivor group (127.5 vs. 332.5, P = 0.07). Blood samples taken shortly before cannulation showed that pH (P = 0.27), lactate level (P = 0.33), PaO2/FiO2 ratio (P = 0.49), or oxygenation index (P = 0.35) showed no correlation to success or failure of ECMO. Conclusion: ECMO can be safely used to resuscitate and support children with refractory septic shock. We recommend that patients with oliguria whose lactate level has not decreased within 6 h of starting maximum drug therapy be transferred to an ECMO referral center. PMID:26628825

  10. Septic peritonitis secondary to unilateral pyometra and ovarian bursal abscessation in a dog.

    PubMed

    Van Israel, N; Kirby, B M; Munro, E A C

    2002-10-01

    A seven-year-old, female entire Labrador retriever was presented for acute-onset vomiting and lethargy, associated with weakness and generalised tremors. The clinical, radiographic, ultrasonographic and histopathological findings revealed septic peritonitis which occurred secondarily to unilateral pyometra and ovarian bursal abscessation. However, in this case, the initial clinical findings, blood parameters, radiographic and ultrasonographic findings did not allow a specific diagnosis. Repeat monitoring was required, and abdominocentesis proved to be the most useful diagnostic test, allowing a definitive diagnosis and the decision to be made as to whether or not to carry out exploratory surgery. PMID:12400643

  11. The race against the "septic shark".

    PubMed

    Westphal, Martin; Kampmeier, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Great white sharks are responsible for about 10 cases of death annually worldwide, as compared with millions of deaths caused by sepsis. However, the basic principles of avoiding shark attacks and fighting sepsis seem to be similar: avoidance, attention, and speed, if necessary. The present review discusses the current status of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria, which are actually content for discussion because of their low specificity. Current data suggest that one in eight patients with severe sepsis does not fulfill the SIRS criteria and is consequently missed, and therefore the calls for new definitions of sepsis are getting louder. Furthermore, the need for early treatment of sepsis and fast admission to an intensive care unit (ICU) with experienced stuff is reviewed as well as the early and appropriate initiation of therapy, namely antibiotic and volume therapy. A key feature is the analysis of the studies from the so-called "Sepsis Trilogy" (ProCESS, ARISE, and ProMiSe studies), with a focus on the status of early goal-directed therapy (EGDT). The authors of the "Sepsis Trilogy" concluded that there is no benefit regarding survival in septic patients by using EGDT as compared with standard therapy. However, the low mortality of the control groups within the "Sepsis Trilogy" studies as compared with the Rivers et al. study from 2001 leads to the conclusion that there has been an improvement in the therapy of septic patients, most probably due to the early initiation of therapy as a kind of "standard" in sepsis therapy. Finally, the phenomenon of a "large trial disease" is discussed, exemplary in a trial which investigated the maintenance of the "right" mean arterial pressure in sepsis patients. Even if the result of a large randomized trial might be that there is no difference between two study groups, the real exercise is to identify the patient collectives who might benefit or experience harm due to an intervention. In summary, as

  12. The race against the "septic shark"

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Great white sharks are responsible for about 10 cases of death annually worldwide, as compared with millions of deaths caused by sepsis. However, the basic principles of avoiding shark attacks and fighting sepsis seem to be similar: avoidance, attention, and speed, if necessary. The present review discusses the current status of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria, which are actually content for discussion because of their low specificity. Current data suggest that one in eight patients with severe sepsis does not fulfill the SIRS criteria and is consequently missed, and therefore the calls for new definitions of sepsis are getting louder. Furthermore, the need for early treatment of sepsis and fast admission to an intensive care unit (ICU) with experienced stuff is reviewed as well as the early and appropriate initiation of therapy, namely antibiotic and volume therapy. A key feature is the analysis of the studies from the so-called "Sepsis Trilogy" (ProCESS, ARISE, and ProMiSe studies), with a focus on the status of early goal-directed therapy (EGDT). The authors of the "Sepsis Trilogy" concluded that there is no benefit regarding survival in septic patients by using EGDT as compared with standard therapy. However, the low mortality of the control groups within the "Sepsis Trilogy" studies as compared with the Rivers et al. study from 2001 leads to the conclusion that there has been an improvement in the therapy of septic patients, most probably due to the early initiation of therapy as a kind of "standard" in sepsis therapy. Finally, the phenomenon of a "large trial disease" is discussed, exemplary in a trial which investigated the maintenance of the "right" mean arterial pressure in sepsis patients. Even if the result of a large randomized trial might be that there is no difference between two study groups, the real exercise is to identify the patient collectives who might benefit or experience harm due to an intervention. In summary, as

  13. Enteral nutrition intolerance in critically ill septic burn patients.

    PubMed

    Lavrentieva, Athina; Kontakiotis, Theodore; Bitzani, Militsa

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the frequency of enteral feeding intolerance in critically ill septic burn patients, the effect of enteral feeding intolerance on the efficacy of feeding, the correlation between the infection marker (procalcitonin [PCT]) and the nutrition status marker (prealbumin) and the impact of feeding intolerance on the outcome of septic burn patients. From January 2009 to December 2012 the data of all burn patients with the diagnosis of sepsis who were placed on enteral nutrition were analyzed. Septic patients were divided into two groups: group A, septic patients who developed feeding intolerance; group B, septic patients who did not develop feeding intolerance. Demographic and clinical characteristics of patients were analyzed and compared. The diagnosis of sepsis was applied to 29% of all patients. Of these patients 35% developed intolerance to enteral feeding throughout the septic period. A statistically significant increase in mean PCT level and a decrease in prealbumin level was observed during the sepsis period. Group A patients had statistically significant lower mean caloric intake, higher PCT:prealbumin ratio, higher pneumonia incidence, higher Sequential Organ Failure Assessment Maximum Score, a longer duration of mechanical ventilation, and a higher mortality rate in comparison with the septic patients without gastric feeding intolerance. The authors concluded that a high percentage of septic burn patients developed enteral feeding intolerance. Enteral feeding intolerance seems to have a negative impact on the patients' nutritional status, morbidity, and mortality. PMID:24879397

  14. Vasopressor and Inotropic Management Of Patients With Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, Sacha; Edwin, Stephanie B.; Alaniz, Cesar

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have evaluated the role of vasopressors and inotropes in the management of septic shock. This review assesses available evidence for the use of specific vasopressors in the management of septic shock. Use of adjunctive vasopressor therapy is also evaluated, examining the potential value of individual agents. Lastly, inotropic agents are evaluated for use in patients with myocardial dysfunction. PMID:26185405

  15. Steroids for septic shock: back from the dead? (Pro).

    PubMed

    Balk, Robert A

    2003-05-01

    The use of corticosteroids as adjunctive therapy for severe sepsis and septic shock has been a source of controversy for the past 35 years. Despite a wealth of preclinical data supporting both survival and physiologic benefit for early steroid use, the data in human sepsis have been much less convincing. There have even been reports suggesting the potential for harm associated with the administration of early high-dose corticosteroids in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. Recent trials have reported hemodynamic and survival benefits associated with the use of more physiologic steroid replacement therapy in patients with vasopressor-dependent septic shock. These results coupled with the observation of "relative adrenal insufficiency" in some patients with severe sepsis and septic shock may once again establish a defined role for corticosteroid therapy in the management of severe sepsis and septic shock. PMID:12740234

  16. Judging quality of current septic shock definitions and criteria.

    PubMed

    Shankar-Hari, Manu; Bertolini, Guido; Brunkhorst, Frank M; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Annane, Djillali; Deutschman, Clifford S; Singer, Mervyn

    2015-01-01

    Septic shock definitions are being revisited. We assess the feasibility, reliability, and validity characteristics of the current definitions and criteria of septic shock. Septic shock is conceptualised as cardiovascular dysfunction, tissue perfusion and cellular abnormalities caused by infection. Currently, for feasibility, septic shock is identified at the bedside by using either hypotension or a proxy for tissue perfusion/cellular abnormalities (e.g., hyperlactatemia). We propose that concurrent presence of cardiovascular dysfunction and perfusion/cellular abnormalities could improve validity of septic shock diagnosis, as we are more likely to identify a patient population with all elements of the illness concept. This epidemiological refinement should not affect clinical care and may aid study design to identify illness-specific biomarkers and interventions. PMID:26702879

  17. Septic Pulmonary Embolism Following Appendectomy Surgery.

    PubMed

    Lardo, Soroy; Ariane, Anna; Chen, Khie

    2015-07-01

    Septic Pulmonary embolism is a rare condition where there were numerous pulmonary infarcts resulting from blood clot emboli that also contains microorganism. This disorder is insidious onset, Its clinical features usually unspecific and the diagnosis usually difficult to establish. A 43 old woman who underwent an appendicitis surgery, reentered the hospital at the sixth day after surgery presented with fever, pain at the surgical site, progressive severe dyspnea and chest tightness. From the physical examination finding there were tachycardia, tachypneu, wet rough basal rhonki on the right rear and tenderness at right lower region of the abdomen. The thorax-abdomen CT scan result was pleuropneumonial with minimal effusion in the right side. A CT angiography scan of the chest and abdomen showed intralumen emboli in medial lobe segmen of right pulmonary artery, right pleuropneumonia with segmental lession in segmen 10 right lobe and inflammation process along right lateral wall of the abdomen. Laboratory results that also supported diagnosis were D dimer 3442 ng/mL and culture result from surgical site pus showed E. Coli ESBL (+). Base on these findings, this case was established as a septic pulmonary embolism. PMID:26586389

  18. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... vein that are done regularly at the hospital. Physical Therapy An appropriate physical therapy program is essential to the management of any type of arthritis. A physical therapist will explain the importance of certain activities ...

  19. Arthritis of the Hand

    MedlinePlus

    ... of hand and wrist arthritis. (Note: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not test dietary supplements. These compounds may cause negative interactions with other medications. Always consult your doctor before taking dietary supplements.) ...

  20. Arthritis and the Feet

    MedlinePlus

    ... for months, or years, then abate, sometimes permanently. Gout (gouty arthritis) : Gout is a condition caused by a buildup of ... sauces, shellfish, and brandy is popularly associated with gout, there are other protein compounds in foods such ...

  1. Living with Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... effects. Learn more about biologic treatments . Reducing your sensitivity to pain When the pain of psoriatic arthritis ... your doctor about medication that helps reduce your sensitivity to pain. Prescription pain medications such as Gabapentin ...

  2. Arthritis and IBD

    MedlinePlus

    ... Events Search: What are Crohn's & Colitis? What is Crohn's Disease What is Ulcerative Colitis Types of Medications What’s ... affect as many as 25% of people with Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis. Although arthritis is typically associated ...

  3. Spontaneous talar and calcaneal fracture in rheumatoid arthritis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Spina, Antonio; Clemente, Alberto; Vancini, Chiara; Fejzo, Majlinda; Campioni, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) leads to a progressive weakening of the skeleton which may result in bone fractures. However, spontaneous fractures (exclusive of stress fractures, vertebral collapse, and superficial articular fragmentation) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis have been only occasionally reported in the medical literature. A case of spontaneous talar and calcaneal fracture in rheumatoid arthritis is described. Bone lesions were identified on radiographs, MR images and scintigraphy in a patient with right ankle pain. The absence of episodes of acute trauma, and the presence of acute clinical manifestations should guide the clinical suspicion. PMID:22470803

  4. Success of applying early goal-directed therapy for septic shock patients in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Worapratya, Panita; Wanjaroenchaisuk, Apisit; Joraluck, Jutharat; Wuthisuthimethawee, Prasit

    2016-01-01

    Background Since early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) became standard care in severe sepsis and septic shock patients in intensive care units many years ago, we suppose that the survival rate of severe sepsis and septic shock patients improves if the resuscitative procedure is quickly implemented and is initiated in the emergency room. Objective We aimed at recording emergency department time to improve our patient care system as well as determine the rate at which EGDT goals can be achieved. The second analysis is to find out how much we can improve the survival rate. Methods This was a prospective observational study in an emergency room setting at a tertiary care facility where EGDT was applied for resuscitation of severe sepsis and septic shock patients. The data recorded were the initial vital signs, APACHE II (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II) score, SAP II (Simplified Acute Physiology II) score, SOFA (Sequential Organ Failure Assessment) score, time at which EGDT goals were achieved (central venous oxygen saturation [ScvO2] >70%), initial and final diagnosis, and outcome of treatment. The t-test and Mann–Whitney U-test were used to compare between the achieved goal and nonachieved goal groups. Results There were 63 cases of severe sepsis in the study period. Only 55 patients submitted a signed consent form and had central line insertion. Twenty-eight (50.9%) cases were male. Thirty-nine (70.9%) patients achieved the goal, and the mean SAP II score was 8. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups (P-value =0.097). Thirty of the 39 patients (70.9%) survived in the achieved goal group, which was a statistically significant improvement of the survival rate when compared with only one of 16 patients (6.3%) surviving in the nonachieved goal group (P<0.001).

  5. HLA-DRB1 shared epitope genotyping using the revised classification and its association with circulating autoantibodies, acute phase reactants, cytokines and clinical indices of disease activity in a cohort of South African rheumatoid arthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The revised shared epitope (SE) concept in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is based on the presence (S) or absence (X) of the SE RAA amino acid motif at positions 72 to 74 of the third hypervariable region of the various human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1 alleles. The purpose of this study was to investigate SE subtypes on the basis of the American College of Rheumatology 1987 revised criteria for the classification of RA in a cohort of South African RA patients (n = 143) and their association with clinical and circulating biomarkers of disease activity (autoantibodies, acute phase reactants and cytokines). Methods Genomic DNA was analysed using high-resolution recombinant sequence-specific oligonucleotide PCR typing of the HLA-DRB1 allele. Subtypes of the SE were classified according to the amino acids at positions 72 to 74 for the RAA sequence, and further sub-divided according to the amino acids at positions 70 and 71, which either contribute to (S2, S3P), or negate (S1, S3D) RA susceptibility. Disease activity was assessed on the basis of (1) Disease Activity Score in 28 joints using C-reactive protein (CRP), (2) rheumatoid factor (RF), (3) CRP and (4) serum amyloid A by nephelometry, anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (aCCP) by an immunofluorometric procedure, and cytokines by multiplex bead array technology. Results Of the 143 RA patients, 81 (57%) were homozygous (SS) and 50 (35%) were heterozygous (SX) for the SE alleles with significant overexpression of S2 and S3P (respective odds ratios (ORs) 5.3 and 5.8; P < 0.0001), and 12 (8%) were classified as no SE allele (XX). Both the SS and SX groups showed a strong association with aCCP positivity (OR = 10.2 and P = 0.0010, OR = 9.2 and P = 0.0028, respectively) relative to the XX group. Clinical scores and concentrations of the other biomarkers of disease activity (RF, CRP and T helper cell type 1 (Th1), Th2, macrophage and fibroblast cytokines) were also generally higher in the SS group than

  6. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy in neonates with septic shock.

    PubMed

    McCune, S; Short, B L; Miller, M K; Lotze, A; Anderson, K D

    1990-05-01

    Neonatal septic shock has significant morbidity and mortality with current therapeutic measures. At Children's National Medical Center, from June 1984 to October 1986, 10 of 100 patients treated with venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) had a documented diagnosis of septic shock. All of these infants fulfilled criteria consistent with 80% mortality using conventional intensive medical management. However, the survival rate for the septic neonates in this study was 100%. Compared with other groups of infants treated with ECMO, these septic neonates required significantly more ventilatory support after ECMO and had a higher incidence of chronic lung disease (30% v 12%). The septic neonates were also at higher risk for intracranial hemorrhage than the other infants treated with ECMO (40% v 26%). The necessity for prolonged intubation after ECMO for patients with septic shock suggests that this condition may be associated with additional structural damage not seen with meconium aspiration syndrome or respiratory distress syndrome. Nevertheless, for neonatal patients with septic shock unresponsive to conventional medical management, ECMO must be considered a viable alternative treatment. PMID:2352078

  7. Induction of lyme arthritis in LSH hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, J.L.; Schell, R.F.; Hejka, A.; England, D.M.; Konick, L.

    1988-09-01

    In studies of experimental Lyme disease, a major obstacle has been the unavailability of a suitable animal model. We found that irradiated LSH/Ss Lak hamsters developed arthritis after injection of Borrelia burgdorferi in the hind paws. When nonirradiated hamsters were injected in the hind paws with B. burgdorferi, acute transient synovitis was present. A diffuse neutrophilic infiltrate involved the synovia and periarticular structures. The inflammation was associated with edema, hyperemia, and granulation tissue. Numerous spirochetes were seen in the synovial and subsynovial tissues. The histopathologic changes were enhanced in irradiated hamsters. The onset and duration of the induced swelling were dependent on the dose of radiation and the inoculum of spirochetes. Inoculation of irradiated hamsters with Formalin-killed spirochetes or medium in which B. burgdorferi had grown for 7 days failed to induce swelling. This animal model should prove useful for studies of the immune response to B. burgdorferi and the pathogenesis of Lyme arthritis.

  8. Septic Shock Due to Biliary Stones in a Postcholecystectomy Patient.

    PubMed

    Azfar, Mohammad Feroz; Khan, Muhammad Faisal; Khursheed, Moazzum

    2015-10-01

    Septic shock leading to multi-organ failure is not uncommon. Early diagnosis to confirm the source is the distinctive attribute of sepsis management guidelines. Cholangitis as the source of sepsis can become a diagnostic dilemma in patients who have had cholecystectomy in the past. CT abdomen should be the investigation of choice in this group of patients. This report describes two postcholecystectomy patients who presented with septic shock secondary to biliary stones. The source of septic shock in both patients were biliary stones was confirmed with abdominal CT. Ultrasound abdomen failed to report biliary stones in these patients. Both improved on percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage. PMID:26522207

  9. Antimicrobial therapy in patients with septic shock.

    PubMed

    Pastene, Bruno; Duclos, Gary; Martin, Claude; Leone, Marc

    2016-04-01

    Providing antibiotics is a life-saving intervention in patients with septic shock. Cultures as clinically appropriate before antimicrobial therapy are required. Guidelines recommend providing broad-spectrum antibiotics within the first hour after recognition of shock. The site of infection, the patient's history and clinical status, and the local ecology all affect the choice of empirical treatment. The appropriateness of this choice is an important determinant of patient outcome. At 48-96h, the antimicrobial treatment should be systematically reassessed based on the clinical course and culture results. Cessation, de-escalation, continuation, or escalation are discussed according to these variables. Unnecessary treatment should be avoided to reduce the emergence of multidrug resistant pathogens. PMID:27062114

  10. Physical Activity and Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Psoriatic Arthritis Info Kit Resources Community icon: Link text: Post your questions in our online community and ... psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Talk Psoriasis icon: Link text: Contact our Patient Navigators for free and confidential ...

  11. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... to take a more active role in your care. The information in these videos should not take ... She is a critical member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing ...

  12. Transfusion requirements in septic shock (TRISS) trial - comparing the effects and safety of liberal versus restrictive red blood cell transfusion in septic shock patients in the ICU: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Transfusion of red blood cells (RBC) is recommended in septic shock and the majority of these patients receive RBC transfusion in the intensive care unit (ICU). However, benefit and harm of RBCs have not been established in this group of high-risk patients. Methods/Design The Transfusion Requirements in Septic Shock (TRISS) trial is a multicenter trial with assessor-blinded outcome assessment, randomising 1,000 patients with septic shock in 30 Scandinavian ICUs to receive transfusion with pre-storage leuko-depleted RBC suspended in saline-adenine-glucose and mannitol (SAGM) at haemoglobin level (Hb) of 7 g/dl or 9 g/dl, stratified by the presence of haematological malignancy and centre. The primary outcome measure is 90-day mortality. Secondary outcome measures are organ failure, ischaemic events, severe adverse reactions (SARs: anaphylactic reaction, acute haemolytic reaction and transfusion-related circulatory overload, and acute lung injury) and mortality at 28 days, 6 months and 1 year. The sample size will enable us to detect a 9% absolute difference in 90-day mortality assuming a 45% event rate with a type 1 error rate of 5% and power of 80%. An interim analysis will be performed after 500 patients, and the Data Monitoring and Safety Committee will recommend the trial be stopped if a group difference in 90-day mortality with P ≤0.001 is present at this point. Discussion The TRISS trial may bridge the gap between clinical practice and the lack of efficacy and safety data on RBC transfusion in septic shock patients. The effect of restrictive versus liberal RBC transfusion strategy on mortality, organ failure, ischaemic events and SARs will be evaluated. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01485315. Registration date 30 November 2011. First patient was randomised 3 December 2011. PMID:23702006

  13. [Infection-induced reactive arthritis : etiopathogenesis, clinical spectrum, therapy].

    PubMed

    Brzank, M; Wollenhaupt, J

    2013-12-01

    Reactive arthritis is an inflammatory joint disease induced by a preceding, sometimes asymptomatic bacterial infection outside the joints. With an estimated prevalence of 40/100,000 inhabitants, the disease primarily affects adults between the ages of 20 and 40 years. The clinical presentation is typically characterized by monoarthritis to oligoarthritis of the lower extremities with possible accompanying enthesitis, bursitis, tenosynovitis, sacroiliitis, dactylitis and rare extra-articular manifestations. Because of the similar clinical symptoms and an association with HLA-B27, reactive arthritis is attributed to the spondyloarthropathies. Typical triggering pathogens are Chlamydia, Salmonella, Yersinia, Shigella and Campylobacter. In about 20% of the cases the usually self-limiting disease becomes chronic. The pathogenesis is not yet understood in detail but it is currently assumed that the intracellular persistence of the pathogen causes an immune reaction resulting in arthritis. Common international diagnostic criteria do not yet exist; therefore the diagnosis is made largely on the basis of clinical findings, medical history and the direct and/or indirect pathogen detection. Several therapeutic options are used to treat reactive arthritis. Ongoing extra-articular infections, with the exception of enteritis should be treated with antibiotics. Besides symptom-orientated treatment of acute arthritis, in prolonged and chronic reactive arthritis an immunomodulatory therapy with steroids, sulfasalazine or methotrexate is used. The role of long-term antibiotic therapy for eradication of persistent intra-articular pathogens in chronic cases is the subject of current research. PMID:24337200

  14. Cryoprecipitate infusion fails to improve organ function in septic shock.

    PubMed

    Hesselvik, F; Brodin, B; Carlsson, C; Cedergren, B; Jorfeldt, L; Liedén, G

    1987-05-01

    Plasma fibronectin may be of critical importance for the septic patient through its proposed function as the major opsonin for macrophage clearance of circulating, noncellular debris. As a rule, critically ill, septic patients are depleted of fibronectin. In earlier uncontrolled studies, infusion of fibronectin-rich cryoprecipitate had resulted in improved renal and pulmonary functions and changes in peripheral hemodynamics. In this controlled study, 32 septic ICU patients (mean initial fibronectin level = 60% of normal) received cryoprecipitate or control infusions. Although the fibronectin level was significantly elevated to the normal range in the cryoprecipitate group, no effects were seen in hemodynamics, oxygen metabolism, or lung and kidney functions. Our results indicate that this form of fibronectin therapy does not influence the impaired organ function in septic shock. PMID:3552444

  15. Preliminary characterization of abandoned septic tank systems. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    This report documents the activities and findings of the Phase I Preliminary Characterization of Abandoned Septic Tank Systems. The purpose of the preliminary characterization activity was to investigate the Tiger Team abandoned septic systems (tanks and associated leachfields) for the purpose of identifying waste streams for closure at a later date. The work performed was not to fully characterize or remediate the sites. The abandoned systems potentially received wastes or effluent from buildings which could have discharged non-domestic, petroleum hydrocarbons, hazardous, radioactive and/or mixed wastes. A total of 20 sites were investigated for the preliminary characterization of identified abandoned septic systems. Of the 20 sites, 19 were located and characterized through samples collected from each tank(s) and, where applicable, associated leachfields. The abandoned septic tank systems are located in Areas 5, 12, 15, 25, and 26 on the Nevada Test Site.

  16. TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL OF WASTES PUMPED FROM SEPTIC TANKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study identified methods of treating and disposing of septic tank sludge (septage). Biological, chemical, and physical properties of septage were determined and curves were developed for designing septage treatment facilities. Two processes were tested for treating and dispos...

  17. Cloxacillin control of experimental arthritis induced by SEC(+) Staphylococcus aureus is associated with downmodulation of local and systemic cytokines.

    PubMed

    Colavite, Priscila Maria; Ishikawa, Larissa Lumi Watanabe; Zorzella-Pezavento, Sofia Fernanda Gonçalves; Oliveira, Larissa Ragozo Cardoso de; França, Thaís Graziela Donegá; da Rosa, Larissa Camargo; Chiuso-Minicucci, Fernanda; Vieira, Andreia Espíndola; Francisconi, Carolina Fávaro; da Cunha, Maria de Lourdes Ribeiro de Souza; Garlet, Gustavo Pompermaier; Sartori, Alexandrina

    2016-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the most common agent of septic arthritis (SA) that is a severe, rapidly progressive and erosive disease. In this work we investigated the clinical, histopathological and immunological characteristics of the SA triggered by an enterotoxin C producer S. aureus strain. The effect of a β-lactamic antibiotic over disease evolution and cytokine production was also evaluated. After confirmation that ATCC 19095 SEC(+) strain preserved its ability to produce enterotoxin C, this bacteria was used to infect C57BL/6 male mice. Body weight, clinical score and disease prevalence were daily evaluated during 14 days. Cytokine production by splenocytes, cytokine mRNA expression in arthritic lesions, transcription factors mRNA expression in inguinal lymph nodes and histopathological analysis were performed 7 and 14 days after infection. ATCC 19095 SEC(+) strain caused a severe arthritis characterized by weight loss, high clinical scores and a 100% disease prevalence. Histopathological analysis revealed inflammation, pannus formation and bone erosion. Arthritis aggravation was associated with elevated production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, higher local mRNA expression of these cytokines and also higher mRNA expression of T-bet, ROR-γ and GATA-3. Disease control by cloxacillin was associated with decreased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines but not of IL-10. These findings indicate that the ATCC 19095 SEC(+) strain is able to initiate a severe septic arthritis in mice associated with elevated cytokine production that can be, however, controlled by cloxacillin. PMID:26695535

  18. A review of current knowledge of the complement system and the therapeutic opportunities in inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, M

    2006-01-01

    The complement activation system, a key component of the innate immune system, protects the host from microorganisms such as bacteria, and other foreign threats including abnormal cells. However, it is also double-edged in that it can have negative effects in the host; excessive complement activation damages the host and can even kill in anaphylactic shock and septic shock. Regulation of the complement system is a useful strategy to control inflammatory diseases, including inflammatory arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis is a common inflammatory disease worldwide. Many medicines are developed to control inflammation, including recently developed biological response modifiers such as anti-TNF and IL-6 agents. Nevertheless, in some patients disease remains difficult to control because of complications, side effects and tolerance of medicines. In inflammatory arthritis, including rheumatoid arthritis, there is abundant evidence implicating complement activation in humans and animal models. Therefore, anti-complement agents might be beneficial as part of clinical treatment. However, at present, there are still no applicable agents for therapeutic regulation of excessive complement activation in chronic disease. Novel agents in development might be useful as a strategy to control complement activation. Here I describe recent knowledge of the complement system in inflammatory arthritis, the recent developments in anti-complement agents and their considerable potential for the future. PMID:16787214

  19. Non Activated Protein C Supplementation in Septic Pediatric Hematological Patients

    PubMed Central

    Perillo, Teresa; Muggeo, Paola; Arcamone, Giampaolo; Leonardis, Francesco De; Santoro, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine safety and efficacy of non-activated Protein C (PC) supplementation in our cohort of septic pediatric hematological patients. We conducted a retrospective study of 22 septic patients receiving human plasma-derived PC concentrate from 2008 to 2015 at our Pediatric Oncology Center (Bari, Italy). The Surviving sepsis campaign definitions for sepsis, severe sepsis and septic shock were used to define the patients’ septic status. For each patient, we calculated Lansky performance status scale (LPSS) and a risk score defined the Hematologic risk score (HRS) that we created in 2007. Patients were defined as High risk for severe sepsis/septic shock in case of HRS>3. HRS<3 identified low risk patients. Baseline serum PC levels, PC administration dosage and duration and days until a 20% improvement in LPSS. Observed baseline serum PC levels (bPC) blood concentrations ranged from 31 to 80%. Patients received PC supplementation in case of low age-related bPC levels or >10% PC concentration decrease within 12 hours from the first evaluation. All patients received 80 U/kg/day PC, intravenously, every twenty-four hours. No drug-related adverse event was observed. The observed sepsis-related mortality rate in our cohort was 9%. PC supplementation in our cohort appeared to be safe, and, probably due to prompt PC administration, we observed an overall mortality that was much lower than expected mortality in cancer severe septic patients. PMID:27433305

  20. Arthritis-associated syndromes.

    PubMed

    Osial, T A; Cash, J M; Eisenbeis, C H

    1993-12-01

    There are a number of diseases characterized by inflammatory arthropathy that, although not as commonly seen as rheumatoid arthritis, often present to the family physician as difficult diagnostic problems. The diagnosis is frequently most difficult during the early course of these diseases. During recent years, new and altered concepts have arisen regarding both diagnostic and therapeutic management of this challenging group of arthropathies. This article presents a review of the more common arthritis-associated syndromes with emphasis on the differential diagnosis and medicinal therapeutics. PMID:8310085

  1. Diagnosis and classification of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kourilovitch, Maria; Galarza-Maldonado, Claudio; Ortiz-Prado, Esteban

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic chronic inflammatory disease of unclear etiology that is manifested in by a progressive and destructive polyarthritis in association with serological evidence of autoreactivity. Its diagnosis is based on the classification criteria that involve four parameters: joint involvement, serology (rheumatoid factor and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide--anti-CCP), levels of acute phase reactants and the duration of the symptoms Aletaha, et al. [1]. This classification simplifies the categorization of the patients with early RA; however, the diagnosis requires highly trained specialists who are able to differentiate early symptoms of RA from other pathologies. PMID:24568777

  2. Idiopathic septic arthritis of a lumbar facet joint associated with paraspinal abscess.

    PubMed

    Kitova-John, Margarita Borislavova; Azim-Araghi, Ali; Sheikh, Faraz Tariq; Kitov, Borislav Dimitrov

    2015-01-01

    A 48-year-old woman presented with a 1-month history of severe lower back pain on a background of 24 h of mild fever and general tiredness with an associated right-sided foot drop. Five weeks after the onset and with no improvement in symptoms in spite of analgesia and physiotherapy, the patient had a lumbar spine MRI which demonstrated a collection extending from the facet joints of L5 and L6 to the iliacus muscle on the right. A CT-guided aspiration was performed with a lengthy hospital stay for intravenous antibiotic treatment. The culture and sensitivity study of the aspirate isolated Streptococcus pneumoniae. PMID:26272966

  3. [The value of quantitative analysis of procalcitonine in diagnostics of septic complications in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Lapin, S V; Maslianskiĭ, A L; Lazareva, N M; Vasil'eva, E Iu; Totolian, A A

    2013-01-01

    The infections very often complicate the course of autoimmune rheumatic diseases. In diagnostic of septic complications in rheumatic patients the new biomarkers of infections can have a decisive importance. The procalciotonine test is one of them. The issue was to evaluate the diagnostic informativity of this test. The sample included 93 patients. The examination was applied to 65 patients with rheumatic diseases. Among them, 13 patients had bacterial infections. The group consisted of 33 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, 11 patients with systemic lupus erythematous, 6 patients with systemic angiitis, and 15 patients with other rheumatic diseases. The comparative group included 27 patients of cardio-therapeutic profile and 8 of these patients had bacterial infections. The procalcitonine test was applied with quantitative electrochemiluminescent technique. In patients with rheumatoid arthritis the mean levels of procalciotonine test consisted 0.10 +/- 0.13 ng/ml; with systemic lupus erythematous--0.08 +/- 0.06 ng/ml; with systemic angiitis--0.22 +/- 0.2 ng/ml; with other rheumatic diseases--0.12 +/- 0.15 ng/ml; of cardio-therapeutic profile without infections--0.08 +/- 0.06 ng/vl/ With threshold of procalcitonine test higher than 0.5/ml the sensitivity to diagnostic of infections consisted of 58%, specificity--94% in the group with rheumatic diseases. The procalciotonine test in case of no infection process with values higher than 0.5 ng/ml was detected in three patients. The evaluation of dependence of sensitivity and specificity for procalciotonine test and C-reactive protein the area under curve of procalcitonine test was larger in patients with rheumatic diseases (0.85 against 0.79) and in patients of cardio-therapeutic profile (0.92 against 0.90). The quantitative procalcitonine test is the best technique to detect septic complications in rheumatic patients. PMID:23807991

  4. Brucella arthritis of the knee, 1 year after revision of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Papastergiou, S G; Koukoulias, N E; Koumis, P; Kyparlis, D; Santas, R

    2011-01-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic infection with a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations. The authors report the first case in the literature of septic arthritis of the knee 1 year after revision of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Brucella melitensis biotype 3 was found in both synovial fluid and blood cultures. The patient was treated initially with arthroscopic debridement. After the diagnosis was confirmed, a second arthroscopic lavage and metal work removal was applied leaving the graft in place. Antimicrobial chemotherapy was prescribed for 3 months. The infection was fully eradicated and the patient is still asymptomatic, 4 years after the treatment. PMID:22700607

  5. Brucella arthritis of the knee, 1 year after revision of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Papastergiou, S G; Koukoulias, N E; Koumis, P; Kyparlis, D; Santas, R

    2011-01-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic infection with a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations. The authors report the first case in the literature of septic arthritis of the knee 1 year after revision of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Brucella melitensis biotype 3 was found in both synovial fluid and blood cultures. The patient was treated initially with arthroscopic debridement. After the diagnosis was confirmed, a second arthroscopic lavage and metal work removal was applied leaving the graft in place. Antimicrobial chemotherapy was prescribed for 3 months. The infection was fully eradicated and the patient is still asymptomatic, 4 years after the treatment. PMID:22700607

  6. Leflunomide in psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kaltwasser, Joachim Peter

    2007-09-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a common unique form of inflammatory arthritis associated with psoriasis. Its exact prevalence is unknown but 5-30% of the 2-3% of subjects of the general population affected with psoriasis are developing PsA. Typically PsA presents as an oligoarticular asymmetrical arthritis with predominant distal finger joint pattern, presence of spinal involvement enthesitis and dactylitis. There is evidence that T-cells play a key role in the immunopathology of PsA as well as Psoriasis. Leflunomide, a selective pyrimidine synthesis inhibitor with the property to inhibit T-cell activation and proliferation has been shown to improve both joint and skin symptoms in patients with PsA. Significant response rates have been observed for Psoriatic Arthritis Response Criteria (PsARC), modified ACR20 and PASI 50 after 24 weeks of treatment with 20 mg/d Leflunomide orally in a randomised, placebo controlled multicenter trial (TOPAS Study). Leflunomide treatment also improved quality of life and showed a favourable safety profile. It is therefore concluded that Leflunomide offers an efficacious, well tolerated, safe, and relatively inexpensive therapeutic option for the treatment of actively inflamed joints and psoriatic skin lesions in patients with PsA. PMID:17854740

  7. [Arthritis and palmoplantar pustulosis].

    PubMed

    Bauduceau, B; Hanny, P; Chanudet, X; Celton, H; Doury, P; Larroque, P

    1987-01-01

    Pustulosis palmaris et plantaris may be associated with a number of articular diseases. Known to be present in Fiessinger-Leroy-Reiter syndrome and psoriasis arthropatica, this skin disease has been classified by Japanese authors as a new nosological entity: pustular osteo-arthritis. Pustulosis palmaris et plantaris seems to represent a meeting point for axial rheumatisms close to ankylozing spondylitis. PMID:3563169

  8. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Septic Systems in New York State.

    PubMed

    Truhlar, Allison M; Rahm, Brian G; Brooks, Rachael A; Nadeau, Sarah A; Makarsky, Erin T; Walter, M Todd

    2016-07-01

    Onsite septic systems use microbial processes to eliminate organic wastes and nutrients such as nitrogen; these processes can contribute to air pollution through the release of greenhouse gases (GHGs). Current USEPA estimates for septic system GHG emissions are based on one study conducted in north-central California and are limited to methane; therefore, the contribution of these systems to the overall GHG emission budget is unclear. This study quantified and compared septic system GHG emissions from the soil over leach fields and the roof vent, which are the most likely locations for gas emissions during normal septic system operation. At each of eight septic systems, we measured fluxes of CH, CO, and NO using a static chamber method. The roof vent released the majority of septic system gas emissions. In addition, the leach field was a significant source of NO fluxes. Comparisons between leach field and vent emissions suggest that biological processes in the leach field soil may influence the type and quantity of gas released. Overall, our results suggest that (i) revisions are needed in USEPA guidance (e.g., septic systems are not currently listed as a source of NO emissions) and (ii) similar studies representing a wider range of climatic and geographic settings are needed. The total vent, sand filter, and leach field GHG emissions were 0.17, 0.045, and 0.050 t CO-equivalents capita yr, respectively. In total, this represents about 1.5% of the annual carbon footprint of an individual living in the United States. PMID:27380062

  9. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Lemierre's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hein, Paul N.; Soghikian, Maida V.; Bhangoo, Munveer S.

    2014-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is an infectious disease defined by the presence of septic thrombophlebitis with associated embolic phenomenon, most commonly to the lungs. Here we present two cases from a single institution of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) developing as a result of Lemierre's syndrome in previously healthy young adult men. ARDS can occur as a consequence of pulmonary septic emboli and sepsis, both of which are well-described consequences of Lemierre's syndrome. We describe important diagnostic and management considerations in the care of patients with hypoxemic respiratory failure and Lemierre's syndrome. Essential components of management include prompt antibiotic therapy, lung-protective ventilation strategies, and supportive care. PMID:25143837

  10. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Lemierre's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hein, Paul N; Soghikian, Maida V; Bhangoo, Munveer S

    2014-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is an infectious disease defined by the presence of septic thrombophlebitis with associated embolic phenomenon, most commonly to the lungs. Here we present two cases from a single institution of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) developing as a result of Lemierre's syndrome in previously healthy young adult men. ARDS can occur as a consequence of pulmonary septic emboli and sepsis, both of which are well-described consequences of Lemierre's syndrome. We describe important diagnostic and management considerations in the care of patients with hypoxemic respiratory failure and Lemierre's syndrome. Essential components of management include prompt antibiotic therapy, lung-protective ventilation strategies, and supportive care. PMID:25143837

  11. Early initiation of low-dose corticosteroid therapy in the management of septic shock: a retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The use of low-dose steroid therapy in the management of septic shock has been extensively studied. However, the association between the timing of low-dose steroid therapy and the outcome has not been evaluated. Therefore, we evaluated whether early initiation of low-dose steroid therapy is associated with mortality in patients with septic shock. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 178 patients who received low-dose corticosteroid therapy for septic shock between January 2008 and December 2009. Time-dependent Cox regression models were used to adjust for potential confounding factors in the association between the time to initiation of low-dose corticosteroid therapy and in-hospital mortality. Results The study population consisted of 107 men and 71 women with a median age of 66 (interquartile range, 54 to 71) years. The 28-day mortality was 44% and low-dose corticosteroid therapy was initiated within a median of 8.5 (3.8 to 19.1) hours after onset of septic shock-related hypotension. Median time to initiation of low-dose corticosteroid therapy was significantly shorter in survivors than in non-survivors (6.5 hours versus 10.4 hours; P = 0.0135). The mortality rates increased significantly with increasing quintiles of time to initiation of low-dose corticosteroid therapy (P = 0.0107 for trend). Other factors associated with 28-day mortality were higher Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) 3 (P < 0.0001) and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores (P = 0.0007), dose of vasopressor at the time of initiation of low-dose corticosteroid therapy (P < 0.0001), need for mechanical ventilation (P = 0.0001) and renal replacement therapy (P < 0.0001), while the impaired adrenal reserve did not affect 28-day mortality (81% versus 82%; P = 0.8679). After adjusting for potential confounding factors, the time to initiation of low-dose corticosteroid therapy was still significantly associated with 28-day mortality (adjusted odds

  12. Suppression of arthritis-induced bone erosion by a CRAC channel antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Harry C; Soboloff, Jonathan; Robinson, Lisa J; Tourkova, Irina L; Larrouture, Quitterie C; Witt, Michelle R; Holaskova, Ida; Schafer, Rosana; Elliott, Meenal; Hirsch, Raphael; Barnett, John B

    2016-01-01

    Objective We have shown in vitro and in vivo that osteoclast maturation requires calcium-release activated calcium (CRAC) channels. In inflammatory arthritis, osteoclasts mediate severe and debilitating bone erosion. In the current study, we assess the value of CRAC channels as a therapeutic target to suppress bone erosion in acute inflammatory arthritis. Methods Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was induced in mice. The CRAC channel inhibitor 3,4-dichloropropionaniline (DCPA) and a placebo was administered 1 day prior to collagen II booster to induce arthritis. Effects on swelling, inflammatory cell invasion in joints, serum cytokines and bone erosion were measured. Results Assays, by blinded observers, of arthritis severity showed that DCPA, 21 mg/kg/day, suppressed arthritis development over 3 weeks. Bone and cartilage damage in sections of animal feet was reduced approximately 50%; overall swelling of joints was reduced by a similar amount. Effects on bone density by µCT showed clear separation in DCPA-treated CIA animals from CIA without treatment, while differences between controls without CIA and CIA treated with DCPA differed by small amounts and in most cases were not statistically different. Response was not related to anticollagen titres. There were no adverse effects in the treated group on animal weight or activity, consistent with low toxicity. The effect was maximal 12–17 days after collagen booster, during the rapid appearance of arthritis in untreated CIA. At 20 days after treatment (day 40), differences in arthritis score were reduced and tumour necrosis factor α, interleukin (IL)-1, or IL-6 in the serum of the animals were similar in treated and untreated animals. Conclusions DCPA, a novel inhibitor of CRAC channels, suppresses bone erosion associated with acute arthritis in mice and might represent a new treatment modality for acute arthrits. PMID:26819750

  13. Chondrosternal Arthritis in Infant: An Unusual Entity

    PubMed Central

    Dumitriu, Dana

    2014-01-01

    Primary arthritis of chondrosternal joint is very rare and occurs in infants less than 18 months of age. Presentation is most often subacute but may be acute. Child presents with a parasternal mass with history of fever and/or local signs of infection. Clinical symptoms vary from a painless noninflammatory to a painful mass with local tenderness and swelling, while fever may be absent. Laboratory data show low or marginally raised levels of white blood cells and C-reactive protein, reflecting, respectively, the subacute or acute character of the infection. It is a self-limiting affection due to the adequate immune response of the patient. Evolution is generally good without antibiotherapy with a progressive spontaneous healing. A wait-and-see approach with close follow-up in the first weeks is the best therapeutic option. PMID:25386377

  14. Chondrosternal arthritis in infant: an unusual entity.

    PubMed

    Nikolarakou, Athina; Dumitriu, Dana; Docquier, Pierre-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Primary arthritis of chondrosternal joint is very rare and occurs in infants less than 18 months of age. Presentation is most often subacute but may be acute. Child presents with a parasternal mass with history of fever and/or local signs of infection. Clinical symptoms vary from a painless noninflammatory to a painful mass with local tenderness and swelling, while fever may be absent. Laboratory data show low or marginally raised levels of white blood cells and C-reactive protein, reflecting, respectively, the subacute or acute character of the infection. It is a self-limiting affection due to the adequate immune response of the patient. Evolution is generally good without antibiotherapy with a progressive spontaneous healing. A wait-and-see approach with close follow-up in the first weeks is the best therapeutic option. PMID:25386377

  15. Right ventricular dysfunction in patients with septic shock.

    PubMed

    Dhainaut, J F; Lanore, J J; de Gournay, J M; Huyghebaert, M F; Brunet, F; Villemant, D; Monsallier, J F

    1988-01-01

    Using a rapid computerized thermodilution method, we examined the evolution of right ventricular performance in 23 patients with septic shock. Nine survived the episode of septic shock. The other 14 patients died of refractory circulatory shock. Significant right ventricular systolic dysfunction, defined as decreased ejection fraction (-39%) and right ventricular dilation (+38%) was observed in all patients with septic shock. However, in the survivors, increased right ventricular preload may prevent hemodynamic evidence of right ventricular pump failure by utilizing the Frank-Starling mechanism to maintain stroke volume. Conversely, in the nonsurvivors, right ventricular dysfunction was more prononced two days after the onset of septic shock, leading to a fall in stroke. In the last patients, a decrease in contractility appears to be the major factor accounting for decreased right ventricular performance, as evidenced by the marked increase in end-systolic volume (+27%) without significant change in pulmonary artery pressure, during the later stage of septic shock. The observed right ventricular pump failure then appears associated with an alteration in diastolic mechanical properties of this ventricle, as suggested by a leftward displacement of the individual pressure-volume curves. PMID:3403793

  16. [Septic shock in intensive care units. Current focus on treatment].

    PubMed

    Arriagada S, Daniela; Donoso F, Alejandro; Cruces R, Pablo; Díaz R, Franco

    2015-01-01

    Essential therapeutic principles in children with septic shock persist over time, although some new concepts have been recently incorporated, and fully awareness of pediatricians and intensivists is essential. Fluid resuscitation is a fundamental intervention, but the kind of ideal fluid has not been established yet, as each of these interventions has specific limitations and there is no evidence supportive of the superiority of one type of fluid. Should septic shock persists despite adequate fluid resuscitation, the use of inotropic medication and/or vasopressors is indicated. New vasoactive drugs can be used in refractory septic shock caused by vasopressors, and the use of hydrocortisone should be considered in children with suspected adrenal insufficiency, as it reduces the need for vasopressors. The indications for red blood cells transfusion or the optimal level of glycemia are still controversial, with no consensus on the threshold value for the use of these blood products or the initiation of insulin administration, respectively. Likewise, the use of high-volume hemofiltration is a controversial issue and further study is needed on the routine recommendation in the course of septic shock. Nutritional support is crucial, as malnutrition is a serious complication that should be properly prevented and treated. The aim of this paper is to provide update on the most recent advances as concerns the treatment of septic shock in the pediatric population. PMID:26323988

  17. Greenhouse gas emissions from septic systems in New York State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truhlar, A. M.; Rahm, B. G.; Brooks, R. A.; Nadeau, S. A.; Walter, M. T.

    2015-12-01

    Onsite septic systems are a practical way to treat wastewater in rural or less-densely populated areas. Septic systems utilize microbial processes to eliminate organic wastes and nutrients such as nitrogen; these processes can contribute to air pollution through the release of greenhouse gases (GHGs). At each of nine septic systems, we measured fluxes of CH4, CO2, and N2O from the soil over the leach field and sand filter, and from the roof outlet vent. These are the most likely locations for gas emissions during normal operation of the septic system. The majority of all septic system gas emissions were released from the roof vent. However, our comparisons of the gas fluxes from these locations suggest that biological processes in the soil, especially the soil over the leach field, can influence the type and quantity of gas that is released from the system. The total vent, sand filter, and leach field GHG emissions were 0.12, 0.045, and 0.046 tonne CO2e capita-1 year-1, respectively. In total, this represents about 1.5% of the annual carbon footprint of an individual living in the US.

  18. Arthritis associated with calcium oxalate crystals in an anephric patient treated with peritoneal dialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, A.; Ryan, L.M.; McCarty, D.J.

    1988-09-02

    The authors report a case of calcium oxalate arthropathy in a woman undergoing intermittent peritoneal dialysis who was not receiving pharmacologic doses of ascorbic acid. She developed acute arthritis, with calcium oxalate crystals in Heberden's and Bouchard's nodes, a phenomenon previously described in gout. Intermittent peritoneal dialysis may be less efficient than hemodialysis in clearing oxalate, and physicians should now consider calcium oxalate-associated arthritis in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis who are not receiving large doses of ascorbic acid.

  19. Postoperative Surgical Infection After Spinal Surgery in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Kensuke; Ohba, Tetsuro; Ebata, Shigeto; Haro, Hirotaka

    2016-05-01

    Individuals with rheumatoid arthritis are at higher risk for infection than the general population, and surgical site infection after spinal surgery in this population can result in clinically significant complications. The goal of this study was to identify risk factors for acute surgical site infection after spinal surgery in patients with rheumatoid arthritis who were treated with nonbiologic (conventional) disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) alone or with biologic DMARDs. All patients treated with biologic agents were treated with nonbiologic agents as well. The authors performed a retrospective, single-center review of 47 consecutive patients with rheumatoid arthritis who underwent spinal surgery and had follow-up of 3 months or longer. The incidence of surgical site infection was examined, and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to test the association of surgical site infection with putative risk factors, including the use of biologic agents, methotrexate, and prednisolone, as well as the duration of rheumatoid arthritis, the presence of diabetes, patient age, length of surgery, and number of operative levels. After spinal surgery, 14.89% (7 of 47) of patients had surgical site infection. Use of methotrexate and/or prednisolone, patient age, diabetes, duration of rheumatoid arthritis, length of surgery, number of operative levels, and use of biologic DMARDs did not significantly increase the risk of infection associated with spinal surgery. All patients who had surgical site infection had undergone spinal surgery with instrumentation. The findings show that greater attention to preventing surgical site infection may be needed in patients with rheumatoid arthritis who undergo spinal surgery with instrumentation. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study to show that the use of biologic agents did not increase the incidence of surgical site infection after spinal surgery in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

  20. The effect of resveratrol on the recurrent attacks of gouty arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haiyan; Zheng, Shucong; Wang, Yuankai; Zhu, Huiqing; Liu, Qiong; Xue, Yu; Qiu, Jianhua; Zou, Hejian; Zhu, Xiaoxia

    2016-05-01

    Gouty arthritis is characterized by inflammation induced by monosodium urate (MSU) crystal deposition, which is resulted by an increase of serum urate concentration. The management of gout, especially the recurrent acute attacks of chronic gouty arthritis, is still a problem to be resolved. In this study, we aimed to develop the preventive and therapeutic effect of resveratrol on gouty arthritis. MSU was used to induce gouty arthritis in the foot pad of C57BL/6 mice. Yeast polysaccharide and potassium oxonate were used to induce hyperuricemia in Kunming mice. Resveratrol was intraperitoneal injected to the mice in the treatment group. The pad inflammation and the level of serum uric acid were investigated to estimate the effect of resveratrol in gouty arthritis. Hyperuricemia was significantly detected in the mice treated with yeast polysaccharide and potassium oxonate, and gouty arthritis was successfully induced with MSU in mice. We further identified that resveratrol inhibited pad swelling and pad 99mTc uptake in gouty mice. Moreover, serum uric acid level was also decreased by resveratrol in hyperuricemia mice. This study highlighted that resveratrol might be applied to prevent the recurrent acute attack of gouty arthritis because of its inhibition of articular inflammation and down-regulation of serum uric acid. PMID:25451618

  1. A case of reactive arthritis due to Clostridium difficile colitis

    PubMed Central

    Essenmacher, Alex C.; Khurram, Nazish; Bismack, Gregory T.

    2016-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is an acute, aseptic, inflammatory arthropathy following an infectious process but removed from the site of primary infection. It is often attributed to genitourinary and enteric pathogens, such as Chlamydia, Salmonella, Shigella, Campylobacter, and Yersinia, in susceptible individuals. An uncommon and less recognized cause of this disease is preceding colonic infection with Clostridium difficile, an organism associated with pseudomembranous colitis and diarrhea in hospitalized patients and those recently exposed to antibiotics. Recognition of this association may be complicated by non-specific presentation of diarrhea, the interval between gastrointestinal and arthritic symptoms, and the wide differential in mono- and oligoarthritis. We present the case of a 61-year-old, hospitalized patient recently treated for C. difficile colitis who developed sudden, non-traumatic, right knee pain and swelling. Physical examination and radiographs disclosed joint effusion, and sterile aspiration produced cloudy fluid with predominant neutrophils and no growth on cultures. Diagnostic accuracy is enhanced by contemporaneous laboratory investigations excluding other entities such as gout and rheumatoid arthritis and other infections that typically precede reactive arthritis. Contribution of Clostridium infection to reactive arthritis is an obscure association frequently difficult to prove, but this organism is warranted inclusion in the differential of reactive arthritis. PMID:26908381

  2. Alternative for Anti-TNF Antibodies for Arthritis Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Paquet, Joseph; Henrionnet, Christel; Pinzano, Astrid; Vincourt, Jean-Baptiste; Gillet, Pierre; Netter, Patrick; Chary-Valckenaere, Isabelle; Loeuille, Damien; Pourel, Jacques; Grossin, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), a proinflammatory cytokine, plays a key role in the pathogenesis of many inflammatory diseases, including arthritis. Neutralization of this cytokine by anti-TNF-α antibodies has shown its efficacy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and is now widely used. Nevertheless, some patients currently treated with anti-TNF-α remain refractory or become nonresponder to these treatments. In this context, there is a need for new or complementary therapeutic strategies. In this study, we investigated in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory potentialities of an anti-TNF-α triplex-forming oligonucleotide (TFO), as judged from effects on two rat arthritis models. The inhibitory activity of this TFO on articular cells (synoviocytes and chondrocytes) was verified and compared to that of small interfering RNA (siRNA) in vitro. The use of the anti-TNF-α TFO as a preventive and local treatment in both acute and chronic arthritis models significantly reduced disease development. Furthermore, the TFO efficiently blocked synovitis and cartilage and bone destruction in the joints. The results presented here provide the first evidence that gene targeting by anti-TNF-α TFO modulates arthritis in vivo, thus providing proof-of-concept that it could be used as therapeutic tool for TNF-α-dependent inflammatory disorders. PMID:21811249

  3. A case of reactive arthritis due to Clostridium difficile colitis.

    PubMed

    Essenmacher, Alex C; Khurram, Nazish; Bismack, Gregory T

    2016-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is an acute, aseptic, inflammatory arthropathy following an infectious process but removed from the site of primary infection. It is often attributed to genitourinary and enteric pathogens, such as Chlamydia, Salmonella, Shigella, Campylobacter, and Yersinia, in susceptible individuals. An uncommon and less recognized cause of this disease is preceding colonic infection with Clostridium difficile, an organism associated with pseudomembranous colitis and diarrhea in hospitalized patients and those recently exposed to antibiotics. Recognition of this association may be complicated by non-specific presentation of diarrhea, the interval between gastrointestinal and arthritic symptoms, and the wide differential in mono- and oligoarthritis. We present the case of a 61-year-old, hospitalized patient recently treated for C. difficile colitis who developed sudden, non-traumatic, right knee pain and swelling. Physical examination and radiographs disclosed joint effusion, and sterile aspiration produced cloudy fluid with predominant neutrophils and no growth on cultures. Diagnostic accuracy is enhanced by contemporaneous laboratory investigations excluding other entities such as gout and rheumatoid arthritis and other infections that typically precede reactive arthritis. Contribution of Clostridium infection to reactive arthritis is an obscure association frequently difficult to prove, but this organism is warranted inclusion in the differential of reactive arthritis. PMID:26908381

  4. Interleukin 6 and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yuji; Tanaka, Toshio

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a representative cytokine featuring pleiotropic activity and redundancy. A transient synthesis of IL-6 contributes to host defense against infectious agents and tissue injuries by inducing acute phase reactions and immunological and hematopoietic responses. However, uncontrolled persistent production of IL-6 may lead to the development of several immune-mediated diseases. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic disease with joint and systemic inflammation resulting from immunological abnormalities and it has been found that IL-6 plays a key role in the development of this disease. Clinical trials in various parts of the world of tocilizumab, a humanized anti-IL-6 receptor antibody, have proved its efficacy and tolerable safety either as monotherapy or in combination with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. As a result, it is currently used as a first-line biologic for the treatment of moderate-to-severe RA in more than 100 countries. Clarification of the mechanism(s) through which tocilizumab exerts its effect on RA and of the reason(s) why IL-6 is continuously produced in RA can be expected to lead to the best use of this agent for RA patients and aid in investigations into the pathogenesis of RA. PMID:24524085

  5. Arthritis associated with hidradenitis suppurativa.

    PubMed Central

    Bhalla, R; Sequeira, W

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To review the presentation and clinical findings of arthritis associated with hidradenitis suppurativa. METHOD--Medical records from the rheumatology clinics of two major teaching hospitals were reviewed for arthritis and hidradenitis suppurativa. The nine patient records fulfilling these criteria were reviewed and compared with 20 previous reports. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION--The arthritis associated with hidradenitis suppurativa is rare and most commonly affects the peripheral joints. The axial skeleton is less frequently involved and is often asymptomatic. Images PMID:8311560

  6. Chitinase-like Proteins are Candidate Biomarkers for Sepsis-induced Acute Kidney Injury*

    PubMed Central

    Maddens, B.; Ghesquière, B.; Vanholder, R.; Demon, D.; Vanmassenhove, J.; Gevaert, K.; Meyer, E.

    2012-01-01

    Sepsis-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent complication of critically ill patients and leads to high mortality rates. The specificity of currently available urinary biomarkers for AKI in the context of sepsis is questioned. This study aimed to discover urinary biomarkers for septic AKI by contemporary shotgun proteomics in a mouse model for sepsis and to validate these in individual urine samples of mice and human septic patients with and without AKI. At 48 h after uterine ligation and inoculation of Escherichia coli, aged mice (48 weeks) became septic. A subgroup developed AKI, defined by serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, and renal histology. Separate pools of urine from septic mice with and without AKI mice were collected during 12 h before and between 36–48 h after infection, and their proteome compositions were quantitatively compared. Candidate biomarkers were validated by Western blot analysis of urine, plasma, and renal tissue homogenates from individual mice, and a limited number of urine samples from human septic patients with and without AKI. Urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, thioredoxin, gelsolin, chitinase 3-like protein 1 and -3 (CHI3L3) and acidic mammalian chitinase were the most distinctive candidate biomarkers selected for septic AKI. Both neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and thioredoxin were detected in urine of septic mice and increased with severity of AKI. Acidic mammalian chitinase was only present in urine of septic mice with AKI. Both urinary chitinase 3-like protein 1 and -3 were only detected in septic mice with severe AKI. The human homologue chitinase 3-like protein 1 was found to be more excreted in urine from septic patients with AKI than without. In summary, urinary chitinase 3-like protein 1 and -3 and acidic mammalian chitinase discriminated sepsis from sepsis-induced AKI in mice. Further studies of human chitinase proteins are likely to lead to additional insights in septic AKI. PMID

  7. Septic systems as hot-spots of pollutants in the environment: Fate and mass balance of micropollutants in septic drainfields.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yun-Ya; Toor, Gurpal S; Wilson, P Chris; Williams, Clinton F

    2016-10-01

    Septic systems, a common type of onsite wastewater treatment systems, can be an important source of micropollutants in the environment. We investigated the fate and mass balance of 17 micropollutants, including wastewater markers, hormones, pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in the drainfield of a septic system. Drainfields were replicated in lysimeters (1.5m length, 0.9m width, 0.9m height) and managed similar to the field practice. In each lysimeter, a drip line dispersed 9L of septic tank effluent (STE) per day (equivalent to 32.29L/m(2) per day). Fourteen micropollutants in the STE and 12 in the leachate from drainfields were detected over eight months. Concentrations of most micropollutants in the leachate were low (<200ng/L) when compared to STE because >85% of the added micropollutants except for sucralose were attenuated in the drainfield. We discovered that sorption was the key mechanism for retention of carbamazepine and partially for sulfamethoxazole, whereas microbial degradation likely attenuated acetaminophen in the drainfield. This data suggests that sorption and microbial degradation limited transport of micropollutants from the drainfields. However, the leaching of small amounts of micropollutants indicate that septic systems are hot-spots of micropollutants in the environment and a better understanding of micropollutants in septic systems is needed to protect groundwater quality. PMID:27312276

  8. Lake phosphorus loading form septic systems by seasonally perched groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilliom, R.J.; Patmont, C.R.

    1983-01-01

    The movement of effluent phosphorus (P) from old septic systems by seasonally perched groundwater was investigated. A previous study indicated a correlation between P loadings and the presence of old homes. Water samples were taken from shallow wells installed 10 to 50 m downgradient from seven septic systems 20 to 40 years old. The equivalent volumetric fraction of each sample consisting of undiluted effluent was estimated from chloride concentration. A Monte Carlo analysis was used to account for the various sources of uncertainty. Movement of diluted septic effluent to the lake was common, but transport of more than 1% of effluent P through the soil was probable for only 4 of 26 samples. The greatest apparent P movement was associated with persistently saturated conditions.

  9. [Psoriatic arthritis and etanercept].

    PubMed

    Pedraz, J; Daudén, E

    2010-05-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PA) is a chronic inflammatory condition whose symptoms generally appear after the skin symptoms. Making an early diagnosis and treatment of the disease is of vital importance because of the potential development of mutilating and deforming arthritis. Classical treatments of PA include the use of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD) such as methotrexate, sulfasalazine, or gold, and finally, leflunomide. Research on the pathophysiology of psoriasis and of the PA has led to the incorporation of biological treatments, specifically anti-TNF drugs. The three treatments used most in PA are etanercept, infliximab and adalimumab. Of all these, we are going to make a systematic review of the principal studies available on etanercept for the treatment of PA. PMID:20492877

  10. [Pauciarticular juvenile chronic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Hertzberger-ten Cate, R; Fiselier, T

    1991-10-01

    On basis of clinical and immunogenetic factors most children with pauciarticular juvenile chronic arthritis can be included in one of the subtypes: type 1 and type 2 pauciarticular JCA. Type 1 occurs in young children, mainly girls, with involvement of knees, ankles or elbows. In the majority of children antinuclear antibodies can be detected. The presence of these autoantibodies is associated with chronic anterior uveitis. Type 2 or the juvenile spondylarthropathies include morbus Bechterew, the reactive arthritides and arthritis associated with psoriasis and inflammatory bowel diseases. Large joints of the lower extremities are involved, back pain is unusual at onset, but enthesitis is frequently present. There is a strong association with HLA-B27. Treatment of both subsets consists of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, application of intra-articular steroids, physio- and hydrotherapy and splinting. In children with a polyarticular course of type 1, or a prolonged course of type 2 disease modifying drugs are often needed. PMID:1957301

  11. [Juvenile psoriatic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Lu, Shan; Zhou, Wei; Zhang, Qian; Yu, Xin-Ying; Liu, Dong-Ming; Liu, Xiang-Yuan

    2007-08-01

    A case of juvenile psoriatic arthritis in a 12 year-old boy was reported. The patient had a history of one and half a year of bilateral heel pain, followed by pain in the right knee and ankle and right hip joint. He developed psoriatic lesions affecting his nails and skin. He had increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) contents. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) B27 was detected but serum rheumatoid factor was not in the patient. A skin biopsy revealed psoriasis and ultrasonography demonstrated synovitis in right knee and ankle. Juvenile psoriatic arthritis was diagnosed based on his physical, laboratory and skin biopsy findings. A treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and sulfasalazine produced no effect. Leflunomide in conjunction with anti-TNF biologic agents (Etanercept) was administered, followed by symptomatic improvement 2 weeks later. PMID:17706035

  12. Glucose–insulin–potassium infusion in sepsis and septic shock: no hard evidence yet

    PubMed Central

    van der Horst, Iwan CC; Ligtenberg, Jack JM; Bilo, Henk JG; Zijlstra, Felix; Gans, Rijk OB

    2003-01-01

    There is no hard evidence yet for a positive effect of glucose–insulin–potassium infusion in sepsis, septic shock or burn patients. Each individual element of the glucose–insulin–potassium regimen, and eventually euglycaemia, should theoretically be beneficial. At present, evidence exists only for reduced mortality with strict metabolic treatment (i.e. blood glucose levels of 4.4–6.1 mmol/l) in critically ill patients admitted to surgical intensive care units, and for better metabolic regulation (i.e. blood glucose levels of 7.0–10.0 mmol/l) in patients with hyperglycaemia and/or diabetes mellitus, and in patients without signs of heart failure (i.e. Killip class I) during acute myocardial infarction. PMID:12617733

  13. Changes in plasma kynurenic acid concentration in septic shock patients undergoing continuous veno-venous haemofiltration.

    PubMed

    Dabrowski, Wojciech; Kocki, Tomasz; Pilat, Jacek; Parada-Turska, Jolanta; Malbrain, Manu L N G

    2014-02-01

    Kynurenic acid (KYNA) is one of the end products of tryptophan metabolism. The aim of this study was to analyse plasma KYNA concentration in septic shock patients (SSP) with acute kidney injury (AKI) undergoing continuous veno-venous haemofiltration (CVVH). Changes in KYNA content were compared to alterations in the levels of procalcitonin (PCT), C-reactive protein and lactate. Adult SSP with AKI were examined. Measurements were conducted at seven time points: before beginning CVVH and at 6, 12, 24, 48, 72 and 96 h after the beginning of CVVH. Based on clinical outcomes, the data were analysed separately for survivors and non-survivors. Twenty-seven patients were studied. CVVH was associated with reduced plasma KYNA concentration only in survivors. Plasma KYNA concentration correlated with the levels of lactate and PCT only in survivors. (1) CVVH reduced plasma KYNA concentration only in survivors; (2) lack of this reduction may predict fatal outcomes in SSP. PMID:24043287

  14. Adalimumab in psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Salvarani, Carlo; Pipitone, Nicolò; Catanoso, Mariagrazia; Chiarolanza, Ilaria; Boiardi, Luigi; Caruso, Andrea; Pazzola, Giulia; Macchioni, Pierluigi; Di Lernia, Vito; Albertini, Giuseppe

    2012-07-01

    Open prospective studies and randomized controlled trials (RCT) have shown the short-term efficacy of adalimumab (ADA) in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and psoriasis. ADA effectively treated all varied musculoskeletal manifestations characteristic of PsA, including peripheral arthritis, spinal disease, enthesitis, and dactylitis. ADA significantly inhibited structural changes on radiographs, lessened disability, and improved quality of life in patients with active PsA. One study showed the efficacy of 24-week ADA therapy on bone marrow edema and erosions, as measured by magnetic resonance imaging. The clinical and radiographic efficacy of ADA demonstrated during short-term treatment was sustained during longterm treatment. ADA was generally well tolerated and its safety profile was similar to that reported in studies of ADA in rheumatoid arthritis. Overall, ADA has a favorable risk-benefit profile in PsA. The combination of ADA and cyclosporine seems to be more effective than ADA monotherapy in patients with active PsA and inadequate response to methotrexate; however, this observation must be confirmed in RCT. PMID:22751600

  15. Mitral and Aortic Valvulitis in Primary Chronic Septic Endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Bushmanova, G M; Zorina, I G; Nikityuk, D B; Nepomnyashchikh, R D; Lapii, G A; Postnikova, O A; Semenov, D E

    2015-05-01

    Results of long-term prospective follow-up of patients with early stages of mitral and aortic valvulitis and primary chronic septic endocarditic are presented. Clinical diagnostics of the diseases is described and the key role is assigned to pathognomic (absolute) clinical symptoms. The tendency to progressive fibrosis of endocardial structures with subsequent gradual development of valve dysfunction and stenosis (especially for the mitral valve) is revealed. It is shown that early treatment increases the effective valve area and promotes reversion of mitral stenosis. The possibility of early diagnostics of primary chronic septic endocarditis in combination with adequate etiopathogenetic therapy provide the basis for prevention of acquired valvular disease. PMID:26033580

  16. First-trimester Septic Abortion Due to Salmonella enteritidis Oranienburg

    PubMed Central

    Jelsema, Russel D.; Isada, Nelson B.

    1995-01-01

    Background: Septic abortion caused by transplacental salmonella infection is extremely rare; there are no reported cases of serotype oranienburg as an etiology. Case: We describe a patient with non-typhoidal Salmonella enteritidis serotype oranienburg as a cause of first-trimester pregnancy loss. The rapid progression of this patient's septicemia and adverse outcome is described. The epidemiology and natural history of salmonella infections are also discussed. Conclusion: Non-typhoidal salmonella is still a cause of morbidity in Western countries. This infection can result in rapid-onset fetal demise and septic abortion. PMID:18475401

  17. Panayiotopoulos syndrome in a child masquerading as septic shock.

    PubMed

    Zaki, Syed Ahmed; Verma, Devendra Kumar; Tayde, Pavan

    2016-06-01

    Panayiotopoulos syndrome (PS) is a benign childhood epilepsy with predominant autonomic symptoms. The syndrome can have varied presentations resulting in diagnostic dilemma. We herein describe a 3-year-old boy with PS, who had manifestations similar to septic shock. His investigations were normal and had a complete recovery. Through this case, we wish to highlight the unusual presentation of PS as septic shock. Physicians should be aware of the different ways in which this syndrome can present to ensure its early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27390462

  18. Panayiotopoulos syndrome in a child masquerading as septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, Syed Ahmed; Verma, Devendra Kumar; Tayde, Pavan

    2016-01-01

    Panayiotopoulos syndrome (PS) is a benign childhood epilepsy with predominant autonomic symptoms. The syndrome can have varied presentations resulting in diagnostic dilemma. We herein describe a 3-year-old boy with PS, who had manifestations similar to septic shock. His investigations were normal and had a complete recovery. Through this case, we wish to highlight the unusual presentation of PS as septic shock. Physicians should be aware of the different ways in which this syndrome can present to ensure its early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27390462

  19. Assessment of Septic System Performance Using Remote Sensing Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, A.; Kuszmaul, J. S.; Harvey, C.

    2005-12-01

    Failing and improperly managed septic systems can affect water quality and cause health problems for individuals, community residents, and wildlife. Early detection of septic system leakage and failure can limit the extent off-site contamination. State and county health agencies are typically responsible for permitting and regulating septic systems, and they rely on onsite inspection to identify malfunctioning systems. External symptoms which occur over an improperly functioning septic system can include lush or greener growth of vegetation, distress of vegetation, excessive soil moisture levels, or pooling of surface effluent. The use of remote sensing technologies coupled with attainable permit records to identify these features will enable the appropriate agencies to target problem areas without extensive field inspection. High-resolution thermal and color-infrared imagery were acquired in May 2005 for a study area in Jackson County, Mississippi, adjacent to the Gulf of Mexico. Within this coastal neighborhood known to have significant septic system failures, volunteers supplied information regarding the function of their systems by completing a survey and allowing access to their property. For each of 36 data locations, a septic system score was calculated to indicate the level of system performance. Potential predictors of system performance were derived from data obtained from installation records and data extracted from imagery. Linear regression analyses of the dataset identified the significant predictors of septic system performance, and two models have been developed and proposed for the prioritization of problem septic systems by regulatory agencies. The Drain Field Model was developed using linear regression. Vegetative Index and Normalized Differential Vegetative Index were identified as the best predictors of system performance. The model considers the maximum values of the VI and NDVI within each drain field and calculates a score for each system

  20. Mycoplasma bovis mastitis and arthritis in a dairy heifer.

    PubMed

    2015-12-19

    Mycoplasma bovis causing mastitis and arthritis in a dairy heifer. Nutritional myopathy in a three-month-old suckler calf. Acute fasciolosis in ewes in Ayrshire. Cardiomyopathy of unknown aetiology causing death of a three-year-old Suffolk ram. Spinal aspergillosis in a seven-week-old pheasant poult These are among matters discussed in the disease surveillance report for August from SAC Consulting: Veterinary Services (SAC C VS). PMID:26679914

  1. Subchondral pseudocysts in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rennell, C; Mainzer, F; Multz, C V; Genant, H K

    1977-12-01

    Subchondral cyst formation (geode) is a not uncommon manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis which may at times impede correct radiologic interpretation. Four patients with rheumatoid arthritis who demonstrated striking subarticular cystic erosive disease are described. These cases emphasize the nature and appearance of this interesting finding. PMID:413361

  2. Mouse Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Caplazi, P; Baca, M; Barck, K; Carano, R A D; DeVoss, J; Lee, W P; Bolon, B; Diehl, L

    2015-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic debilitating autoimmune disorder characterized by synovitis that leads to cartilage and bone erosion by invading fibrovascular tissue. Mouse models of RA recapitulate many features of the human disease. Despite the availability of medicines that are highly effective in many patient populations, autoimmune diseases (including RA) remain an area of active biomedical research, and consequently mouse models of RA are still extensively used for mechanistic studies and validation of therapeutic targets. This review aims to integrate morphologic features with model biology and cover the key characteristics of the most commonly used induced and spontaneous mouse models of RA. Induced models emphasized in this review include collagen-induced arthritis and antibody-induced arthritis. Collagen-induced arthritis is an example of an active immunization strategy, whereas antibody- induced arthritis models, such as collagen antibody-induced arthritis and K/BxN antibody transfer arthritis, represent examples of passive immunization strategies. The coverage of spontaneous models in this review is focused on the TNFΔ (ARE) mouse, in which arthritis results from overexpression of TNF-α, a master proinflammatory cytokine that drives disease in many patients. PMID:26063174

  3. [Novel immunodiagnostics for inflammatory arthritis].

    PubMed

    Wahle, M; Kling, E

    2016-05-01

    Immunodiagnostics play an important role in the differential diagnostics of arthritis but the test results must be interpreted with respect to the clinical context. The detection of antibodies against citrullinated proteins has significantly improved the immunodiagnostics of arthritis, whereas the importance of testing for rheumatoid factor has decreased due to the low specificity. Antibodies against carbamylated or oxidized proteins will expand the immunodiagnostics of arthritis (especially rheumatoid arthritis) in the future. In contrast, the determination of cytokine concentrations in plasma or synovial fluid plays a subordinate role in the differential diagnostics of arthritis. Indirect immunofluorescence continues to be the gold standard in the detection of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and in the case of positive results further testing for antigen specificity should be carried out. The presence of ANA is not necessarily associated with autoimmune diseases. An example of a non-pathogenic ANA is anti-DFS70 antibodies. PMID:27142378

  4. Caloric requirement of the critically ill septic patient

    SciTech Connect

    Shizgal, H.M.; Martin, M.F.

    1988-04-01

    The caloric requirement of the critically ill septic patient was determined by measuring body composition, by multiple isotope dilution, before and at 2-wk intervals while receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN) in 86 septic and 57 nonseptic malnourished patients. All patients received a TPN solution containing 25% dextrose and 2.75% crystalline amino acids. The body composition of the nonseptic patients, who received 51.9 +/- 1.5 kcal/kg.day, improved significantly, while that of the septic patients, receiving 46.8 +/- 1.1 kcal/kg.day was only maintained. The relationship between caloric intake and the restoration of a malnourished body cell mass (BCM) was determined for each group by correlating, using multiple linear regression, the mean daily change in the BCM with the caloric intake and the nutritional state, as determined by body composition. According to the resultant regressions, an intake of 35.1 and 50.7 kcal/kg.day was required to maintain the BCM of the septic and nonseptic patients, respectively. To restore a depleted BCM, caloric intakes in excess of this amount are required.

  5. Percolation Tests for Septic Systems: A Laboratory Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tinker, John R., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Describes how the procedures by which a certificate soil tester evaluates a parcel of land for its suitability as a site for a private sewage system or septic tank can be used by college students as a laboratory exercise in environmental geology. (HM)

  6. FEASIBILITY OF TREATING SEPTIC TANK WASTE BY ACTIVATED SLUDGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of the study reported herein was to evaluate the impact of household septic tank wastes on municipal activated sludge treatment plants. Septage addition was evaluated on a continuous basis over a four-month period in a 7500 l/day (1980 gpd) pilot plant. The septage ...

  7. Parenteral sulfur amino acid requirements in septic infants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To investigate parenteral methionine requirements of critically ill, septic infants, we conducted an investigation involving 12 infants (age 2+/-1 years; weight 13+/-2kg) using the intravenous indicator amino acid oxidation and balance technique. They received a balanced parenteral amino acid formul...

  8. Reduced oxygen utilization in septic shock: disorder or adaptation?

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Alexandre A

    2015-01-01

    A fall in oxygen utilization during septic or endotoxic shock is thought to reflect circulatory hypoxia or mitochondrial dysfunction, but these pathology-oriented hypotheses do not explain all clinical observations. Here we discuss an alternative hypothesis of how oxygen utilization could fall as the result of a physiological thermometabolic adaptation. PMID:27227060

  9. DETERMINATION OF TOXIC CHEMICALS IN EFFLUENT FROM HOUSEHOLD SEPTIC TANKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report study evaluated the presence of volatile organics in raw domestic sewage generated in a subdivision and treated by a large 5-year-old community septic tank that had recently been cleaned by having the solids removed by pumping just prior to this study. Analysis showed ...

  10. [Role of vasopressin in septic shock : critical evaluation].

    PubMed

    Gradwohl-Matis, I; Brunauer, A; Dankl, D; Dünser, M

    2014-06-01

    Restoration of adequate tissue perfusion is the goal of resuscitation in septic shock. A growing understanding of microcirculatory dysfunction in sepsis led to a change in resuscitation practice away from targeting arterial and central venous pressures and towards tissue perfusion-guided protocols. This change in the approach to resuscitation was accompanied by a change in the role of vasoconstrictors. This review summarizes the pathophysiological and therapeutic mainstays of septic shock resuscitation and attempts to critically evaluate the scientific evidence on the use of vasopressin as a non-adrenergic vasoconstrictor in septic shock. Based on the published study results vasopressin appears to be of potential benefit in adult patients with moderate septic shock (norepinephrine requirements < 15 μg/min) and lacking signs of systemic hypoperfusion (e.g. normal arterial lactate levels). A vasopressin infusion with the sole target to increase arterial blood pressure despite the presence of systemic hypoperfusion is dangerous and can result in a critical deterioration of tissue perfusion. PMID:24838480

  11. Septic shock; current pathogenetic concepts from a clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Tsiotou, Adelais G; Sakorafas, George H; Anagnostopoulos, George; Bramis, John

    2005-03-01

    Sepsis is an infection-induced syndrome characterized by a generalized inflammatory state and represents a frequent complication in the surgical patient. The normal reaction to infection involves a series of complex immunologic processes. A potent, complex immunologic cascade ensures a prompt protective response to microbial invasion in humans. Although activation of the immune system during microbial invasion is generally protective, septic shock develops in a number of patients as a consequence of excessive or poorly regulated immune response to the offending organism (Gram-negative or Gram-positive bacteria, fungi, viruses, or microbial toxins). This unbalanced reaction may harm the host through a maladaptive release of endogenously generated inflammatory compounds. Many mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of septic shock, including the release of cytokines, the activation of neutrophils, monocytes, and microvascular endothelial cells, as well as the activation of neuroendocrine reflexes and plasma protein cascade systems, such as the complement system, the intrinsic (contact system) and extrinsic pathways of coagulation, and the fibrinolytic system. In critically ill patients, the gastrointestinal tract plays a central role in the pathogenesis of septic shock. The potential for complementary and synergistic interaction of the different components in this cascade highlights the difficulty encountered in trying to identify a single means of altering the progression of sepsis and septic shock to multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and multiple organ failure (MOF). PMID:15735579

  12. Molecular signature of organic nitrogen in septic-impacted groundwater.

    PubMed

    Arnold, William A; Longnecker, Krista; Kroeger, Kevin D; Kujawinski, Elizabeth B

    2014-01-01

    Dissolved inorganic and organic nitrogen levels are elevated in aquatic systems due to anthropogenic activities. Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) arises from various sources, and its impact could be more clearly constrained if specific sources were identified and if the molecular-level composition of DON were better understood. In this work, the pharmaceutical carbamazepine was used to identify septic-impacted groundwater in a coastal watershed. Using ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry data, the nitrogen-containing features of the dissolved organic matter in septic-impacted and non-impacted samples were compared. The septic-impacted groundwater samples have a larger abundance of nitrogen-containing formulas. Impacted samples have additional DON features in the regions ascribed as 'protein-like' and 'lipid-like' in van Krevelen space and have more intense nitrogen-containing features in a specific region of a carbon versus mass plot. These features are potential indicators of dissolved organic nitrogen arising from septic effluents, and this work suggests that ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry is a valuable tool to identify and characterize sources of DON. PMID:25142948

  13. Autoantibodies in inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Conigliaro, P; Chimenti, M S; Triggianese, P; Sunzini, F; Novelli, L; Perricone, C; Perricone, R

    2016-07-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic chronic inflammatory disease characterized by extensive synovitis resulting in erosions of articular cartilage and marginal bone with joint destruction. The lack of immunological tolerance in RA represents the first step toward the development of autoimmunity. Susceptible individuals, under the influence of environmental factors, such as tobacco smoke, and silica exposure, develop autoimmune phenomena that result in the presence of autoantibodies. HLA and non-HLA haplotypes play a major role in determining the development of specific autoantibodies differentiating anti-citrullinated antibodies (ACPA)-positive and negative RA patients. Rheumatoid factor (RF) and ACPA are the serological markers for RA, and during the preclinical immunological phase, autoantibody titers increase with a progressive spread of ACPA antigens repertoire. The presence of ACPA represents an independent risk factor for developing RA in patients with undifferentiated arthritis or arthralgia. Moreover, anti-CarP antibodies have been identified in patients with RA as well as in individuals before the onset of clinical symptoms of RA. Several autoantibodies mainly targeting post-translational modified proteins have been investigated as possible biomarkers to improve the early diagnosis, prognosis and response to therapy in RA patients. Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is distinguished from RA by infrequent positivity for RF and ACPA, together with other distinctive clinical features. Actually, specific autoantibodies have not been described. Recently, anti-CarP antibodies have been reported in sera from PsA patients with active disease. Further investigations on autoantibodies showing high specificity and sensibility as well as relevant correlation with disease severity, progression, and response to therapy are awaited in inflammatory arthritides. PMID:26970491

  14. [Early rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Babić-Naglić, Durdica

    2008-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is chronic joint disease which if untreated leads to permanent structural damage and disability. Early diagnosis and therapy are the main requests for good clinical practice. Early diagnosis tools include specific clinical assesment, serological, immunogenetic and radiological evaluation. Disease activity score is cornerstone in clinical assesment, rheumatoid factor and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti-CCP) are very specific serological parameters. The shared epitope containing HLA-DRB1* alleles represent the most significant genetic risk for RA. Magnetic resonance and ultrasound imaging are very sensitive methods in early phase of disease. PMID:19024271

  15. Increased survival of cirrhotic patients with septic shock

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The overall outcome of septic shock has been recently improved. We sought to determine whether this survival gain extends to the high-risk subgroup of patients with cirrhosis. Methods Cirrhotic patients with septic shock admitted to a medical intensive care unit (ICU) during two consecutive periods (1997-2004 and 2005-2010) were retrospectively studied. Results Forty-seven and 42 cirrhotic patients presented with septic shock in 1997-2004 and 2005-2010, respectively. The recent period differed from the previous one by implementation of adjuvant treatments of septic shock including albumin infusion as fluid volume therapy, low-dose glucocorticoids, and intensive insulin therapy. ICU and hospital survival markedly improved over time (40% in 2005-2010 vs. 17% in 1997-2004, P = 0.02 and 29% in 2005-2010 vs. 6% in 1997-2004, P = 0.009, respectively). Furthermore, this survival gain in the latter period was sustained for 6 months (survival rate 24% in 2005-2010 vs. 6% in 1997-2004, P = 0.06). After adjustment with age, the liver disease stage (Child-Pugh score), and the critical illness severity score (SOFA score), ICU admission between 2005 and 2010 remained an independent favorable prognostic factor (odds ratio (OR) 0.09, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.02-0.4, P = 0.004). The stage of the underlying liver disease was also independently associated with hospital mortality (Child-Pugh score: OR 1.42 per point, 95% CI 1.06-1.9, P = 0.018). Conclusions In the light of advances in management of both cirrhosis and septic shock, survival of such patients substantially increased over recent years. The stage of the underlying liver disease and the related therapeutic options should be included in the decision-making process for ICU admission. PMID:23601847

  16. Septic systems as hot-spots of pollutants in the environment: Fate and mass balance of micropollutants in septic drainfields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effluent discharged from septic systems, also known as onsite wastewater treatment systems, can be an important source of micropollutants in the environment. We investigated the fate and transport of 17 micropollutants, including human excretion markers, hormones, pharmaceuticals and personal care p...

  17. Prevalence of acute and chronic viral seropositivity and characteristics of disease in patients with psoriatic arthritis treated with cyclosporine: a post hoc analysis from a sex point of view on the observational study of infectious events in psoriasis complicated by active psoriatic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Delia; Chimenti, Sergio; Grossi, Paolo Antonio; Marchesoni, Antonio; Bardazzi, Federico; Ayala, Fabio; Simoni, Lucia; Vassellatti, Donatella; Bellia, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    Background Sex medicine studies have shown that there are sex differences with regard to disease characteristics in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, including psoriasis, in immune response and susceptibility to viral infections. We performed a post hoc analysis of the Observational Study of infectious events in psoriasis complicated by active psoriatic arthritis (SYNERGY) study in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) treated with immunosuppressive regimens including cyclosporine, in order to evaluate potential between-sex differences in severity of disease and prevalence of viral infections. Methods SYNERGY was an observational study conducted in 24 Italian dermatology clinics, which included 238 consecutively enrolled patients with PsA, under treatment with immunosuppressant regimens including cyclosporin A. In this post hoc analysis, patients’ demographical data and clinical characteristics of psoriasis, severity and activity of PsA, prevalence of seropositivity for at least one viral infection, and treatments administered for PsA and infections were compared between sexes. Results A total of 225 patients were evaluated in this post hoc analysis, and 121 (54%) were males. Demographic characteristics and concomitant diseases were comparable between sexes. Statistically significant sex differences were observed at baseline in Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score (higher in males), mean number of painful joints, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, and the global activity of disease assessed by patients (all higher in females). The percentage of patients with at least one seropositivity detected at baseline, indicative of concomitant or former viral infection, was significantly higher among women than among men. No between-sex differences were detected in other measures, at other time points, and in treatments. Patients developed no hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus reactivation during cyclosporine treatment. Conclusion Our post hoc

  18. Targeting GM-CSF in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Avci, Ali Berkant; Feist, Eugen; Burmester, Gerd-Rüdiger

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is well-known as a haemopoietic growth factor. However, it is also essential in regulating functions of mature myeloid cells such as macrophages. Preclinical studies and observations of flares of arthritis in patients following GM-CSF treatment supported its important contribution to the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). As the most advanced compound, mavrilimumab, a monoclonal antibody against GM-CSF receptor, has already completed phase II trials with a long term of follow-up period of 74 weeks. During this exposure period, an acceptable sustained safety and tolerability profile has been observed addressing the concerns of development of cytopenias or pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. Of note, a rapid and sustained efficacy and normalisation of acute phase reactants were consistently shown in studies both targeting GM-CSF and its receptor. Its tumour necrosis factor (TNF) independent mode of action with concurrent blockade of GM-CSF as well as IL-17 signalling reported from preclinical studies supports the assumption that it can be a useful biologic and an alternative agent in TNF inhibitor resistant patients with RA. Therefore, subsequent studies are warranted to investigate the safety and efficacy of GM-CSF blocking agents in different subgroups of RA. PMID:27586802

  19. Campylobacter Reactive Arthritis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Janet E.; Krizova, Adriana; Garg, Amit X.; Thiessen-Philbrook, Heather; Ouimet, Janine M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To review the literature on the epidemiology of Campylobacter associated ReA. Methods A Medline (PubMed) search identified studies from 1966–2006 that investigated the epidemiology of Campylobacter associated ReA. Search terms included: “reactive arthritis”, “spondyloarthropathy”, “Reiter’s syndrome”, “gastroenteritis”, “diarrhea”, “epidemiology”, “incidence”, “prevalence”, and “Campylobacter”. Results The literature available to date suggests that the incidence of Campylobacter reactive arthritis may occur in 1 to 5% of those infected. The annual incidence of ReA after Campylobacter or Shigella may be 4.3 and 1.3 respectively per 100,000. The duration of acute ReA varies considerably between reports, and the incidence and impact of chronic reactive arthritis from Campylobacter infection is virtually unknown. Conclusions Campylobacter associated ReA incidence and prevalence varies widely from reviews such as: case ascertainment differences, exposure differences, lack of diagnostic criteria for ReA and perhaps genetics and ages of exposed individuals. At the population level it may not be associated with HLA-B27 and inflammatory back involvement is uncommon. Follow up for long-term sequelae is largely unknown. Five percent of Campylobacter ReA may be chronic or relapsing (with respect to musculoskeletal symptoms). PMID:17360026

  20. Transgenic Disruption of Glucocorticoid Signaling in Osteoblasts Attenuates Joint Inflammation in Collagen Antibody-Induced Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Tu, Jinwen; Zhang, Yaqing; Kim, Sarah; Wiebe, Edgar; Spies, Cornelia M; Buttgereit, Frank; Cooper, Mark S; Seibel, Markus J; Zhou, Hong

    2016-05-01

    The role of endogenous glucocorticoids (GCs) in rheumatoid arthritis remains unclear. Herein, we examined the role of osteoblastic GC signaling in collagen antibody-induced arthritis. Intracellular GC signaling was abrogated exclusively in mature osteoblasts via transgenic (tg) expression of 11ß-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2. Arthritis was induced in 8-week-old male tg mice and their wild-type (WT) littermates. Paw swelling was scored daily from induction to end point (day 14). Inflammation, cartilage degradation, and local bone erosion were assessed at the wrist, knee, and ankle joints. Systemic skeletal changes were determined by microcomputed tomography and histomorphometrical analysis of the tibiae. Both tg and WT mice developed acute arthritis in response to the administration of collagen antibodies. However, compared with WT mice, both clinical and histological indexes of joint inflammation were significantly mitigated in animals with disrupted osteoblastic GC signaling. In WT mice, arthritis was associated with increased bone resorption, decreased bone formation, and significant bone loss. In contrast, bone turnover and bone mass remained unchanged in tg arthritic mice. Disruption of GC signaling in osteoblasts significantly reduces joint inflammation and prevents structural bone and cartilage damage in collagen antibody-induced arthritis. These data corroborate the concept that osteoblasts modulate the inflammatory response in immune-mediated arthritis via a GC-dependent pathway. PMID:26988651

  1. Immature Platelet Fraction in Septic Patients: Clinical Relevance of Immature Platelet Fraction is Limited to the Sensitive and Accurate Discrimination of Septic Patients From Non-Septic Patients, Not to the Discrimination of Sepsis Severity

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Hyuk; Ha, Sang Ook; Cho, Young-Uk; Park, Chan-Jeoung

    2016-01-01

    Background The immature platelet fraction (IPF) reflects the degree of reticulated platelets. We evaluated performances of IPF as a biomarker for the discrimination of septic patients from non-septic patients and sepsis severity. Methods Total 312 patients admitted between March and July 2013 were enrolled and samples were obtained at admission. Lactate (LA), procalcitonin (PCT), C-reactive protein (CRP), immature granulocyte fraction (IG), immature reticulocyte fraction (IRF), and IPF were analyzed as sepsis biomarkers and their performances were compared. Results The performance of IPF (area under the curve [AUC]=0.868) in the discrimination of septic patients from non-septic patients was comparable to PCT/CRP/LA/IG (AUC=0.923/0.940/0.781/0.812, P=0.233/0.106/0.186/0.353, respectively), and was significantly better than the IRF (AUC=0.658, P=0.007). Sensitivity (89.8%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 84.9-99.8%) and accuracy (83.2%, 95% CI 78.8-90.0%) of IPF were the best among all biomarkers. The performance of IPF in discriminating septic patients from non-septic patients with local infection showed similar results. However, the IPF could not efficiently discriminate sepsis severity (AUC=0.599), similar to other biomarkers (AUC=0.519-0.752). Conclusions The IPF possessed high sensitivity/accuracy in discriminating septic patients from non-septic patients, regardless of local infection status. However, the IPF did not efficiently discriminate sepsis severity. The clinical relevance of IPF as a sepsis biomarker is, therefore, limited to sensitive and accurate discrimination of septic patients from non-septic patients, not discrimination of sepsis severity. PMID:26522752

  2. Effect of methylguanidine in a model of septic shock induced by LPS.

    PubMed

    Marzocco, Stefania; Di Paola, Rosanna; Ribecco, Maria Teresa; Sorrentino, Raffaella; Domenico, Britti; Genesio, Massimini; Pinto, Aldo; Autore, Giuseppina; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore

    2004-11-01

    Septic shock, a severe form of sepsis, is characterized by cardiovascular collapse following microbial invasion of the body. The progressive hypotension, hyporeactivity to vasopressor agents and vascular leak leads to circulatory failure with multiple organ dysfunction and death. Many inflammatory mediators (e.g. TNF-alpha, IL-1 and IL-6) are involved in the pathogenesis of shock and, among them, nitric oxide (NO). The overproduction of NO during septic shock has been demonstrated to contribute to circulatory failure, myocardial dysfunction, organ injury and multiple organ failure. We have previously demonstrated with in vitro and in vivo studies that methylguanidine (MG), a guanidine compound deriving from protein catabolism, significantly inhibits iNOS activity, TNF-alpha release and carrageenan-induced acute inflammation in rats. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible anti-inflammatory activity of MG in a model of septic shock induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in mice. MG was administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) at the dose of 30 mg/kg 1 h before and at 1 and 6 h after LPS-induced shock. LPS injection (10 mg/kg in 0.9% NaCl; 0.1 ml/mouse; i.p.) in mouse developed a shock syndrome with enhanced NO release and liver, kidney and pancreatic damage 18 h later. NOx levels, evaluated as nitrite/nitrate serum levels, was significantly reduced in MG-treated rats (78.6%, p < 0.0001; n = 10). Immunohistochemistry revealed, in the lung tissue of LPS-treated group, a positive staining for nitrotyrosine and poly(adenosine diphosphate [ADP] ribose) synthase, both of which were reduced in MG-treated mice. Furthermore, enzymatic evaluation revealed a significant reduction in liver, renal and pancreatic tissue damage and MG treatment also improved significantly the survival rate. This study provides evidence that MG attenuates the degree of inflammation and tissue damage associated with endotoxic shock in mice. The mechanisms of the anti-inflammatory effect

  3. Eosinophilia in an Acutely Limping Child: An Easy Guess of Rare Systemic Aetiology!

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Harshita; Ahmed, Maaz; Rathi, Surbhi

    2016-01-01

    Painful limping child is often considered due to septic arthritis. Iliopsoas abscess (IPA) is rare in adults and children. The aetiology is often related to tuberculosis of spine. Hereby we report a case of staphylococcal IPA where incidental evaluations led to obvious diagnosis of a rare primary immunodeficiency syndrome called Job syndrome or hyperimmunoglobulin E and Eosinophilia Syndrome (HIES). This was the first case of IPA in a case of immunodeficiency syndrome including HIES. PMID:27504370

  4. Current haemodynamic management of septic shock.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Jean-Louis; Orbegozo Cortés, Diego; Acheampong, Angela

    2016-04-01

    Early and adequate resuscitation of patients with acute circulatory failure is important to restore the balance between oxygen needs and delivery. Haemodynamic management can globally be separated into three categories according to the VIP mnemonic - Ventilate, Infuse, Pump - which should be considered simultaneously in the patient with shock. Sufficient oxygen should be given early, and endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation performed without hesitation if there is any indication that oxygenation is inadequate. Fluids should be administered using the SOSD mnemonic - Salvage, Optimization, Stabilization, De-escalation. After initial liberal administration, ongoing requirements should be guided by repeated fluid challenges using a combination of balanced crystalloid solutions and colloid. Noradrenaline is the vasopressor of choice and should be started early. Dobutamine may be needed to improve myocardial contractility and cardiac output. Haemodynamic support should be personalized according to individual patient characteristics and global and regional parameters of haemodynamic and oxygenation status. PMID:27079763

  5. The Role of Hepatic Invariant (I)NKT Cells in Systemic/Local Inflammation and Mortality During Polymicrobial Septic Shock1

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Caroline K.; Venet, Fabienne; Heffernan, David S.; Wang, Yvonne L.; Horner, Brian; Huang, Xin; Chung, Chun-Shiang; Gregory, Stephen H.; Ayala, Alfred

    2009-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT)4 cells have been described as “innate regulatory cells” because of their rapid response to conserved glycolipids presented on CD1d via their invariant TCR. However, little is known about the contribution of the hepatic NKT cell to the development of a local and/or systemic immune response to acute septic challenge (cecal ligation & puncture; CLP). We found not only that mice deficient in invariant [i] NKT cells (Jα18 -/-) had a marked attenuation in CLP induced mortality, but also exhibited an oblation of the systemic inflammatory response (with little effect on splenic/ peritoneal immune responsiveness). Flow cytometric data indicated that following CLP, there was a marked decline in the % of CD3+αGalCer-CD1d-tetramer+ cells in the mouse C57BL/6J and Balb/c liver non-parenchymal cell population. This was associated with the marked activation of these cells (increased expression of CD69 and CD25) as well as a rise in the frequency of NKT cells positive for both Th1 and Th2 intracellular cytokines. In this respect, when mice were pre-treated in vivo with anti-CD1d blocking antibody we observed not only that this inhibited the systemic rise of IL-6 and IL-10 levels in septic mice and improved overall septic survival, but that the CLP induced changes in liver macrophage IL-6 and IL-10 expressions were inversely effected by this treatment. Together, these findings suggest that the activation of hepatic iNKT cells plays a critical role in regulating the innate immune/ systemic inflammatory response and survival in a model of acute septic shock. PMID:19201902

  6. Protection from septic peritonitis by rapid neutrophil recruitment through omental high endothelial venules.

    PubMed

    Buscher, Konrad; Wang, Huiyu; Zhang, Xueli; Striewski, Paul; Wirth, Benedikt; Saggu, Gurpanna; Lütke-Enking, Stefan; Mayadas, Tanya N; Ley, Klaus; Sorokin, Lydia; Song, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Acute peritonitis is a frequent medical condition that can trigger severe sepsis as a life-threatening complication. Neutrophils are first-responders in infection but recruitment mechanisms to the abdominal cavity remain poorly defined. Here, we demonstrate that high endothelial venules (HEVs) of the greater omentum constitute a main entry pathway in TNFα-, Escherichia coli (E. coli)- and caecal ligation and puncture-induced models of inflammation. Neutrophil transmigration across HEVs is faster than across conventional postcapillary venules and requires a unique set of adhesion receptors including peripheral node addressin, E-, L-selectin and Mac-1 but not P-selectin or LFA-1. Omental milky spots readily concentrate intra-abdominal E. coli where macrophages and recruited neutrophils collaborate in phagocytosis and killing. Inhibition of the omental neutrophil response exacerbates septic progression of peritonitis. This data identifies HEVs as a clinically relevant vascular recruitment site for neutrophils in acute peritonitis that is indispensable for host defence against early systemic bacterial spread and sepsis. PMID:26940548

  7. Protection from septic peritonitis by rapid neutrophil recruitment through omental high endothelial venules

    PubMed Central

    Buscher, Konrad; Wang, Huiyu; Zhang, Xueli; Striewski, Paul; Wirth, Benedikt; Saggu, Gurpanna; Lütke-Enking, Stefan; Mayadas, Tanya N.; Ley, Klaus; Sorokin, Lydia; Song, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Acute peritonitis is a frequent medical condition that can trigger severe sepsis as a life-threatening complication. Neutrophils are first-responders in infection but recruitment mechanisms to the abdominal cavity remain poorly defined. Here, we demonstrate that high endothelial venules (HEVs) of the greater omentum constitute a main entry pathway in TNFα-, Escherichia coli (E. coli)- and caecal ligation and puncture-induced models of inflammation. Neutrophil transmigration across HEVs is faster than across conventional postcapillary venules and requires a unique set of adhesion receptors including peripheral node addressin, E-, L-selectin and Mac-1 but not P-selectin or LFA-1. Omental milky spots readily concentrate intra-abdominal E. coli where macrophages and recruited neutrophils collaborate in phagocytosis and killing. Inhibition of the omental neutrophil response exacerbates septic progression of peritonitis. This data identifies HEVs as a clinically relevant vascular recruitment site for neutrophils in acute peritonitis that is indispensable for host defence against early systemic bacterial spread and sepsis. PMID:26940548

  8. Stay active and exercise - arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... your overall health and sense of well-being. Exercise keeps your muscles strong and increases your range ... Water exercises may be the best exercise for your arthritis. Swimming laps, water aerobics, or even just walking in ...

  9. MedlinePlus: Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... an Expert For You Women Patient Handouts Summary Psoriasis is a skin disease that causes itchy or ... other parts of your body. Some people with psoriasis have psoriatic arthritis. It causes pain, stiffness, and ...

  10. State Waste Discharge Permit application: 400 Area Septic System

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations, the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affects groundwater or has the potential to affect groundwater would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173-216 (or 173-218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. This document constitutes the State Waste Discharge Permit application for the 400 Area Septic System. The influent to the system is domestic waste water. Although the 400 Area Septic System is not a Public Owned Treatment Works, the Public Owned Treatment Works application is more applicable than the application for industrial waste water. Therefore, the State Waste Discharge Permit application for Public Owned Treatment Works Discharges to Land was used.

  11. A Case of Acinetobacter Septic Pulmonary Embolism in an Infant

    PubMed Central

    Ananthan, Anitha; David, Jane; Ghildiyal, Radha

    2016-01-01

    Case Characteristics. An 11-month-old girl presented with fever and breathlessness for 5 days. Patient had respiratory distress with bilateral coarse crepitations. Chest radiograph revealed diffuse infiltrations in the right lung with thick walled cavities in mid and lower zone. Computed tomography showed multiple cystic spaces and emboli. Blood culture grew Acinetobacter species. Intervention. Patient was treated with Meropenem and Vancomycin. Outcome. Complete clinical and radiological recovery was seen in child. Message. Blood cultures and CT of the chest are invaluable in the evaluation of a patient with suspected septic pulmonary embolism. With early diagnosis and appropriate antimicrobial therapy, complete recovery can be expected in patients with septic pulmonary embolism. PMID:27529040

  12. Aquatic Plant/microbial Filters for Treating Septic Tank Effluent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolverton, B. C.

    1988-01-01

    The use of natural biological processes for treating many types of wastewater have been developed by NASA at the John C. Stennis Space Center, NSTL, Mississippi, during the past 15 years. The simplest form of this technology involves the use of aquatic plant/marsh filters for treatment of septic tank effluent. Septic tank effluent from single home units can be treated to advanced secondary levels and beyond by using a 37.2 sq m (400 sq ft) surface area washed gravel filter. This filter is generally 0.3 m (1 ft) deep with a surface cover of approximately 0.15 m (6 in.) of gravel. The plants in this filter are usually aesthetic or ornamental such as calla lily (Zantedeschia aethiopica), canna lily (Canna flaccida), elephant ear (Colocasia esculenta), and water iris (Iris pseudacorus).

  13. Initial resuscitation and management of pediatric septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Kelly; Weiss, Scott L.

    2015-01-01

    The pediatric sepsis syndrome remains a common cause of morbidity, mortality, and health care utilization costs worldwide. The initial resuscitation and management of pediatric sepsis is focused on 1) rapid recognition of abnormal tissue perfusion and restoration of adequate cardiovascular function, 2) eradication of the inciting invasive infection, including prompt administration of empiric broad-spectrum antimicrobial medications, and 3) supportive care of organ system dysfunction. Efforts to improve early and aggressive initial resuscitation and ongoing management strategies have improved outcomes in pediatric severe sepsis and septic shock, though many questions still remain as to the optimal therapeutic strategies for many patients. In this article, we will briefly review the definitions, epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and pathophysiology of sepsis and provide an extensive overview of both current and novel therapeutic strategies used to resuscitate and manage pediatric patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. PMID:25604591

  14. Leflunomide for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    2000-07-01

    Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are given to patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to prevent synovitis, slow destruction of articular cartilage and bone, preserve function and control systemic manifestations of the disease. Recognition that irreversible joint damage often occurs early in RA has led to much prompter use of DMARDs, with sulfasalazine or methotrexate commonly considered the treatment of first choice. Leflunomide (Arava-Aventis) is a new DMARD, licensed for the treatment of adults with active RA. The manufacturer claims that leflunomide has "comparable efficacy to methotrexate and sulphasalazine", with a "faster onset of action", and an "acceptable tolerability profile". Here, we consider the place of leflunomide in the management of patients with RA. PMID:11027115

  15. Smoking and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kathleen; Yang, So Min; Kim, Seong Heon; Han, Kyoung Hee; Park, Se Jin; Shin, Jae Il

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Smoking has been implicated as one of the most important extrinsic risk factors for its development and severity. Recent developments have shed light on the pathophysiology of RA in smokers, including oxidative stress, inflammation, autoantibody formation and epigenetic changes. The association of smoking and the development of RA have been demonstrated through epidemiologic studies, as well as through in vivo and animal models of RA. With increased use of biological agents in addition to standard disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), there has been interest in how smoking affects drug response in RA treatment. Recent evidence suggests the response and drug survival in people treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF) therapy is poorer in heavy smokers, and possible immunological mechanisms for this effect are presented in the current paper. PMID:25479074

  16. Physiotherapy in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kavuncu, Vural; Evcik, Deniz

    2004-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and painful clinical condition that leads to progressive joint damage, disability, deterioration in quality of life, and shortened life expectancy. Even mild inflammation may result in irreversible damage and permanent disability. The clinical course according to symptoms may be either intermittent or progressive in patients with RA. In most patients, the clinical course is progressive, and structural damage develops in the first 2 years. The aim of RA management is to achieve pain relief and prevent joint damage and functional loss. Physiotherapy and rehabilitation applications significantly augment medical therapy by improving the management of RA and reducing handicaps in daily living for patients with RA. In this review, the application of physiotherapy modalities is examined, including the use of cold/heat applications, electrical stimulation, and hydrotherapy. Rehabilitation treatment techniques for patients with RA such as joint protection strategies, massage, exercise, and patient education are also presented. PMID:15266230

  17. [Rheumatoid arthritis and malignancy].

    PubMed

    Kameda, Tomohiro; Dobashi, Hiroaki

    2016-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with excess mortality. Especially, malignancy is a major cause of mortality. According to previous reports, the overall incidence of malignancies in RA patients has been reported to be comparable or slightly higher than that in general population. The increased incidence of malignant lymphoma and lung cancer has been reported to be consistent in most studies. The use of some csDMARD was also reported as risk factors for malignancy. Recently, MTX associated lymphoproliferative disorder(MTX-LPD) is one of the important complications in RA treatment. We revealed the mean MTX dose was demonstrated to be an independent risk factor regarding MTX-LPD onset in RA patients. This data suggest that the treatment with higher MTX dose promotes LPD onset in Japanese RA patients. PMID:27311195

  18. Physiotherapy in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kavuncu, Vural; Evcik, Deniz

    2004-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and painful clinical condition that leads to progressive joint damage, disability, deterioration in quality of life, and shortened life expectancy. Even mild inflammation may result in irreversible damage and permanent disability. The clinical course according to symptoms may be either intermittent or progressive in patients with RA. In most patients, the clinical course is progressive, and structural damage develops in the first 2 years. The aim of RA management is to achieve pain relief and prevent joint damage and functional loss. Physiotherapy and rehabilitation applications significantly augment medical therapy by improving the management of RA and reducing handicaps in daily living for patients with RA. In this review, the application of physiotherapy modalities is examined, including the use of cold/heat applications, electrical stimulation, and hydrotherapy. Rehabilitation treatment techniques for patients with RA such as joint protection strategies, massage, exercise, and patient education are also presented. PMID:15266230

  19. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Krupa H; Karjodkar, Freny R; Sansare, Kaustubh; Patil, Darshana

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) is the most chronic musculoskeletal disease of pediatric population. The chronic course of disease has a great impact on oral health. Temporomandibular joint is involved in JIA causing limited mouth opening with progressive open bite, retrognathia, microgenia and bird like appearance. Joints of upper and lower extremities are also involved. Effect on upper limb function leads to difficulty with fine motor movements required for brushing and flossing. This increases incidence of caries and periodontal disease in children. The cause of JIA is still poorly understood and none of the available drugs for JIA can cure the disease. However, prognosis has improved as a result of progress in disease classification and management. The dental practitioner should be familiar with the symptoms and oral manifestations of JIA to help manage as multidisciplinary management is essential. PMID:24808703

  20. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis and the temporomandibular joint: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    El Assar de la Fuente, S; Angenete, O; Jellestad, S; Tzaribachev, N; Koos, B; Rosendahl, K

    2016-05-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most common inflammatory rheumatic disease of childhood and represents a series of chronic inflammatory arthritides of unknown cause. Involvement of the temporomandibular joint has been reported in up to 87% of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis when based on magnetic tomography imaging; it can be asymptomatic and may lead to severe long term complications. In this review a summary of the contemporary literature of imaging of the temporomandibular joint in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis will be provided, including ultrasound which is a valuable method for guided joint injections, but does not necessarily allow detection of acute inflammation, cone beam computed tomography, which has emerged as a feasible and accurate low-dose alternative as compared to conventional computed tomography to detect destructive change, and magnetic resonance imaging which is considered the method of choice for assessing acute, inflammatory change, although the lack of normative standards remains a challenge in children. PMID:26924432

  1. Ciclamilast Ameliorates Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-cheng; Zhang, Shui-juan; Jin, Bo; Wu, Yujin; Yang, Xin-fu; Yu, Bing; Xie, Qiang-min

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the effect of a novel and selective phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitor, ciclamilast, on chronic inflammation in adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA), a rat model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and acute inflammation in the rat and mouse model of carrageenan-induced paw edema and peritonitis. Our results showed that daily oral administration of ciclamilast at 1, 3, and 10 mg/kg dose-dependently inhibited the increase in hind paw volume of rats with AIA. The inhibition of paw edema was associated with inhibition of both the production of cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 and cell infiltration assessed in subcutaneous paw tissue. Moreover, there was significantly less tissue destruction in the ciclamilast-treated rats compared to the vehicle-treated rats, as assessed by radiographic analysis and histopathological evaluation. In the two acute inflammation models, ciclamilast inhibited carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats and inflammatory cell migration into the peritoneal cavity in mice in a dose-dependent manner. These results not only suggest that ciclamilast, as a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD), can attenuate RA but also provide proof of principle that a PDE4 inhibitor may be useful for the treatment of arthritis. PMID:26000303

  2. Procalcitonin kinetics – prognostic and diagnostic significance in septic patients

    PubMed Central

    Mierzchała-Pasierb, Magdalena; Durek, Grażyna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Severe sepsis and septic shock are advanced clinical conditions representing the patient's response to infection and having a variable but high mortality rate. Early evaluation of sepsis stage and choice of adequate treatment are key factors for survival. Some study results suggest the necessity of daily procalcitonin (PCT) monitoring because of its prognostic and discriminative value. Material and methods An observational and prospective study was conducted to evaluate the prognostic and discriminative value of PCT kinetics in comparison to PCT absolute value measurements. In a group of 50 intensive care unit patients with diagnosis of severe sepsis or septic shock, serum PCT measurements were performed on admission, and on the 2nd, 3rd and 5th day of therapy. The level of PCT was determined with a commercially available test according to the manufacturer's protocol. Results The kinetics of PCT assessed by ΔPCT was statistically significant in the survivors vs. the non-survivors subgroup (ΔPCT3/1, p = 0.022; ΔPCT5/1, p = 0.021). ΔPCT has no statistical significance in the severe sepsis and septic shock subgroups for all analyzed days. Only the 5th day PCT level was significantly higher in the non-survivors vs. survivors group (p = 0.008). The 1st day PCT level in the severe sepsis vs. septic shock group has a discriminative impact (p = 0.009). Conclusions According to the results, single serum PCT measurement, regardless of absolute value, has a discriminative impact but no prognostic significance, during the first 2 days of therapy. The PCT kinetics is of prognostic value from the 3rd day and is of earlier prognostic significance in comparison to changes in the patient's clinical condition evaluated by SOFA score kinetics. PMID:26925126

  3. How to monitor the brain in septic patients?

    PubMed

    Oddo, M; Taccone, F S

    2015-07-01

    Brain injury is frequently observed after sepsis and may be primarily related to the direct effects of the septic insult on the brain (e.g., brain edema, ischemia, seizures) or to secondary/indirect injuries (e.g., hypotension, hypoxemia, hypocapnia, hyperglycemia). Management of brain injury in septic patients is first focused to exclude structural intracranial complications (e.g., ischemic/hemorrhagic stroke) and possible confounders (e.g., electrolyte alterations or metabolic disorders, such as dysglycemia). Sepsis-associated brain dysfunction is frequently a heterogeneous syndrome. Despite increasing understanding of main pathophysiologic determinants, therapy is essentially limited to protect the brain against further cerebral damage, by way of "simple" therapeutic manipulations of cerebral perfusion and oxygenation and by avoiding over-sedation. Non-invasive monitoring of cerebral perfusion and oxygenation with transcranial Doppler (TCD) and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is feasible in septic patients. Electroencephalography (EEG) allows detection of sepsis-related seizures and holds promise also as sedation monitoring. Brain CT-scan detects intra-cerebral structural lesions, while magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides important insights into primary mechanisms of sepsis-related direct brain injury, (e.g., cytotoxic vs. vasogenic edema) and the development of posterior reversible encephalopathy. Together with EEG and evoked potentials (EP), MRI is also important for coma prognostication. Emerging clinical evidence suggests monitoring of the brain in septic patients can be implemented in the ICU. The objective of this review was to summarize recent clinical data about the role of brain monitoring - including TCD, NIRS, EEG, EP, CT, and MRI - in patients with sepsis and to illustrate its potential utility for the diagnosis, management and prognostication. PMID:25812488

  4. Corticosteroids and Pediatric Septic Shock Outcomes: A Risk Stratified Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Sarah J.; Cvijanovich, Natalie Z.; Thomas, Neal J.; Allen, Geoffrey L.; Anas, Nick; Bigham, Michael T.; Hall, Mark; Freishtat, Robert J.; Sen, Anita; Meyer, Keith; Checchia, Paul A.; Shanley, Thomas P.; Nowak, Jeffrey; Quasney, Michael; Weiss, Scott L.; Banschbach, Sharon; Beckman, Eileen; Howard, Kelli; Frank, Erin; Harmon, Kelli; Lahni, Patrick; Lindsell, Christopher J.; Wong, Hector R.

    2014-01-01

    Background The potential benefits of corticosteroids for septic shock may depend on initial mortality risk. Objective We determined associations between corticosteroids and outcomes in children with septic shock who were stratified by initial mortality risk. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of an ongoing, multi-center pediatric septic shock clinical and biological database. Using a validated biomarker-based stratification tool (PERSEVERE), 496 subjects were stratified into three initial mortality risk strata (low, intermediate, and high). Subjects receiving corticosteroids during the initial 7 days of admission (n = 252) were compared to subjects who did not receive corticosteroids (n = 244). Logistic regression was used to model the effects of corticosteroids on 28-day mortality and complicated course, defined as death within 28 days or persistence of two or more organ failures at 7 days. Results Subjects who received corticosteroids had greater organ failure burden, higher illness severity, higher mortality, and a greater requirement for vasoactive medications, compared to subjects who did not receive corticosteroids. PERSEVERE-based mortality risk did not differ between the two groups. For the entire cohort, corticosteroids were associated with increased risk of mortality (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.3–4.0, p = 0.004) and a complicated course (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.1–2.5, p = 0.012). Within each PERSEVERE-based stratum, corticosteroid administration was not associated with improved outcomes. Similarly, corticosteroid administration was not associated with improved outcomes among patients with no comorbidities, nor in groups of patients stratified by PRISM. Conclusions Risk stratified analysis failed to demonstrate any benefit from corticosteroids in this pediatric septic shock cohort. PMID:25386653

  5. [Reactive arthritis: inflammation or true infection?].

    PubMed

    Finckh, Axel

    2016-03-01

    Reactive arthritis has been classically defined as an aseptic arthritis induced by a bacterial infection in another organ. If the classical form of reactive arthritis is in fact a spondyloarthritis triggered by a urogenital or intestinal bacterial infection, it is not necessarily sterile, and in some cases it may be worthwhile to treat a chronic infection with long-term antibiotherapy. In a broader definition, the concept of reactive arthritis is widened to other post-infectious rheumatism, such as post-streptococcal arthritis or post-viral arthritis. PMID:27089639

  6. Ameliorative effect of methylthiouracil on TGFBIp-induced septic responses.

    PubMed

    Jung, Byeongjin; Ku, Sae-Kwang; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2015-08-01

    The screening of bioactive compound libraries can be an effective approach for repositioning FDA-approved drugs or discovering new treatments for human diseases. Transforming growth factor β-induced protein (TGFBIp) is an extracellular matrix protein whose expression in several cell types is greatly increased by TGF-β. TGFBIp is released by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), and functions as a mediator of experimental sepsis. Here, we investigated the anti-septic effects and underlying mechanisms of methylthiouracil (MTU), used as antithyroid drug, against TGFBIp-mediated septic responses in HUVECs and mice. The anti-inflammatory activities of MTU were determined by measuring permeability, human neutrophils adhesion and migration, and activation of pro-inflammatory proteins in TGFBIp-activated HUVECs and mice. According to the results, MTU effectively inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced release of TGFBIp, and suppressed TGFBIp-mediated septic responses, such as hyperpermeability, adhesion and migration of leukocytes, and expression of cell adhesion molecules. In addition, MTU suppressed CLP-induced sepsis lethality and pulmonary injury. Collectively, these results indicate that MTU could be a potential therapeutic agent for treatment of various severe vascular inflammatory diseases via inhibition of the TGFBIp signaling pathway. PMID:26043683

  7. Alteco endotoxin hemoadsorption in Gram-negative septic shock patients

    PubMed Central

    Shum, Hoi Ping; Leung, Yuk Wah; Lam, Sin Man; Chan, King Chung; Yan, Wing Wa

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: Severe sepsis and septic shock are common causes of mortality and morbidity in an intensive care unit setting. Endotoxin, derived from the outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria, is considered a major factor in the pathogenesis of sepsis. This study investigated the effect of Alteco endotoxin hemoadsorption device on Gram-negative septic shock patients. Materials and Methods: An open, controlled, prospective, randomized, single-center trial was conducted between February 2010 and June 2012. Patients with septic shock due to intra-abdominal sepsis were randomized to either conventional therapy (n = 8) or conventional therapy plus two 2-hourly sessions of Alteco endotoxin hemoadsorption (n = 7). Primary endpoint was the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score changes from 0 to 72 h. Secondary end points included vasopressor requirement, PaO2/FiO2 ratio (PFR), length of stay (LOS), and 28-day mortality. Results: This study was terminated early as interim analysis showed a low probability of significant findings. No significant difference was noted between the two groups with respect to change in SOFA score, vasopressor score, PFR, LOS, and 28-day mortality. Side-effect was minimal. Conclusions: We could not identify any clinical benefit on the addition of Alteco endotoxin hemoadsorption to conventional therapy in patients who suffered from intra-abdominal sepsis with shock. The side effect profile of this novel device was acceptable. PMID:25538412

  8. Management of Septic Shock in the Remote Prehospital Setting.

    PubMed

    Joynes, Emma Lucy; Martin, Jodie; Ross, Mark

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to assess the management of septic shock by air medical retrieval teams in the remote setting. A retrospective observational study was performed over 36 months. Sixty-seven adult patients who met the criteria for septic shock were included. Respiratory sepsis was the working diagnosis for 53% of patients; this was confirmed on intensive care unit (ICU) discharge in 39% of patients. Intravenous antibiotics and oxygen were delivered in over 90% of patients. Central and arterial line insertions were performed in 48% and 40% of patients, respectively, and 79% of patients were catheterized. Thirty-three percent of patients required intubation, and 80% of patients received an initial crystalloid fluid bolus of 20 mL/kg. Vasopressors were started in 89% of patients. Upon reaching definitive care, 91% of patients were admitted to a high-dependency or ICU setting, with a median length of ICU stay of 4 days and a 30-day mortality of 13%. Of those admitted to the ICU, intubation was required in 48%, new renal support in 20%, and blood pressure support in 84% of patients, respectively. Septic shock was recognized early and managed aggressively by remote retrieval teams, which may have contributed to the low mortality rate observed. PMID:27393760

  9. [Septic pulmonary emboli caused by parenteral nutrition catheter infection].

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, M; Itoi, K; Ariyasu, T; Yanagihara, K; Nasu, T

    1990-09-01

    A case of septic pulmonary emboli due to parenteral nutrition catheter infection was reported. Characteristic radiologic features were recognized. A 50-year-old man, who was receiving parenteral nutrition after total gastrectomy, consulted our department with complaints of fever and general malaise. A chest radiograph showed scattered ill-defined small peripheral nodules, which were not present before parenteral nutrition, and these nodules were quickly formed cavities + in 2nd day. He was suffering from high fever, hemo-sputum and dyspnea after removal of the parenteral nutrition catheter. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from the tip of parenteral nutrition catheter and sputum cultures. Septic pulmonary emboli were diagnosed and antibiotic therapy was performed. Bacterial endocarditis and septic thrombophlebitis were ruled out. The multiple cavity nodules extended to involve the peripheral areas of the lung and invasive shadows appeared on the chest radiograph in 8th day. Then, the invasive shadows disappeared and the walls of the cavitary lesions became thinner. After 2 months, all cavitary lesions disappeared with only linear shadows remaining. PMID:2125088

  10. Protein phosphorylation in isolated hepatocytes of septic and endotoxemic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Deaciuc, I.V.; Spitzer, J.A. )

    1989-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate possible alterations induced by sepsis and endotoxicosis in the late phase of Ca2+-dependent signaling in rat liver. Hepatocytes isolated from septic or chronically endotoxin (ET)-treated rats were labeled with (32P)H3PO4 and stimulated with various agents. Proteins were resolved by one-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiographed. Vasopressin (VP)- and phenylephrine (PE)-induced responses were attenuated in both septic and ET-treated rats for cytosolic and membrane proteins compared with their respective controls. Glucagon and 12-O-myristate phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) affected only the phosphorylation of membrane proteins. Glucagon-induced changes in the phosphorylation of membrane proteins were affected by both sepsis and endotoxicosis, whereas TPA-stimulated phosphorylation was lowered only in endotoxicosis. Response to the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 was depressed in septic rats for cytosolic proteins. The phosphorylation of two cytosolic proteins, i.e., 93 and 61 kDa (previously identified as glycogen phosphorylase and pyruvate kinase, respectively), in response to VP, PE, and A23187 was severely impaired by endotoxicosis and sepsis. TPA did not affect the phosphorylation state of these two proteins. The results show that sepsis and endotoxicosis produce perturbations of the phosphorylation step in Ca2+ transmembrane signaling. Such changes can explain alterations of glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis associated with sepsis and endotoxicosis.

  11. Bedside Washout of a Septic Shoulder in the Emergency Department: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Bunting, Leonard; Kuper, Kenneth

    2016-07-01

    We present a case of successful bedside irrigation of a septic joint in the emergency department. Complicating factors prevented the patient from undergoing operative management. With a simple 2 catheter technique the authors irrigated the patient's septic shoulder at the bedside. The patient's pain and range of motion improved immediately following the technique. The patient had complete recovery without open drainage. With further investigation, definitive management of septic joints could begin in the emergency department. PMID:26875059

  12. Bone marrow examination before steroids in thrombocytopenic purpura or arthritis.

    PubMed

    Reid, M M

    1992-12-01

    Corticosteroids were used to treat two children with presumed idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and one with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis without examination of the bone marrow. Of the two with presumed idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, one had Fanconi's anaemia and the other may have had aplastic anaemia. The third child had acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. The diagnosis of Fanconi's anaemia was delayed. A diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma was caused in the second case. In the third, delayed diagnosis and, perhaps, compromised outlook resulted. These three cases re-emphasize the well aired caveats about the diagnosis of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and provide further support for the arguments of those who believe that if corticosteroids are to be used to treat such children, their bone marrow should be examined first. PMID:1290852

  13. Post-streptococcal reactive arthritis: where are we now.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Himanshu; Marshall, Tarnya

    2016-01-01

    A 35-year-old man presented with polyarthritis and constitutional symptoms, and a recent history of multiple tick bites and skin rash on trekking holiday. He did not respond to oral doxycycline and cephalexine for presumed Lyme's disease. Further investigation confirmed strongly positive streptococcal serology. There was absence of clinical or echocardiography evidence of heart involvement and immunological screening for inflammatory arthritis was negative. In the absence of other major Jones criteria for acute rheumatic fever, besides polyarthritis and the serological evidence of a recent streptococcal infection, a diagnosis of post-streptococcal reactive arthritis (PSRA) was also made. He responded well to penicillin therapy and has been started on oral penicillin prophylaxis as per available guidance. As streptococcal infections in the adult population are increasingly reported, it is a timely opportunity to revisit PSRA, and develop comprehensive treatment and antibiotic prophylaxis guidelines. PMID:27520996

  14. Post-streptococcal reactive arthritis: where are we now

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Himanshu; Marshall, Tarnya

    2016-01-01

    A 35-year-old man presented with polyarthritis and constitutional symptoms, and a recent history of multiple tick bites and skin rash on trekking holiday. He did not respond to oral doxycycline and cephalexine for presumed Lyme's disease. Further investigation confirmed strongly positive streptococcal serology. There was absence of clinical or echocardiography evidence of heart involvement and immunological screening for inflammatory arthritis was negative. In the absence of other major Jones criteria for acute rheumatic fever, besides polyarthritis and the serological evidence of a recent streptococcal infection, a diagnosis of post-streptococcal reactive arthritis (PSRA) was also made. He responded well to penicillin therapy and has been started on oral penicillin prophylaxis as per available guidance. As streptococcal infections in the adult population are increasingly reported, it is a timely opportunity to revisit PSRA, and develop comprehensive treatment and antibiotic prophylaxis guidelines. PMID:27520996

  15. Nutrition support in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Ioannidis, Orestis; Lavrentieva, Athina; Botsios, Dimitrios

    2008-01-01

    In the majority (80%) of patients with acute pancreatitis, the disease is self limiting and, after a few days of withholding feeding and intravenous administration of fluids, patients can again be normally fed orally. In a small percentage of patients, the disease progresses to severe necrotic pancreatitis, with an intense systemic inflammatory response and often with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. As mortality is high in patients with severe disease and as mortality and morbidity rates are directly related to the failure of establishing a positive nitrogen balance, it is assumed that feeding will improve survival in patients with severe disease. The aim of nutritional support is to cover the elevated metabolic demands as much as possible, without stimulating pancreatic secretion and maximizing self-digestion. The administration of either total parenteral nutrition or jejunal nutrition does not stimulate pancreatic secretion. Recently, a series of controlled clinical studies has been conducted in order to evaluate the effectiveness of enteral nutrition with jejunal administration of the nutritional solution. The results have shown that enteral nutrition, as compared to total parenteral nutrition, was cheaper, safer and more effective as regards the suppression of the immunoinflammatory response, the decrease of septic complications, the need for surgery for the management of the complications of acute pancreatitis and the reduction of the total hospitalization period. It did not seem to affect mortality or the rate of non-septic complications. In conclusion, enteral nutrition should be the preferred route of nutritional support in patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:18648127

  16. Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA): Treatment and Causes

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Treatment and Causes Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table of Contents How Is Rheumatoid Arthritis Treated? Doctors have many ways to treat this ...

  17. Arthritis Mechanisms May Vary by Joint

    MedlinePlus

    ... Molecular differences between knee and hip joints with rheumatoid arthritis may inform more personal treatment strategies. Sebastian Kaulitzki/Hemera/Thinkstock Knee and hip joints with rheumatoid arthritis have differing genetic markers linked to inflammation, suggesting ...

  18. Experimental Drug for Rheumatoid Arthritis Shows Promise

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_158076.html Experimental Drug for Rheumatoid Arthritis Shows Promise Baricitinib helped patients who failed other ... HealthDay News) -- An experimental drug to treat rheumatoid arthritis showed promise in a new six-month trial. ...

  19. New Treatments Helping Kids with Juvenile Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159984.html New Treatments Helping Kids With Juvenile Arthritis Several biologics have been approved by the FDA ... 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- New treatments for juvenile arthritis offer hope to children with the chronic autoimmune ...

  20. Arthritis - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Arthritis URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/arthritis.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  1. [Juvenile idiopathic arthritis: Definition and classification].

    PubMed

    Deslandre, C

    2016-04-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a group of diseases defined by the presence of arthritis of more than 6weeks duration in patients aged less than 16years and with unknown etiology. The international classification based on clinical and biological criteria define each type of JIA: systemic, oligoarticular, polyarticular with and without rheumatoid factor, enthesitis-related arthritis, and psoriatic arthritis. However, some discussions persist concerning systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, whose clinical symptoms and pathogenic mechanisms are quite similar to those observed in autoinflammatory diseases, arthritis with antinuclear factors (poly- and oligoarticular) that could be considered as a homogenous group, and a family history of psoriasis that frequently led to unclassified arthritis. Better knowledge of the pathogenic mechanisms should improve the initial clinical classification with more homogeneous groups of patients and reduce the number of unclassified cases of arthritis. PMID:26968301

  2. Arthritis - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Arthritis URL of this page: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/languages/arthritis.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  3. Prognostic Value of Venoarterial Carbon Dioxide Gradient in Patients with Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Troskot, Rosana; Šimurina, Tatjana; Žižak, Mirza; Majstorović, Karolina; Marinac, Ivana; Šutić, Ines Mrakovčić

    2010-01-01

    Aim To investigate the changes in the venoarterial carbon-dioxide gradient (V-a Pco2) and its prognostic value for survival of patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. Methods The study was conducted in General Hospital Holy Spirit from January 2004 to December 2007 and included 71 conveniently sampled adult patients (25 women and 46 men), who fulfilled the severe sepsis and septic shock criteria and were followed for a median of 8 days (interquartile range, 12 days). The patients were divided in two groups depending on whether or not they had been mechanically ventilated. Both groups of patients underwent interventions with an aim to achieve hemodynamic stability. Mechanical ventilation was applied in respiratory failure. Venoarterial carbon dioxide gradient was calculated from the difference between the partial pressure of arterial CO2 and the partial pressure of mixed venous CO2, which was measured with a pulmonary arterial Swan-Ganz catheter. The data were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, along with a calculation of the hazard ratios. Results There was a significant difference between non-ventilated and ventilated patients, with almost 4-fold greater hazard ratio for lethal outcome in ventilated patients (3.85; 95% confidence interval, 1.64-9.03). Furthermore, the pattern of changes of many other variables was also different in these two groups (carbon dioxide-related variables, variables related to acid-base status, mean arterial pressure, systemic vascular resistance, lactate, body mass index, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II, Simplified Acute Physiology II Score, and Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment score). Pco2 values (with a cut-off of 0.8 kPa) were a significant predictor of lethal outcome in non-ventilated patients (P = 0.015) but not in ventilated ones (P = 0.270). Conclusion V-a Pco2 was a significant predictor of fatal outcome only in the non-ventilated group of patients. Ventilated patients are more

  4. Acute Hematogenous Osteomyelitis in Children.

    PubMed

    Whyte, Noelle S B; Bielski, Robert J

    2016-06-01

    This article discusses the most common organisms associated with acute hematogenous osteomyelitis in children. Magnetic resonance imaging is extremely important in evaluating the extent of the disease process. Osteomyelitis due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus can be extremely difficult to treat and eradicate. It spreads quickly and causes local tissue necrosis. It is also associated with other serious sequelae such as deep venous thrombosis and septic pulmonary emboli. A multidisciplinary approach is needed to treat these infections. Hospital stays are often lengthy, complications are frequent, and patients are often critically ill. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(6):e204-e208.]. PMID:27294494

  5. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 271: Areas 25, 26, and 27 Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    R. B. Jackson

    2003-05-01

    The Areas 25, 26 and 27 Septic Systems are in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 271. This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) provides selected corrective action alternatives and proposes the closure methodology for CAU 271. CAU 271 is located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) approximately 105 kilometers (65 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, and consists of the following 15 Corrective Action Sites (CAS): CAS 25-04-1, Septic System; CAS 25-04-03, Septic System; CAS25-04-04, Septic System; CAS 25-04-08, Septic System; CAS 25-04-09, Septic System; CAS 25-04-10, Septic System; CAS 25-04-11, Septic System; CAS 26-03-01, Contaminated Water Reservoir; CAS 26-04-1, Septic System; CAS 26-04-02, Septic System; CAS 26-05-01, Radioactive Leachfield; CAS-26-05-03, Septic System; CAS 26-05-04, Septic System; CAS 26-05-05, Septic System; and CAS 27-05-02, Leachfield.

  6. [Exotic viral arthritis: role of alphavirus].

    PubMed

    Jeandel, P; Josse, R; Durand, J P

    2004-01-01

    Only six of the many alphavirus known to affect humans can cause articular manifestations. They are the Ross River and Barmah Forest viruses from the South Pacific, the Chikungunya, O'Nyong Nyong and Sindbis viruses from tropical Africa, and the Mayaro virus from South America. In most cases, articular manifestations involve arthralgia or transient arthritis and are usually minor. However in some cases especially involving Ross River virus acute polyarthritis may be the most prominent clinical feature and even develop before fever. Although these joint symptoms may be severe and persist for weeks or months in a subacute mode with slightly inflammatory episodes that can be relieved using analgesics, they never cause permanent damage. Differential diagnosis of alphavirsus-related polyarthritis is simple to diagnosis especially in epidemic outbreaks as is frequently the case for Ross River virus epidemics in Australia. Imported cases should be suspected in patients presenting acute or subacute polyarthritis after a recent stay of any length of time in a tropical country and can be confirmed by ordering serology from a specialized reference laboratory. PMID:15224565

  7. 9 CFR 311.7 - Arthritis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Arthritis. 311.7 Section 311.7 Animals... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.7 Arthritis. (a) Carcasses affected with arthritis which is localized and not associated with systemic change may be passed for...

  8. 9 CFR 311.7 - Arthritis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Arthritis. 311.7 Section 311.7 Animals... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.7 Arthritis. (a) Carcasses affected with arthritis which is localized and not associated with systemic change may be passed for...

  9. 9 CFR 311.7 - Arthritis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Arthritis. 311.7 Section 311.7 Animals... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.7 Arthritis. (a) Carcasses affected with arthritis which is localized and not associated with systemic change may be passed for...

  10. 9 CFR 311.7 - Arthritis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Arthritis. 311.7 Section 311.7 Animals... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.7 Arthritis. (a) Carcasses affected with arthritis which is localized and not associated with systemic change may be passed for...

  11. 9 CFR 311.7 - Arthritis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Arthritis. 311.7 Section 311.7 Animals... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.7 Arthritis. (a) Carcasses affected with arthritis which is localized and not associated with systemic change may be passed for...

  12. Vaccinations for Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Lisa M.; Winthrop, Kevin L.; Curtis, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) suffer an increased burden of infectious disease-related morbidity and mortality and have twice the risk of acquiring a severe infection compared to the general population. This increased risk is not only a result of the autoimmune disease but is also attributed to the immunosuppressive therapies that are commonly used in this patient population. Given the increase in infection-related risks in RA, there is great interest in mitigating such risk. A number of vaccines are available to the rheumatologist, with a handful that are of importance for RA patients in the United States. The goal of this paper is to highlight the most recent literature on the key vaccines and the specific considerations for the rheumatologist and their RA patients, with a particular focus on influenza, pneumococcal, and herpes zoster vaccines. It is important for rheumatologist to understand and be aware of which vaccines are live and what potential contraindications exist for giving vaccines to RA patients. PMID:24925587

  13. [Vasculitis in rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Bély, M; Apáthy, A

    1996-07-21

    The frequency and histopathological characteristics of systemic vasculitis were studied in the autopsy material of 161 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Systemic vasculitis was observed in 36 case (22.4%). In percentage of all cases with systemic vasculitis, the most frequently involved organs were the heart (66.7%), skeletal muscles (54.8%), and peripheral nerves (52%). The skin was involved only in about one third of 36 cases (36%). In most cases the arterioles and the small arteries were affected by vasculitis. Three types of vasculitis (non specific, fibrinoid necrotic, granulomatous) could be observed simultaneously in different vessels or combined in the same vessel. Different stages of inflammation could be found simultaneously, reflecting the relapsing nature of vasculitis. The frequency, the severity, and the recurrence of vasculitis are different aspects of the same phenomenon running usually parallel to each other in different organs and on different vessels. Vasculitis lead to local ischaemia and regressive changes depend on the number and size of the involved vessels. Systemic vasculitis led to death in 19 of 36 cases. Vasculitis was detected clinically in 7 of 36 cases. Exitus lethalis depend on the localization of the involved vessels. Vasculitis in the heart and brain are more life threatening, than that of localized to the skin. PMID:8757068

  14. Rheumatoid arthritis and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Klipple, G L; Cecere, F A

    1989-05-01

    The activity of RA is significantly altered by pregnancy with approximately 70 per cent of patients experiencing substantial improvement in symptoms, signs and sometimes extra-articular manifestations. This lessening of disease activity occurs in association with an almost complete cessation of medications. However, whether partial or complete this remission is short-lived with more than 90 per cent of women who improved relapsing by 6 to 8 months postpartum. Further, in approximately 30 per cent of RA patients the course remains unchanged or worsens during gestation and indeed the first symptoms of RA may develop during pregnancy or shortly thereafter. Conversely active rheumatoid arthritis seems to little influence the maternal course or fetal outcome of pregnancy. The multiple and complex immunologic alterations of the pregnant state are designed to ensure survival of the fetal allograft in a foreign host. A number of these alterations particularly involving modulation of cell-mediated immunity, immunoglobulin composition, immune complex generation, or the inflammatory response have the potential to interfere with the pathophysiology of RA. In short, although the specific mechanism remains an enigma, the reason for the amelioration of RA during pregnancy is probably an incidental and fortuitous reaction to one or more of these immunomodulatory factors. PMID:2657889

  15. From Space to the Septic Patient: Assessment of Cellular Immunity in Severely Immune Compromised Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sudhoff, Lars; Kaufmann, Ines; Feuerecker, Matthias; Crucian, Brian; Sams, Clarence; Mehta, Satish; Pierson, Duane; Schelling, Gustav; Chouker, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Immune dysfunctions and sepsis as a most severe condition immune dysfunction constitute the leading cause for death in critically ill patients and accounts for about as many annual deaths as acute myocardial infarction, making it an eminent health care issue. In progressed phases of sepsis, the cellular immune response is typically markedly dysfunctional. Space and Antarctic analogues of space have revealed states of major immune dysfunction. Due to various contributing stressors, such as physical stress and hypoxia, spaceflight can exerts strong modulatory and even depressive effects on the immune system, entailing a broad panel of studies on the topic. The aim of this study was to analyze the cellular immunity of septic patients in comparison to healthy controls, hereby translating the question from space to the patient and applying the newly developed and evolved DLR/ESA-NASA immune assays to the clinic accordingly. Methods: 76 patients were enrolled for blood withdrawal within 24 hours after the onset of severe sepsis or septic shock, as opposed to eleven healthy controls. Whole blood was stimulated with bacterial antigen mixture (containing diphteria-, tetanus- and pertussis-toxoid), fungal antigen mixture (containing candida-lysate and trichophyton-lysate), pokeweed mitogen (PWM), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), phorbol-myristate-acetate and anti-CD3/CD28, respectively. Subsequent to a 48-hour incubation period, supernatant cytokine concentrations were measured using Luminex xMAP technology (Bioplex). Non-normally distributed data is given as median [interquartile range (IQR)]. Results: In almost all of the multiple read-outs analyzed, marked immune dysfunction was present in the critically ill patient collective (median SAPS II (Simplified Acute Physiology Score): 67). As an exception, IL-10 release was scarcely impaired. Exemplarily, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) was severely suppressed in the patient group in whole blood stimulated with

  16. Vitamin D deficiency at admission is not associated with 90-day mortality in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock: Observational FINNAKI cohort study.

    PubMed

    Ala-Kokko, Tero I; Mutt, Shivaprakash J; Nisula, Sara; Koskenkari, Juha; Liisanantti, Janne; Ohtonen, Pasi; Poukkanen, Meri; Laurila, Jouko J; Pettilä, Ville; Herzig, Karl-Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Low levels of vitamin D have been associated with increased mortality in patients that are critically ill. This study explored whether vitamin D levels were associated with 90-day mortality in severe sepsis or septic shock. Methods Plasma vitamin D levels were measured on admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) in a prospective multicentre observational study. Results 610 patients with severe sepsis were included; of these, 178 (29%) had septic shock. Vitamin D deficiency (<50 nmol/L) was present in 333 (55%) patients. The 90-day mortality did not differ among patients with or without vitamin D deficiency (28.3% vs. 28.5%, p = 0.789). Diabetes was more common among patients deficient compared to those not deficient in vitamin D (30% vs. 18%, p < 0.001). Hospital-acquired infections at admission were more prevalent in patients with a vitamin D deficiency (31% vs. 16%, p < 0.001). A multivariable adjusted Cox regression model showed that low vitamin D levels could not predict 90-day mortality (<50 nmol/L: hazard ratio (HR) 0.99 (95% CI: 0.72-1.36), p > 0.9; and <25 nmol/L: HR 0.44 (95% CI: 0.22-0.87), p = 0.018). Conclusions Vitamin D deficiency detected upon ICU admission was not associated with 90-day mortality in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. Key messages In severe sepsis and septic shock, a vitamin D deficiency upon ICU admission was not associated with increased mortality. Compared to patients with sufficient vitamin D, patients with deficient vitamin D more frequently exhibited diabetes, elevated C-reactive protein levels, and hospital-acquired infections upon ICU admission, and they more frequently developed acute kidney injury. PMID:26800186

  17. Procalcitonin determined at emergency department as an early indicator of progression to septic shock in patient with sepsis associated with ureteral calculi

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Young Hwii; Ji, Yoon Seob; Park, Sin-Youl; Kim, Su Jin; Song, Phil Hyun

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: To investigate the role of initial procalcitonin (PCT) level as an early predictor of septic shock for the patient with sepsis induced by acute pyelonephritis (APN) secondary to ureteral calculi. Materials and Methods: The data from 49 consecutive patients who met criteria of sepsis due to APN following ureteral stone were collected and divided into two groups: with (n=15) or without (n=34) septic shock. The clinical variables including PCT level for this outcome were retrospectively compared by univariate analysis, followed by multivariable logistic regression model. Results: All subjects had hydronephrosis, and were hospitalized with the mean of 11.8 days (3–42 days). The mean size of the ureteral stones was 7.5mm (3–30mm), and 57% were located in upper ureter. At univariate analysis, patients with septic shock were significantly older, a higher proportion had hypertension, lower platelet count and serum albumin level, higher CRP and PCT level, and higher positive blood culture rate. Multivariate models indicated that lower platelet count and higher PCT level are independent risk factors (p=0.043 and 0.046, respectively). In ROC curve, the AUC was significantly wider in PCT (0.929), compared with the platelet count (0.822, p=0.004). At the cut-off of 0.52ng/mL, the sensitivity and specificity were 86.7% and 85.3%. Conclusion: Our study demonstrated elevated initial PCT levels as an early independent predictor to progress into septic shock in patients with sepsis associated with ureteral calculi. PMID:27256181

  18. Polyarticular psoriatic arthritis is more like oligoarticular psoriatic arthritis, than rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Helliwell, P S; Porter, G; Taylor, W J

    2007-01-01

    Background and objective Since the original description of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) subgroups by Moll and Wright, there has been some discrepancy in the precise prevalence of the different subgroups and in particular the proportion of patients with polyarthritis. The higher prevalence of the polyarthritis subgroup may be due to the inclusion of patients with seronegative rheumatoid arthritis with coincidental psoriasis. The classification of psoriatic arthritis (CASPAR) study database provided an opportunity to examine this question. Methods The CASPAR study collected clinical, radiological and laboratory data on 588 patients with physician‐diagnosed PsA and 525 controls with other inflammatory arthritis, 70% of whom had rheumatoid arthritis. Patients with PsA were divided into two groups: polyarthritis and non‐polyarthritis (which included the Moll and Wright subgroups of spinal disease, distal interphalangeal predominant and arthritis mutilans) and were compared with patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Comparisons were made between all three groups and, if a significant difference occurred, between the two groups with PsA. Results The three groups differed significantly with regard to all clinical and laboratory variables except duration of disease. Significant differences were also found between the two groups of PsA in terms of age, sex, total number of involved joints, disability score and symmetry. However, no differences were found between the groups of patients with PsA in terms of seropositivity for rheumatoid factor and antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptide, enthesitis, and spinal pain and stiffness. Further, dactylitis was commonly seen in patients with PsA (57% in the polyarticular group and 45% in non‐polyarticular group), and uncommonly found in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (5%). With the exception of entheseal changes, syndesmophytes and osteolysis, typical radiological features of PsA could not be used to distinguish between the Ps

  19. Triglyceride kinetics in fasted and fed E. coli septic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lanza-Jacoby, S.; Tabares, A. )

    1990-02-26

    The mechanism for the development of hypertriglyceridemia during gram-negative sepsis was studies by examining the liver production and clearance of very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) triglyceride (TG). To assess the liver output and peripheral clearance the kinetics of VLDL-TG were determined by a constant intravenous infusion of (2-{sup 3}H) glycerol-labeled VLDL in fasted control, fasted E. coli-treated, fed control, and fed E.coli-treated rats. Lewis inbred rats, 275-300 g, were made septic with 8 {times} 10{sup 7} live E.coli colonies per 100 g body weight. Twenty-four hours following E.coli injection serum TG of fasted E.coli-treated rats was elevated by 170% which was attributed to a 67% decrease in the clearance rate of VLDL-TG in fasted E.coli-treated rats compared with their fasted controls. The secretion of VLDL-TG declined by 31% in the livers of the fasted E.coli-treated rats which was accompanied by a 2-fold increase in the composition of liver TG. In a second series of experiments control and E.coli-treated rats were fed intragastrically (IG) a balanced solution containing glucose plus fat as the sources of nonprotein calories. Serum TG were 26% lower in the fed E.coli-treated rats because the clearance rate increased by 86%. The secretion of TG in the fed septic rats increased by 40% but this difference was not significant. In the septic rat the ability to clear triglycerides from the plasma depends upon the nutritional state.

  20. Septic tank discharges as multi-pollutant hotspots in catchments.

    PubMed

    Richards, Samia; Paterson, Eric; Withers, Paul J A; Stutter, Marc

    2016-01-15

    Small point sources of pollutants such as septic tanks are recognised as significant contributors to streams' pathogen and nutrient loadings, however there is little data in the UK on which to judge the potential risks that septic tank effluents (STEs) pose to water quality and human health. We present the first comprehensive analysis of STE to help assess multi-pollutant characteristics, management-related risk factors and potential tracers that might be used to identify STE sources. Thirty-two septic tank effluents from residential households located in North East of Scotland were sampled along with adjacent stream waters. Biological, physical, chemical and fluorescence characterisation was coupled with information on system age, design, type of tank, tank management and number of users. Biological characterisation revealed that total coliforms and Escherichia coli (E. coli) concentration ranges were: 10(3)-10(8) and 10(3)-10(7)MPN/100 mL, respectively. Physical parameters such as electrical conductivity, turbidity and alkalinity ranged 160-1730 μS/cm, 8-916 NTU and 15-698 mg/L, respectively. Effluent total phosphorus (TP), soluble reactive P (SRP), total nitrogen (TN) and ammonium-N (NH4-N) concentrations ranged 1-32, <1-26, 11-146 and 2-144 mg/L, respectively. Positive correlations were obtained between phosphorus, sodium, potassium, barium, copper and aluminium. Domestic STE may pose pollution risks particularly for NH4-N, dissolved P, SRP, copper, dissolved N, and potassium since enrichment factors were >1651, 213, 176, 63, 14 and 8 times that of stream waters, respectively. Fluorescence characterisation revealed the presence of tryptophan peak in the effluent and downstream waters but not detected upstream from the source. Tank condition, management and number of users had influenced effluent quality that can pose a direct risk to stream waters as multiple points of pollutants. PMID:26556750

  1. Mixed fibers diet in surgical ICU septic patients.

    PubMed

    Chittawatanarat, Kaweesak; Pokawinpudisnun, Piman; Polbhakdee, Yaowalak

    2010-01-01

    Diarrhea commonly occurs in surgical critically ill patients, especially septic patients and fiber formulas have been reported to improve diarrhea. Most reports have used soluble or insoluble fiber exclusively, while the effects of a mixed fiber diet remain unclear. This study compares diarrhea scores between mixed-fiber and non-fiber diets in surgical septic patients receiving broad spectrum antibiotics. We conducted a prospective randomized control double blind study in a general surgical ICU. Patients who received broad spectrum antibiotics and no contraindication to enteral feeding were randomly allocated to a fiber or non-fiber diet for up to 14 days. Nutritional delivery and diarrhea scores were recorded daily. Intention to treat analysis was performed. Thirty-four patients were enrolled in the study, 17 in the fiber group and 17 in non-fiber group. These two patients groups were similar in demographics, disease severity, nutritional status, cause of sepsis and total feeding per day. The proportion of patients with diarrhea score ≥12 was higher in the non-fiber group than in the fiber group, but the difference was not statistically significant [8/17 (47.06%) vs. 4/17(23.53%); p=0.15]. However, the fiber group had a lower mean diarrhea score (fiber vs. non-fiber = 3.6 ± 2.3 vs. 6.3 ± 3.6; p=0.005), as well as a lower global diarrhea score from the generalized estimation equation model for repeated measurement [Coefficient -3.03 (95%CI= -5.03 to -0.92); p=0.005]. In summary, a mixed fiber diet formula can reduce the diarrhea score in surgical critically ill septic patients who received broad spectrum antibiotics. PMID:21147705

  2. Septic Lateral Sinus Thrombosis: Sinus Exploration Is Unnecessary

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gautam Bir; Arora, Rubeena; Garg, Sunil; Kumar, Deepak; Ranjan, Shruti

    2016-01-01

    The algorithm of treatment of septic lateral sinus thrombosis (SLST) has undergone a paradigm shift with the understanding of the natural history of sigmoid sinus thrombosis. Thus, the recent medical literature promulgates the management of these cases with no sinus exploration. However, in view of marked paucity of literature on the cited subject, not much is known about this form of treatment. We present our experience of treating two paediatric cases of SLST with mastoid surgery and no sinus exploration: both cases had excellent recovery. Finally, conclusions are drawn in light of contemporary literature on this subject. PMID:26881164

  3. Novel therapies for septic shock over the past 4 decades.

    PubMed

    Suffredini, Anthony F; Munford, Robert S

    2011-07-13

    Infections that result in shock and organ failure are a major public health problem worldwide. Severe sepsis and septic shock affect patients of all ages and often complicate chronic diseases. They are the major causes of death in critical care units and contribute substantially to hospital inpatient costs. Translating the scientific advances of the last 4 decades into clinical practice has been challenging. Despite many attempts to develop new therapies, the basic elements of treatment have not changed since the 1960s. In this Grand Rounds, we summarize the results of the clinical trials conducted during the last 4 decades, discuss some lessons learned, and suggest possible directions for future investigation. PMID:21750297

  4. Pulmonary extraction of biogenic amines during septic shock

    SciTech Connect

    Kerstein, M.D.; Kohler, J.; Gould, S.; Moseley, P.

    1982-10-01

    The effect of live Escherichia coli on the pulmonary extraction of the biogenic amines /sup 14/C 5-hydroxytryptamine, (5-HT) and /sup 3/H-epinephrine was investigated. The labeled isotopes were injected into a central venous catheter and collected from an aortic catheter. One hundred per cent of the labeled epinephrine was recovered in the control and septic state. Only 32.8 +/- 3.6% SEM of the 5-hydroxytryptamine was recovered before sepsis and 42.5 +/- 4.9% SEM after sepsis. During sepsis, mean arterial pressure fell to 58 mm Hg from 121 mm Hg. Pulmonary shunt increased from .7 +/- .05 SEM to .33 +/- .09 SEM.

  5. Is It Time to Beta Block the Septic Patient?

    PubMed

    Pemberton, Philip; Veenith, Tonny; Snelson, Catherine; Whitehouse, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Beta blockers are some of the most studied drugs in the pharmacopoeia. They are already widely used in medicine for treating hypertension, chronic heart failure, tachyarrhythmias, and tremor. Whilst their use in the immediate perioperative patient has been questioned, the use of esmolol in the patients with established septic shock has been recently reported to have favourable outcomes. In this paper, we review the role of the adrenergic system in sepsis and the evidence for the use of beta stimulation and beta blockers from animal models to critically ill patients. PMID:26557668

  6. Postpartum septic sacroiliitis coincident with labour epidural analgesia.

    PubMed

    Mulvey, J M

    2008-11-01

    A 22-year-old woman presented to hospital 10 days after emergency caesarean section with severe back pain, fever tachycardia and a raised C-reactive protein. She had received labour epidural analgesia and was investigated for an epidural abscess. After repeat magnetic resonance imaging she was ultimately diagnosed with septic sacroiliitis. Although an uncommon cause of back pain, pregnancy-associated sacroiliitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of post-epidural back pain, as the presentation and symptoms of an epidural infection and sacroiliitis are similar. We recommend imaging to include the sacroiliac joints when considering the diagnosis of an epidural collection. PMID:19115661

  7. An unusual case of septic shock in a geriatric patient.

    PubMed

    Kourelis, Taxiarchis; Kannan, Subramanian; Foley, Raymond J

    2010-03-01

    Capnocytophaga canimorsus is a gram-negative rod that is a normal inhabitant of the oral flora of most dogs, cats and other animals. Clinically significant infections of humans by this common organism are extremely rare. We present a case of an 87-year-old woman who presented with septic shock and multiorgan system failure. Blood cultures were positive for a gram-negative rod that five days after admission was identified as C. canimorsus. She was treated aggressively with intravenous fluid resuscitation, vasopressors and parenteral antibiotics and recovered. The epidemiology, virulence factors, and treatment options for C. canimorsus are discussed. PMID:20391818

  8. SEPTIC TANK SETBACK DISTANCES: A WAY TO MINIMIZE VIRUS CONTAMINATION OF DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Septic tanks are the most frequently reported causes of contamination in ground-water disease outbreaks associated with the consumption of untreated ground water in the United States. The placement of septic tanks is generally controlled by county-wide or state-wide regulations, ...

  9. Blood histamine concentrations are not elevated in humans with septic shock

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, R.; Kaliner, M.; Shelhamer, J.H.; Parrillo, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    Histamine has been suggested as an important mediator of the cardiovascular abnormalities during septic shock. To determine if blood histamine levels were increased during human sepsis and septic shock, plasma histamine was measured using a very sensitive radioenzyme assay employing histamine N-methyltransferase (HNMT) in the following patient groups: normal controls (n = 76), nonseptic critically ill (n = 12), nonseptic shock (n = 2), sepsis without shock (n = 28), and septic shock (n = 41). Using this enzyme binding assay, all these groups had similar, normal plasma histamine concentrations, except those patients with septic shock whose mean histamine measurements were significantly reduced (p less than .002). This decrease was found to be due to an artifact of the assay: plasma contained a circulating inhibitor that falsely lowered the measured histamine level. Fractionation of septic shock plasma using molecular exclusion membranes and gel filtration revealed a 5000 MW inhibitory factor. After removal of this inhibitor from plasma, septic shock plasma histamine levels were normal. Thus, septic shock patients may have a circulating inhibitor of the HNMT enzyme, but plasma histamine concentrations are normal. Histaminemia is unlikely to play an important role in the pathogenesis of septic shock in humans.

  10. Assessment of Neutrophil Function in Patients with Septic Shock: Comparison of Methods

    PubMed Central

    Wenisch, C.; Fladerer, P.; Patruta, S.; Krause, R.; Hörl, W.

    2001-01-01

    Patients with septic shock are shown to have decreased neutrophil phagocytic function by multiple assays, and their assessment by whole-blood assays (fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis) correlates with assays requiring isolated neutrophils (microscopic and spectrophotometric assays). For patients with similar underlying conditions but without septic shock, this correlation does not occur. PMID:11139215

  11. Pyogenic infection and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, I. F.; Deans, A. C.; Keat, A. C.

    1987-01-01

    Ten episodes of severe pyogenic infection occurring in nine patients with rheumatoid arthritis are reported. There was a wide range of presenting features including pyoarthrosis in 7 episodes. Three cases presented with meningitis, bacterial endocarditis and probable multiple abscesses respectively. Infection was caused by Staphylococcus aureus in 7 episodes and by Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae and beta-haemolytic Streptococcus in each of one episode. Three infective episodes were fatal. Pyogenic, especially staphylococcal, infection should be considered in patients with rheumatoid arthritis with unexplained illness with or without sudden deterioration in joint symptoms. It is important to recognize and treat infection rapidly. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:3671222

  12. Childhood arthritis: classification and radiology.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Karl; Gardner-Medwin, Janet

    2002-01-01

    Childhood arthritis has now been reclassified into a single internationally recognized entity of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Radiology provides an important role in the management of JIA, in helping in the differential diagnosis, monitoring disease progression and detecting complications. Traditionally, plain radiographs have been the imaging investigation of choice but magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound are now providing a more effective and safer alternative. The appropriate use of sequences in MR imaging is important in the early detection of joint abnormalities in JIA. PMID:11798203

  13. CAPing inflammation and acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Rosin, Diane L; Okusa, Mark D

    2016-09-01

    The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway has been shown to modulate inflammation in disease models such as rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. A recent study demonstrated a protective effect of vagus nerve stimulation with activation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway in the ischemia reperfusion model of acute kidney injury. PMID:27521104

  14. Olecranon Bursitis Caused by Candida parapsilosis in a Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gamarra-Hilburn, Carla F; Rios, Grissel; Vilá, Luis M

    2016-01-01

    Septic bursitis is usually caused by bacterial organisms. However, infectious bursitis caused by fungi is very rare. Herein, we present a 68-year-old woman with long-standing rheumatoid arthritis who developed pain, erythema, and swelling of the right olecranon bursa. Aspiration of the olecranon bursa showed a white blood cell count of 3.1 × 10(3)/μL (41% neutrophils, 30% lymphocytes, and 29% monocytes). Fluid culture was positive for Candida parapsilosis. She was treated with caspofungin 50 mg intravenously daily for 13 days followed by fluconazole 200 mg orally daily for one week. She responded well to this treatment but had recurrent swelling of the bursa. Bursectomy was recommended but she declined this option. This case, together with other reports, suggests that the awareness of uncommon pathogens, their presentation, and predisposing risk factors are important to establish an early diagnosis and prevent long-term complications. PMID:27595032

  15. Olecranon Bursitis Caused by Candida parapsilosis in a Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rios, Grissel

    2016-01-01

    Septic bursitis is usually caused by bacterial organisms. However, infectious bursitis caused by fungi is very rare. Herein, we present a 68-year-old woman with long-standing rheumatoid arthritis who developed pain, erythema, and swelling of the right olecranon bursa. Aspiration of the olecranon bursa showed a white blood cell count of 3.1 × 103/μL (41% neutrophils, 30% lymphocytes, and 29% monocytes). Fluid culture was positive for Candida parapsilosis. She was treated with caspofungin 50 mg intravenously daily for 13 days followed by fluconazole 200 mg orally daily for one week. She responded well to this treatment but had recurrent swelling of the bursa. Bursectomy was recommended but she declined this option. This case, together with other reports, suggests that the awareness of uncommon pathogens, their presentation, and predisposing risk factors are important to establish an early diagnosis and prevent long-term complications. PMID:27595032

  16. Candida arthritis: cellular immune responses of synovial fluid and peripheral blood lymphocytes to Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, E; Mayet, W J; Klein, O; Lohse, A W; Trautwein, C; Michiels, I; Poralla, T; Meyer zum Büschenfelde, K H

    1991-01-01

    A case of septic Candida albicans arthritis of the knee in a patient with systemic candidiasis is presented. Systemic and intra-articular cellular immune responses to C albicans and various bacterial antigens were monitored for 15 weeks. It is shown that the candida induced blastogenesis of synovial fluid lymphocytes was much more stimulated than that of peripheral blood lymphocytes, and that the proportion of activated cells expressing HLA class II antigens was markedly increased in the synovial fluid. Strong cellular immune responses to Candida albicans could still be shown many weeks after the synovial fluid aspirates had become sterile. For the first time synovial fluid derived, CD4 positive T lymphocyte clones with specificity for candida antigens were characterised and further propagated in vitro. Images PMID:1720301

  17. Comparison of bone and gallium-67 imaging in heroin users' arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Bittini, A.; Dominguez, P.L.; Martinez Pueyo, M.L.; Lopez Longo, F.J.; Monteagudo, I.; Carreno, L.

    1985-12-01

    Nine cases of primary septic arthritis in heroin addicts are reported. Fibrous and cartilaginous joint localizations are prominent (four sternoarticular, three sacroiliac, one sacroccocygeal, and one knee). In all patients but one, conventional roentgenographic studies were negative. In six cases the causative agent was Staphylococcus aureus and in two cases, Candida albicans. In one case, it could not be determined. Our clinical observations, correlating the radioisotopic studies, suggest that in the first week of evolution the diagnostic procedure of choice is the (67Ga)citrate scintigram. Indeed, during this period the (99Tc)MDP bone scan is usually negative. The early demonstration and localization of the disease, together with the rapid bacteriologic diagnosis, allows for an early and more appropriate antibiotic treatment and better results.

  18. Treatment of arthritis, including rheumatoid arthritis, with radioactive isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, E.; Bordoni, M.E.; Thornton, A.K.

    1988-06-21

    A radioactive composition is described for the treatment of arthritis comprising, in combination, a ferric hydroxide or aluminum hydroxide aggregate suspension having a particle size of 3 to 20 microns, wherein a radionuclide is entrapped, the radionuclide being /sup 166/Holmium.

  19. Hemodynamic effects of plasma exchange in septic patients: preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Berlot, G; Gullo, A; Fasiolo, S; Serra, L; Silvestri, L; Wörz, M

    1997-01-01

    To assess the effects of plasma exchange on the hemodynamic performance of septic patients, we studied 12 septic patients (11 males and 1 female, age range 19-64, mean 39 +/- 17 years). After cardiovascular stabilization, plasma exchange was performed in the spontaneous mode via a femorofemoral arteriovenous shunt; during the treatment the infusion rate of cardiovascular drugs and the mechanical ventilation setting were not modified. Heart rate, pulmonary artery occlusion pressure, and peripheral vascular resistance did not change significantly. The stroke volume index increased significantly (from 49 +/- 9 to 60 +/- 9 ml/min/m2; p < 0.05) as well as the cardiac index (from 5.5 +/- 1.2 to 6.3 +/- 0.8 liters/min/m2, the oxygen delivery (from 785 +/- 166 to 872 +/- 118 ml/min/m2; p < 0.05), and the left ventricular stroke work index/pulmonary artery occlusion pressure ratio (from 4.03 +/- 1.92 to 5.07 +/- 2.54; p < 0.05). The oxygen consumption did not change. Four patients survived. In conclusion, in our patients plasma exchange was associated with an improvement in cardiac function, possibly due to the elimination of some sepsis mediator(s) with negative inotropic properties. PMID:9096906

  20. Genetics Home Reference: rheumatoid arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... risk factors for rheumatoid arthritis are variations in human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes , especially the HLA-DRB1 gene. The proteins produced from HLA genes help the immune system distinguish the body's own proteins from proteins made by foreign invaders ( ...

  1. Medicines to Treat Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... and 55, but it can happen at any age. Rheumatoid arthritis affects women more than men. Visit your doctor to talk about your health and the medicines you may need. This factsheet will give you information about a type of medicine. You will learn ...

  2. [The temporomandibular joint in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: what radiologists need to look for on magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    De La Hoz Polo, M; Navallas, M

    2014-01-01

    The term "juvenile idiopathic arthritis" (JIA) encompasses a group of arthritis of unknown cause with onset before the age of 16 years that last for at least 6 weeks. The prevalence of temporomandibular joint involvement in published series ranges from 17% to 87%. Temporomandibular joint involvement is difficult to detect clinically, so imaging plays a key role in diagnosis and monitoring treatment. MRI is the technique of choice for the study of arthritis of the temporomandibular joint because it is the most sensitive technique for detecting acute synovitis and bone edema. Power Doppler ultrasonography can also detect active synovitis by showing the hypervascularization of the inflamed synovial membrane, but it cannot identify bone edema. This article describes the MRI technique for evaluating the temporomandibular joint in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, defines the parameters to look for, and illustrates the main findings. PMID:24792314

  3. Saline breast implant fluid collection and reactive arthritis in a patient with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kohannim, Omid; Rubin, Zachary; Taylor, Mihaela

    2011-03-01

    Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome is a potentially lethal condition with an increasing incidence over the last 30 years. We present the case of a 55-year-old patient with signs and symptoms of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. This patient's presentation was unique in that it was followed by an accumulation of fluid at her breast implant in addition to a polyarticular reactive arthritis. We propose that the patient's reactive arthritis is consistent with the diagnosis of post-streptococcal reactive arthritis, a variant of acute rheumatic fever, which similarly to its variant is immunologically driven. We hypothesize that the fluid collection around the patient's breast implant was triggered by her infection and was also immunologically mediated. PMID:21325958

  4. Clostridium difficile Enterocolitis and Reactive Arthritis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Cappella, Michela; Pugliese, Fabrizio; Zucchini, Andrea; Marchetti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is a rare complication of Clostridium difficile enterocolitis, especially in children. We review the 6 pediatric cases published in the English and non-English literature and discuss their clinical presentation, outcome, treatment, and pathophysiology. We also report the seventh case of Clostridium difficile reactive arthritis in a 6-year-old boy who was treated with amoxicillin-clavulanate for 10 days because of an upper respiratory infection. After the antibiotic course, the child developed at the same time diarrhea with positive stool culture for Clostridium difficile and an asymmetric polyarthritis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and metronidazole completely resolved the pain, joint swelling, and diarrhea. After twelve months of follow-up there has been no recurrence. This report confirms the self-limiting course of Clostridium difficile reactive arthritis. Clostridium difficile testing in children with gastrointestinal symptoms and acute onset of joint pain should be always considered. PMID:27190666

  5. Clostridium difficile Enterocolitis and Reactive Arthritis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Cappella, Michela; Pugliese, Fabrizio; Zucchini, Andrea; Marchetti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is a rare complication of Clostridium difficile enterocolitis, especially in children. We review the 6 pediatric cases published in the English and non-English literature and discuss their clinical presentation, outcome, treatment, and pathophysiology. We also report the seventh case of Clostridium difficile reactive arthritis in a 6-year-old boy who was treated with amoxicillin-clavulanate for 10 days because of an upper respiratory infection. After the antibiotic course, the child developed at the same time diarrhea with positive stool culture for Clostridium difficile and an asymmetric polyarthritis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and metronidazole completely resolved the pain, joint swelling, and diarrhea. After twelve months of follow-up there has been no recurrence. This report confirms the self-limiting course of Clostridium difficile reactive arthritis. Clostridium difficile testing in children with gastrointestinal symptoms and acute onset of joint pain should be always considered. PMID:27190666

  6. Autoimmune hypothyroidism: might its presence be useful to support the diagnosis of sarcoidosis in a patient with acute symmetrical oligoarthritis?

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Fernandez, F J; Sanchez-Trigo, S; Sesma, P

    2011-01-01

    Acute sarcoid arthritis may be present in isolation or as part of Löfgren's syndrome. Its true incidence is unclear since the diagnosis may be difficult when patients present with articular symptoms alone. The diagnosis of sarcoid arthritis is based upon suggestive clinical, imaging, synovial fluid findings, and in some cases upon synovial biopsy. The finding of sterile noncaseating granulomatous inflammation on biopsy is supportive, but it is not pathognomic of sarcoidosis. On the other hand, sarcoidosis has been associated with autoimmune diseases, especially with autoimmune thyroid disease. We believe that it might be of interest to evaluate thyroid function testing in patients with clinical features consistent with sarcoid arthritis, and the diagnosis of sarcoidosis should be considered in patients who present with symmetrical arthritis and thyroid autoimmune disease. We describe herein a patient with subclinical autoimmune hypothyroidism and an acute symmetrical oligoarthritis, with a clinical presentation and laboratory data consistent with acute sarcoid arthritis (Ref. 14). PMID:21692413

  7. Acute oesophageal necrosis (black oesophagus).

    PubMed

    Galtés, Ignasi; Gallego, María Ángeles; Esgueva, Raquel; Martin-Fumadó, Carles

    2016-03-01

    A 54-year-old man was admitted to hospital after being found unconscious in his home. He had a history of alcoholism, multiple drug addictions, and type I diabetes mellitus. At admission, he had hyperglycaemia (550 mg/dL) with glucosuria and ketone bodies in the urine, along with septic shock refractory to bilateral alveolar infiltrates and severe respiratory failure. The patient died 24 hours post admission due to multiple organ failure, with diabetic ketoacidosis decompensated by possible respiratory infection in a patient with polytoxicomania. The autopsy confirmed the presence of acute bilateral bronchopneumonia, chronic pancreatitis, severe hepatic steatosis, and generalized congestive changes. At the oesophagus, acute oesophageal necrosis was evident. PMID:26949146

  8. Acute Salpingitis in a Nonsexually Active Adolescent.

    PubMed

    Fein, Daniel M; Sellinger, Catherine; Fagan, Michele J

    2015-12-01

    Acute salpingitis is an uncommon cause of an acute surgical abdomen, especially in an adolescent who is not sexually active. The following is a case of a 12-year-old girl who denied sexual activity, had a remote history of an appendectomy, and a recent diagnosis of a large, right-sided ovarian cyst, who presented with acute abdominal pain, urinary symptoms, and fever. The patient was ill-appearing and progressed to uncompensated septic shock in the emergency department despite aggressive fluid resuscitation and empiric antibiotics. She ultimately underwent an exploratory laparotomy and was diagnosed with acute bilateral salpingitis. This case highlights the diagnostic dilemmas facing those caring for an adolescent girl with abdominal pain and presents an extremely rare etiology for abdominal pain in a nonsexually active adolescent. PMID:26626893

  9. Treating Rheumatoid Arthritis: Are Biologic Drugs Right for You?

    MedlinePlus

    Treating Rheumatoid Arthritis: Are Biologic Drugs Right for You? What is rheumatoid arthritis (RA)? Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a serious condition. The body’s immune system attacks the lining of ...

  10. Management of sepsis and septic shock in infants and children.

    PubMed

    von Rosenstiel, N; von Rosenstiel, I; Adam, D

    2001-01-01

    Sepsis and septic shock constitute an important cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill children. Thus, the systemic response to infection and its management remains a major challenge in clinical medicine. Apart from antibiotic administration, the majority of available therapies are limited to supportive strategies, although considerable efforts are being undertaken to devise innovative approaches that modulate host inflammatory responses. In suspected sepsis, 2 or 3 days' empiric antibiotic therapy should begin immediately after cultures have been obtained without awaiting results. Antibiotics should be re-evaluated when the results of the cultures and susceptibility tests are available. The initial antibiotic (combination) is determined by the likely causative agent, susceptibility patterns within a specific institution, CNS penetration, toxicity, and the patient's hepatic and renal function. The likely offending micro-organism in turn depends primarily on the patient's age, coexistence of any premorbid condition leading to impaired immune response, and the presenting signs and symptoms. Close attention to cardiovascular, respiratory, fluid and electrolyte, haematological, renal and metabolic/nutritional support is essential to optimise outcome. Fluid resuscitation is of utmost importance to overcome hypovolaemia on the basis of a diffuse capillary leak. Monitoring and normalisation of the heart rate is essential. In case of nonresponse to fluid resuscitation, inotropic and vasoactive agents are commonly used to increase cardiac output, maintain adequate blood pressure and enhance oxygen delivery to the tissue. Because respiratory distress syndrome is seen in about 40% of critically ill children with septic shock, increased inspired oxygen is essential. To provide optimal relief from respiratory muscle fatigue and facilitate the provision of positive airway pressure, early intubation and mechanical ventilation should be considered. Renal support is

  11. [State of the art - intensive care therapy of septic patients].

    PubMed

    Reith, Sebastian; Ortlepp, Jan Rudolf

    2016-07-01

    After recognition of the diagnosis sepsis early resuscitation of the patient is mandatory. Patients should have a mean arterial pressure (MAP) ≥65 mmHg. Patients with hypotension should receive initial fluid challenge with approximately 30 mL/kg of balanced electrolyte solutions. However, iatrogenic volume overload should be avoided. If MAP remains < 65mmHg despite adequate volume norepinephrine is the first choice catecholamine. Oxygen should be delivered when oxygen saturation is below 90% to avoid hypoxemia. Intubation and invasive ventilation is reasonable in hemodynamically unstable or unconscious patients. Two blood cultures should be drawn immediately in every septic patient plus further microbiological test depending on the primary focus. After that broad spectrum antibiotics should be given (<60 min after diagnosis). Strong effort must be done to identify the primary source of sepsis including examination, history and different imaging technics. Physicians have to check actively, if the source can be controlled (<12h) by surgery or intervention. Ventilated patients must be monitored for depth of sedation, pain and delir with standardized tools (RASS, CPOT, BPS, CAM-ICU). Lung protective ventilation (TV 6-8ml/kg Ideal-BW, Pmax<30mbar, application of PEEP) is standard in septic patients. It should be combined with low sedation and early mobilisation to allow spontaneous breathing. Permanent monitoring for further organ dysfunction is mandatory. In case of sepsis induced kidney injury, early CRRT should be started with an average dose of 20-25ml/kg/h. Under CRRT many antibiotics must be given at a high dose to prevent underdosing. Concerning nutrition, enteral nutrition starting with 48h is recommended with a dose of 15-25kcal/kg. However, it remains uncertain if hypocaloric nutrition or parenteral application may be equivalent. Transfusion should be done restrictively (with a trigger Hb < 7g/dl). For the prevention of nosocomial sepsis high standard

  12. Early Standard Electroencephalogram Abnormalities Predict Mortality in Septic Intensive Care Unit Patients

    PubMed Central

    Azabou, Eric; Magalhaes, Eric; Braconnier, Antoine; Yahiaoui, Lyria; Moneger, Guy; Heming, Nicholas; Annane, Djillali; Mantz, Jean; Chrétien, Fabrice; Durand, Marie-Christine; Lofaso, Frédéric; Porcher, Raphael; Sharshar, Tarek

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Sepsis is associated with increased mortality, delirium and long-term cognitive impairment in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Electroencephalogram (EEG) abnormalities occurring at the acute stage of sepsis may correlate with severity of brain dysfunction. Predictive value of early standard EEG abnormalities for mortality in ICU septic patients remains to be assessed. Methods In this prospective, single center, observational study, standard EEG was performed, analyzed and classified according to both Synek and Young EEG scales, in consecutive patients acutely admitted in ICU for sepsis. Delirium, coma and the level of sedation were assessed at the time of EEG recording; and duration of sedation, occurrence of in-ICU delirium or death were assessed during follow-up. Adjusted analyses were carried out using multiple logistic regression. Results One hundred ten patients were included, mean age 63.8 (±18.1) years, median SAPS-II score 38 (29–55). At the time of EEG recording, 46 patients (42%) were sedated and 22 (20%) suffered from delirium. Overall, 54 patients (49%) developed delirium, of which 32 (29%) in the days after EEG recording. 23 (21%) patients died in the ICU. Absence of EEG reactivity was observed in 27 patients (25%), periodic discharges (PDs) in 21 (19%) and electrographic seizures (ESZ) in 17 (15%). ICU mortality was independently associated with a delta-predominant background (OR: 3.36; 95% CI [1.08 to 10.4]), absence of EEG reactivity (OR: 4.44; 95% CI [1.37–14.3], PDs (OR: 3.24; 95% CI [1.03 to 10.2]), Synek grade ≥ 3 (OR: 5.35; 95% CI [1.66–17.2]) and Young grade > 1 (OR: 3.44; 95% CI [1.09–10.8]) after adjustment to Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS-II) at admission and level of sedation. Delirium at the time of EEG was associated with ESZ in non-sedated patients (32% vs 10%, p = 0.037); with Synek grade ≥ 3 (36% vs 7%, p< 0.05) and Young grade > 1 (36% vs 17%, p< 0.001). Occurrence of delirium in the days after

  13. Genetics of psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    O'Rielly, Darren D; Rahman, Proton

    2014-10-01

    Spondyloarthritis (SpA) represents a group of inflammatory rheumatic diseases that cluster within families and possess overlapping clinical features. The pathogenesis of SpA encompasses a complex array of genetic, immunological and environmental factors. In this article, we will briefly review the genetics of PsA, and then focus on the genes that may be potentially linked either directly or indirectly to the immunopathology of the Th-17 pathway. The most consistent and dominant genetic effect of PsV and PsA is located on chromosome 6p21.3 within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region, which accounts for approximately one-third of the genetic contribution of PsV and PsA. To date, 36 genes have reached genome-wide significance, accounting for approximately 22% of psoriasis (PsV) heritability. Prominent genes identified via GWAS include HLA-Cw6, IL12B, IL23R, IL23A, TNIP1, TNFAIP3, LCE3B-LCE3C, TRAF3IP2, NFkBIA, FBXL19, TYK2, IFIH1, REL, and ERAP1. Genes identified in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) has largely echoed those in PsV and include HLA-B/C, HLA-B, IL-12B, IL-23R, TNIP1, TRAF3IP2, FBXL19, and REL. The lack of identified genetic susceptibility loci is largely attributed to the much smaller number of PsA patients and the greater clinical heterogeneity of PsA. Searching for different types of genetic variants such as small CNVs and/or insertions/deletions has also led to the identification of several genes with a function relative to PsV in particular including DEFB4, LCE3C_LCE3B, and IL-22 gene (exon 1). The candidate genes identified in PsV/PsA have highlighted pathways of critical importance to psoriatic disease including distinct signaling pathways comprised of barrier integrity, innate immune response and adaptive immune response, mediated primarily by Th-17 and Th-1 signalling. While GWAS studies have yielded great insights into the genes that contribute to the pathogenesis of PsV and PsA, replication in large cohorts, fine-mapping and resequencing

  14. Septic arthritis caused by a gram-negative bacterium representing a new species related to the Bordetella-Alcaligenes complex.

    PubMed

    Kronvall, G; Hanson, H S; von Stedingk, L V; Törnqvist, E; Falsen, E

    2000-03-01

    A knee-joint exudate culture yielded on two occasions a gram-negative bacterium. Regular methods for speciation did not provide an identification. The infection was successfully treated with ciprofloxacin. The unknown isolate, CCUG 36768, was subjected to further investigation, including 16S rDNA sequencing, protein profiling, cellular fatty acid analysis, and various biochemical tests, in order to produce a species identification. The 1469 bp-long 16S rDNA sequence did not reveal identity with any known species sequence. CCUG 36768 clustered in a group of species, including Alcaligenes defragrans, Denitrobacter permanens, Taylorella equigenitalis, Alcaligenes faecalis, and four strains of Alcaligenes species without a specific species name. Bordetella species also showed a high degree of similarity with CCUG 36768. Protein profiling, cellular fatty acid analysis and computer-assisted analysis of biochemical profiles indicated similarity with Bordetella-Alcaligenes species, often close to B. holmesii and B. avium. API 20 NE indicated the profile of Moraxella species of poor identity. It is concluded that CCUG 36768 represents a new bacterial species of pathogenic potential in humans. It is related to the Bordetella-Alcaligenes group. Powerful new methods for speciation are available and it is recommended that unknown isolates from normally sterile sites be submitted for further analysis. Several isolates are required for the definition of new species. PMID:10752687

  15. Group B Streptococcal Septic Arthritis of the Shoulder and Potential Association with Pelvic Examination and PAP Smear.

    PubMed

    Daner, William E; Meeks, Brett D; Foster, William C; Boardman, Norman D

    2016-01-01

    Group B streptococcal (GBS) infection of a native joint in a nonpregnant adult is uncommon. While many women are colonized with this flora, it rarely becomes pathogenic in its adult host. GBS associated joint infections have been reported, most of which have been related to hematogenous seeding from unknown sources. To our knowledge, there are no published case reports of a GBS joint infection in association with a pelvic exam and Papanicolaou (PAP) smear. In this case report, we present a case of GBS sepsis of a native shoulder, possibly resulting from a routine pelvic exam and PAP smear. PMID:26981299

  16. Group B Streptococcal Septic Arthritis of the Shoulder and Potential Association with Pelvic Examination and PAP Smear

    PubMed Central

    Daner, William E.; Meeks, Brett D.; Foster, William C.; Boardman, Norman D.

    2016-01-01

    Group B streptococcal (GBS) infection of a native joint in a nonpregnant adult is uncommon. While many women are colonized with this flora, it rarely becomes pathogenic in its adult host. GBS associated joint infections have been reported, most of which have been related to hematogenous seeding from unknown sources. To our knowledge, there are no published case reports of a GBS joint infection in association with a pelvic exam and Papanicolaou (PAP) smear. In this case report, we present a case of GBS sepsis of a native shoulder, possibly resulting from a routine pelvic exam and PAP smear. PMID:26981299

  17. Psoriatic arthritis: Epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jung-Tai; Yeh, Horng-Ming; Liu, Shyun-Yeu; Chen, Kow-Tong

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of psoriatic arthritis has evolved as new knowledge of the disease has emerged. However, the exact prevalence of psoriatic arthritis is unknown, and its pathogenesis has not been fully elucidated. Genetic, environmental, and immunologic factors have all been implicated in disease development. Early diagnosis and treatment have become primary objectives in clinical rheumatology. Psoriatic arthritis not only causes functional impairment, but also increases mortality risk of patients. The advent of new therapeutic agents capable of arresting the progression of joint damage is expected. However, early psoriatic arthritis assessment remains limited. The objectives of this article are to outline the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of psoriatic arthritis and to suggest a paradigm for identifying early psoriatic arthritis patients. PMID:25232529

  18. Septic tanks as larval habitats for the mosquitoes Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus in Playa-Playita, Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Burke, R; Barrera, R; Lewis, M; Kluchinsky, T; Claborn, D

    2010-06-01

    Adult Aedes aegypti (Linnaeus) (Diptera: Culicidae) were previously recovered from emergence traps on septic tanks in southeastern Puerto Rico. In this study we quantified immature mosquito abundance and its relationship with structural variables of the septic tanks and chemical properties of the water containing raw sewage. A miniaturized floating funnel trap was used to sample 89 septic tanks for larvae in the Puerto Rican community of Playa-Playita. Aedes aegypti larvae were recovered from 18% of the sampled tanks (10.3 larvae per septic tank per day). Larval presence was positively associated with cracking of the septic tank walls and uncovered access ports. Larval abundance was positively associated with cracking of the septic tank walls and larger tank surface areas, and inversely associated with the total dissolved solids (TDS). Culex quinquefasciatus (Say) larvae were also recovered from 74% of the septic tanks (129.6 larvae per septic tank per day). Larval presence was negatively associated with TDS in the water and larval abundance was positively associated with cracking of the septic tank walls. A screened, plastic emergence trap was used to sample 93 septic tanks within the community for Ae. aegypti and Cx. quinquefasciatus adults. Aedes aegypti adults were recovered from 49% of the sampled tanks (8.7 adults per septic tank per day) and Cx. quinquefasciatus adults were recovered from 97% of the sampled tanks (155.5 adults per septic tank per day). Aedes aegypti adult presence was positively associated with cracking, uncapped openings and septic water pH. The Ae. aegypti adult counts were positively associated with cracking and inversely associated with TDS and conductivity. This study marks the first published record of the recovery of Ae. aegypti larvae from holding tanks containing raw sewage in the Caribbean region. Our study indicates that Ae. aegypti larvae are present in sewage water and that septic tanks have at least the potential to maintain

  19. [Chronic osteitis and arthritis of palmoplantar pustulosis. A familial form of B-27 negative spondylarthropathy].

    PubMed

    Kurc, D; De Saint-Père, R; Madoule, P; Laoussadi, S; Caquet, R

    1987-01-01

    A 35-year old woman presented with pustulosis palmaris et plantaris evolving in acute episodes parallel to those of a rheumatic disease consisting of bilateral sacro-iliac arthritis, manubriosternal fusion and sterno-clavicular arthritis. Her brother had spondylitis compatible with the diagnosis of pustular osteo-arthritis though without pustulosis. He presented with bilateral sacro-iliac arthritis, manubriosternal fusion, sterno-clavicular arthritis and an ossified fragment detached from the antero-inferior angle of C6. The two patients had the same HLA phenotype: A1, A9, B5, B41, CW4, DR2, DR4, absence of B27. In a specimen from the sacro-iliac joint the authors found active bone remodelling and inflammatory osteitis with fibrosis and infiltrates rich in mononucleate cells. An electron microscopic study--to the authors' knowledge, the first to be performed in such cases--demonstrated intracytoplasmic filamentous inclusions in two macrophages of the synovial fringe. Only one other case of the familial form has been published so far. Like the rheumatism of acne conglobata, the spondylitis of pustulosis palmaris et plantaris is one of the causes of sterno-costo-clavicular hyperostosis. PMID:3563168

  20. [Advances in the research of early goal-directed therapy in severe sepsis and septic shock].

    PubMed

    Sun, W; Yuan, H X; An, Y Z

    2016-05-20

    Nowadays, severe infection has become one of the common problems in clinic. The morbidity of severe sepsis and septic shock is increasing, which becomes a big threat to patients with burn wounds or chronic diseases. It has become a key subject about how to cure severe sepsis and septic shock. In recent years, mortality of patients in such condition has declined slightly, which might be attributed to the application of early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) in certain degree. This article reviews application of EGDT in severe sepsis and septic shock, in order to analyze its effectiveness and boundedness, as well as predict its development. PMID:27188487