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Sample records for acute severe headache

  1. Acute treatment of migraine headaches.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Frederick R

    2010-04-01

    Optimum acute treatment of migraine requires prevention of headache as a top priority. Recognition of the multitude of migraine presentations, the frequency of total headache attacks, and number of days of headache disability are critical. Successful treatment requires excellent patient-clinician communication enhancing confidence and mutual trust based on patient needs and preferences. Optimum management of acute migraine nearly always requires pharmacologic treatment for rapid resolution. Migraine-specific triptans, dihydroergotamine, and several antiinflammatories have substantial empirical clinical efficacy. Older nonspecific drugs, particularly butalbital and opioids, contribute to medication overuse headache and are to be avoided. Clinicians should utilize evidence-based acute migraine-specific therapy stressing the imperative acute treatment goal of early intervention, but not too often with the correct drug, formulation, and dose. This therapy needs to provide cost-effective fast results, meaningful to the patient while minimizing the need for additional drugs. Migraine-ACT evaluates 2-hour pain freedom with return to normal function, comfort with treatment, and consistency of response. Employ a thoroughly educated patient, formulary, testimonials, stratification, and rational cotherapy against the race to central sensitization for optimum outcomes. PMID:20352584

  2. Migraine headache confounding the diagnosis of acute mountain sickness.

    PubMed

    Karle, Francis J; Auerbach, Paul S

    2014-03-01

    A 36-year-old man with a history of migraine headache attempted to hike from Lukla, Nepal, to Mount Everest Base Camp. On the sixth day of hiking, he had a migraine headache. After achieving resolution with typical therapies and rest, he ascended higher. Another headache developed that was interpreted to be a migraine. The headache was treated, and he ascended higher, after which severe symptoms of acute mountain sickness developed, necessitating his evacuation by helicopter. Persons with headaches in daily life may present challenges to diagnosis when traveling to high altitude. Careful evaluation and decision making are needed to achieve proper diagnosis and treatment of acute mountain sickness. PMID:24462763

  3. Headache

    MedlinePlus

    ... headache (not caused by another medical condition) is migraine. Migraine headaches are usually characterized by severe pain on ... Women are more likely than men to have migraine headaches. Is there any treatment? When headaches occur ...

  4. Stress and sleep duration predict headache severity in chronic headache sufferers.

    PubMed

    Houle, Timothy T; Butschek, Ross A; Turner, Dana P; Smitherman, Todd A; Rains, Jeanetta C; Penzien, Donald B

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the time-series relationships between stress, sleep duration, and headache pain among patients with chronic headaches. Sleep and stress have long been recognized as potential triggers of episodic headache (<15 headache days/month), though prospective evidence is inconsistent and absent in patients diagnosed with chronic headaches (≥15 days/month). We reanalyzed data from a 28-day observational study of chronic migraine (n=33) and chronic tension-type headache (n=22) sufferers. Patients completed the Daily Stress Inventory and recorded headache and sleep variables using a daily sleep/headache diary. Stress ratings, duration of previous nights' sleep, and headache severity were modeled using a series of linear mixed models with random effects to account for individual differences in observed associations. Models were displayed using contour plots. Two consecutive days of either high stress or low sleep were strongly predictive of headache, whereas 2 days of low stress or adequate sleep were protective. When patterns of stress or sleep were divergent across days, headache risk was increased only when the earlier day was characterized by high stress or poor sleep. As predicted, headache activity in the combined model was highest when high stress and low sleep occurred concurrently during the prior 2 days, denoting an additive effect. Future research is needed to expand on current findings among chronic headache patients and to develop individualized models that account for multiple simultaneous influences of headache trigger factors.

  5. [Headache].

    PubMed

    Godin, O

    1976-03-01

    Headache is an alarm sympton, whether there is an organic disease (lesional headache) or a perturbation of one of the various functions of the head (functional headache). Lesional headaches follow a sinusitis or an arthrosis, or accompany a "temporal arteritis of Horton". Funstional headaches include several varieties. 1. Trigemellar neuralgia. 2.Vascular algi originating from the basal arteries, the large cerebral venous sinuses or the branches of the external carotid. Among these are: a) headaches due to a dilatation of the internal wall, causing "Horton headache", migraine-like psychosomatic migraine and hormonal migraines (premenstrual, menstrual, menopausal or linked to the use of contraceptive pills); b) headaches caused by an angiospasm of the arteriole, which is the case in exposure to the cold, in traumatic headaches (malfunction of temporomandibular articulation, dry alveolitis), in psychosomatic angiospastic algias and in ethmoidal artery algias preciously described by the author in 1949 (Godin's disease).3. Headaches due to psychic hypertension. 4. Postconcussional psychogenic headaches. 5. Neurotic headaches. The author gives a detailed description of the subjective symptoms in each case, including localisation, from, intensity, duration course and associated phenomenons. This facilitates greatly the differential diagnosis and the choice of complementary examinations. Necessary biological investigations should be performed (e.g. hormonal balance). One should however avoid to increase the number of complementary examination which would only delay treatement and would expose patients to somatisation. Furthermore, in each case drug treatment, periarterial infiltration technics of the temporal, internal frontal, facial, mastoid and occipital arteries are described. The necessity of questioning the patient at lenght and to listen to him to enable him to verbalise conscious conflicts is emphasized. A serious medicopsychlogical examination and a relaxation

  6. [Headache].

    PubMed

    Godin, O

    1976-01-01

    Headache is an alarm symptom, whether there is an organic disease (lesional headache) or a perturbation of one of the various functions of the head (functional headache). Lesional headaches follow a sinusitis or an arthrosis, or accompany a "temporal arteritis of Horton". Functional headaches include several varieties. 1. Trigemellar neuralgia. 2. Vascular algia originating from the basal arteries, the large cerebral venous sinuses or the branches of the external carotid. Among these are: a) headaches due to a dilatation of the internal wall, causing "Horton headache", migrain-like psychosomatic migraine and hormonal migraines (premenstrual, menstrual, menopausal or linked to the use of contraceptive pills); b) headaches caused by an angiospasm of the arteriole, which is the case in exposure to the cold, in traumatic headaches (malfunction of temporomandibular articulation, dry alveolitis), in psychosomatic angiospastic algias and in ethmoidal artery algias previously described by the author in 1949 (Godin's disease). 3. Headaches due to psychic hypertension. 4. Postconcussional psychogenic headaches. 5. Neurotic headaches. The author gives a detailed description of the subjective symptoms in each case, including localisation, form, intensity, duration course and associated phenomenons. This facilitates greatly the differential diagnosis and the choice of complementary examinations. Necessary biological investigations should be performed (e.g. hormonal balance). One should however avoid to increase the number of complementary examinations which would only delay treatment and would expose patients to somatisation. Furthermore, in each case drug treatment, periarterial infiltration technics of the temporal, internal frontal, facial, mastoid and occipital arteries are described. The necessity of questioning the patient at length and to listen to him to enable him to verbalise conscious conflicts is emphasized. A serious medicopsychological examination and a relaxation

  7. Altitude, Acute Mountain Sickness and Headache

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pinterest Follow us on Instagram DONATE TODAY About Migraine Patient Registry Corporate Roundtable Info for Residents & Fellows Living With Migraines Types of Headache/Migraine Life with Headache/Migraine ...

  8. Headache

    MedlinePlus

    ... The most common type of headache is a tension headache. Tension headaches are due to tight muscles in your ... or anxiety. You are more likely to get tension headaches if you work too much, don't ...

  9. A guide to children with acute and chronic headaches.

    PubMed

    Rosenblum, R K; Fisher, P G

    2001-01-01

    Children with acute and chronic headaches are often seen by primary care providers. A complete, elaborate history, obtained from both the parents and child, is key in diagnosing and managing the child who presents with a headache. A thorough social and educational history may reveal significant school or family stresses. Historic features of concern must be explored immediately. A thorough physical examination with a focused neurologic examination must be done Focal neurologic findings may indicate serious organic problems. A comprehensive approach to the management of headaches in children consisting of reassurance, education, pharmacologic interventions, and nonpharmacologic interventions is presented. A two-tiered management plan is used in conjunction with medications. The aim of this article is to provide the novice or experienced practitioner with a comprehensive review of acute and chronic headache pathogenesis, assessment, and management. This review includes migraines and other nonmigraine types of headaches. PMID:11562640

  10. Granulomatous hypophysitis: a case of severe headache.

    PubMed

    Wan Muhamad Hatta, Sharifah Faradila; Hamdan, M Farhan; Md Ali, Siti Aishah; Abdul Ghani, Rohana

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic granulomatous hypophysitis (GH) is an uncommon inflammatory disease of the pituitary with impairment of pituitary gland function due to infiltration by lymphocytes, plasma cells and macrophages. We report the case of a 39-year-old woman who presented with worsening of headaches for 1 month and blurring of vision over 5 days. An MRI revealed a homogeneous supra-sellar mass evoking a pituitary tumour with bulky pituitary stalk extending into the left and right cavernous sinuses. Hormonal investigations showed anterior pituitary hormone deficiencies; meanwhile histopathological examination revealed an aspect of hypophysitis. Clinical and radiological remission occurred immediately postglucocorticoid therapy with the addition of a steroid-sparing agent later in view of recurrence of symptoms on glucocorticoid dose reduction. GH has important diagnostic and therapeutic implications, as clinical and radiological features ameliorate via medical treatment. With further understanding and recognition of the disease, we hope to highlight a case of GH, in which signs and symptoms improved after initiation of corticosteroids. PMID:27613264

  11. Mindfulness meditation in the control of severe headache.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tzan-Fu; Kuo, Chung-Chih; Chiu, Nien-Mu

    2002-08-01

    In the West, the use of the methods of alternative medicine, including meditation, has been on the rise. In the US, Kabat-Zinn and associates have pioneered the extensive use of mindfulness meditation (MM) for the treatment of people facing pain and illness. Among the essentials of MM is the observation of bodily sensations, including pain. In Taiwan, despite the deep cultural roots of meditation, its therapeutic use has received little attention from institutionalized medicine. We report on the case of a man who was prone to developing severe headaches due to activities requiring extreme concentration. He learned to control his pain and discomfort through mindfulness meditation, although this practice in fact induced headaches initially. It is suggested that training in MM may be a medically superior and cost-effective alternative to pain medication for the control of headaches with no underlying organic causes in highly motivated patients.

  12. Headache.

    PubMed

    Lance, J W

    1981-07-01

    Present views on the cause and treatment of temporal arteritis, trigeminal neuralgia, pain arising from the neck, benign intracranial hypertension, and other headaches of intracranial origin are summarized. The clinical components of migraine are correlated with recent studies of cerebral blood flow, monoamine changes, and the platelet release reaction. Psychological, physiological, and pharmacological management is based on the holistic concept of migraine as an uninhibited protective reaction. Cluster headache is subdivided into three varieties which respond preferentially to different medication. Tension headache may depend more on vascular mechanisms than excessive muscle contraction, but treatment is still directed at behavioral management and relaxation training with the aid of antidepressant therapy. PMID:7023351

  13. Headaches

    MedlinePlus

    ... questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist. Keep in mind that children should not take aspirin. Aspirin can ... herbal health product for headache relief, keep in mind that these products aren't tested to be ...

  14. Headache

    MedlinePlus

    ... hours How much you slept What you were doing and where you were right before the pain started How long the headache lasted and what made it stop Review your diary with your health care provider to identify ...

  15. A systematic review of causes of sudden and severe headache (Thunderclap Headache): should lists be evidence based?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There are many potential causes of sudden and severe headache (thunderclap headache), the most important of which is aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage. Published academic reviews report a wide range of causes. We sought to create a definitive list of causes, other than aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage, using a systematic review. Methods Systematic Review of EMBASE and MEDLINE databases using pre-defined search criteria up to September 2009. We extracted data from any original research paper or case report describing a case of someone presenting with a sudden and severe headache, and summarized the published causes. Results Our search identified over 21,000 titles, of which 1224 articles were scrutinized in full. 213 articles described 2345 people with sudden and severe headache, and we identified 6 English language academic review articles. A total of 119 causes were identified, of which 46 (38%) were not mentioned in published academic review articles. Using capture-recapture analysis, we estimate that our search was 98% complete. There is only one population-based estimate of the incidence of sudden and severe headache at 43 cases per 100,000. In cohort studies, the most common causes identified were primary headaches or headaches of uncertain cause. Vasoconstriction syndromes are commonly mentioned in case reports or case series. The most common cause not mentioned in academic reviews was pneumocephalus. 70 non-English language articles were identified but these did not contain additional causes. Conclusions There are over 100 different published causes of sudden and severe headache, other than aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage. We have now made a definitive list of causes for future reference which we intend to maintain. There is a need for an up to date population based description of cause of sudden and severe headache as the modern epidemiology of thunderclap headache may require updating in the light of research on cerebral

  16. The future of acute care and prevention in headache.

    PubMed

    Krymchantowski, A V; Rapoport, A M; Jevoux, C C

    2007-05-01

    Migraine is a chronic neurological disease with heterogeneous characteristics resulting in a range of symptom profiles, burden and disability. It affects nearly 12% of the adult population in Western countries and up to 22% of the Brazilian population, imposing considerable suffering as well as personal, economic and social losses. The pharmacological treatment of migraine is divided into preventive and acute treatment. A better comprehension of migraine pathophysiology, as well as the finding of novel molecular targets, has led to a growing number of upcoming therapeutic opportunities. The same is true of cluster headache, which affects only about 0.07%-0.4% of most populations. This review focuses on current and emerging agents and procedures for the treatment of migraine and cluster headache.

  17. Headaches

    MedlinePlus

    ... stress, changes in sleep patterns, or even the weather. Getting Relief Most headaches will go away if ... or she will probably want to do a physical examination and get your medical history to help figure out what might ... Getty Images, Corbis, Veer, Science Photo Library, Science Source Images, Shutterstock, and Clipart. ...

  18. Pharmacokinetics and interactions of headache medications, part I: introduction, pharmacokinetics, metabolism and acute treatments.

    PubMed

    Sternieri, Emilio; Coccia, Ciro Pio Rosario; Pinetti, Diego; Ferrari, Anna

    2006-12-01

    Recent progress in the treatment of primary headaches has made available specific, effective and safe medications for these disorders, which are widely spread among the general population. One of the negative consequences of this undoubtedly positive progress is the risk of drug-drug interactions. This review is the first in a two-part series on pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions of headache medications. Part I addresses acute treatments. Part II focuses on prophylactic treatments. The overall aim of this series is to increase the awareness of physicians, either primary care providers or specialists, regarding this topic. Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions of major severity involving acute medications are a minority among those reported in literature. The main drug combinations to avoid are: i) NSAIDs plus drugs with a narrow therapeutic range (i.e., digoxin, methotrexate, etc.); ii) sumatriptan, rizatriptan or zolmitriptan plus monoamine oxidase inhibitors; iii) substrates and inhibitors of CYP2D6 (i.e., chlorpromazine, metoclopramide, etc.) and -3A4 (i.e., ergot derivatives, eletriptan, etc.), as well as other substrates or inhibitors of the same CYP isoenzymes. The risk of having clinically significant pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions seems to be limited in patients with low frequency headaches, but could be higher in chronic headache sufferers with medication overuse. PMID:17125411

  19. Quantitative evaluation of headache severity before and after endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary adenoma.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Amparo; Goncalves, Sandy; Salehi, Fateme; Bird, Jeff; Cooper, Paul; Van Uum, Stan; Lee, Donald H; Rotenberg, Brian W; Duggal, Neil

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT The relationship between headaches, pituitary adenomas, and surgical treatment of pituitary adenomas remains unclear. The authors assessed the severity and predictors of self-reported headaches in patients referred for surgery of pituitary adenomas and evaluated the impact of endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery on headache severity and quality of life (QOL). METHODS In this prospective study, 79 patients with pituitary adenomas underwent endoscopic transsphenoidal resection and completed the Headache Impact Test (HIT-6) and the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) QOL questionnaire preoperatively and at 6 weeks and 6 months postoperatively. RESULTS Preoperatively, 49.4% of patients had mild headache severity, 13.9% had moderate severity, 13.9% had substantial severity, and 22.8% had intense severity. Younger age and hormone-producing tumors predisposed greater headache severity, while tumor volume, suprasellar extension, chiasmal compression, and cavernous sinus invasion of the pituitary tumors did not. Preoperative headache severity was found to be significantly associated with reduced scores across all SF-36 QOL dimensions and most significantly associated with mental health. By 6 months postoperatively, headache severity was reduced in a significant proportion of patients. Of the 40 patients with headaches causing an impact on daily living (moderate, substantial, or intense headache), 70% had improvement of at least 1 category on HIT-6 by 6 months postoperatively, while headache worsened in 7.6% of patients. The best predictors of headache response to surgery included younger age, poor preoperative SF-36 mental health score, and hormone-producing microadenoma. CONCLUSIONS The results of this study confirm that surgery can significantly improve headaches in patients with pituitary adenomas by 6 months postoperatively, particularly in younger patients whose preoperative QOL is impacted. A larger multicenter study is underway to evaluate the long

  20. The Impact of Dyspepsia on Symptom Severity and Quality of Life in Adults with Headache

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Mei-Ling Sharon; Norhatta, Norbelinda; Goh, Khean Jin; Moy, Foong Ming; Sujarita, Ramanujam; Asraff, Azman Ahmad; Lee, Qin Zhi; Ng, Jiun Hoong; Tan, Eugene Choon Li; Mahadeva, Sanjiv

    2015-01-01

    Background Dyspepsia and headache frequently co-exist, but the clinical implication of this association is uncertain. We planned to examine the prevalence and impact of dyspepsia in adults with headache. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in a secondary care setting. Clinical, psychological and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) data were compared between subjects with headache and controls (non-headache subjects). The impact of dyspepsia was analysed further in subjects with headache alone. Results 280 subjects (93 cases with headache and 187 matched controls) were recruited. The following baseline characteristics of subjects were as follows: mean age 45.0±17.3 years, 57.0% females and ethnic distribution—Malaysian = 45 (48.4%), Chinese n = 24 (25.8%) and Indians n = 24 (25.8%). Headache sub-types among cases with headache were as follows: tension-type headache (TTH) n = 53 (57.0%) and migraine n = 40 (43.0%). Dyspepsia was more prevalent in cases with headache compared to controls (25.8% vs 12.8%, p = 0.011), and headache was independently associated with dyspepsia (OR 2.75, 95% CI 1.39–5.43). Among cases with headache, there was a trend towards a higher prevalence of dyspepsia in those with migraine (27.5%) compared to TTH (24.5%). Subjects with headache and dyspepsia, compared to those with headache alone, had a greater severity of headache symptoms (63.67±22.85 mm vs 51.20 ±24.0 mm VAS, p = 0.029). Overall HRQOL scores were lower in headache subjects with dyspepsia (EQ-5D summary score 0.82±0.18 vs 0.90 ±0.16, p = 0.037 and EQ-5D VAS 62.08±17.50 mm vs 72.62 ±18.85 mm, p = 0.018), compared to those without dyspepsia. Conclusion Dyspepsia is associated with more severe headache symptoms and results in a lower HRQOL in patients with headache. PMID:25629323

  1. Postoperative Severe Headache Following Cervical Posterior Surgical Fixation from C2 Distally

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Hun; Kim, Jin-Young; Kim, Yong-Chan; Peters, Colleen; Imagama, Shiro; Ishiguro, Naoki; Buchowski, Jacob; Riew, K. Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To identify the prevalence of severe headache occurring after cervical posterior surgical fixation (PSF) and to evaluate the clinical and radiological findings associated with severe headache after surgery. Overview of Literature Several studies have reported on the axial pain after cervical surgery. However, to our knowledge, the incidence of severe headache after cervical PSF has not been elucidated. Methods The medical records and radiological assessment of patients who underwent surgical treatment from August 2002 to May 2012 were reviewed to identify the prevalence and risk factors for severe headaches occurring following PSF from C2 distally. Neck disability index scores (NDI) (the item for neck pain), the type of C2 screw, number of cervical fused levels (1–6), and smoking habit were calculated preoperatively and postoperatively. In addition, radiological parameters (T1 slope angle, C1/2 angle, C2–7 Cobb angle, C2–7 sagittal vertical axis and C1-implant distance) were assessed for all patients. Severe headache was defined as a high NDI headache score (>4 out of 5). Results Eighty-two patients met the inclusion criteria. The mean age was 59.2 years (range, 21–78 years), and the mean number of fused levels was 5.1. The mean follow-up period was 2.9 years (range, 1–10.9 years). While only one severe headache occurred de novo postoperatively in a patient in the C3 or C4 distally group (total 30 patients, average age of 50.2 years), 11 patients in the C2 distally group (p=0.04) had severe headache occur postoperatively. The radiological parameters were not significantly different between the postoperative milder headache and severe headache (SH) groups. The SH group had a significantly higher preoperative NDI score (neck pain) (p<0.01). Conclusions Newly occurring severe headaches can occur in 18% of patients after PSF from C2 distally. The patients with newly occurring severe headaches had significantly higher

  2. Use of the Emergency Department for Severe Headache. A population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Benjamin W.; Serrano, Daniel; Reed, Michael; Diamond, Merle; Lipton, Richard B.

    2008-01-01

    Background Although headache is a common emergency department (ED) chief complaint, the role of the ED in the management of primary headache disorders has rarely been assessed from a population perspective. We determined frequency of ED use and risk factors for use among patients suffering severe headache. Methods As part of the American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention study, a validated self-administered questionnaire was mailed to 24,000 severe headache sufferers, who were randomly drawn from a larger sample constructed to be socio-demographically representative of the US population. Participants were asked a series of questions on headache management, healthcare system use, socio-demographic features, and number of ED visits for management of headache in the previous 12 months. In keeping with the work of others, “frequent” ED use was defined as a particpants report of four or more visits to the ED for treatment of a headache in the previous 12 months. Headaches were categorized into specific diagnoses using a validated methodology. Results Of 24,000 surveys, 18,514 were returned, and 13,451 (56%) provided complete data on ED use. Socio-demographic characteristics did not differ substantially between responders and non-responders. Among the 13,451 responders, over the course of the previous year, 12,592 (94%) did not visit the ED at all, 415 (3%) visited the ED once, and 444 (3%) visited the ED more than once. Patients with severe episodic tension-type headache were less likely to use the ED than patients with severe episodic migraine (OR 0.4 [95%CI 0.3, 0.6]). Frequent ED use was reported by 1% of the total sample or 19% (95%CI: 17, 22%) of subjects who used the ED in the previous year, though frequent users accounted for 51% (95%CI: 49, 53) of all ED visits. Predictors of ED use included markers of disease severity, elevated depression scores, low socio-economic status, and a predilection for ED use for conditions other than headache. Conclusions Most

  3. Aspirin with or without an antiemetic for acute migraine headaches in adults

    PubMed Central

    Kirthi, Varo; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background Migraine is a common, disabling condition and a burden for the individual, health services and society. Many sufferers choose not to, or are unable to, seek professional help and rely on over-the-counter analgesics. Co-therapy with an antiemetic should help to reduce nausea and vomiting commonly associated with migraine headaches. Objectives To determine the efficacy and tolerability of aspirin, alone or in combination with an antiemetic, compared to placebo and other active interventions in the treatment of acute migraine headaches in adults. Search methods We searched Cochrane CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Oxford Pain Relief Database for studies through 10 March 2010. Selection criteria We included randomised, double-blind, placebo- or active-controlled studies using aspirin to treat a discrete migraine headache episode, with at least 10 participants per treatment arm. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Numbers of participants achieving each outcome were used to calculate relative risk and numbers needed to treat (NNT) or harm (NNH) compared to placebo or other active treatment. Main results Thirteen studies (4222 participants) compared aspirin 900 mg or 1000 mg, alone or in combination with metoclopramide 10 mg, with placebo or other active comparators, mainly sumatriptan 50 mg or 100 mg. For all efficacy outcomes, all active treatments were superior to placebo, with NNTs of 8.1, 4.9 and 6.6 for 2-hour pain-free, 2-hour headache relief, and 24-hour headache relief with aspirin alone versus placebo, and 8.8, 3.3 and 6.2 with aspirin plus metoclopramide versus placebo. Sumatriptan 50 mg did not differ from aspirin alone for 2-hour pain-free and headache relief, while sumatriptan 100 mg was better than the combination of aspirin plus metoclopramide for 2-hour pain-free, but not headache relief; there were no data for 24-hour headache relief. Associated symptoms of nausea, vomiting

  4. Treatment of headache.

    PubMed

    Diamond, S; Freitag, F G

    1989-01-01

    Headache is the most common complaint encountered in clinical practice. Approximately 45 million people in the United States experience chronic headaches. The management of migraine headache involves both pharmacologic and nondrug therapy. Drug therapy for migraine involves the use of abortive and prophylactic agents. Abortive agents, such as ergotamine tartrate and ketoprofen, may be used to relieve the acute attack. Prophylactic therapy is focused on reducing the frequency and severity of the attacks. beta-Adrenergic blocking agents, such as propranolol, remain the primary agents for many migraine patients, although other drugs, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including ketoprofen, or calcium-channel blocking agents, such as verapamil, may be beneficial for many patients. For cluster headache and its variants, methysergide and corticosteroids are usually the drugs of choice. Patients with chronic cluster headache may achieve good results from long-term treatment with other therapies, including lithium carbonate, verapamil, and ketoprofen. PMID:2520442

  5. Paracetamol (acetaminophen) with or without an antiemetic for acute migraine headaches in adults

    PubMed Central

    Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background Migraine is a common, disabling condition and a burden for the individual, health services and society. Many sufferers choose not to, or are unable to, seek professional help and rely on over-the-counter analgesics. Co-therapy with an antiemetic should help to reduce nausea and vomiting commonly associated with migraine. Objectives To determine the efficacy and tolerability of paracetamol (acetaminophen), alone or in combination with an antiemetic, compared to placebo and other active interventions in the treatment of acute migraine in adults. Search methods We searched Cochrane CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Oxford Pain Relief Database for studies through 4 October 2010. Selection criteria We included randomised, double-blind, placebo- or active-controlled studies using self-administered paracetamol to treat a migraine headache episode, with at least 10 participants per treatment arm. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Numbers of participants achieving each outcome were used to calculate relative risk and numbers needed to treat (NNT) or harm (NNH) compared to placebo or other active treatment. Main results Ten studies (2769 participants, 4062 attacks) compared paracetamol 1000 mg, alone or in combination with an antiemetic, with placebo or other active comparators, mainly sumatriptan 100 mg. For all efficacy outcomes paracetamol was superior to placebo, with NNTs of 12, 5.2 and 5.0 for 2-hour pain-free and 1- and 2-hour headache relief, respectively, when medication was taken for moderate to severe pain. Nausea, photophobia and phonophobia were reduced more with paracetamol than with placebo at 2 hours (NNTs of 7 to 11); more individuals were free of any functional disability at 2 hours with paracetamol (NNT 10); and fewer participants needed rescue medication over 6 hours (NNT 6). Paracetamol 1000 mg plus metoclopramide 10 mg was not significantly different from oral sumatriptan

  6. Management of cluster headache.

    PubMed

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer C; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2012-07-01

    The prevalence of cluster headache is 0.1% and cluster headache is often not diagnosed or misdiagnosed as migraine or sinusitis. In cluster headache there is often a considerable diagnostic delay - an average of 7 years in a population-based survey. Cluster headache is characterized by very severe or severe orbital or periorbital pain with a duration of 15-180 minutes. The cluster headache attacks are accompanied by characteristic associated unilateral symptoms such as tearing, nasal congestion and/or rhinorrhoea, eyelid oedema, miosis and/or ptosis. In addition, there is a sense of restlessness and agitation. Patients may have up to eight attacks per day. Episodic cluster headache (ECH) occurs in clusters of weeks to months duration, whereas chronic cluster headache (CCH) attacks occur for more than 1 year without remissions. Management of cluster headache is divided into acute attack treatment and prophylactic treatment. In ECH and CCH the attacks can be treated with oxygen (12 L/min) or subcutaneous sumatriptan 6 mg. For both oxygen and sumatriptan there are two randomized, placebo-controlled trials demonstrating efficacy. In both ECH and CCH, verapamil is the prophylactic drug of choice. Verapamil 360 mg/day was found to be superior to placebo in one clinical trial. In clinical practice, daily doses of 480-720 mg are mostly used. Thus, the dose of verapamil used in cluster headache treatment may be double the dose used in cardiology, and with the higher doses the PR interval should be checked with an ECG. At the start of a cluster, transitional preventive treatment such as corticosteroids or greater occipital nerve blockade can be given. In CCH and in long-standing clusters of ECH, lithium, methysergide, topiramate, valproic acid and ergotamine tartrate can be used as add-on prophylactic treatment. In drug-resistant CCH, neuromodulation with either occipital nerve stimulation or deep brain stimulation of the hypothalamus is an alternative treatment strategy

  7. [Tomodensitometry of severe acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Frija, J; Abanou, A; Viandier, A; Laval-Jeantet, M

    1983-01-01

    90 computed tomographic examinations were performed to 57 patients referred at Hospital Saint-Louis for an acute pancreatitis. 32 patients were operated or autopsied. Among these 32 patients, 19 patients had 21 examinations before surgery or autopsy; the other 13 patients had their computed tomographic examinations after one or more surgical procedures. During a severe acute pancreatitis the pancreas is always large either locally or diffusely. A pancreatic reaction is visible around and possibly at distance of the pancreas. When extraluminal gas is visible (3/5) it signifies gangrenous pancreatitis but it is necessary to eliminate a digestive fistulous tract and/or a communication between a pseudocyst and the digestive tract. Except gangrenous it is not possible to precise the nature of pancreatic reaction. The diagnosis of pseudocyst was easy 9/10, difficult 1/10; we did a false positive diagnosis of pseudocyst. Computed tomography and ultrasounds were compared in ten patients for the search of gallbladder lithiasis. Computed tomography can show large and small (2/4) biliary calculus in the gallbladder that cannot be shown by ultrasounds. A normal pancreas in a normal retroperitoneal space exclude the diagnosis of a severe acute pancreatitis. CT aspects of acute pancreatitis must be considered as a good diagnostic test of an acute pancreatitis.

  8. Ibuprofen with or without an antiemetic for acute migraine headaches in adults

    PubMed Central

    Rabbie, Roy; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background Migraine is a common, disabling condition and a burden for the individual, health services and society. Many sufferers do not seek professional help, relying instead on over-the-counter analgesics. Co-therapy with an antiemetic should help to reduce symptoms commonly associated with migraine headaches. Objectives To determine efficacy and tolerability of ibuprofen, alone or in combination with an antiemetic, compared to placebo and other active interventions in the treatment of acute migraine headaches in adults. Search methods We searched Cochrane CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Oxford Pain Relief Database for studies through 22 April 2010. Selection criteria We included randomised, double-blind, placebo- or active-controlled studies using self-administered ibuprofen to treat a migraine headache episode, with at least 10 participants per treatment arm. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Numbers of participants achieving each outcome were used to calculate relative risk and number needed to treat (NNT) or harm (NNH) compared to placebo or other active treatment. Main results Nine studies (4373 participants, 5223 attacks) compared ibuprofen with placebo or other active comparators; none combined ibuprofen with a self-administered antiemetic. All studies treated attacks with single doses of medication. For ibuprofen 400 mg versus placebo, NNTs for 2-hour pain-free (26% versus 12% with placebo), 2-hour headache relief (57% versus 25%) and 24-hour sustained headache relief (45% versus 19%) were 7.2, 3.2 and 4.0, respectively. For ibuprofen 200 mg versus placebo, NNTs for 2-hour pain-free (20% versus 10%) and 2-hour headache relief (52% versus 37%) were 9.7 and 6.3, respectively. The higher dose was significantly better for 2-hour headache relief than the lower dose. Soluble formulations of ibuprofen 400 mg were better than standard tablets for 1-hour, but not 2-hour headache relief

  9. Severe headache as a presenting complaint in sigmoid sinus thrombosis complicated by functional overlay.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Pradhyuman; Banwari, Girish; Parikh, Nimesh; Gandhi, Hitendra

    2015-01-01

    An otherwise serious and potentially fatal organic condition may present with a co-existing strong functional component. We encountered a female patient who presented with bouts of severe headache over the occipital region, associated with blurring of vision. Initially, non-contrast computed tomography (CT) scan (Brain) showed normal study, and she was deemed as having functional symptoms. Later, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (Brain) showed filling defect in right sigmoid sinus and magnetic resonance (MR) venography confirmed right sigmoid sinus thrombosis. On adequate anticoagulation, she did not improve and still had bouts of severe headache, although no longer associated with impaired vision. The treating neurophysician concluded that symptoms could no longer be accounted for by the organic condition. Overt and covert psychosocial stressors were found to be present in a detailed psychological exploration. Psychological intervention effectively controlled the headache. Thus, functional overlay can complicate the clinical picture in a severe organic condition and may require active psychiatric intervention over and above medical treatment.

  10. The effects of gabapentin on severity of post spinal anesthesia headache.

    PubMed

    Vahabi, Sepideh; Nadri, Sedigheh; Izadi, Fatemeh

    2014-09-01

    Spinal anesthesia is a common anesthesia method and post dural puncture headache (PDPH) is one of its most common adverse effects. Gabapentin is a popular anticonvulsant drug that has been used as an oral nonopioid analgesic in recent years. In this placebo-controlled double-blind study, 120 patients were randomized in two equal groups (Placebo or gabapentin). The patients in the gabapentin group received gabapentin 300 mg orally one hour before the surgery and then every 12 hours for the first 24 hours after the surgery while the placebo group received placebos in the same way. Severity of headache and postoperative pain assessed by verbal rating score for pain (VRSP), morphine consumption, nausea, vomiting, somnolence, pruritus, dizziness in the first 48 hours, hypertension, hypotension, bradycardia and tachycardia in the first 24 hours after the surgery were recorded. In first 48 hour after surgery the mean of severity of headache in the gabapentin group was 0.20±0.05, and in the placebo group it was 0.93±0.01. The mean of postoperative pain in the gabapentin group was2.25±0.793, and in the placebo group it was3.77±0.813. In the first 24 hours post operative the mean of morphine consumptions were 0.20±0.030 and 0.32±0.0 30 mg in gabapentin and placebo groups. No significant differences were found between the two groups regarding incidence rate of the adverse effects. In this study, administration of gabapentin decreased the incidence and severity of post spinal anesthesia headache, postoperative pain and morphine consumption, without any significant differences in serious adverse effects.

  11. Severe acute pancreatitis and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Robertson, K W; Stewart, I S; Imrie, C W

    2006-01-01

    For most patients with pregnancy-associated pancreatitis there is little maternal survival threat and only occasionally are there foetal deaths. We describe 4 young women with pregnancy-associated severe acute pancreatitis who each had gallstones. Their ages were 17, 18, 20 and 24 years. Each was a tertiary referral to our unit in Glasgow and each pursued a life-threatening course with hospital stays ranging from 37 to 90 days. One patient required pancreatic necrosectomy for infected necrosis, another had percutaneous management of a pancreatic abscess and 2 had cystogastrostomy as treatment for pancreatic pseudocyst. All underwent early endoscopic sphincterotomy and later cholecystectomy. It is important to be aware that pregnancy-associated acute pancreatitis may be severe, posing a survival threat even in the youngest patients. Gallstones, as we reported almost 20 years ago, are the most common aetiological factor in such patients.

  12. Predicting severity of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Rau, Bettina M

    2007-04-01

    Severity stratification is a critical issue in acute pancreatitis that strongly influences diagnostic and therapeutic decision making. According to the widely used Atlanta classification, "severe" disease comprises various local and systemic complications that are associated with an increased risk of mortality. However, results from recent clinical studies indicate that these complications vary in their effect on outcome, and many are not necessarily life threatening on their own. Therefore, "severe," as defined by Atlanta, must be distinguished from "prognostic," aiming at nonsurvival. In the first week after disease onset, pancreatitis-related organ failure is the preferred variable for predicting severity and prognosis because it outweighs morphologic complications. Contrast-enhanced CT and MRI allow for accurate stratification of local severity beyond the first week after symptom onset. Among the biochemical markers, C-reactive protein is still the parameter of choice to assess attack severity, although prognostic estimation is not possible. Other markers, including pancreatic protease activation peptides, interleukins-6 and -8, and polymorphonuclear elastase are useful early indicators of severity. Procalcitonin is one of the most promising single markers for assessment of major complications and prognosis throughout the disease course.

  13. Severe acute malnutrition and infection

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kelsey D J; Berkley, James A

    2014-01-01

    Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) is associated with increased severity of common infectious diseases, and death amongst children with SAM is almost always as a result of infection. The diagnosis and management of infection are often different in malnourished versus well-nourished children. The objectives of this brief are to outline the evidence underpinning important practical questions relating to the management of infectious diseases in children with SAM and to highlight research gaps. Overall, the evidence base for many aspects covered in this brief is very poor. The brief addresses antimicrobials; antipyretics; tuberculosis; HIV; malaria; pneumonia; diarrhoea; sepsis; measles; urinary tract infection; nosocomial Infections; soil transmitted helminths; skin infections and pharmacology in the context of SAM. The brief is structured into sets of clinical questions, which we hope will maximise the relevance to contemporary practice. PMID:25475887

  14. Treating severe acute malnutrition seriously

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Steve

    2007-01-01

    Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) affects approximately 13 million children under the age of 5 and is associated with 1–2 million preventable child deaths each year. In most developing countries, case fatality rates (CFRs) in hospitals treating SAM remain at 20–30% and few of those requiring care actually access treatment. Recently, community‐based therapeutic care (CTC) programmes treating most cases of SAM solely as outpatients have dramatically reduced CFRs and increased the numbers receiving care. CTC uses ready‐to‐use therapeutic foods and aims to increase access to services, promoting early presentation and compliance, thereby increasing coverage and recovery rates. Initial data indicate that this combination of centre‐based and community‐based care is cost effective and should be integrated into mainstream child survival programmes. PMID:17449529

  15. Headache in divers.

    PubMed

    Cheshire, W P; Ott, M C

    2001-03-01

    The increasing popularity of scuba diving has added a new category to the differential diagnosis of headache. Headache in divers, while uncommon and generally benign, can occasionally signify serious consequences of hyperbaric exposure such as arterial gas embolism, decompression sickness, and otic or paranasal sinus barotrauma. Inadequate ventilation of compressed gases can lead to carbon dioxide accumulation, cerebral vasodilatation, and headache. Other types of headache encountered in divers include exertional headache, cold stimulus headache, migraine, tension-type headache, acute traumatic headache, cervicogenic headache, carbon monoxide poisoning headache, and headache associated with envenomation. Correct diagnosis and appropriate treatment require a careful history and neurologic examination as well as an understanding of the unique physiologic stresses of the subaquatic environment.

  16. Acute headache at emergency department: reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome complicated by subarachnoid haemorrhage and cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Yger, M; Zavanone, C; Abdennour, L; Koubaa, W; Clarençon, F; Dupont, S; Samson, Y

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome is becoming widely accepted as a rare cause of both ischemic and haemorrhagic stroke and should be evocated in case of thunderclap headaches associated with stroke. We present the case of a patient with ischemic stroke associated with cortical subarachnoid haemorrhage (cSAH) and reversible diffuse arteries narrowing, leading to the diagnosis of reversible vasoconstriction syndrome. Case Report. A 48-year-old woman came to the emergency department because of an unusual thunderclap headache. The computed tomography of the brain completed by CT-angiography was unremarkable. Eleven days later, she was readmitted because of a left hemianopsia. One day after her admission, she developed a sudden left hemiparesis. The brain MRI showed ischemic lesions in the right frontal and occipital lobe and diffuse cSAH. The angiography showed vasoconstriction of the right anterior cerebral artery and stenosis of both middle cerebral arteries. Nimodipine treatment was initiated and vasoconstriction completely regressed on day 16 after the first headache. Conclusion. Our case shows a severe reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome where both haemorrhagic and ischemic complications were present at the same time. The history we reported shows that reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome is still underrecognized, in particular in general emergency departments.

  17. New clinical decision rule to exclude subarachnoid haemorrhage for acute headache: a prospective multicentre observational study

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Akio; Kobayashi, Kentaro; Yamaguchi, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Takeshi; Harada, Masahiro; Honda, Hideki; Mori, Yoshio; Hirose, Keika; Tanaka, Noriko

    2016-01-01

    Objective To ensure good outcomes in the management of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), accurate prediction is crucial for initial assessment of patients presenting with acute headache. We conducted this study to develop a new clinical decision rule using only objectively measurable predictors to exclude SAH, offering higher specificity than the previous Ottawa SAH Rule while maintaining comparable sensitivity. Design Multicentre prospective cohort study. Setting Tertiary-care emergency departments of five general hospitals in Japan from April 2011 to March 2014. Participants Eligible patients comprised 1781 patients aged >15 years with acute headache, excluding trauma or toxic causes and patients who presented in an unconscious state. Main outcome measures Definitive diagnosis of SAH was based on confirmation of SAH on head CT or lumbar puncture findings of non-traumatic red blood cells or xanthochromia. Results A total of 1561 patients were enrolled in this study, of whom 277 showed SAH. Using these enrolled patients, we reached a rule with mainly categorical predictors used in previous reports, called the ‘Ottawa-like rule’, offering 100% sensitivity when using any of age ≥40 years, neck pain or stiffness, altered level of consciousness or onset during exertion. Using the 1317 patients from whom blood samples were obtained, a new rule using any of systolic blood pressure >150 mm Hg, diastolic blood pressure >90 mm Hg, blood sugar >115 mg/dL or serum potassium <3.9 mEq/L offered 100% sensitivity (95% CI 98.6% to 100%) and 14.5% specificity (12.5% to 16.9%), while the Ottawa-like rule showed the same sensitivity with a lower specificity of 8.8% (7.2% to 10.7%). Conclusions While maintaining equal sensitivity, our new rule seemed to offer higher specificity than the previous rules proposed by the Ottawa group. Despite the need for blood sampling, this method can reduce unnecessary head CT in patients with acute headache. Trial registration

  18. Headaches and exercise.

    PubMed

    McCrory, P

    2000-09-01

    Exercise-related headache is one of the most common medical problems affecting the modern-day athlete. Despite the high prevalence of headache in community populations, the epidemiology of sports-related headache is unclear. In certain collision sports, up to 50% of athletes report regular headaches as a consequence of their athletic participation. The classification of the different types of sport-related headache by the International Headache Society (IHS) and in previously published articles does not adequately encompass the clinical problem faced by team physicians. Confusion exists where terms such as 'effort headache' and 'exertional headache' may be used to describe similar entities. In this review, the specific headache entities discussed include benign exertional headache, effort headache, acute post-traumatic headache and cervicogenic headache. For the sports physician, an understanding of the variety of specific headache syndromes that occur with particular sports is necessary for everyday clinical practice. This article reviews the common exercise-related headache syndromes and attempts to provide a framework for their overall management. Team physicians also need to be cognisant that many of the standard preparations used to treat headaches may be banned drugs under International Olympic Committee (IOC) rules. PMID:10999425

  19. [Prediction and monitoring of severe acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Gürlich, R; Maruna, P; Spicák, J

    2006-01-01

    Twenty to thirty percent patients with acute pancreatitis develop severe acute pancreatitis with high mortality and morbidity rate. Markers of severity of acute pancreatitis are clinically important for the early diagnosis of complications. We reviewed the literature for markers of acute pancreatitis. On their relevance for prediction of severe pancreatitis are given. Several markers can predict severe cases of acute pancreatitis with a different positive and negative predictive value. Useful predictors of severity may include serum procalcitonin and urinary trypsinogen activation peptide at the admission, serum interleukins-6 and -8 at 24 h, and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) in 48 hours interval. The valuable marker for daily monitoring appears to be serum procalcitonin.

  20. The acute treatment of migraine in adults: the american headache society evidence assessment of migraine pharmacotherapies.

    PubMed

    Marmura, Michael J; Silberstein, Stephen D; Schwedt, Todd J

    2015-01-01

    The study aims to provide an updated assessment of the evidence for individual pharmacological therapies for acute migraine treatment. Pharmacological therapy is frequently required for acutely treating migraine attacks. The American Academy of Neurology Guidelines published in 2000 summarized the available evidence relating to the efficacy of acute migraine medications. This review, conducted by the members of the Guidelines Section of the American Headache Society, is an updated assessment of evidence for the migraine acute medications. A standardized literature search was performed to identify articles related to acute migraine treatment that were published between 1998 and 2013. The American Academy of Neurology Guidelines Development procedures were followed. Two authors reviewed each abstract resulting from the search and determined whether the full manuscript qualified for review. Two reviewers studied each qualifying full manuscript for its level of evidence. Level A evidence requires at least 2 Class I studies, and Level B evidence requires 1 Class I or 2 Class II studies. The specific medications - triptans (almotriptan, eletriptan, frovatriptan, naratriptan, rizatriptan, sumatriptan [oral, nasal spray, injectable, transcutaneous patch], zolmitriptan [oral and nasal spray]) and dihydroergotamine (nasal spray, inhaler) are effective (Level A). Ergotamine and other forms of dihydroergotamine are probably effective (Level B). Effective nonspecific medications include acetaminophen, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (aspirin, diclofenac, ibuprofen, and naproxen), opioids (butorphanol nasal spray), sumatriptan/naproxen, and the combination of acetaminophen/aspirin/caffeine (Level A). Ketoprofen, intravenous and intramuscular ketorolac, flurbiprofen, intravenous magnesium (in migraine with aura), and the combination of isometheptene compounds, codeine/acetaminophen and tramadol/acetaminophen are probably effective (Level B). The antiemetics prochlorperazine

  1. Cluster headache

    MedlinePlus

    Histamine headache; Headache - histamine; Migrainous neuralgia; Headache - cluster; Horton's headache; Vascular headache - cluster ... be related to the body's sudden release of histamine (chemical in the body released during an allergic ...

  2. Managing Chronic Headache Disorders.

    PubMed

    Forde, Grace; Duarte, Robert A; Rosen, Noah

    2016-01-01

    Headaches are a very common disorder, more common than asthma and diabetes combined. Migraine is the most common headache disorder, but it remains underdiagnosed and therefore undertreated. The treatment of migraines is divided into acute and prophylaxis. Patients who are experiencing 8 or more headaches a month or those who experience disability with their headaches as determined by the Migraine Disability Assistance Score or MIDAS should be placed on prophylaxis. PMID:26614723

  3. Evidence for efficacy of acute treatment of episodic tension-type headache: methodological critique of randomised trials for oral treatments.

    PubMed

    Moore, R Andrew; Derry, Sheena; Wiffen, Philip J; Straube, Sebastian; Bendtsen, Lars

    2014-11-01

    The International Headache Society (IHS) provides guidance on the conduct of trials for acute treatment of episodic tension-type headache (TTH), a common disorder with considerable disability. Electronic and other searches identified randomised, double-blind trials of oral drugs treating episodic TTH with moderate or severe pain at baseline, or that tested drugs at first pain onset. The aims were to review methods, quality, and outcomes reported (in particular the IHS-recommended primary efficacy parameter pain-free after 2 hours), and to assess efficacy by meta-analysis. We identified 58 reports: 55 from previous reviews and searches, 2 unpublished reports, and 1 clinical trial report with results. We included 40 reports of 55 randomised trials involving 12,143 patients. Reporting quality was generally good, with potential risk of bias from incomplete outcome reporting and small size; the 23 largest trials involved 82% of patients. Few trials reported IHS outcomes. The number needed to treat values for being pain-free at 2 hours compared with placebo were 8.7 (95% confidence interval [CI] 6.2 to 15) for paracetamol 1000 mg, 8.9 (95% CI 5.9 to 18) for ibuprofen 400mg, and 9.8 (95% CI 5.1 to 146) for ketoprofen 25mg. Lower (better) number needed to treat values were calculated for outcomes of mild or no pain at 2 hours, and patient global assessment. These were similar to values for these drugs in migraine. No other drugs had evaluable results for these patient-centred outcomes. There was no evidence that any one outcome was better than others. The evidence available for treatment efficacy is small in comparison to the size of the clinical problem.

  4. Diclofenac with or without an antiemetic for acute migraine headaches in adults

    PubMed Central

    Derry, Sheena; Rabbie, Roy; Moore, R Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Migraine is a common, disabling condition and a burden for the individual, health services and society. Many sufferers choose not to, or are unable to, seek professional help and rely on over-the-counter (OTC) analgesics. Diclofenac is an established analgesic, and new formulations using the potassium or epolamine salts, which can be dissolved in water, have been developed for rapid absorption, which may be beneficial in acute migraine. Co-therapy with an antiemetic should help to reduce the nausea and vomiting commonly associated with migraine. Objectives To determine the efficacy and tolerability of diclofenac, alone or in combination with an antiemetic, compared to placebo and other active interventions in the treatment of acute migraine headaches in adults. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Oxford Pain Relief Database, ClinicalTrials.gov, and reference lists for studies through 27 September 2011. Selection criteria We included randomised, double-blind, placebo- and/or active-controlled studies using self administered diclofenac to treat a migraine headache episode, with at least 10 participants per treatment arm. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We used numbers of participants achieving each outcome to calculate relative risk (or ‘risk ratio’) and numbers needed to treat to benefit (NNT) or harm (NNH) compared to placebo or a different active treatment. Main results Five studies (1356 participants) compared oral diclofenac with placebo, and one also compared it with sumatriptan; none combined diclofenac with a self administered antiemetic. Four studies treated attacks with single doses of medication, and two allowed an optional second dose for inadequate response. Only two studies, with three active treatment arms, provided data for pooled analysis of primary outcomes. For single doses of diclofenac

  5. Severe headache with eye involvement from herpes zoster ophthalmicus, trigeminal tract, and brainstem nuclei.

    PubMed

    Siritho, Sasitorn; Pumpradit, Wadchara; Suriyajakryuththana, Wiboon; Pongpirul, Krit

    2015-01-01

    A 43-year-old female presented with severe sharp stabbing right-sided periorbital and retroorbital area headache, dull-aching unilateral jaw pain, eyelid swelling, ptosis, and tearing of the right eye but no rash. The pain episodes lasted five minutes to one hour and occurred 10-15 times per day with unremitting milder pain between the attacks. She later developed an erythematous maculopapular rash over the right forehead and therefore was treated with antivirals. MRI performed one month after the onset revealed small hypersignal-T2 in the right dorsolateral mid-pons and from the right dorsolateral aspect of the pontomedullary region to the right dorsolateral aspect of the upper cervical cord, along the course of the principal sensory nucleus and spinal nucleus of the right trigeminal nerve. No definite contrast enhancement of the right brain stem/upper cervical cord was seen. Orbital imaging showed no abnormality of bilateral optic nerves/chiasm, extraocular muscles, and globes. Slight enhancement of the right V1, V2, and the cisterna right trigeminal nerve was detected. Our findings support the hypothesis of direct involvement by virus theory, reflecting rostral viral transmission along the gasserian ganglion to the trigeminal nuclei at brainstem and caudal spreading along the descending tract of CN V. PMID:25922780

  6. [Severe acute pancreatitis associated with gallbladder gangrene].

    PubMed

    Arroyo-Sánchez, Abel S; Aguirre-Mejía, Rosa Y; Echenique-Martínez, Sergio E

    2014-01-01

    We present a diabetic patient who developed severe acute pancreatitis associated to gallbladder gangrene, in this case we assessed the applicability of classification criteria and management of the pathways for acute pancreatitis and also we suggest some topics that could be investigated in the future.

  7. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS): epidemiology and clinical features

    PubMed Central

    Hui, D; Chan, M; Wu, A; Ng, P

    2004-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a newly emerged infectious disease with a significant morbidity and mortality. The major clinical features include persistent fever, chills/rigor, myalgia, malaise, dry cough, headache, and dyspnoea. Older subjects may present without the typical febrile response. Common laboratory features include lymphopenia, thrombocytopenia, raised alanine transaminases, lactate dehydrogenase, and creatine kinase. The constellation of compatible clinical and laboratory findings, together with certain characteristic radiological features and lack of clinical response to broad spectrum antibiotics, should arouse suspicion of SARS. Measurement of serum RNA by real time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction technique has a detection rate of 75%–80% in the first week of the illness. PMID:15254300

  8. Diagnostic Dilemma in a Young Woman with Acute Headache: Delayed Diagnosis of Third Ventricular Colloid Cyst with Hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hashel, Jasem Y.; Rady, Azza A. H.; Soliman, Doaa Y.; Vembu, Periasamy

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To highlight the importance of early diagnosis of colloid cyst of the third ventricle and its early management. Clinical Presentation and Intervention. This is a young lady who presented with sudden onset headache. She attended a local clinic and also her area hospital. Her diagnosis was delayed several hours due to a diagnostic dilemma initially. No surgical intervention was tried since the patient developed early signs of brainstem coning by the time she was seen by neurosurgeon. Patient died after few days in spite of intensive ICU measures. Conclusion. Sudden onset headache in young adults should be looked at carefully. Early imaging is mandatory to prevent mortality. PMID:26346103

  9. Dietary Intake Patterns and Diet Quality in a Nationally Representative Sample of Women With and Without Severe Headache or Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Evans, E. Whitney; Lipton, Richard B.; Peterlin, B. Lee; Raynor, Hollie A.; Thomas, J. Graham; O'Leary, Kevin C.; Pavlovic, Jelena; Wing, Rena R.; Bond, Dale S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective/Background The role of diet in migraine is not well understood. We sought to characterize usual dietary intake patterns and diet quality in a nationally representative sample of women with and without severe headache or migraine. We also examined whether the relationship between migraine and diet differs by weight status. Methods In this analysis, women with migraine or severe headache status was determined by questionnaire for 3069 women, ages 20-50 years, who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Study, 1999-2004. Women who experienced severe headaches or migraines were classified as migraine for the purposes of this analysis. Dietary intake patterns (micro- and macronutrient intake and eating frequency) and diet quality, measured by the Healthy Eating Index, 2005, were determined using one 24-hour dietary recall. Results Dietary intake patterns did not significantly differ between women with and without migraine. Normal weight women with migraine had significantly lower diet quality (Healthy Eating Index, 2005 total scores) than women without migraine (52.5 ± 0.9 vs 45.9 ± 1.0; P < .0001). Conclusions Whereas findings suggest no differences in dietary intake patterns among women with and without migraine, dietary quality differs by migraine status in normal weight women. Prospective analyses are needed to establish how diet relates to migraine onset, characteristics, and clinical features in individuals of varying weight status. PMID:25758250

  10. High-altitude headache.

    PubMed

    Marmura, Michael J; Hernandez, Pablo Bandres

    2015-05-01

    High-altitude headache is one of many neurological symptoms associated with the ascent to high altitudes. Cellular hypoxia due to decreased barometric pressure seems to be the common final pathway for headache as altitude increases. Susceptibility to high-altitude headache depends on genetic factors, history of migraine, and acclimatization, but symptoms of acute mountain sickness are universal at very high altitudes. This review summarizes the pathophysiology of acute mountain sickness and high-altitude headache as well as the evidence for treatment and prevention with different drugs and devices which may be useful for regular and novice mountaineers. This includes an examination of other headache disorders which may mimic high-altitude headache. PMID:25795155

  11. Consensus guidelines on severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Pezzilli, Raffaele; Zerbi, Alessandro; Campra, Donata; Capurso, Gabriele; Golfieri, Rita; Arcidiacono, Paolo G; Billi, Paola; Butturini, Giovanni; Calculli, Lucia; Cannizzaro, Renato; Carrara, Silvia; Crippa, Stefano; De Gaudio, Raffaele; De Rai, Paolo; Frulloni, Luca; Mazza, Ernesto; Mutignani, Massimiliano; Pagano, Nico; Rabitti, Piergiorgio; Balzano, Gianpaolo

    2015-07-01

    This Position Paper contains clinically oriented guidelines by the Italian Association for the Study of the Pancreas (AISP) for the diagnosis and treatment of severe acute pancreatitis. The statements were formulated by three working groups of experts who searched and analysed the most recent literature; a consensus process was then performed using a modified Delphi procedure. The statements provide recommendations on the most appropriate definition of the complications of severe acute pancreatitis, the diagnostic approach and the timing of conservative as well as interventional endoscopic, radiological and surgical treatments.

  12. [Evaluation of severity in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Ryu, Ji Kon

    2009-10-01

    Acute pancreatitis has a variable etiology and natural history, and some patients have severe complications with a significant risk of death. The prediction of severe disease should be achieved by careful ongoing clinical assessment coupled with the use of a multiple factor scoring system and imaging studies. Over the past 30 years several scoring systems have been developed to predict the severity of acute pancreatitis. However, there are no complete scoring index with high sensitivity and specificity till now. The interest in new biological markers and predictive models for identifying severe acute pancreatitis testifies to the continued clinical importance of early severity prediction. Among them, IL-6, IL-10, procalcitonin, and trypsinogen activation peptide are most likely to be used in clinical practice as predictors of severity. Even if contrast-enhanced CT has been considered the gold standard for diagnosing pancreatic necrosis, early scanning for the prediction of severity is limited because the full extent of pancreatic necrosis may not develop within the first 48 hour of presentation.

  13. Drug induced acute pancreatitis: incidence and severity.

    PubMed Central

    Lankisch, P G; Dröge, M; Gottesleben, F

    1995-01-01

    To determine the incidence and severity of drug induced acute pancreatitis, data from 45 German centres of gastroenterology were evaluated. Among 1613 patients treated for acute pancreatitis in 1993, drug induced acute pancreatitis was diagnosed in 22 patients (incidence 1.4%). Drugs held responsible were azathioprine, mesalazine/sulfasalazine, 2',3'-dideoxyinosine (ddI), oestrogens, frusemide, hydrochlorothiazide, and rifampicin. Pancreatic necrosis not exceeding 33% of the organ was found on ultrasonography or computed tomography, or both, in three patients (14%). Pancreatic pseudocysts did not occur. A decrease of arterial PO2 reflecting respiratory insufficiency, and an increase of serum creatinine, reflecting renal insufficiency as complications of acute pancreatitis were seen in two (9%) and four (18%) patients, respectively. Artificial ventilation was not needed, and dialysis was necessary in only one (5%) case. Two patients (9%) died of AIDS and tuberculosis, respectively; pancreatitis did not seem to have contributed materially to their death. In conclusion, drugs rarely cause acute pancreatitis, and drug induced acute pancreatitis usually runs a benign course. PMID:7489946

  14. Pazopanib-Induced Severe Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Kawakubo, Kazumichi; Hata, Hiroo; Kawakami, Hiroshi; Kuwatani, Masaki; Kawahata, Shuhei; Kubo, Kimitoshi; Imafuku, Keisuke; Kitamura, Shinya; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2015-01-01

    Pazopanib is an oral angiogenesis inhibitor targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptors, platelet-derived growth factor receptors, and c-Kit approved for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma and soft tissue sarcoma. Nonselective kinase inhibitors, such as sunitinib and sorafenib, are known to be associated with acute pancreatitis. There are few case reports of severe acute pancreatitis induced by pazopanib treatment. We present a case of severe acute pancreatitis caused by pazopanib treatment for cutaneous angiosarcoma. The patient was an 82-year-old female diagnosed with cutaneous angiosarcoma. She had been refractory to docetaxel treatment and began pazopanib therapy. Three months after pazopanib treatment, CT imaging of the abdomen showed the swelling of the pancreas and surrounding soft tissue inflammation without abdominal pain. After she continued pazopanib treatment for 2 months, she presented with nausea and appetite loss. Abdominal CT showed the worsening of the surrounding soft tissue inflammation of the pancreas. Serum amylase and lipase levels were 296 and 177 IU/l, respectively. She was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis induced by pazopanib treatment and was managed conservatively with discontinuation of pazopanib, but the symptoms did not improve. Subsequently, an abdominal CT scan demonstrated the appearance of a pancreatic pseudocyst. She underwent endoscopic ultrasound-guided pseudocyst drainage using a flared-end fully covered self-expandable metallic stent. Then, the symptoms resolved without recurrence. Due to the remarkable progress of molecular targeted therapy, the oncologist should know that acute pancreatitis was recognized as a potential adverse event of pazopanib treatment and could proceed to severe acute pancreatitis. PMID:26464570

  15. Pain. Part 10: Headaches.

    PubMed

    Chong, M S; Renton, Tara

    2016-06-01

    This last in a series of 10 papers aims to provide the dental and medical teams with an update in headache conditions relevant to dentistry and medicine. Headache is the most common presenting symptom for patients presenting to A&E departments. CPD/Clinical Relevance: Most of the dental team take for granted their knowledge and ability to manage acute dental pain. However, the education and preparation in managing patients with headache conditions remains poor. Dentists are in a privileged position to be able to advise their patients about common conditions including headaches. PMID:27529913

  16. Acute respiratory failure following severe arsenic poisoning.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, C; Davies, S; McGowan, T; Schorer, A; Drage, C

    1979-11-01

    A 47-year-old man had an episode of severe respiratory failure after acute intoxication with arsenic. Features of the initial clinical presentation included nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea, acute psychosis, diffuse skin rash, and marked pancytopenia. A peripheral neuropathy then developed which resulted in severe weakness of all muscles of the limbs, the shoulder and pelvis girdles, and the trunk. The neuropathy continued to progress despite treatment with dimercaprol (BAL in oil). Five weeks after the initial exposure, the patient was no longer able to maintain adquate ventilation and required mechanical ventilatory support. Improvement in the patient's neuromuscular status permitted successful weaning from the ventilator after one month of mechanical ventilation. Long-term follow-up revealed no further respiratory difficulty and slow improvement in the strength of the peripheral muscles.

  17. Tissue factor in predicted severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Ellen; Axelsson, Jakob; Eckerwall, Gunilla; Ansari, Daniel; Andersson, Roland

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To study tissue factor (TF) in acute pancreatitis and evaluate the role of TF as a predictive marker of severity. METHODS: Forty-nine consecutive patients admitted to Lund University Hospital, fulfilling the criteria of predicted severe acute pancreatitis (AP), were recruited prospectively between 2002 and 2004. Blood samples for TF analyses were drawn at inclusion in the study and 12 h, 1 d and 3 d later. RESULTS: Twenty-seven patients developed mild AP, and 22 patients severe AP. At inclusion in the study, the groups were comparable with respect to gender, aetiology, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score, and duration of pain. At inclusion in the study and at 12 h, TF was higher in the severe AP group (P = 0.035 and P = 0.049, respectively). After 1 and 3 d, no differences in TF levels were noted. Interleukin (IL)-6 was significantly higher in the severe AP group at all of the studied time points. C-reactive protein (CRP) was significantly higher in the AP group at 1 and 3 d. In receiver operating characteristic-curves, the area under the curve (AUC) for TF was 0.679 (P = 0.035) at inclusion in the study, and a cut off level for TF of 40 pg/mL showed a sensitivity of 71% and a specificity of 67%, whereas corresponding AUC for IL-6 was 0.775, P = 0.001, and for CRP was 0.653. IL-6 showed better AUC-values than TF at all time points studied. CONCLUSION: TF-levels are raised early in severe AP. TF as an early predictive marker of severe AP is superior to CRP, but inferior to IL-6. PMID:21182229

  18. Therapeutic Strategies for Severe Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Janet. V.; Brower, Roy; Calfee, Carolyn S.; Matthay, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective In the management of patients with severe Acute Lung Injury and the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ALI/ARDS), clinicians are sometimes challenged to maintain acceptable gas exchange while avoiding harmful mechanical ventilation practices. In some of these patients, physicians may consider the use of “rescue therapies” to sustain life. Our goal is to provide a practical, evidence-based review to assist critical care physicians’ care for patients with severe ALI/ARDS. Data Sources and Study Selection We searched the Pub Med database for clinical trials examining the use of the following therapies in ALI/ARDS: recruitment maneuvers, high positive end expiratory pressure, prone position, high frequency oscillatory ventilation, glucocorticoids, inhaled nitric oxide, buffer therapy and extracorporeal life support. Study selection All clinical trials that included patients with severe ALI/ARDS were included in the review. Data Synthesis The primary author reviewed the aforementioned trials in depth and then disputed findings and conclusions with other authors until consensus was achieved. Conclusions This article is designed to: a) provide clinicians with a simple, bedside definition for the diagnosis of severe ARDS; b) describe several therapies that can be used in severe ARDS with an emphasis on the potential risks as well as the indications and benefits; and c) to offer practical guidelines for implementation of these therapies. PMID:20562704

  19. Chapter 14: Acute severe asthma (status asthmaticus).

    PubMed

    Shah, Rachna; Saltoun, Carol A

    2012-01-01

    Acute severe asthma, formerly known as status asthmaticus, is defined as severe asthma unresponsive to repeated courses of beta-agonist therapy such as inhaled albuterol, levalbuterol, or subcutaneous epinephrine. It is a medical emergency that requires immediate recognition and treatment. Oral or parenteral corticosteroids should be administered to all patients with acute severe asthma as early as possible because clinical benefits may not occur for a minimum of 6-12 hours. Approximately 50% of episodes are attributable to upper respiratory infections, and other causes include medical nonadherence, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory exposure in aspirin-allergic patients, allergen exposure (especially pets) in severely atopic individuals, irritant inhalation (smoke, paint, etc.), exercise, and insufficient use of inhaled or oral corticosteroids. The patient history should be focused on acute severe asthma including current use of oral or inhaled corticosteroids, number of hospitalizations, emergency room visits, intensive-care unit admissions and intubations, the frequency of albuterol use, the presence of nighttime symptoms, exercise intolerance, current medications or illicit drug use, exposure to allergens, and other significant medical conditions. Severe airflow obstruction may be predicted by accessory muscle use, pulsus paradoxus, refusal to recline below 30°, a pulse >120 beats/min, and decreased breath sounds. Physicians' subjective assessments of airway obstruction are often inaccurate. More objective measures of airway obstruction via peak flow (or forced expiratory volume in 1 second) and pulse oximetry before oxygen administration usually are helpful. Pulse oximetry values >90% are less commonly associated with problems although CO(2) retention and a low Pao(2) may be missed. PMID:22794687

  20. Recent advances in the acute management of migraine and cluster headaches.

    PubMed

    Kumar, K L

    1994-06-01

    I have discussed the pharmacokinetics, efficacies, and side effects of the various nonnarcotic drugs available for the treatment of patients who have headache. Sumatriptan, the newest one, is expensive but may be cost-effective for those who have failed traditional migraine treatment, who visit the ER frequently, who have potential for drug abuse, or who have to miss time from school or work due to the headache. Studies are in progress to compare sumatriptan with other available drugs such as DHE-45 and to determine its possible role in the prophylaxis of migraine. A new 5-HT1D receptor agonist with more efficacy and fewer side effects may be developed in the future. When sumatriptan and DHE-45 are contraindicated due to hypertension or coronary artery disease, other drugs such as metoclopramide, ketorolac, and butorphanol can be used as alternatives.

  1. Isolated acute sphenoid sinusitis presenting with hemicranial headache and ipsilateral abducens nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rahul; Shukla, Rakesh; Mishra, Anupam; Parihar, Anit

    2015-06-08

    Isolated sphenoid sinusitis is a rare disorder and may present with complications due to its anatomical location and proximity to the intracranial and orbital contents. It is frequently misdiagnosed, because the sphenoid sinus is not visualised adequately with routine sinus radiographs and is not accessible to direct clinical examination. We report a case who presented with hemicranial headache and ipsilateral abducens nerve palsy as the presenting feature of sphenoid sinusitis. The symptoms disappeared within a week of conservative treatment. Sphenoid sinusitis should be kept in the differential diagnosis of isolated sixth cranial nerve palsy, especially in the presence of headache, and all patients should be investigated with CT/MRI brain. Prompt diagnosis and management before intracranial extension can prevent devastating complications.

  2. Cluster headache

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The revised International Headache Society (IHS) criteria for cluster headache are: attacks of severe or very severe, strictly unilateral pain, which is orbital, supraorbital, or temporal pain, lasting 15 to 180 minutes and occurring from once every other day to eight times daily. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of interventions to abort cluster headache? What are the effects of interventions to prevent cluster headache? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations, such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 23 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: baclofen (oral); botulinum toxin (intramuscular); capsaicin (intranasal); chlorpromazine; civamide (intranasal); clonidine (transdermal); corticosteroids; ergotamine and dihydroergotamine (oral or intranasal); gabapentin (oral); greater occipital nerve injections (betamethasone plus xylocaine); high-dose and high-flow-rate oxygen; hyperbaric oxygen; leuprolide; lidocaine (intranasal); lithium (oral); melatonin; methysergide (oral); octreotide (subcutaneous); pizotifen (oral); sodium valproate (oral); sumatriptan (oral, subcutaneous, and intranasal); topiramate (oral); tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs); verapamil; and zolmitriptan (oral and intranasal). PMID:21718584

  3. [Severe and prolonged post-dural puncture headache: from pathological basis to therapeutic role and correct timing for epidural blood patch].

    PubMed

    Wetzl, R G; Taglione, G; Ceresa, F; D'Agostino, R; Foresta, S; Guarnerio, C; Ladiana, N; Megaro, F; Zanesi, R; De Vietro, A; Pavani, M

    2001-09-01

    Believed to be due to unbalance between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) production rate and its loss through the spinal dural puncture hole, post-dural puncture headache (PDPH) is often considered as a physiological syndrome, usually reversible without pathological sequelae after dural hole's closure. The clinical case here presented (incapacitating headache associated with diagnostic dural puncture in a leukaemic young female patient who underwent bone marrow transplantation) shows potentially fatal pathological sequelae following prolonged headache (untreated, due to the severe postransplant immunodeficiency and coagulopathy). The observed RMI lesions suggest interesting conclusions about the clinical indications and correct timing of autologous epidural blood patch (EBP). We also suggest the ways to preventing rebound intracranial hypertension following autologous epidural blood patch in patients suffering from incapacitating and prolonged headache.

  4. Laboratory markers predicting severity of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Staubli, Sebastian Manuel; Oertli, Daniel; Nebiker, Christian Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is an inflammatory disease of highly variable severity, ranging from mild cases with low mortality to severe cases with high mortality. Numerous biomarkers have been studied as potential early predictors of the severity of this disease so that treatment can be optimally tailored to prevent complications. We aim to present and discuss the most relevant biomarkers for early severity assessment in AP that have been studied to date. We review the current literature on biomarkers that have been used to predict the severity in AP. C-reactive protein (CRP) is still considered to be the gold standard, with a cut-off value of 150 mg/ml 48 h after disease onset. Other markers, including procalcitonin (PCT) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) have been implemented in some hospitals, but are not used on a routine basis. Most other markers, including acute phase proteins (LBP, SAA, PTX3), cytokines (Il-8, TNF-a, MIF), activation peptides of pancreatic proteases (TAP, CAPAP, PLAP), antiproteases (AAT, a2M), adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, selectins, E-cadherin) and leukocyte-derived enzymes (PA2, PMN-E) have shown some promising results but have not been routinely implemented. Furthermore, new and interesting biomarkers (Copeptin, TRX-1, Ang-2, E-2) have shown good results, but more research is needed to determine if they could play a role in the future. Various reasons why new markers for disease severity have not been adopted in daily routine include low accuracy, cumbersome laboratory techniques and high cost. Despite these difficulties, research is still very active in finding new markers to predict the severity of AP.

  5. Severe acute pancreatitis: Clinical course and management.

    PubMed

    Beger, Hans G; Rau, Bettina M

    2007-10-14

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) develops in about 25% of patients with acute pancreatitis (AP). Severity of AP is linked to the presence of systemic organ dysfunctions and/or necrotizing pancreatitis pathomorphologically. Risk factors determining independently the outcome of SAP are early multi-organ failure, infection of necrosis and extended necrosis (>50%). Up to one third of patients with necrotizing pancreatitis develop in the late course infection of necroses. Morbidity of SAP is biphasic, in the first week strongly related to early and persistence of organ or multi-organ dysfunction. Clinical sepsis caused by infected necrosis leading to multi-organ failure syndrome (MOFS) occurs in the later course after the first week. To predict sepsis, MOFS or deaths in the first 48-72 h, the highest predictive accuracy has been objectified for procalcitonin and IL-8; the Sepsis-Related Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA)-score predicts the outcome in the first 48 h, and provides a daily assessment of treatment response with a high positive predictive value. Contrast-enhanced CT provides the highest diagnostic accuracy for necrotizing pancreatitis when performed after the first week of disease. Patients who suffer early organ dysfunctions or at risk of developing a severe disease require early intensive care treatment. Early vigorous intravenous fluid replacement is of foremost importance. The goal is to decrease the hematocrit or restore normal cardiocirculatory functions. Antibiotic prophylaxis has not been shown as an effective preventive treatment. Early enteral feeding is based on a high level of evidence, resulting in a reduction of local and systemic infection. Patients suffering infected necrosis causing clinical sepsis, pancreatic abscess or surgical acute abdomen are candidates for early intervention. Hospital mortality of SAP after interventional or surgical debridement has decreased in high volume centers to below 20%.

  6. Looking at "thunderclap headache" differently? Circa 2016.

    PubMed

    Ravishankar, K

    2016-01-01

    The term "thunderclap headache" (TCH) was first coined in 1986 by Day and Raskin to describe headache that was the presenting feature of an underlying unruptured cerebral aneurysm. The term is now well established to describe the abrupt onset headache seen with many other conditions and is also now included in The International Classification of Headache Disorders 3(rd) edition beta version rubric 4.4. An essential to label an acute headache as "TCH" and differentiate it from other "sudden onset, severe headaches" is the arbitrary time frame of 1 min from onset to peak intensity for "TCH." What happens in practice, however, is that even those "sudden onset, severe headaches" that do not strictly fulfill the definition criteria are also labeled as "TCH" and investigated with the same speed and in the same sequence and managed based on the underlying cause. This article begins by questioning the validity and usefulness of this "one minute" arbitrary time frame to define "TCH," particularly since this time frame is very difficult to assess in practice and is usually done on a presumptive subjective basis. The article concludes with suggestions for modification of the current investigation protocol for this emergency headache scenario. This proposal for "a change in practice methodology" is essentially based on (1) the fact that in the last two decades, we now have evidence for many more entities other than just subarachnoid hemorrhage that can present as "TCH" or "sudden onset, severe headache" and (2) the evidence from literature which shows that advances in imaging technology using higher magnet strength, better contrast, and newer acquisition sequences will result in a better diagnostic yield. It is therefore time now, in our opinion, to discard current theoretical time frames, use self-explanatory terminologies with practical implications, and move from "lumbar puncture (LP) first" to "LP last!" PMID:27570377

  7. Looking at "thunderclap headache" differently? Circa 2016.

    PubMed

    Ravishankar, K

    2016-01-01

    The term "thunderclap headache" (TCH) was first coined in 1986 by Day and Raskin to describe headache that was the presenting feature of an underlying unruptured cerebral aneurysm. The term is now well established to describe the abrupt onset headache seen with many other conditions and is also now included in The International Classification of Headache Disorders 3(rd) edition beta version rubric 4.4. An essential to label an acute headache as "TCH" and differentiate it from other "sudden onset, severe headaches" is the arbitrary time frame of 1 min from onset to peak intensity for "TCH." What happens in practice, however, is that even those "sudden onset, severe headaches" that do not strictly fulfill the definition criteria are also labeled as "TCH" and investigated with the same speed and in the same sequence and managed based on the underlying cause. This article begins by questioning the validity and usefulness of this "one minute" arbitrary time frame to define "TCH," particularly since this time frame is very difficult to assess in practice and is usually done on a presumptive subjective basis. The article concludes with suggestions for modification of the current investigation protocol for this emergency headache scenario. This proposal for "a change in practice methodology" is essentially based on (1) the fact that in the last two decades, we now have evidence for many more entities other than just subarachnoid hemorrhage that can present as "TCH" or "sudden onset, severe headache" and (2) the evidence from literature which shows that advances in imaging technology using higher magnet strength, better contrast, and newer acquisition sequences will result in a better diagnostic yield. It is therefore time now, in our opinion, to discard current theoretical time frames, use self-explanatory terminologies with practical implications, and move from "lumbar puncture (LP) first" to "LP last!"

  8. [Concept of SIRS and severe acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Hirota, Masahiko; Sugita, Hiroki; Maeda, Keisuke; Ichibara, Atsushi; Ogawa, Michio

    2004-11-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a potentially fatal disease, the severity of which ranges from a mild edematous form to a severe necrotizing form. Most patients develop systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), which is induced by proinflammatory cytokines. The cytokine production can be induced by activation of Toll-like receptor. The breakdown products of the pancreatic and peripancreatic tissues by proteases might be the agonists. Cytokines are supposed to be produced as a biological defense system. However, cytokines may often evoke organ failure and/or immunosuppressive state, if they would be produced excessively. To express this complicated pathologic condition, Ogawa proposed a concept of LISIS(local inflammation-induced systemic immunosuppression syndrome). We have to pay attention to such aspects in the management of this disease. PMID:15552899

  9. Business management of headache centers.

    PubMed

    Nappi, G; Micieli, G; Cavallini, A; Rossi, G; Rossi, G; Rossi, F

    1998-02-01

    Economic evaluation of the costs and benefits of a headache center or unit has become very important for headache specialists. Many of the problems concerning this "financial" approach to headache derive from the model of organization of the Headache Unit, which is dependent on the various approaches to healthcare practiced in the country considered. So far there are two models of headache center that are generally considered: the hospital-based center and the independent center. An argument favoring hospital-based headache clinics is the lower costs, primarily because of their functional connection with the services of a general hospital, i.e., neuroradiology, neurophysiology, routine laboratory analysis, etc. Another is that the headache specialist has the possibility to visit the patients presenting to the emergency room in the acute phase of headache. Independent clinics have greater costs, but are equally as effective as hospital-based models. PMID:9533678

  10. Secondary Headaches

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pinterest Follow us on Instagram DONATE TODAY About Migraine Patient Registry Corporate Roundtable Info for Residents & Fellows Living With Migraines Types of Headache/Migraine Life with Headache/Migraine ...

  11. Update of Inpatient Treatment for Refractory Chronic Daily Headache.

    PubMed

    Lai, Tzu-Hsien; Wang, Shuu-Jiun

    2016-01-01

    Chronic daily headache (CDH) is a group of headache disorders, in which headaches occur daily or near-daily (>15 days per month) and last for more than 3 months. Important CDH subtypes include chronic migraine, chronic tension-type headache, hemicrania continua, and new daily persistent headache. Other headaches with shorter durations (<4 h/day) are usually not included in CDH. Common comorbidities of CDH are medication overuse headache and various psychiatric disorders, such as depression and anxiety. Indications of inpatient treatment for CDH patients include poor responses to outpatient management, need for detoxification for overuse of specific medications (particularly opioids and barbiturates), and severe psychiatric comorbidities. Inpatient treatment usually involves stopping acute pain, preventing future attacks, and detoxifying medication overuse if present. Multidisciplinary integrated care that includes medical staff from different disciplines (e.g., psychiatry, clinical psychology, and physical therapy) has been recommended. The outcomes of inpatient treatment are satisfactory in terms of decreasing headache intensity or frequency, withdrawal from medication overuse, reducing disability, and improving life quality, although long-term relapse is not uncommon. In conclusion, inpatient treatment may be useful for select patients with refractory CDH and should be incorporated in a holistic headache care program.

  12. Acupuncture for tension-type headache

    PubMed Central

    Linde, Klaus; Allais, Gianni; Brinkhaus, Benno; Manheimer, Eric; Vickers, Andrew; White, Adrian R

    2011-01-01

    Background Acupuncture is often used for tension-type headache prophylaxis but its effectiveness is still controversial. This review (along with a companion review on ‘Acupuncture for migraine prophylaxis’) represents an updated version of a Cochrane review originally published in Issue 1, 2001, of The Cochrane Library. Objectives To investigate whether acupuncture is a) more effective than no prophylactic treatment/routine care only; b) more effective than ‘sham’ (placebo) acupuncture; and c) as effective as other interventions in reducing headache frequency in patients with episodic or chronic tension-type headache. Search strategy The Cochrane Pain, Palliative & Supportive Care Trials Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Complementary Medicine Field Trials Register were searched to January 2008. Selection criteria We included randomized trials with a post-randomization observation period of at least 8 weeks that compared the clinical effects of an acupuncture intervention with a control (treatment of acute headaches only or routine care), a sham acupuncture intervention or another intervention in patients with episodic or chronic tension-type headache. Data collection and analysis Two reviewers checked eligibility; extracted information on patients, interventions, methods and results; and assessed risk of bias and quality of the acupuncture intervention. Outcomes extracted included response (at least 50% reduction of headache frequency; outcome of primary interest), headache days, pain intensity and analgesic use. Main results Eleven trials with 2317 participants (median 62, range 10 to 1265) met the inclusion criteria. Two large trials compared acupuncture to treatment of acute headaches or routine care only. Both found statistically significant and clinically relevant short-term (up to 3 months) benefits of acupuncture over control for response, number of headache days and pain intensity. Long-term effects (beyond 3 months) were not

  13. Medical emergencies: pulmonary embolism and acute severe asthma.

    PubMed

    Somasundaram, K; Ball, J

    2013-01-01

    In this, the second of two articles covering specific medical emergencies, we discuss the definitions, epidemiology, pathophysiology, acute and chronic management of pulmonary embolus and acute severe asthma. PMID:23210560

  14. Pterostilbene as treatment for severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y J; Ding, Y; Wu, J; Ning, B T

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) has a fast onset and progression, which lead to an unfavorable prognosis. Therefore, the development of novel drugs for its treatment is critical. As a homologous derivative of resveratrol, pterostilbene exerts a variety of effects including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antitumor effects. This study investigated the potential of pterostilbene for treatment of severe AP (SAP) and related mechanisms. Effects of pterostilbene were evaluated in a Wistar rat model of AP. Serum levels of amylase (AMY), creatinine (Cr), and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were quantified. Furthermore, serum levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-a and interleukin (IL)-1b were quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Nuclear factor (NF)-kB expression in pancreatic tissues was quantified by real-time PCR and western blotting. The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was determined using a spectrometer, while superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was assayed. In the AP rat model, the expression of inflammatory markers TNF-a and IL-1b, expression of NF-kB, and serum indices (AMY, Cr, and ALT) increased compared to the corresponding levels in the control group (P < 0.05). Pterostilbene reduced serum levels of TNF-a and IL-1b; decreased NF-kB gene expression, serum indices, and ROS generation; and increased SOD activity in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, pterostilbene can alleviate SAP-induced tissue damage by decreasing the inflammatory response and by promoting antioxidation leading to the protection of pancreatic tissues. PMID:27525946

  15. High altitude headache and acute mountain sickness at moderate elevations in a military population during battalion-level training exercises.

    PubMed

    Norris, Jacob N; Viirre, Erik; Aralis, Hilary; Sracic, Michael K; Thomas, Darren; Gertsch, Jeffery H

    2012-08-01

    Few studies have evaluated high altitude headache (HAH) and acute mountain sickness (AMS) in military populations training at moderate (1,500-2,500 m) to high altitudes (>2,500 m). In the current study, researchers interviewed active duty personnel training at Marine Corps Mountain Warfare Training Center. Participants were asked about HAH and AMS symptoms, potential risk factors, and medications used. In a sample of 192 U.S. Navy and Marine Corps personnel, 14.6% reported AMS (Lake Louise Criteria > or = 3) and 28.6% reported HAH. Dehydration and recent arrival at altitude (defined as data collected on days 2-3) were significantly associated with AMS; decreased sleep allowance was significantly associated with HAH. Although ibuprofen/Motrin users were more likely to screen positive for AMS, among AMS-positive participants, ibuprofen/Motrin users had decreased likelihood of reporting robust AMS relative to non-ibuprofen/Motrin users (p < 0.01). These results suggest that maintenance of hydration and adequate sleep allowance may be critical performance requirements at altitude. Further, ibuprofen/Motrin may be a reasonable treatment for the symptoms of AMS and HAH, although further study is warranted.

  16. Pediatric Posttraumatic Headache.

    PubMed

    Kacperski, Joanne; Hung, Ryan; Blume, Heidi K

    2016-02-01

    Concussion and mild traumatic brain injury are common injuries in pediatrics, and posttraumatic headache is the most common complaint following them. Although most children and teens recover from a simple, isolated concussion without incidents within 1-2 weeks, some develop symptoms that can last for months. It is important to manage both acute and persistent posttraumatic headaches appropriately to speed recovery, minimize disability, and maximize function. In this article, we review the definitions, epidemiology, and current recommendations for the evaluation and treatment of acute and persistent posttraumatic headaches. Although this is still a developing field and there is much that we still need to learn about concussion and the best strategies to prevent and treat these injuries and their sequelae, we hope that this review will help providers to understand the current evidence and treatment recommendations to improve care for children with concussion and mild traumatic brain injury. PMID:27017019

  17. Pediatric Posttraumatic Headache.

    PubMed

    Kacperski, Joanne; Hung, Ryan; Blume, Heidi K

    2016-02-01

    Concussion and mild traumatic brain injury are common injuries in pediatrics, and posttraumatic headache is the most common complaint following them. Although most children and teens recover from a simple, isolated concussion without incidents within 1-2 weeks, some develop symptoms that can last for months. It is important to manage both acute and persistent posttraumatic headaches appropriately to speed recovery, minimize disability, and maximize function. In this article, we review the definitions, epidemiology, and current recommendations for the evaluation and treatment of acute and persistent posttraumatic headaches. Although this is still a developing field and there is much that we still need to learn about concussion and the best strategies to prevent and treat these injuries and their sequelae, we hope that this review will help providers to understand the current evidence and treatment recommendations to improve care for children with concussion and mild traumatic brain injury.

  18. Clinical value of severity markers in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Lempinen, M; Puolakkainen, P; Kemppainen, E

    2005-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a common digestive disease of which the severity may vary from mild, edematous to severe, necrotizing disease. An improved outcome in the severe form of the disease is based on early identification of disease severity and subsequent focused management of these high-risk patients. However, the ability of clinicians to predict, upon presentation, which patient will have mild or severe acute pancreatitis is not accurate. Prospective systems using clinical criteria have been used to determine severity in patients with acute pancreatitis, such as the Ranson's prognostic signs, Glasgow score, and the acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II score (APACHE II). Their application in clinical practise has been limited by the time delay of at least 48 h to judge all parameters in the former two and by being cumbersome and time-consuming in the latter. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography is presently the most accurate non-invasive single method to evaluate the severity of acute pancreatitis. It cannot, however, be performed to all patients with acute pancreatitis. Therefore, considerable interest has grown in the development of reliable biochemical markers that reflect the severity of acute pancreatitis. In this article we critically appraise current and new severity markers of acute pancreatitis in their ability to distinguish between mild and severe disease and their clinical utility.

  19. THE PANC 3 SCORE PREDICTING SEVERITY OF ACUTE PANCREATITIS

    PubMed Central

    BEDUSCHI, Murilo Gamba; MELLO, André Luiz Parizi; VON-MÜHLEN, Bruno; FRANZON, Orli

    2016-01-01

    Background : About 20% of cases of acute pancreatitis progress to a severe form, leading to high mortality rates. Several studies suggested methods to identify patients that will progress more severely. However, most studies present problems when used on daily practice. Objective : To assess the efficacy of the PANC 3 score to predict acute pancreatitis severity and its relation to clinical outcome. Methods : Acute pancreatitis patients were assessed as to sex, age, body mass index (BMI), etiology of pancreatitis, intensive care need, length of stay, length of stay in intensive care unit and mortality. The PANC 3 score was determined within the first 24 hours after diagnosis and compared to acute pancreatitis grade of the Revised Atlanta classification. Results : Out of 64 patients diagnosed with acute pancreatitis, 58 met the inclusion criteria. The PANC 3 score was positive in five cases (8.6%), pancreatitis progressed to a severe form in 10 cases (17.2%) and five patients (8.6%) died. Patients with a positive score and severe pancreatitis required intensive care more often, and stayed for a longer period in intensive care units. The PANC 3 score showed sensitivity of 50%, specificity of 100%, accuracy of 91.4%, positive predictive value of 100% and negative predictive value of 90.6% in prediction of severe acute pancreatitis. Conclusion : The PANC 3 score is useful to assess acute pancreatitis because it is easy and quick to use, has high specificity, high accuracy and high predictive value in prediction of severe acute pancreatitis. PMID:27120730

  20. Antibiotics as part of the management of severe acute malnutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Severe acute malnutrition contributes to 1 million deaths among children annually. Adding routine antibiotic agents to nutritional therapy may increase recovery rates and decrease mortality among children with severe acute malnutrition treated in the community. In this randomized, double-blind, plac...

  1. Sphenopalatine ganglion stimulation for the treatment of cluster headache

    PubMed Central

    Puche, Miguel; Garcia, Ana; Gascón, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Cluster headache is a severe, debilitating disorder with pain that ranks among the most severe known to humans. Patients with cluster headaches have few therapeutic options and further, 10–20% develop drug-resistant attacks. The often brief duration of cluster attacks makes abortive therapy a challenge, and preventive medications are almost always provided to patients, but the side effects of these preventive medications can be significant. The sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) is believed to play a role in headache pain and cranial autonomic symptoms associated with cluster headache, which is a result of activation of the trigeminal-autonomic reflex. For over 100 years, the SPG has been a clinical target to treat primary headache disorders using pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic methods. Radiofrequency lesioning and nerve-resection therapies, while initially beneficial, are irreversible procedures, and the use of neurostimulation provides one method of interfacing with the neural pathways without causing permanent damage to neural tissue. SPG neurostimulation is both reversible and adjustable, and has recently been tested in both proof-of-concept work and in a randomized, sham-controlled trial for the treatment of cluster headache. A randomized, sham-controlled study of 32 patients was performed to evaluate further the use of SPG stimulation for the acute treatment of chronic cluster headache. Of the 32 patients, 28 completed the randomized experimental period. Overall, 68% of patients experienced an acute response, a frequency response, or both. In this study the majority of adverse events were related to the implantation procedure, which typically resolved or remained mild in nature at 3 months following the implant procedure. This and other studies highlight the promise of using SPG stimulation to treat the pain-associated cluster headache. SPG stimulation could be a safe and effective option for chronic cluster headache. PMID:24790646

  2. Acute encephalomyelitis complicated with severe neurological sequelae after intrathecal administration of methotrexate in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Takuro; Okamoto, Yasuhiro; Maruyama, Shinsuke; Tanabe, Takayuki; Kurauchi, Koichiro; Kodama, Yuichi; Nakagawa, Shunsuke; Shinkoda, Yuichi; Kawano, Yoshifumi

    2014-11-01

    A four-year-old girl on maintenance therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) complained of a headache and low back pain on the day she received her 21st intrathecal methotrexate (it-MTX) administration, and the next day experienced numbness and pain in her foot. This numbness gradually spread to her hand. She thereafter developed a fever and was hospitalized on day 8. After antibiotic therapy, the fever disappeared. However, her lower limbs became paralyzed, and she also developed urinary retention. On day 12, her paralysis progressed upwards, and she also developed paralysis of the upper limbs. Finally, she experienced convulsions with an impairment of consciousness. A magnetic resonance imaging study of the brain and spinal cord showed abnormal signals in the brain cortex and anterior horn. Accordingly, we diagnosed acute encephalomyelitis associated with it-MTX. High-dose intravenous immunoglobulin, steroid pulse therapy, plasma exchange, and dextromethorphan administration were initiated, while she received mechanical ventilation. Despite this intensive treatment, she suffered severe neurological damage and had to be maintained on mechanical ventilation due to persistent flaccid quadriplegia one year after the onset. When patients have symptoms of ascending paralysis during it-MTX treatment, clinicians should carefully consider the possibility of acute encephalomyelitis due to it-MTX. PMID:25501412

  3. Cervicogenic headache: a real headache.

    PubMed

    Antonaci, Fabio; Sjaastad, Ottar

    2011-04-01

    Although theories regarding headache originating in the neck have existed for more than 150 years, the term "cervicogenic headache" originated in 1983. Early descriptions pinpoint the characteristic symptoms as dizziness, visual disturbances, tinnitus, and "posterior" headache, conceivably as a consequence of arthrosis, infliction upon the vertebral artery, or with a "migrainous" background and occurring in "advanced age." Cervicogenic headache (mean age of onset, 33 years) displays a somewhat different picture: unilateral headache, starting posteriorly, but advancing to the frontal area, most frequently the main site of pain; usually accompanied by ipsilateral arm discomfort, reduced range of motion in the neck, and mechanical precipitation of exacerbations (eg, through external pressure upon hypersensitive, occipital tendon insertions). Treatment options in treatment-resistant cases include cervical stabilization operations and extracranial electrical stimulation. In a personal, population-based study of 1,838 individuals (88.6% of the population), a prevalence of 2.2% "core" cases was found.

  4. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy in severe acute asthma.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, B K; Laursen, L C; Lervang, H H; Stjernebjerg, T; Weeke, B

    1987-02-01

    In a group comparative double blind pilot study six asthmatic patients with an acute exacerbation of their disease were randomly treated with either methylprednisolone pulse therapy (MPPT) (1000 mg daily for 3 days) (n = 2) followed by placebo tablets, or standard doses of methylprednisolone (MP) (50 mg daily gradually decreased to zero over 3 weeks) (n = 4). The results showed that the effect of MPPT did not differ from that of standard doses of MP. MPPT has, however, the potential of being preferable to standard treatment with MP, because of easy administration and optimal patient compliance. PMID:3296841

  5. Oxidative stress in severe acute illness.

    PubMed

    Bar-Or, David; Bar-Or, Raphael; Rael, Leonard T; Brody, Edward N

    2015-01-01

    The overall redox potential of a cell is primarily determined by oxidizable/reducible chemical pairs, including glutathione-glutathione disulfide, reduced thioredoxin-oxidized thioredoxin, and NAD(+)-NADH (and NADP-NADPH). Current methods for evaluating oxidative stress rely on detecting levels of individual byproducts of oxidative damage or by determining the total levels or activity of individual antioxidant enzymes. Oxidation-reduction potential (ORP), on the other hand, is an integrated, comprehensive measure of the balance between total (known and unknown) pro-oxidant and antioxidant components in a biological system. Much emphasis has been placed on the role of oxidative stress in chronic diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and atherosclerosis. The role of oxidative stress in acute diseases often seen in the emergency room and intensive care unit is considerable. New tools for the rapid, inexpensive measurement of both redox potential and total redox capacity should aid in introducing a new body of literature on the role of oxidative stress in acute illness and how to screen and monitor for potentially beneficial pharmacologic agents.

  6. Headache (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Headaches are usually caused by either muscle tension, vascular problems, or both. Migraines are vascular in origin, and may be preceded by visual disturbances, loss of peripheral vision, and fatigue. ...

  7. Headaches in medical school students.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, J M; Matos, E; Calheiros, J M

    1994-01-01

    Medical students of the Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas 'Abel Salazar' at the University of Oporto were interviewed using a structured headache questionnaire in order to assess the prevalence and characteristics of headaches in a young adult university population. This was the first population-based study of headaches in Portugal. 491 students were questioned. The parameters evaluated included age, sex, headache characteristics (frequency, localization, severity, duration), premonitory and associated symptoms and family history. Headaches were classified using the Ad Hoc Committee (1962) and the International Headache Society (1988) criteria. There was a high prevalence of overall headaches in this young population. The results of the application of these two types of criteria to the same population showed for the most prevalent forms, migraine and tension-type headaches, a prevalence that depends on the classification adopted and the number of criteria items considered. If all (9 items) were used, the statistics obtained for migraine were 6.9% (Ad Hoc) and 6.1% (IHS), an insignificant difference, and for tension-type headache 14.3% (Ad Hoc) and 16.0% (IHS), which corresponds to a significant difference (p = 0.0129, McNemar test). It is concluded that IHS classification criteria identify less cases of migraine and more cases of tension-type headaches, which means a higher specificity for migraine and a higher sensitivity for tension-type headache.

  8. Severe Plasmodium falciparum infection mimicking acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Helmi; Ismail, Muhammad Dzafir; Jalalonmuhali, Maisarah; Atiya, Nadia; Ponnampalavanar, Sasheela

    2014-08-30

    This case report describes a case of presumed acute myocardial infarction in a returned traveler who was later diagnosed to have severe malaria. Emergency coronary angiography was normal and subsequent peripheral blood film was positive for Plasmodium falciparum.

  9. Survival from acute renal failure after severe burns.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Y; Momma, S; Takamizawa, A; Nishida, S

    1984-12-01

    We describe a patient with 50 per cent, third degree flame burns who had a history of paint thinner inhalation for over 10 years. Moreover, chlorpromazine had been administered for the treatment of insomnia caused by chronic thinner intoxication. He developed oliguric acute renal failure soon after the burn injury, although adequate resuscitation therapy was given, and survived following frequent haemodialysis. Although survival from acute renal failure after severe burns is rare, once the diagnosis of acute renal failure has been made, haemodialysis should be instituted as early as possible. Furthermore, in a severely burnt patient with episodes of chronic and acute intoxication from organic chemicals or drugs which may have caused renal damage, acute renal failure may occur, so that careful observation is advised. PMID:6525538

  10. [PREVENTION AND CORRECTION OF PULMONARY COMPLICATIONS FOR SEVERE ACUTE PANCREATITIS].

    PubMed

    Fedorkiv, M B

    2015-06-01

    Increased of proinflammatory cytokines levels, including interleukin-8 (IL-8) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) on severe acute pancreatitis causes vasodilatation, increased permeability of the wall, accumulation of fluid in lung tissue and pleural sinuses. Transudate from acute parapancreatyc clusters of hot liquid and abdomen falls into the chest cavity through microscopic defects in the diaphragm due to the formation of pathological pleural-peritoneal connections or the relevant pressure gradient between the abdominal and pleural cavities. Remediation and removal of acute parapancreatyc clusters combined with the use of a multicomponent drug infusion therapy Cytoflavin provide a reduction in the frequency of pulmonary complications of acute pancreatitis from 48.3 to 31.0%. Use of the drug Cytoflavin reduces the severity of endogenous intoxication and mortality from acute lung injury from 12.9 to 6.1%. PMID:26521460

  11. Indomethacin-responsive headaches.

    PubMed

    VanderPluym, Juliana

    2015-01-01

    Indomethacin-responsive headaches are a heterogeneous group of primary headache disorders distinguished by their swift and often absolute response to indomethacin. The epidemiology of these conditions is incompletely defined. Traditionally, indomethacin-responsive headaches include a subset of trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (paroxysmal hemicrania and hemicrania continua), Valsalva-induced headaches (cough headache, exercise headache, and sex headache), primary stabbing headache, and hypnic headache. These headache syndromes differ in extent of response to indomethacin, clinical features, and differential diagnoses. Neuroimaging is recommended to investigate for various organic causes that may mimic these headaches. Case reports of other primary headache disorders that also respond to indomethacin, such as cluster headache, nummular headache, and ophthalmoplegic migraine, have been described. These "novel" indomethacin-responsive headaches beg the question of what headache characteristics are required to qualify a headache as an indomethacin-responsive headache. Furthermore, they challenge the concept of using a therapeutic intervention as a diagnostic criterion.

  12. Severe acute ulcerative colitis: the pediatric perspective.

    PubMed

    Turner, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Many features of pediatric ulcerative colitis (UC) are similar to adult-onset disease, but the rate of extensive disease is doubled in children. It is, therefore, not surprising that the admission rate for severe UC is higher in childhood-onset UC, reaching 28% by the age of 16 years. Approximately 30-40% of children will fail corticosteroids and require second-line medical therapy or colectomy. A pediatric UC activity index (PUCAI) score of >65 indicates severe disease and the index can assist in determining the need and timing of second-line medical therapy or colectomy early during the admission. A PUCAI score of >45 points on day 3 identify patients likely to fail corticosteroids (negative predictive value 90-95%), and a score >70 points on day 5 identify patients who will require short-term treatment escalation (positive predicting value 95-100%). Data in children are limited, but it seems that cyclosporine, tacrolimus and infliximab achieve a similar short-term response rate, in the range of 60-80%. Infliximab has the advantage that it may be given for a prolonged period of time while calcineurin inhibitors should not be used for more than 3-4 months, bridging to a thiopurine regimen. Colectomy is indicated in toxic megacolon or in cases refractory to one salvage therapy. The choice of colectomy in other cases should carefully consider its effect on the patient's quality of life, its impact on the physical and emotional development at a critical age of personality development, and its association with a high infertility rate in females undergoing pouch procedure before childbearing age.

  13. Liver transplantation for acute liver failure accompanied by severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Kirino, Izumi; Fujimoto, Yasuhiro; Hata, Koichiro; Uemoto, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    The role of liver transplantation (LT) in acute liver failure (ALF) complicated by severe acute pancreatitis is still unclear. We here report a case of deceased-donor LT for idiopathic ALF accompanied by severe acute pancreatitis. A 58-year-old man with no history of liver disease presented with idiopathic ALF and acute pancreatitis. After careful consideration, he received a liver from a deceased donor. Following surgery, the patient's liver function rapidly reverted to normal level and the acute pancreatitis simultaneously subsided. The patient later developed a pancreatic pseudocyst, which was treated successfully with combination interventional radiology. LT can be considered for ALF associated with severe acute pancreatitis if there is no clinical evidence of an absolute contraindication for organ transplantation, such as systemic or local infection. Moreover, we recommend a close follow-up by ultrasonography to allow early detection and treatment of pancreatic pseudocysts following surgery. PMID:27600056

  14. Allergies and Headache

    MedlinePlus

    ... vasoactive or neuroactive amino acids such as tyramine , dopamine, phenylethylamine or monosodium glutamate that can trigger a ... Headache Fact Sheets Tags: allergy , allergy and headache , dopamine , headache , migraine , sinus headache , tyramine More Posts ← Tension- ...

  15. Markers for predicting severity and progression of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Schütte, Kerstin; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Several tools have been developed for severity stratification in acute pancreatitis. They include single biochemical markers, imaging methods, and complex scoring systems, all of which aim at an early detection of severe acute pancreatitis to optimise monitoring and treatment of patients as early as possible. Among single biochemical markers, C-reactive protein (CRP) remains the most useful. Despite its delayed increase, peaking not earlier than 72 h after the onset of symptoms, it is accurate and widely available. Many other markers have been evaluated for their usefulness, and for some of them very promising data could be shown. Among them interleukin 6 seems to be the most promising parameter for use in clinical routine. For the detection of pancreatic infection, procalcitonin is the most sensitive, and can be used as an indicator for the need for fine-needle aspiration of pancreatic necrosis. Regarding imaging, contrast-enhanced computed tomography is still the reference method for the detection of necrotising acute pancreatitis. Pancreatitis-specific scoring systems have been shown to be of value for the prediction of severity and progression of acute pancreatitis, but cannot be applied any earlier than 48 h after admission to hospital. The APACHE-II score has not been developed specifically for acute pancreatitis and is rather complex to assess, but has been proven to be an early and reliable tool. Indication, timing and consequences of the methods applied need to be carefully considered and incorporated into clinical assessments to avoid costs and harm to the patient.

  16. [Principles of intensive care in severe acute pancreatitis in 2008].

    PubMed

    Darvas, Katalin; Futó, Judit; Okrös, Ilona; Gondos, Tibor; Csomós, Akos; Kupcsulik, Péter

    2008-11-23

    Acute pancreatitis is a dynamic, often progressive disease; 14-20% require intensive care in its severe form due to multiorgan dysfunction and/or failure. This review was created using systematic literature review of articles published on this subject in the last 5 years. The outcome of severe acute pancreatitis is determined by the inflammatory response and multiorgan dysfunction - the prognostic scores (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation, Glasgow Prognostic Index, Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment, Multi Organ Dysfunction Syndrome Scale, Ranson Scale) can be used to determine outcome. Clinical signs (age, coexisting diseases, confusion, obesity) and biochemistry values (serum amylase, lipase, C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, creatinine, urea, calcium) have important prognostic roles as well. Early organ failure increases the risk of late abdominal complications and mortality. Intensive care can provide appropriate multi-function patient monitoring which helps in early recognition of complications and appropriate target-controlled treatment. Treatment of severe acute pancreatitis aims at reducing systemic inflammatory response and multiorgan dysfunction and, on the other side, at increasing the anti-inflammatory response. Oral starvation for 24-48 hours is effective in reducing the exocrine activity of the pancreas; the efficacy of protease inhibitors is questionable. Early intravascular volume resuscitation and stable haemodynamics improve microcirculation. Early oxygen therapy and mechanical ventilation provide adequate oxygenation. Electrolyte and acid-base control can be as important as tight glucose control. Adequate pain relief can be achieved by thoracic epidural catheterization. Early enteral nutrition with immunonutrition should be used. There is evidence that affecting the coagulation cascade by activated protein C can play a role in reducing the inflammatory response. The complex therapy of acute pancreatitis includes appropriate

  17. [Principles of intensive care in severe acute pancreatitis in 2008].

    PubMed

    Darvas, Katalin; Futó, Judit; Okrös, Ilona; Gondos, Tibor; Csomós, Akos; Kupcsulik, Péter

    2008-11-23

    Acute pancreatitis is a dynamic, often progressive disease; 14-20% require intensive care in its severe form due to multiorgan dysfunction and/or failure. This review was created using systematic literature review of articles published on this subject in the last 5 years. The outcome of severe acute pancreatitis is determined by the inflammatory response and multiorgan dysfunction - the prognostic scores (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation, Glasgow Prognostic Index, Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment, Multi Organ Dysfunction Syndrome Scale, Ranson Scale) can be used to determine outcome. Clinical signs (age, coexisting diseases, confusion, obesity) and biochemistry values (serum amylase, lipase, C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, creatinine, urea, calcium) have important prognostic roles as well. Early organ failure increases the risk of late abdominal complications and mortality. Intensive care can provide appropriate multi-function patient monitoring which helps in early recognition of complications and appropriate target-controlled treatment. Treatment of severe acute pancreatitis aims at reducing systemic inflammatory response and multiorgan dysfunction and, on the other side, at increasing the anti-inflammatory response. Oral starvation for 24-48 hours is effective in reducing the exocrine activity of the pancreas; the efficacy of protease inhibitors is questionable. Early intravascular volume resuscitation and stable haemodynamics improve microcirculation. Early oxygen therapy and mechanical ventilation provide adequate oxygenation. Electrolyte and acid-base control can be as important as tight glucose control. Adequate pain relief can be achieved by thoracic epidural catheterization. Early enteral nutrition with immunonutrition should be used. There is evidence that affecting the coagulation cascade by activated protein C can play a role in reducing the inflammatory response. The complex therapy of acute pancreatitis includes appropriate

  18. Psychosocial Care and its Association with Severe Acute Malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anurag; Agarwal, Sheesham

    2016-05-01

    This cross-sectional study compared 120 children having severe acute malnutrition with 120 healthy children for exposure to 40 behaviors, by measuring psychosocial care based on Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment (HOME) inventory. The mean (SD) psychosocial care score of cases and controls significantly differed [18.2 (2.2) vs 23.5 (2.1); P<0.001]. A score of less than 14 was significantly associated with severe acute malnutrition (OR 23.2; 95% CI 8.2, 50). PMID:27254059

  19. Sleep and Headache.

    PubMed

    Dosi, Claudia; Figura, Mariagrazia; Ferri, Raffaele; Bruni, Oliviero

    2015-06-01

    The interaction between sleep and headache or migraine is powerful and an elevated comorbidity between these 2 disorders has been reported in either adults or children. This comobidity is linked to common neurophysiological and neuroanatomical substrates that are genetically based strongly. The first reports on this relationship were related to the prevalence of parasomnias and sleep-disordered breathing in headache but recent research has expanded the comorbidity to several other sleep disorders, such as restless legs syndrome, periodic limb movements during sleep, and narcolepsy. The assessment of children with headache should always include an accurate anamnesis for the presence of sleep problems either in the child or in the relatives; no correct approach for treating children and adolescents is possible without an integrated method of evaluation and management.

  20. Headache and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Bauer, P R; Carpay, J A; Terwindt, G M; Sander, J W; Thijs, R J; Haan, J; Visser, G H

    2013-08-01

    Headache and epilepsy often co-occur. Epidemiologic studies conducted in the past few years reinforce the notion of a bi-directional association between migraine and epilepsy. Data on an association between headache (in general) and epilepsy, however, are less clear. Peri-ictal headache often presents with migraine-like symptoms and can be severe. A correct diagnosis and management are paramount. It was demonstrated that cortical hyperexcitability may underlie both epilepsy and migraine. A recent study linked spreading depolarisation, the supposed underlying pathophysiological mechanism of migraine with aura, to epilepsy. Although this study was carried out in patients who had suffered a subarachnoid haemorrhage, the finding may shed light on pathophysiological mechanisms common to epilepsy and migraine.

  1. Management of patients after recovering from acute severe biliary pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Dedemadi, Georgia; Nikolopoulos, Manolis; Kalaitzopoulos, Ioannis; Sgourakis, George

    2016-01-01

    Cholelithiasis is the most common cause of acute pancreatitis, accounting 35%-60% of cases. Around 15%-20% of patients suffer a severe attack with high morbidity and mortality rates. As far as treatment is concerned, the optimum method of late management of patients with severe acute biliary pancreatitis is still contentious and the main question is over the correct timing of every intervention. Patients after recovering from an acute episode of severe biliary pancreatitis can be offered alternative options in their management, including cholecystectomy, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and sphincterotomy, or no definitive treatment. Delaying cholecystectomy until after resolution of the inflammatory process, usually not earlier than 6 wk after onset of acute pancreatitis, seems to be a safe policy. ERCP and sphincterotomy on index admission prevent recurrent episodes of pancreatitis until cholecystectomy is performed, but if used for definitive treatment, they can be a valuable tool for patients unfit for surgery. Some patients who survive severe biliary pancreatitis may develop pseudocysts or walled-off necrosis. Management of pseudocysts with minimally invasive techniques, if not therapeutic, can be used as a bridge to definitive operative treatment, which includes delayed cholecystectomy and concurrent pseudocyst drainage in some patients. A management algorithm has been developed for patients surviving severe biliary pancreatitis according to the currently published data in the literature. PMID:27678352

  2. Management of patients after recovering from acute severe biliary pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Dedemadi, Georgia; Nikolopoulos, Manolis; Kalaitzopoulos, Ioannis; Sgourakis, George

    2016-01-01

    Cholelithiasis is the most common cause of acute pancreatitis, accounting 35%-60% of cases. Around 15%-20% of patients suffer a severe attack with high morbidity and mortality rates. As far as treatment is concerned, the optimum method of late management of patients with severe acute biliary pancreatitis is still contentious and the main question is over the correct timing of every intervention. Patients after recovering from an acute episode of severe biliary pancreatitis can be offered alternative options in their management, including cholecystectomy, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and sphincterotomy, or no definitive treatment. Delaying cholecystectomy until after resolution of the inflammatory process, usually not earlier than 6 wk after onset of acute pancreatitis, seems to be a safe policy. ERCP and sphincterotomy on index admission prevent recurrent episodes of pancreatitis until cholecystectomy is performed, but if used for definitive treatment, they can be a valuable tool for patients unfit for surgery. Some patients who survive severe biliary pancreatitis may develop pseudocysts or walled-off necrosis. Management of pseudocysts with minimally invasive techniques, if not therapeutic, can be used as a bridge to definitive operative treatment, which includes delayed cholecystectomy and concurrent pseudocyst drainage in some patients. A management algorithm has been developed for patients surviving severe biliary pancreatitis according to the currently published data in the literature.

  3. Management of patients after recovering from acute severe biliary pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Dedemadi, Georgia; Nikolopoulos, Manolis; Kalaitzopoulos, Ioannis; Sgourakis, George

    2016-09-14

    Cholelithiasis is the most common cause of acute pancreatitis, accounting 35%-60% of cases. Around 15%-20% of patients suffer a severe attack with high morbidity and mortality rates. As far as treatment is concerned, the optimum method of late management of patients with severe acute biliary pancreatitis is still contentious and the main question is over the correct timing of every intervention. Patients after recovering from an acute episode of severe biliary pancreatitis can be offered alternative options in their management, including cholecystectomy, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and sphincterotomy, or no definitive treatment. Delaying cholecystectomy until after resolution of the inflammatory process, usually not earlier than 6 wk after onset of acute pancreatitis, seems to be a safe policy. ERCP and sphincterotomy on index admission prevent recurrent episodes of pancreatitis until cholecystectomy is performed, but if used for definitive treatment, they can be a valuable tool for patients unfit for surgery. Some patients who survive severe biliary pancreatitis may develop pseudocysts or walled-off necrosis. Management of pseudocysts with minimally invasive techniques, if not therapeutic, can be used as a bridge to definitive operative treatment, which includes delayed cholecystectomy and concurrent pseudocyst drainage in some patients. A management algorithm has been developed for patients surviving severe biliary pancreatitis according to the currently published data in the literature. PMID:27678352

  4. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) Prevention in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Hsueh-Erh

    2004-01-01

    Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) is a newly identified respiratory disease that threatened Taiwan between April 14 and July 5, 2003. Chang Gung University experienced various SARS-related episodes, such as the postponement of classes for 7 days, the reporting of probable SARS cases, and the isolation of students under Level A and B…

  5. Is ketamine a lifesaving agent in childhood acute severe asthma?

    PubMed Central

    Hendaus, Mohamed A; Jomha, Fatima A; Alhammadi, Ahmed H

    2016-01-01

    Children with acute severe asthma exacerbation are at risk of developing respiratory failure. Moreover, conventional aggressive management might be futile in acute severe asthma requiring intubation and invasive ventilation. The aim of this review is to detail evidence on the use of ketamine in childhood asthma exacerbations. A search of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases was performed, using different combinations of the following terms: ketamine, asthma, use, exacerbation, and childhood. In addition, we searched the references of the identified articles for additional articles. We then reviewed titles and included studies that were relevant to the topic of interest. Finally, the search was limited to studies published in English and Spanish from 1918 to June 2015. Due to the scarcity in the literature, we included all published articles. The literature reports conflicting results of ketamine use for acute severe asthma in children. Taking into consideration the relatively good safety profile of the drug, ketamine might be a reasonable option in the management of acute severe asthma in children who fail to respond to standard therapy. Furthermore, pediatricians and pediatric emergency clinicians administering ketamine should be knowledgeable about the unique actions of this drug and its potential side effects. PMID:26955277

  6. [Acute necrotizing esophagitis (black esophagus) with secondary severe stenosis].

    PubMed

    Gómez, Álvaro A; Guerrero, Diego; Hani, Albis C; Cañadas, Raúl

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 67 years old patient with a history of diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation and chronic renal failure, who developed diabetic ketoacidosis and severe sepsis, later presenting an acute necrotizing esophagitis, and then a esophageal stenosis requiring treatment with self-expanding esophageal prosthesis with good clinical results. PMID:26802889

  7. Headaches in patients with shunts.

    PubMed

    Rekate, Harold L; Kranz, Dory

    2009-03-01

    Headache is one of the most common afflictions suffered by humans. Headache in patients with a shunt triggers a series of events that includes utilization of expensive technologies and often potentially dangerous surgical intervention. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of headaches in patients with shunts and, hopefully, the relationship of those headache disorders to the treatment of hydrocephalus. The Hydrocephalus Association maintains a self-reporting database recorded from individuals treated for hydrocephalus and their families. This database was mined to determine the incidence of severe headaches requiring treatment and interfering with normal life in patients who have been treated for hydrocephalus. There were 1,242 responders between the ages of 19 months and 45 years of age. Of these, 1,233 answered the question, "Do you or your family member suffer from (does your child complain of) frequent or chronic headaches?" This subset forms the basis of this study. Three groups were defined by age: children (19 months-12 years), adolescents (13 years-19 years), and young adults (20 years-45 years). Most respondents were initially treated during infancy (before 18 months of age); 84% of children and 69% of both adolescents and young adults were treated very early in life. Severe headaches became a more frequent problem as the age of the population treated for hydrocephalus increased. In terms of frequency and severity of headaches, direct comparisons with epidemiologic studies of normal populations are difficult because of the limitations of data available in the database. However, it is likely that this population has a higher incidence of severe headaches than normal populations. The cost of management of headaches in this population is very high, and the patients are at risk throughout life. Early treatment decisions have a significant effect on later quality of life. Strategies that lead to normalization of cerebrospinal fluid dynamics

  8. Acupuncture as analgesia for non-emergent acute non-specific neck pain, ankle sprain and primary headache in an emergency department setting: a protocol for a parallel group, randomised, controlled pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kun Hyung; Ryu, Ji Ho; Park, Maeng Real; Kim, Yong In; Min, Mun Ki; Park, Yong Myeon; Kim, Yu Ri; Noh, Seung Hee; Kang, Min Joo; Kim, Young Jun; Kim, Jae Kyu; Lee, Byung Ryul; Choi, Jun Yong; Yang, Gi Young

    2014-01-01

    Introduction This study aims to assess the feasibility of acupuncture as an add-on intervention for patients with non-emergent acute musculoskeletal pain and primary headache in an emergency department (ED) setting. Methods and analysis A total of 40 patients who present to the ED and are diagnosed to have acute non-specific neck pain, ankle sprain or primary headache will be recruited by ED physicians. An intravenous or intramuscular injection of analgesics will be provided as the initial standard pain control intervention for all patients. Patients who still have moderate to severe pain after the 30 min of initial standard ED management will be considered eligible. These patients will be allocated in equal proportions to acupuncture plus standard ED management or to standard ED management alone based on computer-generated random numbers concealed in opaque, sealed, sequentially numbered envelopes. A 30 min session of acupuncture treatment with manual and/or electrical stimulation will be provided by qualified Korean medicine doctors. All patients will receive additional ED management at the ED physician's discretion and based on each patient's response to the allocated intervention. The primary outcome will be pain reduction measured at discharge from the ED by an unblinded assessor. Adverse events in both groups will be documented. Other outcomes will include the patient-reported overall improvement, disability due to neck pain (only for neck-pain patients), the treatment response rate, the use of other healthcare resources and the patients’ perceived effectiveness of the acupuncture treatment. A follow-up telephone interview will be conducted by a blinded assessor 72±12 h after ED discharge. Ethics and dissemination Written informed consent will be obtained from all participants. The study has been approved by the Institutional Review Boards (IRBs). The results of this study will guide a full-scale randomised trial of acupuncture in an ED context

  9. Meteorological parameters and severity of acute pulmonary embolism episodes.

    PubMed

    Staśkiewicz, Grzegorz; Czekajska-Chehab, Elżbieta; Przegaliński, Jerzy; Maciejewski, Marcin; Pachowicz, Marcin; Drop, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    Frequency of acute pulmonary embolism episodes has been previously shown to correlate significantly with meteorological factors in the period preceding their occurrence. The purpose of the study was to analyze the relation of meteorological factors and the severity of acute pulmonary embolism, expressed by the CT-based pulmonary obstruction score. A retrospective analysis of medical data of 182 consecutive patients with acute pulmonary embolism diagnosed with CT pulmonary angiography was performed. Severity of pulmonary obstruction was assessed by analysis of CT pulmonary angiography examinations, and defined with pulmonary obstruction score by Qanadli et al. The study group was divided into low (L group, 95 patients) and high PE severity (H group, 87 patients), with a cutoff value of 50% of maximum pulmonary obstruction score. Meteorological data collected for the relevant time period were: air temperature, humidity, atmospheric pressure, visibility, wind speed and precipitation. No significant differences in seasonal distribution of pulmonary embolism episodes were observed. Episodes of more severe pulmonary embolism were preceded by periods of lower atmospheric pressure (1,016.35 hPA for group H, vs. 1,016.35 hPa for group L, p = 0.022). No significant relations between other meteorological factors and severity of PE were observed. The reported finding shows the need of further research on the nature of meteorological factors influence on the course of pulmonary embolism, which should be analyzed not ony regarding the frequency, but also severity of PE episodes.

  10. Managing tension headaches at home

    MedlinePlus

    Tension-type headache - self-care; Muscle contraction headache - self-care; Headache - benign - self-care; Headache - tension- self-care; Chronic headaches - tension - self-care; Rebound headaches - ...

  11. Extracorporeal life support for adults with severe acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Del Sorbo, Lorenzo; Cypel, Marcelo; Fan, Eddy

    2014-02-01

    Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) is an artificial means of maintaining adequate oxygenation and carbon dioxide elimination to enable injured lungs to recover from underlying disease. Technological advances have made ECLS devices smaller, less invasive, and easier to use. ECLS might, therefore, represent an important step towards improved management and outcomes of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Nevertheless, rigorous evidence of the ability of ECLS to improve short-term and long-term outcomes is needed before it can be widely implemented. Moreover, how to select patients and the timing and indications for ECLS in severe acute respiratory distress syndrome remain unclear. We describe the physiological principles, the putative risks and benefits, and the clinical evidence supporting the use of ECLS in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Additionally, we discuss controversies and future directions, such as novel technologies and indications, mechanical ventilation of the native lung during ECLS, and ethics considerations. PMID:24503270

  12. High-altitude cerebral edema with absence of headache.

    PubMed

    Thomassen, Oyvind; Skaiaa, Sven Chr

    2007-01-01

    Headache is the cardinal symptom of acute mountain sickness (AMS). The headache normally worsens, with increased cerebral affection and the development of high-altitude cerebral edema (HACE). A Norwegian expedition aimed to climb Baruntse (7129 m) in Nepal in 2003. At 5400 m a 35-year-old man felt exhausted. The next day he aborted his attempt at further climbing as a result of extreme fatigue. Over the next 24 hours he developed cough, dyspnea, and severe hypoxia before progressing to ataxia and blurred vision. At no point did he experience headache or nausea. The patient was evacuated by helicopter. He improved immediately after descent and recovered completely within a week. The speed of progression from AMS to HACE varies. Abrupt onset of HACE is occasionally reported. High-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) may induce severe hypoxia that can lead to rapid development of HACE. High-altitude cerebral edema in the setting of HAPE was the most likely diagnosis despite the unusual lack of headache. Rapid onset of HAPE with subsequent severe desaturation should raise awareness of the development of HACE, even in the absence of headache. PMID:17447714

  13. Headaches after Concussion in Pediatrics: a Review.

    PubMed

    Blume, Heidi K

    2015-09-01

    Concussion and mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) are common pediatric injuries. Headaches are one of the most common and disabling complaints following concussion in the acute phase and are pervasive in those who have prolonged symptoms following concussion. The body of evidence regarding the epidemiology of and risk factors for pediatric concussion and post-traumatic headache is growing rapidly, but there still is a distinct lack of strong scientific evidence to support the best treatment strategies for post-traumatic headaches in either children or adults. In this article, we will review the current evidence regarding the epidemiology of acute and chronic headaches following concussion in the pediatric population, as well as current recommendations for the management of acute and chronic pediatric post-traumatic headaches.

  14. Early plasmapheresis in patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia induced acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Nasa, Prashant; Alexander, George; Kulkarni, Amitabh; Juneja, Deven; Sehra, Sudhish; Agarwal, Rajesh; Koul, Kandy

    2015-08-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia can cause severe diseases such as acute pancreatitis (AP) and coronary artery disease. The routine management of hypertriglyceridemia is dietary restriction of fat and lipid-lowering medications to manage the secondary or precipitating causes of hypertriglyceridemia. However, in cases of AP with severe hypertriglyceridemia (SHTG) (triglycerides [TG] >1000 mg/dl) rapid reduction of TG levels to well below 1000 mg/dl can improve outcome and prevent further episodes of pancreatitis. Plasmapheresis is a therapeutic option in such medical emergencies. We discussed 2 cases of severe AP with SHTG where we used early plsmapheresis along with other supportive management. PMID:26321811

  15. Neuroanatomical correlates of severe cardiac arrhythmias in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Frank; Kallmünzer, Bernd; Gutjahr, Isabell; Breuer, Lorenz; Winder, Klemens; Kaschka, Iris; Kloska, Stephan; Doerfler, Arnd; Hilz, Max-Josef; Schwab, Stefan; Köhrmann, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Neurocardiological interactions can cause severe cardiac arrhythmias in patients with acute ischemic stroke. The relationship between the lesion location in the brain and the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias is still discussed controversially. The aim of the present study was to correlate the lesion location with the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Cardiac arrhythmias were systematically assessed in patients with acute ischemic stroke during the first 72 h after admission to a monitored stroke unit. Voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping (VLSM) was used to correlate the lesion location with the occurrence of clinically relevant severe arrhythmias. Overall 150 patients, 56 with right-hemispheric and 94 patients with a left-hemispheric lesion, were eligible to be included in the VLSM study. Severe cardiac arrhythmias were present in 49 of these 150 patients (32.7%). We found a significant association (FDR correction, q < 0.05) between lesions in the right insular, right frontal and right parietal cortex as well as the right amygdala, basal ganglia and thalamus and the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias. Because left- and right-hemispheric lesions were analyzed separately, the significant findings rely on the 56 patients with right-hemispheric lesions. The data indicate that these areas are involved in central autonomic processing and that right-hemispheric lesions located to these areas are associated with an elevated risk for severe cardiac arrhythmias.

  16. Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome presenting as acute hepatic failure

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung Gil

    2015-01-01

    Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is characterized by fever, thrombocytopenia, leukopenia, and altered consciousness, which may also involve multi-organ failure. Initially SFTS mortality was as high as 30%, when diagnosis remained unclear. We present a case of a 53-year- old man with SFTS presenting with acute hepatic failure. On admission, he presented with confusion, elevated serum liver enzyme and ammonia levels, whose serum markers were negative for acute viral hepatitis. He was diagnosed with SFTS based on reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction identification of the SFTS virus M segment. Percutaneous liver biopsy was performed to identify the degree and extent of necroinflammation and patient prognosis. After recovery, he was followed-up for 12 months with no SFTS-related sequelae. A discordance in severity between biopsy findings and clinical course could explain the rapid clinical improvement. Atypical presentations with multi-organ failure can delay timely diagnosis and management of infected patients. PMID:27752587

  17. Severe acute respiratory syndrome and its lesions in digestive system

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian-Zhong

    2003-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is an infectious atypical pneumonia that has recently been recognized in the patients in 32 countries and regions. This brief review summarizes some of the initial etiologic findings, pathological description, and its lesions of digestive system caused by SARS virus. It is an attempt to draw gastroenterologists and hepatologists' attention to this fatal illness, especially when it manifests itself initially as digestive symptoms. PMID:12800212

  18. Control Measures for Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Twu, Shiing-Jer; Chen, Tzay-Jinn; Chen, Chien-Jen; Olsen, Sonja J.; Lee, Long-Teng; Fisk, Tamara; Hsu, Kwo-Hsiung; Chang, Shan-Chwen; Chen, Kow-Tong; Chiang, I-Hsin; Wu, Yi-Chun; Wu, Jiunn-Shyan

    2003-01-01

    As of April 14, 2003, Taiwan had had 23 probable cases of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), all imported. Taiwan isolated these first 23 patients with probable SARS in negative-pressure rooms; extensive personal protective equipment was used for healthcare workers and visitors. For the first 6 weeks of the SARS outbreak, recognized spread was limited to one healthcare worker and three household contacts. PMID:12781013

  19. Headaches (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... migraines. Migraines Often triggered by things like stress, sleep deprivation, and menstruation, migraine headaches can cause the following ... your child headache following a head injury or loss of consciousness headache accompanied by seizures visual changes ...

  20. Headache and facial pain in scuba divers.

    PubMed

    Cheshire, William P

    2004-08-01

    Headache occasionally occurs during or after scuba diving. Although its significance often is benign, headache may signal a serious neurological disorder in some circumstances. In addition to the usual causes of headache, the diagnostic evaluation should consider otic and paranasal sinus barotrauma, arterial gas embolism, decompression sickness, carbon dioxide retention, carbon monoxide toxicity, hyperbaric-triggered migraine, cervical and temporomandibular joint strain, supraorbital neuralgia, carotid artery dissection, and exertional and cold stimulus headache syndromes. Focal neurologic symptoms, even in the migraineur, should not be ignored, but rather treated with 100% oxygen acutely and referred without delay to a facility with a hyperbaric chamber.

  1. Update: Outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome--worldwide, 2003.

    PubMed

    2003-03-28

    CDC continues to support the World Health Organization (WHO) in the investigation of a multicountry outbreak of unexplained atypical pneumonia referred to as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). This report includes summaries of the epidemiologic investigations and public health responses in several affected locations where CDC is collaborating with international and national health authorities. This report also describes an unusual cluster of cases associated with a hotel in Hong Kong and identifies the potential etiologic agent of SARS. Epidemiologic and laboratory investigations of SAPS are ongoing. PMID:12680518

  2. Severe Raynaud's phenomenon-A streamlined approach to acute management.

    PubMed

    Lee, Regent; Lomas, Oliver; Handa, Ashok

    2011-01-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon is an exaggerated vasospastic response to cold or emotional stress which not only may cause the patient severe pain but also critical ischaemia and necrosis of the digits. We report the case of a 69-year-old woman who presented with rest pain, impending ulceration and necrosis of finger tips due to an episode of left-sided Raynaud's phenomenon. Intravenous prostacyclin was administered successfully as a bridge to endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy. Vascular surgery units are ideally positioned for the acute management of severe Raynaud's phenomenon to provide continuity of care to patients with profound digital ischaemia and impending tissue loss.

  3. Severe acute pancreatitis: Pathogenetic aspects and prognostic factors

    PubMed Central

    Mofleh, Ibrahim A Al

    2008-01-01

    Approximately 20% of patients with acute pancreatitis develop a severe disease associated with complications and high risk of mortality. The purpose of this study is to review pathogenesis and prognostic factors of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). An extensive medline search was undertaken with focusing on pathogenesis, complications and prognostic evaluation of SAP. Cytokines and other inflammatory markers play a major role in the pathogenesis and course of SAP and can be used as prognostic markers in its early phase. Other markers such as simple prognostic scores have been found to be as effective as multifactorial scoring systems (MFSS) at 48 h with the advantage of simplicity, efficacy, low cost, accuracy and early prediction of SAP. Recently, several laboratory markers including hematocrit, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and serum amyloid A (SAA) have been used as early predictors of severity within the first 24 h. The last few years have witnessed a tremendous progress in understanding the pathogenesis and predicting the outcome of SAP. In this review we classified the prognostic markers into predictors of severity, pancreatic necrosis (PN), infected PN (IPN) and mortality. PMID:18205255

  4. MANAGEMENT OF ACUTE SEVERE ULCERATIVE COLITIS: A CLINICAL UPDATE

    PubMed Central

    SOBRADO, Carlos Walter; SOBRADO, Lucas Faraco

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Acute severe colitis is a potentially lethal medical emergency and, even today, its treatment remains a challenge for clinicians and surgeons. Intravenous corticoid therapy, which was introduced into the therapeutic arsenal in the 1950s, continues to be the first-line treatment and, for patients who are refractory to this, the rescue therapy may consist of clinical measures or emergency colectomy. Objective: To evaluate the indications for and results from drug rescue therapy (cyclosporine, infliximab and tacrolimus), and to suggest a practical guide for clinical approaches. Methods: The literature was reviewed using the Medline/PubMed, Cochrane library and SciELO databases, and additional information from institutional websites of interest, by cross-correlating the following keywords: acute severe colitis, fulminating colitis and treatment. Results: Treatments for acute severe colitis have avoided colectomy in 60-70% of the cases, provided that they have been started early on, with multidisciplinary follow-up. Despite the adverse effects of intravenous cyclosporine, this drug has been indicated in cases of greater severity with an imminent risk of colectomy, because of its fast action, short half-life and absence of increased risk of surgical complications. Therapy using infliximab has been reserved for less severe cases and those in which immunosuppressants are being or have been used (AZA/6-MP). Indication of biological agents has recently been favored because of their ease of therapeutic use, their good short and medium-term results, the possibility of maintenance therapy and also their action as a "bridge" for immunosuppressant action (AZA/6-MP). Colectomy has been reserved for cases in which there is still no response five to seven days after rescue therapy and in cases of complications (toxic megacolon, profuse hemorrhage and perforation). Conclusion: Patients with a good response to rescue therapy who do not undergo emergency

  5. Acute, Severe Cryptosporidiosis in an Immunocompetent Pediatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Tallant, Caitlin; Huddleston, Patrick; Alshanberi, Asim

    2016-01-01

    Severe diarrheal illness in children can be attributed to a number of different microbiological agents. Without appropriate microbiological testing of stool samples, patients who present with multiple days of severe diarrhea might have a delay in proper diagnosis and treatment. Here, we report a case of an immunocompetent pediatric patient presenting with acute cryptosporidiosis. Humans and bovine species are known hosts of cryptosporidium and several studies have evaluated the zoonotic transmission of cryptosporidium from cattle to humans. Adding diagnostic tests for cryptosporidium like Ziehl-Neelsen staining of stool or fecal rapid antigen detection techniques should be considered in the workup of patients presenting with undifferentiated, severe diarrheal illness, especially in those who have close contact with livestock. PMID:27478580

  6. Severe hypophosphataemia during recovery from acute respiratory acidosis.

    PubMed

    Storm, T L

    1984-08-25

    Three elderly patients with established chronic obstructive airways disease were admitted with a short history of increasing dyspnoea and tiredness and (in two cases) a deterioration in mental state. Acute respiratory acidosis was diagnosed and mechanical ventilation instituted. Two hours after beginning mechanical ventilation the mean arterial pH had risen to 7.40, but all patients showed a dramatic fall in the serum phosphate concentration (lowest value 0.3 mmol/l (0.9 mg/100 ml] accompanied by a low urinary excretion of phosphate. No patient could tolerate withdrawal of mechanical ventilation until the serum and urinary concentrations of phosphate had returned to normal. Recovery from acute respiratory acidosis should be added to the list of conditions associated with severe hypophosphataemia.

  7. Evidence-based treatments for cluster headache

    PubMed Central

    Gooriah, Rubesh; Buture, Alina; Ahmed, Fayyaz

    2015-01-01

    Cluster headache (CH), one of the most painful syndromes known to man, is managed with acute and preventive medications. The brief duration and severity of the attacks command the use of rapid-acting pain relievers. Inhalation of oxygen and subcutaneous sumatriptan are the two most effective acute therapeutic options for sufferers of CH. Several preventive medications are available, the most effective of which is verapamil. However, most of these agents are not backed by strong clinical evidence. In some patients, these options can be ineffective, especially in those who develop chronic CH. Surgical procedures for the chronic refractory form of the disorder should then be contemplated, the most promising of which is hypothalamic deep brain stimulation. We hereby review the pathogenesis of CH and the evidence behind the treatment options for this debilitating condition. PMID:26635477

  8. Acute fatty liver of pregnancy associated with severe acute pancreatitis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Cássio Vieira; Moreira, Alecsandro; Baima, Julio P; Franzoni, Leticia de C; Lima, Talles B; Yamashiro, Fabio da S; Coelho, Kunie Yabuki Rabelo; Sassaki, Ligia Y; Caramori, Carlos Antonio; Romeiro, Fernando G; Silva, Giovanni F

    2014-01-01

    Acute fatty liver of pregnancy is a rare disease that affects women in the third trimester of pregnancy. Although infrequent, the disease can cause maternal mortality. The diagnosis is not always clear until the pregnancy is terminated, and significant complications, such as acute pancreatitis, can occur. Pancreatic involvement typically only occurs in severe cases after the development of hepatic and renal impairment. To date, little knowledge is available regarding how the disease causes pancreatitis. Treatment involves supportive measures and pregnancy interruption. In this report, we describe a case of a previously healthy 26-year-old woman at a gestational age of 27 wk and 6 d who was admitted with severe abdominal pain and vomiting. This case illustrates the clinical and laboratory overlap between acute fatty liver of pregnancy and pancreatitis, highlighting the difficulties in differentiating each disease. Furthermore, the hypothesis for this overlapping is presented, and the therapeutic options are discussed. PMID:25068005

  9. Acute fatty liver of pregnancy associated with severe acute pancreatitis: A case report.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Cássio Vieira; Moreira, Alecsandro; Baima, Julio P; Franzoni, Leticia de C; Lima, Talles B; Yamashiro, Fabio da S; Coelho, Kunie Yabuki Rabelo; Sassaki, Ligia Y; Caramori, Carlos Antonio; Romeiro, Fernando G; Silva, Giovanni F

    2014-07-27

    Acute fatty liver of pregnancy is a rare disease that affects women in the third trimester of pregnancy. Although infrequent, the disease can cause maternal mortality. The diagnosis is not always clear until the pregnancy is terminated, and significant complications, such as acute pancreatitis, can occur. Pancreatic involvement typically only occurs in severe cases after the development of hepatic and renal impairment. To date, little knowledge is available regarding how the disease causes pancreatitis. Treatment involves supportive measures and pregnancy interruption. In this report, we describe a case of a previously healthy 26-year-old woman at a gestational age of 27 wk and 6 d who was admitted with severe abdominal pain and vomiting. This case illustrates the clinical and laboratory overlap between acute fatty liver of pregnancy and pancreatitis, highlighting the difficulties in differentiating each disease. Furthermore, the hypothesis for this overlapping is presented, and the therapeutic options are discussed. PMID:25068005

  10. Primary Headache Disorders: Focus on Migraine

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Migraine is the most common disabling headache disorder. Most patients with disabling tension-type headache are likely to have migraine and accordingly respond to treatments efficacious in migraine. Individuals are genetically predisposed to experiencing recurrent migraine. Evidence supports migraine to be a primarily neural and not vascular mediated disorder. 1–2% of the population have chronic daily headache associated with acute-relief medication overuse; the majority are migraineurs. The presence of acute-relief medication overuse renders preventative medication less adequately efficacious. PMID:26525886

  11. [Protocol for the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis with necrosis].

    PubMed

    Barreda, Luis; Targarona, Javier; Rodriguez, César

    2005-01-01

    The Severe Acute Pancreatic Unit of Edgardo Rebagliati Martins National Hospital was officially created in the year 2000. Up to date, we have cared for more than 195 patients with Pancreatic Necrosis. All of them have been treated under a management protocol presented by us. This has helped us to standardize treatment and also to compare results with work groups around the world. This Protocol comes from our own experience and that of our colleagues abroad with a wide knowledge in this kind of pathology abroad, with whom we maintain close ties.

  12. Non-invasive vagus nerve stimulation for PREVention and Acute treatment of chronic cluster headache (PREVA): A randomised controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Diener, Hans-Christoph; Silver, Nicholas; Magis, Delphine; Reuter, Uwe; Andersson, Annelie; Liebler, Eric J; Straube, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic cluster headache (CH) is a debilitating disorder for which few well-controlled studies demonstrate effectiveness of available therapies. Non-invasive vagus nerve stimulation (nVNS) was examined as adjunctive prophylactic treatment of chronic CH. Methods PREVA was a prospective, open-label, randomised study that compared adjunctive prophylactic nVNS (n = 48) with standard of care (SoC) alone (control (n = 49)). A two-week baseline phase was followed by a four-week randomised phase (SoC plus nVNS vs control) and a four-week extension phase (SoC plus nVNS). The primary end point was the reduction in the mean number of CH attacks per week. Response rate, abortive medication use and safety/tolerability were also assessed. Results During the randomised phase, individuals in the intent-to-treat population treated with SoC plus nVNS (n = 45) had a significantly greater reduction in the number of attacks per week vs controls (n = 48) (−5.9 vs −2.1, respectively) for a mean therapeutic gain of 3.9 fewer attacks per week (95% CI: 0.5, 7.2; p = 0.02). Higher ≥50% response rates were also observed with SoC plus nVNS (40% (18/45)) vs controls (8.3% (4/48); p < 0.001). No serious treatment-related adverse events occurred. Conclusion Adjunctive prophylactic nVNS is a well-tolerated novel treatment for chronic CH, offering clinical benefits beyond those with SoC. PMID:26391457

  13. [Cluster headache differential diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Guégan-Massardier, Evelyne; Laubier, Cécile

    2015-11-01

    Cluster headache is characterized by disabling stereotyped headache. Early diagnosis allows appropriate treatment, unfortunately diagnostic errors are frequent. The main differential diagnoses are other primary or essential headaches. Migraine, more frequent and whose diagnosis is carried by excess, trigeminal neuralgia or other trigemino-autonomic cephalgia. Vascular or tumoral underlying condition can mimic cluster headache, neck and brain imaging is recommended, ideally MRI.

  14. The pipeline in headache therapy.

    PubMed

    Vollbracht, Sarah; Rapoport, Alan M

    2013-09-01

    Migraine is a common, disabling, neurovascular disorder characterized by episodic attacks of head pain and associated disability plus systemic autonomic and neurologic symptoms. The advent of the triptan class of medication in the 1990s revolutionized the acute treatment of migraine, but many migraineurs do not respond optimally or at all to triptans, have intolerable adverse effects, or have contraindications to their use. Preventive pharmacotherapy has advanced mostly through serendipity, with new drugs being found effective while being used for other indications. There remains a significant need for new medications and devices that can provide effective, rapid, and sustained pain relief without adverse effects or recurrence. Several new acute and preventive therapies for the treatment of migraine and cluster headaches have shown promise and are currently under investigation. This article covers innovative delivery mechanisms, calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor antagonists, antibodies to calcitonin gene-related peptide and its receptor, 5-HT1F receptor agonists, transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor modulators, orexin receptor antagonists, glial cell modulators, and neurostimulation. PMID:23839594

  15. Modular headache theory.

    PubMed

    Young, W B; Peres, M F; Rozen, T D

    2001-10-01

    Many people experience headaches that do not fulfil the International Headache Society's criteria for a specific headache disorder yet behave biologically like that disorder. Others fulfil criteria for one headache disorder and yet have features of another disorder. To explain these observations, we propose that groups of neurones called modules become activated to produce each symptom of a primary headache disorder, and that each module is linked to other modules that together produce an individual's headache. This theory has implications for the classification, research and treatment of primary and secondary headache patients.

  16. Hemodialysis-related headache.

    PubMed

    Sav, Murat Yusuf; Sav, Tansu; Senocak, Elif; Sav, Nadide Melike

    2014-10-01

    Headache is one of the most frequently encountered neurological symptoms during hemodialysis. According to International Classification of Headache criteria dialysis-related headache was defined as the headache occurring during hemodialysis with no specific characteristic. It resolves spontaneously within 72 hours after the hemodialysis session ends. There are few studies in the literature investigating the clinical features of dialysis headache. The pathophysiology of hemodialysis-related headache is not known, but various triggering factors have been identified, including changes in blood pressure, serum sodium and magnesium levels during hemodialysis sessions, caffeine deprivation and stress. The aim of this article is to evaluate and analyze features of headache in patients undergoing hemodialysis.

  17. NIV-Helmet in Severe Hypoxemic Acute Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Joana; Nunes, P.; Silvestre, C.; Abadesso, C.; Loureiro, H.; Almeida, H.

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) is a method to be applied in acute respiratory failure, given the possibility of avoiding tracheal intubation and conventional ventilation. A previous healthy 5-month-old boy developed low-grade intermittent fever, flu-like symptoms, and dry cough for 3 days. On admission, he showed severe respiratory distress with SpO2/FiO2 ratio of 94. Subsequent evaluation identified an RSV infection complicated with an increase of inflammatory parameters (reactive C protein 15 mg/dL). Within the first hour after NIV-helmet CPAP SpO2/FiO2 ratio increased to 157. This sustained improvement allowed the continuing of this strategy. After 102 h, he was disconnected from the helmet CPAP device. The NIV use in severe hypoxemic acute respiratory failure should be carefully monitored as the absence of clinical improvement has a predictive value in the need to resume to intubation and mechanical ventilation. We emphasize that SpO2/FiO2 ratio is a valuable monitoring instrument. Helmet interface use represents a more comfortable alternative for providing ventilatory support, particularly to small infants, which constitute a sensitive group within pediatric patients. PMID:26000189

  18. Management of migraine headache in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Carrie E; Black, David F; Swanson, Jerry W

    2010-04-01

    Headache is one of the more common reasons for adults to visit an emergency department. Most of these visits are for primary headache disorders, most commonly migraine headache. The authors discuss management options for patients presenting to the emergency department with prolonged, severe, or refractory migraine headaches. Particular attention is given to parenteral treatments and protocols that would not be options as an outpatient. The epidemiology, investigation, and outpatient management of migraine headache are discussed in other articles in this issue. PMID:20352590

  19. Primary headache disorders.

    PubMed

    Benoliel, Rafael; Eliav, Eli

    2013-07-01

    Primary headache disorders include migraine, tension-type headaches, and the trigeminal autonomic cephalgias (TACs). "Primary" refers to a lack of clear underlying causative pathology, trauma, or systemic disease. The TACs include cluster headache, paroxysmal hemicrania, and short-lasting neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing; hemicrania continua, although classified separately by the International Headache Society, shares many features of both migraine and the TACs. This article describes the features and treatment of these disorders.

  20. Clinical characteristics and the diagnosis and treatment status of headaches in the Department of Gerontology of a university hospital in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Li, Wang-Wen; Duan, Jing-Xi; Deng, Yong-Tao; Pan, Lin; Zhou, Ji-Ying

    2014-10-01

    Headache is a common problem among the population, many factors may impact the headache characteristics and medical consultation behaviors in different age groups. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics and the diagnosis and treatment status of headaches in elderly patients hospitalized in a gerontologic department. Consecutive patients hospitalized in the Department of Gerontology eligible for this study were registered. All the patients underwent a comprehensive evaluation of their whole health status, performed by three gerontologists initially. Then headache was evaluated by two physicians experienced in headache studies. Headache diagnosis was made according to the criteria of the second edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders. In this study, 20% of the participants reported at least one headache attack in the previous year. Sixty percent of the migraineurs and 79·7% of the tension type headache (TTH) patients reported bilateral pain. Throbbing/pulsating and tightness/pressing were the most frequently described pain quality by the migraineurs and TTH patients, respectively. The migraineurs reported the most severe pain (P < 0·001). The frequency of headache attacks was not significantly different in the three subgroups (P  =  0·053). About 76·2% of the migraineurs, 68·8% of the TTH, and 80% of the other type headache patients had consulted a physician for their headaches in the previous year. Taking acute analgesics for headache was more common in migraineurs (P < 0·001). The results showed that headache remained under-recognized and under-treated in the geriatrics department.

  1. Tension Type Headache.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, Marina; Fernández-de-Las-Penas, César

    2016-01-01

    Tension type headache (TTH) is the most common headache and it has been discussed for years without reaching consensus on its pathophysiology, or proper rationale management. This primary headache remains a challenge into its management for clinicians. This review aims to provide an updated and critical discussion on what is currently known and supported by scientific evidence about TTH and which gaps there still may be in our understanding of this condition. Clinical features of TTH resemble common manifestations of muscle referred pain. Episodic TTH may evolve into the chronic form by different aspects and several triggers may be involved at the same time. Both peripheral and central sensitization mechanisms seem to be clearly involved in this process. Individuals with episodic TTH exhibit higher levels of peripheral excitability whereas chronic TTH clearly show central sensitization manifestations. The role of associated muscle hyperalgesia seems to be important factors in TTH. Therapeutic management of individuals with TTH should be multimodal including appropriate use of pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions to reduce the nociceptive peripheral drive to the central nervous system. If properly applied, treatment may not only reduce the number of TTH attacks but may also prevent or delay the transition from episodic to chronic TTH. Scientific evidence of pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment is discussed in this review. PMID:26717946

  2. Mechanisms of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gralinski, Lisa E.; Bankhead, Armand; Jeng, Sophia; Menachery, Vineet D.; Proll, Sean; Belisle, Sarah E.; Matzke, Melissa; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Luna, Maria L.; Shukla, Anil K.; Ferris, Martin T.; Bolles, Meagan; Chang, Jean; Aicher, Lauri; Waters, Katrina M.; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.; Law, G. Lynn; Katze, Michael G.; McWeeney, Shannon; Baric, Ralph S.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Systems biology offers considerable promise in uncovering novel pathways by which viruses and other microbial pathogens interact with host signaling and expression networks to mediate disease severity. In this study, we have developed an unbiased modeling approach to identify new pathways and network connections mediating acute lung injury, using severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) as a model pathogen. We utilized a time course of matched virologic, pathological, and transcriptomic data within a novel methodological framework that can detect pathway enrichment among key highly connected network genes. This unbiased approach produced a high-priority list of 4 genes in one pathway out of over 3,500 genes that were differentially expressed following SARS-CoV infection. With these data, we predicted that the urokinase and other wound repair pathways would regulate lethal versus sublethal disease following SARS-CoV infection in mice. We validated the importance of the urokinase pathway for SARS-CoV disease severity using genetically defined knockout mice, proteomic correlates of pathway activation, and pathological disease severity. The results of these studies demonstrate that a fine balance exists between host coagulation and fibrinolysin pathways regulating pathological disease outcomes, including diffuse alveolar damage and acute lung injury, following infection with highly pathogenic respiratory viruses, such as SARS-CoV. PMID:23919993

  3. Severe acute otitis media caused by mucoid Streptococcus pyogenes in a previously healthy adult.

    PubMed

    Kakuta, Risako; Yano, Hisakazu; Hidaka, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Hiromitsu; Irimada, Mihoko; Oda, Kiyoshi; Arai, Kazuaki; Ozawa, Daiki; Takahashi, Takashi; Kaku, Mitsuo; Katori, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus (S.) pyogenes is well recognized as the most common pathogen causing pharyngotonsillitis in school-age children. In Japan, mucoid Streptococcus pneumoniae is well known as a causative agent of severe acute otitis media (AOM); however, mucoid S. pyogenes has rarely been reported. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an AOM patient caused by mucoid S. pyogenes in Japan. A 36-year-old previously healthy female was referred to our hospital with suspicion of cerebrospinal otorrhea due to increasing otalgia accompanied by headache following myringotomy. Bacterial cultures of middle ear secretions were performed, and mucoid-form colonies surrounded by zones of complete β-hemolysis were produced on sheep's blood agar. Antigen-agglutination test results were positive for S. pyogenes, and thus the patient received treatment with panipenem-betamipron 2.0 g/day for 10 days, which resolved nearly all symptoms. The bacteriological features of this strain were then investigated. The M-protein genotype encoded by the emm gene, the major virulence factor of S. pyogenes, was determined to be emm75. Generally, S. pyogenes forms colonies having non-mucoid matt appearances based on β-hemolysis of sheep's blood agar. The mucoid phenotype results from abundant production of hyaluronic acid capsular polysaccharide, a key virulence determinant. emm75 is common in noninvasive, but less common in invasive disease. In conclusion, mucoid S. pyogenes can cause severe infection even in previously healthy persons. Emergence of mucoid S. pyogenes and drug resistance trends should be monitored in the future. PMID:24727832

  4. The Role of Peritoneal Lavage in Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Ranson, John H. C.; Spencer, Frank C.

    1978-01-01

    Encouraged by reports of the therapeutic efficacy of peritoneal lavage in small series of five or six patients with acute pancreatitis, we have evaluated this treatment in 24 patients with “severe” pancreatitis. One hundred and three patients with “severe” pancreatitis (28% mortality) were separated from 347 with “mild” pancreatitis (0.9% mortality) by previously described early objective signs. Early treatment (Day 0-7) of “severe” pancreatitis included peritoneal lavage through catheters placed nonoperatively in 18 (Group A) and by catheters placed at laparotomy in six (Group C). Early treatment of nonlavaged patients with “severe” pancreatitis was by standard nonoperative measures in 61 (Group B) and included early operation in 18 (Group D). Lavage was continued for 48-96 hours, usually using 36-48 L/24 hours of balanced isotonic dialysate fluid, and was uncomplicated. Lavage led to striking immediate clinical improvement and no lavaged patient (Groups A and C) died during the first 10 days of treatment of pancreatitis. By contrast, 45% of deaths in nonlavaged patients (Group B and D) occurred during this early period, usually from cardiovascular or respiratory failure. Although lavage reduced mortality in subgroups of patients, ultimate overall survival was no affected (Group A, 83%; B, 84%; C, 33%; D,33%). Late peripancreatic abscesses caused most deaths in lavaged patients. These data show that peritoneal complications of severe acute pancreatitis and dramatically reduces early mortality. Lavage does not prevent the late local sequelae of peripancreatic necrosis. PMID:646497

  5. An indolent case of severe acute respiratory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lam, Man-Fai; Ooi, Gaik C; Lam, Bing; Ho, James C; Seto, Wing H; Ho, Pak L; Wong, Poon C; Liang, Raymond; Lam, Wah K; Tsang, Kenneth W

    2004-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a highly contagious and typically rapidly progressive form of atypical pneumonia, which spread from Asia to many parts of the world in early 2003. Clinical diagnosis of SARS requires the presence of unremitting fever and progressive pneumonia despite antibiotic therapy, particularly in the presence of lymphopenia and raised transaminase levels. We report the case of a woman who had undergone a successful allogeneic bone marrow transplant for acute myeloid leukemia. She presented initially with fever and a normal chest radiograph. Her indolent clinical course of SARS was punctuated by resolution of fever, but there was progressive radiologic deterioration and increasing serum antibody titer against SARS coronavirus. Treatment with oral prednisolone and ribavirin normalized her lymphopenia, altered transaminases, chest radiograph and high-resolution computed tomography appearances rapidly. Our experience should alert other clinicians in recognizing this atypical indolent presentation of SARS, to protect health care workers and the community at large and to ensure that these patients are properly treated.

  6. Severe acute respiratory syndrome diagnostics using a coronavirus protein microarray.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Heng; Hu, Shaohui; Jona, Ghil; Zhu, Xiaowei; Kreiswirth, Nate; Willey, Barbara M; Mazzulli, Tony; Liu, Guozhen; Song, Qifeng; Chen, Peng; Cameron, Mark; Tyler, Andrea; Wang, Jian; Wen, Jie; Chen, Weijun; Compton, Susan; Snyder, Michael

    2006-03-14

    To monitor severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) infection, a coronavirus protein microarray that harbors proteins from SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and five additional coronaviruses was constructed. These microarrays were used to screen approximately 400 Canadian sera from the SARS outbreak, including samples from confirmed SARS-CoV cases, respiratory illness patients, and healthcare professionals. A computer algorithm that uses multiple classifiers to predict samples from SARS patients was developed and used to predict 206 sera from Chinese fever patients. The test assigned patients into two distinct groups: those with antibodies to SARS-CoV and those without. The microarray also identified patients with sera reactive against other coronavirus proteins. Our results correlated well with an indirect immunofluorescence test and demonstrated that viral infection can be monitored for many months after infection. We show that protein microarrays can serve as a rapid, sensitive, and simple tool for large-scale identification of viral-specific antibodies in sera.

  7. Infants born to mothers with severe acute respiratory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shek, Chi C; Ng, Pak C; Fung, Genevieve P G; Cheng, Frankie W T; Chan, Paul K S; Peiris, Malik J S; Lee, Kim H; Wong, Shell F; Cheung, Hon M; Li, Albert M; Hon, Ellis K L; Yeung, Chung K; Chow, Chun B; Tam, John S; Chiu, Man C; Fok, Tai F

    2003-10-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a newly discovered infectious disease caused by a novel coronavirus. During the community outbreak in Hong Kong, 5 liveborn infants were born to pregnant women with SARS. A systematic search for perinatal transmission of the SARS-associated coronavirus, including serial reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assays, viral cultures, and paired serologic titers, failed to detect the virus in any of the infants. In addition, none of the infants developed clinical, radiologic, hematologic, or biochemical evidence suggestive of SARS. One preterm infant developed jejunal perforation and another developed necrotizing enterocolitis with ileal perforation shortly after birth. This case series is the first report to describe the clinical course of the first cohort of liveborn infants born to pregnant women with SARS. PMID:14523207

  8. Severe acute kidney injury as presentation of Burkitt's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    ter Haar, Eva; Labarque, Veerle; Tousseyn, Thomas; Mekahli, Djalila

    2016-01-01

    We discuss a case of acute kidney injury (AKI) at a very young age caused by primary lymphomatous renal infiltration due to Burkitt's lymphoma and analyse the literature on this rare condition. At presentation, clinical examination showed impressive bilateral nephromegaly and hypertension. Blood analysis indicated severe AKI, mild anaemia and normal serum electrolytes. There were no signs of tumour lysis syndrome. Urine sediment was normal, with neither haematuria nor proteinuria. Abdominal ultrasound demonstrated bilateral renal enlargement (+12 SD), with increased corticomedullar differentiation. MRI demonstrated the presence of a homogenous renal enlargement with features of an infiltrative lesion. Ultimately, microscopic and immunohistochemical analysis of the renal biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of Burkitt's lymphoma. Early and aggressive therapy is the key to ensure a good outcome. PMID:27118748

  9. Headaches and hormones.

    PubMed

    Pakalnis, Ann; Gladstein, Jack

    2010-06-01

    It is clear that hormones play an important role in modulating and exacerbating headaches. From an epidemiologic standpoint, we know that before puberty, incidence of new headache is similar for boys and girls. By age 18, however, most new cases of migraine occur in young women. The role of sex hormones in headache is described in the context of pubertal development. Obesity and Pseudotumor also impact headache through hormonal influences. Menstrual migraine will often present in the teenage years. Oral contraceptives may worsen or ameliorate headache. This article will introduce these concepts and help the reader become familiar with the role of hormones in headache.

  10. Headache care in China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shengyuan; Zhang, Mingjie; Zhou, Jiying; Liu, Ruozhuo; Wan, Qi; Li, Yansheng

    2014-04-01

    Headache disorders are problematic worldwide. China is no different. A population-based door-to-door survey revealed that the 1-year prevalence of primary headache disorders in China was 23.8%, constituting a major societal burden. Many headache centers and clinics have been established in China, and headache disorders (and associated stress) are receiving an increased level of expert attention. This review summarizes the outcomes of the epidemiological survey and the progress of clinical and basic research in China, describes the present situation in terms of headache diagnosis and treatment, and discusses the future of headache care in China.

  11. Neural Plasticity in Common Forms of Chronic Headaches

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Tzu-Hsien; Protsenko, Ekaterina; Cheng, Yu-Chen; Loggia, Marco L.; Coppola, Gianluca; Chen, Wei-Ta

    2015-01-01

    Headaches are universal experiences and among the most common disorders. While headache may be physiological in the acute setting, it can become a pathological and persistent condition. The mechanisms underlying the transition from episodic to chronic pain have been the subject of intense study. Using physiological and imaging methods, researchers have identified a number of different forms of neural plasticity associated with migraine and other headaches, including peripheral and central sensitization, and alterations in the endogenous mechanisms of pain modulation. While these changes have been proposed to contribute to headache and pain chronification, some findings are likely the results of repetitive noxious stimulation, such as atrophy of brain areas involved in pain perception and modulation. In this review, we provide a narrative overview of recent advances on the neuroimaging, electrophysiological and genetic aspects of neural plasticity associated with the most common forms of chronic headaches, including migraine, cluster headache, tension-type headache, and medication overuse headache. PMID:26366304

  12. [Headache and sleep disorders].

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Masayuki; Suzuki, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Hirata, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Headache and sleep problems are both some of the most commonly reported symptoms in clinical practice. There is a clear association between chronic headache and sleep disorders, especially headaches occurring during the night or early morning. Identification of sleep problems in chronic headache patients is worthwhile because treatment of sleep disorders among chronic headache patients may be followed by improve of the headache. Morning headache has been recognised as an obstructive sleep apnoea related symptom. Treatment with continuous positive airway pressure usually reduced headache, however, we often encounter obstructive sleep apnoea patients who present various characteristics of morning headache that often do not fulfil the criteria for "sleep apnoea headache" according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders: 2nd edition (ICHD-2) criteria. The pathophysiologic background for a relation between obstructive sleep apnoea and morning headache is multifactorial. We should also be noted that tension-type headache and migraine might be coexisted in obstructive sleep apnoea patients. In addition, we review the relationship between migraine and sleep disorders such as restless legs syndrome, narcolepsy and parasomnia (dream enacting behaviour) including our studies. PMID:25672689

  13. [Principles of acute management of the severe diving accident].

    PubMed

    Lampl, L; Frey, G; Dietze, T; Bock, K H

    1989-10-01

    The basics of the acute management of severe diving accidents are outlined by means of 25 patients (20 patients presented with decompression sickness, 5 suffered from a barotrauma of the lungs with consecutive air embolism) treated at our facilities. Contrary to widespread notion, disturbed vital functions have to be treated by intensive care measures, prior to the definite recompression therapy. These are: (1) Treatment of generalized or localized tissue hypoxia secondary to bubble-generation; (2) puncture of a (valvular-) pneumothorax after a pulmonary barotrauma; (3) haemodynamic stabilization when cardiac or spinal shock is present; (4) improvement of the rheological situation. When vital functions are unstable or endangered, these patients must not be transported in a monoplace chamber. This type of chamber does not leave any access to the patient in case of a deteriorating status. Since the severe diving accident mostly turns out to be a problem of intensive care medicine in close combination with the recompression therapy, the continuous integration of the recompression protocol with a comprehensive intensive care therapy is considered crucial. PMID:2817326

  14. Headaches - danger signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... KB. Headaches and other head pain. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 398. Garza I, Schwedt TJ, Robertson CE, Smith JH. Headache and other craniofacial pain. In: Daroff ...

  15. Chewing gum headaches.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, H J; Vance, D A

    1997-01-01

    Aspartame, a popular dietetic sweetener, may provoke headache in some susceptible individuals. Herein, we describe three cases of young women with migraine who reported their headaches could be provoked by chewing sugarless gum containing aspartame.

  16. Headache Sufferers' Diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... of sensitivities (for example, people who find red wine to be a headache trigger often find chocolate ... headaches from alcohol . Others react mostly to red wine (especially Chianti), which is a sensitivity to chemicals, ...

  17. Headache management: pharmacological approaches

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Alex J; Sturrock, Aaron; Davies, Brendan; Matharu, Manjit

    2015-01-01

    Headache is one of the most common conditions presenting to the neurology clinic, yet a significant proportion of these patients are unsatisfied by their clinic experience. Headache can be extremely disabling; effective treatment is not only essential for patients but is rewarding for the physician. In this first of two parts review of headache, we provide an overview of headache management, emerging therapeutic strategies and an accessible interpretation of clinical guidelines to assist the busy neurologist. PMID:26141299

  18. Methacholine induced headache.

    PubMed Central

    Carratala, C.; Gea, J. G.; Aguar, M. C.; Grau, S.; Espadaler-Medina, J. M.; Broquetas, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    A lung function technician developed episodes of headache, probably related to the use of methacholine. The headache disappeared with breathing 100% oxygen. Cholinergic agents are known to induce headaches but the mechanism remains unclear. Vascular factors could be implicated. PMID:7660351

  19. Methacholine induced headache.

    PubMed

    Carratala, C; Gea, J G; Aguar, M C; Grau, S; Espadaler-Medina, J M; Broquetas, J M

    1995-03-01

    A lung function technician developed episodes of headache, probably related to the use of methacholine. The headache disappeared with breathing 100% oxygen. Cholinergic agents are known to induce headaches but the mechanism remains unclear. Vascular factors could be implicated. PMID:7660351

  20. Severe Acute Axonal Neuropathy following Treatment with Arsenic Trioxide for Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kühn, Marcus; Sammartin, Kety; Nabergoj, Mitja; Vianello, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of arsenic toxicity. Symptoms are usually mild and reversible following discontinuation of treatment. A more severe chronic sensorimotor polyneuropathy characterized by distal axonal-loss neuropathy can be seen in chronic arsenic exposure. The clinical course of arsenic neurotoxicity in patients with coexistence of thiamine deficiency is only anecdotally known but this association may potentially lead to severe consequences. We describe a case of acute irreversible axonal neuropathy in a patient with hidden thiamine deficiency who was treated with a short course of arsenic trioxide for acute promyelocytic leukemia. Thiamine replacement therapy and arsenic trioxide discontinuation were not followed by neurological recovery and severe polyneuropathy persisted at 12-month follow-up. Thiamine plasma levels should be measured in patients who are candidate to arsenic trioxide therapy. Prophylactic administration of vitamin B1 may be advisable. The appearance of polyneuropathy signs early during the administration of arsenic trioxide should prompt electrodiagnostic testing to rule out a pattern of axonal neuropathy which would need immediate discontinuation of arsenic trioxide. PMID:27158436

  1. Post-Traumatic Headache Therapy in the Athlete.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Tad

    2016-06-01

    Post-traumatic headache can occur after any traumatic brain injury, regardless of severity. Headache is consistently the most common symptom following concussion and occurs in over 90% of athletes with sports-related concussion. Despite this prevalence, the complaint of headache after a possible concussive injury is often dismissed. Even when sports-related concussion is accurately diagnosed, many athletes fall victim to mismanagement of this associated symptom by clinicians who are not well-versed in headache treatment. Furthermore, benign headaches may also occur incidentally in the context of head trauma. This complex, and often non-specific, nature of headaches provides a significant challenge in return to play decision-making. Post-traumatic headaches are generally categorized according to primary headache disorders in an attempt to guide treatment; however, there is minimal medical literature on headache management in the concussed athlete. There is clearly a continued need for prospective studies of existing treatments and new approaches. PMID:27184059

  2. [Lactic acidosis in a child with acute severe asthma].

    PubMed

    Perrin, C; Savy, N; Lang, M; Caron, N; Labbé, A

    2014-10-01

    Lactic acidosis is a recognized event in adult patients with acute severe asthma (ASA). Only a few cases have been reported in children. Hereinafter is reported the case of a 2-year-old girl hospitalized in the pediatric intensive care unit for ASA, which was treated with high-flow oxygen therapy and intravenous methylprednisolone and salbutamol. During hospitalization, she had metabolic acidosis with a 7.29 pH, a 26mmHg hypocapnia, and a decrease in bicarbonates to 12 mmol/L. The anion gap was increased to 20 mmol/L and lactates to 8 mmol/L. The work-up for a congenital metabolic disease was normal. Progression was propitious with spontaneous improvement of lactic acidosis, and the child was discharged from the intensive care unit after 72 h. The origin of lactic acidosis during ASA seems to be multifactorial. Although its recovery can be spontaneous, it is important to know how to identify it because it can worsen respiratory symptoms and can lead to incongruous therapeutic escalation.

  3. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS): a year in review.

    PubMed

    Skowronski, Danuta M; Astell, Caroline; Brunham, Robert C; Low, Donald E; Petric, Martin; Roper, Rachel L; Talbot, Pierre J; Tam, Theresa; Babiuk, Lorne

    2005-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) emerged from China as an untreatable and rapidly spreading respiratory illness of unknown etiology. Following point source exposure in February 2003, more than a dozen guests infected at a Hong Kong hotel seeded multi-country outbreaks that persisted through the spring of 2003. The World Health Organization responded by invoking traditional public health measures and advanced technologies to control the illness and contain the cause. A novel coronavirus was implicated and its entire genome was sequenced by mid-April 2003. The urgency of responding to this threat focused scientific endeavor and stimulated global collaboration. Through real-time application of accumulating knowledge, the world proved capable of arresting the first pandemic threat of the twenty-first century, despite early respiratory-borne spread and global susceptibility. This review synthesizes lessons learned from this remarkable achievement. These lessons can be applied to re-emergence of SARS or to the next pandemic threat to arise. PMID:15660517

  4. Epidemiology of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS): adults and children.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Nan-Shan; Wong, Gary W K

    2004-12-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a newly described respiratory infection with pandemic potential. The causative agent is a new strain of coronavirus most likely originating from wild animals. This disease first emerged in November 2002 in Guangdong Province, China. Early in the outbreak the infection had been transmitted primarily via household contacts and healthcare settings. In late February 2003 the infection was transmitted to Hong Kong when an infected doctor from the mainland visited there. During his stay in Hong Kong at least 17 guests and visitors were infected at the hotel at which he stayed. By modern day air travel, the infection was rapidly spread to other countries including Vietnam, Singapore and Canada by these infected guests. With the implementation of effective control strategies including early isolation of suspected cases, strict infection control measures in the hospital setting, meticulous contact tracing and quarantine, the outbreak was finally brought under control by July 2003. In addition, there were another two events of SARS in China between the end of December 2003 and January 2004 and from March to May 2004; both were readily controlled without significant patient spread. PMID:15531250

  5. The severe acute respiratory syndrome epidemic in mainland China dissected

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Wu-Chun; de Vlas, Sake J.; Richardus, Jan Hendrik

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides a review of a recently published series of studies that give a detailed and comprehensive documentation of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic in mainland China, which severely struck the country in the spring of 2003. The epidemic spanned a large geographical extent but clustered in two areas: first in Guangdong Province, and about 3 months later in Beijing with its surrounding areas. Reanalysis of all available epidemiological data resulted in a total of 5327 probable cases of SARS, of whom 343 died. The resulting case fatality ratio (CFR) of 6.4% was less than half of that in other SARS-affected countries or areas, and this difference could only partly be explained by younger age of patients and higher number of community acquired infections. Analysis of the impact of interventions demonstrated that strong political commitment and a centrally coordinated response was the most important factor to control SARS in mainland China, whereas the most stringent control measures were all initiated when the epidemic was already dying down. The long-term economic consequence of the epidemic was limited, much consumption was merely postponed, but for Beijing irrecoverable losses to the tourist sector were considerable. An important finding from a cohort study was that many former SARS patients currently suffer from avascular osteonecrosis, as a consequence of the treatment with corticosteroids during their infection. The SARS epidemic provided valuable information and lessons relevant in controlling outbreaks of newly emerging infectious diseases, and has led to fundamental reforms of the Chinese health system. In particular, a comprehensive nationwide internet-based disease reporting system was established. PMID:24470901

  6. Respiratory autoresuscitation following severe acute hypoxemia in anesthetized adult rats.

    PubMed

    Krause, A; Nowak, Z; Srbu, R; Bell, H J

    2016-10-01

    In the present study we investigated the pattern and efficacy of respiratory autoresuscitation in spontaneously breathing adult male rats across three separate anesthetic backgrounds. Each animal was administered one of three injectable anesthetics to achieve a surgical plane of anesthesia: ketamine-xylazine (KET, n=10), pentobarbital (PEN, n=10), or urethane (URE, n=10). Animals were tracheostomized and equipped with a femoral artery catheter to record airflow and arterial pressures. In response to a bout of breathing anoxic air, none of the 10 URE animals were able to mount a successful autoresuscitation response. In contrast, all KET and PEN animals survived all four consecutive anoxic exposures, restoring eupneic breathing in all cases. Moreover, only 4/10 URE animals expressed gasping breaths following the onset of respiratory arrest, and these were temporally delayed (p<0.001) and much smaller in volume (P≤0.012) compared to KET and PEN animals. URE animals showed no clear aberrations in their cardiovascular responses to anoxia, with the exception of lower arterial pulse pressures compared to either KET or PEN animals at specific points following RA. Ketamine-xylazine and pentobarbital anesthesia can be reliably and effectively used to create models for the study of autoresuscitation in adult rats. In contrast, urethane causes catastrophic failure of respiratory autoresuscitation, by delaying or outright preventing the elaboration of gasping breaths following anoxia-induced respiratory arrest. The neuronal and synaptic alterations accompanying urethane anesthesia may therefore provide a means of understanding potential pathological alterations in rhythm generation that can predispose the respiratory control system to failed autoresuscitation following an episode of acute severe hypoxemia. PMID:27378495

  7. [Severe acute respiratory syndrome: a global overview of the epidemic].

    PubMed

    Franco-Paredes, Carlos; Kuri-Morales, Pablo; Alvarez-Lucas, Carlos; Palacios-Zavala, Ethel; Nava-Frías, Margarita; Betancourt-Cravioto, Miguel; Santos-Preciado, José Ignacio; Tapia-Conyer, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    In early February 2003, the World Health Organization (WHO) began receiving reports of patients with a syndrome characterized by an atypical pneumonia with rapid progression to respiratory failure without an identified cause despite extensive diagnostic workups. Most of these reports pointed out that the outbreak started in Southern China, specifically in the Guandong Province. The initial outbreak in South East Asia has already spread to other Regions in Asia, Europe, North and South America, and South Africa. Many of these cases can be linked through chains of transmission to an index case from the Guandong Province who visited Hong Kong. Although the exact mode of transmission has not been clearly established, the etiology of this syndrome has already been identified. A novel Coronavirus has been identified by electron microscopy and molecular assays in multiple laboratories from respiratory specimens throughout the world. The syndrome has been defined as SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) by WHO, and is characterized by an incubation period between 1 and 10 days (average 5 days) and by a febrile phase that usually lasts approximately 3 days. During the respiratory phase that begins around day 3, patients start developing a dry cough, shortness of breath and hypoxemia. Mechanical ventilatory support is required in about 10 to 40% of cases and the case-fatality rate ranges between 3 and 16%. The laboratory findings in SARS cases include leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and a rise in transaminases and lactic dehydrogenase levels. Treatment of SARS includes supportive measures and the empiric use of ribavirin. Respiratory isolation, use of respiratory masks, and compulsory hand hygiene constitute the principal preventive measures. The confirmation of a case can be performed at reference laboratories by serologic and molecular assays. From the onset of this epidemic Mexico established a surveillance system as well as clinical guidelines and recommendations for

  8. History of headache research in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Tfelt-Hansen, P

    2001-09-01

    Headache research in Denmark started with the description in 1949 by Dalsgaard-Nielsen of the percutaneous nitroglycerin test. In 1976 Jes Olesen started The Copenhagen Acute Headache Clinic and from that time modern headache research began in Denmark. Specific changes in regional cerebral blood flow during attacks of migraine with aura, spreading oligaemia, were described for the first time in 1980. The first headache classification with operational diagnostic criteria was published in 1988 and used in a Danish population study from 1989. The lifetime prevalence of migraine was 8% in men and 25% in women. An intravenous nitroglycerin test was introduced in 1989 and has been developed as an experimental headache model. In 1993 it was suggested by Jes Olesen et al. that NO supersensitivity could be a possible molecular mechanism of migraine pain. Recent genetic studies have supported the distinction between migraine with aura and migraine without aura. From the middle of the 1980s the pathophysiology of tension-type headache has been investigated and recent results indicate central sensitization in patients with chronic tension-type headache.

  9. Severe acute respiratory syndrome: clinical and laboratory manifestations.

    PubMed

    Lam, Christopher W K; Chan, Michael H M; Wong, Chun K

    2004-05-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a recently emerged infectious disease with significant morbidity and mortality. An epidemic in 2003 affected 8,098 patients in 29 countries with 774 deaths. The aetiological agent is a new coronavirus spread by droplet transmission. Clinical and general laboratory manifestations included fever, chills, rigor, myalgia, malaise, diarrhoea, cough, dyspnoea, pneumonia, lymphopenia, neutrophilia, thrombocytopenia, and elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase (LD), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and creatine kinase (CK) activities. Treatment has been empirical; initial potent antibiotic cover, followed by simultaneous ribavirin and corticosteroids, with or without pulse high-dose methylprednisolone, have been used. The postulated disease progression comprises (1) active viral infection, (2) hyperactive immune response, and (3) recovery or pulmonary destruction and death. We investigated serum LD isoenzymes and blood lymphocyte subsets of SARS patients, and found LD1 activity as the best biochemical prognostic indicator for death, while CD3+, CD4+, CD8+ and natural killer cell counts were promising predictors for intensive care unit (ICU) admission. Plasma cytokine and chemokine profiles showed markedly elevated Th1 cytokine interferon (IFN)-gamma, inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6 and IL-12, neutrophil chemokine IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and Th1 chemokine IFN-gamma-inducible protein-10 (IP-10) for at least two weeks after disease onset, but there was no significant elevation of inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Corticosteroid reduced IL-8, MCP-1 and IP-10 concentrations from 5-8 days after treatment. Measurement of biochemical markers of bone metabolism demonstrated significant but transient increase in bone resorption from Day 28-44 after onset of fever, when pulse steroid was most frequently given. With tapering down of steroid

  10. Impaired Bile Acid Homeostasis in Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ling; Voskuijl, Wieger; Mouzaki, Marialena; Groen, Albert K.; Alexander, Jennifer; Bourdon, Celine; Wang, Alice; Versloot, Christian J.; Di Giovanni, Valeria; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Bandsma, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Objective Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) is a major cause of mortality in children under 5 years and is associated with hepatic steatosis. Bile acids are synthesized in the liver and participate in dietary fat digestion, regulation of energy expenditure, and immune responses. The aim of this work was to investigate whether SAM is associated with clinically relevant changes in bile acid homeostasis. Design An initial discovery cohort with 5 healthy controls and 22 SAM-patients was used to identify altered bile acid homeostasis. A follow up cohort of 40 SAM-patients were then studied on admission and 3 days after clinical stabilization to assess recovery in bile acid metabolism. Recruited children were 6–60 months old and admitted for SAM in Malawi. Clinical characteristics, feces and blood were collected on admission and prior to discharge. Bile acids, 7α-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one (C4) and FGF-19 were quantified. Results On admission, total serum bile acids were higher in children with SAM than in healthy controls and glycine-conjugates accounted for most of this accumulation with median and interquartile range (IQR) of 24.6 μmol/L [8.6–47.7] compared to 1.9 μmol/L [1.7–3.3] (p = 0.01) in controls. Total serum bile acid concentrations did not decrease prior to discharge. On admission, fecal conjugated bile acids were lower and secondary bile acids higher at admission compared to pre- discharge, suggesting increased bacterial conversion. FGF19 (Fibroblast growth factor 19), a marker of intestinal bile acid signaling, was higher on admission and was associated with decreased C4 concentrations as a marker of bile acid synthesis. Upon recovery, fecal calprotectin, a marker of intestinal inflammation, was lower. Conclusion SAM is associated with increased serum bile acid levels despite reduced synthesis rates. In SAM, there tends to be increased deconjugation of bile acids and conversion from primary to secondary bile acids, which may contribute to the

  11. Symptomatic cervicogenic headache.

    PubMed

    Delfini, R; Salvati, M; Passacantilli, E; Pacciani, E

    2000-01-01

    Cervicogenic headache is a little-known clinical condition whose true importance has only recently been recognized. A number of causes may lie at the basis of the onset of headache (symptomatic cervicogenic headache). However, despite exhaustive attempts, sometimes it is not possible to identify a clear cause responsible for the onset of the syndrome (primitive cervicogenic headache). The genesis of symptomatic cervicogenic headaches sometimes may be easy to identify as a result of a close, pre-existing, cause-effect relationship (i.e. trauma). On other occasions it may be much more laborious to pinpoint the pathology responsible for headache (some cranio-cervical anomalies, etc.). Clinically, it is necessary to perform a thorough preliminary clinical and anamnestic evaluation which can orient subsequent investigations to achieve a diagnosis in the least time possible with the minimum discomfort to the patient and his relatives, not to mention lower costs for society. PMID:10824284

  12. [Electrotherapy for headaches].

    PubMed

    Lutters, B; Koehler, P J

    2016-01-01

    Neuromodulation is being applied increasingly for the treatment of drug resistant headache. Although these techniques are often considered high-tech, electrotherapy for headache has a long history; electric fish have been used for headache treatment since the first century CE. During the eighteenth and nineteenth century, static electricity was a treatment for a wide variety of neuropsychiatric disorders including headache. The efficacy of electrotherapy, however, has been disputed continuously, since opponents were of the opinion that the positive results could be attributed to suggestion. At the beginning of the twentieth century, the electric treatment of headache gradually disappeared. In recent years, there has been a resurgence in the use of electrotherapy, along with the efficacy debate. With this historical review we wish to emphasize the importance of placebo-controlled studies, not only in terms of electrotherapy of headache, but also for the evaluation of neuromodulation for other disorders. PMID:27353158

  13. Heredity, genes, and headache.

    PubMed

    Barbas, Nancy R; Schuyler, Erica A

    2006-11-01

    It is well recognized that headache, and especially migraine, runs in families. Recent studies into the heritability of primary headache subtypes, migraine, cluster and tension headache, and conditions in which headache is a prominent feature, such as the mitochondrial disease, mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and strokelike episodes, and the arteriopathy, cerebral autosomal-dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarctions and leukoencephalopathy, are improving our understanding of the genetic contribution to headache. Studies of the rare familial hemiplegic migraine are leading to advances in understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms of the more common migraine types. Current knowledge of hereditary and genetic features of headache subtypes is reviewed and the implications for understanding the pathophysiology of migraine are discussed.

  14. Weekly headache periodicity and the effect of weather changes on headache

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterman, P. O.; Lövstrand, K. G.; Lundberg, P. O.; Lundquist, S.; Muhr, C.

    1981-03-01

    A weekly periodicity in the occurrence of headache was found in 53 patients with migraine and in 20 with tension headache during an observation period of four weeks. In the migraine group the frequency was highest on Thursday and on Saturday and lowest on Sunday Monday, and in patients with tension headache it was lowest on Sunday Tuesday and highest on Friday. During the observation period several climatic factors were recorded. After correction for the weekly periodicity a highly significant correlation was found in the migraine group between headache frequency, on the one hand, and atmospheric pressure and outdoor temperature recorded 1 3 days later, on the other.

  15. Management of acute moderate and severe childhood malnutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acute childhood malnutrition affects about a tenth of the world's children under 5 years of age, particularly those living in circumstances of extreme poverty in the developing world. Malnutrition is typically the result of an inadequate diet and is one of the most common diagnoses in children in he...

  16. All-transretinoic acid (ATRA) treatment-related pancarditis and severe pulmonary edema in a child with acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Işık, Pamir; Çetin, Ilker; Tavil, Betul; Azik, Fatih; Kara, Abdurrahman; Yarali, Nese; Tunc, Bahattin

    2010-11-01

    Use of all-transretinoic acid (ATRA) with other chemotherapeutic agents in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) has been shown to cause the differentiation of abnormally granulated specific blast cells into mature granulocytes by acting on the t(15; 17) fusion gene product. The complete remission rate is increased and survival time is prolonged in APL patients who receive chemotherapy plus ATRA, whereas ATRA syndrome and other ATRA-related adverse effects including pseudo tumor cerebri, headache, severe bone pain, mucosal and skin dryness, hypercholesterolemia, and cheilitis may be observed especially during induction phase of the treatment. In this paper, we report a 9-year-old girl with APL who developed pancarditis while receiving the APL-93 treatment protocol. In our patient, endocarditis and myocarditis were initially determined after ATRA treatment during the induction part of the protocol. All findings disappeared after ATRA was discontinued. When ATRA was readministered in the maintenance part of the treatment protocol, she developed pancarditis and severe pulmonary edema. As her symptoms decreased dramatically with the discontinuation of ATRA and the initiation of steroid treatment, the clinical picture strongly suggested the ATRA treatment as the causative factor. To the best of our knowledge, this clinical picture of pancarditis secondary to ATRA treatment has not been reported earlier in the English literature. PMID:20881874

  17. Headaches and sleep disorders.

    PubMed

    Freedom, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Headaches and sleep disorders are associated in a complex manner. Both the disorders are common in the general population, but the relationship between the two is more than coincidental. Sleep disorders can exacerbate headache sand the converse is also true. Treatment of sleep disorders can have a positive impact on the treatment of headaches. Screening for sleep disorders should be considered in all patients with headaches. This can be accomplished with brief screening tools. Those who screen positively can be further evaluated or referred to asleep specialist.

  18. Caspase-1 inhibition alleviates acute renal injury in rats with severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Hua; Li, Min-Li; Wang, Bin; Guo, Mei-Xia; Zhu, Ren-Min

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the effect of inhibition of caspase-1 on acute renal injury in rats with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). METHODS: Forty-two Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: healthy controls (HC, n = 6), SAP rats treated with saline (SAP-S, n = 18), or SAP rats treated with a caspase-1/interleukin (IL)-1β-converting-enzyme (ICE) inhibitor (SAP-I-ICE, n = 18). SAP was induced by retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the bile-pancreatic duct. HC rats were subjected to identical treatment and surgical procedures without sodium taurocholate. Rats received an intraperitoneal injection of isotonic saline (SAP-S) or the inhibitor (SAP-ICE-I) at 2 and 12 h after induction of acute pancreatitis. Surviving rats were sacrificed at different time points after SAP induction; all samples were obtained and stored for subsequent analyses. The levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine (Cr) were measured using automatic methods, and serum IL-1β concentrations were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Intrarenal expression of IL-1β, IL-18 and caspase-1 mRNAs was detected by RT-PCR. IL-1β protein expression and the pathologic changes in kidney tissues were observed by microscopy after immunohistochemical or hematoxylin and eosin staining, respectively. RESULTS: The serum levels of BUN and Cr in the SAP-S group were 12.48 ± 2.30 mmol/L and 82.83 ± 13.89 μmol/L at 6 h, 23.53 ± 2.58 mmol/L and 123.67 ± 17.67 μmol/L at 12 h, and 23.60 ± 3.33 mmol/L and 125.33 ± 21.09 μmol/L at 18 h, respectively. All were significantly increased compared to HC rats (P < 0.01 for all). Levels in SAP-ICE-I rats were significantly decreased compared to SAP-S rats both at 12 and 18 h (P < 0.01 for all). Serum IL-1β levels in the SAP-S group were 276.77 ± 44.92 pg/mL at 6 h, 308.99 ± 34.95 pg/mL at 12 h, and 311.60 ± 46.51 pg/mL at 18 h; all significantly higher than those in the HC and SAP-ICE-I groups (P < 0.01 for all

  19. [Integrated headache care network. Kiel Migraine and Headache Center and German National Headache Treatment Network].

    PubMed

    Göbel, H; Heinze-Kuhn, K; Petersen, I; Göbel, A; Heinze, A

    2013-04-01

    Migraine and other headaches affect 54 million people in Germany. They rank among the ten most severely disabling complaints and the three most expensive neurological disorders. Nevertheless, they are not adequately recognized in the healthcare system with sketchy diagnoses and inadequate treatment. This inadequate care is not primarily due to a lack of medical and scientific knowledge on the development and treatment of headaches but is predominantly due to organizational deficits in the healthcare system and in the implementation of current knowledge. To overcome the organizational barriers the national headache treatment network was initiated in Germany. For the first time it allows national cross-sectoral and multidisciplinary links between inpatient and outpatient care. A hand in hand treatment programme, better education, better information exchange between all partners and combined efforts using clearly defined treatment pathways and goals are the basis for state of the art and efficient treatment results. The treatment network is geared towards the specialized treatment of severely affected patients with chronic headache disorders. A national network of outpatient and inpatient pain therapists in both practices and hospitals works hand in hand to optimally alleviate pain in a comprehensive cross-sectoral and multidisciplinary manner. For therapy refractive disorders, a high-intensive supraregional fully inpatient treatment can be arranged. This concept offers for the first time a nationwide coordinated treatment without limitation by specialization and bureaucratic remuneration sectors.

  20. Headaches and Migraines: Headache Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Headaches and Migraines Headache Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment Past Issues / Spring ... of headache. Each has distinct symptoms and treatments. Migraine and Other Vascular Headaches—Symptoms and Diagnosis Migraine: ...

  1. [Validity of graphic headache diary for children having primary headaches].

    PubMed

    Fujita, Mitsue; Fujiwara, Junko

    2011-11-01

    We investigated whether the graphic headache diary is useful for diagnosing headache types in children, especially suffering from chronic daily headaches. Our study involved 109 children who completed the diaries for more than 3 weeks. The headache diary was a modified version of that used in the study by Sakai et al. Of 109, 84 had migraine, 15 had tension-type headache and 10 had both tension-type headache and migraine from the questionnaire and the first interview. The diary disclosed that 20 children, initially diagnosed as having migraine, had co-existing chronic tension-type headache with a variety of psychosocial problems. The graphic headache diary seems to be helpful for headache diagnosis and awareness of stress in children who suffered from strong and persistent headaches. Our study suggested that the graphic headache diary is useful not only for diagnosing headache types in children but also for finding out problems in school and/or family.

  2. Stabbing headache in an 8-year-old girl: primary or drug induced headache?

    PubMed

    Biedroł, Agnieszka; Kaciłski, Marek; Skowronek-Bała, Barbara

    2014-04-01

    The occurrence of stabbing headaches in children requires a thorough diagnostic approach that excludes secondary headaches. The organic background should be taken into consideration when alarming symptoms occur, such as a purely 1-sided location, a change in the character of the headache, or possibly a link to physical activity. The current study describes the case of an 8-year-old girl who suffered short-lasting stabbing headache attacks. The headaches with increasing intensity and frequency started 1 month before her hospitalization and were usually preceded by physical activity (dancing, running). The pain, which was located in the right supraorbital region, lasted 1 second and occurred several times during the day. No associated symptoms were observed. In addition, the girl suffered from allergic rhinitis and was on antiallergic treatment (levocetirizine, fluticasone nasal spray). On admission she was in good general condition, and a pediatric and neurologic examination revealed no abnormalities. Her brain MRI was normal. The initial diagnosis was that the patient was suffering from primary stabbing headaches. However, during a follow-up visit 4 months later, a relationship was observed between the cessation of the headache attacks and the discontinuation of an antihistaminic drug. Six months later, the girl remained headache free. In cases involving differential diagnoses of stabbing headaches, it is important to consider the adverse reactions of the drugs used.

  3. Stabbing headache in an 8-year-old girl: primary or drug induced headache?

    PubMed

    Biedroł, Agnieszka; Kaciłski, Marek; Skowronek-Bała, Barbara

    2014-04-01

    The occurrence of stabbing headaches in children requires a thorough diagnostic approach that excludes secondary headaches. The organic background should be taken into consideration when alarming symptoms occur, such as a purely 1-sided location, a change in the character of the headache, or possibly a link to physical activity. The current study describes the case of an 8-year-old girl who suffered short-lasting stabbing headache attacks. The headaches with increasing intensity and frequency started 1 month before her hospitalization and were usually preceded by physical activity (dancing, running). The pain, which was located in the right supraorbital region, lasted 1 second and occurred several times during the day. No associated symptoms were observed. In addition, the girl suffered from allergic rhinitis and was on antiallergic treatment (levocetirizine, fluticasone nasal spray). On admission she was in good general condition, and a pediatric and neurologic examination revealed no abnormalities. Her brain MRI was normal. The initial diagnosis was that the patient was suffering from primary stabbing headaches. However, during a follow-up visit 4 months later, a relationship was observed between the cessation of the headache attacks and the discontinuation of an antihistaminic drug. Six months later, the girl remained headache free. In cases involving differential diagnoses of stabbing headaches, it is important to consider the adverse reactions of the drugs used. PMID:24664098

  4. [Treatment of cluster headache].

    PubMed

    Fabre, N

    2005-07-01

    Remarkable therapeutic improvements have come forward recently for trigemino-autonomic cephalalgias. Attack treatment in cluster headache is based on sumatriptan and oxygen. Non-vasoconstrictive treatments are opening a new post-triptan era but are not yet applicable. Prophylactic treatment of cluster headache is based on verapamil and lithium. The efficacy of anti-epileptic drugs in cluster headache remains to be demonstrated. Surgical treatment aimed at the parasympathetic pathways and at the trigeminal nerve demonstrates a high rate of recurrence and adverse events and questions about the relevance of a "peripheral" target in cluster headache. The efficacy of continuous hypothalamic stimulation in patients with intractable headache constitutes a breakthrough, but must be demonstrated at a larger scale and the benefice/risk ratio must be carefully evaluated. Indomethacin still remains the gold standard in paroxysmal hemicrania treatment. Until recently SUNCT was considered an intractable condition. However there are some reports of complete relief with lamotrigine, topiramate and gabapentin.

  5. Headache yesterday in Europe

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Surveys enquiring about burden of headache over a prior period of time (eg, 3 months) are subject to recall bias. To eliminate this as far as possible, we focused on presence and impact of headache on the preceding day (“headache yesterday”). Methods Adults (18-65 years) were surveyed from the general populations of Germany, Italy, Lithuania, Luxembourg and the Netherlands, from a work-force population in Spain and from mostly non-headache patient populations of Austria, France and UK. A study of non-responders in some countries allowed detection of potential participation bias where initial participation rates were low. Results Participation rates varied between 11% and 59% (mean 27%). Non-responder studies suggested that, because of participation bias, headache prevalence might be overestimated in initial responders by up to 2% (absolute). Across all countries, 1,422 of 8,271 participants (15-17%, depending on correction for participation bias) had headache yesterday lasting on average for 6 hours. It was bad or very bad in 56% of cases and caused absence from work or school in 6%. Among those who worked despite headache, 20% reported productivity reduced by >50%. Social activities were lost by 24%. Women (21%) were more likely than men (12%) to have headache yesterday, but impact was similar in the two genders. Conclusions With recall biases avoided, our findings indicate that headache costs at least 0.7% of working capacity in Europe. This calculation takes into account that most of those who missed work could make up for this later, which, however, means that leisure and social activities are even more influenced by headache. PMID:24884765

  6. Neurostimulation in the treatment of primary headaches.

    PubMed

    Miller, Sarah; Sinclair, Alex J; Davies, Brendan; Matharu, Manjit

    2016-10-01

    There is increasing interest in using neurostimulation to treat headache disorders. There are now several non-invasive and invasive stimulation devices available with some open-label series and small controlled trial studies that support their use. Non-invasive stimulation options include supraorbital stimulation (Cefaly), vagus nerve stimulation (gammaCore) and single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (SpringTMS). Invasive procedures include occipital nerve stimulation, sphenopalatine ganglion stimulation and ventral tegmental area deep brain stimulation. These stimulation devices may find a place in the treatment pathway of headache disorders. Here, we explore the basic principles of neurostimulation for headache and overview the available methods of neurostimulation. PMID:27152027

  7. Neurostimulation in the treatment of primary headaches.

    PubMed

    Miller, Sarah; Sinclair, Alex J; Davies, Brendan; Matharu, Manjit

    2016-10-01

    There is increasing interest in using neurostimulation to treat headache disorders. There are now several non-invasive and invasive stimulation devices available with some open-label series and small controlled trial studies that support their use. Non-invasive stimulation options include supraorbital stimulation (Cefaly), vagus nerve stimulation (gammaCore) and single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (SpringTMS). Invasive procedures include occipital nerve stimulation, sphenopalatine ganglion stimulation and ventral tegmental area deep brain stimulation. These stimulation devices may find a place in the treatment pathway of headache disorders. Here, we explore the basic principles of neurostimulation for headache and overview the available methods of neurostimulation.

  8. Neurostimulation in the treatment of primary headaches

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Sarah; Sinclair, Alex J; Davies, Brendan; Matharu, Manjit

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing interest in using neurostimulation to treat headache disorders. There are now several non-invasive and invasive stimulation devices available with some open-label series and small controlled trial studies that support their use. Non-invasive stimulation options include supraorbital stimulation (Cefaly), vagus nerve stimulation (gammaCore) and single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (SpringTMS). Invasive procedures include occipital nerve stimulation, sphenopalatine ganglion stimulation and ventral tegmental area deep brain stimulation. These stimulation devices may find a place in the treatment pathway of headache disorders. Here, we explore the basic principles of neurostimulation for headache and overview the available methods of neurostimulation. PMID:27152027

  9. Epidemiology of headache in the Republic of San Marino.

    PubMed Central

    D'Alessandro, R; Benassi, G; Lenzi, P L; Gamberini, G; Sacquegna, T; De Carolis, P; Lugaresi, E

    1988-01-01

    An epidemiological survey on headache was performed in the Republic of San Marino, which is the smallest independent State in the world, located near the Adriatic Coast, within Italy. Among a random sample of 1500 inhabitants over 7 years of age the frequency of headache, severe headache and migraine in the previous year was 35.3%, 12.2%, 9.3% respectively for men, and 46.2%, 20.6%, 18% for women. The most common factors reported to provoke headache were emotional stress, physical strain, lack of sleep, particular foods or drinks and for women menstruation. Migraine patients differed from people without headache in that they had a higher consumption of coffee, more frequently reported bad sleep, allergic disease and previous appendectomy. Furthermore, migraine patients and severe headache sufferers had a higher diastolic blood pressure than non headache subjects. PMID:3258357

  10. Resolution of New Daily Persistent Headache After Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Joshua

    2016-03-01

    New daily persistent headache is a refractory headache with an elusive cause and treatment. Limited available data suggest that abnormalities in the musculoskeletal system may increase vulnerability to this type of headache. Osteopathic manipulative treatment has been used successfully to manage primary headache disorders. In this case report, a patient with new daily persistent headache and severe somatic dysfunction had resolution of her pain after osteopathic manipulative treatment. This case suggests that osteopathic manipulative treatment may be useful in patients with this typically treatment-resistant disorder.

  11. Soluble CD163 is increased in patients with acute pancreatitis independent of disease severity.

    PubMed

    Karrasch, Thomas; Brünnler, Tanja; Hamer, Okka W; Schmid, Karin; Voelk, Markus; Herfarth, Hans; Buechler, Christa

    2015-10-01

    Macrophages are crucially involved in the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis. Soluble CD163 (sCD163) is specifically released from macrophages and systemic levels are increased in inflammatory diseases. Here, sCD163 was measured in serum of 50 patients with acute pancreatitis to find out possible associations with disease activity. Admission levels of systemic sCD163 were nearly three-fold higher in patients with acute pancreatitis compared to controls. In patients sCD163 did not correlate with C-reactive protein and leukocyte count as established markers of inflammation. Levels were not associated with disease severity assessed by the Schroeder score, Balthazar score, Acute Physiology, Age, and Chronic Health Evaluation (Apache) II score and peripancreatic necrosis score. Soluble CD163 was not related to complications of acute pancreatitis. These data show that serum sCD163 is increased in acute pancreatitis indicating activation of macrophages but is not associated with disease severity and outcome.

  12. Chronic Daily Headache: Mechanisms and Principles of Management.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Amy W; Gould, Harry J

    2016-02-01

    Primary headache is a common malady that is often under-recognized and frequently inadequately managed in spite of the fact that it affects up to 95 % of the population in a lifetime. Many forms of headache, including episodic tension and migraine headaches, if properly diagnosed, are reasonably amenable to treatment, but a smaller, though not insignificant, percent of the population suffer daily from a chronic, intractable form of headache that destroys one's productivity and quality of life. These patients are frequently seen in neurological practices at a point when treatment options are limited and largely ineffective. In the following review, we will discuss mechanisms drawn from recent studies that address the transition from acute to chronic pain that may apply to the transformation from episodic to chronic daily headaches which may offer opportunities for preempting headache transformation.

  13. Endorphin patterns within the headache spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Nappi, G; Facchinetti, F; Martignoni, E; Petraglia, F; Manzoni, G C; Sances, G; Sandrini, G; Genazzani, A R

    1985-05-01

    The role of opioid peptides in modulating the nervous system adaptability has been demonstrated recently; proopiomelanocortin (POMC)-related peptides, in particular, serve in pain perception, in adaptation to stress, and in modulating higher brain functions. Primary headaches, besides pain, involve neuroendocrine/autonomic/adaptive processes as well as mood and personality factors. The view that primary headaches can be taken as a possible model of POMC-related peptides dysfunction led us to evaluate the resting plasma and CSF peptide levels and their plasma changes in response to various stimuli affecting their release. The data obtained from basal and dynamic studies agree with the concept that primary headaches are sustained by opioid system disturbance. In particular the reduced release of endogenous opioids by anterior pituitary in response to physical, endocrine or pharmacological stimuli agrees with a weak adaptive ability of headache sufferers. This impairment of endorphin responsiveness could play a key role in headache susceptibility to environmental stimuli. Primary headaches constitute a wide, intriguing field, including several subgroups bordering on "ischemic" and behavioral/affective disorders. The development of neuroendocrine techniques could be a useful means for supporting the clinical criteria identifying subpopulations of headache sufferers.

  14. Acute Otitis Media Severity: Association with Cytokine Gene polymorphisms and other Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, David P.; Grady, James J.; Diego, Alejandro; Matalon, Reuben; Revai, Krystal; Patel, Janak A.; Han, Yimei; Chonmaitree, Tasnee

    2011-01-01

    Background We have previously shown an association between polymorphisms of proinflammatory cytokine genes and susceptibility to upper respiratory tract infection and acute otitis media. It has not been known whether polymorphisms or risk factors are associated with the severity of acute otitis media. Objective To evaluate the influences of proinflammatory cytokine gene polymorphisms and other risk factors on severity of acute otitis media following upper respiratory infection. Methods In a prospective, longitudinal study, children aged 6-35 months were followed for one year for occurrences of upper respiratory tract infection and acute otitis media. Children were studied for TNFα-308, interleukin (IL)- 6-174 and IL-1 ß+3953 polymorphisms, taking into account age, gender, race, family history of otitis, tobacco smoke exposure, breast feeding, day of upper respiratory tract infection at the time of diagnosis and pneumococcal vaccine status. Symptoms and signs of acute otitis media were graded according to a validated scale. The association between acute otitis media clinical severity, polymorphic genotypes, and risk factors was analyzed using statistical models that account for multiple episodes of acute otitis media per child. Results A total of 295 episodes of acute otitis media in 128 subjects were included. More severe acute otitis media symptoms were associated with young age (P=0.01), family history of acute otitis media (P=0.002), tobacco smoke exposure (P=0.008), and early diagnosis of otitis after onset of upper respiratory tract infection (P=0.02). Among children with a bulging or perforated tympanic membrane (206 episodes, 104 subjects), those who had the IL- 1 ß+3953 polymorphism, experienced higher symptom scores (P<0.02). Conclusion This is the first report of the association between risk factors and acute otitis media severity. Risk factors such as tobacco smoke exposure and a positive family history appear to be more significantly associated with

  15. Severe acute hepatitis in the DRESS syndrome: Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Lens, Sabela; Crespo, Gonzalo; Carrión, Jose A; Miquel, Rosa; Navasa, Miquel

    2010-01-01

    The DRESS (drug rash, eosinophilia and systemic symptoms) syndrome, also known as DIHS (drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome), is a severe idiosyncratic reaction to several drugs, mainly antiepileptics and antibiotics, which can occasionally produce acute liver failure. In this article we present two cases of the DRESS syndrome presenting with severe acute hepatitis, including the first case of DRESS associated with levetiracetam. Although both cases finally resolved with good outcomes, DRESS can lead to acute liver failure and has a bad prognosis when liver damage is present. Rapid diagnosis is crucial since withdrawal of the offending drug is the key of treatment, while the potential role of corticosteroids is discussed. PMID:20526017

  16. Home-based therapy for severe acute malnutrition with ready-to-use food

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Severe acute malnutrition is a devastating condition afflicting children under 5 years in many developing countries, but concentrated in sub-Saharan Africa. This paper examines the development of home-based lipid-nutrient therapeutic foods for the treatment of acute malnutrition in sub-Saharan Afric...

  17. Clinical aspects of perimenstrual headaches.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Frederick R

    2009-02-01

    Menstrual migraine (MM) is either pure, if attacks are limited solely during the perimenstrual window (PMW), or menstrually related (MRM), if two of three PMWs are associated with attacks with additional migraine events outside the PMW. Acute migraine specific therapy is equally effective in MM and non-MM. Although the International Classification of Headache Disorders-II classifies MM without aura, data suggest this needs revision. The studies on extended-cycle oral contraceptives suggest benefits for headache-prone individuals. Triptan mini-prophylaxis outcomes are positive, but a conclusion of "minimal net benefit compared to placebo" is not entirely unwarranted. In a 2008 evidence-based review, grade B recommendations exist for sumatriptan (50 and 100 mg), mefenamic acid (500 mg), and riza-triptan (10 mg) for the acute treatment of MRM. For the preventive mini-prophylactic treatment of MRM, grade B recommendations are provided for transcutaneous estrogen (1.5 mg), frovatriptan (2.5 mg twice daily), and naratriptan (1 mg twice daily). PMID:19126376

  18. Headache - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... about headaches; Migraine - what to ask your doctor; Tension-type headache - what to ask your doctor; Cluster ... is dangerous? What are the symptoms of a tension-type headache ? A migraine headache ? A cluster headache ? ...

  19. [Individual medical relevance of headaches. Comorbidities and quality of life].

    PubMed

    Haag, G

    2014-08-01

    In a multitude of cases, very frequent primary headaches lead to a clear deterioration in quality of life. Particularly in patients with chronic migraine, chronic tension headache, and cluster headache, quality of life is limited. This contradicts the preconception still encountered today that headaches are not a serious illness. Comorbidities with somatic and above all mental disorders are also very frequently observed in headache patients. In the foreground are the cardiovascular diseases of arterial hypertension, stroke, and coronary heart disease, as well as the mental disorders of depression, anxiety disorders, posttraumatic stress disorders, and sleep disorders. When such comorbidities are present, the quality of life of the sufferers is significantly reduced. Therefore, headache disorders should be taken seriously and sufferers should be provided with a consistent therapy. In cases of severe types of headache and in the presence of comorbidities, it is imperative that therapy is also prophylactic and multimodal in nature.

  20. Ginkgo biloba for the prevention of severe acute mountain sickness (AMS) starting one day before rapid ascent.

    PubMed

    Gertsch, Jeffrey H; Seto, Todd B; Mor, Joanne; Onopa, Janet

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that 5 days of prophylactic ginkgo decreases the incidence of acute mountain sickness (AMS) during gradual ascent. This trial was designed to determine if ginkgo is an effective prophylactic agent if begun 1 day prior to rapid ascent. In this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, 26 participants residing at sea level received ginkgo (60 mg TID) or placebo starting 24 h before ascending Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Subjects were transported from sea level to the summit (4205 m) over 3 hours, including 1 hour at 2835 m. The Lake Louise Self-report Questionnaire constituted the primary outcome measure at baseline, 2835 m, and after 4 h at 4205 m. AMS was defined as a Lake Louise Self-report Score (LLSR) >/= 3 with headache. Subjects who developed severe AMS were promptly transported to lower altitude for the remainder of the study. The ginkgo (n = 12) and placebo (n = 14) groups were well matched (58% vs. 50% female; median age 28 yr, range 22-53 vs. 33 yr, range 21-53; 58% vs. 57% Caucasian). Two (17%) subjects on ginkgo and nine (64%) on placebo developed severe AMS and required descent for their safety (p = 0.021); all recovered without sequelae. Median LLSR at 4205 m was significantly lower for ginkgo versus placebo (4, range 1-8 vs. 5, range 2-9, p = 0.03). Ginkgo use did not reach statistical significance for lowering incidence of AMS compared with placebo (ginkgo 7/12, 58.3% vs. placebo 13/14, 92.9%, p = 0.07). Twenty-one of 26 (81%) subjects developed AMS overall. This is the first study to demonstrate that 1 day of pretreatment with ginkgo 60 mg TID may significantly reduce the severity of AMS prior to rapid ascent from sea level to 4205 m.

  1. Ginkgo biloba for the prevention of severe acute mountain sickness (AMS) starting one day before rapid ascent.

    PubMed

    Gertsch, Jeffrey H; Seto, Todd B; Mor, Joanne; Onopa, Janet

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that 5 days of prophylactic ginkgo decreases the incidence of acute mountain sickness (AMS) during gradual ascent. This trial was designed to determine if ginkgo is an effective prophylactic agent if begun 1 day prior to rapid ascent. In this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, 26 participants residing at sea level received ginkgo (60 mg TID) or placebo starting 24 h before ascending Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Subjects were transported from sea level to the summit (4205 m) over 3 hours, including 1 hour at 2835 m. The Lake Louise Self-report Questionnaire constituted the primary outcome measure at baseline, 2835 m, and after 4 h at 4205 m. AMS was defined as a Lake Louise Self-report Score (LLSR) >/= 3 with headache. Subjects who developed severe AMS were promptly transported to lower altitude for the remainder of the study. The ginkgo (n = 12) and placebo (n = 14) groups were well matched (58% vs. 50% female; median age 28 yr, range 22-53 vs. 33 yr, range 21-53; 58% vs. 57% Caucasian). Two (17%) subjects on ginkgo and nine (64%) on placebo developed severe AMS and required descent for their safety (p = 0.021); all recovered without sequelae. Median LLSR at 4205 m was significantly lower for ginkgo versus placebo (4, range 1-8 vs. 5, range 2-9, p = 0.03). Ginkgo use did not reach statistical significance for lowering incidence of AMS compared with placebo (ginkgo 7/12, 58.3% vs. placebo 13/14, 92.9%, p = 0.07). Twenty-one of 26 (81%) subjects developed AMS overall. This is the first study to demonstrate that 1 day of pretreatment with ginkgo 60 mg TID may significantly reduce the severity of AMS prior to rapid ascent from sea level to 4205 m. PMID:12006162

  2. National Headache Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... has been to further awareness of headache and migraine as legitimate neurobiological diseases. Much has changed during this time, and with aid from advanced technology and clinical innovation, there are more treatment options than ever before. However, we understand that ...

  3. American Headache Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Info for Residents & Fellows Int. Headache Academy Medical Student Resources New Investigators & Trainees Resources AHMA – For Patients ... pm #CMEP afternoon w @ranicholson & @SmithermanTodd talking patient engagement, communication & behavioral tools for managing #migraine h J ...

  4. Predictors of severity and necrosis in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Papachristou, Georgios I; Whitcomb, David C

    2004-12-01

    C-reactive protein remains the single standard biochemical marker for predicting the severity of AP. Because the combination of clinical-physiological scores and CRP provide good information at 48 hours, research has focused on the predictive ability of various markers when applied in the initial 24 hours after admission to the hospital. After detailed review of the literature, the authors conclude that there is no single tool that serves as the optimal predictor of severity. There are, however, data that support the use of certain tests to improve upon the clinician's early predictive ability on the subsequent course of AP. These include an APACHE II score greater than 7 and IL-6 at the time of admission, and urine TAP, urine trypsinogen-2, and serum PMN elastase at 24 hours (Table 4). These markers only will be able to help the clinician's predictive ability if they can be performed locally and if the results can be available ina timely manner. Future research should focus on promising markers such as procalcitonin, IL-8, IL-I ra, sTNFR, CAPAP, PLA-2, novel markers, and the combined use of more than one marker. The conventional research approach in predicting severity used in the last 15 years has limitations and appears to have reached its maximal potential. Novel conceptions and approaches, such as identification of genetic polymorphisms that predispose to severe course and complications of AP or other approaches are needed for a quantum step forward.

  5. Inflammatory markers of disease severity in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Papachristou, Georgios I; Whitcomb, David C

    2005-03-01

    To date, CRP remains the single standard biochemical marker for predicting the severity of AP. Because the combination of clinico-physiological scores and CRP provides good information at 48 hours, research has focused on the predictive ability of various markers when applied in the initial 24 hours after admission to the hospital. After detailed review of the literature, the authors conclude that there is no single tool that serves as the optimal predictor of severity. There are, however, data supporting the use of certain tests to improve upon the clinician's early predictive ability on the subsequent course of AP. These include an APACHE II score greater than seven, IL-6 at the time of admission, and urine TAP, urine trypsinogen-2,and serum PMN-elastase at 24 hours (Box 1). These markers will only be able to help the clinician's predictive ability if they can be performed locally and if the results can be available in a timely manner. Future research should focus on markers such as procalcitonin, IL-8, IL-I ra, sTNFR,CAPAP, PLA-2, novel markers, and the combined use of more than one marker. The conventional research approach in predicting severity used in the last15 years has limitations and appears to have reached its maximal potential. Novel conceptions and approaches, such as identification of genetic polymorphisms that predispose to severe course and complications of AP, are needed for a quantum step forward.

  6. Headache following parturition.

    PubMed

    Adinma, J I; Agbai, A O

    2000-01-01

    The incidence of headache following childbirth in 226 Nigerian women is 24.3% (n=55) or one in four births. Headache was more prevalent among women aged between 21 and 30 years (n=44); those of social class 3-5 (n=50); and also increased incidence with increasing parity, although these relationships did not reach significance. There is a highly significant association between the incidence of postparturition headache and evidence of stress (P=0.004), but not with a history of migraine (p=0.102). A highly significant association also exists between the incidence of postparturition headache and anaemia (Hb value less than 10 g/dl (68%), (p=0.004). Headache started on the day of delivery in the majority of cases (36.4%; n=20) although the median number of days of onset after delivery was 2 days. Post-natal headache may be associated with some underlying sociomedical factors which may be influenced by the fall in pregnancy hormones following parturition.

  7. Cluster headache after orbital exenteration.

    PubMed

    Evers, S; Sörös, P; Brilla, R; Gerding, H; Husstedt, I W

    1997-10-01

    A 37-year-old man developed an ipsilateral headache which fulfilled the criteria for cluster headache after orbital extenteration because of a traumatic lesion of the bulb. The headache could be treated successfully by drugs usually applied in the therapy of cluster headache. Six similar cases of cluster headache after orbital exenteration could be identified in the literature suggesting that the eye itself is not necessarily part of the pathogenesis of cluster headache. We hypothesize that orbital exenteration can cause cluster headache by lesions of sympathetic structures. Possibly, these mechanisms are similar to those of sympathetic reflex dystrophy (Sudeck-Leriche syndrome) causing pain of the limbs. PMID:9350391

  8. Relationship of the serum procalcitonin level with the severity of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Nobuhiro; Endo, Shigeatsu; Kasai, Takeshi; Inoue, Yoshihiro; Fujino, Yasuhisa; Onodera, Makoto; Imai, Satoko; Takahashi, Gaku; Miyata, Michiko; Kitamura, Michihiko; Wakabayashi, Go

    2004-01-01

    The procalcitonin (PCT) level in the blood was determined in cases of acute pancreatitis. The PCT level was found to show a significant correlation with the severity of acute pancreatitis. Furthermore, the PCT level was significantly higher in the cases which developed MODS than in those which did not. The PCT level was significantly higher in the patients who eventually died than in those who survived. A significant correlation was observed between the serum PCT level and the serum tumor necrosis factor alpha level. Thus, PCT level was found to be a reliable indicator of the severity of acute pancreatitis.

  9. Celiac disease unmasked by acute severe iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Meseeha, Marcelle G; Attia, Maximos N; Kolade, Victor O

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of celiac disease (CD) appears to be increasing in the United States. However, the proportion of new CD cases with atypical presentations is also rising. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman who was diagnosed with CD in the setting of new, severe iron-deficiency anemia, 13 years into treatment of diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome associated with chronic mildly elevated liver function tests. While CD and iron deficiency anemia are common, this is a rare presentation of CD. PMID:27406450

  10. Celiac disease unmasked by acute severe iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Meseeha, Marcelle G.; Attia, Maximos N.; Kolade, Victor O.

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of celiac disease (CD) appears to be increasing in the United States. However, the proportion of new CD cases with atypical presentations is also rising. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman who was diagnosed with CD in the setting of new, severe iron-deficiency anemia, 13 years into treatment of diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome associated with chronic mildly elevated liver function tests. While CD and iron deficiency anemia are common, this is a rare presentation of CD. PMID:27406450

  11. Cannabinoids and hallucinogens for headache.

    PubMed

    McGeeney, Brian E

    2013-03-01

    Hallucinogens and most cannabinoids are classified under schedule 1 of the Federal Controlled Substances Act 1970, along with heroin and ecstacy. Hence they cannot be prescribed by physicians, and by implication, have no accepted medical use with a high abuse potential. Despite their legal status, hallucinogens and cannabinoids are used by patients for relief of headache, helped by the growing number of American states that have legalized medical marijuana. Cannabinoids in particular have a long history of use in the abortive and prophylactic treatment of migraine before prohibition and are still used by patients as a migraine abortive in particular. Most practitioners are unaware of the prominence cannabis or "marijuana" once held in medical practice. Hallucinogens are being increasingly used by cluster headache patients outside of physician recommendation mainly to abort a cluster period and maintain quiescence for which there is considerable anecdotal success. The legal status of cannabinoids and hallucinogens has for a long time severely inhibited medical research, and there are still no blinded studies on headache subjects, from which we could assess true efficacy.

  12. Early and Late Acute Kidney Injury in Severely Burned Patients

    PubMed Central

    Witkowski, Wojciech; Kawecki, Marek; Surowiecka-Pastewka, Agnieszka; Klimm, Wojciech; Szamotulska, Katarzyna; Niemczyk, Stanisław

    2016-01-01

    Background This study evaluated factors influencing early and late occurrence of AKI in severely burned patients and assessed the relationship between time of occurrence of AKI and mortality of AKI patients. Material/Methods Renal function was evaluated at 3 time points: at admission, at the critical point or middle point of hospitalization, and at the endpoint for which death or a discharge from the center was considered. AKI criteria were: decrease in GFR of less than 60 ml/min at admission, decrease in GFR of more than 75% compared to baseline, and decrease in the daily diuresis of less than 500 ml/24 h. Results At admission, 15.1% of the patients had eGFR <60 ml/min. AKI occurred in 38.5% of cases. The occurrence of AKI was associated with: elderly age (p<0.001), female sex (p=0.017), overweight and obesity (p=0.055); extent and depth of burns, respiratory failure, low protein concentration (for all p<0.001), low blood pressure (p=0.014), and high WBC (p=0.010). Early AKI was detected in 28% of patients. Mortality was 100% with the initial GFR ≥60, 100% with the initial GFR <60 and early deterioration of renal function, 80% with the initial GFR <60 and late worsening, and 60% with the initial GFR <60 and no worsening. Late AKI was observed in 10% of patients and mortality in this group was 79.2%. Mortality in the entire group with AKI was 88.0% versus 24.5%. Conclusions The frequent occurrence of AKI, especially early, worsens the prognosis for survival. Assessment of renal function should be included in the prognostic scales for burned patients. PMID:27746455

  13. Severe acute exacerbations and mortality in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Soler-Cataluna, J; Martinez-Garcia, M; Roman, S; Salcedo, E; Navarro, M; Ochando, R

    2005-01-01

    Background: Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) often present with severe acute exacerbations requiring hospital treatment. However, little is known about the prognostic consequences of these exacerbations. A study was undertaken to investigate whether severe acute exacerbations of COPD exert a direct effect on mortality. Methods: Multivariate techniques were used to analyse the prognostic influence of acute exacerbations of COPD treated in hospital (visits to the emergency service and admissions), patient age, smoking, body mass index, co-morbidity, long term oxygen therapy, forced spirometric parameters, and arterial blood gas tensions in a prospective cohort of 304 men with COPD followed up for 5 years. The mean (SD) age of the patients was 71 (9) years and forced expiratory volume in 1 second was 46 (17)%. Results: Only older age (hazard ratio (HR) 5.28, 95% CI 1.75 to 15.93), arterial carbon dioxide tension (HR 1.07, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.12), and acute exacerbations of COPD were found to be independent indicators of a poor prognosis. The patients with the greatest mortality risk were those with three or more acute COPD exacerbations (HR 4.13, 95% CI 1.80 to 9.41). Conclusions: This study shows for the first time that severe acute exacerbations of COPD have an independent negative impact on patient prognosis. Mortality increases with the frequency of severe exacerbations, particularly if these require admission to hospital. PMID:16055622

  14. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS): lessons learnt in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Many healthcare workers were infected while looking after the SARS patients on the medical wards in 2003. The high infectivity of the SARS coronavirus with peak viral load on day 10 of illness when patients were ill, overcrowding of the old medical wards with low air changes/hr (ACH), and aerosol-generating procedures while resuscitating the patients were the major factors. Procedures reported to present an increased risk of SARS transmission include tracheal intubation, non-invasive ventilation, tracheotomy and manual ventilation before intubation whereas oxygen therapy and bed distance <1 m were also implicated. Studies based on laser visualization technique with smoke particles as smokers in the human patient simulator has shown that oxygen therapy via Hudson mask and nasal cannula could disperse exhaled air of patients to 0.4 and 1 m respectively whereas jet nebulizer could disperse exhaled air >0.8 m from the patient. Bigger isolation rooms with 16 ACH are more effective than smaller isolation rooms with 12 ACH in removing exhaled air and preventing room contamination but at the expense of more noise and electricity consumption. Non-invasive ventilation via face masks and single circuit can disperse exhaled air from 0.4 to 1 m. Both higher inspiratory pressures and use of whisper swivel device (to facilitate carbon dioxide removal) could increase the exhaled air leakage and isolation room contamination during on-invasive ventilation. Addition of a viral-bacterial filter during manual ventilation by bagging may reduce the exhaled air leakage forward and yet increase the sideway leakage. N95 mask was more effective than surgical mask in preventing expelled air leakage during patient’s coughing but there was still significant sideway leakage to 15 cm. Clinicians should be aware of air leakage from the various face masks and adopt strict infection control measures during resuscitation of patients with severe respiratory infections. Carefully designed clinical

  15. Access to care - an unmet need in headache management?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Access to care for headache sufferers is not always simple. A survey conducted in a large number of members of lay associations point to the existence of multiple barriers to care for headache in several European countries. Patients usually discover the existence of specialized structures with a delay of several years after the onset of their headache. Furthermore, a relevant portion of them are not satisfied with the management of their disease, partly because of the poor efficacy of treatments and partly because of the difficulty to get in touch with the specialist. Headache disorders, and primary headaches in particular, represent an important issue in public health, because they are common, disabling and treatable. A joint effort is required from the relevant stakeholders (scientists, lay organizations, decision-makers, healthcare policymakers, and others) to improve the access to care for headache sufferers. PMID:24742114

  16. Diagnosis and management of migraine headaches.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Elizabeth C

    2004-11-01

    Migraine headaches afflict approximately 6% of men and 18% of women in the United States, and cost billions of dollars each year in lost productivity, absenteeism, and direct medical expendi tures. Despite its prevalence and the availability of therapeutic op tions, many patients do not seek treatment, and among those who do, a significant portion are misdiagnosed. Correct diagnosis can be made by identifying the historic and physical examination finding that distinguish primary headache disorders from secondary head ache disorders, as well as the key clinical features that distinguis migraine headaches from other types. Once diagnosis is made, im proper or inadequate management of headache pain, related symp toms such as nausea, and the possible aggravating side-effects of pharmacologic therapies represent further obstacles to effective ther apy. Dissatisfaction with migraine therapy on the basis of these factors is common. Among abortive therapy options there are de livery methods available which may avoid aggravating symptom such as nausea. Recommended pharmacologic agents include non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, intranasal butorphanol, ergota mine and its derivatives, and the triptans. Indications for prophylac tic in addition to abortive therapy include the occurrence o headaches that require abortive therapy more than twice a week, tha do not respond well to abortive therapy, and which are particularly severe. Research is ongoing in the pathophysiology of migraines evaluation of nonpharmacologic treatment modalities, assessment of new drug therapies, and validation of headache guidelines. PMID:15586597

  17. [Recent new information on epidemiology of headache].

    PubMed

    Kavuk, I; Katsarava, Z; Stang, A; Agelink, M W; Diener, H C

    2004-04-01

    We reviewed the epidemiology of headache disorders for the most frequent primary headache-syndromes: migraine, tension-type headache and trigemino-autonomic headache syndromes. In the last years scientific data about headache disorders have increased. New studies investigated not only the prevalence of headaches, but also economic costs of this disorder. Epidemiologic headache research also investigates the quality of life.

  18. Characteristics of Elderly-Onset (≥65 years) Headache Diagnosed Using the International Classification of Headache Disorders, Third Edition Beta Version

    PubMed Central

    Song, Tae-Jin; Kim, Yong-Jae; Kim, Byung-Kun; Kim, Byung-Su; Kim, Jae-Moon; Kim, Soo-Kyoung; Moon, Heui-Soo; Cha, Myoung-Jin; Park, Kwang-Yeol; Sohn, Jong-Hee; Chu, Min Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose New-onset headache in elderly patients is generally suggestive of a high probability of secondary headache, and the subtypes of primary headache diagnoses are still unclear in the elderly. This study investigated the characteristics of headache with an older age at onset (≥65 years) and compared the characteristics between younger and older age groups. Methods We prospectively collected demographic and clinical data of 1,627 patients who first visited 11 tertiary hospitals in Korea due to headache between August 2014 and February 2015. Headache subtype was categorized according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders, Third Edition Beta Version. Results In total, 152 patients (9.3%, 106 women and 46 men) experienced headache that began from 65 years of age [elderly-onset group (EOG)], while the remaining 1,475 patients who first experienced headache before the age of 65 years were classified as the younger-age-at-onset group (YOG). Among the primary headache types, tension-type headache (55.6% vs. 28.8%) and other primary headache disorders (OPH, 31.0% vs. 17.3%) were more common in the EOG than in the YOG, while migraine was less frequent (13.5% vs. 52.2%) (p=0.001) in the EOG. Among OPH, primary stabbing headache (87.2%) was more frequent in the EOG than in the YOG (p=0.032). The pain was significantly less severe (p=0.026) and the frequency of medication overuse headache was higher in EOG than in YOG (23.5% vs. 7.6%, p=0.040). Conclusions Tension-type headache and OPH headaches, primarily stabbing headache, were more common in EOG patients than in YOG patients. The pain intensity, distribution of headache diagnoses, and frequency of medication overuse differed according to the age at headache onset.

  19. Novel Paramyxovirus Associated with Severe Acute Febrile Disease, South Sudan and Uganda, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Albariño, César G.; Foltzer, Michael; Towner, Jonathan S.; Rowe, Lory A.; Campbell, Shelley; Jaramillo, Carlos M.; Bird, Brian H.; Reeder, DeeAnn M.; Vodzak, Megan E.; Rota, Paul; Metcalfe, Maureen G.; Spiropoulou, Christina F.; Knust, Barbara; Vincent, Joel P.; Frace, Michael A.; Nichol, Stuart T.; Rollin, Pierre E.

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, a female wildlife biologist experienced fever, malaise, headache, generalized myalgia and arthralgia, neck stiffness, and a sore throat shortly after returning to the United States from a 6-week field expedition to South Sudan and Uganda. She was hospitalized, after which a maculopapular rash developed and became confluent. When the patient was discharged from the hospital on day 14, arthralgia and myalgia had improved, oropharynx ulcerations had healed, the rash had resolved without desquamation, and blood counts and hepatic enzyme levels were returning to reference levels. After several known suspect pathogens were ruled out as the cause of her illness, deep sequencing and metagenomics analysis revealed a novel paramyxovirus related to rubula-like viruses isolated from fruit bats. PMID:24447466

  20. Comparison of two simplified severity scores (SAPS and APACHE II) for patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Moreau, R; Soupison, T; Vauquelin, P; Derrida, S; Beaucour, H; Sicot, C

    1989-05-01

    The Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS), the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II), the Acute Physiology Score (APS), and the Coronary Prognostic Index (CPI), calculated within the first 24 h of ICU admission, were compared in 76 patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Sixteen (21%) patients subsequently died in the ICU. The nonsurvivors had significantly higher SAPS, APACHE II, and CPI scores than the survivors. ROC curves drawn for each severity index were in a discriminating position. There were no significant differences either between the areas under the ROC curves drawn for SAPS, APACHE II, and CPI, or between the overall accuracies of these indices. APS provided less homogeneous information. We conclude that SAPS and APACHE II, two severity indices which are easy to use, assess accurately the short-term prognosis, i.e., the ICU outcome, of patients with AMI. PMID:2707010

  1. Two cases of acute atraumatic compartment syndrome complicated with severe heat stroke.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Yukihiro; Hasegawa, Arifumi; Tsukada, Yasuhiko; Abe, Yoshinobu; Shimada, Jiro; Tase, Choichiro

    2010-12-01

    Acute compartment syndrome is a life-threatening complication in trauma patients. Not only regional neuromuscular disability, but also systemic organ disorders can result from prolonged tissue ischemia. In this report, we describe 2 cases of acute atraumatic compartment syndrome complicated with severe heat stroke. In both cases, emergency fasciotomy was rapidly performed after recognition of the syndrome, but serious regional neuromuscular disabilities remained. Microvascular endothelial injury is an important mechanism of acute atraumatic compartment syndrome. Thrombi diffusely formed in the compartmental space hinder establishment of reperfusion even after fasciotomy. Furthermore, disruption of fibrinolysis due to heat stroke could enhance this damage.

  2. Recurrent Acute Decompensated Heart Failure Owing to Severe Iron Deficiency Anemia Caused by Inappropriate Habitual Bloodletting

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Woo-Hyun; Kim, Hack-Lyoung; Kim, Ki-Hwan; Na, Sang Hoon; Lee, Hyun-Jung; Kang, Eun Gyu; Seo, Jae-Bin; Chung, Woo-Young; Zo, Joo-Hee; Hong, Jung Ae; Kim, Kwangyoun; Kim, Myung-A

    2015-01-01

    A 68-year-old woman visited the emergency department twice with symptoms of acute heart failure including shortness of breath, general weakness, and abdominal distension. Laboratory findings showed extremely low level of serum hemoglobin at 1.4 g/dL. Echocardiographic examination demonstrated dilated left ventricular cavity with systolic dysfunction and moderate amount of pericardial effusion. In this patient, acute heart failure due to severe iron deficiency anemia was caused by inappropriate habitual bloodletting. PMID:26755934

  3. Headache features in patients with dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Domingues, R B; Kuster, G W; Onuki de Castro, F L; Souza, V A; Levi, J E; Pannuti, C S

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the frequency and features of headache among patients with confirmed dengue virus infection and to compare the headache features in patients with dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever, primary and secondary dengue infection, and patients with and without neurological involvement. Patients with classic dengue fever had a more intense headache than those with the more severe form of the disease, dengue haemorrhagic fever.

  4. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome and the Delivery of Continuing Medical Education: Case Study from Toronto

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Dave; Ryan, David; Sibbald, Gary; Rachlis, Anita; Davies, Sharon; Manchul, Lee; Parikh, Sagar

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) struck Toronto in the spring of 2003, causing many deaths, serious morbidity, forced quarantine of thousands of individuals, and the closure of all provincial hospitals for several weeks. Given the direction by public health authorities to cancel or postpone all continuing medical education…

  5. Severe pancytopenia due to acute folate deficiency despite normal folate erythrocyte level.

    PubMed

    Huguenin, Antoine; Barraud, Sara; Daliphard, Sylvie; Marot, Didier; Garnotel, Roselyne; Bani-Sadr, Firouzé

    2016-06-01

    We report the case of an alcoholic patient with severe pancytopenia with low plasma folate level but normal erythrocyte folates and cobalamin levels. The bone marrow smear concluded to a pancytopenia due to folates and/or cobalamin deficiency. Severe pancytopenia due to acute plasma folate deficiency can be observed despite normal erythrocyte folates level which reflects the organism's folates store. PMID:27108778

  6. Effects of acute alcohol withdrawal on nest building in mice selectively bred for alcohol withdrawal severity.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Gian D; Phillips, Tamara J; Crabbe, John C

    2016-10-15

    Nest building has been used to assess thermoregulatory behavior and positive motivational states in mice. There are known genetic influences on ethanol withdrawal severity as well as individual/thermoregulatory nest building. Withdrawal Seizure-Prone (WSP-1, WSP-2) and Withdrawal Seizure-Resistant (WSR-1, WSR-2) mice were selectively bred for high vs low handling-induced convulsion (HIC) severity, respectively, during withdrawal from chronic ethanol vapor inhalation. They also differ in HIC severity during withdrawal from an acute, 4g/kg ethanol injection. In our initial study, withdrawal from an acute dose of ethanol dose-dependently impaired nest building over the initial 24h of withdrawal in genetically segregating Withdrawal Seizure Control (WSC) mice. In two further studies, acute ethanol withdrawal suppressed nest building for up to two days in WSP-1 females. Deficits in nest building from ethanol were limited to the initial 10h of withdrawal in WSR-1 females and to the initial 24h of withdrawal in WSP-1 and WSR-1 males. Effects of ethanol on nest building for up to two days were found in WSP-2 and WSR-2 mice of both sexes. Nest building deficits in female mice from the first replicate could not be explained by a general decrease in locomotor behavior. These results suggest that nest building is a novel behavioral phenotype for indexing the severity of acute ethanol withdrawal, and that genes contributing to this trait differ from those affecting acute withdrawal HIC severity. PMID:27503811

  7. Types of headache and those remedies in traditional persian medicine

    PubMed Central

    Zarshenas, Mohammad M.; Petramfar, Peyman; Firoozabadi, Ali; Moein, Mahmood Reza; Mohagheghzadeh, Abdolali

    2013-01-01

    The history of headache, as a common neurological complication, goes back to almost 9000 years ago. Many ancient civilizations present references to headaches and the coherent treatment strategies. Accordingly, several documents comprising headache complications embodying precise medical information stem from Traditional Persian Medicine (TPM) that can provide useful opportunities for more comprehensive treatment. We conducted a survey on headache through original important pharmacopeias and other important medical manuscripts of TPM which were written during 9th to 19th centuries and have derived all headache categories and herbal remedies. An extensive search of scientific data banks, such as Medline and Scopus, has also been exercised to find results relating to the anti-inflammatory, anti-nociceptive, and analgesic effects of denoted medicinal herbs. The concept of headache and treatments in TPM covers over 20 various types of headache and more than 160 different medicinal plants administered for oral, topical, and nasal application according to 1000 years of the subject documents. Nearly, 60% of remarked medicinal herbs have related anti-inflammatory or analgesic effects and some current headache types have similarities and conformities to those of traditional types. Beside historical approaches, there are many possible and available strategies that can lead to development of new and effective headache treatment from medicinal plants so that this study can provide beneficial information on clinical remedies based on centuries of experience in the field of headache which can stand as a new candidate for further investigations. PMID:23922452

  8. Temporomandibular Disorders and Headache.

    PubMed

    Graff-Radford, Steven B; Abbott, Jeremy J

    2016-08-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and primary headaches can be perpetual and debilitating musculoskeletal and neurological disorders. The presence of both can affect up to one-sixth of the population at any one time. Initially, TMDs were thought to be predominantly musculoskeletal disorders, and migraine was thought to be solely a cerebrovascular disorder. The further understanding of their pathophysiology has helped to clarify their clinical presentation. This article focuses on the role of the trigeminal system in associating TMD and migraine. By discussing recent descriptions of prevalence, diagnosis, and treatment of headache and TMD, we will further elucidate this relationship. PMID:27475510

  9. Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndrome Without Typical Thunderclap Headache.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Valérie; Ducros, Anne

    2016-04-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is characterized by severe headache and diffuse segmental intracranial arterial constriction that resolve within three months. Stroke, which is the major complication of RCVS, can result in persistent neurological disability, and rarely causes death. Diagnosis of RCVS early in the clinical course might improve outcomes. Although recurrent thunderclap headache is the clinical hallmark of RCVS, the absence of such a pattern should not lead to discard the diagnosis. Our literature review shows that RCVS can also manifest as an unspecific headache, such as a single severe headache episode, a mild or a progressive headache. Moreover, a subset of patients with severe RCVS presents without any headache, but frequently with seizures, focal neurological deficits, confusion or coma, in the setting of stroke or posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. These patients may be aphasic or in comatose state, explaining their inability to give their own medical history. They may have forgotten the headache they had a few days before more dramatic symptoms, or may have a variant of the classical RCVS. By consequence, an RCVS should be suspected in patients with any unusual headache, whether thunderclap or not, and in patients with cryptogenic stroke or convexity subarachnoid hemorrhage, whether the patient also has headache or not. Diagnosis in such cases relies on the demonstration of reversible multifocal intracranial arterial stenosis and the exclusion of other causes. PMID:27016378

  10. Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndrome Without Typical Thunderclap Headache.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Valérie; Ducros, Anne

    2016-04-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is characterized by severe headache and diffuse segmental intracranial arterial constriction that resolve within three months. Stroke, which is the major complication of RCVS, can result in persistent neurological disability, and rarely causes death. Diagnosis of RCVS early in the clinical course might improve outcomes. Although recurrent thunderclap headache is the clinical hallmark of RCVS, the absence of such a pattern should not lead to discard the diagnosis. Our literature review shows that RCVS can also manifest as an unspecific headache, such as a single severe headache episode, a mild or a progressive headache. Moreover, a subset of patients with severe RCVS presents without any headache, but frequently with seizures, focal neurological deficits, confusion or coma, in the setting of stroke or posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. These patients may be aphasic or in comatose state, explaining their inability to give their own medical history. They may have forgotten the headache they had a few days before more dramatic symptoms, or may have a variant of the classical RCVS. By consequence, an RCVS should be suspected in patients with any unusual headache, whether thunderclap or not, and in patients with cryptogenic stroke or convexity subarachnoid hemorrhage, whether the patient also has headache or not. Diagnosis in such cases relies on the demonstration of reversible multifocal intracranial arterial stenosis and the exclusion of other causes.

  11. Psychological Risk Factors in Headache

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Robert A.; Houle, Timothy T.; Rhudy, Jamie L.; Norton, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    Headache is a chronic disease that occurs with varying frequency and results in varying levels of disability. To date, the majority of research and clinical focus has been on the role of biological factors in headache and headache-related disability. However, reliance on a purely biomedical model of headache does not account for all aspects of headache and associated disability. Using a biopsychosocial framework, the current manuscript expands the view of what factors influence headache by considering the role psychological (i.e., cognitive and affective) factors have in the development, course, and consequences of headache. The manuscript initially reviews evidence showing that neural circuits responsible for cognitive–affective phenomena are highly interconnected with the circuitry responsible for headache pain. The manuscript then reviews the influence cognitions (locus of control and self-efficacy) and negative affect (depression, anxiety, and anger) have on the development of headache attacks, perception of headache pain, adherence to prescribed treatment, headache treatment outcome, and headache-related disability. The manuscript concludes with a discussion of the clinical implications of considering psychological factors when treating headache. PMID:17371358

  12. A study of the clinical profile of acute pancreatitis and its correlation with severity indices

    PubMed Central

    Vengadakrishnan, K.; Koushik, A. K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute pancreatitis is a common disease with wide clinical variation and its incidence is increasing. Acute pancreatitis may vary in severity, from mild self-limiting pancreatic inflammation to pancreatic necrosis with life-threatening sequelae. Severity of acute pancreatitis is linked to the presence of systemic organ dysfunctions and/or necrotizing pancreatitis. Aim and objectives The present study was aimed to assess the clinical profile of acute pancreatitis and to assess the efficacy of various severity indices in predicting the outcome of patients. Methodology This was a prospective study done in Sri Ramachandra Medical College and Hospital from April 2012–September 2014. All patients with a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis were included in this study. Along with routine lab parameters, serum amylase, lipase, lipid profile, calcium, CRP, LDH, CT abdomen, CXR and 2D Echo was done for all patients. Results A total of 110 patients were analysed. 50 patients required Intensive care, among them 9 patients (18%) died. 20 patients (18.2%) had MODS, 15 patients (13.6%) had pleural effusion, 9 patients (8.2%) had pseudocyst, 2 patients(1.8%) had hypotension, 2 patients(1.8%) had ARDS and 2 patients(1.8%) had DKA. In relation to various severity indices, high score of CRP, LDH and CT severity index was associated with increased morbidity and mortality. 15 patients (13.6%) underwent open necrosectomy surgery, 3 patients (2.7%) underwent laparoscopic necrosectomy and 7 patients (6.4%) were tried step up approach but could not avoid surgery. Step up approach and surgery did not have a significant reduction in the mortality. Conclusion Initial assessment of severity by CRP, LDH and lipase could be reliable indicators of outcome in acute pancreatitis PMID:26715920

  13. The relationship of headache occurrence to barometric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulman, Jane; Leviton, A.; Slack, W.; Porter, D.; Graham, J. R.

    1980-09-01

    A total of 75 people residing in the metropolitan Boston area who had frequently recurring headaches kept a headache diary for one month beginning March 1975. Data were also collected about barometric pressure during this time. We found that the probability of headache severity on any day was independent of the effects of time. An inference of this, supported by other findings in this study, is that headache occurrence is minimally affected by time-related phenomena such as barometric pressure readings or changes..

  14. Contraception and headache.

    PubMed

    MacGregor, E Anne

    2013-02-01

    Most women have used at least 1 method of contraception during their reproductive years, with the majority favoring combined oral contraceptives. Women are often concerned about the safety of their method of choice and also ask about likely effects on their pre-existing headache or migraine and restrictions on using their headache medication. While there should be no restriction to the use of combined hormonal contraceptives by women with migraine without aura, the balance of risks vs benefits for women with aura are debatable. Migraine with aura, but not migraine without aura, is associated with a twofold increased risk of ischemic stroke, although the absolute risk is very low in healthy, nonsmoking women. Although ethinylestradiol has been associated with increased risk of ischemic stroke, the risk is dose-dependent. Low-dose pills currently used are considerably safer than pills containing higher doses of ethinylestradiol but they are not risk-free. This review examines the evidence available regarding the effect that different methods of contraception have on headache and migraine and identifies strategies available to minimize risk and to manage specific triggers such as estrogen "withdrawal" headache and migraine associated with combined hormonal contraceptives. The independent risks of ischemic stroke associated with migraine and with hormonal contraceptives are reviewed, and guidelines for use of contraception by women with migraine are discussed in light of the current evidence. PMID:23432442

  15. Percutaneous mechanical assist for severe cardiogenic shock due to acute right ventricular failure.

    PubMed

    Kipp, Ryan; Raval, Amish N

    2015-05-01

    Acute right ventricular failure can lead to severe cardiogenic shock and death. Recovery may be achieved with early supportive measures. In many patients, intravenous fluid and inotropic resuscitation is inadequate to improve cardiac output. In these cases, percutaneous mechanical assist may provide a non-surgical bridge to recovery. Herein, we describe a case series of patients with severe, refractory cardiogenic shock due to acute right ventricular failure who received a continuous flow percutaneous ventricular device primarily utilizing the right internal jugular vein for out flow cannula placement.

  16. Impairment in episodic and chronic cluster headache.

    PubMed

    Jürgens, Tim P; Gaul, Charly; Lindwurm, Andrea; Dresler, Thomas; Paelecke-Habermann, Yvonne; Schmidt-Wilcke, Tobias; Lürding, Ralf; Henkel, Karsten; Leinisch, Elke

    2011-04-01

    Despite being an excruciating headache, little is known about the burden of cluster headache (CH) regarding its various subtypes. In a multicentre, prospective study, patients with chronic CH (n = 27), with episodic CH in the active (n = 26) and outside the active period (n = 22), migraine patients (n = 24) and healthy controls (n = 31) were included. Epidemiological data, the German version of the Headache Disability Inventory (HDI) and a screening for psychiatric complaints were applied. About 25% of chronic CH patients in our study received invalidity allowance due to CH. HDI scores (total and subscales emotion and function) indicated a severe headache-specific disability (one-way ANOVA: P < 0.01). Patients with chronic and active episodic CH were significantly more affected than patients with inactive CH and migraine. Healthy volunteers were significantly less affected than all headache patients. Symptoms suggestive of psychiatric co-morbidity were found predominantly in chronic CH: depressive symptoms (56%), signs of agoraphobia (33%) and suicidal tendencies (25%) were frequently reported. Patients with chronic and active episodic CH were severely impaired in non-economic and economic domains such as disability, working life and psychiatric complaints. Remarkably, psychiatric co-morbidity was highest in chronic CH. Thus, especially chronic CH warrants special medical and further supportive care. PMID:21123629

  17. Medical Comorbidities in Pediatric Headache.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Howard; Singhi, Samata; Gladstein, Jack

    2016-02-01

    Comorbid conditions frequently occur in pediatric headaches and may significantly affect their management. Comorbidities that have been associated with pediatric headaches include attention-deficit or hyperactivity disorder, autism, developmental disabilities, depression, anxiety, epilepsy, obesity, infantile colic, atopic disorders, inflammatory bowel disease, and irritable bowel syndrome. The goal of this article is to review these comorbidities associated with pediatric headache, thereby empowering child neurologists to identify common triggers and tailor management strategies that address headache and its comorbidities. PMID:27017024

  18. Case studies of uncommon headaches.

    PubMed

    Evans, Randolph W

    2006-05-01

    The following interesting and uncommon headache disorders are presented through case studies: exploding head syndrome, hypnic headache, neck-tongue syndrome, "Alice in Wonderland" syndrome, nummular headache, red ear syndrome, burning mouth syndrome, spontaneous intracranial hypotension syndrome, and cardiac cephalalgia. PMID:16684636

  19. Valproic Acid-Induced Severe Acute Pancreatitis with Pseudocyst Formation: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Khamrui, Sujan; Kataria, Mohnish; Biswas, Jayanta; Saha, Suman

    2015-01-01

    Valproic acid is the most widely used anti-epilep­tic drug in children, and it is probably the most frequent cause of drug-induced acute pancreatitis. Outcomes for patients with valproic acid-associated pancreatitis vary from full recovery after discontinuation of the drug to severe acute pancreatitis and death. Here, we present a case of valproic acid-induced severe acute pancreatitis with pseudocyst formation in a 10-year-old girl with cerebral palsy and generalized tonic-clonic seizure. There was no resolution of the pseudocyst after discontinuation of valproic acid. The patient became symptomatic with a progressive increase in the size of the pseudocyst. She was successfully treated with cystogastrostomy and was well at 12-month follow-up. PMID:26366333

  20. Abdominal compartment syndrome in severe acute pancreatitis treated with percutaneous catheter drainage.

    PubMed

    Park, Soonyoung; Lee, Seungho; Lee, Hyo Deok; Kim, Min; Kim, Kyeongmin; Jeong, Yusook; Park, Seon Mee

    2014-09-01

    Acute pancreatitis is one of the main causes of intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH). IAH contributes to multiple physiologic alterations and leads to the development of abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) that induces multiorgan failure. We report a case of ACS in a patient with severe acute pancreatitis. A 44-year-old man who was admitted in a drunk state was found to have severe acute pancreatitis. During management with fluid resuscitation in an intensive care unit, drowsy mentality, respiratory acidosis, shock requiring inotropes, and oliguria developed in the patient, with his abdomen tensely distended. With a presumptive diagnosis of ACS, abdominal decompression through percutaneous catheter drainage was performed immediately. The intraperitoneal pressure measured with a drainage catheter was 31 mm Hg. After abdominal decompression, the multiorgan failure was reversed. We present a case of ACS managed with percutaneous catheter decompression. PMID:25325011

  1. Different effects of tianeptine pretreatment in rats exposed to acute stress and repeated severe stress.

    PubMed

    Kasar, M; Mengi, M; Yildirim, E A; Yurdakos, E

    2009-04-01

    In this study we aim to discuss the relationship between stress and learning and emotionality in an experimental model using two different stress conditions: acute stress (single restraint stress for 20 min) and repeated severe stress (6-h daily restraint for 21 days). We studied the effects of tianeptine, which has been suggested to have anxiolytic and cognition-enhancing effects under stressful conditions. After acute stress, the increase in the duration of immobility (F = 5.753 and 3.664) in the open field and holeboard tests and the decrease in rearing (F = 3.891) in the holeboard test were significant when compared to controls (P < 0.05). Results for repeated severe stress showed that in both the open field and holeboard tests the decrease in rearing (F = 4.494 and 4.530, respectively), increase in the duration of immobility (F = 6.069 and 4.742, respectively) and decrease in head dips (F = 4.938) in the holeboard test were statistically significant (P < 0.05). The group pretreated with tianeptine showed no significant difference from controls for either acute or repeated severe stress conditions. In the Morris water maze test, acute stress led to a prolongation of average escape latency, which indicated a spatial learning deficit. Treatment with tianeptine prior to acute stress prevented this spatial deficit. Repeated severe stress also led to spatial learning deficits in rats, but this deficit was not prevented by treatment with tianeptine. Our study demonstrates that pretreatment with tianeptine had different effects on stress-induced spatial learning deficits under acute and repeated stress conditions, while the effects on emotionality and anxiety-like behavior were similar. The mechanisms implicated in stress-induced emotional and memory deficits will be discussed.

  2. A randomised, double blind, multicentre trial of octreotide in moderate to severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Uhl, W; Buchler, M; Malfertheiner, P; Beger, H; Adler, G; Gaus, W; the, G

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The pharmacological inhibition of exocrine pancreatic secretion with the somatostatin analogue octreotide has been advocated as a specific treatment of acute pancreatitis.
AIM—To investigate the efficacy of octreotide in acute pancreatitis in a randomised, placebo controlled trial.
METHODS—302 patients from 32 hospitals, fulfilling the criteria for moderate to severe acute pancreatitis within 96 hours of the onset of symptoms, were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups: group P (n=103) received placebo, while groups O1 (n=98) and O2 (n=101) received 100 and 200 µg of octreotide, respectively, by subcutaneous injection three times daily for seven days. The primary outcome variable was a score composed of mortality and 15 typical complications of acute pancreatitis.
RESULTS—The three groups were well matched with respect to pretreatment characteristics. An intent to treat analysis of all 302 patients revealed no significant differences among treatment groups with respect to mortality (P: 16%; O1: 15%; O2: 12%), the rate of newly developed complications, the duration of pain, surgical interventions, or the length of the hospital stay. A valid for efficacy analysis (251 patients) also revealed no significant differences.
CONCLUSIONS—This trial shows no benefit of octreotide in the treatment of acute pancreatitis.


Keywords: acute pancreatitis; somatostatin; octreotide; randomised controlled multicentre trial PMID:10369711

  3. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome as a cause of thunderclap headache: a retrospective case series study.

    PubMed

    Papathanasiou, Athanasios; Zouvelou, Vasiliki; Breen, David P; Phillips, Timothy J; Misbahuddin, Anjum; Chawda, Sanjiv; de Silva, Rajith

    2015-06-01

    Thunderclap headache is a common emergency department presentation. Although subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) should be the first diagnosis to exclude, reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is an important alternative cause, which may be commoner than appreciated. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome is characterized by multifocal narrowing of cerebral arteries, typically manifested by acute, severe headache with or without neurologic deficits. To compare and discuss the clinical and radiologic characteristics of patients with RCVS. We report 4 cases of RCVS, presenting at a single unit in 1 year. All presented with thunderclap headache, whereas half of them had additional neurologic symptoms such as right homonymous hemianopia, right-sided weakness, and slurred speech. Brain computed tomography was normal in 2 of our patients, but subsequent cerebrospinal fluid analysis revealed xanthochromia consistent with SAH. The remaining 2 patients demonstrated intracerebral hemorrhage on computed tomography. All of our patients underwent digital subtraction angiography that showed segmental narrowing and dilatation of one or more cerebral arteries without any signs of aneurysm. Repeat digital subtraction angiography after 3 months was entirely normal prompting the diagnosis of RCVS. Thunderclap headache requires urgent workup to identify the underlying cause. Although SAH is the most important diagnosis to exclude in the first instance, emergency physicians should be aware of other causes and how they present, such as RCVS. Early recognition of this condition is important in order to remove precipitants, avoid unnecessary investigations, and inform patients about their prognosis. PMID:25583268

  4. Social support and response to AIDS and severe acute respiratory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Arijit; Tracy, Melissa; Aiello, Allison; Des Jarlais, Don C; Galea, Sandro

    2008-05-01

    Negative public reactions to emerging infectious diseases can adversely affect population health. We assessed whether social support was associated with knowledge of, worry about, and attitudes towards AIDS and severe acute respiratory syndrome. Our findings suggest that social support may be central to our understanding of public responses to emerging infectious diseases.

  5. Exploring the Roles and Nature of Science: A Case Study of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yeung Chung

    2008-01-01

    The roles of science in society and the nature of science are the focus of many science curricula. Current views about these two aspects of science have largely been informed by the history of scientific development. This article uses the outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome--a recent health scare--as a case study to explore the roles of…

  6. Fear of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) among Health Care Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Samuel M. Y.; Kwong-Lo, Rosalie S. Y.; Mak, Christine W. Y.; Wong, Joe S.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined fear related to severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) among 2 samples of hospital staff in Hong Kong. Sample 1 included health care workers (n = 82) and was assessed during the peak of the SARS epidemic. Sample 2 included hospital staff who recovered from SARS (n = 97). The results show that participants in…

  7. Management of severe acute malnutrition in low-income and middle-income countries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Kwashiorkor and marasmus, collectively termed severe acute malnutrition (SAM), account for at least 10% of all deaths among children under 5 years of age worldwide, virtually all of them in low-income and middle-income countries. A number of risk factors, including seasonal food insecurity, environm...

  8. Gut DNA viromes of Malawian twins discordant for severe acute malnutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The bacterial component of the human gut microbiota undergoes a definable program of postnatal development. Evidence is accumulating that this program is disrupted in children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM) and that their persistent gut microbiota immaturity, which is not durably repaired with...

  9. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Epidemic and Change of People's Health Behavior in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Xiaodong; Li, Shiyue; Wang, Chunhong; Chen, Xiaoqing; Wu, Xiaomin

    2004-01-01

    Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) has become a new worldwide epidemic whose origin was until recently unknown. It is the unpredictable nature of this epidemic that makes people want answers to some important questions about what they can do to protect themselves. This study presents an inquiry into peoples knowledge and self-reported…

  10. Toward an Improved Scale for Assessing Symptom Severity in Children With Acute Otitis Media.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Nader; Hoberman, Alejandro; Rockette, Howard E; Kurs-Lasky, Marcia; Paradise, Jack L

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine whether changes in the previously developed 7-item Acute Otitis Media Severity of Symptoms scale could improve its responsiveness and its longitudinal construct validity. The items "diminished activity" and "diminished appetite" had low or borderline levels of responsiveness and longitudinal construct validity. Dropping these items seems to be potentially advantageous.

  11. Colonic fistula associated with severe acute pancreatitis: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Atsushi; Suzuki, Shohachi; Sakaguchi, Takanori; Oishi, Kosuke; Fukumoto, Kazuhiko; Ota, Shigeyasu; Inaba, Keisuke; Takehara, Yasuo; Sugimura, Haruhiko; Uchiyama, Takashi; Konno, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    Colonic fistula is a rare and potentially critical sequela of severe acute pancreatitis, which requires surgical treatment. We report two cases that were successfully treated by a colectomy for colonic fistula associated with severe acute pancreatitis. Case 1 is a 71-year-old man infected with pseudocysts owing to severe acute pancreatitis that developed into a colonic fistula as an early complication with a resulting pancreatic abscess. This patient underwent a left hemicolectomy, a transverse colostomy, and drainage of the pancreatic abscess. He has done well without recurrent disease for 35 months following surgery. Case 2 is a 58-year-old woman who had a past history of drainage during a laparotomy for a pancreatic abscess induced by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography 10 years earlier. She was admitted to our hospital with left lateral abdominal pain and low-grade fever. Abdominal magnetic resonance imaging showed a retroperitoneal abscess and fistula to the descending colon. She underwent a left hemicolectomy and drainage of the retroperitoneal abscess. She has remained symptom-free for 20 months following surgery. The colonic fistula should therefore be recognized as a late complication during long-term follow-up as well as an early sequela associated with severe acute pancreatitis.

  12. Cerebral Venous Thrombosis with Migraine-Like Headache and the Trigeminovascular System

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Fábio A.; Sória, Marília Grando; Rizelio, Vanessa; Kowacs, Pedro A.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis- (CVT-) associated headache is considered a secondary headache, commonly presenting as intracranial hypertension headache in association with seizures and/or neurological signs. However, it can occasionally mimic migraine. We report a patient presenting with a migraine-like, CVT-related headache refractory to several medications but intravenous dihydroergotamine (DHE). The response to DHE, which is considered to be an antimigraine medication, in addition to the neurovascular nature of migraine, points out to a probable similarity between CVT-headache and migraine. Based on experimental studies, we discuss this similarity and hypothesize a trigeminovascular role in the genesis of CVT-associated headache. PMID:26989532

  13. Acute severe asthma. A prospective study of the precipitating factors in 40 children.

    PubMed

    Potter, P C; Weinberg, E; Shore, S C

    1984-09-15

    A prospective study was undertaken to determine the factors precipitating acute severe asthma in children attending the Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, Cape Town. A comparison in terms of recent exposure to possible precipitating factors was made between 40 known asthmatics presenting with acute severe asthma and 40 known asthmatics who were clinically well. Exposure to known allergens had occurred in 7 cases. The time of onset of symptoms bore no relationship to meteorological changes in temperature, humidity or average pressure. Drug compliance in both groups was of the order of 50%. The majority of severe asthma attacks were associated with infection of the respiratory tract. The importance of infection as a precipitating factor in a severe asthma attack is discussed with reference to the cholinergic, adrenergic and immunological mechanisms.

  14. High-mobility group box 1 protein and its role in severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiao; Li, Wei-Qin

    2015-02-01

    The high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), which belongs to the subfamily of HMG-1/-2, is a highly conserved single peptide chain consisting of 215 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of approximately 24894 Da. HMGB1 is a ubiquitous nuclear protein in mammals and plays a vital role in inflammatory diseases. Acute pancreatitis is one of the most common causes of acute abdominal pain with a poor prognosis. Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammatory process of the pancreas (duration of less than six months), for which the severe form is called severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). More and more studies have shown that HMGB1 has a bidirectional effect in the pathogenesis of SAP. Extracellular HMGB1 can aggravate the pancreatic inflammatory process, whereas intracellular HMGB1 has a protective effect against pancreatitis. The mechanism of HMGB1 is multiple, mainly through the nuclear factor-κB pathway. Receptors for advanced glycation end-products and toll-like receptors (TLR), especially TLR-2 and TLR-4, are two major types of receptors mediating the inflammatory process triggered by HMGB1 and may be also the main mediators in the pathogenesis of SAP. HMGB1 inhibitors, such as ethyl pyruvate, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, can decrease the level of extracellular HMGB1 and are the promising targets in the treatment of SAP.

  15. Diagnosis and clinical features of trigemino-autonomic headaches.

    PubMed

    May, Arne

    2013-10-01

    Although severe short-lasting headaches are rare, they can be considered disabling conditions with a major impact on the quality of life of patients. These headaches can divided broadly in to those associated with autonomic symptoms, so called trigeminal autonomic cephalgias (TACs), and those with few or no autonomic symptoms. The TACs include cluster headache, paroxysmal hemicranias, hemicrania continua, and short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with cranial autonomic symptoms as well as short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing syndrome. In all of these syndromes, half-sided head pain and ipsilateral cranial autonomic symptoms such as lacrimation or rhinorrhea are prominent. The paroxysmal hemicranias have, unlike cluster headaches, a very robust response to indomethacin, leading to a notion of indomethacin-sensitive headaches. The diagnosis of TACs is exclusively a clinical task. Because of the fact that cluster headache is strictly half-sided, typically involves the region around the eye and temple and often starts in the upper jaw, most patients first consult a dentist or ophthalmologist. No single instrumental examination has yet been able to define, or ensure, the correct diagnosis, or differentiate idiopathic headache syndromes. It is crucial that a trained neurologist sees these patients early so that management can be optimized and unnecessary procedures can be avoided. Although TACS are, in comparison to migraine, quite rare, they are nevertheless clinically very important for the neurologist to consider as they are easy to diagnose and the treatment is very effective in most patients.

  16. Headaches and myofascial temporomandibular disorders: overlapping entities, separate managements?

    PubMed

    Conti, P C R; Costa, Y M; Gonçalves, D A; Svensson, P

    2016-09-01

    There are relevant clinical overlaps between some of the painful temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and headache conditions that may hamper the diagnostic process and treatment. A non-systematic search for studies on the relationship between TMD and headaches was carried out in the following databases: PubMed, Cochrane Library and Embase. Important pain mechanisms contributing to the close association and complex relationship between TMD and headache disorders are as follows: processes of peripheral and central sensitisation which take place in similar anatomical areas, the possible impairment of the descending modulatory pain pathways and the processes of referred pain. In addition, the clinical examination does not always provide distinguishing information to differentiate between headaches and TMD. So, considering the pathophysiology and the clinical presentation of some types of headache and myofascial TMD, such overlap can be considered not only a matter of comorbid relationship, but rather a question of disorders where the distinction lines are sometimes hard to identify. These concerns are certainly reflected in the current classification systems of both TMD and headache where the clinical consequences of diagnosis such as headache attributed to or associated with TMD are uncertain. There are several similarities in terms of therapeutic strategies used to manage myofascial TMD and headaches. Considering all these possible levels of interaction, we reinforce the recommendation for multidisciplinary approaches, by a team of oro-facial pain specialists and a neurologist (headache specialist), to attain the most precise differential diagnosis and initiate the best and most efficient treatment. PMID:27191928

  17. Headaches and myofascial temporomandibular disorders: overlapping entities, separate managements?

    PubMed

    Conti, P C R; Costa, Y M; Gonçalves, D A; Svensson, P

    2016-09-01

    There are relevant clinical overlaps between some of the painful temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and headache conditions that may hamper the diagnostic process and treatment. A non-systematic search for studies on the relationship between TMD and headaches was carried out in the following databases: PubMed, Cochrane Library and Embase. Important pain mechanisms contributing to the close association and complex relationship between TMD and headache disorders are as follows: processes of peripheral and central sensitisation which take place in similar anatomical areas, the possible impairment of the descending modulatory pain pathways and the processes of referred pain. In addition, the clinical examination does not always provide distinguishing information to differentiate between headaches and TMD. So, considering the pathophysiology and the clinical presentation of some types of headache and myofascial TMD, such overlap can be considered not only a matter of comorbid relationship, but rather a question of disorders where the distinction lines are sometimes hard to identify. These concerns are certainly reflected in the current classification systems of both TMD and headache where the clinical consequences of diagnosis such as headache attributed to or associated with TMD are uncertain. There are several similarities in terms of therapeutic strategies used to manage myofascial TMD and headaches. Considering all these possible levels of interaction, we reinforce the recommendation for multidisciplinary approaches, by a team of oro-facial pain specialists and a neurologist (headache specialist), to attain the most precise differential diagnosis and initiate the best and most efficient treatment.

  18. Gastrointestinal Headache; a Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    T Noghani, Majid; Rezaeizadeh, Hossein; Fazljoo, Sayed Mohammad Baqer; Keshavarz, Mansoor

    2016-01-01

    There are studies reporting primary headaches to be associated with gastrointestinal disorders, and some report resolution of headache following the treatment of the associated gastrointestinal disorder. Headache disorders are classified by The International Headache Society as primary or secondary; however, among the secondary headaches, those attributed to gastrointestinal disorders are not appreciated. Therefore, we aimed to review the literature to provide evidence for headaches, which originate from the gastrointestinal system. Gastrointestinal disorders that are reported to be associated with primary headaches include dyspepsia, gastro esophageal reflux disease (GERD), constipation, functional abdominal pain, inflammatory bowel syndrome (IBS), inflammatory bowel disorders (IBD), celiac disease, and helicobacter pylori (H. Pylori) infection. Some studies have demonstrated remission or improvement of headache following the treatment of the accompanying gastrointestinal disorders. Hypotheses explaining this association are considered to be central sensitization and parasympathetic referred pain, serotonin pathways, autonomic nervous system dysfunction, systemic vasculopathy, and food allergy. Traditional Persian physicians, namely Ebn-e-Sina (Avicenna) and Râzi (Rhazes) believed in a type of headache originating from disorders of the stomach and named it as an individual entity, the "Participatory Headache of Gastric Origin". We suggest providing a unique diagnostic entity for headaches coexisting with any gastrointestinal abnormality that are improved or cured along with the treatment of the gastrointestinal disorder. PMID:27800536

  19. The economic impact of the insured patients with severe chronic and acute illnesses: a qualitative approach

    PubMed Central

    Aji, Budi; Yamamoto, Shelby Suzanne; Sauerborn, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Background Little research has focused on the economic hardship among the insured with severe illnesses and high treatment costs, in particular, the consequence of poorer insurance coverage for high-cost illnesses. Therefore, we presented the case for identifying the experiences of insured patients with severe chronic and acute illnesses. This study identified a qualitative understanding of the economic impact of severe chronic and acute illnesses and household strategies to deal with high treatment costs. Design Interviews were conducted with 19 insured households of three different health insurance programs with a family member that had been hospitalized for severe chronic or acute illnesses in either Banyumas or Margono Sukarjo hospitals in Banyumas, Central Java, Indonesia. A thematic analysis was applied to guide the interpretation of the data. Results Insured households with a family member that had been hospitalized for severe chronic and acute illnesses were greatly affected by the high treatment costs. Four major issues emerged from this qualitative study: insured patients are still burdened with high out-of-pocket payments, households adopt various strategies to cope with the high cost of treatments, households experience financial hardships, and positive and negative perceptions of the insured regarding their health insurance coverage for acute and chronic illnesses. Conclusions Askes and Jamsostek patients faced financial burdens from high cost sharing for hospital amenities, non-covered drugs, and treatments and other indirect costs. Meanwhile, Jamkesmas beneficiaries faced no financial burden for related medical services but were rather burdened with indirect costs for the carers. Households relied on internal resources to cover hospital bills as the first strategy, which included the mobilization of savings, sale of assets, and borrowing of money. External support was tapped secondarily and included financial support from extended family members

  20. Imaging of Headache in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Skliut, Maryna; Jamieson, Dara G

    2016-10-01

    Pregnant women are most likely to have primary headaches, such as migraine and tension-type headaches, which can be diagnosed and treated without brain imaging. Primary headaches may even start de novo during pregnancy, especially in the first few months. However, when the headache occurs late in pregnancy or in the peripartum period, secondary causes of headaches need to be considered and evaluated by brain and/or vascular imaging, generally using magnetic resonance techniques. There is considerable overlap between the cerebrovascular complications of pregnancy, including preeclampsia/eclampsia, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS), and both hemorrhagic and ischemic strokes; although, their imaging may be distinctive. Imaging is necessary to distinguish between arterial and venous pathology causing headache in the peripartum patient, as there can be similar presenting symptoms. Mass lesions, both neoplastic and inflammatory, can enlarge and produce headaches and neurological symptoms late in pregnancy. PMID:27562782

  1. Psychological factors in childhood headaches.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Kathleen; Dunn, David; Scott, Eric

    2010-06-01

    Recurrent headaches in children are most often migraines and are based in a genetic predisposition with a low headache threshold. As with any pain experience, there is a large emotional component associated with an attack of migraines that grows in amplitude as the headaches become more frequent and resistant to medicine, sleep, or other agents that used to work. Childhood headaches are especially complicated for 3 reasons: (1) the parents' fear (communicated to the child that serious medical pathology underlies the head pain), (2) the lack of evidence-based pharmacologic treatment, and (3) the belief that these headaches are largely psychological. This article addresses the mystery surrounding childhood headaches by delving into the influence of school, friends, and family; the impact of divorce; the coping skills required for a child to manage a migrainous nervous system; the potential secondary gain from headaches; psychiatric comorbidities and how to treat them; and the role of psychological intervention.

  2. The Management of Chronic Headaches

    PubMed Central

    Murray, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    Most patients who complain of recurrent headaches have migraine, muscle contraction headache, or both. At a patient's first office visit for headache, the family physician should carry out a physical and neurological examination. The type of headache and factors that can precipitate it may then be explained, and the patient should be advised to take only simple analgesics for pain, as soon as he recognizes the first symptom of headache. A daily diary can help reveal specific factors that precipitate the patient's headaches. He can also benefit from educational material, and be taught relaxation techniques to ease headache pain. At least one follow up office visit is necessary in order to emphasize and review instructions from the previous assessment, and to give the patient an opportunity to consider the explanation and problems and voice any remaining concerns or questions. PMID:21278963

  3. Psychological Aspects of Headache

    PubMed Central

    Sloane, R. Bruce

    1964-01-01

    Headache is considered as a non-specific syndrome illustrating the concept of pain as an emotion. Viewed in this way, its meaning looms larger than its site. Pain indicates dis-ease of the patient, sometimes with his body, but more often with his life. No pain is “imaginary”, nor can some pain be assigned to physiological and some to psychological pathways. Such a decision is often merely a judgmental one. Just as the “brain” cannot easily be separated from the “mind”, so to believe that some pain is “physical” and some “emotional” is a distortion. All painful syndromes are mixed and the problem is to decipher the meaning of the pain. Only rarely will headache respond to physical measures alone. PMID:14199822

  4. Acute pandysautonomia and severe sensory deficit with poor recovery. A clinical, neurophysiological and pathological case study.

    PubMed Central

    Fagius, J; Westerberg, C E; Olsson, Y

    1983-01-01

    A patient with acute loss of autonomic functions and virtually all afferent functions of peripheral nerves is described. The course was chronic and the outcome fatal. The clinical course was followed with measurements of sensory thresholds and conduction velocities, autonomic tests and microneurographic recordings. Neuropathological changes were severe and localised in the peripheral nervous system. Previously reported similar cases were reviewed. It was concluded that acute pandysautonomia is a disorder similar to the Guillain-Barré syndrome; the course is often protracted and residual neurological deficit common. Images PMID:6886716

  5. Prevalence of medication overuse headache in an interdisciplinary pain clinic

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Medication overuse headache (MOH) has been recognized as an important problem in headache patients although the pathophysiological mechanisms remain unclear. The diagnosis of MOH is based on clinical characteristics defined by the International Headache Society. The aim was the evaluation of the diagnostic criteria of MOH in a mixed population of chronic pain patients to gain information about the prevalence and possible associations with MOH. Methods Data of all patients referred to the interdisciplinary pain clinic at the University Hospital of Zurich between September 2005 and December 2007 were retrospectively analyzed. Demographic data (age, sex, history of migration), as well as data about duration of pain disease, category of pain disease (neurological, psychiatric, rheumatologic, other), use of medication, history of trauma, and comorbidity of depression and anxiety have been collected. Results Totally 178 of 187 consecutive chronic pain patients were included in the study. A total of 138 patients (78%) used analgesics on 15 or more days per month. Chronic headache was more prevalent among patients with analgesic overuse (39.8%) than without analgesic overuse (18%). The prevalence of MOH was 29%. The odds ratio (OR) for a patient with medication overuse to have chronic headache was 13.1 if he had a history of primary headache, compared to a patient without a primary headache syndrome. Furthermore, history of headache (OR 2.5, CI [1.13;5.44]), history of migration (OR 2.9, CI [1.31;6.32]) and comorbid depression (OR 3.5, CI [1.46;8.52]) were associated with overuse of acute medication, in general. Conclusions Primary headaches have a high risk for chronification in patients overusing analgesics for other pain disorders. Whereas history of headache, history of migration and comorbidity of depression are independentely associated with analgesic overuse in this group of patients. PMID:23565761

  6. Examination of the diagnostic validity of 'headache attributed to whiplash injury': a controlled, prospective study.

    PubMed

    Schrader, H; Stovner, L J; Obelieniene, D; Surkiene, D; Mickeviciene, D; Bovim, G; Sand, T

    2006-11-01

    Acute and chronic headache attributed to whiplash injury are new diagnostic entities in the International Classification of Headache Disorders, second edition. A main objective of the present study was to assess the validity of these nosologic entities by studying the headache pattern in an inception cohort of 210 rear-end car collision victims and in 210 matched controls. Consecutive drivers involved in rear-end collisions were identified from the daily records of the Traffic Police Department of Kaunas, Lithuania. A standard self-report questionnaire was sent to the drivers between 2 and 7 days after the collision, and their passengers were recruited as well. Headache and neck pain were evaluated within 7 days of the collision, at 2 months and 1 year after the collision. A control group of non-traumatized subjects received questionnaires at the time of the selection and 1 year later. Of the 75 collision victims who developed headache within the first 7 days of the collision, 37 had a clinical picture in accordance with the criteria for acute whiplash headache (i.e., concomitant neck pain) and 38 did not. For acute headache after collision, concomitant neck pain was of no relevance to the headache type or its course. In both these subgroups, migraine and tension-type headache could be diagnosed in similar proportions and the prognosis after 2 months and 1 year was also similar. Preexisting headache was a strong prognostic factor in both groups for both acute and chronic pain. Compared with the non-traumatized control group, the 1-year incidence of new or worsened headache, or of headache improvement, was the same. A likely interpretation of the data is that acute headaches after rear-end car collisions mainly represent episodes of a primary headache precipitated by the stress of the situation. We conclude that the nosologic validity of both acute and chronic whiplash headache is poor as the headaches, in accordance with the criteria lack distinguishing clinical

  7. Oxidation-Reduction Potential as a Biomarker for Severity and Acute Outcome in Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Stewart; Carrick, Matthew; Mains, Charles W.; Slone, Denetta S.

    2016-01-01

    There are few reliable markers for assessing traumatic brain injury (TBI). Elevated levels of oxidative stress have been observed in TBI patients. We hypothesized that oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) could be a potent biomarker in TBI. Two types of ORP were measured in patient plasma samples: the static state of oxidative stress (sORP) and capacity for induced oxidative stress (icORP). Differences in ORP values as a function of time after injury, severity, and hospital discharge were compared using ANOVAs with significance at p ≤ 0.05. Logit regression analyses were used to predict acute outcome comparing ORP, Injury Severity Score (ISS), Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS), and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). Antioxidant capacity (icORP) on day 4 was prognostic for acute outcomes (p < 0.05). An odds ratio of 4.08 was associated with poor acute outcome when icORP > 7.25 μC. IcORP was a better predictor than ISS, AIS, or GCS scores. sORP increased in those with the highest ISS values (p < 0.05). Based on these findings ORP is useful biomarker for severity and acute outcome in TBI patients. Changes in ORP values on day 4 after injury were the most prognostic, suggesting that patients' response to brain injury over time is a factor that determines outcome.

  8. Oxidation-Reduction Potential as a Biomarker for Severity and Acute Outcome in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Bjugstad, Kimberly B; Rael, Leonard T; Levy, Stewart; Carrick, Matthew; Mains, Charles W; Slone, Denetta S; Bar-Or, David

    2016-01-01

    There are few reliable markers for assessing traumatic brain injury (TBI). Elevated levels of oxidative stress have been observed in TBI patients. We hypothesized that oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) could be a potent biomarker in TBI. Two types of ORP were measured in patient plasma samples: the static state of oxidative stress (sORP) and capacity for induced oxidative stress (icORP). Differences in ORP values as a function of time after injury, severity, and hospital discharge were compared using ANOVAs with significance at p ≤ 0.05. Logit regression analyses were used to predict acute outcome comparing ORP, Injury Severity Score (ISS), Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS), and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). Antioxidant capacity (icORP) on day 4 was prognostic for acute outcomes (p < 0.05). An odds ratio of 4.08 was associated with poor acute outcome when icORP > 7.25 μC. IcORP was a better predictor than ISS, AIS, or GCS scores. sORP increased in those with the highest ISS values (p < 0.05). Based on these findings ORP is useful biomarker for severity and acute outcome in TBI patients. Changes in ORP values on day 4 after injury were the most prognostic, suggesting that patients' response to brain injury over time is a factor that determines outcome. PMID:27642494

  9. Signal Intensity of Superb Microvascular Imaging Correlates with the Severity of Acute Cholecystitis

    PubMed Central

    Tomizawa, Minoru; Shinozaki, Fuminobu; Motoyoshi, Yasufumi; Sugiyama, Takao; Yamamoto, Shigenori; Ishige, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of the severity of acute cholecystitis is critical for the management of this condition. Superb microvascular imaging (SMI) enables the assessment of slow blood flow of small vessels without any contrast medium. An 84-year-old man visited our hospital with right upper abdominal pain. Computed tomography and abdominal ultrasonography showed a slight thickening of the gallbladder. White blood cell count and C-reactive protein levels were elevated. He was diagnosed with acute cholecystitis and treated conservatively with antibiotics. Two days later, his condition worsened and percutaneous transhepatic gallbladder drainage (PTGBD) was performed. The patient recovered and was discharged, and his drainage was withdrawn 7 days later. On admission, color-coded SMI (cSMI) showed pulsatory signals on the slightly thickened gallbladder wall. On the day of PTGBD, the intensity of the signal on cSMI had increased. Once the patient was cured, no further signal was observed on the gallbladder wall with either cSMI or mSMI. In conclusion, the strong pulsatory signal correlated with the severity of acute cholecystitis observed with cSMI and mSMI. Illustrating the signal intensity is useful for the evaluation of the severity of acute cholecystitis. PMID:27721732

  10. Oxidation-Reduction Potential as a Biomarker for Severity and Acute Outcome in Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Stewart; Carrick, Matthew; Mains, Charles W.; Slone, Denetta S.

    2016-01-01

    There are few reliable markers for assessing traumatic brain injury (TBI). Elevated levels of oxidative stress have been observed in TBI patients. We hypothesized that oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) could be a potent biomarker in TBI. Two types of ORP were measured in patient plasma samples: the static state of oxidative stress (sORP) and capacity for induced oxidative stress (icORP). Differences in ORP values as a function of time after injury, severity, and hospital discharge were compared using ANOVAs with significance at p ≤ 0.05. Logit regression analyses were used to predict acute outcome comparing ORP, Injury Severity Score (ISS), Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS), and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). Antioxidant capacity (icORP) on day 4 was prognostic for acute outcomes (p < 0.05). An odds ratio of 4.08 was associated with poor acute outcome when icORP > 7.25 μC. IcORP was a better predictor than ISS, AIS, or GCS scores. sORP increased in those with the highest ISS values (p < 0.05). Based on these findings ORP is useful biomarker for severity and acute outcome in TBI patients. Changes in ORP values on day 4 after injury were the most prognostic, suggesting that patients' response to brain injury over time is a factor that determines outcome. PMID:27642494

  11. Oxidation-Reduction Potential as a Biomarker for Severity and Acute Outcome in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Bjugstad, Kimberly B; Rael, Leonard T; Levy, Stewart; Carrick, Matthew; Mains, Charles W; Slone, Denetta S; Bar-Or, David

    2016-01-01

    There are few reliable markers for assessing traumatic brain injury (TBI). Elevated levels of oxidative stress have been observed in TBI patients. We hypothesized that oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) could be a potent biomarker in TBI. Two types of ORP were measured in patient plasma samples: the static state of oxidative stress (sORP) and capacity for induced oxidative stress (icORP). Differences in ORP values as a function of time after injury, severity, and hospital discharge were compared using ANOVAs with significance at p ≤ 0.05. Logit regression analyses were used to predict acute outcome comparing ORP, Injury Severity Score (ISS), Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS), and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). Antioxidant capacity (icORP) on day 4 was prognostic for acute outcomes (p < 0.05). An odds ratio of 4.08 was associated with poor acute outcome when icORP > 7.25 μC. IcORP was a better predictor than ISS, AIS, or GCS scores. sORP increased in those with the highest ISS values (p < 0.05). Based on these findings ORP is useful biomarker for severity and acute outcome in TBI patients. Changes in ORP values on day 4 after injury were the most prognostic, suggesting that patients' response to brain injury over time is a factor that determines outcome.

  12. Headache after substance abuse: a diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Kamat, A S; Aliashkevich, A F; Denton, J R; Fitzjohn, T P

    2012-03-01

    An 18-year-old man inhaled a substance containing synthetic cannabinoids and 1 hour later developed a severe global headache. Imaging revealed a perimesencephalic subarachnoid haemorrhage. An angiogram suggested that a small superior cerebellar artery aneurysm was the culprit. This report discusses the, as yet undefined, relationship between "herbal highs" and intracranial haemorrhage.

  13. Headache and sferics.

    PubMed

    Vaitl, D; Propson, N; Stark, R; Walter, B; Schienle, A

    2001-10-01

    Many patients with migraine believe weather is a trigger for their headaches. The objective of this study was to determine if very low frequency sferics, pulse-shaped electromagnetic fields originating from atmospheric discharges (lightning), are precipitating factors. The occurrence of sferics impulses is characterized by a daily, as well as an annual, periodicity and is thought to be associated with various pathological processes. The diaries of 37 women suffering from migraine and tension-type headaches were analyzed over a period of 6 months and correlated with daily sferics activity and other weather phenomena in the area of Giessen, Germany. From October through December (autumn), sferics activity was correlated with the occurrence of migraine (r = 0.33, P<.01); however, there was no correlation in July and August (summer), when the thunderstorm activity had been very intense. In summer, tension-type headaches were associated with other weather parameters such as temperature (r = 0.36, P<.01) and vapor pressure (r = 0.27, P<.05). PMID:11703470

  14. Radiofrequency treatment of cervicogenic headache

    PubMed Central

    Peñarrocha, Miguel; Peñarrocha, Maria; Calvo, Ana; Jiménez, Alejandro; March, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: In the clinical management of facial pain, a possible cervical origin must be considered. A clinical exploration is therefore essential. The disorder originates in the intimate connections between the cranial portion of the spinal cord and the trigeminal system. Although solid evidence supporting the use of radiofrequency (RF) treatment is lacking, it remains one of the management options to be taken into account. The present study evaluates the efficacy of RF in application to cervicogenic headache. Study design: We present three cases of severe facial pain arising from different cervical structures. Results: In two cases the pain originated in cervical roots C2 and C3, while in the third patient the trigger point was located at the level of the atlantoaxial joint. Pulsed RF was applied for 4 minutes at the dorsal ganglion of C2 and C3 in the first two cases, and for 8 minutes at intraarticular level in the third patient. The pain gradually subsided during the first month in all cases. The first two patients reported 70% improvement after one month, 60% improvement after 6 months, and 30-50% after one year, versus baseline. The third patient reported complete pain resolution lasting approximately 5 months, after which the pain reappeared with the same intensity as before. Conclusions: Radiofrequency is a satisfactory treatment option, affording adequate analgesia, though the effects are sometimes temporary. Key words:Cervicogenic headache, pulsed radiofrequency, analgesia. PMID:23229235

  15. [Severe hypertriglyceridemia induced acute pancreatitis: a case report and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Herrera Del Águila, Dwight Denis; Garavito Rentería, Jorge; Linarez Medina, Karen; Lizarzaburu Rodríguez, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis occurs in about 1-4% of the cases. It is the third leading cause of pancreatitis after biliary and alcoholic etiology. Hypertriglyceridemia can be caused by primary causes, lipid metabolism disorders and secondary causes. A 32 year old man, born in Huancayo, with a history of diabetes mellitus type 2, severe mixed dyslipidemia with primary hypertriglyceridemia, was admitted to emergency with 10 days of abdominal pain with moderate intensity in epigastrium and left hypochondrium spreading to dorsal region after intake of high-fat meal. 24 hours before admission, pain exacerbates increasing intensity and causing nausea and bilious vomits. Therefore, all laboratory examinations are carried out resulting in hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis. For that reason, an adequate clinical history physical examination associated with laboratory and image examinations are important to consider hypertriglyceridemia as part of the etiology of acute pancreatitis.

  16. A new pathological scoring method for adrenal injury in rats with severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wenhong; Hui, Yuanjian; Yu, Jia; Wang, Weixing; Xu, Sheng; Chen, Chen; Xiong, Xincheng

    2014-12-01

    These studies investigated the appearance and function of adrenal glands in rats with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and established a new histopathological score to evaluate adrenal histopathological changes. Severe acute pancreatitis relied on retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the bile-pancreatic duct. The damage of SAP was estimated by serum amylase, secretory phospholipase A2 and pancreatic histopathology. Light and electron microscopy of adrenal gland, and the levels of serum corticosterone were investigated. These results showed that the generally ascending trend of adrenal pathological score was inversely proportional to the generally descending trend of serum corticosterone levels, but parallel with the changes of pancreatic histopathology. Herein, the new adrenal histopathological score was effective in the evaluation of adrenal injury following SAP. It may indirectly reflect the variation of serum cortisol levels and the severity of pancreatitis to a certain extent.

  17. [Biochemical markers in assessment of severity and prognosis of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Petricusić, Lidija; Banić, Marko; Cabrijan, Zeljko; Urek-Crncević, Marija; Hulak-Karlak, Vanja; Grgurević, Ivica

    2009-01-01

    The authors reveal and discuss the role of novel biochemical parameters in early diagnosis of acute pancreatitis and assessment of the severity of the disease. These biochemical parameters, beside routinely used amilase and lipase, might enable us to early identify those patients who are at risk of developing severe form of pancreatitis or complications. These parameters include trypsinogen activation peptide (TAP), C-reactive protein (CRP, tripsinogen-2, procalcitonin, phospholipase-A2 (PLA2), carboxypeptidase activation peptide (CAPAP) and interleukin-6 and 8 (IL-6, IL-8). Although these markers are still not incorporated in routine clinical practice, IL-6, IL-10, procalcitonin and trypsinogen activation peptide seem to have a good chance to be used as a new biochemical markers in assessment of severity and prognosis of acute pancreatitis.

  18. Prevalence and burden of primary headache disorders among a local community in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Headache disorders are the most common complaints worldwide. Migraine, tension type and cluster headaches account for majority of primary headaches and improvise a substantial burden on the individual, family or society at large. There is a scanty data on the prevalence of primary headaches in sub-Saharan Africa in general and Ethiopia in particular. Moreover there is no population based urban study in Ethiopia. The purpose of this study is to determine the prevalence and burden of primary headaches in local community in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Methods Cross-sectional sample survey was carried out in Addis Ketema sub city, Kebele 16/17/18 (local smallest administrative unit). Using systematic random sampling, data were collected by previously used headache questionnaire, over a period of 20 days. Results The study subjects were 231 of which 51.5% were males and 48.5% were females. The overall one year prevalence of primary headache disorders was 21.6% and that for migraine was 10%, migraine without aura 6.5% migraine with aura was 2.6% and probable migraine was 0.9%. The prevalence of tension type of headache was found to be 10.4%, frequent episodic tension type headache was 8.2% followed by infrequent tension type headache of 2.2%. The prevalence of cluster headache was 1.3%. The burden of primary headache disorders in terms of missing working, school or social activities was 68.0%. This was 78.3% for migraineurs and 66.7% for tension type headache. Majority 92.0% of primary headache cases were not using health services and 66.0% did not use any drug or medications during the acute attacks and none were using preventive therapy. Conclusion Prevalence and burden of primary headache disorders was substantial in this community. Health service utilization of the community for headache treatment was poor. PMID:23574933

  19. Consensus definitions of 14 severe acute toxic effects for childhood lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment: a Delphi consensus.

    PubMed

    Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Attarbaschi, Andishe; Barzilai, Shlomit; Escherich, Gabriele; Frandsen, Thomas Leth; Halsey, Christina; Hough, Rachael; Jeha, Sima; Kato, Motohiro; Liang, Der-Cherng; Mikkelsen, Torben Stamm; Möricke, Anja; Niinimäki, Riitta; Piette, Caroline; Putti, Maria Caterina; Raetz, Elizabeth; Silverman, Lewis B; Skinner, Roderick; Tuckuviene, Ruta; van der Sluis, Inge; Zapotocka, Ester

    2016-06-01

    Although there are high survival rates for children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, their outcome is often counterbalanced by the burden of toxic effects. This is because reported frequencies vary widely across studies, partly because of diverse definitions of toxic effects. Using the Delphi method, 15 international childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia study groups assessed acute lymphoblastic leukaemia protocols to address toxic effects that were to be considered by the Ponte di Legno working group. 14 acute toxic effects (hypersensitivity to asparaginase, hyperlipidaemia, osteonecrosis, asparaginase-associated pancreatitis, arterial hypertension, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, seizures, depressed level of consciousness, methotrexate-related stroke-like syndrome, peripheral neuropathy, high-dose methotrexate-related nephrotoxicity, sinusoidal obstructive syndrome, thromboembolism, and Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia) that are serious but too rare to be addressed comprehensively within any single group, or are deemed to need consensus definitions for reliable incidence comparisons, were selected for assessment. Our results showed that none of the protocols addressed all 14 toxic effects, that no two protocols shared identical definitions of all toxic effects, and that no toxic effect definition was shared by all protocols. Using the Delphi method over three face-to-face plenary meetings, consensus definitions were obtained for all 14 toxic effects. In the overall assessment of outcome of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment, these expert opinion-based definitions will allow reliable comparisons of frequencies and severities of acute toxic effects across treatment protocols, and facilitate international research on cause, guidelines for treatment adaptation, preventive strategies, and development of consensus algorithms for reporting on acute lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment. PMID:27299279

  20. The Neuropharmacology of Cluster Headache and other Trigeminal Autonomic Cephalalgias

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Alfredo; Antonaci, Fabio; Ramusino, Matteo Cotta; Nappi, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs) are a group of primary headaches including cluster headache (CH), paroxysmal hemicrania (PH) and short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache with conjunctival injection and tearing (SUNCT). Another form, hemicrania continua (HC), is also included this group due to its clinical and pathophysiological similarities. CH is the most common of these syndromes, the others being infrequent in the general population. The pathophysiology of the TACs has been partly elucidated by a number of recent neuroimaging studies, which implicate brain regions associated with nociception (pain matrix). In addition, the hypothalamic activation observed in the course of TAC attacks and the observed efficacy of hypothalamic neurostimulation in CH patients suggest that the hypothalamus is another key structure. Hypothalamic activation may indeed be involved in attack initiation, but it may also lead to a condition of central facilitation underlying the recurrence of pain episodes. The TACs share many pathophysiological features, but are characterised by differences in attack duration and frequency, and to some extent treatment response. Although alternative strategies for the TACs, especially CH, are now emerging (such as neurostimulation techniques), this review focuses on the available pharmacological treatments complying with the most recent guidelines. We discuss the clinical efficacy and tolerability of the currently used drugs. Due to the low frequency of most TACs, few randomised controlled trials have been conducted. The therapies of choice in CH continue to be the triptans and oxygen for acute treatment, and verapamil and lithium for prevention, but promising results have recently been obtained with novel modes of administration of the triptans and other agents, and several other treatments are currently under study. Indomethacin is extremely effective in PH and HC, while antiepileptic drugs (especially lamotrigine) appear to be

  1. The Neuropharmacology of Cluster Headache and other Trigeminal Autonomic Cephalalgias.

    PubMed

    Costa, Alfredo; Antonaci, Fabio; Ramusino, Matteo Cotta; Nappi, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs) are a group of primary headaches including cluster headache (CH), paroxysmal hemicrania (PH) and short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache with conjunctival injection and tearing (SUNCT). Another form, hemicrania continua (HC), is also included this group due to its clinical and pathophysiological similarities. CH is the most common of these syndromes, the others being infrequent in the general population. The pathophysiology of the TACs has been partly elucidated by a number of recent neuroimaging studies, which implicate brain regions associated with nociception (pain matrix). In addition, the hypothalamic activation observed in the course of TAC attacks and the observed efficacy of hypothalamic neurostimulation in CH patients suggest that the hypothalamus is another key structure. Hypothalamic activation may indeed be involved in attack initiation, but it may also lead to a condition of central facilitation underlying the recurrence of pain episodes. The TACs share many pathophysiological features, but are characterised by differences in attack duration and frequency, and to some extent treatment response. Although alternative strategies for the TACs, especially CH, are now emerging (such as neurostimulation techniques), this review focuses on the available pharmacological treatments complying with the most recent guidelines. We discuss the clinical efficacy and tolerability of the currently used drugs. Due to the low frequency of most TACs, few randomised controlled trials have been conducted. The therapies of choice in CH continue to be the triptans and oxygen for acute treatment, and verapamil and lithium for prevention, but promising results have recently been obtained with novel modes of administration of the triptans and other agents, and several other treatments are currently under study. Indomethacin is extremely effective in PH and HC, while antiepileptic drugs (especially lamotrigine) appear to be

  2. Alterations of acute phase reaction and cytokine production in patients following severe burn injury.

    PubMed

    Dehne, Marius G; Sablotzki, Armin; Hoffmann, Andreas; Mühling, Jörg; Dietrich, Friedrich E; Hempelmann, Gunter

    2002-09-01

    To determine the acute immunologic reaction, mediated by cytokines, interleukines (ILs) and growth factors and the susceptibility to infections and sepsis after severe burn injury a prospective, single unit, longitudinal study of acute phase reactants and mediators who performed. After approval by the ethics committee of our hospital, we investigated the plasma concentrations of IL-2, -6, -8, -10, and -13, the soluble IL-2 receptor (sIL-2R), and the acute phase proteins procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) at admission and every 3 days in 24 patients over a time course of 28 days after thermal injury and categorized by percent burn: < or =30% (group 1; n=12) and >30% (group 2; n=12). Shortly after burn injury we found higher concentrations of IL-2, -6, -10 and PCT in those patients >30% TBSA. During the study period, we found significant higher levels of acute phase proteins, IL-6 and -8 in patients >30% TBSA. The incidence of SIRS and MODS was three times increased in patients >30% TBSA. Our results show different patterns of cytokines and acute phase proteins in patients with different burned surface areas over a long time and continuous monitoring of a more distinct inflammatory response in these patients.

  3. [Different headache forms of chapter 4 of the International Headache Classification].

    PubMed

    Göbel, A; Heinze, A; Göbel, H

    2012-12-01

    Chapter 4 of the International Classification of Headaches contains a group of clinically very heterogeneous primary headache forms. Little is known about the pathogenesis of these headache types and therapy is usually based on isolated case reports and uncontrolled studies. The forms include primary stabbing headache, primary cough headache, primary exertional headache, primary headache associated with sexual activity, hypnic headache, primary thunderclap headache, hemicrania continua and the new daily persistent headache. Some of these headache forms may be of a symptomatic nature and require careful examination, imaging and further tests. Primary and secondary headache forms must be carefully distinguished.

  4. Geographic Access to High Capability Severe Acute Respiratory Failure Centers in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, David J.; Angus, Derek C.; Seymour, Christopher W.; Yealy, Donald M.; Carr, Brendan G.; Kurland, Kristen; Boujoukos, Arthur; Kahn, Jeremy M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Optimal care of adults with severe acute respiratory failure requires specific resources and expertise. We sought to measure geographic access to these centers in the United States. Design Cross-sectional analysis of geographic access to high capability severe acute respiratory failure centers in the United States. We defined high capability centers using two criteria: (1) provision of adult extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), based on either 2008–2013 Extracorporeal Life Support Organization reporting or provision of ECMO to 2010 Medicare beneficiaries; or (2) high annual hospital mechanical ventilation volume, based 2010 Medicare claims. Setting Nonfederal acute care hospitals in the United States. Measurements and Main Results We defined geographic access as the percentage of the state, region and national population with either direct or hospital-transferred access within one or two hours by air or ground transport. Of 4,822 acute care hospitals, 148 hospitals met our ECMO criteria and 447 hospitals met our mechanical ventilation criteria. Geographic access varied substantially across states and regions in the United States, depending on center criteria. Without interhospital transfer, an estimated 58.5% of the national adult population had geographic access to hospitals performing ECMO and 79.0% had geographic access to hospitals performing a high annual volume of mechanical ventilation. With interhospital transfer and under ideal circumstances, an estimated 96.4% of the national adult population had geographic access to hospitals performing ECMO and 98.6% had geographic access to hospitals performing a high annual volume of mechanical ventilation. However, this degree of geographic access required substantial interhospital transfer of patients, including up to two hours by air. Conclusions Geographic access to high capability severe acute respiratory failure centers varies widely across states and regions in the United States. Adequate

  5. Overlap between Headache, Depression, and Anxiety in General Neurological Clinics: A Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Cui-Bai; Jia, Jian-Ping; Wang, Fen; Zhou, Ai-Hong; Zuo, Xiu-Mei; Chu, Chang-Biao

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many studies have reported that depression and anxiety have bidirectional relationship with headache. However, few researches investigated the roles of depression or anxiety in patients with headache. We surveyed the prevalence of depression and anxiety as a complication or cause of headache among outpatients with a chief complaint of headache at neurology clinics in general hospitals. Additional risk factors for depression and anxiety were also analyzed. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted at 11 general neurological clinics. All consecutive patients with a chief complaint of headache were enrolled. Diagnoses of depression and anxiety were made using the Chinese version of the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview, and those for headache were made according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd Edition. The headache impact test and an 11-point verbal rating scale were applied to assess headache severity and intensity. Logistic regression was used to analyze risk factors of patients with headache for depression or anxiety. Results: A total of 749 outpatients with headache were included. Among them, 148 (19.7%) were diagnosed with depression and 103 (13.7%) with anxiety. Further analysis showed that 114 (15.2%) patients complaining headache due to somatic symptoms of psychiatric disorders and 82 (10.9%) had a depression or anxiety comorbidity with headache. Most patients with depression or anxiety manifested mild to moderate headaches. Poor sleep and severe headache-related disabilities were predictors for either depression or anxiety. Conclusion: Clinicians must identify the etiology of headache and recognize the effects of depression or anxiety on headache to develop specific treatments. PMID:27270532

  6. Update on medical and surgical options for patients with acute severe ulcerative colitis: What is new?

    PubMed Central

    Andrew, Rachel E; Messaris, Evangelos

    2016-01-01

    Acute severe ulcerative colitis (UC) is a highly morbid condition that requires both medical and surgical management through the collaboration of gastroenterologists and colorectal surgeons. First line treatment for patients presenting with acute severe UC consists of intravenous steroids, but those who do not respond require escalation of therapy or emergent colectomy. The mortality of emergent colectomy has declined significantly in recent decades, but due to the morbidity of this procedure, second line agents such as cyclosporine and infliximab have been used as salvage therapy in an attempt to avoid emergent surgery. Unfortunately, protracted medical therapy has led to patients presenting for surgery in a poorer state of health leading to poorer post-operative outcomes. In this era of multiple medical modalities available in the treatment of acute severe UC, physicians must consider the advantages and disadvantages of prolonged medical therapy in an attempt to avoid surgery. Colectomy remains a mainstay in the treatment of severe ulcerative colitis not responsive to corticosteroids and rescue therapy, and timely referral for surgery allows for improved post-operative outcomes with lower risk of sepsis and improved patient survival. Options for reconstructive surgery include three-stage ileal pouch-anal anastomosis or a modified two-stage procedure that can be performed either open or laparoscopically. The numerous avenues of medical and surgical therapy have allowed for great advances in the treatment of patients with UC. In this era of options, it is important to maintain a global view, utilize biologic therapy when indicated, and then maintain an appropriate threshold for surgery. The purpose of this review is to summarize the growing number of medical and surgical options available in the treatment of acute, severe UC. PMID:27721922

  7. Evaluation of headache relief with cosmetic onabotulinumtoxinA injections.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Neal D; Dorton, Leighanne H; Marcum, Kristin K; Gilbert, Ryan M; Sandoval, Laura F

    2014-09-01

    Chronic headaches are common and can have a significant effect on quality of life. Approved treatment options are vast and include the use botulinum toxin injections. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effects of purely cosmetic onabotulinumtoxinA (BOTOX) injections on the frequency and severity of chronic headaches. Patients seeking treatment of hyperfunctional facial lines were enrolled to complete pre- and posttreatment questionnaires assessing headache symptoms. Quantitative data was compared using paired two-tailed student t-tests between groups of patients who received onabotulinumtoxinA injections, both onabotulinumtoxinA and hyaluronic acid (Restylane) injections, and hyaluronic acid injections. One hundred and ten patients were enrolled; 73 completed the study. Of the 45 patients with pretreatment headaches, 76% (22/29) that received cosmetic onabotulinumtoxinA injections alone and 69% (27/39) that received onabotulinumtoxinA with or without hyaluronic acid injections reported overall improvement in headaches. Patients who received only onabotulinumtoxinA reported a significant decrease in the frequency (P = 0.0016) and severity (P = 0.0002) of headaches, and the number of days over-the-counter medications were taken (P = 0.0238). It took an average 9.5 days for headache improvement vs. 4.4 days for an appearance change. In patients who received only hyaluronic acid injections (n = 6), no significant improvement in headaches was reported. Overall satisfaction was high and unaffected by whether patients experienced headache relief. The majority of patients (93%) reported that they would "definitely" or "likely" receive onabotulinumtoxinA injections again in the future. Purely cosmetic onabotulinumtoxinA injections of doses between 15-50 units can significantly decrease the severity and frequency of headaches.

  8. Influence of age, previous health status, and severity of acute illness on outcome from intensive care.

    PubMed

    Le Gall, J R; Brun-Buisson, C; Trunet, P; Latournerie, J; Chantereau, S; Rapin, M

    1982-09-01

    Age, previous health status (HS), and severity of acute illness were assessed prospectively on 228 unselected patients admitted over 1 yr to the multidisciplinary ICU, to determine their influence on outcome. One hundred and fifty patients (66%) were discharged from the ICU, but the survival rate fell to 50% at 6 months, and was similar after 1 yr (49%). Over a 6-month period, there was improved HS in survivors which gradually leveled off. Compared to prior HS, the final HS was worsened in 37% of survivors. Three factors were important predictors of late survival: age under 50, good previous HS, and less than two visceral failures. We conclude that evaluation of ICU outcome should provide information on 6-month survival and HS and include important variables as age, previous HS, and severity of acute illness. PMID:7105766

  9. Acute Radiation Syndrome Severity Score System in Mouse Total-Body Irradiation Model.

    PubMed

    Ossetrova, Natalia I; Ney, Patrick H; Condliffe, Donald P; Krasnopolsky, Katya; Hieber, Kevin P

    2016-08-01

    Radiation accidents or terrorist attacks can result in serious consequences for the civilian population and for military personnel responding to such emergencies. The early medical management situation requires quantitative indications for early initiation of cytokine therapy in individuals exposed to life-threatening radiation doses and effective triage tools for first responders in mass-casualty radiological incidents. Previously established animal (Mus musculus, Macaca mulatta) total-body irradiation (γ-exposure) models have evaluated a panel of radiation-responsive proteins that, together with peripheral blood cell counts, create a multiparametic dose-predictive algorithm with a threshold for detection of ~1 Gy from 1 to 7 d after exposure as well as demonstrate the acute radiation syndrome severity score systems created similar to the Medical Treatment Protocols for Radiation Accident Victims developed by Fliedner and colleagues. The authors present a further demonstration of the acute radiation sickness severity score system in a mouse (CD2F1, males) TBI model (1-14 Gy, Co γ-rays at 0.6 Gy min) based on multiple biodosimetric endpoints. This includes the acute radiation sickness severity Observational Grading System, survival rate, weight changes, temperature, peripheral blood cell counts and radiation-responsive protein expression profile: Flt-3 ligand, interleukin 6, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, thrombopoietin, erythropoietin, and serum amyloid A. Results show that use of the multiple-parameter severity score system facilitates identification of animals requiring enhanced monitoring after irradiation and that proteomics are a complementary approach to conventional biodosimetry for early assessment of radiation exposure, enhancing accuracy and discrimination index for acute radiation sickness response categories and early prediction of outcome. PMID:27356057

  10. [Comments on treatment of severe acute respiratory syndrome by integrated traditional Chinese and western medicine].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Lu; Zhou, Yong-Hong

    2003-07-01

    There are obvious advantages of the integrated traditional Chinese and western medicine on the treatment of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). Combining the ancient and present literature with the special epidemic patterns, pathological changes and clinical symptoms of SARS, the paper discussed the methods of application of the integrated traditional Chinese and western medicine on the treatment of SARS, and some matters needing attention in clinic.

  11. Acute Radiation Syndrome Severity Score System in Mouse Total-Body Irradiation Model.

    PubMed

    Ossetrova, Natalia I; Ney, Patrick H; Condliffe, Donald P; Krasnopolsky, Katya; Hieber, Kevin P

    2016-08-01

    Radiation accidents or terrorist attacks can result in serious consequences for the civilian population and for military personnel responding to such emergencies. The early medical management situation requires quantitative indications for early initiation of cytokine therapy in individuals exposed to life-threatening radiation doses and effective triage tools for first responders in mass-casualty radiological incidents. Previously established animal (Mus musculus, Macaca mulatta) total-body irradiation (γ-exposure) models have evaluated a panel of radiation-responsive proteins that, together with peripheral blood cell counts, create a multiparametic dose-predictive algorithm with a threshold for detection of ~1 Gy from 1 to 7 d after exposure as well as demonstrate the acute radiation syndrome severity score systems created similar to the Medical Treatment Protocols for Radiation Accident Victims developed by Fliedner and colleagues. The authors present a further demonstration of the acute radiation sickness severity score system in a mouse (CD2F1, males) TBI model (1-14 Gy, Co γ-rays at 0.6 Gy min) based on multiple biodosimetric endpoints. This includes the acute radiation sickness severity Observational Grading System, survival rate, weight changes, temperature, peripheral blood cell counts and radiation-responsive protein expression profile: Flt-3 ligand, interleukin 6, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, thrombopoietin, erythropoietin, and serum amyloid A. Results show that use of the multiple-parameter severity score system facilitates identification of animals requiring enhanced monitoring after irradiation and that proteomics are a complementary approach to conventional biodosimetry for early assessment of radiation exposure, enhancing accuracy and discrimination index for acute radiation sickness response categories and early prediction of outcome.

  12. Headaches prior to earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, L. L.

    1988-06-01

    In two surveys of headaches it was noted that their incidence had increased significantly within 48 h prior to earthquakes from an incidence of 17% to 58% in the first survey using correlated samples and from 20.4% to 44% in the second survey using independent samples. It is suggested that an increase in positive air ions from rock compression may trigger head pain via a decrease in brain levels of the neurotransmitter serotonin. The findings are presented as preliminary, with the hope of generating further research efforts in areas more prone to earthquakes.

  13. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) treatment of sports-related severe acute hamstring injuries

    PubMed Central

    Guillodo, Yannick; Madouas, Gwénaelle; Simon, Thomas; Le Dauphin, Hermine; Saraux, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Summary Purpose hamstring injury is the most common musculoskeletal disorder and one of the main causes of missed sporting events. Shortening the time to return to play (TTRTP) is a priority for athletes and sports medicine practitioners. Hypothesis platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection at the site of severe acute hamstring injury increases the healing rate and shortens the TTRTP. Study design Cohort study. Methods all patients with ultrasonography and MRI evidence of severe acute hamstring injury between January 2012 and March 2014 were offered PRP treatment. Those who accepted received a single intramuscular PRP injection within 8 days post-injury; the other patients served as controls. The same standardized rehabilitation program was used in both groups. A physical examination and ultrasonography were performed 10 and 30 days post-injury, then a phone interview 120 days post-injury, to determine the TTRTP at the pre-injury level. Results of 34 patients, 15 received PRP and 19 did not. Mean TTRTP at the pre-injury level was 50.9±10.7 days in the PRP group and 52.8±15.7 days in the control group. The difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion a single intramuscular PRP injection did not shorten the TTRTP in sports people with severe acute hamstring injuries. PMID:26958537

  14. [Severe acute asthma in the emergency room: amelioration of decreased peak flow rate is interpreted with difficulty].

    PubMed

    Bouvard, E; Bellocq, A; Bernier, C; Meyniel, D

    1999-09-01

    We report a severe acute asthma case whose course was marked by persistent hypoxemia whereas proximal flows were normalized. This discordance reveals a ventilation/perfusion mismatch. This data suggests that care must be taken in interpreting the peak flow improvement during acute severe asthma management.

  15. Diagnosing and managing peripartum headache

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia; Gelpi, Brian; Wortman, Alison; Tao, Weike

    2015-01-01

    A 38-year-old gravida 7 para 5 Hispanic woman at 36 weeks and 4 days gestation presented with a postpartum headache following vaginal delivery complicated by an unintentional dural puncture for epidural analgesia. Due to the positional nature of the headache and its frontal and occipital origin, a postdural puncture headache was diagnosed. After failure of conservative treatment, an epidural blood patch was used, which offered immediate relief. However, shortly following the procedure, the parturient's neurological condition deteriorated due to an unrecognized intraparenchymal and subarachnoid hemorrhage requiring an emergent craniectomy. This case highlights the importance of diligence when evaluating and treating postpartum headache despite a classic presentation. PMID:26424942

  16. Neurostimulation for chronic cluster headache

    PubMed Central

    Kaube, Holger

    2012-01-01

    Neurostimulation techniques for the treatment of primary headache syndromes, particularly of chronic cluster headache, have received much interest in recent years. Occipital nerve stimulation (ONS) has yielded favourable clinical results and, despite the limited numbers of published cases, is becoming a routine treatment for refractory chronic cluster headache in specialized centres. Meanwhile, other promising techniques such as spinal cord stimulation (SCS) or sphenopalate ganglion stimulation have emerged. In this article the current state of clinical research for neurostimulation techniques for chronic cluster headache is reviewed. PMID:22590481

  17. Autonomic dysregulation in headache patients.

    PubMed

    Gass, Jason J; Glaros, Alan G

    2013-12-01

    To analyze autonomic nervous system activity in headache subjects, measurements of heart rate variability (HRV), skin temperature, skin conductance, and respiration were compared to a matched control group. HRV data were recorded in time and frequency domains. Subjects also completed self-report questionnaires assessing psychological distress, fatigue, and sleep dysfunction. Twenty-one headache and nineteen control subjects participated. In the time domain, the number of consecutive R-to-R intervals that varied by more than 50 ms and the standard deviation of the normalized R-to-R intervals, both indices of parasympathetic nervous system activity, were significantly lower in the headache group than the control group. Groups did not differ statistically on HRV measures in the frequency domain. Self-report measures showed significantly increased somatization, hostility, anxiety, symptom distress, fatigue, and sleep problems in the headache group. The results suggest headache subjects have increased sympathetic nervous system activity and decreased parasympathetic activity compared to non-headache control subjects. Headaches subjects also showed greater emotional distress, fatigue, and sleep problems. The results indicate an association between headaches and cardiovascular functioning suggestive of sympathetic nervous system activation in this sample of mixed migraine and tension-type headache sufferers. PMID:23912525

  18. Hormonal changes in headache patients.

    PubMed

    Elwan, O; Abdella, M; el Bayad, A B; Hamdy, S

    1991-11-01

    Seventy-three patients with headache underwent serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) radioimmunoassays of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), cortisol and prolactin. Serum FSH showed significant increases in all headache patients while serum LH increased only in females. Such a rise of serum FSH and LH is attributed to disturbances of the sleep-wake cycle. On the other hand, serum cortisol was significantly decreased in the male headache patients, probably due to altered circadian rhythm. Serum prolactin remained within normal limits. CSF prolactin, FSH and LH showed detectable levels in all headache sufferers compared to undetectable levels in control subjects, while CSF cortisol was significantly reduced.

  19. The art of history-taking in a headache patient

    PubMed Central

    Ravishankar, K.

    2012-01-01

    Headache is a common complaint that makes up for approximately 25% of any neurologists outpatient practice. Yet, it is often underdiagnosed and undertreated. Ninety percent of headaches seen in practice are due to a primary headache disorder where there are no confirmatory tests, and neuroimaging studies, if done, are normal. In this situation, a good headache history allows the physician to recognize a pattern that in turn leads to the correct diagnosis. A comprehensive history needs time, interest, focus and establishment of rapport with the patient. When to ask what question to elicit which information, is an art that is acquired by practice and improves with experience. This review discusses the art of history-taking in headache patients across different settings. The nuances of headache history-taking are discussed in detail, particularly the questions related to the time, severity, location and frequency of the headache syndrome in general and the episode in particular. An emphasis is made on the recognition of red flags that help in the identification of secondary headaches. PMID:23024567

  20. Upregulation of PIAS1 protects against sodium taurocholate-induced severe acute pancreatitis associated with acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ping; Huang, Liya; Sun, Yunwei; Yuan, Yaozong

    2011-06-01

    The regulator of cytokine signaling known as protein inhibitor of activated STAT-1 (PIAS1) is increasingly understood to have diverse regulatory functions for inflammation, but its effect in inflammatory conditions such as severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) has not previously been reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of upregulation of PIAS1 on SAP associated with acute lung injury (ALI), and its subsequent effect on disease severity. Sprague-Dawley rats were given an IV injection of adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5)/F35-PIAS1, Ad5/F35-vector or saline before induction of SAP. The control group received only a sham operation. Lung and pancreas samples were harvested 16h after induction. The protein levels of PIAS1 in tissue were investigated. The severity of pancreatic injury was determined by a histological score of pancreatic injury, serum amylase, and pancreatic water content. The lung injury was evaluated by measurement of pulmonary microvascular permeability, lung myeloperoxidase activity and malondialdehyde levels. The survival rates of rats were also analyzed. The results found that in Ad5/F35-PIAS1 treated rats, serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 levels were decreased but showed no influence on the levels of IL-10, and the severity of pancreatic tissue injury was less compared with either untreated SAP or Ad5/F35-vector treated rats (P<0.01). The administration of Ad5/F35-PIAS1 in SAP-induced rats downregulated the activity of the signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 (STAT1) pathway and the expressions of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 protein in lung. Thus, compared with the untreated SAP rats, the inflammatory response and the severity of ALI decreased, and the survival rates increased (P<0.01). These findings suggest that PIAS1 could augment anti-inflammatory activity by inhibiting STAT1, thus attenuating the severity of SAP associated with ALI.

  1. [Hemicrania: primary headache].

    PubMed

    Nattero, G; Allais, G; De Lorenzo, C

    1992-01-01

    Migraine is the commonest form among the so-called primary headaches and the description of its clinical picture is lost in the mists of time. On the contrary, headaches of organic origin have only recently received a proper nosological individuation thanks to the modern technological progress achieved in the field of medicine. The migraine crisis, both with and without aura, is so typical in its clinical features that it does not require subtle instrumental methodologies to be diagnosed. In most cases a careful anamnesis provides all the elements necessary to formulate a precise diagnosis: the positive family history, the time and mode of onset of crises, the nature of head pain, the chronological stages are quite constant whatever the trigger factor may be. Some other considerations add further evidence to the primitivity of migraine. First of all, migraine can be relieved by quite structurally different drugs with different mechanisms of action. In addition, no significant relationship has ever been found between migraine and other pathologies.

  2. Causes and Associated Factors of Headaches among 5 to 15-year-old Children Referred to a Neurology Clinic in Kashan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    TALEBIAN, Ahmad; SOLTANI, Babak; HAJI REZAEI, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Objective Headaches are common neurologic problems for children and adolescents. They are divided into two types: primary and secondary. Primary headaches include migraines and tension-type as well as comprise the majority of headaches. We detect the causes of headaches and their associations with demographic variables among children and adolescents. Materials & Methods This cross-sectional study was performed on 5–15 year-old children with headaches from March 2010 to April 2012 who presented at a pediatric neurology clinic in Kashan, Iran. Diagnosis of headaches was done in accordance with the International Classification of Headache Disorders. Data regarding the type of headache, age, gender, pain severity, aura, family history, and sleep disorder were collected. Results One hundred fourteen children (44 male and 70 female) with headaches were enrolled in the study. The types of headaches were comprised as follows: 67 cases of migraines, 38 cases of tension-type headaches, 2 cases of cluster headaches, and 7 cases of secondary headaches. Pulsating headaches, family history of headaches, insomnia, and pain severity had higher prevalence in migrainous patients. Conclusion Physicians should extend their information gathering about primary and secondary headaches. Sleep disturbances and a family history of headaches were the most important factors associated with migraine headaches. PMID:25767542

  3. Melatonin prevents acute kidney injury in severely burned rats via the activation of SIRT1

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xiao-Zhi; He, Ting; Gao, Jian-Xin; Liu, Yang; Liu, Jia-Qi; Han, Shi-Chao; Li, Yan; Shi, Ji-Hong; Han, Jun-Tao; Tao, Ke; Xie, Song-Tao; Wang, Hong-Tao; Hu, Da-Hai

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication after severe burns. Melatonin has been reported to protect against multiple organ injuries by increasing the expression of SIRT1, a silent information regulator that regulates stress responses, inflammation, cellular senescence and apoptosis. This study aimed to investigate the protective effects of melatonin on renal tissues of burned rats and the role of SIRT1 involving the effects. Rat severely burned model was established, with or without the administration of melatonin and SIRT1 inhibitor. The renal function and histological manifestations were determined to evaluate the severity of kidney injury. The levels of acetylated-p53 (Ac-p53), acetylated-p65 (Ac-p65), NF-κB, acetylated-forkhead box O1 (Ac-FoxO1), Bcl-2 and Bax were analyzed to study the underlying mechanisms. Our results suggested that severe burns could induce acute kidney injury, which could be partially reversed by melatonin. Melatonin attenuated oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis accompanied by the increased expression of SIRT1. The protective effects of melatonin were abrogated by the inhibition of SIRT1. In conclusion, we demonstrate that melatonin improves severe burn-induced AKI via the activation of SIRT1 signaling. PMID:27599451

  4. Melatonin prevents acute kidney injury in severely burned rats via the activation of SIRT1.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiao-Zhi; He, Ting; Gao, Jian-Xin; Liu, Yang; Liu, Jia-Qi; Han, Shi-Chao; Li, Yan; Shi, Ji-Hong; Han, Jun-Tao; Tao, Ke; Xie, Song-Tao; Wang, Hong-Tao; Hu, Da-Hai

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication after severe burns. Melatonin has been reported to protect against multiple organ injuries by increasing the expression of SIRT1, a silent information regulator that regulates stress responses, inflammation, cellular senescence and apoptosis. This study aimed to investigate the protective effects of melatonin on renal tissues of burned rats and the role of SIRT1 involving the effects. Rat severely burned model was established, with or without the administration of melatonin and SIRT1 inhibitor. The renal function and histological manifestations were determined to evaluate the severity of kidney injury. The levels of acetylated-p53 (Ac-p53), acetylated-p65 (Ac-p65), NF-κB, acetylated-forkhead box O1 (Ac-FoxO1), Bcl-2 and Bax were analyzed to study the underlying mechanisms. Our results suggested that severe burns could induce acute kidney injury, which could be partially reversed by melatonin. Melatonin attenuated oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis accompanied by the increased expression of SIRT1. The protective effects of melatonin were abrogated by the inhibition of SIRT1. In conclusion, we demonstrate that melatonin improves severe burn-induced AKI via the activation of SIRT1 signaling. PMID:27599451

  5. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy in acute severe asthma. A randomized, double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Engel, T; Dirksen, A; Frølund, L; Heinig, J H; Svendsen, U G; Pedersen, B K; Weeke, B

    1990-04-01

    Methylprednisolone pulse therapy (MPPT) has been shown to possess a long-lasting effect in other immune-inflammatory diseases without the well-known side effects caused by long-term treatment with glucocorticosteroids. In an attempt to reduce the long-term use of oral steroids in asthmatics, we conducted this double-blind, double-dummy study to compare the use of MPPT (1 g of methylprednisolone intravenously) (8 patients) with a short course of oral prednisolone (10 patients) in asthmatics presenting with acute severe asthma. Both treatments were effective in relieving the acute attack of asthma. The MPPT-treated patients did not show a faster resolution than did the orally treated group. No patients needed assisted ventilation, and no deaths occurred. One week after the treatment FEV1 tended to decrease in the methylprednisolone group compared with the oral prednisolone group (P = 0.06). The patients initially receiving MPPT needed supplementary prednisolone earlier and in higher doses than did the patients receiving oral prednisolone as initial treatment. At the end of the 12 weeks' study period, the groups reached identical FEV1. In conclusion, we did not find intravenous methylprednisolone superior to oral prednisolone in the treatment of acute attacks of severe asthma, but methylprednisolone pulse therapy had a shorter duration as regards protection against future asthma attacks. PMID:2183645

  6. Does virus-bacteria coinfection increase the clinical severity of acute respiratory infection?

    PubMed

    Damasio, Guilherme A C; Pereira, Luciane A; Moreira, Suzana D R; Duarte dos Santos, Claudia N; Dalla-Costa, Libera M; Raboni, Sonia M

    2015-09-01

    This retrospective cohort study investigated the presence of bacteria in respiratory secretions of patients hospitalized with acute respiratory infections and analyzed the impact of viral and bacterial coinfection on severity and the mortality rate. A total of 169 patients with acute respiratory infections were included, viruses and bacteria in respiratory samples were detected using molecular methods. Among all samples, 73.3% and 59.7% were positive for viruses and bacteria, respectively; 45% contained both virus and bacteria. Bacterial coinfection was more frequent in patients infected by community respiratory viruses than influenza A H1N1pdm (83.3% vs. 40.6%). The most frequently bacteria detected were Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae. Both species were co-detected in 54 patients and identified alone in 22 and 21 patients, respectively. Overall, there were no significant differences in the period of hospitalization, severity, or mortality rate between patients infected with respiratory viruses alone and those coinfected by viruses and bacteria. The detection of mixed respiratory pathogens is frequent in hospitalized patients with acute respiratory infections, but its impact on the clinical outcome does not appear substantial. However, it should be noted that most of the patients received broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy, which may have contributed to this favorable outcome.

  7. Baroreflex control of heart rate during sleep in severe obstructive sleep apnoea: effects of acute CPAP.

    PubMed

    Bonsignore, M R; Parati, G; Insalaco, G; Castiglioni, P; Marrone, O; Romano, S; Salvaggio, A; Mancia, G; Bonsignore, G; Di Rienzo, M

    2006-01-01

    Baroreflex control of heart rate during sleep (baroreflex sensitivity; BRS) has been shown to be depressed in obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), and improved after treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Whether CPAP also acutely affects BRS during sleep in uncomplicated severe OSA is still debatable. Blood pressure was monitored during nocturnal polysomnography in 18 patients at baseline and during first-time CPAP application. Spontaneous BRS was analysed by the sequence method, and estimated as the mean sequence slope. CPAP did not acutely affect mean blood pressure or heart rate but decreased cardiovascular variability during sleep. Mean BRS increased slightly during CPAP application (from 6.5+/-2.4 to 7.5+/-2.9 ms x mmHg(-1)), mostly in response to decreasing blood pressure. The change in BRS did not correlate with changes in arterial oxygen saturation or apnoea/hypopnoea index. The small change in baroreflex control of heart rate during sleep at first application of continuous positive airway pressure in severe obstructive sleep apnoea was unrelated to the acute resolution of nocturnal hypoxaemia, and might reflect autonomic adjustments to positive intrathoracic pressure, and/or improved sleep architecture. The small increase in baroreflex control of heart rate during sleep may be of clinical relevance as it was accompanied by reduced cardiovascular variability, which is acknowledged as an independent cardiovascular risk factor.

  8. Severity of Spatial Neglect During Acute Inpatient Rehabilitation Predicts Community Mobility After Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Oh-Park, Mooyeon; Hung, Cynthia; Chen, Peii; Barrett, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine whether stroke survivors with more severe spatial neglect during their acute inpatient rehabilitation had poorer mobility after returning to their communities. Design A prospective observational study. Setting Acute inpatient rehabilitation and follow-up in the community. Participants Thirty-one consecutive stroke survivors with right-brain damage (women, n = 15 [48.4%]), with the mean (standard deviation) age of 60 ± 11.5 years, were included in the study if they demonstrated spatial neglect within 2 months after stroke. Methods Spatial neglect was assessed with the Behavioral Inattention Test (BIT) (range, 0-146 [a lower score indicates more severity]) and the Catherine Bergego Scale (range, 0-30 [a higher score indicates more severity]). A score of the Behavioral Inattention Test <129 or of the Catherine Bergego Scale >0 defined the presence of spatial neglect. Main Outcome Measurements The outcome measure is community mobility, defined by the extent and frequency of traveling within the home and in the community, and is assessed with the University of Alabama at Birmingham Study of Aging Life-Space Assessment (range, 0-120 [a lower score indicates less mobile]). This measure was assessed after participants returned home ≥6 months after stroke. The covariates were age, gender, functional independence at baseline; follow-up interval; and depressed mood, which may affect the relationship between spatial neglect and community mobility. Results A lower Behavioral Inattention Test score was a significant predictor of a lower Life-Space Assessment score after controlling for all the covariates (β = 0.009 [95% confidence interval, 0.008-0.017]); P = .020). The proportion of participants unable to travel independently beyond their homes was 0%, 27.3%, and 72.7% for those with mild, moderate, and severe acute neglect, respectively (Catherine Bergego Scale range, 1-10, 11-20, and 21-30, respectively). Conclusions Our result indicates that acute

  9. Successful use of extracorporeal life support after double traumatic tracheobronchial injury in a patient with severe acute asthma.

    PubMed

    Valette, Xavier; Desjouis, Aurélie; Massetti, Massimo; Hanouz, Jean-Luc; Icard, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of an asthmatic patient with blunt trachea and left main bronchus injuries who developed acute severe asthma after surgical repair. Despite medical treatment and ventilatory support, asthma persisted with high airway pressures and severe respiratory acidosis. We proposed venovenous extracorporeal life support for CO(2) removal which allowed arterial blood gas normalization and airway pressures decrease. Extracorporeal life support was removed on day five after medical treatment of acute severe asthma. So we report the successful use of extracorporeal life support for operated double blunt tracheobronchial injury with acute severe asthma. PMID:22135742

  10. Nicardipine-induced acute pulmonary edema: a rare but severe complication of tocolysis.

    PubMed

    Serena, Claire; Begot, Emmanuelle; Cros, Jérôme; Hodler, Charles; Fedou, Anne Laure; Nathan-Denizot, Nathalie; Clavel, Marc

    2014-01-01

    We report four cases of acute pulmonary edema that occurred during treatment by intravenous tocolysis using nicardipine in pregnancy patients with no previous heart problems. Clinical severity justified hospitalization in intensive care unit (ICU) each time. Acute dyspnea has begun at an average of 63 hours after initiation of treatment. For all patients, the first diagnosis suspected was pulmonary embolism. The patients' condition improved rapidly with appropriate diuretic treatment and by modifying the tocolysis. The use of intravenous nicardipine is widely used for tocolysis in France even if its prescription does not have a marketing authorization. The pathophysiological mechanisms of this complication remain unclear. The main reported risk factors are spontaneous preterm labor, multiple pregnancy, concomitant obstetrical disease, association with beta-agonists, and fetal lung maturation corticotherapy. A better knowledge of this rare but serious adverse event should improve the management of patients. Nifedipine or atosiban, the efficiency of which tocolysis was also studied, could be an alternative. PMID:25215245

  11. Ethical and legal challenges posed by severe acute respiratory syndrome: implications for the control of severe infectious disease threats.

    PubMed

    Gostin, Lawrence O; Bayer, Ronald; Fairchild, Amy L

    2003-12-24

    The appearance and spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) on a global level raised vital legal and ethical issues. National and international responses to SARS have profound implications for 3 important ethical values: privacy, liberty, and the duty to protect the public's health. This article examines, through legal and ethical lenses, various methods that countries used in reaction to the SARS outbreak: surveillance and contact tracing, isolation and quarantine, and travel restrictions. These responses, at least in some combination, succeeded in bringing the outbreak to an end. The article articulates a set of legal and ethical recommendations for responding to infectious disease threats, seeking to reconcile the tension between the public's health and individual rights to privacy, liberty, and freedom of movement. The ethical values that inform the recommendations include the precautionary principle, the least restrictive/intrusive alternative, justice, and transparency. Development of a set of legal and ethical recommendations becomes even more essential when, as was true with SARS and will undoubtedly be the case with future epidemics, scientific uncertainty is pervasive and urgent public health action is required.

  12. [Hot issues on the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis by Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine].

    PubMed

    Xia, Qing; Deng, Li-Hui

    2013-11-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is recognized as critical refractory disease. The case fatality rate of SAP is as high as 36%-50%. Although significant progress has been achieved on the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) by Integrated Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and Western Medicine (WM), there still exist some difficulties hindering the further improvement of therapeutic efficacy. The hot issues includes: unconfirmative curative effects and diverse treatment principles, complicated predictive scoring systems and inaccurate markers for the severity stratification, unproved new therapeutic tools and controversial methods waiting more high qualified evidence, unclarified mechanism of Integrated TCM and WM. In order to overcome the difficulties, we aim to launch the clinical pathway of Integrated TCM and WM, to strengthen the unity of multidisciplinary cooperation. We also need to keep the efforts on screening the markers for early evaluation and prediction of disease severity, improving the diagnosis and treatment, exploring the mechanism of Traditional Chinese Medicine in treating SAP with more high quality basic and clinical research. Based on these efforts, we could provide better treatments and prognosis for SAP patients.

  13. [Acupuncture in daily practice. Headache].

    PubMed

    Senta, A Q

    1976-11-24

    The aetiopathogenesis of headache is explained in a general review of this subject. Attention is directed the various forms of reflexotherapy that can be cmployed in its treatment. Acupuncture is examined in some detail, from both the general and the symptomatic standpoint. Stress is laid on the different picture presented by headache in different patients. PMID:1004762

  14. Acute Serum Hormone Levels: Characterization and Prognosis after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Emily H.; Niyonkuru, Christian; Ozawa, Haishin; Loucks, Tammy L.; Dobos, Julie A.; Brett, Christopher A.; Santarsieri, Martina; Dixon, C. Edward; Berga, Sarah L.; Fabio, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI) studies report the neuroprotective effects of female sex steroids on multiple mechanisms of injury, with the clinical assumption that women have hormonally mediated neuroprotection because of the endogenous presence of these hormones. Other literature indicates that testosterone may exacerbate injury. Further, stress hormone abnormalities that accompany critical illness may both amplify or blunt sex steroid levels. To better understand the role of sex steroid exposure in mediating TBI, we 1) characterized temporal profiles of serum gonadal and stress hormones in a population with severe TBI during the acute phases of their injury; and 2) used a biological systems approach to evaluate these hormones as biomarkers predicting global outcome. The study population was 117 adults (28 women; 89 men) with severe TBI. Serum samples (n=536) were collected for 7 days post-TBI for cortisol, progesterone, testosterone, estradiol, luteinizing hormone (LH), and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). Hormone data were linked with clinical data, including acute care mortality and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) scores at 6 months. Hormone levels after TBI were compared to those in healthy controls (n=14). Group based trajectory analysis (TRAJ) was used to develop temporal hormone profiles that delineate distinct subpopulations in the cohort. Structural equations models were used to determine inter-relationships between hormones and outcomes within a multivariate model. Compared to controls, acute serum hormone levels were significantly altered after severe TBI. Changes in the post-TBI adrenal response and peripheral aromatization influenced hormone TRAJ profiles and contributed to the abnormalities, including increased estradiol in men and increased testosterone in women. In addition to older age and greater injury severity, increased estradiol and testosterone levels over time were associated with increased mortality and worse global

  15. Inpatient management of children with severe acute malnutrition: a review of WHO guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Tickell, Kirkby D

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To understand how the World Health Organization’s (WHO’s) guidelines on the inpatient care of children with complicated severe acute malnutrition may be strengthened to improve outcomes. Methods In December 2015, we searched Google scholar and WHO’s website for WHO recommendations on severe acute malnutrition management and evaluated the history and cited evidence behind these recommendations. We systematically searched WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, clinicaltrials.gov and the Controlled Trials metaRegister until 10 August 2015 for recently completed, ongoing, or pending trials. Findings WHO’s guidelines provide 33 recommendations on the topic. However, 16 (48.5%) of these recommendations were based solely on expert opinion – unsupported by published evidence. Another 11 (33.3%) of the recommendations were supported by the results of directly relevant research – i.e. either randomized trials (8) or observational studies (3). The other six recommendations (18.2%) were based on studies that were not conducted among children with complicated severe malnutrition or studies of treatment that were not identical to the recommended intervention. Trials registries included 20 studies related to the topic, including nine trials of alternative feeding regimens. Acute medical management and follow-up care studies were minimally represented. Conclusion WHO’s guidelines on the topic have a weak evidence base and have undergone limited substantive adjustments over the past decades. More trials are needed to make that evidence base more robust. If the mortality associated with severe malnutrition is to be reduced, inpatient and post-discharge management trials, supported by studies on the causes of mortality, are needed. PMID:27708469

  16. The history of craniotomy for headache treatment.

    PubMed

    Assina, Rachid; Sarris, Christina E; Mammis, Antonios

    2014-04-01

    Both the history of headache and the practice of craniotomy can be traced to antiquity. From ancient times through the present day, numerous civilizations and scholars have performed craniotomy in attempts to treat headache. Today, surgical intervention for headache management is becoming increasingly more common due to improved technology and greater understanding of headache. By tracing the evolution of the understanding of headache alongside the practice of craniotomy, investigators can better evaluate the mechanisms of headache and the therapeutic treatments used today.

  17. Vaccines to prevent severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-induced disease

    PubMed Central

    Enjuanes, Luis; DeDiego, Marta L.; Álvarez, Enrique; Deming, Damon; Sheahan, Tim; Baric, Ralph

    2009-01-01

    An important effort has been performed after the emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic in 2003 to diagnose and prevent virus spreading. Several types of vaccines have been developed including inactivated viruses, subunit vaccines, virus-like particles (VLPs), DNA vaccines, heterologous expression systems, and vaccines derived from SARS-CoV genome by reverse genetics. This review describes several aspects essential to develop SARS-CoV vaccines, such as the correlates of protection, virus serotypes, vaccination side effects, and bio-safeguards that can be engineered into recombinant vaccine approaches based on the SARS-CoV genome. The production of effective and safe vaccines to prevent SARS has led to the development of promising vaccine candidates, in contrast to the design of vaccines for other coronaviruses, that in general has been less successful. After preclinical trials in animal models, efficacy and safety evaluation of the most promising vaccine candidates described has to be performed in humans. PMID:17416434

  18. Applying Pharmacokinetics to Optimize Dosing of Anti-TNF Biologics in Acute Severe Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Michael J.; Minar, Philip; Vinks, Alexander A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute severe ulcerative colitis (ASUC), the most aggressive presentation ulcerative colitis (UC), occurs in 15 percent of adults and children with UC. First line therapy with intravenous corticosteroids is ineffective in half of adults and one third of children. Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies against TNF (anti-TNF therapy) are emerging as a common treatment for ASUC due to their similar efficacy to calcineurin inhibitors and more favorable adverse effect profile. Aim To comprehensively review the evidence for anti-TNF therapy for ASUC in children and adults with regard to outcomes and pharmacokinetics. Methods PubMed and recent conference proceedings were searched using the terms “ulcerative colitis”, “acute severe ulcerative colitis”, “anti-TNF”, “pharmacokinetics”, and the generic names of specific anti-TNF agents. Results Outcomes after anti-TNF therapy for ASUC remain suboptimal with aboutone half of children and adults undergoing colectomy. While several randomized controlled trials have demonstrated the efficacy of anti-TNF therapy for ambulatory patients with moderate to severely active UC, patients in these studies were less ill than those with ASUC. Patients with ASUC may exhibit more rapid clearance of anti-TNF biologics due pharmacokinetic mechanisms influenced by disease severity. Conclusions Conventional weight-based dosing effective in patients with moderately to severely active UC, may not be equally effective in those with ASUC. Personalized anti-TNF dosing strategies that integratepatient factors and early measures of pharmacokinetics and response hold promise for ensuring sustained drug exposure and maximizing early mucosal healing in patients with ASUC. PMID:25809869

  19. From Moderately Severe to Severe Hypertriglyceridemia Induced Acute Pancreatitis: Circulating MiRNAs Play Role as Potential Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Min; Jiang, Lisha; Lu, Guoming; Huang, Mindan; Guo, Jizhong; Liu, Side

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of hypertriglyceridemia induced acute pancreatitis (HTAP) continues to rise in China. It has systemic complications and high mortality, making the early assessment of the severity of this disease even more important. Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) could be novel, non-invasive biomarkers for disease progression judgment. This study aimed to identify the potential role of serum miRNAs as novel biomarkers of HTAP progression. HTAP patients were divided into two groups: moderately severe (HTMSAP) and severe (HTSAP), healthy people were used as control group. The serum miRNA expression profiles of these three groups were determined by microarray and verified by qRT-PCR. The functions and pathways of the targeted genes of deregulated miRNAs were predicted, using bioinformatics analysis; miRNA-mRNA network was generated. Moreover, the correlation between miR-181a-5p and pancreatitis metabolism related substances were studied and the serum concentration of inflammatory cytokines and miRNAs at different time points during the MSAP and SAP were investigated, respectively. Finally, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of miRNAs was studied. Significant changes in the serum concentration of the following miRNAs of HTAP patients (P<0.05) were discovered: miR24-3p, 361-5p, 1246, and 222-3p (constantly upregulated), and 181a-5p (constantly downregulated) (P<0.05). Bioinformatics analysis predicted that 13 GOs and 36 pathways regulated by overlap miRNAs were involved in glucose, fat, calcium (Ca++), and insulin metabolism (P<0.001). miRNA-mRNA network revealed that the overlap miRNAs targeted genes participating in pancreas metabolism and miR-181a-5p, the only downregulated miRNA, had good negative correlation with triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), and fast blood glucose (FBG), but a positive correlation with Ca++. When compared with inflammatory cytokines, the changes of all five overlap miRNAs were more stable. It was found that when used for

  20. Induction of alternatively activated macrophages enhances pathogenesis during severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Page, Carly; Goicochea, Lindsay; Matthews, Krystal; Zhang, Yong; Klover, Peter; Holtzman, Michael J; Hennighausen, Lothar; Frieman, Matthew

    2012-12-01

    Infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) causes acute lung injury (ALI) that often leads to severe lung disease. A mouse model of acute SARS-CoV infection has been helpful in understanding the host response to infection; however, there are still unanswered questions concerning SARS-CoV pathogenesis. We have shown that STAT1 plays an important role in the severity of SARS-CoV pathogenesis and that it is independent of the role of STAT1 in interferon signaling. Mice lacking STAT1 have greater weight loss, severe lung pathology with pre-pulmonary-fibrosis-like lesions, and an altered immune response following infection with SARS-CoV. We hypothesized that STAT1 plays a role in the polarization of the immune response, specifically in macrophages, resulting in a worsened outcome. To test this, we created bone marrow chimeras and cell-type-specific knockouts of STAT1 to identify which cell type(s) is critical to protection from severe lung disease after SARS-CoV infection. Bone marrow chimera experiments demonstrated that hematopoietic cells are responsible for the pathogenesis in STAT1(-/-) mice, and because of an induction of alternatively activated (AA) macrophages after infection, we hypothesized that the AA macrophages were critical for disease severity. Mice with STAT1 in either monocytes and macrophages (LysM/STAT1) or ciliated lung epithelial cells (FoxJ1/STAT1) deleted were created. Following infection, LysM/STAT1 mice display severe lung pathology, while FoxJ1/STAT1 mice display normal lung pathology. We hypothesized that AA macrophages were responsible for this STAT1-dependent pathology and therefore created STAT1/STAT6(-/-) double-knockout mice. STAT6 is essential for the development of AA macrophages. Infection of the double-knockout mice displayed a lack of lung disease and prefibrotic lesions, suggesting that AA macrophage production may be the cause of STAT1-dependent lung disease. We propose that the control of AA

  1. Modular headache theory: a new approach.

    PubMed

    Young, William B

    2002-03-01

    Many people experience headaches that do not fulfill the International Headache Society's criteria for a specific headache disorder, yet behave biologically like that disorder. Others fulfill criteria for one headache disorder but have features of another. To explain these observations, we propose that groups of neurons, called modules, become activated to produce each symptom of a primary headache disorder, and that each module is linked to other modules that together produce an individual's headache. Headaches develop phenotypic stability through a process referred to as learned stereotypy. This theory has implications for the classification, research, and treatment of primary and secondary headache patients.

  2. Resolution of primary severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus infection requires Stat1.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Robert J; Gao, Guangping; Rowe, Thomas; Bell, Peter; Flieder, Douglas; Paragas, Jason; Kobinger, Gary P; Wivel, Nelson A; Crystal, Ronald G; Boyer, Julie; Feldmann, Heinz; Voss, Thomas G; Wilson, James M

    2004-10-01

    Intranasal inhalation of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS CoV) in the immunocompetent mouse strain 129SvEv resulted in infection of conducting airway epithelial cells followed by rapid clearance of virus from the lungs and the development of self-limited bronchiolitis. Animals resistant to the effects of interferons by virtue of a deficiency in Stat1 demonstrated a markedly different course following intranasal inhalation of SARS CoV, one characterized by replication of virus in lungs and progressively worsening pulmonary disease with inflammation of small airways and alveoli and systemic spread of the virus to livers and spleens.

  3. Managing severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) intellectual property rights: the possible role of patent pooling.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, James H. M.; Claassen, Eric; Correa, Carmen E.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.

    2005-01-01

    Patent applications that incorporate the genomic sequence of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus, have been filed by a number of organizations. This is likely to result in a fragmentation of intellectual property (IP) rights which in turn may adversely affect the development of products, such as vaccines, to combat SARS. Placing these patent rights into a patent pool to be licensed on a non-exclusive basis may circumvent these difficulties and set a key precedent for the use of this form of mechanism in other areas of health care, leading to benefits to public health. PMID:16211163

  4. Preparing to prevent severe acute respiratory syndrome and other respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Ho, Mei-Shang; Su, Ih-Jen

    2004-11-01

    Globalisation and its effect on human development has rendered an environment that is conducive for the rapid international spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), and other new infectious diseases yet to emerge. After the unprecedented multi-country outbreak of avian influenza with human cases in the winter of 2003-2004, an influenza pandemic is a current threat. A critical review of problems and solutions encountered during the 2003-2004 SARS epidemics will serve as the basis for considering national preparedness steps that can be taken to facilitate the early detection of avian influenza, and a rapid response to an influenza pandemic should it occur.

  5. Headache and comorbidity in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Headache is one of the most common neurological symptom reported in childhood and adolescence, leading to high levels of school absences and being associated with several comorbid conditions, particularly in neurological, psychiatric and cardiovascular systems. Neurological and psychiatric disorders, that are associated with migraine, are mainly depression, anxiety disorders, epilepsy and sleep disorders, ADHD and Tourette syndrome. It also has been shown an association with atopic disease and cardiovascular disease, especially ischemic stroke and patent foramen ovale (PFO). PMID:24063537

  6. Steroid hormones in cluster headaches.

    PubMed

    Stillman, Mark

    2006-04-01

    For decades, glucocorticoid therapy has been a well-recognized abortive treatment for cluster headaches. However, the role of steroid hormones, including both glucocorticoids and sex steroids, in the pathophysiology and therapy of cluster headaches has been a topic of much debate and speculation. Current research now points to the importance of cortisol and testosterone in the pathogenesis of cluster headaches, and they appear to be linked mechanistically to another hormone, melatonin. Melatonin, unlike cortisol or testosterone, is not a product of the hypothalamic pituitary axis but of the retinohypothalamic pineal axis, and is the major biomarker of circadian rhythms. The regulation of steroids and melatonin in the pathogenesis of cluster headaches in turn depends on the sympathetic nervous system. Accumulated evidence suggests sympathetic dysfunction--embodied in the Horner sign so commonly seen in the cluster headache--as a necessary ingredient in the inception of the cluster headache. Sympathetic dysfunction now is thought to be associated with the hypercortisolism, hypotestosteronism, and lower-than-normal melatonin levels in the active cluster patient. Future research may hold the key to a fuller explanation of the complex interaction of hormonal systems in the cluster headache.

  7. Acupuncture in primary headache treatment.

    PubMed

    Schiapparelli, Paola; Allais, Gianni; Rolando, Sara; Airola, Gisella; Borgogno, Paola; Terzi, Maria Grazia; Benedetto, Chiara

    2011-05-01

    Acupuncture has a long tradition of use for the treatment of many pain conditions, including headache. Its effectiveness has been studied mainly for primary headaches, particularly for migraine and tension-type headache (TTH). Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) has two diagnostic frameworks for headaches: meridian diagnoses, based on the location of the pain and on the meridians (or channels) that pass through it; syndrome diagnoses, dependent on external or internal factors and on the characteristics of the pain. The four meridians involved in headache are Shaoyang (TE-GB channels, on the temporal sides of the head); Taiyang (SI-BL channels, occiput); Yangming (LI-ST channels, forehead) and Jueyin (PC-LR channels, vertex). The syndromes may be due to excess or deficit. Very generally, the excess syndromes correspond in the majority of cases to migraine and the deficit syndromes to TTH. Acupuncture is a complex intervention, which is also characterized by a close interaction between patient and therapist. The complicated system of TCM classification of headaches has frequently generated great diversity among the various therapeutic approaches used in the different studies on acupuncture in headache treatment. Despite these differences, the recent Cochrane systematic reviews on acupuncture in migraine and in TTH suggest that acupuncture is an effective and valuable option for patients suffering from migraine or frequent TTH. Moreover, acupuncture seems to be a cost-effective treatment.

  8. Applying a low-flow CO2 removal device in severe acute hypercapnic respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ajay S; Weerwind, Patrick W; Strauch, Uli; van Belle, Arne; Maessen, Jos G; Wouters, Emiel F M

    2016-03-01

    A novel and portable extracorporeal CO2-removal device was evaluated to provide additional gas transfer, auxiliary to standard therapy in severe acute hypercapnic respiratory failure. A dual-lumen catheter was inserted percutaneously in five subjects (mean age 55 ± 0.4 years) and, subsequently, connected to the CO2-removal device. The median duration on support was 45 hours (interquartile range 26-156), with a blood flow rate of approximately 500 mL/min. The mean PaCO2 decreased from 95.8 ± 21.9 mmHg to 63.9 ± 19.6 mmHg with the pH improving from 7.11 ± 0.1 to 7.26 ± 0.1 in the initial 4 hours of support. Three subjects were directly weaned from the CO2-removal device and mechanical ventilation, one subject was converted to ECMO and one subject died following withdrawal of support. No systemic bleeding or device complications were observed. Low-flow CO2 removal adjuvant to standard therapy was effective in steadily removing CO2, limiting the progression of acidosis in subjects with severe acute hypercapnic respiratory failure.

  9. Interventional Treatment of Abdominal Compartment Syndrome during Severe Acute Pancreatitis: Current Status and Historical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Radenkovic, Dejan V.; Johnson, Colin D.; Milic, Natasa; Gregoric, Pavle; Ivancevic, Nenad; Bezmarevic, Mihailo; Bilanovic, Dragoljub; Cijan, Vladimir; Antic, Andrija; Bajec, Djordje

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is a marker of severe disease. It occurs as combination of inflammation of retroperitoneum, visceral edema, ascites, acute peripancreatic fluid collections, paralytic ileus, and aggressive fluid resuscitation. The frequency of ACS in SAP may be rising due to more aggressive fluid resuscitation, a trend towards conservative treatment, and attempts to use a minimally invasive approach. There remains uncertainty about the most appropriate surgical technique for the treatment of ACS in SAP. Some unresolved questions remain including medical treatment, indications, timing, and interventional techniques. This review will focus on interventional treatment of this serious condition. First line therapy is conservative treatment aiming to decrease IAP and to restore organ dysfunction. If nonoperative measures are not effective, early abdominal decompression is mandatory. Midline laparostomy seems to be method of choice. Since it carries significant morbidity we need randomized studies to establish firm advantages over other described techniques. After ACS resolves efforts should be made to achieve early primary fascia closure. Additional data are necessary to resolve uncertainties regarding ideal timing and indication for operative treatment. PMID:26839539

  10. Medication-overuse headache: a perspective review

    PubMed Central

    Westergaard, Maria Lurenda; Munksgaard, Signe Bruun; Bendtsen, Lars; Jensen, Rigmor Højland

    2016-01-01

    Medication-overuse headache (MOH) is a debilitating condition in which frequent and prolonged use of medication for the acute treatment of pain results in the worsening of the headache. The purpose of this paper is to review the most recent literature on MOH and discuss future avenues for research. MOH accounts for a substantial share of the global burden of disease. Prevalence is often reported as 1–2% but can be as high as 7% overall, with higher proportions among women and in those with a low socioeconomic position. Management consists of withdrawing pain medication, focusing on prophylactic and nonmedical treatments, and limiting acute symptomatic medication. Stress reduction and lifestyle interventions may support the change towards rational pain medication use. Support, follow up, and education are needed to help patients through the detoxification period. There is fertile ground for research in MOH epidemiology, pathophysiology, and neuroimaging. Randomized and long-term follow-up studies on MOH treatment protocols are needed. Further focused research could be of major importance for global health. PMID:27493718

  11. Hemicrania continua evolving from cluster headache responsive to valproic acid.

    PubMed

    Lambru, Giorgio; Castellini, Paola; Bini, Annamaria; Evangelista, Andrea; Manzoni, Gian Camillo; Torelli, Paola

    2008-10-01

    Hemicrania continua (HC) is a rare type of primary headache characterized by a prompt and enduring response to indomethacin. We describe a patient who suffered from cluster headache evolving into ipsilateral HC, who does not tolerate a long-term indomethacin therapy. The case was complex in terms of diagnosis, associated comorbidity, and choice of treatment; after several trials with different therapeutic regimens, we started the patient on a therapy with valproic acid and obtained an improvement of her HC.

  12. Viruses as Sole Causative Agents of Severe Acute Respiratory Tract Infections in Children

    PubMed Central

    Moesker, Fleur M.; van Kampen, Jeroen J. A.; van Rossum, Annemarie M. C.; de Hoog, Matthijs; Koopmans, Marion P. G.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Fraaij, Pieter L. A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza A viruses are known to cause severe acute respiratory tract infections (SARIs) in children. For other viruses like human rhinoviruses (HRVs) this is less well established. Viral or bacterial co-infections are often considered essential for severe manifestations of these virus infections. Objective The study aims at identifying viruses that may cause SARI in children in the absence of viral and bacterial co-infections, at identifying disease characteristics associated with these single virus infections, and at identifying a possible correlation between viral loads and disease severities. Study Design Between April 2007 and March 2012, we identified children (<18 year) with or without a medical history, admitted to our paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) with SARI or to the medium care (MC) with an acute respiratory tract infection (ARTI) (controls). Data were extracted from the clinical and laboratory databases of our tertiary care paediatric hospital. Patient specimens were tested for fifteen respiratory viruses with real-time reverse transcriptase PCR assays and we selected patients with a single virus infection only. Typical bacterial co-infections were considered unlikely to have contributed to the PICU or MC admission based on C-reactive protein-levels or bacteriological test results if performed. Results We identified 44 patients admitted to PICU with SARI and 40 patients admitted to MC with ARTI. Twelve viruses were associated with SARI, ten of which were also associated with ARTI in the absence of typical bacterial and viral co-infections, with RSV and HRV being the most frequent causes. Viral loads were not different between PICU-SARI patients and MC-ARTI patients. Conclusion Both SARI and ARTI may be caused by single viral pathogens in previously healthy children as well as in children with a medical history. No relationship between viral load and disease severity was identified. PMID:26964038

  13. Coping and Quality of Life in relation to headache in Dutch schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Bandell-Hoekstra, Inez E N G; Abu-Saad, Huda Hujier; Passchier, Jan; Frederiks, Carla M A; Feron, Frans J M; Knipschild, Paul

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the Quality of Life and pain coping strategies of school children in relation to headache severity. We conducted a cross-sectional study in 2815 children between the age of 9 and 17 years, who filled out Waters' Headache Questionnaire (WHQ), the Paediatric Pain Assessment Tool (PPAT), the Quality of Life Headache in Youth (QLH-Y) questionnaire and the Pain Coping Questionnaire (PCQ) in the class-room setting. Weekly headaches were reported by 22% of the sample. Low, medium, and high headache severity groups were constructed, based on headache frequency, duration and intensity criteria. Results show that children with the highest headache severity report the lowest Quality of Life in general and the lowest Quality of Health, as well as the most problems with regard to physical functioning, impact of headache on daily and leisure activities, physical symptoms other than headache, and social functioning at home. With regard to using pain coping strategies, children with the most severe headaches seek more social support, they internalize and externalize more, they use less behavioural and cognitive distraction techniques, and seek information less. PMID:12161097

  14. Endotoxin adsorption therapy using polymyxin B-immobilized fiber as a treatment for septic shock-associated severe acute cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yoshihiro; Fujino, Yasuhisa; Onodera, Makoto; Kikuchi, Satoshi; Takahashi, Gaku; Kojika, Masahiro; Endo, Shigeatsu

    2013-10-01

    The application of endotoxin adsorption therapy for severe acute cholangitis is controversial. We present a survival case of septic shock and multiple organ failure due to severe acute cholangitis. The patient was treated by endotoxin adsorption therapy using polymyxin B-immobilized fiber because he continued to remain in shock even after successful endoscopic nasobiliary drainage. The patient was an 84-year-old male diagnosed with acute cholangitis and acute pancreatitis who was transferred to our department because of shock and severe dyspnea. The patient had already developed acute respiratory failure, acute renal failure, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. We performed endoscopic nasobiliary drainage immediately, but the patient continued to remain in shock and plasma endotoxin level was markedly elevated at 133.6 pg/mL. Therefore, we performed direct hemoperfusion with polymyxin B-immobilized fiber. On starting the hemoperfusion, blood pressure and urine volume increased, and the plasma endotoxin level reduced considerably. On the basis of our experience in this case, we think that direct hemoperfusion with polymyxin B-immobilized fiber may be a useful modality in the management of severe acute cholangitis.

  15. The significance of tubular and glomerular proteinuria in critically ill patients with severe acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Christopher Thiam Seong; Tan, Han Khim; Lau, Yeow Kok

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Critically ill patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) frequently need acute renal replacement therapy (aRRT). We evaluated an inexpensive, rapid quantitative and qualitative analysis of proteinuria on the course of AKI patients requiring aRRT in intensive care. Method: This was a prospective, observational study of critically ill patients with severe established AKI or Acute on Chronic Kidney Injury (AoCKI) requiring aRRT. Urine samples were analyzed using Sodium-Dodecyl-Sulphate-Polyacryamide Gel Electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Results: A total of 30 critically ill patients were studied. Those who died have higher APACHE II (29 ± 6 vs. 20 ± 5, p<0.001), multi-organ failure (0.7 ± 0.5 vs. 0.2 ± 0.4, p < 0.02) and Tubular/Glomerular ratio (114 ± 60 vs. 75± 37, p < 0.05).The renal non-recoverers have higher baseline creatinine (415 ± 328 vs. 125± 19 umol/l, p < 0.01), urinary Dipstick value (1.8±0.8 vs. 0.5±0, p <0.05) and Glomerular score (3.0 ± 1.8 vs. 0.6 ± 0.2, p < 0.02).Heavy tubular proteinuria also predicts a longer duration of interim dialysis support and mortality whereas glomerular proteinuria correlates with development of chronicity and End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD). Conclusions: The dominant presence of tubular proteinuria is associated with poor survival in patients who have high APACHE II score and multi-organ failure. It also correlates with a longer duration of dialysis support in survivals. Renal Non-recoverers had heavy dominant presence of glomerular proteinuria. SDS-PAGE proteinuria analysis offers a reliable and inexpensive method to prognosticate proteinuria in this group of critically ill patients. PMID:25674105

  16. [Cluster headache and brain imagery].

    PubMed

    Giraud, Pierric; Demarquay, Geneviève

    2015-11-01

    Cluster headache is defined on clinical international criteria developed by International Headache Society (IHS, 2013). The realization of a brain MRI with arterial angio-MRI is required according to the French recommendations (Donnet et al., 2014) based on recent the literature. Numerous causes or diseases can mimic typical or atypical AVF (Edvardsson, 2014). Identification of these causes allows an appropriate treatment in addition with symptomatic treatment. PMID:26585270

  17. The Acute Asthma Severity Assessment Protocol (AASAP) study: objectives and methods of a study to develop an acute asthma clinical prediction rule.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Donald H; Gebretsadik, Tebeb; Abramo, Thomas J; Sheller, James R; Resha, Donald J; Hartert, Tina V

    2012-06-01

    Acute asthma exacerbations are one of the most common reasons for paediatric emergency department visits and hospitalisations, and a relapse frequently necessitates repeat urgent care. While care plans exist, there are no acute asthma prediction rules (APRs) to assess severity and predict outcome. The primary objective of the Acute Asthma Severity Assessment Protocol study is to develop a multivariable APR for acute asthma exacerbations in paediatric patients. A prospective, convenience sample of paediatric patients aged 5-17 years with acute asthma exacerbations who present to an urban, academic, tertiary paediatric emergency department was enrolled. The study protocol and data analysis plan conform to accepted biostatistical and clinical standards for clinical prediction rule development. Modelling of the APR will be performed once the entire sample size of 1500 has accrued. It is anticipated that the APR will improve resource utilisation in the emergency department, aid in standardisation of disease assessment and allow physician and non-physician providers to participate in earlier objective decision making. The objective of this report is to describe the study objectives and detailed methodology of the Acute Asthma Severity Assessment Protocol study.

  18. [The 452th case: rash, hypotension, abdominal pain and headache].

    PubMed

    Bian, S N; Yang, H H; Wang, Q; Xu, D; Zhao, Y

    2016-09-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized with multiple organ involvements. Acute acalculous cholecystitis(AAC) is an extremely rare manifestation of digestive system involvement in SLE. We reported a case of 32-year-old woman who complained skin rashes for two weeks and stomachache and oliguria for one day. She had rashes at onset, and developed fever, stomachache, hypotension and headache. Physical examination at admission indicated blood pressure 76/47 mmHg(1 mmHg=0.133 kPa), heart rate 107 beats/min, warm acra. Murphy's sign was positive. Ultrasound suggested the enlarged gallbladder with surrounding hypoecho band yet no biliary calculi were found. A diagnosis of SLE was made, characteristic with distributive shock at the onset and AAC, complicated with neuropsychiatric lupus and lupus nephritis. She had an acute and severe course of disease, which had been relieved after treatment of high dose glucocorticoid and immunosuppressants. This case arouses clinicians to pay more attention to AAC as a rare form of disease flare in SLE. Early diagnosis of AAC is crucial to a favorable prognosis and in avoid of abdominal surgery. PMID:27586989

  19. Increased levels of 3-hydroxykynurenine parallel disease severity in human acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Skouras, Christos; Zheng, Xiaozhong; Binnie, Margaret; Homer, Natalie Z. M.; Murray, Toby B. J.; Robertson, Darren; Briody, Lesley; Paterson, Finny; Spence, Heather; Derr, Lisa; Hayes, Alastair J.; Tsoumanis, Andreas; Lyster, Dawn; Parks, Rowan W.; Garden, O. James; Iredale, John P.; Uings, Iain J.; Liddle, John; Wright, Wayne L.; Dukes, George; Webster, Scott P.; Mole, Damian J.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) protects against multiple organ dysfunction (MODS) in experimental acute pancreatitis (AP). We aimed to precisely define the kynurenine pathway activation in relation to AP and AP-MODS in humans, by carrying out a prospective observational study of all persons presenting with a potential diagnosis of AP for 90 days. We sampled peripheral venous blood at 0, 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, 72 and 168 hours post-recruitment. We measured tryptophan metabolite concentrations and analysed these in the context of clinical data and disease severity indices, cytokine profiles and C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations. 79 individuals were recruited (median age: 59.6 years; 47 males, 59.5%). 57 met the revised Atlanta definition of AP: 25 had mild, 23 moderate, and 9 severe AP. Plasma 3-hydroxykynurenine concentrations correlated with contemporaneous APACHE II scores (R2 = 0.273; Spearman rho = 0.581; P < 0.001) and CRP (R2 = 0.132; Spearman rho = 0.455, P < 0.001). Temporal profiling showed early tryptophan depletion and contemporaneous 3-hydroxykynurenine elevation. Furthermore, plasma concentrations of 3-hydroxykynurenine paralleled systemic inflammation and AP severity. These findings support the rationale for investigating early intervention with a KMO inhibitor, with the aim of reducing the incidence and severity of AP-associated organ dysfunction. PMID:27669975

  20. Epidemiological, clinical and pharmacological aspects of headache in a university undergraduate population in Palestine.

    PubMed

    Sweileh, W M; Sawalha, A F; Zyoud, S H; Al-Jabi, S W; Shamseh, F F B; Khalaf, H S

    2010-04-01

    Headache is one of the most common complaints in clinical practice. Few studies regarding headache in university students have been conducted in the Middle East. The objective of this study was to explore the prevalence, clinical characteristics, triggering factors and treatment options of headaches in university undergraduate students in Palestine/Middle East. Data were collected by interviewing a sample of 1900 students. The Headache Assessment Quiz was used to measure quality and severity of headache and to collect data on triggering factors and symptom management. A total of 1808 (95.2%) reported having at least one headache episode in the previous year. A positive family history of headache was found in 40% of students. The prevalence rate of frequent headache (tow or more episodes/month) was found in 1096 (60.9%) students; 613 women (55.9%). Of those having frequent headaches, 228 (20.8%) experienced moderate to severe episodes, 341 (31.2%) had pulsating, throbbing and pounding pain, and 274 (25%) had unilateral pain. The most common triggering factors among students with frequent headaches were: tension/stress (78.2%) and sleep deprivation (75.4%). Less than 5% of students sought medical assistance during headache episodes. Most students (79.1%) reported self-therapy with a single analgesic (53.4%), herbs (10.2%) or combination (15.5%), while 20.9% reported using no medication of any type to decrease pain. Paracetamol (48.5%) followed by ibuprofen (4.9%) were the most commonly used non-prescription analgesic drugs. Headache is a prevalent symptom in the college age population. Further research is needed to determine the prevalence of specific types of headaches. Healthcare providers are required to educate this population as well as to assist students in properly diagnosing and treating headache types. PMID:19673913

  1. Modified Da Chengqi granules improvement in immune function in early severe acute pancreatitis patients.

    PubMed

    Jiang, D-L; Yang, J; Jiang, S-Y; Yuan, F-L; Gu, Y-L; Li, J-P; Pei, Z-J

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the role of modified Da Chengqi granules in improving immune function in early severe acute pancreatitis patients. Early severe acute pancreatitis patients who agreed to receive combined treatment of traditional Chinese and Western medicine were randomly assigned to the experimental or control group. All subjects received conventional therapy to support organ function. The experimental group also received modified Da Chengqi granules. Cytokine (interleukin-6, interleukin-10, and tumor necrosis factor-α) levels, immunological markers (HLA-DR, Treg, and Th1/Th2), urinary lactulose/mannitol ratio, and endotoxin levels were measured at 1, 3, 7, and 14 days after hospital admission. The total mortality rate was 11.69% (9/77), which was significantly lower in the experimental group [4.88% (2/41)] than in the control group [19.44% (7/36); χ(2) = 3.940, P < 0.05]. Serum interleukin-6, interleukin-10, tumor necrosis factor-α and endotoxin levels and the lactulose/mannitol ratio were significantly lower on day 7 and day 14 than on day 1 in experimental and control groups (P < 0.01). Immunological indices were significantly lower in the experimental group than in the control group on day 14 (all P < 0.01 or 0.05). HLA-DR-positive cell ratio gradually increased over 14 days in experimental and control groups (P < 0.01 vs day 1), but was higher in the experimental group than in the control group by day 14 (P < 0.05). Notably, Treg cell prevalence and Th1/Th2 cell ratio deteriorated within 7 days in both groups (P < 0.01 vs day 1), but then returned to day 1 levels (P < 0.01 or 0.05 vs day 1). Significant differences in Treg levels and Th1/Th2 cell ratio between experimental and control groups were observed on day 14 (P < 0.01). These results show that modified Da Chengqi granules can improve immune function in early severe acute pancreatitis patients.

  2. Aspartame and susceptibility to headache.

    PubMed

    Schiffman, S S; Buckley, C E; Sampson, H A; Massey, E W; Baraniuk, J N; Follett, J V; Warwick, Z S

    1987-11-01

    We performed a double-blind crossover trial of challenges with 30 mg of aspartame per kilogram of body weight or placebo in 40 subjects who reported having headaches repeatedly after consuming products containing aspartame. The incidence rate of headache after aspartame (35 percent) was not significantly different from that after placebo (45 percent) (P less than 0.50). No serious reactions were observed, and the incidence of symptoms other than headache following aspartame was also equivalent to that after placebo. No treatment-related effects were detected in vital signs, blood pressure, or plasma concentrations of cortisol, insulin, glucagon, histamine, epinephrine, or norepinephrine. Most of the subjects were well educated and overweight and had a family or personal history of allergic reactions. The subjects who had headaches had lower plasma concentrations of norepinephrine (P less than 0.0002) and epinephrine (P less than 0.02) just before the development of headache. We conclude that in this population, aspartame is no more likely to produce headache than placebo.

  3. [Headache from the neurological point of view].

    PubMed

    Krämer, G

    1984-08-01

    After a short review of the most important clinical signs of headaches including history and dynamic course as well as diagnostic management a systematic presentation of the most common neurological headache forms is given with the aid of tabular surveys. Considered are: psychogenic headache, tension headache, migraine including its special forms, cluster headache, headache associated with giant cell arteritis, meningeal irritation or space occupying cerebral lesions, trigeminal neuralgia and posttraumatic headache. Some less common special forms like the low spinal fluid pressure syndrome or the Tolosa Hunt syndrome are briefly discussed. PMID:6385099

  4. Viral Infection in Adults with Severe Acute Respiratory Infection in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Remolina, Yuly Andrea; Ulloa, María Mercedes; Vargas, Hernán; Díaz, Liliana; Gómez, Sandra Liliana; Saavedra, Alfredo; Sánchez, Edgar; Cortés, Jorge Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To identify the viral aetiology in adult patients with severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) admitted to sentinel surveillance institutions in Bogotá in 2012. Design A cross-sectional study was conducted in which microarray molecular techniques for viral identification were used on nasopharyngeal samples of adult patients submitted to the surveillance system, and further descriptions of clinical features and relevant clinical outcomes, such as mortality, need for critical care, use of mechanical ventilation and hospital stay, were obtained. Setting Respiratory infections requiring hospital admission in surveillance centres in Bogotá, Colombia. Participants Ninety-one adult patients with acute respiratory infection (55% were female). Measurements Viral identification, intensive care unit admission, hospital stay, and mortality. Results Viral identification was achieved for 63 patients (69.2%). Comorbidity was frequently identified and mainly involved chronic pulmonary disease or pregnancy. Influenza, Bocavirus and Adenovirus were identified in 30.8%, 28.6% and 18.7% of the cases, respectively. Admission to the intensive care unit occurred in 42.9% of the cases, while mechanical ventilation was required for 36.3%. The average hospital stay was 9.9 days, and mortality was 15.4%. Antibiotics were empirically used in 90.1% of patients. Conclusions The prevalence of viral aetiology of SARI in this study was high, with adverse clinical outcomes, intensive care requirements and high mortality. PMID:26576054

  5. Severe envenomation by Cerastes cerastes viper: an unusual mechanism of acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Rebahi, Houssam; Nejmi, Hicham; Abouelhassan, Taoufik; Hasni, Khadija; Samkaoui, Mohamed-Abdenasser

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral complications after snake bites--particularly ischemic complications--are rare. Very few cases of cerebral infarction resulting from a viper bite have been reported, and we call attention to this uncommon etiology. We discuss 3 authenticated reports of acute ischemic cerebrovascular accidents after 3 typical severe envenomations by Cerastes cerastes vipers. The 3 patients developed extensive local swelling and life-threatening systemic envenomation characterized by disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, increased fibrinolysis, thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and acute renal failure. This clinical picture involved atypical neurologic manifestations. These patients had either low Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) or hemiparesis within hours to 4 days after being bitten, and they were found to have computed tomographic evidence of single or multiple ischemic (nonhemorrhagic) strokes of small- to large-vessel territories of the brain. One patient had good clinical recovery without neurologic deficits. Thrombotic complications occurred an average of 36 hours after being bitten, and their importance depends on the degree of envenomation. The possible mechanisms for cerebral infarction in these cases include generalized prothrombotic action of the venom (consumptive coagulopathy), toxin-induced vasculitis, and endothelial damage.

  6. Differential acute effects of selenomethionine and sodium selenite on the severity of colitis.

    PubMed

    Hiller, Franziska; Oldorff, Lisa; Besselt, Karolin; Kipp, Anna Patricia

    2015-04-01

    The European population is only suboptimally supplied with the essential trace element selenium. Such a selenium status is supposed to worsen colitis while colitis-suppressive effects were observed with adequate or supplemented amounts of both organic selenomethionine (SeMet) and inorganic sodium selenite. In order to better understand the effect of these selenocompounds on colitis development we examined colonic phenotypes of mice fed supplemented diets before the onset of colitis or during the acute phase. Colitis was induced by treating mice with 1% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) for seven days. The selenium-enriched diets were either provided directly after weaning (long-term) or were given to mice with a suboptimal selenium status after DSS withdrawal (short-term). While long-term selenium supplementation had no effect on colitis development, short-term selenite supplementation, however, resulted in a more severe colitis. Colonic selenoprotein expression was maximized in all selenium-supplemented groups independent of the selenocompound or intervention time. This indicates that the short-term selenite effect appears to be independent from colonic selenoprotein expression. In conclusion, a selenite supplementation during acute colitis has no health benefits but may even aggravate the course of disease. PMID:25867950

  7. Enucleation and development of cluster headache: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Sörös, Peter; Vo, Oanh; Gerding, Heinrich; Husstedt, Ingo W; Evers, Stefan

    2005-01-01

    Background Cluster headache (CH) is a neurovascular, primary headache disorder. There are, however, several case reports about patients whose CH started shortly after a structural brain disease or trauma. Motivated by a patient who developed CH 3 weeks after the removal of an eye and by similar case reports, we tested the hypothesis that the removal of an eye is a risk factor for CH. Methods A detailed headache questionnaire was filled out by 112 patients on average 8 years after enucleation or evisceration of an eye. Results While 21 % of these patients experienced previously unknown headaches after the removal of an eye, no patient fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for CH. Conclusion Our data does not suggest that the removal of an eye is a major risk factor for the development of CH. PMID:15784136

  8. Chronic headache and potentially modifiable risk factors: screening and behavioral management of sleep disorders.

    PubMed

    Rains, Jeanetta C

    2008-01-01

    Sleep-related variables have been identified among risk factors for frequent and severe headache conditions. It has been postulated that migraine, chronic daily headache, and perhaps other forms of chronic headache are progressive disorders. Thus, sleep and other modifiable risk factors may be clinical targets for prevention of headache progression or chronification. The present paper is part of the special series of papers entitled "Chronification of Headache" describing the empirical evidence, future research directions, proposed mechanisms, and risk factors implicated in headache chronification as well as several papers addressing individual risk factors (ie, sleep disorders, medication overuse, psychiatric disorders, stress, obesity). Understanding the link between risk factors and headache may yield novel preventative and therapeutic approaches in the management of headache. The present paper in the special series reviews epidemiological research as a means of quantifying the relationship between chronic headache and sleep disorders (sleep-disordered breathing, insomnia, circadian rhythm disorders, parasomnias) discusses screening for early detection and treatment of more severe and prevalent sleep disorders, and discusses fundamental sleep regulation strategies aimed at headache prevention for at-risk individuals.

  9. Comorbidity as a contributor to frequent severe acute exacerbation in COPD patients

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Suk Hyeon; Lee, Hyun; Carriere, KC; Shin, Sun Hye; Moon, Seong Mi; Jeong, Byeong-Ho; Koh, Won-Jung; Park, Hye Yun

    2016-01-01

    Background Comorbidities have a serious impact on the frequent severe acute exacerbations (AEs) in patients with COPD. Previous studies have used the Charlson comorbidity index to represent a conglomerate of comorbidities; however, the respective contribution of each coexisting disease to the frequent severe AEs remains unclear. Methods A retrospective, observational study was performed in 77 COPD patients who experienced severe AE between January 2012 and December 2014 and had at least 1-year follow-up period from the date of admission for severe AE. We explored the incidence of frequent severe AEs (≥2 severe AEs during 1-year period) in these patients and investigated COPD-related factors and comorbidities as potential risk factors of these exacerbations. Results Out of 77 patients, 61 patients (79.2%) had at least one comorbidity. During a 1-year follow-up period, 29 patients (37.7%) experienced frequent severe AEs, approximately two-thirds (n=19) of which occurred within the first 90 days after admission. Compared with patients not experiencing frequent severe AEs, these patients were more likely to have poor lung function and receive home oxygen therapy and long-term oral steroids. In multiple logistic regression analysis, coexisting asthma (adjusted odds ratio [OR] =4.02, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.30–12.46, P=0.016), home oxygen therapy (adjusted OR =9.39, 95% CI =1.60–55.30, P=0.013), and C-reactive protein (adjusted OR =1.09, 95% CI =1.01–1.19, P=0.036) were associated with frequent severe AEs. In addition, poor lung function, as measured by forced expiratory volume in 1 second (adjusted OR =0.16, 95% CI =0.04–0.70, P=0.015), was inversely associated with early (ie, within 90 days of admission) frequent severe AEs. Conclusion Based on our study, among COPD-related comorbidities, coexisting asthma has a significant impact on the frequent severe AEs in COPD patients. PMID:27536097

  10. How do patients referred to neurologists for headache differ from those managed in primary care?

    PubMed Central

    Ridsdale, Leone; Clark, Lucy V; Dowson, Andrew J; Goldstein, Laura H; Jenkins, Linda; McCrone, Paul; Morgan, Myfanwy; Seed, Paul T

    2007-01-01

    Background Headache is the neurological symptom most frequently presented to GPs and referred to neurologists, but little is known about how referred patients differ from patients managed by GPs. Aim To describe and compare headache patients managed in primary care with those referred to neurologists. Design of study Prospective study. Setting Eighteen general practices in south-east England. Method This study examined 488 eligible patients consulting GPs with primary headache over 7 weeks and 81 patients referred to neurologists over 1 year. Headache disability was measured by the Migraine Disability Assessment Score, headache impact by the Headache Impact Test, emotional distress by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and illness perception was assessed using the Illness Perception Questionnaire. Results Participants were 303 patients who agreed to participate. Both groups reported severe disability and very severe impact on functioning. Referred patients consulted more frequently than those not referred in the 3 months before referral (P = 0.003). There was no significant difference between GP-managed and referred groups in mean headache disability, impact, anxiety, depression, or satisfaction with care. The referred group were more likely to link an increased number of symptoms to their headaches (P = 0.01), to have stronger emotional representations of their headaches (P = 0.006), to worry more (P = 0.001), and were made anxious by their headache symptoms (P = 0.044). Conclusion Patients who consult for headache experience severe disability and impact, and up to a third report anxiety and/or depression. Referral is not related to clinical severity of headaches, but is associated with higher consultation frequency and patients' anxiety and concern about their headache symptoms. PMID:17504590

  11. Severe acute respiratory failure secondary to acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia requiring mechanical ventilation: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    López-Cuenca, Sonia; Morales-García, Silvia; Martín-Hita, Ana; Frutos-Vivar, Fernando; Fernández-Segoviano, Pilar; Esteban, Andrés

    2012-08-01

    A 27-year-old woman was admitted to our ICU with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure and criteria for ARDS. Despite an F(IO(2)) of 1.0 and a lung protective strategy, the patient died on day 15 without any improvement. The relatives gave consent for post-mortem analysis. The histopathologic study of the lung showed findings typical of an acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia. Apropos of this case we performed a PubMed search. We found 13 articles, including a total of 29 patients. Acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia is an unusual cause of acute lung injury. The diagnostic criterion is histopathologic. There is little information regarding the pathophysiology of this illness. Important questions remain regarding this disease, including predisposing factors and management. Patients who require mechanical ventilation have poor outcomes.

  12. Behavioral management of headache in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Faedda, Noemi; Cerutti, Rita; Verdecchia, Paola; Migliorini, Daniele; Arruda, Marco; Guidetti, Vincenzo

    2016-12-01

    Headache is the most frequent neurological symptom and the most prevalent pain in children and adolescents, and constitutes a serious health problem that may lead to impairment in several areas. Psychosocial factors, social environment, life events, school and family stressors are all closely related to headaches. A multidisciplinary strategy is fundamental in addressing headache in children and adolescents. Applying such a strategy can lead to reductions in frequency and severity of the pain, improving significantly the quality of life of these children.It has been demonstrated that behavioral intervention is highly effective, especially in the treatment of paediatric headache, and can enhance or replace pharmacotherapy, with the advantage of eliminating dangerous side effects and or reducing costs. Behavioral interventions appear to maximize long-term therapeutic benefits and improve compliance with pharmacological treatment, which has proven a significant problem with child and adolescent with headache.The goal of this review is to examine the existing literature on behavioral therapies used to treat headache in children and adolescents, and so provide an up-to-date picture of what behavioral therapy is and what its effectiveness is. PMID:27596923

  13. Severe acute interstitial nephritis after combination immune-checkpoint inhibitor therapy for metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Naoka; Borges, Thiago J.; Yamashita, Michifumi; Riella, Leonardo V.

    2016-01-01

    Immune-checkpoint inhibitors are emerging as revolutionary drugs for certain malignancies. However, blocking the co-inhibitory signals may lead to immune-related adverse events, mainly in the spectrum of autoimmune diseases including colitis, endocrinopathies and nephritis. Here, we report a case of a 75-year-old man with metastatic malignant melanoma treated with a combination of nivolumab (anti-PD1-antibody) and ipilimumab (anti-CTLA-4 antibody) who developed systemic rash along with severe acute tubulointerstitial nephritis after two doses of combination therapy. Kidney biopsy and peripheral blood immune profile revealed highly proliferative and cytotoxic T cell features. Herein, we discuss the pathophysiology and management of immune checkpoint blockade-related adverse events. PMID:27274826

  14. Progress in Global Surveillance and Response Capacity 10 Years after Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Braden, Christopher R.; Dowell, Scott F.; Jernigan, Daniel B.

    2013-01-01

    Ten years have elapsed since the World Health Organization issued its first global alert for an unexplained illness named severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). The anniversary provides an opportunity to reflect on the international response to this new global microbial threat. While global surveillance and response capacity for public health threats have been strengthened, critical gaps remain. Of 194 World Health Organization member states that signed on to the International Health Regulations (2005), <20% had achieved compliance with the core capacities required by the deadline in June 2012. Lessons learned from the global SARS outbreak highlight the need to avoid complacency, strengthen efforts to improve global capacity to address the next pandemic using all available 21st century tools, and support research to develop new treatment options, countermeasures, and insights while striving to address the global inequities that are the root cause of many of these challenges. PMID:23731871

  15. Prospects for Emerging Infections in East and Southeast Asia 10 Years after Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Dirk; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    It is 10 years since severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) emerged, and East and Southeast Asia retain a reputation as a hot spot of emerging infectious diseases. The region is certainly a hot spot of socioeconomic and environmental change, and although some changes (e.g., urbanization and agricultural intensification) may reduce the probability of emerging infectious diseases, the effect of any individual emergence event may be increased by the greater concentration and connectivity of livestock, persons, and products. The region is now better able to detect and respond to emerging infectious diseases than it was a decade ago, but the tools and methods to produce sufficiently refined assessments of the risks of disease emergence are still lacking. Given the continued scale and pace of change in East and Southeast Asia, it is vital that capabilities for predicting, identifying, and controlling biologic threats do not stagnate as the memory of SARS fades. PMID:23738977

  16. Progress in global surveillance and response capacity 10 years after severe acute respiratory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Braden, Christopher R; Dowell, Scott F; Jernigan, Daniel B; Hughes, James M

    2013-06-01

    Ten years have elapsed since the World Health Organization issued its first global alert for an unexplained illness named severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). The anniversary provides an opportunity to reflect on the international response to this new global microbial threat. While global surveillance and response capacity for public health threats have been strengthened, critical gaps remain. Of 194 World Health Organization member states that signed on to the International Health Regulations (2005), <20% had achieved compliance with the core capacities required by the deadline in June 2012. Lessons learned from the global SARS outbreak highlight the need to avoid complacency, strengthen efforts to improve global capacity to address the next pandemic using all available 21st century tools, and support research to develop new treatment options, countermeasures, and insights while striving to address the global inequities that are the root cause of many of these challenges. PMID:23731871

  17. Prospects for emerging infections in East and southeast Asia 10 years after severe acute respiratory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Horby, Peter W; Pfeiffer, Dirk; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2013-06-01

    It is 10 years since severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) emerged, and East and Southeast Asia retain a reputation as a hot spot of emerging infectious diseases. The region is certainly a hot spot of socioeconomic and environmental change, and although some changes (e.g., urbanization and agricultural intensification) may reduce the probability of emerging infectious diseases, the effect of any individual emergence event may be increased by the greater concentration and connectivity of livestock, persons, and products. The region is now better able to detect and respond to emerging infectious diseases than it was a decade ago, but the tools and methods to produce sufficiently refined assessments of the risks of disease emergence are still lacking. Given the continued scale and pace of change in East and Southeast Asia, it is vital that capabilities for predicting, identifying, and controlling biologic threats do not stagnate as the memory of SARS fades.

  18. Study progress on mechanism of severe acute pancreatitis complicated with hepatic injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi-ping; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Jie

    2007-04-01

    Study on the action mechanism of inflammatory mediators generated by the severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) in multiple organ injury is a hotspot in the surgical field. In clinical practice, the main complicated organ dysfunctions are shock, respiratory failure, renal failure, encephalopathy, with the rate of hepatic diseases being closely next to them. The hepatic injury caused by SAP cannot only aggravate the state of pancreatitis, but also develop into hepatic failure and cause patient death. Its complicated pathogenic mechanism is an obstacle in clinical treatment. Among many pathogenic factors, the changes of vasoactive substances, participation of inflammatory mediators as well as OFR (oxygen free radical), endotoxin, etc. may play important roles in its progression.

  19. Protective Effect of Tetrandrine on Sodium Taurocholate-Induced Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xian-lin; Li, Jie-xing; Li, Zhen-dong; Liu, Da-sheng; Lu, Su-hong; Liu, Kang-li; Duan, Hong-yan; Luo, Yu-hong

    2015-01-01

    Tet is a type of alkaloid extracted from Stephania tetrandra, and it has recently been demonstrated that Tet can protect against inflammation and free radical injury and inhibit the release of inflammatory mediators. The present study was designed to observe the protective effect of Tet on sodium taurocholate-induced severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). The rat model of SAP was induced by retrograde bile duct injection of sodium taurocholate and then treated with Verapamil and Tet. The results showed that Tet can reduce NF-κB activation in pancreas issue, inhibit the SAP cascade, and improve SAP through inducing pancreas acinar cell apoptosis and stabilizing intracellular calcium in the pancreas, thus mitigating the damage to the pancreas. Our study revealed that Tet may reduce systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and multiple organ dysfunction syndromes (MODS) to protect against damage, and these roles may be mediated through the NF-κB pathway to improve the proinflammatory/anti-inflammatory imbalance. PMID:26557854

  20. Protective Effect of Tetrandrine on Sodium Taurocholate-Induced Severe Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xian-Lin; Li, Jie-Xing; Li, Zhen-Dong; Liu, Da-Sheng; Lu, Su-Hong; Liu, Kang-Li; Duan, Hong-Yan; Luo, Yu-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Tet is a type of alkaloid extracted from Stephania tetrandra, and it has recently been demonstrated that Tet can protect against inflammation and free radical injury and inhibit the release of inflammatory mediators. The present study was designed to observe the protective effect of Tet on sodium taurocholate-induced severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). The rat model of SAP was induced by retrograde bile duct injection of sodium taurocholate and then treated with Verapamil and Tet. The results showed that Tet can reduce NF-κB activation in pancreas issue, inhibit the SAP cascade, and improve SAP through inducing pancreas acinar cell apoptosis and stabilizing intracellular calcium in the pancreas, thus mitigating the damage to the pancreas. Our study revealed that Tet may reduce systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and multiple organ dysfunction syndromes (MODS) to protect against damage, and these roles may be mediated through the NF-κB pathway to improve the proinflammatory/anti-inflammatory imbalance. PMID:26557854

  1. Spatial dynamics of an epidemic of severe acute respiratory syndrome in an urban area.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinfeng; McMichael, Anthony J.; Meng, Bin; Becker, Niels G.; Han, Weiguo; Glass, Kathryn; Wu, Jilei; Liu, Xuhua; Liu, Jiyuan; Li, Xiaowen; Zheng, Xiaoying

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To map risk of exposure to severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in an urban area and assess the ability of traditional interventions to control dispersion of the disease. METHODS: Data on the Beijing SARS epidemic were used to map spatial clusters of identified contacts and to estimate transmission of SARS using a model with a time-dependent transmission rate. RESULTS: The estimated transmission rate decreased dramatically from 20 to 30 April 2003. The total number of cases in the epidemic in Beijing was estimated to be 2521. Hierarchical clustering revealed that risk-exposures were widespread, but clustered in a pattern that is distinctly related to the Beijing urban ring roads. CONCLUSION: Traditional control measures can be very effective at reducing transmission of SARS. Spatial patterns of risk-exposures can inform disease surveillance, prediction and control by identifying spatial target areas on which interventions should be focused. PMID:17242832

  2. Acute Onset Peripartum Cardiomyopathy in a Woman with Severe Pre-eclamptia: A Diagnostic Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Basak, Sonela; Rudra, Pallab

    2013-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a form of dilated cardiomyopathy that can present as acute life-threatening pulmonary oedema in late pregnancy or early puerperium, its diagnosis is mainly by exclusion of other causes. Morbidity is high due to the reduced physiological reserve in pregnancy. PPCM and severe pre-eclampsia can co-exist and their clinical presentation may overlap, making the diagnosis more difficult and often delayed, with potentially devastating consequences. Here, we would like to share our experience of such a case and present to the readers how we dealt with the challenge. As obstetricians we often do not resort to transthoracic echocardiography, which in our case prompted the diagnosis timely. Lateral thinking and a heightened suspicion does help. Proper diagnosis is extremely important not only for the immediate appropriate management but also for advising long-term lifestyle modifications to minimize risk and counselling for future pregnancy.

  3. [Risk factors for severe acute lower respiratory tract infection in Bogota, 2001].

    PubMed

    Jaimes, María Belén; Cáceres, Diana C; de la Hoz, Fernando; Gutiérrez, Camilo; Herrera, Diana; Pinilla, Jairo; Porras, Alexandra; Rodríguez, Fabio; Velandia, Martha

    2003-09-01

    Severity of acute respiratory infection is higher in developing countries, especially among the socioeconomically underprivileged. Viral pneumonias are more common, especially among children. A prospective hospital-based case control study was undertaken in Bogota between November 2000 and August 2001, aimed to identify factors related to severe low acute respiratory infection (SLARI). Cases were limited to children aged between 2 months and 5 years who filled WHO criteria for SLARI. Controls were children at the same hospital with ARI in a similar age range, but without symptoms of chest drawing. A total of 638 children (277 cases and 361 controls) were included. The most important risk factors included the following: living in borrowed houses (odds ratio (OR) = 2.7; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.06-7.07), sharing the bed (OR = 1.88, CI: 1.0-3.7), living with more than 9 people (OR = 1.82, CI: 1.0-3.51), and living with smokers (OR = 1.4, CI: 1.0-2.05). Of the 114 samples collected (from children at third day after beginning of symptoms), 98 had viruses, sincitial respiratory virus was the most frequently identified virus (41.8%), followed by influenza A virus (3.1%) and influenza B virus (1%). All positive isolates for influenza A and B were sent to the United States Center for Disease Control (CDC) in Atlanta, where they were classified as influenza A/PANAMA/2007/99-like and influenza B/SICHUAN/379/99-like, respectively. PMID:14582331

  4. [Risk factors for severe acute lower respiratory tract infection in Bogota, 2001].

    PubMed

    Jaimes, María Belén; Cáceres, Diana C; de la Hoz, Fernando; Gutiérrez, Camilo; Herrera, Diana; Pinilla, Jairo; Porras, Alexandra; Rodríguez, Fabio; Velandia, Martha

    2003-09-01

    Severity of acute respiratory infection is higher in developing countries, especially among the socioeconomically underprivileged. Viral pneumonias are more common, especially among children. A prospective hospital-based case control study was undertaken in Bogota between November 2000 and August 2001, aimed to identify factors related to severe low acute respiratory infection (SLARI). Cases were limited to children aged between 2 months and 5 years who filled WHO criteria for SLARI. Controls were children at the same hospital with ARI in a similar age range, but without symptoms of chest drawing. A total of 638 children (277 cases and 361 controls) were included. The most important risk factors included the following: living in borrowed houses (odds ratio (OR) = 2.7; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.06-7.07), sharing the bed (OR = 1.88, CI: 1.0-3.7), living with more than 9 people (OR = 1.82, CI: 1.0-3.51), and living with smokers (OR = 1.4, CI: 1.0-2.05). Of the 114 samples collected (from children at third day after beginning of symptoms), 98 had viruses, sincitial respiratory virus was the most frequently identified virus (41.8%), followed by influenza A virus (3.1%) and influenza B virus (1%). All positive isolates for influenza A and B were sent to the United States Center for Disease Control (CDC) in Atlanta, where they were classified as influenza A/PANAMA/2007/99-like and influenza B/SICHUAN/379/99-like, respectively.

  5. Safety and Efficacy of Acute Clopidogrel Load in Patients with Moderate and Severe Ischemic Strokes

    PubMed Central

    Monlezun, Dominique J.; Rincon, Natalia; Tiu, Jonathan; Valmoria, Melisa

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To study the safety and efficacy of a clopidogrel loading dose in patients with moderate and severe acute ischemic strokes. Background. The safety of clopidogrel loading has been extensively investigated in patients with minor strokes and transient ischemic attacks. Methods. Acute ischemic stroke patients presenting consecutively to our center from 07/01/08 to 07/31/13 were screened. Clopidogrel loading was defined as at least 300 mg dose (with or without aspirin) given within 6 hours of admission. We compared outcomes in patients with baseline NIHSS > 3 with and without clopidogrel loading. Results. Inclusion criteria were met for 1011 patients (43.6% females, 69.1% black, median age 63). Patients with clopidogrel loading had lower baseline NIHSS than patients who were not loaded (8 versus 9, p = 0.005). The two groups had similar risk for hemorrhagic transformation (p = 0.918) and symptomatic hemorrhage (p = 0.599). Patients who were loaded had a lower rate of neurological worsening (38.9% versus 48.3%, p = 0.031) and less in-hospital mortality (4.3% versus 13.4%, p = 0.001) compared to those who were not loaded. The likelihood of having a poor functional outcome did not differ between the two groups after adjusting for NIHSS on admission (OR = 0.71, 95% CI 0.4633–1.0906, p = 0.118). Conclusion. Clopidogrel loading dose was not associated with increased risk for hemorrhagic transformation or symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage in our retrospective study and was associated with reduced rates of neuroworsening following moderate and severe stroke.

  6. Paroxysmal stabbing headache in the multiple dermatomes of the head and neck: a variant of primary stabbing headache or occipital neuralgia?

    PubMed

    Shin, J H; Song, H K; Lee, J H; Kim, W K; Chu, M K

    2007-10-01

    A paroxysmal stabbing or icepick-like headache in the multiple nerve dermatomes, especially involving both trigeminal and cervical nerves, has not been fully explained or classified by the International Classification of Headache Disorder, 2(nd) Edition (ICHD-II). Of patients with acute-onset paroxysmal stabbing headache who had visited the Hallym University Medical Center during the last four years, 28 subjects with a repeated stabbing headache involving multiple dermatomes at the initial presentation or during the course were prospectively enrolled. All patients were neurologically and otologically symptom free. A coincidental involvement of both trigeminal and cervical nerve dermatomes included seven cases. Six cases involved initially the trigeminal and then cervical nerve dermatomes. Five cases showed an involvement of the cervical and then trigeminal nerve dermatomes. The remaining patients involved multiple cervical nerve branches (the lesser occipital, greater occipital and greater auricular). Pain lasted very shortly and a previous history of headache with the same nature was reported in 13 cases. Preceding symptom of an infection and physical and/or mental stress were manifested in seven and six subjects, respectively. All patients showed a self-limited benign course and completely recovered within a few hours to 30 days. Interestingly, a seasonal gradient in occurrence of a stabbing headache was found in this study. A paroxysmal stabbing headache manifested on multiple dermatomes can be explained by the characteristics of pain referral, and may be considered to be a variant of primary stabbing headache or occipital neuralgia. PMID:17725653

  7. Severe but reversible acute kidney injury resulting from Amanita punctata poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Eunjung; Cheong, Ka-Young; Lee, Min-Jeong; Kim, Seirhan; Shin, Gyu-Tae; Kim, Heungsoo; Park, In-Whee

    2015-01-01

    Mushroom-related poisoning can cause acute kidney injury. Here we report a case of acute kidney injury after ingestion of Amanita punctata, which is considered an edible mushroom. Gastrointestinal symptoms occurred within 24 hours from the mushroom intake and were followed by an asymptomatic period, acute kidney injury, and elevation of liver and pancreatic enzymes. Kidney function recovered with supportive care. Nephrotoxic mushroom poisoning should be considered as a cause of acute kidney injury. PMID:26779427

  8. Severe Acute Respiratory Illness (SARI) Surveillance in Louisiana, 2013-2014.

    PubMed

    Hand, Julie P; Serrano, Jose; Johnson, Jenna I; Jespersen, Megan; Ratard, Raoult C

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this article are to describe the severe acute respiratory illness (SARI) surveillance implemented in Louisiana during the 2013-2014 influenza season, present the epidemiology of reported SARI cases, and identify ways to improve this system by incorporating formal SARI surveillance into the influenza surveillance program. Of the 212 SARI cases, 181 (85%) had at least one underlying medical condition, 54 (25.7%) had two conditions, 43 (20.3%) had three conditions, and 25 (11.8%) reported four or more. The most common four underlying conditions were: obesity (43.4%), chronic cardiac conditions (39.6%), diabetes (29.7%), and chronic pulmonary conditions (26.9%). While obesity was the most reported underlying condition, it was three times more likely to be reported in less than 65 years old rather than those >65. Continuation of SARI data collection in future seasons will allow comparisons regarding severity, populations affected, and identify risk factors most commonly associated with severe illness. Reporting of SARI cases also increased influenza-associated adult mortality reporting to the Office of Public Health's Office of Infectious Diseases Epidemiology (ID Epi). Though all influenza-associated mortality is reportable in Louisiana, adult mortality was reported rarely prior to the 2013-2014 season. PMID:27159455

  9. Cortisol levels and the severity and outcomes of acute stroke: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Barugh, Amanda Jayne; Gray, Paul; Shenkin, Susan Deborah; MacLullich, Alasdair Maurice Joseph; Mead, Gillian Elizabeth

    2014-03-01

    Studies in non-stroke patients have shown an association between dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and morbidity and mortality. We conducted a systematic review to evaluate cortisol levels in acute stroke and their associations with outcome. We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE for articles up to April 2013 and PsychINFO for articles up to July 2013, using the keywords "cortisol" and "stroke" and associated terms or synonyms. We included studies published in peer-reviewed journals that recruited 10 or more participants and measured cortisol at least once in the first year following stroke. Data were extracted regarding cortisol levels, including changes over time and their relationship to stroke severity, and outcome. Of 11,240 abstracts, 101 full texts were obtained and 48 fulfilled our inclusion criteria. Cortisol levels were high in the first week after stroke in the majority of studies (26 studies, n = 1,340). Higher cortisol was associated with dependency (8/11 studies, n = 822), delirium (5/6 studies, n = 269) depression (3/5 studies n = 117) and mortality (8/10 studies, n = 856). Five studies adjusted for stroke severity; one found an association between higher cortisol and dependency, and three found an association between higher cortisol and mortality. Cortisol levels are high for at least 7 days after stroke. Elevated cortisol after stroke is associated with dependency, morbidity, and mortality; however, there is insufficient evidence to conclude that these relationships are independent of stroke severity.

  10. Diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia in a dental hospital; report of a case with severe gingival hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Misirlioglu, M; Adisen, M Z; Yilmaz, S

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs) are aggressive hematopoietic neoplasms that, if untreated, can lead to death within days. Owing to its high morbidity rate, early diagnosis and appropriate medical therapy is essential. Oral lesions may be the presenting feature of acute leukemias and are, therefore, important diagnostic indicators of the disease. Erythematous or cyanotic gingival hyperplasia with or without necrosis is reported to be the most consistent symptom leading to a diagnosis of acute leukemia that directs the patient to seek early dental consultation. This report refers to a patient with AML that was provisionally diagnosed in the dental hospital due to severe gingival enlargements.

  11. Headache during airplane travel ("airplane headache"): first case in Greece.

    PubMed

    Kararizou, Evangelia; Anagnostou, Evangelos; Paraskevas, George P; Vassilopoulou, Sofia D; Naoumis, Dimitrios; Kararizos, Grigoris; Spengos, Konstantinos

    2011-08-01

    Headache related to airplane flights is rare. We describe a 37-year-old female patient with multiple intense, jabbing headache episodes over the last 3 years that occur exclusively during airplane flights. The pain manifests during take-off and landing, and is located always in the left retro-orbital and frontotemporal area. It is occasionally accompanied by dizziness, but no additional symptoms occur. Pain intensity diminishes and disappears after 15-20 min. Apart from occasional dizziness, no other symptoms occur. The patient has a history of tension-type headache and polycystic ovaries. Blood tests and imaging revealed no abnormalities. Here, we present the first case in Greece. We review the current literature on this rare syndrome and discuss on possible pathophysiology and the investigation of possible co-factors such as anxiety and depression.

  12. Cluster Headache: Special Considerations for Treatment of Female Patients of Reproductive Age and Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    VanderPluym, Juliana

    2016-01-01

    Cluster headache is a rare disorder that is more common in adult male patients. It has a unique phenotype of unilateral, severe, to very severe headaches lasting 15 to 180 min with ipsilateral autonomic symptoms. Time to correct diagnosis can be protracted. A number of treatment options exist for the standard cluster headache patient, but special considerations must be made for female patients of reproductive age and pediatric patients. The objective of this article is to explore the current literature pertaining to special considerations in cluster headache management, including treatment of pregnant or breastfeeding patients and pediatric patients. PMID:26711274

  13. Comparative efficacy trial of cupping and serkangabin versus conventional therapy of migraine headaches: A randomized, open-label, comparative efficacy trial

    PubMed Central

    Firoozabadi, Mohammad Dehghani; Navabzadeh, Maryam; Roudsari, Mohammad Khodashenas; Zahmatkash, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    Background: Migraine headaches are the most common acute and recurrent headaches. Current treatment of a migraine headache consists of multiple medications for control and prevention of recurrent attacks. Global emergence of alternative medicine led us to examine the efficacy of cupping therapy plus serkangabin syrup in the treatment of migraine headaches. Materials and Methods: This study was a randomized, controlled, open-label, comparative efficacy trial. We randomly assigned patients with migraine into cupping therapy plus serkangabin group (30 patients) and conventional treatment group (30 patients). An investigator assessed the severity of headache, frequency of attacks in a week and duration of attacks per hour in 5 visits (at the end of 2 weeks, 1, 3 and 6 months). Generalized estimating equations approach was used to analyze repeated measures data to compare outcomes in both groups. Results: Average age for cupping therapy group and conventional treatment group were 31.7 (±7.6) and 32.6 (±12.7) years, respectively (P = 0.45). After treatment for 2 weeks; and 1, 3 and 6 months, severity of headache (P = 0.80), frequency of migraine attacks (P = 0.63) and duration of attacks per hours (P = 0.48) were similar in conventional and cupping groups but these symptoms were decreased in each group during the study (P < 0.001). Conclusion: There was no significant difference between cupping plus serkangabin therapy and conventional treatment in the treatment and prophylaxis of migraine. The alternative therapy may be used in cases of drug intolerance, no medication response, and in primary care. PMID:25709653

  14. Soluble P-selectin promotes acute myocardial infarction onset but not severity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ling; Sun, Guizhi; Wang, Guoyu; Ning, Wenhu; Zhao, Kan

    2015-03-01

    P‑selectin, an integral membrane glycoprotein of platelets and endothelial cells, and the soluble form of P‑selectin are hypothesized to play a role in the initiation of atherosclerosis and acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, limited data are available with which to evaluate the main role of soluble P‑selectin (sP‑selectin) in the onset or the severity of AMI. In the present study, we investigated 15 patients who suffered from angina, 10 patients who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) therapy and 10 patients who underwent thrombolysis therapy, compared with 15 volunteers with no cardiovascular disease. We confirmed that the plasma sP‑selectin levels were increased in patients with obesity (particularly pericardial obesity) and hyperlipidemia, positively correlated with plasma tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‑α and strongly negatively correlated with adiponectin in all patients regardless of AMI status. Furthermore, sP‑selectin levels were significantly higher in PCI and thrombolysis patients compared with angina patients and the control cohort. However, we observed that sP‑selectin levels did not change following PCI and thrombolysis therapy. In addition, there was no correlation between sP‑selectin levels and the severity of AMI in the cohort which received PCI or thrombolysis therapy. Therefore, we deduced that sP‑selectin only induced the onset of AMI but did not promote its severity. To confirm this hypothesis, a P‑selectin inhibitor was administered to an atherosclerosis formation model, plaque rapture model and neointimal hyperplasia model. We revealed that atherosclerotic plaque formation and rupture, neointimal formation and neointimal bleeding were suppressed by the sP‑selectin inhibitor. We concluded that sP‑selectin, induced by systemic inflammation in conditions including obesity and hyperlipidemia, promoted atherosclerotic plaque and neointimal formation, plaque rapture and neointimal bleeding, further

  15. Severity of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in haematology patients: long-term impact and early predictive factors.

    PubMed

    Lagier, D; Platon, L; Chow-Chine, L; Sannini, A; Bisbal, M; Brun, J-P; Blache, J-L; Faucher, M; Mokart, D

    2016-09-01

    Severe forms of acute respiratory distress syndrome in patients with haematological diseases expose clinicians to specific medical and ethical considerations. We prospectively followed 143 patients with haematological malignancies, and whose lungs were mechanically ventilated for more than 24 h, over a 5-y period. We sought to identify prognostic factors of long-term outcome, and in particular to evaluate the impact of the severity of acute respiratory distress syndrome in these patients. A secondary objective was to identify the early (first 48 h from ICU admission) predictive factors for acute respiratory distress syndrome severity. An evolutive haematological disease (HR 1.71; 95% CI 1.13-2.58), moderate to severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (HR 1.81; 95% CI 1.13-2.69) and need for renal replacement therapy (HR 2.24; 95% CI 1.52-3.31) were associated with long-term mortality. Resolution of neutropaenia during ICU stay (HR 0.63; 95% CI 0.42-0.94) and early microbiological documentation (HR 0.62; 95% CI 0.42-0.91) were associated with survival. The extent of pulmonary infiltration observed on the first chest X-ray and the diagnosis of invasive fungal infection were the most relevant early predictive factors of the severity of acute respiratory distress syndrome.

  16. Severity of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in haematology patients: long-term impact and early predictive factors.

    PubMed

    Lagier, D; Platon, L; Chow-Chine, L; Sannini, A; Bisbal, M; Brun, J-P; Blache, J-L; Faucher, M; Mokart, D

    2016-09-01

    Severe forms of acute respiratory distress syndrome in patients with haematological diseases expose clinicians to specific medical and ethical considerations. We prospectively followed 143 patients with haematological malignancies, and whose lungs were mechanically ventilated for more than 24 h, over a 5-y period. We sought to identify prognostic factors of long-term outcome, and in particular to evaluate the impact of the severity of acute respiratory distress syndrome in these patients. A secondary objective was to identify the early (first 48 h from ICU admission) predictive factors for acute respiratory distress syndrome severity. An evolutive haematological disease (HR 1.71; 95% CI 1.13-2.58), moderate to severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (HR 1.81; 95% CI 1.13-2.69) and need for renal replacement therapy (HR 2.24; 95% CI 1.52-3.31) were associated with long-term mortality. Resolution of neutropaenia during ICU stay (HR 0.63; 95% CI 0.42-0.94) and early microbiological documentation (HR 0.62; 95% CI 0.42-0.91) were associated with survival. The extent of pulmonary infiltration observed on the first chest X-ray and the diagnosis of invasive fungal infection were the most relevant early predictive factors of the severity of acute respiratory distress syndrome. PMID:27418297

  17. Spectrum, antibiotic susceptibility and virulence factors of bacterial infections complicating severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Israil, A M; Palade, R; Chifiriuc, M C; Vasile, D; Grigoriu, M; Voiculescu, D; Popa, D

    2011-01-01

    Secondary infection of pancreatic necrotic tissue and peripancreatic fluid is a serious complication of acute pancreatitis resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to find out the spectrum of bacterial infections, their antibiotic susceptibility patterns and virulence features in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). A total of 19 patients with acute pancreatitis were consecutively selected from 153 clinical cases of septic abdominal surgical emergencies (age 29-80, 12 males, 7 females) admitted during 2009-2011, in the First Surgical Clinic of the University Emergency Hospital of Bucharest. All 19 SAP cases were submitted to pre-operatory antibiotic empiric treatment. Ten cases were culture negative, in spite of the positive microscopy registered in eight of them. The rest of nine cases were culture positive, 17 different bacterial strains being isolated and identified as belonging to eight aerobic and four anaerobic species. Polymicrobial infection was seen in six patients and the etiology was dominated by Gram-negative bacilli, followed by gut anaerobic bacteria, attesting their colonic origin. The susceptibility testing of the isolated strains confirmed in vitro in all cases the efficiency of the antibiotics that had been used in the empiric pre-operatory treatment. Out of 19 cases submitted to pre-operatory empiric treatment, 14 proved a favorable evolution and five a lethal outcome. The host depending factors (sepsis and other co-morbidities), as well as the aggressivity of the isolated microbial strains (mediated by the presence of different factors implicated in adherence, toxicity and invasion) were found to contribute to the unfavorable, even lethal clinical outcome of SAP cases. In spite of all theoretical controversies, the antibiotic therapy remains at present a very important therapeutic mean for the SAP treatment; although it cannot solve the septic necrotizing pancreatitis in 100% of cases, however

  18. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus envelope protein ion channel activity promotes virus fitness and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Torres, Jose L; DeDiego, Marta L; Verdiá-Báguena, Carmina; Jimenez-Guardeño, Jose M; Regla-Nava, Jose A; Fernandez-Delgado, Raul; Castaño-Rodriguez, Carlos; Alcaraz, Antonio; Torres, Jaume; Aguilella, Vicente M; Enjuanes, Luis

    2014-05-01

    Deletion of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) envelope (E) gene attenuates the virus. E gene encodes a small multifunctional protein that possesses ion channel (IC) activity, an important function in virus-host interaction. To test the contribution of E protein IC activity in virus pathogenesis, two recombinant mouse-adapted SARS-CoVs, each containing one single amino acid mutation that suppressed ion conductivity, were engineered. After serial infections, mutant viruses, in general, incorporated compensatory mutations within E gene that rendered active ion channels. Furthermore, IC activity conferred better fitness in competition assays, suggesting that ion conductivity represents an advantage for the virus. Interestingly, mice infected with viruses displaying E protein IC activity, either with the wild-type E protein sequence or with the revertants that restored ion transport, rapidly lost weight and died. In contrast, mice infected with mutants lacking IC activity, which did not incorporate mutations within E gene during the experiment, recovered from disease and most survived. Knocking down E protein IC activity did not significantly affect virus growth in infected mice but decreased edema accumulation, the major determinant of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) leading to death. Reduced edema correlated with lung epithelia integrity and proper localization of Na+/K+ ATPase, which participates in edema resolution. Levels of inflammasome-activated IL-1β were reduced in the lung airways of the animals infected with viruses lacking E protein IC activity, indicating that E protein IC function is required for inflammasome activation. Reduction of IL-1β was accompanied by diminished amounts of TNF and IL-6 in the absence of E protein ion conductivity. All these key cytokines promote the progression of lung damage and ARDS pathology. In conclusion, E protein IC activity represents a new determinant for SARS-CoV virulence. PMID:24788150

  19. Acute toxicity of zinc to several aquatic species native to the Rocky Mountains.

    PubMed

    Brinkman, Stephen F; Johnston, Walter D

    2012-02-01

    National water-quality criteria for the protection of aquatic life are based on toxicity tests, often using organisms that are easy to culture in the laboratory. Species native to the Rocky Mountains are poorly represented in data sets used to derive national water-quality criteria. To provide additional data on the toxicity of zinc, several laboratory acute-toxicity tests were conducted with a diverse assortment of fish, benthic invertebrates, and an amphibian native to the Rocky Mountains. Tests with fish were conducted using three subspecies of cutthroat trout (Colorado River cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarkii pleuriticus, greenback cutthroat trout O. clarkii stomias, and Rio Grande cutthroat trout O. clarkii virginalis), mountain whitefish (Prosopium williamsoni), mottled sculpin (Cottus bairdi), longnose dace (Rhinichthys cataractae), and flathead chub (Platygobio gracilis). Aquatic invertebrate tests were conducted with mayflies (Baetis tricaudatus, Drunella doddsi, Cinygmula sp. and Ephemerella sp.), a stonefly (Chloroperlidae), and a caddis fly (Lepidostoma sp.). The amphibian test was conducted with tadpoles of the boreal toad (Bufo boreas). Median lethal concentrations (LC(50)s) ranged more than three orders of magnitude from 166 μg/L for Rio Grande cutthroat trout to >67,000 μg/L for several benthic invertebrates. Of the organisms tested, vertebrates were the most sensitive, and benthic invertebrates were the most tolerant. PMID:21811884

  20. Serum Levels of Substance P and Mortality in Patients with a Severe Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Lorente, Leonardo; Martín, María M; Almeida, Teresa; Pérez-Cejas, Antonia; Ramos, Luis; Argueso, Mónica; Riaño-Ruiz, Marta; Solé-Violán, Jordi; Hernández, Mariano

    2016-01-01

    Substance P (SP), a member of tachykinin family, is involved in the inflammation of the central nervous system and in the appearance of cerebral edema. Higher serum levels of SP have been found in 18 patients with cerebral ischemia compared with healthy controls. The aim of our multi-center study was to analyze the possible association between serum levels of SP and mortality in ischemic stroke patients. We included patients with malignant middle cerebral artery infarction (MMCAI) and a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) lower than 9. Non-surviving patients at 30 days (n = 31) had higher serum concentrations of SP levels at diagnosis of severe MMCAI than survivors (n = 30) (p < 0.001). We found in multiple regression an association between serum concentrations of SP higher than 362 pg/mL and mortality at 30 days (Odds Ratio = 5.33; 95% confidence interval = 1.541-18.470; p = 0.008) after controlling for age and GCS. Thus, the major novel finding of our study was the association between serum levels of SP and mortality in patients suffering from severe acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27338372

  1. A case of severe acute exacerbation of Yokkaichi asthma treated with a vibrating mesh nebulizer.

    PubMed

    Yano, Takeshi; Yonaha, Tetsu; Hidaka, Koutaro; Nagahama, Masumi; Koshida, Tomohiro; Matsuoka, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Masahiko; Tsuneyoshi, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Yokkaichi asthma was one of the most common environmental pollution diseases in Japan in the 1960s and 1970s. The problem of air pollution in Yokkaichi was solved in the 1970s. However, mortality and life expectancy were still affected by the late effects of air pollution in patients with Yokkaichi asthma even in the 2000s. In this case report, we described the experience of successful treatment of a patient with severe asthmatic status due to Yokkaichi asthma. A 40s-year-old man, who was officially certified as a patient with Yokkaichi asthma from his infancy, was admitted to hospital due to acute exacerbation of asthma. Mechanical ventilation, intravenous administration of aminophylline and dexamethasone, enteral administration of montelukast, and a transdermal patch of tulobuterol were started. However, because of the lack of improvement in clinical status, inhalation of procaterol using vibrating mesh nebulizer systems was started. Inhalation of procaterol was used three times a day. After using the vibrating mesh nebulizer, respiratory system compliance and hypercapnia rapidly improved. Bilateral expiratory wheezing was diminished. Weaning from mechanical ventilation was initiated, and on the eighth day of mechanical ventilation, the patient was extubated. Although intractable respiratory failure with decreased respiratory system compliance resulting from the late effects of air pollution and a long-time asthmatic inflammatory condition was observed, the use of a vibrating mesh nebulizer for the inhaled administration of procaterol was useful to relieve severe bronchospasm due to Yokkaichi asthma. PMID:27547723

  2. Serum Levels of Substance P and Mortality in Patients with a Severe Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lorente, Leonardo; Martín, María M.; Almeida, Teresa; Pérez-Cejas, Antonia; Ramos, Luis; Argueso, Mónica; Riaño-Ruiz, Marta; Solé-Violán, Jordi; Hernández, Mariano

    2016-01-01

    Substance P (SP), a member of tachykinin family, is involved in the inflammation of the central nervous system and in the appearance of cerebral edema. Higher serum levels of SP have been found in 18 patients with cerebral ischemia compared with healthy controls. The aim of our multi-center study was to analyze the possible association between serum levels of SP and mortality in ischemic stroke patients. We included patients with malignant middle cerebral artery infarction (MMCAI) and a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) lower than 9. Non-surviving patients at 30 days (n = 31) had higher serum concentrations of SP levels at diagnosis of severe MMCAI than survivors (n = 30) (p < 0.001). We found in multiple regression an association between serum concentrations of SP higher than 362 pg/mL and mortality at 30 days (Odds Ratio = 5.33; 95% confidence interval = 1.541–18.470; p = 0.008) after controlling for age and GCS. Thus, the major novel finding of our study was the association between serum levels of SP and mortality in patients suffering from severe acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27338372

  3. Increased Gut Redox and Depletion of Anaerobic and Methanogenic Prokaryotes in Severe Acute Malnutrition

    PubMed Central

    Million, Matthieu; Tidjani Alou, Maryam; Khelaifia, Saber; Bachar, Dipankar; Lagier, Jean-Christophe; Dione, Niokhor; Brah, Souleymane; Hugon, Perrine; Lombard, Vincent; Armougom, Fabrice; Fromonot, Julien; Robert, Catherine; Michelle, Caroline; Diallo, Aldiouma; Fabre, Alexandre; Guieu, Régis; Sokhna, Cheikh; Henrissat, Bernard; Parola, Philippe; Raoult, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) is associated with inadequate diet, low levels of plasma antioxidants and gut microbiota alterations. The link between gut redox and microbial alterations, however, remains unexplored. By sequencing the gut microbiomes of 79 children of varying nutritional status from three centers in Senegal and Niger, we found a dramatic depletion of obligate anaerobes in malnutrition. This was confirmed in an individual patient data meta-analysis including 107 cases and 77 controls from 5 different African and Asian countries. Specifically, several species of the Bacteroidaceae, Eubacteriaceae, Lachnospiraceae and Ruminococceae families were consistently depleted while Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus were consistently enriched. Further analyses on our samples revealed increased fecal redox potential, decreased total bacterial number and dramatic Methanobrevibacter smithii depletion. Indeed, M. smithii was detected in more than half of the controls but in none of the cases. No causality was demonstrated but, based on our results, we propose a unifying theory linking microbiota specificity, lacking anaerobes and archaea, to low antioxidant nutrients, and lower food conversion. PMID:27183876

  4. Hydrogen-rich saline attenuates acute renal injury in sodium taurocholate-induced severe acute pancreatitis by inhibiting ROS and NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qiao; Liao, Kang-Shu; Zhao, Kai-Liang; Wang, Wei-Xing; Zuo, Teng; Deng, Wen-Hong; Chen, Chen; Yu, Jia; Guo, Wen-Yi; He, Xiao-Bo; Abliz, Ablikim; Wang, Peng; Zhao, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen (H2), a new antioxidant, was reported to reduce (•)OH and ONOO(-) selectively and inhibit certain proinflammatory mediators to product, without disturbing metabolic redox reactions or ROS involved in cell signaling. We herein aim to explore its protective effects on acute renal injury in sodium taurocholate-induced acute pancreatitis and its possible mechanisms. Rats were injected with hydrogen-rich saline (HRS group) or normal saline (SO and SAP group) through tail intravenously (6 mL/kg) and compensated subcutaneously (20 mL/kg) after successful modeling. Results showed that hydrogen-rich saline attenuated the following: (1) serum Cr and BUN, (2) pancreatic and renal pathological injuries, (3) renal MDA, (4) renal MPO, (5) serum IL-1β, IL-6, and renal TNF-α, HMGB1, and (6) tyrosine nitration, IκB degradation, and NF-κB activation in renal tissues. In addition, it increased the level of IL-10 and SOD activity in renal tissues. These results proved that hydrogen-rich saline attenuates acute renal injury in sodium taurocholate-induced acute pancreatitis, presumably because of its detoxification activity against excessive ROS, and inhibits the activation of NF-κB by affecting IκB nitration and degradation. Our findings highlight the potential value of hydrogen-rich saline as a new therapeutic method on acute renal injury in severe acute pancreatitis clinically.

  5. Hydrogen-Rich Saline Attenuates Acute Renal Injury in Sodium Taurocholate-Induced Severe Acute Pancreatitis by Inhibiting ROS and NF-κB Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Qiao; Liao, Kang-Shu; Zhao, Kai-Liang; Zuo, Teng; Deng, Wen-Hong; Chen, Chen; Yu, Jia; Guo, Wen-Yi; He, Xiao-Bo; Abliz, Ablikim; Wang, Peng; Zhao, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen (H2), a new antioxidant, was reported to reduce •OH and ONOO− selectively and inhibit certain proinflammatory mediators to product, without disturbing metabolic redox reactions or ROS involved in cell signaling. We herein aim to explore its protective effects on acute renal injury in sodium taurocholate-induced acute pancreatitis and its possible mechanisms. Rats were injected with hydrogen-rich saline (HRS group) or normal saline (SO and SAP group) through tail intravenously (6 mL/kg) and compensated subcutaneously (20 mL/kg) after successful modeling. Results showed that hydrogen-rich saline attenuated the following: (1) serum Cr and BUN, (2) pancreatic and renal pathological injuries, (3) renal MDA, (4) renal MPO, (5) serum IL-1β, IL-6, and renal TNF-α, HMGB1, and (6) tyrosine nitration, IκB degradation, and NF-κB activation in renal tissues. In addition, it increased the level of IL-10 and SOD activity in renal tissues. These results proved that hydrogen-rich saline attenuates acute renal injury in sodium taurocholate-induced acute pancreatitis, presumably because of its detoxification activity against excessive ROS, and inhibits the activation of NF-κB by affecting IκB nitration and degradation. Our findings highlight the potential value of hydrogen-rich saline as a new therapeutic method on acute renal injury in severe acute pancreatitis clinically. PMID:25878401

  6. Does Viral Co-Infection Influence the Severity of Acute Respiratory Infection in Children?

    PubMed Central

    Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Salas, Antonio; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Justicia, Antonio; Rivero-Calle, Irene; Sumner, Edward; Fink, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Background Multiple viruses are often detected in children with respiratory infection but the significance of co-infection in pathogenesis, severity and outcome is unclear. Objectives To correlate the presence of viral co-infection with clinical phenotype in children admitted with acute respiratory infections (ARI). Methods We collected detailed clinical information on severity for children admitted with ARI as part of a Spanish prospective multicenter study (GENDRES network) between 2011–2013. A nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) approach was used to detect respiratory viruses in respiratory secretions. Findings were compared to an independent cohort collected in the UK. Results 204 children were recruited in the main cohort and 97 in the replication cohort. The number of detected viruses did not correlate with any markers of severity. However, bacterial superinfection was associated with increased severity (OR: 4.356; P-value = 0.005), PICU admission (OR: 3.342; P-value = 0.006), higher clinical score (1.988; P-value = 0.002) respiratory support requirement (OR: 7.484; P-value < 0.001) and longer hospital length of stay (OR: 1.468; P-value < 0.001). In addition, pneumococcal vaccination was found to be a protective factor in terms of degree of respiratory distress (OR: 2.917; P-value = 0.035), PICU admission (OR: 0.301; P-value = 0.011), lower clinical score (-1.499; P-value = 0.021) respiratory support requirement (OR: 0.324; P-value = 0.016) and oxygen necessity (OR: 0.328; P-value = 0.001). All these findings were replicated in the UK cohort. Conclusion The presence of more than one virus in hospitalized children with ARI is very frequent but it does not seem to have a major clinical impact in terms of severity. However bacterial superinfection increases the severity of the disease course. On the contrary, pneumococcal vaccination plays a protective role. PMID:27096199

  7. Cynomolgus Macaque as an Animal Model for Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lawler, James V; Endy, Timothy P; Hensley, Lisa E; Garrison, Aura; Fritz, Elizabeth A; Lesar, May; Baric, Ralph S; Kulesh, David A; Norwood, David A; Wasieloski, Leonard P; Ulrich, Melanie P; Slezak, Tom R; Vitalis, Elizabeth; Huggins, John W; Jahrling, Peter B; Paragas, Jason

    2006-01-01

    Background The emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in 2002 and 2003 affected global health and caused major economic disruption. Adequate animal models are required to study the underlying pathogenesis of SARS-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) infection and to develop effective vaccines and therapeutics. We report the first findings of measurable clinical disease in nonhuman primates (NHPs) infected with SARS-CoV. Methods and Findings In order to characterize clinically relevant parameters of SARS-CoV infection in NHPs, we infected cynomolgus macaques with SARS-CoV in three groups: Group I was infected in the nares and bronchus, group II in the nares and conjunctiva, and group III intravenously. Nonhuman primates in groups I and II developed mild to moderate symptomatic illness. All NHPs demonstrated evidence of viral replication and developed neutralizing antibodies. Chest radiographs from several animals in groups I and II revealed unifocal or multifocal pneumonia that peaked between days 8 and 10 postinfection. Clinical laboratory tests were not significantly changed. Overall, inoculation by a mucosal route produced more prominent disease than did intravenous inoculation. Half of the group I animals were infected with a recombinant infectious clone SARS-CoV derived from the SARS-CoV Urbani strain. This infectious clone produced disease indistinguishable from wild-type Urbani strain. Conclusions SARS-CoV infection of cynomolgus macaques did not reproduce the severe illness seen in the majority of adult human cases of SARS; however, our results suggest similarities to the milder syndrome of SARS-CoV infection characteristically seen in young children. PMID:16605302

  8. Risk taking in hospitalized patients with acute and severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Fecteau, Shirley; Levasseur-Moreau, Jean; García-Molina, Alberto; Kumru, Hatiche; Vergara, Raúl Pelayo; Bernabeu, Monste; Roig, Teresa; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Tormos, José Maria

    2013-01-01

    Rehabilitation can improve cognitive deficits observed in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, despite rehabilitation, the ability of making a choice often remains impaired. Risk taking is a daily activity involving numerous cognitive processes subserved by a complex neural network. In this work we investigated risk taking using the Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART) in patients with acute TBI and healthy controls. We hypothesized that individuals with TBI will take less risk at the BART as compared to healthy individuals. We also predicted that within the TBI group factors such as the number of days since the injury, severity of the injury, and sites of the lesion will play a role in risk taking as assessed with the BART. Main findings revealed that participants with TBI displayed abnormally cautious risk taking at the BART as compared to healthy subjects. Moreover, healthy individuals showed increased risk taking throughout the task which is in line with previous work. However, individuals with TBI did not show this increased risk taking during the task. We also investigated the influence of three patients' characteristics on their performance at the BART: Number of days post injury, Severity of the head injury, and Status of the frontal lobe. Results indicate that performance at the BART was influenced by the number of days post injury and the status of the frontal lobe, but not by the severity of the head injury. Reported findings are encouraging for risk taking seems to naturally improve with time postinjury. They support the need of conducting longitudinal prospective studies to ultimately identify impaired and intact cognitive skills that should be trained postinjury. PMID:24386232

  9. Survival in acute and severe low o environment: use of a genetic model system.

    PubMed

    Azad, Priti; Haddad, Gabriel G

    2009-10-01

    Hypoxia whether present during physiologic states (e.g., embryogenesis) or during pathologic states (e.g., obstructive sleep apnea and sickle cell anemia), challenges the vertebrate or invertebrate organism. Clearly, hypoxia can lead to sublethal cell injury or death and consequently organ or systemic injury and failure, depending on severity. We discovered that the adult Drosophila melanogaster is tolerant to a low O(2) environment, withstanding approximately 3-4 hours of total O(2) deprivation or anoxia without showing any evidence of cell injury. This opened major avenues for us since the Drosophila has been used so effectively in so many relevant research areas. We investigated the changes in gene expression in D. melanogaster after severe (1% O(2)) intermittent or constant hypoxia treatment for 2.5 hours. Our microarray analysis has identified multiple gene families that are up- or downregulated in response to acute constant (CH) and intermittent hypoxia (IH). We observed that even for short-term the gene expression response to IH and CH varied not only in the number of genes but also type of gene families. Furthermore, by utilizing powerful Drosophila genetic tools we studied the role of single genes (up- or downregulated in arrays) in survival under either paradigm in adult flies. We observed significant increased adult survival (as compared to controls) of P-element lines for Hsp70 and Hsp23 genes during CH and Mdr49 and l (2)08717 genes during IH. This suggests that the increased transcript levels as observed in array data after either paradigm play an important role under severe hypoxia. Indeed, we found for example that over-expressing Hsp70 in vivo in specific fly organs (such as heart) significantly increased adult survival during CH as compared to controls. These data provide further clues about the mechanisms by which intermittent and constant hypoxia lead to cell injury and morbidity or adaptation and survival. PMID:19845605

  10. [Evoked potentials in patients with secondary headaches].

    PubMed

    Iakupov, E Z; Kuznetsova, E A

    2010-01-01

    Characteristics of brain evoked activity were studied in patients with most frequent variants of secondary headaches: chronic posttraumatic headaches, cervicogenic headaches and vascular headaches in patients with arterial hypertension and chronic brain ischemia. The multimodal registration of evoked potentials (EP) (short-latency brainstem auditory, visual EPs to flash stimulation and cognitive EPs - P300) revealed signs of brainstem dysfunction, decrease of visual analyzer and diminished cognitive functions in most patients with secondary headaches. Based on results obtained, we can recommend a complex therapy of chronic secondary headaches with neuroprotectors and nootropics.

  11. Mind-body therapies for headache.

    PubMed

    Sierpina, Victor; Astin, John; Giordano, James

    2007-11-15

    Headache is one of the most common and enigmatic problems encountered by family physicians. Headache is not a singular entity, and different pathologic mechanisms are involved in distinct types of headache. Most types of headache involve dysfunction of peripheral or central nociceptive mechanisms. Mind-body therapies such as biofeedback, cognitive behavior therapy, hypnosis, meditation, and relaxation training can affect neural substrates and have been shown to be effective treatments for various types of headache. Meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials show that the use of mind-body therapies, alone or in combination, significantly reduces symptoms of migraine, tension, and mixed-type headaches. Side effects generally are minimal and transient.

  12. Retino-hypothalamic-pineal hypothesis in the pathophysiology of primary headaches.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Vinod D

    2006-01-01

    Primary headaches include migraine, tension, cluster headaches, paroxysmal hemicrania and miscellaneous headaches unassociated with structural lesions. A putative role of the retino-hypothalamic-pineal (RHP) axis in the pathophysiology of primary headaches is reviewed in terms of (1) retinal dysfunction, (2) hypothalamic dysfunction and human circadian desynchrony, (3) pineal melatonin dysfunction and (4) rostral limbic dysfunction mediating the human stress response. Unified RHP hypothesis is proposed, suggesting that an acute, periodic or chronic, circadian desynchrony and dysfunction of the whole or part of the RHP axis is implicated in the pathophysiology of primary headaches. Supportive evidence for the RHP hypothesis, including recent PET studies showing changes in dorsal pons, hypothalamus and rostral limbic structures, is presented.

  13. Muscle Activation During Exercise in Severe Acute Hypoxia: Role of Absolute and Relative Intensity

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Peralta, Rafael; Losa-Reyna, José; González-Izal, Miriam; Perez-Suarez, Ismael; Calle-Herrero, Jaime; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Torres-Peralta, Rafael, José Losa-Reyna, Miriam González-Izal, Ismael Perez-Suarez, Jaime Calle-Herrero, Mikel Izquierdo, and José A.L. Calbet. Muscle activation during exercise in severe acute hypoxia: Role of absolute and relative intensity. High Alt Med Biol 15:472–482, 2014.—The aim of this study was to determine the influence of severe acute hypoxia on muscle activation during whole body dynamic exercise. Eleven young men performed four incremental cycle ergometer tests to exhaustion breathing normoxic (FIo2=0.21, two tests) or hypoxic gas (FIo2=0.108, two tests). Surface electromyography (EMG) activities of rectus femoris (RF), vastus medialis (VL), vastus lateralis (VL), and biceps femoris (BF) were recorded. The two normoxic and the two hypoxic tests were averaged to reduce EMG variability. Peak Vo2 was 34% lower in hypoxia than in normoxia (p<0.05). The EMG root mean square (RMS) increased with exercise intensity in all muscles (p<0.05), with greater effect in hypoxia than in normoxia in the RF and VM (p<0.05), and a similar trend in VL (p=0.10). At the same relative intensity, the RMS was greater in normoxia than in hypoxia in RF, VL, and BF (p<0.05), with a similar trend in VM (p=0.08). Median frequency increased with exercise intensity (p<0.05), and was higher in hypoxia than in normoxia in VL (p<0.05). Muscle contraction burst duration increased with exercise intensity in VM and VL (p<0.05), without clear effects of FIo2. No significant FIo2 effects on frequency domain indices were observed when compared at the same relative intensity. In conclusion, muscle activation during whole body exercise increases almost linearly with exercise intensity, following a muscle-specific pattern, which is adjusted depending on the FIo2 and the relative intensity of exercise. Both VL and VM are increasingly involved in power output generation with the increase of intensity and the reduction in FIo2. PMID:25225839

  14. Prevalence and associated factors for episodic and chronic daily headache in the Colombian population.

    PubMed

    Rueda-Sánchez, M; Díaz-Martínez, L A

    2008-03-01

    There are multiple risk factors for chronic daily headache (CDH), but they are usually assessed in an isolated form without an adequate control for confounders. CDH is considered a variant of episodic headache, but studies have not gathered enough evidence to evaluate simultaneously CDH and episodic in the same population. We set out to establish simultaneously the factors associated with chronic daily or episodic headache in a population setting, using a cross-sectional survey in a random sample of 1505 adult urban inhabitants (Bucaramanga, Colombia). The survey asked questions about headache, family and personal history of disease, and consumption or abuse of caffeine, alcohol, hypnotics and analgesics. The association among independent variables and CDH or episodic headache was made with multinomial logistic regression. Female gender, arterial hypertension or cranial trauma history, and a high score in the depression scale are associated with episodic headache and CDH. Parents with CDH, the complaint of multiple arousals during sleep and use of hypnotics are associated with CDH, but not with episodic headache. Age <36 years, alcoholism and snoring are factors associated only with episodic headache. Chronic daily headache and episodic headache have several common risk factors, but there are other factors not shared by both conditions. PMID:18254892

  15. Acute compartment syndrome--presenting as severe pain in an extremity out of proportion with the injury.

    PubMed

    Khan, M; Hodkinson, S L

    1997-10-01

    A 24 year old combat medic was admitted to the field hospital at Tomislavgrad in Bosnia, with a suspected forearm, fracture. Radiographs did not show any bony injury. Clinical examination showed marked swelling and tenderness over the extensor compartment. The pain became more severe over the following 12 hours with the pain becoming most intensely felt in the extensors on passive extension. Fasciotomy for suspected acute compartment syndrome was carried out. Acute compartment syndrome is a common complication of extremity injury, and is a clinical diagnosis which should be suspected in all injuries with marked swelling and severe pain.

  16. Analysis of Trigger Factors in Episodic Migraineurs Using a Smartphone Headache Diary Applications

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeong-Wook; Chu, Min Kyung; Kim, Jae-Moon; Park, Sang-Gue; Cho, Soo-Jin

    2016-01-01

    effective tool to assess migraine trigger factors. The headaches with trigger factors had greater severity or migraine features. The type of triggers and the presence of preventive medication influenced the headache characteristics; hence, an investigation of trigger factors would be helpful in understanding migraine occurrences. PMID:26901341

  17. Relationship between insomnia and headache in community-based middle-aged Hong Kong Chinese women.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Wing-Fai; Chung, Ka-Fai; Wong, Chun-Yue

    2010-06-01

    Limited studies have investigated the prevalence of insomnia symptoms among individuals with different headache diagnoses and the association between insomnia and headache in subjects with comorbid anxiety and depression. A total of 310 community-dwelling Hong Kong Chinese women aged 40-60 years completed a self-administered questionnaire on headache, sleep difficulties, mood disturbances, and functional impairment. About 31% of the sample complained of recurrent headache unrelated to influenza and the common cold in the past 12 months. The percentages of women diagnosed to have migraine, tension-type headache (TTH), and headache unspecified were 8.4, 15.5 and 7.1%, respectively. The most frequent insomnia complaint was "problem waking up too early" (29.4%), followed by "difficulty staying asleep" (28.0%) and "difficulty falling asleep" (24.4%). Women with headaches were significantly more likely to report insomnia symptoms than those without headaches. There were no significant differences among women with migraine, TTH, and headache unspecified in the prevalence of insomnia symptoms. Logistic regression analysis showed that women with insomnia disorder as defined by an insomnia severity index total score >or=8 had 2.2-fold increased risk of reporting recurrent headache, 3.2-fold increased risk of migraine, and 2.3-fold increased risk of TTH, after adjusting for anxiety and depression. Individual insomnia symptoms were not independent predictors. The association between insomnia and headache was stronger in subjects with more frequent headaches. Our findings suggest that insomnia and the associated distress, but not insomnia symptoms alone, is an independent risk factor for recurrent headache in middle-aged women with mixed anxiety, depression and sleep disturbances. PMID:20186559

  18. Severe acute oxidant exposure: morphological damage and aerobic metabolism in the lung

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, M.R.; Teuscher, F.; LaSota, I.; Niewoehner, D.E.

    1986-09-01

    Groups of male rats were exposed to acute doses of oxygen, ozone, or paraquat which produced equivalent mortality (25-30%) over a 28 day post-exposure period. Quantitative evaluation of morphological changes indicated the primary response to be edema and inflammation with only slight fibrosis being apparent by the end of the observation period. Aerobic pulmonary metabolism was inhibited in lungs from animals exposed to oxygen and ozone as evidenced by decreased oxygen consumption; however, this was transient and O/sub 2/ consumption returned to normal within 24 hours after removal from the exposure chamber. Conversely, treatment with paraquat caused an immediate, transient stimulation of O/sub 2/ consumption. Glucose metabolism was unaltered by the gas exposures and, as previously reported, was initially stimulated by paraquat treatment. In vitro, only paraquat altered both O/sub 2/ consumption and glucose metabolism when added to lung slice preparations; ozone had no effect. Oxygen did not alter O/sub 2/ consumption but caused a slight biphasic response in glucose metabolism. Aerobic metabolism is relatively unchanged by these doses of oxygen and ozone which result in the death of 25-30% of all treated animals. Even though paraquat produces similar morphologic changes, it may represent a more severe metabolic insult than ''equivalent'' doses of oxygen or ozone. Also, if interstitial pulmonary fibrosis is a desired result of experimental exposure, rats may not be a suitable model for oxidant induced lung injury.

  19. Severe acute respiratory syndrome: a challenge for public health practice in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Lee, A; Abdullah, A

    2003-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is now a global challenge affecting more than 8000 patients in different continents. The dictum of public health practice especially for infectious disease is "prevention better than cure". It is especially true for SARS as the treatment strategies remain diverse and experimental. Maintaining a healthy and hygienic environment can be one of the effective public health measures to combat infectious disease. The major challenge is that some of the most important public health measures are to be taken outside the health sector. The community also needs to be strengthened and equipped with the health skills to promote better health and hygiene. There is also the need to create a supportive environment conducive to health for long term sustainability. The WHO approach of promoting health through setting approach would be one possible solution to face the challenge. This paper will describe some of the public health initiatives in Hong Kong through "setting approach" and "community development model" in helping the society fight against SARS. With the emergence of SARS, this might be the time to globalise public health medicine as an important component of medical practice. PMID:12933766

  20. Ulinastatin promotes T lymphocyte apoptosis in rats with severe acute pancreatitis via mitochondrial pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, C L; Li, N; Ma, T; Zhang, P; You, S Y

    2015-05-25

    We explored the influence of ulinastatin on apoptosis of T lymphocytes in rats with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and the effect of ulinastatin on mitochondrial apoptosis pathways in spleen lymphocytes. Thirty-six Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups (N = 12): a sham operated group, a SAP group, and an ulinastatin-treated SAP group. The SAP model was established by injecting 5% sodium taurocholate into the intrapancreatobiliary duct. Study rats were sacrificed after 24 h, and splenic lymphocytes were then collected. CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes were labeled by direct immune fluorescence assays; the percentage of apoptotic cells, mitochondrial membrane potential levels, and mitochondria permeability transition pore opening levels were measured by flow cytometry. In the ulinastatin-treated SAP group, the ratio of CD4(+)/CD8(+) T lymphocytes was significantly higher than that in the SAP group, and the apoptosis percentage of CD4(+) T lymphocytes was significantly decreased. The percentage of lymphocytes with an abnormal opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore and lymphocytes with decreased mitochondrial membrane potential in the ulinastatin-treated SAP group were significantly lower than that in the SAP group. Ulinastatin can directly enhance immunological function and attenuate immune suppression in SAP rats through inhibiting the apoptosis of CD4(+) T lymphocytes. These study findings demonstrate that therapeutic effects may occur through inhibiting the apoptosis induced by mitochondrial signaling pathways.

  1. Transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome in dynamical small-world networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Naoki; Konno, Norio; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2004-03-01

    The outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is still threatening the world because of a possible resurgence. In the current situation that effective medical treatments such as antiviral drugs are not discovered yet, dynamical features of the epidemics should be clarified for establishing strategies for tracing, quarantine, isolation, and regulating social behavior of the public at appropriate costs. Here we propose a network model for SARS epidemics and discuss why superspreaders emerged and why SARS spread especially in hospitals, which were key factors of the recent outbreak. We suggest that superspreaders are biologically contagious patients, and they may amplify the spreads by going to potentially contagious places such as hospitals. To avoid mass transmission in hospitals, it may be a good measure to treat suspected cases without hospitalizing them. Finally, we indicate that SARS probably propagates in small-world networks associated with human contacts and that the biological nature of individuals and social group properties are factors more important than the heterogeneous rates of social contacts among individuals. This is in marked contrast with epidemics of sexually transmitted diseases or computer viruses to which scale-free network models often apply.

  2. Coronavirus Pathogenesis and the Emerging Pathogen Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Susan R.; Navas-Martin, Sonia

    2005-01-01

    Coronaviruses are a family of enveloped, single-stranded, positive-strand RNA viruses classified within the Nidovirales order. This coronavirus family consists of pathogens of many animal species and of humans, including the recently isolated severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV). This review is divided into two main parts; the first concerns the animal coronaviruses and their pathogenesis, with an emphasis on the functions of individual viral genes, and the second discusses the newly described human emerging pathogen, SARS-CoV. The coronavirus part covers (i) a description of a group of coronaviruses and the diseases they cause, including the prototype coronavirus, murine hepatitis virus, which is one of the recognized animal models for multiple sclerosis, as well as viruses of veterinary importance that infect the pig, chicken, and cat and a summary of the human viruses; (ii) a short summary of the replication cycle of coronaviruses in cell culture; (iii) the development and application of reverse genetics systems; and (iv) the roles of individual coronavirus proteins in replication and pathogenesis. The SARS-CoV part covers the pathogenesis of SARS, the developing animal models for infection, and the progress in vaccine development and antiviral therapies. The data gathered on the animal coronaviruses continue to be helpful in understanding SARS-CoV. PMID:16339739

  3. 4-Phenylbutyric Acid Attenuates Pancreatic Beta-Cell Injury in Rats with Experimental Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wen-yi; Zhao, Liang; Xiang, Ming-wei; Mei, Fang-chao; Abliz, Ablikim; Hu, Peng; Deng, Wen-hong; Yu, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a particular process with an imbalance of homeostasis, which plays an important role in pancreatitis, but little is known about how ER stress is implicated in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) induced pancreatic beta-cell injury. To investigate the effect of 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA) on the beta-cell injury following SAP and the underlying mechanism, twenty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into sham-operation (SO) group, SAP model group, and 4-PBA treatment group. SAP model was induced by infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the biliopancreatic duct. 4-PBA or normal saline was injected intraperitoneally for 3 days in respective group before successful modeling. Results showed that 4-PBA attenuated the following: (1) pancreas and islet pathological injuries, (2) serum TNF-α and IL-1β, (3) serum insulin and glucose, (4) beta-cell ultrastructural changes, (5) ER stress markers (BiP, ORP150, and CHOP), Caspase-3, and insulin expression in islet. These results suggested that 4-PBA mitigates pancreatic beta-cell injury and endocrine disorder in SAP, presumably because of its role in inhibiting excessive endoplasmic reticulum stress. This may serve as a new therapeutic target for reducing pancreatic beta-cell injury and endocrine disorder in SAP upon 4-PBA treatment.

  4. Infusion of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Attenuates Experimental Severe Acute Pancreatitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Dandan; Gao, Jun; Gong, Yanfang; Wu, Hongyu; Xu, Aifang

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims. Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) remains a high-mortality disease. Bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been demonstrated to have plasticity of transdifferentiation and to have immunomodulatory functions. In the present study, we assessed the roles of MSCs in SAP and the therapeutic effects of MSC on SAP after transplantation. Methods. A pancreatitis rat model was induced by the injection of taurocholic acid (TCA) into the pancreatic duct. After isolation and characterization of MSC from BM, MSC transplantation was conducted 24 hrs after SAP induction by tail vein injection. The survival rate was observed and MSCs were traced after transplantation. The expression of TNF-α and IL-1β mRNA in the transplantation group was also analyzed. Results. The survival rate of the transplantation group was significantly higher compared to the control group (p < 0.05). Infused MSCs were detected in the pancreas and BM 3 days after transplantation. The expression of TNF-α and IL-1β mRNA in the transplantation group was significantly lower than in the control group in both the pancreas and the lungs (p < 0.05). Conclusions. MSC transplantation could improve the prognosis of SAP rats. Engrafted MSCs have the capacity of homing, migration, and planting during the treatment of SAP. PMID:27721836

  5. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus as an Agent of Emerging and Reemerging Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Vincent C. C.; Lau, Susanna K. P.; Woo, Patrick C. Y.; Yuen, Kwok Yung

    2007-01-01

    Before the emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus (SARS-CoV) in 2003, only 12 other animal or human coronaviruses were known. The discovery of this virus was soon followed by the discovery of the civet and bat SARS-CoV and the human coronaviruses NL63 and HKU1. Surveillance of coronaviruses in many animal species has increased the number on the list of coronaviruses to at least 36. The explosive nature of the first SARS epidemic, the high mortality, its transient reemergence a year later, and economic disruptions led to a rush on research of the epidemiological, clinical, pathological, immunological, virological, and other basic scientific aspects of the virus and the disease. This research resulted in over 4,000 publications, only some of the most representative works of which could be reviewed in this article. The marked increase in the understanding of the virus and the disease within such a short time has allowed the development of diagnostic tests, animal models, antivirals, vaccines, and epidemiological and infection control measures, which could prove to be useful in randomized control trials if SARS should return. The findings that horseshoe bats are the natural reservoir for SARS-CoV-like virus and that civets are the amplification host highlight the importance of wildlife and biosecurity in farms and wet markets, which can serve as the source and amplification centers for emerging infections. PMID:17934078

  6. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus E protein transports calcium ions and activates the NLRP3 inflammasome.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Torres, Jose L; Verdiá-Báguena, Carmina; Jimenez-Guardeño, Jose M; Regla-Nava, Jose A; Castaño-Rodriguez, Carlos; Fernandez-Delgado, Raul; Torres, Jaume; Aguilella, Vicente M; Enjuanes, Luis

    2015-11-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) envelope (E) protein is a viroporin involved in virulence. E protein ion channel (IC) activity is specifically correlated with enhanced pulmonary damage, edema accumulation and death. IL-1β driven proinflammation is associated with those pathological signatures, however its link to IC activity remains unknown. In this report, we demonstrate that SARS-CoV E protein forms protein-lipid channels in ERGIC/Golgi membranes that are permeable to calcium ions, a highly relevant feature never reported before. Calcium ions together with pH modulated E protein pore charge and selectivity. Interestingly, E protein IC activity boosted the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome, leading to IL-1β overproduction. Calcium transport through the E protein IC was the main trigger of this process. These findings strikingly link SARS-CoV E protein IC induced ionic disturbances at the cell level to immunopathological consequences and disease worsening in the infected organism.

  7. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus papain-like protease: Structure of a viral deubiquitinating enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Ratia, Kiira; Saikatendu, Kumar Singh; Santarsiero, Bernard D.; Barretto, Naina; Baker, Susan C.; Stevens, Raymond C.; Mesecar, Andrew D.

    2006-01-01

    Replication of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus (SARS-CoV) requires proteolytic processing of the replicase polyprotein by two viral cysteine proteases, a chymotrypsin-like protease (3CLpro) and a papain-like protease (PLpro). These proteases are important targets for development of antiviral drugs that would inhibit viral replication and reduce mortality associated with outbreaks of SARS-CoV. In this work, we describe the 1.85-Å crystal structure of the catalytic core of SARS-CoV PLpro and show that the overall architecture adopts a fold closely resembling that of known deubiquitinating enzymes. Key features, however, distinguish PLpro from characterized deubiquitinating enzymes, including an intact zinc-binding motif, an unobstructed catalytically competent active site, and the presence of an intriguing, ubiquitin-like N-terminal domain. To gain insight into the active-site recognition of the C-terminal tail of ubiquitin and the related LXGG motif, we propose a model of PLpro in complex with ubiquitin–aldehyde that reveals well defined sites within the catalytic cleft that help to account for strict substrate-recognition motifs. PMID:16581910

  8. Acute kidney injury in a shepherd with severe malaria: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Boushab, Boushab Mohamed; Fall-Malick, Fatim-Zahra; Savadogo, Mamoudou; Basco, Leonardo Kishi

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is one of the main reasons for outpatient consultation and hospitalization in Mauritania. Although four Plasmodium species, ie, Plasmodium (P.) falciparum, P. vivax, P. malariae, and P. ovale, cause malaria in Mauritania, recent data on their frequency is lacking. Since infections with P. falciparum generally result in serious disease, their identification is important. We report a case of oliguric renal injury associated with malaria in a 65-year-old shepherd. Clinical manifestations included anemia, oliguria, and elevated creatinine and urea. The rapid diagnostic test for malaria and microscopic examination of blood smears were positive for P. falciparum. On the basis of this, the patient was diagnosed as having acute kidney injury as a complication of severe malaria. The patient was treated for malaria with intravenous quinine for 4 days, followed by 3 days of oral treatment. Volume expansion, antipyretic treatment, and diuretics were administered. He also had two rounds of dialysis after which he partially recovered renal function. This outcome is not always the rule. Prognosis depends much on early diagnosis and appropriate supportive treatment. PMID:27785088

  9. Protecting healthcare staff from severe acute respiratory syndrome: filtration capacity of multiple surgical masks.

    PubMed

    Derrick, J L; Gomersall, C D

    2005-04-01

    Guidelines issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organisation state that healthcare workers should wear N95 masks or higher-level protection during all contact with suspected severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). In areas where N95 masks are not available, multiple layers of surgical masks have been tried to prevent transmission of SARS. The in vivo filtration capacity of a single surgical mask is known to be poor. However, the filtration capacity of a combination of masks is unknown. This was a crossover trial of one, two, three and five surgical masks in six volunteers to determine the in vivo filtration efficiency of wearing more than one surgical mask. We used a Portacount to measure the difference in ambient particle counts inside and outside the masks. The best combination of five surgical masks scored a fit factor of 13.7, which is well below the minimum level of 100 required for a half face respirator. Multiple surgical masks filter ambient particles poorly. They should not be used as a substitute for N95 masks unless there is no alternative. PMID:15749326

  10. 4-Phenylbutyric Acid Attenuates Pancreatic Beta-Cell Injury in Rats with Experimental Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wen-yi; Zhao, Liang; Xiang, Ming-wei; Mei, Fang-chao; Abliz, Ablikim; Hu, Peng; Deng, Wen-hong; Yu, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a particular process with an imbalance of homeostasis, which plays an important role in pancreatitis, but little is known about how ER stress is implicated in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) induced pancreatic beta-cell injury. To investigate the effect of 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA) on the beta-cell injury following SAP and the underlying mechanism, twenty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into sham-operation (SO) group, SAP model group, and 4-PBA treatment group. SAP model was induced by infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the biliopancreatic duct. 4-PBA or normal saline was injected intraperitoneally for 3 days in respective group before successful modeling. Results showed that 4-PBA attenuated the following: (1) pancreas and islet pathological injuries, (2) serum TNF-α and IL-1β, (3) serum insulin and glucose, (4) beta-cell ultrastructural changes, (5) ER stress markers (BiP, ORP150, and CHOP), Caspase-3, and insulin expression in islet. These results suggested that 4-PBA mitigates pancreatic beta-cell injury and endocrine disorder in SAP, presumably because of its role in inhibiting excessive endoplasmic reticulum stress. This may serve as a new therapeutic target for reducing pancreatic beta-cell injury and endocrine disorder in SAP upon 4-PBA treatment. PMID:27656209

  11. 4-Phenylbutyric Acid Attenuates Pancreatic Beta-Cell Injury in Rats with Experimental Severe Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yu-Pu; Guo, Wen-Yi; Wang, Wei-Xing; Zhao, Liang; Xiang, Ming-Wei; Mei, Fang-Chao; Abliz, Ablikim; Hu, Peng; Deng, Wen-Hong; Yu, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a particular process with an imbalance of homeostasis, which plays an important role in pancreatitis, but little is known about how ER stress is implicated in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) induced pancreatic beta-cell injury. To investigate the effect of 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA) on the beta-cell injury following SAP and the underlying mechanism, twenty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into sham-operation (SO) group, SAP model group, and 4-PBA treatment group. SAP model was induced by infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the biliopancreatic duct. 4-PBA or normal saline was injected intraperitoneally for 3 days in respective group before successful modeling. Results showed that 4-PBA attenuated the following: (1) pancreas and islet pathological injuries, (2) serum TNF-α and IL-1β, (3) serum insulin and glucose, (4) beta-cell ultrastructural changes, (5) ER stress markers (BiP, ORP150, and CHOP), Caspase-3, and insulin expression in islet. These results suggested that 4-PBA mitigates pancreatic beta-cell injury and endocrine disorder in SAP, presumably because of its role in inhibiting excessive endoplasmic reticulum stress. This may serve as a new therapeutic target for reducing pancreatic beta-cell injury and endocrine disorder in SAP upon 4-PBA treatment. PMID:27656209

  12. The severity of acute kidney injury predicts progression to chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Lakhmir S; Amdur, Richard L; Amodeo, Susan; Kimmel, Paul L; Palant, Carlos E

    2011-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with progression to advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD). We tested whether patients who survive AKI and are at higher risk for CKD progression can be identified during their hospital admission, thus providing opportunities to intervene. This was assessed in patients in the Department of Veterans Affairs Healthcare System hospitalized with a primary diagnosis indicating AKI (ICD9 codes 584.xx). In the exploratory phase, three multivariate prediction models for progression to stage 4 CKD were developed. In the confirmatory phase, the models were validated in 11,589 patients admitted for myocardial infarction or pneumonia during the same time frame that had RIFLE codes R, I, or F and complete data for all predictor variables. Of the 5351 patients in the AKI group, 728 entered stage 4 CKD after hospitalization. Models 1, 2, and 3 were all significant with ‘c' statistics of 0.82, 0.81, and 0.77, respectively. In model validation, all three were highly significant when tested in the confirmatory patients, with moderate to large effect sizes and good predictive accuracy (‘c' 0.81–0.82). Patients with AKI who required dialysis and then recovered were at especially high risk for progression to CKD. Hence, the severity of AKI is a robust predictor of progression to CKD. PMID:21430640

  13. Severe hypercalcemia as a form of acute lymphoblastic leukemia presentation in children

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Andreia Luís; Moniz, Marta; Nunes, Pedro Sampaio; Abadesso, Clara; Loureiro, Helena Cristina; Duarte, Ximo; Almeida, Helena Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Hypercalcemia is a rare metabolic disorder in children and is potentially fatal. It has a wide differential diagnosis, including cancer. Here, we report the case of a previously healthy 3-year-old who was admitted to the emergency room with fatigue, hyporeactivity, fever and limping gait that had evolved over 5 days and that was progressively worsening. On examination the patient was unconscious (Glasgow coma score: 8). Laboratory tests indicated severe hypercalcemia (total calcium 21.39mg/dL, ionized calcium 2.93mmol/L) and microcytic anemia. Hyperhydration was initiated, and the child was transferred to the pediatric intensive care unit. Continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration with calcium-free solution was instituted, which brought progressive normalization of serum calcium and an improved state of consciousness. Zoledronate was administered, and metabolic and infectious causes and poisoning were excluded. The bone marrow smear revealed a diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Hypercalcemia associated with malignancy in children is rare and occurs as a form of cancer presentation or recurrence. Continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration should be considered in situations where there is imminent risk to life. PMID:26761480

  14. [Scoring of severity of patients' condition with acute surgical diseases and injuries of the abdominal cavity].

    PubMed

    Efimenko, N A; Lesik, P S; Kharisov, A M; Pashaev, A A

    2015-07-01

    Ten of the most frequent symptoms that do not require special methods of their determination except general clinical examinations established by any health care professional on pre-hospital stage were determined on the basis of analysis of more than one thousand records of patients with acute surgical abdominal diseases and clinical symptom load. The authors performed an assessment of each symptom depending on severity of patient's condition ranging from 1 point (satisfactory condition) till 5 points (critical condition). Information has been obtained: in case of satisfactory condition--up to 10 points, moderate--up to 20 points, heavy--up to 30 points, extremely heavy condition--up to 45 points and terminal condition--more than 45 points. Thus, conditional descriptive method of assessment of patient's condition during the clinical examination is combined with objective-scoring. The given method combines numeric expression with methods accepted in literature--"MFS-CA", "APACHE II" and allows to perform an objective assessment of the treatment process at different stages, to practice health care standards, to perform an analysis of outcomes. The article provides tables, which substantiate proposed method.

  15. [Severe acute respiratory syndrome: the first transmissible disease of the 21st century].

    PubMed

    Nicastri, Emanuele; Petrosillo, Nicola; Macrì, Giulia; Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2003-01-01

    The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) is the first severe and easily transmissible disease to emerge in the 21st century. It is caused by the infection with a coronavirus, a single strand RNA capsulated virus, recently found in a small mammalian, the masked palm civet. It is likely to represent the source of human infection. The first cases of SARS have been reported in the Chinese province of Guangdong and, since then, probable cases have been reported world wide. The clinical picture is characterized by nonspecific symptoms such as fever, cough or dyspnea in patients affected by air-space opacities (unifocal involvement in the 54.6% of cases) or distress respiratory syndrome and linked to a recent exposure to a SARS case or to a travel/residence in an affected area. The empirical therapy is based on broad-spectrum antibiotics, steroids and ribavirin, but susceptibility testing have failed to demonstrate direct anti-viral activity of ribavirin against SARS-related coronavirus in vitro. The exposure to respiratory droplets and the contact with biologic fluids (respiratory and gastrointestinal secretions) represent the most efficient transmission modality of the SARS-related coronavirus. Hand hygiene is the most simple and cost effective measure of infection control to prevent contagion, and the use of airborne, contact and droplet precaution is strictly recommended to all health care workers taking care of such patients. The spread of SARS, to less developed country with limited resource for public health programs, represent the emerging alarming threat in the new global scenario.

  16. Comparison of laparoscopy and open surgery in treating severe acute pancreatitis and its relative aftercare.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Jiang, M X; Zheng, Y; Shu, M; Sun, S B

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the effects and compare laparoscopic intervention and open surgery in treating severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and its relative aftercare, to improve the overall treatment of SAP. Ninety patients with SAP were enrolled from the 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University from 2008 to 2014 and divided into a laparoscopic intervention group (25 cases) and an open surgery group (65 cases). Patients were asked for clinical symptoms, general hospital information, laboratory inspection, imageological examination, local and systemic complications, treatment and outcome. SAP patients’ relevant clinical indicators were compared between the two groups before and after the operation. Results revealed that there was no statistical significance in lesion range and main scoring indexes for reflecting the severity of the disease. For both groups statistical significance was found in blood loss (285.3±79.8 mL vs 362±91.6 mL), intensive care unit (ICU) monitoring time (9.04±6.35 d vs 12.48±8.34 d) and service time of breathing machine (9.47±6.24 d vs 12.98±8.25 d), and the laparoscopic operation group was superior to the open surgery group (p < 0.05). Besides, the laparoscopic operation group was also superior to the open surgery group in demand for main analgesics one week after the operation, as well as for recovery rate and incidence of complications (p < 0.05). Thus, it can be concluded that patients undergoing laparoscopic intervention are less likely to develop pulmonary infection and more likely to be cured in comparison with patients who receive open surgery. In addition, laparoscopic intervention results in less damage, lighter pain and fewer complications compared with open surgery. PMID:27049091

  17. Hydrogen-rich saline ameliorates the severity of L-arginine-induced acute pancreatitis in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Han; Sun, Yan Ping; Li, Yang; Liu, Wen Wu; Xiang, Hong Gang; Fan, Lie Ying; Sun, Qiang; Xu, Xin Yun; Cai, Jian Mei; Ruan, Can Ping; Su, Ning; Yan, Rong Lin; Sun, Xue Jun; Wang, Qiang

    2010-03-05

    Molecular hydrogen, which reacts with the hydroxyl radical, has been considered as a novel antioxidant. Here, we evaluated the protective effects of hydrogen-rich saline on the L-arginine (L-Arg)-induced acute pancreatitis (AP). AP was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by giving two intraperitoneal injections of L-Arg, each at concentrations of 250 mg/100 g body weight, with an interval of 1 h. Hydrogen-rich saline (>0.6 mM, 6 ml/kg) or saline (6 ml/kg) was administered, respectively, via tail vein 15 min after each L-Arg administration. Severity of AP was assessed by analysis of serum amylase activity, pancreatic water content and histology. Samples of pancreas were taken for measuring malondialdehyde and myeloperoxidase. Apoptosis in pancreatic acinar cell was determined with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling technique (TUNEL). Expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) were detected with immunohistochemistry. Hydrogen-rich saline treatment significantly attenuated the severity of L-Arg-induced AP by ameliorating the increased serum amylase activity, inhibiting neutrophil infiltration, lipid oxidation and pancreatic tissue edema. Moreover, hydrogen-rich saline treatment could promote acinar cell proliferation, inhibit apoptosis and NF-{kappa}B activation. These results indicate that hydrogen treatment has a protective effect against AP, and the effect is possibly due to its ability to inhibit oxidative stress, apoptosis, NF-{kappa}B activation and to promote acinar cell proliferation.

  18. Emergency room assessment and adrenaline treatment of patients with acute asthma of different severity.

    PubMed

    Limthongkul, S

    1989-06-01

    The adequacy of emergency room assessment and treatment of patients with acute severe asthmatic attacks was evaluated by analyzing the course of 451 visits of 348 patients to Chulalongkorn hospital's Emergency Room. Eighty-five per cent of the patients had an initial index score of greater than or equal to 4 and an average peak expiratory flow rate of 92.16 +/- 46.3 L/min. The discharge index score was 85 per cent with a score of less than or equal to 3 and an average peak expiratory flow rate of 192 +/- 40.3 L/min. Our study indicated that the predictive index proposed by Fischl et al correlated with the severity of airway obstruction; however, the initial index did not help with emergency room decision-making in predicting which patients might be hospitalized, have a relapse or be discharged. In fact, in our emergency room department, the index score to determine airway obstruction and the pattern of response to treatment were better predictors of the outcome, which was classified into three categories: non-responsive or minimally responsive, responsive, and partially responsive. By using conventional clinical criteria (i.e. recumbent position with elimination of laboured breathing, disappearance of dyspnea and reduction of wheezing), there was a 93 per cent accurate determination in the episodes of patients who responded sufficiently to the emergency room treatment to allow their discharge. The remaining 7 per cent of those seeking emergency treatment were hospitalized, which is a lower incidence than that of others series.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Over-the-scope clip placement is effective rescue therapy for severe acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Matthew; Gutierrez, Juan P.; Neumann, Helmut; Wilcox, C. Mel; Burski, Chad; Mönkemüller, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Background and study aim: The novel over-the-scope clip (OTSC) allows for excellent apposition of tissue, potentially permitting hemostasis to be achieved in various types of gastrointestinal lesions. This study aimed to evaluate the usefulness and safety of OTSCs for endoscopic hemostasis in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding in whom traditional endoscopic methods had failed. Patients and methods: A retrospective case series of all patients who underwent placement of an OTSC for severe recurrent upper gastrointestinal bleeding over a 14-month period was studied. Outcome data for the procedure included achievement of primary hemostasis, episodes of recurrent bleeding, and complications. Results: Twelve consecutive patients (67 % men; mean age 59, range 29 – 86) with ongoing upper gastrointestinal bleeding despite previous endoscopic management were included. They had a mean ASA score of 3 (range 2 – 4), a mean hemoglobin of 7.2 g/dL (range 5.2 – 9.1), and shock was present in 75 % of patients. They had all received packed red blood cells (mean 5.1 units, range 2 – 12). The etiology of bleeding was: duodenal ulcer (n = 6), gastric ulcer (n = 2) Dieulafoy lesion (n = 2), anastomotic ulceration (n = 1), Mallory – Weiss tear (n = 1). Hemostasis was achieved in all patients. Rebleeding occurred in two patients 1 day and 7 days after OTSC placement. There were no complications associated with OTSC application. Conclusions: OTSC use represents an effective, easily performed, and safe endoscopic therapy for various causes of severe acute gastrointestinal bleeding when conventional endoscopic techniques have failed. This therapy should be added to the armamentarium of therapeutic endoscopists. PMID:26134611

  20. Phenotyping community-acquired pneumonia according to the presence of acute respiratory failure and severe sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory failure (ARF) and severe sepsis (SS) are possible complications in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). The aim of the study was to evaluate prevalence, characteristics, risk factors and impact on mortality of hospitalized patients with CAP according to the presence of ARF and SS on admission. Methods This was a multicenter, observational, prospective study of consecutive CAP patients admitted to three hospitals in Italy, Spain, and Scotland between 2008 and 2010. Three groups of patients were identified: those with neither ARF nor SS (Group A), those with only ARF (Group B) and those with both ARF and SS (Group C) on admission. Results Among the 2,145 patients enrolled, 45% belonged to Group A, 36% to Group B and 20% to Group C. Patients in Group C were more severe than patients in Group B. Isolated ARF was correlated with age (p < 0.001), COPD (p < 0.001) and multilobar infiltrates (p < 0.001). The contemporary occurrence of ARF and SS was associated with age (p = 0.002), residency in nursing home (p = 0.007), COPD (p < 0.001), multilobar involvement (p < 0.001) and renal disease (p < 0.001). 4.2% of patients in Group A died, 9.3% in Group B and 26% in Group C, p < 0.001. After adjustment, the presence of only ARF had an OR for in-hospital mortality of 1.85 (p = 0.011) and the presence of both ARF and SS had an OR of 6.32 (p < 0.001). Conclusions The identification of ARF and SS on hospital admission can help physicians in classifying CAP patients into three different clinical phenotypes. PMID:24593040

  1. Gut Microbiota in Children Hospitalized with Oedematous and Non-Oedematous Severe Acute Malnutrition in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Kia Hee Schultz; Wiese, Maria; Rytter, Maren Johanne Heilskov; Özçam, Mustafa; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg; Namusoke, Hanifa; Friis, Henrik; Nielsen, Dennis Sandris

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) among children remains a major health problem in many developing countries. SAM manifests in both an oedematous and a non-oedematous form, with oedematous malnutrition in its most severe form also known as kwashiorkor. The pathogenesis of both types of malnutrition in children remains largely unknown, but gut microbiota (GM) dysbiosis has recently been linked to oedematous malnutrition. In the present study we aimed to assess whether GM composition differed between Ugandan children suffering from either oedematous or non-oedematous malnutrition. Methodology/Principal Findings As part of an observational study among children hospitalized with SAM aged 6–24 months in Uganda, fecal samples were collected at admission. Total genomic DNA was extracted from fecal samples, and PCR amplification was performed followed by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) and tag-encoded 16S rRNA gene-targeted high throughput amplicon sequencing. Alpha and beta diversity measures were determined along with ANOVA mean relative abundance and G-test of independence followed by comparisons between groups. Of the 87 SAM children included, 62% suffered from oedematous malnutrition, 66% were boys and the mean age was 16.1 months. GM composition was found to differ between the two groups of children as determined by DGGE (p = 0.0317) and by high-throughput sequencing, with non-oedematous children having lower GM alpha diversity (p = 0.036). However, beta diversity analysis did not reveal larger differences between the GM of children with oedematous and non-oedematous SAM (ANOSIM analysis, weighted UniFrac, R = -0.0085, p = 0.584; unweighted UniFrac, R = 0.0719, p = 0.011). Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that non-oedematous SAM children have lower GM diversity compared to oedematous SAM children, however no clear compositional differences were identified. PMID:26771456

  2. One severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus protein complex integrates processive RNA polymerase and exonuclease activities.

    PubMed

    Subissi, Lorenzo; Posthuma, Clara C; Collet, Axelle; Zevenhoven-Dobbe, Jessika C; Gorbalenya, Alexander E; Decroly, Etienne; Snijder, Eric J; Canard, Bruno; Imbert, Isabelle

    2014-09-16

    In addition to members causing milder human infections, the Coronaviridae family includes potentially lethal zoonotic agents causing severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the recently emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome. The ∼30-kb positive-stranded RNA genome of coronaviruses encodes a replication/transcription machinery that is unusually complex and composed of 16 nonstructural proteins (nsps). SARS-CoV nsp12, the canonical RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), exhibits poorly processive RNA synthesis in vitro, at odds with the efficient replication of a very large RNA genome in vivo. Here, we report that SARS-CoV nsp7 and nsp8 activate and confer processivity to the RNA-synthesizing activity of nsp12. Using biochemical assays and reverse genetics, the importance of conserved nsp7 and nsp8 residues was probed. Whereas several nsp7 mutations affected virus replication to a limited extent, the replacement of two nsp8 residues (P183 and R190) essential for interaction with nsp12 and a third (K58) critical for the interaction of the polymerase complex with RNA were all lethal to the virus. Without a loss of processivity, the nsp7/nsp8/nsp12 complex can associate with nsp14, a bifunctional enzyme bearing 3'-5' exoribonuclease and RNA cap N7-guanine methyltransferase activities involved in replication fidelity and 5'-RNA capping, respectively. The identification of this tripartite polymerase complex that in turn associates with the nsp14 proofreading enzyme sheds light on how coronaviruses assemble an RNA-synthesizing machinery to replicate the largest known RNA genomes. This protein complex is a fascinating example of the functional integration of RNA polymerase, capping, and proofreading activities. PMID:25197083

  3. One severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus protein complex integrates processive RNA polymerase and exonuclease activities

    PubMed Central

    Subissi, Lorenzo; Posthuma, Clara C.; Collet, Axelle; Zevenhoven-Dobbe, Jessika C.; Gorbalenya, Alexander E.; Decroly, Etienne; Snijder, Eric J.; Canard, Bruno; Imbert, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    In addition to members causing milder human infections, the Coronaviridae family includes potentially lethal zoonotic agents causing severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the recently emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome. The ∼30-kb positive-stranded RNA genome of coronaviruses encodes a replication/transcription machinery that is unusually complex and composed of 16 nonstructural proteins (nsps). SARS-CoV nsp12, the canonical RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), exhibits poorly processive RNA synthesis in vitro, at odds with the efficient replication of a very large RNA genome in vivo. Here, we report that SARS-CoV nsp7 and nsp8 activate and confer processivity to the RNA-synthesizing activity of nsp12. Using biochemical assays and reverse genetics, the importance of conserved nsp7 and nsp8 residues was probed. Whereas several nsp7 mutations affected virus replication to a limited extent, the replacement of two nsp8 residues (P183 and R190) essential for interaction with nsp12 and a third (K58) critical for the interaction of the polymerase complex with RNA were all lethal to the virus. Without a loss of processivity, the nsp7/nsp8/nsp12 complex can associate with nsp14, a bifunctional enzyme bearing 3′-5′ exoribonuclease and RNA cap N7-guanine methyltransferase activities involved in replication fidelity and 5′-RNA capping, respectively. The identification of this tripartite polymerase complex that in turn associates with the nsp14 proofreading enzyme sheds light on how coronaviruses assemble an RNA-synthesizing machinery to replicate the largest known RNA genomes. This protein complex is a fascinating example of the functional integration of RNA polymerase, capping, and proofreading activities. PMID:25197083

  4. The role of the physical examination in the evaluation of headache.

    PubMed

    Donohoe, Charles D

    2013-03-01

    The population of patients suffering with headaches is vast and underserved. The most critical element in headache evaluation is the history. The targeted history not only differentiates primary from secondary headaches but also provides a realistic list of conditions associated with secondary headache. Several of these conditions do present with specific physical findings, such as papilledema, Horner's syndrome, or CN palsy. The targeted physical examination of the patient with headache takes less than 3 minutes. The ability simply to recognize but a few straightforward clinical findings directs the evaluation in the proper direction. If you enjoy seeing patients, feel competent identifying but a few physical findings, and understand the basics of primary and secondary headaches and facial pain, there is urgent need of your services.

  5. Chronic daily headache: helping adolescents help themselves with self-hypnosis.

    PubMed

    Kohen, Daniel P

    2011-07-01

    Although the evidence is clear that hypnosis has been an effective treatment for recurrent headaches in children, review of the literature revealed no previous reports of hypnosis for youth with the condition of chronic daily headache. Two adolescents with continuing chronic daily headaches were taught self-hypnosis through careful attention to individual strengths and finding the hypnotic elements within the clinical encounters. Self-reports of intensity, frequency, and duration of headaches described substantial benefit from learning and practicing self-hypnosis after little to no benefit from pharmacologic and other nonpharmacologic therapies. These results and analogous success with several other adolescents with chronic daily headache support the further use of self-hypnosis training for this condition. As a self-regulation technique that is quickly and easily learned by most young people, self-hypnosis training holds considerable promise for effectively treating and perhaps preventing chronic daily headaches in children and adolescents. PMID:21922710

  6. Effects of Gender on Severity, Management and Outcome in Acute Biliary Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chin-Li; Li, Chung-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Background We conducted a population-based cross-sectional study to examine gender differences in severity, management, and outcome among patients with acute biliary pancreatitis (ABP) because available data are insufficient and conflicting. Methods We analyzed 13,110 patients (50.6% male) with first-attack ABP from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database between 2000 and 2009. The primary outcome was hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes included the development of severe ABP and the provision of treatment measures. Gender difference was assessed using multivariable analyses with generalized estimating equations models. Results The odds of gastrointestinal bleeding (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.44, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.18–1.76) and local complication (aOR 1.38, 95% CI 1.05–1.82) were 44% and 38% higher in men than in women, respectively. Compared with women, men had 24% higher odds of receiving total parenteral nutrition (aOR 1.24, 95% CI 1.00–1.52), but had 18% and 41% lower odds of receiving cholecystectomy (aOR 0.82, 95% CI 0.72–0.93) and hemodialysis (aOR 0.59, 95% CI 0.42–0.83), respectively. Hospital mortality was higher in men than in women (1.8% vs. 1.1%, p = 0.001). After adjustment for potential confounders, men had 81% higher odds of in-hospital death than women (aOR 1.81, 95% CI 1.15–2.86). Among patients with severe ABP, hospital mortality was 11.0% and 7.5% in men and women (p<0.001), respectively. The adjusted odds of death remained higher in men than in women with severe ABP (aOR 1.72, 95% CI 1.10–2.68). Conclusions Gender is an important determinant of outcome in patients with ABP and may affect their treatment measures. PMID:23469006

  7. Influence of Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine on Acute Otitis Media with Severe Middle Ear Inflammation: A Retrospective Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Sugino, Hirotoshi; Tsumura, Shigeru; Kunimoto, Masaru; Noda, Masuhiro; Chikuie, Daisuke; Noda, Chieko; Yamashita, Mariko; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Ishii, Hidemasa; Tashiro, Toru; Iwata, Kazuhiro; Kono, Takashi; Tsumura, Kaoru; Sumiya, Takahiro; Takeno, Sachio; Hirakawa, Katsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The Japanese guidelines for acute otitis media in children recommend classifying acute otitis media by age, manifestations and local findings, and also recommend myringotomy for moderate-grade cases with severe local findings, severe-grade cases, and treatment-resistant cases. The heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine was released in Japan in February 2010. In Hiroshima City, public funding allowing free inoculation with this vaccine was initiated from January 2011, and the number of vaccinated individuals has since increased dramatically. This study investigated changes in the number of myringotomies performed to treat acute otitis media during the 5-year period from January 2008 to December 2012 at two hospitals and five clinics in the Asa Area of Hiroshima City, Japan. A total of 3,165 myringotomies for acute otitis media were performed. The rate of procedures per child-year performed in <5-year-old children decreased by 29.1% in 2011 and by 25.2% in 2012 compared to the mean rate performed in the 3 years prior to the introduction of public funding. A total of 895 myringotomies were performed for 1-year-old infants. The rate of myringotomies per child-year performed for acute otitis media in 1-year-old infants decreased significantly in the 2 years after the introduction of public funding for heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine compared to all years before introduction (p<0.000001). Our results suggest a benefit of heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine for acute otitis media in reducing the financial burden of myringotomy. In addition, this vaccine may help prevent acute otitis media with severe middle ear inflammation in 1-year-old infants. PMID:26348230

  8. Influence of Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine on Acute Otitis Media with Severe Middle Ear Inflammation: A Retrospective Multicenter Study.

    PubMed

    Sugino, Hirotoshi; Tsumura, Shigeru; Kunimoto, Masaru; Noda, Masuhiro; Chikuie, Daisuke; Noda, Chieko; Yamashita, Mariko; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Ishii, Hidemasa; Tashiro, Toru; Iwata, Kazuhiro; Kono, Takashi; Tsumura, Kaoru; Sumiya, Takahiro; Takeno, Sachio; Hirakawa, Katsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The Japanese guidelines for acute otitis media in children recommend classifying acute otitis media by age, manifestations and local findings, and also recommend myringotomy for moderate-grade cases with severe local findings, severe-grade cases, and treatment-resistant cases. The heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine was released in Japan in February 2010. In Hiroshima City, public funding allowing free inoculation with this vaccine was initiated from January 2011, and the number of vaccinated individuals has since increased dramatically. This study investigated changes in the number of myringotomies performed to treat acute otitis media during the 5-year period from January 2008 to December 2012 at two hospitals and five clinics in the Asa Area of Hiroshima City, Japan. A total of 3,165 myringotomies for acute otitis media were performed. The rate of procedures per child-year performed in <5-year-old children decreased by 29.1% in 2011 and by 25.2% in 2012 compared to the mean rate performed in the 3 years prior to the introduction of public funding. A total of 895 myringotomies were performed for 1-year-old infants. The rate of myringotomies per child-year performed for acute otitis media in 1-year-old infants decreased significantly in the 2 years after the introduction of public funding for heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine compared to all years before introduction (p<0.000001). Our results suggest a benefit of heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine for acute otitis media in reducing the financial burden of myringotomy. In addition, this vaccine may help prevent acute otitis media with severe middle ear inflammation in 1-year-old infants.

  9. Role of Inhaled Nitric Oxide in the Management of Severe Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Juliette Lucinda; Bronicki, Ronald A.; Anas, Nick

    2016-01-01

    To date, there have been several systematic reviews with meta-analysis that have shown no reduction in mortality with the use of inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Importantly, these reports fail to make a distinction between the pediatric and adult patient. The number of adult patients in these reviews are far greater than the number of pediatric patients, which makes it difficult to interpret the data regarding the role of iNO on the pediatric population. Extrapolating data from the adult population to the pediatric population is complicated as we know that physiology and the body’s response to disease can be different between adult and pediatric patients. iNO has been demonstrated to improve outcomes in term and near-term infants with hypoxic respiratory failure associated with pulmonary hypertension. Recently, Bronicki et al. published a prospective randomized control trial investigating the impact of iNO on the pediatric patient population with acute respiratory failure. In this study, a benefit of decreased duration of mechanical ventilation and an increased rate of ECMO-free survival was demonstrated in patients who were randomized to receiving iNO, suggesting that there may be benefit to the use of iNO in pediatric ARDS (PARDS) that has not been demonstrated in adults. iNO has repeatedly been shown to transiently improve oxygenation in all age groups, and yet neonates and pediatric patients have shown improvement in other outcomes that have not been seen in adults. The mechanism that explains improvement with the use of iNO in these patient populations are not well understood but does not appear to be solely a result of sustained improvement in oxygenation. There are physiologic studies that suggest alternative mechanisms for explaining the positive effects of iNO, such as platelet aggregation inhibition and reduction in systemic inflammation. Hence, the role of iNO by various mechanisms and in various

  10. Treatment of post-electroconvulsive therapy headache with topical methyl salicylate.

    PubMed

    Logan, Christopher J; Stewart, Jonathan T

    2012-06-01

    Headache after administration of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is common, affecting approximately half of patients treated. Post-ECT headache is typically treated with acetaminophen or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs but occasionally requires agents such as sumatriptan, opioids, or β-blockers. We report on a patient whose severe post-ECT headaches responded completely to methyl salicylate ointment, applied to the area of his temporalis and masseter muscles. Topical methyl salicylate is generally well tolerated and may be a viable option for some patients with post-ECT headache. PMID:22622298

  11. Headaches and Migraines: Migraine 101 Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Headaches and Migraines Migraine 101 Quiz Past Issues / Spring 2009 Table of ... the facts when it comes to headaches and migraines? Test your knowledge with this quick quiz. True/ ...

  12. Resistin is not an appropriate biochemical marker to predict severity of acute pancreatitis: A case-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Maramhy, Hamdi; Abdelrahman, Abdelrahman I; Sawalhi, Samer

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess levels of serum resistin upon hospital admission as a predictor of acute pancreatitis (AP) severity. METHODS: AP is both a common and serious disease, with severe cases resulting in a high mortality rate. Several predictive inflammatory markers have been used clinically to assess severity. This prospective study collected data from 102 patients who were diagnosed with an initial acute biliary pancreatitis between March 2010 and February 2013. Measurements of body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) were obtained and serum resistin levels were analyzed at the time of hospital admission using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Additionally, resistin levels were measured from a control group after matching gender, BMI and age. RESULTS: A total of 102 patients (60 females and 42 males) were diagnosed with acute gallstone-induced pancreatitis. The mean age was 45 years, and mean BMI value was 30.5 kg/m2 (Obese, class I). Twenty-two patients (21.6%) had severe AP, while eighty-eight patients had mild pancreatitis (78.4%). Our results showed that BMI significantly correlated with pancreatitis severity (P = 0.007). Serum resistin did not correlate with BMI, weight or WC. Furthermore, serum resistin was significantly higher in patients with AP compared to control subjects (P < 0.0001). The mean resistin values upon admission were 17.5 ng/mL in the severe acute biliary pancreatitis group and 16.82 ng/mL in the mild AP group (P = 0.188), indicating that resistin is not an appropriate predictive marker of clinical severity. CONCLUSION: We demonstrate that obesity is a risk factor for developing severe AP. Further, although there is a correlation between serum resistin levels and AP at the time of hospital admission, resistin does not adequately serve as a predictive marker of clinical severity. PMID:25386084

  13. Ryodoraku therapy for migraine headache.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, K; Sadove, M S; Kim, S I; Lee, M H; Cheng, D

    1975-01-01

    The authors discuss Ryodoraku electric acupuncture therapy in detail in Part I. The results of the treatment of migraine headache (20 cases) by Ryodoraku therapy were investigated in part II. In the present study 15 out of 20 patients achieved good to excellent responses to this type of therapy. PMID:1119438

  14. Community-based management of severe acute malnutrition in India: new evidence from Bihar123

    PubMed Central

    Burza, Sakib; Mahajan, Raman; Marino, Elisa; Sunyoto, Temmy; Shandilya, Chandra; Tabrez, Mohammad; Kumari, Kabita; Mathew, Prince; Jha, Amar; Salse, Nuria; Mishra, Kripa Nath

    2015-01-01

    Background: An estimated one-third of the world’s children who are wasted live in India. In Bihar state, of children <5 y old, 27.1% are wasted and 8.3% have severe acute malnutrition (SAM). In 2009, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) initiated a community-based management of acute malnutrition (CMAM) program for children aged 6–59 mo with SAM. Objective: In this report, we describe the characteristics and outcomes of 8274 children treated between February 2009 and September 2011. Design: Between February 2009 and June 2010, the program admitted children with a weight-for-height z score (WHZ) <−3 SD and/or midupper arm circumference (MUAC) <110 mm and discharged those who reached a WHZ >−2 SDs and MUAC >110 mm. These variables changed in July 2010 to admission on the basis of an MUAC <115 mm and discharge at an MUAC ≥120 mm. Uncomplicated SAM cases were treated as outpatients in the community by using a WHO-standard, ready-to-use, therapeutic lipid-based paste produced in India; complicated cases were treated as inpatients by using F75/F100 WHO-standard milk until they could complete treatment in the community. Results: A total of 8274 children were admitted including 5149 girls (62.2%), 6613 children aged 6–23 mo (79.9%), and 87.3% children who belonged to Scheduled Caste, Scheduled Tribe, or Other Backward Caste families or households. Of 3873 children admitted under the old criteria, 41 children (1.1%) died, 2069 children (53.4%) were discharged as cured, and 1485 children (38.3%) defaulted. Of 4401 children admitted under the new criteria, 36 children (0.8%) died, 2526 children (57.4%) were discharged as cured, and 1591 children (36.2%) defaulted. For children discharged as cured, the mean (±SD) weight gain and length of stay were 4.7 ± 3.1 and 5.1 ± 3.7 g · kg−1 · d−1 and 8.7 ± 6.1 and 7.3 ± 5.6 wk under the old and new criteria, respectively (P < 0.01). After adjustment, significant risk factors for default were as follows: no community

  15. Acute Myeloid Leukemia Complicated by Giant Cell Arteritis.

    PubMed

    Tsunemine, Hiroko; Umeda, Ryosuke; Nohda, Yasuhiro; Sakane, Emiko; Akasaka, Hiroshi; Itoh, Kiminari; Izumi, Mayuko; Tsuji, Goh; Kodaka, Taiichi; Itoh, Tomoo; Takahashi, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA), a type of systemic arteritis, is rare in Japan. We herein report a case of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) complicated by GCA that manifested during chemotherapy for AML. A 77-year-old woman with severe back pain was diagnosed with AML. She achieved complete remission with the resolution of her back pain following induction chemotherapy. However, she developed a headache and fever after consolidation chemotherapy. A diagnosis of GCA was made based on a biopsy of the temporal artery and arterial imaging. GCA should therefore be included in the differential diagnosis in AML patients complicated with a headache and fever of unknown origin. PMID:26831026

  16. Is hemicrania continua a single entity or the association of two headache forms? Considerations from a case report.

    PubMed

    Allena, Marta; Tassorelli, Christina; Sances, Grazia; Guaschino, Elena; Sandrini, Giorgio; Nappi, Giuseppe; Antonaci, Fabios

    2010-05-01

    Hemicrania continua (HC) belongs to the group of primary headaches and it is characterized by a strictly unilateral, continuous headache of moderate intensity, with superimposed exacerbations of severe intensity that are accompanied by trigeminal autonomic features. The syndrome is completely responsive to indomethacin. Here we report a case of a 49-year-old man with HC, which may be viewed as a combination of different types of headache, ie, chronic tension-type headache and trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia. The analysis of this case raises interesting issues regarding the proper place of HC among the primary headache forms.

  17. Poisoning severity score, APACHE II and GCS: effective clinical indices for estimating severity and predicting outcome of acute organophosphorus and carbamate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Sam, Kishore Gnana; Kondabolu, Krishnakanth; Pati, Dipanwita; Kamath, Asha; Pradeep Kumar, G; Rao, Padma G M

    2009-07-01

    Self-poisoning with organophosphorus (OP) compounds is a major cause of morbidity and mortality across South Asian countries. To develop uniform and effective management guidelines, the severity of acute OP poisoning should be assessed through scientific methods and a clinical database should be maintained. A prospective descriptive survey was carried out to assess the utility of severity scales in predicting the outcome of 71 organophosphate (OP) and carbamate poisoning patients admitted during a one year period at the Kasturba Hospital, Manipal, India. The Glasgow coma scale (GCS) scores, acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II) scores, predicted mortality rate (PMR) and Poisoning severity score (PSS) were estimated within 24h of admission. Significant correlation (P<0.05) between PSS and GCS and APACHE II and PMR scores were observed with the PSS scores predicting mortality significantly (P< or =0.001). A total of 84.5% patients improved after treatment while 8.5% of the patients were discharged with severe morbidity. The mortality rate was 7.0%. Suicidal poisoning was observed to be the major cause (80.2%), while other reasons attributed were occupational (9.1%), accidental (6.6%), homicidal (1.6%) and unknown (2.5%) reasons. This study highlights the application of clinical indices like GCS, APACHE, PMR and severity scores in predicting mortality and may be considered for planning standard treatment guidelines.

  18. Unexpectedly Severe Acute Radiotherapy Side Effects Are Associated With Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms of the Melanocortin-1 Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Fogarty, Gerald B.; Muddle, Rory; Sprung, Carl N.

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: The melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) regulates melanin biogenesis. Deoxyribonucleic acid sequence variants in the form of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of MC1R affect melanin expression and are linked to skin phenotype. We aimed to determine whether SNPs of MC1R were associated with unexpectedly severe ionizing radiation reactions. Methods and Materials: The MC1R genotype of a cohort of Australians with unexpectedly severe acute and/or late reactions (Common Terminology Criteria Version 3 (CTCv3) Grade 3 or 4) to radiotherapy (RT) for cancer (n = 30) was analyzed. The findings were compared with control data from our previous study of MC1R representative of the general Australian population (n = 1,787). Results: The difference in frequency of alleles encoding a 'red hair color' phenotype in the cohort of patients with unexpectedly severe acute radiation reactions (n = 12) was significantly increased compared with the control population (p = 0.003). Acute radiosensitivity was especially associated with the R160W variant allele (odds ratio, 3.64 [95% confidence interval, 1.3-10.27]). The corresponding comparison of MC1R controls with unexpectedly severe late radiation reactions (n = 18) was not significant. It was also found that R160W as a part of the genotype in the patients with unexpectedly severe acute RT side effects as compared with the control group was also significant (p = 0.043). Conclusions: In this small cohort of cancer patients, deoxyribonucleic acid sequence variants of the MC1R gene, especially the R160W variant, have been associated with unexpectedly severe acute reactions to RT. This result needs to be verified in a larger cohort of patients.

  19. Psychiatric Symptoms in Children with Primary Headache

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anttila, Pirjo; Sourander, Andre; Metsahonkala, Liisa; Aromaa, Minna; Helenius, Hans; Sillanpaa, Matti

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine the association of psychiatric symptoms with migraine and tension-type headache in children. Method: A questionnaire completed by 1,135 Finnish children in the sixth grade identified 154 children with migraine, 138 with tension-type headache, and 407 children who were headache-free. Seventy children were randomly selected…

  20. Headache - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Headaches (Arabic) الصداع - العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Headaches 头痛 - 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) Headaches 頭痛 - 繁體中文 (Chinese - Traditional) ...

  1. Dietary cysteine is used more efficiently by children with severe acute malnutrition with edema compared with those without edema

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Children with edematous severe acute malnutrition (SAM) produce less cysteine than do their nonedematous counterparts. They also have marked glutathione (GSH) depletion, hair loss, skin erosion, gut mucosal atrophy, and depletion of mucins. Because GSH, skin, hair, mucosal, and mucin proteins are ri...

  2. Dietary supplementation with aromatic amino acids increases protein synthesis in children wHh severe acute malnutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although 2 earlier studies reported that aromatic amino acid (AAA) supplementation of children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM) improved whole-body protein anabolism during the early postadmission (maintenance) phase of rehabilitation, it is not known whether this positive effect was maintained ...

  3. DO ACUTE PHASE PROTEINS REFLECT SEVERITY OF INFLAMMATION IN RAT MODELS OF POLLUTANT-INDUCED LUNG INJURY?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Title: DO ACUTE PHASE PROTEINS REFLECT THE SEVERITY OF INFLAMMATION IN RAT MODELS OF POLLUTANT-INDUCED LUNG INJURY?

    M. C. Schladweiler, BS 1, P. S. Gilmour, PhD 2, D. L. Andrews, BS 1, D. L. Costa, ScD 1, A. D. Ledbetter, BS 1, K. E. Pinkerton, PhD 3 and U. P. Kodavanti, ...

  4. Randomised, double blind, placebo controlled trial of intravenous antioxidant (n‐acetylcysteine, selenium, vitamin C) therapy in severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Siriwardena, Ajith K; Mason, James M; Balachandra, Srinivasan; Bagul, Anil; Galloway, Simon; Formela, Laura; Hardman, Jonathan G; Jamdar, Saurabh

    2007-01-01

    Background Based on equivocal clinical data, intravenous antioxidant therapy has been used for the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis. To date there is no randomised comparison of this therapy in severe acute pancreatitis. Methods We conducted a randomised, double blind, placebo controlled trial of intravenous antioxidant (n‐acetylcysteine, selenium, vitamin C) therapy in patients with predicted severe acute pancreatitis. Forty‐three patients were enrolled from three hospitals in the Manchester (UK) area over the period June 2001 to November 2004. Randomisation stratified for APACHE‐II score and hospital site, and delivered groups that were similar at baseline. Results Relative serum levels of antioxidants rose while markers of oxidative stress fell in the active treatment group during the course of the trial. However, at 7 days, there was no statistically significant difference in the primary end point, organ dysfunction (antioxidant vs placebo: 32% vs 17%, p = 0.33) or any secondary end point of organ dysfunction or patient outcome. Conclusions This study provides no evidence to justify continued use of n‐acetylcysteine, selenium, vitamin C based antioxidant therapy in severe acute pancreatitis. In the context of any future trial design, careful consideration must be given to the risks raised by the greater trend towards adverse outcome in patients in the treatment arm of this study. PMID:17356040

  5. Evaluation of the routine use of amoxicillin as part of the home-based treatment of severe acute malnutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine whether the inclusion of amoxicillin correlates with better recovery rates in the home-based treatment of severe acute malnutrition with ready-to-use therapeutic food. This retrospective cohort study compared data from the treatment of two groups of children in Malawi aged 6-59 months w...

  6. The prognostic value of pulmonary embolism severity index in acute pulmonary embolism: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Prognostic assessment is important for the management of patients with acute pulmonary embolism (APE). Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index (PESI) and simple PESI (sPESI) are new emerged prognostic assessment tools for APE. The aim of this meta-analysis is to assess the accuracy of the PESI and the sPESI to predict prognostic outcomes (all-cause and PE-related mortality, serious adverse events) in APE patients, and compare between these two PESIs. Methods MEDLINE and EMBASE database were searched up to June 2012 using the terms “Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index” and “pulmonary embolism”. Summary odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for prognostic outcomes in low risk PESI versus high risk PESI were calculated. Summary receiver operating characteristic curve (SROC) used to estimate overall predicting accuracies of prognostic outcomes. Results Twenty-one studies were included in this meta-analysis. The results showed low-risk PESI was significantly associated with lower all-cause mortality (OR 0.13; 95% CI 0.12 to 0.15), PE-related mortality (OR 0.09; 95% CI 0.05 to 0.17) and serious adverse events (OR 0.34; 95% CI 0.29 to 0.41), with no homogeneity across studies. In sPESI subgroup, the OR of all-cause mortality, PE-related mortality, and serious adverse events was 0.10 (95% CI 0.08 to 0.14), 0.09 (95% CI 0.03 to 0.26) and 0.40 (95% CI 0.31 to 0.51), respectively; while in PESI subgroup, the OR was 0.14 (95% CI 0.13 to 0.16), 0.09 (95% CI 0.04 to 0.21), and 0.30 (95% CI 0.23 to 0.38), respectively. For accuracy analysis, the pooled sensitivity, the pooled specificity, and the overall weighted AUC for PESI predicting all-cause mortality was 0.909 (95% CI: 0.900 to 0.916), 0.411 (95% CI: 0.407 to 0.415), and 0.7853±0.0058, respectively; for PE-related mortality, it was 0.953 (95% CI: 0.913 to 0.978), 0.374 (95% CI: 0.360 to 0.388), and 0.8218±0.0349, respectively; for serious adverse events, it was 0.821 (95% CI: 0.795 to 0.845), 0

  7. Acute Migraine Treatment in Adults.

    PubMed

    Becker, Werner J

    2015-06-01

    There are many options for acute migraine attack treatment, but none is ideal for all patients. This study aims to review current medical office-based acute migraine therapy in adults and provides readers with an organized approach to this important facet of migraine treatment. A general literature review includes a review of several recent published guidelines. Acetaminophen, 4 nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (ibuprofen, acetylsalicylic acid [ASA], naproxen sodium, and diclofenac potassium), and 7 triptans (almotriptan, eletriptan, frovatriptan, naratriptan, rizatriptan, sumatriptan, and zolmitriptan) have good evidence for efficacy and form the core of acute migraine treatment. NSAID-triptan combinations, dihydroergotamine, non-opioid combination analgesics (acetaminophen, ASA, and caffeine), and several anti-emetics (metoclopramide, domperidone, and prochlorperazine) are additional evidence-based options. Opioid containing combination analgesics may be helpful in specific patients, but should not be used routinely. Clinical features to be considered when choosing an acute migraine medication include usual headache intensity, usual rapidity of pain intensity increase, nausea, vomiting, degree of disability, patient response to previously used medications, history of headache recurrence with previous attacks, and the presence of contraindications to specific acute medications. Available acute medications can be organized into 4 treatment strategies, including a strategy for attacks of mild to moderate severity (strategy one: acetaminophen and/or NSAIDs), a triptan strategy for patients with severe attacks and for attacks not responding to strategy one, a refractory attack strategy, and a strategy for patients with contraindications to vasoconstricting drugs. Acute treatment of migraine attacks during pregnancy, lactation, and for patients with chronic migraine is also discussed. In chronic migraine, it is particularly important that medication

  8. Infections in Children Admitted with Complicated Severe Acute Malnutrition in Niger

    PubMed Central

    Page, Anne-Laure; de Rekeneire, Nathalie; Sayadi, Sani; Aberrane, Said; Janssens, Ann-Carole; Rieux, Claire; Djibo, Ali; Manuguerra, Jean-Claude; Ducou-le-Pointe, Hubert; Grais, Rebecca F.; Schaefer, Myrto; Guerin, Philippe J.; Baron, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    Background Although malnutrition affects thousands of children throughout the Sahel each year and predisposes them to infections, there is little data on the etiology of infections in these populations. We present a clinical and biological characterization of infections in hospitalized children with complicated severe acute malnutrition (SAM) in Maradi, Niger. Methods Children with complicated SAM hospitalized in the intensive care unit of a therapeutic feeding center, with no antibiotics in the previous 7 days, were included. A clinical examination, blood, urine and stool cultures, and chest radiography were performed systematically on admission. Results Among the 311 children included in the study, gastroenteritis was the most frequent clinical diagnosis on admission, followed by respiratory tract infections and malaria. Blood or urine culture was positive in 17% and 16% of cases, respectively, and 36% had abnormal chest radiography. Enterobacteria were sensitive to most antibiotics, except amoxicillin and cotrimoxazole. Twenty-nine (9%) children died, most frequently from sepsis. Clinical signs were poor indicators of infection and initial diagnoses correlated poorly with biologically or radiography-confirmed diagnoses. Conclusions These data confirm the high level of infections and poor correlation with clinical signs in children with complicated SAM, and provide antibiotic resistance profiles from an area with limited microbiological data. These results contribute unique data to the ongoing debate on the use and choice of broad-spectrum antibiotics as first-line treatment in children with complicated SAM and reinforce the call for an update of international guidelines on management of complicated SAM based on more recent data. PMID:23874731

  9. Mechanisms of Host Receptor Adaptation by Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Kailang; Peng, Guiqing; Wilken, Matthew; Geraghty, Robert J.; Li, Fang

    2012-12-10

    The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) from palm civets has twice evolved the capacity to infect humans by gaining binding affinity for human receptor angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). Numerous mutations have been identified in the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of different SARS-CoV strains isolated from humans or civets. Why these mutations were naturally selected or how SARS-CoV evolved to adapt to different host receptors has been poorly understood, presenting evolutionary and epidemic conundrums. In this study, we investigated the impact of these mutations on receptor recognition, an important determinant of SARS-CoV infection and pathogenesis. Using a combination of biochemical, functional, and crystallographic approaches, we elucidated the molecular and structural mechanisms of each of these naturally selected RBD mutations. These mutations either strengthen favorable interactions or reduce unfavorable interactions with two virus-binding hot spots on ACE2, and by doing so, they enhance viral interactions with either human (hACE2) or civet (cACE2) ACE2. Therefore, these mutations were viral adaptations to either hACE2 or cACE2. To corroborate the above analysis, we designed and characterized two optimized RBDs. The human-optimized RBD contains all of the hACE2-adapted residues (Phe-442, Phe-472, Asn-479, Asp-480, and Thr-487) and possesses exceptionally high affinity for hACE2 but relative low affinity for cACE2. The civet-optimized RBD contains all of the cACE2-adapted residues (Tyr-442, Pro-472, Arg-479, Gly-480, and Thr-487) and possesses exceptionally high affinity for cACE2 and also substantial affinity for hACE2. These results not only illustrate the detailed mechanisms of host receptor adaptation by SARS-CoV but also provide a molecular and structural basis for tracking future SARS-CoV evolution in animals.

  10. Gut DNA viromes of Malawian twins discordant for severe acute malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Alejandro; Blanton, Laura V; Cao, Song; Zhao, Guoyan; Manary, Mark; Trehan, Indi; Smith, Michelle I; Wang, David; Virgin, Herbert W; Rohwer, Forest; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2015-09-22

    The bacterial component of the human gut microbiota undergoes a definable program of postnatal development. Evidence is accumulating that this program is disrupted in children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM) and that their persistent gut microbiota immaturity, which is not durably repaired with current ready-to-use therapeutic food (RUTF) interventions, is causally related to disease pathogenesis. To further characterize gut microbial community development in healthy versus malnourished infants/children, we performed a time-series metagenomic study of DNA isolated from virus-like particles (VLPs) recovered from fecal samples collected during the first 30 mo of postnatal life from eight pairs of mono- and dizygotic Malawian twins concordant for healthy growth and 12 twin pairs discordant for SAM. Both members of discordant pairs were sampled just before, during, and after treatment with a peanut-based RUTF. Using Random Forests and a dataset of 17,676 viral contigs assembled from shotgun sequencing reads of VLP DNAs, we identified viruses that distinguish different stages in the assembly of the gut microbiota in the concordant healthy twin pairs. This developmental program is impaired in both members of SAM discordant pairs and not repaired with RUTF. Phage plus members of the Anelloviridae and Circoviridae families of eukaryotic viruses discriminate discordant from concordant healthy pairs. These results disclose that apparently healthy cotwins in discordant pairs have viromes associated with, although not necessarily mediators, of SAM; as such, they provide a human model for delineating normal versus perturbed postnatal acquisition and retention of the gut microbiota's viral component in populations at risk for malnutrition.

  11. Dietary supplementation with aromatic amino acids increases protein synthesis in children with severe acute malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jean W; Badaloo, Asha; Wilson, Lorraine; Taylor-Bryan, Carolyn; Chambers, Bentley; Reid, Marvin; Forrester, Terrence; Jahoor, Farook

    2014-05-01

    Although 2 earlier studies reported that aromatic amino acid (AAA) supplementation of children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM) improved whole-body protein anabolism during the early postadmission (maintenance) phase of rehabilitation, it is not known whether this positive effect was maintained during the catch-up growth and recovery phases of treatment. This study aimed to determine whether supplementation with an AAA cocktail (330 mg · kg(-1) · d(-1)) vs. isonitrogenous Ala would improve measures of protein kinetics in 22 children, aged 4-31 mo, during the catch-up growth and recovery phases of treatment for SAM. Protein kinetics were assessed by measuring leucine, phenylalanine, and urea kinetics with the use of standard stable isotope tracer methods in the fed state. Supplementation started at the end of the maintenance period when the children were clinically/metabolically stable and continued up to full nutritional recovery. Three experiments were performed: at the end of maintenance (at ∼13 d postadmission), at mid-catch-up growth (at ∼23 d post- admission when the children had replenished 50% of their weight deficit), and at recovery (at ∼48 d postadmission when they had achieved at least 90% weight for length). Children in the AAA group had significantly faster protein synthesis compared with those in the Ala group at mid-catch-up growth (101 ± 10 vs. 72 ± 7 μmol phenylalanine · kg(-1) · h(-1); P < 0.05) and better protein balance at mid-catch-up growth (49 ± 5 vs. 30 ± 2 μmol phenylalanine · kg(-1) · h(-1); P < 0.05) and at recovery (37 ± 8 vs. 11 ± 3 μmol phenylalanine · kg(-1) · h(-1); P < 0.05). We conclude that dietary supplementation with AAA accelerates net protein synthesis in children during nutritional rehabilitation for SAM.

  12. Changes in whole-blood PUFA and their predictors during recovery from severe acute malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Babirekere-Iriso, Esther; Mortensen, Charlotte G; Mupere, Ezekiel; Rytter, Maren J H; Namusoke, Hanifa; Michaelsen, Kim F; Briend, André; Stark, Ken D; Friis, Henrik; Lauritzen, Lotte

    2016-05-28

    Children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM) with complications require in-patient management including therapeutic feeding. Little attention has been given to the effects of these feeds on the essential fatty acid status of children with SAM. The objective of this study was to describe changes in the PUFA composition in whole blood in children with SAM during treatment and to determine predictors of change. This prospective study took place in a paediatric nutrition rehabilitation unit in Kampala, Uganda, and assessed whole-blood fatty acid composition of children with SAM at admission, transition, discharge and follow-up (8 and 16 weeks). ANCOVA was used to identify predictors of change in whole-blood PUFA. The study included 120 children with SAM and twenty-nine healthy control children of similar age and sex. Among the SAM children, 38 % were female and 64 % had oedema. Whole-blood n-6 PUFA proportions increased from admission to follow-up, except for arachidonic acid, which decreased by 0·79 (95 % CI 0·46, 1·12) fatty acid percentage (FA%) from admission to transition and 0·10 (95 % CI 0·23, 0·44) FA% at discharge. n-3 Long-chain (LC) PUFA decreased by 0·21 (95 % CI 0·03, 0·40) FA% at discharge and 0·22 (95 % CI 0·01, 0·42) FA% at 8 weeks of follow-up. This decrease was greater in children from families with recent fish intake and those with nasogastric tube feeding. Current therapeutic feeds do not correct whole-blood levels of LCPUFA, particularly n-3 LCPUFA, in children with SAM. Increased attention is needed to the contents of n-3 LCPUFA in therapeutic feeds. PMID:26996197

  13. The effect of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) on emergency airway management.

    PubMed

    Wong, Evelyn; Ho, Khoy Kheng

    2006-07-01

    From early March 2003 to late May 2003, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) was detected in Singapore. The increase in workload and new infection control procedures were thought to affect resuscitation and airway management. Our aim was to study the effects of wearing of personal protective equipment (PPE) and powered air-purifying respirator (PAPR) and the restriction in the number of resuscitation personnel on airway management during the SARS crisis. Data was collected prospectively through an ongoing emergency airway registry. The data was divided into three periods: (1) before PPE was instituted from 1 November 2002 to 31 March 2003; (2) during SARS (when PPE use was mandatory) from 1 April to 31 July 2003; (3) post-SARs (when PPE use was non-mandatory but encouraged) from 1 August to 31 March 2004. There was no change in patient demographics during the three periods. There were significant increases in the proportion of resuscitation cases and airway interventions during the SARS period compared to the pre-SARS period. The resident medical officer intubation rate decreased from 45.1% pre-SARS to 35.2% during SARS and 17.7% post-SARS. The complication rates were 10.5%, 9.9% and 9.4% in periods 1-3, respectively. Restriction in the number of healthcare staff attending to each patient may have influenced the department's decision to allow only the most confident or experienced personnel to manage the airway. The exposure of junior medical officers in emergency airway management during SARS and the immediate post-SARS period was decreased. This trend should be monitored further and intervention may be necessary should it continue to decline. PMID:16762480

  14. Gut DNA viromes of Malawian twins discordant for severe acute malnutrition

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Alejandro; Blanton, Laura V.; Cao, Song; Zhao, Guoyan; Manary, Mark; Trehan, Indi; Smith, Michelle I.; Wang, David; Virgin, Herbert W.; Rohwer, Forest; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial component of the human gut microbiota undergoes a definable program of postnatal development. Evidence is accumulating that this program is disrupted in children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM) and that their persistent gut microbiota immaturity, which is not durably repaired with current ready-to-use therapeutic food (RUTF) interventions, is causally related to disease pathogenesis. To further characterize gut microbial community development in healthy versus malnourished infants/children, we performed a time-series metagenomic study of DNA isolated from virus-like particles (VLPs) recovered from fecal samples collected during the first 30 mo of postnatal life from eight pairs of mono- and dizygotic Malawian twins concordant for healthy growth and 12 twin pairs discordant for SAM. Both members of discordant pairs were sampled just before, during, and after treatment with a peanut-based RUTF. Using Random Forests and a dataset of 17,676 viral contigs assembled from shotgun sequencing reads of VLP DNAs, we identified viruses that distinguish different stages in the assembly of the gut microbiota in the concordant healthy twin pairs. This developmental program is impaired in both members of SAM discordant pairs and not repaired with RUTF. Phage plus members of the Anelloviridae and Circoviridae families of eukaryotic viruses discriminate discordant from concordant healthy pairs. These results disclose that apparently healthy cotwins in discordant pairs have viromes associated with, although not necessarily mediators, of SAM; as such, they provide a human model for delineating normal versus perturbed postnatal acquisition and retention of the gut microbiota’s viral component in populations at risk for malnutrition. PMID:26351661

  15. The effect of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) on emergency airway management.

    PubMed

    Wong, Evelyn; Ho, Khoy Kheng

    2006-07-01

    From early March 2003 to late May 2003, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) was detected in Singapore. The increase in workload and new infection control procedures were thought to affect resuscitation and airway management. Our aim was to study the effects of wearing of personal protective equipment (PPE) and powered air-purifying respirator (PAPR) and the restriction in the number of resuscitation personnel on airway management during the SARS crisis. Data was collected prospectively through an ongoing emergency airway registry. The data was divided into three periods: (1) before PPE was instituted from 1 November 2002 to 31 March 2003; (2) during SARS (when PPE use was mandatory) from 1 April to 31 July 2003; (3) post-SARs (when PPE use was non-mandatory but encouraged) from 1 August to 31 March 2004. There was no change in patient demographics during the three periods. There were significant increases in the proportion of resuscitation cases and airway interventions during the SARS period compared to the pre-SARS period. The resident medical officer intubation rate decreased from 45.1% pre-SARS to 35.2% during SARS and 17.7% post-SARS. The complication rates were 10.5%, 9.9% and 9.4% in periods 1-3, respectively. Restriction in the number of healthcare staff attending to each patient may have influenced the department's decision to allow only the most confident or experienced personnel to manage the airway. The exposure of junior medical officers in emergency airway management during SARS and the immediate post-SARS period was decreased. This trend should be monitored further and intervention may be necessary should it continue to decline.

  16. Predicting Outcome in Acute Organophosphorus Poisoning with a Poison Severity Score or the Glasgow Coma Scale

    PubMed Central

    Davies, James O. J.; Eddleston, Michael; Buckley, Nick A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Organophosphorus pesticide poisoning kills around 200,000 people each year, principally due to self poisoning in the Asia-Pacific region. Aim: We wished to assess whether patients at high risk of death could be identified accurately using clinical parameters soon after hospital admission. Design: We evaluated the usefulness of the International Program on Chemical Safety Poison Severity Score (IPCS PSS) and the Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) prospectively for predicting death in patients poisoned by organophosphorus pesticides. Methods: Data were collected as part of a multicentre cohort study in Sri Lanka. Study doctors saw all patients on admission, collecting data on pulse, blood pressure, pupil size, need for intubation, and GCS. Results: 1365 patients with a history of acute organophosphorus poisoning were included. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were calculated for the IPCS PSS and GCS on admission. The IPCS PSS and GCS had similar ROC area under the curves (AUC) and best cut points as determined by Youden's index (AUC/sensitivity/specificity 0.81/0.78/0.79 for IPCS PSS ≥ grade 2 and 0.84/0.79/0.79 for GCS ≤13). The predictive value varied with the pesticide ingested, being more accurate for dimethoate poisoning and less accurate for fenthion poisoning (GCS AUC 0.91 compared to 0.69). Conclusions: GCS and the IPCS PSS were similarly effective at predicting outcome. Patients presenting with a GCS ≤ 13 need intensive monitoring and treatment. However, the identity of the organophosphate must be taken into account since the half of all patients who died from fenthion poisoning only had mild symptoms at presentation. PMID:18319295

  17. The hydrocortisone protection of glycocalyx on the intestinal capillary endothelium during severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shun-Liang; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Shao-Yang; Liang, Zhong-Yan; Yu, Wen-Qiao; Liang, Ting-Bo

    2015-05-01

    Malfunctioning of the intestinal microcirculation secondary to severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) can cause injuries to the intestinal mucosal barrier, translocation of gut flora, and sepsis. The glycocalyx on the vascular endothelium helps maintain its normal function through multiple mechanisms, including regulation of vascular permeability and inhibition of intercellular adhesion. It is unknown that whether pancreatitis inflicts injuries to the intestinal mucosal barrier through damaging glycocalyx or stabilizing glycocalyx can be a potential therapeutic target in maintaining the integrity of the intestinal mucosal barrier during SAP. Injecting sodium taurocholate into the pancreatic duct of Sprague-Dawley rats induced SAP. Intestinal perfusion, changes in endothelial glycocalyx, and the associated molecular mechanisms were assessed by laser Doppler velocimetry, electron microscopy, and the levels of heparan sulfate, syndacan-1, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the superior mesenteric vein. Protective effects of hydrocortisone treatment in the intestinal microcirculation during SAP were evaluated. Degradation of the glycocalyx in intestinal vascular endothelium developed 3 h after the onset of SAP in rats. By 12 h, significant reduction of intestinal perfusion was observed. The concomitant elevated levels of TNF-α in the superior mesenteric vein suggest that TNF-α is involved in the degradation of the glycocalyx. With the use of hydrocortisone, intestinal perfusion was improved and the degradation of glycocalyx was reduced. The degradation of glycocalyx is involved in the malfunction of the intestinal microcirculation. The massive release of TNF-α participates in this process and leads to glycocalyx degradation. Hydrocortisone may be a good therapy to prevent this process.

  18. Challenges of Estimating the Annual Caseload of Severe Acute Malnutrition: The Case of Niger

    PubMed Central

    Hallarou, Mahaman; Gérard, Jean-Christophe; Donnen, Philippe; Macq, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Reliable prospective estimates of annual severe acute malnutrition (SAM) caseloads for treatment are needed for policy decisions and planning of quality services in the context of competing public health priorities and limited resources. This paper compares the reliability of SAM caseloads of children 6–59 months of age in Niger estimated from prevalence at the start of the year and counted from incidence at the end of the year. Methods Secondary data from two health districts for 2012 and the country overall for 2013 were used to calculate annual caseload of SAM. Prevalence and coverage were extracted from survey reports, and incidence from weekly surveillance systems. Results The prospective caseload estimate derived from prevalence and duration of illness underestimated the true burden. Similar incidence was derived from two weekly surveillance systems, but differed from that obtained from the monthly system. Incidence conversion factors were two to five times higher than recommended. Discussion Obtaining reliable prospective caseloads was challenging because prevalence is unsuitable for estimating incidence of SAM. Different SAM indicators identified different SAM populations, and duration of illness, expected contact coverage and population figures were inaccurate. The quality of primary data measurement, recording and reporting affected incidence numbers from surveillance. Coverage estimated in population surveys was rarely available, and coverage obtained by comparing admissions with prospective caseload estimates was unrealistic or impractical. Conclusions Caseload estimates derived from prevalence are unreliable and should be used with caution. Policy and service decisions that depend on these numbers may weaken performance of service delivery. Niger may improve SAM surveillance by simplifying and improving primary data collection and methods using innovative information technologies for single data entry at the first contact with the health

  19. Impaired cardiovascular structure and function in adult survivors of severe acute malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Tennant, Ingrid A; Barnett, Alan T; Thompson, Debbie S; Kips, Jan; Boyne, Michael S; Chung, Edward E; Chung, Andrene P; Osmond, Clive; Hanson, Mark A; Gluckman, Peter D; Segers, Patrick; Cruickshank, J Kennedy; Forrester, Terrence E

    2014-09-01

    Malnutrition below 5 years remains a global health issue. Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) presents in childhood as oedematous (kwashiorkor) or nonoedematous (marasmic) forms, with unknown long-term cardiovascular consequences. We hypothesized that cardiovascular structure and function would be poorer in SAM survivors than unexposed controls. We studied 116 adult SAM survivors, 54 after marasmus, 62 kwashiorkor, and 45 age/sex/body mass index-matched community controls who had standardized anthropometry, blood pressure, echocardiography, and arterial tonometry performed. Left ventricular indices and outflow tract diameter, carotid parameters, and pulse wave velocity were measured, with systemic vascular resistance calculated. All were expressed as SD scores. Mean (SD) age was 28.8±7.8 years (55% men). Adjusting for age, sex, height, and weight, SAM survivors had mean (SE) reductions for left ventricular outflow tract diameter of 0.67 (0.16; P<0.001), stroke volume 0.44 (0.17; P=0.009), cardiac output 0.5 (0.16; P=0.001), and pulse wave velocity 0.32 (0.15; P=0.03) compared with controls but higher diastolic blood pressures (by 4.3; 1.2-7.3 mm Hg; P=0.007). Systemic vascular resistance was higher in marasmus and kwashiorkor survivors (30.2 [1.2] and 30.8 [1.1], respectively) than controls 25.3 (0.8), overall difference 5.5 (95% confidence interval, 2.8-8.4 mm Hg min/L; P<0.0001). No evidence of large vessel or cardiac remodeling was found, except closer relationships between these indices in former marasmic survivors. Other parameters did not differ between SAM survivor groups. We conclude that adult SAM survivors had smaller outflow tracts and cardiac output when compared with controls, yet markedly elevated peripheral resistance. Malnutrition survivors are thus likely to develop excess hypertension in later life, especially when exposed to obesity.

  20. Changes in whole-blood PUFA and their predictors during recovery from severe acute malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Babirekere-Iriso, Esther; Mortensen, Charlotte G; Mupere, Ezekiel; Rytter, Maren J H; Namusoke, Hanifa; Michaelsen, Kim F; Briend, André; Stark, Ken D; Friis, Henrik; Lauritzen, Lotte

    2016-05-28

    Children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM) with complications require in-patient management including therapeutic feeding. Little attention has been given to the effects of these feeds on the essential fatty acid status of children with SAM. The objective of this study was to describe changes in the PUFA composition in whole blood in children with SAM during treatment and to determine predictors of change. This prospective study took place in a paediatric nutrition rehabilitation unit in Kampala, Uganda, and assessed whole-blood fatty acid composition of children with SAM at admission, transition, discharge and follow-up (8 and 16 weeks). ANCOVA was used to identify predictors of change in whole-blood PUFA. The study included 120 children with SAM and twenty-nine healthy control children of similar age and sex. Among the SAM children, 38 % were female and 64 % had oedema. Whole-blood n-6 PUFA proportions increased from admission to follow-up, except for arachidonic acid, which decreased by 0·79 (95 % CI 0·46, 1·12) fatty acid percentage (FA%) from admission to transition and 0·10 (95 % CI 0·23, 0·44) FA% at discharge. n-3 Long-chain (LC) PUFA decreased by 0·21 (95 % CI 0·03, 0·40) FA% at discharge and 0·22 (95 % CI 0·01, 0·42) FA% at 8 weeks of follow-up. This decrease was greater in children from families with recent fish intake and those with nasogastric tube feeding. Current therapeutic feeds do not correct whole-blood levels of LCPUFA, particularly n-3 LCPUFA, in children with SAM. Increased attention is needed to the contents of n-3 LCPUFA in therapeutic feeds.

  1. Tension-type headache: one or more headaches?

    PubMed

    Sjaastad, Ottar

    2011-01-01

    In this context, the focus will be on the homogeneity of tension-type headache (T-TH): is it a disease? Or: is it more likely to be a syndrome? A multiplicity of disorders from as drastically different fields of medicine as disorders caused by environmental gases, intra-psychic conflicts, and nuchal/cervical disorders can putatively fake T-TH. T-TH is in all probability a conglomerate of disorders and not one solid, homogeneous disorder. PMID:22152438

  2. Tension-type headache: one or more headaches?

    PubMed Central

    Sjaastad, Ottar

    Summary In this context, the focus will be on the homogeneity of tension-type headache (T-TH): is it a disease? Or: is it more likely to be a syndrome? A multiplicity of disorders from as drastically different fields of medicine as disorders caused by environmental gases, intra-psychic conflicts, and nuchal/cervical disorders can putatively fake T-TH. T-TH is in all probability a conglomerate of disorders and not one solid, homogeneous disorder. PMID:22152438

  3. Case Studies of Uncommon and Rare Headache Disorders.

    PubMed

    Evans, Randolph W

    2016-08-01

    The following 6 case studies are presented: a 12-day migraine with recurring aura?; a migraineur with a new constant headache for 1 month; an orthostatic headache; a unilateral headache; migraine with aura and limb pain without headache; and nocturnal headaches. These cases illustrate the fascinating diversity and challenges of primary and secondary headaches that neurologists commonly encounter.

  4. Case Studies of Uncommon and Rare Headache Disorders.

    PubMed

    Evans, Randolph W

    2016-08-01

    The following 6 case studies are presented: a 12-day migraine with recurring aura?; a migraineur with a new constant headache for 1 month; an orthostatic headache; a unilateral headache; migraine with aura and limb pain without headache; and nocturnal headaches. These cases illustrate the fascinating diversity and challenges of primary and secondary headaches that neurologists commonly encounter. PMID:27445245

  5. Accessing Inpatient Rehabilitation after Acute Severe Stroke: Age, Mobility, Prestroke Function and Hospital Unit Are Associated with Discharge to Inpatient Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hakkennes, Sharon; Hill, Keith D.; Brock, Kim; Bernhardt, Julie; Churilov, Leonid

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the variables associated with discharge to inpatient rehabilitation following acute severe stroke and to determine whether hospital unit contributed to access. Five acute hospitals in Victoria, Australia participated in this study. Patients were eligible for inclusion if they had suffered an acute severe…

  6. Serum amyloid A, procalcitonin, and C-reactive protein in early assessment of severity of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Pezzilli, R; Melzi d'Eril, G V; Morselli-Labate, A M; Merlini, G; Barakat, B; Bosoni, T

    2000-06-01

    Amyloid A (SAA) and procalcitonin (PCT) have been reported as useful indicators of inflammation. Our aim was to assess the utility of SAA and PCT in establishing the severity of acute pancreatitis in comparison to C-reactive protein (CRP): Thirty-one patients with acute pancreatitis enrolled within 24 hr from the onset of pain and 31 healthy subjects were studied. Nineteen patients had mild acute pancreatitis, and 12 had severe pancreatitis. Serum SAA, PCT, and CRP were measured in all subjects at admission and, in acute pancreatitis patients, during the following five days. Patients with acute pancreatitis had serum concentrations of SAA, PCT, and CRP significantly higher (P < 0.001) than those of healthy subjects during the entire study period. Using cutoff values ranging from 240 to 250 mg/liter for SAA, from 0.252 to 0.255 ng/ml for PCT, and from 12.8 to 12.9 mg/dl for CRP, the sensitivity (calculated on patients with severe pancreatitis), the specificity (calculated on patients with mild pancreatitis), and the efficiency (calculated as the percentage of correct classifications) were 76.8%, 69.3%, and 72.4% for SAA; 21.7%, 83.2%, and 58.2% for PCT; and 60.9%, 89.1%, and 77.6% for CRP. In conclusion, the sensitivity of SAA is significantly higher than that of PCT and CRP in assessing the severity of pancreatitis, whereas PCT and CRP had a specificity significantly higher than SAA. The accuracy and efficiency were similar for SAA and CRP, and both these markers had an accuracy and efficiency significantly higher than those of PCT.

  7. Predictors of Severe Acute and Late Toxicities in Patients With Localized Head-and-Neck Cancer Treated With Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Francois; Fortin, Andre; Wang, Chang Shu; Liu, Geoffrey

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) causes acute and late toxicities that affect various organs and functions. In a large cohort of patients treated with RT for localized head and neck cancer (HNC), we prospectively assessed the occurrence of RT-induced acute and late toxicities and identified characteristics that predicted these toxicities. Methods and Materials: We conducted a randomized trial among 540 patients treated with RT for localized HNC to assess whether vitamin E supplementation could improve disease outcomes. Adverse effects of RT were assessed using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Acute Radiation Morbidity Criteria during RT and one month after RT, and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Scheme at six and 12 months after RT. The most severe adverse effect among the organs/tissues was selected as an overall measure of either acute or late toxicity. Grade 3 and 4 toxicities were considered as severe. Stepwise multivariate logistic regression models were used to identify all independent predictors (p < 0.05) of acute or late toxicity and to estimate odds ratios (OR) for severe toxicity with their 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: Grade 3 or 4 toxicity was observed in 23% and 4% of patients, respectively, for acute and late toxicity. Four independent predictors of severe acute toxicity were identified: sex (female vs. male: OR = 1.72, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.06-2.80), Karnofsky Performance Status (OR = 0.67 for a 10-point increment, 95% CI: 0.52-0.88), body mass index (above 25 vs. below: OR = 1.88, 95% CI: 1.22-2.90), TNM stage (Stage II vs. I: OR = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.25-2.92). Two independent predictors were found for severe late toxicity: female sex (OR = 3.96, 95% CI: 1.41-11.08) and weight loss during RT (OR = 1.26 for a 1 kg increment, 95% CI: 1.12-1.41). Conclusions: Knowledge of these predictors easily collected in a clinical setting could help

  8. Chronic daily headache in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Özge, Aynur

    2013-12-01

    Disabling headache disorders are ubiquitous in all age groups, including the elderly, yet they are under-recognized, underdiagnosed and undertreated worldwide. Surveys and clinic-based research reports on headache disorders in elderly populations are extremely limited in number. Chronic daily headache (CDH) is an important and growing subtype of primary headache disorders, associated with increased burden and disruption to quality of life. CDH can be divided into two forms, based on headache duration. Common forms of primary headache disorders of long duration (>4 hours) were comprehensively defined in the third edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-3 beta). These include chronic migraine, chronic tension-type headache, new daily persistent headache, and hemicrania continua. Rarer short-duration (<4 hours) forms of CDH are chronic cluster headache, chronic paroxysmal hemicrania, SUNCT, and hypnic headache. Accurate diagnosis, management, and relief of the burden of CDH in the elderly population present numerous unique challenges as the "aging world" continues to grow. In order to implement appropriate coping strategies for the elderly, it is essential to establish the correct diagnosis at each step and to exercise caution in differentiating from secondary causes, while always taking into consideration the unique needs and limitations of the aged body.

  9. Headache and ADHD in Pediatric Age: Possible Physiopathological Links.

    PubMed

    Paolino, Maria Chiara; Ferretti, Alessandro; Villa, Maria Pia; Parisi, Pasquale

    2015-07-01

    Primary headache and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are common disorders in children and adolescences, frequently associated to severe cognitive, emotional, and behavioral impairments. They both are a disabling condition with consequences on family and child's quality of life. Literature data on their association are contrasting. Dopaminergic system dysfunction, brain iron deficiency, and sleep disturbance should be considered to better understand headache and ADHD overlap. In this review, we analyze the complex association between these two diseases and the potential impact on child neurodevelopment. PMID:26049768

  10. Post-Lumbar Puncture Headache Etiology and Management

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, John R.; Raymond, Patrick A.

    1988-01-01

    Headache following a lumbar puncture is a common and often debilitating syndrome. Continued leakage of cerebrospinal fluid from a puncture site decreases intracranial pressure, which leads to traction on pain-sensitive intracranial structures. The headache is characteristically postural, often associated with nausea and optic, vestibular, or otic symptoms. Although usually self-limited after a few days, severe postural pain can incapacitate the patient. Management is mainly symptomatic, but definitive treatment with the epidural blood patching technique is safe and effective when done by an expert operator. PMID:3176458

  11. [Coaxil treatment of primary headaches comorbid with depression].

    PubMed

    Vorob'eva, O V; Shavlovskaia, O A

    2005-01-01

    Twenty patients with headaches and concomitant mild depression (the Beck scale mean score 13,6), aged 20-62 years (mean 40,3), illness duration 0,5-40 years, (mean 17,7), attack frequency 3-30 days, (mean 13,4), have been studied. Coaxil was prescribed in dosage of 12,5 mg daily during 6 weeks. Neurological examination and clinical evaluation using a number of scales, along with patients self-rating, was conducted. Twenty one patients have completed the treatment course. Coaxil therapy resulted in significant decrease of frequency and severity of headache attacks and improvement of the patient's general state.

  12. The impact of physical therapy in patients with severe traumatic brain injury during acute and post-acute rehabilitation according to coma duration.

    PubMed

    Lendraitienė, Eglė; Petruševičienė, Daiva; Savickas, Raimondas; Žemaitienė, Ieva; Mingaila, Sigitas

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] The aim of study was to evaluate the impact of physical therapy on the recovery of motor and mental status in patients who sustained a severe traumatic brain injury, according to coma duration in acute and post-acute rehabilitation. [Subjects and Methods] The study population comprised patients with levels of consciousness ranging from 3 to 8 according to Glasgow Coma Scale score. The patients were divided into 2 groups based on coma duration as follows: group 1, those who were in a coma up to 1 week, and group 2, those who were in a coma for more than 2 weeks. The recovery of the patients' motor function was evaluated according to the Motor Assessment Scale and the recovery of mental status according to the Mini-Mental State Examination. [Results] The evaluation of motor and mental status recovery revealed that the patients who were in a coma up to 1 week recovered significantly better after physical therapy during the acute rehabilitation than those who were in a coma for longer than 2 weeks. [Conclusion] The recovery of motor and mental status of the patients in acute rehabilitation was significantly better for those in a coma for a shorter period.

  13. The impact of physical therapy in patients with severe traumatic brain injury during acute and post-acute rehabilitation according to coma duration.

    PubMed

    Lendraitienė, Eglė; Petruševičienė, Daiva; Savickas, Raimondas; Žemaitienė, Ieva; Mingaila, Sigitas

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] The aim of study was to evaluate the impact of physical therapy on the recovery of motor and mental status in patients who sustained a severe traumatic brain injury, according to coma duration in acute and post-acute rehabilitation. [Subjects and Methods] The study population comprised patients with levels of consciousness ranging from 3 to 8 according to Glasgow Coma Scale score. The patients were divided into 2 groups based on coma duration as follows: group 1, those who were in a coma up to 1 week, and group 2, those who were in a coma for more than 2 weeks. The recovery of the patients' motor function was evaluated according to the Motor Assessment Scale and the recovery of mental status according to the Mini-Mental State Examination. [Results] The evaluation of motor and mental status recovery revealed that the patients who were in a coma up to 1 week recovered significantly better after physical therapy during the acute rehabilitation than those who were in a coma for longer than 2 weeks. [Conclusion] The recovery of motor and mental status of the patients in acute rehabilitation was significantly better for those in a coma for a shorter period. PMID:27512262

  14. The impact of physical therapy in patients with severe traumatic brain injury during acute and post-acute rehabilitation according to coma duration

    PubMed Central

    Lendraitienė, Eglė; Petruševičienė, Daiva; Savickas, Raimondas; Žemaitienė, Ieva; Mingaila, Sigitas

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of study was to evaluate the impact of physical therapy on the recovery of motor and mental status in patients who sustained a severe traumatic brain injury, according to coma duration in acute and post-acute rehabilitation. [Subjects and Methods] The study population comprised patients with levels of consciousness ranging from 3 to 8 according to Glasgow Coma Scale score. The patients were divided into 2 groups based on coma duration as follows: group 1, those who were in a coma up to 1 week, and group 2, those who were in a coma for more than 2 weeks. The recovery of the patients’ motor function was evaluated according to the Motor Assessment Scale and the recovery of mental status according to the Mini-Mental State Examination. [Results] The evaluation of motor and mental status recovery revealed that the patients who were in a coma up to 1 week recovered significantly better after physical therapy during the acute rehabilitation than those who were in a coma for longer than 2 weeks. [Conclusion] The recovery of motor and mental status of the patients in acute rehabilitation was significantly better for those in a coma for a shorter period. PMID:27512262

  15. Interleukin-22 ameliorates acute severe pancreatitis-associated lung injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Ying-Ying; Liu, Xiao-Qin; Xu, Chang-Qin; Zhang, Zheng; Xu, Hong-Wei

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the potential protective effect of exogenous recombinant interleukin-22 (rIL-22) on L-arginine-induced acute severe pancreatitis (SAP)-associated lung injury and the possible signaling pathway involved. METHODS: Balb/c mice were injected intraperitoneally with L-arginine to induce SAP. Recombinant mouse IL-22 was then administered subcutaneously to mice. Serum amylase levels and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in the lung tissue were measured after the L-arginine administration. Histopathology of the pancreas and lung was evaluated by hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining. Expression of B cell lymphoma/leukemia-2 (Bcl-2), Bcl-xL and IL-22RA1 mRNAs in the lung tissue was detected by real-time PCR. Expression and phosphorylation of STAT3 were analyzed by Western blot. RESULTS: Serum amylase levels and MPO activity in the lung tissue in the SAP group were significantly higher than those in the normal control group (P < 0.05). In addition, the animals in the SAP group showed significant pancreatic and lung injuries. The expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL mRNAs in the SAP group was decreased markedly, while the IL-22RA1 mRNA expression was increased significantly relative to the normal control group (P < 0.05). Pretreatment with PBS did not significantly affect the serum amylase levels, MPO activity or expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL or IL-22RA1 mRNA (P > 0.05). Moreover, no significant differences in the degrees of pancreatic and lung injuries were observed between the PBS and SAP groups. However, the serum amylase levels and lung tissue MPO activity in the rIL-22 group were significantly lower than those in the SAP group (P < 0.05), and the injuries in the pancreas and lung were also improved. Compared with the PBS group, rIL-22 stimulated the expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and IL-22RA1 mRNAs in the lung (P < 0.05). In addition, the ratio of p-STAT3 to STAT3 protein in the rIL-22 group was significantly higher than that in the PBS group (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION

  16. ThermoSpots to Detect Hypothermia in Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition

    PubMed Central

    Mole, Thomas B.; Kennedy, Neil; Ndoya, Noel; Emond, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Hypothermia is a risk factor for increased mortality in children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM). Yet frequent temperature measurement remains unfeasible in under-resourced units in developing countries. ThermoSpot is a continuous temperature monitoring sticker designed originally for neonates. When applied to skin, its liquid crystals are designed to turn black with hypothermia and remain green with normothermia. Aims To (i) estimate the diagnostic accuracy of ThermoSpots for detecting WHO-defined hypothermia (core temperature <35.5°C or peripheral temperature <35.0°C) in children with SAM and (ii) determine their acceptability amongst mothers. Methods Children with SAM in a malnutrition unit in Malawi were enrolled during March-July 2010. The sensitivity and specificity of ThermoSpots were calculated by comparing the device colour against ‘gold standard’ rectal temperatures taken on admission and follow up peripheral temperatures taken until discharge. Guardians completed a questionnaire to assess acceptability. Results Hypothermia was uncommon amongst the 162 children enrolled. ThermoSpot successfully detected the one rectal temperature and two peripheral temperatures recorded that met the WHO definition of hypothermia. Overall, 3/846 (0.35%) temperature measurements were in the WHO-defined hypothermia range. Interpreting the brown transition colour (between black and green) as hypothermia improved sensitivities. For milder hypothermia definitions, sensitivities declined (<35.4°C, 50.0%; <35.9°C, 39.2%). Specificity was consistently above 94%. From questionnaires, 40/43 (93%) mothers reported they were 90–100% happy with the device overall. Free-text answers revealed themes of “Skin Rashes”, “User-satisfaction” and “Empowerment". Conclusion Although hypothermia was uncommon in this study, ThermoSpots successfully detected these episodes in malnourished children and were acceptable to mothers. Research in settings where

  17. Do Children with Uncomplicated Severe Acute Malnutrition Need Antibiotics? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Alcoba, Gabriel; Kerac, Marko; Breysse, Serge; Salpeteur, Cécile; Galetto-Lacour, Annick; Briend, André; Gervaix, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Background Current (1999) World Health Organization guidelines recommend giving routine antibiotics (AB) for all children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM), even if they have uncomplicated disease with no clinically obvious infections. We examined the evidence behind this recommendation. Methods and Findings OVID-MEDLINE, EMBASE, COCHRANE, GLOBAL-HEALTH, CINAHL, POPLINE, AFRICA-WIDE-NiPAD, and LILACS were searched for AB efficacy, bacterial resistance, and infection rates in SAM. Following PRISMA guidelines, a systematic review and meta-analysis were performed. Three randomised controlled trials (RCT), five Cochrane reviews, and 37 observational studies were identified. One cohort-study showed no increase in nutritional-cure and mortality in uncomplicated SAM where no AB were used. (p>0.05). However, an unpublished RCT in this setting did show mortality benefits. Another RCT did not show superiority of ceftriaxone over amoxicilllin for these same outcomes, but adressed SAM children with and without complications (p = 0.27). Another RCT showed no difference between amoxicillin and cotrimoxazole efficacies for pneumonia in underweight, but not SAM. Our meta-analysis of 12 pooled susceptibility-studies for all types of bacterial isolates, including 2767 stricly SAM children, favoured amoxicillin over cotrimoxazole for susceptibility medians: 42% (IQR 27–55%) vs 22% (IQR 17–23%) and population-weighted-means 52.9% (range 23–57%) vs 35.4% (range 6.7–42%). Susceptibilities to second-line AB were better, above 80%. Prevalence of serious infections in SAM, pooled from 24 studies, ranged from 17% to 35.2%. No study infered any association of infection prevalence with AB regimens in SAM. Conclusions The evidence underlying current antibiotic recommendations for uncomplicated SAM is weak. Susceptibility-studies favour amoxicillin over cotrimoxazole. However, given that these antibiotics have side-effects, costs, and risks as well as benefits, their routine use

  18. Complete renal recovery from severe acute renal failure after thrombolysis of bilateral renal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Ramadoss, Suresh; Jones, Robert G; Foggensteiner, Lukas; Willis, Andrew P; Duddy, Martin J

    2012-10-01

    A previously healthy young man presented with acute renal failure due to extensive spontaneous deep vein thrombosis, including the inferior vena cava (IVC) and both renal veins. The patient was treated with selectively delivered thrombolytic therapy over a 7-day-period, which resulted in renal vein patency and complete recovery of renal function. A stent was placed over a segment stenosis of the IVC. No thrombophilic factors were identified. Bilateral renal vein thrombosis in young fit individuals is an unusual cause of acute renal failure. Thrombolytic therapy, even with delay, can completely restore renal function.

  19. A Case of Idiopathic Severe Acute Pancreatitis following Cesarean Section Delivery.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung; Choi, Jin Ho; Shin, Bang Sup; Nam, Joon Yeul; Kang, Eun Ae; Kim, Joo Seong; Hwang, Jin Hyeok; Kim, Jaihwan

    2016-09-25

    Acute pancreatitis rarely occurs in the postpartum period. Furthermore, there are very few reports of it after cesarean section delivery. A 35-year-old woman presented with dyspnea and abdominal distension on the third day after cesarean section delivery. Under a suspicion of acute pancreatitis, she was initially managed with conservative treatment. However, she developed intra-abdominal fluid collections and gastric bleeding, which were managed with percutaneous drainage, endoscopic hemostasis, and angiographic embolization. She was discharged with good clinical recovery. Postpartum pancreatitis, especially after cesarean section, is rare; however, its management is not different from that for usual pancreatitis. PMID:27646587

  20. [Importance of the case of coronavirus-associated severe acute respiratory syndrome detected in Hungary in 2005].

    PubMed

    Rókusz, László; Jankovics, István; Jankovics, Máté; Sarkadi, Júlia; Visontai, Ildikó

    2013-11-24

    Ten years have elapsed since the severe acute respiratory syndrome outbreak, which resulted in more than 8000 cases worldwide with more than 700 deaths. Recently, a new coronavirus, the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus emerged, causing serious respiratory cases and death. By the end of August 2013, 108 cases including 50 deaths were reported. The authors discuss a coronavirus-associated severe acute respiratory syndrome, which was detected in Hungary in 2005 and highlight its significance in 2013. In 2005 the patient was hospitalized and all relevant clinical and microbiological tests were performed. Based on the IgG antibody positivity of the serum samples, the patient was diagnosed as having severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection in the past. The time and source of the infection remained unknown. The condition of the patient improved and he was discharged from the hospital. The case raises the possibility of infections in Hungary imported from remote areas of the world and the importance of thorough examination of patients with severe respiratory syndrome with unknown etiology.

  1. Social problem-solving, perceived stress, depression and life-satisfaction in patients suffering from tension type and migraine headaches.

    PubMed

    Eskin, Mehmet; Akyol, Ali; Çelik, Emine Yilmaz; Gültekin, Bülent Kadri

    2013-08-01

    This study aimed at investigating social problem solving, perceived stress, depression, and life-satisfaction in patients with tension type and migraine headaches. Forty-nine migraine and 42 tension type headache patients (n = 91) consenting to participate were compared to a total of 49 matched healthy control group. Participants filled in a questionnaire consisting self-report measures of problem solving, perceived stress, depression and life satisfaction. They were also asked about headache duration, frequency, pain severity, psychiatric treatment and sense of control in one's life. T-tests, chi-square, analysis of variance, logistic regression analysis and Pearson product moment correlation coefficient procedures were used to analyze the data. Tension type headache patients reported having had more frequent headaches than the migraine patients but migraine patients reported having had more intense pain than the tension type headache patients. Instances of psychiatric treatment were more common among tension type headache patients than the migraine and the control group. Compared to the healthy controls, headache patients displayed a deficiency in problem solving, higher levels of perceived stress and depression. Levels of problem solving skills in headache patients were related inversely to depression, perceived stress and the number of negative life events but problem solving skills of headache patients was related positively to life-satisfaction. The findings from this study suggested that cognitive behavioral problem solving therapy or training might be a viable option for reducing levels of stress and depression, and to increase life-satisfaction in patients suffering from primary headache.

  2. Brief communication: Legionnaire's disease successfully treated in acute myelocytic leukemia during severe neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, T H; Mahizhnan, P

    1983-01-01

    A patient with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia developed progressive lung infiltrates and unremitting fevers during a profound neutropenic state. Legionnaire's disease was diagnosed by simple immunologic studies and successfully treated with erythromycin. This index case alerts physicians toward a treatable infection which would not normally be susceptible to the empiric antibiotic regimens given neutropenic patients with fevers.

  3. The prevalence of migraine and tension-type headache among schoolchildren in Kayseri, Turkey: an evaluation of sensitivity and specificity using multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Poyrazoğlu, Hatice Gamze; Kumandas, Sefer; Canpolat, Mehmet; Gümüs, Hakan; Elmali, Ferhan; Kara, Ahu; Per, Hüseyin

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to determine the prevalence as well as psychosocial and demographic features of migraine and tension-type headache among school children between the ages of 7 and 17, and using the International Classification of Headache Disorders II. The study was conducted during the questionnaire phase and the interview phase. The prevalence of recurrent headache was 47.5%, whereas that of primary recurrent headache was 21%. The estimated prevalence rates of migraine and tension-type headache were 7.2% and 7.8%, respectively. Unilateral headache, throbbing-type headache, severe headache, and the severity of the headache with physical activity were specific for migraine. Headache was significantly higher in first-degree relatives of the children with migraine compared to the children with tension-type headache (P < .0001). We determined the prevalence rates of migraine and tension-type headache and revealed the characteristics as well as the psychosocial and demographic features of migraine and tension-type headache. Sensitivity, specificity, and multivariate analysis were also evaluated.

  4. Prevalence of Chronic Headache in Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Vuković-Cvetković, Vlasta; Lovrenčić-Huzjan, Arijana

    2013-01-01

    Background. Chronic headache describes the presence of headache for >15 days per month on average for >3 months and fulfills the rest of the IHS criteria. The prevalence of chronic headache is within the range of 0.5–7.3% worldwide. The aim of this study was to determine the 1-year prevalence of chronic headache in adult Croatian population. Methods. The data were collected from a cross-sectional survey of an adult population (>18 years of age) sample. Randomly selected patients from the general population in four Croatian cities were asked to fulfill a self-completed questionnaire. The prevalence of chronic headache was calculated in the sample representing 3 383 769 Croatian adults. Results. The total sample included 1542 responders among which 616 were with headache. The 1-year prevalence of chronic headache was 2.4%, and 0.9% of responders declared having headache 30 days per month. According to these results, 81 192 adult inhabitants in Croatia suffer from chronic headache. Conclusions. The prevalence of chronic headache in Croatia is comparable to other countries worldwide. These patients require special attention and should be offered multidisciplinary medical support. PMID:24078925

  5. Psilocybin dose-dependently causes delayed, transient headaches in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Matthew W.; Sewell, R. Andrew; Griffiths, Roland R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Psilocybin is a well-characterized classic hallucinogen (psychedelic) with a long history of religious use by indigenous cultures, and nonmedical use in modern societies. Although psilocybin is structurally related to migraine medications, and case studies suggest that psilocybin may be efficacious in treatment of cluster headache, little is known about the relationship between psilocybin and headache. Methods This double-blind study examined a broad range of psilocybin doses (0, 5, 10, 20, and 30 mg/70 kg) on headache in 18 healthy participants. Results Psilocybin frequently caused headache, the incidence, duration, and severity of which increased in a dose-dependent manner. All headaches had delayed onset, were transient, and lasted no more than a day after psilocybin administration. Conclusions Possible mechanisms for these observations are discussed, and include induction of delayed headache through nitric oxide release. These data suggest that headache is an adverse event to be expected with the nonmedical use of psilocybin-containing mushrooms as well as the administration of psilocybin in human research. Headaches were neither severe nor disabling, and should not present a barrier to future psilocybin research. PMID:22129843

  6. Neuroprotective effects of bloodletting at Jing points combined with mild induced hypothermia in acute severe traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Yue; Miao, Xiao-mei; Yi, Tai-long; Chen, Xu-yi; Sun, Hong-tao; Cheng, Shi-xiang; Zhang, Sai

    2016-01-01

    Bloodletting at Jing points has been used to treat coma in traditional Chinese medicine. Mild induced hypothermia has also been shown to have neuroprotective effects. However, the therapeutic effects of bloodletting at Jing points and mild induced hypothermia alone are limited. Therefore, we investigated whether combined treatment might have clinical effectiveness for the treatment of acute severe traumatic brain injury. Using a rat model of traumatic brain injury, combined treatment substantially alleviated cerebral edema and blood-brain barrier dysfunction. Furthermore, neurological function was ameliorated, and cellular necrosis and the inflammatory response were lessened. These findings suggest that the combined effects of bloodletting at Jing points (20 μL, twice a day, for 2 days) and mild induced hypothermia (6 hours) are better than their individual effects alone. Their combined application may have marked neuroprotective effects in the clinical treatment of acute severe traumatic brain injury. PMID:27482221

  7. Association of Matrix Metalloproteinases -7, -8 and -9 and TIMP -1 with Disease Severity in Acute Pancreatitis. A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Nukarinen, Eija; Lindström, Outi; Kuuliala, Krista; Kylänpää, Leena; Pettilä, Ville; Puolakkainen, Pauli; Kuuliala, Antti; Hämäläinen, Mari; Moilanen, Eeva; Repo, Heikki; Hästbacka, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Several biomarkers for early detection of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) have been presented. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) and their tissue inhibitors (TIMP) are released early in inflammation. We aimed to assess levels of MMP-7, -8, -9 and TIMP-1 in acute pancreatitis (AP) and explore their ability to detect disease severity. Our second aim was to find an association between MMPs, TIMP and creatinine. Methods We collected plasma samples for MMP-7, -8, -9 and TIMP-1 analyses from 176 patients presenting within 96 h from onset of acute pancreatitis (AP) symptoms. We used samples from 32 control subjects as comparison. The revised Atlanta Classification was utilised to assess severity of disease. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis and Spearman´s Rho-test were utilised for statistical calculations. Results Compared with controls, patients showed higher levels of all studied markers. MMP-8 was higher in moderately severe AP than in mild AP (p = 0.005) and MMP-8, -9 and TIMP-1 were higher in severe than in mild AP (p<0.001, p = 0.005 and p = 0.019). MMP-8 detected SAP with an AUC of 0.939 [95% CI 0.894–0.984], LR+ 9.03 [5.30–15.39]. MMP-8, -9 and TIMP-1 failed to discern moderately severe AP from SAP. MMP-7 was not different between patient groups. MMP-7 and TIMP-1 correlated weakly with creatinine (Rho = 0.221 and 0.243). MMP-8 might be a useful biomarker in early detection of SAP. PMID:27561093

  8. Natural history of premacular hemorrhage due to severe acute anemia: clinical and anatomical features in two untreated patients.

    PubMed

    Turco, Claudia Del; La Spina, Carlo; Mantovani, Elena; Gagliardi, Marco; Lattanzio, Rosangela; Pierro, Luisa

    2014-01-01

    Premacular retrohyaloid hemorrhage is a rare complication of acute severe anemia. The authors report two cases of premacular hemorrhage in which no treatment other than clinical and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography observation was performed. The natural history of this condition reveals that complete clinical resolution is not accompanied by full anatomical restoration. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2014;45:E5-E7.]. PMID:24496165

  9. How Healthcare Provider Talk with Parents of Children Following Severe Traumatic Brain Injury is Perceived in Early Acute Care

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Teresa A.; Grant, Gerald; Philipsen, Gerry

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare provider talk with parents in early acute care following children’s severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) affects parents’ orientations to these locales, but this connection has been minimally studied. This lack of attention to this topic in previous research may reflect providers’ and researchers’ views that these locales are generally neutral or supportive to parents’ subsequent needs. This secondary analysis used data from a larger descriptive phenomenological study (2005 – 2007) with parents of children following moderate to severe TBI recruited from across the United States. Parents of children with severe TBI consistently had strong negative responses to the early acute care talk processes they experienced with providers, while parents of children with moderate TBI did not. Transcript data were independently coded using discourse analysis in the framework of ethnography of speaking. The purpose was to understand the linguistic and paralinguistic talk factors parents used in their meta-communications that could give a preliminary understanding of their cultural expectations for early acute care talk in these settings. Final participants included 27 parents of children with severe TBI from 23 families. We found the human constructed talk factors that parents reacted to were: a) access to the child, which is where information was; b) regular discussions with key personnel; c) updated information that is explained; d) differing expectations for talk in this context; and, e) perceived parental involvement in decisions. We found that the organization and nature of providers’ talk with parents was perceived by parents to positively or negatively shape their early acute care identities in these locales, which influenced how they viewed these locales as places that either supported them and decreased their workload or discounted them and increased their workload for getting what they needed. PMID:23746606

  10. Chronic migraine headache prevention with noninvasive vagus nerve stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Calhoun, Anne H.; Lipton, Richard B.; Grosberg, Brian M.; Cady, Roger K.; Dorlas, Stefanie; Simmons, Kristy A.; Mullin, Chris; Liebler, Eric J.; Goadsby, Peter J.; Saper, Joel R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility, safety, and tolerability of noninvasive vagus nerve stimulation (nVNS) for the prevention of chronic migraine (CM) attacks. Methods: In this first prospective, multicenter, double-blind, sham-controlled pilot study of nVNS in CM prophylaxis, adults with CM (≥15 headache d/mo) entered the baseline phase (1 month) and were subsequently randomized to nVNS or sham treatment (2 months) before receiving open-label nVNS treatment (6 months). The primary endpoints were safety and tolerability. Efficacy endpoints in the intent-to-treat population included change in the number of headache days per 28 days and acute medication use. Results: Fifty-nine participants (mean age, 39.2 years; mean headache frequency, 21.5 d/mo) were enrolled. During the randomized phase, tolerability was similar for nVNS (n = 30) and sham treatment (n = 29). Most adverse events were mild/moderate and transient. Mean changes in the number of headache days were −1.4 (nVNS) and −0.2 (sham) (Δ = 1.2; p = 0.56). Twenty-seven participants completed the open-label phase. For the 15 completers initially assigned to nVNS, the mean change from baseline in headache days after 8 months of treatment was −7.9 (95% confidence interval −11.9 to −3.8; p < 0.01). Conclusions: Therapy with nVNS was well-tolerated with no safety issues. Persistent prophylactic use may reduce the number of headache days in CM; larger sham-controlled studies are needed. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01667250. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class II evidence that for patients with CM, nVNS is safe, is well-tolerated, and did not significantly change the number of headache days. This pilot study lacked the precision to exclude important safety issues or benefits of nVNS. PMID:27412146

  11. Inhibition of pulmonary nuclear factor kappa-B decreases the severity of acute Escherichia coli pneumonia but worsens prolonged pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Nuclear factor (NF)-κB is central to the pathogenesis of inflammation in acute lung injury, but also to inflammation resolution and repair. We wished to determine whether overexpression of the NF-κB inhibitor IκBα could modulate the severity of acute and prolonged pneumonia-induced lung injury in a series of prospective randomized animal studies. Methods Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to undergo intratracheal instillation of (a) 5 × 109 adenoassociated virus (AAV) vectors encoding the IκBα transgene (5 × 109 AAV-IκBα); (b) 1 × 1010 AAV-IκBα; (c) 5 × 1010 AAV-IκBα; or (d) vehicle alone. After intratracheal inoculation with Escherichia coli, the severity of the lung injury was measured in one series over a 4-hour period (acute pneumonia), and in a second series after 72 hours (prolonged pneumonia). Additional experiments examined the effects of IκBα and null-gene overexpression on E. coli-induced and sham pneumonia. Results In acute pneumonia, IκBα dose-dependently decreased lung injury, improving arterial oxygenation and lung static compliance, reducing alveolar protein leak and histologic injury, and decreasing alveolar IL-1β concentrations. Benefit was maximal at the intermediate (1 × 1010) IκBα vector dose; however, efficacy was diminished at the higher (5 × 1010) IκBα vector dose. In contrast, IκBα worsened prolonged pneumonia-induced lung injury, increased lung bacterial load, decreased lung compliance, and delayed resolution of the acute inflammatory response. Conclusions Inhibition of pulmonary NF-κB activity reduces early pneumonia-induced injury, but worsens injury and bacterial load during prolonged pneumonia. PMID:23622108

  12. Human resistin promotes neutrophil proinflammatory activation and neutrophil extracellular trap formation and increases severity of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shaoning; Park, Dae Won; Tadie, Jean-Marc; Gregoire, Murielle; Deshane, Jessy; Pittet, Jean Francois; Abraham, Edward; Zmijewski, Jaroslaw W

    2014-05-15

    Although resistin was recently found to modulate insulin resistance in preclinical models of type II diabetes and obesity, recent studies also suggested that resistin has proinflammatory properties. We examined whether the human-specific variant of resistin affects neutrophil activation and the severity of LPS-induced acute lung injury. Because human and mouse resistin have distinct patterns of tissue distribution, experiments were performed using humanized resistin mice that exclusively express human resistin (hRTN(+/-)(/-)) but are deficient in mouse resistin. Enhanced production of TNF-α or MIP-2 was found in LPS-treated hRtn(+/-/-) neutrophils compared with control Rtn(-/-/-) neutrophils. Expression of human resistin inhibited the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase, a major sensor and regulator of cellular bioenergetics that also is implicated in inhibiting inflammatory activity of neutrophils and macrophages. In addition to the ability of resistin to sensitize neutrophils to LPS stimulation, human resistin enhanced neutrophil extracellular trap formation. In LPS-induced acute lung injury, humanized resistin mice demonstrated enhanced production of proinflammatory cytokines, more severe pulmonary edema, increased neutrophil extracellular trap formation, and elevated concentration of the alarmins HMGB1 and histone 3 in the lungs. Our results suggest that human resistin may play an important contributory role in enhancing TLR4-induced inflammatory responses, and it may be a target for future therapies aimed at reducing the severity of acute lung injury and other inflammatory situations in which neutrophils play a major role.

  13. Cervicogenic headache alleviation after cervical coblation nucleoplasty: A prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    He, Liangliang; Yue, Jianning; Yang, Liqiang; Wu, Baishan; Cao, Guoqing; Guo, Yuna; Lai, Guanghui; Tang, Yuanzhang; Ni, Jiaxiang

    2016-09-01

    A degenerative cervical disc is a pain generator for headaches, and headaches can benefit from cervical prolapse surgery. However, as an alternative intervention for open cervical surgery, no study has reported whether headaches can benefit from cervical nucleoplasty.The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of cervical coblation nucleoplasty in the treatment of cervicogenic headaches.In a prospective cohort study performed between December 2013 and August 2015, 20 patients with cervicogenic headaches undergoing cervical nucleoplasty for shoulder-arm pain were recruited into group C, and 20 patients with cervicogenic headaches undergoing lumbar nucleoplasty for low back pain, matched for age and sex, were recruited into group L. Cervicogenic pain was diagnosed according to the International Headache Society criteria. During the 24-month follow-up, pain visual analog scale (VAS) scores were collected as the primary outcomes, and significant pain relief rate, Neck Disability Index (NDI) headache scores, and Patients Satisfaction Index (PSI) scores were recorded as secondary outcomes to evaluate headache severity and physical function postoperatively.During the 24-month follow-up, a significant decrease in headache VAS scores was observed in group C but not in group L. NDI and PSI scores in group C were better than those in group L. In comparison with the final follow-up, no significant differences in the NDI and PSI scores were found in all observations after surgery. In comparison to group L, ≥50% pain relief was significantly better in group C. No serious complications were observed except for ≤20% of ecchymoma at the needle insertion site.This prospective study indicated that cervicogenic headaches may benefit from nucleoplasty.

  14. Cervicogenic headache alleviation after cervical coblation nucleoplasty: A prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    He, Liangliang; Yue, Jianning; Yang, Liqiang; Wu, Baishan; Cao, Guoqing; Guo, Yuna; Lai, Guanghui; Tang, Yuanzhang; Ni, Jiaxiang

    2016-09-01

    A degenerative cervical disc is a pain generator for headaches, and headaches can benefit from cervical prolapse surgery. However, as an alternative intervention for open cervical surgery, no study has reported whether headaches can benefit from cervical nucleoplasty.The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of cervical coblation nucleoplasty in the treatment of cervicogenic headaches.In a prospective cohort study performed between December 2013 and August 2015, 20 patients with cervicogenic headaches undergoing cervical nucleoplasty for shoulder-arm pain were recruited into group C, and 20 patients with cervicogenic headaches undergoing lumbar nucleoplasty for low back pain, matched for age and sex, were recruited into group L. Cervicogenic pain was diagnosed according to the International Headache Society criteria. During the 24-month follow-up, pain visual analog scale (VAS) scores were collected as the primary outcomes, and significant pain relief rate, Neck Disability Index (NDI) headache scores, and Patients Satisfaction Index (PSI) scores were recorded as secondary outcomes to evaluate headache severity and physical function postoperatively.During the 24-month follow-up, a significant decrease in headache VAS scores was observed in group C but not in group L. NDI and PSI scores in group C were better than those in group L. In comparison with the final follow-up, no significant differences in the NDI and PSI scores were found in all observations after surgery. In comparison to group L, ≥50% pain relief was significantly better in group C. No serious complications were observed except for ≤20% of ecchymoma at the needle insertion site.This prospective study indicated that cervicogenic headaches may benefit from nucleoplasty. PMID:27684803

  15. Extended-release morphine sulfate in treatment of severe acute and chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Balch, Robert J; Trescot, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Morphine is the archetypal opioid analgesic. Because it is a short-acting opioid, its use has been limited to the management of acute pain. The development of extended-release formulations have resulted in the increased utilization of morphine in chronic pain conditions. This review documents the history of morphine use in pain treatment, and describes the metabolism, pharmacodynamics, formulations, and efficacy of the currently available extended-release morphine medications. PMID:21197323

  16. Adenovirus type 7 associated with severe and fatal acute lower respiratory infections in Argentine children

    PubMed Central

    Carballal, Guadalupe; Videla, Cristina; Misirlian, Alicia; Requeijo, Paula V; Aguilar, María del Carmen

    2002-01-01

    Background Adenoviruses are the second most prevalent cause of acute lower respiratory infection of viral origin in children under four years of age in Buenos Aires, Argentina. The purpose of this study was to analyze the clinical features and outcome of acute lower respiratory infection associated with different adenovirus genotypes in children. Methods Twenty-four cases of acute lower respiratory infection and adenovirus diagnosis reported in a pediatric unit during a two-year period were retrospectively reviewed. Adenovirus was detected by antigen detection and isolation in HEp-2 cells. Adenovirus DNA from 17 isolates was studied by restriction enzyme analysis with Bam HI and Sma I. Results Subgenus b was found in 82.3% of the cases, and subgenus c in 17.7%. Within subgenus b, only genotype 7 was detected, with genomic variant 7h in 85.7% (12/14) and genomic variant 7i in 14.3% (2/14). Mean age was 8.8 ±; 6 months, and male to female ratio was 3.8: 1. At admission, pneumonia was observed in 71% of the cases and bronchiolitis in 29%. Malnutrition occurred in 37% of the cases; tachypnea in 79%; chest indrawing in 66%; wheezing in 58%; apneas in 16%; and conjunctivitis in 29%. Blood cultures for bacteria and antigen detection of other respiratory viruses were negative. During hospitalization, fatality rate was 16.7% (4 /24). Of the patients who died, three had Ad 7h and one Ad 7i. Thus, fatality rate for adenovirus type 7 reached 28.6% (4/14). Conclusions These results show the predominance of adenovirus 7 and high lethality associated with the genomic variants 7h and 7i in children hospitalized with acute lower respiratory infection. PMID:12184818

  17. Current Approaches to Neuromodulation in Primary Headaches: Focus on Vagal Nerve and Sphenopalatine Ganglion Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Puledda, Francesca; Goadsby, Peter J

    2016-07-01

    Neuromodulation is a promising, novel approach for the treatment of primary headache disorders. Neuromodulation offers a new dimension in the treatment that is both easily reversible and tends to be very well tolerated. The autonomic nervous system is a logical target given the neurobiology of common primary headache disorders, such as migraine and the trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs). This article will review new encouraging results of studies from the most recent literature on neuromodulation as acute and preventive treatment in primary headache disorders, and cover some possible underlying mechanisms. We will especially focus on vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) and sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) since they have targeted autonomic pathways that are cranial and can modulate relevant pathophysiological mechanisms. The initial data suggests these approaches will find an important role in headache disorder management going forward.

  18. Analysis of Internet sites for headache.

    PubMed

    Peroutka, S J

    2001-02-01

    The Internet is capable of providing an unprecedented amount of information to both physicians and patients interested in headache. To assess the status of headache information on the Internet (as of January 2000), a search for 'headache' was performed using 10 leading Internet search engines. The number of web pages identified ranged from 4419 (WebCrawler) to 506 426 (Northern Light). The 'average' search yielded nearly 150 000 web page listings for 'headache'. The content was then reviewed of the top 10 listed web pages for each search (i.e. a total of 100 page listings). The results demonstrate that, at the present time, Internet-based information on headache is extensive but poorly organized. Editorial review of this potential valuable resource is required in order to maximize its utility in headache education and management. PMID:11298659

  19. Clinical effects of laparotomy with perioperative continuous peritoneal lavage and postoperative hemofiltration in patients with severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The elevated serum and peritoneal cytokine concentrations responsible for the systemic response syndrome (SIRS) and multiorgan failure in patients with severe acute pancreatitis lead to high morbidity and mortality rates. Prompted by reports underlining the importance of reducing circulating inflammatory mediators in severe acute pancreatitis, we designed this study to evaluate the efficiency of laparotomy followed by continuous perioperative peritoneal lavage combined with postoperative continuous venovenous diahemofiltration (CVVDH) in managing critically ill patients refractory to intensive care therapy. As the major clinical outcome variables we measured morbidity, mortality and changes in the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II) score and cytokine concentrations in serum and peritoneal lavage fluid over time. Methods From a consecutive group of 23 patients hospitalized for acute pancreatitis, we studied 6 patients all with Apache II scores ≥19, who underwent emergency surgery for acute complications (5 for an abdominal compartment syndrome and 1 for septic shock) followed by continuous perioperative peritoneal lavage and postoperative CVVDH. CVVDH was started within 12 hours after surgery and maintained for at least 72 hours, until the multiorgan dysfunction syndrome improved. Samples were collected from serum, peritoneal lavage fluid and CVVDH dialysate for cytokine assay. Apache II scores were measured daily and their association with cytokine levels was assessed. Results All six patients tolerated CVVDH well, and the procedure lasted a mean 6 days (range, 3-12). Five patients survived and one died of Acinetobacter infection after surgery (mortality rate 16.6%). The mean APACHE II score was ≥ 19 (range 19-22) before laparotomy and decreased significantly during peritoneal lavage and postoperative CVVDH (P = 0.013 by matched-pairs Students t-test). The decrease in cytokine concentrations in serum and lavage fluid was

  20. Increased platelet count and leucocyte–platelet complex formation in acute symptomatic compared with asymptomatic severe carotid stenosis

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, D; Harrison, P; Mackie, I; Sidhu, P; Purdy, G; Lawrie, A; Watt, H; Machin, S; Brown, M

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The risk of stroke in patients with recently symptomatic carotid stenosis is considerably higher than in patients with asymptomatic stenosis. In the present study it was hypothesised that excessive platelet activation might partly contribute to this difference. Methods: A full blood count was done and whole blood flow cytometry used to measure platelet surface expression of CD62P, CD63, and PAC1 binding and the percentage of leucocyte–platelet complexes in patients with acute (0–21 days, n = 19) and convalescent (79–365 days) symptomatic (n = 16) and asymptomatic (n = 16) severe (⩾70%) carotid stenosis. Most patients were treated with aspirin (37.5–300 mg daily) although alternative antithrombotic regimens were more commonly used in the symptomatic group. Results: The mean platelet count was higher in patients with acute and convalescent symptomatic compared with asymptomatic carotid stenosis. There were no significant differences in the median percentage expression of CD62P and CD63, or PAC1 binding between the acute or convalescent symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. The median percentages of neutrophil–platelet (p = 0.004), monocyte–platelet (p = 0.046), and lymphocyte–platelet complexes (p = 0.02) were higher in acute symptomatic than in asymptomatic patients. In patients on aspirin monotherapy, the percentages of neutrophil–platelet and monocyte–platelet complexes (p = 0.03) were higher in acute symptomatic (n = 11) than asymptomatic patients (n = 14). In the convalescent phase, the median percentages of all leucocyte–platelet complexes in the symptomatic group dropped to levels similar to those found in the asymptomatic group. Conclusion: Increased platelet count and leucocyte–platelet complex formation may contribute to the early excess risk of stroke in patients with recently symptomatic carotid stenosis. PMID:16107361