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Sample records for acute sickle cell

  1. Managing Acute Complications Of Sickle Cell Disease In Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Sathyaseelan; Chao, Jennifer H

    2016-11-01

    Sickle cell disease is a chronic hematologic disease with a variety of acute, and often recurring, complications. Vaso-occlusive crisis, a unique but common presentation in sickle cell disease, can be challenging to manage. Acute chest syndrome is the leading cause of death in patients with sickle cell disease, occurring in more than half of patients who are hospitalized with a vaso-occlusive crisis. Uncommon diagnoses in children, such as stroke, priapism, and transient red cell aplasia, occur more frequently in patients with sickle cell disease and necessitate a degree of familiarity with the disease process and its management. Patients with sickle cell trait generally have a benign course, but are also subject to serious complications. This issue provides a current review of evidence-based management of the most common acute complications of sickle cell disease seen in pediatric patients in the emergency department.

  2. Acute soft head syndrome in children with sickle cell anaemia in lagos, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Akodu, Samuel Olufemi; Njokanma, Olisamedua Fidelis; Diaku-Akinwumi, Ijeoma Nnenna; Ubuane, Peter Odion; Adediji, Uchechukwu Okwudili

    2014-09-01

    Acute soft head syndrome is rare complications seen in children with sickle cell anaemia. A case report of a child with sickle cell anaemia who developed acute soft head syndrome. A 12-year old known sickle cell anaemia patient presented with acute, rapidly progressive skull pain and swelling, manifestations indicative of the rare complication of SCD which is called acute soft head syndrome. Conservative treatment with intravenous fluids and analgesics and empirical use of broad-spectrum antibiotics resulted in recovery. Acute soft head syndrome is a rare complication in children with sickle cell anaemia probably related to skull infarction. It further draws attention to the importance of acute soft head syndrome as a differential to be considered for pains in the head and skull swellings in children with sickle cell anaemia.

  3. Sickle Cell Trait Complicated by Acute Rhabdomyolysis in Military Personnel: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Joshua M; Wuerdeman, Marc F

    2015-08-01

    Sickle cell trait, a trait known to be protective against falciparum malaria, is prevalent in the African American community. Unlike true sickle cell disease, sickle cell trait is currently not a disqualifying condition for military service. In the case below, we describe an occurrence, from Logar Provence, Afghanistan (2,072 m above mean sea level), of exertional acute rhabdomyolysis in an American service member known to be a sickle cell trait carrier. The case serves to educate Military Medical providers and Commanders alike, to the increased risk certain training and work environments have on sickle cell trait Service members; it raises the question of what duty limitations, if any, sickle cell carriers should have.

  4. The intersection between asthma and acute chest syndrome in children with sickle-cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    DeBaun, Michael R; Strunk, Robert C

    2016-06-18

    Acute chest syndrome is a frequent cause of acute lung disease in children with sickle-cell disease. Asthma is common in children with sickle-cell disease and is associated with increased incidence of vaso-occlusive pain events, acute chest syndrome episodes, and earlier death. Risk factors for asthma exacerbation and an acute chest syndrome episode are similar, and both can present with shortness of breath, chest pain, cough, and wheezing. Despite overlapping risk factors and symptoms, an acute exacerbation of asthma or an episode of acute chest syndrome are two distinct entities that need disease-specific management strategies. Although understanding has increased about asthma as a comorbidity in sickle-cell disease and its effects on morbidity, substantial gaps remain in knowledge about best management.

  5. The intersection between asthma and acute chest syndrome in children with sickle-cell anaemia

    PubMed Central

    DeBaun, Michael R; Strunk, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    Acute chest syndrome is a frequent cause of acute lung disease in children with sickle-cell disease. Asthma is common in children with sickle-cell disease and is associated with increased incidence of vaso-occlusive pain events, acute chest syndrome episodes, and earlier death. Risk factors for asthma exacerbation and an acute chest syndrome episode are similar, and both can present with shortness of breath, chest pain, cough, and wheezing. Despite overlapping risk factors and symptoms, an acute exacerbation of asthma or an episode of acute chest syndrome are two distinct entities that need disease-specific management strategies. Although understanding has increased about asthma as a comorbidity in sickle-cell disease and its effects on morbidity, substantial gaps remain in knowledge about best management. PMID:27353685

  6. Acute clinical events in 299 homozygous sickle cell patients living in France. French Study Group on Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Neonato, M G; Guilloud-Bataille, M; Beauvais, P; Bégué, P; Belloy, M; Benkerrou, M; Ducrocq, R; Maier-Redelsperger, M; de Montalembert, M; Quinet, B; Elion, J; Feingold, J; Girot, R

    2000-09-01

    A subset of 299 patients with homozygous sickle cell anaemia, enrolled in the cohort of the French Study Group on sickle cell disease (SCD), was investigated in this study. The majority of patients were children (mean age 10.1 +/- 5.8 yr) of first generation immigrants from Western and Central Africa, the others originated from the French West Indies (20.2%). We report the frequency of the main clinical events (mean follow-up 4.2 +/- 2.2 yr). The prevalence of meningitis-septicaemia and osteomyelitis was, respectively, 11.4% and 12% acute chest syndrome was observed in 134 patients (44.8%). Twenty patients (6.7%) developed stroke with peak prevalence at 10-15 yr of age. One hundred and seventy-two patients (58%) suffered from one or more painful sickle cell crises, while the others (42.5%) never suffered from pain. The overall frequency of acute anaemic episodes was 50.5%, (acute aplastic anaemia 46%; acute splenic sequestration 26%). A group of 27 patients were asymptomatic (follow-up > 3 yr). Epistatic mechanisms influencing SCD were studied. Coinherited alpha-thalassemia strongly reduced the risk of stroke (p <0.001) and increased that of painful crises (p < 0.02). There was a low prevalence of Senegal and Bantu (CAR) betas-chromosomes in patients with meningitis (p <0.04) and osteomyelitis (p < 0.03). Prevalence of Senegal betas-chromosomes was lower in the asymptomatic group of 27 patients (p < 0.02). The patients come from a population of unmixed immigrants in whom the beta-globin gene haplotype strongly reflects the geographic origin and identifies subgroups with a homogenous genetic background. Thus the observed effects might result more from differences in as yet unidentified determinants in the genetic background than from the direct linkage with differences in the beta-globin gene locus.

  7. Effects of Patient Controlled Analgesia Hydromorphone during Acute Painful Episodes in Adolescents with Sickle Cell Disease: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Eufemia; Hockenberry, Marilyn; Mueller, Brigitta U

    2008-01-01

    The use of hydromorphone is increasing but little is known about its effects during painful episodes in adolescents with sickle cell disease. This pilot study examined the intensity, location, and quality of pain and evaluated the amount of relief and side effects from PCA hydromorphone during acute painful episodes in five adolescents with sickle cell disease. Data suggest that hydromorphone may provide a better alternative than morphine, the most commonly prescribed opioid in patients with sickle cell disease. Hydromorphone may provide improved pain control and recovery from acute painful episodes in patients with sickle cell disease.

  8. Sickle cell anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - sickle cell; Hemoglobin SS disease (Hb SS); Sickle cell disease ... Sickle cell anemia is caused by an abnormal type of hemoglobin called hemoglobin S. Hemoglobin is a protein inside red blood cells ...

  9. Original Research: Acute chest syndrome in sickle cell disease: Effect of genotype and asthma.

    PubMed

    Pahl, Kristy; Mullen, Craig A

    2016-04-01

    Sickle cell disease is a severe hemoglobinopathy caused by mutations in the beta globin genes. The disorder has protean manifestations and leads to severe morbidity and early mortality. Acute chest syndrome (ACS) is a common complication and in the USA is the leading cause of death in patients with sickle cell disease. Care of patients with sickle cell disease is complex and typically involves both primary care physicians and hematology subspecialists. The purpose of this study was first to attempt to validate in a pediatric sickle cell patient cohort associations between ACS and sickle cell disease genotype and between ACS and asthma as a comorbidity. The second purpose of the study was to study in a typical community the frequency with which asthma associated with ACS was addressed in terms of electronic medical record integration, pulmonary subspecialty consultation for management of asthma, and completion of pulmonary function testing (PFTs). A retrospective study of the electronic medical record of a children's hospital that provides most of the medical care for children in a portion of western New York state was performed. We found that ACS was more common in the sickle cell disease genotypes SS and S/beta-thalassemia-null, and that ACS was more frequent in patients treated for asthma. We also found that despite the use of a comprehensive electronic medical record, there was poor documentation of ACS and asthma episodes in the problem lists of patients with sickle cell disease, and that most patients with sickle cell disease with ACS or asthma failed to receive formal consultation services from pediatric pulmonary subspecialists.

  10. Sickle cell anemia - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - sickle cell anemia ... The following organizations are good resources for information on sickle cell anemia : American Sickle Cell Anemia Association -- www.ascaa.org National Heart, Blood, and Lung Institute -- www. ...

  11. Evolution of acute chest syndrome in sickle cell trait: an ultrastructural and light microscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    Hasleton, P S; Orr, K; Webster, A; Lawson, R A

    1989-01-01

    Light and electron microscopic studies of a patient with sickle cell trait who had an episode of sickling during coronary artery surgery, from which he died, showed fibrin thrombi, focal alveolar wall necrosis, and epithelial cell damage. It is suggested that in cases of sickle trait full precautionary measures should be taken to prevent sickling in these circumstances. Images PMID:2617448

  12. The role of rib infarcts in the acute chest syndrome of sickle cell diseases.

    PubMed

    Rucknagel, D L

    2001-01-01

    The acute chest syndrome is a generic term for pulmonary complications of sickle cell diseases with heterogeneous etiologies that include pneumonia, vaso-occlusion of pulmonary arterioles, rib infarction, and fat embolism syndrome. My review summarizes these etiologies, the evidence, and pathophysiology supporting the hypothesis that infarction of segments of ribs by the same vaso-occlusive process responsible for the acute episodes of pain (characteristic of the sickle cell diseases) is often involved in the acute chest structure. Inflammation associated with the infarct then causes splinting, hypoventilation, and hypoxia and further vaso-occlusion. The relationship with adult respiratory distress syndrome and fat embolism is also discussed. Use of the incentive spirometer combined with effective analgesia when chest pain is present is advocated for prevention of the pulmonary infiltrates. Newer understanding of the role of nitric oxide in regulating oxygen transport and its relationship to blood transfusions used in therapy of the acute chest syndrome are discussed.

  13. Sickle Cell Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Sickle cell anemia is a disease in which your body produces abnormally shaped red blood cells. The cells are shaped like ... normal, round red blood cells. This leads to anemia. The sickle cells also get stuck in blood ...

  14. Sickle Cell Crisis (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Sickle Cell Crisis (Pain Crisis) KidsHealth > For Teens > Sickle Cell ... drepanocíticas (Crisis de dolor) What Is a Sickle Cell Crisis? Sickle cell disease changes the shape of ...

  15. Cardiopulmonary Effects of Acute Stressful Exercise at Altitude of Individuals with Sickle Cell Trait (SCT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    AD___ AD-A222 948 CARDIOPULMONARY EFFECTS OF ACUTE STRESSFUL EXERCISE AT ALTITUDE OF INDIVIDUALS WITH SICKLE CELL TRAIT (SCT) FINAL REPORT Idelle M...DAMD17-86-G-6015 National Jewish Center for Immunology and Respiratory Medicine 1400 Jackson Street Denver, Colorado 80206 Approved for public release...8217Jewishi Center for (if applica ble) Immuoloy & Respiratory Medicinj 6r. ADDRESS trlty, State, and LIP Code) 7b, ADORESS(CIty, State, and ZIP Code) 1400

  16. Sickle Cell Disease (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... from each parent has hemoglobin SS disease , also called sickle cell anemia . A person can also inherit a sickle cell ... Is Affected? In the United States, hemoglobin SS disease (sickle cell anemia) affects mostly African Americans. However, forms of sickle ...

  17. Monitoring the acute phase response to vaso-occlusive crisis in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, J; Stone, P C; Akinola, N O; Gallimore, J R; Pepys, M B

    1994-01-01

    AIMS--To identify suitable acute phase proteins as objective markers of tissue ischaemia during painful vaso-occlusive crises in sickle cell disease. METHODS--The prodromal and established phases of 14 vaso-occlusive crises were studied longitudinally in 10 patients with sickle cell anaemia. Automated solid phase enzyme immunoassays were used to measure the fast responding acute phase proteins C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A protein. Slower responding glycoproteins (fibrinogen, orosomucoid, sialic acid and concanavalin-A binding) were measured in parallel. RESULTS--C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A protein increased early in crisis, sometimes within the early (prodromal) phase. Crises that resolved within 24 hours in hospital showed a minor and transient rise compared with crises that required treatment for four days or more. In eight crises treated by patients at home the acute phase response ranged from minor to a level consistent with extensive tissue ischaemia. CONCLUSIONS--Sensitive enzyme immunoassays for C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A protein are of potential value for monitoring the onset of tissue ischaemia in sickle cell crisis and for confirming subsequent resolution. PMID:7510726

  18. Prospective Evaluation for Respiratory Pathogens in Children With Sickle Cell Disease and Acute Respiratory Illness

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Ashok; Wang, Winfred C.; Gaur, Aditya; Smith, Teresa; Gu, Zhengming; Kang, Guolian; Leung, Wing; Hayden, Randall T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Human rhinovirus (HRV), human coronavirus (hCoV), human bocavirus (hBoV), and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) infections in children with sickle cell disease have not been well studied. Procedure Nasopharyngeal wash specimens were prospectively collected from 60 children with sickle cell disease and acute respiratory illness, over a 1-year period. Samples were tested with multiplexed-PCR, using an automated system for nine respiratory viruses, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Bordetella pertussis. Clinical characteristics and distribution of respiratory viruses in patients with and without acute chest syndrome (ACS) were evaluated. Results A respiratory virus was detected in 47 (78%) patients. Nine (15%) patients had ACS; a respiratory virus was detected in all of them. The demographic characteristics of patients with and without ACS were similar. HRV was the most common virus, detected in 29 of 47 (62%) patients. Logistic regression showed no association between ACS and detection of HRV, hCoV, hBoV, hMPV, and other respiratory pathogens. Co-infection with at least one additional respiratory virus was seen in 14 (30%) infected patients, and was not significantly higher in patients with ACS (P=0.10). Co-infections with more than two respiratory viruses were seen in seven patients, all in patients without ACS. Bacterial pathogens were not detected. Conclusion HRV was the most common virus detected in children with sickle cell disease and acute respiratory illness, and was not associated with increased morbidity. Larger prospective studies with asymptomatic controls are needed to study the association of these emerging respiratory viruses with ACS in children with sickle cell disease. PMID:24123899

  19. Sickle Cell Information Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... procedure for stem cell transplantation from healthy, ... NYT, Nature, Wash Post, SciAm, CNN - Google Custom Search Sickle ... summarizing medical research on sickle-cell anemia. NYT, Nature, Wash Post, SciAm, CNN - Google Custom Search Genetic ...

  20. Sickle Cell Trait

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Us Information For... Media Policy Makers Sickle Cell Trait Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... the trait on to their children. How Sickle Cell Trait is Inherited If both parents have SCT, ...

  1. Sickle Cell Disease Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Us Information For... Media Policy Makers Sickle Cell Disease Quiz Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... True or False: Only African Americans get sickle cell disease. A True B False 2. True or ...

  2. Sickle Cell Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Us Overview of CDC’s work. Advancements in Sickle Cell Disease New supplement from the American Journal of Preventive Medicine describes the state of sickle cell disease related care in the United States. Read Supplement ...

  3. Sickle Cell Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... anemia or an excess amount of iron (iron overload). People with sickle cell anemia who receive multiple blood transfusions may experience an iron overload. ^ Back to top When is it ordered? Sickle ...

  4. Sickle cell test

    MedlinePlus

    Sickledex; Hgb S test ... This test is done to tell if a person has abnormal hemoglobin that causes sickle cell disease and sickle ... and no symptoms, or only mild ones. This test does not tell the difference between these two ...

  5. What Causes Sickle Cell Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Sickle Cell Disease? Abnormal hemoglobin, called hemoglobin S , causes sickle cell ... that hemoglobin works. ( See Overview. ) How Is Sickle Cell Disease Inherited? When the hemoglobin S gene is inherited ...

  6. What is Sickle Cell Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Sickle Cell Disease? Español The term sickle cell disease (SCD) ... common forms of SCD. Some Forms of Sickle Cell Disease Hemoglobin SS Hemoglobin SC Hemoglobin Sβ 0 thalassemia ...

  7. Acute on chronic liver failure in a patient with sickle cell anaemia (HbSS).

    PubMed

    Im, Dana DaEun; Essien, Utibe; DePasse, Jacqueline W; Chiappa, Victor

    2015-07-01

    A man in his late 40s with sickle cell anaemia (HbSS) presented to the emergency department with 2 weeks of diffuse oedema, increased abdominal girth and dyspnoea. His anasarca was thought to be indicative of an acute decompensation of his known liver cirrhosis with transfusion-induced haemosiderosis. While his anasarca improved with diuresis, his direct hyperbilirubinaemia suddenly worsened without any signs of haemolysis, biliary disease or obstruction. He also developed an acute worsening in serum creatinine (1.17-7.0 mg/dL in 7 days) despite subsequent treatment for presumed hepatorenal syndrome (HRS). Given his clinical decline, the patient's goals of care were transitioned to comfort measures only. His clinical presentation and rapid liver and renal deterioration were most typical of sickle cell intrahepatic cholestasis (SCIC). SCIC can lead to rapid deterioration in renal function and can be mistaken for HRS. When SCIC is suspected, consideration of exchange transfusions should be made early.

  8. Living with Sickle Cell Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Sickle Cell Disease If you or your child has sickle ... NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Sickle Cell Disease (Nicholas) 09/02/2011 In this video— ...

  9. Acute Pain and Depressive Symptoms: Independent Predictors of Insomnia Symptoms among Adults with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Moscou-Jackson, Gyasi; Allen, Jerilyn; Kozachik, Sharon; Smith, Michael T.; Budhathoki, Chakra; Haywood, Carlton

    2015-01-01

    Background No studies to-date have systematically investigated insomnia symptoms among adults with sickle cell disease (SCD). The purpose of this study was to 1) describe the prevalence of insomnia symptoms and 2) identify bio-psychosocial predictors in community-dwelling adults with Sickle Cell Disease. Methods Cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from 263 African-American adults with SCD (aged 18 years or older). Measures included the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), Center for Epidemiologic Studies in Depression scale, Urban Life Stress Scale, Brief Pain Inventory, and a chronic pain item. SCD genotype was extracted from the medical record. Results A slight majority (55%) of the sample reported clinically significant insomnia symptomatology (ISI ≥10), which suggests that insomnia symptoms are prevalent among community-dwelling African-American adults with SCD. While insomnia symptoms were associated with a number of bio-psychosocial characteristics, depressive symptoms and acute pain were the only independent predictors. Conclusion Given the high number of participants reporting clinically significant insomnia symptoms, nurses should screen for insomnia symptoms and to explore interventions to promote better sleep among adults with SCD with an emphasis on recommending treatment for pain and depression. In addition, current pain and depression interventions in this population could add insomnia measures and assess the effect of the intervention on insomnia symptomatology as a secondary outcome. PMID:26673730

  10. MEK1/2 inhibitors reverse acute vascular occlusion in mouse models of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yulin; Schwartz, Evan A; Palmer, Gregory M; Zennadi, Rahima

    2016-03-01

    In sickle cell disease (SCD), treatment of recurrent vasoocclusive episodes, leading to pain crises and organ damage, is still a therapeutic challenge. Vasoocclusion is caused primarily by adherence of homozygous for hemoglobin S (SS) red blood cells (SSRBCs) and leukocytes to the endothelium. We tested the therapeutic benefits of MEK1/2 inhibitors in reversing vasoocclusion in nude and humanized SCD mouse models of acute vasoocclusive episodes using intravital microscopy. Administration of 0.2, 0.3, 1, or 2 mg/kg MEK1/2 inhibitor to TNF-α-pretreated nude mice before human SSRBC infusion inhibited SSRBC adhesion in inflamed vessels, prevented the progression of vasoocclusion, and reduced SSRBC organ sequestration. By use of a more clinically relevant protocol, 0.3 or 1 mg/kg MEK1/2 inhibitor given to TNF-α-pretreated nude mice after human SSRBC infusion and onset of vasoocclusion reversed SSRBC adhesion and vasoocclusion and restored blood flow. In SCD mice, 0.025, 0.05, or 0.1 mg/kg MEK1/2 inhibitor also reversed leukocyte and erythrocyte adhesion after the inflammatory trigger of vasoocclusion and improved microcirculatory blood flow. Cell adhesion was reversed by shedding of endothelial E-selectin, P-selectin, and αvβ3 integrin, and leukocyte CD44 and β2 integrin. Thus, MEK1/2 inhibitors, by targeting the adhesive function of SSRBCs and leukocytes, could represent a valuable therapeutic intervention for acute sickle cell vasoocclusive crises.

  11. Acute liver failure at 26 weeks' gestation in a patient with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Mara; Daugherty, Tami J; Elihu, Arvand; Sharaf, Ravi; Concepcion, Waldo; Druzin, Maurice; Esquivel, Carlos O

    2009-10-01

    Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) for acute liver failure (ALF) during pregnancy is an uncommon occurrence with variable outcomes. In pregnancy-related liver failure, prompt diagnosis and immediate delivery are essential for a reversal of the underlying process and for maternal and fetal survival. In rare cases, the reason for ALF during pregnancy is either unknown or irreversible, and thus OLT may be necessary. This case demonstrates the development of cryptogenic ALF during the 26th week of pregnancy in a woman with sickle cell disease. She underwent successful cesarean delivery of a healthy male fetus at 27 weeks with concurrent OLT. This report provides a literature review of OLT in pregnancy and examines the common causes of ALF in the pregnant patient. On the basis of the management and outcome of our case and the literature review, we present an algorithm for the suggested management of ALF in pregnancy.

  12. Acute kidney injury in children with sickle cell disease-compounding a chronic problem.

    PubMed

    Mammen, Cherry; Bissonnette, Mei Lin; Matsell, Douglas G

    2017-03-28

    In an article recently published in Pediatric Nephrology, Baddam and colleagues discuss the relatively underreported clinical problem of repeated episodes of acute kidney injury (AKI) in children with sickle cell disease (SCD). Their report is a cautionary note about the importance of repeated kidney injury on the background of underlying chronic kidney injury and its potential implications on long-term kidney outcome. In children and adults with SCD, this includes the effects of repeated vaso-occlusive crises and the management of these painful episodes with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Here we review the scope of kidney involvement in SCD in children and discuss the potential short- and long-term consequences of AKI in children with SCD.

  13. Sickle cell anemia in Guadeloupean children: pattern and prevalence of acute clinical events.

    PubMed

    Tarer, Vanessa; Etienne-Julan, Maryse; Diara, Jean-Pierre; Belloy, Marie Sylvaine; Mukizi-Mukaza, Martin; Elion, Jacques; Romana, Marc

    2006-03-01

    We analyzed the records of 153 Guadeloupean children with sickle cell anemia (SCA), for whom clinical and laboratory data were prospectively collected (mean follow-up duration 8.4 +/- 4.6 yr). Prevalence and age-specific frequencies of acute clinical events were determined and correlations between complications, hematological parameters and potential modulating factors investigated. Painful crisis and acute chest syndrome (ACS) were the two most common complications, affecting 65.4% and 58.8% of the patients, respectively. The frequency of acute anemia was 49.7% (acute splenic sequestration 24.8%; acute aplastic anemia 15.0%). Prevalences of septicemia-meningitis and osteomyelitis were 15.7% and 16.3%, respectively. A higher incidence of infections, painful crises and acute anemia was detected in patients who developed ACS. The well-documented protective effect of HbF level on the overall disease expression was observed with higher HbF level in asymptomatic than in symptomatic patients (17.5% +/- 8% vs. 9.9% +/- 6.4%, P = 0.01) with similar ages and sex ratio. It was also confirmed on ACS and, for the first time, further extended to acute anemic events and septicemia. Besides its effect on hematological parameters, alpha-thalassemia seems to have little impact on the prevalence of complications, as do beta(S)-globin haplotypes. Comparison with other series suggests that the natural history of SCA in Guadeloupe is more similar to that in Jamaica with regard to those reported in Europe and the United States, suggesting a potential impact of environmental factors on the clinical course of the disease.

  14. Changes in sleep, food intake, and activity levels during acute painful episodes in children with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Eufemia; Miaskowski, Christine; Savedra, Marilyn; Beyer, Judith E; Treadwell, Marsha; Styles, Lori

    2006-02-01

    As part of a larger study that examined pain experience, pain management, and pain outcomes among children with sickle cell disease, functional status (sleep, food intake, and activity levels) was examined during hospitalization for acute painful episodes. Children were asked to rate the amount of pain they experienced as well as the amount of time they slept, the amount of food they ate, and the amount of activity they had everyday. Children reported high levels of pain, which showed only a small decrease throughout hospitalization, and had disrupted sleep and wake patterns, decreased food intake, and decreased activity levels. Nurses need to routinely monitor functional status during acute painful episodes so that strategies to promote adequate sleep, food intake, and activity may be incorporated to minimize long-term negative outcomes in children with sickle cell disease.

  15. Non-traumatic spontaneous acute epidural hematoma in a patient with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Serarslan, Yurdal; Aras, Mustafa; Altaş, Murat; Kaya, Hasan; Urfalı, Boran

    2014-01-01

    A 19-year-old female with sickle cell anemia (SCD) was referred to our hospital after two days of hospitalization at another hospital for a headache crisis. This headache crisis was due to a raised intracranial pressure; these symptoms were noted and included in her comprehensive list of symptoms. There was an acute drop in the hemoglobin and hematocrit levels. The cranial CT scan demonstrated a left fronto-parietal acute epidural hematoma (AEH) and a calvarial bone expansion, which was suggestive of medullary hematopoiesis. The patient underwent emergent craniotomy and evacuation of the hematoma. There were no abnormal findings intra-operatively apart from the AEH, except skull thickening and active petechial bleeding from the dural arteries. Repeated CT scan showed a complete evacuation of the hematoma. The possible underlying pathophysiological mechanisms were discussed. In addition to the factors mentioned in the relevant literature, any active petechial bleeding from the dural arteries on the separated surface of the dura from the skull could have contributed to the expanding of the AEH in our patient. Neurosurgeons and other health care providers should be aware of spontaneous AEH in patients with SCD.

  16. Facts about Sickle Cell Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Us Information For... Media Policy Makers Facts About Sickle Cell Disease Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... SCD. Infographic: 5 Facts You Should Know About Sickle Cell Disease Did you know SCD affects people from ...

  17. Sickle Cell Anemia (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Can You Do to Stay Well? en español Anemia falciforme What Is Sickle Cell Disease? Sickle cell ... about 10 to 20 days. This usually causes anemia . Anemia is what happens when the body's number ...

  18. Transport proteins and acute phase reactant proteins in children with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed Central

    Warrier, R. P.; Kuvibidila, S.; Gordon, L.; Humbert, J.

    1994-01-01

    Transport proteins, acute-phase reactant proteins (APRP), hematology, and anthropometry were studied in 34 sickle cell disease (SCD) children (20 boys, 14 girls) and 27 controls without growth deficits (13 boys, 14 girls) [corrected]. The age range was 1/2 to 16 1/2 years. Weight deficits (< 80%) by Waterlow's classification were observed in 41% of SCD boys and 25% of SCD girls, and height deficits (< 90%) were observed in 25% SCD boys and 25% girls. Mean white blood cell counts were significantly higher (P < .001) and hematocrit and hemoglobin (Hb) lower (P < .005) in SCD children than in controls. Although both groups had similar mean levels of albumin, transferrin, and APRP, SCD children had significantly lower mean levels of retinol-binding protein (RBP) (P < .001) and retinol-prealbumin (P < .001). Retinol-binding protein levels were abnormal in 18 (53%) SCD children and in only 23% controls (chi 2 = 14.06; P < 0.005); transferrin levels were abnormal in 20% of SCD children and in none of the controls. Children with SC and SF Hb phenotype had normal mean levels of RBP, whereas those with S beta thal and SS phenotype had levels below normal. Growth-retarded children by weight and height had reduced mean levels of RBP and prealbumin compared with growth-normal SCD children. The implication of primary protein-energy malnutrition on growth retardation in SCD children is under study. PMID:7512147

  19. Hashimoto's thyroiditis and acute chest syndrome revealing sickle cell anemia in a 32 years female patient.

    PubMed

    Igala, Marielle; Nsame, Daniela; Ova, Jennie Dorothée Guelongo Okouango; Cherkaoui, Siham; Oukkach, Bouchra; Quessar, Asmae

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia results from a single amino acid substitution in the gene encoding the β-globin subunit. Polymerization of deoxygenated sickle hemoglobin leads to decreased deformability of red blood cells. Hashimoto's thyroiditis is a common thyroid disease now recognized as an auto-immune thyroid disorder, it is usually thought to be haemolytic autoimmune anemia. We report the case of a 32 years old women admitted for chest pain and haemolysis anemia in which Hashimoto's thyroiditis and sickle cell anemia were found. In our observation the patient is a young woman whose examination did not show signs of goitre but the analysis of thyroid function tests performed before an auto-immune hemolytic anemia (confirmed by a high level of unconjugated bilirubin and a Coombs test positive for IgG) has found thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and positive thyroid antibody at rates in excess of 4.5 times their normal value. In the same period, as the hemolytic anemia, and before the atypical chest pain and anguish they generated in the patient, the search for hemoglobinopathies was made despite the absence of a family history of haematological disease or painful attacks in childhood. Patient electrophoresis's led to research similar cases in the family. The mother was the first to be analyzed with ultimately diagnosed with sickle cell trait have previously been ignored. This case would be a form with few symptoms because the patient does not describe painful crises in childhood or adolescence.

  20. Sickle-cell disease.

    PubMed

    Rees, David C; Williams, Thomas N; Gladwin, Mark T

    2010-12-11

    Sickle-cell disease is one of the most common severe monogenic disorders in the world. Haemoglobin polymerisation, leading to erythrocyte rigidity and vaso-occlusion, is central to the pathophysiology of this disease, although the importance of chronic anaemia, haemolysis, and vasculopathy has been established. Clinical management is basic and few treatments have a robust evidence base. One of the main problems of sickle-cell disease in children is the development of cerebrovascular disease and cognitive impairment, and the role of blood transfusion and hydroxycarbamide for prevention of these complications is starting to be understood. Recurrent episodes of vaso-occlusion and inflammation result in progressive damage to most organs, including the brain, kidneys, lungs, bones, and cardiovascular system, which becomes apparent with increasing age. Most people with sickle-cell disease live in Africa, where little is known about this disease; however, we do know that the disorder follows a more severe clinical course in Africa than for the rest of the world and that infectious diseases have a role in causing this increased severity of sickle-cell disease. More work is needed to develop effective treatments that specifically target pathophysiological changes and clinical complications of sickle-cell disease.

  1. Outcomes of Acute Chest Syndrome in Adult Patients with Sickle Cell Disease: Predictors of Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Allareddy, Veerajalandhar; Roy, Aparna; Lee, Min Kyeong; Nalliah, Romesh P.; Rampa, Sankeerth; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush; Rotta, Alexandre T.

    2014-01-01

    Adults with sickle cell disease(SCD) are a growing population. Recent national estimates of outcomes in acute chest syndrome(ACS) among adults with SCD are lacking. We describe the incidence, outcomes and predictors of mortality in ACS in adults. We hypothesize that any need for mechanical ventilation is an independent predictor of mortality. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample(2004–2010),the largest all payer inpatient database in United States, to estimate the incidence and outcomes of ACS needing mechanical ventilation(MV) and exchange transfusion(ET) in patients >21 years. The effects of MV and ET on outcomes including length of stay(LOS) and in-hospital mortality(IHM) were examined using multivariable linear and logistic regression models respectively. The effects of age, sex, race, type of sickle cell crisis, race, co-morbid burden, insurance status, type of admission, and hospital characteristics were adjusted in the regression models. Results Of the 24,699 hospitalizations, 4.6% needed MV(2.7% for <96 hours, 1.9% for ≥96 hours), 6% had ET, with a mean length of stay(LOS) of 7.8 days and an in-hospital mortality rate(IHM) of 1.6%. There was a gradual yearly increase in ACS hospitalizations that needed MV(2.6% in 2004 to 5.8% in 2010). Hb-SS disease was the phenotype in 84.3% of all hospitalizations. After adjusting for a multitude of patient and hospital related factors, patients who had MV for <96 hours(OR = 67.53,p<0.01) or those who had MV for ≥96 hours(OR = 8.73,p<0.01) were associated with a significantly higher odds for IHM when compared to their counterparts. Patients who had MV for ≥96 hours and those who had ET had a significantly longer LOS in-hospitals(p<0.001). Conclusion In this large cohort of hospitalized adults with SCD patients with ACS, the need for mechanical ventilation predicted higher mortality rates and increased hospital resource utilization. Identification of risk factors

  2. Pulmonary manifestations of sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, A; Ahmed, S

    2003-01-01

    Pulmonary complications account for significant morbidity and mortality in patients with sickle cell disease. Clinical lung involvement manifests in two major forms: the acute chest syndrome and sickle cell chronic lung disease. Acute chest syndrome is characterised by fever, chest pain, and appearance of a new infiltrate on chest radiograph. Sickle cell chronic lung disease, on the other hand, manifests as radiographic interstitial abnormalities, impaired pulmonary function, and, in its most severe form, by the evidence of pulmonary hypertension. Progress has been made in understanding the pathophysiology and management of these complications. In this review the current knowledge of the mechanism, diagnosis, and treatment of pulmonary complications of sickle cell disease are discussed. PMID:12897216

  3. Sickle cell retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Mason, G; Scherrer, F

    1991-12-01

    Sickle cell retinopathy was described as early as 1930 and research has been ongoing as to the pathophysiology of the disease, its effects on the eye and successful treatment. Disease stages have been identified and treatment modalities have been established for each stage. Research results and case reports have been published in medical journals available to physicians; however, there are no identifiable publications applicable to the nursing skills required to deal with this disease. Ophthalmic nurses should be knowledgeable of the sickle cell diseases and specifically the resultant retinopathy.

  4. Detection of acute osteomyelitis with indium-111 labeled white blood cells in a patient with sickle cell disease

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Ulloa, M.; Vasavada, P.J.; Black, R.R.

    1989-02-01

    A young patient with sickle cell disease (SCD) and multiple hospitalizations for crisis was admitted because of suspected osteomyelitis. Initial laboratory work, radiographs, and bone images were not contributory. An In-111 white blood cell (WBC) study demonstrated two areas of increased radionuclide uptake consistent with osteomyelitis. One of these had associated soft tissue infection. No other areas of active osteomyelitis were visualized, in spite of the presence of several additional infection sites. Imaging with In-111 WBC is probably not justified for routine diagnosis of acute osteomyelitis in areas free of previous disease, where conventional bone images are highly efficient. In-111 WBC imaging, however, may be helpful in detecting osteomyelitis in selected patients with SCD in whom Tc-99m bone images and radiographs are usually abnormal and difficult to interpret due to previous bone infarcts. Localization of the infection focus is very important in choosing the aspiration site for bacteriologic studies. A negative study, however, should be interpreted cautiously.

  5. Osteoarticular involvement in sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Junior, Geraldo Bezerra; Daher, Elizabeth De Francesco; da Rocha, Francisco Airton Castro

    2012-01-01

    The osteoarticular involvement in sickle cell disease has been poorly studied and it is mainly characterized by osteonecrosis, osteomyelitis and arthritis. The most frequent complications and those that require hospital care in sickle cell disease patients are painful vaso-occlusive crises and osteomyelitis. The deoxygenation and polymerization of hemoglobin S, which results in sickling and vascular occlusion, occur more often in tissues with low blood flow, such as in the bones. Bone microcirculation is a common place for erythrocyte sickling, which leads to thrombosis, infarct and necrosis. The pathogenesis of microvascular occlusion, the key event in painful crises, is complex and involves activation of leukocytes, platelets and endothelial cells, as well as hemoglobin S-containing red blood cells. Osteonecrosis is a frequent complication in sickle cell disease, with a painful and debilitating pattern. It is generally insidious and progressive, affecting mainly the hips (femur head) and shoulders (humeral head). Dactylitis, also known as hand-foot syndrome, is an acute vaso-occlusive complication characterized by pain and edema in both hands and feet, frequently with increased local temperature and erythema. Osteomyelitis is the most common form of joint infection in sickle cell disease. The occurrence of connective tissue diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus, has rarely been reported in patients with sickle cell disease. The treatment of these complications is mainly symptomatic, and more detailed studies are required to understand the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the complications and propose more adequate and specific therapies. PMID:23049406

  6. Pulmonary platelet thrombi and vascular pathology in acute chest syndrome in patients with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Anea, Ciprian B.; Lyon, Matthew; Lee, Itia A.; Gonzales, Joyce N.; Adeyemi, Amidat; Falls, Greer; Kutlar, Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests a role for platelets in sickle cell disease (SCD). Despite the proinflammatory, occlusive nature of platelets, a role for platelets in acute chest syndrome (ACS), however, remains understudied. To provide evidence and potentially describe contributory factors for a putative link between ACS and platelets, we performed an autopsy study of 20 SCD cases—10 of whom died from ACS and 10 whose deaths were not ACS‐related. Pulmonary histopathology and case history were collected. We discovered that disseminated pulmonary platelet thrombi were present in 3 out of 10 of cases with ACS, but none of the matched cases without ACS. Those cases with detected thrombi were associated with significant deposition of endothelial vWF and detection of large vWF aggregates adhered to endothelium. Potential clinical risk factors were younger age and higher platelet count at presentation. However, we also noted a sharp and significant decline in platelet count prior to death in each case with platelet thrombi in the lungs. In this study, neither hydroxyurea use nor perimortem transfusion was associated with platelet thrombi. Surprisingly, in all cases, there was profound pulmonary artery remodeling with both thrombotic and proliferative pulmonary plexiform lesions. The severity of remodeling was not associated with a severe history of ACS, or hydroxyurea use, but was inversely correlated with age. We thus provide evidence of undocumented presence of platelet thrombi in cases of fatal ACS and describe clinical correlates. We also provide novel correlates of pulmonary remodeling in SCD. Am. J. Hematol. 91:173–178, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. American Journal of Hematology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26492581

  7. Sickle Cell Anemia Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christy, Steven C.

    Presents sources for the acquisition of medical, social, psychological, educational, and practical knowledge of sickle cell anemia. The materials listed are designed to help parents, educators, and public service workers. Materials include journal articles, films, brochures, slides, and fact sheets. The usual bibliographic information is given.…

  8. Sickle Cell Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canipe, Stephen L.

    Included in this high school biology unit on sickle cell anemia are the following materials: a synopsis of the history of the discovery and the genetic qualities of the disease; electrophoresis diagrams comparing normal, homozygous and heterozygous conditions of the disease; and biochemical characteristics and population genetics of the disease. A…

  9. Myonecrosis in Sickle Cell Anemia: Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Turaga, Lalita Prabha; Boddu, Prajwal; Kipferl, Steve; Basu, Anupam; Yorath, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Male, 27 Final Diagnosis: Myonecrosis of sickle cell anaemia Symptoms: Pain • redness to feet • swelling foot Medication: — Clinical Procedure: MRI Specialty: Podiatry Objective: Rare disease Background: Myonecrosis is one of the more poorly studied, painful manifestations of sickle cell crisis. Medical literature is sparse detailing the manifestations and management of such symptoms. In myonecrosis, red cells containing sickle hemoglobin become rigid, resulting in reduced blood flow and myonecrosis. Case Report: We present a case study of a patient in sickle cell crisis with an episode of acute pain and swelling to the intrinsic muscles of the foot as a prominent feature of the crises. Although muscle biopsy is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of myositis or myonecrosis, a low intensity signal on T1 and high intensity signal on T2 at the affected muscle belly can be as conclusive as imaging studies. In an actively sickling patient any invasive intervention should be avoided as it can result in ischemic necrosis of the tissues, due to interruption of capillary flow in end-arteries. Conclusions: Early recognition is critical in sickle cell disease management, allowing for prompt and aggressive fluid resuscitation which remains a cornerstone in the management of most sickle cell vaso-occlusive crises. In this instance, off loading the extremity and early fluid resuscitation resolved the pain and swelling and prevented myonecrosis. PMID:28133359

  10. The Role of Inspiratory Muscle Training in Sickle Cell Anemia Related Pulmonary Damage due to Recurrent Acute Chest Syndrome Attacks

    PubMed Central

    Camcıoğlu, Burcu; Boşnak-Güçlü, Meral; Karadallı, Müşerrefe Nur; Akı, Şahika Zeynep; Türköz-Sucak, Gülsan

    2015-01-01

    Background. The sickling of red blood cells causes a constellation of musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and pulmonary manifestations. A 32-year-old gentleman with sickle cell anemia (SCA) had been suffering from recurrent acute chest syndrome (ACS). Aim. To examine the effects of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on pulmonary functions, respiratory and peripheral muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, and quality of life in this patient with SCA. Methods. Functional exercise capacity was evaluated using six-minute walk test, respiratory muscle strength using mouth pressure device, hand grip strength using hand-held dynamometer, pain using Visual Analogue Scale, fatigue using Fatigue Severity Scale, dyspnea using Modified Medical Research Council Scale, and health related quality of life using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QOL measurement. Results. A significant improvement has been demonstrated in respiratory muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, pain, fatigue, dyspnea, and quality of life. There was no admission to emergency department due to acute chest syndrome in the following 12 months after commencing regular erythrocytapheresis. Conclusion. This is the first report demonstrating the beneficial effects of inspiratory muscle training on functional exercise capacity, respiratory muscle strength, pain, fatigue, dyspnea, and quality of life in a patient with recurrent ACS. PMID:26060589

  11. Red blood cells, multiple sickle cells (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Sickle cell anemia is an inherited disorder in which abnormal hemoglobin (the red pigment inside red blood cells) is produced. The abnormal hemoglobin causes red blood cells to assume a sickle shape, like the ones seen in this photomicrograph.

  12. Red blood cells, sickle cell (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Sickle cell anemia is an inherited blood disease in which the red blood cells produce abnormal pigment (hemoglobin). ... abnormal hemoglobin causes deformity of the red blood cells into crescent or sickle-shapes, as seen in this photomicrograph.

  13. Learning about Sickle Cell Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... cell to stimulate production of normal hemoglobin. Recent experiments show promise. Researchers used bioengineering to create mice with a human gene that produces the defective hemoglobin causing sickle ...

  14. Spontaneous Intracranial Extradural Hematoma in Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    N'dri Oka, Dominique; Tokpa, André; Bah, Alpha; Derou, Louis

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous extradural hematoma is rare in patients with sickle cell disease. We report a clinical case of a 19-year-old young man with sickle cell anemia who presented a sickle cell crisis complicated by the development of multiple acute extradural and subgaleal hematomas that had not been treated surgically. We discuss the physiopathology of this event. Although it is rare, clinicians should be aware of this phenomenon as part of a spectrum of neurologic complications in these patients. PMID:26251822

  15. Pulmonary thromboembolism in a child with sickle cell hemoglobin d disease in the setting of acute chest syndrome.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Hazel; Kuril, Sandeepkumar; Krajewski, Jennifer; Sedrak, Aziza

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Sickle cell hemoglobin D disease (HbSD) is a rare variant of sickle cell disease (SCD). Incidence of pulmonary thromboembolism (PE) and deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in children with HbSD is unknown. PE and DVT are known complications of SCD in adults but have not been reported in the literature in children with HbSD. Case Report. We are reporting a case of a 12-year-old boy with HbSD with acute chest syndrome (ACS) complicated by complete thrombosis of the branch of the right pulmonary artery and multiple small pulmonary artery emboli seen on computed tomography (CT) pulmonary angiogram and thrombosis of the right brachial vein seen on Doppler ultrasound. Our patient responded to treatment with anticoagulant therapy. Conclusion. There are no cases reported in children with HbSD disease presenting as ACS with pulmonary thromboembolism. We suggest that PE should be suspected in patients presenting with ACS who do not show improvement with standard management. CT pulmonary angiogram should be utilized for early diagnosis and appropriate management as there is no current protocol for management of PE/DVT in pediatric patients with SCD.

  16. Pulmonary Thromboembolism in a Child with Sickle Cell Hemoglobin D Disease in the Setting of Acute Chest Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Hazel; Kuril, Sandeepkumar; Krajewski, Jennifer; Sedrak, Aziza

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Sickle cell hemoglobin D disease (HbSD) is a rare variant of sickle cell disease (SCD). Incidence of pulmonary thromboembolism (PE) and deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in children with HbSD is unknown. PE and DVT are known complications of SCD in adults but have not been reported in the literature in children with HbSD. Case Report. We are reporting a case of a 12-year-old boy with HbSD with acute chest syndrome (ACS) complicated by complete thrombosis of the branch of the right pulmonary artery and multiple small pulmonary artery emboli seen on computed tomography (CT) pulmonary angiogram and thrombosis of the right brachial vein seen on Doppler ultrasound. Our patient responded to treatment with anticoagulant therapy. Conclusion. There are no cases reported in children with HbSD disease presenting as ACS with pulmonary thromboembolism. We suggest that PE should be suspected in patients presenting with ACS who do not show improvement with standard management. CT pulmonary angiogram should be utilized for early diagnosis and appropriate management as there is no current protocol for management of PE/DVT in pediatric patients with SCD. PMID:24159402

  17. Development of myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia 15 years after hydroxyurea use in a patient with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Baz, Walid; Najfeld, Vesna; Yotsuya, Matthew; Talwar, Jotica; Terjanian, Terenig; Forte, Frank

    2012-01-01

    We report a 41 year old male with sickle cell disease who developed a myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia with complex karyotype involving chromosomes 5, 7 and 17 after 15 years of hydroxyurea treatment. He responded poorly to induction chemotherapy with cytarabine/idarubicin followed by high dose cytarabine and succumbed to neutropenic sepsis. Multiple systematic reviews, observational studies and clinical trials were conducted to identify the toxicity profile of hydroxurea. Only six cases of leukemia/myelodysplastic syndrome were identified in patients with sickle cell anemia treated with hydroxyurea. Subsequently, it was concluded that hydroxyurea is not leukemogenic. However, it was noted that most of the published studies had only up to 9 years of follow-up. Our patient was started on hydroxyurea in 1990, before the widespread use of the drug and took hydroxyurea for 15 years. His presentation may reflect an outcome otherwise not yet observed because of the short follow-up of prior studies. We believe that the leukemogenic risk of hydroxyurea should be discussed with the patients and their families. Studies evaluating the adverse effects of hydroxyurea should have longer follow-up before definitive conclusions are drawn.

  18. The acute phase inflammatory response to maximal exercise testing in children and young adults with sickle cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    Liem, Robert I; Onyejekwe, Kasiemobi; Olszewski, Marie; Nchekwube, Chisalu; Zaldivar, Frank P; Radom-Aizik, Shlomit; Rodeghier, Mark J; Thompson, Alexis A

    2015-12-01

    Although individuals with sickle cell anaemia (SCA) have elevated baseline inflammation and endothelial activation, the acute phase response to maximal exercise has not been evaluated among children with SCA. We measured the acute phase response to maximal exercise testing for soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule (sVCAM) as well as interleukin 6 (IL6), total white blood cell (WBC) count, C-reactive protein (CRP) and D-dimer in a cohort of children with SCA and matched controls at baseline, immediately after, and 30, 60 and 120 min following exercise. Despite higher baseline levels of all biomarkers except CRP, the acute phase response from baseline to immediately after exercise was significantly greater in subjects versus controls for CRP (2·1 vs. 0·2 mg/l, P = 0·02) and D-dimer (160 vs. 10 μg/l, P < 0·01) only. Similar between-group trends were observed over time for all biomarkers, including sVCAM, IL6, total WBC, CRP and D-dimer. Lower fitness, defined by peak oxygen consumption (VO2 ), was independently associated with greater acute phase responses to exercise for sVCAM. Our results suggest maximal exercise may not be associated with any greater escalation of endothelial activation or inflammation in SCA and provide preliminary biomarker evidence for the safety of brief, high-intensity physical exertion in children with SCA.

  19. Sickle cell disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Roseff, S D

    2009-01-01

    The substitution of one amino acid in the hemoglobin molecule results in sickle hemoglobin. As a result, RBCs sickle in low oxygen states causing occlusion of blood vessels, increased viscosity, and inflammation. These RBCs are prematurely removed from the circulation, resulting in a chronic hemolytic anemia. With newborn screening and early treatment, the death rate among children with SCD has declined. In addition, a variety of treatments are being introduced to help manage the various manifestations of disease. Transfusion, simple or exchange, is a mainstay of therapy, since it reduces the amount of Hgb S in circulation and suppresses erythropoiesis. Transfusion is indicated for symptomatic anemia and specifically to prevent stroke (first or recurrent), during acute stroke, and for acute chest syndrome. Unfortunately, transfusion carries risks for infectious disease transmission, as well as immunologic and inflammatory sequelae. For patients with SCD who may be chronically transfused, iron overload occurs frequently. In addition, due to differences in RBC antigens between donors and recipients, these patients are at increased risk for development of RBC alloantibodies, which can complicate further transfusion. It is, therefore, important to prevent alloimmunization by transfusing leukoreduced RBCs that match the patient for the C, E, and K1 antigens. Human progenitor cell (from bone marrow, peripheral blood stem cells, or umbilical blood) transplant can cure the disease, and is used for patients with severe disease for whom conventional therapy may not be effective.

  20. [Sickle cell pathophysiology].

    PubMed

    Renaudier, P

    2014-11-01

    Sickle cell disease is associated with the inversion of one base pair (A = T → A = T). The sixth codon of the beta globin chain [GAA] becomes [GTA]. Accordingly, the sixth amino acid (glutamic acid, negatively charged) is replaced by valine, hydrophobic. A hydrophobic site is present on the outside of the HbS β chain. This incurs a hydrophobic bond with the phenylalanine in position 85 and leucine in position 88, in which outsource deoxy haemoglobin. Therefore, it creates a HbS polymer that deforms the red blood cell and causes vaso-occlusive crisis in the capillary venous pole. In this conventional design, the roles are added to the nitrogen monoxide and vascular tone, the increase in adhesion of red blood cells to the endothelium damage caused by red blood cells HbS: dehydration, senescence, formation of microvesicles. If these advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology have not yet had a clinical application, they will happen one day. It is therefore particularly important to pursue in France the network structure of sickle cell disease with a view to set up multicenter trials when the day comes.

  1. Sexuality and sickle cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    Côbo, Viviane de Almeida; Chapadeiro, Cibele Alves; Ribeiro, João Batista; Moraes-Souza, Helio; Martins, Paulo Roberto Juliano

    2013-01-01

    Background Sickle cell disease, the most common hereditary blood disease in the world, is the result of an atypical hemoglobin called S (Hb S) which, when homozygous (Hb SS) is the cause of sickle cell anemia. Changes of puberty, correlated with a delayed growth spurt, begin late in both male and female sickle cell anemia individuals with repercussions on sexuality and reproduction. The objectives of this exploratory and descriptive study were to characterize the development of sexuality in adults with sickle cell anemia by investigating the patient's perception of their sex life, as well as the information they had and needed on this subject. Methods Twenty male and female sickle cell anemia patients treated at the Hemocentro Regional de Uberaba (UFTM) with ages between 19 and 47 years old were enrolled. A socioeconomic questionnaire and a semi-structured interview on sexuality, reproduction and genetic counseling were applied. Results This study shows that the sickle cell anemia patients lacked information on sexuality especially about the risks of pregnancy and the possible inheritance of the disease by their children. Moreover, the sexual life of the patients was impaired due to pain as well as discrimination and negative feelings experienced in close relationships. Conclusion The health care of sickle cell anemia patients should take into account not only the clinical aspects of the disease, but also psychosocial aspects by providing counseling on sexuality, reproduction and genetics, in order to give this population the possibility of a better quality of life. PMID:23741184

  2. Latest Sickle Cell Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Special Section: Sickle Cell Disease Latest Sickle Cell Research Past Issues / Winter 2011 Table of Contents ... Complications of sickle cell trait 100 Years of Sickle Cell Research Dr. James B. Herrick Photo: National Library ...

  3. Renal abnormalities in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Ataga, K I; Orringer, E P

    2000-04-01

    Sickle cell anemia and the related hemoglobinopathies are associated with a large spectrum of renal abnormalities. The patients have impaired urinary concentrating ability, defects in urinary acidification and potassium excretion, and supranormal proximal tubular function. The latter is manifest by increased secretion of creatinine and by reabsorption of phosphorus and beta(2)-microglobulin. Young patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) have supranormal renal hemodynamics with elevations in both effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). These parameters decrease with age as well as following the administration of prostaglandin inhibitors. Proteinuria, a common finding in adults with sickle cell disease, may progress to the nephrotic syndrome. Proteinuria, hypertension, and increasing anemia predict end-stage renal disease (ESRD). While ESRD can be managed by dialysis and/or renal transplantation, there may be an increased rate of complications in renal transplant recipients with SCD. Hematuria is seen in individuals with all of the SCDs as well as with sickle cell trait. In most cases the etiology of the hematuria turns out to be benign. However, there does appear to be an increased association between SCD and renal medullary carcinoma. Therefore, those SCD patients who present with hematuria should initially undergo a thorough evaluation in order to exclude this aggressive neoplasm. Papillary necrosis may occur due to medullary ischemia and infarction. Erythropoietin levels are usually lower than expected for their degree of anemia and decrease further as renal function deteriorates. An abnormal balance of renal prostaglandins may be responsible for some of the changes in sickle cell nephropathy. Acute renal failure is a component of the acute multiorgan failure syndrome (MOFS). Finally, progression of sickle cell nephropathy to ESRD may be slowed by adequate control of hypertension and proteinuria. However, the prevention of the

  4. Sickle Cell Disease (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the pain, and immunizations and daily doses of penicillin (an antibiotic) can help prevent infection. Infection used ... children with sickle cell disease. But thanks to penicillin (or a similar antibiotic, amoxicillin) and appropriate immunizations , ...

  5. Sickle Cell Anemia (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... centers partly scooped out. They are soft and flexible so they can easily move through very small blood vessels and deliver oxygen throughout a person's body. Sickle cells are stiffer. Instead of being disc ...

  6. Sickle cell disease in children.

    PubMed

    Meier, Emily Riehm; Miller, Jeffery L

    2012-05-07

    Early identification of infants with sickle cell disease (SCD) by newborn screening, now universal in all 50 states in the US, has improved survival, mainly by preventing overwhelming sepsis with the early use of prophylactic penicillin. Routine transcranial Doppler screening with the institution of chronic transfusion decreases the risk of stroke from 10% to 1% in paediatric SCD patients. Hydroxyurea decreases the number and frequency of painful crises, acute chest syndromes and number of blood transfusions in children with SCD. Genetic research continues to be driven toward the prevention and ultimate cure of SCD before adulthood. This review focuses on clinical manifestations and therapeutic strategies for paediatric SCD as well as the evolving topic of gene-focused prevention and therapy.

  7. The impact of recurrent acute chest syndrome on the lung function of young adults with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Knight-Madden, Jennifer M; Forrester, Terrence S; Lewis, Norma A; Greenough, Anne

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of recurrent acute chest syndrome (ACS) episodes on the lung function of young adults with sickle cell disease (SCD). Our prospective study included 80 SCD adults [26 with recurrent acute chest syndrome (ACS)] and 80 ethnically matched controls aged between 18 and 28 years. Lung function (spirometry and lung volumes) was measured and the results were expressed as the percentage predicted for height. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) was assessed by the response to either a bronchodilator or an exercise challenge. The adults with recurrent ACS (two or more ACS episodes) had lower median forced vital capacity (74 vs. 83%, p = 0.03), forced expiratory volume in 1 s (79 vs. 90%, p < 0.03), and total lung capacity (69 vs. 81%, p = 0.04) than SCD adults who had one or no ACS episodes. The greater the number of ACS episodes, the greater the reduction in lung function (p = 0.001). The adults with SCD had lower median forced vital capacity (81 vs. 106%), forced expiratory volume in 1 s (85 vs. 107%), and total lung capacity (80 vs. 87%) than the controls (p < 0.001). Similar numbers in each group had BHR (p = 0.2). The prevalence of restrictive ventilatory defect in the patients with SCD was almost double that of the controls (p = 0.004). Young adults with SCD have worse lung function than ethnically matched controls, particularly if they have suffered recurrent ACS episodes.

  8. Sickle Cell Screening: Emphasis on Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valente, Carmine; Frank, William

    1972-01-01

    This article relates the sickle cell education program, the personnel training and the screening procedures of a pilot sickle cell screening program by the Prince George's County Health Department. (JA)

  9. Living Well with Sickle Cell Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information For... Media Policy Makers Living Well with Sickle Cell Disease Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir People with sickle cell disease can live full lives and enjoy most ...

  10. How Is Sickle Cell Disease Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Sickle Cell Disease Diagnosed? Screening Tests People who do not ... NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Sickle Cell Disease (Nicholas) 09/02/2011 In this video— ...

  11. Mechanism of testosterone deficiency in the transgenic sickle cell mouse.

    PubMed

    Musicki, Biljana; Zhang, Yuxi; Chen, Haolin; Brown, Terry R; Zirkin, Barry R; Burnett, Arthur L

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone deficiency is associated with sickle cell disease (SCD), but its underlying mechanism is not known. We investigated the possible occurrence and mechanism of testosterone deficiency in a mouse model of human SCD. Transgenic sickle male mice (Sickle) exhibited decreased serum and intratesticular testosterone and increased luteinizing hormone (LH) levels compared with wild type (WT) mice, indicating primary hypogonadism in Sickle mice. LH-, dbcAMP-, and pregnenolone- (but not 22-hydroxycholesterol)- stimulated testosterone production by Leydig cells isolated from the Sickle mouse testis was decreased compared to that of WT mice, implying defective Leydig cell steroidogenesis. There also was reduced protein expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR), but not cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), in the Sickle mouse testis. These data suggest that the capacity of P450scc to support testosterone production may be limited by the supply of cholesterol to the mitochondria in Sickle mice. The sickle mouse testis exhibited upregulated NADPH oxidase subunit gp91phox and increased oxidative stress, measured as 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, and unchanged protein expression of an antioxidant glutathione peroxidase-1. Mice heterozygous for the human sickle globin (Hemi) exhibited intermediate hypogonadal changes between those of WT and Sickle mice. These results demonstrate that testosterone deficiency occurs in Sickle mice, mimicking the human condition. The defects in the Leydig cell steroidogenic pathway in Sickle mice, mainly due to reduced availability of cholesterol for testosterone production, may be related to NADPH oxidase-derived oxidative stress. Our findings suggest that targeting testicular oxidative stress or steroidogenesis mechanisms in SCD offers a potential treatment for improving phenotypic changes associated with testosterone deficiency in this disease.

  12. Sickle erythrocytes inhibit human endothelial cell DNA synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, R.; Zhou, M.A.; Bartlett-Pandite, A.; Wenc, K. )

    1990-11-15

    Patients with sickle cell anemia experience severe vascular occlusive phenomena including acute pain crisis and cerebral infarction. Obstruction occurs at both the microvascular and the arterial level, and the clinical presentation of vascular events is heterogeneous, suggesting a complex etiology. Interaction between sickle erythrocytes and the endothelium may contribute to vascular occlusion due to alteration of endothelial function. To investigate this hypothesis, human vascular endothelial cells were overlaid with sickle or normal erythrocytes and stimulated to synthesize DNA. The erythrocytes were sedimented onto replicate monolayers by centrifugation for 10 minutes at 17 g to insure contact with the endothelial cells. Incorporation of 3H-thymidine into endothelial cell DNA was markedly inhibited during contact with sickle erythrocytes. This inhibitory effect was enhanced more than twofold when autologous sickle plasma was present during endothelial cell labeling. Normal erythrocytes, with or without autologous plasma, had a modest effect on endothelial cell DNA synthesis. When sickle erythrocytes in autologous sickle plasma were applied to endothelial monolayers for 1 minute, 10 minutes, or 1 hour and then removed, subsequent DNA synthesis by the endothelial cells was inhibited by 30% to 40%. Although adherence of sickle erythrocytes to the endothelial monolayers was observed under these experimental conditions, the effect of sickle erythrocytes on endothelial DNA synthesis occurred in the absence of significant adherence. Hence, human endothelial cell DNA synthesis is partially inhibited by contact with sickle erythrocytes. The inhibitory effect of sickle erythrocytes occurs during a brief (1 minute) contact with the endothelial monolayers, and persists for at least 6 hours of 3H-thymidine labeling.

  13. Sickle Cell Disease and Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Sickle Cell Disease Pulmonary & PH Hypertension Did you know that if you have Sickle Cell Disease you are at risk for Pulmonary Hypertension? ... for example), chronic liver disease, congenital heart disease, sickle cell disease and HIV infection. Finally, PAH can be ...

  14. Sickle Cell Disease: A Brief Update.

    PubMed

    Azar, Sharl; Wong, Trisha E

    2017-03-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited monogenic disease characterized by misshapen red blood cells that causes vaso-occlusive disease, vasculopathy, and systemic inflammation. Approximately 300,000 infants are born per year with SCD globally. Acute, chronic, and acute-on-chronic complications contribute to end-organ damage and adversely affect quantity and quality of life. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the only cure available today, but is not feasible for the vast majority of people suffering from SCD. Fortunately, new therapies are in late clinical trials and more are in the pipeline, offering hope for this unfortunate disease, which has increasing global burden.

  15. Lung imaging during acute chest syndrome in sickle cell disease: computed tomography patterns and diagnostic accuracy of bedside chest radiograph

    PubMed Central

    Mekontso Dessap, Armand; Deux, Jean-François; Habibi, Anoosha; Abidi, Nour; Godeau, Bertrand; Adnot, Serge; Brun-Buisson, Christian; Rahmouni, Alain; Galacteros, Frederic; Maitre, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The lung computed tomography (CT) features of acute chest syndrome (ACS) in sickle cell disease patients is not well described and the diagnostic performance of bedside chest radiograph (CR) has not been tested. Our objectives were to describe CT features of ACS and evaluate the reproducibility and diagnostic performance of bedside CR. Methods We screened 127 consecutive patients during 166 ACS episodes and 145 CT scans (in 118 consecutive patients) were included in the study. Results Among the 145 CT scans, 139 (96%) exhibited a new pulmonary opacity and 84 (58%) exhibited at least one complete lung segment consolidation. Consolidations were predominant as compared to ground-glass opacities and atelectasis. Lung parenchyma was increasingly consolidated from apex to base; the right and left inferior lobes were almost always involved in patients with a new complete lung segment consolidation on CT scan (98% and 95% of cases respectively). Patients with a new complete lung segment consolidation on CT scan had a more severe presentation and course as compared to others. The sensitivity of bedside CR for the diagnosis of ACS using CT as a reference was good (>85%) whereas the specificity was weak (<60%). Conclusion ACS more frequently presented on CT as a consolidation pattern, predominating in lung bases. The reproducibility and diagnostic capacity of bedside CR were far from perfect. These findings may help improve the bedside imaging diagnosis of ACS. PMID:23925645

  16. Chronic and acute anemia and extracranial internal carotid stenosis are risk factors for silent cerebral infarcts in sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Bernaudin, Françoise; Verlhac, Suzanne; Arnaud, Cécile; Kamdem, Annie; Vasile, Manuela; Kasbi, Florence; Hau, Isabelle; Madhi, Fouad; Fourmaux, Christine; Biscardi, Sandra; Epaud, Ralph; Pondarré, Corinne

    2015-03-05

    Early transcranial Doppler (TCD) screening of the Créteil sickle cell anemia (SCA)-newborn cohort, and rapid initiation of transfusion programs, resulted in successful prevention of overt strokes, but a high cumulative risk of silent cerebral infarcts (SCI) remained, suggesting that TCD screening does not identify all patients with SCA at risk for SCI. We hypothesized that episodes of hypoperfusion/hypoxia, as observed during acute chest syndromes or acute anemic events (AAE), and extracranial internal carotid artery (eICA) stenoses, detectable via submandibular Doppler sonography and cervical magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), could also be risk factors for SCI. This study includes 189 stroke-free patients with SCA from the Créteil newborn cohort (1992-2010) followed longitudinally by magnetic resonance imaging/MRA, including cervical MRA at the last assessment. All patients with abnormal TCD and/or intracranial stenoses were placed on a transfusion program. Mean follow-up was 9.9 years (range, 2.2-19.9 years; 1844 patient-years). Annual rates of clinical events were calculated. The cumulative risk for SCI was 39.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 23.5%-54.7%) by age 18 years, with no plateau. We confirm that baseline hemoglobin level lower than 7 g/dL before age 3 years is a highly significant predictive risk factor for SCI (hazard ratio, 2.97; 95% CI, 1.43-6.17; P = .004). Furthermore, we show that AAE rate (odds ratio, 2.64 per unit increase; 95% CI, 1.09-6.38; P = .031) and isolated eICA stenosis (odds ratio, 3.19; 95% CI, 1.18-8.70; P = .023) are significant and independent risk factors for SCI.

  17. Sickle cell disease: acute clinical manifestations in early childhood and molecular characteristics in a group of children in Rio de Janeiro

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Filho, Isaac Lima; Ribeiro, Georgina Severo; Moura, Patrícia Gomes; Vechi, Monica Longo; Cavalcante, Andréa Cony; de Andrada-Serpa, Maria José

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To describe clinical events of sickle cell disease and the correlation with β-globin haplotypes and α-thalassemia in under 6-year-old children. Methods A retrospective study was conducted of under 6-year-old children from the neonatal screening program in Rio de Janeiro. Forty-eight male and 48 female children were enrolled in this study, 79 with sickle cell anemia and 17 with hemoglobin SC. The mean age was 29.9 (standard deviation = 20.9) months, 62 (16.2 ± 8.6) were aged between 0-3 years old and 34 (54.9 ± 11.3) were from 3-6 years old. Painful events, acute splenic sequestration, hemolytic crises, hand-foot and acute chest syndromes and infections were evaluated. Results The events were more frequent in under 3-year-old children, 94% of children had at least one episode. Infection was the most common event affecting 88.5% of children. Acute splenic sequestration took place earlier, while painful crises and acute chest syndromes in under 6-year-old children. Thal-α 3.7 was observed in 20.9% of cases. Bantu was the most frequent haplotype found, followed by Benin. No correlation was observed between clinical events and β-globin haplotypes. Children with sickle cell anemia and α-thalassemia have less infectious events. No correlation was found among these polymorphisms and clinical events, however, the majority of children with Bantu/Bantu and without α-thalassemia had more clinical events. PMID:23049419

  18. First report of successful stem cell transplantation in a patient with sickle cell hemoglobin D disease.

    PubMed

    Hamidieh, Amir Ali; Jalili, Mahdi; Khojasteh, Omid; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir

    2010-07-01

    Sickle cell hemoglobin D disease is a rare variant of sickle cell disease. Affected patients suffer from episodes of acute exacerbation of clinical course with a wide range of manifestations such as acute chest syndrome, stroke, painful vaso-occlusive crises, acute sequestration crises, joint necrosis, organ failure, infections, and temporary aplastic crises, collectively called sickling crises. Conventional treatments for patients with sickle cell disease include hydroxyurea therapy and prophylactic red blood cell transfusion. However, morbidity and mortality rates remain high with these remedies. In this article, we report hematopoietic stem cell transplantation as an alternative treatment in children with high-risk factors. According to our knowledge and an extensive review of the literature, stem cell transplantation in sickle cell hemoglobin D disease previously has not been reported in any published study and our patient is the first case.

  19. [Advances in sickle cell disease].

    PubMed

    de Montalembert, Mariane

    2008-10-01

    Generation of transgenic mice have identified new pathophysiological mechanisms in sickle disease, including a permanent proinflammatory state and dysregulation of vascular tone. Treatment is no longer solely symptomatic. New agents target red cell hydration and the kinetics of deoxyhemoglobin S polymerization. Hydroxyurea, which reactivates fetal hemoglobin synthesis, is now widely used. Anti-adhesion molecules and agents modulating vascular tone are being tried in sickle mice. Bone marrow transplantation is widely used to cure patients with HLA-identical siblings, and gene therapy looks promising for those without a donor.

  20. "I Have Sickle Cell Disease, But Sickle Cell Doesn't Have Me" | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Special Section: Sickle Cell Disease "I Have Sickle Cell Disease, But Sickle Cell Doesn't Have Me" Past ... Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. On living with sickle cell disease: I've lived with sickle cell my whole ...

  1. Sub-acute hemolysis in sickle cell mice causes priapism secondary to NO imbalance and PDE5 dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Sopko, Nikolai A.; Matsui, Hotaka; Hannan, Johanna L.; Berkowitz, Dan; Champion, Hunter C.; Hsu, Lewis L.; Musicki, Biljana; Burnett, Arthur L.; Bivalacqua, Trinity J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Recent research suggests that priapism in Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) is due to dysregulation of penile erection homeostasis including alteration of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) activities by excessive levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) released during hemolysis. It is unknown if sub-acute exposure to hemolysis is sufficient or if chronic reconditioning of erectile tissues is required for perturbation of homeostatic pathways and whether PDE5 inhibitor (PDE5I) treatment can restore erectile homeostasis in the sub-acute setting. Aims To investigate the effects of sub-acute hemolysis (3 month exposure) on priapism and NO pathway regulation. Methods Mice underwent bone marrow transplantation with either SCD (BM-SS) or wild type (WT) bone marrow. BM-SS mice were treated with sildenafil 100mg/kg/day. We measured intracavernous pressure (ICP) measurements with or without cavernosal nerve stimulation (CNS) following bone marrow transplantation to assess for priapism. Main Outcome Measures ICP and frequency of erections were assessed. Penile tissues were analyzed for NOS, PKG, PDE5, and ROS activities. Results BM-SS mice demonstrated a priapism phenotype. PDE5I treatment reduced the frequency of erections in BM-SS mice (1.7 ± 1.1 vs. 5.5 ± 2.8 erections/hour, p<0.05). Penile tissues from BM-SS mice demonstrated decreased NOS, PKG, PDE5 and elevated ROS activities compared to that of control mice. PDE5I treatment increased NOS (11.6 ± 1.3% vs. 7.8 ± 2.3%, p<0.05) and PDE5 (76.3 ± 9.8% vs. 52.3 ± 11.1%, p<0.05) activities and decreased ROS activity (137.8 ± 12.1% vs. 199.1 ± 11.3%, p<0.05) compared to non-PDE5I treated BM-SS mice. PKG activity was increased beyond control levels with PDE5I treatment (158.4 ± 10.3%, p<0.05). Conclusion Short-term hemolysis is sufficient to establish a priapism phenotype and results in loss of erectile function. PDE5I treatment ameliorates priapism, in part, due to restored NO balance with

  2. Role of Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress in Sickle Cell Trait and Disease.

    PubMed

    Chirico, Erica N; Faës, Camille; Connes, Philippe; Canet-Soulas, Emmanuelle; Martin, Cyril; Pialoux, Vincent

    2016-05-01

    Sickle cell disease is a class of hemoglobinopathy in humans, which is the most common inherited disease in the world. Although complications of sickle cell disease start from polymerization of red blood cells during its deoxygenating phase, the oxidative stress resulting from the biological processes associated with this disease (ischaemic and hypoxic injuries, hemolysis and inflammation) has been shown to contribute to its pathophysiology. It is widely known that chronic exercise reduces oxidative stress in healthy people, mainly via improvement of antioxidant enzyme efficiency. In addition, recent studies in other diseases, as well as in sickle cell trait carriers and in a mouse model of sickle cell disease, have shown that regular physical activity could decrease oxidative stress. The purpose of this review is to summarize the role of oxidative stress in sickle cell disease and the effects of acute and chronic exercise on the pro-oxidant/antioxidant balance in sickle cell trait and sickle cell disease.

  3. Sickle cell disease: clinical management.

    PubMed

    Ballas, S K

    1998-03-01

    Sickle cell syndromes are a group of inherited disorders of haemoglobin structure that have no cure in adults at the present time. Bone marrow transplantation in children has been shown to be curative in selected patients. The phenotypic expression of these disorders and their clinical severity vary greatly among patients and longitudinally in the same patient. They are multisystem disorders and influence all aspects of the life of affected individuals including social interactions, family relations, peer interaction, intimate relationships, education, employment, spiritual attitudes and navigating the complexities of the health care system, providers and their ancillary functions. The clinical manifestations of these syndromes are protean. In this review emphasis is placed on four sets of major complications of these syndromes and their management. The first set pertains to the management of anaemia and its sequelae; the second set addresses painful syndromes both acute and chronic; the third set discusses infections; the fourth section deals with organ failure. New experimental therapies for these disorders are briefly mentioned at the end. Efforts were made to include several tables and figures to clarify the message of this review.

  4. Orbital Infarction due to Sickle Cell Disease without Orbital Pain

    PubMed Central

    Mai, Kim-Binh T.

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is a hemoglobinopathy that results in paroxysmal arteriolar occlusion and tissue infarction that can manifest in a plurality of tissues. Rarely, these infarcted crises manifest in the bony orbit. Orbital infarction usually presents with acute onset of periorbital tenderness, swelling, erythema, and pain. Soft tissue swelling can result in proptosis and attenuation of extraocular movements. Expedient diagnosis of sickle cell orbital infarction is crucial because this is a potentially sight-threatening entity. Diagnosis can be delayed since the presentation has physical and radiographic findings mimicking various infectious and traumatic processes. We describe a patient who presented with sickle cell orbital crisis without pain. This case highlights the importance of maintaining a high index of suspicion in patients with known sickle cell disease or of African descent born outside the United States in a region where screening for hemoglobinopathy is not routine, even when the presentation is not classic. PMID:27891273

  5. Computed tomography of the spleen and liver in sickle cell disease

    SciTech Connect

    Magid, D.; Fishman, E.K.; Siegelman, S.S.

    1984-08-01

    The spleen was assessed in 10 patients with sickle cell disease studied with computed tomography (CT) for abdominal pain and/or unexplained fever. Patients with homozygous sickle cell anemia were found to have small, densely calcified spleens with occasional low-density infarcts. Five of six had hepatomegaly, and there was one case each of hepatic abscess, infarcts, and hemochromatosis. All patients with heterozygous sickle cell disease were found to have splenomegaly, with a variety of findings including acute hemorrhage, acute and chronic infarcts, rupture, and possible sequestration. It was concluded that CT is useful for evaluating the status of the spleen and liver in symptomatic patients with sickle cell disease.

  6. Advances in management of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, M B

    2003-08-01

    Sickle cell disease is numerically as common as thalassaemia. However, it affects relatively under privileged population i.e. tribal population belonging to economically poor class and having inadequate access to education and modern health facilities. A recent explosion acknowledged in understanding the pathogenesis of this disease has lead to newer dimensions in treatment. Some of these viz. prevention of overwhelming bacterial infection, present indications and controversies regarding blood transfusion, prevention of stroke, acute chest syndrome, hydroxyurea therapy--probably the best disease modifying agent at the moment, stem cell transplantation--a cure and certain promising experimental therapies including gene therapy have been discussed in this review.

  7. [Susceptibility of induced sickle in samples of heterozygous hemoglobin S patients (sickle cell trait) suffering diabetes mellitus type 2].

    PubMed

    Díaz-Piedra, Pablo; Cervantes-Villagrana, Alberto Rafael; Ramos-Jiménez, Raúl; Presno-Bernal, José Miguel; Cervantes-Villagrana, Rodolfo Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Hemoglobin S is an abnormal protein that induces morphological changes in erythrocyte in low-oxygen conditions. In Mexico, it is reported that up to 13.7% of the population with mutation in one allele are considered asymptomatic (sickle cell trait). The sickle cell trait and diabetes mellitus are conditions that occur together in more than one million patients worldwide. Both diseases possibly produce microvascular changes in retinopathy and acute chest syndrome. The aim of this study was to evaluate the induction of sickle cells in samples of diabetic patients with sickle cell trait to identify altered red cell parameters. We obtained samples of diabetic patients to determine hemoglobin A1c and S; furthermore, red blood cell biometrics data were analyzed. We found that older men with diabetes were susceptible to generate sickle cells and this correlated with reduced red blood cell count and an increase in media cell volume. In samples of women diabetes, there were no differences. We conclude that samples from patients with sickle cell trait and diabetes can cause sickle cells with high frequency in men, with lower red blood cells count and increased mean corpuscular volume as susceptibility parameters.

  8. Current issues in sickle cell pain and its management.

    PubMed

    Ballas, Samir K

    2007-01-01

    Pain is the insignia of sickle cell disease and the acute painful crisis is the number-one cause of hospital admissions. Tissue damage due to vaso-occlusion releases numerous inflammatory mediators that initiate the transmission of painful stimuli and the perception of pain. The acute sickle cell painful crisis evolves along four distinct phases coupled with changes in certain markers of the disease. Hospital readmission within 1 week occurs in about 16% of discharged patients. Failure to treat acute pain aggressively may lead to chronic pain syndrome. Management of sickle pain is primarily pharmacologic in nature, and opioids are the analgesics used most often. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of opioids explain individual differences among patients and justify the use of individualized treatment plans.

  9. Human genome project and sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Norman, Brenda J; Miller, Sheila D

    2011-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is one of the most common genetic blood disorders in the United States that affects 1 in every 375 African Americans. Sickle cell disease is an inherited condition caused by abnormal hemoglobin in the red blood cells. The Human Genome Project has provided valuable insight and extensive research advances in the understanding of the human genome and sickle cell disease. Significant progress in genetic knowledge has led to an increase in the ability for researchers to map and sequence genes for diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of sickle cell disease and other chronic illnesses. This article explores some of the recent knowledge and advances about sickle cell disease and the Human Genome Project.

  10. Sickle cell anemia, the first molecular disease: overview of molecular etiology, pathophysiology, and therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Martin H

    2008-12-25

    The root cause of sickle cell disease is a single beta-globin gene mutation coding for the sickle beta-hemoglobin chain. Sickle hemoglobin tetramers polymerize when deoxygenated, damaging the sickle erythrocyte. A multifaceted pathophysiology, triggered by erythrocyte injury induced by the sickle hemoglobin polymer, and encompassing more general cellular and tissue damage caused by hypoxia, oxidant damage, inflammation, abnormal intracellular interactions, and reduced nitric oxide bioavailability, sets off the events recognized clinically as sickle cell disease. This disease is a group of related disorders where sickle hemoglobin is the principal hemoglobin species. All have varying degrees of chronic hemolytic anemia, vasculopathy, vasoocclusive disease, acute and chronic organ damage, and shortened life span. Its complex pathophysiology, of which we have a reasonable understanding, provides multiple loci for potential therapeutic intervention.

  11. Sickle Cell Trait, Exercise, and Altitude.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1986-01-01

    Sickle cell trait is generally benign and does not shorten life, but it may confer some small risk with extremes of exercise or altitude. Research concerning these risks is presented, and it is concluded sickle cell trait is no barrier to outstanding athletic performance. (Author/MT)

  12. Mortality by sickle cell disease in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Arduini, Giovanna Abadia Oliveira; Rodrigues, Letícia Pinto; Trovó de Marqui, Alessandra Bernadete

    This work aimed to characterize mortality by sickle cell disease in Brazil. The MEDLINE electronic database was searched using the terms 'mortality' and 'sickle cell disease' and 'Brazil' for articles published in the last five years aiming to provide a current analysis of the subject in question. Eight studies on mortality by sickle cell disease were carried out in the Brazilian states of Maranhão, Bahia, Minas Gerais, Rio de Janeiro and Mato Grosso do Sul. The majority of the deaths occurred in patients with sickle cell anemia, which is the most common genotype and causes the most severe clinical manifestation of the disease. In summary, there are few published studies on mortality related to sickle cell disease in Brazil, and most are from the state of Minas Gerais. This study emphasizes the importance of developing more studies on sickle cell disease mortality, so that it may be possible to profile gene carriers and give health professionals more data to strategize the delivery of more effective assistance to these individuals. Despite the early diagnosis of sickle cell disease by the Neonatal Screening Program and the use of preventive and therapeutic measures (penicillin, immunization and hydroxyurea), mortality by sickle cell disease on the world stage is still significant.

  13. The Student with Sickle Cell Anemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tetrault, Sylvia M.

    1981-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is the most common and severe of inherited chronic blood disorders. In the United States, sickle cell anemia is most common among the Black population. Among the most commonly occurring symptoms are: an enlarged spleen, episodes of severe pain, easily contracted infections, skin ulcers, and frequent urination. (JN)

  14. Acute chest syndrome is associated with single nucleotide polymorphism-defined beta globin cluster haplotype in children with sickle cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    Bean, Christopher J; Boulet, Sheree L; Yang, Genyan; Payne, Amanda B; Ghaji, Nafisa; Pyle, Meredith E; Hooper, W Craig; Bhatnagar, Pallav; Keefer, Jeffrey; Barron-Casella, Emily A; Casella, James F; Debaun, Michael R

    2013-10-01

    Genetic diversity at the human β-globin locus has been implicated as a modifier of sickle cell anaemia (SCA) severity. However, haplotypes defined by restriction fragment length polymorphism sites across the β-globin locus have not been consistently associated with clinical phenotypes. To define the genetic structure at the β-globin locus more thoroughly, we performed high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) mapping in 820 children who were homozygous for the sickle cell mutation (HbSS). Genotyping results revealed very high linkage disequilibrium across a large region spanning the locus control region and the HBB (β-globin gene) cluster. We identified three predominant haplotypes accounting for 96% of the β(S) -carrying chromosomes in this population that could be distinguished using a minimal set of common SNPs. Consistent with previous studies, fetal haemoglobin level was significantly associated with β(S) -haplotypes. After controlling for covariates, an association was detected between haplotype and rate of hospitalization for acute chest syndrome (ACS) (incidence rate ratio 0·51, 95% confidence interval 0·29-0·89) but not incidence rate of vaso-occlusive pain or presence of silent cerebral infarct (SCI). Our results suggest that these SNP-defined β(S) -haplotypes may be associated with ACS, but not pain or SCI in a study population of children with SCA.

  15. 21 CFR 864.7825 - Sickle cell test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sickle cell test. 864.7825 Section 864.7825 Food... DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7825 Sickle cell test. (a) Identification. A sickle cell test is a device used to determine the sickle cell hemoglobin content of...

  16. 21 CFR 864.7825 - Sickle cell test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sickle cell test. 864.7825 Section 864.7825 Food... DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7825 Sickle cell test. (a) Identification. A sickle cell test is a device used to determine the sickle cell hemoglobin content of...

  17. 21 CFR 864.7825 - Sickle cell test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sickle cell test. 864.7825 Section 864.7825 Food... DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7825 Sickle cell test. (a) Identification. A sickle cell test is a device used to determine the sickle cell hemoglobin content of...

  18. 21 CFR 864.7825 - Sickle cell test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sickle cell test. 864.7825 Section 864.7825 Food... DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7825 Sickle cell test. (a) Identification. A sickle cell test is a device used to determine the sickle cell hemoglobin content of...

  19. 21 CFR 864.7825 - Sickle cell test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sickle cell test. 864.7825 Section 864.7825 Food... DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7825 Sickle cell test. (a) Identification. A sickle cell test is a device used to determine the sickle cell hemoglobin content of...

  20. Juvenile fibromyalgia in an adolescent patient with sickle cell disease presenting with chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Ramprakash, Stalin; Fishman, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    Juvenile fibromyalgia in children with sickle cell disease has not been reported in the literature. We report an adolescent patient with sickle cell whose pain symptoms progressed from having recurrent acute sickle cell pain crisis episodes to a chronic pain syndrome over several years. He was eventually diagnosed with juvenile fibromyalgia based on the clinical history and myofascial tender points and his pain symptoms responded better to multidisciplinary strategies for chronic fibromyalgia pain. Chronic pain in sickle cell disease is an area of poor research, and in addition there is inconsistency in the definition of chronic pain in sickle cell disease. Central sensitisation to pain is shown to occur after recurrent painful stimuli in a genetically vulnerable individual. In a chronic pain condition such as fibromyalgia central sensitisation is thought to play a key role. Fibromyalgia should be considered as one of the main differential diagnosis in any sickle cell patient with chronic pain.

  1. Ischemic Monomeric Neuropathy in a Woman with Sickle Cell Anaemia

    PubMed Central

    Aiken, Laura; Linpower, Lisa; Tsitsikas, Dimitris A.

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is an inherited haemoglobinopathy that can affect multiple organs and systems. The most common neurological complication in sickle cell disease is stroke and silent cerebral infarcts. Peripheral nervous system involvement has been described but is exceedingly rare. Herein, we describe the case of a young woman who presented with acute flaccid paralysis and sensory loss of the left lower extremity in the context of a painful vasoocclusive crisis which resolved rapidly after receiving an emergency automated red cell exchange transfusion. PMID:27994894

  2. Dopamine D3 Receptor Ser9Gly and Catechol-O-methyltransferase Val158Met Polymorphisms and Acute Pain in Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jhun, Ellie; He, Ying; Yao, Yingwei; Molokie, Robert E.; Wilkie, Diana J.; Wang, Zaijie Jim

    2014-01-01

    Background Pain in sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized by episodes of acute pain, primarily responsible for acute health care utilization, and persistent chronic pain. Pain severity and frequency vary significantly among SCD patients. In this study, we investigated the possible contribution of monoamine gene polymorphisms to pain variation. Methods Adult subjects with SCD completed PAINReportIt®, a computerized McGill Pain Questionnaire, from which we calculated the Composite Pain Index. Utilization data were obtained from the medical record and biweekly telephone calls for 12 months. Utilization is defined as admissions to the emergency department and/or the acute care center resulting from a sickle cell pain crisis. We performed genotyping for catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) Val158Met (rs4680) and dopamine D3 receptor(DRD3) Ser9Gly (rs6280) polymorphisms, which were analyzed for associations with pain phenotypes. Results Binary logistic models revealed that DRD3 Ser9Gly heterozygote patients were more likely not to have an acute pain crisis (odds ratio [OR] [95% confidence interval (CI)], 4.37 [1.39, 22.89]; p=0.020), which remained so when demographic variables were considered (OR [95% CI], 4.53 [1.41, 28.58]; p=0.016). COMT Val158Met Met allele showed lower probability for zero utilization (OR [95% CI], 0.32 [0.12, 0.83]; p=0.020) than the Val allele. In the negative binomial regression analysis, subjects with COMT Met/Met genotype had utilization incident rate ratio [95% CI] of 2.20 [1.21, 3.99] over those with Val/Val (p=0.010). Conclusions These exploratory findings suggest that DRD3 Ser9Gly and COMT Val158Met may contribute to pain heterogeneity in SCD, as suggested by the different rates of acute pain crisis. Specifically, SCD patients with the DRD3 homozygote genotypes, COMT 158 Met allele or Met/Met genotype are more likely to have acute care utilization, an indicator of acute pain. These results, however, will need to be further examined in

  3. Reticulocyte count is the most important predictor of acute cerebral ischemia and high-risk transcranial Doppler in a newborn cohort of 395 children with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Belisário, André Rolim; Sales, Rahyssa Rodrigues; Toledo, Nayara Evelin; Muniz, Maristela Braga de Sousa Rodrigues; Velloso-Rodrigues, Cibele; Silva, Célia Maria; Viana, Marcos Borato

    2016-10-01

    Stroke is a severe clinical manifestation of sickle cell anemia (SCA). Despite the prognostic relevance of transcranial Doppler (TCD), more accurate tools to assess stroke risk in children with SCA are required. Here, we describe the effect of clinical, laboratory, and molecular features on the risk of stroke and high-risk TCD in children from the newborn cohort of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Outcomes studied were acute cerebral ischemia and high-risk TCD. Clinical and hematological data were retrieved from children's records. Genetic markers, which were known for their association with stroke risk, were genotyped by polymerase chain reaction/restriction fragment length polymorphism and sequencing. The cumulative incidence of acute cerebral ischemia by the age of 8 years was 7.4 % and that of high-risk TCD by the age of 11.5 years was 14.2 %. The final multivariate model for acute cerebral ischemia risk included high white blood cell count and reticulocyte count, acute chest syndrome rate, and the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) TEK rs489347 and TNF-α rs1800629. The model for high-risk TCD included high reticulocyte count and the SNPs TEK rs489347 and TGFBR3 rs284875. Children with risk factors should be considered for intensive risk monitoring and for intervention therapy.

  4. Sickle cell disease pain management in adolescents: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Bridget H; Nelson, Jessica

    2015-04-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) pain continues to emerge in adolescents. More than 98,000 individuals are believed to have SCD in the United States. In fact, 1 in 500 Black infants will be affected by SCD. Identifying standards of care for this unique population can improve pain management and treatment. A significant effect of vaso-occlusive crisis is a decrease in the quality of life in children. Therefore, pain management is multidimensional and includes pharmacologic, physical, and psychological strategies. A review of the literature was conducted to identify best practices regarding pain management in adolescents with sickle cell anemia. Key words such as pain, pain management, adolescent sickle cell anemia, and acute sickle cell pain were entered into databases to reveal qualitative and quantitative studies from 2009 to the present. Many of the research articles identified poor SCD pain management. Studies showed that acute SCD pain management is essential and should be evaluated and robustly managed to achieve optimum pain relief for patients. Acute SCD pain usually occurs as a result of vaso-occlusive crisis. Untreated acute SCD pain can result in morbidity and mortality in adolescents. Nursing knowledge is critical to reducing the stigma and improving management of SCD pain. Nurses play a vital role in the introduction of evidence-based practice within the clinical setting. In an effort to educate nurses and other health care professionals about SCD, this article is a literature review of studies concerning SCD and pain management in emergency rooms.

  5. HLA DRB1*130101-DQB1*060101 haplotype is associated with acute chest syndrome in sickle cell anemia patients.

    PubMed

    Mahdi, N; Al-Subaie, A M; Al-Ola, K; Al-Irhayim, A Q; Ali, M E; Al-Irhayim, Z; Almawi, W Y

    2009-03-01

    We investigated the association of human leukocyte antigens (HLA) class II alleles and haplotypes with the pathogenesis of acute chest syndrome (ACS) in 186 sickle cell anemia (SCA) patients, of whom 58 had documented ACS (new pulmonary infiltrate, fever, and other associated clinical events) and 128 with a negative history of ACS, serving as controls. HLA DRB1* and -DQB1* genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific priming. Of the DRB1* and DQB1* alleles analyzed, only DRB1*130101 (Pc < 0.001) was positively associated with ACS. DRB1*130101-DQB1*060101 haplotype was more prevalent among ACS patients (P = 0.018), thus conferring disease susceptibility. Specific HLA alleles and haplotypes may influence ACS risk in SCA patients, and specific HLA genotypes may be useful markers for identifying high-risk SCA ACS patients.

  6. Genetic modulation of sickle cell anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, M.H.

    1995-05-01

    Sickle cell anemia, a common disorder associated with reduced life span of the red blood cell and vasoocclusive events, is caused by a mutation in the {Beta}-hemoglobin gene. Yet, despite this genetic homogeneity, the phenotype of the disease is heterogeneous. This suggests the modulating influence of associated inherited traits. Some of these may influence the accumulation of fetal hemoglobin, a hemoglobin type that interferes with the polymerization of sickle hemoglobin. Another inherited trait determines the accumulation of {alpha}-globin chains. This review focuses on potential genetic regulators of the phenotype of sickle cell anemia. 125 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Protrusio acetabuli in sickle-cell anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, S.; Apple, J.S.; Baber, C.; Putman, C.E.; Rosse, W.F.

    1984-04-01

    Of 155 adults with sickle-cell anemia (SS, SC), radiographs of the pelvis or hip demonstrated protrusio acetabuli on at least one side in 14 (3 men and 11 women), as indicated by projection of the acetabular line medial to the ilio-ischial line. All 14 patients had bone changes attributable to sickle-cell anemia, including marrow hyperplasia and osteonecrosis; however, the severity of femoral or acetabular osteonecrosis did not appear directly related to the protrusion. The authors conclude that sickle-cell anemia can predispose to development of protrusio acetabuli.

  8. [Segmental testicular infarction in sickle cell anemia].

    PubMed

    Mueller, F E

    2014-05-01

    Vascular occlusions are the clinical indicators of sickle cell disease and in urology they can lead to papillary necrosis, renal infarction or priapism. Segmental testicular infarction in patients with sickle cell disease is a rare event and only a few cases have been reported. We present a 25-year-old man with right testicular pain increasing over 3 days and sickle cell disease. Ultrasound of the right scrotum presented an inhomogeneous, mainly hypoechegenic mass with a hyperechogenic margin and no sign of blood flow. A partial orchiectomy was performed with total enucleation of the lesion, which was histologically diagnosed as benign hemorrhagic necrotic testicular tissue.

  9. Pathology of Berkeley sickle cell mice: similarities and differences with human sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Manci, Elizabeth A; Hillery, Cheryl A; Bodian, Carol A; Zhang, Zheng G; Lutty, Gerard A; Coller, Barry S

    2006-02-15

    Because Berkeley sickle cell mice are used as an animal model for human sickle cell disease, we investigated the progression of the histopathology in these animals over 6 months and compared these findings to those published in humans with sickle cell disease. The murine study groups were composed of wild-type mixed C57Bl/6-SV129 (control) mice and sickle cell (SS) mice (alpha-/-, beta-/-, transgene +) of both sexes and between 1 and 6 months of age. SS mice were similar to humans with sickle cell disease in having erythrocytic sickling, vascular ectasia, intravascular hemolysis, exuberant hematopoiesis, cardiomegaly, glomerulosclerosis, visceral congestion, hemorrhages, multiorgan infarcts, pyknotic neurons, and progressive siderosis. Cerebral perfusion studies demonstrated increased blood-brain barrier permeability in SS mice. SS mice differed from humans with sickle cell disease in having splenomegaly, splenic hematopoiesis, more severe hepatic infarcts, less severe pulmonary manifestations, no significant vascular intimal hyperplasia, and only a trend toward vascular medial hypertrophy. Early retinal degeneration caused by a homozygous mutation (rd1) independent from that causing sickle hemoglobin was an incidental finding in some Berkeley mice. While our study reinforces the fundamental strength of this model, the notable differences warrant careful consideration when drawing parallels to human sickle cell disease.

  10. Effect of automated red cell exchanges on oxygen saturation on-air, blood parameters and length of hospitalization in sickle cell disease patients with acute chest syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Aneke, John C.; Huntley, Nancy; Porter, John; Eleftheriou, Perla

    2016-01-01

    Background: Red cell exchanges (RCEs) lead to improvement in tissue oxygenation and reduction in inflammatory markers in sickle cell disease (SCD) patients who present with acute chest syndrome (ACS). The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of automated-RCE (auto-RCE) on oxygen saturation (SpO2) on-air, blood counts, the time to correct the parameters and length of hospitalization after the exchange in SCD patients presenting with ACS. Subjects and Methods: This was 2 years study involving five SCD patients; the time for SpO2 on air to increase to ≥95% and chest symptoms to resolve, postprocedure, as well as the length of in-patient hospitalization was recorded. All data were entered into Statistical Package for Social Sciences Version 20.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) computer software for analyses. Results: The study involved 4 (80%) hemoglobin (Hb) SS and 1 (20%) HbSC patients. The median time of SpO2 recovery was 24 h, ranging from 6 to 96 h. About 60% (3/5) of patients achieved optimal SpO2 within 24 h post-RCE, while discharge from intensive care unit was 24 h after auto-RCE in one patient. The Hb concentration was significantly higher, while the total white cell and absolute neutrophil counts were significantly lower at the time of resolution of symptoms, compared to before auto-RCE (P < 0.05). The average post auto-red cell transfusion symptoms duration was 105.6 (24–240) h while mean inpatient stay was 244.8 (144–456) h. Conclusion: Auto-RCE could reverse hypoxia in ACS within 24 h. PMID:27397962

  11. Sickle Cell Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... in families). It causes a type of abnormal hemoglobin (a protein found in red blood cells). Hemoglobin carries oxygen in the blood. Normal red blood ... betathalassemia, chronic hemolytic anemia, drepanocytic anemia, Hb S disease, ... disease, hemoglobin SC disease, hemoglobin SS disease, hemoglobin synthesis, ...

  12. Preoperative blood transfusions for sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Estcourt, Lise J; Fortin, Patricia M; Trivella, Marialena; Hopewell, Sally

    2016-01-01

    ongoing trials identified. These trials were conducted between 1988 and 2011. The majority of people included had haemoglobin (Hb) SS SCD. The majority of surgical procedures were considered low or intermediate risk for developing sickle cell-related complications. Aggressive versus simple red blood cell transfusions One trial (551 participants) compared an aggressive transfusion regimen (decreasing sickle haemoglobin to less than 30%) to a simple transfusion regimen (increasing haemoglobin to 100 g/l). This trial re-randomised participants and therefore quantitative analysis was only possible on two subsets of data: participants undergoing cholecystectomy (230 participants); and participants undergoing tonsillectomy or adenoidectomy surgeries (107 participants). Data were not combined as we do not know if any participant received both surgeries. Overall, the quality of the evidence was very low across different outcomes according to GRADE methodology. This was due to the trial being at high risk of bias primarily due to lack of blinding, indirectness and the outcome estimates being imprecise. Cholecystectomy subgroup results are reported in the abstract. Results for both subgroups were similar. There was no difference in all-cause mortality between people receiving aggressive transfusions and those receiving conservative transfusions. No deaths occurred in either subgroup. There were no differences between the aggressive transfusion group and conservative transfusion group in the number of people developing: an acute chest syndrome, risk ratio 0.84 (95% confidence interval 0.38 to 1.84) (one trial, 230 participants, very low quality evidence);vaso-occlusive crisis, risk ratio 0.30 (95% confidence interval 0.09 to 1.04) (one trial, 230 participants, very low quality evidence);serious infection, risk ratio 1.75 (95% confidence interval 0.59 to 5.18) (one trial, 230 participants, very low quality evidence);any perioperative complications, risk ratio 0.75 (95% confidence

  13. Haematopoietic cell transplantation in the treatment of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Atkins, Robert C; Walters, Mark C

    2003-12-01

    Allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is presently the only treatment which offers the possibility of a cure for patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). While approximately 84% of patients survive disease-free after human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-identical sibling donor HCT, this therapy has traditionally been reserved for patients who have suffered serious complications due to the risk of transplant-related morbidity and mortality. Typically, these sickle-related complications have included recurrent episodes of acute chest syndrome, recurrent vaso-occlusive episodes and stroke. The future of HCT for haemoglobinopathies undoubtedly will evolve as transplant-related complications are reduced and as the process of selecting patients for HCT is refined.

  14. Kidney abnormalities in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    López Revuelta, K; Ricard Andrés, M P

    2011-01-01

    Patients with sickle cell disease exhibits numerous kidney structural and functional abnormalities, changes that are seen along the entire length of the nephron. Changes are most marked in patients with homozygous sickle cell anemia, but are also seen in those with compound heterozygous states and the sickle cell trait. The renal features of sickle cell disease include some of the most common reasons for referral to nephrologists, such as hematuria, proteinuria, tubular disturbances and chronic kidney disease. Therapy of these conditions requires specialized knowledge of their distinct pathogenic mechanisms. Spanish Haemathology and Hemotherapy Association has recently publicated their Clinical Practice Guidelines of SCD management. Renal chapter is reproduced in this article for Nefrología difussion.

  15. Prevalence of sickle cell disease and sickle cell trait in national neonatal screening studies

    PubMed Central

    Lervolino, Luciana Garcia; Baldin, Paulo Eduardo Almeida; Picado, Silvia Miguéis; Calil, Karina Barreto; Viel, Ana Amélia; Campos, Luiz Alexandre Freixo

    2011-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is the best known hereditary blood disorder; there are serious complications associated with the condition. Diagnosis and early intervention reduce morbidity and mortality. These benefits have resulted in the widespread use of newborn screening education programs. In Brazil, the National Neonatal Screening Program established by decree 822/01 included sickle cell disease in the list of diseases tested in the so called "heel prick test". Since then, national studies of the results of this program have been periodically published. To review the literature in order to assess the prevalence of sickle cell trait and sickle cell anemia from data of national neonatal screening studies on hemoglobin S (Hb S). A bibliographic review was carried out using the key words: sickle cell anemia & hemoglobinopathies & neonatal screening & Brazil in the Bireme and SciELO databases. Original Brazilian studies presenting data on prevalence of the sickle cell trait (Hb AS) and sickle cell anemia (Hb SS) based on neonatal screening for Hb S were analysed. Twelve original national studies were identified with prevalences varying from 1.1% to 9.8% for the sickle cell trait and from 0.8 to 60 per 100,000 live births for sickle cell disease in different Brazilian regions. Conclusion: Neonatal screening for Hb S is a very useful method to assess the prevalence of sickle cell trait (Hb AS) and sickle cell anemia (Hb SS) in Brazil. There is a heterogeneous distribution of this disease with the highest prevalence in the northeastern region and the lowest prevalence in the south. PMID:23284244

  16. Current Management of Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    McGann, Patrick T.; Nero, Alecia C.; Ware, Russell E.

    2013-01-01

    Proper management of sickle cell anemia (SCA) begins with establishing the correct diagnosis early in life, ideally during the newborn period. The identification of affected infants by neonatal screening programs allows early initiation of prophylactic penicillin and pneumococcal immunizations, which help prevent overwhelming sepsis. Ongoing education of families promotes the early recognition of disease-released complications, which allows prompt and appropriate medical evaluation and therapeutic intervention. Periodic evaluation by trained specialists helps provide comprehensive care, including transcranial Doppler examinations to identify children at risk for primary stroke, plus assessments for other parenchymal organ damage as patients become teens and adults. Treatment approaches that previously highlighted acute vaso-occlusive events are now evolving to the concept of preventive therapy. Liberalized use of blood transfusions and early consideration of hydroxyurea treatment represent a new treatment paradigm for SCA management. PMID:23709685

  17. Relationship between pulmonary and cardiac abnormalities in sickle cell disease: implications for the management of patients

    PubMed Central

    Maioli, Maria Christina Paixão; Soares, Andrea Ribeiro; Bedirian, Ricardo; Alves, Ursula David; de Lima Marinho, Cirlene; Lopes, Agnaldo José

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association between clinical, pulmonary, and cardiovascular findings in patients with sickle cell disease and, secondarily, to compare these findings between sickle cell anemia patients and those with other sickle cell diseases. Methods Fifty-nine adults were included in this cross-sectional study; 47 had sickle cell anemia, and 12 had other sickle cell diseases. All patients underwent pulmonary function tests, chest computed tomography, and echocardiography. Results Abnormalities on computed tomography, echocardiography, and pulmonary function tests were observed in 93.5%, 75.0%; and 70.2% of patients, respectively. A higher frequency of restrictive abnormalities was observed in patients with a history of acute chest syndrome (85% vs. 21.6%; p-value < 0.0001) and among patients with increased left ventricle size (48.2% vs. 22.2%; p-value = 0.036), and a higher frequency of reduced respiratory muscle strength was observed in patients with a ground-glass pattern (33.3% vs. 4.3%; p-value = 0.016). Moreover, a higher frequency of mosaic attenuation was observed in patients with elevated tricuspid regurgitation velocity (61.1% vs. 24%; p-value = 0.014). Compared to patients with other sickle cell diseases, sickle cell anemia patients had suffered increased frequencies of acute pain episodes, and acute chest syndrome, and exhibited mosaic attenuation on computed tomography, and abnormalities on echocardiography. Conclusion A significant interrelation between abnormalities of the pulmonary and cardiovascular systems was observed in sickle cell disease patients. Furthermore, the severity of the cardiopulmonary parameters among patients with sickle cell anemia was greater than that of patients with other sickle cell diseases. PMID:26969771

  18. Red Blood Cell Storage Duration is Not Associated with Clinical Outcomes for Acute Chest Syndrome in Children with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fields, Melanie E.; Hulbert, Monica L.; Chen, Ling; Berlin, Ari N.; Jackups, Ron; Spinella, Philip C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Providers commonly transfuse sickle cell disease (SCD) patients with fresh red blood cells (RBCs) as treatment for acute chest syndrome (ACS). The objective of this study is to determine if there is an association between the storage duration of RBCs and length of hospitalization and oxygen requirement after transfusion in pediatric SCD patients with ACS. Study Design and Methods This is a retrospective cohort study of pediatric SCD patients with ACS treated with a simple RBC transfusion over 8.5 years at a single institution. Multivariate generalized estimation equation analysis was used to identify associations between storage duration of RBCs and outcome measures. Results Two hundred thirty-four ACS episodes in 131 subjects were included. The median storage duration of the oldest unit of transfused RBCs was 17 days (IQR 11 – 26). The majority of ACS episodes, 77.4% were treated with 1 unit of transfused RBCs, 20.9% received 2 units and 1.7% received 3 or more units of RBCs. There was no association between the storage duration of the oldest unit of transfused RBCs, and either duration of hospitalization or supplemental oxygen requirement after transfusion in multivariate analyses. Conclusion This retrospective study is one of the first to investigate the role of the storage lesion in children with SCD, and does not support the preferential transfusion of fresh RBCs for ACS. Ultimately, a randomized controlled trial (RCT) is necessary to determine whether the storage age of RBCs affects outcomes for patients with SCD and ACS. PMID:26033266

  19. Sickle cell crisis in the adult: chest radiographic findings and comparison with pediatric sickle cell disease.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, J. A.; Hinrichs, C. R.

    2001-01-01

    With the advent of improved therapy, an increasing proportion of individuals suffering from sickle cell disease (SCD) are surviving into adulthood. In contrast to children, little has been documented concerning the typical radiographic findings in adults presenting with sickle cell crises (SCC). We describe the chest radiographic (CXR) manifestations of adults with SCD presenting in SSC, correlated to hemoglobin (Hb) values, and compare them to those of the pediatric sickle cell population. The chest radiographs of 66 consecutive adults presenting to our emergency department complaining of symptoms consistent with acute SCC were retrospectively reviewed over a 12-month period. The radiographic findings were correlated with admission Hb values and compared with those of 50 children with known SCD presenting with SCC. Chi square analysis revealed no significant difference between the cardiovascular and bony findings in the adults and in those of the pediatric controls (p > 0.08-p > 1.0). However, one important difference in the two cohorts was that upper lobe infiltrates occurred exclusively in the pediatric group (p = 0.06). There was a statistically significant (p < 0.05) difference in cardiovascular and skeletal abnormalities between adults with Hb above and below the mean (8.2 g/dL). The radiographic features of adults presenting in acute SCCs are similar to those of children. Although the chest radiograph is often normal, in decreasing frequency, cardiovascular abnormalities, pneumonia sparing the upper lobes, and aseptic osteonecrosis of the shoulders and spine are not uncommon. There is a significant relationship, however, between cardiovascular abnormalities and Hb levels. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:12653383

  20. Sickle cell, habitual dys-positions and fragile dispositions: young people with sickle cell at school

    PubMed Central

    Dyson, Simon M; Atkin, Karl; Culley, Lorraine A; Dyson, Sue E; Evans, Hala

    2011-01-01

    The experiences of young people living with a sickle cell disorder in schools in England are reported through a thematic analysis of forty interviews, using Bourdieu’s notions of field, capital and habitus. Young people with sickle cell are found to be habitually dys-positioned between the demands of the clinic for health maintenance through self-care and the field of the school, with its emphases on routines, consistent attendance and contextual demands for active and passive pupil behaviour. The tactics or dispositions that young people living with sickle cell can then employ, during strategy and struggle at school, are therefore fragile: they work only contingently, transiently or have the unintended consequences of displacing other valued social relations. The dispositions of the young people with sickle cell are framed by other social struggles: innovations in school procedures merely address aspects of sickle cell in isolation and are not consolidated into comprehensive policies; mothers inform, liaise, negotiate and advocate in support of a child with sickle cell but with limited success. Reactions of teachers and peers to sickle cell have the enduring potential to drain the somatic, cultural and social capital of young people living with sickle cell. PMID:21375541

  1. Sickle Cell Screening: Medical, Legal, Ethical, Psychological and Social Problems; A Sickle Cell Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, James E.

    In recent years, sickle cell screening programs have been initiated by community groups, health centers, hospitals, medical schools, health departments, school systems, city and State governments, various branches of the Federal Government, fraternal and social clubs, and other organizations. Problems have resulted from mass sickle cell screening,…

  2. Do You Know about Sickle Cell Anemia? (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Most young kids with sickle cell anemia take penicillin (say: pen-uh-SIL - in), a drug that ... which helps the body make new RBCs. Taking penicillin or vitamins does not cure sickle cell anemia, ...

  3. Sickle Cell Trait in Blacks Can Skew Diabetes Test Results

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163463.html Sickle Cell Trait in Blacks Can Skew Diabetes Test Results ... less accurate in black people who have the sickle cell anemia trait, a new study says. The test ...

  4. Gene Therapy: a Breakthrough for Sickle Cell Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Gene Therapy: A Breakthrough for Sickle Cell Anemia? But treatment has only been given to one ... to treat, or even potentially cure, sickle cell anemia. The findings come from just one patient, a ...

  5. Mechanisms of sickle cell alloimmunization☆

    PubMed Central

    Yazdanbakhsh, K.

    2016-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) alloimmunization can be a life-threatening complication for patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) receiving therapeutic transfusions. Despite provision of extended antigen-matched donor RBCs, patients continue to develop antibodies due to high degree of polymorphisms in the immunogenic antigens in individuals of African ancestry. Identification of biomarkers of alloimmunization in this patient population is therefore of great interest and will help to identify in advance patients most likely to make antibodies in response to transfusion. We have recently identified altered T cell responses and innate immune abnormalities in alloimmunized SCD patients. In this paper, we summarize this work and propose our working model of how innate immune abnormalities can contribute to pathogenic T cell responses in alloimmunized SCD patients. We believe that unravelling the basis of such altered interactions at the cellular and molecular level will help future identification of biomarkers of alloimmunization with the goal that this information will ultimately help guide therapy in these patients. PMID:26056038

  6. Environmental determinants of severity in sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Tewari, Sanjay; Brousse, Valentine; Piel, Frédéric B.; Menzel, Stephan; Rees, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease causes acute and chronic illness, and median life expectancy is reduced by at least 30 years in all countries, with greater reductions in low-income countries. There is a wide spectrum of severity, with some patients having no symptoms and others suffering frequent, life-changing complications. Much of this variability is unexplained, despite increasingly sophisticated genetic studies. Environmental factors, including climate, air quality, socio-economics, exercise and infection, are likely to be important, as demonstrated by the stark differences in outcomes between patients in Africa and USA/Europe. The effects of weather vary with geography, although most studies show that exposure to cold or wind increases hospital attendance with acute pain. Most of the different air pollutants are closely intercorrelated, and increasing overall levels seem to correlate with increased hospital attendance, although higher concentrations of atmospheric carbon monoxide may offer some benefit for patients with sickle cell disease. Exercise causes some adverse physiological changes, although this may be off-set by improvements in cardiovascular health. Most sickle cell disease patients live in low-income countries and socioeconomic factors are undoubtedly important, but little studied beyond documenting that sickle cell disease is associated with decreases in some measures of social status. Infections cause many of the differences in outcomes seen across the world, but again these effects are relatively poorly understood. All the above factors are likely to account for much of the pathology and variability of sickle cell disease, and large prospective studies are needed to understand these effects better. PMID:26341524

  7. Environmental determinants of severity in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Tewari, Sanjay; Brousse, Valentine; Piel, Frédéric B; Menzel, Stephan; Rees, David C

    2015-09-01

    Sickle cell disease causes acute and chronic illness, and median life expectancy is reduced by at least 30 years in all countries, with greater reductions in low-income countries. There is a wide spectrum of severity, with some patients having no symptoms and others suffering frequent, life-changing complications. Much of this variability is unexplained, despite increasingly sophisticated genetic studies. Environmental factors, including climate, air quality, socio-economics, exercise and infection, are likely to be important, as demonstrated by the stark differences in outcomes between patients in Africa and USA/Europe. The effects of weather vary with geography, although most studies show that exposure to cold or wind increases hospital attendance with acute pain. Most of the different air pollutants are closely intercorrelated, and increasing overall levels seem to correlate with increased hospital attendance, although higher concentrations of atmospheric carbon monoxide may offer some benefit for patients with sickle cell disease. Exercise causes some adverse physiological changes, although this may be off-set by improvements in cardiovascular health. Most sickle cell disease patients live in low-income countries and socioeconomic factors are undoubtedly important, but little studied beyond documenting that sickle cell disease is associated with decreases in some measures of social status. Infections cause many of the differences in outcomes seen across the world, but again these effects are relatively poorly understood. All the above factors are likely to account for much of the pathology and variability of sickle cell disease, and large prospective studies are needed to understand these effects better.

  8. Investigational drugs in sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Kotiah, Sandy D; Ballas, Samir K

    2009-12-01

    Sickle cell anemia is one of the most common autosomal recessive diseases in the world. Patients with sickle cell anemia have variable penetrance and it is hard to predict the risk and timing of complications. It is characterized by a point mutation in the beta-globin gene (GAG --> GTG) and the production of hemoglobin S. The latter leads to decreased deformability of the red blood cells (RBCs) that adhere to endothelia cells culminating in vascular occlusion and its sequelae of tissue ischemia and organ damage. Moreover, sickled RBCs undergo intravascular hemolysis and accelerated erythropoesis. The hallmarks of this disease are shortened RBC survival and vaso-occlusive crises. For the past ten years, the pathophysiology of this disease has been better elucidated and has led to significant improvements in the standard of care. Vaso-occlusion is now understood to be a complex event that involves abnormal interactions between RBCs, leukocytes, endothelial cells and the coagulation pathways. The field of translational research in sickle cell anemia has expanded greatly and has led to new clinical trials with new therapeutic agents and strategies. In this paper, we review the drugs that are now being investigated in the treatment of sickle cell anemia.

  9. Legal, Ethical, Social and Economic Issues in Sickle Cell Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, James E.

    1973-01-01

    Urges that mandatory sickle cell screening laws be repealed, and that all screening programs be voluntary; bogus sickle cell organizations are a major crisis in black communities and must be eliminated; research and education in sickle cell disease is badly needed. (Author/JM)

  10. 78 FR 44575 - Sickle Cell Disease Treatment Demonstration Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Sickle Cell Disease Treatment Demonstration... Services (HHS). ACTION: Request for Class Deviation for Non-Competitive Extension: Sickle Cell Disease... nine programs that are funded through competitive grant awards under the Sickle Cell Disease...

  11. Efficacy of tramadol vs meperidine in vasoocclusive sickle cell crisis.

    PubMed

    Uzun, Belkan; Kekec, Zeynep; Gurkan, Emel

    2010-05-01

    Despite progress in management, patients with sickle cell disease who are experiencing acute painful episode are often incompletely treated. We compared meperidine and tramadol with respect to their effects on the hemodynamics and pain relief in patients with sickle cell disease who were admitted to the emergency department with painful crisis. A total of 68 patients with sickle cell disease were randomly assigned to receive either tramadol 1.5 mg/kg (n = 34) or meperidine 1 mg/kg (n = 34). Hemodynamic parameters were recorded at regular intervals after analgesic infusions. Pain intensity and relief were documented by visual analog and pain relief scale, respectively. Sedation level was defined according to Ramsay sedation scale. Both meperidine and tramadol administration resulted in a significant reduction in systolic and diastolic blood pressure after 2 hours (P < .05). Efficacy in pain relief between the analgesics was more rapid and better in the meperidine group, although the degree of relief were significantly improved compared to baseline levels in both groups (P < .05). Sedation was more commonly seen in the meperidine arm. None of the patients had experienced neurotoxicity. In summary, both agents had proven safe and effective for emergent use in patients with sickle cell disease. Avoiding meperidine injections as recommended with previous guidelines needs to be carefully reconsidered especially when low doses are mentioned.

  12. Cerebral blood flow in sickle cell cerebrovascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Huttenlocher, P.R.; Moohr, J.W.; Johns, L.; Brown, F.D.

    1984-05-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) has been studied by the xenon-133 (/sup 133/Xe) inhalation method in 16 children with suspected sickle cell cerebrovascular disease. Abnormalities consisting of decreases in total, hemispheral, or regional CBF were found in 17 of 26 studies. Eleven studies performed immediately after stroke, transient ischemic attack, or depression of state of alertness showed abnormalities. In addition to confirming regional cerebrovascular insufficiency in children with stroke due to major cerebral artery occlusion, the method detected diffuse decrease in CBF in children with stupor, coma, and seizures who had normal angiographic findings. In contrast, six of seven studies obtained after exchange transfusion or during maintenance on hypertransfusion therapy showed normal findings. The difference between results in patients with acute neurologic disturbances and those receiving transfusion therapy was statistically significant (P less than .005). The data indicate that the /sup 133/Xe method reliably demonstrates cerebrovascular impairment in sickle cell disease. They also suggest that CBF changes in patients with sickle cell disease can be reversed by exchange transfusion and by hypertransfusion therapy. The /sup 133/Xe CBF method may be useful for following up children with sickle cell disease who are at high risk for recurrent stroke.

  13. Tonsilectomy in sickle cell diseases

    PubMed Central

    Helvaci, Mehmet Rami; Gokce, Cumali; Davran, Ramazan; Acipayam, Can; Akkucuk, Seckin; Ugur, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Background: We tried to understand whether or not there are lowered prevalences of terminal consequences of sickle cell diseases (SCDs) with tonsilectomy. Methods: All cases with SCDs were taken into the study. Results: The study included 334 patients (164 females). There were 27 cases with tonsilectomy and 307 cases without. The mean ages, female ratios, and prevalences of associated thalassemia minors and smoking were similar in both groups (P>0.05 for all). Although the white blood cell and platelet counts of peripheric blood were higher in patients without tonsilectomy, the mean hematocrit value was lower in them, but the differences were nonsignificant probably due to the small sample size of the tonsilectomy group (P>0.05 for all). Similarly, although the painful crises per year, digital clubbing, leg ulcers, pulmonary hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, rheumatic heart disease, avascular necrosis of bone, cirrhosis, stroke, and mortality were higher in cases without tonsilectomy, the differences were nonsignificant probably due to the same reason again (P>0.05 for all). Conclusion: There may be an inverse relationship between prevalence of tonsilectomy and severity of SCDs, and the tonsils may act as chronic inflammatory foci accelerating the chronic endothelial damage all over the body in such patients. PMID:26064389

  14. Musculoskeletal Manifestations of Sickle Cell Disease: A Review.

    PubMed

    Vaishya, Raju; Agarwal, Amit Kumar; Edomwonyi, Edwin O; Vijay, Vipul

    2015-10-20

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited disorder of abnormal haemoglobin commonly encountered in the West African sub-region. It has varied osteoarticular and non-osseous complications that mimic some surgical conditions. The most common orthopaedic complications include avascular necrosis, osteomyelitis, septic arthritis, etc. A cautious and painstaking evaluation is required in handling these patients. Acute care and anaesthetic precautions are vital in ensuring an uneventful postoperative period.

  15. Musculoskeletal Manifestations of Sickle Cell Disease: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Raju; Edomwonyi, Edwin O; Vijay, Vipul

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited disorder of abnormal haemoglobin commonly encountered in the West African sub-region. It has varied osteoarticular and non-osseous complications that mimic some surgical conditions. The most common orthopaedic complications include avascular necrosis, osteomyelitis, septic arthritis, etc. A cautious and painstaking evaluation is required in handling these patients. Acute care and anaesthetic precautions are vital in ensuring an uneventful postoperative period. PMID:26623213

  16. Deterministic Aperiodic Sickle Cell Blood Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atsaves, Louis; Harris, Wesley

    2013-11-01

    In this paper sickle cell blood flow in the capillaries is modeled as a hydrodynamical system. The hydrodynamical system consists of the axisymmetric unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and a set of constitutive equations for oxygen transport. Blood cell deformation is not considered in this paper. The hydrodynamical system is reduced to a system of non-linear partial differential equations that are then transformed into a system of three autonomous non-linear ordinary differential equations and a set of algebraic equations. We examine the hydrodynamical system to discern stable/unstable, periodic/nonperiodic, reversible/irreversible properties of the system. The properties of the solutions are driven in large part by the coefficients of the governing system of equations. These coefficients depend on the physiological properties of the sickle cell blood. The chaotic nature of the onset of crisis in sickle cell patients is identified. Research Assistant.

  17. Assessing Chaos in Sickle Cell Anemia Crises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Wesley; Le Floch, Francois

    2006-11-01

    Recent developments in sickle cell research and blood flow modeling allow for new interpretations of the sickle cell crises. With an appropriate set of theoretical and empirical equations describing the dynamics of the red cells in their environment, and the response of the capillaries to major changes in the rheology, a complete mathematical system has been derived. This system of equations is believed to be of major importance to provide new and significant insight into the causes of the disease and related crises. With simulations, it has been proven that the system transition from a periodic solution to a chaotic one, which illustrates the onset of crises from a regular blood flow synchronized with the heart beat. Moreover, the analysis of the effects of various physiological parameters exposes the potential to control chaotic solutions, which, in turn, could lead to the creation of new and more effective treatments for sickle cell anemia. .

  18. Prenatal Sickle Cell Screening Education Effect on the Follow-up Rates of Infants with Sickle Cell Trait.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Yih-Ming; Andrews, Susan; Peterson, Rose; Shah, Arvind; Cepeda, Manuel

    2000-01-01

    Assesses the effect of prenatal education about newborn sickle cell screening on parents' compliance with the follow-up for infants with sickle cell trait. Results show that parents whose prenatal education included sickle cell hemoglobinopathy information retained significantly more of the information given during the post-natal education than…

  19. Fetal hemoglobin in sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Akinsheye, Idowu; Alsultan, Abdulrahman; Solovieff, Nadia; Ngo, Duyen; Baldwin, Clinton T; Sebastiani, Paola; Chui, David H K; Steinberg, Martin H

    2011-07-07

    Fetal hemoglobin (HbF) is the major genetic modulator of the hematologic and clinical features of sickle cell disease, an effect mediated by its exclusion from the sickle hemoglobin polymer. Fetal hemoglobin genes are genetically regulated, and the level of HbF and its distribution among sickle erythrocytes is highly variable. Some patients with sickle cell disease have exceptionally high levels of HbF that are associated with the Senegal and Saudi-Indian haplotype of the HBB-like gene cluster; some patients with different haplotypes can have similarly high HbF. In these patients, high HbF is associated with generally milder but not asymptomatic disease. Studying these persons might provide additional insights into HbF gene regulation. HbF appears to benefit some complications of disease more than others. This might be related to the premature destruction of erythrocytes that do not contain HbF, even though the total HbF concentration is high. Recent insights into HbF regulation have spurred new efforts to induce high HbF levels in sickle cell disease beyond those achievable with the current limited repertory of HbF inducers.

  20. Transgenic knockout mice with exclusively human sickle hemoglobinand sickle cell disease

    SciTech Connect

    Paszty, C.; Brion, C.; Manci, E.; Witkowska, E.; Stevens, M.; Narla, M.; Rubin, E.

    1997-06-13

    To create mice expressing exclusively human sicklehemoglobin (HbS), transgenic mice expressing human alpha-, gamma-, andbeta[S]-globin were generated and bred with knockout mice that haddeletions of the murine alpha- and beta-globin genes. These sickle cellmice have the major features (irreversibly sickled red cells, anemia,multiorgan pathology) found in humans with sickle cell disease and, assuch, represent a useful in vivo system to accelerate the development ofimproved therapies for this common genetic disease.

  1. [Sickle Cell Disease International Organization (SCDIO)].

    PubMed

    Ebakisse-Badassou, E

    2010-12-01

    A century after the first scientific description of sickle cell disease that had been known to African peoples under various names for more than three centuries, it is now time for this blood disorder and its associated sanitary and social disparities to come out of the shadows. Although sickle cell disease is the most widespread genetic disease in the world, public awareness remains low despite the considerable effort that has been made over the last decade. In order to improve understanding and management, the Sickle Cell Disease International Organization (SCDIO) has defined the following ambitious objectives: to implement effective action plans that must be based on the ability to sensitize minds about this disease; expand active support from public and private personalities and organizations; convince potential partners in all countries involved of the need for their active support of this important cause; raise funds that are indispensable to finance planned operations; provide effective organization to carry out priority initiatives aimed at lowering child mortality due to sickle cell disease in the world. To these ends, the SCDIO will continue in its advocacy role that will not stop until the resolutions are adopted and applied in all affected countries. The SCDIO will continue to prioritize the development of south/south partnerships. In view of the history of sickle cell disease, the major challenges for the next century will consist of prioritizing action to improve the quality of life of patients wherever they are and of developing research. To meet these challenges, we will need the involvement and support of the entire international community. We must all stand "United against sickle cell disease".

  2. Sickle cell disease in tribal populations in India

    PubMed Central

    Colah, Roshan B.; Mukherjee, Malay B.; Martin, Snehal; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2015-01-01

    The sickle gene is widespread among many tribal population groups in India with prevalence of heterozygotes varying from 1-40 per cent. Co-inheritance of the sickle gene with β-thalassaemia, HbD Punjab and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency has also been reported. Most of the screening programmes in India now use high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis although the solubility test is also sensitive and cheap. Sickle cell disease (SCD) among tribal populations is generally milder than among non-tribal groups with fewer episodes of painful crises, infections, acute chest syndrome and need for hospitalization. This has partly been attributed to the very high prevalence of α-thalassaemia among these tribes as well as higher foetal haemoglobin levels. However, the clinical presentation is variable with many cases having a severe presentation. There is not much information available on maternal and perinatal outcome in tribal women with sickle cell disease. Newborn screening programmes for SCD have recently been initiated in Maharashtra, Gujarat, Odisha and Chattisgarh and monitoring these birth cohorts will help to understand the natural history of SCD in India. Prenatal diagnosis is acceptable by tribal families in India. The Indian Council of Medical Research and the National Rural Health Mission in different States are undertaking outreach programmes for better management and control of the disease. PMID:26139766

  3. Salmonella Osteomyelitis of the Hand in an Infant with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sinkin, Jeremy C.; Wood, Benjamin C.; Sauerhammer, Tina M.; Boyajian, Michael J.; Rogers, Gary F.

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Salmonella osteomyelitis involving the hand is a rare, but potentially morbid, complication of sickle cell disease in children. This entity can be difficult to distinguish from the more frequent presentation of dactylitis, but accurate diagnosis is critical to direct proper treatment. We report on a 15-month-old patient with sickle cell disease who ultimately developed osteomyelitis of 1 hand after an acute vasoocclusive episode caused 4 extremity dactylitis. The case description illustrates the diagnostic and treatment challenges. PMID:25674379

  4. The role of blood rheology in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Connes, Philippe; Alexy, Tamas; Detterich, Jon; Romana, Marc; Hardy-Dessources, Marie-Dominique; Ballas, Samir K

    2016-03-01

    Studies performed in the last decades have highlighted the need to better understand the contribution of the endothelium, vascular function, oxidative stress, inflammation, coagulation, hemolysis and vascular adhesion mechanisms to the pathophysiology of acute vaso-occlusive like events and chronic organ damages in sickle cell disease (SCD). Although SCD is a hemorheological disease, a few works focused on the contribution of blood viscosity, plasma viscosity, red blood cell deformability and aggregation in the pathophysiology of SCD. After a brief description of basic hemorheology, the present review focuses on the role of the hemorheological abnormalities in the causation of several SCD complications, mainly in sickle cell anemia and hemoglobin (Hb) SC disease. Several genetic and cellular modulators of blood rheology in SCD are discussed, as well as unresolved questions and perspectives.

  5. Sickle cell detection using a smartphone

    PubMed Central

    Knowlton, S. M.; Sencan, I.; Aytar, Y.; Khoory, J.; Heeney, M. M.; Ghiran, I. C.; Tasoglu, S.

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease affects 25% of people living in Central and West Africa and, if left undiagnosed, can cause life threatening “silent” strokes and lifelong damage. However, ubiquitous testing procedures have yet to be implemented in these areas, necessitating a simple, rapid, and accurate testing platform to diagnose sickle cell disease. Here, we present a label-free, sensitive, and specific testing platform using only a small blood sample (<1 μl) based on the higher density of sickle red blood cells under deoxygenated conditions. Testing is performed with a lightweight and compact 3D-printed attachment installed on a commercial smartphone. This attachment includes an LED to illuminate the sample, an optical lens to magnify the image, and two permanent magnets for magnetic levitation of red blood cells. The sample is suspended in a paramagnetic medium with sodium metabisulfite and loaded in a microcapillary tube that is inserted between the magnets. Red blood cells are levitated in the magnetic field based on equilibrium between the magnetic and buoyancy forces acting on the cells. Using this approach, we were able to distinguish between the levitation patterns of sickle versus control red blood cells based on their degree of confinement. PMID:26492382

  6. Sickling Cells, Cyclic Nucleotides, and Protein Kinases: The Pathophysiology of Urogenital Disorders in Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Claudino, Mário Angelo; Fertrin, Kleber Yotsumoto

    2012-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is one of the best studied inherited diseases, and despite being caused by a single point mutation in the HBB gene, multiple pleiotropic effects of the abnormal hemoglobin S production range from vaso-occlusive crisis, stroke, and pulmonary hypertension to osteonecrosis and leg ulcers. Urogenital function is not spared, and although priapism is most frequently remembered, other related clinical manifestations have been described, such as nocturia, enuresis, increased frequence of lower urinary tract infections, urinary incontinence, hypogonadism, and testicular infarction. Studies on sickle cell vaso-occlusion and priapism using both in vitro and in vivo models have shed light on the pathogenesis of some of these events. The authors review what is known about the deleterious effects of sickling on the genitourinary tract and how the role of cyclic nucleotides signaling and protein kinases may help understand the pathophysiology underlying these manifestations and develop novel therapies in the setting of urogenital disorders in sickle cell disease. PMID:22745902

  7. Iris atrophy in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed Central

    Acheson, R W; Ford, S M; Maude, G H; Lyness, R W; Serjeant, G R

    1986-01-01

    Iris atrophy, of unknown origin and believed to be secondary to the vaso-occlusive process of sickle cell disease, has been observed in 25 eyes of 22 patients (two SS disease, 20 SC disease). The crude prevalence was highest in males with SC disease, in whom 14.7% of patients were affected. Iris atrophy was closely associated with proliferative sickle retinopathy in the same eye. Analysis of haematological indices failed to reveal any significant differences between patients with and without iris atrophy. The characteristics and distribution of iris atrophy are described as well as the histopathology in one 68-year-old male patient with SS disease. Images PMID:3718915

  8. Nucleosomes and neutrophil activation in sickle cell disease painful crisis.

    PubMed

    Schimmel, Marein; Nur, Erfan; Biemond, Bart J; van Mierlo, Gerard J; Solati, Shabnam; Brandjes, Dees P; Otten, Hans-Martin; Schnog, John-John; Zeerleder, Sacha

    2013-11-01

    Activated polymorphonuclear neutrophils play an important role in the pathogenesis of vaso-occlusive painful sickle cell crisis. Upon activation, polymorphonuclear neutrophils can form neutrophil extracellular traps. Neutrophil extracellular traps consist of a meshwork of extracellular DNA, nucleosomes, histones and neutrophil proteases. Neutrophil extracellular traps have been demonstrated to be toxic to endothelial and parenchymal cells. This prospective cohort study was conducted to determine neutrophil extracellular trap formation in sickle cell patients during steady state and painful crisis. As a measure of neutrophil extracellular traps, plasma nucleosomes levels were determined and polymorphonuclear neutrophil activation was assessed measuring plasma levels of elastase-α1-antitrypsin complexes in 74 patients in steady state, 70 patients during painful crisis, and 24 race-matched controls using Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Nucleosome levels in steady state sickle cell patients were significantly higher than levels in controls. During painful crisis levels of both nucleosomes and elastase-α1-antitrypsin complexes increased significantly. Levels of nucleosomes correlated significantly to elastase-α1-antitrypsin complex levels during painful crisis, (Sr = 0.654, P<0.001). This was seen in both HbSS/HbSβ(0)-thalassemia (Sr=0.55, P<0.001) and HbSC/HbSβ(+-)thalassemia patients (Sr=0.90, P<0.001) during painful crisis. Levels of nucleosomes showed a correlation with length of hospital stay and were highest in patients with acute chest syndrome. These data support the concept that neutrophil extracellular trap formation and neutrophil activation may play a role in the pathogenesis of painful sickle cell crisis and acute chest syndrome.

  9. Common gynecological challenges in adolescents with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Stimpson, Sarah-Jo; Rebele, Erin C; DeBaun, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is one of the most common genetic blood disorders worldwide. Individuals with sickle cell disease (SCD) experience clinical manifestations such as chronic anemia, developmental delay, vaso-occlusive pain, acute chest syndrome, and neurological complications. Adolescent girls with SCD face unique gynecological challenges including delayed puberty marked by a later onset in menarche, vaso-occlusive pain associated with their menstrual cycle, and underdiagnosed abnormal uterine bleeding. This review focuses on these challenges with particular emphasis on delayed menarche and vaso-occlusive pain episodes associated with menstruation, in addition to the evaluation and initial management of heavy menstrual bleeding for adolescents with SCD. We highlight research opportunities in this neglected area to help enhance the comprehensive care model for this population.

  10. Sickle Cell: A Selected Resource Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Washington, DC.

    This annotated, selective bibliography lists the following types of educational and informational material on both sickle cell disease and trait: (1) professional education materials; (2) fact sheets, pamphlets, and brochures; and (3) audiovisual material. A selected list of references is provided for the following topic areas: (1) genetic…

  11. Neurocognitive Aspects of Pediatric Sickle Cell Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Ronald T.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    This literature review on neurocognitive functioning and learning of children with sickle cell disease found diffuse neurocognitive deficits, with much variability across subjects. Studies of psychosocial development of these children indicate that behavioral problems, low self-esteem, and body image disturbances are frequently characteristic.…

  12. Sickle Cell Disease as a Neurodevelopmental Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schatz, Jeffrey; McClellan, Catherine B.

    2006-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a blood disorder; however, the central nervous system (CNS) is one of the organs frequently affected by the disease. Brain disease can begin early in life and often leads to neurocognitive dysfunction. Approximately one-fourth to one-third of children with SCD have some form of CNS effects from the disease, which…

  13. Sickle Cell Trait and Scholastic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Yvonne; Ayrer, James

    1974-01-01

    In a preliminary study, no significant interaction effects were found between scholastic achievement and sickle cell trait in black children currently in eight and ninth grades, as measured by the Iowa Tests of Basic Skills over a consecutive period of four years, 1968 through 1971, grades four through seven. (EH)

  14. Beyond the Definitions of the Phenotypic Complications of Sickle Cell Disease: An Update on Management

    PubMed Central

    Ballas, Samir K.; Kesen, Muge R.; Goldberg, Morton F.; Lutty, Gerard A.; Dampier, Carlton; Osunkwo, Ifeyinwa; Wang, Winfred C.; Hoppe, Carolyn; Hagar, Ward; Darbari, Deepika S.; Malik, Punam

    2012-01-01

    The sickle hemoglobin is an abnormal hemoglobin due to point mutation (GAG → GTG) in exon 1 of the β globin gene resulting in the substitution of glutamic acid by valine at position 6 of the β globin polypeptide chain. Although the molecular lesion is a single-point mutation, the sickle gene is pleiotropic in nature causing multiple phenotypic expressions that constitute the various complications of sickle cell disease in general and sickle cell anemia in particular. The disease itself is chronic in nature but many of its complications are acute such as the recurrent acute painful crises (its hallmark), acute chest syndrome, and priapism. These complications vary considerably among patients, in the same patient with time, among countries and with age and sex. To date, there is no well-established consensus among providers on the management of the complications of sickle cell disease due in part to lack of evidence and in part to differences in the experience of providers. It is the aim of this paper to review available current approaches to manage the major complications of sickle cell disease. We hope that this will establish another preliminary forum among providers that may eventually lead the way to better outcomes. PMID:22924029

  15. Beyond the definitions of the phenotypic complications of sickle cell disease: an update on management.

    PubMed

    Ballas, Samir K; Kesen, Muge R; Goldberg, Morton F; Lutty, Gerard A; Dampier, Carlton; Osunkwo, Ifeyinwa; Wang, Winfred C; Hoppe, Carolyn; Hagar, Ward; Darbari, Deepika S; Malik, Punam

    2012-01-01

    The sickle hemoglobin is an abnormal hemoglobin due to point mutation (GAG → GTG) in exon 1 of the β globin gene resulting in the substitution of glutamic acid by valine at position 6 of the β globin polypeptide chain. Although the molecular lesion is a single-point mutation, the sickle gene is pleiotropic in nature causing multiple phenotypic expressions that constitute the various complications of sickle cell disease in general and sickle cell anemia in particular. The disease itself is chronic in nature but many of its complications are acute such as the recurrent acute painful crises (its hallmark), acute chest syndrome, and priapism. These complications vary considerably among patients, in the same patient with time, among countries and with age and sex. To date, there is no well-established consensus among providers on the management of the complications of sickle cell disease due in part to lack of evidence and in part to differences in the experience of providers. It is the aim of this paper to review available current approaches to manage the major complications of sickle cell disease. We hope that this will establish another preliminary forum among providers that may eventually lead the way to better outcomes.

  16. Sickle-Cell Disease Healthcare Cost in Africa: Experience of the Congo

    PubMed Central

    Ngolet, L. O.; Moyen Engoba, M.; Kocko, Innocent; Elira Dokekias, Alexis; Mombouli, Jean-Vivien; Moyen, Georges Marius

    2016-01-01

    Background. Lack of medical coverage in Africa leads to inappropriate care that has an impact on the mortality rate. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the cost of severe acute sickle-cell related complications in Brazzaville. Methods. A retrospective study was conducted in 2014 in the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit. It concerned 94 homozygote sickle-cell children that developed severe acute sickle-cell disease related complications (average age 69 months). For each patient, we calculated the cost of care complication. Results. The household income was estimated as low (sickle-cell related acute complications was XAF 65,460/USD 115.21. Costs were fluctuating depending on the generating factors of the severe acute complications (p = 0.041). They were higher in case of complications generated by bacterial infections (ranging from XAF 66,765/USD 117.50 to XAF 135,271.50/USD 238.07) and lower in case of complications associated with malaria (ranging from XAF 28,305/49.82 to XAF 64,891.63/USD 114.21). The mortality rate was 17% and was associated with the cost of the case management (p = 0.006). Conclusion. The case management cost of severe acute complications of sickle-cell disease in children is high in Congo. PMID:26949544

  17. Renal failure in sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Wong, W Y; Elliott-Mills, D; Powars, D

    1996-12-01

    ESRD is a major complication in young adults with sickle cell anemia. As more patients with sickle cell anemia reach the third and fourth decades of life, the incidence of clinically apparent renal insufficiency will increase. As we understand the pathophysiology of renal damage and the effects of various therapies on the sickle renal vasculature, we can tailor specific management without further compromising already impaired renal function. Diagnostic clues must be recognized prior to the onset of irreversible damage, with appropriate intervention initiated at each age group. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is the only available cure for SCA at the present time. The demonstration that several distinct haplotypes of the beta s gene cluster on chromosome 11 influence the clinical expression of sickle cell anemia may be useful in delineating children who are at high risk for severe disease, and hence candidates for such hazardous therapeutic interventions as BMT prior to onset of clinically discernable disease. Current BMT preparative regimens can produce renal cortical and pulmonary toxicity, posing a patient selection problem in those cases in which the vasculopathy of the major organs is at an early stage and might be potentially repairable. Gene therapy without toxic preparative regimens is the ultimate answer. The challenge for the near future is the development of effective early therapeutic intervention during childhood and young adulthood.

  18. Biologic complexity in sickle cell disease: implications for developing targeted therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Gee, Beatrice E

    2013-01-01

    Current therapy for sickle cell disease (SCD) is limited to supportive treatment of complications, red blood cell transfusions, hydroxyurea, and stem cell transplantation. Difficulty in the translation of mechanistically based therapies may be the result of a reductionist approach focused on individual pathways, without having demonstrated their relative contribution to SCD complications. Many pathophysiologic processes in SCD are likely to interact simultaneously to contribute to acute vaso-occlusion or chronic vasculopathy. Applying concepts of systems biology and network medicine, models were developed to show relationships between the primary defect of sickle hemoglobin (Hb S) polymerization and the outcomes of acute pain and chronic vasculopathy. Pathophysiologic processes such as inflammation and oxidative stress are downstream by-products of Hb S polymerization, transduced through secondary pathways of hemolysis and vaso-occlusion. Pain, a common clinical trials endpoint, is also complex and may be influenced by factors outside of sickle cell polymerization and vascular occlusion. Future sickle cell research needs to better address the biologic complexity of both sickle cell disease and pain. The relevance of individual pathways to important sickle cell outcomes needs to be demonstrated in vivo before investing in expensive and labor-intensive clinical trials.

  19. Renal Failure in Sickle Cell Disease: Prevalence, Predictors of Disease, Mortality and Effect on Length of Hospital Stay.

    PubMed

    Yeruva, Sri L H; Paul, Yonette; Oneal, Patricia; Nouraie, Mehdi

    2016-09-01

    Renal dysfunction in sickle cell disease is not only a chronic comorbidity but also a mortality risk factor. Though renal dysfunction starts early in life in sickle cell patients, the predictors that can identify sickle cell disease patients at risk of developing renal dysfunction is not known. We used the Truven Health MarketScan(®) Medicaid Databases from 2007 to 2012. Incidence of new acute renal failure (ARF) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) was calculated in this cohort. There were 9481 patients with a diagnosis of sickle cell disease accounting for 64,201 hospital admissions, during the study period. Both ARF and CKD were associated with higher risk of inpatient mortality, longer duration of the hospital stay and expensive hospitalizations. The yearly incidence of new ARF in sickle cell disease patients was 1.4% and annual CKD incidence was 1.3%. The annual rate of new ARF and CKD in the control group was 0.4 and 0.6%, respectively. The most important predictors of new CKD were proteinuria, ARF and hypertension. Chronic kidney disease, hypertension and sickle cell crisis were the most important predictors of new ARF. The annual rate of incidences of ARF and CKD were 2- to 3-fold higher in sickle cell disease compared to the non sickle cell disease group. Besides the common risk factors for renal disease in the general population, it is imperative to monitor the sickle cell disease patients with more severe disease to prevent them from developing renal dysfunction.

  20. Comparative Analysis of Pain Behaviours in Humanized Mouse Models of Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Jianxun; Benson, Barbara; Tran, Huy; Ofori-Acquah, Solomon F.; Gupta, Kalpna

    2016-01-01

    Pain is a hallmark feature of sickle cell anemia (SCA) but management of chronic as well as acute pain remains a major challenge. Mouse models of SCA are essential to examine the mechanisms of pain and develop novel therapeutics. To facilitate this effort, we compared humanized homozygous BERK and Townes sickle mice for the effect of gender and age on pain behaviors. Similar to previously characterized BERK sickle mice, Townes sickle mice show more mechanical, thermal, and deep tissue hyperalgesia with increasing age. Female Townes sickle mice demonstrate more hyperalgesia compared to males similar to that reported for BERK mice and patients with SCA. Mechanical, thermal and deep tissue hyperalgesia increased further after hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) treatment in Townes sickle mice. Together, these data show BERK sickle mice exhibit a significantly greater degree of hyperalgesia for all behavioral measures as compared to gender- and age-matched Townes sickle mice. However, the genetically distinct “knock-in” strategy of human α and β transgene insertion in Townes mice as compared to BERK mice, may provide relative advantage for further genetic manipulations to examine specific mechanisms of pain. PMID:27494522

  1. Sickle cell disease biochip: a functional red blood cell adhesion assay for monitoring sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    ALAPAN, YUNUS; KIM, CEONNE; ADHIKARI, ANIMA; GRAY, KAYLA E.; GURKAN-CAVUSOGLU, EVREN; LITTLE, JANE A.; GURKAN, UMUT A.

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) afflicts millions of people worldwide and is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Chronic and acute vaso-occlusion are the clinical hallmarks of SCD and can result in pain crisis, widespread organ damage, and early movtality. Even though the molecular underpinnings of SCD were identified more than 60 years ago, there are no molecular or biophysical markers of disease severity that are feasibly measured in the clinic. Abnormal cellular adhesion to vascular endothelium is at the root of vaso-occlusion. However, cellular adhesion is not currently evaluated clinically. Here, we present a clinically applicable microfluidic device (SCD biochip) that allows serial quantitative evaluation of red blood cell (RBC) adhesion to endothelium-associated protein-immobilized microchannels, in a closed and preprocessing-free system. With the SCD biochip, we have analyzed blood samples from more than 100 subjects and have shown associations between the measured RBC adhesion to endothelium-associated proteins (fibronectin and laminin) and individual RBC characteristics, including hemoglobin content, fetal hemoglobin concentration, plasma lactate dehydrogenase level, and reticulocyte count. The SCD biochip is a functional adhesion assay, reflecting quantitative evaluation of RBC adhesion, which could be used at baseline, during crises, relative to various long-term complications, and before and after therapeutic interventions. PMID:27063958

  2. What dentists should know about sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Devine, Bill P

    2013-11-01

    The medical history should be a communication between the patient and the dentist. A good history will reveal a patient's medical problems,concerns, ideas, and expectations. Understanding medical conditions on a patient's medical history is of up most importance in providing the patient with the best possible standard of care. Sickle cell disease is an inherited blood disorder that affects red blood cells. Normal red blood cells contain hemoglobin A. People with sickle cell disease have red blood cells containing mostly hemoglobin S, an abnormal type of hemoglobin. These mutated sickle cells do not have the smooth motion needed for oxygenation and deoxygenation. One of the main concerns in sickle cell disease is the reversible extreme pain episodes called “sickle cell crisis.”Pain episodes occur when sickle cells clog small vessels, depriving the body of adequate blood and oxygen. Treatment of the sickle cell patient should be a team approach between dentist,patient, and physician. Dental treatments should be conservative and stress free for the patient.Prevention of dental disease and infections are of the up most importance to the sickle cell patient.If your patient has sickle cell disease, know about it and talk to your patient about the disease.Maintaining excellent oral health to decrease the possibility of oral infections will ensure the best care for these patients.Key words: communication, sickle cell disease (SCD), sickle cell anemia (SCA), blood inherited disorder, sickle cell trait, crisis, African Americans, deoxygenation, hemoglobin,supporting dentist, prophylactic antibiotics, and infection.

  3. Smoothing the crescent curve: sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Talano, Julie-An; Cairo, Mitchell S

    2014-12-05

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited disorder secondary to a point mutation at the sixth position of the beta chain of human hemoglobin that results in the replacement of valine for glutamic acid. This recessive genetic abnormality precipitates the polymerization of the deoxygenated form of hemoglobin S that induces a major distortion of red blood cells (sickle red blood cells), which decreases sickle red blood cell deformability, leading to chronic hemolysis and vasoocclusion. These processes can result in severe complications, including chronic pain, end organ dysfunction, stroke, and early mortality. The only proven curative therapy for patients with SCD is myeloablative conditioning and allogeneic stem cell transplantation from HLA-matched sibling donors. In this review, we discuss the most recent advances in allogeneic stem cell transplantation in SCD, including more novel approaches such as reduced toxicity conditioning and the use of alternative allogeneic donors (matched unrelated donors, umbilical cord blood transplantation, haploidentical donors) and autologous gene correction stem cell strategies. Prospects are bright for new stem cell approaches for patients with SCD that will enable curative stem and genetic correction therapies for a greater number of patients suffering from this chronic and debilitating condition.

  4. Hydroxycarbamine: from an Old Drug Used in Malignant Hemopathies to a Current Standard in Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cannas, Giovanna; Poutrel, Solène; Thomas, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    While hydroxycarbamide (hydroxyurea, HU) has less and fewer indications in malignant hemopathies, it represents the only widely used drug which modifies sickle cell disease pathogenesis. Clinical experience with HU for patients with sickle cell disease has been accumulated over the past 25 years in Western countries. The review of the literature provides increasing support for safety and efficacy in both children and adults for reducing acute vaso-occlusive events including pain episodes and acute chest syndrome. No increased incidence of leukemia and teratogenicity was demonstrated. HU has become the standard-of-care for sickle cell anemia but remains underused. Barriers to its use should be identified and overcome. PMID:28293403

  5. Idiopathic facial swelling secondary to sickle cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    Moghe, Swapnil; Pillai, Ajay; Guru, Kanishka Navin; Nair, Preeti P

    2012-10-10

    Sickle cell disease is a common inherited autosomal disease that is characterised by abnormally shaped (sickle-shaped) red blood cells (RBCs). It can involve virtually any organ system. The clinical manifestations of sickle cell disease vary and are classified as vaso-occlusion, chronic anaemia and infection. The imaging appearances of central nervous system and musculoskeletal involvement by sickle cell disease have been well documented; however, involvement of the head and neck region is often unreported, although it is not uncommon. In the head and neck, sickle cell disease can involve the inner ears, orbits, paranasal sinuses, bones, lymph nodes and vessels. This paper describes a case of idiopathic facial swelling associated with sickle cell disease in a young patient.

  6. What dentists should know about sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Devine, Bill P

    2014-05-01

    The medical history should be a communication between the patient and the dentist. A good history will reveal a patient's medical problems, concerns, ideas, and expectations. Understanding medical conditions on a patient's medical history is of upmost importance in providing the patient with the best possible standard of care. Sickle cell disease is an inherited blood disorder that affects red blood cells. Normal red blood cells contain hemoglobin A. People with sickle cell disease have red blood cells containing mostly hemoglobin S, an abnormal type of hemoglobin. These mutated sickle cells do not have the smooth motion needed for oxygenation and deoxygenation. One of the main concerns in sickle cell disease is the reversible extreme pain episodes called "sickle cell crisis." Pain episodes occur when sickle cells clog small vessels, depriving the body of adequate blood and oxygen. Treatment of the sickle cell patient should be a team approach between dentist, patient, and physician, Dental treatments should be conservative and stress free for the patient. Prevention of dental disease and infections are of the upmost importance to the sickle cell patient. If your patient has sickle cell disease, know about it and talk to your patient about the disease. Maintaining excellent oral health to decrease the possibility of oral infections will ensure the best core for these patients.

  7. 2015 Clinical trials update in sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Archer, Natasha; Galacteros, Frédéric; Brugnara, Carlo

    2015-10-01

    Polymerization of HbS and cell sickling are the prime pathophysiological events in sickle cell disease (SCD). Over the last 30 years, a substantial understanding at the molecular level has been acquired on how a single amino acid change in the structure of the beta chain of hemoglobin leads to the explosive growth of the HbS polymer and the associated changes in red cell morphology. O2 tension and intracellular HbS concentration are the primary molecular drivers of this process, and are obvious targets for developing new therapies. However, polymerization and sickling are driving a complex network of associated cellular changes inside and outside of the erythrocyte, which become essential components of the inflammatory vasculopathy and result in a large range of potential acute and chronic organ damages. In these areas, a multitude of new targets for therapeutic developments have emerged, with several ongoing or planned new therapeutic interventions. This review outlines the key points of SCD pathophysiology as they relate to the development of new therapies, both at the pre-clinical and clinical levels.

  8. Microfluidic approach of Sickled Cell Anemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abkarian, Manouk; Loiseau, Etienne; Massiera, Gladys

    2012-11-01

    Sickle Cell Anemia is a disorder of the microcirculation caused by a genetic point mutation that produces an altered hemoglobin protein called HbS. HbS self-assembles reversibly into long rope like fibers inside the red blood cells. The resulting distorded sickled red blood cells are believed to block the smallest capillaries of the tissues producing anemia. Despite the large amount of work that provided a thorough understanding of HbS polymerization in bulk as well as in intact red blood cells at rest, no consequent cellular scale approaches of the study of polymerization and its link to the capillary obstruction have been proposed in microflow, although the problem of obstruction is in essence a circulatory problem. Here, we use microfluidic channels, designed to mimic physiological conditions (flow velocity, oxygen concentration, hematocrit...) of the microcirculation to carry out a biomimetic study at the cellular scale of sickled cell vaso-occlusion. We show that flow geometry, oxygen concentration, white blood cells and free hemoglobin S are essential in the formation of original cell aggregates which could play a role in the vaso-occlusion events.

  9. Sickle Cell Research: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and Recent Developments | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... sickle cell trait. If the test shows sickle hemoglobin, a second blood test is done to confirm ... anemia. Some of these interfere with sickling of hemoglobin, others prevent the cells from sticking to blood ...

  10. Mortal quintet of sickle cell diseases

    PubMed Central

    Helvaci, Mehmet Rami; Gokce, Cumali; Davran, Ramazan; Akkucuk, Seckin; Ugur, Mustafa; Oruc, Cem

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sickle cell diseases (SCDs) are chronic inflammatory processes on capillary level. We tried to understand some possible correlations between stroke and severity of SCDs. Methods: All patients with SCDs were taken into the study. Results: The study included 343 patients (174 males and 169 females). There were 30 cases (8.7%) with stroke. The mean ages were similar in both groups (32.5 versus 29.1 years in the stroke group and other, respectively, P>0.05). The female ratios were similar in both groups, too (43.3% versus 49.8%, respectively, P>0.05). Prevalences of associated thalassemia minors were also similar in them (73.3% versus 65.1%, respectively, P>0.05). Smoking was higher among the stroke cases, significantly (26.6% versus 13.0%, P<0.05). Mean white blood cell count, hematocrit value, and mean platelet count of the peripheric blood were similar in both groups (P>0.05 for all). On the other hand, although the painful crises per year, tonsilectomy, priapism, ileus, pulmonary hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, coronary heart disease, chronic renal disease, rheumatic heart disease, avascular necrosis of bones, cirrhosis, and mortality were all higher in the stroke group, the differences were only significant for acute chest syndrome (ACS), digital clubbing, and leg ulcers (P<0.05 for all), probably due to the small sample size of the stroke group. Conclusion: SCDs and smoking are chronic destructive processes on endothelium, and both terminate with early organ failures in life. Probably smoking, digital clubbing, leg ulcers, ACS, and stroke are mortal quintet of the SCDs that may indicate shortened survival in such patients. PMID:26379961

  11. Hearing Loss and Auditory Function in Sickle Cell Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burch-Sims, G.P.; Matlock, V.R.

    2005-01-01

    Sickle cell disease was first reported in 1910 by J. Herrick, and since then, various associated conditions and complications have been described. Sickle cell disease is a hereditary disorder characterized by abnormality of the hemoglobin in the red blood cell. During periods of decreased oxygen tension in the red blood cell's environment, the…

  12. Linus Pauling and sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Eaton, William A

    2003-01-01

    The 1949 paper by Linus Pauling et al. [Science 110 (1949) 543-548] describing the discovery of sickle cell anemia as the first molecular disease had a major impact on biology and medicine. Inspired by the scholarly works of John Edsall on the history of hemoglobin research, I present a brief retrospective analysis of Pauling's paper. This is followed by some personal recollections of Edsall and Pauling.

  13. Cardiovascular Abnormalities in Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gladwin, Mark T.; Sachdev, Vandana

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is characterized by recurrent episodes of ischemia-reperfusion injury to multiple vital organ systems and a chronic hemolytic anemia, both contributing to progressive organ dysfunction. The introduction of treatments that induce protective fetal hemoglobin and reduce infectious complications has greatly prolonged survival. However, with increased longevity, cardiovascular complications are increasingly evident, with the notable development of a progressive proliferative systemic vasculopathy, pulmonary hypertension (PH) and left ventricular diastolic dysfunction. Pulmonary hypertension is reported in autopsy studies and numerous clinical studies have shown that increased pulmonary pressures are an important risk marker for mortality in these patients. In epidemiological studies, the development of PH is associated with intravascular hemolysis, cutaneous leg ulceration, renal insufficiency, iron overload and liver dysfunction. Chronic anemia in sickle cell disease results in cardiac chamber dilation and a compensatory increase in left ventricular mass. This is often accompanied by left ventricular diastolic dysfunction which has also been a strong independent predictor of mortality patients with sickle cell disease. Both PH and diastolic dysfunction are associated with marked abnormalities in exercise capacity in these patients. Sudden death is an increasingly recognized problem and further cardiac investigations are necessary to recognize and treat high-risk patients. PMID:22440212

  14. Cardiopulmonary Effects of Acute Stressful Exercise at Altitude (2300m) of Individuals with Sickle Cell Trait (SCT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-01

    Central and peripheral circulatory changes after training of arms or legs. J. Appl. Physiol. 225:675-682, 1973. 56 6WM. 7. Clausen,J.P. Muscle blood...altitude of 2,300m. During Phase III the following studies were carried out: 1. PHYSIOLOGIC RESPONSE TO ACUTE STRENUOUS EXERCISE DURING INSPIRATORY ...and cause a deterioration in gas exchange and overall 02 delivery. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of inspiratory hypoxia

  15. Splenectomy in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease in Tabuk

    PubMed Central

    Ghmaird, Asmaa; Alnoaiji, Mohammad Mohammad; Al-Blewi, Sawsan; Zaki, Shaimaa; El-lewi, Ahmad; Ahmad, Nehal

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sickle cell disease is a common genetic disease in Saudi Arabia; it is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by production of abnormal hemoglobin S and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Acute splenic sequestration is a life-threatening complication for this disease. Prophylactic splenectomy is the only effective strategy for preventing future life-threatening episodes. AIM: The aim of this study was to study hospital records for all children aged 2 to 12 year old with Sickle cell disease who underwent splenectomy in Tabuk in Saudi Arabia. METHODS: Records of 24 children (13 males, 11 females) who underwent splenectomy in surgery department of King Salman North West Armed Hospital, Tabuk, Saudi Arabia between 2008 and 2015 were reviewed retrospectively and analyzed for age, sex, indications for splenectomy, surgical technique, preoperative and postoperative length of stay, operative and postoperative complications, acute chest syndrome, painful crises, blood transfusion and fever (preoperative and postoperative). RESULTS: We stressed on the information about the details of operation, the frequency of blood transfusion, fever, acute chest syndrome and painful crisis before and after operation. CONCLUSION: Here we found that blood transfusion frequency decreased after splenectomy. PMID:27275341

  16. Sickle cell microRNAs inhibit the malaria parasite.

    PubMed

    Duraisingh, Manoj T; Lodish, Harvey F

    2012-08-16

    Sickle cell hemoglobin conveys resistance to malaria. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, LaMonte et al. (2012) demonstrate a surprising mechanism for this innate immunity. A microRNA enriched in sickle red blood cells is translocated into the parasite, incorporated covalently into P. falciparum mRNAs and inhibits parasite growth.

  17. Coagulation fibrinolysis in sickle-cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, P. A.; Breeze, G. R.; Mann, J. R.; Stuart, J.

    1974-01-01

    A study of fibrinolytic activity in sickle-cell patients during asymptomatic periods has shown a normal fibrinolytic response to exercise and local heat to the arm. During vasoocclusive crises there was no significant decrease in fibrinolytic activity. These results contrast with earlier reports of decreased fibrinolysis during crisis and a suggestion that fibrinolytic activators might be of value in preventing vasoocclusive episodes. Patients in painful crisis showed a significant rise in fibrinogen concentration and fall in platelet count. The former may contribute to localized vascular sludging by increasing whole-blood viscosity, while the latter probably results from local trapping of platelets in areas of sickling or from subsequent splenic sequestration of damaged platelets. There was no evidence of disseminated, as opposed to localized, intravascular coagulation during crisis. PMID:4412492

  18. Sickle cell disease in childhood: Part II. Diagnosis and treatment of major complications and recent advances in treatment.

    PubMed

    Wethers, D L

    2000-09-15

    Treatment advances over the past 25 years have significantly decreased morbidity and mortality in children with sickle cell disease. Aggressive management of fever, early diagnosis of acute chest syndrome, judicious use of transfusions and proper treatment of pain can improve quality of life and prognosis for these children. Prophylactic hydroxyurea therapy has been shown to reduce the incidence and severity of pain crises in adults with sickle cell disease and has been effective in limited studies conducted in children. Research into stem cell transplantation provides hope that a cure for sickle cell disease may be possible.

  19. Sickle cell trait is associated with controlled levels of haem and mild proinflammatory response during acute malaria infection

    PubMed Central

    Ademolue, T. W.; Amodu, O. K.

    2017-01-01

    Summary The controlled induction of haemoxygenase‐1 (HO‐1), an enzyme that catabolizes haem, has been shown to reduce haem, preventing pathologies associated with haem toxicity. The hemoglobin genotype HbAS confers reduced susceptibility to severe complications of malaria by a mechanism that is not well understood. Using a longitudinal approach, we investigated the effect of baseline concentrations of HO‐1 on the accumulation of haem during acute Plasmodium falciparum malaria in HbAS and HbAA genotypes. Plasma concentrations of haem, HO‐1 and cytokines were quantified in venous blood obtained from children (9 months–5 years of age) during malaria infection, and at convalescence (baseline levels). Parasitaemia was determined during malaria infection. In patients with the HbAA genotype, there was a significant elevation in the plasma concentration of haem (P = 0.002), and a consequent increased induction of HO‐1 (P < 0.001) during falciparum malaria compared with levels at convalescence. Contrary to HbAA, plasma concentration of haem did not change in the HbAS genotypical group (P = 0·110), and the induction of HO‐1 was reduced during malaria compared with levels at convalescence (P = 0·006). Higher plasma levels of haem were observed in HbAS compared with HbAA at convalescence (P = 0·010), but this difference did not affect the levels of HO‐1 within each genotype (P = 0·450). Relatively milder proinflammatory responses were observed in HbAS children during malaria infection compared to HbAA children. Our findings suggest that a mechanism of reduced susceptibility to severe malaria pathologies by the HbAS genotype may involve the control of haem, leading to controlled levels of HO‐1 and milder proinflammatory responses during acute malaria. PMID:28142190

  20. Mouse models of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Beuzard, Y

    2008-01-01

    In the absence of a natural animal model for sickle cell disease, transgenic mouse models have been generated to better understand the complex pathophysiology of the disease and to evaluate potential specific therapies. In the early nineties, the simple addition of human globin genes induced the expression of hemoglobin S (HbS) or HbS-related human hemoglobins in mice still expressing mouse hemoglobin. To increase the proportion of human hemoglobin and the severity of the mouse sickle cell syndrome, the proportion of mouse hemoglobin could be decreased by a combination of mouse alpha- and beta-thalassemic defects, leading to complex genotypes and mild disease. Following the discovery of gene targeting in the mouse embryonic stem cells (ES cells), it was made possible to knock out all mouse adult globin genes (2alpha and 2beta) and to add the human homologous genes elsewhere in the mouse genome. In addition, the human gamma gene of fetal hemoglobin was protecting the fetus from HbS polymer formation. Accordingly, the resulting adult mouse models obtained in 1997, expressing human HbS-only, had a very severe anemia (Hb=5-6 g/dL). In order to survive, these "HbS-only mice" had to reduce the HbS concentration within the red blood cells. The phenotype could be less severe by adding modified human gamma genes, still expressed in adult mice. In 2006, a last "S-only" model was obtained by homologous knock in, replacing the mouse globin genes by human genes. This array of models contributes to better understand the role of different interacting factors in the complexity of sickle cell events, such as red cell defects, changes in blood flow and vaso-occlusion, hyperhemolysis, vascular tone dysregulation, oxidations, inflammation, activation and adhesion of cells, ischemia, reperfusion... In addition, each model has an appropriate usefulness to evaluate experimental therapies in vivo and to perform preclinical studies.

  1. How I treat and manage strokes in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Kassim, Adetola A; Galadanci, Najibah A; Pruthi, Sumit; DeBaun, Michael R

    2015-05-28

    Neurologic complications are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in sickle cell disease (SCD). In children with sickle cell anemia, routine use of transcranial Doppler screening, coupled with regular blood transfusion therapy, has decreased the prevalence of overt stroke from ∼11% to 1%. Limited evidence is available to guide acute and chronic management of individuals with SCD and strokes. Current management strategies are based primarily on single arm clinical trials and observational studies, coupled with principles of neurology and hematology. Initial management of a focal neurologic deficit includes evaluation by a multidisciplinary team (a hematologist, neurologist, neuroradiologist, and transfusion medicine specialist); prompt neuro-imaging and an initial blood transfusion (simple followed immediately by an exchange transfusion or only exchange transfusion) is recommended if the hemoglobin is >4 gm/dL and <10 gm/dL. Standard therapy for secondary prevention of strokes and silent cerebral infarcts includes regular blood transfusion therapy and in selected cases, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. A critical component of the medical care following an infarct is cognitive and physical rehabilitation. We will discuss our strategy of acute and long-term management of strokes in SCD.

  2. Anesthesia for sickle cell disease and congenital myopathy in combination.

    PubMed

    Fanning, Rebecca; O'Donnell, Brian; Lynch, Brian; Stephens, Michael; O'Donovan, Frances

    2006-08-01

    We report on the perioperative management of anesthesia and analgesia in a child with sickle cell disease and a congenital myopathy, presenting for corrective orthopedic surgery. The case illustrates two valuable points of interest: the many benefits of regional anesthesia in complex medical cases and the successful use of tourniquets in children with sickle cell disease.

  3. African American Students' Awareness of Sickle Cell Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogamdi, Simon O.

    1994-01-01

    Reports a study that investigated knowledge level about sickle cell disease among students at a predominantly black university. Survey results indicated the students most directly concerned did not well understand the basic facts about sickle cell disease. Most students could not recall whether they had ever been tested. (SM)

  4. Newborn Sickle Cell Screening: Benefits and Burdens Realized.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowley, Peter T.; Huntzinger, Donna J.

    1983-01-01

    Follow-up data on a program that screened 17 newborns for sickle cell anemia suggests that in order to derive maximum benefit from such screening physicians need to better understand the differential diagnosis, treatment, and inheritance of sickle cell disease, and individual guidance must be provided to families. (GC)

  5. Etiology of Strokes in Children with Sickle Cell Anemia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBaun, Michael R.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; McKinstry, Robert C., III

    2006-01-01

    The most devastating complication of sickle cell anemia is cerebral infarction, affecting [approximately]30% of all individuals with sickle cell anemia. Despite being one of the most common causes of stroke in infants and children, the mechanism of cerebral infarction in this population has not been extensively studied and is poorly understood.…

  6. 78 FR 66747 - Sickle Cell Disease Public Meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Sickle Cell Disease Public Meeting on Patient-Focused Drug... public comment on Patient-Focused Drug Development for sickle cell disease. Patient-Focused Drug... impact of sickle cell disease on daily life and on available therapies for sickle cell disease....

  7. The ethnic distribution of sickle cell disease in Sudan.

    PubMed

    Sabahelzain, Majdi Mohammed; Hamamy, Hanan

    2014-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is one of the most common inherited disorders of haemoglobin in Africa and it is expected that sickle cell trait varies in frequency in different areas in Sudan. An extensive literature search was carried out accessing the US National Library of Medicine, the WHO Eastern Mediterranean Region resources, the Catalogue for Transmission Genetics in Arabs and papers and documents published in Sudan that included data on the prevalence of sickle cell anaemia and trait. Rates of SCA and trait varied in different areas in Sudan with the highest rates reported from Western and Eastern Sudan where one in every 123 children born in Messeryia tribe in Western Sudan is at risk of having SCD. High consanguinity rates and malaria endemicity are strong related factors with sickle cell gene in Sudan. This review will present what is known about the rates of sickle cell gene in different ethnic groups in Sudan.

  8. Oral and Dental Considerations in Management of Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sickle cell anemia is a genetic disease that primarily affects the black population. This anemia is due to a homozygous state of the abnormal hemoglobin S. An alteration occurs on the DNA molecule involving the substitution of the amino acid valine for glutamic acid at the sixth position on the beta polypeptide chain. This biochemical variation on the DNA molecule creates a physiological change that causes sickle-shaped red blood cells to be produced. The sickle-shaped cells are the result of the hemoglobin S being deoxygenated. This case report presents a case of 16-year-old female with sickle cell disease and its dental management. How to cite this article: Acharya S. Oral and Dental Considerations in Management of Sickle Cell Anemia. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(2):141-144. PMID:26379384

  9. GBT440 Inhibits Sickling of Sickle Cell Trait Blood Under In Vitro Conditions Mimicking Strenuous Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Dufu, Kobina; Lehrer-Graiwer, Josh; Ramos, Eleanor; Oksenberg, Donna

    2016-01-01

    In sickle cell trait (SCT), hemoglobin A (HbA) and S (HbS) are co-expressed in each red blood cell (RBC). While homozygous expression of HbS (HbSS) leads to polymerization and sickling of RBCs resulting in sickle cell disease (SCD) characterized by hemolytic anemia, painful vaso-occlusive episodes and shortened life-span, SCT is considered a benign condition usually with minor or no complications related to sickling. However, physical activities that cause increased tissue oxygen demand, dehydration and/or metabolic acidosis leads to increased HbS polymerization and life-threatening complications including death. We report that GBT440, an agent being developed for the treatment of SCD, increases the affinity of oxygen for Hb and inhibits in vitro polymerization of a mixture of HbS and HbA that simulates SCT blood. Moreover, GBT440 prevents sickling of SCT blood under in vitro conditions mimicking strenuous exercise with hypoxia, dehydration and acidosis. Together, our results indicate that GBT440 may have the potential to protect SCT individuals from sickling-related complications during conditions that favor HbS polymerization. PMID:27757216

  10. Quality of care in sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Evensen, Christian T.; Treadwell, Marsha J.; Keller, San; Levine, Roger; Hassell, Kathryn L.; Werner, Ellen M.; Smith, Wally R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Documented deficiencies in adult sickle cell disease (SCD) care include poor access to knowledgeable providers and inadequate treatment in emergency departments (EDs). The aim of this study was to create patient-reported outcome measures of the quality of ambulatory and ED care for adults with SCD. We developed and pilot tested SCD quality of care questions consistent with Consumer Assessments of Healthcare Providers and Systems surveys. We applied psychometric methods to develop scores and evaluate reliability and validity. The participants of this study were adults with SCD (n = 556)—63% aged 18 to 34 years; 64% female; 64% SCD-SS—at 7 US sites. The measure used was Adult Sickle Cell Quality of Life Measurement information system Quality of Care survey. Most participants (90%) reported at least 1 severe pain episode (pain intensity 7.8 ± 2.3, 0–10 scale) in the past year. Most (81%) chose to manage pain at home rather than the ED, citing negative ED experiences (83%). Using factor analysis, we identified Access, Provider Interaction, and ED Care composites with reliable scores (Cronbach α 0.70–0.83) and construct validity (r = 0.32–0.83 correlations with global care ratings). Compared to general adult Consumer Assessments of Healthcare Providers and Systems scores, adults with SCD had worse care, adjusted for age, education, and general health. Results were consistent with other research reflecting deficiencies in ED care for adults with SCD. The Adult Sickle Cell Quality of Life Measurement Quality of Care measure is a useful self-report measure for documenting and tracking disparities in quality of SCD care. PMID:27583862

  11. Recurrent infarction of sphenoid bone with subperiosteal collection in a child with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Alsuhaibani, Adel H; Marzouk, Mohammed Abu

    2011-01-01

    Infarction of the orbital bone in patients with sickle cell disease is very rare. The authors report a young boy who presented twice with marked acute proptosis and eyelid swelling of the right eye resulting from infarction in the greater wing of the sphenoid bone accompanied by an orbital subperiosteal collection. The time interval between the 2 attacks was 3 years.

  12. Anisotropic light scattering of individual sickle red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngchan; Higgins, John M.; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Suresh, Subra; Park, YongKeun

    2012-04-01

    We present the anisotropic light scattering of individual red blood cells (RBCs) from a patient with sickle cell disease (SCD). To measure light scattering spectra along two independent axes of elongated-shaped sickle RBCs with arbitrary orientation, we introduce the anisotropic Fourier transform light scattering (aFTLS) technique and measured both the static and dynamic anisotropic light scattering. We observed strong anisotropy in light scattering patterns of elongated-shaped sickle RBCs along its major axes using static aFTLS. Dynamic aFTLS analysis reveals the significantly altered biophysical properties in individual sickle RBCs. These results provide evidence that effective viscosity and elasticity of sickle RBCs are significantly different from those of the healthy RBCs.

  13. Hydrodynamics of Hemostasis in Sickle-Cell Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, S. I. A.; Mahadevan, L.

    2013-03-01

    Vaso-occlusion, the stoppage of blood flow in sickle-cell disease, is a complex dynamical process spanning multiple time and length scales. Motivated by recent ex vivo microfluidic measurements of hemostasis using blood from sickle-cell patients, we develop a multiphase model that couples the kinetics and hydrodynamics of a flowing suspension of normal and sickled cells in a fluid. We use the model to derive expressions for the cell velocities and concentrations that quantify the hydrodynamics of hemostasis, and provide simple criteria as well as a phase diagram for occlusion, consistent with our simulations and earlier observations.

  14. Numerical Simulation of Sickle Cell Blood Flow in the Microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Stanley A.; Carlson, Brian E.

    2001-11-01

    A numerical simulation of normal and sickle cell blood flow through the transverse arteriole-capillary microcirculation is carried out to model the dominant mechanisms involved in the onset of vascular stasis in sickle cell disease. The transverse arteriole-capillary network is described by Strahler's network branching method, and the oxygen and blood transport in the capillaries is modeled by a Krogh cylinder analysis utilizing Lighthill's lubrication theory, as developed by Berger and King. Poiseuille's law is used to represent blood flow in the arterioles. Applying this flow and transport model and utilizing volumetric flow continuity at each network bifurcation, a nonlinear system of equations is obtained, which is solved iteratively using a steepest descent algorithm coupled with a Newton solver. Ten different networks are generated and flow results are calculated for normal blood and sickle cell blood without and with precapillary oxygen loss. We find that total volumetric blood flow through the network is greater in the two sickle cell blood simulations than for normal blood owing to the anemia associated with sickle cell disease. The percentage of capillary blockage in the network increases dramatically with decreasing pressure drop across the network in the sickle cell cases while there is no blockage when normal blood flows through simulated networks. It is concluded that, in sickle cell disease, without any vasomotor dilation response to decreasing oxygen concentrations in the blood, capillary blockage will occur in the microvasculature even at average pressure drops across the transverse arteriole-capillary networks.

  15. Haemolysis and abnormal haemorheology in sickle cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    Connes, Philippe; Lamarre, Yann; Waltz, Xavier; Ballas, Samir K; Lemonne, Nathalie; Etienne-Julan, Maryse; Hue, Olivier; Hardy-Dessources, Marie-Dominique; Romana, Marc

    2014-05-01

    Although pulmonary hypertension, leg ulcers, priapism, stroke and glomerulopathy in sickle cell anaemia (SCA) result from the adverse effects of chronic haemolysis on vascular function (haemolytic phenotype), osteonecrosis, acute chest syndrome and painful vaso-occlusive crises are caused by abnormal vascular cell adhesion and increased blood viscosity (viscosity-vaso-occlusion phenotype). However, this model with two sub-phenotypes does not take into account the haemorheological dimension. We tested the relationships between the biological parameters reflecting the haemolytic rate (haemolytic component) and red blood cell (RBC) rheological characteristics in 97 adults with SCA. No significant difference in the proportion of patients with low or high haemolytic component in the low and high blood viscosity groups was observed. The RBC elongation index (i.e. deformability) was negatively correlated with the haemolytic component. The RBC aggregates strength (i.e. RBC aggregates robustness) was negatively correlated with RBC elongation index. Sickle RBCs with high density had lower elongation index and higher aggregates strength. In conclusion, (i) the 'haemolytic' phenotype is characterized by decreased RBC deformability and increased RBC aggregates strength and (ii) the viscosity-vaso-occlusive phenotype is characterized by increased RBC deformability but not always by increased blood viscosity. α-thalassaemia modulates the haemorheological properties but other factors seem to be involved.

  16. Clinical response of patients with sickle cell anemia to cromolyn sodium nasal spray.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Mehran; Zekavat, Omid R; Sharifzadeh, Sedigeh; Mousavizadeh, Kazem; Mosavizadeh, Kazem

    2006-11-01

    Sickle cell anemia is the most common heritable hematological disease affecting humans. Although hydroxyurea is the most commonly used antisickling agent, several previous studies suggest that cromolyn sodium also prevents sickling when administered acutely. However, no previous studies have evaluated the safety or efficacy of prolonged administration of cromolyn to patients with sickle cell anemia. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to test the hypothesis that prolonged administration of cromolyn alone or in combination with hydroxyurea would decrease the incidence of pain crises and/or alter the chronic pain seen in patients with this disease. In this crossover, single-blind, in vivo and in vitro study, 17 patients with sickle cell disease were studied. Each patient had to fill out a standard pain chart. Every 3 months the patients' medications changed in the following manner: The first 3 months the patients used cromolyn sodium nasal spray; the second 3 months they received placebo nasal spray; the third 3 months they received cromolyn sodium nasal spray and hydroxyurea capsule; and the last 3 months they received hydroxyurea capsule and placebo nasal spray. The least pain was felt with the mixture of hydroxyurea capsule and cromolyn sodium nasal inhaler. Furthermore, with the other combinations of medications, there were no significant statistical changes in the number of sickled red blood cells. Every combination used in this survey had positive effects on decreasing the pain. cromolyn sodium nasal spray is significantly efficient in decreasing sickle cell crisis as well as pain intensity in patients with sickle cell anemia.

  17. Neurologic complications of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, Akila; Adams, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a group of genetic blood disorders that vary in severity, but the most severe forms, primarily homozygous sickle cell anemia, are associated with neurologic complications. Over the last 90 years it has become established that some patients will develop severe arterial disease of the intracranial brain arteries and suffer brain infarction. Smaller infarctions and brain atrophy may also be seen and over time there appear to be negative cognitive effects in some patients, with or without abnormal brain imaging. Focal mononeuropathies and pneumococcal meningitis are also more common in these patients. Brain infarction in children can largely be prevented screening children beginning at age 2 years and instituting regular blood transfusion when the Doppler indicates high stroke risk (>200cm/sec). Iron overload and the uncertain duration of transfusion are disadvantages but overall this approach, tested in a randomized clinical trial, reduced first stroke by over 90%. Secondary stroke prevention has not been subjected to a randomized controlled trial except for one recently stopped comparison of regular transfusions compared to hydroxuyrea (results favored transfusion). The usual stroke prevention agents (such as aspirin or warfarin) have not been rigorously tested. Magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography give evidence of subtle and sometimes overt brain injury due to stroke in many adults, but a preventive strategy for adults with SCD has not been developed. Bone marrow transplantation is the only cure, but some non-neurologic symptoms can be controlled in adults with hydroxuyrea.

  18. Coping and health service utilisation in a UK study of paediatric sickle cell pain

    PubMed Central

    Anie, K; Steptoe, A; Ball, S; Dick, M; Smalling, B

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To assess sickle cell pain and coping in children and to examine the relation between these factors and the utilisation of health services. Methods: Cross sectional study involving 67 children with sickle cell disease attending three London hospitals. Interviews and questionnaires involved measures of pain, health service utilisation, and coping responses (measured with the Coping Strategies Questionnaire (CSQ), revised for children with sickle cell disease). Medical data on complications, haemoglobin (Hb) levels, and foetal haemoglobin (HbF) percentage were also collected. Results: Pain accounted for about 24% of hospital service use, independent of age, sex, number of with sickle cell disease complications, and Hb levels. However, 42% of patients had not utilised hospital services in the past 12 months. Three higher order factors emerged from analysis of the CSQ (active coping, affective coping, passive adherence coping). Pain severity was predicted by passive adherence coping, while utilisation of hospital services was predicted by active coping. Conclusions: Sickle cell disease in children involves severe recurrent pain leading to hospitalisation in some cases. Psychological coping patterns are relevant to both pain experience, and the use of acute hospital services. It is likely that children would benefit from community based interventions that incorporate both medical and psychological assessments. PMID:11970920

  19. Correction of the sickle cell mutation in embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Judy C; Ye, Lin; Kan, Yuet Wai

    2006-01-24

    Sickle cell anemia is one of the most common genetic diseases worldwide. Patients often suffer from anemia, painful crises, infections, strokes, and cardiopulmonary complications. Although current management has improved the quality of life and survival of patients, cure can be achieved only with bone marrow transplantation when histocompatible donors are available. The ES cell technology suggests that a therapeutic cloning approach may be feasible for treatment of this disease. Using a transgenic/knockout sickle cell anemia mouse model, which harbors 240 kb of human DNA sequences containing the beta(S)-globin gene, we prepared ES cells from blastocysts that had the sickle cells anemia genotype and carried out homologous recombination with DNA constructs that contained the beta(A)-globin gene. We obtained ES cells in which the beta(S) was corrected to the beta(A) sequence. Hematopoietic cells differentiated from these ES cells produced both hemoglobin A and hemoglobin S. This approach can be applied to human ES cells to correct the sickle mutation as well as beta-thalassemia mutations.

  20. Pathophysiological aspects of sickle cell vaso-occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 30 selections. Some of the titles are: An Animal Model for Sickle Cell Vaso-Occlusion: A Study Using NMR and Technetium Imaging; Sickle-Cell Vaso-Occlusion in an Animal Model: Intravital Microscopy and Radionuclide Imaging of Selective Sequestration of Dense Cells; Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Percentage of Dense Cells, and Serum Prostanoids as Tools for Objective Assessment of Pain Crisis: A Preliminary Report; and Painful Crisis and Dense Echinocytes: Effects of Hydration and Vasodilators.

  1. Vasculopathy and pulmonary hypertension in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Potoka, Karin P; Gladwin, Mark T

    2015-02-15

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder in the gene encoding the β-chain of hemoglobin. Deoxygenation causes the mutant hemoglobin S to polymerize, resulting in rigid, adherent red blood cells that are entrapped in the microcirculation and hemolyze. Cardinal features include severe painful crises and episodic acute lung injury, called acute chest syndrome. This population, with age, develops chronic organ injury, such as chronic kidney disease and pulmonary hypertension. A major risk factor for developing chronic organ injury is hemolytic anemia, which releases red blood cell contents into the circulation. Cell free plasma hemoglobin, heme, and arginase 1 disrupt endothelial function, drive oxidative and inflammatory stress, and have recently been referred to as erythrocyte damage-associated molecular pattern molecules (eDAMPs). Studies suggest that in addition to effects of cell free plasma hemoglobin on scavenging nitric oxide (NO) and generating reactive oxygen species (ROS), heme released from plasma hemoglobin can bind to the toll-like receptor 4 to activate the innate immune system. Persistent intravascular hemolysis over decades leads to chronic vasculopathy, with ∼10% of patients developing pulmonary hypertension. Progressive obstruction of small pulmonary arterioles, increase in pulmonary vascular resistance, decreased cardiac output, and eventual right heart failure causes death in many patients with this complication. This review provides an overview of the pathobiology of hemolysis-mediated endothelial dysfunction and eDAMPs and a summary of our present understanding of diagnosis and management of pulmonary hypertension in sickle cell disease, including a review of recent American Thoracic Society (ATS) consensus guidelines for risk stratification and management.

  2. Cerebral vasculopathy in children with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Fasano, Ross M; Meier, Emily R; Hulbert, Monica L

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA)-associated cerebral vasculopathy and moyamoya is a unique entity reflecting the abnormal interactions between sickled red blood cells (RBCs) and the cerebral arterial endothelium. Endothelial injury, coagulation activation, and the inflammatory response generated by sickled RBCs are implicated in the development of cerebral vasculopathy, but the pathophysiology remains incompletely understood. SCA-specific screening and treatment guidelines have successfully reduced the incidence of overt strokes in this high-risk population. However, despite aggressive hematological management, many children with cerebral vasculopathy due to SCA have progressive vasculopathy and recurrent strokes; therefore, more effective therapies, such as revascularization surgery and curative hematopoietic stem cell transplant, are urgently needed.

  3. Phytomedicines and Nutraceuticals: Alternative Therapeutics for Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Imaga, Ngozi Awa

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a genetically inherited disease in which the “SS” individual possesses an abnormal beta globin gene. A single base substitution in the gene encoding the human β-globin subunit results in replacement of β6 glutamic acid by valine, leading to the devastating clinical manifestations of sickle cell disease. This substitution causes drastic reduction in the solubility of sickle cell hemoglobin (HbS) when deoxygenated. Under these conditions, the HbS molecules polymerize to form long crystalline intracellular mass of fibers which are responsible for the deformation of the biconcave disc shaped erythrocyte into a sickle shape. First-line clinical management of sickle cell anemia include, use of hydroxyurea, folic acid, amino acids supplementation, penicillinprophylaxis, and antimalarial prophylaxis to manage the condition and blood transfusions to stabilize the patient's hemoglobin level. These are quite expensive and have attendant risk factors. However, a bright ray of hope involving research into antisickling properties of medicinal plants has been rewarding. This alternative therapy using phytomedicines has proven to not only reduce crisis but also reverse sickling (in vitro). The immense benefits of phytomedicines and nutraceuticals used in the management of sickle cell anemia are discussed in this paper. PMID:23476125

  4. Phytomedicines and nutraceuticals: alternative therapeutics for sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Imaga, Ngozi Awa

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a genetically inherited disease in which the "SS" individual possesses an abnormal beta globin gene. A single base substitution in the gene encoding the human β -globin subunit results in replacement of β 6 glutamic acid by valine, leading to the devastating clinical manifestations of sickle cell disease. This substitution causes drastic reduction in the solubility of sickle cell hemoglobin (HbS) when deoxygenated. Under these conditions, the HbS molecules polymerize to form long crystalline intracellular mass of fibers which are responsible for the deformation of the biconcave disc shaped erythrocyte into a sickle shape. First-line clinical management of sickle cell anemia include, use of hydroxyurea, folic acid, amino acids supplementation, penicillinprophylaxis, and antimalarial prophylaxis to manage the condition and blood transfusions to stabilize the patient's hemoglobin level. These are quite expensive and have attendant risk factors. However, a bright ray of hope involving research into antisickling properties of medicinal plants has been rewarding. This alternative therapy using phytomedicines has proven to not only reduce crisis but also reverse sickling (in vitro). The immense benefits of phytomedicines and nutraceuticals used in the management of sickle cell anemia are discussed in this paper.

  5. Haemoglobin F modulation in childhood sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Trompeter, Sara; Roberts, Irene

    2009-02-01

    While supportive care remains the best option for most well children with sickle cell disease (SCD), increasing awareness of early signs of chronic organ damage in childhood has focused attention on therapy which modulates the natural history of the disease. Since cure by stem cell transplantation is only feasible for a minority and gene therapy remains developmental, pharmacological modification by Haemoglobin F (HbF)-inducers, is the most widely used approach in SCD. Currently, the only HbF modulator with a clear place in the management of childhood SCD is hydroxycarbamide for which the main indications are frequent painful crises and recurrent acute chest syndrome. In the majority of SCD children treated with hydroxycarbamide there is clear evidence of clinical benefit and the drug is well tolerated. The main disadvantages are the need for frequent monitoring and uncertainity about long-term risks of carcinogenicity and impaired fertility, although these risks appear to be very low. The role of hydroxycarbamide in sickle-associated central nervous system disease remains to be established. Decitabine and butyrate derivatives show some promise although robust data in children with SCD are lacking. A number of other drugs are currently under investigation for their effects on HbF production including thalidomide and lenolidamide.

  6. Metabolomic analysis of normal and sickle cell erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Darghouth, D; Koehl, B; Junot, C; Roméo, P-H

    2010-09-01

    Metabolic signatures of specialized circulating hematopoietic cells in physiological or human hematological diseases start to be described. We use a simple and highly reproductive extraction method of erythrocytes metabolites coupled with a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry based metabolites profiling method to determine metabolomes of normal and sickle cell erythrocytes. Sickle cell erythrocytes and normal erythrocytes metabolomes display major differences in glycolysis, in glutathione, in ascorbate metabolisms and in metabolites associated to membranes turnover. In addition, the amounts of metabolites derived from urea cycle and NO metabolism that partly take place within erythrocyte were different between normal and sickle cell erythrocytes. These results show that metabolic profiling of red blood cell diseases can now be determined and might indicate new biomarkers that can be used for the follow-up of sickle cell patients.

  7. Sickle cell disease, vasculopathy, and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Kassim, Adetola A; DeBaun, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is caused by a mutation in both beta globin genes, resulting in chronic hemolysis and multiorgan disease that ultimately leads to premature death. Although hemoglobin S (HbS) polymerization and vaso-occlusion are central to the pathogenesis of SCD, overlapping pathways implicated in SCD-related endothelial dysfunction include hemolysis, defects in nitric oxide metabolism, ischemia-reperfusion injury, oxidative stress, increased cell-to-cell adhesion, and proinflammatory and coagulation mediators. Progression of organ-specific vasculopathy often precedes organ dysfunction and may provide targets for therapeutic intervention. SCD-related vasculopathies include, but are not limited to, moyamoya that often precedes cerebral infarcts or hemorrhage, proliferative retinopathy prior to loss of eyesight, pulmonary vasculopathy associated with pulmonary hypertension, and renal vasculopathy prior to the onset of chronic renal disease. This review evaluates evidence that SCD vasculopathy is a harbinger for organ dysfunction and reviews the potential for targeted antivasculopathy therapies.

  8. What Is Sickle Cell Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... have it? For more information... Acknowledgments Concept 15 : DNA and proteins are key molecules of the cell nucleus. Learn the basic chemistry of DNA and proteins. Concept 27 : Mutations are changes in ...

  9. [Genetic aspects of sickle cell anemia].

    PubMed

    Labie, D

    1992-10-01

    The genetics of sickle cell anemia may be considered as a model. Its mendelian transmission was hypothesized even before the molecular era. Once the mutation identified, it could be studied at the protein and DNA level; a consistent pathophysiological mechanism was proposed; the various genetic forms of the disease could be identified; the way by which a balanced polymorphism with Plasmodium falciparum malaria is obtained was analyzed. More recently, investigations were run in order to understand how modulating, or epistatic factors could modify the pathophysiological mechanism and contribute to the high clinical diversity of the disease. Several factors have been identified, among which a concomitant alpha-thalassemia, an overproduction of fetal hemoglobin, due either to an activation of the gamma genes or to an increase of the F-cell number, and finally a quantitative control of the beta s chains themselves. Such a high number of genetic active factors questions the concept itself of a monogenic disease.

  10. [Cardiopulmonary complications in sickle cell anemia].

    PubMed

    Rojas-Jiménez, Sara; Lopera-Valle, Johan; Yabur-Espítia, Mirna

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia, considered the most prevalent genetic disease among African Americans, is a disease with autosomal recessive inheritance pattern, characterized by the production of hemoglobin S. This abnormal protein polymerizes and facilitates the formation of fibrillar aggregates that alters the erythrocyte morphology. The stiffness of the red blood cells hinders the adequate transit across microcirculation, leading to hemolysis and increased blood viscosity, which ease thrombogenesis and vascular occlusion, resulting in tissue ischemia and microinfarcts. This disease has a high rate of morbidity and mortality, especially in the first three years of life, when a rapid diagnosis and appropriate treatment are essential. Cardiovascular complications such as heart failure and pulmonary hypertension may develop independently, and each one contributes to increased mortality, being the combination of both risk factors, an important aggravating factor for prognosis and a determinant indicator of mortality.

  11. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Sickle Cell Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... transfusions may also have heart damage from iron overload . (See transfusion management.) Pulmonary Hypertension In adolescents and ... blood transfusions may develop liver damage from iron overload . Leg Ulcers Sickle cell ulcers are sores that ...

  12. Ideal donors, imperfect results in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Alexis A

    2013-08-08

    In this issue of Blood, Chou et al report findings from an observational study of alloimmunization in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) receiving blood transfusions from ethnically matched donors.

  13. Nursing Diagnoses and Caring for Patients with Sickle Cell Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    London, Fran

    1990-01-01

    This continuing education article is designed to teach nurses to describe sickle cell anemia, identify complications, specify signs and symptoms, and describe nursing interventions. It concludes with a multiple-choice test. (SK)

  14. Progress in Early Diagnosis of Sickle Cell Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Howard A.

    1971-01-01

    Discusses the basis of sickle cell Anemia, including: a description of the diseased blood, genetic implications, recognition of symptoms in infancy, the need for implementation of wide screening procedures, and the future prospects of a cure. (AJ)

  15. Micro- and macrovascular function in children with sickle cell anaemia and sickle cell haemoglobin C disease.

    PubMed

    Möckesch, Berenike; Charlot, Keyne; Jumet, Stéphane; Romana, Marc; Divialle-Doumdo, Lydia; Hardy-Dessources, Marie-Dominique; Petras, Marie; Tressieres, Benoît; Tarer, Vanessa; Hue, Olivier; Etienne-Julan, Maryse; Connes, Philippe; Antoine-Jonville, Sophie

    2017-02-04

    It is unclear whether vascular function is affected similarly in children with sickle cell anaemia (SS) and children with sickle haemoglobin C (SC) disease. Therefore, we compared micro and macrovascular functions in healthy (AA) children, children with SS and SC disease, and assessed their association with physical activity. Participants (24 SS, 22 SC and 16 AA), were compared in terms of 1) thermal hyperaemic response (finger pad warming to 42°C) measured by Laser Doppler techniques, 2) arterial stiffness determined by pulse wave velocity, 3) daily energy expenditure related to moderate and intense physical activities estimated by questionnaire and 4) fitness level, evaluated by the six-minute walk test. Response to heating differed between SS, SC and controls. Peripheral microvascular reactivity was lower and pulse wave velocity higher in SS compared to AA. SC had blunted microvascular reactivity in response to heating compared to AA but pulse wave velocity was not different within the two groups. Physical activity and fitness levels were markedly lower in sickle cell patients compared to healthy controls but no association was observed with vascular function. Microvasodilatory reserve is decreased in both SS and SC patients but only SS patients were also characterised by impaired macrovascular function.

  16. The prevention of pain from sickle cell disease by trandolapril.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, R. Michael; Moskowitz, David W.

    2007-01-01

    A 48-year-old African-American woman with both sickle cell anemia and chronic pain was treated with a hydrophobic angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor. This resulted in the complete resolution of her pain. When the ACE inhibitor was deliberately stopped, her pain recurred, only to cease again after the ACE inhibitor was deliberately resumed. The activation of ACE may be an early step in the arterial vaso-occlusion typical of sickle cell disease. PMID:17393952

  17. Sickle cell anemia and transposition of the great vessels.

    PubMed

    Hudson, R L; Castro, O; Spivak, J L; Sampson, C; Downing, J W

    1978-02-01

    A child with homozygous sickle cell disease and transposition of the great vessels had erythrocytosis associated with markedly increased plasma erythropoietin activity. Her clinical course was complicated by neurologic manifestations but not by recurrent sickle cell vasooculsive episodes. The fetal hemoglobin level which had been greater than 25% during the first two years of life gradually decreased to less than 10%. She died at 3 years of age of congestive heart failure and severe anemia. The only sickle cell painful crisis occurred during her terminal illness. It is likely that the high levels of fetal hemorglobin decreased sickling and thus allowed erythrocytosis to develop. Fetal hemoglobin may also have prevented frequent vaso-occlusive events despite the high hematocrit level.

  18. Sickle cell in Latin America and the United States [corrected].

    PubMed

    Huttle, Alexandra; Maestre, Gladys E; Lantigua, Rafael; Green, Nancy S

    2015-07-01

    Latin Americans are an underappreciated population affected by sickle cell disease (SCD). Sickle trait and SCD exist throughout Latin America and U.S. Latino communities. We describe the epidemiology and genetic heterogeneity of SCD among Latin Americans, and fetal hemoglobin expression. National population-based newborn screening for SCD is limited to Brazil, Costa Rica, and the U.S. Available and extrapolated data suggest that over 6,000 annual births and 100,000-150,000 Latin Americans are affected by SCD. This comprehensive review highlights the substantial numbers and population distribution of SCD and sickle trait in Latin America, and where national newborn screening programs for SCD exist.

  19. Nocturnal enuresis in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Rachel B; Kassim, Adetola A; Goodpaster, Robert L; DeBaun, Michael R

    2014-04-01

    Nocturnal enuresis is a prevalent and challenging problem in children and young adults with sickle cell disease (SCD). Limited progress has been made in elucidating etiology and pathophysiology of nocturnal enuresis in individuals with SCD. Among adults with SCD ages 18-20 years, approximately 9% report nocturnal enuresis. Nocturnal enuresis contributes to decreased health related quality of life in people with SCD, resulting in low self-esteem and sometimes social isolation. Postulated non-mutually exclusive causes of nocturnal enuresis in individuals with SCD include hyposthenuria leading to nocturnal polyuria, decreased bladder capacity or nocturnal bladder overactivity, increased arousal thresholds, and sleep disordered breathing. No evidence-based therapy for nocturnal enuresis in SCD exists. This review is focused on describing the natural history, postulated causes and a rational approach to the evaluation and management of nocturnal enuresis in children and adults with SCD.

  20. Headache and Facial Pain in Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Vgontzas, Angeliki; Charleston, Larry; Robbins, Matthew S

    2016-03-01

    Children and adolescents with sickle cell disease (SCD) have a high prevalence of recurrent headaches (24.0-43.9 %). Acute presentation with headache can be diagnostically challenging, as the clinician must consider evaluation of several potentially devastating conditions including vascular diseases (stroke, hemorrhage, venous sinus thrombosis, moyamoya, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome), facial and orbital bone infarcts, dental pain, and osteomyelitis. Patients with SCD and primary headache disorders may benefit from comprehensive headache treatment plans that include abortive therapy, prophylactic therapy, and non-pharmacological modalities. Although there is limited data in adults, those with SCD are at risk for medication overuse headache secondary to frequent opioid use. Addressing headache in patients with SCD may help to reduce their use of opioids and disability and improve pain and quality of life.

  1. [French guidelines for the management of adult sickle cell disease: 2015 update].

    PubMed

    Habibi, A; Arlet, J-B; Stankovic, K; Gellen-Dautremer, J; Ribeil, J-A; Bartolucci, P; Lionnet, F

    2015-05-11

    Sickle cell disease is a systemic genetic disorder, causing many functional and tissular modifications. As the prevalence of patients with sickle cell disease increases gradually in France, every physician can be potentially involved in the care of these patients. Complications of sickle cell disease can be acute and chronic. Pain is the main symptom and should be treated quickly and aggressively. In order to reduce the fatality rate associated with acute chest syndrome, it must be detected and treated early. Chronic complications are one of the main concerns in adults and should be identified as early as possible in order to prevent end organ damage. Many organs can be involved, including bones, kidneys, eyes, lungs, etc. The indications for a specific treatment (blood transfusion or hydroxyurea) should be regularly discussed. Coordinated health care should be carefully organized to allow a regular follow-up near the living place and access to specialized departments. We present in this article the French guidelines for the sickle cell disease management in adulthood.

  2. Sickle Cell Research: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of a normal red blood cell with normal hemoglobin. Figure B shows abnormal, sickled red blood cells ... cross-section of a sickle-cell with abnormal hemoglobin. Illustration courtesy of National Heart, Lung, and Blood ...

  3. Evolving locally appropriate models of care for Indian sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Serjeant, Graham R.

    2016-01-01

    The sickle cell gene in India represents a separate occurrence of the HbS mutations from those in Africa. Sickle cell disease in India occurs against different genetic and environmental backgrounds from those seen in African patients and there is evidence of clinical differences between the populations. Knowledge of the clinical features of African disease was drawn from the Jamaican Cohort Study, based on prospective follow up of all cases of sickle cell disease detected by the screening of 100,000 consecutive newborns in Kingston, Jamaica, and supplemented by observations from the Cooperative Study of Sickle Cell Disease in the US. Defining the principal causes of early morbidity in African sickle cell disease led to successful interventions including pneumococcal prophylaxis, parental education in the early diagnosis of acute splenic sequestration, and the early detection by trans-cranial Doppler of cerebral vessel stenosis predictive of stroke but their success depended on early diagnosis, ideally at birth. Although reducing mortality among patients with African forms of SS disease, the question remains whether these interventions are appropriate or justified in Indian patients. This dilemma is approached by comparing the available data in African and Indian forms of SS disease seeking to highlight the similarities and differences and to identify the deficiencies in knowledge of Indian disease. These deficiencies could be most readily addressed by cohort studies based on newborn screening and since much of the morbidity of African disease occurs in the first five years of life, these need not be a daunting prospect for Indian health care personnel. Newborn screening programmes for sickle cell disease are already underway in India and appropriate protocols and therapeutic trials could quickly answer many of these questions. Without this knowledge, Indian physicians may continue to use possibly unnecessary and expensive models of care. PMID:27377495

  4. Cellular therapy for sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Allistair; Jacobsohn, David A; Bollard, Catherine M

    2016-11-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a monogenic red cell disorder affecting more than 300 000 annual births worldwide and leading to significant organ toxicity and premature mortality. Although chronic therapies such as hydroxyurea have improved outcomes, more durable therapeutic and curative options are still being investigated. Newer understanding of the disease has implicated invariant natural killer T cells as a critical immune profile that potentiates SCD. Hence, targeting this cell population may offer a new approach to disease management. Hematopoietic stem cell transplant is a curative option for patients with SCD, but the under-representation of minorities on the unrelated donor registry means that this is not a feasible option for more than 75% of patients. Work in this area has therefore focused on increasing the donor pool and decreasing transplant-related toxicities to make this a treatment option for the majority of patients with SCD. This review focuses on the currently available cell and gene therapies for patients with SCD and acknowledges that newer gene-editing approaches to improve gene therapy efficiency and safety are the next wave of potentially curative approaches.

  5. Pain measurement as part of primary healthcare of adult patients with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Signorelli, Andreza Aparecida Felix; Ribeiro, Sonia Beatriz Felix; Moraes-Souza, Helio; de Oliveira, Lucas Felix; Ribeiro, João Batista; da Silva, Sheron Hellen; de Oliveira, Daniel Fachinelli Felix; Ribeiro, Matheus Fernando Felix

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this exploratory, cross-sectional study was to evaluate pain in sickle cell disease patients and aspects related to primary healthcare. Methods Data were obtained through home interviews. The assessment instruments (body diagram, Numerical Pain Scale, McGill Pain Questionnaire) collected information on the underlying disease and on pain. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences program for Windows. Associations between the subgroups of sickle cell disease patients (hemoglobin SS, hemoglobin SC, sickle β-thalassemia and others) and pain were analyzed using contingency tables and non-parametric tests of association (classic chi-square, Fisher's and Kruskal-Wallis) with a level of 5% (p-value < 0.05) being set for the rejection of the null hypothesis. Results Forty-seven over 18-year-old patients with sickle cell disease were evaluated. Most were black (78.7%) and female (59.6%) and the mean age was 30.1 years. The average number of bouts of pain annually was 7.02; pain was predominantly reported by individuals with sickle cell anemia (hemoglobin SS). The intensity of pain (Numeric Pain Scale) was 5.5 and the quantitative index (McGill) was 35.9. This study also shows that patients presented a high frequency of moderately painful crises in their own homes. Conclusion According to these facts, it is essential that pain related to sickle cell disease is properly identified, quantified, characterized and treated at the three levels of healthcare. In primary healthcare, accurate measurement of pain combined with better care may decrease acute painful episodes and consequently minimize tissue damage, thus improving the patient's overall health. PMID:24106446

  6. Biomechanics and biorheology of red blood cells in sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuejin; Dao, Ming; Lykotrafitis, George; Karniadakis, George Em

    2017-01-04

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is an inherited blood disorder that causes painful crises due to vaso-occlusion of small blood vessels. The primary cause of the clinical phenotype of SCA is the intracellular polymerization of sickle hemoglobin resulting in sickling of red blood cells (RBCs) in deoxygenated conditions. In this review, we discuss the biomechanical and biorheological characteristics of sickle RBCs and sickle blood as well as their implications toward a better understanding of the pathophysiology and pathogenesis of SCA. Additionally, we highlight the adhesive heterogeneity of RBCs in SCA and their specific contribution to vaso-occlusive crisis.

  7. Biomechanics and biorheology of red blood cells in sickle cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuejin; Dao, Ming; Lykotrafitis, George; Karniadakis, George Em

    2017-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is an inherited blood disorder that causes painful crises due to vaso-occlusion of small blood vessels. The primary cause of the clinical phenotype of SCA is the intracellular polymerization of sickle hemoglobin resulting in sickling of red blood cells (RBCs) in deoxygenated conditions. In this review, we discuss the biomechanical and biorheological characteristics of sickle RBCs and sickle blood as well as their implications toward a better understanding of the pathophysiology and pathogenesis of SCA. Additionally, we highlight the adhesive heterogeneity of RBCs in SCA and their specific contribution to vaso-occlusive crisis. PMID:27876368

  8. Dietary ω-3 fatty acids protect against vasculopathy in a transgenic mouse model of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Kalish, Brian T; Matte, Alessandro; Andolfo, Immacolata; Iolascon, Achille; Weinberg, Olga; Ghigo, Alessandra; Cimino, James; Siciliano, Angela; Hirsch, Emilio; Federti, Enrica; Puder, Mark; Brugnara, Carlo; De Franceschi, Lucia

    2015-07-01

    The anemia of sickle cell disease is associated with a severe inflammatory vasculopathy and endothelial dysfunction, which leads to painful and life-threatening clinical complications. Growing evidence supports the anti-inflammatory properties of ω-3 fatty acids in clinical models of endothelial dysfunction. Promising but limited studies show potential therapeutic effects of ω-3 fatty acid supplementation in sickle cell disease. Here, we treated humanized healthy and sickle cell mice for 6 weeks with ω-3 fatty acid diet (fish-oil diet). We found that a ω-3 fatty acid diet: (i) normalizes red cell membrane ω-6/ω-3 ratio; (ii) reduces neutrophil count; (iii) decreases endothelial activation by targeting endothelin-1 and (iv) improves left ventricular outflow tract dimensions. In a hypoxia-reoxygenation model of acute vaso-occlusive crisis, a ω-3 fatty acid diet reduced systemic and local inflammation and protected against sickle cell-related end-organ injury. Using isolated aortas from sickle cell mice exposed to hypoxia-reoxygenation, we demonstrated a direct impact of a ω-3 fatty acid diet on vascular activation, inflammation, and anti-oxidant systems. Our data provide the rationale for ω-3 dietary supplementation as a therapeutic intervention to reduce vascular dysfunction in sickle cell disease.

  9. Dietary ω-3 fatty acids protect against vasculopathy in a transgenic mouse model of sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Kalish, Brian T.; Matte, Alessandro; Andolfo, Immacolata; Iolascon, Achille; Weinberg, Olga; Ghigo, Alessandra; Cimino, James; Siciliano, Angela; Hirsch, Emilio; Federti, Enrica; Puder, Mark; Brugnara, Carlo; De Franceschi, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    The anemia of sickle cell disease is associated with a severe inflammatory vasculopathy and endothelial dysfunction, which leads to painful and life-threatening clinical complications. Growing evidence supports the anti-inflammatory properties of ω-3 fatty acids in clinical models of endothelial dysfunction. Promising but limited studies show potential therapeutic effects of ω-3 fatty acid supplementation in sickle cell disease. Here, we treated humanized healthy and sickle cell mice for 6 weeks with ω-3 fatty acid diet (fish-oil diet). We found that a ω-3 fatty acid diet: (i) normalizes red cell membrane ω-6/ω-3 ratio; (ii) reduces neutrophil count; (iii) decreases endothelial activation by targeting endothelin-1 and (iv) improves left ventricular outflow tract dimensions. In a hypoxia-reoxygenation model of acute vaso-occlusive crisis, a ω-3 fatty acid diet reduced systemic and local inflammation and protected against sickle cell-related end-organ injury. Using isolated aortas from sickle cell mice exposed to hypoxia-reoxygenation, we demonstrated a direct impact of a ω-3 fatty acid diet on vascular activation, inflammation, and anti-oxidant systems. Our data provide the rationale for ω-3 dietary supplementation as a therapeutic intervention to reduce vascular dysfunction in sickle cell disease. PMID:25934765

  10. Abnormal expression of inflammatory genes in placentas of women with sickle cell anemia and sickle hemoglobin C disease.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Letícia C; Costa, Maria Laura; Ferreira, Regiane; Albuquerque, Dulcinéia M; Lanaro, Carolina; Fertrin, Kleber Y; Surita, Fernanda G; Parpinelli, Mary A; Costa, Fernando F; Melo, Mônica Barbosa de

    2016-10-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a complex disease that is characterized by the polymerization of deoxyhemoglobin S, altered red blood cell membrane biology, endothelial activation, hemolysis, a procoagulant state, acute and chronic inflammation, and vaso-occlusion. Among the physiological changes that occur during pregnancy, oxygen is consumed by fetal growth, and pregnant women with SCD are more frequently exposed to low oxygen levels. This might lead to red blood cells sickling, and, consequently, to vaso-occlusion. The mechanisms by which SCD affects placental physiology are largely unknown, and chronic inflammation might be involved in this process. This study aimed to evaluate the gene expression profile of inflammatory response mediators in the placentas of pregnant women with sickle cell cell anemia (HbSS) and hemoglobinopathy SC (HbSC). Our results show differences in a number of these genes. For the HbSS group, when compared to the control group, the following genes showed differential expression: IL1RAP (2.76-fold), BCL6 (4.49-fold), CXCL10 (-2.12-fold), CXCR1 (-3.66-fold), and C3 (-2.0-fold). On the other hand, the HbSC group presented differential expressions of the following genes, when compared to the control group: IL1RAP (4.33-fold), CXCL1 (3.05-fold), BCL6 (4.13-fold), CXCL10 (-3.32-fold), C3 (-2.0-fold), and TLR3 (2.38-fold). Taken together, these data strongly suggest a differential expression of several inflammatory genes in both SCD (HbSS and HbSC), indicating that the placenta might become an environment with hypoxia, and increased inflammation, which could lead to improper placental development.

  11. Effects of Poloxamer 188 on red blood cell membrane properties in sickle cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    Sandor, Barbara; Marin, Mickaël; Lapoumeroulie, Claudine; Rabaï, Miklos; Lefevre, Sophie D; Lemonne, Nathalie; El Nemer, Wassim; Mozar, Anaïs; Français, Olivier; Le Pioufle, Bruno; Connes, Philippe; Le Van Kim, Caroline

    2016-04-01

    Vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC) is the main acute complication in sickle cell anaemia (SS) and several clinical trials are investigating different drugs to improve the clinical severity of SS patients. A phase III study is currently exploring the profit of Velopoloxamer in SS during VOCs. We analysed, in-vitro, the effect of poloxamer (P188) on red blood cell (RBC) properties by investigating haemorheology, mechanical and adhesion functions using ektacytometry, microfluidics and dynamic adhesion approaches, respectively. We show that poloxamer significantly reduces blood viscosity, RBC aggregation and adhesion to endothelial cells, supporting the beneficial use of this molecule in SS therapy.

  12. Sickle cell anemia and antisickling agents then and now.

    PubMed

    Mehanna, A S

    2001-02-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a genetic blood disorder arising from a point mutation in the beta-globin gene that leads to the replacement of glutamic acid residue by valine at the sixth position of the beta--chain of hemoglobin. At low oxygen tension, the mutant hemoglobin, sickle hemoglobin, polymerizes inside the red blood cells into a gel or further into fibers leading to a drastic decrease in the red cell deformability. As a result, micro-vascular occlusion arises which may lead to serious, sometimes fatal, crises. The present article reviews the historical, genetic, molecular, cellular, and clinical aspects of the disease. A review for the development and design of drugs to treat sickle cell anemia is presented. Anti-sickling agents are classified, based on the target to be modified, into three classes: the gene, the sickle hemoglobin molecule, and the red cell membrane modifiers. In spite of the full understanding of the pathology, physiology, and the molecular nature of the disease, and the development of large number of antisickling agents, a cure for sickle cell anemia still is unavailable. Strategies to treat sickle cell anemia since the early times of the disease state discovery in 1910, has focussed mainly on prophylactic measures to alleviate the painful crises. The article addresses clinical approaches used then and now to treat the disease, and the rationale of their use. Currently in clinical practice, hydroxyurea is the most commonly used agent to treat the disease, and it has been recently approved by the united states Food and Drug Administration as a drug for that purpose.

  13. Phenotypic Diversity of Sickle Cell Disease in Patients with a Double Heterozygosity for Hb S and Hb D-Punjab.

    PubMed

    Torres, Lidiane S; Okumura, Jéssika V; Belini-Júnior, Édis; Oliveira, Renan G; Nascimento, Patrícia P; Silva, Danilo G H; Lobo, Clarisse L C; Oliani, Sonia M; Bonini-Domingos, Claudia R

    2016-09-01

    Phenotypic heterogeneity for sickle cell disease is associated to several genetic factors such as genotype for sickle cell disease, β-globin gene cluster haplotypes and Hb F levels. The coinheritance of Hb S (HBB: c.20A > T) and Hb D-Punjab (HBB: c.364G > C) results in a double heterozygosity, which constitutes one of the genotypic causes of sickle cell disease. This study aimed to assess the phenotypic diversity of sickle cell disease presented by carriers of the Hb S/Hb D-Punjab genotype and the Bantu [- + - - - -] haplotype. We evaluated medical records from 12 patients with sickle cell disease whose Hb S/Hb D-Punjab genotype and Bantu haplotype were confirmed by molecular analysis. Hb S and Hb D-Punjab levels were quantified by chromatographic analysis. Mean concentrations of Hb S and Hb D-Punjab were 44.8 ± 2.3% and 43.3 ± 1.8%, respectively. Painful crises were present in eight (66.7%) patients evaluated, representing the most common clinical event. Acute chest syndrome (ACS) was the second most prevalent manifestation, occurring in two individuals (16.7%). Three patients were asymptomatic, while another two exhibited greater diversity of severe clinical manifestations. Medical records here analyzed reported a significant clinical diversity in sickle cell disease ranging from the absence of symptoms to wide phenotypic variety. The sickle cell disease genotype, Bantu haplotype and hemoglobin (Hb) levels did not influence the clinical diversity. Thus, we concluded that the phenotypic variation in sickle cell disease was present within a specific genotype for disease regardless of the β-globin gene cluster haplotypes.

  14. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Vermylen, C; Cornu, G

    1997-11-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the only therapy able to cure sickle cell anemia at the present time. So far, transplantations have been undertaken in approximatively 140 sickle cell patients all over the world, with good results. The selection of patients for transplantation remains a subject of dilemma because of the unpredictable course of the disease and the lack of valuable prognostic markers. The selection criteria accepted so far concern young patients under the age of 16, with a morbid course of the disease and having a HLA-compatible sibling. In Belgium, patients going back to their country of origin were also considered for transplantation. For 100 patients who underwent transplantation in Europe, the current Kaplan-Meier estimates of overall survival, event-free survival, and disease-free survival rates are 90%, 79%, and 81%, respectively. Benefits and side effects are analyzed.

  15. Amelioration of Sickle Cell Pain after Parathyroidectomy in Two Patients with Concurrent Hyperparathyroidism: An Interesting Finding

    PubMed Central

    Muthu, John

    2016-01-01

    Patients with sickle cell disease have high morbidity and healthcare utilization due to repeated painful crises. Some coexisting conditions which cause pain similar to sickle cell disease may go undiagnosed in these patients. We report two adults with concurrent hyperparathyroidism who experienced significant improvement in sickle cell pain following parathyroidectomy thereby pointing to hyperparathyroidism as the principal causative factor for their pain. Meticulous evaluation for parathyroid disorders can be rewarding in sickle cell disease. PMID:27579039

  16. Small-molecule nociceptin receptor agonist ameliorates mast cell activation and pain in sickle mice

    PubMed Central

    Vang, Derek; Paul, Jinny A.; Nguyen, Julia; Tran, Huy; Vincent, Lucile; Yasuda, Dennis; Zaveri, Nurulain T.; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of pain with morphine and its congeners in sickle cell anemia is suboptimal, warranting the need for analgesics devoid of side effects, addiction and tolerance liability. Small-molecule nociceptin opioid receptor ligands show analgesic efficacy in acute and chronic pain models. We show that AT-200, a high affinity nociceptin opioid receptor agonist with low efficacy at the mu opioid receptor, ameliorated chronic and hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced mechanical, thermal and deep tissue/musculoskeletal hyperalgesia in HbSS-BERK sickle mice. The antinociceptive effect of AT-200 was antagonized by SB-612111, a nociceptin opioid receptor antagonist, but not naloxone, a non-selective mu opioid receptor antagonist. Daily 7-day treatment with AT-200 did not develop tolerance and showed a sustained anti-nociceptive effect, which improved over time and led to reduced plasma serum amyloid protein, neuropeptides, inflammatory cytokines and mast cell activation in the periphery. These data suggest that AT-200 ameliorates pain in sickle mice via the nociceptin opioid receptor by reducing inflammation and mast cell activation without causing tolerance. Thus, nociceptin opioid receptor agonists are promising drugs for treating pain in sickle cell anemia. PMID:26294734

  17. Small-molecule nociceptin receptor agonist ameliorates mast cell activation and pain in sickle mice.

    PubMed

    Vang, Derek; Paul, Jinny A; Nguyen, Julia; Tran, Huy; Vincent, Lucile; Yasuda, Dennis; Zaveri, Nurulain T; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-12-01

    Treatment of pain with morphine and its congeners in sickle cell anemia is suboptimal, warranting the need for analgesics devoid of side effects, addiction and tolerance liability. Small-molecule nociceptin opioid receptor ligands show analgesic efficacy in acute and chronic pain models. We show that AT-200, a high affinity nociceptin opioid receptor agonist with low efficacy at the mu opioid receptor, ameliorated chronic and hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced mechanical, thermal and deep tissue/musculoskeletal hyperalgesia in HbSS-BERK sickle mice. The antinociceptive effect of AT-200 was antagonized by SB-612111, a nociceptin opioid receptor antagonist, but not naloxone, a non-selective mu opioid receptor antagonist. Daily 7-day treatment with AT-200 did not develop tolerance and showed a sustained anti-nociceptive effect, which improved over time and led to reduced plasma serum amyloid protein, neuropeptides, inflammatory cytokines and mast cell activation in the periphery. These data suggest that AT-200 ameliorates pain in sickle mice via the nociceptin opioid receptor by reducing inflammation and mast cell activation without causing tolerance. Thus, nociceptin opioid receptor agonists are promising drugs for treating pain in sickle cell anemia.

  18. ARQ 092, an orally-available, selective AKT inhibitor, attenuates neutrophil-platelet interactions in sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyungho; Li, Jing; Barazia, Andrew; Tseng, Alan; Youn, Seock-Won; Abbadessa, Giovanni; Yu, Yi; Schwartz, Brian; Andrews, Robert K.; Gordeuk, Victor R.; Cho, Jaehyung

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies identified the Ser/Thr protein kinase, AKT, as a therapeutic target in thrombo-inflammatory diseases. Here we report that specific inhibition of AKT with ARQ 092, an orally-available AKT inhibitor currently in phase Ib clinical trials as an anti-cancer drug, attenuates the adhesive function of neutrophils and platelets from sickle cell disease patients in vitro and cell-cell interactions in a mouse model of sickle cell disease. Studies using neutrophils and platelets isolated from sickle cell disease patients revealed that treatment with 50–500 nM ARQ 092 significantly blocks αMβ2 integrin function in neutrophils and reduces P-selectin exposure and glycoprotein Ib/IX/V-mediated agglutination in platelets. Treatment of isolated platelets and neutrophils with ARQ 092 inhibited heterotypic cell-cell aggregation under shear conditions. Intravital microscopic studies demonstrated that short-term oral administration of ARQ 092 or hydroxyurea, a major therapy for sickle cell disease, diminishes heterotypic cell-cell interactions in venules of sickle cell disease mice challenged with tumor necrosis factor-α. Co-administration of hydroxyurea and ARQ 092 further reduced the adhesive function of neutrophils in venules and neutrophil transmigration into alveoli, inhibited expression of E-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in cremaster vessels, and improved survival in these mice. Ex vivo studies in sickle cell disease mice suggested that co-administration of hydroxyurea and ARQ 092 efficiently blocks neutrophil and platelet activation and that the beneficial effect of hydroxyurea results from nitric oxide production. Our results provide important evidence that ARQ 092 could be a novel drug for the prevention and treatment of acute vaso-occlusive complications in patients with sickle cell disease. PMID:27758820

  19. ARQ 092, an orally-available, selective AKT inhibitor, attenuates neutrophil-platelet interactions in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyungho; Li, Jing; Barazia, Andrew; Tseng, Alan; Youn, Seock-Won; Abbadessa, Giovanni; Yu, Yi; Schwartz, Brian; Andrews, Robert K; Gordeuk, Victor R; Cho, Jaehyung

    2017-02-01

    Previous studies identified the Ser/Thr protein kinase, AKT, as a therapeutic target in thrombo-inflammatory diseases. Here we report that specific inhibition of AKT with ARQ 092, an orally-available AKT inhibitor currently in phase Ib clinical trials as an anti-cancer drug, attenuates the adhesive function of neutrophils and platelets from sickle cell disease patients in vitro and cell-cell interactions in a mouse model of sickle cell disease. Studies using neutrophils and platelets isolated from sickle cell disease patients revealed that treatment with 50-500 nM ARQ 092 significantly blocks αMβ2 integrin function in neutrophils and reduces P-selectin exposure and glycoprotein Ib/IX/V-mediated agglutination in platelets. Treatment of isolated platelets and neutrophils with ARQ 092 inhibited heterotypic cell-cell aggregation under shear conditions. Intravital microscopic studies demonstrated that short-term oral administration of ARQ 092 or hydroxyurea, a major therapy for sickle cell disease, diminishes heterotypic cell-cell interactions in venules of sickle cell disease mice challenged with tumor necrosis factor-α. Co-administration of hydroxyurea and ARQ 092 further reduced the adhesive function of neutrophils in venules and neutrophil transmigration into alveoli, inhibited expression of E-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in cremaster vessels, and improved survival in these mice. Ex vivo studies in sickle cell disease mice suggested that co-administration of hydroxyurea and ARQ 092 efficiently blocks neutrophil and platelet activation and that the beneficial effect of hydroxyurea results from nitric oxide production. Our results provide important evidence that ARQ 092 could be a novel drug for the prevention and treatment of acute vaso-occlusive complications in patients with sickle cell disease.

  20. Novel approaches to treatment of sickle cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    Steinberg; Mitchell

    1999-11-01

    Sickle cell anaemia, a chronic and often debilitating disease, results from homozygosity for a single amino acid substitution in the beta-globin subunit of the haemoglobin molecule. Sickle haemoglobin (HbS), the product of this mutation, polymerises when deoxygenated, thus damaging the red blood cell and causing vaso-occlusive complications and haemolytic anaemia. Most cases of sickle cell anaemia are found in Africa. Until recently, treatment was directed at the management of disease complications. Patients with central nervous system events undergo exchange transfusions followed by chronic transfusion programmes. Patients with painful episodes, which result in many days missed from work and school are treated with narcotics and aggressive hydration. Novel therapy for sickle cell anaemia is designed to prevent complications through targeting disease mechanisms. Hydroxyurea is given to severely affected sickle cell anaemia patients in an attempt to prevent painful episodes, reduce hospital days, improve the patients' overall quality of life, and perhaps to prevent or provide some degree of end-organ damage stabilisation. Other novel therapies, such as bone marrow transplantation and gene therapy, pursue a cure. For these novel therapies to be effective on a global basis they must be amenable to underdeveloped and poorer countries of the world.

  1. Dynamic deformability of sickle red blood cells in microphysiological flow.

    PubMed

    Alapan, Y; Matsuyama, Y; Little, J A; Gurkan, U A

    2016-06-01

    In sickle cell disease (SCD), hemoglobin molecules polymerize intracellularly and lead to a cascade of events resulting in decreased deformability and increased adhesion of red blood cells (RBCs). Decreased deformability and increased adhesion of sickle RBCs lead to blood vessel occlusion (vaso-occlusion) in SCD patients. Here, we present a microfluidic approach integrated with a cell dimensioning algorithm to analyze dynamic deformability of adhered RBC at the single-cell level in controlled microphysiological flow. We measured and compared dynamic deformability and adhesion of healthy hemoglobin A (HbA) and homozygous sickle hemoglobin (HbS) containing RBCs in blood samples obtained from 24 subjects. We introduce a new parameter to assess deformability of RBCs: the dynamic deformability index (DDI), which is defined as the time-dependent change of the cell's aspect ratio in response to fluid flow shear stress. Our results show that DDI of HbS-containing RBCs were significantly lower compared to that of HbA-containing RBCs. Moreover, we observed subpopulations of HbS containing RBCs in terms of their dynamic deformability characteristics: deformable and non-deformable RBCs. Then, we tested blood samples from SCD patients and analyzed RBC adhesion and deformability at physiological and above physiological flow shear stresses. We observed significantly greater number of adhered non-deformable sickle RBCs than deformable sickle RBCs at flow shear stresses well above the physiological range, suggesting an interplay between dynamic deformability and increased adhesion of RBCs in vaso-occlusive events.

  2. Anaesthesia for peculiar cells--a century of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Firth, P G

    2005-09-01

    Sickle cell disease is a congenital haemoglobinopathy with a high incidence of perioperative complications. Traditional anaesthetic management, based largely on extrapolation from biochemical models, has emphasized avoidance of red cell sickling to prevent exacerbations of the disease. This historical review outlines the evolution of the traditional approach to sickle cell pathology, assesses the validity of this model, describes the emergence of the concept of the disease as one defined by chronic inflammatory vascular damage, and outlines the practical implications of this new approach.

  3. Curative treatment for severe sickle cell disease: allogeneic transplantation.

    PubMed

    Oshrine, Benjamin; Talano, Julie-An

    2015-04-01

    Sickle cell disease is an inherited hematologic disorder that in its severe form can result in substantial morbidity and early mortality. Patients with this disorder can suffer from severe pain, lung disease, and strokes, resulting in chronic debilitating conditions, end organ dysfunction, and organ failure. The health care costs of caring for these chronically ill patients are substantial. Allogeneic transplantation is a modality that has the potential to cure these patients. To date, matched sibling donor transplantation is widely accepted as a standard of care for pediatric patients. Utilizing alternative donors for transplant is still under investigation, as is transplant for adult patients with sickle cell disease. This review focuses on the most recent data for hematopoietic cell transplantation for patients with sickle cell disease.

  4. Perioperative management of sickle cell disease in paediatric cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, K; Cherian, S; Agarwal, R; Jose, S; Cherian, K M

    2007-10-01

    In sickle cell disease, cardiopulmonary bypass may induce red cell sickling. Partial exchange transfusion reduces the circulating haemoglobin S level. We report the management of a child with sickle cell disease who required surgical closure of a ventricular septal defect. Preoperative exchange transfusion of 50% of the total blood volume was performed with fresh packed red cells over three days. Further exchange transfusion was performed as cardiopulmonary bypass commenced. The haemoglobin S level was reduced from 76% to 37%. The blood removed from the patient during the exchanges was processed allowing storage and re-infusion of the patient's plasma and platelets. Combined preoperative and intraoperative exchange transfusions, instead of a single stage 50% volume exchange, was effective and potentially avoids larger haemodynamic effects. Cardiopulmonary bypass was conducted at normothermia and cold cardioplegia was avoided (fibrillatory arrest was used during the surgical repair).

  5. Possible Links between Sickle Cell Crisis and Pentavalent Antimony

    PubMed Central

    Garcerant, Daniel; Rubiano, Luisa; Blanco, Victor; Martinez, Javier; Baker, Nancy C.; Craft, Noah

    2012-01-01

    For over 60 years, pentavalent antimony (Sbv) has been the first-line treatment of leishmaniasis. Sickle cell anemia is a disease caused by a defect in red blood cells, which among other things can cause vasooclusive crisis. We report the case of a 6-year-old child with leishmaniasis who during treatment with meglumine antimoniate developed a sickle cell crisis (SCC). No previous reports describing the relationship between antimonial drugs and sickle cell disease were found. Reviews of both the pathophysiology of SCC and the mechanism of action of Sbv revealed that a common pathway (glutathione) may have resulted in the SCC. ChemoText, a novel database created to predict chemical-protein-disease interactions, was used to perform a more expansive and systematic review that was able to support the association between glutathione, Sbv, and SCC. Although suggestive evidence to support the hypothesis, additional research at the bench would be needed to prove Sbv caused the SCC. PMID:22665619

  6. Laparoscopic Splenectomy Alone for Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Al-Balushi, Zainab N.; Bhatti, Khalid M.; Ehsan, Muhammad T.; Al-Shaqsi, Yousuf; Al-Sharji, Nawal A. R.; Mady, Hatem A. A.; Sherif, Mahmoud H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In Oman, the most frequent indication for a splenectomy in children is sickle cell disease (SCD), which is one of the most common haematological disorders in the Gulf region. This study aimed to describe paediatric laparoscopic splenectomies alone for SCD at a tertiary hospital in Oman. Methods This study was conducted between February 2010 and October 2015 at the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Muscat, Oman. The medical records of all children aged ≤15 years old undergoing splenectomies during the study period were reviewed. Results A total of 71 children underwent laparoscopic splenectomies during the study period; of these, 50 children (28 male and 22 female) underwent laparoscopic splenectomies alone for SCD. The children’s weight ranged between 11–43 kg. The most common indication for a splenectomy was a recurrent splenic sequestration crisis (92%). Surgically removed spleens weighed between 155–1,200 g and measured between 9–22 cm. Operative times ranged between 66–204 minutes and intraoperative blood loss ranged between 10–800 mL. One patient required conversion to an open splenectomy. Postoperative complications were noted in only four patients. The median hospital stay duration was three days. Conclusion Among this cohort, the mean operating time was comparable to that reported in the international literature. In addition, rates of conversion and postoperative complications were very low. These findings indicate that a laparoscopic splenectomy alone in paediatric patients with SCD is a feasible option. PMID:28003896

  7. Sickle Cell Trait and Fatal Exertional Heat Illness: Implications for Exercise-Related Death of Young Ddults

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-22

    anemia with increased RDW for 97% of sickle cell disease. • 2. Quantitative... Sickle Cell Trait Patients – have higher risk of death Clinical Features of Sickle Cell Disease Hemolytic anemia & other types of anemia • Median Hb about...and sensitivity. • CBC - normal for Hb AS, anemia with increased RDW for 97% of sickle cell disease. • Quantitative Hemoglobin electrophoresis

  8. Advances in sickle cell therapies in the hydroxyurea era.

    PubMed

    Field, Joshua J; Nathan, David G

    2014-12-16

    In the hydroxyurea era, insights into mechanisms downstream of erythrocyte sickling have led to new therapeutic approaches for patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). Therapies have been developed that target vascular adhesion, inflammation and hemolysis, including innovative biologics directed against P-selectin and invariant natural killer T cells. Advances in hematopoietic stem cell transplant and gene therapy may also provide more opportunities for cures in the near future. Several clinical studies are underway to determine the safety and efficacy of these new treatments. Novel approaches to treat SCD are desperately needed, since current therapies are limited and rates of morbidity and mortality remain high.

  9. Neonatal Screening and the Clinical Outcome in Children with Sickle Cell Disease in Central India

    PubMed Central

    Upadhye, Dipti S.; Jain, Dipty L.; Trivedi, Yogesh L.; Nadkarni, Anita H.; Ghosh, Kanjaksha; Colah, Roshan B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a major health burden in India. The objective of the study was to establish a neonatal screening program and to understand the clinical course of children with SCD in central India. Methods and Findings Pregnant mothers were screened for sickle hemoglobin using the solubility test. Babies were screened by high performance liquid chromatography if the mother was positive for sickle hemoglobin. The diagnosis was confirmed by molecular analysis. They received early prophylactic treatment and vaccination. Of 2134 newborns screened, 104 were sickle homozygous (SS), seven had sickle β-thalassemia (S-β thal) and 978 were sickle heterozygous (AS). The other hemoglobin abnormalities detected included HbS -δβ thalassemia-1, HbSD disease-2, HbE traits-5, β-thalassemia traits-4, alpha chain variants-3 and HbH disease-1.These babies were followed up regularly for hematological and clinical evaluation. Pain, severe anemia requiring blood transfusions and acute febrile illness were the major complications with 59.7, 45.1 and 42.6 cases per 100 person years. Fetal hemoglobin (HbF) levels were inversely associated with vaso-oclussive crisis (VOC) and severe anemia while presence of alpha thalassemia increased the rate of painful events and sepsis. Six early deaths occurred among the SS babies. Conclusion A systematic follow up of this first newborn SCD cohort in central India showed that 47% of babies presented within 1 year of age. In spite of the presence of the Arab-Indian haplotype many babies had severe manifestations. PMID:26785407

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging in pediatric sickle cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinxian; Li, Chenglong; Li, Qiancheng

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is the result of altered genetic make up due to hereditary encounter and its form as homozygous sickle cell anemia is the most common and severe. The disease is characterized by chronic anemia, recurrent pain crises and vascular occlusion. Neurologically, there is a high incidence of stroke in childhood, as well as cognitive dysfunction. Newborn screening programmes and preventative treatments have allowed a much longer lifespan. However, recently, neurological research has shifted to characterizing more subtle aspects of brain development and functioning that may be critically important to the individual's quality of life. The present review article examines the neurological and neurocognitive complications of sickle cell disease, and discusses the importance of magnetic resonance imaging scans in the management of the disease. PMID:27446243

  11. Sickle cell trait and sudden death--bringing it home.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Bruce L.

    2007-01-01

    Sickle cell trait continues to be the leading cause of sudden death for young African Americans in military basic training and civilian organized sports. The syndrome may have caused the death of up to 10 college football players since 1974 and, as recently as 2000, was suspected as the cause of death of three U.S. Army recruits. The penal military-style boot camps in the United States and the recent death of two teenagers with sickle cell trait merits renewed vigor in the education of athletic instructors, the military and the public about conditions associated with sudden death in individuals with sickle cell trait. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:17393956

  12. Physicians' attitude and practices in sickle cell disease pain management.

    PubMed

    Labbé, Elise; Herbert, Donald; Haynes, Johnson

    2005-01-01

    Many physicians believe that patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) are more likely to become addicted to pain medication than are other patient populations. This study hypothesizes that physicians' attitudes towards addiction in patients with SCD affects pain management practices. The Physician Attitudes Survey was sent to 286 physicians at seven National Institutes of Health-funded university-based comprehensive sickle cell centres. The survey assessed demographic information; and physician's attitudes toward and knowledge of pain, pain treatment, and drug addiction and abuse. Significant Pearson product-moment correlations were found between attitudes towards pain and beliefs regarding addiction to prescribed opioids. Physicians reported varied pain management strategies, however, many believe that attitudes toward addiction and to patients in pain crises may result in undertreatment of pain. These results indicate that physicians might benefit from additional education regarding sickle cell disease, addiction to pain medication, the pharmacology of opioids, and the assessment and treatment of pain.

  13. Paramagnetic Europium Salen Complex and Sickle-Cell Anemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wynter, Clive I.; Ryan, D. H.; May, Leopold; Oliver, F. W.; Brown, Eugene; Hoffman, Eugene J.; Bernstein, David

    2005-04-01

    A new europium salen complex, Eu(salen)2NH4, was synthesized, and its composition was confirmed by chemical analysis and infrared spectroscopy. Further characterization was carried out by 151 Eu Mössbauer spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Mössbauer spectroscopic measurements were made at varying temperatures between 9 K and room temperature and a value of Debye temperature of 133 ±5 K was computed. Both Mössbauer and magnetic susceptibility measurements confirmed the paramagnetic behavior of this complex and the trivalent state of the europium ion. In view of the fact that the "odd" paramagnetic molecule NO has been shown to reverse sickling of red blood cells in sickle cell anemia, the interaction between the paramagnetic europium salen complex and sickle cells was examined after incubation with this europium complex and shown to have similar effects.

  14. Sickle Cell Disease in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Williams, Thomas N

    2016-04-01

    In Africa, at least 240,000 children are born each year with sickle cell disease. Historically, in the absence of newborn screening and appropriate treatment, most such children died undiagnosed in early childhood. However, with increasing awareness of the condition and economic and epidemiologic transition, increasing numbers are surviving. Greater investments in basic and applied research in the African context, and increased sensitization or African ministries of health regarding the importance of this condition, could make a substantial difference to the lives and livelihoods of millions of people living with sickle cell disease on the continent and their families.

  15. [Is the sickle-cell trait a risk factor?].

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Edmond

    2005-09-01

    Generally the sickle-cell trait is not regarded as a risk factor for morbidity or mortality and consequently does not entail occupational restrictions on physical activity (except for military pilots or divers). However many reports have described cases of visceral infarction, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and sudden death. High altitude, strenuous exertion, dehydration and fever may increase the risk. For getting more date, the author propose a medical follow-up program for athletes and soldiers with sickle-cell trait and the implementation of a national registry for sudden deaths involving athletes.

  16. Recent insights on the medicinal chemistry of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, J L; Chin, C M

    2011-01-01

    Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) is one of the most prevalent hematological diseases in the world. SCD is a genetic disease characterized by punctual mutation that basis on the exchange of glutamic acid to valine in a beta chain of hemoglobin. In deoxygenated state, the interaction among the beta chains leads to hemoglobin polymerization carrying out to deformation of cytoskeleton structure of red blood cells to a sickle shape. Currently, the treatment is performed with the antineoplasic drug hydroxyurea. This review summarizes current knowledge about possible targets and the approaches to discover new compounds to treat the SCD symptoms. Drug design based on therapeutical application and molecular modifications strategies will be discussed.

  17. Retroperitoneal fibrosis in three siblings with the sickle cell trait

    PubMed Central

    Phills, James A.; Geggie, Peter; Hidvegi, Robert I.; Oliva, Luis A.

    1973-01-01

    Three West-Indian black siblings with the sickle cell trait developed retroperitoneal fibrosis, a previously unreported association. Other well known renal manifestations associated with the sickle cell trait were also present in some of these cases and included renal medullary necrosis and spontaneous hematuria. It is postulated that the sickling of the erythrocytes in the periureteral vessels resulted in thrombosis, ischemia, reactive scarring and progressive fibrosis indistinguishable from the known histological picture of retroperitoneal fibrosis. The finding of fibrin thrombi in the small veins of the fibrotic tissue of one of these patients would support this explanation. ImagesFIG. 1AFIG. 1BFIG. 2FIG. 3AFIG. 3BFIG. 4AFIG. 4BFIG. 4C PMID:4699274

  18. A hydrodynamic interpretation of crisis in sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Cima, L G; Discher, D E; Tong, J; Williams, M C

    1994-01-01

    The occurrence of crisis events in patients with sickle cell disease is associated with an increase in blood plasma viscosity, the hydrodynamic consequences of which are examined here. A mathematical model of the flow of sickle cells in capillaries predicts that for moderate increases in plasma viscosity, a regime of multivalued solutions for blood velocities is encountered, and the likely physical response is a precipitous drop to the lowest velocity solution. This behavior results from the coupling of the hydrodynamics with sickle erythrocyte rheology and oxygen transport to the surrounding tissue; no such catastrophe is predicted for normal erythrocytes. The type of velocity changes predicted by the model strongly suggest that plasma viscosity changes may play an important role in initiating or exacerbating crisis.

  19. The flow of sickle-cell blood in the capillaries.

    PubMed Central

    Berger, S A; King, W S

    1980-01-01

    Oxygen tension levels and red cell velocities for the flow of sickle-cell blood in the capillaries are determined by using the Krogh model for oxygen transport and lubrication theory for the cell motion. The coupling and interaction between these arises from the red cell compliance, which is assumed to vary with the oxygen concentration. Microsieving data is used to establish an upper bound for this relationship. Calculations are carried out for a range of capillary sizes, taking into account the rightward shift of the oxyhemoglobin dissociation curve and the reduced hematocrit of sickle-cell blood, and are compared to, as a base case, the flow of normal blood under normal pressure gradient. The results indicate that under normal pressure gradients the oxygen tensions and cell velocities for sickle blood are considerably higher than for normal blood, thus acting against the tendency for cells to sickle, or significantly change their rheological properties, in the capillaries. Under reduced pressure gradients, however, the concentrations and velocities drop dramatically, adding to the likelihood of such shape or flow property changes. PMID:7260242

  20. Epidural anesthesia for laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a patient with sickle cell anemia, beta thalassemia, and Crohn's disease -A case report-

    PubMed Central

    Özlü, Onur

    2012-01-01

    A 37-year-old woman diagnosed with sickle cell anemia (SCA), beta (+) thalassemia, Crohn's disease, and liver dysfunction was scheduled for laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) due to acute cholecystitis with gall bladder. Regional anesthesia was performed. An epidural catheter was inserted into the 9-10 thoracal epidural space and then 15 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine was injected through the catheter. The level of sensorial analgesia tested with pinprick test reached up to T4. Here we describe the first case of the combination of sickle cell anemia (SCA), beta (+) thalassemia, and Crohn's disease successful anesthetic management with attention to hemodynamics, particularly with regards to liver dysfunction. PMID:23115690

  1. Nutrition assessment in children with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Williams, R; George, E O; Wang, W

    1997-01-01

    Children with sickle cell disease have decreased height and weight when compared with their peers. Although exact reasons for poor growth have not been established, increased calorie and protein needs and deficiencies in zinc, folic acid, and vitamins A, C, and E may be factors. To determine whether inadequate nutrient intake contributes to this poor growth, we conducted a survey of the nutrition knowledge and practices of families affected by sickle cell disease. Sixty-one patients with a median age of 8 years (range, 13 months to 17 years) participated in the study. Patients with homozygous S hemoglobin (sickle cell) disease (Hb SS, n = 34) and sickle beta zero thalassemia (Hb S beta zero-thalassemia, n = 2) were combined; 19% were below the fifth percentile for height. The other patients, with sickle hemoglobin C disease (Hb SC, n = 21) and sickle beta plus thalassemia (Hb beta(+)-thalassemia, n = 4), were grouped, and 4% were below the fifth percentile for height (P = .043). Ninety percent of the study patients or their parents were familiar with the food groups indicated on the US Department of Agriculture's Food Guide Pyramid, but most patients failed to consume appropriate amounts from those groups. Although two thirds of the patients ate the recommended number of servings daily from the meat group, only 20% to 31% of the recommended servings from each of the other food groups was consumed. This was possibly related to low socioeconomic status. The patients in the Hb SS group ate significantly less from the bread (P < .037) and milk (P < .022) categories than the patients in the Hb SC group. Fifty-nine percent of families had incomes below the poverty level, and 79% participated in a food assistance program. We conclude that the nutrient intake of patients with sickle cell disease is often inadequate. Education for patients with sickle cell disease should focus on (1) specific nutrient needs, with proper distribution of dietary intake among the food groups

  2. Associations between environmental factors and hospital admissions for sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Piel, Frédéric B; Tewari, Sanjay; Brousse, Valentine; Analitis, Antonis; Font, Anna; Menzel, Stephan; Chakravorty, Subarna; Thein, Swee Lay; Inusa, Baba; Telfer, Paul; de Montalembert, Mariane; Fuller, Gary W; Katsouyanni, Klea; Rees, David C

    2017-04-01

    Sickle cell disease is an increasing global health burden. This inherited disease is characterized by a remarkable phenotypic heterogeneity, which can only partly be explained by genetic factors. Environmental factors are likely to play an important role but studies of their impact on disease severity are limited and their results are often inconsistent. This study investigated associations between a range of environmental factors and hospital admissions of young patients with sickle cell disease in London and in Paris between 2008 and 2012. Specific analyses were conducted for subgroups of patients with different genotypes and for the main reasons for admissions. Generalized additive models and distributed lag non-linear models were used to assess the magnitude of the associations and to calculate relative risks. Some environmental factors significantly influence the numbers of hospital admissions of children with sickle cell disease, although the associations identified are complicated. Our study suggests that meteorological factors are more likely to be associated with hospital admissions for sickle cell disease than air pollutants. It confirms previous reports of risks associated with wind speed (risk ratio: 1.06/standard deviation; 95% confidence interval: 1.00-1.12) and also with rainfall (1.06/standard deviation; 95% confidence interval: 1.01-1.12). Maximum atmospheric pressure was found to be a protective factor (0.93/standard deviation; 95% confidence interval: 0.88-0.99). Weak or no associations were found with temperature. Divergent associations were identified for different genotypes or reasons for admissions, which could partly explain the lack of consistency in earlier studies. Advice to patients with sickle cell disease usually includes avoiding a range of environmental conditions that are believed to trigger acute complications, including extreme temperatures and high altitudes. Scientific evidence to support such advice is limited and sometimes

  3. Sickle cell anaemia: The need for new approaches in management.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell anaemia is an important genetic disorder in India and is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Over 100 000 people are affected by this disorder and 10%-40% of the 85 million tribal population carries this gene. Conventional management and therapy with hydroxyurea provides symptomatic relief. A search for an anti-sickling agent has so far proved unsuccessful. However, improving upon existing compounds; looking for newer products using modern tools of bioinformatics, monoclonal antibody and aptamer technology; and evaluating medicines from ethno-pharmacology are promising approaches in managing this disease.

  4. Sickle Cell Disease: An Opportunity for Palliative Care across the Life Span

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Bonnye; Mack, A. Kyle; Labotka, Richard; Molokie, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is a chronic illness that impacts patients physically and emotionally and can do so at an early age. An ecological model of palliative care that involves improved communication among the health care team, patients, and their families can be beneficial. Open and honest communication regarding advance care planning, disease management, relief of pain and other symptoms, and bereavement and grief are all important for the patient, family, and health care team. Given the multiple acute and chronic complications of sickle cell disease, an approach to care that is holistic and comprehensive may help to improve a patient’s biological function and the perceived health, functional status, and quality of life of the patient and family. PMID:20804884

  5. Relative deformability of red blood cells in sickle cell trait and sickle cell anemia by trapping and dragging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Rance; Cooper, James; Welker, Gabriel; Aguilar, Elaura; Flanagan, Brooke; Pennycuff, Chelsey; Scott, David; Farone, Anthony; Farone, Mary; Erenso, Daniel; Mushi, Robert; del Pilar Aguinaga, Maria

    2013-06-01

    Genetic mutation of the β-globin gene or inheritance of this mutated gene changes the chemical composition of the oxygen-carrying hemoglobin molecule that could lead to either the heterozygote genotype, resulting in sickle cell trait (SCT), or the homozygote genotype, resulting in sickle cell anemia (SCA). These mutations could affect the reversible elastic deformations of the red blood cells (RBCs) which are vital for biological functions. We have investigated this effect by studying the differences in the deformability of RBCs from blood samples of an individual with SCT and an untreated patient with SCA along with hemoglobin quantitation of each blood sample. Infrared 1064 nm laser trap force along with drag shear force are used to induce deformation in the RBCs. Ultra2-High Performance Liquid Chromatography (UHPLC) is used for the hemoglobin quantitation.

  6. Nature of the Renal Concentrating Defect in Sickle Cell Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Hatch, Fred E.; Culbertson, James W.; Diggs, Lemuel W.

    1967-01-01

    Free water reabsorption (TcH2O) measured during 10% mannitol diuresis and subsequently during 3% saline diuresis was compared in patients with sickle cell anemia and in normal subjects. During mannitol infusion, TcH2O progressively rose with increasing osmolar clearance (Cosm) and reached a maximal level in both groups studied. During hypertonic saline diuresis, TcH2O progressively rose in the normal subjects and exceeded the maximal levels attained during mannitol diuresis, with no evidence of a maximal TcH2O level appearing. In contrast, none of the saline curves significantly exceeded the mannitol curves in the sickle cell patients but tended to parallel the mannitol curves at comparable rates of solute clearance. Since TcH2O is an index of both solute (sodium) transport from the loop of Henle and solute accumulation in the hypertonic medullary interstitium, tubular sodium handling was examined in both sickle cell patients and control subjects alike. No difference in the tubular transport of sodium could be demonstrated either under conditions of sodium loading or under conditions in which the tubular sodium load was low (water diuresis). These data support the conclusion that the defect in urinary concentration in sickle cell patients is caused by a limitation in maintaining a high concentration of solute in the medullary interstitium, thus limiting the rate of TcH2O from the collecting duct. PMID:6023770

  7. Breathing Exercises for Inpatients with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Matthie, Nadine; Brewer, Cheryl A.; Moura, Vera L.; Jenerette, Coretta M.

    2017-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a painful condition wherein breathing often is compromised. This pilot study supports the premise that individuals with SCD are willing to learn breathing exercises. Medical-surgical nurses should encourage breathing exercises for managing pain and preventing complications. PMID:26306354

  8. Development and evaluation of a sickle cell assessment instrument.

    PubMed

    Day, Sara W

    2004-01-01

    The current ability to predict very young children with sickle cell disease who are likely to have severe complications later in life permits accurate tailoring of therapy to match disease-related risks. A valid and reliable instrument is essential to accurately assess these children prior to referring them to therapies that are not without risk. This study was designed to develop a Sickle Cell Disease Assessment Instrument with two domains-high-risk identification and disease severity classification-and to evaluate instrument validity and reliability. Instrument development involved identification and definition of critical attributes, assignment of numerical values to critical attributes, and development of a scoring system. Content validity was measured using a panel of five experts in the field of sickle cell disease. Registered nurses using the equivalence approach determined interrater reliability and using test-retest design determined stability. Nurses are often the first persons to identify sickle cell patients that need additional intervention. This instrument will allow them to accurately and objectively assess their patients for high-risk indicators and disease severity classification.

  9. Academic Attainment Findings in Children with Sickle Cell Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epping, Amanda S.; Myrvik, Matthew P.; Newby, Robert F.; Panepinto, Julie A.; Brandow, Amanda M.; Scott, J. Paul

    2013-01-01

    Background: Children with sickle cell disease (SCD) demonstrate deficits in cognitive and academic functioning. This study compared the academic attainment of children with SCD relative to national, state, and local school district rates for African American students. Methods: A retrospective chart review of children with SCD was completed and…

  10. The Cognitive and Academic Impact of Sickle Cell Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Sara; Chismark, Elisabeth

    2006-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) affects over 30,000 students in the United States. Central nervous system complications are widespread among students with SCD and include stroke, silent cerebral infarction, and cognitive impairment. The effects of these complications may lead to academic failure, limited career options, and for some, total disability.…

  11. Sickle Cell Disease Pain: Relation of Coping Strategies to Adjustment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gil, Karen M.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Examined pain coping strategies in 79 adult sickle cell disease (SCD) patients. Results revealed that coping strategies factors were important predictors of pain and adjustment. Subjects high on Negative Thinking and Passive Adherence had more severe pain, were less active and more distressed, and used more health services. Individuals high on…

  12. Quantifying the abnormal hemodynamics of sickle cell anemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Huan; Karniadakis, George

    2012-02-01

    Sickle red blood cells (SS-RBC) exhibit heterogeneous morphologies and abnormal hemodynamics in deoxygenated states. A multi-scale model for SS-RBC is developed based on the Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) method. Different cell morphologies (sickle, granular, elongated shapes) typically observed in deoxygenated states are constructed and quantified by the Asphericity and Elliptical shape factors. The hemodynamics of SS-RBC suspensions is studied in both shear and pipe flow systems. The flow resistance obtained from both systems exhibits a larger value than the healthy blood flow due to the abnormal cell properties. Moreover, SS-RBCs exhibit abnormal adhesive interactions with both the vessel endothelium cells and the leukocytes. The effect of the abnormal adhesive interactions on the hemodynamics of sickle blood is investigated using the current model. It is found that both the SS-RBC - endothelium and the SS-RBC - leukocytes interactions, can potentially trigger the vicious ``sickling and entrapment'' cycles, resulting in vaso-occlusion phenomena widely observed in micro-circulation experiments.

  13. Malevolent ogbanje: recurrent reincarnation or sickle cell disease?

    PubMed

    Nzewi, E

    2001-05-01

    The Igbo of Nigeria believe that everyone is ogbanje (reincarnates) but malevolent ogbanje differ from others in being revenge-driven, chronically ill and engaging in repeated cycles of birth, death and reincarnation. This study examined culturally defined symptoms of 100 children classified as malevolent ogbanje; and investigated their family history and child mortality experience. There was concordance between cultural descriptions of malevolent ogbanje and symptoms as manifested in sickle cell patients. Hemoglobin analysis showed that 70 of the 100 children had sickle cell disease (SCD); while 68 families had death-related names. The symptoms associated with Igbo cases of reincarnation, high child mortality rates, and the high prevalence of sickle cell disease among children classified as malevolent ogbanje all support the conclusion that the symptomatology and early mortality experience are related to sickle cell. Names with themes of death were prevalent in families of children described as malevolent ogbanje. The findings are discussed with reference to cultural resistance to SCD as an explanation for malevolent ogbanje and the implications for the health care of children with SCD in Nigeria.

  14. Sickle cell disease: old discoveries, new concepts, and future promise.

    PubMed

    Frenette, Paul S; Atweh, George F

    2007-04-01

    The discovery of the molecular basis of sickle cell disease was an important landmark in molecular medicine. The modern tools of molecular and cellular biology have refined our understanding of its pathophysiology and facilitated the development of new therapies. In this review, we discuss some of the important advances in this field and the impediments that limit the impact of these advances.

  15. Treatment of sickle cell leg ulcers with pentoxifylline.

    PubMed

    Frost, M L; Treadwell, P

    1990-06-01

    A 58-year-old black man with leg ulcers of 43 years duration responded to pentoxifylline 400 mg tid in 8 months. The ability of pentoxifylline to increase erythrocyte flexibility and decrease blood viscosity was the basis for our use of this agent. Oral pentoxifylline may be a useful adjunct in healing sickle cell leg ulcers and preventing their recurrence.

  16. Precursors of executive function in infants with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Alexandra M; Telfer, Paul T; Kirkham, Fenella J; de Haan, Michelle

    2013-10-01

    Executive dysfunction occurs in sickle cell anemia, but there are few early data. Infants with sickle cell anemia (n = 14) and controls (n = 14) performed the "A-not-B" and Object Retrieval search tasks, measuring precursors of executive function at 9 and 12 months. Significant group differences were not found. However, for the A-not-B task, 7 of 11 sickle cell anemia infants scored in the lower 2 performance categories at 9 months, but only 1 at 12 months (P = .024); controls obtained scores at 12 months that were statistically comparable to the scores they had already obtained at 9 months. On the Object Retrieval task, 9- and 12-month controls showed comparable scores, whereas infants with sickle cell anemia continued to improve (P = .027); at 9 months, those with lower hemoglobin oxygen saturation passed fewer trials (R s = 0.670, P = .024) and took longer to obtain the toy (R s = -0.664, P = .013). Subtle delays in acquiring developmental skills may underlie abnormal executive function in childhood.

  17. Fetal hemoglobin in sickle cell anemia: a glass half full?

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Martin H; Chui, David H K; Dover, George J; Sebastiani, Paola; Alsultan, Abdulrahman

    2014-01-23

    Fetal hemoglobin (HbF) modulates the phenotype of sickle cell anemia by inhibiting deoxy sickle hemoglobin (HbS) polymerization. The blood concentration of HbF, or the number of cells with detectable HbF (F-cells), does not measure the amount of HbF/F-cell. Even patients with high HbF can have severe disease because HbF is unevenly distributed among F-cells, and some cells might have insufficient concentrations to inhibit HbS polymerization. With mean HbF levels of 5%, 10%, 20%, and 30%, the distribution of HbF/F-cell can greatly vary, even if the mean is constant. For example, with 20% HbF, as few as 1% and as many as 24% of cells can have polymer-inhibiting, or protective, levels of HbF of ∼10 pg; with lower HbF, few or no protected cells can be present. Only when the total HbF concentration is near 30% is it possible for the number of protected cells to approach 70%. Rather than the total number of F-cells or the concentration of HbF in the hemolysate, HbF/F-cell and the proportion of F-cells that have enough HbF to thwart HbS polymerization is the most critical predictor of the likelihood of severe sickle cell disease.

  18. Red cell exchange: special focus on sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Haewon C

    2014-12-05

    The primary function of red blood cells (RBCs) is to deliver oxygen from the lungs to tissues. Tissue hypoxia occurs when the oxygen-carrying capacity of RBCs is compromised due primarily to 3 causes: (1) a reduction in circulating RBC mass, (2) an increase in circulating RBC mass, or (3) abnormal hemoglobin (Hb) that either does not sufficiently release oxygen to tissues (high-oxygen-affinity hemoglobin) or occludes the microvasculature due to deformed RBCs (sickled RBCs). To improve oxygenation in patients with reduced or increased RBC mass, RBC administration (simple transfusion) or RBC removal (RBC depletion) is performed, respectively. However, for patients with abnormal Hb, RBCs containing abnormal Hb are removed and replaced by healthy volunteer donor RBCs by red cell exchange (RCE). RCE can be performed by manual exchange or by automated exchange using a blood cell separator (erythrocytapheresis). In this review, indications for RCE in sickle cell disease using the evidence-based American Society for Apheresis categories(1) are presented and the rationale for RCE in each disorder are discussed. Simple transfusion versus RCE and manual RCE versus automated RCE are compared. Finally, this review briefly presents some of the challenges of performing erythrocytapheresis in small children and discusses various choices for central venous access during RCE.(2.)

  19. Genetic strategies for the treatment of sickle cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    Mansilla-Soto, Jorge; Rivière, Isabelle; Sadelain, Michel

    2011-09-01

    Sickle cell anaemia is a severe inherited blood disorder for which there is presently no curative therapy other than allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation. This therapeutic option, however, is not available to most patients because of the lack of a matched related donor. Different genetic strategies aiming to treat the anaemia and prevent sickling are under investigation. They include strategies to transfer a regulated globin gene in autologous HSCs-the most developed approach, which is about to undergo clinical evaluation-, and strategies to either restore endogenous HBG expression, repair or eliminate HBB(S) mutant transcripts, or correct the sickle mutation in HSCs or induced pluripotent stem cells. Their common ultimate goals are to afford therapeutic levels of HbA or HbF in the erythroid progeny of autologous HSCs (sufficient to prevent pathological sickling) and engraft the genetically modified HSCs with minimal short-term toxicity (primarily caused by the conditioning regimen) and long-term toxicity (primarily caused by genotoxicity). We discuss here the status of application of these technologies, outlining recent advances and the hurdles that lay ahead.

  20. Sickle cell disease: time for a targeted neonatal screening programme.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, C; Geoghegan, R; Conroy, H; Lippacott, S; O'Brien, D; Lynam, P; Langabeer, L; Cotter, M; Smith, O; McMahon, C

    2015-02-01

    Ireland has seen a steady increase in paediatric sickle cell disease (SCD). In 2005, only 25% of children with SCD were referred to the haemoglobinopathy service in their first year. A non-funded screening programme was implemented. This review aimed to assess the impact screening has had. All children referred to the haemoglobinopathy service born in Ireland after 2005 were identified. Data was collected from the medical chart and laboratory system. Information was analysed using Microsoft Excel. 77 children with SCD were identified. The median age at antibiotic commencement in the screened group was 56 days compared with 447 days in the unscreened group, p = < 0.0003. 22 (28%) of infants were born in centre's that do not screen and 17 (81%) were over 6 months old at referral, compared with 14 (21%) in the screened group. 6 (27%) of those in the unscreened group presented in acute crisis compared with 2 (3%) in the screened population. The point prevalence of SCD in Ireland is 0.2% in children under 15 yr of African and Asian descent. We identified delays in referral and treatment, which reflect the lack of government funded support and policy. We suggest all maternity units commence screening for newborns at risk of SCD. It is a cost effective intervention with a number needed to screen of just 4 to prevent a potentially fatal crisis.

  1. Sickle cell disease: management options and challenges in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Ansong, Daniel; Akoto, Alex Osei; Ocloo, Delaena; Ohene-Frempong, Kwaku

    2013-01-01

    Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) is the most common genetic disorder of haemoglobin in sub-Saharan Africa. This commentary focuses on the management options available and the challenges that health care professionals in developing countries face in caring for patients with SCD. In a developing countries like Ghana, new-born screening is now about to be implemented on a national scale. Common and important morbidities associated with SCD are vaso-occlusive episodes, infections, Acute Chest Syndrome (ACS), Stroke and hip necrosis. Approaches to the management of these morbidities are far advanced in the developed countries. The differences in setting and resource limitations in developing countries bring challenges that have a major influence in management options in developing countries. Obviously clinicians in developing countries face challenges in managing SCD patients. However understanding the disease, its progression, and instituting the appropriate preventive methods are paramount in its management. Emphasis should be placed on early counselling, new-born screening, anti-microbial prophylaxis, vaccination against infections, and training of healthcare workers, patients and caregivers. These interventions are affordable in developing countries.

  2. AAPT Diagnostic Criteria for Chronic Sickle Cell Disease Pain.

    PubMed

    Dampier, Carlton; Palermo, Tonya M; Darbari, Deepika S; Hassell, Kathryn; Smith, Wally; Zempsky, William

    2017-01-05

    Pain in sickle cell disease (SCD) is associated with increased morbidity, mortality, and high health care costs. Although episodic acute pain is the hallmark of this disorder, there is an increasing awareness that chronic pain is part of the pain experience of many older adolescents and adults. A common set of criteria for classifying chronic pain associated with SCD would enhance SCD pain research efforts in epidemiology, pain mechanisms, and clinical trials of pain management interventions, and ultimately improve clinical assessment and management. As part of the collaborative effort between the Analgesic, Anesthetic, and Addiction Clinical Trial Translations Innovations Opportunities and Networks public-private partnership with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the American Pain Society, the Analgesic, Anesthetic, and Addiction Clinical Trial Translations Innovations Opportunities and Networks-American Pain Society Pain Taxonomy initiative developed the outline of an optimal diagnostic system for chronic pain conditions. Subsequently, a working group of experts in SCD pain was convened to generate core diagnostic criteria for chronic pain associated with SCD. The working group synthesized available literature to provide evidence for the dimensions of this disease-specific pain taxonomy. A single pain condition labeled chronic SCD pain was derived with 3 modifiers reflecting different clinical features. Future systematic research is needed to evaluate the feasibility, validity, and reliability of these criteria.

  3. Sickle cell disease in the Kurdish population of northern Iraq.

    PubMed

    Al-Allawi, Nasir A S; Jalal, Sana D; Nerwey, Farida F; Al-Sayan, Galawezh O O; Al-Zebari, Sahima S M; Alshingaly, Awny A; Markous, Raji D; Jubrael, Jaladet M S; Hamamy, Hanan

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have revealed that sickle cell disease patients are clustered in two geographical areas in Iraq, one among the Arabs in the extreme south, another among the Kurdish population in the extreme north, where they constitute major health problems. However, no studies have focused on the genotypes responsible for sickle cell disease or the β-globin gene haplotypes associated with it. For the latter purpose, a total of 103 unrelated Kurdish sickle cell disease patients were evaluated by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) for the sickle cell mutation, followed by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse hybridization for β- and α-thalassemia (β- and α-thal) mutations, whenever indicated. Results showed that the most common genotype was sickle cell anemia (68.0%) followed by Hb S/β(0)-thal and Hb S/β(+)-thal at frequencies of 24.2 and 7.8%, respectively. Eight β-thal mutations were associated with the latter two genotypes including: IVS-II-1 (G>A), IVS-I-110 (G>A), codon 8 (-AA), codon 44 (-C), codon 22 (-7 bp), IVS-I-1 (G>A), codon 30 (G>C) and IVS-I-6 (T>C). In Hb SS patients, the -α(3.7) deletion was documented in 10.0% and was the only α-thal mutation detected. Furthermore, 5' β-globin gene cluster haplotyping of 128 β(S) chromosomes revealed that the most common haplotype seen in 69.5% was the Benin haplotype, followed by the Arab-Indian haplotype in 12.5%. These latter findings closely resemble reports from neighboring Turkey, Syria, Jordan, Lebanon and Mediterranean countries, suggesting a possible common origin, but are in contrast to findings from the Eastern Arabian Peninsula and Iran.

  4. Improving Emergency Providers’ Attitudes Towards Sickle Cell Patients in Pain

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Aditi; Haywood, Carlton; Beach, Mary Catherine; Guidera, Mark; Lanzkron, Sophie; Valenzuela-Araujo, Doris; Rothman, Richard E.; Dugas, Andrea Freyer

    2015-01-01

    Background Provider biases and negative attitudes are recognized barriers to optimal pain management in sickle cell disease, particularly in the emergency department (ED). Measures This prospective cohort measures pre- and post-intervention provider attitudes towards patients with sickle pain crises using a validated survey instrument. Intervention ED providers viewed an eight-minute online video that illustrated challenges in sickle cell pain management, perspectives of patients and providers as well as misconceptions and stereotypes of which to be wary. Outcomes Ninety-six ED providers were enrolled. Negative attitude scoring decreased, with a mean difference -11.5 from baseline, and positive attitudes improved, with a mean difference +10. Endorsement of red-flag behaviors similarly decreased (mean difference -12.8). Results were statistically significant and sustained on repeat testing three months post-intervention. Conclusions/Lessons Learned Brief video-based educational interventions can improve emergency provider attitudes towards patients with sickle pain crises, potentially curtailing pain crises early, improving health outcomes and patient satisfaction scores. PMID:26596878

  5. Erythrocyte microparticles can induce kidney vaso-occlusions in a murine model of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Camus, Stéphane M; Gausserès, Blandine; Bonnin, Philippe; Loufrani, Laurent; Grimaud, Linda; Charue, Dominique; De Moraes, Joao A; Renard, Jean-Marie; Tedgui, Alain; Boulanger, Chantal M; Tharaux, Pierre-Louis; Blanc-Brude, Olivier P

    2012-12-13

    Patients with sickle cell disease suffer from painful crises associated with disseminated vaso-occlusions, increased circulating erythrocyte microparticles (MPs), and thrombospondin-1 (TSP1). MPs are submicron membrane vesicles shed by compromised or activated cells. We hypothesized that TSP1 mediates MP shedding and participates in vaso-occlusions. We injected TSP1 to transgenic SAD mice with sickle cell disease and characterized circulating phosphatidylserine+ MPs by FACS. TSP1 stimulated MPs in plasma and initiated vaso-occlusions within minutes. In vitro, TSP1 triggered rapid erythrocyte conversion into spicule-covered echinocytes, followed by MP shedding. MP shedding was recapitulated by peptides derived from the TSP1 carboxyterminus. We purified MPs shed by erythrocytes in vitro and administered them back to SAD mice. MPs triggered immediate renal vaso-occlusions. In vitro, MPs triggered the production of radical oxygen species by endothelial monolayers, favored erythrocyte adhesion, and induced endothelial apoptosis. MPs also compromised vasodilation in perfused microvessels. These effects were inhibited by saturating MP phosphatidylserine with annexin-V, or with inhibitors of endothelial ROS production. We conclude that TSP1 triggers erythrocyte MP shedding. These MPs induce endothelial injury and facilitate acute vaso-occlusive events in transgenic SAD mice. This work supports a novel concept that toxic erythrocyte MPs may connect sickle cell anemia to vascular disease.

  6. Hematopoietic cell transplantation: a curative option for sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan

    2007-12-01

    Sickle cell disease is associated with considerable morbidity and premature mortality. Hematopoietic cell transplantation offers the possibility of cure and is associated with excellent results in pediatric patients receiving stem cell transplantation from a matched sibling donor. Reduced intensity conditioning regimen have the potential to further reduce regimen related morbidity and mortality. Improved understanding of the natural history of complications such as stroke and pulmonary hypertension, effects of treatments, such as hydroxyurea and blood transfusions, as well as the impact of transplantation on organ damage are likely to influence the timing and indication of transplantation. Improvements in preparative regimen may enable the safe use of alternate source of stem cells such as unrelated matched donors and further improve the applicability and acceptability of this treatment.

  7. Crizanlizumab for the Prevention of Pain Crises in Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Ataga, Kenneth I; Kutlar, Abdullah; Kanter, Julie; Liles, Darla; Cancado, Rodolfo; Friedrisch, João; Guthrie, Troy H; Knight-Madden, Jennifer; Alvarez, Ofelia A; Gordeuk, Victor R; Gualandro, Sandra; Colella, Marina P; Smith, Wally R; Rollins, Scott A; Stocker, Jonathan W; Rother, Russell P

    2017-02-02

    Background The up-regulation of P-selectin in endothelial cells and platelets contributes to the cell-cell interactions that are involved in the pathogenesis of vaso-occlusion and sickle cell-related pain crises. The safety and efficacy of crizanlizumab, an antibody against the adhesion molecule P-selectin, were evaluated in patients with sickle cell disease. Methods In this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, phase 2 trial, we assigned patients to receive low-dose crizanlizumab (2.5 mg per kilogram of body weight), high-dose crizanlizumab (5.0 mg per kilogram), or placebo, administered intravenously 14 times over a period of 52 weeks. Patients who were receiving concomitant hydroxyurea as well as those not receiving hydroxyurea were included in the study. The primary end point was the annual rate of sickle cell-related pain crises with high-dose crizanlizumab versus placebo. The annual rate of days hospitalized, the times to first and second crises, annual rates of uncomplicated crises (defined as crises other than the acute chest syndrome, hepatic sequestration, splenic sequestration, or priapism) and the acute chest syndrome, and patient-reported outcomes were also assessed. Results A total of 198 patients underwent randomization at 60 sites. The median rate of crises per year was 1.63 with high-dose crizanlizumab versus 2.98 with placebo (indicating a 45.3% lower rate with high-dose crizanlizumab, P=0.01). The median time to the first crisis was significantly longer with high-dose crizanlizumab than with placebo (4.07 vs. 1.38 months, P=0.001), as was the median time to the second crisis (10.32 vs. 5.09 months, P=0.02). The median rate of uncomplicated crises per year was 1.08 with high-dose crizanlizumab, as compared with 2.91 with placebo (indicating a 62.9% lower rate with high-dose crizanlizumab, P=0.02). Adverse events that occurred in 10% or more of the patients in either active-treatment group and at a frequency that was at least twice as high

  8. What motivates individuals with sickle cell disease to talk with others about their illness? Reasons for and against sickle cell disease disclosure.

    PubMed

    Derlega, Valerian J; Maduro, Ralitsa S; Janda, Louis H; Chen, Ian A; Goodman, Benjamin M

    2016-05-26

    This interview study documented how individuals with sickle cell disease make decisions about who to talk with concerning their illness based on psychological and interpersonal issues that are important to them. Reasons for sickle cell disease disclosure to specific persons were self-related (receiving support, venting feelings), other-related (educating others about sickle cell disease, forewarning others about sickle cell disease-related problems, someone asked for information about the disease), or situational (mostly focusing on another person being physically close or available to talk to). Reasons for sickle cell disease nondisclosure to specific persons were self-related (fear of rejection, being stereotyped, maintaining privacy) or other-related (lack of support, not worrying someone).

  9. Impairment of neutrophil oxidative burst in children with sickle cell disease is associated with heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Evans, Ceri; Orf, Katharine; Horvath, Erzsebet; Levin, Michael; De La Fuente, Josu; Chakravorty, Subarna; Cunnington, Aubrey J

    2015-12-01

    Sickle cell disease is a risk factor for invasive bacterial infections, and splenic dysfunction is believed to be the main underlying cause. We have previously shown that the liberation of heme in acute hemolysis can induce heme oxygenase-1 during granulopoiesis, impairing the ability of developing neutrophils to mount a bactericidal oxidative burst, and increasing susceptibility to bacterial infection. We hypothesized that this may also occur with the chronic hemolysis of sickle cell disease, potentially contributing to susceptibility to infections. We found that neutrophil oxidative burst activity was significantly lower in treatment-naïve children with sickle cell disease compared to age-, gender- and ethnicity-matched controls, whilst degranulation was similar. The defect in neutrophil oxidative burst was quantitatively related to both systemic heme oxygenase-1 activity (assessed by carboxyhemoglobin concentration) and neutrophil mobilization. A distinct population of heme oxygenase-1-expressing cells was present in the bone marrow of children with sickle cell disease, but not in healthy children, with a surface marker profile consistent with neutrophil progenitors (CD49d(Hi) CD24(Lo) CD15(Int) CD16(Int) CD11b(+/-)). Incubation of promyelocytic HL-60 cells with the heme oxygenase-1 substrate and inducer, hemin, demonstrated that heme oxygenase-1 induction during neutrophilic differentiation could reduce oxidative burst capacity. These findings indicate that impairment of neutrophil oxidative burst activity in sickle cell disease is associated with hemolysis and heme oxygenase-1 expression. Neutrophil dysfunction might contribute to risk of infection in sickle cell disease, and measurement of neutrophil oxidative burst might be used to identify patients at greatest risk of infection, who might benefit from enhanced prophylaxis.

  10. In vitro microfluidic model of sickle cell disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, D. K.; Higgins, J. M.; Mahadevan, L.; Bhatia, S. N.

    2010-03-01

    The pathophysiology of sickle cell disease is complicated by the multiscale processes that link the molecular genotype to the organismal phenotype: hemoglobin polymerization occurring in milliseconds, microscopic cellular sickling in a few seconds or less, and macroscopic vessel occlusion over a time scale of minutes. The rheology of sickle blood, which captures many of these processes, can be studied in vitro using physical tools and insights. We present a minimal microfluidic device in which blood flow dynamics can be directly manipulated by modulating physical factors such as oxygen concentration, capillary size, and fluid shear. We have used this system to map out the phase space of blood flow with respect to a combination of geometric, physical, chemical, and biological parameters. We show that morphological changes in erythrocytes due to sickle hemoglobin polymerization and melting are alone sufficient to change blood rheology. We characterize whole blood from many patients in this device and correlate in vitro performance to clinical outcomes, suggesting the potential utility of such a device for patient monitoring. Our experimental study integrates the dynamics of many of the processes associated with vasoocclusion and provides a potential tool for optimizing and individualizing treatment, and identifying new therapies.

  11. Types of anaemic crises in paediatric patients with sickle cell anaemia seen in Enugu, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Juwah, A; Nlemadim, E; Kaine, W

    2004-01-01

    Background: Anaemic crises in paediatric patients with sickle cell anaemia are major causes of morbidity and mortality. Some children admitted to hospitals' emergency rooms or paediatric wards of the hospitals with severe anaemia die before blood transfusion. Aims and Methods: A total of 108 episodes of anaemic crises were prospectively evaluated in 108 patients with sickle cell anaemia attending the paediatric sickle cell clinic of the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, Nigeria. Results: Hyper-haemolytic crises were the commonest types of anaemic crises in the patients studied. The mean haemoglobin concentration of 44.66 (SD 6.42) g/l in crises was significantly lower than the mean steady state level of 78.69 (SD 8.50) g/l. Reticulocytes, unconjugated serum bilirubin concentrations, and the presence of nucleated red blood cells were also increased. About 4.6% of patients were not jaundiced at presentation even though they were profoundly anaemic. Their haematological indices gradually returned to normal without marked changes in their serum bilirubin concentrations. These patients were probably in the early recovery phase of aplastic crises. The classical presentation of acute splenic sequestration crisis with a rapidly enlarging spleen and hypotension was not observed. This was probably because of its precipitate nature and accompanying circulatory collapse, which carried a high mortality rate. Minor forms of sequestration crises may have occurred in the liver and spleen. Conclusions: Malaria appeared to have played a role in precipitating some of the hyper-haemolytic episodes. Further studies to elucidate this role are required so that appropriate recommendations regarding malaria prophylaxis can be made in patients with sickle cell anaemia. PMID:15155406

  12. Buccal Micronucleus Cytome Assay in Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Naga, Mallika Bokka Sri Satya; Gour, Shreya; Nallagutta, Nalini; Velidandla, Surekha; Manikya, Sangameshwar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sickle Cell Anaemia (SCA) is a commonly inherited blood disorder preceded by episodes of pain, chronic haemolytic anaemia and severe infections. The underlying phenomenon which causes this disease is the point mutation in the haemoglobin beta gene (Hbβ) found on chromosome 11 p. Increased oxidative stress leads to DNA damage. DNA damage occurring in such conditions can be studied by the buccal micronucleus cytome assay, which is a minimally invasive method for studying chromosomal instability, cell death and regenerative potential of human buccal tissue. Aim To evaluate genomic instability in patients with sickle cell disease by buccal micronucleus cytome assay. Materials and Methods The study included 40 sickle cell anemia patients (Group A) and 40 age and sex matched controls (Group B). Buccal swabs were collected and stained with Papanicolaou (PAP). Number of cells with micronucleus, binuclei, nuclear bud, pyknosis and karyolysis were counted in two groups as parameters for the evaluation of genome stability. Results All the analysis was done using t-test. A p-value of <0.001 was considered statistically significant. There was a statistically significant increase in micronuclei number in SCA patients when compared with controls. Karyolytic (un-nucleated) cell number in Group A was more than to those of the controls. Conclusion The results might suggest that patients with sickle cell anaemia have genome instability which is represented by the presence of micronuclei in the somatic cells. Presence of apoptotic cells might only indicate the bodily damage to the tissue as a result of the disease. PMID:27504413

  13. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in thalassemia and sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Lucarelli, Guido; Isgrò, Antonella; Sodani, Pietro; Gaziev, Javid

    2012-05-01

    The globally widespread single-gene disorders β-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia (SCA) can only be cured by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). HSCT treatment of thalassemia has substantially improved over the last two decades, with advancements in preventive strategies, control of transplant-related complications, and preparative regimens. A risk class-based transplantation approach results in disease-free survival probabilities of 90%, 84%, and 78% for class 1, 2, and 3 thalassemia patients, respectively. Because of disease advancement, adult thalassemia patients have a higher risk for transplant-related toxicity and a 65% cure rate. Patients without matched donors could benefit from haploidentical mother-to-child transplantation. There is a high cure rate for children with SCA who receive HSCT following myeloablative conditioning protocols. Novel non-myeloablative transplantation protocols could make HSCT available to adult SCA patients who were previously excluded from allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

  14. [Vestibular neuronitis in a teenager with sickle cell disease. Treatment is urgent].

    PubMed

    Runel-Belliard, C; Lesprit, E; Quinet, B; Wiener-Vacher, S; Saizou, C; Grimprel, E

    2008-09-01

    Vestibular syndrome is not frequently described in patients with sickle cell disease. We report the case of a teenager with sickle cell disease who had a vestibular syndrome with vertigo that successfully responded to exchange transfusion. We discuss guidelines and review the literature in view of this case report. Sensorineural disorders should be considered as stroke syndromes. They require urgent treatment consisting of exchange transfusion or maintaining optimal hydration associated with blood withdrawal. Treatment of vestibular syndrome in sickle cell disease is urgent.

  15. Is sickle cell trait a health hazard? Medical problems: a brief review.

    PubMed

    Knasel, A

    1982-01-01

    Investigators have statistically linked the occurrence of certain conditions to sickle cell trait (hemoglobin AS). Other associations between hemoglobin AS and morbid conditions have been reported with reliable documentation, although these reports have lacked a statistical base. The need for continued, careful, and clear documentation of such associations is emphasized because physicians caring for patients with sickle cell trait will continue to question such associations. An approach to counseling patients with sickle cell trait is suggested.

  16. Management of sickle cell disease from childhood through adulthood.

    PubMed

    Kanter, Julie; Kruse-Jarres, Rebecca

    2013-11-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a genetic disorder characterised by anaemia and "sickling" of red blood cells, leading to chronic haemolytic anaemia, vascular injury, and organ dysfunction. Although children and adults experience many similar symptoms and problems, complications increase with age, leading to early mortality. Hydroxyurea (hydroxycarbamide), the only US Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment, continues to be under-utilised and other treatments available to children are often inaccessible for adults. Haematopoietic stem-cell transplantation is a curative option, but is limited by a lack of donors and concerns for transplant-related toxicities. Although comprehensive programs exist in paediatrics, affected adults may not have access to preventative and comprehensive healthcare because of a lack of providers or care coordination. They are often forced to rely on urgent care, leading to increased healthcare utilisation costs and inappropriate treatment. This problem highlights the importance of primary care during the transition from paediatrics to adulthood.

  17. ET-1 and ecNOS gene polymorphisms andsusceptibility to acute chest syndrome and painful vaso-occlusive crises in children with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Chaar, Vicky; Tarer, Vanessa; Etienne-Julan, Maryse; Diara, Jean Pierre; Elion, Jacques; Romana, Marc

    2006-09-01

    The association of endothelin 1 (ET-1) and endothelial constitutive nitric oxide synthase (ecNOS) gene polymorphisms (G5665T and T8002C, VNTR and T-786C respectively) with the occurrence of acute chest syndrome and painful vaso-occlusive crises was evaluated in homozygous SS children. This retrospective study reveals that ET-1 T8002 and ecNOS C-786 alleles are associated with, respectively, an increased and a decreased risk of acute chest syndrome.

  18. Perioperative Anaesthetic Approach in a Homozygous Sickle Cell Anaemia Patient with Frequent Pain Crises.

    PubMed

    Tuzcu, Kasım; Karcıoğlu, Murat; Davarcı, Işıl; Hakimoğlu, Sedat; Akküçük, Seçkin

    2014-12-01

    Sickle cell disease (HbS) is a haemolytic anaemia characterized by the formation of abnormal haemoglobin. In patients with sickle cell disease, high rates of erythrocyte generation, degradation, and hyperbilirubinemia increase the risk for cholelithiasis. Previous studies have found that the incidence of cholelithiasis is 70% in adult patients. In sickle cell disease, decreased oxygen concentration leads to the sickling of erythrocytes by causing aggregation and polymerization. Sickle erythrocytes can have devastating effects on many vital organs by causing microvascular occlusion. In patients with sickle cell anaemia, anaesthetic technique, anaesthetic agents, and surgical trauma may cause additional risk. In this case report, we present a perioperative anaesthetic approach in the laparoscopic cholecystectomy of a patient with HbS, elevated liver function tests, and frequent pain crises.

  19. Perioperative Anaesthetic Approach in a Homozygous Sickle Cell Anaemia Patient with Frequent Pain Crises

    PubMed Central

    Tuzcu, Kasım; Karcıoğlu, Murat; Davarcı, Işıl; Hakimoğlu, Sedat; Akküçük, Seçkin

    2014-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (HbS) is a haemolytic anaemia characterized by the formation of abnormal haemoglobin. In patients with sickle cell disease, high rates of erythrocyte generation, degradation, and hyperbilirubinemia increase the risk for cholelithiasis. Previous studies have found that the incidence of cholelithiasis is 70% in adult patients. In sickle cell disease, decreased oxygen concentration leads to the sickling of erythrocytes by causing aggregation and polymerization. Sickle erythrocytes can have devastating effects on many vital organs by causing microvascular occlusion. In patients with sickle cell anaemia, anaesthetic technique, anaesthetic agents, and surgical trauma may cause additional risk. In this case report, we present a perioperative anaesthetic approach in the laparoscopic cholecystectomy of a patient with HbS, elevated liver function tests, and frequent pain crises. PMID:27366449

  20. Light Scattering and Absorption Studies of Sickle Cell Hemoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim-Shapiro, Daniel

    1997-11-01

    The use of physical techniques has been very important in understanding the pathophysiology of sickle cell disease. In particular, light scattering and absorption studies have been used to measure the kinetics of sickle cell hemoglobin polymerization and depolymerization (melting). The theory of sickle cell polymerization that has been derived and tested by these methods has not only led to an increased understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease but has also led to improved treatment strategies. Sickle cell disease effects about 1 out of 600 people of African descent born in the United States. The disease is caused by a mutant form of hemoglobin (the oxygen transporting molecule in the blood), hemoglobin S (HbS), which differs from normal adult hemoglobin by the substitution of a single amino acid for another. The polymerization of HbS, which occurs under conditions of low oxygen pressure, causes distortion and increased rigidity of the sickle red blood cell that leads to blockage of the capillaries and a host of resulting complications. The disease is associated with tissue damage, severe painful crises and a high degree of mortality. Light scattering studies of purified HbS and whole cells (conducted by F.A. Ferrone, J. Hofrichter, W.A. Eaton, and their associates) have been used to determine the mechanism of HbS polymerization. Polymerization will generally not occur when the hemoglobin is in an oxygen-rich environment. The question is, when HbS is rapidly deoxygenated (as it is when going from the lungs to the tissues) what is the kinetics of polymerization? Photolysis methods were used to rapidly deoxygenate HbS and light scattering was used as a function of time to measure the kinetics of polymerization. Polarized light scattering may be a more effective way to measure polymer content than total intensity light scattering. It was found that no polymerization occurs during a period of time called the delay time and subsequent polymerization occurs

  1. Haplotype map of sickle cell anemia in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Moumni, Imen; Ben Mustapha, Maha; Sassi, Sarra; Zorai, Amine; Ben Mansour, Ikbel; Douzi, Kais; Chouachi, Dorra; Mellouli, Fethi; Bejaoui, Mohamed; Abbes, Salem

    2014-01-01

    β-Globin haplotypes are important to establish the ethnic origin and predict the clinical development of sickle cell disease patients (SCD). To determine the chromosomal background of β (S) Tunisian sickle cell patients, in this first study in Tunisia, we have explored four polymorphic regions of β-globin cluster on chromosome 11. It is the 5' region of β-LCR-HS2 site, the intervening sequence II (IVSII) region of two fetal ((G)γ and (A)γ) genes and the 5' region of β-globin gene. The results reveal a high molecular diversity of a microsatellite configuration describing the sequences haplotypes. The linkage disequilibrium analysis showed various haplotype combinations giving 22 "extended haplotypes". These results confirm the utility of the β-globin haplotypes for population studies and contribute to knowledge of the Tunisian gene pool, as well as establishing the role of genetic markers in physiopathology of SCD.

  2. Neodymium-YAG laser vitreolysis in sickle cell retinopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Hrisomalos, N.F.; Jampol, L.M.; Moriarty, B.J.; Serjeant, G.; Acheson, R.; Goldberg, M.F.

    1987-08-01

    Six patients with proliferative sickle cell retinopathy and vitreous bands were treated with the neodymium-YAG (Nd-YAG) laser to accomplish lysis of avascular traction bands or to clear the media in front of the macula. Transection of bands was possible in five of the six cases but in two of these the effect was only partial. Three cases were satisfactorily treated with the Nd-YAG laser application alone, two eventually required conventional vitreoretinal surgery, and one patient's condition stabilized despite failure of the treatment. Complications from the treatment occurred in three cases and included subretinal (choroidal) hemorrhage, preretinal hemorrhage, microperforation of a retinal vein, and focal areas of damage to the retinal pigment epithelium. Neodymium-YAG vitreolysis may be a useful modality in carefully selected patients with proliferative sickle cell retinopathy, but potentially sight-threatening complications may occur.

  3. Gene Therapy in a Patient with Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Ribeil, Jean-Antoine; Hacein-Bey-Abina, Salima; Payen, Emmanuel; Magnani, Alessandra; Semeraro, Michaela; Magrin, Elisa; Caccavelli, Laure; Neven, Benedicte; Bourget, Philippe; El Nemer, Wassim; Bartolucci, Pablo; Weber, Leslie; Puy, Hervé; Meritet, Jean-François; Grevent, David; Beuzard, Yves; Chrétien, Stany; Lefebvre, Thibaud; Ross, Robert W; Negre, Olivier; Veres, Gabor; Sandler, Laura; Soni, Sandeep; de Montalembert, Mariane; Blanche, Stéphane; Leboulch, Philippe; Cavazzana, Marina

    2017-03-02

    Sickle cell disease results from a homozygous missense mutation in the β-globin gene that causes polymerization of hemoglobin S. Gene therapy for patients with this disorder is complicated by the complex cellular abnormalities and challenges in achieving effective, persistent inhibition of polymerization of hemoglobin S. We describe our first patient treated with lentiviral vector-mediated addition of an antisickling β-globin gene into autologous hematopoietic stem cells. Adverse events were consistent with busulfan conditioning. Fifteen months after treatment, the level of therapeutic antisickling β-globin remained high (approximately 50% of β-like-globin chains) without recurrence of sickle crises and with correction of the biologic hallmarks of the disease. (Funded by Bluebird Bio and others; HGB-205 ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02151526 .).

  4. Intradermal hepatitis B vaccine in thalassaemia and sickle cell disease.

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Q; Underhill, G; Wonke, B; Aldouri, M; Kelsey, M; Jefferies, D

    1989-01-01

    Thirty two patients with beta thalassaemia and sickle cell disease who were having regular blood transfusions were selected to test the efficacy and immunogenicity of low dose (2 micrograms or 0.1 ml) intradermal hepatitis B vaccine compared with the standard (20 micrograms or 1 ml) intramuscular dose. There was no significant difference in the rates of seroconversion, seroconversion had occurred in all patients by seven months. There were no significant differences in antibody titres between the intramuscular and intradermal groups at 1, 2, and 6 months. Although the titres were significantly higher in the intramuscular group at seven months and at 12-18 months, the antibody titre in the intradermal group did not fall below 10 IU/l. The results of this study suggest that low dose intradermal hepatitis B vaccination is an effective and economical way of stimulating an immune response in patients with beta thalassaemia and sickle cell disease. PMID:2526622

  5. Post-bleaching sensitivity in patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Lisboa, Guacyra M; Guedes, Verónica L; Luna, Maria do R Ml; Carneiro-Jr, Américo M; Stegun, Roberto C

    2016-04-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a monogenic disease that affects millions of people worldwide. This study analyzed the effectiveness of bleaching and tooth sensitivity after in-office bleaching in patients with SCD. Forty volunteers were randomly assigned to four groups of 10 patients each (five with the SCD and five healthy controls) and treated using in-office bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide and different light activation protocols. No statistically significant difference was observed with relation to presence of tooth sensitivity, with or without use of a source of light for peroxide activation, and all bleaching therapies were effective, regardless of the technique employed and the presence/absence of sickle cell disease. The data showed that in-office dental bleaching is a viable alternative for improvement of oral esthetics for patients with SCD.

  6. Sickle cell anemia from central India: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Jain, Dipty; Italia, Khushnooma; Sarathi, Vijaya; Ghoshand, Kanjaksha; Colah, Roshan

    2012-11-01

    Although sickle cell anemia in India is believed to have a mild clinical presentation, few studies report severe disease in many patients from central India. Hence, we have retrospectively studied 316 children with SCA who were followed up for a period of 5.8±5.7 years. There were 55.4 blood transfusions, 43.3 episodes of vaso-occlusive crises requiring hospitalization, and 108.9 hospitalizations per 100 person years. Ninety six (30%) patients had severe disease whereas 74 patients also fulfilled the criteria for hydroxyurea therapy. Significant proportion of children with sickle cell anemia from central India present with severe clinical presentation and require regular medical attention.

  7. Updated Mechanisms of Sickle Cell Disease-Associated Chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Brianna; Meiler, Steffen E.; Bekker, Alex; Tao, Yuan-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD), a hemoglobinopathy, causes sickling of red blood cells, resulting in vessel blockage, stroke, anemia, inflammation, and extreme pain. A vast majority of SCD patients experience pain on a chronic basis, and many turn to opioids to provide limited relief. The side effects that come with chronic opioid use push for research into understanding the specific mechanisms of SCD-associated chronic pain. Current advances in SCD-associated pain have focused on alterations in the pain pathway including nociceptor sensitization and endogenous pain inducers. This article reviews the underlying pathophysiology of SCD, potential pain mechanisms, current treatments and their mechanism of action, and future directions of SCD-associated pain management. The information provided could help propel research in SCD-associated chronic pain and uncover novel treatment options for clinicians. PMID:26301256

  8. N-acetylcysteine reduces oxidative stress in sickle cell patients.

    PubMed

    Nur, Erfan; Brandjes, Dees P; Teerlink, Tom; Otten, Hans-Martin; Oude Elferink, Ronald P J; Muskiet, Frits; Evers, Ludo M; ten Cate, Hugo; Biemond, Bart J; Duits, Ashley J; Schnog, John-John B

    2012-07-01

    Oxidative stress is of importance in the pathophysiology of sickle cell disease (SCD). In this open label randomized pilot study the effects of oral N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on phosphatidylserine (PS) expression as marker of cellular oxidative damage (primary end point), and markers of hemolysis, coagulation and endothelial activation and NAC tolerability (secondary end points) were studied. Eleven consecutive patients (ten homozygous [HbSS] sickle cell patients, one HbSβ(0)-thalassemia patient) were randomly assigned to treatment with either 1,200 or 2,400 mg NAC daily during 6 weeks. The data indicate an increment in whole blood glutathione levels and a decrease in erythrocyte outer membrane phosphatidylserine exposure, plasma levels of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) and cell-free hemoglobin after 6 weeks of NAC treatment in both dose groups. One patient did not tolerate the 2,400 mg dose and continued with the 1,200 mg dose. During the study period, none of the patients experienced painful crises or other significant SCD or NAC related complications. These data indicate that N-acetylcysteine treatment of sickle cell patients may reduce SCD related oxidative stress.

  9. Orbital wall infarction in child with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Janssens, C; Claeys, L; Maes, P; Boiy, T; Wojciechowski, M

    2015-12-01

    We present the case of a 17-year-old boy, known with homozygous sickle cell disease, who was admitted because of generalised pain. He developed bilateral periorbital oedema and proptosis, without pain or visual disturbances. In addition to hyperhydration, oxygen and analgesia IV antibiotics were started, to cover a possible osteomyelitis. Patients with sickle cell disease are at risk for vaso-occlusive crises, when the abnormally shaped red blood cells aggregate and block the capillaries. Such a crisis typically presents at a location with high bone marrow activity, as the vertebrae and long bones. At an early age, the bone marrow is still active at other sites, for example the orbital wall, and thus infarction can also occur there. Thus, in young persons with sickle cell disease, it is important to consider orbital wall infarction in the differential diagnosis, since the approach is different from osteomyelitis. If the disease is complicated by an orbital compression syndrome, corticosteroids or surgical intervention may be necessary to preserve the vision. In our patient, an MRI of the orbitae demonstrated periorbital oedema with bone anomalies in the orbital and frontal bones, confirming orbital wall infarction. Ophthalmological examination revealed no signs of pressure on the nervus opticus. The patient recovered gradually with conservative treatment.

  10. The management of pain in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Yaster, M; Kost-Byerly, S; Maxwell, L G

    2000-06-01

    The pain of vaso-occlusive crisis in patients with sickle cell disease is excruciating, incapacitating, and sometimes refractory to even the most advanced analgesic treatments. A comprehensive, multimodal approach to therapy that includes education, cognitive therapies, anti-inflammatory drugs, opioids, and psychostimulant adjuvant drugs has been presented. Until a cure for the underlying disease is found, these are the best approaches available. The authors hope that future research will find even better modalities of analgesic care.

  11. Neurological Complications following Blood Transfusions in Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Khawar, Nayaab; Kulpa, Jolanta; Bellin, Anne; Proteasa, Simona; Sundaram, Revathy

    2017-01-01

    In Sickle Cell Anemia (SCA) patient blood transfusions are an important part of treatment for stroke and its prevention. However, blood transfusions can also lead to complications such as Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome (RPLS). This brief report highlights two cases of SCA who developed such neurological complications after a blood transfusion. RLPS should be considered as the cause of neurologic finding in patients with SCA and hypertension following a blood transfusion. PMID:28127478

  12. Sickle cell vasoocclusion and rescue in a microfluidic device

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, J. M.; Eddington, D. T.; Bhatia, S. N.; Mahadevan, L.

    2007-01-01

    The pathophysiology of sickle cell disease is complicated by the multiscale processes that link the molecular genotype to the organismal phenotype: hemoglobin polymerization occurring in milliseconds, microscopic cellular sickling in a few seconds or less [Eaton WA, Hofrichter J (1990) Adv Protein Chem 40:63–279], and macroscopic vessel occlusion over a time scale of minutes, the last of which is necessary for a crisis [Bunn HF (1997) N Engl J Med 337:762–769]. Using a minimal but robust artificial microfluidic environment, we show that it is possible to evoke, control, and inhibit the collective vasoocclusive or jamming event in sickle cell disease. We use a combination of geometric, physical, chemical, and biological means to quantify the phase space for the onset of a jamming event, as well as its dissolution, and find that oxygen-dependent sickle hemoglobin polymerization and melting alone are sufficient to recreate jamming and rescue. We further show that a key source of the heterogeneity in occlusion arises from the slow collective jamming of a confined, flowing suspension of soft cells that change their morphology and rheology relatively quickly. Finally, we quantify and investigate the effects of small-molecule inhibitors of polymerization and therapeutic red blood cell exchange on this dynamical process. Our experimental study integrates the dynamics of collective processes associated with occlusion at the molecular, polymer, cellular, and tissue level; lays the foundation for a quantitative understanding of the rate-limiting processes; and provides a potential tool for optimizing and individualizing treatment, and identifying new therapies. PMID:18077341

  13. Morphological and functional platelet abnormalities in Berkeley sickle cell mice.

    PubMed

    Shet, Arun S; Hoffmann, Thomas J; Jirouskova, Marketa; Janczak, Christin A; Stevens, Jacqueline R M; Adamson, Adewole; Mohandas, Narla; Manci, Elizabeth A; Cynober, Therese; Coller, Barry S

    2008-01-01

    Berkeley sickle cell mice are used as animal models of human sickle cell disease but there are no reports of platelet studies in this model. Since humans with sickle cell disease have platelet abnormalities, we studied platelet morphology and function in Berkeley mice (SS). We observed elevated mean platelet forward angle light scatter (FSC) values (an indirect measure of platelet volume) in SS compared to wild type (WT) (37+/-3.2 vs. 27+/-1.4, mean+/-SD; p<0.001), in association with moderate thrombocytopenia (505+/-49 x 10(3)/microl vs. 1151+/-162 x 10(3)/microl; p<0.001). Despite having marked splenomegaly, SS mice had elevated levels of Howell-Jolly bodies and "pocked" erythrocytes (p<0.001 for both) suggesting splenic dysfunction. SS mice also had elevated numbers of thiazole orange positive platelets (5+/-1% vs. 1+/-1%; p<0.001), normal to low plasma thrombopoietin levels, normal plasma glycocalicin levels, normal levels of platelet recovery, and near normal platelet life spans. Platelets from SS mice bound more fibrinogen and antibody to P-selectin following activation with a threshold concentration of a protease activated receptor (PAR)-4 peptide compared to WT mice. Enlarged platelets are associated with a predisposition to arterial thrombosis in humans and some humans with SCD have been reported to have large platelets. Thus, additional studies are needed to assess whether large platelets contribute either to pulmonary hypertension or the large vessel arterial occlusion that produces stroke in some children with sickle cell disease.

  14. Prevalence of Sickle Cell Trait in the Southern Suburb of Beirut, Lebanon

    PubMed Central

    El Ariss, Abdel Badih; Younes, Mohamad; Matar, Jad; Berjaoui, Zeina

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence, gender differences, and time trends of Sickle Cell Trait in the Southern Suburb of Beirut, Lebanon, as well as to highlight the importance of screening for Sickle Cell Trait carriers in this population. Another objective was to describe a new screening technique for Sickle Cell Trait carriers. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study carried out at a private laboratory in the Southern Suburb of Beirut, Lebanon between 2002 and 2014. The sickling test was carried out for each patient using two methods: the classical “sodium metabisulfite sickling test”, and the new “sickling test method” used in the private lab. As a confirmatory test, hemoglobin electrophoresis was run on a random sample of 223 cases which were found to be positive using the two sickling tests. Results A total of 899 cases were found to be positive for the sickle cell trait out of 184,105 subjects screened during the 12-year period, prevalence = 0.49% (95% CI: 0.46 – 0.52). Among the total sample, females were found to have higher prevalence, where no time trend over the studied period was noted. The haemoglobin electrophoresis method confirmed the results of this new sickling test technique among the random sample of the 223 cases. Conclusion We found that the prevalence of sickle cell trait is lower as compared to other Arab countries, higher in females, with no significant time trend. The sickle cell test was found to be an accurate, simple and cheap test that could be easily added as a requirement for the pre-marital testing to screen for Sickle Cell Trait carriers. PMID:26977274

  15. Sickle cell anemia with moyamoya disease: outcomes after EDAS procedure.

    PubMed

    Fryer, Robert H; Anderson, Richard C; Chiriboga, Claudia A; Feldstein, Neil A

    2003-08-01

    Moyamoya disease is a relatively uncommon neurovascular complication of sickle cell anemia. We report a case series of six patients with sickle cell anemia who developed moyamoya disease and underwent encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis procedures. These six patients presented with either cerebrovascular accidents, transient ischemic attacks, or seizures, and subsequent magnetic resonance imaging scans were suggestive of moyamoya-like changes in the cerebral vasculature. Conventional cerebral angiography was used to confirm the diagnosis in all six patients. Four of six patients manifested a cerebrovascular accident before surgery, and two of these patients were compliant on a transfusion protocol at the time of their cerebrovascular accident. Bilateral (n = 4) or unilateral (n = 2) encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis procedures were performed without any complications. The patient who was stroke-free preoperatively had a cerebrovascular accident 2 weeks after the procedure; otherwise, all patients have remained free of neurovascular complications with an average follow-up of 33 months. Collateral anastomoses between external and internal carotid arteries were established by magnetic resonance angiography in three patients. The encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis procedure is a safe and effective treatment option in patients with sickle cell anemia who develop moyamoya disease.

  16. Radiographic predictors of neurocognitive functioning in pediatric Sickle Cell disease.

    PubMed

    Kral, Mary C; Brown, Ronald T; Connelly, Mark; Curé, Joel K; Besenski, Nada; Jackson, Sherron M; Abboud, Miguel R

    2006-01-01

    We compared magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic resonance angiography, and transcranial Doppler ultrasonography as predictors of specific neurocognitive functions in children with sickle cell disease. Participants were 27 children with sickle cell anemia (hemoglobin SS) who were participants in the Stroke Prevention Trial in Sickle Cell Anemia (STOP) and had no documented history of stroke. Children's MRIs were classified as normal or silent infarct, and their magnetic resonance angiograms were classified as normal or abnormal. The highest time-averaged mean flow velocity on transcranial Doppler ultrasonographic examination of the major cerebral arteries was analyzed. Age and hematocrit also were analyzed as predictor variables. The battery of neurocognitive tests included measures of intellectual functioning, academic achievement, attention, memory, visual-motor integration, and executive functions. MRI, magnetic resonance angiography, transcranial Doppler ultrasonography, age, and hematocrit were analyzed as predictors of participants' performance on the various measures of neurocognitive functioning. Age and hematocrit were robust predictors of a number of global and specific neurocognitive functions. When age and hematocrit were controlled, transcranial Doppler ultrasonography was a significantly unique predictor of verbal memory. We found an association between low hemoglobin and neurocognitive impairment. We also found that abnormalities on transcranial Doppler ultrasonography can herald subtle neurocognitive deficits. (J Child Neurol 2006;21:37-44).

  17. Normal sublingual microcirculation during painful crisis in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    van Beers, Eduard J; Goedhart, Peter T; Unger, Michiel; Biemond, Bart J; Ince, Can

    2008-05-01

    Obstruction of the microcirculation is the most important cause of painful crisis in sickle cell disease (SCD). Extensive microvascular obstruction has been observed in mouse models of SCD. A technique to determine the extent of the microcirculatory obstructions in humans may be helpful in the clinical setting and for research purposes. Therefore, we measured sublingual microcirculation longitudinally in patients with SCD admitted with painful crisis. Sublingual microcirculation was recorded with side-stream darkfield (SDF) imaging and semi-quantified with a microvascular flow index (MFI) on a range from 0 to 4 (arbitrary units; from 0 (no flow) to 4 (hyperdynamic flow)). Thirteen consecutive adult sickle cell patients admitted with painful crises were included and provided 47 measurements of MFI in 14 episodes of painful crisis. Seven patients provided baseline measurements and seven healthy controls were studied. The mean (+/-standard error of the mean) MFI during painful crisis was 2.6+/-0.1 and did not change during the painful crisis. The mean MFI of patients with SCD during steady state (2.7+/-0.1) and the mean MFI of the controls (2.7+/-0.1) were not different from the mean MFI during painful crisis. During painful crisis irregular microvascular perfusion, expressed by the distribution width of the microvascular blood flow velocity, correlated negatively (r=-0.484; P=0.002) with hemoglobin concentration. We conclude that sublingual microcirculatory blood flow velocity is not disturbed in sickle cell patients during painful crisis.

  18. Utility of Iron Staining in Identifying the Cause of Renal Allograft Dysfunction in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yingchun; Khan, Salman; Li, Wei; Zhang, Ping L.

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell nephropathy (SCN) is associated with iron/heme deposition in proximal renal tubules and related acute tubular injury (ATI). Here we report the utility of iron staining in differentiating causes of renal allograft dysfunction in patients with a history of sickle cell disease. Case 1: the patient developed acute allograft dysfunction two years after renal transplant. Her renal biopsy showed ATI, supported by patchy loss of brush border and positive staining of kidney injury molecule-1 in proximal tubular epithelial cells, where diffuse increase in iron staining (2+) was present. This indicated that ATI likely resulted from iron/heme toxicity to proximal tubules. Electron microscope confirmed aggregated sickle RBCs in glomeruli, indicating a recurrent SCN. Case 2: four years after renal transplant, the patient developed acute allograft dysfunction and became positive for serum donor-specific antibody. His renal biopsy revealed thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) and diffuse positive C4d stain in peritubular capillaries. Iron staining was negative in the renal tubules, implying that TMA was likely associated with acute antibody-mediated rejection (AAMR, type 2) rather than recurrent SCN. These case reports imply that iron staining is an inexpensive but effective method in distinguishing SCN-associated renal injury in allograft kidney from other etiologies. PMID:26697257

  19. Altered heme-mediated modulation of dendritic cell function in sickle cell alloimmunization

    PubMed Central

    Godefroy, Emmanuelle; Liu, Yunfeng; Shi, Patricia; Mitchell, W. Beau; Cohen, Devin; Chou, Stella T.; Manwani, Deepa; Yazdanbakhsh, Karina

    2016-01-01

    Transfusions are the main treatment for patients with sickle cell disease. However, alloimmunization remains a major life-threatening complication for these patients, but the mechanism underlying pathogenesis of alloimmunization is not known. Given the chronic hemolytic state characteristic of sickle cell disease, resulting in release of free heme and activation of inflammatory cascades, we tested the hypothesis that anti-inflammatory response to heme is compromised in alloimmunized sickle patients, increasing their risk of alloimmunization. Heme-exposed monocyte-derived dendritic cells from both non-alloimmunized sickle patients and healthy donors inhibited priming of pro-inflammatory CD4+ type 1 T cells, and exhibited significantly reduced levels of the maturation marker CD83. In contrast, in alloimmunized patients, heme did not reverse priming of pro-inflammatory CD4+ cells by monocyte-derived dendritic cells or their maturation. Furthermore, heme dampened NF-κB activation in non-alloimmunized, but not in alloimmunized monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Heme-mediated CD83 inhibition depended on Toll-like receptor 4 but not heme oxygenase 1. These data suggest that extracellular heme limits CD83 expression on dendritic cells in non-alloimmunized sickle patients through a Toll-like receptor 4-mediated pathway, involving NF-κB, resulting in dampening of pro-inflammatory responses, but that in alloimmunized patients this pathway is defective. This opens up the possibility of developing new therapeutic strategies to prevent sickle cell alloimmunization. PMID:27229712

  20. [Sickle cell anemia causes varied symptoms and high morbidity. Serious prognosis in the most common genetic disease in the world].

    PubMed

    Kjellander, Christian; Sennström, Maria K B; Stiller, Viveka; Ågren, Anna

    2015-03-03

    Sickle cell anemia is a life-threatening disease, and the most common genetic disease in the world. The prevalence of sickle cell anemia in Sweden is unknown. Sickle cell anemia is an important disease, because of its variable complications, in many medical and surgical specialties. The overview highlights common medical problems encountered in sickle cell anemia presented through a case report of a pregnant woman.

  1. Sickle cell trait diagnosis: clinical and social implications

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Rakhi P.; Haywood, Carlton

    2015-01-01

    The sickle hemoglobin (HbS) point mutation has independently undergone evolutionary selection at least five times in the world because of its overwhelming malarial protective effects in the heterozygous state. In 1949, homozygous Hb S or sickle cell disease (SCD) became the first inherited condition identified at the molecular level; however, since then, both SCD and heterozygous Hb S, sickle cell trait (SCT), have endured a long and complicated history. Hasty adoption of early mass screening programs for SCD, recent implementation of targeted screening mandates for SCT in athletics, and concerns about stigmatization have evoked considerable controversy regarding research and policy decisions for SCT. Although SCT is a largely protective condition in the context of malaria, clinical sequelae, such as exercise-related injury, renal complications, and venous thromboembolism can occur in affected carriers. The historical background of SCD and SCT has provided lessons about how research should be conducted in the modern era to minimize stigmatization, optimize study conclusions, and inform genetic counseling and policy decisions for SCT. PMID:26637716

  2. Light scattering from Sickle Cell Hemoglobin: Polarized and Unpolarized

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kejing; Hantgan, Roy R.; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.

    1999-11-01

    Sickle cell polymers form due to aggregation of a mutant form of hemoglobin (HbS). The polymerization of HbS leads to microvascular occlusion characteristic of Sickle Cell Disease. A good understanding of HbS polymerization requires a way to quantify the degree of polymerization. As our calculations show, total intensity light scattering is not always linearly dependent on the amount of polymer. Polarized light scattering has been proposed as a more accurate way to measure polymer content. We use a new modulation method to measure all 16 Mueller Matrix elements, which completely describe how the Polarization State of light is altered upon scattering. Preliminary results of light scattering measurements from spheres and hemoglobin show that the instrument works properly. In future experiments, we will attempt to use polarized light scattering as an accurate measure of polymerization. In addition, Polarized light scattering may provide information on the higher order structure of sickle polymer bundles that has not been obtainable by other means.

  3. Mechanism of vaso-occlusion in sickle cell anemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Huan; Karniadakis, George

    2012-11-01

    Vaso-occlusion crisis is one of the key hallmark of sickle cell anemia. While early studies suggested that the crisis is caused by blockage of a single elongated cell, recent experimental investigations indicate that vaso-occlusion is a complex process triggered by adhesive interactions among different cell groups in multiple stages. Based on dissipative particle dynamics, a multi-scale model for the sickle red blood cells (SS-RBCs), accounting for diversity in both shapes and cell rigidities, is developed to investigate the mechanism of vaso-occlusion crisis. Using this model, the adhesive dynamics of single SS-RBC was investigated in arterioles. Simulation results indicate that the different cell groups (deformable SS2 RBCs, rigid SS4 RBCs, leukocytes, etc.) exhibit heterogeneous adhesive behavior due to the different cell morphologies and membrane rigidities. We further simulate the tube flow of SS-RBC suspensions with different cell fractions. The more adhesive SS2 cells interact with the vascular endothelium and further trap rigid SS4 cells, resulting in vaso-occlusion in vessels less than 15 μm . Under inflammation, adherent leukocytes may also trap SS4 cells, resulting in vaso-occlusion in even larger vessels. This work was supported by the NSF grant CBET-0852948 and the NIH grant R01HL094270.

  4. Effects of oxidative stress on red blood cell rheology in sickle cell patients.

    PubMed

    Hierso, Régine; Waltz, Xavier; Mora, Pierre; Romana, Marc; Lemonne, Nathalie; Connes, Philippe; Hardy-Dessources, Marie-Dominique

    2014-08-01

    Sickle cell anaemia (SS) and sickle cell-haemoglobin C disease (SC) patients exhibit severe red blood cell (RBC) rheological alterations involved in the development of several complications. The contribution of oxidative stress in these haemorheological abnormalities is still unknown. We compared RBC reactive oxygen species (ROS) and glutathione (GSH) content, and the haemorheological profile of SS (n = 11), SC (n = 11) and healthy subjects (n = 12) at baseline and after in-vitro treatment with t-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP). We showed: (i) higher RBC ROS content in SS and SC patients, with the highest level observed in SS patients; (ii) lower RBC GSH content in sickle syndrome patients, especially in SS patients; (iii) TBHP increased RBC ROS production and decreased RBC GSH content in all groups; (iv) TBHP decreased RBC aggregation and increased the strength of RBC aggregates in all groups but the increase in RBC aggregates strength was greater in sickle cell patients; (v) TBHP decreased RBC deformability in the three groups but with a higher magnitude in sickle cell patients. These data suggest that RBCs from sickle cell patients have an exaggerated response to oxidative stress, which is accompanied by a profound abnormal haemorheological profile, with greater alterations in SS than in SC patients.

  5. A Review of the Literature: Use of the Health Belief Model in Sickle Cell Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo-Gamble, Tilicia L.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with sickle cell disease experience a life-time of morbidity as well as a decreased lifespan. Since African Americans are disproportionately affected by the disease, sickle cell contributes to growing health disparities within this population. Thus, addressing issues related to the disease presents an increased need for health…

  6. "Untangling Sickle-Cell Anemia and the Teaching of Heterozygote Protection"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Eric Michael

    2007-01-01

    Introductory biology textbooks often use the example of sickle-cell anemia to illustrate the concept of heterozygote protection. Ordinarily scientists expect the frequency of a gene associated with a debilitating illness would be low owing to its continual elimination by natural selection. The gene that causes sickle-cell anemia, however, has a…

  7. Newborn screening for sickle cell disease in Jamaica: logistics and experience with umbilical cord samples.

    PubMed

    Serjeant, G R; Serjeant, B E; Mason, K P; Gardner, R; Warren, L; Gibson, F; Coombs, M

    2017-01-01

    The study aims to describe the logistics and results of a programme for newborn screening for sickle cell disease based on samples from the umbilical cord. Samples were dried on Guthrie cards and analysed by high pressure liquid chromatography. All suspected clinically significant abnormal genotypes were confirmed by age 4-6 weeks with family studies and then recruited to local sickle cell clinics. The programme has screened 66,833 samples with the sickle cell trait in 9.8 % and the HbC trait in 3.8 %. Sickle cell syndromes occurred in 407 babies (204 SS, 148 SC, 35 Sbeta(+) thalassaemia, 6 Sbeta(o) thalassaemia, 6 sickle cell-variants, 8 sickle cell-hereditary persistence of fetal haemoglobin) and HbC syndromes in 42 (22 CC, 14 Cbeta(+) thalassaemia, 1 Cbeta(o) thalassaemia, 5 HbC- hereditary persistence of fetal haemoglobin). Focusing on the year 2015, screening was performed in 15,408, compliance with sample collection was 98.1 %, and maternal contamination occurred in 335 (2.6 %) but in only 0.05 % did diagnostic confusion require patient recall and further tests. This model of newborn screening for sickle cell disease is accurate, robust and economic. It is hoped that it may be helpful for other societies with high prevalence of abnormal haemoglobins and limited resources, who are planning to embark on newborn screening for sickle cell disease.

  8. Comparison of Emergency Department Wait Times in Adults with Sickle Cell Disease Versus Other Painful Etiologies.

    PubMed

    Pulte, Dianne; Lovett, Paris B; Axelrod, David; Crawford, Albert; McAna, John; Powell, Rhea

    2016-09-01

    Sickle cell disease is characterized by intermittent painful crises often requiring treatment in the emergency department (ED). Past examinations of time-to-provider (TTP) in the ED for patients with sickle cell disease demonstrated that these patients may have longer TTP than other patients. Here, we examine TTP for patients presenting for emergency care at a single institution, comparing patients with sickle cell disease to both the general population and to those with other painful conditions, with examination of both institutional and patient factors that might affect wait times. Our data demonstrated that at our institution patients with sickle cell disease have a slightly longer average TTP compared to the general ED population (+16 min.) and to patients with other painful conditions (+4 min.) However, when confounding factors were considered, there was no longer a significant difference between TTP of patients with sickle cell disease and the general population nor between patients with sickle cell disease and those with other painful conditions. Multivariate analyses demonstrated that gender, race, age, high utilizer status, fast track use, time of presentation, acuity and insurance type, were all independently associated with TTP, with acuity, time of presentation and use of fast track having the greatest influence. We concluded that the longer TTP observed in patients with sickle cell disease can at least partially be explained by institutional factors such as the use of fast track protocols. Further work to reduce TTP for sickle cell disease and other patients is needed to optimize care.

  9. Understanding the mechanisms of sickle cell disease by simulations with a discrete particle model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Katrina; Lin, Guang; Pan, Wenxiao

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited blood disorder characterized by rigid, sickle-shaped red blood cells (RBCs). Because of their rigidity and shape, sickle cells can get stuck in smaller blood vessels, causing blockages and depriving oxygen to tissues. This study develops and applies mathematical models to better understand the mechanism of SCD. Two-dimensional models of RBCs and blood vessels have been constructed by representing them as discrete particles interacting with different forces. The nonlinear, elastic property of healthy RBCs could be adequately reproduced using a cosine angle bending force and a worm-like chain spring force. With the ability to deform, RBCs can squeeze through narrow blood vessels. In modeling sickle cells as rigid bodies and applying repelling and friction forces from the blood vessel, this study shows that geometrical factors (dimensions of the sickle cell and blood vessels) as well as rigidity and adhesiveness of the sickle cell all play an important role in determining how, and if, sickle cells become trapped within narrow blood capillaries. With lack of data to validate the model, this study primarily provides a sensitivity analysis of factors influencing sickle cell occlusion and identified critical data to support future modeling.

  10. A Group Counseling Approach for Persons Who Work With Sickle Cell Anemia Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvin, Richmond

    Although many workshops on sickle cell anemia have been held, it is still difficult to implement a comprehensive training program for sickle cell anemia clients in many communities. Research data on the topic are somewhat nebulous and insufficient political and social pressure have been exerted to change attitudes and take action towards the…

  11. Current Sickle Cell Screening Program for Newborns in New York City, 1979-1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grover, Ranjeet; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Screening tests indicated that 141 out of 106,565 infants examined in New York City during 1979-80, had various forms of sickle cell anemia. Follow-up of 131 patients confirmed the original diagnoses, suggesting that the New York City Follow-up Program for Sickle Cell Screening of newborns was successful. (Author/MJL)

  12. Children with Sickle-Cell Anemia: Parental Relations, Parent-Child Relations, and Child Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Robert C.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Investigated the influence of a child with sickle-cell anemia on parental affiliation, parent-child relationships, and parents' perception of their child's behavior. In the sickle-cell group, parents' interpersonal relationship suffered; parent-child relationship and child behavior correlated significantly; and single-parent families estimated…

  13. Advanced sickle cell associated interstitial lung disease presenting with cor pulmonale in a Nigerian.

    PubMed

    Fawibe, Ademola Emmanuel; Kolo, Philip Manman; Ogunmodede, James Ayodele; Desalu, Olufemi Olumuyiwa; Salami, Kazeem Alakija

    2012-04-01

    Previous studies have reported abnormal pulmonary function and pulmonary hypertension among Nigerians with sickle cell disease, but there is no report of interstitial lung disease among them. We report a Nigerian sickle cell patient who presented with computed tomography proven interstitial lung disease complicated by pulmonary hypertension and cor pulmonale.

  14. Aging in Sickle Cell Disease: Co-morbidities and New Issues in Management.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Manpreet K; Cohen, Alice

    2015-01-01

    Availability of hydroxyurea (HU) coupled with early therapeutic interventions has increased the life expectancy of patients with sickle cell disease. Hence, the sickle cell community needs to be aware of common diseases of aging that survivors are predisposed to. We chose to investigate the sickle cell disease-related complications as well as non sickle cell disease-related medical problems of aging in 45 sickle cell patients over the age of 40 years. The most frequent chronic complications of sickle cell disease were elevated tricuspid regurgitant jet velocity on echocardiogram, chronic renal disease, iron overload and leg ulcers. Medical co-morbidities in this patient group included hypertension, diabetes mellitus (DM), hypercholesterolemia and symptomatic coronary artery disease (CAD). In our cohort, only 38.0% had a primary care doctor. Only 11.0% over age 50 had a screening colonoscopy, and of the women, 42.0% had a screening mammography. Medical co-morbidities and lack of health maintenance in older sickle cell patients are likely to impact overall health and mortality. Aging patients with sickle cell disease may benefit from a primary medical home for age appropriate comprehensive health care.

  15. Kidney Transplant in a 26-Year-Old Nigerian Patient with Sickle Cell Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Okafor, U. H.; Wachukwu, C.; Emem-Chioma, P.; Wokoma, F. S.

    2012-01-01

    Sickle cell nephropathy (SCN) is a common complication of sickle cell disease (SCD). It has variable presentation, ranging from hyposthenuria to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Management of ESRD in SCD patients is froth with multiple challenges which has potential to impact negatively the outcome of the patient. Kidney transplant is the preferred renal replacement therapy in these patients. The objective of this case study is to report kidney transplant in a Nigerian young man with sickle cell nephropathy and to highlight the outcome and the challenges to kidney transplant in this patient. The index case is a 26-years-old sickle cell disease patient with ESRD complicated with cardiovascular, pulmonary, immunological, and infective challenges. These conditions were controlled, and the patient had a successful live-related kidney transplant. Kidney transplant is a viable option for sickle cell disease patients with ESRD. PMID:24555134

  16. NEGATIVE EPISTASIS BETWEEN α+ THALASSAEMIA AND SICKLE CELL TRAIT CAN EXPLAIN INTERPOPULATION VARIATION IN SOUTH ASIA

    PubMed Central

    Penman, Bridget S; Habib, Saman; Kanchan, Kanika; Gupta, Sunetra; Read, A

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies in Kenya and Ghana have shown that individuals who inherit two malaria-protective genetic disorders of haemoglobin—α+ thalassaemia and sickle cell trait—experience a much lower level of malaria protection than those who inherit sickle cell trait alone. We have previously demonstrated that this can limit the frequency of α+ thalassaemia in a population in which sickle cell is present, which may account for the frequency of α+ thalassaemia in sub-Saharan Africa not exceeding 50%. Here we consider the relationship between α+ thalassaemia and sickle cell in South Asian populations, and show that very high levels of α+ thalassaemia combined with varying levels of malaria selection can explain why sickle cell has penetrated certain South Asian populations but not others. PMID:22133230

  17. Proposed low-cost premarital screening program for prevention of sickle cell and thalassemia in Yemen.

    PubMed

    Al-Nood, Hafiz; Al-Hadi, Abdulrahman

    2013-01-01

    In Yemen, the prevalence of sickle cell trait and β-thalassemia trait are high. The aim of this premarital program is to identify sickle cell and thalassemia carrier couples in Yemen before completing marriages proposal, in order to prevent affected birth. This can be achieved by applying a low-cost premarital screening program using simple blood tests compatible with the limited health resources of the country. If microcytosis or positive sickle cell is found in both or one partner has microcytosis and the other has positive sickle cell, so their children at high risk of having sickle cell or/and thalassemia diseases. Carrier couples will be referred to genetic counseling. The outcomes of this preventive program are predicted to decrease the incidence of affected birth and reduce the health burden of these disorders. The success of this program also requires governmental, educational and religious supports.

  18. Blood transfusion for preventing primary and secondary stroke in people with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Estcourt, Lise J; Fortin, Patricia M; Hopewell, Sally; Trivella, Marialena; Wang, Winfred C

    2017-01-17

    hydroxyurea (hydroxycarbamide) and phlebotomy to long-term transfusions and iron chelation therapy: one in primary prevention (children); and one in secondary prevention (children and adolescents).The quality of the evidence was very low to moderate across different outcomes according to GRADE methodology. This was due to the trials being at a high risk of bias due to lack of blinding, indirectness and imprecise outcome estimates. Red cell transfusions versus standard care Children with no previous long-term transfusionsLong-term transfusions probably reduce the incidence of clinical stroke in children with a higher risk of stroke (abnormal transcranial doppler velocities or previous history of silent cerebral infarct), risk ratio 0.12 (95% confidence interval 0.03 to 0.49) (two trials, 326 participants), moderate quality evidence.Long-term transfusions may: reduce the incidence of other sickle cell disease-related complications (acute chest syndrome, risk ratio 0.24 (95% confidence interval 0.12 to 0.48)) (two trials, 326 participants); increase quality of life (difference estimate -0.54, 95% confidence interval -0.92 to -0.17) (one trial, 166 participants); but make little or no difference to IQ scores (least square mean: 1.7, standard error 95% confidence interval -1.1 to 4.4) (one trial, 166 participants), low quality evidence.We are very uncertain whether long-term transfusions: reduce the risk of transient ischaemic attacks, Peto odds ratio 0.13 (95% confidence interval 0.01 to 2.11) (two trials, 323 participants); have any effect on all-cause mortality, no deaths reported (two trials, 326 participants); or increase the risk of alloimmunisation, risk ratio 3.16 (95% confidence interval 0.18 to 57.17) (one trial, 121 participants), very low quality evidence. Children and adolescents with previous long-term transfusions (one trial, 79 participants)We are very uncertain whether continuing long-term transfusions reduces the incidence of: stroke, risk ratio 0.22 (95

  19. Blood transfusion for preventing primary and secondary stroke in people with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Estcourt, Lise J; Fortin, Patricia M; Hopewell, Sally; Trivella, Marialena; Wang, Winfred C

    2017-01-01

    hydroxyurea (hydroxycarbamide) and phlebotomy to long-term transfusions and iron chelation therapy: one in primary prevention (children); and one in secondary prevention (children and adolescents). The quality of the evidence was very low to moderate across different outcomes according to GRADE methodology. This was due to the trials being at a high risk of bias due to lack of blinding, indirectness and imprecise outcome estimates. Red cell transfusions versus standard care Children with no previous long-term transfusions Long-term transfusions probably reduce the incidence of clinical stroke in children with a higher risk of stroke (abnormal transcranial doppler velocities or previous history of silent cerebral infarct), risk ratio 0.12 (95% confidence interval 0.03 to 0.49) (two trials, 326 participants), moderate quality evidence. Long-term transfusions may: reduce the incidence of other sickle cell disease-related complications (acute chest syndrome, risk ratio 0.24 (95% confidence interval 0.12 to 0.48)) (two trials, 326 participants); increase quality of life (difference estimate -0.54, 95% confidence interval -0.92 to -0.17) (one trial, 166 participants); but make little or no difference to IQ scores (least square mean: 1.7, standard error 95% confidence interval -1.1 to 4.4) (one trial, 166 participants), low quality evidence. We are very uncertain whether long-term transfusions: reduce the risk of transient ischaemic attacks, Peto odds ratio 0.13 (95% confidence interval 0.01 to 2.11) (two trials, 323 participants); have any effect on all-cause mortality, no deaths reported (two trials, 326 participants); or increase the risk of alloimmunisation, risk ratio 3.16 (95% confidence interval 0.18 to 57.17) (one trial, 121 participants), very low quality evidence. Children and adolescents with previous long-term transfusions (one trial, 79 participants) We are very uncertain whether continuing long-term transfusions reduces the incidence of: stroke, risk ratio 0.22 (95

  20. Modeling sickle cell vasoocculsion in the rat leg: Quantification of trapped sickle cells and correlation with sup 31 P metabolic and sup 1 H magnetic resonance imaging changes

    SciTech Connect

    Fabry, M.E.; Rajanayagam, V.; Fine, E.; Holland, S.; Gore, J.C.; Nagel, R.L.; Kaul, D.K. )

    1989-05-01

    The authors have developed an animal model to elucidate the acute effects of perfusion abnormalities on muscle metabolism induced by different density-defined classes of erythrocytes isolated from sickle cell anemia patients. Technetium-99m ({sup 99m}Tc)-labeled, saline-washed normal (AA), homozygous sickle (SS), or high-density SS (SS4) erythrocytes were injected into the femoral artery of the rat and quantitative {sup 99m}Tc imaging, {sup 31}P magnetic resonance spectroscopy by surface coil at 2 teslas, and {sup 1}H magnetic resonance imaging at 0.15 tesla were performed. Between 5 and 25 {mu}l of SS4 cells was trapped in the microcirculation of the thigh. In contrast, fewer SS discocytes (SS2) or AA cells were trapped. After injection of SS4 cells an initial increase in inorganic phosphate was observed in the region of the thigh served by the femoral artery, intracellular pH decreased, and subsequently the proton relaxation time T{sub 1} reached a broad maximum at 18-28 hr. When T{sub 1} obtained at this time was plotted against the volume of cells trapped, an increase of T{sub 1} over the control value of 411 {plus minus} 48 msec was found that was proportional to the number of cells trapped. They conclude that the densest SS cells are most effective at producing vasoocclusion. The extent of the change detected by {sup 1}H magnetic resonance imaging is dependent on the amount of cells trapped in the microcirculation and the magnitude of the initial increase of inorganic phosphate.

  1. Umbilical cord blood transplantation for children with thalassemia and sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, Annalisa; Eapen, Mary; Scaravadou, Andromachi; Cairo, Mitchell S; Bhatia, Monica; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Wingard, John R; Fasth, Anders; Lo Nigro, Luca; Ayas, Mouhab; Purtill, Duncan; Boudjedir, Karim; Chaves, Wagnara; Walters, Mark C; Wagner, John; Gluckman, Eliane; Rocha, Vanderson

    2011-09-01

    We examined the efficacy of unrelated cord blood (CB) transplantation in children with thalassemia (n = 35) and sickle cell disease (n = 16), using data reported to 3 registries. Donor-recipient pairs were matched at HLA-A and -B (antigen level) and DRB1 (allele level) in 7 or HLA mismatched at 1 (n = 18), 2 (n = 25), or 3 loci (n = 1). Transplant conditioning was myeloablative (n = 39) or reduced intensity (n = 12). Neutrophil recovery with donor chimerism was documented in 24 patients; 11 patients developed grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) and 10 patients, chronic GVHD (cGVHD). Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were 62% and 21% for thalassemia and 94% and 50% for sickle cell disease (SCD), respectively. In multivariate analysis, engraftment rate (hazard ratio [HR] 2.2, P = .05) and DFS (HR 0.4, P = .01) were higher with cell dose >5 × 10(7)/kg. The 2-year probability of DFS was 45% in patients who received grafts with cell dose >5 × 10(7)/kg and 13% with lower cell dose. Primary graft failure was the predominant cause of treatment failure occurring in 20 patients with thalassemia and 7 patients with SCD. Primary graft failure was fatal in 5 patients with thalassemia. These results suggest that only CB units containing an expected infused cell dose >5 × 10(7)/kg should be considered for transplantation for hemoglobinopathy.

  2. Sickle cell anemia: targeting the role of fetal hemoglobin in therapy.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Emma; Inusa, Baba

    2007-06-01

    Sickle cell anemia results from the single amino acid substitution of valine for glutamic acid in the beta-chain owing to a nucleotide defect that causes the production of abnormal beta-chains in hemoglobin S. Abnormal hemoglobin chains form polymers in the deoxygenated state, leading to the characteristic sickle cells. The polymerization of deoxygenated hemoglobin S accounts for the pathologic changes in sickle cell disease. The main-stay of therapy in sickle cell disease aims to reduce the amount of sickled hemoglobin present through the prevention of polymerization and reversal of this process. One way of discouraging polymerization is to increase the level of fetal hemoglobin, which because of its high oxygen affinity, does not participate in the polymerization process. Fetal hemoglobin production may be induced pharmacologically or by the use of gene therapy and genetic engineering techniques.

  3. Sickle cell anaemia and the consequences on the anaesthetic management of cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Mennes, I; Van de Velde, M; Missant, C

    2012-01-01

    A review of the available literature on genetics and pathophysiology of Sickle Cell Anaemia was performed with special emphasis on the intraoperative management during cardiac surgery. Hypoxia, acidosis and hypothermia have been identified as independent sickling provoking factors. Although no official guidelines on transfusion for Sickle Cell patients have been published, useful directives on preoperative transfusion could be derived from available data. Additionally, we bundled and reviewed the published expertise in the management of cardiopulmonary bypass and the necessity of hypothermia during cardiac surgery in Sickle Cell patients. Our conclusion is that the available data in case reports and case series on cardiac surgery in case of Sickle Cell Anaemia suggest a necessary preoperative or on bypass blood transfusion to guarantee an uncomplicated course of cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermia.

  4. A novel inflammatory role for platelets in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Davila, Jennifer; Manwani, Deepa; Vasovic, Ljiljana; Avanzi, Mauro; Uehlinger, Joan; Ireland, Karen; Mitchell, W Beau

    2015-01-01

    The severe pain, ischemia and organ damage that characterizes sickle cell disease (SCD) is caused by vaso-occlusion, which is the blockage of blood vessels by heterotypic aggregates of sickled erythrocytes and other cells. Vaso-occlusion is also a vasculopathy involving endothelial cell dysfunction, leukocyte activation, platelet activation and chronic inflammation resulting in the multiple adhesive interactions between cellular elements. Since platelets mediate inflammation as well as thrombosis via release of pro- and anti-inflammatory molecules, we hypothesized that platelets may play an active inflammatory role in SCD by secreting increased amounts of cytokines. Since platelets have been shown to contain mRNA and actively produce proteins, we also hypothesized that SCD platelets may contain increased cytokine mRNA. In this cross-sectional study, we sought to compare both the quantity of cytokines secreted and the cytokine mRNA content, between SCD and control platelets. We measured the secretion of Th1, Th2, and Th17-related cytokines from platelets in a cohort of SCD patients. We simultaneously measured platelet mRNA levels of those cytokines. Platelets from SCD patients secreted increased quantities of IL-1β, sCD40L, and IL-6 compared to controls. Secretion was increased in patients with alloantibodies. Additionally, mRNA of those cytokines was increased in SCD platelets. Platelets from sickle cell patients secrete increased amounts of inflammatory cytokines, and contain increased cytokine mRNA. These findings suggest a novel immunological role for platelets in SCD vasculopathy, in addition to their thrombotic role, and strengthen the rationale for the use of anti-platelet therapy in SCD.

  5. Dynamic quantitative microscopy and nanoscopy of red blood cells in sickle cell disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaked, Natan T.; Satterwhite, Lisa L.; Telen, Marilyn J.; Truskey, George A.; Wax, Adam

    2012-03-01

    We have applied wide-field digital interferometric techniques to quantitatively image sickle red blood cells (RBCs) [1] in a noncontact label-free manner, and measure the nanometer-scale fluctuations in their thickness as an indication of their stiffness. The technique can simultaneously measure the fluctuations for multiple spatial points on the RBC and thus yields a map describing the stiffness of each RBC in the field of view. Using this map, the local rigidity regions of the RBC are evaluated quantitatively. Since wide-field digital interferometry is a quantitative holographic imaging technique rather than one-point measurement, it can be used to simultaneously evaluate cell transverse morphology plus thickness in addition to its stiffness profile. Using this technique, we examine the morphology and dynamics of RBCs from individuals who suffer from sickle cell disease, and find that the sickle RBCs are significantly stiffer than healthy RBCs. Furthermore, we show that the technique is sensitive enough to distinguish various classes of sickle RBCs, including sickle RBCs with visibly-normal morphology, compared to the stiffer crescent-shaped sickle RBCs.

  6. Correction of sickle cell disease by homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li-Chen; Sun, Chiao-Wang; Ryan, Thomas M; Pawlik, Kevin M; Ren, Jinxiang; Townes, Tim M

    2006-08-15

    Previous studies have demonstrated that sickle cell disease (SCD) can be corrected in mouse models by transduction of hematopoietic stem cells with lentiviral vectors containing antisickling globin genes followed by transplantation of these cells into syngeneic recipients. Although self-inactivating (SIN) lentiviral vectors with or without insulator elements should provide a safe and effective treatment in humans, some concerns about insertional mutagenesis persist. An ideal correction would involve replacement of the sickle globin gene (beta(S)) with a normal copy of the gene (beta(A)). We recently derived embryonic stem (ES) cells from a novel knock-in mouse model of SCD and tested a protocol for correcting the sickle mutation by homologous recombination. In this paper, we demonstrate the replacement of the human beta(S)-globin gene with a human beta(A)-globin gene and the derivation of mice from these cells. The animals produce high levels of normal human hemoglobin (HbA) and the pathology associated with SCD is corrected. Hematologic values are restored to normal levels and organ pathology is ameliorated. These experiments provide a foundation for similar studies in human ES cells derived from sickle cell patients. Although efficient methods for production of human ES cells by somatic nuclear transfer must be developed, the data in this paper demonstrate that sickle cell disease can be corrected without the risk of insertional mutagenesis.

  7. Deoxygenation Reduces Sickle Cell Blood Flow at Arterial Oxygen Tension.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xinran; Wood, David K; Higgins, John M

    2016-06-21

    The majority of morbidity and mortality in sickle cell disease is caused by vaso-occlusion: circulatory obstruction leading to tissue ischemia and infarction. The consequences of vaso-occlusion are seen clinically throughout the vascular tree, from the relatively high-oxygen and high-velocity cerebral arteries to the relatively low-oxygen and low-velocity postcapillary venules. Prevailing models of vaso-occlusion propose mechanisms that are relevant only to regions of low oxygen and low velocity, leaving a wide gap in our understanding of the most important pathologic process in sickle cell disease. Progress toward understanding vaso-occlusion is further challenged by the complexity of the multiple processes thought to be involved, including, but not limited to 1) deoxygenation-dependent hemoglobin polymerization leading to impaired rheology, 2) endothelial and leukocyte activation, and 3) altered cellular adhesion. Here, we chose to focus exclusively on deoxygenation-dependent rheologic processes in an effort to quantify their contribution independent of the other processes that are likely involved in vivo. We take advantage of an experimental system that, to our knowledge, uniquely enables the study of pressure-driven blood flow in physiologic-sized tubes at physiologic hematocrit under controlled oxygenation conditions, while excluding the effects of endothelium, leukocyte activation, adhesion, inflammation, and coagulation. We find that deoxygenation-dependent rheologic processes are sufficient to increase apparent viscosity significantly, slowing blood flow velocity at arterial oxygen tension even without additional contributions from inflammation, adhesion, and endothelial and leukocyte activation. We quantify the changes in apparent viscosity and define a set of functional regimes of sickle cell blood flow personalized for each patient that may be important in further dissecting mechanisms of in vivo vaso-occlusion as well as in assessing risk of patient

  8. Potential therapeutic approaches for the treatment of vaso-occlusion in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Hillery, C A

    1998-03-01

    Vaso-occlusion is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in sickle cell disease. The pathogenesis of vaso-occlusion likely involves many complex steps related to both the primary event of deoxyhemoglobin S polymerization and the many resultant pathologic changes in both the sickle erythrocyte and the vascular endothelium. Several therapeutic approaches have been designed to reduce the extent of deoxyhemoglobin S polymerization. Although direct chemical inhibition of deoxyhemoglobin S polymerization has proven difficult, strategies to increase levels of fetal hemoglobin or reverse sickle erythrocyte dehydration have been more successful. Although gene therapy is actively being pursued, the ability to cure sickle cell disease is currently limited to bone marrow transplantation with its attendant toxicities and limitations. Because the pathophysiology of vaso-occlusion in sickle cell disease is complex, its treatment will likely be optimized using a multifactorial therapeutic approach.

  9. Chronic red blood cell exchange to prevent clinical complications in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Cabibbo, Sergio; Fidone, Carmelo; Garozzo, Giovanni; Antolino, Agostino; Manenti, Giovanna Oriella; Bennardello, Francesco; Licitra, Vincenzo; Calabrese, Salvatore; Costantino, Francesco; Travali, Simone; Distefano, Roberto; Bonomo, Pietro

    2005-06-01

    We tracked the results of 394 manual or automatic red blood cell exchanges done with a cell separator in 20 sickle cell patients at high risk for recurrent complications. Over an average of 6 years, none of the patients developed complications related to the procedure or to the increased blood use. It was safe and effective in preventing complications of sickle cell disease, and if done automatically, reduced iron overload. Ferritin levels also decreased in patients treated with automatic red blood cell exchange. Furthermore, using Single Donor Red Blood Cell units (SDRC) we reduced the potential exposure to transfusion transmitted infectious diseases (TTI).

  10. Subcortical and cerebellar volumetric deficits in paediatric sickle cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    Kawadler, Jamie M; Clayden, Jonathan D; Kirkham, Fenella J; Cox, Timothy C; Saunders, Dawn E; Clark, Chris A

    2013-11-01

    Sickle cell anaemia (SCA) is associated with silent cerebral infarction (SCI), affecting white and cortical grey matter, but there are few data on subcortical volumes. We analysed retrospective magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data in 26 SCA patients and 20 controls, comparing mean subcortical volumes between three groups: controls, SCA with SCI (n = 13) and SCA without visible abnormality (n = 13). Specific volumetric differences were found in the hippocampus, amygdala, pallidum, caudate, putamen, thalamus, and cerebellum. This is the first study to demonstrate subcortical volume change in SCA, with the most severe volumetric deficits occurring in children with SCI seen on MRI.

  11. [Cholecystectomy in patients with sickle-cell anemia].

    PubMed

    Jukemura, J; da Cunha, J E; Penteado, S; Montaguini, A L; Abdo, E E; Machado, M A; Machado, M C; Pinotti, H W

    1992-01-01

    The surgical treatment of cholelithiasis in patients with sickle cell anemia is rather frequently followed by the operative complications. In order to study the influence of pre-operative factors and post operative complications, 31 consecutive patients distributed in two groups has been studied. In group I, all the patients have been operated by conventional procedures with 43.75% of complications. In group II, a more appropriated technique and a better metabolic control ensured a lower morbidity (6.67%). There was no pos operative death in this series. Pre operative bilirubin levels was the only condition associated with increased pos operative morbidity.

  12. Mast cell activation contributes to sickle cell pathobiology and pain in mice.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Lucile; Vang, Derek; Nguyen, Julia; Gupta, Mihir; Luk, Kathryn; Ericson, Marna E; Simone, Donald A; Gupta, Kalpna

    2013-09-12

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is an inherited disorder associated with severe lifelong pain and significant morbidity. The mechanisms of pain in SCA remain poorly understood. We show that mast cell activation/degranulation contributes to sickle pain pathophysiology by promoting neurogenic inflammation and nociceptor activation via the release of substance P in the skin and dorsal root ganglion. Mast cell inhibition with imatinib ameliorated cytokine release from skin biopsies and led to a correlative decrease in granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and white blood cells in transgenic sickle mice. Targeting mast cells by genetic mutation or pharmacologic inhibition with imatinib ameliorates tonic hyperalgesia and prevents hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced hyperalgesia in sickle mice. Pretreatment with the mast cell stabilizer cromolyn sodium improved analgesia following low doses of morphine that were otherwise ineffective. Mast cell activation therefore underlies sickle pathophysiology leading to inflammation, vascular dysfunction, pain, and requirement for high doses of morphine. Pharmacological targeting of mast cells with imatinib may be a suitable approach to address pain and perhaps treat SCA.

  13. Chaos in an Eulerian Based Model of Sickle Cell Blood Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apori, Akwasi; Harris, Wesley

    2001-11-01

    A novel Eulerian model describing the manifestation of sickle cell blood flow in the capillaries has been formulated to study the apparently chaotic onset of sickle cell crises. This Eulerian model was based on extending previous models of sickle cell blood flow which were limited due to their Lagrangian formulation. Oxygen concentration, red blood cell velocity, cell stiffness, and plasma viscosity were modeled as system state variables. The governing equations of the system were expressed in canonical form. The non-linear coupling of velocity-viscosity and viscosity- stiffness proved to be the origin of chaos in the system. The system was solved with respect to a control parameter representing the unique rheology of the sickle cell erythrocytes. Results of chaos tests proved positive for various ranges of the control parameter. The results included con-tinuous patterns found in the Poincare section, spectral broadening of the Fourier power spectrum, and positive Lyapunov exponent values. The onset of chaos predicted by this sickle cell flow model as the control parameter was varied appeared to coincide with the change from a healthy state to a crisis state in a sickle cell patient. This finding that sickle cell crises may be caused from the well understood change of a solution from a steady state to chaotic could point to new ways in preventing and treating crises and should be validated in clinical trials.

  14. Red blood cells and thrombin generation in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Whelihan, Matthew F; Lim, Ming Y; Key, Nigel S

    2014-05-01

    The prothrombotic nature of sickle cell disease (SCD) is evidenced by the chronically elevated levels of almost all coagulation activation biomarkers, and an increased incidence of certain thrombotic events, including venous thromboembolism. Numerous studies have attempted to define the extent and elucidate the mechanism of the observed increase in thrombin generation in SCD patients in vivo. In general, these studies were performed using thrombin generation assays in platelet poor or platelet rich plasma and showed little difference in endogenous thrombin potential between the SCD cohort and healthy matched controls. In SCD, erythrocytes and monocytes have been demonstrated to exhibit procoagulant characteristics. Thus, the absence of these cellular components in standard thrombin generation assays may fail to reflect global hypercoagulability in the whole blood of patients with SCD. We were therefore surprised to see no difference in net thrombin generation in tissue factor-initiated initiated clotting of whole blood from patients with SCD. However, we are continuing to reconcile these seemingly disparate observations by slight modifications of the whole blood model that include alternative coagulation triggers and a re-examination of the net thrombin generation when the protein/protein S system is simultaneously interrogated.

  15. An analysis of the NIH-supported sickle cell disease research portfolio.

    PubMed

    Gavini, Nara; Hoots, W Keith; Mensah, George A; Hanspal, Manjit

    2015-02-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD), an inherited blood disorder is due to a single amino acid substitution on the beta chain of hemoglobin, and is characterized by anemia, severe infections, acute and chronic pain, and multi-organ damage. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is dedicated to support basic, translational and clinical science research to improve care and ultimately, to find a cure for SCD that causes such suffering. This report provides a detailed analysis of grants funded by the NIH for SCD research in Fiscal Years 2007 through 2013. During this period, the NIH supported 247 de novo grants totaling $272,210,367 that address various aspects of SCD. 83% of these funds supported research project grants investigating the following 5 scientific themes: Pathology of Sickle Red Blood Cells; Globin Gene Expression; Adhesion and Vascular Dysfunction; Neurological Complications and Organ-specific Dysfunction; and Pain Management and Intervention. The remaining 17% of total funds supported career development and training grants; Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) grants; large Center grants; and Conference grants. Further analysis showed that the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) is the largest funder of SCD research within NIH with 67% of total grants, contributing 77% of total funds; followed by the National Institute for Digestive Diseases and Kidney (NIDDK) that is funding 19% of grants, contributing 13% of total funds. The remaining 14% of grants totaling 10% of the funds were supported by all other NIH Institutes/Centers (ICs) combined. In summary, the NIH is using multiple funding mechanisms to support a sickle cell disease research agenda that is intended to advance the detection, treatment, and cure of this debilitating genetic disease.

  16. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-based stem cell mobilization in patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Cara; Peace, David; Rich, Elizabeth; Van Besien, Koen

    2008-06-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been reported to exacerbate vaso-occlusive crises in sickle cell disease. It has been recommended to avoid its use for stem cell mobilization in this population, yet autologous transplant is the standard of care and at times a life-saving treatment for patients with various hematologic malignancies such as relapsed aggressive lymphoma or multiple myeloma. We report 5 cases of patients with sickle cell disease and related hemoglobinopathies who underwent granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)-mobilization of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC). Three of them developed manageable vaso-occlusive pain symptoms requiring parenteral narcotics alone. The 2 others had no complications. These cases demonstrate that stem cell mobilization using G-CSF, although complicated and not without risk, is feasible in patients with sickle cell syndromes.

  17. Patient-specific blood rheology in sickle-cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuejin; Du, E; Lei, Huan; Tang, Yu-Hang; Dao, Ming; Suresh, Subra; Karniadakis, George Em

    2016-02-06

    Sickle-cell anaemia (SCA) is an inherited blood disorder exhibiting heterogeneous cell morphology and abnormal rheology, especially under hypoxic conditions. By using a multiscale red blood cell (RBC) model with parameters derived from patient-specific data, we present a mesoscopic computational study of the haemodynamic and rheological characteristics of blood from SCA patients with hydroxyurea (HU) treatment (on-HU) and those without HU treatment (off-HU). We determine the shear viscosity of blood in health as well as in different states of disease. Our results suggest that treatment with HU improves or worsens the rheological characteristics of blood in SCA depending on the degree of hypoxia. However, on-HU groups always have higher levels of haematocrit-to-viscosity ratio (HVR) than off-HU groups, indicating that HU can indeed improve the oxygen transport potential of blood. Our patient-specific computational simulations suggest that the HVR level, rather than the shear viscosity of sickle RBC suspensions, may be a more reliable indicator in assessing the response to HU treatment.

  18. BOLD delay times using group delay in sickle cell disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coloigner, Julie; Vu, Chau; Bush, Adam; Borzage, Matt; Rajagopalan, Vidya; Lepore, Natasha; Wood, John

    2016-03-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited blood disorder that effects red blood cells, which can lead to vasoocclusion, ischemia and infarct. This disease often results in neurological damage and strokes, leading to morbidity and mortality. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) is a non-invasive technique for measuring and mapping the brain activity. Blood Oxygenation Level-Dependent (BOLD) signals contain also information about the neurovascular coupling, vascular reactivity, oxygenation and blood propagation. Temporal relationship between BOLD fluctuations in different parts of the brain provides also a mean to investigate the blood delay information. We used the induced desaturation as a label to profile transit times through different brain areas, reflecting oxygen utilization of tissue. In this study, we aimed to compare blood flow propagation delay times between these patients and healthy subjects in areas vascularized by anterior, middle and posterior cerebral arteries. In a group comparison analysis with control subjects, BOLD changes in these areas were found to be almost simultaneous and shorter in the SCD patients, because of their increased brain blood flow. Secondly, the analysis of a patient with a stenosis on the anterior cerebral artery indicated that signal of the area vascularized by this artery lagged the MCA signal. These findings suggest that sickle cell disease causes blood propagation modifications, and that these changes could be used as a biomarker of vascular damage.

  19. Patient-specific blood rheology in sickle-cell anaemia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuejin; Du, E.; Lei, Huan; Tang, Yu-Hang; Dao, Ming; Suresh, Subra; Karniadakis, George Em

    2016-01-01

    Sickle-cell anaemia (SCA) is an inherited blood disorder exhibiting heterogeneous cell morphology and abnormal rheology, especially under hypoxic conditions. By using a multiscale red blood cell (RBC) model with parameters derived from patient-specific data, we present a mesoscopic computational study of the haemodynamic and rheological characteristics of blood from SCA patients with hydroxyurea (HU) treatment (on-HU) and those without HU treatment (off-HU). We determine the shear viscosity of blood in health as well as in different states of disease. Our results suggest that treatment with HU improves or worsens the rheological characteristics of blood in SCA depending on the degree of hypoxia. However, on-HU groups always have higher levels of haematocrit-to-viscosity ratio (HVR) than off-HU groups, indicating that HU can indeed improve the oxygen transport potential of blood. Our patient-specific computational simulations suggest that the HVR level, rather than the shear viscosity of sickle RBC suspensions, may be a more reliable indicator in assessing the response to HU treatment. PMID:26855752

  20. Mechanical differences of sickle cell trait (SCT) and normal red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yi; Cachia, Mark A; Ge, Ji; Xu, Zhensong; Wang, Chen; Sun, Yu

    2015-08-07

    Sickle cell trait (SCT) is a condition in which an individual inherits one sickle hemoglobin gene (HbS) and one normal beta hemoglobin gene (HbA). It has been hypothesized that under extreme physical stress, the compromised mechanical properties of the red blood cells (RBCs) may be the underlying mechanism of clinical complications of sickle cell trait individuals. However, whether sickle cell trait (SCT) should be treated as physiologically normal remains controversial. In this work, the mechanical properties (i.e., shear modulus and viscosity) of individual RBCs were quantified using a microsystem capable of precisely controlling the oxygen level of RBCs' microenvironment. Individual RBCs were deformed under shear stress. After the release of shear stress, the dynamic cell recovery process was captured and analyzed to extract the mechanical properties of single RBCs. The results demonstrate that RBCs from sickle cell trait individuals are inherently stiffer and more viscous than normal RBCs from healthy donors, but oxygen level variations do not alter their mechanical properties or morphology.

  1. [Issues and difficulties in the relationship between patients and caregivers in painful sickle cell vaso-occlusive crisis].

    PubMed

    Dzierzynski, N; Stankovic Stojanovic, K; Georgin-Lavialle, S; Lionnet, F

    2016-02-01

    Sickle cell patients in acute pain situation experiment cognitive, behavioral and emotional changes that can accentuate their pain and disrupt communication with caregivers. On the other hand, caregivers have to face pain assessment difficulties and their own psychological reactions to their patient's pain. The gap between the patient's experience and caregiver's evaluation can lead to conflict and non-adherence treatment, and have a direct impact on the sickle cell disease prognosis. There is nothing inevitable about these phenomena, whose knowledge allows the action and opens up prospects for improving the management of sickle cell disease pain. This article is a narrative review updating the interactions between acute pain and some configurations, such as the inability to discern emotions, catastrophizing, post-traumatic stress or feeling ostracized. The overestimation of patient's addiction by caregivers also influences the pain itself. Open communication, as well as some treatments, medicated or not, a consistent institutional organization and a multidisciplinary approach altogether have an analgesic role by acting on pain cognitive and emotional components.

  2. Perinatal outcome in sickle cell anemia: a prospective study from India.

    PubMed

    Daigavane, Mayoor M; Jena, Rabindra K; Kar, Tushar J

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia, the homozygous genotype of sickle cell disease is one of the most common heritable diseases in the world. The Arab-Asian haplotype present in India is one of the least severe of all haplotypes. Many sickle cell anemia patients are now leading a symptom-free productive life due to hydroxyurea (HU) and better supportive care. Although pregnancy in sickle cell anemia patients is considered a high-risk category, it perinatal outcome is least studied, particularly among carriers of the Arab-Asian haplotype. Thus, the present prospective, randomized study was performed to assess the perinatal outcome in sickle cell anemia. Neonatal outcome such as low birth weight, perinatal mortality rate, special care newborn unit (SCNU) admission, intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) and pre term births were significantly higher in sickle cell anemia mothers. Maternal outcome such as severe anemia, preeclampsia, vasoocclusive crisis (VOC), pulmonary complications, jaundice and blood transfusion requirements were significantly higher in sickle cell anemia mothers, which were successfully managed. Cesarian section rate was not significantly different from normal controls. Successful pregnancies were achieved in 84.44% of cases. However, we strongly recommend that pregnancies in these patients should be managed in an institutional setup.

  3. Hemoglobin Aggregation in Single Red Blood Cells of Sickle Cell Anemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, Izumi; Tanaka, Toyoichi; Sun, Shao-Tang; Imanishi, Yuri; Tsuyoshi Ohnishi, S.

    1983-06-01

    A laser light scattering technique was used to observe the extent of hemoglobin aggregation in solitary red blood cells of sickle cell anemia. Hemoglobin aggregation was confirmed in deoxygenated cells. The light scattering technique can also be applied to cytoplasmic studies of any biological cell.

  4. Transfusion of sickle cells may be a therapeutic option for patients suffering metastatic disease.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Joel S

    2010-04-01

    Red blood cells from patients with sickle cell disease will sickle under conditions of hypoxemia and acidosis which is a similar milieu found in malignant tumors. While control of tumor angiogenesis has long been a goal of cancer therapy, selective occlusion of tumor blood supply may be achieved by transfusion of sickle cells into patients who suffer metastatic cancer. Although this potential therapy has not been previously reported in the medical literature, the concept may have been elusive to medical mainstream thinking because it requires transfusion of diseased cells. For this therapy to be effective, other environmental factors may need to be manipulated such inducing mild hypoxemia or hypercarbia (respiratory acidosis) to induce red cell sickling. Preliminary evidence supportive of this therapeutic approach to cancer treatment is provided by case evidence that sickle cell occlusion of a malignant brain tumor (glioma) produced tumor necrosis. Also sickle cells have been successfully transfused into primates. Furthermore, donor blood is crossmatched and transfused into patients suffering from sickle cell disease regularly in clinics and this procedure is associated with acceptable morbidity. Most importantly, animal models of sickle cell disease and cancer currently exist, and this theory could be tried with available technologies including ultrasound detection of vaso-occlusion. While the proposed therapy may not cure metastatic cancer, this treatment could prove useful for decreasing the size and perhaps the pain from metastatic tumor burden. Therefore, it is hypothesized that ABO Rh compatible crossmatched sickle cells transfused into patients who suffer metastatic cancer under controlled conditions of blood oxygenation and pH will selectively produce vaso-occlusive infarcts in malignant tumors and be a useful therapy. The author hopes for further investigations.

  5. Th1 and Th2 cytokine profiles in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Raghupathy, R; Haider, M Z; Azizieh, F; Abdelsalam, R; D'Souza, T M; Adekile, A D

    2000-01-01

    We have investigated the levels of Th1 (IL-2 and IFN-gamma) and Th2 (IL-4) cytokines in the plasma and supernatants following peripheral blood mononuclear cell culture and mitogen stimulation in a group of 39 patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) made up of 29 SS, 8 Sbeta-thal and 2 Hb SD in steady state. Five SS patients were studied during 7 episodes of vaso-occlusive crisis. Twenty-four control (3 Hb AS and 21 Hb AA) were also studied; 10 were acutely ill while 14 were healthy at the time of the study. The plasma levels of IL-2 and IFN-gamma were similar in the patients and the controls. However, plasma IL-4 was significantly higher among the steady-state SS patients than in the controls. While there was no significant difference in cytokine levels following mitogen stimulation in the different groups, plasma IL-2 to IL-4 and IFN-gamma to IL-4 ratios were significantly lower among the steady-state SS patients, indicating a possible Th2 bias in our sickle cell patients and suggesting a possible mechanism to explain the predisposition of SCD patients to bacterial infections. However, SS patients with good splenic function showed a relative Th1 bias, which may be an additional explanation for the protection against bacterial infections in such patients.

  6. Sickle Cell Trait Tied to Higher Kidney Failure Risk for Blacks

    MedlinePlus

    ... cell anemia is an inherited disorder that affects hemoglobin -- the substance in red blood cells that carries oxygen through the blood. This disease causes the hemoglobin to form in a sickle shape instead of ...

  7. Sickle cell disease and HIV: a case highlighting management challenges for children in a resource-limited setting.

    PubMed

    Odera, Esther Brenda; Kwobah, Charles; Stone, Geren; Some, Faraj; Vreeman, Rachel Christine

    2014-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a genetic disorder resulting from a mutation in the hemoglobin (Hb) gene. Sickle cell disease results in chronic anemia and a variety of acute and chronic complications that can lead to early mortality. A child with both SCD and HIV presents a management challenge, particularly in a resource-limited setting. In this case report, we describe the case of an 18-month-old Kenyan girl with SCD and HIV who developed a severe hypersensitivity reaction to first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART). Selecting an appropriate drug substitute for a child with SCD and HIV presents a management dilemma when the available options have problematic side effect profiles or are inaccessible or inappropriate according to national guidelines. The challenges in choosing an appropriate ART regimen for a child with SCD and HIV highlight the lack of data and scarcity of treatment options for pediatric patients.

  8. Traditional Herbal Management of Sickle Cell Anemia: Lessons from Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ameh, Sunday J.; Tarfa, Florence D.; Ebeshi, Benjamin U.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Patients in West Africa where sickle cell anemia (SCA) is endemic have for ages been treated with natural products, especially herbs, as, is still the case in rural communities. Objective. In this paper we look closely at some of these herbs to see if there are any lessons to be learnt or clues to be found for optimizing the treatments based on them, as had been done in the case of NIPRISAN, which was developed from herbs in Nigeria based on Yoruba Medicine. Methods. Select publications on SCA, its molecular biology and pathology, and actual and experimental cases of herbal treatment were perused in search of molecular clues that can be linked to chemical constituents of the herbs involved. Results. The study revealed that during the last 2-3 decades, much progress was made in several aspects of SCA pharmacology, especially the approval of hydroxyurea. As for SCA herbalism, this paper revealed that antisickling herbs abound in West Africa and that the most promising may yet be found. Three new antisickling herbs (Entandrophragma utile, Chenopodium ambrosioides, and Petiveria alliacea) were reported in May 2011. At NIPRD, where NIPRISAN was developed, three other recipes are currently awaiting development. Conclusion. The study raised the hope that the search in the Tropics for more effective herbal recipes for managing sickle cell anaemia will be more fruitful with time and effort. PMID:23198140

  9. Traditional herbal management of sickle cell anemia: lessons from Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ameh, Sunday J; Tarfa, Florence D; Ebeshi, Benjamin U

    2012-01-01

    Background. Patients in West Africa where sickle cell anemia (SCA) is endemic have for ages been treated with natural products, especially herbs, as, is still the case in rural communities. Objective. In this paper we look closely at some of these herbs to see if there are any lessons to be learnt or clues to be found for optimizing the treatments based on them, as had been done in the case of NIPRISAN, which was developed from herbs in Nigeria based on Yoruba Medicine. Methods. Select publications on SCA, its molecular biology and pathology, and actual and experimental cases of herbal treatment were perused in search of molecular clues that can be linked to chemical constituents of the herbs involved. Results. The study revealed that during the last 2-3 decades, much progress was made in several aspects of SCA pharmacology, especially the approval of hydroxyurea. As for SCA herbalism, this paper revealed that antisickling herbs abound in West Africa and that the most promising may yet be found. Three new antisickling herbs (Entandrophragma utile, Chenopodium ambrosioides, and Petiveria alliacea) were reported in May 2011. At NIPRD, where NIPRISAN was developed, three other recipes are currently awaiting development. Conclusion. The study raised the hope that the search in the Tropics for more effective herbal recipes for managing sickle cell anaemia will be more fruitful with time and effort.

  10. Improved survival of children and adolescents with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Charles T; Rogers, Zora R; McCavit, Timothy L; Buchanan, George R

    2010-04-29

    The survival of young children with sickle cell disease (SCD) has improved, but less is known about older children and adolescents. We studied the Dallas Newborn Cohort (DNC) to estimate contemporary 18-year survival for newborns with SCD and document changes in the causes and ages of death over time. We also explored whether improvements in the quality of medical care were temporally associated with survival. The DNC now includes 940 subjects with 8857 patient-years of follow-up. Most children with sickle cell anemia (93.9%) and nearly all children with milder forms of SCD (98.4%) now live to become adults. The incidence of death and the pattern of mortality changed over the duration of the cohort. Sepsis is no longer the leading cause of death. All the recent deaths in the cohort occurred in patients 18 years or older, most shortly after the transition to adult care. Quality of care in the DNC has improved over time, with significantly more timely initial visits and preventive interventions for young children. In summary, most children with SCD now survive the childhood years, but young adults who transition to adult medical care are at high risk for early death.

  11. The Role of Nutrition in Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Hyacinth, H I; Gee, B E; Hibbert, J M

    2010-01-01

    Finding a widely available cure for sickle cell anemia (HbSS) still remains a challenge one hundred years after its discovery as a genetically inherited disease. However, growing interest in the nutritional problems of the disease has created a body of literature from researchers seeking nutritional alternatives as a means of decreasing morbidity and improving quality of life among HbSS patients. This review demonstrates that over the past 30 years the role of protein/energy deficiency in HbSS has been more clearly defined via direct measurements, leading to the concept of a relative shortage of nutrients for growth and development, despite apparently adequate dietary intakes. Although there is still a paucity of data supporting the efficacy of macronutrient supplementation, it is becoming clearer that recommended dietary allowances (RDAs) for the general population are insufficient for the sickle cell patient. A similar shortage is likely to be true for micronutrient deficiencies, including recent findings of vitamin D deficiency that may be associated with incomplete ossification and bone disease, which are well known complications of HbSS disease. We conclude that there is need for more effort and resources to be dedicated to research (including supplementation studies of larger sample size) aimed at establishing specific RDAs for HbSS patients, much like the specific RDAs developed for pregnancy and growth within the general population.

  12. Sickle cell disease in Middle East Arab countries.

    PubMed

    El-Hazmi, Mohsen A F; Al-Hazmi, Ali M; Warsy, Arjumand S

    2011-11-01

    The sickle cell (HbS) gene occurs at a variable frequency in the Middle Eastern Arab countries, with characteristic distribution patterns and representing an overall picture of blood genetic disorders in the region. The origin of the gene has been debated, but studies using β-globin gene haplotypes have ascertained that there were multiple origins for HbS. In some regions the HbS gene is common and exhibits polymorphism, while the reverse is true in others. A common causative factor for the high prevalence and maintenance of HbS and thalassaemia genes is malaria endemicity. The HbS gene also co-exists with other haemoglobin variants and thalassaemia genes and the resulting clinical state is referred to as sickle cell disease (SCD). In the Middle Eastern Arab countries, the clinical picture of SCD expresses two distinct forms, the benign and the severe forms, which are related to two distinct β-globin gene haplotypes. These are referred to as the Saudi-Indian and the Benin haplotypes, respectively. In a majority of the Middle Eastern Arab countries the HbS is linked to the Saudi-Indian haplotype, while in others it is linked to the Benin haplotype. This review outlines the frequency, distribution, clinical feature, management and prevention as well as gene interactions of the HbS genes with other haemoglobin disorders in the Middle Eastern Arab countries.

  13. [Sickle cell syndrome. Association between hemoglobin S and β thalassemia].

    PubMed

    Gasparini, Nehuen P; Agriello, Evangelina E; Zanella, M J Lorena; Iommi, María P; Maradei, Juan; Sandoval, Marisa J

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell syndrome HbS/β thalassemia is an inheritable mendelian type disease where two affected alleles are simultaneously present, one from HbS (βS) and the other from β thalassemia. That situation is mainly linked to individuals who share African and Mediterranean ancestors. The mutation responsible for HbS is a point mutation, whereas for β thalassemia, there are more than 200 mutations that cause different degrees of deficiency synthesis of β globin chain, which justifies the clinical and genetic heterogeneity of this syndrome. It is presented a clinical case of a young adult man with limited resources that consulted by longstanding bone pain. The patient presented anemia with a marked microcytosis. Hemoglobin electrophoresis was performed, an abnormal peak in position of HbS and high HbA2 fraction were detected. These last results indicated two possible molecular alterations simultaneously, for this reason the molecular study was performed looking for the most common β thalassemia mutations in our population and, the point mutation responsible for S hemoglobinopathy. Clinical data and biochemical laboratory allowed the diagnosis of sickle cell syndrome. The molecular study confirmed the syndrome carrying mutations IVS-I nt 110 G > A, responsible for β thalassemia and, codon 6 A > T (GAG → GTG: Glu → Val) responsible for S hemoglobinophaty. Since it is a disease of high health impact, it is important to provide genetic counseling to the whole family.

  14. Sickle cell disease in Middle East Arab countries

    PubMed Central

    El-Hazmi, Mohsen A. F.; Al-Hazmi, Ali M.; Warsy, Arjumand S.

    2011-01-01

    The sickle cell (HbS) gene occurs at a variable frequency in the Middle Eastern Arab countries, with characteristic distribution patterns and representing an overall picture of blood genetic disorders in the region. The origin of the gene has been debated, but studies using β-globin gene haplotypes have ascertained that there were multiple origins for HbS. In some regions the HbS gene is common and exhibits polymorphism, while the reverse is true in others. A common causative factor for the high prevalence and maintenance of HbS and thalassaemia genes is malaria endemicity. The HbS gene also co-exists with other haemoglobin variants and thalassaemia genes and the resulting clinical state is referred to as sickle cell disease (SCD). In the Middle Eastern Arab countries, the clinical picture of SCD expresses two distinct forms, the benign and the severe forms, which are related to two distinct β-globin gene haplotypes. These are referred to as the Saudi-Indian and the Benin haplotypes, respectively. In a majority of the Middle Eastern Arab countries the HbS is linked to the Saudi-Indian haplotype, while in others it is linked to the Benin haplotype. This review outlines the frequency, distribution, clinical feature, management and prevention as well as gene interactions of the HbS genes with other haemoglobin disorders in the Middle Eastern Arab countries. PMID:22199098

  15. Sickle cell trait in French West Indian elite sprint athletes.

    PubMed

    Marlin, L; Etienne-Julan, M; Le Gallais, D; Hue, O

    2005-10-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the percentage of sickle cell trait (SCT) carriers among French West Indian sprinters selected for the French National Team in 2000. The investigation determined the number of SCT carriers and the number of national records they had established. Sixteen athletes were indexed (6 males and 10 females). The athletes were within the ranges of 20-33 years, 161-186 cm and 60-80 kg. The results showed the presence of SCT carriers in this population among whom three were SCT carriers (2 males and 1 female) (18.75%). Moreover, there is a significantly higher percentage of titles and records held by the SCT carriers (38.6% and 50%, respectively). In conclusion, this study shows that sickle cell trait carriers are able to perform sprint exercises at the highest levels, and it further indicates that brief and explosive exercise involving mainly the alactic anaerobic metabolism may be enhanced by HbS.

  16. Metastable Mesoscopic Clusters in Solutions of Sickle-Cell Hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Weichun; Galkin, Oleg; Filobelo, Luis; Nagel, Ronald L.; Vekilov, Peter G.

    2007-01-01

    Sickle cell hemoglobin (HbS) is a mutant, whose polymerization while in deoxy state in the venous circulation underlies the debilitating sickle cell anemia. It has been suggested that the nucleation of the HbS polymers occurs within clusters of dense liquid, existing in HbS solutions. We use dynamic light scattering with solutions of deoxy-HbS, and, for comparison, of oxy-HbS and oxy-normal adult hemoglobin, HbA. We show that solutions of all three Hb variants contain clusters of dense liquid, several hundred nanometers in size, which are metastable with respect to the Hb solutions. The clusters form within a few seconds after solution preparation and their sizes and numbers remain relatively steady for up to 3 h. The lower bound of the cluster lifetime is 15 ms. The clusters exist in broad temperature and Hb concentration ranges, and occupy 10−5–10−2 of the solution volume. The results on the cluster properties can serve as test data for a potential future microscopic theory of cluster stability and kinetics. More importantly, if the clusters are a part of the nucleation mechanism of HbS polymers, the rate of HbS polymerization can be controlled by varying the cluster properties. PMID:17040989

  17. Epidemiology of sickle cell disease in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Jastaniah, Wasil

    2011-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by production of abnormal hemoglobin S and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Information about the prevalence of SCD in Saudi Arabia is patchy and probably underestimated, but studies have reported that SCD is a relatively common genetic disorder in this part of the world. The prevalence of SCD in Saudi Arabia varies significantly in different parts of the country, with the highest prevalence is in the Eastern province, followed by the southwestern provinces. The reported prevalence for sickle-cell trait ranges from 2% to 27%, and up to 2.6% will have SCD in some areas. Clinical and hematological variability exists in SCD in Saudi Arabia with two major phenotypes: a mild phenotype and a severe phenotype. Further studies on the prevalence, molecular and clinical epidemiology of SCD may help predict disease severity and risk stratification of patients to determine whether to receive early intensive care or continued symptomatic care. PMID:21623060

  18. Epidemiology of human parvovirus B19 in children with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Smith-Whitley, Kim; Zhao, Huaqing; Hodinka, Richard L; Kwiatkowski, Janet; Cecil, Renee; Cecil, Tamara; Cnaan, Avital; Ohene-Frempong, Kwaku

    2004-01-15

    Human parvovirus (HPV) B19 causes significant morbidity and mortality in children with sickle cell disease (SCD), but little data are published about the epidemiology of HPV B19 infection and its associated complications in this patient population. In this study, prevalence and incidence rates of HPV B19 were determined in 633 patients with SCD followed at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia between November 1996 and December 2001. Thirty percent (30%) were HPV B19 immunoglobulin G (IgG) positive at first testing, and the 70% without evidence of past HPV B19 infection were tested annually. One hundred ten patients developed evidence of HPV B19 infection for an incidence rate of 11.3 per 100 patient years. Sixty-eight episodes of HPV B19-induced transient red cell aplasia occurred with the following clinical events: fever (89.7%), pain (61.8%), acute splenic sequestration (19.1%), and acute chest syndrome (11.8%). Pain, fever, and acute splenic sequestration were more frequent events with acute HPV B19 infections compared with acute events in uninfected patients. The results of this epidemiologic study, the largest and most comprehensive to date, justify the development of HPV B19 prevention strategies to diminish the frequent and often severe complications associated with HPV B19 infections in patients with SCD.

  19. A Comprehensive Fluid Dynamic-Diffusion Model of Blood Microcirculation with Focus on Sickle Cell Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Floch, Francois; Harris, Wesley L.

    2009-11-01

    A novel methodology has been developed to address sickle cell disease, based on highly descriptive mathematical models for blood flow in the capillaries. Our investigations focus on the coupling between oxygen delivery and red blood cell dynamics, which is crucial to understanding sickle cell crises and is unique to this blood disease. The main part of our work is an extensive study of blood dynamics through simulations of red cells deforming within the capillary vessels, and relies on the use of a large mathematical system of equations describing oxygen transfer, blood plasma dynamics and red cell membrane mechanics. This model is expected to lead to the development of new research strategies for sickle cell disease. Our simulation model could be used not only to assess current researched remedies, but also to spur innovative research initiatives, based on our study of the physical properties coupled in sickle cell disease.

  20. Refractory sickle cell leg ulcer: is heparan sulphate a new hope?

    PubMed

    Hayek, Shady; Dibo, Saad; Baroud, Joe; Ibrahim, Amir; Barritault, Denis

    2016-02-01

    Patients with sickle cell disease are known to have recurrent lower extremity ulcers that have a high pain score and are resistant to conventional means of wound therapy. This study reports the successful use of synthetic heparan sulphate (Cacipliq20(®) , OTR3, Paris, France) in the treatment of a sickle cell ulcer that had failed to respond to several other means of treatment. Therapeutic success was assessed by complete wound coverage and vast improvement in pain score. This is the first study to report use of heparan sulphate in sickle cell ulcers.

  1. The in vitro antisickling and antioxidant effects of aqueous extracts Zanthoxyllum heitzii on sickle cell disorder

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Several plant extracts from Rutaceae family are currently used to the management of sickle cell disorder (SCD) in the African. Few reports have shown that extracts from Zanthoxyllum or Fagara genus demonstrated anti-sickling property. This study investigates the in vitro antisickling and antioxidant properties of extracts from Zanthoxyllum heitzii. Methods The sickling of red blood cells (RBCs) was induced using sodium metabisulfite (2%) followed by treatment with extracts at different concentrations. The osmotic fragility tests permits to explore the effect of Z. heitzii extracts on haemoglobin S solubility and sickle cells membrane stability. For each extract, qualitative phytochemical tests were used to identify the presence of alkaloids, tannins, saponins, flavonoids, glycosides and phenols, while some quantitative methods such as Folin, Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power (FRAP) and diphenyl 1, 2 picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) were used to determine the antioxidant potential of these extracts. Results Sodium metabisulphite increased the sickling of RBCs from 29.62 to 55.46% during 2 h. Treatment of sickling cells with extracts at different concentrations showed that a decrease of the percentage of sickling cells was found in both induced and non induced sickling cells. The fruits extract of Z. heitzii demonstrated the best anti-sickling property. The same extract at 250 μg/mL showed the best membrane cell stability compared to others. All the extracts revealed an antioxidant and anti-radical activities although lesser compared to the standard. Conclusion The fruit extract of Z. Heitzii demonstrated the most significant antisickling effect with a potential for use in the clinical management of SCD. PMID:23829696

  2. Inpatient management of sickle cell pain: a 'snapshot' of current practice.

    PubMed

    Miller, Scott T; Kim, Hae-Young; Weiner, Debra; Wager, Carrie G; Gallagher, Dianne; Styles, Lori; Dampier, Carlton D

    2012-03-01

    The Sickle Cell Disease Clinical Research Network (SCDCRN) designed the PROACTIVE Feasibility Study (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00951808) to determine whether elevated serum levels of secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) during hospitalization for pain would permit preemptive therapy of sickle cell acute chest syndrome (ACS) by blood transfusion. While PROACTIVE was not designed to assess pain management and was terminated early due to inadequate patient accrual, collection of clinical data allowed a "snapshot" of current care by expert providers. Nearly half the patients admitted for pain were taking hydroxyurea; hydroxyurea did not affect length of stay. Providers commonly administered parenteral opioid analgesia, usually morphine or hydromorphone, to adults and children, generally by patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). Adult providers were more likely to prescribe hydromorphone and did so at substantially higher morphine equivalent doses than were given to adults receiving morphine; the latter received doses similar to children who received either medication. All subjects treated with PCA received higher daily doses of opioids than those treated by time-contingent dosing. Physicians often restricted intravenous fluids to less than a maintenance rate and underutilized incentive spirometry, which reduces ACS in patients hospitalized for pain.

  3. Survival and mortality among users and non-users of hydroxyurea with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    de Araujo, Olinda Maria Rodrigues; Ivo, Maria Lúcia; Ferreira, Marcos Antonio; Pontes, Elenir Rose Jardim Cury; Bispo, Ieda Maria Gonçalves Pacce; de Oliveira, Eveny Cristine Luna

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to estimate survival, mortality and cause of death among users or not of hydroxyurea with sickle cell disease. METHOD: cohort study with retrospective data collection, from 1980 to 2010 of patients receiving inpatient treatment in two Brazilian public hospitals. The survival probability was determined using the Kaplan-Meier estimator, survival calculations (SPSS version 10.0), comparison between survival curves, using the log rank method. The level of significance was p=0.05. RESULTS: of 63 patients, 87% had sickle cell anemia, with 39 using hydroxyurea, with a mean time of use of the drug of 20.0±10.0 years and a mean dose of 17.37±5.4 to 20.94±7.2 mg/kg/day, raising the fetal hemoglobin. In the comparison between those using hydroxyurea and those not, the survival curve was greater among the users (p=0.014). A total of 10 deaths occurred, with a mean age of 28.1 years old, and with Acute Respiratory Failure as the main cause. CONCLUSION: the survival curve is greater among the users of hydroxyurea. The results indicate the importance of the nurse incorporating therapeutic advances of hydroxyurea in her care actions. PMID:25806633

  4. Level of nitric oxide and antioxidant vitamins in sickle cell anaemia patients.

    PubMed

    Hundekar, Prakash S; Suryakar, Aadinath N; Karnik, Aarti C; Katkam, Raghvendra V; Joshi, Nitin G; Ghone, Rahul A

    2012-01-01

    Sickle cell anaemia (SCA) is characterized with sever anaemia and vasoocclussive episodes. Nitric Oxide (NO) a potential vasodilator, synthesized from various cells including endothelial cell. However SCA is associated with endothelial dysfunction, a measure cognitive factor for pulmonary hypertension (PH) and vasoocclussive crisis. The present study was attempted to evaluate level of serum NO and plasma antioxidant vitamins A, E and C in homozygous (n = 30) and heterozygous (n = 30) sickle cell patients and compared with age and sex matched healthy controls (n = 30). We found, significantly (P < 0.0001) elevated level of serum NO and significantly (P < 0.0001) depleted antioxidant vitamins in homozygous and heterozygous sickle cell patients compared to healthy controls. Our study reveals that oxidative stress may be a responsible factor for the reduced bioavailability of NO which can impair the vasodilation in sickle cell patients.

  5. Red Blood Cell Alloimmunization in Sickle Cell Disease: Listen to Your Ancestors

    PubMed Central

    Campbell-Lee, Sally A.; Kittles, Rick A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Red blood cell (RBC) alloimmunization occurs in approximately 30% of transfused sickle cell disease patients compared to 2–5% of all transfusion recipients. Because RBC transfusion is an important part of therapy in sickle cell disease, the need for additional antigen matching once alloimmunization occurs is problematic and leads to therapeutic limitations. Thus, identification of risk factors would benefit this patient population. Genome-wide analyses, in particular, methods which take into account genetic ancestry such as admixture mapping, could identify molecular markers which could be used to identify immune responders to transfusion. PMID:25670930

  6. Monoclonal antibodies specific for sickle cell hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, R.H.; Vanderlaan, M.; Grabske, R.J.; Branscomb, E.W.; Bigbee, W.L.; Stanker, L.H.

    1985-01-01

    Two mouse hybridoma cell lines were isolated which produce monoclonal antibodies that bind hemoglobin S. The mice were immunized with peptide-protein conjugates to stimulate a response to the amino terminal peptide of the beta chain of hemoglobin S, where the single amino acid difference between A and S occurs. Immunocharacterization of the antibodies shows that they bind specifically to the immunogen peptide and to hemoglobin S. The specificity for S is high enough that one AS cell in a mixture with a million AA cells is labeled by antibody, and such cells can be analyzed by flow cytometry. Immunoblotting of electrophoretic gels allows definitive identification of hemoglobin S as compared with other hemoglobins with similar electrophoretic mobility. 12 references, 4 figures.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: sickle cell disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease is a group of disorders that affects hemoglobin , the molecule in red blood cells that delivers ... the body. People with this disorder have atypical hemoglobin molecules called hemoglobin S, which can distort red blood ...

  8. Emerging science of hydroxyurea therapy for pediatric sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Green, Nancy S; Barral, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Hydroxyurea (HU) is the sole approved pharmacological therapy for sickle cell disease (SCD). Higher levels of fetal hemoglobin (HbF) diminish deoxygenated sickle globin polymerization in vitro and clinically reduce the incidence of disease morbidities. Clinical and laboratory effects of HU largely result from induction of HbF expression, though to a highly variable extent. Baseline and HU-induced HbF expression are both inherited complex traits. In children with SCD, baseline HbF remains the best predictor of drug-induced levels, but this accounts for only a portion of the induction. A limited number of validated genetic loci are strongly associated with higher baseline HbF levels in SCD. For induced HbF levels, genetic approaches using candidate single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have identified some of these same loci as being also associated with induction. However, SNP associations with induced HbF are only partially independent of baseline levels. Additional approaches to understanding the impact of HU on HbF and its other therapeutic effects on SCD include pharmacokinetic, gene expression-based, and epigenetic analyses in patients and through studies in existing murine models for SCD. Understanding the genetic and other factors underlying the variability in therapeutic effects of HU for pediatric SCD is critical for prospectively predicting good responders and for designing other effective therapies.

  9. Patient-specific modeling of individual sickle cell behavior under transient hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuejin; Du, E.; Dao, Ming; Suresh, Subra; Karniadakis, George Em

    2017-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a highly complex genetic blood disorder in which red blood cells (RBC) exhibit heterogeneous morphology changes and decreased deformability. We employ a kinetic model for cell morphological sickling that invokes parameters derived from patient-specific data. This model is used to investigate the dynamics of individual sickle cells in a capillary-like microenvironment in order to address various mechanisms associated with SCD. We show that all RBCs, both hypoxia-unaffected and hypoxia-affected ones, regularly pass through microgates under oxygenated state. However, the hypoxia-affected cells undergo sickling which significantly alters cell dynamics. In particular, the dense and rigid sickle RBCs are obstructed thereby clogging blood flow while the less dense and deformable ones are capable of circumnavigating dead (trapped) cells ahead of them by choosing a serpentine path. Informed by recent experiments involving microfluidics that provide in vitro quantitative information on cell dynamics under transient hypoxia conditions, we have performed detailed computational simulations of alterations to cell behavior in response to morphological changes and membrane stiffening. Our model reveals that SCD exhibits substantial heterogeneity even within a particular density-fractionated subpopulation. These findings provide unique insights into how individual sickle cells move through capillaries under transient hypoxic conditions, and offer novel possibilities for designing effective therapeutic interventions for SCD. PMID:28288152

  10. The Flow of Sickle-Cell Blood in an Arteriolar-Capillary Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Stanley A.; Carlson, Brian

    1999-11-01

    The clinical symptomology of sickle-cell disease is primarily a manifestation of abnormal events in the microcirculation. Sickle-cell (HbSS) blood undergoes rheological and shape changes if the oxygen tension levels fall to sufficiently low values. The senior author developed a quantitative theoretical model coupling oxygen transport to the motion of the red blood cells in the capillaries, and including the most relevant physico-chemical characteristics of HbSS blood (S.A.Berger & W.S.King, The Flow of Sickle Cell Blood in the Capillaries, Biophysical J., Vol. 29: 119-148, 1980). We will report on an extension of this work to an arteriolar-capillary network to simulate the flow of sickle-cell blood in a typical skeletal muscle microvasculature. The aim is to uncover the critical factors that lead to ischemic events in the surrounding tissue and the extent of these events as a result of stasis in the capillaries.

  11. Optimal haematocrit in subjects with normal haemoglobin genotype (HbAA), sickle cell trait (HbAS), and homozygous sickle cell disease (HbSS).

    PubMed

    Bowers, A S; Pepple, D J; Reid, H L

    2011-01-01

    The determination of an optimal haematocrit (H0) has important clinical implications if such a level can be attained, and more importantly, maintained. This is defined as a haematocrit level, above or below which oxygen delivery is deleteriously affected. This study is designed to determine an optimal haematocrit in normal (AA), sickle cell trait (AS) and sickle cell disease (SS) subjects. Twenty-seven apparently healthy subjects having normal haemoglobin genotype, 24 with sickle cell trait and 42 with homozygous sickle cell disease were recruited into the study. Whole blood viscosity (WBV) was measured by a Wells Brookfield Cone and Plate Viscometer at a shear rate of 230 sec-1. Haematocrit was determined by an AC.Tron Coulter Counter. The optimal haematocrit was calculated as the inverse of a constant, K, which was derived from the haematocrit and viscosity data. Our findings showed that the H0 varied significantly among the 3 haemoglobin genotypes, in the order AA vs SS and AS vs SS. Additionally, the data indicated an increased H0 in subjects with sickle cell trait, suggesting a possible impairment in oxygen delivery in these individuals.

  12. [Multiorgan failure after sickle cell vaso occlusive attack: integrated clinical and biological emergency].

    PubMed

    Cottin, Laurane; Rouvet, Camille; Homedan, Chadi; Conté, Mathieu; Mortaza, Satar; Rousselet, Marie-Christine; Corby, Anne; Le Guyader, Maïlys; Zandecki, Marc; Reynier, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    We describe the case of a 30-year-old patient, suffering from composite S/β + sickle cell disease. He was hospitalized following a vaso-occlusive attack with acute bone pains. Despite an analgesic treatment and transfusion of three units of red blood cells, a non-regenerative anemia appeared within 24 hours. One day later an acute chest syndrome with atelectasis of the left lung and desaturation and multi-organ failure occurred and necessitated the patient's intubation and required him to be placed in an artificial coma. A bronchoalveolar lavage was performed, which eliminated pneumonia but proved, after staining with oil red O, many neutral fatty acid microvacuoles in more than 80% of macrophages, suggesting a pulmonary fat embolism. The hypothesis of a bone marrow necrosis causing a pulmonary fat embolism was discussed and confirmed the next day by the characteristic appearance of the bone marrow. A therapeutic protocol associating iteratively bleeding and red blood cells transfusion was administered on the second day with the objective of maintaining haemoglobin S at less than 20% rate. Successive haemoglobin S assay was applied using a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) technique with a quick response within one hour after transfusion or bleeding. This protocol resulted in an improvement in the patient's condition, with a gradual normalization of vital signs and extubation twelve days later and discharge without sequelae twenty-five days later. The succession of rare but serious sickle cell complications anaemia which occurred in this patient could be controlled by adapting the laboratory for the clinical emergency.

  13. Tract specific analysis in patients with sickle cell disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Yaqiong; Coloigner, Julie; Qu, Xiaoping; Choi, Soyoung; Bush, Adam; Borzage, Matt; Vu, Chau; Lepore, Natasha; Wood, John

    2015-12-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a hereditary blood disorder in which the oxygen-carrying hemoglobin molecule in red blood cells is abnormal. It affects numerous people in the world and leads to a shorter life span, pain, anemia, serious infections and neurocognitive decline. Tract-Specific Analysis (TSA) is a statistical method to evaluate white matter alterations due to neurocognitive diseases, using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance images. Here, for the first time, TSA is used to compare 11 major brain white matter (WM) tracts between SCD patients and age-matched healthy subjects. Alterations are found in the corpus callosum (CC), the cortico-spinal tract (CST), inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFO), inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF), superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF), and uncinated fasciculus (UNC). Based on previous studies on the neurocognitive functions of these tracts, the significant areas found in this paper might be related to several cognitive impairments and depression, both of which are observed in SCD patients.

  14. On the road to gene therapy for beta-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Bank, Arthur

    2008-01-01

    Human globin gene therapy is a potential cure for sickle cell disease and beta-thalassemia (Cooley anemia). A clinical trial of this treatment is currently under way in Paris using lentiglobin vectors.

  15. [Severe cases of Salmonella non typhi infections on sickle cell patients in Réunion Island].

    PubMed

    Vandroux, D; Jabot, J; Angue, M; Belcour, D; Galliot, R; Allyn, J; Gaüzère, B-A

    2014-12-01

    We report two cases of septic shocks due to Salmonella non typhi infection on sickle cell patients admitted to an intensive care unit. Such patients should enforce food hygiene measures, especially under tropical settings, to avoid potentially deadly severe infections.

  16. Renal medullary carcinoma in a white adolescent with sickle cell trait.

    PubMed

    Daher, Paul; Bourgi, Ali; Riachy, Edward; Khoury, Antoine; Rehayem, Caline; Sader-Ghorra, Claude

    2014-07-01

    Renal medullary carcinoma (RMC) is a rare neoplasm of the kidney that has been recently described. It is almost exclusive to young patients of African descent and associated with sickle cell hemoglobinopathy, mainly sickle cell trait and hemoglobin sickle cell disease. The prognosis of RMC is very poor because of the highly aggressive behavior of this neoplasm and its resistance to conventional chemotherapy. Metastatic disease is almost universal at the time of presentation, and the malignancy is minimally responsive to a variety of regimens and/or modalities, including surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and biological immune-modulation therapy. We report the seventh case of a left RMC occurring in a white child with sickle cell trait, but with a localization of the tumor in the left kidney, considered a nonpredominant side for this type of tumor.

  17. Primary stroke in a woman with sickle cell anemia responsive to hydroxyurea therapy.

    PubMed

    Ballas, Samir K; Martinez, Ubaldo; Savage, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The most common cause of stroke in children with sickle cell anemia is infarction due to ischemia. In adults, however, stroke is most commonly hemorrhagic in nature. Other causes of stroke in patients with sickle cell disease are very rare. In this short communication, we describe a woman with sickle cell anemia responsive to hydroxyurea (HU) therapy who had primary stroke due to paradoxical embolization caused by a large atrial septal defect. Successful management of the stroke included surgical closure of the defect with trans-esophageal echocardiographic guidance. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first patient with sickle cell anemia and stroke due to congenital heart disease who did not require open heart surgery for successful management.

  18. Fanconi's Anemia Effect or Sickle Cell Anemia Effect: That is the Question.

    PubMed

    Unal, Sule; Chui, David H K; Gumruk, Fatma

    2015-01-01

    A 16-year-old boy who was diagnosed to have sickle cell anemia was referred to our center. The parental consanguinity, growth retardation and dysmorphic features prompted a search for possible Fanconi's Anemia (FA). The diepoxybutane (DEB) test was positive, confirming FA. The interaction of both diseases might account for his relatively mild phenotype in terms of both sickle cell anemia (or Hb S, HBB: c.20A > T) and FA. The high Hb F level that might be related to concomitant FA, may have caused a milder phenotype of sickle cell anemia, whereas nitric oxide (NO) depletion as a consequence of sickle cell anemia, may have caused a delay in the bone marrow failure of FA.

  19. The lived experiences of adolescents with sickle cell disease in Kingston, Jamaica

    PubMed Central

    Forrester, Andrea Brown; Barton-Gooden, Antoinette; Pitter, Cynthia; Lindo, Jascinth L. M.

    2015-01-01

    Aim To explore the lived experiences of adolescents with sickle cell disease, in Kingston, Jamaica. Method A descriptive qualitative design was used for this research. In-depth interviews were conducted with six adolescents with sickle cell disease at a Sickle Cell Unit operated by the University of the West Indies. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, and thematically analyzed. Results The majority of the adolescents demonstrated a positive self-concept. They reported strong family, school, and peer support which made them feel accepted. All were actively engaged in social activities such as parties, but had challenges participating in sporting activities. Various coping strategies were utilized to address challenges of the disease including praying, watching television, and surfing the Internet. Conclusion Sickle cell disease can be very challenging for the adolescent, but with positive self-concept and increased social support, especially from family and peers, these adolescents were able to effectively cope with their condition and live productive lives. PMID:26341889

  20. A Demonstration of the Molecular Basis of Sickle-Cell Anemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Marty; Gaynor, John J.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a demonstration that permits the separation of different hemoglobin molecules within two to three hours. Introduces students to the powerful technique of gel electrophoresis and illustrates the molecular basis of sickle-cell anemia. (JRH)

  1. Systemic lupus erythematosus associated with sickle-cell disease: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The occurrence of systemic lupus erythematosus has been only rarely reported in patients with sickle-cell disease. Case presentation We describe the case of a 23-year-old North-African woman with sickle-cell disease and systemic lupus erythematosus, and discuss the pointers to the diagnosis of this combination of conditions and also present a review of literature. The diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus was delayed because our patient’s symptoms were initially attributed to sickle-cell disease. Conclusions Physicians should be alerted to the possible association of sickle-cell disease and systemic lupus erythematosus so as not to delay correct diagnosis and initiation of appropriate treatment. PMID:23101910

  2. Prognostic significance of early vaso-occlusive complications in children with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Charles T; Shull, Elizabeth P; Ahmad, Naveed; Lee, Nancy J; Rogers, Zora R; Buchanan, George R

    2007-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia (SS) is highly phenotypically variable, and early predictors of outcome could guide clinical care. To determine whether early vaso-occlusive complications predicted subsequent adverse outcomes in the Dallas Newborn Cohort, we studied all members with SS or sickle-beta0-thalassemia who presented in their first year of life and had 5 years or more of follow-up. We defined 3 potential early predictors: hospitalizations in the first 3 years of life for (1) painful events other than dactylitis, (2) dactylitis, and (3) acute chest syndrome (ACS). We studied the associations of these predictors with the following late adverse outcomes (occurring after the third birthday): death, first overt stroke, use of disease-modifying therapy, and hospitalizations for pain events and ACS. None of the early events predicted death or stroke. Early pain and ACS both predicted a modest, temporary increase in the number of later painful episodes, but early ACS strongly increased the odds of more frequent ACS throughout childhood. Dactylitis had limited utility as a predictor. Although we still lack a useful prognostic framework for young children with SS, those who experience early ACS might be candidates for higher risk interventions to mitigate or cure their disease.

  3. Incidence and Predictors of Bacterial infection in Febrile Children with Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, Benita J; Bycroft, Thomas P; Almossawi, Ofran; Wilkey, Olufunke B; Daniels, Justin G

    2015-01-01

    Children with sickle cell disease are at increased risk of developing bacteremia and other serious bacterial infections. Fever is a common symptom in sickle cell disease and can also occur with sickle cell crises and viral infections. We aimed to evaluate the incidence and predictors of bacteremia and bacterial infection in children with sickle cell disease presenting with fever to a district hospital and sickle cell center in London. A retrospective analysis was performed on all attendances of children (aged under 16 years) with sickle cell disease presenting with a fever of 38.5 °C or higher over a 1-year period. Confirmed bacterial infection was defined as bacteremia, bacterial meningitis, urinary tract infection (UTI), pneumonia, osteomyelitis or other bacterial infection with positive identification of organism. Children were defined as having a suspected bacterial infection if a bacterial infection was suspected clinically, but no organism was identified. Over a 1-year period there were 88 episodes analyzed in 59 children. Bacteremia occurred in 3.4% of episodes and confirmed bacterial infection in 7.0%. Suspected bacterial infection occurred in 33.0%. One death occurred from Salmonella typhirium septicemia. C-reactive protein (CRP) level and white blood cell (WBC) count were both significantly associated with bacterial infection (p = 0.004 and 0.02, respectively.) In conclusion, bacterial infections continue to be a significant problem in children with sickle cell disease. C-reactive protein was significantly associated with bacterial infections, and could be included in clinical risk criteria for febrile children with sickle cell disease.

  4. Awareness of sickle cell among people of reproductive age: Dominicans and African Americans in northern Manhattan.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Saira; Schunk, Kelly; Batista, Milagros; Adames, Francisca; Ayala, Peggy; Stix, Benjamin; Rodriguez, Jacqueline; McCord, Mary; Green, Nancy S

    2012-02-01

    Sickle cell disease is a chronic condition that is characterized by severe anemia, painful crises, and organ dysfunction. In the U.S.A., sickle cell is a health burden typically associated with African Americans. Dominicans constitute the largest Latino group in New York City (N.Y.C.) and have the second overall highest prevalence of sickle trait-one in 20 births, compared to one in 12 African American births. We aimed to document the prevalence of sickle within the largely Dominican and African American community of Northern Manhattan (Washington Heights, Inwood, Harlem), assess and compare knowledge about sickle disease and carrier status in young adults of reproductive age between African Americans and Dominicans, and elicit preferred sources of health information. N.Y. State Newborn Screening data in Northern Manhattan were analyzed by zip code. A brief oral survey was administered to 208 parents of young children-150 Dominicans and 58 African Americans. Significant differences were seen in knowledge about sickle-27% of Dominican parents surveyed correctly defined sickle cell disease as an inherited blood disorder, compared to 76% of African Americans (p < 0.001). Only 7% of African Americans did not know their own trait status, compared to 43% of Dominicans (p < 0.001). Parents were better informed if they or family members were affected by sickle conditions. Participants from both groups prefer receiving information from doctors and online. A separate group of 168 predominantly Dominican youth, ages 14-24, demonstrated knowledge levels similar to that of Dominican parents. These results suggest that many of reproductive age in a N.Y.C. community affected by sickle conditions frequently lack basic relevant information, with larger information gaps among Dominicans. Expanded efforts are warranted to inform young adults of diverse affected communities.

  5. Fetal haemoglobin in sickle-cell disease: from genetic epidemiology to new therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Lettre, Guillaume; Bauer, Daniel E

    2016-06-18

    Sickle-cell disease affects millions of individuals worldwide, but the global incidence is concentrated in Africa. The burden of sickle-cell disease is expected to continue to rise over the coming decades, adding to stress on the health infrastructures of many countries. Although the molecular cause of sickle-cell disease has been known for more than half a century, treatment options remain greatly limited. Allogeneic haemopoietic stem-cell transplantation is the only existing cure but is limited to specialised clinical centres and remains inaccessible for most patients. Induction of fetal haemoglobin production is a promising strategy for the treatment of sickle-cell disease. In this Series paper, we review scientific breakthroughs in epidemiology, genetics, and molecular biology that have brought reactivation of fetal haemoglobin to the forefront of sickle-cell disease research. Improved knowledge of the regulation of fetal haemoglobin production in human beings and the development of genome editing technology now support the design of innovative therapies for sickle-cell disease that are based on fetal haemoglobin.

  6. Quality of life of female caregivers of children with sickle cell disease: a survey.

    PubMed

    van den Tweel, Xandra W; Hatzmann, Janneke; Ensink, Elske; van der Lee, Johanna H; Peters, Marjolein; Fijnvandraat, Karin; Grootenhuis, Martha

    2008-04-01

    Caring for a child with sickle cell disease poses extra demands on parents, both practically and psychologically, which may influence their quality of life. Since families of children with sickle cell disease in the Netherlands usually belong to immigrant communities with a low socio-economic status, there may be an additional strain on caregivers. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the quality of life of caregivers of children with sickle cell disease. The quality of life of female caregivers of sickle cell disease patients, measured with the TNO-AZL Adult Quality of Life questionnaire, was compared to the norm data of healthy Dutch females (n=700) and female caregivers of healthy children with the same socio-economic status and ethnic background (socio-economic status control group). Groups were compared by the Mann-Whitney U test. Point estimates and 95% confidence intervals of the median difference are presented. The results of questionnaires of 54 caregivers of children with sickle cell disease and 28 caregivers of a control group of the same socio-economic status were analyzed. Caregivers of patients with sickle cell disease had a significantly lower quality of life on all subscales compared to the Dutch norm population. Compared to the control group of the same socio-economic status, the quality of life of caregivers of patients with sickle cell disease was significantly lower on the subscales depressive moods, daily activities and vitality. In this first study reporting on the quality of life of caregivers of children with sickle cell disease, we demonstrate a reduced quality of life in these caregivers compared to the healthy Dutch female population and caregivers of healthy children with the same socio-economic status.

  7. Frontal and orbital bone infarctions causing periorbital swelling in patients with sickle cell anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Garty, I.; Koren, A.; Garzozi, H.

    1984-10-01

    Two cases of unilateral and bilateral periorbital hematomas occurred in patients with sickle cell anemia. The cause of periorbital swelling in these cases was found to be orbital and frontal bone infarctions, respectively, diagnosed by technetium Tc 99m medronate bone scintigraphy. To our knowledge, periorbital bone infarction, as a part of the differential diagnosis of periorbital hematoma and as part of the possible ocular manifestations in patients with sickle cell anemia, has not previously been described.

  8. Nutritional status, hospitalization and mortality among patients with sickle cell anemia in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Sharon E.; Makani, Julie; Fulford, Anthony J.; Komba, Albert N.; Soka, Deogratius; Williams, Thomas N.; Newton, Charles R.; Marsh, Kevin; Prentice, Andrew M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Reduced growth is common in children with sickle cell anemia, but few data exist on associations with long-term clinical course. Our objective was to determine the prevalence of malnutrition at enrolment into a hospital-based cohort and whether poor nutritional status predicted morbidity and mortality within an urban cohort of Tanzanian sickle cell anemia patients. Design and Methods Anthropometry was conducted at enrolment into the sickle cell anemia cohort (n=1,618; ages 0.5–48 years) and in controls who attended screening (siblings, walk-ins and referrals) but who were found not to have sickle cell anemia (n=717; ages 0.5–64 years). Prospective surveillance recorded hospitalization at Muhimbili National Hospital and mortality between March 2004 and September 2009. Results Sickle cell anemia was associated with stunting (OR=1.92, P<0.001, 36.2%) and wasting (OR=1.66, P=0.002, 18.4%). The greatest growth deficits were observed in adolescents and in boys. Independent of age and sex, lower hemoglobin concentration was associated with increased odds of malnutrition in sickle cell patients. Of the 1,041 sickle cell anemia patients with a body mass index z-score at enrolment, 92% were followed up until September 2009 (n=908) or death (n=50). Body mass index and weight-for-age z-score predicted hospitalization (hazard ratio [HZR]=0.90, P=0.04 and HZR=0.88, P=0.02) but height-for-age z-score did not (HZR=0.93, NS). The mortality rate of 2.5 per 100 person-years was not associated with any of the anthropometric measures. Conclusions In this non-birth-cohort of sickle cell anemia with significant associated undernutrition, wasting predicted an increased risk of hospital admission. Targeted nutritional interventions should prioritize treatment and prevention of wasting. PMID:21459787

  9. Splenic uptake of both technetium-99m diphosphonate and technetium-99m sulfur colloid in sickle cell beta degrees thalassemia

    SciTech Connect

    Heck, L.L.; Brittin, G.M. )

    1989-08-01

    A 19-year-old black woman with sickle cell beta degrees thalassemia had experienced more than 100 hospital admissions for sickle cell crisis and aseptic necrosis of both femoral heads. Her spleen was enlarged threefold and accumulated both radiocolloid and bone-seeking agent on two occasions, demonstrating an exception to the rule in sickle cell anemia that spleens that take up bone-seeking agents demonstrate functional asplenia. In the context of fever, left upper quadrant pain, and splenomegaly, the pattern of calcification in the patient's spleen as revealed in ultrasound and CT studies suggested possible abscess and led to unnecessary splenectomy. The nuclear medicine studies did not support this diagnosis. Nuclear medicine physicians should not be misled by splenic findings of sickle cell thalassemia (and possibly of other heterozygous sickle cell disorders) that differ from those of the more familiar homozygous sickle cell anemia.

  10. Glomerular filtration rate is altered in children with sickle cell disease: a comparison between Hb SS and Hb SC

    PubMed Central

    de Paula, Rafael Pereira; Nascimento, Alana Ferreira; Sousa, Sandra Mara Bispo; Bastos, Paulo Roberto Velasco; Barbosa, Ana Angélica Leal

    2013-01-01

    Background Renal failure is common among older patients with sickle cell disease; this is preceded by subclinical glomerular hyperfiltration. Data about renal function of adults with sickle cell disease have been reported, but data on children is scarce, especially when comparing heterozygotic and homozygotic patients. Objective The goal of this study was to investigate the glomerular filtration rate of heterozygotic and homozygotic children with sickle cell disease. Methods The glomerular filtration rate of 11 children with sickle cell disease [7 homozygotic (SS) and 4 heterozygotic (SC)] with a mean age of 11 years (standard deviation: ± 5 years) was evaluated using standard laboratory techniques. Results are presented as descriptive analysis. Results Our results suggest that glomerular hyperfiltration is present in children with sickle cell disease; this is more evident in homozygotic than heterozygotic children. Conclusion There is evidence of a need to monitor the renal function of children with sickle cell disease when special attention should be paid to homozygotic patients. PMID:24255619

  11. Cost-effectiveness analysis of preoperative transfusion in patients with sickle cell disease using evidence from the TAPS trial.

    PubMed

    Spackman, Eldon; Sculpher, Mark; Howard, Jo; Malfroy, Moira; Llewelyn, Charlotte; Choo, Louise; Hodge, Renate; Johnson, Tony; Rees, David C; Fijnvandraat, Karin; Kirby-Allen, Melanie; Davies, Sally; Williamson, Lorna

    2014-03-01

    The study's objective was to assess the cost-effectiveness of preoperative transfusion compared with no preoperative transfusion in patients with sickle cell disease undergoing low- or medium-risk surgery. Seventy patients with sickle cell disease (HbSS/Sß(0) thal genotypes) undergoing elective surgery participated in a multicentre randomised trial, Transfusion Alternatives Preoperatively in Sickle Cell Disease (TAPS). Here, a cost-effectiveness analysis based on evidence from that trial is presented. A decision-analytic model is used to incorporate long-term consequences of transfusions and acute chest syndrome. Costs and health benefits, expressed as quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), are reported from the 'within-trial' analysis and for the decision-analytic model. The probability of cost-effectiveness for each form of management is calculated taking into account the small sample size and other sources of uncertainty. In the range of scenarios considered in the analysis, preoperative transfusion was more effective, with the mean improvement in QALYs ranging from 0.018 to 0.206 per patient, and also less costly in all but one scenario, with the mean cost difference ranging from -£813 to £26. All scenarios suggested preoperative transfusion had a probability of cost-effectiveness >0.79 at a cost-effectiveness threshold of £20 000 per QALY.

  12. HLA-haploidentical bone marrow transplantation with posttransplant cyclophosphamide expands the donor pool for patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Bolaños-Meade, Javier; Fuchs, Ephraim J; Luznik, Leo; Lanzkron, Sophie M; Gamper, Christopher J; Jones, Richard J; Brodsky, Robert A

    2012-11-22

    Allogeneic marrow transplantation can cure sickle cell disease; however, HLA-matched donors are difficult to find, and the toxicities of myeloablative conditioning are prohibitive for most adults with this disease. We developed a nonmyeloablative bone marrow transplantation platform using related, including HLA-haploidentical, donors for patients with sickle cell disease. The regimen consisted of antithymocyte globulin, fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and total body irradiation, and graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis with posttransplantation high-dose cyclophosphamide, mycophenolate mofetil, and tacrolimus or sirolimus. After screening 19 patients, we transplanted 17, 14 from HLA-haploidentical and 3 from HLA-matched related donors. Eleven patients engrafted durably. With a median follow-up of 711 days (minimal follow up 224 days), 10 patients are asymptomatic, and 6 patients are off immunosupression. Only 1 patient developed skin-only acute graft-versus-host disease that resolved without any therapy; no mortality was seen. Nonmyeloablative conditioning with posttransplantation high-dose cyclophosphamide expands the donor pool, making marrow transplantation feasible for most patients with sickle cell disease, and is associated with a low risk of complications, even with haploidentical related donors. Graft failure, 43% in haploidentical pairs, remains a major obstacle but may be acceptable in a fraction of patients if the majority can be cured without serious toxicities.

  13. Traumatic Exposure History as a Risk Factor for Chronic Pain in Adult Patients with Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Works, Teresa; Jones, Sasia; Grady, James; Andemariam, Biree

    2016-02-01

    This article describes the impact of the integration of a licensed clinical social worker (LCSW) with expertise in behavioral health on identification of risk factors for chronic pain in a cohort of adults with sickle cell disease. Authors conducted a retrospective chart review of all visits to the adult sickle cell center during the first six months of LCSW integration. Demographics, clinical history, and LCSW notes were reviewed. Overall, 71 patients were introduced to the LCSW; 55 percent of them had chronic pain. Patients with chronic pain were older, used opioids daily, took hydroxyurea, reported higher daily pain scores, and underwent more acute care visits and hospitalizations for pain with longer stays. Fifty-eight (81 percent) patients requested concrete social work services such as transportation and housing. Thirty-two patients (55 percent) expressed a desire for mental health counseling while receiving concrete services. Twenty-two (69 percent) of these patients self-disclosed at least one traumatic experience. In fact, a statistically significant relationship between chronic pain and a history of trauma was identified (p = 0.001). Results suggest that sickle cell patients should receive clinical social work services to assess for traumatic exposures that may influence chronic pain.

  14. HLA-haploidentical bone marrow transplantation with posttransplant cyclophosphamide expands the donor pool for patients with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Ephraim J.; Luznik, Leo; Lanzkron, Sophie M.; Gamper, Christopher J.; Jones, Richard J.; Brodsky, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Allogeneic marrow transplantation can cure sickle cell disease; however, HLA-matched donors are difficult to find, and the toxicities of myeloablative conditioning are prohibitive for most adults with this disease. We developed a nonmyeloablative bone marrow transplantation platform using related, including HLA-haploidentical, donors for patients with sickle cell disease. The regimen consisted of antithymocyte globulin, fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and total body irradiation, and graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis with posttransplantation high-dose cyclophosphamide, mycophenolate mofetil, and tacrolimus or sirolimus. After screening 19 patients, we transplanted 17, 14 from HLA-haploidentical and 3 from HLA-matched related donors. Eleven patients engrafted durably. With a median follow-up of 711 days (minimal follow up 224 days), 10 patients are asymptomatic, and 6 patients are off immunosupression. Only 1 patient developed skin-only acute graft-versus-host disease that resolved without any therapy; no mortality was seen. Nonmyeloablative conditioning with posttransplantation high-dose cyclophosphamide expands the donor pool, making marrow transplantation feasible for most patients with sickle cell disease, and is associated with a low risk of complications, even with haploidentical related donors. Graft failure, 43% in haploidentical pairs, remains a major obstacle but may be acceptable in a fraction of patients if the majority can be cured without serious toxicities. PMID:22955919

  15. Hydroxycarbamide decreases sickle reticulocyte adhesion to resting endothelium by inhibiting endothelial lutheran/basal cell adhesion molecule (Lu/BCAM) through phosphodiesterase 4A activation.

    PubMed

    Chaar, Vicky; Laurance, Sandrine; Lapoumeroulie, Claudine; Cochet, Sylvie; De Grandis, Maria; Colin, Yves; Elion, Jacques; Le Van Kim, Caroline; El Nemer, Wassim

    2014-04-18

    Vaso-occlusive crises are the main acute complication in sickle cell disease. They are initiated by abnormal adhesion of circulating blood cells to vascular endothelium of the microcirculation. Several interactions involving an intricate network of adhesion molecules have been described between sickle red blood cells and the endothelial vascular wall. We have shown previously that young sickle reticulocytes adhere to resting endothelial cells through the interaction of α4β1 integrin with endothelial Lutheran/basal cell adhesion molecule (Lu/BCAM). In the present work, we investigated the functional impact of endothelial exposure to hydroxycarbamide (HC) on this interaction using transformed human bone marrow endothelial cells and primary human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells. Adhesion of sickle reticulocytes to HC-treated endothelial cells was decreased despite the HC-derived increase of Lu/BCAM expression. This was associated with decreased phosphorylation of Lu/BCAM and up-regulation of the cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase 4A expression. Our study reveals a novel mechanism for HC in endothelial cells where it could modulate the function of membrane proteins through the regulation of phosphodiesterase expression and cAMP-dependent signaling pathways.

  16. Alcohol abuse in sickle cell disease: the Pisces Project.

    PubMed

    Levenson, James L; McClish, Donna K; Dahman, Bassam A; Penberthy, Lynne T; Bovbjerg, Viktor E; Aisiku, Imoigele P; Roseff, Susan D; Smith, Wally R

    2007-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is common in patients with chronic painful medical disorders, but it has not been studied in sickle cell disease (SCD). In a prospective cohort study of SCD adults, 31.4% were identified as abusing alcohol. There were no significant differences between alcohol abusers and nonabusers on demographics, biological variables, depression, anxiety, measures of crisis and noncrisis pain, or opioid use, but abusers reported more pain relief from opioids than nonabusers did. Alcohol abusers had fewer unscheduled clinic visits, emergency room visits, hospital days, and any health care utilization for SCD, but this was only significant for emergency room visits. Quality of life was similar between both groups, except that alcohol abusers unexpectedly had better overall physical summary scores. Alcohol abusers were more likely to report coping by ignoring pain, diverting attention, and using particular self-statements.

  17. Sickle cell disease: new opportunities and challenges in Africa.

    PubMed

    Makani, J; Ofori-Acquah, S F; Nnodu, O; Wonkam, A; Ohene-Frempong, K

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is one of the most common genetic causes of illness and death in the world. This is a review of SCD in Africa, which bears the highest burden of disease. The first section provides an introduction to the molecular basis of SCD and the pathophysiological mechanism of selected clinical events. The second section discusses the epidemiology of the disease (prevalence, morbidity, and mortality), at global level and within Africa. The third section discusses the laboratory diagnosis and management of SCD, emphasizing strategies that been have proven to be effective in areas with limited resources. Throughout the review, specific activities that require evidence to guide healthcare in Africa, as well as strategic areas for further research, will be highlighted.

  18. Sickle cell anemia: the impact of discovery, politics, and business.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lai-Hua; Doye, Angelia A; Conley, Eric; Gwathmey, Judith K

    2013-11-01

    Sickle cell anemia affects 100,000 African Americans. Frequent blood transfusions to prevent stroke lead to fatal iron-overload. Iron chelation with deferoxamine (DFO) requires expensive infusions. In the present study, we explore the feasibility of using a new delivery system for DFO, i.e., targeted liposome entrapped DFO (LDFO). Our results reveal that our novel formulation lowered the dosage requirements by 50%-75%, allowed for less frequent and shorter treatment durations, eliminating the need for a pump and the standard multi-night administration of DFO. In an iron-overloaded rat model, LDFO reduced iron in the liver, and also improved cardiac function. The lower dosage and improved safety profile makes our novel LDFO delivery system a highly desirable new therapy. Meanwhile, this system will also provide an ideal model for studying the mechanism of Fe overload-induced arrhythmias. The political and economic factors related to health care disparities are also discussed.

  19. Sickle Cell Disease: New Opportunities and Challenges in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Makani, J.; Ofori-Acquah, S. F.; Nnodu, O.; Wonkam, A.; Ohene-Frempong, K.

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is one of the most common genetic causes of illness and death in the world. This is a review of SCD in Africa, which bears the highest burden of disease. The first section provides an introduction to the molecular basis of SCD and the pathophysiological mechanism of selected clinical events. The second section discusses the epidemiology of the disease (prevalence, morbidity, and mortality), at global level and within Africa. The third section discusses the laboratory diagnosis and management of SCD, emphasizing strategies that been have proven to be effective in areas with limited resources. Throughout the review, specific activities that require evidence to guide healthcare in Africa, as well as strategic areas for further research, will be highlighted. PMID:25143960

  20. [Echocardiographic assessment of patients with sickle cell anemia].

    PubMed

    Blandón, R; Leandro, I M; Altafulla, M; Díaz Fernández, R

    1991-05-01

    One hundred and sixty four (164) patients were evaluated. Sixty (60) with Sickle cell disease (SSHg.) and ninety seven (97) with Trait (ASHg.); seventeen (17) were normal control group. The study confirmed that the incidence of cardiomyopathy in Trait (ASHg.) is greater than reported by other clinical investigations. Cardiac arrhythmia, atrial fibrillation, premature ventricular contractions, bundle branch blocks, and T and ST modifications with sub epicardial isquemia were most significant electrocardiographics changes. The possibility of myocardial infarction in SS patients with low or normal hemoglobin is significant. M-Mode and 2-D echo, demonstrated similar end diastolic volumes in AS and SS patients in which cardiomyopathy were diagnosticated. Patients with cardiac failure, treated with cardiotonics, diuretics and ACE were compensated most frequently. To prevent hemosiderosis, antioxydant (alfatocoferol and Ubiquinones) were used with satisfactory response.

  1. Gene replacement therapy for sickle cell disease and other blood disorders.

    PubMed

    Townes, Tim M

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that sickle cell disease (SCD) can be corrected in mouse models by transduction of hematopoietic stem cells with lentiviral vectors containing anti-sickling globin genes followed by transplantation of these cells into syngeneic recipients. Although self-inactivating (SIN) lentiviral vectors with or without insulator elements should provide a safe and effective treatment in humans, some concerns about insertional mutagenesis persist. An ideal correction would involve replacement of the sickle globin gene (betaS) with a normal copy of the gene (betaA). We recently derived embryonic stem (ES) cells from a novel knockin mouse model of SCD and tested a protocol for correcting the sickle mutation by homologous recombination. Animals derived after gene replacement produced high levels of normal human hemoglobin (HbA), and the pathology associated with SCD was corrected. These experiments provided a foundation for similar studies in which our group collaborated with Rudolf Jaenisch's laboratory to correct SCD by gene replacement in iPS (induced pluripotent stem) cells derived by direct reprogramming of sickle skin fibroblasts. Corrected iPS cells were differentiated into hematopoeitic progenitors that were transplanted into irradiated sickle recipients. The transplanted animals produced high levels of normal human HbA, and the pathology of SCD was corrected. These proof-of-principle studies provide a foundation for the development of gene replacement therapy for human patients with SCD and other blood disorders.

  2. Sickle Cell Disease: quality of life in patients with hemoglobin SS and SC disorders

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Sônia Aparecida dos Santos; Brener, Stela; Cardoso, Clareci Silva; Proietti, Anna Bárbara de Freitas Carneiro

    2013-01-01

    Objective Sickle cell disease comprises chronic, genetically determined disorders, presenting significant morbidity and high prevalence in Brazil. The goal of this study was to evaluate the quality of life of sickle cell disease patients (hemoglobin SS and SC) and their sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. Methods Data was collected from clinical records and semi-structured interviews consisting of clinical questionnaires and the World Health Organization Quality of Life-brief questionnaire. Results Interviews were conducted with 400 patients, aged between 18 and 72, treated in the Fundação HEMOMINAS in Belo Horizonte. The participants predominantly had sickle cell disease hemoglobin SS variant (65.5%), were female (61.8%), single (55.3), with up to 8 years of schooling (49.6%), and self-defined as mulattos (50%). Pain crises, hospitalizations, blood transfusions, and other morbidities of sickle cell disease had a significant impact on the quality of life of these patients. Conclusion Within this group, the social profile was that of low income and unemployed with sickle cell disease considered to be a significant impediment to finding a job. Evaluating quality of life as a determining factor of health is essential for the creation of specific policies and measures, appropriate for the specific characteristics and social context of sickle cell disease. PMID:24255615

  3. Haptoglobin gene polymorphisms and interleukin-6 and -8 levels in patients with sickle cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    Pierrot-Gallo, Bruna Spinella; Vicari, Perla; Matsuda, Sandra Satiko; Adegoke, Samuel Ademola; Mecabo, Grazielle; Figueiredo, Maria Stella

    2015-01-01

    Background Haptoglobin genotypes, and interleukin-6 and -8 participate in the pathophysiology of sickle cell anemia. The expression of cytokines is regulated by genetic mechanisms however the effect of haptoglobin polymorphisms on these cytokines is not fully understood. This study aimed to compare the frequency of haptoglobin genotypes and the interleukin-6 and -8 concentrations in sickle cell anemia patients and controls to investigate the association between haptoglobin genotypes and cytokine levels. Methods Sixty sickle cell anemia patients and 74 healthy individuals were analyzed. Haptoglobin genotypes were determined by multiplex polymerase chain reaction, and the interleukin-6 and -8 levels by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. The association between haptoglobin genotypes and cytokines was investigated by statistical tests. Results Hp2-1 was the most common genotype in both the cases and controls while Hp1-1 was less frequent among sickle cell anemia patients. Interleukin-6 and -8 levels were higher in patients than controls (p-value <0.0001). There was no significant difference in interleukin-6 and -8 concentrations between the genotypes (p-value >0.05). A similar trend was observed among the controls. Conclusion Although, levels of interleukin-6 and -8 were higher in the sickle cell anemia patients, they appeared not to be related to the haptoglobin genotypes. Further investigations are necessary to identify factors responsible for increased secretion of the interleukin-6 and -8 pro-inflammatory cytokines in patients with sickle cell anemia. PMID:26408368

  4. Functional and anatomical evidence of cerebral tissue hypoxia in young sickle cell anemia mice.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Lindsay S; Gazdzinski, Lisa M; Tsui, Albert Ky; Zhou, Yu-Qing; Portnoy, Sharon; Liu, Elaine; Mazer, C David; Hare, Gregory Mt; Kassner, Andrea; Sled, John G

    2017-03-01

    Cerebral ischemia is a significant source of morbidity in children with sickle cell anemia; however, the mechanism of injury is poorly understood. Increased cerebral blood flow and low hemoglobin levels in children with sickle cell anemia are associated with increased stroke risk, suggesting that anemia-induced tissue hypoxia may be an important factor contributing to subsequent morbidity. To better understand the pathophysiology of brain injury, brain physiology and morphology were characterized in a transgenic mouse model, the Townes sickle cell model. Relative to age-matched controls, sickle cell anemia mice demonstrated: (1) decreased brain tissue pO2 and increased expression of hypoxia signaling protein in the perivascular regions of the cerebral cortex; (2) elevated basal cerebral blood flow , consistent with adaptation to anemia-induced tissue hypoxia; (3) significant reduction in cerebrovascular blood flow reactivity to a hypercapnic challenge; (4) increased diameter of the carotid artery; and (5) significant volume changes in white and gray matter regions in the brain, as assessed by ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging. Collectively, these findings support the hypothesis that brain tissue hypoxia contributes to adaptive physiological and anatomic changes in Townes sickle cell mice. These findings may help define the pathophysiology for stroke in children with sickle cell anemia.

  5. Perception of primary care doctors and nurses about care provided to sickle cell disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Xavier Gomes, Ludmila Mourão; de Andrade Barbosa, Thiago Luis; Souza Vieira, Elen Débora; Caldeira, Antônio Prates; de Carvalho Torres, Heloísa; Viana, Marcos Borato

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the perception of primary care physicians and nurses about access to services and routine health care provided to sickle cell disease patients. Methods This descriptive exploratory study took a qualitative approach by surveying thirteen primary care health professionals who participated in a focus group to discuss access to services and assistance provided to sickle cell disease patients. The data were submitted to thematic content analysis. Results Access to primary care services and routine care for sickle cell disease patients were the categories that emerged from the analysis. Interaction between people with sickle cell disease and primary care health clinics was found to be minimal and limited mainly to scheduling appointments. Patients sought care from the primary care health clinics only in some situations, such as for pain episodes and vaccinations. The professionals noted that patients do not recognize primary care as the gateway to the system, and reported that they feel unprepared to assist sickle cell disease patients. Conclusion In the perception of these professionals, there are restrictions to accessing primary care health clinics and the primary care assistance for sickle cell disease patients is affected. PMID:26190428

  6. [Patient with homozygous sickle cell disease and free flap surgery: Ensuring the success of the procedure].

    PubMed

    Deneuve, S; Maire, L; Bachelot, V; Dammacco, M-A; Zrounba, P; Delay, E

    2017-04-01

    Sickle cell anaemia is rare in France but frequent in Africa, leading to rigid, sickle-like shape red blood cells which bind together blocking microcirculation under certain circumstances. The vaso-occlusive crisis is the most frequent clinical manifestation especially in case of homozygous disease. Sickle cells disease is therefore usually considerated as a contraindication to microsurgery, however sometimes, a free flap procedure is mandatory. We here report the case of a 47-year-old man suffering with homozygous sickle cell anaemia and needing an antebrachial free flap procedure for a tongue reconstruction. The postoperative course was unremarkable apart from a delayed healing which is common in this particular localization. A review of the litterature allows to list the precautions to be taken to ensure a microsurgical procedure with this medical background. The preoperative examination has to assess usual sickle cell disease comorbidities such as kidney failure, heart failure or pulmonary hypertension. All the events leading to either low output syndrome, hypoxia, hypothermia, or a stress caused by uncontrolled pain should be avoided per- and postoperatively. With an optimum medical care, microsurgery is possible even in patients suffering with sickle cells anaemia. This case is rare in France but will become frequent in Africa with the improvement of the healthcare system, allowing to give all patients the best medical care.

  7. Newborn screening shows a high incidence of sickle cell anemia in Central India.

    PubMed

    Jain, Dipty L; Sarathi, Vijaya; Upadhye, Dipty; Gulhane, Rohini; Nadkarni, Anita H; Ghosh, Kanjaksha; Colah, Roshan B

    2012-01-01

    There is limited data on the incidence of sickle cell anemia in Central India; we therefore conducted a study to estimate the incidence of this disease in Central India. Mothers who delivered a live baby at the Government Medical College, Nagpur, India were screened for the presence of the sickle cell hemoglobin {Hb S: [β6 (A3) Glu→Val, GAG>GTG]} using the solubility test within 48 hours of delivery. Infants of mothers who showed the presence of Hb S then underwent Hb analysis by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). A total of 8243 mothers was screened, 1178 of whom were positive. One thousand, one hundred and sixty-two infants of mothers with a positive solubility test underwent Hb analysis by HPLC; 530 infants were normal, while 536 were heterozygous for Hb S (sickle cell trait), 88 babies were homozygous for Hb S (sickle cell anemia), while another eight babies had other Hb abnormalities. The incidence of sickle cell anemia was highest in the Scheduled caste group (1:50). We concluded that the incidence of sickle cell anemia is high in central India.

  8. Brazilian Guidelines for transcranial doppler in children and adolescents with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Clarisse Lopes de Castro; Cançado, Rodolfo Delfini; Leite, Ana Claudia Celestino Bezerra; dos Anjos, Ana Claudia Mendonça; Pinto, Ana Cristina Silva; Matta, Andre Palma da Cunha; Silva, Célia Maria; Silva, Gisele Sampaio; Friedrisch, João Ricardo; Braga, Josefina Aparecida Pellegrini; Lange, Marcos Christiano; Figueiredo, Maria Stella; Rugani, Marília Álvares; Veloso, Orlando; Moura, Patrícia Gomes; Cortez, Paulo Ivo; Adams, Robert; Gualandro, Sandra Fátima Menosi; de Castilho, Shirley Lopes; Thomé, Ursula; Zetola, Viviane Flumignan

    2011-01-01

    Background Sickle cell disease is the most common monogenic hereditary disease in Brazil. Although strokes are one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality in these patients, the use of transcranial Doppler to identify children at risk is not universally used. Objective To develop Brazilian guidelines for the use of transcranial Doppler in sickle cell disease children and adolescents, so that related health policies can be expanded, and thus contribute to reduce morbidity and mortality. Methods The guidelines were formulated in a consensus meeting of experts in transcranial Doppler and sickle cell disease. The issues discussed were previously formulated and scientific articles in databases (MEDLINE, SciELO and Cochrane) were carefully analyzed. The consensus for each question was obtained by a vote of experts on the specific theme. Results Recommendations were made, including indications for the use of transcranial Doppler according to the sickle cell disease genotype and patients age; the necessary conditions to perform the exam and its periodicity depending on exam results; the criteria for the indication of blood transfusions and iron chelation therapy; the indication of hydroxyurea; and the therapeutic approach in cases of conditional transcranial Doppler. Conclusion The Brazilian guidelines on the use of transcranial doppler in sickle cell disease patients may reduce the risk of strokes, and thus reduce the morbidity and mortality and improve the quality of life of sickle cell disease patients. PMID:23284243

  9. Is the medical home for adult patients with sickle cell disease a reality or an illusion?

    PubMed

    Ballas, Samir K; Vichinsky, Elliott P

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) emerged as a viable method to improve delivery of medical care. Due to all the promotion about the effectiveness of the PCMH, patients with sickle cell disease, their families and the community hoped that this could be a possible solution to the problems that arise in the treatment of adult patients with sickle cell disease. Review of the literature and review of the criteria for the establishment of a PCMH show that the PCMH is not an ideal model for patients with sickle cell disease because finding a personal physician, which is the first criteria of a functional PCMH, is a major problem in the process of transitioning the care of patients with sickle cell disease from pediatrics to adult care. Moreover, garnering hospital support to defray the initial costs to establish a PCMH for adults with sickle cell disease is unlikely given the already high costs of care for patients with sickle cell disease. Moreover, recent studies have shown insufficient evidence to determine the presumed beneficial effects of the PCMH, especially in patients with chronic disease.

  10. Anxiety and depression in children and adolescents with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Benton, Tami D; Ifeagwu, Judith A; Smith-Whitley, Kim

    2007-04-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that depressive disorders and anxiety disorders are much more prevalent among medically ill children and adolescents when compared with the general population, and that the presence of comorbidity may adversely affect medical outcomes and quality of life. Whereas the prevalence and impact of anxiety and depressive disorders have been described in chronic conditions such as asthma, diabetes, and epilepsy, much less is known about sickle cell disease (SCD), a disorder that affects more than 70,000 Americans, primarily those of African and Mediterranean descent. A hallmark of this disorder is recurrent, acute, and chronic pain that often requires emergency management and hospitalization. Medical advances in the treatment of this illness have transformed SCD from a condition associated with very early morbidity and mortality into a chronic condition of adulthood. This article reviews the evidence describing our knowledge of anxiety and depression in children and adolescents with SCD, its clinical impact, and effectiveness of interventions.

  11. Spontaneous central retinal artery occlusion in a teenager with sickle cell trait.

    PubMed

    Pai, Sivakami A; Hebri, Sudhira Pai; Dekhain, Moza A

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell trait (SCT) is traditionally considered a benign condition by ophthalmologists. Several studies have reported ocular complications in SCT, but these complications have been described as a consequence of trauma, exertion, and associated systemic disorders. We here in the report a case of an Arab teen boy, who presented with a sudden loss of vision in his left eye of 1 h duration. The ocular examination revealed acute central retinal artery occlusion. He underwent a series of laboratory and radiological investigations. The blood investigations revealed SCT and abnormal partial thromboplastin time. The fundus fluorescein angiography revealed abnormal retinal vascular perfusion. Marked blood rheological impairment and activation of the coagulation pathway can occur without any contributing factors in SCT leading to severe ocular complications. This is one of the young patients with spontaneous vascular occlusion in SCT.

  12. Pregnancy outcome in patients with sickle cell disease in the UK--a national cohort study comparing sickle cell anaemia (HbSS) with HbSC disease.

    PubMed

    Oteng-Ntim, Eugene; Ayensah, Benjamin; Knight, Marian; Howard, Jo

    2015-04-01

    We describe the findings from a national study of maternal and fetal outcomes of pregnancy in women with sickle cell disease (SCD). Data were collected via the United Kingdom Obstetric Surveillance System between 1 February 2010 and 31 January 2011 from 109 women, of whom 51 (46·8%) had HbSS and 44 (40·4%) had HbSC. Data included antenatal, maternal and fetal outcomes. Comparisons were made between women with HbSS and HbSC. Incidence of complications were acute pain (57%), blood transfusion (26%), urinary tract infection (UTI; 12%) and critical care unit admission (23%) and these were all more common in women with HbSS than HbSC. There was no difference in the incidence of acute chest syndrome, hypertension and venous thromboembolism between HbSS and HbSC. Women with HbSS were more likely to deliver at <37 weeks gestation (P = 0·01) and their babies were more likely to have reduced birth weight. Delivery at <34 weeks was increased in both HbSS and HbSC women (5·9% vs. 4·6%) compared to national data. This study confirms a high rate of maternal and fetal complications in mothers with SCD, even in women with HbSC, which has previously been considered to have a more benign phenotype in pregnancy.

  13. Resting blood lactate in individuals with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Petto, Jefferson; de Jesus, Jaqueline Brito; Vasques, Leila Monique Reis; Pinheiro, Renata Leão Silva; Oliveira, Aila Mascarenhas; Spinola, Kelly Aparecida Borges; Silva, Wellington dos Santos

    2011-01-01

    Background The most common hereditary hemoglobin disorder, affecting 20 million individuals worldwide, is sickle cell disease. The vascular obstruction resulting from the sickling of cells in this disease can produce local hypoxemia, pain crises and infarction in several tissues, including the bones, spleen, kidneys and lungs. Objective To determine red blood group genes in a Brazilian populations. Methods The present study is characterized as a case control study, with the aim of identifying the baseline blood lactate concentration in individuals with hemoglobin SS and SC diseases. One-way ANOVA with the Tukey post-test was used to analyze the results and a p-value < 0.05 was considered significant. Calculations were made using the INSTAT statistical program. The graphs were generated using the ORING program. The study sample was composed of 31 men and women residing in the city of Santo Antônio de Jesus, Bahia, Brazil. The individuals were divided into two groups: Group GC of 16 subjects who did not present with any type of structural hemoglobinopathy; and Group GE composed of 15 individuals with ages between 2 and 35 years old, who had the SS and SC genotypes. Sample analyses were performed with 3 mL of blood during fasting. Results The baseline blood lactate concentration of the SS and SC individuals was higher than that of the control group (p<0.001) with means of 4.86 ± 0.95; 3.30 ± 0.33; 1.31 ± 0.08 IU/L for SS, SC and controls, respectively. This corroborates the initial research hypothesis. Conclusion The baseline blood lactate of SS and SC individuals is 3 to 4 times higher than that of healthy subjects, probably due to the fact that these patients have a metabolic deviation to the anaerobic pathway. PMID:23284239

  14. Attitudes toward clinical trials among patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Haywood, Carlton; Lanzkron, Sophie; Diener-West, Marie; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer; Strouse, John J; Bediako, Shawn; Onojobi, Gladys; Beach, Mary Catherine

    2014-06-01

    Background A substantial number of planned clinical trials for sickle cell disease (SCD) have terminated early due to insufficient patient enrollment. Purpose To describe attitudes toward clinical trials among a sample of adults with SCD and identify patient-level factors associated with these attitudes. Methods Our data came from a sample (N = 291) of primarily adults with SCD participating in the Improving Patient Outcomes with Respect and Trust (IMPORT) study, which is a federally funded observational study of SCD patient experiences in seeking healthcare. Attitudes toward clinical trials were assessed using items from the Perceptions of Participation in Clinical Research instrument. Patient factors examined as potential correlates of clinical trial attitudes were demographics, disease severity, engagement in self-care, trust, healthcare experience ratings, and prior history of participation in clinical trials. Multiple regression analyses were used to identify patient-level correlates of clinical trial attitudes. Results Our sample of SCD patients expressed overwhelmingly favorable attitudes about clinical trials, with 77%-92% of our sample expressing agreement with a series of positive statements about clinical trials in general. Demographics, engagement in self-care, healthcare experience ratings, and prior trial participation each explained significant portions of the variability in clinical trial attitudes. Limitations The generalizability of our results to the entire SCD population may be of concern as the study participants were all receiving care at comprehensive sickle cell centers and already participating in clinical research. Conclusion Our results suggest that, in principle, adults with SCD enrolled in an observational study express very positive general attitudes about clinical trial participation and that specific factors attached to particular clinical trial opportunities may play a greater role in a SCD patient's decision to participate than a

  15. Genetic determinants of haemolysis in sickle cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    Milton, Jacqueline N; Rooks, Helen; Drasar, Emma; McCabe, Elizabeth L; Baldwin, Clinton T; Melista, Efi; Gordeuk, Victor R; Nouraie, Mehdi; Kato, Gregory R; Kato, Gregory J; Minniti, Caterina; Taylor, James; Campbell, Andrew; Luchtman-Jones, Lori; Rana, Sohail; Castro, Oswaldo; Zhang, Yingze; Thein, Swee Lay; Sebastiani, Paola; Gladwin, Mark T; Steinberg, Martin H

    2013-04-01

    Haemolytic anaemia is variable among patients with sickle cell anaemia and can be estimated by reticulocyte count, lactate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase and bilirubin levels. Using principal component analysis of these measurements we computed a haemolytic score that we used as a subphenotype in a genome-wide association study. We identified in one cohort and replicated in two additional cohorts the association of a single nucleotide polymorphism in NPRL3 (rs7203560; chr16p13·3) (P = 6·04 × 10(-07) ). This association was validated by targeted genotyping in a fourth independent cohort. The HBA1/HBA2 regulatory elements, hypersensitive sites (HS)-33, HS-40 and HS-48 are located in introns of NPRL3. Rs7203560 was in perfect linkage disequilibrium (LD) with rs9926112 (r(2)  = 1) and in strong LD with rs7197554 (r(2)  = 0·75) and rs13336641 (r(2)  = 0·77); the latter is located between HS-33 and HS-40 sites and next to a CTCF binding site. The minor allele for rs7203560 was associated with the -∝(3·7) thalassaemia gene deletion. When adjusting for HbF and ∝ thalassaemia, the association of NPRL3 with the haemolytic score was significant (P = 0·00375) and remained significant when examining only cases without gene deletion∝ thalassaemia (P = 0·02463). Perhaps by independently down-regulating expression of the HBA1/HBA2 genes, variants of the HBA1/HBA2 gene regulatory loci, tagged by rs7203560, reduce haemolysis in sickle cell anaemia.

  16. Genetic variants and cell-free hemoglobin processing in sickle cell nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Saraf, Santosh L; Zhang, Xu; Shah, Binal; Kanias, Tamir; Gudehithlu, Krishnamurthy P; Kittles, Rick; Machado, Roberto F; Arruda, Jose A L; Gladwin, Mark T; Singh, Ashok K; Gordeuk, Victor R

    2015-10-01

    Intravascular hemolysis and hemoglobinuria are associated with sickle cell nephropathy. ApoL1 is involved in cell-free hemoglobin scavenging through association with haptoglobin-related protein. APOL1 G1/G2 variants are the strongest genetic predictors of kidney disease in the general African-American population. A single report associated APOL1 G1/G2 with sickle cell nephropathy. In 221 patients with sickle cell disease at the University of Illinois at Chicago, we replicated the finding of an association of APOL1 G1/G2 with proteinuria, specifically with urine albumin concentration (β=1.1, P=0.003), observed an even stronger association with hemoglobinuria (OR=2.5, P=4.3×10(-6)), and also replicated the finding of an association with hemoglobinuria in 487 patients from the Walk-Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension and Sickle cell Disease with Sildenafil Therapy study (OR=2.6, P=0.003). In 25 University of Illinois sickle cell disease patients, concentrations of urine kidney injury molecule-1 correlated with urine cell-free hemoglobin concentrations (r=0.59, P=0.002). Exposing human proximal tubular cells to increasing cell-free hemoglobin led to increasing concentrations of supernatant kidney injury molecule-1 (P=0.01), reduced viability (P=0.01) and induction of HMOX1 and SOD2. HMOX1 rs743811 associated with chronic kidney disease stage (OR=3.0, P=0.0001) in the University of Illinois cohort and end-stage renal disease (OR=10.0, P=0.0003) in the Walk-Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension and Sickle cell Disease with Sildenafil Therapy cohort. Longer HMOX1 GT-tandem repeats (>25) were associated with lower estimated glomerular filtration rate in the University of Illinois cohort (P=0.01). Our findings point to an association of APOL1 G1/G2 with kidney disease in sickle cell disease, possibly through increased risk of hemoglobinuria, and associations of HMOX1 variants with kidney disease, possibly through reduced protection of the kidney from hemoglobin

  17. Genetic variants and cell-free hemoglobin processing in sickle cell nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Saraf, Santosh L.; Zhang, Xu; Shah, Binal; Kanias, Tamir; Gudehithlu, Krishnamurthy P.; Kittles, Rick; Machado, Roberto F.; Arruda, Jose A.L.; Gladwin, Mark T.; Singh, Ashok K.; Gordeuk, Victor R.

    2015-01-01

    Intravascular hemolysis and hemoglobinuria are associated with sickle cell nephropathy. ApoL1 is involved in cell-free hemoglobin scavenging through association with haptoglobin-related protein. APOL1 G1/G2 variants are the strongest genetic predictors of kidney disease in the general African-American population. A single report associated APOL1 G1/G2 with sickle cell nephropathy. In 221 patients with sickle cell disease at the University of Illinois at Chicago, we replicated the finding of an association of APOL1 G1/G2 with proteinuria, specifically with urine albumin concentration (β=1.1, P=0.003), observed an even stronger association with hemoglobinuria (OR=2.5, P=4.3×10−6), and also replicated the finding of an association with hemoglobinuria in 487 patients from the Walk-Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension and Sickle cell Disease with Sildenafil Therapy study (OR=2.6, P=0.003). In 25 University of Illinois sickle cell disease patients, concentrations of urine kidney injury molecule-1 correlated with urine cell-free hemoglobin concentrations (r=0.59, P=0.002). Exposing human proximal tubular cells to increasing cell-free hemoglobin led to increasing concentrations of supernatant kidney injury molecule-1 (P=0.01), reduced viability (P=0.01) and induction of HMOX1 and SOD2. HMOX1 rs743811 associated with chronic kidney disease stage (OR=3.0, P=0.0001) in the University of Illinois cohort and end-stage renal disease (OR=10.0, P=0.0003) in the Walk-Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension and Sickle cell Disease with Sildenafil Therapy cohort. Longer HMOX1 GT-tandem repeats (>25) were associated with lower estimated glomerular filtration rate in the University of Illinois cohort (P=0.01). Our findings point to an association of APOL1 G1/G2 with kidney disease in sickle cell disease, possibly through increased risk of hemoglobinuria, and associations of HMOX1 variants with kidney disease, possibly through reduced protection of the kidney from hemoglobin

  18. Infectious complications after surgical splenectomy in children with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Monaco, Cypriano Petrus; Fonseca, Patricia Belintani Blum; Braga, Josefina Aparecida Pellegrini

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the frequency of infectious complications in children with sickle cell disease (SCD) after surgical splenectomy for acute splenic sequestration crisis. METHODS: Retrospective cohort of children with SCD who were born after 2002 and were regularly monitored until July 2013. Patients were divided into two groups: cases (children with SCD who underwent surgical splenectomy after an episode of splenic sequestration) and controls (children with SCD who did not have splenic sequestration and surgical procedures), in order to compare the frequency of invasive infections (sepsis, meningitis, bacteremia with positive blood cultures, acute chest syndrome and/or pneumonia) by data collected from medical records. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistical analysis. RESULTS: 44 patients were included in the case group. The mean age at the time of splenectomy was 2.6 years (1-6.9 years) and the mean postoperative length of follow-up was 6.1 years (3.8-9.9 years). The control group consisted of 69 patients with a mean age at the initial follow-up visit of 5.6 months (1-49 months) and a mean length of follow-up of 7.2 years (4-10.3 years).All children received pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. No significant difference was observed between groups in relation to infections during the follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: Surgical splenectomy in children with sickle cell disease that had splenic sequestration did not affect the frequency of infectious complications during 6 years of clinical follow-up. PMID:25913493

  19. Hematopoietic cell transplantation for thalassemia and sickle cell disease: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, M; Walters, M C

    2008-01-01

    beta-Thalassemia major and sickle cell disease (SCD) are among the most common hereditary disorders worldwide. The supportive treatment of beta-thalassemia major requires chronic, life-long RBC transfusions, which cause progressive iron overload and the potential for impaired endocrine, cardiac and hepatic function. The phenotype of thalassemia major is reliably predicted by its genotype. In contrast, SCD is a variable genetic disease caused by a single amino acid substitution in the beta chain of human hemoglobin. Manifestations of SCD are quite varied, but generally result from the tendency of Hb S to irreversibly polymerize under physiologic stressors such as hypoxemia and acidosis. The polymerization causes perturbations in the erythrocyte integrity that promote vaso-occlusion and which manifest as clinical events such as severe painful episodes, acute chest syndrome, splenic infarction, stroke and avascular necrosis of target joints. The only cure proved for these disorders is correction of the genetic defect by allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We illustrate the pediatric experience of HCT for hemoglobinopathies and discuss how these results affect future therapeutic decisions in children who inherit these disorders.

  20. Lung vaso-occlusion in sickle cell disease mediated by arteriolar neutrophil-platelet microemboli

    PubMed Central

    Bennewitz, Margaret F.; Jimenez, Maritza A.; Vats, Ravi; Tutuncuoglu, Egemen; Jonassaint, Jude; Kato, Gregory J.; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2017-01-01

    In patients with sickle cell disease (SCD), the polymerization of intraerythrocytic hemoglobin S promotes downstream vaso-occlusive events in the microvasculature. While vaso-occlusion is known to occur in the lung, often in the context of systemic vaso-occlusive crisis and the acute chest syndrome, the pathophysiological mechanisms that incite lung injury are unknown. We used intravital microscopy of the lung in transgenic humanized SCD mice to monitor acute vaso-occlusive events following an acute dose of systemic lipopolysaccharide sufficient to trigger events in SCD but not control mice. We observed cellular microembolism of precapillary pulmonary arteriolar bottlenecks by neutrophil-platelet aggregates. Blood from SCD patients was next studied under flow in an in vitro microfluidic system. Similar to the pulmonary circulation, circulating platelets nucleated around arrested neutrophils, translating to a greater number and duration of neutrophil-platelet interactions compared with normal human blood. Inhibition of platelet P-selectin with function-blocking antibody attenuated the neutrophil-platelet interactions in SCD patient blood in vitro and resolved pulmonary arteriole microembolism in SCD mice in vivo. These results establish the relevance of neutrophil-platelet aggregate formation in lung arterioles in promoting lung vaso-occlusion in SCD and highlight the therapeutic potential of targeting platelet adhesion molecules to prevent acute chest syndrome. PMID:28097236

  1. A Comprehensive, Ethnically Diverse Library of Sickle Cell Disease-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Seonmi; Gianotti-Sommer, Andreia; Molina-Estevez, Francisco Javier; Vanuytsel, Kim; Skvir, Nick; Leung, Amy; Rozelle, Sarah S; Shaikho, Elmutaz Mohammed; Weir, Isabelle; Jiang, Zhihua; Luo, Hong-Yuan; Chui, David H K; Figueiredo, Maria Stella; Alsultan, Abdulraham; Al-Ali, Amein; Sebastiani, Paola; Steinberg, Martin H; Mostoslavsky, Gustavo; Murphy, George J

    2017-04-11

    Sickle cell anemia affects millions of people worldwide and is an emerging global health burden. As part of a large NIH-funded NextGen Consortium, we generated a diverse, comprehensive, and fully characterized library of sickle-cell-disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from patients of different ethnicities, β-globin gene (HBB) haplotypes, and fetal hemoglobin (HbF) levels. iPSCs stand to revolutionize the way we study human development, model disease, and perhaps eventually, treat patients. Here, we describe this unique resource for the study of sickle cell disease, including novel haplotype-specific polymorphisms that affect disease severity, as well as for the development of patient-specific therapeutics for this phenotypically diverse disorder. As a complement to this library, and as proof of principle for future cell- and gene-based therapies, we also designed and employed CRISPR/Cas gene editing tools to correct the sickle hemoglobin (HbS) mutation.

  2. Pathophysiology and treatment of pulmonary hypertension in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Gordeuk, Victor R; Castro, Oswaldo L; Machado, Roberto F

    2016-02-18

    Pulmonary hypertension affects ∼10% of adult patients with sickle cell disease (SCD), particularly those with the homozygous genotype. An increase in pulmonary artery systolic pressure, estimated noninvasively by echocardiography, helps identify SCD patients at risk for pulmonary hypertension, but definitive diagnosis requires right-heart catheterization. About half of SCD-related pulmonary hypertension patients have precapillary pulmonary hypertension with potential etiologies of (1) a nitric oxide deficiency state and vasculopathy consequent to intravascular hemolysis, (2) chronic pulmonary thromboembolism, or (3) upregulated hypoxic responses secondary to anemia, low O2 saturation, and microvascular obstruction. The remainder have postcapillary pulmonary hypertension secondary to left ventricular dysfunction. Although the pulmonary artery pressure in SCD patients with pulmonary hypertension is only moderately elevated, they have a markedly higher risk of death than patients without pulmonary hypertension. Guidelines for diagnosis and management of SCD-related pulmonary hypertension were published recently by the American Thoracic Society. Management of adults with sickle-related pulmonary hypertension is based on anticoagulation for those with thromboembolism; oxygen therapy for those with low oxygen saturation; treatment of left ventricular failure in those with postcapillary pulmonary hypertension; and hydroxyurea or transfusions to raise the hemoglobin concentration, reduce hemolysis, and prevent vaso-occlusive events that cause additional increases in pulmonary pressure. Randomized trials have not identified drugs to lower pulmonary pressure in SCD patients with precapillary pulmonary hypertension. Patients with hemodynamics of pulmonary arterial hypertension should be referred to specialized centers and considered for treatments known to be effective in other forms of pulmonary arterial hypertension. There have been reports that some of these treatments

  3. Kinetic assay shows that increasing red cell volume could be a treatment for sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Quan; Henry, Eric R; Hofrichter, James; Smith, Jeffrey F; Cellmer, Troy; Dunkelberger, Emily B; Metaferia, Belhu B; Jones-Straehle, Stacy; Boutom, Sarah; Christoph, Garrott W; Wakefield, Terri H; Link, Mary E; Staton, Dwayne; Vass, Erica R; Miller, Jeffery L; Hsieh, Matthew M; Tisdale, John F; Eaton, William A

    2017-01-31

    Although it has been known for more than 60 years that the cause of sickle cell disease is polymerization of a hemoglobin mutant, hydroxyurea is the only drug approved for treatment by the US Food and Drug Administration. This drug, however, is only partially successful, and the discovery of additional drugs that inhibit fiber formation has been hampered by the lack of a sensitive and quantitative cellular assay. Here, we describe such a method in a 96-well plate format that is based on laser-induced polymerization in sickle trait cells and robust, automated image analysis to detect the precise time at which fibers distort ("sickle") the cells. With this kinetic method, we show that small increases in cell volume to reduce the hemoglobin concentration can result in therapeutic increases in the delay time prior to fiber formation. We also show that, of the two drugs (AES103 and GBT440) in clinical trials that inhibit polymerization by increasing oxygen affinity, one of them (GBT440) also inhibits sickling in the absence of oxygen by two additional mechanisms.

  4. Myonecrosis in sickle cell anemia: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Vicari, Perla; Achkar, Ruth; Oliveira, Kathia R B; Miszpupten, Milton L; Fernandes, Artur R C; Figueiredo, Maria S; Bordin, José O

    2004-09-01

    Vascular occlusion is responsible for most of the severe complications of sickle cell anemia (SCA). The involvement of muscle and fascia is uncommon in SCA, but myonecrosis may occur in SCA crisis. The data accumulated in the literature is limited to only a few reports describing mainly adult patients presenting with severe muscular pain. We report a rare case of sickle myonecrosis and secondary involvement of an associated joint after a severe painful crisis in the left thigh.

  5. High protein diet attenuates histopathologic organ damage and vascular leakage in transgenic murine model of sickle cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    Manci, Elizabeth Ann; Hyacinth, Hyacinth I; Capers, Patrice L; Archer, David R; Pitts, Sydney; Ghosh, Samit; Patrickson, John; Titford, Michael E; Ofori-Acquah, Solomon F; Hibbert, Jacqueline M

    2014-01-01

    Previous reports have shown that a high protein diet improves weight gain and decreases expression of inflammatory markers in weanling Berkeley transgenic sickle cell mice. The effect of this diet on the underlying histopathology, however, has not been studied. Age-matched, male C57BL/6 controls (n=24), Berkley sickle mice (n=31) and Townes sickle mice (n=14) were randomized in a terminal experiment at weaning to isoenergetic diets, with either normal (20%) or high (35%) amount of energy from protein, by replacing dextrin. Tissue sampling for blinded histologic study and scoring of changes at baseline and after 3 months of feedings showed progressive siderosis and infarcts in spleen, kidney, and liver in all sickle groups, and no significant changes in age- and sex-matched normal controls. High-protein (35%) fed Berkeley sickle mice had significantly fewer (p<0.01) infarcts in spleen (35.7% less), liver (12.5% less), and kidney (28.6% less) and lower histopathologic scores (p<0.01) for chronic tissue injury in liver and spleen than matched normal-protein (20%) fed Berkeley sickle mice. In addition, high-protein fed Townes sickle mice had less vascular leakage (~36%) in the heart, lungs, and brain and a better survival rate (21%) than matched normal-protein Townes sickle mice. This is the first report of histopathologic evidence that a high protein:calorie diet attenuates sickle cell related chronic organ injury in transgenic sickle cell mouse models. PMID:24842894

  6. No evidence for cell activation or brain vaso-occlusion with plerixafor mobilization in sickle cell mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Erika; Branch, Craig; Cui, Min-Hui; Yazdanbakhsh, Karina; Mohandas, Narla; Billett, Henny H; Shi, Patricia A

    2016-03-01

    Gene therapy for sickle cell disease is currently in active trials. Collecting hematopoietic progenitor cells safely and effectively is challenging, however, because granulocyte colony stimulating factor, the drug used most commonly for mobilization, can cause life-threatening vaso-occlusion in patients with sickle cell disease, and bone marrow harvest requires general anesthesia and multiple hip bone punctures. Plerixafor is an inhibitor of the CXCR4 chemokine receptor on hematopoietic progenitor cells, blocking its binding to SDF-1 (CXCL12) on bone marrow stroma. In support of a clinical trial in patients with sickle cell disease of plerixafor mobilization (NCT02193191), we administered plerixafor to sickle cell mice and found that it mobilizes hematopoietic progenitor cells without evidence of concomitant cell activation or brain vaso-occlusion.

  7. The role of the arginine metabolome in pain: implications for sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Bakshi, Nitya; Morris, Claudia R

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the most common hemoglobinopathy in the US, affecting approximately 100,000 individuals in the US and millions worldwide. Pain is the hallmark of SCD, and a subset of patients experience pain virtually all of the time. Of interest, the arginine metabolome is associated with several pain mechanisms highlighted in this review. Since SCD is an arginine deficiency syndrome, the contribution of the arginine metabolome to acute and chronic pain in SCD is a topic in need of further attention. Normal arginine metabolism is impaired in SCD through various mechanisms that contribute to endothelial dysfunction, vaso-occlusion, pulmonary complications, risk of leg ulcers, and early mortality. Arginine is a semiessential amino acid that serves as a substrate for protein synthesis and is the precursor to nitric oxide (NO), polyamines, proline, glutamate, creatine, and agmatine. Since arginine is involved in multiple metabolic processes, a deficiency of this amino acid has the potential to disrupt many cellular and organ functions. NO is a potent vasodilator that is depleted in SCD and may contribute to vaso-occlusive pain. As the obligate substrate for NO production, arginine also plays a mechanistic role in SCD-related pain, although its contribution to pain pathways likely extends beyond NO. Low global arginine bioavailability is associated with pain severity in both adults and children with SCD as well as other non-SCD pain syndromes. Preliminary clinical studies of arginine therapy in SCD demonstrate efficacy in treating acute vaso-occlusive pain, as well as leg ulcers and pulmonary hypertension. Restoration of arginine bioavailability through exogenous supplementation of arginine is, therefore, a promising therapeutic target. Phase II clinical trials of arginine therapy for sickle-related pain are underway and a Phase III randomized controlled trial is anticipated in the near future. PMID:27099528

  8. CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Correction of the Sickle Mutation in Human CD34+ cells.

    PubMed

    Hoban, Megan D; Lumaquin, Dianne; Kuo, Caroline Y; Romero, Zulema; Long, Joseph; Ho, Michelle; Young, Courtney S; Mojadidi, Michelle; Fitz-Gibbon, Sorel; Cooper, Aaron R; Lill, Georgia R; Urbinati, Fabrizia; Campo-Fernandez, Beatriz; Bjurstrom, Carmen F; Pellegrini, Matteo; Hollis, Roger P; Kohn, Donald B

    2016-09-01

    Targeted genome editing technology can correct the sickle cell disease mutation of the β-globin gene in hematopoietic stem cells. This correction supports production of red blood cells that synthesize normal hemoglobin proteins. Here, we demonstrate that Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs) and the Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 nuclease system can target DNA sequences around the sickle-cell mutation in the β-globin gene for site-specific cleavage and facilitate precise correction when a homologous donor template is codelivered. Several pairs of TALENs and multiple CRISPR guide RNAs were evaluated for both on-target and off-target cleavage rates. Delivery of the CRISPR/Cas9 components to CD34+ cells led to over 18% gene modification in vitro. Additionally, we demonstrate the correction of the sickle cell disease mutation in bone marrow derived CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from sickle cell disease patients, leading to the production of wild-type hemoglobin. These results demonstrate correction of the sickle mutation in patient-derived CD34+ cells using CRISPR/Cas9 technology.

  9. A pilot study comparing the level of sickle cell disease knowledge in a university in southeastern Texas and a university in Enugu, Enugu State, Nigeria, West Africa.

    PubMed

    Ogamdi, S O; Onwe, F

    2000-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is the most commonly inheritable blood disorder in man. Sickle cell anemia affects approximately one in 375 Blacks in the United States. There is yet no known cure for this disease. Families of sickle cell patients continue to be financially and emotionally devastated by sickle cell disease complications. A high level of sickle cell disease knowledge will encourage non-directional sickle cell disease counseling that would reduce the incidence of this disease. A pilot study to determine the level of sickle cell disease knowledge in a university in southeastern Texas and a university in Enugu, Enugu State, Nigeria, West Africa found that there was a need to improve retention of sickle cell disease factual information.

  10. 2-D Model for Normal and Sickle Cell Blood Microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tekleab, Yonatan; Harris, Wesley

    2011-11-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a genetic disorder that alters the red blood cell (RBC) structure and function such that hemoglobin (Hb) cannot effectively bind and release oxygen. Previous computational models have been designed to study the microcirculation for insight into blood disorders such as SCD. Our novel 2-D computational model represents a fast, time efficient method developed to analyze flow dynamics, O2 diffusion, and cell deformation in the microcirculation. The model uses a finite difference, Crank-Nicholson scheme to compute the flow and O2 concentration, and the level set computational method to advect the RBC membrane on a staggered grid. Several sets of initial and boundary conditions were tested. Simulation data indicate a few parameters to be significant in the perturbation of the blood flow and O2 concentration profiles. Specifically, the Hill coefficient, arterial O2 partial pressure, O2 partial pressure at 50% Hb saturation, and cell membrane stiffness are significant factors. Results were found to be consistent with those of Le Floch [2010] and Secomb [2006].

  11. Treatment of sickle cell anemia mouse model with iPS cells generated from autologous skin.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Jacob; Wernig, Marius; Markoulaki, Styliani; Sun, Chiao-Wang; Meissner, Alexander; Cassady, John P; Beard, Caroline; Brambrink, Tobias; Wu, Li-Chen; Townes, Tim M; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2007-12-21

    It has recently been demonstrated that mouse and human fibroblasts can be reprogrammed into an embryonic stem cell-like state by introducing combinations of four transcription factors. However, the therapeutic potential of such induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells remained undefined. By using a humanized sickle cell anemia mouse model, we show that mice can be rescued after transplantation with hematopoietic progenitors obtained in vitro from autologous iPS cells. This was achieved after correction of the human sickle hemoglobin allele by gene-specific targeting. Our results provide proof of principle for using transcription factor-induced reprogramming combined with gene and cell therapy for disease treatment in mice. The problems associated with using retroviruses and oncogenes for reprogramming need to be resolved before iPS cells can be considered for human therapy.

  12. Elevated Pulse Pressure is Associated with Hemolysis, Proteinuria and Chronic Kidney Disease in Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Novelli, Enrico M.; Hildesheim, Mariana; Rosano, Caterina; Vanderpool, Rebecca; Simon, Marc; Kato, Gregory J.; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2014-01-01

    A seeming paradox of sickle cell disease is that patients do not suffer from a high prevalence of systemic hypertension in spite of endothelial dysfunction, chronic inflammation and vasculopathy. However, some patients do develop systolic hypertension and increased pulse pressure, an increasingly recognized major cardiovascular risk factor in other populations. Hence, we hypothesized that pulse pressure, unlike other blood pressure parameters, is independently associated with markers of hemolytic anemia and cardiovascular risk in sickle cell disease. We analyzed the correlates of pulse pressure in patients (n  =  661) enrolled in a multicenter international sickle cell trial. Markers of hemolysis were analyzed as independent variables and as a previously validated hemolytic index that includes multiple variables. We found that pulse pressure, not systolic, diastolic or mean arterial pressure, independently correlated with high reticulocyte count (beta  =  2.37, p  =  0.02) and high hemolytic index (beta  =  1.53, p = 0.002) in patients with homozygous sickle cell disease in two multiple linear regression models which include the markers of hemolysis as independent variables or the hemolytic index, respectively. Pulse pressure was also independently associated with elevated serum creatinine (beta  =  3.21, p  =  0.02), and with proteinuria (beta  =  2.52, p  =  0.04). These results from the largest sickle cell disease cohort to date since the Cooperative Study of Sickle Cell Disease show that pulse pressure is independently associated with hemolysis, proteinuria and chronic kidney disease. We propose that high pulse pressure may be a risk factor for clinical complications of vascular dysfunction in sickle cell disease. Longitudinal and mechanistic studies should be conducted to confirm these hypotheses. PMID:25478953

  13. Pulmonary artery segmentation and quantification in sickle cell associated pulmonary hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linguraru, Marius George; Mukherjee, Nisha; Van Uitert, Robert L.; Summers, Ronald M.; Gladwin, Mark T.; Machado, Roberto F.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2008-03-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a known complication associated with sickle-cell disease; roughly 75% of sickle cell disease-afflicted patients have pulmonary arterial hypertension at the time of death. This prospective study investigates the potential of image analysis to act as a surrogate for presence and extent of disease, and whether the size change of the pulmonary arteries of sickle cell patients could be linked to sickle-cell associated pulmonary hypertension. Pulmonary CT-Angiography scans from sickle-cell patients were obtained and retrospectively analyzed. Randomly selected pulmonary CT-Angiography studies from patients without sickle-cell anemia were used as negative controls. First, images were smoothed using anisotropic diffusion. Then, a combination of fast marching and geodesic active contours level sets were employed to segment the pulmonary artery. An algorithm based on fast marching methods was used to compute the centerline of the segmented arteries. From the centerline, the diameters at the pulmonary trunk and first branch of the pulmonary arteries were measured automatically. Arterial diameters were normalized to the width of the thoracic cavity, patient weight and body surface. Results show that the pulmonary trunk and first right and left pulmonary arterial branches at the pulmonary trunk junction are significantly larger in diameter with increased blood flow in sickle-cell anemia patients as compared to controls (p values of 0.0278 for trunk and 0.0007 for branches). CT with image processing shows great potential as a surrogate indicator of pulmonary hemodynamics or response to therapy, which could be an important tool for drug discovery and noninvasive clinical surveillance.

  14. Increased phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) receptor function associated with sickle red cell membrane ghosts

    SciTech Connect

    Ramachandran, M.; Nair, C.N.; Abraham, E.C.

    1987-05-01

    The biological receptor for tumor-promoting phorbol esters has been identified as the CaS /phospholipid dependent enzyme, protein kinase C. In the red cell, this enzyme is mainly cytosolic but becomes translocated to the membrane if the cellular CaS is allowed to rise. Since cellular CaS in sickle red cells is high, it was reasoned that this enzyme may become more membrane-bound. In fact, the authors noticed a four-fold increase in the binding of TH-PDBu by membrane ghosts isolated from sickle red cells compared to normal red cells (pmoles PDBu bound/mg protein; normal = 0.3 vs sickle cell = 1.4). Attempts to assay the enzyme directly as phospholipid-activated TSP incorporation into the acid-precipitable membrane proteins also indicated a two-fold increase in the radiolabelling of sickle cell membrane ghosts. Autophosphorylation of membrane proteins and analysis of the phosphorylation profile by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography revealed phosphorylation predominantly of bands 3, 4.1 and 4.9 which are known protein kinase C substrates for the red cell enzyme. The increased membrane-associated protein kinase C in sickle red cells may have a bearing on the altered membrane properties reported in this condition.

  15. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene polymorphism is associated with sickle cell disease patients in India.

    PubMed

    Nishank, Sudhansu Sekhar; Singh, Mendi Prema Shyam Sunder; Yadav, Rajiv; Gupta, Rasik Bihari; Gadge, Vijay Sadashiv; Gwal, Anil

    2013-12-01

    Patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) produce significantly low levels of plasma nitric oxide (NO) during acute vaso-occlusive crisis. In transgenic sickle cell mice, NO synthesized by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) enzyme of vascular endothelial cells has been found to protect the mice from vaso-occlusive events. Therefore, the present study aims to explore possible association of eNOS gene polymorphism as a potential genetic modifier in SCD patients. A case control study involving 150 SCD patients and age- and ethnicity-matched 150 healthy controls were genotyped by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism techniques for three important eNOS gene polymorphisms-eNOS 4a/b, eNOS 894G>T and eNOS -786T>C. It was observed that SCD patients had significantly higher frequencies of mutant alleles besides heterozygous and homozygous mutant genotypes of these three eNOS gene polymorphisms and low levels of plasma nitrite (NO2) as compared with control groups. The SCD severe group had significantly lower levels of plasma NO2 and higher frequencies of mutant alleles of these three SNPs of eNOS gene in contrast to the SCD mild group of patients. Haplotype analysis revealed that frequencies of one mutant haplotype '4a-T-C' (alleles in order of eNOS 4a/b, eNOS 894G>T and eNOS -786T>C) were significantly high in the severe SCD patients (P<0.0001), whereas the frequency of a wild haplotype '4b-G-T' was found to be significantly high (P<0.0001) in the SCD mild patients, which indicates that eNOS gene polymorphisms are associated with SCD patients in India and may act as a genetic modifier of the phenotypic variation of SCD patients.

  16. Allogeneic transplantation strategies including haploidentical transplantation in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Gluckman, Eliane

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the most common inherited hemoglobinopathy. Despite antenatal counseling and neonatal screening programs implemented in higher income countries, SCD is still associated with multiple morbidities and early mortality. To date, the only curative approach to SCD is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, but this therapy is not yet established worldwide. The registries of the European Blood and Marrow Transplant (EBMT) and the Centre for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) account, respectively, for 611 and 627 patients receiving transplantations for SCD. Most of these patients were transplanted with grafts from an HLA-identical sibling donor. The main obstacles to increasing the number of transplantations are a lack of awareness on the part of physicians and families, the absence of reliable prognostic factors for severity, and the perceived risk that transplantation complications may outweigh the benefits of early transplantation. Results show that more than 90% of patients having undergone an HLA-identical sibling transplantation after myeloablative conditioning are cured, with very limited complications. Major improvement is expected from the use of new reduced-toxicity conditioning regimens and the use of alternative donors, including unrelated cord blood transplantations and related haploidentical bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplantations.

  17. Morphine for the Treatment of Pain in Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ballas, Samir K.

    2015-01-01

    Pain is a hallmark of sickle cell disease (SCD) and its treatment remains challenging. Opioids are the major family of analgesics that are commonly used for treating severe pain. However, these are not always effective and are associated with the liabilities of their own. The pharmacology and multiorgan side effects of opioids are rapidly emerging areas of investigation, but there remains a scarcity of clinical studies. Due to opioid-induced endothelial-, mast cell-, renal mesangial-, and epithelial-cell-specific effects and proinflammatory as well as growth influencing signaling, it is likely that when used for analgesia, opioids may have organ specific pathological effects. Experimental and clinical studies, even though extremely few, suggest that opioids may exacerbate existent organ damage and also stimulate pathologies of their own. Because of the recurrent and/or chronic use of large doses of opioids in SCD, it is critical to evaluate the role and contribution of opioids in many complications of SCD. The aim of this review is to initiate inquiry to develop strategies that may prevent the inadvertent effect of opioids on organ function in SCD, should it occur, without compromising analgesia. PMID:25654130

  18. Information and Resources for Caregivers: Sickle Cell Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... weather Being overly tired or fatigued Exercising too hard Being dehydrated (not drinking enough water and other fluids) Not having enough oxygen in the blood (Adapted from American Academy of Family Physicians, 2000.) Who Gets Sickle ...

  19. Hematopoietic stem cell mobilization strategies for gene therapy of beta thalassemia and sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Yannaki, Evangelia; Stamatoyannopoulos, George

    2010-08-01

    Effective gene therapy for hemoglobinopathies will require high numbers of autologous gene-engineered hematopoetic stem cells to be reintroduced into the patients. Stem cell mobilization using G-CSF is the most convenient and effective approach to achieve this goal, but it can have severe side effects in sickle cell anemia and be potentially harmful in the case of severe thalassemia. Hence, the optimal way of collection of hematopoetic stem cells from patients with thalassemia and sickle cell disease needs to be determined. In this paper, we review the possible risks of G-CSF mobilization in hemoglobinopathies and we outline the approaches used in an on-going clinical trial in which pretreatment with hydroxyurea is used to reduce potential risks of G-CSF administration to patients with severe beta thalassemia.

  20. Deoxygenation affects tyrosine phosphoproteome of red cell membrane from patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Siciliano, Angela; Turrini, Franco; Bertoldi, Mariarita; Matte, Alessandro; Pantaleo, Antonella; Olivieri, Oliviero; De Franceschi, Lucia

    2010-04-15

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a worldwide distributed hereditary red cell disorder related to the production of a defective form of hemoglobin, hemoglobin S (HbS). One of the hallmarks of SCD is the presence of dense, dehydrate highly adhesive sickle red blood cells (RBCs) that result from persistent membrane damage associated with HbS polymerization, abnormal activation of membrane cation transports and generation of distorted and rigid red cells with membrane perturbation and cytoskeleton dysfunction. Although modulation of phosphorylation state of the proteins from membrane and cytoskeleton networks has been proposed to participate in red cell homeostasis, much still remains to be investigated in normal and diseased red cells. Here, we report that tyrosine (Tyr-) phosphoproteome of sickle red cells was different from normal controls and was affected by deoxygenation. We found proteins, p55 and band 4.1, from the junctional complex, differently Tyr-phosphorylated in SCD RBCs compared to normal RBCs under normoxia and modulated by deoxygenation, while band 4.2 was similarly Tyr-phosphorylated in both conditions. In SCD RBCs we identified the phosphopeptides for protein 4.1R located in the protein FERM domain (Tyr-13) and for alpha-spectrin located near or in a linker region (Tyr-422 and Tyr-1498) involving protein areas crucial for their functions in the context of red cell membrane properties, suggesting that Tyr-phosphorylation may be part of the events involved in maintaining membrane mechanical stability in SCD red cells.

  1. [Evaluation of hemogram in patients with homozygous sickle cell disease: about 87 cases].

    PubMed

    Dahmani, Fatima; Benkirane, Souad; Kouzih, Jaafar; Woumki, Aziz; Mamad, Hassan; Masrar, Azlarab

    2016-01-01

    Homozygous sickle cell disease is one of the most frequent haemoglobinopathies in Morocco. Sickle cell disease is characterized by a large clinical and biological expression variability which depends on modulating genetic and environmental factors. Clinical manifestation includes regenerative anemia whose severity may vary among individuals. In the absence of treatment, it results in premature death. Sickle cell disease is characterized by a large clinical and biological expression variability which depends on genetic and environmental factors. A severe clinical picture marked by high early transfusion frequency, severe infectious complications and early mortality. A constant inflammatory condition characterized by elevated inflammatory proteins and compromised nutritional status. The objective of this study is to determine the hematological parameters profile in moroccan patients with homozygous sickle cell (SS) disease during stationary phases. We conducted a cross-sectional descriptive study of 87 patients with sickle cell (SS) disease. We performed a biological study based on: Hemogram with morphological assessment of red blood cells stained with MGG and automated reticulocyte counting; Hemoglobin electrophoresis test performed on alkaline agarose gel (pH 8.8) and densitometric integration. The average age is 13.22 years ± 16.36, ranging betrween 0.6 and 36 years, with a sex ratio (M/F) of 1.175. Biological effects of anemia were intense in 88.5% of patients; 67.8% of patients had normocytic anemia compared with 29.9% with microcytosis, and 2.3% with macrocytosis. The degree of anisocytosis was related to the degree of anemia, very evocative in patients with homozygous S/S (95.4%). Reticulocytosis was observed in 81.6% of patients; 52.9% of patients had thrombocytosis. Leukocytosis was observed in 64.4% of patients; 80.5% of patients had neutropenia. The parameters of the hemogram will serve as a basis for comparison during crises and will make it possible to

  2. The prevalence of hypertension and abnormal kidney function in children with sickle cell disease –a cross sectional review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Renal disease is a known contributor to mortality in adults with sickle cell disease (SCD) and renal abnormalities are evident in childhood. Hyperfiltration (evidenced by elevated glomerular filtration rate, GFR) occurs in children with SCD early in disease. However, the incidence of low GFR (<90 ml/min/1.73 m2) suggestive of chronic kidney disease (CKD), is not well established. The prevalence of hypertension is also not well known. The goal of this study was to determine the prevalence of hypertension and CKD in a cohort of children with SCD. Methods We performed a retrospective chart review of patients followed at the Rainbow Babies and Children’s Sickle Cell Disease Clinic who were seen during routine follow up visits. Inclusion criteria were all patients ages 3–18. Exclusion criteria included recent (within 2 weeks) hospitalization and/or episode of acute chest, pain crises, febrile illness or red blood cell transfusion. Data collected included serum creatinine, blood pressure and history of sickle cell complications (acute chest syndrome, stroke or stroke risk). Estimated GFR (eGFR) was calculated using the updated Schwartz creatinine-based estimating formula. Analysis examined the associations among eGFR, blood pressure and sickle cell complications. The Institutional Review Board at University Hospitals Case Medical Center approved this study. Results A total of 48 children had complete data available. Mean eGFR was 140 mL/min/1.73 m2 +/- 34.9 (range 71.9-404.2 mL/min/1.73 m2). Four patients (8.3%) had eGFRs < 90 mL/min/1.73 m2, 35 patients (72.9%) had eGFRs > 120 mL/min/1.73 m2 and 9 patients (18.8%) had eGFRs in the normal range. Eight patients (16.7%) had evidence of elevated blood pressures (pre-hypertension or hypertension). There was no correlation between eGFR and age, and no association of eGFR with acute chest or stroke risk. Conclusion In this SCD cohort, we identified abnormally low eGFR (suggestive of early CKD

  3. Increased adhesive and inflammatory properties in blood outgrowth endothelial cells from sickle cell anemia patients.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Tatiana Mary; Lanaro, Carolina; Ozelo, Margareth Castro; Garrido, Vanessa Tonin; Olalla-Saad, Sara Teresinha; Conran, Nicola; Costa, Fernando Ferreira

    2013-11-01

    The endothelium plays an important role in sickle cell anemia (SCA) pathophysiology, interacting with red cells, leukocytes and platelets during the vaso-occlusive process and undergoing activation and dysfunction as a result of intravascular hemolysis and chronic inflammation. Blood outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs) can be isolated from adult peripheral blood and have been used in diverse studies, since they have a high proliferative capacity and a stable phenotype during in vitro culture. This study aimed to establish BOEC cultures for use as an in vitro study model for endothelial function in sickle cell anemia. Once established, BOECs from steady-state SCA individuals (SCA BOECs) were characterized for their adhesive and inflammatory properties, in comparison to BOECs from healthy control individuals (CON BOECs). Cell adhesion assays demonstrated that control individual red cells adhered significantly more to SCA BOEC than to CON BOEC. Despite these increased adhesive properties, SCA BOECs did not demonstrate significant differences in their expression of major endothelial adhesion molecules, compared to CON BOECs. SCA BOECs were also found to be pro-inflammatory, producing a significantly higher quantity of the cytokine, IL-8, than CON BOECs. From the results obtained, we suggest that BOEC may be a good model for the in vitro study of SCA. Data indicate that endothelial cells of sickle cell anemia patients may have abnormal inflammatory and adhesive properties even outside of the chronic inflammatory and vaso-occlusive environment of patients.

  4. Future directions of sickle cell disease research: the NIH perspective.

    PubMed

    Hoots, W Keith; Shurin, Susan B

    2012-08-01

    Efforts to enhance therapy for children and adults with sickle cell disease (SCD) have proven more challenging than might have been predicted from the fact that an understanding of the underlying pathogenesis antedated that of many other diseases for which good treatments presently exist. The multi-organ injury that occurs with SCD certainly contributes to this clinical reality. Research over decades indicates that the primary defect in hemoglobin that results in polymerization of the protein under low oxygen conditions and resultant cellular deformity of the red blood cell initiates a complex downstream pathogenesis associated with vascular injury and organ ischemia. Deciphering this in a manner that informs successful therapies that improve all target organs continues to challenge hematologists. The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) is dedicated to support research across the basic science, translational and clinical spectrum to achieve these clinical outcomes. The following provides a brief summary of the research strategies which NHLBI is presently supporting and will support in the future to enhance care and ultimately, to effect cure of this hemoglobin disease that causes such suffering to those who inherit this monogenic disease.

  5. Severe sickle cell disease--pathophysiology and therapy.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, George; Vichinsky, Elliott; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan; Shenoy, Shalini

    2010-01-01

    Over 70,000 people live with sickle cell disease (SCD) in the United States and multitudes worldwide. About 2000 afflicted babies are born in this country each year. In African countries such as Nigeria, over 100,000 babies are born with the disease each year. Great strides have been made in the conservative management of SCD. However, the medical and psychosocial cost of supporting patients with this chronic illness is enormous and spans a lifetime. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) can abrogate SCD manifestations, and is the best option for cure today. Yet, this treatment modality is underutilized as less than 500 transplants are reported in the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) database because of its significant risk of morbidity and mortality. There is growing understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease, and this, coupled with advances in transplantation and new approaches to therapy, continue to improve care of patients with SCD both in children and during adulthood. Continuing investigation seeks to predict the course of the disease and to determine timing and modality of therapy in order to optimize outcomes.

  6. Immunologic Effects of Hydroxyurea in Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Lederman, Howard M.; Connolly, Margaret A.; Kalpatthi, Ram; Ware, Russell E.; Wang, Winfred C.; Luchtman-Jones, Lori; Waclawiw, Myron; Goldsmith, Jonathan C.; Swift, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Susceptibility to encapsulated bacteria is well known in sickle cell disease (SCD). Hydroxyurea use is common in adults and children with SCD, but little is known about hydroxyurea’s effects on immune function in SCD. Because hydroxyurea inhibits ribonucleotide reductase, causing cell cycle arrest at the G1–S interface, we postulated that hydroxyurea might delay transition from naive to memory T cells, with inhibition of immunologic maturation and vaccine responses. METHODS: T-cell subsets, naive and memory T cells, and antibody responses to pneumococcal and measles, mumps, and rubella vaccines were measured among participants in a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of hydroxyurea in infants and young children with SCD (BABY HUG). RESULTS: Compared with placebo, hydroxyurea treatment resulted in significantly lower total lymphocyte, CD4, and memory T-cell counts; however, these numbers were still within the range of historical healthy controls. Antibody responses to pneumococcal vaccination were not affected, but a delay in achieving protective measles antibody levels occurred in the hydroxyurea group. Antibody levels to measles, mumps, and rubella showed no differences between groups at exit, indicating that effective immunization can be achieved despite hydroxyurea use. CONCLUSIONS: Hydroxyurea does not appear to have significant deleterious effects on the immune function of infants and children with SCD. Additional assessments of lymphocyte parameters of hydroxyurea-treated children may be warranted. No changes in current immunization schedules are recommended; however, for endemic disease or epidemics, adherence to accelerated immunization schedules for the measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine should be reinforced. PMID:25180279

  7. Thalassemia and sickle cell anemia in Swedish immigrants: Genetic diseases have become global

    PubMed Central

    Hemminki, Kari; Li, Xinjun; Försti, Asta; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Some 15% of the Swedish population is born outside Sweden, originating from all continents of the world. Thalassemia and sickle cell anemia constitute the most common inherited recessive disorders globally and they are endemic in areas of Africa and Asia, origins of many immigrants to Sweden. We aimed at investigating the origins of the Swedish sickle cell and thalassemia patients. Methods: Patients were identified using data from the Swedish Hospital Discharge Register since 1987 and from the Outpatient Register since 2001 up to year 2010. Results: A total of 3064 persons were diagnosed with thalassemia. The incidence was highest, 62.9/100,000 for immigrants from Thailand, followed by Iraqis (47.1/100,000); the rate was 0.7/100,000 among those born in Sweden. The total number of sickle cell anemia patients was 584 and the highest rate of 13.0/100,000 was found for Sub-Saharan immigrants. For thalassemia, 363 of the patients were siblings, while for sickle cell anemia, 180 were siblings. Conclusions: The data showed that >90% of sickle cell and thalassemia patients were first- or second-generation immigrants to Sweden and the endemic regions for these were the origins of immigrants with the highest incidence. Global immigration provides global challenges to national health care systems. PMID:27092253

  8. EXPLORING PARENT-SIBLING COMMUNICATION IN FAMILIES OF CHILDREN WITH SICKLE CELL DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Graff, J. Carolyn; Hankins, Jane S.; Hardy, Belinda T.; Hall, Heather R.; Roberts, Ruth J.; Neely-Barnes, Susan L.

    2011-01-01

    Focus group interviews were conducted with parents of children with sickle cell disease to explore parent-sibling communication about sickle cell disease. Communication was influenced by attributes and behaviors of the parent, the child with sickle cell disease, and the sibling; extended family, neighbors, friends, and church members or social networks; and available, accessible resources related to the child’s health, child’s school, and parent employment. Outcomes that influenced and were influenced by factors within and outside the parent-sibling dyad and nuclear family included parent satisfaction, parent roles, family intactness, and status attainment. These findings support previous research with African American families and expand our views of the importance of educating parents, family members, and others about sickle cell disease. The findings suggest a need to explore sibling perception of this communication, parent and sibling perception of the impact of frequent hospitalizations and clinic visits on the sibling and family, and variations within families of children with sickle cell disease. PMID:20384476

  9. Hematological differences between patients with different subtypes of sickle cell disease on hydroxyurea treatment

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Fabia; Menezes Neto, Osvaldo Alves; Polis, Larissa Bueno; Bassi, Sarah Cristina; Brunetta, Denise Menezes; Silva-Pinto, Ana Cristina; Angulo, Ivan Lucena

    2012-01-01

    Objective Sickle cell anemia and the interaction S/Beta thalassemia differ in hematological values due to microcytosis and hypochromia caused by the thalassemic mutation. The clinical benefit of long-term hydroxyurea treatment is undeniable in sickle cell disease with monitoring of the biological action of the drug being by the complete blood count. The objective of this work is to compare changes in some of the erythrocytic indexes between S/Beta thalassemia and sickle cell anemia patients on long-term hydroxyurea treatment. Methods The values of erythrocyte indexes (mean corpuscular volume and mean corpuscular hemoglobin) were compared in a retrospective study of two groups of patients (Sickle cell anemia and S/Beta thalassemia) on hydroxyurea treatment over a mean of six years. Results The quantitative values of the two parameters differed between the groups. Increases in mean corpuscular volume and reductions in mean corpuscular hemoglobin delay longer in S/Beta thalassemia patients (p-value = 0.018). Conclusion Hematological changes are some of the beneficial effects of hydroxyurea in sickle cell disease as cellular hydration increases and the hemoglobin S concentration is reduced. The complete blood count is the best test to monitor changes, but the interpretation of the results in S/Beta thalassemia should be different. PMID:23323066

  10. Pregnancy in Sickle Cell Disease Is a Very High-Risk Situation: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Elenga, Narcisse; Adeline, Aurélie; Balcaen, John; Vaz, Tania; Calvez, Mélanie; Terraz, Anne; Accrombessi, Laetitia; Carles, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is a serious genetic disorder affecting 1/235 births in French Guiana. This study aimed to describe the follow-up of pregnancies among sickle cell disease patients in Cayenne Hospital, in order to highlight the most reported complications. 62 records of pregnancies were analyzed among 44 females with sickle cell disease, between 2007 and 2013. Our results were compared to those of studies conducted in Brazil and Guadeloupe. There were 61 monofetal pregnancies and 2 twin pregnancies, 27 pregnancies among women with SS phenotype, 30 SC pregnancies, and five S-beta pregnancies. The study showed that the follow-up of patients was variable, but no maternal death was found. We also noted that the main maternofetal complications of pregnancies were anemia (36.5%), infection (31.7%), vasoocclusive crisis (20.6%), preeclampsia (17.5%), premature birth (11.1%), intrauterine growth retardation (15.9%), abnormal fetal heart rate (14.3%), and intrauterine fetal death (4.8%). Pregnancies were more at risk among women with SS phenotype. Pregnancy in sickle cell disease patients requires a supported multidisciplinary team including the primary care physician, the obstetrician, and the Integrated Center for Sickle Cell Disease. PMID:27403164

  11. Correction of the sickle cell disease mutation in human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Hoban, Megan D; Cost, Gregory J; Mendel, Matthew C; Romero, Zulema; Kaufman, Michael L; Joglekar, Alok V; Ho, Michelle; Lumaquin, Dianne; Gray, David; Lill, Georgia R; Cooper, Aaron R; Urbinati, Fabrizia; Senadheera, Shantha; Zhu, Allen; Liu, Pei-Qi; Paschon, David E; Zhang, Lei; Rebar, Edward J; Wilber, Andrew; Wang, Xiaoyan; Gregory, Philip D; Holmes, Michael C; Reik, Andreas; Hollis, Roger P; Kohn, Donald B

    2015-04-23

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized by a single point mutation in the seventh codon of the β-globin gene. Site-specific correction of the sickle mutation in hematopoietic stem cells would allow for permanent production of normal red blood cells. Using zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) designed to flank the sickle mutation, we demonstrate efficient targeted cleavage at the β-globin locus with minimal off-target modification. By co-delivering a homologous donor template (either an integrase-defective lentiviral vector or a DNA oligonucleotide), high levels of gene modification were achieved in CD34(+) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Modified cells maintained their ability to engraft NOD/SCID/IL2rγ(null) mice and to produce cells from multiple lineages, although with a reduction in the modification levels relative to the in vitro samples. Importantly, ZFN-driven gene correction in CD34(+) cells from the bone marrow of patients with SCD resulted in the production of wild-type hemoglobin tetramers.

  12. Let's Talk about the Needs of African American Children with Sickle Cell Disease: A Recognized "Other Health Impairment."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dooley, Elizabeth A.; Perkins, Nechelle

    Children who inherit sickle cell disease, primarily African Americans and Hispanics, are at risk for serious medical conditions and require special care both at home and in school. Sickle cell disease is recognized as an "Other Health Impairment" and identified students may be eligible for special education services under the Individuals…

  13. Carbon-fiber microelectrode amperometry reveals sickle-cell-induced inflammation and chronic morphine effects on single mast cells.

    PubMed

    Manning, Benjamin M; Hebbel, Robert P; Gupta, Kalpna; Haynes, Christy L

    2012-03-16

    Sickle cell disease, caused by a mutation of hemoglobin, is characterized by a complex pathophysiology including an important inflammatory component. Mast cells are tissue-resident leukocytes known to influence a range of immune functions in a variety of different ways, largely through the secretion of biologically active mediators from preformed granules. However, it is not understood how mast cells influence the inflammatory environment in sickle cell disease. A notable consequence of sickle cell disease is severe pain. Therefore, morphine is often used to treat this disease. Because mast cells express opioid receptors, it is pertinent to understand how chronic morphine exposure influences mast cell function and inflammation in sickle cell disease. Herein, carbon-fiber microelectrode amperometry (CFMA) was used to monitor the secretion of immunoactive mediators from single mast cells. CFMA enabled the detection and quantification of discrete exocytotic events from single mast cells. Mast cells from two transgenic mouse models expressing human sickle hemoglobin (hBERK1 and BERK) and a control mouse expressing normal human hemoglobin (HbA-BERK) were monitored using CFMA to explore the impact of sickle-cell-induced inflammation and chronic morphine exposure on mast cell function. This work, utilizing the unique mechanistic perspective provided by CFMA, describes how mast cell function is significantly altered in hBERK1 and BERK mice, including decreased serotonin released compared to HbA-BERK controls. Furthermore, morphine was shown to significantly increase the serotonin released from HbA-BERK mast cells and demonstrated the capacity to reverse the observed sickle-cell-induced changes in mast cell function.

  14. Major Surgery in A Jehovah Witness with Sickle Cell Disease: Case Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Anyaehie, Udo Ego; Nwadinigwe, Cajetan Uwatoronye; Nwosu, Arinze Duke; Ogbui, Valentine Ogochukwu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: A Jehovah’s Witness belongs to the religious group that does not accept blood transfusion in any form, while a sickle cell disease patient has abnormal haemoglobins that do not last in circulation predisposing one to anaemia and other systemic complications. Performing a major surgery in a Jehovah’s Witness who has sickle cell disease is tasking for a surgeon. Case presentation: This case reports a 28-year-old African female with sickle cell disease who outrightly refused any form of blood transfusion as being a Jehovah’s Witness and having a complex primary hip that required total hip replacement. This work highlighted the complexity and difficulty encountered by virtue of the fact that patient had orthopaedic complications of Sickle Cell Disease and measures taken to prevent sickling crisis. Conclusion: It is possible to carry out major surgery in a sickler who has durable power of attorney not to receive blood, but optimum preparation, meticulous and fast surgery and adequate monitoring must be instituted to avert morbidity and mortality seen in this group of patients. PMID:27703935

  15. Erythropoietic differentiation of a human embryonic stem cell line harbouring the sickle cell anaemia mutation.

    PubMed

    Pryzhkova, Marina V; Peters, Ann; Zambidis, Elias T

    2010-08-01

    Herein is reported efficient erythropoietic differentiation of a human embryonic stem cell (ESC) line derived from a preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD)-screened embryo that harbours the homozygous sickle cell disease (SCD) haemoglobinopathy mutation. This human ESC line possesses typical pluripotency characteristics and forms multilineage teratomas in vivo. SCD-human ESC efficiently differentiated to the haematopoietic lineage under serum-free and stromal co-culture conditions and gave rise to robust primitive and definitive erythrocytes. Expression of embryonic, fetal and adult sickle globin genes in SCD PGD-derived human ESC-derived erythrocytes was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR, intracytoplasmic fluorescence-activated cell sorting and in-situ immunostaining of PGD-derived human ESC teratoma sections. These data introduce important methodologies and paradigms for using patient-specific human ESC to generate normal and haemoglobinopathic erythroid progenitors for biomedical research.

  16. Erythrocyte deformability and aggregation in homozygous sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Vayá, Amparo; Collado, Susana; Dasí, Maria Angeles; Pérez, Maria Luz; Hernandez, Jose Luis; Barragán, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Rheological properties of homozygous sickle cell anaemia (SCA) show marked heterogeneity, which may be explained in part by the concomitance of alpha genotypes or beta haplotypes, along with hydroxurea (HU) treatment. To further clarify this issue, in 11 homozygous patients with SCA in the steady state and in 16 healthy controls, we analysed erythrocyte deformability (ED) in a Rheodyn SSD by means of the Elongation Index (EI) at 12, 30 and 60 Pa, and erythrocyte aggregation at stasis (EA0) and at 3 sec-1 (EA1) in a Myrenne aggregometer along with fibrinogen, biochemical and haematological parameters. When compared with controls, homozygous (SS) patients showed a lower EI at all the shear stresses tested (p < 0.01) and higher EA0 (p < 0.014), but not higher EA1 (p = 0.076). Fibrinogen did not show statistical differences (p = 0.642). In the Spearman's correlation IE60 correlated inversely with Hb S (p < 0.05) and directly with MCV, MCH and Hb F levels (p < 0.01). EA0 correlated inversely with MCV, MCH, Hb F (p < 0.01) and directly with Hb S (p < 0.05). HU treatment improved EI and EA0, but not EA1. This paradoxical behaviour of HU on erythrocyte aggregation merits further research to be clarified.

  17. Transition Needs of Adolescents With Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Regina A.; Cho, Esther; Chadwick-Mansker, Kelley R.; D’Souza, Natalia; Housten, Ashley J.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This article describes how adolescents with sickle cell disease (SCD) perceive their ability to perform everyday tasks required for transition to adult health care and independent living. METHOD. The Adolescent Autonomy Checklist (AAC) was adapted to include skills associated with managing SCD (AAC–SCD) and was administered to adolescents during clinic visits. Participants indicated “can do already” or “needs practice” for 100 activities in 12 categories. RESULTS. Of 122 patients, the percentage of adolescents who needed practice was greatest in living arrangements (38.7%), money management (35.8%), vocational skills (29.6%), and health care skills (25.5%). We found a significant effect of age and of cerebrovascular injury on the percentage of those who reported “needs practice” in multiple categories. We found no effect of gender and limited effect of hemoglobin phenotype on any skill category. CONCLUSION. Findings support the need for educational intervention to improve transition skills in adolescents with SCD. PMID:26122692

  18. Growth Patterns in Children with Sickle Cell Anemia during Puberty

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Melissa; Akohoue, Sylvie A.; Shankar, Sadhna M.; Fleming, Irma; An, Angel; Yu, Chung; Acra, Sari; Buchowski, Maciej S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Previous studies of children with homozygous sickle cell anemia (SCA) show impaired growth and maturation. The correlation of this suboptimal growth with metabolic and hematological factors during puberty is poorly understood. Procedure We studied a group of pre-adolescent children with SCA (19 males, 14 females) and healthy controls (16 males, 15 females) matched for race, sex, body size, and pubertal development. Height, weight, body mass index (BMI), and body composition changes were longitudinally assessed over a 2-year period and compared between the groups and with Z scores based on US growth charts. These changes were correlated with hemoglobin concentration and with energy expenditure measured using indirect whole-room calorimetry. Results Children with SCA progressed through puberty slower than control children. While, after 2 years, pubertal males with SCA were shorter, their annual increases in weight were not different from controls. The mean fat free mass (FFM) increments were significantly less in males and females with SCA than in control children. In males with SCA, growth in height declined over time and was significantly slower than in matched controls (p<0.05). Conclusion Growth delays were present during puberty in children with SCA. Decreased growth velocity in children with SCA was independently associated with decreased hemoglobin concentration and increased total energy expenditure. PMID:19544390

  19. Birth Weights in Sickle Cell Disease Pregnancies: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Susan E.; Macleod, David

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy in women with Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) has been linked with an increased incidence of adverse foetal outcomes when compared to women without haemoglobinopathies (HbAA). There’s a paucity of data into foetal outcomes for infants born to women with SCD. Customised growth charts have been demonstrated to be better than population-based growth charts at identifying unhealthy small babies. We analysed the mean birth weight and customised birth weight centiles of infants born to mothers with SCD versus mothers with HbAA genotype, to quantify the risk of having a smaller baby. Birth weight and birth weight centiles were analysed for 88 women with SCD (50 HbSS; 38 HbSC) and 176 controls (HbAA). Statistically significant differences were seen in the mean birth weight (P value = 0.004) and the mean birth weight centiles (P value = 0.016). We conclude that SCD is a risk factor for having a smaller baby. PMID:27776167

  20. Barriers to effective pain management in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Wright, Kerri; Adeosum, Omolola

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a long-term condition that would benefit from a long-term conditions approach to its care and management. SCD is growing in prevalence, affecting 10,000-12,000 people in the UK, with SCD sufferers having an increased life expectancy from in the past. The most problematic aspect of managing SCD is management of the pain from vaso-occlusive crises. Vaso-occlusive pain is the most common reason for hospital admissions in people with SCD and accounts for large numbers of accident and emergency (A&E) attendances. A literature review was carried out to examine the management of vaso-occlusive pain in SCD. The review identified three main barriers to effective pain management in SCD: the manifestation of vaso-occlusive pain, the sociocultural factors affecting pain assessment, and the concerns regarding addiction and pseudo-addiction. Addressing these barriers will allow people with SCD to have their pain managed more effectively, improve their quality of life and potentially reduce A&E attendances and admissions to hospital.

  1. Controlling sickle cell disease in Ghana - ethics and options

    PubMed Central

    Kyerewaa Edwin, Ama; Edwin, Frank; Etwire, Victor

    2011-01-01

    Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) is a significant public health burden in Ghana. Recent studies indicate that 2% of Ghanaian newborns are affected by SCD; one in three Ghanaians has the hemoglobin S and/or C gene. As a means of controlling the disease, some authorities have recommended prenatal diagnosis (PND) and selective abortion. In the current era, SCD has a good prognosis and fairly reasonable quality of life. Advances in bone marrow transplantation have shown the disease is curable in selected patients. PND and selective abortion therefore raises a myriad of ethical dilemmas which are considered in this review. In the light of the demonstration of improved prognosis in recent times, PND and selective abortion appears to be applying capital punishment to the unborn child for “crimes” only the parents can be responsible for. In this review, we recommend control of SCD on three levels – preconception genetic testing and strategic reproductive choices, PND and education for carrier parents, and holistic management of persons with SCD. We emphasize the critical importance of self-management, especially self-awareness, in assuring a good quality of life for persons with SCD. We believe such an approach is cost-effective, and consistent with sound ethical principles and good conscience. PMID:22187596

  2. Genetic predictors for stroke in children with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Jonathan M; Frohlich, Denise M; Howard, Thad A; Schultz, William H; Driscoll, Catherine; Nagasubramanian, Ramamoorthy; Mortier, Nicole A; Kimble, Amy C; Aygun, Banu; Adams, Robert J; Helms, Ronald W; Ware, Russell E

    2011-06-16

    Stroke is a devastating complication of sickle cell anemia (SCA), affecting 5% to 10% of patients before adulthood. Several candidate genetic polymorphisms have been proposed to affect stroke risk, but few have been validated, mainly because previous studies were hampered by relatively small sample sizes and the absence of additional patient cohorts for validation testing. To verify the accuracy of proposed genetic modifiers influencing stroke risk in SCA, we performed genotyping for 38 published single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), as well as α-thalassemia, G6PD A(-) variant deficiency, and β-globin haplotype in 2 cohorts of children with well-defined stroke phenotypes (130 stroke, 103 nonstroke). Five polymorphisms had significant influence (P < .05): SNPs in the ANXA2, TGFBR3, and TEK genes were associated with increased stroke risk, whereas α-thalassemia and a SNP in the ADCY9 gene were linked with decreased stroke risk. Further investigation at these genetic regions may help define mutations that confer stroke risk or protection in children with SCA.

  3. Kidney Transplantation From a Donor With Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Rossidis, A; Lim, M A; Palmer, M; Levine, M H; Naji, A; Bloom, R D; Abt, P L

    2017-02-01

    In the United States, >100 000 patients are waiting for a kidney transplant. Given the paucity of organs available for transplant, expansion of eligibility criteria for deceased donation is of substantial interest. Sickle cell disease (SCD) is viewed as a contraindication to kidney donation, perhaps because SCD substantially alters renal structure and function and thus has the potential to adversely affect multiple physiological processes of the kidney. To our knowledge, transplantation from a donor with SCD has never been described in the literature. In this paper, we report the successful transplantation of two kidneys from a 37-year-old woman with SCD who died from an intracranial hemorrhage. Nearly 4 mo after transplant, both recipients are doing well and are off dialysis. The extent to which kidneys from donors with SCD can be safely transplanted with acceptable outcomes is unknown; however, this report should provide support for the careful expansion of kidneys from donors with SCD without evidence of renal dysfunction and with normal tissue architecture on preimplantation biopsies.

  4. Sheehan's syndrome and sickle cell disease: the story of Natasha.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Barbara A; Rose, Anita; Florschutz, Gerhard

    2016-11-17

    Sheehan's syndrome (SS) is one of the pituitary disorders caused by severe blood loss during childbirth leading to necrosis of the pituitary gland. Diagnosis is made following severe haemorrhage, failure to produce milk and failure to menstruate. Rare in countries with good obstetric care, SS is still frequent in those countries with poor healthcare services. The majority of papers published on SS do not mention psychological or neuropsychological sequelae. Of those that do, mood disorders are sometimes reported and occasionally cognitive problems are noted, typically attention, memory or executive deficits. We report on Natasha, a British woman of Caribbean ancestry with sickle cell disease (SCD), diagnosed at age 33 years with SS following the birth of her second child. We know of no reports of a person with both SCD and SS. Natasha has been seen regularly for neuropsychological assessment and treatment for over two years. There has been a slight increase in her cognitive functioning but she remains with Balint's syndrome, so is unable to read. Treatment for this has been partially successful. Natasha presented with psychotic type symptoms when first seen but these have improved to a large extent. We believe that these symptoms are consistent with SS but the severe cognitive problems are more likely to be due to the strokes she suffered at the time of the haemorrhage and, possibly, to hypoxic damage caused by very low blood pressure.

  5. Unexpected Anemia and Reticulocytopenia in an Adolescent With Sickle Cell Anemia Receiving Chronic Transfusion Therapy.

    PubMed

    Blauel, Emily R; Grossmann, Lily T; Vissa, Madhav; Miller, Scott T

    2015-10-01

    In a patient with sickle cell disease receiving chronic transfusion, exacerbation of anemia with reticulocytopenia must prompt consideration of a delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction with hyperhemolysis, as further transfusion may worsen this condition; definitive diagnosis is sometimes difficult. Anemia evolving during parvovirus B19-induced erythroid hypoplasia (transient aplastic crisis) should be attenuated in chronic transfusion patients due to superior survival of transfused over endogenous red blood cells. A 16-year-old with sickle cell disease receiving chronic transfusion of modified intensity (goal to maintain hemoglobin S<50%) who developed symptomatic anemia with reticulocytopenia was later shown to have had transient aplastic crisis.

  6. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation for sickle cell disease. A study of patients' decisions.

    PubMed

    van Besien, K; Koshy, M; Anderson-Shaw, L; Talishy, N; Dorn, L; Devine, S; Yassine, M; Kodish, E

    2001-09-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is increasingly considered as a curative though risky treatment option for adults with sickle cell disease. Little is known about attitudes of adult patients and their health care providers regarding the risks and benefits of transplantation. A survey of 100 patients and their health care providers was undertaken. Assessment of risk was by a reference gamble paradigm. Comparison was made of the characteristics of those accepting substantial risk vs those not accepting risk, as well as assessment of agreement on risks recommended by health care providers and accepted by patients. Sixty-three of 100 patients were willing to accept some short-term risk of mortality in exchange for the certainty of cure. Fifteen patients were willing to accept more than 35% mortality risk. No differences in patient or disease-related variables were identified between those accepting risk and those not accepting risk. There was no agreement between the recommendations of health care providers and the risk accepted by patients. A substantial proportion of adults with sickle cell disease are interested in curative treatment, at the expense of considerable risk. The decision to accept risk is influenced by individual patient values that cannot be easily quantified and that do not correlate with the assessment of the health care provider. Given the substantial interest in curative therapy, education about and consultation for allogeneic stem cell transplantation in sickle cell patients should be encouraged.

  7. Molecular matching of red blood cells is superior to serological matching in sickle cell disease patients

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Daiane Cobianchi; Pellegrino Jr, Jordão; Guelsin, Gláucia Andréia Soares; Ribeiro, Karina Antero Rosa; Gilli, Simone Cristina Olenscki; Castilho, Lilian

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the usefulness of DNA methods to provide a means to precisely genotypically match donor blood units for the antigen-negative type of 35 sickle cell disease patients. Methods Red blood cell units were investigated for ABO, D, C, c, E, e, K, Fya, Fyb, Jka, Jkb, S, s, Dia and RH variants by performing a molecular array (Human Erythrocyte Antigen BeadChipTM, BioArray Solutions), polymerase chain reaction followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and sequencing of patient samples and donor units that had been serologically matched based on the ABO, Rh and K phenotypes and the presence of antibodies. Results Matches for 21 of 35 sickle cell disease patients presented discrepancies or mismatches for multiple antigens between the genotype profile and the antigen profile of their serologically-matched blood units. The main discrepancies or mismatches occurred in the RH, FY, JK and MNS systems. Eight Rh alloimmunized patients presented RHD and RHCE variants that had not been serologically identified. According to these results better matches were found for the patients with genotyped units and the patients benefited as shown by better in vivo red blood cell survival. Conclusion Molecular matching is superior to serological matching in sickle cell disease patients, decreasing the risk of transfusion reactions, especially delayed transfusion reactions to existing alloantibodies and preventing alloimmunization. PMID:23580882

  8. Exercise limitation, exercise testing and exercise recommendations in sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Connes, Philippe; Machado, Roberto; Hue, Olivier; Reid, Harvey

    2011-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA or SS homozygous sickle cell disease) is an inherited blood disorder caused by single nucleotide substitution in the β-globin gene that renders their hemoglobin (HbS) much less soluble than normal hemoglobin (HbA) when deoxygenated. The polymerization of HbS upon deoxygenation is the basic pathophysiologic event leading to RBC sickling, hemolysis, vasoocclusion and ultimately to chronic organ damage. The metabolic changes imposed by exercise may initiate sickling and vaso-occlusive episodes. Further, in patients with SCA, exercise limitation may be related to anemia or chronic complications such as pulmonary vascular disease, congestive heart failure and chronic parenchymal lung disease. Few studies have investigated the cardiorespiratory responses of patients with SCA during either symptom-limited maximal exercise test on cyclo-ergometer or during a six minute walk test. Therefore, patients are advised to start exercise slowly and progressively, to maintain adequate hydration during and after exercise, to avoid cold exposure or sudden change in temperature, and to avoid sports associated with mechanical trauma. There are, however, lack of evidence to allow practitioners to prescribe an exercise program for patients with SCA, and individuals are usually encouraged to exercise on a symptom-limited basis. Finally, this review will also highlight the basic principles that are often used for exercise practice and could be used for exercise prescription and rehabilitation in patients with sickle cell anemia.

  9. Analysis of hemoglobin F production in Saudi Arabian families with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Miller, B A; Salameh, M; Ahmed, M; Olivieri, N; Antognetti, G; Orkin, S H; Huisman, T H; Nathan, D G

    1987-09-01

    Erythrocytes and progenitor-derived erythroblasts of sickle cell anemia patients from the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia contain increased fetal hemoglobin and G gamma globin. A distinctive DNA polymorphism haplotype in the beta globin gene cluster (++- +-), tightly coupled to a C----T substitution at position -158 5' to the cap site of the G gamma globin gene, is strongly associated with sickle cell disease in this region. To determine whether the increased fetal hemoglobin production and/or elevated G gamma globin content are tightly linked to this haplotype, we studied 55 members of five Saudi families in which sickle cell disease is present. The results did not suggest a tight linkage of the haplotype to increased fetal hemoglobin production. On the other hand, several sickle trait family members heterozygous for the haplotype had normal fetal hemoglobin production in culture but elevated G gamma to A gamma ratios in peripheral blood. This observation suggests that in this genetic background increased expression of the G gamma globin gene may occur without a measurable increase in total fetal hemoglobin production. The family studies also clearly demonstrate that increased fetal hemoglobin production by erythroid progenitors is dependent on zygosity for the sickle gene in this population. These findings strongly suggest that other factors, such as the products of genes stimulated by hemolytic stress or other genetic determinants associated with the Saudi beta S chromosome, may interact with the -158 C----T substitution and influence gamma globin gene expression in this population.

  10. Alloimmunization is associated with older age of transfused red blood cells in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Desai, Payal C; Deal, Allison M; Pfaff, Emily R; Qaqish, Bahjat; Hebden, Leyna M; Park, Yara A; Ataga, Kenneth I

    2015-08-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) alloimmunization is a significant clinical complication of sickle cell disease (SCD). It can lead to difficulty with cross-matching for future transfusions and may sometimes trigger life-threatening delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions. We conducted a retrospective study to explore the association of clinical complications and age of RBC with alloimmunization in patients with SCD followed at a single institution from 2005 to 2012. One hundred and sixty six patients with a total of 488 RBC transfusions were evaluated. Nineteen patients (11%) developed new alloantibodies following blood transfusions during the period of review. The median age of RBC units was 20 days (interquartile range: 14-27 days). RBC antibody formation was significantly associated with the age of RBC units (P = 0.002), with a hazard ratio of 3.5 (95% CI: 1.71-7.11) for a RBC unit that was 7 days old and 9.8 (95% CI: 2.66-35.97) for a unit that was 35 days old, 28 days after the blood transfusion. No association was observed between RBC alloimmunization and acute vaso-occlusive complications. Although increased echocardiography-derived tricuspid regurgitant jet velocity (TRV) was associated with the presence of RBC alloantibodies (P = 0.02), TRV was not significantly associated with alloimmunization when adjusted for patient age and number of transfused RBC units. Our study suggests that RBC antibody formation is significantly associated with older age of RBCs at the time of transfusion. Prospective studies in patients with SCD are required to confirm this finding.

  11. F-cell levels are altered with erythrocyte density in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sumanta; Dash, Bisnu Prasad; Patel, Dilip Kumar; Chakravarty, Sudipa; Chakravarty, Amit; Banerjee, Debashis; Chakrabarti, Abhijit

    2011-08-15

    Lighter cells from density fractionated erythrocytes of sickle cell disease (SCD) patients carry higher amount of externalized phosphatidylserine (PS) and cell surface glycophorins compared to the denser counterparts. Further analysis also revealed that the denser cells contained higher levels of fetal hemoglobin (HbF) compared to the lighter cells, supported by the presence of larger number of F-cells in these populations. In this report, we have found direct evidence on the higher survival of the HbF rich erythrocytes in SCD.

  12. [Stress fracture of the femur: a rare complication of sickle cell disease].

    PubMed

    Bahebeck, J; Ngowe Ngowe, M; Monny Lobe, M; Sosso, M; Hoffmeyer, P

    2002-12-01

    A 24-year-old patient with homozygous sickle cell disease developed a stress fracture of the femur. Successive x-rays demonstrated defective ossification and a spontaneous unicortical fracture with no notion of trauma or stressful activities (e.g. sports) followed six months later by a bicortical fracture with displacement and periosteal reaction leading to the diagnosis of stress fracture. This type of fracture has not been reported previously in sickle cell disease. The patient was treated with centromedullary nailing. The follow-up was uneventful. Bone healing was achieved at three months. The patient was pain free and could walk without crutches. Stress fracture is a potential diagnosis in homozygous sickle cell disease patients with defective ossification who present spontaneous pain even when plain x-rays do not visualize an overt fracture. Computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging should be performed when available. Conventional treatment with nailing provides successful cure with good functional outcome.

  13. Design, synthesis, and pharmacological evaluation of novel hybrid compounds to treat sickle cell disease symptoms.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Jean Leandro; Lanaro, Carolina; Lima, Lídia Moreira; Gambero, Sheley; Franco-Penteado, Carla Fernanda; Alexandre-Moreira, Magna Suzana; Wade, Marlene; Yerigenahally, Shobha; Kutlar, Abdullah; Meiler, Steffen E; Costa, Fernando Ferreira; Chung, ManChin

    2011-08-25

    A novel series of thalidomide derivatives (4a-f) designed by molecular hybridization were synthesized and evaluated in vitro and in vivo for their potential use in the oral treatment of sickle cell disease symptoms. Compounds 4a-f demonstrated analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and NO-donor properties. Compounds 4c and 4d were considered promising candidate drugs and were further evaluated in transgenic sickle cell mice to determine their capacity to reduce the levels of the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα). Unlike hydroxyurea, the compounds reduced the concentrations of TNFα to levels similar to those induced with the control dexamethasone (300 μmol/kg). These compounds are novel lead drug candidates with multiple beneficial actions in the treatment of sickle cell disease symptoms and offer an alternative to hydroxyurea treatment.

  14. Sickle Cell Disease with Cyanotic Congenital Heart Disease: Long-Term Outcomes in 5 Children

    PubMed Central

    Adisa, Olufolake A.; Oster, Matthew E.; McConnell, Michael; Mahle, William T.

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is a risk factor for cerebrovascular accidents in the pediatric population. This risk is compounded by hypoxemia. Cyanotic congenital heart disease can expose patients to prolonged hypoxemia. To our knowledge, the long-term outcome of patients who have combined sickle cell and cyanotic congenital heart disease has not been reported. We retrospectively reviewed patient records at our institution and identified 5 patients (3 girls and 2 boys) who had both conditions. Their outcomes were uniformly poor: 4 died (age range, 12 mo–17 yr); 3 had documented cerebrovascular accidents; and 3 developed ventricular dysfunction. The surviving patient had developmental delays. On the basis of this series, we suggest mitigating hypoxemia, and thus the risk of stroke, in patients who have sickle cell disease and cyanotic congenital heart disease. Potential therapies include chronic blood transfusions, hydroxyurea, earlier surgical correction to reduce the duration of hypoxemia, and heart or bone marrow transplantation. PMID:28100970

  15. Minireview: Prognostic factors and the response to hydroxurea treatment in sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This review describes current considerations in the use of hydroxyurea for the management of sickle cell disease in the context of clinical severity. Randomized trials of hydroxyurea have generally enrolled subjects with increased severity based on frequent vaso-occlusive events. An exception was the BABY HUG study in infants which documented substantial benefit even for asymptomatic subjects. Increasing data indicate that hydroxyurea has a substantial effect on reducing mortality in both adults and children—perhaps the most compelling reason for advocating the drug’s widespread use. Although the efficacy of hydroxyurea is mediated primarily through increased erythrocyte fetal hemoglobin and much has been learned about the genomic influences on fetal hemoglobin levels in sickle cell disease, our ability to predict the fetal hemoglobin response to hydroxyurea remains limited; much more work in this area is indicated. The review is concluded with the recommendations of the 2014 NIH Evidence-Based Management of Sickle Cell Disease Expert Panel Report. PMID:27026724

  16. Hydroxyurea and Growth in Young Children With Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Patricia E.; Wang, Winfred C.; Iyer, Rathi V.; Goldsmith, Jonathan; Casella, James F.; Reed, Caroline K.; Rogers, Zora R.; Waclawiw, Myron A.; Thompson, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Growth impairment is a known complication of sickle cell disease. Effects of hydroxyurea (HU) on growth in very young children are not known. METHODS: Height, weight, BMI, and head circumference (HC) were compared with World Health Organization (WHO) standards in BABY HUG, a multicenter, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled 2-year clinical trial of HU in 193 children 9 to 18 months of age. Anthropometric data were closely monitored and converted to z scores by using WHO standardized algorithms for descriptive analyses. The treatment and placebo groups were compared longitudinally by using a mixed model analysis. RESULTS: At entry, the z scores of BABY HUG children were higher than WHO norms. After 2 years of HU or placebo treatment, there were no significant differences between the groups, except for the mean HC z scores at study exit (HU: +0.8 versus placebo: +1.0, P = .05). Baseline z scores were the best predictors of z scores at study exit. The absolute neutrophil count, absolute reticulocyte count, and total white blood cell count had significant negative correlations with growth measures. CONCLUSIONS: Both groups had normal or near normal anthropometric measures during the study. The HC z scores at study entry and exit were slightly greater than WHO norms. Higher baseline white blood cell count, absolute reticulocyte count, and absolute neutrophil count were associated with poorer growth. The significance of the slightly lower HC in the treatment group at study exit is not clear. Trends toward normalization of weight and height and effects on HC will be monitored in ongoing BABY HUG follow-up studies. PMID:25157002

  17. Endothelin‐1 contributes to the progression of renal injury in sickle cell disease via reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Brett Heimlich, J; Speed, Joshua S; O'Connor, Paul M; Pollock, Jennifer S; Townes, Tim M; Meiler, Steffen E; Kutlar, Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Endothelin‐1 (ET‐1) is increased in patients with sickle cell disease and may contribute to the development of sickle cell nephropathy. The current study was designed to determine whether ET‐1 acting via the ETA receptor contributes to renal injury in a mouse model of sickle cell disease. Experimental Approach Adult, humanized HbSS (homozygous for sickle Hb) mice had increased ET‐1 mRNA expression in both the cortex and the glomeruli compared with mice heterozygous for sickle and Hb A (HbAS controls). In the renal cortex, ETA receptor mRNA expression was also elevated in HbSS (sickle) mice although ETB receptor mRNA expression was unchanged. Ligand binding assays confirmed that sickle mice had increased ETA receptors in the renal vascular tissue when compared with control mice. Key Results In response to PKC stimulation, reactive oxygen species production by isolated glomeruli from HbSS sickle mice was increased compared with that from HbSA controls, an effect that was prevented by 1 week in vivo treatment with the selective ETA antagonist, ABT‐627. Protein and nephrin excretion were both elevated in sickle mice, effects that were also significantly attenuated by ABT‐627. Finally, ETA receptor antagonism caused a significant reduction in mRNA expression of NADPH oxidase subunits, which may contribute to nephropathy in sickle cell disease. Conclusions and Implications These data support a novel role for ET‐1 in the progression of sickle nephropathy, specifically via the ETA receptor, and suggest a potential role for ETA receptor antagonism in a treatment strategy. PMID:26561980

  18. Kinetic assay shows that increasing red cell volume could be a treatment for sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Quan; Henry, Eric R.; Hofrichter, James; Smith, Jeffrey F.; Cellmer, Troy; Dunkelberger, Emily B.; Metaferia, Belhu B.; Jones-Straehle, Stacy; Boutom, Sarah; Christoph, Garrott W.; Wakefield, Terri H.; Link, Mary E.; Staton, Dwayne; Vass, Erica R.; Miller, Jeffery L.; Hsieh, Matthew M.; Tisdale, John F.; Eaton, William A.

    2017-01-01

    Although it has been known for more than 60 years that the cause of sickle cell disease is polymerization of a hemoglobin mutant, hydroxyurea is the only drug approved for treatment by the US Food and Drug Administration. This drug, however, is only partially successful, and the discovery of additional drugs that inhibit fiber formation has been hampered by the lack of a sensitive and quantitative cellular assay. Here, we describe such a method in a 96-well plate format that is based on laser-induced polymerization in sickle trait cells and robust, automated image analysis to detect the precise time at which fibers distort (“sickle”) the cells. With this kinetic method, we show that small increases in cell volume to reduce the hemoglobin concentration can result in therapeutic increases in the delay time prior to fiber formation. We also show that, of the two drugs (AES103 and GBT440) in clinical trials that inhibit polymerization by increasing oxygen affinity, one of them (GBT440) also inhibits sickling in the absence of oxygen by two additional mechanisms. PMID:28096387

  19. Interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 gene polymorphisms are associated with manifestations of sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Vicari, Perla; Adegoke, Samuel A; Mazzotti, Diego Robles; Cançado, Rodolfo Delfini; Nogutti, Maria Aparecida Eiko; Figueiredo, Maria Stella

    2015-03-01

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA), a disorder characterized by both acute and chronic inflammation, exhibits substantial phenotypic variability. Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and IL-6 are important in acute and chronic diseases, and their single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been considered as predictors of prognosis in several inflammatory conditions. This study aims at exploring possible association of IL-1β and IL-6 SNPs as potential genetic modifiers and or predictors of SCA clinical and laboratory phenotypes. This cross-sectional study involved 107 SCA patients and 110 age, sex and ethnicity-matched healthy individuals. The SNPs were identified by PCR-RFLP for IL-1β (-511C>T and +3954C>T) and IL-6 (-597G>A and -174G>C) genes. Associations between these SNPs and the clinical and laboratory profiles of patients with SCA were then determined. Allelic and genotypic frequencies of IL-1β and IL-6 SNPs between patients with SCA and controls were similar and followed HWE. IL-1β +3954C>T SNP was associated with increased risk of osteonecrosis, elevated pulmonary arterial pressure and lower absolute reticulocyte count, while IL-6 -597G>A was associated with higher likelihood of retinopathy and leg ulcer. These data indicate that IL-1β and IL-6 gene SNPs are associated with SCA complications among Brazilian patients and may act as genetic predictors of SCA clinical heterogeneity.

  20. Beneficial effects of nitric oxide breathing in adult patients with sickle cell crisis.

    PubMed

    Head, C Alvin; Swerdlow, Paul; McDade, William A; Joshi, Ratan Mani; Ikuta, Tohru; Cooper, Melanie L; Eckman, James R

    2010-10-01

    Pain from vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC) is the major cause of hospitalization in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). The beneficial therapeutic effects of inhaled nitric oxide (NO) on the pathophysiology of SCD have been reported. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted to determine whether NO breathing reduces acute VOC pain in adult patients and to study the safety of inhaled NO. Twenty-three patients experiencing acute VOC were enrolled. After randomization but before treatment, five were found to not meet final eligibility criteria. Nine patients were assigned to inhaled NO (80 ppm) and nine to placebo (21% O2). Primary outcome was the mean change in pain scores after 4 hr of inhalation, measured on a 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS). Both groups had similar baseline VAS pain scores but inhaled NO significantly reduced pain scores compared with placebo (P 5 0.02) at the end of NO inhalation. Secondary outcome was parenteral morphine use at baseline, 4, and 6 hr. Parenteral morphine use was lower in the inhaled NO group, but the difference was not statistically significant.Safety assessments included systolic blood pressure measurements,pulse oximetry readings, concentration of delivered nitrogen dioxide, and concentration of methemoglobin (metHb). None of these NO toxicities was observed.