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Sample records for acute skin haemorrhage

  1. Acute myocardial infarction complicating subarachnoid haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    van der Velden, L.B.J.; Otterspoor, L.C.; Schultze Kool, L.J.; Biessels, G.J.; Verheugt, F.W.A.

    2009-01-01

    An acute myocardial infarction is a rare complication of a subarachnoid haemorrhage. The combination of these two conditions imposes important treatment dilemmas. We describe two patients with this combination of life-threatening conditions. Patient 1 was treated with emergency percutaneous coronary intervention followed by clipping of the anterior communicating artery aneurysm. Six months after discharge the patient's memory and orientation had almost completely recovered. Patient 2 was treated with aspirin until coiling of the aneurysm could be performed. After successful coiling low-molecular-weight heparin was added. One week later the patient died due to a free wall rupture. (Neth Heart J 2009;17:284-7.19789696) PMID:19789696

  2. Acute Methanol Poisoning: Prevalence and Predisposing Factors of Haemorrhagic and Non-Haemorrhagic Brain Lesions.

    PubMed

    Zakharov, Sergey; Kotikova, Katerina; Vaneckova, Manuela; Seidl, Zdenek; Nurieva, Olga; Navratil, Tomas; Caganova, Blazena; Pelclova, Daniela

    2016-08-01

    The purpose was to study the prevalence and predisposing factors of brain lesions in survivors of acute methanol poisoning. Clinical data on 106 patients with methanol poisoning were collected during the Czech mass poisoning outbreak. Of 83 survivors, in 46 (55%) patients, follow-up examinations including magnetic resonance imaging of brain (MR) were performed 3-8 and 24-28 months after discharge from the hospital. Of 46 patients with a median age of 49 (interquartile range, 35-57) years, 24 (52%) patients had a total of 40 abnormal brain findings with haemorrhagic lesions detected in 15 (33%) and non-haemorrhagic lesions found in 9 (19%) patients. The patients with haemorrhagic brain lesions were more acidemic (lower arterial blood pH, higher base deficit) and had higher glycaemia and lactacidaemia on admission than those without haemorrhages (all p < 0.05). Thirteen of 32 (41%) of patients with systemic anticoagulation and 2 of 14 (14%) of patients without it had haemorrhagic lesions (p = 0.080). Bleeding complications during the treatment occurred in 4 of 15 (27%) patients, and 5 of 15 (33%) patients had conditions predisposing to haemorrhage in the group with haemorrhagic lesions. In three cases with a series of computer tomography (CT)/MR performed during hospitalization, the necrotic lesions in the brain remained non-haemorrhagic during hospitalization and haemorrhagic lesions were detected on the follow-up MR examinations only. No association between brain haemorrhages and systemic anticoagulation during dialysis was found: brain haemorrhages might occur in severely poisoned patients treated without systemic anticoagulation, whereas treatment with high doses of heparin might not lead to brain haemorrhages. PMID:26806851

  3. Acute Kidney Injury is More Common in Acute Haemorrhagic Stroke in Mymensingh Medical College Hospital.

    PubMed

    Ray, N C; Chowdhury, M A; Sarkar, S R

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication after acute stroke and is an independent predictor of both early and long-term mortality after acute stroke. Acute kidney injury is associated with increased mortality in haemorrhagic stroke patients. This cross sectional observational study was conducted in Nephrology, Neuromedicine and Medicine department of Mymensingh Medical College & Hospital, Mymensingh from July 2012 to June 2014. A total of 240 patients with newly detected acute stroke confirmed by CT scan of brain were included in this study. According to this study, 15.42% of acute stroke patients developed AKI. Among the patients with haemorrhagic stroke 21.87% developed AKI while only 13.07% patients with ischaemic stroke developed AKI. So, early diagnosis and management of AKI in patients with acute stroke especially in haemorrhagic stroke is very important to reduce the morbidity and mortality of these patients. PMID:26931240

  4. Managing Major Postpartum Haemorrhage following Acute Uterine Inversion with Rusch Balloon Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Keriakos, Remon; Chaudhuri, Smriti Ray

    2011-01-01

    Acute postpartum uterine inversion is a relatively rare complication. The uterus inverts and the uterine fundus prolapses to or through the dilated cervix. It is associated with major postpartum haemorrhage with or without shock. Shock is sometimes out of proportion to the haemorrhage. Minimal maternal morbidity and mortality can be achieved when uterine inversion is promptly and aggressively managed. We present this report of three cases of acute uterine inversion complicated with major postpartum haemorrhage and managed with Rusch balloon. The paper highlights the importance of early recognition and the safety of the use of intrauterine balloon to manage major postpartum haemorrhage in these cases. PMID:24826322

  5. An outbreak of acute haemorrhagic conjunctivitis in Kaduna, Nigeria.

    PubMed Central

    Babalola, O E; Amoni, S S; Samaila, E; Thaker, U; Darougar, S

    1990-01-01

    Clinical studies were carried out on two groups of patients with acute haemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC) during an epidemic in 1985 in Northern Nigeria. Group 1 consisted of 99 students attending a girls' boarding school, group 2 of 200 patients selected randomly from 1000 examined at the local clinic. Moderate to severe hyperaemia and papillary responses were present in the palpebral conjunctiva of all patients, and 234 (66%) had subconjunctival haemorrhages. Transient superficial punctate keratitis was noted in over 60% of patients. A transient flare suggestive of a low grade iritis was seen in five patients. No neurological disorders were noted. Serological studies were carried out on patients from group 2. Fifteen paired and 20 single serum samples were titrated against adenovirus type 4 (Ad-4) and enterovirus type 70 (EV-70). Two pairs of sera showed a 4-fold rise in antibody levels to EV-70, whereas the antibody titres to EV-70 in the rest of the sera ranged from 1:20 (no antibody) to 1:160. None of the paired serum samples showed a 4-fold rise in antibody levels to adenovirus. The results of clinical studies and serological findings support EV-70 as a probable cause of AHC in Nigeria. PMID:2155654

  6. The effect of acute haemorrhage in the dog and man on plasma-renin concentration

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J. J.; Davies, D. L.; Lever, A. F.; Robertson, J. I. S.; Verniory, A.

    1966-01-01

    1. The effect of acute haemorrhage on the plasma renin concentration was studied in the dog and man. 2. Plasma-renin concentration was regularly increased after the larger bleeds; after the smaller haemorrhages plasma-renin concentration remained unchanged. 3. The results are discussed in relation to current hypotheses concerning the control of renin and aldosterone secretion. PMID:4287431

  7. Elevated local skin temperature impairs cutaneous vasoconstrictor responses to a simulated haemorrhagic challenge while heat stressed

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, J.; Lucas, R. A. I.; Crandall, C. G.

    2016-01-01

    During a simulated haemorrhagic challenge, syncopal symptoms develop sooner when individuals are hyperthermic relative to normothermic. This is due, in part, to a large displacement of blood to the cutaneous circulation during hyperthermia, coupled with inadequate cutaneous vasoconstriction during the hypotensive challenge. The influence of local skin temperature on these cutaneous vasoconstrictor responses is unclear. This project tested the hypothesis that local skin temperature modulates cutaneous vasoconstriction during simulated haemorrhage in hyperthermic humans. Eight healthy participants (four men and four women; 32 ± 7 years old; 75.2 ± 10.8 kg) underwent lower-body negative pressure to presyncope while heat stressed via a water-perfused suit sufficiently to increase core temperature by 1.2 ± 0.2°C. At forearm skin sites distal to the water-perfused suit, local skin temperature was either 35.2 ± 0.6 (mild heating) or 38.2 ± 0.2°C (moderate heating) throughout heat stress and lower-body negative pressure, and remained at these temperatures until presyncope. The reduction in cutaneous vascular conductance during the final 90 s of lower-body negative pressure, relative to heat-stress baseline, was greatest at the mildly heated site (−10 ± 15% reduction) relative to the moderately heated site (−2 ± 12%; P = 0.05 for the magnitude of the reduction in cutaneous vascular conductance between sites), because vasoconstriction at the moderately heated site was either absent or negligible. In hyperthermic individuals, the extent of cutaneous vasoconstriction during a simulated haemorrhage can be modulated by local skin temperature. In situations where skin temperature is at least 38°C, as is the case in soldiers operating in warm climatic conditions, a haemorrhagic insult is unlikely to be accompanied by cutaneous vasoconstriction. PMID:22903981

  8. Acute intracerebral haemorrhage: grounds for optimism in management.

    PubMed

    Delcourt, Candice; Anderson, Craig

    2012-12-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) is one of the most devastating types of stroke, which has considerable disease burden in "non-white" ethnic groups where the population-attributable risks of elevated blood pressure are very high. Since the treatment of ICH remains largely supportive and expectant, nihilism and the early withdrawal of active therapy influence management decisions in clinical practice. However, approaches to management are now better defined on the basis of evidence that both survival and speed (and degree) of recovery are critically dependent on the location, size, and degree of expansion and extension into the intraventricular system of the haematoma of the ICH. Although no medical treatment has been shown to improve outcome in ICH, several promising avenues have emerged that include haemostatic therapy and intensive control of elevated blood pressure. Conversely, there is continued controversy over the role of evacuation of the haematoma of ICH via open craniotomy. Despite being an established practice for several decades, and having undergone evaluation in multiple randomised trials, there is uncertainty over which patients have the most to gain from an intervention with clear procedural risk. Minimally invasive surgery via local anaesthetic applied drill-puncture of the cranium and infusion of a thrombolytic agent is an attractive option for patients requiring critical management of the haematoma, not just in low resource settings but arguably also in specialist centres of western countries. With several ongoing clinical trials nearing completion, these treatments could enter routine practice within the next few years, further justifying the urgency of "time is brain" and that active management within well-organized, comprehensive acute stroke care units includes patients with ICH. PMID:23088860

  9. Acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage in west of Scotland: case ascertainment study.

    PubMed Central

    Blatchford, O.; Davidson, L. A.; Murray, W. R.; Blatchford, M.; Pell, J.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the incidence and case fatality of acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage in the west of Scotland and to identify associated factors. DESIGN: Case ascertainment study. SETTING: All hospitals treating adults with acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage in the west of Scotland. SUBJECTS: 1882 patients aged 15 years and over treated in hospitals for acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage during a six month period. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Incidence of acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage per 100,000 population per year, and case fatality. RESULTS: The annual incidence was 172 per 100,000 people aged 15 and over. The annual population mortality was 14.0 per 100,000. Both were higher among elderly people, men, and patients resident in areas of greater social deprivation. Overall case fatality was 8.2%. This was higher among those who bled as inpatients after admission for other reasons (42%) and those admitted as tertiary referrals (16%). Factors associated with increased case fatality were age, uraemia, pre-existing malignancy, hepatic failure, hypotension, cardiac failure, and frank haematemesis or a history of syncope at presentation. Social deprivation, sex, and anaemia were not associated with increased case fatality after adjustment for other factors. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage was 67% greater than the highest previously reported incidence in the United Kingdom, which may be partially attributable to the greater social deprivation in the west of Scotland and may be related to the increased prevalence of Helicobacter pylori. Fatality after acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage was associated with age, comorbidity, hypotension, and raised blood urea concentrations on admission. Although deprivation was associated with increased incidence, it was not related to the risk of fatality. PMID:9329304

  10. Historical overview and review of current day treatment in the management of acute variceal haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Rajoriya, Neil; Tripathi, Dhiraj

    2014-06-01

    Variceal haemorrhage is one of the most devastating consequences of portal hypertension, with a 1-year mortality of 40%. With the passage of time, acute management strategies have developed with improved survival. The major historical treatment landmarks in the management of variceal haemorrhage can be divided into surgical, medical, endoscopic and radiological breakthroughs. We sought to provide a historical overview of the management of variceal haemorrhage and how treatment modalities over time have impacted on clinical outcomes. A PubMed search of the following terms: portal hypertension, variceal haemorrhage, gastric varices, oesophageal varices, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt was performed. To complement this, Google™ was searched with the aforementioned terms. Other relevant references were identified after review of the reference lists of articles. The review of therapeutic advances was conducted divided into pre-1970s, 1970/80s, 1990s, 2000-2010 and post-2010. Also, a summary and review on the pathophysiology of portal hypertension and clinical outcomes in variceal haemorrhage was performed. Aided by the development of endoscopic therapies, medication and improved radiological interventions; the management of variceal haemorrhage has changed over recent decades with improved survival from an often-terminating event in recent past. PMID:24914369

  11. Historical overview and review of current day treatment in the management of acute variceal haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Rajoriya, Neil; Tripathi, Dhiraj

    2014-01-01

    Variceal haemorrhage is one of the most devastating consequences of portal hypertension, with a 1-year mortality of 40%. With the passage of time, acute management strategies have developed with improved survival. The major historical treatment landmarks in the management of variceal haemorrhage can be divided into surgical, medical, endoscopic and radiological breakthroughs. We sought to provide a historical overview of the management of variceal haemorrhage and how treatment modalities over time have impacted on clinical outcomes. A PubMed search of the following terms: portal hypertension, variceal haemorrhage, gastric varices, oesophageal varices, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt was performed. To complement this, Google™ was searched with the aforementioned terms. Other relevant references were identified after review of the reference lists of articles. The review of therapeutic advances was conducted divided into pre-1970s, 1970/80s, 1990s, 2000-2010 and post-2010. Also, a summary and review on the pathophysiology of portal hypertension and clinical outcomes in variceal haemorrhage was performed. Aided by the development of endoscopic therapies, medication and improved radiological interventions; the management of variceal haemorrhage has changed over recent decades with improved survival from an often-terminating event in recent past. PMID:24914369

  12. Pituitary apoplexy can mimic acute meningoencephalitis or subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Sadek, Ahmed-Ramadan; Gregory, Stephen; Jaiganesh, Thiagarajan

    2011-01-01

    Pituitary apoplexy is an uncommon but life-threatening condition that is often overlooked and underdiagnosed. We report a 45-year-old man who presented to our emergency department with a sudden onset headache, acute confusion, signs of meningeal irritation and ophthalmoplegia. An initial diagnosis of acute meningoencephalitis was made, which was amended to pituitary apoplexy following thorough investigation within the emergency department.A 45-year-old man was brought to our emergency department by ambulance with a history of sudden onset of frontal headache and acute confusion. His wife provided the history. There was no significant past medical history of diabetes, hypertension, recent travel abroad, exposure to sick contacts, involvement in outdoor pursuits such as hiking/cave diving, or trauma. He worked in a bank and had been well until 24 h prior to the onset of sudden headache, which was gradually worsening in nature and associated with increasing confusion. The patient's wife reported that he had neither experienced any fevers, night sweats, or coryzal symptoms nor received any recent vaccinations. He was not on any regular medications. He was a non-smoker and occasionally consumed alcohol. There was no significant family history. On examination in the ED, his temperature was 37.6°C, his pulse was 110/min, and he was normotensive and normoglycaemic. A macular blanching rash was noted over the patient's trunk. The patient was disoriented to time and place. Neurological examination revealed reduced GCS (11/15-E3, M6, V2), marked neck stiffness, a positive Kernig's sign and a right sixth nerve palsy.A provisional diagnosis of acute meningoencephalitis was made and the patient was started on a course of intravenous antibiotics with benzyl penicillin 1.2 g, cefotaxime 2 g and acyclovir 750 mg. Baseline blood investigations revealed hyponatraemia (122 mmol/l), a white-cell count of 11 × 109/l and a C-reactive protein > 250. Due to the sudden onset of the

  13. Acute haemorrhagic leucoencephalitis localised to the brainstem and cerebellum: a report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Michaud, Jean; Helle, Todd L

    1982-01-01

    Two cases of acute haemorrhagic leucoencephalitis localised to the brainstem and cerebellum are reported. One followed the insertion of a ventriculoatrial shunt and the other an upper respiratory tract infection. The rare previously reported cases of this condition involving mainly the posterior fossa structures are reviewed. Images PMID:7069428

  14. Cerebral blood flow changes in acute experimental haemorrhagic vasospasm.

    PubMed

    Jakubowski, J; McCleery, W N; Todd, J H; Smart, R C

    1976-01-01

    Subarachnoid haemorrhage was produced in 26 dogs by injecting fresh homogenous blood into the cysterna chiasmatica. Two types of vasospasm were observed, firstly segmental arterial spasm closely related to the bleeding point and secondly generalized arterial vasospasm not directly related to the bleeding point and often occurring some way from the bleeding point. Reduction in CBF occurred in 61% of cases and was always accompanied by radiological vasospasm. However, in about one quarter of the cases with vasospasm there was no alteration in CBF. PMID:961484

  15. Central nervous system haemorrhage causing early death in acute promyelocytic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Borowska, Anna; Stelmaszczyk-Emmel, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) is a rare type of paediatric leukaemia characterised by a specific genetic mutation and life-threatening coagulopathy. The discovery of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), which acts directly on promyelocytic locus-retinoic acid receptor α (PML-RARα) gene product, brought a revolution to the therapy of this disorder. Unfortunately, despite an improvement in the complete remission rate, the early death (ED) rate has not changed significantly, and the haemorrhages remain a major problem. The most common bleeding site, which accounts for about 65-80% of haemorrhages, is the central nervous system. Second in line are pulmonary haemorrhages (32%), while gastrointestinal bleedings are relatively rare. Haemorrhages result from thrombocytopaenia, disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC), and systemic fibrinolysis. Herein we present a boy aged one year and nine months with APL. The patient was not eligible for ATRA administration due to poor clinical condition. He developed bleeding diathesis that presented as disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and led to intracranial haemorrhage, which resulted in the patient's death. PMID:26862315

  16. Comparison of fibreoptic endoscopy in acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage in Africans and Europeans.

    PubMed

    Wicks, A C; Thomas, G E; Clain, D J

    1975-11-01

    The results of endoscopy in acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage were compared in a group of 138 Africans and one of 84 Europeans. Contrary to widely held clinical opinion, the incidence of gastric and duodenal ulceration was similar in the two races. Peptic ulcers were the main source of bleeding in both groups and were surprisingly more common than varices in the Africans. Bleeding from varices, however, was far more common in the Africans than in the Europeans. Stomal ulcers were confined to Europeans. Gastric erosions, often attributed to herbal medicines, were more common in the Africans but the difference was not significant. The study was not designed to determine reduced mortality since the introduction of endoscopy, but management, especially in the Africans, was aided by early recognition of haemorrhage from oesophageal varices and acute gastric erosions. PMID:1081417

  17. Spinal Intradural Schwannoma with Acute Intratumoural Haemorrhage: Case Report and Review

    PubMed Central

    Kongwad, Lakshman I.; Valiathan, Manna G.

    2016-01-01

    Schwannomas account for around half of all intradural spinal tumours, with chronic progressive symptoms as the most common presenting features. Intratumoural haemorrhage as a presenting feature of spinal schwannoma is very rare and only 11 cases have been reported till date. Authors here report a previously asymptomatic 40-year-old male who presented with acute onset paraplegia 12 hours after a minor trauma. MR imaging revealed a C7-D3 intradural-extramedullary lesion with features of acute blood and showing no enhancement. Emergency laminectomy and complete removal of the mass was performed and histopathology revealed features of schwannoma with haemorrhage. Patient had modest improvement of his neurological deficits at a follow-up of 6 months. Pertinent literature is reviewed in brief. PMID:26894121

  18. Early and widespread injury of astrocytes in the absence of demyelination in acute haemorrhagic leukoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Christopher A; Adiele, Reginald C; Tham, Mylyne; Lucchinetti, Claudia F; Popescu, Bogdan F G H

    2014-01-01

    Acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis (AHL) is a fulminant demyelinating disease of unknown etiology. Most cases are fatal within one week from onset. AHL pathology varies with the acuteness of disease. Hemorrhages, vessel fibrinoid necrosis, perivascular fibrin exudation, edema and neutrophilic inflammation are early features, while perivascular demyelination, microglial foci and myelin-laden macrophages appear later. Reactive astrocytosis is not present in early hemorrhagic non-demyelinated lesions, but is seen in older lesions. This case report presents the pathology of an AHL case with fulminant course and fatal outcome within 48 hours from presentation. Severe hemorrhages, edema and neutrophilic inflammation in the absence of circumscribed perivascular demyelination affected the temporal neocortex and white matter, hippocampus, cerebellar cortex and white matter, optic chiasm, mammillary bodies, brainstem, cranial nerve roots and leptomeninges. Perivascular end-feet and parenchymal processes of astrocytes exhibited impressive swelling in haemorrhagic but non-demyelinated white matter regions. Astrocytes were dystrophic and displayed degenerating processes. Astrocytic swellings and remnants were immunoreactive for aquaporin-4, aquaporin-1 and glial fibrillary acidic protein. These morphological changes of astrocytes consistent with injury were also observed in haemorrhagic and normal appearing cortex. Our findings reinforce that perivascular demyelination is not present early in AHL. This is the first study that highlights the early and widespread astrocytic injury in the absence of demyelination in AHL, suggesting that, similarly to neuromyelitis optica and central pontine myelinolysis, demyelination in AHL is secondary to astrocyte injury. PMID:24887055

  19. Upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage in the acute cardiac care setting: antiplatelets and endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Musa, S A; Brecker, S J; Rahman, T M; Kang, J Y

    2012-05-01

    Upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage (UGIH) in cardiac patients receiving antiplatelets presents a difficult management problem. The aim of this study was to describe a series of cardiac inpatients receiving antiplatelets who underwent endoscopy for an acute UGIH. Cardiac inpatients receiving antiplatelets and requiring endoscopy for UGIH over an 18-month period were followed up. Forty-one patients were studied. Most patients (25 [61%]) presented with melaena. Antiplatelets were withheld in 34 (83%) patients; predominantly in those with higher pre-endoscopy Rockall scores (median, 4; interquartile range [IQR], 3-5 versus median, 3; IQR, 2-4; P < 0.05). Positive findings were identified at endoscopy in 80%. Duodenal ulcers were the most common lesion and adrenaline the most common method of haemostasis. Median time to first endoscopy was 0 (IQR, 0-1) days. Seven (17%) patients re-bled, median Rockall score was six (IQR, 4-8). Three (7%) patients experienced procedural complications, two patients became hypoxic and one patient died. Following endoscopy, antiplatelets were restarted after a median of three (IQR, 3-5) days. On discharge, 27/28 (96%) patients continued with antiplatelet and proton-pump inhibitor therapy. Thirty-day inpatient mortality was 7% (3 patients). One patient re-bled within six months of discharge. Endoscopy helped assess the risk of re-bleeding and timing of antiplatelet re-introduction in cardiac inpatients experiencing UGIH. PMID:22555229

  20. [Acute therapeutic measures for limb salvage Part 1 : Haemorrhage control, emergency revascularization, compartment syndrome].

    PubMed

    Willy, C; Stichling, M; Engelhardt, M; Vogt, D; Back, D A

    2016-05-01

    The primary care of Gustilo-Anderson type IIIC extremity injuries with relevant vessel lacerations is decisive for the success of a limb salvage procedure. This article shall present substantial emergency procedures for the salvage of the nutritive perfusion of a mangled extremity, based on the current literature. After provisory control of a peripheral haemorrhage (e. g. by manual pressure or tourniquet), an immediate decision must be made about the kind of emergency revascularization to be implemented as the limb salvage procedure. Here, the temporary intravascular shunt will be the fastest technique that can ensure a sufficient tissue perfusion in the case of vessel lacerations. Regarding the treatment of a fracture versus perfusion recovery, a shortening of ischemia time should have priority over fracture stabilization.If an acute compartment syndrome is suspected, a documented monitoring has to be performed in the limb salvage situation for 24 hours with clinical controls every 4 hours. Disproportional pain that does not respond to analgesics, and passive muscle stretching pain can be seen as cardinal symptoms. The positive predictive value of clinical findings is <15 %. During the observation period with an impending but not manifest compartment syndrome, an elevation of the extremity above heart level or its cooling are contraindicated. An intracompartmental pressure measurement is the most important instrument-based supplemental diagnostic method. The open fasciotomy of the affected compartments is the only causal therapy and should be performed as fast as possible. A decision against fasciotomy in cases of non-explicit clinical signs should not be made without a documented intracompartmental pressure measurement. PMID:27160729

  1. Dating of Acute and Subacute Subdural Haemorrhage: A Histo-Pathological Study

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Murali G; Vashista, Rakesh Kumar; Sharma, Suresh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Microscopic study of the organization of the Subdural Haemorrhage (SDH) verified against the time period can help us in the determination of its age which has serious medico-legal implications. Very few studies concerning the dating of SDH are present in the literature. Aim This study was conducted for dating the early subdural haemorrhage by routine histopathological stains. Materials and Methods A prospective analytical study was conducted during July 2009 to December 2010. A total of 100 cases (50 males and 50 females) fulfilling the inclusion and exclusion criteria were included in this study. Routine histopathological staining of the subdural haematoma was done. Results Correlation between the frequency of a given histomorphological phenomenon and the length of the Post-Traumatic Interval (PTI) was evidential. All the histomorphological features, when correlated with PTI groups, were found to be statistically significant, except for Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes (PMN). Conclusion We concluded that routine histopathology was reliable in the dating of early subdural haemorrhages.

  2. Not All Acute Abdomen Cases in Early Pregnancy Are Ectopic; Expect the Unexpected: Renal Angiomyolipoma Causing Massive Retroperitoneal Haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Rana, Muhammad Asim; Mady, Ahmed F; Jakaraddi, Nagesh; Mumtaz, Shahzad A; Ahmad, Habib; Naser, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Retroperitoneal haemorrhage (or retroperitoneal haematoma) refers to an accumulation of blood found in the retroperitoneal space. It is a rare clinical entity with variable aetiology including anticoagulation, ruptured aortic aneurysm, acute pancreatitis, malignancy, and bleeding from renal aneurysm. Diagnosis of retroperitoneal bleed is sometimes missed or delayed as presentation is often nonspecific. Multislice CT and arteriography are important for diagnosis. There is no consensus about the best management plan for patients with retroperitoneal haematoma. Stable patients can be managed with fluid resuscitation, correction of coagulopathy if any, and blood transfusion. Endovascular options involving selective intra-arterial embolisation or stent-grafts are clearly getting more and more popularity. Open repair is usually reserved for cases when there is failure of conservative or endovascular measures to control the bleeding or expertise is unavailable and in cases where the patient is unstable. Mortality of patients with retroperitoneal haematoma remains high if appropriate and timely measures are not taken. Haemorrhage from a benign renal tumour is a rarer entity which is described in this case report which emphasizes that physicians should have a wide index of suspicion when dealing with patients presenting with significant groin, flank, abdominal, or back pain, or haemodynamic instability of unclear cause. Our patient presented with features of acute abdomen and, being pregnant, was thought of having a ruptured ectopic pregnancy. PMID:27429809

  3. Not All Acute Abdomen Cases in Early Pregnancy Are Ectopic; Expect the Unexpected: Renal Angiomyolipoma Causing Massive Retroperitoneal Haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Mady, Ahmed F.; Jakaraddi, Nagesh; Naser, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Retroperitoneal haemorrhage (or retroperitoneal haematoma) refers to an accumulation of blood found in the retroperitoneal space. It is a rare clinical entity with variable aetiology including anticoagulation, ruptured aortic aneurysm, acute pancreatitis, malignancy, and bleeding from renal aneurysm. Diagnosis of retroperitoneal bleed is sometimes missed or delayed as presentation is often nonspecific. Multislice CT and arteriography are important for diagnosis. There is no consensus about the best management plan for patients with retroperitoneal haematoma. Stable patients can be managed with fluid resuscitation, correction of coagulopathy if any, and blood transfusion. Endovascular options involving selective intra-arterial embolisation or stent-grafts are clearly getting more and more popularity. Open repair is usually reserved for cases when there is failure of conservative or endovascular measures to control the bleeding or expertise is unavailable and in cases where the patient is unstable. Mortality of patients with retroperitoneal haematoma remains high if appropriate and timely measures are not taken. Haemorrhage from a benign renal tumour is a rarer entity which is described in this case report which emphasizes that physicians should have a wide index of suspicion when dealing with patients presenting with significant groin, flank, abdominal, or back pain, or haemodynamic instability of unclear cause. Our patient presented with features of acute abdomen and, being pregnant, was thought of having a ruptured ectopic pregnancy. PMID:27429809

  4. Oritavancin for acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection

    PubMed Central

    Messina, Julia A.; Fowler, Vance G.; Corey, G. Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Inpatient treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) exerts a significant economic burden on the healthcare system. Oritavancin is a concentration-dependent, rapidly bactericidal agent approved for the treatment of ABSSSI. Its prolonged half-life with one-time intravenous (IV) dosing offers a potential solution to this burden. In addition, oritavancin represents an alternative therapy for Streptococci and multidrug resistant gram-positive bacteria including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus. Animal models have also shown promising results with oritavancin for other disease states including those that require long courses of IV therapy. Areas covered This review covers oritavancin’s basic chemistry, spectrum of activity, pharmacodynamics/ pharmacokinetics, efficacy in clinical trials, and provides expert opinion on future directions. To compose this review, a search of PubMed was performed, and articles written in the English language were selected based on full text availability. Expert Opinion If oritavancin is proven to be a cost-effective strategy for outpatient treatment and prevents complications of prolonged IV therapy, it will be sought as an alternative antibiotic therapy for ABSSSI. In addition, further clinical data demonstrating efficacy in gram-positive infections requiring prolonged therapy such as endocarditis and osteomyelitis could support oritavancin’s success in the current market. PMID:25803197

  5. [Efficacy of plasma substitutes of different molecular weight in acute haemorrhagic shock in dogs (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Klose, R; Hartung, H J; Ruffmann, R; Lutz, H

    1979-08-01

    Dogs were bled into haemorrhagic shock. They were then given isovolaemic infusions of dextran 60 and 40 and of hydroxyethyl starch with an average molecular weight of 200,000 and 40,000 respectively with a view of assessing the haemodynamic efficacy of these plasma substitutes. Solutions of high molecular weight hydroxyethyl starch (HES 400) were retained in the circulation for about the same length of time as was dextran 60. HES 40 (molecular weight 40,000) was retained for about 3-4 hours as measured by cardiac output. For normalizing a relative hypovolaemia, e.g. during anaesthesia or in some emergencies, colloidal plasma substitutes which will be retained for only a short time are entirely satisfactory. PMID:91161

  6. Acute myelomonocytic leukaemia presenting as xanthomatous skin eruption

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, JR; Tansey, P; Chung, P; Burnett, AK; Thomson, J; McDonald, GA

    1982-01-01

    A case of acute myelomonocytic leukaemia (AMMOL) is reported in which skin infiltration with xanthomatous nodules was the presenting feature. The histological, including ultrastructural, appearances are described. Images PMID:6958680

  7. Intracerebral haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Adnan I; Mendelow, A David; Hanley, Daniel F

    2011-01-01

    Intracerebral haemorrhage is an important public health problem leading to high rates of death and disability in adults. Although the number of hospital admissions for intracerebral haemorrhage has increased worldwide in the past 10 years, mortality has not fallen. Results of clinical trials and observational studies suggest that coordinated primary and specialty care is associated with lower mortality than is typical community practice. Development of treatment goals for critical care, and new sequences of care and specialty practice can improve outcome after intracerebral haemorrhage. Specific treatment approaches include early diagnosis and haemostasis, aggressive management of blood pressure, open surgical and minimally invasive surgical techniques to remove clot, techniques to remove intraventricular blood, and management of intracranial pressure. These approaches improve clinical management of patients with intracerebral haemorrhage and promise to reduce mortality and increase functional survival. PMID:19427958

  8. Intracerebral haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Adnan I; Mendelow, A David; Hanley, Daniel F

    2009-05-01

    Intracerebral haemorrhage is an important public health problem leading to high rates of death and disability in adults. Although the number of hospital admissions for intracerebral haemorrhage has increased worldwide in the past 10 years, mortality has not fallen. Results of clinical trials and observational studies suggest that coordinated primary and specialty care is associated with lower mortality than is typical community practice. Development of treatment goals for critical care, and new sequences of care and specialty practice can improve outcome after intracerebral haemorrhage. Specific treatment approaches include early diagnosis and haemostasis, aggressive management of blood pressure, open surgical and minimally invasive surgical techniques to remove clot, techniques to remove intraventricular blood, and management of intracranial pressure. These approaches improve clinical management of patients with intracerebral haemorrhage and promise to reduce mortality and increase functional survival. PMID:19427958

  9. Soluble Toll-Like Receptors 2 and 4 in Cerebrospinal Fluid of Patients with Acute Hydrocephalus following Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Sokół, Bartosz; Jankowski, Roman; Hołysz, Marcin; Więckowska, Barbara; Jagodziński, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    Background Toll-like receptor (TLR) signalling begins early in subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), and plays a key role in inflammation following cerebral aneurysm rupture. Available studies suggest significance of endogenous first-line blockers of a TLR pathway—soluble TLR2 and 4. Methods Eighteen patients with SAH and acute hydrocephalus underwent endovascular coiling and ventriculostomy; sTLR2 and 4 levels were assayed in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collected on post-SAH days 0–3, 5, and 10–12. Release kinetics were defined. CSF levels of sTLR2 and 4 were compared with a control group and correlated with the clinical status on admission, the findings on imaging, the degree of systemic inflammation and the outcome following treatment. Results None of study group showed detectable levels of sTLR2 and 4 on post-SAH day 0–3. 13 patients showed increased levels in subsequent samples. In five SAH patients sTLR2 and 4 levels remained undetectable; no distinctive features of this group were found. On post-SAH day 5 the strongest correlation was found between sTLR2 level and haemoglobin level on admission (cc = -0.498, P = 0.037). On post-SAH day 10–12 the strongest correlation was revealed between sTLR2 and treatment outcome (cc = -0.501, P = 0.076). Remaining correlations with treatment outcome, status at admission, imaging findings and inflammatory markers on post-SAH day 5 and 10–12 were negligible or low (-0.5 ≤ cc ≤ 0.5). Conclusions In the majority of cases, rupture of a cerebral aneurysm leads to delayed release of soluble TLR forms into CSF. sTLR2 and 4 seem to have minor role in human post-SAH inflammation due to delayed release kinetics and low levels of these protein. PMID:27223696

  10. Dalbavancin for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Silvano; Noviello, Silvana; Leone, Sebastiano

    2015-12-01

    Dalbavancin is a novel parenteral lipoglycopeptide antibiotic approved for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs) in adults. Dalbavancin is highly active against common Gram-positive pathogens, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Dalbavancin has a prolonged half-life that allows for once weekly dosing. Phase III trials have demonstrated non-inferiority compared with vancomycin/linezolid in the treatment of ABSSSIs, including those sustained by MRSA. PMID:26700080

  11. Skin temperature reveals the intensity of acute stress.

    PubMed

    Herborn, Katherine A; Graves, James L; Jerem, Paul; Evans, Neil P; Nager, Ruedi; McCafferty, Dominic J; McKeegan, Dorothy E F

    2015-12-01

    Acute stress triggers peripheral vasoconstriction, causing a rapid, short-term drop in skin temperature in homeotherms. We tested, for the first time, whether this response has the potential to quantify stress, by exhibiting proportionality with stressor intensity. We used established behavioural and hormonal markers: activity level and corticosterone level, to validate a mild and more severe form of an acute restraint stressor in hens (Gallus gallus domesticus). We then used infrared thermography (IRT) to non-invasively collect continuous temperature measurements following exposure to these two intensities of acute handling stress. In the comb and wattle, two skin regions with a known thermoregulatory role, stressor intensity predicted the extent of initial skin cooling, and also the occurrence of a more delayed skin warming, providing two opportunities to quantify stress. With the present, cost-effective availability of IRT technology, this non-invasive and continuous method of stress assessment in unrestrained animals has the potential to become common practice in pure and applied research. PMID:26434785

  12. Skin temperature reveals the intensity of acute stress

    PubMed Central

    Herborn, Katherine A.; Graves, James L.; Jerem, Paul; Evans, Neil P.; Nager, Ruedi; McCafferty, Dominic J.; McKeegan, Dorothy E.F.

    2015-01-01

    Acute stress triggers peripheral vasoconstriction, causing a rapid, short-term drop in skin temperature in homeotherms. We tested, for the first time, whether this response has the potential to quantify stress, by exhibiting proportionality with stressor intensity. We used established behavioural and hormonal markers: activity level and corticosterone level, to validate a mild and more severe form of an acute restraint stressor in hens (Gallus gallus domesticus). We then used infrared thermography (IRT) to non-invasively collect continuous temperature measurements following exposure to these two intensities of acute handling stress. In the comb and wattle, two skin regions with a known thermoregulatory role, stressor intensity predicted the extent of initial skin cooling, and also the occurrence of a more delayed skin warming, providing two opportunities to quantify stress. With the present, cost-effective availability of IRT technology, this non-invasive and continuous method of stress assessment in unrestrained animals has the potential to become common practice in pure and applied research. PMID:26434785

  13. Early treatment of acute submacular haemorrhage secondary to wet AMD using intravitreal tissue plasminogen activator, C3F8, and an anti-VEGF agent.

    PubMed

    de Silva, S R; Bindra, M S

    2016-07-01

    PurposeAcute submacular haemorrhage secondary to wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD) has a poor prognosis for which there is currently no 'gold standard' treatment. We evaluated the efficacy of early treatment using intravitreal triple therapy of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), expansile gas, and an anti-VEGF agent.MethodsThis retrospective case series included eight patients presenting with acute submacular haemorrhage involving the fovea. All patients received treatment with 50 μg (0.05 ml) tPA, 0.3 ml 100% perfluoropropane (C3F8), and an anti-VEGF agent (0.05 mg Ranibizumab or 1.25 mg Bevacizumab in 0.05 ml) administered via intravitreal injection. An anterior chamber paracentesis post injection or vitreous tap was performed before injection to prevent retinal vascular occlusion secondary to raised intra-ocular pressure. Outcomes assessed were visual acuity, change in macular morphology, and complications.ResultsPatients presented promptly with delay between symptom onset and clinic review being 1.9±0.6 days (mean±SD). Treatment was delivered quickly with interval from presentation to treatment being 1.1±1.2 days. Symptom onset to treatment was 3.0±1.0 days. Subfoveal haemorrhage was effectively displaced in all patients. LogMAR visual acuity improved from 1.67±0.47 at presentation to 0.63±0.33 at final follow-up (P<0.0001), a mean of 7.9±4.8 months after treatment. Central retinal thickness improved from 658.1±174.2 μm at presentation to 316.6±142.4 μm at final follow-up (P=0.0028).ConclusionsEarly treatment of submacular haemorrhage using intravitreal tPA, C3F8, and anti-VEGF was effective in significantly improving visual acuity in this series of patients who presented soon after symptom onset. Treatment was well tolerated in this group of elderly and potentially frail patients. PMID:27080482

  14. Acute methyl salicylate toxicity complicating herbal skin treatment for psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Bell, Anthony J; Duggin, Geoffrey

    2002-06-01

    We present an interesting case of salicylism arising from the use of methyl salicylate as part of a herbal skin cream for the treatment of psoriasis. A 40-year-old man became quite suddenly and acutely unwell after receiving treatment from an unregistered naturopath. Methyl salicylate (Oil of Wintergreen) is widely available in many over the counter topical analgesic preparations and Chinese medicated oils. Transcutaneous absorption of the methyl salicylate was enhanced in this case due to the abnormal areas of skin and use of an occlusive dressing. The presence of tinnitus, vomiting, tachypnoea and typical acid/base disturbance allowed a diagnosis of salicylate toxicity to be made. Our patient had decontaminated his skin prior to presentation, limiting the extent of toxicity and was successfully treated with rehydration and establishment of good urine flow. PMID:12147116

  15. Chronic gastrointestinal haemorrhage controlled by antifibrinolytic agents.

    PubMed Central

    Willoughby, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Antifibrinolytic agents are used chiefly for control of acute haemorrhage. Their applicability to chronic bleeding from inflammatory lesions of the gastrointestinal tract is illustrated by two case histories. PMID:2813242

  16. Acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections in internal medicine wards: old and new drugs.

    PubMed

    Falcone, Marco; Concia, Ercole; Giusti, Massimo; Mazzone, Antonino; Santini, Claudio; Stefani, Stefania; Violi, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are a common cause of hospital admission among elderly patients, and traditionally have been divided into complicated and uncomplicated SSTIs. In 2010, the FDA provided a new classification of these infections, and a new category of disease, named acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs), has been proposed as an independent clinical entity. ABSSSIs include three entities: cellulitis and erysipelas, wound infections, and major cutaneous abscesses This paper revises the epidemiology of SSTIs and ABSSSIs with regard to etiologies, diagnostic techniques, and clinical presentation in the hospital settings. Particular attention is owed to frail patients with multiple comorbidities and underlying significant disease states, hospitalized on internal medicine wards or residing in nursing homes, who appear to be at increased risk of infection due to multi-drug resistant pathogens and treatment failures. Management of ABSSSIs and SSTIs, including evaluation of the hemodynamic state, surgical intervention and treatment with appropriate antibiotic therapy are extensively discussed. PMID:27084183

  17. Bilateral adrenal haemorrhage leading to adrenal crisis

    PubMed Central

    McGowan-Smyth, Sam

    2014-01-01

    A 77-year-old man presented with an acute worsening of chronic back pain. CT showed dense bilateral adrenal glands suggestive of adrenal haemorrhage which was confirmed by MRI. Despite appropriate glucocorticoid replacement for adrenal insufficiency, 7 days after admission this patient suffered an adrenal crisis. Owing to the timely diagnosis, appropriate treatment was given and the patient survived. Large bilateral adrenal haemorrhage however, can lead to cardiovascular collapse and death if not appropriately diagnosed and managed promptly. Despite its rarity, bilateral adrenal haemorrhage should always be considered as a differential for back pain in the setting of an acute illness due to its potentially fatal consequences. PMID:24969071

  18. Current and future trends in antibiotic therapy of acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections.

    PubMed

    Russo, A; Concia, E; Cristini, F; De Rosa, F G; Esposito, S; Menichetti, F; Petrosillo, N; Tumbarello, M; Venditti, M; Viale, P; Viscoli, C; Bassetti, M

    2016-04-01

    In 2013 the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued recommendations and guidance on developing drugs for treatment of skin infection using a new definition of acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infection (ABSSSI). The new classification includes cellulitis, erysipelas, major skin abscesses and wound infection with a considerable extension of skin involvement, clearly referring to a severe subset of skin infections. The main goal of the FDA was to better identify specific infections where the advantages of a new antibiotic could be precisely estimated through quantifiable parameters, such as improvement of the lesion size and of systemic signs of infection. Before the spread and diffusion of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in skin infections, antibiotic therapy was relatively straightforward. Using an empiric approach, a β-lactam was the preferred therapy and cultures from patients were rarely obtained. With the emergence of MRSA in the community setting, initial ABSSSI management has been changed and readdressed. Dalbavancin, oritavancin and tedizolid are new drugs, approved or in development for ABSSSI treatment, that also proved to be efficient against MRSA. Dalbavancin and oritavancin have a long half-life and can be dosed less frequently. This in turn makes it possible to treat patients with ABSSSI in an outpatient setting, avoiding hospitalization or potentially allowing earlier discharge, without compromising efficacy. In conclusion, characteristics of long-acting antibiotics could represent an opportunity for the management of ABSSSI and could profoundly modify the management of these infections by reducing or in some cases eliminating both costs and risks of hospitalization. PMID:27125562

  19. Neutralisation of Local Haemorrhage Induced by the Saw-Scaled Viper Echis carinatus sochureki Venom Using Ethanolic Extract of Hibiscus aethiopicus L.

    PubMed

    Hasson, S S; Al-Balushi, M S; Said, E A; Habbal, O; Idris, M A; Mothana, R A A; Sallam, T A; Al-Jabri, A A

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study is to investigate the anti-snake venom activities of a local plant, Hibiscus aethiopicus L. The H. aethiopicus was dried and extracted with ethanol. Different assays were performed according to standard techniques, to evaluate the plant's acute toxicity and its antivenom activities. The results of evaluating the systemic acute toxicity of the H. aethiopicus extract using "oral and intra-peritoneal" route were normal even at the highest dose (24 g/kg) tested. All guinea pigs (n = 3) when treated with venoms E. c. sochureki (75 μg) alone induced acute skin haemorrhage. In contrast, all guinea pigs (n = 18) treated with both venom and the plant extract at a concentration between 500 and 1000 mg/kg showed no signs of haemorrhage. Moreover, all guinea pigs (n = 18) treated with venom and the plant extract below 400 mg/kg showed acute skin haemorrhage. All guinea pigs treated with venom E. c. sochureki (75 μg) alone induced acute skin haemorrhage after both 24 and 32 hours. In contrast, all guinea pigs treated with both venom and the plant extract (administered independently) at concentrations between 500 and 1000 mg/kg showed no signs of haemorrhage after 32 hours. However, after 24 hours all tested guinea pigs showed less inhibition (<60%) compared to that obtained after 32 hours. The outcome of this study reflects that the extract of H. aethiopicus plant may contain an endogenous inhibitor of venom induced local haemorrhage. PMID:22666294

  20. Topical tacrolimus does not negatively impact acute skin wound healing.

    PubMed

    Namkoong, Sun; Chung, Jimin; Yoo, Jiyeon; Jung, Minyoung; Gye, Jiwon; Kim, Ji Seok; Kim, Jee Young; Ahn, Sung Ku; Park, Byung Cheol; Kim, Myung Hwa; Hong, Seung Phil

    2013-05-01

    Despite the increasing use of topical tacrolimus, there is little information about its effect on skin wound healing. To determine effects on acute cutaneous wound healing, two full-thickness skin wounds were imparted on the backs of 45 hairless mice, which were then divided into vehicle-, topical tacrolimus- and topical steroid-treated group. Each drug was topically applied once daily. The wound area was assessed by using dermoscopic images every two days after wounding. At 3, 7 and 11 days after wounding, 10 wounds in each group were collected for semi-quantitative analysis of histological features including re-epithelialization, polymorphonuclear leucocytes, fibroblasts and collagen. We also checked the mRNA expression levels of EGF, TGF-β, TNF-α and IL-1α. While topical application of clobetasol propionate was found to delay re-epithelialization and infiltration of polymorphonuclear leucocyte, topical treatment with tacrolimus showed patterns similar to that of the vehicle. In the tacrolimus-treated group, mRNA expression levels of IL-1α and TGF-β were slightly decreased, while the others were similar with the vehicle-treated group. Unlike steroid, topical tacrolimus, therefore, did not disturb the wound healing process in a murine skin wound model. PMID:23614749

  1. Acute effects of cigarette smoke exposure on experimental skin flaps

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, J.; Jenkins, R.A.; Kurihara, K.; Schultz, R.C.

    1985-04-01

    Random vascular patterned caudally based McFarlane-type skin flaps were elevated in groups of Fischer 344 rats. Groups of rats were then acutely exposed on an intermittent basis to smoke generated from well-characterized research filter cigarettes. Previously developed smoke inhalation exposure protocols were employed using a Maddox-ORNL inhalation exposure system. Rats that continued smoke exposure following surgery showed a significantly greater mean percent area of flap necrosis compared with sham-exposed groups or control groups not exposed. The possible pathogenesis of this observation as well as considerations and correlations with chronic human smokers are discussed. Increased risks of flap necrosis by smoking in the perioperative period are suggested by this study.

  2. Skin nodules in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Le Clech, Lenaïg; Hutin, Pascal; Le Gal, Solène; Guillerm, Gaëlle

    2014-01-01

    Opportunistic infections cause a significant morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. We describe the case of a patient with skin fusariosis and a probable cerebral toxoplasmosis after UCB stem cell transplantation for B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Fusarium species (spp) infections are difficult to treat. To date, there has been no consensus on the treatment of fusariosis and the management of its side effects. Given the negative pretransplant Toxoplasma serology in this case, identifying the origin of the Toxoplasma infection was challenging. All usual transmission routes were screened for and ruled out. The patient's positive outcome was not consistent with that of the literature reporting 60% mortality due to each infection. PMID:24408938

  3. Primary dengue haemorrhagic fever in patients from northeast of Brazil is associated with high levels of interferon-β during acute phase.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Renato Antônio Dos Santos; Silva, Mayara Marques Carneiro da; Calzavara-Silva, Carlos Eduardo; Silva, Ana Maria; Cordeiro, Marli Tenório; Moura, Patrícia Muniz Mendes Freire de; Baptista, Paulo Neves; Marques, Ernesto Torres de Azevedo; Gil, Laura Helena Vega Gonzales

    2016-05-24

    Dengue is an acute febrile disease caused by the mosquito-borne dengue virus (DENV) that according to clinical manifestations can be classified as asymptomatic, mild or severe dengue. Severe dengue cases have been associated with an unbalanced immune response characterised by an over secretion of inflammatory cytokines. In the present study we measured type I interferon (IFN-I) transcript and circulating levels in primary and secondary DENV infected patients. We observed that dengue fever (DF) and dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) patients express IFN-I differently. While DF and DHF patients express interferon-α similarly (52,71 ± 7,40 and 49,05 ± 7,70, respectively), IFN- β were associated with primary DHF patients. On the other hand, secondary DHF patients were not able to secrete large amounts of IFN- β which in turn may have influenced the high-level of viraemia. Our results suggest that, in patients from our cohort, infection by DENV serotype 3 elicits an innate response characterised by higher levels of IFN- β in the DHF patients with primary infection, which could contribute to control infection evidenced by the low-level of viraemia in these patients. The present findings may contribute to shed light in the role of innate immune response in dengue pathogenesis. PMID:27223651

  4. Primary dengue haemorrhagic fever in patients from northeast of Brazil is associated with high levels of interferon-β during acute phase

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Renato Antônio dos Santos; da Silva, Mayara Marques Carneiro; Calzavara-Silva, Carlos Eduardo; Silva, Ana Maria; Cordeiro, Marli Tenório; de Moura, Patrícia Muniz Mendes Freire; Baptista, Paulo Neves; Marques, Ernesto Torres de Azevedo; Gil, Laura Helena Vega Gonzales

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is an acute febrile disease caused by the mosquito-borne dengue virus (DENV) that according to clinical manifestations can be classified as asymptomatic, mild or severe dengue. Severe dengue cases have been associated with an unbalanced immune response characterised by an over secretion of inflammatory cytokines. In the present study we measured type I interferon (IFN-I) transcript and circulating levels in primary and secondary DENV infected patients. We observed that dengue fever (DF) and dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) patients express IFN-I differently. While DF and DHF patients express interferon-α similarly (52,71 ± 7,40 and 49,05 ± 7,70, respectively), IFN- β were associated with primary DHF patients. On the other hand, secondary DHF patients were not able to secrete large amounts of IFN- β which in turn may have influenced the high-level of viraemia. Our results suggest that, in patients from our cohort, infection by DENV serotype 3 elicits an innate response characterised by higher levels of IFN- β in the DHF patients with primary infection, which could contribute to control infection evidenced by the low-level of viraemia in these patients. The present findings may contribute to shed light in the role of innate immune response in dengue pathogenesis. PMID:27223651

  5. Successful vaginal delivery following spontaneous adrenal haemorrhage at term.

    PubMed

    Street, Sally; Dekker Nitert, Marloes; Callaway, Leonie K

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous adrenal haemorrhage (SAH) is a rare event in the general population, estimated to be around 0.3-1.8%. The exact incidence in pregnancy is unknown but rare. Most cases of SAH at or near term have presented with massive haemorrhage and haemodynamic instability, requiring emergency caesarean delivery or intrauterine fetal death. This is the first reported case of a successful vaginal delivery after acute, spontaneous, left adrenal haemorrhage at term. PMID:27190116

  6. Oritavancin: a review in acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections.

    PubMed

    Syed, Yahiya Y; Scott, Lesley J

    2015-11-01

    Oritavancin (Orbactiv(®)) is a new generation lipoglycopeptide approved for use in adult patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI). It is administered as a single 1200 mg intravenous infusion over 3 h. In phase 3 trials in adult patients with ABSSSI, oritavancin was noninferior to vancomycin in terms of a composite outcome (cessation of spreading or reduction in the size of the baseline lesion, absence of fever and no rescue antibacterials required; primary endpoint) assessed at an US FDA-recommended early timepoint of 48-72 h after initiation of treatment. Oritavancin was also noninferior to vancomycin in terms of a ≥20 % reduction in the baseline lesion size at the early timepoint and clinical cure rate 7-14 days after the end of treatment. Oritavancin was generally well tolerated in the phase 3 trials, with most treatment-emergent adverse reactions being mild in severity. The most common adverse events occurring in oritavancin recipients were nausea, headache, vomiting, limb and subcutaneous abscesses, and diarrhoea. Oritavancin offers a number of potential advantages, including a convenient single dose treatment that may shorten or eliminate hospital stays, a reduction in healthcare resource utilization and cost, no need for dosage adjustment in patients with mild to moderate hepatic or renal impairment, no need for therapeutic drug monitoring, and elimination of compliance concerns. Therefore, oritavancin is a useful treatment option for adults with ABSSSI. PMID:26464319

  7. Clinical efficacy of dalbavancin for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI)

    PubMed Central

    Leuthner, Kimberly D; Buechler, Kristin A; Kogan, David; Saguros, Agafe; Lee, H Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) are a common disease causing patients to seek treatment through the health care system. With the continued increase of drug-resistant bacterial pathogens, these infections are becoming more difficult to successfully cure. Lipoglycopeptides have unique properties that allow the drug to remain active toward both common and challenging pathogens at the infected site for lengthy periods of time. Dalbavancin, a new lipoglycopeptide, provides two unique dosing regimens for the treatment of ABSSSI. The original regimen of 1,000 mg intravenous infusion followed by a 500 mg intravenous infusion after a week has been shown as safe and effective in multiple, randomized noninferiority trials. These studies also demonstrated that dalbavancin was similar to standard regimens in terms of both safety and tolerability. Recently a single 1,500 mg dose was demonstrated to be equivalent to the dalbavancin two-dose regimen for treating ABSSSI. With the introduction of dalbavancin, clinicians have the option to provide an intravenous antimicrobial agent shown to be as effective as traditional therapies, without requiring admission into the hospitals or prescribing a medication which may not be utilized optimally. Further understanding of dalbavancin and its unusual properties can provide unique treatment situations with potential benefits for both the patient and the overall health care system, which should be further explored. PMID:27354809

  8. Dalbavancin for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections

    PubMed Central

    Ramdeen, Sheena; Boucher, Helen W

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) have increased in incidence and severity. The involvement of resistant organisms, particularly methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, presents additional challenges. The lipoglycopeptide dalbavancin has a prolonged half-life, high protein binding, and excellent tissue levels which led to its development as a once-weekly treatment for ABSSSI. In the pivotal DISCOVER 1 and DISCOVER 2 trials, dalbavancin proved non-inferior to vancomycin followed by linezolid when used sequentially for ABSSSI, forming the basis for its recent approval in the US and Europe for ABSSSI. Areas covered A literature search of published pharmacologic and clinical data was conducted to review the chemistry, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacokinetics of dalbavancin. We also discuss its development process, highlighting efficacy and safety data from pertinent clinical trials and the role it could play in the current clinical landscape. Expert opinion DISCOVER 1 and DISCOVER 2 demonstrated dalbavancin’s non-inferiority to vancomycin followed by linezolid for ABSSSI and confirmed its safety and tolerability. They were among the first trials to use new, early primary efficacy endpoints, and dalbavancin was among the first agents designated a Qualified Infectious Disease Product for expedited review. Dalbavancin may prove to be a valuable option for ABSSSI patients in whom conventional therapy is limited. PMID:26239321

  9. Evaluation of acute skin irritation and phototoxicity by aqueous and ethanol fractions of Angelica keiskei

    PubMed Central

    LEE, SANG-HAN

    2013-01-01

    In this study, to assess whether aqueous and ethanol fractions of Angelica keiskei induce acute skin irritation and phototoxicity, acute skin irritancy and phototoxicity tests were performed. The skin of rabbits or guinea pigs was treated with these fractions (100 mg/dose) and whether the animals sustained significant skin damage was determined. The data demonstrated that the aqueous and ethanol fractions of Angelica keiskei did not induce acute toxicity in the skin of the animals, as assessed by anatomical and pathological observations. The results from the present study suggest that these aqueous and ethanol fractions of Angelica keiskei have promising potential uses as cosmetic ingredients that do not induce significant levels of skin irritation or phototoxicity. PMID:23251240

  10. Acute skin lesions due to localized ``hot particle`` radiation exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, J.W.; Carsten, A.L.; Kaurin, D.G.L.; Schaefer, C.W.

    1996-06-01

    Purpose of the studies was to determine incidence and severity of lesions resulting from localized deposition of dose to the skin from small (<0.5 mm) discrete radioactive particles. Hanford mini-swine were exposed to localized doses from 0.2 to over 600 Gy (averaged over 1 cm{sup 2} at 70{mu}m depth) from isotopes having max beta particle energies from about 0.3-3 MeV. Incidence of erythema and scabs (indicating ulceration) were scored routinely for up to 71 days post-irradiation. Responses followed normal probability distributions, and thus, no true threshold could be defined. Ten and 50% incidence rates were deduced using probit analyses. Lowest dose producing 10% incidence was about 1 Gy for exposures to Yb-175 (0.5 MeV max energy) beta particles. Severity of lesions was estimated using diameters and persistence. From preliminary considerations of probability of induction, size, and persistence of acute lesions, a special limit for hot particle exposures in the range of 5-50 Gy may be reasonable, with an action level between about 1 Gy and the limit.

  11. Rapid creation of skin substitutes from human skin cells and biomimetic nanofibers for acute full-thickness wound repair.

    PubMed

    Mahjour, Seyed Babak; Fu, Xiaoling; Yang, Xiaochuan; Fong, Jason; Sefat, Farshid; Wang, Hongjun

    2015-12-01

    Creation of functional skin substitutes within a clinically acceptable time window is essential for timely repair and management of large wounds such as extensive burns. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of fabricating skin substitutes via a bottom-up nanofiber-enabled cell assembly approach and using such substitutes for full-thickness wound repair in nude mice. Following a layer-by-layer (L-b-L) manner, human primary skin cells (fibroblasts and keratinocytes) were rapidly assembled together with electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL)/collagen (3:1, w/w; 8%, w/v) nanofibers into 3D constructs, in which fibroblasts and keratinocytes were located in the bottom and upper portion respectively. Following culture, the constructs developed into a skin-like structure with expression of basal keratinocyte markers and deposition of new matrix while exhibiting good mechanical strength (as high as 4.0 MPa by 14 days). Treatment of the full-thickness wounds created on the back of nude mice with various grafts (acellular nanofiber meshes, dermal substitutes, skin substitutes and autografts) revealed that 14-day-cultured skin substitutes facilitated a rapid wound closure with complete epithelialization comparable to autografts. Taken together, skin-like substitutes can be formed by L-b-L assembling human skin cells and biomimetic nanofibers and they are effective to heal acute full-thickness wounds in nude mice. PMID:26187057

  12. Use of drug therapy to manage acute cutaneous necrosis of the skin.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Jill S; Hall, John C

    2010-04-01

    Acute cutaneous necrosis is defined as a sudden onset of gangrenous skin changes in the skin, associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The following diseases are included in this discussion: coumadin necrosis, heparin necrosis, brown recluse spider bite, necrotizing fasciitis, vasculitis, pyoderma gangrenosum, calciphylaxis, clotting abnormalities and embolic phenomena. The importance of early diagnosis, early distinction and early drug therapy or drug withdrawal must match the diagnosis for maximal preservation of the skin and underlying tissue. PMID:20514791

  13. Endoscopy management algorithms: role of cyanoacrylate glue injection and self-expanding metal stents in acute variceal haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    El Sayed, G; Tarff, S; O'Beirne, J; Wright, G

    2015-01-01

    Mortality from acute variceal bleeding (AVB) has improved markedly over the last 2–3 decades due to increased specialisation and standardisation of medical and endoscopic practice culminating in the production of consensus guidance based on expert opinion. Nonetheless, despite greater exposure, training and endoscopic practices, 30-day mortality still remains high at around 30%. This is a reflection of the high morbidity with liver disease, and limited endoscopic experience and/or endoscopic techniques used by the majority of general endoscopists. Clinical necessity defines our drive for further endoscopic innovation to improve ‘best practice’ and, therefore, clinical outcomes accordingly. Sclerotherpy, variceal band ligation and/or rescue balloon tamponade have been entrenched in most treatment algorithms over the decades. However, in recent years and albeit limited to specialised liver centres, cyanoacrylate glue injection therapy (for oesophageal and gastric varices), and the placement of a self-expanding metallic stent for oesophageal varices have begun to offer improved endoscopic care in experienced hands. Yet even in specialised centres, their application is sporadic and operator dependent. Here, we discuss the evidence of these newer endoscopic approaches, and hope to propose their inclusion in endoscopic therapy algorithms for ‘best practice’ management of AVB in all appropriately supported endoscopy units. PMID:26167267

  14. Epizootic Haemorrhagic Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Epizootic haemorrhagic disease (EHD) is an infectious non contagious viral disease transmitted by insects of the genus Culicoides which affects wild and domestic ruminants. The causative agent, the epizootic haemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV), belongs to the family Reoviridae, genus Orbivirus and sha...

  15. Transient global amnesia and left frontal haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Jacome, D. E.; Yanez, G. F.

    1988-01-01

    A patient developed spontaneous, acute, dominant frontal lobe haemorrhage neighbouring on a zone of pre-existing post-traumatic encephalomalacia manifesting clinically as transient global amnesia. Amnesia can be secondary to disease of the frontal lobe, affecting pathways interconnecting the basal forebrain and hippocampus of the temporal lobe. Images Figure 1 PMID:3174526

  16. New developments in the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections: considerations for the effective use of dalbavancin

    PubMed Central

    Juul, Janelle J; Mullins, Caitlin F; Peppard, William J; Huang, Angela M

    2016-01-01

    Dalbavancin, an intravenous glycopeptide, was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in May 2014 for use in adult patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections. The recommended dosing regimen for effective use of dalbavancin is 1,000 mg followed by a 500 mg dose after 1 week. Two multinational, identically designed, non-inferiority trials, DISCOVER 1 and 2, demonstrated similar early clinical success with dalbavancin compared to vancomycin with an option to switch to oral linezolid. In a recently published non-inferiority trial, a single-dose regimen of dalbavancin was compared to the traditional two-dose administration and was found to have a non-inferior clinical response. In the aforementioned trials, dalbavancin was well tolerated, with patients experiencing transient adverse events of mild to moderate severity. The prolonged half-life, excellent skin and soft tissue penetration, bactericidal activity against Gram-positive bacteria including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and convenient dosing make dalbavancin a reasonable option for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections in adult patients who have tried and failed other therapies. PMID:26937194

  17. Subarachnoid Haemorrhage and Sports

    PubMed Central

    Sousa Nanji, Liliana; Melo, Teresa P.; Canhão, Patrícia; Fonseca, Ana Catarina; Ferro, José Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Background Some cases of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) have been associated with vigorous physical activity, including sports. Our research aimed to describe the association between SAH and sports and to identify the types of sports that were more frequently found as precipitating factors in a tertiary single-centre SAH register. Methods We retrieved information from a prospectively collected SAH registry and reviewed discharge notes of acute SAH patients admitted to the Stroke Unit of Hospital de Santa Maria, Lisbon, between 1995 and 2014. Results Out of 738 patients included in the analysis, 424 (57.5%) cases of SAH were preceded by physical activity. Nine cases (1.2%) were associated with sports, namely running (2 cases), aerobics (2 cases), cycling, body balance, dance, surf and windsurf. Patients with SAH while practicing sports were younger than controls (average age 43.1 vs. 57.0 years; p = 0.007). In 1 patient, there was a report of trauma to the neck. Patients in the sports group only had Hunt and Hess scale grades 1 (11.1%) or 2 (88.9%) at admission, while patients in the control group had a wider distribution in severity. Conclusions Our findings indicate that SAH precipitated by sports is not very frequent and is uncommonly related to trauma. Patients who suffered SAH associated with sports were younger and apparently had a milder clinical presentation. PMID:26648972

  18. Ebolavirus and Haemorrhagic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Matua, Gerald A.; Van der Wal, Dirk M.; Locsin, Rozzano C.

    2015-01-01

    The Ebola virus is a highly virulent, single-stranded ribonucleic acid virus which affects both humans and apes and has fast become one of the world’s most feared pathogens. The virus induces acute fever and death, with haemorrhagic syndrome occurring in up to 90% of patients. The known species within the genus Ebolavirus are Bundibugyo, Sudan, Zaïre, Reston and Taï Forest. Although endemic in Africa, Ebola has caused worldwide anxiety due to media hype and concerns about its international spread, including through bioterrorism. The high fatality rate is attributed to unavailability of a standard treatment regimen or vaccine. The disease is frightening since it is characterised by rapid immune suppression and systemic inflammatory response, causing multi-organ and system failure, shock and often death. Currently, disease management is largely supportive, with containment efforts geared towards mitigating the spread of the virus. This review describes the classification, morphology, infective process, natural ecology, transmission, epidemic patterns, diagnosis, clinical features and immunology of Ebola, including management and epidemic containment strategies. PMID:26052448

  19. Comparative analysis of the acute response of zebrafish Danio rerio skin to two different bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Lü, Aijun; Hu, Xiucai; Wang, Yi; Shen, Xiaojing; Zhu, Aihua; Shen, Lulu; Ming, Qinglei; Feng, Zhaojun

    2013-12-01

    Skin is an important innate immune organ in fish; however, little is known about the skin's immune response to infectious pathogens. We conducted a comparative analysis of the acute immune response of Zebrafish Danio rerio skin against gram-positive (Staphylococcus chromogenes) and gram-negative (Citrobacter freundii) bacterial infections. Gene expression profiles induced from the two different infections were identified by microarray hybridization, with many genes demonstrating an acute immune response in the skin. Differentially expressed genes were mainly involved in response to stress and stimulus, complement activation, acute-phase response, and defense and immune response. Compared with transcription patterns of skin from the two infections, a similar innate immunity (e.g., transferrin, coagulation factor, complements, and lectins) was observed but with different acute-phase genes (e.g., ceruloplasmin, alpha-1-microglobulin, vitellogenin, and heat shock protein). These results suggest that the skin of fish plays an important role in the innate immune responses to bacterial infection. PMID:24341765

  20. Transitions of care in the management of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections: a paradigm shift.

    PubMed

    Verastegui, Jaime E; Hamada, Yukihiro; Nicolau, David P

    2016-08-01

    Acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) have evolved over a relatively short period of time to become one of the most challenging medical problems encountered in clinical practice. Notably the high incidence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) across the continuum of care has coincided with increased outpatient failures and higher rates of hospital admissions for parental antibiotic therapy. Consequently the management of ABSSSI constitutes a tremendous burden to the healthcare system in terms of cost of care and consumption of institutional and clinical resources. This perspective piece discusses current and new approaches to the management of ABSSSI in a hospital setting and the need for a multifaceted approach. Treatment strategies for the management through the utilization of observation units (OU), Outpatient Parental Antibiotic Therapy (OPAT), and newly developed antibiotics for the use against skin infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria will be discussed in the context of ABSSSI. PMID:27248789

  1. Prevention of intracerebral haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Patrick; Mitra, Dipayan; Gregson, Barbara A; Mendelow, A David

    2007-07-01

    Nontraumatic intracerebral haemorrhages arise from a wide range of causes falling into two broad groups: discreet vascular "ictohaemorrhagic" lesions such as aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations, cavernomas, tumours, and dural fistulae; and more generalised amyloid or hypertension related conditions. It is now possible using family history, associated risk factors and gradient echo MRI to predict cases at high risk of hypertensive or amyloid related haemorrhage. There is considerable potential for prevention of hypertensive haemorrhages by treatment of high risk cases with antihypertensive medication. As yet no effective preventative treatment for amyloid angiopathy related ICH has emerged although a variety of drugs are under investigation. Prevention of haemorrhage from ictohaemorrhagic lesions revolves around removal or obliteration of the lesion. Although there is a wide range of such lesions available treatments come down to three modalities. These are surgical excision, stereotactic radiosurgery and endovascular embolisation. PMID:17630936

  2. Haemorrhagic Fevers, Viral

    MedlinePlus

    ... fever, dengue, Omsk haemorrhagic fever, Kyasanur forest disease). Ebola virus disease outbreak in West Africa in 2014-2015 All information on Ebola virus disease Ebola features map Dashboard - Progress update ...

  3. Topical versus Systemic Antibiotics in the Treatment of Acute Superficial Skin Infections

    PubMed Central

    Belcon, Michael C.

    1979-01-01

    Use of antibiotics in some superficial skin infections is examined. The choice of a route of administration is dependent on a number of factors, including the site and extent of skin lesions, frequency of recurrence, and clinical and immunological state of the host. However, the consensus of various studies on the subject seem to indicate a preference for the systemic route in acute infectious dermatoses. PMID:423278

  4. Understanding the Acute Skin Injury Mechanism Caused by Player-Surface Contact During Soccer

    PubMed Central

    van den Eijnde, Wilbert A.J.; Peppelman, Malou; Lamers, Edwin A.D.; van de Kerkhof, Peter C.M.; van Erp, Piet E.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Superficial skin injuries are considered minor, and their incidence is probably underestimated. Insight into the incidence and mechanism of acute skin injury can be helpful in developing suitable preventive measures and safer playing surfaces for soccer and other field sports. Purpose: To gain insight into the incidence and severity of skin injuries related to soccer and to describe the skin injury mechanism due to player-surface contact. Study Design: Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: The prevention model by van Mechelen et al (1992) combined with the injury causation model of Bahr and Krosshaug (2005) were used as a framework for the survey to describe the skin injury incidence and mechanism caused by player-surface contact. Results: The reviewed literature showed that common injury reporting methods are mainly based on time lost from participation or the need for medical attention. Because skin abrasions seldom lead to absence or medical attention, they are often not reported. When reported, the incidence of abrasion/laceration injuries varies from 0.8 to 6.1 injuries per 1000 player-hours. Wound assessment techniques such as the Skin Damage Area and Severity Index can be a valuable tool to obtain a more accurate estimation of the incidence and severity of acute skin injuries. Conclusion: The use of protective equipment, a skin lubricant, or wet surface conditions has a positive effect on preventing abrasion-type injuries from artificial turf surfaces. The literature also shows that essential biomechanical information of the sliding event is lacking, such as how energy is transferred to the area of contact. From a clinical and histological perspective, there are strong indications that a sliding-induced skin lesion is caused by mechanical rather than thermal injury to the skin. PMID:26535330

  5. Profile of oritavancin and its potential in the treatment of acute bacterial skin structure infections

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Subhashis; Saeed, Usman; Havlichek, Daniel H; Stein, Gary E

    2015-01-01

    Oritavancin, a semisynthetic derivative of the glycopeptide antibiotic chloroeremomycin, received the US Food and Drug Administration approval for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections caused by susceptible Gram-positive bacteria in adults in August 2014. This novel second-generation semisynthetic lipoglycopeptide antibiotic has activity against a broad spectrum of Gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA), and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus. Oritavancin inhibits bacterial cell wall synthesis and is rapidly bactericidal against many Gram-positive pathogens. The long half-life of this drug enables a single-dose administration. Oritavancin is not metabolized in the body, and the unchanged drug is slowly excreted by the kidneys. In two large Phase III randomized, double-blind, clinical trials, oritavancin was found to be non-inferior to vancomycin in achieving the primary composite end point in the treatment of acute Gram-positive skin and skin structure infections. Adverse effects noted were mostly mild with nausea, headache, and vomiting being the most common reported side effects. Oritavancin has emerged as another useful antimicrobial agent for treatment of acute Gram-positive skin and skin structure infections, including those caused by MRSA and VISA. PMID:26185459

  6. Evaluating the consistency of location of the most severe acute skin reaction and highest skin dose measured by thermoluminescent dosimeter during radiotherapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li-Min; Huang, Chih-Jen; Chen, Hsiao-Yun; Chang, Gia-Hsin; Tsao, Min-Jen

    2016-01-01

    We conducted this prospective study to evaluate whether the location of the most severe acute skin reaction matches the highest skin dose measured by thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) during adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for patients with breast cancer after breast conservative surgery. To determine whether TLD measurement can reflect the location of the most severe acute skin reaction, 80 consecutive patients were enrolled in this prospective study. We divided the irradiated field into breast, axillary, inframammary fold, and areola/nipple areas. In 1 treatment session when obvious skin reaction occurred, we placed the TLD chips onto the 4 areas and measured the skin dose. We determined whether the highest measured skin dose area is consistent with the location of the most severe skin reaction. The McNemar test revealed that the clinical skin reaction and TLD measurement are more consistent when the most severe skin reaction occurred at the axillary area, and the p = 0.0108. On the contrary, TLD measurement of skin dose is less likely consistent with clinical observation when the most severe skin reaction occurred at the inframammary fold, breast, and areola/nipple areas (all the p > 0.05). Considering the common site of severe skin reaction over the axillary area, TLD measurement may be an appropriate way to predict skin reaction during RT. PMID:27158022

  7. Bilayer Cryogel Wound Dressing and Skin Regeneration Grafts for the Treatment of Acute Skin Wounds.

    PubMed

    Priya, S Geetha; Gupta, Ankur; Jain, Era; Sarkar, Joyita; Damania, Apeksha; Jagdale, Pankaj R; Chaudhari, Bhushan P; Gupta, Kailash C; Kumar, Ashok

    2016-06-22

    In this study, the potential of cryogel bilayer wound dressing and skin regenerating graft for the treatment of surgically created full thickness wounds was evaluated. The top layer was composed of polyvinylpyrrolidone-iodine (PVP-I) cryogel and served as the antiseptic layer, while the bottom regenerative layer was made using gelatin cryogel. Both components of the bilayer showed typical features of a cryogel interconnected macropore network, rapid swelling, high water uptake capacity of about 90%. Both PVP and gelatin cryogel showed high tensile strength of 45 and 10 kPa, respectively. Gelatin cryogel sheets were essentially elastic and could be stretched without any visible deformation. The antiseptic PVP-I layer cryogel sheet showed sustained iodine release and suppressed microbial growth when tested with skin pathogens (zone of inhibition ∼2 cm for sheet of 0.9 cm diameter). The gelatin cryogel sheet degraded in vitro in weeks. The gelatin cryogel sheet supported cell infiltration, attachment, and proliferation of fibroblasts and keratinocytes. Microparticles loaded with bioactive molecules (mannose-6-phosphate and human fibrinogen) were also incorporated in the gelatin cryogel sheets for their role in enhancing skin regeneration and scar free wound healing. In vivo evaluation of healing capacity of the bilayer cryogel was checked in rabbits by creating full thickness wound defect (diameter 2 cm). Macroscopic and microscopic observation at regular time intervals for 4 weeks demonstrated better and faster skin regeneration in the wound treated with cryogel bilayer as compared to untreated defect and the repair was comparable to commercial skin regeneration scaffold Neuskin-F. Complete skin regeneration was observed after 4 weeks of implantation with no sign of inflammatory response. Defects implanted with cryogel having mannose-6-phosphate showed no scar formation, while the wound treated with bilayer incorporated with human fibrinogen microparticles showed

  8. Recovery after subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, P.; Willison, J. R.; Lowe, D.; Neil-Dwyer, G.

    1989-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the implications of subarachnoid haemorrhage for quality of life and aftercare. DESIGN--Prospective follow up study of patients surviving subarachnoid haemorrhage over one year (at discharge, three months, and one year) by examination of cognitive functions (a test battery) and changes in everyday life (semistructured interview). SETTING--Regional neurosurgical unit at a tertiary referral centre. PATIENTS--100 Patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage; 17 were lost during the study because of ineligibility (further surgery, previous head injury, relevant psychiatric history, and cultural differences), loss of contact, and non-compliance; a further 13 patients who developed a neurological deficit were considered separately. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Performance on cognitive test battery and reported changes in quality of life. RESULTS--At discharge patients with and without neurological deficit scored below established norms with most tests, but by three months the difference had resolved in patients without deficit. Reduced quality of life attributable to subarachnoid haemorrhage at one year mainly included less energy (seven patients), adverse emotional changes (five), early retirement, affected social life, and domestic tension (three each). None reported reduced capacity for work. CONCLUSIONS--Patients surviving subarachnoid haemorrhage without neurological symptoms have a good prognosis and should be encouraged to return to a normal lifestyle within about three months. PMID:2507029

  9. Effects of glycerol on human skin damaged by acute sodium lauryl sulphate treatment.

    PubMed

    Atrux-Tallau, Nicolas; Romagny, Céline; Padois, Karine; Denis, Alain; Haftek, Marek; Falson, Françoise; Pirot, Fabrice; Maibach, Howard I

    2010-08-01

    Glycerol, widely used as humectant, is known to protect against irritants and to accelerate recovery of irritated skin. However, most studies were done with topical formulations (i.e. emulsions) containing glycerol in relatively high amounts, preventing drawing conclusions from direct effects. In this study, acute chemical irritations were performed on the forearm with application of a 10% sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) aqueous solution under occlusion for 3 h. Then, glycerol aqueous solutions from 1 to 10% were applied under occlusion for 3 h. After elimination of moist excess consecutive to occlusive condition, in ambient air for 15 and 30 min, skin barrier function was investigated by dual measurement of skin hydration and transepidermal water loss (TEWL). Treatments with SLS solution under occlusion significantly increased TEWL and decreased skin hydration as assessed by capacitance measurements. The SLS irritant property was raised by the occlusion and the water barrier function as well as water content appeared impaired. Recovery with glycerol at low doses was remarkable through a mechanism that implies its hygroscopic properties and which is saturable. This precocious effect acts through skin rehydration by enhancing water-holding capacity of stratum corneum that would facilitate the late physiological repair of impaired skin barrier. Thus, glycerol appears to substitute for natural moisturizing factors that have been washed out by the detergent action of SLS, enhancing skin hydration but without restoring skin barrier function as depicted by TEWL values that remained high. Thus, irritant contact dermatitis treated with glycerol application compensate for skin dehydration, favouring physiological process to restore water barrier function of the impaired skin. Empirical use of glycerol added topical formulations onto detergent altered skin was substantiated in the present physicochemical approach. PMID:20043170

  10. Intracranial haemorrhage in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Fairhall, Jacob M; Stoodley, Marcus A

    2009-01-01

    Intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) is a rare, yet potentially devastating event in pregnancy. There is a risk of maternal mortality or morbidity and a significant risk to the unborn child. The risk of haemorrhage increases during the third trimester and is greatest during parturition and the puerperium. ICH can be extradural, subdural, subarachnoid or intraparenchymal. Causes of bleeding include trauma, arteriovenous malformations, aneurysms, preeclampsia/eclampsia and venous thrombosis. Urgent neurosurgical conditions generally outweigh obstetric considerations in management decisions, although anaesthetic and surgical modifications can be made to minimize adverse effects to the fetus.

  11. Experimental subarachnoid haemorrhage results in multifocal axonal injury.

    PubMed

    Kummer, Terrance T; Magnoni, Sandra; MacDonald, Christine L; Dikranian, Krikor; Milner, Eric; Sorrell, James; Conte, Valeria; Benetatos, Joey J; Zipfel, Gregory J; Brody, David L

    2015-09-01

    The great majority of acute brain injury results from trauma or from disorders of the cerebrovasculature, i.e. ischaemic stroke or haemorrhage. These injuries are characterized by an initial insult that triggers a cascade of injurious cellular processes. The nature of these processes in spontaneous intracranial haemorrhage is poorly understood. Subarachnoid haemorrhage, a particularly deadly form of intracranial haemorrhage, shares key pathophysiological features with traumatic brain injury including exposure to a sudden pressure pulse. Here we provide evidence that axonal injury, a signature characteristic of traumatic brain injury, is also a prominent feature of experimental subarachnoid haemorrhage. Using histological markers of membrane disruption and cytoskeletal injury validated in analyses of traumatic brain injury, we show that axonal injury also occurs following subarachnoid haemorrhage in an animal model. Consistent with the higher prevalence of global as opposed to focal deficits after subarachnoid haemorrhage and traumatic brain injury in humans, axonal injury in this model is observed in a multifocal pattern not limited to the immediate vicinity of the ruptured artery. Ultrastructural analysis further reveals characteristic axonal membrane and cytoskeletal changes similar to those associated with traumatic axonal injury. Diffusion tensor imaging, a translational imaging technique previously validated in traumatic axonal injury, from these same specimens demonstrates decrements in anisotropy that correlate with histological axonal injury and functional outcomes. These radiological indicators identify a fibre orientation-dependent gradient of axonal injury consistent with a barotraumatic mechanism. Although traumatic and haemorrhagic acute brain injury are generally considered separately, these data suggest that a signature pathology of traumatic brain injury-axonal injury-is also a functionally significant feature of subarachnoid haemorrhage, raising

  12. Experimental subarachnoid haemorrhage results in multifocal axonal injury

    PubMed Central

    Magnoni, Sandra; MacDonald, Christine L.; Dikranian, Krikor; Milner, Eric; Sorrell, James; Conte, Valeria; Benetatos, Joey J.; Zipfel, Gregory J.; Brody, David L.

    2015-01-01

    The great majority of acute brain injury results from trauma or from disorders of the cerebrovasculature, i.e. ischaemic stroke or haemorrhage. These injuries are characterized by an initial insult that triggers a cascade of injurious cellular processes. The nature of these processes in spontaneous intracranial haemorrhage is poorly understood. Subarachnoid haemorrhage, a particularly deadly form of intracranial haemorrhage, shares key pathophysiological features with traumatic brain injury including exposure to a sudden pressure pulse. Here we provide evidence that axonal injury, a signature characteristic of traumatic brain injury, is also a prominent feature of experimental subarachnoid haemorrhage. Using histological markers of membrane disruption and cytoskeletal injury validated in analyses of traumatic brain injury, we show that axonal injury also occurs following subarachnoid haemorrhage in an animal model. Consistent with the higher prevalence of global as opposed to focal deficits after subarachnoid haemorrhage and traumatic brain injury in humans, axonal injury in this model is observed in a multifocal pattern not limited to the immediate vicinity of the ruptured artery. Ultrastructural analysis further reveals characteristic axonal membrane and cytoskeletal changes similar to those associated with traumatic axonal injury. Diffusion tensor imaging, a translational imaging technique previously validated in traumatic axonal injury, from these same specimens demonstrates decrements in anisotropy that correlate with histological axonal injury and functional outcomes. These radiological indicators identify a fibre orientation-dependent gradient of axonal injury consistent with a barotraumatic mechanism. Although traumatic and haemorrhagic acute brain injury are generally considered separately, these data suggest that a signature pathology of traumatic brain injury—axonal injury—is also a functionally significant feature of subarachnoid haemorrhage

  13. Prophylaxis and management of acute radiation-induced skin reactions: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Salvo, N.; Barnes, E.; van Draanen, J.; Stacey, E.; Mitera, G.; Breen, D.; Giotis, A.; Czarnota, G.; Pang, J.; De Angelis, C.

    2010-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a common treatment for cancer patients. One of the most common side effects of radiation is acute skin reaction (radiation dermatitis) that ranges from a mild rash to severe ulceration. Approximately 85% of patients treated with radiation therapy will experience a moderate-to-severe skin reaction. Acute radiation-induced skin reactions often lead to itching and pain, delays in treatment, and diminished aesthetic appearance—and subsequently to a decrease in quality of life. Surveys have demonstrated that a wide variety of topical, oral, and intravenous agents are used to prevent or to treat radiation-induced skin reactions. We conducted a literature review to identify trials that investigated products for the prophylaxis and management of acute radiation dermatitis. Thirty-nine studies met the pre-defined criteria, with thirty-three being categorized as prophylactic trials and six as management trials. For objective evaluation of skin reactions, the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria and the U.S. National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria were the most commonly used tools (65% of the studies). Topical corticosteroid agents were found to significantly reduce the severity of skin reactions; however, the trials of corticosteroids evaluated various agents, and no clear indication about a preferred corticosteroid has emerged. Amifostine and oral enzymes were somewhat effective in preventing radiation-induced skin reactions in phase ii and phase iii trials respectively; further large randomized controlled trials should be undertaken to better investigate those products. Biafine cream (Ortho–McNeil Pharmaceuticals, Titusville, NJ, U.S.A.) was found not to be superior to standard regimes in the prevention of radiation-induced skin reactions (n = 6). In conclusion, the evidence is insufficient to support the use of a particular agent for the prevention and management of acute radiation-induced skin reactions. Future trials should focus

  14. Prophylaxis and management of acute radiation-induced skin reactions: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Salvo, N; Barnes, E; van Draanen, J; Stacey, E; Mitera, G; Breen, D; Giotis, A; Czarnota, G; Pang, J; De Angelis, C

    2010-08-01

    Radiation therapy is a common treatment for cancer patients. One of the most common side effects of radiation is acute skin reaction (radiation dermatitis) that ranges from a mild rash to severe ulceration. Approximately 85% of patients treated with radiation therapy will experience a moderate-to-severe skin reaction. Acute radiation-induced skin reactions often lead to itching and pain, delays in treatment, and diminished aesthetic appearance-and subsequently to a decrease in quality of life. Surveys have demonstrated that a wide variety of topical, oral, and intravenous agents are used to prevent or to treat radiation-induced skin reactions. We conducted a literature review to identify trials that investigated products for the prophylaxis and management of acute radiation dermatitis. Thirty-nine studies met the pre-defined criteria, with thirty-three being categorized as prophylactic trials and six as management trials.For objective evaluation of skin reactions, the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria and the U.S. National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria were the most commonly used tools (65% of the studies). Topical corticosteroid agents were found to significantly reduce the severity of skin reactions; however, the trials of corticosteroids evaluated various agents, and no clear indication about a preferred corticosteroid has emerged. Amifostine and oral enzymes were somewhat effective in preventing radiation-induced skin reactions in phase II and phase III trials respectively; further large randomized controlled trials should be undertaken to better investigate those products. Biafine cream (Ortho-McNeil Pharmaceuticals, Titusville, NJ, U.S.A.) was found not to be superior to standard regimes in the prevention of radiation-induced skin reactions (n = 6).In conclusion, the evidence is insufficient to support the use of a particular agent for the prevention and management of acute radiation-induced skin reactions. Future trials should focus on

  15. Differentially expressed miRNAs in acute wound healing of the skin: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; He, Quanyong; Luo, Chengqun; Qian, Liyuan

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) from scar and normal skin areas in patients who suffered acute injuries in the skin. A total of 9 patients with acute injuries in the skin who received surgical treatment from December 2012 to March 2013 were included in this pilot study. Specimens from the hypertrophic scar and normal skin areas were obtained from the same patient during surgery. To screen for differentially expressed miRNAs, we applied 3 statistical methods, namely the traditional t test, the false discovery rate (FDR), and a novel sure independence screening procedure based on the distance correlation (DC-SIS). We examined the functional trends and metabolic and regulatory pathways for the target genes of the identified miRNAs, and explored interaction of these miRNAs in the implication of scar healing using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. DC-SIS identified 18 differentially expressed miRNAs, 4 of which (miR-149, miR-203a, miR-222, miR-122) were also identified by FDR. The target genes of the 4 miRNAs exhibit a variety of biological functions, and are involved in various pathways such as mitogen-activated protein kinase, Wnt signaling, and focal adhesion. We identified 1 network in which 14 out of the 18 differentially expressed miRNAs were involved. Many of the miRNAs in the network target genes were involved in cell proliferation and apoptosis.In this pilot study, we identified several miRNAs exhibiting differential expression in patients who suffered acute injuries in the skin. Further studies on these miRNAs are needed to validate our findings and explore their roles in the wound healing process of the skin. PMID:25700309

  16. Acute Pain Speeds Skin Barrier Recovery in Healthy Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Jennifer E.; Song, Sunmi; Engeland, Christopher G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Psychological stress is known to impair skin barrier recovery, but little is known about the impact of pain on skin healing processes. Our primary goals were to examine the degree to which acute pain affects recovery from skin barrier disruption, and the potential mediating impact of cortisol and catecholamines. Methods Healthy non-smokers aged 18-43 (N=53, 65% women) underwent a 3-minute cold pressor pain stimulus to their foot. Tape-stripping of forearm skin occurred at two separate locations: before (site 1) and after (site 2) the pain stimulus. Transepidural water loss (TEWL) was assessed at baseline (pre-stripping), immediately post-stripping, and at 75 minutes to determine skin barrier recovery. Cortisol and catecholamine responses were obtained from multiple saliva and plasma samples, respectively. Results Contrary to expectations, greater pain was associated with faster skin barrier recovery, even after controlling for demographics, mood, anxiety, and other factors. Those who reported higher pain showed faster recovery at site 2 compared to a) individuals who experienced lower pain; and b) their own recovery at site 1. Greater increase in norepinephrine (but not in cortisol) was also associated with faster recovery at site 2, and mediated the impact of pain on recovery. Discussion Results bolster evidence that acute pain can affect immune-related processes. It is possible that acute pain may speed recovery from dermal abrasions, although pain is likely to impair recovery from more severe wounds. As pain is an important potential target for clinical intervention, further investigation of pain, stress, and healing processes is warranted. PMID:23148814

  17. Acute management of skin tears: a change in practice pilot study.

    PubMed

    Vandervord, John G; Tolerton, Sarah K; Campbell, Peter A; Darke, Jan M; Loch-Wilkinson, Anna-Marie V

    2016-02-01

    Skin tears are an increasingly common injury occurring in the elderly population and have significant associated morbidity secondary to poor wound healing, prolonged hospital stays and reduced mobility. There has been a shift in practice for the acute management of skin tears within our institution, which has resulted in improved outcomes and reduced morbidity for this common and debilitating injury. Review of past and current practices including cost analyses has led to the establishment of a management protocol for the hospital and wider area health service with the aim to reduce the burden of disease amongst our ever-expanding elderly population. PMID:24612698

  18. Spontaneous intracranial haemorrhage: computed tomographic patterns in Accra.

    PubMed

    Obajimi, M O; Nyame, P K; Jumah, K B; Wiredu, E K

    2002-01-01

    The diagnosis of stroke and the ability to distinguish the subtypes is central in the management of patients. This CT study has confirmed an increased prevalence of stroke (CVA) among Ghanaians. It has also reaffirmed a relatively higher incidence (52.9%) of spontaneous intracranial haemorrhage over cerebral infarcts among the 1,172 stroke patients studied. The study points to a male preponderance and a mean age of 55.7 years. Parenchymal haemorrhage was found to be the commonest variety of these haemorrhages. It occurred in 83.6% of cases while primary subarachnoid haemorrhage was reported in only 8.1% of cases. Ventricular extension of the parenchymal haemorrhage was reported in 22.7% of cases. The latter were mostly unilateral and on the left side especially in the parietal lobe (70.9%), subdural haemorrhage like the parenchymal variety was also reported to be more on the left, mainly unilateral and acute. Haemorrhages in the cerebellum and pons which are normally difficult to diagnose were also outlined with ease in the CT images. Other CT findings in these patients include parilesional oedema and mass effect found in 87.10% and 77.4% respectively. PMID:12081348

  19. Spontaneous cervical haemorrhage of a parathyroid adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Knee, Graham; Todd, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Summary Haemorrhage of a parathyroid adenoma is a rare clinical presentation. This report describes a previously fit and well 54-year-old woman who presented with acute neck swelling and pain with an overlying ecchymosis. Admission laboratory tests revealed a raised parathyroid hormone and hypercalcaemia. A computed tomography (CT) scan showed widespread anterior cervical haemorrhage and a lesion at the inferior pole of the left thyroid gland. A working diagnosis of spontaneous haemorrhage from a parathyroid adenoma was made. As she was haemodynamically stable, she was treated conservatively with a period of observation in hospital to monitor for signs of neck organ compression. Follow-up imaging with CT, ultrasound and sestamibi confirmed the likely source of haemorrhage as a parathyroid nodule with significant vascularity. The diagnosis was confirmed on histopathological analysis after elective surgical exploration of the neck 6 months after her presentation. This revealed a benign parathyroid adenoma with evidence of acute and chronic bleeding. The patient made a full recovery with immediate normalisation of her biochemistry post-operatively. Despite developing a hoarse voice in the immediate post-operative period, this resolved completely within 1 month. This case report provides further evidence to support a minimal delay for elective surgery after conservative management to reduce the risks associated with recurrent bleeding. Learning points Haemorrhage of a parathyroid adenoma should be a differential for all cases of acute cervical swelling or ecchymosis with no precipitating factor.The clerking should identify any risk factors for endocrine disease.Blood tests to screen for abnormal parathyroid biochemistry should be performed on admission.Detailed imaging of the neck is essential to identify the source of haemorrhage and risk of compression to vital neck organs.Conservative management is a suitable option for patients who remain haemodynamically stable

  20. A study of the pharmacologic control of blood flow to acute skin flaps using xenon washout. Part I

    SciTech Connect

    Hendel, P.M.; Lilien, D.L.; Buncke, H.J.

    1983-03-01

    This study was undertaken to understand the control mechanisms differentiating circulation to normal skin and acute skin flaps. The approach was to compare the effects of systemic vasoactive drugs on skin blood flow in rats in acute skin flaps and identical areas of control skin. With this model it was felt that systemic changes would affect both areas equally and any difference in response would be due to vascular control mechanisms unique to the flap. Xenon washout by percutaneous injection was chosen to measure blood flow. The results of over 8000 observations in these studies were: 1. Vasodilation enhances blood flow and flap survival. 2. Vasoconstriction decreases blood flow. 3. Depletion of sympathetic nerve terminals enhances blood flow and flap survival. 4. The acute flap is less sensitive to systemic alpha-agonists than control skin. 5. The acute flap is less sensitive to vasodilators acting at the receptor-site level than control skin. 6. Total sympathetic denervation does not occur. 7. Biologic increases in area of flap survival did occur in drug dose ranges predicted by xenon washout measurements in this model. These findings indicate that the vessels in an acutely raised skin flap have a greater vasospastic tone than is optimal for maximum nutrient blood flow. One explanation consistent with these findings is offered in which the mechanism responsible for this tone is the release of catecholamines from the sympathetic nerve terminals after the flap has been raised.

  1. Acute Skin Toxicity Following Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Who's at Risk?

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, Bradford S.; Laser, Benjamin; Kowalski, Alex V.; Fontenla, Sandra C.; Pena-Greenberg, Elizabeth; Yorke, Ellen D.; Lovelock, D. Michael; Hunt, Margie A.; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: We examined the rate of acute skin toxicity within a prospectively managed database of patients treated for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and investigated factors that might predict skin toxicity. Methods: From May 2006 through January 2008, 50 patients with Stage I NSCLC were treated at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center with 60 Gy in three fractions or 44-48 Gy in four fractions. Patients were treated with multiple coplanar beams (3-7, median 4) with a 6 MV linac using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and dynamic multileaf collimation. Toxicity grading was performed and based on the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Effects. Factors associated with Grade 2 or higher acute skin reactions were calculated by Fisher's exact test. Results: After a minimum 3 months of follow-up, 19 patients (38%) developed Grade 1, 4 patients (8%) Grade 2, 2 patients (4%) Grade 3, and 1 patient Grade 4 acute skin toxicity. Factors associated with Grade 2 or higher acute skin toxicity included using only 3 beams (p = 0.0007), distance from the tumor to the posterior chest wall skin of less than 5 cm (p = 0.006), and a maximum skin dose of 50% or higher of the prescribed dose (p = 0.02). Conclusions: SBRT can be associated with significant skin toxicity. One must consider the skin dose when evaluating the treatment plan and consider the bolus effect of immobilization devices.

  2. Protective Effects of Soy Oligopeptides in Ultraviolet B-Induced Acute Photodamage of Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li-wen; Liu, Juan; Zhang, Jia-an; Xu, Yang; Wu, Di; Permatasari, Felicia

    2016-01-01

    Aim. We explored the effects of soy oligopeptides (SOP) in ultraviolet B- (UVB-) induced acute photodamage of human skin in vivo and foreskin ex vivo. Methods. We irradiated the forearm with 1.5 minimal erythemal dose (MED) of UVB for 3 consecutive days, establishing acute photodamage of skin, and topically applied SOP. Erythema index (EI), melanin index, stratum corneum hydration, and transepidermal water loss were measured by using Multiprobe Adapter 9 device. We irradiated foreskin ex vivo with the same dose of UVB (180 mJ/cm2) for 3 consecutive days and topically applied SOP. Sunburn cells were detected by using hematoxylin and eosin staining. Apoptotic cells were detected by using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), p53 protein, Bax protein, and Bcl-2 protein were detected by using immunohistochemical staining. Results. Compared with UVB group, UVB-irradiated skin with topically applied SOP showed significantly decreased EI. Compared with UVB group, topical SOP significantly increased Bcl-2 protein expression and decreased CPDs-positive cells, sunburn cells, apoptotic cells, p53 protein expression, and Bax protein expressions in the epidermis of UVB-irradiated foreskin. Conclusion. Our study demonstrated that topical SOP can protect human skin against UVB-induced photodamage. PMID:27478534

  3. Protective Effects of Soy Oligopeptides in Ultraviolet B-Induced Acute Photodamage of Human Skin.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bing-Rong; Ma, Li-Wen; Liu, Juan; Zhang, Jia-An; Xu, Yang; Wu, Di; Permatasari, Felicia; Luo, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Aim. We explored the effects of soy oligopeptides (SOP) in ultraviolet B- (UVB-) induced acute photodamage of human skin in vivo and foreskin ex vivo. Methods. We irradiated the forearm with 1.5 minimal erythemal dose (MED) of UVB for 3 consecutive days, establishing acute photodamage of skin, and topically applied SOP. Erythema index (EI), melanin index, stratum corneum hydration, and transepidermal water loss were measured by using Multiprobe Adapter 9 device. We irradiated foreskin ex vivo with the same dose of UVB (180 mJ/cm(2)) for 3 consecutive days and topically applied SOP. Sunburn cells were detected by using hematoxylin and eosin staining. Apoptotic cells were detected by using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), p53 protein, Bax protein, and Bcl-2 protein were detected by using immunohistochemical staining. Results. Compared with UVB group, UVB-irradiated skin with topically applied SOP showed significantly decreased EI. Compared with UVB group, topical SOP significantly increased Bcl-2 protein expression and decreased CPDs-positive cells, sunburn cells, apoptotic cells, p53 protein expression, and Bax protein expressions in the epidermis of UVB-irradiated foreskin. Conclusion. Our study demonstrated that topical SOP can protect human skin against UVB-induced photodamage. PMID:27478534

  4. A Qualitative Analysis of Acute Skin Toxicity among Breast Cancer Radiotherapy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schnur, Julie B.; Ouellette, Suzanne C.; DiLorenzo, Terry A.; Green, Sheryl; Montgomery, Guy H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives One of the most common acute side effects of breast cancer radiotherapy is treatment induced skin changes, referred to as skin toxicity. Yet no research to date has focused expressly on skin toxicity-related quality of life in breast cancer radiotherapy patients. Therefore, our aim was to use qualitative approaches to better understand the impact of skin toxicity on quality of life. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 women (Stage 0-III breast cancer), during their last week of external beam radiotherapy. Each interview was transcribed verbatim, and thematic analysis was performed. Results Three themes were identified based on the interview responses: First, skin changes affect multiple dimensions of quality of life. They cause physical discomfort, body image disturbance, emotional distress, and impair both day-to-day functioning and satisfaction with radiation treatment. Second, individual differences affect women’s experiences. Generally African-American women, younger women, women who are not currently in a relationship, women who are being treated during the summer, and women who are more invested in their appearance are more distressed by skin toxicity. Third, women use a variety of symptom management strategies including self-medication, complementary/alternative medicine approaches, and psychological strategies. Conclusions Implications of results are: 1) Skin toxicity affects numerous dimensions of quality of life, and assessment approaches and psychosocial interventions should address this; 2) individual differences may affect the experience of skin toxicity, and should be considered in treatment and education approaches; and 3) participants’ own creativity and problem-solving should be used to improve the treatment experience. PMID:20238306

  5. Dengue haemorrhagic fever with unusual prolonged thrombocytopaenia.

    PubMed

    Kamil, S M; Mohamad, N H; Narazah, M Y; Khan, F A

    2006-04-01

    We describe a case of dengue haemorrhagic fever with prolonged thrombocytopaenia. A 22-year-old Malay man with no prior illness presented with a history of fever and generalised macular rash of four days duration. Initial work-up suggested the diagnosis of dengue haemorrhagic fever based on thrombocytopaenia and positive dengue serology. Patient recovered from acute illness by day ten, and was discharged from the hospital with improving platelet count. He was then noted to have declining platelet count on follow-up and required another hospital admission on day 19 of his illness because of declining platelet count. The patient remained hospitalised till day 44 of his illness and managed with repeated platelet transfusion and supportive care till he recovered spontaneously. PMID:16572249

  6. Management of postpartum haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet, Marie Pierre; Benhamou, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Postpartum Haemorrhage (PPH) is a major cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. Treatment of acquired coagulopathy observed in severe PPH is an important part of PPH management, but is mainly based on literature in trauma patients, and data thus should be interpreted with caution. This review describes recent advances in transfusion strategy and in the use of tranexamic acid and fibrinogen concentrates in women with PPH. PMID:27408694

  7. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis To Estimate Antibacterial Treatment Effect in Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infection.

    PubMed

    Cates, Jordan E; Mitrani-Gold, Fanny S; Li, Gang; Mundy, Linda M

    2015-08-01

    A systematic literature review and meta-analysis were conducted to estimate the antibacterial treatment effect for linezolid and ceftaroline to inform on the design of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection (ABSSSI) noninferiority trials. The primary endpoints included an early clinical treatment response (ECTR) defined as cessation of lesion spread at 48 to 72 h postrandomization and the test-of-cure (TOC) response defined as total resolution of the infection at 7 to 14 days posttreatment. The systematic review identified no placebo-controlled trials in ABSSSI, 4 placebo-controlled trials in uncomplicated skin and soft tissue infection as a proxy for placebo in ABSSSI, 12 linezolid trials in ABSSSI, 3 ceftaroline trials in ABSSSI, and 2 trials for nonantibacterial treatment. The ECTR rates at 48 to 72 h and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were 78.7% (95% CI, 61.1 to 96.3%) for linezolid, 74.0% (95% CI, 69.7 to 78.3%) for ceftaroline, and 59.0% (95% CI, 52.8 to 65.3%) for nonantibacterial treatment. The early clinical treatment effect could not be estimated, given no available placebo or proxy for placebo data for this endpoint. Clinical, methodological, and statistical heterogeneity influenced the selection of trials for the meta-analysis of the TOC treatment effect estimation. The pooled estimates of the TOC treatment response were 31.0% (95% CI, 6.2 to 55.9%) for the proxy for placebo, 88.1% (95% CI, 81.0 to 95.1%) for linezolid, and 86.1% (95% CI, 83.7 to 88.6%) for ceftaroline. The TOC clinical treatment effect estimation was 25.1% for linezolid and 27.8% for ceftaroline. The antibacterial treatment effect estimation at TOC will inform on the design and analysis of future noninferiority ABSSSI clinical trials. PMID:25987628

  8. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis To Estimate Antibacterial Treatment Effect in Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cates, Jordan E.; Li, Gang; Mundy, Linda M.

    2015-01-01

    A systematic literature review and meta-analysis were conducted to estimate the antibacterial treatment effect for linezolid and ceftaroline to inform on the design of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection (ABSSSI) noninferiority trials. The primary endpoints included an early clinical treatment response (ECTR) defined as cessation of lesion spread at 48 to 72 h postrandomization and the test-of-cure (TOC) response defined as total resolution of the infection at 7 to 14 days posttreatment. The systematic review identified no placebo-controlled trials in ABSSSI, 4 placebo-controlled trials in uncomplicated skin and soft tissue infection as a proxy for placebo in ABSSSI, 12 linezolid trials in ABSSSI, 3 ceftaroline trials in ABSSSI, and 2 trials for nonantibacterial treatment. The ECTR rates at 48 to 72 h and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were 78.7% (95% CI, 61.1 to 96.3%) for linezolid, 74.0% (95% CI, 69.7 to 78.3%) for ceftaroline, and 59.0% (95% CI, 52.8 to 65.3%) for nonantibacterial treatment. The early clinical treatment effect could not be estimated, given no available placebo or proxy for placebo data for this endpoint. Clinical, methodological, and statistical heterogeneity influenced the selection of trials for the meta-analysis of the TOC treatment effect estimation. The pooled estimates of the TOC treatment response were 31.0% (95% CI, 6.2 to 55.9%) for the proxy for placebo, 88.1% (95% CI, 81.0 to 95.1%) for linezolid, and 86.1% (95% CI, 83.7 to 88.6%) for ceftaroline. The TOC clinical treatment effect estimation was 25.1% for linezolid and 27.8% for ceftaroline. The antibacterial treatment effect estimation at TOC will inform on the design and analysis of future noninferiority ABSSSI clinical trials. PMID:25987628

  9. Safety, Tolerability, and Efficacy of GSK1322322 in the Treatment of Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections

    PubMed Central

    Corey, Ralph; O'Riordan, William D.; Dumont, Etienne; Jones, Lori S.; Kurtinecz, Milena; Zhu, John Z.

    2014-01-01

    GSK1322322 represents a new class of antibiotics that targets an essential bacterial enzyme required for protein maturation, peptide deformylase. This multicenter, randomized, phase IIa study compared the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of GSK1322322 at 1,500 mg twice daily (b.i.d.) with that of linezolid at 600 mg b.i.d. in patients suspected of having Gram-positive acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs). The primary endpoint was assessment of the safety of GSK1322322, and a key secondary endpoint was the number of subjects with a ≥20% decrease in lesion area from the baseline at 48 and 72 h after treatment initiation. GSK1322322 administration was associated with mild-to-moderate drug-related adverse events, most commonly, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and headache. Adverse events (86% versus 74%) and withdrawals (28% versus 11%) were more frequent in the GSK1322322-treated group. Treatment with GSK1322322 and linezolid was associated with ≥20% decreases from the baseline in the lesion area in 73% (36/49) and 92% (24/26) of the patients, respectively, at the 48-h assessment and in 96% (44/46) and 100% (25/25) of the patients, respectively, at the 72-h assessment. Reductions in exudate/pus, pain, and skin infection scores were comparable between the GSK1322322 and linezolid treatments. The clinical success rates within the intent-to-treat population and the per-protocol population that completed this study were 67 and 91%, respectively, in the GSK1322322-treated group and 89 and 100%, respectively, in the linezolid-treated group. These results will be used to guide dose selection in future studies with GSK1322322 to optimize its tolerability and efficacy in patients with ABSSSIs. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01209078 and at http://www.gsk-clinicalstudyregister.com [PDF113414].) PMID:25136015

  10. Timing of intraventricular haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, P; Fujimura, M; Howat, P; Howes, D; Keeling, J; Robinson, R O; Salisbury, D; Tizard, J P

    1977-01-01

    The detection of the onset of intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) during life is a necessary preliminary to understanding the cause of this condition. In 10 infants of very low birthweight treated with serial transfusions of adult blood the proportions of transfused cells circulating after each transfusion were compared with the proportion of transfused cells found in the intraventricular clot at necropsy. This allowed the timing of IVH to be restricted retrospectively to the period between consecutive blood transfusions. In addition, the proportional changes of transfused cells produced by infusion of a known red cell mass allow changes in the babies' original red cell mass to be followed during life. A fall in this value occurred in 8 infants dying with IVH and was taken to indicate haemorrhage. Comparison of the two methods in 9 infants suggested that, while in some cases intraventricular bleeding occurs rapidly, in others it takes place over a period of time. The interval between birth and the onset of haemorrhage was directly proportional to the gestational age of the infant. PMID:848996

  11. Beryllium metal I. experimental results on acute oral toxicity, local skin and eye effects, and genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Strupp, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The toxicity of soluble metal compounds is often different from that of the parent metal. Since no reliable data on acute toxicity, local effects, and mutagenicity of beryllium metal have ever been generated, beryllium metal powder was tested according to the respective Organisation for Economical Co-Operation and Development (OECD) guidelines. Acute oral toxicity of beryllium metal was investigated in rats and local effects on skin and eye in rabbits. Skin-sensitizing properties were investigated in guinea pigs (maximization method). Basic knowledge about systemic bioavailability is important for the design of genotoxicity tests on poorly soluble substances. Therefore, it was necessary to experimentally compare the capacities of beryllium chloride and beryllium metal to form ions under simulated human lung conditions. Solubility of beryllium metal in artificial lung fluid was low, while solubility in artificial lysosomal fluid was moderate. Beryllium chloride dissolution kinetics were largely different, and thus, metal extracts were used in the in vitro genotoxicity tests. Genotoxicity was investigated in vitro in a bacterial reverse mutagenicity assay, a mammalian cell gene mutation assay, a mammalian cell chromosome aberration assay, and an unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) assay. In addition, cell transformation was tested in a Syrian hamster embryo cell assay, and potential inhibition of DNA repair was tested by modification of the UDS assay. Beryllium metal was found not to be mutagenic or clastogenic based on the experimental in vitro results. Furthermore, treatment with beryllium metal extracts did not induce DNA repair synthesis, indicative of no DNA-damaging potential of beryllium metal. A cell-transforming potential and a tendency to inhibit DNA repair when the cell is severely damaged by an external stimulus were observed. Beryllium metal was also found not to be a skin or eye irritant, not to be a skin sensitizer, and not to have relevant acute oral

  12. Beryllium Metal I. Experimental Results on Acute Oral Toxicity, Local Skin and Eye Effects, and Genotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Strupp, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The toxicity of soluble metal compounds is often different from that of the parent metal. Since no reliable data on acute toxicity, local effects, and mutagenicity of beryllium metal have ever been generated, beryllium metal powder was tested according to the respective Organisation for Economical Co-Operation and Development (OECD) guidelines. Acute oral toxicity of beryllium metal was investigated in rats and local effects on skin and eye in rabbits. Skin-sensitizing properties were investigated in guinea pigs (maximization method). Basic knowledge about systemic bioavailability is important for the design of genotoxicity tests on poorly soluble substances. Therefore, it was necessary to experimentally compare the capacities of beryllium chloride and beryllium metal to form ions under simulated human lung conditions. Solubility of beryllium metal in artificial lung fluid was low, while solubility in artificial lysosomal fluid was moderate. Beryllium chloride dissolution kinetics were largely different, and thus, metal extracts were used in the in vitro genotoxicity tests. Genotoxicity was investigated in vitro in a bacterial reverse mutagenicity assay, a mammalian cell gene mutation assay, a mammalian cell chromosome aberration assay, and an unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) assay. In addition, cell transformation was tested in a Syrian hamster embryo cell assay, and potential inhibition of DNA repair was tested by modification of the UDS assay. Beryllium metal was found not to be mutagenic or clastogenic based on the experimental in vitro results. Furthermore, treatment with beryllium metal extracts did not induce DNA repair synthesis, indicative of no DNA-damaging potential of beryllium metal. A cell-transforming potential and a tendency to inhibit DNA repair when the cell is severely damaged by an external stimulus were observed. Beryllium metal was also found not to be a skin or eye irritant, not to be a skin sensitizer, and not to have relevant acute oral

  13. Potential role of tedizolid phosphate in the treatment of acute bacterial skin infections

    PubMed Central

    Urbina, Olatz; Ferrández, Olivia; Espona, Mercè; Salas, Esther; Ferrández, Irene; Grau, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Tedizolid phosphate (TR-701), a prodrug of tedizolid (TR-700), is a next-generation oxazolidinone that has shown favorable results in the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections in its first Phase III clinical trial. Tedizolid has high bioavailability, penetration, and tissue distribution when administered orally or intravenously. The activity of tedizolid was greater than linezolid against strains of Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., and Enterococcus spp. in vitro studies, including strains resistant to linezolid and those not susceptible to vancomycin or daptomycin. Its pharmacokinetic characteristics allow for a once-daily administration that leads to a more predictable efficacy and safety profile than those of linezolid. No hematological adverse effects have been reported associated with tedizolid when used at the therapeutic dose of 200 mg in Phase I, II, or III clinical trials of up to 3 weeks of tedizolid administration. Given that the clinical and microbiological efficacy are similar for the 200, 300, and 400 mg doses, the lowest effective dose of 200 mg once daily for 6 days was selected for Phase III studies in acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections, providing a safe dosing regimen with low potential for development of myelosuppression. Unlike linezolid, tedizolid does not inhibit monoamine oxidase in vivo, therefore interactions with adrenergic, dopaminergic, and serotonergic drugs are not to be expected. In conclusion, tedizolid is a novel antibiotic with potent activity against Gram-positive microorganisms responsible for skin and soft tissue infections, including strains resistant to vancomycin, linezolid, and daptomycin, thus answers a growing therapeutic need. PMID:23589680

  14. Acute UV irradiation increases heparan sulfate proteoglycan levels in human skin.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ji-Yong; Oh, Jang-Hee; Kim, Yeon Kyung; Shin, Mi Hee; Lee, Dayae; Chung, Jin Ho

    2012-03-01

    Glycosaminoglycans are important structural components in the skin and exist as various proteoglycan forms, except hyaluronic acid. Heparan sulfate (HS), one of the glycosaminoglycans, is composed of repeated disaccharide units, which are glucuronic acids linked to an N-acetyl-glucosamine or its sulfated forms. To investigate acute ultraviolet (UV)-induced changes of HS and HS proteoglycans (HSPGs), changes in levels of HS and several HSPGs in male human buttock skin were examined by immunohistochemistry and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) after 2 minimal erythema doses (MED) of UV irradiation (each n = 4-7). HS staining revealed that 2 MED of UV irradiation increased its expression, and staining for perlecan, syndecan-1, syndecan-4, CD44v3, and CD44 showed that UV irradiation increased their protein levels. However, analysis by real-time qPCR showed that UV irradiation did not change mRNA levels of CD44 and agrin, and decreased perlecan and syndecan-4 mRNA levels, while increased syndecan-1 mRNA level. As HS-synthesizing or -degrading enzymes, exostosin-1 and heparanase mRNA levels were increased, but exostosin-2 was decreased by UV irradiation. UV-induced matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression was confirmed for proper experimental conditions. Acute UV irradiation increases HS and HSPG levels in human skin, but their increase may not be mediated through their transcriptional regulation. PMID:22379342

  15. Reduction of acute photodamage in skin by topical application of a novel PARP inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Beatrix; Magyarlaki, Marta; Csete, Bela; Nemeth, Jozsef; Rabloczky, Gyorgy; Bernath, Sandor; Literáti Nagy, Peter; Sümegi, Balazs

    2002-03-01

    The ultraviolet (UV) components of sunlight induce damage to the DNA in skin cells, which is considered to be the initiating step in the harmful biological effects of UV radiation. Repair of DNA damage results in the formation of single-strand DNA breaks, which activate the nuclear poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Overactivation of PARP worsens the oxidative cell damage and impairs the energy metabolism, raising the possibility that moderation of PARP activation following DNA damage may protect skin cells from UV radiation. The topical effects of the novel PARP inhibitor O-(3-pyperidino-2-hydroxy-1-propyl) pyridine-3-carboxylic acid amidoxime monohydrochloride (BGP-15M) were investigated on UV-induced skin damage in a hairless mouse model. For evaluation of the UV-induced acute photodamage to the skin and the potential protective effect of BGP-15M, DNA injury was detected by measuring the formation of single-strand DNA breaks and counting the resulting sunburn (apoptotic) cells. The ADP-ribosylation of PARP was assessed by Western blot analysis and then quantified. In addition, the UV-induced immunosuppression was investigated by the immunostaining of tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-10 expressions in epidermal cells. The signs of inflammation were examined clinically and histochemically. Besides its primary effect in decreasing the activity of nuclear PARP, topically applied BGP-15M proved to be protective against solar and artificial UV radiation-induced acute skin damage. The DNA injury was decreased (P<0.01). An inhibition of immunosuppression was observed by down-regulation of the epidermal production of cytokines IL-10 and TNFalpha. In the mouse skin, clinical or histological signs of UV-induced inflammation could not be observed. These data suggest that BGP-15M directly interferes with UV-induced cellular processes and modifies the activity of PARP. The effects provided by topical application of the new PARP-regulator BGP-15M indicate that it

  16. The preventive effect of linalool on acute and chronic UVB-mediated skin carcinogenesis in Swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Gunaseelan, Srithar; Balupillai, Agilan; Govindasamy, Kanimozhi; Muthusamy, Ganesan; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan; Shanmugam, Mohana; Prasad, N Rajendra

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we evaluated the role of linalool in acute ultraviolet-B (UVB; 280-320 nm) radiation-induced inflammation and chronic UVB-mediated photocarcinogenesis in mouse skin. Acute UVB-irradiation (180 mJ cm(-2)) causes hyperplasia, edema formation, lipid peroxidation, antioxidant depletion, and overexpression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) in mouse skin. Topical or intraperitoneal (i.p.) treatment of linalool prevented acute UVB-induced hyperplasia, edema formation, lipid peroxidation, and antioxidant depletion in mouse skin. Further, linalool treatment prevented UVB-induced overexpression of COX-2 and ODC in mouse skin. In the chronic study, mice were subjected to UVB-exposure thrice weekly for 30 weeks. Chronic UVB-exposure induced tumor incidence and expression of proliferative markers such as NF-κB, TNF-α, IL-6, COX-2, VEGF, TGF-β1, Bcl-2 and mutated p53 in mouse skin. Treatment with linalool before each UVB-exposure significantly prevented the expression of these proliferative markers and subsequently decreased the tumor incidence in mice skin. Histopathological studies confirmed the development of dysplasia and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in the chronic UVB-exposed mouse skin; and this was prevented by both topical and i.p. linalool treatment. Therefore, linalool may be considered as a photochemopreventive agent against UVB radiation induced skin carcinogenesis. PMID:27251985

  17. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Analysis for Efficacy of Ceftaroline Fosamil in Patients with Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections

    PubMed Central

    Hammel, Jeffrey P.; Van Wart, Scott A.; Rubino, Christopher M.; Reynolds, Daniel K.; Forrest, Alan; Drusano, George L.; Khariton, Tatiana; Friedland, H. David; Riccobene, Todd A.; Ambrose, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    Ceftaroline is a cephalosporin with broad-spectrum in vitro activity against pathogens commonly associated with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI), including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Ceftaroline fosamil, the prodrug of ceftaroline, is approved for the treatment of patients with ABSSSI. Using data from the microbiologically evaluable population from two phase 2 and two phase 3 randomized, multicenter, double-blind studies of patients with ABSSSI, an analysis examining the relationship between drug exposure, as measured by the percentage of time during the dosing interval that free-drug steady-state concentrations remain above the MIC (f%T>MIC), and clinical and microbiological responses was undertaken. The analysis population included 526 patients, of whom 423 had infections associated with S. aureus. Clinical and microbiological success percentages were 94.7 and 94.5%, respectively, among all of the patients and 95.3 and 95.7%, respectively, among those with S. aureus infections. Univariable analysis based on data from all of the patients and those with S. aureus infections demonstrated significant relationships between f%T>MIC and microbiological response (P < 0.001 and P = 0.026, respectively). Multivariable logistic regression analyses demonstrated other patient factors in addition to f%T>MIC to be significant predictors of microbiological response, including age and infection type for all of the patients evaluated and age, infection type, and the presence of diabetes mellitus for patients with S. aureus infections. Results of these analyses confirm that a ceftaroline fosamil dosing regimen of 600 mg every 12 h provides exposures associated with the upper plateau of the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationship for efficacy. PMID:25367904

  18. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic analysis for efficacy of ceftaroline fosamil in patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections.

    PubMed

    Bhavnani, Sujata M; Hammel, Jeffrey P; Van Wart, Scott A; Rubino, Christopher M; Reynolds, Daniel K; Forrest, Alan; Drusano, George L; Khariton, Tatiana; Friedland, H David; Riccobene, Todd A; Ambrose, Paul G

    2015-01-01

    Ceftaroline is a cephalosporin with broad-spectrum in vitro activity against pathogens commonly associated with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI), including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Ceftaroline fosamil, the prodrug of ceftaroline, is approved for the treatment of patients with ABSSSI. Using data from the microbiologically evaluable population from two phase 2 and two phase 3 randomized, multicenter, double-blind studies of patients with ABSSSI, an analysis examining the relationship between drug exposure, as measured by the percentage of time during the dosing interval that free-drug steady-state concentrations remain above the MIC (f%T>MIC), and clinical and microbiological responses was undertaken. The analysis population included 526 patients, of whom 423 had infections associated with S. aureus. Clinical and microbiological success percentages were 94.7 and 94.5%, respectively, among all of the patients and 95.3 and 95.7%, respectively, among those with S. aureus infections. Univariable analysis based on data from all of the patients and those with S. aureus infections demonstrated significant relationships between f%T>MIC and microbiological response (P < 0.001 and P = 0.026, respectively). Multivariable logistic regression analyses demonstrated other patient factors in addition to f%T>MIC to be significant predictors of microbiological response, including age and infection type for all of the patients evaluated and age, infection type, and the presence of diabetes mellitus for patients with S. aureus infections. Results of these analyses confirm that a ceftaroline fosamil dosing regimen of 600 mg every 12 h provides exposures associated with the upper plateau of the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationship for efficacy. PMID:25367904

  19. Profile of tedizolid phosphate and its potential in the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Ronald G; Michaels, Heidi N

    2015-01-01

    Tedizolid phosphate is the first once-daily oxazolidinone approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI). It is more potent in vitro than linezolid against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and other gram-positive pathogens causing ABSSSI, even retaining activity against some linezolid-resistant strains. Tedizolid is approximately 90% protein bound, leading to lower free-drug concentrations than linezolid. The impact of the effect of food, renal or hepatic insufficiency, or hemodialysis on tedizolid’s pharmacokinetic have been evaluated, and no dosage adjustment is needed in these populations. In animal and clinical studies, tedizolid’s effect on bacterial killing is optimized by the free-drug area under the curve to minimum inhibitory concentration ratio (fAUC/MIC). The 200 mg once-daily dose is able to achieve the target fAUC/MIC ratio in 98% of simulated patients. Two Phase III clinical trials have demonstrated the noninferiority of tedizolid 200 mg once daily for 6 days to linezolid 600 mg twice daily for 10 days. In vitro, animal, and clinical studies have failed to demonstrate that tedizolid inhibits monoamine oxidase to a clinically relevant extent. Tedizolid has several key advantages over linezolid including once daily dosing, decreased treatment duration, minimal interaction with serotonergic agents, possibly associated with less adverse events associated with the impairment of mitochondrial protein synthesis (eg, myelosuppression, lactic acidosis, and peripheral/optic neuropathies), and retains in vitro activity against linezolid-resistant gram-positive bacteria. Economic analyses with tedizolid are needed to describe the cost-effectiveness of this agent compared with other options used for ABSSSI, particularly treatment options active against MRSA. PMID:25960671

  20. The effects of acute and chronic administration of n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on ethanol-induced gastric haemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Hunter, B; McDonald, G S; Gibney, M J

    1992-05-01

    Female weanling rats in three equal groups (n 12) were given orally by intubation 1 ml micellar solution of taurocholic acid (10 mM) and either arachidonic acid (20:4 n-6), linoleic acid (18:2 n-6) or eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5 n-3) at a concentration of 120 mM. After 1 h the rats were given intragastrically 2 ml absolute ethanol and were killed 1 h later. Rats given oral 20:4 n-6 showed a significant reduction (P less than 0.05) in the extent (%) of gastric mucosal haemorrhage compared with either the rats given 20:5 n-3 or 18:2 n-6 (8.3 (SD 7.3), 23.2 (SD 10.4) and 21.4 (SD 10.4) respectively. In a second experiment, four equal groups (n 12) of female Wistar rats were fed for 5 weeks on either a control diet of standard laboratory rat food, or the same diet enriched with either maize oil or fish oil or butterfat at a level of 100 g/kg. Following a 24 h fast the rats received an intragastric dose of 2 ml ethanol and were killed 1 h later. Examination of the extent (%) of gastric lesion showed a significant reduction (P less than 0.05) with the feeding of either maize oil or fish oil compared with the controls (12.2 (SD 8.2), 15.3 (SD 13.2) and 29.3 (SD 14.0) respectively). The butterfat diet was not significantly different from the control diet (23.8 (SD 8.1)). PMID:1622986

  1. [Management of post partum haemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Csorba, Roland

    2012-04-29

    Primary post partum haemorrhage is the most common form of major obstetric haemorrhage. The traditional definition of primary post partum haemorrhage is the loss of 500 ml or more of blood from the genital tract within 24 hours of the birth of a baby. Post partum haemorrhage can be minor (500-1000 ml) or major (more than 1000 ml). Major could be divided to moderate (1000-2000 ml) or severe (more than 2000 ml). The recommendations in this article apply to women experiencing primary post partum haemorrhage of 500 ml or more. Secondary post partum haemorrhage is defined as abnormal or excessive bleeding from the birth canal between 24 hours and 12 weeks postnatally. The main causes of the secondary form are: inflammations (endometritis), placental tissue retention, inadequate involution of the uterus and malignancy. Because of its importance as a leading cause of maternal morbidity and mortality, obstetric haemorrhage must be considered as a priority topic. According to the tragic and dramatic outcomes of this morbidity, and to the fact that most cases of post partum haemorrhage have no identifiable risk factors, the practical obstetricians should be aware of the accurate diagnosis and management of this illness. PMID:22543219

  2. Fatality due to acute systemic fluoride poisoning following a hydrofluoric acid skin burn.

    PubMed

    Tepperman, P B

    1980-10-01

    Reports indicate that death due to hydrofluoric acid exposure is usually the result of inhalation of vapor causing pulmonary edema and fluoride poisoning. Absorption via the skin route of fluoride ion sufficient to cause serious systemic problems and even death has rarely been reported. A fatality resulting from a severe facial burn, which produced acute systemic fluoride poisoning with profound hypocalcemia and hypomagnesemia, is presented. The importance of proper personal protective equipment as well as the immediate initiation of first aid and appropriate medical measures, including the monitoring and replacement of serum calcium and magnesium, are emphasized. PMID:7431138

  3. Haemorrhagic Lumbar Juxtafacet Cyst with Ligamentum Flavum Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Ghent, Finn; Davidson, Trent; Mobbs, Ralph Jasper

    2014-01-01

    Juxtafacet cysts are an uncommon cause of radiculopathy. They occur most frequently in the lumbar region, and their distribution across the spine correlates with mobility. Haemorrhagic complications are rare and may occur in the absence of any provocation, although there is some association with anticoagulation and trauma. We present a case of acute radiculopathy due to an L5/S1 juxtafacet cyst with unprovoked haemorrhage which was found to extend into ligamentum flavum. The patient underwent uncomplicated microscope assisted decompression with excellent results. The demographics, presentation, aetiology, and management of juxtafacet cysts are discussed. PMID:25580330

  4. Intraventricular haemorrhage and haemostasis defects.

    PubMed Central

    Beverley, D W; Chance, G W; Inwood, M J; Schaus, M; O'Keefe, B

    1984-01-01

    Twenty five of 106 preterm infants of 34 weeks' gestation or less developed intraventricular haemorrhage within the first 48 hours of life. A comparison of infants with and without intraventricular haemorrhage showed no significant differences in their haemostatic parameters at birth. At age 48 hours the group with intraventricular haemorrhage showed a prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time and reduced factor II, VII, and X activity. There was a significant correlation between the severity of intraventricular haemorrhage and the degree of haemostasis abnormality both in cord blood and in blood obtained at age 48 hours. Those infants sustaining grade IV intraventricular haemorrhage had a significantly prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time, reduced factor II, VII, and X activity; and a decreased fibrinogen concentration at birth. At age 48 hours these defects were accompanied by reduced platelet counts and an increased megathrombocyte index. Although intraventricular haemorrhage is multifactorial, we postulate that correction of haemostasis abnormalities at birth may prevent progression to more severe grades of haemorrhage. PMID:6732274

  5. In Vivo Assessment of Acute UVB Responses in Normal and Xeroderma Pigmentosum (XP-C) Skin-Humanized Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    García, Marta; Llames, Sara; García, Eva; Meana, Alvaro; Cuadrado, Natividad; Recasens, Mar; Puig, Susana; Nagore, Eduardo; Illera, Nuria; Jorcano, José Luis; Del Rio, Marcela; Larcher, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    In vivo studies of UVB effects on human skin are precluded by ethical and technical arguments on volunteers and inconceivable in cancer-prone patients such as those affected with Xeroderma Pigmentosum (XP). Establishing reliable models to address mechanistic and therapeutic matters thus remains a challenge. Here we have used the skin-humanized mouse system that circumvents most current model constraints. We assessed the UVB radiation effects including the sequential changes after acute exposure with respect to timing, dosage, and the relationship between dose and degree-sort of epidermal alteration. On Caucasian-derived regenerated skins, UVB irradiation (800 J/m2) induced DNA damage (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers) and p53 expression in exposed keratinocytes. Epidermal disorganization was observed at higher doses. In contrast, in African descent–derived regenerated skins, physiological hyperpigmentation prevented tissue alterations and DNA photolesions. The acute UVB effects seen in Caucasian-derived engrafted skins were also blocked by a physical sunscreen, demonstrating the suitability of the system for photoprotection studies. We also report the establishment of a photosensitive model through the transplantation of XP-C patient cells as part of a bioengineered skin. The inability of XP-C engrafted skin to remove DNA damaged cells was confirmed in vivo. Both the normal and XP-C versions of the skin-humanized mice proved proficient models to assess UVB-mediated DNA repair responses and provide a strong platform to test novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:20558577

  6. Acute and chronic effects of sulfur mustard on the skin: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Ghanei, Mostafa; Poursaleh, Zohreh; Harandi, Ali Amini; Emadi, Seyed Emad; Emadi, Seyed Naser

    2010-12-01

    Sulfur mustard (2,2-dichlorodiethyl sulfide, SM) is one of the vesicant classes of chemical warfare agents that causes blistering in the skin and mucous membranes, where it can have lingering long-term effects for up to ten years (1). SM was employed extensively by the Iraqi army against not only Iranian soldiers but also civilians between 1983 and 1988, resulting in over 100,000 chemical casualties. Approximately 45,000 victims are still suffering from long-term effects of exposure (2,3). More than 90% of the patients exposed to SM exhibit various cutaneous lesions in the affected area. The human skin can absorb approximately 20% of the SM through exposure. Up to 70% of the chemical is concentrated in the epidermis and the remainder in the basement membrane and in the dermis (4).Sulfur mustard exists in different physical states. The liquid form of SM evaporates slowly in cold weather and can penetrate through the clothing, thereby increasing exposure. However, the gas form readily diffuses in the air and it can be inhaled, leading to systemic absorption. In addition, warm temperatures are ideal conditions that liquid SM present in the clothing of the exposed individual could be converted to gas form. SM-induced clinical cutaneous symptoms include itching and burning. Other clinical findings include erythema or painless sunburn, bulla, hypo- and hyper pigmentation in both exposed and unexposed areas (5,6) The mechanism and biochemical cascade of SM-induced cutaneous manifestations are not completely understood but several published pathways support many of the know facts. Our current understanding fails to explain the time interval between the acute chemical exposure and the late-onset and delayed tissue damage (7,8). The aim of this article is to review the acute and long-term cutaneous findings resulting from SM exposure. Also, cellular and molecular mechanism involved in SM-induced skin pathology have been discussed. PMID:20868209

  7. [Empirical therapeutic approach to infection by resistant gram positive (acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections and health care pneumonia). Value of risk factors].

    PubMed

    González-DelCastillo, J; Núñez-Orantos, M J; Candel, F J; Martín-Sánchez, F J

    2016-09-01

    Antibiotic treatment inadequacy is common in these sites of infection and may have implications for the patient's prognosis. In acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections, the document states that for the establishment of an adequate treatment it must be assessed the severity, the patient comorbidity and the risk factors for multidrug-resistant microorganism. The concept of health care-associated pneumonia is discussed and leads to errors in the etiologic diagnosis and therefore in the selection of antibiotic treatment. This paper discusses how to perform this approach to the possible etiology to guide empirical treatment. PMID:27608306

  8. Vesical Artery Embolization in Haemorrhagic Cystitis in Children.

    PubMed

    García-Gámez, Andrés; Bermúdez Bencerrey, Patricia; Brio-Sanagustin, Sonia; Guerrero Vara, Rubén; Sisinni, Luisa; Stuart, Sam; Roebuck, Derek; Gómez Muñoz, Fernando

    2016-07-01

    Haemorrhagic cystitis is an uncommon and, in its severe form, potentially life-threatening complication of haematopoietic stem cell transplantation or cancer therapy in children. The severe form involves macroscopic haematuria with blood clots, urinary obstruction and/or renal impairment. There are many therapeutic options to treat acute haemorrhage, but only recombinant factor VII has a high level of clinical evidence in children. Supraselective vesical artery embolization (SVAE) is an increasingly used therapeutic procedure for controlling haemorrhage in adults, but is less commonly used in children. This might be due to several factors, such as the invasive nature of the procedure, lack of appropriate medical experience and possible long-term side effects. We present three cases of children successfully treated by means of effective SVAE. PMID:26850734

  9. Recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide attenuates trauma-/haemorrhagic shock-induced acute lung injury through inhibiting oxidative stress and the NF-κB-dependent inflammatory/MMP-9 pathway.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhi; Zhao, Xiu; Liu, Martin; Jin, Hongxu; Wang, Ling; Hou, Mingxiao; Gao, Yan

    2015-12-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is one of the most serious complications in traumatic patients and is an important part of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). Recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide (rhBNP) is a peptide with a wide range of biological activity. In this study, we investigated local changes in oxidative stress and the NF-κB-dependent matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) pathway in rats with trauma/haemorrhagic shock (TH/S)-induced ALI and evaluated the effects of pretreatment with rhBNP. Forty-eight rats were randomly divided into four groups: sham operation group, model group, low-dosage rhBNP group and high-dosage rhBNP group (n = 12 for each group). Oxidative stress and MPO activity were measured by ELISA kits. MMP-9 activity was detected by zymography analysis. NF-κB activity was determined using Western blot assay. With rhBNP pretreatment, TH/S-induced protein leakage, increased MPO activity, lipid peroxidation and metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 activity were inhibited. Activation of antioxidative enzymes was reversed. The phosphorylation of NF-κB and the degradation of its inhibitor IκB were suppressed. The results suggested that the protection mechanism of rhBNP is possibly mediated through upregulation of anti-oxidative enzymes and inhibition of NF-κB activation. More studies are needed to further evaluate whether rhBNP is a suitable candidate as an effective inhaling drug to reduce the incidence of TH/S-induced ALI. PMID:26852688

  10. Intracranial haemorrhage and child abuse.

    PubMed

    Cheah, I G; Kasim, M S; Shafie, H M; Khoo, T H

    1994-01-01

    Intracranial haemorrhage is a major cause of severe morbidity and mortality in child abuse cases in developed countries. However, similar data are not available in most developing countries. This study therefore aimed to determine the incidence of intracranial haemorrhage amongst all cases of child physical abuse, the nature of the injuries incurred, and the morbidity and mortality resulting therefrom. Among 369 cases of physical abuse seen over a 4-year period, 41 (11.4%) had intracranial haemorrhage, of whom 37 (90%) were 2 years old or less. A history of trauma was present in only eight (20%), of which only two were compatible with the injuries incurred. Subdural haemorrhages accounted for 80% of the cases, with skull fractures present in only nine cases. Fifty-four per cent of the 37 children aged 2 years of age or less had no external signs of trauma, but 11 of them had retinal haemorrhages. This is in contrast to the children older than 2 years of age who all had external signs of trauma. The overall prognosis was dismal with an early mortality of almost 30% (13 cases) and at least seven cases with severe neurological sequelae. These findings are comparable with studies from developed countries which have established that non-accidental injury must be considered as a cause of intracranial haemorrhage in any young child, despite the absence of external signs of trauma. PMID:7880096

  11. Emergency Imaging of Intracerebral Haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Alobeidi, Farah; Aviv, Richard I

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) is a devastating condition with high mortality and morbidity despite advances in neurocritical care. Early deterioration is common in the first few hours after ICH onset, secondary to rapid haematoma expansion and growth. Rapid diagnosis and aggressive early management of these patients are therefore crucial. Imaging plays a key role in establishing the diagnosis and the underlying aetiology of ICH, identifying complications and predicting patients who are at high risk for haematoma expansion. In this chapter, we present an evidence-based imaging framework for the management of spontaneous ICH in the acute setting. Non-enhanced computed tomography is long established as the gold standard for ICH diagnosis but has limitations in demonstrating the underlying aetiology in cases of secondary ICH. There is now growing evidence for the ability of non-invasive angiography to establish the underlying aetiology and to predict further haematoma expansion. The presence of small enhancing foci within the haematoma on computed tomography angiography (CTA), the CTA Spot Sign, has been prospectively validated as a predictor of haematoma expansion. Early identification of patients at risk of haematoma expansion allows for the appropriate escalation of care to a neurosurgical team, admission to a neurocritical care unit, appropriate supportive therapy and targeted novel medical and surgical interventions. Catheter angiography, which remains the gold standard for identifying underlying secondary vascular lesions, should be used in selected cases. However, non-invasive vascular imaging should be considered as an important step in the diagnosis and early management of secondary ICH patients. Previous concerns related to the radiation dose, contrast-induced nephropathy and cost are addressed in this chapter. Recently, animal models have enabled the qualitative assessment of haematoma expansion, and our increased understanding of ICH may

  12. Epizootic haemorrhagic disease.

    PubMed

    Maclachlan, N J; Zientara, S; Savini, G; Daniels, P W

    2015-08-01

    Summary Epizootic haemorrhagic disease (EHD) is an arthropod-transmitted viral disease of certain wild ungulates, notably North American white-tailed deer and, more rarely, cattle. The disease in white-tailed deer results from vascular injury analogous to that caused by bluetongue virus (BTV), to which EHD virus (EHDV) is closely related. There are seven serotypes of EHDV recognised, and Ibaraki virus, which is the cause of sporadic disease outbreaks in cattle in Asia, is included in EHDV serotype 2. The global distribution and epidemiology of BTV and EHDV infections are also similar, as both viruses occur throughout temperate and tropical regions of the world where they are transmitted by biting Culicoides midges and infect a wide variety of domestic and wild ungulates. However, the global distribution and epidemiology of EHDV infection are less well characterised than they are for BTV. Whereas most natural and experimental EHDV infections (other than Ibaraki virus infection) of livestock are subclinical or asymptomatic, outbreaks of EHD have recently been reported among cattle in the Mediterranean Basin, Reunion Island, South Africa, and the United States. Accurate and convenient laboratory tests are increasingly available for the sensitive and specific serological and virological diagnosis of EHDV infection and confirmation of EHD in animals, but commercial vaccines are available only for prevention of Ibaraki disease and not for protection against other strains and serotypes of EHDV. PMID:26601439

  13. Modified skin window technique for the extended characterisation of acute inflammation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Marks, D. J. B.; Radulovic, M.; McCartney, S.; Bloom, S.; Segal, A. W.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To modify the skin window technique for extended analysis of acute inflammatory responses in humans, and demonstrate its applicability for investigating disease. Subjects 15 healthy subjects and 5 Crohn’s patients. Treatment Skin windows, created by dermal abrasion, were overlaid for various durations with filter papers saturated in saline, 100 ng/ml muramyl dipeptide (MDP) or 10 μg/ml interleukin-8 (IL-8). Methods Exuded leukocytes were analyzed by microscopy, immunoblot, DNA-bound transcription factor arrays and RT-PCR. Inflammatory mediators were quantified by ELISA. Results Infiltrating leukocytes were predominantly neutrophils. Numerous secreted mediators were detectable. MDP and IL-8 enhanced responses. Many signalling proteins were phosphorylated with differential patterns in Crohn’s patients, notably PKC α/β hyperphosphorylation (11.3 ± 3.1 vs 1.2 ± 0.9 units, P < 0.02). Activities of 44 transcription factors were detectable, and sufficient RNA isolated for expression analysis of over 400 genes. Conclusions The modifications enable broad characterisation of inflammatory responses and administration of exogenous immunomodulators. PMID:17522815

  14. In vivo analysis of THz wave irradiation induced acute inflammatory response in skin by laser-scanning confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Yoonha; Ahn, Jinhyo; Mun, Jungho; Bae, Sangyoon; Jeong, Young Uk; Vinokurov, Nikolay A; Kim, Pilhan

    2014-05-19

    The recent development of THz sources in a wide range of THz frequencies and power levels has led to greatly increased interest in potential biomedical applications such as cancer and burn wound diagnosis. However, despite its importance in realizing THz wave based applications, our knowledge of how THz wave irradiation can affect a live tissue at the cellular level is very limited. In this study, an acute inflammatory response caused by pulsed THz wave irradiation on the skin of a live mouse was analyzed at the cellular level using intravital laser-scanning confocal microscopy. Pulsed THz wave (2.7 THz, 4 μs pulsewidth, 61.4 μJ per pulse, 3Hz repetition), generated using compact FEL, was used to irradiate an anesthetized mouse's ear skin with an average power of 260 mW/cm(2) for 30 minutes using a high-precision focused THz wave irradiation setup. In contrast to in vitro analysis using cultured cells at similar power levels of CW THz wave irradiation, no temperature change at the surface of the ear skin was observed when skin was examined with an IR camera. To monitor any potential inflammatory response, resident neutrophils in the same area of ear skin were repeatedly visualized before and after THz wave irradiation using a custom-built laser-scanning confocal microscopy system optimized for in vivo visualization. While non-irradiated control skin area showed no changes in the number of resident neutrophils, a massive recruitment of newly infiltrated neutrophils was observed in the THz wave irradiated skin area after 6 hours, which suggests an induction of acute inflammatory response by the pulsed THz wave irradiation on the skin via a non-thermal process. PMID:24921268

  15. Consent for Brain Tissue Donation after Intracerebral Haemorrhage: A Community-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Samarasekera, Neshika; Lerpiniere, Christine; Farrall, Andrew J.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; White, Philip M.; Torgersen, Antonia; Ironside, James W.; Smith, Colin; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam

    2015-01-01

    Background Spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage is a devastating form of stroke and its incidence increases with age. Obtaining brain tissue following intracerebral haemorrhage helps to understand its cause. Given declining autopsy rates worldwide, the feasibility of establishing an autopsy-based collection and its generalisability are uncertain. Methods We used multiple overlapping sources of case ascertainment to identify every adult diagnosed with intracerebral haemorrhage between 1st June 2010-31st May 2012, whilst resident in the Lothian region of Scotland. We sought consent from patients with intracerebral haemorrhage (or their nearest relative if the patient lacked mental capacity) to conduct a research autopsy. Results Of 295 adults with acute intracerebral haemorrhage, 110 (37%) could not be approached to consider donation. Of 185 adults/relatives approached, 91 (49%) consented to research autopsy. There were no differences in baseline demographic variables or markers of intracerebral haemorrhage severity between consenters and non-consenters. Adults who died and became donors (n = 46) differed from the rest of the cohort (n = 249) by being older (median age 80, IQR 76–86 vs. 75, IQR 65–83, p = 0.002) and having larger haemorrhages (median volume 23ml, IQR 13–50 vs. 13ml, IQR 4–40; p = 0.002). Conclusions Nearly half of those approached consent to brain tissue donation after acute intracerebral haemorrhage. The characteristics of adults who gave consent were comparable to those in an entire community, although those who donate early are older and have larger haemorrhage volumes. PMID:26302447

  16. Telavancin for Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections, a Post Hoc Analysis of the Phase 3 ATLAS Trials in Light of the 2013 FDA Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Pushkin, Richard; Barriere, Steven L.; Corey, G. Ralph; Stryjewski, Martin E.

    2015-01-01

    Two phase 3 ATLAS trials demonstrated noninferiority of telavancin compared with vancomycin for complicated skin and skin structure infections. Data from these trials were retrospectively evaluated according to 2013 U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidance on acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections. This post hoc analysis included patients with lesion sizes of ≥75 cm2 and excluded patients with ulcers or burns (updated all-treated population; n = 1,127). Updated day 3 (early) clinical response was defined as a ≥20% reduction in lesion size from baseline and no rescue antibiotic. Updated test-of-cure (TOC) clinical response was defined as a ≥90% reduction in lesion size, no increase in lesion size since day 3, and no requirement for additional antibiotics or significant surgical procedures. Day 3 (early) clinical responses were achieved in 62.6% and 61.0% of patients receiving telavancin and vancomycin, respectively (difference, 1.7%, with a 95% confidence interval [CI] of −4.0% to 7.4%). Updated TOC visit cure rates were similar for telavancin (68.0%) and vancomycin (63.3%), with a difference of 4.8% (95% CI, −0.7% to 10.3%). Adopting current FDA guidance, this analysis corroborates previous noninferiority findings of the ATLAS trials of telavancin compared with vancomycin. PMID:26248356

  17. Immediate skin grafting of sub-acute and chronic wounds debrided by hydrosurgery.

    PubMed

    Vanwijck, R; Kaba, L; Boland, S; Gonzales y Azero, M; Delange, A; Tourbach, S

    2010-03-01

    A wound bed may be prepared by various non-surgical debridements using autolytic, biological or enzymatic techniques. These are all effective in selective wounds but tend to be time consuming. Surgical debridement is not selective since healthy collateral tissue is also removed. Physical debridement uses whirlpool therapy to slough off necrotic tissues - the saline which comes out of the hand piece if vapourized over the wound - and therefore disseminates contaminated droplets. Hydrosurgery combines physical and surgical debridement but does not have their drawbacks. Water dissection works by using a high-pressure jet of sterile saline that travels parallel to the wound and creates a Venturi effect, thus enabling the selective removal of necrotic tissues without dissemination of contaminants. In this study, the authors report on 167 sub-acute and chronic wounds from 155 patients treated under general anaesthesia by hydrosurgery (Versajet). Of these, 95% of the debrided wounds were immediately covered with an autologous meshed graft. Compared to other debridement techniques, hydrosurgery has two main advantages: namely its tissue selectivity and its high percentage of successful engraftment after immediate skin grafting. PMID:19196559

  18. Amphetamine abuse and intracranial haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Buxton, N; McConachie, N S

    2000-01-01

    Amphetamines taken by any route can cause cerebral vasculitis and intracranial haemorrhage. 8 cases were seen in a neurosurgical unit over 3.5 years. The published work indicates that those who experience these complications, mainly young adults, have poor outcomes. PMID:11089483

  19. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell implantation for the treatment of radioactivity‑induced acute skin damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Kai; Wu, Weizhen; Yang, Shunliang; Huang, Lianghu; Chen, Jin; Gong, Chungui; Fu, Zhichao; Zhang, Linlin; Tan, Jianming

    2015-11-01

    The present study aimed to observe the role of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in the repair of acute skin damage caused by radiation. Rat bone marrow MSCs (BMSCs) were isolated and cultured in vitro. A rat model of radiation‑induced acute skin damage was established by irradiation of the hind legs of Sprague-Dawley rats using a linear accelerator (45 Gy). After irradiation, rats were randomly divided into two groups: BMSC group and control group. Rats in the BMSC group were treated with a tail vein injection of 2x106 BMSCs (1 ml) immediately after irradiation and a local multipoint injection of 2x106 BMSCs at the injured area two weeks later. Then the wound healing of each rat was observed. The expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)‑β1, stromal cell‑derived factor-1 (SDF‑1) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in the wounded tissues was determined by immunohistochemistry. The results demonstrated that skin damage was milder in the BMSC group than in the control group. Moreover, the speed of healing in the BMSC group was better than that in the control group. In addition, the wound score, it was significantly lower in the BMSC group than in the control group (P<0.05). The expression of PGE2 and TGF‑β1 in the BMSC group was also significantly lower than that in the control group (P<0.05), whereas the SDF‑1 expression was significantly higher in the BMSC group than that in the control group (P<0.05). BMSCs can effectively reduce inflammation and fibrosis in the wounded skin and promote the repair of acute radioactive skin injury. Thus, may be developed as a novel treatment for wound healing. PMID:26323987

  20. Measurement and comparison of skin dose using OneDose MOSFET and Mobile MOSFET for patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Mattar, Essam H.; Hammad, Lina F.; Al-Mohammed, Huda I.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Total body irradiation is a protocol used to treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia in patients prior to bone marrow transplant. It is involved in the treatment of the whole body using a large radiation field with extended source-skin distance. Therefore measuring and monitoring the skin dose during the treatment is important. Two kinds of metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (OneDose MOSFET and mobile MOSEFT) dosimeter are used during the treatment delivery to measure the skin dose to specific points and compare it with the target prescribed dose. The objective of this study was to compare the variation of skin dose in patients with acute lymphatic leukemia (ALL) treated with total body irradiation (TBI) using OneDose MOSFET detectors and Mobile MOSFET, and then compare both results with the target prescribed dose. Material/Methods The measurements involved 32 patient’s (16 males, 16 females), aged between 14–30 years, with an average age of 22.41 years. One-Dose MOSFET and Mobile MOSFET dosimetry were performed at 10 different anatomical sites on every patient. Results The results showed there was no variation between skin dose measured with OneDose MOSFET and Mobile MOSFET in all patients. Furthermore, the results showed for every anatomical site selected there was no significant difference in the dose delivered using either OneDose MOSFET detector or Mobile MOSFET as compared to the prescribed dose. Conclusions The study concludes that One-Dose MOSFET detectors and Mobile MOSFET both give a direct read-out immediately after the treatment; therefore both detectors are suitable options when measuring skin dose for total body irradiation treatment. PMID:21709641

  1. [Leptospirosis with necro-haemorrhagic cholecystitis in a Boxer puppy].

    PubMed

    Steil, D; Quandt, A; Mayer-Scholl, A; Sie, J M; Löhr, C V; Teifke, J P

    2014-01-01

    A Boxer puppy from the island of Rügen, which was properly vaccinated according to its age, was presented with acute gastrointestinal symptoms. The presumptive diagnosis of leptospirosis with acute renal failure, hepatic damage, and jaundice was confirmed by seroconversion (increased titre to 1 : 800 in a non-vaccine serogroup 4 weeks after disease onset). Cholecystitis was diagnosed based on clinical symptoms and sonographic results. After an initial improvement, the puppy's condition deteriorated and cholecystectomy was performed. Histopathological diagnosis indicated a haemorrhagic necrotizing cholecystitis. PMID:25423604

  2. Rabbit haemorrhagic disease (RHD) and rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV): a review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) is a calicivirus of the genus Lagovirus that causes rabbit haemorrhagic disease (RHD) in adult European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus). First described in China in 1984, the virus rapidly spread worldwide and is nowadays considered as endemic in several countries. In Australia and New Zealand where rabbits are pests, RHDV was purposely introduced for rabbit biocontrol. Factors that may have precipitated RHD emergence remain unclear, but non-pathogenic strains seem to pre-date the appearance of the pathogenic strains suggesting a key role for the comprehension of the virus origins. All pathogenic strains are classified within one single serotype, but two subtypes are recognised, RHDV and RHDVa. RHD causes high mortality in both domestic and wild adult animals, with individuals succumbing between 48-72 h post-infection. No other species has been reported to be fatally susceptible to RHD. The disease is characterised by acute necrotising hepatitis, but haemorrhages may also be found in other organs, in particular the lungs, heart, and kidneys due to disseminated intravascular coagulation. Resistance to the disease might be explained in part by genetically determined absence or weak expression of attachment factors, but humoral immunity is also important. Disease control in rabbitries relies mainly on vaccination and biosecurity measures. Such measures are difficult to be implemented in wild populations. More recent research has indicated that RHDV might be used as a molecular tool for therapeutic applications. Although the study of RHDV and RHD has been hampered by the lack of an appropriate cell culture system for the virus, several aspects of the replication, epizootology, epidemiology and evolution have been disclosed. This review provides a broad coverage and description of the current knowledge on the disease and the virus. PMID:22325049

  3. Comprehensive Evaluation of Personal, Clinical, and Radiation Dosimetric Parameters for Acute Skin Reaction during Whole Breast Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dae Sik; Lee, Jung Ae; Lee, Nam Kwon; Park, Young Je; Lee, Suk; Kim, Chul Yong; Son, Gil Soo

    2016-01-01

    Skin reaction is major problem during whole breast radiotherapy. To identify factors related to skin reactions during whole breast radiotherapy, various personal, clinical, and radiation dosimetric parameters were evaluated. From January 2012 to December 2013, a total of 125 patients who underwent breast conserving surgery and adjuvant whole breast irradiation were retrospectively reviewed. All patients had both whole breast irradiation and boost to the tumour bed. Skin reaction was measured on the first day of boost therapy based on photography of the radiation field and medical records. For each area of axilla and inferior fold, the intensity score of erythema (score 1 to 5) and extent (score 0 to 1) were summed. The relationship of various parameters to skin reaction was evaluated using chi-square and linear regression tests. The V100 (volume receiving 100% of prescribed radiation dose, p < 0.001, both axilla and inferior fold) and age (p = 0.039 for axilla and 0.026 for inferior fold) were significant parameters in multivariate analyses. The calculated axilla dose (p = 0.003) and breast separation (p = 0.036) were also risk factors for axilla and inferior fold, respectively. Young age and large V100 are significant factors for acute skin reaction that can be simply and cost-effectively measured. PMID:27579310

  4. Comprehensive Evaluation of Personal, Clinical, and Radiation Dosimetric Parameters for Acute Skin Reaction during Whole Breast Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dae Sik; Lee, Jung Ae; Yoon, Won Sup; Lee, Nam Kwon; Park, Young Je; Lee, Suk; Kim, Chul Yong; Son, Gil Soo

    2016-01-01

    Skin reaction is major problem during whole breast radiotherapy. To identify factors related to skin reactions during whole breast radiotherapy, various personal, clinical, and radiation dosimetric parameters were evaluated. From January 2012 to December 2013, a total of 125 patients who underwent breast conserving surgery and adjuvant whole breast irradiation were retrospectively reviewed. All patients had both whole breast irradiation and boost to the tumour bed. Skin reaction was measured on the first day of boost therapy based on photography of the radiation field and medical records. For each area of axilla and inferior fold, the intensity score of erythema (score 1 to 5) and extent (score 0 to 1) were summed. The relationship of various parameters to skin reaction was evaluated using chi-square and linear regression tests. The V 100 (volume receiving 100% of prescribed radiation dose, p < 0.001, both axilla and inferior fold) and age (p = 0.039 for axilla and 0.026 for inferior fold) were significant parameters in multivariate analyses. The calculated axilla dose (p = 0.003) and breast separation (p = 0.036) were also risk factors for axilla and inferior fold, respectively. Young age and large V 100 are significant factors for acute skin reaction that can be simply and cost-effectively measured. PMID:27579310

  5. Use of Axillary Deodorant and Effect on Acute Skin Toxicity During Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: A Prospective Randomized Noninferiority Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Theberge, Valerie; Harel, Francois; Dagnault, Anne

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To prospectively determine the effect of deodorant use on acute skin toxicity and quality of life during breast radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Before breast RT, 84 patients were randomly assigned to the deodorant group (n = 40) or the no-deodorant group (n = 44). The patients were stratified by axillary RT and previous chemotherapy. Toxicity evaluations were always performed by the principal investigator, who was unaware of the group assignment, at the end of RT and 2 weeks after completion using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute skin toxicity criteria. Symptoms of acute skin toxicity (i.e., discomfort, pain, pruritus, sweating) and quality of life were self-evaluated. For each criterion, the point estimate of rate difference with the 95% one-sided upper confidence limit was computed. To claim noninferiority owing to deodorant use, the 95% one-sided upper confidence limit had to be lower than the noninferiority margin, fixed to 12.8%. Results: In the deodorant vs. no-deodorant groups, Grade 2 axillary radiodermatitis occurred in 23% vs. 30%, respectively, satisfying the statistical criteria for noninferiority (p = .019). Grade 2 breast radiodermatitis occurred in 30% vs. 34% of the deodorant vs. no-deodorant groups, respectively, also satisfying the statistical criteria for noninferiority (p = .049). Similar results were observed for the self-reported evaluations. The deodorant group reported less sweating (18% vs. 39%, p = .032). No Grade 3 or 4 radiodermatitis was observed. Conclusion: According to our noninferiority margin definition, the occurrence of skin toxicity and its related symptoms were statistically equivalent in both groups. No evidence was found to prohibit deodorant use (notwithstanding the use of an antiperspirant with aluminum) during RT for breast cancer.

  6. Rising United States Hospital Admissions for Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Recent Trends and Economic Impact

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Keith S.; Patel, Dipen A.; Stephens, Jennifer M.; Khachatryan, Alexandra; Patel, Ayush; Johnson, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Background The number of ambulatory patients seeking treatment for skin and skin structure infections (SSSI) are increasing. The objective of this study is to determine recent trends in hospital admissions and healthcare resource utilization and identify covariates associated with hospital costs and mortality for hospitalized adult patients with a primary SSSI diagnosis in the United States. Methods We performed a retrospective cross-sectional analysis (years 2005–2011) of data from the US Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project National Inpatient Sample. Recent trends, patient characteristics, and healthcare resource utilization for patients hospitalized with a primary SSSI diagnosis were evaluated. Descriptive and bivariate analyses were conducted to assess patient and hospital characteristics. Results A total of 1.8% of hospital admissions for the years 2005 through 2011 were for adult patients with a SSSI primary diagnosis. SSSI-related hospital admissions significantly changed during the study period (P < .001 for trend) ranging from 1.6% (in 2005) to 2.0% (in 2011). Mean hospital length of stay (LOS) decreased from 5.4 days in the year 2005 to 5.0 days in the year 2011 (overall change, P < .001) with no change in hospital costs. Patients with postoperative wound infections had the longest hospital stays (adjusted mean, 5.81 days; 95% confidence interval (CI), 5.80–5.83) and highest total costs (adjusted mean, $9388; 95% CI, $9366-$9410). Year of hospital admission was strongly associated with mortality; infection type, all patient refined diagnosis related group severity of illness level, and LOS were strongly associated with hospital costs. Conclusions Hospital admissions for adult patients in the United States with a SSSI primary diagnosis continue to increase. Decreasing hospital inpatient LOS and mortality rate may be due to improved early treatment. Future research should focus on identifying alternative treatment processes for patients with SSSI

  7. Reduction in periventricular haemorrhage in preterm infants.

    PubMed Central

    Szymonowicz, W; Yu, V Y; Walker, A; Wilson, F

    1986-01-01

    Our previous cerebral ultrasound study of antecedents of periventricular haemorrhage in infants weighing 1250 g or less at birth suggested that neonatal events that caused increased or fluctuating cerebral blood flow lead to periventricular haemorrhage. As the risk period for this type of haemorrhage was the first four days of life strict guidelines were introduced to avoid the previously identified neonatal risk factors. No attempt was made to modify obstetric practice. Over the next two years, although the obstetric risk profile, the frequency and severity of hyaline membrane disease, and the gestation, birth weight, and sex distributions of a similar cohort of infants did not change, the incidence of periventricular haemorrhage decreased significantly from 60% to 36%. Significant antecedents of haemorrhage similar to those found in the previous study included severe bruising, low arterial:fractional inspiratory oxygen ratio and low packed cell volume on admission, hyaline membrane disease, hypercarbia, and hypoxaemia. Assisted ventilation, pneumothorax, treatment with tubocurarine, and hypotension were no longer significant risk factors for periventricular haemorrhage. A multivariate discriminant analysis correctly predicted haemorrhage in 86% of the study group when bruising, hypercarbia, hypoxaemia, hyaline membrane disease, and low gestation were considered. These results suggest that changes in neonatal practices can reduce the incidence of periventricular haemorrhage and that drug studies indicating similar reduction in haemorrhage need to be evaluated carefully to ensure that placebo and treated groups are in fact comparable. PMID:3740905

  8. Standard or hypofractionated radiotherapy in the postoperative treatment of breast cancer: a retrospective analysis of acute skin toxicity and dose inhomogeneities

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To identify predictive factors of radiation-induced skin toxicity in breast cancer patients by the analysis of dosimetric and clinical factors. Methods 339 patients treated between January 2007 and December 2010 are included in the present analysis. Whole breast irradiation was delivered with Conventional Fractionation (CF) (50Gy, 2.0/day, 25 fractions) and moderate Hypofractionated Schedule (HS) (44Gy, 2.75Gy/day, 16 fractions) followed by tumour bed boost. The impact of patient clinical features, systemic treatments and, in particular, dose inhomogeneities on the occurrence of different levels of skin reaction has been retrospectively evaluated. Results G2 and G3 acute skin toxicity were 42% and 13% in CF patients and 30% and 7.5% in HS patients respectively. The retrieval and revaluation of 200 treatment plans showed a strong correlation between areas close to the skin surface, with inhomogeneities >107% of the prescribed dose, and the desquamation areas as described in the clinical records. Conclusions In our experience dose inhomogeneity underneath G2 – G3 skin reactions seems to be the most important predictor for acute skin damage and in these patients more complex treatment techniques should be considered to avoid skin damage. Genetic polymorphisms too have to be investigated as possible promising candidates for predicting acute skin reactions. PMID:23651532

  9. Diffuse Optical Spectroscopy for the Quantitative Assessment of Acute Ionizing Radiation Induced Skin Toxicity Using a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Lee; Korpela, Elina; Kim, Anthony; Yohan, Darren; Niu, Carolyn; Wilson, Brian C.; Liu, Stanley K.

    2016-01-01

    Acute skin toxicities from ionizing radiation (IR) are a common side effect from therapeutic courses of external beam radiation therapy (RT) and negatively impact patient quality of life and long term survival. Advances in the understanding of the biological pathways associated with normal tissue toxicities have allowed for the development of interventional drugs, however, current response studies are limited by a lack of quantitative metrics for assessing the severity of skin reactions. Here we present a diffuse optical spectroscopic (DOS) approach that provides quantitative optical biomarkers of skin response to radiation. We describe the instrumentation design of the DOS system as well as the inversion algorithm for extracting the optical parameters. Finally, to demonstrate clinical utility, we present representative data from a pre-clinical mouse model of radiation induced erythema and compare the results with a commonly employed visual scoring. The described DOS method offers an objective, high through-put evaluation of skin toxicity via functional response that is translatable to the clinical setting. PMID:27284926

  10. Diffuse Optical Spectroscopy for the Quantitative Assessment of Acute Ionizing Radiation Induced Skin Toxicity Using a Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Chin, Lee; Korpela, Elina; Kim, Anthony; Yohan, Darren; Niu, Carolyn; Wilson, Brian C; Liu, Stanley K

    2016-01-01

    Acute skin toxicities from ionizing radiation (IR) are a common side effect from therapeutic courses of external beam radiation therapy (RT) and negatively impact patient quality of life and long term survival. Advances in the understanding of the biological pathways associated with normal tissue toxicities have allowed for the development of interventional drugs, however, current response studies are limited by a lack of quantitative metrics for assessing the severity of skin reactions. Here we present a diffuse optical spectroscopic (DOS) approach that provides quantitative optical biomarkers of skin response to radiation. We describe the instrumentation design of the DOS system as well as the inversion algorithm for extracting the optical parameters. Finally, to demonstrate clinical utility, we present representative data from a pre-clinical mouse model of radiation induced erythema and compare the results with a commonly employed visual scoring. The described DOS method offers an objective, high through-put evaluation of skin toxicity via functional response that is translatable to the clinical setting. PMID:27284926

  11. Focus on JNJ-Q2, a novel fluoroquinolone, for the management of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Travis M; Johnson, Steven W; DiMondi, V Paul; Wilson, Dustin T

    2016-01-01

    JNJ-Q2 is a novel, fifth-generation fluoroquinolone that has excellent in vitro and in vivo activity against a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms. In vitro studies indicate that JNJ-Q2 has potent activity against pathogens responsible for acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) and community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP), such as Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae. JNJ-Q2 also has been shown to have a higher barrier to resistance compared to other agents in the class and it remains highly active against drug-resistant organisms, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus, ciprofloxacin-resistant methicillin-resistant S. aureus, and drug-resistant S. pneumoniae. In two Phase II studies, the efficacy of JNJ-Q2 was comparable to linezolid for ABSSSI and moxifloxacin for CABP. Furthermore, JNJ-Q2 was well tolerated, with adverse event rates similar to or less than other fluoroquinolones. With an expanded spectrum of activity and low potential for resistance, JNJ-Q2 shows promise as an effective treatment option for ABSSSI and CABP. Considering its early stage of development, the definitive role of JNJ-Q2 against these infections and its safety profile will be determined in future Phase III studies. PMID:27354817

  12. Ceftaroline fosamil as first-line versus second-line treatment for acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) or community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP).

    PubMed

    Guervil, David J; Kaye, Keith S; Hassoun, Ali; Cole, Phillip; Huang, Xing-Yue; Friedland, H David

    2016-06-01

    The Clinical Assessment Program and Teflaro(®) Utilization Registry (CAPTURE) is a multicenter registry study of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection (ABSSSI) and community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) patients treated with ceftaroline fosamil in the US. Data for this analysis were collected between August 2011 and February 2013 at US study centres by randomly ordered chart review. Clinical success rates among ABSSSI patients were >81% when ceftaroline fosamil was used as first- or second-line therapy, including monotherapy and concurrent therapy. Among CABP patients, clinical success rates were >77% among first-line and second-line patients and patients who received first-line concurrent therapy or second line monotherapy or concurrent therapy. For CABP patients treated with ceftaroline fosamil as first-line monotherapy, the clinical success rate was 70%. Ceftaroline fosamil is an effective treatment option for patients with ABSSSI or CABP with similar clinical success rates when used as first-line or second-line treatment. PMID:25817579

  13. Focus on JNJ-Q2, a novel fluoroquinolone, for the management of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections.

    PubMed

    Jones, Travis M; Johnson, Steven W; DiMondi, V Paul; Wilson, Dustin T

    2016-01-01

    JNJ-Q2 is a novel, fifth-generation fluoroquinolone that has excellent in vitro and in vivo activity against a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms. In vitro studies indicate that JNJ-Q2 has potent activity against pathogens responsible for acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) and community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP), such as Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae. JNJ-Q2 also has been shown to have a higher barrier to resistance compared to other agents in the class and it remains highly active against drug-resistant organisms, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus, ciprofloxacin-resistant methicillin-resistant S. aureus, and drug-resistant S. pneumoniae. In two Phase II studies, the efficacy of JNJ-Q2 was comparable to linezolid for ABSSSI and moxifloxacin for CABP. Furthermore, JNJ-Q2 was well tolerated, with adverse event rates similar to or less than other fluoroquinolones. With an expanded spectrum of activity and low potential for resistance, JNJ-Q2 shows promise as an effective treatment option for ABSSSI and CABP. Considering its early stage of development, the definitive role of JNJ-Q2 against these infections and its safety profile will be determined in future Phase III studies. PMID:27354817

  14. Antimicrobial Activity of the Investigational Pleuromutilin Compound BC-3781 Tested against Gram-Positive Organisms Commonly Associated with Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections

    PubMed Central

    Biedenbach, Douglas J.; Paukner, Susanne; Ivezic-Schoenfeld, Zrinka; Jones, Ronald N.

    2012-01-01

    BC-3781 is a novel semisynthetic pleuromutilin antimicrobial agent developed as an intravenous and oral therapy for acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) and respiratory tract infections (RTI). BC-3781 and comparator agents were tested by the broth microdilution method against 1,893 clinical Gram-positive organisms predominantly causing ABSSSI. BC-3781 exhibited potent activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MIC50/90, 0.12/0.25 μg/ml), coagulase-negative staphylococci (MIC50/90, 0.06/0.12 μg/ml), β-hemolytic streptococci (MIC50/90, 0.03/0.06 μg/ml), viridans group streptococci (MIC50/90, 0.12/0.5 μg/ml), and Enterococcus faecium (including vancomycin-nonsusceptible strains) (MIC50/90, 0.12/2 μg/ml). Compared with other antibiotics in use for the treatment of ABSSSI, BC-3781 displayed the lowest MICs and only a minimal potential for cross-resistance with other antimicrobial classes. PMID:22232289

  15. UK guidelines on the management of variceal haemorrhage in cirrhotic patients

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Dhiraj; Stanley, Adrian J; Hayes, Peter C; Patch, David; Millson, Charles; Mehrzad, Homoyon; Austin, Andrew; Ferguson, James W; Olliff, Simon P; Hudson, Mark; Christie, John M

    2015-01-01

    These updated guidelines on the management of variceal haemorrhage have been commissioned by the Clinical Services and Standards Committee (CSSC) of the British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) under the auspices of the liver section of the BSG. The original guidelines which this document supersedes were written in 2000 and have undergone extensive revision by 13 members of the Guidelines Development Group (GDG). The GDG comprises elected members of the BSG liver section, representation from British Association for the Study of the Liver (BASL) and Liver QuEST, a nursing representative and a patient representative. The quality of evidence and grading of recommendations was appraised using the AGREE II tool. The nature of variceal haemorrhage in cirrhotic patients with its complex range of complications makes rigid guidelines inappropriate. These guidelines deal specifically with the management of varices in patients with cirrhosis under the following subheadings: (1) primary prophylaxis; (2) acute variceal haemorrhage; (3) secondary prophylaxis of variceal haemorrhage; and (4) gastric varices. They are not designed to deal with (1) the management of the underlying liver disease; (2) the management of variceal haemorrhage in children; or (3) variceal haemorrhage from other aetiological conditions. PMID:25887380

  16. Acute skin lesions following psoralen plus ultraviolet A radiation investigated by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. M.; Zhong, H. Q.; Zhai, J.; Wang, C. X.; Xiong, H. L.; Guo, Z. Y.

    2013-08-01

    Psoralen plus ultraviolet A radiation (PUVA) therapy is a very important clinical treatment of skin diseases such as vitiligo and psoriasis, but associated with an increased risk of skin photodamage, especially photoaging. In this work, optical coherence tomography (OCT), a novel non-invasive imaging technology, was introduced to investigate in vivo the photodamage induced by PUVA qualitatively and quantitatively. Balb/c mouse dorsal skin was treated with 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP), and then exposed to UVA radiation. OCT images of the tissues were obtained by an OCT system with a 1310 nm central wavelength. Skin thickness and the attenuation coefficient were extracted from the OCT images to analyze the degree of injury to mouse skin. The results demonstrated that PUVA-treated skin showed an increase in skin thickness, and a reduction of attenuation coefficient in the OCT signal compared with the control groups. The data also showed good correlation with the results observed in histological sections using hematoxylin and eosin staining. In conclusion, OCT is a promising tool for photobiological studies aimed at assessing the effect of PUVA therapy in vivo.

  17. Mouse model of intracerebellar haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tijjani Salihu, Abubakar; Muthuraju, Sangu; Aziz Mohamed Yusoff, Abdul; Ahmad, Farizan; Zulkifli Mustafa, Mohd; Jaafar, Hasnan; Idris, Zamzuri; Rahman Izaini Ghani, Abdul; Malin Abdullah, Jafri

    2016-10-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the behavior and neuronal morphological changes in the perihaemorrhagic tissue of the mouse intracerebellar haemorrhage experimental model. Adult male Swiss albino mice were stereotactically infused with collagenase type VII (0.4U/μl of saline) unilaterally in to the cerebellum, following anaesthesia. Motor deficits were assessed using open field and composite score for evaluating the mouse model of cerebellar ataxia at 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 days after collagenase infusion. The animals were sacrificed at the same time interval for evaluation of perihaematomal neuronal degeneration using haematoxylin and eosin staining and Annexin V-FITC/Propidium iodide assay. At the end of the study, it was found that infusion of 0.4U collagenase produces significant locomotor and ataxic deficit in the mice especially within the first week post surgery, and that this gradually improved within three weeks. Neuronal degeneration evident by cytoplasmic shrinkage and nuclear pyknosis was observed at the perihaematomal area after one day; especially at 3 and 7 days post haemorrhage. By 21 days, both the haematoma and degenerating neurons in the perihaematomal area were phagocytosed and the remaining neuronal cells around the scar tissue appeared normal. Moreover, Annexin-V/propidium iodide-positive cells were observed at the perihaematomal area at 3 and 7 days implying that the neurons likely die via apoptosis. It was concluded that a population of potentially salvageable neurons exist in the perihaematomal area after cerebellar haemorrhage throughout a wide time window that could be amenable to treatment. PMID:27327104

  18. Prevention of upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage: current controversies and clinical guidance

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Johanne; Warburton, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a common medical emergency and associated with significant morbidly and mortality. The risk of bleeding from peptic ulceration and oesophagogastric varices can be reduced by appropriate primary and secondary preventative strategies. Helicobacter pylori eradication and risk stratification with appropriate gastroprotection strategies when used with antiplatelet drugs and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are effective in preventing peptic ulcer bleeding, whilst endoscopic screening and either nonselective beta blockade or endoscopic variceal ligation are effective at reducing the risk of variceal haemorrhage. For secondary prevention of variceal haemorrhage, the combination of beta blockade and endoscopic variceal ligation is more effective. Recent data on the possible interactions of aspirin and NSAIDs, clopidogrel and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), and the increased risk of cardiovascular adverse events associated with all nonaspirin cyclo-oxygenase (COX) inhibitors have increased the complexity of choices for preventing peptic ulcer bleeding. Such choices should consider both the GI and cardiovascular risk profiles. In patients with a moderately increased risk of GI bleeding, a NSAID plus a PPI or a COX-2 selective agent alone appear equivalent but for those at highest risk of bleeding (especially those with previous ulcer or haemorrhage) the COX-2 inhibitor plus PPI combination is superior. However naproxen seems the safest NSAID for those at increased cardiovascular risk. Clopidogrel is associated with a significant risk of GI haemorrhage and the most recent data concerning the potential clinical interaction of clopidogrel and PPIs are reassuring. In clopidogrel-treated patients at highest risk of GI bleeding, some form of GI prevention is indicated. PMID:23997925

  19. Significance of placental pathology in transplacental haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Devi, Banti; Jennison, R. F.; Langley, F. A.

    1968-01-01

    Placentae were examined from 120 women whose pregnancy and delivery was normal, from 264 women whose pregnancy or delivery was complicated, and from 98 women who were Rh-negative without antibodies and 35 women Rh-negative with antibodies. The presence of Kline's haemorrhages, intervillous thrombi, infarcts, and retroplacental haemorrhages was positively correlated with the presence of foetal cells in the maternal circulation. When there were no maternal antibodies transplacental haemorrhages occurred occasionally in the absence of such placental lesions but more frequently when these lesions were present. Moreover, the greater the number of lesions in a placenta the greater the size of the transplacental haemorrhage. In Rh-negative women with antibodies the observed incidence of transplacental haemorrhage was significantly less despite an appreciable increase in placental lesions. Images PMID:4972435

  20. Desmopressin Acetate in Intracranial Haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Kapapa, Thomas; Röhrer, Stefan; Struve, Sabine; Petscher, Matthias; König, Ralph; Wirtz, Christian Rainer; Woischneck, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The secondary increase in the size of intracranial haematomas as a result of spontaneous haemorrhage or trauma is of particular relevance in the event of prior intake of platelet aggregation inhibitors. We describe the effect of desmopressin acetate as a means of temporarily stabilising the platelet function. Patients and Methods. The platelet function was analysed in 10 patients who had received single (N = 4) or multiple (N = 6) doses of acetylsalicylic acid and 3 patients (control group) who had not taken acetylsalicylic acid. All subjects had suffered intracranial haemorrhage. Analysis was performed before, half an hour and three hours after administration of desmopressin acetate. Statistical analysis was performed by applying a level of significance of P ≤ 0.05. Results. (1) Platelet function returned to normal 30 minutes after administration of desmopressin acetate. (2) The platelet function worsened again after three hours. (3) There were no complications related to electrolytes or fluid balance. Conclusion. Desmopressin acetate can stabilise the platelet function in neurosurgical patients who have received acetylsalicylic acid prior to surgery without causing transfusion-related side effects or a loss of time. The effect is, however, limited and influenced by the frequency of drug intake. Further controls are needed in neurosurgical patients. PMID:25610644

  1. [Seizures caused by subarachnoid haemorrhage in a pregnant woman].

    PubMed

    Shim, Susy; Christiansen, Ulla Birgitte; Sørensen, Anne Nødgaard

    2016-07-25

    This case report describes a pregnant woman of gestational week 37 + 2 days who was admitted to the hospital with first-time seizures. The patient was stabilized, and an acute caesarian section was performed due to the possible aetiology of eclampsia and the advanced gestational age. Because of the atypical clinical history and normal maternal blood samples a computed tomography of the cerebrum was performed demonstrating a subarachnoid haemorrhage. A computed tomography-angiography revealed an aneurism at the anterior communicating artery. The aneurism was coiled the following day to reduce the risk of rebleeding. PMID:27460576

  2. A multicentre study of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections in China: susceptibility to ceftaroline and molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Xiao, Meng; Kong, Fanrong; O'Sullivan, Matthew V N; Mao, Lei-Li; Zhao, Hao-Ran; Zhao, Ying; Wang, He; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2015-04-01

    Ceftaroline is a novel cephalosporin with activity against Gram-positive organisms, including meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The objective of this study was to investigate the susceptibility to ceftaroline of hospital-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA) isolates causing acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections (ABSSSIs) in China and to examine their relationship by genotyping. A total of 251 HA-MRSA isolates causing ABSSSIs were collected from a multicentre study involving 56 hospitals in 38 large cities across 26 provinces in mainland China. All isolates were characterised by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing, spa typing and detection of the Panton-Valentine leukocidin locus (lukS-PV and lukF-PV). Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 14 antimicrobial agents, including ceftaroline, were determined by broth microdilution and were interpreted using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute breakpoints. The ceftaroline MIC50 and MIC90 values (MICs that inhibit 50% and 90% of the isolates, respectively) were 1 μg/mL and 2 μg/mL, respectively; 33.5% (n=84) of the isolates studied were ceftaroline-non-susceptible, with MICs of 2 μg/mL, but no isolate exhibited ceftaroline resistance (MIC>2 μg/mL). All of the ceftaroline-non-susceptible isolates belonged to the predominant HA-MRSA clones: 95.2% (n=80) from MLST clonal complex 8 (CC8), with the remaining 4.8% (n=4) from CC5. The high rate of non-susceptibility to ceftaroline amongst HA-MRSA causing ABSSSIs in China is concerning. PMID:25649348

  3. Examination of hospital length of stay in Canada among patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Potashman, Michele H; Stokes, Michael; Liu, Jieruo; Lawrence, Robin; Harris, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Skin infections, particularly those caused by resistant pathogens, represent a clinical burden. Hospitalization associated with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major contributor to the economic burden of the disease. This study was conducted to provide current, real-world data on hospitalization patterns for patients with ABSSSI caused by MRSA across multiple geographic regions in Canada. Patients and methods This retrospective cohort study evaluated length of stay (LOS) for hospitalized patients with ABSSSI due to MRSA diagnosis across four Canadian geographic regions using the Discharge Abstract Database. Patients with ICD-10-CA diagnosis consistent with ABSSSI caused by MRSA between January 2008 and December 2014 were selected and assigned a primary or secondary diagnosis based on a prespecified ICD-10-CA code algorithm. Results Among 6,719 patients, 3,273 (48.7%) and 3,446 (51.3%) had a primary and secondary diagnosis, respectively. Among patients with a primary or secondary diagnosis, the cellulitis/erysipelas subtype was most common. The majority of patients presented with 0 or 1 comorbid condition; the most common comorbidity was diabetes. The mean LOS over the study period varied by geographic region and year; in 2014 (the most recent year analyzed), LOS ranged from 7.7 days in Ontario to 13.4 days in the Canadian Prairie for a primary diagnosis and from 18.2 days in Ontario to 25.2 days in Atlantic Canada for a secondary diagnosis. A secondary diagnosis was associated with higher rates of continuing care compared with a primary diagnosis (10.6%–24.2% vs 4.6%–12.1%). Conclusion This study demonstrated that the mean LOS associated with ABSSSI due to MRSA in Canada was minimally 7 days. Clinical management strategies, including medication management, which might facilitate hospital discharge, have the potential to reduce hospital LOS and related economic

  4. Viral haemorrhagic fever in children.

    PubMed

    MacDermott, Nathalie E; De, Surjo; Herberg, Jethro A

    2016-05-01

    Viral haemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) are currently at the forefront of the world's attention due to the recentZaire ebolavirusepidemic in West Africa. This epidemic has highlighted the frailty of the world's public health response mechanisms and demonstrated the potential risks to nations around the world of imported cases of epidemic diseases. While imported cases in children are less likely, the potential for such a scenario remains. It is therefore essential that paediatricians are aware of and prepared for potential imported cases of tropical diseases, VHFs being of particular importance due to their propensity to cause nosocomial spread. Examining the four families of viruses-Filoviridae,Arenaviridae,BunyaviridaeandFlaviviridae, we describe the different types of VHFs, with emphasis on differentiation from other diseases through detailed history-taking, their presentation and management from a paediatric perspective. PMID:26787609

  5. Surgical Craniotomy for Intracerebral Haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Mendelow, A David

    2015-01-01

    Craniotomy is probably indicated for patients with superficial spontaneous lobar supratentorial intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) when the level of consciousness drops below 13 within the first 8 h of the onset of the haemorrhage. Once the level drops below 9, it is probably too late to consider craniotomy for these patients, so clinical vigilance is paramount. While this statement is only backed up by evidence that is moderately strong, meta-analysis of available data suggests that it is true in the rather limited number of patients with ICH. Meta-analyses like this can often predict the results of future prospective randomised controlled trials a decade or more before the trials are completed and published. Countless such examples exist in the literature, as is the case for thrombolysis in patients with myocardial infarction in the last millennium: meta-analysis determined the efficacy more than a decade BEFORE the last trial (ISIS-2) confirmed the benefit of thrombolysis for myocardial infarction. Careful examination of the meta-analysis' Forest plots in this chapter will demonstrate why this statement is made at the outset. Other meta-analyses of surgery for ICH have also indicated that minimal interventional techniques using topical thrombolysis or endoscopy via burrholes or even twist drill aspiration may be particularly successful for the treatment of supratentorial ICH, especially when the clot is deep seated. Ongoing clinical trials (CLEAR III and MISTIE III) should confirm this in the fullness of time. There are 2 exceptions to these generalisations. First, based on trial evidence, aneurysmal ICH is best treated with surgery. Second, cerebellar ICH represents a special case because of the development of hydrocephalus, which may require expeditious drainage as the intracranial pressure rises. The cerebellar clot will then require evacuation, usually via posterior fossa craniectomy, rather than craniotomy. Technical advances suggest that image-guided surgery

  6. Spontaneous idiopathic bilateral adrenal haemorrhage: a rare cause of abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Nazir, Salik; Sivarajah, Surendra; Fiscus, Valena; York, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of a 62-year-old woman with a history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease who presented to the emergency department with left lower quadrant abdominal pain, flank pain with nausea and no history of preceding trauma. The patient had finished a course of azithromycin and oral methylprednisolone 1 day prior to presentation. Abdominal and pelvic CT scan identified changes suggestive of bilateral adrenal haemorrhage. The patient did not show signs of acute adrenal insufficiency but was started on steroid replacement therapy because of concerns about possible disease progression. All recognised causes of adrenal haemorrhage were excluded suggesting this was a case of spontaneous idiopathic bilateral adrenal haemorrhage, a rarely reported phenomenon in the literature. The patient was discharged after clinical improvement following 6 days in hospital, taking oral steroid replacement. PMID:27166002

  7. Acute leukemia after radiotherapy in a patient with Turcot's syndrome. Impaired colony formation in skin fibroblast cultures after irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, F.P.; Little, J.B.; Bech-Hansen, N.T.; Paterson, M.C.; Arlett, C.; Garnick, M.B.; Mayer, R.J.

    1983-02-01

    Colonic polyposis and carcinoma developed in a woman with Turcot's syndrome at the age of 31 years; astrocytoma developed when she was 37. Her brother and sister had died of astrocytoma at the ages of 18 and 33 years, respectively. Progressive neutropenia developed in the patient three months after radiotherapy for her brain tumor and acute myelomonocytic leukemia 19 months after treatment. Three laboratories independently evaluated cultures of her skin fibroblasts for in vitro sensitivity to cell killing (loss of colony-forming ability) by x-rays. Survival assays consistently revealed slight but significant radiosensitivity in an early-passage (six to 10 doublings) fibroblast subculture. A later subculture (21 to 29 doublings) showed no abnormality, a possible effect of selective in vitro loss of radiosensitive cells.

  8. TLD skin dose measurements and acute and late effects after lumpectomy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy only for early breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, Francisco . E-mail: francisco.perera@lrcc.on.ca; Chisela, Frank; Stitt, Larry; Engel, Jay; Venkatesan, Varagur

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: This report examines the relationships between measured skin doses and the acute and late skin and soft tissue changes in a pilot study of lumpectomy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy only for breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Thirty-seven of 39 women enrolled in this pilot study of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (37.2 Gy in 10 fractions b.i.d.) each had thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) at 5 points on the skin of the breast overlying the implant volume. Skin changes at TLD dose points and fibrosis at the lumpectomy site were documented every 6 to 12 months posttreatment using a standardized physician-rated cosmesis questionnaire. The relationships between TLD dose and acute skin reaction, pigmentation, or telangiectasia at 5 years were analyzed using the GEE algorithm and the GENMOD procedure in the SAS statistical package. Fisher's exact test was used to determine whether there were any significant associations between acute skin reaction and late pigmentation or telangiectasia or between the volumes encompassed by various isodoses and fibrosis or fat necrosis. Results: The median TLD dose per fraction (185 dose points) multiplied by 10 was 9.2 Gy. In all 37 patients, acute skin reaction Grade 1 or higher was observed at 5.9% (6 of 102) of dose points receiving 10 Gy or less vs. 44.6% (37 of 83) of dose points receiving more than 10 Gy (p < 0.0001). In 25 patients at 60 months, 1.5% telangiectasia was seen at dose points receiving 10 Gy or less (1 of 69) vs. 18% (10 of 56) telangiectasia at dose points receiving more than 10 Gy (p 0.004). Grade 1 or more pigmentation developed at 1.5% (1 of 69) of dose points receiving less than 10 Gy vs. 25% (14 of 56) of dose points receiving more than 10 Gy (p < 0.001). A Grade 1 or more acute skin reaction was also significantly associated with development of Grade 1 or more pigmentation or telangiectasia at 60 months. This association was most significant for acute reaction and telangiectasia directly over the

  9. Transdermal glyceryl trinitrate (nitroglycerin) in healthy persons: acute effects on skin temperature and hemodynamic orthostatic response.

    PubMed

    Haebisch, E M

    1995-01-01

    In order to find an explanation for individual reactions to transdermal glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) we studied the skin temperature and hemodynamic reactions in 63 healthy persons. The data were obtained before and after the application of GTN and Glycerin (GL) placebo patches, during one hour. The skin temperature was measured on both forearms, the local (left sided) and systemic (right sided) reaction on GTN was related to the skin fold and the calculated body fat content. The bilateral rise of skin temperature and its duration was higher and longer in obese than in lean persons mainly in obese women. The UV induced thermo and the later photothermoreaction (Erythema) was reduced on the left forearm after the application of GTN and GL patches. The observed hemodynamic GTN effect confirmed known postural reactions, such as decreased arterial pressure (delta mAP = -2.9%), increased heart rate (delta HR = +7.4%) and QTc prolongation (delta QTc = +4.9%) in upright position. An adverse drug effect with increased mean blood pressure (delta mAP = +12%) and increased heart rate (delta HR = +10.4%) mainly in supine position was observed in 11% of the participants, but only in men. Such a reaction was already described by Murell, 1879. Individual GTN effects were analyzed and related to habits and family history. In male smokers and in persons with hypertensive and diabetic close relatives, the hypotensive GTN effect was accentuated in supine position. In the upright position the group with hypertensives in the family presented a moderate hypotensive reaction without secondary tachycardia and the smokers presented only a slightly increased heart rate. Our observations suggest that individual reactions to transdermal glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) with its active component nitric oxide (NO) depends on physiological conditions, related to endogenous vasoactive substances, mainly the interaction with EDRF (the endogenous NO) and the activity of the Renin-Angiotensin System. PMID

  10. Amyloid angiopathy and lobar cerebral haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, N; Nishihara, Y; Horie, A

    1984-01-01

    Seven cases of lobar cerebral haemorrhage due to amyloid angiopathy were found among 60 necropsy cases of intracerebral haemorrhage. Clinically five patients were demented and two had hypertension. Immediately after the onset of stroke there was a high incidence of headache and vomiting, followed by nuchal rigidity. Amyloid angiopathy was most prominent in the cerebral cortex and the leptomeninges. Senile plaques were noted in all cases. One should suspect that a haemorrhage may be due to amyloid angiopathy, when lobar cerebral haemorrhage occurs in an aged, normotensive patient with or without dementia. Surgical evacuation of the haematoma is inadvisable, because of the diffuse nature of amyloid angiopathy, high recurrence rate and less tendency to cause brain stem compression. Images PMID:6502178

  11. Acute Activation of Oxidative Pentose Phosphate Pathway as First-Line Response to Oxidative Stress in Human Skin Cells.

    PubMed

    Kuehne, Andreas; Emmert, Hila; Soehle, Joern; Winnefeld, Marc; Fischer, Frank; Wenck, Horst; Gallinat, Stefan; Terstegen, Lara; Lucius, Ralph; Hildebrand, Janosch; Zamboni, Nicola

    2015-08-01

    Integrity of human skin is endangered by exposure to UV irradiation and chemical stressors, which can provoke a toxic production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative damage. Since oxidation of proteins and metabolites occurs virtually instantaneously, immediate cellular countermeasures are pivotal to mitigate the negative implications of acute oxidative stress. We investigated the short-term metabolic response in human skin fibroblasts and keratinocytes to H2O2 and UV exposure. In time-resolved metabolomics experiments, we observed that within seconds after stress induction, glucose catabolism is routed to the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) and nucleotide synthesis independent of previously postulated blocks in glycolysis (i.e., of GAPDH or PKM2). Through ultra-short (13)C labeling experiments, we provide evidence for multiple cycling of carbon backbones in the oxidative PPP, potentially maximizing NADPH reduction. The identified metabolic rerouting in oxidative and non-oxidative PPP has important physiological roles in stabilization of the redox balance and ROS clearance. PMID:26190262

  12. Specificity of T cells invading the skin during acute graft-vs.-host disease after semiallogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Gaschet, J; Mahé, B; Milpied, N; Devilder, M C; Dréno, B; Bignon, J D; Davodeau, F; Hallet, M M; Bonneville, M; Vié, H

    1993-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for skin lesions during acute graft-vs.-host disease (aGVHD) after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) are poorly understood. The exact role of various effector cell populations and "major" (particularly HLA-DP) or "minor" antigens as target molecules is not known. To investigate the nature of cells responsible for tissue injury, we cultured T cells from skin biopsy first with interleukin 2 (IL-2) alone and then in polyclonal activation conditions to avoid in vitro antigenic sensitization before specificity testing. We applied this method to two biopsies performed during aGVHD after semiallogeneic BMT and obtained cytotoxic T cells against four graft mismatches: CD8+ T cells against HLA-A2.2 and HLA-B27 and CD4+ T cells against HLA-DP101 and HLA-DP401. This demonstrates that T cells with documented specificity can be obtained from an aGVHD lesion without antigenic selection. Moreover, these data directly implicate DP as a potential target antigen for aGVHD. Images PMID:8423212

  13. A Randomized Clinical Trial of Single-Dose Versus Weekly Dalbavancin for Treatment of Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dunne, Michael W.; Puttagunta, Sailaja; Giordano, Philip; Krievins, Dainis; Zelasky, Michael; Baldassarre, James

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs) are a cause of significant morbidity and therapy can be a burden to the healthcare system. New antibiotics that simplify treatment and avoid hospitalization are needed. This study compared the safety and efficacy of a single intravenous infusion of 1500 mg of dalbavancin to the 2-dose regimen. Methods. This study was a randomized, double-blind trial in patients aged >18 years with ABSSSIs. Patients were randomized to dalbavancin 1500 mg either as a single intravenous (IV) infusion or 1000 mg IV on day 1 followed 1 week later by 500 mg IV. The primary endpoint was a ≥20% reduction in the area of erythema at 48–72 hours in the intent-to-treat population. Noninferiority was to be declared if the lower limit of the 95% confidence interval (CI) on the difference in the outcomes was greater than −10%. Clinical outcome was also assessed at days 14 and 28. Results. Six hundred ninety-eight patients were randomized. Demographic characteristics were similar on each regimen, although there were more patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) at baseline on the 2-dose regimen (36/210 [17.1%] vs 61/220 [27.7%]). Dalbavancin delivered as a single dose was noninferior to a 2-dose regimen (81.4% vs 84.2%; difference, −2.9% [95% CI, −8.5% to 2.8%]). Clinical outcomes were also similar at day 14 (84.0% vs 84.8%), day 28 (84.5% vs 85.1%), and day 14 in clinically evaluable patients with MRSA in a baseline culture (92.9% vs 95.3%) in the single- and 2-dose regimens, respectively. Treatment-emergent adverse events occurred in 20.1% of the single-dose patients and 19.9% on the 2-dose regimen. Conclusions. A single 1500-mg infusion of dalbavancin is noninferior to a 2-dose regimen, has a similar safety profile, and removes logistical constraints related to delivery of the second dose. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT02127970. PMID:26611777

  14. Ebola haemorrhagic fever in Zaire, 1976

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    Between 1 September and 24 October 1976, 318 cases of acute viral haemorrhagic fever occurred in northern Zaire. The outbreak was centred in the Bumba Zone of the Equateur Region and most of the cases were recorded within a radius of 70 km of Yambuku, although a few patients sought medical attention in Bumba, Abumombazi, and the capital city of Kinshasa, where individual secondary and tertiary cases occurred. There were 280 deaths, and only 38 serologically confirmed survivors. The index case in this outbreak had onset of symptoms on 1 September 1976, five days after receiving an injection of chloroquine for presumptive malaria at the outpatient clinic at Yambuku Mission Hospital (YMH). He had a clinical remission of his malaria symptoms. Within one week several other persons who had received injections at YMH also suffered from Ebola haemorrhagic fever, and almost all subsequent cases had either received injections at the hospital or had had close contact with another case. Most of these occurred during the first four weeks of the epidemic, after which time the hospital was closed, 11 of the 17 staff members having died of the disease. All ages and both sexes were affected, but women 15-29 years of age had the highest incidence of disease, a phenomenon strongly related to attendance at prenatal and outpatient clinics at the hospital where they received injections. The overall secondary attack rate was about 5%, although it ranged to 20% among close relatives such as spouses, parent or child, and brother or sister. Active surveillance disclosed that cases occurred in 55 of some 550 villages which were examined house-by-house. The disease was hitherto unknown to the people of the affected region. Intensive search for cases in the area of north-eastern Zaire between the Bumba Zone and the Sudan frontier near Nzara and Maridi failed to detect definite evidence of a link between an epidemic of the disease in that country and the outbreak near Bumba. Nevertheless it was

  15. Characterization of acute and long-term pathologies of superficial and deep dermal sulfur mustard skin lesions in the hairless guinea pig model.

    PubMed

    Dachir, Shlomit; Cohen, Maayan; Kamus-Elimeleh, Dikla; Fishbine, Eliezer; Sahar, Rita; Gez, Rellie; Brandeis, Rachel; Horwitz, Vered; Kadar, Tamar

    2012-01-01

    Sulfur mustard induces severe acute and prolonged damage to the skin and only partially effective treatments are available. We have previously validated the use of hairless guinea pigs as an experimental model for skin lesions. The present study aimed to characterize a model of a deep dermal lesion and to compare it with the previously described superficial lesion. Clinical evaluation of the lesions was conducted using reflectance colorimetry, trans-epidermal water loss and wound area measurements. Prostaglandin E(2) content, matrix metalloproteinase-2 and 9 activity, and histopathology were conducted up to 4 weeks post-exposure. Sulfur mustard skin injury, including erythema and edema, impairment of skin barrier and wounds developed in a dose-dependent manner. Prostaglandin E(2) content and matrix metalloproteinase-2 and 9 activities were elevated during the wound development and the healing process. Histological evaluation revealed severe damage to the epidermis and deep dermis and vesications. At 4 weeks postexposure, healing was not completed: significantly impaired stratum corneum, absence of hair follicles, and epidermal hyperplasia were observed. These results confirm the use of the superficial and deep dermal skin injuries in the hairless guinea pigs as suitable models that can be utilized for the investigation of the pathological processes of acute as well as long-term injuries. These models will be further used to develop treatments to improve the healing process and prevent skin damage and long-term effects. PMID:23082902

  16. Dermoscopic Follow-Up of the Skin towards Acute Graft-versus-Host-Disease in Patients after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kaminska-Winciorek, Grazyna; Czerw, Tomasz; Kruzel, Tomasz; Giebel, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) involving skin is one of the most frequent complications of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT), usually diagnosed based on clinical manifestations. So far, skin biopsy with histopathological evaluation is the only method to confirm the diagnosis. Objective. In this prospective study we monitored alloHSCT recipients by dermoscopy in order to assess its utility as an alternative noninvasive tool to early diagnose acute GVHD. Methods. Thirteen consecutive patients who received alloHSCT were examined clinically and dermoscopically towards aGVHD [days 28 (±7), 56 (±7), and 100 (±7)], as well as in each patient who developed cutaneous aGVHD diagnosed according to clinical criteria (Glucksberg scale). Results. Six patients (46%) developed symptoms of cutaneous acute GVHD (grade 1, n = 3; grade 2, n = 3). Dermoscopic evaluation revealed pinkish or reddish background and well-visible, multiple thin telangiectasias. Conclusion. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the use of dermoscopy to evaluate skin involvement in the course of acute GVHD suggesting its role as a diagnostic tool in follow-up of GVHD, which can be also used before clinical symptoms occur. PMID:27446950

  17. Disseminated Mycobacterium abscessus Complex Infection Manifesting as Multiple Areas of Lymphadenitis and Skin Abscess in the Preclinical Stage of Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Masahiro; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Yamasaki, Kei; Orihashi, Takeshi; Hirosawa, Makoto; Ogoshi, Takaaki; Noguchi, Shingo; Nishida, Chinatsu; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Yonezawa, Akihito; Tsukada, Junichi; Mukae, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    A 37-year-old woman was admitted to a hospital due to a prolonged fever and a rash on her legs. She had systemic lymphadenitis and a skin abscess on her left leg. Pathological findings of a left leg skin biopsy revealed abscess formation with granulomatous dermatitis, Mycobacterium abscessus complex was cultured from the resected left supraclavicular lymph node, and disseminated M. abscessus complex infection was diagnosed. She was treated with combination treatment with antimicrobials and percutaneous drainage, and her clinical findings improved. Four months later, she developed acute lymphocytic leukemia. Leukemia is a risk factor for disseminated M. abscessus complex infection, even before developing leukemia. PMID:27374685

  18. [Acute pancreatitis caused by varicella-zoster virus after liver transplantation].

    PubMed

    Coelho, J C; Wiederkehr, J C; Campos, A C; Zeni Neto, C; Oliva, V

    1994-02-01

    Twenty-six days after liver transplantation for primary biliary cirrhosis, a 52 year-old patient was rehospitalized for viral infection. The clinical features were fatigue, anorexia and vomiting. On physical examination, vesicular skin lesions involving the left 8 th intercostal space were suggestive of herpes-zoster infection. The following day the patient was extremely tired and dyspnoeic. The abdomen was distended with moderate abdominal epigastric pain. The clinical picture worsened rapidly and the patient died a few hours later. Autopsy revealed acute haemorrhagic necrosis of the pancreas due to herpes-zoster virus. PMID:8207103

  19. [EHEC-associated colon stenosis after ulcerous-chronic haemorrhagic colitis and consecutive resulting ileus].

    PubMed

    Lipp, M J; Schirmer, J; Feyerabend, B; Stavrou, G A; Cordruwisch, W; Faiss, S; Oldhafer, K J

    2012-05-01

    We report on the case of a segmentally emphasised, ulcerous chronic haemorrhagic colitis with the development of granulation tissue und scarred fibrosis with consecutive resulting stenosis of the colon. A 49-year-old male patient was infected with enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli bacteria during the EHEC-epidemic in northern Germany in early summer 2011. In the course of the infection the patient suffered from haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS) with acute renal failure and neurological symptoms. Haemodialysis and plasmapheresis had become mandatory. A simultaneous ileus was estimated to be of paralytic origin. One month after treatment of the acute phase of the infection a CT scan of the abdomen was performed and discovered a symptomatic stenosis of the proximal colon transversum. This obstruction needed to be treated by performing a right hemicolectomy with an ileo-transverso anastomosis. After surgery the patient recovered continuously. The histopathological examination verified an ulcerous-chronic haemorrhagic colitis on the background of an EHEC infection. PMID:22581700

  20. Response of swine skin microvasculature to acute single exposures of x-rays: quantification of endothelial changes

    SciTech Connect

    Archambeau, J.O.; Ines, A.; Fajardo, L.F.

    1984-04-01

    An acute single X-ray exposure of 2300 R produces in swine skin a moist reaction (ulceration) that appears at 17 days, heals by 32 days, and may break down again between 42 and 70 days. Initial studies quantified the epidermal population density changes during this 70-day period. This study was designed to quantify the density changes occuring in the endothelial cell population of the dermal microvasculature. While the basal population decreases to a nadir of 10% control by 24 days, the endothelial population remains at control levels. Beyond 24 days, the endothelial cell density decreases abruptly to 50% as the epidermal cell density returns to control levels and overshoots by 20% at 32 days. Subsequently, both populations decrease to zero by 57 days. Endothelial cell loss parallels a similar decrease in vascular lumen density. These finding indicate that the initial moist reaction results from a radiation-induced loss of epidermal cells, while the second reaction results from the loss of dermal microvasculature.

  1. A newly synthesized macakurzin C-derivative attenuates acute and chronic skin inflammation: The Nrf2/heme oxygenase signaling as a potential target.

    PubMed

    Akram, Muhammad; Shin, Iljin; Kim, Kyeong-A; Noh, Dabi; Baek, Seung-Hoon; Chang, Sun-Young; Kim, Hyoungsu; Bae, Ok-Nam

    2016-09-15

    Impaired immune responses in skin play a pivotal role in the development and progression of chemical-associated inflammatory skin disorders. In this study, we synthesized new flavonoid derivatives from macakurzin C, and identified in vitro and in vivo efficacy of a potent anti-inflammatory flavonoid, Compound 14 (CPD 14), with its underlying mechanisms. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated murine macrophages and IFN-γ/TNF-α-stimulated human keratinocytes, CPD 14 significantly inhibited the release of inflammatory mediators including nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandins, and cytokines (IC50 for NO inhibition in macrophages: 4.61μM). Attenuated NF-κB signaling and activated Nrf2/HO-1 pathway were responsible for the anti-inflammatory effects of CPD 14. The in vivo relevance was examined in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (TPA)-induced acute skin inflammation and oxazolone-induced atopic dermatitis models. Topically applied CPD 14 significantly protected both irritation- and sensitization-associated skin inflammation by suppressing the expression of inflammatory mediators. In summary, we demonstrated that a newly synthesized flavonoid, CPD 14, has potent inhibitory effects on skin inflammation, suggesting it is a potential therapeutic candidate to treat skin disorders associated with excessive inflammation. PMID:27450019

  2. Acute skin toxicity management in head and neck cancer patients treated with radiotherapy and chemotherapy or EGFR inhibitors: Literature review and consensus.

    PubMed

    Russi, Elvio G; Moretto, Francesco; Rampino, Monica; Benasso, Marco; Bacigalupo, Almalina; De Sanctis, Vitaliana; Numico, Gianmauro; Bossi, Paolo; Buglione, Michela; Lombardo, Antonino; Airoldi, Mario; Merlano, Marco C; Licitra, Lisa; Denaro, Nerina; Pergolizzi, Stefano; Pinto, Carmine; Bensadoun, Renè-Jean; Girolomoni, Giampiero; Langendijk, Johannes A

    2015-10-01

    The adverse effects of radiation therapy, often integrated with chemotherapy and/or targeted therapies, on the skin include severe acute and chronic dermatitis associated with pain, discomfort, itching, and burning, and may heavily affect patients' quality of life. The management of these skin adverse effects in head and neck cancer patients (HNCPs) are very heterogeneous due to the lack of shared rigorous classification systems and evidence based treatments. A multidisciplinary group of head and neck cancer specialists from Italy met with the aim of reaching a consensus on a clinical definition and management of dermatitis in HNCPs treated with radiotherapy with or without systemic therapies in order to improve skin toxicity management. The Delphi Appropriateness Method was used. External expert reviewers then evaluated the conclusions carefully according to their area of expertise. This paper offers contains seven clusters of statements about the management of dermatitis in HNCPs and a review of recent literature on these topics. PMID:26187236

  3. Comparison of acute skin reaction following morning versus late afternoon radiotherapy in patients with breast cancer who have undergone curative surgical resection

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Jae Myoung; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Hyojung; Huh, Seung Jae; Park, Won; Seol, Seung Won; Jeong, Bae Kwon; Nam, Seok Jin; Lee, Jeong Eon; Kil, Won-Ho

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between the time of radiotherapy (RT) and treatment outcomes in breast cancer. Patients with pathologic T1–2N0–1 breast cancer who received adjuvant RT in the morning (before 10:00 AM) or late afternoon (after 3:00 PM) were eligible for inclusion in this study. We retrospectively compared the clinicopathologic characteristics, acute skin reaction, and survival outcomes according to the time of RT. The median follow-up duration was 83 months (range, 10–131 months). From the 395 eligible patients, 190 (48.1%) and 205 (51.9%) patients were classified into the morning RT group and the afternoon RT group, respectively. The clinicopathologic characteristics were relatively well balanced between the treatment groups, except for pathologic N-stage (P = 0.0409). Grade 2 or higher acute skin reaction according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria was observed in 39 (9.9%) patients, with a higher frequency in the afternoon RT group than the morning RT group (13.7% vs 5.8%, respectively; P = 0.0088). There was no difference in the failure patterns or survival outcomes between the treatment groups. RT in late afternoon was associated with increased Grade 2 or more skin reaction after RT for breast cancer patients, but treatment outcomes did not differ according to the time of RT. Individualized considerations for treatment should be taken into account to reduce the risk of skin reactions. PMID:24385471

  4. Feasibility of electrical impedance tomography in haemorrhagic stroke treatment using adaptive mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasehi Tehrani, J.; Anderson, C.; Jin, C.; van Schaik, A.; Holder, D.; McEwan, A.

    2010-04-01

    EIT has been proposed for acute stroke differentiation, specifically to determine the type of stroke, either ischaemia (clot) or haemorrhage (bleed) to allow the rapid use of clot-busting drugs in the former (Romsauerova et al 2006) . This addresses an important medical need, although there is little treatment offered in the case of haemorrhage. Also the demands on EIT are high with usually no availability to take a 'before' measurement, ruling out time difference imaging. Recently a new treatment option for haemorrhage has been proposed and is being studied in international randomised controlled trial: the early reduction of elevated blood pressure to attenuate the haematoma. This has been shown via CT to reduce bleeds by up to 1mL by Anderson et al 2008. The use of EIT as a continuous measure is desirable here to monitor the effect of blood pressure reduction. A 1mL increase of haemorrhagic lesion located near scalp on the right side of head caused a boundary voltage change of less than 0.05% at 50 kHz. This could be visually observed in a time difference 3D reconstruction with no change in electrode positions, mesh, background conductivity or drift when baseline noise was less than 0.005% but not when noise was increased to 0.01%. This useful result informs us that the EIT system must have noise of less than 0.005% at 50 kHz including instrumentation, physiological and other biases.

  5. Spontaneous retroperitoneal haemorrhage in a young adult

    PubMed Central

    Baksi, Aditya; Gupta, Shahana; Ray, Udipta; Ghosh, Shibajyoti

    2014-01-01

    We report a rare case of a primary adrenal cortical malignancy presenting with spontaneous retroperitoneal haemorrhage in a young adult. To the best of our knowledge, this is the thirteenth such case to be reported in the English literature. PMID:24658522

  6. Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia manifesting as subdural empyema.

    PubMed

    Solanki, Sandeep P; Taylor, Christopher; Robertson, Iain

    2016-06-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) also known as Osler-Weber-Rendu disease is a rare autosomal dominant condition causing vascular dysplasia. Cerebral abscess formation, secondary to paradoxical septic emboli via HHT-derived pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (pAVMs) in this context is well documented. Herein, we present the first case of subdural empyema with this aetiology. PMID:26982736

  7. Noninvasive device readouts validated by immunohistochemical analysis enable objective quantitative assessment of acute wound healing in human skin.

    PubMed

    Ud-Din, Sara; Greaves, Nicholas S; Sebastian, Anil; Baguneid, Mohamed; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2015-01-01

    Objective evaluation of cutaneous wounds through use of noninvasive devices has important implications for diagnosis, monitoring treatment efficacy, progression and may lead to development of improved theranostic treatment strategies. However, there is a lack of validation in the use of certain devices in wound repair, where objective measurements taken by noninvasive devices have been corroborated by immunohistochemical analysis. Thus, data from three acute wound-healing studies in healthy volunteers using three noninvasive objective devices were further evaluated by immunohistochemistry. One hundred ten participants had 5-mm diameter skin biopsies to their arms. Spectrophotometric intracutaneous analysis (SIAscopy), full-field laser perfusion imaging, and three-dimensional imaging provided quantitative measurements of melanin, hemoglobin, collagen, blood flow, and wound size; all of which were validated by immunohistochemistry. Full-field laser perfusion imaging showed blood flow increased to D7 and decreased by 40% to D14. SIAscopy showed that hemoglobin increased to D7 and reduced to D14. CD31 analysis corroborated this by showing a 76% increase in blood vessel density to D7 and a reduction by 14% to D14. Three-dimensional imaging showed that wound surface area reduced by 50% from day 7 to day 14. Alpha-smooth muscle Actin (Alpha-SMA) staining supported these trends by showing increased levels by 72% from D0 to D14 (corresponding to wound contraction). Collagen, measured by SIAscopy, decreased to D7 and increased to D14, which was validated by collagen III analysis. Additionally, collagen I increased by 14% from D0 to D14. SIAscopy measurements for melanin showed an increase at D7 and a slight reduction to D14, while melanogenesis increased by 46.7% from D0 to D14. These findings show the utility of noninvasive objective devices in the quantitative evaluation of wound-healing parameters in human skin as corroborated by immunohistochemistry. This may contribute

  8. Effect of neonatal periventricular haemorrhage on neurodevelopmental outcome.

    PubMed Central

    Catto-Smith, A G; Yu, V Y; Bajuk, B; Orgill, A A; Astbury, J

    1985-01-01

    All 56 infants born between 23 and 28 weeks' gestation admitted to this hospital in 1981 were examined for periventricular haemorrhage with cerebral ultrasonography. Haemorrhage was diagnosed in 34 (61%)-12 (22%) had germinal layer haemorrhage, 18 (32%) had intraventricular haemorrhage, and four (7%) had intracerebral haemorrhage. The two year outcome of survivors with and without periventricular haemorrhage was compared to determine the effect on neurodevelopment. Only three (16%) of 19 infants with normal scans or germinal layer haemorrhages had evidence of major disability but nine (75%) of 12 infants with intraventricular or intracerebral haemorrhage had major disability. The mental and psychomotor performance on the Bayley scales of infant development was also significantly worse in the latter group. All three survivors with intracerebral haemorrhage had major disability. The continuation of life support treatment for extremely preterm infants who are at very high risk of severe handicap is a matter of increasing concern in neonatal intensive care. Our results show that if extensive periventricular haemorrhage, in particular intracerebral haemorrhage, occurs in this gestational group, extreme pessimism is warranted. PMID:2578773

  9. Influence of Double-Strand Break Repair on Radiation Therapy-Induced Acute Skin Reactions in Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Mumbrekar, Kamalesh Dattaram; Fernandes, Donald Jerard; Goutham, Hassan Venkatesh; Sharan, Krishna; Vadhiraja, Bejadi Manjunath; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu; Bola Sadashiva, Satish Rao

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: Curative radiation therapy (RT)-induced toxicity poses strong limitations for efficient RT and worsens the quality of life. The parameter that explains when and to what extent normal tissue toxicity in RT evolves would be of clinical relevance because of its predictive value and may provide an opportunity for personalized treatment approach. Methods and Materials: DNA double-strand breaks and repair were analyzed by microscopic γ-H2AX foci analysis in peripheral lymphocytes from 38 healthy donors and 80 breast cancer patients before RT, a 2 Gy challenge dose of x-ray exposed in vitro. Results: The actual damage (AD) at 0.25, 3, and 6 hours and percentage residual damage (PRD) at 3 and 6 hours were used as parameters to measure cellular radiosensitivity and correlated with RT-induced acute skin reactions in patients stratified as non-overresponders (NOR) (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group [RTOG] grade <2) and overresponders (OR) (RTOG grade ≥2). The results indicated that the basal and induced (at 0.25 and 3 hours) γ-H2AX foci numbers were nonsignificant (P>.05) between healthy control donors and the NOR and OR groups, whereas it was significant between ORs and healthy donors at 6 hours (P<.001). There was a significantly higher PRD in OR versus NOR (P<.05), OR versus healthy donors (P<.001) and NOR versus healthy donors (P<.01), supported further by the trend analysis (r=.2392; P=.0326 at 6 hours). Conclusions: Our findings strongly suggest that the measurement of PRD by performing γ-H2AX foci analysis has the potential to be developed into a clinically useful predictive assay.

  10. Sensitivity of computed tomography performed within six hours of onset of headache for diagnosis of subarachnoid haemorrhage: prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Stiell, Ian G; Sivilotti, Marco L A; Bullard, Michael J; Émond, Marcel; Symington, Cheryl; Sutherland, Jane; Worster, Andrew; Hohl, Corinne; Lee, Jacques S; Eisenhauer, Mary A; Mortensen, Melodie; Mackey, Duncan; Pauls, Merril; Lesiuk, Howard; Wells, George A

    2011-01-01

    Objective To measure the sensitivity of modern third generation computed tomography in emergency patients being evaluated for possible subarachnoid haemorrhage, especially when carried out within six hours of headache onset. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting 11 tertiary care emergency departments across Canada, 2000-9. Participants Neurologically intact adults with a new acute headache peaking in intensity within one hour of onset in whom a computed tomography was ordered by the treating physician to rule out subarachnoid haemorrhage. Main outcome measures Subarachnoid haemorrhage was defined by any of subarachnoid blood on computed tomography, xanthochromia in cerebrospinal fluid, or any red blood cells in final tube of cerebrospinal fluid collected with positive results on cerebral angiography. Results Of the 3132 patients enrolled (mean age 45.1, 2571 (82.1%) with worst headache ever), 240 had subarachnoid haemorrhage (7.7%). The sensitivity of computed tomography overall for subarachnoid haemorrhage was 92.9% (95% confidence interval 89.0% to 95.5%), the specificity was 100% (99.9% to 100%), the negative predictive value was 99.4% (99.1% to 99.6%), and the positive predictive value was 100% (98.3% to 100%). For the 953 patients scanned within six hours of headache onset, all 121 patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage were identified by computed tomography, yielding a sensitivity of 100% (97.0% to 100.0%), specificity of 100% (99.5% to 100%), negative predictive value of 100% (99.5% to 100%), and positive predictive value of 100% (96.9% to 100%). Conclusion Modern third generation computed tomography is extremely sensitive in identifying subarachnoid haemorrhage when it is carried out within six hours of headache onset and interpreted by a qualified radiologist. PMID:21768192

  11. Simultaneous occurrence of internal capsule infarct and cerebellar haemorrhage in a patient with hemiplegia.

    PubMed

    Pande, Nikhil; Vivek, Ganapathiraman; Hande, Manjunath; Acharya, Vasudeva

    2014-01-01

    A 68-year-old woman with hypertension with no history of cerebrovascular events presented with a left-sided hemiplegia which had developed acutely 2 days ago. She was not on maintenance therapy with antiplatelets or anticoagulants. A CT scan showed acute ischaemic infarction of the right internal capsule and cerebellar haemorrhage. Cardiac evaluation was normal. Doppler ultrasonography of the extracranial carotid and vertebral arteries showed diffuse arteriosclerotic changes, but did not reveal any haemodynamic occlusion. The simultaneous development of dual strokes was considered to be an extension of the same arteriosclerotic process to the intracranial carotid and basilar arteries. PMID:24408941

  12. Bilateral macular haemorrhages secondary to hepatitis-associated aplastic anaemia, treated with Nd:YAG laser posterior hyaloidotomy.

    PubMed

    Ranganath, Akshatha; Mariatos, George; Thakur, Shakti

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis-associated aplastic anaemia (HAAA) is an uncommon but distinct variant of aplastic anaemia in which pancytopenia and bone marrow failure appears 2-3 months after an acute attack of hepatitis. Although bilateral vision loss may rarely be the initial presentation of aplastic anaemia, no such report is known in HAAA. Here the authors report such a case presenting with large premacular subhyaloid haemorrhages secondary to severe anaemia and thrombocytopenia. Anaemic hypoxic damage to the vessel wall together with increased cardiac output and low platelet counts are interacting causal factors in the development of bleeding. Though these haemorrhages are benign and usually improve spontaneously, the presence of blood may cause permanent macular changes before it resolves. Posterior hyaloidotomy enabled rapid resolution of premacular subhyaloid haemorrhage thereby restoring vision and preventing need for vitreo-retinal surgery. These patients should be advised to refrain from valsalva manoeuvres, ocular rubbing and vigorous exercise to prevent ocular morbidity. PMID:22674943

  13. Intracisternal naloxone and cardiac nerve blockade prevent vasodilatation during simulated haemorrhage in awake rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, R G; Ludbrook, J; Potocnik, S J

    1989-01-01

    1. Acute haemorrhage was simulated in five unanaesthetized rabbits, by inflating a cuff on the inferior vena cava so that cardiac output fell by 8.3% of its resting level per minute. Simulated haemorrhage was performed after sham treatment, after graded doses of intravenous and intracisternal naloxone, and after cardiac nerve blockade with intrapericardial procaine. 2. After sham treatment, the haemodynamic response to simulated haemorrhage was biphasic. During the first phase, systemic vascular conductance fell steadily, heart rate rose steadily, and arterial pressure fell only slightly. A second decompensatory phase began abruptly when cardiac output had fallen to approximately 55% of its resting level. Vascular conductance rose steeply, heart rate fell slowly, and arterial pressure fell precipitately. 3. Treatment with naloxone (intravenous, 0.04-0.4 mg kg-1; intracisternal, 0.2-2 micrograms kg-1) did not affect either phase of the haemodynamic response to simulated haemorrhage. 4. After treatment with larger doses of naloxone (intravenous, 4-8 mg kg-1; intracisternal, 4-69 micrograms kg-1), the first phase was unaffected, but the second phase no longer occurred. Throughout simulated haemorrhage, systemic vascular conductance fell steadily, heart rate rose, and arterial pressure was well maintained. The dose of intracisternal naloxone which prevented the second phase was 90-900 times less than the corresponding intravenous dose. The second phase was also prevented by cardiac nerve blockade. 5. We conclude that an endogenous opiate mechanism is responsible for the haemodynamic decompensation that occurs when cardiac output falls to a critical level. The mechanism is located within the central nervous system. It is triggered by a signal from the heart. PMID:2585286

  14. European research priorities for intracerebral haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Thorsten; Petersson, Jesper; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam; Christensen, Hanne; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Csiba, Laszlo; Harnof, Sagi; Krieger, Derk; Mendelow, David; Molina, Carlos; Montaner, Joan; Overgaard, Karsten; Roine, Risto O; Schmutzhard, Erich; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Toni, Danilo; Stapf, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Over 2 million people are affected by intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) worldwide every year, one third of them dying within 1 month, and many survivors being left with permanent disability. Unlike most other stroke types, the incidence, morbidity and mortality of ICH have not declined over time. No standardised diagnostic workup for the detection of the various underlying causes of ICH currently exists, and the evidence for medical or surgical therapeutic interventions remains limited. A dedicated European research programme for ICH is needed to identify ways to reduce the burden of ICH-related death and disability. The European Research Network on Intracerebral Haemorrhage EURONICH is a multidisciplinary academic research collaboration that has been established to define current research priorities and to conduct large clinical studies on all aspects of ICH. PMID:21986448

  15. European Research Priorities for Intracerebral Haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Thorsten; Petersson, Jesper; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam; Christensen, Hanne; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Csiba, Laszlo; Harnof, Sagi; Krieger, Derk; Mendelow, David; Molina, Carlos; Montaner, Joan; Overgaard, Karsten; Roine, Risto O.; Schmutzhard, Erich; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Toni, Danilo; Stapf, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Over 2 million people are affected by intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) worldwide every year, one third of them dying within 1 month, and many survivors being left with permanent disability. Unlike most other stroke types, the incidence, morbidity and mortality of ICH have not declined over time. No standardised diagnostic workup for the detection of the various underlying causes of ICH currently exists, and the evidence for medical or surgical therapeutic interventions remains limited. A dedicated European research programme for ICH is needed to identify ways to reduce the burden of ICH-related death and disability. The European Research Network on Intracerebral Haemorrhage EURONICH is a multidisciplinary academic research collaboration that has been established to define current research priorities and to conduct large clinical studies on all aspects of ICH. PMID:21986448

  16. Lessons from nosocomial viral haemorrhagic fever outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Fisher-Hoch, Susan P

    2005-01-01

    The outbreak of Marburg haemorrhagic fever in Angola in 2004-2005 shows once again the devastating and rapid spread of viral haemorrhagic fevers in medical settings where hygiene practices are poorly applied or ignored. The legacy of years of war and poverty in Angola has resulted in very poor medical education and services. The initial high rate of infection among infants in Angola may have been related to poor hospital practices, possibly administration of vaccines. Though the outbreak in Angola was in a part of Africa not previously known to have filovirus infection, prior ecological modelling had predicted this location and many others. Prevention of future outbreaks will not be easy. The urgent need is dissemination of knowledge and the training, discipline and resources for good clinical practice. Educating the public to demand higher standards could be a powerful tool. Good practices are difficult to establish and maintain on the scale needed. PMID:16373655

  17. Factors of influence on acute skin toxicity of breast cancer patients treated with standard three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) after breast conserving surgery (BCS)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives Standard 3D-CRT after BCS may cause skin toxicity with a wide range of intensity including acute effects like erythema or late effects. In order to reduce these side effects it is mandatory to identify potential factors of influence in breast cancer patients undergoing standard three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) of the breast and modern systemic therapy. Materials/Methods Between 2006 and 2010 a total of 211 breast cancer patients (median age 52,4 years, range 24–77) after BCS consecutively treated in our institution with 3D-CRT (50 Gy whole breast photon radiotherapy followed by 16 Gy electron boost to the tumorbed) were evaluated with special focus on documented skin toxicity at the end of the 50 Gy-course. Standardized photodocumentation of the treated breast was done in each patient lying on the linac table with arms elevated. Skin toxicity was documented according to the common toxicity criteria (CTC)-score. Potential influencing factors were classified in three groups: patient-specific (smoking, age, breast size, body mass index = BMI, allergies), tumor-specific (tumorsize) and treatment-specific factors (antihormonal therapy with tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors, chemotherapy). Uni- and multivariate statistical analyses were done using IBM SPSS version 19. Results After 50 Gy 3D-CRT to the whole breast 28.9% of all 211 patients had no erythema, 62.2% showed erythema grade 1 (G1) and 8.5% erythema grade 2. None of the patients had grade 3/4 (G3/4) erythema. In univariate analyses a significant influence or trend on the development of acute skin toxicities (erythema G0 versus G1 versus G2) was observed for larger breast volumes (p=0,004), smoking during radiation therapy (p=0,064) and absence of allergies (p=0,014) as well as larger tumorsize (p=0,009) and antihormonal therapy (p=0.005). Neither patient age, BMI nor choice of chemotherapy showed any significant effect on higher grade toxicity. In the multivariate

  18. Preventing the acute skin side effects in patients treated with radiotherapy for breast cancer: the use of corneometry in order to evaluate the protective effect of moisturizing creams

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose The purpose of this study was to add, to the objective evaluation, an instrumental assessment of the skin damage induced by radiation therapy. Materials and methods A group of 100 patients affected by breast cancer was recruited in the study over one year. Patients were divided into five groups of 20 patients. For each group it was prescribed a different topical treatment. The following products were used: Betaglucan, sodium hyaluronate (Neoviderm®), Vitis vinifera A. s-I-M.t-O.dij (Ixoderm®), Alga Atlantica plus Ethylbisiminomethylguaicolo and Manganese Cloruro (Radioskin1®) and Metal Esculetina plus Ginko Biloba and Aloe vera (Radioskin 2®); Natural triglycerides-fitosterols (Xderit®); Selectiose plus thermal water of Avene (Trixera+®). All hydrating creams were applied twice a day starting 15 days before and one month after treatment with radiations. Before and during treatment patients underwent weekly skin assessments and corneometry to evaluate the symptoms related to skin toxicity and state of hydration. Evaluation of acute cutaneous toxicity was defined according to the RTOG scale. Results All patients completed radiotherapy; 72% of patients presented a G1 cutaneous toxicity, 18% developed a G2 cutaneous toxicity, 10% developed a G3 toxicity, no one presented G4 toxicity. The corneometry study confirmed the protective role of effective creams used in radiation therapy of breast cancer and showed its usefulness to identify radiation-induced dermatitis in a very early stage. Conclusions The preventive use of topic products reduces the incidence of skin side effects in patients treated with radiotherapy for breast cancer. An instrumental evaluation of skin hydration can help the radiation oncologist to use strategies that prevent the onset of toxicity of high degree. All moisturizing creams used in this study were equally valid in the treatment of skin damage induced by radiotherapy. PMID:23497676

  19. Acute irritant threshold correlates with barrier function, skin hydration and contact hypersensitivity in atopic dermatitis and rosacea.

    PubMed

    Darlenski, Razvigor; Kazandjieva, Jana; Tsankov, Nikolai; Fluhr, Joachim W

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the study was to disclose interactions between epidermal barrier, skin irritation and sensitization in healthy and diseased skin. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and stratum corneum hydration (SCH) were assessed in adult patients with atopic dermatitis (AD), rosacea and healthy controls. A 4-h patch test with seven concentrations of sodium lauryl sulphate was performed to determine the irritant threshold (IT). Contact sensitization pattern was revealed by patch testing with European baseline series. Subjects with a lower IT had higher TEWL values and lower SCH. Subjects with positive allergic reactions had significantly lower IT. In AD, epidermal barrier deterioration was detected on both volar forearm and nasolabial fold, while in rosacea, impeded skin physiology parameters were observed on the facial skin only, suggesting that barrier impediment is restricted to the face in rosacea, in contrast with AD where the abnormal skin physiology is generalized. PMID:24112695

  20. Restoration of blood pressure by choline treatment in rats made hypotensive by haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Ulus, I. H.; Arslan, B. Y.; Savci, V.; Kiran, B. K.

    1995-01-01

    1. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of choline (25-150 micrograms) increased blood pressure in rats made acutely hypotensive by haemorrhage. Intraperitoneal administration of choline (60 mg kg-1) also increased blood pressure, but to a lesser extent. Following i.c.v. injection of 25 micrograms or 50 micrograms of choline, heart rate did not change, while 100 micrograms or 150 micrograms i.c.v. choline produced a slight and short lasting bradycardia. Choline (150 micrograms) failed to alter the circulating residual volume of blood in haemorrhaged rats. 2. The pressor response to i.c.v. choline (50 micrograms) in haemorrhaged rats was abolished by pretreatment with mecamylamine (50 micrograms, i.c.v.) but not atropine (10 micrograms, i.c.v.). The pressor response to choline was blocked by pretreatment with hemicholinium-3 (20 micrograms, i.c.v.). 3. The pressor response to i.c.v. choline (150 micrograms) was associated with a several fold increase in plasma levels of vasopressin and adrenaline but not of noradrenaline and plasma renin. 4. The pressor response to i.c.v. choline (150 micrograms) was not altered by bilateral adrenalectomy, but was attenuated by systemic administration of either phentolamine (10 mg kg-1) or the vasopressin antagonist [beta-mercapto-beta,beta-cyclopenta-methylenepropionyl1, O-Me-Tyr2,Arg8]-vasopressin (10 micrograms kg-1). 5. It is concluded that the precursor of acetylcholine, choline, can increase and restore blood pressure in acutely haemorrhaged rats by increasing central cholinergic neurotransmission. Nicotinic receptor activation and an increase in plasma vasopressin and adrenaline level appear to be involved in this effect of choline. PMID:8528579

  1. Bevacizumab in vitreous haemorrhage secondary to radiation retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Montero, Javier Antonio; Yanez-Castro, Giovanni; Sanchis-Merino, Maria Eugenia; Ruiz-Moreno, Jose Maria

    2014-01-01

    Radiation retinopathy is a delayed-onset side effect of radiation exposure caused by retinal ischaemia that may induce proliferative retinopathy with neovascularisation, vitreous haemorrhage and macular oedema. An otherwise healthy, 51-year-old male patient who had been diagnosed with olfactory neuroblastoma and undergone complete surgical removal of the lesion followed by cranial irradiation developed bilateral cataracts and radiation retinopathy. The patient was treated by panretinal photocoagulation (PRP), followed by three-port pars-plana vitrectomy. Recurrent episodes of vitreous haemorrhages occurred following surgery and the patient was successfully treated by one intravitreal injection of bevacizumab with resolution of vitreous blood. Vitreous haemorrhage recurred 6 months later and a scheduled treatment with intravitreal bevacizumab every 4 months was established, preventing further haemorrhagic episodes. Six months after the last injection, a new episode of vitreous haemorrhage occurred. Scheduled intravitreal bevacizumab injections may help prevent recurrent vitreous haemorrhages in vitrectomised patients with radiation retinopathy. PMID:24510700

  2. Factors associated with periventricular haemorrhage in very low birthweight infants.

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, R W

    1981-01-01

    Periventricular haemorrhage was diagnosed in vivo in 20 of 29 consecutively admitted infants of birthweight below 1500 g using an ultrasound scanner. Ten (51%) infants with haemorrhages survived. Mortality was related to the extent of the bleeding. Statistically significant associations with respiratory distress, ventilator therapy, metabolic acidosis, and hypercapnia were observed, lending support to their role in the pathogenesis of periventricular haemorrhage. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3a Fig. 4a Fig. 5a PMID:7259272

  3. Bilateral eyelid ecchymosis and subconjunctival haemorrhage manifesting as presenting feature in a case of dengue haemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Jain, Sparshi; Goswami, Anup; Singh, Nidhi; Kaur, Savleen

    2015-10-01

    We report a case of bilateral eyelid ecchymosis and subconjunctival haemorrhage, a rare presenting feature of dengue haemorrhagic fever. A 17-year-old boy presented to the emergency department with complaints of redness in both eyes and vomiting. He had bilateral eyelid ecchymosis with subconjunctival haemorrhage. Complete blood count revealed a significantly reduced platelet count of 11000/µL suggestive of dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF). Ocular manifestations were followed by other systemic haemorrhagic manifestations of dengue later on which violates the usual sequence of events of dengue fever. Bilateral eyelid ecchymosis is a rare clinical manifestation and a rare presenting feature of dengue fever and one has to keep high index of suspicion for presence of dengue whenever a case of fever presents with lid ecchymosis/haemorrhage. PMID:25540163

  4. Skin turgor

    MedlinePlus

    Doughy skin; Poor skin turgor; Good skin turgor; Decreased skin turgor ... Call your health care provider if: Poor skin turgor occurs with vomiting, diarrhea, or fever. The skin is very slow to return to normal, or the skin "tents" up ...

  5. Neonatal cranial ultrasound screening for intraventricular haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tudehope, D I; Lamont, A C

    1998-04-01

    The cost effectiveness of performing routine neonatal cranial ultrasound scans to diagnose intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) on cohorts of high risk infants is in question. In the early 1980s cranial ultrasound scans were performed on preterm infants to expand knowledge of the incidence, aetiology, pathogenesis and evolution of IVH. In many neonatal units high risk infants are scanned on days 5-7 and 10-14 and prior to discharge for extremely low birthweight (ELBW) infants. Cranial ultrasound scanning is often used as a surrogate for assessment of neurodevelopmental outcome with information from meta analyses used to counsel parents about the likelihood of subsequent neurosensory disability. PMID:9588629

  6. Subconjunctival haemorrhage from bronchoscopy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Huey Ying; Puah, Ser Hon; Ang, Leslie Jonathan P.S.; Teo, En Qi; Lau, Sabrina Y.; Goh, Kee San; Lim, Albert Y.H.; Tai, Dessmon Y.H.; Abisheganaden, John; Verma, Akash

    2015-01-01

    Flexible bronchoscopy has been available for almost five decades. It has evolved as one of the most commonly used invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedure in pulmonology, and its scope of applications is progressively expanding with the addition of new adjunct technologies such as endobronchial ultrasound, bronchial Thermoplasty, and navigational bronchoscopy. It is a safe procedure with complications ranging from fever, infiltrates, hypoxemia, bleeding, pneumothoraces and death, with most significant complications being bleeding and pneumothorax. We report a case of subconjuctival haemorrhage as an immediate complication of bronchoscopy. To our knowledge this is the first report documenting this rare complication. PMID:26744668

  7. Enlargement of the third ventricle and hyponatraemia in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Wijdicks, E F; Vandongen, K J; Vangijn, J; Hijdra, A; Vermeulen, M

    1988-01-01

    Hyponatraemia following aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage is associated with an increased risk of cerebral infarction. Whether the development of hyponatraemia was related to enlargement of the third ventricle on the admission CT scan was investigated in a consecutive series of 133 patients who were seen within 72 hours of aneurysmal haemorrhage. Hyponatraemia occurred significantly more often in patients with enlargement of the third ventricle (with or without dilatation of the lateral ventricles) than in patients with a normal ventricular system (20/41 versus 24/92, p = 0.016). After ventricular drainage, the sodium levels returned to normal in two patients in whom the size of the third ventricle decreased and not in four patients with persistent enlargement of the third ventricle. The significant relationship between enlargement of the third ventricle and hyponatraemia remained after adjustment for the amount of cisternal blood, but not after adjustment for the amount of intraventricular blood. These results suggest that the size of the third ventricle is an important but not the only factor in the relationship between acute hydrocephalus and hyponatraemia in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage. Images PMID:3379424

  8. Ultrasound and necropsy study of periventricular haemorrhage in preterm infants.

    PubMed Central

    Szymonowicz, W; Schafler, K; Cussen, L J; Yu, V Y

    1984-01-01

    The diagnostic accuracy of cerebral ultrasound for periventricular haemorrhage was determined by comparing this with necropsy findings in 30 preterm neonates of 30 weeks' gestation or less and birthweight under 1500 g. Ultrasound gave an accurate diagnosis of 85% in infants with germinal layer haemorrhage, 92% in intraventricular haemorrhage, and 97% in intracerebral haemorrhage. False positive errors were caused by vascular congestion; false negative errors occurred when the maximum dimension of haemorrhage was less than 3 mm. Cerebral ultrasound gave a diagnostic accuracy of 63% for periventricular leucomalacia. False negative errors occurred when periventricular leucomalacia was microscopic or when it was out of range of the scanner. The maximum width of the germinal layer was measured in 77 neonates of gestational age 23 to 36 weeks who died and had no periventricular haemorrhage at necropsy. The progressive involution of the germinal layer with increasing gestational age paralleled the steady decrease in incidence of periventricular haemorrhage diagnosed over the same gestational age range. Neonates of the youngest gestational age who had the most extensive germinal layers also had the highest risk for periventricular haemorrhage. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 p640-b Fig. 4 PMID:6465933

  9. Ultrasound and necropsy study of periventricular haemorrhage in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Szymonowicz, W; Schafler, K; Cussen, L J; Yu, V Y

    1984-07-01

    The diagnostic accuracy of cerebral ultrasound for periventricular haemorrhage was determined by comparing this with necropsy findings in 30 preterm neonates of 30 weeks' gestation or less and birthweight under 1500 g. Ultrasound gave an accurate diagnosis of 85% in infants with germinal layer haemorrhage, 92% in intraventricular haemorrhage, and 97% in intracerebral haemorrhage. False positive errors were caused by vascular congestion; false negative errors occurred when the maximum dimension of haemorrhage was less than 3 mm. Cerebral ultrasound gave a diagnostic accuracy of 63% for periventricular leucomalacia. False negative errors occurred when periventricular leucomalacia was microscopic or when it was out of range of the scanner. The maximum width of the germinal layer was measured in 77 neonates of gestational age 23 to 36 weeks who died and had no periventricular haemorrhage at necropsy. The progressive involution of the germinal layer with increasing gestational age paralleled the steady decrease in incidence of periventricular haemorrhage diagnosed over the same gestational age range. Neonates of the youngest gestational age who had the most extensive germinal layers also had the highest risk for periventricular haemorrhage. PMID:6465933

  10. The link between intracranial haemorrhage and cardiogenic shock: a case of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Caretta, Giorgio; Vizzardi, Enrico; Rovetta, Riccardo; Evaristi, Laura; Quinzani, Filippo; Raddino, Riccardo; Dei Cas, Livio

    2012-06-01

    Myocardial dysfunction occurs frequently during subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) and it is often referred to as neurogenic stunned myocardium (NSM). Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC), which can lead to life-threatening acute heart failure, has been considered a possible complication of SAH. Actually, NSM and TTC are believed to share the same pathophysiological mechanisms and are likely a manifestation of the same disease. We report a case of a 64-year-old woman with SAH and cardiogenic shock due to acute left ventricular dysfunction. Echocardiography and ventriculography showed the typical pattern of TTC. Angiography excluded coronary artery disease or coronary spasm. Short-term inotropic support was necessary. Rapid recovery of left ventricular function was observed after 8 days. Acute myocardial dysfunction due to TTC in the setting of SAH may lead to cardiogenic shock which is difficult to treat. Patients with SAH and haemodynamic instability warrant a careful assessment of ventricular function on admission to rule out TTC PMID:22870749

  11. Skin pathology induced by snake venom metalloproteinase: acute damage, revascularization, and re-epithelization in a mouse ear model.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Natalia; Escalante, Teresa; Gutiérrez, José María; Rucavado, Alexandra

    2008-10-01

    Viperid snakebite envenomation induces blistering and dermonecrosis. The pathological alterations induced by a snake venom metalloproteinase in the skin were investigated in a mouse ear model. Metalloproteinase BaP1, from Bothrops asper, induced rapid edema, hemorrhage, and blistering; the latter two effects were abrogated by preincubation with the metalloproteinase inhibitor batimastat. Neutrophils did not play a role in the pathology, as depletion of these cells resulted in a similar histological picture. Blisters are likely to result from the direct proteolytic activity of BaP1 of proteins at the dermal-epidermal junction, probably at the lamina lucida, as revealed by immunostaining for type IV collagen and laminin. Widespread apoptosis of keratinocytes was detected by the TUNEL assay, whereas no apoptosis of capillary endothelial cells was observed. BaP1 induced a drastic reduction in the microvessel density, revealed by immunostaining for the endothelial marker vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2. This was followed by a rapid angiogenic response, leading to a partial revascularization. Skin damage was followed by inflammation and granulation tissue formation. Then, a successful re-epithelization process occurred, and the skin of the ear regained its normal structure by 2 weeks. Venom metalloproteinase-induced skin damage reproduces the pathological changes described in snakebitten patients. PMID:18449209

  12. Bichat guidelines for the clinical management of haemorrhagic fever viruses and bioterrorism-related haemorrhagic fever viruses.

    PubMed

    Bossi, Philippe; Tegnell, Anders; Baka, Agoritsa; Van Loock, Frank; Hendriks, Jan; Werner, Albrecht; Maidhof, Heinrich; Gouvras, Georgios

    2004-12-01

    Haemorrhagic fever viruses (HFVs) are a diverse group of viruses that cause a clinical disease associated with fever and bleeding disorder. HFVs that are associated with a potential biological threat are Ebola and Marburg viruses (Filoviridae), Lassa fever and New World arenaviruses (Machupo, Junin, Guanarito and Sabia viruses) (Arenaviridae), Rift Valley fever (Bunyaviridae) and yellow fever, Omsk haemorrhagic fever, and Kyanasur Forest disease (Flaviviridae). In terms of biological warfare concerning dengue, Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever and Hantaviruses, there is not sufficient knowledge to include them as a major biological threat. Dengue virus is the only one of these that cannot be transmitted via aerosol. Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever and the agents of haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome appear difficult to weaponise. Ribavirin is recommended for the treatment and the prophylaxis of the arenaviruses and the bunyaviruses, but is not effective for the other families. All patients must be isolated and receive intensive supportive therapy. PMID:15677844

  13. Acute and long-term transcriptional responses in sulfur mustard-exposed SKH-1 hairless mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Vallet, V; Poyot, T; Cléry-Barraud, C; Coulon, D; Sentenac, C; Peinnequin, A; Boudry, I

    2012-03-01

    Sulfur mustard (HD) ranks among the alkylating chemical warfare agents. Skin contact with HD produces an inflammatory response that evolves into separation at the epidermal-dermal junction conducting to blistering and epidermis necrosis. Up to now, current treatment strategies of HD burns have solely consisted in symptomatic management of skin damage. Therapeutic efficacy studies are still being conducted; classically using appropriate animal skin toxicity models. In order to substantiate the use of SKH-1 hairless mouse as an appropriate model for HD-induced skin lesions, we investigate the time-dependent quantitative gene expression of various selected transcripts associated to the dorsal skin exposure to HD saturated vapors. Using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), the expression of interleukins (IL-1β and IL-6), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, macrophage inflammatory proteins (MIP)-2α (also called Cxcl2) and MIP-1αR (also called Ccr1), matrix metalloproteases (MMP-9 and MMP-2), laminin γ2 monomer (Lamc2) and keratin (K)1 was determined up to 21 days after HD challenge in order to allow enough time for wound repair to begin. Specific transcript RT-qPCR analysis demonstrated that IL-6, IL-1β, Ccr1, Cxcl2 mRNA levels increased as early as 6 h in HD-exposed skins and remained up-regulated over a 14-day period. Topical application of HD also significantly up-regulated MMP-9, TNF-α, and Lamc2 expression at specific time points. In contrast, MMP-2 mRNA levels remained unaffected by HD over the time-period considered, whereas that long-term study revealed that K1 mRNA level significantly increased only 21 days after HD challenge. Our study hereby provides first-hand evidence to substantiate a long period variation expression in the inflammatory cytokine, MMPs and structural components following cutaneous HD exposure in hairless mouse SKH-1. Our data credit the use of SKH-1 for investigating mechanisms of HD-induced skin toxicity and for

  14. Skin Dictionary

    MedlinePlus

    ... your skin, hair, and nails Skin dictionary Camp Discovery Good Skin Knowledge lesson plans and activities Video library Find a ... your skin, hair, and nails Skin dictionary Camp Discovery Good Skin Knowledge lesson plans and activities Video library Find a ...

  15. Skin graft

    MedlinePlus

    Skin transplant; Skin autografting; FTSG; STSG; Split thickness skin graft; Full thickness skin graft ... site. Most people who are having a skin graft have a split-thickness skin graft. This takes ...

  16. Spontaneously reported haemorrhagic adverse events associated with rivaroxaban and dabigatran in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Esa Y. H.; Diug, Basia; Bell, J. Simon; Mc Namara, Kevin P.; Dooley, Michael J.; Kirkpatrick, Carl M.; McNeil, John J.; Caughey, Gillian E.; Ilomäki, Jenni

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of our study was to describe spontaneously reported haemorrhagic adverse events associated with rivaroxaban and dabigatran in Australia. Methods: Data were sourced from the Australian Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) Database of Adverse Event Notifications between June 2009 and May 2014. Records of haemorrhagic adverse events in which rivaroxaban or dabigatran was considered as a potential cause were analysed. Results: There were 240 haemorrhagic adverse events associated with rivaroxaban and 504 associated with dabigatran. Age was specified for 164 (68%) haemorrhages associated with rivaroxaban, of which 101 occurred in people aged ⩾75 years. Age was specified for 437 (87%) haemorrhages associated with dabigatran, of which 300 occurred in people aged ⩾75 years. Time from treatment initiation to haemorrhage was specified for 122 (51%) haemorrhages associated with rivaroxaban, with 69 (57%) haemorrhages occurring within 30 days of rivaroxaban initiation. Time from treatment initiation to haemorrhage was specified for 253 (50%) haemorrhages associated with dabigatran, with 123 (49%) haemorrhages occurring within 30 days of dabigatran initiation. Gastrointestinal (GI) haemorrhages were the most frequent type of haemorrhages associated with both rivaroxaban (n = 105, 44%) and dabigatran (n = 302, 60%). Data were available on the severity of haemorrhage for 101 (42%) haemorrhages associated with rivaroxaban, with haemorrhage leading to death in 17 people. The severity of haemorrhage was specified for 384 (76%) haemorrhages associated with dabigatran, with haemorrhage leading to death in 61 people. Conclusions: Our study highlights the need for research on the haemorrhagic complications of anticoagulation in clinical care. A considerable proportion of reported haemorrhagic events occurred within 30 days of rivaroxaban and dabigatran initiation. This highlights the importance of considering bleeding risk at the time of treatment

  17. Medium dose ultraviolet A1 phototherapy and mRNA expression of interleukin 8, interferon γ, and chemokine receptor 4 in acute skin lesions in atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Malinowska, Karolina; Sysa-Jedrzejowska, Anna; Wozniacka, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Mechanisms responsible for UVA1 efficacy in atopic dermatitis (AD) are not fully elucidated. Aim To investigate IL-8, CCR-4, and IFN-γ mRNA expression in AD before and after UVA1, to identify correlations among them, and to determine whether and to what degree mRNA expression is influenced by UVA1. Material and methods Twenty-five patients with AD underwent medium dose UVA1-phototherapy at daily dosages of 10, 20, 30, 45, and then continuing 45 J/cm2 up to 20 days, from Monday to Friday for 4 weeks. Before and after UVA1, biopsies from acute skin lesions were studied using reverse-transcription and RT-PCR. Results The levels of CCR-4 mRNA correlated with those of IFN-γ, both before and after UVA1 phototherapy (p < 0.05). A significant correlation was found after UVA1 between mRNA levels of IL-8 and IFN-γ (p < 0.05). After UVA1 an increase in IL-8 mRNA expression in comparison to the baseline assessment (p = 0.02) was found, while no significant difference was revealed in the expression of CCR-4 and IFN-γ mRNA. UVA1 improved both SCORAD and severity of AD (p < 0.001). SCORAD and the severity of AD did not correlate with the degree of expression of measured cytokine mRNA, neither before nor after UVA1. Conclusions CCR-4 is expressed in parallel with IFN-γ in acute skin lesions of patients with AD both before and after UVA1 phototherapy. UVA1 significantly improves SCORAD index, lessens the severity of AD and increases the expression of IL-8, with no direct effects on other studied molecules. PMID:27512350

  18. [Anticoagulants after intracerebral haemorrhage in frail elderly].

    PubMed

    Olde Rikkert, Marcel; Claassen, Jurgen

    2015-01-01

    Restarting anticoagulants in frail older patients who have had an intracerebral haemorrhage as an adverse reaction to anticoagulant therapy is a major dilemma, and one which is not specifically addressed in the state-of-the-art paper on restarting anticoagulants elsewhere in this issue. Frail older persons have the highest risk of recurrent bleeding, but, in theory, also have the most benefit from anticoagulants due to the high absolute risk for ischemic events in atrial fibrillation, which is the major indication. However, frail older persons are largely excluded from trials with anticoagulants, which makes it impossible to solve this dilemma in an evidence-based way. Therefore, we argue that sound decision making cannot only be based on neurological or cardiological expertise, as proposed by others, but should include an overall comprehensive geriatric assessment, and, most importantly, patients and caregivers should be included in shared goal setting and shared decision making. PMID:25873225

  19. Pathogenesis of intraventricular haemorrhage in newborn infants

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Valerie A.; Durbin, G. M.; Olaffson, A.; Reynolds, E. O. R.; Rivers, R. P. A.; Smith, J. F.

    1974-01-01

    The ventricular CSF of a group of preterm infants dying in the newborn period contained a large excess of protein which appeared to be a plasma filtrate. This excess was found whether or not an intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) was also present. After consideration of the clinical features of the infants, their coagulation status, and the findings at necropsy, we suggest that increased cerebral venous and capillary pressure, usually caused by heart failure resulting from hypoxia and acidosis, was responsible both for the IVH, by rupturing the terminal veins, and for promoting the filtration of plasma proteins into the CSF. Abnormalities of haemostasis, though very common, did not seem to provide an adequate explanation for the initiation of intraventricular bleeding, though they may have exacerbated it. PMID:4422777

  20. Viral haemorrhagic fevers in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Richards, Guy A; Weyer, Jacqueline; Blumberg, Lucille H

    2015-09-01

    Viral haemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) include a diverse array of diseases caused by a broad range of viruses transmitted from various animal hosts and originating from almost all the continents in the world. These are potentially fatal and highly transmissible diseases without specific treatments or prophylactic vaccines. As has been demonstrated during the Ebola virus disease outbreak in West Africa, the consequences of VHFs are not limited to specific countries - they may become epidemic, and may have considerable economic impact and disrupt local public health and social service structures. Intensive public health intervention is necessary to contain these diseases. Here we provide a concise overview of the VHFs that are of current public health importance to South Africa. PMID:26428973

  1. Doctors' Knowledge of Viral Haemorrhagic Fevers.

    PubMed

    Lisk, Clifford; Snell, Luke; Haji-Coll, Michael; Ellis, Jayne; Sufi, Saaidullah; Raj, Rohit; Sharma, A; Smith, C

    2015-01-01

    Viral Haemorrhagic Fevers (VHF) such as Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) are of increasing concern to clinicians and public heath bodies across Europe and America due to the on-going epidemic in West Africa. We conducted an online study to assess clinicians' knowledge of VHF across six hospital sites in London. This showed suboptimal knowledge of Public Health England guidance, EVD epidemiology and the risk factors for acquiring VHF. Knowledge about VHF was dependent on seniority of grade with the most junior grade of doctors performing worse in several areas of the survey. Poor knowledge raises concerns that those at risk of VHF will be inappropriately risk stratified and managed. Education of doctors and other healthcare professionals about VHF is necessary to address these knowledge gaps. PMID:26305080

  2. Bilateral adrenal gland haemorrhage: an unusual cause

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Vasant; Malabu, Usman; Cameron, Donald; Sangla, Kunwarjit

    2014-01-01

    Summary Our patient had drainage of a large amoebic liver abscess. This got complicated by a severe degree of hypotension, which required aggressive fluid resuscitation and hydrocortisone support. Computerised tomography (CT) of the abdomen revealed bilateral adrenal gland haemorrhage (BAH) resulting in primary adrenal gland failure, which was the cause for hypotension. Patient was on long-term warfarin for provoked deep vein thrombosis of lower limb, which was discontinued before the procedure. Thrombophilia profile indicated the presence of lupus anticoagulant factor with prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT). Patient was discharged on lifelong warfarin. This case emphasises the need for strong clinical suspicion for diagnosing BAH, rare but life-threatening condition, and its association with amoebic liver abscess and anti-phospholipid antibody syndrome (APLS). Learning points Recognition of BAH as a rare complication of sepsis.APLS can rarely cause BAH. PMID:25276353

  3. Retinal haemorrhages associated with fatal paediatric infections.

    PubMed

    Salvatori, Marcus C; Lantz, Patrick E

    2015-04-01

    For many physicians, retinal haemorrhages (RHs) in infants and young children remain highly diagnostic of non-accidental (abusive) head trauma. Because clinicians have applied indirect ophthalmoscopy selectively to cases of suspected child abuse, the association between RH and other conditions such as infection, coagulopathy and accidental trauma has encountered habitual bias, creating the potential for iatrogenic misdiagnosis of child abuse. We present an autopsy case series of four children, aged three years old or younger, in whom RHs were detected by post-mortem monocular indirect ophthalmoscopy after the patients had died from infections. We discuss the laterality, number, type and location of RHs in these cases, and summarize proposed mechanisms of RH formation in fatalities from paediatric infection. We demonstrate that many of the ophthalmological findings that have been considered diagnostic of abusive head trauma can also occur in association with infective processes. PMID:24644226

  4. Selective Exposure of the Fetal Lung and Skin/Amnion (but Not Gastro-Intestinal Tract) to LPS Elicits Acute Systemic Inflammation in Fetal Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Masatoshi; Newnham, John P.; Cox, Tom; Jobe, Alan H.; Kramer, Boris W.; Kallapur, Suhas G.

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation of the uterine environment (commonly as a result of microbial colonisation of the fetal membranes, amniotic fluid and fetus) is strongly associated with preterm labour and birth. Both preterm birth and fetal inflammation are independently associated with elevated risks of subsequent short- and long-term respiratory, gastro-intestinal and neurological complications. Despite numerous clinical and experimental studies to investigate localised and systemic fetal inflammation following exposure to microbial agonists, there is minimal data to describe which fetal organ(s) drive systemic fetal inflammation. We used lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from E.coli in an instrumented ovine model of fetal inflammation and conducted a series of experiments to assess the systemic pro-inflammatory capacity of the three major fetal surfaces exposed to inflammatory mediators in pregnancy (the lung, gastro-intestinal tract and skin/amnion). Exposure of the fetal lung and fetal skin/amnion (but not gastro-intestinal tract) caused a significant acute systemic inflammatory response characterised by altered leucocytosis, neutrophilia, elevated plasma MCP-1 levels and inflammation of the fetal liver and spleen. These novel findings reveal differential fetal organ responses to pro-inflammatory stimulation and shed light on the pathogenesis of fetal systemic inflammation after exposure to chorioamnionitis. PMID:23691033

  5. Randomized, Double-Blind, Phase II, Multicenter Study Evaluating the Safety/Tolerability and Efficacy of JNJ-Q2, a Novel Fluoroquinolone, Compared with Linezolid for Treatment of Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infection ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Covington, Paul; Davenport, J. Michael; Andrae, David; O'Riordan, William; Liverman, Lisa; McIntyre, Gail; Almenoff, June

    2011-01-01

    JNJ-Q2 is a fluoroquinolone with broad coverage including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). A double-blind, multicenter, phase II noninferiority study treated 161 patients for 7 to 14 days, testing the efficacy of JNJ-Q2 (250 mg, twice a day [BID]) versus linezolid (600 mg, BID) in patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI). The prespecified criterion for noninferiority was 15%. Primary intent-to-treat analysis was unable to declare noninferiority, as the risk difference lower bound of the 95% confidence interval between treatments was 19% at 36 to 84 h postrandomization for the composite end point of lesion assessment and temperature. Prespecified clinical cure rates 2 to 14 days after completion of therapy were similar (83.1% for JNJ-Q2 versus 82.1% for linezolid). Post hoc analyses revealed that JNJ-Q2 was statistically noninferior to linezolid (61.4% versus 57.7%, respectively; P = 0.024) based on the 2010 FDA guidance, which defines treatment success as lack of lesion spread and afebrile status within 48 to 72 h postrandomization. Despite evidence of systemic disease, <5% of patients presented with fever, suggesting fever is not a compelling surrogate measure of systemic disease resolution for this indication. Nausea and vomiting were the most common adverse events. Of the patients, 86% (104/121) had S. aureus isolated from the infection site; 63% of these were MRSA. The results suggest JNJ-Q2 shows promise as an effective treatment for ABSSSI, demonstrating (i) efficacy for early clinical response (i.e., lack of spread of lesions and absence of fever at 48 to 72 h), and (ii) cure rates for ABSSSI pathogens (especially MRSA) consistent with the historical literature. PMID:21947389

  6. A randomized, double-blind, Phase 2 study to evaluate subjective and objective outcomes in patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections treated with delafloxacin, linezolid or vancomycin

    PubMed Central

    Kingsley, Jeff; Mehra, Purvi; Lawrence, Laura E.; Henry, Eugenia; Duffy, Erin; Cammarata, Sue K.; Pullman, John

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Delafloxacin is an investigational anionic fluoroquinolone being developed to treat infections caused by Gram-positive and -negative organisms. This clinical trial evaluated the efficacy and safety of delafloxacin in the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs). Methods In a double-blind, Phase 2 trial, 256 patients were randomized (1 : 1 : 1) to 300 mg of delafloxacin, 600 mg of linezolid or 15 mg/kg vancomycin (actual body weight), each administered intravenously twice daily for 5–14 days. Randomization was stratified by infection category. The primary endpoint was the investigator's assessment of cure, defined as complete resolution of baseline signs and symptoms at follow-up. Secondary endpoints included reductions in the total areas of erythema and induration and assessments of bacterial eradication. This trial has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration number NCT01283581. Results Cure rates were significantly greater with delafloxacin versus vancomycin (mean difference: −16.3%; 95% CI, −30.3% to −2.3%; P = 0.031); differences were significant for obese patients (BMI ≥30 kg/m2; mean difference: −30.0%; 95% CI, −50.7% to −9.3%; P = 0.009), but not for non-obese patients. Cure rates with delafloxacin and linezolid were similar. Using digital measurement, the percentage decrease in total erythema area was significantly greater with delafloxacin versus vancomycin at follow-up (−96.4% versus −84.5%; P = 0.028). There were no differences in bacterial eradication among the treatment groups. The most frequently reported treatment-emergent adverse events were nausea, diarrhoea and vomiting. Conclusions These data show that delafloxacin is effective in the treatment of ABSSSIs and is well tolerated. PMID:26679243

  7. Skin disorders at sea.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Ray; Boniface, Keith; Hite, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the types of skin disorders occurring at sea requiring acute treatment. The case logs of a tele-medicine service for US flagged ships at sea were reviewed from March 1, 2006 until March 1, 2009. Of 1844 total cases, 10% (n = 183) were for skin disorders. Sixty-eight percent (n = 125) were infections, 14% (n = 25) were inflammatory, 7% (n = 13) were environmental, and 11% (n = 20) were non-specific rashes. Cutaneous abscesses and cellulitis (n = 84) were the most common acute skin disorders encountered. In some cases (n = 81), still digital photographs aided in the diagnosis. PMID:20496321

  8. Angiogenesis in steno-occlusive vasculopathies as a common pathway for intracranial haemorrhage. A report of six cases.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, René; Rijssenbeek, Astrid L; Sprengers, Marieke E S; Bot, Joost C J; Majoie, Charles B L M; Roos, Yvo B W E M; Vandertop, William P

    2014-01-01

    Vasculopathies, including vasculitis of the central nervous system, can lead to stenosed, cicatrized vessels and the development of arterio-arteriolar collateral vessels. Bleeding due to these vascular changes, although rare, does occur. We describe six patients (all female, age range, 21-52 years; mean age, 42 years) with steno-occlusive lesions of intracranial vessels who presented with an acute intracranial haemorrhage. All had arterial steno-occlusive changes in conjunction with extensive leptomeningeal and arterio-arteriolar collaterals. Within the collaterals, focal dilatations could be identified, which were in close spatial relationship with the intracranial haemorrhage. Cause of bleeding was depicted on CT angiography in four out of six patients. One patient presented in childhood with acute stroke, one patient was diagnosed with Buerger's disease and one with sickle cell disease; the other three patients had no relevant history and the exact cause remained unclear. Outcome was favourable in all patients. Despite focal vascular weaknesses, no recurrent haemorrhage was seen during follow-up, supporting, at least in this small patient group, a conservative wait-and-see policy. PMID:24556309

  9. [Retinal haemorrhages in non-accidental head injury in childhood].

    PubMed

    Oberacher-Velten, I M; Helbig, H

    2014-09-01

    Retinal haemorrhages are one of the three cardinal manifestations of the "shaken baby syndrome" or "non-accidental head injury" in childhood. The role of an ophthalmologist in suspected non-accidental head injury has not only medical but also legal aspects and has been discussed controversially in the literature. The differential diagnosis and the specificity of retinal haemorrhages in childhood for an abusive head trauma will be pointed out in this paper. PMID:25181505

  10. Sagging Skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... Non-ablative Laser Rejuvenation Non-invasive Body Contouring Treatments Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Information Free Skin Cancer Screenings Skin ... Non-ablative Laser Rejuvenation Non-invasive Body Contouring Treatments Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Information Free Skin Cancer Screenings Skin ...

  11. Skin Diseases: Skin Health and Skin Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... the sun. Photo: PhotoDisc Care for conditions from acne to wrinkles Did you know that your skin ... other skin conditions. Many skin problems, such as acne, also affect your appearance. Your skin can also ...

  12. Decreased plasma isoleucine concentrations after upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Dejong, C H; Meijerink, W J; van Berlo, C L; Deutz, N E; Soeters, P B

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A decrease in arterial isoleucine values after intragastric blood administration in pigs has been observed. This contrasted with increased values of most other amino acids, ammonia, and urea. After an isonitrogenous control meal in these pigs all amino acids including isoleucine increased, and urea increased to a lesser extent, suggesting a relation between the arterial isoleucine decrease and uraemia after gastrointestinal haemorrhage. METHODS: To extend these findings to humans, plasma amino acids were determined after gastrointestinal haemorrhage in patients with peptic ulcers (n = 9) or oesophageal varices induced by liver cirrhosis (n = 4) and compared with preoperative patients (n = 106). RESULTS: After gastrointestinal haemorrhage, isoleucine decreased in all patients by more than 60% and normalised within 48 hours. Most other amino acids increased and also normalised within 48 hours. Uraemia occurred in both groups, hyperammonaemia was seen in patients with liver cirrhosis. CONCLUSIONS: These results confirm previous findings in animals and healthy volunteers that plasma isoleucine decreases after simulated upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage. This supports the hypothesis that the absence of isoleucine in blood protein causes decreased plasma isoleucine values after gastrointestinal haemorrhage, and may be a contributory factor to uraemia and hyperammonaemia in patients with normal and impaired liver function, respectively. Intravenous isoleucine administration after gastrointestinal haemorrhage could be beneficial and will be the subject of further research. PMID:8881800

  13. Aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage: guidance in making the correct diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Liebenberg, W; Worth, R; Firth, G; Olney, J; Norris, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: The natural history of untreated aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage carries a dismal prognosis. Case fatalities range between 32% and 67%. Treatment with either surgical clipping or endovascular coiling is highly successful at preventing re-bleeding and yet the diagnosis is still missed. Methods: Based on the national guidelines for analysis of cerebrospinal fluid for bilirubin in suspected subarachnoid haemorrhage and a review of other available literature this study has compiled guidance in making the diagnosis. Conclusion: In patients presenting with a suspected non-traumatic subarachnoid haemorrhage, computed tomography within 12 hours will reliably show 98% of subarachnoid haemorrhage. In patients who present after 12 hours with a negative computed tomogram, formal cerebrospinal fluid spectophotometry will detect subarachnoid haemorrhage for the next two weeks with a reliability of 96%. Between the early diagnosis with the aid of computed tomography and the later diagnosis with the added benefit of spectophotometry in the period where computed tomograms become less reliable, it should be possible to diagnose most cases of subarachnoid haemorrhage correctly. PMID:15998826

  14. Acute Scorpion Pancreatitis in Trinidad

    PubMed Central

    Bartholomew, Courtenay

    1970-01-01

    Over a two-month period 30 patients were admitted to hospital following stings of the scorpion of Trinidad, the Tityus trinitatis. In 24 cases acute pancreatitis developed soon after the sting, but in nine of these no abdominal pain occurred. All the patients made an uneventful recovery. Although such complications have been reported no pseudocyst formations or acute haemorrhagic pancreatitis occurred in this series. PMID:5443968

  15. Hyaline membrane disease, alkali, and intraventricular haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Wigglesworth, J S; Keith, I H; Girling, D J; Slade, S A

    1976-01-01

    The relation between intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) and hyaline membrane disease (HMD) was studied in singletons that came to necropsy at Hammersmith Hospital over the years 1966-73. The incidence of IVH in singleton live births was 3-22/1000 and of HMD 4-44/1000. Although the high figures were partily due to the large number of low birthweight infants born at this hospital, the incidence of IVH in babies weighing 1001-1500 g was three times as great as that reported in the 1658 British Perinatal Mortality Survey. Most IVH deaths were in babies with HMD, but the higher frequency of IVH was not associated with any prolongation of survival time of babies who died with HMD as compared with the 1958 survey. IVH was seen frequently at gestations of up to 36 weeks in babies with HMD but was rare above 30 weeks' gestation in babies without HMD. This indicated that factors associated with HMD must cause most cases of IVH seen at gestations above 30 weeks. Comparison of clinical details in infants with HMD who died with or without IVH (at gestations of 30-37 weeks) showed no significant differences between the groups other than a high incidence of fits and greater use of alkali therapy in the babies with IVH. During the 12 hours when most alkali therapy was given, babies dying with IVD received a mean total alkali dosage of 10-21 mmol/kg and those dying without IVH 6-34 mmol/kg (P less than 0-001).There was no difference in severity of hypoxia or of metabolic acidosis between the 2 groups. Babies who died with HMD and germinal layer haemorrhage (GLH) without IVH had received significantly more alkali than those who died with HMD alone, whereas survivors of severe respiratory distress syndrome had received lower alkali doses than other groups. It is suggested that the greatly increased death rate from IVH in babies with HMD indicates some alteration of management of HMD (since 1958) as a causative factor. Liberal use of hypertonic alkali solutions is the common factor

  16. Development and validation of the Essen Intracerebral Haemorrhage Score

    PubMed Central

    Weimar, C; Benemann, J; Diener, H‐C

    2006-01-01

    Background Spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) accounts for the highest in‐hospital mortality of all stroke types. Nevertheless, outcome is favourable in about 30% of patients. Only one model for the prediction of favourable outcome has been validated so far. Objective To describe the development and validation of the Essen ICH score. Methods Inception cohorts were assessed on the National Institutes of Health stroke scale (NIH‐SS) on admission and after follow up of 100 days. On the basis of previously validated clinical variables, a simple clinical score was developed to predict mortality and complete recovery (Barthel index after 100 days ⩾95) in 340 patients with acute ICH. Subscores for age (<60 = 0; 60–69 = 1; 70–79 = 2; ⩾80 = 3), NIH‐SS level of consciousness (alert = 0; drowsy = 1; stuporose = 2; comatose = 3), and NIH‐SS total score (0–5 = 0; 6–10 = 1; 11–15 = 2; 16–20 = 3; >20 or coma = 4) were combined into a prognostic scale with <3 predicting complete recovery and >7 predicting death. The score was subsequently validated in an external cohort of 371 patients. Results The Essen ICH score showed a high prognostic accuracy for complete recovery and death in both the development and validation cohort. For prediction of complete recovery on the Barthel index after 100 days, the Essen ICH score was superior to the physicians' prognosis and to two previous prognostic scores developed for a slightly modified outcome. Conclusions The Essen ICH score provides an easy to use scale for outcome prediction following ICH. Its high positive predictive values for adverse outcomes and easy applicability render it useful for individual prognostic indications or the design of clinical studies. In contrast, physicians tended to predict outcome too pessimistically. PMID:16354736

  17. Acute complications of spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Ellen Merete

    2015-01-18

    The aim of this paper is to give an overview of acute complications of spinal cord injury (SCI). Along with motor and sensory deficits, instabilities of the cardiovascular, thermoregulatory and broncho-pulmonary system are common after a SCI. Disturbances of the urinary and gastrointestinal systems are typical as well as sexual dysfunction. Frequent complications of cervical and high thoracic SCI are neurogenic shock, bradyarrhythmias, hypotension, ectopic beats, abnormal temperature control and disturbance of sweating, vasodilatation and autonomic dysreflexia. Autonomic dysreflexia is an abrupt, uncontrolled sympathetic response, elicited by stimuli below the level of injury. The symptoms may be mild like skin rash or slight headache, but can cause severe hypertension, cerebral haemorrhage and death. All personnel caring for the patient should be able to recognize the symptoms and be able to intervene promptly. Disturbance of respiratory function are frequent in tetraplegia and a primary cause of both short and long-term morbidity and mortality is pulmonary complications. Due to physical inactivity and altered haemostasis, patients with SCI have a higher risk of venous thromboembolism and pressure ulcers. Spasticity and pain are frequent complications which need to be addressed. The psychological stress associated with SCI may lead to anxiety and depression. Knowledge of possible complications during the acute phase is important because they may be life threatening and/ or may lead to prolonged rehabilitation. PMID:25621207

  18. Acute complications of spinal cord injuries

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Ellen Merete

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to give an overview of acute complications of spinal cord injury (SCI). Along with motor and sensory deficits, instabilities of the cardiovascular, thermoregulatory and broncho-pulmonary system are common after a SCI. Disturbances of the urinary and gastrointestinal systems are typical as well as sexual dysfunction. Frequent complications of cervical and high thoracic SCI are neurogenic shock, bradyarrhythmias, hypotension, ectopic beats, abnormal temperature control and disturbance of sweating, vasodilatation and autonomic dysreflexia. Autonomic dysreflexia is an abrupt, uncontrolled sympathetic response, elicited by stimuli below the level of injury. The symptoms may be mild like skin rash or slight headache, but can cause severe hypertension, cerebral haemorrhage and death. All personnel caring for the patient should be able to recognize the symptoms and be able to intervene promptly. Disturbance of respiratory function are frequent in tetraplegia and a primary cause of both short and long-term morbidity and mortality is pulmonary complications. Due to physical inactivity and altered haemostasis, patients with SCI have a higher risk of venous thromboembolism and pressure ulcers. Spasticity and pain are frequent complications which need to be addressed. The psychological stress associated with SCI may lead to anxiety and depression. Knowledge of possible complications during the acute phase is important because they may be life threatening and/ or may lead to prolonged rehabilitation. PMID:25621207

  19. Angiogenesis Is Induced and Wound Size Is Reduced by Electrical Stimulation in an Acute Wound Healing Model in Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Ud-Din, Sara; Sebastian, Anil; Giddings, Pamela; Colthurst, James; Whiteside, Sigrid; Morris, Julie; Nuccitelli, Richard; Pullar, Christine; Baguneid, Mo; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis is critical for wound healing. Insufficient angiogenesis can result in impaired wound healing and chronic wound formation. Electrical stimulation (ES) has been shown to enhance angiogenesis. We previously showed that ES enhanced angiogenesis in acute wounds at one time point (day 14). The aim of this study was to further evaluate the role of ES in affecting angiogenesis during the acute phase of cutaneous wound healing over multiple time points. We compared the angiogenic response to wounding in 40 healthy volunteers (divided into two groups and randomised), treated with ES (post-ES) and compared them to secondary intention wound healing (control). Biopsy time points monitored were days 0, 3, 7, 10, 14. Objective non-invasive measures and H&E analysis were performed in addition to immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Western blotting (WB). Wound volume was significantly reduced on D7, 10 and 14 post-ES (p = 0.003, p = 0.002, p<0.001 respectively), surface area was reduced on days 10 (p = 0.001) and 14 (p<0.001) and wound diameter reduced on days 10 (p = 0.009) and 14 (p = 0.002). Blood flow increased significantly post-ES on D10 (p = 0.002) and 14 (p = 0.001). Angiogenic markers were up-regulated following ES application; protein analysis by IHC showed an increase (p<0.05) in VEGF-A expression by ES treatment on days 7, 10 and 14 (39%, 27% and 35% respectively) and PLGF expression on days 3 and 7 (40% on both days), compared to normal healing. Similarly, WB demonstrated an increase (p<0.05) in PLGF on days 7 and 14 (51% and 35% respectively). WB studies showed a significant increase of 30% (p>0.05) on day 14 in VEGF-A expression post-ES compared to controls. Furthermore, organisation of granulation tissue was improved on day 14 post-ES. This randomised controlled trial has shown that ES enhanced wound healing by reduced wound dimensions and increased VEGF-A and PLGF expression in acute cutaneous wounds, which further substantiates the role of ES in up

  20. The metabolic effects of moderately severe upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage in man.

    PubMed Central

    Foster, K. J.; Alberti, K. G.; Binder, C.; Holdstock, G.; Karran, S. J.; Smith, C. L.; Talbot, S.; Turnell, D. C.

    1982-01-01

    The metabolic effects of moderately severe gastrointestinal haemorrhage were investigated in man. Before resuscitation, patients had raised circulating concentrations of glucose, lactate, alanine, glycerol and cortisol. After urgent operation for haemorrhage, metabolite concentrations were similar to those of control patients having elective abdominal surgery, but insulin concentrations were higher and cortisol lower in haemorrhage patients. There were no significant differences in nitrogen excretion between haemorrhage patients and their controls, but urinary 3-methyl-histidine excretion by haemorrhage patients was lower indicating decreased muscle protein breakdown. Decreased amino acid release from muscle might account for previously reported imparied wound healing after haemorrhage. PMID:7045838

  1. Pathological mechanisms underlying aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage and vasospasm.

    PubMed

    Penn, David L; Witte, Samantha R; Komotar, Ricardo J; Sander Connolly, E

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage is a cerebrovascular disease associated with an overall mortality as high as 50%. Delayed ischaemic neurologic deficits are a major contributor to this statistic, as well as the significant morbidity associated with the disease. Studies examining the pathophysiologic events causing these devastating changes in cerebral blood flow have identified several mechanisms which are thought to contribute to the development of delayed ischaemic neurological deficits, perhaps the most damaging of which are increased intracranial pressure and cerebral vasospasm. In addition, the presence of blood in the subarachnoid space can trigger a myriad of reactions resulting in increased capillary permeability, breakdown of the blood-brain barrier, and inflammation in surrounding neural tissue that adds to the devastating effects of haemorrhage. A detailed understanding of the post-haemorrhagic cellular and molecular changes that contribute to the development of cerebral ischaemia and vasospasm is imperative to the formulation of treatment and prevention options for subarachnoid haemorrhage patients. Despite a large body of research within this field, a complete understanding of rupture and vasospasm remains elusive. This study reviews the role of vasoactive substances, such as endothelin-1, as well as the histochemistry and molecular pathology of post-haemorrhage inflammation in the development of vasospasm and cerebral ischaemia. PMID:25113969

  2. Chronic haemorrhagic radiation proctitis: A review

    PubMed Central

    Nelamangala Ramakrishnaiah, Vishnu Prasad; Krishnamachari, Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Chronic haemorrhagic radiation proctitis (CHRP) is a difficult problem faced by the patients following radiation for pelvic malignancy. There is no standard treatment for this condition, but many methods of treatment are available. The aim of this study was to review the literature to see whether there is an improvement in the available evidence in comparison with previously published systematic reviews in treating patients with CHRP. The PubMed/Medline database and Google Scholar search was selectively searched. Studies, which treated patients with rectal bleeding due to chronic radiation proctitis or CHRP, were included. Seventy studies were finally selected out of which 14 were randomized controlled clinical trials. Though these studies could not be compared, it could be seen that there was an improvement in the methodology of the studies. There was an objective assessment of symptoms, signs and an objective assessment of outcomes. But, still, there were only a few studies that looked into the quality of life following treatment of CHRP. To increase recruitment to trials, a national registry of cases with established late radiation toxicity would facilitate the further improvement of such studies. Some of the conclusions that could be reached based on the available evidence are 4% formalin should be the first line treatment for patients with CHRP. Formalin and argon plasma coagulation (APC) are equally effective, but formalin is better for severe disease. Refractory patients, not responding to formalin or APC, need to be referred for hyperbaric oxygen therapy or surgery. Radio-frequency ablation is a promising modality that needs to be studied further in randomized trials. PMID:27462390

  3. Chronic haemorrhagic radiation proctitis: A review.

    PubMed

    Nelamangala Ramakrishnaiah, Vishnu Prasad; Krishnamachari, Srinivasan

    2016-07-27

    Chronic haemorrhagic radiation proctitis (CHRP) is a difficult problem faced by the patients following radiation for pelvic malignancy. There is no standard treatment for this condition, but many methods of treatment are available. The aim of this study was to review the literature to see whether there is an improvement in the available evidence in comparison with previously published systematic reviews in treating patients with CHRP. The PubMed/Medline database and Google Scholar search was selectively searched. Studies, which treated patients with rectal bleeding due to chronic radiation proctitis or CHRP, were included. Seventy studies were finally selected out of which 14 were randomized controlled clinical trials. Though these studies could not be compared, it could be seen that there was an improvement in the methodology of the studies. There was an objective assessment of symptoms, signs and an objective assessment of outcomes. But, still, there were only a few studies that looked into the quality of life following treatment of CHRP. To increase recruitment to trials, a national registry of cases with established late radiation toxicity would facilitate the further improvement of such studies. Some of the conclusions that could be reached based on the available evidence are 4% formalin should be the first line treatment for patients with CHRP. Formalin and argon plasma coagulation (APC) are equally effective, but formalin is better for severe disease. Refractory patients, not responding to formalin or APC, need to be referred for hyperbaric oxygen therapy or surgery. Radio-frequency ablation is a promising modality that needs to be studied further in randomized trials. PMID:27462390

  4. Induction of haemorrhagic anovulatory follicles in mares.

    PubMed

    Ginther, O J; Gastal, M O; Gastal, E L; Jacob, J C; Beg, M A

    2008-01-01

    A follicular wave and luteolysis were induced in mares by ablation of follicles > or =6 mm and treatment with prostaglandin F(2alpha) (PGF) on Day 10 (where ovulation = Day 0). The incidence of haemorrhagic anovulatory follicles (HAFs) in the induced waves (20%) was greater (P < 0.007) than in preceding spontaneous waves (2%). Hormone and follicle dynamics were compared between induced follicular waves that ended in ovulations (ovulating group; n = 36) v. HAFs (HAF group; n = 9). The day of the first ovulation or the beginning of HAF formation at the end of an induced wave was designated as post-treatment Day 0. The mean 13-day interval from Day 10 (PGF and ablation) to the post-treatment ovulation was normalised into Days 10 to 16, followed by Day -6 to Day 0 relative to the post-treatment ovulation. Concentrations of LH were greater (P < 0.05) in the HAF group than in the ovulating group on Days 10, 11, 12, 14, -3 and -2. The HAF group had greater (P < 0.003) LH concentrations on Day 10 of the preceding oestrous cycle with spontaneous ovulatory waves. The diameter of the largest follicle was less (P < 0.05) in the HAF group on most days between Day 13 and Day -1 and this was attributable to later (P < 0.002) emergence of the future largest follicle at 6 mm in the HAF group (Day 12.4 +/- 0.5) than in the ovulating group (Day 11.3 +/- 0.1). The results indicate that the high incidence of HAFs after PGF and ablation was associated with later follicle emergence and immediate and continuing greater LH concentration after PGF treatment, apparently augmented by an inherently high pretreatment LH concentration. PMID:19007559

  5. A nairovirus isolated from African bats causes haemorrhagic gastroenteritis and severe hepatic disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Akihiro; Ueno, Keisuke; Orba, Yasuko; Sasaki, Michihito; Moonga, Ladslav; Hang'ombe, Bernard M; Mweene, Aaron S; Umemura, Takashi; Ito, Kimihito; Hall, William W; Sawa, Hirofumi

    2014-01-01

    Bats can carry important zoonotic pathogens. Here we use a combination of next-generation sequencing and classical virus isolation methods to identify novel nairoviruses from bats captured from a cave in Zambia. This nairovirus infection is highly prevalent among giant leaf-nosed bats, Hipposideros gigas (detected in samples from 16 individuals out of 38). Whole-genome analysis of three viral isolates (11SB17, 11SB19 and 11SB23) reveals a typical bunyavirus tri-segmented genome. The strains form a single phylogenetic clade that is divergent from other known nairoviruses, and are hereafter designated as Leopards Hill virus (LPHV). When i.p. injected into mice, the 11SB17 strain causes only slight body weight loss, whereas 11SB23 produces acute and lethal disease closely resembling that observed with Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic Fever virus in humans. We believe that our LPHV mouse model will be useful for research on the pathogenesis of nairoviral haemorrhagic disease. PMID:25451856

  6. A nairovirus isolated from African bats causes haemorrhagic gastroenteritis and severe hepatic disease in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Akihiro; Ueno, Keisuke; Orba, Yasuko; Sasaki, Michihito; Moonga, Ladslav; Hang’ombe, Bernard M.; Mweene, Aaron S.; Umemura, Takashi; Ito, Kimihito; Hall, William W.; Sawa, Hirofumi

    2014-01-01

    Bats can carry important zoonotic pathogens. Here we use a combination of next-generation sequencing and classical virus isolation methods to identify novel nairoviruses from bats captured from a cave in Zambia. This nairovirus infection is highly prevalent among giant leaf-nosed bats, Hipposideros gigas (detected in samples from 16 individuals out of 38). Whole-genome analysis of three viral isolates (11SB17, 11SB19 and 11SB23) reveals a typical bunyavirus tri-segmented genome. The strains form a single phylogenetic clade that is divergent from other known nairoviruses, and are hereafter designated as Leopards Hill virus (LPHV). When i.p. injected into mice, the 11SB17 strain causes only slight body weight loss, whereas 11SB23 produces acute and lethal disease closely resembling that observed with Crimean–Congo Haemorrhagic Fever virus in humans. We believe that our LPHV mouse model will be useful for research on the pathogenesis of nairoviral haemorrhagic disease. PMID:25451856

  7. Role of self-expanding metal stents in the management of variceal haemorrhage: Hype or hope?

    PubMed

    Hogan, Brian J; O'Beirne, James P

    2016-01-10

    Despite the advances of medical, endoscopic and radiological therapy over recent years the mortality rates of acute variceal haemorrhage are still 16%-20% and the medium term outcome has not improved in the last 25 years. Early transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt has proved to be an effective therapy for selected groups of patients with a high risk of re-bleeding and moderate liver disease. However, there is an unmet need for a therapy that can be applied in patients with a high risk of re-bleeding and advanced liver disease either as definitive therapy or as a bridge to permanent therapy. Self-expanding metal stents can be placed without the need for endoscopic or fluoroscopic control and, once in place, will provide effective haemostasis and allow a route for oral fluids and nutrition. They can remain in place whilst liver function recovers and secondary prophylaxis is initiated. We review the results of 6 case series including a total of 83 patients and the first randomised controlled trial of self-expanding metal stents vs balloon tamponade (BT) in the management of refractory variceal haemorrhage. We report that self-expanding metal stents provide effective haemostasis and perform better than BT in refractory bleeding, where they are associated with fewer complications. Whilst the most effective place for self-expanding metal stents in the management algorithm needs to be determined by further randomised controlled trials, currently they provide an effective alternative to BT in selected patients. PMID:26788260

  8. Role of self-expanding metal stents in the management of variceal haemorrhage: Hype or hope?

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Brian J; O’Beirne, James P

    2016-01-01

    Despite the advances of medical, endoscopic and radiological therapy over recent years the mortality rates of acute variceal haemorrhage are still 16%-20% and the medium term outcome has not improved in the last 25 years. Early transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt has proved to be an effective therapy for selected groups of patients with a high risk of re-bleeding and moderate liver disease. However, there is an unmet need for a therapy that can be applied in patients with a high risk of re-bleeding and advanced liver disease either as definitive therapy or as a bridge to permanent therapy. Self-expanding metal stents can be placed without the need for endoscopic or fluoroscopic control and, once in place, will provide effective haemostasis and allow a route for oral fluids and nutrition. They can remain in place whilst liver function recovers and secondary prophylaxis is initiated. We review the results of 6 case series including a total of 83 patients and the first randomised controlled trial of self-expanding metal stents vs balloon tamponade (BT) in the management of refractory variceal haemorrhage. We report that self-expanding metal stents provide effective haemostasis and perform better than BT in refractory bleeding, where they are associated with fewer complications. Whilst the most effective place for self-expanding metal stents in the management algorithm needs to be determined by further randomised controlled trials, currently they provide an effective alternative to BT in selected patients. PMID:26788260

  9. microRNA Alterations Driving Acute and Late Stages of Radiation-Induced Fibrosis in a Murine Skin Model

    SciTech Connect

    Simone, Brittany A.; Ly, David; Savage, Jason E.; Hewitt, Stephen M.; Dan, Tu D.; Ylaya, Kris; Shankavaram, Uma; Lim, Meng; Jin, Lianjin; Camphausen, Kevin; Mitchell, James B.; Simone, Nicole L.

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Although ionizing radiation is critical in treating cancer, radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF) can have a devastating impact on patients' quality of life. The molecular changes leading to radiation-induced fibrosis must be elucidated so that novel treatments can be designed. Methods and Materials: To determine whether microRNAs (miRs) could be responsible for RIF, the fibrotic process was induced in the right hind legs of 9-week old CH3 mice by a single-fraction dose of irradiation to 35 Gy, and the left leg served as an unirradiated control. Fibrosis was quantified by measurements of leg length compared with control leg length. By 120 days after irradiation, the irradiated legs were 20% (P=.013) shorter on average than were the control legs. Results: Tissue analysis was done on muscle, skin, and subcutaneous tissue from irradiated and control legs. Fibrosis was noted on both gross and histologic examination by use of a pentachrome stain. Microarrays were performed at various times after irradiation, including 7 days, 14 days, 50 days, 90 days, and 120 days after irradiation. miR-15a, miR-21, miR-30a, and miR-34a were the miRs with the most significant alteration by array with miR-34a, proving most significant on confirmation by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, c-Met, a known effector of fibrosis and downstream molecule of miR-34a, was evaluated by use of 2 cell lines: HCT116 and 1522. The cell lines were exposed to various stressors to induce miR changes, specifically ionizing radiation. Additionally, in vitro transfections with pre-miRs and anti-miRs confirmed the relationship of miR-34a and c-Met. Conclusions: Our data demonstrate an inverse relationship with miR-34a and c-Met; the upregulation of miR-34a in RIF causes inhibition of c-Met production. miRs may play a role in RIF; in particular, miR-34a should be investigated as a potential target to prevent or treat this devastating side effect of irradiation.

  10. The collagen-binding protein of Streptococcus mutans is involved in haemorrhagic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Kazuhiko; Hokamura, Kazuya; Taniguchi, Naho; Wada, Koichiro; Kudo, Chiho; Nomura, Ryota; Kojima, Ayuchi; Naka, Shuhei; Muranaka, Yoshinori; Thura, Min; Nakajima, Atsushi; Masuda, Katsuhiko; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Speziale, Pietro; Shimada, Nobumitsu; Amano, Atsuo; Kamisaki, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Tokutaro; Umemura, Kazuo; Ooshima, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Although several risk factors for stroke have been identified, one-third remain unexplained. Here we show that infection with Streptococcus mutans expressing collagen-binding protein (CBP) is a potential risk factor for haemorrhagic stroke. Infection with serotype k S. mutans, but not a standard strain, aggravates cerebral haemorrhage in mice. Serotype k S. mutans accumulates in the damaged, but not the contralateral hemisphere, indicating an interaction of bacteria with injured blood vessels. The most important factor for high-virulence is expression of CBP, which is a common property of most serotype k strains. The detection frequency of CBP-expressing S. mutans in haemorrhagic stroke patients is significantly higher than in control subjects. Strains isolated from haemorrhagic stroke patients aggravate haemorrhage in a mouse model, indicating that they are haemorrhagic stroke-associated. Administration of recombinant CBP causes aggravation of haemorrhage. Our data suggest that CBP of S. mutans is directly involved in haemorrhagic stroke. PMID:21952219

  11. Bench-to-bedside review: Optimising emergency reversal of vitamin K antagonists in severe haemorrhage – from theory to practice

    PubMed Central

    Vigué, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    Critical care physicians are increasingly facing patients receiving oral anticoagulation for either cessation of major haemorrhage or to reverse the effects of vitamin K antagonists ahead of emergency surgery. Rapid reversal of anticoagulation is particularly essential in cases of life-threatening bleeding. In these situations, guidelines recommend the concomitant administration of prothrombin complex concentrates (PCCs) and oral or intravenous vitamin K for the fastest normalisation of the international normalised ratio (INR). Despite their universal recommendation, PCCs remain underused by many physicians who prefer to opt for fresh frozen plasma despite its limitations in anticoagulant reversal, including time to reverse INR and high risk of transfusion-related acute lung injury. In contrast, the lower volume required to normalise INR with PCCs and the room temperature storage facilitate faster preparation and administration time, thus increasing the speed at which haemorrhages can be treated. PCCs therefore allow faster, more reliable and complete reversal of vitamin K anticoagulation, especially when administered immediately following confirmation of haemorrhage. In the emergency setting, probabilistic dosing may be considered. PMID:19486503

  12. Intraventricular haemorrhage and periventricular leucomalacia: ultrasound and autopsy correlation.

    PubMed Central

    Trounce, J Q; Fagan, D; Levene, M I

    1986-01-01

    The brains of 30 infants who died after at least one real time ultrasound scan were examined after fixation. The ultrasound diagnosis of either periventricular haemorrhage or periventricular leucomalacia was compared with the macroscopic and histological appearances. Each hemisphere was considered separately for both periventricular haemorrhage and periventricular leucomalacia. The accuracy of ultrasound diagnosis for periventricular haemorrhage was 88%, with sensitivity of 91% and specificity of 85%. The accuracy for periventricular leucomalacia was 90%, with sensitivity of 85% and specificity of 93%. Ultrasound was shown to diagnose the entire range of periventricular leucomalacia lesions. Three hemispheres showed the appearance of prolonged flare, and this correlated with extensive spongiosis and microcalcification of the periventricular white matter, although no macroscopic lesion was seen. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:3545096

  13. Haemorrhagic complications of pancreatitis: presentation, diagnosis and management.

    PubMed Central

    Ammori, B. J.; Madan, M.; Alexander, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    Massive haemorrhage is an uncommon complication in pancreatitis. Most affected patients suffer from chronic disease with associated pseudocyst. We present five patients (four male) with a mean age of 41 years (range 34-48 years). All patients had alcohol-induced pancreatitis complicated either by haematemesis (3), intraperitoneal haemorrhage (1) or both haematemesis and intraperitoneal haemorrhage (1). Source of bleeding was pseudocyst wall (2), splenic artery pseudoaneurysm (2) and splenic artery rupture (1). Distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy was performed in two patients, intracystic ligation and drainage in two, and packing with subsequent external drainage in one. Rebleeding occurred in two patients and required subsequent distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy in one; the other patient died of splenic rupture. No rebleeding and no mortality occurred after resection. Primary pancreatic resection is recommended whenever possible. Other management options include embolisation and ligation. Images Figure 1 PMID:9849330

  14. Nososcomial transmission of viral haemorrhagic fever in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Richards, Guy A

    2015-09-01

    Recent events in West Africa have highlighted the potential for the viral haemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) to cause considerable mortality and morbidity among heathcare workers. However, this is not a new threat as, although the risk is currently increased, it has always been present. In South Africa (SA) the only endemic haemorrhagic fever is Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever, transmitted by the Hyalomma tick, which is ubiquitous in cattle farming areas. Johannesburg, the commercial and transport hub of SA, is unusual in that all cases of VHF seen there are imported, either from rural areas in SA or from countries to the north. Johannesburg functions as the gateway to and from the rest of Africa, and as a destination for more affluent residents of neighbouring countries seeking medical attention. Numerous outbreaks of nosocomial infection have occurred in SA, and these are described in the form of brief case reports. PMID:26428962

  15. Blood transfusion and the anaesthetist: management of massive haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, D; Wee, M; Clyburn, P; Walker, I; Brohi, K; Collins, P; Doughty, H; Isaac, J; Mahoney, PF; Shewry, L

    2010-01-01

    Hospitals must have a major haemorrhage protocol in place and this should include clinical, laboratory and logistic responses. Immediate control of obvious bleeding is of paramount importance (pressure, tourniquet, haemostatic dressings). The major haemorrhage protocol must be mobilised immediately when a massive haemorrhage situation is declared. A fibrinogen < 1 g.l−1 or a prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) of > 1.5 times normal represents established haemostatic failure and is predictive of microvascular bleeding. Early infusion of fresh frozen plasma (FFP; 15 ml.kg−1) should be used to prevent this occurring if a senior clinician anticipates a massive haemorrhage. Established coagulopathy will require more than 15 ml.kg−1 of FFP to correct. The most effective way to achieve fibrinogen replacement rapidly is by giving fibrinogen concentrate or cryoprecipitate if fibrinogen is unavailable. 1:1:1 red cell:FFP:platelet regimens, as used by the military, are reserved for the most severely traumatised patients. A minimum target platelet count of 75 × 109.l−1 is appropriate in this clinical situation. Group-specific blood can be issued without performing an antibody screen because patients will have minimal circulating antibodies. O negative blood should only be used if blood is needed immediately. In hospitals where the need to treat massive haemorrhage is frequent, the use of locally developed shock packs may be helpful. Standard venous thromboprophylaxis should be commenced as soon as possible after haemostasis has been secured as patients develop a prothrombotic state following massive haemorrhage. PMID:20963925

  16. Haemorrhagic complications of peripartum anticoagulation: A retrospective chart review

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Erica HZ; Marnoch, Catherine A; Khurana, Rshmi; Sia, Winnie

    2014-01-01

    Background Women with venous thromboembolism (VTE), thrombophilias or mechanical heart valves may require anticoagulation during pregnancy and postpartum. The incidence of postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) in the literature is 2.9–6%, but the rate while on anticoagulation is not well documented. Aims To determine the incidence of haemorrhagic complications associated with the use of peripartum anticoagulation, and the types and risk factors for haemorrhagic complications. Methods A retrospective chart review was conducted on women who delivered at an academic teaching hospital and received peripartum anticoagulation between January 2000 and August 2009. Women with known bleeding disorders were excluded. Results In total, 195 cases were identified with mean age 31.3 years and gestational age of 37.7 weeks. Of these, 49% had a history of VTE, 21% had active VTE in the index pregnancy, and 63% had vaginal delivery. Types of anticoagulation used antepartum were unfractionated heparin (UFH) (43%) and low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) (36%), with 26% receiving therapeutic doses. The rate of haemorrhagic complications was 12.8%, with majority being PPH (80%). Sixty percent of the PPH occurred before reintroduction of anticoagulation postpartum. Use of therapeutic UFH antepartum was associated with increased risk of haemorrhagic complications compared to LMWH (OR 3.08, 95% CI 0.663 – 15.03, p = 0.183). Conclusion The rate of haemorrhagic complications is higher in women on peripartum anticoagulation compared with published incidence in unselected obstetric populations; however, this rate is similar to our institution’s reported rates. Our findings inform clinicians about competing risks of thrombotic and haemorrhagic complications in this population.

  17. A new NOTCH3 mutation presenting as primary intracerebral haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Pradotto, Luca; Orsi, Laura; Daniele, Dino; Caroppo, Paola; Lauro, Danilo; Milesi, Alessandra; Sellitti, Luigi; Mauro, Alessandro

    2012-04-15

    Primary intracerebral haemorrhages (PICH) are defined as haemorrhages within the brain parenchyma in the absence of readily identifiable causes. CADASIL (Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy) is a hereditary vascular disease and its mainly clinical manifestations are early-onset infarcts. Spontaneous lobar haematomas are a rare occurrence. We report a very unusual presentation of CADASIL in a 65 year-old man carrying a new NOTCH3 mutation. The clinical onset of the disease was related to an intracerebral haematoma following colon surgery and causing a delirium. In brief, our report suggests that CADASIL must be considered in patient with PICH. PMID:22206696

  18. Management of post-haemorrhagic hydrocephalus in premature infants.

    PubMed

    Ellenbogen, Jonathan R; Waqar, Mueez; Pettorini, Benedetta

    2016-09-01

    Post-haemorrhagic hydrocephalus (PHH) is the most common neurological complication of preterm birth and can result in severe and life-long psychomotor and cognitive sequelae. Cerebrospinal fluid diversion is often required but the optimum time for intervention is unclear. Numerous neurosurgical procedures exist to temporise PHH but it is not clear which is the optimum method. Approximately 15% of preterm infants who suffer intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) will require permanent cerebrospinal fluid diversion with a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. It is likely that earlier intervention may result in reduced neurological disability and ventriculoperitoneal shunt dependency. In this review we discuss the current methods of PHH management. PMID:27369088

  19. Emergency reversal of anticoagulation with a three-factor prothrombin complex concentrate in patients with intracranial haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Imberti, Davide; Barillari, Giovanni; Biasioli, Chiara; Bianchi, Marina; Contino, Laura; Duce, Rita; D’Incà, Marco; Gnani, Maria Cristina; Mari, Elisa; Ageno, Walter

    2011-01-01

    Background Intracranial haemorrhage is a serious and potentially fatal complication of oral anticoagulant therapy. Prothrombin complex concentrates can substantially shorten the time needed to reverse the effects of oral anticoagulants. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy and safety of a prothrombin complex concentrate for rapid reversal of oral anticoagulant therapy in patients with intracranial haemorrhage. Methods Patients receiving oral anticoagulant therapy and suffering from acute intracranial haemorrhage were eligible for this prospective cohort study if their International Normalised Ratio (INR) was higher than or equal to 2.0. The prothrombin complex concentrate was infused at doses of 35–50 IU/kg, stratified according to the initial INR. Results Forty-six patients (25 males; mean age: 75 years; range 38–92 years) were enrolled. The median INR at presentation was 3.5 (range, 2–9). At 30 minutes after administration of the prothrombin complex concentrate, the median INR was 1.3 (range, 0.9–3), and the INR then declined to less than or equal to 1.5 in 75% of patients. The benefit of the prothrombin complex concentrate was maintained for a long time, since the median INR remained lower than or equal to 1.5 (median, 1.16; range, 0.9–2.2) at 96% of all post-infusion time-points up to 96 hours. No thrombotic complications or significant adverse events were observed during hospitalisation; six patients (13%) died, but none of these deaths was judged to be related to administration of the prothrombin complex concentrate. Conclusions Prothrombin complex concentrates are an effective, rapid and safe treatment for the urgent reversal of oral anticoagulation in patients with intracranial haemorrhage. Broader use of prothrombin complex concentrates in this clinical setting appears to be appropriate. PMID:21251465

  20. Moyamoya Disease Associated with Recurrent Right Thalamic Haemorrhage and Hydrocephalus: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rohan; Jain, Amit Kumar; Jagdhane, Nitin; Nandy, Parvati; Khanna, Satish Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Moyamoya disease, a rare chronic, progressive cerebrovascular disease leads to occlusion of intracranial internal carotid arteries and its proximal branches. We report a case of a 51-year-old female who presented with recurrent thalamic bleed and intraventricular haemorrhage nine years apart in the same territory. The first bleed was managed conservatively and second bleed led to development of hydrocephalus. The acute phase of the hydrocephalus was managed by external ventricular drainage and the final CSF diversion was managed by ventriculoperitoneal shunt. The definitive treatment could not be done to denial of consent from the patient. We present the case to highlight the role CSF diversion as a means of palliative treatment for the Moyamoya disease. PMID:26442554

  1. Skin Keratins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fengrong; Zieman, Abigail; Coulombe, Pierre A.

    2016-01-01

    Keratins comprise the type I and type II intermediate filament-forming proteins and occur primarily in epithelial cells. They are encoded by 54 evolutionarily conserved genes (28 type I, 26 type II) and regulated in a pairwise and tissue type-, differentiation-, and context-dependent manner. Keratins serve multiple homeostatic and stress-enhanced mechanical and nonmechanical functions in epithelia, including the maintenance of cellular integrity, regulation of cell growth and migration, and protection from apoptosis. These functions are tightly regulated by posttranslational modifications as well as keratin-associated proteins. Genetically determined alterations in keratin-coding sequences underlie highly penetrant and rare disorders whose pathophysiology reflects cell fragility and/or altered tissue homeostasis. Moreover, keratin mutation or misregulation represents risk factors or genetic modifiers for several acute and chronic diseases. This chapter focuses on keratins that are expressed in skin epithelia, and details a number of basic protocols and assays that have proven useful for analyses being carried out in skin. PMID:26795476

  2. Breathing-Impaired Speech after Brain Haemorrhage: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heselwood, Barry

    2007-01-01

    Results are presented from an auditory and acoustic analysis of the speech of an adult male with impaired prosody and articulation due to brain haemorrhage. They show marked effects on phonation, speech rate and articulator velocity, and a speech rhythm disrupted by "intrusive" stresses. These effects are discussed in relation to the speaker's…

  3. Diffuse alveolar haemorrhage associated with aerosol propellant use

    PubMed Central

    Kelchen, Phillip; Jamous, Fady; Huntington, Mark K

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar haemorrhage (DAH) is a clinical syndrome resulting from injury to the alveolar microcirculation, most commonly associated with not only autoimmune disorders or connective tissue disease, but also a variety of infections, neoplasms and toxins. We report here a case of an otherwise healthy young man with DAH attributable to an inhalation injury resulting from use of aerosol spray paint. PMID:23955981

  4. Haemorrhage in seven cats with suspected anticoagulant rodenticide intoxication.

    PubMed

    Kohn, B; Weingart, C; Giger, U

    2003-10-01

    Clinical features were evaluated in seven adult cats (six males, one female) with haemorrhage and presumptive anticoagulant rodenticide intoxication. Haemorrhage appeared as thoracic haemorrhage, otic bleeding, haematoma, melena, haematochezia, and petechiation. The most common other presenting signs were lethargy, anorexia, and tachypnoea or dyspnoea. Six cats were anaemic, four cats were mildly thrombocytopenic (58000-161000/ microL), and three had slightly decreased plasma protein or albumin values. The prothrombin time (30.3->100 s, reference range: 16.5-27.5 s) and activated partial thromboplastin time values (32.6->100 s; reference range: 14-25 s) were markedly prolonged in all cats. All cats received vitamin K(1)subcutaneously or orally (3.7-5 mg/kg body weight initially) and depending on severity of signs five cats were transfused with fresh whole blood. Plasma coagulation times improved in all cats and returned to normal in 1-5 days. Rodenticide poisons represent an important but relatively rare cause of haemorrhage in cats and can be effectively treated. PMID:12948505

  5. Mometasone Furoate Effect on Acute Skin Toxicity in Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Radiotherapy: A Phase III Double-Blind, Randomized Trial From the North Central Cancer Treatment Group N06C4

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Robert C.; Schwartz, David J.; Sloan, Jeff A.; Griffin, Patricia C.; Deming, Richard L.; Anders, Jon C.; Stoffel, Thomas J.; Haselow, Robert E.; Schaefer, Paul L.; Bearden, James D.; Atherton, Pamela J.; Loprinzi, Charles L.; Martenson, James A.

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: A two-arm, double-blind, randomized trial was performed to evaluate the effect of 0.1% mometasone furoate (MMF) on acute skin-related toxicity in patients undergoing breast or chest wall radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Patients with ductal carcinoma in situ or invasive breast carcinoma who were undergoing external beam radiotherapy to the breast or chest wall were randomly assigned to apply 0.1% MMF or placebo cream daily. The primary study endpoint was the provider-assessed maximal grade of Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, radiation dermatitis. The secondary endpoints included provider-assessed Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events Grade 3 or greater radiation dermatitis and adverse event monitoring. The patient-reported outcome measures included the Skindex-16, the Skin Toxicity Assessment Tool, a Symptom Experience Diary, and a quality-of-life self-assessment. An assessment was performed at baseline, weekly during radiotherapy, and for 2 weeks after radiotherapy. Results: A total of 176 patients were enrolled between September 21, 2007, and December 7, 2007. The provider-assessed primary endpoint showed no difference in the mean maximum grade of radiation dermatitis by treatment arm (1.2 for MMF vs. 1.3 for placebo; p = .18). Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events toxicity was greater in the placebo group (p = .04), primarily from pruritus. For the patient-reported outcome measures, the maximum Skindex-16 score for the MMF group showed less itching (p = .008), less irritation (p = .01), less symptom persistence or recurrence (p = .02), and less annoyance with skin problems (p = .04). The group's maximal Skin Toxicity Assessment Tool score showed less burning sensation (p = .02) and less itching (p = .002). Conclusion: Patients receiving daily MMF during radiotherapy might experience reduced acute skin toxicity compared with patients receiving placebo.

  6. Mometasone Furoate Effect on Acute Skin Toxicity in Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Radiotherapy: A Phase 3 Double-Blind, Randomized Trial from the North Central Cancer Treatment Group N06C4

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Robert C.; Schwartz, David J.; Sloan, Jeff A.; Griffin, Patricia C.; Deming, Richard L.; Anders, Jon C.; Stoffel, Thomas J.; Haselow, Robert E.; Schaefer, Paul L.; Bearden, James D.; Atherton, Pamela J.; Loprinzi, Charles L.; Martenson, James A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose A 2-arm, double-blinded, randomized trial to evaluate the effect of 0.1% mometasone furoate (MMF) on acute skin-related toxicity in patients undergoing breast or chest wall radiotherapy. Methods and Materials Patients with ductal carcinoma in situ or invasive breast carcinoma receiving external beam radiotherapy to breast or chest wall were randomly assigned to daily apply 0.1% MMF or placebo cream. Primary study end point was provider-assessed maximum grade of Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 3.0 radiation dermatitis. Secondary end points included provider-assessed CTCAE grade 3 or greater radiation dermatitis and adverse-event monitoring. Patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures included the Skindex-16, the Skin Toxicity Assessment Tool, a Symptom Experience Diary, and quality of life self-assessment. Assessment was performed at baseline, weekly during radiotherapy, and for 2 weeks after radiotherapy. Results In total, 176 patients were enrolled from September 21, 2007 through December 7, 2007. The provider-assessed primary end point showed no difference in mean maximum grade of radiation dermatitis by treatment arm (1.2 for MMF vs 1.3 for placebo; P=.18). CTCAE toxicity was greater in placebo group (P=.04), primarily from pruritus. For PRO measures, the maximum Skindex-16 score for MMF group showed less itching (P=.008), less irritation (P=.01), less symptom persistence or recurrence (P=.02), and less annoyance with skin problems (P=.04); the group's maximum Skin Toxicity Assessment Tool score showed less burning sensation (P=.02) and less itching (P=.002). Conclusion Patients receiving daily MMF during radiotherapy may experience reduced acute skin toxicity in comparison to placebo. PMID:20800381

  7. Endoscopic management of hypertensive intraventricular haemorrhage with obstructive hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Yad Ram; Mukerji, Gaurav; Shenoy, Ravikiran; Basoor, Abhijeet; Jain, Gaurav; Nelson, Adam

    2007-01-01

    Background Intracranial haemorrhage accounts for 30–60 % of all stroke admissions into a hospital, with hypertension being the main risk factor. Presence of intraventricular haematoma is considered a poor prognostic factor due to the resultant obstruction to CSF and the mass effect following the presence of blood resulting in raised intracranial pressure and hydrocephalus. We report the results following endoscopic decompression of obstructive hydrocephalus and evacuation of haematoma in patients with hypertensive intraventricular haemorrhage. Methods During a two year period, 25 patients diagnosed as having an intraventricular haemorrhage with obstructive hydrocephalus secondary to hypertension were included in this study. All patients underwent endoscopic evacuation of the haematoma under general anaesthesia. Post operative evaluation was done by CT scan and Glasgow outcome scale. Results Of the 25 patients, thalamic haemorrhage was observed in 12 (48%) patients, while, 11 (44%) had a putaminal haematoma. Nine (36%) patients had a GCS of 8 or less pre-operatively. Resolution of hydrocephalus following endoscopic evacuation was observed in 24 (96%) patients. No complications directly related to the surgical technique were encountered in our study. At six months follow-up, a mortality rate of 6.3% and 55.5% was observed in patients with a pre-operative GCS of ≥ 9 and ≤ 8 respectively. Thirteen of the 16 (81.3%) patients with a pre-operative GCS ≥ 9 had good recovery. Conclusion Endoscopic technique offers encouraging results in relieving hydrocephalus in hypertensive intraventricular haemorrhage. Final outcome is better in patient with a pre-operative GCS of >9. Future improvements in instrumentation and surgical techniques, with careful case selection may help improve outcome in these patients. PMID:17204141

  8. Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... are specialized skin cells that produce pigment called melanin. The melanin pigment produced by melanocytes gives skin its color. ... absorbing and scattering the energy. People with more melanin have darker skin and better protection from UV ...

  9. Skin Conditions

    MedlinePlus

    Your skin is your body's largest organ. It covers and protects your body. Your skin Holds body fluids in, preventing dehydration Keeps harmful ... it Anything that irritates, clogs, or inflames your skin can cause symptoms such as redness, swelling, burning, ...

  10. Comparison of the reversed passive Arthus and local Shwartzman reactions of rabbit skin: effects of the long-acting PAF antagonist UK-74,505

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Keith E; Williams, Timothy J; Rossi, Adriano G

    1997-01-01

    By using the selective, potent and long acting platelet-activating factor (PAF) antagonist, UK-74,505, we investigated the role of PAF in a local Shwartzman reaction (LSR) and a reversed passive Arthus (RPA) reaction in rabbit skin. For comparison, we also studied the effect of the PAF antagonist on neutrophil aggregation in vitro and on acute inflammatory responses induced by intradermally (i.d.) injected lipopolysaccharide (LPS), PAF, bradykinin and zymosan-activated plasma.Neutrophil aggregation was assessed photometrically. Haemorrhage, oedema formation, platelet deposition and neutrophil accumulation were quantified in rabbit skin by measuring the accumulation of i.v. injected 51Cr-labelled red blood cells (RBC), 125I-labelled human serum albumin, 111In-labelled platelets and 111In-labelled neutrophils respectively.UK-74,505 inhibited in vitro neutrophil aggregation induced by PAF but not by leukotriene B4. When injected i.v. into rabbits UK-74,505 suppressed oedema formation in response to i.d. PAF for up to 4 h but had no effect on oedema induced by bradykinin or zymosan-activated plasma.Oedema formation, but not neutrophil accumulation, produced during the RPA reaction was significantly inhibited by i.v. UK-74,505. The PAF antagonist also suppressed 111In-platelet but not 111In-neutrophil accumulation in response to i.d. LPS. UK-74,505 did not affect haemorrhage or oedema formation produced during the LPS-mediated LSR.The results demonstrate that PAF is an important mediator of oedema formation, but not neutrophil accumulation, in the immune-complex mediated RPA reaction in rabbit skin. PAF also appears to be required for platelet, but not neutrophil, accumulation in response to locally injected LPS. Our studies do not suggest a role for PAF in the LPS-mediated LSR. PMID:9105704

  11. Cryotherapy - skin

    MedlinePlus

    Cryosurgery - skin; Warts - freezing; Warts - cryotherapy ... Cryotherapy or cryosurgery may be used to: Remove warts Destroy precancerous skin lesions (actinic keratoses or solar keratoses) In rare cases, ...

  12. Resuscitation in massive obstetric haemorrhage using an intraosseous needle.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, D J; Bukunola, B; Samuels, T L; Induruwage, L; Uncles, D R

    2011-04-01

    A 38-year-old woman experienced a massive postpartum haemorrhage 30 minutes after emergency caesarean delivery. The patient became severely haemodynamically compromised with an unrecordable blood pressure. Rapid fluid resuscitation was limited by the capacity of the intravenous cannula in place at the time and inability to establish additional vascular access using conventional routes in a timely manner. An intraosseous needle was inserted in the proximal humerus at the first attempt and administration of resuscitation fluid by this route subsequently enabled successful placement of further intravenous lines. Blood and blood products were deployed in conjunction with intra-operative cell salvage and transoesophageal Doppler cardiac output monitoring was used to assess adequacy of volume replacement. Haemorrhage control was finally achieved with the use of recombinant factor VIIa and hysterectomy. PMID:21401545

  13. Detection and localization of internal haemorrhaging using electrical bioimpedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, J.; Fenech, M.

    2013-04-01

    Electrical bioimpedance is an effective measuring tool to provide quick, non-invasive, real-time results which will be applied to the detection of internal haemorrhaging. Experiments were performed on female Fancy Rats weighing 333±44g, and 10mL of porcine blood was injected abdominally over 3 minutes. Data was collected using an 8×8 needle electrode array at 5 kHz, and 95 kHz and sent to the BioParHom Z-Flow. A strong correlation was found between the electrode paths crossing directly through the blood injection site, showing a decrease of about -0.17±0.1Ω/mL for the 5 kHz frequency. This correlation allows us to quickly detect internal haemorrhaging and also localize it with the current path set-up in the electrode array.

  14. Reversible Akinetic Mutism after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Haemorrhage in the Territory of the Anterior Cerebral Artery without Permanent Ischaemic Damage to Anterior Cingulate Gyri

    PubMed Central

    Sibille, François-Xavier; Duprez, Thierry; van Pesch, Vincent; Giglioli, Simone

    2016-01-01

    We report on two cases of transient akinetic mutism after massive subarachnoid haemorrhage due to the rupture of an intracranial aneurysm of the anterior cerebral artery (ACA). In the two cases, vasospasm could not be demonstrated by imaging studies throughout the clinical course. Both patients shared common radiological features: a hydrocephalus due to haemorrhagic contamination of the ventricular system and a mass effect of a subpial hematoma on the borders of the corpus callosum. Patients were also investigated using auditory event-related evoked potentials at acute stage. In contrast to previous observations of akinetic mutism, P300 wave could not be recorded. Both patients had good recovery and we hypothesized that this unexpectedly favourable outcome was due to the absence of permanent structural damage to the ACA territory, with only transient dysfunction due to a reversible mass effect on cingulate gyri. PMID:27418987

  15. Skin Biomes.

    PubMed

    Fyhrquist, N; Salava, A; Auvinen, P; Lauerma, A

    2016-05-01

    The cutaneous microbiome has been investigated broadly in recent years and some traditional perspectives are beginning to change. A diverse microbiome exists on human skin and has a potential to influence pathogenic microbes and modulate the course of skin disorders, e.g. atopic dermatitis. In addition to the known dysfunctions in barrier function of the skin and immunologic disturbances, evidence is rising that frequent skin disorders, e.g. atopic dermatitis, might be connected to a dysbiosis of the microbial community and changes in the skin microbiome. As a future perspective, examining the skin microbiome could be seen as a potential new diagnostic and therapeutic target in inflammatory skin disorders. PMID:27056560

  16. Spontaneous subdural haemorrhage in a patient with scleroderma renal crisis

    PubMed Central

    Bhangoo, Munveer Singh; Hein, Paul; Nicholson, Laura; Carter, Caitlin

    2014-01-01

    A 52-year-old woman with a history of systemic sclerosis presented with new onset seizures and renal failure. The patient's history, laboratory data and pathology supported the diagnosis of scleroderma renal crisis. The patient was also noted to have a subdural haemorrhage (SDH) in the absence of trauma. This is the first report of scleroderma renal crisis associated with a spontaneous SDH. PMID:25193814

  17. Early heparin therapy in patients with spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Boeer, A; Voth, E; Henze, T; Prange, H W

    1991-01-01

    In 68 patients with spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage the effect of heparin treatment beginning on the second, fourth or tenth day was investigated. Early (day 2) low-dose heparin medication significantly lowered the incidence of pulmonary embolism. An increase in the number of patients with rebleeding was not observed. The results indicate that the early use of heparin in these patients is safe and can be recommended for the prevention of thromboembolic complications. PMID:1865215

  18. Surgical Trial in Lobar Intracerebral Haemorrhage (STICH II) Protocol

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Within the spectrum of spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage there are some patients with large or space occupying haemorrhage who require surgery for neurological deterioration and others with small haematomas who should be managed conservatively. There is equipoise about the management of patients between these two extremes. In particular there is some evidence that patients with lobar haematomas and no intraventricular haemorrhage might benefit from haematoma evacuation. The STICH II study will establish whether a policy of earlier surgical evacuation of the haematoma in selected patients will improve outcome compared to a policy of initial conservative treatment. Methods/Design an international multicentre randomised parallel group trial. Only patients for whom the treating neurosurgeon is in equipoise about the benefits of early craniotomy compared to initial conservative treatment are eligible. All patients must have a CT scan confirming spontaneous lobar intracerebral haemorrhage (≤1 cm from the cortex surface of the brain and 10-100 ml in volume). Any clotting or coagulation problems must be corrected and randomisation must take place within 48 hours of ictus. With 600 patients, the study will be able to demonstrate a 12% benefit from surgery (2p < 0.05) with 80% power. Stratified randomisation is undertaken using a central 24 hour randomisation service accessed by telephone or web. Patients randomised to early surgery should have the operation within 12 hours. Information about the status (Glasgow Coma Score and focal signs) of all patients through the first five days of their trial progress is also collected in addition to another CT scan at about five days (+/- 2 days). Outcome is measured at six months via a postal questionnaire to the patient. Primary outcome is death or severe disability defined using a prognosis based 8 point Glasgow Outcome Scale. Secondary outcomes include: Mortality, Rankin, Barthel, EuroQol, and Survival. Trial

  19. Blood products and their use in traumatic major haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Deveau, Simon Ross

    2016-02-01

    Blood loss due to trauma is a leading cause of death in young people and is the result of the 'lethal triad' of hypothermia, acidosis and coagulopathy, which collectively reduce haemostasis. Emergency department nurses can help to reverse the triad through the timely and efficient use of blood products and fluids. This article briefly examines different blood groups, describes the elements of the lethal triad, and discusses the blood products used to transfuse patients with major haemorrhage. PMID:26853674

  20. Nosocomial ventriculitis due to Roseomonas gilardii complicating subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Jason S; Waites, Ken B

    2005-04-01

    Roseomonas gilardii is a pink-pigmented, non-fermentative, Gram-negative coccobacillus that has been recognized as a rare cause of human infections. We report the first case of ventriculitis caused by R. gilardii in a 54-year-old man with a subarachnoid haemorrhage secondary to a vertebral artery aneurysm; discuss previous reports of this organism as a nosocomial and community-acquired pathogen, laboratory diagnosis, and patient management. PMID:15780421

  1. Acute Compressive Ulnar Neuropathy In A Patient Of Dengue Fever: An Unusual Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Mehtani, Anil K; Jha, Ashutosh; Kataria, Himanshu; Jangira, Vivek; Shukla, Ajay

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Dengue haemorrhagic fever is known for its haemorrhagic and neurologic complications. Neurologic complications are caused by three mechanism namely neurotropism, systemic complications causing encephalopathy and postinfectious immune-mediated mechanisms. However acute compressive neuropathy due to haemorrhage is not frequent and we could find no literature describing this Case Report: We report a case of acute compressive ulnar neuropathy due to peri neural hematoma, following an attempt at intravenous cannulation in the cubital fossa in a patient of dengue haemorrhagic fever with thrombocytopenia. Immediate fasciotomy and removal of haematoma was performed to relieve the symptoms. Conclusion: Compression neuropathies can be seen in dengue hemorrhagic fever and removal of compressing hematoma relieves symptoms PMID:27298902

  2. Bone marrow depletion with haemorrhagic diathesis in calves in Germany: characterization of the disease and preliminary investigations on its aetiology.

    PubMed

    Kappe, Eva C; Halami, Mohammad Yahya; Schade, Benjamin; Alex, Michaela; Hoffmann, Doris; Gangl, Armin; Meyer, Karsten; Dekant, Wolfgang; Schwarz, Bernd-Andreas; Johne, Reimar; Buitkamp, Johannes; Böttcher, Jens; Müller, Hermann

    2010-01-01

    Since 2007 a new fatal haemorrhagic diathesis in calves has been observed in all areas of Germany. Analysis of 56 cases submitted for necropsy allowed its characterization. Calves fell ill within the first month of life independent of breed and sex. Only single or a few animals per herd were affected. Petechial and ecchymotic haemorrhages in many organs and tissues, particularly in skin, subcutis and gastrointestinal tract, were major findings in all animals. Microscopically a severe depletion of bone marrow cells was always observed. Lymphocytic depletion (43%) and inflammatory lesions (46%) were less frequently observed. Blood analysis of five animals indicated an aplastic pancytopenia. The resulting thrombocytopenia is regarded as major pathomechanism of this Haemorrhagic Disease Syndrome (HDS). Pedigree analysis gave no indication of hereditary disease. Tests for specific toxins such as S-(1,2-Dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (DCVC), furazolidone, or mycotoxins resulting in bone marrow depletion were negative. Bacterial infections, Bovine Viral Diarrhoea Virus, and Bluetongue Virus were ruled out as cause of the disease. HDS shares similarities with a circoviral infection in chickens (chicken infectious anaemia). A broad-spectrum PCR allowed detection of circoviral DNA in 5 of 25 HDS cases and in 1 of 8 non-HDS cases submitted for necropsy. Sequencing of the whole viral genome revealed a high similarity (up to 99%) with Porcine Circovirus type 2b. Single bone marrow cells stained weakly positive for PCV2 antigen by immunohistochemistry in 1 of 8 tested HDS animals. This is the first report of circovirus detection in cattle in Germany. The exact cause of HDS still remains unknown. A multifactorial aetiology involving infection, poisoning, immunopathy, or a genetic predisposition is conceivable. Additional research is necessary to clarify the pathogenesis and the potential role of PCV2 in HDS. PMID:20135908

  3. Intraventricular haemorrhage in the preterm infant without hyaline membrane disease.

    PubMed Central

    Wigglesworth, J S; Davies, P A; Keith, I H; Slade, S A

    1977-01-01

    The clinicopathological associations of 33 singleton infants who died with intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) without hyaline membrane disease (HMD) ('IVH only') were compared with those of 39 infants who died with IVH+HMD over the same gestation range in order to determine what factors other than those related to HMD may contribute to the pathogenesis of IVH. The incidence of 'IVH only' was inversely related to gestational age in the Hammersmith birth population, whereas the incidence of IVH+HMD rose to a peak at 28-29 weeks' gestation. Infants with 'IVH only' lived longer on average than those with IVH+HMD despite a lower birthweight and shorter gestation. Infants who died in the first 12 hours from 'IVH only' had suffered severe birth asphyxia but in those who died later the main symptom was recurrent apnoea. Fewer infants with asphyxia but in those who died later the main symptom was.recurrent apnoea. Fewer infants with 'IVH only' were given alkali therapy or were connected to the ventilator as compared to those with IVH+HMD, but there were no differences in alkali therapy in those who lived for 12 hours or more. In the 'IVH only' group there was a high incidence of haemorrhage from other sites and of bacterial infections. It is suggested that, in the absence of HMD, extreme immaturity is the main factor determining the occurrence of IVH. Birth asphyxia, apnoeic attacks, haemorrhage, and infections may play subsidiary roles, possibly through development of metabolic acidosis. PMID:879829

  4. New sites of localisation of Pasteurella multocida B:2 in buffalo surviving experimental haemorrhagic septicaemia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Haemorrhagic septicaemia (HS) is an acute septicaemic disease of buffalo and cattle caused by Pasteurella multocida B:2 and E:2. Field outbreaks of HS are known to result in localisation of bacteria in the tonsils of surviving buffalo, confirming that animals can become carriers and the role of respiratory tract in the transmission of the disease. This report describes additional sites of localisation of P. multocida B:2 in surviving buffalo following experimental induction of HS. Results Following P. multocida B:2 infection, all calves in group 1 and one calf in group 2 that was allowed to commingle with infected calves from group 1 were euthanised within 48 h. Pasteurella multocida B:2 was detected from the nasal and rectal swab samples on days 5 and 6 from the remaining calves in group 2. The first injection of dexamethasone into the carrier animals resulted in reemergence in samples from the nose, rectum and vagina. However, subsequent dexamethasone injections failed to re-activate P. multocida B:2. When surviving carrier calves in group 2 were euthanised at the end of the experiment, P. multocida B:2 was detected in the lungs and various organs of the respiratory, gastrointestinal and urinary tracts. Conclusions Commingling naive buffalo calves with calves acutely infected with P. multocida B:2 resulted in carriers among surviving buffalo. Pasteurella was found in various organs of the respiratory, gastrointestinal and urinary tracts, suggesting their role in the pathogenesis of HS. PMID:24721163

  5. Targeting aspirin in acute disabling ischemic stroke: an individual patient data meta‐analysis of three large randomized trials

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Gordon D.; Candelise, Livia; Chen, Zhengming; Sandercock, Peter A. G.; Whiteley, William N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Aspirin is of moderate overall benefit for patients with acute disabling ischemic stroke. It is unclear whether functional outcome could be improved after stroke by targeting aspirin to patients with a high risk of recurrent thrombosis or a low risk of haemorrhage. Aims We aimed to determine whether patients at higher risk of thrombotic events or poor functional outcome, or lower risk of major haemorrhage had a greater absolute risk reduction of poor functional outcome with aspirin than the average patient. Methods We used data on individual ischemic stroke patients from three large trials of aspirin vs. placebo in acute ischemic stroke: the first International Stroke Trial (n = 18 372), the Chinese Acute Stroke Trial (n = 20 172) and the Multicentre Acute Stroke Trial (n = 622). We developed and evaluated clinical prediction models for the following: early thrombotic events (myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism); early haemorrhagic events (significant intracranial haemorrhage, major extracranial haemorrhage, or haemorrhagic transformation of an infarct); and late poor functional outcome. We calculated the absolute risk reduction of poor functional outcome (death or dependence) at final follow‐up in: quartiles of early thrombotic risk; quartiles of early haemorrhagic risk; and deciles of poor functional outcome risk. Results Ischemic stroke patients who were older, had lower blood pressure, computerized tomography evidence of infarct or more severe deficits due to stroke had increased risk of thrombotic and haemorrhagic events and poor functional outcome. Prediction models built with all baseline variables (including onset to treatment time) discriminated weakly between patients with and without recurrent thrombotic events (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve 0·56, 95% CI:0·53–0·59) and haemorrhagic events (0·57, 0·52–0·64), though well between patients with and

  6. Skin Aging

    MedlinePlus

    ... too. Sunlight is a major cause of skin aging. You can protect yourself by staying out of ... person has smoked. Many products claim to revitalize aging skin or reduce wrinkles, but the Food and ...

  7. Skin Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... drugs that can help clear up this condition. Day-to-Day Skin Care See our tips for daily skin ... Risk? Diagnosis Lower Your Risk Risk Test Alert Day Prediabetes My Health Advisor Tools to Know Your ...

  8. Skin lumps

    MedlinePlus

    ... and contains fluid or semisolid material Benign skin growths such as seborrheic keratoses or neurofibromas Boils , painful, red bumps usually involving an infected hair follicle Corn or callus, caused by skin thickening in response ...

  9. Skin Pigment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professional Version Pigment Disorders Overview of Skin Pigment Albinism Vitiligo Hyperpigmentation Melasma Melanin is the brown pigment ... dark-skinned people produce the most. People with albinism have little or no melanin and thus their ...

  10. Skin graft

    MedlinePlus

    ... caused a large amount of skin loss Burns Cosmetic reasons or reconstructive surgeries where there has been skin damage or skin ... anesthesia are: Reactions to medicines Problems with breathing Risks for this surgery are: Bleeding Chronic pain (rarely) Infection Loss of ...

  11. Skin Aging

    MedlinePlus

    Your skin changes as you age. You might notice wrinkles, age spots and dryness. Your skin also becomes thinner and loses fat, making it ... heal, too. Sunlight is a major cause of skin aging. You can protect yourself by staying out ...

  12. Origin of intraventricular haemorrhage in the preterm infant.

    PubMed Central

    Hambleton, G; Wigglesworth, J S

    1976-01-01

    A technique has been developed for the injection and stereomicroscopic examination of blood vessels in the preterm newborn brain. Using this technique it can be seen that in the immature brain there is a rich capillary bed in the germinal layer region supplied mainly by Heubner's artery. Capillary channels drain directly into the terminal vein and its main branches. Study of 19 cases with spontaneous germinal layer haemorrhage (GLH) with or without intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) failed to show rupture of the terminal vein or germinal layer infarction. In babies of up to 28 weeks' gestation GLH developed most frequently over the body of the caudate nucleus, whereas in babies of 29 weeks' gestation or more the haemorrhages were usually over the head of the caudate nucleus. Histological study of 10 cases of GLH failed to show rupture either of arteries or veins, though evidence of rupture at a capillary-vein junction was seen in one case and masses of fibrin adjacent to the vein wall in 2 others. Injection through the carotid artery caused prominent leaks of injection mass within the germinal layer capillary bed, often adjacent to the veins. Injection through the jugular veins in 2 cases failed to rupture the terminal vein but caused multiple vein ruptures at the junction of deep and cortical venous systems. Additional small ruptures in the germinal layer occurred in one of the cases only. It is suggested that the capillaries within the germinal layer may be ruptured by a rise in arterial pressure, particularly in conditions of hypercapnia and hypoxia. Images FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 FIG. 7 FIG. 8 FIG. 9 FIG. 10 FIG. 11 FIG. 12 FIG. 13 PMID:999324

  13. Intracerebral haemorrhage in primary and metastatic brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Salmaggi, Andrea; Erbetta, Alessandra; Silvani, Antonio; Maderna, Emanuela; Pollo, Bianca

    2008-09-01

    Intracerebral haemorrhage may both be a presenting manifestation in unrecognised brain tumour or--more frequently--take place in the disease course of known/suspected brain tumour due to diagnostic/therapeutic procedures, including biopsy, locoregional treatments and anti-angiogenic therapies. Apart from the difficulties inherent to accurate neuroradiological diagnosis in selected cases with small tumour volume, the main clinical problem that neurologists face is represented by decision making in prophylaxis/treatment of venous thromboembolism in these patients. These points are briefly discussed and available evidence on the last point is commented on. PMID:18690513

  14. Sensitive skin.

    PubMed

    Misery, L; Loser, K; Ständer, S

    2016-02-01

    Sensitive skin is a clinical condition defined by the self-reported facial presence of different sensory perceptions, including tightness, stinging, burning, tingling, pain and pruritus. Sensitive skin may occur in individuals with normal skin, with skin barrier disturbance, or as a part of the symptoms associated with facial dermatoses such as rosacea, atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. Although experimental studies are still pending, the symptoms of sensitive skin suggest the involvement of cutaneous nerve fibres and neuronal, as well as epidermal, thermochannels. Many individuals with sensitive skin report worsening symptoms due to environmental factors. It is thought that this might be attributed to the thermochannel TRPV1, as it typically responds to exogenous, endogenous, physical and chemical stimuli. Barrier disruptions and immune mechanisms may also be involved. This review summarizes current knowledge on the epidemiology, potential mechanisms, clinics and therapy of sensitive skin. PMID:26805416

  15. Epidermal skin grafting.

    PubMed

    Herskovitz, Ingrid; Hughes, Olivia B; Macquhae, Flor; Rakosi, Adele; Kirsner, Robert

    2016-09-01

    Autologous skin grafts, such as full- and split-thickness, have long been part of the reconstructive ladder as an option to close skin defects. Although they are effective in providing coverage, they require the need for a trained surgeon, use of anaesthesia and operating room and creation of a wound at the donor site. These drawbacks can be overcome with the use of epidermal skin grafts (ESGs), which can be harvested without the use of anaesthesia in an office setting and with minimal to no scarring at the donor site. ESGs consist only of the epidermal layer and have emerged as an appealing alternative to other autologous grafts for the treatment of acute and chronic wounds. In this article, we provide an overview of epidermal grafting and its role in wound management. PMID:27547964

  16. Purification and characterization of an organ specific haemorrhagic toxin from Vipera russelli russelli (Russell's viper) venom.

    PubMed

    Kole, L; Chakrabarty, D; Datta, K; Bhattacharyya, D

    2000-04-01

    A haemorrhagic toxin (VRR-12) from Vipera russelli russelli (Russell's viper) venom has been purified by ion-exchange chromatography on CM-Sephadex C-50 followed by size-exclusion HPLC to electrophoretically homogeneous state. It is a 12 kDa single polypeptide having 1 mole of Zn+2 ion. This toxin induces intense intestinal haemorrhage and to a lesser extent skeletal muscle haemorrhage in mice. It does not show detectable proteolytic and esterolytic activity with selected substrates under specified conditions, haemolytic and phospholipase activity. When VRR-12, preincubated with bivalent antiserum against Saw-scaled and Russell's viper venom or EDTA was injected, haemorrhagic activity was not reduced, on the other hand preincubation with phenylmethyl sulphonyl fluoride reduced the activity markedly. Biodistribution studies with 125I VRR-12 show that haemorrhagic manifestation by this toxin is not a direct function of the fraction of the totally administered toxin distributed to that tissue. PMID:10983422

  17. Comparative studies for serodiagnosis of haemorrhagic septicaemia in cattle sera

    PubMed Central

    El-Jakee, Jakeen K.; Ali, Samah Said; El-Shafii, Soumaya Ahmed; Hessain, Ashgan M.; Al-Arfaj, Abdullah A.; Mohamed, Moussa I.

    2015-01-01

    Haemorrhagic septicaemia caused by Pasteurella multocida is a major epizootic disease in cattle and buffaloes in developing countries with high morbidity and mortality rate. In the present study, a total of 88 P. multocida isolates were isolated from 256 nasopharyngeal swabs and lung tissues samples (34.4%) during the period from January, 2013 to March, 2014 from different governorates located in Egypt. Dead calves showed the highest percentage of P. multocida isolation followed by the emergency slaughtered calves, diseased calves then apparently healthy ones. These isolates were confirmed as P. multocida microscopically, biochemically by traditional tests and by API 20E commercial kit then by PCR. The percentages of positive serum samples using somatic antigen and micro-agglutination test at 1/1280 diluted serum were 10%, 54.49% and 0% in apparently healthy, diseased and emergency slaughtered samples, respectively whereas, the percentages using capsular antigen and indirect haemagglutination test were 40%, 60.89% and 60% in apparently healthy, diseased and emergency slaughtered samples, respectively. The ELISA showed the highest sensitivity for diagnosing P. multocida in apparently healthy, diseased and emergency slaughtered animals with percentages of 42%; 92.9% and 80%, respectively. The obtained results revealed that the ELISA using capsular antigen of P. multocida is a more sensitive and specific serological test for diagnosis of haemorrhagic septicaemia. PMID:26858538

  18. Comparative studies for serodiagnosis of haemorrhagic septicaemia in cattle sera.

    PubMed

    El-Jakee, Jakeen K; Ali, Samah Said; El-Shafii, Soumaya Ahmed; Hessain, Ashgan M; Al-Arfaj, Abdullah A; Mohamed, Moussa I

    2016-01-01

    Haemorrhagic septicaemia caused by Pasteurella multocida is a major epizootic disease in cattle and buffaloes in developing countries with high morbidity and mortality rate. In the present study, a total of 88 P. multocida isolates were isolated from 256 nasopharyngeal swabs and lung tissues samples (34.4%) during the period from January, 2013 to March, 2014 from different governorates located in Egypt. Dead calves showed the highest percentage of P. multocida isolation followed by the emergency slaughtered calves, diseased calves then apparently healthy ones. These isolates were confirmed as P. multocida microscopically, biochemically by traditional tests and by API 20E commercial kit then by PCR. The percentages of positive serum samples using somatic antigen and micro-agglutination test at 1/1280 diluted serum were 10%, 54.49% and 0% in apparently healthy, diseased and emergency slaughtered samples, respectively whereas, the percentages using capsular antigen and indirect haemagglutination test were 40%, 60.89% and 60% in apparently healthy, diseased and emergency slaughtered samples, respectively. The ELISA showed the highest sensitivity for diagnosing P. multocida in apparently healthy, diseased and emergency slaughtered animals with percentages of 42%; 92.9% and 80%, respectively. The obtained results revealed that the ELISA using capsular antigen of P. multocida is a more sensitive and specific serological test for diagnosis of haemorrhagic septicaemia. PMID:26858538

  19. Recombinant activated factor VII in post partum haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Magon, Navneet; Babu, K. M.; Kapur, Krishan; Chopra, Sanjiv; Joneja, Gurdarshan Singh

    2013-01-01

    Post-partum haemorrhage (PPH) is a life-threatening obstetric complication and the leading cause of maternal death. Any bleeding that results in or could result in haemodynamic instability, if untreated, must be considered as PPH. There is no controversy about the need for prevention and treatment of PPH. The keystone of management of PPH entails first, non-invasive and nonsurgical methods and then invasive and surgical methods. However, mortality remains high. Therefore, new advancements in the treatment are most crucial. One such advancement has been the use of recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) in PPH. First used 12 years back in PPH, this universal haemostatic agent has been effectively used in controlling PPH. The best available indicator of rFVIIa efficacy is the arrest of haemorrhage, which is judged by visual evidence and haemodynamic stabilization. It also reduces costs of therapy and the use of blood components in massive PPH. In cases of intractable PPH with no other obvious indications for hysterectomy, administration of rFVIIa should be considered before surgery. We share our experience in a series of cases of PPH, successfully managed using rFVIIa. PMID:24403703

  20. Intracerebral haemorrhage in Down syndrome: protected or predisposed?

    PubMed Central

    Buss, Lewis; Fisher, Elizabeth; Hardy, John; Nizetic, Dean; Groet, Jurgen; Pulford, Laura; Strydom, André

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS), which arises from trisomy of chromosome 21, is associated with deposition of large amounts of amyloid within the central nervous system. Amyloid accumulates in two compartments: as plaques within the brain parenchyma and in vessel walls of the cerebral microvasculature. The parenchymal plaque amyloid is thought to result in an early onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD) dementia, a phenomenon so common amongst people with DS that it could be considered a defining feature of the condition. The amyloid precursor protein ( APP) gene lies on chromosome 21 and its presence in three copies in DS is thought to largely drive the early onset AD. In contrast, intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH), the main clinical consequence of vascular amyloidosis, is a more poorly defined feature of DS. We review recent epidemiological data on stroke (including haemorrhagic stroke) in order to make comparisons with a rare form of familial AD due to duplication (i.e. having three copies) of the APP region on chromosome 21, here called ‘dup-APP’, which is associated with more frequent and severe ICH. We conclude that although people with DS are at increased risk of ICH, this is less common than in dup-APP, suggesting the presence of mechanisms that act protectively. We review these mechanisms and consider comparative research into DS and dup-APP that may yield further pathophysiological insight. PMID:27239286

  1. Skin aging and dry skin.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Hideo

    2004-08-01

    Skin aging appears to be the result of both scheduled and continuous "wear and tear" processes that damage cellular DNA and proteins. Two types of aging, chronological skin aging and photoaging, have distinct clinical and histological features. Chronological skin aging is a universal and inevitable process characterized primarily by physiologic alterations in skin function. In this case, keratinocytes are unable to properly terminally differentiate to form a functional stratum corneum, and the rate of formation of neutral lipids that contribute to the barrier function slows, causing dry, pale skin with fine wrinkles. In contrast, photoaging results from the UVR of sunlight and the damage thus becomes apparent in sun-exposed skin. Characteristics of this aging type are dry and sallow skin displaying fine wrinkles as well as deep furrows, resulting from the disorganization of epidermal and dermal components associated with elastosis and heliodermatitis. Understanding of the functions of the skin and the basic principles of moisturizer use and application is important for the prevention of skin aging. Successful treatment of dry skin with appropriate skin care products gives the impression of eternal youth. PMID:15492432

  2. Coincidental cerebral venous thrombosis and subarachnoid haemorrhage related to ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, Claudia; Baumgartner, Annette; Mader, Irina; Rijntjes, Michel; Meckel, Stephan

    2016-08-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) and cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) are rare cerebrovascular pathologies. Here, we report the extremely rare coincidental presentation of both entities and discuss the likely relationship in aetiology and their optimal management. A female patient presented with headache and progressive neurological deficits. Cranial computed tomography and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) revealed dural venous sinus thrombosis, left-sided frontal and parietal infarcts, and left middle and anterior cerebral artery stenosis. In addition, left hemispheric subarachnoid haemosiderosis was seen on MRI. Following standard anticoagulation therapy for CVT, she represented with acute SAH. Digital subtraction angiography revealed a ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm and left middle cerebral artery/anterior cerebral artery vasospasms that were responsive to intra-arterial nimodipine. The latter were already present on the previous MRI, and had most likely prevented the detection of the aneurysm initially. The aneurysm was successfully coil embolised, and the patient improved clinically. Despite this case being an extremely rare coincidence, a ruptured aneurysm should be excluded in the presence of CVT and non-sulcal SAH. A careful consideration of treatment of both pathologies is required, since anticoagulation may have a potentially negative impact on aneurysmal bleeding. PMID:27188326

  3. Prevention and treatment of acute radiation-induced skin reactions: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Radiation-induced skin reaction (RISR) is a common side effect that affects the majority of cancer patients receiving radiation treatment. RISR is often characterised by swelling, redness, pigmentation, fibrosis, and ulceration, pain, warmth, burning, and itching of the skin. The aim of this systematic review was to assess the effects of interventions which aim to prevent or manage RISR in people with cancer. Methods We searched the following databases up to November 2012: Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL (2012, Issue 11), MEDLINE (from 1946), EMBASE (from 1974), PsycINFO (from 1806), CINAHL (from 1981) and LILACS (from 1982). Randomized controlled trials evaluating interventions for preventing or managing RISR in cancer patients were included. The primary outcomes were development of RISR, and levels of RISR and symptom severity. Secondary outcomes were time taken to develop erythema or dry desquamation; quality of life; time taken to heal, a number of skin reaction and symptom severity measures; cost, participant satisfaction; ease of use and adverse effects. Where appropriate, we pooled results of randomized controlled trials using mean differences (MD) or odd ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Forty-seven studies were included in this review. These evaluated six types of interventions (oral systemic medications; skin care practices; steroidal topical therapies; non-steroidal topical therapies; dressings and other). Findings from two meta-analyses demonstrated significant benefits of oral Wobe-Mugos E for preventing RISR (OR 0.13 (95% CI 0.05 to 0.38)) and limiting the maximal level of RISR (MD -0.92 (95% CI -1.36 to -0.48)). Another meta-analysis reported that wearing deodorant does not influence the development of RISR (OR 0.80 (95% CI 0.47 to 1.37)). Conclusions Despite the high number of trials in this area, there is limited good, comparative research that provides definitive results suggesting the

  4. Skin optics

    SciTech Connect

    van Gemert, M.J.; Jacques, S.L.; Sterenborg, H.J.; Star, W.M.

    1989-12-01

    Quantitative dosimetry in the treatment of skin disorders with (laser) light requires information on propagation of light in the skin related to the optical properties of the individual skin layers. This involves the solution of the integro-differential equation of radiative transfer in a model representing skin geometry, as well as experimental methods to determine the optical properties of each skin layer. These activities are unified under the name skin optics. This paper first reviews the current status of tissue optics, distinguishing between the cases of: dominant absorption, dominant scattering, and scattering about equal to absorption. Then, previously published data as well as some current unpublished data on (human) stratum corneum, epidermis and dermis, have been collected and/or (re)analyzed in terms of absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient, and anisotropy factor of scattering. The results are that the individual skin layers show strongly forward scattering (anisotropy factors between 0.7 and 0.9). The absorption and scattering data show that for all wavelengths considered scattering is much more important than absorption. Under such circumstances, solutions to the transport equation for a multilayer skin model and finite beam laser irradiation are currently not yet available. Hence, any quantitative dosimetry for skin treated with (laser) light is currently lacking.

  5. Platelet count and transfusion requirements during moderate or severe postpartum haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Jones, R M; de Lloyd, L; Kealaher, E J; Lilley, G J; Precious, E; Burckett St Laurent, D; Hamlyn, V; Collis, R E; Collins, P W

    2016-06-01

    Limited data exist on platelet transfusion during postpartum haemorrhage. We retrospectively analysed a consecutive cohort from a single centre of 347 women with moderate or severe postpartum haemorrhage, transfused according to national guidelines. Twelve (3%) women required a platelet transfusion. There were no differences between women who did and did not receive platelets with respect to age, mode of initiation of labour or mode of delivery. Women receiving a platelet transfusion had a lower median (IQR [range]) platelet count at study entry than women who did not receive platelets before haemorrhage (135 (97-175 [26-259])×10(9) .l(-1) vs 224 (186-274 [91-1006])×10(9) .l(-1) ), respectively), and at diagnosis of postpartum haemorrhage (median 114 (78-153 [58-238])×10(9) .l(-1) vs 193 (155-243 [78-762])×10(9) .l(-1) respectively). Six women were thrombocytopenic pre-delivery. The cause of haemorrhage that was associated with the highest rate of platelet transfusion was placental abruption, with three of 14 women being transfused. If antenatal thrombocytopenia or consumptive coagulopathy were not present, platelets were only required for haemorrhage > 5000 ml. Early formulaic platelet transfusion would have resulted in many women receiving platelets unnecessarily. Using current guidelines, the need for platelet transfusion is uncommon without antenatal thrombocytopenia, consumptive coagulopathy or haemorrhage > 5000 ml. We found no evidence to support early fixed-ratio platelet transfusion. PMID:27062151

  6. Protective effect of vitamin E (DL-alpha-tocopherol) against intraventricular haemorrhage in premature babies.

    PubMed Central

    Chiswick, M L; Johnson, M; Woodhall, C; Gowland, M; Davies, J; Toner, N; Sims, D G

    1983-01-01

    Forty four babies, of less than 32 weeks' gestation, were either randomly given 25 mg/kg vitamin E (DL-alpha-tocopherol acetate) intramuscularly after birth (day 0) and on days 1, 2, and 3 or served as controls. Frequent real time ultrasound examinations of the brain were made in each baby during the first week and less frequently thereafter. In babies under 32 weeks' gestation the incidence of intraventricular haemorrhage was lower in supplemented babies (18.8%) compared with the controls (56.3%). On days 0, 1, 2, and 3 median plasma vitamin E concentrations in babies without haemorrhage and in those with subependymal haemorrhage only were similar. Babies with intraventricular haemorrhage had lower median concentrations on day 1 (p less than 0.002) and day 2 (p less than 0.05) compared with those with subependymal haemorrhage and lower concentrations on day 0 (p less than 0.02) and day 1 (p less than 0.05) compared with those without haemorrhage. These findings suggest that in premature babies vitamin E, an antioxidant, protects endothelial cell membranes from oxidative damage and disruption and limits the magnitude of haemorrhage and its spread from the subependyma into the ventricles. Images FIG 1 PMID:6407714

  7. Diagnostic laboratory for bleeding disorders ensures efficient management of haemorrhagic disorders.

    PubMed

    Riddell, A; Chuansumrit, A; El-Ekiaby, M; Nair, S C

    2016-07-01

    Haemorrhagic disorders like Postpartum haemorrhage and Dengue haemorrhagic fever are life threatening and requires an active and efficient transfusion service that could provide the most appropriate blood product which could be effective in managing them. This would essentially require prompt identification of the coagulopathy so that the best available product can be given to the bleeding patient to correct the identified haemostatic defect which will help control the bleeding. This would only be possible if the transfusion service has a laboratory to correctly detect the haemostatic defect and that too with an accuracy and precision which is ensured by a good laboratory quality assurance practices. These same processes are necessary for the transfusion services to ensure the quality of the blood products manufactured by them and that it contains adequate amounts of haemostasis factors which will be good to be effective in the management of haemorrhagic disorders. These issues are discussed in detail individually in the management of postpartum haemorrhage and Dengue haemorrhagic fever including when these can help in the use of rFVIIa in Dengue haemorrhagic fever. The requirements to ensure good-quality blood products are made available for the management of these disorders and the same have also been described. PMID:27405683

  8. Efficacy of topical phenol decontamination strategies on severity of acute phenol chemical burns and dermal absorption: in vitro and in vivo studies in pig skin.

    PubMed

    Monteiro-Riviere, N A; Inman, A O; Jackson, H; Dunn, B; Dimond, S

    2001-05-01

    Pure phenol is colorless and used in the manufacture of phenolic resins, plastics, explosives, fertilizers, paints, rubber, textiles, adhesives, pharmaceuticals, paper, soap, and wood preservatives. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of several phenol decontamination strategies following dermal exposure using the pig as a model for human exposure, and then assess the effect of the two best treatments on phenol absorption in the isolated perfused porcine skin flap (IPPSF). Six anesthetized Yorkshire pigs were exposed to 89% aqueous phenol for 1 min using Hilltop chambers (10 skin sites/pig; 400 microl/site). Exposure to phenol was followed by one of 10 different decontamination procedures: 1-, 5-, 15-, and 30-min water wash; Ivory soap solution; polyethylene glycol (PEG 400); PEG 400/industrial methylated spirits (IMS); PEG 400/ethanol (EtOH); polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP)/70% isopropanol (IPA); and 70% IPA. For each of the last five strategies, 1-min treatment washes were repeatedly alternated with 1-min water washes for a total of 15 min. Evaluation was based on scoring of erythema, edema, and histological parameters such as intracellular and intercellular epidermal edema, papillary dermal edema, perivascular infiltrates, pyknotic stratum basale cells, and epidermal-dermal separation. It was concluded that PEG 400 and 70% IPA were superior to the other treatments investigated and equally efficacious in the reduction of phenol-induced skin damage. In addition, phenol absorption was assessed utilizing the two most effective in vivo treatments in the IPPSF. The assessment of percutaneous absorption of phenol found the PEG 400, 70% IPA, and 15-min water treatments significantly (P < 0.05) reduced phenol absorption relative to no treatment. PMID:12479505

  9. Skin Substitutes

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Nicole; Cohen, George

    2014-01-01

    In a relatively short timespan, a wealth of new skin substitutes made of synthetic and biologically derived materials have arisen for the purpose of wound healing of various etiologies. This review article focuses on providing an overview of skin substitutes including their indications, contraindications, benefits, and limitations. The result of this overview was an appreciation of the vast array of options available for clinicians, many of which did not exist a short time ago. Yet, despite the rapid expansion this field has undergone, no ideal skin substitute is currently available. More research in the field of skin substitutes and wound healing is required not only for the development of new products made of increasingly complex biomolecular material, but also to compare the existing skin substitutes. PMID:25371771

  10. Intravenous Immunoglobulin Responsive Persistent Thrombocytopenia after Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever

    PubMed Central

    Charaniya, Riyaz; Ghosh, Anindya; Sahoo, Ratnakar

    2016-01-01

    Dengue outbreak is common in Indian subcontinent and causes significant morbidity and mortality. Year 2015 has witnessed yet another Dengue epidemic in northern India and the number of cases this year is maximum in a decade. Dengue infection is a viral disease and there are 4 different serotypes DENV1, DENV2, DENV3 and DENV4. This year DENV2 and DENV4 have been isolated from most of the patients. Thrombocytopenia is hallmark of dengue infection and generally recovers within ten days of onset of symptoms. We report a case of dengue haemorrhagic fever in which thrombocytopenia persisted for almost a month and improved after Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) administration. This is the first case where IVIG has been successfully used for treating persisting thrombocytopenia after dengue infection. PMID:27190868

  11. [“Sumo-compression” Stops Post PartumHaemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Spätling, L; Schneider, H

    2014-10-01

    Post partum haemorrhage (PPH) from uterine atony or extensive trauma of vaginal tissue is a major cause of maternal mortality. Compression of vaginal tissue and uterus by tightly packing the vagina with laparotomy pads is described as a novel approach for the management of PPH. A bandage is placed as a very tight belt above the uterus. Counterpressure is achieved by a second bandage, which runs from anterior to posterior and is tied to the belt pressing the pads inside the vagina firmly against the uterus. The term "Sumo-compression" was chosen to remind people of the pants of the Japanese wrestlers. Using this method 5 women were successfully treated between January 2010 and October 2012. PMID:25353217

  12. Progress towards the treatment of Ebola haemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Ströher, Ute; Feldmann, Heinz

    2006-12-01

    Being highly pathogenic for human and nonhuman primates and the subject of former weapon programmes makes Ebola virus one of the most feared pathogens worldwide today. Due to a lack of licensed pre- and postexposure intervention, the current response depends on rapid diagnostics, proper isolation procedures and supportive care of case patients. Consequently, the development of more specific countermeasures is of high priority for the preparedness of many nations. Over the past years, enhanced research efforts directed to better understand virus replication and pathogenesis have identified potential new targets for intervention strategies. The authors discuss the most promising therapeutic approaches for Ebola haemorrhagic fever as judged by their efficacy in animal models. The current development in this field encourages discussions on how to move some of the experimental approaches towards clinical application. PMID:17107278

  13. Viewpoint: filovirus haemorrhagic fever outbreaks: much ado about nothing?

    PubMed

    Borchert, M; Boelaert, M; Sleurs, H; Muyembe-Tamfum, J J; Pirard, P; Colebunders, R; Van der Stuyft, P; van der Groen, G

    2000-05-01

    The recent outbreak of Marburg haemorrhagic fever in the Democratic Republic of Congo has put the filovirus threat back on the international health agenda. This paper gives an overview of Marburg and Ebola outbreaks so far observed and puts them in a public health perspective. Damage on the local level has been devastating at times, but was marginal on the international level despite the considerable media attention these outbreaks received. The potential hazard of outbreaks, however, after export of filovirus from its natural environment into metropolitan areas, is argued to be considerable. Some avenues for future research and intervention are explored. Beyond the obvious need to find the reservoir and study the natural history, public health strategies for a more timely and efficient response are urgently needed. PMID:10886793

  14. Intravenous Immunoglobulin Responsive Persistent Thrombocytopenia after Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prabhat; Charaniya, Riyaz; Ghosh, Anindya; Sahoo, Ratnakar

    2016-04-01

    Dengue outbreak is common in Indian subcontinent and causes significant morbidity and mortality. Year 2015 has witnessed yet another Dengue epidemic in northern India and the number of cases this year is maximum in a decade. Dengue infection is a viral disease and there are 4 different serotypes DENV1, DENV2, DENV3 and DENV4. This year DENV2 and DENV4 have been isolated from most of the patients. Thrombocytopenia is hallmark of dengue infection and generally recovers within ten days of onset of symptoms. We report a case of dengue haemorrhagic fever in which thrombocytopenia persisted for almost a month and improved after Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) administration. This is the first case where IVIG has been successfully used for treating persisting thrombocytopenia after dengue infection. PMID:27190868

  15. Subarachnoid haemorrhage as the initial manifestation of cortical venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rajesh; Sahu, Ritesh; Lalla, Rakesh

    2012-01-01

    Aneurysmal rupture is the commonest cause of non-traumatic subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). SAH can rarely be the manifestation of cortical venous thrombosis (CVT). CVT is potentially lethal but treatable disorder with positive outcome if timely treatment is instituted. The site of bleeding is mainly on convexities and sulcus with sparing of basal cisterns in SAH related to CVT. Anticoagulation is the mainstay of treatment, in spite of SAH complicated by CVT. In this submission, the author highlighted a case of SAH presented as initial manifestation of CVT in an elderly woman. Early therapy with anticoagulation led to complete clinical and radiological recovery in a short duration of 2 weeks. Thus, diagnosis of CVT should be kept in mind in unusual presentation of SAH. PMID:22914236

  16. How to manage patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Geisthoff, Urban W; Nguyen, Ha-Long; Röth, Alexander; Seyfert, Ulrich

    2015-11-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia is a rare systemic autosomal dominantly inherited disorder of the fibrovascular tissue with a wide variety of clinical manifestations. Diagnosis is based on the clinical Curaçao criteria or molecular genetic testing. Dilated vessels can develop into telangiectases or larger vascular malformations in various organs, calling for an interdisciplinary approach. Epistaxis and gastrointestinal bleeding can result from these vascular defects. Various conservative and interventional treatments have been described for these conditions. However, no optimal therapy exists. Treatment can become especially difficult due to progressive anaemia or when anticoagulant or anti-thrombotic therapy becomes necessary. Screening for pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVM) should be performed in all confirmed and suspected patients. Treatment by percutaneous transcatheter embolotherapy and antibiotic prophylaxis is normally effective for PAVM. Cerebral or hepatic vascular malformations and rare manifestations need to be evaluated on a case-by-case basis to determine the best course of action for treatment. PMID:26205234

  17. Haemorrhage after home birth: audit of decision making and referral.

    PubMed

    Smit, Marrit; Dijkman, Anneke; Rijnders, Marlies; Bustraan, Jacqueline; van Dillen, Jeroen; Middeldorp, Johanna; Havenith, Barbara; van Roosmalen, Jos

    2013-11-01

    In the Netherlands, 20 per cent of women give birth at home. In 0.7 per cent, referral to secondary care because of postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) is indicated. Midwives are regularly trained in managing obstetric emergencies. A postgraduate training programme developed for Dutch community-based midwives called 'CAVE' (pre-hospital obstetric emergency course) focuses on the identification and management of obstetric emergencies, including timely and adequate referral to hospital. This descriptive study aims to identify substandard care (SSC) in PPH after home birth in the Netherlands. Sixty seven cases of PPH reported by community-based midwives were collected. After applying selection criteria, seven cases were submitted to audit. The audit panel consisted of 12 midwives (of which seven contributed a case), 10 obstetricians, an educational expert and an ambulance paramedic. First, an individual assessment was performed by all members. Subsequently, at a plenary audit meeting, SSC factors were determined and assigned incidental, minor and major substandard care. PMID:24371910

  18. A rare case of Weil's disease with alveolar haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Abhiram; Nandy, Manab; Pal, Dipankar; Mallik, Sudesna

    2014-01-01

    Leptospirosis, a disease of protean manifestations occurs sporadically throughout the year with a peak seasonal incidence during the rainy season mimicking other febrile viral illness. In the rare case, the disease leads to renal and hepatic involvement with hemorrhage which may be associated with multisystem organ dysfunction in form of pulmonary, cardiac and central nervous system, when it is known as Weil's disease. Rarely haemorrhagic manifestations are assosciated. Early diagnosis is important as sometimes the disease may be life threatening. Proper antibiotics results in dramatic improvement. We hereby presented a case that had clinical features of Weil's disease with cough, dyspnoea and haemoptysis. Leptospirosis was detected on ELISA testing. Patient was cured rapidly with antibiotics. PMID:25183149

  19. Haemorrhage, hyponatraemia and more than just a hack

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Mitsu; Kandil, Hala

    2014-01-01

    A 43-year-old previously healthy solicitor presented with a 9-day history of cough productive of yellow sputum with a prodrome of sore throat and myalgia. The cough was paroxysmal in nature and severe enough to cause extensive bilateral subconjunctival haemorrhages and cough syncopes multiple times a day, with one bout of associated haematemesis on the day of admission. He was isolated, treated for a presumed atypical chest infection with tazocin and clarithromycin, and monitored carefully until the hyponatraemia on presentation was resolved. Atypical screen and blood cultures were sent off, though unexciting at first, eventually confirmed the unlikely; Bordetella pertussis, much to the surprise of many who had Legionella as the top differential. PMID:24943139

  20. Haemorrhage, hyponatraemia and more than just a hack.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mitsu; Kandil, Hala

    2014-01-01

    A 43-year-old previously healthy solicitor presented with a 9-day history of cough productive of yellow sputum with a prodrome of sore throat and myalgia. The cough was paroxysmal in nature and severe enough to cause extensive bilateral subconjunctival haemorrhages and cough syncopes multiple times a day, with one bout of associated haematemesis on the day of admission. He was isolated, treated for a presumed atypical chest infection with tazocin and clarithromycin, and monitored carefully until the hyponatraemia on presentation was resolved. Atypical screen and blood cultures were sent off, though unexciting at first, eventually confirmed the unlikely; Bordetella pertussis, much to the surprise of many who had Legionella as the top differential. PMID:24943139

  1. Structural elucidation and estimation of the acute toxicity of the major UV-visible photoproduct of fludioxonil - detection in both skin and flesh samples of grape.

    PubMed

    Lassalle, Yannick; Nicol, Édith; Genty, Christophe; Bourcier, Sophie; Bouchonnet, Stéphane

    2015-06-01

    Ultraviolet (UV)-visible irradiation of fludioxonil was investigated with two photoreactors using either a mercury or xenon vapor lamp. In both cases, it led to the formation of only one photoproduct in significant amount: 2-(2,2-difluorobenzo[d][1,3]dioxol-4-yl)-2-(nitrosomethylene)-4-oxobutanenitrile, which has been characterized using Liquid Chromatography - High Resolution - Tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC-HR-MS/MS) coupling. A photolysis pathway has been proposed to rationalize its formation in degassed water. In vitro bioassays on Vibrio fischeri bacteria showed that UV-vis irradiation of an aqueous solution of fludioxonil significantly increases its toxicity. Because no other by-product was detected in significant amount, the photoproduct mentioned above may be considered mainly responsible for this increase in toxicity. Grape berries treated with a 50 ppm aqueous solution of fludioxonil were submitted to UV-visible irradiation under laboratory conditions. The fungicide and photoproduct were detected in both skin and flesh of berries, even after they have been rinsed with water. The ability of the photoproduct to pass through the fruit skin is comparable with that of fludioxonil. These results are of concern for consumers because they mean that water tap rinsing does not lead to efficient removing of both compounds. PMID:26169141

  2. Remote Cerebellar Haemorrhage after Burr Hole Drainage of Chronic Subdural Haematoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Karaarslan, Numan; Gök, Sevki; Soyalp, Celaleddin

    2016-01-01

    Remote cerebellar haemorrhage (RCH) is an unusual complication of supratentorial neurosurgical procedures. Even the rarer is cerebellar haemorrhage occurring after supratentorial burr hole drainage of Chronic Subdural Haematoma (CSDH). The exact mechanism is still unclear despite some possible causative factors such as rapid evacuation of haematoma and overdrainage of CSF (Cerebrospinal Fluid). We report a 80-year-old male patient who developed cerebellar haemorrhage after burr hole drainage of left frontoparietal chronic subdural haematoma and discuss the possible aetiological mechanisms through the review of the current literature. PMID:27437296

  3. A risk scoring system for prediction of haemorrhagic stroke.

    PubMed

    Zodpey, S P; Tiwari, R R

    2005-01-01

    The present pair-matched case control study was carried out at Government Medical College Hospital, Nagpur, India, a tertiary care hospital with the objective to devise and validate a risk scoring system for prediction of hemorrhagic stroke. The study consisted of 166 hospitalized CT scan proved cases of hemorrhagic stroke (ICD 9, 431-432), and a age and sex matched control per case. The controls were selected from patients who attended the study hospital for conditions other than stroke. On conditional multiple logistic regression five risk factors- hypertension (OR = 1.9. 95% Cl = 1.5-2.5). raised scrum total cholesterol (OR = 2.3, 95% Cl = 1.1-4.9). use of anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents (OR = 3.4, 95% Cl =1.1-10.4). past history of transient ischaemic attack (OR = 8.4, 95% Cl = 2.1- 33.6) and alcohol intake (OR = 2.1, 95% Cl = 1.3-3.6) were significant. These factors were ascribed statistical weights (based on regression coefficients) of 6, 8, 12, 21 and 8 respectively. The nonsignificant factors (diabetes mellitus, physical inactivity, obesity, smoking, type A personality, history of claudication, family history of stroke, history of cardiac diseases and oral contraceptive use in females) were not included in the development of scoring system. ROC curve suggested a total score of 21 to be the best cut-off for predicting haemorrhag stroke. At this cut-off the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictivity and Cohen's kappa were 0.74, 0.74, 0.74 and 0.48 respectively. The overall predictive accuracy of this additive risk scoring system (area under ROC curve by Wilcoxon statistic) was 0.79 (95% Cl = 0.73-0.84). Thus to conclude, if substantiated by further validation, this scorincy system can be used to predict haemorrhagic stroke, thereby helping to devise effective risk factor intervention strategy. PMID:16479901

  4. Athletic skin injuries: combating pressure and friction.

    PubMed

    Basler, Rodney S W; Hunzeker, Christopher M; Garcia, Michael A

    2004-05-01

    Because the skin is the athlete's first line of defense, it is exposed to friction and pressure in nearly every athletic setting. Whether applied acutely or chronically, friction and pressure often cause skin trauma, such as abrasions, chafing, calluses, blisters, talon noir (black heel), and acne mechanica. Sports medicine clinicians, who regularly see skin injuries, can speed healing by making a timely diagnosis, recommending effective treatment, and discussing prevention strategies. PMID:20086411

  5. Autophagy in acute brain injury.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Blomgren, Klas; Kroemer, Guido

    2016-08-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily ancient mechanism that ensures the lysosomal degradation of old, supernumerary or ectopic cytoplasmic entities. Most eukaryotic cells, including neurons, rely on proficient autophagic responses for the maintenance of homeostasis in response to stress. Accordingly, autophagy mediates neuroprotective effects following some forms of acute brain damage, including methamphetamine intoxication, spinal cord injury and subarachnoid haemorrhage. In some other circumstances, however, the autophagic machinery precipitates a peculiar form of cell death (known as autosis) that contributes to the aetiology of other types of acute brain damage, such as neonatal asphyxia. Here, we dissect the context-specific impact of autophagy on non-infectious acute brain injury, emphasizing the possible therapeutic application of pharmacological activators and inhibitors of this catabolic process for neuroprotection. PMID:27256553

  6. Skin Cancer in Skin of Color

    PubMed Central

    Bradford, Porcia T.

    2009-01-01

    Skin cancers in skin of color often present atypically or with advanced stage in comparison to Caucasian patients. Health care providers must maintain a high index of suspicion when examining skin lesions in skin of color. PMID:19691228

  7. Hyperelastic skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... is most often seen in people who have Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. People with this disorder have very elastic skin. ... any member of your family been diagnosed with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome? What other symptoms are present?

  8. Your Skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... Butterflies? Read This Chloe & Nurb Meet The Brain (Movie) Quiz: Do You Need a Flu Shot? Got ... For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Movie: Skin Acne Myths Blisters, Calluses, and Corns Fungal ...

  9. Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Review. 17 Wu S, Han J, Laden F, Qureshi AA. Long-term ultraviolet flux, other potential risk factors, ... MR, Shive ML, Chren MM, Han J, Qureshi AA, Linos E. Indoor tanning and non-melanoma skin ...

  10. Skin Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... nearby What to Do Teach kids not to pop, pick at, or scratch pimples, pus-filled infections, ... Your Skin Abscess Impetigo Ringworm Cellulitis Should I Pop My Pimple? Tips for Taking Care of Your ...

  11. Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... exposure to ultraviolet light, which is found in sunlight and in lights used in tanning salons. What ... the safe-sun guidelines. 1. Avoid the sun. Sunlight damages your skin. The sun is strongest during ...

  12. Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... early. If not treated, some types of skin cancer cells can spread to other tissues and organs. Treatments ... and a type of laser light to kill cancer cells. Biologic therapy boosts your body's own ability to ...

  13. Hyperelastic skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... is most often seen in people who have Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. People with this disorder have very elastic skin. ... any member of your family been diagnosed with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome? What other symptoms are present? Alternative Names India ...

  14. Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... States. The two most common types are basal cell cancer and squamous cell cancer. They usually form on the head, face, ... If not treated, some types of skin cancer cells can spread to other tissues and organs. Treatments ...

  15. The FIB-PPH trial: fibrinogen concentrate as initial treatment for postpartum haemorrhage: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) remains a leading cause of maternal mortality worldwide. In Denmark 2% of parturients receive blood transfusion. During the course of bleeding fibrinogen (coagulation factor I) may be depleted and fall to critically low levels, impairing haemostasis and thus worsening the ongoing bleeding. A plasma level of fibrinogen below 2 g/L in the early phase of postpartum haemorrhage is associated with subsequent development of severe haemorrhage. Use of fibrinogen concentrate allows high-dose substitution without the need for blood type crossmatch. So far no publications of randomised controlled trials involving acutely bleeding patients in the obstetrical setting have been published. This trial aims to investigate if early treatment with fibrinogen concentrate reduces the need for blood transfusion in women suffering severe PPH. Methods/Design In this randomised placebo-controlled double-blind multicentre trial, parturients with primary PPH are eligible following vaginal delivery in case of: manual removal of placenta (blood loss ≥ 500 ml) or manual exploration of the uterus after the birth of placenta (blood loss ≥ 1000 ml). Caesarean sections are also eligible in case of perioperative blood loss ≥ 1000 ml. The exclusion criteria are known inherited haemostatic deficiencies, prepartum treatment with antithrombotics, pre-pregnancy weight <45 kg or refusal to receive blood transfusion. Following informed consent, patients are randomly allocated to either early treatment with 2 g fibrinogen concentrate or 100 ml isotonic saline (placebo). Haemostatic monitoring with standard laboratory coagulation tests and thromboelastography (TEG, functional fibrinogen and Rapid TEG) is performed during the initial 24 hours. Primary outcome is the need for blood transfusion. To investigate a 33% reduction in the need for blood transfusion, a total of 245 patients will be included. Four university-affiliated public

  16. Senescent Skin

    PubMed Central

    Kushniruk, William

    1974-01-01

    The cutaneous surface is continually influenced by aging and environmental factors. A longer life span is accompanied by an increase in the frequency of problems associated with aging skin. Although most of these changes and lesions are not life threatening, the premalignant lesions must be recognized and treated. The common aging and actinic skin changes are discussed and appropriate management is described. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:20469067

  17. Retroperitoneal Haematom due to Spontaneous Rupture and Haemorrhage of Adrenal Cyst Presenting with Grey Turner's Sign.

    PubMed

    Sonmez, Bedriye Muge; Yilmaz, Fevzi; Özkan, Fevzi Bircan; Ongar, Murat; Özturk, Derya; Cesur, Fatma

    2015-07-01

    Spontaneous retroperitoneal haemorrhage is a rare entity and a potentially life-threatening condition. A 41-year-old woman presented to our emergency department with left flank pain and dysuria. Her physical examination disclosed left abdominal and costovertebral angle tenderness, left flank ecchymosis (Grey Turner sign). Abdominal computerised tomography revealed spontaneous retroperitoneal haemorrhage. She was discharged after 10 days with recommendation of urology follow-up. PMID:26160093

  18. Foetal and neonatal intracranial haemorrhage in term newborn infants: Hacettepe University experience.

    PubMed

    Tavil, Betül; Korkmaz, Ayşe; Bayhan, Turan; Aytaç, Selin; Unal, Sule; Kuskonmaz, Baris; Yigit, Sule; Cetin, Mualla; Yurdakök, Murat; Gumruk, Fatma

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we aimed to evaluate the incidence, risk factors, causes and clinical management of intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) diagnosed during foetal life or in the first month of life in term neonates with a discussion of the role of haematological risk factors. This study included term neonates (gestational age 37-42 weeks) with ICH diagnosed, treated and followed up in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey, between January 1994 and January 2014. Medical follow-up was obtained retrospectively from hospital files and prospectively from telephonic interviews and/or clinical visits. During the study period, 16 term neonates were identified as having ICH in our hospital. In six (37.5%) neonates, ICH was diagnosed during foetal life by obstetric ultrasonography, and in 10 (62.5%) neonates, it has been diagnosed after birth. Haemorrhage types included intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) in eight (50.0%), intraparenchymal haemorrhage in six (37.5%), subarachnoid haemorrhage in one (6.2%) and subdural haemorrhage in one (6.2%) neonate. IVH was the most common (n = 5/6, 83.3%) haemorrhage type among neonates diagnosed during foetal life. Overall, haemorrhage severity was determined as mild in three (18.7%) neonates, moderate in three (18.75%) neonates and severe in 10 (62.5%) neonates. During follow-up, one infant was diagnosed as afibrinogenemia, one diagnosed as infantile spasm, one cystic fibrosis, one orofaciodigital syndrome and the other diagnosed as Friedrich ataxia. Detailed haematological investigation and search for other underlying diseases are very important to identify the reason of ICH in term neonates. Furthermore, early diagnosis, close monitoring and prompt surgical interventions are significant factors to reduce disabilities. PMID:26829281

  19. Schwann cells generated from neonatal skin-derived precursors or neonatal peripheral nerve improve functional recovery after acute transplantation into the partially injured cervical spinal cord of the rat.

    PubMed

    Sparling, Joseph S; Bretzner, Frederic; Biernaskie, Jeff; Assinck, Peggy; Jiang, Yuan; Arisato, Hiroki; Plunet, Ward T; Borisoff, Jaimie; Liu, Jie; Miller, Freda D; Tetzlaff, Wolfram

    2015-04-29

    The transplantation of Schwann cells (SCs) holds considerable promise as a therapy for spinal cord injury, but the optimal source of these cells and the best timing for intervention remains debatable. Previously, we demonstrated that delayed transplantation of SCs generated from neonatal mouse skin-derived precursors (SKP-SCs) promoted repair and functional recovery in rats with thoracic contusions. Here, we conducted two experiments using neonatal rat cells and an incomplete cervical injury model to examine the efficacy of acute SKP-SC transplantation versus media control (Experiment 1) and versus nerve-derived SC or dermal fibroblast (Fibro) transplantation (Experiment 2). Despite limited graft survival, by 10 weeks after injury, rats that received SCs from either source showed improved functional recovery compared with media- or fibroblast-treated animals. Compared with media treatment, SKP-SC-transplanted rats showed enhanced rubrospinal tract (RST) sparing/plasticity in the gray matter (GM) rostral to injury, particularly in the absence of immunosuppression. The functional benefits of SC transplantations over fibroblast treatment correlated with the enhanced preservation of host tissue, reduced RST atrophy, and/or increased RST sparing/plasticity in the GM. In summary, our results indicate that: (1) early transplantation of neonatal SCs generated from skin or nerve promotes repair and functional recovery after incomplete cervical crush injury; (2) either of these cell types is preferable to Fibros for these purposes; and (3) age-matched SCs from these two sources do not differ in terms of their reparative effects or functional efficacy after transplantation into the injured cervical spinal cord. PMID:25926450

  20. Neuromodulators for Aging Skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... Non-ablative Laser Rejuvenation Non-invasive Body Contouring Treatments Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Information Free Skin Cancer Screenings Skin ... Non-ablative Laser Rejuvenation Non-invasive Body Contouring Treatments Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Information Free Skin Cancer Screenings Skin ...

  1. Acute Cyclophosphamide Hemorrhagic Myopericarditis: Dilemma Case Report, Literature Review and Proposed Diagnostic Criteria

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide is a potent DNA alkylating agent used in chemotherapy and immunosuppression. Although an old agent, its use in the present day has expanded for cases of refractory autoimmune disease. In this report, a case of haemorrhagic myopericarditis resulting from high-dose cyclophosphamide for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy is presented. The patient had no predisposing cardiovascular risk factors and a structurally normal heart on previous echocardiogram. Following administration of high-dose cyclophosphamide, the patient developed acute congestive heart failure. Serial echocardiography demonstrated pericardial effusion, myocardial thickening, and progressive right ventricular dysfunction. Histopathology on autopsy revealed acute myocardial necrosis, intra-myocardial extravasation of blood, fibrin, and fibrin-platelet microthrombi compatible with the diagnosis of haemorrhagic myopericarditis. The ante-mortem diagnostic dilemma is described to emphasize the need for pattern recognition and clinical criteria for diagnosis. Subsequent comprehensive literature review was performed to identify features that will facilitate earlier diagnosis of haemorrhagic myopericarditis by healthcare providers. PMID:26674419

  2. Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kurien, Matthew; Lobo, Alan J

    2015-10-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB) is a frequently encountered medical emergency with an incidence of 84-160/100000 and associated with mortality of approximately 10%. Guidelines from the National Institute for Care and Care Excellence outline key features in the management of AUGIB. Patients require prompt resuscitation and risk assessment using validated tools. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy provides accurate diagnosis, aids in estimating prognosis and allows therapeutic intervention. Endoscopy should be undertaken immediately after resuscitation in unstable patients and within 24 hours in all other patients. Interventional radiology may be required for bleeding unresponsive to endoscopic intervention. Drug therapy depends on the cause of bleeding. Intravenous proton pump inhibitors should be used in patients with high-risk ulcers. Terlipressin and broad-spectrum antibiotics should be used following variceal haemorrhage. Hospitals admitting patients with AUGIB need to provide well organised services and ensure access to relevant services for all patients, and particularly to out of hours endoscopy. PMID:26430191

  3. Skin care and incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    Incontinence - skin care ... in a wheelchair, regular chair, or bed TAKING CARE OF THE SKIN Using diapers and other products ... skin. Over time, the skin breaks down. Special care must be taken to keep the skin clean ...

  4. Skin characteristics in newborns

    MedlinePlus

    Newborn skin characteristics; Infant skin characteristics ... the first few weeks of the baby's life. Newborn skin will vary, depending on the length of the pregnancy. Premature infants have thin, transparent skin. The skin of a ...

  5. The Socioeconomic Impacts of Clinically Diagnosed Haemorrhagic Septicaemia on Smallholder Large Ruminant Farmers in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, M; Young, J R; Suon, S; Bush, R D; Windsor, P A

    2015-10-01

    Haemorrhagic septicaemia (HS) is an acute fatal infectious disease of mainly cattle and buffalo and outbreaks occur commonly in Cambodia. Disease outbreak reports were examined to select five villages from three provinces for a retrospective investigation of HS epidemiology and socioeconomic impact on smallholders, with an aim of identifying potential benefits from improving disease prevention through biosecurity and vaccination. The Village Animal Health Worker (VAHW) or Chief in each village and 66 affected smallholders were surveyed. At the village level, 24% of all households were affected with an estimated mean village herd morbidity of 10.1% and mortality of 28.8%. Affected farmers reported HS disease morbidity and mortality at 42.7% and 63.6% respectively. Buffalo had a higher morbidity (OR = 2.3; P = 0.003) and mortality (OR = 6.9; P < 0.001) compared with cattle, and unvaccinated large ruminants a higher morbidity (OR = 2.9; P = 0.001). The financial impact varied depending on whether the animal survived, provision of treatment, draught replacement and lost secondary income. The mean cost per affected household was USD 952.50 based on ownership of five large ruminants. The impact per affected animal was USD 375.00, reducing the pre-disease value by 66.1%. A partial budget revealed an overwhelming incentive for farmers to practice biannual vaccination, with a net benefit of USD 951.58 per household based on an annual disease incidence rate of 1. Sensitivity analysis showed that a net benefit of USD 32.42 remained based on an outbreak every 20 years. This study indicates HS can cause a catastrophic financial shock to smallholders and remains a critical constraint to improving large ruminant productivity and profitability. Addressing HS disease control requires a focus on improving smallholder farmer knowledge of biosecurity and vaccination and should be priority to stakeholders interested in addressing regional food insecurity and poverty reduction. PMID

  6. Imaging cerebral haemorrhage with magnetic induction tomography: numerical modelling.

    PubMed

    Zolgharni, M; Ledger, P D; Armitage, D W; Holder, D S; Griffiths, H

    2009-06-01

    Magnetic induction tomography (MIT) is a new electromagnetic imaging modality which has the potential to image changes in the electrical conductivity of the brain due to different pathologies. In this study the feasibility of detecting haemorrhagic cerebral stroke with a 16-channel MIT system operating at 10 MHz was investigated. The finite-element method combined with a realistic, multi-layer, head model comprising 12 different tissues, was used for the simulations in the commercial FE package, Comsol Multiphysics. The eddy-current problem was solved and the MIT signals computed for strokes of different volumes occurring at different locations in the brain. The results revealed that a large, peripheral stroke (volume 49 cm(3)) produced phase changes that would be detectable with our currently achievable instrumentation phase noise level (17 m degrees ) in 70 (27%) of the 256 exciter/sensor channel combinations. However, reconstructed images showed that a lower noise level than this, of 1 m degrees , was necessary to obtain good visualization of the strokes. The simulated MIT measurements were compared with those from an independent transmission-line-matrix model in order to give confidence in the results. PMID:19491437

  7. Surgical management of postpartum haemorrhage: survey of French obstetricians

    PubMed Central

    Bouet, Pierre-Emmanuel; Brun, Stéphanie; Madar, Hugo; Schinkel, Elsa; Merlot, Benjamin; Sentilhes, Loïc

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the theoretical and practical knowledge of French obstetricians about the surgical management of postpartum haemorrhage (PPH). Our study is a national anonymous self-administered survey. A total of 363 obstetricians responded to this questionnaire between December 2013 and April 2014. Questionnaire sent through email to all French obstetricians who are members of either of two federations of hospital-based obstetricians. Answers were collected until the end of June 2014. The main outcome measure was obstetricians’ level of mastery of each surgical technique. The results were analysed descriptively (proportions). Only the 286 questionnaires fully completed were analysed; the complete response rate was 23% (286/1246). In all, 33% (95/286) of the responding obstetricians reported that they had not mastered sufficiently or even at all the technique for bilateral ligation of the uterine arteries, 37% (105/286) for uterine compression suture, 62% (178/286) for ligation of the internal iliac arteries, and 47% (134/286) for emergency peripartum hysterectomy. In all, 18% (52/286) of respondents stated that they had not mastered any of these techniques. Our study shows that a worrisome number of French obstetricians reported insufficient mastery of the surgical techniques for PPH management. PMID:27460158

  8. Three years prospective investigation of pituitary functions following subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Karaca, Z; Tanriverdi, F; Dagli, A T; Selcuklu, A; Casanueva, F F; Unluhizarci, K; Kelestimur, F

    2013-03-01

    Subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) is known to be related to pituitary dysfuntion in retrospective and short-term prospective studies. We aimed to investigate pituitary functions in patients with SAH in longer follow-up periods to demonstrate if pituitary hormone deficiencies recover, persist or new hormone deficiencies occur. Twenty patients with SAH, who were followed up for 3 years, were included in the present study. Patients were evaluated with basal hormone levels and glucagon stimulation test (GST).Serum basal cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels were found to be significantly elevated at 3rd year of SAH compared to 1st year. Other basal hormone levels at 3rd year did not show a significant change from the levels found at 1st year. One of the patients had ACTH deficiency at 1st year of SAH and recovered at 3rd year. Growth hormone (GH) deficiency, according to GST,was diagnosed in 4 patients. One patient with GH deficiency at first year was still deficient, 3 of them recovered and 3 patients were found to have new-onset GH deficiency 3 years after SAH. SAH is associated with anterior pituitary dysfunction and GH is the most frequently found deficient hormone in the patients. Although one year after SAH seems to be an appropriate time for the evaluation of pituitary functions, further follow-up may be required at least in some cases due to recovered and new-onset hormone deficiencies at 3rd year of SAH. PMID:22315089

  9. Dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever in adolescents and adults.

    PubMed

    Tantawichien, Terapong

    2012-05-01

    Dengue fever (DF) is endemic in tropical and subtropical zones and the prevalence is increasing across South-east Asia, Africa, the Western Pacific and the Americas. In recent years, the spread of unplanned urbanisation, with associated substandard housing, overcrowding and deterioration in water, sewage and waste management systems, has created ideal conditions for increased transmission of the dengue virus in tropical urban centres. While dengue infection has traditionally been considered a paediatric disease, the age distribution of dengue has been rising and more cases have been observed in adolescents and adults. Furthermore, the development of tourism in the tropics has led to an increase in the number of tourists who become infected, most of whom are adults. Symptoms and risk factors for dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and severe dengue differ between children and adults, with co-morbidities and incidence in more elderly patients associated with greater risk of mortality. Treatment options for DF and DHF in adults, as for children, centre round fluid replacement (either orally or intravenously, depending on severity) and antipyretics. Further data are needed on the optimal treatment of adult patients. PMID:22668446

  10. Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia in a black adult male: case report.

    PubMed

    Kitonyi, G W; Wambugu, P M; Oburra, H O; Ireri, J M

    2008-08-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia, (HHT) or Rendu-Osler-Weber disease is a genetic autosomal dominant disorder that is characterised by telangiectasias, (small vascular malformations), in mucocutaneous tissues and arterial venous malformations, (AVMs), in various internal organs. Although HHT is relatively common in whites, the disorder has been reported to be rare in people of black African descent. Majority of HHT patients present with recurrent epistaxis, which in a significant proportion of patients is severe, warranting repeated blood transfusions and iron supplementation. Telangiectasias are most frequent on the tongue, hands, nose, lips and the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). AVMs occur in internal organs, particularly the lungs, brain, and the liver. Early and correct diagnosis of HHT is crucial as patients derive benefit from certain specific treatment modalities. Besides, AVMs which occur in various organs pose serious complications that may lead to death and therefore require early detection. We report a 55 year old black African male with HHT who presented with severe recurrent epistaxis and haematochezia leading to severe anaemia requiring repeated blood transfusions. His son, daughter and a maternal uncle experience milder recurrent epistaxis. The management of this patient and a brief review of the clinical features and management of HHT is presented. Our aim is to raise awareness of the occurrence of HHT in Kenya, in order to enhance early diagnosis and appropriate management. PMID:19115559

  11. Delineating the Association between Heavy Postpartum Haemorrhage and Postpartum Depression

    PubMed Central

    Eckerdal, Patricia; Kollia, Natasa; Löfblad, Johanna; Hellgren, Charlotte; Karlsson, Linnea; Högberg, Ulf; Wikström, Anna-Karin; Skalkidou, Alkistis

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore the association between postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) and postpartum depression (PPD), taking into account the role of postpartum anaemia, delivery experience and psychiatric history. Methods A nested cohort study (n = 446), based on two population-based cohorts in Uppsala, Sweden. Exposed individuals were defined as having a bleeding of ≥1000ml (n = 196) at delivery, and non-exposed individuals as having bleeding of <650ml (n = 250). Logistic regression models with PPD symptoms (Edinburgh Postnatal Depression scale (EPDS) score ≥ 12) as the outcome variable and PPH, anaemia, experience of delivery, mood during pregnancy and other confounders as exposure variables were undertaken. Path analysis using Structural Equation Modeling was also conducted. Results There was no association between PPH and PPD symptoms. A positive association was shown between anaemia at discharge from the maternity ward and the development of PPD symptoms, even after controlling for plausible confounders (OR = 2.29, 95%CI = 1.15–4.58). Path analysis revealed significant roles for anaemia at discharge, negative self-reported delivery experience, depressed mood during pregnancy and postpartum stressors in increasing the risk for PPD. Conclusion This study proposes important roles for postpartum anaemia, negative experience of delivery and mood during pregnancy in explaining the development of depressive symptoms after PPH. PMID:26807799

  12. Rabbit haemorrhagic disease: virus persistence and adaptation in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Schwensow, Nina I; Cooke, Brian; Kovaliski, John; Sinclair, Ron; Peacock, David; Fickel, Joerns; Sommer, Simone

    2014-01-01

    In Australia, the rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) has been used since 1996 to reduce numbers of introduced European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) which have a devastating impact on the native Australian environment. RHDV causes regular, short disease outbreaks, but little is known about how the virus persists and survives between epidemics. We examined the initial spread of RHDV to show that even upon its initial spread, the virus circulated continuously on a regional scale rather than persisting at a local population level and that Australian rabbit populations are highly interconnected by virus-carrying flying vectors. Sequencing data obtained from a single rabbit population showed that the viruses that caused an epidemic each year seldom bore close genetic resemblance to those present in previous years. Together, these data suggest that RHDV survives in the Australian environment through its ability to spread amongst rabbit subpopulations. This is consistent with modelling results that indicated that in a large interconnected rabbit meta-population, RHDV should maintain high virulence, cause short, strong disease outbreaks but show low persistence in any given subpopulation. This new epidemiological framework is important for understanding virus–host co-evolution and future disease management options of pest species to secure Australia's remaining natural biodiversity. PMID:25553067

  13. Viral haemorrhagic disease of rabbits and human health.

    PubMed Central

    Carman, J. A.; Garner, M. G.; Catton, M. G.; Thomas, S.; Westbury, H. A.; Cannon, R. M.; Collins, B. J.; Tribe, I. G.

    1998-01-01

    Viral haemorrhagic disease of rabbits (VHD), a potential biological control for wild rabbits in Australia and New Zealand, escaped from quarantined field trials on Wardang Island and spread to the mainland of Australia in October 1995. This study looked for any evidence of infection or illness in people occupationally exposed to the virus. Two hundred and sixty-nine people were interviewed and 259 blood samples were collected. Exposures to VHD-infected rabbits ranged from nil to very high. No VHD antibodies were detected in any of the 259 sera when tested by VHD competitive enzyme immunoassay, which had been validated with 1013 VHDV-specific antibody negative sera. A questionnaire designed to elicit symptoms of disease in a range of organ systems found no significant differences between illness in those exposed and those not exposed to VHD, nor could an association be found between exposure and subsequent episodes of illness. The findings are consistent with the view that exposure to VHD is not associated with infection or disease in humans. PMID:9825794

  14. The autophagy-lysosomal system in subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haijian; Niu, Huanjiang; Wu, Cheng; Li, Yong; Wang, Kun; Zhang, Jianmin; Wang, Yirong; Yang, Shuxu

    2016-09-01

    The autophagy-lysosomal pathway is a self-catabolic process by which dysfunctional or unnecessary intracellular components are degraded by lysosomal enzymes. Proper function of this pathway is critical for maintaining cell homeostasis and survival. Subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) is one of the most devastating forms of stroke. Multiple pathogenic mechanisms, such as inflammation, apoptosis, and oxidative stress, are all responsible for brain injury and poor outcome after SAH. Most recently, accumulating evidence has demonstrated that the autophagy-lysosomal pathway plays a crucial role in the pathophysiological process after SAH. Appropriate activity of autophagy-lysosomal pathway acts as a pro-survival mechanism in SAH, while excessive self-digestion results in cell death after SAH. Consequently, in this review article, we will give an overview of the pathophysiological roles of autophagy-lysosomal pathway in the pathogenesis of SAH. And approaching the molecular mechanisms underlying this pathway in SAH pathology is anticipated, which may ultimately allow development of effective therapeutic strategies for SAH patients through regulating the autophagy-lysosomal machinery. PMID:27027405

  15. Solute equilibrium over the extracellular fluid space in haemorrhagic hypotension: a study in a cannulated thoracic duct model.

    PubMed

    Ware, J; Norberg, K A; Nylander, G

    1983-01-01

    Haemorrhagic hypotension, 50 mm Hg, has been inflicted on non-starved rats. Osmolar and solute developments have been followed in lymph and arterial plasma to assess diffusion and equilibration characteristics of the initial stages of haemorrhage. Lymph flow changes have reflected an intracellular fluid mobilization to the interstitium, caused by an osmotic gradient due to the elevated levels of glucose. A fluid homeostatic effect of pseudodiabetes associated with stress and haemorrhage is postulated. PMID:6617708

  16. Transvaginal Oocyte Retrieval Complicated by Life-Threatening Obturator Artery Haemorrhage and Managed by a Vessel-Preserving Technique.

    PubMed Central

    Bolster, Ferdia; Mocanu, Edgar; Geoghegan, Tony; Lawler, Leo

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 36-year-old woman with secondary infertility who underwent routine transvaginal oocyte retrieval as part of IVF treatment. Four days following the procedure she presented with life threatening haemorrhagic shock. She underwent surgical laparotomy followed by CT and selective angiography, which demonstrated haemorrhage from a pseudoaneurysm of the obturator artery. The haemorrhage was successfully managed endovascularly with a vessel preserving covered stent. PMID:25484463

  17. Recommendations for the management of intracranial haemorrhage - part I: spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage. The European Stroke Initiative Writing Committee and the Writing Committee for the EUSI Executive Committee.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Thorsten; Kaste, Markku; Katse, Markku; Forsting, Michael; Mendelow, David; Kwiecinski, Hubert; Szikora, Istvan; Juvela, Seppo; Marchel, Andrzej; Chapot, René; Cognard, Christophe; Unterberg, Andreas; Hacke, Werner

    2006-01-01

    This article represents the recommendations for the management of spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage of the European Stroke Initiative (EUSI). These recommendations are endorsed by the 3 European societies which are represented in the EUSI: the European Stroke Council, the European Neurological Society and the European Federation of Neurological Societies. PMID:16926557

  18. Genetic contribution to postpartum haemorrhage in Swedish population: cohort study of 466 686 births

    PubMed Central

    Hernandéz-Diaź, Sonia; Frisell, Thomas; Greene, Michael F; Almqvist, Catarina; Bateman, Brian T

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the familial clustering of postpartum haemorrhage in the Swedish population, and to quantify the relative contributions of genetic and environmental effects. Design Register based cohort study. Setting Swedish population (multi-generation and medical birth registers). Main outcome measure Postpartum haemorrhage, defined as >1000 mL estimated blood loss. Participants The first two live births to individuals in Sweden in 1997-2009 contributed to clusters representing intact couples (n=366 350 births), mothers with separate partners (n=53 292), fathers with separate partners (n=47 054), sister pairs (n=97 228), brother pairs (n=91 168), and mixed sibling pairs (n=177 944). Methods Familial clustering was quantified through cluster specific tetrachoric correlation coefficients, and the influence of potential sharing of known risk factors was evaluated with alternating logistic regression. Relative contributions of genetic and environmental effects to the variation in liability for postpartum haemorrhage were quantified with generalised linear mixed models. Results The overall prevalence of postpartum haemorrhage after vaginal deliveries in our sample was 4.6%. Among vaginal deliveries, 18% (95% confidence interval 9% to 26%) of the variation in postpartum haemorrhage liability was attributed to maternal genetic factors, 10% (1% to 19%) to unique maternal environment, and 11% (0% to 26%) to fetal genetic effects. Adjustment for known risk factors only partially explained estimates of familial clustering, suggesting that the observed shared genetic and environmental effects operate in part through pathways independent of known risk factors. There were similar patterns of familial clustering for both of the main subtypes examined (atony and retained placenta), though strongest for haemorrhage after retained placenta. Conclusions There is a maternal genetic predisposition to postpartum haemorrhage, but more than half of the total

  19. [Skin and soft tissue infections].

    PubMed

    Piso, R J; Bassetti, S

    2012-03-14

    Skin- and Soft tissue infections are a frequent problem in hospital as well as in ambulatory care. Diagnostic procedures and treatment principles have to include the most frequent pathogens. While the acute forms of skin and soft tissue infections, with, necrotising fasciitis as important exception, rarely cause diagnostic or therapeutic problem, the treatment of patients with recurrent furunculosis, chronic wounds and diabetic feet is often difficult and frustration for patients and physicians. This article gives an overview of the most important problems and treatment strategies. PMID:22419138

  20. Intrauterine balloon tamponade as management of postpartum haemorrhage and prevention of haemorrhage related to low-lying placenta.

    PubMed

    Patacchiola, F; D'Alfonso, A; Di Fonso, A; Di Febbo, G; Kaliakoudas, D; Carta, G

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Bakri balloon in preventing and treating postpartum haemorrhage (PPH). Intrauterine Bakri balloon was used in a total of 16 patients with two different purposes: prophylactic placement of the balloon after cesarean section (CS) in six patients with low-lying placenta and therapeutic placement in ten patients with persistent bleeding from uterine atony, after spontaneous delivery, and administration of uterotonics. Intrauterine Bakri balloon was a successful approach in controlling and preventing PPH in all 16 patients. The median nadir hematocrit was 26.6% in six patients who underwent CS and 25.6% in ten patients with persistent bleeding after spontaneous delivery. The intrauterine balloon was in place for a duration of 24 hours. The median balloon infusion volume was 345 ml (range 250-455). No complications were reported. Bakri balloon tamponade was a useful measure in treating PPH unresponsive to pharmacological therapy in patients who delivered vaginally. Moreover, it was able to prevent persistent bleeding in patients who underwent CS for central placenta previa. PMID:23444752

  1. Spontaneous Bilateral Adrenal Haemorrhage after Duodenopancreatectomy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Guglielmo, N; Montalto, G M; Della Pietra, F; Garofalo, M; Mennini, G; Melandro, F; Berloco, P B

    2015-01-01

    it is difficult to diagnose because of its nonspecific presentation. This condition frequently occurs in association with an extreme physical stress and may lead to acute adrenal insufficiency or death if not promptly and properly treated. We report a rare case of acute bilateral adrenal hemorrhage with adrenal insufficiency following duodenopancreatectomy for ampulloma in absence of surgical complications. Early diagnosis and corticosteroid replacement with aggressive management of the precipitating pathology are essential to enable a successful outcome. PMID:25945442

  2. Skin cancer and photoaging in ethnic skin.

    PubMed

    Halder, Rebat M; Ara, Collette J

    2003-10-01

    Skin cancer prevalence in ethnic skin is low. Squamous cell carcinoma, hypopigmented mycosis fungoides, and acral lentiginous melanoma are the most serious types of skin cancer noted in the darker-skinned population. Photoaging occurs less frequently and is less severe in ethnic skin. PMID:14717413

  3. Gastro-intestinal haemorrhage risks of selective serotonin receptor antagonist therapy: a new look

    PubMed Central

    Opatrny, Lucie; Delaney, J A ‘Chris’; Suissa, Samy

    2008-01-01

    AIMS (i) To determine the effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) and other classes of antidepressants on upper gastro-intestinal (GI) haemorrhage and (ii) to assess the drug–drug interaction effects of antidepressants and warfarin or clopidogrel on the risk of GI haemorrhage. METHODS This was a population-based case control study in the General Practice Research Database (GPRD). Cases with a first episode of upper GI haemorrhage between 2000 and 2005 were matched with up to 10 controls. Exposure to the study drugs was defined by a prescription issued in the 90 days before the index date. Rate ratios were estimated using conditional logistic regression. RESULTS Four thousand and twenty-eight cases of GI haemorrhage and 40 171 controls were identified. The excess risk of GI haemorrhage with SSRI use was small (Rate Ratio [RR]: 1.3; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.1, 1.6) and null with exposure to tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) (RR 1.0; 95% CI: 0.8, 1.3). The risk of GI haemorrhage was highest with venlafaxine use (RR: 1.9; 95% CI: 1.3, 2.6). There was no drug–drug interaction between warfarin anticoagulation and antidepressant use. CONCLUSIONS This study supports a small increased risk of upper GI haemorrhage with the use of SSRI antidepressants compared with the older TCA drugs, but to a lesser extent than previously reported due to confounding by alcohol use. The small elevation in risk of GI haemorrhage with SSRI and venlafaxine should be weighed against the therapeutic benefit of their use. WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECT The known biological effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) on platelets are consistent with an increased risk of gastrointestinal haemorrhage in patients on SSRI therapy.Previous research supports this increased risk among SSRI users with a large increase in bleeding risk observed. WHAT THIS STUDY ADDS This large study was able to compare the effects of different classes of antidepressant as

  4. Effects of green tea catechins on the pro-inflammatory response after haemorrhage/resuscitation in rats.

    PubMed

    Relja, Borna; Töttel, Eva; Breig, Lara; Henrich, Dirk; Schneider, Heinz; Marzi, Ingo; Lehnert, Mark

    2011-06-28

    Plant polyphenols, i.e. green tea extract (GTE), possess high antioxidative and anti-inflammatory capacity, thus being protective in various models of acute inflammation. However, their anti-inflammatory effect and a feasible mechanism in haemorrhage/resuscitation (H/R)-induced liver injury remain unknown. We investigated the effects of GTE and the role of NF-κB in the pathogenesis of liver injury induced by H/R, and their effects on intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression and neutrophil infiltration. Female Lewis rats were fed a standard chow diet (control, ctrl) or a diet containing 0·1 % polyphenolic GTE for five consecutive days before H/R. Rats were haemorrhaged to a mean arterial pressure of 30 (sem 2) mmHg for 60 min and resuscitated. Control groups (sham_ctrl and sham_GTE) underwent surgical procedures without H/R. At 2 h after resuscitation, tissues were harvested. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and IL-6 were measured. Hepatic necrosis, ICAM-1 expression and polymorphonuclear leucocyte (PMNL) infiltration were assessed. Hepatic expression of IκBα (phospho) was measured. H/R induced strong liver damage with increased necrosis and serum ALT levels. Compared with both sham groups, inflammatory markers (serum IL-6 and hepatic PMNL infiltration) were elevated after H/R (P < 0·05). Also, H/R increased IκBα phosphorylation. GTE administration markedly (P < 0·05) decreased serum ALT and IL-6 levels, hepatic necrosis as well as PMNL infiltration and the expression of ICAM-1 and phosphorylated IκBα compared with H/R. In conclusion, we observed that NF-κB activation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of liver injury after H/R through the up-regulation of hepatic ICAM-1 expression and subsequent PMNL infiltration. GTE pre-treatment prevents liver damage in this model of acute inflammation through a NF-κB-dependent mechanism. PMID:21294935

  5. Antecedents of periventricular haemorrhage in infants weighing 1250 g or less at birth.

    PubMed Central

    Szymonowicz, W; Yu, V Y; Wilson, F E

    1984-01-01

    Fifty infants who weighed 1250 g or less at birth were studied with serial real time cerebral ultrasound to evaluate the temporal relation of various perinatal factors to the onset and progression of periventricular haemorrhage (PVH). The significant antecedents of PVH were severe bruising at birth, low birthweight, short gestation, ratio of arterial oxygen pressure (PaO2) to fractional inspired oxygen (FiO2), and haematocrit on admission, hyaline membrane disease, assisted ventilation, pneumothorax, administration of tubocurarine, hypercapnia, hypoxaemia, and hypotension. Case control studies, in which infants with PVH at 26 weeks' and 28 weeks' gestation were compared with matched infants without PVH, confirmed that the antecedents identified were independent of gestational influences. A multivariate discriminant analysis for the antecedents of PVH showed that hyaline membrane disease, hypercapnia, and short gestation correctly classified presence or absence of PVH in 78% of the study group. A similar analysis comparing infants with germinal layer haemorrhage or intraventricular haemorrhage with those who developed intracerebral extension of haemorrhage showed that three factors found on admission (hypothermia, a low PaO2:FiO2 ratio, and severe bruising) combined to classify correctly 90% of the haemorrhages. Our data suggest that prevention of perinatal trauma and asphyxia as well as respiratory illness, especially hyaline membrane disease, and stabilisation of blood gas tensions, blood pressure, and haematocrit within the physiological range, are likely to be the most effective ways of preventing PVH in extremely preterm infants. PMID:6696488

  6. Haemorrhagic disease of the newborn in the British Isles: two year prospective study.

    PubMed Central

    McNinch, A W; Tripp, J H

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the incidence of haemorrhagic disease of the newborn in the British Isles, study risk factors, and examine the effect of vitamin K prophylaxis. DESIGN--Prospective survey of all possible cases of haemorrhagic disease of the newborn as reported by consultant paediatricians using the monthly notification cards of the British Paediatric Surveillance Unit and a follow up questionnaire for each case to validate the diagnosis and accrue further data. SETTING--Britain (England, Scotland, and Wales) and Ireland (Northern Ireland and the Irish Republic) during December 1987 to March 1990. PATIENTS--27 infants classified as having confirmed (n = 25) or probable (n = 2) haemorrhagic disease of the newborn. RESULTS--24 of the 27 infants were solely breast fed. 10 suffered intracranial haemorrhage; two of these died and there was clinical concern about the remainder. 20 infants had received no vitamin K prophylaxis, and seven had received oral prophylaxis. Relative risk ratios for these groups compared with babies who had received intramuscular vitamin K were 81:1 and 13:1 respectively. Six infants had hepatitis (alpha 1 antitrypsin deficiency in four), unsuspected until presentation with haemorrhagic disease of the newborn, of whom four had received oral prophylaxis. One other baby had prolonged jaundice. One mother had taken phenytoin during pregnancy. CONCLUSIONS--All newborn infants should receive vitamin K prophylaxis. Intramuscular vitamin K is more effective than oral prophylactic regimens currently used in the British Isles. PMID:1747578

  7. Progress and opportunities for tissue-engineered skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacNeil, Sheila

    2007-02-01

    Tissue-engineered skin is now a reality. For patients with extensive full-thickness burns, laboratory expansion of skin cells to achieve barrier function can make the difference between life and death, and it was this acute need that drove the initiation of tissue engineering in the 1980s. A much larger group of patients have ulcers resistant to conventional healing, and treatments using cultured skin cells have been devised to restart the wound-healing process. In the laboratory, the use of tissue-engineered skin provides insight into the behaviour of skin cells in healthy skin and in diseases such as vitiligo, melanoma, psoriasis and blistering disorders.

  8. Massive haemorrhage in liver transplantation: Consequences, prediction and management

    PubMed Central

    Cleland, Stuart; Corredor, Carlos; Ye, Jia Jia; Srinivas, Coimbatore; McCluskey, Stuart A

    2016-01-01

    From its inception the success of liver transplantation has been associated with massive blood loss. Massive transfusion is classically defined as > 10 units of red blood cells within 24 h, but describing transfusion rates over a shorter period of time may reduce the potential for survival bias. Both massive haemorrhage and transfusion are associated with increased risk of mortality and morbidity (need for dialysis/surgical site infection) following liver transplantation although causality is difficult to prove due to the observational design of most trials. The blood loss associated with liver transplantation is multifactorial. Portal hypertension secondary to cirrhosis results in extensive collateral circulation, which can bleed during hepatectomy particular if portal pressures are increased. Avoiding volume loading and maintenance of a low central venous pressure together with the use of vasopressors have been shown to reduce blood loss and transfusion during liver transplantation, but may increase the risk of renal impairment post-operatively. Coagulation defects may be present pre-transplant, but haemostasis is often re-balanced due to a deficit in both pro- and anti-coagulation factors. Further derangement of haemostasis may develop in the anhepatic and neohepatic phases due to absent hepatic metabolic function, hyperfibrinolysis and platelet sequestration in the donor liver. Point-of-care tests of coagulation such as the viscoelastic tests rotation thromboelastometry/thromboelastometry allow and more accurate and rapid assessment of these derangements in coagulation and guide the use of factor replacement and antifibrinolytics. Transfusion protocols guided by these tests have been shown to reduce transfusion rates compared with conventional coagulation tests, but have not shown improvements in mortality or morbidity. Pre-operative factors associated with massive transfusion include previous surgery, re-do transplantation, the aetiology and severity of liver

  9. Massive haemorrhage in liver transplantation: Consequences, prediction and management.

    PubMed

    Cleland, Stuart; Corredor, Carlos; Ye, Jia Jia; Srinivas, Coimbatore; McCluskey, Stuart A

    2016-06-24

    From its inception the success of liver transplantation has been associated with massive blood loss. Massive transfusion is classically defined as > 10 units of red blood cells within 24 h, but describing transfusion rates over a shorter period of time may reduce the potential for survival bias. Both massive haemorrhage and transfusion are associated with increased risk of mortality and morbidity (need for dialysis/surgical site infection) following liver transplantation although causality is difficult to prove due to the observational design of most trials. The blood loss associated with liver transplantation is multifactorial. Portal hypertension secondary to cirrhosis results in extensive collateral circulation, which can bleed during hepatectomy particular if portal pressures are increased. Avoiding volume loading and maintenance of a low central venous pressure together with the use of vasopressors have been shown to reduce blood loss and transfusion during liver transplantation, but may increase the risk of renal impairment post-operatively. Coagulation defects may be present pre-transplant, but haemostasis is often re-balanced due to a deficit in both pro- and anti-coagulation factors. Further derangement of haemostasis may develop in the anhepatic and neohepatic phases due to absent hepatic metabolic function, hyperfibrinolysis and platelet sequestration in the donor liver. Point-of-care tests of coagulation such as the viscoelastic tests rotation thromboelastometry/thromboelastometry allow and more accurate and rapid assessment of these derangements in coagulation and guide the use of factor replacement and antifibrinolytics. Transfusion protocols guided by these tests have been shown to reduce transfusion rates compared with conventional coagulation tests, but have not shown improvements in mortality or morbidity. Pre-operative factors associated with massive transfusion include previous surgery, re-do transplantation, the aetiology and severity of liver

  10. How to Check Your Skin for Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Cancer Types Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Patient Skin Cancer Treatment Melanoma Treatment Merkel Cell Carcinoma Treatment Skin Cancer Prevention Skin Cancer Screening Health Professional Skin Cancer Treatment Melanoma Treatment Merkel Cell Carcinoma Treatment Skin Cancer ...

  11. Electrohydrothermoprobe--a simple alternative to laser therapy in the management of acute gastrointestinal haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Bate, C M; Aziz, L A

    1985-01-01

    One hundred and twenty six consecutive patients presenting with upper alimentary bleeding were endoscoped. Seventeen gastric and 11 duodenal lesions with visible blood vessels were identified and cauterised with the electrohydrothermoprobe. One gastric and four duodenal vessels rebled, necessitating surgery. For the gastric vessels this represents about one tenth of the expected rebleeding rate, and is a significant reduction. The technique appears to have no effect on the rebleeding rate in duodenal vessels. PMID:3873381

  12. PPD skin test

    MedlinePlus

    Purified protein derivative standard; TB skin test; Tuberculin skin test; Mantoux test ... Berger BJ. Mantoux skin test (PPD test, purified protein derivative test, Tb test, tuberculin skin test, TST, ...

  13. Skin Pigmentation Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Pigmentation means coloring. Skin pigmentation disorders affect the color of your skin. Your skin gets its color from a pigment called melanin. Special cells in the skin make melanin. When these cells become damaged or ...

  14. Allergy testing - skin

    MedlinePlus

    Patch tests - allergy; Scratch tests - allergy; Skin tests - allergy; RAST test ... There are three common methods of allergy skin testing. The skin prick test involves: Placing a small amount of substances that may be causing your symptoms on the skin, ...

  15. ECMO Rescue Therapy in Diffuse Alveolar Haemorrhage: A Case Report with Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Rawal, Gautam; Kumar, Raj; Yadav, Sankalp

    2016-06-01

    Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) has evolved as a treatment option for patients having potentially reversible severe respiratory failure who are deteriorating on conventional ventilation. During ECMO, systemic anticoagulation is needed to maintain patency of the circuit. Therefore, ongoing haemorrhage remains a relative contra-indication to ECMO as it can further increase the bleeding. There is only limited evidence available for the use of ECMO in patients with alveolar haemorrhage. Most of these patients did not receive any anticoagulation during ECMO. We describe our experience with a patient who received intravenous anticoagulation during ECMO for refractory hypoxemic respiratory failure due to Diffuse Alveolar Haemorrhage (DAH) associated with Granulomatosis polyangitis (Wegner's GPA). ECMO sustained life by maintaining gas exchange support and provided the time for the immunotherapy to be effective. We report the successful use of anticoagulation during ECMO in a patient with DAH. PMID:27504336

  16. Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia Presenting as Bilateral Retinal Haemorrhages with Multiple Retinal Infiltrates

    PubMed Central

    Barot, Rakesh K.; Gohel, Devadatta Jayantilal; Bhagat, Nupur

    2016-01-01

    Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia (CML) causes retinopathy manifesting as venous dilation and tortuosity, perivascular sheathing, retinal haemorrhages, microaneurysms, cotton-wool spots and optic nerve infiltration. Retina is the most commonly involved intraocular structure in CML. However, retinal involvement is a rare form of presentation of CML and few cases have been reported. We report a case of CML presenting as unilateral sudden visual loss. Fundus showed multiple white centered retinal haemorrhages in both eyes with unilateral macular oedema. Blood work-up showed raised WBC count, high platelet count and low Haemoglobin. Cytological analysis of bone marrow biopsy confirmed Philadelphia chromosome. After a course of Imatinib, visual acuity improved and haemorrhages resolved with normalization of macular thickness. In our case, patient presented early, leading to early detection producing better visual prognosis. This highlights the importance of detailed hematological work up in patients with retinal involvement to rule out leukaemic retinopathy.

  17. Mosquito-borne haemorrhagic fevers of South and South-East Asia.

    PubMed

    Halstead, S B

    1966-01-01

    During the past decade outbreaks of a severe haemorrhagic disease caused by dengue viruses of multiple types have been reported in the Philippines, Thailand, Malaysia, Viet-Nam and eastern India. In many of these outbreaks chikungunya virus, a group A arbovirus, was simultaneously the cause of similar but probably milder disease. Both these viruses appear to be able to be able to produce classical dengue fever in some individuals and disease with haemorrhagic manifestations in others. Because of the growing public health importance and the progressive spread of this disease a unified review of its clinical and epidemiological features has been needed. This paper presents the history and salient clinical features of mosquito-borne haemorrhagic fever and summarizes recent epidemiological studies and current diagnostic and control methods. PMID:5297536

  18. Mosquito-borne haemorrhagic fevers of South and South-East Asia*

    PubMed Central

    Halstead, Scott B.

    1966-01-01

    During the past decade outbreaks of a severe haemorrhagic disease caused by dengue viruses of multiple types have been reported in the Philippines, Thailand, Malaysia, Viet-Nam and eastern India. In many of these outbreaks chikungunya virus, a group A arbovirus, was simultaneously the cause of similar but probably milder disease. Both these viruses appear to be able to be able to produce classical dengue fever in some individuals and disease with haemorrhagic manifestations in others. Because of the growing public health importance and the progressive spread of this disease a unified review of its clinical and epidemiological features has been needed. This paper presents the history and salient clinical features of mosquito-borne haemorrhagic fever and summarizes recent epidemiological studies and current diagnostic and control methods. ImagesFIG. 4 PMID:5297536

  19. ECMO Rescue Therapy in Diffuse Alveolar Haemorrhage: A Case Report with Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Raj; Yadav, Sankalp

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) has evolved as a treatment option for patients having potentially reversible severe respiratory failure who are deteriorating on conventional ventilation. During ECMO, systemic anticoagulation is needed to maintain patency of the circuit. Therefore, ongoing haemorrhage remains a relative contra-indication to ECMO as it can further increase the bleeding. There is only limited evidence available for the use of ECMO in patients with alveolar haemorrhage. Most of these patients did not receive any anticoagulation during ECMO. We describe our experience with a patient who received intravenous anticoagulation during ECMO for refractory hypoxemic respiratory failure due to Diffuse Alveolar Haemorrhage (DAH) associated with Granulomatosis polyangitis (Wegner’s GPA). ECMO sustained life by maintaining gas exchange support and provided the time for the immunotherapy to be effective. We report the successful use of anticoagulation during ECMO in a patient with DAH.

  20. Acute and subacute idiopathic interstitial pneumonias.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Hiroyuki; Kondoh, Yasuhiro

    2016-07-01

    Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) may have an acute or subacute presentation, or acute exacerbation may occur in a previously subclinical or unrecognized chronic IIP. Acute or subacute IIPs include acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP), cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP), nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (AE-IPF) and AE-NSIP. Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) including connective tissue disease (CTD) associated ILD, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, acute eosinophilic pneumonia, drug-induced lung disease and diffuse alveolar haemorrhage need to be differentiated from acute and subacute IIPs. Despite the severe lack of randomized controlled trials for the treatment of acute and subacute IIPs, the mainstream treatment remains corticosteroid therapy. Other potential therapies reported in the literature include corticosteroids and immunosuppression, antibiotics, anticoagulants, neutrophil elastase inhibitor, autoantibody-targeted treatment, antifibrotics and hemoperfusion therapy. With regard to mechanical ventilation, patients in recent studies with acute and subacute IIPs have shown better survival than those in previous studies. Therefore, a careful value-laden decision about the indications for endotracheal intubation should be made for each patient. Noninvasive ventilation may be beneficial to reduce ventilator associated pneumonia. PMID:27123874

  1. Cutaneous skin tag

    MedlinePlus

    Skin tag; Acrochordon; Fibroepithelial polyp ... have diabetes. They are thought to occur from skin rubbing against skin. ... The tag sticks out of the skin and may have a short, narrow stalk connecting it to the surface of the skin. Some skin tags are as long as ...

  2. Novel bivalent vectored vaccine for control of myxomatosis and rabbit haemorrhagic disease.

    PubMed

    Spibey, N; McCabe, V J; Greenwood, N M; Jack, S C; Sutton, D; van der Waart, L

    2012-03-24

    A novel, recombinant myxoma virus-rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) vaccine has been developed for the prevention of myxomatosis and rabbit haemorrhagic disease (RHD). A number of laboratory studies are described illustrating the safety and efficacy of the vaccine following subcutaneous administration in laboratory rabbits from four weeks of age onwards. In these studies, both vaccinated and unvaccinated control rabbits were challenged using pathogenic strains of RHD and myxoma viruses, and 100 per cent of the vaccinated rabbits were protected against both myxomatosis and RHD. PMID:22266680

  3. Biomarkers and acute brain injuries: interest and limits

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    For patients presenting with acute brain injury (such as traumatic brain injury, subarachnoid haemorrhage and stroke), the diagnosis and identification of intracerebral lesions and evaluation of the severity, prognosis and treatment efficacy can be challenging. The complexity and heterogeneity of lesions after brain injury are most probably responsible for this difficulty. Patients with apparently comparable brain lesions on imaging may have different neurological outcomes or responses to therapy. In recent years, plasmatic and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers have emerged as possible tools to distinguish between the different pathophysiological processes. This review aims to summarise the plasmatic and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers evaluated in subarachnoid haemorrhage, traumatic brain injury and stroke, and to clarify their related interests and limits for diagnosis and prognosis. For subarachnoid haemorrhage, particular interest has been focused on the biomarkers used to predict vasospasm and cerebral ischaemia. The efficacy of biomarkers in predicting the severity and outcome of traumatic brain injury has been stressed. The very early diagnostic performance of biomarkers and their ability to discriminate ischaemic from haemorrhagic stroke were studied. PMID:25029344

  4. Haemorrhagic cystitis due to BK virus in a child with ALL on standard chemotherapy without stem cell transplant

    PubMed Central

    Alavi, Samin; Yazdi, Mohammad Kaji; Parvin, Mahmoud; Zohrehbandian, Farahnaz; Azma, Roxana

    2013-01-01

    The BK virus (BKV) is a nonenveloped double-stranded DNA virus of the polyomavirus family that primarily affects immunocompromised people. BKV infects humans at an early age. Initial infections with BKV are mainly asymptomatic and usually remain latent in the brain, peripheral blood, kidneys, and urothelium. Following the primary infection, viruses persist indefinitely as ‘latent’ infections of the kidney and urinary system because the virus is urotheliotropic. Reactivation of the virus infections occurs in individuals with severe immunosuppression states such as kidney and stem cell transplantation and rarely in pregnancy. In this line, BKV has been implicated as a common cause of late-onset haemorrhagic cystitis (HC) in patients who have undergone stem cell transplantation. In contrast, reports of BKV-associated diseases in nontransplant paediatric patients are almost exclusively in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection. Herein, we report the first case of a child with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia who developed BKV-associated HC without receiving stem cell transplantation while on standard maintenance chemotherapy. PMID:24062808

  5. Ventricular longitudinal function is associated with microvascular obstruction and intramyocardial haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Foley, James R J; Musa, Tarique Al; Ripley, David P; Swoboda, Peter P; Erhayiem, Bara; Dobson, Laura E; McDiarmid, Adam K; Greenwood, John P; Plein, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Background Microvascular obstruction (MVO) and intramyocardial haemorrhage (IMH) are associated with adverse prognosis, independently of infarct size after reperfused ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Mitral annular plane systolic excursion (MAPSE) is a well-established parameter of longitudinal function on echocardiography. Objective We aimed to investigate how acute MAPSE, assessed by a four-chamber cine-cardiovascular MR (CMR), is associated with MVO, IMH and convalescent left ventricular (LV) remodelling. Methods 54 consecutive patients underwent CMR at 3T (Intera CV, Philips Healthcare, Best, The Netherlands) within 3 days of reperfused STEMI. Cine, T2-weighted, T2* and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging were performed. Infarct and MVO extent were measured from LGE images. The presence of IMH was investigated by combined analysis of T2w and T2* images. Averaged-MAPSE (medial-MAPSE+lateral-MAPSE/2) was calculated from 4-chamber cine imaging. Results 44 patients completed the baseline scan and 38 patients completed 3-month scans. 26 (59%) patients had MVO and 25 (57%) patients had IMH. Presence of MVO and IMH were associated with lower averaged-MAPSE (11.7±0.4 mm vs 9.3±0.3 mm; p<0.001 and 11.8±0.4 mm vs 9.2±0.3 mm; p<0.001, respectively). IMH (β=−0.655, p<0.001) and MVO (β=−0.567, p<0.001) demonstrated a stronger correlation to MAPSE than other demographic and infarct characteristics. MAPSE ≤10.6 mm demonstrated 89% sensitivity and 72% specificity for the detection of MVO and 92% sensitivity and 74% specificity for IMH. LV remodelling in convalescence was not associated with MAPSE (AUC 0.62, 95% CI 0.44 to 0.77, p=0.22). Conclusions Postreperfused STEMI, LV longitudinal function assessed by MAPSE can independently predict the presence of MVO and IMH. PMID:27175286

  6. Intracerebral haemorrhage in a population-based stroke registry (LuSSt): incidence, aetiology, functional outcome and mortality.

    PubMed

    Palm, F; Henschke, N; Wolf, J; Zimmer, K; Safer, A; Schröder, R J; Inselmann, G; Brenke, C; Becher, H; Grau, A J

    2013-10-01

    Data on incidence of intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) vary widely. Population-based data on predictors of ICH survival and functional outcome are rare. The Ludwigshafen Stroke Study is a prospective, population-based stroke registry which started in January 2006. All residents of the city of Ludwigshafen, Germany, who suffer from acute stroke or transient ischaemic attack are registered. Patients with first-ever primary intracerebral haemorrhage (FE-pICH) between 2006 and 2010 were included in the present analysis. Between January 1st, 2006 and December 31st, 2010, 152 patients suffered a FE-pICH. Crude and age-adjusted incidence rates per 100,000 for FE-pICH were 18.7 (95 % CI 15.9-21.9) and 11.9 (95 % CI 10.2-14.0), respectively, and remained stable over time. Case-fatality rates for FE-pICH were 27.0, 34.9 and 44.1 % at days 28, 90 and 365, respectively. In 21 patients, an (21.3 %) early do-not resuscitate-order was documented. Excluding these patients from multivariate analyses, National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) (OR 1.22, 95 % CI 1.08-1.36), hypercholesterolemia (OR 0.16, 95 % CI 0.05-0.55) and modified Rankin Scale (mRS) prior to stroke (OR 1.56, 95 % CI 1.06-2.3) were independently associated with risk of 1-year mortality, whereas NIHSS (OR 1.41, 95 % CI 1.20-1.66) and leukocyte count on admission (OR 1.48, 95 % CI 1.16-1.89) were independently associated with good or moderate functional outcome (mRS ≤ 3) after 1 year. Incidence of FE-ICH is in the lower range of those reported from other registries and remained stable over the observation period. Higher treatment rates for hypertension might partly account for this. Stroke severity as indicated by NIHSS was independently associated with mortality and functional outcome after 1 year. We found no association between aetiology and outcome in ICH patients. PMID:23812642

  7. Computational Intelligence Method for Early Diagnosis Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever Using Fuzzy on Mobile Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, Afan; Lina, Yen; Simon, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Mortality from Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever (DHF) is still increasing in Indonesia particularly in Jakarta. Diagnosis of the dengue shall be made as early as possible so that first aid can be given in expectation of decreasing death risk. The Study will be conducted by developing expert system based on Computational Intelligence Method. On the first year, study will use the Fuzzy Inference System (FIS) Method to diagnose Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever particularly in Mobile Device consist of smart phone. Expert system application which particularly using fuzzy system can be applied in mobile device and it is useful to make early diagnosis of Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever that produce outcome faster than laboratory test. The evaluation of this application is conducted by performing accuracy test before and after validation using data of patient who has the Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever. This expert system application is easy, convenient, and practical to use, also capable of making the early diagnosis of Dengue Haemorraghic to avoid mortality in the first stage.

  8. Large bilateral adrenal haemorrhages in a newborn with unrepaired cyanotic CHD.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Lerraughn M; Austin, Erle H; Holland, Brian J

    2016-06-01

    Management of newborns with cyanotic CHD and bilateral adrenal haemorrhages has not previously been described in the literature. These abnormalities present unique challenges due to the potential for haemodynamic instability, need for open heart surgery and associated systemic anticoagulation in the newborn period, and the risk of catastrophic bleeding. PMID:27056035

  9. Trends in maternal mortality due to haemorrhage: two decades of Indian rural observations.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, S; Sirohi, Ritu

    2004-01-01

    Obstetric haemorrhage continues to be a major cause of maternal mortality. Our analysis of records of over a period of 20 years from April 1982 to March 2002 reveals that it was a contributory cause of maternal mortality in 19.9% of cases. The majority of deaths, (65%) had occurred within 24 hours of admission and in 47.5% of cases there was severe anaemia on admission; 17.5% had died due to an atonic PPH, which was the largest category, followed by ruptured uterus (15%), abruptio placenta (15%) and retained placenta (12.5%). Deaths due to obstetric haemorrhage because of a ruptured uterus, retained placenta and abortion have decreased from 22.22% between 1982 and 1987 to zero in the last 5 years and an increase was seen in deaths due to haemorrhage because of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia and ectopic pregnancy, from 1.69% to 4.87%, unclassified haemorrhage 1.96% to 7.31% and placenta praevia from zero between 1982 and 1987 to 4.87% between 1997 and 2002. PMID:14675979

  10. Bilateral subhyaloid haemorrhage in a conscious patient: a new spectrum of ocular involvement by Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Abdali, Nasar; Malik, Azharuddin Mohammed; Shamim, Md Dilawez; Rizvi, Syed Wajahat Ali

    2014-01-01

    A 24-year-old woman presented with a history of high-grade fever with rigours since 3 days and bilateral sudden loss of vision since 6 h. She was conscious, oriented and her vitals were stable. She had a temperature of 101°F, anaemia, thrombocytopaenia, normal white cell count and moderate splenomegaly. On testing visual activity, she could only perceive hand movements although her pupils were bilaterally equal, and normal in size and reaction. On indirect ophthalmoscopy, optic discs were normal bilaterally; however, fovea of both eyes was masked by subhyaloid haemorrhage. Peripheral smear showed gametocytes of Plasmodium falciparum. The patient was started on arteminsinin-combined therapy and advised to be in propped-up position to help resolution of the haemorrhage. The patient was afebrile in 4 days and follow-up fundus examination showed gradual resolution of the haemorrhage. After two months, the patient regained normal visual acuity in both eyes; however, it took nearly 3 months for complete resolution of the haemorrhage. PMID:24862605

  11. Biochemical and functional characterization of Bothropoidin: the first haemorrhagic metalloproteinase from Bothrops pauloensis snake venom.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Mário Sérgio R; Naves de Souza, Dayane L; Guimarães, Denise O; Lopes, Daiana S; Mamede, Carla C N; Gimenes, Sarah Natalie C; Achê, David C; Rodrigues, Renata S; Yoneyama, Kelly A G; Borges, Márcia H; de Oliveira, Fábio; Rodrigues, Veridiana M

    2015-03-01

    We present the biochemical and functional characterization of Bothropoidin, the first haemorrhagic metalloproteinase isolated from Bothrops pauloensis snake venom. This protein was purified after three chromatographic steps on cation exchange CM-Sepharose fast flow, size-exclusion column Sephacryl S-300 and anion exchange Capto Q. Bothropoidin was homogeneous by SDS-PAGE under reducing and non-reducing conditions, and comprised a single chain of 49,558 Da according to MALDI TOF analysis. The protein presented an isoelectric point of 3.76, and the sequence of six fragments obtained by MS (MALDI TOF\\TOF) showed a significant score when compared with other PIII Snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs). Bothropoidin showed proteolytic activity on azocasein, Aα-chain of fibrinogen, fibrin, collagen and fibronectin. The enzyme was stable at pH 6-9 and at lower temperatures when assayed on azocasein. Moreover, its activity was inhibited by EDTA, 1.10-phenanthroline and β-mercaptoethanol. Bothropoidin induced haemorrhage [minimum haemorrhagic dose (MHD) = 0.75 µg], inhibited platelet aggregation induced by collagen and ADP, and interfered with viability and cell adhesion when incubated with endothelial cells in a dose and time-dependent manner. Our results showed that Bothropoidin is a haemorrhagic metalloproteinase that can play an important role in the toxicity of B. pauloensis envenomation and might be used as a tool for studying the effects of SVMPs on haemostatic disorders and tumour metastasis. PMID:25261583

  12. Experimental respiratory Marburg virus haemorrhagic fever infection in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus)

    PubMed Central

    Smither, Sophie J; Nelson, Michelle; Eastaugh, Lin; Laws, Thomas R; Taylor, Christopher; Smith, Simon A; Salguero, Francisco J; Lever, Mark S

    2013-01-01

    Marburg virus causes a highly infectious and lethal haemorrhagic fever in primates and may be exploited as a potential biothreat pathogen. To combat the infection and threat of Marburg haemorrhagic fever, there is a need to develop and license appropriate medical countermeasures. To determine whether the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) would be an appropriate model to assess therapies against Marburg haemorrhagic fever, initial susceptibility, lethality and pathogenesis studies were performed. Low doses of virus, between 4 and 28 TCID50, were sufficient to cause a lethal, reproducible infection. Animals became febrile between days 5 and 6, maintaining a high fever before succumbing to disease between 8 and 11 days postchallenge. Typical signs of Marburg virus infection were observed including haemorrhaging and a transient rash. In pathogenesis studies, virus was isolated from the animals’ lungs from day 3 postchallenge and from the liver, spleen and blood from day 5 postchallenge. Early signs of histopathology were apparent in the kidney and liver from day 3. The most striking features were observed in animals exhibiting severe clinical signs, which included high viral titres in all organs, with the highest levels in the blood, increased levels in liver function enzymes and blood clotting times, decreased levels in platelets, multifocal moderate-to-severe hepatitis and perivascular oedema. PMID:23441639

  13. Mitral endocarditis due to Rothia aeria with cerebral haemorrhage and femoral mycotic aneurysms, first French description.

    PubMed

    Collarino, R; Vergeylen, U; Emeraud, C; Latournèrie, G; Grall, N; Mammeri, H; Messika-Zeitoun, D; Vallois, D; Yazdanpanah, Y; Lescure, F-X; Bleibtreu, A

    2016-09-01

    Rothia aeria is a Rothia species from the Micrococcaceae family. We report here the first French R. aeria endocarditis complicated by brain haemorrhage and femoral mycotic aneurysms. Altogether, severity and antimicrobial susceptibility should make us consider the management of R. aeria endocarditis as Staphylococcus aureus methicillin-susceptible endocarditis. PMID:27408740

  14. Superselective embolization in an errosive haemorrhage of a carcinoma in the parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Feifel, H; Volle, E; Riediger, D; Gustorf-Aeckerle, R

    1991-12-01

    Haemorrhage due to errosion of blood vessels in tumors of the head and neck are a dramatic event. Superselective embolization plays an important role in the treatment of these entities. A therapeutic approach and method of embolization is described. PMID:1770245

  15. Visual outcome of 25-gauge microincision vitrectomy surgery in diabetic vitreous haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Burhan Abdul Majid; Rizvi, Syed Fawad; Mahmood, Syed Asaad; Mal, Washoo; Zafar, Shakir

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the visual outcome and complications of 25-gauge micro incision vitrectomy surgery (MIVS) in diabetic vitreous haemorrhage. Methods: This Quasi Experimental study was conducted at LRBT, Tertiary eye care hospital Karachi, from February 2012 to January 2013. Sixty eyes of sixty patients with uncontrolled type II diabetes mellitus (DM) were included. There were 43 (71.7%) males and 17 (28.3%) females. Age range was 40 – 60 years. All randomly selected patients underwent 25-gauge sutureless micro incision vitrectomy surgery for diabetic vitreous haemorrhage. Main outcomes measured were best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) assessed with logMAR and post-operative complications. Follow ups were at one day, one week, one month, three months and six months post-operatively. Result: Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) gradually improved in majority of subjects in each subsequent follow up visit. Preoperative visual acuity was 1.023 ±0.226 logMAR, which was improved after final follow up to 0.457±0.256 and P-value was < 0.001. Five patients developed recurrent vitreous haemorrhage during study period, one patient developed cataract (1.7%), one (1.7%) had ocular hypotony defined as intraocular pressure < 5 mmHg and one (1.7%) developed endophthalmitis. Conclusion: 25-gauge micro incision vitrectomy surgery (MIVS) is an effective sutureless parsplana vitrectomy surgery which has good visual outcome in diabetic vitreous haemorrhage with minimum manageable complications. PMID:26649013

  16. Evidence that venoconstriction reverses the phase II sympathoinhibitory and bradycardic response to haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Potas, J R; Dampney, R A L

    2004-03-31

    Severe hypotensive haemorrhage results in a biphasic response, characterized by an initial increase in heart rate and sympathetic vasomotor activity (phase I) followed by a life-threatening hypotension, accompanied by profound sympathoinhibition and bradycardia (phase II). The phase II response is believed to be dependent on inputs from cardiopulmonary receptors, and may be triggered by the reduction in venous return and cardiac filling associated with severe haemorrhage. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the phase II response could be reversed by venoconstriction, which is known to enhance venous return and cardiac filling, by comparing the effects of phenylephrine (which constricts veins as well as arterioles) with that of vasopressin (which constricts arterioles but not veins). In sodium pentobarbitone-anaesthetised rats, haemorrhage evoked an initial increase in heart rate (HR) and renal sympathetic activity (RSNA) followed by a large decrease in both variables to levels below the pre-haemorrhage baseline levels (phase II response). During the phase II response, an intravenous injection of phenylephrine, sufficient to restore mean arterial pressure to the pre-haemorrhage level, resulted in a gradually developing increase (over 3-4 min) in HR and RSNA back to the baseline levels. In contrast, intravenous injection of an equipressor dose of vasopressin did not result in any increase in RSNA and only a transient increase in HR. Injection of phenylephrine, but not vasopressin, also increased the pulsatile component of central venous pressure, indicative of reduced venous capacitance. The findings indicate that venoconstriction reverses the phase II sympathoinhibition and bradycardia. PMID:15109933

  17. Prevalence and incidence of intracranial haemorrhage in a population of children with haemophilia. The Hemophilia Growth and Development Study.

    PubMed

    Nelson, M D; Maeder, M A; Usner, D; Mitchell, W G; Fenstermacher, M J; Wilson, D A; Gomperts, E D

    1999-09-01

    The prevalence of intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) in our population of haemophiliacs was 12%. The incidence of ICH was approximately 2% per year. At entry, 7% (21/309) had clinical histories of ICH without MRI evidence of old haemorrhage, indicating that either the haemorrhages had completely resolved, that routine MRI sequences are not particularly sensitive for the detection of old blood products, or a combination of both of these factors. One half (4/8) of the ICHs documented by entry MRI were clinically silent, and three of the 11 incident cases documented by MRI were clinically silent. HIV infection did not increase the risk of ICH. PMID:10583511

  18. Skin (Pressure) Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Skin dryness Next Topic Sleep problems Skin (pressure) sores A skin or pressure sore develops when the blood supply to an ... is bedridden or always in a wheelchair puts pressure on the same places much of the time. ...

  19. Layers of the Skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... produce the skin coloring or pigment known as melanin, which gives skin its tan or brown color ... Sun exposure causes melanocytes to increase production of melanin in order to protect the skin from damaging ...

  20. Learning about Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... have red or blond hair and blue or light-colored eyes - although anyone can get skin cancer. Skin cancer is related to lifetime exposure to UV radiation, therefore most skin cancers appear after age ...

  1. Scalded skin syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Ritter disease; Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSS) ... Scalded skin syndrome (SSS) is caused by infection with certain strains of Staphylococcus bacteria. The bacteria produce a toxin that causes the skin ...

  2. Basal cell skin cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur on skin that is regularly exposed to sunlight or other ultraviolet radiation. This type of skin ... skin cancer is to reduce your exposure to sunlight . Always use sunscreen: Apply sunscreen with sun protection ...

  3. Dry Skin (Xerosis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin, which may bleed if severe. Chapped or cracked lips. When dry skin cracks, germs can get ... cause the skin to become dry, raw, and cracked. Swimming : Some pools have high levels of chlorine, ...

  4. Skin Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skin Cancer Skin color and being exposed to sunlight can increase the risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer ... carcinoma include the following: Being exposed to natural sunlight or artificial sunlight (such as from tanning beds) ...

  5. Stages of Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skin Cancer Skin color and being exposed to sunlight can increase the risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer ... carcinoma include the following: Being exposed to natural sunlight or artificial sunlight (such as from tanning beds) ...

  6. Vasoactive mediators and the progression from oedematous to necrotising experimental acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Weidenbach, H; Lerch, M M; Gress, T M; Pfaff, D; Turi, S; Adler, G

    1995-01-01

    Little is known about the pathophysiological factors that determine the clinical severity of acute pancreatitis. Because impairment of pancreatic circulation and oxygenation is associated with greater disease severity and morphological damage in experimental pancreatitis it has been suggested that various vasoactive mediators might participate in the progression from the oedematous to the necrotising variety of the disease. This study used an animal model of acute pancreatitis induced by intravenous caeruleint (10 micrograms/kg/h for up to six hours), which does not entail either haemorrhage or significant necrosis of the pancreas. This study considered whether the administration or the inhibition of either nitric oxide, bradykinin, or adrenergic mediators can convert this mild variety into haemorrhagic and necrotising pancreatitis. Neither nitric oxide nor catecholamines were involved in the progression from oedematous to haemorrhagic pancreatitis. Their substitution, activation, and inhibition all failed to change the severity of the disease process. Bradykinin alone seemed to be critically involved in the pathogenesis of pancreatic haemorrhage and necrosis. However, the inhibition of bradykinin and not its activation or substitution increased the severity of the disease. Images Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7590444

  7. Epidemiology of Intracranial Haemorrhages Associated with Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants in Spain: TAC Registry

    PubMed Central

    Zapata-Wainberg, Gustavo; Ximénez-Carrillo Rico, Álvaro; Benavente Fernández, Lorena; Masjuan Vallejo, Jaime; Gállego Culleré, Jaime; Freijó Guerrero, María del Mar; Egido, José; Gómez Sánchez, José Carlos; Martínez Domeño, Alejandro; Purroy García, Francisco; Vives Pastor, Bárbara; Blanco González, Miguel; Vivancos, José

    2015-01-01

    Background Vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (VKA-OACs) are effective for primary and secondary prevention of embolic events. The rate of haemorrhagic neurological complications in patients admitted to neurology departments in Spain is not yet known. Aims We aimed to determine the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of patients with intracranial haemorrhage secondary to VKA-OACs as well as the incidence of this severe complication. Methods We conducted a retrospective, descriptive, multi-centre study using information from the medical records of all patients admitted to neurology departments, diagnosed with spontaneous intracranial haemorrhage, and treated with VKA-OACs within a 1-year period. We collected demographic and care data from centres, patients' medical records [demographic data, medical history, haemorrhage origin, vascular risk factors, concomitant treatment, and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores], and patients' outcome at 3 months [independence (modified Rankin Scale score <3) and mortality rate]. Results Twenty-one hospitals serving a population of 8,155,628 inhabitants participated in the study. The total number of cases was 235, the mean age was 78.2 (SD 9.4) years, and the baseline NIHSS score was 11.6 (SD 9.5; median 9; interquartile range 14). The VKA-OACs used were acenocoumarol in 95.3% (224 patients) and warfarin in 4.7% (11 patients). The haemorrhage origin was deep in 29.8%, lobar in 25.5%, intraventricular in 11.5%, extensive in 17.4% (>100 ml), cerebellar in 12.3%, and in the brainstem in 3.4%. The international normalised ratio was within therapeutic ranges at admission (according to indication) in 29.4% (69 patients). The global incidence (cases per 100,000 inhabitants per year) is 2.88. The in-hospital mortality rate was 40%, and 24.3% of the patients were independent at 3 months, while the mortality at 3 months was 42.6%. Conclusion VKA-OAC treatment is associated with a large percentage of all

  8. Biologic and synthetic skin substitutes: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Halim, Ahmad Sukari; Khoo, Teng Lye; Mohd. Yussof, Shah Jumaat

    2010-01-01

    The current trend of burn wound care has shifted to more holistic approach of improvement in the long-term form and function of the healed burn wounds and quality of life. This has demanded the emergence of various skin substitutes in the management of acute burn injury as well as post burn reconstructions. Skin substitutes have important roles in the treatment of deep dermal and full thickness wounds of various aetiologies. At present, there is no ideal substitute in the market. Skin substitutes can be divided into two main classes, namely, biological and synthetic substitutes. The biological skin substitutes have a more intact extracellular matrix structure, while the synthetic skin substitutes can be synthesised on demand and can be modulated for specific purposes. Each class has its advantages and disadvantages. The biological skin substitutes may allow the construction of a more natural new dermis and allow excellent re-epithelialisation characteristics due to the presence of a basement membrane. Synthetic skin substitutes demonstrate the advantages of increase control over scaffold composition. The ultimate goal is to achieve an ideal skin substitute that provides an effective and scar-free wound healing. PMID:21321652

  9. Histopathology of laser skin resurfacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, Sharon L.; Baldwin, Bonnie; Chi, Eric; Ellard, Jeff; Schwartz, Jon A.

    1997-05-01

    Pulsed carbon-dioxide laser skin resurfacing is a purportedly 'non-thermal' procedure enjoying wide application as a cosmetic treatment for skin wrinkles. Treatment success has been based on clinical assessments of skin smoothness. Skin lesions (1 cm2) created by one, two or three superimposed carbon-dioxide laser passes were placed on the backs of 28 'fuzzy' Harlan Sprague Dawley rats. The variable laser irradiation parameters included measured energies ranging from 112 to 387/pulse with pulse widths of 65 and 125 microseconds and a repetition rate of 8 Hz. The square, flat laser beam measured 3 mm2 at the focal point. The lesions were collected from 0 to 10 days after treatment for qualitative and quantitative histopathology. Thermal damage and treatment effect tended to increase in severity and, to a lesser extent, depth with increased delivery parameters. In acute lesions, the vacuolated and fragmented, desiccated and thermally coagulated epidermis was partially removed exposing the underlying thermally coagulated dermal collagen and cells. Epidermal and dermal necrosis and slough occurred between 24 to 72 hours after treatment. Epithelial regeneration originated from the adnexa and the lesion edges. Dermal fibrous scar formation began at 5 days below the regenerated epidermis and became more prominent at 7 and 10 days.

  10. Necrotic encephalitis as a manifestation of acute sarcocystosis in cattle.

    PubMed

    Van der Lugt, J J; Markus, M B; Kitching, J P; Daly, T J

    1994-09-01

    Extensive brain pathology attributed to Sarcocystis is described in a heifer and a 2- to 4-month-old calf. These appear to be the first recorded cases of naturally occurring acute sarcocystosis in cattle in sub-Saharan Africa. The heifer became recumbent and had convulsions before dying, while clinical signs in the calf included loss of body mass, diarrhoea, nervousness and opisthotonus. Disseminated haemorrhages were noted in the brains of both animals at necropsy. Microscopically, the grey and white matter contained multiple areas of necrosis associated with haemorrhage, fibrinoid vasculitis, perivascular cuffing and gliosis. A multifocal meningitis was also present. First-generation Sarcocystis schizonts were evident in, or adjacent to endothelial cells of several arterioles and small arteries. The association of first- (as opposed to second-) generation schizogony with overt and fatal bovine sarcocystosis, has not previously been reported. PMID:7595918

  11. Alveolar haemorrhage in anti‐glomerular basement membrane disease without detectable antibodies by conventional assays

    PubMed Central

    Serisier, D J; Wong, R C W; Armstrong, J G

    2006-01-01

    Anti‐glomerular basement membrane (anti‐GBM) disease represents the spectrum of disease attributable to circulating anti‐GBM antibodies. While active anti‐GBM disease in the absence of circulating anti‐GBM antibodies has been described, it is considered rare with the use of current routinely available assays. We report four subjects with features consistent with active anti‐GBM antibody disease without detectable antibodies by routinely available enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoblot techniques. All were smokers who presented with diffuse alveolar haemorrhage, minimal renal involvement, and undetectable anti‐GBM antibodies. Seronegative anti‐GBM disease with predominant pulmonary involvement may be more common than previously appreciated and should be part of the differential diagnosis for otherwise unexplained diffuse alveolar haemorrhage. Renal biopsy with immunofluorescent studies should be considered in the diagnostic evaluation of such subjects, including those with idiopathic pulmonary haemosiderosis. PMID:16807392

  12. Isolated impairment of posterior pituitary function secondary to severe postpartum haemorrhage due to uterine rupture.

    PubMed

    Adali, Ertan; Kucukaydin, Zehra; Adali, Fulya; Yildizhan, Recep

    2011-08-01

    Cranial diabetes insipidus (DI) due to postpartum haemorrhage is an extremely rare clinical event. We describe herein isolated posterior pituitary insufficiency in a 26-year-old woman who had undergone subtotal hysterectomy for severe postpartum haemorrhage because of uterine rupture. The patient experienced polyuria within 6 h postoperatively. DI was suggested by the elevated urine volumes and low urine specific gravity. The diagnosis of DI was confirmed by water deprivation test and vasopressin stimulation test. The anterior pituitary function was within normal limits. A high clinical suspicion is certainly required for the diagnosis of DI in the immediate postpartum period. To rapidly initiate appropriate therapy, the possibility of DI should always be kept in mind while evaluating patients who have polyuria and polydipsia after severe postpartum bleeding. Delay or failure to treat this condition might result in hypovolemic shock. PMID:20636230

  13. Successful treatment of active haemorrhage from a duodenal diverticulum using surgicel (absorbable haemostat): a case report.

    PubMed

    Muguti, Gi; Gandhi, H; Ridgeway, D

    2007-01-01

    Haemorrhage is one of the rare but serious complications of duodenal diverticula. Current methods of treatment include: endoscopy with injection therapy or hemoclip application and diverticulectomy. In this paper we present the case of a 61 year old man with life threatening haemorrhage who was managed successfully with gentle packing of a bleeding duodenal diverticulum using SURGICEL (Absorbable Haemostat). This appears to be a simple and effective way of dealing with the problem especially in situations where other methods are ineffective or inapplicable. Early surgical intervention before the development of any coagulopathy increases the chances of a successful outcome. It has not been possible to find a similar report from a thorough literature search. PMID:20353131

  14. Cervical tourniquet in case of uncontrollable haemorrhage during caesarean section owing to a placenta accreta

    PubMed Central

    Huijgen, Q C A; Gijsen, A F; Hink, E; Van Kesteren, P J M

    2013-01-01

    This case report describes a 38-year-old woman in whom a primary caesarean section for placenta previa was complicated by postpartum haemorrhage due to a placenta accreta. Despite tamponade with a Bakri balloon and placement of a B-Lynch suture, the amount of blood loss could not be effectively reduced. The blood loss was eventually minimised by the placement of a Penrose drain around the cervix as a cervical tourniquet. We think that a cervical tourniquet is an effective method of stopping haemorrhage during caesarean section, as shown in this case report, and we consider this technique to be a valuable addition to several existing methods through which fertility is preserved by preventing emergency hysterectomy. PMID:23608864

  15. Cervical tourniquet in case of uncontrollable haemorrhage during caesarean section owing to a placenta accreta.

    PubMed

    Huijgen, Q C A; Gijsen, A F; Hink, E; Van Kesteren, P J M

    2013-01-01

    This case report describes a 38-year-old woman in whom a primary caesarean section for placenta previa was complicated by postpartum haemorrhage due to a placenta accreta. Despite tamponade with a Bakri balloon and placement of a B-Lynch suture, the amount of blood loss could not be effectively reduced. The blood loss was eventually minimised by the placement of a Penrose drain around the cervix as a cervical tourniquet. We think that a cervical tourniquet is an effective method of stopping haemorrhage during caesarean section, as shown in this case report, and we consider this technique to be a valuable addition to several existing methods through which fertility is preserved by preventing emergency hysterectomy. PMID:23608864

  16. Pregnancy complicated by haemorrhagic ascites in a woman with newly diagnosed HIV.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Catrin; Nicholls, Kate; Gangat, Nusraat; Sansome, Stafford

    2016-01-01

    A young pregnant Zambian woman was referred from a district hospital in South Zambia to the university teaching hospital, Lusaka with severe anaemia and ascites. The ascites had developed over a month and the woman was currently 15 weeks pregnant. Further workup revealed that the patient was HIV-positive and the ascitic tap showed haemorrhagic fluid. After being reviewed by multiple doctors, the cause of the haemorrhagic ascites remained unclear; therefore, the decision was made to do a laparotomy. The laparotomy revealed haemoperitoneum and a large cyst attached to the liver containing 5 L of bloodstained fluid. The histopathology report revealed features consistent with a giant haemangioma. There were many barriers to accessing optimum healthcare in this case. These included limited access to blood, poor communication resulting in the patient being unaware of her HIV status and lack of patient education about HIV. PMID:27473033

  17. Subdural haemorrhage and severe coagulopathy resulting in transtentorial uncal herniation in a neonate undergoing therapeutic hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dianna; McMillan, Hugh; Bariciak, Erika

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia has been shown to be efficacious for improving long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes following perinatal asphyxia. Thus, cooling protocols have been adopted at most tertiary neonatal centres. We present a case of a term neonate who underwent therapeutic whole-body cooling for hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy following a difficult forceps delivery. She abruptly deteriorated, exhibiting signs of transtentorial uncal herniation and severe disseminated intravascular coagulopathy. CT of the head confirmed a life-threatening subdural haematoma and a concealed skull fracture. Hypothermia has been shown to impair haemostasis in vivo and thus may potentially exacerbate occult haemorrhages in a clinical setting. Newborns that require instrument-assisted delivery are a particularly high-risk group for occult head injuries and should undergo careful clinical assessment for fractures and intracranial haemorrhage prior to initiation of therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:25100805

  18. Skin lesion biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... This may include deep layers of skin and fat. The area is closed with stitches to place the skin back together. If a large area is biopsied, the surgeon may use a skin graft or flap to replace the skin that was ...

  19. Stiff skin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Geng, S; Lei, X; Toyohara, J P; Zhan, P; Wang, J; Tan, S

    2006-07-01

    Stiff skin syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by pronounced skin induration, mild hypertrichosis and limited joint mobility, predominantly on the buttocks and thighs. Many heterogeneous cases have been reported under the name of stiff skin syndrome. We present a case of stiff skin syndrome from China, the diagnosis based on the patient's typical clinical and histopathological features. PMID:16836505

  20. Visual outcomes of vitrectomy for polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy-related breakthrough vitreous haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Lin, H-C; Yang, C-H; Yang, C-M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the long-term visual outcomes of pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) for polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV)-associated vitreous haemorrhage (VH). Method We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients with PCV-related VH who underwent PPV. The main outcome measures were best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and fundus findings at 3 months postoperatively and final visit. Results Seventeen eyes of 17 patients with massive subretinal haemorrhage (16.7±7.1 disc size of mean subretinal haemorrhage area) were enrolled. The mean postoperative follow-up period was 25.2 months. Four eyes received intravitreal bevacizumab injections, and three eyes underwent photodynamic therapy before the onset of VH. The mean BCVA improved from logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (LogMAR) of 2.63±0.57 preoperatively to 1.43±0.82 at final visit (P<0.001). Among the eyes with initial polyps at subfoveal or juxtafoveal area, 16.70% achieved final BCVA ≥20/400 (LogMAR 1.3), whereas 87.50% of eyes with initial polyps at extrafoveal area had final BCVA ≥20/400 (Fisher's exact test, P=0.026). Conclusions PCV with massive subretinal haemorrhage is at risk for breakthrough VH. The visual prognosis in eyes with PCV-related breakthrough VH is variable after vitrectomy. Initial polyps at the extrafoveal area led to better functional outcomes. Early vitrectomy may be beneficial for visual recovery after PCV-related VH. PMID:24924445

  1. Deaths associated with dengue haemorrhagic fever: the first in Australia in over a century.

    PubMed

    McBride, William J H

    2005-07-01

    A dengue fever epidemic was recognised in the Torres Strait Islands of Queensland in late 2003. Two fatal cases of dengue haemorrhagic fever occurred in early 2004. This severe manifestation is more common when a patient is infected a second time, with a different virus serotype to the first infection. These are the first fatalities related to dengue fever in Australia in over a century. PMID:15992338

  2. Transcatheter coil embolotherapy: a safe and effective option for major colonic haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, A; Ettles, D; Hartley, J; Curzon, I; Lee, P; Duthie, G; Monson, J

    1998-01-01

    Background—The management of major colonic bleeding is problematic. A proportion of patients require emergency surgery which is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Percutaneous embolotherapy, previously considered a high risk procedure in the colon, may provide an alternative treatment in this group of patients. 
Aims—To assess the safety and efficacy of embolotherapy in the treatment of life threatening colonic haemorrhage. 
Patients and methods—Thirty eight patients with fresh haemorrhage per rectum were referred for surgery because of failed conservative treatment. All underwent angiography; in 14 a bleeding site or vascular abnormality was detected. A coaxial catheter was directed to the most distal bleeding artery and this was embolised with platinum coils. 
Results—Detection of a bleeding site correlated with haemodynamic stability at the time of angiography (r=1 for a systolic blood pressure less than 100 mm Hg). Bleeding sites or vascular abnormalities were detected and embolised in 14 patients (37%). In 12/14 there was immediate and sustained haemodynamic improvement; two continued to bleed and required emergency hemicolectomy (14%). Three developed ischaemic complications (21.4%); these were managed conservatively and required no intervention. The 30 day mortality was 7.1% in the embolotherapy group and 10.5% in the overall group of 38patients. 
Conclusion—Colonic embolotherapy for life threatening haemorrhage is an effective, relatively safe procedure with a low incidence of major complications. Its use depends on the identification of a focal bleeding point or vascular abnormality, which in turn depends on the haemodynamic stability of the patient at the time of angiography. 

 Keywords: colonic haemorrhage; embolisation; angiography; angiodysplasia; diverticular disease PMID:9771409

  3. Pulmonary haemorrhage due to an aortopulmonary collateral artery after arterial switch.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Ai; Ota, Noritaka; Sakamoto, Kisaburo

    2016-03-01

    A neonate with transposition of the great arteries and intact ventricular septum presented without pulmonary over-circulation, and subsequently developed pulmonary haemorrhage after corrective surgery. Postoperative CT revealed an aortopulmonary collateral artery arising from the descending aorta, and we performed successful embolisation on postoperative day 9. Aggressive imaging modalities such as angiography and/or CT imaging with contrast can detect unexpected extra-pulmonary blood supply and guide further management. PMID:26144860

  4. Optimization of oxygen delivery in a Jehovah's Witness with severe anaemia after postpartum haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, LaVone; Stephenson-Famy, Alyssa; Easterling, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The delivery of a 25-year-old Jehovah's Witness was complicated by postpartum haemorrhage with a nadir haematocrit of 3%. To improve oxygen delivery without blood transfusion, FiO2 was increased to maximize dissolved oxygen delivery. Central venous oxygen saturation was used to assess tissue oxygenation. When blood products are refused, successful management of severe anaemia is possible with supportive medical care to achieve haemostasis, optimize oxygen delivery and promote haematopoiesis.

  5. Ergometrine given during caesarean section and incidence of delayed postpartum haemorrhage due to uterine atony.

    PubMed

    Lourens, R; Paterson-Brown, S

    2007-11-01

    Delayed postpartum haemorrhage due to uterine atony after caesarean section was occurring in women in our recovery area despite many of them already having an oxytocin infusion running to prevent such a problem. We therefore decided to compare the incidence of such problems for a 2-month period before and after altering our uterotonic policy: in addition to the routine bolus dose of 5 units of oxytocin after delivery of the baby, we added 500 microg of intramuscular ergometrine during abdominal closure. We noticed a reduced number of massive postpartum haemorrhages due to an atonic uterus in the recovery room but an increased incidence of nausea and vomiting. No prophylactic anti-emetic was given during this pilot study. This small study suggests that 50 women would need to be given ergometrine at caesarean section to prevent one delayed massive haemorrhage from uterine atony and four extra women would suffer with vomiting. We feel this is reasonable and now use a prophylactic anti-emetic as well as delaying the ergometrine until closure of the rectus sheath which reduces the incidence of nausea and vomiting. PMID:18097896

  6. Extensive haemorrhagic necrosis of liver is an unpredictable fatal complication in dengue infection: a postmortem study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dengue infection carries a potential risk of death despite stringent management of plasma leak and haemorrhage. It appears that the extent of liver dysfunction determines the outcome. Methods We present a postmortem study of five patients, died of dengue shock syndrome who had markedly elevated liver enzymes and irreparable circulatory failure. Results All were females with a median age of 46 years (range 20–50 years). All had positive NS1 and IgM. Clinically, one patient developed severe degree of hepatic encephalopathy whilst three patients developed uncontrollable bleeding manifestations. Dengue virus was detected in three liver specimens by reverse transcription PCR. Histology of the liver revealed massive necrosis with haemorrhages in these patients with evidence of micro and macrovesicular steatosis with significant periportal inflammatory infiltrate. No significant ischaemic changes or necrosis was observed in the other organs. Conclusions Severe haemorrhagic necrosis of the liver was the cause of death in these patients probably due to direct viral infection. Predilection for severe liver disease remains unknown. Therefore, it is prudent to think beyond plasma leak as the main pathology of dengue infection and attempts should be made to develop other treatment modalities to prevent and manage unforeseen fatal complications of dengue infection. PMID:24628767

  7. N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate Is Very Effective for Massive Haemorrhage during the Perinatal Period

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, Suguru; Izuchi, Shinichirou; Ogawa, Yukihisa; Yoshimathu, Misako; Takizawa, Kenji; Nakajima, Yasuo; Tanaka, Mamoru; Ishizuka, Bunpei; Suzuki, Nao

    2013-01-01

    Objective The liquid embolic agent n-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) is a tissue adhesive used as an immediate and permanent embolic agent when mixed with oil-based contrast medium. In this study, the preservation of fertility with TAE using NBCA for massive haemorrhage during pregnancy or the peripartum period and the utility of this therapy were investigated. Methods Cases from January 2005 to October 2010 in which TAE was performed for massive haemorrhage in pregnant women, particularly during the peripartum period, were investigated. Results TAE was performed in 27 pregnant women. The embolic agent used was GS only in five cases, NBCA only in 19 cases, and additional embolization with NBCA when the effect with GS was insufficient in three cases, one each of abruptio placentae, cervical pregnancy, and uterine atony.A comparison of mean blood loss when each embolic agent was used for haemostasis showed a significant difference between cases in which GS only was used and cases in which NBCA only was used. In a comparison of mean transfusion volume, a significant difference was seen between cases in which both GS and NBCA were used and cases in which NBCA only was used. In a postoperative follow-up survey, menses resumed in eight patients, including four patients who later became pregnant and three who delivered. Conclusions TAE with NBCA, which has an embolic effect unrelated to clotting dysfunction for massive haemorrhage during the peripartum period, is a minimally invasive and very effective treatment method for patients with severe DIC. PMID:24223099

  8. Update on the Surgical Trial in Lobar Intracerebral Haemorrhage (STICH II): statistical analysis plan

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous studies had suggested that the outcome for patients with spontaneous lobar intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) and no intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) might be improved with early evacuation of the haematoma. The Surgical Trial in Lobar Intracerebral Haemorrhage (STICH II) set out to establish whether a policy of earlier surgical evacuation of the haematoma in selected patients with spontaneous lobar ICH would improve outcome compared to a policy of initial conservative treatment. It is an international, multi-centre, prospective randomised parallel group trial of early surgery in patients with spontaneous lobar ICH. Outcome is measured at six months via a postal questionnaire. Results Recruitment to the study began on 27 November 2006 and closed on 15 August 2012 by which time 601 patients had been recruited. The protocol was published in Trials (http://www.trialsjournal.com/content/12/1/124/). This update presents the analysis plan for the study without reference to the unblinded data. The trial data will not be unblinded until after follow-up is completed in early 2013. The main trial results will be presented in spring 2013 with the aim to publish in a peer-reviewed journal at the same time. Conclusion The data from the trial will provide evidence on the benefits and risks of early surgery in patients with lobar ICH. Trial registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN22153967 PMID:23171588

  9. Chronic alveolar haemorrhage in a paediatric patient: a diagnostic and treatment challenge.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Ana; Senra, Virgílio; Marinho, António; Guedes, Margarida

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary haemosiderosis is characterised by chronic alveolar haemorrhage, which can lead to serious cardiorespiratory complications. Although considered idiopathic in most patients, there are many possible aetiologies. We present a case of an 18-year-old woman with pulmonary haemosiderosis since 4 years of age, with an inconclusive initial study, who was treated with systemic corticosteroids and hydroxychloroquine until the age of 12 years, and azathioprine since then. Multiple exacerbations led to interstitial lung disease with restrictive functional pattern. Unilateral cochlear deafness was diagnosed at the age of 12 years and occasional polyarthralgias were recorded. When she was 16 years of age the study revealed an atypical myeloperoxidase-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA) pattern. Cyclophosphamide and rituximab were administered with resolution of respiratory insufficiency and functional disability, without new episodes of alveolar haemorrhage. This case of chronic pulmonary haemorrhage was revealed to be an ANCA vasculitis, the diagnosis of which was possible only after 12 years of symptoms, with clinical and functional improvement with the association of cyclophosphamide and rituximab. PMID:25899510

  10. Late onset haemorrhagic disease in premature infants who received intravenous vitamin K1.

    PubMed

    Loughnan, P M; McDougall, P N; Balvin, H; Doyle, L W; Smith, A L

    1996-06-01

    The clinical details are reported of two premature infants who developed late onset haemorrhagic disease after receiving their initial doses of vitamin K1 prophylaxis intravenously. Both reported infants had received two doses of intravenous vitamin K1, 0.1 mg, in the 1st week of life, and a further oral dose, 1.0 mg, at 4 weeks. Bleeding due to vitamin K deficiency occurred on days 74 and 84, respectively. Vitamin K deficiency bleeding is rare in low birthweight infants, probably because it has been routine practice to give such infants intramuscular vitamin K1. One of the reported infants had cytomegalovirus hepatitis, the other did not have liver disease. These findings could be explained if intramuscular vitamin K1 were to have a longer duration of effect than intravenous vitamin K1. This may be because intramuscular vitamin K1 acts as a depot preparation. The findings suggest that intravenous vitamin K1 is less effective than intramuscular for long-term prophylaxis against late onset haemorrhagic disease. Intravenous vitamin K1 should not be used for long-term prophylaxis in the prevention of late onset haemorrhagic disease. PMID:8827551

  11. Introduction of an algorithm for ROTEM-guided fibrinogen concentrate administration in major obstetric haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Mallaiah, S; Barclay, P; Harrod, I; Chevannes, C; Bhalla, A

    2015-02-01

    We compared blood component requirements during major obstetric haemorrhage, following the introduction of fibrinogen concentrate. A prospective study of transfusion requirements and patient outcomes was performed for 12 months to evaluate the major obstetric haemorrhage pathway using shock packs (Shock Pack phase). The study was repeated after the pathway was amended to include fibrinogen concentrate (Fibrinogen phase). The median (IQR [range]) number of blood components given was 8.0 (3.0-14.5 [0-32]) during the Shock Pack phase, and 3.0 (2.0-5.0 [0-26]) during the Fibrinogen phase (p = 0.0004). The median (IQR [range]) quantity of fibrinogen administered was significantly greater in the Shock Pack phase, 3.2 (0-7.1 [0-20.4]) g, than in the Fibrinogen phase, 0 (0-3.0 [0-12.4]) g, p = 0.0005. Four (9.5%) of 42 patients in the Shock Pack phase developed transfusion associated circulatory overload compared with none of 51 patients in the Fibrinogen phase (p = 0.038). Fibrinogen concentrate allows prompt correction of coagulation deficits associated with major obstetric haemorrhage, reducing the requirement for blood component therapy and the attendant risks of complications. PMID:25289791

  12. Factors influencing occurrence of postpartum haemorrhage in pregnant women with hepatitis E infection and deranged coagulation profile

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Manju; Patra, Sharda; Singh, Preeti; Malhotra, Nidhi; Trivedi, Shubha Sagar; Sharma, Sunita; Kumar, Ashish; Sarin, Shiv Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Coagulopathy is an important complication associated with hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection in pregnant women. Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) remains a serious risk while managing the labour of these women. The aim of this paper is to study the factors influencing the occurrence of PPH in pregnant women with hepatitis E infection with coagulopathy. The labours of 38 pregnant women with hepatitis E and deranged coagulation profile were followed. Factors that may predict postpartum bleeding complications in women with HEV infection and deranged coagulation profile were statistically analysed. Of 38 pregnant women with acute viral hepatitis due to HEV, 13 (34%) suffered a PPH while 25 (66%) did not. On univariate analysis low alanine aminotransferase (P = 0.016), high international normalized ratio (P = 0.003), high levels of d-dimer (P = 0.008), presence of hepatic encephalopathy (P = 0.028), intrauterine fetal death (P = 0.001) and gastrointestinal bleeding (P = 0.004) were found to predict PPH. However, on multivariate analysis the only independent variable that predicted PPH was the presence gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding (odds ratio [OR] 11.363; 95% CI: 1.003, 125; P = 0.050). Women with GI bleeding have 11 times higher risk of PPH than those without a GI bleed; however, the confidence interval is very wide. Administration of fresh frozen plasma in the peripartum period reduces the risk of PPH. In conclusion, early recognition of factors which predict the risk of PPH and timely intervention with judicious use of blood and blood components in the peripartum period can improve the outcome of pregnant women with HEV infection with deranged coagulation.

  13. Skin cancer in skin of color.

    PubMed

    Bradford, Porcia T

    2009-01-01

    In general, skin cancer is uncommon in people of color when compared to Caucasians. When it does occur, it is often associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Differences in survival rates may be attributed to skin cancers being diagnosed at a more advanced stage, and socioeconomic factors such as lack of adequate insurance coverage and lack of transportation can function as barriers to timely diagnosis and early treatment. In addition to advanced stage at presentation, malignant skin lesions in skin of color often present in an atypical fashion. Because skin cancer prevention and screening practices historically have been lower among Hispanics, Blacks, and Asians, and given the changing demographics in the United States, interventions that are tailored to each of these groups will be needed. Public educational campaigns should be expanded to educate people of all skin types with emphasis on skin cancers occurring in areas not exposed to the sun (Byrd-Miles et al., 2007), since sunlight is not as important an etiologic factor in the pathogenesis of skin cancer in people of color. Dermatologists and primary care physicians should instruct their darker-skinned patients on how to perform routine skin self-examinations. Physicians should also encourage patients to ask their specialists such as their gynecologist, dentist, and ophthalmologist to look for abnormal pigmentation during routine exams. To reduce the burden of skin cancer, several prevention methods for all people have been strongly encouraged, including monthly self-examinations, daily use of SPF 30 or greater sunscreen, sunglasses with UV-absorbing lenses, and avoiding tanning booths (American Cancer Society, 2008) (see Table 7). In addition, recommendations for clinicians to promote the prevention of skin cancer in skin of color have also been made, including closely monitoring changing pigmented lesions on the palms and soles and hyperkeratotic or poorly healing ulcers in immunosuppressed patients

  14. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... or though physical contact (for example, on unwashed hands). Being exposed to tobacco smoke, air pollution, dusts, vapors, and fumes can also cause acute bronchitis. Less often, bacteria can also cause acute bronchitis. To diagnose acute ...

  15. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... control. Menopause also increases the risk for a urinary tract infection. The following also increase your chances of having ...

  16. Long-term skin damage due to chemical weapon exposure.

    PubMed

    Firooz, Alireza; Sadr, Bardia; Davoudi, Seyed M; Nassiri-Kashani, Mansour; Panahi, Yunes; Dowlati, Yahya

    2011-03-01

    Sulfur mustard (2,2-dichlorodiethyl sulfide: SM), the protagonist of vesicant chemical weapons, was first used in July 1917. Despite prohibition of its production and use by international conventions, it has been used in several conflicts. More than 100,000 soldiers and civilians were injured due to SM exposure during Iran-Iraq war (1980-1988). The acute skin lesions consist of erythema, edema, and blisters. Skin xerosis and pruritus, pigmentation disorders, scars, and cherry angiomas are among the most common long-term skin lesions after contact with SM. Although SM is a well-known carcinogenic substance, skin cancers are rarely reported. PMID:21047269

  17. Lingual Haematoma due to Tenecteplase in a Patient with Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Bal, Muhlis; Salturk, Ziya; Ateş, Ahmet Hakan; Yağcı, Serkan; Coşkun Bal, Gökçen

    2013-01-01

    The use of intravenous thrombolytic agents has revolutionised the treatment of acute myocardial infarction. However, the improvement in mortality rate achieved with these drugs is tempered by the risk of serious bleeding complications, including intracranial haemorrhage. Tenecteplase is a genetically engineered mutant tissue plasminogen activator. Haemorrhagic complications of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) are well known. Compared to other tPAs, tenecteplase use leads to lower rates of bleeding complications. Here, we report a case of unusual site of spontaneous bleeding, intralingual haematoma during tenecteplase therapy following acute myocardial infarction, which caused significant upper airway obstruction and required tracheotomy to maintain the patient's airway. Clinical dilemmas related to securing the airway or reversing the effects of tissue plasminogen activator are discussed. PMID:23862086

  18. Viral Skin Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ramdass, Priya; Mullick, Sahil; Farber, Harold F

    2015-12-01

    In the vast world of skin diseases, viral skin disorders account for a significant percentage. Most viral skin diseases present with an exanthem (skin rash) and, oftentimes, an accompanying enanthem (lesions involving the mucosal membrane). In this article, the various viral skin diseases are explored, including viral childhood exanthems (measles, rubella, erythema infectiosum, and roseola), herpes viruses (herpes simplex virus, varicella zoster virus, Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus, viral zoonotic infections [orf, monkeypox, ebola, smallpox]), and several other viral skin diseases, such as human papilloma virus, hand, foot, and mouth disease, molluscum contagiosum, and Gianotti-Crosti syndrome. PMID:26612372

  19. Skin cell proliferation stimulated by microneedles.

    PubMed

    Liebl, Horst; Kloth, Luther C

    2012-03-01

    A classical wound may be defined as a disruption of tissue integrity. Wounds, caused by trauma from accidents or surgery, that close via secondary intention rely on the biological phases of healing, i.e., hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling (HIPR). Depending on the wound type and severity, the inflammation phase begins immediately after injury and may last for an average of 7-14 days. Concurrent with the inflammation phase or slightly delayed, cell proliferation is stimulated followed by the activation of the remodeling (maturation) phase. The latter phase can last as long as 1 year or more, and the final healed state is represented by a scar tissue, a cross-linked collagen formation that usually aligns collagen fibers in a single direction. One may assume that skin microneedling that involves the use of dozens or as many as 200 needles that limit penetration to 1.5 mm over 1 cm(2) of skin would cause trauma and bleeding followed by the classical HIPR. However, this is not the case or at least the HIPR phases are significantly curtailed and healing never ends in a scar formation. Conversely dermabrasion used in aesthetic medicine for improving skin quality is based on "ablation" (destruction or wounding of superficial skin layers), which requires several weeks for healing that involves formation of new skin layers. Such procedures provoke an acute inflammatory response. We believe that a less intense inflammatory response occurs following microneedle perforation of the skin. However, the mechanism of action of microneedling appears to be different. Here we review the potential mechanisms by which microneedling of the skin facilitates skin repair without scarring after the treatment of superficial burns, acne, hyperpigmentation, and the non-advancing periwound skin surrounding the chronic ulcerations of the integument. PMID:24527373

  20. Skin Cell Proliferation Stimulated by Microneedles

    PubMed Central

    Liebl, Horst; Kloth, Luther C.

    2012-01-01

    A classical wound may be defined as a disruption of tissue integrity. Wounds, caused by trauma from accidents or surgery, that close via secondary intention rely on the biological phases of healing, i.e., hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling (HIPR). Depending on the wound type and severity, the inflammation phase begins immediately after injury and may last for an average of 7–14 days. Concurrent with the inflammation phase or slightly delayed, cell proliferation is stimulated followed by the activation of the remodeling (maturation) phase. The latter phase can last as long as 1 year or more, and the final healed state is represented by a scar tissue, a cross-linked collagen formation that usually aligns collagen fibers in a single direction. One may assume that skin microneedling that involves the use of dozens or as many as 200 needles that limit penetration to 1.5 mm over 1 cm2 of skin would cause trauma and bleeding followed by the classical HIPR. However, this is not the case or at least the HIPR phases are significantly curtailed and healing never ends in a scar formation. Conversely dermabrasion used in aesthetic medicine for improving skin quality is based on “ablation” (destruction or wounding of superficial skin layers), which requires several weeks for healing that involves formation of new skin layers. Such procedures provoke an acute inflammatory response. We believe that a less intense inflammatory response occurs following microneedle perforation of the skin. However, the mechanism of action of microneedling appears to be different. Here we review the potential mechanisms by which microneedling of the skin facilitates skin repair without scarring after the treatment of superficial burns, acne, hyperpigmentation, and the non-advancing periwound skin surrounding the chronic ulcerations of the integument. PMID:24527373

  1. Neutralization of the haemorrhagic activities of viperine snake venoms and venom metalloproteinases using synthetic peptide inhibitors and chelators.

    PubMed

    Howes, J-M; Theakston, R D G; Laing, G D

    2007-04-01

    Envenoming by the West African saw-scaled viper, Echis ocellatus resembles that of most vipers, in that it results in local blistering, necrosis and sometimes life-threatening systemic haemorrhage. While effective against systemic envenoming, current antivenoms have little or no effect against local tissue damage. The major mediators of local venom pathology are the zinc-dependant snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs). The high degree of structural and functional homology between SVMPs and their mammalian relatives the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) suggests that substrate/inhibitor interactions between these subfamilies are likely to be analogous. In this study, four recently developed MMP inhibitors (MMPIs) (Marimastat, AG-3340, CGS-270 23A and Bay-12 9566) are evaluated in addition to three metal ion chelators (EDTA, TPEN and BAPTA) for their ability to inhibit the haemorrhagic activities of the medically important E. ocellatus venom and one of its haemorrhagic SVMPs, EoVMP2. As expected, the metal ion chelators significantly inhibited the haemorrhagic activities of both whole E. ocellatus venom and EoVMP2, while the synthetic MMPIs show more variation in their efficacies. These variations suggest that individual MMPIs show specificity towards SVMPs and that their application to the neutralization of local haemorrhage may require a synthetic MMPI mixture, ensuring that a close structural component for each SVMP is represented. PMID:17196631

  2. Scaly Skin (Ichthyosis Vulgaris)

    MedlinePlus

    ... should improve by restoring moisture (hydration) to the skin. Creams and ointments are better moisturizers than lotions, and ... Physician May Prescribe To treat the dry, scaly skin of ichthyosis ... cream or lotion containing the following: Prescription-strength alpha- ...

  3. Squamous cell skin cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cell; NMSC - squamous cell; Squamous cell skin cancer; Squamous cell carcinoma of the skin ... squamous cell cancer is called Bowen disease (or squamous cell carcinoma in situ). This type does not spread to ...

  4. CSD skin test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003385.htm CSD skin test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The cat scratch disease (CSD) skin test was once used to help ...

  5. Squamous cell skin cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur on skin that is regularly exposed to sunlight or other ultraviolet radiation. The earliest form of ... skin cancer is to reduce your exposure to sunlight . Always use sunscreen: Apply sunscreen with sun protection ...

  6. Skin Pigmentation Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin gets its color from a pigment called melanin. Special cells in the skin make melanin. When these cells become damaged or unhealthy, it affects melanin production. Some pigmentation disorders affect just patches of ...

  7. Fungal Skin Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fungal Skin Infections Overview of Fungal Skin Infections Candidiasis Overview of Dermatophytoses (Ringworm, Tinea) Athlete's Foot Jock ... are caused by yeasts (such as Candida —see Candidiasis ) or dermatophytes, such as Epidermophyton, Microsporum, and Trichophyton ( ...

  8. Skin color - patchy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Injury Exposure to radiation (such as from the sun) Exposure to heavy metals Changes in hormone levels Exposure ... example, lighter-skinned people are more sensitive to sun exposure and damage, which raises the risk of skin ...

  9. Components of skin

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... skin layers from the outside environment and contains cells that make keratin, a substance that waterproofs and strengthens the skin. The epidermis also has cells that contain melanin, the dark pigment that gives ...

  10. Friction induced skin tags.

    PubMed

    Allegue, Francisco; Fachal, Carmen; Pérez-Pérez, Lidia

    2008-01-01

    Skin tags are common benign neoplasm located predominantly in intertriginous skin. Generally of cosmetic concern, they can be easily treated with cryotherapy, electrodessication or snip-excision. Despite their high incidence data about their etiopathogenesis are scarce in the medical literature. We describe a patient who developed multiple skin tags arranged in a linear fashion suggesting an etiopathogenic role for friction. PMID:18627719

  11. Skin self-exam

    MedlinePlus

    Skin cancer - self-exam; Melanoma - self-exam; Basal cell cancer - self-exam; Squamous cell - self-exam; Skin mole - self-exam ... do not agree on whether or not skin self-exams should be performed. So there is no ...

  12. Psychoneuroimmunology and the Skin.

    PubMed

    Honeyman, Juan F

    2016-08-23

    The nervous, immune, endocrine and integumentary systems are closely related and interact in a number of normal and pathological conditions. Nervous system mediators may bring about direct changes to the skin or may induce the release of immunological or hormonal mediators that cause pathological changes to the skin. This article reviews the psychological mechanisms involved in the development of skin diseases. PMID:27282344

  13. Ultrasound skin imaging.

    PubMed

    Alfageme Roldán, F

    2014-12-01

    The interaction of high-frequency ultrasound waves with the skin provides the basis for noninvasive, fast, and accessible diagnostic imaging. This tool is increasingly used in skin cancer and inflammatory conditions as well as in cosmetic dermatology. This article reviews the basic principles of skin ultrasound and its applications in the different areas of dermatology. PMID:24838227

  14. Biology of Skin Color.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcos, Alain

    1983-01-01

    Information from scientific journals on the biology of skin color is discussed. Major areas addressed include: (1) biology of melanin, melanocytes, and melanosomes; (2) melanosome and human diversity; (3) genetics of skin color; and (4) skin color, geography, and natural selection. (JN)

  15. Skin self-exam

    MedlinePlus

    Skin cancer - self-exam; Melanoma - self-exam; Basal cell cancer - self-exam; Squamous cell - self-exam; Skin mole - self-exam ... Experts do not agree on whether or not skin self-exams should be performed. So there is ...

  16. Dietary supplement use and nosebleeds in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia — an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Chamali, Basel; Finnamore, Helen; Manning, Richard; Laffan, Michael A; Hickson, Mary; Whelan, Kevin; Shovlin, Claire L

    2016-01-01

    Summary Understanding potential provocations of haemorrhage is important in a range of clinical settings, and particularly for people with abnormal vasculature. Patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) can report haemorrhage from nasal telangiectasia in real time, and suggested dietary factors may precipitate nosebleeds. To examine further, nosebleed severity, dietary supplement use, and blood indices were evaluated in an unselected group of 50 HHT patients recruited from a specialist UK service. Using the validated Epistaxis Severity Score, nosebleed severity ranged from 0 to 9.1 out of 10 (median 3.9). Using a Food Frequency Questionnaire, 24/50 (48%) participants reported use of dietary supplements in the previous year. A third (18/50; 36%) had used self prescribed, non-iron containing dietary supplements, ingesting between 1 and 3 different supplements each day. Eight (16%) used fish oils. Despite having more severe epistaxis (p = 0.012), the 12 iron supplement users had higher serum iron concentrations, and were able to maintain their red blood cell indices. In contrast, there was no evident benefit for the participants using non iron supplements. Furthermore, platelet counts and serum fibrinogen tended to be lower in fish oil/supplement users, and one fish oil user demonstrated reduced in vitro platelet aggregation. In conclusion, in this small study, a third of HHT patients used non-iron dietary supplements, and one in six ingested fish oils, unaware of their known anti-platelet activity. The scale of use, and potential of these “natural health supplements” to exacerbate nosebleeds has not been appreciated previously in HHT. PMID:27195194

  17. Visual detection of goose haemorrhagic polyomavirus in geese and ducks by loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Woźniakowski, Grzegorz; Tarasiuk, Karolina

    2015-01-01

    Goose haemorrhagic polyomavirus (GHPV) is an aetiological agent of haemorrhagic nephritis and enteritis of geese occurring in geese (Anser anser). GHPV may also infect Muscovy ducks (Carina mochata) and mule ducks. Early detection of GHPV is important to isolate the infected birds from the rest of the flock thus limiting infection transmission. The current diagnosis of haemorrhagic nephritis and enteritis of geese is based on virus isolation, histopathological examination, haemagglutination inhibition assay, ELISA and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Recently, real-time PCR assay was developed which considerably improved detection of GHPV. In spite of many advantages, these methods are still time-consuming and inaccessible for laboratories with limited access to ELISA plate readers or PCR thermocyclers. The aim of our study was to develop loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) that may be conducted in a water bath. Two pairs of specific primers complementary to VP1 gene of GHPV were designed. The results of GHPV LAMP were recorded under ultraviolet light. Our study showed LAMP was able to specifically amplify VP1 fragment of a GHPV without cross-reactivity with other pathogens of geese and ducks. LAMP detected as little as 1.5 pg of DNA extracted from a GHPV standard strain (150 pg/µl). The optimized LAMP was used to examine 18 field specimens collected from dead and clinically diseased geese and ducks aged from 1 to 12 weeks. The positive signal for GHPV was detected in three out of 18 (16.6%) specimens. These results were reproducible and consistent with those of four real-time PCR. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report on LAMP application for the GHPV detection. PMID:25959267

  18. Late intracranial haemorrhage and subsequent carotid-cavernous sinus fistula after fracture of the facial bones.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chien-Ming; Cheng, Chi-Sheng

    2013-12-01

    Carotid-cavernous sinus fistula is an arteriovenous fistula between the internal carotid artery and the cavernous sinus, and is usually caused by a traumatic tear or a ruptured aneurysm of the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery. We describe a rare case of delayed intracranial haemorrhage and carotid-cavernous sinus fistula that presented 3 weeks after fracture of the facial bones. The patient developed orbital apex syndrome including ptosis of upper eyelid, pulsatile exophthalmos, chemosis, loss of ocular motility, monocular blindness on the right, and numbness of the right infraorbital region. After transcatheter intra-arterial embolisation, the ptosis and chemosis improved. PMID:23958350

  19. Incidence of delayed cerebral ischaemia following subarachnoid haemorrhage of unknown cause.

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, P

    1985-01-01

    A retrospective study was made of 50 consecutive patients with spontaneous subarachnoid haemorrhage for which no cause was found, looking for evidence of delayed cerebral ischaemia particularly during the first 2 weeks after the bleed. Twenty-three patients had blood visible on the CT scan but only 4-6% developed delayed ischaemia, all of whom made a good recovery. The low incidence of this complication in this group of patients suggests that subarachnoid blood is not a sufficient cause for delayed ischaemia. PMID:3981169

  20. Haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome: literature review and distribution analysis in China.

    PubMed

    Zou, Lu-Xi; Chen, Mao-Jie; Sun, Ling

    2016-02-01

    Hantaviruses infect their reservoir hosts and humans, but the infection only causes disease in humans. In Asia and Europe (the Old World), the hantaviruses usually cause haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS). This article summarizes the current understanding of hantavirus epidemiology, as well as the clinical manifestations, pathogenesis, renal pathology, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of HFRS. Moreover, the spatiotemporal distribution of HFRS was analysed based on the latest data obtained from the Chinese Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, for the period January 2004 to April 2015, to provide valuable information for the practical application of more effective HFRS control and prevention strategies in China. PMID:26791541

  1. Overcoming entrenched disagreements: the case of misoprostol for post-partum haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Ghinea, Narcyz; Lipworth, Wendy; Little, Miles; Kerridge, Ian; Day, Richard

    2015-04-01

    The debate about whether misoprostol should be distributed to low resource communities to prevent post-partum haemorrhage (PPH), recognized as a major cause of maternal mortality, is deeply polarised. This is in spite of stakeholders having access to the same evidence about the risks and benefits of misoprostol. To understand the disagreement, we conducted a qualitative analysis of the values underpinning debates surrounding community distribution of misoprostol. We found that different moral priorities, epistemic values, and attitudes towards uncertainty were the main factors sustaining the debate. With this understanding, we present a model for ethical discourse that might overcome the current impasse. PMID:25897445

  2. First detection of canine parvovirus type 2c in pups with haemorrhagic enteritis in Spain.

    PubMed

    Decaro, N; Martella, V; Desario, C; Bellacicco, A L; Camero, M; Manna, L; d'Aloja, D; Buonavoglia, C

    2006-12-01

    Canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2), the aetiological agent of haemorrhagic enteritis in dogs, includes three antigenic variants, types 2a, 2b and 2c. CPV-2c has been detected initially in Italy and subsequently in Vietnam. We report the first identification of this novel antigenic variant in Spain, where it caused an outbreak of fatal enteritis in basset hound pups in association with canine coronavirus type I and type II. We suggest that this new antigenic variant of CPV-2 could spread throughout Europe and that there is a subsequent need to update current CPV vaccines. PMID:17123424

  3. Partial Recovery of Audiological, Vestibular, and Radiological Findings following Spontaneous Intralabyrinthine Haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Pézier, Thomas; Hegemann, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis, work-up, and treatment of sudden sensorineural hearing loss and sudden vestibular loss vary widely between units. With the increasing access to both magnetic resonance imaging and objective vestibular testing, our understanding of the various aetiologies at hand is increasing. Despite this, the therapeutic options are limited and without a particularly strong evidence base. We present a rare, yet increasingly diagnosed, case of intralabyrinthine haemorrhage (ILH) together with radiological, audiological, and vestibular test results. Of note, this occurred spontaneously and has shown partial recovery in all the mentioned modalities. PMID:24455375

  4. Primary postpartum haemorrhage in an Australian tertiary hospital: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Henry, Amanda; Birch, Mary-Rose; Sullivan, Elizabeth A; Katz, Sue; Wang, Yueping Alex

    2005-06-01

    The present study aimed to determine the incidence of primary postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) after vaginal birth at an Australian tertiary hospital, and to investigate risk factors for primary PPH at this hospital. A case-control study of women delivering vaginally at a tertiary hospital from February to June 2003 was performed. Demographic, antenatal, intrapartum, treatment and outcome data were abstracted from patient records. The study population comprised 125 cases and 125 controls, with a primary PPH rate of 12.1 per 100 vaginal births. Risk factors on multivariate analysis were past history of PPH, second stage labour > 60 min, forceps delivery, and incomplete placenta/ragged membranes. PMID:15904450

  5. A Rare Cause of Haemorrhage in the Upper Gastrointestinal System: Bochdalek Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Cevizci, MN; Erdemir, G; Cayir, A

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Diaphragmatic hernia originates from insufficient closure of the pericardioperitoneal canals and pleuroperitoneal membranes. It is seen in one in every 4000 births. The general finding in the newborn period is respiratory difficulty. Mortality is 40–50%. There may be other accompanying organ anomalies. Congenital diaphragmatic hernias diagnosed after the newborn period are known as late-presenting congenital diaphragmatic hernias. This group is seen at a level of 5–20% and poses difficulty in diagnosis. This report describes a case under observation and receiving treatment for gastrointestinal haemorrhage, diagnosed as Bochdalek hernia. PMID:26360672

  6. Intracerebral haemorrhage and hemiplegia with heterotopic ossification of the affected hip.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, M M C; Murray, T; Keeling, F; Williams, D

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 72-year-old woman who developed right hemiparesis following a left frontal intraparenchymal haemorrhage. Three months following initial presentation, the patient noted poorly localised right lower quadrant pain. Following extensive investigations, a diagnosis of heterotopic ossification of the hip was made. We discuss the aetiology and pathogenesis of this uncommon entity, and discuss its relationship to ipsilateral neurological injury. The link with neurological injury can result in a delayed and atypical presentation. Early recognition and treatment are important for those caring for patients with acquired neurological deficits, and permit improved patient outcomes. PMID:26243751

  7. A global compendium of human Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus occurrence.

    PubMed

    Messina, Jane P; Pigott, David M; Duda, Kirsten A; Brownstein, John S; Myers, Monica F; George, Dylan B; Hay, Simon I

    2015-01-01

    In order to map global disease risk, a geographic database of human Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) occurrence was produced by surveying peer-reviewed literature and case reports, as well as informal online sources. Here we present this database, comprising occurrence data linked to geographic point or polygon locations dating from 1953 to 2013. We fully describe all data collection, geo-positioning, database management and quality-control procedures. This is the most comprehensive database of confirmed CCHF occurrence in humans to-date, containing 1,721 geo-positioned occurrences in total. PMID:25977820

  8. Neurosurgical versus endovascular treatment of subarachnoid haemorrhage caused by ruptured cerebral aneurysm: comparison of patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kamensky, J

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this critical review is to determine whether endovascular treatment (EVT) of a subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) has better patient outcomes than neurosurgical treatment (NST). A review of six cohort studies (listed in Table 1) was carried out and the main findings were summarised in the conclusion. In addition the list of author's recommendations is included at the end of the paper. Theatre practitioners involved in neurosurgery might find this review useful in enhancing their understanding of how SAH is currently treated. It could also bring some insights about the reasons why a particular modality of the treatment was chosen for their patient. PMID:26016283

  9. Deep vein thrombosis induced by thalidomide to control epistaxis secondary to hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Penaloza, Andrea; Vekemans, Marie-Christiane; Lambert, Catherine; Hermans, Cedric

    2011-10-01

    Thalidomide was recently reported to reduce the severity and frequency of epistaxes in patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). We here describe the case of a patient with HHT and severe epistaxes refractory to medical and local surgical treatments who developed an extensive deep vein thrombosis shortly after initiation of treatment with thalidomide. This is the first report of venous thromboembolic complication induced by thalidomide prescribed in this setting. Although thalidomide was recently found to provide an alternative therapeutic strategy in patients with HHT and refractory epistaxes, this agent should be used with great caution in this indication, given its thrombogenicity and difficulties to manage systemic anticoagulation in patients with HHT. PMID:21885956

  10. Endoscopic resection of giant lipoma mimicking colonic neoplasm initially presenting with massive haemorrhage: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lazaraki, Georgia; Tragiannidis, Dimitrios; Xirou, Persefoni; Nakos, Andreas; Pilpilidis, Ioannis; Katsos, Ioannis

    2009-01-01

    Lipomas of the colon are benign tumors that rarely occur. Their size ranges from 2 mm to several cm. They are usually asymptomatic but occasionally they present with clinical manifestations depending on tumor size, localization and complications, which often lead to diagnostic difficulty. A 40-year-old man presented with massive rectal haemorrhage. During colonoscopy a giant polyp of over 50 mm in its bigger diameter, with a thick stalk of 2 cm, located in the transverse colon, was revealed. Endoscopic resection was performed with success. Histologic examination demonstrated a giant lipoma. In this report discussion over endoscopic resection of colonic lipomas mimicking neoplasms is also performed. PMID:20181161

  11. Endoscopic resection of giant lipoma mimicking colonic neoplasm initially presenting with massive haemorrhage: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Lipomas of the colon are benign tumors that rarely occur. Their size ranges from 2 mm to several cm. They are usually asymptomatic but occasionally they present with clinical manifestations depending on tumor size, localization and complications, which often lead to diagnostic difficulty. A 40-year-old man presented with massive rectal haemorrhage. During colonoscopy a giant polyp of over 50 mm in its bigger diameter, with a thick stalk of 2 cm, located in the transverse colon, was revealed. Endoscopic resection was performed with success. Histologic examination demonstrated a giant lipoma. In this report discussion over endoscopic resection of colonic lipomas mimicking neoplasms is also performed. PMID:20181161

  12. Acute exposure to ultraviolet-B radiation modulates sex steroid hormones and receptor expression in the skin and may contribute to the sex bias of melanoma in a fish model.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, David L; Fernandez, André A; Garcia, Rachel; Paniker, Lakshmi; Lin, Kevin; Hanninen, Amanda; Zigelsky, Kyle; May, Matthew; Nuttall, Mark; Lo, Herng-Hsiang; Person, Maria D; Earley, Ryan

    2014-05-01

    Using the Xiphophorus fish melanoma model, we show a strong male bias for sunlight-induced malignant melanoma, consistent with that seen in the human population. To examine underlying factors, we exposed adult X. couchianus fish to a single, sublethal dose of UVB and measured circulating sex steroid hormones and expression of associated hormone receptor genes over a 24-h period. We found that a single exposure had profound effects on circulating levels of steroid hormones with significant decreases for all free sex steroids at 6 and 24 h and increases in conjugated 2-estradiol and 11-ketotestosterone at 6 and 24 h, respectively. Whereas ARα expression increased in male and female skin, neither ARβ nor either of the ERs showed significant responses to UVB in either sex. The rapid response of male androgens and their receptors in the skin after UVB irradiation implicates hormones in the male bias of skin cancer and suggests that the photoendocrine response immediately after UV exposure may be relevant to melanomagenesis. PMID:24406016

  13. Acute exposure to ultraviolet-B radiation modulates sex steroid hormones and receptor expression in the skin and may contribute to the sex-bias of melanoma in a fish model

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, David L.; Fernandez, André A.; Garcia, Rachel; Paniker, Lakshmi; Lin, Kevin; Hanninen, Amanda; Zigelsky, Kyle; May, Matthew; Nuttall, Mark; Lo, Herng-hsiang; Person, Maria D.; Earley, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Using the Xiphophorus fish melanoma model we show a strong male bias for cutaneous malignant melanoma, consistent with that seen in the human population. To examine underlying factors, we exposed adult X. couchianus fish to a single, sub-lethal dose of UVB and measured circulating sex steroid hormones and expression of associated hormone receptor genes over a 24 hour period. We found that a single exposure had profound effects on circulating levels of steroid hormones with significant decreases for all free sex steroids at 6 and 24 h and increases in conjugated 2-estradiol and 11-ketotestosterone at 6 and 24 h, respectively. Whereas ARα expression increased in male and female skin, neither ARβ nor either of the ER’s showed significant responses to UVB in either sex. The rapid response of male androgens and their receptors in the skin after UVB irradiation implicates hormones in the male-bias of skin cancer and suggests that the photoendocrine response immediately after UV exposure may be relevant to melanomagenesis. PMID:24406016

  14. Evidence-Based Skin Care: A Systematic Literature Review and the Development of a Basic Skin Care Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Lichterfeld, Andrea; Hauss, Armin; Surber, Christian; Peters, Tina; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Kottner, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Patients in acute and long-term care settings receive daily routine skin care, including washing, bathing, and showering, often followed by application of lotions, creams, and/or ointments. These personal hygiene and skin care activities are integral parts of nursing practice, but little is known about their benefits or clinical efficacy. The aim of this article was to summarize the empirical evidence supporting basic skin care procedures and interventions and to develop a clinical algorithm for basic skin care. Electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL were searched and afterward a forward search was conducted using Scopus and Web of Science. In order to evaluate a broad range of basic skin care interventions systematic reviews, intervention studies, and guidelines, consensus statements and best practice standards also were included in the analysis. One hundred twenty-one articles were read in full text; 41documents were included in this report about skin care for prevention of dry skin, prevention of incontinence-associated dermatitis and prevention of skin injuries. The methodological quality of the included publications was variable. Review results and expert input were used to create a clinical algorithm for basic skin care. A 2-step approach is proposed including general and special skin care. Interventions focus primarily on skin that is either too dry or too moist. The target groups for the algorithm are adult patients or residents with intact or preclinical damaged skin in care settings. The goal of the skin care algorithm is a first attempt to provide guidance for practitioners to improve basic skin care in clinical settings in order to maintain or increase skin health. PMID:26165590

  15. Urostomy - stoma and skin care

    MedlinePlus

    ... it well before you attach the pouch. Avoid skin care products that contain alcohol. These can make your ... the pouch to your skin. Use fewer special skin care products. This will make problems with your skin ...

  16. Anyone Can Get Skin Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    No matter if your skin is light, dark, or somewhere in between, everyone is at risk for skin cancer. Learn what skin cancer looks like, how to find it early, and how to lower the chance of skin cancer.

  17. Immunohistochemical detection of IgM and IgG in lung tissue of dogs with leptospiral pulmonary haemorrhage syndrome (LPHS)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leptospiral pulmonary haemorrhage syndrome (LPHS) is a severe form of leptospirosis. Pathogenic mechanisms are poorly understood. Lung tissues from 26 dogs with LPHS, 5 dogs with pulmonary haemorrhage due to other causes and 6 healthy lungs were labelled for IgG, IgM and leptospiral antigens. Three ...

  18. Design and Experimental Evaluation of a Non-Invasive Microwave Head Imaging System for Intracranial Haemorrhage Detection.

    PubMed

    Mobashsher, A T; Bialkowski, K S; Abbosh, A M; Crozier, S

    2016-01-01

    An intracranial haemorrhage is a life threatening medical emergency, yet only a fraction of the patients receive treatment in time, primarily due to the transport delay in accessing diagnostic equipment in hospitals such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging or Computed Tomography. A mono-static microwave head imaging system that can be carried in an ambulance for the detection and localization of intracranial haemorrhage is presented. The system employs a single ultra-wideband antenna as sensing element to transmit signals in low microwave frequencies towards the head and capture backscattered signals. The compact and low-profile antenna provides stable directional radiation patterns over the operating bandwidth in both near and far-fields. Numerical analysis of the head imaging system with a realistic head model in various situations is performed to realize the scattering mechanism of haemorrhage. A modified delay-and-summation back-projection algorithm, which includes effects of surface waves and a distance-dependent effective permittivity model, is proposed for signal and image post-processing. The efficacy of the automated head imaging system is evaluated using a 3D-printed human head phantom with frequency dispersive dielectric properties including emulated haemorrhages with different sizes located at different depths. Scattered signals are acquired with a compact transceiver in a mono-static circular scanning profile. The reconstructed images demonstrate that the system is capable of detecting haemorrhages as small as 1 cm3. While quantitative analyses reveal that the quality of images gradually degrades with the increase of the haemorrhage's depth due to the reduction of signal penetration inside the head; rigorous statistical analysis suggests that substantial improvement in image quality can be obtained by increasing the data samples collected around the head. The proposed head imaging prototype along with the processing algorithm demonstrates its feasibility for

  19. The release of transforming growth factor-beta following haemorrhage: its role as a mediator of host immunosuppression.

    PubMed Central

    Ayala, A; Meldrum, D R; Perrin, M M; Chaudry, I H

    1993-01-01

    Haemorrhage in the absence of trauma is reported to induce a profound depression in cell-mediated immunity. Recent studies have drawn attention to the cytokine transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) that, while important in wound healing, also has marked immunosuppressive effects. The aim of this study was to determine whether: (1) haemorrhage induces an increase in circulating TGF-beta and if this is associated with the loss of host immunoresponsiveness; and (2) administration of monoclonal antibody (mAb) to TGF-beta following haemorrhage ablates these changes. To determine this, C3H/HeN mice were bled to and maintained at a mean arterial pressure of 35 mmHg for 1 hr. This required removing approximately 50% of the circulating blood volume. Following this period of hypotension, the mice were adequately resuscitated. Blood samples obtained at 24 and 72 hr, but not at 2 hr, following haemorrhage showed a significant elevation in plasma TGF-beta levels when compared to shams. At 24 hr, the increase of TGF-beta in the plasma was associated with decreases in both concanavalin A (Con A)-induced splenocyte proliferation and splenic macrophage antigen presentation. Treating animals with neutralizing antibody (animals received 200 micrograms mAb against bovine TGF-beta 1,2,3/mouse intraarterially) not only reduced the levels of TGF-beta in the blood at 24 hr, but also restored splenocyte functions, such as Con A-induced proliferation, interleukin-2 (IL-2) release, and the capacity of splenic macrophages to present antigen. However, elevated levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) seen in plasma during haemorrhage were only partially depressed by the antibody treatment. These results indicate that the release of TGF-beta contributes to the protracted (> or = 24 hr) suppression of cell-mediated immunity following haemorrhage. PMID:8406575

  20. Pursuing prosthetic electronic skin.

    PubMed

    Chortos, Alex; Liu, Jia; Bao, Zhenan

    2016-09-01

    Skin plays an important role in mediating our interactions with the world. Recreating the properties of skin using electronic devices could have profound implications for prosthetics and medicine. The pursuit of artificial skin has inspired innovations in materials to imitate skin's unique characteristics, including mechanical durability and stretchability, biodegradability, and the ability to measure a diversity of complex sensations over large areas. New materials and fabrication strategies are being developed to make mechanically compliant and multifunctional skin-like electronics, and improve brain/machine interfaces that enable transmission of the skin's signals into the body. This Review will cover materials and devices designed for mimicking the skin's ability to sense and generate biomimetic signals. PMID:27376685

  1. Skin Exposure and Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Redlich, Carrie A.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous occupational and environmental exposures that increase asthma risk have been identified. Research and prevention have focused primarily on the respiratory tract. However, recent studies suggest that the skin may also be an important route of exposure and site of sensitization that contributes to asthma development. Factors that impair skin barrier function, such as filaggrin gene mutations or skin trauma, may facilitate allergen entry and promote Th2-like sensitization and subsequent asthma. Animal studies demonstrate that skin exposure to chemical and protein allergens is highly effective at inducing sensitization, with subsequent inhalation challenge eliciting asthmatic responses. A similar role for human skin exposure to certain sensitizing agents, such as isocyanates, is likely. Skin exposure methodologies are being developed to incorporate skin exposure assessment into epidemiology studies investigating asthma risk factors. PMID:20427586

  2. What have drugs to offer the patient with acute stroke?

    PubMed Central

    Grosset, D G

    1992-01-01

    1. Drug treatment for acute stroke is designed to salvage neuronal tissue, and to prevent complications of stroke, which are often non-neurological. This review addresses the areas of recent advance in treatment designed to reduce the size of the cerebral infarct. With the exception of cardiac-source embolism, for which anticoagulation in the acute phase is sometimes considered, prevention of recurrent events is not discussed. 2. It is to be hoped that pharmaceutical developments will improve the current bleak picture in which there are no proven treatments for ischaemic stroke or intracerebral haemorrhage. To meet this challenge will require careful, controlled evaluation of treatment early after acute stroke in large scale clinical studies. PMID:1524958

  3. Lethal, oedema, haemorrhagic activity of spotted butterfish (Scatophagus argus, Linn) sting extract and its neutralization by antiserum and pharmacological antagonists.

    PubMed

    Muhuri, D; Dasgupta, S C; Gomes, A

    2005-06-01

    An attempt has been made in this communication to develop antiserum in rabbit against Scatophagus. argus sting extract. Antiserum did not neutralized the sting extract induced proinflammatory and haemorrhagic activity but successfully neutralized lethality upto 2LD50. Cyproheptadine, indomethacin and BW 755C pretreatment significantly reduced sting extract induced proinflammatory activity. The haemorrhagic activity of sting extract was significantly inhibited by temperature, UV-exposure, EDTA, cyproheptadine, indomethacin and BW 755C pretreatment. The results conclude that the local effects of S.argus venom is likely to be mediated through release of mediators and may be encountered by pharmacological antagonists better than the antiserum. PMID:15991572

  4. The prevention and treatment of postpartum haemorrhage: what do we know, and where do we go to next?

    PubMed

    Weeks, A

    2015-01-01

    Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) remains a major cause of maternal deaths worldwide, and is estimated to cause the death of a woman every 10 minutes. This review presents the latest clinical advice, including new evidence on controlled cord traction, misoprostol, and oxytocin. The controversy around the diagnosis of PPH, the limitations of universal prophylaxis, and novel ways to provide obstetric first aid are also presented. It ends with a call to develop high-quality front-line obstetric services that can deal rapidly with unexpected haemorrhages as well as minimising blood loss at critical times: major abruption, placenta praevia, and caesarean for prolonged labour. PMID:25289730

  5. Performance characteristics of methods for quantifying spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage: data from the Efficacy of Nitric Oxide in Stroke (ENOS) trial

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Kailash; Mukhtar, Siti F; Lingard, James; Houlton, Aimee; Walker, Elizabeth; Jones, Tanya; Sprigg, Nikola; Cala, Lesley A; Becker, Jennifer L; Dineen, Robert A; Koumellis, Panos; Adami, Alessandro; Casado, Ana M; Bath, Philip M W; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2015-01-01

    Background Poor prognosis after intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) is related to haemorrhage characteristics. Along with developing therapeutic interventions, we sought to understand the performance of haemorrhage descriptors in large clinical trials. Methods Clinical and neuroimaging data were obtained for 548 participants with ICH from the Efficacy of Nitric Oxide in Stroke (ENOS) trial. Independent observers performed visual categorisation of the largest diameter, measured volume using ABC/2, modified ABC/2, semiautomated segmentation (SAS), fully automatic measurement methods; shape, density and intraventricular haemorrhage were also assessed. Intraobserver and interobserver reliability were determined for these measures. Results ICH volume was significantly different among standard ABC/2, modified ABC/2 and SAS: (mean) 12.8 (SD 16.3), 8.9 (9.2), 12.8 (13.1) cm3, respectively (p<0.0001). There was excellent agreement for haemorrhage volume (n=193): ABC/2 intraobserver intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) 0.96–0.97, interobserver ICC 0.88; modified ABC/2 intraobserver ICC 0.95–0.97, interobserver ICC 0.91; SAS intraobserver ICC 0.95–0.99, interobserver ICC 0.93; largest diameter: (visual) interadjudicator ICC 0.82, (visual vs measured) adjudicator vs observer ICC 0.71; shape intraobserver ICC 0.88 interobserver ICC 0.75; density intraobserver ICC 0.86, interobserver ICC 0.73. Graeb score (mean 3.53) and modified Graeb (5.22) scores were highly correlated. Using modified ABC/2, ICH volume was underestimated in regular (by 2.2-2.5 cm3, p<0.0001) and irregular-shaped haemorrhages (by 4.8-4.9 cm3, p<0.0001). Fully automated measurement of haemorrhage volume was possible in only 5% of cases. Conclusions Formal measurement of haemorrhage characteristics and visual estimates are reproducible. The standard ABC/2 method is superior to the modified ABC/2 method for quantifying ICH volume. Clinical trial registration ISRCTN9941422. PMID:25575847

  6. Development of sonic technology for the daily cleansing of the skin.

    PubMed

    Akridge, Robert E; Pilcher, Kenneth A

    2006-06-01

    Even though many skin cleansing products are commercially available, the cleansing of the skin is dependent upon the user's diligence, compliance, and technique, which often results in inconsistent cleansing. When the skin is inadequately or excessively cleansed, the skin becomes compromised, sometimes leading to acute or chronic conditions that may require medical attention. A sonic skincare brush was developed to enhance and provide consistent skin cleansing while preventing the skin from becoming compromised. Utilizing a technology previously used to cleanse the oral cavity, the sonic skincare brush is optimized to work with the skin's own elasticity providing rapid oscillatory flexing of the infundibular opening. By oscillating at sonic speed the net result is the inelastic comedones become loosened and detached from the infundibular wall and are then cleared from the acroinfundibulum. Although additional clinical research into the various applications of sonic skin care technology is needed, utilization of sonic technology is now available for effectively and consistently cleansing the skin. PMID:17173597

  7. The Protective Role of Melanin Against UV Damage in Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Michaela; Hearing, Vincent J.

    2009-01-01

    Human skin is repeatedly exposed to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) that influences the function and survival of many cell types and is regarded as the main causative factor in the induction of skin cancer. It has been traditionally believed that skin pigmentation is the most important photoprotective factor, since melanin, besides functioning as a broadband UV absorbent, has antioxidant and radical scavenging properties. Besides, many epidemiological studies have shown a lower incidence for skin cancer in individuals with darker skin compared to those with fair skin. Skin pigmentation is of great cultural and cosmetic importance, yet the role of melanin in photoprotection is still controversial. This article outlines the major acute and chronic effects of UV radiation on human skin, the properties of melanin, the regulation of pigmentation and its effect on skin cancer prevention. PMID:18435612

  8. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    Bronchitis is an inflammation of the bronchial tubes, the airways that carry air to your lungs. It ... chest tightness. There are two main types of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis ...

  9. Acute abdominal pain in patients with lassa fever: Radiological assessment and diagnostic challenges

    PubMed Central

    Eze, Kenneth C.; Salami, Taofeek A.; Kpolugbo, James U.

    2014-01-01

    Background: To highlight the problems of diagnosis and management of acute abdomen in patients with lassa fever. And to also highlight the need for high index of suspicion of lassa fever in patients presenting with acute abdominal pain in order to avoid surgical intervention with unfavourable prognosis and nosocomial transmission of infections, especially in Lassa fever-endemic regions. Materials and Methods: A review of experiences of the authors in the management of lassa fever over a 4-year period (2004-2008). Literature on lassa fever, available in the internet and other local sources, was studied in November 2010 and reviewed. Results: Normal plain chest radiographic picture can change rapidly due to pulmonary oedema, pulmonary haemorrhage and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Plain abdominal radiograph may show dilated bowels with signs of paralytic ileus or dynamic intestinal obstruction due to bowel wall haemorrhage or inflamed and enlarged Peyer's patches. Ultrasound may show free intra-peritoneal fluid due to peritonitis and intra-peritoneal haemorrhage. Bleeding into the gall bladder wall may erroneously suggest infective cholecystitis. Pericardial effusion with or without pericarditis causing abdominal pain may be seen using echocardiography. High index of suspicion, antibody testing for lassa fever and viral isolation in a reference laboratory are critical for accurate diagnosis. Conclusion: Patients from lassa fever-endemic regions may present with features that suggest acute abdomen. Radiological studies may show findings that suggest acute abdomen but these should be interpreted in the light of the general clinical condition of the patient. It is necessary to know that acute abdominal pain and vomiting in lassa fever-endemic areas could be caused by lassa fever, which is a medical condition. Surgical option should be undertaken with restraint as it increases the morbidity, may worsen the prognosis and increase the risk of nosocomial transmission

  10. Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever replication interplays with regulation mechanisms of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Karlberg, Helen; Tan, Yee-Joo; Mirazimi, Ali

    2015-03-01

    Pathogenesis of viral haemorrhagic fevers is associated with alteration of vascular barrier function and haemorrhage. To date, the specific mechanism behind this is unknown. Programmed cell death and regulation of apoptosis in response to viral infection is an important factor for host or virus survival but this has not been well-studied in the case of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV). In this study, we demonstrated that CCHFV infection suppresses cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), triggered by staurosporine early post-infection. We also demonstrated that CCHFV infection suppresses activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9. Most interestingly, we found that CCHFV N can suppress induction of apoptosis by Bax and inhibit the release of cytochrome c from the inner membrane of mitochondria to cytosol. However, CCHFV infection induces activation of Bid late post-infection, suggesting activation of extrinsic apoptotic signalling. Consistently, supernatant from cells stimulated late post-infection was found to induce PARP cleavage, most probably through the TNF-α death receptor pathway. In summary, we found that CCHFV has strategies to interplay with apoptosis pathways and thereby regulate caspase cascades. We suggest that CCHFV suppresses caspase activation at early stages of the CCHFV replication cycle, which perhaps benefits the establishment of infection. Furthermore, we suggest that the host cellular response at late stages post-infection induces host cellular pro-apoptotic molecules through the death receptor pathway. PMID:25481756

  11. Nitric oxide decreases intestinal haemorrhagic lesions in rat anaphylaxis independently of mast cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, J. Carvalho; Moreno, A.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the intestinal lesions of passive anaphylaxis, since this experimental model resembles necrotizing enterocolitis. Sprague-Dawley rats were sensitized with IgE anti-dinitrophenol monoclonal antibody. Extravasation of protein-rich plasma and haemorrhagia were measured in the small intestine. Plasma histamine was measured to assess mast cell activation. The effect of exogenous NO on the lesions was assessed by using two structurally unrelated NO-donors: sodium nitroprusside and S-nitroso-Nacetyl-penicillamine (SNAP). An increased basal production of NO was observed in cells taken after anaphylaxis, associated with a reduced response to platelet-activating factor, interleukin 1beta, and IgE/DNP-bovine serum albumin complexes. The response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide and dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP) was enhanced 24 h after challenge, but at earlier times was not significantly different from that observed in controls. Treatment with either sodium nitroprusside or SNAP produced a significant reduction of the haemorrhagic lesions, which are a hallmark of rat anaphylaxis. The extravasation of protein-rich plasma was not influenced by NO-donors. The increase of plasma histamine elicited by the anaphylactic challenge was not influenced by SNAP treatment. NO-donors protect intestinal haemorrhagic lesions of rat anaphylaxis by a mechanism apparently independent of mast cell histamine release. PMID:18472830

  12. Ischaemic and haemorrhagic brain lesions in newborns with seizures and normal Apgar scores.

    PubMed Central

    Mercuri, E.; Cowan, F.; Rutherford, M.; Acolet, D.; Pennock, J.; Dubowitz, L.

    1995-01-01

    Serial ultrasound scans and conventional and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed on 16 neonates who presented with seizures. The Apgar scores were normal and subsequently no metabolic or infective cause could be found. The aim of the study was to evaluate the extent to which early sequential imaging can elucidate the cause of seizures in apparently neurologically normal infants. Fourteen of the infants had haemorrhagic or ischaemic lesions on MRI and these were detected by ultrasound scanning in 11. Early ultrasound scanning detected the haemorrhagic lesions but the ischaemic lesions were often not seen until the end of the first week of life. Early MRI, however, was able to detect all the ischaemic lesions. The evolution of the insult could be timed by using serial ultrasound scans and a combination of diffusion weighted and conventional MRI during the first week of life, confirming a perinatal insult even in the absence of fetal distress. Although the aetiology of these lesions remains obscure, serial ultrasound scans will detect the presence of cerebral lesions in neonates presenting with isolated seizures but additional MRI sequences will give better definition on type, site, and extent of the pathology. Images Figures 5 and 6 Figure 2 Figures 3 and 4 Figure 1 PMID:7583609

  13. Timing and evolution of periventricular haemorrhage in infants weighing 1250 g or less at birth.

    PubMed Central

    Szymonowicz, W; Yu, V Y

    1984-01-01

    The brains of 50 consecutively admitted infants who weighed 1250 g or less at birth were examined with real time ultrasound. Of 30 (60%) who had periventricular haemorrhage (PVH), 19 (63%) bled on the first day and 17 (57%) showed extension of the initial haemorrhage on serial scans. The median age was 16 hours when PVH was first detected and 48 hours when PVH reached its maximum extent. Ventricular size at birth correlated with gestation. Progressive ventricular growth was seen after birth in infants both with and without PVH. Charts of normal ranges of ventricular size and head circumference were drawn up from birth to 10 weeks of age. All infants with PVH showed a transient increase in ventricular size at 2 weeks of age but most returned to normal by 6 weeks of age. Ventricular dilatation after PVH that was greater than the 95th centile for this population developed in 5 (31%) of 16 survivors, four of whom subsequently developed hydrocephalus, although none required ventriculo peritoneal shunting. The optimal timing for diagnosis with ultrasound is at the end of the first week for PVH and the second to third week for ventricular dilatation. PMID:6696499

  14. Advances in the understanding of delayed cerebral ischaemia after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Liam; Andrews, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Delayed cerebral ischaemia has been described as the single most important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients who survive the initial aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage. Our understanding of the pathophysiology of delayed cerebral ischaemia is meagre at best and the calcium channel blocker nimodipine remains the only intervention to consistently improve functional outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage. There is substantial evidence to support cerebral vessel narrowing as a causative factor in delayed cerebral ischaemia, but contemporary research demonstrating improvements in vessel narrowing has failed to show improved functional outcomes. This has encouraged researchers to investigate other potential causes of delayed cerebral ischaemia, such as early brain injury, microthrombosis, and cortical spreading depolarisation. Adherence to a common definition of delayed cerebral ischaemia is needed in order to allow easier assessment of studies using multiple different terms. Furthermore, improved recognition of delayed cerebral ischaemia would not only allow for faster treatment but also better assessment of interventions. Finally, understanding nimodipine’s mechanism of action may allow us to develop similar agents with improved efficacy. PMID:26937276

  15. Diode laser treatment and clinical management of multiple oral lesions in patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Favia, G; Tempesta, A; Limongelli, L; Suppressa, P; Sabbà, C; Maiorano, E

    2016-05-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is rare, and characterised by vascular dysplasia that leads to various symptoms including visceral arteriovenous malformations and mucocutaneous telangiectatic lesions. Our aim was to describe the clinical features and options for the treatment of multiple oral lesions, and to illustrate the efficacy of the diode laser in the treatment of early (<2mm) and advanced lesions (2mm or more). We report 24 patients with 1200 oral telangiectatic lesions, which were often associated with regular bleeding (from monthly to daily), superinfection, pain, and swelling, and treated with multiple sessions of laser according to the number and size of the lesions. Early lesions were treated with a single laser impulse in ultrapulsed mode, and advanced lesions with repeated laser impulses in pulsed mode (t-on 200ms/t-off 500ms), at a power of 8W. Early lesions healed completely after laser photocoagulation with no operative or postoperative complications, while advanced lesions improved with a remarkable reduction in size but more discomfort. Protective occlusal plates were sometimes used to reduce the incidence of new lesions caused by dental trauma. The treatment of oral telangiectatic lesions is still being debated, and it is important to improve quality of life for patients. Diode laser surgery could be an effective treatment for oral lesions in those with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia. PMID:26360009

  16. Resilience to orthostasis and haemorrhage: A pilot study of common genetic and conditioning mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Davydov, Dmitry M.; Zhdanov, Renad I.; Dvoenosov, Vladimir G.; Kravtsova, Olga A.; Voronina, Elena N.; Filipenko, Maxim L.

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge presently is not only to identify the genetic polymorphisms increasing risk to diseases, but to also find out factors and mechanisms, which can counteract a risk genotype by developing a resilient phenotype. The objective of this study was to examine acquired and innate vagal mechanisms that protect against physical challenges and haemorrhages in 19 athletes and 61 non-athletes. These include examining change in heart rate variability (HF-HRV; an indicator of vagus activity) in response to orthostatic challenge, platelet count (PLT), mean platelet volume (MPV), and single-nucleotide polymorphisms in genes that encode several coagulation factors, PAI-1, and MTHFR. Individual differences in PLT and MPV were significant predictors, with opposite effects, of the profiles of the HF-HRV changes in response to orthostasis. Regular physical training of athletes indirectly (through MPV) modifies the genetic predisposing effects of some haemostatic factors (PAI-1 and MTHFR) on vagal tone and reactivity. Individual differences in vagal tone were also associated with relationships between Factor 12 C46T and Factor 11 C22771T genes polymorphisms. This study showed that genetic predispositions for coagulation are modifiable. Its potential significance is promoting advanced protection against haemorrhages in a variety of traumas and injuries, especially in individuals with coagulation deficits. PMID:26024428

  17. Resilience to orthostasis and haemorrhage: A pilot study of common genetic and conditioning mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Davydov, Dmitry M; Zhdanov, Renad I; Dvoenosov, Vladimir G; Kravtsova, Olga A; Voronina, Elena N; Filipenko, Maxim L

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge presently is not only to identify the genetic polymorphisms increasing risk to diseases, but to also find out factors and mechanisms, which can counteract a risk genotype by developing a resilient phenotype. The objective of this study was to examine acquired and innate vagal mechanisms that protect against physical challenges and haemorrhages in 19 athletes and 61 non-athletes. These include examining change in heart rate variability (HF-HRV; an indicator of vagus activity) in response to orthostatic challenge, platelet count (PLT), mean platelet volume (MPV), and single-nucleotide polymorphisms in genes that encode several coagulation factors, PAI-1, and MTHFR. Individual differences in PLT and MPV were significant predictors, with opposite effects, of the profiles of the HF-HRV changes in response to orthostasis. Regular physical training of athletes indirectly (through MPV) modifies the genetic predisposing effects of some haemostatic factors (PAI-1 and MTHFR) on vagal tone and reactivity. Individual differences in vagal tone were also associated with relationships between Factor 12 C46T and Factor 11 C22771T genes polymorphisms. This study showed that genetic predispositions for coagulation are modifiable. Its potential significance is promoting advanced protection against haemorrhages in a variety of traumas and injuries, especially in individuals with coagulation deficits. PMID:26024428

  18. A review on clinical management and pharmacological therapy on hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT).

    PubMed

    Zarrabeitia, Roberto; Albiñana, Virginia; Salcedo, Matilde; Señaris-Gonzalez, B; Fernandez-Forcelledo, Jose-Luis; Botella, Luisa-Maria

    2010-07-01

    Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT) or Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome, is an autosomal dominant rare disease characterized by localized angiodysplasia. This is manifested as epistaxis, mucocutaneous and gastrointestinal telangiectases, and arteriovenous malformations in the pulmonary, cerebral or hepatic circulation. The prevalence is between 1 in 5,000 to 8,000, although it is higher in some regions. The most frequent clinical manifestation of HHT is epistaxis, normally from light to moderate from the 4(th) decade of life. However, many patients show severe epistaxis which may interfere with their quality of life. The epistaxis is due to telangiectasia on the nasal mucosa. These are focally dilated postcapilar venules, which in advanced phases show many layers of smooth muscle cells without elastic fibers, and very frequently directly connect with dilated arterioles. As a consequence of these vascular alterations, telangiectases are very sensitive to slight trauma and even to the friction with the air when breathing, which gives rise to nose bleeds. Unfortunately, there is no optimal pharmacological treatment for the epistaxis in HHT. The use of antifibrinolytic agents for the treatment of HHT has been studied recently by our group as an effective relief for nasal and gastric haemorrhages. This work represents a systematic review and the beginning of a systematic laboratory work we are now conducting in our lab to screen for "orphan drugs" as therapeutic agents in HHT. In this context, the use of hormones, immunosuppresants and anti-angiogenic agents are under preclinical study in our laboratory. PMID:19485912

  19. Complications and pregnancy outcome following uterine compression suture for postpartum haemorrhage: a single centre experience.

    PubMed

    Liu, S; Mathur, M; Tagore, S

    2014-07-01

    In the treatment of postpartum haemorrhage from uterine atony, uterine compression sutures, such as the B-Lynch suture and its modifications have a role with the advantage of preservation of the uterus for fertility. There is however, a risk that apposition of the anterior and posterior walls of the uterus will impede drainage of lochia, resulting in undesirable complications. We undertook a five-year retrospective study of all women who underwent uterine compression sutures at the KK Women's and Children's Hospital, between 2008 and 2012. In total, 23 women had uterine compression sutures during the study period, of which, nineteen women managed to conserve their uterus. Our complication rate was 25%, which included persistent vaginal discharge, pyometra and endometritis. There were three conceptions, with two successful pregnancies. Our study shows uterine compression suture to be a safe and effective alternative to avoid hysterectomy with preservation of fertility at the time of major postpartum haemorrhage. The outcome of subsequent pregnancies is reassuring. PMID:24678816

  20. Viral haemorrhagic fevers in Europe--effective control requires a co-ordinated response.

    PubMed

    Crowcroft, N S; Morgan, D; Brown, D

    2002-03-01

    Viral haemorrhagic fevers (VHF) have attracted the attention of the medical world and general public for many reasons, some based in reality and more on misinformation. They are amongst the highest profile infections in the public mind, because they are thought to be highly infectious and to kill most of their victims in a dramatic way (1,2). To add to the intrigue, mysteries remain about the source of some of the viruses involved. They emerge and re-emerge in many countries, most recently Ebola in Uganda in 2000 (3) and Gabon in 2001/02 (4), and Congo Crimean Haemorrhagic Fever (CCHF) in Kosovo (5) and Pakistan in 2001 (6). Large outbreaks have affected populations in endemic areas, living mainly in inaccessible areas or refugee camps where living conditions are very difficult. Poorly resourced medical facilities have played a role in amplifying transmission and infection control measures have been difficult or virtually impossible to establish. These viruses are likely to remain a threat until the reservoir is identified and as long as endemic areas are afflicted with ecological change, poverty and social instability. Recent events since September 11 2001 remind us of their potential to be used as weapons, and that fear can present a risk to public health. PMID:12631941

  1. Complete tamponade system for management of severe postpartum vaginal haemorrhage due to uterine atony.

    PubMed

    Atilgan, Remzi; Ozkan, Zehra Sema; Orak, Ugur; Baspinar, Melike

    2014-01-01

    A 30-year-old, 39 weeks pregnant, multiparous woman with single fetus, attended our obstetric clinic with complete cervical dilation in intractable mentum anterior presentation. The fetus was delivered by caesarean section with vertical uterine incision under general anaesthesia and lithotomy position. After surgery, examination of the vagina revealed multiple, serious tears with severe haemorrhage. Vaginal bleeding could not be controlled by sutures and concurrently uterine atony developed, which could not be controlled with medical treatment. Owing to intractable bleeding from uterus and vagina, a complete tamponade system was used. After the instillation of the uterine balloon with 500 mL and vaginal balloon with 300 mL liquid, the bleeding was controlled. The estimated blood loss was 3200 mL. The vaginal wound healed well during the postoperative 2 weeks. A complete tamponade system may be an effective treatment method for treatment of postpartum haemorrhage owing to vaginal lacerations and uterine atony. PMID:25452297

  2. The use of an alum irrigation in the treatment of massive bladder haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Schootstra, R; van Driel, M F; Hassankhan, R; van de Werff, R; Oremus, E T; Uges, D R; Mensink, H J

    1989-10-20

    Severe, massive bladder haemorrhage is a difficult and often frustrating clinical problem. The aetiologies are numerous and include irradiation, malignancy, severe infection and drug-induced changes. Among the numerous modalities of treatment that have been reported formalin, phenol and silver nitrate instillations have often been associated with significant side effects, morbidity and mortality and have had varying degrees of success. During the last two years we have used continuous closed irrigation of a sterile 0.5% alum solution in 16 patients. Alum is an astringent and acts by protein precipitation over the bleeding surface. Because of a low cell permeability its action is limited to the cell surface and interstitial spaces. The permeability of the cell membrane is reduced but remains viable. The preparation and the pharmaceutical aspects of the 0.5% alum irrigation will be discussed. The conclusion is that the technique of managing massive bladder haemorrhage is simple, efficient, nontoxic and less expensive than previously reported therapies. Therefore, irrigation with alum before instituting invasive means to control bleeding is recommended. PMID:2594469

  3. Radiation effects control: Eyes, skin. [space environment simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hightower, D.; Smathers, J. B.

    1974-01-01

    Adverse effects on the lens of the eye and the skin due to exposure to proton radiation during manned space flight were evaluated. Actual proton irradiation which might be encountered in space was simulated. Irradiation regimes included single acute exposures, daily fractionated exposures, and weekly fractionated exposures. Animals were exposed and then maintained and examined periodically until data sufficient to meet the objective were obtained. No significant skin effects were noted and no serious sight impairment was exhibited.

  4. Acute Cholecystitis in Patients with Scrub Typhus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun; Ji, Misuk; Hwang, Jeong-Hwan; Lee, Ja-Yeon; Lee, Ju-Hyung; Chung, Kyung Min; Lee, Chang-Seop

    2015-11-01

    Acute cholecystitis is a rare complication of scrub typhus. Although a few such cases have been reported in patients with scrub typhus, the clinical course is not well described. Of 12 patients, acute cholecystitis developed in 66.7% (8/12) of patients older than 60 yr. The scrub typhus group with acute cholecystitis had marginal significant longer hospital stay and higher cost than the group without cholecystitis according to propensity score matching. Scrub typhus should be kept in mind as a rare etiology of acute cholecystitis in endemic areas because the typical signs of scrub typhus such as skin rash and eschar can present after the abdominal pain. PMID:26539017

  5. A four-point clinical criteria distinguishes immune thrombocytopenia from acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Lum, S H; How, S J; Ariffin, H; Krishnan, S

    2016-02-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia is the most common diagnosis of isolated thrombocytopenia. The dilemma encountered by paediatricians is missing diagnosis of acute leukaemia in children with isolated thrombocytopenia. We demonstrated childhood ITP could be diagnosed using a four point clinical criteria without missing a diagnosis of acute leukaemia. Hence, bone marrow examination is not necessary in children with typical features compatible with ITP prior to steroid therapy. This can encourage paediatricians to choose steroid therapy, which is cheaper and non-blood product, as first line platelet elevating therapy in children with significant haemorrhage. PMID:27130741

  6. Comparison of Provider-Assessed and Patient-Reported Outcome Measures of Acute Skin Toxicity During a Phase III Trial of Mometasone Cream Versus Placebo During Breast Radiotherapy: The North Central Cancer Treatment Group (N06C4)

    SciTech Connect

    Neben-Wittich, Michelle A.; Atherton, Pamela J.; Schwartz, David J.; Sloan, Jeff A.; Griffin, Patricia C.; Deming, Richard L.; Anders, Jon C.; Loprinzi, Charles L.; Burger, Kelli N.; Martenson, James A.; Miller, Robert C.

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: Considerable interobserver variability exists among providers and between providers and patients when measuring subjective symptoms. In the recently published Phase III N06C4 trial of mometasone cream vs. placebo to prevent radiation dermatitis, the primary provider-assessed (PA) endpoint, using the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), was negative. However, prospectively planned secondary analyses of patient-reported outcomes (PROs), using the Skindex-16 and Skin Toxicity Assessment Tool (STAT), were positive. This study assesses the relationship between PA outcomes and PROs. Methods and Materials: Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated to compare the three tools. Statistical correlations were defined as follows: <0.5, mild; 0.5-0.7, moderate; and >0.7, strong. Results: CTCAE dermatitis moderately correlated with STAT erythema, and CTCAE pruritus strongly correlated with STAT itching. CTCAE pruritus had a moderate correlation with Skindex-16 itching. Comparing the 2 PRO tools, Skindex-16 itching correlated moderately with STAT itching. Skindex-16 burning, hurting, irritation, and persistence all showed the strongest correlation with STAT burning; they showed moderate correlations with STAT itching and tenderness. Conclusions: The PRO Skindex-16 correlated well with the PRO portions of STAT, but neither tool correlated well with CTCAE. PROs delineated a wider spectrum of toxicity than PA measures and provided more information on rash, redness, pruritus, and annoyance measures compared with CTCAE findings of rash and pruritus. PROs may provide a more complete measure of patient experience than single-symptom, PA endpoints in clinical trials assessing radiation skin toxicity.

  7. Haemobilia causing cholangitis in a patient on dual anti-platelet treatment suffering from acute acalculous cholecystitis

    PubMed Central

    Luhmann, Andreas; Buter, Anton; Abela, Jo-Etienne

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Haemobilia is a rare cause of upper gastro-intestinal haemorrhage which can be difficult to diagnose. PRESENTATION OF CASE We present the case of a patient who suffered from acute acalculous cholecystitis while on dual anti-platelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel. We describe the diagnostic and treatment challenges arising from the patient's complicated past history and the steps leading to the diagnosis of haemobilia causing biliary obstruction and cholangitis. Our patient did not, at any point, manifest anaemia or evidence of haemorrhage. DISCUSSION Haemobilia has a varied aetiology. To our knowledge there is no association with dual anti-platelet treatment in the literature to date. Diagnosis is difficult and relies on multiple modalities. In our patient the final diagnosis was only made in the course of open bile duct exploration. CONCLUSION In acute biliary obstruction we recommend the consideration of haemobilia in the differential diagnosis, especially in patients with a bleeding tendency. PMID:23466686

  8. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Asian Haemorrhagic Septicaemia-Associated Strains of Pasteurella multocida Identifies More than 90 Haemorrhagic Septicaemia-Specific Genes

    PubMed Central

    Moustafa, Ahmed M.; Seemann, Torsten; Gladman, Simon; Adler, Ben; Harper, Marina; Boyce, John D.; Bennett, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida is the primary causative agent of a range of economically important diseases in animals, including haemorrhagic septicaemia (HS), a rapidly fatal disease of ungulates. There is limited information available on the diversity of P. multocida strains that cause HS. Therefore, we determined draft genome sequences of ten disease-causing isolates and two vaccine strains and compared these genomes using a range of bioinformatic analyses. The draft genomes of the 12 HS strains were between 2,298,035 and 2,410,300 bp in length. Comparison of these genomes with the North American HS strain, M1404, and other available P. multocida genomes (Pm70, 3480, 36950 and HN06) identified a core set of 1,824 genes. A set of 96 genes was present in all HS isolates and vaccine strains examined in this study, but absent from Pm70, 3480, 36950 and HN06. Moreover, 59 genes were shared only by the Asian B:2 strains. In two Pakistani isolates, genes with high similarity to genes in the integrative and conjugative element, ICEPmu1 from strain 36950 were identified along with a range of other antimicrobial resistance genes. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the HS strains formed clades based on their country of isolation. Future analysis of the 96 genes unique to the HS isolates will aid the identification of HS-specific virulence attributes and facilitate the development of disease-specific diagnostic tests. PMID:26151935

  9. Bacterial Skin Infections.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Fadi; Khan, Tariq; Pujalte, George G A

    2015-12-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections account for 0.5% of outpatient visits to primary care. Skin and soft tissue infections can usually be managed in an outpatient setting. However, there are certain circumstances as discussed in this article that require more urgent care or inpatient management. Primary care providers should be able to diagnose, manage, and provide appropriate follow-up care for these frequently seen skin infections. This article provides family physicians with a comprehensive review of the assessment and management of common bacterial skin infections. PMID:26612370

  10. Immunohistochemistry of porcine skin.

    PubMed

    Wollina, U; Berger, U; Mahrle, G

    1991-01-01

    The present paper reports immunohistological findings in porcine skin, which were obtained by use of mono- and polyclonal antihuman antibodies and either alkaline phosphatase anti-alkaline phosphatase (APAAP) or peroxidase (POX) technique. Epidermal staining was observed with antibodies to keratins (K 8.12, RSKE 60), filaggrin, and calmodulin (ACAM). Staining of connective tissue and vessels was achieved using antibodies to vimentin (V9(1)), collagen type IV, and fibronectin. In general, these antibodies gave a staining pattern similar to that of normal human skin. The similarities of immunoreactivity to poly- and monoclonal antihuman antibodies in porcine and human skin render porcine skin a reliable model in biomedical research. PMID:1710864

  11. In vitro and human testing strategies for skin irritation.

    PubMed

    Robinson, M K; Osborne, R; Perkins, M A

    2000-01-01

    Prior to the manufacture, transport, and marketing of chemicals or products, it is critical to assess their potential for skin toxicity (corrosion or irritation), thereby protecting the worker and consumer from adverse skin effects due to intended or accidental skin exposure. Traditionally, animal testing procedures have provided the data needed to assess the more severe forms of skin toxicity, and current regulations may require animal test data before permission can be obtained to manufacture, transport, or market chemicals or the products that contain them. In recent years, the use of animals to assess skin safety has been opposed by some as inhumane and unnecessary. The conflicting needs of the industrial toxicologist to (1) protect human safety, (2) comply with regulations, and (3) reduce animal testing have led to major efforts to develop alternative, yet predictive, test methods. A variety of in vitro skin corrosion test methods have been developed and several have successfully passed initial international validation. These have included skin or epidermal equivalent assays that have been shown to distinguish corrosive from noncorrosive chemicals. These skin/epidermal equivalent assays have also been modified and used to assess skin irritation potential relative to existing human exposure test data. The data show a good correlation between in vitro assay data and different types of human skin irritation data for both chemicals and consumer products. The effort to eliminate animal tests has also led to the development of a novel human patch test for assessment of acute skin irritation potential. A case study shows the benefits of in vitro and human skin irritation tests compared to the animal tests they seek to replace, and strategies now exist to adequately assess human skin irritation potential without the need to rely on animal test methods. PMID:11083109

  12. Sunburn, Thermal, and Chemical Injuries to the Skin.

    PubMed

    Monseau, Aaron J; Reed, Zebula M; Langley, Katherine Jane; Onks, Cayce

    2015-12-01

    Sunburn, thermal, and chemical injuries to the skin are common in the United States and worldwide. Initial management is determined by type and extent of injury with special care to early management of airway, breathing, and circulation. Fluid management has typically been guided by the Parkland formula, whereas some experts now question this. Each type of skin injury has its own pathophysiology and resultant complications. All primary care physicians should have at least a basic knowledge of management of acute and chronic skin injuries. PMID:26612374

  13. Skin necrosis caused by prallethrin-A worldwide used insecticide.

    PubMed

    Botnariu, Gina; Birsan, Cristina; Podoleanu, Cristian; Moldovan, Cosmin; Stolnicu, Simona; Chiriac, Anca

    2016-04-01

    We report a case of necrosis caused by the use of prallethrin (mosquito repellent) on the skin in a 67-year-old diabetic female patient suffering from delusions of parasitosis. Cutaneous toxicity due to pyrethroids is less known or reported, despite well-documented pyrethroid poisoning involving the gastrointestinal, respiratory, cardiac, and nervous systems. Skin irritation has been described after acute accidental exposure but, as far as we know, no data have been published on the effects of pyrethroids when applied directly to the skin. PMID:26987111

  14. Revascularization of autogenous skin grafts placed on irradiated tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, M.; Torii, S.; Kaneda, T.; Oka, T.

    1982-08-01

    Vascular changes in rat skin after irradiation were examined microangiographically. Revascularization of the skin transplanted during the chronic stage after irradiation was also studied. The results obtained through these examinations revealed higher vascular densities at the acute and the subacute stages, and low values at the chronic stages compared with those of the control. Furthermore, when the skin grafts were transplanted to the irradiated beds in the chronic stage, primary revascularization was scant, and the inhibited capillary proliferation in the recipient sites prevented new vessel penetration. This explains why grafts transplanted to previously irradiated beds fail to survive.

  15. Leptospirosis pulmonary haemorrhage syndrome is associated with linear deposition of immunoglobulin and complement on the alveolar surface.

    PubMed

    Croda, J; Neto, A N D; Brasil, R A; Pagliari, C; Nicodemo, A C; Duarte, M I S

    2010-06-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonotic infection associated with severe diseases such as leptospirosis pulmonary haemorrhage syndrome (LPHS). The cause of pulmonary haemorrhage is unclear. Understanding which mechanisms and processes are involved in LPHS will be important in treatment regimens under development for this life-threatening syndrome. In the present study, we evaluated 30 lung specimens from LPHS patients and seven controls using histology and immunohistochemistry (detection of IgM, IgG, IgA and C3) in order to describe the pathological features associated with this syndrome. Immunoglobulin deposits were detected on the alveolar surface in 18/30 LPHS patients. Three staining patterns were observed for the immunoglobulins and C3 in the lung tissues of LPHS patients: AS, delicate linear staining adjacent to the alveolar surface, which was indicative of a membrane covering the luminal surface of type I and II pneumocyte cells; S, heterogeneous staining which was sporadically distributed along the alveolar septum; and IA, weak, focal intra-alveolar granular staining. Human LPHS is associated with individual and unique histological patterns that differ from those of other causes of pulmonary haemorrhage. In the present study, it was found that the linear deposition of immunoglobulins (IgA, IgG and IgM) and complement on the alveolar surface may play a role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary haemorrhage in human leptospirosis. PMID:19778300

  16. Isolation of a haemorrhagic protein toxin (SA-HT) from the Indian venomous butterfish (Scatophagus argus, Linn) sting extract.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, S; Muhuri, D C; Dasgupta, S C; Nagchaudhuri, A K; Gomes, A

    2004-05-01

    A haemorrhagic protein toxin (SA-HT) was isolated and purified from the spine extract of the Indian venomous butterfish, S. argus Linn, by two step ion exchange chromatography. The toxin was homogeneous in native and SDS-PAGE gel. SDS-molecular weight of the toxin was found to be 18.1 +/- 0.09 kDa. SA-HT produced severe haemorrhage on stomach wall but devoid of cutaneous haemorrhage. UV, EDTA, trypsin, protease, cyproheptadine, indomethacin, acetylsalicylic acid and BW755C treatment significantly antagonized the haemorrhagic activity of SA-HT. The toxin produced dose and time dependent oedema on mice hind paw, which was significantly encountered by cyproheptadine, indomethacin and BW755C. SA-HT increased capillary permeability on guinea pig dorsal flank. On isolated guineapig ileum, rat fundus and uterus, SA-HT produced slow contraction which was completely antagonised by prostaglandin blocker SC19220. On isolated rat duodenum, SA-HT produced slow relaxation. SA-HT significantly increased plasma plasmin, serum MDA level and decreased serum SOD level indicating the possible involvement of cyclooxygenase and lipooxygenase pathway. PMID:15233468

  17. Involvement of the histaminergic system in the resuscitating effect of centrally acting leptin in haemorrhagic shock in rats.

    PubMed

    Jochem, J; Altinbas, B; Yalcin, M; Ottani, A; Giuliani, D; Savci, V; Kasperska-Zajac, A; Guarini, S

    2016-02-01

    Leptin, acting centrally as a neuromodulator, induces the activation of the sympathetic nervous system, which may lead to a pressor action in normotensive animals. In haemorrhagic shock, leptin administered intracerebroventricularly (icv.) evokes the resuscitating effect, with long-lasting rises in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR), subsequent increase in peripheral blood flows, and a 100% survival at 2 h. Since leptin is able to activate histaminergic neurons, and centrally acting histamine also induces the resuscitating effect with the activation of the sympathetic nervous system, in the present study, we investigated an involvement of the histaminergic system in leptin-evoked cardiovascular effects in haemorrhagic shock. The model of irreversible haemorrhagic shock, with MAP decreased to and stabilised at 20 - 25 mmHg, has been used. Leptin (20 μg) given icv. at 5 min of critical hypotension evoked 181.5% increase in extracellular hypothalamic histamine concentration during the first 10 min after injection. Rises in MAP, HR and renal, mesenteric and hindquarters blood flows induced by leptin were inhibited by icv. pre-treatment with histamine H1 receptor antagonist chlorpheniramine (50 nmol). In contrast, there was no effect of H2, H3 and H4 receptor antagonists ranitidine (25 nmol), VUF 5681 (25 nmol) and JNJ 10191584 (25 nmol), respectively. In conclusion, the histaminergic system is involved in centrally-acting leptin-induced resuscitating effect in haemorrhagic shock in rats. PMID:27010896

  18. Redox Imbalance in T Cell-Mediated Skin Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pastore, Saveria; Korkina, Liudmila

    2010-01-01

    The skin is permanently exposed to physical, chemical, and biological aggression by the environment. In addition, acute and chronic inflammatory events taking place in the skin are accompanied by abnormal release of pro-oxidative mediators. In this paper, we will briefly overview the homeostatic systems active in the skin to maintain the redox balance and also to counteract abnormal oxidative stress. We will concentrate on the evidence that a local and/or systemic redox dysregulation accompanies the chronic inflammatory disorder events associated to psoriasis, contact dermatitis, and atopic dermatitis. We will also discuss the fact that several well-established treatments for the therapy of chronic inflammatory skin disorders are based on the application of strong physical or chemical oxidants onto the skin, indicating that, in selected conditions, a further increase of the oxidative imbalance may lead to a beneficial outcome. PMID:20847812

  19. Haemorrhagic smolt syndrome (HSS) in Norway: pathology and associated virus-like particles.

    PubMed

    Nylund, A; Plarre, H; Hodneland, K; Devold, M; Aspehaug, V; Aarseth, M; Koren, C; Watanabe, K

    2003-03-17

    Atlantic salmon Salmo salar pre-smolt, smolt and post-smolt, with clinical signs of haemorrhagic smolt syndrome (HSS) have been found in several locations along the Norwegian coast (Rogaland to Troms). Affected fish had pale gills and bleeding at the fin bases, but seemed to be in good physical condition with no obvious weight loss. The internal organs and body cavity showed distinct bleedings. Petechiae were found on the gastrointestinal tract, swim bladder and peritoneum, visceral adipose tissue, heart and somatic musculature. The liver was bright yellow and sometimes mottled with petechiae and ecchymoses. Acitic fluid was found in the visceral cavity and fluid was also present in the pericardial cavity. Histological examination revealed haemorrhage in most organs. The glomeruli were degenerated and the renal tubules were filled with erythrocytes. The aims of this study were to describe the pathology and discover, if possible, the aetiology of the HSS. Tissues were collected for light and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), immunofluorescence (IFAT), reverse transcription (RT)-PCR diagnostics (screening for infectious salmon anaemia virus [ISAV], viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus [VHSV], salmon pancreas disease virus [SPDV], sleeping disease virus [SDV] and infectious haematopoetic necrosis virus [IHNV]), and tissue homogenates (heart, liver, kidney and spleen) were sterile-filtered and inoculated into cell cultures. Homogenates made from several tissues were also injected intraperitoneally into salmon and rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. The diagnostic tests revealed no consistent findings of any pathogens, with the exception of TEM which showed 2 types of virus-like particles: Type I was 50 to 60 nm in diameter and Type II about 50 nm in diameter. These virus-like particles were found in salmon from all farms affected by HSS and screened by TEM. Several different cells, blood vessel endothelial cells, endocardial cells, heart myofibres, and leukocytes

  20. Skin Photoaging and the Role of Antioxidants in Its Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Pandel, Ruža; Poljšak, Borut

    2013-01-01

    Photoaging of the skin depends primarily on the degree of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and on an amount of melanin in the skin (skin phototype). In addition to direct or indirect DNA damage, UVR activates cell surface receptors of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in the skin, which leads to a breakdown of collagen in the extracellular matrix and a shutdown of new collagen synthesis. It is hypothesized that dermal collagen breakdown is followed by imperfect repair that yields a deficit in the structural integrity of the skin, formation of a solar scar, and ultimately clinically visible skin atrophy and wrinkles. Many studies confirmed that acute exposure of human skin to UVR leads to oxidation of cellular biomolecules that could be prevented by prior antioxidant treatment and to depletion of endogenous antioxidants. Skin has a network of all major endogenous enzymatic and nonenzymatic protective antioxidants, but their role in protecting cells against oxidative damage generated by UV radiation has not been elucidated. It seems that skin's antioxidative defence is also influenced by vitamins and nutritive factors and that combination of different antioxidants simultaneously provides synergistic effect. PMID:24159392