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Sample records for acute skin reactions

  1. [Cytarabine and skin reactions in acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Grille, Sofía; Guadagna, Regina; Boada, Matilde; Irigoin, Victoria; Stevenazzi, Mariana; Guillermo, Cecilia; Díaz, Lilián

    2013-01-01

    Cytarabine is an antimetabolite used in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). It has many adverse effects as: myelosuppression, toxic reactions involving central nervous system, liver, gastrointestinal tract, eyes or skin. Dermatologic toxicity is often described as rare; nevertheless there are differences in the reported frequency. We performed a retrospective study including all AML treated with chemotherapy that involved cytarabine between 1st July of 2006 and 1st July of 2012; 46 patients were included with a median age of 55 years. The overall incidence of skin reactions was 39% (n = 18). Sex, age, history of atopy, history of drug reactions, or dose of cytarabine used, were not associated with them. Skin reactions were observed from 2 to 8 days after treatment started. Considering injury degree: 27.8% had grade 1, 38.9% grade 2 and 33.3% grade 3. We did not find any injury grade 4 or death associated with skin toxicity. As for the type of injury: 55.6% presented macules, 22.2% papules and 22.2% erythema. Lesions distribution was diffuse in 52% of patients, acral in 39.3%, and at flexural level in 8.7%. Adverse cutaneous reactions secondary to the administration of cytarabine are frequent in our service and include some cases with severe involvement. Although these reactions usually resolve spontaneously, they determine an increased risk of infection and a compromise of the patient quality of life.

  2. Acute skin reaction suggestive of pembrolizumab-induced radiosensitization.

    PubMed

    Sibaud, Vincent; David, Isabelle; Lamant, Laurence; Resseguier, Sarah; Radut, Roxana; Attal, Justine; Meyer, Nicolas; Delord, Jean-Pierre

    2015-12-01

    The combination of localized radiotherapy and immune checkpoint inhibitors represents a promising therapeutic strategy for various cancers, including metastatic melanoma. Radiation therapy may enhance tumor antigen presentation and cytokine release, which may optimize the systemic antitumor immune response induced by these immunotherapeutic antibodies, with a potential delayed abscopal effect. However, clinical experience of using immune checkpoint inhibitors with concurrent radiotherapy remains scarce. We report here for the first time a case suggestive of acute skin radiosensitization induced by pembrolizumab, with a suggestive time relationship between the completion of ionizing radiation, drug administration, and rapid onset of the skin reaction. This suggests that radiation therapy may also interact rapidly with anti-programmed-death 1 antibodies. Therefore, caution should be exercised when prescribing this combination therapy in advanced cancers.

  3. Prophylaxis and management of acute radiation-induced skin reactions: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Salvo, N.; Barnes, E.; van Draanen, J.; Stacey, E.; Mitera, G.; Breen, D.; Giotis, A.; Czarnota, G.; Pang, J.; De Angelis, C.

    2010-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a common treatment for cancer patients. One of the most common side effects of radiation is acute skin reaction (radiation dermatitis) that ranges from a mild rash to severe ulceration. Approximately 85% of patients treated with radiation therapy will experience a moderate-to-severe skin reaction. Acute radiation-induced skin reactions often lead to itching and pain, delays in treatment, and diminished aesthetic appearance—and subsequently to a decrease in quality of life. Surveys have demonstrated that a wide variety of topical, oral, and intravenous agents are used to prevent or to treat radiation-induced skin reactions. We conducted a literature review to identify trials that investigated products for the prophylaxis and management of acute radiation dermatitis. Thirty-nine studies met the pre-defined criteria, with thirty-three being categorized as prophylactic trials and six as management trials. For objective evaluation of skin reactions, the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria and the U.S. National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria were the most commonly used tools (65% of the studies). Topical corticosteroid agents were found to significantly reduce the severity of skin reactions; however, the trials of corticosteroids evaluated various agents, and no clear indication about a preferred corticosteroid has emerged. Amifostine and oral enzymes were somewhat effective in preventing radiation-induced skin reactions in phase ii and phase iii trials respectively; further large randomized controlled trials should be undertaken to better investigate those products. Biafine cream (Ortho–McNeil Pharmaceuticals, Titusville, NJ, U.S.A.) was found not to be superior to standard regimes in the prevention of radiation-induced skin reactions (n = 6). In conclusion, the evidence is insufficient to support the use of a particular agent for the prevention and management of acute radiation-induced skin reactions. Future trials should focus

  4. Evaluating the consistency of location of the most severe acute skin reaction and highest skin dose measured by thermoluminescent dosimeter during radiotherapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li-Min; Huang, Chih-Jen; Chen, Hsiao-Yun; Chang, Gia-Hsin; Tsao, Min-Jen

    2016-01-01

    We conducted this prospective study to evaluate whether the location of the most severe acute skin reaction matches the highest skin dose measured by thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) during adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for patients with breast cancer after breast conservative surgery. To determine whether TLD measurement can reflect the location of the most severe acute skin reaction, 80 consecutive patients were enrolled in this prospective study. We divided the irradiated field into breast, axillary, inframammary fold, and areola/nipple areas. In 1 treatment session when obvious skin reaction occurred, we placed the TLD chips onto the 4 areas and measured the skin dose. We determined whether the highest measured skin dose area is consistent with the location of the most severe skin reaction. The McNemar test revealed that the clinical skin reaction and TLD measurement are more consistent when the most severe skin reaction occurred at the axillary area, and the p = 0.0108. On the contrary, TLD measurement of skin dose is less likely consistent with clinical observation when the most severe skin reaction occurred at the inframammary fold, breast, and areola/nipple areas (all the p > 0.05). Considering the common site of severe skin reaction over the axillary area, TLD measurement may be an appropriate way to predict skin reaction during RT.

  5. Comprehensive Evaluation of Personal, Clinical, and Radiation Dosimetric Parameters for Acute Skin Reaction during Whole Breast Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dae Sik; Lee, Jung Ae; Lee, Nam Kwon; Park, Young Je; Lee, Suk; Kim, Chul Yong; Son, Gil Soo

    2016-01-01

    Skin reaction is major problem during whole breast radiotherapy. To identify factors related to skin reactions during whole breast radiotherapy, various personal, clinical, and radiation dosimetric parameters were evaluated. From January 2012 to December 2013, a total of 125 patients who underwent breast conserving surgery and adjuvant whole breast irradiation were retrospectively reviewed. All patients had both whole breast irradiation and boost to the tumour bed. Skin reaction was measured on the first day of boost therapy based on photography of the radiation field and medical records. For each area of axilla and inferior fold, the intensity score of erythema (score 1 to 5) and extent (score 0 to 1) were summed. The relationship of various parameters to skin reaction was evaluated using chi-square and linear regression tests. The V100 (volume receiving 100% of prescribed radiation dose, p < 0.001, both axilla and inferior fold) and age (p = 0.039 for axilla and 0.026 for inferior fold) were significant parameters in multivariate analyses. The calculated axilla dose (p = 0.003) and breast separation (p = 0.036) were also risk factors for axilla and inferior fold, respectively. Young age and large V100 are significant factors for acute skin reaction that can be simply and cost-effectively measured. PMID:27579310

  6. Comprehensive Evaluation of Personal, Clinical, and Radiation Dosimetric Parameters for Acute Skin Reaction during Whole Breast Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dae Sik; Lee, Jung Ae; Yoon, Won Sup; Lee, Nam Kwon; Park, Young Je; Lee, Suk; Kim, Chul Yong; Son, Gil Soo

    2016-01-01

    Skin reaction is major problem during whole breast radiotherapy. To identify factors related to skin reactions during whole breast radiotherapy, various personal, clinical, and radiation dosimetric parameters were evaluated. From January 2012 to December 2013, a total of 125 patients who underwent breast conserving surgery and adjuvant whole breast irradiation were retrospectively reviewed. All patients had both whole breast irradiation and boost to the tumour bed. Skin reaction was measured on the first day of boost therapy based on photography of the radiation field and medical records. For each area of axilla and inferior fold, the intensity score of erythema (score 1 to 5) and extent (score 0 to 1) were summed. The relationship of various parameters to skin reaction was evaluated using chi-square and linear regression tests. The V 100 (volume receiving 100% of prescribed radiation dose, p < 0.001, both axilla and inferior fold) and age (p = 0.039 for axilla and 0.026 for inferior fold) were significant parameters in multivariate analyses. The calculated axilla dose (p = 0.003) and breast separation (p = 0.036) were also risk factors for axilla and inferior fold, respectively. Young age and large V 100 are significant factors for acute skin reaction that can be simply and cost-effectively measured. PMID:27579310

  7. Therapeutics interventions with anti-inflammatory creams in post radiation acute skin reactions: a systematic review of most important clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Koukourakis, Georgios V; Kelekis, Nikolaos; Kouvaris, John; Beli, Ivelina K; Kouloulias, Vassilios E

    2010-06-01

    The majority of cancer patients will receive radiation therapy treatment at some stage during their malignancy. An acute skin reaction represents a common post radiation side effect with different grade of severity. In order to investigate the optimal methods to prevent and manage acute skin reactions related to radiation therapy we have conducted a systematic review on this topic. It seems that skin washing, including gentle washing with water alone with or without mild soap, should be permitted in patients receiving radiation therapy, to prevent acute skin reaction. In addition, a low dose (i.e., 1%) corticosteroid cream may be beneficial in the reduction of itching and irritation. We have concluded that there is insufficient evidence to support or refute specific topical or oral agents for the prevention or management of acute skin reaction. There is a need for further research to review treatments that have produced promising results in the reviewed research studies and to evaluate other commonly recommended topical treatments. The purpose of this patent and literature review is to advocate the current management of acute skin reaction.

  8. Delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin reaction to hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) in patients with type B acute and chronic hepatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Nagafuchi, S; Kashiwagi, S; Hayashi, S; Inoue, T; Imayama, S; Takeshita, M; Kikuchi, M

    1985-01-01

    Skin reactivity to HBsAg was studied in patients with type B acute and chronic hepatitis and in healthy controls. HBsAg preparations containing 50 micrograms/ml of antigen both with and without alum elicited positive skin reactions in all seven anti-HBs+ persons. Histological examination of skin tissue from the reactive area using monoclonal antibodies to the cell surface of lymphocytes revealed accumulation of Leu-3a positive lymphocytes, showing that the inflammation was a typical delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction. Irrespective of the presence of HBeAg and anti-HBe, patients with chronic type B hepatitis responded clearly to PPD and SK/SD antigens, whereas they did not exhibit DTH skin reactivity to HBsAg. In contrast, although patients with acute type B hepatitis did not exhibit specific DTH a reaction to HBsAg in the acute period, they began to develop DTH skin reactivity to HBsAg in the convalescent phase of the disease preceding the appearance of anti-HBs antibody. It is suggested that DTH reaction to HBsAg might play an important role in the pathogenesis of type B viral hepatitis. Images Fig. 2 PMID:4075587

  9. Acute erythema and edematous skin reaction and ectropion following docetaxel in a patient with non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Ali Osman; Buyukberber, Suleyman; Coskun, Ugur; Yildiz, Ramazan; Ozturk, Banu; Yaman, Emel; Adisen, Esra; Gureli, Mustafa; Benekli, Mustafa

    2008-01-01

    Docetaxel can cause skin reactions such as hypersensitivity, edema, and erythrodysesthesia syndrome as well as side effects involving the skin, including alopecia, nail onycholysis, nail pigmentation, photosensitivity, scleroderma, and paresthesia. In this case report, a patient was admitted to the hospital with widespread erythematous and edematous eruption in the head, neck, trunk, and lower and upper extremities, erythema around the eyes, and drooping of the lower eyelids that developed about 2 hours after receiving chemotherapy consisting of docetaxel. Use of the Naranjo Adverse Drug Reaction Probability Scale--a method for estimating the probability of adverse drug reactions--indicated a probable relationship between the skin reaction and docetaxel therapy in this patient. Docetaxel-associated skin reactions that are so extensive and severe as to lead to eye madarosis and ectropion are reported rarely in the literature.

  10. Comparison of acute skin reaction following morning versus late afternoon radiotherapy in patients with breast cancer who have undergone curative surgical resection

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Jae Myoung; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Hyojung; Huh, Seung Jae; Park, Won; Seol, Seung Won; Jeong, Bae Kwon; Nam, Seok Jin; Lee, Jeong Eon; Kil, Won-Ho

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between the time of radiotherapy (RT) and treatment outcomes in breast cancer. Patients with pathologic T1–2N0–1 breast cancer who received adjuvant RT in the morning (before 10:00 AM) or late afternoon (after 3:00 PM) were eligible for inclusion in this study. We retrospectively compared the clinicopathologic characteristics, acute skin reaction, and survival outcomes according to the time of RT. The median follow-up duration was 83 months (range, 10–131 months). From the 395 eligible patients, 190 (48.1%) and 205 (51.9%) patients were classified into the morning RT group and the afternoon RT group, respectively. The clinicopathologic characteristics were relatively well balanced between the treatment groups, except for pathologic N-stage (P = 0.0409). Grade 2 or higher acute skin reaction according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria was observed in 39 (9.9%) patients, with a higher frequency in the afternoon RT group than the morning RT group (13.7% vs 5.8%, respectively; P = 0.0088). There was no difference in the failure patterns or survival outcomes between the treatment groups. RT in late afternoon was associated with increased Grade 2 or more skin reaction after RT for breast cancer patients, but treatment outcomes did not differ according to the time of RT. Individualized considerations for treatment should be taken into account to reduce the risk of skin reactions. PMID:24385471

  11. Influence of Double-Strand Break Repair on Radiation Therapy-Induced Acute Skin Reactions in Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Mumbrekar, Kamalesh Dattaram; Fernandes, Donald Jerard; Goutham, Hassan Venkatesh; Sharan, Krishna; Vadhiraja, Bejadi Manjunath; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu; Bola Sadashiva, Satish Rao

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: Curative radiation therapy (RT)-induced toxicity poses strong limitations for efficient RT and worsens the quality of life. The parameter that explains when and to what extent normal tissue toxicity in RT evolves would be of clinical relevance because of its predictive value and may provide an opportunity for personalized treatment approach. Methods and Materials: DNA double-strand breaks and repair were analyzed by microscopic γ-H2AX foci analysis in peripheral lymphocytes from 38 healthy donors and 80 breast cancer patients before RT, a 2 Gy challenge dose of x-ray exposed in vitro. Results: The actual damage (AD) at 0.25, 3, and 6 hours and percentage residual damage (PRD) at 3 and 6 hours were used as parameters to measure cellular radiosensitivity and correlated with RT-induced acute skin reactions in patients stratified as non-overresponders (NOR) (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group [RTOG] grade <2) and overresponders (OR) (RTOG grade ≥2). The results indicated that the basal and induced (at 0.25 and 3 hours) γ-H2AX foci numbers were nonsignificant (P>.05) between healthy control donors and the NOR and OR groups, whereas it was significant between ORs and healthy donors at 6 hours (P<.001). There was a significantly higher PRD in OR versus NOR (P<.05), OR versus healthy donors (P<.001) and NOR versus healthy donors (P<.01), supported further by the trend analysis (r=.2392; P=.0326 at 6 hours). Conclusions: Our findings strongly suggest that the measurement of PRD by performing γ-H2AX foci analysis has the potential to be developed into a clinically useful predictive assay.

  12. Management of radiotherapy-induced skin reactions.

    PubMed

    Trueman, Ellen

    2015-04-01

    Radiotherapy is a highly effective cancer treatment that not only offers cure but also excellent palliation of disease related symptoms and complications. Although radiotherapy is primarily an outpatient treatment, delivered within specialist centres, a diverse range of health professionals may be involved in the treatment pathway before, during and after treatment. Radiotherapy can, and does, make a significant contribution to improving a patient's wellbeing through effective symptom management. However, treatment-related side-effects do occur, with an acute skin reaction being one of the most common. It is imperative that radiotherapy-induced skin reactions are correctly assessed and appropriately managed in promoting patient comfort, treatment compliance and enhanced quality of life. This article describes how the use of a recognised assessment tool and evidence-based guidelines can facilitate consistent, high-quality care in the management of radiotherapy-induced skin reactions.

  13. [RBE of neutrons from the BR-10 reactor based on their antitumor effect and on acute radiation reactions of the skin].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, M N; Ul'ianenko, S E

    1989-05-01

    The paper is concerned with the results of investigation of antitumor effectiveness (rats, sarcoma M-1) of neutron radiation of a BR-10 reactor with the mean energy of 0.85 MeV, correlated with the effect of 60Co gamma radiation (Luch-1). RBE in single local tumor radiation with neutrons was 4.5, being higher than RBE based on acute skin radiation reactions over a tumor (4.0). For this case FTA is over I (1.13) but slightly lower than after dose fractionated irradiation (1.18). Experimental data indicate the necessity of extending the clinical use of reactor neutrons and a profound study of the effects after neutron irradiation, particularly in dose-fractionated regimens.

  14. Drug hypersensitivity reactions involving skin.

    PubMed

    Hausmann, Oliver; Schnyder, Benno; Pichler, Werner J

    2010-01-01

    Immune reactions to drugs can cause a variety of diseases involving the skin, liver, kidney, lungs, and other organs. Beside immediate, IgE-mediated reactions of varying degrees (urticaria to anaphylactic shock), many drug hypersensitivity reactions appear delayed, namely hours to days after starting drug treatment, showing a variety of clinical manifestations from solely skin involvement to fulminant systemic diseases which may be fatal. Immunohistochemical and functional studies of drug-specific T cells in patients with delayed reactions confirmed a predominant role for T cells in the onset and maintenance of immune-mediated delayed drug hypersensitivity reactions (type IV reactions). In these reactions, drug-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are stimulated by drugs through their T cell receptors (TCR). Drugs can stimulate T cells in two ways: they can act as haptens and bind covalently to larger protein structures (hapten-carrier model), inducing a specific immune response. In addition, they may accidentally bind in a labile, noncovalent way to a particular TCR of the whole TCR repertoire and possibly also major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-molecules - similar to their pharmacologic action. This seems to be sufficient to reactivate certain, probably in vivo preactivated T cells, if an additional interaction of the drug-stimulated TCR with MHC molecules occurs. The mechanism was named pharmacological interaction of a drug with (immune) receptor and thus termed the p-i concept. This new concept may explain the frequent skin symptoms in drug hypersensitivity to oral or parenteral drugs. Furthermore, the various clinical manifestations of T cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity may be explained by distinct T cell functions leading to different clinical phenotypes. These data allowed a subclassification of the delayed hypersensitivity reactions (type IV) into T cell reactions which, by releasing certain cytokines and chemokines, preferentially activate and recruit

  15. Phytohemagglutinin induces major short-term protease-sensitive lymphocyte traffic involving high endothelium venule-like blood vessels in acute delayed-type hypersensitivity-like reactions in skin and other tissues.

    PubMed

    Binns, R M; Licence, S T; Wooding, F B

    1990-05-01

    Injection of phytohemagglutinin induces dose-dependent acute delayed-type hypersensitivity-like reactions in young pig skin which attract large numbers of labeled peripheral blood lymphocytes and lymphoblasts but not red cells. Similar reactions are induced in the gut wall, joints, and draining lymph nodes, and also in the skin of sheep and cattle, and by concanavalin A. Labeled peripheral blood lymphocyte entry starts within 2 h, is maximal at 6-18 h and is effectively over by 48 h and, both early and late, is markedly inhibited in a selective way by trypsinization, like high endothelium venule-mediated entry to lymphoid tissues. Electron microscopy showed development of high endothelium venule-like blood vessels with intramural lymphoid cells in mononuclear infiltrates. Inductive processes in this model short-term peripheral defense mechanism are being investigated.

  16. Prevention and treatment of acute radiation-induced skin reactions: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Radiation-induced skin reaction (RISR) is a common side effect that affects the majority of cancer patients receiving radiation treatment. RISR is often characterised by swelling, redness, pigmentation, fibrosis, and ulceration, pain, warmth, burning, and itching of the skin. The aim of this systematic review was to assess the effects of interventions which aim to prevent or manage RISR in people with cancer. Methods We searched the following databases up to November 2012: Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL (2012, Issue 11), MEDLINE (from 1946), EMBASE (from 1974), PsycINFO (from 1806), CINAHL (from 1981) and LILACS (from 1982). Randomized controlled trials evaluating interventions for preventing or managing RISR in cancer patients were included. The primary outcomes were development of RISR, and levels of RISR and symptom severity. Secondary outcomes were time taken to develop erythema or dry desquamation; quality of life; time taken to heal, a number of skin reaction and symptom severity measures; cost, participant satisfaction; ease of use and adverse effects. Where appropriate, we pooled results of randomized controlled trials using mean differences (MD) or odd ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Forty-seven studies were included in this review. These evaluated six types of interventions (oral systemic medications; skin care practices; steroidal topical therapies; non-steroidal topical therapies; dressings and other). Findings from two meta-analyses demonstrated significant benefits of oral Wobe-Mugos E for preventing RISR (OR 0.13 (95% CI 0.05 to 0.38)) and limiting the maximal level of RISR (MD -0.92 (95% CI -1.36 to -0.48)). Another meta-analysis reported that wearing deodorant does not influence the development of RISR (OR 0.80 (95% CI 0.47 to 1.37)). Conclusions Despite the high number of trials in this area, there is limited good, comparative research that provides definitive results suggesting the

  17. 78 FR 63220 - Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing Drugs for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin... guidance for industry entitled ``Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing Drugs for... drugs to treat acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI). This guidance finalizes...

  18. Glaucoma eye drops adverse skin reactions.

    PubMed

    Cantisani, Carmen; Ambrifi, Marina; Frascani, Federica; Fazia, Gilda; Paolino, Giovanni; Lisi, Roberto; Calvieri, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    The term "Glaucoma" is used to describe a number of diseases of the eye characterized by a particular form of optic nerve damage that is often associated with high intraocular pressure (IOP). The open-angle glaucoma is the most common form that is also referred to as chronic glaucoma. This is described as an optic neuropathy with multifactorial nature in which there is a loss of characteristics of the optic nerve fibers. Therapeutic options for the treatment of this disease are different, you can take advantage of eye drops, laser therapy and conventional surgery or more combined treatments. Medicated eye drops are the most common way to treat glaucoma. Although eye drops are widely used, adverse reactions are not frequently observed and described. In particular, the adverse skin reactions are not frequently described in the literature, but often seen in dermatologic clinic, we reported their skin reactions and possible alternative treatments described in literature and their patent applications. PMID:25487259

  19. Current concept of allergic skin reactions.

    PubMed

    Polak, L

    1980-10-01

    Synopsis On the basis of literature and experimental work the present views on the mechanism of the development of allergic skin reactions of the contact type are reviewed. Precursors of effector cells originating from stem cells are stimulated by the antigenic complex formed by the application of the hapten to the skin. Autologous skin proteins and macrophages play an important role in this preparatory and antigen recognition phases. Activated T lymphocytes proliferate in the draining lymph node and differentiate into effector and memory cells. The former react to a repeated application of the hapten with release of mediators inducing a skin inflammatory reaction. The latter produce further effector cells thus enhancing the degree of contact sensitivity (booster effect). The hapten application also activates a specific control mechanism consisting of lymphocytes with the same specificity but adverse activity. These cells, called suppressors, restrict the development of further effector cells thus limiting the degree of contact sensitivity. Elimination of suppressor cells leads to an enhancement of the degree of contact sensitivity whereas an intended extreme activation of these cells induces a state of specific immunological unresponsiveness (tolerance).

  20. Electrophilic reactions of skin-sensitizing sultones.

    PubMed

    Roberts, David W; Williams, Douglas L; Bethell, Donald

    2007-01-01

    Reactions of the strong skin sensitizer hexadec-1-ene-1,3-sultone with sodium hydroxide, sodium methoxide, sodium metabisulfite, sodium butanethiolate, n-butylamine, and aniline have been investigated, and the reaction products have been identified. Most of the nucleophiles studied react by nucleophilic addition (Michael type addition) to the double bond at the 2-position, although in most cases the final products result from further reactions of the initital adducts. The findings are considered together with those reported by Meschkat, Barratt, and Lepoittevin for reactions of hex-1-ene-1,3-sultone and hexane-1,3-sultone, and the implications of the two sets of findings for the mechanism of skin-sensitizing action are discussed. It is concluded that nucleophilic attack at the 3-position of the alk-1-ene-1,3-sultones occurs only with those nucleophiles, which either have very low reactivity in nucleophilic addition or are unable to give rise to thermodynamically stable products via initial reaction at the 2-position. It is further concluded that the observed differences in electrophilic reactivity between alk-1-ene-1,3-sultones and alkane-1,3-sultones are not large enough to rationalize the differences in skin sensitization properties between the two types of sultone. It is suggested that the differences in specificity arise because the alk-1-ene-1,3-sultones act as Michael type electrophiles whereas the alkane sultones act as SN2 electrophiles. It is suggested that the reason for the greater potency of the alk-1-ene-1,3-sultones may be the ability of the initial C2 adducts with protein to undergo further reactions by substitution at C3, leading to cross-linking and consequent perturbation to the protein tertiary structure.

  1. Radiotherapy-induced skin reactions: assessment and management.

    PubMed

    Bostock, Samantha; Bryan, Julie

    Patients undergoing radiotherapy often experience a skin reaction to their treatment. In an attempt to assist clinicians in the recognition and care of these radiotherapy-induced skin reactions, an assessment and management tool has been designed for use. This patient-focused assessment tool has been distributed across the counties that the authors' trust serves. It has standardised the care of patients with these skin reactions, so that the patients can be treated with the same interventions whether they visit their GP, hospital or district nurse.

  2. Radiotherapy-induced skin reactions: assessment and management.

    PubMed

    Bostock, Samantha; Bryan, Julie

    Patients undergoing radiotherapy often experience a skin reaction to their treatment. In an attempt to assist clinicians in the recognition and care of these radiotherapy-induced skin reactions, an assessment and management tool has been designed for use. This patient-focused assessment tool has been distributed across the counties that the authors' trust serves. It has standardised the care of patients with these skin reactions, so that the patients can be treated with the same interventions whether they visit their GP, hospital or district nurse. PMID:26911177

  3. Nefazadone-induced acute dystonic reaction.

    PubMed

    Burda, A; Webster, K; Leikin, J B; Chan, S B; Stokes, K A

    1999-10-01

    A 53-y-o patient presented approximately 2 h after taking her first dose of nefazadone. Chief complaint was lip smacking with hand and arm gesturing. The patient also took 25 mg meclizine which she had used before with no adverse effects. Diphenhydramine followed by benztropine led to resolution of symptoms within 1 h. Patient subsequently used meclizine with no untoward reactions. Nefazadone should be added to the list of agents that cause acute dystonic reactions. PMID:10509438

  4. Acute gut GVHD in children: does skin involvement matter?

    PubMed

    Gassas, A; Sung, L; Dupuis, A; Schechter, T; Egeler, M; Ali, M

    2013-08-01

    Gut GVHD (G-GVHD) is frequently the most severe and difficult to treat compared with skin GVHD. It is unknown if skin involvement with G-GVHD has prognostic significance. To compare the prognosis of acute isolated G-GVHD vs acute gut and skin GVHD (GS-GVHD) in children following allo-SCT. Allo-SCT recipients from Jan 2000-Dec 2009 were included and patients who underwent endoscopy and gut biopsy for G-GVHD were identified. Four hundred and fifty children (0-18 years) underwent allo-SCT during the study period. Seventy-nine (17.5%) patients underwent endoscopy and biopsy. At least stage II was required for skin involvement. Forty nine patients had G-GVHD and 30 had combined, GS-GVHD. The majority of patients received CsA and MTX for GVHD prophylaxis. Sixty-seven percent of patients with GS-GVHD had grade III-IV while only 31% had grade III-IV in the G-GVHD group. Median follow-up was 6.3 years (range 3.6-11.9 years). Relapse rate was similar in both the groups. However, children with G-GVHD had a significantly higher risk of dying from GVHD related complications (37% vs 16%) resulting in superior survival for those with skin involvement (79% vs 49% P=0.02). Extension of G-GVHD to the skin may suggest a better outcome.

  5. Acute Skin Toxicity Following Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Who's at Risk?

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, Bradford S.; Laser, Benjamin; Kowalski, Alex V.; Fontenla, Sandra C.; Pena-Greenberg, Elizabeth; Yorke, Ellen D.; Lovelock, D. Michael; Hunt, Margie A.; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: We examined the rate of acute skin toxicity within a prospectively managed database of patients treated for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and investigated factors that might predict skin toxicity. Methods: From May 2006 through January 2008, 50 patients with Stage I NSCLC were treated at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center with 60 Gy in three fractions or 44-48 Gy in four fractions. Patients were treated with multiple coplanar beams (3-7, median 4) with a 6 MV linac using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and dynamic multileaf collimation. Toxicity grading was performed and based on the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Effects. Factors associated with Grade 2 or higher acute skin reactions were calculated by Fisher's exact test. Results: After a minimum 3 months of follow-up, 19 patients (38%) developed Grade 1, 4 patients (8%) Grade 2, 2 patients (4%) Grade 3, and 1 patient Grade 4 acute skin toxicity. Factors associated with Grade 2 or higher acute skin toxicity included using only 3 beams (p = 0.0007), distance from the tumor to the posterior chest wall skin of less than 5 cm (p = 0.006), and a maximum skin dose of 50% or higher of the prescribed dose (p = 0.02). Conclusions: SBRT can be associated with significant skin toxicity. One must consider the skin dose when evaluating the treatment plan and consider the bolus effect of immobilization devices.

  6. [Tattoo skin reactions: Management and treatment algorithm].

    PubMed

    Kluger, N

    2016-01-01

    So-called "allergic" reactions to ink or colouring agents constitute the main current complication associated with tattoos that lead individuals to consult. However, general practitioners are frequently at a loss about how to manage such complications. In order to assist clinicians in their daily practice, we propose an update of the modes of managing allergic reactions to tattoos, and we offer a therapeutic scale and a decision-making algorithm.

  7. [Tattoo skin reactions: Management and treatment algorithm].

    PubMed

    Kluger, N

    2016-01-01

    So-called "allergic" reactions to ink or colouring agents constitute the main current complication associated with tattoos that lead individuals to consult. However, general practitioners are frequently at a loss about how to manage such complications. In order to assist clinicians in their daily practice, we propose an update of the modes of managing allergic reactions to tattoos, and we offer a therapeutic scale and a decision-making algorithm. PMID:27181822

  8. Skin temperature reveals the intensity of acute stress

    PubMed Central

    Herborn, Katherine A.; Graves, James L.; Jerem, Paul; Evans, Neil P.; Nager, Ruedi; McCafferty, Dominic J.; McKeegan, Dorothy E.F.

    2015-01-01

    Acute stress triggers peripheral vasoconstriction, causing a rapid, short-term drop in skin temperature in homeotherms. We tested, for the first time, whether this response has the potential to quantify stress, by exhibiting proportionality with stressor intensity. We used established behavioural and hormonal markers: activity level and corticosterone level, to validate a mild and more severe form of an acute restraint stressor in hens (Gallus gallus domesticus). We then used infrared thermography (IRT) to non-invasively collect continuous temperature measurements following exposure to these two intensities of acute handling stress. In the comb and wattle, two skin regions with a known thermoregulatory role, stressor intensity predicted the extent of initial skin cooling, and also the occurrence of a more delayed skin warming, providing two opportunities to quantify stress. With the present, cost-effective availability of IRT technology, this non-invasive and continuous method of stress assessment in unrestrained animals has the potential to become common practice in pure and applied research. PMID:26434785

  9. Tattoo-Associated Skin Reaction: The Importance of an Early Diagnosis and Proper Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bassi, Andrea; Campolmi, Piero; Cannarozzo, Giovanni; Conti, Rossana; Bruscino, Nicola; Gola, Massimo; Ermini, Stefano; Massi, Daniela; Moretti, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Tattoo is going to be a very common practice especially among young people and we are witnessing a gradual increase of numerous potential complications to tattoo placement which are often seen by physicians, but generally unknown to the public. The most common skin reactions to tattoo include a transient acute inflammatory reaction due to trauma of the skin with needles and medical complications such as superficial and deep local infections, systemic infections, allergic contact dermatitis, photodermatitis, granulomatous and lichenoid reactions, and skin diseases localized on tattooed area (eczema, psoriasis, lichen, and morphea). Next to these inflammatory skin reactions we have to consider also the possibility of the development of cutaneous conditions such as pseudolymphomatous reactions and pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia. The aim of this study is to underline the importance of an early diagnosis by performing a histological examination especially when we are in front of suspected papulonodular lesions arising from a tattoo, followed by a proper treatment, since cutaneous neoplastic evolution is known to be a rare but possible complication. PMID:25147796

  10. The role of MRI in the diagnosis of acute radiation reaction in breast cancer patient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Startseva, Zh A.; Musabaeva, L. I.; Usova, AV; Frolova, I. G.; Simonov, K. A.; Velikaya, V. V.

    2016-02-01

    A clinical case with acute radiation reaction of the left breast after organ-preserving surgery with 10 Gy IORT (24.8 Gy) conventional radiation therapy has been presented. Comprehensive MRI examination showed signs of radiation- induced damage to skin, soft tissues and vessels of the residual breast.

  11. Acute methyl salicylate toxicity complicating herbal skin treatment for psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Bell, Anthony J; Duggin, Geoffrey

    2002-06-01

    We present an interesting case of salicylism arising from the use of methyl salicylate as part of a herbal skin cream for the treatment of psoriasis. A 40-year-old man became quite suddenly and acutely unwell after receiving treatment from an unregistered naturopath. Methyl salicylate (Oil of Wintergreen) is widely available in many over the counter topical analgesic preparations and Chinese medicated oils. Transcutaneous absorption of the methyl salicylate was enhanced in this case due to the abnormal areas of skin and use of an occlusive dressing. The presence of tinnitus, vomiting, tachypnoea and typical acid/base disturbance allowed a diagnosis of salicylate toxicity to be made. Our patient had decontaminated his skin prior to presentation, limiting the extent of toxicity and was successfully treated with rehydration and establishment of good urine flow.

  12. Acute methyl salicylate toxicity complicating herbal skin treatment for psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Bell, Anthony J; Duggin, Geoffrey

    2002-06-01

    We present an interesting case of salicylism arising from the use of methyl salicylate as part of a herbal skin cream for the treatment of psoriasis. A 40-year-old man became quite suddenly and acutely unwell after receiving treatment from an unregistered naturopath. Methyl salicylate (Oil of Wintergreen) is widely available in many over the counter topical analgesic preparations and Chinese medicated oils. Transcutaneous absorption of the methyl salicylate was enhanced in this case due to the abnormal areas of skin and use of an occlusive dressing. The presence of tinnitus, vomiting, tachypnoea and typical acid/base disturbance allowed a diagnosis of salicylate toxicity to be made. Our patient had decontaminated his skin prior to presentation, limiting the extent of toxicity and was successfully treated with rehydration and establishment of good urine flow. PMID:12147116

  13. The Cutaneous Microbiome in Outpatients Presenting With Acute Skin Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Horton, James M.; Gao, Zhan; Sullivan, D. Matthew; Shopsin, Bo; Perez-Perez, Guillermo I.; Blaser, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Previous studies have demonstrated an association between antibiotic use and the development of skin abscesses. We tested the hypothesis that alterations in the composition of the cutaneous microbiota may predispose individuals to skin abscesses. Methods. We studied 25 patients with skin abscesses and 25 age-matched controls, who each completed a questionnaire. Skin swab samples were obtained for DNA analysis from 4 sites around the abscess site (hereafter, “peri-abscess specimens”) and from similar sites on the patient's contralateral side and on healthy control subjects. DNA was extracted and analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and high-throughput sequencing. The purulent abscess drainage was sent for culture. Results. Fifteen patients with abscess were infected with Staphylococcus aureus. Use of nuc qPCR to quantitate S. aureus revealed a significantly greater frequency of positive results for peri-abscess and contralateral skin samples, compared with control skin specimens. Analysis of community structure showed greater heterogeneity in the control samples than in the peri-abscess and contralateral samples. Metagenomic analysis detected significantly more predicted genes related to metabolic activity in the peri-abscess specimens than in the control samples. Conclusions. The peri-abscess microbiome was similar to the contralateral microbiome, but both microbiomes differed from that for control patients. Host characteristics affecting microbial populations might be important determinants of abscess risk. PMID:25583170

  14. Acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections in internal medicine wards: old and new drugs.

    PubMed

    Falcone, Marco; Concia, Ercole; Giusti, Massimo; Mazzone, Antonino; Santini, Claudio; Stefani, Stefania; Violi, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are a common cause of hospital admission among elderly patients, and traditionally have been divided into complicated and uncomplicated SSTIs. In 2010, the FDA provided a new classification of these infections, and a new category of disease, named acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs), has been proposed as an independent clinical entity. ABSSSIs include three entities: cellulitis and erysipelas, wound infections, and major cutaneous abscesses This paper revises the epidemiology of SSTIs and ABSSSIs with regard to etiologies, diagnostic techniques, and clinical presentation in the hospital settings. Particular attention is owed to frail patients with multiple comorbidities and underlying significant disease states, hospitalized on internal medicine wards or residing in nursing homes, who appear to be at increased risk of infection due to multi-drug resistant pathogens and treatment failures. Management of ABSSSIs and SSTIs, including evaluation of the hemodynamic state, surgical intervention and treatment with appropriate antibiotic therapy are extensively discussed. PMID:27084183

  15. Risk of skin reactions when using ibuprofen-based medicines.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Borges, Mario; Capriles-Hulett, Arnaldo; Caballero-Fonseca, Fernan

    2005-09-01

    Adverse reactions to drugs are a frequent cause of morbidity and medical consultation; it is no surprise that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) run second, after antibiotics, mainly of the beta-lactam group (penicillins and cephalosporins). Numerous clinical pictures involving the skin--various morbilliform rashes, urticaria and angioedema as the most common--due to hypersensitivity to a particular NSAID (i.e., ibuprofen) have been described; other clinically defined skin diseases such as vasculitis, Steven-Johnson's syndrome, photosensitivity, fixed drug eruptions, livedo-like dermatitis, linear drug eruption, lichenoid drug eruption, exanthematous pustulosis, eczematous eruption, contact dermatitis and pemphigoid have received the attention of physicians. Extensive use around the world makes it interesting to investigate adverse cutaneous reactions to ibuprofen and other members of the propionic acid derivative group, to ascertain their prevalence, clinical presentation and prevention. This paper presents a review of published literature concerning cutaneous hypersensitivity reactions to ibuprofen and related arylpropionic acids.

  16. [Skin reaction to carbamazepine or DRESS syndrome: a case presentation].

    PubMed

    Cabrera Fundora, Emigdio Jesús; Cabrera Osorio, Yuliet; Cabrera Osorio, Claudia

    2016-02-25

    Carbamazepine is a frequently used drug that can produce adverse reactions like vertigo, somnolence and severe skin reactions like Drug Rash with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms Syndrome (DRESS Syndrome). This syndrome is characterized by a late-appearing, slow-progressing cutaneous eruption accompanied by atypical lymphocytes, eosinophilia, and systemic symptoms such as fever, lymphadenopathy, hepatic compromise, and renal dysfunction that can be severe enough to cause death. We present a case that aims to highlight the importance of an early diagnosis of DRESS syndrome to adjust therapy and improve survival. The patient is a female patient prescribed carbamazepine for trigeminal neuralgia who presented with skin lesions, which were initially attributed to a hypersensitivity reaction. The lesions worsened in spite of treatment and systemic symptoms ensued. A diagnosis of DRESS syndrome was proposed and steroid treatment was initiated with rapid improvement.

  17. Current and future trends in antibiotic therapy of acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections.

    PubMed

    Russo, A; Concia, E; Cristini, F; De Rosa, F G; Esposito, S; Menichetti, F; Petrosillo, N; Tumbarello, M; Venditti, M; Viale, P; Viscoli, C; Bassetti, M

    2016-04-01

    In 2013 the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued recommendations and guidance on developing drugs for treatment of skin infection using a new definition of acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infection (ABSSSI). The new classification includes cellulitis, erysipelas, major skin abscesses and wound infection with a considerable extension of skin involvement, clearly referring to a severe subset of skin infections. The main goal of the FDA was to better identify specific infections where the advantages of a new antibiotic could be precisely estimated through quantifiable parameters, such as improvement of the lesion size and of systemic signs of infection. Before the spread and diffusion of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in skin infections, antibiotic therapy was relatively straightforward. Using an empiric approach, a β-lactam was the preferred therapy and cultures from patients were rarely obtained. With the emergence of MRSA in the community setting, initial ABSSSI management has been changed and readdressed. Dalbavancin, oritavancin and tedizolid are new drugs, approved or in development for ABSSSI treatment, that also proved to be efficient against MRSA. Dalbavancin and oritavancin have a long half-life and can be dosed less frequently. This in turn makes it possible to treat patients with ABSSSI in an outpatient setting, avoiding hospitalization or potentially allowing earlier discharge, without compromising efficacy. In conclusion, characteristics of long-acting antibiotics could represent an opportunity for the management of ABSSSI and could profoundly modify the management of these infections by reducing or in some cases eliminating both costs and risks of hospitalization.

  18. Current and future trends in antibiotic therapy of acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections.

    PubMed

    Russo, A; Concia, E; Cristini, F; De Rosa, F G; Esposito, S; Menichetti, F; Petrosillo, N; Tumbarello, M; Venditti, M; Viale, P; Viscoli, C; Bassetti, M

    2016-04-01

    In 2013 the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued recommendations and guidance on developing drugs for treatment of skin infection using a new definition of acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infection (ABSSSI). The new classification includes cellulitis, erysipelas, major skin abscesses and wound infection with a considerable extension of skin involvement, clearly referring to a severe subset of skin infections. The main goal of the FDA was to better identify specific infections where the advantages of a new antibiotic could be precisely estimated through quantifiable parameters, such as improvement of the lesion size and of systemic signs of infection. Before the spread and diffusion of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in skin infections, antibiotic therapy was relatively straightforward. Using an empiric approach, a β-lactam was the preferred therapy and cultures from patients were rarely obtained. With the emergence of MRSA in the community setting, initial ABSSSI management has been changed and readdressed. Dalbavancin, oritavancin and tedizolid are new drugs, approved or in development for ABSSSI treatment, that also proved to be efficient against MRSA. Dalbavancin and oritavancin have a long half-life and can be dosed less frequently. This in turn makes it possible to treat patients with ABSSSI in an outpatient setting, avoiding hospitalization or potentially allowing earlier discharge, without compromising efficacy. In conclusion, characteristics of long-acting antibiotics could represent an opportunity for the management of ABSSSI and could profoundly modify the management of these infections by reducing or in some cases eliminating both costs and risks of hospitalization. PMID:27125562

  19. Acemannan-containing wound dressing gel reduces radiation-induced skin reactions in C3H mice

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, D.B.; Travis, E.L.

    1995-07-15

    To determine (a) whether a wound dressing gel that contains acemannan extracted from aloe leaves affects the severity of radiation-induced acute skin reactions in C3H mice; (b) if so, whether other commercially available gels such as a personal lubricating jelly and a healing ointment have similar effects; and (c) when the wound dressing gel should be applied for maximum effect. Male C3H mice received graded single doses of gamma radiation ranging from 30 to 47.5 Gy to the right leg. In most experiments, the gel was applied daily beginning immediately after irradiation. Dose-response curves were obtained by plotting the percentage of mice that reached or exceeded a given peak skin reaction as a function of dose. Curves were fitted by logit analysis and ED{sub 50} values, and 95% confidence limits were obtained. The average peak skin reactions of the wound dressing gel-treated mice were lower than those of the untreated mice at all radiation doses tested. The ED{sub 50} values for skin reactions of 2.0-2.75 were approximately 7 Gy higher in the wound dressing gel-treated mice. The average peak skin reactions and the ED{sub 50} values for mice treated with personal lubricating jelly or healing ointment were similar to irradiated control values. Reduction in the percentage of mice with skin reactions of 2.5 or more was greatest in the groups that received wound dressing gel for at least 2 weeks beginning immediately after irradiation. There was no effect if gel was applied only before irradiation or beginning 1 week after irradiation. Wound dressing gel, but not personal lubricating jelly or healing ointment, reduces acute radiation-induced skin reactions in C3H mice if applied daily for at least 2 weeks beginning immediately after irradiation. 31 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Allogeneic versus xenogeneic immune reaction to bioengineered skin grafts.

    PubMed

    Erdag, Gulsun; Morgan, Jeffrey R

    2004-01-01

    There are conflicting reports on the survival and immune reaction to allografts and xenografts of cultured skin substitutes (CSS). In this study, we investigated the allogeneic and xenogeneic responses to CSS of human keratinocytes and genetically engineered CSS expressing keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) that forms a hyperproliferative epidermis. CSS (control and KGF modified) and neonatal human foreskins were evaluated by immunohistochemistry for the expression of MHC class I and II. To study allograft rejection, grafts were transplanted to human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (huPBMC)-reconstituted SCID mice. To study xenograft rejection, grafts were transplanted to immunocompetent mice. Graft survival and immune reaction were assessed visually and microscopically. After transplantation, control CSS formed a normal differentiated epidermis, whereas KGF CSS formed a hyperproliferative epidermis. Control and KGF CSS expressed class I similar to neonatal foreskin, but did not express class II. In the allograft model, rejection of neonatal foreskins was between 5 and 9 days. In contrast, neither control nor KGF CSS was rejected by huPBMC-SCID mice. Histology showed dense mononuclear cell infiltration in human foreskins, with few, if any, mononuclear cells in control or KGF CSS. In contrast to the allogeneic reaction, CSS (control and KGF) were rejected in the xenograft model, but rejection was delayed (9-21 days) compared with neonatal skin (5-8 days). Humanized SCID mice rejected allografts of human neonatal foreskins, but did not reject control CSS or KGF CSS, even though the KGF CSS formed a hyperproliferative epidermis. Rejection of control and KGF CSS by immunocompetent mice in a xenograft model was comparable and their survival was significantly prolonged compared with neonatal skin. These results demonstrate that control CSS and hyperproliferative KGF CSS are less immunogenic than normal human skin and that sustained hyperproliferation of the epidermis

  1. Acute UV irradiation increases heparan sulfate proteoglycan levels in human skin.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ji-Yong; Oh, Jang-Hee; Kim, Yeon Kyung; Shin, Mi Hee; Lee, Dayae; Chung, Jin Ho

    2012-03-01

    Glycosaminoglycans are important structural components in the skin and exist as various proteoglycan forms, except hyaluronic acid. Heparan sulfate (HS), one of the glycosaminoglycans, is composed of repeated disaccharide units, which are glucuronic acids linked to an N-acetyl-glucosamine or its sulfated forms. To investigate acute ultraviolet (UV)-induced changes of HS and HS proteoglycans (HSPGs), changes in levels of HS and several HSPGs in male human buttock skin were examined by immunohistochemistry and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) after 2 minimal erythema doses (MED) of UV irradiation (each n = 4-7). HS staining revealed that 2 MED of UV irradiation increased its expression, and staining for perlecan, syndecan-1, syndecan-4, CD44v3, and CD44 showed that UV irradiation increased their protein levels. However, analysis by real-time qPCR showed that UV irradiation did not change mRNA levels of CD44 and agrin, and decreased perlecan and syndecan-4 mRNA levels, while increased syndecan-1 mRNA level. As HS-synthesizing or -degrading enzymes, exostosin-1 and heparanase mRNA levels were increased, but exostosin-2 was decreased by UV irradiation. UV-induced matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression was confirmed for proper experimental conditions. Acute UV irradiation increases HS and HSPG levels in human skin, but their increase may not be mediated through their transcriptional regulation.

  2. Radiotherapy-induced skin reactions: prevention and cure.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Kàren

    This article describes the prophylactic use of Mepitel Film in three breast-cancer patients undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy. Each patient had significant risk factors for developing severe radiotherapy-induced skin reactions. This article details the experience encountered by these patients through their treatment courses, with observations by the review radiographers responsible for the care and support of these patients during their radiotherapy and the patients themselves. The film was found to be easy to use by the clinical team and resulted in a significant reduction in adverse side effects to the skin, with an associated improvement in patient satisfaction. There was found to be a financial benefit with the use of Mepitel Film when compared to the foam dressings often required for wound management if the patients had suffered moist desquamation. PMID:25203851

  3. Acute effects of cigarette smoke exposure on experimental skin flaps

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, J.; Jenkins, R.A.; Kurihara, K.; Schultz, R.C.

    1985-04-01

    Random vascular patterned caudally based McFarlane-type skin flaps were elevated in groups of Fischer 344 rats. Groups of rats were then acutely exposed on an intermittent basis to smoke generated from well-characterized research filter cigarettes. Previously developed smoke inhalation exposure protocols were employed using a Maddox-ORNL inhalation exposure system. Rats that continued smoke exposure following surgery showed a significantly greater mean percent area of flap necrosis compared with sham-exposed groups or control groups not exposed. The possible pathogenesis of this observation as well as considerations and correlations with chronic human smokers are discussed. Increased risks of flap necrosis by smoking in the perioperative period are suggested by this study.

  4. Sympathetic skin response in acute sensory ataxic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Arunodaya, G R; Taly, A B; Swamy, H S

    1995-05-01

    Sympathetic skin response (SSR) is a recently described objective method of studying sudomotor sympathetic nerve function and has been studied in a variety of peripheral neuropathies. We report SSR changes in nine patients with acute sensory ataxic neuropathy (ASAN). All had severe sensory and mild motor nerve conduction abnormalities; five had dysautonomia. SSR, elicited by electric shock and cough stimuli, was absent in three patients. Latency was normal in all when SSR was present. Two patients had SSR amplitude of 0.2 mV or less. Absence of SSR did not correlate with dysautonomia, absence of sensory nerve action potential or motor nerve conduction abnormalities. Follow up SSR studies revealed return of absent SSR in one patient over a period of 3 months, despite persistence of ataxia. To our knowledge, this is the first report of SSR changes in ASAN.

  5. Sorafenib Induced Hand Foot Skin Rash in FLT3 ITD Mutated Acute Myeloid Leukemia-A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Senapati, Jayastu; Devasia, Anup J.; Ganapule, Abhijeet; George, Leni; Viswabandya, Auro

    2014-01-01

    Sorafenib is a novel small molecule multiple kinase inhibitor which has been used for metastatic renal cancer, hepatocellular cancer. Sorafenib induced skin rash has been discussed as a side effect in trials in both, FLT3 wild type and mutated acute myeloid leukemia (AML), as monotherapy or as combination with other chemotherapeutic agents. We describe a patient with FLT 3 ITD mutated AML, who was started on adjunctive Sorafenib therapy. Skin reactions manifested as NCI Grade III palmoplantar erythrodysesthesia (PPE), requiring drug discontinuation. Several pathogenic mechanisms have been implicated in Sorafenib induced skin reactions, but none has been conclusively proven. While treatment options are varied for early stage skin reactions, drug discontinuation remains the only possible therapy presently for severe grade skin reaction. PMID:24678393

  6. Evaluation of a cyanoacrylate protectant to manage skin tears in the acute care population.

    PubMed

    Mamrosh, Martha A; Valk, Debbie L; Milne, Catherine T

    2013-01-01

    Skin tears are a common problem that can impact the quality of life due to pain and the potential of becoming complicated wounds if not treated properly. The use of a cyanoacrylate skin protectant to manage skin tears was evaluated in 30 patients in an acute care setting.

  7. Fibroblast radiosensitivity versus acute and late normal skin responses in patients treated for breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, W.A.; Wike, J.; Tucker, S.L.

    1995-07-30

    To determine if the radiosensitivity of normal human skin fibroblasts, measured in early passage cultures, is significantly correlated with the degree of acute or late normal skin damage in patients treated for breast cancer with radiotherapy. To test assay reproducibility, SF2 values derived from paired biopsies of the same patient (12 cases) were compared. A reasonably good correlation (p = 0.075) was obtained for SF2s determined by high dose-rate irradiations with immediated plating, but not for delayed plating or low dose-rate treatments. The median coefficient of variation in the replicate SF2s after high dose-rate treatment and immediate plating was 13%, suggesting that the poor correlation in paired SF2 values is due to the magnitude of the uncertainty in SF2 relative to the overall spread in SF2 values between patients (CV = 28%). Individual SF2 values and averaged values from patients with data from two biopsies were compared with the acute and late clinical reactions. A significant negative correlation was found between SF2 and relative clinical response, but only when averaged high dose-rate SF2 values and telangiectasia scores were compared. There was no significant correlation between average SF2 values and acute responses or between individual SF2 measurements and either the acute or late clinical response. The results of this study suggest that the degree of late telangiectasia is at least partially dependent upon the intrinsic cellular radiosensitivity of normal fibroblasts, but the relationship is not clear cut. Multiple replicate assays are necessary to obtain reliable estimates of fibroblast SF2 values using current techniques. 20 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Evaluation of acute skin irritation and phototoxicity by aqueous and ethanol fractions of Angelica keiskei

    PubMed Central

    LEE, SANG-HAN

    2013-01-01

    In this study, to assess whether aqueous and ethanol fractions of Angelica keiskei induce acute skin irritation and phototoxicity, acute skin irritancy and phototoxicity tests were performed. The skin of rabbits or guinea pigs was treated with these fractions (100 mg/dose) and whether the animals sustained significant skin damage was determined. The data demonstrated that the aqueous and ethanol fractions of Angelica keiskei did not induce acute toxicity in the skin of the animals, as assessed by anatomical and pathological observations. The results from the present study suggest that these aqueous and ethanol fractions of Angelica keiskei have promising potential uses as cosmetic ingredients that do not induce significant levels of skin irritation or phototoxicity. PMID:23251240

  9. Clinical efficacy of dalbavancin for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI)

    PubMed Central

    Leuthner, Kimberly D; Buechler, Kristin A; Kogan, David; Saguros, Agafe; Lee, H Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) are a common disease causing patients to seek treatment through the health care system. With the continued increase of drug-resistant bacterial pathogens, these infections are becoming more difficult to successfully cure. Lipoglycopeptides have unique properties that allow the drug to remain active toward both common and challenging pathogens at the infected site for lengthy periods of time. Dalbavancin, a new lipoglycopeptide, provides two unique dosing regimens for the treatment of ABSSSI. The original regimen of 1,000 mg intravenous infusion followed by a 500 mg intravenous infusion after a week has been shown as safe and effective in multiple, randomized noninferiority trials. These studies also demonstrated that dalbavancin was similar to standard regimens in terms of both safety and tolerability. Recently a single 1,500 mg dose was demonstrated to be equivalent to the dalbavancin two-dose regimen for treating ABSSSI. With the introduction of dalbavancin, clinicians have the option to provide an intravenous antimicrobial agent shown to be as effective as traditional therapies, without requiring admission into the hospitals or prescribing a medication which may not be utilized optimally. Further understanding of dalbavancin and its unusual properties can provide unique treatment situations with potential benefits for both the patient and the overall health care system, which should be further explored. PMID:27354809

  10. Dalbavancin for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections

    PubMed Central

    Ramdeen, Sheena; Boucher, Helen W

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) have increased in incidence and severity. The involvement of resistant organisms, particularly methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, presents additional challenges. The lipoglycopeptide dalbavancin has a prolonged half-life, high protein binding, and excellent tissue levels which led to its development as a once-weekly treatment for ABSSSI. In the pivotal DISCOVER 1 and DISCOVER 2 trials, dalbavancin proved non-inferior to vancomycin followed by linezolid when used sequentially for ABSSSI, forming the basis for its recent approval in the US and Europe for ABSSSI. Areas covered A literature search of published pharmacologic and clinical data was conducted to review the chemistry, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacokinetics of dalbavancin. We also discuss its development process, highlighting efficacy and safety data from pertinent clinical trials and the role it could play in the current clinical landscape. Expert opinion DISCOVER 1 and DISCOVER 2 demonstrated dalbavancin’s non-inferiority to vancomycin followed by linezolid for ABSSSI and confirmed its safety and tolerability. They were among the first trials to use new, early primary efficacy endpoints, and dalbavancin was among the first agents designated a Qualified Infectious Disease Product for expedited review. Dalbavancin may prove to be a valuable option for ABSSSI patients in whom conventional therapy is limited. PMID:26239321

  11. Acute anaphylactoid reactions during hemodialysis in France.

    PubMed

    Forêt, M; Kuentz, F; Meftahi, H; Milongo, R; Hachache, T; Elsener, M; Dechelette, E; Cordonnier, D

    1987-04-01

    A retrospective survey of anaphylactoid reactions during dialysis in France was conducted. In 52 of 112 hemodialysis units surveyed 111 patients who had suffered one or more anaphylactoid reactions during dialysis were identified. According to the Hamilton/Adkinson classification, in 31 patients reactions were minor, in 54 patients moderate, and in 26 patients severe. Four patients died of their reactions. A preponderance of reactions (75 and 11%) occurred with cuprammonium cellulose hollow-fiber and plate dialyzers, respectively. Severe dialyzer reactions were found to occur more frequently after the long (weekend) interdialytic interval. In an in vitro study, six brands of cuprammonium cellulose hollow-fiber dialyzers were rinsed with water and the eluates analyzed by size exclusion chromatography for contaminant particles. Substantial variation in the amount of extractable material was found between dialyzers of different brands, despite the fact that all dialyzers used membranes from the same manufacturer. Previous data by others has suggested that this extractable material is a derivative of cellulose. Results of our epidemiologic survey in France are similar to those previously reported in the United States and suggest an increased incidence of dialyzer reactions with ethylene oxide-sterilized cuprammonium cellulose dialyzers. The presence of cellulose-derived particles in the rinsing fluid of such dialyzers and the possible increased incidence of reactions after the long (weekend) interdialytic interval suggest that allergy to cellulose-derived particles eluted from cellulosic dialyzers may contribute to dialyzer hypersensitivity reactions.

  12. Comparative assessment of the acute skin irritation potential of detergent formulations using a novel human 4-h patch test method.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Michael K; Kruszewski, Francis H; Al-Atrash, Jenan; Blazka, Mark E; Gingell, Ralph; Heitfeld, Fred A; Mallon, David; Snyder, Neil K; Swanson, Judith E; Casterton, Phillip L

    2005-12-01

    Predictive skin irritation test methods, which do not require use of animals, are needed for the pre-market assessment of detergent formulations. The utility of a novel and ethical human acute skin irritation patch test method, originally developed for chemical skin irritation assessment, was evaluated. In this IRB-approved method, subjects were patched under occlusion for increasing periods of time up to 4h in duration. The total incidence of positive skin reactions for test products was compared to a positive control (20% aqueous sodium dodecyl sulfate [SDS]). Acutely irritating formulas were defined as those showing a significantly increased or equal incidence of positive responders compared with that of SDS. The time of exposure required for 50% of subjects to show a positive skin reaction (TR50 value) was calculated for each product and enabled test product comparisons within and between studies. Using this approach, 24 detergent formulations of various types were tested in seven individual studies. The skin irritation profiles were generally consistent within product types, which could be categorized as follows (by decreasing irritancy): mold/mildew removers (average TR50 = 0.37 h) > disinfectants/sanitizers (0.64 h) > fabric softener concentrate (1.09 h) = aluminum wash (1.20 h) > 20% SDS (1.81 h) > liquid laundry detergents (3.48 h) > liquid dish detergents (4.16 h) = liquid fabric softeners (4.56 h) = liquid hand soaps (4.58 h) = shampoos (5.40 h) = hard surface cleaners (6.34 h) > powder automatic dish detergents (>16 h) = powder laundry detergents (>16 h). In addition to formulation effects, some seasonal effects were noted; particularly greater winter-time reactivity to 20% SDS and the hard surface cleaner and liquid laundry formulations. These results demonstrate the utility of this patch test method for the comparative skin irritation assessment of these different product types. PMID:16026914

  13. Skin Testing in the Evaluation and Management of Carboplatin-Related Hypersensitivity Reactions.

    PubMed

    Lax, Timothy; Long, Aidan; Banerji, Aleena

    2015-01-01

    Carboplatin-induced hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) are a frequent occurrence in patients being retreated for malignancy. The most common and severe reactions are thought to be IgE mediated. Currently, skin testing is the only method used clinically to identify individuals sensitized to carboplatin. Despite almost 20 years of clinical use, a standardized approach to skin testing and its use in the management of carboplatin HSRs has not been well established. We review the utility of carboplatin skin testing and discuss factors that influence the interpretation of skin testing results. A risk stratification strategy using skin testing and desensitization to manage patients with carboplatin HSRs is proposed.

  14. Topical alpha-selective p38 MAP kinase inhibition reduces acute skin inflammation in guinea pig

    PubMed Central

    Medicherla, Satyanarayana; Ma, Jing Ying; Reddy, Mamtha; Esikova, Irina; Kerr, Irene; Movius, Fabiola; Higgins, Linda S; Protter, Andrew A

    2010-01-01

    Certain skin pathologies, including psoriasis, are thought to be immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. Available literature clearly indicates the involvement of inflammatory cells (neutrophils, T cells, and macrophages), their cytokines, and the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway in the pathophysiology of psoriasis. Neutrophils play an important role in the formation of acute inflammatory changes in psoriasis. Acute inflammation or acute flares in psoriasis remain poorly addressed in clinical medicine. In this communication, we first establish a simple and reproducible model for studying neutrophil-mediated acute skin inflammation. Using the hairless guinea pig, due to the similarity of skin architecture to that of human, acute inflammation was induced with an intradermal injection of 50 μg/mL lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in 50 μL solution. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity was measured by MPO-positive neutrophils and shown to increase for 24-hours post-injection. Simultaneously, the level of phosphorylated p38 MAPK was documented for 48-hours post-LPS injection in the skin. Next, we used this model to examine the therapeutic potential of an α-selective p38 MAPK inhibitor, SCIO-469. A comparison of topical application of SCIO-469 at 5 mg/mL or 15 mg/mL to vehicle revealed that SCIO-469 dose-dependently reduces acute skin inflammation and that this effect is statistically significant at the higher dose. Further examination of tissues that received this dose also revealed statistically significant reduction of MPO activity, phosphorylated p38 MAPK, interleukin-6, and cyclooxygenase-2. These data suggest that the α-selective p38 MAPK inhibitor, SCIO-469, acts as a topical anti-inflammatory agent via the p38 MAPK pathway to reduce neutrophil induced acute inflammation in the skin. These observations suggest that α-selective p38 MAPK inhibition may be an effective therapeutic strategy to manage acute skin inflammation PMID:22096353

  15. Skin Reactions to Pine Processionary Caterpillar Thaumetopoea pityocampa Schiff

    PubMed Central

    Foti, Caterina; Vestita, Michelangelo; Angelini, Gianni

    2013-01-01

    Pine caterpillar, Thaumetopoea pityocampa Schiff, is a phyto- and xylophagous lepidopteran, responsible for the delay in the growth or the death of various types of pines. Besides nature damage, pine caterpillar causes dermatological reactions in humans by contact with its irritating larvae hairs. Although the dermatitis occurs among outdoor professionals, it is primarily extraprofessional. Contamination generally occurs in pinewoods, rarely in cities. Means of contamination comprise direct contact with the nest or the processional caterpillar and indirect contact with air dispersed hairs. The dermatitis is generally observed in late spring and particularly from April to June, among campers and tourers. The eruption has its onset 1–12 hours after contact with the hairs and presents with intense and continuous itching. Morphologically, it is strophulus-like and consists of papulous, excoriated, and pinkish lesions on an oedematous base. Diagnosis is usually straightforward. The pathogenetic mechanism of the affection is mechanical, pharmacological, and allergic in nature. Besides skin, T. pityocampa Schiff can involve the eyes and rarely the airways. Despite the considerable damages to humans and nature, pine caterpillar infestation is an underestimated problem; medical literature lists few studies, and often relevant information is referred to local media and popular wisdom. PMID:23781164

  16. The prevalence of skin tears in the acute care setting in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yee Y; Carville, Keryln; Tay, Ai C

    2016-10-01

    Skin tears appear to be a hidden and extensive problem despite an increased focus in the literature on skin tear epidemiology, prevention strategies and management modalities. Currently, there has been no report of skin tear epidemiology published in Singapore. The aim of the present study was to pilot the methodology by WoundWest at one of the tertairy hospitals in Singapore. The secondary objective was to determine the prevalence and current nursing management of skin tears within two selected acute medical wards in the hospital. A point prevalence survey was conducted within the two medical wards. Six registered nurses acted as the surveyors and underwent pre-survey education. Inter-rater reliability testing was conducted. Surveyors were paired and performed skin examinations on all available patients in the two wards. Data were collected on age, gender, skin tear anatomical locations, their Skin Tear Audit Research categories, dressings used on identified skin tears and related documentation. A total of 144 (98%) patients consented to skin inspections. Findings demonstrated a skin tear prevalence of 6·2%; all skin tears were found to be hospital-acquired and located on the extremities. Most (78%) were in the age range of 70-89 years. There was a dearth in nursing documentation of the skin tears identified and their management. The findings suggested that nurses were lacking in the knowledge of skin tears, and documentation, if available, was not consistent. There is an urgent clinical need for the implementation of a validated skin tear classification tool; standardised protocols for skin tear prevention and management; and a comprehensive skin tear educational programme for hospital care staff. Quarterly hospital-wide skin tear prevalence surveys are also needed to evaluate improvement strategies.

  17. The prevalence of skin tears in the acute care setting in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yee Y; Carville, Keryln; Tay, Ai C

    2016-10-01

    Skin tears appear to be a hidden and extensive problem despite an increased focus in the literature on skin tear epidemiology, prevention strategies and management modalities. Currently, there has been no report of skin tear epidemiology published in Singapore. The aim of the present study was to pilot the methodology by WoundWest at one of the tertairy hospitals in Singapore. The secondary objective was to determine the prevalence and current nursing management of skin tears within two selected acute medical wards in the hospital. A point prevalence survey was conducted within the two medical wards. Six registered nurses acted as the surveyors and underwent pre-survey education. Inter-rater reliability testing was conducted. Surveyors were paired and performed skin examinations on all available patients in the two wards. Data were collected on age, gender, skin tear anatomical locations, their Skin Tear Audit Research categories, dressings used on identified skin tears and related documentation. A total of 144 (98%) patients consented to skin inspections. Findings demonstrated a skin tear prevalence of 6·2%; all skin tears were found to be hospital-acquired and located on the extremities. Most (78%) were in the age range of 70-89 years. There was a dearth in nursing documentation of the skin tears identified and their management. The findings suggested that nurses were lacking in the knowledge of skin tears, and documentation, if available, was not consistent. There is an urgent clinical need for the implementation of a validated skin tear classification tool; standardised protocols for skin tear prevention and management; and a comprehensive skin tear educational programme for hospital care staff. Quarterly hospital-wide skin tear prevalence surveys are also needed to evaluate improvement strategies. PMID:26833792

  18. Transcription-coupled and global genome repair differentially influence UV-B-induced acute skin effects and systemic immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Garssen, J; van Steeg, H; de Gruijl, F; de Boer, J; van der Horst, G T; van Kranen, H; van Loveren, H; van Dijk, M; Fluitman, A; Weeda, G; Hoeijmakers, J H

    2000-06-15

    Exposure to UV-B radiation impairs immune responses in mammals by inhibiting especially Th1-mediated contact hypersensitivity and delayed-type hypersensitivity. Immunomodulation is not restricted to the exposed skin, but is also observed at distant sites, indicating the existence of mediating factors such as products from exposed skin cells or photoactivated factors present in the superficial layers. DNA damage appears to play a key role, because enhanced nucleotide excision repair (NER) strongly counteracts immunosuppression. To determine the effects of the type and genomic location of UV-induced DNA damage on immunosuppression and acute skin reactions (edema and erythema) four congenic mouse strains carrying different defects in NER were compared: CSB and XPC mice lacking transcription-coupled or global genome NER, respectively, as well as XPA and TTD/XPD mice carrying complete or partial defects in both NER subpathways, respectively. The major conclusions are that 1) transcription-coupled DNA repair is the dominant determinant in protection against acute skin effects; 2) systemic immunomodulation is only affected when both NER subpathways are compromised; and 3) sunburn is not related to UV-B-induced immunosuppression. PMID:10843671

  19. TLD skin dose measurements and acute and late effects after lumpectomy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy only for early breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, Francisco . E-mail: francisco.perera@lrcc.on.ca; Chisela, Frank; Stitt, Larry; Engel, Jay; Venkatesan, Varagur

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: This report examines the relationships between measured skin doses and the acute and late skin and soft tissue changes in a pilot study of lumpectomy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy only for breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Thirty-seven of 39 women enrolled in this pilot study of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (37.2 Gy in 10 fractions b.i.d.) each had thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) at 5 points on the skin of the breast overlying the implant volume. Skin changes at TLD dose points and fibrosis at the lumpectomy site were documented every 6 to 12 months posttreatment using a standardized physician-rated cosmesis questionnaire. The relationships between TLD dose and acute skin reaction, pigmentation, or telangiectasia at 5 years were analyzed using the GEE algorithm and the GENMOD procedure in the SAS statistical package. Fisher's exact test was used to determine whether there were any significant associations between acute skin reaction and late pigmentation or telangiectasia or between the volumes encompassed by various isodoses and fibrosis or fat necrosis. Results: The median TLD dose per fraction (185 dose points) multiplied by 10 was 9.2 Gy. In all 37 patients, acute skin reaction Grade 1 or higher was observed at 5.9% (6 of 102) of dose points receiving 10 Gy or less vs. 44.6% (37 of 83) of dose points receiving more than 10 Gy (p < 0.0001). In 25 patients at 60 months, 1.5% telangiectasia was seen at dose points receiving 10 Gy or less (1 of 69) vs. 18% (10 of 56) telangiectasia at dose points receiving more than 10 Gy (p 0.004). Grade 1 or more pigmentation developed at 1.5% (1 of 69) of dose points receiving less than 10 Gy vs. 25% (14 of 56) of dose points receiving more than 10 Gy (p < 0.001). A Grade 1 or more acute skin reaction was also significantly associated with development of Grade 1 or more pigmentation or telangiectasia at 60 months. This association was most significant for acute reaction and telangiectasia directly over the

  20. Comparative analysis of the acute response of zebrafish Danio rerio skin to two different bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Lü, Aijun; Hu, Xiucai; Wang, Yi; Shen, Xiaojing; Zhu, Aihua; Shen, Lulu; Ming, Qinglei; Feng, Zhaojun

    2013-12-01

    Skin is an important innate immune organ in fish; however, little is known about the skin's immune response to infectious pathogens. We conducted a comparative analysis of the acute immune response of Zebrafish Danio rerio skin against gram-positive (Staphylococcus chromogenes) and gram-negative (Citrobacter freundii) bacterial infections. Gene expression profiles induced from the two different infections were identified by microarray hybridization, with many genes demonstrating an acute immune response in the skin. Differentially expressed genes were mainly involved in response to stress and stimulus, complement activation, acute-phase response, and defense and immune response. Compared with transcription patterns of skin from the two infections, a similar innate immunity (e.g., transferrin, coagulation factor, complements, and lectins) was observed but with different acute-phase genes (e.g., ceruloplasmin, alpha-1-microglobulin, vitellogenin, and heat shock protein). These results suggest that the skin of fish plays an important role in the innate immune responses to bacterial infection. PMID:24341765

  1. Acute skin lesions after surgical procedures: a clinical approach.

    PubMed

    Borrego, L

    2013-11-01

    In the hospital setting, dermatologists are often required to evaluate inflammatory skin lesions arising during surgical procedures performed in other departments. These lesions can be of physical or chemical origin. Povidone iodine is the most common reported cause of such lesions. If this antiseptic solution remains in contact with the skin in liquid form for a long period of time, it can give rise to serious irritant contact dermatitis in dependent or occluded areas. Less common causes of skin lesions after surgery include allergic contact dermatitis and burns under the dispersive electrode of the electrosurgical device. Most skin lesions that arise during surgical procedures are due to an incorrect application of antiseptic solutions. Special care must therefore be taken during the use of these solutions and, in particular, they should be allowed to dry.

  2. Profile of oritavancin and its potential in the treatment of acute bacterial skin structure infections

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Subhashis; Saeed, Usman; Havlichek, Daniel H; Stein, Gary E

    2015-01-01

    Oritavancin, a semisynthetic derivative of the glycopeptide antibiotic chloroeremomycin, received the US Food and Drug Administration approval for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections caused by susceptible Gram-positive bacteria in adults in August 2014. This novel second-generation semisynthetic lipoglycopeptide antibiotic has activity against a broad spectrum of Gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA), and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus. Oritavancin inhibits bacterial cell wall synthesis and is rapidly bactericidal against many Gram-positive pathogens. The long half-life of this drug enables a single-dose administration. Oritavancin is not metabolized in the body, and the unchanged drug is slowly excreted by the kidneys. In two large Phase III randomized, double-blind, clinical trials, oritavancin was found to be non-inferior to vancomycin in achieving the primary composite end point in the treatment of acute Gram-positive skin and skin structure infections. Adverse effects noted were mostly mild with nausea, headache, and vomiting being the most common reported side effects. Oritavancin has emerged as another useful antimicrobial agent for treatment of acute Gram-positive skin and skin structure infections, including those caused by MRSA and VISA. PMID:26185459

  3. Predicting chemically-induced skin reactions. Part II: QSAR models of skin permeability and the relationships between skin permeability and skin sensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Alves, Vinicius M.; Muratov, Eugene; Fourches, Denis; Strickland, Judy; Kleinstreuer, Nicole; Tropsha, Alexander

    2015-04-15

    Skin permeability is widely considered to be mechanistically implicated in chemically-induced skin sensitization. Although many chemicals have been identified as skin sensitizers, there have been very few reports analyzing the relationships between molecular structure and skin permeability of sensitizers and non-sensitizers. The goals of this study were to: (i) compile, curate, and integrate the largest publicly available dataset of chemicals studied for their skin permeability; (ii) develop and rigorously validate QSAR models to predict skin permeability; and (iii) explore the complex relationships between skin sensitization and skin permeability. Based on the largest publicly available dataset compiled in this study, we found no overall correlation between skin permeability and skin sensitization. In addition, cross-species correlation coefficient between human and rodent permeability data was found to be as low as R{sup 2} = 0.44. Human skin permeability models based on the random forest method have been developed and validated using OECD-compliant QSAR modeling workflow. Their external accuracy was high (Q{sup 2}{sub ext} = 0.73 for 63% of external compounds inside the applicability domain). The extended analysis using both experimentally-measured and QSAR-imputed data still confirmed the absence of any overall concordance between skin permeability and skin sensitization. This observation suggests that chemical modifications that affect skin permeability should not be presumed a priori to modulate the sensitization potential of chemicals. The models reported herein as well as those developed in the companion paper on skin sensitization suggest that it may be possible to rationally design compounds with the desired high skin permeability but low sensitization potential. - Highlights: • It was compiled the largest publicly-available skin permeability dataset. • Predictive QSAR models were developed for skin permeability. • No concordance between skin

  4. Diffuse Optical Spectroscopy for the Quantitative Assessment of Acute Ionizing Radiation Induced Skin Toxicity Using a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Lee; Korpela, Elina; Kim, Anthony; Yohan, Darren; Niu, Carolyn; Wilson, Brian C.; Liu, Stanley K.

    2016-01-01

    Acute skin toxicities from ionizing radiation (IR) are a common side effect from therapeutic courses of external beam radiation therapy (RT) and negatively impact patient quality of life and long term survival. Advances in the understanding of the biological pathways associated with normal tissue toxicities have allowed for the development of interventional drugs, however, current response studies are limited by a lack of quantitative metrics for assessing the severity of skin reactions. Here we present a diffuse optical spectroscopic (DOS) approach that provides quantitative optical biomarkers of skin response to radiation. We describe the instrumentation design of the DOS system as well as the inversion algorithm for extracting the optical parameters. Finally, to demonstrate clinical utility, we present representative data from a pre-clinical mouse model of radiation induced erythema and compare the results with a commonly employed visual scoring. The described DOS method offers an objective, high through-put evaluation of skin toxicity via functional response that is translatable to the clinical setting. PMID:27284926

  5. Skin: Major target organ of allergic reactions to small molecular weight compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Merk, Hans F. Baron, Jens M.; Neis, Mark M.; Obrigkeit, Daniela Hoeller; Karlberg, Ann-Therese

    2007-11-01

    Skin is a major target organ for allergic reactions to small molecular weight compounds. Drug allergic reactions may be life-threatening such as in the case of anaphylactic reactions or bullous drug reactions and occur in about 5% of all hospitalized patients. Allergic contact dermatitis has an enormous influence on the social life of the patient because it is the most frequent reason for occupational skin diseases and the treatment and prevention of this disease cost approximately Euro 3 billion per year in Germany. The different proposed pathophysiological pathways leading to a drug eruption are discussed in this paper. All major enzymes which are involved in the metabolism of xenobiotica were shown to be present in skin. Evidence supporting the role of metabolism in the development of drug allergy and allergic contact dermatitis is demonstrated in the example of sulphonamides and fragrances.

  6. Skin: major target organ of allergic reactions to small molecular weight compounds.

    PubMed

    Merk, Hans F; Baron, Jens M; Neis, Mark M; Obrigkeit, Daniela Höller; Karlberg, Ann-Therese

    2007-11-01

    Skin is a major target organ for allergic reactions to small molecular weight compounds. Drug allergic reactions may be life-threatening such as in the case of anaphylactic reactions or bullous drug reactions and occur in about 5% of all hospitalized patients. Allergic contact dermatitis has an enormous influence on the social life of the patient because it is the most frequent reason for occupational skin diseases and the treatment and prevention of this disease cost approximately euro 3 billion per year in Germany. The different proposed pathophysiological pathways leading to a drug eruption are discussed in this paper. All major enzymes which are involved in the metabolism of xenobiotica were shown to be present in skin. Evidence supporting the role of metabolism in the development of drug allergy and allergic contact dermatitis is demonstrated in the example of sulphonamides and fragrances.

  7. Predicting chemically-induced skin reactions. Part II: QSAR models of skin permeability and the relationships between skin permeability and skin sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Vinicius M.; Muratov, Eugene; Fourches, Denis; Strickland, Judy; Kleinstreuer, Nicole; Andrade, Carolina H.; Tropsha, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Skin permeability is widely considered to be mechanistically implicated in chemically-induced skin sensitization. Although many chemicals have been identified as skin sensitizers, there have been very few reports analyzing the relationships between molecular structure and skin permeability of sensitizers and non-sensitizers. The goals of this study were to: (i) compile, curate, and integrate the largest publicly available dataset of chemicals studied for their skin permeability; (ii) develop and rigorously validate QSAR models to predict skin permeability; and (iii) explore the complex relationships between skin sensitization and skin permeability. Based on the largest publicly available dataset compiled in this study, we found no overall correlation between skin permeability and skin sensitization. In addition, cross-species correlation coefficient between human and rodent permeability data was found to be as low as R2=0.44. Human skin permeability models based on the random forest method have been developed and validated using OECD-compliant QSAR modeling workflow. Their external accuracy was high (Q2ext = 0.73 for 63% of external compounds inside the applicability domain). The extended analysis using both experimentally-measured and QSAR-imputed data still confirmed the absence of any overall concordance between skin permeability and skin sensitization. This observation suggests that chemical modifications that affect skin permeability should not be presumed a priori to modulate the sensitization potential of chemicals. The models reported herein as well as those developed in the companion paper on skin sensitization suggest that it may be possible to rationally design compounds with the desired high skin permeability but low sensitization potential. PMID:25560673

  8. Clinical categories of exaggerated skin reactions to mosquito bites and their pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Tatsuno, Kazuki; Fujiyama, Toshiharu; Matsuoka, Hiroyuki; Shimauchi, Takatoshi; Ito, Taisuke; Tokura, Yoshiki

    2016-06-01

    Mosquito bites are skin irritating reactions, which usually resolve spontaneously without intensive medical care. However, in certain situations, mosquito bites may form a more vicious reaction, sometimes accompanying fever and systemic symptoms. In such cases, the presence of rare hematological disorders, abnormalities in eosinophils and/or association with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) may underlie. Importantly, hypersensitivity to mosquito bites (HMB), which is characterized by necrotic skin reactions to mosquito bites with various systemic symptoms, is often observed in association with EBV infection and natural killer (NK) cell lymphoproliferative disorder. Exaggerated skin reaction to mosquito bites is also seen in Wells' syndrome. While strong Th2-skewing immune dysregulation is apparent in the patients, they also show robust CD4(+) T cell proliferation in response to mosquito salivary gland extracts, indicating close association between Wells' syndrome and mosquito bites. Similar skin reaction to mosquito bites is also noticed in certain types of B cell neoplasm, although the role of B cells in this peculiar reaction to mosquito bites is yet to be elucidated. In this review, we will discuss the current knowledge of exaggerated reaction toward mosquito bites seen in conjunction with these unique hematological disorders, and examine the scientific studies and observations reported in previous literatures to organize our current understanding of the pathogenesis of this distinct disorder.

  9. Acute skin sun damage in children and its consequences in adults.

    PubMed

    Pustisek, Nives; Sikanić-Dugić, Nives; Hirsl-Hećej, Vlasta; Domljan, Mislav Luka

    2010-04-01

    Children spend more time outdoors than adults and there is compelling evidence that childhood is a particularly vulnerable time for the photocarcinogenic effects of the sun. The negative effects of solar radiation are accumulated during the entire lifetime; however 80% of total lifetime sun exposure is taking place before the age of 18 years. Child skin is more sensitive than adult skin because natural defense mechanisms are not fully developed. A short exposure to midday sun will result in sunburns. Epidemiologic studies show a higher incidence of malignant melanoma in persons with a history of sunburns during childhood and adolescence. Sun exposure among infants and pre-school children is largely dependent on the discretion of adult care providers. Sun protective habits of mothers may predict the level of sun exposure in children. It is very important to transfer the knowledge and positive habits of proper sun protection to children. The purpose of sun-safety behavior is not to avoid outdoor activities, but rather to protect the skin from detrimental sun effects. Proper sun protection of children includes protection from excessive sun exposure, sunburns and other forms of skin damage caused by sun, which may lead to the future development of skin cancers. This paper reviews acute skin reactivity to sun in childhood and adolescence that causes damage in skin structure and function and produces undesirable chronic changes in adults.

  10. SU-E-J-273: Skin Temperature Recovery Rate as a Potential Predictor for Radiation-Induced Skin Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Biswal, N C; Wu, Z; Chu, J; Sun, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the potential of dynamic infrared imaging to evaluate early skin reactions during radiation therapy in cancer patients. Methods: Thermal images were captured by our home-built system consisting of two flash lamps and an infrared (IR) camera. The surface temperature of the skin was first raised by ∼ 6 °C from ∼1 ms short flashes; the camera then captured a series of IR images for 10 seconds. For each image series, a basal temperature was recorded for 0.5 seconds before flash was triggered. The temperature gradients (ε) were calculated between a reference point (immediately after the flash) and at a time point of 2sec, 4sec and 9sec after that. A 1.0 cm region of interest (ROI) on the skin was drawn; the mean and standard deviations of the ROIs were calculated. The standard ε values for normal human skins were evaluated by imaging 3 healthy subjects with different skin colors. All of them were imaged on 3 separate days for consistency checks. Results: The temperature gradient, which is the temperature recovery rate, depends on the thermal properties of underlying tissue, i.e. thermal conductivity. The average ε for three volunteers averaged over 3 measurements were 0.64±0.1, 0.72±0.2 and 0.80±0.3 at 2sec, 4sec and 9sec respectively. The standard deviations were within 1.5%–3.2%. One of the volunteers had a prior small skin burn on the left wrist and the ε values for the burned site were around 9% (at 4sec) and 13% (at 9sec) lower than that from the nearby normal skin. Conclusion: The temperature gradients from the healthy subjects were reproducible within 1.5%–3.2 % and that from a burned skin showed a significant difference (9%–13%) from the normal skin. We have an IRB approved protocol to image head and neck patients scheduled for radiation therapy.

  11. Acute management of skin tears: a change in practice pilot study.

    PubMed

    Vandervord, John G; Tolerton, Sarah K; Campbell, Peter A; Darke, Jan M; Loch-Wilkinson, Anna-Marie V

    2016-02-01

    Skin tears are an increasingly common injury occurring in the elderly population and have significant associated morbidity secondary to poor wound healing, prolonged hospital stays and reduced mobility. There has been a shift in practice for the acute management of skin tears within our institution, which has resulted in improved outcomes and reduced morbidity for this common and debilitating injury. Review of past and current practices including cost analyses has led to the establishment of a management protocol for the hospital and wider area health service with the aim to reduce the burden of disease amongst our ever-expanding elderly population.

  12. Systemic hydrocortisone/cortisol induces allergic skin reactions in presensitized subjects.

    PubMed

    Lauerma, A I; Reitamo, S; Maibach, H I

    1991-02-01

    To determine whether systemic hydrocortisone can elicit allergic skin reactions in patients with contact hypersensitivity to hydrocortisone, we studied four patients with contact hypersensitivity to hydrocortisone and hydrocortisone-17-butyrate and two patients with contact hypersensitivity to hydrocortisone-17-butyrate but not to hydrocortisone. Open oral provocation with 100 or 250 mg hydrocortisone in patients with hydrocortisone contact hypersensitivity elicited cutaneous reactions at sites of previous allergic dermatitis caused by hydrocortisone in two patients and at sites of earlier allergic patch test reactions caused by hydrocortisone in the other two patients. Provocations in two patients with contact hypersensitivity to hydrocortisone-17-butyrate but not to hydrocortisone remained negative. To determine whether the adrenal cortical hormone cortisol, which is identical to hydrocortisone, could induce similar skin reactions, one patient with hydrocortisone contact hypersensitivity underwent adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation tests; as a control, one hydrocortisone-sensitive patient underwent analogous provocations with placebo. After an 8-hour infusion with the adrenocorticotropic hormone analog tetracosactide, a similar skin reaction to that seen with oral hydrocortisone was observed, whereas provocations with placebo remained negative. We conclude that both oral hydrocortisone and intrinsic cortisol are able to induce allergic skin reactions in presensitized subjects.

  13. Early Identification of Acute Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions: Realistic Implications for Best Practice in Patient Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Menendez, Juliet Battard; Edwards, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Acute hemolytic transfusion reactions can result in severe complications and death. Through early identification and prompt intervention, nurses can reduce the risks associated with these serious reactions. Realistic evidence-based patient monitoring protocols can help guide identification of acute hemolytic transfusion reactions and facilitate lifesaving interventions to avert critical patient situations. PMID:27323466

  14. Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms without skin rash

    PubMed Central

    Sasidharanpillai, Sarita; Binitha, Manikoth P.; Manikath, Neeraj; Janardhanan, Anisha K.

    2015-01-01

    Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) or drug hypersensitivity syndrome is considered as a severe cutaneous adverse drug reaction which is most commonly precipitated by aromatic anticonvulsants, lamotrigine, dapsone, allopurinol, minocycline, and salazopyrin. Its clinical manifestations are often variable. On rare occasions, it can present with only systemic involvement without any cutaneous features. A complete drug history is of paramount importance in making an early diagnosis. We report the case of a male patient who presented with fever, lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and hepatitis, 2 weeks after starting salazopyrin. The presence of atypical lymphocytes in the peripheral smear was indicative of a viral infection or a hematological dyscrasia. Bone marrow examination revealed a normocellular marrow with an increase in eosinophil precursors. Investigations for the common causes for fever and hepatitis were negative. The presence of eosinophilia, the temporal relationship of the symptoms with the initiation of treatment with salazopyrin, and the marked improvement on withdrawal of the drug along with the administration of systemic corticosteroids, were features consistent with the diagnosis of DRESS. With the incidence of this condition showing a rising trend, it is important for the clinician to be aware of its variable manifestations, as a delay in diagnosis and treatment can be fatal. PMID:26729967

  15. Protective Effects of Soy Oligopeptides in Ultraviolet B-Induced Acute Photodamage of Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li-wen; Liu, Juan; Zhang, Jia-an; Xu, Yang; Wu, Di; Permatasari, Felicia

    2016-01-01

    Aim. We explored the effects of soy oligopeptides (SOP) in ultraviolet B- (UVB-) induced acute photodamage of human skin in vivo and foreskin ex vivo. Methods. We irradiated the forearm with 1.5 minimal erythemal dose (MED) of UVB for 3 consecutive days, establishing acute photodamage of skin, and topically applied SOP. Erythema index (EI), melanin index, stratum corneum hydration, and transepidermal water loss were measured by using Multiprobe Adapter 9 device. We irradiated foreskin ex vivo with the same dose of UVB (180 mJ/cm2) for 3 consecutive days and topically applied SOP. Sunburn cells were detected by using hematoxylin and eosin staining. Apoptotic cells were detected by using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), p53 protein, Bax protein, and Bcl-2 protein were detected by using immunohistochemical staining. Results. Compared with UVB group, UVB-irradiated skin with topically applied SOP showed significantly decreased EI. Compared with UVB group, topical SOP significantly increased Bcl-2 protein expression and decreased CPDs-positive cells, sunburn cells, apoptotic cells, p53 protein expression, and Bax protein expressions in the epidermis of UVB-irradiated foreskin. Conclusion. Our study demonstrated that topical SOP can protect human skin against UVB-induced photodamage. PMID:27478534

  16. Protective Effects of Soy Oligopeptides in Ultraviolet B-Induced Acute Photodamage of Human Skin.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bing-Rong; Ma, Li-Wen; Liu, Juan; Zhang, Jia-An; Xu, Yang; Wu, Di; Permatasari, Felicia; Luo, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Aim. We explored the effects of soy oligopeptides (SOP) in ultraviolet B- (UVB-) induced acute photodamage of human skin in vivo and foreskin ex vivo. Methods. We irradiated the forearm with 1.5 minimal erythemal dose (MED) of UVB for 3 consecutive days, establishing acute photodamage of skin, and topically applied SOP. Erythema index (EI), melanin index, stratum corneum hydration, and transepidermal water loss were measured by using Multiprobe Adapter 9 device. We irradiated foreskin ex vivo with the same dose of UVB (180 mJ/cm(2)) for 3 consecutive days and topically applied SOP. Sunburn cells were detected by using hematoxylin and eosin staining. Apoptotic cells were detected by using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), p53 protein, Bax protein, and Bcl-2 protein were detected by using immunohistochemical staining. Results. Compared with UVB group, UVB-irradiated skin with topically applied SOP showed significantly decreased EI. Compared with UVB group, topical SOP significantly increased Bcl-2 protein expression and decreased CPDs-positive cells, sunburn cells, apoptotic cells, p53 protein expression, and Bax protein expressions in the epidermis of UVB-irradiated foreskin. Conclusion. Our study demonstrated that topical SOP can protect human skin against UVB-induced photodamage. PMID:27478534

  17. A Qualitative Analysis of Acute Skin Toxicity among Breast Cancer Radiotherapy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schnur, Julie B.; Ouellette, Suzanne C.; DiLorenzo, Terry A.; Green, Sheryl; Montgomery, Guy H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives One of the most common acute side effects of breast cancer radiotherapy is treatment induced skin changes, referred to as skin toxicity. Yet no research to date has focused expressly on skin toxicity-related quality of life in breast cancer radiotherapy patients. Therefore, our aim was to use qualitative approaches to better understand the impact of skin toxicity on quality of life. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 women (Stage 0-III breast cancer), during their last week of external beam radiotherapy. Each interview was transcribed verbatim, and thematic analysis was performed. Results Three themes were identified based on the interview responses: First, skin changes affect multiple dimensions of quality of life. They cause physical discomfort, body image disturbance, emotional distress, and impair both day-to-day functioning and satisfaction with radiation treatment. Second, individual differences affect women’s experiences. Generally African-American women, younger women, women who are not currently in a relationship, women who are being treated during the summer, and women who are more invested in their appearance are more distressed by skin toxicity. Third, women use a variety of symptom management strategies including self-medication, complementary/alternative medicine approaches, and psychological strategies. Conclusions Implications of results are: 1) Skin toxicity affects numerous dimensions of quality of life, and assessment approaches and psychosocial interventions should address this; 2) individual differences may affect the experience of skin toxicity, and should be considered in treatment and education approaches; and 3) participants’ own creativity and problem-solving should be used to improve the treatment experience. PMID:20238306

  18. Skin test, RAST and clinical reactions to peanut allergens in children.

    PubMed

    Kemp, A S; Mellis, C M; Barnett, D; Sharota, E; Simpson, J

    1985-01-01

    One-hundred-and-four children were skin-tested with four peanut-allergen preparations, a commercial extract, extracts of raw and roast peanuts prepared by NH4HCO3 extraction, and a wheatgerm lectin-reactive glycoprotein obtained by affinity chromatography. The presence of symptoms after ingestion of peanut or peanut products was also recorded. The roast allergen extract provided the greatest specificity with eight symptomatic children having a positive skin test and only one positive skin-test reaction in an asymptomatic child in the group of 104 children tested. Despite differences in the incidence of skin-test reactions there was a strong correlation between raw, roast and commercial RAST suggesting common allergens were being identified by circulating IgE. Clinical sensitivity was observed particularly in younger children with 75% of the children being under 4 years of age. A positive roast skin test or a RAST test adds confirmation to the clinical history of allergic reactions to peanuts.

  19. Reactions of ozone with human skin lipids: Sources of carbonyls, dicarbonyls, and hydroxycarbonyls in indoor air

    PubMed Central

    Wisthaler, Armin; Weschler, Charles J.

    2010-01-01

    This study has used proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) for direct air analyses of volatile products resulting from the reactions of ozone with human skin lipids. An initial series of small-scale in vitro and in vivo experiments were followed by experiments conducted with human subjects in a simulated office. The latter were conducted using realistic ozone mixing ratios (≈15 ppb with occupants present). Detected products included mono- and bifunctional compounds that contain carbonyl, carboxyl, or α-hydroxy ketone groups. Among these, three previously unreported dicarbonyls have been identified, and two previously unreported α-hydroxy ketones have been tentatively identified. The compounds detected in this study (excepting acetone) have been overlooked in surveys of indoor pollutants, reflecting the limitations of the analytical methods routinely used to monitor indoor air. The results are fully consistent with the Criegee mechanism for ozone reacting with squalene, the single most abundant unsaturated constituent of skin lipids, and several unsaturated fatty acid moieties in their free or esterified forms. Quantitative product analysis confirms that squalene is the major scavenger of ozone at the interface between room air and the human envelope. Reactions between ozone and human skin lipids reduce the mixing ratio of ozone in indoor air, but concomitantly increase the mixing ratios of volatile products and, presumably, skin surface concentrations of less volatile products. Some of the volatile products, especially the dicarbonyls, may be respiratory irritants. Some of the less volatile products may be skin irritants. PMID:19706436

  20. Safety, tolerability, and efficacy of GSK1322322 in the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections.

    PubMed

    Corey, Ralph; Naderer, Odin J; O'Riordan, William D; Dumont, Etienne; Jones, Lori S; Kurtinecz, Milena; Zhu, John Z

    2014-11-01

    GSK1322322 represents a new class of antibiotics that targets an essential bacterial enzyme required for protein maturation, peptide deformylase. This multicenter, randomized, phase IIa study compared the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of GSK1322322 at 1,500 mg twice daily (b.i.d.) with that of linezolid at 600 mg b.i.d. in patients suspected of having Gram-positive acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs). The primary endpoint was assessment of the safety of GSK1322322, and a key secondary endpoint was the number of subjects with a ≥20% decrease in lesion area from the baseline at 48 and 72 h after treatment initiation. GSK1322322 administration was associated with mild-to-moderate drug-related adverse events, most commonly, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and headache. Adverse events (86% versus 74%) and withdrawals (28% versus 11%) were more frequent in the GSK1322322-treated group. Treatment with GSK1322322 and linezolid was associated with ≥20% decreases from the baseline in the lesion area in 73% (36/49) and 92% (24/26) of the patients, respectively, at the 48-h assessment and in 96% (44/46) and 100% (25/25) of the patients, respectively, at the 72-h assessment. Reductions in exudate/pus, pain, and skin infection scores were comparable between the GSK1322322 and linezolid treatments. The clinical success rates within the intent-to-treat population and the per-protocol population that completed this study were 67 and 91%, respectively, in the GSK1322322-treated group and 89 and 100%, respectively, in the linezolid-treated group. These results will be used to guide dose selection in future studies with GSK1322322 to optimize its tolerability and efficacy in patients with ABSSSIs. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01209078 and at http://www.gsk-clinicalstudyregister.com [PDF113414].). PMID:25136015

  1. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis To Estimate Antibacterial Treatment Effect in Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cates, Jordan E.; Li, Gang; Mundy, Linda M.

    2015-01-01

    A systematic literature review and meta-analysis were conducted to estimate the antibacterial treatment effect for linezolid and ceftaroline to inform on the design of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection (ABSSSI) noninferiority trials. The primary endpoints included an early clinical treatment response (ECTR) defined as cessation of lesion spread at 48 to 72 h postrandomization and the test-of-cure (TOC) response defined as total resolution of the infection at 7 to 14 days posttreatment. The systematic review identified no placebo-controlled trials in ABSSSI, 4 placebo-controlled trials in uncomplicated skin and soft tissue infection as a proxy for placebo in ABSSSI, 12 linezolid trials in ABSSSI, 3 ceftaroline trials in ABSSSI, and 2 trials for nonantibacterial treatment. The ECTR rates at 48 to 72 h and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were 78.7% (95% CI, 61.1 to 96.3%) for linezolid, 74.0% (95% CI, 69.7 to 78.3%) for ceftaroline, and 59.0% (95% CI, 52.8 to 65.3%) for nonantibacterial treatment. The early clinical treatment effect could not be estimated, given no available placebo or proxy for placebo data for this endpoint. Clinical, methodological, and statistical heterogeneity influenced the selection of trials for the meta-analysis of the TOC treatment effect estimation. The pooled estimates of the TOC treatment response were 31.0% (95% CI, 6.2 to 55.9%) for the proxy for placebo, 88.1% (95% CI, 81.0 to 95.1%) for linezolid, and 86.1% (95% CI, 83.7 to 88.6%) for ceftaroline. The TOC clinical treatment effect estimation was 25.1% for linezolid and 27.8% for ceftaroline. The antibacterial treatment effect estimation at TOC will inform on the design and analysis of future noninferiority ABSSSI clinical trials. PMID:25987628

  2. Delayed-type skin reaction to the heparin-alternative danaparoid.

    PubMed

    Szolar-Platzer, C; Aberer, W; Kränke, B

    2000-11-01

    Eczematous, infiltrated plaques at the site of subcutaneously administered heparin appear to be common. Heparinoids cannot be recommended in general as a substitute for heparin or low molecular weight heparin because delayed-type skin reactions to these molecules can also occur, as demonstrated in this case report. PMID:11044823

  3. Beryllium metal I. experimental results on acute oral toxicity, local skin and eye effects, and genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Strupp, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The toxicity of soluble metal compounds is often different from that of the parent metal. Since no reliable data on acute toxicity, local effects, and mutagenicity of beryllium metal have ever been generated, beryllium metal powder was tested according to the respective Organisation for Economical Co-Operation and Development (OECD) guidelines. Acute oral toxicity of beryllium metal was investigated in rats and local effects on skin and eye in rabbits. Skin-sensitizing properties were investigated in guinea pigs (maximization method). Basic knowledge about systemic bioavailability is important for the design of genotoxicity tests on poorly soluble substances. Therefore, it was necessary to experimentally compare the capacities of beryllium chloride and beryllium metal to form ions under simulated human lung conditions. Solubility of beryllium metal in artificial lung fluid was low, while solubility in artificial lysosomal fluid was moderate. Beryllium chloride dissolution kinetics were largely different, and thus, metal extracts were used in the in vitro genotoxicity tests. Genotoxicity was investigated in vitro in a bacterial reverse mutagenicity assay, a mammalian cell gene mutation assay, a mammalian cell chromosome aberration assay, and an unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) assay. In addition, cell transformation was tested in a Syrian hamster embryo cell assay, and potential inhibition of DNA repair was tested by modification of the UDS assay. Beryllium metal was found not to be mutagenic or clastogenic based on the experimental in vitro results. Furthermore, treatment with beryllium metal extracts did not induce DNA repair synthesis, indicative of no DNA-damaging potential of beryllium metal. A cell-transforming potential and a tendency to inhibit DNA repair when the cell is severely damaged by an external stimulus were observed. Beryllium metal was also found not to be a skin or eye irritant, not to be a skin sensitizer, and not to have relevant acute oral

  4. Beryllium Metal I. Experimental Results on Acute Oral Toxicity, Local Skin and Eye Effects, and Genotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Strupp, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The toxicity of soluble metal compounds is often different from that of the parent metal. Since no reliable data on acute toxicity, local effects, and mutagenicity of beryllium metal have ever been generated, beryllium metal powder was tested according to the respective Organisation for Economical Co-Operation and Development (OECD) guidelines. Acute oral toxicity of beryllium metal was investigated in rats and local effects on skin and eye in rabbits. Skin-sensitizing properties were investigated in guinea pigs (maximization method). Basic knowledge about systemic bioavailability is important for the design of genotoxicity tests on poorly soluble substances. Therefore, it was necessary to experimentally compare the capacities of beryllium chloride and beryllium metal to form ions under simulated human lung conditions. Solubility of beryllium metal in artificial lung fluid was low, while solubility in artificial lysosomal fluid was moderate. Beryllium chloride dissolution kinetics were largely different, and thus, metal extracts were used in the in vitro genotoxicity tests. Genotoxicity was investigated in vitro in a bacterial reverse mutagenicity assay, a mammalian cell gene mutation assay, a mammalian cell chromosome aberration assay, and an unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) assay. In addition, cell transformation was tested in a Syrian hamster embryo cell assay, and potential inhibition of DNA repair was tested by modification of the UDS assay. Beryllium metal was found not to be mutagenic or clastogenic based on the experimental in vitro results. Furthermore, treatment with beryllium metal extracts did not induce DNA repair synthesis, indicative of no DNA-damaging potential of beryllium metal. A cell-transforming potential and a tendency to inhibit DNA repair when the cell is severely damaged by an external stimulus were observed. Beryllium metal was also found not to be a skin or eye irritant, not to be a skin sensitizer, and not to have relevant acute oral

  5. An analysis of skin prick test reactions in 656 asthmatic patients.

    PubMed Central

    Hendrick, D J; Davies, R J; D'Souza, M F; Pepys, J

    1975-01-01

    Of 656 asthmatic patients referred specifically for allergy assessments, 544 (84 percent) gave positive immediate skin prick tests to at least one of 22 common allergens used routinely. Comparison of these skin test positive patients with the 102 (16 percent) who were skin test negative showed a number of significant differences. The majority of the skin test positive patients (52 percent) were less than 10 years old at the time of onset of the asthma, whereas, of the skin test negative patients, 56 percent were aged over 30 years at the time of onset. Seventy per cent report rhinitis compared with 48 per cent of the skin test negative patients, and 29 per cent reported infantile eczema compared with 9 per cent. Symptoms attributed to house dust, pollens, and animals were noted two to three times more frequently by the skin test positive patients, while corticosteroid drugs had been used more commonly by the skin test negative patients (45 percent compared with 35 percent). No significant differences were observed with the other factors studied, namely, history of urticaria or angio-oedema, family history of "allergic" disease, and awareness of sensitivity to foods, aspirin or penicillin. Prick test reactions in the skin test positive patients were most commonly seen to house dust or the acarine mite, Dermatophagoides farinae (82 percent), followed by pollens (66 percent), animal danders (38 percent), foods (16 percent), Aspergillus fumigatus (16 percent), and other moulds (21 percent). There was a highly significant association of positive history with positive prick test for all allergens studied. Images PMID:1168378

  6. Late skin reaction to iodixanol (Visipaque): clinical manifestations, patch test study, and histopathological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Jimenez, Yolanda; Perez-Gala, Silvia; Aragüés, Maximiliano; Sanchez-Perez, Javier; Garcia-Diez, Amaro

    2006-12-01

    Late reactions to iodinated contrast media are frequent. Cutaneous manifestations are the commonest, in which maculopapular exanthema, a type of cutaneous presentation, is widespread. Controversy exists about the utility of the skin test in the management of these reactions. The aim of this study is to analyse the clinical characteristics, the histopathological findings, and the results of the patch test in patients who developed a late skin reaction (LSR) to the nonionic, dimeric, iodinated contrast media Visipaque. We retrospectively reviewed the patients with LSR to Visipaque, seen in the Dermatology Department between 1999 and 2005. A total of 12 patients participated in this study (7 men and 5 women), ages ranging from 39 to 76 years (mean 56). 11 of the patients had significant medical history. All the patients developed a maculopapular exanthema between 2 hr and 3 days after the radiological examination, involving the trunk and proximal limbs, although some of the patients showed involvement of distal areas. The skin biopsy, performed in 6 patients, showed nonspecific findings consistent with drug reaction. In 3 patients, patch tests to Visipaque and iodixanol were positive. The most frequent manifestation of LSR to iodixanol is a maculopapular exanthema, involving the trunk and the limbs, although distal involvement can be seen. Histopathological findings are nonspecific and cannot be distinguished from other drug reaction. Patch tests have a limited value, and in cases where they were negative, reintroduction of the drug triggered a new LSR.

  7. Dorsal skin reactions of hairless dogs to topical treatment with corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Kimura, T; Doi, K

    1999-01-01

    Dorsal skin reactions to continuous topical treatment with different types of corticosteroids were histologically investigated in hairless descendants of Mexican hairless dogs. The preparations tested were prednisolone (ST-1; weak), fluocinolone acetonide (ST-2; moderate), diflucortolone valrerate (ST-3; strong), and mometasone furoate (ST-4; very strong). Grossly, the sites treated with ST-3 and ST-4 showed moderate inflammatory reactions. After completion of the corticosteroid treatment, both sites were less pigmented and had a thin texture. The severity of histologic changes in the skin was dependent on the efficacy of the corticosteroids. The epidermis was prominently thinned from 1 wk after treatment with the corticosteroids, resulting in a flat dermis-epidermis junction. By the end of the corticosteroid treatment, these lesions became progressively more severe. At 2 wk after completion of topical treatment, the epidermal thickness in the sites treated with ST-1 and ST-2 began to return to normal values, whereas the epidermis of the skin treated with ST-3 and ST-4 became thinner. At 3-4 wk after topical treatment with ST-3 and ST-4, the dermis showed hyalinization of collagen bundles. These dermatologic findings in hairless dogs are in accordance with steroid-induced skin atrophy of human beings. These results suggest that the skin of hairless dogs responds sensitively to topical corticosteroids and that these animals are a useful model for investigating the efficacy and adverse effects of cutaneous topical corticosteroids. PMID:10528632

  8. Low-dose radiation modifies skin response to acute gamma-rays and protons.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiao Wen; Pecaut, Michael J; Cao, Jeffrey D; Moldovan, Maria; Gridley, Daila S

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to obtain pilot data on the effects of protracted low-dose/low-dose-rate (LDR) γ-rays on the skin, both with and without acute gamma or proton irradiation (IR). Six groups of C57BL/6 mice were examined: a) 0 Gy control, b) LDR, c) Gamma, d) LDR+Gamma, e) Proton, and f) LDR+Proton. LDR radiation was delivered to a total dose of 0.01 Gy (0.03 cGy/h), whereas the Gamma and Proton groups received 2 Gy (0.9 Gy/min and 1.0 Gy/min, respectively). Assays were performed 56 days after exposure. Skin samples from all irradiated groups had activated caspase-3, indicative of apoptosis. The significant (p<0.05) increases in immunoreactivity in the Gamma and Proton groups were not present when LDR pre-exposure was included. However, the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling assay for DNA fragmentation and histological examination of hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections revealed no significant differences among groups, regardless of radiation regimen. The data demonstrate that caspase-3 activation initially triggered by both forms of acute radiation was greatly elevated in the skin nearly two months after whole-body exposure. In addition, LDR γ-ray priming ameliorated this response.

  9. Quantitative analysis of eosinophils in acute graft-versus-host disease compared with drug hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Joshua; Bergfeld, Wilma F

    2010-02-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD), if not detected and treated early, is a common cause of morbidity and mortality. Drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs), the most frequent clinical and histopathological mimickers of early aGVHD, are often still distinguished from aGVHD by the presence of eosinophils within the inflammatory infiltrate on skin biopsy. Distinguishing these entities is important because the delay of appropriate treatment of aGVHD may lead to advanced stages of the disease process with a poor prognosis. To determine whether the existence or amount of eosinophilic infiltrate could be used to differentiate these entities, we employed a quantitative method of analyzing eosinophils in skin biopsies of rashes from patients with aGVHD and DHR. Eosinophils were counted in 50 high-power fields (HPFs) in skin biopsies of patients with clinical grade >or=2 aGVHD (+aGVHD), with clinical grade <2 aGVHD (-aGVHD), and those with clinical DHR (+DHR). The average number of eosinophils per 10 HPFs (ave. eos/10 HPFs) increased throughout each group. The ave. eos/10 HPFs in +DHR was significantly different from both aGVHD groups (P < 0.001). The specificity to completely rule out aGVHD did not reach 100% until 16.0 ave. eos/10 HPFs was observed. There is a significant difference between the numbers of eosinophils found in differentiating DHR from aGVHD, but a very high number (>16.0 ave. eos/10 HPFs) is necessary to rule out aGVHD completely. Therefore, a quantitative analysis of eosinophils in all biopsies to rule out aGVHD would be of limited value and should only be considered in those biopsies with significant eosinophilia.

  10. Post-treatment skin reactions reported by cancer patients differ by race, not by treatment or expectations

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, J L; Bole, C; Hickok, J T; Figueroa-Moseley, C; Colman, L; Khanna, R C; Pentland, A P; Morrow, G R

    2007-01-01

    Cancer patients may experience skin problems while undergoing chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Frequency of skin reactions may be influenced by skin pigmentation and psychological factors. A Symptom Inventory completed by 656 cancer patients nationwide before and after chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or chemotherapy plus radiation therapy was analysed to determine if treatment type, race (Black vs White), and pretreatment expectations influenced post-treatment skin reactions. Subsequent analysis of a local Symptom Inventory completed weekly for 5 weeks by 308 patients receiving radiation therapy examined severity of reported skin reactions. Significantly more patients receiving radiation therapy had stronger expectations of skin problems (62%) than patients receiving chemotherapy (40%, P=0.001) or chemotherapy plus radiation therapy (45%, P=0.003). Overall, expectations did not correlate with patient reported post-treatment skin problems in white (r=0.014, P=0.781) or black (r=0.021, P=0.936) patients. Although no significant difference was found between black and white patients in their pretreatment expectations of skin problems (P=0.32), black patients (10 out of 18, 56%) reported more skin problems than white patients (90 out of 393, 23%, P=0.001). Similarly, the local study showed that significantly more black patients (1 out of 5, 20%) reported severe skin reactions at the treatment site than white patients (12 out of 161, 8%). A direct correlation was observed between severity of skin problems and pain at the treatment site (r=0.541, P<0.001). Total radiation exposure did not significantly correlate with the report of skin problems at the treatment site for white or black patients. Overall, black patients reported more severe post-treatment skin problems than white patients. Our results suggest that symptom management for post-treatment skin reactions in cancer patients receiving radiation treatment could differ depending on their racial background. PMID

  11. The preventive effect of linalool on acute and chronic UVB-mediated skin carcinogenesis in Swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Gunaseelan, Srithar; Balupillai, Agilan; Govindasamy, Kanimozhi; Muthusamy, Ganesan; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan; Shanmugam, Mohana; Prasad, N Rajendra

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we evaluated the role of linalool in acute ultraviolet-B (UVB; 280-320 nm) radiation-induced inflammation and chronic UVB-mediated photocarcinogenesis in mouse skin. Acute UVB-irradiation (180 mJ cm(-2)) causes hyperplasia, edema formation, lipid peroxidation, antioxidant depletion, and overexpression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) in mouse skin. Topical or intraperitoneal (i.p.) treatment of linalool prevented acute UVB-induced hyperplasia, edema formation, lipid peroxidation, and antioxidant depletion in mouse skin. Further, linalool treatment prevented UVB-induced overexpression of COX-2 and ODC in mouse skin. In the chronic study, mice were subjected to UVB-exposure thrice weekly for 30 weeks. Chronic UVB-exposure induced tumor incidence and expression of proliferative markers such as NF-κB, TNF-α, IL-6, COX-2, VEGF, TGF-β1, Bcl-2 and mutated p53 in mouse skin. Treatment with linalool before each UVB-exposure significantly prevented the expression of these proliferative markers and subsequently decreased the tumor incidence in mice skin. Histopathological studies confirmed the development of dysplasia and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in the chronic UVB-exposed mouse skin; and this was prevented by both topical and i.p. linalool treatment. Therefore, linalool may be considered as a photochemopreventive agent against UVB radiation induced skin carcinogenesis.

  12. The action spectrum for vitamin D3: initial skin reaction and prolonged exposure.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Arjan; den Outer, Peter; van Kranen, Henk; Slaper, Harry

    2016-07-01

    Vitamin D3 photosynthesis in the skin is formulated as a set of reaction equations, including side-reactions to lumisterol, tachysterol and toxisterols, and the accompanying reverse reactions, isomerisation of previtamin D3 to vitamin D3 and photodegradation of vitamin D3. The solution of this set is given for the stationary irradiance spectrum. The effective action spectrum for the instantaneous vitamin D3 production changes shape as a function of exposure, and therefore, no single action spectrum can be used. We assessed the action spectrum for unexposed skin and for skin that has been exposed to 7.5 Standard Erythemal Doses (SED). We constructed two new estimates: (1) the RIVM action spectrum, based on absorption spectra, quantum yields and skin transmission spectra, and (2) the modified QUT action spectrum, which is adjusted for self-absorption and skin transmission. For previously unexposed skin, the modified QUT action spectrum gives a qualitatively similar, but larger estimate than the RIVM action spectrum. We have not been able to solve the lack of quantitative agreement between the vitamin D production estimates from the three action spectrum estimates (RIVM, modified QUT and CIE). All new action spectra have stronger emphasis on the short wavelengths than the CIE action spectrum. We showed that, for wavelengths larger than 300 nm, the bandwidth that was used in the experiment that formed the basis of the CIE action spectrum, gives a red-shift of about 1 nm. Generally, with the formation of previtamin D3, the return reaction to provitamin D3 limits the production of vitamin D3. After some exposure, the new action spectrum has negative values for the longer wavelengths in the UVB. For the RIVM action spectrum, this happens after 7.5 SED, for the modified QUT action spectrum already after 1.25 SED, and after 7.5 SED the net production rate is largely cancelled. Thus prolonged exposure of previously unexposed skin saturates vitamin D3 formation. For maximum

  13. [Acute myocardial infarction secondary to anaphylactic reaction following shellfish ingestion. The need for rescue coronary angioplasty].

    PubMed

    López-Mínguez, J R; González Fernández, R; Millán Núñez, V; Merchán Herrera, A; Altozano Gómez, J C; García-Andoaín, J M

    2000-12-01

    During anaphylactic (or anaphylactoid) reactions severe cardiovascular events may occur, acute myocardial infarction among them. This etiology of myocardial infarction, is known, although it is infrequent and only sporadically reported in literature. A case of acute myocardial infarction secondary to anaphylactic reaction following shellfish ingestion, treated with subcutaneous epinephrine and in whom a rescue coronary angioplasty was necessary is reported. The mechanism of coronary occlusion in this kind of reaction and the possible influence on the efficacy of treatment is discussed.

  14. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2012.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2013-01-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis; hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects; and allergic skin diseases that were reported in the Journal in 2012. Studies support an increase in peanut allergy prevalence in children and exposure to the antibacterial agent triclosan and having filaggrin (FLG) loss-of-function mutations as risk factors for food sensitization. The role of specific foods in causing eosinophilic esophagitis is elucidated by several studies, and microRNA analysis is identified as a possible noninvasive disease biomarker. Studies on food allergy diagnosis emphasize the utility of component testing and the possibility of improved diagnosis through stepped approaches, epitope-binding analysis, and bioinformatics. Treatment studies of food allergy show promise for oral immunotherapy, but tolerance induction remains elusive, and additional therapies are under study. Studies on anaphylaxis suggest an important role for platelet-activating factor and its relationship to the need for prompt treatment with epinephrine. Insights on the pathophysiology and diagnosis of non-IgE-mediated drug allergy are offered, with novel data regarding the interaction of drugs with HLA molecules. Numerous studies support influenza vaccination of persons with egg allergy using modest precautions. Evidence continues to mount that there is cross-talk between skin barrier defects and immune responses in patients with atopic dermatitis. Augmentation of the skin barrier with reduction in skin inflammatory responses will likely lead to the most effective intervention in patients with this common skin disease.

  15. Malondialdehyde-derived epitopes in human skin result from acute exposure to solar UV and occur in nonmelanoma skin cancer tissue.

    PubMed

    Williams, Joshua D; Bermudez, Yira; Park, Sophia L; Stratton, Steven P; Uchida, Koji; Hurst, Craig A; Wondrak, Georg T

    2014-03-01

    Cutaneous exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is a causative factor in photoaging and photocarcinogenesis. In human skin, oxidative stress is widely considered a key mechanism underlying the detrimental effects of acute and chronic UVR exposure. The lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde (MDA) accumulates in tissue under conditions of increased oxidative stress, and the occurrence of MDA-derived protein epitopes, including dihydropyridine-lysine (DHP), has recently been substantiated in human skin. Here we demonstrate for the first time that acute exposure to sub-apoptogenic doses of solar simulated UV light (SSL) causes the formation of free MDA and protein-bound MDA-derived epitopes in cultured human HaCaT keratinocytes and healthy human skin. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that acute exposure to SSL is sufficient to cause an almost twenty-fold increase in general MDA- and specific DHP-epitope content in human skin. When compared to dose-matched solar simulated UVA, complete SSL was more efficient generating both free MDA and MDA-derived epitopes. Subsequent tissue microarray (TMA) analysis revealed the prevalence of MDA- and DHP-epitopes in nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC). In squamous cell carcinoma tissue, both MDA- and DHP-epitopes were increased more than threefold as compared to adjacent normal tissue. Taken together, these date demonstrate the occurrence of MDA-derived epitopes in both solar UVR-exposed healthy human skin and NMSC TMA tissue; however, the potential utility of these epitopes as novel biomarkers of cutaneous photodamage and a functional role in the process of skin photocarcinogenesis remain to be explored.

  16. Eczema-Like Psoriasiform Skin Reaction due to Brazilian Keratin Treatment.

    PubMed

    Gavazzoni-Dias, Maria Fernanda Reis; Rochael, Mayra; Vilar, Enoï; Tanus, Aline; Tosti, Antonella

    2016-02-01

    The use of formaldehyde and formaldehyde releasers in hair-straightening formulations started in Rio de Janeiro in 2003. The technique is known as BKT, Brazilian keratin treatment. The aim of this study was to analyze the types of skin reactions presented by patients due to BKT. We describe 7 patients with severe erythema and scurf on the scalp which developed shortly after BKT. The lesions were eczema-like psoriasiform, located mainly on the scalp. Some patients also developed eczema-like lesions and pustules on the face, neck, upper arms, and upper trunk. Dermatoscopic findings included erythema, perifollicular and interfollicular scurf. The peripilar desquamation resembled the outer skin of an onion bulb. Scalp biopsies revealed psoriasiform and spongiotic psoriasiform patterns, one of them similar to anti-TNFα biologic drug psoriasiform alopecia. The possible consequences of the absorption of formaldehyde by hairdressers or clients are still to be verified by the scientific community; however, the skin and scalp reactions observed in our cases suggest a drug reaction phenomenon and not only eczemas of irritant or allergic origin. PMID:27172059

  17. Relationship between severity of the local skin reactions and the rate of local skin reaction resolution in patients treated with ingenol mebutate gel

    PubMed Central

    Jim On, Shelbi C; Knudsen, Kim Mark; Skov, Torsten; Lebwohl, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Background Ingenol mebutate gel is a topical field treatment for actinic keratosis (AK). The treatment elicits application-site reactions in most patients. This analysis evaluated the relationship between the severity of reactions and the speed of their resolution. Methods Patients in Phase III studies were treated for AKs on the face (n=218), scalp (n=56), and trunk and extremities (n=209). All of the patients were treated with either ingenol mebutate gel 0.015% once daily for three consecutive days (face/scalp) or ingenol mebutate gel 0.05% once daily for two consecutive days (trunk/extremities). Local skin reactions (LSRs) were assessed on a 5-point scale from 0 to 4 in six categories, yielding composite scores in the range of 0 to 24. Results The composite LSR score on the day after the last application of ingenol mebutate gel was an important predictor of the speed of resolution of LSRs. The rate of resolution was greatest for AKs treated on the face, followed by the scalp, and then the trunk and extremities. All patients were expected to have minimal LSR scores for the face and scalp at 2 weeks, and for the trunk and extremities at 4 weeks. Conclusion The absolute reduction in LSR scores was proportional to the composite LSR score on the day after the last application of ingenol mebutate gel treatment. The rate of resolution for LSRs was dependent on the anatomic site treated as well as the day 4 composite score.

  18. Relationship between severity of the local skin reactions and the rate of local skin reaction resolution in patients treated with ingenol mebutate gel

    PubMed Central

    Jim On, Shelbi C; Knudsen, Kim Mark; Skov, Torsten; Lebwohl, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Background Ingenol mebutate gel is a topical field treatment for actinic keratosis (AK). The treatment elicits application-site reactions in most patients. This analysis evaluated the relationship between the severity of reactions and the speed of their resolution. Methods Patients in Phase III studies were treated for AKs on the face (n=218), scalp (n=56), and trunk and extremities (n=209). All of the patients were treated with either ingenol mebutate gel 0.015% once daily for three consecutive days (face/scalp) or ingenol mebutate gel 0.05% once daily for two consecutive days (trunk/extremities). Local skin reactions (LSRs) were assessed on a 5-point scale from 0 to 4 in six categories, yielding composite scores in the range of 0 to 24. Results The composite LSR score on the day after the last application of ingenol mebutate gel was an important predictor of the speed of resolution of LSRs. The rate of resolution was greatest for AKs treated on the face, followed by the scalp, and then the trunk and extremities. All patients were expected to have minimal LSR scores for the face and scalp at 2 weeks, and for the trunk and extremities at 4 weeks. Conclusion The absolute reduction in LSR scores was proportional to the composite LSR score on the day after the last application of ingenol mebutate gel treatment. The rate of resolution for LSRs was dependent on the anatomic site treated as well as the day 4 composite score. PMID:27601928

  19. In Vivo Assessment of Acute UVB Responses in Normal and Xeroderma Pigmentosum (XP-C) Skin-Humanized Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    García, Marta; Llames, Sara; García, Eva; Meana, Alvaro; Cuadrado, Natividad; Recasens, Mar; Puig, Susana; Nagore, Eduardo; Illera, Nuria; Jorcano, José Luis; Del Rio, Marcela; Larcher, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    In vivo studies of UVB effects on human skin are precluded by ethical and technical arguments on volunteers and inconceivable in cancer-prone patients such as those affected with Xeroderma Pigmentosum (XP). Establishing reliable models to address mechanistic and therapeutic matters thus remains a challenge. Here we have used the skin-humanized mouse system that circumvents most current model constraints. We assessed the UVB radiation effects including the sequential changes after acute exposure with respect to timing, dosage, and the relationship between dose and degree-sort of epidermal alteration. On Caucasian-derived regenerated skins, UVB irradiation (800 J/m2) induced DNA damage (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers) and p53 expression in exposed keratinocytes. Epidermal disorganization was observed at higher doses. In contrast, in African descent–derived regenerated skins, physiological hyperpigmentation prevented tissue alterations and DNA photolesions. The acute UVB effects seen in Caucasian-derived engrafted skins were also blocked by a physical sunscreen, demonstrating the suitability of the system for photoprotection studies. We also report the establishment of a photosensitive model through the transplantation of XP-C patient cells as part of a bioengineered skin. The inability of XP-C engrafted skin to remove DNA damaged cells was confirmed in vivo. Both the normal and XP-C versions of the skin-humanized mice proved proficient models to assess UVB-mediated DNA repair responses and provide a strong platform to test novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:20558577

  20. Acute and chronic effects of sulfur mustard on the skin: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Ghanei, Mostafa; Poursaleh, Zohreh; Harandi, Ali Amini; Emadi, Seyed Emad; Emadi, Seyed Naser

    2010-12-01

    Sulfur mustard (2,2-dichlorodiethyl sulfide, SM) is one of the vesicant classes of chemical warfare agents that causes blistering in the skin and mucous membranes, where it can have lingering long-term effects for up to ten years (1). SM was employed extensively by the Iraqi army against not only Iranian soldiers but also civilians between 1983 and 1988, resulting in over 100,000 chemical casualties. Approximately 45,000 victims are still suffering from long-term effects of exposure (2,3). More than 90% of the patients exposed to SM exhibit various cutaneous lesions in the affected area. The human skin can absorb approximately 20% of the SM through exposure. Up to 70% of the chemical is concentrated in the epidermis and the remainder in the basement membrane and in the dermis (4).Sulfur mustard exists in different physical states. The liquid form of SM evaporates slowly in cold weather and can penetrate through the clothing, thereby increasing exposure. However, the gas form readily diffuses in the air and it can be inhaled, leading to systemic absorption. In addition, warm temperatures are ideal conditions that liquid SM present in the clothing of the exposed individual could be converted to gas form. SM-induced clinical cutaneous symptoms include itching and burning. Other clinical findings include erythema or painless sunburn, bulla, hypo- and hyper pigmentation in both exposed and unexposed areas (5,6) The mechanism and biochemical cascade of SM-induced cutaneous manifestations are not completely understood but several published pathways support many of the know facts. Our current understanding fails to explain the time interval between the acute chemical exposure and the late-onset and delayed tissue damage (7,8). The aim of this article is to review the acute and long-term cutaneous findings resulting from SM exposure. Also, cellular and molecular mechanism involved in SM-induced skin pathology have been discussed. PMID:20868209

  1. Diagnosis of Mesobuthus eupeus envenomation by skin test: reverse passive Arthus reaction.

    PubMed

    Khoobdel, M; NikbakhtBoroujeni, Gh; ZahraeiSalehi, T; Khosravi, M; Sasani, F; Bokaei, S; Koochakzadeh, A; Zamani-Ahmadmahmudi, M; Akbari, A

    2014-01-01

    While being stung by two large families of scorpions, Buthidae and Scorpionidae have different symptoms and complications, a similar maintenance treatment usually considers as the scorpion species could not be identified easily. Therefore, this study was an attempt to develop an immunologic response for designing a skin sensitivity test that can be used to determine the poisoning. The sensitivity and the specificity of RPA reaction for detecting experimental envenomated mice were evaluated. The inflammatory response for detection of envenomation was obtained by the injection of a solution containing complement, polyelectrolytes and purified monovalent antibodies. As the result, 84.44% sensitivity and 100% specificity recorded 15 min after challenge. Macroscopic findings were also confirmed histologically. No cross-reactions were observed with other species of scorpions and snake venoms. Designed Skin test induced obvious inflammatory reaction without any histological lesions. Besides adding the complement components and polyelectrolyte to the monovalent antibody leads to an increased susceptibility of inflammatory cells in this reaction, resulting in forming a visible inflammation in a short time. According to satisfactory specificity and sensitivity and visible results in about 15 min, non-harmful and cost benefity of reverse passive Arthus test can be used for diagnosis of scorpion envenomation. PMID:24269785

  2. The Hand-Foot Skin Reaction and Quality of Life Questionnaire: An Assessment Tool for Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Karen N.; Doll, Helen A.; Camacho, Fabian

    2015-01-01

    Background. Skin toxicity (hand-foot syndrome/hand-foot skin reaction, HFS/R) related to antineoplastic therapy is a significant issue in oncology practice, with potentially large impacts on health-related quality of life (HRQL). Materials and Methods. A patient-reported questionnaire, the hand-foot skin reaction and quality of life (HF-QoL) questionnaire was developed to measure the HFS/R symptoms associated with cancer therapeutic agents and their effect on daily activities. The validity and reliability of the HF-QoL questionnaire was tested in a randomized trial of capecitabine with sorafenib/placebo in 223 patients with locally advanced/metastatic breast cancer. Other measures completed included patient ratings of condition severity, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast cancer (FACT-B), and the clinician-rated National Cancer Institute-Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (NCI-CTCAE), version 3.0, hand-foot skin reaction grade. The psychometric properties of the HF-QoL tested included structural validity, internal consistency, construct validity, discriminant validity, and responsiveness. Finally, the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) was estimated. Results. The HF-QoL instrument comprises a 20-item symptom scale and an 18-item daily activity scale. Each scale demonstrated excellent measurement properties and discriminated between NCI-CTCAE grade and patient-rated condition severity with large effect sizes. The daily activity scale had excellent internal consistency and correlated with the FACT-B and HF-QoL symptom scores. Both HF-QoL scale scores increased linearly with increasing patient-rated condition severity. The MCIDs were estimated as 5 units for daily activities and 8 units for symptoms mean scores. Conclusion. The HF-QoL was sensitive to symptoms and HRQL issues associated with HFS/R among participants treated with capecitabine with and without sorafenib. The HF-QoL appears suitable for assessing the HRQL

  3. [Empirical therapeutic approach to infection by resistant gram positive (acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections and health care pneumonia). Value of risk factors].

    PubMed

    González-DelCastillo, J; Núñez-Orantos, M J; Candel, F J; Martín-Sánchez, F J

    2016-09-01

    Antibiotic treatment inadequacy is common in these sites of infection and may have implications for the patient's prognosis. In acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections, the document states that for the establishment of an adequate treatment it must be assessed the severity, the patient comorbidity and the risk factors for multidrug-resistant microorganism. The concept of health care-associated pneumonia is discussed and leads to errors in the etiologic diagnosis and therefore in the selection of antibiotic treatment. This paper discusses how to perform this approach to the possible etiology to guide empirical treatment. PMID:27608306

  4. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2014.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2015-02-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis; hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects; and allergic skin diseases that were reported in the Journal in 2014. Studies on food allergy suggest worrisomely high rates of peanut allergy and food-induced anaphylaxis-related hospitalizations. Evidence is mounting to support the theory that environmental exposure to peanut, such as in house dust, especially with an impaired skin barrier attributed to atopic dermatitis (AD) and loss of function mutations in the filaggrin gene, is a risk factor for sensitization and allergy. Diagnostic tests are improving, with early studies suggesting the possibility of developing novel cellular tests with increased diagnostic utility. Treatment trials continue to show the promise and limitations of oral immunotherapy, and mechanistic studies are elucidating pathways that might define the degree of efficacy of this treatment. Studies have also provided insights into the prevalence and characteristics of anaphylaxis and insect venom allergy, such as suggesting that baseline platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase activity levels are related to the severity of reactions. Advances in drug allergy include identification of HLA associations for penicillin allergy and a microRNA biomarker/mechanism for toxic epidermal necrolysis. Research identifying critical events leading to skin barrier dysfunction and the polarized immune pathways that drive AD have led to new therapeutic approaches in the prevention and management of AD.

  5. [Skin reactions on exposure to the pine processionary caterpillar (Thaumetopoea pityocampa)].

    PubMed

    Vega, J; Vega, J M; Moneo, I

    2011-11-01

    The pine processionary caterpillar is the larval form of the Thaumetopoea pityocampa moth. Mediterranean forests regularly suffer plagues of this insect, which has been moving north as a result of global warming. When the small urticating hairs that develop during the last 3 larval stages are shed and can become airborne. If they come in contact with skin, they can cause a variety of reactions, notably contact urticaria and papular rashes. Irritation can also occur if the hairs lodge in the mucosa of the conjunctiva or in the respiratory tract. Several cases of anaphylactic reactions have been reported in recent years. Mechanical (irritative) mechanisms may be involved in the pathogenesis of lesions, or immunoglobulin E-mediated allergic hypersensitivity reactions may be implicated when the process is rapid, recurrent, and progressively more severe.

  6. The chemical mediation of delayed hypersensitivity skin reactions. I. Purification of a macrophage-chemotactic factor from bovien gamma-globulin-induced skin reactions in guinea pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Kambara, T.; Ueda, K.; Maeda, S.

    1977-01-01

    A macrophage-chemotactic factor (MCFS) was extracted in the pseudoglobulin fraction from delayed hypersensitivity skin lesions induced by bovine gamma-globulin in guinea pigs. Its chemotactic activity was estimated by a modification of Boyden's method using Nuclepore filter. After chromatography of the protein fraction using Sephadex G-50 and DEAE-cellulose, in that order, two chemotactic fractions were obtained. The chemotactic factor with stronger activity (MCFS-1) was further highly purified (488-fold) by chromatography on CM-Sephadex. This factor migrated in a single band on acrylamide disc gel electrophoresis and was found to be a protein that was free of nucleic acid. Gel filtration showed that its molecular weight was similar to that of IgG. Its chemotactic activity was heat labile. Intradermal injection of this factor into normal guinea pigs induced a pronounced mononuclear cell emigration from venules. These findings are pertinent to understanding macrophage reaction in the delayed hypersensitivity reactions. Am J Pathol 87:359-374, 1977). Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:66878

  7. Severe systemic reaction to diphosphonate bone imaging agents: skin testing to predict allergic response and a safe alternative agent

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos-Gabatin, A.; Orzel, J.A.; Maloney, T.R.; Murnane, J.E.; Borchert, R.D.

    1986-09-01

    We describe a severe systemic reaction which occurred in a patient on two occasions after i.v. injection of chemically related diphosphonate bone imaging agents. Skin testing showed reactivity to multiple commercially available diphosphonate compounds but no significant response to pyrophosphates. A subsequent pyrophosphate bone scan resulted in no adverse reaction. Severe systemic reactions to diphosphonates can occur, skin testing may prove useful in evaluating allergic reactions, and pyrophosphates appear to be a safe alternative agent in patients proven or suspected allergic to diphosphonates.

  8. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insect stings.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2004-07-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insect venom that were reported primarily in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology from 2002 through 2003. Among the topics highlighted are new insights into the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis and potential strategies for more effective treatment of the atopic march. Patients should remain supine with raised legs during anaphylactic shock because upper body elevation could result in sudden death from loss of venous return to the heart. A major advance in food allergy was that humanized, monoclonal anti-IgE antibody showed protection against peanut-induced anaphylaxis. In addition to studies elucidating mechanisms of drug hypersensitivity, a clinical study showed patients with a history of prior penicillin allergy with negative penicillin allergy test results are unlikely to experience reactions or resensitization on subsequent oral courses of penicillin. Lastly, there are new recommendations for patients with convincing insect sting reaction histories but negative skin test responses to venom.

  9. Oral sapropterin acutely augments reflex vasodilation in aged human skin through nitric oxide-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Stanhewicz, Anna E; Alexander, Lacy M; Kenney, W Larry

    2013-10-01

    Functional constitutive nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and its cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) are required for full reflex cutaneous vasodilation and are attenuated in primary aging. Acute, locally administered BH4 increases reflex vasodilation through NO-dependent mechanisms in aged skin. We hypothesized that oral sapropterin (Kuvan, shelf-stable pharmaceutical formulation of BH4) would augment reflex vasodilation in aged human skin during hyperthermia. Nine healthy human subjects (76 ± 1 yr) ingested sapropterin (10 mg/kg) or placebo in a randomized double-blind crossover design. Venous blood samples were collected prior to, and 3 h following, ingestion of sapropterin for measurement of plasma BH4. Three intradermal microdialysis fibers were placed in the forearm skin for local delivery of 1) lactated Ringer's solution, 2) 10 mM BH4, and 3) 20 mM N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) to inhibit NOS. Red cell flux was measured at each site by laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF) as reflex vasodilation was induced using a water-perfused suit. At 1°C rise in oral temperature, mean body temperature was clamped and 20 mM l-NAME was perfused at each site. Cutaneous vascular conductance was calculated (CVC = LDF/MAP) and expressed as a percentage of maximum (%CVCmax 28 mM sodium nitroprusside and local heat 43°C). Plasma concentrations of BH4 were significantly elevated 3 h after ingestion of sapropterin (0 h: 19.1 ± 2 pmol/ml vs. 3 h: 43.8 ± 3 pmol/ml; P < 0.001). Sapropterin increased NO-dependent vasodilation at control site (placebo: 14 ± 1 %CVCmax vs. sapropterin: 25 ± 4 %CVCmax; P = 0.004). Local BH4 administration increased NO-dependent vasodilation compared with control in placebo trials only (control: 14 ± 1 %CVCmax vs. BH4-treated: 24 ± 3 %CVCmax; P = 0.02). These data suggest oral sapropterin increases bioavailable BH4 in aged skin microvasculature sufficiently to increase NO synthesis through NOS and that sapropterin may be a viable intervention to

  10. Use of Specific IgE and Skin Prick Test to Determine Clinical Reaction Severity.

    PubMed

    Ta, Von; Weldon, Brittany; Yu, Grace; Humblet, Olivier; Neale-May, Susan; Nadeau, Kari

    2011-01-01

    AIMS: To determine whether specific IgE and skin prick test correlate better in predicting reaction severity during a double-blinded placebo controlled food challenge (DBPCFC) for egg, milk, and multiple tree nut allergens. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective study. PLACE AND DURATION OF STUDY: Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, August 2009 and ongoing. METHODOLOGY: We examined the reaction severity of twenty-four subjects to nine possible food allergens: milk, egg, almond, cashew, hazelnut, peanut, sesame, pecan and walnut. Specific IgE and SPT were performed before each DBPCFC. DBPCFC results were classified into mild (1), moderate (2), or severe (3) reactions using a modified Bock's criteria. RESULTS: Twenty four subjects underwent a total of 80 DBPCFC. Eighty percent of all DBPCFCs resulted in a positive reaction. A majority, 71%, were classified as mild. No reactions occurred with a SPT of zero mm while three reactions occurred with a negative specific IgE. All reactions were reversible with medication. CONCLUSION: These data suggest that SPT and specific IgE levels are not associated with reaction severity (p<0.64 and 0.27, respectively). We also found that combining specific IgE and SPT improved specificity but did not help to achieve clinically useful sensitivity. For instance, an SPT > 5mm had a sensitivity of 91% and specificity of 50%. Combining SPT > 5mm and IgE > 7 resulted in a reduced sensitivity of 64%. Unexpectedly, a history of anaphylaxis 70% (n=17) was not predictive of anaphylaxis on challenge 4% (n=2). PMID:22993721

  11. Modified skin window technique for the extended characterisation of acute inflammation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Marks, D. J. B.; Radulovic, M.; McCartney, S.; Bloom, S.; Segal, A. W.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To modify the skin window technique for extended analysis of acute inflammatory responses in humans, and demonstrate its applicability for investigating disease. Subjects 15 healthy subjects and 5 Crohn’s patients. Treatment Skin windows, created by dermal abrasion, were overlaid for various durations with filter papers saturated in saline, 100 ng/ml muramyl dipeptide (MDP) or 10 μg/ml interleukin-8 (IL-8). Methods Exuded leukocytes were analyzed by microscopy, immunoblot, DNA-bound transcription factor arrays and RT-PCR. Inflammatory mediators were quantified by ELISA. Results Infiltrating leukocytes were predominantly neutrophils. Numerous secreted mediators were detectable. MDP and IL-8 enhanced responses. Many signalling proteins were phosphorylated with differential patterns in Crohn’s patients, notably PKC α/β hyperphosphorylation (11.3 ± 3.1 vs 1.2 ± 0.9 units, P < 0.02). Activities of 44 transcription factors were detectable, and sufficient RNA isolated for expression analysis of over 400 genes. Conclusions The modifications enable broad characterisation of inflammatory responses and administration of exogenous immunomodulators. PMID:17522815

  12. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2013.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2014-02-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis; hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects; and allergic skin diseases that were reported in the Journal in 2013. Studies on food allergy suggest that (1) 7.6% of the US population is affected, (2) a "healthy" early diet might prevent food allergy, (3) the skin might be an important route of sensitization, (4) allergen component testing might aid diagnosis, (5) the prognosis of milk allergy might be predictable through early testing, (6) oral or sublingual immunotherapy show promise but also have caveats, and (7) preclinical studies show promising alternative modes of immunotherapy and desensitization. Studies on eosinophilic esophagitis show a relationship to connective tissue disorders and that dietary management is an effective treatment for adults. Markers of anaphylaxis severity have been determined and might inform potential diagnostics and therapeutic targets. Insights on serum tests for drug and insect sting allergy might result in improved diagnostics. Genetic and immune-mediated defects in skin epithelial differentiation contribute to the severity of atopic dermatitis. Novel management approaches to treatment of chronic urticaria, including use of omalizumab, are being identified.

  13. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2011.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2012-01-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis; hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects; and allergic skin diseases that were reported in the Journal in 2011. Food allergy appears to be increasing in prevalence and carries a strong economic burden. Risk factors can include dietary ones, such as deficiency of vitamin D and timing of complementary foods, and genetic factors, such as filaggrin loss-of-function mutations. Novel mechanisms underlying food allergy include the role of invariant natural killer T cells and influences of dietary components, such as isoflavones. Among numerous preclinical and clinical treatment studies, promising observations include the efficacy of sublingual and oral immunotherapy, a Chinese herbal remedy showing promising in vitro results, the potential immunotherapeutic effects of having children ingest foods with baked-in milk if they tolerate it, and the use of anti-IgE with or without concomitant immunotherapy. Studies of allergic skin diseases, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity to drugs and insect venom are elucidating cellular mechanisms, improved diagnostics, and potential targets for future treatment. The role of skin barrier abnormalities, as well as the modulatory effects of the innate and adaptive immune responses, are major areas of investigation.

  14. Attenuation of UVB-induced sunburn reaction and oxidative DNA damage with no alterations in UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis in Nrf2 gene-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Kawachi, Yasuhiro; Xu, Xuezhu; Taguchi, Shiroma; Sakurai, Hideko; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Ishii, Yoshiyuki; Fujisawa, Yasuhiro; Furuta, Junichi; Takahashi, Takenori; Itoh, Ken; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Yamazaki, Fumikazu; Otsuka, Fujio

    2008-07-01

    UV radiation is an important environmental factor in the pathogenesis of skin aging and cancer. Many harmful effects of UV radiation are associated with generation of reactive oxygen species. Cellular antioxidants prevent the occurrence and reduce the severity of UV-induced photoaging and diseases of the skin. The transcription factor Nrf2 (NF-E2-related factor 2) and its negative regulator protein, Keap1 (Kelch-like-ECH-associated protein 1), are central regulators of cellular antioxidant responses. We used nrf2-null mice to investigate the roles of the Nrf2-Keap1 system in protection of skin from harmful effects of UVB irradiation. A single irradiation with UVB induced stronger and longer lasting sunburn reaction in nrf2-null mice. Histological changes, including epidermal necrosis, dermal edema, inflammatory cell infiltration, sunburn cell formation, TUNEL-positive apoptotic cell formation, and accumulation of oxidative DNA products such as 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine after UVB irradiation, were more prominent in nrf2-null mice. These findings indicate that the Nrf2-Keap1 pathway plays an important role in protection of the skin against acute UVB reactions, including cutaneous cell apoptosis and oxidative damage. However, there were no significant differences in skin carcinogenesis between nrf2-null and wild-type mice exposed to chronic UVB irradiation, suggesting that there is a complex and subtle balance between factors promoting and preventing photocarcinogenesis. Journal of Investigative Dermatology (2008) 128, 1773-1779; doi:10.1038/sj.jid.5701245; published online 17 January 2008.

  15. Severe Toxic Skin Reaction Caused by a Common Anemone and Identification of the Culprit Organism.

    PubMed

    Tezcan, Özgür Deniz; Gözer, Özgür

    2015-01-01

    In a marine envenomation, identification of the culprit organism can be difficult. In this case report, we present our method to identify snakelocks anemone (Anemonia viridis or formerly Anemonia sulcata) as the culprit of a severe toxic skin reaction. A. viridis is one of the most common anemones of the Mediterranean Sea and the North Atlantic Ocean. It lives at a depth of up to 10 m. It is a member of the phylum Cnidaria, which includes jellyfish, anemones, hydroids, and corals. They have toxic organelles called cnidocysts that have the capacity to inject venom with microscopic harpoon-like structures. The cnidocysts of A. viridis may cause toxic and allergic reactions, and although its venom is one of the most studied cnidarian venoms, detailed case reports are rare. PMID:26146820

  16. The Cutaneous Microbiome and Aspects of Skin Antimicrobial Defense System Resist Acute Treatment with Topical Skin Cleansers.

    PubMed

    Two, Aimee M; Nakatsuji, Teruaki; Kotol, Paul F; Arvanitidou, Evangelia; Du-Thumm, Laurence; Hata, Tissa R; Gallo, Richard L

    2016-10-01

    The human skin microbiome has been suggested to play an essential role in maintaining health by contributing to innate defense of the skin. These observations have inspired speculation that the use of common skin washing techniques may be detrimental to the epidermal antibacterial defense system by altering the microbiome. In this study, several common skin cleansers were used to wash human forearms and the short-term effect on the abundance of the antimicrobial peptide LL-37 and the abundance and diversity of bacterial DNA was measured. Despite small but significant decreases in the amount of LL-37 on the skin surface shortly after washing, no significant change in the bacterial community was detected. Furthermore, Group A Streptococcus did not survive better on the skin after washing. In contrast, the addition of antimicrobial compounds such as benzalkonium chloride or triclocarban to soap before washing decreased the growth of Group A Streptococcus applied after rinse. These results support prior studies that hand washing techniques in the health care setting are beneficial and should be continued. Additional research is necessary to better understand the effects of chronic washing and the potential impact of skin care products on the development of dysbiosis in some individuals. PMID:27377698

  17. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2008.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2009-02-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects and in allergic skin disease that were reported in the Journal in 2008. Key epidemiologic observations include a rise in anaphylaxis in a population-based study and lower rates of peanut allergy in Israel, where infants consume peanut early compared with the United Kingdom, where dietary introduction is generally delayed. Advances in food allergy diagnosis include IgE epitope mapping that discloses the likelihood and severity of allergy; studies correlating likelihood of clinical reactivity on the basis of food-specific IgE to sesame, peanut, milk, and tree nuts; and an observation that a low baseline angiotensin-converting enzyme level may be associated with having pharyngeal edema during a reaction. Molecular, immunologic, and genetic studies are discerning pathways that are key in development of food allergy, identifying new modalities to interrupt mast cell degranulation, and elucidating risks associated with penicillin allergy. Regarding treatment, clinical studies show a majority of children with milk and egg allergy tolerate these proteins in modest amounts when they are extensively heated in baked goods, and studies show promise for oral immunotherapy to treat milk allergy and sublingual immunotherapy for honey bee venom hypersensitivity. The importance of skin barrier dysfunction has continued to be highlighted in the pathophysiology of atopic dermatitis (AD). Research has also continued to identify immunologic defects that contribute to the propensity of patients with AD to develop viral and bacterial infection. New therapeutic approaches to AD, urticaria, and angioedema have been reported including use of probiotics, biologics, vitamin D, and skin barrier creams.

  18. Predicting chemically-induced skin reactions. Part I: QSAR models of skin sensitization and their application to identify potentially hazardous compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Alves, Vinicius M.; Muratov, Eugene; Fourches, Denis; Strickland, Judy; Kleinstreuer, Nicole; Tropsha, Alexander

    2015-04-15

    Repetitive exposure to a chemical agent can induce an immune reaction in inherently susceptible individuals that leads to skin sensitization. Although many chemicals have been reported as skin sensitizers, there have been very few rigorously validated QSAR models with defined applicability domains (AD) that were developed using a large group of chemically diverse compounds. In this study, we have aimed to compile, curate, and integrate the largest publicly available dataset related to chemically-induced skin sensitization, use this data to generate rigorously validated and QSAR models for skin sensitization, and employ these models as a virtual screening tool for identifying putative sensitizers among environmental chemicals. We followed best practices for model building and validation implemented with our predictive QSAR workflow using Random Forest modeling technique in combination with SiRMS and Dragon descriptors. The Correct Classification Rate (CCR) for QSAR models discriminating sensitizers from non-sensitizers was 71–88% when evaluated on several external validation sets, within a broad AD, with positive (for sensitizers) and negative (for non-sensitizers) predicted rates of 85% and 79% respectively. When compared to the skin sensitization module included in the OECD QSAR Toolbox as well as to the skin sensitization model in publicly available VEGA software, our models showed a significantly higher prediction accuracy for the same sets of external compounds as evaluated by Positive Predicted Rate, Negative Predicted Rate, and CCR. These models were applied to identify putative chemical hazards in the Scorecard database of possible skin or sense organ toxicants as primary candidates for experimental validation. - Highlights: • It was compiled the largest publicly-available skin sensitization dataset. • Predictive QSAR models were developed for skin sensitization. • Developed models have higher prediction accuracy than OECD QSAR Toolbox. • Putative

  19. Evaluation of Apoptosis in Skin Biopsies of Patients of Borderline Leprosy and Lepra Type 1 Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Patnaik, Nivedita; Agarwal, Sarla; Sharma, Sonal; Sharma, Satendra; Pandhi, Deepika

    2015-01-01

    Background: The role of apoptosis is not clear in leprosy and lepra reactions. Objectives: To evaluate frequency of apoptosis in skin lesions of borderline leprosy and Type 1 lepra reaction. Methods: Sixty patients with borderline leprosy (30 with clinically diagnosed Type 1 reaction (T1R) (Group I) and 30 without clinical evidence of reaction (Group II)) were analyzed in this prospective study. Apoptosis was detected by two different methods for comparison, that is, histopathologic examination (HPE) and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) fragmentation and electrophoresis. Quantification of apoptotic bodies/10 high power fields (HPF) was also done. Results: Out of 30 cases, apoptosis was detected in 29 cases in Group I and 24 cases in Group II by HPE (P = 0.103), whereas, with the use of DNA electrophoresis it was detected in 24 cases in Group I and 18 cases in Group II (P = 0.091). On quantitative estimation it was found that number of apoptotic bodies are higher in Group I in comparison to Group II (2.77 vs 1.99), which is statistically significant. Conclusions: There was moderate agreement (κ = 0.47) between the two methods of apoptosis detection. Apoptosis was seen more in patients with T1R both qualitatively (statistically nonsignificant) and quantitatively (statistically significant). Clinical significance of this novel finding is that apoptosis can be used as one of the variables for diagnosis of T1R to increase detection rate. PMID:25657399

  20. Probing the neutron-skin thickness by photon production from reactions induced by intermediate-energy protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Gao-Feng

    2015-07-01

    The photon from neutron-proton bremsstrahlung in p +Pb reactions is examined as a potential probe of the neutron-skin thickness in different centralities and at different proton incident energies. It is shown that the best choice of reaction environment is about 140 MeV for the incident proton and the 95%-100% centrality for the reaction system since the incident proton mainly interacts with neutrons inside the skin of the target and thus leads to different photon production to a maximal extent. Moreover, considering two main uncertainties from both photon production probability and nucleon-nucleon cross section in the reaction, I propose to use the ratio of photon production from two reactions to measure the neutron-skin thickness because of its cancellation effects on these uncertainties simultaneously, but preserved about 13%-15% sensitivities on the varied neutron-skin thickness from 0.1 to 0.3 fm within the current experimental uncertainty range of the neutron-skin size in 208Pb.

  1. Early Activation of Th2/Th22 Inflammatory and Pruritogenic Pathways in Acute Canine Atopic Dermatitis Skin Lesions.

    PubMed

    Olivry, Thierry; Mayhew, David; Paps, Judy S; Linder, Keith E; Peredo, Carlos; Rajpal, Deepak; Hofland, Hans; Cote-Sierra, Javier

    2016-10-01

    Determining inflammation and itch pathway activation in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) is fraught with the inability to precisely assess the age of skin lesions, thus affecting the analysis of time-dependent mediators. To characterize inflammatory events occurring during early experimental acute AD lesions, biopsy samples were collected 6, 24, and 48 hours after epicutaneous application of Dermatophagoides farinae house dust mites to sensitized atopic dogs. The skin transcriptome was assessed using a dog-specific microarray and quantitative PCR. Acute canine AD skin lesions had a significant up-regulation of genes encoding T helper (Th) 2 (e.g., IL4, IL5, IL13, IL31, and IL33), Th9 (IL9), and Th22 (IL22) cytokines as well as Th2-promoting chemokines such as CCL5 and CCL17. Proinflammatory (e.g., IL6, LTB, and IL18) cytokines were also up-regulated. Other known pruritogenic pathways were also activated: there was significant up-regulation of genes encoding proteases cathepsin S (CTSS), mast cell chymase (CMA1), tryptase (TPS1) and mastin, neuromedin-B (NMB), nerve growth factor (NGF), and leukotriene-synthesis enzymes (ALOX5, ALOX5AP, and LTA4H). Experimental acute canine house dust mite-induced AD lesions exhibit an activation of innate and adaptive immune responses and pruritogenic pathways similar to those seen in humans with acute AD, thereby validating this model to test innovative therapeutics modalities for this disease.

  2. Acute physical exercise under hypoxia improves sleep, mood and reaction time.

    PubMed

    de Aquino-Lemos, Valdir; Santos, Ronaldo Vagner T; Antunes, Hanna Karen Moreira; Lira, Fabio S; Luz Bittar, Irene G; Caris, Aline V; Tufik, Sergio; de Mello, Marco Tulio

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to assess the effect of two sessions of acute physical exercise at 50% VO2peak performed under hypoxia (equivalent to an altitude of 4500 m for 28 h) on sleep, mood and reaction time. Forty healthy men were randomized into 4 groups: Normoxia (NG) (n = 10); Hypoxia (HG) (n = 10); Exercise under Normoxia (ENG) (n = 10); and Exercise under Hypoxia (EHG) (n = 10). All mood and reaction time assessments were performed 40 min after awakening. Sleep was reassessed on the first day at 14 h after the initiation of hypoxia; mood and reaction time were measured 28 h later. Two sessions of acute physical exercise at 50% VO2peak were performed for 60 min on the first and second days after 3 and 27 h, respectively, after starting to hypoxia. Improved sleep efficiency, stage N3 and REM sleep and reduced wake after sleep onset were observed under hypoxia after acute physical exercise. Tension, anger, depressed mood, vigor and reaction time scores improved after exercise under hypoxia. We conclude that hypoxia impairs sleep, reaction time and mood. Acute physical exercise at 50% VO2peak under hypoxia improves sleep efficiency, reversing the aspects that had been adversely affected under hypoxia, possibly contributing to improved mood and reaction time.

  3. Characterisation of leukocytes in a human skin blister model of acute inflammation and resolution.

    PubMed

    Jenner, William; Motwani, Madhur; Veighey, Kristin; Newson, Justine; Audzevich, Tatsiana; Nicolaou, Anna; Murphy, Sharon; Macallister, Raymond; Gilroy, Derek W

    2014-01-01

    There is an increasing need to understand the leukocytes and soluble mediators that drive acute inflammation and bring about its resolution in humans. We therefore carried out an extensive characterisation of the cantharidin skin blister model in healthy male volunteers. A novel fluorescence staining protocol was designed and implemented, which facilitated the identification of cell populations by flow cytometry. We observed that at the onset phase, 24 h after blister formation, the predominant cells were CD16hi/CD66b+ PMNs followed by HLA-DR+/CD14+ monocytes/macrophages, CD11c+ and CD141+ dendritic cells as well as Siglec-8+ eosinophils. CD3+ T cells, CD19+ B cells and CD56+ NK cells were also present, but in comparatively fewer numbers. During resolution, 72 h following blister induction, numbers of PMNs declined whilst the numbers of monocyte/macrophages remain unchanged, though they upregulated expression of CD16 and CD163. In contrast, the overall numbers of dendritic cells and Siglec-8+ eosinophils increased. Post hoc analysis of these data revealed that of the inflammatory cytokines measured, TNF-α but not IL-1β or IL-8 correlated with increased PMN numbers at the onset. Volunteers with the greatest PMN infiltration at onset displayed the fastest clearance rates for these cells at resolution. Collectively, these data provide insight into the cells that occupy acute resolving blister in humans, the soluble mediators that may control their influx as well as the phenotype of mononuclear phagocytes that predominate the resolution phase. Further use of this model will improve our understanding of the evolution and resolution of inflammation in humans, how defects in these over-lapping pathways may contribute to the variability in disease longevity/chronicity, and lends itself to the screen of putative anti-inflammatory or pro-resolution therapies.

  4. Prevention of skin reactions due to teletherapy in women with breast cancer: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    de Andrade, Marceila; Clapis, Maria José; do Nascimento, Talita Garcia; Gozzo, Thaís de Oliveira; de Almeida, Ana Maria

    2012-01-01

    One of the possible courses of cancer treatment is teletherapy, and one of the most important adverse side effects are skin reactions, an ailment more commonly called radiodermatitis. The main purpose of this study is to analyze knowledge of the evidence about topical products used in the prevention of radiodermatitis, to support care delivery to women with breast cancer during teletherapy. The research method used here is the comprehensive literature review. Four databases were used to select the bibliography. The sample consists of 15 articles. The data shows that, among the topical products analyzed here, Calendula, corticosteroids and Xclair have shown significant protective effects, underlining their actions. The lack of articles published in Brazil highlights the need for further research in this area, seeking better care quality through the use of products with scientifically proven efficiency.

  5. Predicting chemically-induced skin reactions. Part I: QSAR models of skin sensitization and their application to identify potentially hazardous compounds

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Vinicius M.; Muratov, Eugene; Fourches, Denis; Strickland, Judy; Kleinstreuer, Nicole; Andrade, Carolina H.; Tropsha, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Repetitive exposure to a chemical agent can induce an immune reaction in inherently susceptible individuals that leads to skin sensitization. Although many chemicals have been reported as skin sensitizers, there have been very few rigorously validated QSAR models with defined applicability domains (AD) that were developed using a large group of chemically diverse compounds. In this study, we have aimed to compile, curate, and integrate the largest publicly available dataset related to chemically-induced skin sensitization, use this data to generate rigorously validated and QSAR models for skin sensitization, and employ these models as a virtual screening tool for identifying putative sensitizers among environmental chemicals. We followed best practices for model building and validation implemented with our predictive QSAR workflow using random forest modeling technique in combination with SiRMS and Dragon descriptors. The Correct Classification Rate (CCR) for QSAR models discriminating sensitizers from non-sensitizers were 71–88% when evaluated on several external validation sets, within a broad AD, with positive (for sensitizers) and negative (for non-sensitizers) predicted rates of 85% and 79% respectively. When compared to the skin sensitization module included in the OECD QSAR toolbox as well as to the skin sensitization model in publicly available VEGA software, our models showed a significantly higher prediction accuracy for the same sets of external compounds as evaluated by Positive Predicted Rate, Negative Predicted Rate, and CCR. These models were applied to identify putative chemical hazards in the ScoreCard database of possible skin or sense organ toxicants as primary candidates for experimental validation. PMID:25560674

  6. C-reactive protein and the acute phase reaction in geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Bertsch, Thomas; Triebel, Jakob; Bollheimer, Cornelius; Christ, Michael; Sieber, Cornel; Fassbender, Klaus; Heppner, Hans Jürgen

    2015-10-01

    The C-reactive protein (CRP), first described as a serum component capable of precipitating the C-polysaccharide of pneumococci, is one of the most important proteins because the serum concentration rises in the acute phase reaction. The acute phase reaction is the nonspecific reaction of the body to noxious stimuli of the most varied kinds, such as infections, burns, neoplasms and tissue trauma. The CRP is synthesized in liver parenchymal cells by cytokines which are derived from stimulated leucocytes and released into the circulation. Because of its molecular structure and in synergy with the complement system, it is able to precipitate and/or lyse microorganisms, thereby rendering them harmless. Measurement of the serum CRP concentration can provide important information with respect to the diagnosis and monitoring of treatment. Due to immunosenescence in geriatric patients the synthesis of CRP appears to be limited to inflammatory stimuli; however, this phenomenon does not appear to be of major clinical relevance. Despite the introduction of new parameters of the acute phase reaction, sometimes with better performance, such as interleukin-6, procalcitonin and the soluble endotoxin receptor sCD14, measurement of CRP for diagnosis and treatment monitoring is still justified even in geriatric patients as testing is rapid, economic and nearly ubiquitously available round the clock. Biochemical markers of the acute phase reaction should always be interpreted together with the clinical picture and their specific limitations.

  7. The leucocoyte disappearance reaction in non-immune acute inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sultan, A M; Dunn, C J; Mimms, P C; Giroud, J P; Willoughby, D A

    1978-12-01

    Injection of a variety of irritants (saline, ovalbumin, compound 48/80 and powdered glass) into the rat pleural cavity induced the disappearance of pleural leucocytes during the first two hours of the reaction. This phenomenon, termed the leucocyte disappearance reaction (LDR), was suppressed by treatment with the anticoagulants heparin and warfarin. The in-vitro incubation of normal, or inflammatory pleural leucocytes resulted in the deposition of dense interconnecting meshwork of fibrin only upon addition of fibrinogen to the culture medium. It is suggested from these results that the LDR is related to the clotting system, involving leucocyte-derived enzyme(s) analogous to those of the clotting system (e.g., tissue thromboplastin), which convert fibrogen to fibrin, resulting in cell-trapping and subsequent "disappearance" of pleural leuococytes. Similarities were observed betweeen the LDR in non-immune inflammation and the macrophage disappearance reaction of cell-mediated immunity. The significance of these phenomena in the inflammatory process, both immune and non-immune, is discussed.

  8. Split-Thickness Skin Grafts Remain the Gold Standard for the Closure of Large Acute and Chronic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Simman, Richard; Phavixay, Laemthong

    2012-01-01

    Healing large chronic and acute wounds is a challenging task for wound care providers. It requires numerous visits and frequent dressing changes and often involves expensive therapeutic modalities. Our primary and ultimate goal is to heal these wounds as quickly as possible. In a prepared wound bed, covered with granulation tissue and free of infection, skin graft is the gold standard procedure to achieve this goal. One should keep in mind that not all patients are good candidates for surgery. PMID:24525612

  9. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell implantation for the treatment of radioactivity‑induced acute skin damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Kai; Wu, Weizhen; Yang, Shunliang; Huang, Lianghu; Chen, Jin; Gong, Chungui; Fu, Zhichao; Zhang, Linlin; Tan, Jianming

    2015-11-01

    The present study aimed to observe the role of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in the repair of acute skin damage caused by radiation. Rat bone marrow MSCs (BMSCs) were isolated and cultured in vitro. A rat model of radiation‑induced acute skin damage was established by irradiation of the hind legs of Sprague-Dawley rats using a linear accelerator (45 Gy). After irradiation, rats were randomly divided into two groups: BMSC group and control group. Rats in the BMSC group were treated with a tail vein injection of 2x106 BMSCs (1 ml) immediately after irradiation and a local multipoint injection of 2x106 BMSCs at the injured area two weeks later. Then the wound healing of each rat was observed. The expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)‑β1, stromal cell‑derived factor-1 (SDF‑1) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in the wounded tissues was determined by immunohistochemistry. The results demonstrated that skin damage was milder in the BMSC group than in the control group. Moreover, the speed of healing in the BMSC group was better than that in the control group. In addition, the wound score, it was significantly lower in the BMSC group than in the control group (P<0.05). The expression of PGE2 and TGF‑β1 in the BMSC group was also significantly lower than that in the control group (P<0.05), whereas the SDF‑1 expression was significantly higher in the BMSC group than that in the control group (P<0.05). BMSCs can effectively reduce inflammation and fibrosis in the wounded skin and promote the repair of acute radioactive skin injury. Thus, may be developed as a novel treatment for wound healing. PMID:26323987

  10. Parent-Child Agreement Regarding Children's Acute Stress: The Role of Parent Acute Stress Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kassam-Adams, Nancy; Garcia-Espana, J. Felipe; Miller, Victoria A.; Winston, Flaura

    2006-01-01

    Objective: We examined parent--child agreement regarding child acute stress disorder (ASD) and the relationship between parent ASD symptoms and parent ratings of child ASD. Method: Parent-child dyads (N = 219; child age 8-17 years) were assessed within 1 month of child injury. Parent--child agreement was examined regarding child ASD presence,…

  11. Suppression of immediate and late anti-IgE-induced skin reactions by topically applied alcohol/onion extract.

    PubMed

    Dorsch, W; Ring, J

    1984-01-01

    In a double blind study, alcohol/onion extract (5% ethanol) was injected simultaneously with 20 IU and 200 IU rabbit anti-human-IgE intradermally in 12 adult volunteers (6 atopics, 6 non-atopics). Diameters of wheals and flares were measured 10 min after and compared with control sites challenged with 20 IU and 200 IU anti-IgE in a 5% ethanol solution. The skin sites were then treated epidermally with 45% alcohol/onion extract and 45% ethanol under occlusion. Diameters of late cutaneous reactions were measured hourly. Oedema formation was clinically estimated according to an arbitrary scale and skin thickness measured with a calliper. In the onion-treated skin sites the wheal areas were significantly reduced (20 IU: control: 108 +/- 53 mm2; onion 69 +/- 42 mm2, P less than 0.05; 200 IU anti-IgE: control: 152 +/- 25 mm2, onion: 138 +/- 26 mm2, P less than 0.02). The oedema formation during the late phase skin reaction was markedly depressed (P less than 0.005 at 2 h, P less than 0.01 at 4 and 6 h, P less than 0.02 at 8 h). The extent of late skin reactions was slightly, but not significantly reduced. Obviously, onions contain pharmacologically active substances with anti-inflammatory and/or allergic properties. PMID:6364880

  12. Acute Hemolytic Transfusion Reaction in a Patient with Bombay Phenotype: Implications for ABO Grouping.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Sheetal; Dhawan, Hari Krishan; Jain, Ashish; Sachdev, Suchet; Marwaha, Neelam

    2014-09-01

    Bombay blood group is a rare phenotype that is characterized serologically by absence of H, A and B antigens on red cell surface and presence of corresponding antibodies in the serum. We report a case of 45-year old patient having Bombay blood group phenotype who experienced an acute reaction due to transfusion of mismatched blood unit.

  13. Regorafenib-associated hand–foot skin reaction: practical advice on diagnosis, prevention, and management

    PubMed Central

    McLellan, B.; Ciardiello, F.; Lacouture, M. E.; Segaert, S.; Van Cutsem, E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Regorafenib is an orally available, small-molecule multikinase inhibitor with international marketing authorizations for use in colorectal cancer and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. In clinical trials, regorafenib showed a consistent and predictable adverse-event profile, with hand–foot skin reaction (HFSR) among the most clinically significant toxicities. This review summarizes the clinical characteristics of regorafenib-related HFSR and provides practical advice on HFSR management to enable health care professionals to recognize, pre-empt, and effectively manage the symptoms, thereby allowing patients to remain on active therapy for as long as possible. Design This review is based on a systematic literature search of the PubMed database (using synonyms of HFSR, regorafenib, and skin toxicities associated with targeted therapies or cytotoxic chemotherapy). However, as this search identified very few articles, the authors also use their clinical experience as oncologists and dermatologists managing patients with treatment-related HFSR to provide recommendations on recognition and management of HFSR in regorafenib-treated patients. Results Regorafenib-related HFSR is similar to that seen with other multikinase inhibitors (e.g. sorafenib, sunitinib, cabozantinib, axitinib, and pazopanib) but differs from the hand–foot syndrome seen with cytotoxic chemotherapies (e.g. fluoropyrimidines, anthracyclines, and taxanes). There have been no controlled trials of symptomatic management of regorafenib-related HFSR, and limited good-quality evidence from randomized clinical trials of effective interventions for HFSR associated with other targeted therapies. Recommendations on prevention and management of regorafenib-related HFSR in this review are therefore based on the expert opinion of the authors (dermatologists and oncologists with expertise in the management of treatment-related skin toxicities and oncologists involved in clinical trials of regorafenib) and

  14. Skin substitute-assisted repair shows reduced dermal fibrosis in acute human wounds validated simultaneously by histology and optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Greaves, Nicholas S; Iqbal, Syed A; Hodgkinson, Tom; Morris, Julie; Benatar, Brian; Alonso-Rasgado, Teresa; Baguneid, Mohamed; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2015-01-01

    Skin substitutes are heterogeneous biomaterials designed to accelerate wound healing through provision of replacement extracellular matrix. Despite growing evidence for their use in chronic wounds, the role of skin substitutes in acute wound management and their influence on fibrogenesis remains unclear. Skin substitute characteristics including biocompatibility, porosity, and elasticity strongly influence cellular behavior during wound healing. Thus, we hypothesize that structural and biomechanical variation between biomaterials may induce differential scar formation after cutaneous injury. The following human prospective cohort study was designed to investigate this premise. Four 5-mm full thickness punch biopsies were harvested from 50 volunteers. In all cases, site 1 healed by secondary intention, site 2 was treated with collagen-GAG scaffold (CG), and decellularised dermis (DCD) was applied to site 3 while tissue extracted from site 4 was replaced (autograft). Healing tissue was assessed weekly with optical coherence tomography (OCT), before being excised on days 7, 14, 21, or 28 depending on study group allocation for later histological and immunohistochemical evaluation. Extracted RNA was used in microarray analysis and polymerase chain reaction of highlighted genes. Autograft treatment resulted in minimal fibrosis confirmed immunohistochemically and with OCT through significantly lower collagen I levels (p = 0.047 and 0.03) and reduced mean grayscale values (p = 0.038 and 0.015), respectively. DCD developed intermediate scar formation with partial rete ridge reformation and reduced fasiculonodular fibrosis. It was uniquely associated with late up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinases 1 and 3, oncostatin M, and interleukin-10 (p = 0.007, 0.04, 0.019, 0.019). Regenerated dermis was significantly thicker in DCD and autografts 28 days post-injury compared with control and CG samples (p = 0.003 and < 0.0001). In conclusion, variable fibrotic outcomes were

  15. Skin substitute-assisted repair shows reduced dermal fibrosis in acute human wounds validated simultaneously by histology and optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Greaves, Nicholas S; Iqbal, Syed A; Hodgkinson, Tom; Morris, Julie; Benatar, Brian; Alonso-Rasgado, Teresa; Baguneid, Mohamed; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2015-01-01

    Skin substitutes are heterogeneous biomaterials designed to accelerate wound healing through provision of replacement extracellular matrix. Despite growing evidence for their use in chronic wounds, the role of skin substitutes in acute wound management and their influence on fibrogenesis remains unclear. Skin substitute characteristics including biocompatibility, porosity, and elasticity strongly influence cellular behavior during wound healing. Thus, we hypothesize that structural and biomechanical variation between biomaterials may induce differential scar formation after cutaneous injury. The following human prospective cohort study was designed to investigate this premise. Four 5-mm full thickness punch biopsies were harvested from 50 volunteers. In all cases, site 1 healed by secondary intention, site 2 was treated with collagen-GAG scaffold (CG), and decellularised dermis (DCD) was applied to site 3 while tissue extracted from site 4 was replaced (autograft). Healing tissue was assessed weekly with optical coherence tomography (OCT), before being excised on days 7, 14, 21, or 28 depending on study group allocation for later histological and immunohistochemical evaluation. Extracted RNA was used in microarray analysis and polymerase chain reaction of highlighted genes. Autograft treatment resulted in minimal fibrosis confirmed immunohistochemically and with OCT through significantly lower collagen I levels (p = 0.047 and 0.03) and reduced mean grayscale values (p = 0.038 and 0.015), respectively. DCD developed intermediate scar formation with partial rete ridge reformation and reduced fasiculonodular fibrosis. It was uniquely associated with late up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinases 1 and 3, oncostatin M, and interleukin-10 (p = 0.007, 0.04, 0.019, 0.019). Regenerated dermis was significantly thicker in DCD and autografts 28 days post-injury compared with control and CG samples (p = 0.003 and < 0.0001). In conclusion, variable fibrotic outcomes were

  16. Skin infections and immunoglobulin A in serum, sweat, and saliva of patients recovered from poststreptococcal acute glomerulonephritis or acute rheumatic fever and their siblings.

    PubMed

    Potter, E V; Vincente, J B; Mayon-WHite, R T; Shaughnessy, M A; Poon-King, T; Earle, D P

    1982-06-01

    Differences in hygienic habits and base-line secretory immunoglobulin (Ig) A which might have contributed to the prevalence of skin infections and/or absence of increased serum IgA values were sought in patients with poststreptococcal acute glomerulonephritis (nephritis) in contrast to patients with acute rheumatic fever in Trinidad by studying patients and their siblings after the patients had recovered from these diseases. The overall history of skin infections was similar at this time in all groups, although they had been much more common in patients with nephritis and their families at the time of acute illness. The recovered nephritis patients bathed slightly less often than the other individuals, used a cream or lotion after bathing rather than coconut oil, and tended to sweat less than the others, but none of these differences was statistically significant. Neither were significant differences demonstrated in amounts of IgA and IgG in serum and saliva of recovered nephritis patients and their siblings compared to recovered rheumatic fever patients and their siblings, while only small amounts of IgA and IgG were present in any sweat, and probably had been transuded rather than secreted. These studies suggest that the lower serum IgA titers in patients with nephritis compared to patients with rheumatic fever in Trinidad do not reflect basic differences in serum IgA or secretory IgA as measured in saliva, and that IgA is not secreted by the eccrine glands.

  17. Use of Axillary Deodorant and Effect on Acute Skin Toxicity During Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: A Prospective Randomized Noninferiority Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Theberge, Valerie; Harel, Francois; Dagnault, Anne

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To prospectively determine the effect of deodorant use on acute skin toxicity and quality of life during breast radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Before breast RT, 84 patients were randomly assigned to the deodorant group (n = 40) or the no-deodorant group (n = 44). The patients were stratified by axillary RT and previous chemotherapy. Toxicity evaluations were always performed by the principal investigator, who was unaware of the group assignment, at the end of RT and 2 weeks after completion using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute skin toxicity criteria. Symptoms of acute skin toxicity (i.e., discomfort, pain, pruritus, sweating) and quality of life were self-evaluated. For each criterion, the point estimate of rate difference with the 95% one-sided upper confidence limit was computed. To claim noninferiority owing to deodorant use, the 95% one-sided upper confidence limit had to be lower than the noninferiority margin, fixed to 12.8%. Results: In the deodorant vs. no-deodorant groups, Grade 2 axillary radiodermatitis occurred in 23% vs. 30%, respectively, satisfying the statistical criteria for noninferiority (p = .019). Grade 2 breast radiodermatitis occurred in 30% vs. 34% of the deodorant vs. no-deodorant groups, respectively, also satisfying the statistical criteria for noninferiority (p = .049). Similar results were observed for the self-reported evaluations. The deodorant group reported less sweating (18% vs. 39%, p = .032). No Grade 3 or 4 radiodermatitis was observed. Conclusion: According to our noninferiority margin definition, the occurrence of skin toxicity and its related symptoms were statistically equivalent in both groups. No evidence was found to prohibit deodorant use (notwithstanding the use of an antiperspirant with aluminum) during RT for breast cancer.

  18. Neuroendocrine and cardiovascular reactions to acute psychological stress are attenuated in smokers.

    PubMed

    Ginty, Annie T; Jones, Alexander; Carroll, Douglas; Roseboom, Tessa J; Phillips, Anna C; Painter, Rebecca; de Rooij, Susanne R

    2014-10-01

    A number of studies have now examined the association between smoking and the magnitude of physiological reactions to acute psychological stress. However, no large-scale study has demonstrated this association incorporating neuroendocrine in addition to cardiovascular reactions to stress. The present study compared neuroendocrine and cardiovascular reactions to acute stress exposure in current smokers, ex-smokers, and those who had never smoked in a large community sample. Salivary cortisol, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, heart rate and frequency components of systolic blood pressure and heart rate variability were measured at rest and during exposure to a battery of three standardized stress tasks in 480 male and female participants from the Dutch Famine Birth Cohort Study. Current smokers had significantly lower cortisol, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and heart rate reactions to stress. They also exhibited smaller changes in the low frequency band of blood pressure variability compared to ex- and never smokers. There were no group differences in stress related changes in overall heart rate variability as measured by the root mean square of successive interbeat interval differences or in the high frequency band of heart rate variability. In all cases, effects remained significant following statistical adjustment for a host of variables likely to be associated with reactivity and/or smoking. In secondary analyses, there were no significant associations between lifetime cigarette consumption or current consumption and stress reactivity. In conclusion, compared to non-smokers and ex-smokers, current smokers exhibited attenuated neuroendocrine and cardiovascular reactions to acute psychological stress. Among smokers and ex-smokers, there is no evidence that lifetime exposure was associated with physiological reactions to acute stress, nor that current levels of cigarette consumption were associated with reactivity. It is possible, then, that

  19. Mast cells contribute to fibrin deposition in reverse passive Arthus reaction in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Ramos, B F; Zhang, Y; Jakschik, B A

    1992-09-01

    The activation of the clotting system is an important process during inflammation to contain the injury and initiate tissue repair. In the present study, we investigated the effect of mast cells on fibrin deposition in reverse passive Arthus reaction in mast cell-deficient WBB6F1-W/Wv(W/Wv) and control WBB6F1-(+)/+(+/+) mice, that were given 125I-labeled fibrogen intravenousty. An antibody dose-dependent increase in radioactivity was observed in the challenged skin sites. Sequential water and urea extractions characterized the radioiodinated fibrinogen derivatives present in the tissue. The radioactivity found in the various fractions of the stimulated samples from +/+ was 2-10-fold higher than that in specimens from W/Wv mice. The greatest difference was observed in the urea-insoluble pellet (cross-linked fibrin and its early degradation products). Reconstitution of W/Wv mice with mast cells augmented the response to levels similar to those in +/+ mice. Pretreatment with the antihistamine pyrilamine blocked the accumulation of 125I-labeled fibrinogen and its derivatives by approximately 70% in +/+ but not in W/Wv mice. Inhibition of leukotriene synthesis by A-63162 markedly decreased the accumulation of iodinated fibrinogen in both +/+ and W/Wv mice. The data suggest that mast cells and their vasoactive mediator histamine contribute to the exudation of clotting factors, which results in fibrin deposition and that mast cells also enhance fibrin cross-linkage.

  20. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2010.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2011-02-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis; hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects; and allergic skin disease that were reported in the Journal in 2010. Key epidemiologic observations include an apparent increase in peanut allergy, with more than 1% of children affected, and increasing evidence that early food allergen exposure, rather than avoidance, might improve allergy outcomes. Advances in food allergy diagnosis include improved insights into prognosis and estimation of severity through component-resolved diagnostics and characterization of IgE binding to specific epitopes. Regarding treatment, oral and epicutaneous immunotherapy show promise. Studies of drug allergies show insights into pathophysiology, and studies on insect hypersensitivity reveal improved diagnostic methods. Genetic and functional studies have revealed the important role of epidermal differentiation products in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. Cross-talk between the atopic immune response with the innate immune response have also been found to predispose to infection in patients with atopic dermatitis. New therapeutic approaches to control chronic urticaria have also been identified during the past year.

  1. On the mathematical modeling of wound healing angiogenesis in skin as a reaction-transport process

    PubMed Central

    Flegg, Jennifer A.; Menon, Shakti N.; Maini, Philip K.; McElwain, D. L. Sean

    2015-01-01

    Over the last 30 years, numerous research groups have attempted to provide mathematical descriptions of the skin wound healing process. The development of theoretical models of the interlinked processes that underlie the healing mechanism has yielded considerable insight into aspects of this critical phenomenon that remain difficult to investigate empirically. In particular, the mathematical modeling of angiogenesis, i.e., capillary sprout growth, has offered new paradigms for the understanding of this highly complex and crucial step in the healing pathway. With the recent advances in imaging and cell tracking, the time is now ripe for an appraisal of the utility and importance of mathematical modeling in wound healing angiogenesis research. The purpose of this review is to pedagogically elucidate the conceptual principles that have underpinned the development of mathematical descriptions of wound healing angiogenesis, specifically those that have utilized a continuum reaction-transport framework, and highlight the contribution that such models have made toward the advancement of research in this field. We aim to draw attention to the common assumptions made when developing models of this nature, thereby bringing into focus the advantages and limitations of this approach. A deeper integration of mathematical modeling techniques into the practice of wound healing angiogenesis research promises new perspectives for advancing our knowledge in this area. To this end we detail several open problems related to the understanding of wound healing angiogenesis, and outline how these issues could be addressed through closer cross-disciplinary collaboration. PMID:26483695

  2. A prevalidation study on the in vitro skin irritation function test (SIFT) for prediction of acute skin irritation in vivo: results and evaluation of ECVAM Phase III.

    PubMed

    Heylings, J R; Diot, S; Esdaile, D J; Fasano, W J; Manning, L A; Owen, H M

    2003-04-01

    A prevalidation study sponsored by the European Centre for the Validation of Alternative Methods (ECVAM) on in vitro tests for acute skin irritation is aimed at identifying non-animal tests capable of discriminating irritants (I) from non-irritants (NI), as defined according to European Union and OECD. This paper reports on Phase III for one of the methods, the skin integrity function test (SIFT), assessing the protocol performance of the SIFT, in terms of reproducibility and predictive ability, in three laboratories. The barrier function properties of excised mouse skin were determined using a set of 20 coded chemicals (10 I, 10 NI), using the endpoints of trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL) and electrical resistance (ER). The basis of the SIFT prediction model is if the ratios of the pre- and post-application values for either TEWL or ER are greater than five-fold, then the test chemical is deemed irritant (I). If the ratio of both parameters is less than five-fold then the chemical is deemed non-irritant (NI). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) indicated that the intra-lab reproducibility was acceptable but that the inter-lab reproducibility was not. Overall, the SIFT test under-predicted the irritancy of the test chemicals chosen for Phase III with an overall accuracy of only 55%. The sensitivity value (ability to correctly predict I) was only 30%. The specificity (ability to predict NI) of the test was better at 80%. A retrospective examination of the SIFT results was undertaken using Student's t-test and a significance level of P<0.05 to predict an irritant based on changes in the TEWL ratio values. This improved the predictivity of the SIFT test, giving a specificity of 60%, a sensitivity of 80% and an overall accuracy of 70%. Appropriate modifications to the prediction model have now been made and the SIFT will be re-examined in a new validation exercise to investigate the potential of this non-animal method to predict acute skin irritation potential. PMID:12650665

  3. Rising United States Hospital Admissions for Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Recent Trends and Economic Impact

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Keith S.; Patel, Dipen A.; Stephens, Jennifer M.; Khachatryan, Alexandra; Patel, Ayush; Johnson, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Background The number of ambulatory patients seeking treatment for skin and skin structure infections (SSSI) are increasing. The objective of this study is to determine recent trends in hospital admissions and healthcare resource utilization and identify covariates associated with hospital costs and mortality for hospitalized adult patients with a primary SSSI diagnosis in the United States. Methods We performed a retrospective cross-sectional analysis (years 2005–2011) of data from the US Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project National Inpatient Sample. Recent trends, patient characteristics, and healthcare resource utilization for patients hospitalized with a primary SSSI diagnosis were evaluated. Descriptive and bivariate analyses were conducted to assess patient and hospital characteristics. Results A total of 1.8% of hospital admissions for the years 2005 through 2011 were for adult patients with a SSSI primary diagnosis. SSSI-related hospital admissions significantly changed during the study period (P < .001 for trend) ranging from 1.6% (in 2005) to 2.0% (in 2011). Mean hospital length of stay (LOS) decreased from 5.4 days in the year 2005 to 5.0 days in the year 2011 (overall change, P < .001) with no change in hospital costs. Patients with postoperative wound infections had the longest hospital stays (adjusted mean, 5.81 days; 95% confidence interval (CI), 5.80–5.83) and highest total costs (adjusted mean, $9388; 95% CI, $9366-$9410). Year of hospital admission was strongly associated with mortality; infection type, all patient refined diagnosis related group severity of illness level, and LOS were strongly associated with hospital costs. Conclusions Hospital admissions for adult patients in the United States with a SSSI primary diagnosis continue to increase. Decreasing hospital inpatient LOS and mortality rate may be due to improved early treatment. Future research should focus on identifying alternative treatment processes for patients with SSSI

  4. Interleukin-6 release and the acute-phase reaction in patients with acute myocardial infarction: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sturk, A; Hack, C E; Aarden, L A; Brouwer, M; Koster, R R; Sanders, G T

    1992-05-01

    We investigated the potential role of interleukin-6 as a mediator of the acute-phase reaction (APR) in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Of the six patients studied, five demonstrated increased plasma interleukin-6 levels. Interleukin-6 levels began to increase at 14 hours (mean; range = 8 to 20 hours) after the initial complaints and reached maximal levels of 28 to 250 U/mL (normal values less than 10 U/mL) after 36 hours (mean; range = 24 to 52 hours). No correlation was seen between the size of the interfaction as indicated by creatine kinase MB assays and the extent of the interleukin-6 increases (r = 0.44; p = 0.38). As an indicator of the APR, plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were measured. CRP levels began to increase after 16 hours (mean; range = 8 to 24 hours) and reached maximum levels of 56 to 322 mg/L (normal values less than 3 mg/L) after 65 hours (mean; range = 48 to 92 hours). The increase of the interleukin-6 level preceded the increase of the CRP level in three patients and was simultaneous in two patients. Maximal interleukin-6 levels correlated significantly with maximal CRP levels (r = 0.96; p = 0.002). Thus these findings indicate that interleukin-6 is an important endogenous mediator for the APR in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

  5. [Procalcitonin. A new marker for acute phase reaction in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Bertsch, T; Richter, A; Hofheinz, H; Böhm, C; Hartel, M; Aufenanger, J

    1997-01-01

    Procalcitonin is a protein which is found in elevated concentrations in the blood circulation during systemic bacterial, fungal or protozoal infection. In contrast to classical acute-phase proteins like C-reactive protein or interleukin-6, it is not elevated after operative trauma. In this paper we present current opinions on the assumed induction mechanisms of the protein by cytokines and endotoxin. Furthermore, the clinical value for early detection of systemic infections in abdominal and transplantation surgery is demonstrated by examples from the literature. Our investigation shows that eight patients with necrotizing pancreatitis had a PCT mean value of 6.9 ng/ml on the day of admission. Seven patients with edematous pancreatitis had only a PCT mean value of 0.69 ng/ml. Despite these differences in the mean values, a significant difference between the normal value and the mean value of the group with necrotizing pancreatitis or edematous pancreatitis was not observed due to the wide range of PCT levels in the group of patients with necrotizing pancreatitis. The fact that only a few of the patients had a superinfected necrosis with systemic evasion of bacterias or their toxins may be the reason for this wide range. We suggest that a discrimination between superinfected necrotizing or sterile pancreatitis and edematous pancreatitis by PCT could be possible but more extensive studies with microbiological examination of the necrotic material are required to recognize the subgroups and to establish the real diagnostic efficiency of PCT in clinical practice, especially in the prediction of the outcome of acute pancreatitis.

  6. Trait Positive Affect Buffers the Effects of Acute Stress on Skin Barrier Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Robles, Theodore F.; Brooks, Kathryn P.; Pressman, Sarah D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study examines the role of self-reported trait positive affect (PA) on skin barrier recovery after skin disruption, and whether the role of trait PA in wound healing is consistent with the direct effects model or the stress-buffering model of PA and health. Design Sixty healthy participants (mean age 22.7 ± 3.9 years) completed a self-report measure of trait positive and negative affect, underwent a “tape-stripping” procedure that disrupts normal skin barrier function, and were randomly assigned to a Stress (Trier Social Stress Test) or No Stress (reading task) condition. Main Outcome Measures Skin barrier recovery was assessed by measuring transepidermal water loss up to 2 hr after skin disruption. Results Multilevel modeling indicated that greater trait PA was related to faster skin barrier recovery (p < .05). The effects of PA on skin barrier recovery were independent of levels of trait NA. Conclusion These findings suggest that trait PA may influence skin barrier recovery following a brief stressor. In addition, these results provide additional evidence that trait PA can positively impact objective health outcomes. PMID:19450044

  7. The risk of systemic reactions to skin prick-tests using food allergens: CICBAA data and literature review.

    PubMed

    Codreanu, F; Moneret-Vautrin, D A; Morisset, M; Guénard, L; Rancé, F; Kanny, G; Lemerdy, Ph

    2006-02-01

    Prick-tests to foods are usually carried out as the first step in the diagnosis of food allergy. Severe anaphylaxis accounts for 4.9 % of allergies in children and occurs more frequently in adults, raising the possibility of systemic reactions to prick-tests in highly sensitized people. Several studies published in the literature have used commercial extracts. As for airborne allergens, concentrations causing a skin reaction of 15 mm do not present a risk of systemic reactions. Prick-tests to native foods--prick-in-prick tests--have been less extensively studied. The CICBAA1 data, from 1,138 food allergic patients of all ages, cover 34,905 prick-in-prick tests to foods. The wheal of these prick-tests has been regulary registered. The risk of systemic reactions can be evaluated at 0.008 %. There were no severe reactions and anti-histamine and corticosteroid therapy were sufficient. These results are similar to those of the large study in 2000 carried out by Devenney in neonates (0.005%). A review of the literature reveals only a few severe reactions in adults. The authors draw attention to the necessary precautions: temporary contra-indication for skin prick-tests in children and adults with grade 3 or 4 asthma, with particular attention to such foods as all kinds of nuts, fish, etc.

  8. [Treatment and prevention of acute radiation dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Benomar, S; Boutayeb, S; Lalya, I; Errihani, H; Hassam, B; El Gueddari, B K

    2010-06-01

    Acute radiation dermatitis is a common side-effect of radiotherapy which often necessitates interruption of the therapy. Currently, there is no general consensus about its prevention or about the treatment of choice. The goal of this work was to focus on optimal methods to prevent and manage acute skin reactions related to radiation therapy and to determine if there are specific topical or oral agents for the prevention of this acute skin reaction. The prevention and the early treatment are the two focus points of the management of the acute radiation dermatitis.

  9. Focus on JNJ-Q2, a novel fluoroquinolone, for the management of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Travis M; Johnson, Steven W; DiMondi, V Paul; Wilson, Dustin T

    2016-01-01

    JNJ-Q2 is a novel, fifth-generation fluoroquinolone that has excellent in vitro and in vivo activity against a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms. In vitro studies indicate that JNJ-Q2 has potent activity against pathogens responsible for acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) and community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP), such as Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae. JNJ-Q2 also has been shown to have a higher barrier to resistance compared to other agents in the class and it remains highly active against drug-resistant organisms, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus, ciprofloxacin-resistant methicillin-resistant S. aureus, and drug-resistant S. pneumoniae. In two Phase II studies, the efficacy of JNJ-Q2 was comparable to linezolid for ABSSSI and moxifloxacin for CABP. Furthermore, JNJ-Q2 was well tolerated, with adverse event rates similar to or less than other fluoroquinolones. With an expanded spectrum of activity and low potential for resistance, JNJ-Q2 shows promise as an effective treatment option for ABSSSI and CABP. Considering its early stage of development, the definitive role of JNJ-Q2 against these infections and its safety profile will be determined in future Phase III studies. PMID:27354817

  10. Antimicrobial Activity of the Investigational Pleuromutilin Compound BC-3781 Tested against Gram-Positive Organisms Commonly Associated with Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections

    PubMed Central

    Biedenbach, Douglas J.; Paukner, Susanne; Ivezic-Schoenfeld, Zrinka; Jones, Ronald N.

    2012-01-01

    BC-3781 is a novel semisynthetic pleuromutilin antimicrobial agent developed as an intravenous and oral therapy for acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) and respiratory tract infections (RTI). BC-3781 and comparator agents were tested by the broth microdilution method against 1,893 clinical Gram-positive organisms predominantly causing ABSSSI. BC-3781 exhibited potent activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MIC50/90, 0.12/0.25 μg/ml), coagulase-negative staphylococci (MIC50/90, 0.06/0.12 μg/ml), β-hemolytic streptococci (MIC50/90, 0.03/0.06 μg/ml), viridans group streptococci (MIC50/90, 0.12/0.5 μg/ml), and Enterococcus faecium (including vancomycin-nonsusceptible strains) (MIC50/90, 0.12/2 μg/ml). Compared with other antibiotics in use for the treatment of ABSSSI, BC-3781 displayed the lowest MICs and only a minimal potential for cross-resistance with other antimicrobial classes. PMID:22232289

  11. Acute skin lesions following psoralen plus ultraviolet A radiation investigated by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. M.; Zhong, H. Q.; Zhai, J.; Wang, C. X.; Xiong, H. L.; Guo, Z. Y.

    2013-08-01

    Psoralen plus ultraviolet A radiation (PUVA) therapy is a very important clinical treatment of skin diseases such as vitiligo and psoriasis, but associated with an increased risk of skin photodamage, especially photoaging. In this work, optical coherence tomography (OCT), a novel non-invasive imaging technology, was introduced to investigate in vivo the photodamage induced by PUVA qualitatively and quantitatively. Balb/c mouse dorsal skin was treated with 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP), and then exposed to UVA radiation. OCT images of the tissues were obtained by an OCT system with a 1310 nm central wavelength. Skin thickness and the attenuation coefficient were extracted from the OCT images to analyze the degree of injury to mouse skin. The results demonstrated that PUVA-treated skin showed an increase in skin thickness, and a reduction of attenuation coefficient in the OCT signal compared with the control groups. The data also showed good correlation with the results observed in histological sections using hematoxylin and eosin staining. In conclusion, OCT is a promising tool for photobiological studies aimed at assessing the effect of PUVA therapy in vivo.

  12. Alterations of acute phase reaction and cytokine production in patients following severe burn injury.

    PubMed

    Dehne, Marius G; Sablotzki, Armin; Hoffmann, Andreas; Mühling, Jörg; Dietrich, Friedrich E; Hempelmann, Gunter

    2002-09-01

    To determine the acute immunologic reaction, mediated by cytokines, interleukines (ILs) and growth factors and the susceptibility to infections and sepsis after severe burn injury a prospective, single unit, longitudinal study of acute phase reactants and mediators who performed. After approval by the ethics committee of our hospital, we investigated the plasma concentrations of IL-2, -6, -8, -10, and -13, the soluble IL-2 receptor (sIL-2R), and the acute phase proteins procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) at admission and every 3 days in 24 patients over a time course of 28 days after thermal injury and categorized by percent burn: < or =30% (group 1; n=12) and >30% (group 2; n=12). Shortly after burn injury we found higher concentrations of IL-2, -6, -10 and PCT in those patients >30% TBSA. During the study period, we found significant higher levels of acute phase proteins, IL-6 and -8 in patients >30% TBSA. The incidence of SIRS and MODS was three times increased in patients >30% TBSA. Our results show different patterns of cytokines and acute phase proteins in patients with different burned surface areas over a long time and continuous monitoring of a more distinct inflammatory response in these patients.

  13. DNA Double-Strand Break Analysis by {gamma}-H2AX Foci: A Useful Method for Determining the Overreactors to Radiation-Induced Acute Reactions Among Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Goutham, Hassan Venkatesh; Mumbrekar, Kamalesh Dattaram; Vadhiraja, Bejadi Manjunath; Fernandes, Donald Jerard; Sharan, Krishna; Kanive Parashiva, Guruprasad; Kapaettu, Satyamoorthy; Bola Sadashiva, Satish Rao

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: Interindividual variability in normal tissue toxicity during radiation therapy is a limiting factor for successful treatment. Predicting the risk of developing acute reactions before initiation of radiation therapy may have the benefit of opting for altered radiation therapy regimens to achieve minimal adverse effects with improved tumor cure. Methods and Materials: DNA double-strand break (DSB) induction and its repair kinetics in lymphocytes of head-and-neck cancer patients undergoing chemoradiation therapy was analyzed by counting {gamma}-H2AX foci, neutral comet assay, and a modified version of neutral filter elution assay. Acute normal tissue reactions were assessed by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Results: The correlation between residual DSBs and the severity of acute reactions demonstrated that residual {gamma}-H2AX foci in head-and-neck cancer patients increased with the severity of oral mucositis and skin reaction. Conclusions: Our results suggest that {gamma}-H2AX analysis may have predictive implications for identifying the overreactors to mucositis and skin reactions among head-and-neck cancer patients prior to initiation of radiation therapy.

  14. Skin discolouration with acute onset parkinsonism secondary to systemic zirconium intoxication.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Hwa J; Yoon, Su J; Park, Jong-Tae; Kim, Young H; Jung, Jin M; Park, Moon-Ho; Rhyu, Im J; Kwon, Do-Young

    2014-01-01

    A 72-year-old woman presented with suspected parkinsonism and discolouration of the skin especially on sun-exposed areas. Thorough investigation revealed systemic zirconium intoxication due to intake of metallic colloids as a home remedy as a cause of the skin colour change. There may be an association between skin discolouration and her parkinsonism. This is unique in that various clinical manifestations developed following systemic ingestion of zirconium and this should serve as a warning on the risk of taking illicit dietary supplements.

  15. Active Hemovigilance Significantly Improves Reporting of Acute Non-infectious Adverse Reactions to Blood Transfusion.

    PubMed

    Agnihotri, Naveen; Agnihotri, Ajju

    2016-09-01

    One of the key purposes of a hemovigilance program is to improve reporting of transfusion related adverse events and subsequent data-driven improvement in blood transfusion (BT) practices. We conducted a study over 3 years to assess the impact of healthcare worker training and an active feedback programme on reporting of adverse reactions to BTs. All hospitalized patients who required a BT were included in the study. Healthcare workers involved in BT to patients were sensitized and trained in adverse reaction reporting by conducting training sessions and meetings. All the transfused patients were 'actively' monitored for any acute adverse reaction by using a uniquely coded blood issue form. A total of 18,914 blood components transfused to 5785 different patients resulted in 61 adverse reaction episodes. This incidence of 0.32 % in our study was found to be significantly higher (p < 0.005) than that reported from the same region in the past. Red blood cell units were the most frequently transfused component and thus most commonly involved in an adverse reaction (42.6 %), however apheresis platelets had the highest chance of reaction per unit transfused (0.66 %). There was no mortality associated with the BT during the study period. An active surveillance program significantly improves reporting and management of adverse reactions to BTs. PMID:27429527

  16. Study of acute transfusion reactions in a teaching hospital of Sikkim: A hemovigilance initiative

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Dhruva Kumar; Datta, Supratim; Gupta, Amlan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Blood transfusions are inherently associated with risks ranging in severity from minor to life-threatening. Continuous monitoring of transfusion related complications can promote understanding of factors contributing to transfusion reactions and help to formulate necessary remedial measures. This study was designed to analyze the frequency and nature of transfusion reactions reported to the blood bank of a remote North East Indian teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: All acute transfusion reactions (ATRs) reported to the blood bank over a period of 20 months (May 2013 to January 2015) were reviewed and analyzed. The risk of transfusion reactions associated with each individual component was assessed. Results: A total of 3455 units of whole blood and component transfusions were carried out of which a total of 32 (0.92%) ATRs were encountered. Packed red blood cells (PRBCs) (n = 15, P = 0.06) and whole blood (WB) (n = 13, P = 0.83) were most commonly implicated. Allergic reaction was the most frequent transfusion reaction encountered (65.6%), seen most commonly with PRBC (risk of 0.76%, P = 0.42), and WB (risk of 0.68%, P = 0.63) transfusions. This was followed by febrile reactions (28.1%), which were seen more commonly with PRBCs (risk of 0.57%, P = 0.016). No reactions were observed with platelet transfusions. Conclusion: The overall incidence of transfusion reactions in this hospital is slightly higher than those having more advanced transfusion facilities in India. The lack of leukoreduction facilities in our hospital could be a likely cause for the same. The use of leukoreduced WB and PRBCs could possibly reduce the overall incidence of ATRs in general and febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reactions in particular. PMID:26285707

  17. Ceftaroline Fosamil for the Treatment of Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia Secondary to Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections or Community-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez, Jose A.; Maggiore, Christy R.; Cole, Phillip; Smith, Alexander; Jandourek, Alena; Friedland, H. David

    2015-01-01

    Background The Clinical Assessment Program and Teflaro® Utilization Registry is designed to collect information on the clinical use of ceftaroline fosamil in the Unites States. This report presents data on the treatment of patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) secondary to acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs) or community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP). Methods Patients diagnosed with ABSSSI or CABP were identified through sequential review of randomly ordered charts generated from pharmacy listings from August 2011 to February 2013. Data were collected by chart review 30 days or more after completion of ceftaroline fosamil therapy. Results Secondary SAB was reported in a total of 48 of 1428 evaluable patients (27 with ABSSSI, 21 with CABP). The mean (SD) patient age was 61 (15) years. At least 1 comorbidity was recorded for 74% of patients with ABSSSI and 81% with CABP. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus was isolated from 59% of patients with ABSSSI and 76% with CABP. The mean (SD) duration of ceftaroline fosamil therapy was 5.8 (4.8) days for ABSSSI and 7.0 (3.8) days for CABP. Clinical success among all patients with SAB treated with ceftaroline fosamil was 58% (52% for SAB secondary to ABSSSI, 67% for SAB secondary to CABP). Clinical success rates of methicillin-resistant S. aureus SAB were 50% (8/16) for ABSSSI and 63% (10/16) for CABP. Conclusions This study supports the use of ceftaroline fosamil as a viable treatment option in hospitalized patients with SAB secondary to ABSSSI or CABP. Further studies evaluating the use of ceftaroline fosamil for the treatment of SAB are warranted. PMID:25574117

  18. Skin reactions triggered by the use of cosmetic products in nonspecific lipid transfer protein-sensitive patients.

    PubMed

    Giani, M; Pirotta, L; Locanto, M; Cadoni, S; Puddu, P; De Pità, O

    2010-01-01

    Nonspecific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs) are members of the prolamine superfamily and they are found in pollen and food, as well as in latex. Due to the strong stability both against pepsin digestion and thermal denaturation, sensitisation towards these proteins is often associated with severe systemic reactions (angioedema, urticaria, asthma, anaphylaxis, etc.) following the ingestion of both raw or fresh food and cooked or preserved food. Many studies have shown reactivity towards nsLTPs both via inhalation and orally and in this study we present two cases of nsLTPs-sensitive patients who manifested the immediate onset of skin reactions following the use of cosmetic products containing these proteins. Thus, in order to prevent immediate reactions linked to their use, it is necessary to recommend nsLTPssensitive patients to avoid the topical use of products containing these proteins (and obviously the ingestion of foods containing these proteins).

  19. Examination of hospital length of stay in Canada among patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Potashman, Michele H; Stokes, Michael; Liu, Jieruo; Lawrence, Robin; Harris, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Skin infections, particularly those caused by resistant pathogens, represent a clinical burden. Hospitalization associated with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major contributor to the economic burden of the disease. This study was conducted to provide current, real-world data on hospitalization patterns for patients with ABSSSI caused by MRSA across multiple geographic regions in Canada. Patients and methods This retrospective cohort study evaluated length of stay (LOS) for hospitalized patients with ABSSSI due to MRSA diagnosis across four Canadian geographic regions using the Discharge Abstract Database. Patients with ICD-10-CA diagnosis consistent with ABSSSI caused by MRSA between January 2008 and December 2014 were selected and assigned a primary or secondary diagnosis based on a prespecified ICD-10-CA code algorithm. Results Among 6,719 patients, 3,273 (48.7%) and 3,446 (51.3%) had a primary and secondary diagnosis, respectively. Among patients with a primary or secondary diagnosis, the cellulitis/erysipelas subtype was most common. The majority of patients presented with 0 or 1 comorbid condition; the most common comorbidity was diabetes. The mean LOS over the study period varied by geographic region and year; in 2014 (the most recent year analyzed), LOS ranged from 7.7 days in Ontario to 13.4 days in the Canadian Prairie for a primary diagnosis and from 18.2 days in Ontario to 25.2 days in Atlantic Canada for a secondary diagnosis. A secondary diagnosis was associated with higher rates of continuing care compared with a primary diagnosis (10.6%–24.2% vs 4.6%–12.1%). Conclusion This study demonstrated that the mean LOS associated with ABSSSI due to MRSA in Canada was minimally 7 days. Clinical management strategies, including medication management, which might facilitate hospital discharge, have the potential to reduce hospital LOS and related economic

  20. Prophylactic use of danaparoid in high-risk pregnancy with heparin-induced thrombocytopaenia-positive skin reaction.

    PubMed

    Myers, Bethan; Westby, John; Strong, Jane

    2003-07-01

    We describe a case where danaparoid was used prophylactically in a high-risk twin pregnancy following the development of heparin-allergy while on prophylactic dalteparin. Danaparoid was substituted for dalteparin at 20 weeks of pregnancy following the development of a severe skin reaction while on the low molecular weight heparin. Although there was no significant fall in platelet count, an aggregation assay for heparin-induced thrombocytopaenia was positive. The skin lesions rapidly resolved following the change to subcutaneous danaparoid. Delivery was by emergency caesarian section at 35 weeks under a general anaesthetic, as a dose of danaparoid had been given 6 h prior to delivery. A sample of breast milk showed no anti-activated factor X activity. Danaparoid was continued post-delivery until the patient was fully warfarinized. To our knowledge, there are no previous reports of the use of danaparoid in this setting. PMID:12851535

  1. Non-sting barrier cream in radiotherapy-induced skin reactions.

    PubMed

    Scott, Audrey

    A pilot evaluation was undertaken in 13 patients with head and neck cancer exploring the use of a non-sting barrier film (Sorbaderm(®,) Aspen Medical Europe Ltd). The Society of Radiographers issued guidance in 2013 warning their members that the use of Aqueous cream for moisturising the skin during radiotherapy was potentially harmful. Patients were monitored over a period of 6 weeks and the aim was to explore whether applying non-sting barrier cream provided a protective barrier that did not impair treatment, slowed or prevented skin damage, was easy and simple to apply for patients and carers, improved quality of life for patients during radiotherapy or aided healing. There appeared to be a delay in skin breakdown in this evaluation from week 3 to week 4 and then only mild pain was recorded and with a maximum Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale of 2.5 in the patient that had combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The patients' overall assessment demonstrated that the use of non-sting barrier cream provided symptom relief in both dry, tightening and itching of the skin associated with radiotherapy. All except one patient found the cream easy to apply. The head and neck nursing team rated the product as 'good' to 'very good'.

  2. Non-sting barrier cream in radiotherapy-induced skin reactions.

    PubMed

    Scott, Audrey

    A pilot evaluation was undertaken in 13 patients with head and neck cancer exploring the use of a non-sting barrier film (Sorbaderm(®,) Aspen Medical Europe Ltd). The Society of Radiographers issued guidance in 2013 warning their members that the use of Aqueous cream for moisturising the skin during radiotherapy was potentially harmful. Patients were monitored over a period of 6 weeks and the aim was to explore whether applying non-sting barrier cream provided a protective barrier that did not impair treatment, slowed or prevented skin damage, was easy and simple to apply for patients and carers, improved quality of life for patients during radiotherapy or aided healing. There appeared to be a delay in skin breakdown in this evaluation from week 3 to week 4 and then only mild pain was recorded and with a maximum Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale of 2.5 in the patient that had combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The patients' overall assessment demonstrated that the use of non-sting barrier cream provided symptom relief in both dry, tightening and itching of the skin associated with radiotherapy. All except one patient found the cream easy to apply. The head and neck nursing team rated the product as 'good' to 'very good'. PMID:26018180

  3. Studies in porphyria. IV. Expression of the gene defect of acute intermittent porphyria in cultured human skin fibroblasts and amniotic cells: prenatal diagnosis of the porphyric trait

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    The gene lesion of the porphyrin-heme synthetic pathway in acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is reflected in a deficient level of activity of the cytosol enzyme uroporphyrinogen I synthetase (URO-S). A marked URO-S deficiency has been demonstrated in the liver and in circulating erythrocytes of individuals with both active and latent AIP. This enzymic abnormality accounts for the excessive production and excretion into urine of the porphyrin precursors, lamda-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and porphobilinogen (PBG) in AIP subjects. In this study, utilizing cell culture techniques, a marked URO-S deficiency has also been demonstrated in skin fibroblasts from AIP patients and in cells derived through aminocentesis from an approximately 17-wk old fetus. The prenatal diagnosis of the AIP trait in this fetus was confirmed postnatally by the demonstration in the child of a deficient level of erythrocyte URO-S activity which was comparable to those found in her AIP mother and affected sibling and which was approximately one-half the levels characterizing her normal father and aunt and a second unaffected sibling. The identification of the URO-S deficiency in cultured human fibroblasts from AIP patients was facilitated by a newly developed, sensitive assay for the enzyme activity. In this assay, the ability of such cells to convert ALA to protoporphyrin was quantitated; in the sequence of reactions involved in this transformation, URO-S is limiting so that the gene defect of AIP could be simply and precisely determined by appropriate spectrofluorometry of cell extracts. The technique described has distinct advantages over the direct enzymatic assay for URO-S activity in cultured human skin fibroblasts and permits clear differentiation of AIP carrier from normal individuals. PMID:1165472

  4. Studies in porphyria. IV. Expression of the gene defect of acute intermittent porphyria in cultured human skin fibroblasts and amniotic cells: prenatal diagnosis of the porphyric trait.

    PubMed

    Sassa, S; Solish, G; Levere, R D; Kappas, A

    1975-09-01

    The gene lesion of the porphyrin-heme synthetic pathway in acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is reflected in a deficient level of activity of the cytosol enzyme uroporphyrinogen I synthetase (URO-S). A marked URO-S deficiency has been demonstrated in the liver and in circulating erythrocytes of individuals with both active and latent AIP. This enzymic abnormality accounts for the excessive production and excretion into urine of the porphyrin precursors, lamda-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and porphobilinogen (PBG) in AIP subjects. In this study, utilizing cell culture techniques, a marked URO-S deficiency has also been demonstrated in skin fibroblasts from AIP patients and in cells derived through aminocentesis from an approximately 17-wk old fetus. The prenatal diagnosis of the AIP trait in this fetus was confirmed postnatally by the demonstration in the child of a deficient level of erythrocyte URO-S activity which was comparable to those found in her AIP mother and affected sibling and which was approximately one-half the levels characterizing her normal father and aunt and a second unaffected sibling. The identification of the URO-S deficiency in cultured human fibroblasts from AIP patients was facilitated by a newly developed, sensitive assay for the enzyme activity. In this assay, the ability of such cells to convert ALA to protoporphyrin was quantitated; in the sequence of reactions involved in this transformation, URO-S is limiting so that the gene defect of AIP could be simply and precisely determined by appropriate spectrofluorometry of cell extracts. The technique described has distinct advantages over the direct enzymatic assay for URO-S activity in cultured human skin fibroblasts and permits clear differentiation of AIP carrier from normal individuals.

  5. Acute effects of exercise and active video games on adults' reaction time and perceived exertion.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, José F; López-García, Jesús

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the acute effects of resting, aerobic exercise practised alone, and aerobic exercise with active video games (AVG), on complex reaction time (CRT) and the post-exercise acute rate of perceived exertion (RPE) in young healthy adults. The experimental group was composed of 92 healthy young adults, 78 males and 13 females (age M = 21.9 ± 2.7 years) who completed two sessions, A and B. In session A, participants rode 30 min on an ergometer, while in session B they exercised for 30 min on an ergometer while playing an AVG on a Wii. The control group was composed of 30 young adults, 26 males and 4 females (age M = 21.4 ± 2.9 years) who rested for 30 min. In each session, a CRT task was performed before and after exercising or resting, and post-exercise global RPE was noted. Repeated measures general linear model (GLM) and Wilcoxon tests were performed. (1) Both aerobic exercise alone and aerobic exercise combined with AVG improved CRT, while resting did not; (2) aerobic exercise combined with AVG did not improve CRT more than aerobic exercise only; and (3) RPE was lower after aerobic exercise combined with AVG compared with aerobic exercise only. In young adults, exercise produces acute benefits on CRT, and practising exercise with AVG helps to decrease RPE.

  6. Acute effects of exercise and active video games on adults' reaction time and perceived exertion.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, José F; López-García, Jesús

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the acute effects of resting, aerobic exercise practised alone, and aerobic exercise with active video games (AVG), on complex reaction time (CRT) and the post-exercise acute rate of perceived exertion (RPE) in young healthy adults. The experimental group was composed of 92 healthy young adults, 78 males and 13 females (age M = 21.9 ± 2.7 years) who completed two sessions, A and B. In session A, participants rode 30 min on an ergometer, while in session B they exercised for 30 min on an ergometer while playing an AVG on a Wii. The control group was composed of 30 young adults, 26 males and 4 females (age M = 21.4 ± 2.9 years) who rested for 30 min. In each session, a CRT task was performed before and after exercising or resting, and post-exercise global RPE was noted. Repeated measures general linear model (GLM) and Wilcoxon tests were performed. (1) Both aerobic exercise alone and aerobic exercise combined with AVG improved CRT, while resting did not; (2) aerobic exercise combined with AVG did not improve CRT more than aerobic exercise only; and (3) RPE was lower after aerobic exercise combined with AVG compared with aerobic exercise only. In young adults, exercise produces acute benefits on CRT, and practising exercise with AVG helps to decrease RPE. PMID:27239681

  7. Acute psychosocial stress and emotion regulation skills modulate empathic reactions to pain in others.

    PubMed

    Buruck, Gabriele; Wendsche, Johannes; Melzer, Marlen; Strobel, Alexander; Dörfel, Denise

    2014-01-01

    Psychosocial stress affects resources for adequate coping with environmental demands. A crucial question in this context is the extent to which acute psychosocial stressors impact empathy and emotion regulation. In the present study, 120 participants were randomly assigned to a control group vs. a group confronted with the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), an established paradigm for the induction of acute psychosocial stress. Empathy for pain as a specific subgroup of empathy was assessed via pain intensity ratings during a pain-picture task. Self-reported emotion regulation skills were measured as predictors using an established questionnaire. Stressed individuals scored significantly lower on the appraisal of pain pictures. A regression model was chosen to find variables that further predict the pain ratings. These findings implicate that acute psychosocial stress might impair empathic processes to observed pain in another person and the ability to accept one's emotion additionally predicts the empathic reaction. Furthermore, the ability to tolerate negative emotions modulated the relation between stress and pain judgments, and thus influenced core cognitive-affective functions relevant for coping with environmental challenges. In conclusion, our study emphasizes the necessity of reducing negative emotions in terms of empathic distress when confronted with pain of another person under psychosocial stress, in order to be able to retain pro-social behavior. PMID:24910626

  8. Acute psychosocial stress and emotion regulation skills modulate empathic reactions to pain in others.

    PubMed

    Buruck, Gabriele; Wendsche, Johannes; Melzer, Marlen; Strobel, Alexander; Dörfel, Denise

    2014-01-01

    Psychosocial stress affects resources for adequate coping with environmental demands. A crucial question in this context is the extent to which acute psychosocial stressors impact empathy and emotion regulation. In the present study, 120 participants were randomly assigned to a control group vs. a group confronted with the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), an established paradigm for the induction of acute psychosocial stress. Empathy for pain as a specific subgroup of empathy was assessed via pain intensity ratings during a pain-picture task. Self-reported emotion regulation skills were measured as predictors using an established questionnaire. Stressed individuals scored significantly lower on the appraisal of pain pictures. A regression model was chosen to find variables that further predict the pain ratings. These findings implicate that acute psychosocial stress might impair empathic processes to observed pain in another person and the ability to accept one's emotion additionally predicts the empathic reaction. Furthermore, the ability to tolerate negative emotions modulated the relation between stress and pain judgments, and thus influenced core cognitive-affective functions relevant for coping with environmental challenges. In conclusion, our study emphasizes the necessity of reducing negative emotions in terms of empathic distress when confronted with pain of another person under psychosocial stress, in order to be able to retain pro-social behavior.

  9. Acute psychosocial stress and emotion regulation skills modulate empathic reactions to pain in others

    PubMed Central

    Buruck, Gabriele; Wendsche, Johannes; Melzer, Marlen; Strobel, Alexander; Dörfel, Denise

    2014-01-01

    Psychosocial stress affects resources for adequate coping with environmental demands. A crucial question in this context is the extent to which acute psychosocial stressors impact empathy and emotion regulation. In the present study, 120 participants were randomly assigned to a control group vs. a group confronted with the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), an established paradigm for the induction of acute psychosocial stress. Empathy for pain as a specific subgroup of empathy was assessed via pain intensity ratings during a pain-picture task. Self-reported emotion regulation skills were measured as predictors using an established questionnaire. Stressed individuals scored significantly lower on the appraisal of pain pictures. A regression model was chosen to find variables that further predict the pain ratings. These findings implicate that acute psychosocial stress might impair empathic processes to observed pain in another person and the ability to accept one's emotion additionally predicts the empathic reaction. Furthermore, the ability to tolerate negative emotions modulated the relation between stress and pain judgments, and thus influenced core cognitive-affective functions relevant for coping with environmental challenges. In conclusion, our study emphasizes the necessity of reducing negative emotions in terms of empathic distress when confronted with pain of another person under psychosocial stress, in order to be able to retain pro-social behavior. PMID:24910626

  10. Effect of acute tadalafil on sperm motility and acrosome reaction: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Ma, Y; Yang, H; Jin, Y; Hu, K; Wang, H-X; Wang, Y-X; Huang, Y-R; Chen, B

    2014-05-01

    Effects of acute tadalafil on sperm motility and acrosome reaction were investigated, both in vitro and in vivo. Twenty asthenozoospermic and 20 normozoospermic patients as control were randomly enrolled. For in vitro part, 0.5 ml tadalafil solutions with different concentrations were added (0.2, 0.1, 0.05 and 0.025 μg ml(-1) , respectively) into semen samples. In both groups, samples treated with 0.2 μg ml(-1) tadalafil had significant increase in sperm motility after 2 h incubation. For in vivo part, oral administration of tadalafil (20 mg) or sildenafil (100 mg) was given. In both groups, computer-assisted semen analysis parameters showed no significant difference. After the administration of tadalafil (2 h) and sildenafil (1 h), there was no significant difference observed in premature acrosome reaction incidence rate. Taking both in vitro and in vivo results into consideration, acute on-demand administration of tadalafil would have no adverse effect on semen parameters.

  11. Acute Activation of Oxidative Pentose Phosphate Pathway as First-Line Response to Oxidative Stress in Human Skin Cells.

    PubMed

    Kuehne, Andreas; Emmert, Hila; Soehle, Joern; Winnefeld, Marc; Fischer, Frank; Wenck, Horst; Gallinat, Stefan; Terstegen, Lara; Lucius, Ralph; Hildebrand, Janosch; Zamboni, Nicola

    2015-08-01

    Integrity of human skin is endangered by exposure to UV irradiation and chemical stressors, which can provoke a toxic production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative damage. Since oxidation of proteins and metabolites occurs virtually instantaneously, immediate cellular countermeasures are pivotal to mitigate the negative implications of acute oxidative stress. We investigated the short-term metabolic response in human skin fibroblasts and keratinocytes to H2O2 and UV exposure. In time-resolved metabolomics experiments, we observed that within seconds after stress induction, glucose catabolism is routed to the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) and nucleotide synthesis independent of previously postulated blocks in glycolysis (i.e., of GAPDH or PKM2). Through ultra-short (13)C labeling experiments, we provide evidence for multiple cycling of carbon backbones in the oxidative PPP, potentially maximizing NADPH reduction. The identified metabolic rerouting in oxidative and non-oxidative PPP has important physiological roles in stabilization of the redox balance and ROS clearance. PMID:26190262

  12. Acute Activation of Oxidative Pentose Phosphate Pathway as First-Line Response to Oxidative Stress in Human Skin Cells.

    PubMed

    Kuehne, Andreas; Emmert, Hila; Soehle, Joern; Winnefeld, Marc; Fischer, Frank; Wenck, Horst; Gallinat, Stefan; Terstegen, Lara; Lucius, Ralph; Hildebrand, Janosch; Zamboni, Nicola

    2015-08-01

    Integrity of human skin is endangered by exposure to UV irradiation and chemical stressors, which can provoke a toxic production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative damage. Since oxidation of proteins and metabolites occurs virtually instantaneously, immediate cellular countermeasures are pivotal to mitigate the negative implications of acute oxidative stress. We investigated the short-term metabolic response in human skin fibroblasts and keratinocytes to H2O2 and UV exposure. In time-resolved metabolomics experiments, we observed that within seconds after stress induction, glucose catabolism is routed to the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) and nucleotide synthesis independent of previously postulated blocks in glycolysis (i.e., of GAPDH or PKM2). Through ultra-short (13)C labeling experiments, we provide evidence for multiple cycling of carbon backbones in the oxidative PPP, potentially maximizing NADPH reduction. The identified metabolic rerouting in oxidative and non-oxidative PPP has important physiological roles in stabilization of the redox balance and ROS clearance.

  13. Acute allergic reactions in Vietnamese children after drinking a new milk product.

    PubMed

    Vo, Thuan Huu; Le, Ninh Hoang; Patel, Mahomed Said; Phan, Lan Trong; Tran Minh, Nhu Nguyen

    2012-02-01

    In early October 2009, pediatricians in hospitals in Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC) reported an unusual increase in the number of children presenting with an acute onset of itchy rash and some with breathing difficulties shortly after drinking milk products. The pediatricians considered the illness to be an allergic reaction to milk. The objective of our investigation was to identify the cause of this acute illness. Following early case reports, all hospitals in HCMC were requested to report cases of this illness. Parents were advised to take children with symptoms to a hospital immediately. A case-series was conducted to generate hypotheses on the possible causes of the illness and was followed by a case-control study to test the hypothesis. Parents of all cases and controls were interviewed face-to-face. The association between food items and the allergy was tested using conditional logistics regression. From 9 to 28 October 2009, 19 cases fulfilled the case definition, and 16 of the 17 cases included in the study had consumed milk supplemented with galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS) shortly before the onset of illness. Fifty age-matched, neighborhood controls were enrolled into the case control study. Of the 30 food items consumed by study participants in the preceding 24 h, only the odds ratio (OR) of milk supplemented with GOS was statistically significant: OR=34.0 (95% CI=3.9, 294.8). Laboratory tests of this milk product did not reveal any unusual properties, chemicals, or other toxic substances. This is the first report of an acute allergic reaction to fresh milk supplemented with GOS. However, the specific allergen in this product was not identified. Further cases were not reported once this product was withdrawn from sale. Vietnam's food safety authorities should expand laboratory capacity to detect allergens in food products.

  14. Acute Transfusion Reactions (ATRs) in Intensive Care Unit (ICU): A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rajesh; Gupta, Manvi; Gupta, Varun; Kaur, Amarjit; Gupta, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Background: Blood transfusion is a frequent and integral part of critical care. Although life saving, it can occasionally be unsafe and result in a spectrum of adverse events. Acute transfusion reactions (ATRs) are probably under diagnosed in critically ill patients due to confusion of the symptoms with the underlying disease. Aim: To analyze the incidence and spectrum of ATRs occuring in critically ill patients. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective review conducted from 1st April 2011 till 31st March 2013. The ATRs related to the administration of blood components in the patients admitted in various Intensive Care Units (ICUs) were recorded, analyzed and classified on the basis of their clinical features and laboratory tests. Results: During the study period 98651 blood components were issued. Out of these 21971 were issued to various ICUs. A total of 225 transfusion reactions were reported from the various critical care departments during this period. The most frequent were Febrile Non Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions (FNHTR) 136 (60.4%), allergic reactions 70 (31.2%), hemolytic reactions 1(0.4%) and non specific reactions 18 (8%). The incidence of ATRs in our study was found to be 1.09% in adult ICUs and 0.36% in pediatric ICUs. Conclusions: Blood transfusion is a vital therapeutic procedure with a potential risk to already critical patients. So a strict vigilance has to be kept and each transfusion has to be monitored carefully with prompt recognition and treatment of ATRs. A rational use of these products considering their deleterious effects can decrease transfusion related morbidity and mortality in the critically ill patients. PMID:24701502

  15. Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis: an update on pharmacogenetics studies in drug-induced severe skin reaction.

    PubMed

    Rufini, Sara; Ciccacci, Cinzia; Politi, Cristina; Giardina, Emiliano; Novelli, Giuseppe; Borgiani, Paola

    2015-11-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis are severe, life-threatening drug reactions involving skin and membranes mucous, which are associated with significant morbidity and mortality and triggered, especially by drug exposure. Different studies have demonstrated that drug response is a multifactorial character and that the interindividual variability in this response depends on both environmental and genetic factors. The last ones have a relevant significance. In fact, the identification of new specific genetic markers involved in the response to drugs, will be of great utility to establish a more personalized therapeutic approach and to prevent the appearance of these adverse reactions. In this review, we summarize recent progresses in the Pharmacogenetics studies related to Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis reporting the major genetic factors identified in the last years as associated with the disease and highlighting the use of some of these genomic variants in the clinical practice.

  16. In Vitro Activities of Tedizolid and Linezolid against Gram-Positive Cocci Associated with Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections and Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ko-Hung; Huang, Yu-Tsung; Liao, Chun-Hsing; Sheng, Wang-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Tedizolid is a novel, expanded-spectrum oxazolidinone with potent activity against a wide range of Gram-positive pathogens. A total of 425 isolates of Gram-positive bacteria were obtained consecutively from patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs) or pneumonia. These isolates included methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) (n = 100), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (n = 100), Streptococcus pyogenes (n = 50), Streptococcus agalactiae (n = 50), Streptococcus anginosus group (n = 75), Enterococcus faecalis (n = 50), and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) (Enterococcus faecium) (n = 50). The MICs of tedizolid and linezolid were determined by the agar dilution method. Tedizolid exhibited better in vitro activities than linezolid against MSSA (MIC90s, 0.5 versus 2 μg/ml), MRSA (MIC90s, 0.5 versus 2 μg/ml), S. pyogenes (MIC90s, 0.5 versus 2 μg/ml), S. agalactiae (MIC90s, 0.5 versus 2 μg/ml), Streptococcus anginosus group (MIC90s, 0.5 versus 2 μg/ml), E. faecalis (MIC90s, 0.5 versus 2 μg/ml), and VRE (MIC90s, 0.5 versus 2 μg/ml). The tedizolid MICs against E. faecalis (n = 3) and VRE (n = 2) intermediate to linezolid (MICs, 4 μg/ml) were 1 μg/ml and 0.5 μg/ml, respectively. The tedizolid MIC90s against S. anginosus, S. constellatus, and S. intermedius were 0.5, 1, and 0.5 μg/ml, respectively, and the rates of susceptibility based on the U.S. FDA MIC interpretive breakpoints to the isolates were 16%, 28%, and 72%, respectively. Tedizolid exhibited 2- to 4-fold better in vitro activities than linezolid against a variety of Gram-positive cocci associated with ABSSSIs and pneumonia. The lower susceptibilities of tedizolid against isolates of S. anginosus and S. constellatus than against those of S. intermedius in Taiwan were noted. PMID:26248355

  17. In Vitro Activities of Tedizolid and Linezolid against Gram-Positive Cocci Associated with Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections and Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ko-Hung; Huang, Yu-Tsung; Liao, Chun-Hsing; Sheng, Wang-Hui; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2015-10-01

    Tedizolid is a novel, expanded-spectrum oxazolidinone with potent activity against a wide range of Gram-positive pathogens. A total of 425 isolates of Gram-positive bacteria were obtained consecutively from patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs) or pneumonia. These isolates included methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) (n = 100), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (n = 100), Streptococcus pyogenes (n = 50), Streptococcus agalactiae (n = 50), Streptococcus anginosus group (n = 75), Enterococcus faecalis (n = 50), and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) (Enterococcus faecium) (n = 50). The MICs of tedizolid and linezolid were determined by the agar dilution method. Tedizolid exhibited better in vitro activities than linezolid against MSSA (MIC90s, 0.5 versus 2 μg/ml), MRSA (MIC90s, 0.5 versus 2 μg/ml), S. pyogenes (MIC90s, 0.5 versus 2 μg/ml), S. agalactiae (MIC90s, 0.5 versus 2 μg/ml), Streptococcus anginosus group (MIC90s, 0.5 versus 2 μg/ml), E. faecalis (MIC90s, 0.5 versus 2 μg/ml), and VRE (MIC90s, 0.5 versus 2 μg/ml). The tedizolid MICs against E. faecalis (n = 3) and VRE (n = 2) intermediate to linezolid (MICs, 4 μg/ml) were 1 μg/ml and 0.5 μg/ml, respectively. The tedizolid MIC90s against S. anginosus, S. constellatus, and S. intermedius were 0.5, 1, and 0.5 μg/ml, respectively, and the rates of susceptibility based on the U.S. FDA MIC interpretive breakpoints to the isolates were 16%, 28%, and 72%, respectively. Tedizolid exhibited 2- to 4-fold better in vitro activities than linezolid against a variety of Gram-positive cocci associated with ABSSSIs and pneumonia. The lower susceptibilities of tedizolid against isolates of S. anginosus and S. constellatus than against those of S. intermedius in Taiwan were noted.

  18. Granulomatous dysimmune reactions (sarcoidosis, granuloma annulare, and others) on differently injured skin areas.

    PubMed

    Lo Schiavo, Ada; Ruocco, Eleonora; Gambardella, Alessio; O'Leary, Ryan E; Gee, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Granulomatous disorders are chronic cell-mediated immune responses histologically characterized by collections of macrophages, epithelioid cells, and multinucleated giant cells. This disease spectrum often has an infectious origin, but sometimes neither an infective agent nor an inciting antigenic stimulus can be identified. The skin may be a preferential target for these disorders, especially in the areas that have been damaged by various forms of skin injury (eg, herpetic infections, trauma, thermal or solar burns, vaccinations, tattoos). These damaged skin sites frame the new concept of an immunocompromised cutaneous district (ICD), which defines a skin area with acquired immune dysregulation that can pave the way for the local onset of opportunistic disorders, such as infections, tumors, and granulomatous disorders. Sarcoidosis, granuloma annulare (GA), and forms of granulomatous vasculitis, such as Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) and Wegener's granulomatosis (WG), are the most common granulomatous disorders that occur in an ICD and may share common pathogenic mechanisms. Recent studies have found clinical and pathologic overlapping features across noninfectious granulomas. Although no unifying etiology exists, the development of granulomatous processes in the ICD has often been reported and the literature contains various hypotheses to explain it: (1) overactive immune response in a previously injured region with or without loss of immune tolerance; (2) overall reduced immune response; (3) retention of an exogeneous antigen or foreign body; (4) altered neural signaling; and (5) a combination of all the aforementioned processes. T helper cells, T regulatory cells, and macrophages, as well as a number of antigenic proteins, have been identified as potential contributing factors. In addition, a genetic predisposition and an intact systemic immune system are both instrumental for the persistence of local granuloma formation in the ICD. PMID:25160106

  19. Characterization of acute and long-term pathologies of superficial and deep dermal sulfur mustard skin lesions in the hairless guinea pig model.

    PubMed

    Dachir, Shlomit; Cohen, Maayan; Kamus-Elimeleh, Dikla; Fishbine, Eliezer; Sahar, Rita; Gez, Rellie; Brandeis, Rachel; Horwitz, Vered; Kadar, Tamar

    2012-01-01

    Sulfur mustard induces severe acute and prolonged damage to the skin and only partially effective treatments are available. We have previously validated the use of hairless guinea pigs as an experimental model for skin lesions. The present study aimed to characterize a model of a deep dermal lesion and to compare it with the previously described superficial lesion. Clinical evaluation of the lesions was conducted using reflectance colorimetry, trans-epidermal water loss and wound area measurements. Prostaglandin E(2) content, matrix metalloproteinase-2 and 9 activity, and histopathology were conducted up to 4 weeks post-exposure. Sulfur mustard skin injury, including erythema and edema, impairment of skin barrier and wounds developed in a dose-dependent manner. Prostaglandin E(2) content and matrix metalloproteinase-2 and 9 activities were elevated during the wound development and the healing process. Histological evaluation revealed severe damage to the epidermis and deep dermis and vesications. At 4 weeks postexposure, healing was not completed: significantly impaired stratum corneum, absence of hair follicles, and epidermal hyperplasia were observed. These results confirm the use of the superficial and deep dermal skin injuries in the hairless guinea pigs as suitable models that can be utilized for the investigation of the pathological processes of acute as well as long-term injuries. These models will be further used to develop treatments to improve the healing process and prevent skin damage and long-term effects. PMID:23082902

  20. Two-eyed versus one-eyed salamanders: does binocularity enhance the optically evoked skin blanching reactions of Ambystoma larvae?

    PubMed

    Pietsch, P; Schneider, C W

    1990-08-01

    A wide variety of visual functions show increases attributable to binocularity, and the question pursued here was whether a second eye enhances the visually stimulated skin blanching reaction of the larval salamander. Dermal melanin spots (produced by the aggregations of melanosomes within dermal melanophores and which contract or expand to lighten or darken the skin) were measured in eyeless (controls), one-eyed and two-eyed Ambystoma punctatum larvae after chronic adaptation of the subjects to a white background (i.e., stimulus conditions for maximum blanching). The eyeless subjects showed no blanching (thus remained dark) in white cups, and they exhibited melanin spots 7 or 8 times the size of those of the other two groups. All one-eyed or two-eyed subjects exhibited blanching reactions; planometric comparison revealed a significantly larger melanin spot area for one-eyed than for two-eyed animals; i.e., the binocular condition permitted greater contraction of the pigment spots than did the monocular condition. Analytical data compared favorably with independently ascertained pigmentation indices. The results indicate that a second eye quantitatively elevates the blanching maximum of a larval salamander.

  1. Does effect of BCG vaccine decrease with time since vaccination and increase tuberculin skin test reaction?

    PubMed

    Subramani, R; Datta, Manjula; Swaminathan, S

    2015-10-01

    The protective efficacy of BCG was studied for over 15 years, from 1968, in South India. A secondary analysis of data was performed to investigate the relationship between Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) and tuberculosis (TB) disease and between BCG and positive tuberculin skin test for different time periods among children aged less than 10 years. A randomized controlled trial was conducted, where 281,161 persons were allocated to receive BCG 0.1mg, BCG 0.01mg or placebo. Tuberculin skin test was performed at baseline and at 4 years after BCG vaccination. Surveys were conducted every 2.5 years to detect all new cases of culture-positive/smear-positive TB occurring in the community over a 15-year period. Relative risk (RR) was obtained from the ratio of incidence among the vaccinated and the placebo groups. Among those children vaccinated with 0.1mg of BCG, the RR for TB was 0.56 (95% CI: 0.32-0.87, P=0.01) at 12.5 years but increased to 0.73 later. Similar pattern was seen with 0.01mg. The increase in the number of skin test positives with 0.1mg of BCG was 57.8%, 49.4% and 34% for cut-off points at ≥10mm, ≥12mm and ≥15mm, respectively. The study suggests that the effect of BCG may decrease since vaccination and the tuberculin positive was higher at post-vaccination test period due to BCG.

  2. Successful Feeding of Amblyomma coelebs (Acari: Ixodidae) Nymphs on Humans in Brazil: Skin Reactions to Parasitism.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Marcos V; Matias, Jaqueline; Aguirre, AndrÉ De A R; Csordas, Barbara G; SzabÓ, Matias P J; Andreotti, Renato

    2015-03-01

    Identifying the tick species that successfully feed on humans would increase knowledge of the epidemiology of several tick-borne diseases. These species salivate into the host, increasing the risk of pathogen transmission. However, there is a lack of data in the literature regarding the ticks that prefer to feed on humans. Herein, we describe the successful feeding of Amblyomma coelebs Neumann nymphs on two of the authors after accidental tick bites occurred during field surveys in two preserved areas of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. One of the host-parasite interactions was closely monitored, and the tick development, gross host skin alterations, and related sensations are presented. PMID:26336294

  3. Successful Feeding of Amblyomma coelebs (Acari: Ixodidae) Nymphs on Humans in Brazil: Skin Reactions to Parasitism.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Marcos V; Matias, Jaqueline; Aguirre, AndrÉ De A R; Csordas, Barbara G; SzabÓ, Matias P J; Andreotti, Renato

    2015-03-01

    Identifying the tick species that successfully feed on humans would increase knowledge of the epidemiology of several tick-borne diseases. These species salivate into the host, increasing the risk of pathogen transmission. However, there is a lack of data in the literature regarding the ticks that prefer to feed on humans. Herein, we describe the successful feeding of Amblyomma coelebs Neumann nymphs on two of the authors after accidental tick bites occurred during field surveys in two preserved areas of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. One of the host-parasite interactions was closely monitored, and the tick development, gross host skin alterations, and related sensations are presented.

  4. Successful Feeding of Amblyomma coelebs (Acari: Ixodidae) Nymphs on Humans in Brazil: Skin Reactions to Parasitism

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Marcos V.; Matias, Jaqueline; Aguirre, André De A. R.; Csordas, Barbara G.; Szabó, Matias P. J.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the tick species that successfully feed on humans would increase knowledge of the epidemiology of several tick-borne diseases. These species salivate into the host, increasing the risk of pathogen transmission. However, there is a lack of data in the literature regarding the ticks that prefer to feed on humans. Herein, we describe the successful feeding of Amblyomma coelebs Neumann nymphs on two of the authors after accidental tick bites occurred during field surveys in two preserved areas of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. One of the host–parasite interactions was closely monitored, and the tick development, gross host skin alterations, and related sensations are presented. PMID:26336294

  5. GC-MS quantitation of fragrance compounds suspected to cause skin reactions. 1.

    PubMed

    Chaintreau, Alain; Joulain, Daniel; Marin, Christophe; Schmidt, Claus-Oliver; Vey, Matthias

    2003-10-22

    Recent changes in European legislation require monitoring of 24 volatile compounds in perfumes as they might elicit skin sensitization. This paper reports a GC-MS quantitation procedure for their determination in fragrance concentrates. GC and MS conditions were optimized for a routine use: analysis within 30 min, solvent and internal standard selection, and stock solution stability. Calibration curves were linear in the range of 2-100 mg/L with coefficients of determination in excess of 0.99. The method was tested using real perfumes spiked with known amounts of reference compounds.

  6. [Effect of training on treadmill performance, aerobic capacity and body reactions to acute cold exposure].

    PubMed

    Iakushkin, A V; Akimov, E B; Andreev, R S; Kalenov, Iu N; Kozlov, A V; Kuznetsova, O V; Son'kin, V D

    2014-01-01

    An attempt was made to test the hypothesis that regular physical activity at the anaerobic threshold is able to stimulate an increase in the amount of body fat brown or beige, which can manifest itself in increasing lactate utilization during exercise and increase the reactivity in response to acute regional cooling. The methods used are: ramp test, regional acute cold exposure, measurement of gas exchange, lactate and glucose in the blood, heart rate, and heart rate variability, blood pressure and respiration variability at rest and during standard functional tests; infrared thermal imaging, statistical methods of results analysis. Workout 10 physically active volunteers (7 males and 3 females) on a treadmill at a speed corresponding to 75-80% of the persona VO2max for 30 minutes 3 times per week at a fixed ambient temperature 21-22°C for 6 weeks resulted in a significant (from 19 to 39%) increase in test work duration but VO2max on average changed little. The increase in power of anaerobic threshold was associated with a sharp slowdown in the accumulation of lactate in progress of ramp test. Lactate utilization rate during the recovery period, on the contrary, increased. In general, significantly increased work efficiency at a test load. Not revealed noticeable changes in the condition and response to a standard functional tests of autonomic systems, as judged by heart rate variability, blood pressure and respiration variability at rest and during orthostatic tests and imposed breathing rhythm. The functional response of the body to acute cold exposure (1 minute cooling of the feet in ice water) is not changed after a cycle of training--either in terms of metabolism (oxygen consumption, etc.), or the dynamics of the skin temperature in areas of most probable location of brown adipose tissue (BAT). These data do not confirm the previously expressed (2010) hypothesis about the function of BAT as a universal homeostatic instrument in the body. Probably, if under

  7. Dermoscopic Follow-Up of the Skin towards Acute Graft-versus-Host-Disease in Patients after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kaminska-Winciorek, Grazyna; Czerw, Tomasz; Kruzel, Tomasz; Giebel, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) involving skin is one of the most frequent complications of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT), usually diagnosed based on clinical manifestations. So far, skin biopsy with histopathological evaluation is the only method to confirm the diagnosis. Objective. In this prospective study we monitored alloHSCT recipients by dermoscopy in order to assess its utility as an alternative noninvasive tool to early diagnose acute GVHD. Methods. Thirteen consecutive patients who received alloHSCT were examined clinically and dermoscopically towards aGVHD [days 28 (±7), 56 (±7), and 100 (±7)], as well as in each patient who developed cutaneous aGVHD diagnosed according to clinical criteria (Glucksberg scale). Results. Six patients (46%) developed symptoms of cutaneous acute GVHD (grade 1, n = 3; grade 2, n = 3). Dermoscopic evaluation revealed pinkish or reddish background and well-visible, multiple thin telangiectasias. Conclusion. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the use of dermoscopy to evaluate skin involvement in the course of acute GVHD suggesting its role as a diagnostic tool in follow-up of GVHD, which can be also used before clinical symptoms occur. PMID:27446950

  8. Acute Effects of Static and Dynamic Stretching on Balance, Agility, Reaction Time and Movement Time

    PubMed Central

    Chatzopoulos, Dimitris; Galazoulas, Christos; Patikas, Dimitrios; Kotzamanidis, Christos

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the acute effects of three different stretching protocols on balance, agility, reaction time and movement time of the upper limbs. Participants were thirty one female high school athletes (age = 17.3 ± 0.5 yr.). All participants performed one of the following protocols on different days: (a) 3 min jogging followed by 7 min static stretching (SS), (b) 3 min jogging followed by 7 min dynamic stretching (DS), and (c) 3 min jogging followed by 7 min of rest (NS). After the protocols participants performed the following tests: dynamic balance, 505 agility test, reaction time (time between a sound stimulus and release of a button) and movement time (movement of the upper extremity over a 0.5 m distance). The order of stretching protocols and performance tests were counterbalanced to avoid carryover effects. Repeated measures analysis of variance revealed significant main effects for all variables except reaction time. The DS protocol compared to SS performed significantly better in balance, agility and movement time. Additionally, the DS protocol compared to NS performed significantly better in agility. According to the results of the study, a DS protocol is more appropriate than SS for activities that require balance, rapid change of running direction (agility) and movement time of the upper extremities. Key points Static stretching has a negative effect on balance and agility performance compared to dynamic stretching. There was no effect of the stretching protocols on reaction time. Dynamic stretching was more effective than static stretching for increasing movement time of the upper extremities. PMID:24790497

  9. Acute allergic skin response as a new tool to evaluate the allergenicity of whey hydrolysates in a mouse model of orally induced cow's milk allergy.

    PubMed

    van Esch, Betty C A M; Schouten, Bastiaan; Hofman, Gerard A; van Baalen, Ton; Nijkamp, Frans P; Knippels, Léon M J; Willemsen, Linette E M; Garssen, Johan

    2010-06-01

    Hypoallergenic milk formulae are used for cow's milk allergic infants and may be a good option for infants at risk. Clinical studies have shown that the protein source or the hydrolysis methodology used may influence the effectiveness in infants stressing the importance of adequate pre-clinical testing of hypoallergenic formulae in an in vivo model of orally induced cow's milk allergy. This study was undertaken to introduce a new read-out system to measure the residual allergenicity of whey hydrolysates on both the sensitization and challenge phase of orally induced cow's milk allergy in mice. Mice were sensitized orally to whey or a partial whey hydrolysate (pWH) to measure the residual sensitizing capacity. To predict the residual allergenicity of hydrolysates, whey allergic mice were challenged in the ear with pWH, extensive whey hydrolysate or an amino acid-based formula. An acute allergic skin response (ear swelling at 1 h), whey-specific serum antibodies, and local MCP-1 concentrations were measured. In contrast to whey, oral sensitization with pWH did not result in the induction of whey-specific antibodies, although a minor residual skin response to whey was observed after challenge. Skin exposure to whey hydrolysates showed a hydrolysation dependent reduction of the acute allergic skin response in whey allergic mice. In contrast to whey, skin exposure to pWH did not enhance tissue MCP-1 levels. The acute allergic skin response in mice orally sensitized to cow's milk proteins reveals a new pre-clinical tool which might provide information about the residual sensitizing capacity of hydrolysates supporting the discussion on the use of hypoallergenic formulae in high risk children. This mouse model might be a relevant model for the screening of new hypoallergenic formulae aimed to prevent or treat cow's milk allergy.

  10. Noninvasive device readouts validated by immunohistochemical analysis enable objective quantitative assessment of acute wound healing in human skin.

    PubMed

    Ud-Din, Sara; Greaves, Nicholas S; Sebastian, Anil; Baguneid, Mohamed; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2015-01-01

    Objective evaluation of cutaneous wounds through use of noninvasive devices has important implications for diagnosis, monitoring treatment efficacy, progression and may lead to development of improved theranostic treatment strategies. However, there is a lack of validation in the use of certain devices in wound repair, where objective measurements taken by noninvasive devices have been corroborated by immunohistochemical analysis. Thus, data from three acute wound-healing studies in healthy volunteers using three noninvasive objective devices were further evaluated by immunohistochemistry. One hundred ten participants had 5-mm diameter skin biopsies to their arms. Spectrophotometric intracutaneous analysis (SIAscopy), full-field laser perfusion imaging, and three-dimensional imaging provided quantitative measurements of melanin, hemoglobin, collagen, blood flow, and wound size; all of which were validated by immunohistochemistry. Full-field laser perfusion imaging showed blood flow increased to D7 and decreased by 40% to D14. SIAscopy showed that hemoglobin increased to D7 and reduced to D14. CD31 analysis corroborated this by showing a 76% increase in blood vessel density to D7 and a reduction by 14% to D14. Three-dimensional imaging showed that wound surface area reduced by 50% from day 7 to day 14. Alpha-smooth muscle Actin (Alpha-SMA) staining supported these trends by showing increased levels by 72% from D0 to D14 (corresponding to wound contraction). Collagen, measured by SIAscopy, decreased to D7 and increased to D14, which was validated by collagen III analysis. Additionally, collagen I increased by 14% from D0 to D14. SIAscopy measurements for melanin showed an increase at D7 and a slight reduction to D14, while melanogenesis increased by 46.7% from D0 to D14. These findings show the utility of noninvasive objective devices in the quantitative evaluation of wound-healing parameters in human skin as corroborated by immunohistochemistry. This may contribute

  11. [Severe drug-induced skin reactions. Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis].

    PubMed

    Mockenhaupt, M

    2014-05-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are characterized by extensive blistering of the skin and mucosa; they are considered as one disease entity with varying severity. They are rare but potentially life-threatening and accompanied by high mortality. A clear clinical diagnosis is needed to direct specific therapy, but supportive therapy remains most important. In order to identify and withdraw the inducing drug, a very detailed and thorough medication history has to be obtained. Among the highly suspected (strongly associated) agents are allopurinol, antibacterial sulfonamides, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs of the oxicam type, various anti-epileptics and nevaripine. Together they account for more than half of the cases of SJS/TEN. Although a drug is not always the cause, it is considered very like in approximately 75% of cases. Infections have also to be considered as etiologic factors. PMID:24820799

  12. Disseminated Mycobacterium abscessus Complex Infection Manifesting as Multiple Areas of Lymphadenitis and Skin Abscess in the Preclinical Stage of Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Masahiro; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Yamasaki, Kei; Orihashi, Takeshi; Hirosawa, Makoto; Ogoshi, Takaaki; Noguchi, Shingo; Nishida, Chinatsu; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Yonezawa, Akihito; Tsukada, Junichi; Mukae, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    A 37-year-old woman was admitted to a hospital due to a prolonged fever and a rash on her legs. She had systemic lymphadenitis and a skin abscess on her left leg. Pathological findings of a left leg skin biopsy revealed abscess formation with granulomatous dermatitis, Mycobacterium abscessus complex was cultured from the resected left supraclavicular lymph node, and disseminated M. abscessus complex infection was diagnosed. She was treated with combination treatment with antimicrobials and percutaneous drainage, and her clinical findings improved. Four months later, she developed acute lymphocytic leukemia. Leukemia is a risk factor for disseminated M. abscessus complex infection, even before developing leukemia.

  13. Disseminated Mycobacterium abscessus Complex Infection Manifesting as Multiple Areas of Lymphadenitis and Skin Abscess in the Preclinical Stage of Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Masahiro; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Yamasaki, Kei; Orihashi, Takeshi; Hirosawa, Makoto; Ogoshi, Takaaki; Noguchi, Shingo; Nishida, Chinatsu; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Yonezawa, Akihito; Tsukada, Junichi; Mukae, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    A 37-year-old woman was admitted to a hospital due to a prolonged fever and a rash on her legs. She had systemic lymphadenitis and a skin abscess on her left leg. Pathological findings of a left leg skin biopsy revealed abscess formation with granulomatous dermatitis, Mycobacterium abscessus complex was cultured from the resected left supraclavicular lymph node, and disseminated M. abscessus complex infection was diagnosed. She was treated with combination treatment with antimicrobials and percutaneous drainage, and her clinical findings improved. Four months later, she developed acute lymphocytic leukemia. Leukemia is a risk factor for disseminated M. abscessus complex infection, even before developing leukemia. PMID:27374685

  14. In situ identification of T lymphocyte subsets and HLA-DR expressing cells in the human skin tuberculin reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Scheynius, A; Klareskog, L; Forsum, U

    1982-01-01

    T lymphocyte subsets and HLA-DR expressing cells were studied with an immunohistochemical double staining technique in frozen sections of human skin 6, 48 and 96 hr after intradermal PPD injections. The number of lymphocytes reacting with monoclonal Leu 1 antibodies (all mature peripheral T cells) increased with time. The majority of the T lymphocytes at 48 and 96 hr reacted with Leu 3a ('helper/inducer' phenotype) antibodies and a few with Leu 2a ('suppressor/cytotoxic' phenotype) antibodies. Apposition of T lymphocytes of both subsets to HLA-DR expressing cells occurred in the dermis as well as in the epidermis. The study gives a morphological picture of the cell-mediated immune reactions in delayed type of hypersensitivity consistent with in vitro experiments on proliferative responses to soluble antigens. Images p328-a PMID:6751638

  15. Recurrent acute hemolytic transfusion reactions by antibodies against Doa antigens, not detected by cross-matching.

    PubMed

    Baumgarten, Ruben; van Gelder, Warry; van Wintershoven, Joyce; Maaskant-Van Wijk, Petra A; Beckers, Erik A M

    2006-02-01

    An 81-year-old male patient suffered from recurrent acute hemolytic transfusion reactions after transfusion with phenotyped cross-match-negative red blood cells (RBCs). Extensive posttransfusion workup eventually revealed Dombrock (a) (Do(a)) antibodies. Because commercially available cell panels do not allow for identification of anti-Do(a) and owing to the lack of Do(a) typing serum samples, selection of matched units of RBCs is dependent on negative cross-match results. In this case, selection of Do(a-) units by cross-matching failed, indicating that serologic methods were not reliable. A polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific priming assay was used to detect DOA and DOB alleles, which encode Do(a) and Do(b) antigens, respectively. The patient was confirmed to be DOB/DOB by DNA sequencing. Furthermore, the involved mismatched units in each of the three hemolytic episodes were shown to be Do(a+). In the presenting case, DNA typing appeared to be superior to serologic methods in selecting matched RBC units in the presence of anti-Do(a). PMID:16441602

  16. Detection of Onchocerca volvulus in Skin Snips by Microscopy and Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction: Implications for Monitoring and Evaluation Activities.

    PubMed

    Thiele, Elizabeth A; Cama, Vitaliano A; Lakwo, Thomson; Mekasha, Sindeaw; Abanyie, Francisca; Sleshi, Markos; Kebede, Amha; Cantey, Paul T

    2016-04-01

    Microscopic evaluation of skin biopsies is the monitoring and evaluation (M and E) method currently used by multiple onchocerciasis elimination programs in Africa. However, as repeated mass drug administration suppresses microfilarial loads, the sensitivity and programmatic utility of skin snip microscopy is expected to decrease. Using a pan-filarial real-time polymerase chain reaction with melt curve analysis (qPCR-MCA), we evaluated 1) the use of a single-step molecular assay for detecting and identifying Onchocerca volvulus microfilariae in residual skin snips and 2) the sensitivity of skin snip microscopy relative to qPCR-MCA. Skin snips were collected and examined with routine microscopy in hyperendemic regions of Uganda and Ethiopia (N= 500 each) and "residual" skin snips (tissue remaining after induced microfilarial emergence) were tested with qPCR-MCA. qPCR-MCA detected Onchocerca DNA in 223 residual snips: 139 of 147 microscopy(+) and 84 among microscopy(-) snips, suggesting overall sensitivity of microscopy was 62.3% (139/223) relative to qPCR-MCA (75.6% in Uganda and 28.6% in Ethiopia). These findings demonstrate the insufficient sensitivity of skin snip microscopy for reliable programmatic monitoring. Molecular tools such as qPCR-MCA can augment sensitivity and provide diagnostic confirmation of skin biopsies and will be useful for evaluation or validation of new onchocerciasis M and E tools. PMID:26880774

  17. Nanostructured lipid carriers-based flurbiprofen gel after topical administration: acute skin irritation, pharmacodynamics, and percutaneous absorption mechanism.

    PubMed

    Song, Aihua; Su, Zhen; Li, Sanming; Han, Fei

    2015-01-01

    In order to assess the preliminary safety and effectiveness of nanostructured lipid carriers-based flurbiprofen gel (FP NLC-gel), the acute irritation test, in vivo pharmacodynamics evaluation and pharmacokinetic study were investigated after topical application. No dropsy and erythema were observed after continuous dosing 7 d of FP NLC-gel on the rabbit skin, and the xylene-induced ear drossy could be inhibited by FP NLC-gel at different dosages. The maximum concentration of FP in rats muscle was 2.03 μg/g and 1.55 μg/g after oral and topical administration, respectively. While the peak concentration in untreated muscle after topical administration was only 0.37 μg/mL. And at any time, following topical administration the mean muscle-plasma concentration ratio Cmuscle/CPlasma was obviously higher than that following oral administration. Results indicated that FP could directly penetrate into the subcutaneous muscle tissue from the administration site. Thus, the developed FP NLC-gel could be a safe and effective vehicle for topical delivery of FP.

  18. Identification of potential biomarkers of hepatitis B-induced acute liver failure using hepatic cells derived from human skin precursors.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Robim M; Sachinidis, Agapios; De Boe, Veerle; Rogiers, Vera; Vanhaecke, Tamara; De Kock, Joery

    2015-09-01

    Besides their role in the elucidation of pathogenic processes of medical and pharmacological nature, biomarkers can also be used to document specific toxicological events. Hepatic cells generated from human skin-derived precursors (hSKP-HPC) were previously shown to be a promising in vitro tool for the evaluation of drug-induced hepatotoxicity. In this study, their capacity to identify potential liver-specific biomarkers at the gene expression level was investigated with particular emphasis on acute liver failure (ALF). To this end, a set of potential ALF-specific biomarkers was established using clinically relevant liver samples obtained from patients suffering from hepatitis B-associated ALF. Subsequently, this data was compared to data obtained from primary human hepatocyte cultures and hSKP-HPC, both exposed to the ALF-inducing reference compound acetaminophen. It was found that both in vitro systems revealed a set of molecules that was previously identified in the ALF liver samples. Yet, only a limited number of molecules was common between both in vitro systems and the ALF liver samples. Each of the in vitro systems could be used independently to identify potential toxicity biomarkers related to ALF. It seems therefore more appropriate to combine primary human hepatocyte cultures with complementary in vitro models to efficiently screen out potential hepatotoxic compounds.

  19. Skin - clammy

    MedlinePlus

    ... of clammy skin include: Anxiety attack Heart attack Heat exhaustion Internal bleeding Low blood oxygen levels Sepsis (body-wide infection) Severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) Severe pain Shock (low blood pressure)

  20. Assessment of local skin reactions with a sequential regimen of cryosurgery followed by ingenol mebutate gel, 0.015%, in patients with actinic keratosis.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, Gary; Berman, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Lesion-directed and field-directed therapies are used to treat actinic keratosis (AK). Therapeutic approaches that combine both types of therapies may improve the successful elimination of AKs. A randomized, double-blind, vehicle-controlled study evaluated the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of topical field treatment with ingenol mebutate gel, 0.015%, after cryosurgery to AKs on the face and scalp. Patients with 4-8 visible discrete AKs in a 25-cm(2) contiguous area received cryosurgery of all AKs at baseline. After a 3-week healing period, patients applied ingenol mebutate gel, 0.015%, or vehicle gel once daily for 3 consecutive days to the treatment area. The incidence, severity, and time course of the development and resolution of local skin reactions were measured from baseline to week 11. Local skin reactions peaked shortly after completion of ingenol mebutate treatment and generally resolved within 2 weeks. The mean (95% confidence interval) composite score (maximum range, 0-24) for these reactions was higher in patients with treatment of AKs on the face, 9.3 (8.5-10.1), as compared with the scalp, 5.8 (4.3-7.4). Erythema and flaking/scaling were the major contributors to the composite local skin reaction score. These results show that local skin reactions associated with ingenol mebutate treatment of the face or scalp are well tolerated after recent cryosurgery. PMID:25565875

  1. Assessment of local skin reactions with a sequential regimen of cryosurgery followed by ingenol mebutate gel, 0.015%, in patients with actinic keratosis

    PubMed Central

    Goldenberg, Gary; Berman, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Lesion-directed and field-directed therapies are used to treat actinic keratosis (AK). Therapeutic approaches that combine both types of therapies may improve the successful elimination of AKs. A randomized, double-blind, vehicle-controlled study evaluated the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of topical field treatment with ingenol mebutate gel, 0.015%, after cryosurgery to AKs on the face and scalp. Patients with 4–8 visible discrete AKs in a 25-cm2 contiguous area received cryosurgery of all AKs at baseline. After a 3-week healing period, patients applied ingenol mebutate gel, 0.015%, or vehicle gel once daily for 3 consecutive days to the treatment area. The incidence, severity, and time course of the development and resolution of local skin reactions were measured from baseline to week 11. Local skin reactions peaked shortly after completion of ingenol mebutate treatment and generally resolved within 2 weeks. The mean (95% confidence interval) composite score (maximum range, 0–24) for these reactions was higher in patients with treatment of AKs on the face, 9.3 (8.5–10.1), as compared with the scalp, 5.8 (4.3–7.4). Erythema and flaking/scaling were the major contributors to the composite local skin reaction score. These results show that local skin reactions associated with ingenol mebutate treatment of the face or scalp are well tolerated after recent cryosurgery. PMID:25565875

  2. Serum sickness reaction with skin involvement induced by bee venom injection therapy

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hyun-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Bee venom injection therapy is an alternative treatment sometimes used for chronic inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis, to reduce pain. Several chemical components of bee venom have anti-inflammatory effects, and apitoxin, one of the mixed components, has been used for pain prevention therapy. However, there have been no large-scale investigations regarding the efficacy or side effects or apitoxin. In this study, a case of serum sickness reaction that developed after receiving bee venom injection therapy is reported. PMID:26539406

  3. Acute toxicity and early cosmetic outcome in patients treated with multilumen balloon brachytherapy with skin spacing ≤ 7.0 millimeters

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kiwhoon; Quillo, Amy; Dillon, Dustin; Sowards, Keith; Hatmaker, Allison

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To review institutional experience treating patients who underwent breast conserving surgery and adjuvant accelerated partial breast irradiation with multilumen balloon brachytherapy (MLB) with close skin spacing (≤7 mm). Material and methods Since July 2009, 26 patients with skin spacing ≤ 7.0 mm were treated with breast-conserving therapy and adjuvant MLB brachytherapy. Patients were treated with either the Contura or MammoSite ML catheter to a total dose of 34 Gy in 10 fractions. Patients were assessed for acute toxicity at the completion of treatment and 1-month post treatment. Cosmesis and late toxicity were assessed at three-month intervals thereafter. Results The median age of the patients was 56 years and median follow-up was 9 months. Sixteen patients had skin spacing of 5.0–7.0 mm, 10 with < 5.0 mm (median 5.8). The median percentage of the target (PTV_EVAL) receiving ≥ 95% of the prescription dose was 95.6%. The median volume of PTV_EVAL receiving ≥ 200% of the prescription dose was 6.1 cc. The maximum skin dose was 118.2% (median). The most commonly observed acute toxicity was grade 1-2 dermatitis (65.4%). The rate of post-treatment seroma and infection was 38.5% and 3.8%, respectively. Excellent/good cosmetic outcomes seen at the time of last follow-up was 92.3%. Conclusions MLB brachytherapy is safe and feasible in patients with close skin spacing, with acute toxicity and early cosmesis similar to other published series. These devices may broaden the application of balloon brachytherapy in patients previously excluded from this treatment based on anatomy. PMID:23346134

  4. Decreased reaction time variability is associated with greater cardiovascular responses to acute stress.

    PubMed

    Wawrzyniak, Andrew J; Hamer, Mark; Steptoe, Andrew; Endrighi, Romano

    2016-05-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) responses to mental stress are prospectively associated with poor CV outcomes. The association between CV responses to mental stress and reaction times (RTs) in aging individuals may be important but warrants further investigation. The present study assessed RTs to examine associations with CV responses to mental stress in healthy, older individuals using robust regression techniques. Participants were 262 men and women (mean age = 63.3 ± 5.5 years) from the Whitehall II cohort who completed a RT task (Stroop) and underwent acute mental stress (mirror tracing) to elicit CV responses. Blood pressure, heart rate, and heart rate variability were measured at baseline, during acute stress, and through a 75-min recovery. RT measures were generated from an ex-Gaussian distribution that yielded three predictors: mu-RT, sigma-RT, and tau-RT, the mean, standard deviation, and mean of the exponential component of the normal distribution, respectively. Decreased intraindividual RT variability was marginally associated with greater systolic (B = -.009, SE = .005, p = .09) and diastolic (B = -.004, SE = .002, p = .08) blood pressure reactivity. Decreased intraindividual RT variability was associated with impaired systolic blood pressure recovery (B = -.007, SE = .003, p = .03) and impaired vagal tone (B = -.0047, SE = .0024, p = .045). Study findings offer tentative support for an association between RTs and CV responses. Despite small effect sizes and associations not consistent across predictors, these data may point to a link between intrinsic neuronal plasticity and CV responses. PMID:26894967

  5. Cortisol Awakening Response Prospectively Predicts Peritraumatic and Acute Stress Reactions in Police Officers

    PubMed Central

    Inslicht, Sabra S.; Otte, Christian; McCaslin, Shannon E.; Apfel, Brigitte A.; Henn-Haase, Clare; Metzler, Thomas; Yehuda, Rachel; Neylan, Thomas C.; Marmar, Charles R.

    2011-01-01

    Background The hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis is a major stress response system hypothesized to be involved in the pathogenesis of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, few studies have prospectively examined the relationships among pre-exposure HPA activity, acute stress reactions and PTSD symptoms. Methods Two hundred and ninety-six police recruits were assessed during academy training prior to duty-related critical incident exposure and provided salivary cortisol at first awakening and after 30 minutes. A measure of cortisol awakening response (CAR) was computed as the change in cortisol level from the first to the second collection. At 12, 24, and 36 months following the start of active police service, officers were assessed for peritraumatic distress, peritraumatic dissociation, ASD symptoms, and PTSD symptoms to their self-identified worst duty-related critical incident. Mixed models for repeated measures were used to analyze the effects of CAR on the outcome variables pooled across the three follow-up assessments. Results Mixed model analyses indicated that after controlling for time of awakening, first awakening cortisol levels, and cumulative critical incident stress exposure, CAR during academy training was associated with greater peritraumatic dissociation, β=.14, z=3.49, p<.0001, and greater acute stress disorder (ASD) symptoms during police service assessed at 12, 24, and 36 months, β=.09, z=2.03, p<.05, but not with peritraumatic distress β=.03, z=.81, p=.42 or PTSD symptoms β=−.004, z=−.09, p=.93. Conclusions These findings suggest that greater cortisol response to awakening is a pre-exposure risk factor for peritraumatic dissociation and ASD symptoms during police service. PMID:21906725

  6. [Bleeding gastric ulcers and acute hepatitis: 2 simultaneous adverse reactions due to nimesulide in a case].

    PubMed

    Tejos, S; Torrejón, N; Reyes, H; Meneses, M

    2000-12-01

    A 66 year-old obese woman with arthrosis, self-medicated with oral nimesulide, 200 mg daily. After 6 weeks she developed nausea, jaundice and dark urine. Two weeks later she had recurrent hematemesis and was hospitalized. Besides obesity and anemia her physical examination was unremarkable. An upper GI endoscopy revealed 3 acute gastric ulcers and a 4th one in the pyloric channel. Abdominal ultrasonogram showed a slightly enlarged liver with diffuse reduction in ecogenicity; the gallbladder and biliary tract were normal. Blood tests demonstrated a conjugated hyperbilirubinemia (maximal total value: 18.4 mg/dl), ALAT 960 U/l, ASAT 850 U/l, GGT 420 U/l, alkaline phosphatases mildly elevated, pro-time 49% and albumin 2.7 mg/dl. Serum markers for hepatitis A, B and C viruses were negative. ANA, AMA, anti-SmA, were negative. Ceruloplasmin was normal. A liver biopsy showed bridging necrosis and other signs of acute toxic liver damage. Gastric ulcers healed after conventional treatment and hepatitis subsided after 2 months leaving no signs of chronic liver damage. The diagnosis of toxic hepatitis due to nimesulide was supported by the time-course of drug usage, sex, age, absence of other causes of liver disease, a compatible liver biopsy and the improvement after drug withdrawal. Peptic ulcers or toxic hepatitis have been previously described as independent adverse reactions in patients taking nimesulide or other NSAIDs but their simultaneous occurrence in a single patient is a unique event that deserves to be reported.

  7. Decreased reaction time variability is associated with greater cardiovascular responses to acute stress

    PubMed Central

    Hamer, Mark; Steptoe, Andrew; Endrighi, Romano

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular (CV) responses to mental stress are prospectively associated with poor CV outcomes. The association between CV responses to mental stress and reaction times (RTs) in aging individuals may be important but warrants further investigation. The present study assessed RTs to examine associations with CV responses to mental stress in healthy, older individuals using robust regression techniques. Participants were 262 men and women (mean age = 63.3 ± 5.5 years) from the Whitehall II cohort who completed a RT task (Stroop) and underwent acute mental stress (mirror tracing) to elicit CV responses. Blood pressure, heart rate, and heart rate variability were measured at baseline, during acute stress, and through a 75‐min recovery. RT measures were generated from an ex‐Gaussian distribution that yielded three predictors: mu‐RT, sigma‐RT, and tau‐RT, the mean, standard deviation, and mean of the exponential component of the normal distribution, respectively. Decreased intraindividual RT variability was marginally associated with greater systolic (B = −.009, SE = .005, p = .09) and diastolic (B = −.004, SE = .002, p = .08) blood pressure reactivity. Decreased intraindividual RT variability was associated with impaired systolic blood pressure recovery (B = −.007, SE = .003, p = .03) and impaired vagal tone (B = −.0047, SE = .0024, p = .045). Study findings offer tentative support for an association between RTs and CV responses. Despite small effect sizes and associations not consistent across predictors, these data may point to a link between intrinsic neuronal plasticity and CV responses. PMID:26894967

  8. Decreased reaction time variability is associated with greater cardiovascular responses to acute stress.

    PubMed

    Wawrzyniak, Andrew J; Hamer, Mark; Steptoe, Andrew; Endrighi, Romano

    2016-05-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) responses to mental stress are prospectively associated with poor CV outcomes. The association between CV responses to mental stress and reaction times (RTs) in aging individuals may be important but warrants further investigation. The present study assessed RTs to examine associations with CV responses to mental stress in healthy, older individuals using robust regression techniques. Participants were 262 men and women (mean age = 63.3 ± 5.5 years) from the Whitehall II cohort who completed a RT task (Stroop) and underwent acute mental stress (mirror tracing) to elicit CV responses. Blood pressure, heart rate, and heart rate variability were measured at baseline, during acute stress, and through a 75-min recovery. RT measures were generated from an ex-Gaussian distribution that yielded three predictors: mu-RT, sigma-RT, and tau-RT, the mean, standard deviation, and mean of the exponential component of the normal distribution, respectively. Decreased intraindividual RT variability was marginally associated with greater systolic (B = -.009, SE = .005, p = .09) and diastolic (B = -.004, SE = .002, p = .08) blood pressure reactivity. Decreased intraindividual RT variability was associated with impaired systolic blood pressure recovery (B = -.007, SE = .003, p = .03) and impaired vagal tone (B = -.0047, SE = .0024, p = .045). Study findings offer tentative support for an association between RTs and CV responses. Despite small effect sizes and associations not consistent across predictors, these data may point to a link between intrinsic neuronal plasticity and CV responses.

  9. A quantitative analysis of Propionibacterium acnes in lesional and non-lesional skin of patients with progressive macular hypomelanosis by real-time polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    de Morais Cavalcanti, Silvana Maria; de França, Emmanuel Rodrigues; Magalhães, Marcelo; Lins, Ana Kelly; Brandão, Laura Costa; Magalhães, Vera

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the etiology of progressive macular hypomelanosis, although it has been suggested that Propionibacterium acnes plays an important role. While microbiological culture is commonly employed to identify Propionibacterium acnes, new identification methods have been under investigation, amongst them polymerase chain reaction. To determine the cut-off point for the number of genome copies of Propionibacterium acnes in the lesional skin of patients with progressive macular hypomelanosis as a positive marker, employing quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and anaerobic culture, considered gold standard. An observational study with a comparison group, included 35 patients with dermatosis, attended at the Oswaldo Cruz University Hospital, Pernambuco, Brazil, between March and May 2008. Lesional skin was compared to non-lesional skin through positive testing with real-time polymerase chain reaction and culture. The Statistical Package for Social Sciences, version 12.0, was employed for the association analysis with the McNemar test, and the cut-off point with the ROC curve for maximum values. Propionibacterium acnes was most frequently encountered in lesional areas (p<0,025). The cut-off point of Propionibacterium acnes in lesional skin was 1,333 genome copies, with a sensitivity of 87,9% and a specificity of 100,0%. Since Propionibacterium acnes is a saprophyte, identifying the cut-off point may assist in determining its positivity in lesional skin in patients suffering with this dermatosis. PMID:24031649

  10. Epicoccum allergy: skin reaction patterns and spore/mycelium disparities recognized by IgG and IgE ELISA inhibition.

    PubMed

    Portnoy, J; Chapman, J; Burge, H; Muilenberg, M; Solomon, W

    1987-07-01

    Comparable degrees of skin reactivity were observed towards spore and mycelium extracts from two isolates of Epicoccum and to one preparation of Alternaria in 35 rural and 120 university patients. The best experimental extracts detected Epicoccum sensitivity in 70% of the group tested while the commercial extract detected sensitivity in only 6%. Skin reaction correlations were greatest within isolates (eg, spore-A/mycelium-A), then for specific fungus parts (eg, spore-A/spore-B), then between isolates and parts (spore-A/mycelium-B). High correlations were found between individual IgG and IgE ELISA values for all antigens using serum from Epicoccum skin-reactive patients. ELISA inhibition results suggested that significant cross-reactivity exists between Epicoccum and Alternaria antigens recognized by IgG but not by IgE. ELISA inhibition cross-reaction patterns among Epicoccum antigens were comparable to skin reactions while IgG patterns showed little variability. Further characterization of spore/mycelium and interstrain recognition patterns among different immunoglobulin isotypes will be necessary before complete standardization of extracts from different parts of fungi will be possible. The use of spore material for skin testing and treatment of Epicoccum sensitivity appears to be both premature and unnecessary at this time. PMID:3605796

  11. Successful removal of hyperkeratotic-lichenoid reaction to red ink tattoo with preservation of the whole tattoo using a skin grafting knife.

    PubMed

    Mlakar, Boštjan

    2015-01-01

    With the increasing popularity of tattoo body decorations, reports of medical complications with tattoos have increased in parallel. Although tattoo reactions can resolve spontaneously, they often last for months or even years, despite the various treatment methods. In our case, we present the successful removal of hyperkeratotic-lichenoid reaction to red ink using a simple and cheap skin grafting knife. The entire tattoo was preserved with a good aesthetic result with minimal scarring. PMID:26697733

  12. Structure-activity relationship of a series of 17 parabens and related compounds for histamine release in rat peritoneal mast cells and skin allergic reaction in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Uramaru, Naoto; Inoue, Toshio; Watanabe, Yoko; Shigematsu, Hidenari; Ohta, Shigeru; Kitamura, Shigeyuki

    2014-02-01

    Parabens, which are a homologous series of esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid, have been used as preservatives in cosmetics, medicines and foods because of their antimicrobial activity. However, parabens in cosmetics have been suspected to cause allergic contact dermatitis. In this study, we examined paraben-induced histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells and skin reaction in guinea pigs using a series of 17 parabens with different alcohol side chains, ranging from methylparaben to dodecylparaben. Octylparaben showed the greatest histamine release-inducing activity from mast cells, and the activity was decreased in shorter- and longer-side-chain parabens. Octyl benzoate, octyl o-hydroxybenzoate and phenyloctane caused no significant degranulation of mast cells, whereas octyl m-hydroxybenzoate, octyl p-hydroxybenzoate and octyl phenol induced concentration-related degranulation. Metabolites of these parabens (p-hydroxybenzoic acid and alcohols) did not show histamine release-inducing activity. In the guinea pig skin reaction test, heptylparaben induced a typical strong skin reaction, while butylparaben induced a typical weak skin reaction, and methylparaben and dodecylparaben were inactive. Metabolites of parabens (p-hydroxybenzoic acid and alcohols) were also inactive. These results indicate that interaction of parabens with rat mast cells requires a minimum length and adequate lipophilicity of the alkyl side chain. Since metabolites of parabens were inactive, parabens appear to be direct-acting allergens.

  13. Multiplex nested reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction for respiratory viruses in acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Toshio; Monobe, Hiroko; Nomura, Yuka; Shinogami, Masanobu; Yano, Jun

    2003-03-01

    Because respiratory viruses play an important role in the causation and pathogenesis of acute otitis media (AOM), determining which virus has infected a child is important with respect to vaccines and antiviral drugs. In some instances, this information might be used to prevent the occurrence of AOM. We used a rapid, economical, and sensitive diagnostic system involving a multiplex nested reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay to detect various respiratory viruses in clinical specimens of middle ear fluid (MEF) from children with AOM in our hospital. Multiplex RT-PCR was completed on 40 MEF samples from 28 infants and children less than 6 years old with AOM. Viral RNA was detected in 17 MEF samples (43%). Respiratory syncytial virus type A was present in 12 samples, adenovirus in 3, rhinovirus in 2, and influenza A (H3N2) in 1. The multiplex RT-PCR assay is recommended to clinical laboratories that are considering adoption of a molecular technique for viral diagnosis.

  14. Effects of olive leaf extract and its main component oleuroepin on acute ultraviolet B irradiation-induced skin changes in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Sumiyoshi, Maho; Kimura, Yoshiyuki

    2010-07-01

    Olive (Olea europaea L.) leaves have long been used in folk medicine and herbal tea in Europe and the Mediterranean area. The Mediterranean climate is characterized by high temperatures, and by strong ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation causing the skin to age, increasing wrinkling, pigmentation and skin thickness. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of an olive leaf extract and its component oleuropein on skin damage caused by acute UVB irradiation in C57BL/6J mice. The extract (300 or 1000 mg/kg) and oleuropein (25 or 85 mg/kg) were administered orally twice daily for 14 days. UVB was administered daily at a dose of 120 mJ/cm(2) for the first 5 days and then every other day for 9 days. Both treatments inhibited the increases in skin thickness induced by radiation. They also inhibited increases in the Ki-67- and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine-positive cell numbers, melanin granule area and matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) expression. These preventive effects on UVB-induced skin damage might be caused in part by inhibiting the degradation of extracellular matrixes in the corium, and by the proliferation of epidermal cells through the inhibition of increases in MMP-13 levels and reactive oxygen species induced by irradiation. PMID:19957248

  15. Pattern Analysis of Acute Mucosal Reactions in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer Treated With Conventional and Accelerated Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wygoda, Andrzej Maciejewski, Boguslaw; Skladowski, Krzysztof; Hutnik, Marcin; Pilecki, Boleslaw; Golen, Maria; Rutkowski, Tomasz

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate severity of acute mucosal reactions (AMR) caused by conventional (CF) and accelerated fractionation (AF) regimens using a modified Dische system and to analyze differences in incidence and severity of AMR according to frequency and regularity of scoring. Methods and Materials: Sixty-six consecutive patients (33 CF, 33 AF) with head and neck cancer irradiated with 5 fractions in 5 days per week (CF) or with 7 fractions in 7 days (AF) to a total dose of 70 Gy. A modified Dische system was used for daily quantitation of AMR during radiotherapy until complete healing. Results: Confluent mucositis (CM) was noted in 79% of patients in the CF group and 85% in the AF group. In 24% of the CF group and 18% of the AF group the CM presented a wave-like pattern. In 55% of CF and 67% of AF a classic triphasic pattern was noted. In 12 patients acute reactions did not transgress the level of spotted mucositis. The present study clearly shows that quantitation of the incidence and severity of acute mucosal effects strongly depends on frequent and regular scoring. A significant difference in the incidence of CM between the CF and AF groups was noted, mainly in weeks 4-6 of irradiation. When once-weekly irregular instead of daily scoring was evaluated, the incidence of CM was underestimated by approximately 20-36%. Conclusions: Acute mucosal reactions occur as a complex of morphologic and functional disorders with individual intensity, even among patients treated with the same fractionation regimen. In some cases they present a 'wave-like' pattern during irradiation. Therefore, precise quantitation of acute effects requires regular and frequent scoring.

  16. The utility of polymerase chain reaction for diagnosis of lumpy skin disease in cattle and water buffaloes in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Sharawi, S S A; Abd El-Rahim, I H A

    2011-12-01

    An outbreak of lumpy skin disease (LSD) occurred among cattle and water buffaloes in Egypt in 2006. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the agar gel precipitation test (AGPT) were compared. Eight of ten (80%) tissue specimens from diseased cattle were positive with AGPT while 100% were positive with PCR. Of ten tissue specimens from diseased water buffaloes, 70% were positive with AGPT while 100% were positive with PCR. Ten milk samples were obtained from diseased water buffaloes; PCR detected nucleic acid of LSD virus (LSDV) in 50% while AGPT failed to detect LSDV antigen. Water buffaloes are susceptible to LSDV infection. The clinical signs of LSD were less severe in water buffaloes, but the virus was excreted in their milk. Diagnosis of LSD outbreaks by PCR will facilitate rapid application of control measures. Mass vaccination should be applied in both cattle and water buffaloes in Egypt using an effective specific vaccine against LSD, such as the attenuated Neethling strain vaccine or a recombinant vaccine.

  17. Tuberculin Skin-Test Reactions Are Unaffected by the Severity of Hyperendemic Intestinal Helminth Infections and Co-Infections

    PubMed Central

    Zevallos, Karine; Vergara, Katherine C.; Vergara, Antonio; Vidal, Carlos; Garcia, Hector H.; Evans, Carlton A.

    2010-01-01

    The tuberculin skin test (TST) quantifies cell-mediated immunity to tuberculosis antigens. Helminths suppress cell-mediated immunity, so we studied the effect of helminth infection and deworming on the TST in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in an indigenous Amazon community (N = 195). Stool microscopy diagnosed helminths in 98% and co-infection with multiple species in 24% of study subjects. The TST was positive (≥ 10 mm) for 49%, and responses increased with age (P < 0.001), Bacille Calmette Guerin (BCG) vaccination (P = 0.01), and tuberculosis contact (P = 0.05). TST results had no association with helminth-egg concentrations, species, or co-infections (all P > 0.1). One month after deworming with albendazole (three daily 400-mg doses), helminths were reduced, but 63% remained infected with helminths. Albendazole did not cause a change in TST size (P = 0.8) or positivity (P = 0.9) relative to placebo. Thus, TST reactions were unaffected by albendazole therapy that partially cured intestinal helminth infections, and TST interpretation was unaffected by high-burden helminth infections and co-infection with multiple helminth species. PMID:20682875

  18. Suppression of skin inflammation in keratinocytes and acute/chronic disease models by caffeic acid phenethyl ester.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kyung-Min; Bae, SeungJin; Koo, Jung Eun; Kim, Eun-Sun; Bae, Ok-Nam; Lee, Joo Young

    2015-04-01

    Skin inflammation plays a central role in the pathophysiology and symptoms of diverse chronic skin diseases including atopic dermatitis (AD). In this study, we examined if caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), a skin-permeable bioactive compound from propolis, was protective against skin inflammation using in vitro cell system and in vivo animal disease models. CAPE suppressed TNF-α-induced NF-κB activation and expression of inflammatory cytokines in human keratinocytes (HaCaT). The potency and efficacy of CAPE were superior to those of a non-phenethyl derivative, caffeic acid. Consistently, topical treatment of CAPE (0.5 %) attenuated 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate(TPA)-induced skin inflammation on mouse ear as CAPE reduced ear swelling and histologic inflammation scores. CAPE suppressed increased expression of pro-inflammatory molecules such as TNF-α, cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible NO synthase in TPA-stimulated skin. TPA-induced phosphorylation of IκB and ERK was blocked by CAPE suggesting that protective effects of CAPE on skin inflammation is attributed to inhibition of NF-κB activation. Most importantly, in an oxazolone-induced chronic dermatitis model, topical application of CAPE (0.5 and 1 %) was effective in alleviating AD-like symptoms such as increases of trans-epidermal water loss, skin thickening and serum IgE as well as histologic inflammation assessment. Collectively, our results propose CAPE as a promising candidate for a novel topical drug for skin inflammatory diseases.

  19. Suppression of skin inflammation in keratinocytes and acute/chronic disease models by caffeic acid phenethyl ester.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kyung-Min; Bae, SeungJin; Koo, Jung Eun; Kim, Eun-Sun; Bae, Ok-Nam; Lee, Joo Young

    2015-04-01

    Skin inflammation plays a central role in the pathophysiology and symptoms of diverse chronic skin diseases including atopic dermatitis (AD). In this study, we examined if caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), a skin-permeable bioactive compound from propolis, was protective against skin inflammation using in vitro cell system and in vivo animal disease models. CAPE suppressed TNF-α-induced NF-κB activation and expression of inflammatory cytokines in human keratinocytes (HaCaT). The potency and efficacy of CAPE were superior to those of a non-phenethyl derivative, caffeic acid. Consistently, topical treatment of CAPE (0.5 %) attenuated 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate(TPA)-induced skin inflammation on mouse ear as CAPE reduced ear swelling and histologic inflammation scores. CAPE suppressed increased expression of pro-inflammatory molecules such as TNF-α, cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible NO synthase in TPA-stimulated skin. TPA-induced phosphorylation of IκB and ERK was blocked by CAPE suggesting that protective effects of CAPE on skin inflammation is attributed to inhibition of NF-κB activation. Most importantly, in an oxazolone-induced chronic dermatitis model, topical application of CAPE (0.5 and 1 %) was effective in alleviating AD-like symptoms such as increases of trans-epidermal water loss, skin thickening and serum IgE as well as histologic inflammation assessment. Collectively, our results propose CAPE as a promising candidate for a novel topical drug for skin inflammatory diseases. PMID:25501505

  20. Pharmacovigilance program to monitor adverse reactions of recombinant streptokinase in acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Betancourt, Blas Y; Marrero-Miragaya, María A; Jiménez-López, Giset; Valenzuela-Silva, Carmen; García-Iglesias, Elizeth; Hernández-Bernal, Francisco; Debesa-García, Francisco; González-López, Tania; Alvarez-Falcón, Leovaldo; López-Saura, Pedro A

    2005-01-01

    Background Streptokinase (SK) is an effective fibrinolytic agent for the treatment of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The objective of the present study was to assess the adverse drug reactions (ADRs) associated with intravenous recombinant SK in patients with AMI in routine clinical practice. Methods A national, prospective and spontaneous reporting-based pharmacovigilance program was conducted in Cuba. Patient demographics, suspected ADR description, elements to define causality, and outcomes were documented and analyzed. Results A total of 1496 suspected ADRs identified in 792 patients out of the 1660 (47.7 %) prescriptions reported in the program, were received from July 1995 to July 2002. Most of the patients (71.3%) were male, 67.2% were white and mean age was 61.6 ± 13.0 years. The mean time interval between the onset of symptoms and the start of the SK infusion was 4.9 ± 3.7 h. The most frequently reported ADRs were hypotension, arrhythmias, chills, tremors, vomiting, nauseas, allergy, bleeding and fever. ADR severity was 38% mild, 38% moderate, 10% severe, and 4% very severe. Only 3 patients with hemorrhagic stroke were reported. Seventy-two patients died in-hospital mainly because of cardiac causes associated with the patient's underlying clinical condition. Mortality was 3 times more likely in patients suffering arrhythmias than in those without this event (odds ratio 3.1, 95% CI: 1.8 to 5.1). Most of the reported ADRs were classified as possibly or probably associated with the study medication. Conclusion Recombinant SK was associated with a similar post-marketing safety profile to those suggested in previous clinical trials. PMID:16262910

  1. Parameters of immunity acute phase reaction in men in relation to exposure duration to mercury vapours.

    PubMed

    Moszczynski, P; Moszczynski, P; Słowinski, S; Bem, S; Bartus, R

    1991-01-01

    The study was carried out in 89 men aged 21 to 57 years with a history of exposure to mercury vapour from 2 to 26 years during occupational work involving chlorine production by the method of mercury electrolysis. The workers were divided into three groups depending on the duration of occupational exposure: 1) 32 workers with a short history of exposure 2-10 years, 2) 37 workers with medium-long exposure - 11-20 years, and 3) 20 workers with a history of long exposure - 21-26 years. The urinary concentrations of mercury in these individuals was 73 +/- 60 microliters x 1(-1), and in blood this concentration was not exceeding 50 microliters x 1(-1). The control group comprised 40 men aged 17 to 52 years. They had not had any occupational exposure to chemicals, or harmful physical factors. On the basis of clinical, haematological and biochemical studies 89 workers with occupational exposure to mercury vapour were regarded as clinically healthy. None of them had any symptoms and signs of the complete neurasthenic syndrome or organic brain injury. Increased nervous excitability was the complaint of 24 workers, 9 had headaches, sleep disturbances were reported by 5, and a feeling of tiredness and apathy was mentioned by 5 men. EEG recording demonstrated 81 normal tracings, and moderately pathological records in 8 men. The parameters of immunity and proteins acute phase reaction were determined, measuring the concentration of immunoglobulins, lysozyme, C3c, C4, alpha 1-acid glycoprotein, haptoglobin and ceruloplasmin in serum. A lower level of IgA, IgG and lysozyme was only noted in individuals with occupational exposure exceeding 20 years.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1725175

  2. Parameters of immunity acute phase reaction in men in relation to exposure duration to mercury vapours.

    PubMed

    Moszczynski, P; Moszczynski, P; Słowinski, S; Bem, S; Bartus, R

    1991-01-01

    The study was carried out in 89 men aged 21 to 57 years with a history of exposure to mercury vapour from 2 to 26 years during occupational work involving chlorine production by the method of mercury electrolysis. The workers were divided into three groups depending on the duration of occupational exposure: 1) 32 workers with a short history of exposure 2-10 years, 2) 37 workers with medium-long exposure - 11-20 years, and 3) 20 workers with a history of long exposure - 21-26 years. The urinary concentrations of mercury in these individuals was 73 +/- 60 microliters x 1(-1), and in blood this concentration was not exceeding 50 microliters x 1(-1). The control group comprised 40 men aged 17 to 52 years. They had not had any occupational exposure to chemicals, or harmful physical factors. On the basis of clinical, haematological and biochemical studies 89 workers with occupational exposure to mercury vapour were regarded as clinically healthy. None of them had any symptoms and signs of the complete neurasthenic syndrome or organic brain injury. Increased nervous excitability was the complaint of 24 workers, 9 had headaches, sleep disturbances were reported by 5, and a feeling of tiredness and apathy was mentioned by 5 men. EEG recording demonstrated 81 normal tracings, and moderately pathological records in 8 men. The parameters of immunity and proteins acute phase reaction were determined, measuring the concentration of immunoglobulins, lysozyme, C3c, C4, alpha 1-acid glycoprotein, haptoglobin and ceruloplasmin in serum. A lower level of IgA, IgG and lysozyme was only noted in individuals with occupational exposure exceeding 20 years.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Is the Posner Reaction Time Test More Accurate Than Clinical Tests in Detecting Left Neglect in Acute and Chronic Stroke?

    PubMed Central

    Rengachary, Jennifer; d'Avossa, Giovanni; Sapir, Ayelet; Shulman, Gordon L.; Corbetta, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the accuracy of common clinical tests for left neglect with that of a computerized reaction time Posner test in a stroke population. Design Neglect measures were collected longitudinally in stroke patients at the acute (≈2wk) and chronic (≈9mo) stage. Identical measures were collected in a healthy control group. Setting Inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation. Participants Acute stroke patients (n=59) with left neglect, 30 of whom were tested longitudinally; healthy age-matched controls (n=30). Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures A receiver operating characteristic analysis, ranking the measures' sensitivity and specificity using a single summary statistic. Results Most clinical tests were adequately accurate at the acute stage, but many were near chance at the chronic stage. The Posner test was the most sensitive test at both stages, the most sensitive variable being the reaction time difference for detecting targets appearing on the left compared to the right side. Conclusions Computerized reaction time tests can be used to screen for subtle but potentially clinically relevant left neglect, which may not be detectable by conventional clinical tests, especially at the chronic stage. Such tests may be useful to assess the severity of the patients' deficits and provide more accurate measures of the degree of recovery in clinical trials than established clinical measures. PMID:19969172

  4. Optical diagnostics of vascular reactions triggered by weak allergens using laser speckle-contrast imaging technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, Yu L; Kalchenko, V V; Astaf'eva, N G; Meglinski, I V

    2014-08-31

    The capability of using the laser speckle contrast imaging technique with a long exposure time for visualisation of primary acute skin vascular reactions caused by a topical application of a weak contact allergen is considered. The method is shown to provide efficient and accurate detection of irritant-induced primary acute vascular reactions of skin. The presented technique possesses a high potential in everyday diagnostic practice, preclinical studies, as well as in the prognosis of skin reactions to the interaction with potentially allergenic materials. (laser biophotonics)

  5. Preventing the acute skin side effects in patients treated with radiotherapy for breast cancer: the use of corneometry in order to evaluate the protective effect of moisturizing creams

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose The purpose of this study was to add, to the objective evaluation, an instrumental assessment of the skin damage induced by radiation therapy. Materials and methods A group of 100 patients affected by breast cancer was recruited in the study over one year. Patients were divided into five groups of 20 patients. For each group it was prescribed a different topical treatment. The following products were used: Betaglucan, sodium hyaluronate (Neoviderm®), Vitis vinifera A. s-I-M.t-O.dij (Ixoderm®), Alga Atlantica plus Ethylbisiminomethylguaicolo and Manganese Cloruro (Radioskin1®) and Metal Esculetina plus Ginko Biloba and Aloe vera (Radioskin 2®); Natural triglycerides-fitosterols (Xderit®); Selectiose plus thermal water of Avene (Trixera+®). All hydrating creams were applied twice a day starting 15 days before and one month after treatment with radiations. Before and during treatment patients underwent weekly skin assessments and corneometry to evaluate the symptoms related to skin toxicity and state of hydration. Evaluation of acute cutaneous toxicity was defined according to the RTOG scale. Results All patients completed radiotherapy; 72% of patients presented a G1 cutaneous toxicity, 18% developed a G2 cutaneous toxicity, 10% developed a G3 toxicity, no one presented G4 toxicity. The corneometry study confirmed the protective role of effective creams used in radiation therapy of breast cancer and showed its usefulness to identify radiation-induced dermatitis in a very early stage. Conclusions The preventive use of topic products reduces the incidence of skin side effects in patients treated with radiotherapy for breast cancer. An instrumental evaluation of skin hydration can help the radiation oncologist to use strategies that prevent the onset of toxicity of high degree. All moisturizing creams used in this study were equally valid in the treatment of skin damage induced by radiotherapy. PMID:23497676

  6. Impact of acute Cd²⁺ exposure on the antioxidant defence systems in the skin and red blood cells of common carp (Cyprinus carpio).

    PubMed

    Ferencz, Ágnes; Hermesz, Edit

    2015-05-01

    Cd(2+)-induced oxidative stress and its effects on the expression of stress biomarkers and on macromolecule damage in the skin and blood of common carp were studied. Both tissues play important roles in the defence mechanisms against external hazards, serving as an anatomical barrier and as connecting tissue between the organs. In the skin, the production of peroxynitrite anion and hydrogen peroxide was almost doubled after exposure to 10 mg/L Cd(2+). The accumulation of these oxidant molecules suggests an intensive production of superoxide anion and nitrogen monoxide and the development of oxidative and/or nitrosative stress. Although the metallothioneins and the components of the glutathione redox system were activated in the skin, the accumulation of reactive intermediates led to the enhanced damage of lipid molecules after 24 h of metal exposure. In the blood, the basal levels of metallothionein messenger RNAs (mRNAs) were 2-2.5-fold of that measured in the skin. This high level of metallothionein expression could be the reason that the blood was less affected by an acute Cd(2+) challenge and the metallothionein and glutathione systems were not activated.

  7. Atypical skin reaction in a patient treated with gefitinib for advanced lung cancer: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    FERRAZZI, ANNA; RUSSO, IRENE; PASELLO, GIULIA; ALAIBAC, MAURO

    2016-01-01

    Gefitinib is a selective epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor utilized for the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung carcinoma. The most commonly reported adverse event during gefitinib therapy is skin rash, particularly a papulopustular acne-like eruption. Cutaneous toxicities can affect treatment compliance and the quality of life of the patient. The present study reports a case of gefitinib-induced atypical skin reaction in a 73-year-old woman with advanced non-small cell lung cancer, who developed a squamous-crusted eruption on her face after 4 weeks of oral treatment with gefitinib at a dose of 250 mg/day. The patient was treated with 100 mg minocyclin (2 tablets/day, orally) and with ryfamicin topically. A complete resolution of the lesions was observed 2 weeks later. The present case report explored the pathogenesis of this skin manifestation, focusing on the underlying immunological mechanisms. A review of the literature concerning skin reactions to gefitinib was also conducted. PMID:26889239

  8. Rare allergic reaction of the kidney: sitagliptin-induced acute tubulointerstitial nephritis.

    PubMed

    Alsaad, Ali A; Dhannoon, Sarah M; Pantin, Sally-Ann L; Porter, Ivan E

    2016-01-01

    A 56-year-old man with a history of diabetes mellitus type-2 and stage-2 chronic kidney disease secondary to diabetic nephropathy presented with an acute deterioration of kidney function. Non-invasive work-up failed to reveal the underlying aetiology for the acute kidney failure. Kidney biopsy revealed acute tubulointerstitial nephritis (ATIN) which was attributed to sitagliptin use. Only few case reports have shown this correlation. Our aim is to alert physicians and other providers of the potential effect of sitagliptin to cause ATIN with this biopsy-proven case. PMID:27436034

  9. Utility of a single nasal polymerase chain reaction assay in predicting absence of skin and environmental contamination in hospitalized patients with past methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Dubert M; Wagner, Matthew; Carson, Grace; Hanish, Christine; Thompson, Jody; Orr, Megan; Roth, Felix; Carson, Paul J

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated hospitalized patients with a history of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) for persistent colonization and need for contact precautions. Up to 3 daily cultures of nares, skin, and any present wounds were compared with a single nasal polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. Most patients (76.2%) were no longer colonized with MRSA. A single PCR assay was sufficient to exclude persistent colonization and environmental contamination and remove the contact precautions.

  10. Acute and sub-chronic toxicity of glucose-cysteine Maillard reaction products in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Yixing; Su, Linliang; Li, Fenfang; Wang, Chaozheng; Yuan, Debao; Chen, Jiao; Tan, Lin; Jin, Zhiqiang; Ma, Weihong

    2015-06-01

    Maillard reaction products (MRPs) derived from glucose-cysteine reactions have excellent anti-browning ability. However, there is a lack of information about their acute and sub-chronic toxicities. To our knowledge, the present study is the first to evaluate the acute and sub-chronic toxicities of MRPs in experimental animals. Acute toxicity testing and analysis by Horn's method showed that the median lethal oral dose (LD50) of MRPs in rats was 6.81 g/kg body weight. The sub-chronic toxicity test involved feeding rats with diet containing 0, 0.43, 0.85, or 1.70% (w/w) MRPs for 90 days. These treatments did not affect mortality, gross pathology, histology, hematology, or blood chemistry, and there were no dose-dependent changes in feed consumption. Based on these results, the dietary no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for 90-day exposure was 1.29 and 1.51 g MRPs/kg body weight/day for male and female rats, respectively. PMID:25817020

  11. Evaluation of immediate adverse reactions to foods in adult patients. I. Correlation of demographic, laboratory, and prick skin test data with response to controlled oral food challenge.

    PubMed

    Atkins, F M; Steinberg, S S; Metcalfe, D D

    1985-03-01

    Forty-five adult patients, referred to here as the index population, with a history of immediate adverse reactions after food ingestion were evaluated by history, physical examination, laboratory studies, and skin testing. Fifty-six percent of these patients reported adverse reactions to only one food, whereas 84% of the patients reported up to three foods as being capable of eliciting reactions. The average age obtained by history at which adverse reactions began to occur was 19 4/5 yr. The occurrence of these reactions persisted over an average of 14 4/5 yr. Most reactions involved the gastrointestinal tract alone or in combination with the skin or respiratory tract. The most frequently involved foods were shellfish, peanuts, eggs, fish, tomatoes, and walnuts. Twenty-five of the patients participated in oral challenge with the suspected food. The food challenge was positive in 10 patients. Comparison of information obtained by history including personal or family history of any other allergic disease, age of onset of sensitivity, the length of time of suspected sensitivity in years, and the number of foods to which the sensitivity was believed to exist revealed no significant differences between food challenge-positive (FC+) and food challenge-negative (FC-) patients. However, a significant difference in the reaction patterns reported by history in the FC+ and FC- patients was noted in that FC+ patients more often described reactions in which a combination of gastrointestinal, respiratory, and dermatologic symptoms occurred. The complete blood count with differential, blood chemistries, and serum immunoglobulin levels were similar in both groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Artificial light at night alters delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction in response to acute stress in Siberian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Bedrosian, Tracy A; Aubrecht, Taryn G; Kaugars, Katherine E; Weil, Zachary M; Nelson, Randy J

    2013-11-01

    Several physiological and behavioral processes rely on precisely timed light information derived from the natural solar cycle. Using this information, traits have adapted to allow individuals within specific niches to optimize survival and reproduction, but urbanization by humans has significantly altered natural habitats. Nighttime light exposure alters immune function in several species, which could lead to decreased fitness or survival, particularly in the face of an environmental challenge. We exposed male Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) to five lux of light at night for four weeks, and then administered six hours of acute restraint stress. Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response was assessed immediately following stress. Acute restraint increased the DTH reaction in dark nights, but exposure to nighttime light prevented this response. Exposure to light at night prolonged the DTH response in non-stressed control hamsters. These results suggest that light pollution may significantly alter physiological responses in Siberian hamsters, particularly in response to a salient environmental challenge such as stress.

  13. microRNA Alterations Driving Acute and Late Stages of Radiation-Induced Fibrosis in a Murine Skin Model

    SciTech Connect

    Simone, Brittany A.; Ly, David; Savage, Jason E.; Hewitt, Stephen M.; Dan, Tu D.; Ylaya, Kris; Shankavaram, Uma; Lim, Meng; Jin, Lianjin; Camphausen, Kevin; Mitchell, James B.; Simone, Nicole L.

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Although ionizing radiation is critical in treating cancer, radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF) can have a devastating impact on patients' quality of life. The molecular changes leading to radiation-induced fibrosis must be elucidated so that novel treatments can be designed. Methods and Materials: To determine whether microRNAs (miRs) could be responsible for RIF, the fibrotic process was induced in the right hind legs of 9-week old CH3 mice by a single-fraction dose of irradiation to 35 Gy, and the left leg served as an unirradiated control. Fibrosis was quantified by measurements of leg length compared with control leg length. By 120 days after irradiation, the irradiated legs were 20% (P=.013) shorter on average than were the control legs. Results: Tissue analysis was done on muscle, skin, and subcutaneous tissue from irradiated and control legs. Fibrosis was noted on both gross and histologic examination by use of a pentachrome stain. Microarrays were performed at various times after irradiation, including 7 days, 14 days, 50 days, 90 days, and 120 days after irradiation. miR-15a, miR-21, miR-30a, and miR-34a were the miRs with the most significant alteration by array with miR-34a, proving most significant on confirmation by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, c-Met, a known effector of fibrosis and downstream molecule of miR-34a, was evaluated by use of 2 cell lines: HCT116 and 1522. The cell lines were exposed to various stressors to induce miR changes, specifically ionizing radiation. Additionally, in vitro transfections with pre-miRs and anti-miRs confirmed the relationship of miR-34a and c-Met. Conclusions: Our data demonstrate an inverse relationship with miR-34a and c-Met; the upregulation of miR-34a in RIF causes inhibition of c-Met production. miRs may play a role in RIF; in particular, miR-34a should be investigated as a potential target to prevent or treat this devastating side effect of irradiation.

  14. Sensitive skin and rosacea: nosologic framework.

    PubMed

    Misery, L

    2011-11-01

    Flushing due to rosacea may be mistaken for sensitive skin, which can manifest as abnormal sensations during fairly acute reactions to a variety of triggers, many of which are shared by rosacea and sensitive skin. Nevertheless, the two conditions are clearly different. Rosacea is a vascular disease, worsens gradually over time, manifests as flares triggered chiefly by systemic factors, is largely confined to the facial and/or ocular regions, and responds to specific treatments. Sensitive skin, in contrast, is an epidermal cosmetic problem that runs a variable course, with diffuse skin involvement and flares triggered mainly by contact factors. The flares respond to specific cosmetics and are usually worsened by treatments for rosacea.

  15. [Sensitive skin and rosacea: nosologic framework].

    PubMed

    Misery, L

    2011-09-01

    Flushing due to rosacea may be confused with sensitive skin because it is characterized by slightly acute reactions to varied factors with the perception of abnormal sensations and often common triggering factors. Nevertheless, these are clearly two different phenomena. On the one hand, rosacea is a vascular disease, with progressive worsening and eruptions set off by systemic factors, with a facial and/or ocular topography that respond to specific treatments. On the other hand, sensitive skin corresponds to an epidermal, cosmetic problem, with variable progression, whose eruptions are instead set off by contact factors and have a ubiquitous topography. Eruptions are improved by specific cosmetics and usually worsened by rosacea treatments.

  16. Detection of Rickettsia rickettsii, Rickettsia parkeri, and Rickettsia akari in Skin Biopsy Specimens Using a Multiplex Real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay

    PubMed Central

    Denison, Amy M.; Amin, Bijal D.; Nicholson, William L.; Paddock, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Rickettsia rickettsii, Rickettsia parkeri, and Rickettsia akari are the most common causes of spotted fever group rickettsioses indigenous to the United States. Infected patients characteristically present with a maculopapular rash, often accompanied by an inoculation eschar. Skin biopsy specimens are often obtained from these lesions for diagnostic evaluation. However, a species-specific diagnosis is achieved infrequently from pathologic specimens because immunohistochemical stains do not differentiate among the causative agents of spotted fever group rickettsiae, and existing polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays generally target large gene segments that may be difficult or impossible to obtain from formalin-fixed tissues. Methods This work describes the development and evaluation of a multiplex real-time PCR assay for the detection of these 3 Rickettsia species from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) skin biopsy specimens. Results The multiplex PCR assay was specific at discriminating each species from FFPE controls of unrelated bacterial, viral, protozoan, and fungal pathogens that cause skin lesions, as well as other closely related spotted fever group Rickettsia species. Conclusions This multiplex real-time PCR demonstrates greater sensitivity than nested PCR assays in FFPE tissues and provides an effective method to specifically identify cases of Rocky Mountain spotted fever, rickettsialpox, and R. parkeri rickettsiosis by using skin biopsy specimens. PMID:24829214

  17. Adverse skin reactions due to pegylated interferon alpha 2b plus ribavirin combination therapy in a patient with chronic hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Yuki; Kanto, Hiromi; Itoh, Masatoshi

    2007-08-01

    Pegylated interferon (IFN)-alpha-2b with ribavirin has recently replaced "standard" IFN-alpha for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C. The most common side-effect of pegylated IFN-alpha-2b plus ribavirin combination therapy is localized inflammatory skin lesions at the site of injection. A 66-year-old female treated with once-weekly pegylated IFN-alpha-2b plus ribavirin for active chronic hepatitis C developed inflammatory skin lesions 2 months after starting antiviral treatment. The type of skin reactions observed were vesicle erythematous eruptions at the injection sites, and pruritic papular erythematous eruptions located on the face, neck, distal limbs, dorsa of the hands, trunk and buttocks away from the injection sites. Histological examination was performed on the pruritic papular erythematous eruption located on the left forearm, away from the injection sites. It showed epidermal spongiosis, a spongiotic microvesicle, and perivascular infiltration of the upper dermis with lymphocytes. The treatment was interrupted subsequently and the patient was rechallenged with pegylated IFN-alpha-2b plus ribavirin combination therapy, oral prednisolone with olopatadine hydrochloride and topical 0.1% diflucortolone valerate, which led to a significant improvement of skin lesions. Erythema with infiltration can occur at the injection sites of pegylated IFN-alpha-2b. However, the occurrence of vesicle erythematous eruptions away from the injection sites and autosensitization dermatitis apart from injection sites have not yet been frequently reported. PMID:17683392

  18. Agreement of skin test with IL-4 production and CD40L expression by T cells upon immunotherapy of subjects with systemic reactions to Hymenoptera stings.

    PubMed

    Urra, José M; Cabrera, Carmen M; Alfaya, Teresa; Feo-Brito, Francisco

    2016-02-01

    Venom immunotherapy is the only curative intervention for subjects with Hymenoptera venom allergy who suffering systemic reactions upon bee or wasp stings. Venom immunotherapy can restore normal immunity against venom allergens, as well as providing to allergic subjects a lifetime tolerance against venoms. Nevertheless, it is necessary using safety assays to monitoring the development of tolerance in the VIT protocols to avoid fatal anaphylactic reactions. The purpose of this study was to assess the modifications in several markers of tolerance induction in subjects with Hymenoptera venom allergy undergoing immunotherapy. The studies were performed at baseline time and after six month of VIT. Intradermal skin tests, basophil activation tests, specific IgE levels; and the T-cell markers (IL-4 and IFN-γ producing cells; and expression of the surface activation markers CD40L and CTLA-4) were assayed. At six month of immunotherapy all parameters studied had significant alterations. All decreased, except the IFN-γ producing cells. In addition, modifications in intradermal skin test showed a significant correlation with both, CD40L expression on CD4 T lymphocytes (p=0.043) and IL-4 producing T lymphocytes (p=0.012). Neither basophil activation test nor serum levels of sIgE demonstrated any correlation with the immunological parameters studied nor among them. These results suggest that both IL-4 production and CD40L expression could be two good indicators of the beneficial effects of venom immunotherapy which translate into skin tests.

  19. Skin reaction and antibody responses in guinea-pigs sensitized to human leukaemia cells or their nuclei in combination with Bacillus Calmette-Guérin.

    PubMed

    Barnes, R M; Lewis, C M; Pegrum, G D; Prince, G H

    1976-12-01

    Guinea-pigs sensitized by subcutaneous injection of chronic lymphatic leukaemia (CLL) cells combined with Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) displayed good skin reacitons 24 and 48 h after challenge with CLL cells. Equally good responses were also demonstrated using nuclei from the leukaemic cells in combination with BCG. These reactions were significantly greater than those produced in the same manner but without BCG. Sera form the animals were examined for the presence of antibodies against CLL cells by cytotoxicity and immunofluorescence techniques. Only samples from guinea-pigs innoculated with CLL cells were found to contain significant antibodies. Histological examination showed that whereas leukaemic cells persisted at the sensitizing injection site leukaemic cell nuclei could not be visualized. It is suggested that because leukaemic cell nuclei in combination with BCG are able to induce good skin reactivity without provoking a vigorous humoral antibody response they may have possible advantages over leukaemic cells when used for immunotherapy.

  20. A Review of the Use of Topical Calendula in the Prevention and Treatment of Radiotherapy-Induced Skin Reactions.

    PubMed

    Kodiyan, Joyson; Amber, Kyle T

    2015-01-01

    Calendula is a topical agent derived from a plant of the marigold family Calendula Officinalis. Containing numerous polyphenolic antioxidants, calendula has been studied in both the laboratory and clinical setting for the use in treating and preventing radiation induced skin toxicity. Despite strong evidence in the laboratory supporting calendula's mechanism of action in preventing radiation induced skin toxicity, clinical studies have demonstrated mixed results. In light of the controversy surrounding the efficacy of calendula in treating and preventing radiodermatitis, the topic warrants further discussion. PMID:26783706

  1. A Review of the Use of Topical Calendula in the Prevention and Treatment of Radiotherapy-Induced Skin Reactions.

    PubMed

    Kodiyan, Joyson; Amber, Kyle T

    2015-01-01

    Calendula is a topical agent derived from a plant of the marigold family Calendula Officinalis. Containing numerous polyphenolic antioxidants, calendula has been studied in both the laboratory and clinical setting for the use in treating and preventing radiation induced skin toxicity. Despite strong evidence in the laboratory supporting calendula's mechanism of action in preventing radiation induced skin toxicity, clinical studies have demonstrated mixed results. In light of the controversy surrounding the efficacy of calendula in treating and preventing radiodermatitis, the topic warrants further discussion.

  2. A Review of the Use of Topical Calendula in the Prevention and Treatment of Radiotherapy-Induced Skin Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Kodiyan, Joyson; Amber, Kyle T.

    2015-01-01

    Calendula is a topical agent derived from a plant of the marigold family Calendula Officinalis. Containing numerous polyphenolic antioxidants, calendula has been studied in both the laboratory and clinical setting for the use in treating and preventing radiation induced skin toxicity. Despite strong evidence in the laboratory supporting calendula’s mechanism of action in preventing radiation induced skin toxicity, clinical studies have demonstrated mixed results. In light of the controversy surrounding the efficacy of calendula in treating and preventing radiodermatitis, the topic warrants further discussion. PMID:26783706

  3. Comparison of acute non-haemolytic transfusion reactions in female and male patients receiving female or male blood components

    PubMed Central

    Imoto, S; Araki, N; Shimada, E; Saigo, K; Nishimura, K; Nose, Y; Bouike, Y; Hashimoto, M; Mito, H; Okazaki, H

    2007-01-01

    To study the relationship between antibodies detected in patients’ and/or donors’ sera and the clinical features of acute non-haemolytic transfusion reactions (ANHTRs), and to determine any gender-related difference. ANHTRs range from urticaria to transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). Antibodies to human leukocyte antigen (HLA), granulocytes, platelets, and/or plasma proteins are implicated in some of the ANHTRs. A higher antibody positivity is expected for females than for males. A comparative study of ANHTRs for antibody positivity and their clinical features between females and males for both patients and donors is helpful for characterizing ANHTRs including TRALI more clearly, but such studies are few and outdated. Two hundred and twenty-three ANHTR cases reported by 45 hospitals between October 2000 and July 2005 were analysed. The patients and 196 donors of suspect blood products were screened for antibodies to HLA Class I, HLA Class II, granulocytes, and platelets. The patients were also screened for anti-plasma protein antibodies. The types and severity of ANHTR did not differ significantly between female and male patients. The frequency of the anti-HLA antibodies, but not that of the non-HLA antibodies, was significantly higher in females. Non-HLA antibodies were significantly associated with severe reactions in females. All the TRALI cases had predisposing risk factors for acute lung injury, and 60% of the cases showed anti-leucocyte antibodies. Although the anti-HLA antibodies were detected more frequently in females than males, no significant association of ANHTRs including TRALI with gender, not only for patients, but also for donors, could be shown in this study. PMID:18067650

  4. Comparison between qualitative and real-time polymerase chain reaction to evaluate minimal residual disease in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Paula, Francisco Danilo Ferreira; Elói-Santos, Silvana Maria; Xavier, Sandra Guerra; Ganazza, Mônica Aparecida; Jotta, Patricia Yoshioka; Yunes, José Andrés; Viana, Marcos Borato; Assumpção, Juliana Godoy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Minimal residual disease is an important independent prognostic factor that can identify poor responders among patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Objective The aim of this study was to analyze minimal residual disease using immunoglobulin (Ig) and T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements by conventional polymerase chain reaction followed by homo-heteroduplex analysis and to compare this with real-time polymerase chain reaction at the end of the induction period in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Methods Seventy-four patients diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia were enrolled. Minimal residual disease was evaluated by qualitative polymerase chain reaction in 57 and by both tests in 44. The Kaplan–Meier and multivariate Cox methods and the log-rank test were used for statistical analysis. Results Nine patients (15.8%) were positive for minimal residual disease by qualitative polymerase chain reaction and 11 (25%) by real-time polymerase chain reaction considering a cut-off point of 1 × 10−3 for precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 1 × 10−2 for T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Using the qualitative method, the 3.5-year leukemia-free survival was significantly higher in children negative for minimal residual disease compared to those with positive results (84.1% ± 5.6% versus 41.7% ± 17.3%, respectively; p-value = 0.004). There was no significant association between leukemia-free survival and minimal residual disease by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Minimal residual disease by qualitative polymerase chain reaction was the only variable significantly correlated to leukemia-free survival. Conclusion Given the difficulties in the implementation of minimal residual disease monitoring by real-time polymerase chain reaction in most treatment centers in Brazil, the qualitative polymerase chain reaction strategy may be a cost-effective alternative. PMID:26670399

  5. EXPERIMENTAL ACUTE GLOMERULITIS

    PubMed Central

    Lukens, Francis D. W.; Longcope, Warfield T.

    1931-01-01

    1. Both focal and diffuse glomerulitis has been produced in rabbits by the injection directly into the left renal artery of suspensions of heat killed hemolytic streptococci. 2. Similar lesions in the glomeruli could not be obtained by the injection of suspensions of bismuth oxychloride into the left renal artery of normal rabbits. 3. The acute glomerulitis occurred in only about one-half of the rabbits employed for the experiments. 4. Glomerulitis was observed much more frequently in rabbits in which an acute localized streptococcus infection had been produced by the intracutaneous injection of living hemolytic streptococci, than in normal rabbits. The occurrence of acute glomerulitis was usually associated with a well marked skin reaction to the filtrates of hemolytic streptococci. PMID:19869861

  6. The involvement of immune reactions in cardiac damage during acute myocardial infarction: role of cell-mediated immune response.

    PubMed

    Dimitrijevic, M; Vasiljevic, Z; Vuckovic-Dekic, L; Spasic, S

    1997-06-01

    This study was undertaken with the aim of investigating humoral and cell-mediated immune response in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) as possible mechanisms involved in the infarction enlargement. Twenty three patients with first AMI and 15 healthy volunteers were examined. Of the AMI patients, 14 had extensive infarction (group A), while 9 patients had small infarction (group B). Immunologic analyses were performed at admission, and repeated after 3, 7, 14 and 21 days of the acute event. Following parameters were tested: number of CD3+, CD4+, CD8+ and CD20+ cells; serum IgG, IgA, IgM, C3, C4, immune complex and anticardiac antibody levels; polymorphonuclear cell (PMN) function (chemotaxis, phagocytosis, metabolic activity); leukocyte migration in vitro in the presence of water-soluble homologous heart extract. It was demonstrated that the number of B cells, serum IgG, C3, immune complex and anticardiac antibody levels were elevated from 7th-14th days after AMI. Concerning these parameters, however, no significant differences were obtained between group A and group B of AMI patients. Chemotaxis and metabolic activity of peripheral blood PMN, but not phagocytosis, were enhanced during AMI, again changes of PMN did not correlate with the extension of infarction. In contrast, leukocyte migration inhibition in vitro revealed that only patients with extensive AMI have developed positive reaction during the first 14 days after the onset of the disease, while leukocyte inhibition reaction appeared in patients with nonextensive AMI not earlier than the 21st day after the infarction. These findings demonstrate generation of immune reactivity during AMI and indicate that humoral immune response seems more likely to be an epiphenomenon related to tissue necrosis, while cell-mediated immune reactions could influence the extensiveness of cardiac damage.

  7. Drug Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... or diabetes. But medicines can also cause unwanted reactions. One problem is interactions, which may occur between ... more serious. Drug allergies are another type of reaction. They can be mild or life-threatening. Skin ...

  8. Oral ulcerations after placement of orthodontic braces and skin pustules after laser hair removal: novel inducers of pathergy reactions in new-onset Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    van de Ree-Pellikaan, Claire; Kiewiet-Kemper, Rosalie M; Tchetverikov, Ilja; Westerweel, Peter E

    2016-01-01

    A 25-year-old man was admitted to our hospital, with fever, severe ulceration of the oral and pharyngeal mucosa, and pustules on his skin. These pathergy-like lesions had emerged after placement of orthodontic braces and laser therapy for hair removal, respectively. The patient's clinical condition, together with his ethnic background, pointed to the diagnosis of Behçet's disease. Treatment with colchicine and prednisone resulted in rapid improvement of his symptoms. Pathergy reactions in response to placement of dental braces and laser hair removal are a rare first presentation of Behçet's disease. PMID:26951437

  9. Tuberculin Skin Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... perpendicular to the long axis). How Are TST Reactions Interpreted? Skin test interpretation depends on two factors: ... among high-risk groups. What Are False-Positive Reactions? Some persons may react to the TST even ...

  10. Skin Dictionary

    MedlinePlus

    ... your skin, hair, and nails Skin dictionary Camp Discovery Good Skin Knowledge lesson plans and activities Video library Find a ... your skin, hair, and nails Skin dictionary Camp Discovery Good Skin Knowledge lesson plans and activities Video library Find a ...

  11. Medium dose ultraviolet A1 phototherapy and mRNA expression of interleukin 8, interferon γ, and chemokine receptor 4 in acute skin lesions in atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Malinowska, Karolina; Sysa-Jedrzejowska, Anna; Wozniacka, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Mechanisms responsible for UVA1 efficacy in atopic dermatitis (AD) are not fully elucidated. Aim To investigate IL-8, CCR-4, and IFN-γ mRNA expression in AD before and after UVA1, to identify correlations among them, and to determine whether and to what degree mRNA expression is influenced by UVA1. Material and methods Twenty-five patients with AD underwent medium dose UVA1-phototherapy at daily dosages of 10, 20, 30, 45, and then continuing 45 J/cm2 up to 20 days, from Monday to Friday for 4 weeks. Before and after UVA1, biopsies from acute skin lesions were studied using reverse-transcription and RT-PCR. Results The levels of CCR-4 mRNA correlated with those of IFN-γ, both before and after UVA1 phototherapy (p < 0.05). A significant correlation was found after UVA1 between mRNA levels of IL-8 and IFN-γ (p < 0.05). After UVA1 an increase in IL-8 mRNA expression in comparison to the baseline assessment (p = 0.02) was found, while no significant difference was revealed in the expression of CCR-4 and IFN-γ mRNA. UVA1 improved both SCORAD and severity of AD (p < 0.001). SCORAD and the severity of AD did not correlate with the degree of expression of measured cytokine mRNA, neither before nor after UVA1. Conclusions CCR-4 is expressed in parallel with IFN-γ in acute skin lesions of patients with AD both before and after UVA1 phototherapy. UVA1 significantly improves SCORAD index, lessens the severity of AD and increases the expression of IL-8, with no direct effects on other studied molecules. PMID:27512350

  12. Hepatitis C core antigen testing: a reliable, quick, and potentially cost-effective alternative to hepatitis C polymerase chain reaction in diagnosing acute hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Cresswell, Fiona V; Fisher, Martin; Hughes, Daniel J; Shaw, Simon G; Homer, Gary; Hassan-Ibrahim, Mohammed O

    2015-01-15

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is increasingly common among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected men who have sex with men. We evaluated the efficacy of HCV core antigen in diagnosing acute HCV in an HIV-infected cohort. Compared with HCV polymerase chain reaction, core antigen proved sensitive (100%) and specific (97.9%). As a quick, simple, and cost-effective test, it has considerable utility in screening for acute HCV.

  13. Selective Exposure of the Fetal Lung and Skin/Amnion (but Not Gastro-Intestinal Tract) to LPS Elicits Acute Systemic Inflammation in Fetal Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Masatoshi; Newnham, John P.; Cox, Tom; Jobe, Alan H.; Kramer, Boris W.; Kallapur, Suhas G.

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation of the uterine environment (commonly as a result of microbial colonisation of the fetal membranes, amniotic fluid and fetus) is strongly associated with preterm labour and birth. Both preterm birth and fetal inflammation are independently associated with elevated risks of subsequent short- and long-term respiratory, gastro-intestinal and neurological complications. Despite numerous clinical and experimental studies to investigate localised and systemic fetal inflammation following exposure to microbial agonists, there is minimal data to describe which fetal organ(s) drive systemic fetal inflammation. We used lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from E.coli in an instrumented ovine model of fetal inflammation and conducted a series of experiments to assess the systemic pro-inflammatory capacity of the three major fetal surfaces exposed to inflammatory mediators in pregnancy (the lung, gastro-intestinal tract and skin/amnion). Exposure of the fetal lung and fetal skin/amnion (but not gastro-intestinal tract) caused a significant acute systemic inflammatory response characterised by altered leucocytosis, neutrophilia, elevated plasma MCP-1 levels and inflammation of the fetal liver and spleen. These novel findings reveal differential fetal organ responses to pro-inflammatory stimulation and shed light on the pathogenesis of fetal systemic inflammation after exposure to chorioamnionitis. PMID:23691033

  14. Lipodystrophy in Insulin-Treated Subjects and Other Injection-Site Skin Reactions: Are We Sure Everything is Clear?

    PubMed

    Gentile, Sandro; Strollo, Felice; Ceriello, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    Physicians and patients have long been aware of skin lesions at the sites of insulin injections, referred to as lipodystrophy that can present as lipoatrophy (LA) or lipohypertrophy (LH). However, the reported prevalence of these different skin lesions varies widely, emphasizing the need for a correct identification method. In this short review we discuss LA and LH and also take into account other skin lesions, such as bruising, as well as different needle injuries, including those associated with the subcutaneous injection of pegvisomant (a drug aimed at counteracting the high levels of growth hormone associated with acromegaly), long-acting exenatide (a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist), and anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha biologic agents (used against Crohn's disease). In these latter cases specific studies are warranted to understand the pathophysiological background and possible prevention. However, the most common lesion is still insulin injection site-related LD, so a strong effort has to be made to avoid the confusion generated by previously misleading classifications which were barely able to reliably distinguish between LA and LH.

  15. Lipodystrophy in Insulin-Treated Subjects and Other Injection-Site Skin Reactions: Are We Sure Everything is Clear?

    PubMed

    Gentile, Sandro; Strollo, Felice; Ceriello, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    Physicians and patients have long been aware of skin lesions at the sites of insulin injections, referred to as lipodystrophy that can present as lipoatrophy (LA) or lipohypertrophy (LH). However, the reported prevalence of these different skin lesions varies widely, emphasizing the need for a correct identification method. In this short review we discuss LA and LH and also take into account other skin lesions, such as bruising, as well as different needle injuries, including those associated with the subcutaneous injection of pegvisomant (a drug aimed at counteracting the high levels of growth hormone associated with acromegaly), long-acting exenatide (a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist), and anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha biologic agents (used against Crohn's disease). In these latter cases specific studies are warranted to understand the pathophysiological background and possible prevention. However, the most common lesion is still insulin injection site-related LD, so a strong effort has to be made to avoid the confusion generated by previously misleading classifications which were barely able to reliably distinguish between LA and LH. PMID:27456528

  16. High frequency of skin reactions in patients with leishmaniasis treated with meglumine antimoniate contaminated with heavy metals: a comparative approach using historical controls.

    PubMed

    Romero, Gustavo Adolfo Sierra; Flores M, Rico Marlon de Moraes; Noronha, Elza Ferreira; Macêdo, Vanize de Oliveira

    2003-01-01

    We analyzed data from historical controls treated with meglumine antimoniate to compare the frequency of adverse events observed in patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis treated with the same dose of meglumine antimoniate contaminated with heavy metals in an endemic area of the State of Bahia, Brazil. Group A patients were treated in 2000 with the drug produced by Eurofarma Laborat rios Ltda., S o Paulo, Brazil (lot A) and group B patients were treated in 1996 with the reference drug produced by Rhodia Farma Ltda., S o Paulo, Brazil (lot B). We observed an unusual higher frequency of skin reactions in group A patients. However, all type of adverse events observed in group A were also observed in group B. The physico-chemical analysis of these lots revealed that lot A had lower pH and higher concentration of total and trivalent antimony, lead, cadmium, and arsenic. Our findings suggest that the skin reactions could be attributed to heavy metal contamination of lot A.

  17. A randomized, double-blind, Phase 2 study to evaluate subjective and objective outcomes in patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections treated with delafloxacin, linezolid or vancomycin

    PubMed Central

    Kingsley, Jeff; Mehra, Purvi; Lawrence, Laura E.; Henry, Eugenia; Duffy, Erin; Cammarata, Sue K.; Pullman, John

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Delafloxacin is an investigational anionic fluoroquinolone being developed to treat infections caused by Gram-positive and -negative organisms. This clinical trial evaluated the efficacy and safety of delafloxacin in the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs). Methods In a double-blind, Phase 2 trial, 256 patients were randomized (1 : 1 : 1) to 300 mg of delafloxacin, 600 mg of linezolid or 15 mg/kg vancomycin (actual body weight), each administered intravenously twice daily for 5–14 days. Randomization was stratified by infection category. The primary endpoint was the investigator's assessment of cure, defined as complete resolution of baseline signs and symptoms at follow-up. Secondary endpoints included reductions in the total areas of erythema and induration and assessments of bacterial eradication. This trial has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration number NCT01283581. Results Cure rates were significantly greater with delafloxacin versus vancomycin (mean difference: −16.3%; 95% CI, −30.3% to −2.3%; P = 0.031); differences were significant for obese patients (BMI ≥30 kg/m2; mean difference: −30.0%; 95% CI, −50.7% to −9.3%; P = 0.009), but not for non-obese patients. Cure rates with delafloxacin and linezolid were similar. Using digital measurement, the percentage decrease in total erythema area was significantly greater with delafloxacin versus vancomycin at follow-up (−96.4% versus −84.5%; P = 0.028). There were no differences in bacterial eradication among the treatment groups. The most frequently reported treatment-emergent adverse events were nausea, diarrhoea and vomiting. Conclusions These data show that delafloxacin is effective in the treatment of ABSSSIs and is well tolerated. PMID:26679243

  18. Randomized, Double-Blind, Phase II, Multicenter Study Evaluating the Safety/Tolerability and Efficacy of JNJ-Q2, a Novel Fluoroquinolone, Compared with Linezolid for Treatment of Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infection ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Covington, Paul; Davenport, J. Michael; Andrae, David; O'Riordan, William; Liverman, Lisa; McIntyre, Gail; Almenoff, June

    2011-01-01

    JNJ-Q2 is a fluoroquinolone with broad coverage including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). A double-blind, multicenter, phase II noninferiority study treated 161 patients for 7 to 14 days, testing the efficacy of JNJ-Q2 (250 mg, twice a day [BID]) versus linezolid (600 mg, BID) in patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI). The prespecified criterion for noninferiority was 15%. Primary intent-to-treat analysis was unable to declare noninferiority, as the risk difference lower bound of the 95% confidence interval between treatments was 19% at 36 to 84 h postrandomization for the composite end point of lesion assessment and temperature. Prespecified clinical cure rates 2 to 14 days after completion of therapy were similar (83.1% for JNJ-Q2 versus 82.1% for linezolid). Post hoc analyses revealed that JNJ-Q2 was statistically noninferior to linezolid (61.4% versus 57.7%, respectively; P = 0.024) based on the 2010 FDA guidance, which defines treatment success as lack of lesion spread and afebrile status within 48 to 72 h postrandomization. Despite evidence of systemic disease, <5% of patients presented with fever, suggesting fever is not a compelling surrogate measure of systemic disease resolution for this indication. Nausea and vomiting were the most common adverse events. Of the patients, 86% (104/121) had S. aureus isolated from the infection site; 63% of these were MRSA. The results suggest JNJ-Q2 shows promise as an effective treatment for ABSSSI, demonstrating (i) efficacy for early clinical response (i.e., lack of spread of lesions and absence of fever at 48 to 72 h), and (ii) cure rates for ABSSSI pathogens (especially MRSA) consistent with the historical literature. PMID:21947389

  19. Suspected acute hemolytic transfusion reaction mediated by anti-Di(a).

    PubMed

    Bennett, Ashwini; Boyapati, Ray K; Hong, Frank S

    2015-01-01

    Anti-Di(a) can mediate hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn, but it is unclear if it can cause hemolytic transfusion reactions (HTRs). To date, there has only been one report of a possible immediate HTR attributed to anti-Di(a). Our case report details an immediate HTR due to anti-Di(a) in a patient with pre-existing liver failure. This reaction triggered multi-organ failure, and the patient subsequently died. This case also highlights the importance of considering HTRs even when routine antibody screening has been unremarkable, particularly when electronic crossmatch is used, because of the potential for an alloantibody against a low-prevalence antigen. PMID:27187197

  20. Dystonia as acute adverse reaction to cough suppressant in a 3-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Polizzi, A; Incorpora, G; Ruggieri, M

    2001-01-01

    Cough suppressant preparations containing mixtures of dextromethorphan or codeine with antihistamines, decongestants (sympathomimetic), expectorants and antipyretics with either sedative or anticholinergic activity have been associated with dystonic reactions in children. We report on a 3-year-old girl who presented with episodic stiffness and abnormal posturing with rigidity after arbitrary maternal administration of a mixture of methylcodeine and extract from Hedera plant. PMID:11587381

  1. Assessment of skin irritancy by 2 short tests compared to acute irritation induced by sodium lauryl sulfate.

    PubMed

    Hinnen, U; Elsner, P; Burg, G

    1995-10-01

    Irritant contact dermatitis is a very common disease that is preventable by protective measures. The development of screening methods to identify subjects with increased susceptibility to irritants is essential to reduce the incidence of this disorder in the workplace. On the outlook for such methods, 2 quick non-invasive tests for irritability of the skin were compared to reliable, but time-consuming, patch testing with sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS). In 20 healthy volunteers, 0.5% SLS was applied on the medial 1.3 of the forearm for 23 h in order to induce experimental irritant contact dermatitis. On the same part of the forearm, 3 concentrations of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) and a solution of 0.2 mol/l NaOH were applied for 5 min. Assessment of skin irritability was made by visual scoring and measurement of transepidermal water loss. No correlation between the "quick tests" and SLS patch testing was found, indicating that these tests assess different mechanisms of irritation.

  2. Leukemic manifestation of blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm lacking skin lesion : a borderline case between acute monocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Takiuchi, Yoko; Maruoka, Hayato; Aoki, Kazunari; Kato, Aiko; Ono, Yuichiro; Nagano, Seiji; Arima, Hiroshi; Inoue, Daichi; Mori, Minako; Tabata, Sumie; Yanagita, Soshi; Matsushita, Akiko; Nishio, Mari; Imai, Yukihiro; Imai, Yukihiro; Ito, Kiminari; Fujita, Haruyuki; Kadowaki, Norimitsu; Ishikawa, Takayuki; Takahashi, Takayuki

    2012-01-01

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is a rare hematologic malignancy with a poor prognosis. We encountered a unique case of BPDCN that was leukemic at presentation without skin lesion and expressed CD33 antigen. A 74-year-old man was admitted because of dyspnea. Physically, hepatosplenomegaly, but not skin lesions and superficial lymph node swelling, was noted. The white blood count was 33.6 × 10(9)/L with 19% giant abnormal cells. These cells were positive for CD4, CD86, CD123 (bright), BDCA-2, and HLA-DR, but negative for CD1a, CD3, CD11b, CD11c, CD13, CD14, CD19, CD64, and CD68. From these findings, a diagnosis of BPDCN was made. In terms of unusual expression, these tumor cells were positive for CD33 but negative for CD56. The karyotype was 47, XY, t(6;8) (p21;q24), + r. We performed combination chemotherapy (Ara-C + VP-16 + MIT), which resulted in a marked reduction of tumor cells and improvement of the dyspnea. On day 16, however, he died of sepsis due to Bacillus cereus. The clinical picture of this patient is unusual and may provide new information on the clinicopathology of BPDCN. PMID:23037626

  3. Drug-induced skin disease.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, A P

    1984-10-01

    Drug-induced cutaneous reactions encompass a wide variety of rashes that depend in part on route of administration (e.g., contact versus systemic) as well as type of cutaneous response and molecular mechanism underlying the reaction. One such reaction is a type IV immunologic reaction (delayed hypersensitivity) manifest as contact dermatitis and commonly elicited by drugs such as antihistamines, antibiotic ointments, local anesthetics, and paraben esters in cosmetic creams and lotions. A generalized eruption of this sort will occasionally occur with systemic administration of a drug to someone previously sensitized by topical application. Systemic administration of agents can cause nonspecific pruritus or maculopapular eruptions that resemble visual exanthemas. The pathogenesis is unclear and no immune mechanism has been demonstrated. If the drug is continued, exfoliative dermatitis can result. Other types of reactions are urticarial in nature and include acute urticaria/angioedema, erythema multiforme (bullous and nonbullous), Stevens-Johnson syndrome, urticaria in association with serum sickness-like reactions, and urticaria associated with anaphylactoid reactions. In many of these, an allergic reaction in which there is an immunoglobulin (Ig) E-dependent release of mediators in the skin causes hives or swelling. In others, circulating immune complexes may be present, often involving IgG antibody complexed with drug and complement fixation; hives may then be caused by anaphylatoxin release or a concomitant IgE-mediated reaction. In some instances, a cellular reaction may augment the aforementioned inflammatory reactions, perhaps as part of a late-phase reaction or a true delayed hypersensitivity component.

  4. Vision and the skin camouflage reactions of Ambystoma larvae: the effects of eye transplants and brain lesions.

    PubMed

    Pietsch, P; Schneider, C W

    1985-08-01

    Salamander larvae typically adapt their dermal melanophores to achieve camouflage, and it has been known for some time that removal of the eyes abolishes the response. Here we survey the contribution of the optic system to the bright and dark camouflage reactions and report that: the stimulus depends on an interaction between the direct and reflected light; an eye mounted atop the head and oriented vertically tended not to support camouflage, even though the animal responded to visual cues and learned a vision-dependent task; deviating the transplanted eye off the vertical axis enhanced the recovery of camouflage reactions; amputating or reorienting the telencephalon, epithalamus, pretectum or tectum did not abolish either camouflage reaction whereas lesions of the ventral optic pathway blocked brightening; transection near the midbrain-hindbrain junction--well posterior to known optic terminals--retarded the dark reaction; when the latter lesion was combined with disconnection of the telencephalon and epithalamus, contrary to predictions from the lesions executed separately, the animals lost the bright reaction; the hypophysis is necessary for darkening, but the organ supported this reaction even though detached, displaced or reoriented; and the pineal body was not essential for the grosser aspects of camouflage in Ambystoma larvae but may play an adjunctive role in fine tuning. PMID:4027646

  5. The characteristics of aromatase deficient hairless mice indicate important roles of extragonadal estrogen in the skin.

    PubMed

    Tsukahara, Kazue; Kakuo, Shingo; Moriwaki, Shigeru; Hotta, Mitsuyuki; Ohuchi, Atsushi; Kitahara, Takashi; Harada, Nobuhiro

    2008-01-01

    The roles of extragonadal estrogen in the skin are poorly understood, due to the lack of proper animal models. We examined the skin phenotypes of aromatase-knockout hairless (ArKO) mice and wild-type hairless (WT) mice, both of which were obtained through crossbreeding of Ar+/- mice and hairless mice. Differences in the skins of ArKO and WT mice were compared with those of ovariectomized (OVX) and control (Sham) mice. A difference was observed in the skin tone of ArKO mice, which is pale white and differs from the pinkish tone of all other mice. However, both ArKO and OVX mice similarly exhibited deteriorations of skin properties as compared to their respective controls. Furthermore, all the deteriorations were similarly amplified by chronic UVB irradiation in both ArKO and OVX mice as compared to their respective controls. The unique skin phenotype of ArKO mice was observed in sunburn reactions. Specifically, skins of ArKO mice showed no reaction after an acute UVB irradiation at dose intensities caused sunburn in others. However, follow-up observation found delayed reactions associated with brownish skin color and swelling only in ArKO mice, thereby suggesting that the role of extragonadal estrogen may be connected with the protective reactions of skin.

  6. Sagging Skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... Non-ablative Laser Rejuvenation Non-invasive Body Contouring Treatments Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Information Free Skin Cancer Screenings Skin ... Non-ablative Laser Rejuvenation Non-invasive Body Contouring Treatments Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Information Free Skin Cancer Screenings Skin ...

  7. Skin Diseases: Skin Health and Skin Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Skin Health and Skin Diseases Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents ... acne to wrinkles Did you know that your skin is the largest organ of your body? It ...

  8. Mortality due to acute adverse drug reactions in Galicia: 1997-2011.

    PubMed

    Miguel-Arias, Domingo; Pereiro Gómez, César; Bermejo Barrera, Ana M; López de Abajo Rodríguez, Benito; Sobrido Prieto, María

    2016-03-02

    The aim of this research is to study all people who died in the Autonomous Community of Galicia from acute death after drugconsumption (ADR) in which there was judicial intervention during the period from 1997 to 2011, according to inclusion and exclusión criteria established by the National Drug Plan for the entire national territory. Sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of deceased subjects were studied, in order to identify key risk factors and/or vulnerable populations.A total of 805 deaths were recorded. The distribution by provinces and municipalities corresponds to the areas of greatest population, incidence of consumption and proximity to the coast. The average age of these patients was 34.34 years, with a gradual increase over years. Most of them were male (91.2%) and single (47.7). 43.5% of the deceased habitually used the parenteral route of administration and 36.4% had positive HIV serology. The most frequently-detected substances corresponded to opiates (heroin: 61.3%, methadone: 35.6%), followed by cocaine (53.7%), although the most common pattern was that of poly-consumption. ADR mortality figures remain relatively stable throughout the study period. The predominant pattern is that of males, opiates and a long history of consumption.

  9. Mortality due to acute adverse drug reactions in Galicia: 1997-2011.

    PubMed

    Miguel-Arias, Domingo; Pereiro Gómez, César; Bermejo Barrera, Ana M; López de Abajo Rodríguez, Benito; Sobrido Prieto, María

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to study all people who died in the Autonomous Community of Galicia from acute death after drugconsumption (ADR) in which there was judicial intervention during the period from 1997 to 2011, according to inclusion and exclusión criteria established by the National Drug Plan for the entire national territory. Sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of deceased subjects were studied, in order to identify key risk factors and/or vulnerable populations.A total of 805 deaths were recorded. The distribution by provinces and municipalities corresponds to the areas of greatest population, incidence of consumption and proximity to the coast. The average age of these patients was 34.34 years, with a gradual increase over years. Most of them were male (91.2%) and single (47.7). 43.5% of the deceased habitually used the parenteral route of administration and 36.4% had positive HIV serology. The most frequently-detected substances corresponded to opiates (heroin: 61.3%, methadone: 35.6%), followed by cocaine (53.7%), although the most common pattern was that of poly-consumption. ADR mortality figures remain relatively stable throughout the study period. The predominant pattern is that of males, opiates and a long history of consumption. PMID:26990265

  10. In Vivo Performance of Chitosan/Soy-Based Membranes as Wound-Dressing Devices for Acute Skin Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Tírcia C.; Höring, Bernhard; Reise, Kathrin; Marques, Alexandra P.; Silva, Simone S.; Oliveira, Joaquim M.; Mano, João F.; Castro, António G.; van Griensven, Martijn

    2013-01-01

    Wound management represents a major clinical challenge on what concerns healing enhancement and pain control. The selection of an appropriate dressing plays an important role in both recovery and esthetic appearance of the regenerated tissue. Despite the wide range of available dressings, the progress in the wound care market relies on the increasing interest in using natural-based biomedical products. Herein, a rat wound-dressing model of partial-thickness skin wounds was used to study newly developed chitosan/soy (cht/soy)-based membranes as wound-dressing materials. Healing and repair of nondressed, cht/soy membrane-dressed, and Epigard®-dressed wounds were followed macroscopically and histologically for 1 and 2 weeks. cht/soy membranes performed better than the controls, promoting a faster wound repair. Re-epithelialization, observed 1 week after wounding, was followed by cornification of the outermost epidermal layer at the second week of dressing, indicating repair of the wounded tissue. The use of this rodent model, although in impaired healing conditions, may enclose some drawbacks regarding the inevitable wound contraction. Moreover, being the main purpose the evaluation of cht/soy-based membranes' performance in the absence of growth factors, the choice of a clinically relevant positive control was limited to a polymeric mesh, without any growth factor influencing skin healing/repair, Epigard. These new cht/soy membranes possess the desired features regarding healing/repair stimulation, ease of handling, and final esthetic appearance—thus, valuable properties for wound dressings. PMID:23083058

  11. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor in acute rejection reaction following rat orthotopic liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Changsong; Yang, Guangshun; Lu, Dewen; Ling, Yang; Chen, Guihua; Zhou, Tianbao

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in acute rejection reaction (ARR) following orthotopic liver transplantation in a rat model. Serum VEGF and bFGF levels were detected using ELISA, and their expression levels in liver and spleen tissues were determined using immunohistochemistry. The mRNA expression levels of VEGF and bFGF were detected by conducting a quantitative polymerase chain reaction during the ARR following orthotopic liver transplantation. The expression levels of VEGF and bFGF in the serum 3 days following liver transplantation were significantly higher compared with those in the other groups (1 and 7 days following transplantation; P<0.01). In addition, the numbers of cells in the liver tissue that were shown to be positive for the expression VEGF and bFGF using immunohistochemistry were significantly higher 3 days following transplantation than at the other time points (P<0.0001). Furthermore, the numbers of cells positive for VEGF and bFGF expression in the spleen detected 3 days following the transplantation surgery were also significantly higher compared with those at the other time points (P<0.01). VEGF and bFGF mRNA expression levels were also increased from 1 day following the surgery and reached a peak at day 3, prior to declining gradually and remaining at a relatively high level. VEGF and bFGF mRNA expression levels changed dynamically, by peaking and then declining, in ARR following orthotopic liver transplantation. These changes may have an important impact on angiogenesis and the inflammatory reaction, and the identification of these changes increases the current understanding of ARR following orthotopic liver transplantation.

  12. Angiogenesis Is Induced and Wound Size Is Reduced by Electrical Stimulation in an Acute Wound Healing Model in Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Ud-Din, Sara; Sebastian, Anil; Giddings, Pamela; Colthurst, James; Whiteside, Sigrid; Morris, Julie; Nuccitelli, Richard; Pullar, Christine; Baguneid, Mo; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis is critical for wound healing. Insufficient angiogenesis can result in impaired wound healing and chronic wound formation. Electrical stimulation (ES) has been shown to enhance angiogenesis. We previously showed that ES enhanced angiogenesis in acute wounds at one time point (day 14). The aim of this study was to further evaluate the role of ES in affecting angiogenesis during the acute phase of cutaneous wound healing over multiple time points. We compared the angiogenic response to wounding in 40 healthy volunteers (divided into two groups and randomised), treated with ES (post-ES) and compared them to secondary intention wound healing (control). Biopsy time points monitored were days 0, 3, 7, 10, 14. Objective non-invasive measures and H&E analysis were performed in addition to immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Western blotting (WB). Wound volume was significantly reduced on D7, 10 and 14 post-ES (p = 0.003, p = 0.002, p<0.001 respectively), surface area was reduced on days 10 (p = 0.001) and 14 (p<0.001) and wound diameter reduced on days 10 (p = 0.009) and 14 (p = 0.002). Blood flow increased significantly post-ES on D10 (p = 0.002) and 14 (p = 0.001). Angiogenic markers were up-regulated following ES application; protein analysis by IHC showed an increase (p<0.05) in VEGF-A expression by ES treatment on days 7, 10 and 14 (39%, 27% and 35% respectively) and PLGF expression on days 3 and 7 (40% on both days), compared to normal healing. Similarly, WB demonstrated an increase (p<0.05) in PLGF on days 7 and 14 (51% and 35% respectively). WB studies showed a significant increase of 30% (p>0.05) on day 14 in VEGF-A expression post-ES compared to controls. Furthermore, organisation of granulation tissue was improved on day 14 post-ES. This randomised controlled trial has shown that ES enhanced wound healing by reduced wound dimensions and increased VEGF-A and PLGF expression in acute cutaneous wounds, which further substantiates the role of ES in up

  13. Genetics of Host Response to Leishmania tropica in Mice – Different Control of Skin Pathology, Chemokine Reaction, and Invasion into Spleen and Liver

    PubMed Central

    Grekov, Igor; Volkova, Valeriya; Vojtíšková, Jarmila; Slapničková, Martina; Kurey, Iryna; Sohrabi, Yahya; Svobodová, Milena; Demant, Peter; Lipoldová, Marie

    2012-01-01

    Background Leishmaniasis is a disease caused by protozoan parasites of genus Leishmania. The frequent involvement of Leishmania tropica in human leishmaniasis has been recognized only recently. Similarly as L. major, L. tropica causes cutaneous leishmaniasis in humans, but can also visceralize and cause systemic illness. The relationship between the host genotype and disease manifestations is poorly understood because there were no suitable animal models. Methods We studied susceptibility to L. tropica, using BALB/c-c-STS/A (CcS/Dem) recombinant congenic (RC) strains, which differ greatly in susceptibility to L. major. Mice were infected with L. tropica and skin lesions, cytokine and chemokine levels in serum, and parasite numbers in organs were measured. Principal Findings Females of BALB/c and several RC strains developed skin lesions. In some strains parasites visceralized and were detected in spleen and liver. Importantly, the strain distribution pattern of symptoms caused by L. tropica was different from that observed after L. major infection. Moreover, sex differently influenced infection with L. tropica and L. major. L. major-infected males exhibited either higher or similar skin pathology as females, whereas L. tropica-infected females were more susceptible than males. The majority of L. tropica-infected strains exhibited increased levels of chemokines CCL2, CCL3 and CCL5. CcS-16 females, which developed the largest lesions, exhibited a unique systemic chemokine reaction, characterized by additional transient early peaks of CCL3 and CCL5, which were not present in CcS-16 males nor in any other strain. Conclusion Comparison of L. tropica and L. major infections indicates that the strain patterns of response are species-specific, with different sex effects and largely different host susceptibility genes. PMID:22679519

  14. Opiates or cocaine: mortality from acute reactions in six major Spanish cities. State Information System on Drug Abuse (SEIT) Working Group.

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, J; Rodríguez, B; de la Fuente, L; Barrio, G; Vicente, J; Roca, J; Royuela, L

    1995-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--To describe temporal and geographical variations in mortality from acute reactions to opiates or cocaine and the demographic and toxicological characteristics of persons who died from these in major Spanish cities between 1983 and 1991. DESIGN--Descriptive study. Data were obtained retrospectively from pathologists' reports. SETTING--Cities of Madrid, Barcelona, Valencia, Seville, Zaragoza, and Bilbao. SUBJECTS--Deaths from acute reactions to opiates or cocaine were defined as those in which pathologists' reports did not indicate any other cause of death and in which evidence was found of recent consumption of these drugs. MAIN RESULTS--The mortality rate from acute reactions to opiate/cocaine per 100,000 population in the six cities as a whole rose from 1.2 in 1983 to 8.2 in 1991. Average annual rates for the whole period ranged from 1.7 in Seville to 4.9 in Barcelona. The male/female rates ratio was 5.9:1. The mean age of persons who died rose from 25.1 years in 1983 to 28 years in 1991. In more than 90% of the cases in whom toxicological tests were undertaken opiates were detected, and the proportion in which benzodiazepines or cocaine were detected increased during the period studied. CONCLUSIONS--Between 1983 and 1991 mortality from acute reactions to opiates/cocaine rose dramatically in major Spanish cities and significant differences in mortality between cities were found. Deaths were concentrated among men and young people. Acute drug reactions became one of the leading causes of death in persons 15-39 years of age, representing 11.1% of mortality from all causes in 1988 for this age group. Future studies should examine the relationship between the temporal and geographical variations in this type of mortality and various personal, environmental and social factors. PMID:7707007

  15. Metabolic fingerprint after acute and under sustained consumption of a functional beverage based on grape skin extract in healthy human subjects.

    PubMed

    Khymenets, Olha; Andres-Lacueva, Cristina; Urpi-Sarda, Mireia; Vazquez-Fresno, Rosa; Mart, Mercè Mercader; Reglero, Guillermo; Torres, Mireia; Llorach, Rafael

    2015-04-01

    Grape-derived polyphenols are considered to be one of the most promising ingredients for functional foods due to their health-promoting activities. We applied a HPLC-MS-based untargeted metabolomic approach in order to evaluate the impact of a functional food based on grape skin polyphenols on the urinary metabolome of healthy subjects. Thirty-one volunteers participated in two dietary crossover randomized intervention studies: with a single-dose intake (187 mL) and with a 15-day sustained consumption (twice per day, 187 mL per day in total) of a functional beverage (FB). Postprandial (4-hour) and 24-hour urine samples collected after acute consumption and on the last day of sustained FB consumption, respectively, were analysed using an untargeted HPLC-qTOF-MS approach. Multivariate modelling with subsequent application of an S-plot revealed differential mass features related to acute and prolonged consumption of FB. More than half of the mass features were shared between the two types of samples, among which several phase II metabolites of grape-derived polyphenols were identified at confidence level II. Prolonged consumption of FB was specifically reflected in urine metabolome by the presence of first-stage microbial metabolites of flavanols: hydroxyvaleric acid and hydroxyvalerolactone derivatives. Overall, several epicatechin and phenolic acid metabolites both of tissular and microbiota origin were the most representative markers of FB consumption. To our knowledge, this is one of the first studies where an untargeted LC-MS metabolomic approach has been applied in nutrition research on a grape-derived FB.

  16. Early weaning alters the acute-phase reaction to an endotoxin challenge in beef calves.

    PubMed

    Carroll, J A; Arthington, J D; Chase, C C

    2009-12-01

    Previous research indicates that early weaning before shipment can reduce transportation-induced increases in acute-phase proteins (APP) and can increase feedlot performance in beef calves. These data suggest that the combination of weaning and transport stress may compromise the immune system of calves, thus hindering subsequent performance and health. Therefore, our objective was to determine if the innate immune response of early weaned calves (EW; 80 d of age) differed from normal-weaned calves (NW; 250 d of age) in response to an endotoxin challenge. Eighteen Brahman x Angus calves (8 and 10 EW and NW, respectively; 233 +/- 5 kg of BW) were used. Calves were maintained on pasture with supplement and then moved into individual pens for 1 wk of acclimation before the start of the study. Calves were fitted with an indwelling jugular catheter 1 d before LPS challenge (0 h; 1.0 microg/kg of BW, intravenously). Blood samples were collected at 30-min intervals from -2 to 8 h. Serum samples were stored at -80 degrees C until analyzed for cortisol, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF), IL-1 beta, IL-6, interferon-gamma (IFN), ceruloplasmin, and haptoglobin. Whereas LPS increased serum cortisol (P or= 0.15) was observed. A weaning age x time interaction (P

  17. Epidermal dysplasia and Malassezia infection in two West Highland White Terrier siblings: an inherited skin disorder or reaction to severe Malassezia infection?

    PubMed

    Nett, C S; Reichler, I; Grest, P; Hauser, B; Reusch, C E

    2001-10-01

    Two 9-month-old West Highland White Terrier siblings were referred to our clinic with pruritus, alopecia and lichenification. Cytological examination of Scotch tape strippings revealed Malassezia organisms and cocci. Skin biopsy specimens showed epidermal dysplasia. Treatment included bathing with a 2% miconazole/chlorhexidine-containing shampoo, orally administered ketoconazole (5 mg kg-1, every 12 h) and cloxacillin (25 mg kg-1 every 8 h). Six weeks later, the dermal infection had resolved and there was hair regrowth. However, the dogs were still moderately pruritic. Intradermal allergy testing was positive for house dust mites, storage mites and Malassezia. Immunotherapy was initiated, and treatment with ketoconazole and cloxacillin was stopped. Skin biopsies, which were performed in both dogs 4 months after the first presentation, revealed mild superficial perivascular dermatitis. The remaining mild facial pruritus was easily controlled with topical treatment. These two cases indicate that epidermal dysplasia might be an inflammatory or hypersensitivity reaction to the Malassezia infection or a result of excessive self-trauma, rather than a congenital keratinization disorder. PMID:11906654

  18. Epidermal dysplasia and Malassezia infection in two West Highland White Terrier siblings: an inherited skin disorder or reaction to severe Malassezia infection?

    PubMed

    Nett, C S; Reichler, I; Grest, P; Hauser, B; Reusch, C E

    2001-10-01

    Two 9-month-old West Highland White Terrier siblings were referred to our clinic with pruritus, alopecia and lichenification. Cytological examination of Scotch tape strippings revealed Malassezia organisms and cocci. Skin biopsy specimens showed epidermal dysplasia. Treatment included bathing with a 2% miconazole/chlorhexidine-containing shampoo, orally administered ketoconazole (5 mg kg-1, every 12 h) and cloxacillin (25 mg kg-1 every 8 h). Six weeks later, the dermal infection had resolved and there was hair regrowth. However, the dogs were still moderately pruritic. Intradermal allergy testing was positive for house dust mites, storage mites and Malassezia. Immunotherapy was initiated, and treatment with ketoconazole and cloxacillin was stopped. Skin biopsies, which were performed in both dogs 4 months after the first presentation, revealed mild superficial perivascular dermatitis. The remaining mild facial pruritus was easily controlled with topical treatment. These two cases indicate that epidermal dysplasia might be an inflammatory or hypersensitivity reaction to the Malassezia infection or a result of excessive self-trauma, rather than a congenital keratinization disorder.

  19. Staining of skin with dihydroxyacetone.

    PubMed

    WITTGENSTEIN, E; BERRY, H K

    1960-09-30

    The reaction of skin with dihydroxyacetone to produce a brown "artificial tan" appears to proceed through combination with free amino groups in skin proteins, and particularly by combination of dihydroxyacetone with the free guanido group in arginine.

  20. Interleukin-6 Induced "Acute" Phenotypic Microenvironment Promotes Th1 Anti-Tumor Immunity in Cryo-Thermal Therapy Revealed By Shotgun and Parallel Reaction Monitoring Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Xue, Ting; Liu, Ping; Zhou, Yong; Liu, Kun; Yang, Li; Moritz, Robert L; Yan, Wei; Xu, Lisa X

    2016-01-01

    Cryo-thermal therapy has been emerged as a promising novel therapeutic strategy for advanced breast cancer, triggering higher incidence of tumor regression and enhanced remission of metastasis than routine treatments. To better understand its anti-tumor mechanism, we utilized a spontaneous metastatic mouse model and quantitative proteomics to compare N-glycoproteome changes in 94 serum samples with and without treatment. We quantified 231 highly confident N-glycosylated proteins using iTRAQ shotgun proteomics. Among them, 53 showed significantly discriminated regulatory patterns over the time course, in which the acute phase response emerged as the most enhanced pathway. The anti-tumor feature of the acute response was further investigated using parallel reaction monitoring target proteomics and flow cytometry on 23 of the 53 significant proteins. We found that cryo-thermal therapy reset the tumor chronic inflammation to an "acute" phenotype, with up-regulation of acute phase proteins including IL-6 as a key regulator. The IL-6 mediated "acute" phenotype transformed IL-4 and Treg-promoting ICOSL expression to Th1-promoting IFN-γ and IL-12 production, augmented complement system activation and CD86(+)MHCII(+) dendritic cells maturation and enhanced the proliferation of Th1 memory cells. In addition, we found an increased production of tumor progression and metastatic inhibitory proteins under such "acute" environment, favoring the anti-metastatic effect. Moreover, cryo-thermal on tumors induced the strongest "acute" response compared to cryo/hyperthermia alone or cryo-thermal on healthy tissues, accompanying by the most pronounced anti-tumor immunological effect. In summary, we demonstrated that cryo-thermal therapy induced, IL-6 mediated "acute" microenvironment shifted the tumor chronic microenvironment from Th2 immunosuppressive and pro-tumorigenic to Th1 immunostimulatory and tumoricidal state. Moreover, the magnitude of "acute" and "danger" signals play a key

  1. Ischemic tissue injury in the dorsal skinfold chamber of the mouse: a skin flap model to investigate acute persistent ischemia.

    PubMed

    Harder, Yves; Schmauss, Daniel; Wettstein, Reto; Egaña, José T; Weiss, Fabian; Weinzierl, Andrea; Schuldt, Anna; Machens, Hans-Günther; Menger, Michael D; Rezaeian, Farid

    2014-11-17

    Despite profound expertise and advanced surgical techniques, ischemia-induced complications ranging from wound breakdown to extensive tissue necrosis are still occurring, particularly in reconstructive flap surgery. Multiple experimental flap models have been developed to analyze underlying causes and mechanisms and to investigate treatment strategies to prevent ischemic complications. The limiting factor of most models is the lacking possibility to directly and repetitively visualize microvascular architecture and hemodynamics. The goal of the protocol was to present a well-established mouse model affiliating these before mentioned lacking elements. Harder et al. have developed a model of a musculocutaneous flap with a random perfusion pattern that undergoes acute persistent ischemia and results in ~50% necrosis after 10 days if kept untreated. With the aid of intravital epi-fluorescence microscopy, this chamber model allows repetitive visualization of morphology and hemodynamics in different regions of interest over time. Associated processes such as apoptosis, inflammation, microvascular leakage and angiogenesis can be investigated and correlated to immunohistochemical and molecular protein assays. To date, the model has proven feasibility and reproducibility in several published experimental studies investigating the effect of pre-, peri- and postconditioning of ischemically challenged tissue.

  2. WHO co-ordinated short-term double-blind trial with thalidomide in the treatment of acute lepra reactions in male lepromatous patients*

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, C. G. S.; Languillon, J.; Ramanujam, K.; Tarabini-Castellani, G.; de las Aguas, J. Terencio; Bechelli, L. M.; Uemura, K.; Dominguez, V. Martinez; Sundaresan, T.

    1971-01-01

    The treatment of lepra reactions constitutes one of the most serious problems in leprosy. For this reason, the first reports in 1965 of the favourable results obtained with thalidomide aroused considerable interest and led WHO, in 1967, to carry out a trial with the co-operation of four centres. A short-term double-blind trial was designed to study the effect of thalidomide, in comparison with acetylsalicylic acid, in the treatment of acute lepra reactions in male lepromatous patients. Acetylsalicylic acid was used instead of a placebo because of its antipyretic and analgesic activity. Because of the severe adverse reactions that may be caused by thalidomide, mainly the teratogenic effects, only males were included in the trial. The results of this short-term study seem to confirm previous reports of the efficacy of thalidomide and indicate that acetylsalicylic acid also seems to be helpful in the management of certain symptoms of lepra reactions. PMID:4947831

  3. Investigation of whether the acute hemolysis associated with Rho(D) immune globulin intravenous (human) administration for treatment of immune thrombocytopenic purpura is consistent with the acute hemolytic transfusion reaction model

    PubMed Central

    Gaines, Ann Reed; Lee-Stroka, Hallie; Byrne, Karen; Scott, Dorothy E.; Uhl, Lynne; Lazarus, Ellen; Stroncek, David F.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Immune thrombocytopenic purpura and secondary thrombocytopenia patients treated with Rho(D) immune globulin intravenous (human; anti-D IGIV) have experienced acute hemolysis, which is inconsistent with the typical presentation of extravascular hemolysis—the presumed mechanism of action of anti-D IGIV. Although the mechanism of anti-D-IGIV–associated acute hemolysis has not been established, the onset, signs/symptoms, and complications appear consistent with the intravascular hemolysis of acute hemolytic transfusion reactions (AHTRs). In transfusion medicine, the red blood cell (RBC) antigen-antibody incompatibility(-ies) that precipitate AHTRs can be detected in vitro with compatibility testing. Under the premise that anti-D-IGIV–associated acute hemolysis results from RBC antigen-antibody–mediated complement activation, this study evaluated whether the incompatibility(-ies) could be detected in vitro with a hemolysin assay, which would support the AHTR model as the hemolytic mechanism. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Seven anti-D IGIV lots were tested to determine the RBC antibody identities in those lots, including four lots that had been implicated in acute hemolytic episodes. Hemolysin assays were performed that tested each of 73 RBC specimens against each lot, including the RBCs of one patient who had experienced acute hemolysis after anti-D IGIV administration. RESULTS Only two anti-D IGIV lots contained RBC antibodies beyond those expected. No hemolysis endpoint was observed in any of the hemolysin assays. CONCLUSION Although the findings did not support the AHTR model, the results are reported to contribute knowledge about the mechanism of anti-D-IGIV–associated acute hemolysis and to prompt continued investigation into cause(s), prediction, and prevention of this potentially serious adverse event. PMID:19220820

  4. Wavelet analysis of acute effects of static magnetic field on resting skin blood flow at the nail wall in young men.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yili; Shen, Guanghao; Xie, Kangning; Tang, Chi; Wu, Xiaoming; Xu, Qiaoling; Liu, Juan; Song, Ji; Jiang, Xiaofan; Luo, Erping

    2011-11-01

    Whether static magnetic field (SMF) can affect microcirculation and microvasculature in human is still ambiguous. In this study, laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) combined with spectral analysis by wavelet transform was applied to investigate acute SMF-related effects on resting skin blood flow (SBF) at the nail walls. 18 healthy young male volunteers were randomly categorized into two groups: (1) intervention group (INT; n=9) and (2) control group (CTL; n=9). In each group, three 30-minute intervals (pre-exposure, exposure and post-exposure intervals) of continuous LDF recording were taken to evaluate the baseline, SMF effects and its deferred effects. During the exposure interval in the INT group, a neodymium-iron-boron magnet was laid under the middle finger prominence while a sham was used in the CTL group. The effective flux density range of SMF along the axis of the magnet was about 46 to 223 mT between the sites of SBF measurement and the magnet. No intervention existed during other 30-minute intervals in either group. Thereafter, analysis of variance with repeated-measures combined with Bonferroni's multiple comparison tests was adopted to analyze the SBF value and its spectral variants obtained by wavelet transform. The major finding of this study was that SMF exposure induced significant increases in the absolute amplitudes of frequency band III and V (aIII and aV), which indicated intrinsic myogenic and endothelial related activities (P<0.05) respectively while the mean amplitude of SBF flux still maintain on the basal level (P>0.05). Furthermore, after removal of the SMF, variations of rhythmic flow motion of SBF in SMF exposure interval vanished gradually, which suggest the limitations of the deferred-effect of SMF on SBF.

  5. Wavelet analysis of acute effects of static magnetic field on resting skin blood flow at the nail wall in young men.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yili; Shen, Guanghao; Xie, Kangning; Tang, Chi; Wu, Xiaoming; Xu, Qiaoling; Liu, Juan; Song, Ji; Jiang, Xiaofan; Luo, Erping

    2011-11-01

    Whether static magnetic field (SMF) can affect microcirculation and microvasculature in human is still ambiguous. In this study, laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) combined with spectral analysis by wavelet transform was applied to investigate acute SMF-related effects on resting skin blood flow (SBF) at the nail walls. 18 healthy young male volunteers were randomly categorized into two groups: (1) intervention group (INT; n=9) and (2) control group (CTL; n=9). In each group, three 30-minute intervals (pre-exposure, exposure and post-exposure intervals) of continuous LDF recording were taken to evaluate the baseline, SMF effects and its deferred effects. During the exposure interval in the INT group, a neodymium-iron-boron magnet was laid under the middle finger prominence while a sham was used in the CTL group. The effective flux density range of SMF along the axis of the magnet was about 46 to 223 mT between the sites of SBF measurement and the magnet. No intervention existed during other 30-minute intervals in either group. Thereafter, analysis of variance with repeated-measures combined with Bonferroni's multiple comparison tests was adopted to analyze the SBF value and its spectral variants obtained by wavelet transform. The major finding of this study was that SMF exposure induced significant increases in the absolute amplitudes of frequency band III and V (aIII and aV), which indicated intrinsic myogenic and endothelial related activities (P<0.05) respectively while the mean amplitude of SBF flux still maintain on the basal level (P>0.05). Furthermore, after removal of the SMF, variations of rhythmic flow motion of SBF in SMF exposure interval vanished gradually, which suggest the limitations of the deferred-effect of SMF on SBF. PMID:21439302

  6. Sub-acute cutaneous lupus erythematosus following nitrofurantoin: causative or coincidental?

    PubMed

    Murie, Jill; Agarwal, Monica

    2014-11-01

    A 70-year-old woman presented with progressive skin lesions on the face, limbs and trunk in the absence of systemic illness. Three months earlier, she had been prescribed six months prophylactic nitrofurantoin for recurrent urinary tract infections, treated with nitrofurantoin and trimethoprim. Positive immunology and histological inflammatory changes in a skin biopsy were consistent with a diagnosis of sub-acute cutaneous lupus erythematosus. Following treatment with topical steroids, the skin lesions regressed, but alopecia followed and required hydroxychloroquine. One year later, there are no new skin lesions and no evidence of systemic lupus erythematosus. Nitrofurantoin is associated with many side effects and hypersensitivity reactions. Possible drug-induced lupus reactions due to nitrofurantoin include pneumonitis, blood disorders and hepatotoxicity. This is the only published case of isolated sub-acute cutaneous lupus following maintenance nitrofurantoin.

  7. Mometasone Furoate Effect on Acute Skin Toxicity in Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Radiotherapy: A Phase III Double-Blind, Randomized Trial From the North Central Cancer Treatment Group N06C4

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Robert C.; Schwartz, David J.; Sloan, Jeff A.; Griffin, Patricia C.; Deming, Richard L.; Anders, Jon C.; Stoffel, Thomas J.; Haselow, Robert E.; Schaefer, Paul L.; Bearden, James D.; Atherton, Pamela J.; Loprinzi, Charles L.; Martenson, James A.

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: A two-arm, double-blind, randomized trial was performed to evaluate the effect of 0.1% mometasone furoate (MMF) on acute skin-related toxicity in patients undergoing breast or chest wall radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Patients with ductal carcinoma in situ or invasive breast carcinoma who were undergoing external beam radiotherapy to the breast or chest wall were randomly assigned to apply 0.1% MMF or placebo cream daily. The primary study endpoint was the provider-assessed maximal grade of Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, radiation dermatitis. The secondary endpoints included provider-assessed Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events Grade 3 or greater radiation dermatitis and adverse event monitoring. The patient-reported outcome measures included the Skindex-16, the Skin Toxicity Assessment Tool, a Symptom Experience Diary, and a quality-of-life self-assessment. An assessment was performed at baseline, weekly during radiotherapy, and for 2 weeks after radiotherapy. Results: A total of 176 patients were enrolled between September 21, 2007, and December 7, 2007. The provider-assessed primary endpoint showed no difference in the mean maximum grade of radiation dermatitis by treatment arm (1.2 for MMF vs. 1.3 for placebo; p = .18). Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events toxicity was greater in the placebo group (p = .04), primarily from pruritus. For the patient-reported outcome measures, the maximum Skindex-16 score for the MMF group showed less itching (p = .008), less irritation (p = .01), less symptom persistence or recurrence (p = .02), and less annoyance with skin problems (p = .04). The group's maximal Skin Toxicity Assessment Tool score showed less burning sensation (p = .02) and less itching (p = .002). Conclusion: Patients receiving daily MMF during radiotherapy might experience reduced acute skin toxicity compared with patients receiving placebo.

  8. Skin Keratins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fengrong; Zieman, Abigail; Coulombe, Pierre A

    2016-01-01

    Keratins comprise the type I and type II intermediate filament-forming proteins and occur primarily in epithelial cells. They are encoded by 54 evolutionarily conserved genes (28 type I, 26 type II) and regulated in a pairwise and tissue type-, differentiation-, and context-dependent manner. Keratins serve multiple homeostatic and stress-enhanced mechanical and nonmechanical functions in epithelia, including the maintenance of cellular integrity, regulation of cell growth and migration, and protection from apoptosis. These functions are tightly regulated by posttranslational modifications as well as keratin-associated proteins. Genetically determined alterations in keratin-coding sequences underlie highly penetrant and rare disorders whose pathophysiology reflects cell fragility and/or altered tissue homeostasis. Moreover, keratin mutation or misregulation represents risk factors or genetic modifiers for several acute and chronic diseases. This chapter focuses on keratins that are expressed in skin epithelia, and details a number of basic protocols and assays that have proven useful for analyses being carried out in skin.

  9. Skin Keratins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fengrong; Zieman, Abigail; Coulombe, Pierre A.

    2016-01-01

    Keratins comprise the type I and type II intermediate filament-forming proteins and occur primarily in epithelial cells. They are encoded by 54 evolutionarily conserved genes (28 type I, 26 type II) and regulated in a pairwise and tissue type-, differentiation-, and context-dependent manner. Keratins serve multiple homeostatic and stress-enhanced mechanical and nonmechanical functions in epithelia, including the maintenance of cellular integrity, regulation of cell growth and migration, and protection from apoptosis. These functions are tightly regulated by posttranslational modifications as well as keratin-associated proteins. Genetically determined alterations in keratin-coding sequences underlie highly penetrant and rare disorders whose pathophysiology reflects cell fragility and/or altered tissue homeostasis. Moreover, keratin mutation or misregulation represents risk factors or genetic modifiers for several acute and chronic diseases. This chapter focuses on keratins that are expressed in skin epithelia, and details a number of basic protocols and assays that have proven useful for analyses being carried out in skin. PMID:26795476

  10. Type 2 lepra reaction as a cause of pyrexia of unknown origin.

    PubMed

    Vinod, K V; Chandramohan, R; Dutta, T K; Rajesh, N G; Basu, Debdatta

    2012-04-01

    Leprosy, a commonly encountered disease, can rarely present as a reactional state de novo with fever as the main presenting feature. Here we describe an uncommon presentation of leprosy [with type 2 lepra reaction] as pyrexia of unknown origin with prominent rheumatologic manifestations [acute polyarthritis], renal involvement and generalized lymphadenopathy with rare presentation of type 2 lepra reaction without the classic skin lesions of erythema nodosum leprosum, occurring in a treatment naive patient without prior history of leprosy. PMID:23029751

  11. Natural Oil-Based Emulsion Containing Allantoin Versus Aqueous Cream for Managing Radiation-Induced Skin Reactions in Patients With Cancer: A Phase 3, Double-Blind, Randomized, Controlled Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Raymond Javan; Mann, Jennifer; Tripcony, Lee; Keller, Jacqui; Cheuk, Robyn; Blades, Rae; Keogh, Samantha; Poole, Christopher; Walsh, Christopher

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of a natural oil-based emulsion containing allantoin versus aqueous cream for preventing and managing radiation-induced skin reactions. Methods and Materials: A total of 174 patients were randomized and participated in the study. Patients received either cream 1 (the natural oil-based emulsion containing allantoin) or cream 2 (aqueous cream). Skin toxicity, pain, itching, and skin-related quality of life scores were collected for up to 4 weeks after radiation treatment. Results: Patients who received cream 1 had a significantly lower average level of Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events at week 3 (P<.05) but had statistically higher average levels of skin toxicity at weeks 7, 8, and 9 (all P<.001). Similar results were observed when skin toxicity was analyzed by grades. With regards to pain, patients in the cream 2 group had a significantly higher average level of worst pain (P<.05) and itching (P=.046) compared with the cream 1 group at week 3; however, these differences were not observed at other weeks. In addition, there was a strong trend for cream 2 to reduce the incidence of grade 2 or more skin toxicity in comparison with cream 1 (P=.056). Overall, more participants in the cream 1 group were required to use another topical treatment at weeks 8 (P=.049) and 9 (P=.01). Conclusion: The natural oil-based emulsion containing allantoin seems to have similar effects for managing skin toxicity compared with aqueous cream up to week 5; however, it becomes significantly less effective at later weeks into the radiation treatment and beyond treatment completion (week 6 and beyond). There were no major differences in pain, itching, and skin-related quality of life. In light of these results, clinicians and patients can base their decision on costs and preferences. Overall, aqueous cream seems to be a more preferred option.

  12. Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... are specialized skin cells that produce pigment called melanin. The melanin pigment produced by melanocytes gives skin its color. ... absorbing and scattering the energy. People with more melanin have darker skin and better protection from UV ...

  13. Skin Conditions

    MedlinePlus

    Your skin is your body's largest organ. It covers and protects your body. Your skin Holds body fluids in, preventing dehydration Keeps harmful ... it Anything that irritates, clogs, or inflames your skin can cause symptoms such as redness, swelling, burning, ...

  14. Suntan salons and the American skin

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, J.H.

    1981-07-01

    Suntan salon franchises burst upon the economic scene in the United States in 1978 and proliferated rapidly. At present it is estimated that between 1,000 and 2,000 salons are active in the country. Of the two types in use, the more common uses a fluorescent UVB source which emits primarily the highly injurious sunburn rays between 290 and 320 nm. These are the rays that not only are responsible for the acute cellular injury and erythema called sunburn, but at least under experimental conditions are the most carcinogenic. The UVA units are found primarily in Europe. The hazards of their rays have not been clarified as yet, but they are known to be responsible for the vast majority of exogenously photosensitized reactions that occur in the skin, they do augment the acute injury produced by the UVB rays, they cause dermal blood vessel damage, and they can produce lenticular injury. In conclusion, tanning for cosmetic purposes is not innocuous.

  15. Drug metabolism in the skin.

    PubMed

    Baron, J M; Merk, H F

    2001-08-01

    The skin performs a wide range of active metabolic functions including xenobiotic metabolism involving metabolizing enzymes specific to the skin. In this review we focus on the role of drug metabolism: (i) in allergic reactions to substances of low molecular weight; (ii) in cutaneous vitamin A and D3 metabolism and its modulation; (iii) in the interaction of transport and metabolic enzymes in skin cells; and (iv) on novel tools for the measurement of drug metabolism in various compartments of the human skin.

  16. Detection of lumpy skin disease virus antigen and genomic DNA in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues from an Egyptian outbreak in 2006.

    PubMed

    Awadin, W; Hussein, H; Elseady, Y; Babiuk, S; Furuoka, H

    2011-10-01

    An outbreak of lumpy skin disease (LSD) was reported in 2006 in Egypt affecting 16 provinces. Biopsies and post-mortem tissue samples were collected from calves that showed typical clinical signs of LSD and fixed in formalin. These samples were collected from a private dairy farm in the Damietta province of Egypt. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples were assessed using histology, and skin lesions were classified as either acute or subacute/chronic. Both lumpy skin disease virus (LSDV) DNA detected by polymerase chain reaction and LSDV antigen detected by immunohistochemistry using a capripoxvirus-specific monoclonal antibody were observed in the acute skin lesions and in some subacute/chronic skin lesions. PMID:21699673

  17. [Case of the month. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis due to an iodinated contrast radiodiagnostic agent].

    PubMed

    Paquet, P; Vandenbossche, G; Nikkels, A F; Henry, F; Piérard, G E

    2009-12-01

    Iodinated contrast agents are frequently involved in delayed polymorphic adverse skin reactions. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis following administration of iodinated contrast agents is a rare but severe form of such reactions. The disease is characterized by the sudden occurrence of an erosive and pustular erythroderma with fever, leukocytosis and sometimes peripheral adenopathies and liver involvement. This condition is considered as an immunologic reaction, primarily involving T lymphocytes. The overall mortality reaches about 1%. Elucidating the differential diagnosis with other acute paroxysmal drug eruptions (toxic epidermal necrolysis, Steven-Johnson syndrome and drug hypersensitivity syndrome) is of paramount importance for establishing the adequate treatment of PEAG.

  18. [A 42-year-old farmer with nonspecific leucocytosis and elevated transaminases. Acute septic reaction in Coxiella burnetii infection].

    PubMed

    Hempel, U; Schäffler, A; Salzberger, B; Rümmele, P; Schölmerich, J

    2008-06-01

    We report about a 42-year-old farmer with leucocytosis, elevation of transaminases and liver cirrhosis as an underlying condition. The diagnosis of Q fever hepatitis was made through liver biopsy and serology. Under therapy with doxycycline, transaminases initially increased again; after switching to ciprofloxacin, the patient could be discharged 3 weeks after admission. Q fever is caused by Coxiella burnetii. The most frequent acute manifestation is a self-limiting flu-like illness. Chronic Q fever mostly presents as endocarditis. The diagnosis is made through histology ("doughnut" granulomas), PCR, serology (acute: anti-phase II antibodies, chronic: anti-phase I antibodies) and culture. Standard therapy is doxycycline.

  19. Skin Biomes.

    PubMed

    Fyhrquist, N; Salava, A; Auvinen, P; Lauerma, A

    2016-05-01

    The cutaneous microbiome has been investigated broadly in recent years and some traditional perspectives are beginning to change. A diverse microbiome exists on human skin and has a potential to influence pathogenic microbes and modulate the course of skin disorders, e.g. atopic dermatitis. In addition to the known dysfunctions in barrier function of the skin and immunologic disturbances, evidence is rising that frequent skin disorders, e.g. atopic dermatitis, might be connected to a dysbiosis of the microbial community and changes in the skin microbiome. As a future perspective, examining the skin microbiome could be seen as a potential new diagnostic and therapeutic target in inflammatory skin disorders.

  20. [The feasibility of Erwinia asparaginase for pediatric patients who developed an allergic reaction to E.coli asparaginase during treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hiroyoshi; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Kato, Motohiro; Isobe, Kiyotaka; Yasui, Naoko; Mori, Makiko; Akiyama, Kosuke; Kikuchi, Akira; Hanada, Ryoji

    2013-04-01

    Asparaginase (ASNase) is one of the most important key drugs in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). However, clinical hypersensitivity reactions often occur and lead to the discontinuation of ASNase treatment. Here, we report a retrospective study of 68 Erwinia ASNase (Erw-ASNase) administrations in 11 patients with childhood ALL who developed allergic reactions to E.coli-ASNase in our hospital between 2006 and 2012. The median age of the patients was 6 (range, 0 to 14). Erw-ASNase purchased overseas by the patients' guardians had already been administered when we obtained informed consent from the guardians. In all patients, fibrinogen and/or anti-thrombin III levels were decreased, but thrombosis did not develop. There was only one mild adverse event (grade 2 urticaria) in one patient, in whom Erw-ASNase could be continued after increasing the doses of premedication with antihistamine and prednisolone. Erw-ASNase could be safely administered to all patients.

  1. Skin and antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Poljsak, Borut; Dahmane, Raja; Godic, Aleksandar

    2013-04-01

    It is estimated that total sun exposure occurs non-intentionally in three quarters of our lifetimes. Our skin is exposed to majority of UV radiation during outdoor activities, e.g. walking, practicing sports, running, hiking, etc. and not when we are intentionally exposed to the sun on the beach. We rarely use sunscreens during those activities, or at least not as much and as regular as we should and are commonly prone to acute and chronic sun damage of the skin. The only protection of our skin is endogenous (synthesis of melanin and enzymatic antioxidants) and exogenous (antioxidants, which we consume from the food, like vitamins A, C, E, etc.). UV-induced photoaging of the skin becomes clinically evident with age, when endogenous antioxidative mechanisms and repair processes are not effective any more and actinic damage to the skin prevails. At this point it would be reasonable to ingest additional antioxidants and/or to apply them on the skin in topical preparations. We review endogenous and exogenous skin protection with antioxidants.

  2. The aging skin.

    PubMed

    Bergfeld, W F

    1997-01-01

    In the past, sun exposure has been an integral part of the American life style. Along with increased leisure time, outdoor recreational sports, and sun bathing has come greater exposure to the sun. The cumulative effects of unprotected sun exposure coupled with the changes in the ozone layer have resulted in a large photodamaged population and an epidemic of the most dangerous skin cancer, malignant melanoma. Photodamage begins early, with a child's first unprotected sun exposure. Clinical studies show that 50% of an individual's ultraviolet light exposure occurs before the age of 18 years. This damage from acute and chronic ultraviolet light exposure has produced the explosion of skin cancers. Over the next 4 years, it is expected that skin cancer will become the most common type of cancer, and malignant melanoma will become the leading cause of death from skin cancer. This growing hazard to the public has profound medical and psychological ramifications. This paper will focus on prevention, identification, evaluation and treatment of photodamage to skin, as well as skin cancer. Special emphasis will be given to the National Skin Cancer Prevention Education Program.

  3. Effect of Dangguibohyul-Tang, a Mixed Extract of Astragalus membranaceus and Angelica sinensis, on Allergic and Inflammatory Skin Reaction Compared with Single Extracts of Astragalus membranaceus or Angelica sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, You Yeon; Kim, Mi Hye; Hong, Jongki

    2016-01-01

    Dangguibohyul-tang (DBT), herbal formula composed of Astragalus membranaceus (AM) and Angelica sinensis (AS) at a ratio of 5 : 1, has been used for the treatment of various skin diseases in traditional medicine. We investigated the effect of DBT on allergic and inflammatory skin reaction in atopic dermatitis-like model compared to the single extract of AM or AS. DBT treatment showed the remission of clinical symptoms, including decreased skin thickness and scratching behavior, the total serum IgE level, and the number of mast cells compared to DNCB group as well as the single extract of AM- or AS-treated group. Levels of cytokines (IL-4, IL-6, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-1β) and inflammatory mediators (NF-κB, phospho-IκBα, and phospho-MAPKs) were significantly decreased in AM, AS, and DBT groups. These results demonstrated that AM, AS, and DBT may have the therapeutic property on atopic dermatitis by inhibition of allergic and inflammatory mediators and DBT formula; a mixed extract of AM and AS based on the herb pairs theory especially might be more effective on antiallergic reaction as compared with the single extract of AM or AS. PMID:27051450

  4. Allergic reactions (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction can be provoked by skin contact with poison plants, chemicals and animal scratches, as well as by ... dust, nuts and shellfish, may also cause allergic reaction. Medications such as penicillin and other antibiotics are ...

  5. Allergic reactions (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction is a sensitivity to a specific substance, called an allergen, that is contacted through the skin, inhaled into the lungs, swallowed or injected. The body's reaction to an allergen can be mild, such as ...

  6. Environment and the skin

    PubMed Central

    Suskind, Raymond R.

    1977-01-01

    The skin is an important interface between man and his environment; it is an important portal of entry for hazardous agents and a vulnerable target tissue as well. It is a uniquely accessible model system for detecting hazards and for studying mechanisms of a wide variety of biologic funcitons. Environmental causes of skin reactions comprise a vast array of physical, chemical and biological agents. To appreciate the role of the skin as an interface with man's environment, it is necessary to understand the multiple adaptive mechanisms, and the defenses of the skin against the environmental stresses. The skin is endowed with a versatile group of defenses against penetration, fluid loss from the body, thermal stress, solar radiation, physical trauma and microbial agents. Patterns of adverse response range in quality and intensity from uncomplicated itching to metastatic neoplasia. Environmental problems comprise a large segment of disabling skin disease. Although critical epidemiologic data is limited, cutaneous illnesses comprise a significant segment of occupational disease. This represents a significant loss in productivity and a major cause of disability. The most serious research needs include the development of surveillance systems for identifying skin hazards and determining frequency of environmental skin disease; the development of new models for studying cutaneous penetration; the elucidation of the mechanisms of nonallergic inflammatory reactions (primary irritation) and of the accommodation phenomenon; the development of more sensitive models for predicting adverse responses to marginal irritants; the utilization of modern skills of immunobiology and immunochemistry to elucidate mechanisms of allergic responses; the launching of epidemiologic studies to determine the long term effects of PCBs and associated compounds such as dioxins; and the expansion of research in the mechanisms of skin cancer in relation to susceptibility, genetic and metabolic

  7. Adverse reactions to cosmetics and methods of testing.

    PubMed

    Nigam, P K

    2009-01-01

    Untoward reactions to cosmetics, toiletries, and topical applications are the commonest single reason for hospital referrals with allergic contact dermatitis. In most cases, these are only mild or transient and most reactions being irritant rather than allergic in nature. Various adverse effects may occur in the form of acute toxicity, percutaneous absorption, skin irritation, eye irritation, skin sensitization and photosensitization, subchronic toxicity, mutagenicity/genotoxicity, and phototoxicity/photoirritation. The safety assessment of a cosmetic product clearly depends upon how it is used, since it determines the amount of substance which may be ingested, inhaled, or absorbed through the skin or mucous membranes. Concentration of ingredients used in the different products is also important. Various test procedures include in vivo animal models and in vitro models, such as open or closed patch test, in vivo skin irritation test, skin corrosivity potential tests (rat skin transcutaneous electrical resistance test, Episkin test), eye irritation tests (in vivo eye irritancy test and Draize eye irritancy test), mutagenicity/genotoxicity tests (in vitro bacterial reverse mutation test and in vitro mammalian cell chromosome aberration test), and phototoxicity/photoirritation test (3T3 neutral red uptake phototoxicity test). Finished cosmetic products are usually tested in small populations to confirm the skin and mucous membrane compatibility, and to assess their cosmetic acceptability.

  8. Skin Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... drugs that can help clear up this condition. Day-to-Day Skin Care See our tips for daily skin ... Risk? Diagnosis Lower Your Risk Risk Test Alert Day Prediabetes My Health Advisor Tools to Know Your ...

  9. Skin Aging

    MedlinePlus

    ... too. Sunlight is a major cause of skin aging. You can protect yourself by staying out of ... person has smoked. Many products claim to revitalize aging skin or reduce wrinkles, but the Food and ...

  10. Skin tears.

    PubMed

    Baranoski, S

    2001-08-01

    Skin tears are a serious, painful problem for older patients. Find out how your staff can recognize patients at risk, what they can do to prevent skin tears, and how to manage them effectively if they occur.

  11. Skin Pigment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professional Version Pigment Disorders Overview of Skin Pigment Albinism Vitiligo Hyperpigmentation Melasma Melanin is the brown pigment ... dark-skinned people produce the most. People with albinism have little or no melanin and thus their ...

  12. Advanced therapies of skin injuries.

    PubMed

    Maver, Tina; Maver, Uroš; Kleinschek, Karin Stana; Raščan, Irena Mlinarič; Smrke, Dragica Maja

    2015-12-01

    The loss of tissue is still one of the most challenging problems in healthcare. Efficient laboratory expansion of skin tissue to reproduce the skins barrier function can make the difference between life and death for patients with extensive full-thickness burns, chronic wounds, or genetic disorders such as bullous conditions. This engineering has been initiated based on the acute need in the 1980s and today, tissue-engineered skin is the reality. The human skin equivalents are available not only as models for permeation and toxicity screening, but are frequently applied in vivo as clinical skin substitutes. This review aims to introduce the most important recent development in the extensive field of tissue engineering and to describe already approved, commercially available skin substitutes in clinical use.

  13. Sunscreens: topical and systemic approaches for protection of human skin against harmful effects of solar radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Pathak, M.A.

    1982-09-01

    This review deals with topical and systemic approaches for protection of human skin against the harmful effects of solar radiation. Two concerns about the deleterious effects of sun exposure involve: (1) acute effects (e.g., sunburn and drug-induced phototoxicity) and (2) potential long-term risks of repeated sun exposures leading to development of solar elastosis, keratoses, induction of both nonmelanoma and melanoma skin cancer, and alteration of immune responses and functions. Action spectra of normal and abnormal reactions of human skin to acute and chronic effects of solar radiation are presented with a view to helping the physician prescribe the appropriate sunscreens. Factors that influence acute effects of sunburn are reviewed. Various artificial methods effective in minimizing or preventing harmful effects of solar radiation, both in normal individuals and in patients with photosensitivity-related problems, are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the commercially available chemical sunscreens and their properties. Sun protection factor (SPF) values of several brand-name formulations determined with a solar simulator under indoor conditions (laboratory) and with solar radiation under natural, field conditions are presented. Factors responsible for variations of SPF values observed under indoor and outdoor conditions are reviewed. Systemic photoprotective agents and their limitations are outlined. The photobiology of melanin pigmentation (the tanning reaction) is briefly discussed, with emphasis on the dangers of using quick-tanning lotions for stimulation of the tanning reaction.

  14. Sensitive skin.

    PubMed

    Misery, L; Loser, K; Ständer, S

    2016-02-01

    Sensitive skin is a clinical condition defined by the self-reported facial presence of different sensory perceptions, including tightness, stinging, burning, tingling, pain and pruritus. Sensitive skin may occur in individuals with normal skin, with skin barrier disturbance, or as a part of the symptoms associated with facial dermatoses such as rosacea, atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. Although experimental studies are still pending, the symptoms of sensitive skin suggest the involvement of cutaneous nerve fibres and neuronal, as well as epidermal, thermochannels. Many individuals with sensitive skin report worsening symptoms due to environmental factors. It is thought that this might be attributed to the thermochannel TRPV1, as it typically responds to exogenous, endogenous, physical and chemical stimuli. Barrier disruptions and immune mechanisms may also be involved. This review summarizes current knowledge on the epidemiology, potential mechanisms, clinics and therapy of sensitive skin. PMID:26805416

  15. Assessment of acute and late effects to high-LET radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Blakely, E.A.; Castro, J.R. |

    1994-11-01

    We have begun to reassess late tissue effects available from the Charged Particle Cancer Radiotherapy program at Berkeley. Our quantitative approach is limited in the analysis of these Phase I/II studies by not having equivalent patient numbers for each of the particle beams studied, by not having completely comparable follow-up times, by variations in the sizes of the fields compared, by variations in the skin scoring photographic documentation available from the patient charts, and by variations in the fractionation sizes, numbers and schedules. Despite these limitations, preliminary evidence demonstrates acute skin reactions with a shift to increasing lower dose per fraction per field for the maximum skin reactions of helium, carbon and neon ions compared to electrons. Comparisons with skin reactions from low-energy neutrons indicate that Bragg peak carbon ions (initial energy 308 MeV/nucleon) are slightly less effective than 7.5 MeV neutrons. Bragg peak neon ions (initial energy 670 MeV/nucleon) corrected for differences in reference radiation are slightly more effective than 7.5 MeV neutrons. Bragg peak silicon (initial energy 670 MeV/nucleon) result in an enhanced acute skin reaction, and a premature appearance of late effects that may indicate a significantly different mechanism of damage and/or repair.

  16. Anti-inflammatory effects of eugenol on lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory reaction in acute lung injury via regulating inflammation and redox status.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xianfeng; Liu, Yuanyuan; Lu, Yingxun; Ma, Chunhua

    2015-05-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) represents a clinical syndrome that results from complex responses of the lung to a multitude of direct and indirect insults. This study aims to evaluate the possible mechanisms responsible for the anti-inflammatory effects of eugenol (EUL) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory reaction in ALI. ALI was induced in mice by intratracheal instillation of LPS (0.5 mg/kg), and EUL (5, and 10 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally 1h prior to LPS administration. After 6h, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissue were collected. The findings suggest that the protective mechanism of EUL may be attributed partly to decreased production of proinflammatory cytokines through the regulating inflammation and redox status. The results support that use of EUL is beneficial in the treatment of ALI.

  17. Acquired Cell-Mediated Immunodepression in Acute Chagas' Disease

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Antonio R. L.; Teixeira, Glória; Macêdo, Vanize; Prata, Aluizio

    1978-01-01

    In this study two groups of patients with acute Chagas' disease were identified. Group one consisted of five patients with apparent acute Chagas' disease. These patients showed symptoms and signals of an acute illness, such as high fever and enlarged spleen. One of these patients developed severe myocarditis and heart failure. Group two consisted of seven patients with inapparent acute Chagas' disease. This was a nonclinical entity, not perceived by the patient who did not seek medical care. The diagnosis was made by the shift of a serologic test which indicates the presence of immunoglobulin M antibodies to Trypanosoma cruzi. The patients with apparent acute Chagas' disease showed positive delayed-type skin response to T. cruzi antigen. Also, their leukocytes showed significant inhibition of migration in the presence of this antigen. By contrast, the patients with the inapparent acute Chagas' disease did not show positive delayed-type skin response to T. cruzi antigen and no significant inhibition was observed when their cells migrated in the presence of this antigen. Of interest, none of these patients was capable of developing contact sensitivity to 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene. However, three out of five patients with the apparent acute disease and all the normal control subjects showed positive contact reaction after sensitization to this drug. The results of these experiments would suggest that the thymus-derived (T)-lymphocyte function is depressed in patients with the clinically inapparent acute Chagas' disease. This immunodepression seems to be acquired in the course of the T. cruzi infection because all patients showed positive delayed-type skin response to at least one ubiquitous microbial extract, thus indicating previously normal T-cell function. We hypothesize that T. cruzi antigens may directly stimulate T cells with the concomitant release of factors that might become supressive for T-cell responses. Furthermore, the suppressive effect might interfere

  18. Effect of acute L-Alanyl-L-Glutamine and electrolyte ingestion on cognitive function and reaction time following endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Pruna, Gabriel J; Hoffman, Jay R; McCormack, William P; Jajtner, Adam R; Townsend, Jeremy R; Bohner, Jonathan D; La Monica, Michael B; Wells, Adam J; Stout, Jeffrey R; Fragala, Maren S; Fukuda, David H

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of the L-Alanyl-L-Glutamine dipeptide (AG) on cognitive function and reaction time (RT) following endurance exercise. Twelve male endurance athletes (23.5 ± 3.7 y; 175.5 ± 5.4 cm; 70.7 ± 7.6 kg) performed four trials, each consisting of running on a treadmill at 70% of VO2max for 1h, then at 90% of VO2max until exhaustion. One trial consisted of no hydration (DHY), another required ingestion of only a sports electrolyte drink (ED) and two trials required ingestion of a low dose (LD; 300 mg·500 ml(-1)) and high dose (HD) of AG (1 g·500ml(-1)) added to the ED. Cognitive function and reaction tests were administered pre- and post-exercise. Magnitude based inferences were used to analyze ∆ cognitive function and ∆ reaction test data. Results indicated that DHY had a possible negative effect on number of hits in a 60-sec reaction test compared to LD and HD, while ED appeared to have a negative effect compared to HD. Analysis of lower body quickness indicated that LD and HD were likely improved in comparison to DHY. Performance on the serial subtraction test appeared to be possibly better in ED than DHY, while other comparisons between groups regarding cognitive function were unclear. In conclusion, rehydrating with AG during submaximal exercise may maintain or enhance subsequent RT in upper and lower body activities compared to DHY. These same effects were not apparent when participants consumed ED.

  19. Effect of acute L-Alanyl-L-Glutamine and electrolyte ingestion on cognitive function and reaction time following endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Pruna, Gabriel J; Hoffman, Jay R; McCormack, William P; Jajtner, Adam R; Townsend, Jeremy R; Bohner, Jonathan D; La Monica, Michael B; Wells, Adam J; Stout, Jeffrey R; Fragala, Maren S; Fukuda, David H

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of the L-Alanyl-L-Glutamine dipeptide (AG) on cognitive function and reaction time (RT) following endurance exercise. Twelve male endurance athletes (23.5 ± 3.7 y; 175.5 ± 5.4 cm; 70.7 ± 7.6 kg) performed four trials, each consisting of running on a treadmill at 70% of VO2max for 1h, then at 90% of VO2max until exhaustion. One trial consisted of no hydration (DHY), another required ingestion of only a sports electrolyte drink (ED) and two trials required ingestion of a low dose (LD; 300 mg·500 ml(-1)) and high dose (HD) of AG (1 g·500ml(-1)) added to the ED. Cognitive function and reaction tests were administered pre- and post-exercise. Magnitude based inferences were used to analyze ∆ cognitive function and ∆ reaction test data. Results indicated that DHY had a possible negative effect on number of hits in a 60-sec reaction test compared to LD and HD, while ED appeared to have a negative effect compared to HD. Analysis of lower body quickness indicated that LD and HD were likely improved in comparison to DHY. Performance on the serial subtraction test appeared to be possibly better in ED than DHY, while other comparisons between groups regarding cognitive function were unclear. In conclusion, rehydrating with AG during submaximal exercise may maintain or enhance subsequent RT in upper and lower body activities compared to DHY. These same effects were not apparent when participants consumed ED. PMID:25321847

  20. Prevalence of Acute Symptoms among Workers in Printing Factories

    PubMed Central

    Decharat, Somsiri

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To identify socioeconomic situation factors and behavioral factors associated with the prevalence of acute symptoms among 150 printing workers in 16 printing factories in Southern Thailand. Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted by interviewing 150 printing workers in 16 printing factories in Southern Thailand. Results. Acute symptoms comprised dizziness, drowsiness, eye irritation, light-headedness, rhinitis, shortness of breath, cough, chest tightness, nausea/vomiting, exacerbation of asthma, allergic skin reaction, and visual disorder. The prevalence of symptoms was consistently higher among workers in the printing process than among other workers. Smoking cigarettes and drinking alcohol were not associated with an increased prevalence of acute symptoms among these printing-factory workers. Conclusion. The significant associations were found between personal protective equipment and personal hygiene and prevalence of acute symptoms in printing workers. PMID:25386365

  1. Severe systemic allergic reaction induced by accidental skin contact with cow milk in a 16-year-old boy. A case report.

    PubMed

    Liccardi, G; De Falco, F; Gilder, J A; D'Amato, M; D'Amato, G

    2004-01-01

    The symptoms of food allergy are rarely induced by skin contact. A 16-year-old boy was referred to our Allergology Centre after an episode of systemic symptoms triggered by accidental skin contact with a drop of cow milk (CM) dripped from a sandwich containing fresh cheese. The patient had been allergic to CM from the age of 24 months and had experienced several episodes of urticaria-angioedema after the ingestion of tiny or "hidden" amounts of CM proteins. In vivo and in vitro diagnostic procedures showed intense sensitisation to all CM proteins (1/100 dilutions of allergenic extracts produced large wheals, and class 4 specific IgE antibodies. Total IgE antibodies were elevate (770.0 UI/). A moderate degree of bronchial hyperresponsiveness was found (PC20 metacholine: 3.90 milligrams). This case report suggests that patients with a high degree of sensitisation to CM proteins should be alert to the danger of skin contact and should beware of "hidden" CM allergens.

  2. Computational Analysis of AMPK-Mediated Neuroprotection Suggests Acute Excitotoxic Bioenergetics and Glucose Dynamics Are Regulated by a Minimal Set of Critical Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Niamh M. C.; D’Orsi, Beatrice; Monsefi, Naser; Huber, Heinrich J.; Prehn, Jochen H. M.

    2016-01-01

    Loss of ionic homeostasis during excitotoxic stress depletes ATP levels and activates the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), re-establishing energy production by increased expression of glucose transporters on the plasma membrane. Here, we develop a computational model to test whether this AMPK-mediated glucose import can rapidly restore ATP levels following a transient excitotoxic insult. We demonstrate that a highly compact model, comprising a minimal set of critical reactions, can closely resemble the rapid dynamics and cell-to-cell heterogeneity of ATP levels and AMPK activity, as confirmed by single-cell fluorescence microscopy in rat primary cerebellar neurons exposed to glutamate excitotoxicity. The model further correctly predicted an excitotoxicity-induced elevation of intracellular glucose, and well resembled the delayed recovery and cell-to-cell heterogeneity of experimentally measured glucose dynamics. The model also predicted necrotic bioenergetic collapse and altered calcium dynamics following more severe excitotoxic insults. In conclusion, our data suggest that a minimal set of critical reactions may determine the acute bioenergetic response to transient excitotoxicity and that an AMPK-mediated increase in intracellular glucose may be sufficient to rapidly recover ATP levels following an excitotoxic insult. PMID:26840769

  3. A fluid response: Alpha-amylase reactions to acute laboratory stress are related to sample timing and saliva flow rate.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Tamás; van Lien, René; Willemsen, Gonneke; Proctor, Gordon; Efting, Marieke; Fülöp, Márta; Bárdos, György; Veerman, Enno C I; Bosch, Jos A

    2015-07-01

    Salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) is used as a sympathetic (SNS) stress marker, though its release is likely co-determined by SNS and parasympathetic (PNS) activation. The SNS and PNS show asynchronous changes during acute stressors, and sAA responses may thus vary with sample timing. Thirty-four participants underwent an eight-minute memory task (MT) and cold pressor task (CPT). Cardiovascular SNS (pre-ejection period, blood pressure) and PNS (heart rate variability) activity were monitored continuously. Unstimulated saliva was collected repeatedly during and after each laboratory stressor, and sAA concentration (U/ml) and secretion (U/minute) determined. Both stressors increased anxiety. The MT caused an immediate and continued cardiac SNS activation, but sAA concentration increased at task cessation only (+54%); i.e., when there was SNS-PNS co-activation. During the MT sAA secretion even decreased (-35%) in conjunction with flow rate and vagal tone. The CPT robustly increased blood pressure but not sAA. In summary, sAA fluctuations did not parallel changes in cardiac SNS activity or anxiety. sAA responses seem contingent on sample timing and flow rate, likely involving both SNS and PNS influences. Verification using other stressors and contexts seems warranted.

  4. Efficacy of topical phenol decontamination strategies on severity of acute phenol chemical burns and dermal absorption: in vitro and in vivo studies in pig skin.

    PubMed

    Monteiro-Riviere, N A; Inman, A O; Jackson, H; Dunn, B; Dimond, S

    2001-05-01

    Pure phenol is colorless and used in the manufacture of phenolic resins, plastics, explosives, fertilizers, paints, rubber, textiles, adhesives, pharmaceuticals, paper, soap, and wood preservatives. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of several phenol decontamination strategies following dermal exposure using the pig as a model for human exposure, and then assess the effect of the two best treatments on phenol absorption in the isolated perfused porcine skin flap (IPPSF). Six anesthetized Yorkshire pigs were exposed to 89% aqueous phenol for 1 min using Hilltop chambers (10 skin sites/pig; 400 microl/site). Exposure to phenol was followed by one of 10 different decontamination procedures: 1-, 5-, 15-, and 30-min water wash; Ivory soap solution; polyethylene glycol (PEG 400); PEG 400/industrial methylated spirits (IMS); PEG 400/ethanol (EtOH); polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP)/70% isopropanol (IPA); and 70% IPA. For each of the last five strategies, 1-min treatment washes were repeatedly alternated with 1-min water washes for a total of 15 min. Evaluation was based on scoring of erythema, edema, and histological parameters such as intracellular and intercellular epidermal edema, papillary dermal edema, perivascular infiltrates, pyknotic stratum basale cells, and epidermal-dermal separation. It was concluded that PEG 400 and 70% IPA were superior to the other treatments investigated and equally efficacious in the reduction of phenol-induced skin damage. In addition, phenol absorption was assessed utilizing the two most effective in vivo treatments in the IPPSF. The assessment of percutaneous absorption of phenol found the PEG 400, 70% IPA, and 15-min water treatments significantly (P < 0.05) reduced phenol absorption relative to no treatment.

  5. Skin findings in newborns

    MedlinePlus

    Newborn skin characteristics; Infant skin characteristics; Neonatal care - skin ... the first few weeks of the baby's life. Newborn skin will vary, depending on the length of the pregnancy. Premature infants have thin, transparent skin. The skin of a ...

  6. Persistent light reaction associated with photoallergic contact dermatitis to musk ambrette and allergic contact dermatitis to fragrance mix.

    PubMed

    Megahed, M; Hölzle, E; Plewig, G

    1991-01-01

    A 57-year-old man suffering from persistent light reaction with photocontact allergy to musk ambrette and contact allergy to fragrance mix was evaluated. A lowered minimal erythema dose to UV-B (MED-UV-B) was seen. Reactions to long-wave UV-A and visible radiation were normal. A skin biopsy from one MED-UV-B, taken 24 h after irradiation, showed acute spongiotic dermatitis.

  7. Skin tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Mansbridge, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    The major applications of tissue-engineered skin substitutes are in promoting the healing of acute and chronic wounds. Several approaches have been taken by commercial companies to develop products to address these conditions. Skin substitutes include both acellular and cellular devices. While acellular skin substitutes act as a template for dermal formation, this discussion mainly covers cellular devices. In addressing therapeutic applications in tissue engineering generally, a valuable precursor is an understanding of the mechanism of the underlying pathology. While this is straightforward in many cases, it has not been available for wound healing. Investigation of the mode of action of the tissue-engineered skin substitutes has led to considerable insight into the mechanism of formation, maintenance and treatment of chronic wounds. Four aspects mediating healing are considered here for their mechanism of action: (i) colonization of the wound bed by live fibroblasts in the implant, (ii) the secretion of growth factors, (iii) provision of a suitable substrate for cell migration, particularly keratinocytes and immune cells, and (iv) modification of the immune system by secretion of neutrophil recruiting chemokines. An early event in acute wound healing is an influx of neutrophils that destroy planktonic bacteria. However, if the bacteria are able to form biofilm, they become resistant to neutrophil action and prevent reepithelialization. In this situation the wound becomes chronic. In chronic wounds, fibroblasts show a senescence-like phenotype with decreased secretion of neutrophil chemoattractants that make it more likely that biofilms become established. Treatment of the chronic wounds involves debridement to eliminate biofilm, and the use of antimicrobials. A role of skin substitutes is to provide non-senescent fibroblasts that attract and activate neutrophils to prevent biofilm re-establishment. The emphasis of the conclusion is the importance of preventing

  8. Acute inflammatory reaction after myocardial ischemic injury and reperfusion. Development and use of a neutrophil-specific antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, H. K.; Entman, M. L.; Zhu, J. Y.; Youker, K. A.; Berens, K.; Doré, M.; Smith, C. W.

    1996-01-01

    Reperfusion of the infarcted canine myocardium after 1 hour of ischemia is associated with an acute inflammatory infiltrate at the border of the infarct. In this paper, we demonstrate that early margination and emigration of neutrophils originate in thin-walled (approximately 5 micrometers) venous cisterns that average 200 micrometers in length and vary from 10 to 70 micrometers in width and show strong constitutive expression of both ICAM-1 and P-selectin; this class of vessels (venous cisterns) appears to be a unique feature in heart. A monoclonal antibody (SG8H6) with specificity for canine neutrophils was developed that allowed much more sensitive immunohistochemical detection of neutrophils in tissue and allowed us to follow tissue infiltration with time. Samples from 1 hour of reperfusion revealed dense margination and substantial emigration of neutrophils associated with the venous cisterns and collecting venules. By 2 hours, there was intense local emigration to the extravascular space between cardiac myocytes. By 3 hours, the infiltrate extended deeper into the infarct, and there was a continuous border zone of neutrophil infiltration that overlapped a region where intact cardiac myocytes strongly expressed ICAM-1 mRNA and extended into the necrotic tissue. At later times, neutrophil migration into infarcted tissue continued to progress. Neutrophil transmigration into reperfused myocardium is more extensive than previously described, and its extravascular distribution during early reperfusion is primarily in the viable border zone of the myocardium where myocyte ICAM-1 mRNA is found. These data are compatible with the hypothesis that extravascular neutrophils may participate in reperfusion injury. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8669481

  9. Improved minimal residual disease detection by targeted quantitative polymerase chain reaction in Nucleophosmin 1 type a mutated acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, Louise; Levéen, Per; Axler, Olof; Dvorakova, Dana; Juliusson, Gunnar; Ehinger, Mats

    2016-10-01

    Multicolor flow cytometry (MFC) and real-time quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR) are important independent techniques to determine minimal residual disease (MRD) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). MFC is the standard method, but may be unreliable. Therefore, MFC-based determination of MRD with an RQ-PCR-based approach targeting the nucleophosmin 1 (NPM1) type A mutation was set out to compare. Since most current NPM1 RQ-PCR MRD protocols suffer from clear definitions of quantifiability, we sought to define quantifiability in a reproducible and standardized manner. The limit of quantifiability of our RQ-PCR protocol for the NPM1 type A mutation varied between 0.002% and 0.04% residual leukemic cells depending on the features of the standard curve for each PCR experiment. The limit of detection was close to 0.001% leukemic cells. The limit of detection by MFC ranged from 0.01% to 1% depending on the phenotype of the leukemic cells as compared with non-leukemic bone marrow cells. Forty-five MRD samples from 15 patients using both NPM1 mutation specific RQ-PCR and MFC were analyzed. In 32 of the 45 samples (71%), an MRD-signal could be detected with RQ-PCR. A quantifiable NPM1 mutation signal was found in 15 samples (33%) (range 0.003%-2.6% leukemic cells). By contrast, only two follow-up samples (4%) showed residual leukemic cells (0.04% and 0.3%, respectively) by MFC. Thus, RQ-PCR of the NPM1 type A mutation was more sensitive and reliable than MFC for determination of MRD, which might have clinical implications. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Improved minimal residual disease detection by targeted quantitative polymerase chain reaction in Nucleophosmin 1 type a mutated acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, Louise; Levéen, Per; Axler, Olof; Dvorakova, Dana; Juliusson, Gunnar; Ehinger, Mats

    2016-10-01

    Multicolor flow cytometry (MFC) and real-time quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR) are important independent techniques to determine minimal residual disease (MRD) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). MFC is the standard method, but may be unreliable. Therefore, MFC-based determination of MRD with an RQ-PCR-based approach targeting the nucleophosmin 1 (NPM1) type A mutation was set out to compare. Since most current NPM1 RQ-PCR MRD protocols suffer from clear definitions of quantifiability, we sought to define quantifiability in a reproducible and standardized manner. The limit of quantifiability of our RQ-PCR protocol for the NPM1 type A mutation varied between 0.002% and 0.04% residual leukemic cells depending on the features of the standard curve for each PCR experiment. The limit of detection was close to 0.001% leukemic cells. The limit of detection by MFC ranged from 0.01% to 1% depending on the phenotype of the leukemic cells as compared with non-leukemic bone marrow cells. Forty-five MRD samples from 15 patients using both NPM1 mutation specific RQ-PCR and MFC were analyzed. In 32 of the 45 samples (71%), an MRD-signal could be detected with RQ-PCR. A quantifiable NPM1 mutation signal was found in 15 samples (33%) (range 0.003%-2.6% leukemic cells). By contrast, only two follow-up samples (4%) showed residual leukemic cells (0.04% and 0.3%, respectively) by MFC. Thus, RQ-PCR of the NPM1 type A mutation was more sensitive and reliable than MFC for determination of MRD, which might have clinical implications. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27191933

  11. Clinical practice guidelines for the prevention and treatment of acute and late radiation reactions from the MASCC Skin Toxicity Study Group.

    PubMed

    Wong, Rebecca K S; Bensadoun, René-Jean; Boers-Doets, Christine B; Bryce, Jane; Chan, Alexandre; Epstein, Joel B; Eaby-Sandy, Beth; Lacouture, Mario E

    2013-10-01

    Radiation dermatitis (RD) results from radiotherapy and often occurs within the first 4 weeks of treatment, although late effects also occur. While RD may resolve over time, it can have a profound effect on patients' quality of life and lead to dose modifications. A study group of international, interdisciplinary experts convened to develop RD prevention and treatment guidelines based on evidence from randomized, controlled trials. Evidence-based recommendations were developed after an extensive literature review. Randomized, controlled trials with standardized measurement of outcomes were considered the best evidence, and a majority of the recommendations were formulated from this literature. The adoption of washing with water, with or without a mild soap, and allowing the use of antiperspirants is supported by randomized trials. Use of topical prophylactic corticosteroids (mometasone) is recommended to reduce discomfort and itching. There is some evidence that silver sulfadiazine cream can reduce dermatitis score. There is insufficient evidence to support, and therefore the panel recommends against the use of trolamine, topical sulcrate, hyaluronic acid, ascorbic acid, silver leaf dressing, light-emitting diode lasers, Theta cream, dexpanthenol, calendula, proteolytic enzymes, sulcralfate, oral zinc, and pentoxifylline. Moreover, there is no evidence to support the superiority for any specific intervention in a reactive fashion. For patients with established radiation-induced telangiectasia and fibrosis, the panel suggests the use of pulse dye laser for visual appearance, and the use of pentoxifylline and vitamin E for the reduction of fibrosis.

  12. Clinical practice guidelines for the prevention and treatment of acute and late radiation reactions from the MASCC Skin Toxicity Study Group.

    PubMed

    Wong, Rebecca K S; Bensadoun, René-Jean; Boers-Doets, Christine B; Bryce, Jane; Chan, Alexandre; Epstein, Joel B; Eaby-Sandy, Beth; Lacouture, Mario E

    2013-10-01

    Radiation dermatitis (RD) results from radiotherapy and often occurs within the first 4 weeks of treatment, although late effects also occur. While RD may resolve over time, it can have a profound effect on patients' quality of life and lead to dose modifications. A study group of international, interdisciplinary experts convened to develop RD prevention and treatment guidelines based on evidence from randomized, controlled trials. Evidence-based recommendations were developed after an extensive literature review. Randomized, controlled trials with standardized measurement of outcomes were considered the best evidence, and a majority of the recommendations were formulated from this literature. The adoption of washing with water, with or without a mild soap, and allowing the use of antiperspirants is supported by randomized trials. Use of topical prophylactic corticosteroids (mometasone) is recommended to reduce discomfort and itching. There is some evidence that silver sulfadiazine cream can reduce dermatitis score. There is insufficient evidence to support, and therefore the panel recommends against the use of trolamine, topical sulcrate, hyaluronic acid, ascorbic acid, silver leaf dressing, light-emitting diode lasers, Theta cream, dexpanthenol, calendula, proteolytic enzymes, sulcralfate, oral zinc, and pentoxifylline. Moreover, there is no evidence to support the superiority for any specific intervention in a reactive fashion. For patients with established radiation-induced telangiectasia and fibrosis, the panel suggests the use of pulse dye laser for visual appearance, and the use of pentoxifylline and vitamin E for the reduction of fibrosis. PMID:23942595

  13. [Sensitive skin: a complex syndrome].

    PubMed

    Escalas-Taberner, J; González-Guerra, E; Guerra-Tapia, A

    2011-10-01

    Epidemiologic studies indicate that ever larger numbers of people report having sensitive skin, for which a European prevalence of 50% is estimated. Sensitive skin is characterized by hyperreactivity, with manifestations varying in relation to many factors. The pathogenesis of this disorder is poorly understood, although studies point to a biophysical mechanism. Objective diagnosis of sensitive skin is difficult, as information comes mainly from the patient's report of symptoms in the absence of effective, strongly predictive tests because of great interindividual variability in skin sensitivity. Substances that trigger a reaction in hypersensitive skin also vary greatly. The impact of this syndrome on quality of life is considerable and patients often present psychiatric symptoms; therefore, dermatologists should explore this possibility when taking a patient's history. Patient cooperation and physician persistence are both essential for treating sensitive skin.

  14. Oily skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... keep your skin clean using warm water and soap, or a soapless cleanser. Clean your face with astringent pads if frequent face washing causes irritation. Use only water-based or oil-free cosmetics if you have oily skin. Your ...

  15. The effects of acute and prolonged CRAM supplementation on reaction time and subjective measures of focus and alertness in healthy college students

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of acute and prolonged (4-weeks) ingestion of a supplement designed to improve reaction time and subjective measures of alertness, energy, fatigue, and focus compared to placebo. Methods Nineteen physically-active subjects (17 men and 2 women) were randomly assigned to a group that either consumed a supplement (21.1 ± 0.6 years; body mass: 80.6 ± 9.4 kg) or placebo (21.3 ± 0.8 years; body mass: 83.4 ± 18.5 kg). During the initial testing session (T1), subjects were provided 1.5 g of the supplement (CRAM; α-glycerophosphocholine, choline bitartrate, phosphatidylserine, vitamins B3, B6, and B12, folic acid, L-tyrosine, anhydrous caffeine, acetyl-L-carnitine, and naringin) or a placebo (PL), and rested quietly for 10-minutes before completing a questionnaire on subjective feelings of energy, fatigue, alertness and focus (PRE). Subjects then performed a 4-minute quickness and reaction test followed by a 10-min bout of exhaustive exercise. The questionnaire and reaction testing sequence was then repeated (POST). Subjects reported back to the lab (T2) following 4-weeks of supplementation and repeated the testing sequence. Results Reaction time significantly declined (p = 0.050) between PRE and POST at T1 in subjects consuming PL, while subjects under CRAM supplementation were able to maintain (p = 0.114) their performance. Significant performance declines were seen in both groups from PRE to POST at T2. Elevations in fatigue were seen for CRAM at both T1 and T2 (p = 0.001 and p = 0.000, respectively), but only at T2 for PL (p = 0.029). Subjects in CRAM maintained focus between PRE and POST during both T1 and T2 trials (p = 0.152 and p = 0.082, respectively), whereas significant declines in focus were observed between PRE and POST in PL at both trials (p = 0.037 and p = 0.014, respectively). No difference in alertness was seen at T1 between PRE and POST for CRAM (p = 0.083), but a significant decline was

  16. Topical Application of a Platelet Activating Factor Receptor Agonist Suppresses Phorbol Ester-Induced Acute and Chronic Inflammation and Has Cancer Chemopreventive Activity in Mouse Skin

    PubMed Central

    Ocana, Jesus A.; DaSilva-Arnold, Sonia C.; Bradish, Joshua R.; Richey, Justin D.; Warren, Simon J.; Rashid, Badri; Travers, Jeffrey B.; Konger, Raymond L.

    2014-01-01

    Platelet activating factor (PAF) has long been associated with acute edema and inflammatory responses. PAF acts by binding to a specific G-protein coupled receptor (PAF-R, Ptafr). However, the role of chronic PAF-R activation on sustained inflammatory responses has been largely ignored. We recently demonstrated that mice lacking the PAF-R (Ptafr-/- mice) exhibit increased cutaneous tumorigenesis in response to a two-stage chemical carcinogenesis protocol. Ptafr-/- mice also exhibited increased chronic inflammation in response to phorbol ester application. In this present study, we demonstrate that topical application of the non-hydrolysable PAF mimetic (carbamoyl-PAF (CPAF)), exerts a potent, dose-dependent, and short-lived edema response in WT mice, but not Ptafr -/- mice or mice deficient in c-Kit (c-KitW-sh/W-sh mice). Using an ear inflammation model, co-administration of topical CPAF treatment resulted in a paradoxical decrease in both acute ear thickness changes associated with a single PMA application, as well as the sustained inflammation associated with chronic repetitive PMA applications. Moreover, mice treated topically with CPAF also exhibited a significant reduction in chemical carcinogenesis. The ability of CPAF to suppress acute and chronic inflammatory changes in response to PMA application(s) was PAF-R dependent, as CPAF had no effect on basal or PMA-induced inflammation in Ptafr-/- mice. Moreover, c-Kit appears to be necessary for the anti-inflammatory effects of CPAF, as CPAF had no observable effect in c-KitW-sh/W-sh mice. These data provide additional evidence that PAF-R activation exerts complex immunomodulatory effects in a model of chronic inflammation that is relevant to neoplastic development. PMID:25375862

  17. Appearance of a syndrome similar to graft versus host reaction in C57 B1/6 mice bearing skin allogenic graft.

    PubMed

    Nedelea, M; Dima, S

    1975-01-01

    A syndrome similar to GVHR is described in mice of C57B1/6 strain during the WHT/Ht skin allografts rejection period. In all the cases the described thymus involution was associated with the hypertrophy of lymph nodes. Their volume increase is due to the high number of blastic pyroninophilic and plasma cells concomitant with small lymphocytes depletion in the cortical area, and with a very pronounced hypertrophy of medullary cords by presence of a high number of plasmocytes and blastic cells. These changes have been noticed only in some animals sacrified during the first days after grafting and never later one. In agreement with the scarce data of the literature, we think that the immunocompetent passenger lymphocyte comprised in the skin grafts constitute an immunologic organ able to induce a GVHR at the beginning of the period of graft survival on the host. This GVHR, generally mild and without clinical and microscopic signs, becomes obvious only in animals which, for unknown reasons, present a low immunologic defense capacity. In these animals the described process seems to be reversible.

  18. Acute Normal Tissue Reactions in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Treated With IMRT: Influence of Dose and Association With Genetic Polymorphisms in DNA DSB Repair Genes

    SciTech Connect

    Werbrouck, Joke Ruyck, Kim de; Duprez, Frederic; Veldeman, Liv; Claes, Kathleen; Eijkeren, Marc van; Boterberg, Tom; Willems, Petra; Vral, Anne; Neve, Wilfried de; Thierens, Hubert

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the association between dose-related parameters and polymorphisms in DNA DSB repair genes XRCC3 (c.-1843A>G, c.562-14A>G, c.722C>T), Rad51 (c.-3429G>C, c.-3392G>T), Lig4 (c.26C>T, c.1704T>C), Ku70 (c.-1310C>G), and Ku80 (c.2110-2408G>A) and the occurrence of acute reactions after radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: The study population consisted of 88 intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)-treated head-and-neck cancer patients. Mucositis, dermatitis, and dysphagia were scored using the Common Terminology Criteria (CTC) for Adverse Events v.3.0 scale. The population was divided into a CTC0-2 and CTC3+ group for the analysis of each acute effect. The influence of the dose on critical structures was analyzed using dose-volume histograms. Genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) combined with restriction fragment length polymorphism or PCR-single base extension assays. Results: The mean dose (D{sub mean}) to the oral cavity and constrictor pharyngeus (PC) muscles was significantly associated with the development of mucositis and dysphagia, respectively. These parameters were considered confounding factors in the radiogenomics analyses. The XRCC3c.722CT/TT and Ku70c.-1310CG/GG genotypes were significantly associated with the development of severe dysphagia (CTC3+). No association was found between the investigated polymorphisms and the development of mucositis or dermatitis. A risk analysis model for severe dysphagia, which was developed based on the XRCC3c.722CT/TT and Ku70c.-1310CG/GG genotypes and the PC dose, showed a sensitivity of 78.6% and a specificity of 77.6%. Conclusions: The XRCC3c.722C>T and Ku70c.-1310C>G polymorphisms as well as the D{sub mean} to the PC muscles were highly associated with the development of severe dysphagia after IMRT. The prediction model developed using these parameters showed a high sensitivity and specificity.

  19. Exposure to acute electromagnetic radiation of mobile phone exposure range alters transiently skin homeostasis of a model of pigmented reconstructed epidermis.

    PubMed

    Simon, D; Daubos, A; Pain, C; Fitoussi, R; Vié, K; Taieb, A; de Benetti, L; Cario-André, M

    2013-02-01

    Exposure to electromagnetic radiations (EMR) produced by mobile phone concerns half the world's population and raises the problem of their impact on human health. In this study, we looked at the effects of mobile phone exposure (GSM basic, 900 MHz, SAR 2 mW g(-1) , 6 h) on a model of pigmented skin. We have analysed the expression and localization of various markers of keratinocyte and melanocyte differentiation 2, 6, 18 and 24 h after EMR exposure of reconstructed epidermis containing either only keratinocytes or a combination of keratinocytes and melanocytes grown on dead de-epidermized dermis, using histology, immunohistochemistry and Western blot. No changes were found in epidermal architecture, localization of epidermal markers, presence of apoptotic cells and the induction of p53 in both types of epidermis (with or without melanocytes) after exposure to EMR. In pigmented reconstructs, no change in the location and dendricity of melanocytes and in melanin transfer to neighbouring keratinocytes was detected after EMR exposure. Loricrin, cytokeratin 14 were significantly decreased at 6 h. The level of all markers increased at 24 h as compared to 6 h post-EMR exposure, associated with a significant decrease of the 20S proteasome activity. Our data indicate that exposure to 900 MHz frequency induces a transient alteration of epidermal homoeostasis, which may alter the protective capacity of the skin against external factors. Presence or absence of melanocytes did not modify the behaviour of reconstructs after EMR exposure.

  20. Acute Rheumatic Fever: An Evidence-Based Approach To Diagnosis And Initial Management.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Kajal; Liu, Deborah R

    2016-08-01

    Acute rheumatic fever is an inflammatory reaction involving the joints, heart, and nervous system that occurs after a group A streptococcal infection. It typically presents as a febrile illness with clinical manifestations that could include arthritis, carditis, skin lesions, or abnormal movements. Of these, the cardiac manifestations of acute rheumatic fever are most concerning, as children may present in acute heart failure and may go on to develop valvular insufficiency or stenosis. Because this is a rare presentation to emergency departments in developed countries, it is crucial for clinicians to keep a broad differential when presented with clinical presentations suspicious for acute rheumatic fever. This issue focuses on the clinical evaluation and treatment of patients with acute rheumatic fever by offering a thorough review of the literature on diagnosis and recommendations on appropriate treatment. PMID:27462838

  1. Acute toxicity, respiratory reaction, and sensitivity of three cyprinid fish species caused by exposure to four heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongjun; Liang, Youguang; Li, Sixin; Chang, Jianbo

    2013-01-01

    Using 3 cyprinid fish species zebra fish, rare minnow, and juvenile grass carp, we conducted assays of lethal reaction and ventilatory response to analyze sensitivity of the fish to 4 heavy metals. Our results showed that the 96 h LC50 of Hg(2+) to zebra fish, juvenile grass carp, and rare minnow were 0.14 mg L(-1), 0.23 mg L(-1), and 0.10 mg L(-1), respectively; of Cu(2+)0.17 mg L(-1), 0.09 mg L(-1), and 0.12 mg L(-1) respectively; of Cd(2+)6.5 mg L(-1), 18.47 mg L(-1), 5.36 mg L(-1), respectively; and of Zn(2+)44.48 mg L(-1), 31.37 mg L(-1), and 12.74 mg L(-1), respectively. Under a 1-h exposure, the ventilatory response to the different heavy metals varied. Ventilatory frequency (Vf) and amplitude (Va) increased in zebra fish, juvenile grass carp, and rare minnows exposed to Hg(2+) and Cu(2+) (P<0.05), and the Vf and Va of the 3 species rose initially and then declined when exposed to Cd(2+). Zn(2+) had markedly different toxic effects than the other heavy metals, whose Vf and Va gradually decreased with increasing exposure concentration (P<0.05). The rare minnow was the most highly susceptible of the 3 fish species to the heavy metals, with threshold effect concentrations (TEC) of 0.019 mg L(-1), 0.046 mg L(-1), 2.142 mg L(-1), and 0.633 mg L(-1) for Hg(2+), Cu(2+), Cd(2+), and Zn(2+), respectively. Therefore, it is feasible to use ventilatory parameters as a biomarker for evaluating the pollution toxicity of metals and to recognize early warning signs by using rare minnows as a sensor.

  2. Acute toxicity, respiratory reaction, and sensitivity of three cyprinid fish species caused by exposure to four heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongjun; Liang, Youguang; Li, Sixin; Chang, Jianbo

    2013-01-01

    Using 3 cyprinid fish species zebra fish, rare minnow, and juvenile grass carp, we conducted assays of lethal reaction and ventilatory response to analyze sensitivity of the fish to 4 heavy metals. Our results showed that the 96 h LC50 of Hg(2+) to zebra fish, juvenile grass carp, and rare minnow were 0.14 mg L(-1), 0.23 mg L(-1), and 0.10 mg L(-1), respectively; of Cu(2+)0.17 mg L(-1), 0.09 mg L(-1), and 0.12 mg L(-1) respectively; of Cd(2+)6.5 mg L(-1), 18.47 mg L(-1), 5.36 mg L(-1), respectively; and of Zn(2+)44.48 mg L(-1), 31.37 mg L(-1), and 12.74 mg L(-1), respectively. Under a 1-h exposure, the ventilatory response to the different heavy metals varied. Ventilatory frequency (Vf) and amplitude (Va) increased in zebra fish, juvenile grass carp, and rare minnows exposed to Hg(2+) and Cu(2+) (P<0.05), and the Vf and Va of the 3 species rose initially and then declined when exposed to Cd(2+). Zn(2+) had markedly different toxic effects than the other heavy metals, whose Vf and Va gradually decreased with increasing exposure concentration (P<0.05). The rare minnow was the most highly susceptible of the 3 fish species to the heavy metals, with threshold effect concentrations (TEC) of 0.019 mg L(-1), 0.046 mg L(-1), 2.142 mg L(-1), and 0.633 mg L(-1) for Hg(2+), Cu(2+), Cd(2+), and Zn(2+), respectively. Therefore, it is feasible to use ventilatory parameters as a biomarker for evaluating the pollution toxicity of metals and to recognize early warning signs by using rare minnows as a sensor. PMID:23755209

  3. Type 2 leprosy reaction with Sweet's syndrome-like presentation*

    PubMed Central

    Chiaratti, Francielle Chiavelli; Daxbacher, Egon Luiz Rodrigues; Neumann, Antonielle Borges Faria; Jeunon, Thiago

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic disease characterized by manifestations in the peripheral nerves and skin. The course of the disease may be interrupted by acute phenomena called reactions. This article reports a peculiar case of type 2 leprosy reaction with Sweet's syndrome-like features as the first clinical manifestation of leprosy, resulting in a delay in the diagnosis due to unusual clinical presentation. The patient had clinical and histopathological features reminiscent of Sweet's syndrome associated with clusters of vacuolated histiocytes containing acid-fast bacilli isolated or forming globi. Herein, it is discussed how to recognize type 2 leprosy reaction with Sweet's syndrome features, the differential diagnosis with type 1 leprosy reaction and the treatment options. When this kind of reaction is the first clinical presentation of leprosy, the correct diagnosis might be not suspected clinically, and established only with histopathologic evaluation. PMID:27438203

  4. Accumulation of sup 111 In-neutrophils in rabbit skin in allergic and non-allergic inflammatory reactions in vivo. Inhibition by neutrophil pretreatment in vitro with a monoclonal antibody recognizing the CD18 antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Nourshargh, S.; Rampart, M.; Hellewell, P.G.; Jose, P.J.; Harlan, J.M.; Edwards, A.J.; Williams, T.J. )

    1989-05-01

    The mAb 60.3 recognizes the neutrophil CD18 Ag. We have investigated the effect of in vitro pretreatment of radiolabeled neutrophils with mAb 60.3 on their accumulation in vivo. Further, we have compared the in vivo effects of mAb 60.3 with its effects on neutrophil adherence in vitro. Neutrophil accumulation in vivo was measured in response to: (1) exogenous mediators FMLP, C5a des Arg, LTB4 and IL-1; (2) endogenous mediators generated in a non-allergic inflammatory reaction induced by zymosan; and (3) endogenous mediators generated in two allergic inflammatory reactions, a passive cutaneous anaphylactic reaction and a reversed passive Arthus reaction in rabbit skin. Pretreatment of neutrophils with mAb 60.3 inhibited their accumulation in all the responses. The results demonstrate that there is a common mechanism mediating neutrophil accumulation in these inflammatory reactions. Neutrophils pretreated with mAb 60.3 were also unresponsive to chemoattractants in in vitro adherence assays. However, the antibody-treated neutrophils responded normally to FMLP and C5a with respect to granular enzyme release. These results suggest that the basal expression of CD18 Ag is important for the adherence of neutrophils to microvascular endothelial cells stimulated by the local generation, or administration, of chemical mediators in vivo. Despite the fact that mediators such as FMLP can increase CD18 expression in vitro, it appears more likely that such mediators act in vivo by inducing a conformational change in the basally expressed neutrophil adhesive molecules.

  5. Detection of T-cell receptor gamma chain V gene rearrangements using the polymerase chain reaction: application to the study of clonal disease cells in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J J; Rowe, D; Williamson, I K; Christmas, S E; Proctor, S J; Middleton, P G

    1991-05-01

    This report describes the development and characterization of a method for the amplification of rearranged V-J segments of the human T-cell receptor gamma chain (TCRG) locus using an adaptation of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. The technique uses a single pair of 'consensus' primers to amplify rearrangements involving the V gamma I subgroup genes, which are common in malignant cells from acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients. Using this method we were able to detect rearrangements in the TCRG locus in disease cells from patients with T-cell ALL (12 of 12), common ALL (10 of 14), and Null cell ALL (2 of 2) at presentation. Monoallelic and biallelic rearrangements involving V gamma I subgroup genes were identified by restriction analysis of PCR products from DNA samples from a T-cell leukemic cell line, T-cell clones, and disease cells from patients with ALL of T-and B-cell lineage at presentation. These results confirmed the presence of cell clones within the presentation samples and, in one case, confirmed the persistence of the original malignant cell clone at relapse. This is a rapid and specific method for the detection and characterization of rearrangements of the TCRG locus without recourse to Southern blotting. Therefore, the PCR technique described herein can provide the basis for the study of clonal evolution and minimal residual disease on a high proportion of patients with ALL.

  6. Skin graft

    MedlinePlus

    ... caused a large amount of skin loss Burns Cosmetic reasons or reconstructive surgeries where there has been ... Smoking increases your chance of problems such as slow healing. Ask your doctor or nurse for help ...

  7. Your Skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... Butterflies? Read This Chloe & Nurb Meet The Brain (Movie) Quiz: Do You Need a Flu Shot? Got ... For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Movie: Skin Acne Myths Blisters, Calluses, and Corns Fungal ...

  8. Skin Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... nearby What to Do Teach kids not to pop, pick at, or scratch pimples, pus-filled infections, ... Your Skin Abscess Impetigo Ringworm Cellulitis Should I Pop My Pimple? Tips for Taking Care of Your ...

  9. Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... States. The two most common types are basal cell cancer and squamous cell cancer. They usually form on the head, face, ... If not treated, some types of skin cancer cells can spread to other tissues and organs. Treatments ...

  10. Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... exposure to ultraviolet light, which is found in sunlight and in lights used in tanning salons. What ... the safe-sun guidelines. 1. Avoid the sun. Sunlight damages your skin. The sun is strongest during ...

  11. Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Review. 17 Wu S, Han J, Laden F, Qureshi AA. Long-term ultraviolet flux, other potential risk factors, ... MR, Shive ML, Chren MM, Han J, Qureshi AA, Linos E. Indoor tanning and non-melanoma skin ...

  12. Hyperelastic skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... is most often seen in people who have Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. People with this disorder have very elastic skin. ... any member of your family been diagnosed with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome? What other symptoms are present? Alternative Names India ...

  13. Senescent Skin

    PubMed Central

    Kushniruk, William

    1974-01-01

    The cutaneous surface is continually influenced by aging and environmental factors. A longer life span is accompanied by an increase in the frequency of problems associated with aging skin. Although most of these changes and lesions are not life threatening, the premalignant lesions must be recognized and treated. The common aging and actinic skin changes are discussed and appropriate management is described. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:20469067

  14. The skin: its structure and response to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Hopewell, J W

    1990-04-01

    The response of the skin to ionizing radiation has important implications both for the treatment of malignant disease by radiation and for radiological protection. The structural organization of human skin is described and compared with that of the pig, with which it shows many similarities, in order that the response of the skin to ionizing radiation may be more fully understood. Acute radiation damage to the skin is primarily a consequence of changes in the epidermis; the timing of the peak of the reaction is related to the kinetic organization of this layer. The rate of development of damage is independent of the radiation dose, since this is related to the natural rate of loss of cells from the basal layer of the epidermis. Recovery of the epidermis occurs as a result of the proliferation of surviving clonogenic basal cells from within the irradiated area. The presence of clonogenic cells in the canal of the hair follicle is important, particularly after non-uniform irradiation from intermediate energy beta-emitters. The migration of viable cells from the edges of the irradiated site is also significant when small areas of skin are irradiated. Late damage to the skin is primarily a function of radiation effects on the vasculature; this produces a wave of dermal atrophy after 16-26 weeks. Dermal necrosis develops at this time after high doses. A second phase of dermal thinning is seen to develop after greater than 52 weeks, and this later phase of damage is associated with the appearance of telangiectasia. Highly localized irradiation of the skin, either to a specific layer (as may result from exposure to very low energy beta-emitters) or after exposure to small highly radioactive particles, 'hot particles', produces gross effects that become visibly manifest within 2 weeks of exposure. These changes result from the direct killing of the cells of the skin in interphase after doses greater than 100 Gy. Dose-effect curves have been established for the majority of

  15. Neuromodulators for Aging Skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... Non-ablative Laser Rejuvenation Non-invasive Body Contouring Treatments Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Information Free Skin Cancer Screenings Skin ... Non-ablative Laser Rejuvenation Non-invasive Body Contouring Treatments Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Information Free Skin Cancer Screenings Skin ...

  16. Assessment of skin and eye irritation of 14 products under the stepwise approach of the OECD.

    PubMed

    Mancebo, Axel; Hernández, Osvaldo; González, Yana; Aldana, Lizet; Carballo, Onelio

    2008-01-01

    The determination of acute eye and skin irritation is included in international regulatory requirements for the testing of chemicals, because of the possibility of exposure during the production, transport, marketing, and disposal of products. Although there have been some advances in the areas of refinement and reduction, no single battery of tests has emerged as being acceptable as a complete replacement for the conventional Draize rabbit eye and skin irritation tests. Currently, dermal irritation and ocular irritation are generally evaluated in a sequential manner in the context of tiered assessment strategies. In this work, we show how 14 products, mostly designed to be used in agriculture, were evaluated in the Center of Experimental Toxicology of the Center for the Production of Laboratory Animals (Centro Nacional para la Producción de Animales de Laboratorio; CENPALAB) in order to assess their acute dermal and ocular effects. The performed studies include the acute dermal toxicity test, the acute dermal irritation/corrosion test, the hen's egg test-chorioallantoic membrane (HET-CAM) method, and the acute eye irritation/corrosion test. In general, it could be concluded that of the 14 products assessed, none of them showed systemic effects, but local reactions mainly to the eyes. The most significant effects were apparently related to the effects of azadirachtin, an active principle of 2 tested neem derivatives. PMID:18988087

  17. Evaluation of a novel alginate gel dressing: cytotoxicity to fibroblasts in vitro and foreign-body reaction in pig skin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Y; Nishimura, Y; Tanihara, M; Suzuki, K; Nakamura, T; Shimizu, Y; Yamawaki, Y; Kakimaru, Y

    1998-02-01

    Calcium alginate dressings have beneficial effects on wound healing by providing a moist wound environment. However, cytotoxicity and the nonbiodegradable nature of calcium alginate dressings induce unresolved chronic foreign-body reaction. In this study, a novel freeze-dried alginate gel dressing (AGA-100) low in calcium ions was evaluated for cytotoxicity to L929 cells in vitro and in full-thickness pig wounds in vivo. Cytotoxicity testing on L929 cells showed the cytocompatibility of AGA-100 extracts, while extracts from Kaltostat, a well-established alginate dressing, induced cytopathic effects. In an in vivo study using pigskin, AGA-100, Kaltostat, and gauze were applied on 1-in-diameter circular full-thickness wounds on the back of pigs and the time course of wound closure was evaluated. Kaltostat and gauze dressings were used as controls. For histologic evaluation, wound tissue was harvested on day 18. AGA-100-treated wounds showed rapid wound closure compared to control wounds on day 15. Foreign-body reaction was marked in Kaltostat- and gauze-treated wounds, and differed significantly from AGA-100-treated wounds. Based on these data, AGA-100 could reduce the cytotoxicity to fibroblasts and foreign-body reaction that have been observed with currently available calcium alginate dressings; it was also found to be useful as an alginate dressing. PMID:9457563

  18. Positive reaction to allergen (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction is a sensitivity to a specific substance, called an allergen, that is contacted through the skin, inhaled into the lungs, swallowed or injected. The body's reaction to an allergen can be mild, such as ...

  19. Impaired skin integrity related to radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ratliff, C.

    1990-09-01

    Skin reactions associated with radiation therapy require frequent nursing assessment and intervention. Preventive interventions and early management can minimize the severity of the skin reaction. With the understanding of the pathogenesis of radiation skin reactions, the ET nurse can determine who is at risk and then implement preventive measures. Because radiation treatment is fractionated, skin reactions do not usually occur until midway through the course of therapy and will subside within a few weeks after completion of radiation. Many patients and their families still fear that radiation causes severe burns. Teaching and anticipatory guidance by the ET nurse is needed to assist patients and their families to overcome this fear, and to educate them on preventive skin care regimens.

  20. Using a thermoluminescent dosimeter to evaluate the location reliability of the highest–skin dose area detected by treatment planning in radiotherapy for breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Li-Min; Huang, Chih-Jen; Chen, Hsiao-Yun; Meng, Fan-Yun; Lu, Tsung-Hsien; Tsao, Min-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Acute skin reaction during adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer is an inevitable process, and its severity is related to the skin dose. A high–skin dose area can be speculated based on the isodose distribution shown on a treatment planning. To determine whether treatment planning can reflect high–skin dose location, 80 patients were collected and their skin doses in different areas were measured using a thermoluminescent dosimeter to locate the highest–skin dose area in each patient. We determined whether the skin dose is consistent with the highest-dose area estimated by the treatment planning of the same patient. The χ{sup 2} and Fisher exact tests revealed that these 2 methods yielded more consistent results when the highest-dose spots were located in the axillary and breast areas but not in the inframammary area. We suggest that skin doses shown on the treatment planning might be a reliable and simple alternative method for estimating the highest skin doses in some areas.

  1. Response of rat skin to boron neutron capture therapy with p-boronophenylalanine or borocaptate sodium.

    PubMed

    Morris, G M; Coderre, J A; Hopewell, J W; Micca, P L; Rezvani, M

    1994-08-01

    The effects of boron neutron capture irradiation employing either BPA or BSH as neutron capture agents has been assessed using the dorsal skin of Fischer 344 rats. Pharmacokinetic studies, using prompt gamma spectrometry, revealed comparable levels of boron-10 (10B) in blood and skin after the intravenous infusion of BSH (100 mg/kg body wt.). The 10B content of blood (12.0 +/- 0.5 micrograms/g) was slightly higher than that of skin (10.0 +/- 0.5 micrograms/g) after oral dosing with BPA. Biphasic skin reactions were observed after irradiation with the thermal neutron beam alone or in combination with BPA or BSH. The time of onset of the first phase of the skin reaction, moist desquamation, was approximately 2 weeks. The time at which the second-wave skin reaction, dermal necrosis, became evident was dose-related and occurred after a latent interval of > or = 24 weeks, well after the acute epithelial reaction had healed. The incidence of both phases of skin damage was also dose-related. The radiation doses required to produce skin damage in 50% of skin sites (ED50 values) were calculated from dose-effect curves and these values were used to determine relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and compound biological effectiveness (CBE) factors for both moist desquamation and dermal necrosis. It was concluded on the basis of these calculations that the microdistribution of the two neutron capture agents had a critical bearing on the overall biological effect after thermal neutron activation. BSH, which was possibly excluded from the cytoplasm of epidermal cells, had a low CBE factor value (0.56 +/- 0.06) while BPA, which may be selectively accumulated in epidermal cells had a very high CBE factor (3.74 +/- 0.7). For the dermal reaction, where vascular endothelial cells represent the likely target cell population, the CBE factor values were comparable, at 0.73 +/- 0.42 and 0.86 +/- 0.08 for BPA ad BSH, respectively.

  2. Immediate Adverse Reactions to Gadolinium-Based MR Contrast Media: A Retrospective Analysis on 10,608 Examinations

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Roberta; dell'Aprovitola, Nicoletta; Catalano, Orlando; Filice, Salvatore; Schiavone, Vincenzo; Izzo, Francesco; Cuomo, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose. Contrast media (CM) for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may determine the development of acute adverse reactions. Objective was to retrospectively assess the frequency and severity of adverse reactions associated with gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) injection in patients who underwent MRI. Material and Methods. At our center 10608 MRI examinations with CM were performed using five different GBCAs: Gd-BOPTA (MultiHance), Gd-DTPA (Magnevist), Gd-EOBDTPA (Primovist), Gd-DOTA (Dotarem), and Gd-BTDO3A (Gadovist). Results. 32 acute adverse reactions occurred, accounting for 0.3% of all administration. Twelve reactions were associated with Gd-DOTA injection (0.11%), 9 with Gd-BOPTA injection (0.08%), 6 with Gd-BTDO3A (0.056%), 3 with Gd-EOB-DTPA (0.028%), and 2 with Gd-DTPA (0.018%). Twenty-four reactions (75.0%) were mild, four (12.5%) moderate, and four (12.5%) severe. The most severe reactions were seen associated with use of Gd-BOPTA, with 3 severe reactions in 32 total reactions. Conclusion. Acute adverse reactions are generally rare with the overall adverse reaction rate of 0.3%. The most common adverse reactions were not severe, consisting in skin rash and hives.

  3. Immediate Adverse Reactions to Gadolinium-Based MR Contrast Media: A Retrospective Analysis on 10,608 Examinations.

    PubMed

    Granata, Vincenza; Cascella, Marco; Fusco, Roberta; dell'Aprovitola, Nicoletta; Catalano, Orlando; Filice, Salvatore; Schiavone, Vincenzo; Izzo, Francesco; Cuomo, Arturo; Petrillo, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose. Contrast media (CM) for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may determine the development of acute adverse reactions. Objective was to retrospectively assess the frequency and severity of adverse reactions associated with gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) injection in patients who underwent MRI. Material and Methods. At our center 10608 MRI examinations with CM were performed using five different GBCAs: Gd-BOPTA (MultiHance), Gd-DTPA (Magnevist), Gd-EOBDTPA (Primovist), Gd-DOTA (Dotarem), and Gd-BTDO3A (Gadovist). Results. 32 acute adverse reactions occurred, accounting for 0.3% of all administration. Twelve reactions were associated with Gd-DOTA injection (0.11%), 9 with Gd-BOPTA injection (0.08%), 6 with Gd-BTDO3A (0.056%), 3 with Gd-EOB-DTPA (0.028%), and 2 with Gd-DTPA (0.018%). Twenty-four reactions (75.0%) were mild, four (12.5%) moderate, and four (12.5%) severe. The most severe reactions were seen associated with use of Gd-BOPTA, with 3 severe reactions in 32 total reactions. Conclusion. Acute adverse reactions are generally rare with the overall adverse reaction rate of 0.3%. The most common adverse reactions were not severe, consisting in skin rash and hives. PMID:27652261

  4. Immediate Adverse Reactions to Gadolinium-Based MR Contrast Media: A Retrospective Analysis on 10,608 Examinations

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Roberta; dell'Aprovitola, Nicoletta; Catalano, Orlando; Filice, Salvatore; Schiavone, Vincenzo; Izzo, Francesco; Cuomo, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose. Contrast media (CM) for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may determine the development of acute adverse reactions. Objective was to retrospectively assess the frequency and severity of adverse reactions associated with gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) injection in patients who underwent MRI. Material and Methods. At our center 10608 MRI examinations with CM were performed using five different GBCAs: Gd-BOPTA (MultiHance), Gd-DTPA (Magnevist), Gd-EOBDTPA (Primovist), Gd-DOTA (Dotarem), and Gd-BTDO3A (Gadovist). Results. 32 acute adverse reactions occurred, accounting for 0.3% of all administration. Twelve reactions were associated with Gd-DOTA injection (0.11%), 9 with Gd-BOPTA injection (0.08%), 6 with Gd-BTDO3A (0.056%), 3 with Gd-EOB-DTPA (0.028%), and 2 with Gd-DTPA (0.018%). Twenty-four reactions (75.0%) were mild, four (12.5%) moderate, and four (12.5%) severe. The most severe reactions were seen associated with use of Gd-BOPTA, with 3 severe reactions in 32 total reactions. Conclusion. Acute adverse reactions are generally rare with the overall adverse reaction rate of 0.3%. The most common adverse reactions were not severe, consisting in skin rash and hives. PMID:27652261

  5. Clinical Pearls: Leprosy Reactions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jane; Boggild, Andrea K

    2016-09-01

    Leprosy reactions are acute inflammatory episodes that occur in the setting of Mycobacterium leprae infection. Precipitants of reactions can be pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic. Both type 1 and type 2 reactions typically occur before and during leprosy treatment but may also occur after treatment has been completed. Reactions cause morbidity due to nerve damage, and prompt corticosteroid therapy is warranted to minimize nerve damage due to reactions.

  6. The Incidence, Classification, and Management of Acute Adverse Reactions to the Low-Osmolar Iodinated Contrast Media Isovue and Ultravist in Contrast-Enhanced Computed Tomography Scanning

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bin; Dong, Yuhao; Liang, Long; Lian, Zhouyang; Liu, Jing; Luo, Xiaoning; Chen, Wenbo; Li, Xinyu; Liang, Changhong; Zhang, Shuixing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Some epidemiologic surveillance studies have recorded adverse drug reactions to radiocontrast agents. We aimed to investigate the incidence and management of acute adverse reactions (AARs) to Ultravist-370 and Isovue-370 in patients who underwent contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scanning. Data from 137,473 patients were analyzed. They had undergone enhanced CT scanning with intravenous injection of Ultravist-370 or Isovue-370 during the period of January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2012 in our hospital. We investigated and classified AARs according to the American College of Radiology and the Chinese Society of Radiology (CSR) guidelines for iodinated contrast media. We analyzed risk factors for AARs and compared the AARs induced by Ultravist-370 and Isovue-370. Four hundred and twenty-eight (0.31%) patients experienced AARs, which included 330 (0.24%) patients with mild AARs, 82 (0.06%) patients with moderate AARs, and 16 (0.01%) patients with severe AARs (including 3 cases of cardiac arrest and one case of death). The incidence of AARs was higher with Ultravist-370 than with Isovue-370 (0.38% vs 0.24%, P < 0.001), but only for mild AARs (0.32% vs 0.16%, P < 0.001). Analyses on risk factors indicated that female patients (n = 221, 0.43%, P < 0.001), emergency patients (n = 11, 0.51%, P < 0.001), elderly patients aged 50 to 60 years (n = 135, 0.43%, P < 0.001), and patients who underwent coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) (n = 55, 0.51%, P < 0.001) had a higher risk of AARs. Cutaneous manifestations (50.52%)—especially rash (59.74%)—were the most frequent mild AARs. Cardiovascular manifestations accounted for most moderate and severe AARs (62.91% and 48.28%, respectively). After proper management, the symptoms and signs of 96.5% of the AARs resolved within 24 hours without sequelae. Ultravist-370 and Isovue-370 are safe for patients undergoing enhanced CT scanning. The incidence of AARs is

  7. The Incidence, Classification, and Management of Acute Adverse Reactions to the Low-Osmolar Iodinated Contrast Media Isovue and Ultravist in Contrast-Enhanced Computed Tomography Scanning.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Dong, Yuhao; Liang, Long; Lian, Zhouyang; Liu, Jing; Luo, Xiaoning; Chen, Wenbo; Li, Xinyu; Liang, Changhong; Zhang, Shuixing

    2016-03-01

    Some epidemiologic surveillance studies have recorded adverse drug reactions to radiocontrast agents. We aimed to investigate the incidence and management of acute adverse reactions (AARs) to Ultravist-370 and Isovue-370 in patients who underwent contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scanning.Data from 137,473 patients were analyzed. They had undergone enhanced CT scanning with intravenous injection of Ultravist-370 or Isovue-370 during the period of January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2012 in our hospital. We investigated and classified AARs according to the American College of Radiology and the Chinese Society of Radiology (CSR) guidelines for iodinated contrast media. We analyzed risk factors for AARs and compared the AARs induced by Ultravist-370 and Isovue-370.Four hundred and twenty-eight (0.31%) patients experienced AARs, which included 330 (0.24%) patients with mild AARs, 82 (0.06%) patients with moderate AARs, and 16 (0.01%) patients with severe AARs (including 3 cases of cardiac arrest and one case of death). The incidence of AARs was higher with Ultravist-370 than with Isovue-370 (0.38% vs 0.24%, P < 0.001), but only for mild AARs (0.32% vs 0.16%, P < 0.001). Analyses on risk factors indicated that female patients (n = 221, 0.43%, P < 0.001), emergency patients (n = 11, 0.51%, P < 0.001), elderly patients aged 50 to 60 years (n = 135, 0.43%, P < 0.001), and patients who underwent coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) (n = 55, 0.51%, P < 0.001) had a higher risk of AARs. Cutaneous manifestations (50.52%)-especially rash (59.74%)-were the most frequent mild AARs. Cardiovascular manifestations accounted for most moderate and severe AARs (62.91% and 48.28%, respectively). After proper management, the symptoms and signs of 96.5% of the AARs resolved within 24 hours without sequelae.Ultravist-370 and Isovue-370 are safe for patients undergoing enhanced CT scanning. The incidence of AARs is higher with Ultravist

  8. Cellular and humoral immune reactions in chronic active liver disease. II. Lymphocyte subsets and viral antigens in liver biopsies of patients with acute and chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed Central

    Eggink, H F; Houthoff, H J; Huitema, S; Wolters, G; Poppema, S; Gips, C H

    1984-01-01

    The characteristics and distribution of the inflammatory infiltrate in liver biopsies of 25 patients with hepatitis B viral (HBV) infection were studied in relation to the distribution and expression of HBV antigens. Mononuclear subsets were characterized with monoclonal (OKT, OKM, Leu) antibodies to surface antigens. For the demonstration of viral antigens directly conjugated antibodies to surface (HBsAg), core (HBcAg) and 'e' (HBeAg) antigen were used. For the study of mutual relations all methods were performed on serial cut tissue sections. In chronic active hepatitis B (CAH-B, n = 12) OKT8+ lymphocytes of T cell origin were the only cell type present in areas with liver cell degeneration and T cell cytotoxicity appears to be the only immune mechanism. In chronic persistent hepatitis B (CPH-B, n = 7) the only conspicuous feature was the presence of many Leu 3+ lymphocytes of the helper/inducer population in the portal tracts. In acute hepatitis B (AHB, n = 6) OKT8+ cells of non-T origin (OKT1-,3-) and Leu 7+ cells of presumed natural killer (NK) potential predominated in the areas with liver cell necrosis, and non-T cell cytotoxicity appears to be the predominant immune mechanism. In none of these disease entities a positive spatial relation could be established between the cytotoxic cells and the demonstrable expression of HBV antigens in hepatocytes. It is concluded that differences in immunological reaction pattern may explain the different course in the three forms of HBV infection studied. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6713726

  9. Does Dietary Deoxynivalenol Modulate the Acute Phase Reaction in Endotoxaemic Pigs?—Lessons from Clinical Signs, White Blood Cell Counts, and TNF-Alpha

    PubMed Central

    Tesch, Tanja; Bannert, Erik; Kluess, Jeannette; Frahm, Jana; Kersten, Susanne; Breves, Gerhard; Renner, Lydia; Kahlert, Stefan; Rothkötter, Hermann-Josef; Dänicke, Sven

    2015-01-01

    We studied the interaction between deoxynivalenol (DON)-feeding and a subsequent pre- and post-hepatic immune stimulus with the hypothesis that the liver differently mediates the acute phase reaction (APR) in pigs. Barrows (n = 44) were divided into a DON-(4.59 mg DON/kg feed) and a control-diet group, surgically equipped with permanent catheters pre- (V. portae hepatis) and post-hepatic (V. jugularis interna) and infused either with 0.9% NaCl or LPS (7.5 µg/kg BW). Thus, combination of diet (CON vs. DON) and infusion (CON vs. LPS, jugular vs. portal) created six groups: CON_CONjug.-CONpor., CON_CONjug.-LPSpor., CON_LPSjug.-CONpor., DON_CONjug.-CONpor., DON_CONjug.-LPSpor., DON_LPSjug.-CONpor.. Blood samples were taken at −30, 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, 120, 150, 180 min relative to infusion and analyzed for leukocytes and TNF-alpha. Concurrently, clinical signs were scored and body temperature measured during the same period. LPS as such induced a dramatic rise in TNF-alpha (p < 0.001), hyperthermia (p < 0.01), and severe leukopenia (p < 0.001). In CON-fed pigs, an earlier return to physiological base levels was observed for the clinical complex, starting at 120 min post infusionem (p < 0.05) and persisting until 180 min. DON_LPSjug.-CONpor. resulted in a lower temperature rise (p = 0.08) compared to CON_LPSjug.-CONpor.. In conclusion, APR resulting from a post-hepatic immune stimulus was altered by chronic DON-feeding. PMID:26703732

  10. Does Dietary Deoxynivalenol Modulate the Acute Phase Reaction in Endotoxaemic Pigs?--Lessons from Clinical Signs, White Blood Cell Counts, and TNF-Alpha.

    PubMed

    Tesch, Tanja; Bannert, Erik; Kluess, Jeannette; Frahm, Jana; Kersten, Susanne; Breves, Gerhard; Renner, Lydia; Kahlert, Stefan; Rothkötter, Hermann-Josef; Dänicke, Sven

    2015-12-23

    We studied the interaction between deoxynivalenol (DON)-feeding and a subsequent pre- and post-hepatic immune stimulus with the hypothesis that the liver differently mediates the acute phase reaction (APR) in pigs. Barrows (n = 44) were divided into a DON-(4.59 mg DON/kg feed) and a control-diet group, surgically equipped with permanent catheters pre- (V. portae hepatis) and post-hepatic (V. jugularis interna) and infused either with 0.9% NaCl or LPS (7.5 µg/kg BW). Thus, combination of diet (CON vs. DON) and infusion (CON vs. LPS, jugular vs. portal) created six groups: CON_CON(jug.)-CON(por.), CON_CON(jug.)-LPS(por.), CON_LPS(jug.)-CON(por.), DON_CON(jug.)-CON(por.), DON_CON(jug.)-LPS(por.), DON_LPS(jug.)-CON(por.). Blood samples were taken at -30, 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, 120, 150, 180 min relative to infusion and analyzed for leukocytes and TNF-alpha. Concurrently, clinical signs were scored and body temperature measured during the same period. LPS as such induced a dramatic rise in TNF-alpha (p < 0.001), hyperthermia (p < 0.01), and severe leukopenia (p < 0.001). In CON-fed pigs, an earlier return to physiological base levels was observed for the clinical complex, starting at 120 min post infusionem (p < 0.05) and persisting until 180 min. DON_LPS(jug.)-CON(por.) resulted in a lower temperature rise (p = 0.08) compared to CON_LPS(jug.)-CON(por.). In conclusion, APR resulting from a post-hepatic immune stimulus was altered by chronic DON-feeding.

  11. [Symptoms and treatment of radiation-induced reactions].

    PubMed

    Brzozowska, Anna; Idziak, Magdalena; Burdan, Franciszek; Mazurkiewicz, Maria

    2015-05-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the main methods of cancer treatment alone or in combination with chemotherapy. It is applied in about 60% of oncological patients. However, in spite of its clinical usefulness, radiotherapy is associated with a high risk of radiation-induced side effects, including dermatitis, enteritis, cystitis, pericarditis, pneumonia or depression, sexual function disorders, cardiomiopathy, coronary heart disease, anomalies of heart valves and development of second malignant tumor. The early diagnosis and proper treatment of radiation-induced side effects have a major impact on patients` quality of life and future prognosis. Radiation reactions can be categorized as acute or late, occurring before and after six months after radiotherapy. Among the most common acute reactions there were observed: skin rash, mucositis, nausea, vomiting, fever and radiation pneumonitis. Within reference to the late complications, we distinguish for instance fibrosis of organs, a radiation necrosis of bone, ulcers, fistulas, sexual dysfunction and the development of second malignant carcinomas. PMID:26039025

  12. Management of hypersensitivity reactions to anti-D immunoglobulin preparations.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, K; Nasser, S M

    2014-11-01

    RhD immunoglobulin G (anti-D) administered to pregnant Rh(-) women prevents Rh isoimmunization. Its use has significantly reduced the incidence of haemolytic disease of the foetus and newborn previously responsible for one death in every 2200 births. In pregnancy, acute drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions including anaphylaxis can have serious deleterious effects on the mother and foetus/neonate. Women can be erroneously labelled as drug allergic as the investigation of hypersensitivity reactions in pregnancy is complex and drug challenges are usually contraindicated. We present three cases of suspected anti-D hypersensitivity clinically presenting as anaphylaxis and delayed transfusion-related reaction. We also propose a new algorithm for the investigations of such reaction. It relies on detailed history, cautious interpretation of skin tests, foetal Rh genotyping from maternal blood and, in some cases, anti-D challenges. This is not to deprive women of anti-D which might put their future pregnancies at risk. PMID:25066207

  13. [Magnesium in skin allergy].

    PubMed

    Błach, Joanna; Nowacki, Wojciech; Mazur, Andrzej

    2007-10-08

    Magnesium is involved in many biological processes within the body. Magnesium deficiency causes many disorders, including impairment of immunity. This review summarizes present knowledge on the relationship between magnesium and skin allergy reactions. Special focus is on allergy types I and IV. At present the best knowledge is on allergy I. Magnesium deficiency in experimental animals, mainly rats, leads to characteristic hyperemia, an increase in IgE, neutrophilia and eosinophilia, an increase in the level of proinflammatory cytokines, mastocyte degranulation, histaminemia, and splenomegaly. These symptoms observed in hypomagnesemic rats are similar to those in atopic patients. Data on the relationship between magnesium and other types of allergy are scarce. Clinical observations show the beneficial effect of topical and oral administration of magnesium salts in patients with skin allergy. All the presented data point to an important role of magnesium in allergy reactions. Other studies are needed to better understand the mechanism of magnesium's action. Well-controlled clinical protocols should also be conducted to assess the efficiency of magnesium supplementation in patients with skin allergy.

  14. Progress and opportunities for tissue-engineered skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacNeil, Sheila

    2007-02-01

    Tissue-engineered skin is now a reality. For patients with extensive full-thickness burns, laboratory expansion of skin cells to achieve barrier function can make the difference between life and death, and it was this acute need that drove the initiation of tissue engineering in the 1980s. A much larger group of patients have ulcers resistant to conventional healing, and treatments using cultured skin cells have been devised to restart the wound-healing process. In the laboratory, the use of tissue-engineered skin provides insight into the behaviour of skin cells in healthy skin and in diseases such as vitiligo, melanoma, psoriasis and blistering disorders.

  15. The tolerance of skin grafts to postoperative radiation therapy in patients with soft-tissue sarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, W.T.; Zabell, A.; McDonald, H.D. )

    1986-03-01

    During the last ten years at the National Cancer Institute, 11 patients have received 12 courses of postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy to skin grafts used for wound closure after the resection of soft-tissue sarcomas. The intervals between grafting and the initiation of radiation ranged between 3 and 20 weeks, and 4 patients received chemotherapy at the same time as their radiation. Ten of the 12 irradiated grafts remained intact after the completion of therapy. One graft had several small persistently ulcerated areas that required no further surgical treatment, and one graft required a musculocutaneous flap for reconstruction of a persistent large ulcer. Acute radiation effects on the grafted skin sometimes developed at slightly lower doses than usually seen with normal skin, but these acute effects necessitated a break in therapy on only five occasions. Concurrent chemotherapy and a relatively short interval between grafting and the initiation of radiation seemed to contribute to more severe radiation reactions. This experience indicates that postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy can be delivered to skin grafted areas without undue fear of complications, especially if the graft is allowed to heal adequately prior to initiating therapy and if chemotherapy is not given in conjunction with radiation.

  16. Polymerase chain reaction detection of Leishmania DNA in skin biopsy samples in Sri Lanka where the causative agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis is Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Ranasinghe, Shalindra; Wickremasinghe, Renu; Hulangamuwa, Sanjeeva; Sirimanna, Ganga; Opathella, Nandimithra; Maingon, Rhaiza D C; Chandrasekharan, Vishvanath

    2015-12-01

    Leishmania donovani is the known causative agent of both cutaneous (CL) and visceral leishmaniasis in Sri Lanka. CL is considered to be under-reported partly due to relatively poor sensitivity and specificity of microscopic diagnosis. We compared robustness of three previously described polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based methods to detect Leishmania DNA in 38 punch biopsy samples from patients presented with suspected lesions in 2010. Both, Leishmania genus-specific JW11/JW12 KDNA and LITSR/L5.8S internal transcribed spacer (ITS)1 PCR assays detected 92% (35/38) of the samples whereas a KDNA assay specific forL. donovani (LdF/LdR) detected only 71% (27/38) of samples. All positive samples showed a L. donovani banding pattern upon HaeIII ITS1 PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. PCR assay specificity was evaluated in samples containing Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium leprae, and human DNA, and there was no cross-amplification in JW11/JW12 and LITSR/L5.8S PCR assays. The LdF/LdR PCR assay did not amplify M. leprae or human DNA although 500 bp and 700 bp bands were observed in M. tuberculosis samples. In conclusion, it was successfully shown in this study that it is possible to diagnose Sri Lankan CL with high accuracy, to genus and species identification, using Leishmania DNA PCR assays.

  17. How to Check Your Skin for Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Cancer Types Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Patient Skin Cancer Treatment Melanoma Treatment Merkel Cell Carcinoma Treatment Skin Cancer Prevention Skin Cancer Screening Health Professional Skin Cancer Treatment Melanoma Treatment Merkel Cell Carcinoma Treatment Skin Cancer ...

  18. Management of skin toxicity during radiation therapy: a review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S; Juresic, E; Barton, M; Shafiq, J

    2010-06-01

    Acute skin toxicity occurs in the majority of the patients undergoing radical radiotherapy. While a variety of topical agents and dressing are used to ameliorate side effects, there is minimal evidence to support their use. The aims of this study were to systematically review evidence on acute skin toxicity management and to assess the current practices in ANZ. A systematic review of the literature was conducted on studies published between 1980 and 2008. A meta-analysis was performed on articles on clinical trials reporting grade II or greater toxicity. Analyses were divided into breast (the most common site) and other sites. A survey of Radiation Oncology departments across ANZ was conducted to identify patterns of practices and compare these with the published evidence. Twenty-nine articles were reviewed. Only seven articles demonstrated statistically significant results for management of side-effects. These were for topical corticosteroids, hyaluronic acid, sucralfate, calendula, Cavilon cream (3M, St Paul, Minnesota, USA) and silver leaf dressing. Meta-analysis demonstrated statistical significance for the prophylactic use of topical agents in the management acute toxicity. The survey of departments had a low response rate but demonstrated variation in skin care practices across ANZ. A considerable number of these practices were based only on anecdotal evidence. Lack of evidence in the literature for the care of radiation skin reactions was associated with variation in practice. Only a limited number of studies have demonstrated a significant benefit of specific topical agents. There is a need for objective and prospective recording of skin toxicity to collect meaningful comparative data on which to base recommendations for practice.

  19. Anaphylaxis and Anaphylactoid Reactions: Diagnosis and Management.

    PubMed

    Luskin, Allan T.; Luskin, Susan S.

    1996-07-01

    Anaphylaxis is an acute fatal or potentially fatal hypersensitivity reaction. Anaphylaxis represent a clinical diagnosis based on history and physical examination and includes symptoms of airway obstruction, generalized skin reactions, particularly flushing, itching, urticaria, angioedema cardiovascular symptoms including hypotension and gastrointestinal symptoms. These symptoms result from the action of mast cell mediators, especially histamine and lipid mediators such as leukotrienes and platelet activating factor on shock tissue. The shock tissue includes blood vessels, mucous glands, smooth muscle, and nerve endings. Anaphylaxis follows the typical immediate hypersensitivity time course, with a reaction beginning within minutes of antigen exposure. A late-phase reaction hours after the initial reaction may occur. Mast cell mediator release can be triggered by both IgE and non--IgE-mediated factors. Therefore, anaphylaxis may be termed anaphylaxis (IgE mediated) or anaphylactoid (non--IgE mediated). The most common IgE-mediated triggers are drugs, typically penicillin or other beta-lactam antibiotics, foods, most commonly nuts, peanuts, fish and shellfish, or hymenoptera stings. Non-IgE-mediated causes include factors causing marked complement activation such as plasma proteins or compounds which act directly on the mast cell membrane, such as vancomycin, quinolone antibiotics, or radiographic contrast media. The pathophysiology of some trigger factors, such as aspirin, remains unclear. Therapy of anaphylaxis revolves around patient education, avoidance, desensitization or pharmacologic pretreatment when agents causing anaphylaxis need to be readministered, and early recognition and prompt therapy of reactions should they occur.

  20. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis due to sulfamethoxazol with positive lymphocyte transformation test (LTT).

    PubMed

    Anliker, Mark David; Wüthrich, Brunello

    2003-01-01

    We studied an acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) due to sulfamethoxazol in a 48-year-old woman with unusual findings in allergy testing. The histological picture provided evidence for a pustular drug eruption and leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Skin testing with sulfamethoxazol was negative for immediate-type reaction (scratch test) and delayed-type reaction (epicutaneous testing). A lymphocyte transformation test (LTT) showed a significant lymphocyte stimulation (stimulation index 5.04/2.61) toward sulfamethoxazol (200/100 mg/ml) by measuring the rate of built-in tritium-thymidine in the DNS of the patients lymphocytes, implicating a drug-specific hypersensibility of lymphocytes; we could be dealing with a combined type III and IV reaction by Coombs and Gell in this case. LTT may play a possible role in the determination of drug allergy in AGEP despite negative skin testing. PMID:12861854

  1. Polymorphic Variants in Oxidative Stress Genes and Acute Toxicity in Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Córdoba, Elisa Eugenia; Abba, Martín Carlos; Lacunza, Ezequiel; Fernánde, Eduardo; Güerci, Alba Mabel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated as an indirect product of radiation therapy (RT). Genetic variation in genes related to ROS metabolism may influence the level of RT-induced adverse effects. We evaluated the potential association of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)–related response to radiotherapy injury in breast cancer patients undergoing RT. Materials and Methods Eighty patients receiving conventional RT were included. Acute effects were evaluated according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scores. DNA was extracted from blood and buccal swab samples. SNPs were genotyped for GSTP1, GSTA1, SOD2, and NOS3 genes by polymerase chain reaction–based restriction fragment length polymorphism. Univariate analysis (odds ratios [ORs] and 95% confidence interval [CI]) and principal component analysis were used for correlation of SNPs and factors related to risk of developing ≥ grade 2 acute effects. Results Sixty-five patients (81.2%) showed side effects, 32 (40%) presented moderate to severe acute skin toxicity, and 33 (41.2%) manifested minimal acute skin reactions by the end of treatment. In both univariate and multivariate analyses, nominally significant associations were found among body mass index (OR, 3.14; 95% CI, 8.5338 to 1.1274; p=0.022), breast size (OR, 5.11; 95% CI, 17.04 to 1.54; p=0.004), and grade ≥ 2 acute radiation skin toxicity. A significant association was also observed between NOS3 G894T polymorphism (OR, 9.8; 95% CI, 211.6 to 0.45; p=0.041) and grade ≥ 2 acute radiation skin toxicity in patients with neo-adjuvant chemotherapy treatment. Conclusion The analysis of the factors involved in individual radiosensitivity contributed to the understanding of the mechanisms underlying this trait. PMID:26790968

  2. Skin manifestations of food allergies.

    PubMed

    Martin, B L

    1999-03-01

    The role of dietary factors in chronic skin diseases has been a subject of controversy, but several investigators have shown the effectiveness of elimination diets in the management of some patients with atopic dermatitis. Chronic skin diseases are common, complex, and often difficult to treat; therefore, the physician should consider all possible causes. More people consider themselves to have food allergies than can actually be documented to have an immunologic reaction to foods. Six foods--egg, peanut, cow's milk, soy, fish, and wheat--account for most skin reactions to food in children, with egg, peanut, and cow's milk being most common. Elimination of the offending food can be an effective form of treatment, but it must be done with caution, and while ensuring that the patient maintains adequate nutrition.

  3. Cutaneous skin tag

    MedlinePlus

    Skin tag; Acrochordon; Fibroepithelial polyp ... have diabetes. They are thought to occur from skin rubbing against skin. ... The tag sticks out of the skin and may have a short, narrow stalk connecting it to the surface of the skin. Some skin tags are as long as ...

  4. Histocompatible chicken inbred lines: homogeneities in the major histocompatibility complex antigens of the GSP, GSN/1, PNP/DO and BM-C inbred lines assessed by hemagglutination, mixed lymphocyte reaction and skin transplantation.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Marcos B; Mizutani, Makoto; Fujiwara, Akira; Yazawa, Hajime; Yamagata, Takahiro; Shimada, Kiyoshi; Namikawa, Takao

    2007-10-01

    Chicken inbred lines of the GSP, GSN/1, PNP/DO and BM-C have been established by selection of a specific allele at the B blood group locus (MHC B-G region) and other polymorphic loci through pedigree mating. To extend the potential of these inbred lines as experimental animals in Aves, we assessed the antigenic homogeneities of the MHC antigens by three immunological methods. Antigenic variations of red blood cells (RBCs) were surveyed in the inbred lines and a random-bred line (NG) derived from the Nagoya breed by using ten kinds of intact antisera produced in the inbred line of chickens against RBCs of a red junglefowl and hybrids. In the hemagglutination test, no individual variations were found within the inbred line at all, while all the ten antisera detected highly heterogeneous reactions in individuals of the NG. The reciprocal one-way mixed lymphocyte reactions gave constantly higher stimulation responses (P<0.01) between individual pairs from the inbred lines having different B alleles compared to pairs within the inbred line, while lower stimulation was observed between pairs of the GSP and GSN/1 inbred lines both having the B(21) allele. In reciprocal skin transplantation, the transplanted skingrafts within the inbred line and between individuals from the GSP and GSN/1 inbred lines survived more than 100 days, while all the skingrafts showed signs of rejection within 7 days among the inbred lines having different B alleles. The results obtained by the three practical methods coincidentally indicated that the individuals in the respective four inbred lines were histocompatible, and further, that the GSP and GSN/1 individuals were histocompatible. PMID:18075192

  5. [From neuropeptides and cytokines to psychotherapy. Skin diseases between psychoneuroimmunology research and psychosomatic treatment].

    PubMed

    Niemeier, V; Kupfer, J; Al-Abesie, S; Schill, W B; Gieler, U

    1999-04-01

    Most therapists recognize that emotional factors influence the course of neurodermitis (ND). Most studies concerning the influence of experimental, acute stressors brought only inconsistent results in ND. Most likely, the experimental stressors chosen thus far were only able to poorly simulate the reactions to real stressors in neurodermitis patients. More recent articles, however, were able to demonstrate changes in psychoimmunological parameters under experimental stress conditions in ND in comparison with a control group of persons with healthy skin. Retrospective studies, serial analyses over time and psychotherapeutic evaluation studies were able to demonstrate even more clearly that emotional factors influence the course of ND. PMID:10352376

  6. Acute-toxicity evaluation of nitroaromatic compounds. Final report, 29 Sep 89-29 Sep 90

    SciTech Connect

    FitzGerald, G.B.; Austin, A.; DiGuilio, N.

    1991-03-01

    The nitroaromatics 1,3-dinitrobenzene (DNB), 1,2,5-trinitrobenzene (TNB) and N-methyl-n,2,4,6-tetranitroaniline (tetryl) have been detected as environmental contaminants of water and soil near production waste sites and at military test grounds. Acute toxicity evaluations were carried out with these compounds to develop environmental and health effects criteria. Dermal and eye irritation tests and acute dermal sensitization (Buehler) tests in guinea pigs were conducted according to EPA standard protocols. The sensitization tests showed that DNB and tetryl are not skin sensitizers while TNB caused a mild allergic reaction. None of these compounds produced skin irritation but positive (DNB) to severe (TNB, tetryl) eye irritation potentials were observed.

  7. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... International clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of acute uncomplicated cystitis and pyelonephritis in women: A 2010 ...

  8. [Systemic reaction after pine processionary caterpillar ingestion. Conservative management?].

    PubMed

    Casado Verrier, Esther; Carro Rodríguez, Miguel A; de la Parte Cancho, María; Piñeiro Pérez, Roi

    2016-06-01

    The larval form of the moth Thaumetopoea pityocampa, known as pine processionary caterpillar, is one of the main forest pests in southern Europe. Often, these caterpillars cause local reactions in humans, due to their microscopic stinging hairs. Most symptoms affect skin, in form of acute urticaria. Systemic reactions are rare. An eleven month old infant with a systemic reaction after ingestion of a pine processionary caterpillar is presented. The boy reached the Emergency Room with orofacial edema, drooling and urticaria. Drug treatment was enough to resolve the symptoms. The patient did not present airway commitment, nor anaphylaxis data at any moment, so more aggressive actions, such as endotracheal intubation, endoscopy or laryngoscopy, were rejected. PMID:27164346

  9. Photoprotection of human skin beyond ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Grether-Beck, Susanne; Marini, Alessandra; Jaenicke, Thomas; Krutmann, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Photoprotection of human skin by means of sunscreens or daily skin-care products is traditionally centered around the prevention of acute (e.g. sunburn) and chronic (e.g. skin cancer and photoaging) skin damage that may result from exposure to ultraviolet rays (UVB and UVA). Within the last decade, however, it has been appreciated that wavelengths beyond the ultraviolet spectrum, in particular visible light and infrared radiation, contribute to skin damage in general and photoaging of human skin in particular. As a consequence, attempts have been made to develop skin care/sunscreen products that not only protect against UVB or UVA radiation but provide photoprotection against visible light and infrared radiation as well. In this article, we will briefly review the current knowledge about the mechanisms responsible for visible light/infrared radiation-induced skin damage and then, based on this information, discuss strategies that have been successfully used or may be employed in the future to achieve photoprotection of human skin beyond ultraviolet radiation. In this regard we will particularly focus on the use of topical antioxidants and the challenges that result from the task of showing their efficacy.

  10. Aesthetic skin branding: a novel form of body art with adverse clinical sequela.

    PubMed

    Karamanoukian, Raffy; Ukatu, Chidi; Lee, Edward; Hyman, Josh; Sundine, Michael; Kobayashi, Mark; Evans, Gregory R D

    2006-01-01

    Branding is a form of body art wherein third-degree burns are inflicted on the skin to produce permanent scars. This method of scarification is a common practice among many indigenous cultures and has become exceedingly common in western societies. As with other forms of body art, branding is not a manifestation of a psychiatric disorder but, rather, a method of self-expression. The process can be performed through the use of electrocautery, laser, chemicals, freezing, and hot metal. Complications arising from the procedure include acute infection, transmission of blood-borne pathogens, allergic reactions, and sequelae arising from third-degree burns. In addition, skin branding has been shown to be associated with substance abuse and high-risk behaviors among adolescents. The purpose of this article is to present the following case report and review to familiarize clinicians with this dangerous method of body art.

  11. Necrotizing vasculitis of the skin and uterine cervix associated with minocycline therapy for acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Schrodt, B J; Kulp-Shorten, C L; Callen, J P

    1999-05-01

    In recent years, minocycline has become a commonly used agent for the treatment of acne vulgaris and rosacea. With this increased use have come reports of severe and in some cases life-threatening toxicity, often occurring in otherwise healthy young women after prolonged courses of minocycline. These adverse reactions include hepatotoxicity, drug-induced lupus erythematosus, eosinophilic pneumonitis, and hypersensitivity syndrome. We describe a 35-year-old woman who had necrotizing vasculitis of the skin and uterine cervix after 2 years of minocycline therapy for acne vulgaris. Skin and cervical biopsies revealed acute inflammation involving through-and-through necrosis of vessel walls with thrombosis, focal fibrinoid change, and a perivascular lymphohistiocytic infiltrate. The disease fully resolved within 3 months of discontinuance of the minocycline therapy. Patients should be informed of these rare but potentially serious adverse effects before the initiation of minocycline therapy. Early recognition of these complications can result in complete resolution.

  12. Aesthetic skin branding: a novel form of body art with adverse clinical sequela.

    PubMed

    Karamanoukian, Raffy; Ukatu, Chidi; Lee, Edward; Hyman, Josh; Sundine, Michael; Kobayashi, Mark; Evans, Gregory R D

    2006-01-01

    Branding is a form of body art wherein third-degree burns are inflicted on the skin to produce permanent scars. This method of scarification is a common practice among many indigenous cultures and has become exceedingly common in western societies. As with other forms of body art, branding is not a manifestation of a psychiatric disorder but, rather, a method of self-expression. The process can be performed through the use of electrocautery, laser, chemicals, freezing, and hot metal. Complications arising from the procedure include acute infection, transmission of blood-borne pathogens, allergic reactions, and sequelae arising from third-degree burns. In addition, skin branding has been shown to be associated with substance abuse and high-risk behaviors among adolescents. The purpose of this article is to present the following case report and review to familiarize clinicians with this dangerous method of body art. PMID:16566546

  13. Effect of immunologic reactions on rat intestinal epithelium. Correlation of increased permeability to chromium 51-labeled ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and ovalbumin during acute inflammation and anaphylaxis

    SciTech Connect

    Ramage, J.K.; Stanisz, A.; Scicchitano, R.; Hunt, R.H.; Perdue, M.H.

    1988-06-01

    In these studies we compared jejunal permeability to two probes--chromium 51-labeled ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (51Cr-EDTA) (mol wt, 360) and ovalbumin (mol wt, 45,000)--under control conditions, during acute intestinal inflammation, and in response to systemic anaphylaxis. Acute inflammation was produced after infection with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis and rats were studied at day 0 (control), day 4 (early), day 10 (acute), and day 35 (postinfection). At the latter stage, immune rats were also studied during anaphylaxis induced by i.v. N. brasiliensis antigen. In each study, blood and urine were sampled over 5 h after the probes were simultaneously injected into ligated loops in anesthetized rats. In controls, small quantities (less than 0.04% and 0.002% of the administered dose for 51Cr-EDTA and ovalbumin, respectively) appeared in the circulation and plateaued at 1 h. During acute inflammation, the appearance of both probes continued to increase with time. Compared with controls, 5-h values for 51Cr-EDTA and ovalbumin were (a) significantly elevated at day 4 (p less than 0.005), (b) increased approximately 20-fold at day 10 (p less than 0.005 and less than 0.01, respectively), and (c) normal at day 35. Urinary recovery of 51Cr-EDTA followed the same pattern. During anaphylaxis, appearance of the probes in the circulation increased at 1 h to values approximately 10-fold those in controls (p less than 0.001 and less than 0.01, for 51Cr-EDTA and ovalbumin, respectively), and then declined. Urinary recovery of 51Cr-EDTA over 5 h was also significantly increased. We conclude that epithelial barrier function becomes impaired during both acute inflammation and anaphylaxis. In this rat model, gut permeability changes to 51Cr-EDTA reflect gut permeability changes to macromolecular antigens.

  14. Acute Generalized Exanthematous Pustulosis Induced by Amoxicillin/Clavulanic Acid: Report of a Case Presenting With Generalized Lymphadenopathy.

    PubMed

    Syrigou, Ekaterini; Grapsa, Dimitra; Charpidou, Andriani; Syrigos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Drug-induced acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis is a rare pustular skin reaction, most commonly triggered by antibiotics. Although its diagnosis is based primarily on the presence of specific clinical and histopathologic features, additional in vivo (patch testing) or in vitro testing may be required, especially in atypical cases, to more accurately determine the causative agent. The authors report a histologically confirmed case of acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis that was induced by amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, as documented by subsequent patch testing, and presented with generalized painful lymphadenopathy, mimicking an acute infectious process. This is a very rare and diagnostically challenging clinical presentation of acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis, which has been reported, to the best of our knowledge, only once previously.

  15. [Cutaneous adverse reactions to tattoos and piercings].

    PubMed

    Mataix, J; Silvestre, J F

    2009-10-01

    Piercings and tattoos have become very popular in western society in recent decades, particularly among younger generations. Reports of medical complications associated with these decorative techniques have increased in parallel with the rise in their popularity. Due to their high frequency, adverse cutaneous reactions are particularly important among these potential complications. Tattoo-related complications include a number of cutaneous and systemic infections secondary to breach of the epidermal barrier, acute and delayed inflammatory reactions with different histopathological patterns, the appearance of benign and malignant tumors on tattooed areas of skin, and certain dermatoses triggered by isomorphic phenomena. Piercing-related complications are similar, though some, such as pyogenic skin infections, are much more common due to the delayed wound healing after piercing in certain sites. We must differentiate between complications that are independent of the site of piercing, and specific complications, which are closely related to the body area pierced. The rate of complications after performing piercings or tattoos depends on the experience of the artist, the hygiene techniques applied, and the postprocedural care by the customer. However, some of these complications are unpredictable and depend on factors intrinsic to the patient. In this article, we review the most common decorative techniques of body art, with particular focus on the potential cutaneous complications and their management. PMID:19775542

  16. Skin (Pressure) Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Skin dryness Next Topic Sleep problems Skin (pressure) sores A skin or pressure sore develops when the blood supply to an ... is bedridden or always in a wheelchair puts pressure on the same places much of the time. ...

  17. Layers of the Skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... produce the skin coloring or pigment known as melanin, which gives skin its tan or brown color ... Sun exposure causes melanocytes to increase production of melanin in order to protect the skin from damaging ...

  18. Learning about Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... have red or blond hair and blue or light-colored eyes - although anyone can get skin cancer. Skin cancer is related to lifetime exposure to UV radiation, therefore most skin cancers appear after age ...

  19. Scalded skin syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Ritter disease; Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSS) ... Scalded skin syndrome (SSS) is caused by infection with certain strains of Staphylococcus bacteria. The bacteria produce a toxin that causes the skin ...

  20. Skin Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skin Cancer Skin color and being exposed to sunlight can increase the risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer ... carcinoma include the following: Being exposed to natural sunlight or artificial sunlight (such as from tanning beds) ...

  1. Stages of Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skin Cancer Skin color and being exposed to sunlight can increase the risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer ... carcinoma include the following: Being exposed to natural sunlight or artificial sunlight (such as from tanning beds) ...

  2. Dry Skin (Xerosis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin, which may bleed if severe. Chapped or cracked lips. When dry skin cracks, germs can get ... cause the skin to become dry, raw, and cracked. Swimming : Some pools have high levels of chlorine, ...

  3. Basal cell skin cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur on skin that is regularly exposed to sunlight or other ultraviolet radiation. This type of skin ... skin cancer is to reduce your exposure to sunlight . Always use sunscreen: Apply sunscreen with sun protection ...

  4. Skin Cancer Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Infographics Children For Your Eyes Clothing Shade Sunscreen Sunburn Seal of Recommendation Are You at Risk? ... Defense The Mini Skin Cancer Prevention Handbook A "Sunscreen Gene"? Skin Cancer Facts & Statistics The Skin Cancer ...

  5. Acute arsenic poisoning: clinical and histopathological features.

    PubMed

    Bartolomé, B; Córdoba, S; Nieto, S; Fernández-Herrera, J; García-Díez, A

    1999-12-01

    We report a woman with acute arsenic poisoning, who developed an erythroderma with vesicles and pustules after the ingestion of 8-16 g of sodium arsenite. Simultaneously, she presented a herpes simplex virus infection. Skin biopsies showed unique features which included multiple small pigment granules inside and outside the histiocytes. In our opinion, these findings are consistent with acute arsenic poisoning, and constitute the first histological description of this entity in skin.

  6. [Skin diseases in travellers returning from tropical countries].

    PubMed

    Blum, Johannes; Pletscher, Martin

    2013-06-01

    The most frequently observed skin lesions in travellers returning from tropical countries are insect bite reactions, bacterial skin diseases, creeping eruption and allergic reactions. The article describes these most relevant diseases and their differential diagnosis focussing on the diseases, which are potentially dangerous and which should not be missed, such as resistant staphylococci, chancre of rickettsia or sleeping sickness, cutaneous leishmaniasis or worms, which are not limited to the skin.

  7. Curcumin Attenuates Acute Graft-versus-Host Disease Severity via In Vivo Regulations on Th1, Th17 and Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung-Hee; Yang, Eun-Ji; Min, Jun-Ki; Cho, Seok-Goo; Yang, Chul-Woo; Park, Sung-Hwan; Kim, Ho-Youn; Cho, Mi-La

    2013-01-01

    Background In this study we examined the in vivo and in vitro effects and mechanisms of action of curcumin on the development of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) using a murine model. Methodology/Principal Findings Mixed lymphocyte reactions were used to determine the in vitro effects of curcumin. Treatment with curcumin attenuated alloreactive T cell proliferation and inhibited the production of interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-17. In a murine acute GVHD model, transplantation of curcumin-treated allogeneic splenocytes into irradiated recipient mice significantly reduced the clinical severity scores of acute GVHD manifested in the liver, skin, colon and lung as compared with animals receiving vehicle-treated splenocytes. c-Fos and c-Jun expression levels in the skin and intestine, which are major target organs, were analyzed using immunohistochemical staining. Expression of both proteins was reduced in epithelial tissues of skin and intestine from curcumin-treated GVHD animals. The IFN-γ-expressing CD4+ splenocytes and IFN-γ-expressing lymph node cells were dramatically decreased in curcumin-treated mice. In contrast, CD4+Foxp3+ splenocytes were increased in the curcumin-treated acute GVHD animals. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that animals transplanted with curcumin-treated allogeneic splenocytes showed increased populations of CD4+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) as well as CD8+ Treg cells, compared to animals administered vehicle-treated splenocytes. Curcumin-treated acute GVHD animals could have a change in B cell subpopulations. Conclusion/Significance In the present study, we investigated the efficacy and mechanism of action of curcumin treatment against acute GVHD. The acute GVHD mice administered with curcumin-treated splenocytes showed significantly reduced severity of acute GVHD. Curcumin exerted in vivo preventive effects on acute GVHD by reciprocal regulation of T helper 1 (Th1) and Treg (both CD4+ and CD8+ Treg) cell lineages as well as

  8. Histopathology of laser skin resurfacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, Sharon L.; Baldwin, Bonnie; Chi, Eric; Ellard, Jeff; Schwartz, Jon A.

    1997-05-01

    Pulsed carbon-dioxide laser skin resurfacing is a purportedly 'non-thermal' procedure enjoying wide application as a cosmetic treatment for skin wrinkles. Treatment success has been based on clinical assessments of skin smoothness. Skin lesions (1 cm2) created by one, two or three superimposed carbon-dioxide laser passes were placed on the backs of 28 'fuzzy' Harlan Sprague Dawley rats. The variable laser irradiation parameters included measured energies ranging from 112 to 387/pulse with pulse widths of 65 and 125 microseconds and a repetition rate of 8 Hz. The square, flat laser beam measured 3 mm2 at the focal point. The lesions were collected from 0 to 10 days after treatment for qualitative and quantitative histopathology. Thermal damage and treatment effect tended to increase in severity and, to a lesser extent, depth with increased delivery parameters. In acute lesions, the vacuolated and fragmented, desiccated and thermally coagulated epidermis was partially removed exposing the underlying thermally coagulated dermal collagen and cells. Epidermal and dermal necrosis and slough occurred between 24 to 72 hours after treatment. Epithelial regeneration originated from the adnexa and the lesion edges. Dermal fibrous scar formation began at 5 days below the regenerated epidermis and became more prominent at 7 and 10 days.

  9. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... tightness. There are two main types of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis get better within several days. But your ... that cause colds and the flu often cause acute bronchitis. These viruses spread through the air when ...

  10. Dysfunctional cognitive appraisal and psychophysiological reactivity in acute stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Elsesser, Karin; Freyth, Claudia; Lohrmann, Thomas; Sartory, Gudrun

    2009-10-01

    The present study investigated the extent of dysfunctional appraisal as measured with the Posttraumatic Cognitions Inventory (PTCI) and physiological responses to trauma-related material in patients with acute stress disorder (ASD; N=44) in comparison to participants without trauma exposure (N=27). Heart-rate (HR), skin conductance responses (SCR), and viewing time were recorded in response to - for trauma victims - idiosyncratically trauma-relevant and control pictures. ASD patients evidenced greater dysfunctional appraisal than control participants with regard to the PTCI scales Self and World and also an accelerative HR reaction and greater SCRs to trauma-relevant pictures. Among patients, PTCI was highly correlated with ASD severity while PTCI World was positively correlated with resting HR and depression. Amplitude of the HR reaction to trauma-related pictures was negatively correlated with viewing time. Results suggest that dysfunctional appraisal and autonomic reactivity are only loosely related in ASD.

  11. Allergy testing - skin

    MedlinePlus

    Patch tests - allergy; Scratch tests - allergy; Skin tests - allergy; RAST test ... There are three common methods of allergy skin testing. The skin prick test involves: Placing a small amount of substances that may be causing your symptoms on the skin, most often ...

  12. [Skin and occupational artificial UV-radiation].

    PubMed

    Fartasch, M; Wittlich, M; Broding, H C; Gellert, B; Blome, H; Brüning, T

    2012-10-01

    In various areas of professional activity, exposure of skin to ultraviolet radiation coming from artificial sources may occur. These UV rays differ from the solar UV radiation due to their intensity and spectrum. We review current developments with the introduction of statutory exposure limit values for jobs with UV radiation from artificial sources, a selection of relevant activities with artificial UV exposure and an overview of the occurrence of skin disorders and dermatologically relevant skin diseases caused by these specific occupational exposures. The latter is relevant for medical advice in occupational dermatology and occupational medicine. On the basis of existing studies on welders and studies regarding occupations with "open flames" (using the example of the glassblower) it is evident that so far no reliable data exist regarding the chronic photodamage or the occurrence of UV-typical skin cancers, but instead clear evidence exists regarding the regular occurrence of acute light damage in these occupations.

  13. [Effect of citicoline on the development of chronic epileptization of the brain (pentylenetetrazole kindling) and acute seizures reaction of kindled mice C57Bl/6].

    PubMed

    Kuznetzova, L V; Karpova, M N; Zinkovsky, K A; Klishina, N V

    2014-01-01

    In experiments on mice C57Bl/6 was studied effects of citicoline (500 mg/kg, i.p.) on development of chronically epileptization of the brain--pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) kindling (30 mg/kg PTZ, i.p. during 24 days) and on acute generalized seizures (i.v., 1% solution of PTZ with the speed of 0.01 ml/s). It was shown that daily injection of citicoline an hour before the introduction of PTZ had no effect on development of chronically epileptization of the brain --PTZ-kindling (the latency of seizures appearance and their severity). However, citicoIine posses anticonvulsive effects on acute seizures in kindled mice. In animals with increased seizure susceptibility of the brain caused by kindling and severity of seizures 2-3 points injection citicoline after 14 days of kindling had anticonvulsive effect, increasing the threshold clonic seizures. Injection of citicoline during 24 days of kindled animals and severity of seizures 3-5 points caused the increase of thresholds as clonic and tonic phase of seizures with lethal outcome. Thus, the anticonvulsant effect of citicoline more pronounced in the long-term use.

  14. Insight into how skin changes perfume.

    PubMed

    Behan, J M; Macmaster, A P; Perring, K D; Tuck, K M

    1996-10-01

    Synopsis Overall consumer perception of personal products such as colognes, deodorants, talc, and soap is often strongly influenced by the presence and nature of the fragrance incorporated into these products, which is also true for the corresponding olfactory characteristics of skin during and after application. Although extensive research has been carried out to define the morphology and characteristics of living skin, relatively little is known about the physical or (bio)chemical behaviour of perfume once deposited onto skin. It is widely acknowledged that some perfumes may perform very differently on different skins, but little definitive information is available to elucidate the associated mechanism(s). Rationalization of this may necessitate understanding both the physical and the chemical interactions between perfume and skin. To assist studies in this area, techniques based on headspace analysis and solvent swabbing have been developed to monitor fragrance concentrations on and above skin in use. Using these techniques, we have carried out some initial exploration into the physical and chemical interactions between skin and perfume. (a) Physical interactions: differences in perfume behaviour when on skin and when on a relatively inert surface (vitreous tile) were quantified to build up at least a qualitative idea of the importance of physical interactions between skin and perfume. (b) Chemical interactions: the potential for skin-mediated chemical transformation of perfume was examined across a wide range of functional groups relevant to perfumes, but was found to be low under 'non-forcing'conditions (i.e. clean dry skin). However, some evidence has been found for changes in perfume ingredients in the underarm, probably arising from microbially catalysed reactions. It is envisaged that it may be possible to harness such transformations usefully - for example, to deliver unusual fragrance effects or enhance fragrance longevity. In addition, product

  15. Granulomatous tattoo reaction induced by intense pulse light treatment.

    PubMed

    Tourlaki, Athanasia; Boneschi, Vinicio; Tosi, Diego; Pigatto, Paolo; Brambilla, Lucia

    2010-10-01

    Cosmetic tattooing involves implantation of pigments into the dermis in order to create a permanent makeup. Here, we report a case of sarcoidal granulomatous reaction to old cosmetic tattoos after an intense pulsed light (IPL) treatment for facial skin rejuvenation. We consider this case as a peculiar example of photo-induced reaction to tattoo. In addition, we hypothesize that an underlying immune dysfunction was present, and acted as a predisposing factor for this unusual response, as the patient had suffered from an episode of acute pulmonary sarcoidosis 15 years before. Overall, our observation suggests that IPL treatment should be used cautiously in patients with tattoos, especially when a history of autoimmune disease is present. PMID:21175859

  16. Skin irritation and sensitization: mechanisms and new approaches for risk assessment. 1. Skin irritation.

    PubMed

    Fluhr, J W; Darlenski, R; Angelova-Fischer, I; Tsankov, N; Basketter, D

    2008-01-01

    Cutaneous irritation presents a major health problem with serious social and occupational impact. The interaction between an irritant and the human skin depends on multiple factors: the intrinsic properties and the nature of the irritant itself, and specific individual- and environment-related variables. The main pathological mechanisms of irritancy include skin barrier disruption, induction of a cytokine cascade and involvement of the oxidative stress network; all of them resulting in a visible or subclinical inflammatory reaction. In vivo, different non-invasive parameters for the evaluation of skin irritation and irritant potential of compounds and their specific formulations have been introduced, such as epidermal barrier function, skin hydration, surface pH, lipid composition, skin colour and skin blood flow. The diverse physiological changes caused by irritating agents require implementation of a multiparametric approach in the evaluation of cutaneous irritancy.

  17. Acute effects of whole body vibration on directionality and reaction time latency of trunk muscles: the importance of rest and implications for spine stability.

    PubMed

    Arora, Neha; Grenier, Sylvain G

    2013-04-01

    Workplace exposure to whole body vibration (WBV) has been identified as one of the major physical risk factors encountered by the population. There are indications that, subsequent to a perturbation, impaired reflex response could allow for destabilization of the spine, possibly leading to injury. The purpose of this study was to investigate if WBV alters reflex response of trunk muscles and if the direction of perturbation (flexion or extension or lateral) and delay between exposure and perturbation influences the response. The results indicate that EMG latency was increased more in the vibration condition than in sitting without vibration. Significant effects with respect to directionality were observed in Erector Spinae muscles. The EMG latency reduced from the effect of perturbation after a 20s rest period. Even though the EMG latency did not fully return to its Pre-test state, the present results still show that recovery from the acute effects of WBV is possible with a rest period.

  18. Long-term skin damage due to chemical weapon exposure.

    PubMed

    Firooz, Alireza; Sadr, Bardia; Davoudi, Seyed M; Nassiri-Kashani, Mansour; Panahi, Yunes; Dowlati, Yahya

    2011-03-01

    Sulfur mustard (2,2-dichlorodiethyl sulfide: SM), the protagonist of vesicant chemical weapons, was first used in July 1917. Despite prohibition of its production and use by international conventions, it has been used in several conflicts. More than 100,000 soldiers and civilians were injured due to SM exposure during Iran-Iraq war (1980-1988). The acute skin lesions consist of erythema, edema, and blisters. Skin xerosis and pruritus, pigmentation disorders, scars, and cherry angiomas are among the most common long-term skin lesions after contact with SM. Although SM is a well-known carcinogenic substance, skin cancers are rarely reported.

  19. [Management of skin lesions in returning travelers].

    PubMed

    Monsel, Gentiane; Caumes, Éric

    2015-04-01

    Dermatoses in returning travellers are common. These dermatoses are mainly infectious, the most common being bacterial infections of cosmopolitan origin (cellulitis, pyoderma and abcess). Others dermatoses are environmental diseases such as sunburns, arthropod-related reactions and superficial injuries. The most common tropical skin disease is hookworm-related cutaneous larva migrans but treating physicians may also face patients with localized cutaneous leishmaniasis, tungiasis, or myiasis. Also some systemic infections can be associated with skin manifestations. The most useful treatments in this setting are oral antihistamines, topical steroids, antibiotics effective against bacterial skin infection, booster for tetanus immunization, and rabies vaccination in case of animal exposure. PMID:26058193

  20. Enzymes, detergents and skin: facts and fantasies.

    PubMed

    Basketter, D A; English, J S C; Wakelin, S H; White, I R

    2008-06-01

    In their raw state, enzymes of bacterial/fungal origin cause allergic reactions in the lung. Proteolytic enzymes also cause irritation to skin, eyes and the respiratory tract. For 40 years, encapsulated enzymes have been used worldwide in detergent products, especially laundry formulations, and have increasing importance due to biodegradability and functionality at low temperatures, offering environmental benefits. Uniquely to the U.K., for years it has been suggested that the inclusion of enzymes in such products leads to adverse skin reactions, including erythema, pruritus and exacerbation of eczema. In this review, we look at the facts, asking whether there is evidence that the hazards identified for enzymes translate into any risk for consumer health. By considering the actual exposures in consumer use and exaggerated product usage, it is concluded that the irritating and allergenic hazards of enzyme raw materials do not translate into a risk of skin reactions, either irritant or allergic. Investigations of numerous individuals with skin complaints attributed to laundry products demonstrate convincingly that enzymes were not responsible. Indeed, enzyme-containing laundry products have an extensive history of safe use. Thus, the supposed adverse effects of enzymes on skin seem to be a consequence of a mythology. The important practical lesson is that when primary or secondary care practitioners are presented with a skin complaint, it should not be dismissed as a result of using an enzyme-containing laundry product as the diagnosis will certainly lie elsewhere. Education for healthcare professionals could usefully be enhanced to take this on board.

  1. Direct Analysis in Real Time Mass Spectrometry (DART-MS) Analysis of Skin Metabolome Changes in the Ultraviolet B-Induced Mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye Min; Kim, Hye Jin; Jang, Young Pyo; Kim, Sun Yeou

    2013-11-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a major environmental factor that leads to acute and chronic reactions in the human skin. UV exposure induces wrinkle formation, DNA damage, and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Most mechanistic studies of skin physiology and pharmacology related with UV-irradiated skin have focused on proteins and their related gene expression or single- targeted small molecules. The present study identified and analyzed the alteration of skin metabolites following UVB irradiation and topical retinyl palmitate (RP, 5%) treatment in hairless mice using direct analysis in real time (DART) time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) with multivariate analysis. Under the negative ion mode, the DART ion source successfully ionized various fatty acids including palmitoleic and linolenic acid. From DART-TOF-MS fingerprints measured in positive mode, the prominent dehydrated ion peak (m/z: 369, M+H-H2O) of cholesterol was characterized in all three groups. In positive mode, the discrimination among three groups was much clearer than that in negative mode by using multivariate analysis of orthogonal partial-least squares-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). DART-TOF-MS can ionize various small organic molecules in living tissues and is an efficient alternative analytical tool for acquiring full chemical fingerprints from living tissues without requiring sample preparation. DART-MS measurement of skin tissue with multivariate analysis proved to be a powerful method to discriminate between experimental groups and to find biomarkers for various experiment models in skin dermatological research.

  2. Direct Analysis in Real Time Mass Spectrometry (DART-MS) Analysis of Skin Metabolome Changes in the Ultraviolet B-Induced Mice

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hye Min; Kim, Hye Jin; Jang, Young Pyo; Kim, Sun Yeou

    2013-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a major environmental factor that leads to acute and chronic reactions in the human skin. UV exposure induces wrinkle formation, DNA damage, and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Most mechanistic studies of skin physiology and pharmacology related with UV-irradiated skin have focused on proteins and their related gene expression or single- targeted small molecules. The present study identified and analyzed the alteration of skin metabolites following UVB irradiation and topical retinyl palmitate (RP, 5%) treatment in hairless mice using direct analysis in real time (DART) time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) with multivariate analysis. Under the negative ion mode, the DART ion source successfully ionized various fatty acids including palmitoleic and linolenic acid. From DART-TOF-MS fingerprints measured in positive mode, the prominent dehydrated ion peak (m/z: 369, M+H-H2O) of cholesterol was characterized in all three groups. In positive mode, the discrimination among three groups was much clearer than that in negative mode by using multivariate analysis of orthogonal partial-least squares-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). DART-TOF-MS can ionize various small organic molecules in living tissues and is an efficient alternative analytical tool for acquiring full chemical fingerprints from living tissues without requiring sample preparation. DART-MS measurement of skin tissue with multivariate analysis proved to be a powerful method to discriminate between experimental groups and to find biomarkers for various experiment models in skin dermatological research. PMID:24404338

  3. Direct Analysis in Real Time Mass Spectrometry (DART-MS) Analysis of Skin Metabolome Changes in the Ultraviolet B-Induced Mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye Min; Kim, Hye Jin; Jang, Young Pyo; Kim, Sun Yeou

    2013-11-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a major environmental factor that leads to acute and chronic reactions in the human skin. UV exposure induces wrinkle formation, DNA damage, and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Most mechanistic studies of skin physiology and pharmacology related with UV-irradiated skin have focused on proteins and their related gene expression or single- targeted small molecules. The present study identified and analyzed the alteration of skin metabolites following UVB irradiation and topical retinyl palmitate (RP, 5%) treatment in hairless mice using direct analysis in real time (DART) time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) with multivariate analysis. Under the negative ion mode, the DART ion source successfully ionized various fatty acids including palmitoleic and linolenic acid. From DART-TOF-MS fingerprints measured in positive mode, the prominent dehydrated ion peak (m/z: 369, M+H-H2O) of cholesterol was characterized in all three groups. In positive mode, the discrimination among three groups was much clearer than that in negative mode by using multivariate analysis of orthogonal partial-least squares-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). DART-TOF-MS can ionize various small organic molecules in living tissues and is an efficient alternative analytical tool for acquiring full chemical fingerprints from living tissues without requiring sample preparation. DART-MS measurement of skin tissue with multivariate analysis proved to be a powerful method to discriminate between experimental groups and to find biomarkers for various experiment models in skin dermatological research. PMID:24404338

  4. The acute effects of a warm-up including static or dynamic stretching on countermovement jump height, reaction time, and flexibility.

    PubMed

    Perrier, Erica T; Pavol, Michael J; Hoffman, Mark A

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this research was to compare the effects of a warm-up with static vs. dynamic stretching on countermovement jump (CMJ) height, reaction time, and low-back and hamstring flexibility and to determine whether any observed performance deficits would persist throughout a series of CMJs. Twenty-one recreationally active men (24.4 ± 4.5 years) completed 3 data collection sessions. Each session included a 5-minute treadmill jog followed by 1 of the stretch treatments: no stretching (NS), static stretching (SS), or dynamic stretching (DS). After the jog and stretch treatment, the participant performed a sit-and-reach test. Next, the participant completed a series of 10 maximal-effort CMJs, during which he was asked to jump as quickly as possible after seeing a visual stimulus (light). The CMJ height and reaction time were determined from measured ground reaction forces. A treatment × jump repeated-measures analysis of variance for CMJ height revealed a significant main effect of treatment (p = 0.004). The CMJ height was greater for DS (43.0 cm) than for NS (41.4 cm) and SS (41.9 cm) and was not less for SS than for NS. Analysis also revealed a significant main effect of jump (p = 0.005) on CMJ height: Jump height decreased from the early to the late jumps. The analysis of reaction time showed no significant effect of treatment. Treatment had a main effect (p < 0.001) on flexibility, however. Flexibility was greater after both SS and DS compared to after NS, with no difference in flexibility between SS and DS. Athletes in sports requiring lower-extremity power should use DS techniques in warm-up to enhance flexibility while improving performance.

  5. Diagnostic approach for suspected pseudoallergic reaction to food ingredients.

    PubMed

    Reese, Imke; Zuberbier, Torsten; Bunselmeyer, Britta; Erdmann, Stephan; Henzgen, Margot; Fuchs, Thomas; Jäger, Lothar; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Lepp, Ute; Niggemann, Bodo; Raithel, Martin; Saloga, Joachim; Vieths, Stephan; Werfel, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Chronic urticaria, recurrent angioedema and non-allergic asthma have all been associated with pseudoallergic reactions to food ingredients. For atopic dermatitis and diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, this association is controversial. Pseudoallergic reactions can be elicited by additives as well as by natural food ingredients. An altered histamine metabolism may be associated with pseudoallergy. Acute urticaria or a short episode of angioedema is not an indication for exhaustive evaluation. If basic diagnostic screening is negative in chronic urticaria, a low-pseudoallergen diet can be considered. Skin and serological tests are not objective diagnostic parameters for pseudoallergic reactions. The severity of symptoms should be documented while the patient is on a low-pseudoaller-gen diet. Oral provocation with additives leads to reproducible symptoms only in a few cases. Therefore, if a low-pseudoallergen diet brings improvement, the patient is then exposed to a pseudoallergen-rich "super meal". After a positive reaction to the "super meal" the challenge with additives takes place in the form of collective group exposition. When the patient has asthma or a history of anaphylac-toid reactions, testing with individual substances in carefully increasing dosages is required. The suspicion of adverse reactions against histamine can be confirmed by a challenge with histamine dihydrochloride. In the case of respiratory symptoms, provocation by inhalation should be considered. Objectifying symptoms especially in gastrointestinal diseases is mandatory and should include double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge, if possible.

  6. Estrogens and aging skin

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, M. Julie

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen deficiency following menopause results in atrophic skin changes and acceleration of skin aging. Estrogens significantly modulate skin physiology, targeting keratinocytes, fibroblasts, melanocytes, hair follicles and sebaceous glands, and improve angiogenesis, wound healing and immune responses. Estrogen insufficiency decreases defense against oxidative stress; skin becomes thinner with less collagen, decreased elasticity, increased wrinkling, increased dryness and reduced vascularity. Its protective function becomes compromised and aging is associated with impaired wound healing, hair loss, pigmentary changes and skin cancer.   Skin aging can be significantly delayed by the administration of estrogen. This paper reviews estrogen effects on human skin and the mechanisms by which estrogens can alleviate the changes due to aging. The relevance of estrogen replacement, selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) and phytoestrogens as therapies for diminishing skin aging is highlighted. Understanding estrogen signaling in skin will provide a basis for interventions in aging pathologies. PMID:24194966

  7. Amelioration of both early and late radiation-induced damage to pig skin by essential fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Hopewell, J.W.; Van den Aardweg, G.J.M.J.; Morris, G.M.

    1994-12-01

    To evaluate the possible role of essential fatty acids, specifically gamma-linolenic and eicosapentaenoic acid, in the amelioration of early and late radiation damage to the skin. Skin sites on the flank of 22-25 kg female large white pigs were irradiated with either single or fractionated doses (20 F/28 days) of {beta}-rays from 22.5 mm diameter {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y plaques at a dose rate of {approximately}3 Gy/min. Essential fatty acids were administered orally in the form of two {open_quotes}active{close_quotes} oils, So-1100 and So-5407, which contained gamma-linolenic acid and a mixture of that oil with eicosapentaenoic acid, respectively. Oils (1.5-6.0 ml) were given daily for 4 weeks prior, both 4 weeks prior and 10-16 weeks after, or in the case of one single dose study, just for 10 weeks after irradiation. Control animals received a {open_quotes}placebo{close_quotes} oil, So-1129, containing no gamma linolenic acid or eicosapentaenoic acid over similar time scales before and after irradiation. Acute and late skin reactions were assessed visually and the dose-related incidence of a specific reaction used to compare the effects of different treatment schedules. A reduction in the severity of both the early and late radiation reactions in the skin was only observed when {open_quotes}active{close_quotes} oils were given over the time course of the expression of radiation damage. Prior treatment with oils did not modify the radiation reaction. A 3.0 ml daily dose of either So-1100 or So-5407 given prior to, but also after irradiation with single and fractionated doses of {beta}-rays produced the most significant modification to the radiation reactions, effects consistent with dose modification factors between 1.06-1.24 for the acute reactions of bright red erythema and/or moist desquamation, and of 1.14-1.35 for the late reactions of dusky/mauve erythema and dermal necrosis. 38 refs., 5 tabs.

  8. [Influence of perlite sand on the skin in experiment].

    PubMed

    Dracheva, E E; Iatsyna, I V; Lapina, N E; Ianin, V A; Antoshina, L I; Zhadan, I Iu; Krasavina, E K

    2012-01-01

    In the present work influence of perlite sand has been studied on a skin of Sprague-Dawley male rat (300-350 g). The biopsy of intact rat skin has been used as control. Contact of the perlite sand with animals' skin causes the reaction of an inflammation amplifying with increase of duration of the influence of substance. Therefore, despite an inert chemical compound, long contact with perlite sand in conditions of production can promote development of skin diseases. From the result of this investigation it is concluded that perlite sand causes irritating action on the skin and it is necessary to apply additional protective means to workers contacting to this substance.

  9. Anaphylactic reactions to cinoxacin.

    PubMed Central

    Stricker, B. H.; Slagboom, G.; Demaeseneer, R.; Slootmaekers, V.; Thijs, I.; Olsson, S.

    1988-01-01

    During 1981 to mid-1988 three cases of anaphylactic shock after treatment with the quinolone derivative cinoxacin were reviewed by the Netherlands Centre for Monitoring of Adverse Reactions to Drugs and 17 cases of an anaphylactic type of reaction notified to the World Health Organisation Collaborating Centre for International Drug Monitoring. In five out of six patients for whom data were available the reaction began shortly after taking a single capsule of a second or next course of treatment. Cinoxacin is related to nalidixic acid, and one patient previously treated with that agent subsequently had an anaphylactoid reaction to cinoxacin and later developed a skin reaction to nalidixic acid. There were no deaths, and patients treated as an emergency with plasma expanders or with adrenaline and corticosteroids generally recovered promptly and uneventfully. In view of the potentially fatal consequences of anaphylactic reactions to cinoxacin and other quinolones doctors should take care when prescribing these drugs. PMID:3147004

  10. Viral Skin Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ramdass, Priya; Mullick, Sahil; Farber, Harold F

    2015-12-01

    In the vast world of skin diseases, viral skin disorders account for a significant percentage. Most viral skin diseases present with an exanthem (skin rash) and, oftentimes, an accompanying enanthem (lesions involving the mucosal membrane). In this article, the various viral skin diseases are explored, including viral childhood exanthems (measles, rubella, erythema infectiosum, and roseola), herpes viruses (herpes simplex virus, varicella zoster virus, Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus, viral zoonotic infections [orf, monkeypox, ebola, smallpox]), and several other viral skin diseases, such as human papilloma virus, hand, foot, and mouth disease, molluscum contagiosum, and Gianotti-Crosti syndrome.

  11. [Sarcoidosis of the skin].

    PubMed

    Suga, Y; Ogawa, H

    1994-06-01

    Sarcoidosis is characterized by formation of epithelioid-cell tubercules, without caseation, of the affected organ systems. The mediastinum, peripheral lymph nodes and eyes, in addition to the skin, are most frequently affected. Between 10% and 30% of patients with systemic sarcoidosis in Japan have skin lesions. Skin sarcoidosis is morphologically classified into three basic groups, erythema nodosum, scar sarcoidosis and skin sarcoid. Skin sarcoid is characterized by specific cutaneous lesions of sarcoidosis, and may take nodular, plaque, angiolupoid, subcutaneous and some other forms. Clinical manifestations of the cutaneous lesions are usually asymptomatic and polymorphous. Skin biopsy is, however, often highly useful for confirming a diagnosis of sarcoidosis.

  12. Viral Skin Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ramdass, Priya; Mullick, Sahil; Farber, Harold F

    2015-12-01

    In the vast world of skin diseases, viral skin disorders account for a significant percentage. Most viral skin diseases present with an exanthem (skin rash) and, oftentimes, an accompanying enanthem (lesions involving the mucosal membrane). In this article, the various viral skin diseases are explored, including viral childhood exanthems (measles, rubella, erythema infectiosum, and roseola), herpes viruses (herpes simplex virus, varicella zoster virus, Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus, viral zoonotic infections [orf, monkeypox, ebola, smallpox]), and several other viral skin diseases, such as human papilloma virus, hand, foot, and mouth disease, molluscum contagiosum, and Gianotti-Crosti syndrome. PMID:26612372

  13. [Reactions to insect stings and bites].

    PubMed

    Ljubojević, Suzana; Lipozencić, Jasna

    2011-01-01

    Reaction to insect sting and bite may be local, such as erythema, edema and pruritus, or systemic, such as anaphylactic reaction. Diagnosis can be made by patient history, clinical picture, skin testing, total and specific IgE level, and provocation test. Local reactions are treated with cold compresses, topical corticosteroids and oral antihistamines. Oral and intramuscular antihistamines and corticosteroids are used for the treatment of mild systemic reactions, and in severe reaction epinephrine injections are added. Hyposensitization is indicated in patients with severe systemic reaction, positive skin tests and high level of specific IgE antibodies.

  14. Quantification of minimal residual disease (MRD) in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) using amplicon-fusion-site polymerase chain reaction (AFS-PCR)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The amplification of putative oncogenes is a common finding within the genome of various cancer types. Identification and further targeting of specific junction sites within the sequence of genomic amplicons (amplicon fusion sites, AFS) by PCR (AFS-PCR) is suitable for quantification of minimal residual disease (MRD). This approach has recently been developed and described for MYCN amplified neuroblastomas. To compare AFS-PCR directly to routinely used MRD diagnostic strategies, we mapped the amplified genomic regions (ampGR) of an iAMP21-amplicon in high resolution of a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Successfully, we established AFS-PCR covering junction sites between ampGR within the iAMP21-amplicon. Quantification of MRD by AFS-PCR was directly comparable to IgH/TCR based real time quantitative PCR and fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis in consecutive bone marrow (BM) specimens. Our data give an additional proof of concept of AFS-PCR for quantification of MRD. The method could be taken into account for ALL patients with genomic amplifications as alternative MRD diagnostic, if no or qualitatively poor Ig/TCR-PCRs are available. PMID:23210797

  15. In vivo evaluation of copper release and acute local tissue reactions after implantation of copper-coated titanium implants in rats.

    PubMed

    Hoene, Andreas; Prinz, Cornelia; Walschus, Uwe; Lucke, Silke; Patrzyk, Maciej; Wilhelm, Lutz; Neumann, Hans-Georg; Schlosser, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Copper (Cu) based coatings can reduce infections for titanium (Ti) implants. However, Cu is also cytotoxic. To examine the balance of antibacterial versus adverse tissue effects, this study aimed at evaluating a Cu coating regarding in vivo Cu release and local inflammatory reactions for 72 h. TiAl6V4 plates received either plasma electrolytic oxidation only (Ti), or an additional galvanic Cu deposition (Ti-Cu). No Staphylococcus aureus were found in vitro on Ti-Cu after 24 h. Following simultaneous intramuscular implantation of two Ti and two Ti-Cu plates into nine rats, serum Cu was elevated until 48 h and residual Cu on explanted samples reduced accordingly after 48 h. Total and tissue macrophages around implants increased until 72 h for both series, and were increased for Ti-Cu. As numbers of total and tissue macrophages were comparable, macrophages were probably tissue-derived. MHC-class-II-positive cells increased for Ti-Cu only. T-lymphocytes had considerably lower numbers than macrophages, did not increase or differ between both series, and thus had minor importance. Tissue reactions increased beyond Cu release, indicating effects of either surface-bound Cu or more likely the implants themselves. Altogether, Ti-Cu samples possessed antibacterial effectiveness in vitro, released measurable Cu amounts in vivo and caused a moderately increased local inflammatory response, demonstrating anti-infective potential of Cu coatings.

  16. Skin cell proliferation stimulated by microneedles.

    PubMed

    Liebl, Horst; Kloth, Luther C

    2012-03-01

    A classical wound may be defined as a disruption of tissue integrity. Wounds, caused by trauma from accidents or surgery, that close via secondary intention rely on the biological phases of healing, i.e., hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling (HIPR). Depending on the wound type and severity, the inflammation phase begins immediately after injury and may last for an average of 7-14 days. Concurrent with the inflammation phase or slightly delayed, cell proliferation is stimulated followed by the activation of the remodeling (maturation) phase. The latter phase can last as long as 1 year or more, and the final healed state is represented by a scar tissue, a cross-linked collagen formation that usually aligns collagen fibers in a single direction. One may assume that skin microneedling that involves the use of dozens or as many as 200 needles that limit penetration to 1.5 mm over 1 cm(2) of skin would cause trauma and bleeding followed by the classical HIPR. However, this is not the case or at least the HIPR phases are significantly curtailed and healing never ends in a scar formation. Conversely dermabrasion used in aesthetic medicine for improving skin quality is based on "ablation" (destruction or wounding of superficial skin layers), which requires several weeks for healing that involves formation of new skin layers. Such procedures provoke an acute inflammatory response. We believe that a less intense inflammatory response occurs following microneedle perforation of the skin. However, the mechanism of action of microneedling appears to be different. Here we review the potential mechanisms by which microneedling of the skin facilitates skin repair without scarring after the treatment of superficial burns, acne, hyperpigmentation, and the non-advancing periwound skin surrounding the chronic ulcerations of the integument. PMID:24527373

  17. Skin Cell Proliferation Stimulated by Microneedles

    PubMed Central

    Liebl, Horst; Kloth, Luther C.

    2012-01-01

    A classical wound may be defined as a disruption of tissue integrity. Wounds, caused by trauma from accidents or surgery, that close via secondary intention rely on the biological phases of healing, i.e., hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling (HIPR). Depending on the wound type and severity, the inflammation phase begins immediately after injury and may last for an average of 7–14 days. Concurrent with the inflammation phase or slightly delayed, cell proliferation is stimulated followed by the activation of the remodeling (maturation) phase. The latter phase can last as long as 1 year or more, and the final healed state is represented by a scar tissue, a cross-linked collagen formation that usually aligns collagen fibers in a single direction. One may assume that skin microneedling that involves the use of dozens or as many as 200 needles that limit penetration to 1.5 mm over 1 cm2 of skin would cause trauma and bleeding followed by the classical HIPR. However, this is not the case or at least the HIPR phases are significantly curtailed and healing never ends in a scar formation. Conversely dermabrasion used in aesthetic medicine for improving skin quality is based on “ablation” (destruction or wounding of superficial skin layers), which requires several weeks for healing that involves formation of new skin layers. Such procedures provoke an acute inflammatory response. We believe that a less intense inflammatory response occurs following microneedle perforation of the skin. However, the mechanism of action of microneedling appears to be different. Here we review the potential mechanisms by which microneedling of the skin facilitates skin repair without scarring after the treatment of superficial burns, acne, hyperpigmentation, and the non-advancing periwound skin surrounding the chronic ulcerations of the integument. PMID:24527373

  18. Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole–Induced Rhabdomyolysis; Gabapentin-Induced Hypoglycemia in Diabetic and Nondiabetic Patients; Purple Glove Syndrome After Oral Phenytoin Administration; Acute Dystonic Reaction After Methylphenidate Initiation; Serotonin Syndrome with Vilazodone Monotherapy; Cabozantinib-Associated Dermatologic Adverse Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Mancano, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this feature is to heighten awareness of specific adverse drug reactions (ADRs), discuss methods of prevention, and promote reporting of ADRs to the US Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) MedWatch program (800-FDA-1088). If you have reported an interesting, preventable ADR to MedWatch, please consider sharing the account with our readers. Write to Dr. Mancano at ISMP, 200 Lakeside Drive, Suite 200, Horsham, PA 19044 (phone: 215-707-4936; e-mail: mmancano@temple.edu). Your report will be published anonymously unless otherwise requested. This feature is provided by the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) in cooperation with the FDA’s MedWatch program and Temple University School of Pharmacy. ISMP is an FDA MedWatch partner. PMID:26715798

  19. Scaly Skin (Ichthyosis Vulgaris)

    MedlinePlus

    ... should improve by restoring moisture (hydration) to the skin. Creams and ointments are better moisturizers than lotions, and ... Physician May Prescribe To treat the dry, scaly skin of ichthyosis ... cream or lotion containing the following: Prescription-strength alpha- ...

  20. Skin Pigmentation Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin gets its color from a pigment called melanin. Special cells in the skin make melanin. When these cells become damaged or unhealthy, it affects melanin production. Some pigmentation disorders affect just patches of ...

  1. PPD skin test

    MedlinePlus

    Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Mantoux skin test (PPD test, purified protein derivative test, Tb test, tuberculin skin test, TST, tuberculosis test) - diagnostic. In: Chernecky CC, Berger BJ, eds. Laboratory Tests and Diagnostic Procedures . ...

  2. Components of skin

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... skin layers from the outside environment and contains cells that make keratin, a substance that waterproofs and strengthens the skin. The epidermis also has cells that contain melanin, the dark pigment that gives ...

  3. Squamous cell skin cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur on skin that is regularly exposed to sunlight or other ultraviolet radiation. The earliest form of ... skin cancer is to reduce your exposure to sunlight . Always use sunscreen: Apply sunscreen with sun protection ...

  4. Examine Your Skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... In Memory Melanoma Info Melanoma Facts Melanoma Prevention Sunscreen Suggestions Examine Your Skin Newly Diagnosed? Understanding Your ... UPDATED: February 5, 2015 Melanoma Facts Melanoma Prevention Sunscreen Suggestions Examine Your Skin Newly Diagnosed? Understanding Your ...

  5. Skin color - patchy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Injury Exposure to radiation (such as from the sun) Exposure to heavy metals Changes in hormone levels Exposure ... example, lighter-skinned people are more sensitive to sun exposure and damage, which raises the risk of skin ...

  6. Fungal Skin Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fungal Skin Infections Overview of Fungal Skin Infections Candidiasis Overview of Dermatophytoses (Ringworm, Tinea) Athlete's Foot Jock ... are caused by yeasts (such as Candida —see Candidiasis ) or dermatophytes, such as Epidermophyton, Microsporum, and Trichophyton ( ...

  7. Automatic Skin Color Beautification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chih-Wei; Huang, Da-Yuan; Fuh, Chiou-Shann

    In this paper, we propose an automatic skin beautification framework based on color-temperature-insensitive skin-color detection. To polish selected skin region, we apply bilateral filter to smooth the facial flaw. Last, we use Poisson image cloning to integrate the beautified parts into the original input. Experimental results show that the proposed method can be applied in varied light source environment. In addition, this method can naturally beautify the portrait skin.

  8. Psychoneuroimmunology and the Skin.

    PubMed

    Honeyman, Juan F

    2016-08-23

    The nervous, immune, endocrine and integumentary systems are closely related and interact in a number of normal and pathological conditions. Nervous system mediators may bring about direct changes to the skin or may induce the release of immunological or hormonal mediators that cause pathological changes to the skin. This article reviews the psychological mechanisms involved in the development of skin diseases.

  9. Biology of Skin Color.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcos, Alain

    1983-01-01

    Information from scientific journals on the biology of skin color is discussed. Major areas addressed include: (1) biology of melanin, melanocytes, and melanosomes; (2) melanosome and human diversity; (3) genetics of skin color; and (4) skin color, geography, and natural selection. (JN)

  10. Skin self-exam

    MedlinePlus

    Skin cancer - self-exam; Melanoma - self-exam; Basal cell cancer - self-exam; Squamous cell - self-exam; Skin mole - self-exam ... Experts do not agree on whether or not skin self-exams should be performed. So there is ...

  11. [Dermatology and skin color].

    PubMed

    Petit, Antoine

    2010-09-01

    Melanin is the pigment that is responsible for skin, hair and eye colours. Genetics and sun exposure are the two key factors that determine skin pigmentation. In dermatology, skin colours is significant, not only for semiology and diagnosis, but also for epidemiology and wounds healing.

  12. Family reaction to homicide.

    PubMed

    Burgess, A N

    1975-04-01

    This pilot study identifies a two-phased syndrome experienced by families of homicide victims. The crisis phase consists of an acute grief process, including immediate reactions to the homicide, the funeral details, and police investigations. The long-term reorganization phase includes the psychological issues of bereavement and the socio-legal issues of the criminal justice process. PMID:1146971

  13. Acute exposure to ultraviolet-B radiation modulates sex steroid hormones and receptor expression in the skin and may contribute to the sex bias of melanoma in a fish model.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, David L; Fernandez, André A; Garcia, Rachel; Paniker, Lakshmi; Lin, Kevin; Hanninen, Amanda; Zigelsky, Kyle; May, Matthew; Nuttall, Mark; Lo, Herng-Hsiang; Person, Maria D; Earley, Ryan

    2014-05-01

    Using the Xiphophorus fish melanoma model, we show a strong male bias for sunlight-induced malignant melanoma, consistent with that seen in the human population. To examine underlying factors, we exposed adult X. couchianus fish to a single, sublethal dose of UVB and measured circulating sex steroid hormones and expression of associated hormone receptor genes over a 24-h period. We found that a single exposure had profound effects on circulating levels of steroid hormones with significant decreases for all free sex steroids at 6 and 24 h and increases in conjugated 2-estradiol and 11-ketotestosterone at 6 and 24 h, respectively. Whereas ARα expression increased in male and female skin, neither ARβ nor either of the ERs showed significant responses to UVB in either sex. The rapid response of male androgens and their receptors in the skin after UVB irradiation implicates hormones in the male bias of skin cancer and suggests that the photoendocrine response immediately after UV exposure may be relevant to melanomagenesis.

  14. Acute exposure to ultraviolet-B radiation modulates sex steroid hormones and receptor expression in the skin and may contribute to the sex-bias of melanoma in a fish model

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, David L.; Fernandez, André A.; Garcia, Rachel; Paniker, Lakshmi; Lin, Kevin; Hanninen, Amanda; Zigelsky, Kyle; May, Matthew; Nuttall, Mark; Lo, Herng-hsiang; Person, Maria D.; Earley, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Using the Xiphophorus fish melanoma model we show a strong male bias for cutaneous malignant melanoma, consistent with that seen in the human population. To examine underlying factors, we exposed adult X. couchianus fish to a single, sub-lethal dose of UVB and measured circulating sex steroid hormones and expression of associated hormone receptor genes over a 24 hour period. We found that a single exposure had profound effects on circulating levels of steroid hormones with significant decreases for all free sex steroids at 6 and 24 h and increases in conjugated 2-estradiol and 11-ketotestosterone at 6 and 24 h, respectively. Whereas ARα expression increased in male and female skin, neither ARβ nor either of the ER’s showed significant responses to UVB in either sex. The rapid response of male androgens and their receptors in the skin after UVB irradiation implicates hormones in the male-bias of skin cancer and suggests that the photoendocrine response immediately after UV exposure may be relevant to melanomagenesis. PMID:24406016

  15. Evidence-Based Skin Care: A Systematic Literature Review and the Development of a Basic Skin Care Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Lichterfeld, Andrea; Hauss, Armin; Surber, Christian; Peters, Tina; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Kottner, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Patients in acute and long-term care settings receive daily routine skin care, including washing, bathing, and showering, often followed by application of lotions, creams, and/or ointments. These personal hygiene and skin care activities are integral parts of nursing practice, but little is known about their benefits or clinical efficacy. The aim of this article was to summarize the empirical evidence supporting basic skin care procedures and interventions and to develop a clinical algorithm for basic skin care. Electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL were searched and afterward a forward search was conducted using Scopus and Web of Science. In order to evaluate a broad range of basic skin care interventions systematic reviews, intervention studies, and guidelines, consensus statements and best practice standards also were included in the analysis. One hundred twenty-one articles were read in full text; 41documents were included in this report about skin care for prevention of dry skin, prevention of incontinence-associated dermatitis and prevention of skin injuries. The methodological quality of the included publications was variable. Review results and expert input were used to create a clinical algorithm for basic skin care. A 2-step approach is proposed including general and special skin care. Interventions focus primarily on skin that is either too dry or too moist. The target groups for the algorithm are adult patients or residents with intact or preclinical damaged skin in care settings. The goal of the skin care algorithm is a first attempt to provide guidance for practitioners to improve basic skin care in clinical settings in order to maintain or increase skin health.

  16. Anyone Can Get Skin Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    No matter if your skin is light, dark, or somewhere in between, everyone is at risk for skin cancer. Learn what skin cancer looks like, how to find it early, and how to lower the chance of skin cancer.

  17. Minimal Residual Disease-Based Risk Stratification in Chinese Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia by Flow Cytometry and Plasma DNA Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Suk Hang; Lau, Kin Mang; Li, Chi Kong; Chan, Natalie P. H.; Ip, Rosalina K. L.; Cheng, Chi Keung; Lee, Vincent; Shing, Matthew M. K.; Leung, Alex W. K.; Ha, Shau Yin; Cheuk, Daniel K. L.; Lee, Anselm C. W.; Li, Chak Ho; Luk, Chung Wing; Ling, Siu Cheung; Hrusak, Ondrej; Mejstrikova, Ester; Leung, Yonna; Ng, Margaret H. L.

    2013-01-01

    Minimal residual disease, or MRD, is an important prognostic indicator in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In ALL-IC-BFM 2002 study, we employed a standardized method of flow cytometry MRD monitoring for multiple centers internationally using uniformed gating, and determined the relevant MRD-based risk stratification strategies in our local patient cohort. We also evaluated a novel method of PCR MRD quantitation using peripheral blood plasma. For the bone marrow flow MRD study, patients could be stratified into 3 risk groups according to MRD level using a single time-point at day-15 (Model I) (I-A: <0.1%, I-B: 0.1–10%, I-C: >10%), or using two time-points at day-15 and day-33 (Model II) (II-A: day-15<10% and day-33<0.01%, II-B: day-15≥10% or day-33≥0.01% but not both, II-C: day-15≥10% and day-33≥0.01%), which showed significantly superior prediction of relapse (p = .00047 and <0.0001 respectively). Importantly, patients with good outcome (frequency: 56.0%, event-free survival: 90.1%) could be more accurately predicted by Model II. In peripheral blood plasma PCR MRD investigation, patients with day-15-MRD≥10−4 were at a significantly higher risk of relapse (p = 0.0117). By multivariate analysis, MRD results from both methods could independently predict patients’ prognosis, with 20–35-fold increase in risk of relapse for flow MRD I-C and II-C respectively, and 5.8-fold for patients having plasma MRD of ≥10−4. We confirmed that MRD detection by flow cytometry is useful for prognostic evaluation in our Chinese cohort of childhood ALL after treatment. Moreover, peripheral blood plasma DNA MRD can be an alternative where bone marrow specimen is unavailable and as a less invasive method, which allows close monitoring. PMID:23936021

  18. Immediate reaction to lidocaine with periorbital edema during upper blepharoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Presman, Benjamin; Vindigni, Vincenzo; Tocco-Tussardi, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Blepharoplasty is the fourth most commonly performed cosmetic surgery in the US, with 207,000 operations in 2014. Lidocaine is the preferred anesthetic agent for blepharoplasty. Presentation of case We describe the unusual case of acute periorbital edema following local anesthesia with lidocaine for upper blepharoplasty. At present, only two other reports of periorbital reactions to lidocaine are present in the literature. The reactions observed are significant palpebral swelling and erythema with scaling of the cheek. Fortunately the swelling, although marked, is transient in nature and resolves almost spontaneously without affecting the visual acuity. Discussion Patients reporting adverse reactions should be screened for allergy according to the standard protocols, but skin testing has only been reported to be positive in less than 10% of all cases and allergy confirmation with IgE is even more rare. Conclusion In clinical practice, we recommend that patient should be informed about the possibility of recurrence of an adverse reaction in case of re-exposure to lidocaine, even in the vast majority of cases where true allergy could not be proven. In case of further need for local anesthesia with history of an adverse event, a different agent may be chosen even from the same class (another amide) as cross-reactions in the amide group are rare. Otherwise, an anesthetic from the ester group can also be safely used. PMID:26785079

  19. Skin temperatures generated following plaster splint application.

    PubMed

    Lindeque, Bennie G P; Shuler, Franklin D; Bates, Christopher M

    2013-05-01

    Heat is generated during the exothermic reaction associated with plaster splint application. The amount of heat generated is affected by the plaster thickness, dipping water temperature, and extremity elevation method. The authors assessed the effect of these variables on skin and plaster temperatures. Short-leg posterior splints were applied to noninjured extremities on a volunteer using 2 protocols. Following splint application, the splinted leg was elevated in 4 ways: on plastic-covered urethane pillows in cotton pillowcases, on cotton blankets, on ice packs (short-term cryotherapy) placed on top of cotton blankets, or with heel elevation to promote free air circulation. Skin and plaster temperatures were monitored at 1-minute intervals. The maximum skin temperature generated and the average time that skin temperature was 40 °C or higher were recorded. PMID:23672893

  20. Pursuing prosthetic electronic skin.

    PubMed

    Chortos, Alex; Liu, Jia; Bao, Zhenan

    2016-09-01

    Skin plays an important role in mediating our interactions with the world. Recreating the properties of skin using electronic devices could have profound implications for prosthetics and medicine. The pursuit of artificial skin has inspired innovations in materials to imitate skin's unique characteristics, including mechanical durability and stretchability, biodegradability, and the ability to measure a diversity of complex sensations over large areas. New materials and fabrication strategies are being developed to make mechanically compliant and multifunctional skin-like electronics, and improve brain/machine interfaces that enable transmission of the skin's signals into the body. This Review will cover materials and devices designed for mimicking the skin's ability to sense and generate biomimetic signals. PMID:27376685

  1. [Skin diseases and obesity].

    PubMed

    Guerra-Segovia, Carolina; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a public health problem worldwide. It predominates in industrialized countries; however, it is prevalent in all nations. It is defined as a condition of excess adipose tissue and is the result of changes in lifestyle, excessive consumption of energy-dense foods with poor nutritional value, physical inactivity and the reduction of open space where one can practice a sport. Although obesity is associated with multiple diseases, it is important to stress that the metabolic changes caused by it affect skin physiology and play a predisposing factor for the development of skin diseases. Very little has been studied on the impact of obesity on the skin. The purpose of this article is to review the most frequently skin diseases in obesity. Some skin pathologies in obesity are caused by changes in skin physiology, others are related to insulin resistance or constitute an exacerbating factor for dermatitis. This article covers the clinical features of obesity related skin disease and its management.

  2. Pursuing prosthetic electronic skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chortos, Alex; Liu, Jia; Bao, Zhenan

    2016-09-01

    Skin plays an important role in mediating our interactions with the world. Recreating the properties of skin using electronic devices could have profound implications for prosthetics and medicine. The pursuit of artificial skin has inspired innovations in materials to imitate skin's unique characteristics, including mechanical durability and stretchability, biodegradability, and the ability to measure a diversity of complex sensations over large areas. New materials and fabrication strategies are being developed to make mechanically compliant and multifunctional skin-like electronics, and improve brain/machine interfaces that enable transmission of the skin's signals into the body. This Review will cover materials and devices designed for mimicking the skin's ability to sense and generate biomimetic signals.

  3. Complementary and alternative medicine in reducing radiation-induced skin toxicity.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jennifer J; Cui, Tengjiao; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L; Allen, Glenn O; Li, Jie; Takita, Cristiane; Lally, Brian E

    2014-08-01

    Radiation therapy-induced acute and late effects, particularly skin toxicities, have significant impact on cancer patients' quality of life and long-term survival. To date, no effective topical agents have been routinely used in the clinical setting to prevent skin toxicity. Using SKH-hr1 hairless mice, we investigated two complementary and alternative medicine in their effects on inflammation and ionizing radiation (IR)-induced skin toxicity: Calendula officinalis (CO) and Ching Wan Hung (CWH). They were applied immediately following each IR dosing of 10 Gy/day for 4 days. Skin toxicity and inflammatory factors were evaluated at multiple time points up to 15 days post-radiation. Serum interleukin (IL)-1α, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP1), keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC), and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) were significantly induced by radiation. Both CO and CWH significantly inhibited IR-induced MCP1 (p < 0.01), KC (p < 0.05), and G-CSF (p < 0.001). IR-induced erythema and blood vessel dilation were significantly reduced by CWH (p < 0.001) but not by CO at day 10 post-IR. Both agents inhibited IR-induced IL-1α (p < 0.01), MCP1 (p < 0.05), and vascular endothelial growth factor (p < 0.05). There were continuous inhibitory effects of CWH on IR-induced skin toxicities and inflammation. In contrast, CO treatment resulted in skin reactions compared to IR alone. Our results suggest that both CO and CWH reduce IR-induced inflammation and CWH reduced IR-induced erythema. In summary, CWH showed promising effects in reducing IR-related inflammation and skin toxicities, and future proof-of-principal testing in humans will be critical in evaluating its potential application in preventing IR-induced skin toxicities.

  4. Machine Learning Approaches for Predicting Human Skin Sensitization Hazard

    EPA Science Inventory

    One of ICCVAM’s top priorities is the development and evaluation of non-animal approaches to identify potential skin sensitizers. The complexity of biological events necessary for a substance to elicit a skin sensitization reaction suggests that no single in chemico, in vit...

  5. Multivariate Models for Prediction of Human Skin Sensitization Hazard

    EPA Science Inventory

    One of ICCVAM’s top priorities is the development and evaluation of non-animal approaches to identify potential skin sensitizers. The complexity of biological events necessary for a substance to elicit a skin sensitization reaction suggests that no single alternative method...

  6. Multivariate Models for Prediction of Skin Sensitization Hazard in Humans

    EPA Science Inventory

    One of ICCVAM’s highest priorities is the development and evaluation of non-animal approaches to identify potential skin sensitizers. The complexity of biological events necessary for a substance to elicit a skin sensitization reaction suggests that no single alternative me...

  7. Cosmetic tattoo pigment reaction.

    PubMed

    Greywal, Tanya; Cohen, Philip R

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundCutaneous reactions to tattoos are most commonly granulomatous or lichenoid.PurposeWe describe a woman who developed a lymphocytic reaction following a cosmetic tattoo procedure with black dye. The reaction occurred not only at the site of the tattoos (eyebrows and eyelash lines), but also in non-tattooed skin (bilateral malar cheeks).Methods and MaterialsWe reviewed PubMed for the following terms: cosmetic, dye, granuloma, granulomatous, lichenoid, lymphocytic, perivascular, pigment, pseudolymphoma, reaction, and tattoo. We also reviewed papers containing these terms and their references.ResultsHistopathologic examination of the left eyebrow and left cheek punch biopsies showed predominantly a perivascular lymphocytic reaction secondary to exogenous tattoo pigment.ConclusionsPerivascular lymphocytic reaction is an uncommonly described complication of tattooing. Our patient had an atypical presentation since she had no prior tattoos, became symptomatic only a few days after the procedure, reacted to black dye, and involved skin both within and outside the confines of the tattoos. Her symptoms and lesions resolved after treatment with systemic and topical corticosteroids and oral antihistamines. PMID:27617722

  8. The Protective Role of Melanin Against UV Damage in Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Michaela; Hearing, Vincent J.

    2009-01-01

    Human skin is repeatedly exposed to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) that influences the function and survival of many cell types and is regarded as the main causative factor in the induction of skin cancer. It has been traditionally believed that skin pigmentation is the most important photoprotective factor, since melanin, besides functioning as a broadband UV absorbent, has antioxidant and radical scavenging properties. Besides, many epidemiological studies have shown a lower incidence for skin cancer in individuals with darker skin compared to those with fair skin. Skin pigmentation is of great cultural and cosmetic importance, yet the role of melanin in photoprotection is still controversial. This article outlines the major acute and chronic effects of UV radiation on human skin, the properties of melanin, the regulation of pigmentation and its effect on skin cancer prevention. PMID:18435612

  9. Direct observation of liposome uptake by leukocytes in vivo in skin blood vessels using intravital fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devoisselle, Jean-Marie; Mordon, Serge R.; Begu, Sylvie; Desmettre, Thomas

    2000-04-01

    This study aimed to observe liposome uptake by leukocytes in vivo. The study was performed on skin by using a dorsal skin-fold chamber implanted in golden hamsters using intravital microscopy. 5,6-CF-encapsulated PEGylated liposomes were injected intravenously. The skin microcirculation was observed with an intravital Eclipse E800 Nikon microscope fitted with a Xenon light source and an epi-fluorescence assembly. An ultra-high sensitivity video-camera mounted on the microscope projected the image onto a monitor, and the images were recorded for playback analysis with a digital video cassette recorder. An acute inflammatory response was obtained by removing one complete layer of skin and the underlying fascia and avascular tissue on the opposing side of the flap corresponding to an area equivalent to the window aperture. Using these model and set-up, leukocyte rolling and adhesion were easily observed and the entry of PEGylated liposomes into hamster blood leukocytes was studied for a period of 6 hours. PEGylated liposomes were clearly identified alone inside the blood flow and inside the leukocytes as soon as the inflammatory reaction appeared. This study shows for the first time that blood leukocytes in their natural milieu of whole blood are capable of interacting with, and taking up liposomes. This observation is in accordance with previous in vitro studies.

  10. [Skin manifestations of new targeted treatments].

    PubMed

    Hello, M; Barbarot, S; Connault, J

    2012-05-01

    Many cutaneous adverse events have been identified with recently developed targeted treatments. Some of them are common and specific, like paradoxical psoriasiform eruptions with anti-TNFα, papulopustular eruptions and paronychias with EGFR inhibitors and peculiar hand-foot skin reactions with multitargeted kinase inhibitors sorefenib and sunitinib. Patients treated with these recently available biologics need a careful monitoring.

  11. Lyme Borreliosis and Skin

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, Biju; Chatterjee, Manas

    2013-01-01

    Lyme disease is a multisystem illness which is caused by the strains of spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and transmitted by the tick, Ixodes. Though very commonly reported from the temperate regions of the world, the incidence has increased worldwide due to increasing travel and changing habitats of the vector. Few cases have been reported from the Indian subcontinent too. Skin manifestations are the earliest to occur, and diagnosing these lesions followed by appropriate treatment, can prevent complications of the disease, which are mainly neurological. The three main dermatological manifestations are erythema chronicum migrans, borrelial lymphocytoma and acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans. Many other dermatological conditions including morphea, lichen sclerosus and lately B cell lymphoma, have been attributed to the disease. Immunofluorescence and polymerase reaction tests have been developed to overcome the problems for diagnosis. Culture methods are also used for diagnosis. Treatment with Doxycycline is the mainstay of management, though prevention is of utmost importance. Vaccines against the condition are still not very successful. Hence, the importance of recognising the cutaneous manifestations early, to prevent systemic complications which can occur if left untreated, can be understood. This review highlights the cutaneous manifestations of Lyme borreliosis and its management. PMID:23723463

  12. Lyme borreliosis and skin.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Biju; Chatterjee, Manas

    2013-05-01

    Lyme disease is a multisystem illness which is caused by the strains of spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and transmitted by the tick, Ixodes. Though very commonly reported from the temperate regions of the world, the incidence has increased worldwide due to increasing travel and changing habitats of the vector. Few cases have been reported from the Indian subcontinent too. Skin manifestations are the earliest to occur, and diagnosing these lesions followed by appropriate treatment, can prevent complications of the disease, which are mainly neurological. The three main dermatological manifestations are erythema chronicum migrans, borrelial lymphocytoma and acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans. Many other dermatological conditions including morphea, lichen sclerosus and lately B cell lymphoma, have been attributed to the disease. Immunofluorescence and polymerase reaction tests have been developed to overcome the problems for diagnosis. Culture methods are also used for diagnosis. Treatment with Doxycycline is the mainstay of management, though prevention is of utmost importance. Vaccines against the condition are still not very successful. Hence, the importance of recognising the cutaneous manifestations early, to prevent systemic complications which can occur if left untreated, can be understood. This review highlights the cutaneous manifestations of Lyme borreliosis and its management. PMID:23723463

  13. Objective determination of Fitzpatrick skin type.

    PubMed

    Ravnbak, Mette Henriksen

    2010-08-01

    The overall aim of this Ph.D. project was to clarify what the subjective Fitzpatrick skin type represents with regard to the skin's reaction to UVR. Fitzpatrick skin type is used as an expression of the constitutive UV-sensitivity. It has been used for guiding dose-levels in phototherapy and is an important risk factor for skin cancer. The subjective Fitzpatrick skin type and the measured skin type PPF (pigment protection factor, calculated based on a skin reflectance measurement, predicts the UV-dose (SED) to give 1 MED) were investigated parallelly in relation to the clinically determined dose to erythema (MED) and/or pigmentation (MMD) to determine which one related best. PPF is an established method for assessing UV-sensitivity by predicting SED to MED. UV-dose to MED and/or MMD was determined after single UV-exposure to Solar Simulator on nates (n= 84) and after single and multiple (5, 6 or 12) UV-exposures (n = 24-62) on the back to four UV-sources (nUVB, Solar, bUVA and UVA1). SED to MMD was also related to wavelength. MED was only determined after a single and four UV-exposures to narrowband UVB (nUVB) and Solar Simulator (Solar). Volunteers with a broad range of constitutive pigmentation (skin types I-V) were included. Equal MMD doses (predetermined after a single UV-exposure) were used at the multiple exposures. The absolute increase in pigmentation after 6 and 12 UV-exposures, where steady-state pigmentation was reached, was independent of skin type and therefore could not enter into the calculations. But it proved that the MMD determinations after single exposure were correct and could be used at multiple UV-exposures. In contrary to what we expected, our results indicate that people may refer to the constitutive pigmentation, when they reply to the question of Fitzpatrick skin type. This applied to both erythema and pigmentation response as both dose to MED and MMD showed a better correlation to nates than to the back. As expected, our results from the

  14. Radiation effects control: Eyes, skin. [space environment simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hightower, D.; Smathers, J. B.

    1974-01-01

    Adverse effects on the lens of the eye and the skin due to exposure to proton radiation during manned space flight were evaluated. Actual proton irradiation which might be encountered in space was simulated. Irradiation regimes included single acute exposures, daily fractionated exposures, and weekly fractionated exposures. Animals were exposed and then maintained and examined periodically until data sufficient to meet the objective were obtained. No significant skin effects were noted and no serious sight impairment was exhibited.

  15. Anaphylactic reaction to intravenous corticosteroids in the treatment of ocular toxoplasmosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction This case report presents for the first time an acute systemic allergic reaction to corticosteroids in a patient with ocular toxoplasmosis after treatment with intravenous cortisone, and discusses alternative treatments. Case presentation We present the case of a 57-year-old Caucasian woman with an anaphylactic reaction after intravenous injection of prednisolone-21-hydrogensuccinate (Solu-Decortin® H) given for the treatment of toxoplasmosis-associated chorioretinitis. Immediately after the injection, she developed an acute erythema of the legs and abdomen, angioedema, hypotension (blood pressure 80/40mmHg), tachycardia (heart rate 140/minute), hyperthermia (38.8°C), and respiratory distress. Allergological examinations showed a positive skin-prick test to prednisolone and methylprednisolone. In addition, an oral exposure test with dexamethasone (Fortecortin®) and betamethasone (Celestamine®) was conducted to find alternative corticosteroids for future treatments. After oral application, no local or systemic reactions were observed for these two substances. Conclusions This case report demonstrates that systemic allergic reactions are possible in patients with uveitis or other inflammatory ophthalmological conditions treated with intravenous corticosteroids. Intravenous administration of cortisone, for example, in the treatment of ocular toxoplasmosis, should always be conducted with caution because of a possible allergic reaction. For patients who react to a particular steroid, it is necessary to undergo allergological testing to confirm that the compound in question is indeed allergenic, and to identify other corticosteroids that are safe for future anti-inflammatory treatments. PMID:24694257

  16. Unexpectedly Severe Acute Radiotherapy Side Effects Are Associated With Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms of the Melanocortin-1 Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Fogarty, Gerald B.; Muddle, Rory; Sprung, Carl N.

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: The melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) regulates melanin biogenesis. Deoxyribonucleic acid sequence variants in the form of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of MC1R affect melanin expression and are linked to skin phenotype. We aimed to determine whether SNPs of MC1R were associated with unexpectedly severe ionizing radiation reactions. Methods and Materials: The MC1R genotype of a cohort of Australians with unexpectedly severe acute and/or late reactions (Common Terminology Criteria Version 3 (CTCv3) Grade 3 or 4) to radiotherapy (RT) for cancer (n = 30) was analyzed. The findings were compared with control data from our previous study of MC1R representative of the general Australian population (n = 1,787). Results: The difference in frequency of alleles encoding a 'red hair color' phenotype in the cohort of patients with unexpectedly severe acute radiation reactions (n = 12) was significantly increased compared with the control population (p = 0.003). Acute radiosensitivity was especially associated with the R160W variant allele (odds ratio, 3.64 [95% confidence interval, 1.3-10.27]). The corresponding comparison of MC1R controls with unexpectedly severe late radiation reactions (n = 18) was not significant. It was also found that R160W as a part of the genotype in the patients with unexpectedly severe acute RT side effects as compared with the control group was also significant (p = 0.043). Conclusions: In this small cohort of cancer patients, deoxyribonucleic acid sequence variants of the MC1R gene, especially the R160W variant, have been associated with unexpectedly severe acute reactions to RT. This result needs to be verified in a larger cohort of patients.

  17. Identification of proteins from 4200-year-old skin and muscle tissue biopsies from ancient Egyptian mummies of the first intermediate period shows evidence of acute inflammation and severe immune response.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jana; Mirzaei, Mehdi; Ravishankar, Prathiba; Xavier, Dylan; Lim, Do Seon; Shin, Dong Hoon; Bianucci, Raffaella; Haynes, Paul A

    2016-10-28

    We performed proteomics analysis on four skin and one muscle tissue samples taken from three ancient Egyptian mummies of the first intermediate period, approximately 4200 years old. The mummies were first dated by radiocarbon dating of the accompany-\\break ing textiles, and morphologically examined by scanning electron microscopy of additional skin samples. Proteins were extracted, separated on SDS-PAGE (sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) gels, and in-gel digested with trypsin. The resulting peptides were analysed using nanoflow high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. We identified a total of 230 unique proteins from the five samples, which consisted of 132 unique protein identifications. We found a large number of collagens, which was confirmed by our microscopy data, and is in agreement with previous studies showing that collagens are very long-lived. As expected, we also found a large number of keratins. We identified numerous proteins that provide evidence of activation of the innate immunity system in two of the mummies, one of which also contained proteins indicating severe tissue inflammation, possibly indicative of an infection that we can speculate may have been related to the cause of death.This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantitative mass spectrometry'. PMID:27644972

  18. Identification of proteins from 4200-year-old skin and muscle tissue biopsies from ancient Egyptian mummies of the first intermediate period shows evidence of acute inflammation and severe immune response.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jana; Mirzaei, Mehdi; Ravishankar, Prathiba; Xavier, Dylan; Lim, Do Seon; Shin, Dong Hoon; Bianucci, Raffaella; Haynes, Paul A

    2016-10-28

    We performed proteomics analysis on four skin and one muscle tissue samples taken from three ancient Egyptian mummies of the first intermediate period, approximately 4200 years old. The mummies were first dated by radiocarbon dating of the accompany-\\break ing textiles, and morphologically examined by scanning electron microscopy of additional skin samples. Proteins were extracted, separated on SDS-PAGE (sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) gels, and in-gel digested with trypsin. The resulting peptides were analysed using nanoflow high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. We identified a total of 230 unique proteins from the five samples, which consisted of 132 unique protein identifications. We found a large number of collagens, which was confirmed by our microscopy data, and is in agreement with previous studies showing that collagens are very long-lived. As expected, we also found a large number of keratins. We identified numerous proteins that provide evidence of activation of the innate immunity system in two of the mummies, one of which also contained proteins indicating severe tissue inflammation, possibly indicative of an infection that we can speculate may have been related to the cause of death.This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantitative mass spectrometry'.

  19. Comparison of Provider-Assessed and Patient-Reported Outcome Measures of Acute Skin Toxicity During a Phase III Trial of Mometasone Cream Versus Placebo During Breast Radiotherapy: The North Central Cancer Treatment Group (N06C4)

    SciTech Connect

    Neben-Wittich, Michelle A.; Atherton, Pamela J.; Schwartz, David J.; Sloan, Jeff A.; Griffin, Patricia C.; Deming, Richard L.; Anders, Jon C.; Loprinzi, Charles L.; Burger, Kelli N.; Martenson, James A.; Miller, Robert C.

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: Considerable interobserver variability exists among providers and between providers and patients when measuring subjective symptoms. In the recently published Phase III N06C4 trial of mometasone cream vs. placebo to prevent radiation dermatitis, the primary provider-assessed (PA) endpoint, using the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), was negative. However, prospectively planned secondary analyses of patient-reported outcomes (PROs), using the Skindex-16 and Skin Toxicity Assessment Tool (STAT), were positive. This study assesses the relationship between PA outcomes and PROs. Methods and Materials: Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated to compare the three tools. Statistical correlations were defined as follows: <0.5, mild; 0.5-0.7, moderate; and >0.7, strong. Results: CTCAE dermatitis moderately correlated with STAT erythema, and CTCAE pruritus strongly correlated with STAT itching. CTCAE pruritus had a moderate correlation with Skindex-16 itching. Comparing the 2 PRO tools, Skindex-16 itching correlated moderately with STAT itching. Skindex-16 burning, hurting, irritation, and persistence all showed the strongest correlation with STAT burning; they showed moderate correlations with STAT itching and tenderness. Conclusions: The PRO Skindex-16 correlated well with the PRO portions of STAT, but neither tool correlated well with CTCAE. PROs delineated a wider spectrum of toxicity than PA measures and provided more information on rash, redness, pruritus, and annoyance measures compared with CTCAE findings of rash and pruritus. PROs may provide a more complete measure of patient experience than single-symptom, PA endpoints in clinical trials assessing radiation skin toxicity.

  20. P38 and JNK signal pathways are involved in the regulation of phlorizin against UVB-induced skin damage.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yimiao; Dang, Yongyan; Gao, Wenke; Zhang, Ye; Xu, Peng; Gu, Jun; Ye, Xiyun

    2015-04-01

    Phlorizin is well known to inhibit sodium/glucose cotransporters in the kidney and intestine for the treatment of diabetes, obesity and stress hyperglycaemia. However, the effects of phlorizin against ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation and its molecular mechanism are still unknown. We examined the effects of phlorizin on skin keratinocyte apoptosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, pro-inflammatory responses after UVB irradiation and the changes of some signal molecules by in vitro and in vivo assay. We observed that phlorizin pretreatments inhibited HaCaT cell apoptosis and overproduction of ROS induced by UVB. Phlorizin also decreased the expression of UVB-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) at the mRNA level. Topical application of phlorizin on UVB-exposed skin of nude mice prevented the formation of scaly skin and erythema, inhibited the increase of epidermal thickness and reduced acute inflammation infiltration in skin. Additionally, PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemical data showed that phlorizin reversed the overexpression of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) induced by UVB irradiation both in vitro and in vivo. The activation of p38 and JNK mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) after UVB irradiation was also inhibited by phlorizin. These findings suggest that phlorizin is effective in protecting skin against UVB-induced skin damage by decreasing ROS overproduction, Cox-2 expression and the subsequent excessive inflammation reactions. It seemed that p38 and JNK MAPK signal pathways are involved in the regulation of the protective function of phlorizin.

  1. Skin mirrors human aging.

    PubMed

    Nikolakis, Georgios; Makrantonaki, Evgenia; Zouboulis, Christos C

    2013-12-01

    Abstract Aged skin exhibits disturbed lipid barrier, angiogenesis, production of sweat, immune functions, and calcitriol synthesis as well as the tendency towards development of certain benign or malignant diseases. These complex biological processes comprise endogenous and exogenous factors. Ethnicity also markedly influences the phenotype of skin aging. The theories of cellular senescence, telomere shortening and decreased proliferative capacity, mitochondrial DNA single mutations, the inflammation theory, and the free radical theory try to explain the biological background of the global aging process, which is mirrored in the skin. The development of advanced glycation end-products and the declining hormonal levels are major factors influencing intrinsic aging. Chronic photodamage of the skin is the prime factor leading to extrinsic skin aging. The deterioration of important skin functions, due to intrinsic and extrinsic aging, leads to clinical manifestations, which mirror several internal age-associated diseases such as diabetes, arterial hypertension and malignancies.

  2. Dress syndrome with sepsis, acute respiratory distress syndrome and pneumomediastinum.

    PubMed

    Giri, Prabhas Prasun; Roy, Swapan; Bhattyacharya, Sukanta; Pal, Priyankar; Dhar, Sandipan

    2011-11-01

    Drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome reflects a serious hypersensitivity reaction to drugs, and is characterized by skin rash, fever, lymph node enlargement, and internal organ involvement. So far, numerous drugs such as sulfonamides, phenobarbital, sulfasalazine, carbamazepine, and phenytoin have been reported to cause DRESS syndrome. We report a case of a 10-year-old girl who developed clinical manifestations of fever, rash, lymphadenopathy, hypereosinophilia, and visceral involvement (hepatitis and pneumonitis) after taking phenobarbital for seizures, with subsequent development of sepsis, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and spontaneous air leak syndrome (pnemothorax and pneumomediastinum). She was put on steroids and various antibiotics and was ventilated, but ultimately succumbed to sepsis and pulmonary complications. PMID:22345792

  3. Skin-lightening cosmetics: frequent, potentially severe adverse effects.

    PubMed

    2011-09-01

    Skin-lightening cosmetics are used by many women and men around the world. The products contain a variety of substances, which are often unknown to the users. Most of these products include topical corticosteroids, hydroquinone and mercury salts. Many other substances may be added. Several surveys and cohort studies, including several thousand individuals, have shown that regular application of skin-lightening cosmetics to large surface areas can have irreversible cutaneous adverse effects, such as patchy hyper- or hypopigmentation, skin atrophy, stretch marks and delayed wound healing, and can also mask or, on the contrary, promote or reactivate skin infections. Cases of skin cancer have been attributed to skin-lightening cosmetics. A Senegalese cohort study of 147 women showed a statistically significant increase in the risk of hypertension and diabetes linked to the use of skin-lightening agents. Other systemic adverse effects attributed to skin-lightening cosmetics include Cushing's syndrome, adrenal insufficiency, nephrotic syndrome, neurological disorders, and ocular disorders. Hypersensitivity reactions, including anaphylaxis, have also been attributed to these products. Many skin-lightening cosmetics contain substances that can harm the unborn child. For example, tretinoin is teratogenic while salicylic acid is feto-toxic. In practice, users are often unaware of the risk of severe adverse effects associated with skin-lightening cosmetics. Users should be informed of these adverse effects and encouraged to stop using these products, especially when skin disorders appear.

  4. In vitro and human testing strategies for skin irritation.

    PubMed

    Robinson, M K; Osborne, R; Perkins, M A

    2000-01-01

    Prior to the manufacture, transport, and marketing of chemicals or products, it is critical to assess their potential for skin toxicity (corrosion or irritation), thereby protecting the worker and consumer from adverse skin effects due to intended or accidental skin exposure. Traditionally, animal testing procedures have provided the data needed to assess the more severe forms of skin toxicity, and current regulations may require animal test data before permission can be obtained to manufacture, transport, or market chemicals or the products that contain them. In recent years, the use of animals to assess skin safety has been opposed by some as inhumane and unnecessary. The conflicting needs of the industrial toxicologist to (1) protect human safety, (2) comply with regulations, and (3) reduce animal testing have led to major efforts to develop alternative, yet predictive, test methods. A variety of in vitro skin corrosion test methods have been developed and several have successfully passed initial international validation. These have included skin or epidermal equivalent assays that have been shown to distinguish corrosive from noncorrosive chemicals. These skin/epidermal equivalent assays have also been modified and used to assess skin irritation potential relative to existing human exposure test data. The data show a good correlation between in vitro assay data and different types of human skin irritation data for both chemicals and consumer products. The effort to eliminate animal tests has also led to the development of a novel human patch test for assessment of acute skin irritation potential. A case study shows the benefits of in vitro and human skin irritation tests compared to the animal tests they seek to replace, and strategies now exist to adequately assess human skin irritation potential without the need to rely on animal test methods. PMID:11083109

  5. In vitro and human testing strategies for skin irritation.

    PubMed

    Robinson, M K; Osborne, R; Perkins, M A

    2000-01-01

    Prior to the manufacture, transport, and marketing of chemicals or products, it is critical to assess their potential for skin toxicity (corrosion or irritation), thereby protecting the worker and consumer from adverse skin effects due to intended or accidental skin exposure. Traditionally, animal testing procedures have provided the data needed to assess the more severe forms of skin toxicity, and current regulations may require animal test data before permission can be obtained to manufacture, transport, or market chemicals or the products that contain them. In recent years, the use of animals to assess skin safety has been opposed by some as inhumane and unnecessary. The conflicting needs of the industrial toxicologist to (1) protect human safety, (2) comply with regulations, and (3) reduce animal testing have led to major efforts to develop alternative, yet predictive, test methods. A variety of in vitro skin corrosion test methods have been developed and several have successfully passed initial international validation. These have included skin or epidermal equivalent assays that have been shown to distinguish corrosive from noncorrosive chemicals. These skin/epidermal equivalent assays have also been modified and used to assess skin irritation potential relative to existing human exposure test data. The data show a good correlation between in vitro assay data and different types of human skin irritation data for both chemicals and consumer products. The effort to eliminate animal tests has also led to the development of a novel human patch test for assessment of acute skin irritation potential. A case study shows the benefits of in vitro and human skin irritation tests compared to the animal tests they seek to replace, and strategies now exist to adequately assess human skin irritation potential without the need to rely on animal test methods.

  6. Sunburn, Thermal, and Chemical Injuries to the Skin.

    PubMed

    Monseau, Aaron J; Reed, Zebula M; Langley, Katherine Jane; Onks, Cayce

    2015-12-01

    Sunburn, thermal, and chemical injuries to the skin are common in the United States and worldwide. Initial management is determined by type and extent of injury with special care to early management of airway, breathing, and circulation. Fluid management has typically been guided by the Parkland formula, whereas some experts now question this. Each type of skin injury has its own pathophysiology and resultant complications. All primary care physicians should have at least a basic knowledge of management of acute and chronic skin injuries. PMID:26612374

  7. Revascularization of autogenous skin grafts placed on irradiated tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, M.; Torii, S.; Kaneda, T.; Oka, T.

    1982-08-01

    Vascular changes in rat skin after irradiation were examined microangiographically. Revascularization of the skin transplanted during the chronic stage after irradiation was also studied. The results obtained through these examinations revealed higher vascular densities at the acute and the subacute stages, and low values at the chronic stages compared with those of the control. Furthermore, when the skin grafts were transplanted to the irradiated beds in the chronic stage, primary revascularization was scant, and the inhibited capillary proliferation in the recipient sites prevented new vessel penetration. This explains why grafts transplanted to previously irradiated beds fail to survive.

  8. Skin necrosis caused by prallethrin-A worldwide used insecticide.

    PubMed

    Botnariu, Gina; Birsan, Cristina; Podoleanu, Cristian; Moldovan, Cosmin; Stolnicu, Simona; Chiriac, Anca

    2016-04-01

    We report a case of necrosis caused by the use of prallethrin (mosquito repellent) on the skin in a 67-year-old diabetic female patient suffering from delusions of parasitosis. Cutaneous toxicity due to pyrethroids is less known or reported, despite well-documented pyrethroid poisoning involving the gastrointestinal, respiratory, cardiac, and nervous systems. Skin irritation has been described after acute accidental exposure but, as far as we know, no data have been published on the effects of pyrethroids when applied directly to the skin. PMID:26987111

  9. Sunburn, Thermal, and Chemical Injuries to the Skin.

    PubMed

    Monseau, Aaron J; Reed, Zebula M; Langley, Katherine Jane; Onks, Cayce

    2015-12-01

    Sunburn, thermal, and chemical injuries to the skin are common in the United States and worldwide. Initial management is determined by type and extent of injury with special care to early management of airway, breathing, and circulation. Fluid management has typically been guided by the Parkland formula, whereas some experts now question this. Each type of skin injury has its own pathophysiology and resultant complications. All primary care physicians should have at least a basic knowledge of management of acute and chronic skin injuries.

  10. Skin care and incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    Incontinence - skin care; Incontinence - pressure sore; Incontinence - pressure ulcer ... redness, peeling, irritation, and yeast infections likely. Bedsores ( pressure sores ) may also develop if the person: Has ...

  11. Bacterial Skin Infections.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Fadi; Khan, Tariq; Pujalte, George G A

    2015-12-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections account for 0.5% of outpatient visits to primary care. Skin and soft tissue infections can usually be managed in an outpatient setting. However, there are certain circumstances as discussed in this article that require more urgent care or inpatient management. Primary care providers should be able to diagnose, manage, and provide appropriate follow-up care for these frequently seen skin infections. This article provides family physicians with a comprehensive review of the assessment and management of common bacterial skin infections. PMID:26612370

  12. Bacterial Skin Infections.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Fadi; Khan, Tariq; Pujalte, George G A

    2015-12-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections account for 0.5% of outpatient visits to primary care. Skin and soft tissue infections can usually be managed in an outpatient setting. However, there are certain circumstances as discussed in this article that require more urgent care or inpatient management. Primary care providers should be able to diagnose, manage, and provide appropriate follow-up care for these frequently seen skin infections. This article provides family physicians with a comprehensive review of the assessment and management of common bacterial skin infections.

  13. The complex problem of sensitive skin.

    PubMed

    Marriott, Marie; Holmes, Jo; Peters, Lisa; Cooper, Karen; Rowson, Matthew; Basketter, David A

    2005-08-01

    There exists within the population subsets of individuals who display heightened skin reactivity to materials the majority find tolerable. In a series of investigations, we have examined interrelationships between many of the endpoints associated with the term 'sensitive skin'. In the most recent work, 58 volunteers were treated with 10% lactic acid, 50% ethanol, 0.5% menthol and 1.0% capsaicin on the nasolabial fold, unoccluded, with sensory reactions recorded at 2.5 min, 5 min and 8 min after application. Urticant susceptibility was evaluated with 1 m benzoic acid and 125 mM trans-cinnamic acid applied to the volar forearm for 20 min. A 2 x 23-h patch test was also conducted using 0.1% and 0.3% sodium dodecyl sulfate, 0.3% and 0.6% cocamidopropyl betaine and 0.1% and 0.2% benzalkonium chloride to determine irritant susceptibility. As found in previous studies, increased susceptibility to one endpoint was not predictive of sensitivity to another. In our experience, nasolabial stinging was a poor predictor of general skin sensitivity. Nevertheless, it may be possible to identify in the normal population individuals who, coincidentally, are more generally sensitive to a range of non-immunologic adverse skin reactions. Whether such individuals are those who experience problems with skin care products remains to be addressed. PMID:16033403

  14. Allergic contact dermatitis caused by white petrolatum on damaged skin.

    PubMed

    Tam, Christine C; Elston, Dirk M

    2006-12-01

    Petrolatum rarely causes hypersensitivity reactions. We report a case of a 51-year-old white man with allergic contact dermatitis due to white petrolatum on damaged skin. The patient, who presented with a history of hand dermatitis and intolerance to ointments for years, was patch-tested with white petrolatum on scratched skin. Patch tests with the European Standard series, preservatives, steroids, vehicles, and emulsifiers were also performed. The patch-test reaction to white petrolatum on scratched skin was positive at 48 and 96 hours. All other patch-test results were negative.

  15. Acute exposure to rhodamine B.

    PubMed

    Dire, D J; Wilkinson, J A

    1987-01-01

    Rhodamine B is a red colored dye that is used in cosmetic products. We report a case of 17 patients who were exposed to aerosolized Rhodamine B inside a maintenance shop. The mean duration of exposure was 26 minutes (range 2-65). Sixteen of the patients (94%) complained of acute symptoms including: burning of the eyes (82%), excessive tearing (47%), nasal burning (41%), nasal itching (35%), chest pain/tightness (35%), rhinorhea (29%), cough (29%), dyspnea (29%), burning of the throat (24%), burning/pruritic skin (24%), chest burning (12%), headache (6%), and nausea (6%). All of the patients had resolution of their symptoms within 24 hours (less than 4 hours in 63%). Acute exposure to Rhodamine B resulted in transient mucous membrane and skin irritation without evidence of serious sequellae.

  16. Skin Photoaging and the Role of Antioxidants in Its Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Pandel, Ruža; Poljšak, Borut

    2013-01-01

    Photoaging of the skin depends primarily on the degree of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and on an amount of melanin in the skin (skin phototype). In addition to direct or indirect DNA damage, UVR activates cell surface receptors of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in the skin, which leads to a breakdown of collagen in the extracellular matrix and a shutdown of new collagen synthesis. It is hypothesized that dermal collagen breakdown is followed by imperfect repair that yields a deficit in the structural integrity of the skin, formation of a solar scar, and ultimately clinically visible skin atrophy and wrinkles. Many studies confirmed that acute exposure of human skin to UVR leads to oxidation of cellular biomolecules that could be prevented by prior antioxidant treatment and to depletion of endogenous antioxidants. Skin has a network of all major endogenous enzymatic and nonenzymatic protective antioxidants, but their role in protecting cells against oxidative damage generated by UV radiation has not been elucidated. It seems that skin's antioxidative defence is also influenced by vitamins and nutritive factors and that combination of different antioxidants simultaneously provides synergistic effect. PMID:24159392

  17. Bioactive compounds from natural resources against skin aging.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Pulok K; Maity, Niladri; Nema, Neelesh K; Sarkar, Birendra K

    2011-12-15

    Skin aging involves degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM) in both the epidermal and dermal layers, it leaves visible signs on the surface of skin and the physical properties of the skin are modified. Chronological aging is due to passage of time, whereas premature aging occurred due to some environmental factors on skin produces visible signs such as irregular dryness, dark/light pigmentation, sallowness, severe atrophy, telangiectases, premalignant lesions, laxity, leathery appearance and deep wrinkling. There are several synthetic skincare cosmetics existing in the market to treat premature aging and the most common adverse reactions of those include allergic contact dermatitis, irritant contact dermatitis, phototoxic and photo-allergic reactions. Recent trends in anti-aging research projected the use of natural products derived from ancient era after scientific validation. Ample varieties of phytomolecules such as aloin, ginsenoside, curcumin, epicatechin, asiaticoside, ziyuglycoside I, magnolol, gallic acid, hydroxychavicol, hydroxycinnamic acids, hydroxybenzoic acids, etc. scavenges free radicals from skin cells, prevent trans-epidermal water loss, include a sun protection factor (SPF) of 15 or higher contribute to protect skin from wrinkles, leading to glowing and healthy younger skin. Present era of treating aging skin has become technologically more invasive; but herbal products including botanicals are still relevant and combining them with molecular techniques outlined throughout this review will help to maximize the results and maintain the desired anti-skin aging benefits. PMID:22115797

  18. Bioactive compounds from natural resources against skin aging.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Pulok K; Maity, Niladri; Nema, Neelesh K; Sarkar, Birendra K

    2011-12-15

    Skin aging involves degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM) in both the epidermal and dermal layers, it leaves visible signs on the surface of skin and the physical properties of the skin are modified. Chronological aging is due to passage of time, whereas premature aging occurred due to some environmental factors on skin produces visible signs such as irregular dryness, dark/light pigmentation, sallowness, severe atrophy, telangiectases, premalignant lesions, laxity, leathery appearance and deep wrinkling. There are several synthetic skincare cosmetics existing in the market to treat premature aging and the most common adverse reactions of those include allergic contact dermatitis, irritant contact dermatitis, phototoxic and photo-allergic reactions. Recent trends in anti-aging research projected the use of natural products derived from ancient era after scientific validation. Ample varieties of phytomolecules such as aloin, ginsenoside, curcumin, epicatechin, asiaticoside, ziyuglycoside I, magnolol, gallic acid, hydroxychavicol, hydroxycinnamic acids, hydroxybenzoic acids, etc. scavenges free radicals from skin cells, prevent trans-epidermal water loss, include a sun protection factor (SPF) of 15 or higher contribute to protect skin from wrinkles, leading to glowing and healthy younger skin. Present era of treating aging skin has become technologically more invasive; but herbal products including botanicals are still relevant and combining them with molecular techniques outlined throughout this review will help to maximize the results and maintain the desired anti-skin aging benefits.

  19. About Skin: Your Body's Largest Organ

    MedlinePlus

    ... your skin, hair, and nails Skin dictionary Camp Discovery Good Skin Knowledge lesson plans and activities Video library Find a ... your skin, hair, and nails Skin dictionary Camp Discovery Good Skin Knowledge lesson plans and activities Video library Find a ...

  20. 40 CFR 799.9120 - TSCA acute dermal toxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of the vehicle on penetration of skin by the test substance should be taken into account. It is... of a substance that can be expected to cause death in 50% of treated animals when applied to the skin... need to be considered. (2) (e) Conventional acute toxicity test—(1) Principle of the test method....